Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIiiihi,
CATALOG 1991-92
Undergraduate and Graduate Stud University of Colorado at Denver


University of Colorado at Denver
P.0. Box 173364
Denver, Colorado 80217-3364
I Second Class Postage Paid
at the Post Office Boulder, Colorado
$2.75


CONTENTS
Academic Calendar................................................................... 2
Message from the Chancellor......................................................... 4
Administration...................................................................... 5
General Information................................................................. 7
The Graduate School................................................................ 41
School of Architecture and Planning................................................ 53
College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration.......................................................... 71
School of Education.................................................................99
College of Engineering and Applied Science.........................................133
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences...............................................163
Military Science...................................................................259
Graduate School of Public Affairs..................................................263
Faculty............................................................................273
Index..............................................................................284


ACADEMIC CALENDAR1
Fall 19912
August 20-23 August 26 September 2 November 28 November 29 December 18
Spring 19922
January 8-13 January 14 January 20 March 16-20 May 12
Summer 19922
May 26-29 May 25 June 1 July 3 August 7
Orientation — Registration
First day of classes
Labor Day Holiday (campus closed)
Thanksgiving Holiday (campus closed)
(campus open, no classes)
End of semester
Orientation — Registration First day of classes
Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday (campus open, no classes) Spring break (campus open, no classes)
End of semester
Orientation — Registration Memorial Day Holiday (campus closed) First day of classes
Independence Holiday (campus closed) End of term
Cover Illustration: Mary Lou Egan Photos: Lucy Branch, Office of Public Relations
University of Colorado at Denver Pages 131, 282, 283 Bob Fader
Pages 50, 70, 98, 132, 162, 262 Gary Isaacs
Pages 6, 40, 51, 52, 161, 261
Design: Publications Department, University of Colorado at Denver
’The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time.
2Consult the Schedule of Classes for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs and registration dates and procedures.


Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog
1991-92
University of Colorado at Denver
Speer at Larimer RQ Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364
Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, course offerings and course descriptions, and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice or obligation. The University of Colorado at Denver is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. For current calendars, tuition rates, requirements, deadlines, etc., students should refer to a copy of the Schedule of Classes for the semester in which they intend to enroll.
The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curriculum. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester, and the faculty teaching a particular course or program may vary from time to time. The instructor may alter the content of a course or program to meet particular class needs.
Courses are listed by college or school.
University of Colorado Catalog.
(USPS 651-060)
262 Stadium Building, Campus Box 384, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0384 Volume 1991, No. 3, May/June Published 4 times a year: January/February March/April, May/June, August/September Second class postage paid at Boulder, Colorado. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to University of Colorado Catalog, CU-Denver Publications, Boulder, Colorado 80302.


Message From the Chancellor
Dear Student:
Welcome to the University of Colorado at Denver. On behalf of the faculty, staff, and students, I offer to you the challenging environment of one of Colorado’s premier institutions of higher education. Your decision to attend CU-Denver shows your willingness to learn at Denver’s only urban public university.
CU-Denver is one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system. As a vital part of that system, offering baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral programs, we have achieved distinction nationally and internationally because of the high quality of our programs, faculty, and alumni. Located in downtown Denver, the University challenges its students both academically and personally in an intellectual environment that encourages commitment, curiosity, and imagination.
A distinguishing characteristic of CU-Denver is our urban perspective that is an integral theme in our academic programming, the orientation of our faculty, and the identity of our student body. Since 1972, enrollment has grown to approximately 10,613 students, including 5,901 undergraduates and 4,712 graduate students.
The University offers some 40 degree and degree option programs at the baccalaureate level and over 60 degree and degree option programs at the post baccalaureate level designed to provide you with a foundation on which to build your intellectual, aesthetic, and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens. Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a complement to classroom study. The University’s seven colleges and schools (Business, Public Affairs, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, School of the Arts, Education, and Architecture and Planning) and The Graduate School provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the opportunities for gaining knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your economic and personal lives.
We at the CU-Denver campus take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs. This is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the applied aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems.
We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars/teachers and dedicated staff. 1 promise a rich intellectual environment and a challenging educational experience. Most of all, I look forward to seeing you at graduation and awarding you the CU-Denver degree.
My best wishes to you and to your future.
John C. Buechner
Chancellor
University of Colorado at Denver


Administration / 5
ADMINISTRATION Board of Regents
KATHY ARNOLD, Littleton, term expires 1994 RICHARD J. BERNICK, Littleton, term expires 1992 ROBERT E. CALDWELL, Colorado Springs, term expires 1992
PETER C. DIETZE, Boulder, term expires 1996 HARVEY W. PHELPS, Pueblo, term expires 1994 NORWOOD L. ROBB, Littleton, term expires 1996 ROY H. SHORE, Greeley, term expires 1992 ROBERT S1EVERS, Boulder, term expires 1996 DAVID W. WINN, Colorado Springs, term expires 1994
University-Wide Officers
JUDITH ALBINO, President of the University; Professor of Psychology; Professor of Applied Dentistry. B.J., Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin.
GLEN R. STINE, Vice President for Budget and Finance. RA., Michigan State; M.A., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Ed.D., Harvard University.
THEO. VOLSKY, JR., Executive Vice President for Administration; Professor of Psychology. B.S., M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.
H.H. ARNOLD, Executive Secretary of the Board of Regents and of the University. B.A., LL.R, University of Colorado. JAMES A. STROUP, Treasurer for the University and Assistant Vice President for Budget and Finance. B.S., Michigan Technical University; M.B.A., Michigan State University.
CU-Denver Officers
JOHN C. BUECHNER, Chancellor; Professor of Public Affairs. BA., College of Wooster; M.P.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. BRUCE W. BERGLAND, Executive Vice Chancellor; Associate Professor of Education. B.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Stanford University.
JOHN BERNHARD, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.A., Stanford University; M.B.A., Columbia University, Graduate School of Business.
PAUL E. BARTLETT, Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Professor and Dean Emeritus of Engineering and Applied Science. RS.(C.E.), RS.(Bus), M.S., University of Colorado.
MARK A. EMMERT, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Associate Professor of Public Affairs. B.A., University of Washington; M.P.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University. KENNETH HERMAN, Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. RS., University of Colorado. SHELIA M. HOOD, Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services. RA., M.A., Colorado State University. FERNIE BACA, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative Activities; Acting Dean of The Graduate School; Associate Professor of Education. B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado.
JULIE CARNAHAN, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Planning and Information Resources Management. RA., M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., University of Michigan.
The University of Colorado seal, adopted in 1908, depicts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed in laurel is placed beside him. The Greek inscription means Let your light shine." According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civilization "stands as the criterion of culture." The laurel symbolizes honor or success, the youth of the figure suggests the “morning of life,” and the scroll represents written language.


Eh v' -• '4^ MR "■J r ■ fWt flp{

L B n



General Information
The University of Colorado at Denver is one of the most important educational resources in the Denver metropolitan area. CU-Denver, one of four institutions in the University of Colorado system, is an urban, non-residential campus located in downtown Denver. Major civic, cultural, business, and governmental activities are in close proximity.
CU-Denver offers undergraduate degrees in more than 40 fields and graduate degrees in more than 60. Ph.D. degrees are offered in public affairs, applied mathematics, and educational administration. Doctoral studies also are available in engineering and other fields in cooperation with CU-Boulder. Special emphasis is placed on programs that will help assure students professional opportunities after graduation. All programs are tailored to meet the needs of the diverse student population. Classes are offered during weekday and evening hours, and on weekends.
Students’ ages range between 17 and 75. The average student age is 29. Two-thirds hold full-time jobs and 60 percent attend part time. Sixty-two percent are enrolled at the upper division or graduate levels.
CU-Denver’s faculty actively promote the special role of an urban institution in meeting the needs of students. Many faculty bring their work experiences to the classroom. They are alert to the challenges and advances of the urban environment and responsible to the needs of students and the community. The combination of CU-Denver’s talented faculty and highly motivated students creates a vital and exciting educational environment. Students are offered the unique educational opportunity to combine real world experience with academic excellence.
History
Just over a century ago the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder, in 1876. In 1912, the University of Colorado’s Department of Correspondence and Extension was established in Denver, to meet the needs of the burgeoning population. As the breadth of course offerings expanded, so did the demand for degreegranting status. The Denver Extension
Center was renamed the University of Colorado-Denver Center in 1965, and by 1969, 23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study were offered.
In 1972 the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria Campus, CU-Denver’s current site. And in this same year the Denver “Center" was renamed CU-Denver. Two years later the University of Colorado was reorganized into four campuses—Denver, Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder.
University of Colorado System
As one of four campuses of the University of Colorado, CU-Denver has a special role and mission in Colorado higher education. The University of Colorado at Boulder now serves about 24,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. The Health Sciences Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, dental, nursing and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 5,900 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. CU-Denver’s role within the University system is primarily to address the needs for undergraduate and graduate instruction in the Denver metropolitan area. Emphasis is given to professional, preprofessional, and liberal arts training in the context of a strong multidisciplinary and applied agenda for research and creative activities. CU-Denver students have access to the library resources of all campuses and cultural events sponsored within the University system.
Academic Structure
Each of the four campuses of the University of Colorado System—Denver, Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Health Sciences in Denver—has its own Chancellor and campus administration. The Chancellors, in turn, report to the President of the CU-System. The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approve the overall direction provided by the President of the System. The System President represents the University of Colorado and manages
the planning for development of the System, apportionment of resources across campuses, the System-wide Graduate School, and general policy regarding academic standards, instructional initiatives, and faculty and staff personnel matters, and is supported by a system-wide Faculty Senate. CU-Denver , as well, has its own faculty governance structure. Students also have their own governance institutions.
The Chancellor of CU-Denver represents CU-Denver and manages campus goalsetting, policy development, academic affairs, and budget and financial matters. The Executive Vice Chancellor and the Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance assist the Chancellor. Each vice chancellor is responsible for the essential components of the campus enterprise.
The Executive Vice Chancellor is responsible for Academic Affairs, The Graduate School, Sponsored Projects, Admissions and Records, Enrollment Management, Planning and Institutional Research, and Student Services. The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance is responsible for the campus budget, Office of Financial and Business Services, and Personnel Services. The CU-Denver Graduate School is a component of the CU System-wide Graduate School. All graduate units reside within The Graduate School except Architecture and Planning, Business, and Public Affairs.
Academic Programs
CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the citizens of Denver and the region. With the rapid development of the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. Today CU-Denver is composed of seven distinct academic units:
School of Architecture and Planning College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education College of Engineering and Applied Science
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
School of the Arts
Graduate School of Public Affairs


8 / General Information
These units now accommodate over 10,000 students taught by about 360 regular, full-time faculty members. The diversity of the student body is a hallmark of CU-Denver and a source of deep pride. Among them are traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school. There also are older students who, perhaps for financial reasons or the press of family commitments or because they’ve only lately recognized the value of a college education, have delayed entry. And there are professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appreciation of the world around them.
The undergraduate colleges admit freshman and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, engineering, and music. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also provides pre-professional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health sciences. The School of Education offers programs leading to teacher education.
The Graduate School offers master’s programs in the arts, sciences, humanities, engineering, education, and music to students with baccalaureate degrees. The School of Architecture and Planning, the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leading to master’s degrees in their specialized areas. CU-Denver doctoral programs are available in public affairs, education, and applied mathematics. Doctoral work in engineering also is available in cooperation with CU-Boulder. CU-Denver faculty also participates in other doctoral programs offered at CU-Boulder.
A complete listing of bachelor’s and master’s degree programs offered by CU-Denver is provided in the college and school sections of this catalog. The college and school sections describe specific policies on requirements for graduation, course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions, and similar information.
CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education which leads to improved professional opportunity in the Information Age. Many programs emphasize practical business world applications, and all CU-Denver students are given the opportunity to attain computer literacy. Specific computer-oriented academic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs.
The Future
CU-Denver is committed to the highest standards of education, scholarship, and service to the community. From this commitment springs the vital energy that infuses every campus pursuit. The pace is fast, perhaps unprecedented. Undergraduate studies are at once becoming more and more varied, challenging, and rewarding. CU-Denver is reaching out to all who can benefit from the high quality education it has to offer. New highly innovative applied and professional graduate degrees are being developed that address the emerging needs of the region’s economy. Centers for state-of-the-field research at CU-Denver are generating important practical solutions to some of Colorado’s and the nation’s most serious social, economic, environmental, and technological problems. Throughout history, urban civilization and the arts and humanities have evolved in a rich synergy. CU-Denver—an urban campus — is deeply involved in enriching the cultural milieu of the Denver area. Clearly, the University of Colorado at Denver is on the move.
Accreditation
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration Colorado State Board of Education Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education
National Architectural Accrediting Board See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalog for the programs accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology National Association of Schools of Music Planning Accreditation Board National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
Auraria Higher Education Center
The Auraria Higher Education Center is the site for the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share
library (which is administered by CU-Denver), classroom, and related facilities on a 171-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered.
On the Auraria campus are administrative and classroom buildings, the Auraria Library, the student union, book center, child care and development centers, physical education facilities, science building, and service buildings.
The new buildings share the campus with the reminders of Denver’s past — historic Ninth Street Park, restored church buildings, and the Tivoli brewery built in 1882. The Tivoli has been renovated into a complex containing specialty shops, restaurants, and entertainment.
Research and Other Creative Pursuits
CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledge through the research and creative efforts of its faculty. Research and creative activities not only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and professional practice. In addition, these activities constitute an important component of CU-Denver’s service to the community at large. Therefore, externally funded projects are a major priority at CU-Denver.
Research projects, training, and public service programs at CU-Denver encompass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study with a focus on issues that relate to city, state, national, and international issues. During 1989-90, CU-Denver faculty and staff received external grants and contracts totalling $8,400,222 for research, training, and public service programs. The benefits for the campus in the years ahead will be substantial. Externally funded activities assist in sustaining scholarly discourse, enable faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge, provide the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern for society, and enhance the education of students. Many students actively participate in projects overseen by faculty members.
An important aspect of research and other creative activities at CU-Denver is its multidisciplinary and applied nature. Research in every school and college at CU-Denver addresses questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region. Its role within a thriving metropolitan area also serves as a base


Centers and Institutes / 9
for exploring topics of national and even international import. But not all research at CU-Denver yields solutions of immediate practical significance. Major efforts now explore topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplines which are carried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that knows no national bounds. These efforts may yield insights that eventually open the way to practical applications in the next century.
Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary economic, political, educational, engineering, mathematical, scientific, and environmental needs. Financial support has been obtained for program and service development in the areas of computational mathematics, bilingual and special education, health administration, international affairs, and executive seminars as well as institutes on aging and veterans’ employment and training.
Other projects include statewide investigations of economic development, poverty, literacy, air quality, water control, and transportation. Computer related projects include multilevel algorithms, fast parallel processing, algorithms in linear programming, and modeling. Projects in basic research range from investigations of earthquakes to neurotoxicology to growth equations for sporangiophores.
In addition, a great deal of research at the University goes on without substantial external support. This effort also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publications, presentations, exhibits, performances, and professional activities. Many members of the faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits bring recognition to the University, establish the credibility of its faculty, and enhance the value of the degrees it confers.
CENTERS AND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE,
AND TRAINING
First Amendment Congress
The mission of the First Amendment Congress is to unite Americans of every persuasion to support freedom of expression, and provide America with a continuing forum to discuss and debate the First Amendment as our cornerstone to liberty. To reach this goal, the Congress sponsors national forums, seminars, and congresses to forge new understanding of First Amendment issues; develops curriculum materials to increase students’ understanding of the First Amendment; aids state and local coalitions to develop First
Amendment organizations and activities; delivers special messages to various audiences reminding them of their duties to uphold First Amendment freedoms, publishes materials, researches public attitudes toward media practices; and supports public awareness campaigns on First Amendment issues.
Center for Health Ethics and Policy
The Center analyzes and develops constructive courses of action concerning policy and ethics aspects of health-related problems facing Colorado and the nation. The Center’s goal is to increase public and private sector attention to these issues and contribute to the making of informed and sound public policy decisions.
Center for Applied Psychology
This Center promotes research and educational programs in four areas: public mental health, psychology and the law, psychology and public health, and organizational effectiveness and decision making. The Center represents a cooperative relationship among higher education, government, business, mental health agencies, public health institutions, and the citizenry of the state of Colorado.
Colorado Principals’ Center
The Center is a staff development, renewal, and training center for practicing principals, assistant principals, centred office supervisors, and others in instructional leadership positions.
Colorado Center for Community Development
The Colorado Center for Community Development provides technical, educational, and applied research assistance to organizations, neighborhoods, and communities that cannot afford or do not have access to professional services. The Center targets its assistance efforts to rural small towns, low income and/or minority communities, and non-traditional, community-based service or development organizations.
Center for Environmental Sciences
The Center focuses on interdisciplinary environmental research from among the faculty and staff of CU-Denver. Further, it involves students—especially Master of Environmental Science students—in ongoing research projects. Example projects include atmospheric science and air pollution studies, environmental risk assessments of regional and national issues, and global sulfur cycling research as it relates to greenhouse warming and global climate.
Center for Urban Transportation Studies
This Center assumes a leading role in the Rocky Mountain region in developing research and interdisciplinary programs in urban transportation and providing a central resource for information concerning urban transportation problems in the Rocky Mountain region. The Center makes available University expertise to outside organizations.
Land and Water Information Systems Group
The Group was created to advance the education and training, research, and public service missions of CU-Denver in the areas of urban and regional information systems, geographic-oriented databases, water resources systems, and built facilities management.
The Centers—Center for the Improvement of Public Management and Center for Public-Private Sector Cooperation
Goals are to improve public sector management and to engage the public, private, and non-profit sectors in devising solutions to community problems. The Centers offer management and leadership training for state and local public officials and private and nonprofit sector emerging leaders. They conduct research on public policy issues, analyzing policy alternatives and evaluating programs. The Centers provide strategic planning, conflict management, and facilitation services as well as other forms of technical assistance to state and local jurisdictions.
Computational Mathematics Group
The Computational Math Group at CU-Denver is a broad-based response to the rapid and dramatic changes in the various fields of computation. The group resides in the Department of Mathematics, but is intended to be a highly interdisciplinary organization with associates in other departments at CU-Denver, on other campuses of the Front Range, and within the business and research community of greater Denver. The ultimate goal is that the Group become an internationally recognized site at which computational mathematics thrives and is advanced.
National Leadership Institute on Aging
The Institute trains leaders from throughout the country to think innova-tively, act with greater strategic skills, and forge new public-private partnerships in meeting the needs of an aging America.
In addition, the Institute consults with organizations involved in designing and


10 / General Information
delivering programs to meet these needs as well as undertakes policy relevant research.
Institute for International Business
The Institute focuses on the global business issues of the 1990s. It is a key resource for business and government in addressing international economic opportunities for Colorado and the U.S. The two major programs are: The Center for International Executive Education, which gives
U.S. and foreign executives hands-on training in successful international business practices; and the Center for Research on Competitiveness, which conducts and disseminates research on international business issues.
National Veterans Training Institute
The Institute provides a series of training courses to strengthen and upgrade the professional skills of the Job Service’s national network of disabled veterans’ outreach specialists and veterans’ representatives who deliver employment services to America’s veterans. The NVTI’s Resource and Technical Assistance Center provides materials and information to trainees and other service providers on topics supporting their professional efforts. The Institute is operated as a joint effort of the University of Colorado at Denver and the U.S. Department of Labor’s Veterans Employment and Training Service.
4th World Center for the Study of Indigenous Law and Politics
This Center provides a research clearinghouse to students and faculty at CU-Denver on legal and political issues that affect indigenous peoples (the 4th World). In addition to supporting a modest library of rare books and periodicals on indigenous issues, the Center also stocks video and audio cassettes on subjects of indigenous politics, and a substantial news-file archive on current developments in the 4th World. Currently, the Center is expanding the number of course offerings in the area of 4th World studies.
Region VIII Resource Access Project
Under a contract funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Resource Access Project provides training and technical assistance to HeadStart centers throughout a six-state region.
Center for Research in Rhetoric
The Center conducts original and applied research in rhetoric, broadly conceived, and engages in projects that involve faculty and students who carry out research studies that contribute to our
understanding of rhetoric and discourse in the broad realm of human affairs. Reports presenting the results of research projects are published by the Center and are available in the English department office.
ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
All questions and correspondence regarding admission to CU-Denver and requests for application forms should be directed to:
Office of Admissions and Records
University of Colorado at Denver
Campus Box 167
P. O. Box 173364
Denver, CO 80217-3364
(303) 556-2704
General Policies
CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program successfully. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being:
1. Level of previous academic performance.
2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests.
3. Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success.
CU-Denver may deny admission to new applicants or readmission to former students whose credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University in order to carry out its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
Applicants who request degree programs that are not available at CU-Denver will be considered for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with an undetermined major. Students admitted with an undetermined major are expected to declare a major by the time they have completed 60 hours toward graduation.
Admission of Undergraduate Degree Students
The University may change documents/ credentials deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands. Applicants should apply as early as possible. Updated information is available from the Office of Admissions Processing (303) 556-2704. For an applicant to be considered for a specific term, ALL documents required for admission must be received in the Office of Admissions Processing by the DEADLINE for that term. Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to be considered for a later term. Transfer students are reminded that they should allow sufficient time to have transcripts sent from institutions they have previously attended. Foreign students are advised that it usually takes 60 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions Processing from international locations.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN
New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, or Liberal Arts and Sciences.
General Requirements. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test.
Specific College Requirements:
College of Business and Administration
English (one year of speech/debate and two years of composition are strongly
recommended)...........................4
Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one year of geometry)... 4 Natural sciences (laboratory science).... 2
Social sciences (including history)....2
Foreign language (both units in a single
language)..............................2
Academic electives ....................2
(Additional courses in English, foreign
language, mathematics, natural or social sciences, not to include business courses.)
Total 16
RECEIPT OF DOCUMENTS DEADLINES
Undergraduate Students Fall Spring Summer
New Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Transfer Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Former University of Colorado Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Intra-university Transfer Students 60 days prior to the beginning of the term
International Students
Undergraduate: July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Graduate: May 26 Oct. 27 March 10


Admissions / 11
College of Engineering and Applied Science1
English (literature, composition,
grammar)...............................4
Mathematics distributed as follows:
Algebra..............................2
Geometry.............................1
Additional mathematics (trigonometry
recommended) ......................1
Natural sciences including one year of physics and one year of chemistry.... 2 Foreign language (both units in a single
language)............................2
Academic electives .................. 3
Total 16
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
English (literature, composition,
grammar).............................4
Mathematics (excluding business
and consumer mathematics) ...........3
Natural sciences.......................3
Social science.........................2
Foreign language
(both units in a single language) ...2
Academic elective.................... 1
Total 15
All music majors in the School of the Arts are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area. Two years of prior piano training are recommended.
An audition is required of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the School of the Arts, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications.
MINIMUM ACADEMIC PREPARATION STANDARDS (MAPS)
Freshmen entering the University of Colorado who have graduated from high school in 1988 or later are required to meet the following Minimum Academic Preparation Standards: 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics),
3 years of social science including one year of U.S. or world history, and 2 years of a single foreign language.
'See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalog for more specific information.
The MAPS focus on subject areas the student has studied in preparation for college. Freshman admission standards define the level of success and achievement necessary to be admitted to the University of Colorado and include factors that predict academic success such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school course work, and the grade-point average. Both the subjects the student has studied and how the student has achieved will be factors that determine admission to the University.
Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade-point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University.
Two levels of deficiency will be recognized.
1. One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student meets other admission standards and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation from the University. Courses taken to make-up a deficiency will count toward graduation, provided the CU-Denver college accepts those course credits toward graduation.
2. In some cases a student having more than one unit of deficiency may be admitted, provided that the student meets other standards of the University. The student must make up additional deficiencies before graduation by taking an expanded program of studies. The student may satisfy the MAPS requirements by successful completion of 1) courses taken at CU,
2) courses taken at other institutions of higher education, 3) additional high school credits, 4) credit-by-examination programs, or 5) other requirements as approved by each CU-Denver college.
Preferred consideration for admission is given to applicants who rank in the top 30% of their high school graduating class and present a composite score of 25 or higher on the American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 1050 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Business applicants will receive preferred consideration if they graduated in the top 25 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 25 on the ACT or 1050 on the SAT. Engineering applicants will receive preferred consideration if they graduated in the top 20 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT and a 28 on the mathematics or a 1100 total on the SAT with a 600 on the mathematics. Applicants who do not meet the admissions
requirements for direct admission to Engineering are encouraged to apply as a preengineering major in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Music major applicants also must successfully pass a music audition.
Applicants who do not satisfy the requirements for preferred consideration are reviewed on an individual basis.
How to Apply
1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor or from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions Processing.
2. The application must be completed in full and sent to the Office of Admissions Processing with a $30 (subject to change) non-refundable fee. For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term, the $30 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions Processing is informed of the intent to enroll for a later term.
3. Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions Processing. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions Processing. Hand-carried copies are not official.
4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to have a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate sent from the certifying agency to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions Processing.
5. Students also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4-4875). High school students may obtain ACT and SAT test dates and locations from their counselors.
Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver as the recipient of the scores must request the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. A Request for Additional Score Report may be obtained from any of the offices listed below.
Registration Department
American College Testing Program (ACT)
P.O. Box 414
Iowa City, Iowa 52240
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 592
Princeton, New Jersey 08540


12 / General Information
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 1025
Berkeley, California 94704
6. International students must submit proof of proficiency in the English language (see Requirements for International Students).
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS
Transfer students may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, and Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students interested in the field of education should contact the School of Education office for information (556-2717).
Established under the auspices of the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and the Colorado Community College and Occupational Education System, transfer agreements have been made with Arapahoe Community College, Front Range Community College, Community College of Aurora, Community College of Denver, and Red Rocks Community College enabling students of these institutions to be directly admitted to CU-Denver. Students should contact the Office of Admissions Processing for complete details.
Minimum transfer admission standards have been developed for all public four-year institutions in Colorado. However, transfer applicants who meet these standards are not guaranteed admission. They also must meet the admissions standards of the University of Colorado and its individual colleges. To meet the minimum standards at the University of Colorado at Denver, students must meet one of the following conditions:
1. Have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade-point average:
a. 2.0 GPA if transferring from Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, University of Colorado at Boulder, or University of Colorado at Colorado Springs.
b. 2.5 GPA if transferring from any other postsecondary institution.
2. Be enrolled in a CCHE-approved guaranteed transfer agreement and meet the minimum academic qualifications of the agreement.
3. Have earned fewer than 30 collegiate semester hours and meet the first-time FRESHMAN standards for the institution.
Transfer students are given priority consideration for admission as follows:
1. College of Business and Administration. To be considered for new transfer admission, students must have completed at least 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Applicants with an overall GPA of 3.0 in applicable course work will be automatically admitted. Students with less than a 3.0 overall GPA, but with a 3.25 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work attempted, will be automatically admitted.
Applicants with at least a 2.6 in applicable course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with less than a 2.6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration.
No applicant will be accepted who is not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
2. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants to the College of Engineering should have at least a 2.75 cumulative grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted, should have completed two semesters each of calculus and physics, and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
3. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music major applicants also must pass an audition. Contact the School of the Arts for audition information (556-2727).
Important Note: Applicants who do not meet the above grade-point average or credit hour requirements will still be considered for admission, but on an individual basis.
The primary factors used when considering students individually are (1) probability of success in the academic program to which admission is desired;
(2) the quality of prior academic work; (3) age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and (4) time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges.
How to Apply
1. The student should obtain a transfer application from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions Processing.
2. The application form must be completed and returned with the required $30
(subject to change) nonrefundable application fee.
3. The student is required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions Processing from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions Processing. Hand-carried copies are not official. If a student is currently enrolled at another institution, an incomplete transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. (Transcripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accompanied by a certified literal English translation.)
4. Students who have attended a two-year school or community college, and were enrolled in the Guaranteed Transfer Program to transfer to CU-Denver, should submit a copy of the Guaranteed Transfer “contract” with their application.
Liberal arts and music major applicants with fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of college work completed also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores.
Engineering applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Applicants to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should be aware that the College requires elementary proficiency in a foreign language for graduation. Applicants to the College have fulfilled this requirement if they have completed three years of any classical or modern foreign language in high school and present a high school transcript to the College Advising Office for verification. For further information, students should contact the College Advising Office, 556-2555.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. Students who do not declare all previously attended institutions are subject to disciplinary action and/or dismissal.
Transfer of College-Level Credit
After all official transcripts have been received and the applicant has been admitted as a degree student, the Office of Admissions Processing and the appropriate academic unit will determine which courses taken at other institutions are applicable to a degree program at CU-Denver. In general transfer credit will be accepted insofar as it meets the degree


Admissions /13
and grade requirements at CU-Denver.
College-level credit may be transferred to the University if it was earned at a college or university of recognized standing, by CLEP or advanced placement examinations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education; if a grade of C- or higher was attained; and if the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution. Courses taken pass/fail are transferred when a grade of C-or higher is required to pass.
The University may accept a maximum of 72 semester credits (108 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution toward the baccalaureate degree requirements and may accept up to 112 semester credits (153 quarter hours) from a four-year college or university. No credit is allowed for voca-tional/technical, remedial, or religious/ doctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met.
The College of Business and Administration generally limits its transfer credit for business courses taken at the lower division level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado. A maximum of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. All correspondence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability, and business courses may not be taken through correspondence.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science, in general, requires that engineering course transfer credit must come from an ABET accredited engineering program to be acceptable for degree purposes. Engineering technology courses are not considered equivalent to engineering courses.
READMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FORMER AND RETURNING CU STUDENTS
CU-Denver students who have not registered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year or longer, and who have not attended another institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmission. Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions Processing.
Students who have attended another college or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as
transfer students and meet the transfer student deadlines for receipt of documents. This requires payment of the $30 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee and submission of official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended. Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to CU-Denver, Admissions Processing,
Campus Box 167, P. O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364.
Students who have not attended the University for up to one year but have attended another college or university in the interim are required to pay a $30 (subject to change) transfer application fee. Transcripts must be requested by the student and sent by the registrar of the other institution(s) to CU-Denver, Admissions Processing, Campus Box 167, P. O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 802172D3364.
Students who last attended another CU campus (including the Division of Extended Studies) must formally apply for readmission. Application forms are available from the Office of Admissions Processing.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to undergraduate and graduate programs.
Undergraduate: Admission requirements for CU-Denver’s schools and colleges vary, and international students seeking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Prospective students should request an International Student Application packet from the Office of Admissions Processing. Information about requirements for each CU-Denver college and school can be found in this catalog.
Deadlines for receipt of documents have been established to allow for the timely mailings of I-20’s. Contact the Office of Admissions Processing for these dates.
Graduate: International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an undergraduate bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Applications are available from The Admissions Processing
Office six months prior to the term for which the student is applying.
Note: Except for summer terms, international students must be in a degreeseeking status. They may attend summer terms as non-degree students. This exception is strictly limited to summer terms.
CU-DENVER INTRA-UNIVERSITY TRANSFER OR CHANGE OF CAMPUS (INCLUDING EXTENDED STUDIES)
CU-Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver Intra-university Transfer Forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Classes. Decisions on intrauniversity transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer.
CU-Denver students may change University of Colorado campuses by applying directly to the Admissions Processing Office of the campus to which they wish to transfer. Change of Campus applications and deadline information also must be obtained from the campus to which the student is applying.
Extended Studies students wishing to enroll in regular CU-Denver courses or degree programs should contact the Office of Admissions Processing.
HIGH SCHOOL CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
High school juniors and seniors with demonstrated academic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for one term only. This approval may be renewed. Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions Processing (303-556-2704).
Admission of Graduate Degree Students
All correspondence and questions regarding admission to the graduate program at CU-Denver should be directed to the following:
Programs in Business
Graduate Business Programs
Graduate School of Business
Administration
595-4007


14 / General Information
Programs in Architecture and Planning School of Architecture and Planning 556-3382
Programs in Public Affairs Graduate School of Public Affairs 820-5600
All Other Programs The Graduate School 556-2663
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Graduate degree programs are offered through The Graduate School by its member schools and colleges (School of Education, College of Engineering and Applied Science, and College of Liberal Arts and Sciences), and by the Graduate School of Business Administration, the School of Architecture and Planning, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs.
GRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION DEADLINES
Admission requirements and application deadlines vary according to the individual graduate program. The Graduate School has general admission requirements which are supplemented by specific requirements of the major departments of graduate study (e.g., electrical engineering, education, English, etc.). Applicants should consult the general information section of The Graduate School portion of this catalog, as well as the college or school sections, for requirements and deadlines for specific programs.
Admission of Non-Degree Students
Persons who have reached the age of twenty and who want to take University courses but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree at this time may be admitted as non-degree students provided that they are academically eligible and admissable. Correspondence and questions regarding admission as a nondegree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions Processing. Those seeking admission as non-degree students for the purpose of teacher certification should contact the School of Education, 556-2717. Each school/college limits the number of semester hours that are transferable to a degree program. Students considering changing from non-degree to degree status should contact the school/ college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about
the number of hours that may be taken as a non-degree student.
Courses taken as a non-degree student are for credit and can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional improvement.
Note: International students are not admitted as non-degree students, except for summer terms. They must hold a valid Visa.
Students with the baccalaureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for course work as non-degree students. There are several types of these students. Among them are teachers who seek renewal of certification; students who wish to take additional course work for professional or personal improvement; and students who feel a need to make up deficiencies before entering a specific program.
Non-degree students should be aware that, generally only a limited number of course credits taken by a non-degree student may be applied later toward a degree program at CU-Denver.
To continue registration as a non-degree student, a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 must be maintained.
HOW TO APPLY FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION
To apply for admission as a non-degree student, obtain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office of Admissions Processing. Return completed application by the deadline for the term desired. A $10 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee is required.
No additional credentials are required. Applicants who seek teacher certification must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials. Non-degree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space available basis.
CHANGING STATUS FROM NONDEGREE TO DEGREE STUDENT
Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined in the Non-degree to Degree procedures available from the Office of Admissions. Academic credentials (i.e., transcripts and/or test scores) and a $30 (subject to change) nonrefundable application fee also must be submitted. Non-degree students who are accepted as undergraduate degree students may generally transfer a limited number of semester hours for courses taken as a non-degree student to an undergraduate
degree program with the approval of their academic dean. Non-degree students should consult with the college to which they are applying during the first semester of their enrollment for the maximum number of semester credit hours acceptable toward a degree program as a nondegree student. (Students enrolled as nondegree students prior to the Fall Semester of 1970 are subject to the policies in effect between January of 1969 and August of 1970.)
Non-degree students may apply for admission to a graduate program by completing the application required by the particular program. The graduate dean, upon recommendation by the department, may accept up to 8 semester hours of credit toward the requirements for a master’s degree for courses taken as a non-degree student at the University or at another recognized graduate school, or some combination thereof. The department may recommend acceptance of additional credit for courses taken as a non-degree student during the semester the student has applied for admission to the desired degree program.
Official Notification of Admission
Official notification of admission to CU-Denver as an undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions Processing. Letters from various schools and colleges indicating acceptance into a particular program are pending subject to official notification of admission to the institution. Applicants who do not receive official notification of admission within a reasonable period of time (approximately 3 weeks) after submitting all application materials should contact the Office of Admissions Processing (303) 556-2704.
Tentative Admission. Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents will be permitted one term to submit the documents. If temporarily waived official documents are not received by the end of the initial term of attendance, registration for subsequent terms will be denied. If at any time additional credentials are received which affect your qualifications, the University reserves the right to change the admission decision.


UNDERGRADUATE AND NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION INFORMATION 1.2.3
Type of Applicant Criteria for Admission1 Required Credentials When to Apply Notes
FRESHMAN (Student seeking bachelor’s degree who has never attended a collegiate institution) IN GENERAL: a) Ranks in top 30 of high school graduating class. b) Has 15 units of acceptable high school work. c) Test scores: ACT comp: 25 or SAT comb: 1050 Complete application $30 applicable fee Official high school transcript showing rank-in-class, date of graduation, 6th semester grades, courses in progress, Official ACT or SAT score report Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Seniors who meet or exceed all admission criteria may apply as early as Oct. 1 for following fall. For specific requirements refer to the college sections of this bulletin. For example: Music requires an audition.
Note: Business and Engineering applicants are expected to have higher test scores, class rank, and number of academic units.
TRANSFER (Student seeking a bachelor’s degree who has attended a collegiate institution other than CU) IN GENERAL: Must be in good standing and eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Applicants must have minimum 2.0 GPA on all work attempted if they have completed 30 or more semester hours. Business and Engineering applicants will be required to have a higher GPA.3 Complete application $30 application fee Two official transcripts sent from each college attended Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Liberal Arts and Music transfers with fewer than 12 sem. hrs. of college work, Business transfers with fewer than 24 sem. hrs., and Engineering transfers with fewer than 24 sem. hrs. must also submit all freshman credentials.
NON-DEGREE (Student is not seeking a degree at this institution) Must be high school graduate or have a GE.D. Must be at least 20 years old Complete application $10 application fee Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Applications will also be accepted after these deadlines if space allows. Non-degree students who have earned a baccalaureate degree should see Graduate School section for additional information.
RETURNING CU STUDENT (Returning non-degree and or degree student who has not attended another institution since CU) Must be in good standing Completed degree Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Applications also will be accepted after these deadlines . if space allows Will be admitted to their previous major unless a new major is requested. Students under academic suspension in certain schools or colleges at the University of Colorado may enroll during the summer terms to improve their grade-point averages.
FORMER CU STUDENT (Degree student who has attended another institution since attending CU) Same as for transfer Complete application $30 application fee Two official transcripts from each intervening college Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Will be admitted to previous major unless a different major is requested on application.
CHANGE OF STATUS: NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE (CU non-degree student who wishes to enter a degree program) Same as for transfer Complete application $30 application fee CU transcript Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Must meet the same criteria as transfer student.
2ND UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE (Students who have received a bachelor’s degree from CU or any other college or university.) Same as for transfer Complete application $30 application fee transcript
CHANGE OF STATUS: DEGREE TO NON-DEGREE (Former CU degree student who has graduated and wishes to take additional work) Must have completed degree Non-degree student application $10 application fee Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Only students who have completed and received degrees are eligible to change to non-degree status.
INTERCAMPUS TRANSFER (Student who has been enrolled on one CU campus and wishes to take courses on another) Must be in good standing Completed degree Transfer to Denver, not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Transfer from Denver: refer to the bulletin for other campus. Transfers from Denver to another campus of CU should refer to the bulletin of the campus to which they are applying for additional requirements. Will be admitted to previous major unless a different major is requested on application.
INTRAUNIVERSITY TRANSFER (Students who wish to change from one CU college to another, e.g., from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to the College of Business) Same as for transfer. Must be a continuing student enrolled on the campus to which you are applying. Intrauniversity transfer application CU transcript 60 days prior to the beginning of the term
'Requirements for individual schools or colleges may vary. 2Foreign students should see International Students in the Admissions section of this catalog. Applicants who have earned 12-29 semester hours must meet freshman standards or have a minimum transfer GPA of 2.5. (Applicants transferring from Colorado School of Mines, CSU, UNC, UCB, or UCCS must have a minimum transfer GPA of 2.0.)


16 / General Information
TUITION AND FEES General Information
All tuition and fee charges are established by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually (usually in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly. The Regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee rates at any time. A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term, and students should contact the Records Office for further information on the tuition and fee charges for a particular term. The following rates are for the 1990-91 academic year and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating cost.
Other Fees1
1. Student Activity Fee (required for all students):
For each term.................$36.00
This fee supports the activities of the student government and helps provide legal services, recreational activties, student health services, the student newspaper, the Center for Student Counseling and Testing, and various student organizations. The fee is approved by student referendum and is required of all students at the University of Colorado at Denver. (The fee includes a Student Health fee.)
2. Auraria Bond Retirement Fee
(required for all students):
Each term.....................$ 32.50
3. Student Information System Fee (a non-refundable fee required of all students each term).................$ 5.00
4. Matriculation Fee (mandatory for the first term for all new students):
...................................$15.00
This is a non-refundable fee charged at the student’s first registration to cover costs of generating transcripts.
5. Information Technology Fee $10.00 The Information Technology Fee provides for capital acquisition of new and/or upgraded systems to support student computing laboratories to include networks and networking infrastructure and facilities directly accessible by students each term.
6. Doctoral dissertation fee (mandatory for all students certified by The Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral dissertation). Students should contact The Graduate School for guidelines established for charges for enrollment.
'Subject to change.
7. Comprehensive examination fee:
Any student in The Graduate School, the Graduate School of Business Administration, or Graduate School of Public Affairs must be enrolled during the term in which the Comprehensive Examination for a master’s degree is completed. Students who are not taking regular courses during that term must enroll as “Candidate for Degree.” Students enrolled only as “Candidate for Degree” pay the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour. The charge varies by the school in which the student is matriculated.
8. Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course):
Breakage deposit............$20.00
An $8 deduction is assessed for expendable items. The unused portion is returned at the end of the semester.
9. Music laboratory fee (mandatory for music majors and others enrolled in certain music courses):
Music fee...................$24.00
Music majors and others enrolled in piano, sound recording and reinforcement, and electronic music must pay this fee. No student is charged more than one $24 fee during a given term.
10. South African Scholarship Fund.
The Regents have authorized the University of Colorado to accept voluntary student contributions of $1.00 per student per semester to be dedicated to scholarship and bursaries for the higher education of needy South African students at South African universities or at the University of Colorado. Students who wish to contribute to this fund should submit a contribution card to the Bursar’s Office before the end of the drop/add period each semester.
Payment of Tuition and Fees
All tuition and fees (except the application fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, according to guidelines in the current Schedule of Classes. Students who register for 7 or more credit hours may arrange at the time of registration to defer payment of part of the charges. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Schedule of Classes published before each semester or summer term. Students who fail to complete payment by the published deadlines, or who fail to file the required promissory note, will be assessed a $50 penalty.
Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even though they may drop out of school.
Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Classes. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, to be issued transcripts, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after graduation.
Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation. Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable to the bank will be charged an additional service charge. Students may pay tuition and fees by credit card.
Tuition Appeals
Exceptions to financial obligations incurred may be granted by the Tuition Appeals Committee. The Committee will only consider appeals when a student has been medically disabled, has experienced a death in the family, or has a change in employment hours or location beyond the student’s control. Documentation of these conditions will be required. Exceptions will not be considered for a student’s failure to comply with published deadlines, or changes in employment under the student’s control.
Please note: tuition appeals must be filed within four months of the end of the term for which the appeal is filed.
FALL AND SPRING 1990-91 TUITION
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES and non-degree students without an undergraduate degree
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $89 $393
2 178 786
3 267 1,179
4 356 1,572
5 445 1,965
6 534 2,358
7 623 3,278
8 712 3,278
9-15 742 3,278
each credit hour over 15 89 393


Tuition and Fees / 17
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $103 $409
2 206 818
3 309 1,227
4 412 1,636
5 515 2,045
6 618 2,454
7 721 3,412
8 824 3,412
9-15 862 3,412
each credit hour over 15 103 409
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $124 $414
2 248 828
3 372 1,242
4 496 1,656
5 620 2,070
6 744 2,484
7 868 3,451
8 992 3,451
9-15 1,030 3,451
each credit hour over 15 124 414
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the School of Architecture and Planning and NON-DEGREE graduate students and non-Denver campus programs*
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $132 $441
2 264 882
3 396 1,323
4 528 1,764
5 660 2,205
6 792 2,646
7 924 3,674
8 1,056 3,674
9-15 1,099 3,674
each credit hour over 15 132 441
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the Graduate School of Business Administration
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $155 $449
2 310 898
3 465 1,347
4 620 1,796
5 775 2,245
6 930 2,694
7 1,085 3,743
8 1,240 3,743
9-15 1,292 3,743
each credit hour over 15 155 449
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College of Engineering, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $146 $441
2 292 882
3 438 1,323
4 584 1,764
5 730 2,205
6 876 2,646
7 1,022 3,674
8 1,168 3,674
9-15 1,215 3,674
each credit hour over 15 146 441
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the School of Education
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $136 $441
2 272 882
3 408 1,323
4 544 1,764
5 680 2,205
6 816 2,646
7 952 3,674
8 1,088 3,674
9-15 1,215 3,674
each credit hour over 15 136 441
Graduate degree students who are registered as “candidate for degree” will be assessed the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour plus the Student Information System Fee.
* Non-degree students who have previously earned a baccalaureate degree are classified as graduate students and assessed graduate tuition regardless of the level of the class(es) they are taking.
THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE TUITION AND FEES AT ANY TIME.
Audit
To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the University or have outstanding financial obligations to the University. The Records Office does not keep any record of courses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where special equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor. Auditor’s cards are issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor when requesting permission to attend a class.
There is no auditor status in summer. Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges, and are not eligible for other student services.
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
Tuition classification is governed by CRS 23-7-101, et. seq. (1973) as amended.1 Institutions of higher education are bound to the provisions of this statute and are not free to make exceptions to the rules set forth.
The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a legal domiciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classification is being sought. Persons over 22 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 22 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court appointed legal guardian. An unemancipated minor’s parent must, therefore, have a legal
'A copy of the Colorado Revised Statutes (1973), as amended, is available in the University of Colorado at Denver Admissions Office.


18 / General Information
domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes.
Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one’s true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colorado domicile on the person seeking to establish the domicile. The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connections with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado, for tuition purposes, begins the day after connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evidence one’s intent. The most common ties with the state are (1) change of driver’s license to Colorado; (2) change of automobile registration to Colorado; (3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado; (5) and most important, payment of state income taxes as a resident by one whose income is sufficient to be taxed. Caution: payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroactive to the time filed.
In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term, the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question. If one’s 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, in-state tuition cannot be granted until the next semester.
Once the student’s tuition classification is established, it remains unchanged unless satisfactory information to the contrary is presented. A student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification from resident to nonresident or vice versa must inform the Tuition Classification Officer within 15 days after such a change occurs. An adult student or emancipated minor who moves outside of Colorado must send written notification to the Tuition Classification Officer within 15 days of the change.
Once a student is classified as nonresident for tuition purposes, the student must petition for a change in classification. Petitions must be submitted NO LATER THAN THE FIRST DAY OF CLASSES of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a nonresident. It is preferred for petitions to be received 30 days prior to the beginning of the term. Late petitions will not be considered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions Processing.
The final decision regarding tuition status rests with the University. Questions regarding residence (tuition) status should
be referred only to the Tuition Classification Officer. Opinions of other persons are not official or binding upon the University. Additional information (including the entire text of CRS 23-7-101) is available in the brochure Classification of Students for Tuition Purposes which may be obtained from the Admissions Processing Office.
Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel
The Colorado Legislature approved resident tuition beginning with the Fall 1986 Semester for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. ELIGIBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM. Students obtain a completed verification form from the base education officer, and submit the form with their military ID to the Records Office after they have registered, but before the end of the drop/add period.
At that time the student’s bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate. Students who have been certified remain classified as non-residents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Colorado.
FINANCIAL AID
Director: Ellie Miller Office: NC 1030 Telephone: 556-2886
The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment considers qualified students for financial aid awards. If the student’s application materials are received before the March 29, 1991, priority date, then the student is considered for a package of need-based grant, work-study (part-time employment), and/or long-term loan funds. For the past several years, these packages have consisted of approximately 50% grant funds and 50% of self-help funds (work-study, loan, unmet need). (Graduate students have only been receiving approximately 10% in grant funds.) If applications are received after the March 29 priority date, the student is usually considered only for Pell Grant and for outside student loans (Stafford Loan — formerly Guaranteed Student Loan or GSL, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, and Supplemental Loan for Students). These funds are not allocated to CU-Denver; they are available throughout the year to students who qualify. There are three separate deadlines for applying for Advantage Scholarship; refer to the
separate brochure for further information.
Applicants for Colorado Fellowship, Deans Scholars, and Regents Scholars are subject to different deadlines and are reviewed by other CU-Denver departments (The Graduate School, undergraduate dean’s offices, and the Office of Admissions respectively). All other students are notified of their award status in writing by the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment.
Eligibility
Each student must qualify for CU-Denver financial aid as follows:
1. Be a U.S. citizen or be admitted to the U.S. by the INS on a permanent basis (except for Colorado Fellowship).
2. Be classified as a degree-seeking student (except for students applying for Advantage Scholarships). Teacher certification students are eligible to apply as undergraduate students for outside student loans (Stafford Loan, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, or Supplemental Loan for Students).
3. Be enrolled for a specified minimum number of credits.
4. Maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined for the financial aid programs.
5. Apply for financial aid by submitting all of the required documentation including the need analysis form (except for Colorado Fellowship, Colorado Scholars, Deans Scholars, Regents Scholars, and Emergency Short Term Loans).
6. Document financial need (except for the programs listed in *5 and the following ones which do not require documented need: Advantage Scholarship, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, and Supplemental Loan for Students).
7. Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes for the following programs: Colorado Student Grant, Colorado Student Incentive Grant, Colorado Graduate Grant, Colorado Work-Study, Regents Scholarship, Deans Scholars, and Colorado Scholars.
8. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant.
9. Be registered for the draft or enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selective Service.
Application
Each applicant must complete the financial aid application materials for submission to the Office of Financial Aid. Complete information must be available to the financial aid counselors before eligibility can be determined.


Financial Aid /19
Limited Funds. The majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis to eligible students who document financial need and complete their application process as soon as possible after January 1, 1991. Application completion is defined as having all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (ACT Family Financial Statement, CSS Financial Aid Form, USAF Singlefile Form or the AFSA) into the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. General financial aid is awarded to eligible students until all of the funds are committed for the year. If you complete your file after March 29, 1991, your awards will probably be limited to the Pell Grant (for first undergraduate students only) and/or outside student loans (Stafford Loan, Supplemental Loans for Students, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students). Please remember to reapply for financial aid each year.
It is the student’s responsibility to be sure application materials are complete. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for application forms and refer to the Financial Aid Fact Sheets for complete details regarding financial aid. All financial aid application procedures are subject to change at any time due to revisions in federal and state laws, regulations, and guidelines.
Qualification
Financial Need. Most financial aid is based on the concept of financial need. Your financial aid counselor calculates financial need as: 1) cost of attendance, minus family contribution which is 2) stu-dent/spouse contribution, and 3) parents’ contribution (for dependent students only).
The cost of attendance is the cost to attend CU-Denver, including tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses.
The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment determines standard budgets for students based upon average tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.
Independent Student. The federal government has specific guidelines that must be followed to define a self-supporting student (one who reports only his/her own income and assets when applying for aid). For 1991-92, a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old or older as of December 31, 1992. If you are under 24, you are considered self-supporting if you fall into one of the following categories:
1. Single undergraduate student with no dependents who was not claimed as a dependent on your parents’ 1989 and 1990 federal income tax returns. Also, you must demonstrate that you are self-sufficient by having total income (including financial aid) of at least $4,000 annually for the two calendar years prior to your first receipt of federal financial aid.
2. Graduate or professional student who will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents’ 1991 federal income tax return.
3. Married and will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents’ 1991 federal income tax return.
4. Student with legal dependents other than a spouse.
5. Veteran of the U.S. armed forces.
6. Orphan or ward of the court.
7. Have unusual circumstances and be approved by the Financial Aid Committee. Contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for appeal guidelines.
If your student/spouse contribution plus your parents’ contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance, you will not qualify for need-based financial aid. For 1990-91, the following budgets were used for room and board, transportation, and personal expenses per month: single students living with parents $330/month; single students not living with parents $730/month. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student was approximately $820 per semester, and non-resident tuition was approximately $3300. These amounts will probably increase by about 5% for the 1991-92 school year.
The contributions from the student/spouse and from the parents of dependent students are calculated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income, savings and other assets, family size, number of children in postsecondary school, medical expenses, and other factors. You may appeal for special consideration of your situation and in some cases the standardized contribution may be adjusted by recommendation of the Financial Aid Committee. FINANCIAL AID IS INTENDED TO SUPPLEMENT (NOT REPLACE) FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS FROM YOU AND YOUR PARENTS.
Course Loads. General financial aid (work-study, grants, Perkins Loans) undergraduate recipients usually must carry at least 12 credit hours per semester and graduate students usually must carry at least five graduate credits per semester during the academic year (fall/spring). Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please
check your award letter for the exact number of hours required). Pell Grant (available only to first undergraduates) and outside student loan recipients must carry at least six credits per semester for undergraduates and three graduate credits for graduates. Summer Term 1991 minimum course loads are as follows: Full-time: undergraduate—8 hours, graduate—3 graduate hours; Half-time: undergraduate—4 hours, graduate—2 graduate hours. Higher or lower standards may be required for individual awards. For further information contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
Satisfactory Academic Progress. CU-Denver students must make satisfactory academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment in order to be eligible and remain eligible for financial aid. Students are referred to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid, available in the Office of Financial Aid.
Non-Degree Students. Non-degree students are not pursuing a degree in a technical sense and, therefore, are only eligible to apply for one type of financial aid at this time—Advantage Scholarship.
Continuing Education/Community College of Denver Courses. Classes offered through the CU-Denver Division of Extended Studies or through the Community College of Denver cannot be included when minimum course loads and satisfactory academic progress are determined. The exception to’this policy is MATH 112 offered by the Community College of Denver.
Residency Status. You are required to be a resident of Colorado for a full calendar year before the Office of Admissions can consider classifying you as a resident for tuition purposes. Non-resident students are encouraged to obtain additional information from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident status. As a resident student, you are potentially eligible for more financial aid programs since you can be considered for the State of Colorado aid funds.
Refunds and Repayments. Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal or reclassification of tuition status must be applied against the recipient’s financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Students may be expected to repay a portion of their award if they withdraw from CU-Denver.
Appeals. Students may appeal all decisions of the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment by completing a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office. Appeals are considered within three weeks.


