Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
1989/90
Undergraduate and Graduate Studies
CU-DENVER


UlfiTDl TSMDIbfi Pages
:>ry of Colleges and Schools
83
113
149
189
229
343
347
355
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING
Architecture Urban Design
Interior Design Urban and Regional Planning
Landscape Architecture and Urban Design
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION AND GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Accounting
Business Administration
Business Administration for Executives
Finance
Health Administration
Health Administration Executive Program
Human Resources Management
Information Systems International Business Management Marketing
Operations Management Quantitative Methods
Transportation and Distribution Management
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Teacher Education Programs Counseling and Personnel Services
Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education
Educational Administration
Educational Psychology
Elementary Education
Foundations
Instructional Technology
Corporate Instructional Development and Training Educational Media Specialist Instructional Computing Specialist Instructional Technologist Language and Culture Reading and Writing Research and Evaluation Methodology Secondary Education Special Education
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE
Applied Mathematics Electrical Engineering
Civil Engineering Mechanical Engineering
Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Engineering, Master of
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Anthropology
Basic Science, Master of
Biology
Chemistry
Communication and Theatre
Economics
English
Environmental Science, Master of
Ethnic Studies
Fine Arts
Geography
Geology
History
Humanities, Honors in
Humanities, Master of
Mathematics
Modern Languages
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science Psychology
Social Science, Master of Sociology
Technical Communication, Master of
Army ROTC
MILITARY SCIENCE
Air Force ROTC
COLLEGE OF MUSIC
Music Performance Music
Criminal Justice
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Public Administration
Directory of Programs and Degrees — Inside Back Cover


Legend
A/P ........ School of Architecture and Planning
BA ............................ Bachelor of Arts
BFA ...................... Bachelor of Fine Arts
BS ......................... Bachelor of Science
BS (CSE) ................... Bachelor of Science
in Computer Science and Engineering
CB ........................ College of Business
CLAS ....... College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
CM ........................... College of Music
e ................................... Emphasis
ED ........................ School of Education
ED S ...................... Education Specialist
ENGR .................... College of Engineering
GSBA ........................ Graduate School of
Business Administration
GSPA ......... Graduate School of Public Affairs
m ...................................... Minor
MA ............................. Master of Arts
M.ARCFI ................. Master of Architecture
MAUD . Master of Architecture in Urban Design
MBA ......... Master of Business Administration
MBS .................... Master of Basic Science
MCJ ................. Master of Criminal Justice
ME ...................... Master of Engineering
MH ....................... Master of Humanities
MID .................. Master of Interior Design
MLA ........... Master of Landscape Architecture
MPA ........... Master of Public Administration
MS .......................... Master of Science
MURP . Master in Urban and Regional Planning
o ..................................... Option
PH D ...................... Doctor of Philosophy
XMBA .............. Executive Master of Business
Administration
XMSHA .............. Executive Master of Science
in Health Administration
Degree Programs
Accounting ...................................... e (CB)
Accounting ................................... MS (GSBA)
Anthropology ................................. BA (CLAS)
Antitropology ............................. MA (CLAS)
Applied Mathematics ....................... BS (ENGR)
Applied Mathematics .......................... MS (ENGR)
Applied Mathematics ....................... PH D (ENGR)
Applied Mathematics/Physics .................. BA (CLAS)
Architecture ............................... M.ARCH (A/P)
Basic Science ............................... MBS (CLAS)
Bilingual Education ............................. e (ED)
Biology ...................................... BA (CLAS)
Biology ...................................... MA (CLAS)
Business Administration ..................... MBA (GSBA)
Business Administration,
Executive Program ...................... XMBA (GSBA)
Chemistry .................................... BA (CLAS)
Chemistry .................................... MS (CLAS)
Civil Engineering ............................ BS (ENGR)
Civil Engineering ............................ MS (ENGR)
Communication and Theatre .................... BA (CLAS)
Communication and Theatre .................... MA (CLAS)
Computer Science ............................. o (CLAS)
Computer Science ............................. MS (ENGR)
Computer Science and Engineering ..... BS (CSE) (ENGR)
Corporate Instructional Development and Training .. e (ED)
Counseling and Personnel Services .............. MA (ED)
Criminal Justice ............................ MCJ (GSPA)
Early Childhood Education ...................... MA (ED)
Economics .................................... BA (CLAS)
Economics .................................... MA (CLAS)
Education Specialist ......................... ED S (ED)
Educational Administration,
curriculum, and supervision ............. MA (ED)
Educational Administration,
curriculum, and supervision ......... ED S (ED)
Educational Administration,
curriculum, and supervision ............. PH D (ED)
Educational Media Specialist ................ c (ED)
Educational Psychology ..................... MA (ED)
Educationally Handicapped ................... e (ED)
Electrical Engineering ................... BS (ENGR)
Electrical Engineering ................... MS (ENGR)
Elementary Education ....................... MA (ED)
Engineering .............................. ME (ENGR)
English .................................. BA (CLAS)
English .................................. MA (CLAS)
English as a Second Language ................ e (ED)
Environmental Science .................... MS (CLAS)
Finance ..................................... e (CB)
Finance .................................. MS (GSBA)
Fine Arts ................................ BA (CLAS)
Fine Arts ............................... BFA (CLAS)
Foundations ................................ MA (ED)
French .................................... BA (CLAS)
Geography ................................. BA (CLAS)
Geography ................................. MA (CLAS)
Geology ................................... BA (CLAS)
German .................................... BA (CLAS)
Health Administration ..................... MS (GSBA)
Health Administration,
Executive Program .................. XMSHA (GSBA)
History ................................... BA (CLAS)
History ................................... MA (CLAS)
Human Resources Management .................. e (CB)
Humanities ................................ MH (CLAS)
Industrial and Organizational
Psychology ..... MBA/BA (CLAS), MBA/MA (CLAS)
Infant Specialization ....................... e (ED)
Information Systems ......................... e (CB)
Information Systems ....................... MS (GSBA)
Instructional Computing Specialist .......... e (ED)
Instructional Technologist .................. e (ED)
Instructional Technology ................... MA (ED)
Instructional Technology .................. PH D (ED)
Interior Design ........................... MID (A/P)
International Affairs ..................... m (CLAS)
International Business ...................... e (CB)
Landscape Architecture .................... MLA (A/P)
Management .................................. e (CB)
Management ................................ MS (GSBA)
Marketing ................................... e (CB)
Marketing ................................. MS (GSBA)
Mathematics ............................... BA (CLAS)
Mathematics ............................... MA (CLAS)
Mechanical Engineering .................... BS (ENGR)
Mechanical Engineering ................. MS (ENGR)
Music ...................................... BS (CM)
Nursing Administration ................. MBA/MS (CB)
Operations Management ....................... e (CB)
Philosophy ................................ BA (CLAS)
Physics ................................... BA (CLAS)
Political Science ......................... BA (CLAS)
Political Science ......................... MA (CLAS)
Psychology ................................ BA (CLAS)
Psychology ................................ MA (CLAS)
Public Administration .................. MPA (GSPA)
Public Administration .................. PH D (GSPA)
Reading and Writing ........................ MA (ED)
Secondary Education ........................ MA (ED)
Social Science .......................... MSS (CLAS)
Sociology ................................. BA (CLAS)
Sociology ................................. MA (CLAS)
Spanish ................................... BA (CLAS)
Special Education .......................... MA (ED)
Teacher Education Programs .................. e (ED)
Technical Communications .................. MS (CLAS)
Transportation and Distribution Management ... e (CB)
Urban and Regional Planning .............. MURP (A/P)
Urban Design ............................. MAUD (A/P)
Writing ................................... BA (CLAS)


University of Colorado at Denver
SECOND CLASS POSTAGE PAID
AT THE POST OFFICE BOULDER. COLORADO
50


CU-DENVER AND THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN METROPOLIS
A few golden crumbs washed out of Cherry Creek and the South Platte River sparked the mass migration that gave birth to Denver. Following Green Russell's discovery in the summer of 1858, 100,000 gold seekers crossed the previously shunned Great American Desert for the Colorado Rockies. Soaring, snowy summits— which had been America's greatest obstacle to westward expansion—suddenly became a goal, a granite-lined treasure chest.
Auraria, the first town company, soon succumbed to a rival across Cherry Creek — Denver City, which was named for James W. Denver, governor of what was then Kansas Territory. Denver was founded on a jumped claim by real estate speculators gambling that America's second great gold rush was no humbug.
The Golden Gamble
Before the great Colorado gold rush of 1858-59, the Rockies offered little to attract settlers, except the "hairy bank notes," the beaver pelts prized by fur trappers, traders, and fashionably-hatted gentlemen in eastern America and Europe. The gold rush changed that, as the rudely dispossessed Cheyenne and Arapaho soon discovered.
Denver City was a long shot. Most of the gold rush "cities" would become ghost towns. In the struggle to become the county seat, the state capitol, and the regional metropolis, there would be many losers and only one winner. Denverites determined early to mine the miners, to relieve prospectors of whatever wealth they might find up in the mountain mining camps.
On the mining frontier, everyone was gambling on the riches of the earth. In the instant city of Denver, folks gambled with cards and dice, with mining stock, and real estate. Such speculation was easier work than wading around in icy mountain streams with picks and pans. Townsfolk bet on everything from dog fights to snow fall. City fathers amused themselves with card games, using town lots as poker chips. Whole blocks of Denver City changed hands of an evening.
Colorado began as a gamble on gold, and Denver as a real estate scheme to mine the miners. William H. Larimer, Jr., founded the Denver City Town Company on November 22, 1858, hoping to make his fortune by selling town lots to successful miners.
Tom Noel Collection


Mining Minds
Town characters included Professor Oscar J. Goldrick, who astonished Coloradans by swearing at his oxen in Latin. This shaggy Irishman also opened the first school. In this windowless, doorless, mud-roofed log cabin, Professor Goldrick accepted all students — red, white, black, yellow, and brown. Foreseeing a need for higher education, a Denver legislator introduced a bill to create a public university in Denver. This led to a squabble in the territorial legislature about where the university should be.
A Prison or a University?
Legislators eventually designed a compromise. Denver received the state capitol. Boulder and Canon City, two other ambitious towns, also sought state institutions. Canon City, at least in legend, was given a choice between the state university and the state penitentiary. City fathers in the southern Colorado town reckoned that the prison would be better attended. Prisoners, they figured, would be better behaved than university students and, in those days, prisoners could be hired as cheap labor. Furthermore, college professors were a poor and strange lot, sometimes as dissipated as their students. So Canon City chose the prison and Boulder received the state university as a consolation prize. Not until 1876 would an embryo university actually open its doors in Boulder.
Photo by Roger Whitacre
Boom and Bust
Meanwhile Denver throve. Gold proved to be only one of the riches of the Colorado earth. Fortunes in silver and coal, in zinc and lead, molybdenum and oil, helped make Denver a major city. By 1890, the Mile High metropolis had a population over 100,000. In a single generation the gold rush crossroads had emerged as the second largest city in the American West, second to San Francisco but larger than Los Angeles or any town in Texas.
Colorado's mineral boom burst with the Depression of 1893. Flush times did not return until after the even bleaker Great Depression of the 1930s. World War II, however, triggered a new bonanza. Since 1940, a million newcomers have settled in the 3,497 square-mile metropolis of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, and Jefferson counties.
Photo by Tom Noel


Colorado cross-country skiers prowl old mines and ghost towns.
Photo by Tom Noel
The Mile High City
From airplane and auto windows, greenhorns catch their first glimpse of the giant, green oasis at the foot of the Rockies. Whereas a spiderweb of railroad tracks transformed Denver into the Queen City of the Plains, a spiderweb of cement enables the city to maintain regional dominance over a vast hinterland. Not only a highway network but the 15 inch thick runways of Stapleton International Airport make Denver the hub of the Rockies. One cannot even get to heaven, Coloradans have been known to grumble, without going through Stapleton Airport.
A freeway network ties the metropolis together. Centered on the notorious “mousetrap" intersection of interstates 25 and 70, this network now bulges with belt loops and suburban sprawl. Whereas Union Station once made Denver the state and regional travel hub, Stapleton International Airport—America's fourth busiest—has done the same since its creation in 1929. A projected new airport is the number one ambition of the metropolis.
Denverites are unusually mobile. They boast one of the highest, if not the highest, per capita licensed motor vehicle ownership rate in the world. Cars are basic to the lifestyle; for each man, woman, and child there is .8 vehicle.
This automobile metropolis, this restless hub of the Rockies, retains its greatest asset—easy escape. Within an hour's drive to the east lie prairie ghost towns and the exquisite solitude of the High Plains. An hour's drive to the west takes Denverites to campgrounds, hiking trails, mountain lakes, ski areas, and wilderness areas snuggled against the Continental Divide.
High country trails a half hour away from Denver offer students easy escape.
Photo by Tom Noel


Education to a Higher Degree
In Colorado's mobile, footloose society education has been prized. Denver boasts the second highest educational level in the country. While the main campus of the state university has remained in Boulder, extension courses have been offered in Denver since 1912. This tiny Denver campus—run for years by a single full-time faculty member—became the Denver Center in 1957 with authority to grant undergraduate and some graduate degrees.
Full independence came in 1973, when the Denver Center became the Denver Campus of the University of Colorado. Over 17,000 students a year enrolled at CU-Denver, confirming the need for the new campus. Then and now the CU-Denver student tended to be unique. The average age is 27, 70% are employed, 55% are married. Over half the students and many of the faculty are part time, enabling them to bring work experiences into the classroom.
Between 1973 and 1976, the state built the Auraria Higher Education Center on a 169-acre campus shared by the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College, and the Community College of Denver. Auraria—from the Latin word for gold—has evolved from a gold rush boom town to a booming campus, the largest in the state with approximately 30,000 students enrolled each semester. The campus is a unique experiment in higher education; its shared facilities include a library, student center, and recreation complex. Each institution maintains a different academic role; CU-Denver is charged with emphasizing upper division and graduate programs.
CU-Denver Finds a Home
After 76 years in recycled downtown buildings, CU-Denver in 1988 moved into its first, custom-made new home. This $28,000,000, 257,000-square-foot building occupies two full blocks between Speer Boulevard and Twelfth Street, Larimer and Lawrence Streets. Hoover, Berg, Desmond, a Denver architectural firm, designed this post modern brick structure with distinctive and generous glass brick atriums. From a five-story frontage facing downtown, the CU-Denver classroom, laboratory, and office complex steps down to two-stories facing the athletic facilities and library at the heart of the campus.
Today, CU-Denver offers graduate and undergraduate programs in Architecture and Planning, Business Administration, Education, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts, Music, and Public Affairs. Ninth Street Historic Park in the center of the campus survives as a reminder that CU-Denver occupies the creek bank where Denver—and Colorado—began. CU-Denver flourishes today on that Auraria site where prospectors found paydirt and founded what is now a metropolis of 1.9 million people.
— Tom Noel, CU-Denver History Department
Photo by Tom Noel


Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog
1989-90
University of Colorado at Denver
1200 Larimer Denver, Colorado 80204
Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, course offerings and course descriptions, and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice or obligation. CU-Denver is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. For current calendars, tuition rates, requirements, deadlines, etc., students should refer to a copy of the Schedule of Classes for the semester in which they intend to enroll.
The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curriculum. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester, and the faculty teaching a particular course or program may vary from time to time. The instructor may alter the content of a course or program to meet particular class needs.
Courses are listed by college or school.
University of Colorado Catalog.
(USPS 651-060)
262 Stadium Building, Campus Box 384, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0384 Volume 1989, No. 3, May/June Published 4 times a year: January/February March/April,1 May/June, August/September Second class postage paid at Boulder, Colorado. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to University of Colorado Catalog, CU-Denver Publications, Boulder, Colorado 80302.


2 / University of Colorado at Denver
Table of Contents
Page
Academic Calendar .................................. 4
Message from the Chancellor ........................ 5
Chancellor's Advisory Group ........................ 6
Administration of the University and of the CU-Denver Campus ........................ 7
The University ..................................... 9
History ............................................ 9
Academic Structure .............................. 9-10
Academic Programs ................................. 10
Accreditation ..................................... 11
Memberships ....................................... 11
General Information ............................ 11-49
Auraria Higher Education Center ................... 11
Affirmative Action ................................ 12
Research .......................................... 12
Centers and Institutes for
Research, Service, and Training .............. 13-16
Faculty and Staff .............................. 16-17
Admission Policies and Procedures .............. 18-26
Undergraduate Admission Information ...... 18-20, 26
Freshmen Requirements .......................... 18-20
Tests ............................................. 20
Transfer Students .............................. 21-22
Former Students ................................... 23
International Students ............................ 23
Graduate Admission ............................. 23-24
Non-Degree Students ............................... 24
Tuition and Fees ............................... 27-29
Residency Classification .......................... 30
Financial Aid .................................. 30-34
Registration ................................... 35-37
Academic Policies and Regulations .............. 37-45
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act ....................................... 44
Special Programs and Facilities ................ 46-49
Alumni Association ................................ 46
Book Center ....................................... 46
Child Care Center ................................. 46
Computing Services ................................ 47
Division of Continuing Education .................. 48
Foundation ........................................ 48
International Education ........................... 48
Student Assistance Center ......................... 49
Student Services ............................... 50-57
Clubs and Organizations ........................... 51
Student Government ................................ 52
Academic Center for Enrichment ................. 54-55
Educational Opportunity Program ................... 55
Page
Pre-Collegiate Development Program ................. 55
Orientation ........................................ 56
Testing Center ..................................... 56
Veterans Affairs ................................... 56
Women's Resources .................................. 56
Student Conduct ................................. 56-57
Center for Internships and Cooperative Education ...................................... 58-61
Library Services ................................ 62-65
Media and Telecommunications ....................... 64
Architecture and Planning Library .................. 65
The Graduate School ............................. 66-81
Degrees Offered ................................. 67-68
Financial Aid ................................... 68-69
Admission Requirements .......................... 69-71
Registration .................................... 72-73
Requirements for Advanced Degrees ............... 73-81
School of Architecture and Planning ............ 82-111
Built Environment Studies ....................... 86-87
Architecture .................................... 92-97
Interior Design ................................ 98-100
Landscape Architecture and Urban Design ... 101-106
Urban and Regional Planning ................... 106-110
College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business
Administration ................................ 112-147
Accounting ............................... 122-123, 126-
127, 134-135, 142-143
Business Law ...................................... 127
Finance .................................. 123,127,135-
136, 143-144
Health Administration .................... 136-137, 144-
145
Human Resources Management .................... 123-124
Information Systems ...................... 124, 128,
137- 138, 145
International Business ............................ 125
Management ............................... 125, 128-129,
138- 139, 145-
146
Marketing ................................ 125, 129-130,
139- 140, 146
Operations Management .................... 126, 130-131,
146-147
Quantitative Methods ..................... 131, 147
Transportation and Distribution
Management ............................ 126, 131
Business Administration, Master ............... 133-134
Executive Programs ............................ 140-141


Contents / 3
Page
School of Education ......................... 148-187
Teacher Education Programs .................. 152-156
Counseling and Personnel Services ........... 156-158
Early Childhood Education and Early
Childhood Special Education ............... 158-160
Educational Administration .................. 161-164
Educational Psychology ...................... 165-167
Elementary Education ........................ 167-169
Foundations ................................. 169-170
Instructional Technology .................... 170-176
Language and Culture ........................ 176-180
Reading and Writing ......................... 180-181
Research and Evaluation Methodology ......... 181-182
Secondary Education ......................... 182-184
Special Education ........................... 184-187
College of Engineering and Applied
Science ..................................... 188-227
Applied Mathematics ......................... 202-203
Civil Engineering ........................... 203-209
Electrical Engineering and
Computer Science .......................... 210-221
Mechanical Engineering ...................... 222-226
Engineering — Non-Departmental .................. 227
Master of Engineering ........................... 227
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ........ 228-341
Anthropology ................................ 243-248
Master of Basic Science ..................... 249-250
Biology ..................................... 251-254
Chemistry ................................... 255-257
Communication and Theatre ................... 258-265
Economics ................................... 266-271
English ..................................... 272-277
Master of Environmental Science ................ 278
Ethnic Studies ............................ 279-281
Page
Fine Arts .................................... 282-285
Geography .....................J.............. 286-287
Geology ...................................... 288-290
History .......................<............... 291-2%
Honors in Humanities ......................... 296-297
Master of Humanities ......................... 297-298
Mathematics .................................. 299-307
Modem Languages ...............,.............. 308-316
Philosophy ................................... 317-320
Physics ...................................... 320-322
Political Science ............................ 323-328
Psychology ................................... 329-332
Master of Social Science ..................... 333-334
Sociology .................................... 335-340
Master of Technical Communication ............ 340-341
Military Science ............................. 342-345
Army ROTC .....................f.............. 343-344
Air Force ROTC ............................... 344-345
College of Music ............................. 346-353
Music ........................................ 351-353
Performance Music ................................ 353
Graduate School of Public Affairs ............ 354-367
The Centers ...................L.............. 357-358
Master of Public Administration .............. 359-360
Doctor of Philosophy, Public
Administration ............................... 360-363
Master of Criminal Justice ................... 366-367
Faculty Roster ............................... 369-380
Campus Map ....................L.............. 382-383
Index ........................................ 385-391
Application Form .............................. 395-3%
Degree Programs ......................... Inside back
cover


4 / University of Colorado at Denver
ACADEMIC CALENDAR1
Summer 19891 2 Summer 19903
June 5-9 Orientation June 4-8 Orientation
June 12 First day of classes June 11 First day of classes
July 4 Holiday (no classes) July 4 Holiday (no classes)
August 9 End of term August 6 End of term
Fall 19892 Fall 19902
August 17-23 Orientation August 13-17 Orientation
August 24 First day of classes August 23 First day of classes
September 4 Holiday (no classes) September 3 Holiday (no classes)
November 23-24 Holidays (no classes) November 22-23 Holidays (no classes)
December 18 End of semester December 17 End of semester
Spring 19902 Spring 19912
January 8-12 Orientation January 7-11 Orientation
January 15 Holiday (no classes) January 14 Holiday (no classes)
January 16 First day of classes January 15 First day of classes
March 19-23 Spring vacation (no classes) March 25-29 Spring vacation (no c
May 14 End of semester May 13 End of semester
1 The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time.
2 Consult the Schedule of Classes for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs and registration dates and procedures.
3 Tentative dates for Summer 1990. Consult the Summer 1990 Schedule of Classes for current dates.


Chancellor / 5
Message From the Chancellor
Dear Student:
Welcome to the University of Colorado at Denver. On behalf of the faculty, staff, and students, I offer to you the challenging environment of one of Colorado's premier institutions of higher education. Your decision to attend CU-Denver shows your willingness to learn at Denver's only urban public university.
CU-Denver is one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system. As a vital part of that system, offering baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral programs, we have achieved distinction nationally and internationally because of the high quality of our programs, faculty, and alumni.
Located in downtown Denver, the University challenges its students both academically and personally in an intellectual environment that encourages commitment, curiosity, and imagination.
A distinguishing characteristic of CU-Denver is our urban perspective that is an integral theme in our academic programming, the orientation of our faculty, and the identity of our student body.
Since 1972, enrollment has grown to approximately 10,096 students, including 5,588 undergraduates and 4,508 graduate students.
The University offers some 40 degree and degree option programs at the baccalaureate level and over 60 degree and degree option programs at the post baccalaureate level designed to provide you with a foundation on which to build your intellectual, aesthetic, and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens. Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a complement to classroom study. The University's seven colleges and schools (Business, Public Affairs, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, Music, and Architecture and Planning) and The Graduate School provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the opportunities for gaining knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your economic and personal lives.
We at the Denver campus take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs. This is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the applied aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems.
We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars/teachers and dedicated staff. I promise a rich intellectual environment and a challenging educational experience. Most of all, I look forward to seeing you at graduation and awarding you the CU-Denver degree.
My best wishes to you and to your future.
Chancellor John C. Buechner
John C. Buechner
Chancellor
University of Colorado at Denver


6 / University of Colorado at Denver
Chancellor's Advisory Group
VERONICA BARELA, Executive Director NEW-SED, Community Development Corporation JACQUES W. BERNIER, Manager, Personnel Administration, Aerospace Systems Program, Hughes Aircraft Company
DIANE BOULTER, President, The Denver Partnership
THE HON. JEANNE FAATZ, Colorado State Representative
WILLIAM W. FLETCHER, President and General Manager, Rocky Mountain News THE HON. REGIS GROFF,Colorado State Senator THE HON. SANDY HUME, Colorado State Senator LEE LARSON, Vice President/General Manager, KOA Radio 85
FRANK NEWMAN, President, Education Commission of the States
THOMAS PECHT, Publisher, Denver Business Journal. BRUCE ROCKWELL, Executive Director, The Colorado Trust
HERRICK ROTH, President, Herrick Roth Associates THE HON. PAUL D. SCHAUER, Colorado State Representative
GAIL SCHOETTLER, Colorado State Treasurer JEROME SERACUSE, Fellow, American Institute of Architects; Seracuse Lawler & Partners TOM STRICKLAND, Brownstein, Hyatt, Farber & Madden
KEN TONNING, Vice President/General Manager,
KUSA-TV, CH 9
BEN TRUJILLO, Principal, Financial Group CLAIR VILLANO, Director, Consumer Fraud Division. THE HON. WILMA WEBB, Colorado State Representative
The University of Colorado seal, adopted in 1908, depicts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed in laurel is placed beside him. The Greek inscription means "Let your light shine. ”
According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civilization "stands as the criterion of culture." The laurel symbolizes honor or success, the youth of the figure suggests the "morning of life," and the scroll represents written language.


Administration / 7
ADMINISTRATION Board of Regents
KATHY ARNOLD, Littleton, term expires 1994 RICHARD J. BERNICK, Littleton, term expires 1992 ROBERT E. CALDWELL, Colorado Springs, term expires 1992
PETER C. DIETZE, Boulder, term expires 1990 LYNN J. ELLINS, Longmont, term expires 199Q HARVEY PHELPS, Pueblo, term expires 1994 NORWOOD L. ROBB, Littleton, term expires 1990 ROY H. SHORE, Greeley, term expires 1992 DAVID WINN, Colorado Springs, term expires 1994
University-Wide Officers
E. GORDON GEE, President of the University; Professor of Law. B.A., University of Utah; J.D., Columbia University; Ed.D., Teacher's College, Columbia University. LAWRENCE MESKIN, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the System-wide Graduate School; Professor of Dentistry. D.D.S., University of Detroit;
M.P.H., University of Minnesota, School of Medicine; M.S.D., Ph.D., University of Minnesota.
C. WILLIAM FISCHER, Vice President for Budget and Finance; Professor Attendant Rank of Public Affairs.
B.A., Muskingum College; M.P.A., Harvard University.
THEO. VOLSKY, JR., Vice President for Administration; Professor of Psychology. B.S., M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.
H.H. ARNOLD, Executive Secretary of the Board of Regents and of the University. B.A., LL.B., University of Colorado.
EDWARD W. MURROW, Treasurer for the University and Assistant Vice President for Budget and Finance.
B.S., University of Colorado.
CU-Denver Officers
OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR
Chancellor....................... John C. Buechner
Assistant to the Chancellor...... Belle Anderson
Director, Public Relations and Publications.................... Bob Nero
DIVISION OF ACADEMIC AFFAIRS Vice Chancellor for Academic
Affairs....................... John S. Haller, Jr.
Assistant to the Vice Chancellor.. Rosemary Kirmaier Acting Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs;
Dean, The Graduate School .... Thomas A. Clark Assistant Vice Chancellor
for Academic Affairs.......... Charles G. Schmidt
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative
Activities.................... Femie Baca
Dean, School of Architecture and Planning........................ H.A. Shirvani
Dean, College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business
Administration................ Donald L. Stevens
Dean, School of Education........ William F. Grady
Acting Dean, College of Engineering and Applied
Science..!.................... Oren G. Strom
Dean, College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences.................. Marvin D. Loflin
Acting Resident Dean, College
of Music...................... Roy Pritts
Dean, Graduate School of
Public Affairs................ Marshall Kaplan
Director, Library................ Patricia Senn Breivik
Associate Director............ Jean F. Hemphill
Division of Continuing Education Director, Center for Internships
and Cooperative Education..... Janet Michalski
DIVISION OF ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE Vice Chancellor for
Administration and Finance... Jeffrey W. Konzak
Director, Budget and Fiscal
Planning...................... Julie Torres
B ursar...J...................... Rodney Anderson
Director, Financial and Business
Services!..................... Kenneth E. Herman
Acting Director, Personnel Office........................... Kenneth Tagawa
DIVISION OF PLANNING Vice Chancellor for
Planning.....................
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Planning and Institutional
Research.....................
Admissions and Records Director of Student Recruitment and Outreach Services.
Registrar..................
Acting Director, Affirmative
Action.....................
Alumni Association
Director, Computing Services....
Director, Financial Aid/Student
Employment...................
Dean, Student Services..........
Director, Academic Center for
Enrichment.................
Director, Campus Life........
Director, Educational
Opportunity Programs.......
Director, Testing Center.....
Director, University Division... Director, Women’s Resources..
CU FOUNDATION
Vice President, CU Foundation at
Denver.......................|
Director, Annual Fund...........
Bruce W. Bergland
Julie Carnahan
Michael Poindexter Martha Barrett
Betsy Lake
George E. Funkey
Elbe Miller Mary Lou Fenili
Kathy R. Jackson Bruce E. Williams
Cecil E. Glenn Diane Fries Paul Encinias Pamela Kesson-Craig
Barbara S. Allar Nancy Rettig




General Information
The University of Colorado at Denver is one of the most important educational resources in the' Denver metropolitan area. CU-Denver, one of four institutions in the University of Colorado system, is an urban, non-residential campus located in downtown Denver. Major civic, cultural, business, and governmental activities are in close proximity.
CU-Denver offers undergraduate degrees in more than 40 fields and graduate degrees in more than 60. Ph.D. degrees are offered in public affairs, applied mathematics, educational administration, and instructional technology. Doctoral studies also are available in engineering and other fields in cooperation with CU-Boulder. Special emphasis is placed on programs that will help assure students professional opportunities after graduation. All programs are tailored to meet the needs of the diverse student population. Classes are offered during weekday and evening hours, and on weekends.
Students' ages range between 17 and 75. The average student age is 29. Two-thirds hold full-time jobs and 60 percent attend part time. Sixty-two percent are enrolled at the upper division or graduate levels.
CU-Denver's faculty actively promote the special role of an urban institution in meeting the needs of students. Many faculty bring their work experiences to the classroom. They are alert to the challenges and advances of the urban environment and responsible to the needs of students and the community. The combination of CU-Denver's talented faculty and highly motivated students creates a vital and exciting educational environment. Students are offered the unique educational opportunity to combine "real world" experience with academic excellence.
History
Just over a century ago the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder, in 1876. In 1912, the University of Colorado's Department of Correspondence and Extension was established in Denver, to meet the needs of the burgeoning population. As the breadth of course offerings expanded, so did the demand for degreegranting status. The Denver Extension Center was renamed the University of Colorado-Denver Center in 1965, and by 1969, 23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study were offered. In 1972 the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria Campus, di-Denver's current site. And in this same year the Denver "Center" was renamed CU-Denver. Two years later the University of
Colorado was reorganized into four campuses — Denver, Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder.
University of Colorado System
As one of four campuses of the University of Colorado, CU-Denver has a special role and mission in Colorado higher education. The University of Colorado at Boulder now serves about 22,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. The Health Sciences Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, dental, nursing and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 5,500 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. CU-Denver's role within the University system is primarily to address the needs for undergraduate and graduate instruction in the Denver metropolitan area. Emphasis is given to professional, preprofessional, and liberal arts training in the context of a strong multidisciplinary and applied agenda for research and creative activities. CU-Denver students have access to the library resources of all campuses and cultural events sponsored within the University system;
Academic Structure
Each of the four campuses of the University of Colorado System — Denver, Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Health Sciences in Denver — has its own Chancellor and campus administration. The Chancellors, in turn, report to the President of the CU-System. The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approve the overall direction provided by the President of the System. The System President represents the University of Colorado and manages the planning for development of the System, apportionment of resources across campuses, the System-wide Graduate School, and general policy regarding academic standards, instructional initiatives, and faculty and staff personnel matters, and is supported by a system-wide Faculty Senate. CU-Denver , as well, has its own faculty governance structure. Students also have their own governance institutions.
The Chancellor of CU-Denver represents CU-Denver and manages campus goal-setting, policy development, academic affairs, and budget and financial matters. Three Vice Chancellors assist the Chancellor in the fields of Academic Affairs, Administration and


10 / General Information
Finance, and Planning and Enrollment Management. Each of these Vice Chancellors is responsible for the essential components of the campus enterprise. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs sets the highest standards in teaching, research, and service, and oversees all academic units, The Graduate School, the library, the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education, Division of Continuing Education, and Research Administration and Creative Activities. The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance manages the campus budget, Office of Financial and Business Services, and the Personnel Office. The Vice Chancellor for Planning oversees Admissions and Records, Affirmative Action, Alumni Office, Computing Services, Facilities Management, Financial Aid, Planning and Institutional Research, and Student Services.
An Office of Public Relations reports directly to the Chancellor and assists in orchestrating all promotional efforts and the external affairs of the campus.
The CU-Denver Graduate School is a component of the CU-System counterpart. All graduate units reside within The Graduate School except Architecture and Planning, Business, and Public Affairs.
Academic Programs
CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the citizens of Denver and the region. With the rapid development of the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. Today CU-Denver is composed of seven distinct academic units:
School of Architecture and Planning College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education
College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Liberal Arts and Sciences College of Music Graduate School of Public Affairs
These units now accommodate approximately 11,000 students — nearly half as large as CU-Boulder itself — taught by about 300 regular, full-time faculty members. The diversity of the student body is a hallmark of CU-Denver and a source of deep pride. Among them are traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school. There also are older students who, perhaps for financial reasons or the press of family commitments or because they've only lately recognized the value of a college education, have delayed entry. And there are professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appreciation of the world around them.
The undergraduate colleges admit freshman and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, engineering, and music. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also provides pre-professional training in
the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health sciences. The School of Education offers programs leading to teacher education. The Graduate School offers master's programs in the arts, sciences, humanities, engineering, education, and music to students with baccalaureate degrees. The School of Architecture and Planning, the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leading to master's degrees in their specialized areas. CU-Denver doctoral programs are available in public affairs, education, and applied mathematics. Doctoral work in engineering also is available in cooperation with CU-Boulder. CU-Denver faculty also participate in a few other doctoral programs offered at CU-Boulder.
For a complete account of bachelor's and master's degree programs offered by CU-Denver, see the listing of degree programs on the inside back cover of this catalog. The college and school sections of this catalog describe specific policies on requirements for graduation, course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions, and similar information.
CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education which leads to improved professional opportunity in the Information Age. Many programs emphasize practical business world applications, and all CU-Denver students are given the opportunity to attain computer literacy. Specific computer-oriented academic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs.
The Future
CU-Denver is committed to the highest standards of education, scholarship, and service to the community. From this commitment springs the vital energy that infuses every campus pursuit. The pace is fast, perhaps unprecedented. Undergraduate studies are at once becoming more and more varied, challenging, and rewarding. CU-Denver is reaching out to all who can benefit from the high quality education it has to offer. New highly innovative applied and professional graduate degrees are being developed that address the emerging needs of the region's economy. Centers for state-of-the-field research at CU-Denver are generating important practical solutions to some of Colorado's and the nation's most serious social, economic, environmental, and technological problems. Throughout history, urban civilization and the arts and humanities have evolved in a rich synergy. CU-Denver — an urban campus — is deeply involved in enriching the cultural milieu of the Denver area. Clearly, the University of Colorado at Denver is on the move. Join us and share in an exciting adventure in learning.


Accreditation /II
Accreditation and Memberships
ACCREDITATION
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools
Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration American Society of Landscape Architects American Planning Association Colorado State Board of Education National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education
National Architectural Accrediting Board See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalog for the programs accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology National Association of Schools of Music National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
MEMBERSHIPS
Listed below are the organizations affiliated with the various divisions and departments at CU-Denver:
School of Architecture and Planning
American Institute of Architects American Institute of Planners American Institute of Certified Planners American Society of Landscape Architects American Society of Interior Designers Architectural Research Centers Consortium Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Council of Landscape Architecture Educators Society of Architectural Historians
College of Business and Administration The Economic Club of Colorado
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Denver Natural History Museum
Denver Art Museum
Mesa Verde National Park
Denver Zoological Garden
Denver Public School System
Colorado Chapter of the American Chemical Society
Psi Chi
College of Music
Colorado Choir, Inc.
Sigma Alpha Iota
Continuing Education
Rocky Mountain Chapter of Chartered Life Underwriters Colorado Chapter: Purchasing Management Association Colorado Department of Labor and Employment League of Women Voters
Auraria Higher Education Center
The Auraria Higher Education Center is the site for the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College, and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share library (which is administered by CU-Denver), classroom, and related facilities on a 171-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered.
On the Auraria campus are administrative and classroom buildings, the Auraria Library, the student center, book center, child care and development centers, physical education facilities, science building, and service buildings.
The new buildings share the campus with the reminders of Denver's past—historic Ninth Street Park, restored church buildings, and the Tivoli brewery built in 1882. The Tivoli has been renovated into a complex containing specialty shops, restaurants, and entertainment.
School of Education Colorado Principals Center
National Educational Renewal Projects-Partnerships U.S. Department of Education, Project L.E.A.D.
College of Engineering and Applied Science
Colorado Minority Engineering Association Associated Engineering Students American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Mechanical Engineers Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Society of Women Engineers
Graduate School of Public Affairs
Colorado Municipal League American Society for Public Administration National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management Pi Alpha Alpha, Public Affairs Honorary Association Western Executive Seminar Center Metro Air Quality Council
Institute for Nonprofit Organization Management


12 / General Information
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Title IX
CU-Denver follows a policy of equal opportunity in education and in employment. In pursuance of this policy, no Denver campus department, unit, discipline, or employee shall descriminate against an individual or group on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, age, national origin, veteran status, or individual handicap. This policy applies to all areas of the University affecting present and prospective students or employees.
The institution's educational programs, activities, and services offered to students and/or employees are administered on a nondiscriminatory basis subject to the provisions of the Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Vietnam-Era Veterans Readjustment Act of 1974, and Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967.
A CU-Denver Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity program has been established to implement this policy. For information about these provisions on equity, discrimination, or fairness contact Affirmative Action, 1250 14th St., 556-2509.
Research and Other Creative Pursuits
CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledge through the research efforts of its faculty. It is equally supportive of the other creative endeavors of its faculties in the arts, humanities, and design fields. These achievements not only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and professional practice. In addition, these activities constitute an important component of CU-Denver's service to the community at large. Therefore, funded research is a major priority at CU-Denver.
An important aspect of research and other creative activities at CU-Denver is its multidisciplinary and applied nature. Research in every school and college at CU-Denver addresses questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region. Its position within a thriving metropolitan area serves, as well, as a base for exploring topics of national and even international import. But not all research at CU-Denver yields solutions of immediate practical significance. Major efforts now explore topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplines. These, of course, are carried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that knows no national bounds. These efforts may yield insights that eventually open the way to practical applications in the next century.
Research projects, training, and public service programs at CU-Denver encompass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study with a focus on issues that relate to city, state, national, and international issues. During 1987-88, CU-Denver faculty and staff received external grants and contracts totalling $7,850,628 for research, training, and public service programs.
All signs point to a steady increase in funded research in the years ahead for CU-Denver. The benefits for the campus will be substantial. Such research assists in sustaining scholarly discourse, enables faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge, provides the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern for society, and enhances the education of students. Many students actively participate in research activities overseen by faculty members.
Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary economic, political, educational, engineering, mathematical, scientific, and environmental needs. Financial support has been obtained for program and service development in the areas of computational mathematics, bilingual and special education, cooperative education, health administration, international affairs, and executive seminars as well as institutes on aging and veterans' employment and training.
Other projects include statewide investigations of economic development, poverty, court-annexed arbitration, air quality and water control, and highway construction. Computer related projects include multilevel algorithms, fast parallel processing, algorithms in linear programming, and modeling. Projects in basic research range from investigations of earthquakes to neurotoxicology to growth equations for sporiangiophores.
In addition, much of the research at the University goes on without substantial external support. This effort also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publications, presentations, exhibits, performances, and professional activities. Many members of the faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits bring recognition to the University, establish the credibility of its faculty, and enhance the value of the degrees it confers.


Centers and Institutes / 13
CENTERS AND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE, AND TRAINING
School of Architecture and Planning
CENTER FOR BUILT ENVIRONMENT STUDIES
As the research and service unit of the School of Architecture and Planning, the Center for Built Environment Studies is committed to making a more humane living environment through research and innovative design. The primary mission of the Center is of qualitative, quantitative, and innovative nature. The Center plays an important role in supporting the educational mission of the School to achieve a balance of practice and research. The Center's resources and expertise include architecture and planning researchers and practitioners combined with a large pool of graduate assistants. As a major contributor to the state of Colorado and the southwest region, the Center has helped to strengthen the quality of built environments in urban and rural towns and regions. As a unit of intellectual forum, the Center is striving to make an impact on the fields of architecture and planning through its community of scholars, facilities, and laboratories. The Center is an interdisciplinary team of educators, designers, and planners working in a collaborative manner to service the professions and the community.
College of Business and Administration
INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
The Institute for International Business was created in August 1988 to help stimulate new business ventures through partnerships with foreign business schools and executives. It has three goals:
• To collaborate with business and government in promoting international economic development opportunities for Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region.
• To be a national center for providing hands-on training to foreign executives doing business with American firms.
• To become internationally recognized for research on competitiveness issues in the global economy of the 1990's.
The Institute will offer programs for senior management in business and government. The programs will identify and interpret trends affecting business in the global marketplace and the skills needed to conduct business in these markets. The programs also will put senior managers in contact with internationalists who are shaping the political, economic, and social environment for international business.
School of Education
COLORADO PRINCIPALS’ CENTER
The University of Colorado at Denver's School of Education and the Colorado Association of School Executives (CASE) formed a partnership to establish the Colorado Principals' Center.
The primary mission of the Colorado Principals' Center is to enable principals to shape their professional intellectual development. Activities related to this mission include topical seminars, panel discussions, roundtable discussions, and ongoing special interest groups.
Topical seminars feature individual presenters (primarily principals) who provide information on promising or successful practices, demonstrations or models, and opportunities for participant interaction. Panel discussions highlight current "high-relevance" topics, with panel and participant interaction in formal and informal settings. Special interest groups facilitate exploration of relevant problems, and issues through brainstorming and idea sharing during a series of meetings. The opportunity for reflective writing is a major feature of Center events.
The Center also focuses on conducting and disseminating research. Projects have included a study of administrator role perceptions in school reform, a study of the effects of principal peer coaching and reflection to improve instructional leadership, and a study to examine the developing professional identity of first year high school principals.
Graduate students are hired by the Center as research assistants. Additionally, graduate students in the School of Education carrying 9 semester hours or more, or enrolled as administrative interns, are offered student membership at no cost.
In addition to part-time research assistants, Center staff includes an executive director who is also an assistant professor, and a secretary, both shared with the Department of Administration, Curriculum, and Supervision.
REGION VIII RESOURCE ACCESS PROJECT
Under a contract funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Resource Access Project provides training and technical assistance to HeadStart centers throughout a six-state region. Through the project, HeadStart staff from the Rocky Mountain and northern plains states (from North Dakota to Utah) will learn how to integrate handicapped children into regular HeadStart classrooms 'more effectively.
The Region VIII project, which serves 71 HeadStart organizations, is only one of ten such projects in the
U.S.


14 / General Information
Lance Wright (left) directs the Colorado Principals' Center which provides in-service education for principals and other school site managers. William Grady (center) Dean of the School of Education, visits a workshop.
College of Engineering and Applied Science
CENTER FOR URBAN TRANSPORTATION STUDIES
The Center for Urban Transportation Studies (CUTS) has as its responsibility:
1. To assume a leading role in developing research and interdisciplinary programs in urban transportation.
2. To provide a central resource for information concerning urban transportation problems in the Rocky Mountain region, making available to outside organizations the expertise within the University.
CUTS is interested in helping to optimize the quality of human life by concentration on research, service, and education in the transportation sector of society. Particularly, CUTS is desirous of improving the movement of people and goods so as to provide enhanced safety, economy, efficiency, and overall amenity.
Administratively, the Center (CUTS) is a part of the Department of Civil Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Science. The director of CUTS is a civil engineering faculty member representing the transportation engineering and planning disciplines.
Recent and current research include investigations of (1) the relationship between rutting of asphalt pavements and truck tire pressures, and (2) the performance of a new type of urban interchange in order to improve its design from the standpoint of safety and capacity. Service activities have involved workshops and short courses to help advance the state-of-the-practice relative to the state-of-the-art in transportation engineering.
As an element of the University, the fundamental thrust of CUTS is, and properly must remain, educational. The Center's emphasis is the broad field of transportation, and includes both urban and non-urban aspects of transportation. Since transportation concerns itself with the safe, efficient, and environmentally responsible movement of people and goods, it either directly or indirectly affects all citizens and many facets of their day-to-day living.- This breadth necessarily involves most of the disciplines within the University. The need for better trained researchers and practitioners in all of the transportation related disciplines is clearly evident. CUTS provides “hands-on" experience within the traditional University structure, offering an opportunity for students through research and service activities which emphasize these otherwise unavailable learning opportunities. These activities take place under conditions of competent supervision that ensure the provision of sound advice and research results to those served by CUTS.
LAND INFORMATION SYSTEMS GROUP
A Land Information Systems Group (LISG) has been formed at CU-Denver to provide opportunity for faculty and students to pursue interests in this multidisciplinary subject area. Housed in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, the LISG is headed by Lynn Johnson, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering.
The objectives of the LISG are to facilitate the educational, research, and public service mission of CU-Denver in the subject areas of computer-aided planning and design, water resources planning, land records systems, geoprocessing and geographic information systems, facilities management and mapping, computer-aid design, and related legal and policy issues.
LISG is multidisciplinary and provides an avenue for individuals to participate together on research and development projects, curriculum development, and to share hardware and software resources. For further information contact Professor Johnson at 556-2739 or 556-2871.


Centers and Institutes / 15
The Graduate School
CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
The Center for Environmental Sciences conducts basic and applied research which focuses on understanding and providing solutions for environmental issues. The Center reports to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Dean of The Graduate School. The Center typically organizes faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students into interdisciplinary teams to Study environmental concerns of interest to the Denver metropolitan area, Colorado, and the Rocky Mountain Region. Typical projects in the past have involved studies of pollution resulting from oil shale production, coal mining, and uranium tailings. These projects have been funded by federal agencies, industry, and private foundations.
In recent years the Center has had a major problem dealing with acid rain. The Center has a state-of-the-art analytical chemistry laboratory. The Center has also been at the forefront in the application of artificial intelligence methods to the interpretation of large environmental databases. Approximately fifteen CU-Denver faculty from ten different departments (and three colleges) have participated in Center projects. In addition, more than thirty faculty from other campuses of the University! of Colorado, as well as other universities in Colorado, New Mexico, and South Dakota, have participated in these projects which have provided opportunities for theses and jobs to numerous students.
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
CENTER FOR RESEARCH IN RHETORIC
The Center for Research in Rhetoric began in 1984 for the purpose of conducting original and applied research in rhetoric, broadly conceived. The Center engages in projects that involve faculty and students who carry out research studies that contribute to our understanding of rhetoric and discourse in the broad realm of human affairs. The interdisciplinary nature of the Center draws on the diverse strengths and unique perspectives of individuals from various disciplines in the University. Reports presenting the results of research projects are published by the Center and are available in the English department office.
COMPUTATIONAL MATHEMATICS GROUP
A particularly strong Computational Mathematics Group has made CU-Denver a regional center for computational mathematics with a national and international reputation. Mathematics clinics investigate contemporary societal issues through the application of mathematical concepts to specific problems. Other research includes the development of fast algorithms for the numerical solution of partial differential equations on super computers, the analysis and development of combinatorial algorithms used in scheduling
artificial intelligence, and the applications of discrete mathematics to problems in ecology, engineering, and computer science.
Graduate School of Public Affairs
THE CENTERS
The Graduate School of Public Affairs coordinates three centers — the Center for the Improvement of Public Management, the Center for Public-Private Sector Cooperation, and the Center for Health Ethics and Policy. The Centers provide students and faculty with opportunities to engage in strategic multi- disciplinary policy research, secure internships, and develop and participate in training and technical assistance problems. The objective of the Centers is to help the public and private sectors respond to grown and revitalization programs. Their respective programs help translate classroom education into real world public policy and public management experiences.
Center for Health Ethics and Policy. The newest of GSPA's centers conducts policy research on health issues, studies the ethical problems surrounding areas of health policy, and provides technical support to those addressing these problems in the state and nation.
Center for the Improvement of Public Management. This center focuses on efforts to increase the planning and management capacity of state, county, and local government officials and staff. Its functions are oriented toward developing puglic sector management and analytical skills.
Center for Public-Private Sector Cooperation. Activities are directed toward increasing understanding between the public and private sectors. Its agenda is aimed at fostering a range of collaborative efforts between state/local government and private firms.
NATIONAL LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE ON AGING
Funded by the U.S. Administration on Aging, Department of Health and Human Services, and private foundations, the Institute is a nationally recognized training facility devoted to providing residential leadership development programs. Participants are persons from throughout the country who are responsible for planning and coordinating state and local social service programs for the elderly.


16 / General Information
National Veterans Training Institute
CU-Denver houses the nation's first National Veterans Training Institute. The program provides skills development training to employment representatives and employees of the Disabled Veterans Outreach Program. The program indirectly serves veterans, with an increased emphasis on improving the quality and quantity of services for disabled veterans.
The program is funded by the U.S. Department of Labor Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS).
FACULTY
About 300 highly qualified faculty members teach full-time at CU-Denver; well over four in five have doctoral degrees. The faculty is alert to the challenges of the urban environment and responsive to the needs of the commuter student.
TEACHING AWARDS, 1987-88
Faculty awards for Teaching were presented to the following faculty in 1988 (1-r): 1st row — William Briggs, Department of Mathematics; Jean Cooper, College of Business and Administration; and Nancy Shanklin, School of Education. 2nd row — Mark Gelemter, School of Architecture and Planning; John Trapp, College of Engineering and Applied Science; Lloyd Burton, Graduate School of Public Affairs; Robert Wick, Library; and Richard VanDeWeghe, Department of EngUsh. Not shown: Wanda Griffith, Department of Sociology. Professor VanDeWeghe was selected Teacher of the Year.
SERVICE AWARDS
Service Awards for 1988 were awarded to the following CU-Denver faculty (1-r): 1st row — Jana Everett, Department of Political Science; Bennett Neiman, School of Architecture and Planning; andjanis Driscoll, Psychology. 2nd row — William Goodwin, School of Education; Thomas Arnberg, College of Engineering and Applied Science; Michael Hayes, College of Business and Administration; and Cecil Glenn, Educational Opportunity Program. Not shown: Mark Emmert, Graduate School of Public Affairs.


Faculty and Staff / 17
RESEARCH/CREATIVE ACTIVITES AWARDS
CU-Denver presented Research/Creative Activities Awards in 1988 to the following faculty (1-f): 1st row — Harvey Greenberg, Department of Mathematics; Zoe Erisman, College of Music; Kenneth Ortega, College of Engineering and Applied Science. 2nd row — Diane Wilk Shirvarti, School of Architecture and Planning; David Jonassen, School of Education; Peter deLeon, Graduate School of Public Affairs; and Loma Moore, Department of Anthropology. Not shown: Rex Bums, Department of English, and Woodrow Eckard, Jr., College of Business and Administration.
Recipients of 1988 Outstanding Staff Awards: (back row, left to right) Diane Berkley, Mary Margaret Martinez-Madrid, Mary Dodge; (front row, left to right) Shirley Konkel, Jean Hogan.
STAFF HONORS
Each year in late spring, staff employees are honored for their years of service — for five years and in increments of five thereafter. Also, four outstanding staff members are selected, representing general administration, academic affairs, student academic services, and library.


18 / General Information
ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
All questions and correspondence regarding admission to CU-Denver and requests for application forms should be directed to:
Office of Admissions and Records
University of Colorado at Denver
1200 Larimer St.
Denver, CO 80204
(303) 556-2704
General Policies
CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program successfully. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being:
1. Level of previous academic performance.
2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment, as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests.
3. Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success.
CU-Denver reserves the right to deny admission to new applicants or readmission to former students whose total credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University in order to carry out its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
Applicants who request degree programs unavailable at CU-Denver will be considered for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with an undetermined major. Students admitted with an undetermined major are expected to declare a major by the time they have 60 hours toward graduation completed.
Admission of Undergraduate Degree Students
RECEIPT OF DOCUMENTS DEADLINES
Undergraduate Fall Spring Summer
Students 1988 1989 1989
New Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Transfer Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Former University of July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Colorado Students
Intrauniversity 60 days prior to the beginning of the term
Transfer Students International Students
Undergraduate: July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Graduate: May 26 Oct. 27 March 10
The University reserves the right to change documents/ credentials deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands. Applicants should apply as early as possible. Updated information is available from the Office of Admissions (303) 556-2704. For an applicant to be
considered for a specific term, ALL documents required for admission must be received by the Office of Admissions by the DEADLINE for that term. Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to have admission consideration made for a later term. Transfer students are reminded that sufficient time should be allowed to have transcripts sent from institutions attended previously. Foreign students are advised that it usually takes 120 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions from international locations.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN
New freshmen may apply for admission to the College of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, or Music.
General Requirements. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test.
Beginning in the Fall Semester of 1988, freshmen entering the University of Colorado are required to meet the following University-wide Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS): 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics), 3 years of natural sciences, 2 years of social science including one year of U.S. or world history, and 2 years of a single foreign language.
Specific College Requirements:
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION
English (one year of speech/debate and two years of compo-
sition are strongly recommended) .................. 4
Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one
year of geometry) .................................. 4
Natural sciences (laboratory science) ................ 2
Social sciences (including history) .................. 2
Foreign language (both units in a single language) ... 2
Academic electives ................................... 2
(Additional courses in English, foreign language, mathematics, natural or social sciences, not to include business courses.)
Total 16


Admissions / 19
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE1
English (literature, composition, grammar) ........... 4
Mathematics distributed as follows:
Algebra ....J...................................... 2
Geometry .......................................... 1
Additional mathematics (trigonometry
recommended) .................................. 1
Natural sciences including one year of physics
and one year of chemistry ......................... 2
Foreign language (both units in a single language) ... 2
Academic electives .................................. 3
Total 16
COLLEGE OF MUSIC
English .............................................. 4
Natural sciences ..................................... 3
Social science ....................................... 2
Foreign language
(both units in a single language) ................. 2
Mathematics .......................................... 3
Academic electives ................................... 1
Total 15
All students are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area. Two years of piano training are recommended.
The College of Music requires an audition of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the College of Music, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications.
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
English (literature, composition, grammar) ............ 4
Mathematics (excluding business
and consumer mathematics) .......................... 3
Natural sciences ...................................... 3
Social science ........................................ 2
Foreign language
(both units in a single language) .................. 2
Academic elective ....................................._i
Total 15
Beginning in the Fall Semester of 1988, freshmen entering the University of Colorado are required to meet the following University-wide minimum academic preparation: 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics), 3 years of natural science including one year of
U.S. or world history, and 2 years of a single foreign language.
1 See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalog for more specific information.
MINIMUM ACADEMIC PREPARATION STANDARDS (MAPS)
Success in undergraduate study is directly related to high school preparation. Sufficiently prepared students have a better probability of success. The MAPS focus on what the student has studied in preparation for college. Admission standards define the level of success and achievement necessary to be admitted to the University of Colorado and include factors that predict academic success such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school course work, and the grade-point average. Both what the student has studied and how the student has achieved will be factors that determine admission to the University.
Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade-point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University.
Two levels of deficiency will be recognized.
1. One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student meets other standards of the University (e.g., test scores, class rank) and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation. Credits so taken will count toward graduation provided the CU college normally accepts those course credits toward graduation.
2. In some cases, a student having more than one unit of deficiency may be admitted, provided that the student meets other standards of the University. The student must make up additional deficiencies before graduation by taking an expanded program of studies. The student may satisfy the MAPS requirements either by 1) courses taken at CU, 2) courses taken at other institutions of higher education, 3) completion of additional high school credits, 4) credit-byexamination programs, or 5) other ways as approved by each college.
All applicants who meet the above MAPS requirements are classified in two ways for admission purposes:
1. Preferred consideration is given to applicants who rank in the top 40% of their high school graduating class and have a composite score of 23 or higher on the American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 1000 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Business applicants will receive preferred consideration if they graduated in the top 30 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 24 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. Engineering applicants are expected to have strong mathematics and science background, higher class rank, and higher test scores. Mujsic applicants also must successfully pass a music audition.


20 / General Information
2. Applicants who rank in the lower 60% of their high school graduating class, and/or have combined SAT scores below 1000 or a composite ACT score below 23, and/or do not have 15 units of acceptable high school credit are reviewed on an individual basis.
To be considered for admission, applicants with a High School Equivalency Certificate must have an average standard GED score of 45 with no score below 36 on any section of the test. Applicants who complete the Spanish Language General Educational Development Test also must submit scores from Test VI, "English as a Second Language."
HOW TO APPLY
1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor or from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application must be completed in full and sent to the Office of Admissions with a $30 (subject to change) non-refundable fee. For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term, the $30 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions is informed of the intent to enroll for a later term.
3. Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. Hand-carried copies are not official.
4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to send a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
5. Students also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and to request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4-4875). High school students may obtain information about when and where these tests are administered by contacting their counselors.
Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver to receive scores must request the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. Complete a Request for Additional Score Report at test centers or from the offices listed below.
Registration Department
American College Testing Program (ACT)
P.O. Box 414 Iowa City, Iowa 52240
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 592
Princeton, New Jersey 08540
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 1025 Berkeley, California 94704
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.


Admissions / 21
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS
Transfer students may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Music. Students interested in the field of education should contact the School of Education office for information (556-2717). International students must submit proof of language proficiency.
Minimum admissions standards have been developed for all public four-year institutions in Colorado. However, transfer applicants who meet these standards are not guaranteed admission. They also must meet the admissions standards of the University of Colorado and its individual colleges. To meet the minimum standards at the University of Colorado at Denver, students must meet one of the following conditions.
1. Have earned fewer than 30 collegiate semester hours and meet the first-time FRESHMAN standards for the institution.
2. Be enrolled in a CCHE-approved guaranteed transfer agreement and meet the minimum academic qualifications of that agreement.
3. Have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade-point average:
a. 2.0 GPA if transferring from Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, University of Colorado at Boulder, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, or the University of Northern Colorado.
b. 2.5 GPA if transferring from any other postsecondary institution.
Transfer students are given priority consideration for admission as follows:
1. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and College of Music. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music applicants also must pass an audition. Contact the College of Music for audition information (556-2727).
2. College of Business and Administration. To be considered for new transfer admission, students must have completed at least 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business). Applicants with an overall GPA of 3.0 in applicable course work will be automatically admitted. Students with less than a 3.0 overall GPA, but with a 3.25 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work attempted, will be automatically admitted.
Applicants with at least a 2.6 in applicable course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with less than a 2.6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration.
No applicant will be accepted with less than a 2.0 GPA in all college level course work attempted. Similarly, no applicant will be accepted who is not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
3. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants to the College of Engineering should have at least a 2.75 cumulative grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted, should have completed two semesters each of calculus and physics, and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
Important Note: Applicants who do not meet the above grade-point average or credit hour requirements will still be considered for admission, but on an individual basis.
The primary factors used when considering students individually are (1) probability of success in the academic program to which admission is desired; (2) the quality of prior academic work; (3) age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and (4) time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges.
HOW TO APPLY
1. The student should obtain a transfer application from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application form must be completed and returned with the required $30 nonrefundable application fee.
3. The student is required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. Hand-carried copies are not official. If a student is currently enrolled at another institution, a transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. (Transcripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accompanied by a certified literal English translation.)
4. Students who have attended a two-year school or community college and were enrolled in the Guaranteed Transfer Program to transfer to CU-Denver, should submit a copy of the Guaranteed Transfer "contract" with their application.
Liberal arts and music applicants with fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of college work completed also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores.
All engineering applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Applicants to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should be aware that the College requires elementary proficiency in a foreign language for graduation. Applicants to the College have fulfilled this requirement if they have completed three years of any classi-


22 / General Information
cal or modern foreign language in high school and present a high school transcript to the College Advising Office for verification. For further information, students should contact the College Advising Office, 556-2555.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT
After all official transcripts have been received and the applicant has been admitted as a degree student, the Office of Admissions and the appropriate academic unit will determine which courses taken at other institutions can be applied to a degree program at CU-Denver. In general, transfer credit will be accepted insofar as it meets the degree, grade, and residence requirements at CU-Denver.
College-level credit may be transferred to the University if it was earned at a college or university of recognized standing, by advanced placement examinations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education; if a grade of C or higher was attained; and if the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution. Courses taken pass/fail are transferred when a grade of C or higher is required to pass.
The University may accept up to 72 semester credits (108 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution toward the baccalaureate degree requirements and may accept up to 112 semester credits (153 quarter hours) from a four-year college or university. No credit is allowed for vocational/technical, remedial, or religious/ doctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met.
The College of Business and Administration generally limits transfer credit for business courses taken at the lower division level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado. A maximum of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. All correspondence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability, and business courses may not be taken through correspondence.
The College of Music requires that 56 of the hours needed for graduation be completed in residence. This total may be reduced by the faculty on the basis of excellent work done at CU-Denver and high scholarship exhibited at institutions previously attended. In no case shall the minimum of fewer than 40 hours be distributed over three semesters.


Admissions / 23
READMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FORMER AND RETURNING CU STUDENTS
CU-Denver students who have not registered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year or longer, and who have not attended another institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmission. Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions.
Former students who have attended another college or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as transfer students and meet the transfer student deadlines for receipt of documents. This requires payment of the $30 non-refundable application fee and submission of official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended. Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to CU-Denver, Admissions Processing, 1200 Larimer St., Denver, CO 80204.
Students who last attended less than one year ago but attended another college or university during the interim are required to pay a $30 transfer application fee. Transcripts must be requested by the student and sent by the registrar of the other institution(s) to CU-Denver, Admissions Processing, 1200 Larimer St., Denver, CO 80204.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to undergraduate and graduate programs.
Undergraduate: Admission requirements for CU-Denver's schools and colleges vary, and international students seeking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Prospective students should request an International Student Application packet from the Office of Admissions. Information about requirements for each college and school can be found in this catalog.
Deadlines for receipt of documents have been established to allow for the timely mailings of I-20's. Contact the Office of Admissions for these dates.
Graduate: International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an undergraduate bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are applying. Applications are available from The Graduate School six months prior to the term for which the student is applying.
Note: Except for summer terms, international students must be in a degree-seeking status. They may attend summer terms as non-degree students. This exception is strictly limited to summer terms.
CU-DENVER INTRAUNIVERSITY TRANSFER OR CHANGE OF CAMPUS
CU-Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver Intrauniversity Transfer Forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Classes. Decisions on intrauniversity transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer.
CU-Denver students may change University of Colorado campuses by applying directly to the Admissions Office of the campus to which they wish to transfer. Change of Campus applications and deadline information also must be obtained from the campus to which the student is applying.
HIGH SCHOOL CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Fligh school juniors and seniors with proven academic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for one term only. This approval may be renewed. Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions (303-556-2704).
Admission of Graduate Degree Students
All correspondence and questions regarding admission to the graduate program at CU-Denver should be directed to the following:
Programs in Business
Office of Graduate Studies
Graduate School of Business Administration
623-4436
Programs in Architecture and Planning School of Architecture and Planning 556-3382
Programs in Public Affairs Graduate School of Public Affairs 556-2825
All Other Programs The Graduate School 556-2663
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
As a principal part of its mission, CU-Denver offers graduate and professional-level programs and during the 1988-89 academic year, approximately 45 percent of the student body was enrolled at the graduate level.
Graduate degree programs are offered through The Graduate School by its member schools and colleges (School of Education, College of Engineering and Ap-


24 / Genera] Information
plied Science, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, College of Music), and outside The Graduate School by the Graduate School of Business Administration, the School of Architecture and Planning, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs. The particular admission and graduation requirements established by each of these academic units are detailed in the following sections of this catalog.
GRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION DEADLINES
Admission requirements and application deadlines vary according to the individual graduate program. The Graduate School has general admission requirements which are supplemented by specific requirements of the major departments of graduate study (e.g., electrical engineering, education, English, etc.). Applicants should consult the general information section of The Graduate School portion of this catalog as well as the college or school sections for requirements and deadlines for specific programs.
should contact the School of Education, 556-2717. Each school/college limits the number of semester hours transferable toward a degree program. Students should contact the school/college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the number of hours which may be taken as a non-degree student and apply toward a degree program.
Undergraduate. CU-Denver will enroll persons who are at least 20 years of age without an undergraduate degree as non-degree students, but applicants are encouraged to apply to an undergraduate program rather than to apply as a non-degree student. Courses taken as a non-degree student are for credit and can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional improvement. Non-degree students must maintain a grade-point average of 2.0 at CU-Denver.
Note: International students are not admitted as nondegree students, except for summer terms.
Graduate. Students with the baccalaureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for course work as non-degree students. There are several types of these students. Among them are teachers who seek renewal of certification; students who have attained the degree or credential status they want, but who wish to take additional course work for professional or personal improvement; and students who feel a need to make up deficiencies before entering a specific program.
Non-degree students should be aware that generally only a limited number of course credits taken by a non-degree student may be applied later toward a degree program at CU-Denver.
To permit continuing registration as a non-degree student, a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 must be maintained.
Note: International students are not admitted as nondegree students, except for summer terms.
HOW TO APPLY FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION
To apply for admission as a non-degree student, obtain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office of Admissions. Return completed application by the deadline for the term desired. A $101 nonrefundable application fee is required. No additional credentials are required. Applicants who seek teacher certification must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials. Non-degree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space available basis.
Admission of Non-Degree Students
Persons who want to take University courses but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree may be admitted as non-degree students. In general, correspondence and questions regarding admission as a non-degree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions. Those seeking admission as nondegree students for the purpose of teacher certification
1 Subject to change


Admissions / 25
CHANGING STATUS FROM NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE STUDENT
Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined in the Non-degree to Degree procedures available from the Office of Admissions. Academic credentials (i.e., transcripts and/or test scores) and a $30 nonrefundable application fee also must be submitted. Non-degree students who are accepted as undergraduate degree students may generally transfer a limited number of semester hours for courses taken as a non-degree student to an undergraduate degree program, with the approval of the dean. Non-degree students should consult with the college to which they are applying during the first semester of their enrollment for the maximum number of semester credit hours acceptable toward a degree program as a non-degree student. (Students enrolled as non-degree students prior to the Fall Semester of 1970 are subject to the policies in effect between January of 1969 and August of 1970.)
Non-degree students may apply for admission to a graduate program by completing the application required by the particular program. The graduate dean, upon recommendation by the department, may accept up to 8 semester hours of credit toward the requirements for a master's degree for courses taken as a non-degree student at the University or at another recognized graduate school, or some combination thereof. The department may recommend acceptance of additional credit for courses taken as a non-degree student during the semester the student has applied for admission to the desired degree program.
Official Notification of Admission
Official notification of admission to CU-Denver as an undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions. Letters from various schools and colleges indicating acceptance into a particular program are pending subject to official notification of admission to the institution. Applicants who do not receive official notification of admission within a reasonable period of time (approximately 3 weeks) after submitting all application materials should contact the Office of Admissions (303) 556-2704.
Tentative Admission. Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents will be permitted one term to submit the documents. Registration for subsequent terms will be denied when documents have not been received.
mmm


UNDERGRADUATE AND NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION INFORMATION1'2’3
Type of Applicant Criteria for Admission1 Required Credentials When to Apply Notes
FRESHMAN (Student seeking bachelor’s degree who has never attended a collegiate institution IN GENERAL: a) Ranks in top 40% of high school graduating class. b) Has 15 units of acceptable high school work. c) Test scores: ACT comp: 23 or SAT comb: 1000 Complete application $30 applicable fee Official high school transcript showing rank-in-class, date of graduation, 7th semester grades, 8th semester courses Official ACT or SAT score report Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Seniors who meet or exceed all admission criteria may apply as early as Oct. 1 for following fall. For specific requirements refer to the college sections of this bulletin. For example: Music requires an audition.
Note: Business and Engineering applicants are expected to have higher test scores, class rank, and number of academic units.
TRANSFER (Student seeking a bachelor’s degree who has attended a collegiate institution other than CU) IN GENERAL: Must be in good standing and eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Applicants must have minimum 2.0 GPA on all work attempted if they have completed 30 or more semester hours. Business and Engineering applicants will be required to have a higher GPA.3 Complete application $30 application fee Two official transcripts sent from each college attended Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Liberal Arts and Music transfers with fewer than 13 sem. hrs. of college work. Business transfers with fewer than 24 sem. hrs., and Engineering transfers with fewer than 24 sem. hrs. must also submit all freshman credentials.
NON-DEGREE (Student who is not seeking a degree at this institution) Must be high school graduate or have a G.E.D. Must be at least 20 years old Complete application $10 application fee Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Applications will also be accepted after these deadlines if space allows. Non-degree students who have earned a baccalaureate degree should see Graduate School section for additional information.
RETURNING CU STUDENT (Returning non-degree and or degree student who has not attended another institution since CU) Must be in good standing Former student application Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Applications also will be accepted after these deadlines if space allows Will be admitted to their previous major unless a new major is requested. Students under academic suspension in certain schools or colleges at the University of Colorado may enroll during the summer terms to improve their grade-point averages.
FORMER CU STUDENT (Degree student who has attended another institution since attending CU) Same as for transfer Complete application $30 application fee Two official transcripts from each intervening college Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Will be admitted to previous major unless a different major is requested on application.
CHANGE OF STATUS: NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE (CU non-degree student who wishes to enter a degree program) Same as for transfer Complete application $30 application fee CU transcript Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Must meet the same criteria as transfer student.
CHANGE OF STATUS: DEGREE TO NON-DEGREE (Former CU degree student who has graduated and wishes to take additional work) Must have completed degree Non-degree student application $10 application fee Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Only students who have completed and received degrees are eligible to change to nondegree status.
INTERCAMPUS TRANSFER (Student who has been enrolled on one CU campus and wishes to take courses on another) Must be in good standing Former student application Transfer to Denver, not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Transfer from Denver: refer to the bulletin for other campus. Transfers from Denver to another campus of CU should refer to the bulletin of the campus to which they are applying for additional requirements. Will be admitted to previous major unless a different major is requested on application.
INTRAUNIVERSITY TRANSFER (Students who wish to change from one CU college to another, e.g., from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to the College of Business) Same as for transfer. Must be a continuing student enrolled on the campus to which you are applying. Intrauniversity transfer application CU transcript 60 days prior to the beginning of the term
'Requirements for individual schools or colleges may vary. 2Foreign students should see International Students in the Admissions section of this catalog. 3Applicants who have earned 12-29 semester hours must meet freshman standards or have a minimum transfer GPA of 2.5. (Applicants transferring from Colorado School of Mines, CSU, UNC, UCB, or UCCS must have a minimum transfer GPA of 2.0.)


Tuition and Fees / 27
TUITION AND FEES
All tuition and fee charges are established by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually (usually in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly. The Regents reserve the right to change tuitioh and fee rates at any time. A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term, and students should contact the Office of Admissions for further information on the tuition and fee charges for a particular term. The following rates are for the 1988-89 academic year and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating cost.
Other Fees1
1. Student Activity Fee (required for all students):
Fall semester 1988 ............... $ 17.00
Spring semester 1989 ............. $ 17.00
Summer term 1989 ................. $ 12.00
2. Auraria Bond Retirement Fee (required for all students:
Each term ........................ $ 19.00
3. Student Information System Fee (a
non-refundable fee required of all students each term) ............................ $ 5.00
4. Matriculation Fee (mandatory for the first term
for all new students): ........... $ 15.00
This is a non-refundable fee charged at the student's first registration to cover costs of generating tran-
scripts.
5. Health Insurance Fee (optional):
Fall semester ....................... $ 156.00
Spring semester (includes summer) . $156.00 Sumrqer term only .................... $ 84.00
Students who wish health insurance coverage must complete and submit a request card with the Bursar's Office before the end of the drop/add period.
The insurance program primarily subsidizes major medical expenses according to the schedule of benefits stated in the insurance brochure, which may be obtained from thy Office of Student Services. Dependent coverage (spouse and/or children) also is available at an additional charge. Further information on health insurance is available from the Office of Student Services, 556-2861.
6. Doctoral dissertation fee (mandatory for all students certified by The Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral dissertation). Students should contact The Graduate School for guidelines established for charges for enrollment
7. Comprehensive examination fee: Any student in The Graduate School, the Graduate School of Business Administration, or Graduate School of Public Affairs must be enrolled during the term in which the Comprehensive Examination for a master's degree is com-
1 Subject to change.
pleted. Students who are not taking regular courses during that term must enroll as "Candidate for Degree." Students enrolled only as "Candidate for Degree" pay the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour. The charge varies by the school in which the student is matriculated.
8. Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course):
Breakage deposit ......L.......... $ 20.00
An $8 deduction is assessed for expendable items. The unused portion is returned at the end of the semester.
9. Music laboratory fee (mandatory for College of Music students and others enrolled in certain music courses):
Music fee ........................ $ 24.00
College of Music students and others enrolled in piano, sound recording and reinforcement, and electronic music must pay this fee. No student is charged more than one $24 fee during a given term.
Payment of Tuition and Fees
All tuition and fees (except application fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, according to guidelines in the current Schedule of Classes. Arrangements may be made through the Bursar's Office at the time of registration to defer payment of part of the charges. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Schedule of Classes published before each semester or summer term. Students who fail to complete payment by the published deadlines, or who fail to file the required promissory note, will be assessed a $50 penalty.
Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even though they may drop out of school. Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Classes. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, to be issued transcripts, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after graduation.
Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation. Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable to the bank will be charged an additional service charge. Students may pay tuition and fees by credit card.
Tuition Appeals
Exceptions to financial obligations incurred may be granted by the Tuition Appeals Committee. The Committee will only consider appeals when a student has been medically disabled, has experienced a death in the family, or has a change in employment hours or


28 / General Information
location beyond the student's control. Documentation of these conditions will be required. Exceptions will not be considered for a student's failure to comply with published deadlines, or changes in employment under the student's control.
Please note: tuition appeals must be filed within four months of the end of the term for which the appeal is filed.
FALL AND SPRING 1988-89 TUITION
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES AND THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC and non-degree students without an undergraduate degree (SO)
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
—jn T73 T537
2 145 674
3 218 1,012
4 290 1,349
5 363 1,686
6 435 2,023
7 508 2,810
8 581 2,810
9-15 605 2,810
each credit
hour over 15 73 337
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND THE COLLEGE OF
ENGINEERING
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
$ 86 $ 351
2 172 702
3 258 1,053
4 344 1,404
5 430 1,755
6 516 2,106
7 602 2,925
8 687 2,925
9-15 716 2,925
each credit
hour over 15 86 351
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $102 $ 355
2 203 710
3 305 1,065
4 407 1,420
5 509 1,775
6 610 2,130
7 712 2,958
8 814 2,958
9-15 848 2,958
each credit
hour over 15 102 355
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College of Engineering, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $120 $ 371
2 240 743
3 360 1,114
4 480 1,485
5 599 1,857
6 719 2,228
7 839 3,094
8 959 3,094
9-15 999 3,094
each credit hour over 15 120 371
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the School of Architecture and Planning, the College of Music, and NON-DEGREE GRADUATE STUDENTS (SW) and non-Denver campus programs: Nursing, Medicine, Law, etc.
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $106 $ 355
2 212 710
3 318 1,065
4 425 1,420
5 531 1,775
6 637 2,130
7 743 2,958
8 849 2,958
9-15 885 2,958
each credit
hour over 15 106 355
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the School of
Education
Credit hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $107 371
2 214 743
3 321 1,114
4 428 1,485
5 535 1,857
6 642 2,228
7 749 3,094
8 856 3,094
9-15 963 3,094
each credit
hour over 15 107 371


Tuition and Fees / 29
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the Graduate School of Business Administration
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 129 $ 371
2 257 743
3 386 1,114
4 514 1,485
5 643 1,857
6 771 2,228
7 900 3,094
8 1,028 3,094
9-15 1,071 3,094
each credit hour over 15 129 371
Graduate degree students who are registered as “candidate for degree” will be assessed the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour plus the Student Information System fee.
NOTE: THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE TUITION AND FEES AT ANY TIME.
Audit
To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the University or have outstanding financial obligations to the University. The Records Office does not keep any record of courses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor. Auditor's cards are issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor when requesting permission to attend a class.
There is no auditor status in summer. Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges.


30 / General Information
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
Tuition classification is governed by CRS 23-7-101, et. seq. (1973) as amended.1 Institutions of higher education are bound to the provisions of this statute and are not free to make exceptions to the rules set forth.
The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a legal domiciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classification is being sought. Persons over 22 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 22 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court appointed legal guardian. An unemancipated minor's parent must, therefore, have a legal domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes.
Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one's true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colorado domicile on the person seeking to establish the domicile. The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connections with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado begins the day after connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evidence one's intent. The most common ties with the state are (1) change of driver's license to Colorado; (2) change of automobile registration to Colorado; (3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado; (5) and most important, payment of state income taxes as a resident by one whose income is sufficient to be taxed. Caution: payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroactive to the time filed.
In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term, the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question. If one's 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, in-state tuition cannot be granted until the next semester.
Once the student's tuition classification is established, it remains unchanged unless satisfactory information to the contrary is presented. A student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification from resident to nonresident or vice versa must inform the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 days after such a change occurs. An adult student or emancipated minor who moves outside of Colorado must send written notification to the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 days of the change.
Once a student is classified as non-resident for tuition purposes, the student must petition the Office of Admissions and Records for a change in classification. Petitions must be submitted no later than the first day of classes of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a non-resident. It is preferred for petitions to be received 30 days prior to the term. Late petitions will not be considered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel
The Colorado Legislature approved resident tuition beginning with the Fall 1986 Semester for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. ELIGIBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM. Students obtain a completed verification form from the base education officer, and submit the form with their military ID to the Record-Office after they have registered, before the end of the drop/add period. At that time the student's bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate. Students who have been certified remain classified as non-residents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Colorado.
FINANCIAL AID
Director:Ellie Miller Office: NC 1030 Telephone:556-2886
The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment considers qualified students for financial aid awards. If the student's application materials are received before the March 31, 1989, priority date, then the student is considered for a package of need-based grant, work-study (part-time employment), and/or long-term loan funds. For the past several years, these packages have consisted of approximately 50% grant funds and 50% of self-help funds (work-study, loan, unmet need). (Graduate students have only been receiving approximately 10% in grant funds.) If applications are received after the March 31 priority date, the student is usually considered only for Pell Grant and for outside student loans (Stafford Loan—formerly Guaranteed Student Loan or GSL, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, and Supplemental Loan for Students). These funds are not allocated to CU-Denver; they are available throughout the year to students who qualify. There are three separate deadlines for applying for Advantage Schloarship; refer to the separate brochure for further information.
1 A copy of the Colorado Revised Statutes (1973), as amended, is available in the University of Colorado at Denver Admissions Office.


Financial Aid / 31
Applicants for Colorado Fellowship, Deans Scholars, and Regents Scholars are subject to different deadlines and are reviewed by other CU-Denver departments (The Graduate School, undergraduate dean's offices, and the Office of Admissions respectively). All other students are notified of their award status in writing by the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
Eligibility
Each student must qualify for CU-Denver financial aid as follows:
1. Be a U.S. citizen or be admitted to the U.S. by the INS on a permanent basis (except for Colorado Fellowship).
2. Be classified as a degree-seeking student (except for students applying for Advantage Scholarships). Teacher certification students are eligible to apply only for outside student loans (Stafford Loan, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, or Supplemental Loan for Students).
3. Be enrolled for a specified minimum number of credits.
4. Maintain Satisfactory academic progress as defined for the financial aid programs.
5. Document financial need by completing the entire need-based application (except for the following programs which are not need-based: Colorado Fellowship, Advantage Scholarship, Colorado Scholars, Deans Scholars, Regents Scholars, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, Supplemental Loan for Students, Short Term Loan, and many outside scholarships).


32 / General Information
6. Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes (except for the following programs: Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Advantage Scholarship, Perkins Loan, College Work-Study, Stafford Loan, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, and Supplemental Loan for Students).
7. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant.
8. Be registered for the draft or enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selective Service (required for all males who are at least 18 years old and bom after December 31, 1959).
Application
Each applicant must complete the financial aid application materials for submission to the Office of Financial Aid. Complete information must be available to the financial aid counselors before eligibility can be determined.
Limited Funds. The majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis to eligible students who document financial need and complete their application process as soon as possible after January 1, 1989. Application completion is defined as having all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (ACT Family Financial Statement or CSS Financial Aid form) into the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. General financial aid is awarded to eligible students until all of the funds are committed for the year. If you complete your file after March 31, 1989, your awards will probably be limited to the Pell Grant (for first undergraduate students only) and/or outside student loans (Stafford Loan, Supplemental Loans for Students, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students). Please remember to reapply for financial aid each year.
It is the student's responsibiliy to be sure application materials are complete. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for application forms and students are referred to the Financial Aid Fact Sheets for complete details regarding financial aid. All financial aid application procedures are subject to change at any time due to revisions in federal and state laws, regulations, and guidelines.
ON-LINE APPLICATION INFORMATION
Please try the new on-line Financial Aid Information System. This system will help you complete the ACT Family Financial Statement, provide you with important financial aid information and current news, and produce a printed copy of your institutional financial aid application for you to turn into the Office of Financial Aid. To use the system, go to a CU-Denver computer lab (North Classroom Bldg., Rooms 1206 or 2206), sign on to the CU-Denver vax computer and enter "money" (in small letters) when prompted for a login. The system will take you to a self-explanatory
menu. If you have any questions about how to use the system, ask one of the computer advisors.
Qualification
Financial Need. Most financial aid is based on the concept of financial need. Your financial aid counselor calculates financial need as: 1) cost of attendance, minus family contributon which is 2) student/spouse contribution, and 3) parents' contributon (for dependent students only).
The cost of attendance is the cost to attend CU-Denver, including tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment determines standard budgets for students based upon average tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.
Independent Student. The federal government has specific guidelines that must be followed to define a self- supporting student (one who reports only his/her own income and assets when applying for aid). For 1989-90, a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old or older as of December 31, 1990. If you are under 24, you are considered self-supporting if you fall into one of the following categories:
1. Single undergraduate student with no dependents who was not claimed as a dependent on your parents' 1987 and 1988 federal income tax returns. Also, you must demonstrate that you are self- sufficient by having total income (including financial aid) or at least $4,000 annually for the two calendar years prior to your first receipt of federal financial aid.
2. Graduate or professional student who will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents' 1989 federal income tax return.
3. Married and will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents' 1989 federal income tax return.
4. Student with legal dependents other than a spouse.
5. Veteran of the U.S. armed forces.
6. Orphan or ward of the court.
7. Appeal to the Financial Aid Committee for an exception to these guidelines and be approved by the Committee because of your unusual circumstances.
If your student/spouse contributon plus your parents' contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance, you will not qualify for need-based financial aid. For 1988-89, the following budgets were used for room and board, transportation, and personal expenses per month: single students living with parents $300/month; single students not living with parents $670/month. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student was approximately $700 per semester, and nonresident tuition ranged from $1800-$2850 per semester. These amounts will probably increase by about 5% for the 1989-90 school year.
The contributions from the student/spouse and from the parents of dependent students are calculated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income, savings and other as-


Financial Aid / 33
sets, family size, number of children in postsecondary school, medical expenses, and other factors. You may appeal for special consideration of your situation and in some cases the standardized contribution may be adjusted by recommendation of the Financial Aid Committee. FINANCIAL AID IS INTENDED TO SUPPLEMENT (NOT REPLACE) FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS FROM YOU AND YOUR PARENTS.
Course Loads, General financial aid (work-study, grants, Perkins Loans) undergraduate recipients usually must carry at least 12 credit hours per semester and graduate students usually must carry at least five graduate credits per semester during the academic year (fall/spring). Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please check your award letter for the exact number df hours required). Pell grant (available only to first undergraduates) and outside student loan recipients must carry at least six credits per semester for undergraduates and three graduate credits for graduates. Summer term minimum course loads are as follows: Full-time: undergraduate — 6 hours, graduate — 3 graduate hours; Half-time: undergraduate — 3 hours, graduate — 2 graduate hours. Higher or lower standards may be required for individual awards. For further information contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
Satisfactory Academic Progress. CU-Denver students must make satisfactory academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment in order to be eligible and remain eligible for financial aid. Students are referred to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policyl for Financial Aid, available in the Office of Financial Aid.
Non-Degree Students. Non-degree students are not pursuing a degree in a technical sense and, therefore, are only eligible to apply for one type of financial aid at this time — Advantage Scholarship.
Continuing Education/Community College of Denver Courses. Some courses cannot be included when minimum course loads and satisfactory academic progress are determined. Classes offered through the CU-Denver Division of Continuing Education or through the Community College of Denver cannot be included.
Residency Status. You are required to be a resident of Colorado for a full calendar year before the Office of Admissions can consider classifying you as a resident for tuition purposes. Non-resident students are encouraged to obtain additional information from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident status. As a resident student, you are potentially eligible for more financial aid programs since you can be considered for the State of Colorado aid funds.
Refunds and Repayments. Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal or reclassification of tuition status must be applied against the recipient's financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Students may be expected to repay a portion of their award if they withdraw from CU-Denver.
Appeals. Students may appeal all decisions of the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment by completing a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office. The Financial Aid Appeals Committee reviews most appeals for exceptions to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy and the Financial Aid Committee reviews all other appeals.
Reapply Each Year. Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each year.
Award
Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 6-12 weeks after all application documents have been received in the Office of Financial Aid. If awarded, an award letter is mailed which includes information such as the type(s) and amount(s) of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours that are required for the award(s).
Types of Aid
The federal government funds the following programs:
1.Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG). A need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a bachelor's degree.
2. Perkins Loan (formerly National Direct Student Loan). The interest rate on this long-term loan is 5% and no payments are due until six or nine months (this time differs depending on when you first receive a Perkins Loan) after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half time.
3. College Work-Study. A program that allows students to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at non-profit agencies to help meet their educational costs.
The State of Colorado funds the following programs.
1. Colorado Student Grant. A need-based grant for resident undergraduate students.
2. Colorado Student Incentive Grant. A need-based grant for resident undergraduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor's degree. This grant is funded 50% by the federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado.
3. Colorado Graduate Grant. A need-based grant for resident graduate students.


34 / General Information
4. Colorado Work-Study. A program similar to the College Work-Study program, but limited to resident undergraduate students.
Pell Grant. Your elibibility for the Pell Grant (federally funded) is determined before any other aid is awarded. Awards are defined by a strict formula provided by the federal government and amounts vary depending on the student's eligibility index, enrollment status, residency classification, and living status. Students are eligible for a Pell Grant if they have not received their first bachelor's degree by June 1, 1989.
Outside Student Loans. Your eligibiity for all other types of aid should be determined prior to applying for outside student loans. The STAFFORD LOAN (formerly Guaranteed Student Loan) program requires that you show financial need in order to qualify. Most students who are working full time do not document sufficient financial need to qualify for the Stafford Loan. The primary purpose of this program is to make low-interest, long-term loans available to students to help them meet their postsecondary educational expenses.
The SUPPLEMENTAL LOAN FOR STUDENTS is a long-term loan program for students who do not document financial need for the Stafford Loan or who need additional funds. Undergraduate dependent students may not borrow the SLS because their parents are eligible to borrow under the same terms. The program for parents is called the PARENTS LOAN FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS.
Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment opportunities are listed in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment, the Auraria Student Assistance Center, and the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education. Full-time undergraduate resident students who apply for College Work-Study and who do not document sufficient financial need may be considered for Colorado No-Need Work-Study. Scholarship information can be found in the Auraria Library Scholarship InfoBank in the reference section of the Library. Handicapped students should inquire about the Ahlin Scholarship in Student Services (556-8427). All applicants for need-based financial aid are automatically considered for the Arnold Scholarship. Minority applicants and students whose parents did not graduate with a bachelor's degree are encouraged to apply for the Advantage Scholarship. Graduate students should inquire about additional types of aid through The Graduate School and their academic department. Students should be aware that Emergency Student Loans are available as well as Financial Aid Advances. American Indian students should inquire in the office for Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships.