20 / General Information
Reapply Each Year. Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each year.
Award
Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 6-12 weeks after all application documents have been received in the Office of Financial Aid. If awarded, an award letter is mailed which includes information such as the type(s) and amount(s) of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours that are required for the award(s).
Types of Aid
The following are federal programs:
1. Pell Grant. Your eligibility for the Pell Grant (federally funded) is determined before any other aid is awarded. Awards are defined by a strict formula provided by the federal government and amounts vary depending on the student’s eligibility index, enrollment status, residency classification, and living status. Students are eligible for a Pell Grant if they have not received their first bachelor’s degree by June 1, 1991.
2. Outside Student Loans. Your eligibility for all other types of aid should be determined prior to applying for outside student loans. The STAFFORD LOAN (formerly Guaranteed Student Loan) program requires that you show financial need in order to qualify. Most single students who are working full time do not document sufficient financial need to qualify for the Stafford Loan. The primary purpose of this program is to make low-interest, long-term loans available to students to help them meet their postsecondary educational expenses. The SUPPLEMENTAL LOAN FOR STUDENTS is a long-term loan program for students who do not document financial need for the Stafford Loan or who need additional funds. Undergraduate dependent students may not borrow the SLS because their parents are eligible to borrow under the same terms. The program for parents is called the PARENTS LOAN FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS (PLUS).
3. Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG). A need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a bachelor’s degree.
4. Perkins Loan (formerly National Direct Student Loan). The interest rate on this long-term loan is 5% and no payments are due until six or nine months (this time differs depending on when you first receive a Perkins Loan) after the stu-
dent ceases to be enrolled at least half time.
5. College Work-Study. A program that allows students to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at nonprofit agencies to help meet their educational costs.
The State of Colorado funds the following programs.
1. Colorado Student Grant. A need-based grant for resident undergraduate students.
2. Colorado Student Incentive Grant. A need-based grant for resident undergraduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor’s degree. This grant is funded 50% by the federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado.
3. Colorado Graduate Grant. A need-based grant for resident graduate students.
4. Colorado Work-Study. A program similar to the College Work-Study program, but limited to resident undergraduate students.
Scholarships
Following is a list of the major scholarships that are offered at CU-Denver. The first listing is for awards funded by the State of Colorado:
1. Regents Scholarship is offered to new freshmen and transfer students by the Office of Admissions (556-2704). To qualify, freshmen candidates must rank in the top 20 percent of their high school class and/or have a composite score of 26 or higher on the ACT or a combined score of 1200 on the SAT. Transfer students must have earned a total cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher for at least 12 semester hours. The deadline for applying is March 29, 1991.
2. Colorado Scholars is for undergraduate resident students who have a minimum of 3.0 cumulative grade point average for at least 12 CU hours. Contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for the application procedures. The deadline for applying is March 29, 1991.
3. Deans Scholarships are awarded by undergraduate deans offices. Contact your dean’s office for more information.
The following programs are funded by CU-Denver:
1. Advantage Scholarship is for minority and/or first generation college students who meet the income guidelines. Contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for applications.
2. Nelson/Running Wolf Scholarship funds are provided to needy American
Indian students. Contact the Office of Student Retention Services (556-2324) for information.
3. Ahlin Fund assistance is available for mobility impaired students. Contact Student Counseling and Testing (556-2815) for applications.
Other scholarship information is available from the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment, the Auraria Library Scholarship InfoBank in the reference section, and the Office of Student Counseling and Testing.
Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment opportunities are listed in the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment, the Auraria Student Assistance Center, and the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education. Full-time undergraduate resident students who apply for College Work-Study and who do not document sufficient financial need may be considered for Colorado No-Need Work-Study. Students who participate in CMEA/MESA, the Pre-Collegiate Development Program, the Minority Scholars Program, or who apply for Advantage Scholarships are automatically considered for Challenge Scholarships. Graduate students should inquire about additional types of aid through their academic department. Students should be aware that Emergency Student Loans are available through the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment as well as Financial Aid Advances. American Indian students should inquire in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for information about Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships.
REGISTRATION
Selecting an Academic Program and Courses
Students should review the following sections of this catalog that describe the academic programs available at CU-Denver, and that provide information by school or college on the various majors available, course requirements by major, course load policies, and other pertinent information.
Courses available during a particular semester or summer term are listed in the Schedule of Classes, published three months before the beginning of each term. Schedules are available from the Records Office.
Undergraduate students who need assistance in planning an academic program or in selecting courses should contact the academic unit in which they


Registration / 21
are enrolled to arrange for an advising appointment prior to registration. Graduate students should contact their respective graduate program for assistance.
Course Abbreviations
In general, the abbreviation preceding the course number identifies the department offering the course. The first digit in the course number indicates the recommended class level of the course:
The digit after the dash in the course number denotes the credit-hour value of the course. The 1-credit lecture/recitation period is 50 minutes long. Hence a student enrolled in a 3-credit hour course will attend class for 150 minutes per week during a 16-week term. A 3-credit hour course will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class. A laboratory credit includes from two to four hours per week in the laboratory credit includes from two to four hours per week in the laboratory, drafting room or field. Unless the course descriptions specify laboratory work, it is understood that the classes consist of lectures and discussions.
Level of Courses Student Classification 1000 Lower division
2000 Lc /er division
3000 Upper division
4000 Upper division
5000 Graduate students or
qualified seniors who have instructor's or dean’s permission 6000 Graduate degree
students
7000 Master’s and Ph.D.
graduate students
8000 Ph.D. graduate students
Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are:
Coreq. —Corequisite Hrs —Hours Lab.—Laboratory Lect.—Lecture Rec—Recitation Sem—Semester Wk.—Week
Thus, the description of CHEM. 1020-5 signifies that the course is offered by the chemistry department at the freshman level, and that it carries 5 semester hours of credit (3 hours of lecture credit, 1 hour of recitation credit, and 1 hour of laboratory credit). Further, the student must have completed CHEM. 1010 (the prerequisite) before enrolling.
Graduate School policy permits specifically approved courses to be offered con-
currently at the 4000 and 5000 levels. Students should expect work at the graduate (5000) level to involve demonstration of greater maturity and critical skills than at the (4000) undergraduate level.
Orientation
An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, prior to the first day of classes. The orientation program conducted by the Office of Student Life provides information to new students about some of the activities and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process and degree requirements also is provided. Academic orientation advising sessions are held during the term, before registration for the next term. Dates and times of new student orientations are published in the Schedule of Classes.
Registration
CU-Denver students can register from any touch-tone telephone. Students will be assigned a time to register and may register at or after their assigned time.
REGISTRATION PRIORITIES
Registration is by time assignment only.
Continuing students, and new students admitted by the priority deadline, will have first priority in the following order: graduate students, new freshmen, fifth year seniors, seniors, juniors, sophomores, freshmen, and non-degree students. All students admitted after the priority deadline will be allowed to register in the order they are admitted.
Non-degree students who apply late should be prepared with alternate choices or classes because students in degree programs will register first. All non-degree students should contact the academic advisors of the degree programs in which they are interested in order to ensure that their classes will fulfill the requirements of the program.
Please note: some courses are not open for registration by non-degree students without special permission. Non-degree students should check the restrictions listed for each course in the Schedule of Classes.
POOLED COURSES AT METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE
Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with
similar courses at Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD). CU-Denver undergraduate students may register for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU-Denver Schedule of Classes.
Pooled Course Restrictions
1. CU-Denver graduate students are not eligible to register for MSC common pool courses.
2. MSC courses will not be included in the University of Colorado grade-point average. MSC courses will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will count in the hours toward graduation.
3. MSC courses cannot be used to meet specific course requirements toward the major without prior approval of the student’s dean. The last 30 semester hours applied toward the baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence at CU-Denver. MSC common pool courses will not satisfy this residence requirement.
1NTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION
CU-Denver degree students may enroll in courses offered by the Community College of Denver, Front Range Community College, and Red Rocks Community College. Students must be enrolled at CU-Denver for at least one course during the semester or summer term to be eligible to register interinstitutionally. Registration is on a space available basis. Interinstitu-tional courses are evaluated for transfer credit and are not included in a CU-Denver student’s grade-point average.
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of Colorado campuses concurrently must contact their school or college on their home campus. Concurrent registration is available only during fall and spring semesters.
A degree student registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if:
1. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean.
2. The course is a required course for the student’s degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver.
3. The student obtains approval from the academic dean.
4. There is space available at the other (host) campus.
5. The student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CU-Denver rates.


22 / General Information
6. The home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes.
7. The concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses.
Students may not register for an independent study course through concurrent registration. Students may not take courses pass/fail or for “no-credit” through concurrent registration.
To drop a concurrent course during the host campus drop/add period, arrange the drop at the home campus school or college office. To drop a concurrent course after the end of the host campus drop/add deadline, drop the course at the host campus Records Office.
Study Abroad
The Office of International Education on the Boulder campus offers study abroad programs that are available for all CU students. More than 30 programs are offered around the world. Resident credit at lower division, upper division, or graduate levels can be earned depending on the program selected and, if appropriate, can be applied to the CU-Denver degree. Students also can apply their financial aid to CU-Boulder sponsored study abroad programs. Information is available from the Study Abroad Programs, 492-7741.
Course Loads
Students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer term) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. Students should petition their academic dean.
Remember that a three-semester-hour course during a fall or spring semester will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class; a three-semester-hour course during a summer term will require nine to thirteen hours of work each week outside of class.
Suggested maximum course loads for the fall and spring semesters for undergraduate students who are employed: Employed
40 or more hours per week:
3-6 semester hours
30-39 hours per week:
5-8 semester hours
20-29 hours per week:
7-11 semester hours
10-19 hours per week:
9-15 semester hours
Students should consider their other obligations—academic, professional, and personal—before registering for courses.
GRADUATE RESTRICTIONS
No more than 15 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a fall or spring semester can be applied toward a graduate degree.
No more than 10 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a given summer term can be applied to a graduate degree.
DEFINITION OF FULL-AND HALF-TIME STATUS FOR FINANCIAL AID AND LOAN DEFERMENT: FALL AND SPRING
Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in the student’s financial aid award letter.
Fall and Spring: effective Fall 1987
Undergraduates and non-degree students:
Full-time......12 or more semester hours
Half-time......6 or more semester hours
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
5 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number—5000+)
8 or more hours of mixed level classes
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports, or thesis preparation)
Half-time: 3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number—5000)
4 or more hours of mixed level classes
Summer (10 week term)
Undergraduates and non-degree students:
Full-time 8 or more semester hours
Half-time 4 or more semester hours
Full-time:
3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number—5000+)
5 or more hours of mixed level classes
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports, preparation)
Half-time:
2 or more hours of graduate
level classes (course number—5000+)
3 or more hours of mixed level classes
Enrollment status for a term cannot be certified until the end of the drop/add period.
These hours do not include interinstitu-tional hours from CCD or hours at MSC, nor do they include hours on another CU
campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration.
Students receiving veteran’s benefits must contact the Veterans Affairs coordinator for definition of full-time status for summer terms.
CCD courses are not considered for full-or half-time status. Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are considered for financial aid purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid.
SHORT TERM COURSES
Courses are also offered in five-week modules in special weekend courses, and in seminars. Topics in Science modular courses are self-contained units designed to cover specific problems or issues in science. Students should contact the college/school office for information on short-term courses offered each semester.
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
Advanced Standing and Advanced Placement Credit
Undergraduate students may obtain credit for lower-division courses in which they demonstrate proficiency by examination. By passing an examination, the student will be given credit for the course to satisfy lower division requirements and may be eligible to enroll in higher level courses than indicated by the student’s formal academic experience. Credit granted for courses by examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate. There are three types of examinations as described below.
Advanced Placement Program
The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency and are granted advanced standing in those areas. Students with scores below 4 may be considered for advanced place-


Policies and Regulations / 23
merit by the discipline concerned. All credit must be validated by subsequent academic performance. For more information contact your high school counselor or the Director of Outreach and Recruitment at CU-Denver.
Credit By Examination
Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade-point average of at least 2.0, and be currently registered. Examinations are arranged through the Records Office, and a nonrefundable fee is charged.
Students should contact the office of the dean of the academic unit in which they are enrolled.
College-level Examination Program
Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have demonstrated college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examinations Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing service. For more information call the CU-Denver Testing Center at 556-2861.
Students who are interested in credit for CLEP examinations must contact the office of their school or college.
Credit for Military Service and Schooling and ROTC
MILITARY SERVICE AND SCHOOLING
To have credit for educational experiences evaluated, applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application: (1) a copy of DD Form 214 and (2) DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Education Experience During Military Service. USAF personnel may present an official transcript from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of the DD Form 295.
Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver.
Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions.
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC)
Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business and then only if the ROTC program is completed.
Grading System and Policies
The following grading system and policies for pass/fail registration, dropping and adding courses, and withdrawal from the University have been standardized for all academic units of the University.
GRADE SYMBOLS
The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol (A, B, C, D, F, IF, IW, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC, W, and ***) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, explained under Pass/Fail Procedure.
A—superior/excellent—4 credit points per credit hour.
B—good/better than average—3 points per credit hour.
C—competent/average—2 credit points per hour.
D—minimum passing—1 credit point per credit hour.
F—Failing—no credit points per credit hour.
Beginning with the Spring 1984 Semester, the University approved the use of a PLUS/MINUS grading system, where a B+ corresponds to 3.3 credit points per credit hour, and a B-corresponds to 2.7 credit points per credit hour. Instructors may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS system, but are not required to do so.
IF—incomplete—becomes an F if not completed within one year.
IW— incomplete—regarded as W if not completed within one year.
IP—in progress—thesis at the graduate level only.
P/F—pass/fail—P grade is not included in the grade-point average; the F grade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor’s degree.
H/P/F—honors/pass/fail— intended for honors courses; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average.
Special Symbols
ATT—indicates registration on a no-credit basis.
W— indicates withdrawal without credit.
** ’—indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed. Graduate students enrolled at the 5000 level of a 4000/5000 course will be expected to complete additional work and be evaluated according to the graduate standards specified by the course instructor.
An incomplete grade is only awarded when special circumstances prevent a student’s completing a course during the term. Students have one year to complete an INCOMPLETE. After one year, an IW is regarded as a DROP-PASSING; an IF as a DROP-FAILING. Students should not reregister for courses in which they have received INCOMPLETES.
Most schools and colleges require a contract between the instructor and student outlining the work necessary to “complete” the incomplete.
MID-TERM GRADES
Beginning with the Spring 1990 Semester, instructors will be asked to assign mid-term grades for a small population of students. Students who may be in some academic difficulty may be contacted and counseled about support services available to them. Please note: academic support services are available to all students through the Office of Student Retention Services, NC 2012, 556-2324.
PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE
1. Students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis must do so during the regular registration. Changes to or from a pass/fail basis may be made only during the regular drop/add period.
2. Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor’s degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass/fail in any given semester.
3. Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of pass/fail registration. All students who register for a pass/fail appear on the regular class roster, and


24 / General Information
a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office, those registrations with a pass/fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D and above convert to grades of P. Courses taken pass/fail will be included in hours toward graduation. Pass grades are not included in a student’s grade-point average. An F grade in a course taken pass/fail will be included in the grade-point average.
4. The record of pass/fail registration is maintained by the Records Office.
5. Exceptions to the pass/fail regulations are permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education, the Division of Extended Studies, and Study Abroad Programs.
6. Graduate degree students can exercise the P/F option for undergraduate courses only. A grade of P will not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement.
7. Students who register for a course on a pass/fail basis, may not later decide to receive a letter grade. Each school and college limits the hours and courses for which students may register on a pass/fail basis.
Please note: many other institutions will not accept a “P” grade for transfer credit.
PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS
College General 16 Hours Maximum Transfer Students
Business and Administration Only non-business electives may be taken pass/fail Only 6 semester hours may be taken pass/fail Only 6 semester hours may be taken pass/fail
Engineering and Applied Science Required courses may not be taken pass/fail. Upper division humanities and social sciences electives are acceptable, otherwise major department approval is required; students without a major are not eligible to take courses pass/fail. Recommended maximum one course/semester. Includes courses taken in the honors program Maximum of 1 semester hour of pass/fail may be applied toward graduation for every 9 semester hours taken in the college
Liberal Arts and Sciences May be restricted in certain majors; not included in 30 hours of C or better work required for major. No more than 6 hours P/F any semester. Does not include courses taken in honors, physical education, cooperative education and certain teacher certification courses; also does not include ENGL. 1002 Proficiency Test or MATH. 1002 Test May not be used by students graduating with only 30 semester hours taken at the University
Music Only non-music electives may be taken pass/fail. No more than 6 hours P/F any semester Includes courses taken in the honors program.


Policies and Regulations / 25
NO CREDIT
Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college. File the no credit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop/add period. Students who register for a course on a no credit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade. Students may not register again for a course which has already been taken on a no credit basis.
SENIOR CITIZENS
Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) may audit classes for no charge. Contact the Division of Enrollment and Student Services at 556-8427, NC 2204.
GRADE-POINT AVERAGE
The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course, totaling the hours and the credit points, and dividing the total points by the total hours.
Grades of P, NC, ***, W, IP, IW, and IF are not included in the grade-point average.
If an IF grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as failed and a grade of F is automatically calculated in the grade-point average at the end of the one-year grace period.
If an IW grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as dropped.
If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point average. The University of Colorado grade-point average does not include courses taken at other institutions.
The grade-point average of graduate students includes only courses, credit hours, and credit points accumulated while enrolled in a Graduate School Program.
The grade-point average does not appear on official transcripts issued from the Records Office but does appear on the Grade Report issued each semester.
Students should consult with the dean of their college or school for explanation of any exceptions made to the University uniform grade-point average.
Undergraduates and non-degree students must maintain a 2.0 grade-point average to remain in good standing. Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain in good standing. Students whose GPA falls below the 2.0/3.0 level are subject to probation or suspension. Such students will be notified by their school or college.
GRADE REPORTS
Grade reports are mailed to CU-Denver students approximately two weeks after the end of the term. To obtain replacement reports, students must present picture identification at the Records Office.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed:
Freshman 0-29 hours
Sophomore 30-59 hours
Junior 60-89 hours
Senior 90+ hours
All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado.
Graduation
Undergraduates. Students who have completed 80 or more semester hours should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or college to determine what requirements remain for graduation. Students intending to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their graduation term. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated. After students have been certified to graduate they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Graduates. Students must file an Application for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with The Graduate School on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term. Check with The Graduate School for more complete information. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated. After students have been certified to graduate, they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Commencement. Letters will be mailed in early April to students eligible to participate in the spring commencement. Information will be provided about ordering special display diplomas, being fitted for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree recorded. Students graduating at the end of the summer term or the end of the fall semester may participate in the following spring commencement.
Transcripts
Transcripts of academic record at the University of Colorado (all campuses) may
be ordered in person or by mail from the University of Colorado at Denver, Transcript Office, 1200 Larimer St., Campus Box 167, Denver, CO 80204. Official transcripts will not be available until approximately four weeks after final examinations. A transcript on which a degree is to be recorded will not be available until approximately eight weeks after final examinations. Requests should include the following:
1. Student’s full name (include given or other name if applicable).
2. Student number.
3. Birthdate.
4. The last term and campus the student attended.
5. Whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordered near the end of a term. Whether the request should be held until a degree is recorded.
6. Agency, college, or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included. Transcripts sent to students are labeled “issued to student.”
7. Student’s signature. (This is the student’s authorization to release the records to the designee.)
There is no charge for individual official transcripts. Transcripts are prepared only at the student’s request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Official transcripts require five to seven working days to be generated. Unofficial copies of transcripts sent to CU-Denver from other institutions can be requested at the Records Office. Official transcripts should be requested directly from the issuing institution. Unofficial CU transcripts are available to students in the CU-Denver Records Office. Students must present picture ID.
Adding and Dropping Courses1
ADDING COURSES
Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 12 (8 in the summer) days of full-term classes, provided there is space available. Instructor approval may be required after the first week of classes.
DROPPING COURSES
1. Students may drop courses without approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (8th day of the
'For the exact dates, check the Schedule of Classes for the appropriate term.


26 / General Information
summer term). Tuition will not be charged for the courses which are dropped as long as the student is not withdrawing. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student’s permanent record.
2. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term), the instructor’s signature is required and the instructor must indicate whether the student is passing or failing. If the student is passing, the course will appear on the student’s permanent record with the grade of W If the student is failing, the course will appear on the permanent record with an F.
4. Dropping all courses requires an official University withdrawal form.
Deadlines for module courses and intensive courses are published in the Schedule of Classes each term.
Withdrawal from the University
To withdraw from the University, students must obtain approval from their academic dean’s office, the Bursar’s Office, and the Records Office. The withdrawal date is recorded on the student’s permanent record page. If the withdrawal date is prior to the 13th day of the semester (9th day of the summer term), the courses will not appear on the student’s permanent record. If the withdrawal date is after the 12th day, the courses will appear with W grades. Students may not withdraw after the 10th week of the semester (7th week of the summer term) except under documented circumstances clearly beyond their control.
Students who are receiving veteran’s benefits or financial aid also must obtain the required signature of those respective offices. International students must obtain clearance from the Office of International Students.
A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receive grades of F for all course work enrolled for during that term.
To withdraw from the University, a graduate students must apply to the dean of their Graduate Program for permission to withdraw in good standing. Students who withdraw without communicating with the dean and without filing the appropriate Withdrawal Form will be marked as having failed their courses for the term.
Deadlines for module courses and intensive courses, as well as specific requirements and tuition adjustment, appear in the Schedule of Classes published prior to the beginning of each term.
Originality of Work
In all academic areas it is imperative that either work be original or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons’ ideas or language. Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the University.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
Periodically, but not less than annually, the University of Colorado informs students of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, with which the institution intends to comply fully. The Act was designed to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.
Local policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the Act. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on each of the several campuses of the University of Colorado.
The following items of student information have been designated by the University of Colorado as public or directory information: student name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study, awards, honors, degree(s) conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical factors (height, weight) of athletes, date and place of birth. This information may be disclosed by the University for any purpose at its discretion.
Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of any category of information under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. To withhold disclosure, written notification must be received in the Records Office on the appropriate campus prior to the end of the drop/add period in the term. Forms requesting the withholding of directory information are available in the Records Office.
The request to withhold disclosure will remain in effect until the student provides written notification to the Records Office. The University of Colorado assumes that when a student fails to request to have directory information withheld, the student is indicating approval for disclosure of information for that term and following terms until otherwise requested.
Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Records Office, 556-2389.
University of Colorado at Denver Confidentiality of Academic Records
STUDENTS:
DO have the right to view and inspect their educational records (excluding any financial records of their parents).
DO have the right to have Directory Information withheld from all persons or organizations outside the University.
Directory Information includes:
name, address, telephone number date and place of birth dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study awards, honors, degree(s) conferred past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities
physical characteristics (height, weight) of athletes
DO NOT have the right to obtain their grades, or other information not considered Directory Information, by telephone.
PARENTS:
DO have the right to obtain the educational records of their child only if they provide a signed statement that their son or daughter is a dependent as defined by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. The Records Office, in NC 1003, 556-2389, has forms available to parents for such requests. Parents are, however, encouraged to obtain final grades with a written approval from the student.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO PERSONNEL:
DO have the right to use educational records of students in the normal exercise of their duties.
DO NOT have the right to use educational records of students for employment purposes, for social organizations, for personal


Special Programs and Facilities / 27
reasons, or for other non-educational interests, without written consent of the student.
PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO:
DO have the right to obtain the Directory Information listed above, unless the student has made a request for nondisclosure. When the term microfiche, or the computer terminal on-line file of the Student Information System indicates PRIVATE, inquirers will be told that no information can be released without the student’s written consent.
PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING FINANCIAL AID TO STUDENTS:
DO have the right to educational records of students only as necessary in determining and enforcing terms of financial aid.
PERSONS IN AN EMERGENCY:
DO have the right to obtain confidential academic records necessary to protect the health or safety of students and others, but such information will only be released by the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services, 556-8427.
These regulations are required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (the Buckley Amendment). For further information, please call the Records Office at (303) 556-2389.
Student records will be released only to the student with current, appropriate identification or upon written authorization of the student whose records are being requested.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES
Alumni Association
The CU-Denver Alumni Association supports the development and awareness of the University through a variety of networks and activities. Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon graduation. Friends and non-degree former students are also welcome to participate.
Horizons, a newspaper published three times a year, is mailed to members of the association. Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/or activities which might interest them. The Alumni Mack Easton Award, the Alumni Recognition Award, and the Alumni Legislative Award are bestowed each year at commence-
ment and are sponsored by the Association. A program of alumni use of the campus recreation center, library, and parking lots is also available through the Association.
The governing board is comprised of alumni representing all schools and colleges on campus. This group plans events, implements programs, and raises funds with the goal of advancing and increasing the visibility of the University.
Auraria Book Center
Student Union: ground level, 556-3230
Hours: M-Th 8-6, F 8-5, Sat. 10-3 except vacation and interim periods.
The Auraria Book Center carries academic, technical, reference, and exam preparation books in support of your higher education. Best sellers, new releases, and gift book selections change frequently and are often accompanied by displays of special value books in many subjects. For additional savings on general reading books, join the Auraria Book Club at the Book Information desk. Special orders and out of print searches are available at no charge.
Students: Bring your course printouts to locate textbooks! Subject areas are marked on each set of shelves; departmental abbreviations, course and section numbers are printed on a shelf tag below each required or optional textbook. When available, used textbooks sell for 75 percent of the new book price. A full refund is given for new and used books accompanied by your receipt and returned within the first three weeks of class for regular semesters and during the first week of class for short terms. Please read the refund policy attached to your receipt!
Macintosh, IBM, Zenith, NeXT, and Toshiba personal computer systems and a variety of software are offered to Auraria campus students at educational discount prices. A current, validated Auraria ID must be presented at the time of purchase. Rounding out the educational sup-ply/campus life areas are insignia sportswear, gifts and cards, and supplies for school, office, art and design.
The Convenience Store is located near the main store in the Student Union lower mall and has extended hours for those wishing to buy snacks, magazines, sundries and school supplies. Used texts are bought back from students throughout the year, and merchandise refunds and exchanges also are performed here.
Auraria Reprographics offers full-service copying in the Convenience Store, M-Th 7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m. and F 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. Special papers, color copying, transparen-
cies, reductions and enlargements, lamination and other options may be specified for jobs of all sizes. Worldwide FAX service and shipping of packages by UPS and Federal Express also are available.
Two IDs are required for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard, VISA, and American Express charges.
Computing Services
Computing Services supports computer and network use by both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. All centralized administrative systems are developed, maintained, and processed by University Management Systems in Boulder with data entry, output processing, and user support provided by Computing Services in Denver. Most Denver campus administrative applications are developed, maintained, and processed by Computing Services. Most academic processing is either done on campus or through one of several networks available through Computing Services.
The Denver campus maintains a VAX 8800 under VMS, a 10-processor Sequent Symmetry under UNIX and Intel 16-processor Hypercube also under UNIX. A communications network allows access to all campus minicomputers as well as connection to the CARL on-line library card-catalog. The VMS and UNIX computers are connected to the Ethernet backbone and are nodes on the growing Colorado SuperNet which provides access to many academic computing networks (ARPANET, NSFNET, JVNCNET, CSNET, etc.) as well as high-speed connections to the Colorado School of Mines, University of Denver, Colorado Springs and Boulder CU campuses, and Colorado State University. CU-Denver also is a BITNET site. There are over 1100 personal computers located on the campus in ten teaching laboratories, three public labs, individual laboratories, and in offices.
Computing Services staff provides assistance to academic and administrative users on all available computing systems. Advisors and a full-time academic user services staff assist students and faculty with questions regarding software packages, programming, the use of computer systems and software availability. Administrative users are assisted with planning, systems design, programming and day-to-day computing activities by Computing Services user services and operations personnel. Campus computing systems are maintained by an operations staff who also assist faculty and staff with hardware planning, acquisitions, questions, and


28 / General Information
problems. This staff also operates campus minicomputers and telecommunications equipment.
The goal of Computing Services is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work. For further information and an informative booklet about computing at CU-Denver, please call 556-2583.
Division of Extended Studies
The Division of Extended Studies offers a wide variety of programs for individuals interested in continuing their personal and professional education. These programs include courses for academic credit, noncredit, and certificate courses for professional development and personal enrichment.
Extended Studies credit courses supplement the University’s general course offerings and include weekend and evening options. Credit received for these courses appears on a CU-Denver transcript and can be applied toward degree programs. Tuition is charged separately from that for courses in the regular program. Noncredit courses explore a wide array of topics including: personal and professional development, test preparation, foreign languages, computers, fine arts, writing and literature, and recreation.
Extended Studies offers University resources to employees in business, industry, governmental agencies, and professional organizations. A blend of education and training is provided in a variety of program areas, both credit and noncredit, through customized training, targeted short courses, seminars and workshops.
Individuals interested in obtaining a copy of the Division of Extended Studies Bulletin or other information are invited to call Extended Studies at 556-2735.
University of Colorado Foundation, Inc.
The University of Colorado Foundation, Inc. was established in 1967 by the Board of Regents to solicit, receive and administer gifts from private sources. In 1981 the CU Foundation established a Denver campus office.
The chief goal of the University of Colorado Foundation, Inc. is to promote the general welfare, development, growth and well-being of the University of Colorado.
The Foundation reuses and manages private funds in support of CU’s missions in teaching, research, and public service. The CU Foundation staff works with administration and faculty to match academic
needs with private support, generates interest and enthusiasm for the University, recruits and organizes volunteers, solicits gifts, and assists donors in planning gifts.
International Education/Study Abroad
The University of Colorado at Denver offers students a variety of opportunities for international education and study abroad. Academic programs in each of the schools and colleges of CU-Denver provide international opportunities for students. For example the International Affairs program is an interdisciplinary program open to all undergraduates and the Institute for International Business within the College of Business and Administration focuses on global business issues. Students interested in international programs and study should contact their advisors.
The Office of International Education on the Boulder campus expedites the exchange of students and faculty, hosts foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and advises foreign students and scholars for Fulbright and other scholarships at CU-Boulder.
The office also arranges study abroad programs and offers over 30 different programs around the globe. Students on any CU campus can participate in most of these programs.
Some of the study abroad programs are of the traditional junior year abroad variety, in which students are placed directly in foreign universities for an academic year. Such programs are available at the University of Lancaster, England; the University of Bordeaux, France; the University of Costa Rica in San Jose; the American University in Cairo, Egypt; the University of Regensburg, Germany; the Hebrew University of Jerusalem,
Israel; the Institute of Higher Education and Technology in Monterrey, Mexico; and Tunghai University in Taiwan.
For students unable to spend an academic year abroad, programs for a single semester or summer are available with various emphases, including intensive language learning. Single semester programs are offered in Rennes, France; Guadalajara and Monterrey, Mexico; Norwich, England; San Jose, Costa Rica; Alicante, and Madrid, Spain; and Taichung, Taiwan. Summer programs are located in Kassel, Germany; Annecy, France; and London, England. Special summer programs, e.g., art history in Italy, are organized with specific departments upon request.
Students are enrolled at the University of Colorado while participating in these
study abroad programs. The applicability of credit in particular departments and colleges of CU-Denver is up to the departments and colleges. A B average with the equivalent of two years of college level work in the appropriate language is required for most of the academic year programs. Financial aid from CU-Denver can be applied to program costs in most cases.
More information about study abroad programs is available in the Office of international Education, Boulder campus, 492-7741.
Auraria Student Assistance Center Division
The Auraria Student Assistance Center Division (ASACD) is composed of nine offices offering specialized assistance to staff, faculty, and all present and prospective students on the Auraria Higher Education Center campus.
1. Office of the Division Dean (ODD). The office is responsible for the supervision of the administrative and program functions of the Division.
2. Office of Information and Referral, Housing, and Disability Services (OIRHDS). This office provides the following services to students, prospective students, faculty, and staff:
Information about each of the three Auraria institutions, including tuition rates, admissions criteria, and information about specific courses Campus tours
Assistance in locating short- and longterm housing
To students who have physical, learning, orpsychiatric/emotional disabilities, this office provides the following academic support services:
Taped textbooks
Sign language and oral interpreters
Notetakers
Scribing
Test accommodation
Sale of handicap parking permits
Disability-related counseling
Advocacy
3. Office of Career Services (OCS) . The Office of Career Services offers assistance to students and alumni in planning their careers and seeking employment through the provision of on-campus employer interviews, current job vacancy listings, resume referrals, career counseling, Campus Career Library, career testing, and a computerized career guidance system (Discover). The student employment office within the OCS maintains a listing of part-time and temporary job openings for currently enrolled students. Workshops


University Policies / 29
and seminars are offered on such topics as resume writing, interview preparation, job search strategies, mock interviews, skills in the work environment, values and the work environment, researching your career, and decision making.
4. Office of International Programs (OIP). The Office of International Programs assists international students on campus from approximately 80 countries by providing support services and aiding in bridging the cultural gaps which many experience when entering the community to attend college. Services include orientation for new students, counseling on immigration issues, host family accommodation, support for personal adjustment, acculturation and peer interaction, an international student reception and pot-luck dinners during the year, and postadmissions follow-up. In addition, OIP offers services for Auraria students wishing to study abroad, coordinating the International Student Exchange Program (ISEP) of CU-Denver, and providing information on other study abroad programs. The office also acts as liaison with consulates, missions, embassies, and foreign organizations.
5. Spring International Language Center (SILC). Spring International Language Center (SILC) has been operating an English language program on the Auraria campus since August 1987. This center offers intensive English language instruction (25 hours per week) to foreign students. It is authorized by INS to issue 1-20’s in order for students to apply for F-l visa status. In addition, SILC provides language proficiency testing services on request for students hoping to enter CU-Denver, CCD or MSCD. SILC classes are used for observation and research by individuals being trained on campus to become English as a second language teachers. SILC provides extensive support services to its students including a host-family program, housing information, counseling services, and social activities designed to make the foreign student feel at home in the United States. SILC works closely with the ASACD/Office of International Programs to further enhance the services offered to all international students on campus.
6. Office of Colorado Rehabilitation Services (CRS). The Office of Colorado Rehabilitation Services helps individuals with handicaps to prepare for, secure, and mountain suitable employment. Eligibility for services is based upon the presence of a physical or mental disability, which for the individual constitutes or results in a substantial handicap to employment. In addition, there must be a reasonable expectation the Rehabilitation Services
may benefit the individual in terms of employability. The specific services that will be rendered in a particular case will depend upon the individual needs of the client.
Counseling and guidance Physical and mental restoration services Vocational and other training services Occupational licenses Rehabilitation engineering services Telecommunications, technological aids Placement in suitable employment, consistent with the client’s capacities/abilities
7. Auraria Child Care Center/Auraria Osage Child Care Center (CCC/CCC-Osage) The Auraria Child Care Center/Auraria Osage Child Care Center serves the child care needs of students, staff and faculty of the Auraria campus by providing high quality early childhood education and care programs. The child care programs are offered at two sites:
The Auraria Child Care Center (southwest corner of the campus) and the Auraria Osage Child Care Center (1111 Osage). The child care programs are consistently recognized by the educational community for their high quality early childhood care and education. Developmentally appropriate practices for young children guide the educational programs that are provided. Curriculum planning is flexible and based on children’s interests. Experiences are planned in accordance with “Key Experiences” adapted from the High/ Scope Cognitively Oriented Curriculum. Supervising and assisting teachers in the Child Care Centers are all degreed teachers meeting the certification guidelines of the National Academy of Early Childhood programs.
Children aged 18 months to six years are served at the Auraria Child Care Center. The Center also has a fully accredited kindergarten program. Children aged six weeks to five years are served at the Auraria Osage Child Care Center.
Auraria Student Union
The Student Union, located at 9th and Lawrence, houses a cafeteria, the campus Book Center, a study lounge, game room, offices for student government and organizations, a copy center, exhibit space, locker rentals, meeting and conference facilities, and a tavern.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity/nritle IX
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to enhancing the diversity of its work force and its student body. Diversity among faculty, staff, administrators, and students is essential to educational excellence and to accomplishing CU-Denver’s mission. Just as diversity in academic programs and scholarly perspectives enriches the University, so too does diversity among faculty, staff, administrators, and students. Diversity among faculty, staff, and administrators provides role models and mentors for students, who will become future leaders in academe and in the larger society, and ensures that a broad array of experiences and world views will inform and shape teaching, research, service, and decision making at CU-Denver.
As the only public university serving the Denver metropolitan area, CU-Denver recognizes, acknowledges, and accepts its central role in education to take explicit affirmative action to employ, retain, and advance in employment qualified applicants and employees, and to admit, retain, and advance qualified applicants and students regardless of their race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, or veteran status.
In employment and educational programs, CU-Denver does not discriminate and will not tolerate discrimination on the basis of race, gender, age, color, national origin, disability, or veteran status.
CU-Denver has adopted an affirmative action plan to implement these commitments. For information, contact the Office of Affirmative Action, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 700, 556-2509.
Ombuds Office
In any large organization, misunderstandings and disagreements may occur. The Ombuds Office helps to enhance the clarity and dissemination of information, to simplify decision making and communication, to assist with the process of change and with adjustment to change, and to improve understanding among staff, students, faculty, and administrators.
The Ombuds Office provides information about programs, policies, services, and procedures affecting members of the University community; makes referrals to appropriate state, CU system, and CU-Denver resources; serves as consultant in the preparation and review of policies and


30 / General Information
procedures; and assists in the solution of problems and the resolution of disputes.
Ombuds Office services are informal, impartial, confidential, and independent of administrative authorities. These services do not replace or circumvent existing channels, but help them work more effectively. For further information or assistance, contact the Ombuds Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 850, 556-4493.
University Policy Regarding A Drug-Free Workplace
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing a drug-free workplace and environment. The University prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of any controlled substance in the workplace. Those individuals who are found to be in violation are engaged in serious misconduct and subject to disciplinary action consistent with the Faculty Handbook (1988), the applicable rules of the State Personnel System, the University’s Unclassified Staff Handbook, and the Student’s Discipline and Review Procedures.
Academic Honor Code and Discipline Policies
Members of the University of Colorado at Denver feel it is an historically established rule of education that instructors have the authority to conduct classes, make assignments, require examinations or other exercises, and make judgments about the academic performance of students.
Maintaining the quality and high performance of students makes it imperative that the academic work completed at the University be original and completed honestly. It is the concern of every student and faculty member that such standards be maintained. A university’s reputation depends on the highest standards of intellectual honesty and ethical conduct.
Academic disciplinary matters are concerns to be addressed by schools or colleges, allowing each school/college to determine the severity and consequences of each infraction. Under the Laws of the Regents, Article IX 2.B and Article VI.C, all matters of educational policy affecting the school or college including academic requirements for admission, for continuance and for graduation shall be under the jurisdiction of each school or college.
In addition, the college or school shall have jurisdiction over matters of academic ethics/academic dishonesty.
Each college and school is required to maintain a standing committee to decide cases of academic dishonesty as defined in this document. Students and faculty are urged to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty in order to better support and maintain high standards of academic scholarship and conduct.
FORMS OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
As members of the academic community, students and faculty accept the responsibility to conduct themselves with integrity in a manner compatible with the University’s function as an educational institution. Furthermore, all members of the academic community have a special responsibility to ensure that the University’s ethical standards are maintained.
One of these standards is academic honesty. Many students underestimate how strongly most faculty and peers feel about academic honesty. Academic dishonesty is defined as a student’s using unauthorized assistance with intent to deceive an instructor or such other person who may be assigned to evaluate the student’s work, in meeting course and degree requirements. Examples of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to the following:
A. Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the use of distinctive ideas or words belonging to another person without providing adequate acknowledgement of that person’s contribution. Regardless of the means of appropriation, incorporating another’s work into one’s own requires adequate identification and acknowledgement. Plagiarism is doubly unethical because it deprives the true author of the rightful credit and gives that credit to someone who has not earned it.
It is the theft of intellectual property. However, acknowledgement is not necessary when the material used is common knowledge. When the source is not noted, the following would constitute plagiarism:
1. Word-for-word copying.
2. The mosaic (to intersperse a few words of one’s own here and there while, in essence, copying another’s work).
3. The paraphrase (the rewriting of others’ work, yet still using their fundamental idea or theory).
4. Fabrication (inventing or counterfeiting sources).
5. Ghost-written material (submitting another’s effort as one’s own).
It is also plagiarism to neglect quotation marks on material that is otherwise acknowledged.
B. Cheating
Cheating involves intentionally possessing, communicating, using (or attempting to use) materials, information, notes, study aides, cheat sheets, or other devices not authorized by the instructor in any academic exercise, or the communication with any other person during such an exercise.
Examples:
1. Copying from another’s paper or receiving unauthorized assistance from another during an academic exercise or in the submission of academic material.
2. Using a calculator when the use has been specifically disallowed.
3. Collaborating with another student or students during an academic exercise without the consent of the instructor.
C. Fabrication and Falsification
This is the intentional and unauthorized alteration or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise.
Examples:
1. Fabrication involves inventing or counterfeiting information; i.e., creating results not obtained, as in a laboratory experiment.
2. Falsification involves altering results, deliberately changing information to suit one’s needs.
D. Multiple Submission
This is the submission of substantial portions of either written or oral academic work which has previously earned credit when such submission is made without instructor authorization.
F. Misuse of Academic Materials
This is intentionally or knowingly destroying, stealing, or making inaccessible, library or other academic resource material.
Examples:
1. Stealing or destroying library or reference materials or computer programs or files.
2. Stealing or destroying another student’s notes or materials, or having in possession such materials without the owner’s permission.
3. Receiving assistance in locating or using sources of information in an assignment where such assistance has been forbidden by the instructor.


University Policies / 31
4. Illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations or answer keys to tests and examinations.
5. Unauthorized alteration, forgery, or falsification of official academic records.
6. Unauthorized selling or purchasing of examinations, papers, or assignments.
F Complicity in Academic Dishonesty
This is intentionally or knowingly contributing to the academic dishonesty of another.
These examples of academic dishonesty shall not be construed to be comprehensive and infractions will be dealt with on an individual basis. It is the obligation of each student to assist in the enforcement of academic standards; infractions— whether by students or faculty—should be first brought to the attention of the instructor.
PROCEDURES IN CASES OF SUSPECTED ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
Students concerned about academic dishonesty should contact their school or college for more specific information.
Faculty and staff members or students may submit charges of academic dishonesty against students. A student who has evidence that another student is guilty of academic dishonesty should inform the instructor or the Dean of the appropriate college in writing of the charge. A faculty member who has evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty should confront the student with the evidence. In cases of academic dishonesty, the faculty member has the authority to reprimand the student appropriately, which could include the issuance of a failing grade (F). In such case of issuance of failing grade for academic dishonesty, the faculty member shall submit a written report to the Dean of the appropriate college within five (5) working days. The report shall include, but is not limited to, the time, place, nature of offense(s), the name(s) of the accused, the accusers), witnesses (if any). If the faculty member feels that his or her reprimand or action is an insufficient sanction for a particular case of academic dishonesty, the faculty member may recommend to the Dean of the appropriate college that further action be taken.
If this signed report recommends further action, the Dean or a committee designated shall schedule a disciplinary hearing as soon as possible. The student has the right to be represented by legal counsel and to be present during the committee’s proceedings. Student(s) must notify the Dean of the appropriate college
five (5) working days in advance of the hearing that he/she intends to have legal counsel present. The Dean or the committee designated may take any of the following actions:
1. Take no further action against the accused student(s).
2. Place student(s) on disciplinary probation for a specified period of time. The record of this would be kept in the committee’s confidential files and the student’s academic file.
3. Suspension of registration for a specified period of time. A record of this shall be kept in the committee’s confidential file and a copy sent to the Registrar.
4. Expulsion: no opportunity to return to the college in which the infraction occurred. A record of this shall be kept permanently in the committee’s confidential file and a copy sent to the Registrar.
Notification to Student(s)
In all cases, the student(s) should be notified of the hearing after seven working days, in writing of the Dean’s or the designated committee’s decision.
Interinstitutional Appeal Procedures
Students who are taking courses at CU-Denver, but are enrolled at other educational institutions on the Auraria campus and are charged with dishonesty, are subject to the same procedures outlined above.
Code of Student Conduct (Student Rights and Responsibilities and Procedures for Disciplinary Review and Action)
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR WHICH ACTION MAY BE TAKEN IF A VIOLATION OCCURS
All persons on University property are required for reasonable cause to identify themselves when requested by University or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers, the University reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to University personnel or property and those who interfere with its function as an educational institution.
All persons on CU-Denver/Auraria property who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applicable to University students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations.
The behaviors outlined below will not be tolerated because they threaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the University and the personal rights and freedoms of its members.
1. Intentional obstruction, disruption, or interference with teaching, research, disciplinary proceedings, or other University activities, including its public service and administrative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denver/Auraria premises.
2. Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, school officials, employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
3. Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CU-Denver/Auraria Higher Education Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the University, or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person.
4. Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms, which includes, but is not limited to, striking, laying hands upon, threatening with violence, or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure; or other treatment of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature. (This includes, but is not limited to, demeaning behavior of an ethnic, sexist, or racist nature, unwanted sexual advances or intimidations.)
5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilities, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU-Denver/Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimental to the University.
6. Forgery, fraud (to include computer fraud), falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification with intent to gain any unentitled advantage.
7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver/ Auraria property and the private property of students, University officials, employees, and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denver/Auraria buildings or facilities. This includes the possession of known stolen property.
8. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus. This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University, or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee. (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons


32 / General Information
may include, but are not limited to, firearms, explosives, BB Guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles, bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switchblades. A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm, explosive, or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly included within the meaning of the terms firearms, explosive, or dangerous weapon.)
9. Sale, distribution, use, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU Denver/Auraria campus.
10. Physical restriction, coercion, or harassment of any person; significant theft; sale/manufacture of illegal drugs (includes possession of a sufficient quantity with intent to sell); damage, theft, or unauthorized possession of University property; or forgery, falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records or instruments of identification to gain any unentitled advantage.
UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS
As a member of the University community, you are held accountable not only for upholding civil and criminal laws, but University Standards as well. Enrollment does not confer either immunity or special consideration with reference to civil and criminal laws. Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to challenge or postponement on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced, or are pending in civil or criminal court. In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a student violates a standard and withdraws from the University before administrative action is final.
USE OF UNIVERSITY/AURARIA PROPERTY OR FACILITIES
Nothing in this Code of Conduct shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the voicing of concerns or grievances. The University is dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge through a free exchange of ideas, and this shall be a cardinal principle in the determination of whether or not a proposed use of University facilities is appropriate.
The Auraria Higher Education Center has established campus regulations and procedures governing the use of CU-Denver/Auraria grounds, buildings, and other facilities. Such regulations are designed to prevent interference with University functions and activities. Except
where otherwise specifically authorized, or when members of the public are invited, the use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilities shall be limited to faculty, staff, and students of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus, and to organizations having chapters, local groups, or other recognized University connected representation among faculty, staff, or students of the three academic institutions on the Auraria campus.
CLASSROOM CONDUCT
You are expected to conduct yourself appropriately in classroom situations. If disruptive behavior occurs in a classroom, an instructor has the authority to ask you to leave the classroom. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist, the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Public Safety and/or the appropriate Dean’s office. The appropriate Dean or his/her representative may withdraw a student from a particular class for disruptive behavior, while the Student Discipline Committee may recommend to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services to suspend, permanently expel, and/or permanently exclude the student from the campus. Appeal questions concerning disruptive behavior should be directed to the Academic Dean’s office when withdrawal from a class is involved, and to the Director of Student Life when suspension or expulsion from the University is involved.
NONACADEMIC DISCIPLINE POLICIES
Violations of Standards of Conduct should be reported to the Director of Student Life during working hours. Auraria Public Safety should be contacted during non-duty hours.
If a violation occurs on campus and it is not in a specific building, Auraria Public Safety and/or the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
If emergency help is needed when on campus, contact Auraria Public Safety and when off campus contact the Denver Police.
Actions available to campus officials include, but are not limited to: asking those involved in inappropriate behavior to cease and desist; requesting offenders) to leave the Auraria campus; denying or restricting use of facilities or services; calling Auraria Public Safety for assistance; billing offender^) for any physical damages; pressing civil charges; and referring student(s) to the Director of Student Life. The chart that follows illustrates the overall structure involved.
DISCIPLINE STRUCTURE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
(1) Violations observed may be resolved by any of the following:
• University Departments such as:
a. Admissions/Records
b. Student Union
c. University/Auraria Public Safety
d. Financial Aid
e. Veterans Affairs
• Faculty/Staff
• Students
• Non-University Members
(2) If violation warrants further attention contact:
• Director of Student Life
a. If students) desires a review by the Director of Student Life Academic dishonesty discipline falls under the jurisdiction of the individual colleges and schools.
b. If violation warrants possible suspension or expulsion
• Student Discipline Committee
(3) Final review (may request only in
cases of suspension/expulsion).
• Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
When one of the 10 Standards of Conduct listed in this code is violated, the student may be referred to the Director of Student Life. Any person may refer a student or student group suspected of violating this code to the Director of Student Life. Persons making such referrals will be asked to provide information pertinent to the case. The Director of Student Life will make a determination as to the seriousness of the case. This will be done in most situations by asking the students) involved in the case to come in for an administrative interview to determine what actions, if any, will be taken by the University. Students will be notified in writing of the results of such administrative reviews.
The Director of Student Life has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no further action other than talking with the accused student(s).
3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student’s behavior has been inappropriate and any further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University.