Registration / 35
REGISTRATION
Selecting a Program and Courses
Students should review the following sections of this catalog that describe the academic programs available at CU-Denver, and that provide information by school or college on the various majors available, course requirements by major, course load policies, and other pertinent information.
Courses available during a particular semester or summer term are listed in the Schedule of Classes, published several weeks before registration. These are available from the Office of Admissions and Records.
Undergraduate students who need assistance in planning a program or in selecting courses should contact the academic unit in which they are enrolled to arrange for an advising appointment prior to registration.
Graduate students should contact their graduate program for assistance.
Coreq. —Corequisite Hrs. —Hours Lab. — Laboratory Led. —Lecture
Prer. —Prerequisite Rec. —Recitation Sem. —Semester Wk. — Week
Thus, the description of CHEM. 1020-5 signifies that the course is offered by the chemistry department at the freshman level, and that it carries 5 semester hours of credit which is divided into 3 hours of lecture credit, 1 hour of recitation credit, and 1 hour of laboratory credit. Further, the student must have completed CHEM. 1010 (the prerequisite) before enrolling.
Orientation
An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, prior to the first day of classes. The orientation, conducted by the Office of the Dean of Student Services and the various schools and colleges, introduces the programs, activities, and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process and on degree requirements also is provided.
Course Scheduling and Abbreviations
For information on scheduling courses, students are encouraged to contact an advisor through their college or school dean's office. In general, the abbreviation preceding the course number identifies the department offering the course. The first digit in the course number indicates the recommended class level of the course:
Level of Courses Student Classification
1000 Lower division
2000 Lower division
3000 Upper division
4000 Upper division
5000 Graduate students or qualified seniors who have the instructor’s or dean’s permission
6000 Graduate degree students
7000 Master and Ph.D. graduate students
8000 Ph.D. graduate students
The Graduate School policy permits specifically approved courses to be offered concurrently at the 4000 and 5000 levels. However, the evaluation and requirements for students enrolled at the graduate (5000) level will be different than those enrolled at the undergraduate (4000) level. It should be expected that work at the graduate level would involve demonstration of greater maturity and critical skills than at the undergraduate level.
The digit after the dash in the course number denotes the credit-hour value of the course. The 1-credit lecture/recitation period is 50 minutes long. Hence a student enrolled in a 3-credit hour course will attend class for 150 minutes per week during a 16-week term. A laboratory credit includes from two to four hours per week in the laboratory, drafting room, or field. Unless the course descriptions specify laboratory work, it is understood that the classes consist of lectures and discussions.
Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are:
Registration
CU-Denver students can register from any touch-tone telephone. Students will be assigned a time to register and may register at or after their assigned time.
POOLED COURSES AT METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE
Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with similar courses at Metropolitan State College (MSQ. CU-Denver undergraduateJ students may register for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU-Denver Schedule of Classes.
CU-Denver students must complete 15 hours at CU-Denver before registering for MSC courses. After this time, CU-Denver students must take at least 25 percent of their course load each term in CU-Denver courses.
MSC courses will not be included in the University of Colorado grade-point average. MSC courses will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will count in the hours toward graduation as elective credit. 1
1 Registration for MSC pooled courses through CU-Denver is restricted to undergraduate students; graduate degree students and graduate non-degree students are not eligible to register for MSC courses through Icommon registration.


36 / General Information
MSC courses cannot be used to meet the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences core requirements toward graduation:
• the English composition requirement
• the mathematics requirement
• the foreign language requirement
• the core course requirements in arts and humanities, social sciences, or natural and physical sciences
MSC courses cannot be used to meet the major and minor requirements toward the degree without prior approval of the student's dean.
INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION
CU-Denver degree students may enroll for courses offered by the various campuses of the Community College of Denver. Students must be enrolled at CU-Denver for at least one course during the semester or summer term to be eligible to register interinstitutionally. Registration is on a space available basis. CCD courses are not included in a CU-Denver student's grade-point average.
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University or College campuses concurrently must contact their school or college on their home campus.
Note: Degree students may register concurrently for the fall and spring semesters only (not summer). Each campus may further limit concurrent registration by resident students if the campus enrollment cap is reached.
A degree student registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if:
1. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean.
2. The course is a required course for the student's degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver.
3. The student obtains approval from the academic dean.
4. There is space available at the other (host) campus.
5. The student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CU- Denver rates.
6. The home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes.
7. The concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses.
Students may not register for an independent study course through concurrent registration. Students may not take courses pass/fail or for “no-credit" through concurrent registration.
To drop a concurrent course during the host campus drop/add period, arrange the drop at the home campus school or college office. To drop a concurrent course after the end of the host campus drop/add deadline, drop the course at the host campus Records Office.
Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Health Sciences Center students: please note the restrictions above. Also, students from other CU campuses cannot register concurrently for MSC courses.
Course Loads
Students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer term) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. The student should obtain the dean's signature on the Registration Form or Course Change Form during Walk-In Registration.
Remember that a three-semester-hour course during a fall or spring semester will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class; a three-semester-hour course during a summer term will require nine to thirteen hours of work each week outside of class.
Suggested maximum course loads for the fall and spring semesters for undergraduate students who are employed:
Employed40 or more hours per week: 3-6 semester hours 30-39 hours per week: 5-8 semester hours
20-29 hours per week: 7-11 semester hours
10-19 hours per week: 9-15 semester hours
Students must weigh their capabilities against the demands of each course.
No more than 15 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a fall or spring semester can be applied toward a graduate degree.
No more than 10 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a given summer term can be applied to a graduate degree.


Academic Policies / 37
DEFINITION OF FULL- AND HALF-TIME STATUS FOR FINANCIAL AID AND LOAN DEFERMENT: FALL AND SPRING
Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in the student's financial aid award letter.
Fall and Spring: effective Fall 1987
Undergraduates and non-degree students:
Full-time 12 or more semester hours
Half-time 6 or more semester hours
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
5 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number — 5000 + )
8 or more hours of mixed level classes
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master's reports, or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number — 5000 + )
4 or more hours of mixed level classes Summer
Undergraduates and non-degree students:
Full-time 8 or more semester hours
Half-time 4 or more semester hours
Full-time:
3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number — 5000 + )
5 or more hours of mixed level classes
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master's reports, or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
2 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number — 5000 + )
3 or more hours of mixed level classes
Enrollment status for a term cannot be certified until the end of the drop/add period.
These hours do not include interinstitutional hours from CCD or hours at MSC, nor do they include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration.
Students receiving veteran's benefits must contact the Veterans Affairs coordinator for definition of fulltime status for summer terms.
CCD courses are not considered for full- or halftime status. Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are considered for financial aid purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid.
SHORT TERM COURSES
Courses are also offered in five-week modules, in special weekend courses, and in seminars. Topics in Science modular courses are self-contained units designed to cover specific problems or issues in science. Students should contact the college/school office for information on short-term courses offered each semester.
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
Advanced Standing and Advanced Placement Credit
Undergraduate students may obtain credit for lower-division courses in which they demonstrate proficiency by examination. By passing an examination, the student will be given credit for the course to satisfy lower division requirements and may be eligible to enroll in higher level courses than indicated by the student's formal academic experience. Credit granted for courses by examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate. There are three types of examinations as described below.
Advanced Placement Program
The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency and are granted advanced standing in those areas. Students with scores below 4 may be considered for advanced placement by the discipline concerned. All credit must be validated by subsequent academic performance. For more information contact your high school counselor or the Director of Admissions for CU-Denver.
Credit By Examination
Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade-point average of at least 2.0, and be currently registered. Examinations are arranged through the Records Office, and a nonrefundable fee is charged.
Students should contact the office of the dean of the academic unit in which they are enrolled.


38 / General Information
College-level Examination Program
Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have excelled at college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examinations Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing service. For more information call 556-2861.
Students who are interested in credit for CLEP examinations must contact the office of their school or college.
Credit for Military Service and Schooling and ROTC
MILITARY SERVICE AND SCHOOLING
To have credit for educational experiences evaluated, applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application: (1) a copy of DD Form 214 and (2) DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Education Experience During Military Service. USAF personnel may present an official transcript from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of the DD Form 295.
Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver.
Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions.
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC)
Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business and then only if the ROTC program is completed.
Grading System and Policies
The following grading system and policies for pass/fail registration, dropping and adding courses, and withdrawal from the University have been standardized for all academic units of the University.


Academic Policies / 39
GRADE SYMBOLS
The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol (A, B, C, D, F, IF, IW, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC, W, and Y) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, explained under Pass/Fail Procedure.
A —superior/excellent—4 credit points per credit hour.
B—good/better than average—3 points per credit how.
C—competent/average—2 credit points per hour.
D—minimum passing—1 credit point per credit hour.
F—Failing—ho credit points per credit hour.
Beginning with the Spring 1984 Semester, the University approved use of a PLUS/MINUS grading system, where a B + corresponds to 3.3 credit points per credit hour, and a B - corresponds to 2.7 credit points per credit hour. Instructors in those schools and colleges may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS system, but are not required to do so.
IF—incomplete—regarded as F if not completed within one year maximum.
IW—incomplete—regarded as W if not completed within one year maximum.
IP—in progress—thesis at the graduate level only.
An incomplete grade is only awarded when special circumstances prevent a student's completing a course during the term. Students have one year to complete an INCOMPLETE. After one year, an IW is regarded as a DROP-PASSING; an IF as a DROP-FAILING. Students should not re-register for courses for which they have received INCOMPLETES.
Students receiving INCOMPLETES: most schools and colleges require a contract between the instructor and student outlining the work necessary to “complete" the incomplete.
P/F—pass/fail—P grade is not included in the grade-point average; the F grade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor's degree.
H/P/F—honors/pass/fail—intended for honors courses; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average.
SPECIAL SYMBOLS
NC — indicates registration on a no-credit basis.
W — indicates withdrawal without credit.
Y — indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed. Graduate students enrolled at the 5000 level of a slash course (4000/5000) will be expected to complete additional work and be evaluated commensurate with graduate standards as specified by the course instructor.
PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE
1. Any student who wishes to register for a course on a pass/fail basis should do so during the regular registration. Changes to or from a pass/fail basis only may be made during the regular drop/add period.
2. Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor's degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass/fail in any given semester.
3. Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of pass/fail registration. All students who register on a pass/fail appear on the regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office, those registrations with a pass/fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D and above convert to grades of P.
4. The record of pass/fail registration is maintained by the Office of Admissions and Records.
5. Exception to the pass/fail regulations is permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education, the Division of Continuing Education, and Study Abroad Programs.
6. Graduate degree students can exercise the P/F option for undergraduate courses only. A grade of Pwill not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement.
7. If you register for a course on a pass/fail basis, you may not later decide that you want a letter grade. Each school or college limits the hours and courses for which you may register on a pass/fail basis. Please note: many colleges will not accept a "P" grade for transfer credit.


40 / General Information
PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS
College General 16 Hours Maximum Transfer Students
Business and Administration Only non-business electives may be taken pass/fail Only 6 semester hours may be taken pass/fail Only 6 semester hours may be taken pass/fail
Engineering and Applied Science Required courses may not be taken pass/fail. Upper division socio-humanistic electives are acceptable, otherwise major department approval is required; students without a major are not eligible to take courses pass/fail . Recommended maximum one course/semester. Includes courses taken in the honors program Maximum of 1 semester hour of pass/fail may be applied toward graduation for every 9 semester hours taken in the college
Liberal Arts and Sciences May be restricted in certain majors; not included in 30 hours of C or better work required for major. No more than 6 hours P/F any semester. Does not include courses taken in honors, physical education, cooperative education and certain teacher certification courses; also does not include ENGL. 1002 Proficiency Test or MATH. 1002 Test May not be used by students graduating with only 30 semester hours taken at the University
Music Only non-music electives may be taken pass/fail . No more than 6 hours P/F any semester Includes courses taken in the honors program.


Academic Policies / 41
NO CREDIT
Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college. File the no credit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop/add period. Students who register for a course on a no credit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade. Students may not register again for a course which has already been taken on a no credit basis.
GRADE-POINT AVERAGE
The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course, totaling the hours and the credit points, and dividing the total points by the total hours.
Grades of P, NC, Y, W, IP, IW, and IF are not included in the grade-point average.
If an IF grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as failed and a grade of F is automatically calculated in the grade-point average at the end of the one-year grace period.
If an IW grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as dropped.
If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point average. The University of Colorado grade-point average does not include courses taken at other institutions.
The grade-point average of graduate students includes only courses, credit hours, and credit points accumulated while enrolled in The Graduate School.
The grade-point average does not appear on official transcripts issued from the Records Office but does appear on the Grade Report issued each semester.
Students should consult with the dean of their college or school for explanation of any exceptions made to the University uniform grade-point average.
Undergraduates and non-degree students must maintain a 2.0 grade-point average to remain in good standing. Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain in good standing. Students whose GPA falls below the 2.0/3.0 level are subject to probation or suspension. Such students will be notified by their school or college.
GRADE REPORTS
Grade reports normally are available for students to pick up at the Records Office within two to three weeks after the end of the semester. Students must present picture identification. Grade reports are not automatically mailed; however, a self-addressed, stamped envelope may be supplied to the Records Office by individual students who wish to have their grades mailed.
Graduation
Undergraduates. Students who have completed 80 or more semester hours should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or college to determine what requirements remain for graduation. Students intending to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their graduation term. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated. After students have been certified to graduate they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Graduates. Students must file an Application for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with The Graduate School on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term. Check with The Graduate School for more complete information. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated. After students have been certified to graduate, they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.


42 / General Information
Commencement. Letters will be mailed in early April to students eligible to participate in the spring commencement. Information will be provided about ordering special display diplomas, being fitted for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree recorded. Students graduating at the end of the summer term or the end of the fall semester may participate in the following spring commencement.


Academic Policies / 43
Transcripts
Transcripts of academic record at the University of Colorado (all campuses) may be ordered in person or by mail from the University of Colorado at Boulder, Records Office, Campus Box B-7, Transcript Section, Regent Administrative Center 125, Boulder, CO 80309. Official transcripts will not be available until approximately five weeks after final examinations. A transcript on which a degree is to be recorded will not be available until approximately eight weeks after final examinations. Requests should include the following:
1. Student's full name (include maiden or other name if applicable).
2. Student number.
3. Birthdate.
4. The last term and campus the student attended.
5. Whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordered near the end of a term. Whether the request should be held until a degree is recorded.
6. Agency, college, or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included. Transcripts sent to students are labeled "issued to student."
7. Student's signature. (This is the student's authorization to release the records to the designee.)
There is no charge for transcripts. Transcripts are prepared only at the student's request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Unofficial copies of transcripts sent to CU-Denver from other institutions can be requested at the Records Office. Official transcripts should be requested directly from the issuing institution.
Adding and Dropping Courses1
ADDING COURSES
Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 12 (8 in the summer) days of full-term classes, provided there is space available. Instructor approval will be required after the first week of classes.
DROPPING COURSES
1. Students may drop courses without approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term). Tuition will not be charged for the dropped courses which are dropped as long as the student is not withdrawing. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student's permanent record.
2. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term), the instructor's signature is required and the instructor must indicate whether
the student is passing or failing. If the student is passing, the course will appear on the student's permanent record with the grade of W. If the student is failing, the course will appear on the permanent record with an F grade. No adjustment of tuition is made for courses which are dropped after the 12th day (8th day for the summer term) of full-term classes.
3. After the 10th week of a fall or spring semester (7th week of a summer term), courses may not be dropped unless there are circumstances clearly beyond the student7 s control. In addition to the instructor's certification (as in 2 above), the student must petition the academic dean for approval to drop the courses. Tuition will be charged even though the drop is allowed.
4. Dropping all courses requires an official University withdrawal form.
Withdrawal from the University
To withdraw from the University, the student must obtain approval of the dean's office, Bursar's Office, and Records Office. The withdrawal date is recorded on the student's permanent record page. If the withdrawal date is prior to the 13th day of the semester (9th day of the summer term), the courses will not appear on the student's permanent record. If the withdrawal date is after the 12th day, the courses will appear with Wgrades. Students may not withdraw after the 10th week of the semester (7th week of the summer term) except under documented circumstances clearly beyond their control.
Students who are receiving veteran's benefits or financial aid also must obtain the required signature of those respective offices.
A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receive grades of F for all course work enrolled for during that term.
To withdraw from the University, a graduate student must apply to the dean of The Graduate School for permission to withdraw in good standing. Students who withdraw without communicating with the dean and without filing the appropriate Withdrawal Form will be marked as having failed their courses for the term.
For specific signatures, requirements, and tuition adjustment the student should refer to the Schedule of Classes published prior to the beginning of each term.
1 For the exact dates, check the Schedule of Classes for the appropriate term.


44 / General Information
Originality of Work
In all academic areas it is imperative that either work be original or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons' ideas or language. Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the University.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
Periodically, but not less than annually, the University of Colorado informs students of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, with which the institution intends to comply fully. The Act was designed to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.
Local policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the Act. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on each of the several campuses of the University of Colorado.
A directory of records, listing all educational records maintained on students by this institution, may be found in the Office of Admissions and Records on each campus.
The following items of student information have been designated by the University of Colorado as public or directory information: student name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study, awards, honors, degree(s) conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical factors (height, weight) of athletes, date and place of birth. This information may be disclosed by the University for any purpose at its discretion.
Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of any category of information under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. To withhold disclosure, written notification must be received in the Office of Admissions and Records on the appropriate campus prior to the end of the drop/add period in the term. Forms requesting the withholding of directory information are available in the Office of Admissions and Records.
Students must request each term to have directory information withheld for that term. The University of Colorado assumes that when a student fails to request to have directory information withheld for that term, the student is indicating approval for disclosure of information for that term and following terms until otherwise requested.
Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Office of Admissions and Records.
University of Colorado at Denver Confidentiality of Academic Records
STUDENTS:
DO have the right to view and inspect their educational records (excluding any financial records of their parents).
DO have the right to have Directory Information withheld from all persons or organizations outside the University.
Directory Information includes:
name, address, telephone number date and place of birth class, major field of study awards, honors, degree(s) conferred past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activites
physical characteristics (height, weight) of athletes
DO NOT have the right to obtain their grades, or other information not considered Directory Information, by telephone.
PARENTS:
DO have the right to obtain the educational records of their child only if they provide a signed statement that their son or daughter is a dependent for income tax purposes. The Records Office, in NC 1003, 556-2389, has forms available to parents for such requests. Parents are, however, encouraged to obtain final grades with a written approval from the student.


Academic Policies / 45
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO PERSONNEL:
DO have the right to use educational records of students in the normal exercise of their duties.
DO NOT have the right to use educational records of students for employment purposes, for social organizations, for personal reasons, or for other non-educational interests, without consent of the student.
PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING FINANCIAL AID TO STUDENTS:
DO have the right to educational records of students only as necessary in determining and enforcing terms of financial aid.
PERSONS IN AN EMERGENCY:
Do have the right to obtain confidential academic records necessary to protect the health or safety of students and others, but such information will only be released by the Dean of Student Services, 556-8427.
These regulations are required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (the Buckley Amendment). For further information, please call the Records Office at (303) 556-2389.
Student records will be released only to the student with current, appropriate identification or upon written authorization of the student whose records are being requested.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed:
Freshman 0-29 hours Sophomore 30-59 hours Junior 60-89 hours Senior 90 + hours
All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado.


46 / General Information
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES
Alumni Association
The CU-Denver Alumni Association supports the development and awareness of the University through a variety of networks and activities. Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon graduation. Friends and non-degree former students are also welcome to participate.
Horizons, a newspaper published quarterly, is mailed to members of the association. Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/or activities on campus which might interest them. The Mack Easton Award for Distinguished Service, The Outstanding Alumnus Award, and the Legislative Recognition Award are bestowed each year at commencement and are sponsored by the Association. A program of alumni access to the campus recreation center, library, and parking lots is also available through the Association.
The governing board is comprised of alumni representing all of the schools and colleges on campus. This group plans events, implements programs, and raises funds with the goal of advancing the University and increasing the visibility of alumni.
Auraria Book Center
Hours: M-Th 8-6, F 8-5, Sat. 10-3 except vacation and interim periods.
The Auraria Book Center features academic, technical, reference, and exam preparation books in support of your higher education. Best sellers, new releases, and gift book selections change frequently and are often accompanied by displays of special value and sale books in many subjects. For additional savings on general reading books, join the Auraria Book Club at the Book Information counter. Special orders and out of print searches are available at no charge.
Students. Please bring your course printouts to locate textbooks! Subject areas are marked on each set of shelves; departmental abbreviations, course, and section numbers are printed on a shelf tag below each required or optional textbook.
When available, used textbooks sell for 75 percent of the new book price. A full refund is given for new and used books returned within the first three weeks of a regular semester's start. Please read the refund policy attached to your receipt!
The Convenience Store is located near the main store in the Student Center lower mall and offers extended hours for those wishing to buy snacks, magazines, sundries, and school supplies. Used texts are bought back from students throughout the year, and refunds and exchanges also are performed here.
Auraria Reprographics offers full-service copying in the Convenience Store, M-Th 7:30-6, F 7:30-5. Special papers, transparencies, reductions and enlargements, and other options may be specified for jobs of all sizes. A self-serve copier is available for small orders.
Two IDs are required for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard and VISA charges.
The Book Center is located in the lower level of the Auraria Student Center at Lawrence and 9th St. For further information, call 556-3230.
Auraria Child Care Center
The Auraria Child Care Center is a non-profit organization which provides a high quality child care and preschool program for the children of students, faculty, and staff of the Auraria Higher Education Center.
The Center operates from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and is fully licensed by the Colorado Department of Social Services to serve 150 children at a time. It is divided into two toddler classrooms, three preschool classrooms, and one kindergarten/after-school classroom. Children must be 18 months to six years of age to attend.
The philosophy of the Center is to foster the development of competence in intellectual and social skills and to provide safe, nurturing environment. The program involves the assessment of individual needs, establishing goals and activities that are appropriate for development. Close parent-teacher communication is a key to the responsive, individually-oriented program provided at the Center.
Parents may register their children on a full-time, part-time or hourly basis to accommodate students' varying class schedules. For additional information, please call 556-3188.


Programs and Facilities / 47
Auraria Student Center
The Student Center, located at 9th and Lawrence, houses a cafeteria, the campus Book Center, a study lounge, game | room, offices for student government and organizations, a copy center, exhibit space, locker rentals, meeting and conference facilities, and a tavern.
Computing Services
Computing Services supports computer use by both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. Most Administrative processing is done in the office of Management Systems in Boulder with data entry, output processing, and user support provided by Computing (Services in Denver. Most academic processing is either done on campus or through one of several networks available through Computing Services.
The Denver Campus maintains a PRIME 9950 under PRIMOS, a VAX 8700 under VMS, and a series of computers (Pyramid 90X, 8- processor Sequent B21000, Intel 16-processor Hypercube) under the UNIX operating system. Access to all machines is through a communications network that allows connection to the campus libraries' op-line card-catalog (CARL-PAC) as well as to any of the other CU campuses. The VMS and
UNIX machines are all connected over the ethemet which also is a node on the growing Colorado SuperNet network. This net provides access to many academic computing networks (ARPANET, NSFNET, JVNCNET, CSNET, etc.) as well as high-speed connections to the Colorado School of Mines, University of Denver, Colorado Springs and Boulder CU campuses, and Colorado State University. CU-Denver also is a BITNET site. A significant amount of computing also is accomplished on the campus' 720 personal computers both in laboratories (10 teaching labs and 3 public labs are available) and in offices.
Computing Services staff provides assistance to academic and administrative users on all computing systems available and on every phase of their use. Advisors and a full-time academic user services staff assist faculty as well as students enrolled in courses using computing with questions regarding programming and the use of computer systems and software available. Administrative users are assisted by a data processing staff as well as user services personnel. Computing systems on the campus are maintained by an operations staff who also assist faculty and staff with hardware planning, acquisitions, questions, and problems.
The goal of Computing Services is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work. For further information and an informative booklet about computing at CU-Denver, please call 556-2583.


48 / General Information
Division of Continuing Education
Through its Division of Continuing Education (CE), the University of Colorado at Denver provides off-campus credit and noncredit educational opportunities for the life-long learner and the non-traditional student. More than 7,000 employees of business, industry, and government, homemakers, senior citizens, and alumni participated in CE classes, workshops, and seminars during the past year.
To provide easy access to as many students as possible, CE uses the city and its environs as its classroom. CU-Denver's excellent faculty is teamed with highly talented part-time instructors from the Denver metropolitan area to ensure quality and excellence in instruction. Credit class offerings provide a linkage between CU-Denver's resident degree programs on-campus and the part-time, off-campus student. Credit courses include weekend classes, teacher recertification classes, and a variety of traditional and nontraditional learning experiences.
CE delivers a wide array of noncredit courses for those interested in career updating, personal enrichment, and intellectual stimulation. Specific programs are developed at the request of business and professional groups. These programs include licensing and career updating courses for engineers, attorneys, accountants, life insurance agents, and architects. Seminars and certificate programs for business and industry are designed to help keep supervisors and managers abreast of new technologies and their management. Courses in the arts and humanities explore such topics as parenting, self-awareness, music and art, photography, languages, and literature.
Through the off-campus programs, and as part of its public service mission, CU-Denver seeks to extend its educational resources to the off-campus student. Individuals, groups, and organizations with special education interests are invited to call the Division of Continuing Education at 556-2735.
University of Colorado Foundation, Inc.
In 1981-82, the University of Colorado Foundation established a Denver office. The CU Foundation was established in 1967 at the direction of the Board of Regents of the University as a privately governed, nonprofit corporation, chartered under the laws of the State of Colorado. It is operated exclusively for charitable, scientific, or educational purposes designed to promote the welfare of CU. The CU Foundation is the approved agency to solicit, receive, and administer gifts from private sources.
International Education/Study Abroad
The Office of International Education on the Boulder campus expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and acts as ad-
viser for Fulbright and other scholarships at CU-Boulder. The office also arranges study abroad programs and offers over 30 different programs around the globe. Students on any CU campus can participate in most of these programs.
Some of the study abroad programs are of the traditional junior year abroad variety, in which students are placed directly in foreign universities for an academic year. Such programs are available at the Universityof Lancaster, England; the University of Bordeaux, France; the University of Costa Rica in San Jose; the American University in Cairo, Egypt; the University of Regensburg, West Germany; the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; the Institute of Higher Education and Technology in Monterrey, Mexico; the University of Seville, Spain; and Tunghai University in Taiwan.


Programs and Facilities / 49
For students unable to spend an academic year abroad, programs for a single semester or summer are available with various emphases, including intensive language learning. Single semester programs are offered in Chambery and Rennes, France; Guadalajara and Monterrey, Mexico; London, England; San Jose, Costa Rica; Seville and Alicante, Spain; and Taipei, Taiwan. Summer programs are located in Kassel, West Germany; Perugia, Italy; and London, England. Special summer programs, e.g., art history in Italy, are organized with specific departments upon request.
Students are enrolled at the University of Colorado while participating in these study abroad programs. The applicability of credit in particular departments and colleges of CU-Denver is up to the departments and colleges. A B average with the equivalent of two years of college level work in the appropriate language is required for most of the academic year programs. Financial aid from CU-Denver can be applied to program costs in most cases.
More information about study abroad programs is available in the Office of International Education, Boulder campus, 492-7741.
Auraria Student Assistance Center
The Auraria Student Assistance Center (ASAC) is composed of five offices offering specialized assistance to all present and prospective Auraria students.
1. Office of Information and Referral Services. This is a central information source that provides objective assistance to prospective students desiring to enroll at CU-Denver or one of the other academic institutions on the Auraria campus.
2. Office of Career Planning Placement Services. Assistance is offered to students and alumni in planning their careers and seeking employment.
3. Office of Disabled Student Services. This officer provides academic support of services to ensure programmatic access for students with disabilities.
4. Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. Campus branch office of the State of Colorado Department of Social Services. This office assists disabled students in becoming fully employable and self-supporting.
5. Office of International Student Services. The office assists international students on campus from 80 countries by providing support services and aiding in bridging the cultural gaps which many of them experience when entering the community to attend college.
6. Office of Off-Campus Housing Referral Services. Provides information on apartment and dormitory living arrangements.


"Student Services strives to create a University environment which enables students, faculty, and staff to be colleagues in the lifelong process of learning and which provides students with a satisfying total educational experience."
—Mary Lou Fenili Dean, Student Services
A support group for re-entry women is facilitated by a counselor from CU-Denver's Center for Women's Resources.


Student Services
Dean: Mary Lou Fenili
Assistant Dean: George H. Wayne
Staff Assistant: Bellverie E. Ross
Offices: North Classroom Bldg., Room 2012
Telephone: 556-8427
Directors:
Paul Encinias, University Division
Diane Fries, Testing Center
Cecil Glenn, Educational Opportunity Program
Kathy Jackson, Academic Center for Enrichment
Pam Kesson-Craig, Center for Women's Resources
Bruce Williams, Campus Life
STUDENT LIFE
Students at urban universities reflect the diversities of their environments: they are older than those considered to be traditional college students; have employment and family responsibilities in addition to their academic programs; include substantial numbers of minorities, women, and single parents; and are more often than not enrolled part-time.
To meet the needs of this diverse student population, CU-Denver provides student life programs and activities designed to complement students' academic programs and to enhance their total educational experience. Students are provided opportunities to develop, experience, and participate in student government, social, cultural, intellectual, and recreational programs. Student life programs create an environment in which students are:
• Assisted in developing leadership through opportunities to practice leadership, decisionmaking, management and marketing, interpersonal and group communication, and relationship skills.
• Encouraged and aided in developing social, cultural, intellectual, recreation and governance programs that expand involvement with the campus community and society and lead to mature appreciation of these pursuits.
• Encouraged to explore self-directed activities that provide opportunities for self-realization and growth in individual and group settings.
• Exposed to various cultures and experiences, ideas and issues, art and musical forms, and styles of life.
• Informed about institutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities.
• Aided in the awareness and utilization of campus facilities and other resources.
• Assisted in developing community spirit through creative interaction among staff, faculty, students, and members of the local community. Students are encouraged to involve their families in campus events and activities.
Programs and services provided by the Associated Students of CU-Denver, the division of StudentServices of CU-Denver, and the Auraria Student Assistance Center contribute to the fulfillment of this philosophy.
Clubs and Organizations
American Planning Association American Society of Mechanical Engineers American Society of Civil Engineers Associated Black Students Associated Engineering Students Beta Gamma Sigma Biology Club
Doctoral Students Association of the Graduate School of Public Affairs Economics Club Eta Kappa Nu Equiponderants Geology Club Golden Key Honor Society Hispanic Student Organization Indigenous Peoples Support Group Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers International Law Club Iranian Cultural Club Korean Christian Fellowship Literary Society MBA Association Musicians Association Native American Student Organization Phi Alpha Theta Phi Chi Theta Pi Sigma Alpha Philosophy Club Psi Chi
Rainshadow Delegation Sigma Alpha Iota
Student Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects Society of Women Engineers Tau Beta Phi
Vietnamese Student Organization


52 / Student Services
DEAN OF STUDENT SERVICES
The dean's office provides vision, leadership, influence, and advocacy on behalf of students and supervises the provision of programs and services for students by Student Services offices. The Dean serves as liaison with the Associated Students of CU-Denver and its clubs and organizations; coordinates orientation and commencement, the Senior Citizens Program, and the Ahlin Scholarship Fund for disabled students; administers the Student Code of Conduct and student grievance procedure; and assures CU-Denver representation in Auraria-shared student services and activities. For the convenience of CU-Denver students, all Student Services offices, including the dean's office are open until 7 p.m. two evenings a week. The dean's office is in Room 2012 of the North Classroom Building, 556-8427.
University Division
University Division provides advising, assistance, and referral services for non-degree undergraduate students and for any other students undecided or uncertain about a major course of study. University Division also provides prospective and non-degree students with information about admission requirements and procedures, academic programs, courses, registration procedures, and campus resources available to assist students.
A non-degree student is a student enrolled in courses but either not seeking a degree or not yet admitted to or enrolled in an undergraduate degree program in the Colleges of Business, Engineering, or Liberal Arts and Sciences.
University Division assigns each non-degree student a student advisor who serves as advisor, mentor, and advocate. Student advisors are upperclass and graduate students.
University Division also offers a variety of workshops, including such topics as academic and personal coping skills, educational and career options, educational goal setting, and long-term academic planning.
University Division is located in North Classroom Building, Room 2014, 556-2322.
Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD)
The Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCU-Denver) serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal University structure. ASCU-Denver assists students with information concerning student clubs and organizations, issues concerning student status and other information of interest to students in general. ASCU-Denver also provides students with assistance with grievances
and with the opportunity to become more intimately involved with the University community through active participation in student government itself or through service on University, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees. More information concerning services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Student Center, Room 340, 556-2510.
Student Legal Services
Student legal services are available to assist students with off-campus legal problems through the provision of legal advice, litigation preparation, document interpretation, and assistance in negotiation. The service will not represent students in court. This student fee funded program is provided free of charge to CU- Denver students; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred such as copying, typing, etc. Contact the office for further details at 556-3333, Student Center, Room 255A.
The Advocate
The purpose of the student newspaper is to advocate and provide a marketplace of ideas from which students may make an impartial judgment of their own. The newspaper strives to include a combination of good investigative reporting, feature articles, and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is to be a tool to assist in the encouragement of and development for writers, journalists, artists, and other student members of its general management and production staff. The office is in the Student Center, Room 151, 556-8321.
Student Activities
The Office of Student Activities is the coordinating, resource, and general information center for student government, student clubs and organizations, student programs, Greek social organizations, and the academic honor societies. All student fee expenditures are monitored by this office to assure compliance with CU-Denver, ASCU-Denver, and state regulations and procedures. The Director of Campus Life represents the Dean of Student Services on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional, ASCU-Denver, and AHEC committees and maintains effective lines of communication with MSC, CCD, and AHEC. The Office of Student Activities is located in the Student Center, Room 153, 556-3399.


Student Services / 53
Students gain valuable journalism experience working on the Advocate, CU-Denver's student newspaper.


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Student Rights and Responsibilities
When a student enrolls in the University, he or she agrees to participate meaningfully in the life of the University and to share in the obligation to preserve and promote his or her rights as a citizen and has a basic obligation not to commit or tolerate any infringement on the rights of others.
Students should thoroughly familiarize themselves with the academic and nonacademic student conduct standards of the University. Academic standards questions should be directed to the dean of the school or college in which the student is enrolled. Nonacademic conduct questions should be directed to the assistant dean of Student Services. Copies of the standards and information regarding all student grievance procedures may be obtained in the Office of the Dean of Student Services.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS
Academic Center for Enrichment
The Academic Center for Enrichment is a learning assistance center designed to promote student success in the academic setting. Services are available to all students. The Center's services include: tutoring, workshops, credit courses, consulting, and a minority resources library.
Tutoring. Free tutoring is available in many subject areas (some limitations apply). Individual or group sessions are held on weekdays/evenings. Both scheduled and open "drop-in" style tutoring are available at set times throughout the semester.
Workshops. Study skills and computer workshops are provided on such topics as test-taking, memory and study techniques, notetaking, introduction to the personal computer, and word processing. Courses. Courses are offered in a small group format in the areas of college survival skills (study skills and computer word processing), English as a second language, developmental composition and reading, and developmental math and problem solving. Consulting. Academic, financial aid, and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy also is available to students eligible for the federally-funded Student Support Services Program.
Library. The Center maintains a small periodical and book collection authored by, and/or about, minorities; these resources are available for student research and leisure.
The Academic Center for Enrichment is located in the North Classroom Building, Room 2004, telephone 556-2802.
STUDY SKILLS COURSES
CMMU. 1400-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languages. This course is designed for ESL students who need to improve their reading and vocabulary skills. For example, students will learn to skim and scan, summarize, increase their reading speed, and make inferences. Coreq., CMMU. 1410, STSK. 0806 and 0807.
CMMU. 1410-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. This is the first course in the ESL composition sequence. Writing begins with sentence-level work and continues with the development of paragraphs based on Western rhetorical patterns. Grammar appropriate to students' needs will be incorporated into this class. Coreq., CMMU. 1400, STSK. 0806 and 0807.
CMMU. 1420-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. Second term course. Continued work on grammar, syntax, and the mechanics of writing. Special attention is given to those aspects of the English language which pose problems for the non-native speaker, e.g., article usage, verb forms, and idioms.
CMMU. 1430-3. Advanced ESL Writing Skills. Designed as a transition course for ESL students in preparation for ENGL. 1010 or 1020. Emphasis is placed on the clarification of grammar and/or punctuation problems that individual students may have and on development of longer compositions.
STSK. 0700-1. Developmental Composition. This course is offered to develop and improve academic writing skills. Areas in which the student feels a need for growth are explored, and a program for improvement is then determined for each individual. Essay form and the process, as well as the mechanics, of writing will be considered as a general guide for composition growth. Open to all students.
STSK. 0702-1. Developmental Reading. This course is offered as a means of enhancing general reading habits and improving study reading techniques. Comprehension and retention, vocabulary development, skimming, scanning, critical reading, and graphic reading are among the topics that will be explored.
STSK. 0703-1. College Preparatory Math I. This course is designed to provide students with a solid foundation in fundamental mathematics skills. Students will study numbers and their properties, integers, rational numbers, fractions, and decimals. Simple linear equations and basic geometry also will be presented.
STSK. 0704-3. College Preparatory Math II. This course prepares students for MATH. 1010. Students will study and practice linear equations, inequalities and sets, systems of equations, and polynomials/functions.
STSK. 0705-1. Problem Solving. This course is designed to improve investigative and problem solving skills. Scientific theory, empirical methodology, and research methods will be utilized. Individual topics investigation will be assigned. Open to all students.
STSK. 0707-1. College Survival Skills. This course is designed to promote success in the academic setting. Topics covered will include university resources, conquering the university system, listening and notetaking, study and memory techniques, test- taking skills, time management, library research strategies, word processing, and simple computer graphics.
STSK. 0708-1. Introduction to Word Processing. This course will thoroughly familiarize the student with an easy-to-use word processing program that will assist in the process of writing, text revision and rearrangement, and the produc-


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tion of "letter perfect" documents. (The word processing program used will be one that is available in the open, student-use, computer lab areas.)
STSK. 0800-1. Developmental Composition for ESL. This class meets for two hours each week. The course is taught in a small group format (limit 10) with attention given to sentence-level development and beginning paragraph development based on Western thought patterns. Students also work on the mechanics of writing.
STSK. 0801-1. Communication Skills. This course meets for two hours each week to improve the oral communication skills of students whose first language is not English. Skills to be emphasized include use of idiomatic English, cross-cultural awareness, cross-cultural problems in communication, and pronunciation.
STSK. 0802-1. Improving Academic Reading Skills for ESL.
This class is designed to improve students' reading of academic texts. Students will work on skills such as comprehension, retention, skimming, scanning, and critical reading. STSK. 0806-1. Study Skills for ESL. The primary focus of this class is to teach ESL students techniques for listening to and taking notes from college lectures. The class also will deal with the spoken English necessary to function in the classroom situations. Coreq., CMMU. 1400/1410 and STSK. 0807. STSK. 0807-1. College Survival Skills for ESL. This course will cover topics such as college resources, time management, study and memory techniques, test anxiety, and testtaking skills. The goal of this course is to help students acquire skills which will enable them to "survive" in an academic setting. Coreq., CMMU. 1400/1410 and STSK. 0806.
Ahlin Fund Scholarship
The Ahlin Fund provides scholarships for disabled students who are seeking undergraduate and graduate degrees and who will be attending CU-Denver either full or part time. These scholarships contribute to the costs of tuition, fees, books, transportation, and child care. The cost of protheses and other adaptive equipment needed to enable students to attend CU-Denver also may be covered. Work-study positions for disabled students attending CU-Denver are available through the Ahlin Fund.
Applications are available in the Office of the Dean of Student Services. Application deadlines are July 1, November 1, and April 1. For further information, call 556-8427.
Educational Opportunity Programs
Educational Opportunity Programs (EOP) are designed specifically to recruit and retain minority students for graduation through community outreach, student advocacy, mentoring programs, and specialized academic, career, and personal advising.
The individualized programs are American Indian EOP, Asian American EOP, Black EOP, Hispanic EOP, and the Minority Early University Enrollment Program. These programs work closely with the Colorado Educational Service Development Association (CESDA), the Colorado Minority Engineering Association (CMEA), the Denver Public Schools, and the business community, as well as the many minority communities in the Denver metropolitan area.
EOP programs and activities include leadership training, new student orientation, Pan-African Nurturing and Development Association (P.A.N.D.A.) Games, and such cultural festivals as Cinco de Mayo, Asian activities, and Native American pow wows.
The EOP office is in North Classroom Bldg., Room 1028, 556-2700.
Pre-Collegiate Development Program
The Pre-Collegiate Development is an academic enrichment and support program designed to motivate minority students to complete a college preparatory curriculum, graduate from high school, and pursue a college education.
The program enables students in grades 9 through 12 to engage in a wide range of activities throughout the academic year and during a full-time, five-week summer program. The academic year component offers monthly study skills and career orientation workshops, advising, tutoring, and a variety of cultural enrichment experiences. The five-week summer session for students in the 10th and 11th grades is held on the CU-Denver campus. The summer session consists of accelerated classes, for which students earn elective high school credit, career orientation, and cultural, social, and recreational activities.
Participation in the CU-Denver Pre-Collegiate Development Program is open to students enrolled in Abraham Lincoln, Aurora Hinckley, Denver East, Denver North, Denver South, Denver West, George Washington, John F. Kennedy, Manual, Montbello, and Thomas Jefferson high schools.
The Pre-Collegiate Development Program office is in the North Classroom Bldg., Room 2008, 556-2862.


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Orientation
ORIENTATION, ADVISING, REGISTRATION, AND SERVICES (OARS), an orientation program for new freshman and transfer students and students returning to CU-Denver after an absence, is held prior to the first day of classes at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters and the summer term. This programis conducted by Student Services in conjunction with the schools and colleges within the University and is divided into separate sessions for undergraduate students, for graduate students, and for parents and spouses of students. OARS introduces and describes academic programs, activities, and services available at CU-Denver, and provides opportunities for students to receive academic advising, to resolve questions and concerns regarding registration, financial aid, and payment of fees. For more information, call 556-8427.
Student Health Insurance Program
A student medical hospital-surgical plan is available for all students; dependent coverage also is available at an additional charge. For further information refer to the portion on Tuition and Fees in the General Information section of this catalog, or call 556-8427.
Testing Center
This multi-faceted assistance center provides various testing for all levels of postsecondary education, professional certification, accreditation, and academic and career planning. The center provides registration information concerning the following:
ACT American College Test
CAT California Achievement Test
CEII Colorado Educational Interest Indicator
GRE Graduate Record Examination
GMAT Graduate Management Admissions Test
GSFLT Graduate School Foreign Language Test
LSAT Law School Admission Test
MAT Miller Analogy Test
MBTI Myers-Briggs Type Indicator
MCAT Medical College Admission Test
TOEFL Test of English as a Foreign Language CLEP College Level Examination Program
SCII Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory
For further information contact 556-2861, North Classroom Building, Room 2006.
Office of Veterans Affairs
The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veteran and dependent students attending CU-Denver utilizing Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists students with filling out VA paperwork and in solving problems associated with the receipt of VA-related benefits.
The OVA maintains proper certification for each eligible student to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements of attendance, course load and content, and other regulations critical to the receipt of educational benefits payments.
In addition, the OVA provides VA Vocational Rehabilitation referrals, VA tutorial assistance, the Colorado Tuition Assistance Program, and VA work/study positions for qualified veterans. For further information contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 556-2630, North Classroom Building, Room 4015.
Center for Women's Resources
The Center provides to CU-Denver students various services and programs aimed at enhancing students' academic experience.
A Re-Entry Program for Women who are returning to school after an interruption is offered each fall and spring semester. This program aims to assist re-entry women as they make the transition to college life, and deals with such issues as stress management, family concerns, self-esteem, and assertiveness.
The Center also provides: professional counseling to all CU-Denver students at no cost, support groups, educational programming, an extensive resource and referral bank for community services such as legal assistance, medical care, child care and professional organizations. The Center maintains a small lending library on various topics relevant to women, and publishes a quarterly newsletter containing campus and community events.
The Center sponsors several scholarships yearly, including the Patricia Schroeder Scholarship for Women, the Women's Center Scholarship, and the Joan Smith Memorial Scholarship.
The Center for Women's Resources at CU-Denver strives to provide support, advocacy, and professional service to the entire CU- Denver community. Stop by and see us in the North Classroom Building, Room 2013, or call 556-2815.
STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT
A student is accountable to both civil and University authorities for acts which constitute violations of laws as well as violations of University rules and regulations. Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to challenge or postponement on the ground that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced, or are pending in civil or criminal court. In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a student violates standards as defined within this document and withdraws from the University before administrative action is final.
All persons on University property are required, for reasonable cause, to identify themselves when requested by University or Auraria Public Safety offi-


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cials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers, the University reserves the right to exclude those posting a danger to University personnel or property and those who interfere with its function as an educational institution.
All persons pn CU-Denver/Auraria property who are not students br employees of the University are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applicable to University students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations.
The behaviors outlined here will not be tolerated because they threaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the University and personal rights and freedom of its members.
1. Intentional obstruction, disruption, or interference with teaching, research, disciplinary proceedings, or other University activities, including its public service and administrative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denver/Auraria premises.
2. Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, University officials, faculty, employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
Students listen attentively to orientation for the Minority Early Enrollment Program at CU-Denver. They are among 50 minority high school students selected each semester for the program which pays for their tuition, fees, and books.
3. Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CU-Denver/Auraria Higher Education Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the University, or any conduct that threatens or endangers the health, safety, or welfare of any such person.
4. Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms, which includes, but is not limited to, striking, laying hands on, treating with violence, or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure; or other treatment of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature. (This includes, but is not limited to, demeaning behavior of an ethnic, sexist, or racist nature; unwanted sexual advances or intimidations.)
5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilities, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU-Denver/Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimental to the University.
6. Forgery, fraud (to include computer fraud), falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification with intent to gain any unentitled advantage.
7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver/Auraria property and the private property of students, university officials, faculty, employees, and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denver/Auraria buildings or facilities.
8. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus. This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University, or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee. (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, firearms, explosives, BB guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles, bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switchblades. A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm, explosive, or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly included within the meaning of the term firearms, explosive, or dangerous weapon.)
9. Sale, distribution, use, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
10. Physical restriction, coercion, or harassment of any person; significant theft; sale/manufacture of illegal drugs (includes possession of a sufficient quantity with intent to sell); damage, theft, or unauthorized possession of University property; or forgery, falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification to gain any unentitled advantage.
Nothing in this section shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the redress of grievances. For additional information, students shall refer to the University of Colorado Students' Rights and Responsibilities Regarding Standards of Conduct, Discipline and Review.


The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education is located on the beautifully landscaped historic Ninth Street Park on the Auraria Campus.
'Tor many students the question that lingers throughout college is 'Where is this all leading?' Cooperative education not only prepares students for a career after graduation but also provides students with the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to a work situation and to bring that experience back to the classroom as a learning tool."
—Director Janet Michalski Center for Internships and Cooperative Education


Center for Internships and Cooperative Education
Director: Janet Michalski
Assistant Director and Coordinator, Engineering: Diane Berkley
Coordinator, Liberal Arts and Sciences: Cherrie Grove Coordinator, Business and Administration: Wayne Sundell Coordinator, Liberal Arts and Sciences: Anthony Trelikes Administrative Assistant: Becky Carter IBM Faculty oh Loan: James T. Hrbek Office: 1047 Ninth Street Historic Park Telephone: 556-2892
Advisory Board:
Marla Bowers, Manager, College Relations, U S WEST, Inc.
Alan Brockway, Professor of Biology Donald S. Gage, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
John S. Haller, Jr., Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
Victoria J. Herujy, Office Administrator, Walters & Theis Law Firm; CU-Denver graduate (CLAS, '83) and former CU-Denver Co-op student
James T. Hrbek, Manager, IBM Central Employment Office
John A. Lanning, Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Robyn McKenry, Assistant to the Executive Director, E-470 Highway Authority; CU-Denver graduate (GSPA, '86) and former CU-Denver Co-op student James H. Milleidlle, Senior Instructor, College of Business and Administration
Roy Pritts, Acting Resident Dean, College of Music Oren G. Strom!, Acting Dean, College of Engineering and Applied Science
CENTER FOR INTERNSHIPS AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education, established at CU-Denver in 1973, provides students with an opportunity to supplement their academic classroom learning with on-the-job work experiences or internships related to their academic studies. Students are placed either as paid co-op trainees or as interns for academic credit with corporations, businesses, or government agencies in the Denver metropolitan area as well as out of state.
Faculty coordinators from each of the University's colleges and schools act as liaisons between the Center and the academic departments. The Center currently places over 400 students each year with some 250 participating employers. Over 30 percent of all co-op students are graduate students.
Cooperative Education
Cooperative education is an educational method which combines classroom study with paid, career related, off-campus work. The purpose is to give students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to real world situations, and to bring that experience back to the classroom as a learning tool.
Cooperative education offers students paid longterm positions (two or more semesters) during which students alternate semesters of full-time work with semesters of full-time school, or work part time year round. Co-op experiences may be eligible for academic credit, and many jobs lead to permanent career positions upon graduation.
Internships
Internships offer students short-term positions (one semester) and they may or may not be paid. Internships are usually done for academic credit and are popular with students who like to explore a variety of careers. Many students complete two, three, or even four internships before graduation. Internships, like co-op jobs, are related to the student's academic studies and/or career goals.
Eligibility for Placement
The Center is open to all students enrolled at least half time in any CU-Denver college or school who have completed their freshman year, have maintained a grade-point average of 2.5, and have completed at least 12 hours in residence (6 hours for graduate students). Some employers have additional requirements, i.e., U.S. citizenship, willingness to travel, and specific course work.
Academic Credit for Work Experience
Undergraduate students placed by the Center in paid or non-paid positions, as well as students who have obtained their own jobs, can apply to earn academic credit through courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and College of Music. Graduate students in some colleges and schools can earn internship, experiential learning, field study, or practicum credit through courses established for this purpose.


60 / Center for Internships and Cooperative Education
Why Students Participate in Cooperative Education
• Students recognize the value of combining theory with practice and find greater relevance in their studies.
• Co-op education allows students to test classroom teaching in the laboratory of the real world.
• The program teaches students valuable job-search skills such as resume writing and interviewing techniques.
• Co-op provides a means of financial assistance that is available to all students, regardless of family income levels or other financial aid arrangements, and does not leave students burdened with educational debts.
• The inclusion of a work component and the contribution from co-op earnings are major factors in encouraging first-generation college students to pursue a college degree.
• Because work experiences involve students with coworkers who come from a variety of backgrounds, students develop a deeper understanding of other people and greater skills in human relations.
Philine Darwin, chemistry major, is a lab assistant at the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes.
"Cooperative education gave me the opportunity to discover what I do and don't want to do as a career and has made me a much more marketable graduate. Through co-op, I have gained experience not only with the types of things going on in industry but also in working with different kinds of people. That's something you can't get from college classes alone." Brent Lambert, electrical engineering co-op student.
Why Employers Participate in Co-op Programs
• Co-op students are an excellent source of temporary manpower for special projects and peak loads or busy seasons.
• Co-op allows the employer to assess an individual's potential for employment after graduation, thus saving entry-level recruiting costs.
• Co-op students can increase productivity of fulltime professional staff.
• Co-op students are highly motivated, productive, and dependable.
• CU-Denver students bring knowledge about the latest academic research to their employers.
• As verified by many studies, co-op students subsequently become full-time employees with far lower turnover rates and better promotion potential than the average entry level professional.


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Facts About Cooperative Education
• Cooperative education programs have been established in over 80 percent of the Fortune 500 corporations. All of the top 10 Fortune 500 companies are involved in cooperative education.
• The last three presidents of General Motors at one time were cooperative education students.
• Cooperative education has been conducted successfully in the U.S. since 1906.
• Over 1,000 colleges and universities currently have cooperative education programs.
• An estimated 200,000 college students are enrolled in cooperative education and gross annual earnings are calculated to be in excess of $200,000,000.
Co-op Employers
Employers who recruit CU-Denver students for cooperative education positions include:
Martin Marietta IBM Corporation Hughes Aircraft Company
NASA Johnson Space Center National Parfj Service Rockwell International Texas Instruments U S WEST Communications Walt Disney World, Inc.
Office of the Governor, State of Colorado Peat Marwick Main & Co.
Kyle Belding Gallery
National Bureau of Standards
KCNC-TV
Los Angeles Times
U.S. General Accounting Office
Denver General Hospital
Environmental Protection Agency
Denver Center for the Performing Arts
Walters & Theis Law Firm
Bloomsbury Review
Colorado Housing & Finance Authority
Hospice of Metro Denver
H.T. Geophysical
Denver Public Defender's Office
Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry
Colorado Association of Public Employees
Cathy Chin, planning intern, with her supervisor at RTD. She is a graduate student in urban and regional planning.


"The Library is both physically and intellectually the heart of the campus. It is a good place to think, to plan, and to learn."
—Patricia Serin Breivik, Director Auraria Library


Library Services
Auraria Library
Director: Patricia Senn Breivik Associate Director: Jean F. Hemphill Associate Director for External Affairs: Margie Shurgot Assistant Director for Collection and Automation Services: Marilyn J. Mitchell
Assistant Director for Media and Telecommunications Services: Muriel E. Woods
Offices: Auraria Library, 11th and Lawrence Sts. Telephone: —Administration: 556-2805 Telephone: —Information: 556-2741
Faculty: Professor: Patricia Senn Breivik Associate Professor: Jean F. Hemphill Assistant Professors: Dene L. Clark, Patricia A. Eskoz, Brian D. Holtz, Elnora Mercado, Terry Ann Mood, Martin A. Tessmer, Robert L. Wick, Muriel E. Woods Instructors: Anneli Ahtola, Lori Arp, Julie A. Brewer, Diana L. Brice, Anthony J. Dedrick, Nikki Dilgarde, Joan B. Fiscella, Eileen Guleff, Kathleen Kenny, Emilei Kim, Marit S. Mac Arthur, Marilyn J. Mitchell, Kay Nichols, Elizabeth Porter, Jay Schafer, Louise T. Stwalley, Linda Tietjen, Rutherford W. Witthus, Eveline L. Yang
Board of Directors, Friends of Auraria Library
Tom Clark, Forward Metro Denver Group, Denver Chamber of Commerce
Lucy Creighton, First Interstate Bank of Denver Claudia Allen Dillman, Gannett Outdoors Nancy Ellins
Mark E. Jones, Merrill Lynch Richard H. Miller, Price Waterhouse Darwin Niekerk, Adolph Coors Co.
Christopher G. Nims, Gensler & Associates Joan Ringel, Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry
Stuart C. Rogers, S.C. Rogers, Inc.
Clair E. Villano, Consumer Fraud Division, District Attorney's Office
Terry M. Wickre, Wicker-Works Video Productions, Inc.
Joan Wohlgenant
Lester Woodward, Davis, Graham & Stubbs
Access to information is essential to academic success. The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus, provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The Library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver.
The Collection
The Auraria Library has a collection of over 600,000 volumes. In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection, the Library also has over 2,000 journal and newspaper subscriptions and a film/videotape collection. The Library is a select depository for U.S. government publications and a full depository for Colorado state documents. The Auraria Library's collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally though interlibrary loan services.
InfoColorado
InfoColorado is a database project developed and managed by the Library to collect and provide access to local economic development information so vital to the business and economic growth of the state. In April 1988, Governor Roy Romer designated the Auraria Library as the central clearinghouse for state economic development information, answering Colorado's need for ready access to accurate, coordinated, and systematically-developed information in such areas as labor and market profiles, economic trends and forecasting, statistical and demographic profiles, industry-specific business activity, and information to assist in the creation, expansion, and relocation of business in Colorado. The database currently contains abstracts of business and economics articles from major newspapers, journals, studies, and reports from across the state as well as references to agencies and organizations which create, analyze, and provide access to primary economic development data. Because InfoColorado is available through the online system of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries (CARL), it is accessible to library users statewide and through telephone dial-up from home or business computers anywhere in the coun-try.
The Online Public Access Catalog
Access to the Auraria Library's collection is through the online Public Access Catalog (PAC), a user-friendly system that also allows for searching of the collections of many other libraries throughout the state. The online Public Access Catalog, which was developed as a cooperative project by the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries, has received national recognition for being on the cutting edge of information technology. The online PAC system allows faster and more


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comprehensive searches than were possible with the traditional card catalog. In addition to using PAC at the Library, patrons may obtain dial-up access through a home or office computer with a modem; PAC also appears as a menu item on the CU-Denver mainframe computer.
Reference Services
The Auraria Library's reference department stands ready to assist students and faculty in using the Library's resources. The reference department is staffed during all times the Library is open. In addition, brief reference questions, such as whether or not the Library owns a particular item, can be answered over the phone.
Media Services
The Media and Telecommunications Division of the Library offers a full range of media services. The media distribution department manages the Library's media collection, which consists of videotapes, audiotapes, records, 16mm films, and kits. These materials are listed in the online Public Access Catalog. This department also houses media viewing and listening facilities. The Library operates an 18-channel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus; at a faculty member's request a film or videotape can be transmitted directly into the classroom over this system. This system also can transmit live programs from
St. Cajetan's, the Student Center, and the Library's television studio to other locations on campus. A self-service graphics lab is also available for student use in the Media and Telecommunications Division and a professional graphic designer is available to assist users.
Computer Assisted Research
Online database searching, for which there is a fee, can save many hours of researching printed abstracts and indexes. In some cases, it provides the only access to certain materials. The Library has access to well over 200 databases. In addition to bibliographic information, many of the business databases also contain directory and financial information. Questions about the Computer Assisted Research service should be directed to the Library's reference department.
Information Retrieval Service
The information retrieval service was instituted as a special aid for busy researchers. For a reasonable fee, Library staff can assist patrons in locating and checking out the library materials they need. Working from the patron's bibliography, staff can: locate and check out books owned by the Library; photocopy articles from journals owned by the Library; submit interlibrary loan requests for materials which the Library does not own; and deliver the materials to the patron's home or office. Inquiries about this time-saving service should be directed to the reference department.


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Library Instruction
The Library is committed to educating people to meet the demands of the Information Society. The Library offers a wide range of instructional programming, including a self-paced audiocassette walking tour of the Library, as well as class sessions to teach information access skills and strategies.
Course content ranges from teaching the skills needed to use a printed index to advanced research methodology for public affairs and other graduate students. All instructional programming is developed in conjunction with discipline faculty. For more information about the Library's instructional offerings contact the office of the Coordinator of Instructional Services at the Library.
Architecture and Planning Library
The Library's main collection is supplemented by the material housed at the nearby Architecture and Planning Branch Library. With a collection of over 13,000 books, 120 periodical subscriptions, and 14,000 slides, this branch library offers specialized information to students of architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and planning. This branch library is open to any student who needs access to these materials.
Services for Persons with Disabilities
The Library is committed to making its resources and services available to all students. Through the media distribution department, a wide variety of adaptive equipment is available to assist persons with disabilities including a Kurzell Reading Machine, a Voyager VTEK magnifier, a Braille dictionary, the World Book Encyclopedia in Braille and on cassette, the Perkins Brailler, and several large print dictionaries. Library services to assist persons with disabilities include orientation to the physical layout of the Library, retrieval of materials, and assistance with use of the Public Access Catalog, periodicals indexes, and special adaptive equipment.
Additional Facilities
Coin-operated typewriters, a copy center, change machines, and study rooms are all available at the Library.
Internships
The Library offers internships, practicums, and independent studies to students interested in telecommunications or information management.


"CU-Denver is emerging as a remarkably strong University with an unusual array of superior graduate programs. Graduate education at CU-Denver not only imparts knowledge which is frequently multi-disciplinary and applied, but also helps students to master the processes of inquiry that generate new knowledge and that yield solutions to pressing societal problems."
—Acting Dean Thomas A. Clark The Graduate School


The Graduate School
Acting Dean: Thomas A. Clark School Office: 1250 14th St., Suite 700 Telephone: 556-2663
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The 1983 Brademas report on Graduate Education in America concluded that "Graduate education and research are the bedrock of every important area of our national life." The report highlighted the fact that a strong national security program, a healthy growing economy, and the prospects for improvement in the quality of life are all dependent upon high quality and vigorous graduate programs in our universities.
High quality graduate programs are synonymous with the University of Colorado. Professors are actively involved in research or creative activity in their disciplines and, thus, are teacher/scholars who continue to study and absorb new data, ideas, and techniques and bring this cutting edge knowledge to the classroom. Graduate students at CU-Denver not only gain from interactions with the graduate faculty but also gain from other students in the classroom. Because most of CU-Denver's graduate students are older and employed, they bring practical experience gained in the Denver community to the classroom and are ready to relate the realities of practice to the models presented in the classroom.
The Graduate School is a University-wide body that authorizes programs within its constituent colleges and schools. At CU-Denver, Education, Engineering, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Music are colleges or schools whose graduate programs are offered through The Graduate School. In concept, there is a single Graduate School regardless of campus. In practice, most master's-level programs are specific to the campus where the student is admitted, insofar as particular options and advisors are concerned.
Doctoral level programs in a discipline are viewed as the responsibility of the entire University community of that discipline. Doctoral level programs on the CU-Denver campus are either coordinated through the office of the system graduate dean or through the corresponding Denver or Boulder department. The Ph.D. degrees in applied mathematics, educational administration, and instructional technology are system degrees in which application is made to The Graduate School at CU-Denver. In a number of other disciplines with integrated degrees, most or all course work for the Ph.D. can be completed at Denver and the research advisor may be a member of the CU-Denver
faculty, but the degree program is administered by the Boulder department. In other disciplines, a significant portion of the course work required for the Ph.D. degree may be taken at CU-Denver. Persons interested in pursuing doctoral level work should consult with the appropriate discipline graduate advisor.
Anyone wishing further information not given in this catalog should write to the dean of The Graduate School, University of Colorado at Denver, 1200 Larimer St., Denver, CO 80204.
Degrees Offered
The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through The Graduate School at CU-Denver. In some cases, a specific required course may only be offered through the University of Colorado at Boulder in a given year.
The Master of Arts (M.A.) in:
Anthropology Geography
Biology History
Communication and Mathematics
theatre Political Science
Economics Psychology
English Sociology
The Master of Arts (M.A. Counseling and personnel services
Early childhood education Educational administration Educational psychology Educational technology Elementary education Foundations, education Instructional technology
Education) in:
(emphasis in corporate instructional development and training, instructional computing specialist, instructional technologist, library media specialist) Reading
Secondary education Special education
The Master of Science (M.S.) in:
Applied mathematics Electrical engineering
Chemistry Environmental science
Civil engineering Mechanical engineering
Computer science1 Technical communication
The Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.)
The Master of Engineering (M.E.)1 The Master of Humanities (M.H.)
The Master of Social Science (M.S.S.)
The Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)
Significant course work can be taken at the Denver campus in the following master's degree programs: Fine arts Journalism
Geology Philosophy
‘Awarded through CU-Boulder.


68 / The Graduate School
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in:
Applied mathematics Instructional technology
Educational administration Public administration
Significant course work is available at the Denver campus in the programs listed below. Students can be resident on the Denver campus studying in these areas in order to take advantage of the multi-campus activities of The Graduate School. It is usually advised that a student complete some course work at another campus of the University.
Biology Chemistry Civil engineering Communication Computer science
Electrical engineering
English
Geography
Mechanical engineering Psychology
The Graduate School at CU-Denver
An average of 4,508 students are enrolled in graduate programs at CU-Denver each fall and spring semester, which includes 1,326 non-degree students taking graduate courses. Of these, approximately 77 percent are part-time students.
GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS
Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructor-ship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. Payment for these teaching appointments for 1988-89 is: instructor (20 hours per week), $8,930; teaching assistant (20 hours per week), salary range $5,381 - $7,080 for the academic year.
A half-time appointment for an instructor is considered to be equal to 6 class contact hours; a half-time teaching assistant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Compensation is based on the number of hours per week. Nonresident students employed as assistants may or may not be eligible for the nonresident tuition differential stipend for their first-year appointment as an assistant only. Exceptions extending beyond the first year must be approved in advance by the respective dean. Teaching assistants and instructors must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate/thesis or dissertation) in good standing for the full period of their appointment.
Faculty
The faculty teaching in these programs are headquartered at CU-Denver, although resources of other University of Colorado campuses are used.
Computing Services
The Computing Services department supports computer use by both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. For a complete description of services offered see Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section of this catalog.
Financial Aid for Graduate Study
COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT
The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by The Graduate School.
Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the State of Colorado. Grant awards are announced each semester for the following semester. Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid.
COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise, and to continuing students on the basis of academic success. In order for fellowships to be renewed, students holding them must reapply each year to The Graduate School.


Graduate Admissions / 69
RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS
Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Nonresident students who are appointed as research assistants in nongeneral fund accounts may or may not be eligible for resident tuition rates. Assistants must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate/thesis or dissertation).
LOAN FUNDS
Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college workstudy program should submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March 1. This office also provides short-term loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Applicants should go directly to the Office of Financial Aid.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work either through conventional employment or through the college work-study program.
Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy.
INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION
The Office of International Education expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and acts as advisor for Fulbright and other scholarships.
The office also arranges study abroad programs. Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while taking regular courses in the foreign universities. A B average with the equivalent of two years of college-level work in the appropriate language is required. There also are occasional summer programs offering academic credit.
Peace Corps information may be obtained from the Office of International Education.
For additional information contact the Office of International Education, Boulder campus, 492-7741, or the Office of International Programs, Auraria Higher Education Center, 556- 3660.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
General Requirements
Students may be admitted to The Graduate School in either of the two categories described below.
Admission to The Graduate School is not admission to candidacy for an advanced degree. A student who wishes to become a candidate for a degree must make special application at the time and in the manner prescribed by the requirements for the degree sought.
The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS
Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, applicants for admission as regular degree students must:
1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recognized standing, or have done work equivalent to that required for such a degree and equivalent to the degree given at this university.
2. Show promise of ability to pursue advanced study and research, as judged by their previous scholastic record.
3. Have had adequate preparation to enter graduate study in the field chosen.
4. Have at least a 2.75 undergraduate grade-point average on all work taken.
5. Meet additional requirements for admission as established by major departments.
Regular degree students must maintain at least a 3.0 grade-point average each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether it is to be applied toward the intended advanced degree or not. Students who fail to maintain this standard of performance will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS
Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular degree students may be admitted as provisional degree students upon the recommendation of the major department. Upon the recommendation of the Admissions Committee and concurrence of the dean of The Graduate School, a department may admit provisional students for a probationary term, which may not exceed two consecutive calendar years. At the end of the probationary period, provisional degree students must either be admitted to regular degree status or be dropped from the graduate program.


70 / The Graduate School
Credit earned by persons in provisional degree status may count toward a degree at this University.
Provisional degree students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average or higher, according to the terms of their provisional admission, each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether or not it is to be applied toward the advanced degree sought. Students who fail to maintain such a standard of performance, will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
Note: All provisional applicants must have completed a minimum of six semester hours of graduate level course work or must take the Graduate Record Examination and submit scores as part of the application.
SENIORS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
A senior in this University who has satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subject and 12 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor7s degree, may be admitted to The Graduate School by special permission of the dean.
A University of Colorado senior enrolled in the College of Engineering and Applied Science who needs not more than 18 semester hours or 36 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degree may be admitted to The Graduate School, but is not eligible for financial aid, scholarships, or fellowships as a graduate student until the equivalent of the minimum requirements for the bachelor's degree have been satisfied.
Application Procedures
Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the CU-Denver Graduate School office concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications.
An applicant for admission must present a completed Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the CU-Denver Graduate School office, and two official transcripts from each institution attended. The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable application fee of $30 (check or money order) when the application is submitted. No application will be processed unless this fee is paid. Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination, and all departments require three or four letters of recommendation.
When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson of each department or a committee named for the purpose shall decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to The Graduate School dean's office, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as non-degree students (see Non-degree Students in this section).

A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 90 days prior to the term for which admission is sought or earlier as may be required by the major department.
Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1989-90, e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, etc., must file a completed application with the department before the announced departmental deadline (see previous section on financial aid).
READMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS
Students who were previously admitted to a graduate degree program but who did not complete that degree program and who have not been registered for one year or more at the University must:
1. Clarify their status with either the department or The Graduate School to determine their eligibility to return and pursue the same degree.
2. After receiving departmental approval, as indicated above, submit a new application Part I to The Graduate School office before deadlines are passed for the term in which they expect to return to the University. A $30 application fee is required unless an exception is given by The Graduate School. Application deadlines are available from the department.


Graduate Admissions / 71
Former students who wish to change from undergraduate to graduate status or from one major to another must apply to the new department.
Students transferring from one campus to another must apply and be accepted to the new campus.
A student admitted to The Graduate School for the master's program must reapply for the doctoral program.
A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student's major department and the dean. In case of lack of agreement between the department and the dean or in the case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Executive Committee.
FOREIGN APPLICANTS
Prospective foreign students should have completed applications on file in The Graduate School office prior to December 1 for the summer term, March 1 for the fall semester, and July 1 for the spring semester. The application packet should include the $50 fee, TOEFL scores, financial documentation, Graduate Record Examination scores, official English translation of all school records, and other documents as noted in the previous section on Application Procedures.
Acceptable TOEFL Scores. The TOEFL is the Test of English as a ijoreign Language. If your native language is not English, or you have not attended a British or American university for at least one year and achieved satisfactory grades, then you must take the TOEFL. All programs within CU-Denver's Graduate School—arts and sciences, education, engineering, and doctoral programs—require a minimum score of 525 for regular admission. Those earning less than 525 will normally be referred to the Spring International Language Center (on campus) for further language study. During that time, these students will study on an 1-20 from Spring, but may take classes as non-degree students at CU-Denver. They may subsequently be granted regular admission to The Graduate School. All international students who take the TOEFL and are granted regular admission to CU-Denver's Graduate School will be asked to take both the Michigan and SPEAK tests during their first semester of study. Those whose TOEFL fell between 525 and 550 will be required to take additional language training in light of whatever deficiencies may be revealed by these diagnostic tests. Those whose TOEFL exceed 550 will be encouraged, but not required, to undertake additional training in light of their performance on these tests. Students seeking admission to all other graduate programs, including those in architecture and planning, business, and public affairs, should consult those program descriptions for language requirements.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS
At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for admission to the graduate program, assistantships, or of any student before his or her status is determined.
Students who are applying for assistantships for the fall semester take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the graduate awards selection committee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an institution.
Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from The Graduate School office or the CU-Denver Testing Center, or from The Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
OTHER GRADUATE QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS
Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain information at the Student Testing Center on the following examinations: Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).
NON-DEGREE STUDENTS
A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado should apply to the Office of Admissions and Records, CU-Denver, 1200 Larimer St., Denver, CO 80204. Non-degree students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted.
Non-degree students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this University are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and supporting credentials as soon as possible.
A department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as much as 9 hours credit toward the requirements of a master's degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a non-degree student at the University, or both. In addition, the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of credit courses taken as a non-degree student at this University during the term for which the student applied for admission to The Graduate School, provided such admission date was delayed through no fault of the student. A grade of B or better must be obtained in any course work transferred in this manner.


72 / The Graduate School
REGISTRATION
Course Work and Examinations
On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to The Graduate School and who expect to study in The Graduate School are required to complete appropriate registration procedures.
Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted into The Graduate School. If unable to attend that semester they must notify the department that has accepted them and submit the necessary forms to the Office of Admissions and Records at CU-Denver in order to attend the following semester.
Changes in Registration
A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should follow the drop/add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Classes). After the tenth week of classes a graduate student may not drop, add, or change a course to no credit without presenting a letter to the dean of The Graduate School, CU-Denver, stating the exceptional circumstances that justify the change. This letter, endorsed by the instructor of the course, must accompany the properly signed and completed drop/add card or no-credit option form.
Withdrawal
A graduate student who desires to withdraw from the University must apply to the dean of The Graduate School for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official withdrawal will be marked as having failed the course. The withdrawal form must be signed by the instructor of the course and pass/fail must be indicated with the instructor's initials.
Master's Thesis
Graduate students working toward master's degrees, if they expect to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)


Requirements for Degrees / 73
Limitation of Registration
FULL LOAD
A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit if the student is registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate/thesis or dissertation hours..
A maximum of two-thirds of a semester of resident credit may be earned during the summer if a student registers for three semester hours of other graduate work, or any number of thesis hours.
For the number of hours required for financial aid see Financial Aid at the University of Colorado at Denver in the General Information section of this catalog. A graduate student may contact the dean's office for information on the appeal process regarding the full load requirement for financial aid purposes.
MAXIMUM LOAD
No graduate student may receive credit toward a degree for more than 15 hours in a regular semester.
The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at CU-Denver is 10 hours per 10-week summer term. A graduate student may contact the dean's office for information on the appeal process regarding an overload.
UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES
Full-time employees of the University may not undertake more than 6 credit hours per semester. Part-time employees, including assistants, may take such work as is approved by the major departments.
TUITION AND FEES
The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information section of this catalog.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES Quality of Graduate Work
Although the work for advance degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours, an advanced degree will not be conferred merely for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses. Students should not expect to obtain all the training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirement for an advanced degree from formal courses. They should work on their own initiative, reading widely and thoughtfully, reaching their own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of values, perspective, proportion.
All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficiencies) must be of graduate status.
A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted while enrolled in The Graduate School.
For the Ph.D., a course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree.
A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School by the dean with the approval of the major department.
Appeal may be made to the Executive Committee of The Graduate School. The committee's decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student's major department and the dean. In case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Executive Committee.
Repeating a Course
A graduate student who receives a grade of C, D, or F in a course may repeat the course once, upon written recommendation to the dean by the chairman of the student's advisory committee and major department, provided the course has not previously been applied toward a degree.
In calculating a student's grade-point average for Graduate School purposes, the grade for a repeated course will substitute for the old grade. Grades earned in courses taken as an undergraduate or as a non-degree student, as well as grades earned in first and second year foreign language courses, will not be used in calculating The Graduate School grade-point average; however, all grades received will appear on the student's transcript.
Change of Department or Major
A graduate student wishing to change department or major must submit a new Part I and Part II of the graduate application to the new department or school and request the former department to forward recommendations and credentials. The student must be formally accepted by the new department.
Use of English
A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of good English in all oral and written work may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance.
Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate's proficiency.


74 / The Graduate School
Graduate Appeals
Final action on appeals submitted by graduate students concerning action taken by faculty members, programs, or administrative officials rests with the campus Executive Committee of The Graduate School, unless such appeal involves a matter affecting two or more campuses. In such a case, the final action rests with the Executive Committee of The Graduate School.
MASTER'S DEGREE
A student regularly admitted to The Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master's degrees will be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met.
In general, only graduates of an approved institution who have a thorough preparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below. All studies offered toward the minimum requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank. Necessary additional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequisites may be partly or entirely undergraduate courses.
The requirements stated below are minimum requirements; additional conditions set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make further regulations not inconsistent with the general rules.
Students planning to graduate should ascertain current deadlines of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student's and the department's responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.).
Departments or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Requirement
The minimum requirement of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by following either Plan I or Plan II below.
Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a thesis. At least 12 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above.
Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis. At least 16 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above.
Plan II does not represent a free option for the student. A candidate for the master's degree may be allowed to select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned.
Graduate Credit
Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above and that are offered by professors who are members of the graduate faculty, or that have otherwise been approved by the dean of The Graduate School. No assurance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless the student has the approval of the department.
Not all courses listed are available at any one time; some of them are given in alternate years.
Courses taken during the Fall Semester 1975 and thereafter will have graduate rank if they are taught by members of The Graduate School faculty and are in one of the following two categories:
1. Courses within the major program at the 5000 level or above.
2. Courses outside the major program at the 4000 level provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean.
3. The Master of Basic Science program (M.B.S.) has approval for 3000- and 4000- level courses if approved by the department and the dean of The Graduate School.
4. Courses outside the major program provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean.
This does not change the minimum number of courses that must be taken at the 5000 level or above; however, as a result, most students who include 4000 level courses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation.
Field of Study
Studies leading to a master's degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program.
Status
After students have made a satisfactory record in this University for at least one semester or summer term, and after they have removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission or by qualifying examinations or otherwise, they should confer with their major department and request that a decision be made on their status. This definite status must be set by the major department before students may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree.
Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without credit toward a graduate degree all prerequisites required by the department concerned.


Master's Degree / 75
Language Requirements
Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as each department requires. See special departmental requirements.
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere and coming within the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the dean of The Graduate School.
Course work taken more than 6 years prior to the completion of final requirements (comprehensive exam and/or filing of thesis) will not be accepted for the degree unless validated by a special examination.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University is 9 semester hours.
Credit will not be transferred until the student has established in The Graduate School of this University a satisfactory record of at least one semester in residence; such transfer will not reduce the residence at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated.
Work already applied toward a master's degree received from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the master's degree at the University of Colorado; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recognized.
Excess undergraduate credits from another institution may not be transferred to The Graduate School. Seniors in this University may, however, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 9 semester hours) provided such work:
1. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this University.
2. Comes within the four-year time limit.
3. Has not been applied toward another degree.
4. Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and approved by the dean of The Graduate School.
Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. For more information contact The Graduate School office. To be eligible for courses to be considered for transfer, a student must have an overall B average in all courses taken at the University of Colorado in The Graduate School.
Continuing Education Course Work
Students may use the resources of the Division of Continuing Education in the pursuit of graduate study only if they obtain proper academic approval from the major department and the graduate dean in advance.
Residence
In general, the residence requirements can be met only by residence at the University for at least two semesters or at least three summer terms. For full residence a student must be registered within the time designated at the beginning of a semester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses numbered 5000 or above, or at least a combination of other course work acceptable for graduate credit. See Limitation of Registration, Full Load, for requirements for full residence credit during the summer. Students who are noticeably deficient in their general training, or in the specific preparation indicated by each department as prerequisite to graduate work, cannot, expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified.
Assistants and other employees of the University may fulfill the residence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than half time. Full-time employees may not satisfy the residence requirements of one year in fewer than four semesters.


76 / The Graduate School
Admission to Candidacy
A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master's degree must file application in the dean's office not later than 10 weeks prior to the completion of the comprehensive final examination. The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be determined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status.
This application must be made on forms obtainable at the dean's office and in various departments and must be signed by the major department, certifying that the student's work is satisfactory and that the program outlined in the application meets the requirements set for the student.
A student on Graduate School probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation.
Thesis Requirements
A thesis, which may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type, is required of every master's degree candidate under Plan I. Every thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must:
1. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field.
2. Be based upon independent study and investigation.
3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work.
4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred.
5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given.
6. Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in University of Colorado Graduate School Specifications for Preparation of Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertation, which is obtainable from The Graduate School.
Two weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred, two formally approved, printed or typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in The Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract.
All theses must be signed by the thesis advisor and the second reader. All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid when the thesis is deposited in The Graduate School.
Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been registered. A student working toward a master's degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total registered credit for thesis must total a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis.
The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. An IP (in progress) will be reported for terms during which the student is registered for thesis prior to completion of the thesis.
Comprehensive Final Examination
All candidates for a master's degree are required to take a comprehensive final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examination may be given near the end of their last semester of residence while they are still taking required courses for the degree, provided they are making satisfactory progress in those courses.
The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed:
1. Students must be registered when they take the examination.
2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean's office at least three days in advance of the examination.
3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned in consultation with the dean.
4. The examination, which may be oral or written, or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essentially complete at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field.
5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments.
6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or minor field. The examination on transferred work will be given by representatives of the corresponding fields of study in this University.
7. A student who fails the comprehensive final examination may not attempt the examination again until at least three months have elapsed and until such work as may be prescribed by the examining committee has been completed. The student may retake the examination only once.


Doctor of Philosophy / 77
Supplemental Examinations
Supplemental examinations should be simply an extension of the original examination and given immediately. If the student fails the supplemental examination, three months must elapse before attempting the comprehensive examination again.
Course Examinations
The regular written examinations of each semester except the last must be taken. Course examinations of the last semester, which come after the comprehensive final examination has been passed, may be omitted with the consent of the instructor.
Master's Thesis Credit
Every graduate student working toward a master's degree who expects to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Time Limit
Master's degree students have 4 years, from the date of the start of course work, to complete all degree requirements. For students who fail to complete the degree in this 4 year period, it will be necessary for the program director to file an annual statement with the graduate dean stating the reasons why the program faculty believe the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. Students who do their work exclusively in summer terms must complete all degree requirements within 72 months from the start of course work.
A student who does not complete all degree requirements within the specified period of time must validate, by special examination(s), any course work taken more than 6 years prior to taking the master's comprehensive examination or completing the thesis defense, depending on which plan is elected.
Deadlines for Master's Degree Candidates Expecting to Graduate During 1989-90
Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling The Graduate School office, 556-2663.
1. Last day for requesting transfer of credit.
2. Applications for admission to candidacy. Applications must be submitted at least 10 weeks before the student expects to take the comprehensive final examination. Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (The form may be picked up in the department or in The Graduate School office.)
3. Last day for thesis to be approved by department.
4. Last day for scheduling of comprehensive final examination.
5. Last day for taking comprehensive final examination.
6. Last day for filing thesis in The Graduate School. At the time of filing, the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by The Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p.m. on the indicated date will be graduated at the commencement following that for which the deadline is indicated.
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University. To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued. Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work in this field; furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge. The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules.
Studies leading to the Ph.D. degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments. The criterion as to what constitutes an acceptable field of study shall be that the student7 s work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University.


78 / The Graduate School
Students planning to graduate should obtain current deadline dates in the office of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student's and the department's responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.).
Department or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by graduate students in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Course/Dissertation Requirements
A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph.D. degree.
Course Work Requirement. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses numbered 5000 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum. At least 20 of the required hours must be in graduate courses taken at this University. Students who have been admitted to The Graduate School with deficiencies may expect to receive little or no residence credits until the deficiencies have been removed.
Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the Ph.D. a student must register for a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than 10 of these credit hours in any one semester. Not more than 10 dissertation hours may be taken preceding the semester of taking comprehensive examinations. In addition, up to 10 hours may be taken in the semester in which the student passes comprehensives. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above and will not be included in calculation of the student's grade-point average. Only the grades of A, B, C and IP shall be used.
Course work and work on dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program; however, at no time shall a doctoral student register for more than 15 hours of 5000-level and above courses. Normally a student must have earned at least three and not more than six semesters of residency before admission to candidacy.
Quality of Work
Students are expected to complete with distinction all work in the formal courses in which they enroll. A course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree. Upon recommendation by the advisory committee and the chair of the department and with the approval of the dean, a student may be required to withdraw at any time for failure to maintain satisfactory progress toward the degree.
Advisory Committee
As soon as the field of specialization has been chosen, the candidate will request the faculty member with whom the committee wishes to work to act as chair of the advisory committee. The chair, with the advice and approval of the chair of the department, may select two or more others to serve on the committee, so that the several fields related to the student's special interest will be represented. A purpose of the advisory committee (beyond guiding the student through graduate study) is to ensure against specialization that is too narrow. The student shall obtain the signature of the chair of the committee (thereby signifying his or her willingness to act) on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form. Any change in the membership of the advisory committee is to be similarly reported.
Residence
The student must be properly registered to earn residence credit. The minimal residence requirement shall be six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor's degree. Mere attendance shall not constitute residence as the word is here used. Residence may be earned for course work completed with distinction, for participation in seminars, or for scholarly research performed here or elsewhere under the auspices of the University of Colorado.
As a guiding policy in determining residence credit for employed students, those who are employed in three-fourths to full-time work that does not contribute directly to their program toward a degree may not earn more than one-half residence credit in any semester. Students who are employed more than one-fourth time and less than three-fourths time in work that does not contribute directly to the degree may earn not more than three-fourths residence credit. Those who have one-fourth time employment or less may earn full residence credit. (All these provisions are subject to the definition of residence credit given in the preceding paragraph.) In case the interpretation of residence credit for any student needs to be clarified, a decision will be made by the chair of the student's advisory committee, the chair of the student's major department, and the dean of The Graduate School.
Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master's degree from another institution of approved standing, but at least four semesters of residence credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work (course and/or dissertation) taken at this University.
A part of the residence requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be spent in another graduate institution, or if field work in absentia (provided that prior approval for work is given by the student's program director and provided that the student's registration is maintained for that period away from the campus).


Doctor of Philosophy / 79
Preliminary Examination
Each department will satisfy itself (by examination or other means) that students who signify intent to undertake study for the Ph.D. degree are qualified to do so. The means by which each department makes this evaluation shall be specified in departmental requirements. Students who are thus evaluated will be notified immediately of the results. The results of this preliminary evaluation shall be reported to The Graduate School office on the Application for Candidacy form filed by the student at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
Language Requirement
Students are required to meet the following language requirements.
Communication Requirement. All graduate students for whom English is the native language are required to demonstrate at least second-year college proficiency in a foreign language of their choice. This requirement may be satisfied in the following ways.
1. The student's undergraduate transcript may be presented, showing completion of grade C or better of at least 3 semester hours of a fourth-semester undergraduate college course in a foreign language. The transcript must accompany the student's Application for Admission to Candidacy when it is submitted to The Graduate School.
2. The student may take The Graduate School Foreign Language Test (GSFLT) at the Testing Office before or after admission to The Graduate School. Students should check with The Graduate School for the passing score required for each language.
3. If the student wishes to demonstrate competence in a language for which the GSFLT is not available, a test designed and administered by the appropriate language department at the University of Colorado may be taken, with the passing criterion to be set comparable to the above GSFLT criterion.
4. The student may register at the University for any fourth-semester course in a foreign language and pass it with a C or better. (Registration in such courses is contingent upon the language department's approval.)
A student who elects 2, 3, or 4 above must complete the requirements before the Ph.D. comprehensive examination may be scheduled.
Students whose native language is not English will, by passing their courses and completing their graduate work at the University, demonstrate sufficient ability in English to meet the communication requirement.
Special Languages. When special languages are needed as tools to read foreign literature in a particular field, the individual academic departments may require further training in foreign languages for all their Ph.D. graduate students. The choice and number of languages as well as the required levels of skill and the methods of testing these skills are determined by the individual departments.
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality earned in another institution of approved standing will not be accepted for transfer to apply toward the doctorate until the student has established in this Graduate School a satisfactory record in residence, but such credit must be transferred before the student makes application for admission to candidacy for the degree. Such transfer will not reduce the minimum residence requirement at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University for the Ph.D. is 10 semester hours.
Application for Admission to Candidacy
A student must make formal application for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree on forms supplied by The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
A student shall have earned at least three semesters of residence, shall have passed the language requirements, and shall have passed the comprehensive examination before admission to candidacy for the degree.
Continuous Registration Requirements for Doctoral Candidates
Following successful completion of comprehensive examinations, students must register continuously. Students admitted to "candidacy for degree" will register for and be charged for 10 hours of credit for each fulltime term of doctoral work. For each term of part-time enrollment, students will be charged for 7 hours of dissertation credit, except that students not making use of campus facilities may petition The Graduate School for 3-credit-hour status. Continuous registration during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense. It is expected that the student and advisor will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classification identified above.
If a student who is certified for the Ph.D. degree, or who has received permission to take the comprehensives and passes them prior to meeting the language requirement must be continuously enrolled as stated above. This continuing registration is independent on whether the candidate is in residence at the University. (See also section on Residence.)