University Policies / 33
5. Refer cases to the Student Discipline Committee where the above sanctions are determined to be inadequate or the students) desires an appeal.
6. Take other actions including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violators) provides compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
STUDENT DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Disciplinary proceedings shall be conducted as administrative proceedings and not as judicial proceedings. The University is not a part of the judicial branch of state government. The University has authority to promulgate and enforce internal rules of behavior that shall be administered in a fair and impartial manner in harmony with its educational objectives and administrative nature. As part of the administrative nature of the committee’s proceedings, fundamental rules of fairness will be followed. Copies of these procedures are available in the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services.
This committee, composed of students, faculty, and staff members, makes the decision whether students charged with violations of the student conduct code may continue to attend the University of Colorado at Denver.
The Student Discipline Committee has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no action other than talking with the accused student.
3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student’s behavior has been inappropriate and further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University.
5. Recommend suspension of a student from the University for disciplinary reasons. This suspension may be for various lengths of time ranging from one semester to an indefinite period of time; after the period of disciplinary suspension has expired a student may apply in writing to have the notation on the student’s record removed.
6. Recommend expulsion of a student permanently from the University; notation on the student’s record will be kept permanently. When a student is suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons an additional sanction may include being excluded from the Auraria campus.
7. Other sanctions including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violators) provides compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
Student(s) must be notified in writing of the disciplinary action taken within five (5) days.
REVIEW PROCEDURES
A student may request a review of the recommendation of suspension or expulsion by the Student Discipline Committee within seven (7) working days to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services. Except in cases involving the exercise of the power of summary suspension (see below), the sanctions of suspension or expulsion for disciplinary reasons shall be effective only after the administrative review by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services has been exhausted or waived. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services’ decision shall be in writing to the student(s) with a copy to the Student Discipline Committee. Copies of review procedures may be obtained from the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services.
SUMMARY SUSPENSION
Summary suspension is a suspension from the University which begins immediately upon notice from the appropriate University official without a formal hearing by the Student Discipline Committee. A hearing before the Student Discipline Committee is then scheduled as soon as possible (usually within seven calendar days) to determine the disposition of the case. Summary suspension may also include a physical exclusion from the campus if deemed necessary.
The Chancellor and/or a Vice Chancellor have the authority to suspend summarily any student when in their opinions such suspension is necessary to:
1. Maintain order on the campus.
2. Preserve the orderly functioning of the University.
3. Stop interference in any manner with the public or private rights of citizens on CU-Denver/Auraria owned or controlled property.
4. Stop actions that are threatening to the health or safety of any person.
5. Stop actions that are destroying or damaging property of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus, its students, faculty, staff, or guests.
PERMANENT RECORD NOTATIONS
While disciplinary proceedings are pending or contemplated, a temporary hold will be placed on the student’s academic record. It will not be released until all actions and appeal procedures have been completed or finalized by the University. Only in those cases where suspension, deferred suspension, or permanent expulsion results from disciplinary action will notations be placed on the academic record.
RELEASE OF DISCIPLINARY INFORMATION
Access to any student’s academic transcript or disciplinary file shall be governed by provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Only the student charged or those University officials who have a legitimate educational interest in disciplinary information may have access to the files. All other inquiries including but not limited to employers, governmental agencies, news media, friends, or Denver Pblice must have a written release from the student to gain access to University disciplinary files.
Every effort will be made by the University to respect the privacy of the student. However, where the identity of the student has been publicly disclosed in the news media, the University reserves the right to respond as it deems appropriate to describe fairly and accurately the disposition of disciplinary matters.
REFUND POLICY AFTER DISCIPLINARY ACTION
Submission of registration materials obligates the student to pay the assessed tuition and fees for that term. If a student is suspended or expelled from the University, the amount of tuition/fees which would be refunded would be the same as when a student voluntarily withdraws from a term. See the General Information section of this catalog or the Schedule of Classes for more information.
The official withdrawal date applicable for tuition/fee refund purposes will be the date of the Student Discipline Committee’s decision. In the event that circumstances are such that the accused student has registered for a subsequent term before the final decision is made, that student does so at his/her own risk and may be liable for payment of tuition and fees for both terms. The Committee will make the decision as to when official suspension or expulsion begins. Failure to make the


34 / General Information
required payment will result in the following action: students will become ineligible for all University services; no grades will be issued for courses in progress; no transcripts, diplomas, certification, or registration materials will be issued for the student until the bill is paid in full; a late payment charged in addition to the interest on the unpaid balance will be assessed.
TRI-INSTITUTIONAL VIOLATIONS
Procedures in deciding violations of the Code of Student Conduct involving students from other academic institutions on the Auraria campus have been developed by CU-Denver and the institution(s) involved. In such cases, the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
Responsibilities of Computing Services Users
Access to CU-Denver computing systems, and use of CU-Denver computing resources, is a privilege granted to members of the CU-Denver community for scholarly, research, and administrative purposes. Those who use computing services on the CU-Denver campus are expected to do so in an effective, efficient, ethical, and legal manner.
As a condition of using computer resources on the CU-Denver campus, users Eire expected to respect the intellectual effort and creativity of others, to respect the privacy of other users, to respect the integrity of the computer systems and other users’ data, and to use computer resources in an efficient and productive manner.
It is the responsibility of all users to respect copyright protection of licensed computer software. Users do not have the right to copy licensed software programs or documentation without the specific permission of the copyright holder, or to use unauthorized copies of licensed software. Unauthorized use, duplication, or distribution of computer software is a violation of University policy and Federal law.
(This statement is adapted from material in the CU-Denver Computing Service News, the University of Colorado Administrative Policy Statement on Copying Computer Software, and the CU-Boulder Academic Computing Services Statement of Responsibilities of Users.)
Sexual Harassment
The University of Colorado at Denver is a collegial academic community whose
mission requires an open learning and working environment for students, faculty, staff, and administrators. An open learning and working environment values and protects individual dignity and the integrity of human relationships. CU-Denver’s educational process is based upon mutual trust, freedom of inquiry, freedom of expression, and the absence of intimidation and exploitation. As a place of work and study, CU-Denver must be free of inappropriate and disrespectful conduct and communication of a sexual nature, of sexual harassment, and of all forms of sexual intimidation and exploitation. Such behavior is reprehensible because it subverts the mission of CU-Denver, poisons the environment, and threatens the careers, educational experiences, and well-being of students, faculty, staff, and administrators.
It is a violation of CU-Denver’s Sexual Harassment Policy for anyone who is authorized to recommend or take action affecting faculty, staff, students, or administrators to make any unwelcome sexual advances, to request sexual favors, or to engage in any other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or status in a course, program, or activity; or (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for employment or educational decisions affecting that individual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or educational experience, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for working or learning.
For further information, contact the Sexual Harassment Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 850, 556-4493.
STUDENT SERVICES
Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services: Shelia
Hood
Student Life
Students at CU-Denver reflect the diversity of its environment: many are older than those considered to be traditional college students; have employment and family responsibilities in addition to their academic programs; include substantial numbers of minorities, women, and single parents; and are most often enrolled part time.
To meet the needs of this diverse student population, CU-Denver provides student life programs and activities designed
to complement students’ academic programs and to enhance their total educational experience. Students are provided opportunities to develop, experience, and participate in student government, social, cultural, intellectual, and recreational programs. Student life programs create an environment in which students are:
• Assisted in developing leadership through opportunities to practice decision making, management and marketing, interpersonal and group communication, and relationship skills.
• Encouraged and aided in developing social, cultural, intellectual, recreation and governance programs that expand involvement with the campus community and society and lead to mature appreciation of these pursuits.
• Encouraged to explore self-directed activities that provide opportunities for personal growth in individual and group settings.
• Exposed to various cultures and experiences, ideas and issues, art and musical forms, and styles of life.
• Informed about institutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities.
• Aided in the awareness and utilization of campus facilities and other resources.
• Assisted in developing community spirit through creative interaction among staff, faculty, students, and members of the local community. Students are encouraged to involve their families in campus events and activities.
Programs and services provided by the
Associated Students of CU-Denver, the Division of Enrollment and Student Services of CU-Denver, and the Auraria Student Assistance Center Division contribute to the fulfillment of this philosophy.
Clubs and Organizations
ACM Computing Club ACS Student Advisory Council Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology) American Institute of Architecture Students
American Planning Association American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Landscape Architecture
American Society of Mechanical Engineers Anthropology Club Asian Cultural Enrichment Society Association of Black Students Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs
Associated Engineering Students Auraria Transnational Student Association


Student Services / 35
BACCHUS
Beta Alpha Omega (Counseling/ Education)
Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Honor Society)
Club Hillel
Denver Society of Black Engineers and Scientists
Equiponderance Pre-Law Club Feminist Alliance
Golden Key National Honor Society Hispanic Student Organization Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Korean Christian Fellowship Master of Social Sciences Club MBA Association
Native American Student Organization Palestinian Solidarity Committee Phi Alpha Theta (History)
Phi Chi Theta (Business)
Philosophy Club
Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering) Psi Chi (Psychology)
Second Stage Theatre Club Society of Accounting Students Society of Hispanic Engineers and Scientists
Society of Women Engineers Student Association of Musicians Tau Beta Phi (Engineering)
Vietnamese Student Organization
Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD)
The Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCU-Denver) serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal University structure. ASCU-Denver assists students with information concerning student clubs and organizations, campus events, issues concerning student status and other information of interest to students in general. ASCU-Denver also provides students with assistance with grievances and with the opportunity to become more closely involved with the University community through active participation in student government itself or through service on University, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees. More information concerning services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Student Union, Room 340, 556-2510.
Student Legal Services
Student legal services are available to assist students with off-campus legal
problems through the provision of legal advice, litigation preparation, document interpretation, and assistance in negotiation. The service will not represent students in court. This student fee funded program is provided free of charge to CU-Denver students; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred such as copying, typing, etc. Contact the office for further details at 556-3333, Student Union, Room 255.
The Advocate
The purpose of the student newspaper is to provide students with information about campus issues and events. The newspaper strives to include good investigative reporting, feature articles, and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is a tool to encourage and develop writers, journalists, artists, and other student members of its general management and production staff. The office is in the Student Union, Room 151, 556-8321.
Office of Student Life
The Office of Student Life is the advising, coordinating, resource, and general information center for student clubs and organizations, student government (ASCUD), student programs, and the academic honor societies. Student Life coordinates new student orientation programs. The office is responsible for the administration of the student fee budget and monitors all student fee expenditures to assure compliance with CU-Denver and the state of Colorado regulations and procedures. The Director of Student Life represents the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees and maintains effective lines of communication with MSC, CCD, and AHEC. The director administers the student conduct and discipline procedure as described in the Code of Student Conduct. The Office of Student Life is located in the Student Union, Room 255,
556-3399.
Office of Veterans Affairs
The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veteran and dependent students attending CU-Denver utilizing Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists students with filling out VA paperwork and in solving problems associated with receiving VA-related benefits.
The OVA maintains proper certification for eligible students to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements for attendance, course load and content, and other regulations necessary to receive educational benefits payments.
In addition, the OVA provides VA Vocational Rehabilitation referrals, and information on VA tutorial assistance, and VA work/study positions for qualified veterans. For further information, contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 556-2630,
NC 4015.
Student Counseling and Testing Center
Phone: 556-2815 Office: NC 2013
The Student Counseling and Testing Center provides a variety of support programs and services to CU-Denver students. Our mission is to help students grow in self understanding, to help make their college years a satisfying and productive experience, and to facilitate meaningful preparation for future goals. Our offerings include the following:
Counseling Services. Students may obtain short term personal counseling provided by professional staff. We also will assist students and others in locating appropriate counseling/mental health services in the community. The office also sponsors professionally-facilitated counseling groups.
Programs and Workshops. The office sponsors a variety of FREE or low-cost programs and workshops on a variety of topics such as assertiveness training, stress management, college survival skills, drug and alcohol awareness, etc. These programs are open to the entire CU-Denver community.
Career Development Services. The office provides career development workshops and programs, and career interest testing to CU-Denver students. Career tests offered include Strong Campbell Interest Inventory, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and Career Orientation Placement and Evaluation Survey.
Women’s Programs and Services. Offerings in this area include: advocacy, programs such as Self Defense for Women, and Dealing with Sexual Harassment; scholarship offerings; and referral /resource information
Re-Entry Program. The Center offers an intensive one-day program each semester which is geared to assisting the returning adult student as he or she makes the transition to university life.


36 / General Information
Testing Services. The Student Counseling and Testing Center houses a full-service Testing Center which provides testing for all levels of postsecondary education, and professional certification. Tests offered include:
ACT American College Test
CAT California Achievement Test
GRE Graduate Record Examination
GMAT Graduate Management Admis-
sions Test
GSFLT Graduate School Foreign Language Test MAT Miller Analogy Test MCAT Medical College Admission Test TOEFL Test of English as a Foreign Language
CLEP College Level Examination Program
For further information on Testing Services, call 556-2861. The office is located in NC 2006.
Office of Student Retention Services
The Office of Student Retention Services offers an array of services and programs designed to foster cultural diversity within the CU-Denver student body, help students adjust to the social and intellectual environment of the campus, and provide the academic support students need to succeed in their studies and derive maximum benefit from their college experience. Outreach and retention services are provided by professional staff in four centers. These include the Center for First-Year Students, Center for Learning Assistance, Center for Educational Opportunity and Cultural Diversity, and the Center for Pre-Collegiate Development. The Office of Student Retention Services is located in NC 2012, 556-2324.
CENTER FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS
The Center for First-Year Students offers individualized support services to help freshman students adjust to college life and succeed in their college studies. Personal advisors in the Center provide orientation to the campus and its programs, assist students in interpreting academic policies and requirements, assist in the selection of classes and academic programs commensurate with students’ educational and career interests, refer students to other campus resources, and provide advocacy, if necessary. The Center is located in NC 2012, 556-2546.
CENTER FOR EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY
The Center for Educational Opportunity and Cultural Diversity provides access and educational opportunities to ethnic minority students through services conducive to the student’s retention and graduation. The Center houses four distinct programs, each of which provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, and other support services tailored to the specific needs of their students. The Center is located in NC 2012, 556-2324.
American Indian Student Services Program
Asian American Student Services Program
Black Student Services Program
Hispanic Student Services Program
CENTER FOR PRE-COLLEGIATE DEVELOPMENT
Programs offered by the Center serve to motivate minority high school students to pursue post-secondary education and provide them the academic skills needed to be successful in their college endeavors. The Center is located in NC 2014, 556-2322.
Pre-Collegiate Development Program. This program enables students in grades 9 through 12 to engage in a wide range of university activities throughout the academic year and during a full-time, five-week summer program. The academic year component offers monthly study skills and career orientation workshops, advising, tutoring, and a variety of cultural enrichment experiences. The five-week summer session for students in the 10th and 11th grades consists of accelerated classes for which students receive elective high school credit, career orientation, and engage in cultural activities.
Minority Scholars Program. The MSP is an early college enrollment program for college bound, high achieving minority students who are completing their final year of high school. The program enables students to begin their college studies by taking one course at CU-Denver during the summer term prior to their senior year in high school. The credit earned in the course can be applied toward a bachelor’s degree. While enrolled in the program, students participate in workshops designed to acclimate them to the University and prepare them for college study.
CENTER FOR LEARNING ASSISTANCE
The Center for Learning Assistance is designed to promote student success in the academic setting. Services are available to all CU-Denver students. The Center’s services include tutoring, workshops, academic institutional credit courses, consulting, and a minority resource library. First-generation college students may be eligible for more intensive services through the Student Support Services component of the Center. The Center is located in NC 2004, 556-2802.
Tutoring. Free tutoring is available in many subject areas (some limitations apply). Scheduled sessions are held on weekdays/evenings. Both scheduled and open lab, walk-in tutoring are available at established times throughout each term (M-F,9 a.m.- 9 p.m.).
Workshops. Study skills workshops are provided on such topics as test-taking, memory and study techniques, notetaking, listening and time management.
Consulting. Academic, financial aid, and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy is available to students eligible for the Student Support Services Program.
Library. The Center maintains a small periodical and book collection authored by, and/or about, minorities; these resources are available for student research and leisure.
Courses. Courses are offered in a small group format in the areas of college survival skills (study skills and computer word processing), English as a second language, and problem solving.
CMMU. 1400-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languages. This course is designed for ESL students who need to improve their reading and vocabulary skills. Students will increase their reading ability through vocabulary building, work attack strategies, and reading analysis.
CMMU. 1410-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. This is the first course in the ESL composition sequence. Writing begins with sentence-level development and continues with the development of paragraphs based on Western rhetorical patterns. Grammar appropriate to students’ needs will be incorporated into the class. CMMU. 1420-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II.
Continued work on grammar, syntax, and the mechanics of writing. Writing begins with paragraphs and moves into essay writing. Prereq: CMMU. 1410 or ESL coordinator’s approved.


Internships and Cooperative Education / 37
CMMU. 1430-3. Advanced ESL Writing Skills. This is the third course in the ESL composition sequence. Emphasis is placed on more complex grammatical problems and on the development of longer compositions. Prereq: CMMU. 1420 or ESL coordinator’s approval.
STSK. 0705-1. Problem Solving. This course is designed to improve investigative and problem solving skills. Scientific theory, empirical methodology, and research methods will be utilized. Individual topics of investigation will be assigned.
STSK. 0707-1. College Survival Skills. This course is designed to promote success in the academic setting. Topics covered will include university resources, conquering the university system, listening and notetaking, study and memory techniques, test-taking skills, time management, library research strategies, and word processing.
STSK. 0708-1. Introduction to Word Processing. This course will thoroughly familiarize the student with an easy-to-use word processing program that will assist in the process of writing text revision and rearrangement, and the production of letter-perfect documents. (The word processing program used will be one that is available in the open student-use computer lab areas.) STSK. 0800-1. Advanced ESL Grammar/ Composition. This class meets for two hours a week. It is designed for students who do not feel competent with their English composition skills. This class is highly individualized in order to focus on those grammar and writing structures that pose particular problems for ESL students. STSK. 0801-1. Communication Skills for ESL Students. This course meets twice a week to improve the oral communication skills of students whose first language is not english. Skills include use of idiomatic English, cross-cultural awareness, cross-cultural problems in communications, and pronunciation.
STSK. 0802-1. Improving Academic Reading Skills for ESL Students. This class meets twice a week. The aim of the class is to improve the student’s ability to read academic texts. Skills practiced include skimming/scanning, reading for the main idea, and critical reading.
STSK. 0806-1. Study Skills for ESL Students. This class is designed for ESL students to improve those skills needed for effective participation in the college classroom. Emphasis will be on academic reading and writing skills, as well as notetaking skills. STSK. 0810. Topics. Special topics in study skills to be selected by instructor.
CENTER FOR INTERNSHIPS AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
Director: Janet Michalski Assistant Director and Coordinator, Engineering: Diane Berkley Coordinator, Liberal Arts and
Sciences: Cherrie Grove Coordinator, Business and
Administration: Wayne Sundell Senior Secretary: Charlene Michael Office: 1047 Ninth Street Historic Park Telephone: 556-2892
The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education, established at CU-Denver in 1973, provides students with an opportunity to supplement their academic classroom learning with on-the-job work experiences or internships related to their academic studies. Students are placed either as paid co-op trainees or as interns for academic credit with corporations, businesses, or government agencies in the Denver metropolitan area as well as out of state.
Faculty coordinators from each of the University’s colleges and schools act as liaisons between the Center and the academic departments. The Center currently places over 400 students each year with some 250 participating employers. Over 30 percent of all co-op students are graduate students.
Cooperative Education
Cooperative education is an educational method which combines classroom study with paid, career related, off-campus work. The purpose is to give students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to real world situations, and to bring that experience back to the classroom as a learning tool.
Cooperative education offers students paid long-term positions (two or more semesters) during which students alternate semesters of full-time work with semesters of full-time school, or work part time year round. Co-op experiences may be eligible for academic credit, and many jobs lead to permanent career positions upon graduation.
Internships
Internships offer students short-term positions (one semester) and they may or may not be paid. Internships are usually done for academic credit and are popular with students who like to explore a variety of careers. Many students complete
two, three, or even four internships before graduation. Internships, like co-op jobs, are related to the student’s academic studies and/or career goals.
Eligibility for Placement
The Center is open to all students enrolled at least half time in any CU-Denver college or school who have completed their freshman year, have maintained a grade-point average of 2.5, and have completed at least 12 hours in residence (6 hours for graduate students). Some employers have additional requirements, i.e., U.S. citizenship, willingness to travel, and specific course work.
Academic Credit for Work Experience
Undergraduate students placed by the Center in paid or non-paid positions, as well as students who have obtained their own jobs, can apply to earn academic credit through courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, School of Education, Graduate School of Public Affairs, and School of Architecture and Planning can earn internship, experiential learning, field study, or practicum credit through courses established for this purpose.
Why Students Participate in Cooperative Education
• Students recognize the value of combining theory with practice and find greater relevance in their studies.
• Co-op education allows students to test classroom teaching in the laboratory of the real world.
• The program teaches students valuable job-search skills such as resume writing and interviewing techniques.
• Co-op provides a means of financial assistance that is available to all students, regardless of family income levels or other financial aid arrangements, and does not leave students burdened with educational debts.
• The inclusion of a work component and the contribution from co-op earnings are major factors in encouraging first-generation college students to pursue a college degree.
• Because work experiences involve students with co-workers who come from a variety of backgrounds, students develop a deeper understanding of other people and greater skills in human relations.


38 / General Information
Why Employers Participate in Co-op Programs
• Co-op students are an excellent source of temporary manpower for special projects and peak loads or busy seasons.
• Co-op allows the employer to assess an individual’s potential for employment after graduation, thus saving entry-level recruiting costs.
• Co-op students can increase productivity of full-time professional staff.
• Co-op students are highly motivated, productive, and dependable.
• CU-Denver students bring knowledge about the latest academic research to their employers.
• As verified by many studies, co-op students subsequently become full-time employees with far lower turnover rates and better promotion potential than the average entry level professional.
Facts About Cooperative Education
• Cooperative education programs have been established in over 80 percent of the Fortune 500 corporations. All of the top 10 Fortune 500 companies are involved in cooperative education.
• The last three presidents of General Motors at one time were cooperative education students.
• Cooperative education has been conducted successfully in the U.S. since 1906.
• Over 1,000 colleges and universities currently have cooperative education programs.
• An estimated 200,000 college students are enrolled in cooperative education and gross annual earnings are calculated to be in excess of $200,000,000.
Co-op Employers
Employers who recruit CU-Denver students for cooperative education positions
include:
Martin Marietta IBM Corporation Hughes Aircraft Company MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour National Park Service Rockwell International U.S. Bureau of Reclamation U S WEST Communications Walt Disney World, Inc.
Office of the Governor, State of Colorado
Peat Marwick Main & Co.
Kyle Belding Gallery
National Bureau of Standards KCNC-TV
Los Angeles Times U.S. General Accounting Office Denver General Hospital Environmental Protection Agency Denver Center for the Performing Arts
Walters & Theis Law Firm Bloomsbury Review Colorado Housing & Finance Authority
Hospice of Metro Denver U.S. Bureau of Land Management Denver Public Defender’s Office Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry
Colorado Association of Public Employees
LIBRARY SERVICES Auraria Library
Dean and Director: Camila Alire Associate Director: Jean F. Hemphill Assistant Director for Media and Acting Assistant Director for Library Services: Jay Schafer
Offices: Auraria Library, 11th and Lawrence Sts.
Telephone: —Administration: 556-2805 Telephone: —Information: 556-2741
Faculty:
Associate Professors: Camila Alire,
Jean F. Hemphill, Martin A. Tessmer Assistant Professors: Dene L. Clark, Patricia A. Eskoz, Brian D. Holtz, Elnora M. Mercado, Terry Ann Leopold, Robert L. Wick, Rutherford W. Witthus, Muriel E. Woods
Instructors: Orlando Archibeque, Anthony J. Dedrick, Nikki Dilgarde, Kerranne Gilmour, Marit S. MacArthur, Lori Oling, Jay Schafer, Mara L. Sprain, James K. Straub, Louise T. Stwalley, Linda D. Tietjen, Diane Turner, Liz Willis, Eveline L. Yang
Friends of Auraria Library
The Friends of Auraria Library is an association formed in 1976 to promote the development of Auraria Library. The Friends of Auraria Library’s ongoing objectives are:
• To promote awareness of and good will toward the Auraria Library on the campus, in the metropolitan area, and in the region.
• To increase Library resources through contributions and solicitations or
grants, bequests, and gifts of books and other appropriate materials.
Access to information is essential to academic success. The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus, provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The Library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver.
The Collection
The Auraria Library has a collection of over 600,000 volumes. In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection, the Library also has over 2,000 journal and newspaper subscriptions and a film/video-tape collection. The Library is a select depository for U.S. government publications and a depository for Colorado state documents. The Auraria Library’s collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally through interlibrary loan services.
The CARL Online Public Access Catalog
Access to the Auraria Library’s collection is through the online CARL (Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries) public access catalog, a user-friendly system that also allows for searching of the collections of many other libraries throughout the state, the region, and the nation. The CARL system has received national recognition for being on the cutting edge of information technology. The system allows faster and more comprehensive searches than were possible with the traditional card catalog. In addition to using CARL at the Library, patrons may obtain dial-up access through a home or office computer with a modem; CARL also appears as a menu item on the CU-Denver mainframe computer.
Reference Services
The Auraria Library Reference Department strives to provide excellent service in assisting students and faculty with their information needs. The Reference Desk is staffed during all hours the Library is open. Additionally, an Information Desk is staffed during peak hours to welcome patrons to the library and to direct them to the appropriate service desks. Telephone reference is provided for quick questions such as, Does the Auraria Library own a particular book? A special effort is made to serve the information needs of disabled patrons.


Library / 39
Computer Assisted Research
Online database searching, for which there is a fee, can save many hours of researching printed abstracts and indexes. In some cases, it provides the only access to certain materials. The Library has access to well over 200 databases. In addition to bibliographic information, databases also may contain directory and financial information, scientific data, and full text. Questions about the Computer Assisted Research service should be directed to the CAR office, 556-2624.
Information Retrieval Service
The information retrieval service was instituted as a special aid for busy researchers. For a reasonable fee, Library staff can assist patrons in locating the library materials they need. Working from the patron’s bibliography, staff can: locate and check out books owned by the Library; photocopy articles from journals owned by the Library; submit interlibrary loan requests for materials which the Library does not own; and deliver the materials to the patron’s home or office. Inquiries about this time-saving service should be directed to the Information Retrieval Service, 556-3538.
Library Instruction
The Library is committed to teaching information skills through its instruction program. The program is varied, ranging from basic, introductory-level material to advanced research methodology for graduate students. For more information about the Library’s instructional offerings, contact the Library Instruction office at 556-3303.
Architecture and Planning Library
The Library’s main collection is supplemented by the material housed at the nearby Architecture and Planning Library. With a collection of over 13,000 books, 90 periodical subscriptions, and 14,000 slides, this library offers specialized information to students of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The library is open to any student who needs access to these materials.
Services for Persons with Disabilities
The Library is committed to making its resources and services available to all students. Through the Media Distribution Department, a wide variety of adaptive equipment is available to assist persons with disabilities including a Kurzweil Reading Machine, a Voyager VTEK magnifier, a Braille dictionary, the World Book Encyclopedia in Braille and on cassette, the Perkins Brailler, and several large print dictionaries. Library services to assist persons with disabilities include orientation to the physical layout of the Library, retrieval of materials, and assistance with use of CARL, the online public access catalog, periodicals, indexes, and special adaptive equipment.
Additional Facilities
Coin-operated typewriters, photocopiers, microform copiers, a copy center, a change machine, and study rooms are all available at the Library.
Internships
The Library offers internships, practi-cums, and independent studies to students interested in telecommunications or information management.
Media Services
Assistant Director for Media and
Telecommunications Services:
Muriel E. Woods
The Media and Telecommunications Division of the Library offers a full range of media services. The Media Distribution Department manages the Library’s media collection, which consists of videotapes, audiotapes, records, 16mm films, and kits. These materials are listed in the online public access catalog. This Department also houses media viewing and listening facilities. The Division operates a 24 channel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus; faculty members may request the transmission of a film or videotape directly into the classroom over this system. Students may request transmission of a film or videotape from one of the carrels in Media Distribution. This system also can
transmit live programs from St. Cajetan’s, the Student Union, and the Division’s television studios to other locations on campus. A self-service graphics lab also is available for student use in the Media and Telecommunications Division. Finally, a Practicum Program is available to students who are interested in converting knowledge gained in electronics and/or television production courses to practical experience.




The Graduate School
Acting Dean: Fernie Baca
Office: CU-Denver Bldg., (formerly Dravo)
Room 710
Telephone: 556-2663
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
Quality graduate programs are synonymous with the University of Colorado. Professors are actively involved in research or creative activity and, as teacher/scholars, continue to study and absorb new data, ideas, and techniques, eventually bringing these experiences to the classroom. Graduate students at CU-Denver gain not only from interactions with the graduate faculty, but also from other students in the classroom. Because most of CU-Denver’s graduate students are older and employed, they bring practical experience gained in the Denver community to the classroom and are ready to relate the realities of practice to the models presented in the classroom.
The Graduate School is a Universitywide body that authorizes programs within its constituent colleges and schools. At CU-Denver, Education, Engineering, and Liberal Arts and Sciences are colleges or schools whose graduate programs are offered through The Graduate School. In concept, there is a single Graduate School regardless of campus. In practice, most master’s-level programs are specific to the campus where the student is admitted, insofar as particular options and advisors are concerned.
Doctoral-level programs in a discipline are viewed as the responsibility of the entire University community of that discipline. Doctoral-level programs on the CU-Denver campus are coordinated either through the office of the system graduate dean or through the corresponding Denver or Boulder department. There are several doctoral-level degree programs offered through CU-Denver.
Degrees Offered
The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through The Graduate School at CU-Denver.
The Master of Arts (M.A.) in: Anthropology Biology
Communication and Theatre
Economics
English
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
The Master of Arts (M.A. Education) in: Administration, Supervision and
Curriculum Development Counseling and Guidance Early Childhood Education Education Instruction and Curriculum Educational Psychology Special Education
The Master of Science (M.S.) in:
Applied Mathematics Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Science Mechanical Engineering Technical Communication
The Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.)
The Master of Engineering (M.E.)1
The Master of Humanities (M.H.)
The Master of Social Science (M.S.S.)
The Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in: Applied Mathematics Administration, Supervision
and Curriculum Development Public Administration
Course work is available at the Denver campus in the programs listed below. Students may be resident on the Denver campus studying in these areas in order to take advantage of the multi-campus activities of The Graduate School.
Biology Chemistry Civil Engineering Communication
‘Awarded through CU-Boulder
Computer Science Electrical Engineering English
Mechanical Engineering Psychology
The Graduate School at CU-Denver
An average of 4,712 students are enrolled in graduate programs at CU-Denver each fall and spring semester, which includes 1,140 non-degree students taking graduate courses. Approximately 74 percent of enrolled graduate students are part-time students.
Computing Services
The Computing Services department supports computer use by both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. For a complete description of services offered see Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section of this catalog.
Financial Aid for Graduate Study
COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT
The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by The Office of Financial Aid.
Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the State of Colorado. Grant awards are announced each semester for the following term. Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid.
COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise and to continuing students on the basis of academic success.


42 / The Graduate School
GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS
Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructorship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course.
A half-time appointment for an instructor is considered to be equal to 6 class contact hours; a half-time teaching assistant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Compensation is based on the number of hours per week. Teaching assistants and instructors must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate/ thesis or dissertation) in good standing for the full period of their appointment.
RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS
Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Assistants must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergradu-ate/graduate/thesis or dissertation).
LOAN FUNDS
Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college workstudy program should submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March 1. This office also provides shortterm loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Applicants should go directly to the Office of Financial Aid.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work either through conventional employment or through the college work-study program.
Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy.
International Education
The Office of International Education expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and acts as advisor for the Fulbright and other fellowships.
The office also arranges study abroad programs. Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while taking regular courses in the foreign universities. A B average with the equivalent of two years of college-level work in the appropriate language is required. There also are occasional summer programs offering academic credit.
Peace Corps information may be obtained from the Office of International Education.
For additional information contact the Office of International Programs, Auraria Higher Education Center, 556-3660, or the Office of International Education, Boulder campus, 492-7741.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
General Requirements
Students may be admitted to The Graduate School in either of the two categories described below.
REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS
Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, applicants for admission as regular degree students must:
1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recognized standing, or have work experience equivalent to that required for such a degree and equivalent to the degree given at this university.
2. Show promise of ability to pursue advanced study and research, as judged by their previous scholastic record.
3. Have adequate preparation to enter graduate study in the field chosen.
4. Have at least a 2.75 undergraduate grade-point average on all work taken.
5. Meet additional requirements for admission as established by major departments.
Regular degree students must maintain at least a 3.0 grade-point average each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether it is to be applied toward
the intended advanced degree or not. Students who fail to maintain this standard of performance will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS
Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular degree students may be admitted as provisional degree students upon the recommendation of the major department.
Upon the recommendation of the Admissions Committee and concurrence of the dean of The Graduate School, a department may admit provisional students for a probationary term which may not exceed two consecutive calendar years. At the end of the probationary period, provisional degree students must either be admitted to regular degree status or be dropped from the graduate program.
Credit earned by persons in provisional degree status may count toward a degree at this University.
Provisional degree students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average or higher, according to the terms of their provisional admission, each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether or not it is to be applied toward the advanced degree sought. Students who fail to maintain such a standard of performance will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
Note: All provisional applicants must have completed a minimum of six semester hours of graduate-level course work or must take the Graduate Record Examination and submit scores as part of the application.
The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
SENIORS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
A senior in this University who has satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements, and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subject and 12 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor’s degree, may be admitted to The Graduate School by special permission of the dean.
A University of Colorado senior enrolled in the College of Engineering and Applied Science who needs not more than 18


Graduate Admission / 43
semester hours or 36 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor’s degree may be admitted to The Graduate School, but is not eligible for financial aid, scholarships, or fellowships as a graduate student until the equivalent of the minimum requirements for the bachelor’s degree have been satisfied.
Application Procedures
Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the Office of Admissions concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications.
An applicant for admission must present a completed Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the Office of Admissions, and two official transcripts from each institution attended. The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable application fee of $30 (check or money order) when the application is submitted. No application will be processed unless this fee is paid. Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination, and all departments require three or four letters of recommendation.
When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson of each department or a student admissions committee shall decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to the Office of Admissions, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as nondegree students (see Non-degree Students in this section).
A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 90 days prior to the term for which admission is sought or earlier as may be required by the major department.
Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1991-92, e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, must file a completed application with the department before the announced departmental deadline.
RE-ADMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS
Students who were previously admitted to a graduate degree program but did not complete that degree program and have not been registered for one year or more at the University must:
1. Clarify their status with the department or school/college to determine their eligibility to return and pursue the same degree.
2. After receiving departmental approval as indicated above, submit a new application Part I to the Office of Admissions before departmental deadlines are passed for the term in which they expect to return to the University. A $30 application fee is required. Application deadlines are available from the department.
Former students who wish to change from undergraduate to graduate status or from one major to another must apply to the new department.
Students transferring from one campus to another must apply and be accepted to the new campus.
A student admitted to The Graduate School for the master’s program must reapply for the doctoral program.
A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student’s major department and the dean. In case of lack of agreement between the department and the dean or in the case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Graduate Council.
FOREIGN APPLICANTS
Prospective foreign students should have completed applications on file in Office of Admissions prior to December 1 for the Summer Term, March 1 for the Fall Semester, and July 1 for the Spring Semester. The application packet should include the $50 fee, TOEFL scores, financial documentation, Graduate Record Examination scores, official English translation of all school records, and other documents as noted in the previous section on Application Procedures.
Acceptable TOEFL Scores. The TOEFL is the Test of English as a Foreign Language. If your native language is not English, or you have not attended a British or American university for at least one year and achieved satisfactory grades, then you must take the TOEFL. All programs within CU-Denver’s Graduate School—arts and sciences, education, engineering, and doctoral programs—require a minimum score of 525 for regular admission. Those earning less than 525 will normally be referred to the Spring International Language Center (on campus) for further language study. During that time, students will study on an 1-20 from Spring International, but may take classes as nondegree students at CU-Denver. They may subsequently be granted regular admission to The Graduate School. All international students who take the TOEFL and are granted regular admission to CU-Denver’s Graduate School will be asked
to take both the Michigan and SPEAK tests during their first semester of study. Those whose TOEFL fell between 525 and 550 will be required to take additional language training in light of whatever deficiencies may be revealed by these diagnostic tests. Those whose TOEFL exceeds 550 will be encouraged, but not required, to undertake additional training in light of their performance on these tests. Students seeking admission to all other graduate programs, including those in architecture and planning, business, and public affairs, should consult those program descriptions for language requirements.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS
At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for admission to the graduate program or for assistantships prior to determining student status.
Students who are applying for assistant-ships for the fall semester take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the selection committee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an institution.
Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from the CU-Denver Testing Center, or from The Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
OTHER GRADUATE QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS
Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain information at the Student Testing Center on the following examinations: Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (I.SAT).
NON-DEGREE STUDENTS
A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado at Denver should apply to the Office of Admissions, Campus Box 167,
P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364. Non-degree students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted.
Non-degree students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this University are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and supporting credentials as soon as possible.


44 / The Graduate School
A department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as many as 9 credit hours toward the requirements of a master’s degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a non-degree student at the University of Colorado, or both. In addition, the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of credit courses taken as a non-degree student at this University during the term for which the student applied for admission to The Graduate School, provided such admission date was delayed through no fault of the student. A grade of B or better must be obtained in any coursework transferred in this manner.
REGISTRATION
Course Work and Examinations
On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to The Graduate School and who expect to study in The Graduate School are required to complete appropriate registration procedures.
Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted into The Graduate School. If unable to attend that semester, they must notify the department that has accepted them and submit the necessary forms to the Office of Admissions and Records at CU-Denver in order to attend the following semester.
Changes in Registration
A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should follow the drop/add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Classes). After the tenth week of classes graduate students may not drop, add, or change a course to no-credit status without presenting a letter to the dean of their school/college, stating the exceptional circumstances that justify the change. This letter, endorsed by the instructor of the course, must accompany the properly signed and completed drop/add card or no-credit option form.
Withdrawal
Graduate students who desire to withdraw from the University must apply to the dean of their school/college for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official withdrawal will be marked as having failed the course. The
withdrawal form must be signed by the instructor of the course and pass/fail must be indicated with the instructor’s initials.
Master's Thesis
Graduate students working toward master’s degrees, if they expect to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Limitation of Registration
FULL LOAD
A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit if the student is registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed under-graduate/graduate/thesis or dissertation hours.
A maximum of two-thirds of a semester of resident credit may be earned during the summer if a student registers for three semester hours of other graduate work or any number of thesis hours.
For the number of hours required for financial aid, see Financial Aid at the University of Colorado at Denver in the General Information section of this catalog. A graduate student may contact the school/college dean’s office for information on the appeal process regarding the full load requirement for financial aid purposes.
MAXIMUM LOAD
No graduate student may receive credit toward a degree for more than 15 hours in a regular semester.
The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at CU-Denver is 10 hours per 10-week summer term. A graduate student may contact the school/college dean’s office for information on the appeal process regarding an overload.
UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES
Full-time employees of the University may not undertake more than 6 credit hours per semester. Part-time employees, including assistants, may take the number of credit hours approved by the major department.
TUITION AND FEES
The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information section of this catalog.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES
Quality of Graduate Work
Although the work for advance degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours, an advanced degree will not be conferred merely for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses. Students should not expect to obtain all the training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirement for an advanced degree from formal courses. They should work on their own initiative, reading widely and thoughtfully, reaching their own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of values, perspective, and proportion.
All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficiencies) must be of graduate status.
A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted while enrolled in The Graduate School.
For the Ph.D., a course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree.
A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School by the dean with the approval of the major department.
Appeal may be made to the Graduate Council. The committee’s decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student’s major department and the dean. In case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Graduate Council.


Master's Degree / 45
Repeating a Course
A graduate student who receives a grade of C, D, or F in a course may repeat the course once, upon written recommendation to the dean by the chairman of the student’s advisory committee and major department, provided the course has not previously been applied toward a degree.
In calculating a student’s grade-point average for Graduate School purposes, the grade for a repeated course will substitute for the old grade. Grades earned in courses taken as an undergraduate or as a non-degree student, as well as grades earned in first- and second-year foreign language courses, will not be used in calculating The Graduate School grade-point average; however, all grades received will appear on the student’s transcript.
Change of Department or Major
A graduate student wishing to change department or major must submit a new Part I and Part II of the graduate application to the new department or school and request the former department to forward recommendations and credentials. The student must be formally accepted by the new department.
Use of English
A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of standard English in all oral and written work may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance.
Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate’s proficiency.
Graduate Appeals
Final action on appeals submitted by graduate students concerning action taken by faculty members, programs, or administrative officials rests with the campus Graduate Council, unless such appeal involves a matter affecting two or more campuses. In such a case, the final action rests with the Executive Committee of the System-Wide Graduate School.
MASTER'S DEGREE
A student regularly admitted to The Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master’s degrees will be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met.
In general, only graduates of an approved institution who have a thorough preparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below. All studies offered toward the minimum requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank. Necessary additional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequisites may be partly or entirely undergraduate courses.
The requirements stated below are minimum requirements; additional conditions set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make further regulations not inconsistent with the general rules.
Students planning to graduate should ascertain current deadlines of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student’s and the department’s responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e. changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.).
Departments or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student’s responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Requirements
The minimum requirements of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by following either Plan I or Plan II below.
Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a thesis. At least 12 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above.
Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis. At least 16 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above.
Plan II does not represent a free option for the student. A candidate for the master’s degree may be allowed to select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned.
Graduate Credit
Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above and that are offered by professors who are members of the graduate faculty, or that have otherwise been approved by the dean of The Graduate School. No assurance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless the student has the approval of the department.
Not all courses listed are available at any one time; some are given in alternate years.
Courses taken during the Fall Semester 1975 and thereafter will have graduate rank if they are taught by members of The Graduate School faculty and are in one of the following categories:
1. Courses within the major program at the 5000 level or above.
2. Courses outside the major program at the 4000 level provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean.
3. The Master of Basic Science program (M.B.S.) has approval for 3000- and 4000-level courses if approved by the department and the dean of The Graduate School.
4. Courses outside the major program, provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degreegranting program and by the campus graduate dean.
This does not change the minimum number of courses that must be taken at the 5000 level or above; however, as a result, most students who include 4000 level courses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation.
Field of Study
Studies leading to a master’s degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program.
Status
After students have made a satisfactory record in this University for at least one semester or summer term, and after they have removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission or by qualifying examinations or otherwise, they should confer with their major department and request that a decision be made on their status. This definite status must


46 / The Graduate School
be set by the major department before students may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree.
Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without credit toward a graduate degree all prerequisites required by the department concerned.
Language Requirements
Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as each department requires. See specific departmental requirements.
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere and coming within the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the dean of the school/college.
Course work taken more than 6 years prior to the completion of final requirements (comprehensive exam and/or filing of thesis) will not be accepted for the degree unless validated by a special examination.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University is 9 semester hours.
Credit will not be transferred until the student has established in The Graduate School of this University a satisfactory record of at least one semester in residence; such transfer will not reduce the residence at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated.
Work already applied toward a master’s degree received from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the master’s degree at the University of Colorado; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recognized.
Excess undergraduate credits from another institution may not be transferred to The Graduate School. Seniors in this University may, however, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 9 semester hours) provided such work:
1. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this University.
2. Comes within the four-year time limit.
3. Has not been applied toward another degree.
4. Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and approved by the dean of the school/college.
Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to the school/college by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. For more information contact your graduate advisor. To be eligible for courses to be considered for transfer, a student must have an overall B average in all courses taken at the University of Colorado in The Graduate School.
Continuing Education Course Work
Students may use the resources of the Division of Extended Studies in the pursuit of graduate study only if they obtain proper academic approval from the major department and the school/college dean in advance.
Residence
In general, the residence requirements can be met only by residence at the University for at least two semesters or at least three summer terms. For full residence, a student must be registered within the time designated at the beginning of a semester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses numbered 5000 or above, or at least a combination of other course work acceptable for graduate credit. See Limitation of Registration, Full Load, for requirements for full residence credit during the summer. Students who are noticeably deficient in their general training or in the specific preparation indicated by each department as prerequisite to graduate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified.
Graduate assistants and other employees of the University may fulfill the residence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than halftime. Full-time employees may not satisfy the residence requirements of one year in fewer than four semesters.
Admission to Candidacy
A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master's degree must file application in the graduate dean’s office 10 weeks prior to the completion of the
comprehensive final examination. The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be determined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status.
This application must be made on forms obtainable from the Graduate School dean’s office and in various departments and must be signed by the major department, certifying that the student’s work is satisfactory and that the program outlined in the application meets the requirements set for the student.
A student on Graduate School probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation.
Thesis Requirements
A thesis, which may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type, is required of every master’s degree candidate under Plan I. Every thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must:
1. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field.
2. Be based upon independent study and investigation.
3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work.
4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred.
5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given.
6. Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in Directions for Preparing Masters' and Doctoral Theses, which is obtainable from The Graduate School.
Two weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred, two formally approved, printed or typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in The Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract.
All theses must be signed by the thesis advisor and the second reader. All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid when the thesis is deposited in The Graduate School.
Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been registered. A student working toward a master’s degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence,but the total registered credit for


Doctor of Philosophy / 47
thesis must total a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis.
The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. An IP (in progress) will be reported for terms during which the student is registered for thesis prior to completion of the thesis.
Comprehensive Final Examination
All candidates for a master’s degree are required to take a comprehensive fined examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examination may be given near the end of their last semester of residence while they are still taking required courses for the degree, provided they are making satisfactory progress in those courses.
The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed:
1. Students must be registered when they take the examination.
2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean’s office at least three days in advance of the examination.
3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned in consultation with the dean.
4. The examination, which may be oral, written, or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essentially complete at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field.
5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments.
6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or minor field. The examination on transferred work will be given by representatives of the corresponding fields of study in this University.
7. A student who fails the comprehensive final examination may not attempt the examination again until at least three months have elapsed and until such work as may be prescribed by the examining committee has been completed. The student may retake the examination only once.
Supplemental Examinations
Supplemental examinations should be simply an extension of the original examination and given immediately. If the student fails the supplemental examination, three months must elapse before attempting the comprehensive examination again.
Course Examinations
The regular written examinations of each semester except the last must be taken. Course examinations of the last semester, which come after the comprehensive final examination has been passed, may be omitted with the consent of the instructor.
Master's Thesis Credit
Every graduate student working toward a master’s degree who expects to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Time Limit
Master’s degree students have 5 years, from the date of the start of course work, to complete all degree requirements. For students who fail to complete the degree in this 5 year period, it will be necessary for the program director to file an annual statement with the graduate dean stating the reasons why the program faculty believe the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. Students who do their work exclusively in summer terms must complete all degree requirements within 72 months from the start of course work.
A student who does not complete all degree requirements within the specified period of time must validate, by special examination^), any course work taken more than 6 years prior to taking the masters comprehensive examination or completing the thesis defense, depending on which plan is elected.
Deadlines for Master's Degree Candidates Expecting to Graduate During 1991-92
Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling The Graduate School office, 556-2663.
1. Last day for requesting transfer of credit.
2. Applications for admission to candidacy. Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (The form may be picked up in the department or in The Graduate School office.)
3. Last day for thesis to be approved by department.
4. Last day for scheduling of comprehensive final examination.
5. Last day for taking comprehensive fined examination.
6. Last day for filing thesis in The Graduate School. At the time of filing, the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by The Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p.m. on the indicated date will be graduated at the commencement following that for which the deadline is indicated.
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University. To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued. Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work in this field; furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement


48 / The Graduate School
of knowledge. The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules.
Studies leading to the Ph.D. degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments. The criterion as to what constitutes an acceptable field of study shall be that the student’s work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University.
Students planning to graduate should obtain current deadline dates in the office of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student’s and the department’s responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e. changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.).
Department or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by graduate students in that department or program. It is the student’s responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Course/Dissertation Requirements
A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph.D. degree.
Course Work Requirement. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses numbered 5000 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum. At least 20 of the required hours must be in graduate courses taken at this University. Students who have been admitted to The Graduate School with deficiencies may expect to receive little or no residence credits until the deficiencies have been removed.
Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the Ph.D., a student must register for a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than 10 of these credit hours in any one semester. Not more than 10 dissertation hours may be taken preceding the semester of taking comprehensive examinations. In addition, up to
10 hours may be taken in the semester in which the student passes comprehensives. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above and will not be included in calculation of the student’s grade-point average. Only the grades of A, B, C and IP shall be used.
Course work and work on the dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program; however, at no time shall a doctoral student register for more than 15 hours of 5000-level and above courses. Normally a student must have earned at least three and not more than six semesters of residency before admission to candidacy.
Advisory Committee
As soon as the field of specialization has been chosen, the candidate will request the faculty member with whom the committee wishes to work to act as chair of the advisory committee. The chair, with the advice and approval of the chair of the department, may select two or more additional members to serve on the committee, so that the several fields related to the student’s special interest will be represented. A purpose of the advisory committee {beyond guiding the student through graduate study) is to ensure against specialization that is too narrow. The student shall obtain the signature of the chair of the committee (thereby signifying his or her willingness to act) on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form. Any change in the membership of the advisory committee is to be similarly reported.
Residence
The student must be properly registered to earn residence credit. The minimal residence requirement shall be six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor’s degree. Mere attendance shall not constitute residence as the word is here used. Residence may be earned for course work completed with distinction, for participation in seminars, or for scholarly research performed here or elsewhere under the auspices of the University of Colorado.
As a guiding policy in determining residence credit for employed students, those who are employed in three-fourths to fulltime work that does not contribute directly to their program toward a degree may not earn more than one-half residence credit in any semester. Students who are employed more than one-fourth time and less than three-fourths time in
work that does not contribute directly to the degree may earn not more than three-fourths residence credit. Those who have one-fourth time employment or less may earn full residence credit. {All these provisions are subject to the definition of residence credit given in the preceding paragraph.) In case the interpretation of residence credit for any student needs to be clarified, a decision will be made by the chair of the student’s advisory committee, the chair of the student’s major department, and the dean of The Graduate School.
Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master’s degree from another institution of approved standing, but at least four semesters of residence credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work (course and/or dissertation) taken at this University.
A part of the residence requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be spent in another graduate institution, or in field work in absentia (provided that prior approval for work is given by the student’s program director and provided that the student’s registration is maintained for that period away from the campus).
Preliminary Examination
Each department will satisfy itself (by examination or other means) that students who signify intent to undertake study for the Ph.D. degree are qualified to do so.
The means by which each department makes this evaluation shall be specified in departmental requirements. Students who are thus evaluated will be notified immediately of the results. The results of this preliminary evaluation shall be reported to The Graduate School office on the Application for Candidacy form filed by the student at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
Language Requirement
The decision on foreign language requirements for Ph.D. degrees is the responsibility of the graduate faculty of each graduate program.1
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality earned in another institution of approved standing will not be accepted for transfer
'Approved by a vote of the system-wide graduate faculty on February 7, 1990.


Doctor of Philosophy / 49
to apply toward the doctorate until the student has established a satisfactory record in residence in this Graduate School, but such credit must be transferred before the student makes application for admission to candidacy for the degree. Such transfer will not reduce the minimum residence requirement at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University for the Ph.D. is 30 semester hours.
Application for Admission to Candidacy
A student must make formal application for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree on forms supplied by The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
A student shall have earned at least three semesters of residence, and shall have passed the comprehensive examination before admission to candidacy for the degree.
Continuous Registration Requirements for Doctoral Candidates
Following successful completion of comprehensive examinations, students must register continuously. Students admitted to candidacy for degree will register for and be charged for seven hours of credit for each full-time term of doctoral work. For each term of part-time enrollment, students will be charged for seven hours of dissertation credit, except that students not making use of campus facilities may petition The Graduate School for three-credit-hour status. Continuous registration during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense. It is expected that the student and advisor will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classification identified above.
Comprehensive Examination
Before admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, the student must pass a comprehensive examination in the field of concentration and related fields. This examination may be oral, written, or
both, and will test the student’s mastery of a broad field of knowledge, not merely the formal course work completed. The oral part is open to members of the faculty. The student must be registered at the time the comprehensive examination is attempted.
The examination shall be conducted by an examining board appointed by the chair of the department concerned and be approved by the campus graduate dean. The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to total a minimum of five. A successful candidate must receive the affirmative votes of a majority of the members of the examination board. In case of failure, the examination may be attempted once more after a period of time determined by the examining board.
Dissertation Requirements
A thesis based upon original investigation, showing mature scholarship, critical judgment, and familiarity with the tools and methods of research, must be written upon some subject approved by the student’s major department. To be acceptable, this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student’s special field. It must be finished and submitted in typewritten form at least 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the day of the final examination and must be formally approved and made available for inspection by the examining committee before the final examination may be taken.
In mechanical features, all dissertations must comply with the specifications of The Graduate School as outlined in the Directions for Preparing Masters’ and Doctoral Theses which may be obtained from The Graduate School.
It is the student’s responsibility to notify The Graduate School of the exact title of the dissertation at least six weeks prior to the commencement at which the student will graduate. This title will be printed in the commencement program (May graduation only).
Two formally-approved, typewritten copies of the dissertation, including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred.
The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts
International. The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department.
All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than two members of the major department staff who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction.
All approved dissertations are kept on file in the library.
When the dissertation is deposited in The Graduate School, the candidate must pay the thesis-binding fee and sign an agreement with University Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform.
Final Examination
After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dissertation and related topics will be conducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral, the oral part being open to anyone. The examination will be conducted by a committee consisting of at least five persons, one of whom must be from outside the student’s department. More than one dissenting vote will disqualify the candidate in the final examination.
Arrangements for the final examination must be made in the graduate dean’s office at least two weeks in advance. The examination must be scheduled not later than two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. A student must be registered at the time of the final examination.
Time Limit
If a student fails to complete all requirements for the degree within the prescribed number of years from the date of the start of course work in the doctoral program, a second examination similar to the first will be required before the candidate may take the final examination. The number of years allowed for completion is normally six, but in some programs it may be seven. If the comprehensive examination is failed, it may be attempted


50 / The Graduate School
once more after not fewer than eight months of further work. For students who fail to complete the degree in this six-year period, it will be necessary for the department to file an annual statement indicating that the program director believes the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. This request must be signed by three members of the graduate faculty who serve on the student’s thesis advisory committee. If approved by the campus graduate dean, the student may continue his/her studies for one additional year. If not approved, the student may be dropped from the program.