80 / The Graduate School
Comprehensive Examination
Before admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, the student must pass a comprehensive examination in the field of concentration and related fields. This examination may be oral, written, or both, and will test the student's mastery of a broad field of knowledge, not merely the formal course work completed. The oral part is open to members of the faculty. The student must be registered at the time the comprehensive examination is attempted.
The examination shall be conducted by an examining board appointed by the chair of the department concerned and be approved by the campus graduate dean. The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to a minimum of five. A successful candidate must receive the affirmative votes of a majority of the members of the examination board. In case of failure, the examination may be attempted once more after a period of time determined by the examining board.
Dissertation Requirements
A thesis based upon original investigation and showing mature scholarship and critical judgement as well as familiarity with tools and methods of research must be written upon some subject approved by the student's major department. To be acceptable, this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student's special field. It must be finished and submitted in typewritten form at least 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the day of the final examination and must be formally approved and made available for inspection by the examining committee before the final examination may be taken.
In mechanical features all dissertations must comply with the specifications of The Graduate School as outlined in the University of Colorado Graduate School Specifications for Preparation of Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertation, which may be obtained from The Graduate School.
It is the student's responsibility to notify The Graduate School of the exact title of the dissertation at least six weeks prior to the commencement at which the student will graduate. This title will be printed in the commencement program.
Two formally-approved, typewritten copies of the dissertation, including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred.
The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International. The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department.
All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than two members of the major department staff who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction.
All approved dissertations are kept on file in the library.
When the dissertation is deposited in The Graduate School, the candidate must pay the thesis-binding fee and sign an agreement with University Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International; and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform.
Final Examination
After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dissertation and related topics will be conducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral, the oral part being open to anyone. The examination will be conducted by a committee appointed by the campus graduate dean, which will consist of at least five persons, one of whom must be from outside the student's department. More than one dissenting vote will disqualify the candidate in the final examination.
Arrangements for the final examination must be made in the dean's office at least two weeks in advance. The examination must be scheduled not later than two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. A student must be registered at the time of the final examination.


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Time Limit
If a student fails to complete all requirements for the degree within the prescribed number of years from the date of the start of course work in the doctoral program, a second examination similar to the first will be required before the candidate may take the final examination. The number of years allowed for completion is normally six, but in some programs it may be seven. If the comprehensive examination is failed, it may be attempted once more after not fewer than eight months of further work. For students who fail to complete the degree in this six-year period, it will be necessary for the department to file an annual statement why the program director believes the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. This request must be signed by three members of the graduate faculty who serve on the student's thesis advisory committee. If approved by the campus graduate dean, the student may continue his/her studies for one additional year. If not approved, the student may be dropped from the program.


"The primary mission of the School is education, research, and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning. Students are required to search into existing abundance of architecture and planning knowledge in order to generate effective, forceful, spirited forms, ideas, and proposals. Faculty and students are engaged in investigation, education, exploration, and generation of new ideas, forms, and proposals to create more humane living environments.
—Dean H.A. Shirvani School of Architecture and Planning


School of Architecture and Planning
Dean: H.A. Shirvani Associate Dean : Yuk Lee
Assistants to the Dean: Donna Lee, Judy Strecker School Office: 1250 14th St., Third Floor Telephone: 556-3382
School Advisory Council:
Chairman: Jerome Syracuse, FAIA, Seracuse Lawler Wong Strauch, Denver Members:
John W. Bright, National Park Service, Denver Rodney Davis, FAIA, Davis Partnership, Denver Nora Dimitrov, ASID, Interior Space Planning and Design, Denver
Peter Dominick, AIA, Urban Design Group, Denver Earl Flansburgh, FAIA, Earl R. Flansburgh and Associates, Inc., Boston, Massachusetts Alan Gerstenberger, President, Cambridge Development Corp., Denver Larry Gibson, CRSS Inc., Denver Mimi Hillen, ASID, Hillen Design Associates, Golden Donald E. Hunt, BRW, Denver John Madden, President, John Madden Company, Denver Jennifer Moulton, AIA, Anthony Pellecchia Architects, Denver Dean Punke, Denver
Maxwell L. Saul, AIA, FCSI, DMJM, Denver Herb Schaal, ASLA, EDAW Inc., Ft. Collins Floyd Tanaka, AICP, THK Associates, Englewood Harry Teague, AIA, Architect, Aspen William Turnbull, FAIA, William Turnbull and Associates, San Francisco, California Joseph Wells, AICP, Doremus and Wells, Aspen Jam Wong, AIA, Seracuse Lawler Wong Strauch, Denver
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The School of Architecture and Planning offers first and post professional programs leading to master's degrees. The primary mission of the School is education, research, and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning. Students are required to search into an existing abundance of architecture and planning knowledge in order to generate effective, forceful, spirited forms, ideas, and proposals. Faculty and students are engaged in investigation, education, exploration, and generation of new ideas, forms, and proposals to create more humane living environments.
In doing so, the School questions existing connections of teaching and practice and is in search of future alternatives. The School's activities are thus geared toward preparation of future architects and planners who are not only able to draw, to calculate, or to propose, but also to question, to explore, and to experiment.
The curriculum is based on a wide range of cultural views of architecture and planning reflective of our faculty and student body. The faculty direct, guide, and encourage students to develop their individual interests with a prerequisite commitment intended to equip the graduate with a lasting ability to produce architecture and planning responsive to the changing needs of society.
It might be that we are all tattooed savages since Sophocles. But there is more to art than the straightness of lines and the perfection of surfaces. Plasticity of style is not as large as the entire idea...\ We have too many things and not enough forms.
(Flaubert 1963)
Our work is not philosophy, neither is it a system relating to a specific theory of nature; it is part of nature and must therefore itself be regarded as an object of knowledge. (El Lissitzky 1930)
If nothing has preceded repetition, if no present has kept watch over the trace, if, after a fashion, it is the "void which reempties itself and marks itself with imprints," then the time of writing no longer follows the line of modified present tenses. What is to come is not a future present, yesterday is not a past present. (Derrida 1978)
It is on these premises that our School is in constant search of the manifest, ideas, and forms for the betterment of the living environments. A community of culturally diverse educators and practitioners centered in an island by the backdrop of the Rocky Mountains provides a unique opportunity for intense study of architecture and planning.


84 / School of Architecture and Planning
Mission and Organization
The School is composed of five graduate degree programs in architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning and a research and service division, the Center for Built Environment Studies. As a unit of graduate professional education with five professional degree programs and a mandate for national excellence and recognition, the School expects to go beyond training students in basic skills for entry-level positions. The School's overall mission is to develop the design capabilities of the individuals and the design professions as a whole as well as provide the intellectual framework which supports design.
Considering this mission, the School emphasizes basic professional training and education necessary for entering professional practice in its first professional degree programs. The post-professional and advanced degree programs are directed toward professionals at various career stages and focuses on research and specialization.
The School supports interdisciplinary work in its programs and focuses on professional education and research concerning the design and planning of the built environment. Within this interdisciplinary approach, it recognizes the professional community input and the role of the other academic disciplines such as humanities, social sciences, and engineering.
In the School's degree programs, various architecture and planning ideologies and views are examined with respect to their historical setting. This examination is combined with critical reviews of design work, dialogues, and methods to form the essential ingredient of design education. Through this dialectic of analyzing and synthesizing, students gain increased understanding of those humanistic ideals underlying the architecture and planning of buildings and spaces and relate them to their own developing personal aspirations.
The School is committed to design as its central intellectual concern and is the largest graduate school of architecture in the western region. Design is used in its broadest sense to include a full range of philosophies, ideologies, theories, and methods. The School's mission is education, research, and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning.
Academic Programs
The School of Architecture and Planning offers academic programs leading to master's degrees in architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The programs are interdisciplinary and, in the design fields, both first and post-professional degrees are offered. In addition, it is possible for students to obtain two degrees, M.Arch. and M.U.R.P. for example, and reduce the time required for doing so by coordinating their programs.
The first professional degree programs are structured for full-time graduate study. For students with employment obligations, most of these programs can be taken on a part-time basis. Usually the first year of the full-time program must be completed before it can be taken part time.
Within any of the programs, the School or Architecture and Planning offers opportunities to develop a self-tailored area of concentration through its varied offerings in architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, interior design, and urban and regional planning. Electives ordinarily can be taken from any program in the School and from an other school in the University with the approval of the student's advisor. The School maintains membership in:
Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning Society of Architectural Historians Council of Landscape Architecture Education Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society Sigma Delta Lambda Honor Society
Academic Environment and Student Body
In addition to its regular curricular programs, the School supports or sponsors a variety of events and activities that enlarge and broaden the learning environment in the School. Student internships for credit are available during the academic year. A summer international study program is offered. The School sponsors three receptions—at the beginning of the academic year, before Christmas, and at the end of the academic year—along with a Beaux Arts Ball in the spring, for students and the local professional community. Finally, the School sponsors several exhibitions of design and art works.
There are about 350 full-time students in the School. The student body is diverse, representing many academic disciplines and a wide variety of previous academic institutions.
Lecture Series
Guest critics are frequently invited to the School. In addition, the School has an official lecture series every year. The Lecture Series is composed of distinguished practitioners, critics, and scholars of national and international nature. Recent visiting critics and speakers in the latter series include:
Lecture Series - 1988-89
George Ranalli, Peter Waldman, Bahram Shirdel, Anthony Vidler, Diane Ghirardo, Kenneth Frampton, John Novack, Peter Walker, Harry Teague, Mark Johnson, Michael Hays, and David R. Hill.
Lecture Series - 1987-88
John R. Stilgoe, Anne Vemez-Moudon, William Turnbull, George Hoover, Nader Ardalan, Frank E. Sanchis, H.A. Shirvani, and Peter Eisenman.


Architecture and Planning / 85
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
The academic regulations of the School of Architecture and Planning supplement those of the University. The Academic Affairs Committee of the School determines academic policies and regulations. Details of the School's academic regulations are composed in a booklet, Academic Policies, Procedures, and Guidelines for Students, and is available from the Office of the Dean. All new students will be supplied with a copy of the booklet. Following are several important academic affairs policies:
Incomplete Grades. In accordance with CU-Denver grading policies, when special circumstances prevent a student from completing course work during a term, the instructor may assign one of two incomplete grades - IF for incomplete failing; IW for incomplete passing. Special circumstances imply severe health and related personal and immediate family problems. Financial emergencies are not special circumstances preventing completion of work and are to be handled differently. If work for the cjourse is not completed within a maximum of one year, the IF reverts to F and the IW to W. In every case that an IW or IF is assigned, the instructor must send a memo to the Program Director for the student's file, 1) explaining the special circumstances preventing completion of the course, and 2) specifying the work necessary for the student to complete the course. A copy should go to the student. When an instructor assigns an IF or IW without the above described explanation, the grade F will be assigned. These policies are implemented to ensure fairness in such special circumstances and to document expectations in each case. |
Grade Requirements. Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 GPA to remain in any of the School's programs. For any semester that a student's grades are less than 3.0, the student is placed on academic probation for the following semester. If, in that following semester, the student's grades are below 3.0 and the overall GPA is below 3.0, the student will be dropped from the program. If, in that following semester, the student's grades are below 3.0 and the overall GPA is above 3.0, the student will remain on probation for one more semester. A student with a GPA below 3.0 for two consecutive semesters will be dropped from the program. A student dropped from a program will be eligible for readmission to it after one calendar year has elapsed.
Course Waivers and Transfer of Credit. Courses in a program may be waived or credit transferred with the consent of the course instructor and the approval of the School's Academic Affairs Committee. Students should provide evidence in their petition for waiver or credit transfer that they have covered equivalent material at a similar level of instruction.
Thesis. In programs which provide for thesis, thesis is available by petition to students with a minimum GPA of 3.5. Thesis requirements are available from program directors and the Office of the Dean. It is the intent of the School programs to support thesis work
which demonstrates, 1) an understanding of both the particular problem under investigation and the means of inquiry in relation to it, as well as 2) an ability to design and document a creative and relevant product and/or solution. In short, students in thesis are expected to demonstrate an ability to articulate and integrate research and design in the specific area they choose to investigate. A thesis should make a contribution either by advancing or clarifying the state-of-the-art in the proposed subject area.
Students may propose thesis work in any area of planning and design in which they have interest, competence, and support from faculty to undertake the investigation. Competence will be demonstrated through a thesis proposal which will be evaluated for approval or disapproval by a committee of the faculty. Each thesis proposal must identify the student's three-person thesis committee.
Students with an approved thesis proposal may substitute and register for six hours of thesis research and programming followed, in the next semester, by six hours of thesis.
Advising. Students are expected to make regular academic progress in their courses of study. Each student is assigned an academic advisor who, with the student, plans a course of study for each program and monitors progress. Students should always consult first their advisor in all academic matters.
Chancellor John Buechner (right) joins long-time Denver architect and philanthropist Temple Buell (left), a generous supporter of CU-Denver's School of Architecture and Planning.


86 / School of Architecture and Planning
SCHOOL FACILITIES
The School's studios, library, Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory, Auto-Cadd Computer Laboratory, photo laboratory and dark room, model shop, gallerias, and offices are housed in three floors of the Dravo Building in 50,000 square feet of space. The laboratories and facilities were developed through an endowment by noted architect Temple Hoyne Buell, FAIA.
Architecture and Planning Library
Robert Wick, Librarian
The Architecture and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library, administered by the University of Colorado at Denver, serves as a learning resource center in the fields of architecture and planning. It contains the following collections: reference, circulating, documentary (planning documents issued by local, regional, state and national agencies with an emphasis on planning materials pertaining to Colorado communities and concerns), periodicals, reserve, and non-print media including architectural slides and microcomputer software. The Architecture and Planning Library has over 13,000 volumes of books and monographs, 15,000 slides, and 105 periodical subscriptions.
The Architecture and Planning Library is open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m.; Friday from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.; Saturday from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m.; and Sunday from 12 noon until 6 p.m. The staff consists of a librarian, library assistant, and several student assistants. The Library provides a number of services including reference and research assistance and library-use instruction. Additional services, such as inter-library loan and computer-assisted research, are provided through the Auraria Library.
Center for Built Environment Studies
Director: F.R. Steiner
Department Office: 1250 14th Street, Third Floor Telephone: 556-2816
Center Staff: S. Boonyatikam, R.D. Piom, P.B. Gallegos Associated Research Faculty: L. Brink, M.G. Brown,
T.A. Clark, F. Downing, H.L. Gamham, M. Hatami,
D.R. Hill, L.M. Johnson, B. Jones, G.W. Karn, Y.
Lee, J.M. Prosser, P.V. Schaeffer, H.A. Shirvani Support Staff : P. Erickson, D. Lee
As the research and service unit of the School of Architecture and Planning, the Center for Built Environment Studies is committed to making a more humane living environment through research and innovative design. The primary mission of the Center is of qualitative, quantitative, and innovative nature. The Center plays an important role in supporting the educational mission of the School of Architecture and Planning to achieve a balance of practice and research. In this regard, the Center's resources and expertise include ar-
chitecture and planning researchers and practitioners combined with a large pool of graduate assistants. As a major contributor to the state of Colorado and the southwest region, the Center for Built Environment Studies has helped to strengthen the quality of built environments in urban and rural towns and regions. As a unit of intellectual forum, the Center is striving to make an impact on the fields of architecture and planning through its community of scholars, facilities, and laboratories. The Center is an interdisciplinary team of educators, designers, and planners working in a collaborative manner to service the professions and the community.
Currently, the Center is involved in a broad range of built environment projects in architecture and planning with particular focus on building performance evaluation and analysis, land-use policy, rural and small town design and planning, and economic development.
The Center staff includes highly regarded researchers in building systems studies, who have experience in lighting, energy conservation, and construction. The School of Architecture and Planning houses a state-of-the-art building technology laboratory. This laboratory offers an excellent setting for simulation of building performance.
Members of the Center staff and School faculty are recognized internationally in the field of land-use planning. Areas of special expertise include soil conservation policy, landscape ecology, environmental impact assessment, and land suitability analysis. Currently, the Center is cooperating with the City of Woodland Park and Teller County to develop a growth management strategy. Center researchers also are working with the U.S. Soil Conservation Service on the implementation of a nationwide land evaluation and site assessment system.
The Center is viewed nationally as a leader in the provision of technical assistance to small towns and rural regions. Funding for this work has been received from the state of Colorado as part of the Colorado Initiatives Program and from the Kellogg Foundation as part of the Colorado Rural Revitalization Project. The latter project is a collaborative effort with Colorado State University. Through the Colorado Initiatives and Colorado Rural Revitalization Projects, the Center works with local officials and citizens to improve the quality of life in rural Colorado. For instance, Center staff helped develop and design an Old Town, based on a Western motif, to attract tourists in the town of Burlington. In the San Luis valley of southern Colorado, the Center has helped citizens to use their rich Hispanic heritage to build a strategy for the future. These kinds of activities extend to every corner of Colorado.
As a result of this work in rural regions, the Center has a record of accomplishment in economic development as well as tourism and recreation design and planning. The experience is augmented by the expertise of several School faculty who have conducted a wide variety of fiscal impact analyses, market studies,


Architecture and Planning / 87

Delta City Manager Steve Schrock (right) seeks counsel on his city's future from Jon Schler, who works in the Grand Junction office of CU-Denver's Center for Built Environment Studies.
population forecasts, labor market analyses, and transportation planning studies.
The Center offers numerous research assistantships to the graduate students enrolled in one of the School's programs. The Center also offers opportunities for students with individual research interests. Finally, the Center offers a variety of seminars, round tables, colloquiums, and interaction with national and international visiting scholars.
MACINTOSH ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN LABORATORY
Director: Bennett R. Neiman
The Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory is dedicated to the promotion of design innovation and exploration with the Macintosh computer. The newly acquired laboratory contains 15 Macintosh II computers with megabyte internal hard drive and high resolution color monitors; a Macintosh II file server with 80 megabyte internal hard drive; an E-size, Hewlett-Packard Draftmaster I pen plotter; LaserWriter II printer; Image Writer II dot matrix printer; and ThunderScan image digitizer. The laboratory is presently experimenting with various drawing and painting software including Mac Architrion professional 3-dimensional modeling software, VersaCad, MacDraw D, SuperPaint, PixelPaint, Adobe Illustrator 88, VideoWorks, Canvas, MiniCad, and Mac3D. This state-of-the-art laboratory has been developed through a contribution by Apple Computer, Inc.
CADD COMPUTER LABORATORY
Director: Kingsley Brown
The CADD Laboratory of the School of Architecture and Planning is located adjacent to the Macintosh Architecture Laboratory and is equipped for upscaled computer-aided design and drafting with a microcomputer based networking system which is being modified and expanded. Six Zenith 2200 PC/ATs, in addition to four IBM PC/XTs with high resolution monitors and digitizing tablets, are now linked with a Novell central file server and 120 megabyte hard disk drive for storage. This network and six additional PC/AT workstations are linked through the addition of AutoCAD compatible software that extends and enhances the ongoing use of AutoCAD and AE/CADD.
Additional capabilities are offered through AutoWord, an interactive word processing package for editing and displaying text of drawings; Auto CoGo, a coordinate geometry program that allows entry of survey and engineering data for site planning and engineering; LandSoft, a system for introducing landscape architectural symbols and drafting extension into the AutoCAD and AE/CADD utilities; and Generic Template, a means of customizing or creating unique design and drafting templates.
Also available are the ComputerVision system which includes the Personal Architect and Personal Designer packages, Gould Colorwriter 6320, and Hewlett-Packard plotters. Additional computing facilities are available at other sites on campus.


88 / School of Architecture and Planning
BUILDING TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY
Director: Soontorn Boonyatikarn
The Building Technology Laboratory functions as a teaching and research facility for both students and outside practitioners. For the student, through hands-on experiment and physical demonstration, it is used to facilitate the learning process as well as bridge the gap between theoretical concepts and practical applications. For practitioners, this facility is used to enhance their practice and update their knowledge.
Some examples of equipment and facilities available include data acquisition systems, lighting research equipment, Macintosh visual input package, windflow simulation table, video equipment, and data logging equipment. Data acquisition systems includes the following components: data logger Model 21X-L with 40K internal memory (RAM) and sealed rechargeable battery from Campbell Scientific; IBM PC-AT with 30 megabyte hard disk and 1.2 megabyte RAM; cassette tape recorder and cassette tape interface (for a remote application); analog and digital control cord; and necessary software for read/write access, data interfacing, and data manipulation. This system is very flexible. It is a textbook sized, D-cell powered precision datalogger using micro-computer based hardware with sub-micro-volt sensitivity. It is the combination of a microcomputer, clock, multimeter, calibrator, scanner, frequency counter, controller, and signal generator. Some important features are:
• Sensitivity and measurement speed: fourteen bit precision on five software selectable ranges. 0.33 microvolt resolution at 37 milliseconds per channel with 100 nanovolt RMS input noise. At 2.5 ms per channel the input noise is 1.2 microvolt RMS.
• Real-time data processing: user programmed processing includes linearization, algebraic, and transcendental functions, engineering unit scaling, averaging, maximum/minimum, totalizing, standard deviation, wind vector integration, histograms, and more.
• Remote programming: programs, parameters, and direct command can be entered directly from keyboard or via the serial communications port from a remote computer or terminal.
• Analog and digital control outputs: two continuous analog outputs with 14 bit resolution for proportional control. Six digital outputs can be set based on time or processed input levels.
Lighting Research Equipment includes: quantum/radiometer/photometer, two units of pyronometer model L1-200SB-50, six units of photometric sensor -model L1-210SB, and luminance meter at one degree spot.
The Macintosh package allows a direct input of visual image from any object into computer for further study. This equipment includes: Macintosh II computer, Macvision digitizer board and supported software, and visual camera model ICD-200 from IKEGAMI.
The windflow simulation table allows the designer to analyze various windflow patterns on two-dimensional forms. By allowing water to flow continuously in a given direction and by adding an even distribution of ink to identify the flow patterns, an immediate study can be encountered on a given site configuration. The following observations can be made: positive and negative zones (show drift patterns and contaminated and turbulent areas), windbreak and wind shadow effect, wind venturi (funnel) effect, and ventilation and wind protection.
Video equipment includes: video camera ROB, video monitor, and high quality four head VSH recorder.
Data logging equipment allows an automatic collection of data for a specific time and period. When furnished with the appropriate sensors, the following data can be obtained: temperature (surface temperature, air temperature, and subsurface temperature), moisture (wetbulb temperature and relative humidity), solar radiation, lighting intensity, and wind speed.
Photo Laboratory. Our new photography lab, with the latest state-of-the-art equipment, is used for architectural photography classes and by students to produce material for their portfolios. There are separate areas for developing, enlarging, drying, and copying. The copy room, in addition to the table copier, has rolls of seamless paper that are used for backgrounds when photographing models.
Model-Making Laboratory. Students will have an 800-square-foot model shop in which to build projects for their classes. Table saws, jig saws, drill presses, jointers, and a full range of hand tools will allow the student to build models of wood, plastic, and steel. An adjacent paint spray room is equipped with a ventilated paint booth and vapor-proof lighting.


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ADMISSIONS
General Requirements
Each applicant for admission into any of the programs of the School of Architecture and Planning must submit:
1. The University of Colorado Application for Graduate Admission forms.
2. Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended.
3. Three letters of recommendation.
4. A statement of purpose.
5. A portfolio of academic, creative, and/or professional work except for Urban and Regional Planning.
6. The application fee.
Special requirements for international applicants are described in a following section.
All portfolio materials must be in 8-1/2 x 11 (or equivalent A-4) format. If slides are included, they must be in a loose-leaf slide holder and annotated. The School of Architecture and Planning will return portfolios if supplied with appropriate postage-paid, preaddressed mailing materials. Portfolios may be picked up in person from the offices.
In general, a 3.00 grade-point average(GPA) on a
4.00 scale (or equivalent) in the prior undergraduate or graduate degree is required for admission. Applicants with a GPA under 3.00 may be reviewed for admission; in such cases, submission of strong supporting materials is advised. For applicants with a GPA under 3.00, GRE scores are required for the Urban and Regional Planning Program and strongly recommended for applicants to the other programs.
The admissions decision is made weighing a variety of factors including academic preparation, quality of work experience and portfolio, appropriateness of the applicant's purpose, and overall likelihood of success in the program. Applicants may be admitted as nondegree students or with special conditions. Because of space limitations, not all qualified applicants may be accepted. Specific requirements for each program are listed below.
ARCHITECTURE
Master of Architecture
(first professional degree; three and one-half year program)
The three and one-half year (114 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with a bachelor's degree and no prior training or background in architecture or related field. Prerequisites are one year of college-level physics and college mathematics through a first course in calculus. For those without these prerequisites, courses are held in the summer term preceding the first semester. No other specific preparation is required, although applicants should be able to demonstrate an aptitude for the study of architecture.
Master of Architecture
(first professional degree: three and one-half year program with advanced standing)
Admission to the three and one-half year program with advanced standing is appropriate for applicants with a non-professional bachelor's degree in architecture or a bachelor's degree in a related field (engineering, design, art). Depending on their undergraduate record, qualified applicants with a non-professional architectural degree (the first part of a 4 -I- 2 program) would ordinarily be admitted to the final two years of the first professional degree program. Applicants with degrees in related fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of preparation but may be required to take all the courses in the architectural design sequence.
Master of Architecture
(post-professional degree: one year program)
The one-year (36 semester hours) post-professional degree program is appropriate for applicants holding a Bachelor of Architecture or equivalent first professional degree or diploma in architecture.
INTERIOR DESIGN
Master of Interior Design (first professional degree)
The three-year (96 semester hours) first professional degree program is appropriate for those with a bachelor's degree and no prior training or background in interior design or a related design field. Applicants with background and training in interior design or a related field may be considered for admission with advanced standing. Applicants with degrees in related fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of preparation but may be required to take all the courses in the interior design sequence.
Master of Interior Design (post-professional degree)
The two-year (60 semester hours) post-professional degree program is appropriate for those with a Bachelor of Interior Design, an equivalent of the first professional degree or diploma in interior design, or B.I.D.,
B.F.A., B.S.L.A., B.S. in Design, B.S. in Architecture.
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
Master of Landscape Architecture (first professipnal degree)
The three-year (96 semester hours) first professional degree program is appropriate for those with a bachelor's degree and no training or background in landscape architecture or a related design field.


90 / School of Architecture and Planning
Master of Landscape Architecture (post-professional degree)
The two-year (60 semester hours) post-professional degree program is appropriate for applicants with a first professional design degree (B.S.L.A., B.L.A., B.Arch., for example. Applicants with the B.L.A. and work experience by receive advanced standing. Applicants without a prior Landscape Architecture degree may be required to take additional core requirements in Landscape Architecture History and Plant Materials.
URBAN DESIGN
Master of Architecture in Urban Design (one-year post-professional degree)
The one-year (36 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with a first professional design degree in architecture (e.g. B.Arch., M.Arch ).
URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING
Master of Urban and Regional Planning
The two-year (51 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with bachelor's degrees in either design, humanities, social, or physical sciences.
International Applicants
Competence in oral and written English is expected in the School. Students without sufficient competence in English in an academic context may be required to enroll in English language courses before proceeding with their program.
In addition, The University of Colorado at Denver, Office of Admissions, requires that all applicants to CU-Denver meet certain qualifications. Qualifications are determined by records and credentials that each applicant is required to provide. It is important that all documents are received by the School of Architecture and Planning before the deadline date of the semester or term the applicant plans to attend. If application documents are received later than the published deadline, the applicant will be considered for the next available term.
Submission Requirements. International applicants must submit:
1. An International Student application and Graduate Admission forms.
2. Two official transcripts from each United States collegiate institution the applicant has attended.
3. Two certified copies of official academic records from each collegiate institution the applicant has attended outside the United States. A certified literal English translation must accompany documents that are not in English.
4. Four letters of recommendation.
5. A statement of purpose.
6. A portfolio of academic, creative, and professional work for application to the Architecture, Interior Design, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Design programs.
7. A nonrefundable $50 application fee.
8. A current CU-Denver Financial Resources Statement. Statements used for other institutions will not be accepted. Photocopied documents are not acceptable unless signed by the originator; signatures must not be photocopies.
9. Official TOEFL Score Report to establish English language proficiency. Institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable. TOEFL score must be 500 or higher to be considered for admission by the University.
Additional supporting documents may subsequently be required by the office of Admissions. All international applicants who are admitted to CU-Denver must have a valid visa and must enroll for and maintain a full course of study (12 or more semester hours) leading to the completion of a masters degree.
Financial Requirements. International applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds available to attend the University of Colorado at Denver. To provide this evidence each international applicant should follow these instructions:
1. Complete the Financial Resources Statement. Applicants must prove that they have sufficient money to pay expenses by submitting the Financial Resources Statement as a part of the application.
a. If applicants are using their own money, their bank must certify that they have the full amount of money on deposit to meet tuition and expense costs. In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement, the bank must certify that the money the applicant needs is on deposit in the applicant's account.
b. If the applicant is being sponsored by a family member, or a friend, the sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. The sponsor's bank must certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money the applicant will need.
c. If the applicant has been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed.
2. An incomplete statement of financial resources or failure to prove the availability of the necessary money will delay or cause the denial of the applicant's admission to the University. Be sure the Financial Resources Statement is accurate and complete.
Dates and Deadlines
The programs in architecture, interior design, landscape architecture and urban design admit for the Fall and Spring Semesters normally. The program in urban and regional planning admits normally for the Fall Semester, but will admit on a space-available basis for both the Fall and Spring Semesters and the Summer Term. See the Calendar in this catalog for specific dates.


Architecture and Planning / 91
To be considered for Fall Semester admission, all application materials must be received by the previous March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1. To be considered for Spring Semester admission, all application materials must be received by the previous November 1. Applications received after March 15 or November 1 may be considered for non-degree status only.
Deadlines for submission of application materials:
March 15 —I for Fall Semester regular admission
April 15 — for Summer Term regular admission
November 1 — for Spring Semester regular admission
Applications after these dates will only be considered on a space-available basis.
Persons interested in any of the programs or in visiting the School are invited to call the Architecture Program at (303) 556-2877, Interior Design Program at (303) 556-2294, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Programs at (303) 556-3475, and Urban and Regional Planning Program at (303) 556-3479 to arrange an appointment. For application forms or additional information, please write to:
Office of the Dean
School of Architecture and Planning
University of Colorado at Denver
1200 Larimer Street
Campus Box 126
Denver, Colorado 80204-5300
(303) 556-3382
Venezuelan student Carlos Gonzales (right) is one of numerous foreign students who attend di-Denver's prestigious School of Architecture and Planning. He is shown working on a model of Burlington in the 1890's with Bob Horn of the School's Center for Built Environment Studies. The model is used in a museum diaorama in the eastern Colorado town.


92 / School of Architecture and Planning
Programs of Study
ARCHITECTURE
Program Director: Robert W. Kindig Secretary: Shelly Juergens Department Office: 1250 14th St., Third Floor Telephone: 556-2877
Faculty: Professors: J.D. Hoag, R.W. Kindig, D. Nuzum,
J.M. Prosser, H.A. Shirvani Associate Professors: S. Boonyatikarn, M.G. Brown,
F. Downing, P.B. Gallegos, M. Hatami Assistant Professors: N. Collier, G.J. Crowell, T.S. Makala,
B. R. Neiman, D.W. Shirvani
Visiting and Adjunct Faculty: C. Childress, D. Decker, C. Moon, W.C. Muchow, A. Pellecchia, P. Saporito,
C. Rabinovitch
The architecture program offers curricula leading to both first and post professional Master of Architecture degrees. The first professional Master of Architecture (M.Arch.I) is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) and is composed of five basic core areas: Architectural Design, History and Theory, Environmental Context, Science and Technology, and Professional Practice.
The program's primary objective is to prepare students to enter the practice of architecture with a thorough foundation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop: an awareness of and sensitivity to the quality of the human environment; architectural context; deep understanding of architectural history, theory and criticism; thorough knowledge of architectural and building technology; competence in design process and expression with particular emphasis on exploration, experimentation, and systhesis; understanding of the institutional framework within which architecture takes place; and skills and understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct.
The ultimate goals of the program are to provide the architecture student with a deep appreciation of architecture, while acquiring critical capacity, through comprehension of all facets of architecture. The above objectives are achieved in five groups of courses, organized in sequences within five coordinated modules.
Master of Architecture I (First professional degree)
Three and one-half year program. The first professional Master of Architecture degree program is a 114 semester hour program requiring three and one-half years (six semesters and a summer term) of full-time study. The curriculum consists of a core of five related course components and 21 semester hours of electives that may be used for a concentration.
The program is taught at three levels, each with a theme. The first level involves the theme of principles, definitions, communication and design abstraction and takes the first two semesters. The next level takes three semesters and involves a dual theme—architecture in context and applications of methodologies. The theme of the final level in the third year is synthesis and professional competency.
THE CURRICULUM - THREE AND ONE-HALF YEAR PROGRAM
DESIGN: 48 semester hours
ARCH. 5500 (6)
ARCH. 5501 (6)
ARCH. 5502 (6) ARCH. 6600 (6) ARCH. 6601 (6) ARCH. 6700 (6)
ARCH. 6701 (6)
ARCH. 5510 (3)
ARCH. 5511 (3)
Introduction to Architectural Design Studio I
Introduction to Architectural Design Studio II
Architectural Design Studio III Architectural Design Studio IV Architectural Design Studio V Advanced Architectural Design Studio
VI
Advanced Architectural Design Studio
VII
Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I
Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II
HISTORY AND THEORY: 15 semester hours
ARCH. 5520 (3)
ARCH. 5521 (3) ARCH. 6620 (3)
ARCH. 6621 (3)
ARCH. 6660 (3)
Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism
Survey of Architectural History Architecture in the 15th through 18th Centuries
Architecture in the 19th and 20th Centuries
Human and Social Dimension of Design


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Undergraduate and Graduate Studies CU-DENVER

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u18701 7540168 _ lry of Colleges and Schools Pages 83 113 149 189 229 343 347 355 SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING Ar c hi t e ctur e Int erio r De s i gn Landsc ap e Ar c hit ecture a nd U rb a n D esig n U r ba n D es ign U r ba n a nd R eg i o n a l P l anni n g COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION AND GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Accounting Busi n ess Admi ni s tr atio n Bus in ess Admi nis tr atio n f o r E xecutives F in a n ce H ea l th Admini s tr atio n H ea lth Admini s tr a tion E xec ut ive P rogram H u m a n R esources Ma na ge m e nt Infom1ation S ys t e m s Int e rn atio n a l Bus in ess M a n age m e nt Mar k e t ing Oper atio n s M a n age m ent Q u anti t ative M e thods T r a n s p o rt a t i o n and D istri buti o n M a n ageme nt SCHOOL OF EDUCATION T eac h e r Educatio n Progr a m s C ou nsel i n g and P e r sonn e l Se r vices Early C h i ldhoo d E ducatio n a n d Ear l y Chil d h o o d S p ec i a l E d ucatio n Educ a t i o na l A d mini s tra t i o n Educ a t i o na l P syc h o l ogy E l e m e nt ary Edu ca tion Foundatio n s I ns tru ctio n a l T ec h nology Corpo r a t e In s tru ctio n a l D eve l opme nt and T r ainin g Educationa l M e di a S p ecialis t I n s tru c t i o na l Computing Sp e cialis t I n s tru ctio n a l T echno l og i s t Lan guage a nd C ultur e R ea d i n g and Wr i tin g R esea r c h and Eval uation M e t h o d o l ogy Seco ndary Educatio n Specia l Ed ucation COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE A ppli e d M a th e m atics Civ il E n g in ee rin g E l ec tri c a l E n g in ee rin g a n d Co mput er Sci e n ce E l ect rical Engi neer ing Mec h an ical Engin eering E n gi n eeri n g, Mas t e r of COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES Anthro p o l ogy B as i c Sci e n ce, M as t e r o f Biol ogy C h emis tr y Communicatio n a n d Th e atr e Econ omic s E n g l i s h Env ir onme ntal Scie n ce, Ma s t e r of E t h nic Studi es F in e A rt s Geog r aphy Geo l ogy A rm y R O T C M u s i c H i s t ory H um a nities, H o n ors i n Huma niti es, Mas t er o f Math e m atics Mode rn L a n g u ages P hil oso ph y P h ys i cs Political Sci e nce Psyc h o l ogy Socia l Scie n ce, Mas ter o f Socio l ogy Technica l Communicat ion, M as t e r of MILITARY SCIENCE Ai r F orce ROTC COLLEGE OF MUSIC Performa n ce M u sic GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS C rimin a l jus t ice P ubli c Adminis tr atio n Directory of Programs and Degrees Inside Back Cover

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Legend AlP ..... .. .. . School of Architectur e a nd Planning BA ... ... . ..... ............. . ......... . .. . . Bachelor of Art s BFA ............... . ................ Bac h elor of Fine Arts BS .................................... Bachelor of Science BS (CSE) ... ........................ Bac h e l o r of Scie nce in Computer Sc i ence and Engineering CB .................................... College of Business CLAS ........ College of Liberal Arts and Sciences CM ................... .. .. . ............ .. College of Music e .. ... .. .. .. ......... ................................ Emphasis ED ..... .............................. Sc h ool of Education EO S ................................ Education Specialist ENG R ................•......... College of Engineering GSBA ................................ Graduate Schoo l of Bus in ess Admin is tration GSPA . . .. .. ..... Graduate Schoo l of Public Affairs m . . ............ . ......................................... Minor MA ........................................ .. Master of Arts M.ARCH . .......... .. .... ... Master of Architecture MAUD Master of Arc hit ecture i n Urban Design M B A ........... Master of Business Administration MBS ........................... Master of Basic Science Mq ........................ Master of Criminal Jus ti ce ME .......... ................ . .. Mas ter of Engi _ n eering MH ............... ................ Master of Humanities M I D ......................... Mas t er of Interior Design MLA ............. Master of Landscape Architect ure MPA .............. Master of Public Administratio n MS ..................................... . Mas ter of Science MUR P . Master in Urba n and Regional Pla nnin g o ................ . ....................................... Optio n PH D ..................... .. ....... Doctor of Philosophy XMBA .. Executive M as ter of Bus iness Administratio n XMSHA ...... .......... E x ecu t ive Mas ter of Scie n ce in Health Administration Degree Programs Accountin g ..... . . .... .......................................... .... e (C B ) Accounting .............................................. .... MS (GSBA) Anthropology ................................................ BA (CLAS) Anth ropology ........... .... ................. ... ............ MA (CLAS) Applied Mathem atics .............................. . ...... BS (ENGR) Applied Mathematics . .. . . . . .. ............ ... . . .......... MS (ENGR) Applied Mathematics ................................ PH D (ENGR) Applied Math ematics/Physic s .......................... BA (CLAS) Architecture ............ ....................... . . ....... M .ARCH (AlP) Basic Scie nce ..... .................. .... ....•• •••......... MBS (CL AS) Bilingua l Edu ca tion ......... ..•. ................................. e !ED) Biology .......................................... .. .•.......... BA (CLAS) Biology ............... . ..................... .. . ............... MA (CLAS) Business Administration .......... .. ................ . MBA (GSBA) Business A dmini s t ration, Executive Program ................................ XMBA {CSBA} Chemistry ............................. . ....... BA (CLAS) Chemistry ................ . .................. . ... •............ MS (CLAS) Civil Engineeri n g .......................................... BS (ENGR) Civil Engineering ......................................... MS (ENG R ) Com munication and Theatre ........................... BA (CLAS) Com munication and Theatre .......................... MA (C LAS) Computer Sci e nce . ........................................... o (CLAS) Comp ut e r Sc i e nce ...................................... MS (ENGR) Computer Science and Engi n eeri n g . ....... BS (CSE) (ENG R ) Corporate Instructional Develop m ent and Training .. e (ED} Co unseling and Personnel Servi c es ..................... MA (EO} Criminal Justice ............................... ... ........ MC) (GSPA) Eady Childhood Education ... .. . ....... . . ................. MA (ED) Economics .... ......................................•........ BA (CLAS) Economi cs . . . . . . . .......... ............ . ..... .. . .•••.• .. . MA (CLAS) Educatio n Spec ial is t ............ .. ......................... EO S (EO) Educa tional Administration , c urriculum , and s upervi s ion ........ ........... MA (EO) Educa t ional Administration, curric ulum , and supervis ion . ................. ED S (EO) Educa tion a L Administratio n , curric ulum , and supervis ion .................. PH 0 (EO) E ducational Media Specialis t ........................... c (EO) Edu c ati o nal Psyc h ology . .............................. MA (ED) Educa tionally Handicapped ............................. e (EO) Electrical Engineering BS (ENGR) E lectric a l Engineering ... .. ........ MS (ENGR) E lementary Education ........... . ..................... MA (EO) E n gineering . . .. ............................ ... ........ ME (ENGR) E n gl i s h . ... . . . . . . .. .......... .. ............ ........... .. . BA (CLAS) E n glis h ............................................. . . .. MA (CLAS) E nglish as a Second Language ......................... e (EO) E nvironment a l Science ............................ MS (CLAS) Fin a n ce ...... .......... . ... . .. ............. . . .................. . e (CB) Fina n ce .......................... .. ..................... MS (GSBA) Fine Arts ................................................ BA (CLAS) Fine Arts ...................... .•• ••.•... . ............. BFA (CLAS) Foundation s . . .. ... . .......... . •••........... ............ MA (EO) Frenc h ........................ BA (CLAS) Geography .. . ... . .......................... .•........... BA (CLAS) Geography ........................... ... .••••••••.... . . MA (CLAS) Geology ................................................. BA (CLAS) German .. .... .. .. ......... ... . . . . ......... .••••• •...... .. BA ( C LAS) Health Administration . ...........•.............. MS (GSBA) H ea lth Admini s tration , Execu tive Program . ........ . .. . .... .. XMSHA (GSBA) History ....... . ............. . . . . . .. ..... .. . . . ............ BA (CLAS) Hi s tory . . ............................ .. ........•........ MA (C LAS) Human Re so urce s Management ....................... e (CB ) Humanities ........................................... MH (CLAS) Indu strial and Organiza t io n a l Psychology . . . .... MBAIBA (CLAS) , MBAIMA (CLAS) Infant Specialization .............. ........... ............. e (ED) Information Sy s tems ....................................... e (CB) Informa ti o n Sy s tem s ....... . ............... ....... MS (GSBA) Ins tructi o nal Computi n g S p ec iali s t ............ ..... e ( E D) Ins tructional Technologist ............................... e (EO) Instructional Technology ............................ MA (EO) Ins tructional Techno logy .......................... PH 0 (ED) Interior Design ........................................ MID (AlP) lntemationa_l Affairs .................................. m (CLAS) Interna ti o nal Business .................................... e (CB) Landscape Architecture .......... . .. . . .............. MLA (AlP) Management ........................................ . ......... e (CB) Management ........... . .. . .....•............... . . ... . MS (GSBA) Marketing ............. . . .••.... .. ............................. e (CB) Marketing .............. . . . .•.•..•. .. . ... . ........... .. MS (GSBA) Mathematics . . .. . . ....... .. . . . ... ......... ... . ......... B A (CLAS) Mathematics ............ . ........... . ................. MA (CLAS) Mechanical Engineering ............... . .......... BS (ENGR) Mec h a ni cal E ngineering .......................... MS (ENGR) Music .......... .... ................ . ......................... B S (CM) Nurs in g Administration ........... ........... MBNMS (CB) Operati o n s Managemen t ................................. e (CB) Philosophy . .. . . .. ........... ........•..... ............. BA (CLAS) P h ysics ................................. . ................. BA (CLAS) Poli ti cal Science ......... . .••••••.. .... ............ .. BA (CLAS) Politica l Scien ce ........... . . .. . . ................... MA (CLAS) Ps yc h o l ogy ............................................ BA (CLAS) Psyc h o l ogy ........................................... MA (CLAS) Publi c Administration .......................... MPA (GSPA) P ublic Admini stntion .......................... PHD (GSPA) Reading and Writing .................................. MA (EO ) Secondary Education .................................. MA (ED) Socia l Scie nce ...... . .. ..............••..... .. . ...... MSS (CLAS) Socio l ogy ................. ...•• • •..................... BA (CLAS) Socio l ogy ....... .... . . .. . ...•... . ......... MA (CLAS) Spanish . .............. . .................................. BA (CLAS) Spocia l Education . . . .. . ... ........................ MA (ED) Teac her Education Program s . .. . ................ ........ e (EO) Technical Comm unications . ..................... M S (CLAS) Tran sportation and Di s tribution Managemen t ... e (CB) Urban and Regional P lann ing ................. MURP (AlP) Urba n Design . ......................... . ............ MAUD (AlP ) Writing ................ . ................................. BA (CLAS)

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. . , .. $3.50 .-•-:.; .... SEGO D CLASS POS T ACE p ID AT THE POST OFFICE BOULDER, COLORADO

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CU-DENVER AND THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN METROPOLIS I A few crumbs washed out of Cherry Creek and the Platte River sparked the mass migration that gave b th to Denver. Following Green Russell ' s discover y in the summer of 1858, 100,000 gold seekers crossed the previously shunned Great American Desert for the Col<;>rado Rockies . Soaring, snowy summitswhich had 'been America ' s greatest ob s tacle to west ward e x p ai}sion-suddenly became a goal, a granite lined treastlre chest. Auraria , he first town company , soon succumbed to a rival a ro s s Cherry Creek Den v er City , which was name d for James W . Denver, governor of what was then K k nsas Territory. Denver was founded on a jumped clai m b y real estate speculators gambling that America ' s 1econd great gold rush was no humbug. The Golden Gamble Before the great Colorado gold rush of 1858-59, the Rockies off red little to attract settlers , except the "hairy bank notes " the beaver pelts prized by fur trappers, traders, andl fashionably-hatted gentlemen in eastern America Europe. The gold rush changed that, as the rudely di s possessed Cheyenne and Arapaho soon discovered . Denver City was a long shot. Most of the gold rush "cities" would become ghost towns. In the struggle to become the county seat , the state capitol, and the re gional metropolis, there would be many losers and only one winner. Denverites determined early to mine the miners , to relieve prospectors of whatever wealth they might find up in the mountain mining camps. On the mining frontier , everyone was gambling on the riches of the earth. In the i:nstant city of Denver, folks gambled with cards and dice, with mining stock, and real estate . Such speculation was easier work than wading around in icy mountain streams with picks and pans. Townsfolk bet on everything from dog figh ts to snow fall. City fathers amused themselves with card games, using town lots as poker chips . Whole blocks of Denver City changed hands of an evening . L'""'"'u" began as a gamble on gold , and Denver as a real estate found e d th e Denver Gty Town Compan y on November 22 , 1858, succes s ful miners . to mine the miners. William H . Larimer , Jr., to make his fortune by selling town Jots to Tom Noel Collection

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Mining Minds Town characters included Professor Oscar J. Goldrick, who astonished Coloradans by swearing at his oxen in Latin. This shaggy Irishman also opened the first school. In this windowless, doorless, mud-roofed log cabin, Professor Goldrick accepted all students -red, white, black, yellow, and brown . Foreseeing a need for higher education , a Denver legislator introduced a bill to cre ate a public university in Denver. This led to a squab ble in the territorial legislature about where the university should be. A Prison or a University? Legislators eventually designed a compromise. Den ver received the state capitol. Boulder and Canon City, two other ambitious towns, also sought state institu tions. Canon City, at least in legend , was given a choice between the state university and the state penitentia ry. City fathers in the southern Colorado town reck oned that the prison would be better attended. Prisoners, they figured, would be better behaved than university students and, in those days, prisoners could be hired as cheap labor. Furthermore, college professors were a poor and strange lot, sometimes as dissipated as their students. So Canon City chose the prison and Boulder received the state university as a consolation prize. Not until 1876 would an embryo university actually open its doors in Boulder. Photo by Tom Noel Photo by Roger Whitacre Boom a n d Bust Meanwhile Denver throve. Gold proved to be only one of the riches of the Colorado earth. Fortunes in silver and coal, in zinc and lead , molybdenum and oil, helped make Denver a major city. By 1890, the Mile High metropolis had a population over 100,000. In a single genera t ion the gold rush crossroads had emerged as the second largest city in the American West, second to San Francisco but larger than Los Angeles or any town in Texas. Colorado's mineral boom burst with the Depression of 1893. Flush times did not return until after the even bleaker Great Depression of the 1930s. World War II, however, triggered a new bonanza. Since 1940, a mil lion newcomers have settled in the 3,497 square-mile metropolis of Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, and Jefferson counties.

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Colorado crofs-country skiers prowl old mines and ghost towns. Photo b y Tom Noel The Mile City From airp ane and auto windows, greenhorns catch their first glimpse of the giant, green oasis at the foot of the Rockies. Whereas a spiderweb of railroad tracks transformed ! Denver into the Queen City of the Plains, a of cement enables the city to maintain regional dominance over a vast hinterland . Not only a highway nerwork but the 15 inch thick runways of Stapleton Inrernational Airport make Denver the hub of the RockiJs. One cannot even get to heaven, Colo radans have been known to grumble, wi thout going t hro ugh Sta ' leton Airport. A freeway network ties the metropolis together. Centered on the nptorious "mousetrap" intersection of interstates 25 and 70, this network now bulges with belt loops and suburb sprawl. Whereas Union Station once made Denver the state and regional travel hub, Stapleton International Airport-America's fourth busiest-has done the sar.e since its creation in 1929 . A projected new airport is the number one ambition of the metropolis . Denverite s are unusually mobile. They boast one of the highe s t , if not the highes t , per capita licensed mo tor vehicle 0wnership rate in the world. Cars are basic to the lifestyle; for each man, woman, and child there is .8 vehicle. This automobile metropolis, this restless hub of the Rockies , retains its greatest asset-easy escape. Within an hour's drive to th e east lie prairie ghost towns and the exquisite solitude of the High Plains. An hour's drive to the west takes Denverites to campgrounds, hiking trail s, mountain lakes, ski areas, and wilder ness areas snu gg led against th e Continental Divide . High country trails a half hour away from Denver offer stu dents easy escape. Photo by Tom Noel

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Education to a Higher Degree In Colorado's mobile, footloose society education has been prized. Denver boasts the second highe st educa tional level in the country. While the main campus of the state university has remained in Boulde r, exten sion courses have been offered in Denver since 1912. This tiny Denver campus-run for years b y a single full-time faculty member-became the Denv er Center in 1957 with authority to grant undergraduate and some graduate degree s . Full independence came in 1973, when th e Denver Center became the Denver Campu s of the University of Colorado. Over 17,000 students a year enrolled at CU-Denver, confirming the need for the new campus. Then and now the CU-Denver student tended to be unique. The average age is 27, 70% are employed, 55% are married. Over half the students and many of the faculty are part time , enabling them to bring work experiences into the classroom. Between 1973 and 1976, the state built th e Auraria Higher Education Center on a 169-acre campus shared by the University of Colorado a t Den ver, Metropolitan State College, and the Community College of Denver. Auraria-from the Latin word for gold-has evo lved from a gold rush boom town to a booming campus, the largest in the sta te with approximately 30,000 stu dent s enrolled each semester. The campus is a unique experiment in higher educa tion ; its shared facilities in clude a librar y, s tudent center, and recreation com plex. Each institution maintains a different academic role; CU-Denver is charged with emphasizing upper division and graduate programs. •• Photo by Tom Noel CU-Denver Finds a Home After 76 yea rs in recycled downtown buildings , CU Denver in 1988 moved into i t s first, c ustom-made new home. This $28,000,000, 257, 000-square-foot building occupies two full blocks between Speer Boulevard and Twelfth Stree t , Larimer and Lawrence Street s. Hoover, Berg, Desmond , a Denver architectural firm, designed this post modern brick str u cture wit h distin ctive and genero us glass brick atriums. From a five-story front age facing downto wn, the CU -Denver clas sroo m , lab oratory, and office comp lex steps down to two-stories facing the athletic facilities and library at th e heart of the campus. Today, CU-Denver offers gradua te and undergrad uate programs in Architec ture and Plafll!ing , Business Administration, Education, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts, Music, and Public Affair s . Ninth Street Historic Park in the center of the campus sur vives as a reminder that CU-Denver occupies the creek bank where Denver-and Colorado-began. CU Denver flourishe s today on that Auraria site where prospectors found paydir t and foun ded what is now a metropolis of 1.9 million people . -Tom Noel, CU-Denver History

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University of Colorado at Denver 1200 Larimer D enver, Colorado 80 2 04 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog 1989-90 Although thi s catalog wa s prepared on the basis of the best information available at the tim e , all information ( includin g the academic calendar , admission and gra duat io n requireme nt s, co ur se offerings and cour se de s criptions , and s tatement s of tuition and fees) is subjec t to change witho ut notice or obligation . CUD e n ver is a n affir m ative ac tion/equal opportunity institution. For c urrent calendars , tuition rates, r eq uir emen t s, deadline s, e tc., s tudent s s hould refer to a copy of the Schedule of Classes fbr the se me s ter in which they intend to enroll. The co ur es lis ted in this catalog are int ended as a genera l indication of the Univer sity of Colorado at D e n ver c u rricu lum . Courses and program s are subject to modifi ca t io n at any tim e . Not all co ur ses are offered every se me s ter , and the fac ult y t eac h i n g a particular co u rse or pr ogram may vary from time to time . The instructor may a lt er the co ntent of a co u rse or pro gram t o meet parti c ular class needs . Cou rses are lis ted by college or school. University C atalog. (USPS 651-0 ) 262 Stadium Building , Campus Box 384, Boulder , Col rado 80309-0384 Volum e 1989 o. 3 , May/]une Published 4 t imes a year: January/February March/April , May/]une, August/Sep temb er Second class pos tage paid at Boulder , Colorado . POSTMASTER: Send address changes t o University of Colorado Catalog , CU Denver Publication s, Boulder , Colorado 80302. I

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2 I University of Colorado at D enver Table of Contents Academic Calendar .... . ... ... ... .................... . Message from the Chancellor ................... .. Chancellor's Advisory Group .......... .......... . Administration of the University and of the CU Denver Campus .............. . The University ..... . ..... . ............ .... .......... . History ................................................. .. Academic Structure . ........ ......................... . Academic Programs ....... ......... ........... ..... .. Accreditation ..................... ...... . . .... .... ..... . Memberships ..... .......... ........... ........ .... .... . General Information ........ .... ................. . Auraria Higher Education Center ...... ......... . Affirmative Action ........................... ........ . Researc.h ....... ....... . ......... . ......... ....... .... . . . . Center s and Institutes for Research, Service, and Training .............. . Faculty and Staff ...... ........ ....................... . Admission Policies and Procedures ...... . Undergraduate Admission Information ....... . Freshmen Requirements ........ .................. .. Tests .......... . .... ... . ........ . ...................... .... . Transfer Students ....... .... ...... ................... . Former Students ...................................... . International Students .............................. . Graduate Admission ........ .......... ..... . . .... ... . Non-Degree Students ....... ........................ . Tui t i o n and Fees ............................ ...... .. Residency Cla ssificatio n ..................... ...... .. Financial Aid . ........... ........ ......... ............ . Registration .......................... . .......... . .... . Academic Pol icies and Regulat ions ..... .. Famil y Educational Rights and Privacy Act ............... ..... ........... .......... .. Special Programs and Facilities ............ . Alumni Association ..................... ......... ... . Book Center ......................... ... ....... ........ . . Child Care Center .................................... . Computing Services ..... ; ... ... ..................... . Division of Continuing Education .............. . Foundation .................................... .... . . . . .. International Education ......... ..... .... . ..... .... . Student Assistance Cen ter ......... ... ............ . Studen t .Service s .................................. .. Clubs and Organizations .......................... . Student Government ...... .... ......... ......... .... . Academic Center for Enrichment . ....... .... ... . Educational Opportunity Program ...... ...... .. Page 4 5 6 7 9 9 9-10 10 11 11 11-49 11 12 12 13-16 16-17 18-26 18-20, 26 18-20 20 21-22 23 23 23-24 24 27-29 30 30-34 35-37 37-45 44 46-49 46 46 46 47 48 48 48 49 50-57 51 52 54-55 55 Pre-Collegiate Deve lopment Program .... ..... . Orientation ....... ...... ......................... .... . . . . Testing Center ...... ................................. . . Veterans Affairs ...... ...... ......... ... ... .... . ...... . Women's Resources ..... ............... ... ......... .. Student Conduct ................. ..... ...... ........ .. C e nter f o r I n t e rnships and C oop erative E ducatio n ............................................ . Library Services . ........................... . ....... . Media and Telecommunications ................ . Architecture and Planning Library ........ . .... . The Graduate School .... ......... .............. .. Degrees Offered ................................ ..... .. Financial Aid ..... . ... ........ ......... ................ . Admission Requirements ..................... ... . .. Registration ........ ................................... .. Requirements for Advanced Degrees ... ....... . School of Architecture and Planning .... . Built Environment Studies ......... ............... . Architecture ....................... . ....... ............. . Interior Design ........................... ...... . .... . .. Landscape Architecture and Urban Design .. . Urban and Regional Planning ................... .. College of Business and Admin i stration and Graduate School of Business Page 55 56 56 56 56 56-57 58-61 62-65 64 65 66-81 67-68 68-69 69-71 72-73 73-81 82-111 86-87 92-97 98-100 101-106 106-110 Administration ........... . . ..... ............ . . ...... 112-147 Accounting ..... .......... .... . ......... ... . ...... ....... 122-123, 126-Business Law 127, 134-135 , 142-143 127 Finance ..................................... ............ .. 123,127,135-136, 143-144 Health Administration .............................. 136-137, 144-145 Human Resources Management ............... .. 123-124 Information Systems ....... .... .. ...... .... . ... ..... . 124, 128, 137-138, 145 International Business .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. 125 Management ...... .... .......... .... .... . ........... .... 125, 128-129, 138-139 , 145-146 Marketing ..................... .......... ... . ..... ... . ... 125, 129-130, 139-140, 146 Operations Management ...................... ..... 126, 130-131, Quantitative Methods .......... .................... . Transportation and Distribution Management ....................................... .. Business Administration, Mas ter .............. .. Executive Programs .... ............................. . 146-147 131, 147 126, 131 133-134 140-141

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School of Education 00 •••••••• 00 00 ••• 00 00 00 •• 00 00. Teacher Education Programs . ............. . ... ... . Counseling Jnd Personnel Services ..... .... ... . Early Education and Early Childhood / Special Education .......... . . . ..... . Educational Administration .................. . ... . Educational Psychology . .. .... .. ..... ... . .......... . Elementary Education . ...... .. . ........ . ........... . Foundations . ... .... . .... .. . . . . . ..... . . .... ..... . ...... . Instructional Technology ...... . ....... ... . . ... . . . . . Language Culture .... . .... . .... ..... ........... . .. ::: ::::: Secondary E 6 ucation ..... ...... .... .... ............ . Special Edu dati on ........... ... ... ....... ............ . College of and Applied Science .............. . ........... .... . . .......... ....... . Applied Mafuematics ....... .. ......... . . . ... ... . ... . C.vil E g . I n me rnng . . ....... . ...... .... .... . ............ . Electrical Engineering and Computer Science ... . ... . ..... . ....... . . .. ..... ... . Mechanical Engineering .... . .................. .... . Non-Departmental . ...... ...... . ::: Anthropology . ..... ................................... . Master of B sic Science ........ .... . .... ..... . ...... . Biology ......... .... ..................... .. ... ........... . Chemistry ........... oo •••••••• oo •••••• oooo•••oo•oo Communica ion and Theatre 00 00.00 00 ••••• 00 •• ••• • Economics . . ........... ....... ... . ... ... ..... . . . . . .. .. . . English .. .... . ...... . ......... ................. . . . ... . . .. . Master of Ejvironmental Science . ... . . ... ...... . Ethnic Studies 00 00 ••• 00 ••• 00 •• 00 00 •••• 00 ••••••• • • 00 ••••• Page 148-187 152-156 156-158 158-160 161-164 165-167 167-169 169-170 170-176 176-180 180-181 181-182 182-184 184-187 188-227 202-203 203-209 210-221 222-226 227 227 228-341 243-248 249-250 251-254 255-257 258-265 266-271 272-277 278 279-281 Contents I 3 Fine Arts oooooooooooooooo.oo oo •• oo ••••• Geography . . oo.oooo• • •oo•oooooo••oooo ...... oooo G eology . ... .............. . . ....... .. .... .. ..... ......... . Histor y .. . .......... ...... . ...... . . .. .. .. .. . .. . .. ........ . Honors in Humanities . ... . ... ... .. ....... ... ... .. .. . Master of Humanities ooooooo••oo••oooooooooooo•oo• .. Mathematics ... 00 • • 00 00 •• 00 00 00 00 00.00 ... 00.00 00 00.00 00. Modem Languages . ... 00 •••••••• 00 00. 00 ... 00 00 ••• 00 00 Philosophy . .... ..... . ........... ....................... . Physics •oooo•oooooo••oooooo ...... oo ..... oo.oooo .... . Political Science 00 00 00. 00 00.00. 00 • • 00 00 ... 00 .. 00 00 00 00 .. Psychology ................ .. . ..... . . ......... .... . ..... . Master of Social Science 00 00 ... 00 00. 00. 00 ......... 00. Sociology .. ............... . . . .. ...... . ................... . Master of Technical Communication ...... 00 .. . Military Science .... 00 ••• 00.00 ••• 00.00 .. 0000 .. 00 00 .. . Army ROTC oooooooooo•oo•oooo• .. oooooooo•oooo• Air Force ROTC . 00 ... 00 00 ••••• 00 00 00.00 ........... 00 00 College of Music ooooooooooooooo/...oo ....... oo •• Music oo•oooo•••oo•oo•oo••oo•oo•oo•oooo•oo•oooooo ... Performance Music 00 00 ••• 00 00 00 00 00 ....... 00 ••• ••• 00. Graduate School of Public Affairs 00 00 oo ... The Centers ..... 00. 00 •• 00 00 •••• 00 00 00 ........ 00 00 ••• 00 00 Master of Public Administration 00 00 00 •• 00 00 00. 00 Doctor of Philosophy, Public Administration ..... . . 00.00 00 •••• 00 00 00 ....... 00 ••••• 00. Master of Criminal Justice ... 00 00 • • 00.00 00 00 .. 00 00 00 Faculty Roster .... 00 • • 00.00 ••••• 00 00 00 00 ............ . Campus Map oo••oo•oooo .......... oo .. oo .. ... oo ..... 00 Index ... oo ............ oooooo•oo ... oo.oo ...... oooooo•oo ... . Application Form oooooo••ooooooooooo ......... oooo•oo Degree Programs Page 282-285 286-287 288-290 291-296 296-297 297-298 299-307 308-316 317-320 320-322 323-328 329-332 333-334 335-340 340-341 342-345 343-344 344-345 346-353 351-353 353 354-367 357-358 359-360 360-363 366-367 369-380 382-383 385-391 395-396 Inside back cover

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4 I University of Colorado at Den ver ACADEMIC CALENDAR1 Sum m er 19892 June 5-9 Orientation June 12 First day of classes July 4 Holiday (no classes) August 9 End of term Fall 19892 August 17-23 Orientation August 24 First day of classes September 4 Holiday (no classes) November 23-24 Holidays (no classes) December 18 End of seme ter • 2 Spnng 1990 January 8-12 Orientation January 15 Holiday (no classes) January 16 First day of classes March 19-23 Spring vacation (no classes) May 14 End of seme ter 1 The University reserves the right to alter th e Acade mic Calendar at any time . 2 Consult the Schedule of Classes for application deadlin e dates, deadlin es for changing programs and registration dates and procedures. 3 Ten tative dates for Summer 1990. Consult the Summer 1990 Sched ule of Classes for current dates . Summer 19903 June 4-8 June 11 July 4 August 6 Fall 19902 August 13-17 August 23 September 3 November 22-23 December 17 Spring 19912 January 7-11 January 14 January 15 March 25-29 May 13 Orientation First day of classes Ho l iday (no classes) E n d of term Orientation First day of classes Holiday (no classes) Holidays (no classes) End of semester O rientation Holiday (no classes) First day of classes S p ring vacation (no classes) End of semester

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I Message F r om the Chancellor Dear studeT: Welcome to the University of Colorado at Den ver. On of the faculty, staff, and students, I offer to you the challenging environment of one of Colorado s premier institutions of higher edu cation . Your decision to attend CU-Denver shows your willingness to learn at Denver's only urban public univ rsity. CU-Denver is one of the four campuses of the University Colorado system. As a vital part of that system ( offering baccalaureate, master's, and doctoral programs, we have achieved distinction nationall y internationally because of the high quality of oltt programs, faculty, and alumni. Located in downtown Denver, the University challenges i ts students both academically and per sonally in ah intellectual environment that e_ncourages1commitment, curiosity, and imagina tion. A distinguishing characteristic of CU-Denver is our urban perspective that is an integral theme in our acaderrtic programming, the orientation of our faculty, and the identity of our student body. Since 1972, enrollment has grown to approximatflY 10,096 students, including 5,588 Chancellor fohn C. Buechner undergraduates and 4,508 graduate students. Chancellor I 5 The University offers some 40 degree and degree option programs at the baccalaureate level and over 60 degree andl degree option programs at the post baccalaureate level designed to provide you with a foundation on which to build your intellectual, aesthetic, and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens . Components of this edutational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a complement to classroom study . The University's seven colleges and schools (Business, Public Affairs, Li!kral Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, Music, and Architecture and Planning) and The G t aduate School provide instruction and research programs that focus on the areas of knowledge1 including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to ma,king available to yo u the opporh!tnities for gaining knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your economic and persor{allives . We at thr Denver campus take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their var ied needs. his is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccala).lreate education and the applied aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national isJues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems. We look l forward to working with you as yo u join our community of scholars/teachers and dedicated staff. I promise a rich intellectual environment and a challenging educational experience . Most of all, I look forward to seeing ypu at graduation and awarding yo u the CU-Denver degree . My best " shes to you and to your future . John C. Buechner Chancellor j University of Colorado at Denver

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6 I University of Colorado at Denver Chancellor's Advisory Group VERONICA BARELA, Executive Director NEW SED,Community Development Corporation JACQUES W. BERNIER, Manager, Personnel Admin istration, Aerospace Systems Program , Hughe s Air-craft Company . DIANE BOULTER, President, The Denver Partner ship THE HON. JEANNE FAATZ, Colorado State Repre sentative WILLIAM W. FLETCHER, President and General Manager, Rocky Mountain News THE HON. REGIS GROFF,Colorado State Senator THE HON. SANDY HUME, Colorado State Senator LEE LARSON, Vice President/General Manager, KOA Radio 85 FRANK NEWMAN, President, Education Commis sion of the States THOMAS PECHT, Publisher, Denver Business Journal. BRUCE ROCKWELL, Executive Director, The Colo rado Trust HERRICK ROTH , President, Herrick Roth Associates THE HON. PAUL D . SCHAUER, Colorado State Rep resentative GAIL SCHOETTLER , Colorado State Treasurer JEROME SERACUSE , Fellow, American Institute of Architects ; Seracuse Lawler & Partners TOM STRICKLAND,Brownstein, Hyatt, Farber & Madden KEN TONNING, Vice President/General Manager , KUSA -TV, CH 9 BEN TRUJILLO, Principal, Financial Group CLAIR VILLANO, Director, Consumer Fraud Division. THE HON. WILMA WEBB, Colorado State Represen tati ve The University of Colorado seal, adopted in 1908, def?icts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed m laurel is placecf beside him. The Greek inscription means " Let your light shine." According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civilization "stands as the criterion of culture." The laurel symbolizes honor or success , the youth of the figure suggests the " morning of life," and the scroll represents written language.

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ADMINISTRATIO N Board of KATHY ARNOLD, Littleton, term expires 1994 RICHARD.). BERNICK, Littleton , term e xpires 1992 ROBERT E. CALDWELL, Colorado Springs, term ex pires 1992 PETER C. DIETZE, Boulder, term expires 1990 LYNN J. E LLINS, Longmont, term expires 1990 HARVEY PHELPS, Pueblo, term expires 1994 NORWOO q L. ROBB, Littleton, term expires 1990 ROY H . SHRE, Greeley, term expires 1992 DAVID WIJN, Colorndo Springs, term expi
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The Univ 1 rsity of Colorado at Denver is one of the most impontant educational resources in the Denver metropolitan area. CU-Denver , one of four institu tions in University of Colorado system, is an urban, non-residential campus located in downtown Denver . Major civic cultural, business, and governmental ac tivities are in close proximity. CU-Den J r offers undergraduate degrees in more than 40 and graduate degree s in more than 60. Ph.D. degrees are offered in public affairs , applied math ematics, educational administration, and instruc tional Doctoral studies also are available in engineerng and other fields in cooperation with CU-Bouldef . Special emphasis is placed on programs that will assure students professional opportuni ties after gr duation. All programs are tailored to meet the needs f the diverse student population. Classes are offered during weekday and evening hours, and on weeken!is. Students ( ages range between 17 and 75. The aver age age is 29 . Two-thirds hold full-time jobs and 60 percent attend part time . Sixty-two percent are enrolled at! the upper division or graduate levels. faculty actively promote the special role of an urban institution in meeting the needs of stu dents. Ma f y faculty bring their work experiences to the classror,m. They are alert to the challenges and advances of the urban environment and responsible to the of students and the community. The com bination of CU-Denver's talented faculty and highly motivated students creates a vital and exciting educa tional environment. Students are offered the unique educationa'l opportunity to combine " real world " ex perience with academic excellence. I His t ory Just ove a century ago the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder, in 1876 . In 1912 , the Univer sity of Colorado's Department of Correspondence and Extension ras established in Denver , to meet the needs of the burgeoning population. As the breadth of course offerings expanded, so did the demand for degree granting status. The Denver Extension Center was re named the University of Colorado-Denver Center in 1965, and by 1969, 23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study were offered. In 1972 the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria Campus, CU-Denver's current site. And in this same year the Denver "Center" was re named CU-Denver. Two years later the University of Colorado was reorganized into four campuses Den ver , Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder . University of Colorado System As one of four campuses of the University of Colo rado, CU-Denver has a special role and mission in Col orado higher education . The University of Colorado at Boulder now serves about 22 , 000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs . The Health Sciences Center in Denver provides edu cation and training to medical, dental, nursing and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 5 ,500 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, grad U?te, and professional programs. CU-Denver' s role within the University system is primarily to address the needs for undergraduate and graduate instruction in the Den ver metropolitan area . Emphasis is given to professional, preprofessional, and liberal arts training in the context of a strong multidisciplinary and applied agenda for research and creative activities. CU-Denver students have access to the library resources of all campuses and cultural events within the University s y stem . Academic Structure Each of the four campuses of the University of Col orado System Denver , Boulder , Colorado Springs , and Health Sciences in Denver has its own Chan c e llor and campus administration. The Chancellors, in turn, report to the President 0f the CU-System. The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado ap prove the overall direction provided by the President of the Sys tem. The System President represents the University of Colorado and manages the planning for d e velopment of the System , apportionment of re s ources across campuses , the System-wide Graduate School , and general policy regarding academic stan dards, instructional initiatives, and faculty and staff personnel matters, and is supported by a system-wide Faculty Senate. CU-Denver , as well, has its own fac ulty governance structure . Students also have their own governance institutions. The Chancellor of CU-Denver represents CO Denver and manages campus goal-setting, policy de velopment, academic affairs, and budget and financial matters. Three Vice Chancellors assist the Chancellor in the fields of Academic Affairs, Administration and

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10 I General Information Finance , and Planning and Enrollment Management. Each of these Vice Chancellors is respo nsible for the essential components of the campus enterpri se. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs se ts the highest standard s in teaching, research, and service, and over sees all academic units, The Graduate School, the library, the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education, Division of Continuing Education, and Research Ad ministration and Creative Activities . The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance manages the campus budget , Office of Financial and Business Services, and the Personnel Office . The Vice Chancellor for Plan ning oversees Admissions and Records, Affirmative Action , Alumni Office, Computing Services, Facilities Management, Financial Aid, Planning and Institu tional Research, and Student Services. An Office of Public Relations reports directly to the Chancellor and assists in orc hestratin g all promotional efforts and the external affairs of th e campus. The CU-Denver Graduate School is a component of the CU-S ys tem counterpart. All gradua te units reside within The Graduate School except Architecture and Planning, Busines s, and Public Affairs. Academic Programs CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the cit izens of Denver and the region. With the rapid de velopment of th e national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue th eir studies here . Today CU-Denver is composed of seven distinct academic units: School of Architecture and Planning Colle ge of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Admini s tration School of Ed ucat ion College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Liber al Arts and Sciences Colleg e of Music Graduate School of Public Affairs These units now accommodate approxima tel y 11,000 students nearly half as large as CU-Boulder itself t aught by about 300 regular, full-time faculty mem bers. The diversity of th e student body is a hallmark of CU-Denver and a source of deep pride. Among them are traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school. There also are older students who, perhaps for financial rea s on s or the press of famil y commitments or because th ey've only lately recognized th e value of a college education, have delayed entry. And there are profes sionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appreciation of the world around them. The undergraduate colleges admit freshm an and trans fer students and offer programs leading to the bacca l aureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, engineering, and music . The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also provides pre -pr ofessional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the hea lt h sciences. The School of Education offers programs lead ing to teacher education. The Gr aduate School offers master's programs in the arts, sciences , humanities, engineering , education, and music to students with baccalaureate degrees. The School of Architecture and Planning , the Graduate School of Bus iness Adminis tration, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leading to master's degrees in their specialized areas. CU-Denver doctoral program s are available in public affairs, education , and applied mathematics. Doc t oral work in engineering also is available in coopera tion with CU-Boulder. CU-Denver faculty also participa t e in a few other doctoral programs offered at CU Boulder . For a complete account of bachelor's and master's degree programs offered by CU Denver, see the list ing of degree programs on t he inside back cover of t his catalog . The college and school sections of this ca t alog describe specific policies on requirements for gradua tion , course requirements for various majors , course load policies, course descriptions, and similar informa tion. CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for ed ucation which leads to improved professional oppor tunity in the Information Age. Many programs emphasize practical business world applications, and all CU Denver students are given the opportunity to attain computer literacy. Specific computer-oriented aca demic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs. The Future CU-Denver is committed to the highest standards of education, scholarship, and service to the community. From this commitment springs the vita l energy tha t infuses every campus pursuit. The pace is fast, per haps unprecedented. Undergraduate studies are at once becoming more and more varied, challenging, and re warding. CU-Denver is reaching out to all who can benefit from the high quality education it has to offer. New highly innovative applied and professional grad u a t e degrees are being developed that address the emerging needs of the region's economy. Centers for state-of-the-fie l d research at CU-Denver are generat ing important practical solutions to some of Colorado's and the nat ion's most serious social, economic, envi ronmental, and technological problems . Throughou t history, urban civilization and the arts and humani ti es have evolved in a rich synergy. CUD enver -an urban campus is deeply involved in enriching t h e cultural milieu of the Denver area. Clearly, the Univer sity of Colorado at Denver is on the move . Join us and share in an exciting adventure in learning.

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Accredi tation and Memberships ACCREDIT ' JION American Jo\ssembly of Collegiate Schools of Business North Cerltral Association of Colleges and Secon dary Schools Accreditin t1 Commission on Education for Health Ser vices Administration American ociety of Landscape Architects American Planning Association Colorado State Board of Education National ouncil for the Accreditation of Teacher Education National Architectural Accrediting Board See the Co pege of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalog for the Rrograms accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board f 1r Engineering and Technology National ssociation of Schools of Music National ssociation of Schools of Public Affairs and Atstration Listed below are the organizations affiliated with the various divisions and departments at CU-Denver : School of chitecture and Planning American Irlstitute of Architects Ameri can In sti tute of Planners American lrtstitute of Certified Planners American S f ciety of Landscape Architects American Society of Int erio r D esig ner s Architectur 1 Researc h Centers Consortium Association of Collegiat e Schools of Planning Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Council of andscape Architecture Educators Society of chitectural Historians College of usiness and Administration The Econo c Club of Colorado SchoolofE1 ucaaon Colorado Principals Center National Educational Renewal Projects-Partnerships U.S. Depar 1 ent of Education , Project L.E. A.D. College of E j gineering and Applied Science Colorado Engineering Association Associated ngineering Students American Society of Ci vil Engineers American Sqciety of Mechanical Engineer s Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers Society of 1 omen Engineers Graduate School of Public Affairs Colorado M nicipal League American S iety for Public Administration National As ociation of Schools of Public Affairs and Adminis tration Association or Public Policy Analysis and Management Pi Alpha Alpha, Public Affairs Honorary Association Western Executive Seminar Center Metro Air Quality Council Institute for Nonprofit Organization Management College of Liberal Arts and Scie nce s Den ver Natural Histor y Museum Den ver Art Museum Mesa Verde National Park Denver Zoological Garden Den ver Public School System Accreditation I 11 Col orado Chapter of the American Chemical Society P si Chi College of Music Colorado Choir, Inc. Sigma Alpha Iota Continuing Education Rocky Mountain Chapter of Chartered Life Underwriters Colorado Chapter : Purchasing Management Association Colorado D epartment of Labor and Employme nt League of Women Voters Aur aria Higher Education Center The Auraria Higher EducatiOI(l Center is the site for the Unive sity of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State Collepe, and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share library (which is adminis t ered by CU-Denver), classroom, and related facilities on a 171-acre Auraria campus . Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered . On the Auraria campus are administrative and class room buildings, the Auraria Library, the student cen ter, book center, child care and development centers, physical education facilities, science building, and ser vice buildings . The new building s share the campus with the re minders Denver's past-historic Ninth Street Park, restored church buildings , and the Tivoli brewery buil t in 1882. The Tivoli has been renovated into a complex containing specialty shops, restaurants, and entertainment.

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12 I General Information Affirmative Acti o n/Equal Opportunity Title IX CU-Denver follows a policy of equal opportunity in education and in employment. In pursuance of this policy, no Denver campus department, unit, disci pline, or employee shall descriminate against an indi vidual or group on the basis of race, sex, creed, color, age, national origin, veteran status, or individual hand icap. This policy applies to all areas of the University affecting present and prospective students or employ ees . The institution's educational programs, activities, and services offered to students and/or employees are ad ministered on a nondiscriminatory basis subject to the provisions of the Titles VI and V1l of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Act of 1974, and Age Dis crimina t ion in Employment Act of 1967. A CU-Denver Affirmative Action/Equal Opportu nity program has been established to implement this policy. For information about these provisions on eq uity, discrimination, or fairness contact Affirmative Action, 1250 14th St., 556-2509. Research an d Oth er Creative Pursuits CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledge through the research efforts of its faculty. It is equally supportive of the other creative en deavors of its faculties in the arts, humanities, and design fields. These achievements not only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in schol arship and professional practice . In addition, these ac tivities constitute an important component of CU-Denver' s service to the community at large. Therefore, funded research is a major priority at CU-Denver. An important aspect of research and other creative a ct ivities at CU-Denver is its multidisciplinary and ap plied nature. Research in every school and college at C U-Denver addresses questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region. Its position within a thriving metropolitan area serves, as well, as a base for exploring topics of national and even international import. But not all research at CO D enver yields solutions of immediate prac t ical significance. Major efforts now explore topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplines. These, of course, are car ried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that k n ows no national bounds. These efforts may yield in sights that eventually open the way to practical ap p lications in the next century. Research projects, training, and public service pro grams at CU-Denver encompass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study with a focus on issues that rela t e to city, state, national , and international issues. D uring 1987-88, CU-Denver faculty and staff received external grants and contracts totalling $7,850,628 for research, training, and public service programs . All signs point to a steady increase in funded research in the years ahead for CU-Denver. The benefits for the campus will be substantial. Such research assists in sustaining scholarly discourse, enables faculty mem bers to engage in the advancement of knowledge, pro vides the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern for society, and enhances the educa tion of students . Many students actively participate in research activities overseen by faculty members . Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporar y economic, political , educa tional , engineering , mathematical , scientific , and en vironmental needs. Financial support has been obtained for program and service development in the areas of computational mathematics, bilingual and s pecial ed ucation, cooperative education, health administra tion , international affairs, and e x ecutive seminars as well as institutes on aging and veterans' employment and training. Other projects include statewide investigations of economic development, poverty , court-anne xed arbi tration, air quality and water control, and highway construction. Computer related projects include mul tilevel algorithms, fast parallel processing, algorithms in linear programming, and modeling. Projects in ba sic research range from investigations of earthquakes to neurotoxicology to growth equations for sporiangiophores. In addition, much of the research at the University goes on without substantial external support. This ef fort also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publications, pre sentations, exhibits , performances, and professional activities. Many members of the faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pur suits bring recognition to the University, establish the credibility of its faculty, and enhance the value of the degrees it confers.

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CENTERS A;ND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE, I D TRAINING School of rchitecture and Planning CENTER FOR BUILT ENVIRONMENT STUDIES As the research and service unit of the School of Architecture nd Planning , the Center for Built Envi ronment Studfes is committed t o making a more hu mane living environment through research and inno vative design. The pf.imary mission of the Center is of qual ita tive , and innovative nature. The Cen ter plays an important role in supportin g the educational mission of the School to achieve a balance of practice and research. lfhe Cente r's resources and expertise in clude architecture and planning researchers and prac titioners combi.hed with a large pool of graduate assistants . As a major ntributor to the s tate of Colorado and the southwest gion, the Center has helped to strengthen the quality of built environments in urban and rural towns and As a unit of intellectu al forum, the Center is to make an impact on the field s of architecture a-11d planning through its community of scholars, facilities, and laboratories. The Center is an interdisciplimu j y team of educators, designers, and plan ners working in a collaborative manner to service the professions arid the community. College of Business and Administration INSTITUTE FOri INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS The Institut • for International Bu siness was created in August 19$ to help stimula t e new business ven tures through p,artnerships wi th foreign business schools and executive 1 • It has three goals: • To collaborate with business and government in pro moting economic de velopment oppor tunities for qolorado and the Rocky Mountain region . • To be a center for providing hands-on train ing to foreigp executives doing business with Amer ican firms . I • To become } ntemationall y recognized for research on competitiveness issues in the global economy of the 1990's. I The Institute will offer programs for senior management in businJss and government. The programs will identify and terpret trends affecting business in the global marke lace and the skills needed to conduct business in th se markets. The programs also will put senior manage s in contact with internationalists who are shaping t e political , economic , and social environment for inltemational business. I Centers and Institutes I 13 School of COLORADO PRINCIPALS' CENTER The of Colorado at Denver's School of Education and the Colorado Association of School Executives (CASE) formed a partnership to establish the Colorado Principals' Center. The mission of the Colorado Principals ' Cen ter is to enaole principals to shape their professional intellectual Activities related to this mis sion include tdpical seminars, panel discussions, roundtable discussions, and ongoing special interest groups. Topical serhlnars feature individual presenters (pri marily princifals) who provide information on prom ising or successful practices, demonstrations or models, and opportur}ities for participant interaction. Panel dis cussions highlight current "high-relevance" topics , with panel and participant interaction in formal and infor mal settings. I Special interest groups facilitate explora tion of relevant problems, and issues through brainstorming and idea sharing during a series of meetings. The opwriting is a major feature of The also focuses on conducting and dissem inating researc h. Projects have included a study of ad ministrator role perceptions in school reform, a study of the effects 1of principal peer coaching and reflection to improve q,.structional leadership , and a study to examine the ! developing professional identity of first year high scl-(ool principals. Graduate students are hired by the Center as re search assis tants. Additionally, graduate students in the School of j Education carrying 9 semester hours or more, or enrolled as administrative interns, are of fered membership at no cost. In addition to part-t i me research assistants, Center staff includes an executive director who is also an as sistant professor, and a secretary, both shared with the Department of Administration, Curriculum , and Supervision. REGION VIII RESOURCE ACCESS PROJECT Under a coptract funded by the U . S . Dep
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14 I General Information Lance Wright (lef t ) directs the Colorado Principals ' Center which provide s in-service education for principa l s and other school site managers. William Grady (center) D ean of the School of Education, visits a workshop. College of Engineering and Applied Science CENTER FOR URBAN TRANSPORTATION STUDIES The Center for Urban Transpor t a t ion Studies (CUTS) has as its responsibility: 1. To assume a l eading role in developing research and int erdisciplinary programs in urban transporta tion. 2. To provide a central resource for informa t ion con cerning urban t ra n sportatio n problems in t h e Rocky Mount ain regio n , m aking availab l e to outsi d e organi zations t h e exp erti se within th e University. CUTS is intere sted in helping to optimize the qual ity of human life b y concentration on research , service, and education in the transportation sector of society. Par t i cul arly, CUT S is desirous of improving t h e move ment of people and goods so as to provide enhanced safety, economy, efficiency , and overall amenity. Administratively , the Center (CUTS) is a part of the Department of Civil Engineering in the College of En gineering and Applied Science. The director of CUTS is a civil engineering faculty member representing the transportation engineering and planning disciplines. Recent and current research include investigations of (1) the relationship between rutting of asphalt pave ments and truck tire pressures, and (2) the perfor mance of a new type of urban interchange in order to improve its design from the standpoint of safety and capacity. Service activities have involved workshops and short courses to help advance the state-of-the practice relative to the s t ate-of-the-art in transporta tion engineering. As an element of the University, the fundamental thrust of CUTS is, and properly must remain, educa tional. The Center's emphasis is the broad field of trans portation, and includes both urban and non-urban aspects of transportation. Since transportation concerns itself with the safe, efficient, and environmentally respon sible movement of people and goods, it either directly or indirectly affects all citizens and many facets of their day-to-da y living: This breadth necessarily involves most of the disciplines within the University. The need for better trained researchers and practitioners in all of the transportation related disciplines is clearly evi dent. CUTS provides "hands-on" experience within the traditional University structure, offering an oppor tunity for students through research and service activ ities which emphasize these otherwise unavailable learning opportunities. These activities take place under condi tions of competent supervision that ensure the provi sion of sound advice and research results to those served by CUTS. LAND INFORMATION SYSTEMS GROUP A Land Information Systems Group (LISG) has been formed at CU-Denver to provide opportunity for faculty and students to pursue interests in this multidisciplinary subject area. Housed in the College of Engineering and Applied Science, the LISG is headed by Lynn Johnson, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. The objectives of the LISG are to facilitate the edu cational, research, and public service mission of CO Denver in the subject areas of computer-aided planning and design, water resources planning, land records systems, geoprocessing and geographic information sys tems, facilities management and mapping, computer aid design , and related legal and policy issues. LISG is multidisciplinary and provides an avenue for individuals to participate together on research and development project s, curriculum development, and to share hardware and software resources. For further information contact Professor Johnson at 556-2739 or 556-2871.

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The Gradujte School CENTER FOR[ ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES The Center f or Environmental Sciences conducts basic and applied. r esearch which focuses on understand ing and provic!ling solutions for environmental issues. The Center to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic tfairs and Dean of The Graduate School. The Center organizes faculty , graduate stu dents , and Ufldergraduate students into interdiscipli nary teams to s tudy environmental concerns of interest to the metropolitan area , Colorado, and the Rocky Mountain Region. Typical projects in the past have in v ol ved studies of pollution resulting from oil shale coal mining, and uranium tailings. These proJeCt I have been funded b y federal agencies, industry , and private foundations . In recent y e f r s the Center has had a major problem dealing wi th acid rain. The Center has a state-of-the art anal y tical chemistr y laboratory. The Center has also been at the forefront in the application of artificial in telligence to the interpretation of large envi ronmental databases. Approximately fifteen CU-Denver faculty from ten different departments (and three col leges) ha ve p 1rticipated in Center projects. In addi tion, more than thirty facult y from other campuses of the Univer s ity ! of Colorado , as well as other universi ties in Colorado , New Mexico , and South Dakota , have participated mJ these projects which have provided op portunitie s fori theses and jobs to numerous students. College of { iberal Arts and Sciences CENTER FOR r ESEARCH IN RHETORIC The Center f or Research in Rhetoric began in 1984 for the purpose of conducting original and applied re search in rhet d ric , broadl y conceived. The Center en gages in proje d ts that in v olve faculty and students who carry out studies that contribute to our un derstanding of r hetoric and discourse in the broad realm of human affa f s . The interdisciplinary nature . of the Center draws on the diverse strengths and unique per spective s of individuals from various disciplines in the Uni_vers i ty . presenting the results of research proJects are pdblished b y the Center and are available in the English epartment office. MATHEMATICS GROUP A s trong Computational Mathematics Group has rna , e CU Denver a regional center for com putational rna hematics with a national and interna tional Mathematics clinics investigate contemporary ! societal issues through the application of concepts to specific problems . Other research includes the development of fast algorithms for the numerical solution of partial differential equa tions on s upe r computer s, the anal y sis and develop ment of co mbin a torial algorithms used in scheduling Centers and Institutes I 15 artificial intelligence , and the applications of discrete mathematics. i to problems in ecology , engineering, and computer science . Graduate School of Public Affairs THE CENTERS The Graduate School of Public Affairs coordinates three centers the Center for the Improvement of Public Management, the Center for Public-Private Sec tor Cooperation, and the Center for Health Ethics and Policy. The Centers provide students and faculty with opporn:rutie to engage in strategic multidisciplin ary policy research, secure internships, and develop and participate in training and technical assistance prob lems . objective of the Centers is to help the public and pnvate sectors respond to grown and revitaliza tion programs. Their respective programs help trans late classroom education into real world public policy and public management experiences. Center for fealth Ethics and Policy. The newest of GSPA's policy research on health is sues, studies ! the ethical problems surrounding areas of health poliay, and provides technical support to those addressing these problems in the state and nation. Center for the Improvement of Public Management. This center fdcuses on efforts to increase the planning and management capacity of state, county, and local government officials and staff . Its functions are ori ented toward developing puglic sector management and skills . Center for Public-Private Sector Cooperation. Activ ities are directed toward increasing understanding be tween the public and private sectors. Its agenda is aimed at fostering a range of collaborative efforts between state/local government and private firms . NATIONAL LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE ON AGING Funded by the U . S . Administration on Aging, De partment of Health and Human Services, and private foundations , l the Institute is a nationally . recognized training facility devoted to providing residential lead ership development programs . Participants are per sons from throughout the country who are responsible for planning and coordinating state and local social service programs for the elderly.