School of Architecture and Planning
Acting Dean: Peter Schneider Associate Dean: Yuk Lee Office: CU-Denver Bldg, (formerly Dravo), Third Floor Telephone: 556-3382 Faculty Professors: Yuk Lee, George Hoover, John Prosser, Peter Schneider, Hamid Shirvani
Associate Professors: Soontorn Boonyatikarn, Lois Brink, Thomas Clark, Phillip Gallegos, Harry Garnham, Marvin Hatami, David Hill, Paul Saporito, Peter Schaeffer Assistant Professors: Teresa Cameron, Ned Collier, Michael Holleran, Taisto Makela, Hans Morgenthaler, Bennett Neiman, Diane Wilk Shirvani, Won Jin Tae, Ping Xu
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The School of Architecture and Planning offers first and post professional programs leading to master’s degrees. The primary mission of the School is education, research, and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning. Students are required to search into the existing abundance of architecture and planning knowledge in order to generate effective, forceful, spirited forms, ideas, and proposals. Faculty and students are engaged in investigation, education, exploration, and generation of new ideas, forms, and proposals to create more humane living environments. As El Lissitzky (1930) stated: “Our work is not philosophy, neither is it a system relating to a specific theory of nature; it is part of nature and must therefore itself be regarded as an object of knowledge.”
In doing so, the School questions existing connections of teaching and practice and is in search of future alternatives. The School’s activities are thus geared toward preparation of future architects and planners who are not only able to draw, to calculate, or to propose, but also to question, to explore, and to experiment.
The curricula are based on a wide range of cultural views of architecture and planning reflective of our faculty and student body. The faculty direct, guide, and encourage students to develop their individual interests with a prerequisite commitment intended to equip the gradu-
ate with a lasting ability to produce architecture and planning responsive to the changing needs of society.
It is on these premises that our School is in constant search of the manifest, ideas, and forms for the betterment of the living environments. A community of culturally diverse educators and practitioners centered in an island by the backdrop of the Rocky Mountains provides a unique opportunity for intense study of architecture and planning.
Mission and Organization
The School is composed of three graduate degree programs in architecture, landscape architecture, and urban and regional planning (M.Arch., M.L.A., M.U.R.R). It also offers urban design as an area of specialization in the architecture program (M.Arch. in Urban Design). As a unit of graduate professional education with three professional degree programs and a mandate for national excellence and recognition, the School expects to go beyond training students in basic skills for entry-level positions. The School’s overall mission is to develop the design capabilities of the individuals and the design professions as a whole as well as provide the intellectual framework which supports design.
Considering this mission, the School emphasizes basic professional training and education necessary for entering professional practice in its first professional degree programs. The post-professional and advanced degree programs are directed toward professionals at various career stages and focuses on research and specialization.
The School supports interdisciplinary work in its programs and focuses on professional education and research concerning the design and planning of the built environment. Within this interdisciplinary approach, it recognizes the professional community input and the role of the other academic disciplines such as humanities, social sciences, and engineering.
In the School’s degree programs, various architecture and planning ideologies and views are examined with respect to their historical setting. This examination is combined with critical reviews of design work,
dialogues, and methods to form the essential ingredient of design education. Through this dialectic of analyzing and synthesizing, students gain increased understanding of those humanistic ideals underlying the architecture and planning of buildings and spaces and relate them to their own developing personal aspirations.
The School is committed to design as its central intellectual concern and is the largest graduate school of architecture in the western region. Design is used in its broadest sense to include a full range of philosophies, ideologies, theories, and methods. The School’s mission is education, research, and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning.
Academic Programs
The three graduate programs are interdisciplinary, and, in the design fields, both first and post professional degrees are offered. In addition, it is possible for students to obtain two degrees, M.Arch. and M.U.R.R for example, and reduce the time required for doing so by coordinating their programs.
The first professional degree programs are structured for full-time graduate study. For students with employment obligations, most of these programs can be taken on a part-time basis. Usually the first year of the full-time program must be completed before it can be taken part-time.
Within any of the programs, the School of Architecture and Planning offers opportunities to develop a self-tailored area of concentration through its varied offerings in architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. Electives ordinarily can be taken from any program in the School and from another school in the University with the approval of the student’s advisor.
The School maintains membership in:
Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture
Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning
Council of Landscape Architecture Educators
Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board
Planning Accreditation Board
Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society
Sigma Delta Lambda Honor Society


54 / School of Architecture and Planning
Academic Environment and Student Body
In addition to its regular curriculum programs, the School supports or sponsors a variety of events and activities that enlarge and broaden the learning environment in the School. Student internships for credit are available during the academic year. A summer international study program is offered. The School sponsors three receptions—at the beginning of the academic year, before Christmas, and at the end of the academic year—along with a Beaux Arts Ball in the spring, for students and the local professional community. Finally, the School sponsors several exhibitions of design and art works.
There are about 275 full-time students in the School. The student body is diverse, representing many academic disciplines and a wide variety of previous academic institutions. Students have previous degrees from a number of universities around the world.
Lecture Series
Guest critics are frequently invited to the School. In addition, the School has an official lecture series every year. The Lecture Series is composed of distinguished practitioners, critics, and scholars of national and international nature. Visiting critics and speakers include: Stanley Allen, Amy Anderson, Nader Ardalan, Ann Bergren, Jennifer Bloomer, Christine Boyer, James Corner, Livio Dimitriu, Peter Eisenman, Tzann Hour Fang, Kenneth Frampton, Mario Gandelsonas, Diane Ghirardo, Michael Hays, Mark Johnson, Keith Loftin, Greg Lynn, Rodolfo Machado, Art McDonald, Ian McHarg, John Meunier, David Niland, John Novack, Patrick Quinn, Dennis Radford, George Ranalli, Frank E. Sanchis, Thomas Schumacher, Robert Segrest, Werner Seligman, Bahram Shirdel, Vladimir Slapeta, Michael Sorkin, John R. Stilgoe, Harry league, William Turnbull, Anne Vernez-Moudon, Anthony Vidler, Peter Waldman, Peter Walker, Michael Web, Morgan Dix Wheelock, and Lebbeus Woods.
SCHOOL FACILITIES
The School’s studios, library, Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory, Auto-Cadd Computer Laboratory, photo laboratory and darkroom, model shop, gallerias, and offices are housed in three floors of the CU-Denver Bldg, in 50,000 square feet of space. The laboratories and facilities were developed through an endowment
by noted architect Temple Hoyne Buell, FAIA.
Architecture and Planning Library
Librarian: Robert Wick
The Architecture and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library (administered by the University of Colorado at Denver), serves as a learning resource center in the fields of architecture and planning. It contains the following collections: reference, circulating, documentary (planning documents issued by local, regional, state and national agencies with an emphasis on planning materials pertaining to Colorado communities and concerns), periodicals, reserve, and non-print media including architectural slides. The Architecture and Planning Library has over 13,000 volumes of books and monographs, professional references, 15,000 slides, and 99 periodical subscriptions.
The Architecture and Planning Library staff consists of a half time librarian, library technician, and several student assistants. The Library provides a number of services including reference and research assistance, and library-use instruction. Additional services, such as inter-library loan and computer-assisted research, are provided through the Auraria Library.
MACINTOSH ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN LABORATORY
The Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory is dedicated to the promotion of design innovation and exploration with the Macintosh computer. The newly acquired laboratory contains 15 Macintosh II computers with megabyte internal hard drive and high resolution color monitors; a Macintosh II file server with 80 megabyte internal hard drive; an E-size, Hewlett-Packard Draftmaster I pen plotter; LaserWriter II printer; Image Writer II dot matrix printer; and ThunderScan image digitizer. The laboratory is presently experimenting with various drawing and painting software including MacArchitrion professional 3-dimensional modeling software, VersaCad, MacDraw II, SuperPaint, PixelPaint, Adobe Illustrator 88, Video-Works, Canvas, MiniCad, and Mac3D. This state-of-the-art laboratory has been developed through a contribution by Apple Computer, Inc.
CADD COMPUTER LABORATORY
The CADD Laboratory of the School of Architecture and Planning is located adjacent to the Macintosh Architecture Laboratory and is equipped for upscaled computer-aided design and drafting with a microcomputer based networking system which is being modified and expanded.
Six Zenith 2200 PC/ATs, in addition to four IBM PC/XTs with high resolution monitors and digitizing tablets, are now linked with a Novell central file server and 120 megabyte hard disk drive for storage. This network and six additional PC/AT workstations are linked through the addition of AutoCAD compatible software that extends and enhances the ongoing use of AutoCAD and AE/CADD.
Additional capabilities are offered through AutoWord, an interactive word processing package for editing and displaying text of drawings; Auto CoGo, a coordinate geometry program that allows entry of survey and engineering data for site planning and engineering; LandSoft, a system for introducing landscape architectural symbols and drafting extension into the AutoCAD and AE/CADD utilities; and Generic Template, a means of customizing or creating unique design and drafting templates.
Also available are the ComputerVision system which includes the Personal Architect and Personal Designer packages, Gould Colorwriter 6320, and Hewlett-Packard plotters. Additional computing facilities are available at other sites on campus.
BUILDING TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY
The Building Technology Laboratory functions as a teaching and research facility for both students and outside practitioners. For the student, through hands-on experiment and physical demonstration, it is used to facilitate the learning process as well as bridge the gap between theoretical concepts and practical applications. For practitioners, this facility is used to enhance their practice and update their knowledge.
Some examples of equipment and facilities available include data acquisition systems, lighting research equipment, Macintosh visual input package, windflow simulation table, video equipment, and data logging equipment. Data acquisition systems includes the following components: data logger Model 21X-L with 40K internal memory (RAM) and sealed


Admissions / 55
rechargeable battery from Campbell Scientific; IBM PC-AT with 30 megabyte hard disk and 1.2 megabyte RAM; cassette tape recorder and cassette tape interface (for a remote application); analog and digital control cord; and necessary software for read/write access, data interfacing, and data manipulation.
Lighting Research Equipment includes: quantum/radiometer/photometer, two units of pyronometer model L1-200SB-50, six units of photometric sensor -model L1-210SB, and luminance meter at one degree spot.
The Macintosh package allows a direct input of visual image from any object into computer for further study. This equipment includes: Macintosh II computer, Macvision digitizer board and supported software, and visual camera model ICD-200 from 1KEGAMI.
The windflow simulation table allows the designer to analyze various windflow patterns on two-dimensional forms. By allowing water to flow continuously in a given direction and by adding an even distribution of ink to identify the flow patterns, an immediate study can be encountered on a given site configuration.
Video equipment includes: video camera RGB, video monitor, and high quality four head VHS recorder.
Data logging equipment allows an automatic collection of data for a specific time and period. When furnished with the appropriate sensors, the following data can be obtained: temperature (surface temperature, air temperature, and subsurface temperature), moisture (wetbulb temperature and relative humidity), solar radiation, lighting intensity, and wind speed.
Photo Laboratory. Our new photography lab, with the latest state-of-the-art equipment, is used for architectural photography classes and by students to produce material for their portfolios.
There are separate areas for developing, enlarging, drying, and copying.
Model-Making Laboratory. Students will have an 800-square-foot model shop in which to build projects for their classes. Table saws, jig saws, drill presses, jointers, and a full range of hand tools will allow the student to build models of wood, plastic, and steel. An adjacent paint spray room is equipped with a ventilated paint booth and vapor-proof lighting.
ADMISSIONS
General Requirements
The School of Architecture and Planning has an Academic Affairs Office.
Primary responsibilities of this office include answering admission inquiries, processing admissions applications, awarding tuition scholarships, enforcing studio and laboratory rules, hearing student grade appeals, overseeing students’ rights and responsibilities, approving new course proposals, enforcing academic policies, and processing graduation applications.
Each applicant for admission into any of the programs of the School of Architecture and Planning must submit:
1. The University of Colorado Application for Graduate Admission forms.
2. Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended.
3. Three letters of recommendation.
4. A statement of purpose.
5. Examples of creative work (see below).
6. The application fee.
Special requirements for international applicants are described in a following section.
Examples of Creative Work. In architecture, landscape architecture, and urban design, applicants are expected to present samples of their creative and analytic work, commonly referred to as a portfolio. A portfolio is an orderly presentation of one’s work. This includes examples of creative and analytical work including but not limited to essays, papers, photographs and photographic reproduction of artistic work such as sculpture, drawings, paintings, musical composition, and other fine arts. The format must be 8-1/2" x 11", bound with not more than twelve pages (excluding papers). Slides are not accepted. All portfolios must be identified by the student’s full name and program to which the student is applying. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must be included for return of portfolio.
In general, a minimum of 3.00 grade-point average (GPA) on a 4.00 scale (or equivalent) in the prior undergraduate or graduate degree is required for admission. Applicants with a GPA under 3.00 may be reviewed for admission; in such cases, submission of strong supporting materials is advised. For applicants with a GPA under 3.00, GRE scores are normally required for the Urban and Regional Planning Program and strongly recommended for applicants to the other programs.
The admissions decision is made weighing a variety of factors including academic preparation, quality of work experience and portfolio, appropriateness of the applicant’s purpose, and overall likelihood of success in the program. Applicants may be admitted as non-degree students or with special conditions. Because of space limitations, not all qualified applicants may be accepted. Specific requirements for
each program are listed below.
Master of Architecture
(first professional degree; three and
one-half year program)
The three and one-half year (114 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with a bachelor’s degree and no prior training or background in architecture or related field. Prerequisites are one year of college-level physics and college mathematics through a first course in calculus. For those without these prerequisites, courses are held in the summer term preceding the first semester.
Master of Architecture (first professional degree; three and one-half year program with advanced standing)
Admission to the three and one-half year program with advanced standing is appropriate for applicants with a nonprofessional bachelor’s degree in architecture or a bachelor’s degree in a related field (engineering, design, art). Depending on their undergraduate record, qualified applicants with a non-professional architectural degree (the first part of a 4 + 2 program) would ordinarily be given advanced standing of up to one curriculum year in the program. Applicants with degrees in related fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of preparation but may be required to take all the courses in the architectural design sequence. The number of credits and exact point of entry into the program will be determined by the program director.
Master of Architecture (post-professional degree)
The one-year (36 semester hours) postprofessional degree program is appropriate for applicants holding a Bachelor of Architecture or equivalent first professional degree or diploma in architecture.
Master of Architecture in Urban Design (one-year post-professional degree)
The one-year (36 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with a first professional design degree in architecture (e.g. RArch., M.Arch.).
Master of Landscape Architecture (first professional degree)
The three-year (90 semester hours) first professional degree program is appropriate for those with a bachelor’s degree and


56 / School of Architecture and Planning
no training or background in landscape architecture or a related design field.
Master of Landscape Architecture (post-professional degree)
The two-year (48 semester hours) postprofessional degree program is appropriate for applicants with a first professional design degree (B.S.L.A., ELLA., B.Arch., for example). Applicants without a prior Land scape Architecture degree may be required to take additional core requirements in Plant Materials and Ecology.
Master of Urban and Regional Planning
The two-year (51 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with bachelor’s degrees in either design, humanities, social, or physical sciences.
International Applicants
Competence in oral and written English is expected in the School. The School of Architecture and Planning requires a minimum of 550 TOEFL score for international students from non-English speaking countries. However, the School will consider applications from students with strong academic credentials whose TOEFL scores are slightly below 550. If accepted, these students will be required to register and successfully complete a one credit hour technical writing workshop. This one credit hour cannot be used to fulfill part of the degree requirements.
Submission Requirements. International applicants must submit:
1. An International Student application and Graduate Admission forms.
2. Two official transcripts from each United States collegiate institution the applicant has attended.
3. Two certified copies of official academic records from each collegiate institution the applicant has attended outside the United States. A certified literal English translation must accompany documents that are not in English.
4. Four letters of recommendation.
5. A statement of purpose.
6. A portfolio of academic, creative, and professional work.
7. A nonrefundable $50 application fee.
8. A current CU-Denver Financial Resources Statement. Statements used for other institutions will not be accepted. Photocopied documents are not acceptable unless signed by the originator; signatures must not be photocopies.
9. Official TOEFL Score Report to establish English language proficiency. Institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable.
Additional supporting documents may subsequently be required by the office of Admissions. All international applicants who are admitted to CU-Denver must have a valid visa and must enroll for and maintain a full course of study (12 or more semester hours) leading to the completion of a master’s degree.
Financial Requirements. International applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds available to attend the University of Colorado at Denver. To provide this evidence each international applicant should follow these instructions:
1. Complete the Financial Resources Statement. You must prove that you have sufficient money to pay your expenses by submitting the Financial Resources Statement as a part of your application.
a. If you are using your own money, your bank must certify that you have the full amount of money on deposit to meet tuition and expense costs. In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement, your bank must certify that the money the applicant needs is on deposit in your account.
b. If you are being sponsored by a family member, or a friend, your sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. Your sponsor’s bank must certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money you will need.
c. If you have been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed.
2. An incomplete statement of financial resources or failure to prove the availability of the necessary money will delay or cause the denial of your admission to the University. Be sure your Financial Resources Statement is accurate and complete.
Dates and Deadlines
All programs in the School admit students for all semesters. However, acceptance for the Spring and Summer Semesters will be on a space-available basis only. See the Academic Calendar in this catalog or the Schedule of Classes for specific dates.
To be considered for Fall Semester admission, all application materials must be received by the previous March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1. To be considered for Spring Semester admission, all application materials must be received by the previous November 1. Applications received after March 15 or November 1 may be considered for non-degree status
only.
Deadlines for submission of application materials:
March 15—for Fall Semester regular admission
April 15—for Summer Term regular admission
November 1—for Spring Semester regular admission
Applications after these dates will only be considered on a space-available basis.
Persons interested in any of the programs or in visiting the School are invited to call the Architecture and Urban Design Programs at (303) 556-2877, and the Landscape Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Programs at (303) 556-3479 to arrange an appointment. For application forms or additional information, please write to:
Office of the Dean
School of Architecture and Planning
University of Colorado at Denver
Campus Box 126
P.O. Box 173364
Denver, Colorado 80217-3364
(303) 556-3382
Programs of Study ARCHITECTURE
Program Director: Peter A. Schneider Office: CU-Denver Bldg., Third Floor Telephone: 556-2877
The architecture program offers curricula leading to both first and post professional Master of Architecture degrees. The first professional Master of Architecture (M.Arch.I) is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) and is composed of five basic core areas: Architectural Design, History and Theory, Environmental Context, Science and Technology, and Professional Practice.
The program’s primary objective is to prepare students to enter the practice of architecture with a thorough foundation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop: an awareness of and sensitivity to the quality of the human environment; architectural context; deep understanding of architectural history, theory and criticism; thorough knowledge of architectural and building technology; competence in design process and expression with particular emphasis on exploration, experimentation, and systhesis; understanding of the institutional framework within which architecture takes place; and skills and


Architecture / 57
understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct.
The ultimate goal of the program is to provide the architecture student with a deep appreciation of architecture, while acquiring critical capacity, through comprehension of all facets of architecture. This is achieved through five groups of courses, organized in sequences within five coordinated modules.
HISTORY AND THEORY:
15 semester hours
ARCH. 5520 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism ARCH. 5521 (3) Survey of Architectural History
ARCH. 6620 (3) Architecture in the 18th through 20th Centuries ARCH. 6621 (3) History of Architectural Theory
Theory Electives: 6 semester hours
Master of Architecture I (First professional degree)
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT: 6 semester hours
Three and one-half year program. The first professional Master of Architecture degree program is a 114 semester hour program requiring three and one-half years (six semesters and a summer term) of full-time study. The curriculum consists of a core of five related course components and 21 semester hours of electives that may be used for a concentration.
The program is taught at three levels, each with a theme. The first level involves the theme principles, definitions, communication, and design abstraction and takes the first two semesters. The next level takes three semesters and involves a dual theme—architecture in context and applications of methodologies. The theme of the final level in the third year is synthesis and professional competency.
THE CURRICULUM - THREE AND ONE-HALF YEAR PROGRAM
DESIGN: 48 semester hours
ARCH. 5500 (6) ARCH. 5501 (6) ARCH. 5502 (6) ARCH. 6600 (6) ARCH. 6601 (6) ARCH. 6700 (6) ARCH. 6701 (6) ARCH. 5510 (3)
ARCH. 5511 (3)
Introduction to Architectural Design Studio I Introduction to Architectural Design Studio II Architectural Design Studio III
Architectural Design Studio IV
Architectural Design Studio V
Advanced Architectural Design Studio VI Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII Dements of Design Expression and Presentation I Dements of Design Expression and Presentation II
LA. 5530 (3) Site Planning
UD. 6620 (3) Architecture of the City
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY-21 semester hours
ARCH. 5530 (3) Structures I ARCH. 5531 (3) Structures II ARCH. 5532 (3) Building Technology I ARCH. 5533 (3) Environmental Control Systems I
ARCH. 6630 (3) Structures III ARCH. 6631 (3) Environmental Control Systems 11
ARCH. 6636 (3) Building Technology II
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
3 semester hours
ARCH. 6750 (3) Professional Practice ELECTIVES: 18 semester hours


58 / School of Architecture and Planning
COURSE SEQUENCE: FIRST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN HISTORY/ THEORY ENVIRON- MENTAL CONTEXT SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
YEAR 1 FALL ARCH. 5500 (6) ARCH. 5510 (3) ARCH. 5520 (3) ARCH. 5530 (3) 15
SPRING ARCH. 5501 (6) ARCH. 5511 (3) ARCH. 5521 (3) ARCH. 5531 (3) 15
SUMMER ARCH. 5502 (6) ARCH. 5532 (3) ARCH. 5533 (3) 12
YEAR II FALL ARCH. 6600 (6) ARCH. 6620 (3) LA. 5530 (3) ARCH. 6630 (3) ARCH. 6631 (3) 18
SPRING ARCH. 6601 (6) ARCH. 6621 (3) ELECTIVES (3) ARCH. 6636 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 18
YEAR III FALL ARCH. 6700 (6) ELECTIVES (3) UD. 6620 (3) ARCH. 6750 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 18
SPRING ARCH. 6701 (6) ELECTIVES (12) 18
48 18 6 21 3 18 114
Advanced Standing in the three and one-half year program. Students admitted with advanced standing to the first-professional degree program follows a course of study based on an evaluation of their academic credentials which takes place during the admissions process. Students who have degrees in related fields may be exempt from certain required courses. Students who have completed a pre-professional bachelor’s degree in an accredited 4 + 2 program will be given advanced standing of up to one curriculum year in the program. The number of credits and exact point of entry into the program will be determined by the Program Director.
The third option, Building Technology, prepares students for specialization in building performance studies utilizing the School’s sophisticated Building Technology Laboratory. Solar, thermo, acoustics, and lighting studies are several main specializations offered by the faculty.
The fourth option, Real Estate Development, focuses on architecture and development process utilizing the expertise of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Program faculty.
Option I: Architectural Experimentation Option II: Architecture and Design with the Macintosh
Option III: Building Technology Option IV: Real Estate Development
ARCH. 6951 (6) Architecture Thesis
URP. 6660 (3) Real Estate Development
Process
URP. 6661 (3) Real Estate Development
Finance
URP. 6662 (3) Real Estate Market
Analysis
URP. 6664 (3) Fiscal Impact Analysis
Master of Architecture II (Post-professional program)
The post professional program in architecture is an advanced curriculum which focuses on research and specialization. The program offers four options of study: 1) Architectural Experimentation,
2) Architecture and Design with Macintosh,
3) Building Technology, and 4) Real Estate Development. The first option, Architectural Experimentation, is suited for students intending to further their knowledge in theory and criticism of architecture. Students are guided to investigate, explore, and experiment with ideas of non-conventional nature and to advance their design ability.
The second option, Architecture and Design with Macintosh, is designed to prepare the student for specialization in computer application in design generation and development.
COURSES:
ARCH. 6622 (3) ARCH. 6623 (3)
ARCH. 6627 (3)
ARCH. 6628 (3) ARCH. 6632 (3)
ARCH. 6633 (3) ARCH. 6640 (3)
ARCH. 6641 (3)
ARCH. 6642 (3)
ARCH. 6643 (3)
ARCH. 6704 (6) ARCH. 6705 (6) ARCH. 6950 (6)
Modern Architecture Investigations in Architecture Post-Structuralist Architecture
Theories of Avant Garde Building Performance Analysis Lighting
Introduction to Computer Graphics
Computer Applications in Architecture Design and Architecture with the Macintosh Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh Architectural Experimentation I Architectural Experimentation II Thesis Research and Programming


Architecture / 59
COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION I, ARCHITECTURAL EXPERIMENTATION ARCHITECTURE ELECTIVES:
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN STUDIO THEORY ELECTIVES ARCH. 5540 (3) Design Photography CREDIT ARCH. 6610 (3) Furniture Design HRS. ARCH. 6622 (3) Modern Architecture
YEAR 1 FALL ARCH. 6704 (6) ARCH. 6622 (3) ARCH. 6627 (3) j2 ARCH. 6623 (3) Investigations in Architecture
SPRING ARCH. 6705 (6) ARCH. 6623 (3) ARCH. 6628 (3) _ ARCH. 6624 (3) The Built Environment in ^ Other Cultures I:
SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 Research Design
12 12 12 ARCH. 6910 (6) The Built Environment in
Experience ARCH. 6627 (3) Post-Structuralist COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION II, ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN WITH THE MACINTOSH Architecture
COURSE SEQUENCE RESEARCH PROJECT OR THESIS THEORY ELECTIVES yuj Mitunto /-yvcuii Vjaiuc ARCH. 6632 (3) Building Performance CREDIT Analysis HRS. ARCH 6633 (3) I iohtina
YEAR 1 FALL ARCH. 6704 (6) OR ARCH. 6950 (6) ARCH. 6640 (3) ARCH. 6642 (3) ARCH. 6634 (3) Materials and Detailing I: 12 Residential ARCH. 6635 (3) Materials and Detailing II:
SPRING ARCH. 6705 (6) OR ARCH. 6951 (6) ARCH. 6641 (3) ARCH. 6643 (3) Commercial 12 ARCH. 6640 (3) Introduction to Computer Graphics
SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 ARCH. 6641 (3) Computer Applications in
12 12 12 Architecture
with the Macintosh COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION III, BUILDING TECHNOLOGY ARCH' 6643 (3) ^tions^withThe" APPl'
COURSE SEQUENCE RESEARCH PROJECT OR THESIS THEORY ELECTIVES ARCH. 6683 (3) Teaching Methods in CREDIT Architecture HRS. ARCH 6704 (6) Architectural
YEAR 1 FALL ARCH. 6704 (6) OR ARCH. 6950 (6) ARCH. 6632 (3) ARCH. 6642 (3) Experimentation I 12 ARCH. 6705 (6) Architectural Experimentation II
SPRING ARCH. 6705 (6) OR ARCH. 6951 (6) ARCH. 6633 (3) ARCH. 6643 (3) ARCH. 6720 (3) American Art 12 and Architecture ARCH. 6721 (3) Art and Architecture
SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 ot Islam
12 12 12 gg ARCH. 6722 (3) Latin American Art
ARCH. 6723 (3) Oriental Art and Architecture COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION IV, REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT ARCH. 6740 (3) Computer Aided Design
COURSE SEQUENCE RESEARCH PROJECT OR THESIS THEORY ELECTIVES ARCH. 6931 (3) Architecture Internship CREDIT ARCH. 6950 (6) Thesis Research and UDC v 7
YEAR 1 FALL ARCH. 6704 (6) OR ARCH. 6950 (6) URP. 6660 (3) URP. 6662 (3) ARCH. 6951 (6) Architecture Thesis 12
SPRING ARCH. 6705 (6) OR ARCH. 6951 (6) URP. 6661 (3) URP. 6664 (3) 12
SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12
12 12 12 36


60 / School of Architecture and Planning
ARCHITECTURE COURSES
ARCH. 5050-3. Applied Mathematics for Designers I. This class is designed for the student with little or no college math experience. It begins with arithmetic skills and short-cuts, continues through college level algebra, and ends with trigonometry. This class is part of the required mathematics for students of architecture, but is recommended for anyone of non- technical background.
ARCH 5051-3. Applied Mathematics for Designers II. A continuation of ARCH 5050, this class will begin with analytical geometry and continue through differential and integral calculus. The course completes the mathematics requirement for students of architecture and is open to those who have credit for or feel competent in the material covered in ARCH. 5050.
ARCH. 5052-3. Environmental Science for Designers. This course is designed to meet the requirements of the School of Architecture and Planning for entrance into the graduate program in architecture. The basic principles of physics will be covered in a practiced way. The course includes the mechanics of bodies at rest, dynamics, electricity, heat, light, and sound. The course is recommended for anyone who needs a working knowledge of science.
ARCH. 5500-6. Introduction to Architectural Design Studio I. The introductory studio focuses on the basic strategies and techniques of design production. Students are introduced to architectonics, design analysis and criticism, and the significance of the elements of design. Emphasis is placed on development of an awareness of the role of architectural theory and history in the design process. Prereq: ARCH. 5050, 5051, and 5052; coreq: ARCH. 5510, 5520 and 5530.
ARCH. 5501-6. Introduction to Architectural Design Studio II. The second introductory design studio continues the examination of the issues raised in the first semester and begins investigation of more complex issues related to building design and landscape. Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic approach to design while simultaneously dealing with the development of theory and intellectual inquiry. Prereq: ARCH. 5500; coreq: ARCH. 5511, 5521, and 5531.
ARCH. 5502-6. Architectural Design Studio III. The first intermediate studio in architecture focuses on the interrelationship between architectural design and the art of construction. The course acts as a transition between the abstract and theoretical concerns of the introductory studios and the thoughtful realization or practice of ideas. The emphasis is placed on development of how a building is put together as a material conceptual construct. Prereq: ARCH. 5501; coreq: ARCH. 5532 and 5533.
ARCH. 5510-3. Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I. This course covers the basic principles of descriptive geometry (technical drawing). Basic principles of orthographic projection, axono-metric projection, perspective, and photographic reproduction methods (portfolio) are examined. Emphasis is placed on defining abstract forms and real objects in terms of line, light, shade, and shadow. ARCH. 5511-3. Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II. This course builds upon the basic principles and issues in the previous semester. Craft and precision are stressed, but with an emphasis toward design articulation and individual expression. Students are introduced to a wide range of compositional techniques and methods and selection of media and materials. The subjects covered are: drawing as analysis; drawing as representation; principles of color interaction; and means of representing architectural space in terms of color, light, shade, and shadow gradation and value distinction.
ARCH. 5520-3. Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism. This course examines the evolution of ideals and principles in modern architecture, design, landscape, and urbanism and traces the historical development of theoretical issues through a study of selected writing. The course provides an overview of the literature in design theories and explores the relationship between design and the writings that include its interpretation and production.
ARCH. 5521-3. Survey of Architectural History. The second course in the history/ theory sequence, beginning with architecture and urbanism in antiquity, stresses the origin and interpretation of built form as symbol and the problems of early building technology and development of tradition in European architecture and urbanism, it examines the emergence of building types and settlement patterns and their relationship to social institutions. Case studies are drawn from pre-classical, classical, and late antiquity, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque architecture.
ARCH. 5530-3. Structures I. The course introduces the analysis and design of structural elements and focuses on fundamental principles of statics and strength of materials. Areas covered are equilibrium, movement, trusses, three force members, properties of structural materials including wood and steel, stress-strain relationships, and an introduction into the design and analysis of structural elements made of wood and steel in tension, shear, and bearing.
ARCH. 5531-3. Structures II. The course is a continuation of Structures I, focusing on study of stress determination of structures, and general principles involved in the design of wood, steel, and concrete members. Problems in design of building elements subjected to direct stress, beveling, and com-
bined stress, deflection, methods of fabrication, and details of connections are explored. ARCH. 5532-3. Building Technology I.
This course addresses issues in building construction and focuses on interrelationships between architectural concepts and objectives and building construction techniques through lectures, case study presentations, and exercises. It focuses on the wide range of materials and construction techniques available to meet design objectives.
ARCH. 5533-3. Environmental Control Systems I. This course focuses on study of environmental control systems in building, including the thermal behavior of buildings, climate as a major determinant of building design, energy use in buildings, strategies for designing buildings as complete environmental control systems, mechanical means of environmental controls, heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, plumbing, electrical, and communication systems, water supply, and sanitation systems.
ARCH. 5540-3. Design Photography. This course will introduce architectural students to the basics of photography and architectural photography. Class will be a combination of lecture/demonstration and student assignments followed by evaluation. The course will enable the student to produce his or her own working photographs of drawings, models, and buildings.
ARCH. 6600-6. Architectural Design IV. The second intermediate studio sequence focuses on exploration of architecture in the urban context and examination of typological form and cultural constructs which will provide a basis for the inclusion of new spaces and forms within the fabric of the city. Emphasis is placed on methodological study of site, program, and elements of architecture which are used to facilitate work.
ARCH. 6601-6. Architectural Design Studio V. The final intermediate studio sequence focuses on examination of impacts of large-scale urban projects that include commercial, office, and residential uses in an existing urban fabric. Issues such as typology, character, and monumentality are considered in relation to the design of buildings of civic significance. Emphasis is placed on relationship of the role of the building to the morphology of the city and the building’s expression in architectural form.
ARCH. 6610-3. Furniture Design. The focus of this studio/lecture course is to explore the effects and responses of physical human factors, material characteristics, structure, joinery, and history in the design of furniture. Design process, programming, design and presentation techniques, along with drawing and model building skills are emphasized in this project oriented course. ARCH. 6620-3. Architecture in the 18th Through 20th Centuries. The third course in the history/theory sequence focuses on the breakdown of the Baroque synthesis and


Architecture Courses / 61
the coming of classical and romantic histori-cism in architecture and the birth of modern architecture. The impact of technology, industrialization and social changes on architecture and urbanism, changing attitudes toward the treatment of architectural space and the formation of new critical concepts, and the emergence of Art Nouveau and the roots of the Modern Movement in architecture are examined.
ARCH. 6621-3. History of Architectural Theory. This course investigates architectural thought from antiquity to the present. It begins with a review of Greek ideals and then proceeds—through an appreciation of architecture and its texts as an essential cultural constituent—with a survey of major themes such as Renaissance Humanism, Enlightenment Rationalism, Romantic Historicism, Neo-Medievalism, the varieties of Modernism, Neo- Eclecticism, and the most recent directions.
ARCH. 6622-3. Modern Architecture. This course examines modern architecture from De Stijl and Bauhaus to Le Corbusier. Emphasis is placed on critical evaluation of this developmental stage and its impact on discipline of architecture and city design. ARCH. 6623-3. Investigations in Architecture. This course focuses on examination of the historical development of theoretical issues through a study of selected writings and the evolution of ideas and design principles in architecture, landscape architecture, and urbanism. It explores the pedagogic relationship between design and the cultural roots that influence its interpretation and production.
ARCH. 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures I: Research Design. This course intends to broaden students’ perspectives by asking them to examine design within another culture. Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a statement of the problem to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken, and the nature of the report produced.
ARCH. 6627-3. Post Structuralist Architecture. This course examines theories of poststructuralism and their implications to architectural exploration and experimentations. Drawing from Russell, Descartes, Derrida, Husserl, Heidegger, Barthes, Foucault, and other leading authorities, the course focuses on development of a theoretical discourse for architecture.
ARCH. 6628-3. Theories of Avant Garde. This course examines the origin and evolution of the Avant Garde theories from Russian Constructivism to Futurism,
Dadaism, Surrealism, and De Stijl. Emphasis is placed on investigation of the implication of historic Avant Garde to present modes of architectural exploration.
ARCH. 6629-3. History of Interior Design. This course is a survey and critical analysis of major 20th century interiors. It begins the process of relating interior environments from antiquity to contem-
porary by focusing on furnishings, the decorative arts, interior architectural detailing, and interior architectural spaces. The special focus is on critical evaluation and analysis of historical precidents.
ARCH. 6630-3. Structures III. This course examines theoretical and conceptual bases for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of indeterminate structures. Course topics include continuity, movement distribution, reinforced concrete elements, precast and prestressed elements, walls, columns, footings, earthquake loads on buildings, and detailing of structural systems.
ARCH. 6631-3. Environmental Control Systems II. The course focuses on lighting and acoustics. Illumination quantity and quality, day lighting and electric lighting, lighting design and applications are covered. The behavior and effect of daylight are studied through the construction of models. Techniques such as preparation of working drawings and specifications are covered. ARCH. 6632-3. Building Performance Analysis. This course addresses issues in performance integration of overall building components and the ability to predict architectural design performance in advance. Students will experience the use of up-to-date technology, laboratory facilities, guided hands-on experiments, on-site observation, and computer simulation.
ARCH. 6633-3. Lighting. This introductory course in lighting investigates the processes and the objectives of lighting and provides the vocabulary and mechanics necessary to the understanding and interpretation of lighting needs in design. Strategies and criteria for lighting are the focus of this course, covering both theoretical and practical issues.
ARCH. 6634-3. Materials and Detailing I: Residential
This course provides students with the opportunity to explore theory and application of materials used in residential interiors. The course focuses on study of composition and characteristics of individual finish materials as well as conventional methods of representing them graphically.
ARCH. 6635-3. Materials and Detailing II: Commercial. The goals and parameters of this course are the same as those outlined for Materials and Detailing I; however, the focus will be commerical interiors. Prereq: ARCH. 6634.
ARCH. 6636-3. Building Technology II.
This course is a continuation of Building Technology I. It focuses on the range of building construction systems and techniques that can be organized to achieve specific design intentions. The course provides this framework to organize and research construction documents with specific performance and design criteria. Prereq: ARCH. 5530, 5531, 5532.
ARCH. 6640-3. Introduction to Computer Graphics. This course provides a hands-on introduction to the Personal Computer and
the Disk Operating System. The fundamentals of drawing with a computer will be taught with the production of moderate-sized drawings. Basic two-dimensional CADD concepts such as symbols and layering will be explored. Students will learn to use a digitizer for input and output graphics to a plotter.
ARCH. 6641-3. Computer Applications in Architecture. This course builds upon the basics learned in ARCH. 6640. Customizing applications to increase productivity will be stressed. Linking of graphics and text databases through the use of attributes will be investigated. Three-dimensional modeling will be used to visualize the design process. ARCH. 6642-3. Design and Architecture with the Macintosh. This course introduces the Macintosh computer as a powerful exploratory design tool which has the potential for exploration and generation of new architectural ideas and forms. The Macintosh is seen as an extension or amplification of the human brain. The course does not require the user to learn computer programming or complicated command structures; a non-technical, intuitive, word of mouth, tried and error mode of learning is possible. Once basic skills are mastered, production is immediate. Emphasis is placed on analysis, self criticism, revision, and refinement of design intentions with the computer tool. ARCH. 6643-3. Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh. This course builds upon experiences gained from the introductory course, ARCH. 6642. The course requires the students to have an extensive knowledge of the Macintosh system. The course will devote the entire semester to work with the three-dimensional modeling programs. Emphasis is placed on techniques of exploration and innovation in three-dimensional spatial representation of design and architectural constructions. ARCH. 6660-3. Human and Social Dimensions of Design. This course focuses on the introduction of basic social and psychological processes relevant to changing environmental conditions, human factors, and problems of the built environment. Emphasis is placed on techniques of interface problems in design; the relationship between human use and perception of space, cognitive mapping, preferences and attitudes toward environmental settings; and the evaluation of particular environments and developing architectural programs. ARCH. 6683-3. Teaching Methods in Architecture. This course is designed to develop teaching and academic capabilities in the context of architecture. The student works with a faculty member in an instructional context eight hours per week.
ARCH. 6686-3. Special Topics. Various topical concerns are offered in architecture history, theory, elements, concepts, methods and implementation strategies, and other related areas.


62 / School of Architecture and Planning
ARCH. 6700-6. Advanced Architectural Design Studio VI. The studio focuses on students’ elaboration and substantiation of personal ideas through complex design exercises and by critically addressing the status of contemporary architectural theory. Empahsis is placed on a comprehensive design project that is structured to test students on integration of structural aspects, mechanical systems, site planning, and climate considerations within their design solutions.
ARCH. 6701-6. Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII. The final design studio continues the comprehensive approach through a full range of design investigation and strategies at all scales from program and conception to construction detail. Students must demonstrate abilities to synthesize all previous work through an application of a complex architectural design project.
ARCH. 6704-6. Architectural Experimen-taton I. An advanced architectural design studio focusing on design explorations and stressing theorization and development of ideologies in architectural design. Emphasis is placed on experimentation with various art medias such as painting, sculpture, music, linguistics, film making, and others.
ARCH. 6705-6. Architectural Experimentation II. As a continuation of ARCH 6704, this studio stresses a culminative effort toward synthesis and contribution of original proposal for development of architectural theory. Empahsis is placed on architectural transformation as a major indicator of the original contribution of this studio.
ARCH. 6720-3. American Art and Architecture. This course focuses on major developements in American art from 1750-1950. Painting and sculpture, as well as important developments in architecture, will be discussed. The work of such artists and architects as Copley, Peale, Whistler, Cassatt, Hopper, O’Keefe, Thomas Jefferson, Louis Sullivan, and Frank Lloyd Wright will be studied.
ARCH. 6721-3. Art and Architecture of Islam. This course focuses on study and examination of the art and architecture of the Islamic cultures from the death of Muhammad through the 18th century from Spain to India.
ARCH. 6722-3. Latin American Art and Architecture. This course focuses on study and examination of the art and architecture of the colonies of Spain and Portugal in the western hemisphere from 1492 to the present.
ARCH. 6723-3. Oriental Art and Architecture. This is an introductory survey of oriental art and architecture. The course aims to uncover the relationship between East Asian art and architecture and its accompanying theories.
ARCH. 6740-3. Computer Aided Design.
The course explores the relationship between design, mathematics, and com-
putation. The concepts of finite mathematics will be introduced using building design examples. Problem-solving methods in design and computation will be explored. The analysis of plan types will be related to topology and geometry; symmetry and combinatorial groups will be introduced. Computer projects and readings will be assigned to explore the concepts.
ARCH. 6750-3. Professional Practice. This course introduces the student to the essential elements of professional practice through subject areas such as internship, licensing, services, modes of practice, fees, marketing, documents, specifications, and production procedures. One three-hour lecture per week. Prereq: final year in program or approval of instructor.
ARCH. 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to architecture.
ARCH. 6910-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures II: Field Experience.
Students will travel to their respective cities and undertake the agreed upon study proposals. The course intends not only to help students consider their own design and planning attitudes, but also help them see the world from a more balanced perspective. ARCH. 6930-3. Architecture Internship. This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to students and is composed of eight hours per week work in a practicing professional’s office during the regular semester. The student is placed in an architectural and/or design office by the School and receives credit instead of pay. Students must complete second year level before taking this course.
ARCH. 6931-3. Architecture Internship. This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to students and is composed of eight hours per week work in a practicing professional’s office during the regular semester. The student is placed in an architectural and/or design office by the School and receives credit instead of pay. Students must complete second year level before taking this course.
ARCH. 6950-6. Thesis Research and Programming.
ARCH. 6951-6. Architecture Thesis.
URBAN DESIGN
Program Coordinator: Paul Saporito
A city no longer inhabited, not simply left behind, but haunted by meaning and culture. This state of being haunted, which keeps the city from returning to nature, is perhaps the general mode of the presence or absence of the thing itself in pure language. (Derrida 1978)
Cities are in reality great campuses of the living and the dead where many elements remain like signals, symbols, cautious. When the holiday is over, what remains of the architecture is scarred, and the sand consumes the street again. There is nothing left but to resume with a certain obstinacy the reconstruction of elements and instruments in expectation of another holiday. (Aldo Rossi 1981)
The Urban Design Program at the School of Architecture and Planning is intended to be a non-conventional research program leading to the degree of Master of Architecture in Urban Design. The premise of the program is investigation, exploration, experimentation, and representation of ideas and proposals regarding the development of the city. Unlike the classical mode of inquiry, the Urban Design Program takes a relatively more radical approach to the analysis of architecture of the city. The curriculum is designed for the questioning of the existing connections and searching for alternative ideologies and proposals for the city’s architecture through a structured sequence of lecture and design studios.
There are two options of study which extend over a two semester or three semester course of study. There are three curriculum steps involved in these plans. The first step of the curriculum engages students in studying the fundamentals of theory and criticism concerning the structure of present architectural text and discourses. Simultaneously, the student also is introduced to the process of decomposition. This step is necessary for the understanding of the interrelationship between architectural text as a language and architectural text as an artifact. The second step of the curriculum engages the student in studying the recomposition of the city a process that is in reverse order of the first step. Recomposition involves a sequence of activities that begins with the questioning of the traditions, followed by an investigation of the metaphysics of origins and presence, and ends with the formulation of new design strategies for the architecture of the city. The third and final step is intended to be a cumulative experience where the student pursues individual interest in urban design.
Master of Architecture in Urban Design
The Master of Architecture in Urban Design Program is a one-year postprofessional degree and is suited for students who have completed a first-


Urban Design Courses / 63
professional degree in Architecture (RArch., M.Arch.). The program requires completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours.
CORE CURRICULUM
The core curriculum consists of six graduate courses for a total of 21 credit hours. Some students entering the program may be advised to take additional courses depending on their educational backgrounds. The core curriculum consists of the following courses:
UD. 6600 (6)
UD. 6601 (6) UD. 6602 (6)
UD. 6620 (3) UD. 6621 (3) ARCH. 6622 (3) ARCH. 6623 (3)
Transformation and Decomposition Studio Composition Studio City of Exploration and Experimentation Studio (Optional)
Architecture of the City City as an Artifact Modern Architecture Investigations in Architecture
ELECTIVES:
LA. 6621 (3)
URP. 5532 (3) URP. 6680 (3)
URP. 6682 (3)
ARCH. 6621 (3)
ARCH. 6627 (3)
ARCH. 6628 (3) ARCH. 6640 (3)
ARCH. 6641 (3)
ARCH. 6642 (3)
ARCH. 6643 (3)
ARCH. 6683 (3)
History of Landscape Architecture Theory Urban Form History Urbanization in Developing Countries Housing in Developing Countries
History of Architectural Theory
Post-Structuralist
Architecture
Theories of Avant Garde Introduction to Computer Graphics
Computer Applications in Architecture Design and Architecture with the Macintosh Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh
Teaching Methods in Architecture
OPTION I: ONE ACADEMIC YEAR
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN STUDIO THEORY ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
YEAR 1 FALL UD. 6600 (6) UD. 6620 (3) ARCH. 6622 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 18
SPRING UD. 6601 (6) UD. 6621 (3) ARCH. 6623 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 18
12 12 12 36
OPTION II: ONE YEAR CALENDAR YEAR
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN STUDIO THEORY ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
FALL UD. 6600 (6) UD. 6620 (3) ARCH. 6622 (3) 12
YEAR 1 SPRING UD. 6601 (6) UD. 6621 (3) ARCH. 6623 (3) 12
SUMMER UD. 6602 (6) ELECTIVES (6) 12
18 12 6 36
ARCH. 6720 (3) ARCH. 6721 (3) ARCH. 6722 (3) ARCH. 6723 (3) ARCH. 6740 (3)
American Art and
Architecture
Art and Architecture of
Islam
Latin American Art and Architecture Oriental Art and Architecture Computer Aided Design
URBAN DESIGN COURSES
UD. 6600-6. Transformation Decomposition Studio. The first studio of a two-studio sequence introduces the process of decomposition in urban structure through analysis of landscape and structures in search of originary and non-originary elements of the city. The studio then is an attempt to restore immanent conditions—the suspension between origin and effect, between positive and negative elements of urban structure. UD. 6601-6. Composition Studio. This studio builds upon the analytical investigations conducted in the previous semester and explores the process of composition or recomposition in the architecture of the city. Drawing upon deconstructivist theory, the studio presents a challenge to the hegemony of traditional design studios and is a search for authenticity. Considering architecture as text, the studio is a means to represent an invention, an invited speculation on the conditions of architecture of city.
UD. 6602-6. City of Exploration and Experimentation Studio. This is an optional independent studio where individual students pursue their individual interests with an emphasis on interaction between architecture and other disciplines. This studio is structured as a cummulative synthesis of knowledge and skills into an original proposal for the betterment of city conditions. UD. 6620-3. Architecture of the City. This course focuses on interpretation of architecture of the city and its landscape, articulation and disarticulation, discontinuity of order, immanence and memory. Drawing from contemporary writers such as Derrida, Barthes, Adorno, Habermas, Heidegger, Husserl, and others, the course examines the questions of replication, representation, and signification in the city.
UD. 6621-3. The City as an Artifact. This course focuses on study of orginary and non-orginary architecture and its implications to urban context. Beginning by examination of classical representation and refutation, the course attempts to present denial and possibility in architecture by investigating tradition and metaphysics of origins and presence.
UD. 6686-3. Special Topics in Urban Design. Various topical concerns are offered in urban design history, theory, elements, concepts, methods, and implementation strategies and other related areas.


64 / School of Architecture and Planning
UD. 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study.
Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to urban design.
UD. 6950-6. Thesis Research and Programming.
UD. 6951-6. Urban Design Thesis.
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
Program Director: Lois A. Brink
The Landscape Architecture Program offers both first and post-professional Master of Landscape Architecture degrees. The first professional Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) is fully accredited by the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB) and is recognized by the Council of Landscape Architecture Educators.
The program’s primary objective is to prepare students to enter the practice of landscape architecture with a thorough foundation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop: an awareness of and sensitivity to the quality of landscape and built environment; spatial context; understanding of history, theory, and criticism of architecture and landscape; thorough knowledge of landscape technology; competence in design process and expression with particular emphasis on exploration, experimentation, and synthesis; and understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct.
The ultimate goal of the program is to provide the student with a deep appreciation of landscape as context within which objects are placed, the integration of landscape and objects, critical capacity, and comprehension of the art of landscape design.
THE CURRICULUM-THREE YEAR PROGRAM
DESIGN: 42 LA. 5500 (6)
LA. 5501 (6)
LA. 6600 (6) LA. 6601 (6) LA. 6700 (6)
LA. 6701 (6)
LA. 5510 (3) LA. 5511 (3)
semester hours Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio II
Landscape Architectural Design Studio III Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio
V
Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio
VI
Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II
I
HISTORY AND THEORY:
12 semester hours
ARCH. 5520 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism ARCH. 5521 (3) Survey of Architectural History
ARCH. 6620 (3) Architecture in the 18th through 20th Centuries LA. 6621 (3) History of Landscape Architecture Theory
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY-
12 semester hours
LA. 5530 (3) Site Planning
LA. 5570 (3) Plants in Design
LA. 6630 (3) Landscape Technology I
LA. 6631 (3) Landscape Technology II
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
3 semester hours
LA. 6750 (3) Professional Practice
ELECTIVES: 21 semester hours
Master of Landscape
Architecture I
(First professional degree)
Master of Landscape in Architecture II (Post-professional degree)
Three year program. The first professional M.L.A. degree requires 90 semester hours and three years of full-time study. The curriculum consists of a core of four related course components: Design, 42 credit hours; History and Theory, 12; Science and Technology 12; and Professional Practice, 3, totaling 69 credit hours, and 21 semester hours of electives.
Two year program. The postprofessional degree program requires 48 semester hours and two years of full-time study.
The core curriculum consists of two groups: Design, 30 credit hours; and His-tory/Theory, 12; for a total of 42 credit hours, and 6 semester hours of electives.
THE CURRICULUM—TWO YEAR PROGRAM
DESIGN: 30 semester hours
LA. 5500 (6) Introduction to Landscape
Architectural Design Studio I LA. 5501 (6) Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio 11
LA. 6700 (6) Advanced Landscape
Architectural Design Studio
V
LA. 6701 (6) Advanced Landscape
Architectural Design Studio
VI
LA. 5510 (3) Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I LA. 5511 (3) Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II
HISTORY AND THEORY:
12 semester hours
ARCH. 5520 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism ARCH. 5521 (3) Survey of Architectural History
ARCH. 6620 (3) Architecture in the 18th through 20th Centuries
LA. 6621 (3) History of Landscape Architecture Theory


Landscape Architecture Courses / 65
COURSE SEQUENCE: MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE I
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN HISTORY/ THEORY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY PROFES- SIONAL PRACTICE ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
YEAR I FALL LA. 5500 (6) LA. 5510 (3) ARCH. 5520 (3) LA. 5530 (3) 15
SPRING LA. 5501 (6) LA. 5511 (3) ARCH. 5521 (3) LA. 5570 (3) 15
YEAR II FALL LA. 6600 (6) ARCH. 6620 (3) LA. 6630 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 15
SPRING LA. 6601 (6) LA. 6621 (3) LA. 6631 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 15
YEAR III FALL LA. 6700 (6) ARCH. 6750 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 15
SPRING LA. 6701 (6) ELECTIVES (9) 15
42 12 12 3 21 90
COURSE SEQUENCE: TWO YEAR PROGRAM
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN HISTORY/ THEORY ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
FALL LA. 5500 (6) LA. 5510 (3) ARCH. 5520 (3) 12
YEAR I SPRING LA. 5501 (6) LA. 5511 (3) ARCH. 5521 (3) 12
YEAR II FALL LA. 6700 (6) ARCH. 6620 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12
SPRING LA. 6701 (6) LA. 6621 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12
30 12 6 48
ELECTIVES:
LA. 6622 (3)
LA. 6624 (3)
LA. 6910 (6)
LA. 6641 (3)
LA. 6686 (3)
LA. 6840 d-3)
LA. 6930 (3)
ARCH. 5540 (3) ARCH. 6622 (3) ARCH. 6623 (3)
ARCH. 6627 (3)
ARCH. 6628 (3) ARCH. 6629 (3)
ARCH. 6640 (3)
ARCH. 6641 (3)
ARCH. 6642 (3)
Visual Quality Analysis The Built Environment in Other Cultures 1:
Research Design The Built Environment in Other Cultures II: Field Experience
Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture Special Topics in Landscape Architecture Independent Study Landscape Architecture Internship
Design Photography Modern Architecture Investigations in Architecture Post-Structuralist Architecture
Theories of Avant Garde History of Interior Design
Introduction to Computer Graphics
Computer Applications in Architecture Design and Architecture with the Macintosh
ARCH. 6643 (3)
ARCH. 6683 (3)
ARCH. 6704 (6)
ARCH. 6705 (6)
ARCH. 6720 (3)
ARCH. 6721 (3)
ARCH. 6722 (3)
ARCH. 6723 (3)
ARCH. 6740 (3) URP. 5520 (3) URP. 5532 (3) URP. 6649 (3)
URP. 6650 (3)
URP. 6660 (3)
URP. 6661 (3)
URP. 6662 (3)
URP. 6664 (3)
Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh
Teaching Methods in Architecture
Architectural Experimentation 1
Architectural Experimentation II
American Art and
Architecture
Art and Architecture of
Islam
Latin American Art and Architecture Oriental Art and Architecture Computer Aided Design Urban Spatial Analysis Urban Form History Environmental Planning I: Ecology
Environmental Planning II: Policy and Law Real Estate Development Process
Real Estate Development Finance
Real Estate Market Analysis
Fiscal Impact Analysis
A thesis option [LA. 6950 (6): Thesis Research and Programming and LA. 6951 (6): Landscape Architecture Thesis] is available primarily for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced academic training in landscape architecture or related fields.
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE COURSES
LA. 5500-6. Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio I. The
introductory studio focuses on the basic strategies and techniques of design production. Students are introduced to architectonics, design analysis and criticism, and the significance of the elements of design. Emphasis is placed on development of an awareness of the role of theory and history in the design process.
LA. 5501-6. Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio II. The second introductory design studio continues the examinatipn of the issues raised in the first semester and begins investigation of more complex issues related to building design and landscape. Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic approach to design while simultaneously dealing with the development of theory and intellectual inquiry.
LA. 5510-3. Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I. This course covers the basic principles of descriptive geometry (technical drawing). Basic principles of orthographic projection, axonometric projection, perspective, and photographic reproduction methods (portfolio) are examined. Emphasis is placed on defining abstract forms and real objects in terms of line, light, shade, and shadow.
LA. 5511-3. Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II. This course builds upon the basic principles and issues in the previous semester. Craft and precision are stressed, but with an emphasis toward design


66 /School of Architecture and Planning
articulation and individual expression. Students are introduced to a wide range of compositional techniques and methods and selection of media and materials. The subjects covered are: drawing as analysis; drawing as representation; principles of color interaction; and means of representing architectural space in terms of color, light, shade, and shadow gradation and value distinction.
LA. 5530-3. Site Planning. The course focuses on the site planning process including research and data gathering, data analysis and synthesis, design analysis and its relationship to building program and concept, and design synthesis of site and preparation of site plan. Emphasis is placed on design through grading, representation, manipulation and calculation of road work, utilities and other site features. Vertical and horizontal alignment, earthwork and cost computation, and integration with existing and proposed features or systems are all covered.
LA. 5570-3. Plants in Design. This course focuses on the study of design methods used in landscape architecture. Formal design principles, spatial sequencing, and plant functions are applied in design studies, based on botanical aesthetic traits and physical requirements of a wide variety of plant material.
LA. 6600-6. Landscape Architectural Design Studio III. The first intermediate studio focuses upon the exploration of landscape as context and its integration of objects. Emphasis is placed on exploration of landscape and experimentation with spatial organization and manipulation of context.
LA. 6601-6. Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV. The second intermediate studio sequence focuses on larger scale development projects deeding with more complex spatial arrangement of buildings and other objects within the landscape, functional needs and requirements within the framework of a variety of social, economic, and natural/physical constraints.
LA. 6620-3. Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism. This course focuses on exploration and assessment of the current state of theory in landscape architecture and related design disciplines, and the ideas undergoing contemporary design approaches. Narrative and explanatory theories are the objects of study. Emphasis is placed on history and pedagogic theories and their relationships to other disciplines such as art, ecology, geography, architecture, and anthropology.
LA. 6621-3. History of Landscape Architecture Theory. This course investigates architectural thought from antiquity to the present. It begins with a review of Greek ideals and then proceeds - through an appreciation of landscape and nature as essential cultural constituents - with a survey of major themes such as Renaissance Humanism, Enlightenment, Rationalism,
Romantic Historicism, Neo-Medievalism, the varieties of Modernism, Neo-Eclecticism, and the most recent directions in landscape and garden design.
LA. 6622-3. Visual Quality Analysis. This course introduces students to a range of philosophies, methods, and techniques in visual landscape analysis. Emphasis is placed on application of methods and techniques to urban and regional context and scale, and visual impact assessment and simulation.
LA. 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures I: Research Design. This course intends to broaden students’ perspectives by asking them to examine design within another culture. Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a statement of the problem to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken, and the nature of the report produced.
LA. 6630-3. Landscape Technology I. This course will address the fundamental techniques of landscape architecture, including drafting skills, surveying and grading, and the natural systems as they affect construction. The application of road design and utility systems for site development will also be covered.
LA. 6631-3. Landscape Technology II. This course is a continuation of LA. 6630 and focuses on the study of materials and methods employed in construction of site features and evolution of palette, techniques and theory of detailed design including pavements, fences, walk, stairs, revetments, basins, and fountains.
LA. 6641-3. Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture. The course introduces problem solving methods, and the relationship between those methods, and the application of a computer to design problems. Introductory problems are given in BASIC using the graphics package, a high-level language such as pascal is used to explore language in more depth, and to conclude, a series of assignments introduces the graphics unit or high-level language. Assignments in programming CAD problems are required.
LA. 6686-3. Special Topics in Landscape Architecture. Various topical concerns are offered in landscape architecture history, theory, elements, concepts, methods, implementation strategies, and other related areas.
LA. 6700-6. Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio V. This studio will focus upon the students’ elaboration and substantiation of personal ideas through complex design exercise which critically address contemporary landscape architectural theory. Emphasis is based upon a comprehensive landscape design project structured to test student ability to investigate ecological, socio-cultural aesthetics, and dimension in their design solutions.
LA. 6701-6. Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio VI. The final studio is comprehensive in its approach. The major goal is to present a full range of com-
plex design investigations and implementation strategies at various scales, while allowing the students to demonstrate their ability to synthesize all previous academic work.
LA. 6750-3. Professional Practice. The
course focuses on studies in the professional practice of landscape architecture and related professions, and case problems in initiating and managing a professional practice. It explores the essential elements of professional practice and equips students with the fundamental knowledge and skills requisite to an understanding of, and participation in, the conduct of practice in landscape architecture. The course covers organization of the landscape office, professional services of landscape architects, fee structures and fee management, contracts, legal rights and responsibilities, and management, marketing, and delivery of professional services.
LA. 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study.
Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to landscape architecture or urban design.
LA. 6910-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures II: Field Experience. Students will travel to their respective cities and undertake the agreed upon study proposals. The course intends not only to help students consider their own design and planning attitudes, but also to help them see the world from a more balanced perspective. LA. 6930-3. Landscape Architecture Internship. This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to students, and is composed of eight hours per week work in a practicing professional’s office during the regular semester. The student is placed in a landscape architectural and/or design office by the School and receives credit instead of pay. Students must complete the second year level before taking this course.
LA. 6950-6. Thesis Research and Programming.
LA. 6951-6. Landscape Architecture Thesis.
URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING
Program Director: Peter V. Schaeffer
Urban and regional planning in the United States and other countries is involved in activities aimed at shaping the pattern of human settlements and providing housing, public services, and other crucial support systems that help support a decent urban living environment. Planning encompasses not only a concern for the structure and image of the built environment, but also a desire to harness the social, economic, political, and techno-


Urban and Regional Planning / 67
logical forces that give meaning to the everyday lives of men and women in residential, work, and recreational settings.
More specifically, urban and regional planning is concerned with: identifying social needs and designing and providing services and facilities to meet those needs; anticipating change and its impact on how people can and do live; understanding the way plans are made, decisions implemented, and actions evaluated and the means by which these processes can be improved; stimulating, guiding, and influencing actions of the private sector with respect to land use and land use transitions in urban, suburban, and rural areas; identifying potentially adverse impacts of human activities on the natural environment and mitigating those impacts; designing the city and the surrounding region to facilitate activities in which people need and desire to engage.
The Urban and Regional Planning Program at the University of Colorado at Denver is designed to prepare students for professional practice in urban and regional planning as well as for more advanced academic training in planning and related fields. The degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) is awarded after successful completion of a course of study normally requiring about two years of full-time course work.
The objectives of the Urban and Regional Planning Program are: to clarify the behavioral and perceptual sources of urban and regional problems; to foster the appropriate use of policy, planning, design, and legal devices for creating urban and regional environments responsive to human needs and ecological principles; and to develop methods for evaluating urban programs, policies, and plans which have important human and natural environmental consequences.
Master of Urban and Regional Planning
The Urban and Regional Planning Program offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P), which requires two years of full-time study and a minimum of 51 credit hours. The M.U.R.P. degree program is accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board. It consists of a core of 27 semester hours of courses in:
Theory, Planning Methods, Spatial Analysis, Planning Law, History, Planning Studio, Site Planning, and at least 24 semester hours of elective courses.
All planning courses qualify as electives. The student should select courses, however, that build on each other and
together form a strong specialization. The Urban and Regional Planning Program requires that students see an advisor at least once a semester before registration to obtain approval for the course selection. Each student is assigned a member of the faculty as an advisor and mentor.
The particular strength of the Urban and Regional Planning Program is Physical Planning with emphasis on Environmental Planning and Land Development. Students are encouraged to consider appropriate courses in the Landscape Architecture Program to achieve greater skills and depth of knowledge. A dual Master of Urban and Regional Planning and Master of Landscape Architecture degree is offered.
Applicants to the Urban and Regional Planning Program are expected to present their application materials in a portfolio. The portfolio should include a resume which describes the applicant’s educational and professional background, a statement of professional goals and objectives, a list of courses that the applicant has taken which relate to planning, and a copy of a student or professional project
or paper with a note explaining why the particular item was selected. The applicant may submit other relevant materials. The format must be 8V2" x 11" and bound. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must be included if the portfolio is to be returned.
CORE COURSES
URP. 5501 (3) Planning History and Theory
URP. 5510 (3) Planning Methods I URP. 5511 (3) Planning Methods II URP. 5520 (3) Urban Spatial Analysis URP. 5530 (3) Planning Law URP. 6630 (4) Planning Studio I URP. 6631 (4) Planning Studio II URP. 6632 (1) Preparation for Professional Certification LA. 5530 (3) Site Planning
A thesis option (URP. 6950 Thesis Research and Programming and URP.
6951 Thesis) is available primarily for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced academic training in planning or related fields.
COURSE SEQUENCE
COURSE SEQUENCE CORE ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
YEAR 1 FALL URP. 5501 (3) URP. 5510 (3) URP. 5530 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12
SPRING URP. 5511 (3) URP. 5520 (3) LA. 5530 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12
FALL URP. 6630 (4) ELECTIVES (9) 13
YEAR II SPRING URP. 6631 (4) URP. 6632 (1) ELECTIVES (9) 14
27 24 51
SPECIALIZED COURSES
The elective courses enable students to explore in-depth an area of special interest. Students should build on the expertise which they already possess. This can be done by learning about a related specialty, or by increased specialization in an already existing area of expertise. The Urban and Regional Planning faculty have particular strengths in Urban Economic Development, Land Use, Environmental Planning, and Real Estate and Land Development. Students must take at least 24 hours of elective courses.


68 / School of Architecture and Planning
URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING COURSES
URP. 5500-3. Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning. This course focuses on the principles of urban and regional planning, theories of planning, community organization, basic techniques, changing philosophies in modern society, and the process of shaping community form.
URP. 5501-3. Planning History and Theory. This course provides an overview of planning history and theory. The philosophical, political, and economic roots of the various theories are discussed. Ideas are placed in the context of the planning profession’s history and its present aims, interests, and ethics.
URP. 5510-3. Planning Methods I. This course focuses on the application of statistical, quantitative, and mathematical techniques, and computer applications for urban and regional planning and policy development. Major topics include types of data, sampling, basic probability distributions, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and an introduction to multi-variate and cluster analysis. Applications in planning and development are emphasized.
URP. 5511-3. Planning Methods II. This course continues the development and applications of techniques introduced in URP.
5510, as well as other planning methods, models, and techniques. These include physical, social, and economic models, urban land use and development models, decisionmaking techniques, and linear and dynamic programming. Prereq: URP. 5510 or consent of instructor.
URP. 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis. This course is an examination of the spatial structure of the urban system. The urban system is analyzed in terms of the system of cities and city as a system. Major topics discussed include the economic theory of the origin of city, the rank-size and primate distributions, the location pattern and hierarchical structure of cities, functional classification of cities, urban growth and economic base, movement of population within and between cities, spatial pattern of land use and economic activities, spatial pattern of urban population density, and urban social space and urban cognition.
URP. 5530-3. Planning Law. This course focuses on the legal setting for urban and regional planning in the United States and major constitutional issues in the effectuation of planning policy. Contemporary controversies are put into the larger context of attempts by the judicial system to redefine the balance between individual rights and governmental power in an increasingly weakened society.
URP. 5532-3. Urban Form History. An
analysis of urban physical form from the origin of cities to the present. The emphasis is on the cities of Western civilization and
American urban planning. Major shifts in urban ideas, architecture, transportation, landscapes, and energy systems are discussed and evaluated using a slide-lecture format.
URP. 5533-3. Urban Form Theory. A
description and analysis of contemporary schools of thought on urban physical form. Theories will be evaluated according to the accuracy of their explanations of present urban form, the quality of their images of future form, and the practicality of their strategies for implementing their ideal using a slide/lecture/discussion format.
URP. 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures I: Research Design. This course intends to broaden students’ perspective by asking them to examine design within another culture. Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a statement of the problem to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken, and the nature of the report produced.
URP. 6630-4. Planning Studio I. This course focuses on plan design in urban and regional planning and explores basic concepts, techniques, and issues related to urban planning, urban design, site planning, and environmental awareness.
URP. 6631-4. Planning Studio II. The focus of Studio II is on plan making related to urban and regional planning. An understanding of the plan-making process is emphasized. Students will have direct experience with the various steps in planning, including data-gathering, goal-setting, identification of alternatives, analysis, synthesis, and presentation of the plan. The plan may be for a city sector, a neighborhood, an entire community, a region, or it may be a policy plan. Where possible, students will work with an actual client. Prereq: URP. 6630.
URP. 6632-1. Preparation for Professional Certification. This course is taken in the student’s final semester before graduation. It provides a comprehensive review of the planning literature and practice. The course coverage follows that of the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) examination. (Only open for planning students in their last semester or consent from the program director.)
URP. 6640-3. Community Development Process. This course introduces community development, a field closely allied with planning, in its devotion to working with people to strengthen their communities in accordance with locally determined goals. Emphasis is placed on understanding groups, organizations, and communities and on developing skills in such areas as community analysis, goal setting, group facilitation, and problem solving.
URP. 6641-3. Social Planning. An increasingly important specialty in comtemporary planning practice is social planning. This course covers the process of formulating public policies and designing, implementing, and evaluating programs in such areas as
social services, housing, health care, employment, and education. Attention is given to the historical perspective and the present-day social and political context within which social policy formation and social planning occurs.
URP. 6642-3. Neighborhood Planning. An
introduction to small area planning including survey of neighborhood and community theory, examination and critique of research and analytical techniques involved in neighborhood planning. Examines and analyzes existing plans of local neighborhoods.
URP. 6649-3. Environmental Planning 1: Ecology. This course studies the physiography cultural factors, and aesthetic criteria in relation to landscape and spatial organization and structure. It will cover data sources and interpretation, and it will look at environmental factors in development and siting analysis. Prereq: URP. 5510 or consent of instructor.
URP. 6650-3. Environmental Planning II: Policy and Law. This course provides a comprehensive perspective on environmental planning policy. It focuses on major environmental issues and problems, methods of evaluation, and legislative responses. Prereq: URP. 5530 or consent of instructor.
URP. 6651-3. Environmental Impact Assessment. The objective of this course is to provide the foundation for understanding the Environmental Impact Assessment process, its legal context, and the criteria and methods for procedural and substantive compliance. Prereq: URP. 5530 or consent of instructor.
URP. 6652-3. Growth Management. This course examines environmental and land regulations such as zoning, subdivision controls, and growth management systems in the context of public policy. Emphasis is placed on case studies, the analysis of past and present practices, the improvement of existing systems, and the design of new regulatory systems. Prereq: URP. 5530 or consent of instructor.
URP. 6653-3. Natural Resources Planning and Management. This course focuses on the study of the economic organization and use of natural resources. It covers the study of property rights and their impact on resource use, optimal depletion of nonrenewable and use and management of renewable resources, applications to fisheries, forests, mineral resources, etc. As well as developing criteria for evaluation of environmental amenities; explores conflicts between growth and environmental quality.
URP. 6660-3. Real Estate Development Process. This course is a detailed analysis of components of the real estate process and its relationship to the design profession and other key participants. Students will learn what variables are within the real estate development business, how they interrelate, and why projects succeed or fail.
URP. 6661-3. Real Estate Development Finance. This course focuses on financial


Urban and Regional Planning Courses / 69
analysis of real estate investments. The course covers topics including measures of value, capitilization rate, capital budgeting, debt and equity markets, and taxation. Cash flow and appraisal techniques, complex deal structuring, innovations in debt financing, syndications, tax shelters, tax exempt financing, and micro-computer applications also are covered.
URP. 6662-3. Real Estate Market Analysis.
This course focuses on examination of techniques of market analysis. Topics include business and construction cycles, regional and urban growth trends, restructuring of urban space, commercial and industrial location theories, and demographic analysis and projection techniques. Prereq: URP. 5510 and 5511, or consent of instructor.
URP. 6664-3. Fiscal Impact Analysis.
This course is designed to provide an introduction to fiscal impact analysis procedures to students interested in the land development process. Several methodologies will be reviewed and assessed for their relevance in diverse circumstances. Prereq: URP. 5510 and 5511, or consent of instructor. URP. 6670-3. Urban Economic Development. This course is an analysis of the public/private partnership in urban economic developement including analysis of potentials, problems, and projects; financing urban economic development through federal grant programs, tax increment financing and other means; and economic theory of urban development.
URP. 6671-3. Regional Economic Development. This course is an analysis of regional patterns and processes of economic development. Theories and models for location patterns and processes of economic activities; labor, industrial, and commercial site requirement; and economic development and growth strategies are emphasized. Prereq: URP. 5520, or consent of instructor.
URP. 6672-3. Urban Labor Market. This course provides a study of the organization and functioning of urban labor markets and covers labor market segmentation, human capital theory, labor mobility, labor market signaling, and discrimination in labor markets. (Offered infrequently.)
URP. 6673-3. Transportation Planning I: Transport Network Analysis. The focus of this course is on the examination of several important aspects of the transport network: accessibility and connectivity of nodes and linkages and the volume and direchon of flow of a transport network. Descriptive, predictive, and planning methods and models discussed include graph theoretical measures, connectivity matrices, gravity model, abstract mode model, entropy-maximization, trip generation model, and flow allocation models. Prereq: URP. 5510, or consent of instructor.
URP. 6674-3. Transportation Planning II: Urban Transportation Planning. This course is a follow-up of the transport network analysis and involves an examination
of major issues of urban transportation in the U.S. These include the role of transportation in urban development, the urban transportation system, relationship between land use planning and transportation planning, urban transportation planning process, and selected case studies. Prereq: URP. 5511 and 6673, or consent of instructor.
URP. 6675-3. Planning and Public Finance. This course focuses on recent trends in financing local governments, revenue and expenditure analysis, budgeting for local governments with particular emphasis in the capital improvement budget, financing capital improvements through bond issues, and capital improvement and its relationship to long-term planning.
URP. 6676-3. Urban Housing. This course involves an examination of planning and other aspects of urban housing, focusing primarily on U.S. urban housing conditions with some references to international conditions and comparisons. Major topics of the course include aggregate trends and patterns, housing in spatial context, the allocation process of housing markets and submarkets (supply/finance, demand/ mobility/demographic change), housing problems and failures (substandardness, inequitable distribution, special group needs, segregation and discrimination, market problems), the role of government, and alternative approaches.
URP. 6680-3. Urbanization in Developing Countries. A description, analysis, and evaluation of urbanization and planning in less developed countries. The special problems of planning, housing, transportation, environmental quality, and economic development in cities of these countries are addressed. Comparisons are made among cities of third-world countries and between third-world countries and first-world countries.
URP. 6682-3. Housing in Developing Countries. This course examines housing problems in developing countries and explores alternative policies, programs, and plans. Emphasis is placed on population growth and the impact housing and urban development, housing demand, shelter, and services for the urban poor, the squatting and squatter-built housing, and comparison of government policies and programs addressing housing problems.
URP. 6686-3. Special Topics in Urban and Regional Planning. Various topical concerns are offered in urban and regional planning, theory, concepts, methods, case studies, and practice.
URP. 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study.
Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to urban and regional planning.
URP. 6910-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures II: Field Experience. Students will travel to their respective cities and undertake the agreed upon study
proposals. The course intends not only to help students consider their own design and planning attitudes, but also to help them see the world from a more balanced perspective. Prereq: URP. 6624.
URP. 6930-3. Planning Internship. This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to students in urban and regional planning. The emphasis is on actual work experience in settings with client groups as the students assist them in determining solutions to their problems. Program director’s approval is required.
URP. 6950-3. Thesis Research and Programming. Prereq: minimum of 24 credit hours earned toward completion of Master of Urban and Regional Planning degree.
URP. 6951-3. Urban and Regional Planning Thesis.




College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Dean: Donald L. Stevens Associate Dean: William D. Murray Associate Dean for Programs:
Jean-Claude Bosch Office: 1250 14th Street Telephone: 595-4007
Director of the Executive Health Administration Program:
John P. Young
Director of the Executive M.B.A.
Program: John P. Young Director, Health Administration Program: Richard W. Foster
Executive Board of the Business Advisory Council
Bob R. Baker, President AMC Cancer Research Center Kermit L. Darkey, President, Mountain States Employers Council Thomas J. Gibson, Executive Vice President, The Gates Corporation Gayle Greer, Vice President American Television and Communications Corporation N. Berne Hart, Chairman of the Board, United Banks of Colorado Del Hock, President and Chairman, Public Service Company
Bruce M. Rockwell, Executive Director, The Colorado Trust Gail Schoettler, Treasurer, State of Colorado
Faculty
Professors: Marcelle V. Arak (Finance), Gordon G. Barnewall (Marketing),
Wayne F. Cascio (Management), Lawrence F. Cunningham (Marketing), Michael A. Firth (Accounting), H.
Michael Hayes (Marketing and Strategic Management), Gary A. Kochenberger (Operations Management), James R. Morris (Finance), William D. Murray (Information Systems), Bruce R. Neumann (Accounting and Health Administration), Edward J. O’Connor (Management), Donald L. Stevens (Finance), Dean G. Taylor (Finance). Associate Professors: W. Graham Astley (Management), Jean-Claude Bosch (Finance), Peter G. Bryant (Management
Science and Information Systems), Kang Rae Cho (Management and International Business), Edward J. Conry (Business Law and Ethics), E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr. (Business Economics), Richard W. Foster (Finance and Health Administration), Dennis F. Murray (Accounting), John C. Ruhnka (Management and Business Law), Clifford E. Young (Marketing), Raymond F. Zammuto (Management). Assistant Professors: Stephen P. Allen (Accounting), Ajeyo Banerjee (Finance), Ben-Hsien Bao (Accounting), Heidi Boerstler (Health Administration), Lloyd Brodsky (Information Systems), James H. Gerlach (Management Science and Information Systems), Jeff E. Heyl (Operations Management), Kenneth A. Hunt (Marketing), Jahangir Karimi (Information Systems), Susan M. Keaveney (Marketing), Feng Yang Kuo (Information Systems), Anne Moeller (Management), Manuel G. Serapio, Jr. (International Business), Marlene A. Smith (Information Systems).
Senior Instructors: Jon L. Bushnell (Operations Management and Statistics), Cindy Fischer (Accounting), Lawrence F. Johnston (Finance).
Instructors: Errol Biggs (Health Administration), Richard E. Cook (Finance), Charles M. Franks (Statistics), Robert D. Hockenbury (Accounting), Chen Ji (Finance), l%ul J. Patinka (Management), Barbara A. Pelter (Finance), Chandrasekaran Rajam (Management), Charles A. Rice (Management), John Turner (Finance), Marianne Westerman (Finance).
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain business community, the College of Business and Administration at the University of Colorado at Denver provides its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective, responsible business professionals. This level of excellence in higher education is achieved by bringing together nationally recognized faculty and highly motivated, mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment.
CU-Denver’s College of Business is a “research institution,” and our faculty are nationally recognized for their contributions to scholarly research. The information contained in university textbooks is first conceived through faculty research and is usually published in textbooks about six years later. Thus, a research-oriented faculty is writing and teaching concepts years before they are typically seen in textbooks. Accordingly, our students have the opportunity to be on the leading edge of business management theory and practice.
Our class schedules offer flexibility to meet the needs of full-and part-time students, with both day and evening classes. Whether you are an experienced working professional seeking an advanced degree, or preparing for a new career in the business world, you will gain the knowledge necessary to succeed in today’s challenging business environment.
CU-Denver’s College of Business can give you an edge over your competition.
College of Business and Administration Educational Goals
CU-Denver’s College of Business and Administration defines the goals of its degree program as follows:
1. The refinement of basic skills essential for success in business; these include writing, speaking, calculating, computing, making high quality decisions, and managing others.
2. The transmission of knowledge essential for success in business. This includes a broad understanding of our social, economic, ethical and political systems derived from education outside the college. Learning within the college, common to all students, focuses on mastery of accounting, finance, marketing, information systems, business law, quantitative methods, and production. Learning within an area-of-emphasis will be evaluated in later stages of outcome assessment.
3. The development of professional views appropriate to fulfilling the manager’s responsibility to self, colleagues, employer, and society.


72 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Faculty
Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about their teaching and research. They hold degrees from the nation’s leading business schools, such as Berkeley, Harvard, Stanford, University of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania, UCLA, and Yale, many of them also bring years of valuable experience in private industry. Their interdisciplinary expertise, academic achievements, scholarly research, and business experience provide students with a dynamic learning environment.
Students
Unlike the students at a traditional college campus, many of our students are adult, working professionals who maintain full-time employment. Their success and experience enrich class discussions and interactions among students. Although a high percentage attend evening classes, a significant number are full-time students attending classes offered during the day. Following the current national trend, women constitute about one half of the student body. Since admission standards are among the highest in the region, the student body is unusually motivated and talented.
This rich mix of backgrounds, experience, and perspectives, when coupled with the strengths of our excellent faculty, fosters stimulating classroom interaction and keen competition among the students.
Accreditation
While there are approximately 800 recognized schools of business nationwide, only 237 are accredited by the national accreditation agency for university schools of business—the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). CU-Denver’s College of Business is one of the few schools in the State accredited by the AACSB. Business Week wrote recently “Today, just having the degree isn’t as important as where you get it ... As corporations become savvier buyers of... talent, they are giving more weight to the AACSB seal ... Accreditation shows that a Business School cares about the quality of its program” In addition, many national fellowship programs accept only students from accredited programs.
In a similar manner, our program in health administration is the only such program in the region accredited by the
Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACCEHSA). This agency ensures that health administration programs meet demanding requirements for quality education in the health administration area.
Cooperative Education
Cooperative Education is a program designed to provide students with practical work experience in a business setting. Through Co-op, students put classroom education into use. Many variables contribute to an individual’s success. On-the-job experience is one of those variables. Cooperative Education provides students with first-hand experience in a real job setting.
How Co-op Works
Working with the College of Business and Administration, the CU-Denver Center for Internships and Cooperative Education places business students as paid Co-op trainees with corporations, businesses, or government agencies in positions that complement their academic work. Many Co-op positions lead to permanent career appointments upon graduation.
Eligibility for Placement
Cooperative Education is open to all students who have completed their freshman year, have maintained a grade-point average of 2.5, and have completed at least 12 hours of course work at CU-Denver (6 hours for graduate students). Some employers have additional requirements,
i.e., U.S. citizenship, willingness to travel, and completion of specific course work.
Scholarships and Financial Aid
Many programs for financial aid are administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Call 556-2886 for detailed information. In addition, the College of Business awards some departmental and general scholarships. The amounts of the awards and the number of awards vary each year. For additional information, contact the College of Business, 595-4007.
Each year, a number of undergraduate students are awarded Deans’ Scholarships, Colorado Scholarships, and Regents Scholarships. These provide financial support for a portion of the students’ tuition and fees.
The Purchasing Management Association of Denver awards an annual scholarship to students interested in careers in
purchasing and the Colorado Chapter of the American Production and Inventory Control Society awards up to two annual scholarships to students interested in careers in operations management. For information contact the operations management faculty advisor in the College of Business.
Graduate tuition awards are available to students admitted to the Graduate School of Business Administration, based on a number of factors including academic performance. For additional information contact the Graduate Programs Office at 628-1271.
Student Organizations
Opportunity for association with other College of Business and Administration students, in varied activities intended to stimulate professional interest and to give recognition to scholastic attainment, is provided by the following student organizations:
Beta Gamma Sigma—national honorary scholastic fraternity in business CSPA—Colorado Society for Personnel Administration (student chapter) for students interested in personnel or industrial relations
CUAMA—student chapter of the American Marketing Association CU Venture Network—campus chapter of the Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs, open to all CU-Denver students
HASO—Health Administration Student Organization
ISC—Information Systems Club MBA Association—University of Colorado at Denver association of master’s students in business
Phi Chi Theta—national professional business and economics fraternity Sigma Iota Epsilon—professional and honorary management fraternity SAS—Society of Accounting Students
Institute for International Business
The Institute for International Business was created in August 1988 to help stimulate new business ventures through partnerships with foreign business schools and executives. It has three goals:
• To collaborate with business and government in promoting international economic development opportunities for Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region.


Academic Policies / 73
• To be a national center for providing
hands-on training to foreign executives
doing business with American firms.
• To become internationally recognized
for research on competitiveness issues in
the global economy of the 1990’s.
The Institute will offer programs for senior management in business and government. The programs will identify and interpret trends affecting business in the global marketplace and the skills needed to conduct business in these markets. The programs also will put senior managers in contact with internationalists who are shaping the political, economic, and social environment for international business.
GENERAL ACADEMIC POLICIES
Academic policies which apply to all CU-Denver students are described in the General Information section of this catalog. The policies described below apply to both undergraduate students in the College of Business and Administration and graduate students in the Graduate School of Business Administration. Policies applying separately to undergraduate and graduate students are described under separate headings.
Each student is responsible for knowing and complying with the academic policies and regulations established for the College. The College cannot assume responsibility for problems resulting from a student’s failure to follow the policies stated in this catalog. Similarly, students are responsible for all deadlines, rules, and regulations stated in the Schedule of Classes.
Academic Ethics
Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and integrity. Cheating, plagiarism, illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations, alteration, forgery, or falsification of official records, and similar acts or the attempt to engage in such acts are grounds for suspension or expulsion from the University. Also, actions which disrupt the administrative process, such as misrepresentation of credentials or academic status, other forms of deception, or verbal abuse of College staff are grounds for suspension or probation. Any reported act of dishonesty may be referred to the College of Business Committee on Student Faculty Relations at the discretion of the dean, a member of the instructional staff, or other appropriate University representative. In particular, students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act involving the offering of
the work of someone else as the student’s own. It is recommended that students consult with the instructors as to the proper preparation of reports, papers, etc. in order to avoid this and similar offenses.
Admission to Business Classes
Admission to business classes is limited to students who have been admitted to the business program, and to other students as described in the separate undergraduate and graduate policy sections. The course admission criteria are designed to meet a number of objectives.
1. To assure access to business courses for students seeking a business degree.
2. To serve students in other colleges who have business-related education objectives or requirements.
3. To service non-degree students who have specific career or education goals.
Please refer to the Schedule of Classes each term for course availability.
Attendance Regulations
Students are required to attend classes on a regular basis. Absences must be arranged with the instructor and must conform with the instructor’s policy on attendance.
Prerequisites
Students are expected to know and fulfill all prerequisite requirements, including any prerequisite information when registering. The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who enroll without the correct prerequisites. Generally, students who are administratively dropped will not receive tuition refunds.
Course Numbering
The course numbering system used at the University of Colorado at Denver identifies the class standing required for enrollment. Students are expected to take 1000 level courses in their freshman year, 2000 level courses in their sophomore year, 3000 level courses in their junior year and 4000 level courses in their senior year. Courses at the 5000 and 6000 level are restricted to graduate business students.
Adding and Dropping Courses
See the General Information section of this catalog for the University-wide drop/add policies.
Withdrawal
See the General Information section of this catalog for University-wide withdrawal policies.
Administrative Drop
The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who are incorrectly enrolled in business courses. Instructors also may recommend to the College of Business and Administration office that students who fail to meet expected course attendance or course prerequisites be dropped from the course. Generally, students who are administratively dropped will not receive tuition refunds.
Appeal Procedure
Students should contact a business advisor in the College of Business and Administration office for appeal and petition procedures pertaining to rules and regulations of the College.
General Grading Policies
Plus/Minus Grading. College of Business faculty have the option to use plus/minus grading. For example, B+ corresponds to 3.3 credit points (for each semester hour), B-corresponds to 2.7 credit points.
Incomplete Grades. The only incomplete grade given in the College is IF.
An IF grade is assigned only when documented circumstances clearly beyond the student’s control prevent the student from completing course requirements (exams, papers, etc.). Generally, students must make up the missing work and may not retake the entire course. Students should not register for the class a second time but should make up the work with the instructor giving the IF. All IF grades must be made up within one year, or the IF will be automatically changed to the grade of F.
All incomplete grades must be completed and recorded at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor concerning the removal of incomplete grades.
Grade Changes. Grades as reported by instructors are final. Grade changes will be considered only in cases of documented clerical errors and when a student is making up an incomplete grade (IW, IF). All changes must be made within one


74 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
year after the course has been taken unless highly unusual circumstances can be documented and the change has been approved by the Undergraduate Appeals Committee for undergraduate courses, or the Graduate Appeals Committee for graduate courses. Normally, grade changes will not be considered for any circumstances after three years.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
A carefully designed curriculum to prepare students for success in business management is available for the student seeking either an undergraduate or graduate degree. The College offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration), Master of Business Administration (M.RA.), and the Master of Science (M.S.) degrees. The particular programs offered are:
Areas of Emphasis (B.S. in Business Administration)
Accounting Finance _
Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business Management Marketing
Operations Management
Graduate Programs
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) Master of Science in Accounting Master of Science in Finance Master of Science in Health Administration
Master of Science in Management Science (Information Systems Emphasis)
Master of Science in Management and Organization Master of Science in Marketing
Executive Programs
Master of Business Administration for Executives
Master of Science in Health Administration for Executives
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Associate Dean: Jean-Claude Bosch Program Coordinator: Nancy Reed
The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree is intended to help
the student achieve the following general objectives:
1. An understanding of the activities that constitute a business enterprise and the principles underlying administration of those activities.
2. The ability to think logically and analytically about the kind of complex problems encountered by management.
3. Facility in the arts of communication.
4. A comprehension of human relationships involved in an organization.
5. Awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in administrative positions.
6. Skill in the art of learning that will help the student continue self-education after leaving the campus.
Undergraduate Admissions
Telephone: 628-1277
Admission of Freshman Students. Freshman applicants must have completed the college preparatory curriculum in high school, graduated in the top 30% of their high school class, and achieved a score of at least 24 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. See the General Information section of this catalog for further information on freshman admission.
Admission of Transfer Students. Applicants who have completed work at other collegiate institutions should review the information on transfer students in the General Information section of this catalog. In addition to University policies, the College of Business and Administration evaluates course work to determine its appropriateness for the degree of Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Students who have completed more than 24 semester hours of transferable course work are evaluated for admission on the basis of their college grade-point average (GPA) without regard to their high school performance. To be automatically admitted, students must have a 3.0 overall GPA in the courses which would apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration), and a 2.0 overall GPA in business courses. Students with less than
3.0 overall will be admitted if they have a
3.0 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work, a 2.0 overall GPA in business courses, and at least a 2.0 overall GPA in courses applying to the degree.
Students who do not meet either of these admission standards, but with a 2.6 in the last 24 hours of applicable work, are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA in the last 24 hours. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available. For information about specific
policies on transfer of credit, consult an undergraduate business program specialist.
Intra-university Transfer. Students who want to transfer to the College of Business and Administration from another college or school of the University of Colorado at Denver must formally apply at the College of Business office. Transfer deadlines are August 1 for Fall Semester, December 1 for Spring Semester, and May 1 for the Summer Term.
Students will be evaluated only on course work that applies to the business degree program. Generally, this will exclude course work of a technical or vocational nature and courses in activity PE and remedial subjects. Students who have completed at least 24 applicable semester hours will be evaluated on their college work; students with fewer than 24 transferable hours will be evaluated on the basis of both high school and college work.
Students will be considered for admission on either their overall GPA in applicable course work from CU and all previous institutions or on their last 24 hours. Applicants with less than a 2.0 GPA in business courses (from CU or other institutions) and overall CU GPA of less than 2.0 will be denied admission even though they meet the minimum requirements for consideration.
Students will be automatically admitted to the College of Business if they have an overall GPA of 3.0 or an overall GPA of
3.00 on their last 24 hours. All other applicants meeting the minimum requirements for admission as stated above will be pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA in the last 24 hours. Pooled applicants will be offered admission as space is available.
To apply for an intra-university transfer, students must submit an Intra-University Transfer form and CU-Denver transcripts to a business program specialist. Transfer forms are available at CU-Denver Admissions or the College of Business office; transcript request forms are available at CU-Denver Records. The transcript must include the student’s most recent semester at the University. Students with previous course work from other institutions are also required to submit a copy of their transfer credit evaluations (advanced standings).
Former Students. A CU student from another campus or a CU-Denver student who has not registered for three consecutive semesters (summers included) is considered a former student and must reapply for admission as a former student. Former CU-Denver business students may be automatically readmitted to the College for up to three years from the semester


Undergraduate Program / 75
they last attended if they are in good standing (not on probation or suspension) in the College. Students who have not attended for more than three years, or who have completed 12 or more semester hours at another institution of higher education, must reapply as other former students and meet the admission and degree requirements applicable at the time they apply.
Old Work Policy. This policy applies to students newly admitted to the College of Business and former business students readmitted to the College after an absence of three semesters. Applicable credits up to five years old will be counted toward business degree requirements. Courses more than five years old will be evaluated individually for their current relevance to the degree program. Students may be required to update their knowledge by taking additional courses when past courses are outdated; in such cases, credit will be given for both courses. Generally, business courses more than eight years old will not apply toward degree credit.
Second Undergraduate Degree. Students may apply to the College of Business and Administration to earn a second undergraduate degree, provided the first undergraduate degree is in a field other than business. Students who are accepted for the second undergraduate degree will be required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a business degree. For example, if a student registered for a second degree has not had the required mathematics or general education courses, these must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses. Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken before a student begins to pursue the major field. Applications are available through the Office of Admissions and Records.
If a student applying for a second undergraduate degree has an academic record that justifies consideration for the graduate program, that student will be encouraged to consider one of the master’s degree programs.
Double Degree Programs. Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason, students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields. Combined programs have been developed for engineering and business, and may be arranged for other professional combinations as well. For additional information, contact an undergraduate business program specialist at 628-1277.
Undergraduate Advising and Academic Planning
Admissions Advising. Persons not yet admitted to the College of Business can receive advising on course selection, admission requirements, and other matters from an undergraduate program specialist. To make an appointment, call 628-1277.
Admitted Students. Upon admission to the College, students execute a Graduation Contract which identifies the courses required to graduate. This contract contains all the information needed to select courses and monitor progress toward completion of requirements for the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Business students are expected to assume responsibility for self advising.
This includes scheduling courses each term, being familiar with all the policies and procedures of the College, and otherwise managing the student's academic career. Program specialists are available to answer questions about unusual situations; however, they do not provide ongoing information about course selection and scheduling.
Career advising is available from business faculty and from the Auraria Office of Career Planning and Placement Services, 556-3477.
Undergraduate Core Curriculum —University of Colorado at Denver
The faculty of the College of Business Administration, College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have established a new core curriculum for undergraduate students. Beginning with the Fall 1990 Semester, all undergraduate students entering CU-Denver will be required to complete the undergraduate core curriculum independent of their college or major. Undergraduate students admitted prior to Fall 1990 will have a choice of either the new core curriculum or the requirements of their college in effect at the time of admission to the college.
The new undergraduate core curriculum seeks to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual competencies in mathematics and computation, writing, oral communication, information literacy, and critical thinking. It also requires all students to come to terms with the basic knowledge areas of the natural and physical sciences, behavioral sciences, social sciences, humanities, and arts. Furthermore, the core curriculum promotes an
awareness of cultural and racial diversity. The majority of the new core curriculum is designed to be completed during a student’s freshman and sophomore years in order to provide the foundation for specific training in a student’s major discipline.
The new undergraduate core curriculum for CU-Denver is outlined in the table below. Each college may augment the campus core curriculum. CU-Denver core requirements for business students are specified under Program Requirements in the following section.


76 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
CU-Denver Undergraduate Core Curriculum
1. Intellectual Competencies a. Writing/Speech b. Mathematics 9 hours 3 hours 6-9 hours in English with library component, 3-0 hours in Communication any computation course or by examination
2. Knowledge Areas a. Natural and Physical Sciences 8 hours two courses with laboratory, in one or two disciplines
Biology, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics
Behavioral Sciences AND Social Sciences 9 hours minimum one course in Behavioral and Social, maximum two in a discipline
b. Behavioral Sciences Anthropology, Communication, and Psychology 3-6 hours one or two courses in one or two disciplines
c. Social Sciences Economics, Geography, Political Science, and Sociology 3-6 hours one or two courses in one or two disciplines
d. Humanities History, Languages, Literature, and Philosophy 6 hours two courses in one or two disciplines
e. Arts Fine Arts, Music, and Theatre 3 hours
f. Multicultural Diversity 3 hours one upper division course from approved list
Graduation Requirements
The Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree requires the following:
Total Credits. A total of 120 semester hours.
Competencies. Demonstration (by course work or testing) of a minimum level of competency in computer literacy, geography, and one foreign language.
Area of Emphasis or Non-Business Minor. Completion of at least 15 semester hours of approved courses in the area of emphasis or completion of at least 15 semester hours in an approved nonbusiness minor.
Residence. At least 30 semester hours of business courses must be completed after a student’s admission to the College. The 30 hours for residence must include MGMT. 4110 and MGMT. 4500, and 24 hours in other business courses (core and/or electives or area of emphasis courses if an area is selected).
Grade-Point Average Requirement. To graduate, a student must maintain a minimum cumulative scholastic grade-point average of 2.0 for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business Administration) degree, 2.0 for
all business courses, and 2.0 for courses in the student’s area of emphasis or nonbusiness minor.
Undergraduate Honors. Upon recommendation of the faculty, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Students must achieve an overall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to be considered for cum laude. Those who achieve an overall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado will be considered for magna cum laude.
Filing for Graduation. Students must file an Undergraduate Candidacy form and Diploma Card, and request a graduation evaluation (senior audit) prior to registering for their final semester. Failure to do so will delay graduation. Also, students desiring to change their area of emphasis after filing for graduation must have the change approved by the graduation supervisor prior to registering for their final semester. Changes after that time will delay graduation.
Business Program Requirements. Satisfaction of all the following requirements:
Program Requirements Semester Hours
College competencies................0-9
CU-Denver core.......................41
Mathematics ..........................3
Business core........................42
International studies ................6
Area of emphasis or
non-business minor.................15
Other Courses......................4-13
Total Semester Hours..............120
Detailed descriptions of courses which satisfy program requirements are presented below:
I. College of Business Required Competencies: 0 - 9 Hours
A minimum level of competency must be demonstrated in computer literacy, geography, and in one foreign language. Students may satisfy the competency requirements by taking courses as described below or by testing. New freshmen and transfer students should (1) satisfy the English, computer literacy, and geography requirements within their first semester of enrollment at the College, and (2) meet the language competency requirement within the first one, two or three semesters of enrollment as dictated by the number of courses required.


Graduation Requirements / 77
A maximum of 9 semester-hours taken to satisfy the competencies may be counted toward the degree (see Other Courses); other hours taken to satisfy the competencies are not applied toward the 120 semester hours required for the degree. To satisfy competency requirements students must pass either competency tests in each specific area or complete the following courses (or their equivalents for transfer students):
MATH. 1350 Computers in the Arts and Sciences or CSC. 1950-3 Computer Mind
Tools I, or test...................0-3
GEOG. 1102 World Regional Geography or
test...............................0-3
3rd semester language or test ......0-13
II. CU-Denver Core Requirements:
41 Semester Hours
A. Intellectual Competencies - 9 semester
hours.
ENGL. 1020 Writing Workshop II.........3
ENGL. 2024 Intermediate Composition . . 3 CMMU. 2101 Speechmaking................3
B. Mathematics - 3 semester hours.
MATH. 1070 Algebra for Social Sciences
and Business (*).....................3
C. Knowledge Areas - 29 semester hours.
1. Natural and Physical Sciences.......8
Two of the following courses (a sequence
in the same discipline or courses in two different disciplines):
BIOL. 1550-4 Basic Biology I BIOL. 1560-4 Basic Biology II CHEM. 1450-4 Real World Chemistry I CHEM. 1460-4 Real World Chemistry II GEOL. 1072-4 Physical Geology I GEOL. 1082-4 Physical Geology II PHYS. 1052-4 Astronomy 1 PHYS. 1062-4 Astronomy II
2. Behavioral Sciences PSYCH. 1002 Introduction to
Psychology............................3
3. Social Sciences
ECON. 2012 Principles of Economics:
Macroeconomics........................3
ECON. 2022 Principles of Economics: Microeconomics........................3
4. Humanities
HIST. 1021 Western Civilization Since
1500 .................................3
HIST. 1011 or HIST. 1361 or HIST. 1371. .3
5. Arts.................................3
One course from the following:
ARTS. 1000-3 Arts in our Time FA. 1001-3 Introduction to Arts MUS. 1001-3 Music Appreciation THTR. 1001-3 Introduction to Theatre
6. Multicultural Diversity.................3
One course from list to be approved by College of Business.
III. College of Business Math Requirement: 3 Semester Hours
MATH. 1080 Polynomial Calculus (*)... .3 (*) Note: The sequence MATH. 1070 and MATH. 1080 may be satisfied by a
6-hour calculus sequence.
IV. Business Core: 42 Semester Hours
Accounting.............................6
Business and Society...................3
Business Law...........................3
Finance................................6
Information Systems....................3
Management.............................6
Marketing .............................6
Operations Management..................3
Quantitative Methods...................3
Capstone Integrative Course............3
Detailed information about these courses will be published in the Fall 1991 Schedule of Courses.
V. International Studies: 6 Semester Hours
A. International Non-Business - One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses:
ECON. 4410, ECON. 4420, ECON. 4500, HIST. 3160, HIST. 4750, HIST. 4030/ 5030, HIST. 4040/5040, HIST. 4330, HIST. 4440, HIST. 4450, HIST. 4460, HIST. 4730, HIST. 4780, HIST. 4820,
PSC. 3006, PSC. 3042, PSC. 3135, PSC. 3656, PSC. 4216, PSC. 4236, PSC. 4246, PSC. 4266, PSC. 4286, PSC. 4726, PSC. 4736, PSC. 4746, PSC. 4756, PSC. 4766, PSC. 4776.
B. International Business - One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses:
FNCE. 4370 International Financial Management
MGMT. 4400 International Business MKTG. 4200 International Marketing MKTG. 4580 international Transportation
VI. Area of Emphasis or Non-Business Minor: 15 Semester Hours
Students may choose a general business degree with a non- business minor, or a business degree with an area of emphasis in Accounting, Finance, Human Resources Management, Information Systems, International Business, Management, Marketing, or Operations Management.
A. General Business: Students in General Business must take an approved nonbusiness minor of at least 15 semester hours. The courses must form an integrated sequence and be approved by
the College of Business. Up to 6 semester hours of the sequence may be in courses used to satisfy the general (CU-Denver core) requirements but the number of Other Courses (see below) will be correspondingly increased to meet the 120 hours total requirement for the degree. Students interested in completing a minor should contact the individual departments regarding requirements.
B. Areas of Emphasis: Areas of Emphasis must consist of at least 15 semester hours, including any business core courses. For most areas, this will mean 9 semester hours beyond the two courses in the business core. For areas with special requirements or areas with only one course in the core, it may mean 12 or more semester hours beyond the business core. Any hours in excess of 9 are included in the Other Courses described below.
VII. Other Courses: 4 - 13 Semester Hours
Students may choose their Other Courses freely, subject to the following general rules: (1) Only non-remedial (college-level, as determined by the College of Business) courses will count towards the B.S. degree; (2) All students receiving the B.S. degree in Business must take at least 48 semester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses). Students in General Business will generally need to take at least one business course in the Other Courses category to meet this requirement; (3) At most 72 semester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses) may be counted toward the 120 credit hours required for the B.S. degree in Business; (4) Any business area of emphasis courses required by specific areas in excess of the 9 hours listed under Area of Emphasis above are included in the Other Courses category;
(5) At most 9 semester hours of college-level course work devoted to satisfying the basic competency requirements may be applied toward the B.S. degree in Business.
Guidelines for Elective Credits. Elective credits should be selected carefully because not all classes are acceptable. Generally, to be acceptable, electives must be taught by regular University of Colorado faculty, must have a form of assessment such as a term paper and/or examinations, and must be regular classroom-type classes. Course coverage must be college level, not repetitious of other work applied toward the degree, must be academic as opposed to vocational or technical, and must be part of the regular University offerings.