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16 I Gener al Information N ational Vet e r a n s Tr a i ning Institute CU-Denve r houses the nation's first National Veter ans Training Institute. The program provides skills de velopment training to employment representatives and employees of the Disabled Veterans Outreach Pro gram . The program indirect l y serves veterans, with an increased emphasis on improving the quality and quan tity of services for disabled veterans. The program is funded by the U .S. Department of Labor Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS). FACULTY About 300 highly qualified faculty members teach full-time at CU-Denver; well over four in five have doc toral degrees . The faculty is a l ert to the challenges of the urban environment and responsive to the needs of the commuter student. TEACHING AWARDS, 1987-8 8 Faculty awards for Teaching were presented to the following faculty in 1988 (1-r): 1st row William Briggs , Department of Mathematics ; jean Cooper, C ollege of Business and Administration ; and Nancy Shanklin, School of Education . 2nd row -Mark Gelernter , School of Architecture and Plan ning; fohn Trapp, Colle ge of Engineering and Applied Sci ence ; Lloyd Burton, Graduate School of Public Affairs; Robert Wick, Librar y; and Richard VanDeWeghe , Department of English. Not shown: Wanda Griffith , Department of Sociol ogy. Professor VanDeWeghe was selected Teacher of the Year. S E R VICE AW ARD S Service Awards for 1988 were awarded to the following CU Denver faculty (1-r): 1st row -]ana Everett, Department of Political Science; Bennett Neiman, School of Architecture and Planning; and.fanis Dri sco ll , Psychology . 2nd row William Goodwin , Schoo l of Education; Thomas Amberg, College of Engineering and Applied Science; Michael Hayes, College of Busines s and Administration; and Cecil Glenn , Educa tional Opporhmity Program. Not shown : Mark Emmert , Grad uate School of Public Affairs .

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RE:SE1\RC:HJ'CR:EATIVE ACfiVITES AWARDS CUDenver presented Research/Creative Activi ties Awards in 1988 to the folld wing farulty (1-f): 1st row-Harvey Greenberg Department of f!athematics; Zoe Erisman , College of Music; Kenneth 0 4 tega, College of Engineering and Applied Science. 2nd row Diane Wilk Shirvani, School of Archi tecture and Plcu1ning; David Jonassen , School of Education ; Peter deLeon , g raduate School of Public Affairs; and Lorna Moore , Department of Anthropology. Not shown : Rex Burns, Department of English, and Woodrow Eckard, Jr., College of Busines s an d i Administration . Faculty and Staff I 17 Recipi ents of 1988 Outstanding Staff Awards: (back row, left to right) Diane Berkley, Mary Margaret Martinez-Madrid, Mary Dodge ; (front row, left to right) Shirley Konkel, Jean Hog an. STAFF HONORS Each yea r in late spring, s taff employees a;! hon ored for their years of service for five yeats and in increments of five ther eaf ter. Also , four outstanding staff members are selected, representing general ad ministration, academic affair s, student academic ser vices, and library.

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18 I General Information ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES All questions and correspondence regarding admis sion to CU-Denver and requests for application forms should be directed to : Office of Admissions and Records University of Color ado at Denver 1200 Larimer St. Denver, CO 80204 (303) 556-2704 General Policies CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program successfully. Admis sion decisions are based on many factors, the most important being: 1. Level of previous academic performance . 2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplish ment, as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests . 3. Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success . CU-Denver reserves the right to deny admission to new applicants or readmission to former students whose total credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed es sential by the University in order to carry out its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution. Applicant s who request degree programs unavail able at CU-Denver will be considered for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with an un determined major. Students admitted with an unde termined major are expected to declare a major by the time they have 60 hours toward graduation completed. Admission of Undergraduate Degree Students RECEIPT OF DOCUMENTS DEADLINES Undergraduate Scudencs New Students Transfer Students Fonner University of Fall 1988 July 22 July 22 July 22 Spring 1989 Dec . I Dec . I Dec. I Summer 1989 May 3 May 3 May 3 Colorado Students Intrauniversity Transfer Students International Students Undergraduate: 60 days prior to the beginning of the term Graduate : July 22 May 26 De c. 1 Oct. 27 May 3 MarchiO 1he University reserves the right to change documents/ credentials deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands . Applicants should apply as early as possi ble. Updated information is available from the Office of Admissions (303) 556-2704. For an applicant to be considered for a specific term , ALL documents re quired for admission must be received by the Office of Admissions by the DEADLINE for that term. Appli cants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to have admission consideration made for a later term. Transfer studen t s are reminded that sufficie nt time should be allowed to hav e transcripts sent from institutions attended previously . Foreign students are advised that it usually takes 120 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions from international locations . ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN New freshmen may apply for admission to the Col lege of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, or Music . General Requirements. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Ed ucation Development (GED) Test. Beginning in the Fall Semester of 1988, freshmen entering the University of Colorado are required to meet the following University-wide Minimum Aca demic Preparation Standards (MAPS): 4 years of En glish (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and con sumer mathematics), 3 years of natural sciences, 2 years of social science including one year of U.S. or world history, and 2 years of a single foreign language . Specific College Requirements : COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION English (one year of speech/debate and two years of compo sition are strongly recommended) .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. 4 Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one year of geometry) ............. ... ...... . . ....................... . . 4 Natural scie nces (laboratory science) .............. .. ........... 2 Social sciences (including history) ............... . . .. . .......... 2 Foreign language (both units in a single language) ....... 2 Academic electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . 2 (Additional courses in English, foreign language , mathematics, natural or social sciences, not to include business courses.) Total 16

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE1 English (literatu e, compositi on, grammar ) .. .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 4 Mathematics dis ributed as follows: Algebra ...... ... ..... . .......... .... .... .... ..... . . . ....... . .......... 2 Geometry ............. .... ................... ... . . . . . .... . . .... ... . . . 1 Additional m thematics (trigo nom etr y recomme ded) . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . 1 Natural sciences including one year of ph ysics and one year 0f chemistry . . . . . . . .. . .. .. . .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . 2 Foreign (both units in a single language) ....... 2 electi T s ....... ......... . ... ....... . . ............. . . . ...... COLLEGE OF MUSIC English ............. .......... .... . .................... ........ .... . . . . ... 4 Natural sciences ............. ..... ...... .. ................ . ..... .... ... 3 Social science . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . .. .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Foreign language (both units in s ingle language) . . . ........... . ..... . ..... ... 2 Mathematics . .......... .... ........ . ... . ... ......................... ... 3 Academic electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . . 1 Total 15 All students 1 re expected to have had previous ex perience in an applied music area. Two years of piano training are The College b f Music requires an audition of all en tering freshmeljl and undergraduate transfer students. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified her in lieu of the personal audition . Interested stud nts should write to the College of Mu CU-Denve I for audition information and applica tions. COLLEGE OF JIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES English (litera turf., composition, grammar) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Mathematics (exoluding business and consumer mathematics ) .... ............ .. .............. ... 3 Natural sciences . .. .. .. . . .. . . . .. . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . .. .. . .. .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Social science .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. . .. . 2 Foreign language (both units in single language) ..... ... ..................... 2 Academic electiv . . . .. . .. . . . .. .. . . .. .. .. . . .. .. . . . .. . .. .. . . . . . . .. . . . . .. 1 Total 15 Beginnin g inJ the Fall Semester of 1988, freshmen entering the Uhiversity of Colorado are required to meet the follo fing Uni v ersity-wid e minimum aca demic preparat ton: 4 years of English (with emphasis on compositior:v, 3 years of college preparatory math ematics (exclu g business and consumer mathemat ics), 3 years of natural science including one year of U.S. or world 'story, and 2 years of a single foreign language . 1 See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalog for more s ecific information . Admissions I 19 MINIMUM!CADEMIC PREPARATION STANDAR S (MAPS) Success in ndergraduate study is directly related to high s chool preparation. Sufficiently prepared s tu dents have a probability of success . The MAPS focus on what the student has studied in preparation for college . Admission standards define the l evel of success and achievement necessary to be a dmitted to the University of Colorado and include factors that pre dict academic success such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school course work, and the gra de point average . Both what the student has studied and how the student has achieved will be factors that determine admission to the University . Students MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admis _ sion standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class , grade-point average) and provided they make up any defici J ncies in the MAPS prior to graduatio n from the University. Two le v els of deficiency will be recognized . 1. One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student II}eets other standards of the University (e. g ., test s cores, cla s s rank) and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation . Credits so taken will couht toward graduation provided the CU college normail y accepts those course credits toward graduation . 2 . In some f ases, a student having more than one unit of deficiency may be admitted , provided that the student meets other standards of the University. The student up additional befo re graduation t.aking an expanded! program of stud ies. The student may satisfy the MAPS requiremen ts either by 1) courses taken at CU, 2) courses take n at other instituti b ns of higher education, 3) completio n of additiona' high school credits, 4) credit-byexamination programs, or 5) other ways as approved by each college. All applica!ljts who meet the above MAPS require ments are classified in two ways for admission pur poses: 1. Preferred ! consideration is given to applicants w ho rank in the top 40% of their high school graduating class and have a composite score of 23 or higher on th,e American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 1000 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Business applicants will receive preferre d consider ation if they graduated in the top 30 percent of their high school cl a ss and achieved a composi te score of at least 24 on or 1100 on the SAT . E nginee ring applicants are expected to have strong mathematics and science ba kground, higher class rank, and higher test scores. Mu ic applicants also must successfully pass a music audition.

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20 I General Information 2. Applican t s who rank in the lower 60% of their high school graduating class, and/or have combined SAT scores below 1000 or a composite ACT score be low 23, and/or do not have 15 units of acceptable high school credit are reviewed on an individual basis . To be considered for admission , applicants with a High School Equivalency Certificate must have an av erage standard GED score of 45 wi th no score below 36 on any section of the test. Applicants who com plete the Spanish Language General Educa tional De velopment Test also must submit scor es from Test VI, "English as a Second Language." HOW TO APPLY 1. Students sho uld ob tain an application for under graduate admission from a Colorado high school coun selor or from the CU-Denver Offic e of Admissions. 2. The applica t ion must be . completed in full and sent to the Office of Admiss ions with a $30 (subject to change) non-refundable fee . For applicants who are granted admissio n but are unable to enroll for that term, the $30 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions is in formed of the inten t to enroll for a later term. 3. Students are require d to have their high school send an official trans crip t of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions . Of ficial transcripts are th ose sent b y the issuing institu tion directly to the CU-De nver Office of Admissions. Hand-carried copies are not official. 4. Students who did not graduate from high sc hool are required to send a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate to the CU -Denv er Office of Ad missions . 5 . Students also are required t o t ake either the Amer ican College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and to reques t that test sco res be sent to CO Denve r (ACT code 0533 or SA T code 4-4875). High school s tudents ma y o btain information about when and where these te s t s are admini s tered b y contacting their counselors. Applicants who took one of the se tests and did not designate CU-Denver to receive sco res must request the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. Com plete a Request for Additional Score Report at test cen ters or from the o ffices listed below . Registration Department American College Testing Program (ACT) P . O. Box 414 Iowa City, Iow a 52240 College Entrance Examination Board (SAT) P . O . Box 592 Princeton , New Jersey 08540 College Entrance Examinat ion Board (SAT) P.O . Box 1025 Berkeley, California 94704 All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file .

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ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS Transfer may for admission to the Colleges Adrrunistration, Engineering and .Applied Arts a.nd Sciences, and Music. Stude ts mterested m the field of education should the School of Education office for infor mation (556-2 1 17). International students must submit proof of langu,age proficiency. Minimum missions standards have been developed for all ptblic four-year institutions in Colorado . However , tra sfer applicants who meet these stan dards are admission. They also must meet the • standards of the University of Col orado and Its mdiVIdual colleges. To meet the minimum the University of Colorado at Denver , students mus meet one of the following conditions . 1. Ha ve ear ed fewer than 30 collegiate semester hours and me.f.t the first-time FRESHMAN standards for the 2 . Be enrolle8 in a CCHE-approved guaranteed trans fer agreement meet the minimum academic qual ifications of th t agreement. 3 . Have d 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the fpllowing grade-point average: a. 2.0 GPA tf transferring from Colorado School of Mines, ColoraJio State University, University of Colo rado at Bould r, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, or th i University of Northern Colorado. b . 2.5 GP A if from any other postsecondary institution . Transfer stu ents are given priority consideration for admission es follows: 1. College or Liberal Arts and Sciences and College of Music. applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted and must be eligible to return to all institutio s previousl y attended. Course work in progres s cannllege and were enrolled in the Guaran teed Transfer Program to transfer to CU-Denver, should submit a cop y of the Guaranteed Transfer "contract" with their application . Liberal arts and music applicants with fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of college work com pleted also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores. All engineering applicants with fewer than 24 se mester hours also must submit high school transcrip ts and ACT/SAlj' scores. Business applicants with fewer thah 24 semester hours also must subinit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores. Applicants to the College of Liberal Arts and Sci ences should be aware that the College requires ele mentary proficiency in a foreign language for graduation. Applicants to the College have fulfilled this requirement if the y have completed three years of any classi-

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22 I General Information cal or modern foreign language in high school present a high school transcript to AdVIs ing Office for verification. For further information, stu dents should contact the College Advising Office, 556-2555. All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT After all official transcripts have been received and the applicant has been admitted as a degree .student , the Office of Admissions and the appropna te aca demic unit will determine which courses taken at other institutions can be applied to a degree program at CU Denver. In general, transfer credit will be in sofar as it meets the degree, grade, and residence requirement s at CU-Denver. . Colleg e-leve l credit may be transferred the . Uru versity if it was earned at a college or uruversity recognized standing, by advanced placement exarm nation s, or in military service or schooling as recom mended by the Commission on of Experiences of the American c;ouncil !f a grade of C or higher was attamed; and if the credit for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institu tion . Courses taken pass/fail are transferred when a grade of C or higher is required to pass. The University may accept up to 72 (108 quarter hours) of work from a two-year mshtution toward the baccalaureate degree requirements and may accept up to 112 semes ter (153 quarter . h?urs) from a four-year college or university .. No lowed for vocational/technical, remedial, or religiOus/ doctrinal w ork. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met. The College of Business and Administration gener ally limits transfer credi t for courses taken at the lower division level. All courses m the area of em phasis must be taken a t the University of Colorado. A maximum of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution may be applied to ward baccalaureate degree requirements. All correspon dence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability, and business courses may not be taken through cor respondence. The College of Music requires that 56 of the hours needed for graduation be completed in residence . This total may be reduced by the faculty on the basis of excellent work done at CU-Denver and high scholar ship exhibited at institutions previously attended. In no case shall the minimum of fewer than 40 hours be distributed over three semesters.

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READMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FORMER AND RETURNING CU STUDENTS CU-Denver students who have not registered and attended class sat CU-Denver for one yea r or longer, and who hav not attended another institution since CU, are returrng students and must formally apply for readmissior . Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions. Former who have attended another college or university last attending the University of Col orado must apply as transfer students and meet the transfer studeht deadlines for receipt of documents . This requires fayment of the $30 non-refundable ap plication fee aq.d submission of official transcripts from all colleges and universities previousl y attended. Tran scripts must b r sent directl y from the i ss uing institu tion to Admissions Processing, 1200 Larimer St., Denver , 80204. Students w o last attended less than one year ago but attended nother college or university during the interim are to pay a $30 transfer application fee. Transcripts must be requested b y the student and sen t by the registrar of the other inst itu tion(s) to CU Denver, Admissions Processing, 1200 Larimer St., Den ver, CO 802041 ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS I The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international to apply for admission to un dergraduate graduate programs . Admission requirements for CU Denver' s scho ls and colleges vary, and international students seeki g admission must meet the require ments of the ff"ogram to which they are applying . In addition , all international students whose first lan guage is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Prospective students should request an Inter national Application packet from the Office of Admissions . about requirements for each college and sctol can be found in this catalog. Deadline s fo receipt of documents have been estab lished to allow for the timely mailings of I-20's . Con tact the Office f Admissions for these dates. Graduate: Inlternational students who wish to pur sue !tudy at CU-Denver must have earned an undergradu te bachelor's degree, or its equivalent , and must all other requirements of the graduate program to wfii.ch they are applying . Applications are available from Graduate School six months prior to the term for.[ which the student is applying. Note: Except for summer terms, international stu dents must be ) in a degree-seeking status. They ma y attend terms as non-degree students. This ex ception is strictly limited to summer terms . Admissions I 23 CU-DENVER INTRAUNIVERSITY TRANSFER OR CHANG OF CAMPUS CU-Denve J students may change colleges or schools within CU-Drnver provided they are accepted by the college or scnool to which they wish to transfer . CU Denver Intrauniversity Transfer Forms may be ob tained from the Office of Admissions . Students should observe deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of C)asses . Decisions on intrauniversity trans fers are made by the college or school to which the student to transfer . CU-Denve ( students may change University of Col orado campuses by applying directly to the Admis sions Office of the campus to which they wish to transfer . Change of Cab pus applications anti deadline informa tion also must be obtained from the campus to which the student is applying . HIGH SCHOOL CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT High school juniors and seniors with proven aca demic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special appro al for one term only . This approval may be renewed. Credit for courses taken may subse quentl y be applied toward a University degree pro gram. For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions (303-5562704). Admission of Graduate Degree Students All correspondence and questions regarding admis sion to the graduate program at CU-Denver should be directed to the following: Programs in Business Office of Graduate Studies Graduate School of Business Administration 623-4436 Programs in Architecture and Planning School of l Architecture and Planning 556-3382 Programs in Public Affairs Graduate School of Public Affairs 556-2825 All Other Programs The Graduate School 556-2663 GRADUATE PROGRAMS As a principal part of its mission, CU Denver offers graduate and professional-leve l programs and during the 1988-89 academic year, approximately 45 percent of the student body was enrolled at the graduate level. Graduate degree programs are offered through The Graduate Schbol by its member schools and colleges (School of Education, College of Engineering and Ap-

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24 I General Information plied Science, Colle ge of Liberal Arts and Sciences, College of Music), and out side The Graduate School by the Graduate School of Business Administration, the School of Architecture and Planning, and the Grad uate School of Publi c Affairs. The particular admission and graduation req uirements established by each of these academic units are detailed in the following sec tion s of thi s ca talog. GRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION DEADLINES Admi ssion requirements a n d application deadlines vary according to the individual grad u ate program. The Gr aduate School has general admission require ments which are supplemented b y spec ifi c require ments of the major department s of grad uat e study (e. g., electrical engineering , e ducation , English, etc .). Ap plicants should consult the general information sec tion of The Graduate Schoo l portion of thi s ca talog as well as the college or school sections for requirements and deadline s for specific programs . Admission of Non-Degree Students Person s who want to take Univers ity courses but do not plan to w ork toward a University of Colorado de gree may be admitted as non-degree students. In ge n eral, correspondence and questions regarding admission as a non-degree student should be directed to the Of fice of Admissions. Those seeking admission as non degree students for the purpose of teacher certification should contact the School of Education, 556-2717. Each schooVcollege limit s the number of se mester hour s trans ferable toward a degree program . Students should con tact the sc hooVcollege to which the y will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the number of hours which may be taken as a non-degree student and apply toward a degree program . Undergraduate . CU-Denver will enroll persons who are at least 20 years of age without an undergraduate degree as non-degree students, but applicants are en couraged to apply to an undergraduate program rather than to apply as a non-degree student. Courses taken as a non-degree student are for credit and can be used for tran sfe r to other institutions or for professional im provem ent. Non-degree s tudent s must maintain a grade point average of 2.0 at CU-Den ver. Note: International students are not admitted as non degree s tudents, except for summer terms . Graduate. Students with the baccal aureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for course work as non-de gree students. There are several types of these students. Among them are teachers who seek renewal of certification; students who have attained the degree or credential status they want, but who wish to take additional course work for profes sion al or perso nal improvement ; and students who f ee l a need to make up deficiencies before enter ing a specific program . Non-degree students should be aware that gener all y only a limited number of course credits taken by a non-degree student may be applie d later toward a de gree program at CU-Denver. To permit continuing registration as a non-degree student, a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 must be maintained. Note: International students are not admitted as non degree students , except for summer term s . HOW TO APPLY FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENT AD MISSION To apply for admission as a non-degree student, ob tain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office of Admissions. Return com pleted application b y the deadline for the term desired. A $101 nonrefundable application fee is required. No additional credentials are required. Applicants who seek teacher certifica tion must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials . Non-degree stu dents are advised that registration for courses i s on a space available basis. 1 Subject to change

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CHANGING STATUS FROM NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE STUDENT Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program b y follow ing the in structions outlined in the Non-degree to Degree pro cedures availatile from the Office of Admissions. Academic credentials (i.1-:., transcript s and/or test scores) and a $30 nonrefuntlable application fee also must be sub mitted. Non-4egree students who are accepted as un dergraduat e degree students may generally tran sfer a limited of semester hours for courses taken as I a non-degree student to an undergraduate degree program, with approval of the dean. Non-degree stu dents should ! consult with the college to which they are applying furing the first semester of their enroll ment for the maximum number of semester credit hours accept able to 1 ard a degree program as a non-degree student. (Studfnts enrolled as non-degree students prior to the Fall Semester of 1970 are subject to the policies in effect January of 1969 and August of 1970.) students may apply for admission to a graduate . am by comple ting the applica tion re quired by the articular program. The graduate dean, upon reco endation by the department , may ac cept up to 8 semester hours of credit toward the re quirement s fl a master's degree for courses taken as a non-degree student at the University or at another recognized gr duate school, or some combination there of . The departlnent may recommend acceptance of ad ditional credit for courses taken as a non-degree student during the semester the student has applied for admis sion to the degree program . Official N J ification of Admission Official notification of admission to CU-Denver as an graduate, or non-degree student is provided by Office of Admissions. Letters from various schools and colleges indicating acceptance into a particul ar prbgram are pending subject to official no tification of to the institution . Applicants who do not official notification of admission within a period of time (approximately 3 weeks) after s11bmitting all application materials should contact the Office of Admissions (303) 556-2704. Tentative Admission . Students who are admitted pend ing receipt of f dditional documents will be permitted one term to sfbmit the documents. Registration for subsequent teryns will be denied when documents have not been recei ed. Admissions I 25

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UNDERGRADUATE AND NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION INFORMA TION1 • 2 • 3 Type of Applicant Criteria for Admission 1 Requ ire d Crede ntial s Whe n t o Apply Not es FRESHMAN I N GENERAL: Complete application Not later than: For s pecific requirements refer ( S t ud e n t seeking bachelor's a ) Rank s in t op 40% of high $30 applicable fee July 22 for fall to the co lle ge sections of this degree w h o has never attended sch oo l graduating class . Official high sc hool tran script Dec . I for spring bulletin . For example : Mu ic a collegiate instit utio n b ) H as 1 5 units of acceptable s howing rank-in-class, date of May 3 for summer requires an audition . high sch ool work . g r aduation , 7th semester Seniors who meet or exceed all c) Te s t sco r es: grades, 8th se me s t er admiss i on crite ria may apply ACT comp: 23 Official Acr or SA T score reas ear l y a s Oct. I for follow-o r port ing fall. SAT comb : 1000 Note : Business and Engineerin g applicants are expected to have higher tes t scores, class rank , and number of academic units . TRANSFER I N GENERAL: Complete application Not l ate r than : Liberal Arts and Music trans( S t ud ent seelting a bac h e l or's Must be in good sta n ding and $30 applicatio n fee July 22 for fall fers w ith fewer than 13 sem . degree w h o has atte n ded a eligible t o return t o all institu Two official tr anscri pts sent Dec . I f or s pring hrs. of co llege work , Business collegiate in s titution other lions previou sly attended. from each college attended May 3 for summer tran s fers with fewer than 24 than CU ) Applicants mus t have minimum sem. hrs., and Engineering 2.0 GPA on all work attempttransfe r s with fewer than 24 ed if they have comp leted 30 sem . hrs . must also s ubmit all or more semester hours. Busifreshman credentials . ness and Engineering applicants will be required to have a higher GPA-' NON-DEGREE Must be high school gradua t e Comple te application Not later than : Non-degree students who have (St u den t who is n ot seelting a or have a G . E . D . $10 application fee July 22 for fall earned a baccalaureate degree degree at this insti tution ) Must be a t least 20 years old Dec . I for s pring should see Graduate School May 3 for s ummer section for additional informaApplications will also be ac-tion . cep ted after these deadlines if s pa ce allows. RETURNING CU STUDENT Must be in good standing Former st udent ap plicati on Not later than : Will be admitted to their previ (Returning non-degree and or July 22 for fall ou s maj o r unles s a new major degree s tudent who has n o t Dec. l for spring is reque sted. Students under atte n ded anoth er i n s tituti o n May 3 for summer academic suspension in certain si n ce CU ) Applicatio n s also will be acschools or colleges at the Unice pted after t h ese deadline s if ver sity o f Co l orado may e n roll space allows during the s ummer terms t o improve thei r grade-point averages. FORMER CU STUDENT Same as for transfer Complete application Not later than : Will be admitted to pre vious (Degree student who has $30 a pp lication fee July 22 for fall major unless a different major a tt e n ded another ins tit ut ion Two offic ial transcript s from Dec. l f o r s prin g is reques t ed o n appli c atio n . si n ce attending CU ) each int erve ning college May 3 f or summer CHANGE OF STATUS: Same as for transfer Complete application Not l a t er than : Mus t meet the same criteria as NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE $30 application fee July 22 for fall transfer st ud ent. ( C U non-degree s tudent who CU transcript Dec. I for s pring wishes to enter a degree May 3 f o r s ummer p rog ram) CHANGE OF STATUS: Mus t have completed degree Non-degree s tudent applica tion Not l a t e r than : Only s tudent s who have com-DEGREE TO NON-DEGREE $10 application fee Jul y 22 for fall pleted and received degrees (Former CU degree s tudent Dec. I for s pring are eligible t o change to non-who has graduated and wishes May 3 for s ummer degree s tatus . to take additional work) INTERCAMPUS TRANSFER Mus t be in good s tanding Former s tud ent a ppli cation Tra n s f e r t o Denver , n o t later Tran s fers from Den ver t o an( S tude n t who has been enrolled than: other cam pus of CU s h o uld on one CU c ampus and wis h es Ju l y 22 for fall refer t o the bulletin of the to take co=s on anoth e r ) Dec . I for s pr ing cam pus to which they are May 3 for s ummer a ppl y ing for additional requireTra n sfe r from Denver : refer t o men t . Will be admitted t o the bulle tin for other previous ma j or unless a differ campus . ent major i s requested on appli ca t ion . INTRA UNIVERSITY Same as f or transfer. Intrauniver sity tran s fer 60 days prior t o the beginning TRANSFER Mus t be a continuing s tud ent application of the t erm ( Stud e nts who wish t o c hange enrolled on the campus t o CU transc .ript from one CU co llege t o anothwhich you are app l ying. er, e.g . , from the College of Liberal Arts and Science s t o the College of Bu s iness) ' Requ ireme n ts for i n divid ual schools or colleges may vary. 2Fore i gn students should see International Student s i n the Admissions section o f this ca tal og . 3A ppli cants who have earned 12-29 semes ter hours must meet fre shman s tandards o r have a minimum tran s fer GPA of 2 . 5 . ( Applicants transferring from Colorado Sc h ool of Mine s, CSU , UNC , UC B . or UCCS mus t have a minimum transfer GPA of 2.0.)

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I TIJITION FEES All tuition land fee charges are es t a bli s hed b y the B oa r d of Regrnts, the governing bo dy of the Uni v er sit y of Colorado, in accordance wi t h legislation en act ed annuall f (us u ally in the s p ring) b y the Colorado G e n eral Assembly. The Regents r eserve the right to chan ge tuitiop and fee rates at any t i me . A tuition sch edule is ptlished prior to r egist ra t io n for each term , and students contact t he Office of Admissions for further infprmation on the tu ition and fee charge s for a particular term . The following r a te s are for the 1988-89 acadebuc year and are provided to ass i st pro s p ective in anticipating cost. Other Fees 1. Studenictivity Fee (required for all stude nts): Falls mester 1988 . ....................... $ 17.00 Sprin . semester 1989 .................... $ 1 7 .00 Sum er term 1989 ....................... $ 12.00 2. Auraria fond Retirement Fee (req uir e d f or all s tudents: Each l erm .............................. .. ... $ 19.00 3. Student Information Syste m Fee (a non-r Jfun dable fee required of all s tudents each term) . . ..... ...... ....... ... ................ . . . $ 5 .00 4. Fee (manda t ory for the firs t term for all new students): .................... $ 15.00 This is a no t -refundable fee charge d a t the s tudent's registrat on to cover cos t s of g enerating transcnpts . 5. Health Fee (op t ional): Fall .............................. $ 156.00 Spring semester (inclu d es summer) . $156.00 Summer term only ....................... $ 84.00 Stu dents wish health insurance cov erage must complete and a reques t card wi th the Bursar ' s Office before re end of the dro p /add pe riod . T h e insuralljce primarily sub s idizes maj?r m e d ical expenpes according to th e schedu le of benefit s s t ated in the rsurance brochure, which ma y be ob t ai ned from thf Office of Studen t Services . Dependent coverage (spolh.se and/or children) also is available at a n additional charge . Further informa t io n on health insurance is a ailable from the Office of Student Services, 6 . Doctoral ssertation fee ( m anda t o r y for all stu-dents certified by The Graduate Sch oo l for enrollment for d octoral di sertation). Stu d ents s h o u l d contact The Gradu ate Schdo! for guidelines e s t a bli s hed for charges for enrollmenl 7. Compre nsive examinat i o n fee: Any s tudent in T h e Graduate , chool, the Grad u ate Scho ol Ad ministratio , or Graduate S ch oo l of Public Affarrs mus t be enro d during the t e r m in w hich the Com p re h ensive Examination for a mas t er's degr e e i s com-1 Subject to chang t Tuition and Fees I 27 pleted. stud ents who are not tabg regular courses during that ! term must enroll as " Candidate for De gree." Students enrolled only as " Candidate for De gree" pay corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour . rThe charge varies by the school in which the student is matriculated. 8 . Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in <1; chemistry laboratory course): Breakage deposit ........................ .. $ 20.00 An $8 deduction is assessed for expendable items. The unused portion is returned at the end of the se mester. 9 . Music laborator y fee (mandatory for College of Music students and others enrolled in certain music courses) : Music fee ................................ .... $ 24.00 College of Music students and others enrolled in piano, sound recording and reinforcement, and elec tronic music must pay this fee. No student is charged more than one $24 fee during a given term . Payment of Tuition and Fees All tuition and fees (except application fee) are as sessed and payable when the student registers for the term, according to guidelines in the current Schedule of Classes. Arrangements may be made through the Bursar's Office at the time of registration to defer pay ment of part of the charges . Specific information on deferred paYif1ent is included in the Schedule of Classes published before each semester or summer term . Stu dents who fail to complete payment by the published deadlines, or who fail to file the required promissory note, will be assessed a $50 penalty. Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even though they ma y drop out of school. Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are inclutled in the Schedule of Classes. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent to be graduated , to be issued tran scripts , or to pe listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regu lation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after graduation. Personal checks are accepted for any University ob ligation . Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable to the bank will be charged an addi tional charge. Students may pay tuition and fees by credit card. Tuition Appeals Exceptions to financial obligations incurred may be granted by the Tuition Appeals Committee . The Com mittee will only consider appeals when a student has been medically disabled, has experienced a death in the family, or has a change in employment hours or

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28 I General In f ormation location beyond the student's control. Documentat ion of these conditions will be required . Exception s will not be considered for a student's f ailure to comply with publishe d deadline s, or changes in employment under the student's control. Please note: tui t ion appeals must be filed within four months of the e n d of the term for which t he appeal is filed. FALL A ND SPRING 1988 89 TUITION UNDERGRADUA T E DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF LIB ERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES AND THE COLLEGE OF MUSIC and non-degree st udents without an un dergraduate degree (SO) Credit Hrs . Resi de nt 0-1 $ 7 3 2 14 5 3 218 4 29 0 5 363 6 435 7 5 08 8 581 9 15 6 0 5 each credit hour over 15 73 Non -r esident $ 337 674 1 , 012 1,349 1 , 686 2 , 023 2,810 2 , 810 2 , 810 337 UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS I N THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AN D THE COL LEGE OF ENGINEERING Credit Hrs. 0-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9-15 each credit hour over 15 Reside n t $ 8 6 172 25 8 344 43 0 516 6 02 6 87 716 86 Non-resident $ 351 702 1 , 053 1,404 1,755 2 , 106 2 , 925 2 , 925 2 , 925 351 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS : with prog rams in the College of Liberal Arts and Sc iences Credit Hrs . Resident 0-1 $ 10 2 2 2 0 3 3 305 4 4 0 7 5 5 09 6 610 7 7 1 2 8 814 9-15 8 4 8 each credit hour over 15 1 0 2 Non -r esident $ 355 710 1 , 065 1,420 1 ,77 5 2,130 2 , 958 2 , 958 2,958 355 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDE NT S : w ith progra ms in the College of E ngineering , a nd the Gr aduat e S ch oo l of Pub lic Affairs Credit Hrs . Res i dent Nonr es i dent 0-1 $120 $ 371 2 240 743 3 360 1 , 114 4 480 1,485 5 599 1 , 857 6 719 2 , 228 7 839 3 , 094 8 959 3 , 094 9-15 999 3 , 094 each credit hour over 15 120 371 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the S chool of Architectu r e and Plan n i ng , the College of Mus ic, an d NON-DEGREE GRADUATE STUDENTS (SW) and no n D enver c ampu s p rograms : Nurs i ng , Medic in e , Law , etc . Credit Hrs. 0-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 15 each credit hour over 15 Residen t $106 212 318 425 531 637 743 849 885 106 Nonr es i dent $ 355 710 1 , 065 1,420 1 , 775 2 , 130 2 , 958 2 , 958 2 , 958 355 GRADUATE DEGREE STUD ENTS : i n the S chool of Education Credit hrs. 0-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9-15 each credit hour over 15 Resident $107 214 321 428 535 642 749 856 963 107 Non-resident 371 743 1 , 114 1 , 485 1 , 857 2 , 228 3 , 094 3 , 094 3 , 094 371

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GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the Graduate Schoo l of Admin istra tion Credit Hrs . Resident Non-resident 0-1 $ 129 $ 371 2 257 743 3 386 1 '114 4 514 1,485 5 643 1,857 6 771 2,228 7 900 3,094 8 1,028 3,094 9-15 1 ,071 3,094 each cred it hour over 15 129 371 Graduate degree studen ts who are registered as " candidate for degree " will be assessed the corre sponding resident tuition for one credit hour plus the Student Information System fee . NOTE: THE 80 RD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVER SITY OF COLORADO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE TUIT'fN AND FEES AT ANY TIME. Tuition and Fees I 29 Audit To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester, a student must lbe 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time the y are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the Univer sity or have outstanding financial obligations to the University. The Records Office doe s not keep any record of courses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with labo ratories or where equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each iJilstructor . Auditor's cards are issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor when requesting per mission to attend a class . There is no auditor status in summer. Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges .

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30 I General Information Residency Classification for Tuition Pur poses Tuition classification is governed by CRS 23-7-101, et. seq. (1973) as amended.1 Institutions of higher ed ucation are bound to the provisions of thi s statute and are not free to make excep tion s to the rules se t forth. The statute provides that an in-sta te s tudent is one who has been a l egal domiciliary of Colorado for one y ear or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classification is being sought. Persons over 22 years of age or who are eman cipated establish their own leg al domicile. Those w ho are under 22 y ear s of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court appointed legal guardian. An unemancipated minor's parent must, there fore, have a lega l domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes . Domicil e is established w hen one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one ' s true, fixed , and permanent home and place of habitation. The tuition sta tute places the burden of es tablishing a Colorado domicile on the person seeking to establish the domi cile . T he question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connections with the s tate s uffi cient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colo rado beg ins the day after connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evide nce one's intent. The most common ties with the state are (1) change of driver's license to Colorado ; (2) change of au tomobile registra tion to Colorado; (3) Colorado voter regis tration ; (4) permanent emplo yment in Colorado; (5) and most im portant , payment of s tate income t axes as a resident b y one whose income is sufficient to be t axe d . Caution: payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish lega l domicile retroactive to the time filed. In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term, the 12-mo nth wai tin g period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question . If one's 12-month wai tin g period expires during the semes ter , in-state tuition cannot be granted until the next semes ter . Once th e student's tuition classification is estab lished , it remains unchanged unless sa t isfactory infor mation to the contrary is presented . A student who, due to subseq uent events, becomes eligi ble for a change in classification from resident t o nonresident or vice versa mus t inform the Office of Admissions and Records within 15 da ys after such a change occurs . An adult student or emancipated minor who moves outside of Color ado must send written notification to the Office of Admissi ons and Records within 15 days of the change. 1 A copy of the Colorado Rev ised Statutes (1973), as amended, is available in the Univer s ity of Colorado at Denver Admissions Of fice. Once a student is classified as non-resident for tu ition purposes, the s tudent must petition the Office of Admis sio ns and Records for a change in classification. Petition s must be s ubmitted no later than the first day of classes of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a non-resident. It is preferred for peti tion s to be received 30 days prior to the term . Late petition s will not be considered until the nex t semes ter. Specific information may be obtained from the Of fice of Admissions and Records. Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel The Colorado approved resident tuition beginning with the Fall 1986 Semester for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. ELIGffiLE STU DENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM. Students obtain a completed verification form from the base ed ucation officer, and submit the form with their mili tary ID to the Record-Office after they have registered, before the end of the drop/add period . At that time the student's bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate. Students who have been certified remain classified as nonreside nts for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish per manent ties to Colorado. FINANCIAL AID Director :Ellie Miller Office: NC 1030 Telephone:556-2886 The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment con siders qualified students for financial aid awards . If the student's application materials are received before the March 31, 1989, priority date, then the student is considered for a package of need-based grant , work study (parttime employment), and/or long-term loan fund s. For the past several years, these packages have consisted of approximately 50 % grant funds and 50% of self-help funds (work-study, loan, unmet need). (Grad uate students have only been receiving approximately 10% in grant funds . ) If applications are received after the March 31 priority date, the student is usually con sidered only for Pell Grant and for outside student loans (Stafford Loan-formerly Guaranteed Student Loan or GSL, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, and Supplemental Loan for Students) . These funds are not allocated to CU-Denver; they are available throughout the year to students who qualify . There are three sep arate deadlines for applying for Advantage Schloarship ; refer to the separate brochure for further information .

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Applicants for Colorado Fellowship , Deans Schol ars, and Scholars are subject to different dead lines and are reviewed b y other CU-Den ver departments (The Graduate 1 School, undergraduate dean's offices, and the Office of Admissions respecti vely). All other studen ts are notified of their award status in writing by the Office Financial Aid/Student Employment. Eligibility Each student must qualify for CU-Den ver financial aid as follows: 1. Be a U.S. c ' tizen or be admitted to the U .S. b y the INS on a perma ent basis (except for Colorado Fellow ship). 2. Be a degree-seeking student (except for students appl1,;,..g for Advantage Scholarships). Teacher certification stuciients are eligible to appl y only for out side student (Stafford Loan, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, or Supplemental Loan for Students) . I 3. Be enrolle l for a specified minimum number of credits . 4. Maintain atisfactory academic progress as de fined for the finhncial aid programs. 5. Document need by completing the en tire need-b ased application (except for the following programs whicn are not need-based: Colorado Fellow ship, Advantage i Scholarship , Colorado Scholars , Dean s Scholars, Scholars , Parents Loan for Under graduate Studeljlt s, Supplemental Loan for Students , Short Term Loan, and many outside scho lar s hip s). Financial Aid I 31

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32 I General Information 6. Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes (except for the following programs: Pell Grant , Sup plemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Advan tage Scholarship, Perkins Loan, College Work-Study, Stafford Loan, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Stu dents, and Supplemental Loan for Students). 7. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant. 8. Be registered for the draft or enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selective Service (required for all males who are at least 18 years old and born after December 31, 1959). Application Each applicant must complete the financial aid plication materials for to the Office ?f Flnancial Aid. Complete informatwn must be available to the financial aid counselors before eligibility can be determined . Limited Funds. The majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served ba sis to eligible students who document financial need complete their application process as soon as poss1ble after January 1, 1989. Application completion is de fined as having all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (ACT Family Financial Statement or CSS Financial Aid form) into the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. General financial aid is awarded to eligible students until all of the funds are committed for the year. If you complete your file after March 31, 1989, your awards will probably be limited to the Pell Grant (for first undergraduate stu dents only) and/or outside student loans (Stafford Loan, Supplemental Loans for Students, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students). Please remember to reapply for financial aid each year. It is the student's responsibiliy to be sure applica tion materials are complete. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for application forms and students are referred to the Financial Aid Fact Sheets for com plete details regarding financial aid. All financial aid application procedures are subject to change at any time due to revisions in federal and state laws, regu lations, and guidelines. ON-LINE APPLICATION INFORMATION Please try the new on-line Financial Aid Informa tion System. This system will help you complete the ACT Family Financial Statement, provide you with im portant financial aid information and current news, and produce a printed copy of your institutional finan cial aid application for yo u to turn into the Office of Financial Aid. To use the system, go to a CU-Denver computer lab (North Classroom Bldg., Rooms 1206 or 2206), sign on to the CU-Denver vax computer and enter "money" (in small letters) when prompted for a login . The system will take you to a self-explanatory menu . If yo u have any questions about how to use the system, ask one of the computer advisors. Qualification Financial Need. Most financial aid is based on the concept of financial need. Your financial aid calculates financial need as: 1) cost of attendance, rm nus family contributon which is 2) student/spouse con tribution, and 3) parents' contributon (for dependent students only). The cost of attendance is the cost to attend CU Denver, including tuition and fees, room and board, book s and supplies, transportation, and personal ex pense s. The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment determines standard budgets for students based upon average tuition and fees charged and bud get items established by the Colorado Comrmsswn on Higher Education. Independent Student. The federal governmen! has specific guidelines that must be followed to a self supporting student (one who only. his/her own income and assets when applymg for a1d). For 1989-90, a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old or older as of December 31, 1990. If you are under 24, you are considered self -supporting if you fall into one of the foll owing categories: 1. Single undergraduate student with no depen dents who was not claimed as a dependent on your parents ' 1987 and 1988 federal income tax returns. Al so, you must demonstrate that yo u are selfsufficient by having total income (including financial aid) or at least $4,000 annuall y for the two calendar years prior to your first receipt of federal financial aid. 2. Graduate or professional student who will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents' 1989 federal income tax return. 3. Married and will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents' 1989 federal income tax return. 4. Student with legal dependents other than a spouse. 5. Veteran of the U.S. armed forces. 6 . Orphan or ward of the court. 7. Appeal to the Financial Aid Committee for an exception to these guidelines and be approved by the Committee because of your unusual circumstances. If your student/spouse contributon plus your parents' contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of at tendance, you will not qualify for need-based financial aid. For 1988-89, the following budgets were used for room and board, transportation, and personal ex penses per month : single students living with parents $300/month; single students not living with parents $670/month. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student was approximately $700 per semester, and non resident tuition ranged from $1800-$2850 per semes ter. These amounts will probabl y increase by about 5% for the 1989-90 school year. The contributions from the student/spouse and from the parents of dependent students are calculated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income, savings and other as-

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sets, family size, number of children in postsecondary school, medical expenses, and other factors. You may appeal for special consideration of your situation and in some cases standardized contribution may be adjusted by of the Financial Aid Com mittee . FINANCIAL AID IS INTENDED TO SUPPLE!viENT (NOT FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS FROM YOU D YOUR PARENTS. Cowse Loads General financial aid (work-study, grants, Perkins Loans) undergraduate recipients usually must carry at least credit hours per semester and gradu ate students usrally must carry at least five graduate credits per seme r ter during the academic year (fall/spring) . Higher or lower minimums may be required for indi vidual awards (please check your award letter for the exact number df hours required). Pell grant (available only to first undergraduates) and outside student loan recipients musrl carry at least six credits per semester for and three graduate credits for grad uates . Summer term minimum course loads are as follows: Full-time , undergraduate -6 hours, graduate -3 graduate ):lours; Half-time: undergraduate -3 hours, -2 graduate hours. Higher or lower standards may required for individual awards . For informatitcontact the Office of Financial Aid!Student Employment. Satisfactor y cademic Progress. CU-Denver stu dents must satisfactory academic progress as de fined by the Offite of Financial Aid/Student Employment in order to be ellgible and remain eligible for financial aid. Student s at referred to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid, available in the Of fice of Financia Aid. Non-Degree Students. Non-degree students are not pursuing a de91ee in a technical sense and, therefore , are only to apply for one type of financial aid at this time .f-dva ntag e Scholarship. Continuing B,ducatio n!Community College of Den ver Courses . Sdme courses cannot be included when minimum courst1loads and satisfactory academic progress are determine1. Classes offered through the CU Denver Divisioljl of Continuing Education or through the Communi College of Denver cannot be includ ed. Residenc y St}tus. You are required to be a resident of Colorado for full calendar year before the Office of Admissions callj consider classifying you as a resident for tuition purposes. Non-resident students are en couraged to obtain additional information from the Of fice of Admissidns about appealing for resident status . As a resident student, you are potentially eligib le for more financial aid programs since you can be consid ered for the Sta e of Colorado aid funds. Financial Aid I 33 Refunds and Repayments. Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal ot reclassification of tuition status must be applied against the recipient's financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Students may be expected to repay a por tion of their award if they withdraw from CU-Denver. Appeals. Students may appeal all decisions of the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment b y com pleting a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office. The Financial Aid Appeals Committee reviews most appeals for exceptions to the Satisfac tory Academic Progress Policy and the Financial Aid Committee reviews all other appeals. Reappl y Each Year. Financial aid awards are not au tomaticall y rer;tewed each year. Students must reappl y and meet priority dates each year. Award Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 6-12 weeks after all applica tion documents have been received in the Office of Financial Aid. If awarded, an award letter is mailed which include1s information such as the type(s) and amount(s) of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours that are required for the award(s). Types of Aid The federal government funds the following pro grams: I. Supplemental Education Opportuni ty Grant (SEOG). A need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a bachelor's degree . 2.Perkins Loan (formerly National Direct Student Loan) . The interest rate on this long-term loan is 5 % and no payment s are due until six or nine months (this time differs depending on when you first receive a Perkins Loan) after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half time. 3. College Work-Study . A program that allows stu dents to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at non-profit agencies to help meet their edu cational costs. The State of Colorado funds the following pro grams. 1. Colorado Student Grant. A need-based grant for resident undetgraduate students. 2. Colorado Student Incentive Grant. A need-based grant for resident undergraduates who have not yet obtained a bac elor's degree. This gFant is funded 50 % by the federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado . 3. Colorado Graduate Grant. A need-based grant for resident graduate students.

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34 I General Information 4. Colorado Work-Study. A program similar to the College Work-Study program, but limited to resident undergraduate students. Fell Grant. Your elibibility for the Pell Grant (feder ally funded) is det ermined before any other aid is award ed. Awards are defined by a strict formula provided by the federal government and amounts vary depend ing on the student's eligibility index, enrollment sta tus, residency classification, and living s tatu s. Students are eligible for a Pell Grant if they have not received their first bachelor ' s degree by June 1, 1989. Outsid e Student Loans. Your eligibiity for all other types of aid s hould be determined prior to appl ying for outside student loans . The STAFFORD LOAN (for merly Guaranteed Student Loan) program requires that you show financial need in order to qualify. Most students who are working full tim e do not document suf ficient financial need to qualify for the Stafford Loan. The primary purpose of this program is to make low interest, long-term loans available to students to help them meet their postsecondary educa tional expenses. The SUPPLEMENTAL LOAN FOR STUDENTS is a long-term loan program for students who do not document financial need for the Stafford Loan or who need additional funds. Undergraduate dependent students may not borrow the SLS because their parents are eli gible to borrow under the same terms. The program for parents is called the PARENTS LOAN FOR UN DERGRADUATE STUDENTS. Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment opportunities are listed in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment, the Auraria Student Assis tance Center, and the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education. Full-time undergraduate resident students who apply for College Work-Study and who do not document sufficient financial need may be con sidered for Colorado No-Need Work-Study. Scholar ship information can be found in the Auraria Library Scholarship InfoBank in the reference section of the Library. Handicapped students should inquire about the Ahlin Scholarship in Student Services (556-8427). All applicants for need-based financial aid are automat ically considered for the Arnold Scholarship. Minority applicants and students whose parents did not grad uate with a bachelor's degree are encouraged to apply for the Advantage Scholarship. Graduate students should inquire about additional types of aid through The Grad uate Schoo l and their academic department. Students should be aware that Emergency Student Loans are available as well as Financial Aid Advances. American Indian students should inquire in the office for Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships.

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REGISTRAT IO N Selecting a Progra m and C ourses Students should review the following sections of this catalog that de Jc ribe the academic programs available at CU-Denver, knd that provide information by school or college on tlhe various majors available, course re quirements by P"tajor, course load policies, and other pertinent infon;nation. Courses avail*ble during a particular semester or sum mer term are listed in the Schedule of Classes, pub lished several before registration. These are available from the Office of Admissions and Records. Undergraduate students who need assistance in plan ning a or in selecting courses should contact the academic unit in which they are enrolled t o ar range for an advising appointment prior to registra tion. Graduate stu
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36 I General Information MSC courses cannot be used to meet the College of Liberal Arts and Science s core requirements toward graduation: • the English composition requirement • the mathematics requirement • the foreign language requirement • the core course requirements in arts and humani ties , social sciences, or natural and physical sci ences MSC courses cannot be used to meet the major and minor requirements toward the degree without prior approval of the student ' s dean. INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION CU-Denver degree students may enroll for courses offered by the various campuses of the Community College of Denver. Students must be enrolled at CO Denver for at least one course during the semester or summer term to be eligible to register interinstitutionally. Registration is on a space available basis. CCD courses are not included in a CU-Denver student's grade point average. CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University or College campuses concurrently must con tact their school or college on their home campus . Note: Degree students may register concurrently for the fall and spring semesters only (not summer). Each campus may further lintit concurrent registration by resident students if the campus enrollment cap is reached. A degree student registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if: 1. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean. 2. The course is a required course for the student's degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver . 3. The student obtains approval from the academic dean. 4. There is space available at the other (host) cam pus. 5. The student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CUDenver rates. 6. The home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classe s. 7. The concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add peJ;"iod on both the host and home campuses. Students may not register for an independent study course through concurrent regi stratio n. Students may not take courses pass /fail or for "no-c redit" through concurrent registration. To drop a concurrent course during the host campus drop /ad d period , arrange the drop at the home campus school or college office. To drop a concurrent course after the end of the host campus drop/add dead line , drop the course at the ho s t campus Records Of fice. Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Health Sciences Cen ter students: please note the restrictions above. Also, students from other CU campuses cannot register con currently for MSC courses. Course Loads Students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer term) must have the overload ap proved by the dean of their college or school. The stu dent should obtain the dean's signature on the Registration Form or Course Change Form during Walk-In Regis tration. Remember that a three-semester-hour course dur ing a fall or spring semes ter will require six to nine hour s of work each week outside of class; a three semester-hour course during a summer term will re quire nine to thirt een hours of work each week outside of class . Suggested maximum course loads for the fall and spring semesters for undergraduate students who are employed: Employed40 or more hours per week: 3-6 semester hours 30-39 hours per week: 5-8 semester hours 20-29 hour s per week: 7-11 semester h ours 10-19 h ours per week: 9-15 semes ter hour s Students must weigh their capabilities against the demands of each course. No more than 15 semester hours taken by a gradu ate student during a fall or spring semester can be applied toward a graduate de gree. No more than 10 semester hours taken by a gradu ate student during a given summer term can be ap plied to a graduate degree.

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DEFINITION OF FULL-AND HALF-TIME STATUS FOR FINANCIAL AID AND LOAN DEFERMENT: FAL L AND SPRING Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to corltplete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in thJ student's financial aid award letter. Fall and Sp ring: effective Fall 1987 Undergraduates nd non-degree students: Full-time Half-time Graduate degree stu dents: Full-time: 12 or more semester hours 6 or more semes ter hours 5 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number 5000 +) 8 or more of mixed level classes 0 hours as candidate for degree 1 or more ours of thesis (not master's reports, or thesis pteparation) Half-time : 3 or more ours of graduate level classes (course number 1 5000 +) 4 or more r ours of mixed level classes Summer Undergraduates jnd non-degree students : Full-time 8 or more semes ter hours Half-time 4 or more semester hours Full-time : 3 or more hours of graduate le vel classes (course number 5000 + ) 5 or more hours of mixed level classes 0 hours as candidate for degree 1 or more hours of thesis (not master's reports , or thesis Half-time: 2 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number -r.5000 + ) 3 or more ours of mixed level classes Enrollments atus for a term cannot be certified un til the end of drop/add period. These hours ldo not include interinstitutional hours from CCD or hours at MSC, nor do the y include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration. Students rece11 iving veteran's benefit s must contact the Veterans Ajffairs coordinator for definition of fulltime status for 1summer terms. CCD , courses are not considered for full-or half time status . vidual exceptions to the minimum grad uate course loati levels are considered for financial aid purposes by Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid . Academic Policies I 37 SHORT TERM COURSES Courses are also offered in five -week modules, in special weekend courses, and in seminars. Topics in Science modular courses are self-contained units de signed to cover specific problems or issues in science . Students should contact the college/school office for information on short-term courses offered each semes ter . ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS Advanced Standing and Advanced Placement Credit Undergraduate students may obtain credit for low er-division cohrses in which they demonstrate profi ciency by examination. By passing an examination, the student wpl be given credit for the course to sat isfy lower division requirements and may be eligible to enroll in higher level courses than indicated by the student's formal academic experience. Credit granted for courses by examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate. There are three types of examinations as described below . Advanced Placement Program The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Exarhination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for courses in which they have demonstrated and are granted advanced stand ing in those areas. Students with scores below 4 may be considere9 for advanced placement by the disci pline concerned. All credit must be validated by subsequent acadebic performance. For more information contact your high school counselor or the Director of Admissions for CU-Denver . Credit By E j amination Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify an examination, the student must be formally work!ing toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade-point average of at least 2.0 , and be currently registered . are arranged through the Records Office , and a r,onrefundable fee is charged . Students shoUld contact the office of the dean of the academic unit in which they are enrolled.

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38 I General Information College-level Exa minatio n Program Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have excelled at college-level proficiency . Interested student s are encouraged to take appropriate subject ex amina t ions provi ded in the College-Level Examinations Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination B oard testing service. For more information call 556-2861. Students who are interes t ed in credit for CLEP ex ami n a t ions must contact the office of t heir school or c oll ege . Credit for Milita ry Service a nd Schooling and ROTC MILITARY SERVICE AND SCH OOLING To have credit for educa tional experiences evaluat e d , applicants wi t h military experience should submit t h e following with their application: (1) a copy of DO Form 214 and (2) DO Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Education Experience During Milit ary Service . USAF personn el may pre sen t an official tran scrip t from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of the DO Form 295. C redit will be awarded as recommended by the Com mission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver. Credi t for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions . RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC) Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC pro grams should consult with the ir college or school re garding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaur eate de gree requirements. The College of Business and Ad ministration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semes ter hour s may be applied toward baccalau reate degree requirements in business and then only if the ROTC program is completed. Grading System an d Policies The following grading sys tem and policies for pass/fail registration, dropping and adding courses, and withdrawal from the University have been standardized for all academic units of the University.

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GRADE SYMBOLS The instructor is responsible for whatever grade sym bol (A, B, C, D, F, IF, IW, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC, W , and Y) are indications of reg istration or status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail designations are not assigned b y the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, explained under Pass/Fail Procedure . A -superior/excellent-4 credit points per credit hour . B-goodlbetter than average-3 points per credit hour . C-competemt/average-2 credit points per hour. D-minimwrr passingI credit point per credit hour. credit points per credit hour. Beginning the Spring 1984 Semester, the University approved use of a PLUS/MINUS s ystem, where a B+ corresponds to 3.3 credit points per credit hour, an? a Bcorresponds to 2. 7 credit points per credit hollli. Instructors in those schools and col leges may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS system, but ar, not required to do so. IF-incomplete-regarded as Fif not completed within one year maximum. IW-incomp{ete-regarded as W if not completed within one year maximum. !P-in progress-thesis at the graduate level only . An incomplete grade is only awarded when special circumstances !Prevent a student's completing a course during the terrl1.. Students have one year to complete an INCOMPLETE. After one year, an IW is regarded as a DROP-PA$SING; an IF as a DROP-FAILING. Stu dents should re-register for courses for which the y have received ItJCOMPLETES. Students IN COMPLETES : most schools and colleges require a contract between the instructor and student outlinihg the work necessar y to " complete" the incomplete ) PIFpass /failP grade is not included in the grade point average; the F grade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail work may be credited toward a bachelor's degree. HIPIF-honorslpass / fail-intended for honors cours es; credit hourJ count toward the degree but are not included in thlgrade-point average. SPECIAL SYM . OLS NC indicates registration on a no-credit basis. W withdrawal without credit. Y -indicatbs the final grade roster was not re ceived by the grades were processed . Graduate students at the 5000 level of a slash course (4000/5000) willpe expected to complete additional work and be evaluated commensurate with graduate stan dards as specified by the course instructor . Academic Policies I 39 PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE 1. Any student who w ishes to re g ister for a course on a pa s s / fail basis should do so during the regular registration . Changes to or from a pa s s/fail basis only may be made during the regular drop/add period. 2. Up to 16 seme s ter hours of regular course work may be taken on a pa s s /fail basis and credited toward the bachelor ' s degree . Only 6 hour s of course work may be taken pass /fail in an y given s emester. 3. Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of pass /fail registration . All students w ho register on a pass/fail appear on the regular cla ss roster, and a nor mal letter grade is as s igned by the professor . When grade s are in the Record s Office, those regis tration s with a pas s / fail de s ignation are automatically converted b y the grade application sy stem . Grades of D and above convert t o grades of P. 4. Th e record of pass/ fail registr a t ion is maintained by the Office of Admissions and R e cords. 5. E x ception to the pass / fail regulations is permitted for specified cour s es off e red by the School of Educa tion, the of Continuing Education, and Study Abroad Programs. 6. Graduate degree s tudents can e x ercise the PIF op tion for undergraduate courses only. A grade of Pwill not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate Schbol requirement. 7. If you register for a course on a pass/fail basis, you may not later decide that y ou want a letter grade. Each school o i college limits the hours and courses for which you may register on a pas s/fail basis. Please note: many college s will not accept a "P" grade for transfer credit!.

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40 I General Informat io n College Business and Admi nistration Engineering and Applied Scien ce Liberal Arts and Sciences Music PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS General Only non-business electives may be t aken pa ss/f ai I R equired courses may not be taken pass/fail. Upper division sociohum anistic electives are acceptable, otherwise major department ap proval is required; students without a major are not eligible to take courses p ass/fail . Recommended maximum o n e course/semes t er. May be restricted in certain major ; not included in 30 hour s of C or bet ter work required for major. No more than 6 hours P/F a n y seme ter. Only non-music electives may be taken pas s/fail . o more than 6 hours P/F any semester 16 Hours Maximum Only 6 semester hour s may be taken pas s/fail Includ es courses taken in the honors program Does not include courses taken in hon ors, physical education, cooperative education and certain teacher cer ti fication courses ; a l so doe s not in clude ENGL. 1002 Profi c ienc y Test or MATH. 1002 Test Includes courses taken in the h onors program . Transfer Students Only 6 semes ter hours may be taken pa ss/fai l MIDtirrum of I semester hour of pass/fail may be applied toward graduation for every 9 semeste r hours taken in the college May not be u sed by students gradu ating with only 30 se mester hours taken a t the University

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NO CREDIT Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college. File the no credit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop/add period. Students who register for a course on a no credit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade . Students may not register again for a course which has already been taken on a no credit basis. GRADE-POINT AVERAGE The grade-point average is computed by multiply ing the credit points per hour (for example , B = 3) by the number of hours for each course, totaling the hours and the credit points, and dividing the total points by the total hours. Grades of P, NC, Y, W, IP, IW, and IF are not in cluded in the grade-point average. If an IF grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as failed and a grade of F is automatically calculated in the grade-point average at the end of one-year grace period. If an IW grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as dropped . If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point average. The University of Colorado graqe-point average does not include courses taken at other ihstitution s. The grade-point average of graduate students in cludes only credit hours, and credit points accumulated while enrolled in The Graduate School. The grade-point average does not appear on official transcripts issued from the Records Office but does appear on the Grade Report issued each semester. Students should consult with the dean of their col lege or school for explanation of any exceptions made to the University uniform grade-point average. Undergraduates and non-degree students must main tain a 2.0 grade-point average to remain in good stand ing. Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 CPA to remain in good standing . Students whose GP A falls below the 2.0!3p level are subject to probation or sus pension . Such students will be notified by their school or college. GRADE REPORTS Grade reports normally are available for students to pick up at the Rfcords Office within two to three weeks after the end of the semester. Students must present picture identifi
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42 I General Information Commencement. Letters will be mailed in early April to students eligib le to participate in the spring commencement. Information will be provided about ordering special display diplomas, being fitted for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree recorded. Students graduating at the end of the summer term or the end of the fall semester may participate in the following spring commencement.

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Transcripts Transcripts of academic record at the University of Colorado (all campuses) may be ordered in person or by mail from the University of Colorado at Boulder , Records Office , Campus Box B-7, Transcript Section , Regent Administrative Center 125, Boulder, CO 80309. Official transcripts will not be available until approxi mately five weeks after final examinations. A tran script on which a degree is to be recorded will not be available until approximately eight weeks after final examinations. Requests should include the following : 1. Student's full name (include maiden or other name if applicable). I 2. Student number. 3. Birthdate . j 4. The last and campus the student attended. 5. Whether the current semester grades are to be included whenj a transcript is ordered near the end of a term. Whether the request should be held until a degree is recorded. 6. Agency, q ollege, or individuals to whom tran scripts are to be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included. Ttanscripts sent to students are labeled "issued to 7. Student's f ignature. (This is the student's autho rization to release the records to the designee.) There is no f harge for transcripts . Transcripts are prepared only at the student's request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not! be granted a transcript . Unofficial cop ies of t ranscrip t s sent to CU-Denver from other insti tutions can be rf.quested at the Records Office. Official transcripts shot!lld be requested directly from the issu ing institution . Adding a n d Dropp i ng Course s1 ADDING Students rna add courses to their original registra tion during the first 12 (8 in the summer) days of full term classes, pr0vided there is space available. Instructor approval will required after the first week of class es . DROPPING C IURSES 1. Students drop courses without approvals dur ing the first 12 Clays of the fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term). Tuition will not be charged for the droppe1 courses which are dropped as long as the student is n9t withdrawing. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student's permanent record . 2. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term), the instructor's signa ture is required and the instructor must indicate whether 1 For the exact dates , check the Schedule of Classes for the appro priate term . Academic Policies I 43 the student is !Passing or failing . If the student is pass ing, the course will appear on the student's permanent record with the grade of W. If the stu dent is failing , the course will appear on the permanent record with an F grade . Nd adjustment of tuition is made for courses which are dropped after the 12th day (8th day for the summer term) of full-term classes. 3. After the lOth week of a fall or spring semester (7th week of a summer term), courses may not be dropped unless there are circumstances clearly beyond the student's control. In addition to the instructor's certification (as in 2 above), the student must petition the academic dean for approval to drop the courses . Tuition will be charged even 1 though the drop is allowed. 4 . Dropping all courses requires an official Univer sity withdrawal form. Withdrawal from the University To withdraw from the University , the student must obtain approval of the dean's office , Bursar's Office, and Records Office . The withdrawal date is recorded on the student's permanent record page. If the with drawal date prior to the 13th day of the semester (9th day of summer term), the courses will not appear on the student's permanent record. If the with drawal date i s after the 12th day, the courses will ap pear with W g r ades. Students may not withdraw after the lOth weeki of the semes ter (7th week of the sum mer term) except under documented circumstances clearly beyond their control. Students who are receiving veteran ' s benefits or financial aid also must obtain the required signature of those respectiye offices . A student who stops attending dasses without offi cially withdrawing from the University will receive grades ofF for all course work enrolled for during that tenn . To withdraw from the University, a graduate student must apply to the dean of The Graduate School for permissiom to withdraw in good standing. Students who withdraw without communicating with the dean and without filing the appropriate Withdrawal Form will be marked as having failed their courses for the term . For specific signatures , requirements, and tuition adjustment the student should refer to the Schedule of Classes published prior to the beginning of each term.

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44 I General Information Originality of Work In all academic areas it is imperative that either work be original or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons' ideas or language . Students should consult with instructors to learn specific pro cedures appropriate for documenting the work of oth ers in each given field . Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from low ering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the University. Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Periodically, but not less than annually, the Univer sity of Colorado informs students of the Family Edu cational Rights and Privacy Act, with which the institution intends to comply fully . The Act was designed to pro tect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspec t and review their educa tional records, and to provide guidelines for the cor rection of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings . Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERP A) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comp l y with the Act. Local policy exp l ains in detail the procedures to b e used by the institution for compliance with the provi sions of the Act. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on each of the several campuses of the Uni versity of Colorado. A directory of records, lis ting all educational records maintained on students by this institution, may be found in the Office of Admissions and Records on each cam pus. The following item s of student information have been designated by t he University of Colorado as public or director y i nformation : student name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, registration s ta tus, class, major field of s tudy, awards, honors, degr ee(s) conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical factors (height , weight) of a t hletes, date and pla ce of birth. This information may be disclosed b y the University for any purpose a t its discretion. Currently enrolled students may withhold disclo sure of any ca t egor y of information under the Family Educational Rights and Privac y Act. To withhold dis closure , wri tten notifica tion must be received in the Offic e of Admissions and Record s on the appropriate campus prior to the end of the drop/add period in the term. Forms requ esting the withholding of directory information are available in the Office of Admissions and Records . Students must reques t each term to have directory information withheld for that term. The University of Colorado assumes tha t when a student fails to request to have directory information withheld for that term, the student is indicating approval for disclosure of in formation for that term and following term s until oth erwise reques ted . Questions concerning the Famil y Educational Rights and P rivacy Act may be referred to the Office of Ad mis sio n s and Record s. Unive r s ity of Colorado at Denver Confidentiality of Academic Records STUDENTS: DO have the right to view and inspect their educational records (excluding any financial recor ds of their parents). DO have the right to have Director y Information withhe ld from all perso n s or organizations outside the University . Director y Info rmation includes: name, address , telephone number date and place of birth class, major field of study awards, honors , degree(s) conferr e d pas t and present participation in officially recog nized sports and ac tivites physical characteristics (height, weight) of athletes DO NOT have the right to obtain their grades, or other in formation not considered Direct ory Information, by tele phon e. PARENTS: DO have the right t o obtain the educational records of their child only if they provide a s igned statement that their son or dau ghter is a dependent for income tax purposes. The Record s Office, in NC 1003, 556-2389, has forms available to parent s for s uch requ es ts. Parent s are, howe ver; encour a ged to ob t ain final grades with a written approval from the student.

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO PERSONNEL: DO have the righ t to use educational records of students in the normal exercise of their duties. DO NOT have the right to use educational records of stu dents for ernpl0yrnent purposes, for social organizations, for personal reasons, or for other non-educational interests, without consent of th e student. PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING FINAN CIAL AID TO STUDENTS: DO ha ve the right to educational records of students only as necessary in determining and enforcing terms of financial aid. PERSONS IN AN EMERGENCY: Do have the right to obtain confidential academic records necessary to prptect the health or safety of students and others, but suclit information will only be released by the Dean of Student Services, 556-8427. These regul l tions are required by the Family Edu cational Right and Privacy Act of 1974 (the Buckley Amendment). For further information, please call the Records Offic at (303) 556-2389. Student recqrds will be released only to the student with current, appropriate identification or upon writ ten of the student whose records are be ing requested. Student Clal ssification Students ar j classified according to the number of semester hour1 passed: Freshman 0-29 hours Sophomore 30-59 hours Junior 60-89 hours Senior 90 + hours All transfer b tudents will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of
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46 I General Information SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES Alumni Associatio n The CU-Denver Alumni Association supports the development and awareness of the Universi t y through a variety of networks and activities. Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon gradu a tion. Friends and non-degree former s tudents are also welcome to participate . Horizons , a newspaper published quarterly, is mailed to members of the association. Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/or activities on campus which might interest them. The Mack Easton Award for Distinguished Service , The Outs tanding Alumnu s Award, and the Legislative Recognition Award are be stowed each year at commencement and are spon sored b y the Association. A program of a lumni access to the campus recreation cen t er, library, and parking lots is also available through the Association. The governing board is comprised of alumni repre senting all of the schools and colleges on campus . This group plans events, impleme n ts programs, and raises funds with the goal of advancing the University and increasing the visibility of a l umni . Auraria Book Center Hours : M-Th 8-6, F 8-5, Sat. 10-3 except vacation and interim periods . The Auraria Book Center features academic , techni cal, reference, and exam preparation books in support of your higher education. Best sellers, new releases, and gift book selections change frequently and are of ten accompanied by displays of special value and sale books in many subjects. For additional savings on gen eral reading books, join the Auraria Book Club at th e Book Information counter . S p ecial orders and out of print searches are available a t n o charge . Students . Please bring your course printouts to lo cate textbooks! Subject areas are marked on each set of shelves; departmental abbreviations , course , and sec tion numbers are printed on a shelf tag below each required or optional textbook. When available, used textbooks sell for 75 percent of the new book price . A full refund is given for new and used books returned within the first three weeks of a regular semester's start. Please read the refund polic y attached to your receipt! The Convenience Store is l ocated near the main store in the Student Center lower mall and offers extended hours for those wishing to buy snacks , magazines, sun dries, and schoo l supplies. Used texts are bought back from students throughout the year , and refunds and exchanges also are performed here. Auraria Reprographics offers full-service copying in the Convenience Store , M-Th 7:30-6, F 7:30-5. Special papers, transparencies , reduc t ions and enlargements , and other options may be specified for jobs of all s iz es. A self-serve copier is available for small orders . T wo are required for purchases paid for b y check. The B ook Cen t er also accepts Master C ard and VISA ch a r ges. T h e B ook Center is located in the lower l eve l of the Aur aria Student Center at Lawrence and 9 th St . For furth er informa t ion, call 556-3230. Auraria Child Care Center Th e Auraria Child Care Center is a non-p r ofi t orga nizati o n whic h provides a high quality chil d c are and pres ch oo l program for the children of s tudents , faculty, and staff of the Auraria Higher Education Center. Th e Center operates from 7 a.m. to 6 p . m . and is full y licensed by the Colorado Departmen t of Social Serv ices t o serv e 150 children at a time. It is divided into two toddl er classrooms, three presch ool class room s , and one kindergarten/after-school cla s s room . Childr e n must be 18 months to six years of a ge to att end. The p hil osophy of the Center is to fos t e r the developme nt of compe t ence in intellectual and s ocial skills and t o provi d e safe, nurturing environme n t. The pro gram in vo l ves th e assessmen t of indivi d ua l needs , es tabli shin g goa l s and activities that are ap p ro priate for dev e lop ment. Close parent-teacher communica tion is a ke y to t he responsive, individually-oriente d pro gram p rovide d at the Cen t er. Pare n t s may register t heir children on a full-time, part t ime or h o u rly basis to accommoda t e students ' var y in g class schedules. For additional info rmation, ple ase call 556-3188.

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Aura ria Student Center The Center , located at 9th and Lawrence, houses a cafeteria, the campus Book Center, a study loun ge, game I room, offices for student government and organizati p ns, a cop y center , exhibit space, locker rentals, meetii;lg and conferenc e facilities , and a tav ern. Computing Services Computing Services supports computer use by both the academic and administrative communities at CO Den ver. Most f dministrative processing is done in the office of Management S ys tem s in Boulder with data entry, output processing , and user support provided by Computing l Services in Denver. Most academic pro cessing is done on campus or through one of several net w orks available through Computing Servic es. The Denver ampus maintains a PRIME 9950 under PRIMOS, a V A!x 8700 under VMS, and a series of com puters 90X, 8 processor Sequent B21000, 16-proces s or I-fypercube) under the UNIX operatmg system. Acces l to all machines is through a commu nications netwp rk that allows connection to the cam-pus libraries' card-catalog (CARL-PAC) as well as to any of other CU campuses . The VMS and Programs and Facilities I 47 UNIX machines are all connected over the ethemet which also is a nod11 on the growing Colorado SuperNet net work. This net provides access to many academic com puting networks (ARPANET, NSFNET, JVNCNET, CSNET, etc.) as well as high-speed connections to the Colo rado School of Mines, University of Denver, Colorado Springs and Boulder CU campuses, and Colorado State University. CU-Denver also is a BITNET site. A signif icant amount of computing also is accomplished on the campus' 720 personal computers both in laborato ries (10 teaching labs and 3 public labs are available) and in offices. Computing Services staff provides assistance to ac ademic and administrative users on all computing sys tem s available and on every phase of their use. Advisors and a full-time academic user services staff assist faculty as well as students enrolled in courses using computing with questions regarding programming and the use of computer systems and software available . Ad ministrative users are assis ted by a data processing s taff as well as user services personnel. Computing systems on the campus are maintained by an opera tion s staff who also assist faculty and staff with hard ware planning, acquisitions, questions, and problems . The goal of Computing Services is to assist all mem bers of the CU-Denver communi!)' in using comput ing as an effective tool in their work. For further information and an informa ti ve booklet about computing at CO Denver, please call 556-2583.

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48 I General Information Division of Continuing Education Through its Division of Continuin g Education (CE), the University of Colorado at Denver provide s off campus credit and noncredit educational opportuni ties for the life-long learner and the non-tr adi tional student. More than 7,000 employees of business, in dustry, and government, homemakers , senior citi zens, and alumni participated in CE classes , workshops , and seminars during the past year . To provide easy access to as many students as possible, CE uses the city and its environs as its classroom. CU-Denver's excellent faculty is teamed with highly talented part-tim e instructors from the Den ver metropolitan area to ensure quality and excellence in instruction . Credit class offerings provide a linkag e between CU-Denver's resident degree program s on campus and the part-time , off-campus student. Credit courses include weekend classes, teacher recertifica tion classes, and a variety of traditional and nontraditional learning experie nces. CE delivers a wide array of noncredit courses for those interested in career updating , personal enrichment , and intellectual stimulation . Specific progra ms are developed at the request of busine ss and profes sional groups. These programs include licensing and career updating courses for engineer s , attorneys, ac countants, life insurance agents , and architects . Sem inars and certificate programs for business and industry are designed to help keep supervisors and managers abreast of new technol ogies and their management. Courses in the arts and humanities explore such top ics as parenting, self-awareness , music and art, pho tograph y, language s, and literature . Through the off-campu s programs , and as part of its public service mission , CU-Den ver seeks to extend its educational resources to th e off-campus student. Individuals , groups, and organizations with special ed ucat ion interests are invited to call the Division of Con tinuing Education at 556-2735. University of Colorado Foundation, Inc. In 1981-82, the University of Colorado Foundation established a Denver office . The CU Foundation was established in 1967 at the direction of the Board of Re gents of the University as a privately governed , non profit corporation, chartered under th e laws of the State of Colorado. It is operated exclusivel y for charitable, scientific , or educational purposes designed to pro mote the welfare of CU . The CU Foundation is the approved agency t o solicit , receive , and administer gifts from private so urces . International Education/Study Abroad The Office of Internat iona l Education on the Boul der campus expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships wi th foreign universitie s, and acts as adviser for Fu lbright and other scho lars h ips at CO Bould er. The office also arra nge s study abroad programs and offers over 30 different programs around the globe. Students on any CU campus can participate in most of these programs . Some of the study abroad programs are of th e tradi tional junior year abroad variety, in w hi ch s tudents . are p l aced directly in foreign universi t ies for an academic year. Such programs are available a t the University of Lancaster, Eng land ; the University of Bordeaux, France; the University of Costa Rica in San Jose; the America n University in Cairo, Egypt; the University of Regensburg, West Germany; th e Hebrew Uni versity of Jerusalem, Israel; the Institute of Higher Education and Technol ogy in Monterrey, Mexico; the University of Sevill e , Spain; and Tunghai University in Taiwan.

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For students to spend an academic year abroad , programs for single semester or summer are avail able with variou1 s emphases, including intensive lan guage learning. Single semester programs are offered in Chambery Rennes , France; Guadalajara and Monterrey , Mebco; London , England; San Jose, Costa Rica; Seville and Alicante, Spain; and Taipei, Taiwan . Summer are located in Kassel, West Germa ny; Perugia , Italy; and London, England . Special sum mer programs , : e . g . , art history in Italy , are organized with specific upon request. Students are at the University of Colorado while participa ing in these study abroad programs . The applicabilit)t of credit in particular departments and colleges of CU-Denver is up to the departments and colleges. A B average with the equivalent of two years of college level work in the appropriate language is required for most of the academic year programs. Financial aid from CU-Denver can be applied to pro gram costs in mo . st cases . More informftion about study abroad programs is available in the Office of International Education, Boul der campus , 492-7741. Programs and Facilities I 49 Auraria Student Assistance Center The Auraria Student Assistance Center (ASAC) is composed of five offices offering specialized assis tance to all present and prospective Auraria students. 1. Office of Information and Referral Services. This is a central information source that provides objective assistance to prospective students desiring to enroll at CU-Denver or one of the other academic institutions on the Auraria campus. 2 . Office of Career Planning Placement Services. As sistance is offered to students and alumni in planning their careers and seeking employment. 3. Office of Disabled Student Ser vic es . This officer provides academic support of services to ensure pro grammatic access for students with disabilities. 4. Office of Vocational Rehabilitation. Campus branch office of the State of Colorado Department of Social Services . This office assists disabled students in becom ing fully employable and self-supporting. 5. Office ofl lntemational Student Services. The office assists international students on campus from 80 countries by providing support services and aiding in bridging the cultural gaps which many of them expe rience when entering the community to attend col lege. 6 . Office of Off-Campu s Housing Referral Services . Provides information on apartment and dormitory liv ing arrangements.

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" Student Services s trives to create a University envirorunen t which enab le s students, faculty , and staff to be colleagues in the lifelong process of learning and which provides studen t s with a satisfying total educational experience." A support group for re-entry women is facilitated by a counselor from CU-Denver's Center for Wome n 's R esources. -Mary Lou Fenili Dean, Student Services

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Dean: Mary Lou Fenili Assistant DeaJ: George H. Wayne Staff Assistant: Bellverie E . Ross Offices: No rth Classroom Bldg., Room 2012 Tele phone: 556-8427 Directors: Paul Encinias, niversity Division Diane Fries, Testing Center Cecil Glenn, Eauca tional Opportunity Program Kathy Jackson, Academic Center for Enrichment Pam Kesson-Craig, Center for Women's Resources Bruce Williams Campus Life STUDENT LifE Students at J rban universities reflect the diversities of their they are older than those con sidered to be trf.ditional emploY:' ment and family responsibilities m addition to therr academic progrtuns; include substantial numbers of mi norities, wome , and single parents; and are more often than not etolled part-time. To meet the needs of this diverse student popula tion, CU-Denv r provides student life programs and activities to complement studen ts' academic programs and o enhance their total educational expe rience . Studen s are provided opportunities to devel op , experience, and participate in student government , social, cultura J , i ntellectual , and recreational pro grams. Studen t life programs create an environment in which students are: I • Assisted in d;eveloping leadership through opportunities to pra q tice leadership, decisionmaking, man agemen t an1 marketing, interpersonal and group and relationship skills . • Encouraged nd aided in developing social, cultur al, intellect u , recreation and governance programs that expand mvolvement with the campus commu nity and soc 1ety and lead to mature appreciation of these pursuits. • Encourage d t exp lore self-directed activities that pro vide opportur,ities for self-realization and growth in individual arrd group settings . • Exposed to vari ous cultures and experiences, ideas and issues, a[t and musical forms, and styles of life. • Informed about institutional policies and proce dures and h
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52 I Student Services DEAN OF STUDENT SERVICES The dean's office provides vision, leadership, influ ence, and advocacy on behalf of students and super vises the provision of programs and services for students by Student Services offices. The Dean serves as liaison with the Associated Students of CU-Denver and its clubs and organizations; coordinates orientation and commencement, the Senior Citizens Program , and the Ahlin Scholarship Fund for disabled students; admin isters the Student Code of Conduct and student griev ance procedure; and assures CU-Denver representation in Auraria-shared student services and activities. For the convenience of CU-Denver students, all Student Services offices, including the dean's office are open until 7 p.m. two evenings a week. The dean's office is in Room 2012 of the North Classroom Building, 556-8427. University Division University Division provides advising, assistance, and referral services for non-degree undergraduate stu dents and for any other students undecided or uncer tain about a major course of study. University Division also provides prospective and non-degree students with information about admission requirements and proce dures, academic programs, courses, registration pro cedures, and campus resources available to assist students. A non-degree student is a student enrolled in courses but either not seeking a degree or not yet admitted to or enrolled in an undergraduate degree program in the Colleges of Business, Engineering, or Liberal Arts and Sciences. University Division assigns each non-degree student a student advisor who serves as advisor, mentor , and advocate. Student advisors are upperclass and grad uate students. University Division also offers a variety of work shops, including such topics as academic and personal coping skills, educational and career options, educa tional goal setting, and long-term academic planning . University _ Division is located in North Classroom Building, Room 2014, 556-2322. Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) The Associated Students of the University of Colo rado at Denver (ASCU-Denver) serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not nor mally offered to students under the formal University structure. ASCU-Denver assists students with infor mation concerning student clubs and organizations , issues concerning student status and other informa tion of interest to students in general. ASCU-Denver also provides students with assistance with grievances and with the opportunity to become more intimately involved with the University community through ac tive participation in student governrnent itself or through service on University, tri-institutional, and AHEC com mittees. More information concerning services and ac tivities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices , Student Center, Room 340, 556-2510. Student Legal Services Student legal services are available to assist students with off-campus legal problems through the provision of legal advice, litigation preparation, document inter pretation , and assistance in negotiation. The service will not represent students in court. This student fee funded program is provided free of charge to CUDen ver students; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred such as copying, typing, etc. Con tact the office for further details at 556-3333, Student Center, Room 255A. The Advocate The purpose of the student newspaper is to advo cate and provide a marketplace of ideas from which students may make an impartial judgment of their own. The newspaper strives to include a combination of good investigative reporting, feature articles, and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is to be a tool to assist in the encour agement of and development for writers, journalists, artists , and other student members of its general man agement and production staff. The office is in the Stu dent Center, Room 151, 556-8321. Student Activities The Office of Student Activities is the coordinating, resource, and general information center for student government, student clubs and organizations, student programs, Greek social organizations, and the aca demic honor societies. All student fee expenditures are monitored by this office to assure compliance with CU-Denver, ASCU-Denver, and state regulations and procedures. The Director of Campus Life represents the Dean of Student Services on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional, ASCU-Denver, and AHEC commit tees and maintains effective lines of communication with MSC, CCD, and AHEC. The Office of Student Activities is located in the Student Center, Room 153, 556-3399.