78 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Specifically, the College will accept:
a. A maximum of 6 hours of the theory of physical education, recreation, and dance, and
b. A maximum of 6 hours of approved independent study, experimental studies, choir, band, music lessons, art lessons, and
c. A maximum of 12 hours of advanced ROTC providing the student is enrolled in the program and completes the total program.
The College will not accept:
Activity physical education classes, recreation, workshops, internships, orientations, dance, teaching methods, practi-cums, and courses reviewing basic skills in computers, English composition, mathematics, and chemistry.
Areas of Emphasis
See individual areas of emphasis in this section for specific courses required.
ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SELECTING COURSES
Registration. Instruction for registering for courses is contained in another publication called the Schedule of Classes, which is available before each semester. That publication lists the times when registration occurs, the place, and the courses offered.
Maximum Units Per Term. The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate business student is 15 semester hours, with a maximum of 18 hours during the fall/spring semesters and 12 hours during the summer term. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Extended Studies, whether in classes or through correspondence, are included in the student’s load.
Repeating Courses. A failed course (grade of F) may be repeated; however, the F will be included in the grade-point average and will appear on the transcript. A course in which a grade of D- or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from a business program specialist. Courses repeated without approval may not be used in the grade-point average calculation.
Courses From Other Institutions. Business students must have the written approval of a business program specialist to register for courses (excluding MSC pooled courses) offered by other institutions. Credit will not be given for courses taken without approval. Grades of C or better must be earned to receive business degree credit. Generally, only non-business electives or lower division, non-business requirements are acceptable for transfer from other institutions once a student has
been admitted to the College of Business. Business students who take more than 12 semester hours from another institution must reapply for admission to the College as transfer students and meet the current admission requirements.
MSC Courses. Business students may select their non-business required and elective courses from those offered from MSC. Grades of C or better must be earned to receive business degree credit; however, the grade is not computed in the CU grade-point average and is treated like other transfer credits. MSC business courses may not be taken for CU-Denver business degree credit.
Graduate Level Courses. With prior written approval of a business program specialist, students may take up to a maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate level non-business elective credits. Students must earn grades of B or better in graduate courses in order to apply the credits toward business degree requirements.
Pass/Fail. Only non-business elective courses may be taken pass/fail. Required business and non-business courses (natural science and social-humanistic elective included) may not be taken pass/fail. A maximum of 6 hours pass/fail credit may be applied toward the business degree. Courses taken in excess of the maximum will not be applied toward degree credit. Pass/fail determination must be made within the posted deadlines (at census dates) and may not be rescinded (unless approved by the Undergraduate Appeals Committee).
Correspondence Courses. Only 6 semester hours of credit taken through correspondence study (from regionally accredited institutions) will be applied toward the business degree. Business courses may not be taken by correspondence. All correspondence courses must be evaluated by a business program specialist to determine their acceptability toward degree requirements, and the program specialist’s written approval is required prior to the student’s registering for courses. Students should contact the Division of Extended Studies for course offerings and registration procedures.
Independent Study. Junior or senior business students desiring to work beyond regular course coverage may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) as nonbusiness electives under the direction of an instructor who approves the project, but the student must have the appropriate approval before registering. A maximum of 3 semester hours of independent study courses may be taken in any one semester; a maximum of 6 semester hours may be applied toward degree
requirements.
An independent study request form must be signed by the student, instructor, department coordinator, and the Associate Dean for Programs.
Study Abroad. Transfer credit from study abroad programs is generally limited to non-business elective credit. Students must meet with a business program specialist to determine course acceptability and for written approval prior to the semester in which they intend to study abroad. Information on the various programs is available at the Office of International Education on the Boulder campus.
ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SUSPENSION AND PROBATION
To be in good standing, students must have an overall CU grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C=2.0) or better for all course work attempted, and a 2.0 GPA or better for all business courses attempted. PE activity courses, remedial course work, MSC courses, and repeated courses not approved by a business advisor are not included in these averages.
When semester grades become available, students below the 2.0 GPA will be notified of 1) probationary status or 2) suspension. Students are responsible for being aware of their academic status at all times; late grades and/or late notification does not waive this responsibility. College rules governing probation and suspension are as follows:
1. Any student whose overall GPA, or business course GPA, is less than 2.0 will be placed on probation immediately. A student may be removed from probation when the overall GPA and business GPA have been raised to 2.0.
2. A student may remain on probation as long as the student maintains normal degree progress each semester as determined by the College and obtains each term on probation a term GPA of 2.5, and term business course GPA of 2.5, with no grade below a C. Failure to meet probationary provisions will result in suspension. Probationary status may continue only until the student has completed a maximum of 15 semester hours or five terms, whichever comes first; the student will be suspended if the GPA deficiency is not cleared within this time.
3. Suspended students may not attend the University of Colorado or any division of the University (including Extended Studies).
4. Students on suspension may petition for readmission to the College after a minimum of one year from the term in


Areas of Emphasis / 79
which they were suspended. Generally, petitions are granted only in unusual circumstances. Any suspended student readmitted to the College will be under contract and placed on a continued probation status until the GPA deficiency has been cleared. Such students will be automatically suspended if, at any time, their overall GPA or business GPA again falls below 2.0.
5. Students earning all failing grades or no academic credit for a semester will have a stop placed on their record and will not be permitted to register without a business advisor’s approval.
6. Combined degree students are required to maintain the same standards of performance as College of Business students in order to be continued in a combined program.
Areas of Emphasis
Each candidate for the B.S. (Business Administration) degree must complete the prescribed courses in an area of emphasis comprising a minimum of 15 semester hours taken at the University of Colorado at Denver. A 2.0 grade-point average is required for area courses. Typically, students select an area of emphasis after taking several of the core courses. They then complete the hours required for their selected area.
Information about each area of emphasis is given below.
Accounting
Advisors: Stephen P. Allen, Ben-Hsien
Bao, Michael Firth
Telephone: 628-1244, 628-1249, 628-1220
Accounting courses are offered in several fields of professional accountancy at the intermediate, advanced and graduate levels. They provide preparation for practice in one or more of the following fields:
Accounting and management control systems
Auditing
Financial accounting
Managerial accounting
Tax accounting
Teaching and research
In all of these fields a thorough knowledge of the social, legal, economic, and political environment is needed. A high degree of analytical ability and communication skill is indispensable.
Courses in English composition, speech, ethics and logic are desirable. Courses in statistics and information systems, beyond
the required College of Business core courses, are highly recommended.
ACCT. 3310 (Managerial Cost Accounting) is a required prerequisite for the accounting area and applies as a business elective. Accounting majors should not take ACCT. 2020.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACCT. 3220. Intermediate Financial
Accounting 1.........................3
ACCT. 3230. Intermediate Financial
Accounting II .......................3
ACCT. 3320. Intermediate Cost
Accounting...........................3
Accounting elective (at the 4000 level) . . 3
Students planning to pursue accounting as a career usually take more than the above required hours. Many students take a total of about 30 hours of accounting, often taking two courses each semester in their junior and senior years. Students should work closely with the accounting faculty and business advisors in planning their accounting programs.
Accounting students often specialize in a particular topical area of accounting beyond the core. Examples of these specializations include the following recommended courses:
Financial Accounting and Auditing ACCT. 4240. Advanced Financial Accounting
ACCT. 4410. Income Tax Accounting ACCT. 4420. Advanced Income Tax Accounting ACCT. 4620. Auditing
Managerial Accounting and Systems ACCT. 4410. Income Tax Accounting ACCT. 4420. Advanced Income Tax Accounting
ACCT. 4540. Accounting Systems and Data Processing ACCT. 4620. Auditing ACCT. 4800. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations Graduate study in accounting is receiving increasing emphasis by professional organizations and employers. Students meeting admission requirements should consider continuing their education at the graduate level.
Finance
Advisor: E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr. Telephone: 628-1218
The principal areas of study in finance are financial management, monetary policy, banking, investments, and international finance. The study of finance is intended to provide an understanding of
fundamental theory pertaining to finance and to develop the ability to make sound financial management decisions. Every endeavor is made to train students to think logically about financial problems and to formulate sound financial decisions and policies. It is necessary to understand the importance of finance in the economy and the functions and purposes of monetary systems, credit, prices, money markets, and financial institutions. Emphasis is placed on financial policy, management, control, analysis, and decision making. Numerous job opportunities exist with financial institutions and in the field of business finance. ACCT. 2000 and ACCT. 2020 (or ACCT. 3310) are required prerequisites for the finance area; ACCT. 2020 will apply as a business elective.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FNCE. 4310. Business Finance 1..........3
FNCE. 4320. Business Finance II.........3
FNCE. 4330. Investment and Portfolio Management............................3
FNCE. 4350. Monetary and Fiscal Pblicy . 3
Recommended Electives FNCE. 4370. International Financial
Management....................
FNCE. 4340. Security Analysis...
FNCE. 4360. Bank Management.....
Students should note that all finance courses are not offered every semester. Finance majors are encouraged to take additional accounting courses as business electives.
Human Resources Management
Advisor: Prof. Wayne F. Cascio Telephone: 628-1215
Human resources management offers opportunities for students to develop professional competence in the areas of personnel administration and labor relations. Students acquire an understanding of and skills in developing and implementing human resources systems including recruitment, selection, evaluation, training, motivation, and union-management relations.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGMT. 4340. Labor and Employee
Relations...........................3
MGMT. 4380. Human Resources
Management: Employment .............3
MGMT. 4390. Human Resources
Management: Legal and Social Issues . 3 MGMT. 4410. Human Resources Management: Compensation Administration..........................3
CO CO CO


80 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Recommended Electives
MGMT. 3350. Managing Individuals and
Work Groups .........................3
MGMT. 4350. Conflict and Change in
Organizations........................3
MGMT. 4370. Organization Design........3
PSY. 3135. Organizational Psychology .. .3
PSY. 3155. Industrial Psychology.......3
PSY. 4405. Theories of Social Psychology 3 OPMG. 4440. Quality and Productivity . . 3 ACCT. 2020. Introduction to Managerial
Accounting...........................3
ISMG. 3500. Logical Data Structures and
Data Base Management Systems.........3
OPMG. 3000. Intermediate Statistics .... 3
SOC. 3052. Sociology of Work ..........3
ECON. 4610. Labor Economics............3
Information Systems
Advisor: Gary A. Kochenberger Telephone: 628-1212
The information systems area is designed for those who wish to prepare themselves for careers as professional data processing managers or as technical specialists in business and government. The student develops those technical skills and administrative insights required for analysis of information systems, the design and implementation of systems, and the management of data processing operations. The emphasis is on management information systems—systems for the collection, organization, accessing, and analysis of information for the planning and control of operations. The automation of data processing is also studied extensively. Students should note that not all courses are offered each semester. ISMG. 2200 and ISMG. 2210 are required prerequisites for the information systems area and apply as business electives.
Required Courses Semester Hours
(The following two courses)
ISMG. 4650. Systems Analysis and
Design I .............................3
ISMG. 4660. Systems Analysis and
Design II.............................3
At least two of the following five courses) QUAN. 3000. Intermediate Statistical Analysis for Decision Support
(infrequently offered)................3
ISMG. 3300. Operations Research for
Decision Support .....................3
ISMG. 3500. Logical Data Structures and
Database Management Systems...........3
ISMG. 4700. Computer and Information
Technology............................3
OPMG. 4400. Planning and Control Systems...............................3
International Business
Advisor: Kang Rae Cho Telephone: 628-1214
Increasingly, businesses are reorienting their thinking, planning, and operations to capitalize on opportunities that exist in the world marketplace. Every phase of business is affected by this reorientation. For individuals with the appropriate skills, training, and interest, international business provides excellent career opportunities.
The international business curriculum is designed to enhance and build on thorough training in basic business skills and to provide students with additional skills and knowledge appropriate to international business.
ECON. 4410 (International Trade and Finance) is a required prerequisite for the international business area and applies as a non-business elective.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FNCE. 4370. International Financial
Management...........................3
MKTG. 4580. International
Transportation ......................3
MKTG. 4200. International Marketing ... 3 MGMT. 4400. International Business .... 3
Students should see an academic advisor for course scheduling.
A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended. The course requirements for a second area can be included as part of the business and free elective hours. In addition, serious consideration should be given to either a minor or a certificate in international affairs, offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and to the study of a foreign language.
Management
Advisor: W. Graham Astley Telephone: 628-1237
The management curriculum provides the foundation for careers in supervision and general management in a wide variety of organizations. It develops skills in management practice through an understanding of general management principles, individual and group behavior, organizational change and design, and human resources management.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGMT. 3350. Managing Individuals
and Work Groups.....................3
MGMT. 4350. Conflict and Change
in Organizations....................3
MGMT. 4370. Organization Design......3
MGMT. 4380. Human Resources Management: Employment .............3
Recommended Electives MGMT. 4340. Labor and Employee
Relations...........................3
MGMT. 4390. Human Resources
Management: Legal and Social Issues . MGMT. 4400. International Business .... MGMT. 4950. Topics in Business.......
Marketing
Advisor: Gordon G. Barnewall Telephone: 628-1296
Marketing is concerned with directing the activities of the organization toward the satisfaction of customer wants and needs. This involves understanding customers, identifying those wants and needs which the organization can best serve, guiding the development of specific products or services, planning and implementing ways to take products or services to the market, securing the customer’s order, and finally, monitoring customer response in order to guide future activities.
In most organizations, marketing is a major functional area that provides a wide variety of career opportunities in such fields as personal selling and sales management, advertising and sales promotion, public relations, marketing research, physical distribution, product management, market management, marketing information systems, and retail management. Increasingly, career opportunities exist in service businesses and not-for-profit organizations.
Required Courses Semester Hours
(The following two courses)
MKTG. 3100. Market Research.............3
MKTG. 4800. Marketing Strategies and
Policies..............................3
(Choose two of the following courses)
MKTG. 3200. Consumer Behavior...........3
MKTG. 4000. Advertising.................3
MKTG. 4100. Physical Distribution
Management............................3
MKTG. 4200. International Marketing ... 3 MKTG. 4500. Advertising Management and Public Relations....................3
CO CO CO


Undergraduate Courses / 81
MKTG. 4580. International Transportations
MKTG. 4600. Business Marketing........3
MKTG. 4700. Personal Selling and Sales Force Management.......................3
In addition to the four required courses, students may select marketing electives, business electives, and non-business electives that support their particular career orientations. The marketing faculty advisor can assist the student in choosing an appropriate set of electives to fit career objectives.
Operations Management
Advisor: Gary A. Kochenberger Telephone: 628-1212
Operations management studies are designed to prepare students for careers as operations manager, management analyst, or systems analyst in such private sector organizations as manufacturing, banking, insurance, hospitals, and construction, as well as in a variety of municipal, state, and federal organizations.
Operations managers may be charged with the design, implementation, operation, and maintenance of the core operational system. Managerial activities could include forecasting demand, inventory planning and control, scheduling labor and equipment, job design and labor standards, quality control, purchasing, and facilities location and layout.
The outlook for jobs in this area continues to be strong. This placement is aided by the student chapter of the American Production and Inventory Control Society and work intern programs provided to qualified students. Participation in live case research and consulting projects with local organizations is usually an integral part of this course of study.
Students whose major areas of emphasis are information systems, transportation management, accounting, or engineering will find the operations management 4000-level courses to be particularly well related to their courses of study. Students should plan their schedules carefully as required courses are not offered every semester.
Required Courses Semester Hours
(The following three courses)
ISMG 3300. Operations Research for
Decision Support ....................3
OPMG. 4400. Planning and Control
Systems..............................3
OPMG. 4440. Quality and Productivity .. 3
(One of the following courses)
OPMG. 4470. Strategic Analysis in Operations Management ...............3
OPMG. 4600. Purchasing, Materials Management, and Negotiation.........3
Recommended Electives ACCT. 3310. Managerial Cost
Accounting..........................3
ISMG. 2200. Business Programming:
Structured COBOL....................3
MGMT. 3350. Managing Work Groups... 3
MGMT. 4370. Organization Design.......3
MGMT. 4340. Labor and Employee
Relations...........................3
MGMT. 4380. Human Resources
Management: Employment .............3
QUAN. 3000. Intermediate Statistics .... 3 GEOG. 3411. Economic Geography:
Manufacturing ......................3
GEOG. 4650. Location Analysis.........3
Students planning to take the APICS (American Production and Inventory Control Society) or NAPM (National Association for Purchasing Management) certification examinations should consult with an advisor to determine which elective should be taken.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES — ACCOUNTING
ACCT. 2000-3. Introduction to Financial Accounting. Fall, Spring, Summer. The preparation and interpretation of the principal financial statements of the business enterprise, with emphasis on asset and liability valuation problems and the determination of net income. Prereq: sophomore standing.
ACCT. 2020-3. Introduction to Managerial Accounting. Fall, Spring. The analysis of cost behavior and the role of accounting in the planning and control of business enterprises, with emphasis on management decision-making uses of accounting information. Note: Finance majors must take this course and accounting majors may not take this course to satisfy degree requirements. Prereq: ACCT. 2000.
ACCT. 3220-3. Intermediate Financial Accounting I. Fall, Spring, Summer. Intensive analysis of generally accepted accounting priniples, accounting theory, and preparation of annual financial statements for public corporations. Prereq: ACCT. 2000 and junior standing.
ACCT. 3230-3. Intermediate Financial Accounting II. Fall, Spring, Summer. Continuation of ACCT. 3220. Prereq: ACCT.
3220.
ACCT. 3310-3. Managerial Cost Accounting. Fall, Spring, Summer. Measurement and reporting of manufacturing and service costs. Identifies and analyzes the role of production costs in income determination. Includes computer processing of cost data. Nonmajors may take either ACCT. 2020 or 3310. Prereq: ACCT. 2000 and ISMG. 2000.
ACCT. 3320-3. Intermediate Cost Accounting. Fall, Spring, Summer. Cost analysis for purposes of control and decision making. Analysis of cost behavior, role of accounting in planning and control, and managerial uses of cost accounting data. Includes use of computer assisted decision models. Prereq: ACCT. 3310 and QUAN.
2010.
ACCT. 4240-3. Advanced Financial Accounting. Fall, Spring. Advanced financial accounting concepts and practices with emphasis on accounting for partnerships, business combinations, and consolidations. Prereq: ACCT. 3220.
ACCT. 4250-3. Financial Accounting Issues and Cases. In-depth analysis of contemporary accounting issues and problems, the development of accounting thought and principles, and critical review of generally accepted accounting principles. Prereq:
ACCT. 3230.
ACCT. 4330-3. Managerial Accounting Problems and Cases. Critical analysis of advanced topics in managerial accounting. Considerable use of cases and current readings. Prereq: ACCT. 3320.
ACCT. 4410-3. Income Tax Accounting. Fall, Spring, Summer. Provisions and procedures of federal income tax laws and requirements affecting individuals and business organizations, including the management problems of tax planning and compliance. Prereq: ACCT. 2020 or 3310.
ACCT. 4420-3. Advanced Income Tax Accounting. Fall, Spring. Continuation of ACCT. 4410, with special emphasis on the income tax problems of partnerships and corporations. Prereq: ACCT. 4410.
ACCT. 4540-3. Accounting Systems and Data Processing. Fall. The design and analysis of accounting information systems, automated data processing methods with special emphasis on computers and computer programming, and the role of accounting in the management process. Prereq: ACCT. 3310 and 6 additional semester hours of accounting.
ACCT. 4620-3. Auditing. Fall, Spring, Summer. Generally accepted auditing standards and the philosophy supporting them; auditing techniques available to the independent public accountant. Pertinent publications of the AICPA reviewed. Prereq: ACCT. 3230.
ACCT. 4800-3. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations.
Spring. Planning and control of government and nonprofit organizations. Includes program budgets, responsibility accounting, and fund accounting. Prereq: ACCT. 2020 or 3310.
ACCT. 4840-variable credit. Independent Study.
ACCT. 4950-3. Special Topics. Research methods and results, special topics, and professional developments in accounting.


82 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Prerequisites vary according to topic and instructor requirements.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES — BUSINESS LAW
BLAW. 3000-3. Business Law. Fall, Spring. Summer. Provides an understanding of basic areas of law important to business managers and consumers. Topics include litigation, torts, contracts, and sales with overviews of consumer law, and legal aspects of banking transactions. Prereq: junior standing.
BLAW. 4120-3. Advanced Business Law. Fall. Spring. Additional legal topics of importance to business, including agency partnerships, corporations, bankruptcy, secured transactions, real and personal property, and securities regulation. Strongly recommended for accounting majors. Prereq: BLAW. 3000.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES — FINANCE
FNCE. 3300-3. Basic Finance. Fall, Spring, Summer. Includes a study of the monetary system and other institutions comprising the money and capital markets; study of the financial manager’s role in business; the investment of capital in assets; and financing the asset requirements of business firms. Prereq: ECON. 2012 and 2022; ACCT. 2000; junior standing.
FNCE. 4310-3. Business Finance I. Fall, Spring, Summer. Basic principles and practices governing financial management of capital in the business firm constitute the core of this course. Determinants of capital requirements, methods of obtaining capital, problems of internal financial management, and methods of financial analysis. Financing the business corporation given primary emphasis. Prereq: FNCE. 3300 and ACCT. 2020.
FNCE. 4320-3. Business Finance II. Fall, Spring. Develops analytical and decisionmaking skills of students in relation to problems that confront financial management. Areas include planning, control, and financing of current operations and longer term capital commitments; management of income; evaluation of capital investments; and expansion. Case method of instruction. Prereq: FNCE. 4310.
FNCE. 4330-3. Investment and Portfolio Management. Fall, Spring. Discusses investment problems and policies and the methodology for implementing them. Includes portfolio analysis, selection of investment media, and measurement of performance. Prereq: FNCE. 4310.
FNCE. 4340-3. Security Analysis. Analysis of the financial condition of the firm, valuation of debt and equity securities, and the selection of investment media for portfolios. Prereq: FNCE. 4310.
FNCE. 4350-3. Financial Markets and Institutions. Fall, Spring. This course focuses on the supply and demand for loanable funds, the process of money creation, the structure of interest rates, and the role of the central bank. Special attention is devoted to the impact of monetary and fiscal policies on interest rates, the flow of funds, and economic activity. Prereq: FNCE. 4310.
FNCE. 4360-3. Bank Management. An analysis of structure, markets, regulations, and chartering commercial banks. Problems and policies of the internal management of funds, loan practices and procedures, investment behavior, deposit and capital adequacy, liquidity, and solvency. Analytical methodology for these problems is developed. Prereq: FNCE. 4310.
FNCE. 4370-3. International Financial Management. Spring. A study of financial management in the international environment that considers international capital movements. Problems of international operations as they affect the financial functions. Reviews foreign and international institutions and the foreign exchange process. Considers financial requirements, problems, sources, and policies of firms doing business internationally. Prereq: FNCE. 3300.
FNCE. 4840-variable credit. Independent Study.
FNCE. 4950-3. Special Topics. Research methods and results, special topics, and professional development in finance. Prerequisites vary according to topic and instructor requirements.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES — INFORMATION SYSTEMS
ISMG. 2000-3. Business Information Systems and the Computer. Fall, Spring, Summer. A study of business information systems focusing upon computer hardware and software as they relate to business information. Includes computer programming, computer systems, and computer applications. The purpose of the course is to introduce the students to the concepts, vocabulary, and function of business information systems and the computer. Prereq: MATH. 1070 and 1080 or 6 hours of nonremedial college mathematics.
ISMG. 2200-3. Business Programming I: Structured COBOL. Fall, Spring, Summer. An introductory course intended to provide the student with a thorough programming foundation in COBOL using structured programming concepts and techniques. The basic elements of the language are discussed and demonstrated through applications in a business environment. Prereq: ISMG. 2000 or consent of instructor.
ISMG. 2210-3. Business Programming II: Files and Data Structures. Fall, Spring.
This course is a continuation of ISMG. 2200. The student is introduced to advanced topics in COBOL and their application in business.
Special emphasis is placed upon alternative physical data and file structures, their implementation in COBOL, and their use in a business setting. The use of system software and utilities will be integrated with the topics. Case studies may be used to illustrate applications of the material. Prereq: ISMG. 2200 or consent of instructor. QUAN. 2010 is recommended.
ISMG. 3300-3. Operations Research for Decision Support. Fall. This course studies the various methods and models of operations research and their application to managerial settings. Typical topics include inventory models, simulation, linear programming, and queuing. Prereq: QUAN. 2010.
ISMG. 3500-3. Logical Data Structures and Database Management Systems.
Spring. This course is an introduction to database management systems, on-line query, and management control systems. It is concerned with database structure and design and the integration of the logical view of the data with its physical storage. Extensive use may be made of a commercial DBMS in student projects to develop an appreciation of the use and organizational issues as well as the technical considerations. Prereq: ISMG 2210.
ISMG. 4650-3. System Analysis. Fall. This course introduces the student to basic system analysis tools and the procedures for conducting a system analysis. Topics to be covered may include system requirements, the initial analysis, the general feasibility study, structured analysis, detailed analysis, logical design, and general system proposal. The student will gain practical experience through projects and/or case studies. Prereq: ISMG. 2210 or consent of instructor.
ISMG. 4660-3. Systems Design. Spring.
This course is a continuation of ISMG. 4650 and discusses topics such as structured design; physical system design; detailed feasibility analysis; specification of input-output methods and formats; design of files, programs, and procedures; system testing; implementation procedures; and system life cycle management. The student will implement these concepts through case studies and/or projects. Prereq: ISMG. 4650, or consent of instructor.
ISMG. 4700-3. Computer and Information Technology. Fall. This course provides the ISMG student with a conceptual foundation in the areas of computer architecture, operating systems, programming translators, and telecommunications. It is intended to serve as a facilitating course to allow the ISMG student to more readily communicate with other technical members of the data processing community. Prereq: ISMG. 2210 or consent of instructor.
ISMG. 4840-variable credit. Independent Study.
ISMG. 4950-3. Special Topics. Research methods are results, special topics, and professional developments in information


Undergraduate Courses / 83
systems. Prerequisites vary according to topics.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES — MANAGEMENT
MGMT. 1000-3. Introduction to Business.
Fall, Spring, Summer Nature of business enterprise. Role of business in our society; problems confronting business management, career opportunities in business. Business students are advised to take this course during their freshman year, but may not take it in the junior or senior years. Open only to freshmen, sophomores, and non-degree students, and music majors at all levels. MGMT. 3300-3. Management and Organization Behavior. Fall, Spring, Summer. Emphasizes the application of behavioral science knowledge to understanding people and organizations. Motivation, authority, politics, and the role of groups in contemporary organizations are some of the topics covered. Prereq: junior standing.
MGMT. 3350-3. Managing Individuals and Work Groups. Fall, Spring, Summer. Examines what makes small groups effective in organizations. Develops the ability to analyze interpersonal and group behavior, and improve group functioning. Builds interpersonal and small group leadership skills. Prereq: MGMT. 3300.
MGMT. 4110-3. Business and Society. Fall, Spring, Summer. An examination of interrelationships between business, society, and the environment. Topics will include perspectives on the socioeconomic-business system, current public policy issues, and social responsiblities and ethics. Prereq: ECON.
2012 and 2022. Open to senior business students only.
MGMT. 4340-3. Labor and Employee Relations. Fall, Spring. Analysis of legal, political, social, and managerial aspects of collective bargaining and employee relations. Prereq: MGMT. 3300.
MGMT. 4350-3. Conflict and Change in Organizations. Spring. This course is designed to help students understand common types of conflict within organizations and the strategies useful for resolving conflict. Techniques for managing change also are stressed. Prereq: MGMT. 3300. MGMT. 4370-3. Organization Design.
Fall. Examines how to structure organizations to perform effectively. Emphasis is placed on the role of the task, technology, and environment as constraints on organization design. Prereq: MGMT. 3300.
MGMT. 4380-3. Human Resources Management: Employment. Fall, Spring. Study of the development and implementation of personnel systems for recruiting, selecting, placing, developing, and evaluating human resources. Prereq: QUAN. 2010 and MGMT. 3300.
MGMT. 4390-3. Human Resources Management: Legal and Social Issues.
Fall. Study of legal issues related to equal employment opportunity, occupational safety and health, and compensation, with emphasis on program implementation and evaluation. Reviews legal questions, guidelines and procedures, and regulatory agencies. It is recommended that students take MGMT. 4340 and 4380 before this course. Prereq: MGMT. 3300.
MGMT. 4400-3. Introduction to International Business. An overview of the international business environment, the impact of environmental factors on international business operations, and the identification and analysis of complex managerial issues facing international business firms. Prereq: ECON. 4410 and junior standing or consent of instructor.
MGMT. 4410-3. Human Resources Management: Compensation Administration. Spring. Study of planning and administration of compensation systems, including government, union and labor market influences on pay; development of pay systems and employee benefits for non-managerial, managerial, and overseas employees. Prereq: QUAN. 2010 and MGMT. 4380.
MGMT. 4500-3. Business Policy and Strategic Management. Fall, Spring, Summer. Emphasis is on integrating the economic, market, social/political, technological, and competition components of the external environment with the internal characteristics of the firm; and deriving through analysis the appropriate interaction between the firm and its environment to facilitate accomplishment of the firm’s objectives. Open only to business students in their graduation semester. Prereq: completion of all business core courses.
MGMT. 4840-variable credit.
Independent Study.
MGMT. 4950-3. Special Topics in Management. A number of different current topics in management will be offered under this course number. Consult the Schedule of Classes for current course offerings.
MGMT. 5840-variable credit.
Independent Study.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES — MARKETING
Note: MKTG. 3000 or an equivalent junior level course in basic marketing is a prerequisite for all marketing courses.
MKTG. 3000-3. Principles of Marketing.
Fall, Spring, Summer. Provides a marketing management approach to the consideration of product planning, pricing, promotion, and distribution of goods and services. Emphasizes the role of the consumer and the social
responsibility of marketing. Prereq: ACCT. 2000 and junior standing.
MKTG. 3100-3. Marketing Research. Fall, Spring. Provides practical experience in research methodologies, planning as investigation, designing a questionnaire, selecting a sample, interpreting results, and making a report. Techniques focus on product analysis, motivation research, cost analysis, and advertising effectiveness. Prereq: MKTG.
3000, QUAN. 2010.
MKTG. 3200-3. Buyer Behavior. Fall, Spring. Focuses on improving the student’s understanding of consumer and organizational buying behavior as a basis for better formulation and implementation of marketing strategy. Blends concepts from the behavioral sciences with empirical evidence and introduces buyer research techniques. Prereq: MKTG. 3000. MKTG. 4000-3. Advertising. Fall, Spring. Analyzes principles and practices in advertising from a managerial viewpoint. Considers the reasons to advertise, product and market analysis as the planning phase of the advertising program, media selection, creation and production of advertisements, copy testing, and development of advertising budgets. Prereq: MKTG. 3000.
MKTG. 4100-3. Physical Distribution Management. Investigation and analysis of logistics of distribution systems for firms engaged in manufacturing and marketing. Component parts of each system are studied and analytical tools are presented for selecting alternatives which will attain distribution goals of the firm. Prereq: MKTG. 3000. MKTG. 4200-3. International Marketing. Spring. Studies managerial marketing policies and practices of firms marketing their products in foreign countries. Analytical survey of institutions, functions, policies, and practices in international marketing. Relates marketing activities to market structure and environment. Prereq: MKTG. 3000.
MKTG. 4400-3. Marketing Institutions and Retailing. Emphasis placed on functions and strategies of all aspects of retail management including site selection, merchandising, pricing and promotion and inventory control. Also includes the examination of wholesaling and broker activities. Prereq: MKTG. 3000.
MKTG. 4500-3. Advertising Management and Public Relations. Focuses on advertising issues from an agency point of view. Considers issues of stimulating primary and selective demand, media selection, developing the advertising program or campaign, establishing budgets, evaluating results, and managing agency relations. Public relations issues incorporated in the campaign include effective publicity techniques, lobbying and stockholder and community relations.
Prereq: MKTG. 4000.
MKTG. 4580-3. International Transportation. (Formerly TRMG. 4580.) Fall. Analysis of international transportation (primarily sea


84 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
and air) in world economy. Detailed study of cargo documentation and freight rate patterns. Included are liability patterns, logistics, economics, and national policies of transportation. Prereq: senior standing. MKTG. 4600-3. Business Marketing. Considers the problems of marketing goods and services to organizations buying for their own use or for incorporation in an end product. Focuses heavily on organizational buying behavior and analysis of demand for goods and services in both profit and not-for-profit organizations. Emphasizes development of marketing programs in the context of organizational demand for goods and services. Prereq: MKTG. 3000.
MKTG. 4700-3. Personal Selling and Sales Management. Introduces the student to principles of personal selling and issues in managing the field sales force. Focuses on models of personal selling, recruiting, selection, training, compensation, supervision and motivation, as well as organizing the field sales force, sales analysis, forecasting, and budgeting. Prereq: MKTG. 3200.
MKTG. 4800-3. Marketing Strategies and Policies. Fall, Spring. Focuses on process of formulating and implementing marketing channels and product analysis. A case approach is utilized to develop the student’s analytical ability to integrate all major areas of marketing. Prereq: MKTG. 3000 and six additional hours in marketing.
MKTG. 4840-variable credit. Independent Study.
MKTG. 4950-3. Special Topics. Courses offered on an irregular basis for the purpose of presenting new subject matter in marketing. Prerequisites will vary depending upon the particular topic and instructor requirements.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES — OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
OPMG. 3000-3. Operations Management.
Fall, Spring, Summer. An introduction to the design and analysis of operating systems in manufacturing, services, and public sector organizations. Topics include facility layout and location, job design, work standards, quality and productivity, inventory planning and control, simulation, waiting line analysis, and linear programming. Prereq: ACCT.
2000, QUAN. 2010. It is important to take this course in the junior year.
OPMG. 4400-3. Planning and Control Systems. Spring. Study of the design, implementation, and control of integrated operations, scheduling, and inventory planning systems. Topics include demand forecasting, aggregate planning, capacity planning, master scheduling, inventory management, material requirements planning, stockless systems, and operations control. Organizations studied include manufacturing, service, and public sector. Prereq: OPMG. 3000.
OPMG. 4440-3. Quality and Productivity.
Spring. Study of the various techniques to measure quality and productivity in organizations and the practical management issues related to implementing quality and productivity systems. Topics include statistical quality control, total factor productivity, quality circles, total quality control, work design and measurement, and quality and productivity management systems. Prereq: OPMG. 3000 and MGMT. 3300.
OPMG. 4470-3. Strategic Analysis in Operations Management. Fall. Study of the analysis and formulation of operations management strategy and policy. Emphasis will be on the role of the operations function in the strategic processes of the organization. Decision making will be stressed through the use of case studies and the analysis of actual business situations Prereq: OPMG. 4400 OPMG. 4600-3. Purchasing, Materials Management and Negotiation. Fall. Study of the purchasing function in manufacturing, service, and public organizations. Topics include source selection, make-buy analysis, material quality standards and specifications, value analysis, negotiations, and legal aspects. Prereq: OPMG. 3000.
OPMG. 4840-variable credit.
Independent Study.
OPMG. 4950-3. Special Topics. A number of different current topics in operations management will be discussed in the course. Consult the Schedule of Classes or contact the area coordinator for further information.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES — QUANTITATIVE METHODS
QUAN. 2010-3. Business Statistics. Fall, Spring, Summer. Statistical applications in business. Includes descriptive statistics, time series analysis, index numbers, probability and sampling distributions, statistical inference, simple regression, and decision analysis without sampling. Prereq: MATH. 1070 and 1080 and ISMG. 2000. Students are encouraged to take QUAN. 2010 in the semester following completion of ISMG.
2000.
QUAN. 3000-3. Intermediate Statistics.
Intermediate treatment of regression and forecasting models in business and research, statistical quality control in manufacturing, sampling and analysis of variance, parametric and nonparametric statistical inferences, decision analysis with sampling. Prereq: QUAN. 2010.
GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS (M.B.A./M.S.)
Associate Dean: Jean-Claude Bosch Program Coordinator: Pete Wolfe
The Graduate School of Business Administration offers programs leading to
the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), and the Master of Science (M.S.) in specific fields of business and health administration. In addition, the Master of Business Administration for Executives (Executive M.B.A.) is offered as a multicampus program of the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the Executive Program in Health Administration (Executive M.S.H.A.) is offered through the Executive Programs.
The M.B.A., the Executive M.B.A., and the M.S. degrees in business are accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). The M.S. in Health Administration is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA).
Requirements for Admission to the M.B.A. and M.S. Programs
Admission to the graduate program in business administration (M.B.A. and M.S.) is granted only to students showing high promise of success in graduate business study. Admission is based on the following indicators of the candidate’s likelihood to succeed in the program.
Academic Record. The bachelor’s degree must be from a regionally accredited university. The total academic record is considered, including the grade-point average, the course of study and the quality of the program.
Testing. The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is required. The GMAT test is given four times each year at numerous centers throughout the world. For information and to make application for the test, write to: Graduate Management Admission Test, Educational Testing Service, CN 6103, Princeton, New Jersey 08541 or phone (609) 771-7330.
The code number for CU-Denver’s graduate business program is 4819.
Work Experience. A record of appropriate employment at increasing levels of responsibility is considered a positive indicator of the likelihood of successful completion of graduate work.
Seniors in this University who have satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements, and who need no more than 6 semester hours overall to meet requirements for a bachelor’s degree, may be admitted to the Graduate School of Business Administration by special permission of the associate dean. They must meet regular admission criteria and submit complete applications by deadlines listed below.
Background Requirements. Students applying for graduate programs in busi-


Master of Business Administration / 85
ness do not need to have taken their undergraduate degrees in business. The M.RA. program is specifically designed so that the required courses cover the material needed for completion of the degree. There are no prerequisites needed to enter the M.RA. program. Students with non-business backgrounds have completed the program successfully. It is expected, however, that students have a minimum level of basic personal computer proficiency as well as a good working knowledge of basic algebra. Should you feel inadequate in either area, please contact the Graduate School of Business Administration for information.
Applicants for the M.S. degree, however, may be required to take prerequisite courses, depending on the individual’s academic and professional background.
For more detailed information contact a graduate student advisor.
THE ADMISSION PROCESS
To be considered for admission, applicants for graduate programs other than Health Administration and Executive Program must:
1. Submit a completed application along with the nonrefundable application fee of $40 ($30 for M.S. applicants) prior to the application deadlines:
April 1 for Summer Term admission.
July 1 for Fall Semester admission.
November 1 for Spring Semester admission.
Early applications are recommended; early applications can receive early priority in registration and class enrollment. Applications received after these dates will not be considered for admission in that term or semester.
2. Have GMAT scores forwarded to the program by the Educational Testing Service. The code for CU-Denver’s graduate business program is 4819.
3. Have two official transcripts (not student copies) sent from each college attended to the address below.
Personal interviews are not required.
The mailing address for applications is:
Graduate Admissions
Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver
P.O. Box 173364, Campus Box 165
Denver, CO 80217-3364
Applicants for the Executive M.RA. and M.S. in Health Administration programs should consult the relevant sections for application information.
Academic Policies for Graduate Students
Advising. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to learn about admissions and program requirements by attending one of the regularly held prospective student orientations. In addition, as soon as possible after admission, students should schedule an appointment with a graduate advisor to discuss general degree requirements. Master of Science students should consult with an advisor to determine any background course work that may be required. All M.S. students need to file a formal degree plan during their first term in residence. All M.RA. students must file a formal degree plan as soon as electives are considered. These plans, with appropriate signatures, will be filed with the Graduate School of Rusiness Administration.
Course Load. The normal course load for full-time graduate students is 9-15 semester hours. However, because many students also are pursuing a career, it is possible to attend classes on a part-time basis at times convenient to the individual’s work schedule. Graduate courses are offered primarily in the evening hours to accommodate the working student.
Transfer of Credit. Upon approval of the Graduate Appeals Committee, a maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate work may be transferred from another AACSR-accredited master’s program.
Time Limit. M.B.A. students must complete the curriculum within five years from the date of first enrollment in the program. Courses older than 5 years generally will not be accepted for the degree unless they have been validated by the specific department. M.S. students must finish courses beyond those in the common body of knowledge list within 5 years with reasonable continuity.
Students who have not been enrolled for three consecutive semesters must reapply for admission to the program. Readmitted students are required to complete degree requirements in effect at the date of their readmission.
Graduation. Students must file an application for Admission to Candidacy and a Diploma Card with the Graduate School of Business Administration no later than September 1 for December graduation, January 1 for May graduation, and June 1 for August graduation.
Minimum Grade-Point Average. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 must be achieved and maintained in courses taken for a graduate business degree. All courses taken to meet the
degree requirements, except transfer hours, are included in the grade-point average. If the student’s cumulative grade-point average falls below 3.0, the student will be placed on academic probation and normally given one year of attendance in which to achieve the required 3.0 cumulative average. Failure to achieve the required average within the allotted time period will result in suspension.
Any grade below a C- (1.7) is a failing grade for graduate students. Graduate students must repeat a course for which they have received a grade below a C-. Both the original grade and the grade for the repeated course count in the computation of the grade-point average.
To earn a grade of W (withdrawal without credit) in a course, a student must be earning a grade of C or better in the course. Students will not be permitted to withdraw from courses after the tenth week of the semester without the approval of the associate dean.
Admission to Graduate Business Courses
Admission to graduate level courses is reserved for students admitted to the graduate programs in business. Graduate students from other University of Colorado schools or colleges may be permitted to attend only with written permission of the associate dean and on a space available basis.
6000-level courses are reserved exclusively for graduate students. 5000-level courses may be offered simultaneously with 6000-level courses. Students should check with an advisor to confirm acceptability of 5000-level courses prior to registering.
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (M.B.A.)
The Master of Business Administration (M.RA.) program provides a general background in management and administration. This background enables the student to have the breadth of exposure and depth of knowledge required for an advanced level management career. The program is devoted to developing the concepts, analytical tools, and communications skills required for competent and responsible administration of an enterprise viewed in its entirety, within its social, political, and economic environment.
The M.RA. program is available in three different configurations: the INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. program, the COHORT M.RA. program, and the EXECUTIVE


86 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
M.B.A. program (see following section).
The INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. and the COHORT M.B.A. both have the same curriculum requirements; they differ only in the flexibility of course scheduling and the time required to complete the program.
The INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. allows the scheduling of classes with maximum flexibility so students can progress through the program at their own pace by taking as little as one class per semester, or as many as five classes per semester, at times that are convenient to their work schedule. The program can be completed in as little as 16 months, or as long as 5 years.
The COHORT M.B.A. enables the student to complete the program in 3 years and one semester, taking 2 courses fall and spring semester and one in the summer term. Each group of entering students moves through the core courses as a cohort, taking prescribed core courses two nights per week, thus sharing their educational and professional experience. Electives are taken as available to meet individual objectives. For working professionals who can meet the time requirements of the COHORT program, it provides a unique and rewarding educational experience.
Candidates in both the individualized and the COHORT M.B.A. programs must complete specific requirements consisting of 16 courses (48 semester hours) as follows:
Core Requirements Semester Hours BUSN. 6000. Accounting for Managers . . 3 BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis............................3
BUSN. 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations.......................3
BUSN. 6060. Marketing Management ... 3 BUSN. 6080. Management of Operations 3 BUSN. 6100. Management Information
Systems.............................3
BUSN. 6120. Managerial Economics .... 3 BUSN. 6140. Financial Management .... 3 BUSN. 6160. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business.............3
BUSN. 6180. Economic Environment
of Business.........................3
BUSN. 6200. Business Policy and
Strategic Management..............._3
Total Required Core Semester Hours . 33
Electives:
One graduate course from each of three of the five following areas:
Accounting, Finance, Information Systems/Operations Management,
Marketing, or Management...............9
Free electives............................6
Total Elective Semester Hours............15
Total Required Semester Hours ........48
for M.B.A. degree
Notes and Restrictions
Core. Depending on demonstration of a strong background in one area, a maximum of one course may be waived in the core, although the 48 hour requirement is not reduced. An additional elective will then be substituted.
Electives. No more than nine hours of elective graduate courses may be taken for credit in any one discipline or area of emphasis. Students may elect not to take any emphasis. Three hours maximum may be taken outside the Graduate School of Business Administration, but only with prior written approval of the associate dean.
Subject to the above distribution requirements, students have a wide range of options available in selecting the 15 hours of electives. No area of emphasis is required for the M.B.A. degree, permitting students to choose a combination of courses appropriate for their individual career needs. If a student wishes to pursue an area of emphasis, several are available including accounting, finance, information systems/operations management, management, and marketing. Areas of emphasis all require 9 semester hours of electives (5000 or 6000 level) in addition to the area core courses. No thesis or comprehensive exam is required for the M.B.A. program.
For additional information about the M.B.A. program contact a graduate student advisor at 628-1271.
MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAMS
Master of Science degrees (M.S.) are offered in the fields of accounting, finance, health administration, marketing, management, and management science (information systems emphasis).
The M.S. degree affords the opportunity for specialization and depth of training within a particular major field and, where allowed or required, a minor field. The specialization and expertise developed with the M.S. program prepares the student for more specialized staff positions in industry, the non-profit sector, and government.
The course requirements for the M.S. degree in each of the fields are divided into two components — common background and graduate core requirements. The common background requires at least 21 semester hours of business courses to develop general breadth and competence in the fields of business administration. These requirements may differ among
degree programs. The common background requirements may be satisfied by equivalent graduate level work, or through undergraduate course work as approved by the advisor. Generally, an undergraduate degree in business administration from an AACSB accredited university will meet most of those requirements. The graduate core requires at least 30 semester hours of graduate level courses as prescribed by the different major programs. Of the 30 hours, a minimum of 18 hours must be at the 6000 level.
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING
Advisors: Stephen R Allen, Ben-Hsien
Bao, Michael Firth
Telephone: 628-1244, 628-1249, 628-1220
The Master of Science in Accounting is a flexible program that provides the student with a thorough understanding of both financial and managerial accounting. The combination of required and elective courses allows the student to design a course of study with the advisor’s approval, leading to a successful career in either public accounting, governmental or non-profit accounting, or management accounting.
The M.S. in accounting requires the completion of components A, B, and C as shown below:
A. Common Background Course Work
Courses Required Semester Hours
ACCT. 2000. Financial Accounting...3
BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis.........................3
BUSN. 6060. Marketing Management ... 3 BUSN. 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations....................
BUSN. 6140. Financial Management .... BUSN. 6120. Managerial Economics .... BLAW. 3000. Business Law...........^
Total Semester Hours............21
It may be possible to satisfy some of these requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work with the approval of the advisor.
It is recommended that students should have a minimal competency in mathematics and computer software applications. Possible courses at CU-Denver are 1SMG. 2000, CSC. 1100, CSC. 1410, and MATH. 1070, 1080. The required courses in Parts B and C (below) will also help meet these objectives. Self-study or review (workshops) also may be used to attain minimal competency levels.
CO CO CO CO


Graduate Programs / 87
B. Accounting Courses Background
Courses Required Semester Hours
ACCT. 3220 and 3230. Intermediate
Financial Accounting, I and II .....6
ACCT. 3310 and 3320. Managerial and
Intermediate Cost Accounting........6
ACCT. 4410 and 4420. Income Tax and Advanced Income Tax Accounting .... 6
C. Graduate Core in Accounting
Courses Required Semester Hours
ACCT. 6250. Seminar: Accounting
Theory...............................3
ACCT. 6260. Seminar: Managerial
Accounting...........................3
ACCT. “core." Any 2 advanced accounting courses (numbered higher than
ACCT. 6260)..........................6
BUSN. 6100. Management Information
Systems..............................3
Sub total..............................15
Electives. (5) Five elective courses may
be selected........................_15
Total Graduate Core Semester Hours 30
Certain graduate courses in accounting are offered only once a year. Consult a current Schedule of Classes for information about current course offerings. Note that ACCT. 5540 and 6250 are usually offered in the fall and other advanced courses are usually offered in the spring.
Comprehensive Examinations. No comprehensive examinations are required in the major field of accounting.
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN FINANCE
Advisor: E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr. Telephone: 628-1218
The M.S. degree in Finance provides the student with the necessary specialized expertise in the field to meet the need of businesses for staff specialists, and to prepare the student for further graduate work in the field of finance.
The M.S. program in finance consists of two components — the common background and the graduate core required courses.
A. Common Background Course Work
Courses Required Semester Hours
BUSN. 6000. Accounting for Managers . . 3
BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis............................3
BUSN. 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations.......................3
BUSN. 6060. Marketing Management ... 3 BUSN. 6120. Managerial Economics .... 3
BUSN. 6160. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business.............3
BUSN. 6180. Economic Environment of
Business...........................33
Total Semester Hours Required......21
It may be possible to satisfy some of the common background requirements by other graduate or undergraduate course work, with the approval of an advisor.
B. Graduate Core in Finance
The M.S. finance core will consist of 30 semester hours (10 courses) beyond the common background requirements. At least six of these courses must be at the 6000 level or higher. A minimum of 21 semester hours (7 courses) must be chosen from regularly scheduled graduate finance courses (excluding independent study); the remaining 9 semester hours (3 courses) may be in finance or in related fields, as approved by the student’s M.S. advisor in finance. A student can elect to include a minor field with at least 9 semester hours approved by a minor field advisor, but a minor is not required.
The 21 hour finance requirement is met by the following requirements and options:
1. Required Courses
BUSN. 6140. Financial Management FNCE. 6310. Decisions and Policies in
Financial Management FNCE. 6330. Investment Management
Analysis
FNCE. 6390. Advanced Finance Seminar
2. Choose at least 3 courses in finance from the list of regularly scheduled graduate classes in this catalog in consultation with the graduate advisor.
Notes and Restrictions
BUSN. 6140 can be waived if a student has taken at least 9 semester hours of upper division undergraduate finance courses within the last 5 years from an AACSB accredited university. However, the student must still take at least 21 hours in finance at the graduate level.
The 9 semester hours (3 course) requirement, beyond the minimum 21 hours (7 courses) of finance courses, can include courses related to the finance major as approved by the M.S. advisor. Areas of study that normally would enhance the study of finance would include economics, mathematics, statistics, accounting, information systems, and computer science. Other fields also could be approved based on the student’s needs and objectives.
No comprehensive examination in finance is required.
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
Advisor: Richard W. Foster Telephone: 628-1286
The goal of the Master of Science in Health Administration (M.S.H.A.) degree is to prepare men and women who, after appropriate practical experience in responsible managerial positions, are capable of assuming positions as chief executive officers or senior administrators in complex, multi-service health care organizations or in organizations’ purchasing and health services.
The curriculum is a synthesis of management concepts and techniques that are applicable to any economic organization and tools that can be specifically applied to health and health services systems. The program emphasizes skills which heighten basic analytic and decision-making processes used by top level managers in selecting broad strategies for the institutions and by junior managers in administering sub-units of health care organizations. The faculty guide the students in their mastery of theoretical, conceptual, and quantitative topics.
The M.S.H.A. program has enjoyed continuous accreditation by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA) since 1970.
The typical course of study is 57 semester hours of graduate level course work for students entering without an undergraduate degree in business from an AACSB accredited program. The curriculum is based on a series of structured learning sequences with M.B.A. courses comprising the majority of the first full year, supplemented by several core health administration courses. It may be possible to satisfy some of the common background requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work. Students should discuss their options with an advisor.
The second academic year provides the student with advanced training in health administration. Within the 57 semester hours, the student must choose 9 semester hours of elective courses.
Semester
Required Business Core Courses Hours
BUSN. 6000. Accounting for Managers . . 3 BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis...........................3


88 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
BUSN. 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations.........................3
BUSN. 6060. Marketing Management ... 3 BUSN. 6080. Management of Operations 3 BUSN. 6100. Management Information
Systems...............................3
BUSN. 6120. Managerial Economics .... 3 BUSN. 6140. Financial Management .... 3 BUSN. 6200. Business Policy and Strategic Management....................3
Required M.S.H.A. Core Courses HLTH. 6010. Medical Care Organization . 3
HLTH. 6020. Health Economics............3
HLTH. 6026. Institutional Management. . 3
HLTH. 6030. Health Sciences ............3
HLTH. 6040. Management Accounting for
Health Care Organizations.............3
HLTH. 6050. Legal and Ethical Problems
in Health Care Administration........3
Electives
HLTH. Electives.......................6
Free Electives......................._6
Total Semester Hours 57
Electives. Elective courses are available in the fields of accounting, finance, marketing, management, organizational development, health policy and planning. In addition, elective courses are available that focus on practice settings such as hospital administration, ambulatory care administration, or long-term care administration.
Management Residency. A management residency is optional, but recommended for ail students, especially those with limited health care experience. The faculty of the program provide assistance to students in securing the residency, as well as regular consultation during the residency period. Information on the full range of local, regional, and national residencies is available in the program office.
Length of Program. The didactic portion of the degree will take at least two academic years since H.A. courses are offered only once each year and many require prerequisites. Part-time study is facilitated by courses being scheduled for late afternoon or evening hours.
Admissions Process
Requirements for Admission. Selection of students is a multi-step process. When making application to the program for the M.S.H.A., candidates should send their applications to:
Graduate Admissions Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver P.O. Box 173364, Campus Box 165 Denver, CO 80127-3364
Credentials or Requirements
1. Completed Application for Graduate Admission Parts I and II.
2. Four letters of recommendation from professional or academic acquaintances who are familiar with the applicant’s aca-demic/professional competence.
3. Satisfactory test score—Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is required. When registering for the GMAT use the code for the University of Colorado at Denver MBA program.
4. $30 application fee.
5. Two (2) official transcripts sent directly from each college or university attended. A minimum baccalaureate degree is required.
6. A well formulated career plan articulated in a brief essay, and summarizing the applicant’s reason(s) for seeking the degree.
7. Experience in the field of health services administration (preferred but not absolutely necessary).
Admission to the M.S.H.A. degree program is on a competitive basis. Therefore, these admission criteria represent minimum entrance qualifications expected of all students.
Deadlines. All credentials should be submitted at the latest by July 1 for Fall Semester, November 1 for Spring Semester, and April 1 for Summer Term. Applications will be reviewed in the order they are received. Early application increases the probability of acceptance.
For further information, brochures, and application materials contact the Graduate Program in Health Administration, Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Colorado at Denver, (303) 628-1271.
Health Administration Scholarships/Loans
Financial assistance is available for new and continuing students directly from the Graduate Program in Health Administration. Each year the following scholar-ships/loans may be awarded:
Eugenie Sontag Award
Kaiser-Permanente Scholarship/ Residency
Healthcare Financial Management Assn. Continuing Student Scholarship
Foster G. McGaw Scholarship Loan Fund
Foster G. McGaw Scholarship
Federation of American Hospitals’ Foundation
Colorado Health Administration alumni Association Scholarship Fund
U.S. Dept, of Health and Human Services Traineeships
In addition, students are eligible to apply for financial aid directly from the University of Colorado Financial Aid Office. Call 556-2886.
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT SCIENCE (INFORMATION SYSTEMS EMPHASIS)
Advisor: Gary A. Kochenberger Telephone: 628-1212
The Master of Science degree in management science (information systems emphasis) prepares students for management roles in the information systems field and for such careers as systems analysts, software engineers, data base administrators, and data processing managers. The curriculum emphasizes the application of computer technology within the business context.
The M.S. degree requires the student to complete the common background courses and the graduate core described below.
A. Common Background Course Work
Courses Required Semester Hours
BUSN. 6000. Accounting for Managers . . 3 BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis...........................3
BUSN. 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations......................
BUSN. 6060. Marketing Management .. . BUSN. 6120. Managerial Economics .... BUSN. 6140. Financial Management .... BUSN. 6160. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business..........._3
Total Semester Hours..............21
All students admitted to the M.S. in management science (information systems emphasis) should possess computer literacy at least equivalent to that attained by taking ISMG. 2200, CSC. 1100, or CSC.
1410.
It may be possible to satisfy some of the common background requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work, with the approval of the advisor.
B. Graduate Core in Management Science and Information Systems
Thirty semester hours of approved graduate work are required. Each student’s plan of study is developed by the student and the faculty advisor, considering the student’s interests and background. The 30 semester hours may be taken entirely in information systems and
CO CO CO CO


Graduate Programs / 89
closely related areas or may be divided between information systems and closely related areas or may be divided between information systems (21 hours) and a minor field (9 hours). At least 7 courses (21 hours) must be taken in information systems. Courses available for the major include:
BUSN. 6100 Management Information Systems
ISMG. 6020. Business Programming and Data Structures ISMG. 6060. Systems Analysis ISMG. 6080. Data Base Management
Systems
ISMG. 6100. Computer Technology ISMG. 6120. Data Communication ISMG. 6140. Systems Design ISMG. 6160. Decision Support Systems/
Expert Systems
ISMG. 6180. Information Systems Policy ISMG. 6800. Special Topics ISMG. 6840. Independent Study ISMG. 6950. Master’s Thesis
All of the above courses are 3 semester hours except ISMG. 6840, which is variable credit. A required course may be waived based on a faculty advisor’s signature, but must be replaced with an information systems course. Minor fields may be chosen from a variety of business and nonbusiness areas, in consultation with the student’s advisor. A maximum off 6 semester hours of approved graduate work at other institutions may be included in the 30 semester hours. For business-related courses, the program must be accredited by the AACSB. Candidates for the M.S. degree are not required to take a comprehensive examination or complete a thesis in the major field.
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION
Advisor: W. Graham Astley Telephone: 628-1237
The objective of the Master of Science in Management and Organization program is to prepare individuals with prior work experience for significant managerial responsibilities in private and public sector organizations. The program provides students with a basic understanding of how to manage interpersonal dynamics, effectively design organizations, implement planned change, and develop and maintain the human resources necessary for effective performance. It also pro-
vides students with the opportunity to learn about specific managerial problems and issues, such as how to turn around poorly performing organizations, implement new technologies, etc. The degree is particularly appropriate for students having an undergraduate degree in a functional area of business, such as accounting, finance, information systems, or in a technical area, such as engineering or computer science.
The Master of Science in Management and Organization consists of two components: the common background and the specialized courses that constitute the graduate core.
A. Common Background Course Work
Students in the M.S. in management and organization program can satisfy the common background requirements by taking the following courses:
Semester Hours BUSN. 6000. Accounting for Managers . . 3
BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis.............................3
BUSN. 6060. Marketing Management ... 3 BUSN. 6100. Management Information
Systems..............................3
BUSN. 6120. Managerial Economics .... 3 BUSN. 6140. Financial Management .... 3 BUSN. 6160. Legal and Ethical
Environment in Business............._3
Total Semester Hours..................21
It may be possible to satisfy some of the common background requirements by other graduate or undergraduate course work, with the approval of the advisor.
B. Graduate Core in Management and Organization
The core will consist of 30 semester hours (10 courses) beyond the common background requirements.
At least 7 of the courses must be 6000-level courses. A minimum of 21 semester hours must be chosen from regularly scheduled management courses (excluding independent study).
The remaining 9 semester hours (3 courses) may be in management and organization or in related fields, as approved by the student’s M.S. advisor in management and organization. A student can elect to include a single minor field with at least 9 semester hours approved by a minor field advisor, but a minor is not required.
The 21-hour requirement is met by the following requirements and options:
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN. 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations........................3
MGMT. 6320. Organizational
Development .........................3
MGMT. 6360. Designing Effective
Organizations........................3
MGMT. 6810. Human Resources
Management...........................3
MGMT. 6800. Special Topics ............9
C. Management and Organization Electives
Choose at least 9 hours of course work from the selections offered under the course designation MGMT. 6800, Special Topics in Management. Usually, two MGMT. 6800 sections will be offered each semester. Consult with the advisor for the year’s special topics offerings.
Students can substitute a 6000-level management course for BUSN. 6040 if they have taken an equivalent upper division organizational behavior course within the last five years from an AACSB accredited university. In that case, students must complete 21 hours of management courses.
The 9 hour minor, if a student should choose to complete a minor, may be taken in another functional area of business, such as marketing, finance, management science and information systems or in another related discipline, such as psychology, sociology, or public administration. Other fields or combinations of courses can be approved based on a student’s needs and career objectives.
Students are not required to take a comprehensive examination or complete a thesis in the major field.
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MARKETING
Advisor: Susan M. Keaveney Telephone: 628-1221
The objective of the Master of Science in Marketing is to prepare individuals with prior work experience for significant management responsibilities in the field of marketing, either in the private or the public sector. The degree is particularly appropriate for individuals who have an undergraduate degree in business.
The degree consists of two components: the common body of knowledge and the specialized courses that constitute the core of the M.S. in marketing.