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Student s elected to run Student Government gain valuable leadership experi ence. Students gain val uable journalism experience working on the Advocate , CU-Denver's student newspaper . Student Services I 53

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54 I Student Services Student Rights and Responsibilities When a student enrolls in the Uni v ersity , he or s he agrees to participate meaningfull y in the life of th e University and to share in the obligation to pre s erve and promote his or her rights a s a citizen and has a basic obligation not to commit or tolerate any infr i ngement on the rights of others. Students s hould thoroughly familiarize them s elves with the academic and nonacademic student conduct standards of the Unive r sity . Academic standards ques tions should be directed to the dean of the school or college in which the student is enrolled. N onaca demic conduct questions should be directed to the as sistant dean of Student Services. Copie s of the standards and information regarding all student grievan c e pro cedures may be obtained in the Office of the Dean of Student Ser vi ces. SPECIAL PROGRAMS Academic Center for Enrichment The Academic Center for Enrichment is a learning assistance center designed to promote student success in the academic setting. Service s are availabl e to all students . The Center's services include : tutoring, work shops, credit courses , consulting , and a minorit y re sources librar y. Tutoring . Free tutoring is available in many s ubject areas (some limitations apply). Individual or group sessions are held on weekdays/e v enings. Both sched uled and open "drop-in" style tutoring ar e a v ailable at set times throughout the semester. Workshops . Stud y skills and computer w orkshops are provided on such topics as test-taking, memory and study techniques , notetakin g, introduction to the personal computer , and word proces s ing . Courses . Courses are offered in a small group for mat in the areas of college survi v al skills (stud y skills and computer word processing), English as a second language, developmental composition and read ing, and developmental math and problem s olving . Consulting. Academic, financial aid, and personal consulting are available . Peer advocacy als o i s avail able to students eligible for the federall y -funded Student Support Services Program. Library. The Center maintains a small periodi c al and book collection authored by , and/or about , minori ties ; these resource s are available for student r e search and leisure . The Academic Center for Enrichment is located in the North Cla s sroom Building , Room 2004, telephone 556-2802. STUDY SKILLS COURSES CMMU. 1400-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Lang uages. Thi s cours e i s de signed for ESL students who need to impro v e their reading and vocabul ary s kill s. For example , students will learn to s kim and s can , summarize , increase their reading speed, and make inferences. C o req. , CMMU . 1410, STSK. 0806 and 0807 . CMMU. 1410-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Lan guages I. This is the fir s t course i n the ESL composition sequence . Writing be g ins with sentence-le ve l work and con tinues wi th the development of paragr aphs b ased on Westem rhetorical pattern s. Grammar appropri a t e to students' need s will be incorporated into this class. C o req., CMMU . 1400, STSK. 0806 and 0807. CMMU. 1420-3. Composition for Speakers of Othe r Lan guages II. Second term course . Continued work on gram mar , s ynta x , and the mechanics of w riting . Sp ecial attention i s gi ven to those a s pect s of the Eng lish langu age which pose problem s for the non-native speaker , e. g . , arti cle usage , verb forms, and idioms. CMMU. 1430-3. Advanced ESL Writing Skills. D esigned as a transition course for ESL students in prepar a tion for ENGL. 1010 or 1020. Emphasis is placed on the clarification of grammar and/or punctuation problems that indi v idual students may have and on development of longe r compos iti o n s. STSK. 0700-1. Developmental Composition. This course is offered to develop and improve academic w rit ing skills. Area s in w hich the student feels a need f o r growth are ex plored , and a program for impro vement is then determined for each individual. E s say form and the p rocess, as well as the mechanics, of writing will be c o n s id e re d as a general guide for composition growth. Open t o all student s. STSK. 0702-1. Developmental Reading. Thi s course is of f ered a s a means of enhancing general readin g habits and improving study reading technique s. Comp rehension and retention , v ocabulary de v elopment , s kimmin g, scanning , crit ical reading , and graphic reading are among the topics that will be e x plored . STSK. 0703-1. College Preparatory Math I. This course is designed to provide students with a solid foundation in fun damental mathematic s skills . Students will study numbers and their propertie s, integers, rat io nal numbers, fractions, and decimals. Simple linear equations and b asic geometry al s o will be presented. STSK. 0704-3. College Preparatory Math II. This course pre pares s tudents forMA rn. 1010. will s tudy and prac tice linear equations , inequalities and sets, sys t ems of equations , and pol y nomials/functions. STSK. 0705-1. Problem Solving. Thi s course is designed to improve investigati v e and problem solving skills. Scientific theor y, empirical methodology, and re search methods will b e utilized . Individual topics invest i g a tion will b e assigned. Open to all students . STSK. 0707-1. College Survival Skills. Thi s course is de s igned to promote s uccess in the academic se tt ing. Topics covered will include uni v ersity resourc es, conquering the univers i ty sy stem, listening and notetaking , study and memory technique s, test taking skills, time management, library re search s trategies , word processing, and s impl e computer graphics . STSK. 0708-1. Introduction to Word Processing. This course will thoroughly familiarize the student w ith a n easyto-use w ord processing program that will a s si s t in th e proces s of writing , te x t revision and rearrang e ment, a n d the produc-

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tion of " letter perfect" documents. (The wor d processing program be one that is available in the open, student use, computer areas.) STSK. 0800 -1. Deve l opme ntal C ompo sition for ESL. This class meets for each week. The course is taught in a small group fo a t (limit 10) with a ttention given to sentencelevel developm nt and be ginning para graph development based on West m thou ght patterns . Student s also work on the mechanics f writing. STSK. 080 1-1. Communicati o n S k ills. Thi s course meets for two hour s each week to improve the oral comm unication skills of students whose first language is not English. Skills to be emphasized include use of idiom atic English, cross cultural cross-cultural problem s in communica tion , and pronunciation . STSK. 0802 -1. Im p r ovin g A cademic Reading Skills for ESL. This class is designed to improve s tudent s' reading of academic texts. StUdents will work on skills s u c h as compre hension, retenti0n, skimming , scanning , and critical reading. STSK. 0806 -1. * udy Skills for ESL. The prim ary focus of this class i s to teach ESL studen t s techniques for listening to and takin g notes from college lectures. The class also will deal with the sroke n English necessar y to f unction in the classroom Coreq., CMMU. 1400/1410 and STSK. 0807. STSK. 080 7 1. aoll ege Survival Skills for ESL. This course will cover topics such as college resources, time manage ment, study and memor y techniques , test anxiety , and test taking skills. The goal of thi s course is to help s tudents acquire skills which will enable them to " survive " in an academic setting. Coreq., CMMU. 1400 /1410 and STSK. 0806. Ahlin Fun d S chola rship The Ahlin und provides scholarship s for disabled students who are seeking undergraduate and gradu ate degrees who will be attending CU-Denver ei ther full or time . These scholarships contribute to the costs of fees, books , transportation, and child care . cost of protheses and other adaptive equipment needed to enable students to attend CO Denver also may be covered. Work-stud y positions for disab led studJnts attending CU-Denver are available thro ugh the Ahlin Fund. Applications are available in the Offi ce of the Dean of S tudent Serfices. Application deadlin es are July 1, November 1 , a;nd Aprill. For further information, call 556-8427 . Educational ! Oppo rtun ity P r ograms Educational Opportunity Program s (EOP) are de signed specifiaally to recruit and retain minority stu dents for through community outreach, student advocacy , memtoring programs, and specialized aca demic, career, Jand personal advising . T h e individualized programs are American Indian EOP, Asian Arherican EOP, Black EOP, Hispanic EOP, and t he Minority Early University Enrollment Pro gram. These programs work closely with the Colorado Ed u cational Service Development Association (CESDA), the Colorado Minority Engineering Association (CMEA), the Denver Public Schools , and the business commu nity, as well as the many minority communities in the Denver metropolitan area . Student Services I 55 EOP programs and activities include leadership train ing , new student orientation, Pan-African Nurturing and Association (P.A.N.D.A.) Games, and such cultural festivals as Cinco de Mayo , Asian activities, and Native American pow wows. The EOP office is in North Classroom Bldg., Room 1028, 556-2700. Pre-Collegia t e Dev elopmen t Progra m The Pre-Collegiate Development is an academic en richment and support program designed to motivate minori ty students to complete a college preparatory curriculum, graduate from high school, and pursue a college education. The program enables students in grades 9 through 12 to engage in a wide range of activities throughout the academic year and during a full-time, five-week summer program. The academic year component of fers monthly study skills and career orientation work shops, advising, tutoring, and a variety of cultural enrichment experiences. The five -wee k summer session for students in the lOth and 11th grades is held on the CO Denver campus. The summer session consists of accelerated classes, for which students earn elective high school credit , career orientation, and cultural, social, and rec reational activities. Participation in the CU-Denver Pre-Collegiate De velopment Program is open to students enrolled in Abraham Lincoln, Aurora Hinckley , Denver East, Den ver North, Denver South, Denver West , George Wash ington , John F. Kennedy, Manual, Montbello, and Thomas Jefferson high schools. The Pre-Collegiate Development Program office is in the North Classroom Bldg., Room 2008, 556-2862 .

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56 I Student Services Orientation ORIENTATION, ADVISING, REGISTRATION, AND SERVICES (OARS), an orientation program for new freshman and transfer students and students return ing to CU-Denver after an absence, is held prior to the first day of classes at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters and the summer term. This prograrnis conducted by Student Services in conjunction with the schools and colleges within the University and is di vided into separa te sessions for undergraduate stu dents, for graduate students, and for parents and spouses of students. OARS introduces and describes academic programs, activities, and services available at CU Denver , and provides opportunities for students toreceive academic advising, to resolve questions and concerns regarding registration, financial aid, and payment of fees. For more information, call 556-8427. Student Health Insurance Program A student medical hospital-surgical plan is available for all students; dependent coverage also is available at an additional charge. For further information refer to the portion on Tuition and Fees in the General Infor mation section of this catalog, or ca11556-8427. Testing Center This multi-faceted assistance center provides vari ous testing for all levels of postsecondary education, professional certification, accreditation, and academic and career planning. The center provides registration information concerning the following : ACf CAT CEil GRE GMAT GSFLT LSAT MAT MBTI MCAT TOEFL CLEP sen American College Test California Achievement Test Colorado Educational Interest Indi cator Graduate Record Examination Graduate Management Admissions Test Graduate School Foreign Language Test Law School Admission Test Miller Analogy Test Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Medical College Admission Test Test of English as a Foreign Language College Level Examination Program Strong-Campbell Inter est Inventory For further information contact 556-2861, North Classroom Building, Room 2006. Office of Veterans Affairs The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veteran and dependent stu dents attending CU Denver utilizing Veterans Admin istration educational benefits. This office assists students with filling out VA paperwork and in solving prob lems associated with the receipt of V A-related bene fits. The OVA maintains proper certification for each el igible student to ensure that each student meets Vet erans Administration requirements of attendance, course load and content, and other regulations critical to the receipt of educational benefits payments. In addition, the OVA provides VA Vocational Reha bilitation referrals, VA tutorial assistance, the Colo rado Tuition Assistance Program, and VA work/study positions for qualified veterans. For further informa tion contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 556-2630, North Classroom Building, Room 4015. Center for Women's Resources The Center provides to CU-Denver students various services and programs aimed at enhancing students' academic experience. A Re-Entry Program for Women who are returning to school after an interruption is offered each fall and spring semester. This program aims to assist re-entry women as they make the transition to college life, and deals with such issues as stress management, family concerns, self-esteem, and assertiveness. The Center also provides: professional counseling to all CU-Denver students at no cost, support groups, educational programming, an extensive resource and referral bank for community services such as legal as sistance, medical care, child care and professional or ganizations. The Center maintains a small lending library on various topics relevant to women, and publishes a quarterl y newsletter containing campus and commu nity events. The Center sponsors several scholarships yearly, in cluding the Patricia Schroeder Scholarship for Wom en, the Women's Center Scholarship, and the Joan Smith Memorial Scholarship. The Center for Women's Resources at CU-Denver strives to provide support, advocacy, and professional service to the entire CUDenver community. Stop by and see us in the North Classroom Building, Room 2013, or call 556-2815. STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT A student is accountable to both civil and University authorities for acts which constitute violations of laws as well as violations of University rules and regula tions . Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to challenge or postponement on the ground that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced, or are pending in civil or criminal court. In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a student violates standards as defined within this document and with draws from the University before administrative ac tion is final. All persons on University property are required, for reasonable cause, to identify themselves when re quested by University or Auraria Public Safety offi-

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cia l s acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through i t s a d minis t ra t ive officers, t he University re s erv es t he right to exclude those posting a danger to Univ ersity pe sonnel or proper t y and t hose who in t er fere wit h its fUnction as an edu cational insti tu tion. All p ersons CU D e nver/Auraria prope rty w h o are not student s o r e m p l oyees o f th e Univers ity are re quired t o adhe r e t o th e Code of Conduct ap pli cab l e to Univer sity students and to abide by University poli cies and campus regulations. The b ehavio r s outlined here will not be t o l era t ed be cause th ey th!jea t e n t he safety o f individ u a l s a n d vio late th e basic p u r p ose of t h e University and personal right s and free d o m of its memb ers. 1. Int entiona l o b str u c t ion, d isruption, or int erfer ence wit h tdching, re searc h , d isciplinary proc eed ings, or other activi t ies, i ncluding i t s public servic e and adminis tr a t ive func t ions or au th or i ze d ac tiviti es on the CUD enver/Auraria premises. 2. W illful o?st ruct ion or in t e rf erence with th e freedom o f movelljlent of students, Uni versity officia l s, fac ulty , employees, and invited g u es t s to all facilities of the C U-DenvJ./Auraria camp us. Student s listen a tt en t ive l y to o r ientatio n for the Minority Early Enrollmen t P rogram at CU-D e nver. The y a r e among 50 minority hig!{ schoo l s tu den t s se l ected each semes t er for the program w hic h pays for t h eir tuiti o n , fees , a n d b ooks. Code of Conduct I 57 3. I I abuse of a n y person on property owned or contro lled] b y the CU-Denver / Auraria Higher Edu c ati o n C entet or at functions sponsored or supervised b y th e U ni v ersity , or any conduct that threatens or enda n ge r s the health , s afety, or welfare of any such p e r s o n . 4. Verbal physical harassment and/or hazing in all form s, wllich includes , but is not limited to, strik ing , l ay in g hands on, treating with violence, or offer in g t o d o b o dil y harm to another person with intent to punis h o r injure ; or other treatment of a tyrannical, a bu sive, s hameful , insulting, or humiliating nature . (Thi s includes , but is not limited to , demeaning beha v ior of a n e thnic , s exist , or racist nature ; unwanted sex ual adv a n ces or intimidations.) 5 . P ro hibited entry to or use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilitie s, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU Denv e r / Auraria property or facilities for illegal pur po ses or purposes detrimental to the University. 6 . F or gery, fraud (to include computer fraud) , falsifica ti o n , a lteration , or use of Uni v ersity documents, record s, o r instruments of identification with intent to ga in a n y une ntitled adv antage. 7 . Th eft o r damage to CU-Denver / Auraria property and th e p ri v ate property of students , university o fficia l s, f acul ty, employees , and invited guests when s uch prop e r ty is located upon or within CU-Denver/Auraria building s or facilities . 8 . P osses sion of firearms, explosives , or other dan gerou s wea pons or material s within or upon the grounds, buildin gs, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus. Thi s policy shall not appl y to any police office r or o ther peace officer while on duty authorized b y th e Univ er s ity, or others authorized in writing b y th e Chi ef of the Auraria Public Safe ty or designee . ( A d a n ge r o u s we apon i s an instrument that is designed to or lik e l y to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, firearms, explosives, BB guns, s lingshots , martial arts devices, brass knuck les, bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switchblades . A harmle ss instrument designed to look like a fire arm , ex plo s ive , or dangerous weapon which is used b y a per so n to cause fear in or assault on another per son i s expres sly included within the meaning of the t e rm firear m s, ex plos ive, or dangero u s weapon . ) 9. Sale, di s tribution , use, posse ssion, or manufac ture of ille ga l drugs w ithin or on the grounds , build ings, or a n y other facilities of th e CU Denver/Auraria campus. 10. P hys ical restrict i on, coercion , or harassment of any p erson; s ignificant theft; sale/ manufacture of ille gal drugs (inctludes possession of a sufficient quantity with int ent t b sell) ; damage, the!:, or unauthorized po ss e ssio n o f University property ; or forgery, falsifi c ation, altera tion , or use of University documents, records , or in strume nts of identification to gain any unentitled advanta g e . Nothin g in thi s section shall be construed to pre vent peace ful and orderly assembly for the redress of gri evances. F or additi onal information, students shall r efer t o the Univer s ity of Colorado Students ' Rights and R es p o n s ibilities Regarding Standards of Conduct , Disciplin e and Review .

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The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education is located on the beautifully landscaped historic Ninth Street Park on the Auraria Campus. "For many students the question that lingers throughout college is ' Where is this all leading? ' Coop erative education not only prepares students for a career after graduation but also provides stu dents with the opportunity to apply w hat the y have learned in the classroom to a work situa tion and to bring that experience back to the classroom as a learning tool. " -Director Janet Michalski Center for Internships and Cooperative Education

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Director: Michalski Assistant Director and Coordinator, Engineering: Diane Berkle y Coord inator, Liberal Arts and Sciences: Cherrie Grove Coordinat or, B1.fSiness and Administration: Wayne Sundell Coordin ator, Liberal Arts and Sciences: Anthony Trelikes AdministratilAssistant: Becky Carter IBM Faculty o Loan: James T. Hrbek Office: 1047 Eth Street Historic Park Telephone: 55[2892 Advisor y Boa d: Bowers,t.Manager, College Relations, US WEST, Alan Brock wa , Profes sor of Biology Donald S. Ga e, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Compu er Science John S. Haller Jr., Vice Chancellor for Academic Af fairs Victoria J. Office Administrator, Walters & Theis Law Firm ; graduate (CLAS, '83) and former CU-De iwer Co-op student James T. Hrbe , Manager , IBM Central Employment Offic e John A . Lanning , Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Scifnces Robyn Assistant to the Executive Director, E-470 Highway Authority; CU-Denver graduate (GSP A, '86) and CU-Denver Co-op student James H. Mille e, Senior Instructor, College of Busi ness and Ad 'stration Roy Pritt s, Actlng Resident Dean, College of Music Oren G. Stro I Acting Dean, College of Engineering and Applied Science INTERNSHIPS AND E EDUCATION The Center for Intern ships and Cooperative Educa tion, at CU-Denver in 1973, provides stu dents with an o portunity to supplement their academic classroom lear n g with on-the-job work experiences or internships elated to their academic studies. Stu dents are placJd either as paid co-op trainees or as interns for acadkmic credit with corporations, business es, or agencies in the Denver metropoli tan area as weU as out of state. Faculty co dr dinators from each of the University's colleges and schools act as liaisons between the Center and the academic departments. The Center currently places over 400 students each year with some 250 par ticipating employers. Over 30 percent of all co-op stu dents are graduate students. Cooperativ . e Education Cooperative education is an educational method which combines classroom study with paid, career related, off-campus work. The purpose is to give students the opportunity to apply what the y have learned in the classroom to real world situations, and to bring that experience back to the classroom as a learning tool. Cooperative education offers students paid long term positions (two or more semesters) during which students alternate semesters of full-time work with se mesters of full-time school, or work part time year round. Co-op experier,ces may be eligible for academic credit, and many jobs lead to permanent career positions upon graduation. Internships Internships offer students short-term positions (one semester) anq the y may or may not be paid. Intern ships are usualny done for academic credit and are pop ular with who like to explore a variety of careers. Many students complete two, three, or even four internships before graduation. Internships , like co -op jobs, are related to the student's academic stud ies and/or career goals. Eligibility for Placement The Center is open to all students enrolled at least half time in CU-Denver college br school who have completed their freshman year, have baintained a grade point average of 2.5, and have completed at least 12 hours in residence (6 hours for graduate students). Some employers haJe additional requirements, i.e., U.S. cit izenship , willingness to travel, and specific course work. Academic Credit for Work Experience Undergraduate students placed by the Center in paid or non-paid positions, as well as students who have obtained their own jobs , can apply to earn academic credit through courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and College of Music. Graduate stu dents in some colleges and schools can earn intern ship, experiential learning, field study, or practicurn credit through courses established for this purpose.

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60 I Center for Internships and Cooperative Education W h y Students Participate in C oo p e rative Education • Students recognize the value of combining theory with practice and find greater relevance in their stud ies. • Co-op education allows students to test classroom teaching in the laboratory of the real world . • The program teach es students valuable job-search skills such as resume writing and interviewing tech niques. • Co-op provides a means of financial assistance that is available to all students, regardless of family in come levels or other financial aid arrangements, and does not leave students burdened with educational debts. • The inclusion of a wo rk component and the contri bution from co-op earnings are major factors in en couraging first-generation college students to pursue a college degree. • Because work experiences involve students with coworkers who come from a variety of backgrounds , students develop a deeper understanding of other people and greater skills in human relations . Philine Darwin, chemistry major , is a Jab assistant at the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes . .....--..-......: ----... ----.....r. ... __ -------------....-...... ....... _...-.-..; " Cooperative education gave me the opportunity to discover what I do and don ' t want to do as a career and has made me a much m o re market abl e graduate . Thro u g h co-op, I have gained experience not only with the types of things going on in industry but also in working with different kinds of people . That ' s something you can't get from college classes alone. " Brent Lambert , electrical engineering co-op student. Why Employers Participate in Co-op Programs • Co-op students are an excellent source of temporary manpower for special projects and peak l oads or busy seasons. • Co-op allows the empl oyer to assess an individual's potential for employmen t after gradua t ion, thus sav ing entrylevel recruiti n g costs . • Co-op students can increase produ ctivity of full t ime professional staff. • Co op stude n ts are highly motivated, produc t ive, and dependab le. • CU-Denver students bring knowledge about the lat est academic research t o their employers. • As verified by many studies , co-op student s s ub se quently become full-time employees with far l ower turnover rates and better promotion potential t han t h e average entry leve l professio nal.

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Facts Abo ut C oop erative Education • Cooper a t iv e education programs have been estab lis hed in o v elf 80 per cent of the Fortune 500 corpo ra t ions . All o f the top 10 For tu ne 500 companies are invo l ved i n c 0 operat ive educ at ion. • T h e last three pres i d ents of General Motors at one time were cooperative education students. • Cooperati v e education has been conducted s u ccess full y in the U . S . sinc e 1906. • Over 1,000 c olleges and universities currently have cooperati v e education progra m s. • An estimatecii200,000 college students are emolled in cooperati v e educat ion and gross annual earnings are to be in excess of $200,000,000. Co-op Empl + ers Employ ers w l jlO recr ui t CU -D e n ver students for cooperative educ ation p ositions in clu de: Martin M arie tt a I B M Corpor a ti d n Hughes Air c raft Comp any Int ernships and Coo p e r ative E ducat ion I 61 I NASA Johnson Space Center National Service Rockwell Inte r national Texas Instruments U S Cqmmunications Walt Disney World, Inc. Office of the Governor , State of Colorado Peat Marwicl<, Main & Co . Kyle Belding Gallery National Bureau of Standards KCNC-TV Los Angeles Times U.S. Genera l Acco u nting Office Denver Gene.r;al Hospital Environmental Protection Agency Denver Center for the Performin g Arts Walters & Theis Law Firm Bloomsbury Review Colorado Housing & Finance A u thority Hospice of Metro Denver H.T. Geophysica l Denver Public Defender's Office Colorado Assbciation of Commerce and Indus t ry Co l orado Assbcia t ion of Publi c E m ployees Cathy Chin, planning intern , with her supervisor at RTD . She is a graduate student in urban and regional planning .

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"The Library is both physically and intel lectually the heart of the campus. It is a good place to think , to plan , and to Jearn. " -Patricia Senn Breivik, Director A uraria Library

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Auraria Library Director : Patricia Senn Breivik Associate Direolor: Jean F . Hemphill Associate for External Affairs: Margie Shurgot Assistant for Collection and Automation Services: Marily ' J. Mitchell Assistant Director for Media and Telecommunications Services: Muriel E. Woods Offices: AurariJ Librar y, 11th and Lawrence Sts. Telephone: .N ministration: 556-2805 Telephone: -Irlformation: 556-2741 Faculty: Profes 1or: Patr icia Senn Breivik Associate Jean F. Hemphill Assistant Professors: Dene L. Clark, Patricia A. Eskoz, Brian D . Elnora Mercado, Terry Ann Mood , Martin A . Tessmer, Robert L. Wick, Muriel E. Woods Instructors: Alnneli Ahtola, Lori Arp, Julie A. Brew er, Diana L. B ce, Anthony J. Dedrick, Nikki Dilgarde, Joan B. Fiscella, Eileen Guleff , Kathleen Kenny, Emilei Kim, Marit S. MacArthur, Marilyn J . Mitchell, Kay Nichols, Elizabeth Porter, Jay Schafer, Louise T. Stwalley, Linda Tietjen Rutherford W. Witthus, Eveline L. Yang Board of Directprs, Friends of Auraria Library Tom Clark, Forward Metro Denver Group, Denver Chamber of Commerce Lucy Creighton, First Interstate Bank of Denver Claudia Allen Dillman, Gannett Outdoors Nancy Ellins I Mark E . Jones, Merrill Lynch Richard H. Price Waterho use Darwin Niekerkl. Adolph Coors Co. Christopher G. Nims, Gensler & Associates Joan Ringel , Colorado Association of Commerce and Industr y Stuart C. Roger , S.C. Rogers, Inc. Oair E. Villano, J ! nsumer Fraud Division, District Attorney's Office Terry M. Wic 4e, Wicker-Works Video Productions , Inc. Joan Wohlgena t Lester Woodwa f d, Da vis, Graham & Stubbs Access to inf d rmation is essential to academic suc cess. The Auraria Library , located at the center of the campus, provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The Library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver. The Collection The Auraria Librar y has a collectibn of over 600,000 vo lume s . In addition to a strong, up-to-date book col lection, the Library also has over Q.,OOO journal and newspaper subscriptions and a film/videotape collec tion. The Library is a select depositor y for U .S. gov ernment publica t ions and a full depo sitory for Colorado state documents. The Auraria Library's collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally though interlibrar y loan services. lnfoColorado InfoC olorado is a database project developed and managed by the Librar y to collect kd provide access to local economic development information so vital to the business and economic growth of the state. In April 1988, Governor Roy Romer designated the Auraria Library as the central clearinghouse for state economic development information , answering Colorado's need for ready access to accurate, coordinated, and systematically developed information in such areas as labor and mar ket profiles, economic trends and forecasting, statistical and demographic profiles , industry-specific business activity, and information to assist i1,1 the creation , expansion, and relocation of business in Colorado. The database currently contains abstracts of business and economics articles from major newspapers, journal s, studies, and reports from across the state as well as references to agencies and organizations which cre ate, anal yz e, and provide access to primary economic development data. Because InfoColorado is available through the on!line system of the Colorado Alliance of Research Libr
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64 I Library Se r vices comprehensive searches than were possible with the traditional card catalog . In addition to using PAC at the Library, patrons may obtain dial-up access through a home or office computer with a modem; PAC also appears as a menu item on the CU-Denver mainframe computer. Reference Services The Auraria Library's reference department stands ready to assist s tuden ts and faculty in using the Library's resources. The reference department is staffed during all times the Library is open. In addition, brief refer ence questions, such as whether or not the Library owns a particular item, can be answered over the phone. Media Services The Media and Telecommunications Divi sion of the Library offers a full range of media services. The me dia distribution department manages the Library's me dia collection, which consists of videotapes, audiotapes, records, 16mm films , and kits. These materials are listed in the online Public Access Catalog. This department also houses media viewing and listening facilities. The Library operates an 18-channel television distribution sys tem which is wired into all classrooms on campus; at a faculty member's request a film or videotape can be transmitted dire ctly into th e classroom over this sys tem. This system a l so can tran smit live programs from St. Cajetan's, the Student Center, and the Library's television studio to other locations on campus. A self service graphics lab is also available for student use in the Media and Telecommunications Division and a pro fessional graphic designer is available to assist users . Computer Assisted Research Online da t abase searching, for which there is a fee, can save many hours of researching printed abstracts and indexes. In some cases, it provides the only access to certain materials. The Library has access to well over 200 databases. In addition to bibliographic informa tion, many of the business databases also contain di rectory and financial information. Questions about the Computer Assisted Research service should be di rected to the Library's reference department. Information Retrieval Service The information retrieval service was instituted as a special aid for busy researchers . For a reasonable fee, Library staff can assist patrons in locating and check ing out the library materials they need. Working from the patron's bibliography, staff can: locate and check out books owned by the Library; photocopy articles from journa ls owned by the Library; submit interlibrary loan requests for materials which the Library does not own; and deliver the materials to the patron's hom e or office. Inquiries about this time-saving service should be directed to the reference department.

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Libra ry Instr uction The Library is committed to educating people to meet the demands o the Information Society. The Library offers a wide ra ge of instructiona l programming, in cluding a self-paced audiocasse tt e walking tour of the Library, as well j as class sessions t o teach information access skills and strategies. Course ranges from teaching the skills needed to use a printeq index to advanced research method ology for public affairs and other graduate students. is develoJi>ed in c?n JUnchon With dtsopline faculty . For more information about the Libra i y's ins t ructiona l offerings contact the office of the c d ordinator of Ins t ructional Services at the Librar y. Architec t u r e and Planning Library The Librar y's main collection is supplemented b y the material ho sed at the near b y Architecture and Planning Branch Library. With a collection of over 13,000 books, 120 subscriptions, and 14,000 slides, this branch offers specialized informa tion to student s of arcitecture, interior design, landscape ar chitecture, urban design, and p lanning. This branch library is open I to any student w h o needs access to these materials. Libr a r y I 65 Services for Persons with Disabilities The Library is committed to making it s re sources and services available to all students. Through the m e dia distribution d epartment, a wide variety of a d aptive equipment is available to assist persons with disabilitie s including a Kurzell Reading Machine , a Voy ager VTEK magnifier , a B ra ill e dictionary, t he World Book E n cy clopedia in Braille and on cassette, tlil.e Perkin s B railler, and several large print dictionaries. Librar y services t o assist persons with disabilities include orient a tion t o the physical layout of the Library, retrie v al of mat eri als, and assistance with use of the Public Acc ess Cat alog, periodicals indexes , and special adaptive equi pme nt. Additiona l Facilities Coin-operated typewriters, a cop y cente r , cha n ge machines, and study rooms are all a v ail a bl e at t he Library. Internships The Library offers internships , prac ticum s, and independent studies to student s inte t ested in t e l eco m munications or information management.

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" CU-Denver is emerging as a remarkably strong University with an unusual array of superior graduate programs . Grad uate education at CU-Denver not only imparts knowledge w hich is frequently multi-disciplinary and applied , but also helps stu dents to master the processes of inquiry that gen erate new knowledge and that yield solutions to pressing societal prob l ems." -Actin g Dean Thomas A. Clark The Graduate School

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Acti n g Dean: Th oma s A. Clark Scho o l Office: 1250 14th St., Suite 700 Telephone: 556-2663 INFORMA T I ON ABO UT THE SCHOOL The 1983 BrLemas report on Graduate Education in Americ a eluded that "Graduate educ a tion and research are t e bedrock of every importan t area of our nation al ."The report highlighted the fact that a strong national se curi ty program, a healthy growing economy , and the prospects for improvement in the quality of life are all dependent upon high quality and vigorous program s in our universities. High quality aduate programs are synonymous with the Univ ersity f Colorado. Professors are ac ti vely in volved in reserch or creative ac t ivity in their disci plines and, are te acher/sc hol ars who con tinu e to study and absqr b new data, i d eas, and techniques and bring thi s cuttfr1g edge knowledge to the cla ssroom. Graduat e at CU-Denver not only gain from interaction s wj th the graduate faculty but also gain from other students in th e classroom . Because most of CU-Den ver's ?raduate student s are older and em plo ye d , the y bring practi cal experience gained in the Denver commu.nity to the classroom and are read y to relate th e realities of practice to th e models presented in the classroom. The Graduatb School is a University-wide body that authorize s programs within its constituent colleg es and schools. At CU-Denver, Educa tion , Engineering, Lib eral Art s and S d iences, and Music are colleges or schools whose graduat l programs are offered through The Grad uate Sch ool. ln concept, there is a single Graduate School regardle ss of camp us. ln practice, most master's-level program s are $ pecific to the campus where the stu dent is insofar as particular options and ad visors are concer ned. Doctoral progr ams in a discipline are viewed as the responsibility of the entire University commu nity of that di sfi pline. D octora l le vel programs on the CU-Denver campus are either coordinated through th e office of the sy tern graduate dean or through the cor responding Den ve r or Boulder departm ent. The Ph. D . degrees in applled mathematic s, educational adminis tration, and instructional technology are sys t em de grees in which application is made to The Graduate School at CU-Denver. In a number of other disciplines with integr ated degree s, most or all course work for the Ph.D. can be completed at Denver and th e re searc h advisor may be a member of the CU-Den ver faculty, but the d egree program is adminis t ered by the Bould er department. In other disciplines, a significant portion of the course work required for the Ph.D . de gree may be taken at CU-Denver. Persons interested in pursuing doctoral level work should consult with the appropriate discipline graduate advisor. Anyone wis hing further information not given in thi s catalog should write to the dean of The Graduate School , University of Colorado at Denver, 1200 Larimer St., D enver, CO 80204. Degrees Offered The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through The Graduate School at CO Denver . ln so me cases, a specific required course may only be offered through the University of Colorado a t Boulder in a given year. The Master of Arts (M.A.) in: Anthrop ology Geography Biology History Communication a nd Mathematics t h eatre Political Science Economics Psychology English Sociology The Master of Arts (M.A. Education) in: Counseling and personnel se r vices Early childhood education Educational admi nistrati on Educational psycho l ogy Ed u cational techno l ogy E lem entary educa tion Foun dations , educatio n lnstructional technology (emphasis in corporate instructional development and training, instructional computing s pecialist, instructional techn ologist, librar y media specialist) Reading Secondary education Special education The Master of Science (M.S . ) in: Applied mathematics Chemistry Civil engineering Computer science1 Electrical engineering Environmental science Mech,anical engineering Teclul.ical communication The Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.) The Mas t er of Engineering (M.E.)1 Th e Mas ter of Humani tie s (M.H.) The Mas ter of Social Science (M.S.S .) The Specialis t in Education (Ed.S.) Significant course work can be taken at the Denver campus in the following master ' s degree programs: Fine arts Journalism Geology Philosophy 1Awarded through CU-Boulder .

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68 I The Graduate School The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in: Applied mathematics Educational administration Instructional t echnology Public administration Significant course work is available at the Denver campus in the programs listed below. Students can be resident on the Denver campus studying in these ar eas in order to take advant age of the multi-campus activities of The Graduate School. It is usually advised that a student complete some course work at another campus of the University. Biology Chemistr y Civil engineering Cornrnunica tion Computer science Electrical engineering English Geography Mechanical engineering Psychology The Graduate School at CU-Denver An average of 4,508 students are emolled in gradu ate programs at CU-Denver each fall and spring se mester, which includes 1,326 non-degree students taking graduate courses. Of these, approximately 77 percent are part-time students. Faculty The faculty teaching in these programs are headquar tered at CU-Denver , although resources of other Uni versity of Colorado campuses are used. Computing Services The Computing Services department supports com puter use by both the academic and administrative com munities at CU-Denver. For a complete description of services offered see Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section of this catalog. Financial Aid for Graduate Study COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by The Graduate School. Competition for these fund s is based on demon strated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the State of Colorado . Grant awards are announced each semester for the following semester. Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid. COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded prima rily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise, and to continuing stu dents on the basis of academic success. In order for fellowships to be renewed, students holding them must reapply each year to The Graduate School. GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS Many departments employ graduate students as part time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructor ship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate M .A. degree who ma y be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. Payment for these teaching appoint ments for 1988-89 is: instructor (20 hours per week), $8,930; teaching assistan t (20 hours per week), salary range $5,381 $7,080 for the academic year. A half-time appointment for an instructor is consid ered to be equal to 6 class contact hours; a half-time teaching assistant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Compensation is based on the number of hours per week. Nomesident students employed as assis tant s may or may not be eligible for the nomesident tuition dif ferential stipend for their first-year appointment as an assistant only. Exceptions extending beyond the first year must be approved in advance by the respective dean . Teaching assistan t s and instructors must be en rolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate/thesis or dissertation) in good standing for the full period of their appointment.

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RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS Research provide opportunities for gradu ate students to obtain part-time work as research as sistan t s in many departments. Nonresident students who are appointed as research assistants in nongeneral fund accounts or may not be eligible for resident tuition rates. Assistants must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate / thesis or dissertation). LOAN FUNDS Graduate stude nts wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college workstudy program should submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Of*e of Financial Aid by March 1 . This office also prmpdes short-term loan assistance to stu dents who have completed one or more semes ters in residence . Shoh-term loans are designed to s upple ment personal funds and to provide for emergencies. pplicants should go directly to the Of fice of Financi Aid. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES The Universi maintains an employment service in the Offic e of FiAancial Aid to help students obtain part time work either through conventional employment or through the college work-study program. Students emJ?loyed by the University are hired solely on the basis of p:eri t and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discrimination because of race , co lor , creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin . Students are also referred t


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70 I The Graduate School Credit earned by persons in provisional degree sta tus may count toward a degree at this University . Provisional degree stude nts are required to main tain a 3.0 grade -point average or higher, according to the terms of their provisional admission, each semes ter or summer term on all work taken, whether or not it is to be applied toward the advanced degree sought. Students who fail to maintain such a s tandard of per formance, will be subject to suspension from The Grad uate School. Note: All provisional applicants must have com pleted a minimum of six semester hours of graduate level course work or must take the Graduate Record Examination and submi t scores as part of th e applica tion. SENIORS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO A senior in this University who has satisfied the un dergraduate residence requirements and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subject and 12 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degree, may be admitted to The Graduate School by specia l permission of the dean. A University of Colorado senior enrolled in the Col lege of Engineering and Applied Science who needs not more than 18 semester hour s or 36 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degre e may be admitted to The Gr aduate School, but is not eligible for financial aid, scholarships, or fellowships as a grad uate student until the equivalent of the minimum re quirements for the bachelor's degree have been satisfied. Application Procedures Graduate students who expect to study at CO Denver should contact the CU-Denver Graduate School office concerning procedures for forwarding com pleted applications. An applicant for admission must present a com pleted Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the CU-Denver Graduate School of fice, and two official transcripts from each institution attended. The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable application fee of $30 (check or money order) when the application is submitted. No applica tion will be processed unless this fee is paid . Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination, and all departments require three or four letters of recommendation. When a prospective degree student applies for ad mission, the chairperson of each department or a com mittee named for the purpose shall decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to The Graduate School dean's office, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as non-degree students (see Non-degree Students in this section). A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 90 days prior to the term for which admission is sought or earlier as may be re quired by the major department. Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1989-90 , e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, etc., must file a completed application with the department before the announced departmental deadline (see previous section on financial aid). READMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS Students who were previously admitted to a gradu ate degree program but who did not complete that degree program and who have not been registered for one year or more at the University must: 1. Clarify their status with either the department or The Graduate School to determine their eligibility to return and pursue the same degree. 2. After receiving departmental approval, as indi cated above, submit a new application Part I to The Graduate School office before deadlines are passed for the term in which they expect to return to the Univer sity. A $30 application fee is required unless an excep tion is given by The Graduate School. Application deadlines are available from the department.

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Former stude nts who wish to change from under graduate to graduate status or from one major to an other must apply to the new department. Students tramsferring from one campus to another must apply and be accepted to the new campus. A student admitted to The Graduate School for the master's program must reapply for the doctoral pro gram. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this applica tion rests jointly with the student' s major department and the dean. In case of lack of agreement between the department and the dean or in the case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Executive Committee. FOREIGN APPLICANTS I Prospective foreign students should have completed applications o 1 file in The Graduate School office prior to December 1 for the summer term , March 1 for the fall semester, and July 1 for the spring semes ter. The application paaket should include the $50 fee, TOEFL scores, financial documentation, Graduate Record Examination official English translation of all school records, and o her documents as noted in the previ ous section on Application Procedures. Acceptable Scores. The TOEFL is the Test of English as a Language. If your native lan guage is not Eljlglish, or you have not attended a Brit ish or Americqn university for at lea st one year and achieved satisf ctory grades, then you must take the TOEFL. All p grams within CU-Denver's Graduate School-arts sciences, education, engineering, and doctoral programs-require a minimum score of 525 for regular adnpssion. Those earning less than 525 will normally be to the Spring International Lan guage Center ( n campus) for further language study. During that time, these students will study on an I-20 from Spring, t may take classes as non-degree stu dents at CU-Depver. They may subsequently be granted regular admis*on to The Graduate School. All inter national studerltts who take the TOEFL and are granted regular admission to CU-Denver's Graduate School will be asked to tai:e both the Michigan and SPEAK tests during their semester of study. Those whose TOEFL fell between 525 and 550 will be required to take addi training in light of whatever deficien cies ma y be re vea led by these diagnostic tests. Those whose TOEFL I exceed 550 will be encouraged, but not required , to uttdertake additional training in light of their performahce on these tests . Students seeking ad mission to all o her graduate programs, including those in architecture and planning , business, and public af fairs, should aonsult those program descriptions for J language reqtUrements. Graduate Admission s I 71 GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS At the optio n of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for admis sion t o the graduate program, assistantships, or of any student before his or her s tatu s is determined. Students are applying for assistantships for the fall semester take the GRE no later than the December tes tin g date so that their scores will be available to the graduate awards selection committee . Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an insti tution . Information regarding these examinations ma y be obtained from The Graduate School office or the CO Denver Testing Center , or from The Educational Test ing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. OTHER GRADUATE QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain information at the Student Test ing Center on the following examinations: Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law Schoo l Admissions Test (LSAT). NON-DEGREE STUDENTS A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado shou ld app l y to the Office of Admissions and Records , CU-Denver, 1200 Larimer St., Denver, CO 80204. Non-degree students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted. Non-degree students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this University are encouraged to submit the comp lete graduate application and support ing credentials as soon as possible. A department ma y recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as much as 9 hours credit toward the requirements of a master's for courses taken either as a stude nt at another recognized graduate school, as a non-degree student at the University, or both . In addition, the department may recommend to the grad uat e dean the acceptance of credit courses taken as a non-degree student at this University during the term for which the student applied fo admission to The Graduate School, provided such admission date was delayed through no fault of the student. A grade of B or bett er must be obtained in any course work trans ferred in this manner.

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72 I The Graduate School REGISTRATION Course Work and Examinations On the regu lar registra tion days of each semester, students who have been admi tted to The Graduate School and who expect to study in The Graduate School are required to comple te app ropri ate registration proce dures. Students should regi s ter for classes th e semester the y are accepted into The Graduate School. If unab l e to attend that semes ter they must notify the department that has accepted th em and submit the necessary forms to the Office of Admissions and Records at CO Den ver in order to attend th e following semester. Changes in Registration A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should follow the drop/add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Classes). After the tenth week of classes a graduate student may not drop, add, or change a course to no credit without presenting a letter to the dea n of The Graduate School, CU-Denver , stating the excep tional circumstances that justify th e change. This letter, endorsed b y the instructor of the course, must accompany the properl y signed and com pleted drop/add card or no-credit option form. Withdrawal A graduate student who desires to withdraw from the University must apply to the dean of The Graduate School for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official withdrawa l will be marked as having failed the course. The wi thdr awal form must be signed by the instruc tor of the course and pass /fail must be indicated with the instructor's initials. Master's Thesis Graduate students working toward master's de grees, if they expect to present a thesis in partial ful fillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semes ter s must equa l the number of credits the student ex pects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted . )

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Limitation of Registration FULL LOAD A graduate will be considered to be carry ing a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit if the student is regis tered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate /gra duate /thesis or dissertation hours .. A maximum of two-thirds of a semester of resident credit may be earned during the summer if a student registers for three semester hours of other graduate work, or any number of thesis hours . For the number of hours required for financial aid see Financial Aid at the University of Colorado at Den ver in th e General Information section of this catalog. A graduate student ma y contact the dean's office for information on I the appeal process regarding the full load requirememt for financial aid purposes . MAXIMUM LOAD No graduate student may receive credit toward a degree for more than 15 hours in a regular semester. The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at CU-Denver is 10 hours per 10-week summer term. A graduate studerh may contact the dean's office for in formation on the appeal process regarding an over load . UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES Full-time of the University may not un dertake more t an 6 credit hours per semester. Part time employees, including assistants , may take such work as is approved by the major departments . TUITION AND FEES The schedule i of tuition and fees is given in the Gen eral Informatio? sec t ion of this catalog . REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES Quality of Work Although the l work for advance degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours, an advanced degree will not be coriferred merely for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of cowlses. Students should not expect to ob tain all the training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirement for an advanced degree from formal courses. They should work on their own ini t iative , 11eading widely and thoughtfully, reach ing their own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of values, perspective, proportion . Requirements for Degrees I 73 All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficiencies) must be of grad uate status. A student is expected to maintain at least a Baver age in all work attempted while enrolled in The Grad uate School. For the Ph.D., a course mark below B is unsatisfac tory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requiremen ts for the degree. A student who fails to do work will be subject to sus pension from The Graduate School b y the dean with the approval of the major department. Appeal may be made to the Executive Committee of The Graduate School. The committee's decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the stu dent's major department and the dean. In case of appeal b y the student, the final decision will be made by the Execu tive Committee. Repeating a Course A graduate student who receives a grade of C , D , or Fin a course may repeat the course once, upon writ ten recommendation to the dean by the chairman of the student's advisory committee and major depart ment, provided the course has not previously been applied toward a degree. In calculating a student's grade-point average for Grad uate School purposes, the grade for a repeated course will substitute for the old grade . Grades earned in courses taken as an undergraduate or as a non-degree student, as well as grades earned in first and second year foreign language courses, will not be used in calculat ing The Graduate School grade-point average; however, all grades received will appear on the student's transcript. Change of Department or Major A graduate student wishing to change department or major must submit a new Part I and Part II of the graduate application to the new department or school and request the former department to forward recom mendations and credentials. The studen t must be for mally accepted by the new department. Use of English A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of good English lin all oral and written work ma y not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Col orado. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance. Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Report s, ex aminations , and speech will be considered in estimat ing the candida te's proficiency.

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74 I The Graduate School Graduate Appeals Final action on appeals submitted by graduate stu dents concerning action taken by faculty members, pro grams, or administrative officials rests with the campus Executive Committee of The Graduate School, unless such appeal involves a rna tter affecting two or more campuses. In such a case, the final ac tion rests with the Executive Committee of The Graduate School. MASTER'S DEGREE A student regularly admitted to The Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master's degrees will be recommended for the degree only after the follow ing requirements have been met. In general, only graduates of an approved institu tion who have a thorough preparation for their pro posed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below. All studies offered toward the minimum requirement for the de gree must be of graduate rank. Necessary additional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequi sites may be partly or entire l y undergraduate courses. The requirements stated below are minimum require ments; additional conditions set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate depart ments. Any department may make further regulations not inconsistent with the general rules. Students planning to graduate should ascertain cur rent deadlines of The Graduate School. It is the grad uate student's and the department's responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.) . Departments or program committees may have ad ditional deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or pro gram chair. M inim um Requirement The minimum requirement of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by following either Plan I or Plan II below. Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a the sis. At least 12 semes ter hours of this work must be at the 5000 l evel or a bove . Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis . At least 16 semes ter hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above . Plan II does not represent a free option for the stu dent. A candidate for the master's degree may be allowed to select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned. Graduate Credit Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above and that are offered b y profes sors who are members of th e graduate faculty, or that have otherwise been approved by the dean of The Grad uate School. No assurance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless the student has the approval of the department. Not all courses listed are available at any one time; some of them are given in alternate years. Courses taken during the Fall Semester 1975 and thereafter will hav e grad uate rank if they are taught by members of The Gradua t e School faculty and are in one of the following two categories: 1. Courses within the major program at the 5000 level or above . 2. Courses outside the major program at the 4000 level provided the y are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus gradua te dean. 3. The Master of Basic Science program (M. B.S.) has approval for 3000and 4000level courses if approved by the department and the dean of The Graduate School. 4. Courses outside the major program provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean. This does not change the minimum number of courses that must be taken at the 5000 level or above; however, as a result, most students who include 4000 level courses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation . Field of Study Studies leading to a master's degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program. Status After students have made a satisfac tor y record in this University for at least one semester or summer term , and after they have removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission or by qualifying examinations or otherwise, they should con fer with their major department and request that a decision be made on their status . This definite status must be set b y the major department before students may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree . Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without credit toward a graduate degree all prereq uisites required by the department concerned.

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Language Requirements Candi dates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as eac h department requires. See special departmental requirements. Credit by Transfer Resident grad u ate work of high quality done in a recognized gradua te school elsewhere and corning within the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended by the department con cerned and approved by the dean of The Graduate School. Course work taken more than 6 years prior to the completion of fi;nal requirement s (comprehensive exam and/or filin g of thesis ) will not be accepted for the de gree unle ss valida ted b y a specia l examination. The maximum amount of work that may be trans ferred t o this University is 9 semester hours. Credit will not be tran sferred until the student has established in 11pe Graduate School of this University a satisfactor y re s ord of at lea s t one se mester in resi dence ; such tr i nsfer will not reduce the reside nce at this Univer sity, but it ma y reduce th e amount of work to be done in formal courses. Requests for transfer of credit to be applie d toward an advanced degree must be made on form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School b y the beginning of the semester p or to that in whic h the student will be graduated. Work alread applied toward a master ' s degree re ceived from amDther in stitution cannot be accep ted for transfer to the maste r's degree at the University of Colora do; e ension work co mpleted a t another in stitution cann t be tran sferred; and corres pondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recog nized. Excess credits from another institu tion ma y not be transferred to The Graduate School. Seniors in thi s University may, ho wever, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 9 semes ter provided such work: 1 . Is complet r d w ith distinction in th e se nior year at this Uni versity 2 . Comes wi hin the four-year time limit. 3 . Has not bEten applied toward another degree. 4. Is rec orrurlended for transfer by the department concerned and approved b y the dean of The Graduate School. Requ ests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced d gree mus t be made on the form spec ified for thi s p pose and submitted to The Graduate School by the oeginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. For more in formation contact The Graduate School office. To be eligib l e for courses to be considered for transfer, a stu dent must have an overall B average in all courses taken at the Uni versity of Col orado in The Graduate School. Master's D egree I 75 Cont inuing Education Course Work Students may use the reso urces of the Division of Continuin g Education in the pursuit of graduate study only if th ey obtain proper academic approva l from the major department and the graduate dean in advance. Residence In general, the residence requirements can be met only by residence at the Uni versity for at least two semesters or a t least three summer terms. For full res idence a student must be registered within the time design ated at the beginning of a semes t er and must carry the equivalent of not fewe r than 5 semes ter hours of work in courses numbered 5000 or above, or at least a combination of other course work acceptable for grad uate credit . See Limitation of Registration , Full Load, for requirements for full residence credi t during the summer. Students who are noticeably deficient in their general training , or in the s pecific prepara tion indi cated by each department as prerequisi t e to graduate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified. Assistants and other emplo yees of the University may fulfill the residence requireme nts of one year in two semesters , provided their duties do not require more than half time. Full-time employees may not sa tisfy the resid ence requirements of one year in fewer than four semesters.

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76 I The Graduate School Admission to Candidacy A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master's degree must file application in the dean's office not later than 10 weeks prior to the completion of the comprehensive final examination. The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be deter mined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status. This application must be made on forms obtainable at the dean's office and in various departments and must be signed by the major department, certifying that the student's work is satisfactory and that the pro gram outlined in the application meets the requirements set for the student. A student on Graduate School probation is not eli gible to be awarded a degree until he or she is re moved from probation. Thesis Requirements A thesis, which may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type, is required of every master's degree candidate under Plan I. Every thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an ad vanced degree must: 1. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field. 2. Be based upon independent study and investiga tion. 3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work. 4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) be fore the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred. 5. Be essentially complete at the time th e compre hensive final examination is given. 6. Comply in mechanical features with specifica tions outlined in University of Colorado Graduate School SpeciEcations for Preparation of Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertation, whic h is obtainable from The Graduate School. Two weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred, two formally approved, printed or type written copies of the thesis must be filed in The Grad uate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract. All theses must be signed by the thesis advisor and the second reader. All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid when the thesis is deposited in The Graduate School. Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be ac cepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been regis tered . A student working toward a master's degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semes ter of residence, but the total registered credit for the sis must total a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesi s. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. An IP (in progress) will be re ported for terms during which the student is regis tered for thesis prior to completion of the thesis. Comprehensive Final Examination All candidates for a mast er's degree are required to take a comprehensive fina l examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examination may be given near the end of their la s t semester of residence while they are still taking re quired courses for the degree, provided they are mak ing satisfactory progress in those courses. The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed: 1. Students must be registered when they take the examination. 2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean's office at least three days in advance of the examination. 3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three gradua te faculty members appointed by the de partment concerned in consultation with the dean. 4. The examination, which may be oral or written, or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essen tially comple te at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field. 5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor de partments. 6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or minor field. The examination on transferred work will be given by rep resentatives of the corresponding fields of study in this University. 7. A student who fails the comprehensive final ex amination may not attempt the examination again until at least three months have elapse d and until such work as may be prescribed by the examining commit tee has been completed. The student may retake the examination only once.

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Supplemen 1al Exam in a ti ons Supplemental examinations should be simply an ex tension of the original examination and given imme dia t ely. If the student fails the supplemental examination, three months must elapse before attempting the com prehensive examination again. Course Examinations T h e regular written examinations of each semester except t he last must be taken. Course examinations of the l ast semester, which come after the comprehensive fina l examination has been passed, may be omitted with t he consent of the instructor. Master ' s Credit Every graduate student working toward a master's degree who expects to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree must reg is t e r for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may reg ister for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence , but the total number of hours for all se mes t ers must the number of credits the student expec t s to rec<;fve for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the t hesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so r egistered, an in progre ss (IP) will be reported. (Tht1 student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submi tt ed.) Time Limit Master's degree students have 4 years, from the date of the s t art of 1 ourse work, to complete all degree re quire m ents. F ' r st u dents who fail to complete the de gree in this 4 year period , it will be necessary for the program director to file an annual statement with the grad u ate dean stating the reasons why the program faculty believe he student is making adequate progress and s h ould b allowed to con t inue in the program. Stude n ts who do t heir work exclusively in summer terms must c mpl ete all degree requirements within 72 m onths from the start of course work. A student wf.o does not complete all degree require m ents within specified period of time must vali d a te , b y special examination(s), any course work taken mo r e than 6 yJars prior to taking t he master's compre hensive examihation or completing the thesis defense , depending oni which plan is elected. Doctor of Philosophy I 77 Deadl ines for Master's Deg r ee Cand i dates Expecting to Gradu a t e During 1989 90 Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling The Graduate School office, 556-2663. 1. Last day for requesting transfer of credit. 2 . Applications for admission to candidacy. Appli cations must be submitted at least 10 weeks before the student expects to take the comprehensive final exam ination . Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (The form may be picked up in the department or in The Graduate School of fice.) 3. Last day for thesis to be approved by department. 4. Last day for scheduling of comprehensive final examination . 5. Last day for taking comprehensive final examina tion . 6. Last day for filing thesis in The Graduate School. At the time of filing , the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by The Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p.m. on the indi cated date will be graduated at the commencemen t following that for which the deadline is indicated. DOCTOR OF PHI L OSOPHY The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the high est academic degree conferred by the University. To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued. Stu dents who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work in this field; furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge. The technical requiremen t s stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consis tent with these general rules. Studies leading to the Ph.D. degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely re lated departments. The criterion as to what consti tutes an acceptable field of study shall be that the student's work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of ac ademic departments within the University .

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78 I The Graduate School Students planning to graduate should obtain cur rent deadline dates in the office of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student's and the department's re sponsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.). Department or program committees may have addi tional deadlines that must be met by graduate stu dents in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or pro gram chair. Minimum Course/Dissertation Requirements A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are re quired for the Ph.D. degree. Course Work Requirement. A minimum of 30 se mester hours of courses numbered 5000 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum. At least 20 of the required hours must be in graduate courses taken at this University. Sh1dents who have been admitted to The Graduate School with deficien cies may expect to receive little or no residence credits until the deficiencies have been removed. Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the Ph .D. a student must register for a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation cred it, with not more than 10 of these credit hours in any one semester. Not more than 10 dissertation hours may be taken preceding the semes ter of taking comprehen sive examinations . In addition, up to 10 hours may be taken in the semester in which the student passes comprehensives. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above and will not be included in calculation of the student' s grade-point average. Only the grades of A, B, C and IP shall be used. Course work and work on dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program; how ever, at no time shall a doc toral student register for more than 15 hours of 5000-level and above courses. Normally a student must have earned at least three and not more than six semes ter s of residency before admission to candidacy. Quality of Work Students are expected to complete with distinction all work in the formal courses in which they enroll. A course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree . Upon recommendation by the advi sory committee and the chair of the department and with the approval of the dean, a student may be re quired to withdraw at any time for failure to maintain satisfactory progress toward the degree. Advisory Committee As soon as the field of specializatio n has been cho sen, the candidate will request the faculty member with whom the committee wishes to work to act as chair of the advisory committee . The chair, wi th the advice and approval of the chair of the department, may select two or more others to serve on the committee, so that the several fields related to the student's specia l inter est will be represented . A purpose of the advisory com mittee (beyond guiding the student through graduate study) is to ensure against specializa tion that is too narrow . The student shall obtain the signature of the chair of the committee (thereby signifying his or her willingness to act) on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form. Any change in the membership of the advisory committee is to be similarly reported. Residence The studen t must be properly regis tered to earn res idence credit . The minimal residence requirement shall be six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor's degree. Mere atten dance shall not constitute residence as the word is here used. Residence may be earned for course work com pleted with distinction , for participation in seminars, or for scholarly research performed here or elsewhere under the auspices of the University of Colorado. As a guiding policy in determining residence credit for employed students, those who are employed in three-fourths to full-time work that does not contrib ute directly to their program to ward a degree may not earn more than one-half residence credit in any semes ter . Students who are employed more than one-fourth time and less than three-fourths time in work that does not contribute directly to the degree may earn not more than three-fourths residence credit. Those who have one-fourth time employment or less may earn full res idence credit . (All these provisions are subject to the definition of residence credit given in the preceding paragraph.) In case the interpretation of residence credit for any student needs to be clarified, a decision will be made by the chair of the student's advisory commit tee , the chair of the student's major department, and the dean of The Graduate School. Two semes ter s of residence credit may be allowed for a master's degree from another institution of ap proved standing, but at least four semes ters of resi dence credit, _ two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work (course and/or dissertation) taken at this University. A part of the residence requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be spent in another graduate institution, or if field work in absentia (provided that prior ap proval for work is given by the student's program di rector and provided that the student 's registration is maintained for that period away from the campus).

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Prelim inary Examination Each department will satisfy itself (by examination or other mea1,1s) that students who signify intent to undertake study for the Ph.D. degree are qualified to do so. The means by which each department makes this evaluation shall be specified in departmental re quirements. Students who are thus evaluated will be notified immediately of the results. The resul t s of this preliminary evaluation shall be reported to The Grad uate School office on the Application for Candidacy form filed by the student at least two weeks before the comprehensiv'e examination is attempted. L anguage Requirement Students a e required to meet the following lan guage requirements. Communication Requirement. All graduate students for who English is the native language are re quired to at least serond-year college proficiency in a foreign lahguage of their choice. This requirement may be satisfibd in the following ways. 1. The undergraduat e transcrip t may be presented, showing completion of grade Cor better of at least 3 hours of a fourth-semester undergraduate college course in a foreign language. The tran script must accompany the student's Application for Admission to Candidacy when it is submitted to The Graduate School. 2. The may take The Scho?l For eign Language Test (GSFLT) at the Testmg Office be fore or after admission to The Graduate School. Students should check rith The Graduate School for t he passing score for each language. 3. If the stu(ient wishes to demonstrate competence in a language for which the GSFL T is not available, a test designed and administered by the appropriate lan guage department at the University of Colorado may be taken, wit the passing criterion to be se t compa rable to the aoove GSFLT criterion . 4. The student may register at the University for any fourth-sefuester course in a foreign language and pass it with at or better. (Registration in suc h c ourses is contingent rpon the language department's approv al.) A student 'rho elects 2, 3, or 4 above must complete the requirements before the Ph.D. comprehensive ex amination m'o/ be scheduled. Students wf,ose native language is not English will, by passing th ir courses and completing their gradu ate work at th University, demonstrate sufficient abil ity in English o meet the communication requirement. Special Laniuages. When special l anguages are needed as t ools to read foreign literature in a partic ular field, the academic departments may requ ire fur ther training in foreign languages for all their Ph.D. graduate students. The choice and number of lan guages as well as the required levels of skill and the methods of testing these skills are determined by the individual del?artments. Doctor of Philosophy I 79 Credit by Transfer Resident work of high quality earned in another institution of approved standing will not be accepted for transfer to apply toward the doctorate un t il t he student has established in this Graduate School a satisfactory record in residence, but such credit must be transferred before the student makes application for admission to candidacy for the degree. Such trans fer will not reduce the minimum residence requirement at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses. The maximum amount of work that may be trans ferred to this University for the Ph.D. is 10 semester hours. Application for Admission t o C andidac y A student must make formal application for admis sion to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree on forms supplied by The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted. A student s h all have earned at least t h ree semesters of residence, s h all have passed the language require ments, and shall have passed the comprehensive ex amination before admission to candidacy for the degree. Continuous Registration Requ i remen t s for Doctoral Cand i da tes Following successful completion of comprehensive examinations, students must register continuously. Stu dent s admitted t o "candidacy for degree" will register for and be cHarged for 10 hours of credit for each fulltime term of doctoral work. For each term of part-time enrollment, students will be charged for 7 hours of dissertation credit, except that students not making use of campus facilities may petition The Graduate Sch ool for 3-credit-hour status. Continuous registra tion during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense. It is expected that the student and advisor will consult each semes ter as to the number of hours for which t he student will register, consistent with t he classification identi fied above. If a student who is certified for the Ph.D. degree, or who has received permission to take the comprehensives and passes them prior to meeting the language requirement must be continuously enrolled as stated above. This continuing registration is independent o n whether t h e candida t e is in residence at the University. (See a l so section on Residence.)

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80 I The Graduate School Comprehensive Examination Before admission to candidacy for the Ph. 0 . degree, the student must pass a comprehen sive examination in the field of concentration and related fields . This examination may be oral , written , or both , and will test the student's mastery of a broad field of knowl edge, not merely the formal course work completed . The oral part is open to members of the faculty. The student must be registered at the tim e the comprehen sive examination is attempted . The examination shall be condu cted b y an examin ing board appointed by the chair of the dep artment concerned and be approved by the campus graduate dean . The board shall consist of the advisory commit tee and additional members as necessary t o a minimum of five . A successful candidate must receive the affirmative votes of a majority of the members of the examination board . In case of failur e, the examination may be attempted once more after a period of time determined by the examining board . Dissertation Requirements A thesis based upon original inve stiga tion and show ing mature scholarship and critical judgement as well as familiarity with tool s and method s of re search must be written upon some subject approved by the student's major department. To be acceptable, thi s di ssertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student's special field. It must be finished and sub mitted in typewritten form at least 30 da ys (in some departments , 90 days) before th e day of the final ex amination and must be formally approved and made available for inspection by the examining committee before the final examination may be taken . In mechanical features all dissert atio ns must com ply with the specifications of The Graduate School as outlined in the University of Colorado Graduate School Specifications for Preparation of Master's Theses and Doctoral Dissertation , which ma y be obtained from The Graduate School. It is the student's responsibility to notify The Grad uate School of the exact title of the dissertation at least six weeks prior to the commencement a t which the student will graduate. This title will be printed in the commencement program. Two formally-approved , typewritten copies of the dissertation , including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in The Grad uate School office at least two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred . The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be pub lished in Dissertation Abstracts International. The de termination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest wi th the major department. All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than two members of the major department staff who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction. All approve d dissertations are kept on file in the library. When the dissertation is depo sited in The Graduate School, the candidate must pa y th e th esis-binding fee and s ign an agreement with University Microfilms In ternational to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstrac t s International ; and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduc e and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from mic roform. The author re tains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform. Final Examination After th e dissertation has been accepted , a final e x amina tion of the dissertation and related topics will be cond ucted . This examination will be wholly or par tially oral, the oral part being open to anyone . The examinatio n will be conducted b y a committee ap pointed b y the campus graduate dean, which will con sist of at least five persons, one of whom must be from outside the student's department. More than one dis senting vote will disqualify the candidate in the final examina tion. Arrangements for the final examination must be made in the dean's office at least two weeks in advance . The examination must be scheduled not later than two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred . A student must be regis tered at the time of the final examination.

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Time Limit If a student fails to complete all requirements for the degree within t he prescribed number of years from the date of the start of course work in the doctoral pro gram, a second examination similar to the first will be required before the candidate may take the final exam ination. The number of years allowed for completion i s normall y six, but in some programs it may be seven. If the comprehensive examination is failed , it may be a ttempted once more after not fewer than eight months of further work. For students who fail to complete the degree in this S ix-year period , it will be necessary for the department to file an annual statement why the program direc t or believes the student is making ade quate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. his request must be signed by three members of the graduate faculty who serve on the student's thesis advisor>{ committee. If approved by the campus graduate dean the student may continue his/her studies for one additional year . If not approved, the stu dent ma y be dropped from the program. Doctor of Philosophy I 81

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"The primary mission of the School is educa tion, research, and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning . Students are required to search into existing abundance of architecture and planning knowledge in order to generate effective , forceful , spirited forms , ideas, and proposals . Faculty and students are engaged in investigation , education , explora tion, and generation of new ideas , forms , and proposals tocreatemore humane living environments . -Dean H.A. Shirvani School of Architecture and Planning

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Dean: H.A. Shirvani Associate Dean: Yuk Lee Assistants to the Dean: Donna Lee , Judy Strecker Sch oo l Office: 1250 14th St., Third Floor Telephone: 556-3382 School Adviso(y Council: Chairman : Jerome FAIA, Seracuse Lawler Wong Strauch, Den ver Members : John W. Brigh, National Park Service , Denver Rodney Davis, FAIA, Davis Partnership , Denver Nora Dimitrov, ASID, Interior Space Planning and Design, Denver Peter Dominick, AlA, Urban Design Group, Denver Earl Flansburgh, F AlA, Earl R. Flansburgh and Asso ciates, Inc., Boston, Massachusetts Alan Gerstenberger, President, Cambridge Development Corp ., Denver Larry Gibson , RSS Inc ., Denver Mimi Hillen , ASID, Hillen Design Associates, Golden Donald E. HUlilt, BRW, Denver John Madden, President , John Madden Company, Denver Jennifer Moulton, AlA, Anthony Pellecchia Archi tects, Denver Dean Punke, !Denver Maxwell L. SaJu, AlA, FCSI , DMJM , Denver Herb Schaal, ASLA, EDAW Inc., Ft. Collins Floyd Tanaka, AICP, THK Associates, Englewood Harry Teague , AlA, Architect, Aspen William Turnbpll, FAIA, William Turnbull and Asso ciates, San rrancisco, California Joseph Wells , 1\ICP, Doremus and Wells, Aspen Jam Wong , AlA, Seracuse Lawler Wong Strauch, Denver INF ORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL The S c hool of Architecture and Planning offers first and post professional programs leading to master's degrees . The p,rimary mission of the School is educa tion, research, ) and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning . Stu dents are required to search into an existing abundance of architecture and planning knowledge in order to generate effective, force ful, spirited forms, ideas, and proposals. Facu lty and students are engaged in investigation, education, ex ploration , and generation of new ideas, forms, and proposals to create more humane living environments. In doing so, the School questions existing connec tions of teaching and practice and is in search of fu ture alternatives. The School's activities are thus geared toward preparation of future archftects and planners who are not only able to draw, to calculate, or to pro pose, but also to question, to explore , and to experi The curriculum is based on a wide range of cultural views of architecture and planning reflective of our faculty and student body . The faculty direct, guide, and encourage students to develop their individual in terests with a prerequisite commitment intended to equip the graduate with a lasting ability to produce architecture and planning responsive to the changing needs of society. It might be that we are all tattooed sav ages s ince Sophodes . But there is more to art than the straightness of lines and the perfection of surfaces. Plastidty of sty le is not as large as the entire idea .... We have too many thing s and not enough forms . (Flaubert 1963) Our work is not philosophy, neither is it a system relating to a specific theor y of na ture; it is part of nature and must there fore itself be regarded as an object of knowledge. (El Lissitzky 1930) If nothing has preceded repetition , if no present has kept w atch over the trace, if, after a fashion, it is the "v oid which reempties itself and marks itself with imprints," then the time of writing no longer follows the line of modified present tenses. What is to come is not a future present, yes terda y is not a past present . ( Derrida 1978) It is on these premises that our School is in constant search of the manifest, ideas, and forms for the betterment of the living environments. A community of cul turally diverse educators and practitioners centered in an island by the backdrop of the Rocky Mountains provides a unique opportunity for intense study of ar chitecture and planning.

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84 I School of Architecture and Plai111ing Mission and Or ga ni zation The School is composed of five gradua t e degree pro grams in architecture, interi o r design, l andscape archi tecture, urban design, and ur ban and regional planning and a re search and service division, the Center for Built Environment Studies . As a unit of graduate pro fessional education with five professiona l degree pro grams and a mandate for national excellence and rerognition, the School expects to go beyond training student s in basic skills for entry-level positions. The School's over all mission is to develop the d esign capa b ilities of the individuals and the design professions as a whole as well as provide the intellectual framework which sup ports design . Considering this mission, th e School emphasizes ba sic professional training and education necessary for entering professional practice in its first professional degree programs. The post-professional and ad vanced degree programs are directed toward profes sionals at various career stages and focuses on research and specialization. The School supports interdisciplinary work in i t s pro grams and focuses on professional education and re search concerning the design and planning of the built environment . Within this in t erdisciplinary approach, it recognizes the professiona l community input and the role of the other academic disciplines such as hu manities, social sciences, and engineering. In the School's degree programs, various architec ture and planning ideologies and views are examined with respect to their historical setting. This examina tion is combined with critical reviews of design work, dialogues, and methods to form the essential ingredi ent of design education. T hrough this dialectic of an alyzing and synthesizing, students gain increased understanding of those humanistic idea l s underlying the architecture and planning of buildings and spaces and relate them to their own developing personal as pirations . The School is committed to design as its central in tellectual concern and is the l argest grad u a t e school of architecture in the western region . Design is used in its broadest sense to include a full range of philoso phies , ideologies, theories, and methods. The School's mission is education, research, and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning. Acad emic Prog r ams The School of Architecture and Planning offers aca demic programs leading to master's degrees in archi tecture, interior design, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The pro grams are interdisciplinary and, in the design fields, both first and post-professional degrees are offered. In addition, it is possible for students to obtain two de grees , M.Arch. and M . U.R.P. for example, and re duce the time required for doing so by coordinating their programs. The first professional degree programs are struc tured for full-time graduate study. For students with employment obligations, most of these programs can be taken on a part-time basis . Usually the first year of the full-time program must be completed before it can be taken part time . Within any of the programs, the School or Architec ture and Planning offers opportunities to develop a self-tailored area of concentration through its varied offerings in architecture, landscape architecture, ur ban design , interior design, and urban and regional planning. Electives ordinarily can be taken from any program in the School and from an other school in the University with the approval of the student's advisor. The School maintains membership in: Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning Society of Architectural Historians Council of Landscape Architecture Education Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society Sigma Delta Lambda Honor Society A cademic Environme n t and S tudent Body In addition to its regular curricular programs, the School supports or sponsors a variety of events and activities that enlarge and broaden the learning envi ronment in the School. Student internships for credit are available during the academic year. A summer in ternational study program is offered. The School spon sors three receptions-at the beginning of the academic year, before Christmas , and at the end of the academic year-along with a Beaux Arts Ball in the spring, for students and the local professional community . Final ly, the School sponsors several exhibitions of design and art works. There are about 350 full-time students in the School. The student body is diverse, representing many aca demic disciplines and a wide variety of previous aca demic institutions. Lecture Series Guest critics are frequently invited to the School. In addition , the School has an official lecture series every year. The Lecture Series is composed of distinguished practitioners, critics, and scholars of national and in ternational nature. Recent visiting critics and speakers in the latter series include: Lecture Series 1988-89 George Ranalli, Peter Waldman , Bahram Shirdel , Anthony Vidler, Diane Ghirardo, Kenneth Frampton, John Novack , Peter Walker, Harry Teague, Mark Johnson, Michael Hays, and David R. Hill. Lecture Series-1987-88 John R. Stilgoe, Anne Vemez-Moudon, William Turnbull, George Hoover, Nader Ardalan, Frank E. Sanchis, H.A. Shirvani, and Peter Eisenman.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES The regulations of the School of Architec ture and Planl1jlng supplement those of the University . Committee of the School deter mmes acaderru;c policies and regu lat ions. Details of the School's academic regulations are composed in a book let, Academic Policies , Procedures , and Guidelines for Students , and is available from the Office of the Dean . All new students will be supplied with a copy of the booklet. FolloWing are several important academic af fairs policies: Incomplete Grades. In accordance with CU-Denver grading 1 s, when special circumstances prevent a from course work during a term , the mstructor ay assign one of two incomplete grades IF for incom Jete failing ; IW for incomplete passing . Special tanc_es imply severe health and related personal and ediate family problems. Financial emer are not special circumstances preventing com pletion of worjk and _ are to be handled differently. If work for the 9 ourse IS not completed within a maximum of one year, the IF reverts to F and the IW toW. In every case that an IW or IF is assigned, the instruc tor must send memo to the Program Director for the student's file, ) explaining the special circumstances preventing COij11pletion of the course , and 2) specify ing the work n F cessary for the student to comp l ete the course. A should go to the student. When an instructor assigns an IF or IW without the above de scribed explanation, the grade F will be assigned. These polic_ies iqplemented to ensure fairness in such crrcum r tances and to document expectations m each case. Grade Reqwrements. Students must maintain a minimum 3.0 GP 4 to remain in any of the School's pro grams . For semester that a student's grades are than 3.0 , the stt:dent is placed on academic pro batiOn for the followmg semester . If, in that following semester , the student's grades are below 3.0 and the overall GPA is below 3.0, the student will be dropped from the prog:pm. If, in that following semester , the student ' s grades are below 3 . 0 and the overall GPA is above 3 .0, the student will remain on probation for one more sem s t er . A student with a GPA below 3 . 0 for two conse utive semesters will be dropped from the "} dropped from a program will be eligible for eadrmss10n to it after one calendar year has elapsed. Course Waivers and Transfer of Credit. Courses in a program ma1 be waived or credit transferred with the consent of the course instructor and the approval of the School's Academic Affairs Committee. Students shou ld proa d evi d ence in their petition for wai ver or cre_dit that th ey covered equivalent ma-tenal at a s ar level of mstruc ti on. Thesis . In p J ograms which provide for thesis, thesis is available by peti tio n to students with a minimum GPA of 3.5 . Thesis requirements are available from pro gram directors and the Office of the Dean. It is the intent of the School programs to support thesis work Archi t ecture and Planning I 85 demons trate s, 1) an understanding of both the particular problem under inves tigat ion and th e means of in relation to it, as well as 2) an ability to de s ign and document a crea tive and relevant product and/or sol ution . In short, students in th esis are ex pected to demonstrate an ability to articula t e and in tegrat e research and design in the specific area they choose to investigate. A th esis should make a contri bution either b y advancing or clarifying the state-of the-art in the proposed subject area . Students may propose thesis work in any area of planning and design in whic h the y have interest, com petence, and support from faculty to undertake the investigation. Competence will be demonstrated through a the sis proposal which will be evaluated for approval o_r disapproval b y a commi ttee of the faculty . Each the SIS proposal must identify the student's three-person thesi s commi ttee . Students with an approved thesis proposal may sub s titut e and regis te r for six hours of thesis research and programming followed, in the next semester, by six hours of thesis. Advising. Students are expected to make regular ac ademic progress in their courses of study . Each student is assigne d an academic advisor who, with the plans a course of study for each program and mom tors progress. Students should always consult first their advisor in all academic matters. Chancellor fohn Buechner (right) joins long-time Denver archite ct and philanthropist Temple Buell (left) , a generous supporter of CU-Denver ' s Schoo l of Architecture and Plan ning.

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86 I School of Architecture and Planning SCHOOL FACILITIES The School's studios, library, Macintosh Architec ture and Design Laboratory, Auto-Cadd Computer Lab oratory, photo laboratory and dark room, model shop, gallerias, and offices are housed in three floors of the Dravo Building in 50,000 square feet of space. The lab oratories and facilities were developed through an en dowment by noted architect Temple Hoyne Buell, F AlA. Architecture and Planning Library Robert Wick, Librarian The Architecture and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library, administered by the University of Colorado at Denver, serves as a learning resource cen ter in the fields of architecture and planning. It con tains the following collections: reference, circulating, documentary (planning documents issued by local, re gional, state and national agencies with an emphasis on planning materials pertaining to Colorado commu nities and concerns), periodicals , reserve, and non print media including architectural slides and microcomputer software. The Architecture and Planning Library has over 13,000 volumes of books and monographs , 15,000 slides, and 105 periodical subscriptions. The Architecture and Planning Library is open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m.; Friday from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.; Saturday from 9 a.m. until 4 p . m . ; and Sunday from 12 noon until 6 p.m. The staff consists of a librarian, library assistant, and several student assistants. The Library provides a number of services including reference and research assis tance and library-use instruction. Additional services, such as inter-library loan and computer-assisted re search, are provided through the Auraria Library. Center for Built Environment Studies Director: F. R. Steiner Department Office: 1250 14th Street, Third Floor Telephone: 556-2816 Center Staff: S. Boonyatikarn, R.D . Hom, P.B. Gallegos Associated Research Faculty: L. Brink, M.G . Brown, T.A. Clark, F . Downing, H.L. Garnham, M. Hatami, D.R. Hill, L.M. Johnson, B. Jones, G.W. Karn, Y. Lee, J.M. Prosser, P.V. Schaeffer, H.A. Shirvani Support Staff: P. Erickson, D. Lee As the research and service unit of the School of Architecture and Planning, the Center for Built Environment Studies is committed to making a more humane living environment through research and innovative design . The primary mission of the Center is of qual itative, quantitative, and innovative nature. The Cen ter plays an important role in supporting the educational mission of the School of Architecture and Planning to achieve a balance of practice and research. In this re gard, the Center's resources and expertise include architecture and planning researchers and practitioners combined with a large pool of graduate assistants. As a major contributor to the state of Colorado and the southwest region, the Center for Built Environment Studies has helped to strengthen the quality of built environments in urban and rural towns and regions. As a unit of intellectual forum, the Center is striving to make an impact on the fields of architecture and planning through its community of scholars , facilities , and laboratories. The Center is an interdisciplinar y team of educators, designers, and planners working in a collaborative manner to service the professions and the community. Currently, the Center is involved in a broad range of built environment projects in architecture and planning with particular focus on building performance evaluation and analysis, land-use policy, rural and small town design and planning, and economic develop ment. The Center staff includes highly regarded research ers in building systems studies , who have experience in lighting, energy conservation, and construction. The School of Architecture and Planning houses a state-of the-art building technology laboratory . This laborator y offers an excellent setting for simulation of building performance. Members of the Center staff and School faculty are recognized internationally in the field of land use plan ning. Areas of special expertise include soil conserva tion policy, landscape ecology , environmental impact assessment, and land suitability analysis. Currently, the Center is cooperating with the City of Woodland Park and Teller County to develop a growth manage ment strategy. Center researchers also are working with the U.S. Soil Conservation Service on the implemen tation of a nationwide land evaluation and s ite assessment system. The Center is viewed nationally as a leader in the provision of technical assistance to small towns and rural regions. Funding for this work has been re ceived from the state of Colorado as part of the Colo rado Initiatives Program and from the Kellogg Foundation as part of the Colorado Rural Revitalization Project. The latter project is a collaborative effort with Colo rado State University. Through the Colorado Initia tives and Colorado Rural Revitalization Projects, the Center works with local officials and citizens to im prove the quality of life in rural Colorado. For in stance, Center staff helped develop and design an Old Town, based on a Western motif , to attract tourists in the town of Burlington . In the San Luis valley of southem Colorado, the Center has helped citizens to use their rich Hispanic heritage to build a strategy for the future. These kinds of activities extend to every comer of Colorado. As a result of this work in rural regions, the Center has a record of accomplishment in economic development as well as tourism and recreation design and planning . The experience is augmented by the exper tise of several School faculty who have conducted a wide variety of fiscal impact analyses, market studies ,

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Architecture and Planning I 87 Delta City Manager Steve Schrock (right) seeks counsel on his city's future from jon Schler , who works in the Grand junction office of CU-Denver ' s Center for Built Environment Studies. popul ation forecasts, labor market anal yses, and transportation pladung studies . The Center dffers numerous research assistan tship s to the graduate ! students enrolled in one of the School's programs. Thefenter also offers opportunities for stu dents with individual research interests . Finally, the Center offers a vckety of seminars, round tables, colloquiums , and interaction with national and international visit ing scholars. ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN LABORA T O , Y Dire ct or: Benn r tt R. Neiman The Macintosh Architecture and Design Laborator y is dedicated to the promotion of design innovation and exploration with the Macintosh computer . The newly acquired labodtory contains 15 Macintosh II comput ers with megciliyte internal hard drive and high reso lution color monitors; a Macintosh II file server with 80 megabyte. hard drive; an E-size, Hewlett Packard I pen plotter; LaserWriter II print er; Image Writer II dot matrix printer ; and ThunderScan image digitizer ! The laborator y is presentl y experiment ing with variohs drawing and painting software in cluding Mac Architrion professional3-dlmensi onal modeling software, VersaCad, MacDraw II, SuperPaint, PixelPaint, Adobe 88, VideoWorks, Canvas, MiniCad , and Mac3D. This state-of-the-art laborator y has been developed through a contribution by Apple Comput er, Inc. CADD COMPUTER LABORATORY Director: Kingsley Brown The CADD Laboratory of the School of Architecture and Planning is located adjacent to the Macintosh Architecture Laboratory and is equipped for upsalled computer aided design and drafting with a microcomputer based networking system which is being modified and expanded. Six Zenith 2200 PC/ATs , in addition to four IBM PC/XTs with high resolution monitors and digi tizing tablets, are now linked with a Novell central file server and 120 megabyte hard drive for storage. This network and six additional PC/AT workstations are linked through the addition of AutoCAD compat ible software that extends and enhances the ongoing use of AutoCAD and AE/CADD. Additional capabilities are offered through Auto Word, an interactive word processing package for editing and displaying text of drawings; Auto CoGo, a coordinate geometry program that allows entry of survey and en gineering data for site planning and engineering; LandSoft, a system for introducing landscape architectural sym bols and drafting extension into the AutoCAD and AE/CADD utilities; and Generic Template, a means of customizing or creating unique design and drafting templates . Also available are the ComputerVision system which includes the Personal Architect and Personal Designer packages, G0uld Colorwriter 6320, and HewlettPackard plotters. Additional computing facilities are available at other sites on campus.

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88 I School of Architecture and Planning BUILDING TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Director: Soontorn Boonyatikarn The Building Technology Laboratory functions as a teaching and research facility for both students and outside practitioners. For the student, through handson experiment and physical demo nstration, it is used to facilitate the learning process as well as bridge the gap between theoretical concepts and practical appli cations. For practitioners, thi s facility is used to en hance their practice and update their knowledge. Some examples of equipment and facili ti es available include data acquisition systems, lighting research equip ment, Macintosh visual input package , windflow sim ulation table, video equipment, and data logging equipment. Data acquisition systems includes the following com ponents: data logger Model 21X-L with 40K internal memory (RAM) and sealed rechargeable batter y from Campbell Scientific; ffiM PC-AT with 30 megabyte hard disk and 1.2 megabyte RAM; cassette tape recorder and cassette tape interface (for a remote application); analog and digital control cord; and necessary soft ware for read/write access, data interfacing, and data manipulation. This system is very flexible. It is a text book sized, D-cell powered precision datalogger using micro-computer based hardware with sub-micro-volt sensitivity. It is the combination of a microcomputer, clock, multimeter, calibrator, scanner , frequency counter, controller, and signal generator. Some important fea tures are: • Sensitivity and measurement speed : fourteen bit pre cision on five software se lectabl e ranges. 0.33 micro volt resolution at 37 milliseconds per channel with 100 nanovolt RMS input noise. At 2.5 ms per chan nel the input noise is 1.2 microvolt RMS. • Real-time data processing: user programmed pro cessing includes linearization, algebraic, and tran scendental functions, engineering unit scaling, averaging, maximum/minimum, totalizing , standard devia tion, wind vector integration, histograms, and more . • Remote programming : programs , parameters, and direct command can be entered directly from key board or via the serial communications port from a remote computer or terminal. • Analog and digital control outputs: two continuous analog outputs with 14 bit resolution for propor tional control. Six digital outputs can be set based on time or processed input levels. Lighting Research Equipment includes: quantum/radiometer/photometer, two units of pyronometer model Ll-200SB-50, six units of photometric sensor model Ll-210SB, and luminance meter at one degree spot. The Macintosh package allows a direct input of vi sual image from any object into computer for further study. This equipment includes: Macintosh II comput er, Macvision digitizer board and supported software, and visual camera model ICD-200 from IKEGAMI. The windflow simulation table allows the designer to analyze various windflow patterns on twodimensional forms . By allowing water to flow contin uously in a given direction and by adding an even distribution of ink to identify the flow patterns, an immediate study can be encountered on a given site configuration. The following observations can be made: positive and negative zones (show drift patterns and contaminated and turbulent areas), windbreak and wind shadow effect, wind venturi (funnel) effect, and ven tilation and wind protection. Video equipment includes: video camera ROB, video monitor, and high quality four head VSH recorder. Data logging equipment allows an automatic collec tion of data for a specific time and period. When fur nished with the appropriate sensors, the following data can be obtained: temperature (surface temperature, air temperature, and subsurface temperature), moisture (wetbulb temperature and relative humidity) , solar ra diation, lighting intensity, and wind speed . Photo Laboratory. Our new photography lab , with the latest state-of-the-art equipment, is used for archi tectural photography classes and by students to pro duce material for their portfolios . There are separate areas for developing, enlarging, drying, and copying . The copy room, in addition to the table copier, ha s rolls of seamless paper that are used for backgrounds when photographing models. Model-Making Laboratory. Students will have an 800square-foot model shop in which to build projects for their classes . Table saws, jig saws, drill presses , joint ers, and a full range of hand tools will allow the student to build models of wood, plastic, and steel. An adjacent paint spray room is equipped with a venti lated paint booth and vapor-proof lighting .

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ADMISSIONS General Reluirements Each appliint for admission into any of the pro grams of the School of Architecture and Planning must submit: 1. The University of Colorado Application for Grad uate Admission forms. 2 . Two offictial transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended . 3. Three letters of recommendation. 4. A statemen t of purpose. 5. A portfolio of academic, creative, and/or profes sional work except for Urban and Regional Planning . 6. The fee . Special req ements for international applicants are described in Cll following section. All portfolio materials must be in 8-1/ 2 x 11 (or equiv alent A-4) at. If slides are included, they must be in a loo se-lea slide holder and annotated. The School of Architec and Planning will return portfolio s if with postage-paid , preaddressed mailing matenals. Portfolios may be picked up in per son from the offic es. In general, a 3.00 grade-poin t average(GPA) on a 4.00 scale (or equivalent) in the prio r undergraduate or graduate ciJ gree is required for admission . Appli cants with a GPA under 3.00 ma y be reviewed for admission; in suc h cases, submission of strong sup porting mate11als is advised. For applicants with a GPA under 3 .00, scores are required for the Urban and Regional Plahning Program and strongly recom mended for to the other programs. The admiss ons decision is made weighing a variety of factors incl ding academic preparation, quality of work experie9ce and portfolio, appropriateness of the applicant's purpose, and overall likelihood of success in the program. Applicants may be admitted as non degree stude Its or with special conditions. Because of space lirnitati ns, not all qualified applicants may be accepted. Specific requirements for each program are listed below . Master of (first degree ; three and one-half year program) The thr ee one-half year (114 semester hours) program is appropria te for applicants with a bachel or's degree and no prior training or background in archi tecture or field. Prerequisites are one year of college-level PfYSics and college mathematics through a first course ir calculus. For those without these pre requisites , cotlrses are held in the summer term pre ceding the first semester. No other specific preparation is required, although applicants should be able to dem onstrate an aptitude for the study of architecture . Archi tecture and Planning I 89 Master of Architecture (first professional degree : three and one-half year program with advanced standing) Admission to the three and one-half year program with advanced s tanding is for applicants with a non-professional bachelor's degree in architec ture or a bache lor's degree in a field (engineer ing, design, art). Depending on their undergraduate record, qualified applicants with a non-professional ar chitectural degree (the first part of a 4 + 2 program) would ordinarily be admi tted to tfe final two years of the first professional degree program. Applicants with degree s in related fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of preparation but ma y be re quired to take all the courses in the architectural de sign sequence. Master of Architecture (post-professional degree: one year program) The one-year (36 semes ter hours ) post-professional degree program is appropriate for applicants holding a Bachelor of Architecture or equivalent first profes sio nal degree or diploma in architecture. INTERIOR DESIGN Master of Interio r Design (first professional degree) The three-year (96 semester hours) first professional degree program is appropriate for those with a bachelor's degree and no prior training or background in interior design or a related design field. Applicants with back. ground and training in interior design or a related field may be considered for admission ""[ith advanced stand ing. Applicants with degrees in related fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of prep aration but may be required to take all the courses in the interior design sequence. Master of Interior Design (post-professional degree) The two-year (60 semes ter hoUI1s) post-professional degree program is appropriate foil those with a Bach elor of Interior Design, an equivalent of the first pro fessional degree or diploma in interior design, or B.I.D., B.F.A., B.S. L.A., B.S. in Design, B.S. in Architecture. LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Master of Landscape Architec ture (first professional degree) The three-year (96 semes ter hours) first professional degree program is appropriate for those with a bachelor's degree and no training or background in landscape architecture or a related design field.

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90 I School of Architecture and Planning Master of Landscape Architecture (post-professional degree) The two-year (60 hours) post-professional degree program is appropriate for applicants with a firstprofessionaldesigndegree (B.S. L.A. , B. L.A., B.Arch., for example . Applicants with the B . L.A . and work experience by receive advanced standing. Applicants without a prior Landscape Architecture degree may be required to take additional core requirements in Landscape Architecture History and Plant Materials. URBAN DESIGN Master of Architecture in Urban Des i gn (one-year post profes sional degree) The one-year (36 semester hours) program is appro priate for applicants with a first professional design degree in architecture (e.g. B.Arch. , M . Arch ). URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING Master of Urban and Regional Plann i ng The two-year (51 semester hours) program is appro priate for applicants with bachelor's degrees in either design, humanities, social, or phys ical sciences. International Applicants Competence in oral and written English is expected in the School. Students without sufficient competence in English in an academic context may be to enroll in English languag e courses before proceeding with their program . In addition, The University of Colorado at Denver, Office of Admissions, requires that all applicants to CU-Denver meet certain qualifications. Qualifications are determined by records and credentials that each applicant is required to provide. It is important that all documents are received by the School of Architecture and Planning before the deadline date of the semester or term the applicant plans to attend . If application documents are received later than the published dead line, th e applicant will be considered for the next avail able term . Submission Requirements. International applicants must submit : 1. An Interna tion al Student application and Gradu ate Admission forms. 2. Two official transcripts from each United States collegiate institution the applicant has attended . 3. Two certified copies of official academic records from each collegiate institution the applicant has at tended outside the United States. A certified literal En glish translation must accompany documents that are not in English. 4 . Four letters of recommendation. 5 . A statement of purpose . 6. A portfolio of academic, creative, and profes sional work for application to the Architecture, Inte rior Design, Landscape Architecture, and Urban Design programs. 7 . A nonrefundable $50 application fee. 8. A current CU-Denver Financial Resource s State ment. Statements used for other institutions will not be accepted . Photocopied documents are not accept able unless signed by the originator; signatures must not be photocopies . 9 . Official TOEFL Score Report to establish English language proficiency . Institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable. TOEFL score must be 500 or higher to be considered for admission by the University . Additional supporting documents may subsequently be required by the office of Admissions. All international applicants who are admitted to CO Denver must have a valid visa and must enroll for and maintain a full course of study (12 or more semester hours) leading to the completion of a masters degree. Financial Requirements. International applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds avail able to attend the University of Colorado at Denver. To provide this evidence each international applicant should follow the se instructions: 1. Complete the Financial Resources Statement. Ap plicants must prove that they have sufficient mone y to pay expenses by submitting the Financial Resources Statement as a part of the application. a. If applicants are using their own money, their bank must certify that they have the full amount of money on deposit to meet tuition and expense costs. In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources State ment, the bank must certify that the money the ap plicant needs is on deposit in the applicant's account . b. If the applicant is being sponsored b y a family member, or a friend , the sponsor must agree to pro vide the money and sign the Financial Reso urces Statement in Part 2, Section 2 . The sponsor's bank must certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money the applicant will need. c. If the applicant has been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources State ment must be comple ted . 2. An incomplete statement of financial resources or failure to prove the availability of the necessar y money will delay or cause the denial of the applicant's admis sion to the University. Be sure the Financial Resources Statement is accurate and complete . Dates and Deadlines The programs in architecture, interior design, land scape architecture and urban design admit for the Fall and Spring Semesters normally. The program in urban and regional planning admits normally for the Fall Semester, but will admit on a space-available basis for both the Fall and Spring Semesters and the Summer Term. See the Calendar in this catalog for specific dates .

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To be considered for Fall Semester admission, all application materials must be received by the previous March 15 . Apfflicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1. To be con sidered for Spring Semester admission, all application materials must be received by the previous November 1. Applications received after J;viarch 15 or November 1 may be consid ered for non-degree statu s only. Dea dlines f 9 r submission of application materials: March 15 -for Fall Semester regular admission April 15 Summer Term regular admission November 1 for Spring Semester regular admiss ion Applicat ion after these dates will only be consid ered on a ! space-available basis. Architecture and Planning I 91 Persons interested in any of the programs or in vis iting the School are invited to call the Architecture Pro gram at (303) 556-2877 , Interior Design Program at (303) 556 2294, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design Programs at (303) 556-3475, and Urban and Regional Planning Program at (303) 556-3479 to arrange an ap pointment. For application forms or additional infor mation , please write to : Office of the Dean School of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver 1200 Larimer Street Campu s Box 126 Denver , Colorado 80204-5300 (303) 556-3382 Venezuelan student Carlos Gonzales (right) is one of numerous foreign students who attend CU-Denver's prestigious School of Architectur e and Planning. He is shown working on a model of B u rlington in the 1890 's with Bob Hom of th e Schdol's Center for Built Environment Studies. The model is used in a museum diaorama in the eas tern Colorad o town.

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92 I School of Architecture and Planning Programs of Study ARCHITECTURE Program Director: Robert W. Kindig Secretary: Shelly Juergens Department Office: 1250 14th St., Third Floor Telephone: 556-2877 Faculty: Professors: J.D. Hoag, R.W . Kindig, D. Nuzum, J.M. Prosser, H.A. Shirvani Associate Professors: S. Boonyatikarn, M.G. Brown , F. Downing, P.B. Gallegos, M. Hatami Assistant Professors: N. Collier, G.J. Crowell, T.S. Makala, B.R. Neiman, D.W . Shirvani Visiting and Adjunct Faculty: C. Childress, D. Deck er, C. Moon , W.C. Muchow, A. Pellecchia, P . Saporito, C. Rabinovitch The architecture program offers curricula leading to both first and post professional Master of Architecture degrees . The first professional Master of Architecture (M. Arch.l) is fully accredited by the National Architec tural Accrediting Board (NAAB) and is composed of five basic core areas: Architectural Design, History and Theory, Environmental Context, Science and Technol ogy, and Professional Practice. The program's primary objective is to prepare stu dents to enter the practice of architecture with a thor ough foundation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods . More specifically, the objectives of the pro gram are to develop: an awareness of and sensitivity to the quality of the human environment; architectural context; deep understanding of architectural history, theory and criticism; thorough knowledge of architec tural and building technology; competence in design process and expression with particular emphasis on exploration, experimentation, and systhesis; under standing of the institutional framework within which architecture takes place ; and skills and understanding of professional practice including management and pro fessional conduct. The ultimate goals of the program are to provide the architecture student with a deep appreciation of archi tecture, while acquiring critical capacity, through com prehension of all facets of architecture. The above objectives are achieved in five groups of courses, organized in sequences within five coordinated modules. Master of Architecture I (First professional degree) Three and one-half year program . The first profes sional Master of Architecture degree program is a 114 semester hour program requiring three and one-half years (six semesters and a summer term) of full-time study . The curriculum consists of a core of five related course components and 21 semester hours of electives that may be used for a concentration. The program is taught at three levels, each with a theme . The first level involves the theme of principles, definitions, communication and design abstraction and takes the first two semesters. The next level takes three semesters and involves a dual theme-architecture in context and applications of methodologies. The theme of the final level in the third year is synthesis and pro fessional competency. THE CURRICULUM THREE AND ONE-HALF YEAR PROGRAM DESIGN: 48 semester hours ARCH . 5500 (6) Introduction to Architectural Design Stu ARCH. 5501 (6) ARCH. 5502 (6) ARCH. 6600 (6) ARCH . 6601 (6) ARCH. 6700 (6) ARCH. 6701 (6) ARCH. 5510 (3) ARCH . 5511 (3) dio! Introduction to Architectural Design Stu dio II Archi tectural Design Studio III Architectural Design Studio IV Archi tectural Design Studio V Advance d Architectural Design Studio VI Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII Elements of Design Expression and Pre senta tion I Eleme nts of De sign Expression and Pre sentatio n II HISTORY AND THEORY: 15 semester hours ARCH. 5520 (3) ARCH. 5521 (3) ARCH. 6620 (3) ARCH . 6621 (3) ARCH. 6660 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Crit icism Survey of Architectural History Architec ture in the 15th through 18th Centuries Architecture in the 19th and 20th Cen turies Human and Social Dimension of Design

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Archi t e ctur e I 93 ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT: 6 se m ester hours I S it e Planning LA 5530 (3) UD. 6610 (3) Urban Design T h eory and Me th ods A d vance d s tandin g in the three and o ne-half year progr a m . Eac h student admi tted with a d vanced stand ing in the a bove c u rriculum follows a c o urse of study b ase d o n cre d e ntial s eval u a t e d d uring the a dmi ssions p r ocess. Students who have c o m plete d a n ar chitec tu ra l b achelor's d egree in a 4 + 2 progr am would or din arily ent er in the second l eve l of th e three and one-half year curriculum. S tu dents who have degrees in r ela ted field s may be exempt form certa in require d c o urses. The e xact point of entry is de t ermined by a c re d entials eva lu a t ion . SCIENCE AND ARCH. 5530 (3) ARCH . 5531 (3) ARCH. 5532 (3) ARCH. 5533 (3) ARCH . 6630 (3) ARCH. 6631 (3) 'ECHNOLOGY : 18 semester hours S t ructures I S tr uctures II B uilding Technology E n vironmental Control Systems I Structures III Environmental Control Systems II PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 6 semes t er hours ARCH. 6750 (3) Professional Prac t ice I ARCH. 6751 (3) P r ofessional Prac t ice II ELECT IVES: 21 s mester hours COURSE SEQUENCE: FIRST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE ENVIRO COURSE HISTORY / MENTAL SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY CONTEXT FALT ARCH . 5500 (6) ARCH . 5520 (3) ARCH . 5510 (3) I ARCH . 5501 ( 6) YEAR I sPw;G ARCH . 55 I I ( 3 ) ARCH . 5521 (3) SUMMER ARCH . 5502 ( 6 ) FALL ARCH . 6600 ( 6 ) ARCH . 6620 (3) LA . 5530 (3) YEAR II ARCH . 6660 (3) SPRING ARCH . 6601 ( 6) ARCH . 6621 (3) UD. 6610 (3) FAL!L ARCH . 6 7 00 ( 6 ) YEAR III SPRING ARCH . 6701 ( 6 ) 4 8 15 6 PROFESSCIENCE & SIONAL CREDIT TECHNOLOGY PRACTICE ELECTIVES HRS . ARCH . 5530 (3) 15 ARCH . 5531 (3) 15 ARCH . 5532 (3) 12 ARCH . 5533 (3) ARCH . 6630 (3) 18 ARCH. 6631 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 18 . ARCH . 6750 (3) ELECTIVES (9) 18 ARCH. 6751 (3) ELECTIVES (9) 18 18 6 21 114

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94 I School of Architecture and Planning Master of Architecture II (Post-professional program) The post professional program in architecture is an advanced curriculum which focuses on research and specialization. The program offers two options of study: 1) Architectural Experimentation and 2) Architecture and Design with Macintosh. The first option, Archi tectural Experimentation, is suited for students intend ing to further their knowledge in theory and criticism of architecture . Students are guided to investigate, ex plore, and experiment ideas of non-conventional na ture and to advance their design ability. The second option, Architecture and Design with Macintosh, prepares the student for specialization in computer applications and its integration in design gen eration and development . Option 1: Architectural Experimentation Option II: Architecture with the Macintosh REQUIRED COURSES : ARCH. 6622 (3) ARCH . 6623 (3) ARCH . 6627 (3) ARCH. 6628 (3) ARCH . 6642 (3) ARCH. 6643 (3) ARCH. 6704 (6) ARCH. 6705 (6) Investigations in Architecture Modem Architecture Theories of A vant Garde Decon s tructi vist Architecture Design and Architecture with the Macintosh Ad v anced Design Applications with the Macintosh Architectural Experimentation I Architectural E x perimentation II ARCHITECTURE ELECTNES: ARCH. 5540 (3) Photography for Design Professionals ARCH . 6622 (3) Investigations in Architecture ARCH . 6623 (3) Modem Architecture ARCH . 6624 (3) The Built Environment in Other Cul ARCH . 6910 (6) ARCH . 6627 (3) ARCH. 6628 (3) ARCH . 6632 (3) ARCH. 6640 (3) ARCH. 6641 (3) ARCH. 6642 (3) ARCH . 6643 (3) ARCH. 6661 (3) ARCH. 6683 (3) ARCH. 6704 (6) ARCH . 6705 (6) ARCH. 6720 (3) ARCH . 6721 (3) ARCH . 6722 (3) ARCH . 6723 (3) ARCH. 6740 (3) tures I : Research Design The Built Environment in Other Cul tures II: Field Experience Theories of Avant Garde Deconstructi v ist Architecture Building Performance Analysis Introd uction to Computer Graphics Computer Applications in Architecture Design and Architecture with the Macintosh Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh Design Methods Teaching Methods in Architecture Archi tectural Experimentation I Architectural Experimentation II American Art and Architecture Art and Architecture of Islam Latin American Art and Architecture Oriental Art and Architecture Computer Aided Design COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION I , ARCHITECTURAL EXPERIMENTATION COURSE DESIGN CREDIT SEQUENCE STUDIO THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. FALL ARCH. 6704 ( 6 ) ARCH. 6622 (3) 12 ARCH. 6627 (3) YEAR I SPRING ARCH. 6705 ( 6 ) ARCH. 6623 (3) 12 ARCH. 6628 (3) SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 12 12 12 36 COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION II, ARCHITECTURE WITH THE MACINTOSH COURSE DESIGN CREDIT SEQUENCE STUDIO THEORY ELECTIVES HOURS FALL ARCH. 6704 ( 6 ) ARCH. 6622 (3) 12 ARCH. 6642 (3) YEAR I SPRING ARCH. 6705 ( 6 ) ARCH. 6623 (3) 12 ARCH. 6643 (3) SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 12 12 12 36

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DESIGN STUDIO COURSES ARCH. 5500-6 t o A r chitectura l Design Stud i o I . The introductory studio focuses on the basic strategies and techniques of design production. Students are intro duced to architec onics, design analysis and criticism, and the significance of the elements of design. Emphasis is placed on development of an awareness of the role of architectural theory and in the design process. ARCH. 5501 6 . Introduction to A r chitectura l Desi gn Stud i o II. The second intoductory design studio continues the ex amination of the i ssues raised in the first semester and be gins investigatiolll of more complex issues related to building design and envirbnmental context. Emphasis is placed on developing a systep-tatic approach to architectural design while simultaneously dealing with the deve l opment of theory and intellectual ARCH. 5502 6 . A chitectu ral Design Stud i o Ill . The first in termediate studio in architecture focuses on the interrelation ship b etween arciftectural design and the art of construction. The course acts a a transition between the abstract and the oretical concerns 0f the introductory studios and the thought ful realization or practice of ideas. The emphasis is placed on development f how a building is put together as a ma terial conceptual onstruct. ARCH. 5510-3 . Elements of Desi gn Expressi on and Presen tation I. This cotlrse covers the basic principles of descrip tive geometry (technical drawing) . Basic principles of orthographic projection, axon dpetric projection, perspective , and photo graphic reproduction methods (portfolio) are examined. Em phasis is placed gn defining abstract forms and real objects in terms of line, shade, and shadow. ARCH. 5511-3. Elements of Design Expressio n and Presen tation II. This course builds upon the basic principles and issues in the previous semester. Craft and precision are stressed , but with an emphasis toward design articulation and indi vidual expression . Students are introduced to a wide range of compositional j techniques and methods and se l ec t ion of media and mate11fals. The subjects covered are: drawing as analysis; drawing as representation; principles of color in teraction; and means of representing architectural space in terms of color , light, shade, and shadow gradation and value distinc t ion. ARCH. 6600-6 . A chit ectural Desi gn IV. The second interme diate s t udio sequ nee focuses on exploration of architecture in the urban and examination of typological form and cultural constructs which will provide a basis for the inclusion of new spaces and forms within the fabric of the city. Emphasis i* placed on methodological study of site, program, and elements of architecture which are used to facilita te work . I ARCH. 6601 6 . Architectural Design Stud i o V . The final in termediate studi6 sequence focuses on examination of im pacts of largescale urban projects that include commercial, office, and uses in an existing urban fabric. Is sues such as t}'P,ology, character, and monumentality are considered in rei tion to the design of buildings of civic sig nificance. is placed on relationship of the role of the building to th,e morphology of the city and the building's expression in arcf,tectural form . ARCH. 6700-6 . Advanced Architectural Desig n Studio VI. The studio focusrs on students' elaboration and substantia tion of personal itleas through complex design exercises and by critically addrrssing the status of contemporary architec tural th eory . Emphasis is placed on a comprehensive design project that is structured to test s tudents on integration of structural aspects, mechanical systems, site planning, and climate considerations within their design solutions. Architecture I 95 ARCH. 6701 6 . Advanced Architectural De s ign Stud i o V II. T h e final design stu dio continues the comprehensive ap proach through a full range of design investigation and strat egies at all scales from program and conception to construction detail . Students must demonstrate abilities to synthesize all previous work through an application of a complex architec tura l design project. ARCH. 6704 6 . Architectu r al Experimentation I . An ad vanced architectural design studio focusing on design explo rations and stressing theorization and development of ideologies in architectural design. Emphasis is placed on experimenta tion with vario us art medias such as painting, sculpture, music , linguistics, film making, and others . ARCH. 6705 6 . Architectura l Experiment a tion II. As a con tinuation of ARCH . 6704, this studio stresses a culminative effort toward synthesis and contribution of original pro posal for development of architectural theory. Emphasis is placed on architectural transformation as a major indicator of t h e original con t ribution of this studio. ARCH. 6950 -6. Thesis Research and P r o gr amming ARCH. 695 1-6. Architecture Thes is. HISTORY, THEORY, AND CRITICISM COURSES ARCH. 5520 -3. Introduct i on to Desi gn T heory and Crit i cism. This course examines the evolution of ideals and prin ciples in modem architecture , design, landscape, and urbanism and traces the historical development of theoretical issues through a study of selected writing. The course provides an overview of the literature in design theories and explores the relationship between design and the writings that include its interpretation and production . ARCH. 5521-3 . Archi t ectural History: Anti quity throug h the 14th Century. The second course in the history/theory seq u ence , beginning with architecture and urbanism in an tiqui ty, stresses the origin and interpretation of built form as symbol and the problems of early building technology and development of tradition in European architecture and urbanism . It examines the emergence of building types and settlement patterns and their relationship to social institu tio ns. Case studies are drawn from p e-classica l , classical and l ate antiquity, through the 14th century. Emphasis is placed on examina t ion of the so cial function of architecture and its spatial articulation and structural treatment. ARCH. 6620-3 . Architectu r e i n the 15th thr ough 18th Cen turies . The third course in the history / theory sequence cov ers architecture and urbanism from the arly 15th to the early 18th centuries . Late Gothic architecture and the Italian Re naissance, as well as the impact of the Renaissance and sub seq uent development of Baroque architecture in Europe and the Colonies , are covered. Emphasis is placed on major ar chitec t s and significant buildings and the changing concepts of urban space. The socio-political context , role of patrons , and architectural t h eory and prac tice are examined. ARCH. 6621-3 . Architectu r e in the 19th and 20th Cen tu ries. The last course in the history/theory sequence focuses on the breakdown of the Baroque synthesis and the coming of classical and romantic historicism in architecture and the birt h of modem architecture. The impact of technology , in dust rialization, and social changes on architecture and ur banism , changing attitudes toward t h e treatment of architectural space and the formation of new critical concepts, and the emergence of Art Nouveau and the roots of the "Modem Movement " in architecture are examined .

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96 I School of Architecture and Planning ARCH. 6622-3. Investigations in Architecture. This course focu.ses ?n examination of the historical development of the through a study of selected writings and the evolution of Ideas and design principles in architecture , land scape architecture, and urbanism . It explores the pedagogic relationship between design and the cultural roots that in fluence its interpretation and production . ARCH. 6623-3. Modern Architecture. This course examines modem architecture from DeStijl and Bauhaus to LeCorbusier. Emphasis is placed on critical evaluation of this developmen tal stage and its impact on discipline of architecture and city design . ARCH. 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures 1: Research Design. This course intends to broaden students' perspectives by asking them to examine design within an other culture. Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a statement of the problem to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken , and the nature of the report produced. ARCH. 6627-3. Theories of Avant Garde. This course exam ines the origin and evolution of the Avant Garde theories from Russian constructionism to futurism, Dadaism surre alism, and DeStijl. Emphasis is placed on of the implication of historic Avant Garde to present modes of architectural exploration. ARCH. 6628-3. Deconstructivist Architecture. This course theory of deconstruction and its implications to architectural exploration and experimentations . Drawing from Russell , Descartes, Derrida , Hasserl, Heidegger, Barthes, Faucault, and other leading authorities, the course focuses on devel opment of a theoretical discourse for architecture. AR.CH. 6660-3. Human and Social Dimensions of Design. This course focuses on the introduction of basic social and psychological processes relevant to changing environmental conditions, human factors , and problems of the built envi ronment. Emphasis is placed on techniques of interface prob lems in design; the relationship between human use and perception of space, cognitive mapping , preferences and at titudes toward environmental settings ; and the evaluation of particular built environments and developing architec tural programs. ARCH. 6661-3. Design Methods. This course focuses on a systematic review and critique of the major philosophical for decision making in design. Models and the ones of methods prevalent in the design world will be ex relevant to the applicability and adequacy to cooent design and planning. Emphasis is placed on a broad under standing of a full range of models and the awareness of in social survey , data collection, and analysis tech ruques . ARCH. 6720-3. American Art and Architecture. This course focuses on major developments in American art from 1750-1950. Painting and sculpture, as well as important develop ments in architecture, will be discussed . The work of such artists and architects as Copley , Peale, Whistler , Cassatt, Hopper, O'Keeffe, Thomas Jefferson , Louis Sullivan, and Frank Lloyd Wright will be studied. ARCH. 6721-3. Art and Architecture of Islam. This course focuses on study and examination of the art and architec ture of the Islamic cultures from the death of Muhammad through the 18th century from Spain to India . ARCH. 6722-3. Latin American Art and Architecture. This course focuses on study and examination of the art and ar chitecture of the colonies of Spain and Portugal in the west em hemisphere from 1492 to the present. ARCH 6723-3. Oriental Art and Architecture. This is an in troductory survey of oriental art and architecture. The course aims to uncover the relationship between east Asian art and architecture and its accompanying theories. 6910-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures II: F1eld Experience. Students will travel to their respective cit ies undertake the agreed upon study proposals. The course mtends not only to help students consider their own design and planning attitudes, but also to help them see the world from a more balanced perspective. BUILDING TECHNOLOGY COURSES ARCH. 5530-3. Structures I. The course introduces the anal ysis and design of structural elements and focuses on fun damental principles of statics and strength of materials. Areas covered are equilibrium, movement, trusses, three-force mem bers, properties of structural materials including wood and steel, stress-strain relationships . An introduction into the design and analysis of structural elements made of wood and steel in tension , shear, and bearing. ARCH. 5531-3. Structures II. The course is a continuation of Structures I, focusing on study of stress determination of structures, and general principles involved in the design of steel, and members . Problems in design of buildi_ng elements subjected to direct stress, beveling, and combmed stress, deflection, methods of fabrication, and de tails of connections are explored . ARCH. 5532-3. Building Technology. This course addresses issues in building construction and focuses on interrelation ships between architectural concepts and objectives and build ing through lectures, case study presentations, and exercises . Construction communication techniques such as preparation of working drawings and specifications are covered. ARCH. 5533-3. Environmental Control Systems I. This course on .study of environmental control systems in build mg, mcluding the thermal behavior of buildings, climate as a major determinant of building design, energy use in build ings, strategies for designing buildings as complete enviromental control systems, mechanical means of environmental con tr?ls, heating, air-conditioning, plumbing, elec trical, and commurucation systems, water supply, and sanitation systems . ARCH. 6630-3. Structures Ill. This course examines theoret ical and conceptual bases for the qualitative and quantitative analrsis . of indeterminate structures . Course topics include contmwty, movement distribution, reinforced concrete ele ments, precast and prestressed elements, walls, columns, footings, earthquake loads on buildings, and detailing of structural systems . ARCH. 6631-3. Enrvironmental Control Systems 11. The course on and acoustics . Illumination quantity and quality, lighting and electric lighting, lighting design, are covered . The behavior and effect of day light are studied through the construction of models. Tech niques such as preparation of working drawings and specifications are covered . ARCH. 6632-3. Building Performance Analysis. This course ?ddresses issues in performance integration of overall build mg components and the ability to predict architectural de sign performance in advance . Students will experience the use of up-to-date technology, laboratory facilities, guided hands-on experiments, on-site observation, and computer simulation. ln. terior Lighting. This introductory course lit?htmg the processes and the objectives of lightmg and proVIdes the vocabulary and mechanics neces the understanding and interpretation of lighting needs m design. Strategies and criteria for lighting are the focus of this course , covering both theoretical and practical issues.

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COMPUTER fOURSES ARCH. 6640-3.1ntroduction to Computer Graphics. This course provides a hands-on introduction to the Personal Computer and the Disk Opfrating System. The fundamentals of draw ing with a comp1.tter will be taught with the production of moderate-sized dfaw ings. B asic two-dimensional CADD con cepts such as syjl' bois and layering will be explore d . Stu dents will learn to use a di gitizer for input and output graphics to a plott er. ARCH. 6641-3. Computer Applications in Architecture. This course build s . upp n the _basics learned U: 6640. Cus tomizing applica tions to mcre ase productiVIty will be stressed . Linking of and text database s thr ough th e use of attri bute s will b1. investiga ted . Three-dimensional modeling will be u sed to \lis ualize the de s ign proces s . ARCH. 6642-3. Design and Architecture with the Macintosh. This course introd uces the Macintos h computer as a po werful expl oratory desig n tool whic h ha s the potentia l for ex ploration and geqe ration of new archi tectural ideas and forms . The Macintosh > see n a s an extension or amplifica tion of the human brain. The cour se doe s n ot require the user to learn computer or comp licated comman d struc tures; a non-tee cal, intuitive , word of mouth , trial and erro r mode of le rning is possible. Once ba sic skills are mas tered, produ ctio is immediate. Emp ha sis is placed on anal ysis, self-criticisrry revision , and refine ment of design intentions with the tool. ARCH. 6643-3. AdVanced Design Applications with the Macintosh. This course builds upon experie nces gained from the intro ductory course, lARCH . 6642. The course requires the stu dents to hav e an exte n s ive knowledge of th e Macintosh system . The course will devo te the entire semester to work with the three-dimensional modeling programs. Emphasis is placed on techniques of exp loration and innovation in three-dimen sional spatial re resentation of design and architec tural con struc tion s. ARCH. 6740-3. Aided Design. The course ex plores the relations hip between design , mathematics , and comp ut ation. concept s of finite mathematics will be in troduced using building design examples. Problem-solving methods in design and computatio n will be explo red . The ana l ys i s of plan ! ypes will be rela ted to t opology and geom etry; symmetry and combinatorial groups will be intro duced. Comput r projects and readings will be assigned to exp l o re th e conee pts . PRACTICE COURSES ARCH 6750-3. Professional Practice I. This co ur se intro duces the stude t to the essential element s of professional practice s ubject areas s uch as internship , licensing , services, modes of pra ctice, fees, marketing , documents, spec ifications, and woduction procedu res . One three-hour lec ture per week. rer., final year in program or ap proval of instructor. ARCH. 6751-3. Professional Practice II. Thi s course ad dresses managerial issues that s tem from architec ture as a professional servic e activity. It addresses the eco nomic en vironment of a rchitectural practice, the relation s hip of man agement and design , the resources and functi ons of the architecture firm, and and oppor tunities in the profession . It presents several !methods and techniques involved with solv ing problems typically encountered b y architects and intro duces new developme nts and approa ches which have a bearing on practice . Architecture I 97 OTHER COURSES ARCH. 5050-3 . Applied Mathematics for Designers I. This class is designed for the student with little or n o college math experience . It begin s with arithmetic skills and short cuts, continues through college level algebra , and ends with trigonometry. This clas s is a part of the required mathem at ics for students of architecture , but is recommended for any one of nontechnical bac kgro und. ARCH. 5051-3. Applied Mathematics for Designers II. A con tinuation of ARCH . 5050, this class will begin with analyti cal geometr y and continue through differential and integral calculus . The course completes the mathematic s require ment for stude nts of architecture and is open to th ose who have credit for or feel competent in the material covered in ARCH. 5050. ARCH. 5052-3. Environmental Science for Designers. This course is designed to meet the requirement s of the School of Architecture and Planning for entrance into the graduate program in architecture . The basic principles of physic s will be covered in a practical way. The course includes the me chanics of bodies at re st, dynamics, electri city, heat , light, and sound. The course i s recommended for anyone who needs a wo rking knowled ge of general scie nce . ARCH. 5540-3. Photography for Design Professionals. This course will intro duce architectural students to the ba sics of photography and architectural photogr aphy . Class will b e a combination of lectur e/demons tration and student assign ment s followed by evaluation. The co'urse will enable stu dent s to produce their own working photograph s of drawings , models, and building s. ARCH. 6683-3. Teaching Methods in Architecture. This course is designed to develop teaching and ac k demic capabilities in the conte xt of architecture . The s tudent works wi th a faculty memb er in an instructi onal context eight hours per week. ARCH. 6686-3 . Special Topics in Architecture . Various top ical concern s are offered in architecture history, theo ry, ele ments , concepts , method s and implem entation strategies , and other rela ted areas. ARCH. 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study . Studies initiated by students or faculty and spo nsored b y a faculty membe r to investigate a special topi c or problem related to architecture . ARCH. 6930-3, ARCH. 6931-3 . Architecture Internship. This course is designed to provide profess ional practice experi ence to s tudents and is composed of eight hours per week work in a practicing profe ssio nal's office during the regular se me ster . The s tudent is placed in arl architectural and/or design office by the School and recei ves credit instead of pay . Students must complete second year l eve l bef ore tak ing this course.

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98 I School of Architecture and Planning INTERIOR DESIGN Program Director: Marvin Hatami Secretary: Sue Eddleman Department Office: 1250 14th St. , Third Floor Telephone: 556-2294 Faculty: Associate Professors: S. Boonyatikam , M. Hatami Visiting and Adjunct Faculty: R. Cox, C. Lanier, S . Woodard Interior Design Program The graduate program in Interior Design empha sizes architecture of the interior spaces and is directed toward explorative and conceptual aspects of design, as well as the development of the necessary theoretical and technical skills. The program is composed of five major components: Design, History and Theory, Tech nology, Professional Practice, and Electives. The program is designed for students who wish to enter professional practice in the field of interior design. Master of Interior Design I (first professional degree) Three year program. The first professional Master of Interior Design degree is a 96 semester hour program requiring three years of full-time study . The curriculum consists of a core of four related course compo nents and 21 semester hours of electives. Major groups: Design , 42 credit hours; History and Theory, 12; Science and Technology, 15; Professional Practice , 6; total: 75 credit hours . COURSE SEQUENCE COURSE HISTORY / SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY FALL INTO. 5500 (6) ARCH . 5520 (3) ARCH 5510 (3) YEAR I SPRING INTO. 5501 (6) INTO . 5521 (3) ARCH . 5511 (3) SUMMER FALL INTO . 6600 (6) ARCH . 6660 (3) YEARn SPRING INTO . 6601 (6) ARCH . 6661 (3) FALL INTO. 6700 (6) YEAR ill SPRING INTO. 6701 ( 6 ) 42 1 2 COURSE SEQUENCE COURSE HISTORY / SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY FALL INTO . 6600 ( 6 ) ARCH . 6660 ( 3 ) YEAR I SPRING INTO. 6601 ( 6 ) ARCH . 6661 (5) FALL INTO . 6700 (6) YEARn SPRING INTO. 6701 ( 6 ) 24 6 THE CURRICULUM -THREE YEAR PROGRAM DESIGN: 42 semester hours INTO . 5500 (6) INTD. 5501 (6) INTD . 6600 (6) INTD . 6601 (6) INTO . 6700 (6) INTD . 6701 (6) ARCH . 5510 (3) ARCH. 5511 (3) Introduction to Interior Design Studio I (Same as ARCH. 5500) Introduction to Interior Design Studio II (Same as ARCH . 5501) Interior Design Studio III Interior Design Studio IV Advanced Interior Design Studio V Advanced Interior Design Studio VI Elements of Design Expression and Pre sentation I Elements of Design Expression and Pre sentation II HISTORY AND THEORY: 12 semester hours INTD. 5521 (3) ARCH. 5520 (3) History of Interior Design Introduction to Design Theory and Crit icism ARCH . 6660 (3) ARCH . 6661 (3) Human and Social Dimensions of De sign Design Method s SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: 15 semes ter hours INTO . 6630 (3) Finish Material s and Textiles INTD. 6631 (3) Construction Detailing INTD . 6632 (3) Interior Lighting ARCH . 5530 (3) Structures I ARCH . 5533 (3) Environmental Control S y stems I PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 6 semester hours ARCH. 6750 (3) ARCH. 6751 (3) SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY ARCH . 5530 ( 3) ARCH . 5533 ( 3 ) INTO . 6630 (3) INTO . 6632 (3) INTO. 6631 (3) 15 SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY INTO. 6630 (3) INTO. 6632 (3) INTO . 6633 ( 3 ) Professional Practice I Professional Practice II PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE ELECTIVES ELECTIVES (3) ELECTIVES (3) ELECTIVES ( 3 ) ARCH . 6750 (3) ELECTIVES ( 6 ) ARCH . 6751 ( 3) ELECTIVES ( 6 ) 6 2 1 PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE ELECTIVES ELECTIVES (3) ELECTIVES (9 ) ARCH . 6751 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 9 3 18 CREDIT HRS . 15 15 3 18 15 15 15 96 CREDIT HRS . 15 15 15 15 60

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Master of l ?terior Design II (Post-profes sional degree) Two year pr bgram. The pos t -professional Master of In te ri o r Design j degree requires a minimum of two years of fullt ime study a n d 60 credi t h ours. T he core cuh-ic ulum consists of four groups: De sig n , 24 credit j hours; History and Theory, 6; Science and Technology, 9; P rofessional Practice, 3; t o t aling 39 credit h ours. The core curriculum is an absol u te re quirement, regard less of any individual's educat ional ba c k gro u nd. -uresis is available o nly by pe tit ion t o t he Program Director a n d upon his /h er approval. THE C URRIC ILUM-TWO-YEAR PROGRAM DES IGN OR THESIS: 24 semester hours INTD. 6600 (6) INTD. 6601 (6) INTD. 6700 (6) INTD. 6701 (6) I I nterior Design Studio III Interior Design Studio IV Advanced Interior Design Studio V Advanced Interior Design Studio VI HIST ORY AND THEORY: 6 semes t er hours A R CH . 6660 (3) ARC H. 6661 (3) Human and Social Dimensions Design Methods SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: 9 semester hours INTD. 6630 (3) INTD . 6632 (3) INTD. 6633 (3) Finish Materials and Textiles Inte r ior Ligh t ing Advanced Interior Lighting PROFESSIONAt PRACTICE: 3 semester hours A R C H . 6751 (3) Professional Practice II AREAS OF C J NC E NTRATION A ND ELECTIVES F ou r areas of concentration are offered in th e Inte rior D esign Program: Facilities Management; History, Theory, and Cri t icism; Interior Design Educa t ion; Light ing Stu dies . j T he re are no se t requiremen t s in each of t h e above a r e as. are required t o d e velop a pla n of study wi th th eir advisor at the beginning of the course of s tu dy. ELE CTI VES INTD. 6640 (3) INTD . 6641 (3) INTD. 6650 (3) INTD. 6686 (3) INTD. 6930 (3) INTD . 6900 (3) Facilities Management I Facilities Management II Furniture Design Special Topics in Interior Design I n terior Design Internship In dependent Study DESIGN STUDIO COURSES INTO. 5500-6 . ll')troduction to Interior Design Studio I. This introd u ctory studio focuses on the analysis of twoand three-di me n sional design principles, and basic and interior design fundamental theories. Emphasis is placed on concept and elements of proportion, balance, rhythm, color, movement, Interior Design I 99 form, and light. A modular component of the course con sis t s of mechanical graphics tools used to illustrate the de sign studio projects. INTO. 55016 . Introduction t o Interior Des ign Studio II. The second introductory design studio continues the examina tion of the fundamental theories and design principles ex plored in the first semester, and applies them t o objective in t erior design projects. Emphasis is placed upon anthropometries and aesthetics, as related to the design of furnishings and interior spaces . A modular component of the course consists of basic freehand graphics tools used to illustrate the design s tu dio projects . INTO. 6600 -6. Interior D es ign Studio Ill. This is the first of the intermediate studio-seminar sequence in which the fo cus is on the analysis of spatial definition and human behav ior, and the implementation of design and process problem-solving skills. Emphasis is placed on practical and theoretical issues, leading to creative design solutions to current residential and non-residential problems. A modular . component of this course consists of advanced graphics tools used to illustrate the design studio projects . INTO. 6601 6 . Interior Design Stud i o IV. This is the second of the intermediate studio -seminar sequence. The focus is on a comprehensive non-residential project, emphasizing space p l anning and human factors considerations. The application of the professional process presentation phases of program ming, schematic design , design development, construction documentation, and specification writing are studied. INTO. 6 7 00 6 . Advance d I n t e rior Des ign Studio V . This is the first of the advanced studio sequence in which the focus is on students' elaboration and substantiation of personal ideas through complex design exercises, and by critically addressing contemporary interior design theory. Emphasis is placed on an interdisciplinary design project that is struc tured to test students on investigation of environmental, humanistidcultural, and aesthetic dimensions within their design solutions. INTO. 6701 6. Advan ced I nter ior Design S t udio VI. This is the second of the advanced studio sequence, which pro vides the opportunity for students to select individual projects in which the full range of design investigation strategies are demonstrated. Students must confirm ability to synthesize all previous course work and accumulate knowledge in this final design project. HISTORY, THEORY, AND CRI T ICISM COURSES INTO. S521-3. Hist o ry of I n teri o r Design. This course is a survey and critical analysis of major 20th century interiors . It begins the process of relating interi0r environments from antiquity to contemporary by focusing on furnishings , the decorative arts , interior architectural detailing, and interior architectural spaces . The s pecial focus is on critical evalua tion and analysis of historical precedents . INTO. 6624 3 . The Built Env ironment in Other Cultur e s 1: Research Design . This course intends to broaden students' perspectives by asking them to examine design within an other culture . Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a statement of the problem! to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken , and the nature of the report produced. INTO. 6910 6 . The Bui lt Environment in Other Culture s II: Field Experienc e . Students will travel to their respective cit ies to undertake the agreed upon study proposals. The course intends not only to help students consider their own design and planning attitudes, but also to help them see the world from a more balanced perspective.

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100 I School of Architecture and P lanning TECHNOLOGY COURSES INTO. 6630-3. Finish Materials and Textiles. This course is an investigation of materials commonly used as interior fin ishes and the study of textiles . It provides the opportunity to study the composition and characteristics of individual fin ish materials, the various applications of each, the processes used to transform the raw materials into a finished product, and the government regulations and tolerances controlling the specification of them . The study of textiles is related to but separate from finish materials and focuses on environ mental textile s, examining the development of fiber to fin ished goods and the process for intelligent se lection of particular textiles for specific applications. INTO. 6631 -3. Construct ion Detailing . This course concen trates on the graphic representation of building construc tion, as it relates to the interior environment and the resolution of the juxtaposition of the various pieces and finishes of con struc tion. Focus is on the types of interior construction , fin ishing and terminology , and the con v entional methods of representing these graphically. INTO. 6632-3. Interior Lighting. Thi s introductory course in lighting investigates the processes and the objectives of light ing, and provides the vocab ulary and mechanics necessary to the understanding and interpretation of lighting needs in design. Strategie s and criteria for lighting are the focus of this course , covering both theoretical and practical issues. INTO. 6650-3. Furniture Design . The focus of this studio/lecture course is to exp l ore the effects and responses of phys ical human factors, material characteristics , struct ur e, joinery, and histor y in the design of furniture . Design process, pro gramming, design and presentation techniques, along with drawing and model building skills are emphasized in thi s project oriented course . OTHER COURSES INTO . 6686-3 . Special Topics. Various topical concerns are offered in in teri or design hi s t ory, theory, elements, con cepts, methods and implementation strategies, and other related areas . INTO. 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem rela ted to interior de sign . INTO . 6930-3. Interior Design Internship. This course is de signed to provide professional practice experience to stu dents and is composed of eight hours per week work in a practicing professional's office during the regular semester. The student works in an interior design or architectural de s ign office and recei ves credi t instead of pay. Students must complete second year level before taking this course. INTO. 6950-6. Thesis Research and Programming. INTO. 6951-6. Interior Design Thesis.

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LANDSCAPE AND URBAN DESIGN Program Harry L. Garnham Secretary: Sue t:d dleman Department Office: 1250 14th Street, Third Floor Telephone: 556l3475 Faculty: Professors: L. Brink , H.L. Garnham Assistant L.M. Johnson, G.W. Karn Visiting and Adjunct Faculty: G. Barnhart , G. W. Jameson, M . John son, T. Johnson , A.E. Rollin ger, S. Specht, G. Vogt I Landscape Architecture Program T he Landscal?e Architecture Program offers both first and post prof 1 ss ional Master of Land scape Architec ture degrees . Landscape Architecture in the School of Architecture a d Planning is a professional design pro gram leading the Master of Landsc ape Architecture (M.L.A.) degref. The first professional Master of Land scape Ar chi tecture (M.L.A.) degree program is fully accredited by the Land scape Architectural Accredita tion Board is recognized by the Council of Land scape ArchitectUre Edu cators. The is organized to create an environment in which can obtain theoretical knowledge, advanced techhlcal skills, and resear ch opportunities directed towar d the design and prope r management of the urban landscape and its region. The program prepares the student in the profession of landscape architecture . The prirnar objective within the Master of Land scape Architec e Program , therefore , is the educa tion of studentJs to be effective professional landscap e architects in private, public, and academic arenas with a strong commitment to , and preparation for , interdis ciplinary practice. More specifically, the main objec tive of the program is to develop an intens e concentration upon design. This is achieved through an awareness of ethics and land stewardship; an un derstanding of landscape history, theor y, and criti cism; a knowledge of the natural, socio-cultural, and aesthetic dirne hsi ons of the design proce ss; and a tech nical ability ref1 uired to achieve implementation of de sign expressio . Considerable emphasis is placed on cornmunicativ , skills, both graphically and verbally, and the use of computer technology as it pertains to these skills. t dditionall y, the program provides the student with a working knowledge of the institutional framework wi ' which design is executed and a thor ough foundat io n of skills in profess ional practice in cluding management, le adershi p, marketing, ethical conduct, and legal issue s. The program is structured into two levels of instruction. A basic tore of land sca pe architecture with de sign as the major focus . This initial program aspect places emphasis on the core of a first professional de gree: landscape architecture history; professional practice; landscape design , planning, and management; and Landscape Architecture and Urban Desig n I 101 design implementation. Within thi s core, the student is exposed to d esign theory and is strong ly encour aged to understand theoretical aspects as the y rela te to design expression. Most of the core material is placed in the first t wo years of th e three-year first p rofes sio nal degree. The second level of the program is the advan ced design aspect. In this period, the studen t is expected to dra w upon the basic core sk ill and "fine tune " skills as an individua l expression of design . This is achieved through a series of advanced studio pro blems which are both complex and innovative in nature. These pro jects are con ceived within one of the four concentrations offered by the total program and emphasize a de sig n process as a syn th esis of theory and quanti tative anal ysis. The concentrations include history, theor y and cri tici sm; land and real es tat e d evelopme nt; urban d e sig n ; and landscape planning. Master of Landscape Architecture I (First professional degree) Three year program. The first professional M.L.A. degree program r equires 96 semester hours and three years of full-time study . The c urr iculum consists of a core of four related course components: Design , 42 c redit hours; History and Theory, 15; Science and Tech nolo gy, 18; and Professional Practice, 3, totaling 78 c redit hours, and 18 semes t er hours of electives that may be used for a concentra tion. THE CURRICULUM -THREE YEAR PROGRAM DESIGN : 42 semes t er hours LA. 5500 (6) LA. 5501 (6) LA. 6600 (6) LA. 6601 (6) LA. 6700 (6) LA. 6701 (6) LA. 5510 (3) LA. 5511 (3) Introduction to Landscape Architec ture Studio I Introduction to Landscape Architec ture Studio II Landscape Arc h itecture Stu dio Ill Landscape Studio IV Advanced Landscape Archi tecture Studio V Advanced Landscape Archi tectu re Studio VI Elements of Design Expressio n and Pre sentation I Elements of D esign Expressio n and Pre sentation II HISTORY AND THEORY : 15 semester hours LA. 5521 (3) Landscape Architecture History LA. 6620 (3) Landscape Architecture Theory and Crit icism ARCH. 5520 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Crit icism ARCH . 6660 (3) Human and Social Dimensio n s of De sign ARCH . 6661 (3) Design Theory

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102 I School of Architecture and Planning SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY : 1 8 semes ter hours LA. 5530 (3) Site Planning LA. 5570 (3) Introduction of Plants in Design LA. 5571 (3) Plants in Design LA. 5572 (3) Landscape Ecology LA. 6630 (3) Landscape Technology I LA. 6631 (3) Landscape Technology II PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 3 semester hours LA. 6750 (3) Professional Practice ELECTIVES: 18 semester hours Master of Landscape in Architecture II (Post-professional degree) Two year program. The post-professional degree pro gram requires 60 semester hours and two years of fulltime study . The program offers both design or thesis options as a part of the core requirements. The core curriculum consis t s of four groups: D e sign, 24 credit hour s (or Design 12 and Thesis 12); Historytrheor y, 9; Science and Technology, 9 ; and Pro fessional Practice, 3, totalling 45 credi t hours . THE CURRICULUM -TWO YEAR PROGRAM DESIGN : 24 semes ter hours LA. 6600 (6) LA. 6601 (6) Landscape Architecture Studio III Land sca pe Architecture Studio N COURSE SEQUENCE COURSE HISTORY / SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY FALL LA . SSOO (6) ARCH . SS20 (3) LA. SSIO (3) YEAR I SP RING LA. SSOI (6) LA.SS21 ( 3) LA. SSII (3) SUMMER FALL LA. 6600 (6) LA. 6620 (3) YEAR II SPRING LA . 6601 ( 6 ) FALL LA . 6700 ( 6 ) ARCH. 6660 ( 3) YEAR ill S PRING LA . 6701 ( 6 ) ARCH . 6661 (3) 42 IS COURSE SEQUENCE COURSE HISTORY / SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY FALL LA. 6600 ( 6 ) LA . 6620 (3) YEAR I ARCH . 6660 (3) SPRING LA. 660 1 ( 6 ) ARCH . 6661 (3) FALL LA. 6700 (6) YEAR II SPRING LA. 670 1 (6) 2 4 9 LA. 6700 (6) LA. 6701 (6) LA. 6702 (6) LA. 6703 (6) Adva n ced Landscape Architecture Studio V Advanced Landscape Architecture Studio VI Thesis Research and Pro gramming Landscape Architecture Thesis HISTORY AND THEORY : 9 semester h o ur s LA. 6620 (3) ARCH . 6660 (3) ARCH. 6661 (3) Landscape Architecture Theory an d Crit icism Human and Social D imensions of De sign Design Methods SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY : 9 semes te r hours LA. 5572 (3) Landscape Ecology LA. 6630 (3) Landscape Ecology I LA. 6631 (3) Landscape Ecology II PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 3 s emester hours LA. 6750 (3) ELECTIVES LA. 6621 (3) LA. 6641 (3) LA. 6686 (3) LA. 6770 (3) LA. 6840 (1-3) LA. 6624 (3) LA. 6910 (6) SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LA. SS70 (3) LA . SS71 (3) LA . SS30 (3) LA. 6630 (3) LA . SS72 (3) LA . 6631 (3) 18 SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY LA. 6630 (3) LA . SS72 (3) LA . 6631 (3) 9 Professional Practice Visual Quality Analys i s Comp ute r Applicatio n s in Landscape Ar chitec tur e Special Topics in Landscape Architec ture Landscape Architecture Internship Independent Study The Built Environm ent in Other Cul tures I : Research Design The Built Environment in Other Cul tures II: Field Experience PROFESSIONAL CRE DIT PRACTICE ELECTIVES HRS. IS IS 3 IS ELECTIVES (3) 12 LA. 67SO (3) ELECTIVES (6) 18 ELECTIVES (9) 18 3 18 96 PROFES SIONAL CREDIT PRACT ICE ELECTIVES HRS . ELECTIVES (3) 18 IS LA . 67SO (3) ELECTIVES (6) IS ELECTIVES (6) 12 3 IS 60

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DESIGN STUDIO COURSES LA. 5500-6 . to Landscape A rchi tecture Stud i o I . This introductory design studio focuses on the analytical study of principles and theory of landscape architecture . It covers concepts 'rd elements of landscape architectural de sign, manipulatior,ofland form, space, and two-and three-di mensional composition . Emphasis is placed upon an awareness of the role of architectural theory and history in the design LA. 5501-6 . lnt roCtuction to L a ndscape A rchi tecture Stud i o II. The second in oductory design studio continues the ex amination of the issues raised in the first semester and be gins investigatio of t he more comp lex environments and the application of design process. Emphasis is placed upon natural, physicaYcultural, and aesthetic aspects associated with the design 0f context and design within context. LA. 5510-3 . of Desi gn Expressi o n and Presenta tion I. This cours cover s free hand drawings of various spaces and o b jects. is placed on abstract forms and real objects in terms of lig ht, shade, and shadow . Design think ing, visualizatio 1 , and presentation and techniques are ex plored through a variety of methods. LA. 5511 3 . of Desi gn Express i on and Presenta tion II. This course emphasizes mechanical drawing means . S tu dents are intrbd uced to a wide range of basic tec h niques, conventions, and means in the design fields , as well as se lection of instruments and surface, typography, and organization of graphic material to achieve the most effec tive presentation . The subjects covered are: principles of graphic communication ; lettering and orthographies; dimetric, ob liqu e, and persp ctive projections; three-dimensional forms emp l oying light shade, and shadow; gradation/value dis tinction in flat an,d curved surfaces; and graphic reproduction . LA. 6600-6 . Landscape Arch i tecture Studio Ill . The first in termediate stu?f will focus upon the exploration of larger urba n and regional e n vironments, landscape elements, the examination of lhe interrelationship of physical space, and cultural constru ts of place. Emphasis is placed upon design process , the ere tion of place, and the analytical and com positional aspec s which lead to crea t ive design so l u t ions of current urban and regional problems . LA. 6601-6. Landscape Architecture Studio IV . The second intermediate will focus upon landscape analys is, de sig n , a n d managemen t studies in the context of urban places. Field work in reconnaissance mapping, spatial analysis, data organization , a d site and socio-cultural inventory and anal ysis will the d esign synthesis of projects based upon the complete of field data . Design problem emph asis is pia ed u pon the relatio n ship of buildings and o b jects to the m rpho l ogy of the city, the cities spatial orgaexpression of special p l ace within LA. 6700-6 . Landscape Archi tectu r e Studio V . This studio will focus upon students ' elaboration and substanti a t ion of perso 1 ideas through complex design exercises w hi c h critically address contemporary landscape architec tura l theory. E phasis is based upon a comprehensive ur ban or regional landscape design project structured to test stude n t ability to investigate ecological, humanistidsocio cultural factors, aesthestics, and complex dimensions in the deve l opment of 1 creative design solutions. LA. 6701 6 . Advanced Landscape Architecture Studio V I . The final studio is com prehensive in it s approach . T h e major goal is to present a full range of complex design investiga tions and implementa t ion strategies at various scales , while allowing the sttlden t s to demonstra t e their ability to synthe size all previou academic work. Landscape Architecture I 103 HISTORY, THEORY, AND CRITICISM COURSES LA. 5521 3 . Landscape Arch i tecture H i sto ry. This course be gins with a survey of major landscapes, places, and tradi tions from ancient Middle East through classical antiquity , t h e R enaissance, and Western landscape traditions. The course focuses on contemporary American landscape and its spa tial organization and development through present history. The rural and urban lifestyle, the of the met ropolitan region , exploration of land and landscape, and the art of creating place also are explored . LA. 6620-3 . Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism . This course focuses on exploration and assessment of the current state of theory in landscape architecture and related design disciplines, and the ideas undergoing contemporary des i gn approaches . Narrative and explanatory theories are the o bjects of study . Emphasis is placed on history and pedagogic theories and their relationships to other disciplines such as art, ecology , geography, architecture, and anthropology . LA. 6624-3 . The Built E n vironment in Other Cultures 1: Re search Design. This course intends to broaden students ' per spectives by asking them to examine design within another cu lt ure. Each student will prepare a proposal of study in clu ding a statement of the prob l em to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken , and the nature of the report produced. LA . . 6910 -6. The Built Env ir onment in Other Cultu r e s II: Field Experience. Students will travel to their respective cit ies and undertake the agreed upon study proposals . The course intends no t only to help s t udents consider t heir own design and planning attitudes, but also to help them see the world from a more balanced perspecti v e . SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY COURSES LA. 5530 3 . Site Planning . The course focuses on the site planning process including research and data gathering , data analysis and synthesis , design analysis and its relationship to building program and concept, and design synthesis of site and prepara t ion of site plan. Emphasis is p l aced on de sig n through grading, representation, manipulation and cal culation of road work, utilities, and other site features . Vertical and horizontal alignment , earthwork and cost computation, and integration with existing and proposed features or sys tems are all covered . LA. 5570-3 . Introduction to Plants in Rocky Moun tain native and introduced trees, shrubs, and grou n dcovers are field identified and studied for botanical traits , physical requirements, and design application. The primary focus of study is a horticultural approach, as Latin names are learned and used in specific plant identification. The secondary fo cus of study is design methods used in planting design. Formal design principles, spatial sequencing, and plant func tions are applied in design studies . LA. 557 13 . Plants in Design . Planting design is the primary focus of study as several projects require that students apply the knowledge of the plant materials and design methods l ea rned in the prepa r ation of p l an t ing plans. The secondary focus to this class is the study of additional plant materials as the spring bloom occurs.

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104 I School of Architecture and Planning LA. 5572-3. Landscape Ecology. This course is focused on the study of physiography, cultural factors, and aesthetic criteria in relation to landscape, spatial organization, and urban and regional structure. Emphasis is placed on conti nuity and change in and ecology of both natural and man made landscape. LA. 6621-3. Visual Quality Analysis. This course introduces students to a range of philosophies, methods, and tech niques in visual landscape analysis . Emphasis is placed on application of methods and technique s to urban and re gional context and scale, and vis ual impact assessment and simulation. LA. 6630-3. Landscape Technology I. The course focuses on application of surveying, grading, road design and site con struction principles, and their application to site develop ment . Emphasis is placed on site design, layout plan, grading plan, and drainage calculations for specific projects. LA. 6631-3. Landscape Technology II. This course is a con tinuation of LA. 6630 and focuses on the study of materials and methods employed in construction of site features and evolution of palette, techniques and theory of detailed de sign including pavements, fences, walk, stairs, revetments , basins, and fountains. LA. 6641-3. Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture. The course introduces problem-solving methods, and the relationship between those methods, and the application of a computer to design pro blems. Introductory problems are given in BASIC using the graphics package, a high-level language such as Pascal is used to explore language in more depth, and, to conclude, a series of assignments introduces the graphics unit or high-level language. Assignments in pro gramming CAD problems are required. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE COURSES LA. 6750-3. Professional Practice. The course focuses on stud ies in the professional practice of landscape architecture and related professions, and case problems in initiating and man aging a professional practice . It explores the essential ele ments of professiona l practice and equips students with the fundamental know led ge and skills requisite to an under standing of, and participation in, the conduct of practice in landscape architecture. The course covers organization of the landscape architectural office, professional services of land scape architects, fee structures and fee management, con tracts, legal rights and responsibilities, and management, marketing , and delivery of professional services. OTHER COURSES LA. 6686-3. Special Topics in Landscape Architecture. Var ious topical concerns are offered in landscape architecture history , theory, elements, concep ts , methods, implementa tion strategies, and other related areas. LA. 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored b y a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to landscape architecture or urban design. LA. 6930-3. Landscape Architecture Internship. This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to students, and is composed of eight hours per week work in a practicing professional's office during the regular semes ter. The student is placed in a landscape architectural and/or design office by the School and receives credit instead of pay. Students must complete the second year level before taking this course. LA. 6950-6. Thesis Research and Programming. LA. 6951-6. Landscape Architecture Thesis. URBAN DESIGN Program Advisor: H .L. Garnham Faculty: Professors: J.M. Prosser , H.A. Shirvani Associate Professors: H .L. Garnham, M. Hatami Assistant Professors: N . Collier , G. W. Karn, T . Makala Urban Design Program A city no longer inhabited , not simp l y l eft behind , but haunted by meaning and cul ture . This state of being haunted , which keeps the city from returning to nature , is perhaps the general mode of the presence or absence of the thing itself in pure lan guage. (Derrida 1978) Gties are in reality great campuses of the living and the dead where many elements remain like signals, symbols, cautious. When the holiday is over, what remains of the architecture is scarred, and the sand con sumes the street again. There is nothin g left but to resume with a certain o b stinacy the reconstruction of element s and instru ments in expectation of another holiday. (Aldo Rossi 1981) Art as the creation of new objects ... By no means does it follow to suppose that by objects we mean objects of every day use . Naturally in factory-made utilitarian objects in the aeroplane or car , we see gen uine art. But we do not wish to limit pro duction of artists to utilitarian objects. Every organized work -a house , a poem or a paint ing-is an expedient object , not leading people away from life , but helping to or ganize it. (Veshch 1922) The Urban Design Program at the School of Archi tecture and Planning is a non-conventional research program leading to the degree of Master of Architec ture in Urban Design . The premise of the program is investigation, exploration, experimentation , and rep resentation of ideas and proposals in regard to the development of the city. The program takes a radical angle opposite to the classical mode of inquiry and representation in regard to the city's architecture. The curriculum is geared toward questioning the existing connections and searching for alternative ideologies and proposals, through a structured sequence of lec ture and design studios. An alternative two or three step structure has been organized which expands over a two or three semes ter course of study. The first step of the curriculum engages students in study of the fundamentals theory and criticism in regard to structure of present archi tectural text and discourses while it simultaneously in troduces students with the process of decomposition. This step is necessary to understand the interrelationship of architectural text as a language as well as an artifact. The second step is an engagement of reverse order in an attempt to recompose the city by question ing the tradition and investigating metaphysics of or igins and presence. The third cumulative step is found in pursuit of individual interest.

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Master of Arrchitecture in Urban Design The Master of Architecture in Urban Design Pro gram is a one-year post-professional degree and is suited for students who have completed a first-professional degree in Archltecture (B.Arch., M.Arch.). The program requires completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours. CORE CURRIC I LUM The core culum consists of six graduate courses for a total of 2 credit hours. Some students entering the program m y be advised to take additional courses depending on their educational backgrounds. The core curriculum consists of the following courses: UD. 6600 (6) Transformation and Decomposition Studio UD. 6601 (6) Composition Studio OPTION 1 : ONE ACADEMIC YEAR COURSE I DESIGN SEQUENCE STUDIO I FALL UD. 6600 (6) YEAR I I SPRING UD. 6601 (6) 12 OPTION II: ON t YEAR CALENDAR YEAR COURSE DESIGN SEQUENCE STUDIO FALL UD. 6600 (6) YEAR I SPRING UD. 6601 (6) SUMMER UD. 6602 (6) 18 UD. 6603 (6) UD. 6620 (3) UD. 6621 (3) ARCH. 6622 (3) ARCH. 6623 (3) ELECTIVES: ARCH. 6626 (3) ARCH. 6627 (3) ARCH. 6628 (3) ARCH. 6720 (3) ARCH. 6721 (3) ARCH. 6722 (3) LA. 6620 (3) URP. 5532 (3) THEORY UD. 6620 ( 3 ) ARCH. 6622 (3) UD. 6621 (3) ARCH. 6623 ( 3 ) 12 THEORY UD. 6620 ( 3 ) ARCH. 6622 ( 3 ) UD. 6621 ( 3 ) ARCH. 6623 (3) 12 Urban Design I 105 Explorations and Experimentations Stu dio ( Optional) The Architecture of the City City as an Artifact ! Investigations in Pirchitecture Modem Archi tectur e American Architecture Theories of Avant Garde Deconstructionist Architecture Oriental Art and Architecture Islamic Architecture Spanish Architecture Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism Historical Development of Urban Form CREDIT ELECTIVES HRS. ELECTIVES (6) 18 ELECTIVES (6) 18 12 36 CREDIT ELECTIVES HOURS 12 12 ELECTIVES (6) 12 6 36

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106 I School of Architecture and Planning DESIGN STUDIO COURSES UD. 6600-6 . Transformation and Decomposition Studio. The first studio of a two-studio se quence introduces the process of decomposition in urban struc ture through analysis of land scape and structures in search of originary and nonoriginary elements of the city. The studio then is an attempt to restore immanent conditions-the suspension between origin and effect, between positive and negative elements of urban structure. UD. 6601-6. Composition Studio. This studio builds upon the analytical investigations conducted in the previous se mester and explores the process of composition or recomposition in the architecture of the city . Drawing upon deconstructionist theory, the studio presents a challenge to the hegemony of traditional design studios and is a search for authenticity. Considering architecture as text, the studio is a means to represent an invention, an invited speculatio n , or the con ditions of architecture of city . UD. 6602-6 . City of Exploration and Experimentation Studio . This is an optional independent s tudio where indi vidual students pursue their individual interests with an em phasis on interaction between architecture and other disciplines. This studio is s tructured as a cumulative syntheses of knowl edge and skills into an original proposal for the betterment of city condition . HISTORY, THEORY, AND CRITICISM COURSES UD. 6620-3. The Architecture of the City. This course focuses on interpretation of architecture of the city and its landscape, articulation and disarticulation, discontinuity of order, immanence, and memory . Drawing from contempo rary writers suc h as Derrida, Barthes , Adorno, Habermas, Heidegger, Husserl, and others, the course examines the ques tions of replication, representation, and signification in the city. UD. 6621-3. City as an Artifa ct. This course focuses on study of originary and non-originary architecture and its implica tions to urban context. Beginning b y examination of classical representation and refutation, the course attempts to present denial and possibility in archi tecture by investigating tradi tion and metaphysics of origins and presence. OTHER COURSES UD. 6686-3 . Special Topics . Various topical concerns are offered in urban design history, theory, elements, concepts, methods , and implementation strategies and other related areas. UD. 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study. Studies initiated b y students or faculty and sponsore d by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to urban de sign . UD. 6930-3. Urban Design Internship. UD. 69S0-6. Thesis Research and Programming. UD. 6951-6. Urban Design Thesis. URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING Program Director: Peter V. Schaeffer Secretary: Kathy Saykally Department Office : 1250 14th Street, Third Floor Telephone: 556-3479 Faculty: Professors: Y . Lee, H . Shirvani Associate Professors: T.A. Clark, D.R. Hill, B . Jones , P.V. Schaeffer, F.R. Steiner Visiting Faculty: R.C. Bliss, E . Haywood, K.L. Hoagland, R. Horn, E. Kelley, G.F. McNeish, D.A. Strammiello, M.E. Zeller Urban and Regional Planning Program Urban and regional planning in the United States and other countries is involved in activities aimed at shaping the pattern of human settlements and provid ing housing, public services, and other crucial support systems that help support a decent urban living envi ronment. Planning encompasses not only a concern for the structure and image of the built environment, but also a desire to harness the social, economic, po litical, and technological forces that give meaning to the everyday live s of men and women in residential, work, and recreational settings. More specifically, urban and regional planning is concerned with: identifying social needs and design ing and providing services and facilities to meet those needs ; anticipating change and its impact on how peo ple can and do live; understanding the way plans are made, decisions implemented, and actions evaluated and the means by whic h these processes can be im proved; stimulating, guiding, and influencing actions of the private sector with respect to land use and land use transitions in urban, suburban, and rural areas; identifying potent ially adverse impacts of human ac tivities on the natural environment and mitigating those impacts ; designing the city and the surrounding re gion to facilitate activities in which people need and desire to engage. The Urban and Regional Planning Program at the University of Colorado at Denver is designed to pre pare students for professional practice in urban and regional planning as well as for more advanced aca demic training in planning and other related fields. The degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) is awarded after successful completion of a course of study normally requiring about two years of course work. The objectives of the Urban and Regional Planning Program are: to clarify the behavioral and perceptual sources of urban and regional problems; to foster the appropriate use of policy, planning, design, and legal devices for creating urban and regional environments responsive to human needs and ecological principles; and to develop methods for evaluating urban pro grams, policies, and plans which have important human and natural environmental consequences .

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Master of Urban and Regional Planning The Urban and Regional Planning Program offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M. U.R.P.), which requires two years of full-t1 e study and a minimum of 51 credit hours . TheM. .R.P . degree program is accredi ted by the P l anning A,l creditation Board, the Associa t ion of the Collegiate Schools of Planning, and the American Institute of Certified Planners. It consists of a core of 27 semester hours of courses in: Theory , Planning Meth o d s, Spatial Analysis, Planning Law, History, D esign and Planning Studio, and one of several optional con centrations. concentrations are : Economic D evel opment, Land p se and Environmental Planning, and Real Estate Devrlopment. Students may petitio n to de sig n t heir own specialized concentration. Approval by t he academic and the Program Director is re quired. The core curriculum is required for all stu dents. CORE COURSES URP. 5501 ( 3 ) URP . 5510 (3) URP. 5511 ( 3 ) URP. 5520 (3) URP. 5530 (3) URP. 5532 (3) URP. 6630 (3) URP. 6631 (3) LA. 5530 ( 3 ) Planning Theory and Process Planning Methods I Planning Methods II Urban Spatial Anal y sis Planning Law Historic a l Development of Urban Form Plannin g Studio I Plannin g Studio II Site Planning A thesis opticm (URP. 6950 Thesis Research an d URP. 6951 Thesis) is k vailable primarily for students who are interested in more advanced academic train ing in plannin or related fields . Students in t e r ested in the thesis option are required to petition and the plan must be approved by the Academic Affairs Committee. ) COURSE SEQUENCE COURSE CREDIT SEQUENCE CORE ELECITVES HRS . URP . 5501 (3) FALl URP . 5510 (3) ELECTIVES ( 3 ) 12 YEAR! URP . 55 30 (3) I URP. 55 I I (3) SPR!N f URP . 55 2 0 (3) ELECTIVES ( 3 ) 12 LA . 553 0 ( 3 } URP . 55 32 (3) ELECTIVES ( 6 ) 12 YEAR II URP. 66 30 (3) SPRING URP . 6631 (3) ELECTIVES (12 ) 15 2 7 24 51 Students are required to declare an area of con cen tration. Within a given area of concentration, t he stu dent must take at least 15 semester hours . Urban and Regional Planning I 107 A REAS OF CONCENTRATION The areas of concentration enable students to ex plore in some depth an area of special interest. Ideal ly, students should build on the expertise which they alread y possess . This can be done b y learning about a rela ted specialty, or b y increased specialization in an already existing area of expertise. The Urban and Regional Planning Program has three establis hed areas of concentration: Economic Development, Land Use and Environmental Planning, and Real Estate Devel opment . It is also possible for students to design their own concentration with the approval of their academic advisor and the Program Director . A concentration must consist of a minimum of 15 semester hours of course work and include a methods , a theory , and a policy course. Economic Development . This concen t ra t ion ad dresses issues in economic development and planning at the urban, regional, I).ational, and international lev els . The curriculum provides expertise in urban spatial and socio-economic struc ture, urban and regional eco nomic development and planning , planning methods and anal y tical techniques, and transportation plan ning. The course work develops a broad foundation in the current state of urban and regional economic de velopment analysis and moves to a more advanced understanding of development issues , questions , and p l ans and policies involved. Land Use and Environmental Planning. Work in this area addresses natural systems , urban and regional growth and land control systems, environmental qual ity of regions, protection of ecological systems , the planning and management of natural resources , and the impacts of development. Emphasis is placed on environmental quality policy, planning and design at both macro and micro levels and includes : land suit ability and capability for various types of develop ment; preservation models of urban and regional natural amenities; national environmental programs and ma jor policy issues as the y relate to regional and local levels; spatial-physical models of environmental land use planning; evaluation and development of regula tions and procedure s which enhance quality of urban living environment; environmental impact assess ment; and urban growth/non-growth . Real Estate Development. The real estate develop ment industry plays a c ritical role in shaping the built environment through the construction of various types of buildings and development : residential, commer cial, industrial, and recreational. It affects urban and regional development not only economically but in cre ating cultural and social environments of lasting sig nificance. This concentration focuses on an interdisciplinary approach to study the real estate development pro cess . The concentration is coordinated to expose stu dents to all major elements of the development process : finance, marketing, political process, law, design, plan ning, construction, and management. Students are ed ucated to assume responsible positions in the private sector real estate development industry and the public

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108 I School of Architecture and Planning agencies dealing with the industry . The emphasis is to educate professionals who can successfully assemb le environmentally sensitive and well-balanced real es tate de velopmen t s. ELECTIVES Students may select as electives any urban and re gional planning course or planning related graduate courses in othe r pro grams at the University of Colo rado at Denver . URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING COURSES URP. 5500-3. Introduction to Urban and Regional Plan ning. This course focuses on th e principles of urban and r egional planning, the ories of planning , comm uni ty organi zation, basic techniques , changing philosophies in modem society, and the proce ss of shap ing community form . URP. 5501-3. Planning Theory and Process. This course de scribes, anal yzes, and evaluates contemp orary schools of thought on proper plan making processes. Plan making for society's physical form an d organizational development is addressed . The philosophical, political , and economic roots of the vari o u s theori es are discussed . The ideas also are placed in the context of the planning professio n 's history and its present aims, interests , and ethics. URP. 5510-3. Planning Methods I. This co ur se focuses on the application of s tati stical, quantitative, and mathematical techniqu es, and computer applications for urban and re gional planning and p olicy development. Major topics in clude types of data, sampling, basic probability distributions , hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and an intro duction to multi-variate and cluster ana l ysis. Applications in planning and development are emphasized. URP. 5511-3. Planning Methods II. This course continues further development and applications of te chniques intro duced in URP. 5510, as well as other planning methods, models, and techniq ues. These include physical, social, and economic models, urb an land u se and development models, decision-working techni ques, and linear and dynamic pro gramming . URP. 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis . This course is an ex amination of the spatial structure of the urban system. The urban system is analyzed in terms of the "system of cities" and "city as a sys tem ." Major topic s disc u ssed include the economic theory of the origin of city , the rank-size and pri mate distributions, the location pattern and hier ar chical str uc ture of cities , func tional classification of cities, urban grow th and economic base, m ovement of population within and be tween cities, spa tial patte rn of l and use and economic activ ity, spatial pattern of urban population density, and urban social space and urban cogni t ion. URP. 5530-3. Planning Law. This course focuses on the legal setting for urban and regional planning in the United States. Major con s t itutio n a l issues in the effectuation of planning policy. Contempor a r y controversies are put into the larger context of attempts by the judicial sys tem to redefine the balance be tween individual rig hts and governmental power in an incre asingly weakened society. URP. S532-3. Historical Development of Urban Form. An analysis of urban physical form from the origin of cities to the present. The emphasis is on the cities of western civili zation and American urban planning . Major shifts in urban ideas, archi t ecture, transpor t ation , landscapes , and energy systems are discussed an d evaluated using a slide-lecture format. URP. 5533 -3. Theories of Urban Form. A description and analysis of con t emporary schools of thought on urban phys ical form . Theories will be eva lu ated according to the accu racy of their exp l anations of pre sent urban form , the quality of their images of future urban form, and the practicality of their strategies for implementing their ideal using a s lide/lecture/discussion format. URP. 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures 1: Research Design. This course intend s to broaden students ' perspectives by asking them t o examine design wi thin an o th er culture. Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a s tat ement of the problem to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken, and the nature of the report prod u ced. URP. 6630-3. Planning Studio I. This course focuses on plan design in urban and regiona l planning and explores basic concepts, techniques, and issues related to urban planning , urban design, site planning, and environmental awareness . URP. 6631-3. Planning Studio 11. The focus of Studio II is on p l an making related to urban and regional planning. An understanding of the plan-making process is emphasized . Students will have direct experience with the vario us steps in planning, incl u ding data ga th ering, goal-setting, identifi cation of alternatives , analysis, synthesis, and presentation of the plan . The plan may be for a city sector, a neighbor hood, an entire community, a region, or it may be a policy plan. Where possible, students will work with a community ba se d , actual client. URP. 6640-3. Community Development Process. This course introduce s community development , a field closel y allied with planning, in its devotion to working with people to strengthen their communities in accordance with locally determined goals . Emphasis is placed on understanding groups , organiza tions, and communities and on developing skills in such areas as community analysis, goal sett ing, group facilita tion, and prob lem solving. URP. 6641-3. Social Planning. An increasingly important spe cialty in contemporary planning practice is social planning . This course covers the process of formulating public policies and designing , implementing, and evaluating programs in such areas as social services, housing , health care, employ ment , and education. Attention is given t o the historical per spective and the present -day social and political context within which social polic y formation and social planning occurs. URP. 6642 -3. Neighborhood Planning. An introduction to small area planning including survey of neighborhood and community theory, examination and critique research and analytical techniques involved in neigh bo rhood planning , and examines and analyzes existing plans of local neighbor hoods . URP. 6643-3. Rural and Small Town Planning. This course provides knowledge and perspective on global changes in rura l areas, with particular reference to the United States . It evaluates the issues of agric ultural , rural, and small-town development and interrelationships with the industrializa tion and urbanization processes and develops knowledge and skills in program planning for rural and small-town development.

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URP. 66503. Environmental Planning . There are two objec tives to this course: 1) to provide fundamental knowledge of natural resourc principles as they relate to planning , and 2) to use this knowledge to develop a micro-based environmen t al imp act/economic development model. Lotus 123 will be taught and used for th e model. URP. 6651 -3. Environmental Impact Assessment. The objec tive of this co9rse is to provide the foundation for under s tandin g the Impac t Assessment process , its legal context, nd th e criteria and methods for procedural and substantiv compliance. URP. 6652 -3. Growth Management . This course examines environmental l and regulations such as zoning, subdi visio n controls, l an d growth management systems in the con text of public pplicy. Emphasis is placed on case studi es, the a nal ysis of past and present practices, the improvement of existing an d the design of new regulatory systems. URP. 6653 -3. Natural Resource Planning and Management. This focuses on the s tud y of the economic or ganization u se of n atural resources. It covers th e study of prope rty rigfts and th eir impact on resource use, optimal depleti on of non-renewable and use and management of re ne wable resoutces, applications to fisheries, forests, mineral re so ur ces, etc. as well as developing criteria for evaluation of envir onmenthl amenities; explores conflicts between growth and qu ality. URP. 666 0-3. Process. This course is a de tailed analysis f components of real estate process and its relation ship to the design profession as well as other key participants. URP. 666 1-3. R1'!al Estate Development Finance . This course focuse s o n financia l analysis of real estate investments. The cour se covers tbpics including meas u res of value, capitaliza tion rat e , capi 1 I budgeting , debt and equity markets, and t axation. Cash flow and appraisal techniques , complex deal structuring , innovations in debt financing , syndications , tax shelters, tax e empt financing, and microcomputer applica tion s also are dovered . URP. 6662-3.1eal Estate Market Analysis. The course fo cuses on exammat i on of techniques of market analysis . The course covers topics including business and construction cy cles, regional "nd urban growth trends , restructuring of ur ban space , commercial and industrial location theories, and demog raphic aPalysis and projectio n techniques. URP. 66 64-3. Fiscal Impact Analysis. This course is designed to pro vide an !introduction to fiscal impact analysis proce dure s to students interested in the land development pro cess. Several dtethodologies will be reviewed and assessed for th eir relev11nce in diverse circumstances . URP. 667 0-3 . Urban Economic Development . This course is an analysis of lthe publidprivate partnership in urban eco nomic including analysis of potentia ls, prob lems, and pro1ects ; financing urban economic development through federal gran t programs, tax increment financing and ot h er means; theory of urban development. URP. 6671-3. Economic Development. This course is an analysis of regional patterns and processes of eco nomic develo ment. Theories and models for location pat terns and pro sses of economic activities; labor , industrial, and commercfJ site r equiremen ts; and economic develop ment and growth strategies are emphasized . Urban and Regional Pla1111ing I 109 URP. 6672-3 . Urban Labor Market. This course provides a study of the organization and functioning of urban labo r markets and covers labor market segmentation, human cap ital th eory , labor mobility , labor market signalling, and dis crimination injlabor markets. URP. 6673 -3. Transportation Planning 1: Trans port Network Analysis. The focus of this course is on examinatio n of several important aspects of the transport network, accessi bility and connectivity nodes and linkages, and the vol ume and direction of flow of a transport network. Descriptive, predictive, and planning methods and models discuss e d inclu de graph theoretical measures, connectivity matrices, grav ity model, abstrac t mode model, entropy-maximizatio n , trip generation model, and flow allocation models. URP. 6674-3 . Transportation Planning II: Urban Transpor tation Planning. This course is a follow-up of the transport network analysis (a recommended backgro und) and invol ves an examination of major issues of urban transporta tion in the U.S . These include th e role of trans portation in urban development, the urban tr ansportation system, rela tionship between l and use planning and transportation plan ning, urban transportation planning processes, and s elected case studies . URP. 6675-3. Planning and Public Finance. This course fo cuses on recent trends in financing local governmen ts , rev enue and expenditure analysis, budgetrng for local governments wit h particular emphasis on the capital improv ement bud get , financing capital improvemen t s through bond issues, capital improvement and its relationship to long term plan ning. URP. 6676-3. Urban Housing . This course involves an exam ina t ion of planning and other aspects of urban housing, fo cusing on the U.S . urban housing conditions wi th some references made to international conditions and com parisons. Major topics of the course include aggregate trends and patterns, housing in spatial context , the allocatio n pro cess of housing markets and submarkets (suppl y/fin ance, demand/mobility/demographic change), housing problems and failures (substan d ardness , inequitable distri bution , speci al group needs , segregation and discrimination, market prob lems) , the role of government , and alternative approaches. URP. 6680-3. Urbanizat i on in Developing Countries. A de scription, analysis, and evaluation of urbanizat ion and plan ning in less developed countries . The specia l problems of planning, housing, transportation, environme ntal quality, and economic development in cities of these countries are addressed . Comparisons are made among cities of third world countries and between third-world countries and firstworld urban areas. URP. 6682-3. Housing in Developing Countries. This cours e examines housing problems in developing cou ntries and ex plores alternative policies, program and plans. Emphasis is placed on population growth and the impac t on housing and urban development, housing demand, shelter, and services for the.1 urban poor, the squatting and squatter-buil t housing, andl comparison of government policies and pro grams address in g housing problems !

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110 I School of Architecture and Planning URP. 6686-3. Special Topics in Urban and Regional Plan ning. Various topical conc erns are offered in urban and re gional planning , theor y, concepts, methods, case s tudie s, and practice. URP. 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study. Studies initiated b y student s or faculty and sponsore d b y a faculty member to investigate a specia l topic or problem rela ted to urb a n de sign . URP. 6910-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures II: Field Experience. S tud ents will travel t o their respe c tive cit ies and undertake the agreed upon stud y propo sals. The cour se intends not only to help student s consider their own design and planning attitude s , but also to h e lp them see the world from a more balanced perspective. URP. 6930-3. Planning Internship. This cou rse is designed to provide professional practice experience to s tudents in urban and regional planning. The emphasis i s on actual work experience in se t tings wi th client groups as the s tudents as sis t th em in de termining so luti o n s to th eir problems. Pro gram Director's approval is required. URP. 6950-3. Thesis Research and Programming. URP. 6951-3. Thesis. Professor Frederick Steiner (right) and a planning s tudent (left) disp l ay her projec t on an ecological inven tor y of the North St. Vrain River . For the project she analyzed geography , physiography , hydrology , so ils, plants , animals, and land use .

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Drawings performed by srudents in ARCH. 5510, Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I, Fall Semester 1987. Professors Marvin Hatarni and Bennett Nieman. ROBERT WALKER JACK HAGEN Student Drawings I 111 KAREN HARRIS ROGER YOUEL

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"Colorado is at a turning point, and a great future can un fold for this region as an important partner in a world econ omy. Having a College of Business working closely with the business community is a key link in developing this future . Excellent faculty research and innovative teaching programs are contributing to Colorado ' s competitive strength in the next century. Our students are the winners , too." -Dean Donald L. Stevens College of Busine ss and Administration and Graduate School of Bus iness Administration

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College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration Dean: Donal L. Stevens Associate Dean: William D. Murray Assistant Dea'n: Linda S. Hull College Offic f : Dravo Bldg . , Second Floor Telephone: sy-4007 Director of Programs: Edward J. Conry Director of Gfaduate Programs: Rex 0 . Bennett Director of th! Executive Health Administration Program: John P. Young Director of t e Executive M.B.A. Program: John P. Young j Executive Board of the Business Advisory Council Bob Baker, Chairman, Columbia Savings Kermit L. Darkey, President , Mountain Sates Employ ers Council ! Thomas_J. Gib j on, Executive Vice President, Gates Cor poration Gayle Greer, vr,ce President of Central Operations, Amer ican Television and Communications Corporation N. Berne Ha+ Chairman of the Board , United Banks of Colorado Del Hock , Chairman and CEO, Public Service Company Bruce M. Rockwell, Executive Director, the Colorado Trust j Gail Schoettle , Colorado State Treasurer Faculty Professors: Gordon G . Barnewall (Marketing), Wayne F . Cascio (anagement), Michael A. Firth (Account ing), H. Miqhael Hayes (Marketing and Strategic Man agement) , James R. Morris (Finance) , William D. Murray (lnformatioh Systems), Bruce R. Neumann (Account ing and Hecllth Administration), Edward J. O'Connor (ManagemElnt), Donald L. Stevens (Finance), James D. Suver (t}ccounting and Health Administration), Dean G . Taylor (Finance) . Associate Professors: W . Graham Astley (Manage ment) , Rex ; o . Bennett (Marketing), Peter G . Bryant (Management Science and Information Systems), Edward J . Conry (Business Law and Ethics) , Lawrence F . Cunningham (Transportation and Marketing), E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr. (Business Economics), Leland Kaiser ((Health Administration), Dennis F. Murray (Accounting), John C. Ruhnka (Management and Business Law), Raymond F. Zammuto (Manage ment) . Assistant Professors: Stephen P. Allen (Accounting), Ben-Hsien Baa (Accounting), Heidi Boerstler (Health Administration) , Jean-Oaude Bosch (Finance), Richard R. Brand (Marketing) , Lloyd Brodsky (Information Systems), Jon L. Bushnell (OpeJttions Management and Information Systems), Jean C. Cooper (Account ing) , Richard W . Foster (Finance and Health Admin istration), James H. Gerlach (Management Science and Information Systems), Jeff E. Hey! (Operations Management), Kenneth A. Hunt (Marketing), Jahangir Karimi (Information Systems) , Susan M . Keaveney (Marketing), Rajendra P. Khandekar (Management), Feng Yang Kuo (Information Systems), Anne Moeller (Management), James W. Peltier (Market ing) , Marilyn Sargent (Management) , Marlene Smith (Information Systems) . Senior Instructors: Steven Cutler Cindy Fischer (Accounting) , James H . Milleville (Business Administration). Instructors: AlbertS. Bowman (Management), Charles M . Franks (Statistics) , Marianne Hite (Finance) , Paul J . Patinka (Management), Barbara A . Radosevich (Finance) , Charles A. Rice (Management), Martin J. Wyand (Management and Managerial Economics) . INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain busi ness community, the College of Business and Admin istration at the Univer sity of Colorado at Denver provides its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective, responsi ble business professionals. This level of excellence in higher education is achieved by bringing together nationally recognized faculty and highly motivated, mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment. Our nation's business and corporate environment is experiencing dramatic and complex change. Your abil ity to understand these changes and function as a skilled manager in today' s rapidly moving business world will depend to a great extent on the quality of your busi ness education. Because of the dynamic changes in business trends and management, research in these areas is crucial to a successful transit ion. The business faculty of " research institutions " provide the most current knowledge, concepts, and advances in the fields of business management. CU-Denver' s College of Business is a "research institution," and our faculty are nationall y recognized for their contributions to scholarly research .

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114 I College of Business and Administration The information contained in university textbooks is first conceived through facu lty research and is usually published in textbooks about six years later. Thus, a research-oriented faculty is writing and teaching con cepts years before they are typically seen in textbooks. Accordingly, our students have the opportunity to be on the leading edge of business management theory and practice. Our class schedules offer flexibility to meet the needs of full-and part-time students, with both day and evening classes. Whether you are an experienced working pro fessional seeking an advanced degree, or preparing for a new career in the business world, you will gain the knowledge necessary to succeed in today' s chal lenging business environment. CU-Denver's College of Business can give you an edge over your competition. Faculty Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about their teaching and research. Recruited from the nation's leading business schools, such as Berkeley, Harvard, Stanford, University of Chica go, University of Pennsylvania, UCLA, and Yale, many of them also bring years of valuable experience in pri vate industry . Their interdisciplinary expertise, aca demic achievements, scholarly research, and business experience provide students with a dynamic learning environment, unequalled in the region. Students Unlike the students at a traditional college campus, many of our students are adult, working professionals who maintain full-time employment. Their success and experience enrich class discussions and interactions among students. Although a high percentage attend evening classes, a significant number are full-time stu dents attending classes offered during the day . Follow ing the current national trend, women constitute a very high percentage of the student body. Since admission standards are among the highest in the region, the student body is unusually motivated and talented. This rich mix of backgrounds, experience, and per spectives, when coupled with the strengths of our ex cellent faculty, fosters stimulating classroom interaction and keen competition among the students . Accreditation While there are approximately 800 recognized schools of business nationwide, only 237 are accredited by the national accreditation agency for university schools of business the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). CUDenver's College of Busi ness is one of the few schools in the State accredited by the AACSB. Business Week wrote recently "Today, just having the degree isn't as important as where you get it ... As corporations become savvier buyers of ... talent, they are giving more weight to the AACSB seal. .. Accreditation shows that a Business School cares about the quality of its program" In addition, many national fellowship programs accept only students from accredited programs . In a similar manner, our program in health admin istration is the only such program in the region accred ited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACCEHSA). This agency ensures that health administration programs meet de manding requirements for quality education in the health administration area. Career Opportunities Graduates occupy positions and perform widely var ied functions in: Accounting Adverti s ing Auditing Banking Consumer cre dit Controller s hip Credit admini s tration Entrepren e ur s hip Financial acc ounting Financial management General management Health admini s tration Industrial s elling and purcha s ing Information sys tems Insurance International business Investments Management accounting Management co nsulting Marketing management Marketing research Mortgage finance Operations management Oper a tions research Organization management Personnel/human resources management Public a ccounting Public administration Real estate Retailing Selling and sales management Taxation Traffic and distribution management Transportation Wholesaling

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Other s hold positions of responsibility in fields as diverse as busp;ess journ alis m , public relations, city planning , cha ber of commerce and trade association management, college adminis tration , and govern ment. Cooperativ i Education Cooperative Education is a program designed to pro vide students vYith pra ctical wo rk e x perience in a busi ness se tt ing . Trrough Co-op, s tudents put classroom education Many variables contribute to an individu al's s ccess. On-the-jo b exper ie nce is one of those variable . . Cooperative Education provides stu dents with first-hand experience in a real job setting. HOW CO OP vyoRKS Working the College of Business and Admin istration, the Center for Internships and Cooperative places business stu dents as paid Co-op trainees wi th corporations, bu sin esses, or gov ernment agenaies in po sitio ns that complement their academic workl. Many Co-op position s lead to perma1 • d . nent career ap om tm ents upon gra uahon. ELIGIBILITY FOR PLA CEMENT Cooperative ! Ed ucation is open to all students who have completed their freshman year, have maintained for graduate sf1dents). Some employers have addi t ional requirer:1;ents, i.e., U.S. citizenship , willingness to tr avel, and l pecific course work. Scholarships and Financial Aid Many progrluns for financia l aid are administered b y the Office of Financial Aid. Call 556-2886 for de tailed informa ion . In addition, the College of Busi ness awards some departmental and general scholarships. T h e amounts the awards and the number of awards vary each y ear. ! For additional information, contact the Coll ege of Bus j ness, 595-4007. Each y ear, a number of undergraduate students are awarded Schol arships, Colorado Scholarships, and Regents Scho larships. These provide financial sup port for a portion of the stude nts' tuition and fees. The Management Association of Denver awards an anry.ual scholarship to students interested in careers in purc hasing and the Colorado Chapter of th e American F l roduction and Inventor y Control Soci ety awards up to two annual scholarships to students interested in careers in opera tions management. For information co tact the operations management facul ty advi s or in the College of Business . Business I 115 Graduate tuition awards are available to students admitted to the Graduate School of Business Admin istration , based on a number of factors including financial need or academic performance. For additional information contact the Graduate Programs Office at 595-4007. Student O r gan izat i on s Opportunity for association with other College of Business and Administration students, in varied activ ities intended to stimulate professional interest and to give recognition to scholastic attailunent, is provided by the following student organizations : Beta Gamma Sigma national honorary scholastic fraternity in business CSP A Colorado Society for Personnel Adminis tration (student chapter) for students interested in per sonnel or industrial relations CUAMA student chapter of the American Mar keting Association CU Venture Network-campus chapter of the As sociation of Collegiate Entrepreneurs , open to all CO Denver students HASO Health Administration Student Organiza tion ISC Information Systems Club MBA Association University of Colorado at Den ver association of master's students in business Phi Chi Theta national professional business and economics fraternity Sigma Iota Epsilon professional and honorary man agement fraternity Institute f or I n t e rnati onal Business The Institute for International Business was created in August 1988 to help stimulate new business ven tures through partnerships with foreign business schools and executives. It has three goals: • To collaborate with business and government in pro moting international economic development oppor tunities for Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region. • To be a national center for providing hands-on train ing to foreign executives doing business with Amer ican firms. • To become internationally recognized for research on competitiveness issues in the global economy of the 1990' s . The Institute will offer programs for senior manage ment in business and government . The programs will identify and interpret trends affecting business in the global marketplace and the skills needed to conduct business in these markets . The programs also will put senior managers in contact with internationalists who are shaping the political, economic , and social envi ronment for international business .