90 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
A. Common Body of Knowledge
Students in the program must satisfy the AACSB Common Body of Knowledge requirements. These are met by the following courses:
Courses Required Semester Hours
BUSN. 6000. Accounting for Managers . . 3 BUSN. 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis.............................3
BUSN. 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations........................3
BUSN. 6100. Management Information
Systems..............................3
BUSN. 6140. Financial Management .... 3 BUSN. 6160. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business..............3
BUSN. 6180. The Economic
Environment of Business.............U3
Total Semester Hours 21
It may be possible to satisfy some of these requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work. Contact a graduate student advisor for information.
B. Graduate Core in Marketing
The M.S. in Marketing requires 30 semester hours beyond the Common Body of Knowledge. Twenty-one (21) semester hours must be in marketing at the 6000 level. The remaining 9 semester hours may be in marketing or in related fields as approved by the student’s advisor. A student may elect to take these 9 semester hours in a single minor field. However, a minor is not required. (Note: a minimum of 18 of the required 30 semester hours must be taken in courses reserved exclusively for graduate students.)
The 21 semester hour marketing requirement is met by the following requirements and electives:
Required Courses—9 hours BUSN. 6060. Marketing Management MKTG. 6010. Marketing Strategy, Evaluation, and Development MKTG. 6050. Marketing Research
Marketing Electives—12 hours MKTG. 6020. International Marketing MKTG. 6030. Sales and Sales Force Management
MKTG. 6040. Services Marketing MKTG. 6060. Buyer Behavior MKTG. 6070. Advertising and Promotion Management
MKTG. 6080. Marketing Function, Organization and Strategy in Deregulating Industries MKTG. 6090. Transportation and Physical Distribution Systems in the Modern Economy
PSY. 6710. Quantitative Methods II MKTG. 6800. Special Topics in Marketing
The 9 hour minor, should a student choose to complete one, may be taken in another functional area of business such as finance or management science and information systems. Alternatively, it may be taken in a related discipline such as international affairs, economics, social psychology, or public administration. Other fields or combinations of courses can be approved, based on the student’s needs and career objectives.
Students are not required to take a comprehensive examination or to complete a thesis.
‘Other courses may be required for students who have taken similar courses as undergraduates.
EXECUTIVE PROGRAMS
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION FOR EXECUTIVES
Administrative Director: W. Scott
Gutherie
Telephone: (303) 623-1888 or
(800) 228-5778
The Executive M.B.A. Program provides executive-level students with a broad, rigorous two-year academic experience leading to the Master of Business Administration degree. The program is designed for persons who hold managerial positions in the private and public sectors. It builds upon the knowledge and experience of these executives with a sophisticated, challenging curriculum which can be pursued simultaneously with a management career.
The Executive M.B.A. Program emphasizes corporate planning; the organization in a complex, international environment; and the applied tools of management. Courses are taught through a variety of methods. Case studies, lectures, and computer simulation are combined with research projects and other teaching methods to provide students with tools useful in their present positions and applicable to more advanced responsibilities as they progress in their management careers.
The Executive Program comprises four semesters over twenty-two months. It begins the last week of August and runs through mid-June for two years. Classes meet for a full day, once a week, on alternating Fridays and Saturdays, making it possible for those who live outside the Denver area to participate.
Two courses are taken simultaneously throughout the program. The program is supplemented by an intensive seminar orientation at the beginning, and a two-day seminar at the conclusion of the first academic year. A second-year seminar is held at an international business center.
Faculty and Resources
The faculty are senior members of regular faculty of the Graduate School of Business Administration from all three of the University’s campuses. The Executive M.B.A. Program is offered jointly by the Graduate Schools of Business Administration in Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Denver. They are selected to conduct these courses because their backgrounds enable them to make the strongest contribution to the program. These faculty members are nationally recognized, and all possess both practical managerial experience and a demonstrated ability to work effectively with executive level students.
Admission Requirements
The Executive M.B.A. Program is designed for men and women who have ten years of business or administrative experience, including at least three years in a managerial position. They should be part of senior management in a small organization or senior or middle management in a larger one, hold at least a baccalaureate degree, and have the ability to do graduate work.
In the selection process, significant attention will be given to the depth and breadth of the candidate’s managerial experience, progression in job responsibility, total work experience, and ability to benefit from this integrative class-room/work environment. The Admissions Committee will base its decision on the application, former academic record, relevant test scores, the employer’s nominating letter, other letters of recommendation, and if deemed desirable, personal interviews with the committee.
For Application and Additional Information:
Executive M.B.A. Program Graduate School of Business Administration University of Colorado P.O. Box 480006 Denver, CO 80248-0006.


Graduate Courses / 91
EXECUTIVE PROGRAM IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
Administrative Director: Dennis M. Becker
Telephone: (303) 623-1888 or (800) 228-5778
Program Sponsors
The Executive Program in Health Administration is a cooperative program of the University of Colorado at Denver and the Western Network for Education in Health Administration.
The University of Colorado at Denver serves as the degree-granting institution for the Executive Program. The University of Colorado’s Graduate Program in Health Administration is located in the Graduate School of Business Administration.
The Western Network for Education in Health Administration is a regional educational consortium representing health care executives and academic faculty from major health administration graduate programs in the western United States, including the University of California at Berkeley, University of California at Los Angeles, University of Southern California, San Diego State University, University of Washington, Arizona State University, and University of British Columbia.
Distinctive Features of the Executive Program in Health Administration
1. Drawing on the expertise represented by the faculties of a consortium of western universities, the program offers the highest quality course content and instructors that typically are not available from a single university.
2. The Executive Program facilitates learning for professionals who have continuing career and family responsibilities. The program is especially tailored for working individuals, allowing students to remain on their jobs while completing their educational program.
3. The program employs innovation in the technology of educational delivery. Learning methods include:
• Computer-assisted instruction and self-paced learning packages.
• Computer conferencing and electronic case analyses.
• On-campus sessions.
For Application and Additional Information:
Executive Program in Health Administration Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver P.O. Box 480006 Denver, CO 80248-0006
DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS M.S.H.A./M.B.A.
Students may obtain the M.BA. degree as well as the M.S.H.A. by completing a 66 credit hour program. In addition to the courses required for the M.S.H.A., students also must complete the following:
Additional Business Core Courses BUSN. 6160. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business............3
BUSN. 6180. Economic Environment of Business..........................3
The dual degree program also requires an additional 3 credit hours of electives and places additional restrictions on how electives may be taken.
Electives
One graduate course from each of three of the five following areas: Accounting, Finance, Management Science and Information Systems, Operations Management,
or Marketing............................9
HLTH. Elective..........................3
M.B.A./B.A.
This program enables qualified students to earn a bachelor’s degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS), and a Master of Business Administration from the Graduate School of Business Administration in five years. The program combines undergraduate general education with the graduate business curriculum.
Bachelor’s candidates may major in any CLAS field (English, political science, biology, or fine arts are examples), and they must fulfill all the requirements for graduation from CLAS. During the senior year, the student begins taking graduate level courses in the M.BA. program; these courses count as electives in the bachelor’s program.
For further information about this program and the admission requirements, contact the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Advising Office, 270-5592.
M.B.A./M.S.—Nursing Administration
The goal of the dual degree program (M.B.A./M.S— Nursing Administration) is to prepare nurses who are capable of assuming senior level and CEO health administration positions in government, consulting, traditional health care organizations, and alternative delivery systems. The 66 credit curriculum is a synthesis of advanced management, health administration, and nursing content.
For information contact the program director in nursing administration, 394-8136.
M.B.A./M.S.
The Graduate School of Business Administration also offers M.B.A./M.S. dual degree programs for each function of business. Each program consists of a minimum of 66 semester hours of graduate work and leads to both an M.BA. degree and an M.S. degree. Contact a graduate advisor for details.
M.B.A./M. A.—Psychology
Students may enroll in a dual degree program to earn both the M.BA. from the Graduate School of Business Administration and the Master of Arts in Psychology from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This program requires the completion of 67 credit hours. Contact a graduate advisor for details.
GRADUATE COURSES
M.B.A. Core or M.S. Common Background Courses
The following graduate courses are open only to admitted graduate degree students.


92 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
BUSINESS
BUSN. 6000-3. Accounting for Managers
Fall, Spring, Summer This course focuses on the use of accounting information in managerial decision-making. Primary emphasis for the first half of the course will be on interpretation of financial statements, understanding accounting conventions and principles underlying the preparation of the statements, and current controversies regarding generally accepted accounting principles. The remainder of the course will stress managerial uses of accounting techniques such as budgeting, cost, volume, profit models, and performance measurement. BUSN. 6020-3. Quantitative Business Analysis. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course will provide the student with basic quantitative analysis tools and techniques necessary for the analysis of business related problems. Topics covered include statistics, probability, sampling, regressing, inference testing, and additional topics such as correlation, contingency tables, non-parametric techniques, and time series analysis.
BUSN. 6040-3. Human Behavior in Organizations. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course focuses on applications of behavioral science concepts to the management of organizations. This course emphasizes analysis and understanding of human behavior in organizations, and using the results of such analyses to select appropriate strategies for managing. The course includes topics such as motivation, leadership, power and conflict, group dynamics, technology, organizational design, and other factors affecting human performance. Special emphasis is placed on concepts used by managers in all functional areas of organization, such as accounting, production, finance, marketing, and engineering.
BUSN. 6060-3. Marketing Management.
Fall, Spring, Summer. The course has two major objectives for the students: (1) understanding basic marketing concepts involving buyer behavior, product planning, pricing, channels for distribution and promotion, and (2) developing marketing decision-making capabilities based on strategic management and analytical skills. The overall objective is to integrate all the functional aspects of marketing with other functional areas of the firm and with the environment, particularly consumption markets, competition, the economy, legal and regulatory environment, and social evolution. Prereq: BUSN. 6000.
BUSN. 6080-3. Management of Operations. Fall, Spring, Summer This course will study the tools and techniques of the management of the operations functions in business organizations. Topics covered will include resource management, linear programming, decision trees, scheduling and control systems, quality assurance techniques, productivity measurement, simulation, and the international elements of the operations function. Significant attention will
be devoted to study of the application of these tools to service and institutional organizations. Prereq: BUSN. 6020.
BUSN. 6100-3. Management Information Systems. Fall, Spring, Summer This course provides an introduction to information systems from a managerial perspective. Topics include basic computer concepts such as hardware, software, data file design, structured computer languages, systems analysis and design, and decision support systems. Managerial, organizational and decisionmaking implications are stressed.
BUSN. 6120-3. Managerial Economics. Fall, Spring, Summer This course has two objectives. A primary objective is to expose the student to the usefulness of microeconomic theory at the firm level. Through economic analysis, output demand and cost characteristics can be evaluated thereby allowing for production and marketing decisions consistent with overall firm goals. An additional focus is the operation of competitive economic markets and the effects of such competition on the firm. Topics include cost and price theory and estimation, forecasting, production theory, and pricing practices. The course is also designed to aid students’ understanding of the business manager’s role in light of organizational and societal objectives. Prereq: BUSN. 6000 and 6020.
BUSN. 6140-3. Financial Management.
Fall, Spring, Summer The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the tools and techniques for making a firm’s investment and financing decisions. These tools and techniques include the mathematics of interest, risk analysis, financial theory of valuation, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and financial analysis. The emphasis is on developing an analytic framework for financial decision making. The class utilizes current literature, text, and cases. Prereq: BUSN. 6000, 6020, and 6120.
BUSN. 6160-3. Legal and Ethical Environment of Business. Fall, Spring, Summer This course focuses on public, administrative, and regulatory law; and on the relation of business to the legal structure and ethical value systems which determine the parameters of business decisions. Topics include litigation, domestic and multinational trade regulation, the allocation of liability for products and environmental injuries, consumer and employee protection, regulation of capital markets, and business torts.
BUSN. 6180-3. Economic Environment of Business. Fall, Spring, Summer The objective of this course is to provide the student with an understanding of how economic policy affects and is affected by the national and international economic environment of business. As such, it focuses on the interaction of business and government as it relates to broader societal objectives. Measures of aggregate economic activity are introduced as a basis for discussion of monetary and fiscal policy. Concerns over economic growth,
employment, prices, and interest rates are seen as motivations for stabilization and industrial policy. Market power, economic externalities, and other market failures are studied as motivations for antitrust policy and regulation of industry entry conditions, product pricing, and production methods. Prereq: BUSN. 6120.
BUSN. 6200-3. Business Policies and Strategic Management. Fall, Spring, Summer. The goal of this course is to develop a general management perspective on issues of management of the total enterprise. An important objective is the integration of knowledge acquired across functional area courses. Objectives of the course include the introduction of strategic concepts, analytical tools, and methodology. The primary focus is to provide the student with both strategy formulation and implementation skills. Prereq: BUSN. 6000, 6020, 6040, 6060, 6080, 6100, 6120, 6140, 6160, and 6180.
M.B.A. Electives/M.S. Courses
ACCOUNTING
ACCT. 5240-3. Advanced Financial Accounting. Fall, Spring, Summer Advanced financial accounting concepts and practice with emphasis on accounting for partnerships, business combinations, and consolidations. Prereq: ACCT. 3220 or 6030. ACCT. 5330-3. Advanced Managerial Accounting. Critical analysis of advanced topics in managerial accounting. Prereq: ACCT. 3320 or 6070 or equivalent.
ACCT. 5540-3. Accounting Systems and Data Processing. Fall The design and analysis of accounting information systems, automated data processing methods with special emphasis on computers and computer programming, and the role of accounting on the management process. Prereq: ACCT.
3320 or 6070.
ACCT. 5620-3. Auditing. Fall, Spring, Summer Generally accepted auditing techniques and the philosophy supporting them; auditing techniques available to the independent public accountant. Pertinent publications of the AICPA reviewed. Prereq: ACCT. 3230 or 6030.
ACCT. 5800-3. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations. Spring Planning and control of government and non-profit organizations. Includes program budgets, responsibility accounting, and fund accounting. Prereq: ACCT. 2020 or 3310 or BUSN. 6000.
ACCT. 6030-3. Financial Accounting Issues and Cases. Accelerated analysis of contemporary accounting issues and problems, the development of accounting thought and principles, and critical review of generally accepted accounting principles. Not recommended for candidates planning to sit for the CPA examination. Prereq: ACCT.
2000 or BUSN. 6000.


Graduate Courses / 93
ACCT. 6070-3. Management Accounting.
Fall, Spring This course is designed to provide M.RA. students with a foundation in management accounting models and information, with emphasis on management decision-making uses of accounting information. Not recommended for candidates planning to sit for the CPA examination. Prereq: BUSN. 6000 or equivalent. Students who have taken ACCT. 3310 or 3320 or their equivalents may not take this course.
ACCT. 6140-3. Tax Planning for Managers. Spring A federal tax survey course with an emphasis on tax planning for the M.B.A. student who wants to understand the impact of taxation on individual and business transactions. Course materials emphasize the application of individual, partnership, and corporate tax principles to the decisionmaking process. Students who have taken ACCT. 4410 may not take this course. Prereq: BUSN. 6000.
ACCT. 6250-3. Seminar: Accounting Theory. Fall Nature and origin of accounting theory and the development of postulates, principles, and practices. Methodology appropriate to development and evaluation of accounting theory, with special emphasis on accepted research standards and procedures. Prereq: ACCT. 3230 or 6030.
ACCT. 6260-3. Seminar: Managerial Accounting. Spring This course focuses upon the conceptual foundations of managerial accounting. Behavioral and quantitative approaches regarding information for decision-making, planning, control, performance evaluation, and other issues will be investigated. Prereq: ACCT. 3320 or 6070 or equivalent.
ACCT. 6270-3. Seminar: Income Determination. Critical analysis of problems and theory of measurement and reporting of periodic net income of business organizations. Net income models, research efforts, and role of professional accounting organizations. Current issues and problems given special attention. Prereq: ACCT. 6250.
ACCT. 6290-3. Management Control Systems. This course focuses on the design and use of control systems which ensure that people in organizations behave consistent with the goals of the organization. Controls for communication, motivation, and performance evaluation - along with informational requirements - will be stressed through analysis of cases and classroom discussion. Prereq: BUSN. 6000 or equivalent.
ACCT. 6350-3. Current Issues in Professional Accounting. In-depth analysis of current issues in the accounting profession, including ethics development, and validity of standards and regulations. Prereq: ACCT. 3230 and 4620 (or 5620) or consent of instructor.
ACCT. 6410-3. Advanced Tax for Individuals. Spring An advanced federal individual income tax course stressing the
methodology used in tax research and in tax planning. Includes use of specialized tax software to address compliance with planning issues by solving complex case type real life situations. Prereq: ACCT. 4410.
ACCT. 6420-3. Advanced Tax for Businesses. An advanced federal tax course stressing research and tax planning issues of corporate and partnership entities. Includes use of specialized tax software to address compliance and planning issues by solving complex case type real life situations. Prereq: ACCT. 4420.
ACCT. 6450-3. Research Problems in Income Tax Accounting. A study of the methodology used in tax research and in tax planning, together with a study of some aspects of tax administration and tax practice, and of some aspects of the current law and proposals for its revision. Prereq: ACCT. 4410 or 6410; or 6420 or consent of instructor.
ACCT. 6620-3. Advanced Auditing Theory.
Summer Development of auditing as a profession, including evolution of standards and audit reports. Historical and contemporary literature in the field reviewed.
Prereq: ACCT. 4620 or 5620.
ACCT. 6800-3. Special Topics. Research methods and results, special topics, and professional developments in accounting. Prerequisites vary according to topics and instructor requirements. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for semester offerings. ACCT. 6840-variable credit. Independent Study.
ACCT. 6950-variable credit. Master's Thesis.
FINANCE
FNCE. 6310-3. Decisions and Policies in Financial Management. Fall, Spring. Emphasizes investment and financing decisions, and the analysis of the financial condition of the firm. Specific topics include capital budgeting, cost of capital, financing mix and strategy, firm valuation, and management of working capital. Prereq: BUSN. 6140.
FNCE. 6320-3. Seminar in Finance. Fall, Spring. This course will treat varying topics that are of special interest. Topics and emphasis could include subjects such as capital budgeting, capital structure theory, valuation of firms, mergers, bankruptcy, financial modeling, option valuation, etc. FNCE. 6330-3. Investment Management Analysis. Spring. The theory of investment management and security valuation, and portfolio management, including the analysis of investment risks and constraints on investment policies and objectives; the analysis and use of investment information; and the development and application of the tools for determining security values. Prereq: BUSN. 6140 and 6180. Prerequisites may vary depending upon topics covered.
FNCE. 6340-3. Security Analysis. Analysis of the financial condition of the firm, valuation of debt and equity securities, and the selection of investment media for portfolios. Prereq: FNCE. 6330.
FNCE. 6350-3. Financial Innovations. This course focuses on financial innovations in fixed income securities including zero coupon instruments, floating rate instruments, collateralized mortgage obligations, stripped mortgage backed securities, eurobonds, and interest rate and currency swaps. How these securities are priced in the marketplace and how they respond to changes in the market interest rate are the focus of the course. In addition, the course covers how these securities fit into a portfolio of fixed income securities, why they were invented and who is likely to find them attractive. Prereq: FNCE. 6330.
FNCE. 6360-3. Management of Financial Institutions. Spring An analysis of structure, markets, regulation, and chartering commercial banks. Problems and policies of the internal management of funds, loan practices and procedures, investment behavior, deposit and capital adequacy, liquidity, and solvency. Analytical methodology for these problems is developed. Prereq: BUSN. 6140 and 6180. FNCE. 6370-3. International Financial Management. Spring. A study of financial management in the international context that considers international capital movements and foreign exchange problems. Problems of international operations as they affect the financial functions. Reviews foreign and international institutions and the foreign exchange process. Considers financial requirements, problems, sources, and policies of firms doing business internationally.
Prereq: BUSN. 6140.
FNCE. 6380-3. Futures and Options. Fall, Spring. The course will explain how futures are related to the underlying commodities; it will describe how to hedge and what pitfalls to watch for. Stock index futures and interest rate futures will get particular attention. How options are priced, how they perform and how to judge whether an option is expensive or cheap will be covered. Bull spreads, bear spreads, straddles and strangles—popular strategies that option traders use—will be discussed. Prereq: FNCE. 6330.
FNCE. 6390-3. Advanced Finance Seminar. Fall This course is an advanced survey of the theory of finance and the empirical research developed from the theory. The student will study the quantitative models that are the basis for theory, and the empirical methods that have been used to confirm or disprove the hypothesis presented by the theory. The material will be presented through lectures and will be supplemented with student research, presentations, and recitation. Prereq: FNCE. 6310 and 6330.
FNCE. 6800-3. Special Topics. Experimental course offered irregularly for the purpose of presenting new subject matter in finance.


94 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Prerequisites will vary, depending upon topics covered. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for course offerings.
FNCE. 6840-variable credit. Independent Study. With the consent of instructor under whos direction the study is undertaken.
HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
HLTH. 6010-3. Medical Care Organization. Fall An introduction to the structure and function of the medical care delivery system. Includes basic concepts and measures of health, disease, quality, values, needs, and utilization; issues in health care manpower, institutions, and system organization; general issues in policy, reimbursement, and regulation; and broad community and organizational considerations in medical care organization.
HLTH. 6015-3. General Systems Theory.
Fall. General systems theory is presented as a conceptual tool in health administration. Health is viewed as a subsystem of society, and interfaces among health and other social subsystems are analyzed. Broad social and cultural issues form a context for meaningful discussion of health planning and administration in the current and future decades.
HLTH. 6020-3. Health Economics. Fall.
An intensive analysis of issues in health economics. Particular attention is given to market failure in health insurance and to alternative methods of containing health care costs, including both regulatory and market approaches. Prereq: BUSN. 6120. HLTH. 6026-3. Institutional Management. Spring. A colloquium designed to integrate major topics in the general management curriculum into relevant health administration issues. Current policies, problems, and issues across the broad spectrum of health service administration are covered. Prereq: HLTH. 6010, 6015, 6020, 6030.
HLTH. 6030-3. Health Sciences. Fall. This course introduces the student to principles of epidemiology. The student will demonstrate the application of epidemiology analyses to the prediction of health care service needs of a population; to identify and integrate contemporary service delivery issues such as access, quality of care, cost of care, program and system development, and evaluation.
The course will assist the student in development of program planning and evaluation skills. Prereq: HLTH. 6010 and BUSN. 6020. HLTH. 6040-3. Management Accounting for Health Care Organizations. Spring. Designed to build on the accounting concepts introduced in BUSN. 6000 and to develop proficiency in the decision-making process of health care providers. Problems, cases, and computer software programs will be used to develop the practical application of management accounting techniques such as cost/ volume/profit and standard cost models, budgeting, and analysis of variances. Prereq: BUSN. 6000, 6020 or consent of instructor.
HLTH. 6050-3. Legal and Ethical Problems in Health Care Administration.
Spring. Designed to acquaint the student with legal issues experienced by the health administrator. Special emphasis is placed on issues such as malpractice, informed consent, medical staff appointments, directors’ and administrators’ liability, medical records, and refusal of treatment. The course should make the student aware of the multitude of legal and ethical problems which confront the health administrator on a daily basis. Prereq: HLTH. 6010.
HLTH. 6630-3. Management Control in Non-Profit Organizations. This course is designed to develop a basic understanding of the management control process and the unique characteristics of non-profit organizations. Topic areas include budgeting, programming, operational control, and pricing policies. Cases will be the primary means to integrate didactic materials with practical applications. Prereq: HLTH. 6040 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
HLTH. 6650-3. Advanced Topics in Health Care Financial Management. The primary focus of this course will be an in-depth research report on a current problem in health care financial management. A health care simulation exercise will be utilized to integrate the financial management concepts introduced in the preceding accounting and finance courses. Prereq: HLTH. 6040 or consent of instructor.
HLTH. 6720-3. Ambulatory Care Administration. The health administration student is exposed to the rapidly developing field of ambulatory care and HMO management. By examination of various ambulatory care and HMO settings, problems in the planning, implementation, administration, and evaluation of ambulatory care are developed. Prereq: HLTH. 6010, or consent of instructor. HLTH. 6740-3. Multi-Institutional Management. Multi-institutional management is a developing trend in health administration. Students are exposed to both profit and nonprofit hospital, nursing home, etc., networks. Shared services, merger, management contracts, hospital acquisitions, and satellite clinics are studied and discussed. Prereq: HLTH. 6010 or consent of instructor.
HLTH. 6760-3. Rural Health Systems I. Introduces the student to the history and evolution of rural health care in the United States. Also to be examined are past attempts to improve rural health and the impact of past national programs affecting rural health. The present status of rural health in the U.S. will be explored. The course will end with a review of private, local, state, and federal programs directed toward solutions for rural health problems. Prereq: consent of instructor.
HLTH. 6780-3. Health Care Marketing.
The application of marketing concepts and techniques to health care delivery. Discussion will focus on the implications of a changing
regulatory/competitive environment for marketing health services. The use of specific concepts and tools, and an understanding of the variety of marketing applications to the planning of health delivery systems. Prereq: BUSN. 6060 or consent of instructor.
HLTH. 6800-3. Special Topics. Research methods and results, special topics, and professional developments in health administration. Offered irregularly. Prerequisites vary according to topics and instructor requirements. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for semester offerings.
HLTH. 6840-variable credit. Independent Study.
HLTH. 6950-variable credit. Master's Thesis.
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
ISMG. 6020-3. Business Programming and Data Systems. Fall, Spring. An accelerated introductory course on programming business applications, with emphasis on file processing. Topics include the COBOL and PASCAL programming languages.
ISMG. 6060-3. Systems Analysis. Spring. This course emphasizes information systems analysis and the logical specification of the system. The life cycle concept is used as the basic framework for development, but there is a recognition of alternatives in this development process. Management, organizations, technology and economic perspectives are considered. Prereq: ISMG. 6020 and BUSN. 6100.
ISMG. 6080-3. Database Management Systems. Spring. The database management course focuses on the analysis, design, and implementation of database systems to support today’s business operations. Current database models and database administration issues will be discussed in detail. Prereq: ISMG. 6020.
ISMG. 6100-3. Computer Technology. Fall This course provides a conceptual foundation in the areas of computer architecture, operating systems, programming translators, and fourth-generation languages. Students will study various computer architectures ranging from microcomputers to minicomputers to mainframe computers and operating systems such as Unix, VMS DOS, and OS/VS. Prereq: ISMG. 6020.
ISMG. 6120-3. Data Communications
Spring. Develops skill and knowledge for communication system design, dealing with network protocols, wide-area network, local-area network, and management implications. Course has a project orientation. Prereq: ISMG. 6100.
ISMG. 6140-3. Systems Design. Fall This course integrates the areas of computer technology, systems analysis, and systems design in designing large-scale application or decision support systems. The course emphasizes modern techniques for the measurement, specification, design, implementation, and


Graduate Courses / 95
testing of information systems. Prereq: ISMG. 6060.
ISMG. 6160-3. Decision Support Systems and Expert Systems. Fall An introductory course in how to design and construct decision support systems and expert systems. Knowledge representation and decisionmaking techniques will be discussed along with artificial intelligence languages such LISP and Prolog. Prereq: ISMG. 6080.
ISMG. 6180-3. Information Systems Policy. Summer Designed for the understanding of the overall information needs of an organization and the role of the computer based information systems. Topics considered are strategic planning of information systems, management of computer center and technical personnel, systems development management, the information systems exclusive, and social and legal issues. Prereq: BUSN. 6100, ISMG. 6020, 6060, and 6080. ISMG. 6800-3. Special Topics A variety of advanced topics are offered in this course. Consult the current Schedule of Classes or the area coordinator for current offerings. ISMG. 6840-variable credit. Independent Study.
ISMG. 6950-variable credit. Master's Thesis.
MANAGEMENT
MGMT. 6320-3. Organizational Development. Fall, Spring. Instruction in the analysis, diagnosis, and resolution of problems in organizing people at work. Models of organizational change are examined. Group experiences, analyses of cases and readings are stressed. Prereq: BUSN. 6040.
MGMT. 6360-3. Designing Effective Organizations. Fall, Spring Examines how to design organizations within the context of environmental, technological, and task constraints. The emphasis is on learning how to recognize and correct structural problems through the analysis of existing organizations in which the students are involved. Prereq: BUSN. 6040.
MGMT. 6800-3. Special Topics in Management. Fall, Spring, Summer A number of different current topics in management will be offered each semester under this course number. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for specific course offerings.
MGMT. 6810-3. Human Resoures Management. Fall, Spring. This course focuses on the management of human resources in organized settings. It is oriented toward the practical application of human resources management principles in the following areas: equal employment opportunity, affirmative action, human resources planning, recruitment, managerial selection, compensation and benefits, labor relations, training, career management, performance appraisal, and occupational health and safety.
MGMT. 6840-variable credit.
Independent Study.
MGMT. 6950-variable. Master's Thesis. MARKETING
MKTG. 6010-3. Marketing Strategy, Evaluation and Development. Fall, Spring, Summer. Focuses on marketing strategy and marketing planning. Addresses the formulation and implementation of marketing plans within the context of the overall strategies and objectives of both profit and not-for-profit organizations. There is heavy emphasis on group projects and presentations. Prereq: BUSN. 6060.
MKTG. 6020-3. International Marketing.
Fall, Spring. Explores problems, practices and strategies involved in marketing goods and services internationally. Emphasizes analysis of uncontrollable environmental forces, including cultures, governments, legal systems, and economic conditions, as they affect international marketing planning. Prereq: BUSN. 6060.
MKTG. 6030-3. Sales and Sales Force Management. Spring. Focuses on issues in personal selling and managing the field sales force. Deals with organization, sales analysis, forecasting, budgeting, and operating, with particular emphasis on the selling task, recruiting, selection, training, compensation, supervision, and motivation. Prereq: BUSN. 6060.
MKTG. 6040-3. Services Marketing. Fall, Spring. This course will inform students of basic modifications to marketing concepts as the U.S. economy changes in emphasis from physical products to services. It also will distinguish between function, organization, and structure in product versus service orientated firms. Lastly, it will concentrate on identifying difficulties in developing marketing plans and strategies in the service environment. Cases and projects with businesses will be used to demonstrate these concepts. Prereq: BUSN. 6060.
MKTG. 6050-3. Marketing Research. Fall, Spring. The objectives of this course relate to effective marketing information management. Objectives include: (1) developing an understanding of the techniques and procedures that can be used to generate timely and relevant marketing information; (2) gaining experience in developing and analyzing information that is decision oriented; and (3) gaining experience in making recommendations and decisions based on relevant and timeiy information. Computer analysis and projects are employed. Prereq: BUSN. 6020 and 6060.
MKTG. 6060-3. Buyer Behavior. Fall, Spring. Explores theory and application of consumer and industrial buying behavior. Internal decision-making processes are examined including perception, motivation, information processing, and attitude information and change. External influences on
buyers' decisions such as culture, family, intra- and inter-organizational influences, and marketing efforts also are investigated. Prereq: BUSN. 6060.
MKTG. 6070-3. Advertising and Promotion Management. Spring or Summer.
Treats tactical planning and management of mass marketing communications including advertising and sales promotion. The course focuses on advertising and promotion objectives, legal considerations, segmentation and target marketing, creative and media selection and scheduling strategies, agency relations, advertising and promotion research, testing and evaluation, budgeting, and trial and purchase stimulation through sales promotion tactics. The focus is on the managerial aspects of marketing communications as opposed to the creative functions. Prereq: BUSN. 6060.
MKTG. 6080-3. Marketing Function, Organization, and Strategy in Deregulating Industries. This course will deal with the development of the marketing function and competition in a host of deregulating industries including transportation, telecommunications, financial services, and health care. The objective of the course will be to demonstrate to students how marketing functions evolve and change as industries move from a regulatory umbrella to a competitive environment. Students will have an opportunity to see how regulation impacts the marketing function and strategy, and how the marketing strategy and function reacts to environments of limited or full competition. Prereq: BUSN. 6060.
MKTG. 6090-3. Transportation, Physical Distribution Systems and Modern Economy. This course will deal with the nature of transportation and logistical systems in the current manufacturing and service oriented economy. It will basically teach students the characteristics, economics, and current concerns of transportation systems, as well as the basics of logistical systems as they operate in modern corporations today.
It will seek to provide students with concepts regarding these issues, as well as practical group projects. Prereq: BUSN. 6060.
MKTG. 6800-variable credit. Topics in Marketing and Transportation Courses offered irregularly for the purpose of presenting new subject matter in marketing and transportation. Prereq: BUSN. 6060. MKTG. 6840-variable credit. Independent Study.
MKTG. 6950-variable credit. Master's Thesis.
OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
OPMG. 5400-3. Planning and Control
Systems. Spring. Study of the design, implementation, and control of integrated operations, scheduling, and inventory planning systems. Topics include demand forecasting, aggregate planning, capacity


96 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
planning, master scheduling, inventory management, material requirement planning, stockless systems, and operations control. Organizations studied include manufacturing, service and public sector. Prereq: BUSN. 6080.
OPMG. 5470-3. Strategic Analysis in Operations Management. Spring. Study of the analysis and formulation of operations management strategy and policy. Emphasis will be on the role of the operations function in the strategic processes of the organization. Decision-making will be stressed through the use of case studies and the analysis of actual business situations. Prereq: OPMG. 6400, BUSN. 6000, BUSN. 6080.
OPMG. 5600-3. Purchasing, Materials Management and Negotiation. Fall. Study of the purchasing function in manufacturing, service, and public organizations. Topics include source selection, make-buy analysis, material quality standards and specifications, value analysis, negotiations, and legal aspects. Prereq: BUSN. 6080.
OPMG. 6400-3. Planning and Control Systems. Spring. Study of the design, implementation, and control of integrated operations, scheduling and inventory planning systems. Topics include demand forecasting, aggregate planning, capacity planning, master scheduling, inventory management, material requirements planning, stockless systems, and operations control. Organizations studied include manufacturing, service and public sector. Prereq: BUSN. 6080.
OPMG. 6440-3. Quality and Productivity.
Spring. Study of the various techniques to measure quality and productivity in organizations and the practical management issues related to implementing quality and productivity systems. Topics include statistical quality control, total factor productivity, quality circles, total quality control, work design and measurement, and quality and productivity management systems. Prereq: BUSN. 6080 and 6040.
OPMG. 6600-3. Purchasing, Materials Management and Negotiation. Fall. Study of the purchasing function in manufacturing, service, and public organizations. Topics include course selection, make-buy analysis, material quality standards and specifications, value analysis, negotiations, and legal aspects. Prereq: BUSN. 6080.
OPMG. 6800-3. Special Topics. Fall. A number of different current topics in operations management will be discussed in this course. Consult the current Schedule of Classes or contact the advisor for further information. Prerequisites will vary depending on topic and instructor requirements. OPMG. 6840-variable credit.
Independent Study.
QUANTITATIVE METHODS
QUAN. 6010-3. Deterministic Models.
Linear programming and its application, network analysis, including scheduling models, dynamic programming, integer programming, non-linear programming. Prereq:
BUSN. 6020 and 6080.
QUAN. 6020-3. Stochastic Models. Probability theory, queuing theory, inventory theory, Markov decision processes, simulation, decision analysis. Prereq: BUSN. 6020 and 6080.
QUAN. 6030-3. Seminar in Quantitative Methods. Application of quantitative methods to problems of business and industry, with emphasis on the functional fields of marketing, financial management, and production. Prereq: QUAN. 6010 and 6020 or consent of instructor. One of the prerequisite courses may be taken as a corequisite. QUAN. 6040-3. Multivariate Analysis. Topics in multivariate data analysis of particular interest to those engaged in business research. Includes techniques such as multivariate discriminate analysis, factor analysis, and multiple regression, and the use of standard multivariate statistical packages such as the SPSS package. Prereq: BUSN. 6020. QUAN. 6800-3. Special Topics. A number of different topics in quantitative methods will be discussed in this course. Consult the current Schedule of Classes or contact the advisor for further information. Prerequisites will vary depending on topic and instructor requirements.
QUAN. 6840-variable credit.
Independent Study.






Full Text

PAGE 1

CATALOG 1991-92 Undergraduate and Graduate Studies University of Co orado at Denver

PAGE 2

University of Colorado at Denver P.O. Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 I Second Class Postage Paid at the Post Office Boulder, Colorado $2.75

PAGE 3

CONTENTS Academic Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Message from the Chancellor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 The Graduate School ..... ....................... ... ... .................... 41 School of Architecture and Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 School of Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 College of Engineering and Applied Science .......................... ......... . 133 College of Uberal Arts and Sciences ..................... . . . .................. 163 Military Science .... . . . ................................... ................ 259 Graduate School of Public Affairs ............ ......................... . . .... . 263 Faculty ..... ............. .................................. ........... . 273 Index ............. ........ . .................. . . ..... ................... 284

PAGE 4

Fall 19912 A u g u st 20-23 A u gust 26 September 2 November 28 November 29 Dece mber 18 ACADEMIC CAL EN DAR1 Orien t atio n Regis t ration First d ay of classes Labor Day Holiday (campus closed) Thanksg ivin g Holiday (campus closed) (camp u s o p en, no classes) End of semester Spring 19922 January 8-13 Ja nuary 14 January 20 March 16-20 May 12 Orientatio n Regis t rat i on F i rst d ay o f classes Martin Lut her King Jr . H oliday (camp u s open, no classes) Spring br eak (campus open , no classes) End o f semester Summer 19922 May 26-29 May 25 J un e 1 July 3 A u g u st 7 Orienta t ion Registration Memoria l Day Holiday (campus closed) First day of classes I ndepen d e nce Holiday ( campus closed) End o f te rm Cove r Illustrat ion : Mary Lou Egan Photos: Lucy Branch, Office of Public Relations University of Colorado at D enve r Pages 1 3 1 , 282 , 283 Bob Fad e r Pages 50, 70, 98, 1 32, 162, 262 Gary I saacs Pages 6, 40, 5 1 , 52, 161, 261 Design: Publications Department, Uni versity of Col orado a t Denver 'T h e Unive r s ity r eserves th e right t o alter th e A ca d emic Calendar a t any time . 2Consu l t the Schedule of C lasses for applicatio n d eadline dates, deadlines f or changing programs and registrat i on dates and pr oced ur es .

PAGE 5

University of Colorado at Denver S pee r at Larime r P.O. Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog 1991-92 Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation require ments, course offerings and course descriptions , and statements of tu i tion and fees) is s ubject to change without notice or obl igation . The University of Colorado at Denver is an affirmative action / e qual opportunity institution . For current calendars, tuition rates, require ments, deadlines, etc., students should refer to a copy of the Schedule of Classes for the semester in which they intend to enroll. The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University o f Colorado at Denver curriculum . Courses and programs are subject to modificatio n a t any time . Not all courses are offered every semester, and the faculty teaching a part icu lar course or program may vary from time to time . The instructor may alter the conten t of a course or program to meet particular class needs. Courses are listed by college or school. University of Colorado Catalog . (USPS 651-060) 262 Stadium Building , Campus Box 384, Boulder , Colorado 80309-0384 Volume 1991, No.3, May/ June Published 4 tim es a year: January / February March/ April, May I June , August / September Second class postag e paid at Boulder , Col orado. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to University of Colorado Catalog, CU-Denver Publications, Boulder , Colorado 80302.

PAGE 6

Message From the Chancellor Dear Student: Welcom e to th e Un iversity o f Colorado at Denver. On behalf of the fac ulty, s taff , and students, l offer to you th e challenging environmen t o f one of Colorado's premier institutions of higher education. Your decisi on to attend CU-D e nv er s hows your willingness to l earn at Denve r's only urban public university. CU-D enver i s one of th e f our campuses of the U niv ersity of Col orado system. As a vital part of that system, of f eri n g baccalaureate, master's , and doctoral programs, we have achieved distinction nationally and internatio n ally because of the high quality of our programs , faculty, and alumni. Located in downtown Denver, the Unive rsit y c h a llenges its s tud ents both academica ll y and persona ll y in an intellectual environme nt that e ncourages commit ment , curiosity , and imag in ation . A distinguishing character i stic of CU-Denver i s our urba n perspective that is an integral th eme in our aca d e mic programming, the orientation of our faculty , and the id entity of our studen t body . Since 1972, enro llm ent has grown to approxima t e l y 10,613 s tud e nts, includ ing 5 ,901 und ergraduates and 4,712 gradua t e students . The University offers some 40 degree and degr e e option programs at the baccalaureate lev e l and over 60 degree and degree opt i o n programs a t th e post baccalaureate level designed to provide you with a foundation on which to build your i nt e llectu a l , aesth et i c , and moral capacities as individuals a nd as citizens. Components of this educa t iona l expe ri ence incl ud e student involvement in independent study, research , and the c r eative process as a complement t o classroom study . The Un i versity's seven colleges and schools (Business, P ublic Affairs, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, School of the Arts, Educat i on, and Architecture and Planning) and The Graduate School provide instruction and research programs that focu s o n t h e fund ame ntal areas of knowledge, in cluding interdisciplinary and professiona l s tudy . W e are committed t o mak in g availabl e to yo u th e op portunities for gainin g knowledge, tr ain in g , s kill s , an d crede nti a l s which will e nhanc e your economi c and p ersonal lives. We at the CU-Denver campus take great pride in th e diversity of our students and our ability to serve th eir varied needs. This i s reflected in a comm itm ent to a n enriched bacca l aureate educa tion and the app l ied aspects of graduate and profes siona l work . Our academ i c programs foc u s on applica t ions relevant t o regional as well as n ational issues and also seek t o provide a humanistic understanding o f social needs and problems . W e look forward to work in g with yo u as you join o ur community o f sch o l a r s / teach ers and d edica ted staff. l promise a rich inte ll ectual e nvir o nm e nt and a c h a ll e nging educatio nal experie nce. Most of a ll , l l ook f o rward to seeing you at gradu a ti on and awarding you the CU-Denver degree. My best wishes to you and to your future . John C. Buechn e r C h ance llor Unive rsit y o f Col orado at D e nv er

PAGE 7

ADMINISTRATION Board of Regents KATHY ARNOLD, Littleton, term expires 1994 RICHARD J. BERNICK, Littleton , term expires 1992 ROBERT E. CALDWELL, Colorado Springs , term expires 1992 PETER C. DIETZE, Boulder , term expires 1996 HARVEY W. PHELPS, Pueblo , term expires 1994 NORWOOD L. ROBB, Littleton, term expires 1996 ROY H. SHORE, Greeley, term exp ires 1992 ROBERT SIEVERS, Bou lder, term expires 1996 DAVID W . WINN, Colorado Springs, t erm expires 1994 University-Wide Officers JUDITH ALBINO, President of the University; Professor of Psycholo gy; Professor of Applied Dentistry . B.J., Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin. GLEN R. STINE, Vice President for Budget and Finance. B.A. , Michigan State; M.A., University of North Carolina, Chape l Hill ; Ed.D., Harvard Universi ty. THEO. VOLSKY, JR., Executive Vice President for Administration; Professor of Psychology. B.S., M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota . H.H. ARNOLD, Executive Secretary of the Board of Regents and of the University. B.A. , LL.B. , Univers ity of Colorado . JAMES A. STROUP, Treasurer for the Un i versity a nd Assis tan t Vice Pre side nt for Budg et and Finance . B.S., Michigan Technical University; M . B . A., Michigan State University. CU-Denver Officers JOHN C. BUECHNER, Chancellor ; Professor of Publi c Affairs . B.A., Coll ege of Wooster ; M.P.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. BRUCE W. BERGLAND, Executive Vice Chancellor ; Associ ate Professor of Education. B.S., Iowa State University ; Ph.D., Stanf ord University . JOHN BERNHARD, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.A. , Stanford University; M.B.A. , Columbia Univer sity, Graduate Schoo l of Business. PAUL E. BARTLETT, Acting Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Profe ssor and Dean Emeritus of Engineer in g and App li ed Science. B.S.(C.E.), B.S.(Bus), M.S., University of Col orado. MARK A. EMMERT, Associate Vice Chancellor for Aca demic Affairs; Associate Professor of Public Affairs . B.A., University of Washington ; M .P.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University. KENNETH HERMAN, Associate Vice C h ancellor for A dministr ation and Finance. B.S., U ni versity of Col o r ado . SHELIA M. HOOD, Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and S tud ent Services. B.A., M.A., Col orado State University. FERNIE BACA, Assistant Vice Chancellor for R esearc h and Crea ti ve Activities; Acting Dean of The Graduate Sch oo l ; Assoc iat e Prof essor o f Education. B.A., University o f North e rn Col o r ado; M .A . , Ph.D., University o f Col orado. JULIE CARNAHAN, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Planning and Inf ormation Resources Management. B.A., M.A. , Univer sity of Colorado ; Ph.D., University of Michigan. Administration / 5 The University of Colorado seal , adop t ed in 1908, depicts a male Greek classica l figur e seated against a pillar and holding a scroll . A burning torch framed in l aurel is placed beside him . The Greek inscripti on means "Let your light s hin e." According to Den ver designer H enry Reed, the classica l design was used because Greek civilization "stands as the criterion of culture." The laurel symbolizes honor or success, the you th of the figur e suggests the "mornin g of life," and the scroll represents written language.