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116 I College of Business and Administration GENERAL ACADEMIC POLICIES Academic policies which apply to all CU-Denver students are described in the General Information section of this catalog. The policies described below apply to both undergraduate students in the College of Busi ness and Administration and graduate students in the Graduate School of Business Administration . Policies applying separately to undergraduate and graduate students are described under separate headings. Each student is responsible for knowing and com plying with the academic policies and regulations es tablished for the College . The College cannot assume responsibility for problems resulting from a student's failure to follow the policies stated in this catalog. Sim ilarly, students are responsible for all deadlines, rules, and regulations stated in the Schedule of Classes . Academic Ethics Students are expected to conduct themselves in ac cordance with the highest standards of honesty and integrity. Cheating, plagiarism, illegitimate posses sion and disposition of examinations, alteration, forg ery, or falsification of official records, and similar acts or the attempt to engage in such acts are grounds for suspension or expulsion from the University. Also, ac tions which disrupt the administrative process, such as misrepresentation of credentials or academic sta tus, other forms of deception , or verbal abuse of Col lege staff are grounds for suspension or probation. Any reported act of dishonesty may be referred to the College of Business Committee on Student Faculty Re lations at the discretion of the dean, a member of the instructional staff, or other appropriate University rep resentative. In particular, students are advised that pla giarism consists of any act involving the offering of the work of someone else as the student's own. It is recommended that students consult with the instruc tors as to the proper preparation of reports, papers, etc. in order to avoid this and similar offenses . Admission to Business Classes Admission to business classes is limited to students who have been admitted to the business program, and to other students as described in the separate under graduate and graduate policy sections. The course ad mission criteria are designed to meet a number of objectives. 1. To assure access to business courses for students seeking a business degree . 2. To serve students in other colleges who have business related education objectives or requirements. 3. To service non-degree students who have specifi c career or education goals. 4. Please refer to the Schedule of Classes each term for course availability . Attendance Regulations Students are required to attend classes on a regular basis . Absences must be arranged with the instructor and mus t conform with the instructor's policy on at tendance. Adding and Dropping Courses See the General Information section of this catalog for the University-wide drop/add policies. Withdrawal See the General Information section of this catalog for University-wide wit hdrawal policies. Administrative Drop The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who are incorrectly enrolled in business courses . Instructors also may recommend to the Col lege of Business and Administration office that stu dents who fail to meet expected course attendance or course prerequisites be dropped from the course. Gen erally, students who are administratively dropped will not receive tuition refunds. Appeal Procedure Student s hould contact a business advisor in the Col lege of Business and Administration office for appeal and petition procedures pertaining to rules and regu lations of the College . General Grading Policies Plus/Minus Grading. College of Business faculty have the option to use plus/minus grading. For example, B + corresponds to 3 . 3 credit points (for each semester hour), B-corresponds to 2. 7 credit points . Incomplete Grades. The only incomplete grade given in the College is IF. An IF grade is assigned only when documented circumstances clearl y beyond the student's control prevent the student from completing course requirements (exams , papers, etc.). Generall y, stu dents must make up the missing work and may not retake the entire course . Students should not register for the class a second time but should make up the work with the instructor giving the IF. All IF grades must be made up within one year, or the IF will be automatically changed to the grade of F. All incomplete grades must be completed and re corded at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor concerning the removal of incomplete grades . Grade Changes. Grades as reported by instructors are final. Grade changes will be considered only in cases of documented clerical errors and when a stu-

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dent is up an incomplete grade (IW, IF). All cha nge s must pe made within one year after the course has b een taken unless highly unusual circums t ances can be documented and the change has been ap proved by the / Undergraduate Appeals Committee for undergraduaty courses, or the Graduate Programs Di rec tor for courses. Normally , grade changes will not be considered for any circumstances after three years. I ACADEMIC PROGRAMS A carefully designed curricu lu m to prepare stu den t s for succ r ss in business management is available for the seeking either an undergraduate or grad uate degree. College offers courses leading to the Bachelo r of Science (Business), Master of Business Ad ministration (*.B.A.) , and the Master of Science (M.S.) degrees. The l articular programs offered are: Areas of Emphasis (B.S. in Business) Accounting F inance Human Re ources Management Infor mation Sys t ems Business Mana gememt Marketing I Operations Management and Distribution Management Graduate Programs Master of B f siness Adminis trat ion ( M . B . A.) Master of Science in Accounting Master of Science in Finance Master of S ience in Health Administration Master of Science in Information Systems Master of S ience in Management Master of Science in Marketing Executive P + grams Master of Administration for Executives Master of Science in Health Administration for Executives UNDERG,DUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS Director: Ed ard J . Conr y Program Coordinator: Patricia Peckinpaugh Program Specialist: Nanc y Reed The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bach e lor of Science (Business) degree is intended to help the student achieve th e following general objectives: 1. An understanding of the activities that constitute a business enterprise and the principles underlying administration of those activities . U ndergraduate Business I 117 2. The ability to think logically and analy ticall y about the kind of comple x problems encountere d b y man agement. 3 . Facility in the art s of communication . 4. A comprehension of human relationships in volved in an organi z ation . 5 . Awareness of the socia l and ethical responsibili ties of those in administrative positions. 6 . Skill in the art of learning that will help the student continue self-education after leaving the campus. Undergraduate Admissions Program Specialist: Juliet Pattullo Telephone: 628-1298 Admission of Freshman Students. Freshman appli cants must have completed the college prepara tor y cur riculum in high school , graduated in the top 30% of their high school class, and achieved a score of at least 24 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. See the General Information section of this catalog for further informa tion on freshman admission. Admission of Transfer Students . Applican ts who have completed work at other collegiate institutions should review the information on transfer students in the Gen eral Information section of this catalog . In addition to Univer s ity policies , the College of Business and Ad ministration evaluates course work to determine i ts appropriateness for the degree of Bachelor of Science (Bu siness) . Students who have completed more than 24 semester hours of transferable course work are eval uated for admission on the basis of their college grade point average (GPA) withou t regard to their high school performance . To be automatically admitted, students must have a 3.0 overall GPA in the courses which woul d apply to the degree , Bachelor of Science (Business). Students with less than 3.0 overall will be automati cally admitted if the y have a 3 .25 in the last 24 semes ter hours of applicable course wo11k. Students who do not meet either of these admission s tandards , but with a 2.6 in the last 24 hours o f appli cable work, are considered on an individual basi s and are offered admission as space is available. For infor mation about specific policies on transfer of credit, con s ult an undergraduate business program specialist. Intra-university Transfer . Students who want to trans fer to the College of Business and Administr ation fro m another college or school of the University must for mally apply at the College of Business office. Transfer deadlines are July 15 for Fall Semester, November 15 for Spring Semester, and April15 for the Summer term. Students will be e v aluated only on course work that applies to the business degree program. Generally, this will e x clude course work of a teohnical or vocational nature and courses in activity PE and remedial sub jects. Students who have completed at least 24 appli cable semester hours will be evaluated on their college work; s tudents with fewer than 24 transferab le hours will be evaluated on the basis of both high school and college w ork.

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118 I College of Business and Administration Students will be considered for admission if their overall GP A in applicable course work from CU and all previous institutions is at least 2.6 , or at least 2.6 in their last 24 hours. Applicants with less than a 2.0 GPA in business courses (from CU or other institu tions) and overall CU GPA of less than 2.0 will be denied admission even though the y meet the minimum requirements for consideration. Students will be automatically admitted to the Col lege of Business if they have an overall GPA of 3.0 or an overall GPA of 3.25 on their last 24 hours . All other applicants meeting the minimum requirements for ad mission as stated above will be pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA in the last 24 hours . Pooled applicants will be offered admission as space is avail able. To apply for an intra-university transfer, students must submit an Intra-University Transfer form and CU Denver transcripts to a business program specialist. Transfer forms are available at CU-Denver Admissions or the College of Business office; transcript request forms are available at CU-Denver Records . The transcript must include the student's most recent semester at the Uni versity. Students with previous course work from other institutions are also required to submit a copy of their transfer credit evaluations (advanced standings). Former Students. A CU student from another campus or a CU-Denver student who has not registered for three consecutive semesters (summers included) is considered a former student and must reapply for ad mission as a former student. Former CU-Denver busi ness students may be automatically readmitted to the College for up to three years from the semester they last attended if they are in good standing (not on proba tion or suspension) in the College. Students who have not attended for more than three years, or who have completed 12 or more semester hours at another insti tution of higher education, must reapply as other former students and meet the admission and degree require ments applicable at the time the y apply . Old Work Policy. This policy applies to students newly admitted to the Colleg e of Business and former busi ness students readmitted to the College after an ab sence of three semesters. Applicable credits up to five years old will be counted toward business degree re quirements. Courses more than five years old will be evaluated individually for their current relevance to the degree program. Students may be required to up date their knowledge by taking additional courses when past courses are outdated; in such cases, credit will be given for both courses. Generally, business courses more than eight years old will not apply toward de gree credit. Second Undergraduate Degree. Students may apply to the College of Business and Administration to earn a second undergraduate degree, provided the first un dergraduate degree is in a field other than business . The students who is accepted for the second under graduate degree will be required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a business degree. For example, if a student registered for a second degree has not had the required mathematics or general education courses , these must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses. Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken before a student be gins to pursue the major field . Applications are available through the Office of Admissions and Records. If a student appl ying for a second undergraduate degree has an academi c record that justifies consider ation for the graduate program, that student will be encouraged to consider one of the master's degree pro grams . Double Degree Programs. Numerous career oppor tunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For thi s reason, students may be intere s ted in combined p rograms of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrentl y in two fields . Combined programs have been developed for engineering and business , and may be arranged for other professional combinations as well. For addi tional information , contact an undergraduate business program specialist at 595-4007.

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Underg r ad u ate Advising and A c ademic Planning Admission Advising . Persons not yet admitted to the College of Business can receive advising on course selec t ion, requirements, and other matters from an program specialist. To make an appointment, call 595-4007. Admitted Students . Upon admission to the College , students a Graduation Contract which identi fies t he courses required to graduate. This contract con tains all the uiformation needed to select courses and monitor progliess t oward completion of requirements for the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business) . Busi ness students j are expected to assume responsibility for self advising. This includes scheduling courses each term, being familiar with all the policies and proce dures of the Cpllege, and otherwise managing the stu dent's acadenuc career. Program specialists are available to answer about unusual situations; howev er, t hey do not provide ongoing information about course selection and cheduling. Career advtsing is available from business faculty and from the Auraria Office of Career Planning and P l acement Se vices, 556-3477. Graduat i on Requ i re m ents The Bache! r of Science (Business) degree requires the following : Total Credi(s. A total of 120 semester hours. Area of Emphasis. Completion of at least 12 semes ter hours of proved courses in the area of emphasis. Residence. t least 30 semester hours of business courses must be completed after a student's admis sion to the College. The 30 hours for residence must include 4110 and MGMT. 4500, the 12 hours in the area o emphasis , and 12 hours in other busi ness courses core and/or electives). Average Requirement . To graduate , a student must maintain a minimum cumulative scho lastic gradeoint average of 2.0 for all courses at tempted at University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business) de$I'ee, 2.0 for all business courses, and 2.0 for the four courses in the student's area of emphasis . Undergraduate Honors . Upon recommendation of the faculty, stUdents who demonstrate superior schol arship are given special recognition at graduation . Stu dents must an overall University of Colorado gra d e-point average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to H,e considered for cum laude. Those who achieve an overall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado will be considered for magna cum laude . Filing for Graduation. Students must file an Under graduate Candidacy form and Diploma Card, and re quest a graduation evaluation (senior audit) prior to registering for their final semester. Failure to do so Undergraduate Business I 119 will delay gradua t ion. Also, students desir ing t o change t h eir area of emphasis after filing for grad u a t ion must have the change approved b y th e gradua t ion supervi sor prior to regis t ering for their final semester. Changes after that time will delay graduation. B usiness Program Requirements. Satisfac t ion of all t h e following requirements: Program Requirements Semester Hours Communications and composition 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00. 6 Mathematics oo••oooo••••ooooooooo•oooo•oo•oo••ooooooooooo oooooooo 6 Political science 00 00 •••••• • • 00 • ••••• 00 •• 00 • • • • 00 00 00.00. 00.00 00.00 00 00 00 6 Introductory socio l ogy or cul tural anthropo l ogy 00000000000 3 Natural science . 00 ••• 00. 00 00 00 •••• 00 00 ••••• • • • 00 ••• 00 • • • • • 00. 00. 00 00. 00 6 Principles of economics 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 .... 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 .. 00. 6 General psychology 00 00. 00 00 • 00 • •••• 00 00 • • 00 00 ... 00 00 • 00 00 •• 00 • ••• 00. 3 Social-humanistic elective . . . .... . 00 00. 00. 00 ••• 00 00. 00 ••• 00 00 •••• 00. 3 Business core requirements 00 00 .. 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 30 Area of emphasis .. 00 00 ••• 00 00 ... .. 00 •••• 00 00 ••• 00 •••• 00 ••• 00 00 •• 00. 12 E l ectives .. 00 ••••• 00 •••• 00 ••• •• 00 00 .... 00 •••• 00 00 •••• 00 ••• 00 00. 00 ...... 00 39 Total Semester Hours 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00. 120 Detailed descriptions of courses which satisfy pro gram requirements are presented below: Program Requirements Semester Hours Communications ... ... . 00.00 ••• 00. 00 • • 00 00 • • 00 00 00 •• 00 00 00 00 00 • • 00 00 00 6 Required : One English composition (ENGL. 1020 or 1034) and one speech course (CMMU. 2021 or 2101) Mathematics ..... 00 00 • • • 00.00 ••• 00 • •••• 00.00 ••• • 00 •••• 00 ••• 00 • • • 00.00 00. 6 Required : MATH . 1070 Algebra for Business and Social Science and MATH . 1080 Polynomial Calculus. College-leve l algebra may be s u bstituted for MATH . 1070. Six semester hours of sequential college-level calculus (i.e . , MATH. 1041, 2411) may be substituted for MATH. 1070 and 1080. Political Science . . 00 ••••• 00. 00 • ••••••••• 00. 00 ••••• 00. 00 ••• 00. 00 00 00 • • 00 6 R equired: P SC. 1001 and 1101. The following courses also will fulfill t h e P SC. 1001 requirements: P SC. 3042, 3062, 3105, 3404, 3532, 3554, 3656. Introductory Sociology or Cultural Anthropology 00 00 00 00. 3 Natural Science ........ 00 00 •••• 00 •••• 00 ••• 00 00.00 00 •• 00 00.00 00 00 00 00 00. 6 Select courses such as biology, chemistry, or physics . Astrogeophysics, earth science, physical geography, and geological scie nce also are acceptable . Mathe m atics, an t hropology, and psychology are not appropria t e courses for this requirement Economics .. 00 •••• 00 00 00 •• 00 00 00 • • 00 ••• 00 00 ••• 00 •• 00 00 • • 00 •• 00 00 •• 00 00 00. 6 Six hours of economics are required . When ECON . 2012 2022 are taken at CU-Denver for eight hours, the addi tional two hours apply as non-b u siness elec t ives. General psychology ... 00 00 00 •• •••••• 00 •••• 00 • ••• 00 00 • • 00 • • • 00 00 00. 00. 3 PSY. 1002 is recommended . Social-humanistic elective . 00 • ••• 00 • • 00 00 • • • 00 00.00 00 •••• 00 ••••• 00 00 3 Select from the following courses : History course (1000 or 2000 level); a behavior p sychology course (PSY. 3135 or 3155 are strongly recommended); PHIL. 1012, 1200, or 2200; C u ltural or SOC. 1001, 1190, 2500, 3001, 3012, 3020, 3030, 3052, 3480. (So ciology and C u ltural Anthropology courses are only acceptable if they are not used to fulfill the introductory Sociology or C u ltural Anthropology requirement.) Co r e Requirements . 00 00 •••• 00 ••• 00 00. 00 00 00 •••••• 00 •••• 00 00 00 00 00.. 30 Complete all of the following courses : ACCT . 2000 Introduction to Financial Acco u nting ISMG. 2000 Business Information Systems and the Computer QUAN . 2010 Business Statistics BLAW. 3000 Business Law

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120 I College of Business and Administration FNCE. 3300 Basic Finance MKTG. 3000 Principles of Marketing MGMT. 3300 Management and Organization Behavior OPMG. 3000 Operations Management MGMT. 4110 Business and Society MGMT . 4500 Business Policy and Strategic Management Areas of Emphasis .. 00 ••••••••• 00 ••••••• 00 •••• 00 ••• 00 ••• 00 •••• 00 00 00 12 Accounting Finance Human resources management Information systems International business Management Marketing Operations management Transportation and distribution management Electives . . 00 .. 00 •• 00 ••• 00 ••• 00 00 •••• 00 00 00 ••• 00 • • 00 •••• 00 ••• 00 00 •• 00 • • • • 39 Business electives ... 00 00 • 00 ..... 00 00 00 ••• 00 ... 00 •••• 00 •• 00 .... 00 00 • • • • 9 (any undergraduate academic course offered by the College of Business other than business core courses and the 12 hours chosen for the area of emphasis; MGMT. 1000 is not required but recommended for freshmen and sopho mores) Non-business electives ..... 00. 00 •••••••• 00. 00 00 •• 00 00 00 00 00 ••• 00.. 15 (These must include 9 hours of upper division 3000or 4000level work; a list of approved non-business elective courses is available from a business program specialist) Free electives .. 00.00 00.00 00.00 00 ••• 00.00 00 ••• 00 00.00 00 •• 00 00.00 00 ••• 00 15 (These may be either business or non-business undergradu ate academic courses) Guidelines for Elective Credits . Elective credits should be selected carefully because not all classes are accept able. Generally, to be acceptable, electives must be taught by regular University of Colorado faculty, must have a form of assessment such as a term paper and/or exam inations, and must be regular classroom-type classes. Course coverage must be college level, not repetitious of other work applied toward the degree, must be ac ademic as opposed to vocational or technical, and must be part of the regular University offerings. Specifically, the College will accept: a. A maximum of 6 hours of the theory of physical education, recreation , and dance, and b. A maximum of 6 hours of approved independent study, experimental studies, choir, band, music les sons, art lessons, and c . A maximum of 12 hours of advanced ROTC pro viding student is enrolled in the program and com pletes the total program . The College will not accept: Activity physical education classes, recreation, work shops, internships, orientations, dance, teaching meth ods, practicums, and courses reviewing basic skills in computers , English composition, mathematics, and chem istry. SUMMARY OF PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS Required Courses ooooooooooooooooooooooooo••••oooooo••••oo••oooooooo 81 Elective Courses ... 00 •••• 00 00 • 00 ••• 00 •• 00 •••• 00 00 00 00 •••• 00 ••• 00 ... 00 39 Total Required Semester Hours 120 Model Degree Program The following sequence of courses is a guide to reg istration. Freshman Year Semester Hours ENGL. 1020 or 1034. English Composition ...... 00 00 00 00 00 00. 3 CMMU . 2021 or 2101. Communication Theory or Public Speaking .. 00. 00 ••• 00 00. 00 .. 00 00............................. 3 MATH. 1070. Algebra for Social Science and Business ... 3 MATH . 1080. Calculus for Social Science and Business .. 3 P SC. 1001. Introduction to Political Science .......... 00.... 3 P SC. 1101. American Political System ........ 00.............. 3 SOC. 1001. Introduction to Sociology .................... 00.... 3 MGMT. 1000. Introduction to Business ....................... 3 Natural Science ............... 00 ..... 00 ...... 00 .................. 00 .... 6 llial Sophomore Year ECON . 2012 and 2022. Principles of Economics (macro/micro) ................ 000 ............................... 000 •• 6 PSY. 1002. Introduction to Psychology ........ 00 .............. 3 Socio-humanistic elective ... 00 ..................................... 3 ISMG. 2000. Business Information and the Computer ... 3 QUAN. 2010. Business Statistics ................................ 3 ACCT . 2000. Introduction to Financial Accounting ....... 3 Non-business e l ectives ..................... . ......... . ............ 00 9 Total 30 Junior Year MKTG. 3000. Principles of Marketing .................. .... 00. 3 FNCE. 3300. Basic Finance .............................. 00 ...... 00 3 MGMT . 3300. Management and Organizational Behavior .... ..... .......... 00 ....... ............. ..................... 3 OPMG . Operations Management ...................... . 3 BLAW. 3000. Business Law ........ ........ .... .............. 00 ... 3 Business electives ................... 00 ............ 00.. .. • • • • .. .. • • • .. • 3 Non-business electives ........................... 00 ........ 00 00 ••• 00 6 Either business or non-business electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Total 30 Senior Year MGMT. 4110. Business and Society ............................ 3 MGMT. 4500. Business Policy and Strategic Management .... .......... ....... ..... 00 .... 00 .................. 00.. 3 Area of emphasis .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 12 Business elective ............ 00 .................... 00 .. • • • .. .. • .. • .. .. • 3 Either business or non-business electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 ThW Areas of Emphasi s See individual areas of emphasis in this section for specific courses required. ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SELECTING COURSES Registration. Instruction for registering for courses is contained in another publication called the Schedule of Gasses, which is available before e ach semester . That publication lists the times when registration oc curs, the place, and the courses offered.

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Maximum nits Per Term. The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate business student is 15 se mester hours, l with a maximum of 18 hours during the fall/spring sters and 12 hours during the summer term. A rna urn of 3 hours can be taken during an interim sessio . Hours carried concurrently in the Di vision of Continuing Education, whether in classe s or through correspondence, are included in the student's load. Repeating (fourses. A failed course (grade of F) may be repeated; however, the F will be included in the grade-point and will appear on the transcript. A course in hich a grade of D-or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from a busine ss program specialist. Courses repeated without approval may not be used in the grade-point aver age Courses Frdm Other Institutions. Bu siness students must have the written approval of a business program specialist to register for courses (excluding MSC pooled courses) offer d by other institutions. Credit will not be given for oourses taken without approval. Grade s of Cor better ! must be earned to receive business de gree credit. G b nerally, only non-business electives or lower divisiorl, non-business requirements are accept able for transfer from other institutions once a student has been admitted to the College of Business. Busi ness students who take more than 12 semester hours from another institution must reapply for admission to the Colleg e as transfer students and meet the cur rent admi ssio n requirements. Unde rgraduate Business I 121 MSC Business students may select their non-bu siness required and elective courses from those offered in the " pool " of MSC courses. Grades of Cor better must 9e earned to receive business degree credit; however the grade is not computed in the CU grade point average and is treated like other transfer credits. Non-pooled, MSC business may not be taken for CU-Denver business degree credit. Gradu a te Level Courses . With prior written ap proval of a business program specialist, students may take up to a maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate level non-business elective credits. Students must earn grades of B or better in graduate courses in order to apply the cre dits toward business degree require ments . Pass/Fail . Only non-business elective courses may be taken pass/fail. Required business and nonbusines s courses (natural science and social-humanis tic elective included) may not be taken pass/fail. A maximum of 6 hours pass/fail credit may be applied toward the business degree. Courses taken in excess of the maximum will not be applied toward degree credit. Pass/fail determination must be made within the posted deadlines (at census dates) and may not be rescinded (unless approved by the Undergraduate Ap peals Committee). Correspondence Courses. Only 6 semester hours of credit taken through correspondence study (from re gionally accredited institutions) will be applied to ward the business degree. Business courses may not be taken by correspondence. All correspondence courses must be evaluated by a business program specialist to determine their acceptability toward degree require ments , and the program specialist's written approval is required prior to the studen t's registering for cours es. Students should contact the Division of Continu ing Education for course offerings and registration procedures . Independent Study. Junior or senior business stu dents desiring to work beyond regular course cover age may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) as non-business electives under the direction of an in structor who approves the project, but the student must have the appropriate approval before registering. A max imum of 3 semester hours of independent study courses may be taken in any one semester; a maximum of 6 semester hours may be applied toward degree require ments. An independent study request form must be signed by the student, instructor, departm ent coordinator, and the Undergraduate Program Director. Study Abroad. Transfer credit from study abroad programs is generally limited to non-business elective credit. Students must meet with a business program specialist to course acceptability and for writ ten approval prior to the semester in which they in tend to study abroad. Information on the various programs is available at the Office of International Education on the Boulder campus.

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122 I College of Business and Administration ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SUSPENSION AND PROBATION To be in good standing, students must have an over all CU grade-point average (GPA) of 2 . 0 (C=2.0) or better for all course work attempted, and a 2.0 GPA or better for all business courses attempted. PE activity courses, remedial course work, MSC courses, andrepeated courses not approved by a business advisor are not included in these averages. When semester grades become available, students below the 2.0 GPA will be notified of 1) probationary status or 2) suspension. Students are responsible for being aware of their academic status at all times; late grades and/or late notification does not waive this re sponsibility. College rules governing probation and sus pension beginning Summer 1988 are as follows: 1. Any student whose overall GP A, or business course GPA, is less than 2.0 will be placed on probation im mediately. A student may be removed from probation when the overall GP A and business GP A have been raised to 2.0. 2. A student may remain on probation as long as the student maintains normal degree progress each semester as determined by the College and obtains each term on probation a term GPA of 2 .5, and term business course GPA of 2.5, with no grade below a C. Failure to meet probationary provisions will result in suspension. Probationary status may continue only until the student has completed a maximum of 15 semes ter hours or five terms, whichever comes first; the studen t will be suspended if the GP A deficiency is not cleared within this time. 3. Suspended students may not attend the Univer sity of Colorado or any division of the University (in cluding Continuing Education). 4. Students on suspension may petition for readmission to the College after a minimum of one year from the term in which the y were suspended. Generally, peti tions are granted only in unusual circumstances. Any suspended student readmitted to the College will be under contract and placed on a continued probation status until the GP A deficiency has been cleared. Such students will be automatically suspended if, at any time, their overall GPA or business GPA again falls below 2.0. 5. Students earning all failing grades or no academic credit for a semes ter will have a stop placed on their record and will not be permitted to register without a business advisor's approval. 6. Combined degree students are required to main tain the same standards of performance as College of Business students in order to be continued in a com bined program. AREAS OF EMPHASIS Each candidate for the B.S. (Business) degree must complete the prescribed courses in an area of empha sis comprising a minimum of 12 semester hour s taken at the University of Colorado at Denver. A 2.0 grade point average is required for the four area courses. Typically, students select an area of emphasis after taking severa l of the core courses. They then complete the hours required for their selected area . Students so desiring may complete a dual area of emphasis by careful selection of courses and use of elective hours for a second area of emphasis . Informa tion about each area of emphasis is given below. Accounting Advisor: Prof. Michael A. Firth Telephone: 628-1220 Accounting courses are offered in several fields of professional accountancy at the intermediate, ad vanced and graduate levels . They provide preparation for practice in one or more of the following fields: Accounting and management control systems Auditing Financial accounting Managerial accounting Tax accounting Teaching and research In all of these fields a thorough knowledge of the social, legal, economic, and political environment is needed. A high degree of analytical ability and com munication skil l is indispensable. Courses in English composition, speech, ethics and logic are desirable . Courses in statistics and informa tion systems, beyond the required College of Business core courses, are highly recommended. ACCT. 3310 (Managerial Cost Accounting) is a re quired prerequisite for the accounting area and ap plies as a business elective . Accounting majors should not take ACCT. 2020. Required Courses Semester Hours ACCT. 3220. Intermediate Financial Accounting I ......... 3 ACCT . 3230. Intermediate Financial Accounting II .... .... 3 ACCT . 3320. Intermediate Cost Accounting ............ ..... 3 Accounting elective (at the 4000 level) ..... .................... 3 Students planning to pursue accounting as a career usually take more than the above required hours. Many students take a total of about 30 hours of accounting, often taking two courses each semester in their junior and senior years. Students should work closely with the accounting faculty and business advisors in plan ning their accounting programs. Accounting students often specialize in a particular topical area of accounting beyond the core. Examples of these specializations include the following recom mended courses: Financial Accounting and Auditing ACCT . 4240. Advanced Financial Accounting ACCT . 4410. Income Tax Accounting ACCT. 4420. Advanced Income T ax Accounting ACCT . 4620. Auditing Managerial Accounting and Systems ACCT. 4330. Managerial Accounting Problems and Cases ACCT . 4410. Income Tax Accounting ACCT . 4420. Advanced Income Tax Accounting ACCT. 4540. Accounting Systems and Data Processing ACCT. 4620. Auditing ACCT . 4800. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Or ganizations

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Graduate s dy in accounting is receiving increas ing emphasis by profe ssio nal organizations and em ployers. Studenrs meeting admission requir eme nts should consider contipuing th eir education a t the graduate le vel. I Finance Advisor: Prof. James R . Morris Telephone : 628-1233 The principal areas of study in finance are financial management, monetar y policy, bankin g, investments, and international finance . The study of finance i s in tended t o an unde rstandin g of fundamental theor y perta g to finan ce and to develop the abili ty to mak e soun financial management decisions. Ever y endeavor i made to train students t o think logi cally about financial problems and to formula te sound financial decistons and policies. It is necessary to un derstand the portance of finance in the econom y and the functi ns and purposes of monetary sys tem s, credit, prices, ;money markets, and financia l institu tions. Emphasis is placed on financial policy, manage ment , control , analysis, and decision making. Numerous job opportunities exist with financial institutions and in the field of business finance . ACCT. 2000 and ACCT . 2020 (or ACCT. 3310) are required prerequisites for the finan ce area; ACCT . 2020 will apply as a business elect ive. Undergraduate Business I 123 Required Courses Semester Hours FNCE . 4310. Business Fin ance I ................................. 3 FNCE. 4320. Business Finance II ................................ 3 FNCE. 4330. Inves t ment and Portfolio Management ...... 3 FNCE. 4350. Monetary and Fiscal Policy .......... ...... ..... 3 Recommended Electives FNCE . 4370. International Financial Management ........ . 3 FNCE. 4340. Security Analysis ................................... 3 FNCE . 4360. Bank Mana gement ...... ................ .... ....... 3 Students sho uld note that all finance courses are not offered every semester . Finance majors are encour aged to take additional accounting courses as business electives. Human Resources Management Advisor: Pro . Wayne F. Cascio Te lephone: 628-1215 Human resources management offers opportunities for students to develop professional competence in the areas of personnel administration and labor relations. Students acquire an understanding of and skills in de ve lopin g and implementing human resources systems including recruitment , se lection , evaluation, training, motivation , and union-management relatio ns .

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124 I College of Business and Administration Required Courses Semester Hours MGMf . 4340. Labor and Employee Relations ............... 3 MGMf. 4380. Human Resources Management : Employment . . . .. .. . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . 3 MGMf . 4390. Human Resources Management: Legal and Social Issues . . . .. .. . . . . .. . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . .. . .. .. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . 3 MGMf . 4410. Human Resources Management: Com pensation Administration ................ ................ 3 Recommended Electives MGMf . 3350. Managing Work Groups ....................... 3 MGMf . 4350. Conflict and Change in Organizations ..... 3 MGMf. 4370. Organization Design ............................ 3 PSY. 3135. Organizational Psychology .... ...... .......... .... . 3 PSY. 3155. Industrial Psychology .............. .................. 3 PSY. 4405. Theories of Social Psychology .................... . 3 OP M G . 4440. Quality and Productivity .. ........ ............. 3 ACCT . 2020. Introduction to Managerial Accounting .... 3 ISMG. 3500. Logical Data Structures and Data Base Man agement Systems . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 3 OPM G . 3000. Intermediate Statistics .... .... ................... 3 SOC. 3052. Sociology of Work .................................. . 3 ECON. 4610. Labor Economics .... ............................... 3 Informat ion S yst ems Advisor: Prof. William D . Murray Telephone: 628-1203 The information systems area is designed for those who wish to prepare themselves for careers as profes sional data processing managers or as technical specialists in business and government. The student develops those technical skills and administrative insight s required for analysis of information systems, the design and implementation of systems, and t h e management of data processing operatio n s. The emphasis is on management information systems -systems for the c o l lection, organization, accessing, and analysis of informa tion for the planning and cont rol of operations. The aut omation of data processing is also studied extensive l y . Students should note that not all courses are offered each semester. ISMG. 2200 and ISMG . 2210 are required prerequisites for the information systems a r ea and apply as business electives. Required Courses Semester Hours (The following two courses) ISMG. 4650. Systems Analysis and Design I ................ 3 ISMG. 4660. Systems Analysis and Design II ............... 3 (At least two of the following five courses) QUAN . 3000. Intermediate Statistical Analysis for Decisio n Support (infrequently offered) .................... 3 ISMG. 3300. Operations Research for Decision Support . 3 ISMG. 3500. Logical Data Structures and Database Management Systems . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . 3 ISMG. 4700. Computer and Information Technology .... . 3 OPMG. 4400. Planning and Control Systems ...... . ........ 3 CU-Denver business professors present their research findings to business leaders d u ring a monthly speakers series sponsored by First Interstate Bank of Denver. Shown here is Professor Wayne Cascio , a nat i o n ally recog nized expert in human resources , who discussed measuring employee performance .

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International B usiness Advisor: Prof. H. Michael Hayes Telephone: 628-1214 Increasingldbusinesses are reorienting their think ing, planning, and operations to capitalize on oppor tunities that e tin the world marketplace. Every phase of business is affected by this reorientation. For indi viduals with th,e appropriate skills, training, and inter est, internatiohal business provides excellent career opportunities . ! The business curriculum is designed to enhance build on thorough training in basic business skills and to provide students with additional skills and appropriate to international busi ness. ECON. 441 (International Trade and Finance) is a required prerequisite for the international business area and applies as a nonbusiness elective. Required Courses Semester Hour s FNCE. 4370. International Financia l Management ......... 3 TRMG. 4580. International Transportation ................... 3 MKTG. 4200. In ernational Marketing .... ... . ................. 3 MGMT . 4400. I ternational Management ...... .............. 3 Students should see an academic advisor for course scheduling. A second area of emphasis in business is highly rec ommended. T e course requirements for a second area can b e indudetl as part of the business and free elec tive hours . In bddi tion , serious consideration should be given to a minor or a certificate in interna tional affairs, offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Science,, r d to the ,tudy of a fmeign language. M a n agememt Advisor: Prof. John C. Ruhnka Telephone: 62 -1212 The manage ent curriculum provides the founda tion for career r in supervision and general manage ment in a wi'* variety of organizations. It develops skills in management practice through an understand ing of general management principles, individual and group behavio { organizational change and design , and human resour
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126 I College of Business and Administration Operations Management Advisor: Prof . Jeff E . Heyl Telephone: 628-1280 Operations management studies are designed to pre pare students for careers as production manager, op erations manager, management analyst, or systems analyst in such private sector organizations as manufacturing, banking, insurance, hospitals, and constr uct ion, as well as in a variety of municipal, state, and federal organi zations. Production or operations managers may be charged with the design, implementation, operation, and main tenance of the production systems. Managerial activ ities could fuclude forecasting demand, production planning and inventory control , scheduling labor and equip ment , job design and labor standards, quality control, purchasing , and facilities location and layout. The outlook for jobs in this area continues to be strong. This placement is aided by the student chapter of the American Production and Inventory Control Society and work intern programs provided to qualified students. Participation in live case research and con sulting projects with local organizations is usually an integral part of this course of study . Students whose major areas of emphasis are infor mation systems, transportation management, or engi neering will find the operations/management 4000-level courses to be particularly well related to their courses of study. Students should plan their schedules care fully as required courses are not offered every semes ter. Required Courses Semester Hours (The following three courses) ISMG. 3300. Operations Research for Decision Support . 3 OPMG . 4400. Planning and Control Systems ....... ........ 3 OPMG . 4440. Quality and Productivity .... .. .... ..... ........ 3 (One of the following courses) ............ .... ................. . OPMG . 4470. Strategic Analysis in Operations Management . . .. . . . . .. . . .. .. . . . .. . .. .. . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . . . . .. .. . .. . . . .. 3 OPMG . 4600. Purchasing, Materials Management , and Negotiation ........................ ...... . ... ... . ...... ....... 3 Recommended Electives ISMG. 2200. Business Programming : Structured COBOL ....... . . ..... .................. . ........... . .............. ... . 3 MGMT. 3350. Managing Work Groups ........ .......... ..... 3 MGMT. 4370. Organization Design ............................ 3 MGMT. 4340. Labor and Employee Relations .. .... ........ . 3 MGMT. 4380. Human Resources Management: Employment . .. .. . . .. .. .. .. .. . . .. . . .. .. . . . . .. .. . . .. . . . . .. . .. . .. .. . . . 3 QUAN . 3000. Intermediate Statistic s ........................... 3 TRMG. 4500. Transportation Operation and Management .. .. . . .. .. . . . .. . . . .. . . . . .. .. . . .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. . .. .. 3 GEOG. 3411. Economic Geograph y : Manufacturing .. .. .. 3 GEOG . 4650. Location Analysis ........ ...... ............ ....... 3 Students planning to take the APICS (American Pro duction and Inventory Control Society) or NAPM (Na tional Association for Purchasing Management) certification examinations should consul t with an advisor to deter mine which elec ti ve should be taken. Transportation and Distribution Management Advisor: Prof. Lawrence. F. Cunningham Telephone: 628-1222 The curriculum in transportation management in cludes the role of transportation in society and the problems of traffic management within specific indus tries as well as the management of firms in the trans portation industry . Such as airlines, trucking firms, railroads, and urban transit firms. International trans portation management problems and policies are an alyzed . One of the recommended elective courses may be substituted with consent of the advisor for one of the required courses if there is a schedule conflict , if the course is not available , or if a s tudent demonstrates a career need for such a course . Required Cour s es Semester Hours (Any four of the f o ll owing s ix cour s e s ) TRMG. 4500. Tran s p or t a tion Oper at ion and Management . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . .. .. . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . .. .. . . 3 TRMG. 4520. Proble ms in Surfac e Tr a n s portation Management . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . 3 TRMG. 4560. Air Tran s p o rtation .. .. ...... .... ...... .. ........ .. 3 TRMG. 4570. Urban T r an s port a tion .............. ..... .. .... ... 3 TRMG. 4580. Internati o nal Transportation ................... 3 MKTG. 4100. Ph ysical Distributi o n Management .. ........ 3 Recommended Elect ives MGMT. 4340. Lab o r and Emplo y ee Relations .... .......... . 3 TRMG. 4510. Sur vey of T r a nsp o rt a tion : Law and Freight Claims ..... . ..... . . . ... ... .............. ... ..... .... ... . .... 3 OPMG . 4600. Purch as ing , Material s Management and Negotiation ..................... . ........ . .................... 3 MKTG. 4200. Internati o nal Mark e ting ...... .... .... ........... 3 GEOG. 4610. Urban G e ography : E c onomic .................. 3 GEOG . 4630. Transp o rtation Geo graphy .. ...... .......... ... 3 UNDERGRADUATE COURSES -ACCOUNTING ACCT. 2000-3. Introduction to Financial Accounting. Fall, Spring , Summer . The preparation and interpretation of the principal financial s t a tements of th e business enterprise , with emphasi s on asset and liability v aluation problems and the determination of net income . Prer ., s ophomore standing. ACCT. 2020-3. Introduction to Managerial Accounting. Fall, Spring . The anal y si s o f cost beha vi or and the role of account ing in the planning and c o ntrol of bus iness enterprises , with emphasi s o n management decision-making uses of account ing information . Note : Finance majors must take this course and accounting major s may not take this course to satisfy degree requirement s. Prer. , ACCT. 2000. ACCT. 3220.3. Intermediate Financial Accounting I. Fall, Spring, Summer . Intensive a nal ys i s of generall y accepted account ing principles, accounting theor y, and preparation of an nual financial statement s f or public corporations . Prer. , ACCT . 2000 and junior standing. ACCT. 3230. Intermediate Financial Accounting II. Fall, Spring , Summer . Continu a tion of ACCT. 3220. Prer. , ACCT . 3220.

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ACCT. 3310-3 . Jl1anagerial Cost Accounting . Fall, Spring , Summer. Measu(ement and reporting of manufacturing and service costs . Identifies and analyzes the role of production costs in income determination . Includes computer process ing of cost data. on-major s may take either ACCf. 2020 or 3310. Prer. , Acqr. 2000 and ISMG . 2000. ACCT. 3320-3. Cost Accounting . Fall , Sp:U:g , Summer . Cost artalysis for purposes of control and deCISIOn making . Analysis of cost behavior , role of accounting in plan ning and control, and managerial uses of cost accounting data. Include s use of computer assisted decision models . Prer . , ACCf. 3310 and QUAN. 2010. ACCT. 4240-3. Advanced Financial Accounting. Fall, Spring. Advanced finandial accounting concepts and practice with emphasis on accpu ntin g for partnerships, business combi nations, and consolidations. Prer., ACCf. 3220. ACCT. 4250-3. Fir ancial Accounting Issues and Cases. In depth analysis of ! contemporary accounting issues and prob lems, th e develOf1 ent of accounting thought and principles , and cri t ical revie of generally accep ted accounting princi ples. Prer., ACq. 3230. ACCT. 4330-3. Managerial Accounting Problems and Cas es. Spring . Critiaal analysis of advanced topics in managerial accounting . Considerable use of cases and current readings . Prer., ACCf. 3320. ACCT. 4410 -3. Income Tax Accounting. Fall, Spring , Sum mer. Provisions and procedures of federal income tax laws and requirements affecting individuals and business organi zations, includin the management problems of tax plan ning and compli4nce. Prer., ACCf. 2020 or 3310. ACCT. 4420 3 . Ad v anced Income Tax Account i ng. Fall, Spring . Con t in u ation of ACCf. 4410, with special emphasis on the income tax probl d ms of partnerships and corporations. Prer., ACCf. 4410. ACCT. 4540 -3. Accounting Systems and Data Processing. Fall. T h e design nd analysis of accou ntin g information sys tems, automated data processing methods with special em phasis on computers and computer programming, and the role of accounting in the management process . Prer. , ACCf. 3310 and 6 semester hours of accounting. ACCT. 4620-3 . Auditing . Fall, Spring , Summer. Generally accep ted auditin g standards and the philosophy supporting them; auditing available to the independent pub lic accountant. Pertinent publications of the AICP A reviewed.Prer., ACCf. 3230. ACCT. 4800 -3. for Government and Nonprofit Organizations . Sfring. Planning and control of government and nonprofit organizations. Includes program budgets; re sponsibility accounting, and fun accounting . Prer., ACCf. 2020 or 3310 . ACCT. 4840-variable credit . In dependent S t udy. ACCT. 4950-3 . Special Topics in Accounting. Research meth ods and results , special topics , and profes sio nal develop ments in accounbng. Prerequisites vary according to topic and instruct or re ( irements . UNDERGRADUATE COURSES-BUSINESS LAW BLAW. 3000-3. Business Law. Fall, Spring , Summer. Pro vides an understanding of basic areas of law impor tant to business managers and consumers. Topics include litiga tion, torts , contracts, and sales with overviews of consumer law , and legal aspects of banking transactions. Prer ., junior standing . Undergraduate Business I 127 BLAW. 4120-3. f.dvanced Business Law . Fall, Spring . Addi tional legal topics of importance to busine ss, including agency partnerships , corporations, bankruptcy, secured transac tions, real and personal property , and securities regulation. Strongly recommended for acco unting majors . Prer. , BLAW. 3000 . UNDERGRADUATE COURSESFINANCE FNCE. 3300 -3. Basic Finance. Fall, Spring , Summer. In cludes a study of the monetary system and other institu tions comprising the money and capital markets; study of the financial manager's role in business ; the investment of capital in assets; and financing the asset requirements of busi ness firms. Prer., ECO . 2012 and 2022; ACCf. 2000; junior standing . FNCE. 4310-3 . Business Finance I. Fall, Spring. Basic princi ples and practices governing financial manage ment of capi tal in the business firm constitute the core of this course. Determinants of capital requirements, methods of obtaining capi tal , problems of internal financial management, and meth ods of financial analysis. Financing the business corporation given primary emphasis. Prer., FNCE. 3300 and ACCf. 2020. FNCE. 4320-3. Business Finance II. Fall, Spring. De velops anal y tical and decision-making skills of s tudents in relation to problems that confronts financial management. Areas in clude planning , control, and financing of current operations and longer term capital commitments; management of in come; evaluation of capital investments; and expansion . Case method of instruction. Prer., FNCE. 4310. FNCE. 4330 3 . Investment and Portfolio Management. Fall, Spring. Discusses investment problems and policies and the methodology for implementing them . Includes portfolio anal ysis, selection of investment media , and measurement of performance . Prer. , FNCE . 4310. FNCE. 4340 -3. Security Analysis . Fall. Analysis of the finan cial condition of the firm, val uation of debt and equity secu rities, and the selection of investment media for portfolios . Prer., F CE. 4310. FNCE. 4350 -3. Financial Markets and Institutions. Fall. This course focuses on the suppl y and demand for loanable funds, t h e process of mpney creation , the str uctur e of interest rates, and the role of the central bank. Special attentio n is devoted to the impact of monetary and fiscal policies on interest rates , the flow of funds, and economic activity. Prer., F CE. 4310. FNCE. 4360 -3. Bank Management. Spring . An analysis of structure, markets, regulations , and chartering commercial banks. Problems and policies of the internal management of funds , loan practices and proced ures, investment behavior , deposit and capital adequa cy, liquidity, and solvency. Ana lytical methodology for these problems is developed. Prer ., FNCE . 4310. FNCE. 4370-3 . International F in ancial Management. Spring . A study of financial management in the international envi ronment that considers international capital movements. Prob lems of international operations as they affect the financial functions. Reviews foreign and international institutions and the foreign exchange proce ss. Consideys financial require ments, problems, sources , and policies of firms doing busi ness internationally . Prer. , F CE. 3300. FNCE. 4840-variable credit. Independent Study. FNCE. 4950-3. Special Topics in Finance. Research methods and results , special topics , and professional development in finance . Prerequisites vary according to topic and instructor requirement s.

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128 I College of Business and Adminis trati on UNDERGRADUATE COURSES INFORMATION SYSTEMS ISMG. 2000-3. Business Information Systems and the Com puter. FaJJ, Spring, Summer. A study of business informa tion systems focu sing upon computer hardware and software as they relate to bu siness information. Includes compu ter programming, computer sys tem s, and computer applica tions . The purpose of the course is to introduce the students to the concepts, vocabulary, and function of business infor mation systems and the compu ter. Prer., MATH. 1070 and 1080 or 6 hours of nonremedial college mathematics. ISMG. 2200-3. Business Programming: Structured I COBOL. Fall, Spring, Summer. An introductory course in tended to provide the student with a thorough programming foundation in COBOL using structured programming con cepts and techniques . The basic elements of the language are discussed and demonstrated through applications in a business environment. Prer., ISMG. 2000 or consent of in structor. ISMG. 2210-3. Business Programming II: Files and Data Struc tures. Fall, Spring. This course is a continua tion of ISMG. 2200. The studen t is introduced to advanced topics in COBOL and their application in business . Special emphasi s is placed upon alternative physical data and file str u ctures, their implementation in COBOL, and their use in a business setting. The use of system software and utilities will be in tegrated with the topics . Case studies may be used to illus trate applications of the material. Prer. , ISMG. 2200 or consent of instructor ; QUAN. 2010 is recommended . ISMG. 3300-3. Operations Research for Decision Support. Fall. Objectives and models of operations research and their application in a managerial se tting. Includes topics such as inventory models and control, simulation, linear program ming topics, network models. Prer., QUAN . 2010. ISMG. 3500-3. Logical Data Structures and Database Man agement Systems. Spring . This course is an introduction to database management systems, on-line query, and manage ment control systems. It is concerned with database struc ture and design and the integration of the logical view of the data with its physical storage. Extensi ve use may be make of a commercial DBMS in student projects to develop an appre ciation of the use and organizational issues as well as the technical considerations . Prer., ISMG. 2210. ISMG. 4650-3. System Analysis. Fall. This course introduces the student to basic system analysis tools and the proce dures for conducting a system analysis . Topics to be covered may include sys tem requirements, the initial analysis, the general feasibility study, structured analysis, detailed anal ysis, logical design , and general system proposal. The stu dent will gain practical experience through projects and/or case studies. Prer ., ISMG. 2210 or consent of instructor. ISMG. 4660-3. Systems Design . Spring. This course is a con tinuation of ISMG. 4650 and discuss topics such as struc tured design ; physical system design ; detailed feasibility analysis ; specification of input-output methods and formats; design of files, programs, and procedures; system testing ; imple mentation procedures; and system life cycle management. The student will implement these concepts through case stud ies and/or projects . Pr er., ISMG. 4650. or consent of instructor. Students learn about leading edge management theory from Professor fohn Ruhnka , w hose research has been published in journals such as the Harvard Business Review . ISMG. 4700-3. Computer and Information Technology. FaJJ. This cpurse provides the IS student with a conceptual foun dation in the areas of co mputer architecture, operating sys tems, programming translators, and telecommunications. It is intended to serve as a facilitating course to allow the IS student to more readily communicate with other technical members of the data processing community. Prer., ISMG. 2210 or consen t of instructor. ISMG. 4840-variable credit. Independent Study. ISMG. 4950-3. Special Topics in Information Systems. Re search methods are results, special topics and professional developments in information systems. Prerequisites vary ac cording to topics. UNDERGRADUATE COURSESMANAGEMENT MGMT. 1000-3. Introduction to Business. Fall, Spring, Sum mer. Nature of busine ss enterprise. Role of business in our society; problems confronting business management. Ca reer opportunities in business . Business students are ad vised to take thi s course during their freshman year, but may not take it in the junior or senior years. Open only to freshmen, so phomore s, non-degree students, and music ma jors at all levels.

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MGMT. 3300 -3. and Organization Behavior . Fan , Sp rin g , su+er. Emphasizes the application of b ehav iora l science knowledge t o understanding people and orga nizations . Motivation, authority , politics, and the role of groups in contem porary organizations are some of the topics cov ere d. Student s a e urged to complete PSY. 1002 and SOC. 1001 befor e takin this course . Prer., junior s tanding . MGMT. 3350 -3. Managing Work Groups . Fan, Spring . Ex amines what makes s mall groups effective in organizations. Develops the ability to anal yze interpersonal and group be havior, and improve group functioning . Builds interper so nal and small g r oup leader ship skills . Prer. , MGMT. 3300. MGMT. 4110-3 . and Society . Fan, Spring, Sum mer. An exarrm:ptio n of interrelationships between busi ness, society, environment. Topics will include perspectives on the socioeconqmic-business system, current publi c polic y issues, and social responsibilities and ethic s. Prer., ECON. 2012 and 2022. Compl etion of PSC. 1101 and the sociology requirement is re o mmende d before takin g this course. Open to senior business s tudent s only. MGMT. 4340-3. Labor and Employee Relations. Fan, Spring . Analysis of legal , political, social, and manageria l aspects of collec t ive bargaining and employee relation s. Prer. , MGMT . 3300. MGMT. 4350-3. Canflict and Change in Organizations. Spring . This course is t o help s tudent s understand com mon types of conflict within organiza tion s and the stra t egies u seful for resolvirlg conflict. Techniq u es for managing chan ge also a re s t ressed. Prer. , MGMT . 3300. MGMT. 4370-3 . Organization Design. Fan. Examines ho w to s tructu re orgahiia tion s to perform effectively . Emphasis is placed on the role of the task, te chnology, and environ ment as constr ts o n organization design . Prer . , MGMT. 3300. MGMT. 4380-3 . Human Resources Management : Employ ment. Fan, Study of the development and implemen tation of personn 1 sys tem s for recruiting, selecting, plac ing, de ve lop ing, and val uatin g human reso u rces . Prer., QU AN . 2010 and MGMT J 3300. MGMT. 4390-3 . 11uman Resources Management : Legal and Social Issues. Fan. Stu d y of legal issues related to equal em ployment opportunity, occupational safety and health, and compensation , Jith emphasis on program implemen t ation and evaluation. Reviews l egal questions, guidelines and pro cedures, and reg}ulator y agencies. H is recommended that stu dent s take MGMT . 4340 and 4380 befo re this course. Prer., MGMT. 3300 . I MGMT. 4400-3 . lrternational Management . Spring. Exam ines the internati;nal busin ess environment as it affec t s com pany polici es an procedures . Integrates all the function s undertaken in int rna tional operations through in-depth anal ysis and case studies. Prer., any two of the following: ECO . 4410 , FNCE . 4370, MKTG. 4900, TRMG. 4580. 1 MGMT. 4410-3 . Resources Management: Compen sation Spring . Study of planning and ad ministration of compe nsation sys t ems, including government , union, and labor arket influences o n p ay ; development of pay sys tem s and em plo yee benefits for non-managerial, man agerial, and ove seas employees . Prer. , QUAN. 2010 and MGMT. 4380. MGMT. 4500 -3. Business Policy and Strategic Manage ment . Fan , Spring , S umm er . Emp h asis is on integrat in g the economic, market, social/political, technological , and com petition components of the external environment with the internal characteristics of the firm ; and deriving through anal ysis the approprikte interaction between the firm and its en-Undergraduate Business I 129 vironment to facilitate accomplishment of the firm's objecti v es. Open only to bus ine ss stu dents in their graduation semes ter. Pr er., comple t ion of all business core courses. MGMT. 4840-variable credit . Independent Study. MGMT. 4950-3. Topics in Management . A number of differ ent current topics in management will be offered under this course number . Consult the Schedule of Classes or th e area coordinator for eac h semester's topics. UNDERGRADUATE COURSES MARKETING Note: MKTG. 3000 or an equivalent course in basic marketing is a prereq uisite for all marketing courses . MKTG. 3000-3. Principles of Marketing. Fan, Spring , Sum mer. Provides a marketing management approach t o the con sideration of product planning, pricing, promotion , and distribution of goods and services. Emphasizes the role of the consumer and the social responsibility of marketing . Prer., ACCT . 2000 and junior standing . MKTG. 3100-3. Marketing Research. Fan, Spring, Summer . Provides practical experience in research methodologies, plan ning an investiga t io n , designing a que stionnaire, se l ecting a sample , interpreting results, and making a report. Tech niques focus on product ana l ysis , moti vatio n re search, cost analysis, and advertising effectivene ss . Prer. , MKTG. 3000, QUAN . 2010. MKTG. 3200-3. Buyer Behavior. Fan, Spring , Summer . Fo c u ses on improving students ' understanding of consumer and organizational buying behavior as a basi s for bett er for mulation and implementation of marketing stra tegy. Blends concepts from the beh avioral scie nce s with empirical evi dence and introd uces buyer behavior research techniques . Prer . , MKTG. 3000 . MKTG . 4000-3. Advertis i ng. Fan, Spring . Analyzes princi p l es and practices in advertising from a managerial view po int. Considers th e reasons to advertise, product and market analysis as the p l anning phase of the adver ti sing program, media selection, creation and production of advertisements, copy testing , and development of advertising budgets. Prer. , MKTG. 3000. MKTG . 4100-3 . Physical Distribution Management. Fall . In vestigation and analysis of logis tic s of distrib ution systems for firms engage d in ma nufacturing and marketing . C ompo nent parts of eac h system are studied and analytical tools are presented for se lect ing alterna tive s whic h will attain dis tribution goals of the firm. Prer . , MKTG. 3000 . MKTG . 4200-3. International Marketing . Fan. S tudie s man agerial marketing policie s and practices of firms marketing their products in foreign coun tries . Ana lytical s urv ey of in sti tution s, functions, policies, and pract ices in in ternat ional marketing . Relates marketing activities to market structure and environment. Prer., MKTG. 3000 . MKTG. 4400-3. Marketing Institutions and Retailing. Fan. Emphasis placed on functions and strategies of all aspects of retail management, including site selection, merchandising, pricing, promoti b n , and inventory control. Also s tudie s whole sa ling and activities . Prer. , MKFG. 3000. MKTG . 4500-3. Advertising Management and Public Rela tions. Offered every 18 months. Focuses on adver tisin g is sues from an agerl.cy point of view. Considers issues of stimulating primary and dem and, media selection, developing the advertising program or campaign, establishing bu dgets, evaluating res ults, and managing agency relations. Public relations issues incorporated in the campaign include effec tive publicity techni ques , lobbying, and stockho ld er and com munity relations. Prer ., MKTG. 4000.

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130 I C o ll ege of Business a n d Adminis t ration MKTG . 4600 -3. Business Marketing . Considers the prob of goods and services to organization s buy mg for t h err own u se or for inco r poration in an end product. Focu ses heavily on organizational buying behavior and anal ysis of demand for goods and services in both profit and no t -for-profit organizations . Emp h asizes development of mar ke t ing programs in t he contex t of organizational demand for goods a n d services. Prer ., MKTG. 3000. MKTG. 4700-3. Personal Selling and Sales Force Manage ment. Spring. I ntr oduces stude n ts to princip l es of personal selling and iss u es in managi n g th e sales force. Focuses on mo d e ls of perso nal selling, recruiting, se l ection, training, c_ompen sation , s u pervision, and moti va tion , organizing the field sales force , sales analysis, forecasting , and budgeting . Prer., MKTG. 3200. MKTG. 4800-3 . Marketing Strategies and Policies. Fall, Spring . on the process of for m ulating and implementin g marke tm g channe l s and produc t analysis. A case approach is u tilized to dev el op the stu d e nt' s analytica l ability to inte gra t e all major areas of marke t i n g . Prer. , MKTG. 3000 and six a ddit ional ho u rs in marke ting. MKTG. 4840-variable credit . Independent Study . MKTG. 4950-3. Special Topics in Marketi ng. Cour ses of fere d on an irregular basis for t he purpose of presenting new s ub ject matter in marketing. Prerequisites will va r y de pen din g upon the particular topic and consent of the instructor. UNDERGRADUATE COURSES OPERATION MANAGEMENT OPMG . 3000 3 . Operations Management. Fall, Spring , Sum An introd u ction to t h e d esign and anal ysis of operat mg sys tems in manufacturing, services, and public sector Topics include facility layo u t and location, job work standards, q u ality and prod u c t ivity, in v entor y p l anrung and control, sim ulat ion, waiti n g line analysis, and linear programming . Prer., ACCT . 2000, QUAN . 2010. It is important to take thi s course in the junior year. OPMG . 4400-3. Planning and Control Systems. Spring. Study of the design, im plementa t io n , and contro l of integrated op erations , sc heduling , and in ve n tory planning and control systems. Topics include de mand forecasting, aggregate plan ning, capacity planning, mas t er scheduling, inventory man agement, material requirements planning, stockle ss systems, and operations control. Organization s s tu died include man ufacturing , service, and p ubli c sector . Prer. , OPMG . 3000. OPMG. 4440 -3. Quality and Productivity. Spring. Study of the _ various techniques to m easure quality and productivity in organizations and the prac t ical management issue s re lated to implementing quality and produc t ivity sys tems . Top ics include sta t is t ical quality cont rol, to tal factor productivity, quality circles, to tal quality control, work de sign and mea s urement , and q u ality and productivity management sys tems . Prer. , OPMG. 3000 and MGMT . 3300.

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OPMG. 4470 3 . Strategic A n a lysis i n O p e r a tions Manage ment . Fall. Stud y of the analysis and formulation of opera tions managemen t strategy an d policy. Emphasis will be on the ro l e of the operations functio n in th e strategic processes of the organizatior.. Deci sion making will be stresse d thr ough the use of case s tudies and the analysis of actual business situa t ions . Prer., OPMG . 4400 and 4440. OPMG. 4600 3 . rurchasing, Materials M ana gement , and Negotiat i on. Fall. Study of the Purchasing function in man ufacturing , service, and public organizations . Topics in clude source se lection , make-buy anal ysis , material qu ality s tandard s and specifi cati ons , val u e analysis , nego tiati ons, and legal aspects. Prer. , OP MG. 3000. OPMG. credit . Independen t S tudy . OPMG. 4950-3 . Topics in Operations Management . A number of dif erent cu rrent topics in operations manage ment will be disrussed in the course. Consult the Schedule of Classes or co tact t he area coordinator for further infor mation. UNDERGRADJ.ATE CO U RSES -QUANTITATIVE METHODS QUAN . 2010 -3. Business S t at istics. Fall, Spring , Summer. Statistical in business. Includes descriptive sta tistic, tim e analysis, index numbers, probability and sa mpling distributions, s t atistica l inference , simp le re gres sion, and decisior analysis without sampling . Prer. , MATH. 1070 and 1080 ar}d ISMG . 2000. Students are encouraged to take QUA N . 20 . o in the seme s ter following comple tion of ISMG. 2000. QUAN. 3000-3. t ntermed iate Statistics. Intermediate treat ment of regression and forecasting m odels in busi nes s and research , I al quality control in manufacturing, sam pling and analys of variance, parametric and non parametric statis t ical infere ces, deci sion analys i s with sampling. Prer. , QUAN . 2010. COURSES TRANSPORT A TION AND DISTRIBUTION MANA G E M ENT TRMG. 4500 3 . if ransporta tion Operat ion and Manage ment . Fall, Spririg. Economics of tr ansportation service and rates . Hi s t ory and patterns of regulation . Explanatio n of var ious forms in u se in freight and passenger tran s porta t ion . to t ariffs and th eir use. Service and managem ent problems of industrial t raffic managers . Prer ., ECON. 2012 and 2022 or consent of instructor . TRMG. 4520-3. Problems in Surface Transportation Man agement Ana l ysis of s urface mod es wi th emphasis on the motor crurier indu stry. Topics include carrier opera tions, re gulatorYj str uctur e , pricing , market structure , de sign of services, rpu tes and terminals, equipment , and pri vate fleets. Ca se analiYses and field s tudi es will b e u se d to de velop deci sion-rrl aking skills . Prer. , TRMG. 4500 or consent of ins t ructor . I TRMG. 4560-3. Transport a tion . Spring. Particular refer ence to operat i n cos t s and methods, p assenge r and car go ra t es, air routes, sc hedule s , safety, regulation , and airport management. Prer. , senior s tanding . TRMG. 45 70. 3 . Urban Transporta ti on. Fall. Analysis of the two aspects of urban tran sportatio n freight and pe ople . Issue s in policy, mode s, governmental actions an d struc ture , investment and costs , and effect upon urban e n viron ment. Pr er., senior st anding. Undergraduate Business I 131 TRMG. 4580-3. I nte rnational Tran s portation. Fall. Anal ys i s of intern ational transportation (primarily sea and air) in w o rld economy. Detailed stud y of cargo docUI1lentation and freight rate patterns . Included are liability patterns , l ogistic s, eco nomic s, and national policies of tr ansportation. Prer., senior standing. Like m a n y s tudent s , Mindy Felcman wor k s full time while earni n g an M . B . A. at CU-Denver. S h e i s a credit anal yst for Citicorp 's corporate banking division . GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS (M. B . A J M .S.) Director: Prof . Rex 0 . Bennett Assist an t Director: Irene R. Matthews Coo rdinat or: Patricia Hocke tt Stud en t A dvisor : P e t e Wo lfe P r o gram Specialist: Sharon Moritz The Graduate School of Busines s Adminis t ration of fers programs leadin g to the Master of Business Ad mini s t ration (M.B.A.), and the Master of Science (M. S . ) in specific fields of business and health administra tion . In a ddit ion, the Mas ter of Business Administra tion for Execu t ives (Executive M.B . A.) is offered as a multicamp u s program of the Graduate School of Bu si ness Administration , and the Executive Program in Heal t h Admiristration (Executivfi M.S.H.A.) is of fered throughj the Executive Programs. The M.B . A ., the Executive M . B .A., and th e M . S . degree s in business are accredi ted b y the American Assembl y of Collegiate Schoo l s of Business (AACSB) . The M.S. in Health Administration is accredited b y the Accrediting Commi s sion on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA ).

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132 I College of Bu siness and Administration Requirements for the Admission to the M.B.A. and M.S. Programs Admission to the graduate program in business ad ministration (M.B.A . and M.S.) is granted only to stu dents showing high promise of success in graduate busines s study. Admission is based on the following indicators of the candidate's likelihood to succeed in the program . Academic Record. The bachelor ' s degree must be from a regionally accredited university. The total aca demic record is considered, including the grade-point average, the course of study, and the quality of the program. Testing. The candidate's performance on the Grad uate management Admission Test (GMAT). While other tests may be submitted, the GMAT is strongly recommended since it is probably the best indicator of high promise of success in graduate schools of business. The GMAT test is given four times each year at nu merous centers through the world. For information and to make application for the test, write to: Gradu ate management Admission Test , Educational Testing Service, CN 6103, Princeton, New Jersey, 08541. The code number for CU-Denver's graduate business pro gram is 4819. Work Experience. A record of appropriate employ ment at increasing levels of responsibility is consid ered a positive indicator of the likelihood of successful completion of graduate work. Seniors in this University who have satisfied the un dergraduate residence requirements, and who need no more than 6 semester hours overall to meet require ments for a bachelor's degree, may be admitted to the Graduate School of Business Administration by spe cial permission of the Director of Graduate Programs. They must meet regular admission criteria and submit complete applications by deadlines listed below. Background Requirements . Students applying for grad uate programs in business do not need to have taken their undergraduate degrees in business. The M . B .A. program is specifically designed so that the required courses cover the material needed for completion of the degree. There are no prerequisites needed to enter the M.B.A. program. Students with non-business back grounds have completed the program successfully . It is expected, however , that students have minimum level of basic personal computer proficiency as well as a good working knowledge of basic algebra . Should you feel inadequate in either area, please contact the Grad uate School of Bu siness Administration for informa tion . Applicants for the M.S. degree , however , may be required to take prerequisite courses, depending on the individual's academic and professional back ground. For more detailed information contact the grad uate student advisor . THE ADMISSION PROCESS To be considered for admission, applicants for grad uate programs other than health administration and the Executive M.B.A. must: 1. Submit a completed application along with the nonrefundable application fee of $40 ($30 for M.S. ap plicants) prior to the application deadlines: April 1 for Summer Term admission. Jul y 1 for Fall Semester admission. November 1 for Spring Semester admission. Early applications are recommended; early applica tions can receive earl y priority in registration and class enrollment. Applicat i ons received after the se dates will not be considered for admission in that term or semes ter. 2. Have GMAT scores forwarded to the College by the Educational Testing Service . The code for CU Denver's graduate business program is 4819. 3. Have two official transcripts (not student copies) sent from each college attended to the address below. Personal interviews are not required . Students applying to the Cohort M.B.A. program may be required to submit an additional nonrefundable deposit after the y have been accepted into the gradu ate program . This deposit serves to request consider ation for admission into the accelerated program and is applied against regular tuition fees at the time of registration. The mailing address for applications is: Graduate Admissions Graduate School of Business Administration University of Colorado at Denver 1200 Larimer Street, Campus Box 165 Den ver, CO 80204-5300 Applicants for the Executive M.B.A. and M.S. in Health Administration programs should consult the relevant sections for application information . Academic Policies for Graduate Students Advising. Prospective graduate students are encour aged to discuss admissions and program require ments with an advisor . In addition, as soon as possible after admission, students should schedule an appoint ment with a graduate advisor to discuss general de gree requirements. Master of Science students should consult with the advisor to determine any background course work that may be required. All M .S. students need to file a formal degree plan during their first term in residence . All M . B .A. students must file a formal degree plan as soon as electives are considered. These plans, with appropriate signatures, will be filed with the Graduate School of Busine ss Administration.

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Course Load,. The normal course load for full-time graduate is 9-15 semester hours . However, because many students also are pursuing a career, it is possible to attend classes on a part-time basis at times convenient to the individual's work schedule. Gradu ate courses are offered primarily in the evening hours to accommoda e the working student. Transfer of Credi t . A maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate worf. can be transferred from another AACSB accredited master's program. Time . B.A. students must complete the cur riculum wit five years from the data of first enroll ment in the pro am . Courses older than 5 years generally will not be accepted for the degree without permission of the of Graduate Programs. M . S . students must finish beyond the common body of knowl edge courses 5 years with reasonable continuity. Students w o have not been enrolled for three con secu t ive must reapply for admission to the program. Readlnitted students may be required to com p l ete t heir degree requiremen t s according to require ments in effect at the date of their readmission. Comprehensive Examinations. A comprehensive ex amination is not required for students pursuing the M . B .A. degre J . A comprehensive examination is re quired of pursing some M.S . degrees; the M.S . advisor should!. be contacted regarding this require ment. Student must be registered for the semester in which the co prehensive examination is taken, nor mally the last semester of attendance. Graduation. / Students must file an application for Admission to and a Diploma Card with the Graduate School of Business Administration no later than the first r eek of the semester in which they in tend to graduate. Minimum d r ade-Point Average . A cumu lative grade-pomt average of 3 . 0 must be achieved and maintained in courses taken for a graduate business degree . All grAduate courses taken to meet the degree requirements, I except transfer hours or those taken as a non-degree student, and business courses taken since admission to the program are included in the grade poin t average. / lf the student's cumulative grade-point average falls below 3.0, the student will be placed on academic and normally given two semes ters of in which to achieve the required 3.0 cumulative average. Failure to achieve the required av erage within the allotted time period will result in sus pension . Any grade elow a C-(1. 7) is a failing grade for graduate Graduate students must repeat a course for which they have received a grade below a C-(1.7) . Both / the original grade and the grade for the repea ted course count in the computation of the grade poin t average. To earn a grade of W (withdrawal without credit) in a course , a student must be earning a grade of C or better in the course. Students will not be permitted to withdraw from courses after the tenth week of the se mester without the approval of the dean. Graduate Business I 133 Admissi on t o G raduate B usiness Cours e s Admission to graduate level courses is reserved for students admitted to the CU-Denver graduate pro gram in business. Graduate students from other Uni versity of Colorado schools or colleges and non-degree students may be permitted to attend only with written permission of the Director of Graduate Programs and on a space available basis . Courses approved to be taken by a non-degree student will not count toward an even tual degree should the student app,ly. 6000-level courses are reserved e x clusively for grad uate students. 5000-le vel courses ma y be offered simul taneously with 6000-level courses. Students should check with an advisor to confirm acceptability of 5000-level courses prior to registering . MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINIS TRA T I ON (M. B . A .) The Master of Busine s s Administration (M.B.A.) pro gram provides the student a general background in management and administration that enables the student to have the breadth of exposure and depth of knowledge required for an advanced level in a management career . The program is devoted to develop ing the concepts, analytical tools, and communications skills required for competent and responsible admin istration of an enterprise viewed in its entirety, within its social , political , and economic environment. The M.B .A. program is available in three differed configurations: the INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. pro gram , the COHORT M . B .A. program and the EXECUTIVE M.B.A. program. The INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. and the COHORT M.B.A. both have the same curriculum requirements; they differ onl y in the flexibility of course scheduling and the time required to complete the program. The INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. allows the schedul ing of classes with maximum flexibility so students can progress through the program at their own pace by taking as little as one class per semester , or as many as five classes per semester, at times that are convenien t to their work schedule. The program can be com pleted in as little as 16 months , as long as 5 years. The COHORT M.B .A. enables the student to com plete the program in 3 y ears and one semester, taking 2 courses fall and spring semester and one in the sum mer term. Each group of entering students moves through the core courses as a cohort, taking prescribed core courses two nights per week, thus sharing their edu cational and professional experience . Electives are taken as available to meet individual objectives . For working professionals who can meet the hme requirements of the COHORT program, it provide s a unique and re warding educational e x perience.

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134 I Graduate School of Business Administration Candidates in both the individualized and the CO HORT M . B.A. programs must complete specific re quirements consisting of 16 courses (48 semester hours) as follows: Core R e quirements Seme s ter Hours BUSN. 6000 . Accounting for Manager s ... ...... ...... ....... . 3 BUSN. 6020. Quantitati v e Business Anal y sis .. . . . ... . .... ... 3 BUSN . 6040. Human Beha v ior in Organizations ... ...... . . 3 BUSN. 6060 . Marketing Management .... . . . . . ... ...... . . ..... 3 BUSN . 6080 . Management of Operations . ............... . ... . 3 BUSN . 6100 . Management Information S y stems ..... .... . . 3 BUSN . 6120 . Managerial Economic s ... ............. . ..... ...... 3 BUSN . 6140 . Financial Management ...... . . . ........... ... ... . 3 BUSN . 6160. Legal and Ethical Environment of Business ............... . ....... .... .... . ... .... . ....... ....... . ..... . . 3 BUSN . 6180 . Economic Environment of Business . . ..... ... 3 BUSN . 6200 . Business Polic y and Strategic Management ............... .... . . ..... ............. ... .. .... . . ..... :._]_ Total Required Core Semester Hours 33 Electives: One graduate course from each of three of the five following areas : ...... . ....... ........... . . ..... ....... . . . .......... ... .... . . . .... . . Accounting , Finance, Information S y stems/Operations Management, Marketing, or Management .. ..... ..... .... 9 Free electives . .... . . . . .............. ... . ............... .... ...... .... ... 6 Total Electi v e Semester Hour s . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . .. .. .. .. .. . . . 15 Total Required Seme s ter Hours for M.B.A. degree 48 Notes and Restrictions Core. Depending on demonstration of a strong background in one area, a maximum of one course may be waived in the core, although the 48 hour requirement is not reduced. An additional elective will then be sub stituted. A maximum of 6 hours may be transferred from another AACSB accredited graduate school , re ducing the number of hours required. Electives . No more than nine hours of elective grad uate courses may be taken for credit in any one disci pline or area of emphasis . Students may elect not to take any emphasis. Three hours maximum may be taken outside the Graduate Schoo l of Business Administra tion, but only with prior writ ten approva l of the Di rector of Graduate Programs. Subject to the above distribution requirements, stu dents have a wide range of options availab le in select ing the 15 hours of electives. No area of emphasis is required for the M.B.A. degree, permitting students to choose a combination of courses appropriate for their individual career needs . If a student wishes to pursue an area of emphasis , severa l are available including accounting , finance , information sys tems/ operations management, management, and market ing. Areas of emphasis all require 9 semester hours of electives (5000 or 6000 level) in additio n to the area core courses . No thesis is required for the M.B.A. pro gram. For additional information about the M.B .A. pro gram contact a graduate student advisor at 623-4436. MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAMS Master of Science degrees (M.S.) are offered in the fields of accounting, accounting and information sys tems, information systems, finance, health administra tion, marketing, and management. The M.S. degree affords the opportunity for special ization and depth of training within a particular major field and, where allowed or required, a minor field. The specializa tion and expertise developed with the M.S. program prepares the student for more special ized s taf f positions in industr y, the non-profi t sector, and government. The course requirements for the M.S . degree in each of the fields are divided into two components com mon background and gra duate core requirements. The common background requires at least 21 semester hours of business courses to develop general breadth and competence in the fields of business administration. These requirements may differ among degree pro grams. The common background requirements may be satisfied by equivalent graduate level work, or through undergraduate course work as approved by the advi sor . Generally, an undergraduate degree in business administration from an AACSB accredited university will meet those requirements. The graduate core re quires at least 30 semester hours of graduate level courses as prescribed by the differen t major programs. Of the 30 hours, a minimum of 18 hours must be at the 6000 level. MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING Advisor: Prof. Michael Firth Telephone: 628-1220 The Master of Science in Accounting is a flexible program that provides the student with a thorough understanding of both financial and managerial ac counting. The combination of required and elective courses allows the student to design a course of study with the advisor's approval, leading to a s ucce ssful career in either public accounting, governmental or non profit accoun ting , or management accounting. The M.S. in accounting requires the completion of components A, B , and Cas shown below: A. Common Background Course Work Courses Required Semester Hours ACCT . 2000. Financial Accounting ......... ......... .... ...... . 3 BUSN . 6020. Quantitative Business Analysis ...... ....... ... 3 BUSN. 6060. Marketing Management . . . . ...... . . .... . ........ 3 BLAW. 3000. Business Law .... . .... ....... . ....... .. .... . .... .... 3 BUSN. 6040. Human Behavior in Organizations . . .. .... ... 3 BUSN . 6140. Financial Management .................. ....... .. 3 BUSN . 6120. Managerial Economics . . ........ .................. 3 Total Semester Hours 21

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It may be pos b ible t o satisfy these requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work with the approval of the advisor. It is recomm nded that students should have a min imal competem:y in mathematics and computer soft ware applicatiops . Possible courses at CU-Denver are ISMG. 2000 , CSC. 1100 , CSC. 1410, and MATH. 1070 , 1080. The required course s in Parts B and C (belo w) will also help meet t hese objectives. Self -study or re view (workshofs) also ma y be used to attain minimal competency lel els. B . Account i ng Courses Background Courses Require ! Semester Hour s ACCT. 3220 and 3230. Intermediate Finan cial Accounting, I and II ... oo oo oooo oo .... oo .. oo ....... . . ... . . 6 ACCT. 3310 an 3320. Managerial and Intermediate Cost Accounting . 00 ••• 00 ••••• 00 •••••••• • •••• • 00 ••••••• 00 00 •••• 00..... . .... 6 C. Graduate C
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136 I Graduate School of Busine ss Administration All M.S. students in finance must pass a compre hensive examination in finance during the last semes ter of their program . M.S. students may choose to complete a thesis that is original research as approved b y a committee of faculty member s appointed by the M.S . advisor . Up to 6 semester hours of credit of independent study could be earned from thesis work. MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION Advisor: Prof . James D . Suver Telephone: 628-1242 The goal of the Master of Science in Health Admin istration (M. S . H.A.) degree is to prepare men and women who, after appropriate practical experience in respon sible managerial positions, are capable of assuming po sitions as chief executive officers or senior administrators in complex, multi-service health care organizations or in organizations' purchasing and health services . The curriculum is a synthesis of management con cepts and techniques that are applicable to any eco nomic organization and tools that can be specifically applied to health and health services systems. The pro gram emphasizes skills which heighten basic analytic and decision-making processes used by top level man agers in selecting broad strategies for the institutions and by junior managers in administering sub-units of health care organizations. The faculty guide the stu dents in their mastery of theoretical , conceptual, and quantitative topics. The M.S.H.A. program has enjoyed continuous ac creditation by the Accrediting Commission of Educa tion for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA) since 1970. The typical course of study is 57 semester hours of graduate level course work. For students entering with out an undergraduate degree in business from an AACSB accredited program. The curriculum is based on a se ries of structured learning sequences with M.B.A. courses comprising the majority of the first full year, supple mented by several core health administration courses. Students with prior course work in business may pe tition to waive required business core courses . The second academic year provides the student with advanced training in health administration. Within the 57 semester hours, the student must choose 9 semes ter hours of elective courses. Required Business Core Courses Semester Hours BUSN . 6000. Accounting for Managers ... . . ....... ... . ..... . . 3 BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business Analysis . . .... ... ... . ... 3 BUSN. 6040. Human Behavior in Organizations ....... .... 3 BUSN . 6060. Marketing Management ....... ... ............... 3 BUSN. 6080. Management of Operation s ..................... 3 BUSN. 6100. Management Information Systems ........... 3 BUSN. 6120. Managerial Economics .. .......................... 3 BUSN . 6140. Financial Management .... .......... ............. 3 Required M . S . H.A. Core Courses BUSN. 6020. Business Policy and Strategic Planning .. ... 3 HLTH . 6010. Medical Care Organization ..................... 3 HLTH . 6015. General S ys tems Theor y ........................ 3 HLTH. 6020. Health Economics ............................... .. 3 HL TH. 6026. Institutional Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 HLTH . 6030. Health Sciences ............ ..... .... ................ 3 HLTH . 6040. Management Accounting for Health Care Organizations . . . .. . . . . . .. .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. . . . . .. . . . . . . .. .. .. 3 HLTH . 6050. Legal and E thical Problems in Health Care Administration ....... ........... ....... ........................... 3 Electives ... . . ........... ..... ....... .... ........... .............. ... .... :...2. Total Semester Hours 57 Electives . Elective courses are available in the fields of accounting, finance, marketing, management, or ganizational development, health policy and plan ning , and community health. In addition, elective courses are available that focus on practice settings suc h as hospital administration, ambulatory care administra tion, or long-term care administration. Management Residency. A management residency is optional, but recommended for all students , espe cially those with limited health care experience. The faculty of the program provide assistance to students in securing the residency, as well as regular consulta tion during the residency period. Information on the full range of local, regional, and national residencies is available in the program office. Comprehensive Examinations. Each candidate must pass a compre hensi ve examination. Length of Program . The didactic portion of the de gree will take at least two academic years since H .A. courses are offered only once each year and many re quire prerequisites . Parttime study is facilitated b y many courses being scheduled for late afternoon or evening hours. Admissions Process Requirements for Admission. Selection of students is a multi-step process . When making application to the program for the M . S.H.A., candidates should send their applications to: Graduate School of Business Administration University of Colorado at Denver 1200 Larimer Street, Campus Box 165 Denver , CO 80204-5300 CREDENTIALS OR REQUIREMENTS 1. Completed Application for Graduate Admission Parts I and II. 2 . Four letters of recommendation from profes sional or academic acquaintances who are familiar with the applicant's academidprofessional competence. 3. Satisfactory test score Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) preferred . When registering for the GMAT; use code #4819 (Denver, MBA) to have score report sent to the University of Colorado at Den ver Graduate School of Business Administration.

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4 . $30 application fee . 5. Two (2) official transcripts from each college or university attended, sent directly to the address above, n ot through a student. Minimum baccalaurea t e de gree required. 6 . A well forrrulated career plan articulated in a brief essay, and sunr-marizing the applicant's reason(s) for seeking the deqree. 7. Experience in the field of health services admin is tr ation (preferred but not absolutely necessary). Admission the M.S.H . A . degree program is on a c ompetitive bafis . Therefore, these admission cri t eria represent minimum entrance qualifications expected of all students. ! D eadlines. PUl credentials should be submi tted at th e l a t est b y July 1 for Fall Semester, November 1 for S p ri n g Semester, and April 1 for Summer Term . Ap plica t ions will reviewed in the order they are re ceive d. Early application increases the probability of accep t ance . For further information, brochures, and application ma t erials the Graduate Program in Heal th Ad minist r ation , :-:"'laduate School of B usiness Administra tion , University of Colorado at Denver, 1200 Larimer S t ree t , Campus Box 165, Denver, CO 80204-5300, (303) 628-1245. Health Scholarships/Loans Fina n cial assistance is available for new and con t inu ing s tu dents directly from the Graduate Program in Health Admiristration. Each year the following sch olarships/loans may be awarded: E u genie Sontag Award Scholarship/Residency Healthcare Fmancial Management Assn. continuing s tudent scholarship Fos t er G . Scholarship Loan Fund F o ster G . M Gaw Scholarship Federation o American Hospitals' Foundation C ol orado H f alth Administration alumni Associati on Fund U .S. Dept. ofHealthandHumanServicesTraineeships I n a ddition, tudents are eligible to apply for finan cial ai d directlY! from the University of Colorado Finan cial Aid Office Call 556-2886. MASTER SCIENCE IN INFORMATION SYST E MS Advisor : Prof. Peter G. Bry ant Telepho ne: 628-1297 The Master of Science degree in informa t ion sys t ems (M.S. in I.S.) prepares students for management ro l es in the information systems field and for such care e rs as systems analysts , software engineers, data Graduate Business I 137 b ase administra t ors, and da t a processing ma n agers . T h e curriculum emphasizes t he application of comput e r technology within the b u siness context. The M . S . in l.S. requires the s tudent to complete the common background courses and the gra d uate core d escribed below . A. Common Background Course Work Courses Required Semester Hours BUSN . 6000. Accounting for Managers .............. ...... ... 3 BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business Analysis ............ .... 3 BUSN. 6040. Human Behavior in Organizations .... ....... 3 BUSN . 6060. Marketing Management ......................... 3 BUSN. 6120. Managerial Economics ............ ........ ........ 3 BUSN. 6140. Financial Management .......... ............ .. ... 3 BUSN. 6160. Legal and Ethical Environment of Business . . .. . . .. . . .. . . . . . . .. .. .. . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . 3 Total Semester Hours 21 All students entering the M . S . in Information Sys tems program should possess computer lite r acy at least eq ui valent t o tha t attained by t aking ISMG. 2000, CSC. 1100, or esc. 1410. I t may be possible to sa t isfy the com m o n back gro und requirements with ot h er gradua t e or under graduate course work, with the approval of t h e advisor . B. G raduate Core in I nformation Systems Thirty semester hours of approved graduate work ar e required . Eac h student's plan of study is devel oped by the student and the faculty advisor, consider ing the student's interests and background. The 30 semester ho u rs may be taken entirely in informatio n systems and closely rela ted areas or may be divided between information sys t ems (21 hours) and a mi n or field (9 ho u rs). At leas t 7 courses (21 hours) must b e t aken in information systems. Courses available for the infor mation systems major include: BUSN. 6100 Management Information Systems1 ISMG . 6020. Busi n ess Programming and Data S truc t u res1 ISMG . 6060. Sys t ems Anal y sis1 ISMG. 6080. Data B ase Management Systems1 ISMG. 6100. Computer Technology1 ISMG. 6120. Data Communication ISMG. 6140. Systems Design ISMG. 6160. Support Systems/Expert Systems ISMG. 6180. Information Systems Policy ISMG. 6800. Special Topics ISMG. 6840. Independent Study ISMG. 6950. Master's Thesis (All are 3 semes t er hours except ISMG. 6840, which is variable credit.) A req u ire d course may b e waived based on an I.S . faculty signature, but must be re placed with an information sys t ems course . Minor fields may be chosen from a variety of business a n d non business areal), in consultation with the stu d e n t's ad vis or. A maxim u m off 6 semes t er hours of a p proved graduate work at other institutions may be included in the 30 semester hours. For business-related courses, 1 R equired c our s es

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138 I Graduate School of Busines s Administration the program m u s t be accredited by the AACSB. Can didates for the M.S. degree must pass a comprehen sive examination over their entire information systems program during the last semester of study. MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT Advisor: Prof. John C. Ruhnka Telephone: 628-1212 T he objective of the Mas ter of Science in Management program is to prepare individuals wi th prior work experience for s ign ificant managerial responsibilities in private and public sector organizations. The pro gram provides students wit h a basic understanding of how to manage interpersonal dynamics, effective l y de sign organizations, implement planned c h ange, and develop and maintain the human resources necessary for effective perf orm ance. It also provides students wit h the opportunity to l earn abou t specific managerial prob lems and issues, such as how do yo u tum around poorly performing organizations , implemen t new tech nologies, e tc . The degree is particularly appropriate for students having an undergraduate degree in a func tional area of business , suc h as accounting, finance, information sys tem s, or in a t echnical area, such as engineering or computer scie n ce . The Master of Science in Management consists of two components: th e common ba ckground and the spe cialized courses that constitute the gradua t e core . A. Common Background Course Work Students in the M.S. in management program can satisfy the common background requirements by tak ing the following courses: Semes t er Hours BUSN . 6000. Accounting for Managers .... .... ............... 3 B USN . 6020. Quantitati ve Busine ss Analysis ................ 3 BUSN. 6060. Marketing Management .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 3 BUSN. 6100. Management Information Systems .... ....... 3 B USN. 6120. Managerial Economics ............................ 3 B USN. 6140. Financial Management ......................... .. 3 B USN . 6160. Legal and Ethica l Environment in Business . . .. . . . . .. .. . . . . .. . . . . . . .. .. .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . .. . . . . .. . . . . 3 To tal Semester Hours 21 It may be possible to satisfy the common background requirements by other graduate or undergrad uate course work, with the approval of the advisor .

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B. Graduate Core in Management The management core will consist of 30 semester hours (10 comses) be yond the common background requirements. At lea st 7 of the courses must be 6000-level courses . A minimum semester hours must be chosen from regularly scheduled management courses (excluding independent study) . The remaining 9 semester hours (3 courses) ma y be in manageme tor in related fields, as approved by the student's M.S. advisor in management. A student can elect to include a single minor field with at least 9 semester hours approved by a minor field advisor, but a minor is nofrequired. The 21-hour management requirement is met by the following req ements and options: Required Cours rs Semester Hours BUSN. 6040. Human Beh avior in Organizations ........... 3 MGMT. 6320. drganizational Development ...... ..... ...... 3 MGMT. 6360. De signing Effective Org anizations . ......... 3 MGMT. 6810. Human Resources Management ... . ......... 3 MGMT. 6800. Special Topics ....... ........ ... . ................... 9 C. Management Electives Choos e at least 9 hour s of course work from the selections offe ,ed under the course designation MGMT . 6800, Special Tqpics in Management. Usually, two MGMT. 6800 sections will be offered each semester. Consult with the management area coordinator for the year's special fferings. Students substitute a 6000-level management course for BUSN . if the y have taken an equivalent upper division orgaryzational behavior course within the last five years from an AACSB accredited university. In that case, stu?ents must complete 21 hours of management courEs. The 9 hour nor, if a student should choose to com plete a minor, may be taken in another functional area of busine ss, s ch as marketing, finance, of informa tion systems r in another related discipline, such as psychology , or public administration. Other fields or combmations of courses can be approved based on a student'S needs and career objectives . Student s ar not required to take a compre hen sive examination or complete a thesis in the major field. MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MARKETING Advisor: Prof Lawrence F. Cunningham Telephone: 628-1222 The objecti { e of the Master of Science in Marketing is to prep are individuals with prior work experience for significant management responsibilities in the field of mark eting, either in the private or the public sector . The degr ee is particularl y appropriate for individuals who ha ve an undergraduate degree in business. Graduate Business I 139 The degree consists of two components: the common body of knowledge and the specialized courses that constitute the core of the M.S. in marketing . A. Common Body of Knowledge Students in the program must satisfy the AACSB Common Body of Knowledge requirements . These are met by the following courses: Courses Required Semester Hours BUSN. 6000. Accounting for Managers ....................... 3 BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business Aljtalysis . . ....... . ...... 3 BUSN. 6040. Human Behavior in Organizations ........... 3 BUSN. 6100. Management Information Systems ........... 3 BUSN. 6140. Financial Management .. ......................... 3 BUSN. 6160. Legal and Ethical Environment of Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 3 BUSN. 6180. The Economic Environment of Business .... 3 Total Semester Hours 21 It may be possible to satisfy these requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work. Con tact the graduate student advisor for information . B. Graduate Core in Marketing The M . S . in Marketing requires 30 semester hours beyond the Common Body of Knowledge. Twen ty-one (21) semester hours must be in marketing at the 6000 level. The remaining 9 semester hours may be in marketing or in related fields as approved by the student's advisor. A student may elect to take these 9 semester hours in a single minor field. However , a minor is not required. (Note: a minimum of 18 of the required 30 semester hours must be taken in courses reserved ex clusively for graduate studen ts.) The 21 semes ter hour marketing requirement is met by the following requirements and electives: Required Courses 9 hours1 BUSN. 6060. Marketing Management MKTG. 6010. Marketing Strategy, Evaluation , and Development MKTG. 6050. Marketing Research Marketing Electives -12 hours MKTG. 6020. lntemational Marketing MKTG. 6030. Sales and Sales Force Management MKTG. 6040. Services Marketing MKTG. 6060. Buyer Behavior MKTG. 6070. Advertising and Promotion Management MKTG. 6080. Marketing Function, Organization and Strategy in Deregul ating Industries MKTG. 6090. Transportation and Physical Di stribution Systems in the Modem Economy PSY. 6710. QJantitative Methods II MKTG. 6800. Special Topics in Marketing The 9 hour minor, should a student choose to com plete one, may be taken in another functional area of 1 Other courses may be required for students who have taken sim ilar courses as undergradu ates .

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140 I Graduate School of Busines s Administration business such as management, finance, or informa tion systems . A l ternatively, it may be taken in a re lated discipline such as international affairs, economics, social psychology, or public administration. Other field s or combinations of courses can be approved, based on the student's needs and career objectives. Students are not required to take a comprehe n sive examination or to complete a the sis. EXECUTIVE PROGRAMS MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION FOR EXECUTIVES Administrative Director: Denni s Becker Telephone: 623-1888 The Executive M.B.A. Program is a multi-campus program of the Graduate School of Business Adminis tration . It provides executive-level students with a broad , rigorous two-year academic experience leading t o the Master of Business Administration degree. The pro gram is designed for persons who hold managerial po sitions in the private and public sectors. It builds upon the knowledge and experience of these executives with a sophisticated, challenging curriculum which ca n be pursued simultaneously with a management career. The Executive M . B.A. Program emphasizes corpo rate p lanning, the business/government interface, and the applied tools of management. Courses are taught through a variety of methods . Case studies, lectures, and computer simulation are combined with research projects and other teaching methods to provide stu dents with tools useful in their present positions and applicable to more advanced responsibili t ies as they progress in their management careers. The Executive Program comprises four semesters over a twenty-two month time period . It begins the last week of August and runs through mid-June for two years. Classes meet for a full day, once a week, on alternating Fridays and Saturdays, making it possib l e for those who live outside the Den ver area to partici pate. Two courses are taken simultaneous l y throughout the program . The program is supplemente d by inten sive in-residence orientation at the beginning, and a two-day retreat at the conclusion . Faculty and Resources The faculty for the program are members of regu lar faculty of the Graduate School of Business Adminis tration from all three of the University's campuses Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Denver. They are se lected to conduct these courses because their back grounds enable them to make th e strongest contribution to the program . Many of the faculty members arenationally recognized, and all possess both practical man agerial experience and a demonstrated a bili ty to work effectively with executive level student s. Admission Requirements The Executive M.B.A. Program is designed for men and women who have ten years of business or admin istrative experience , including at least three years in a managerial position. They should be part of senior man agement in a small organization or senior or middle management in a larger one, hold at least a baccalau reate degree, and have the ability to do graduate work. In the selection process, significant attention will be given to the depth and breadth of the candidate ' s man agerial experience, progression in job responsibility, total work experience, and ability to benefit from this integrative classroom/work environment. The Admis sio n s Committee will base its decision on the applica tion, former academic record, relevant test scores, the employer's nominating letter, other letters of recom mendation , and if deemed desirable, personal inter views with the committee. For further information, contact the Program Direc tor , Executive M.B.A. Program, Graduate School of Busine ss Administration, University of Colorado, 1200 Larimer St., Campus Box 149, Denver, CO 80204, (303) 623-1888. EXECUTIVE PROGRAM IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION Administrative Director: Dennis M. Becker Telephone: 623-1888 Program Sponsors The Executive Program in Health Administration is a cooperative program of the University of Colorado at Denver and the Western Network for Education in Health Administration. The University of Colorado at Denver serves as the degree-granting institution for the Executive Program. The University of Colorado's Graduate Program in Health Administration is located in the Graduate School of Business Administration. The Western Network for Education in Health Ad ministration is a regional educational consortium rep resenting health care executives and academic faculty fro m major health adminis t ration graduate programs in the western United Sta t es, including the University of California at Berkeley , University of California at Los Angeles, San Diego State University, University of Washington, Arizona State University, and Univer sity of British Columbia . Distinctive Features of the Executive Program in Health Admin istrat ion 1 . D rawing on the exper t ise represented by the fac ulties of a consortium of western universities, the program offers the highest quality course conte nt and instructors that typically are not available from a single universi ty.

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2. The ExeClftive Program facili tates learning for pro fessionals who have continuing career and family re sponsibilities. The program is especially tailored for working individuals, allowing students to remain on their jobs while completing their educational pro gram. 3. The program employs innovation in the technology of educa t ional delivery. Learning methods in clude: • Computer-assisted instruction and self-paced learn ing package s. • Compu r conferencing and electronic case analyses . • On-campus sessions. F.or Applic , tion and Additiona l Information: J Executive P ogram in Health Administration Graduat e S hool of Business Administration University + f Color ado at Denver 1200 Larimdr Street, Campus Box 149 DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS MBAIBA This progr m enables qualified students to earn a bachelor's degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS), and a Master of Business Adminis tration from the Graduate School of Business Admin istration in five r,ears. The program combines undergraduate general education with the graduate business curricu lum. Bach elor's aandidates may major in any CLAS field (English, political science , biology, or fine arts are ex amples), and they must fulfill all the requirements for CLAS. During the senior year, the student '1 taking graduate level courses in the M.B.A. program; thes courses count as electives in the bachelor's program. For further information about this program and the admission requirements, contact the College of Liberal Arts and Scie ' ces Advising Office, 556-2555. ' MBA/MA T Industrial and Organizational Psychology This propdped program will enable the student to earn two degrees an M .B.A. from the Graduate School of Busine ss Atlministration and a Master of Arts (M.A.) in psycholo gy from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Contact the program director , Department of Psychologf, 556-2965 , for information. MBAIMS Nursing Administration The goal of the dual degree program (M.B .A./M.S. Nursing Administration) is to prepare nurses who are capable of assuming senior level and CEO health administration positions in government, consulting, traditional health care organizations, and alternative Graduate Business I 141 delivery systems. The 66 credit curriculum is a synthe sis of advanced manag ement, health administration, and nursing content. For information contact the program director in nurs ing administration, 394-8136. MBAIMS The Graduate School of Business Administration is currently considering proposals to create dual degree (MBAIMS) programs for each function of business. Con tact the graduate advisor for details . GRADUATE COURSES M.B.A Core or M.S. Common Background Courses The following graduate courses are open only to ad mitted graduate degree students. BUSINESS BUSN. 6000-3. Accounting for Managers. Fall, Spring, Sum mer. Thi s course focuses on the use of accounting informa tion in managerial decision making . Primary emphasis for the first half of the course will be on interpretation of finan cial statements, understanding accounting conventions and principles underlying the preparation of the s tatements , and current controversies regarding accepted account ing principles . The remainder of the course will stress man agerial uses of accounting techniques such as budgeting, cost, volume, profit models, and performance measure ment. BUSN. 6020-3. Quantitative Business Analysis. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course will provide the student with basic quantitative analysis tools and technique s necessar y for the analysis of business related problems. Topics covered in clude statistics, probability , samplin& regression, inference testing , and additional topics s uch as correlation, contin gency tables , non-parametric techniques , and time series anal ysis. BUSN. 6040-3. Human Behavior in Organizations. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course focuses on apfllications of behavioral science concepts to the management of organizations. This course emphasizes analysis and understanding of human behavior in organizations, and using the results of such anal yses to select appropriate strategies managing. The course includes topics such as motivation, leadership, power and conflict , group dynamic s, technology, orga nizational de sign, and other facto rs affecting human performance . Spe cial emphasis is placed on concepts used by managers in all functional areas of organization, such as accounting, pro duction , finance, marketing , and engineering. BUSN. 6060-3. Marketing Management. Fall, Spring, Sum mer. The course has two major objectives for the students: (1) understanding basic marketing concepts involving buyer behavior , product planning, pricing, channels for distribu tion and promotion, and (2) developing marketing decision making capabilities based on stra tegic management and analytical skills. The overall objective is to integrate all the functional aspects of marketing with other functional areas of the firm and with the environment , particularly consumption mar kets, competition, the economy, legal and regulatory envi ronment, and social evolution . Prer. , BUSN. 6000.

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142 I Gradu ate School of Business Administra tion BUSN. 6080-3. Management of Operations. Fall, Spring, Summer. This co ur se will study the tools and techniques of the management of the operatio ns functions in business or ganizations. Topics covered will include reso urce manage ment, linear programming, decision trees , scheduling and control systems, quality assurance techniques, productivity measurement , simulation, and the international elements of the operations function . Sig nificant at tention will be de voted to the study of the application of these tools to service and institutional organizations. Prer ., BUSN. 6020. BUSN. 61()()-3. Management Information Systems. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course provides a n introduction to informa tion sys tem s from a manageria l perspective . Topics include basic computer co ncept s such as hardware , software, data file design, structured compu ter languages, systems analy sis and design, and decision su pport sys tems . Managerial , organizational and decision-making implicatio n s are stressed. BUSN. 6120-3. Managerial Economics. Fall, Spring , Sum mer. This course has two objec tives. A primary objective is to expose the student to the usefulne ss of microeconomic theory at the firm level. Throug h economic analysis, output demand and cos t characteristics can be evaluated thereby allowing for produc t ion and marketing decisions consistent with overall firm goals. Topics include cost and price theory and estimation, forecasting, production theory , and pricing practices. The course is also designed to aid s tud ents' un derstanding of the business manager's role in light of orga nizational and societal objectives. Thus, we will consider the managerial implications of st ructure , regulatio n , antitrust policy, etc. Prer . , BUSN. 6000 and 6020. BUSN. 6140-3 . Fina ncia l Management. Fall, Spring , Sum mer. The purpose of this course is to introduce th e student to the tools and techniques for makin g a firm's investment and financing decisions. These tools and techniques inclu d e the mathematics of interest , risk analysis, financial theory of valuation, capital budgeting , cost of capital, and financial analysis . The emphasis is on developing an a nal ytic frame work for financial deci sion making . The class utilizes cur rent literature , text, and cases. Prer . , BUSN. 6000, 6020, and 6120. BUSN 6160-3 . Legal and Ethical Environment of Business. Fall, Spring , Summer. This course focuses o n public , admin istrative, and regula tor y law ; and on the relation of business to the legal structure and ethical val ue syste ms which deter mine the parameters of business deci sions . Topics include litigation , domestic and multinational trade regulation, the allocation of liability for products and environmen t al inju ries , consumer and employee pro t ection, regulation of cap ital markets, and business torts. BUSN. 6180-3. Economic Environment of Business. Fall, Spring, Summer. The objective of this course is to provide the s tu dent with an understandin g of how economic policy affects and is affected by the national and international economic environment of business . As s uch, it focuses on the interac tion of business and government as it relates to broader so cietal objectives . Measures of aggregate eco nomi c activity are introduced as a basis for discussion of monetary and fiscal policy . Concerns over eco nomic growth, employmen t , prices, and interest rates are see n as motivations for stabili zation and industrial policy . Market power, eco nomi c exter nalitie s , and other market failures are s tudied as motivations for antitrust policy and regulation of industry entr y condi tions, product pricing, and production methods . Prer., BUSN. 6120. BUSN 6200-3. Business Policy and Strategic Management. Fall, Spring , Summer. The goa l of this co ur se is to develop a general management perspective on issues of manage ment of the tot al enterprise. An important objective is the integra tion of knowledge acquired across functional area cour ses. Objecti ves of the course incl ude the introd uction of s trategic concepts, analytical tools, and methodology. The primar y focus is t o provide the student with both s trate gy formula tion and implementation skills. Pr er. , BUSN. 6000, 6020, 6040, 6060, 6080, 6100, 6120, 6140, 6160, and 6180. M.B.A. Electives/M.S. Courses ACCOUNTING ACCT . 5240-3 . Advanced Financial Accounting. Fall, Spring, Summer. Advanced financia l accounting concepts and prac tice with emphasis on accoun tin g for partnerships , business combinations, and con s olidations . Prer., ACCT. 3220 or 6030 . ACCT. 5330-3. Advanced Managerial Accounting. Spring. Critical analysis of advanced topic s in managerial account ing. Prer . , ACCT . 3320 or 6070, or equivalent. ACCT . 5540 -3. Account ing Systems and Data Processing. Fall. The design and analysis of accounting information sys tems, automated data processing methods with s pecial em phasi s on computers and comp ute r programming, and the role of accounting in the management process. Prer. , ACCT. 3320 or 6070. ACCT. 5620-3 . Auditing . Fall, Spring. Generally accepted au diting s tandards and the philosophy suppor tin g them; au diting techniques available to the independent public accountant. Pertinent publication s of the AICPA reviewed. Prer . , ACCT . 3230 or 6030. ACCT. 5800-3. Account ing for Government and Non-profit Organizat i ons. Spring . Planning and contro l of government and non-profit organizations . Includ es program budge t s, re sponsibility accounting, and fund accounting. Prer . , ACCT. 2020 or 3310 or BUSN . 6000. ACCT. 6030-3. Financial Accounting Issues and cases. Spring. Accelerated ana l ysis of contem pora ry accoun ting iss ues and problems, the development of accounting thought and prin ciples, and critical review of generally accepted accounting principles. Not recommended for candida tes planning to sit for the CPA examination. Prer . , ACCT . 2000 or BUSN . 6000. ACCT. 6070-3. Management Accounting. Fall, Spring. This course is designed to provide M.B.A . students with a foun dation in management accou ntin g models and informatio n , wi th emphasis on management de cisionmaking uses of ac counting information. Not recommended for candidates plan ning to sit for the CPA examination. Prer., BUSN . 6000 or equivalent. St udent s who have taken ACCT. 3310 or 3320 or their equivalent may not take thi s course . ACCT. 6140-3 . Tax Planning for Managers. Spring. A fed eral tax s ur vey course with an emphasis on tax planning for the M.B.A . studen t who wants t o understand the impact of taxation on individual and business transactions. Course ma t erials emphasize the applica tion of individual, partnership, and corporate tax principles to the decision-making process. Students who have taken ACCT . 4410 may not take thi s course. Prer., BUSN. 6000. ACCT. 6250-3. Seminar: Accounting Theory. Fall. Nature and origin of accounting theory and the development of pos tulates , principles, and practices. Methodology appropriate to development and evaluation of accounting theory , with special emphasis on accepted research standards and proce dures . Prer., ACCT. 3230 or 6030.

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ACCT. 6260-3 . Seminar: Managerial Accounting. Spring Summer. This course focuses upon the conceptual foundations of managerial accounting . Behavioral and quantitative ap proaches regarding information for decision making, plan ning, control, performance evaluation, and other issues will be investigated Prer., ACCT. 3320 or 6070 or e qui va l ent. ACCT. 6270-3. s r minar : Income Determination. Critical anal ysis of problems and theory of m easurement and r eporting of periodic net income of business organizatio ns. Net in come models , research efforts , and role of professional accounting organizations. Current issues and problems given special attention. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for semester offerings. Prer. , ACCT . 6250. ACCT. 6290-3 . Management Control Systems. Fall. This course focuses on the design and use of control systems which en sure that people in organizations behave consistent with the goals of the organization . Controls for communica t ion, mo tivat i on , and performance evaluation along wi th informatio n a l requirenients will be stressed throug h a n alysis of cases and class oo m d iscussion. Prer ., BUSN. 6000 or equiv a l ent. ACCT. 6350-3. Current Issues in Professional Accounting . In-depth analysis of current issues in the accounting profes sion, including ethics, development, and validity of standards and regulations. Prer ., ACCT. 6030 or consent of instructor . ACCT . 6410-3 . Advanced Tax for Individuals. Spring. An advanced federal individual income tax course stressing the methodology Ufed in tax research and in tax planning . In cludes use of specialized tax software to address compliance with planningi' ssues by solving complex case type real life situ a t ions . Pre ., ACCT. 4410. ACCT. 6420-3 . J dvanced Tax for Businesses. Summer , Fall. An advanced tederal tax course s t ressing researc h and tax p l anning issue of corporate and partnership entities. Indudes use of specialized tax software to address compliance and planning issues by solving complex case type real life situations . Consult the current Schedule of Classes for se mester offerings. Prer., ACCT. 4420. ACCT . 6450 3. Research Problems in Income Tax Account ing. Fall. A study of the methodo l ogy used in tax research and in tax together wit h a study of so m e aspects of tax administration and tax prac t ice, and of so m e aspects of t h e current law an d proposals for its revision. C o n s u lt the c u rre n t Sched Je of Classes for se m ester offe r ings. Prer., ACCT. 4410 or 6410; or 6420 or con sent of instruc tor. ACCT. 6620-3. Advanced Auditing Theory. Summer . Devel opment of aucllting as a profession, including evolution of standards and I audit reports. Historical and contemporary literature in the field reviewed . Prer., ACCT . 4620 or 5620. ACCT. 6800 3 . Special Topics in Accounting . Research meth ods and result , special topics, and professional d evelop men t s in acco1ting. Prerequisites vary according to topics and instructor requirements. Cons u lt the curren t Schedule of Classes for ' emes t er offerings. ACCT. 6840 variable credit. Independent Study. ACCT. 6950 val-iable credit . Master's Thesis . FINANCE FNCE. 5340-3. Security Analysis. Analysis of the financial condi t ion of the firm, valuation of debt and equity securi ties, and the selection of investment media for portfolios . Prer., BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 5360 3. Bank Management. Spring . An analysis of structure , markets, regulation , and chartering commercial banks. Problems and policies of the internal management of funds, loan prijctices and procedures, investment behavior, G raduate B us ine ss I 143 deposit and capi t a l adequacy, liquidity, and so l ve n cy. Ana lytical methodology for these problems is deve l op e d. Prer., BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 5400-3. International Financia l Management. Spring. A study of financial management in the international con text that conside r s internationa l capital movements and for e i gn exchange probl ems . Prob l e m s of internatio nal op e r atio n s as they affec t t he financial fu n c t ions. Reviews foreign an d in t ernational inst i tutions and t h e foreign exch a n g e process. Considers financial requirements, problems, sources, an d policies of firms doing business internationally . Prer., BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 5410 3. Real Estate Development. Me th o d s of ana lyzing real estate investment opportunities are s tu died. These methods include urban economic, market, and location ana l yses. Local government controls are studied from the developer's viewpoint. Managerial methods of controlling d evelopmen t also are studied. P rer., FNCE. 3400 or consent o f instructor. FNCE. 5420-3. Resident i al and Income Property Apprais ing. Princip l es and techniq u es of es t ima tin g the value o f land, residences, and income property are studie d . Princi ples and techniq u es are applied b y a field problem in ap praising . Prer ., FNCE. 3400 or consent of instruc t or. FNCE. 5430-3 . Real Estat e Investments. Emp h asizes prob lems and methodology for making the real estate investmen t decision. Includes real estate versus other investme nts; real estate user and investor requirements, decision models; local, state , and federal regulations; tax factors; and syndica tion . Prer ,. FNCE. 3400 and BUSN. 6140 or consent of instructor. FNCE. 5440-3. Real Estate Finance. Functio n s and practices of various real es t ate financing i n s t itutions. Em b races mort gage lending, se r vicing, a n d m ort gage banking r e l ative to all types of uses of real estate. Prer., FNCE . 3400 a n d BUSN . 6140 or consent of instructor . FNCE. 5450-3 . Legal Aspects of Real Estate Transactions . Business and legal aspects. Estates in land, purchase and sales contracts, conveyances, mortgage and trus t deed trans actions , property taxes, landlord and tenant, wills and in heritance. Prer ., FNCE. 3400 and B USN. 6140. FNCE. 5500-3. Risk Management and Insurance. Fundamental principles of insurance and their application to life, dis a b ility, property, a n d liability insurance . Provides the basic knowledge for in t elligent solu t ion of personal and b u siness ins u rance pro bl ems as well as for fuJi!her s p ecialized study of insurance. Prer . , B USN. 6140. FNCE. 6310-3. Decisions and Policies i n Financial Management. Fall, Spring. Emphasizes investmen t an d financing decisions , and the analysis of the financial condition of the firm. Specific topics include capital budgeting, cost of capi t al, financing mix and strategy, firm valuation, and manage ment of working capital. Prer., BUSN . 6140. FNCE. 6320-3. Seminar in Finance . Fall, Spring. This course will treat varying topics that are of special interest. Topics and emphasis could include subjec t s such as cap i t al budge t ing, capital structure theory, va l uation of firms, mergers, bankruptcy, financial modeling , op t ion valuation, e tc. Prer., B USN. 6140. FNCE. 6330-3 . Investment Management Analysis. Spring. The theory of investment management and security valua tion , and portfolio management, including the analysis o f investment risks and constraints on investment policies and objectives; the analysis and use of investment information; a n d the development and application of the tools for deter mining security va l ues. Prer., BUSN. 6140.

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144 I Graduate School of Business Administration FNCE. 6340-3. Security Analysis. Analysis of the financial condition of the firm, valuation of debt and equity securi ties, and the selection of investment media for portfolios . Prer., BUSN . 6140. FNCE. 6350-3 . The Financial System. Fall. This course ana lyzes the role of financial institutions and financial markets in allocating credit to the various sectors of the economy. The course covers the financial system ' s responsiveness to economic activity and changing regulatory conditions, the processes by which risk is assessed and priced, and the be havior of interest rates. Prer., BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 6360-3 . Management of Financial Institutions . Spring . An analysis of structure, markets, regulation, and charter ing commercial banks. Problems and policies of the internal management of funds, loan practices and procedures, in vestment behavior, deposit and capital adequacy, liquidity , and solvency . Analy tical methodology for these problems is developed. Prer., BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 6370-3. International Financial Management. Spring . A study of financial management in the international con text that considers international capital movements and for eign exchange problems. Problems of international operations as they affect the financial functions . Reviews foreign and international institutions and the foreign exchange process . Con siders financial requirements, problems, sources , and policies of firms doing business internationally. Prer., BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 6390-3 . Advanced Finance Seminar. Fall . This course is an advanced survey of the theory of finance and the em pirical research developed from the theory. The student will study the quantitative models that are the basis for theory, and the empirical methods that h ave been used to confirm or disprove the hypotheses presented by the theory. The material will be presented through lectures and will be sup plemented with student research, presentations, and recita tion. Prer., BUSN. 6140. FNCE. 6800-3. Special Topics in Finance. Experimental course offered irregularly for the purpose of prese nting new sub ject matter in finance. Prerequisites will vary, depending upon topics covered. Consult the current Schedule of Gasses for course offerings. FNCE. 6840-variable credit. Independent Study. With the consent of instructor under whose direction the study is un dertaken. FNCE. 6950-variable credit. Master's Thesis. HEALTH ADMINISTRAT ION HLTH. 6010-3. Medical Care Organization. Fall. An intro duction to the structure and function of the medical care delivery system . Includes basic concepts and measiues of health, disease , quality, values, needs, and utilization; is sues in health care manpower, institutions, and system or ganization; general issues in policy, reimbursement, and regulation; and broad community and organizational considerations in medical care organization. HLTH. 6015-3. General Systems Theory. Fall . G eneral sys tems theory is prese nted as a conceptual tool in health ad ministration . Hea lth is viewed as a subsystem of society, and interfaces among health and other social subsystems are analyzed. Broad social and cultural issues form a context for meaningful discussion of health planning and administra tion in the current and future decades . HL TH. 6020-3. Health Economics. Fall . An intensive analy sis of issues in health economics. Particular attention is given to "market failure" in health insurance and to alternative methods of containing health care cost s , including both reg ulatory and market approaches. Prer . , BUSN. 6120. HL TH. 6026-3 . Institutional Management. Spring. A colloquium designed to integrate major topics in the general manage ment curriculum into rele v ant health administration issues. Current policies, problem s, and issue s across the board spec trum of health service administration are cov ered . Prer., HLTH. 6010, 6015, 6020, 6030. HLTH. 6030-3. Health Sciences. Fall. This course introduces the student to principles o f epidemiology. The student will demonstrate the application of epidemiology anal y ses to the prediction off health care service needs of a population: to identify and integrate contemporar y service delivery issues such as access, quality of care, cost of care , program and system development , and evaluation . The course will assist the student in the devel opment of program planning and evaluation s kills . Prer. , HLTH . 6010 and BUSN. 6020. HLTH. 6040-3. Management Accounting for Health Care Organizations . Spring . Designed to build on the accounting concepts introduced in BUSN . 6000 and to develop profi ciency in the decision making proce s s or health care provid ers . Problems , cases , and computer software programs will be used to develop the practical application of management acco unt ing technique s s uch as cost/ v olume/profit and stan dard cost models, budgeting, and anal ys is of variance s . Prer . , BUSN. 6000, 6020 or con sent of instructor. HL TH. 6050-3. Legal and Ethical Problems in Health Care Administration. Spring. Designed to acquaint the student with legal issues experienced by the health administrator . Special emphasis is placed on issue s s uch as malpractice, informed consent , medical s taff appointments , directors' and administrators ' liability , medical records, and refusal of treat ment. The course should make the student aware of the mul titude of legal and ethical problems which confront the health administrator on a dail y basis . Prer . , HLTH. 6010. HLTH. 6630 -3. Management Control in Non-Profit Organi zations. This course is designed to develop a basic under standing of the management control process and the unique characteristics of non-profit organizations . Topic areas in dude budgeting, programming, operational control , and pric ing policies. Cases will be the primar y means to integrate didactic materials with practical applic a tions. Prer., HLTH. 6040 or equi v alent or con sent of in s tructor. HLTH. 6650-3. Advanced Topics in Health Care Financial Management. The primar y focus of this course will be an in-depth research report on a current problem in health care financial management. A health care simulation exercise will be utilized to integrate the financial management concepts introduced in the preceding accounting and finance cours e s . Prer . , HLTH. 6040 o r consent o f in s tructor. HL TH . 6720 -3. Ambulatory Care Administration.1 The health administration student is exposed to the rapidly de v eloping field of ambulatory care and HMO management. By exam ination of v arious ambulat o r y care and HMO settings, prob lems in the planning, implementation, administration, and evalua t ion of ambulator y care are de v eloped . Prer ., HLTH. 6010, or consent of in s tructor . 1 These course s are typicall y no t offered every y ear . Cons ult the current Schedule of Class e s for seme s ter offerings .

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HLTH. 6740 -3. 1 Multi-inst ituti onal Management.1 Multi institutional m agement is a developing trend in health administration . Students are exposed to both profit and non profit hospital, pursing home , etc., networks . Shared servic es, merg er, management contracts, hospital acquisitions, and sa tellite clinics are s tudied and discussed. Prer., HLTH. 6010 or consent of instructor. HLTH. 6760-3 . Health Systems I. 1lntrod uces the stu dent to th e history and e volut ion of rural health care in the United States. {\lso to be examined are past attempts to im prove rural hearth and the impact of past national programs affecting ruralfealth. The present status of rural h ealth in the U.S. will b exp lored. The course will end with a review of privat e, Joe I , s tate, and federal progr ams directed to war d solutions for rural health problems. Prer., consent of instructor . HL TH. 6780-3. Care Marketing. 1The application of marketing con q epts and techniques to health care deliver y . Disc us sion will focu s on the implications of a changing regulatory/com etitive environment for marketing health ser vices. The use f specific concepts and tools, and an under standing of the variety of marketing applications to the planning of health delivery systems . Prer., BUSN. 6060 or consent of instructor. HL TH. 6800-3 . Special Topics in Health Adm inistration. 1Research methods and results, special topics, and professio nal devel opments in health admini s tration. Offered irregularly. Pre requisites vary according to topics and instructor requirements. Consult the current Schedule of Classe s for semes ter offer ings. HLTH. 6840-variable credit . Independent Study. HL TH. 6950-va1 iable credit. Master's Thesis. INFORMATIOf'J SYSTEMS ISMG. 6020-3. Business Programming and Data System . Fall, Spring . J1n accelerated introductor y1 course on pro gramming business applications , with emphasis o n file pro cessing. Topics include the COBOL and PASCAL programming languages. ISMG. 6060-3 . Systems Analysis. Spring. This course em phasizes information systems analysis and the logical spec ification of the ! system. The life cycle concept is used as the ba sic for development , but there is a recognition of alternatives in this development process . Management, organization, t chnology, and economic perspectives are con sidered. Prer ., 6020 and BUSN. 6100 . ISMG. 6080 -3. Database Management Systems. Spring. The database course focuses on the analysis, de sign, and implementation of database systems to support today's business operations . Current database models and database acfm4tistration issues will be discussed in detail . Prer., ISMG. 6020. ISMG. 6100. Computer Technology. Fall. This course pro vides a concepfUal foundation in the areas of computer ar chitecture , ope ating system s, programming translators, and fourth-generation languages. Students will study various com puter architecnues ranging from microcomputers to mini computers to IJ',..ru;urame computers and operating systems s uch as Unix, r lYtS, DOS , and OSNS. Prer., ISMG. 6020. 1 These courses are typically not offered every year. Consult the current Schedule of Gasse s for semester offerings . Graduate Business I 145 ISMG. 6120-3 . Data Communications. Spring. Develop s skill and knowledse for communication system design, dealing with network protocols, wide-a rea network, local-area net work, and m:ragement implications . Course has a project orientation. Prer., ISMG. 6100. ISMG. 6140 -3. Systems Design. Fall. 'This course integrates the areas of computer technology, systems analysis, and sys tems design in de signing large-scale application or decision support systems. The course emphasizes modem tech niques for the measurement , specification, design, imple mentation , and testing of information systems. Prer. , ISMG. 6060. ISMG. 6160-3 . Decision Support Systems and Expert Sys tems. Fall. An introductory course in how to design an d construct decision support systems and expert sys tems. Knowl edge representation and decision-making techniq ues will be discus sed along with artificial intelligence languages such as Lisp and Prolog. Prer . , IS. 6080 . ISMG . 6180-3. Information Systems Policy. Summer . De signed for the understanding of the overall information needs of an organization and the role of the computer based infor mation systems. Topics considered are stra tegic planning of information systems, management of computer center and technical personnel, systems development management , the information systems exclusive, and social and legal issues. Prer. , BUSN. 6100, ISMG. 6020, 6060, and 6080. ISMG . 6800-3. Special Topics in Information Systems. A variety of advanced topics are offered in this course . Con sult the current Schedule of Classes or the area coordinator for current offerings . ISMG . 6840-variable credit. Independent Study. ISMG . 6950-variable credit. Master'S! Thesis. MANAGEMENT MGMT. 6320 -3. Organizational Development. Summer, Fall. Instruction in the analysis, diagnosis, and resol ution of prob lems in organizing people at work. Models of organizational change are examined. Group experiehces, analyses of cases and readings are stressed . Prer., BUSN . 6040. MGMT. 6360-3. Designing Effective Organizations . Spring, Summer. Examines how to design organizations within the context of environmental, technological, and task con straints. The emphasis is on learning how to recognize and correct structural problems through the analysis of existing organizations in which the students are involved. Prer., BUSN. 6040. MGMT. 6810 -3. Human Resources Management. Fall, Spring. This course focuses on the management of human resources in organized settings. It is oriented toward the practical ap pltcation of human resources management principles in the following areas: equal employment opportunity/affirmative action, human resources planning, r cruitment, managerial selection , compensation and benefits , labor relations, train ing, career management, performance appraisal, and occu pational health and safety. MGMT. 6800 -3 . Special Topics in Management. A number of different current topics in management will be offered each semester under this course number . The topics listed below were offered during the 1988-89 year. Some will be repeated during 1989-90 and new topics will be added. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for specific course offerings and times, or contact the area coordinator for further information .

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146 I Graduate School of Bus ine ss Administratio n Power and Politics in Organizations . Political processes are examined: how people in organizations get power, keep pow er, and use power. This course is designed to increase stude nt s' capacity to analyze, understand, and use power effective l y in organizations . Participation of class members is stressed . Turnaround Management. Examines how organizations get into and out of tro uble . Topics include : cau s es and strategies for reversing decline, improving d ecision making under cri sis conditions, avoiding catastrop hi c organizational and in terpersonal dynamics, and techniques for managing cuts in operations and personnel. Entrepreneurship and New Business Formation. This course examines characteristics of the s u ccessful entrepreneur, ex ploration of entrepreneurial opportunities within large orga nizations, training in th e motives of successful e ntr epreneurs, exploring the decision to go into bu siness for one's self, and the development of procedural systems for establishing a new business . Implementing New Technologies. The inability of Ameri can leaders to understand, predic t, and manage human re actions to new technology is a critical factor currently inhibiting economic success. C a u ses of and so lut ions for thi s condition are examined, applied, and generalized to the management of both individual and organizational change . Visionary Leadership . Leadership, not management, is crit ical to identifying and impleme ntin g the changes demanded by current competitive conditions . The challenges con fronted and approaches utilized by visionary leaders will be examined . Participan t s will app l y thi s material to their own careers by developing personal leadership plans. MGMT. 6940-variable credit . Independent Study. MGMT. 6950-variable credit. Master's Thesis. MARKETING MKTG. 6010-3. Marketing Strategy, Evaluation, and Devel opment. Fall, Spring, Summer. Focuses on marketing strat egy and marketing planning. Addresses the formulation and implementation of marketing plans within the context of the overall strategies and objectives of both profit and not-for profit organizations . There is heavy emphasis on group projects and presentations. Prer., BUSN. 6060. MKTG. 6020-3. International Marketing . Fall. Explores prob lems , practices, and s tr ategies involved in marketing goods and services internationally . Emp h asizes ana l ysis of uncon trollable environmen tal forces, including cu lture s, govern ments , legal systems, and economic conditions, as th ey affect international marke tin g planning. Prer ., BUSN. 6060. MKTG. 6030..3. Sales and Sales Force Management. Spring . Focuses on issues in personal selling and managing the field sales force. Deals with organization, sales analysis, forecast ing, budgeting, and operating, with particular emphasis on the selling task , recruiting, se lect io n , training , compensa tion , supervision, and motivation. Prer . , BUSN. 6060. MKTG. 6040-3. Services Marketing. Spring . This course will inform students of ba sic modifica tio ns to marketing con cepts as the U .S. economy changes in emphas is from phys ical products to services . It also will distinguish between function, organization, and str u cture in product versus ser vice oriented firms . Lastly, it will concentrate on identifying difficulties in developing marke tin g plans and strategies in the service environment . Cases and projects with busi nesses will be used to demonstrate these concepts. Prer . , BUSN. 6060. MKTG. 6050-3. Marketing Research. Fall, Spring . The ob jectives of this course relate to effective marke ting informa t ion management. Objectives i nclu de: (1) developing an understanding of the techniques and procedures that can be used to generate timely and relevant marke tin g informa tion ; (2) gaining experience in d eveloping and analyzing in formation that is decision orien ted ; and (3) gaining experience in making recommendations and decisions b ased on rele vant and timely i nf ormation. Computer analysis and projects are employed . Prer. , BUSN. 6060. MKTG. 6060-3. Buyer Behavior. Fall or Summer. Explores th eory and application of con sumer and industrial bu ying behavior . Internal deci s ion-making processes are examined including perception, motiva tion , informa t ion processing, and attitude information and change . E x ternal influences on buyers' decisions such as culture, fam il y, intra-and interorganizational influences, and marketing efforts also are inves t igated . Prer., BUSN. 6060. MKTG. 6070-3. Advertising and Promotion Management. Spring or Summer . Treats tactical planning and manage ment of mass marketing communications including adver ti s ing and sales promotion . The course focuses on advertising and promotion objectives , l ega l considera tions, segmenta tion and target m arketing , creative and media selection and sch ed u ling strateg i es , agency relations, advertising and pro motion research , t esting and evaluation, budgeting , and trial and purchase s timul ation through sales promotion tactics . The focus is on the managerial aspects of marketing com munications as opposed to the creative functio ns. Prer . , BUSN. 6060. MKTG. 6080..3. Marketing Function, Organization, and Strat egy in Deregulating Industries. Spring or Summer. This course will deal with the development of the marketing func tion and competition in a host of deregulating indus t ries including transportation, telecommunications, financial ser vices , and heal th care. The o bjecti ve of the course will be to de m o n strate to s tudent s how marketing functions evolve and change as indus tri es move from a regula tor y umbrella to a competitive environment. Students will have an opportunity to see how regulation impacts the marketing func t ion and strat egy , and how the marketing s tr ategy and function reacts to environments of limited or full competition. Prer. , BUSN. 6060. MKTG. 6090..3. Transportation and Physical Distribution Systems in the Modern Economy. Fall or S ummer . This course will deal with the nature of transportation and logistical sys tems in the curren t manufacturing and service oriented econ omy . It will basically teach stude nts the characteristics, economics, an d current co ncern s of tra n s port ation sys tem s, as well as the b asics of logistical syste m s as they operate in modem corporations today . It will seek to provide s tudent s wit h con cep t s regarding these issues, as well as practical group projects . Prer., BUSN. 6060. MKTG . 6800-variable credit. Special Topics in Marketing and Transportation. Courses offered irregular l y for the pur pose of presenting new subject matter in marketing and trans portation. Prer., B USN . 6060. MKTG. 6840-variable credit. Independent Study. MKTG. 6950-variable credit. Master's Thesis. OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT OPMG. 5400-3. Planning and Control Systems. Spring. Study of the design, implementation, and contro l of integrated op erations, scheduling , and inventory planning and control systems . Topics include demand forecasting, aggregate plan ning, capacity planning, master scheduling, inventory man agement , material requiremen t s planning, s tockle ss systems, and operations control. Organiza tions stu died include man ufacturing , service, and public sector. Prer., BUSN. 6080.

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OPMG. 5600-3 ] Purchasing, Materials Management, and Negotiation . FaJJ. Study of the purchasing function in man ufacturing, service, and public organiz a tions. Topics in clude source selec tion , make-buy a nal ysis, materia l quality standards and specifications, va lue analysis, negotiation s, and l egal Prer., BUSN. 6080 . OPMG. 6400-3. Ianning and Control Systems. S pring . Study of the de sign, plementation , an d control of integrated op erations, scheduling and inventory planning and control sys tems . Topics include demand forecas ting, aggregate planning, capacity planning, master sc heduling, inventory man age ment , planning , stockless systems , and operations con trol. Organizations studie d include man ufacturing, ser ce, and public sec tor . Prer., BUSN. 6080. OPMG. 6440 3 Quality and Productivity. Spring. Study of the various tecFques t o measure quality and productivity in organizations and th e practical management issues re lated to implementing quality and productivity sys tems . Top ics includ e statistica l quality con trol, t otal factor productivity , quality circles,Jotal qu ality con trol, work design and mea s ur ement, and quality and prod ucti vity manage ment sys tems . Prer. , B SN . 6080 and 6040. OPMG. 6470-3 , Strategic Analysis i n Operations Manage ment. Study the analysis and formulation of operations management stra tegy and policy . Emphasis will be on the role of th e ope1atio n s function in the strategic processes of the organization. Deci sion making will be s tre ssed thr ough t h e u se of case studi e s and the ana l ysis of actua l business situations . Prer., OPMG . 6400 and 6440 and BUSN. 6000. OPMG. 6600-3 j Purchasing, Materials Management , and Negotiat ion. FaJJ. Study of the purc ha sing func tion in man ufactu ring, service, and public o rgani zations. Topics in clude source make-buy analysis, material quality s tand ards and specifications, va lue analysis, negotiations, an d l egal a Prer ., BUSN. 6080. Graduate Business I 147 OPMG. 6800-3. Special Topics in Operations Management. Fall . A number of different curren t topics in opera tio ns man agement will be discussed in this course. Consult the cur rent Schedule of Classes or contact the advisor for further information. Prerequisites will vary depending on topic and instructor reql!lirements . OPMG. 6840-variable credit. Independent Study. QUANTITATIVE METHODS QUAN. 6010-3 . Deterministic Models . Linear programming and its application, network analysis, inclu ding schedulin g models , dynamic programming, integer programming, nonlinear progra mming. Pre r., BUSN. 6020 and 6080. QUAN . 6020 -3. Stochastic Models. Prob a bility theory, queu ing th eory, inve ntor y theory , Markov decisi on processes, simulation, decision analysis. Prer., BUSN. 6020 and 6080. QUAN . 6030-3 . Seminar: Quantitative Methods. Applica tion of quantitative methods to problems of business and industry, wi th emphasis on the functional fields of market ing, financial management , and production . Prer., QUAN. 6010 and 6020 or consent of instructor. One of t he prerequi site courses may be taken as a corequisite . QUAN. 6040-3. Multivariate Analysis. Topic in multi varia te data analysis of particular interest to those engaged in busi ness research. Includes techniq ue s such as multivariate dis criminate analysis, factor ana l ysis, and multip l e regre ss ion, and the use of s tandard multivari ate statistical packages such as the SPSS package. Prer., BUSN. 6020. QUAN . 6800-3. Special Topics in Quantitative Methods. A number of different topics in quantitative methods will be discussed in this course. Consult the current Schedule of Classes or contac t the adviso r for further information. Pre requisites will vary depending on topic and in s tructo r re quirements. QUAN. 6840-variable credit. Independent Study. Edward Conry, Assodate Professor of Business Law and Ethics, shares his expertise on business ethics in the dassroom and also as a regular columnis t for The Denver Post.

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'There is a need for a global redefinition of education that frees it from today's largel y economic context and acknowl edges its transformational role in both individual lives and social organization . " -Duane K. Troxel Assistan t De an School of Education

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Dean: Willia9' F. Grad y Assistant Def': Duane K . Troxel Assistant for Teacher Education: Marc Mahlios School OfficJ: 1200 Larimer St., Fifth Floor Telephone: 5 , 6-2717 Dean's Advi ory Counc il Paul Albright Director of Communications, WICHE Dr. Pat Calla , Vice President, Education Commission of th e Dr. Roscoe Da dson, Superintendent, Englewood School District #1 Dr . Gerr y D . ord, Executive Director , C.A.S.E. Ed Garner, Board of Education , Denver Pub-lic Schools Jack Hale , Ex cutive Director, BOCES Dennis Jones ) President , NCHEMS Sister Cecilia Linnenbrink , Executive Director, Adult Learning S?urce, Homestead Elementary Russell Holl y Ridge Center The Hon. AI Meiklejohn, Colorado Staff Senate Rachel Noel, Former Chair, African American Studies , MSC, and Former Member, CU Board of Regents Dr. John Pepe.J1, Superintendent, Jefferson County Schools Bea Romer, Ff"st Lad y of Colorado William G. Sweeney and Ross Steven Seay, Rresident, International Bank of Englewood Ken Tanning General Manager, KUSA CH 9 J. Ben Trujillo , President, Hispanic Chamber of Com merce Richard Chairman and Chief Executive Offic er, Public l ervice Company ABOUT THE SCHOOL The School of Education offers master ' s degrees in 11 education I specialties , the Specialist in Education (Ed.S.), and Ph. D.s in Educational Administration, Cur riculum and and Instructional Technolo gy . The is fully accredited b y the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools . The Teacher Education Program is fully accredited by the Colorado Sta_te Board of Education and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. Every facu ty member in the School holds the doc torate and is a member of the graduate faculty. The faculty has a distinguished record of research, publi cation, and teaching. Since 1980 the faculty has authored over 200 journal articles, as well as some 100 books and in books. Currently th e Educa tional Forum, an internationally recognized journal in education , is housed within the School and its editor is a member 0f the faculty . The School also is home base for the new coordi nated degree program mandated by the Colorado Com mission on Higher Education. Coordinated degrees are offered across all three CU Schools of Education at Denver, Boulder, and Colorado Springs . Dr. William F. Grad y, who is Dean of all co01; dinated degree pro grams in education also is Dean at CU-Denver. The School a l so prepares a large percentage of teach ers certified t o teach in Colo rad o r s K-12 schools . The Teacher Educa tion Program is a graduate level pro gram designed to prepare elementary and secondary teachers for a variety of school settings through aca demic w ork , professional studies , classroom teaching experiences, and community field experiences. Teacher Education Programs are available at CU-Denver in : Elementary Education (Kindergarten-6th grade) Secondar y Education (7th-12th grade) (English, German, French, Spanish , Mathematics, Science , So cial Studies) Bilingual Education Endorsement Engli s h as a Second Language Endorsement CU-D e nver offers a certification program for student s wi th a baccalaureate degree and for seniors earn ing degrees in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. All certification course work is at the graduate level. Much of the work is accepted toward a master's de gree in education. AFFILIATED PROGRAMS Access Program The Education Access Program is a CU system-wide School of Education program administered by William F . Grady , Coordinating Dean. Total degree programs are offered in counseling and pe11Sonnel services, ele mentar y and secondary edu cation, special education, educational administration , instructional technology, and curriculum instruction. An endorsement pro gram in English as a second language also is available. Most courses are held at community colleges in the 7-county metropolitan Denver area. Colorado Principals' Director: Lance Wright The primary mission of the Center is to enable prin cipals to shape their professional intellectual develop ment. Activities include topical seminars , panel discussions, round table discussions, and ongoing special interest groups .

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150 I School of Education Topical seminars feature individual presenters (pri marily principals) who provide information on prom . ising or successful practices, demonstrations or models, and opportunities for participant interaction. Panel dis cussions highlight current " high-relevance" topics , with panel and participant interaction in formal and infor mal settings . Special interest groups facilitate explora tion of relevant problems and issues through brainstorming and idea sharing during a series of meetings. The Center also focuses on conducting and dissem inating research. Projects have included a study of ad ministrator role perceptions in school reform, the effects of principal peer coaching and reflection to improve instructional leadership, and examining the develop ing professional identity of first year high school prin cipals . Graduate students are hired by the Center as re search assistants . Storytelli ng Conference Since 1978, the School has sponsored annual Storytelling Confere nces which present poets, artists, and yarnspinners from throughout the U.S. Conference orgaruzeris Norma J. Livo, Professor of Education. The two-day conference, held in Denver, attracts up to 500 participantsmany who register for graduate credit. Nationally known storytellers are featured, presenting tales and poems of other cultures, regions, and times. According to Dr. Livo, "Storytelling has surged in popularity in recent years as the public and educators recognize its power both to captivate audiences and its uses as a teaching tool. It satisfies a need for one of the oldest forms of human communication and also contains unconscious levels of meaning that are not always obvious." Region VIII Resource Access Project Director: Anne Widerstrom Under a con tr act funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Resource Access Project provides training and technical assistance to HeadStart centers throughout a six-sta t e region. The Region VIll project, which serves 71 HeadStart organizations, is only one of ten such projects in the U.S . Through the project , HeadStart staff will learn how to integrate handicapped children into regular HeadStart classrooms more effectively. Lance Wright (left) directs the Colorado Principals Center which provides in-service education for principals and other school site managers. William Grady (center) , Dean of the School of Education , visits a workshop .

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ADMISS I O r degree candidates should request applicat ion forms from t he Office of Student Services, School of Education, University of Colorado at Denver and return the fotpls and a $30 application fee to that office. The fee be made payable in the form of a check or molljey order to the University of Colorado. Two copies of official transcripts of all previous col lege and uniyersity study should be ordered by the applicant to sent to the Office of Student Services. Four on the forms provided, or by lett er, should j be furnished. It is preferred that at least two of these s,hou l d be from college or university pro fessors who cah write with assurance about the applicant's academic and1professional achievement promise. One or two from supervisors or employ ers are acceptab l e with reference to an applicant's abil ity a n d contriBution to the enterprise with which he/she was or is associated . Application papers and all sup porting documents (including GRE scores or MAT scores, see b elow) must b e in the Office of Student Services on March 1 for summer, May 1 for fall, and October 1 for spring admission. Applicants shou l d request the Educational Testing Service to send their scores on the aptitude test (verbal and quantitafkre) of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), or scores from the Millet's Analogy Test, to the Office of Services. If an applicant has not taken t h e G raduate Examination or the Miller's Anal ogy Test, he/she should arrange to do so. The GRE or MAT is at many centers throughout the country. Inforp;a t ion about the GRE may be obtained from The Graduate School office, the Student Aca demic office at CU-Denver, the Educational Testing Service, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jer sey 08540, or he graduate office of a university in the applicant's area . DEGREES AREAS OF SPECI ALIZATION The following programs, offered by the School of Ed u cation, co y er a wide range of professional and ac ademic interests . M.A. Counseling and personnel services (college s*ent personnel, community/agency coun seling, co seling and human resource develop ment, pu lie sc h ool counseling certificate) Early childhoo d e d ucation and early childhood spe cial educati n (family specialization , infant specialization) E d ucational administration, curriculum, and supervision I Educational psyc h ology (school psycho l ogy certification) Elementary education (bilingual education, English as a Second Lan guage, language and culture) Foundations Instructional technology Education I 151 (corporate instructional development and train ing, educational media, instructional computing, instructional technologist) Reading and writing Secondary education (bilingual education, English as a Second Lan guage, English education, language and culture, mathematics education, science education, social studies education, technology in education) Special educa t ion (Teacher 1 and Teacher 2) Ed. S. Educational administration, curriculum, and super vision Ph.D. Educational administration, curriculum , and supervision Instructiona l technology Outlines of each graduate program are listed in the following pages of the School of Education section. Since many of t he graduate degree plans are flexible and can be designed around individual student needs, it is highly desirable that the prospective candidate dis cuss tentative programs of studies with appropriate faculty members prior to submitting applications. Degree Requirements Two Master of Arts degree plans are available, each comprising one academic year or more of graduate work beyond the bac h elor's degree. The minimum resi dence requirement for any master's degree is one ac ademic year or the equivalent, and it may be satisfied by two semesters in residence, or three full summer sessions, or any combination equal to two semesters. 1. M.A. Plan I (With Thesis) . The program con sis t s of 36 semes t er hours or more, including 4 semes ter h ours for the master's thesis . While the inclusion of a minor field is not required by The Graduate School, a student and adviser may agree on a minor, in which 4 to 8 semester hours can be applied toward degree re q uirements. The M.A. thesis is written in accordance with the specifications set by The Graduate School and under the supervision of the student's adviser. When a com p l e t e first draft is ready for final typing , the thesis must be read by a second reader appointed by the dean's office. If the second reader approves the thesis , both t h e reader and the adviser will sign it when it is presented for filing with The Graduate School. If the reader does not approve, the reader and the student's adviser will confer and suggest appropriate changes. Two cop ies are require d by The Graduate School. 2. M .A. -Plan II (Without Thesis). The Plan II pro gram includes 36 or more semester hours of graduate credit, and may include 4 to 10 hours for a minor. The minor is highly recommended in some fields of study .

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152 I School of Education Transfer Credit C redit earned before formal admission is transfer credit. Nine transfer hours may be counted toward the M.A. degree . Education as a Minor Field In M.A. programs for majors outside the School of Education, student s may include education as a minor if both their major department and the dean's office of the School of Education approve . For master's de grees, a minor in education consists of at least 6 se mester hours of study in re l ated courses. Not more than 2 semester hours may be transferred from an other institution. Students who propose to minor in education must hav e had sufficient undergraduate work in education to prepare them for graduate study in the field. Ap praisal of undergraduate preparation will be made by the dean's office and the coordinator of the program area in which the proposed minor courses will be t ak en. TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS Assistant Dean for Teacher Education: Marc Mahlios Director of Clinical Education and Advising: Marilyn Scamman Office: 1200 Larimer St. , Room 4001 Telephone: 556-4387 Academic Advising Students are encouraged to visit the School of Edu cation Office of Student Services for information re garding teacher education. Students seeking initial teacher certification must at tend an orientation session . These sessions are held twice weekly and are designed to acquaint students with Colorado state requirements as well as Univer sity requirements. Call 556-2717 for information regard ing the time and place of orientation sessions. After attending an orientation , students may make an appointment with an advisor. Appointments may be made through the Office of Student Services at 556-4386, or b y con tacting individual faculty members. New students should brin g a completed advising sheet and copies of transcripts to their advising session . Stu dents who are already certified in Colorado and are seeking a second endorsement need not attend an ori entation sessions. These students may make an ap pointment direct l y with a faculty advisor. Out-of-State Teachers Individuals who have a teaching license from an other state and are seeking certification in Colorado shou ld apply for licensure with the Color ado Teacher Education and Certificatio n Office, 201 E . Colfax Ave. (866-6623). This office will evaluate tran scrip ts , expe rience, etc., and determine if an applicant is eligible for certification in Colorado . Colorado Law Regarding Teacher Certification: Pre-Admission or First Semester Requirements According to Colorado la w the following require ments must be met " prior to or no later than during the first class in the educa tional seque nce . " 1. Documented evidence of having worked success fully with children or young people. Students with no experience must register for FNDS .5000 as the first course in the professional sequence. This course in cludes 30 hours of field work in an education setting for student with no experience . (The course is re quired for all students. The lab is required only for students with no docume ntation of working with children or youth . ) 2. Evidence of passing all sections of the Colorado Teacher Competency Tests in Englis h mechanic s/ usage , mathematics, spelling, and oral Englis h. Documenta tion of having taken a college level oral speech course with a B-or higher grade will waive the oral English requirement. The California Achieve ment Test (CAT) is currently given for the written portions of the com petency requirement . 3 . Evidence of academic competence. CU-Denver's approved program requires that teacher candidates have a t least a 2 .75 GPA on all college work. Students seek ing secondary certification also must have a 2. 75 GPA in their teaching field. Educa t ion courses or teaching field courses with a D grade will not count toward cer t ification. Provisional Admission (Initial Certification and Second Endorsement Students) Students seeking initia l teach er ce rtification or a second endorsement must be at least provisionally admitted to the CU-Denver School of Education Teacher Education Program before taking course work in the professional sequence . A maximum of nine semes ter hours, taken as a non-degree student, may apply toward certifica tion . Application deadlines for provisio nal admission : Fall Semester Spring Semester Summer Term Jul y 15 De cember 15 May 1

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REQUIR EMENTS FOR PROVIS IO NAL ADMIS SIO N 1. B accalaureate degr ee or at least 90 semes ter hours completed in the Colle ge of Liberal Arts and Sciences at CU Denver. 2 . A complTted application (both the in t erna l Teacher Education App lication and Part I of the Graduate School Appli cation). 3. A $30 n nrefundable application fee. 4. A two page autobiography listing educa tional back ground and professional goals. 5. Transcripts from each college /unive rsity attend ed. Unofficial transcripts (transcripts issued dire ctly to the student) are acceptable for provisional admission. Official transtnpts (sent directly from the issuing in stitution) are required for FORMAL admission. 6 . A GPA 9f at least 2 .75 (overall). Studen t s seeking secondru:y certification must a _2.75 in th eir subject field course s m the t eaching field) . FORMAL ADMISSION In to the requiremen t s specified for PRO VISIONAL admission, the following must be met be fore formal admission and before applying for student teaching. 1. D ocume tation of passing all sections of the Col orado Teache Competency Tes t s at the 75th percen tile or higher. 2 . Documertation of passing the Oral Competency Examination qr having completed an oral spee ch course with a Bor Higher grade. 3. T wo offidal t ranscripts mailed directly to the School of Edu cation from each college or university attended . 4. A cop y of the student's Colorado Teac her Certificate (if seekir\g a second endorsement). 5. C ompletion of an advising sheet for area of en dorsem ent. This s h ould be comp let ed with an advisor and signed , i ndicating that a planned program has been de veloped and is being followed. 6. Success completion of TED . 5750 (Exploring Education). 7 . Do cumehtation of passing the oral/written lan guage examination given by the Modem Language De partment (for students seeking an endorsement in French , Spanish , or German). NonDegree Students Most courses in the Teacher Education Program are open only to student s who are at least PROVISION ALLY to the CU-Denver School of Education Teacher Education Program. Non-degree stu d e nts n eed department approval to register forT ED. 5750 , EPSY. 5000, FNDS. 5000, ELED. 5130, 5140, 5150, 5160. No more than nine semester hours, taken as a non-degree student , may coun t toward certification. Teacher Ed ucation I 153 Fore i gn L angu a ge Endor s e ment Students seeking a teaching endorsement in French, Germ an, or Spanish must pass both the oral and writ ten proficiency test s given by the Department of Modem Languages. The se examinations must be passed before applying to student teach . This requirement ap plie s to all s tudent s seeking foreign language endorse ment , regardless of where their de gree was obtained . Gr a duate L eve l C ourse s For students with a baccalaureate degree, all courses in th e School of Education are graduate level courses and require graduat e tuition. Students who wish to use some t ea cher education course wo rk toward a master's degre e should appl y early for admission to the master's program. Applying to The Graduat e School master's program is a separate process from applying to the Teacher Education Program. No more than nine s e mest er hours taken before admission to The Graduate School master's program will apply toward a master's degree . Elementary Educati on The faculty of the School of Education at CU-Denver advocates that the most appropriate education for a profe ssional educator is based upon a liberal arts tra dition. The faculty also believes th at preparation for the teacher of young children must be conceptualized differently from the preparation for the subject special ist in the secondary school. The teacher in the elemen tary schoo l is trul y a generalis t and must be aware of the ba sic str ucture of a wi de variety of disciplines. Student s with a baccalaureate degree who seek ele mentary certification must have a liber al arts under graduate major (i. e ., a major in arts and humanities, natural/ph ys ical scienc es, or social scie nces) . Unde r gr a duate Stud e n t s Students who seek elementary certifi cation and do not have a baccalaureate degree should obtain a B .A. from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) in a major of their choice. Some certification courses are accepted by CLAS . CLAS students must appl y for admis sio n to the School of Education and meet all state and uni versity requirements as specified under the sec tion on Colorado Law and Teacher Certifica t ion and the sections concerning provisional and formal admis sion to the Teacher Education Program.

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154 I School of Ed ucation Unapproved Major s Students holding a baccalaureate degree but who do not have an approved liberal arts major (i.e., majors in PE, business, communicative disorders, or elemen t ary edu c a t ion are not approved) must deve l op a broad field lib eral arts major. Such students sho ul d meet with an a d visor early in their program to prepare a pro gram of study. Professional Sequence for E lementary Certificat i o n FNDS. 5000-3. Teaching as a Profession . Includes a lab for those students without documentation of having worked with children/yo u th. Students with no documentation of working successfully with c hil dren/youth must take this course plus lab t h e Erst semester. TED . 5750-2. Exploring Education. Includes 40 hours of fiel d experience in a sc h ool setting. Cannot be waived for prior experience . EPSY. 5000-3. Psychological Foundations of Education 1SPED . 5000-3. Education of Exceptional Child or 1S PED. 5010-3. Mainstreaming the Exceptional Child in the Regular Classroom 1ELED. 5170-3. Community and Interpersonal Relations MATH . 3040-4. Math for Elemen t ary Teachers 1IT. 5180-3. Instr u ctional Technology for Teachers 1ELED. 5210-3. Models of Teaching 1RDG. 5000-3. Effective Reading and Writing Instruction ELED. 5140-3. E l ementary Curriculum Language Arts and Children's Literature ELED . 5150-6. Elementary Curriculum Science, Mathemat ics, Social Studies 1ELED . 5160-3. Expressive Arts: Art, Music, Health, P.E. T ED. 5130-3. Microteaching (Includes 60 hours of field ex perience in schoo l setting.) 1T E D . 5700-8. Student Teaching in the Elementary School (Twelve weeks of teaching full time in school setting . ) SECONDAR Y EDUCATION Requireme nts 1. B accalaurea t e degree from an accredited institu tion of higher education. 2. A major or equivalent in the discipline of endorse m e nt. 3 . Additional courses as prescribed by state certifi ca t ion standards . 0 Will count for mas t er's credit if enrolled in a master's degree pro gram . Although 18 h ours of the Teacher Education Program will count for master's credit, only 9 hours taken before being admitted to the master's degree program may be applied toward a degree . Students preparing for certification in the second ary school should acquire a broad liberal arts back ground and specialize in th e discipline area in which they plant to be endorsed. This specialization must . mee t the College of Libera l Arts and Sciences requirements for a maj or and may include additional require ment s specifie d b y state certification standards. Advisors in the Colleg e a n d in the Sch ool of Education should be consulted o n a regular basis . Some certification cours es, taken during t he senior year, are accepted by CLAS toward the baccalaureate d egree. CLAS students must apply for admission to the School of Education and m u st meet all state and University requirements as spec ified under t h e section on Colorado Law and Teacher Certification and the sectio n s concerning provisional and formal a d mission to th e Teacher Education Pro gram. Professional Sequence for Secon d ary Certification FNDS. 5000-3. Teaching as a Profession. Includes a lab for those student s without documentation of having worked with children/youth . Students with no documentation of working successfully with children/youth must take this course plus l ab the first semester. TED. 5750-2. Exploring Ed u cation . Includes 40 hours of field experience in a school setting. Cannot be waived for prior experience . EPSY. 5000-3. Psychological Foundations of Education 1SPED. 5000-3. Education of Exceptional Child or 1SPED. 5010-3. Mainstrearning the Exceptional Child in the Regular Classroom 1SECE. 5170-3. Community and Interpersonal Relations 1IT. 5180-3. Instructional Technology for Teachers 1SECE. 5210-3. Models of Teaching TED . 5130-3. Microteaching ( Includes 60 hours of field ex perience in school setting.) 1RDG. 5020-3. Reading and Writing Strategies : Secondary Content Areas 1SECE. xxxx-3. Methods Course for Area of Certification 1T ED. 5710-8. Student Teaching in the Secondar y School (Twelve weeks of teaching full time in school setting.)

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STUDENT lACHING Student tea hing provides the student an opportunity to experiE\Ilce, in depth, the full role and meaning of tea ching in a school setting. Requireme nts for Student Teaching 1. Formal Admission Status. Documentation of be ing form ally to the School of Education. 2. of all course work in education or advisor's written permission to postpone a course until after studef t teaching . o course work should be planned for tHe semester of student teaching. 3. Completion of all course work in the teaching field (endorsement area) or advisor ' s written permis sion to postpone a particular course until after student teaching. 4. Completion ofT ED . 5750 (Exploring Education) and ELED .ISEjCE. 5130 (Microteaching) , field experi ence courses r quired by state law, after admission to th e program but before student teaching. 5. An updated advising sheet indicating that all REQUIREMENTS have been met. 6. A student teaching application , re ceived and sigljted by the Coordinator of Student Teach-ing by: I March 1 October 1 February 1 Student Teaching I 155 for Fall for Spring for Summer (second endorsement only)! 7. Documentation of the negative TB test, required of public school employees, including student teach ers. (Must be submitted with student teaching appli cation . ) University credit for student teaching ranges from four to eight credit hours, depending on length of as signment. Students seeking an initial endorsement are required to student teach for 12 weeks, full time (8 credits). Teacher certification students seeking a second endorsement must complete a minimum of 8 weeks of student tea c.bing (4 credits). Students seeking a second endorsement who are currentl y teaching at the same level (e.g., teaching secondary math and wish ing to add science) may student teach for a minimum of 4 weeks, if approved by the Coordinator of Student Teaching . A student who withdraws from student teaching af ter a school placement has been made, or who re ceives a student teaching grade below C must be recommended for a subsequent student teaching placement by the Coordinator of Student Teaching follow ing consultation with the Executive Committee of the Teacher Educa tion Council. 1 Lat e applications will not be accepted . Student teachers prepare a project on creativity for children in their classes .

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156 I School of Education COURSES Any course with a TED prefix may not be applied toward a graduate degree. The following courses may not be applied toward graduate degrees : T ED. 5130 3. Microteaching. Taken af ter or concurrently with ELED./SECE. 5210, Models of Teaching. Cannot be taken during first semester in program or as a nondegree stu dent. Provides extensive clinical supervisio n throu g h analy sis of peer teaching and video taped presentations in sc hools. Extensive field placement required . T ED. 5300-3 . Introductory Secondary Mathematics Meth ods. Survey of secondary mathematics curriculum and meth ods for pre-service teachers. Topics include planning lessons, motivation, grading, constructing tests, problem solving, teach ing aids , expository and discovery lessons, teaching con cepts and skills. TED. 5410-3. Curriculum and Methods: Secondary Math ematics. Intr oductory methods course for pre-service teach ers. Covers content of 7-12 curriculum, princip les of learning, planning lessons, methods of teaching, testing, resources, textbooks , and other topics. TED. 5700-8. Student Teaching-Elementary School. Kinder garten and grades one through six. Student teacher attends an elementary sc hool in Denver metropolitan area . TED. 5710-8. Student Teaching-Secondary School. Student teacher attends a senior or junior hi gh schoo l in D enver met ropolitan area. TED. 5750-2 . Field Experience: Exploring Education. Teach ing experience in small groups in a school se tting. Observa tions in various school settings. TED. 5800-1. Workshop: Classroom Management. Programs of Study COUNSELING AND PERSONNEL SERVICES Division Coordinator: Robert L. Smith Office: 1200 Larimer St. , Room 4028 Telephone: 556-8367 Faculty: Professor: Robert L. Smith Associate Professors: Andrew A. Helwig, William A. Sease Assistant Professor: Walter L. Strandburg CU-Den ver offers an M.A. program preparing pro fessionals for a variety of work settings including pub lic schools, mental health agencies, universities, private practice, and business and industry. Candidates seek ing certification for school counseling (K-12) as a sep arate credential beyond the master's degree are urged to obtain faculty advising relevant to those require ments . The program consists of 48 semester hours, includ ing core requirements , major field sequence, and added electives where chosen. The work is spread over a min imum of four semesters. Program Areas Students can follow one of the following four pro gram areas offered in Counseling and Personnel Ser vices . In addition to the program area course work, a minimum of 12 hour s of foundation level core course work in other School of Education areas is required of all graduate degree student s in Areas One, Two, and Four. Program Area Th ree , Counseling and Human Resource Development , is an interdisciplinary track and requires additional course work outside Counsel ing and Personnel Services. CORE CURRICULUM FOR PROGRAM AREAS ONE , TWO , AND FOUR (12 HOURS) REM. 5200-3. Introduction to Research Method s REM. 5300-3. Introduction to Measurement LC. 5040-3. Multicultural Education EPSY. (course in development) . Human Growth and Development through the Lifespan PROGRAM AREA ONE: PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNSELING CERTIFICATE1 (M.A.) CPS. 5010-3. Foundatio n s of Guidance , Counseling, and Per sonnel Services CPS . 5020-3. Personal Appraisal CPS. 5030-3. Pre-Pr ac t icu m Labor a tor y CPS. 5100-3. Theor y and Techniques of Counseling CPS. 5110-3. Advanced Theory and Techniques: Group Counseling CPS. 5330-3. Professional Seminar in Counseling CPS. 5400-3. Career Development CPS. 5420-3. Organization Deve lopment CPS . 5910-6. Practicum in Counseling CPS. 58003 . Strate gies in Public School Counseling1 Electives: Substance Abuse Counseling Marriage and Family Counseling1 PROGRAM AREA TWO: COMMUNITY/AGENCY COUNSELING (M.A.) CPS. 5010-3. Foundations of Guidance, Counseling , and Personnel Service s CPS. 5020-3. Personal Appraisal CPS. 5030-3. Pre-Practicum Labor atory CPS. 5100-3. Theory and Techniques of Counseling CPS. 5110-3. Advanced Theory and Techniques : Group Counse ling CPS . 5150-3. Marital and Family Counseling CPS. 5280-3. Substance Abuse Counseling CPS. 5330-3. Profes sio nal Seminar in Counseling CPS . 5400-3. Career De v elopment CPS . 5910-6. Practicum in Counseling CPS . 5820-3. Strategies in Agency Counseling PROGRAM AREA THREE: COUNSELING AND HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT (M.A.) CPS. 5010-3. Foundations of Guidance , Counseling, and Personnel Services CPS . 5020-3. Personal Appra isal CPS . 5030-3. Pre-Practicum Laborator y CPS . 5100-3. Theory and Techniques of Counseling CPS . 5150-3. Marital and Family Counseling CPS . 5240-3. Counseling and Human Resource De velo pment CPS . 5280-3. Substance Abuse Counseling CPS . 5330-3. Professional Seminar in Counseling 1 A teaching certificate (vali d in Colorado) and two years of teaching experience are required for the Public School Counseling Certifi cate . Type E certification is available for professional s able to sub s titut e related experiences for the t eaching requirement.

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CPS. 5400-3. De velopment CPS. 5910-6. Pr cticum in Counseli n g CPS. 6240-3. Co sulta ti on Strategies Outsid e course work (12 hours minimum) IS REQUIRED IN InStructional Tech nolo gy, Educa tion Ad ministration , and Management. PROGRAM AlA FOUR: COLLEGE STUDENT PER SONNEL (M.A. CPS . 5010-3. Fo dations of Guidance, Counseling, and Perso nnel ServiCEjS CPS. 5020-3. Pensona l Apprai sal CPS . 5030-3. Pr -Practicum Laboratory CPS . 5100-3. Theory and Techniques of Counseling CPS. 5110-3. Group C ounseling CPS . 5120-3. The S tudent in Higher Education CPS . 5330-3. Professional Seminar in Couns eling CPS . 5400-3. Career De velopment CPS. 5922-3 . Readings in Counseling and Personnel Services De velopment CPS. 5910-6. Pnyticum in Counseling Elective: 3 credi'j Access in Counseling and Person nel Services The Counseling and Personnel Services Program has an Acce ss Program for students who wish to complete the degr ee off-campus. Courses are held at commu nity colle ges other sites in the Denver me tr opoli tan area. Requiremen s and qua lity of instruction for this pro gram are iden;1 ical to those for th e on-campus pro gram. Students sho uld contact their advisor for further information. COURSES Note: During the regular academic year the follow ing courses open to graduate degree student s only and to those aqrru tted for the purpose of pursuing pro fessional certification. Special service sec tions ma y be offered from time to time and are indicated as open. on-degree students may be admitted with permission . S e the current Schedule of Classes. CPS. 50 10 -3. Foundations of Guidance, Counseling, and Per sonnel Services. Overview of the field. History, philosophy, introducti on tot eory. Legal and ethical considerations, spe cial problems , professi onal outlook. Role and function of counselor s i schools and agency settings . To be taken concurrently wi CPS. 5020. C PS. 5 0 20-3. Pe s o nal Appraisal. Personal appraisal tak en concur r ently with CPS. 5010, overview of the field. Empha sizes small group laboratory method and experientia l learn ing designed to foster self exploration and interpersonal skill development relevant to personal and professional goals. Be Counseling and Personnel Services I 157 cause of the exberiential nature of the course the grading is undifferentiated with pass/fail or B as the expected maximum grade . CPS. 5030-3. Pre-Practicum Laboratory. Supervised counsel ing practice in a counseling laboratory located on campus. Emphasis on counseling techniques and therapeutic inter vention strategies. Prer., CPS. 5010, 5@20, or consent of in structor. CPS. 5100-3 . Theory and Techniques of Counseling . Com parative examination of counseling theories and approach strategies. Pre-practicum experience in counseling and in terviewing techniques . Prer., CPS. 5010, 5020. CPS. 5110-3. Advanced Theory and Techniques : Group Coun seling . Utilization of group process. Advanced counseling skill development. The counselor as consultant. Facilitation sk ills. Prer. , CPS. 5100. CPS. 5120-3. The Student in Higher Education. Overview of college student personnel work. Special prob l ems in col lege counseling. Group facilita tion and values clarification skills. Consulting in higher education. CPS. 5150-3 . Marital and Family Counseling. Marital and family conflicts and counseling intervention strategies. (Open.) CPS. 5160-3. Marriage and Family Counseling II. Advanced intervention strategies with families . Prer., CPS. 5150. CPS. 5240-3. Counseling and Human Resource Develop ment. A didactic and experiential course dealing with the application of counseling and human resource development skills within the business setting. Employee Assistance Pro grams are emphasized. Basic HRD terminology, training tech niques, and counseling / training needs are introduced. Prer., CPS. 5010, 502@, or consent of instructor. CPS. 5280-3. Substance Abuse Counseling. This course cov ers federal confidentiality regulations, state drug laws, drunk driving counter measure programs, drug and alcohol phar macology , client-record management. Etiology of substance abuse, diagnosis, and basic treatment mode l s are examined. Prer. CPS. 5010 and 5020, or consent of instruc tor. CPS. 5330-3. Professional Seminar in Counseling . An indepth examination of special problems and topics in the field with emphasis upon individual project investigation andreporting . Prer., CPS. 5010 and 5020. CPS. 5400-3. Career Development. Development of compe tencies in career development counseling. Theories, infor mation s y stems, decision making, awareness of self, and the world of educational and work opportunities. Prer. , CPS. 5010, 5020, or consent of instructor. CPS. 5420-3. Organizational Development. Organizational development and theor y . The development and implemen t ation of counseling and guidance programs in public school setting s , program development, implementation, consulta tion and evaluation . Individual projects required for course completion . Prer., CPS . 5010, 5020, or consent of instructor. CPS. 5800-3. Strategies in Public School Counseling . Role and function of the public school counselor . Utilization of consultation skills and group process relation to guidance objectives. Str<4tegies used with "at risk , " suici de, dropout , culturally different, and gifted students are emphasized. Prer. CPS. 5010, 502b , or consent of instructor. CPS. 5820-3. Strategies in Agency Counseling . Role and function of the counselor in agency settings. Group work. Intervention strategies with agency clientele. Exploration of community resources. CPS. 5824 -3. Counseling Strategies. Individually directed investigation of trends and contemporary problems and is sues in the field. Oriented to the field practitioner and spe cial needs of differential work set tings . (Open.)

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158 I School of Education CPS. S830/S834-1 to 4. Special Topics in Counseling and Personnel Services. Specific topic s vary from semester to semester . Intervention strategies with children; issues in abuse, violence, incest, legal issues, adult counseling, grief, death, and dying . CPS. 5910-6. Practicum in Counseling. Supervised practice counseling in elementary and secondary schools, college stu dent personnel , agency, or business setting. By advance ap plication and arrangements. Application should be made during the preceding semester. Obtain materials and instructions from the Book Center. Prer., all required CPS courses. Sec tion subtitles indicate school or community service place ment. CPS. 5922-3. Readings in Counseling and Personnel Ser vices Development. Focus on special problems in develop ment and delivery of personnel services. Directed readings and small group activities. CPS. 6240-3. Consultation Strategies. This course focuses on the development of consultation skills and implementa tion of strategies. The student is exposed to major theories of the consultation process. In addition the course provides students with the opportunity to practice consultation and implementation strategies within a sys tem : an agency, busi ness setting, or educational setting . Prer. CPS. 5010 and 5020, or consent of instructor. CPS. 6910-3 to 6. Advanced Practicum in Counseling. CPS. 6950-4. Master's Thesis. CPS. 7280-3 Intervention and Treatment in Substance Abuse. This course examines indepth chemical dependency, and the diagnosis and treatment of co-dependents. Treatment mo dalities are emphasized including follow-up and researc h. Prer. CPS. 5010, 5020, and 5280, or consent of instructor. Independent Study CPS. 5840-1 to 4. Independent Study. Individually directed research activity on special topics not covered b y course of ferings. Degree students only, with advance approval by major profe ssor and department. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AND EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION Program Director: Laura D . Goodwin Office: 1200 Larimer St., Fourth Floor Telephone: 556-3372 Faculty: Professor: William L. Goodwin Associate Professor: Anne H. Widerstrom Assistant Professors: Harriet Able Boone, Susan Sandall The early childhood education program is a gradu ate program leading to a master's degree or certification in early childhood special education, or a master's degree in early childhood regular education. Students may choose to emphasize either alternative in their course work and field experiences, in order to prepare for careers working with either young handicapped children birth to five years or young normally devel oping children birth to eight years . Program graduates are currently employed throughout Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region in teaching or administrative positions in public schools, private preschools, com munity colleges, hospitals , community agency pro grams, Child Find, and Head Start. The program is interdisciplinary in focus, drawing upon university resources in educational psychology, special education, communication disorders, and multi cultural education as well as early childhood educa tion, and community resources for occupational/physical therapy, pediatrics, and social work. There is a strong emphasis on field experiences in both regular and spe cial education concentrations. The program also offers specializations in infants birth to three and in families of handicapped young children for students who wish to work in hospitals, center-or home-based programs wi th at-risk or hand icapped infants and their families. The specialization, funded through a grant from the U.S . Office of Edu cation, is jointly offered on the CU-Denver campus and the University of Colorado Health Sciences Cen ter. Curriculum The master's degree in early childhood special edu cation requires 39 semester hours of course work and 4 hours of practicum . Thirty-one semester hours are required for certification only. The master's degree in early childhood regular education typically requires 32 semester hours of course work and 4 semester hours of practicum. The two programs share course content in: Normal child growth and development Learning approaches with young children Measurement and evaluation Basic statistics Multicultural education Research and current issues Early childhood curriculum and program development Working with parents and families The early childhood special education program provides specialized training in: Developmental disorders birth to five Screening and assessment of young children Intervention strategies wit h infants and preschool handicapped children Behavior management Working as a member of the transdisciplinary team Language development and lan guage disorders Treatment of neurologically impaired children The early childhood regular education program pro vides specialized training in: Language acquisition and development Readin g and writing instruction Early childhood program administration

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Infant Specialization Track Coordinator: Laura D. Goodwin Office: 1200 Larimer St., Four th Floor Telephone: 556-3372 Faculty: te Professors : Barbara A. Mowder, Anne H. Wi ers trom Assistant Profe sor: Susan Sandall The program is designed to provide stude nts with the background and skills necessary for working with handicapped or at-risk infants and their families. The specialization is available to studen t s in the early child hood special education certification and master's de gree programs, and the school psychology certification and master's degree programs. It also is available to interested graduate students in re l ated fields, such as nursing, occupational and physical therapy, social work, and communidtion disorders. The program is interdisciplinar y in focus. Univer sity and community resources in communication dis orders, counseling, nursing , occupational and physical therapy , pediatrics, school psychology, social work, and special educa tion are utilized. Field work and site visits are planned in both medical and educatio nal set tings . The specialization con sists of four courses plus field work: Medic a l developmental di sabilities Assessment of andicapped and at-risk infants Interventi on s t ategies for handicapped and at-risk infant s Family dynamics lnfant practicum Students in the early childhood special education master's degree program would tak e these courses b y advisement as !;"art of their program requirements of course work and practicum . Students in th f school ps ycho logy certification would take th ese courses by advisement , primarily as their electives. The cJrtification program in schoo l psychol ogy require s 60 semester hours of course work, includ ing 8 hour s of field work . Early Childhood Education I 159 Family Specialization Track Coordinator: Laura D . Goodwin Office: 1200 Larimer St. , Fourth Floor Telephone: 556-3372 Faculty: Associate Professor: Anne H. Widerstrom Assistant Professors: Harriet Able Boone, Susan Sandall The family specialization provides an in-depth focus on families . Students are provided with the theoretical background and skills to work with families of young special needs children. Students earn a master of arts degree . Students may also choose to comp lete certifi cation requirements in early childhood spe cial educa tion. The specializa tion consists of th ree courses and a one semester practicum in a community-base d , family focused program. Access Program in Early Childhood Special Education T h e Early Childhood Special Education Program has an Access Program for student s who wis h to complete the certification and/or master's degree ofkampus. Courses are h eld at comm unity colleges and other sites in the Denv er metropolitan area, and certification courses are offered a t se lected sites in western, sou thern, and east ern Colorado. Requir ements and quality of instruction for this pro gram are identical to those for the on-campus pro gram. Students s hould contact th eir advisor for further information . COURSES ECE. 5010-3. Curriculum and Program Development in Early Childhood Education. Principles of early child hood pro gram development are re viewe d in the areas of curriculum, staff development , and parent invo l vement. Linkages are made between child development and curriculum planning . Cur riculum areas considered include language , preacademics, motor , social-emo tional , science, socia l studies, and creativity . ECE. 5020-3. Approaches to Young Children's Learning.Review of approaches for facilitating the learning and develop ment of young children. Examined are programs for children (infancy through age 8), including those developed under federal auspices. Approaches are considered in terms of (1) their differing views of intellectual, social, and p h ysical de velopment of yo ung children ; (2) their operation as program activities and procedures; and (3) their effec t s on children' s learning .

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160 I S choo l o f Edu catio n ECE. 5030-3. Directing Programs for Young Children. Anal ys i s of o r ganiza tion a l factors an d instructional events in the class ro om. Facili t ation of t eac h er effectiveness through superv iso r y feed b ack and inservi c e development. Special attentio n is given t o supervisorteacher relationships, parent sch oo l-community re l a t io nshi ps, and processes for feed back. ECE. 5040-3. Administrative Seminar : Selected Topics in Early Childhood Education. E m phasis on those topics re quired of administra t ors in E.C.E. programs in day-to-day o p e r a t ions (phi l osop h y, fina n ce, programmi ng, manage ment, commu nity / p a r ent rela ti o ns, etc.). Special attention is gi ven t o uniqu e admini s t ra t ive c o nc erns in programs for spe cial ca t ego r ies o f children suc h as t oddlers, developmen t ally delayed childre n , etc. ECE. 5060-3. Working with Parents and Families . Review of hi s to rical factors and research r elated to current trends in wor kin g with pa rent s in the reg ul ar classroom and with parents and families of e xceptio nal chil dren. T h e cour se presents content concernin g family sys t e m s theory, various commu ni ty services availa bl e to families, abused and neglected childre n , a n d an ov er view of s u ccessful programs that serve parent s a n d famili es in the edu cational setting . ECE. 5070-3. Cognitive/Emotional Development and D i sor ders in Young Children. T h e prim ary focus of t his course is t he cognitive and social deve l opment of infants and young children , an d probl ems tha t m ay occur duri n g the process. Equ a ll y emphasize d are interve n tion approaches for pre s ch oo l c hil dre n w ith cognitive a n d social/emotional handi caps. Implicat io n s for interve ntion from current research are consider e d . ECE. 5080-3. Language Development and Disorders in Young Children. Overv i ew of n orma l l anguage development, language components, and pertine n t research re l ating to lan gu a g e acquisi t io n . E m phasis is pl aced on language problems commonl y de m o n s tr a ted by young exception a l children and appropri a t e in t e r vention stra t eg ies. ECE. 5090-3. Neuromotor Development and Disorders in Young Children. T hi s course provides an overview of nor mal a n d abnormal m otor and ne u rological development in the inf an t and y oun g child. C u rrent treatmen t approaches for chil dre n wit h neur omotor di sorders are examined, with emphas is on senso r y integratio n and neuro d evelopmental tre a tm e nt. Also r eviewed are se n sory deficits: hearing and v i s ual impairme nt. ECE. 5140-3. Measurement and Evaluation in Ear ly Child hood Education. This course provides classroom experience in basic m eas u r em e n t concep t s and in the screening and asse s sm e n t of y oun g childre n's cognitive, affective, lan guag e an d psyc hom o t or capa b ili t ies and charac t eristics . Tra ditional m eas urement t echniq ues as well as nonreactive measures, huma n a n d video o b servationa l m ethods are included . Eval uation of p rogr am s a n d perso n s i n early childhood educa tion s ettin gs is e xamin ed. ECE.5200-3. Screening and Assessment of Young Children. A field b ased cour se providing exp erience in t h e administratio n an d scoring of a sampling of th e most wide l y used screen ing and assessm ent in struments d esigned for use in preschool class ro o ms. S tudent s will have th e opportunity to adminis ter a v a riety of forma l and info rmal t ests incl u ding the Bayley and M c C arthy S cal es. ECE. 5800 1 to 4. Workshop: Topics in Early Childhood Ed ucation. Topics and credit h ours vary from semester to se mester. ECE. 5911-3. Educational and Observational Practicum in Early Childhood Education. Includes planned experiences built around the clinic and E.C.E. classroom in operation. Students observe in public schools, Hea d Start, day care, and private preschool programs. The practicum will require 30 to 40 clock hours of field placement experience with con current classroom meetings . Opportunities for observation in special education classes are provided. ECE. 5920-1 to 4. Readings in Early Childhood Education. ECE. 6100 -3. Medical Aspects of Developmental Disabili ties : B i rth to Three. A review of the major risk factors and developmental disabilities encountered in young children birth through three years . Medical, educational, genetic, and en vironmental factors are discussed. Special attention is given to recent innova t ions in identification and t reatment of very young children. ECE. 6110-3. Intervention Strateg ies for Handicapped and At-Risk Infants. In-depth study of intervention strategies, curricula, and program mode l s for young children birth to three years . Topics include selection , implementation, and evaluation of t h e different tec h niques. The course will have an interdisciplinary focus . ECE. 6690-3 . Seminar in Research and Current Issues in Early Childhood Educat i on. R esearch methods are reviewed and then selected topics are considered. Emphasis is on re search findings and current iss u es of importance t o teach ers, administra t ors, specialists, and researchers in early childhood and early childhood specia l e d ucation. ECE. 6910-1 to 6. Practicum in Infancy. Field-based experi ences in settings for handicapped and at-risk infants , tod dlers, and their families . ECE. 6911 2 to 4. Practicum in Early Childhood Education. Field-based experiences in se t t i ngs for young children (pre school adminis t ration, day-care center management, parent program directorship, etc.) that are closely linked to the student's professional goals. Requires a minimum of 110, 165, or 220 clock hours under supervision (2,3, or 4 credit hours, respec tively). ECE. 6912 1 to 4 . P r acticum in Early Childhood Special Ed ucation. Fieldb ased experie n ces in settings for young h and icapped children including diagnostic clinics, Project Child Find, hospital and/or classroom. The practicum requires 300 clock hours under supervision. ECE. 6913 -3. Practicum i n Working with Parents and Fam ily. ECE. 6950 4 . Master ' s Thesis . Prer. , REM. 5100 and 5200, plus 20 credits in E.C.E . program . Independent Study ECE. 5840 1 to 4. Independent Study in Early Childhood Education