PAGE 9

T he University o f C o l o rad o a t De n ve r i s o n e o f th e m os t i mp o rt a nt e du catio n a l reso ur ces in th e De n ve r m e t ro polit a n area. CU-D e nver, one o f four insti tuti o ns in th e University o f Col o r a d o sys t e m , is a n urba n , n o n r esidential ca mpus located in dow nt o wn D enve r . M a j o r c i vic, cult ur al, business, and governmen tal activities are i n close p ro x imity. CU-Den ver offers un d e r graduate d egrees in more th an 40 fields and graduate degrees in more than 60. Ph.D. degrees are offe r ed in public affairs, applied mat hematics, and educat i onal administra tion. Doctoral studies also are available in engineeri n g and other f i elds in coope ration with CU-Boulder. Special emphasis is placed on programs that will help assure students professional opportunities after graduation. All programs are tailored to meet the needs of the diverse student population . Classes are offered during weekday and evening hours, and on weekends . Stu dents' ages range between 17 and 75. The average student age is 29 . Two thirds hol d full-time jobs and 60 percent attend part time. Sixty-two percent are enrolled at the upper division or graduate levels. CU-Denver ' s faculty actively promote the special role of an urban institution in meeting the ne e ds of students. Many faculty bring their work experiences to the classroom. They are alert to the challenges and advances of the urban environment and responsible to the needs of students and the community . The com bination of CU-Denver's talented faculty and highly motivated students creates a vital and exciting educational environ ment. Students are offered the unique educational opportunity to combine real world experience with academic excellence. History Just over a century ago the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder, in 1876. In 1912, the University of Colorado ' s Department of Correspondence and Extension was established in Denver , to meet the needs of the burgeoning popula tion. As the breadth of cours e offerings expanded, so did th e demand for degree granting status . The Denver Extension Ce nter was r e n a m e d the U n ive rsit y o f Col o r a do-D e n ve r Cent e r in 1 965, a nd b y 1 969, 2 3 fields o f und e r g r a du a t e s tudy a nd 11 o f g ra du a t e s tudy w e r e of f e r e d . In 1 972 th e Colo r a d o G e n e r al Asse mbl y a p pro pri a t e d suppor t t o build the Aura ria Ca mpus, CU-Den ve r's c urr e nt sit e. An d in this sa m e year the De n ve r "Cente r " was renamed CUDenver. Two years l a t e r t h e U n ivers i ty of Colorado was reorganize d into four campuses-Denver, Colorado Springs, H ealth Sciences (Denver), and Boulder. University of Colorado S ystem As one of four camp u ses of the U n iver sity of Colorado , CU-Denver has a special role and m ission in Colorado higher edu cation. The University of Colorado at Boulder now serves about 24,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs . The Health Sciences Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, denta l , nursing and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 5,900 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate , graduate, and professional programs. CU-Denver's role within the University system is primarily to address the needs for under graduate and graduate instruction in the Denver metropolitan area. Emphasis is given to professional, preprofessional , and liberal arts training in the context of a strong multidisciplinary and applied agenda for research and creative activi ties . CU-Denver students have access to the library resources of all campuses and cultural events sponsored within the University system . Academic S tructure Each of the four campuses of the University of Colorado System-Denver, Boulder, Colorado Springs , and Health Sciences in Denver-has its own Chancellor and campus administration . The Chancel lors, in turn, report to the President of the CU-System . The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approve the overall direction provided by the President of the System. The System President represents the University of Colorado and manages th e plannin g for d e v e lopm e nt o f th e Sys tem , app o r tio nm e nt of r esources a c r oss ca mpuses , the Sys t e m-wid e G ra d ua t e Sch oo l , and ge n e r a l p olic y r egarding academic s tand a rds, ins tru ctio n a l i n itiatives , and fac ult y and s t af f p e r so n nel matters, and i s s upp orted b y a sys t em-wide F ac ult y Sena te. CU-Denver , as well, has its ow n facu l ty governance str u c t ure. Stude n ts a l so have t h e i r own gove rn ance institutio ns. The C h ancellor of CU-Denver represen t s CU-Denver and manages campus goa l setti ng, policy development, academic affai rs, a nd budget and financial matte rs. The Executive Vice Chancellor and the Vice C h a n cellor for Adm i nistration and Finance assist the Chancellor . Each vice chancellor is responsible for the essential components of the campus enterprise. The Executive Vice Chancellor is respon sible for Academic Affairs, The Graduate School, Sponsored Projects, Admissions and Records, Enrollment Management , Planning and Institutional Research , and Student Services. The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance is responsible for the campus budget, Office of Financial and Business Services, and Personnel Services. The CU-Denver Graduate School is a component of the CU System-wide Graduate School. All graduate units reside within The Graduate School except Architecture and Planning, Business , and Public Affairs. Acad e mic Programs CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the citizens of Denver and the region. With the rapid development of the national recognition earned by its gradu ate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. Today CU Denver is composed of seven distinct aca demic units: Schoo l of Architecture and Planning College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Liberal Arts and Sciences School of the Arts Graduate School of Public Affairs

PAGE 10

8 / General Information These units now accommodate over 10, 000 students taught by about 360 r eg ular, full-time faculty memb ers. The diversity of the s tudent body is a hallmark of CU-Denver and a so ur ce of deep pride. Among th e m are traditional students wh o hav e e l ec ted to pursue college degrees immediately after high school. Ther e also are older st ud en ts who, perhaps for finan cial r easons or the press of family commitm e nts or because they've only lately recognized the value of a college educa tion, have delayed entry. And there are professionals who seek to s tren gthen th eir base o f skills o r broaden their apprecia tion of the world around them. The und ergrad uate colleges admit fres h man a nd transfer students a nd offer pro grams l eading t o the baccalaureate degree in t h e arts, sciences, humanities, business, engineering, and music. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also provides pre-professional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the hea lth sciences. The School of Education offers programs leading to teacher education. The Graduate School offers master ' s pro grams in the arts, sciences, humanities, engineering, education, and music to stu dents with baccalaureate degrees. The Schoo l of Architec tur e an d Planning , the Graduate Schoo l of Business Administra tion, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leading to master's degrees in their specialized areas. CU-Denver doctoral programs are avail ab l e in public affairs, education, and applied mathematics. Doctora l work in engineering also is available in coopera tion with CU-Boul der. CU-Denver faculty also participates in other doctoral pro grams offered at CU-Boulder . A complete listing of bache l or's and master's degree programs offered by CU Denver is provided in the college and schoo l sections of this cata l og. The college and school sections describe specific policies on requirements for graduation , course requirements for various majors , course load policies, course descriptions , and similar information. CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education which leads to improved professional opportunity in the Information Age. Many programs empha size practical busi n ess world applicatio ns, and all CU-Denver students a r e given the opportunity to attain computer l iteracy. Specific computer-oriented academic pro grams are offe red in the computer science (engineering), applied mathemat i cs Oiberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs. The F u ture CU-Denver is committed to the highest sta ndards of educa tion , scholarship, a nd se rvic e to th e community. From this commitment springs the vital ene rgy that infuses every ca mpu s pur suit. The pace is fast , perhap s unpreceden te d . Under gra du a t e studies are a t once becoming mo r e a nd more varied, challenging, a nd rewarding . CU-Denver is reac hing ou t to all who can benefit from the high quality educa tion it has t o offe r . New highly innova tive applied and prof essio nal gra du ate d eg rees are being developed that address the emerging n eeds of the regio n's economy. Cent ers for state-of-thefield research at CU-Denver are generat ing imp o rt ant practical solutio n s to some of Col orado's and t h e nation ' s most serious social, economic, e nvironmental, and tech nological problems. Throughout history, urban c i vilization a nd the arts and humanities have evolved in a rich synergy. CU-Denver-an urban campus is deeply involved in enriching th e cultural milieu of the Denver area . C l early, the Universi t y of Colorado at Denver is on the move. Accreditation Nort h Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools American Assemb l y of Collegiate Schoo l s of Business Accrediting Commiss ion on Education for Health Services Administration Colorado State Board of Education Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board National Council for th e Accreditation of Teacher Education Natio n a l Architectural Accre d iting Board See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalog for the programs accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Boa r d for Engineering and T echnology National Assoc i ation of Schools of Music Planning Accreditation Board Nationa l Association of Schools of Publ i c Affairs and Administration Auraria Higher Education Center The Auraria Higher Education Center is the site for the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, a n d the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share library (which is a dminister ed by CU Denver), classroom , and related facilities on a 171-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offe red . On the Auraria campus are administra tive and classr oom buildings, the Auraria Library, the s tud e nt union , book center , child ca re and development cente rs, physica l e du cation facilities, science build ing , a nd service buildin gs . The n ew buildings share the campus with the reminders of D enver ' s past historic Ninth Street Park , restored c hurch buildings, and the Tivoli brewery built in 1882. Th e Tivoli has been renovated int o a complex containing s p ecialty s hops, restaura nts, and en t e rt ainment. Research and Other Creative Pursuits CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowle dg e through the researc h and creative efforts of its faculty . Research and creative activities not only adva nce knowledge and enhance the quality o f life, but also s t rengthen teaching by groun d ing instruction in scholarship and professional p r actice . In a dditi o n , these ac tiviti es constitu t e an important compo n e nt of CU-Denver's service to the comm unit y at large. Therefore , externally funded project s a re a major priority at CU-Denver. Research proj ects, training, and public service program s at CU-Denver encom pass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study with a focus on issues th at relate to city , state, national, and inter national i ssues . During 1 989-90, CU Denver f aculty and staff received external grants and contracts totalling $8,400 , 222 for research , training , a nd public service programs. The benefits for the campus in the years ahead will be substantial. Exter nally funded activities assist in sus t aining scholarly discourse , enable faculty mem bers to e n gage in the advancement of knowledge, provide the foundation for solving pressing practica l probl ems of vital concern for society , and enhance the edu cation o f students . Many students actively participate in projects overseen by faculty members . An import ant aspect of research and other creative activities at CU-Denver is its multidisciplinary and applied nat ure. Research in every schoo l and co llege at CU-Denver addresses questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region. Its rol e within a thriving metropolitan area also serves as a base

PAGE 11

for exploring topics of national and even internationa l import. But not all research at CU-Denver yields solutions of immedi ate practical significance. Major efforts now exp lore topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplin es which are carried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that knows no national bounds. These efforts may yield insights that eventually open the way to practical applications in the next ce ntury . Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary economic, politi cal, ed ucational, enginee r ing , mathematical, scientific, and environ mental needs . Financial support has been obtained for program and service develop ment in the areas of compu t ational mathematics, bilingual and special ed uca tion, health administration, intern ational affairs, and executive seminars as well as institutes on aging and veterans ' employ ment and training . Other projects include statewide investi gations of economic development , poverty , literacy, air quality, water contro l , and transportation. Computer related projects include multilevel algorithms, fast parallel processing , algorithms in linear programming, and modeling . Projects in basic research range from investigations of earthquakes to neurotoxicology to growth equations for sporangiophores. In addition, a great deal of research at the University goes on without substantial external support. This effort also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publica tions, presentations, exhibits, perfor mances, a nd professional activities . Many members of the faculty are l eaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits bring recognition to the Univers ity , establish the credib ility of its faculty , and enhance the value of the degrees it confers. CENTERS AND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE, AND TRAINING First Amendment Congress The mission of the First Amendment Congress is t o unite Americans of every persuasion to support freedom of expres sion, and provide America with a continu ing forum to discuss and debate the First Amendment as our cornerstone to liberty. To reach this goal, the Congress sponsors national forums , seminars, and congresses to forge new understanding of First Amendment issues; develops curricu lum materials to increase students' understand ing of the First Amendment ; aids state and local coalitions to develop First Amendment organizations and activities; delivers special messages to various audiences reminding them of their duties to uphold First Amendment freedoms , publishes materials , researches public atti tudes toward media practices; and sup ports public awareness campaigns on First Amendment issues. Center for Health Ethics and Policy The Center analyzes and develops con structive courses of action concerning policy and ethics aspects of health-related problems facing Colorado and the nation. The Center's goal is to increase public and private sector attention to thes e issues and contr ibut e to the making of informed and sound public policy decisions. Center for Applied Psychology This Center promotes research and educa tional programs in four areas: public mental health , psychology and the law , psychology and public health , and organiza tional effectiveness and decision making . The Center represents a coopera tive relationship among higher education, government, business, mental health agen cies, public health institutions , and the citizenry of the state of Color ado. Colorado Principals' Center The Center is a staff development, renewal, and training center for practicing principals, assistant principals , ce ntral office supervisors , and ot her s in instruc tional leadership positions. Colorado Center for Community Development The Colorado Center for Community Development provides technical, educa tional , and applied research assistance to organizations, neighborhoods, and com munities that cannot afford or do not have access to professional services. The Center targets its assistance efforts to rural small towns , low income a nd /o r minority communities, and non-traditional , community-based service or d eve lopment organizations. Center for Environmental Sciences The Center focuses on interdisciplinary environmental research from among the faculty and staff of CU-Denver . Further, it involves students-especially Master of Environmental Science st udents-in ongo ing research projects. Example projects include atmospheric science and air pollu tion studies, environm e ntal risk assess ments of regional and national issues, and global sulfur cycling research as it relates to greenhouse warming and global climate . Cent ers and Institutes / 9 Center for Urban Transportation Studies This Center assumes a leading role in the Rocky Mountain region in developing research and interdisciplinary programs in urban transportation and providing a cen tral resource for info rmation concerning urban transportation problems in the Rocky Mountain region. The Center makes available University expertise to outside organizations. Land and Water Information Systems Group The Group was created to advance the educatio n and training, research , and pub lic service missions of CU-Denver in the areas of urban and regional information systems, geographic-oriented databases, water resources systems, and built facilities management. The Centers-Center for the Improvement of Public Management and Center for Public-Private Sector Cooperation Goals are to improve public sector management and to engage the public, private , and non-profit sectors in devising solutions to community problems . The Centers offer management and leadership training for state and local public officials and private and nonprofit sector emerging leaders . They conduct research on public policy issues, analyzing policy alternatives and eva luating programs. The Centers pro vide strategic planning, conflict manage m e nt , and facilitation services as well as other forms of technical assistance to state and local jurisdictions. Computational Mathematics Group The Computational Math Group at CU Denver is a broad-based response to th e rapid and dramatic changes in the various fields of computation . The group resides in the Department of Mathematics, but is intended to be a highly interdisciplinary organization with associates in other departments at CU-Denver, on other cam puses of the Front Range, and within the business and research community of greater Denver. The ultimate goal is th at the Group become an internationally recognized site at which computational mathematics thrives and is advanced. National Leadership Institute on Aging The Institute trains leaders from throughout the country to think innova tively, act with greater strategic skills, and forge new public-private partnerships in meeting th e needs o f an aging America. In ad dition , th e Institut e consults with organizat ions involved in designing and

PAGE 12

10 / General Informatio n delivering programs to meet th ese needs as well as undertakes policy rel eva nt research . Institute for International Business The Institute focuses on th e g lobal busi ness issues of th e 1990s. It is a key resource for business a nd government in ad dre ssing international eco n omic op p or tunities for Colorado and th e U.S. The two major programs are : The Center for Int er national Executive Education, which gives U.S. and foreign executives hands-on train ing in successful international business practices ; and the Center for Researc h on Competitiveness, which conducts a n d dissemin ates res earch on internationa l business issues. National Veterans Training Institute The Institut e provides a series of train ing courses to strengthen and upgrade the professional skills of the Job Service's national network of disabled veterans' out reach specialists and veterans' representa tives who deliver employment services to America ' s veterans . The NVfl's Resource and Technical Assistance Center provides materials and information to trainees and other service providers on topics support ing their professional efforts. The Institute is operated as a joint effort of the Univer sity of Colorado at Denver and the U.S. Department of Labor's Vetera ns Employ ment and Training Service . 4th World Center for the Study of Indigenous Law and Politics This Center provides a research clearinghouse to students and faculty at CU-Denver on legal and pol i tical issues that affect indigenous peoples (the 4th World). In addition to supporting a modest library of rare books and periodicals on indigenous issues, the Center also stocks video and audio cassettes on subjects of indigenous politics , and a substantial news file archive on current developments in the 4th World. Currently, the Center is expanding the number of course offerings in the area of 4th World studies. Region VIII Resource Access Project Under a contract funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Resource Access Project pro vides training and technical assistance to HeadStart centers throughout a six-sta t e region. Center for Research in Rhetoric The Center conducts original and applied research in rhetoric , broadly conceived , and engages in projects that involve faculty and students who carry out research studies that contribute to our unde r standing of rhetoric and discourse in the broad realm of human affairs. Reports presenting the results of research projects are published by the Center and are avail ab l e i n th e English department office. ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES All questions a nd correspondence regarding admission to CU-Denver and requests for application forms should be directed to : Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 P. 0. Box 173364 Denver , CO 802 1 7-3364 (303) 556-2704 General Policies CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program successfully. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being: 1. Level of previous academic performance . 2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests. 3. Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success . CU-Denver may deny admission to new applicants or readmission to former students whose credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essen tial by the University in order to carry out its lawful missions, processes, and func tions as an educational institution. Applicants who request degree pro grams that are not available at CU-Denver will be considered for adm i ssion to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with an undetermined major. Students admitted with an undetermined major are expected to declare a major by the t i me they have comple t ed 60 hours toward graduation . Admission of Undergraduate Degree Students The University may change documents / crede ntial s deadlines in accorda n ce with enrollment demands. Applicants should apply as early as possible. Updated infor mation is available from the Office of Admissions Processi n g ( 303) 556-2704 . For an a pplicant to be considered for a specific t erm, ALL docum ents r equ ir ed for admiss i on must be received in the Office of Admissions Processing by the DEADLINE f o r th at term. Applicants who are unab l e t o meet the deadline may elect to be considered for a later term. Transfer studen t s are reminded that they should allow sufficient time to h ave transcripts se nt from institutions th ey have previously attended. Foreign students are adv i sed that i t u sually takes 60 days for credentials to reac h the Office of Admiss i o n s Pro cess ing from international l ocations. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Adminis tration, Engineering and Applied Science, or Liberal Arts and Sciences. General Requirements. The applicant must be a high schoo l graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certif i cate by comp l e ting the General Edu cation Development (GED) Test. Specific College Requirements: College of Business and Administration English (one year of speech / debate and two years of composition are strongly recommended) . ................... . 4 Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one year of geometry) ... 4 Natural sciences Oaboratory science) .... 2 Social sciences (including history) .... . . 2 Foreign language (both units in a single language) .......... .......... ..... 2 Academic electives ...... ......... . . 2 (Additional courses in English , foreign language, mathemat ics, natural or social sciences , not to include business courses.) Total 16 RECEIPT OF DOCUMENTS DEADliNES Und e rgraduat e Students New Students Transfer Students Former University of Colorado Students Intra-university Transfer Stud e nts International Students Undergraduate : Graduate: Fall Spring Summer July 22 Dec. 1 May 3 July 22 Dec. I May 3 July 22 Dec . I May 3 60 days prior to the beginning of the term July 22 May 26 Dec . I Oct. 27 May 3 March 10

PAGE 13

College of Engine ering and Appli e d Sci en c e1 English Q i t e r ature, compos i tion , grammar) ............. ............ 4 Math e m atics distributed as follows: Algebra ............. . . . ..... .... 2 Geome t ry . ..... ........ . ..... ... I Add i t i o n a l mathema t ics (trigonometry recommended) ................. I Natural sciences including one year of physics and one year of chemistry .... 2 Foreign lan guage (both units in a single language) ................. . ..... 2 Academic electives ................ .:.1 Total 16 College of Liberal A rt s a nd Sci e n ces English Qiterature , composition, grammar) ........ ............. . . 4 Mathematics (excluding business and co n sumer mathematics) .. ... . . . 3 Natura l sciences .. ... ...... .. ....... 3 Social science ... ... ... ............. 2 Foreign l anguage (both units in a single language) . .... 2 Academic elective . . ......... . ..... .:...!. Total 15 All music majors in the School of the Arts are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area . Two years of prior piano training are recommended . An audition is required of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the School of the Arts, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications . MINIMUM ACADEMIC PREPARATION STANDARDS (MAPS) Freshmen entering the University of Colorado who have graduated from high sc h oo l in 1 988 or l ater a r e required to meet the following Minimum Academic Preparat i on Standards : 4 years of English (with emph asis on composi t ion), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (exclud ing business and consumer mathematics), 3 years o f social science including one year of U.S. or world history, and 2 years of a sing l e foreign language. 1See the College of Engineering and Appli e d Sci ence section o f this ca talog for m o r e specifi c information . T h e M A P S focus on subject areas the student h as studied i n p r e p aration for college. F r eshman admission standards define th e l evel of success and achieve ment n ecessary to be a d mitted to the University of Colorado a n d include fact o r s that predic t academic success such as scores on t he ACT or SAT, high schoo l course wo r k , and the gra d e-point average. Both the subjects the student has studied and how t h e student h as achieved will be factors tha t determine admission to the University. Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the Univers i ty provided they meet the o t her admissio n standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University. Two levels of deficiency will be recognized. I. One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student meets other admission standards and provided the stu dent makes up the deficiency before graduation from the University . Courses taken to make-up a deficiency will count toward graduation , provided the CU Denver college accepts those course credits toward graduation. 2 . In some cases a student having more than one unit of deficiency may be admit ted, provided that the student meets other standards of the University. The student must make up additiona l deficiencies before graduation by taking an expanded program of studies. The student may satisfy the MAPS requirements by successful comp l etion of I) courses taken at CU, 2) c ourses taken at other institutions of higher education , 3) additional high school credits, 4) credit-by examination programs , or 5) other requirements as approved by each CU-Denver college . Preferred consideration for admission is given to applicants who rank in the top 30 % of their high schoo l graduating class and present a composite score of 25 or higher on the American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 1050 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAn . Business applicants will receive preferred consideration if t hey graduated in the top 25 percent of t h eir high schoo l class and achieved a composite score of at least 25 on the ACT or 1 050 on the SAT. Engineering applicants will receive preferred consideration if they graduated in the top 20 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT and a 28 on the mathematics or a 1100 total on the SAT with a 600 on the mathematics. Appli cants who do not meet the admissions Admissio n s I 11 requireme n ts for direct admission to E n gineering a r e encouraged t o apply as a pre engineering major in the College of Libera l Art s and Sciences. Music major applicants also must successfully pass a music a udit ion. Applicants who do not satisfy the requirements for preferred consideration are rev i ewed on an i n dividual basis . H o w t o Appl y I. Students should obta i n an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor o r from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions Processing. 2 . The application must be completed in full and sent to the Offi ce of Admissions Processing with a $ 30 (subject to change) non-refundable fee . For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to e nroll for that term , the $30 appli c ation fee will remain valid for 12 months , provid e d the Office of Admi s sions Process ing is informed o f the intent to e nroll for a later term. 3 . Students are required to have their high school send an official trans c ript of their high school grades , including class rank, to the Office of Admissions Process ing. Official transcripts are those s e nt by th e issuing institution directl y t o the CU Denver Office of Admissions Proc e ssing . Hand-carried copies are not official. 4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to hav e a copy of their GED test s c ores and GED c ertificate sent from the certifying agency to the CU Denver Office of Admissions Processing . 5 . Students also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or th e Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAn and request that test scores be sent to CU Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4-4875). High school students may obtain ACT and SAT test dates and locations from their counselors. Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver as the recipient o f the scores must request the testing agency to send scores to CU Denver. A Request for Additional Score Report may be obtained from any of the offices listed below. Regi s tr ation Department American College Testing Program (ACT) P .O. Box 414 Iowa City, Iowa 52240 College Entrance Examination Board (SAn P.O. Box 592 Princeton , New Jersey 08540

PAGE 14

12/ Gene ral Information College Entrance Examination Board (SAD P.O. Box 1025 Berk e l ey , California 94704 6. Internatio n a l s tudent s must s ubmit pr oo f of proficiency in th e English lan guage (see Requirements for International S tudents). All c redentials presented for admission becom e the property o f the University of Colorado and must remain on file . ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS Transf e r students may apply for admis s ion to the Colleges o f Business and Administration , Engineering and Applie d Scie n ce, and Liberal Ar t s and Sciences. Students interested in the field of edu cation should contact the School of Educa tion office for informat i o n (556-2717). Established under the a uspi ces of th e Color a d o Comm i ssion on Higher Educa tion and the Col orado Community College and Occupational Education System, transfer agreements have been made with Arapahoe Community College, Front Range Community College, Commu nity College of A ur ora , Comm unit y College of Denver, and R ed Rocks Community College enabling stude nt s of these insti tutions to be directly a dmitt ed to CU Denver . Students should contact the Office of Admissions Processing for comple t e details. Minimum transfer adm issi on standar ds h ave b een developed for all public fouryear institutions in Col o r a d o . H owever, transfer app l icants who meet these s t andards are not guaranteed admission . They also mu st meet th e admi ss i o n s stan dards of the University of Colorad o and its individual colleges. To meet the minim um sta ndard s at the Univers it y of Colora do at Denver, st ud en t s must m ee t one of the followin g co nditi ons: I. H ave ear n e d 12-29 colleg i ate semes ter cre dit hour s and have the following gra depoint average : a. 2 . 0 GPA if transferring from Col o rad o Sch ool of Mines, Colora do S t ate Unive rsity , Univers it y of Col orado a t Boulder, or University o f Colorado at Color ado Springs . b . 2.5 GPA if transferring from any othe r postsecondary ins tituti o n . 2. Be enrolled in a CCHE-approved guara nte ed transfer agreement and meet the minimum academic qu alifications of the agreement. 3. Hav e earn ed fewer than 30 colleg iat e semes ter hours and meet th e first-time FRESHMAN standards for the institutio n . Transfer students are give n pr iority considera tion f or admission as follows : I. College of Business and Administra tion. To be considere d f o r n ew t ransfer admiss ion , s tud e nt s mu s t hav e comp l e t ed at l eas t 24 semes t e r h ou r s which will apply to the degree , Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Applicants w ith an overall GPA of 3 . 0 in applicab l e course wor k will be automatically admitted. S tu dents with less than a 3 . 0 overall GPA, but w ith a 3 .25 in th e last 24 sem ester hours o f applicab l e course work attempted , will be automatically admitted. Applicants w ith at least a 2.6 in appli cab l e co ur se work in the l ast 24 semes t e r hours will be considered as space is avail able. Students with less than a 2 . 6 GPA in the l as t 24 semester hours o f applicable c ourse work will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration. No applicant will be accepted who is not e ligibl e to re turn t o all in s tituti ons previously attended. 2 . College of Engineerin g and Applied Science. Applicants to the College of Eng i neering should have at least a 2 .75 cumu l ative grade-point average (on a 4.0 sca le) for all work attempted , s h ould h ave c omp l e t ed two semesters eac h of calcu lus and physics , and must be eligible to return to all i n stitutions previously attended . 3 . College of Liberal Art s and Sciences. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2 . 0 c umul ative college grade-point aver age (on a 4 . 0 sca le) f or all work attemp ted and must be eligib l e to r e turn to all insti tutio n s previously a tt e n ded. Course work in progress cannot b e used in cal cu l ating the cumulative average . Music major applica nt s also must pass an audition. Con ta c t the Sch oo l of the A rt s for audit ion information (556-2727). Important Note: Applicants who do n ot meet the above grade-point average or cred it hour requirements will still be con side r e d f o r admission , but o n an individual basis. The primary f ac t ors used w hen con sider in g students individually a r e (1) prob ability of success in th e academic progra m to which adm issi on is desired; (2) th e quali ty of prior academic work; (3) age, maturity , and noncollegiat e achieve ments; and (4) tim e e lapsed since last atte ndance at previous colleges. How to Apply I. The student s h o uld ob tain a transfer application from th e CU-Denver Office of Adm i ss ion s Processing. 2 . The application form must be com pleted a nd returned with th e required $30 (sub ject to change) nonr efu ndabl e applica tion fee. 3 . The student is required to have two official tran scripts sent to th e Office of Admissions Pr ocess ing from each collegi ate institution atte nded . Official trans crip ts are thos e sent by the issuing inst ituti o n directly to the CU-Denv er Office of Admis sions Pr ocessing. H and-<:arri ed copies are not offic ial. If a stu d e nt is currently enro lled at another institut ion, a n incom plete trans c ript listi ng all courses except those tak en in the final t erm sho uld be sent. Another transc ript must be submit ted afte r completion o f th e final term. (fransc ript s from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accom pani ed by a ce rtifi ed litera l English translation.) 4 . Students who hav e attended a two year school or comm unit y college , and were enrolled in the Guaranteed Transfer Program t o transfer to CU-Denver , should submi t a copy of the Guaranteed Transfer "contr ac t " with their application. Liberal a rt s and music major applicants with fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter h ours) of college work completed also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores. E n gineering appl i ca nts with fewer th an 24 semes ter hours a l so must submit high schoo l tran scripts an d ACT/SAT sco res. Business applican t s with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school tr a n scripts and ACT/SAT scores. App licant s to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should be aware that the College requires ele m e nt ary proficiency in a foreign l anguage for graduation . Appli can t s to th e College h ave fulfilled thi s requi r e ment if they hav e comple t ed three years of any classical or modern foreign l ang uag e in high sc hool and present a high schoo l transcript to the College Advising Office for verification. For further information , students should contact th e College Advising Office, 556-2555 . All c re d entials presented for admission become th e property of the University of Col orado and must re main o n file . Stu dents who do not declare all previously attended institutions are subject to disciplinary action and/or dismissal. Transfer of College-level Credit Afte r all official transcripts have been received and the applicant has been admitte d as a degree st ud ent , the Offi ce of A dmi ssions Processing and th e appro priat e academic unit will determine which courses taken at other institutions are a pplicabl e to a degree program at CU Denver. In general transfer credit will be accep t e d insofar as it meets the degree

PAGE 15

and grade r equirements at CU-De nver . Collegel evel c r e dit may be transferr e d to th e University if it was earned a t a co lleg e or univer s ity of r ecog niz e d stand ing, by CLEP or advanced pla ceme nt exa minations, o r in military service or schoo ling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Se rvic e Experie nc es of the American Council o n Edu ca tion ; if a grade of Cor higher was attaine d ; and if the c redit is for co urs es appropr iat e to the degree sought a t thi s institution . Courses taken p ass /fail are transfer r e d when a grade of C-or higher is required to pass. The U niv ersity may acce pt a maximum of 72 se mest e r credits (108 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution toward the baccalaureate degree r equi r ements a nd may accep t up to 112 semester credits (153 quarter h ours) from a four-year college o r unive r s ity. No credit is allowed for voca tional / technical, remedial, or religious / doctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semeste r c redits of extension and cor respondenc e work (not to includ e mo re than 30 semester cre dit s of cor respondence) may be a llow e d if the above co ndition s are met. The College of Business and Administra tion ge n e r ally limit s its transf e r credit for business co ur ses taken at the l ower divi sion l evel. All cou rses in the area of em pha s i s must be taken a t th e Unive r s ity o f Colorado. A maximum of 60 semester h o urs (90 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution may be applied toward baccalaureat e degree require ments. All correspondence courses are eva luated to dete rmine their acceptability, a nd business cou rse s may not be tak e n through correspondence . The College of Engineering a nd Appli e d Science, in general, requires th a t e ngin eer ing course transfer cre dit must come from an ABET accredited engineering program to be acceptable for d eg ree purpo ses . Engineering te chno logy co urs es are not co nsidered equivalent to e ngineering co urses. READMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FORMER AND RETURNING CU STUDENTS CU-Denver students who hav e not r egis ter e d and attended classes at CU Denver for o n e year or l o nger, and who hav e not a tt ended an o ther institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmission . Applica tion forms a re available at th e Office of Admi ssions Pro cess ing. Students who have attended a nother college or uni versity since last attending the University of Colorado must a pply as trans f e r stude nts and meet the transfer stu d e nt deadline s for rece ipt of docu ments. This requir es payment o f the $30 (subject to change) non refundable applica tion fee a nd submission of official tran scr ipts from all colleges and universiti e s previously a tt e nd ed. Tra ns c ript s must be se nt dire ctly from the issuing institution to CU-Denv e r , Admissions Processing, Camp u s Box 167, P. 0. Box 173364, Den ver, CO 80217-3364. Studen ts who have not attended the Unive rsity for up to one year but h ave atten d e d ano ther college or university in the interim are required to pay a $30 (sub ject to change) transfer a ppli cation fee. Transcripts must be reques t ed by the stu dent and sent by the registrar of the ot h er institution(s) to CU-Denve r , Admiss i ons Processi ng, Campus Box 1 67, P. 0. Box 173364, Denver, CO 802172D3364 . Students who last attended another CU campus (including the Division of Extende d Studies) must formally app l y for readmission . Applicatio n forms are availab l e from the Office of Admiss i ons Proc e ssi n g . ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS The U niv ersity of Colorado at Denver e nc o urag es int ernatio n a l s tud e nt s t o a ppl y for ad mission to undergraduate and grad uat e program s . Undergraduate : Admission requir e ments for CU-Denver's schools and colleges vary, and international students seeking admis sion must meet the re quirem ents o f the program to whi ch they are applying. In addition, all int e rnational students whose first language is n ot English a re required to hav e a minimum lDEFL (fes t of English as a For eign Language) score o f 525. Prospective st udents should request an Int e rnational Student Applicati o n packet from th e Office of Admissions Processing. Information about require ments for each CU-Denver college and sc hool can be found in this catalog. Deadlines for rece ipt o f documents have been es tablish e d to allow for the timely mailings of !-20's. Contact the Office of Admissio n s Processing for these dates . Graduate: International students who wish t o pursu e graduate s tudy a t CU Denver must h ave earn e d an undergradu ate bachelor's d eg ree , or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirem e nts o f the graduate pro gra m to which th ey are applying. In addition, all internati o nal s tud e nts whose first languag e is not Englis h are required to have a minimum lDEFL (fest of English as a Foreign Lan guage) score of 525. Applications are available from The Admissions Proc ess ing Admissions I 1 3 Offi ce six month s prior to the t erm for which the student is applying. Note: Except for summer t erms, interna tio nal s tudent s must be in a degree seeking s tatus. They may attend sum m er terms as non-d eg ree st ud e nts. This excep tion is s trictl y limited to summer terms. CU-DENVER INTRA-UNIVERSITY TRANSFER OR CHANGE OF CAMPUS (INCLUDING EXTENDED STUDIES) CU-Denver students may change co l leges or sc h ools within CUDenver provided th ey are accepted by the college or schoo l to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver I ntra-university Transfer Forms may be o btain ed from th e Office of Admiss i ons. Students should observe appli catio n deadlin es indicated in the cur re nt Schedule of Classes. Decisions on intra university tr ansfers are made by the college or school to whic h the stude nt wishes to tr ansfer . CU-Denver students may change University of Colorado campuses by applying directly to the Admissions Processing Office of th e campus to which they wish to transfer . Cha n ge of Camp u s applicatio n s and deadline inf ormatio n also must b e obtained from the campus to which the student is a pplyin g . Extended Studies students wis hing to e n roll in regular CU-Denver courses o r degree programs should contact the Office o f Admis s i ons Processin g . \ HIGH SCHOOL CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT High schoo l juniors a nd seniors w ith demonstrated academic abilities may b e a dmitted to CU-Denver with special approva l for one term o nly . This approval may be renew e d . Credit for courses tak e n may subsequently be a ppli ed t owar d a Univers ity de gree program . For more information and applicat ion instructions, co ntact the CU-Denver Off ice of Admis sions Processing (303-55&-2704). Admission of Graduate Degree Students All correspondence a nd questi ons regarding admission to the gradua t e pro g ram at CU-Denver should b e directed t o the f o llowing : Programs in Business Graduate Business Programs Graduate Schoo l of Business Administration 595-4007

PAGE 16

14 /Genera/Information Programs in Architecture and Planning School of Architecture and Planning 556-3382 Programs in Public Affairs Graduate School of Public Affairs 820-5600 All Other Programs The Graduate School 556-2663 GRADUATE PROGRAMS Graduate degree programs are offe red through The Graduate School by its mem ber schools and co lleges ( School of Educa tion, College of Engineering and Applied Science, and College of Liberal Arts and Sciences), and by the Graduate School of Busines s Administration, t he School of Architecture and Planning, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs. GRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION DEADLINES Admission requirements and application deadlines vary according to the individual graduate program. The Graduate Schoo l has general admission requirements which are supplemented by specifi c require ments of the major departments of graduate study (e.g., electrical engineering, edu ca tion, English, etc.). App lican t s should co n sult the general information section of The Graduate School por tion of this cata log , as well as the college or school sec tions , for requirements and deadlines for specific programs . Admission of Non-Degree Students Persons who have reached the age of twenty and who want to take University courses but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree at this time may be admitted as non-degree students provided that they are academically eligi ble and admissable . Correspondence and questions regarding admission as a non degree student should be dire c ted to the Office of Admissions Processing . Those seeking admission as non-degree stude nts for the purpose of teacher certification should contact the Schoo l of Education, 556-2717. Each school/college limits the number of semester hours that are trans ferable to a degree program . Students considering changing from non-degree t o degree status should contact the school! college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for infor mati on abou t the number of hours that may be taken as a non-degree student. Courses taken as a non-degree student are for credit and can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional improvement. Note: International students are not ad mitted as non-degre e students, except for summer terms. They must hold a valid Visa. Students with the ba cca laureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for course work as non-degree st udents. There are several types of these stu dents. Among them are teac hers who seek renewal of certification; stu dents who wish to take additional co urse work for professional or personal improvement; and students who feel a need to make up d eficienc i es before en tering a specific program . Non-degree s tud e nts s hould be aware that, generally only a limit e d number of cou rse credits taken by a non-degree studen t may be applied later toward a degree program at CU-Denver. To continue registration as a non-degree studen t , a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 must be maintained. HOW TO APPLY FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION To apply for admission as a non-degree st udent, obtain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office of Admissions Processing . Return completed application by the deadline for th e term desired. A $10 (subject t o change) non refundable application fee is required . No addi t ional crede ntial s are required . Applicants who seek teacher certification must apply separa t e l y to th e School of Educa tion and s ubmit the required cre d e ntials. Non-degree s tud en ts are advise d th at registration for courses is on a space available basis . CHANGING STATUS FROM NON DEGREE TO DEGREE STUDENT Non-degree students may apply for admiss ion to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions ou tlined in the Non-degree to Degree procedures avai labl e from th e Office of Admissions . Academic crede nti als (i.e., transcripts and/or test scores) and a $30 (subject to change) nonrefundable applica tion fee also must be submitt ed. Non-degree students who are accepted as undergraduate degree students may generally transfer a limited number of semester hours for courses taken as a non-degree student t o an undergraduate degree program with the approval of their academic dean . Non-degree students should consult with the college to which they are applying during the first semester of their enrollment for the maximum number of semester credit hours accepta ble toward a degree program as a non degree student. (Students enrolled as n on degree students prior to th e Fall Semester of 1970 are subject to the policies in effect between J a nu ary of 1969 a nd August of 1 970. ) Non-degree s tudents may apply for admis sion to a gra duate program by com pleting the applica tion required by th e particular program . The graduate dean , upon recomm enda tion by the department , may accept up to 8 semester hours of credit toward the requirements for a master's de g ree for courses taken as a non-degree stude nt at th e University or at anot her recognized graduate school , or some combination thereof . The depar t ment may recommend acceptance of additiona l credit for courses taken as a non-degree student durin g the semester the student has applie d for admission to the desired degree program . Official Notification of Admission Officia l notification of admission to CU Denver as an undergraduate , g radu ate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions Processing . Letters from various schools and colleges indicat ing accep tan ce into a particular program are pending subjec t to official notification of admission to the institution. Applicants who do not receive official notification of admissio n within a reasonable period of time (approximately 3 weeks) after sub mitting all applica tion m ateria l s should contac t th e Office of Admissions Process ing (303) 556-2704 . Tentative Admiss ion. Students who are adm itt ed pending receipt of additional docume nt s will be permitted one term to submit th e documents. If temporarily waived official documents are not received by the end of the initial term of attenda nce, registration for subsequent terms will be denied. If at any time addi tional credentials are received which affect your qualifications, the University reserves the right to c han ge the admission decision.

PAGE 17

UNDERGRADUATE AND NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION INFORMATIONI.2 3 Type o f Appl i cant Criteria for Admission1 Required Credentials When t o Apply Notes FRESHMAN IN GENERAL: Compl ete application Not later than : For specific requirements refer (Student seekin g bachelor ' s a) Ranks in t o p 30 of high $30 applicable fee July 22 for fall to th e college sectio n s of this degree who has n ever attended sch ool grad u ating class O ffi cial h ig h schoo l tra nscript Dec. I for spring bulleti n . For example: Music a co llegia t e in stitution) b) Has 15 units of acceptable s howing rank-in-dass , date of May 3 for summer requires an audition. high school work . graduation , 6th semeste r Senior s wh o meet or excee d a ll c) Test scores: grades , co urses in prog ress. admission criteria may appl y as ACT co mp : 25 o r Official ACT o r S<\T scor e early as Oct. I for following fall. S<\T comb: 1050 report Note : Business and Engineering a pplicant s are expected to hav e higher test scores, class rank , and number of academic units. T RANSFER IN GENERAL: Compl ete applicat i on Not l at e r than : Uberal Arts and Musi c transfers (Stud ent seeking a bachelor's Must be in good standing and S30 app lication fee July 22 lor fall with fewer than 12 sem. hrs o f degree who has attended a e ligible to ret urn to all instituTwo official transcripts sent Dec. I for spring college work, Business transfers coll egiate instituti on other tions previously attend ed. from each co llege atte nded May 3 lor summer with fewer than 24 sem . hrs , than CU) Applicants must have minimum and Engineering transfers with 2.0 GPA on all work att e mpted fewer than 24 sem. hrs. must if they have co mpl eted 30 also s ubmit a ll freshm a n o r more semest e r hours. Busi credentials. ness and Enginee r ing applicants will be required t o hav e a higher GPA.3 NOND EG RE E Must be high school graduate Complet e application Not lat er than : Non-degree students wh o have (Studen t i s n ot seekin g a o r have a G.E. D . S I O app li cation fee Jul y 22 f or fall earn e d a baccalaureat e degree degree at th i s institution ) Must be at least 20 years o ld Dec. I lor sprin g shou ld see Graduate School May 3 for summ e r section for additional informa App li cations will a lso be ac-tion. cepted after these deadlines if s pace a ll ows . RETURNING CU STUDENT Must be in good standin g Comp l e ted d egree Not lat e r than : Will be ad mitt e d t o their pr evi(Returning non-degree a nd or July 22 for fall ous major unless a n e w major degree stude nt who has not Dec. I for spring is requested. Students under atten ded a noth er institution May 3 f or summer acad emic suspension in certain since CU) App l ications a lso will be sch oo l s o r colleges at the U ni acce pted alter these deadlines versity o f Col o rad o may enro ll if space allows during the summer t e rms to improve their grade-point averages. FORME R CU STUDENT Same as for transf e r Comple t e applic ation Not la t e r th an : Will be admilled t o previous (Degree stud ent who has SJO applicatio n fee July 22 for fall major unless a different major altended a n othe r instituti o n Two o ffi cial transcripts fro m Dec. I f o r spring is r e qu es t e d on applicati o n . since a/lend in g CU} e a c h inte rvening college May 3 f o r summer CHANGE OF STATUS : Same as for tra n sfer Com plete a pplication Not l a t e r than: Must meet the same crit eria as NON-DEG REE TO DEGREE $30 app licati o n fee July 22 l o r fall transfer student. {CU non-degree student who CU transcript Dec. I l o r s prin g wishes t o enter a degree May 3 for s umm er prog ram ) 2ND UN D ERGRADUATE Same as f o r transfer Compl e t e ap plicati on DEGREE $30 application lee (Students who have receiv e d transcript a bach e lor's d eg ree from CU or any other college or university . ) CHANGE OF STATUS : Must hav e compl e ted d egree Non-degree student app l ication ot lat er than : Only students who have comDEGREE TO NO DEGREE S I O app l ication fee July 22 f or fall pleted and received degrees (Form er CU d egree student Dec. I for spring a r e e li g ibl e to c h ange t o who has graduated and wishes May 3 for s umm er non-degree status. to take additional work) INTERCAMPUS TRANSFER Must be in good standing Compl eted degree Transf e r t o Denver . not later Transfers fro m Denver to an (Student who has bee n e n ro lled than: other campus of CU sho uld o n o n e CU c ampu s and wishes July 22 f o r fall refer to the bull e tin of the t o take courses on a noth e r) Dec. I f o r spr ing campu s to wh i c h they are May 3 f o r summer app l ying f o r a dditi o nal require-Transfer from Denver: refer t o ments. Will be adm it ted to th e bull e tin lor oth e r previou s major unless a differ campus. ent major i s r equested on application . INTRAUNIVERSITY Same as f or transfer. lntrauniversity trans f e r 60 days pri o r t o the beginning TRA SFE R Must be a co ntinuing student appli cation of t h e term (Students who wish to c h a nge enro lled on the cam pu s to CU transc ript from o n e CU college t o a n o th e r , which yo u a r e applying . e.g., f ro m th e College of Uberal Arts and Scien c e s to the College o f Business) 'Require ment s l o r individual schoo l s or co lleges may vary. ' Foreign stude nt s s h o uld see Int e rn a ti o nal Students in the Admissions sectio n o f thi s catalog . ' Applicants who have earned 12-29 semester hours must meet freshman s t a ndard s o r have a minimum transfer GPA of 2 .5. (Appli cant s transferring from Col orado Schoo l o f Mines, CSU, UNC, UCB, or UCCS mu s t hav e a minimum tran s f e r GPA of 2 . 0.)

PAGE 18

I6 / Genera/Information TUI T ION AND FEES General Information All tuition and fee charges are estab lished by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually (usually in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly. The Regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee rates at any time. A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term, and students should con tact the Records Office for further infor mation on the tuition and fee charges for a particular term. The following rates are for the 1990-91 academic year and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating cost. Ot her Fees1 1. Student Activity Fee (required for all students) : For each term .............. $36 .00 This fee supports the activities of the student government and helps provide legal services , recreational activties , student health services, the student news paper, the Center for Student Counseling and Testing, and various student organiza tions. The fee is approved by student referendum and is required of all students at the University of Colorado at Denver . (The fee includes a Student Health fee. ) 2. Auraria Bond Retirement Fee (required for all students) : Each term . . . ............. $ 32.50 3. Student Information System Fee (a non-refundable fee required of all students each term) ...... ..... . . $ 5.00 4. Matriculation F e e (mandatory for the first term for all new students) : . ........................... $15.00 This is a non-refundable fee charged at the student's first registration to cover costs of generating transcripts. 5 . Information Technology Fee $10.00 The Information Technology Fee provides for capital acquisition of new and / or upgraded systems to support student com puting laboratories to include networks and networking infrastructure and facilities directly accessible by students each term . 6. Doctoral dissertation fee (mandatory for all students certified by The Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral disser tation). Students should contact The Graduate School for guidelines established for charges for enrollment. ' Subje c t to change. 7 . Comprehens ive examination fee: Any student in The Graduate School, the Graduate School of Business Administra tion, or Graduate School of Public Affairs must be enrolled during t he term in which the Comprehensive Examination for a master ' s degree is completed . Students who are not taking regular courses during that term must enroll as "Candidate for Degree: ' Students enrolled only as "Candidate for Degree" pay the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour . The charge varies by the school in which the student is matriculated . 8. Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course): Breakage deposit ........... $20 .00 An $8 deduction is assessed for expend able items. The unused portion is returned at the end of the semester . 9 . Music laboratory fee (mandatory for music majors and others enrolled in cer tain music courses): Music fee .............. ... $24.00 Music majors and others enrolled in piano, sound recording and reinforcement , and electronic music must pay this fee. No student is charged more than one $24 fee during a given term. 10. South African Scholarship Fund . The Regents have authorized the Univer sity of Colorado to accept vol untary stu dent contributions of $1.00 per student per semester to be dedica te d to scholar ship and bursaries for the higher educa tion of needy South Afric a n students at South Afric a n universities or at the University of Colorado. Students who wish to contribute to this fund should submit a c ontribu t ion card to the B u rsar ' s Office before the end of the drop / add period each seme s ter . Payment of Tuition and Fees All tuition and fees (except the applica tion fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term , accord i ng to guide l ines in the current Schedule of Classes. Students who register for 7 or more credit hours may arrange at the time of registration to defer payment of part of the charges. Specif i c information on deferred payment is included in the Schedul e of Classes published before each s emester or summer term . Students who fail to complete payment by the published deadlines , or who fail to file the required promissory note, will be a s sessed a $50 penalty . Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even though they may drop out of school . Refund po l icies for s tu dents who withdraw from th e University are included in the Schedu l e of Classes. A student with finan cial ob l igations to the Univers i ty will not be permitted to register for any subse quent t erm, to be graduated, to be issued transcripts, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves l oans and ot her types of indebt edness which are d u e after graduation. Persona l checks are accepted for any Universi t y obligation . Any student who pays with a check t h at is not acceptable to the bank will be charged an additional service charge. Students may pay tuition and fees by credit card. Tuition Appeal s Exceptions to financial obligations incurred may be granted by the Tuition Appea l s Committee. The Committee will only consider appea l s when a student has been medically disabled, has experienced a deat h in the family, or has a change in employment hours or location beyond the student's control. Documentation of these conditions will be required. Exceptions will no t be considered for a student's failure to comply with published dead lines , or changes in employment under the student's control. Please note : tuition appeals must be filed within four months of the end of the term for which the appeal is filed. FALL AND SPRING 1990-91 TUffiON UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN TilE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES and non-degree stu dents without an undergraduate degree Cred i t Hrs. Resident Non-resident 0-1 $89 $393 2 178 786 3 267 1,179 4 356 1 , 572 5 445 1,965 6 534 2,358 7 623 3,278 8 712 3,278 9-15 742 3,278 each credit hour over 15 89 393

PAGE 19

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING C redit Hrs . Resident Non-resident 0-1 $103 $409 2 206 818 3 309 1,227 4 412 1,636 5 515 2,045 6 618 2,454 7 721 3,412 8 824 3,412 9-15 862 3 ,412 each credit hour ove r 15 103 409 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Credit Hrs . Resident Non-resident 0-1 $124 $414 2 248 828 3 372 1,242 4 496 1,656 5 620 2,070 6 744 2,484 7 868 3,45 1 8 992 3,45 1 9-15 1 , 030 3,451 each credit hour over 15 124 414 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS : with programs in the School of Architecture and Planning and NON-DEGREE graduate students and non-Denver campus programs* Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident 0-1 $132 $441 2 264 882 3 396 1,323 4 528 1,764 5 660 2,205 6 792 2 , 646 7 924 3 ,674 8 1,056 3,674 9-15 1 , 099 3 , 674 each credit hour over 15 132 441 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the Graduate School of Business Administration Cre dit Hrs . Res ident Non-resident 0-1 $155 $449 2 310 898 3 465 1,347 4 620 1 ,796 5 775 2,245 6 930 2,694 7 1 ,085 3,743 8 1,240 3,743 9-15 1,292 3 , 743 eac h credit hour over 15 155 449 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College of Engineering, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs Credit Hrs . Resident Non-resident 0-1 $ 1 46 $441 2 292 882 3 438 1,323 4 584 1,764 5 730 2,205 6 876 2,646 7 1,022 3,674 8 1,168 3,674 9-1 5 1,215 3,674 each c redit hour ove r 1 5 146 441 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the School of Education Credit Hrs . 0-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9-15 each credit hour over 15 Resident $136 272 408 544 680 816 952 1,088 1,215 136 Non-resident $441 882 1 , 323 1,764 2,205 2,646 3,674 3,674 3,674 44 1 Graduate degree students who are registered as "candidate for degree" will be assessed the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour plus the Student Information System Fee. * Non-degree students who have previ ously earned a baccalaureate degree are classified as graduate students and assessed graduate tuition regardless of th e l e vel of the class(es) they are taking. Tuition and Fees I 17 THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSllY OF COWRADO RESERVES THE RIGHT m CHANGE TUIDON AND FEES AT ANY TIME. Audit To qu alify as an auditor f or fall or spring semeste r , a student must b e 21 years of age or older or appro ved by the Registrar . Auditors may not be registered for any other University o f Colorado courses during th e time they are auditing and are not e ligible to audi t courses if they are under suspension from the Unive r sity or have outstanding financial obligations to the U niv ersity . The R ecor d s Office does not k eep any record of courses audi t ed; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be establis h ed. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except th ose courses with laboratories or where special equipme nt is used), provided they have received permission from each instr uctor. Auditor's cards are issued after classes begin . This card should be presented to the instructor when requesting permission to attend a class . There i s no auditor s t atus in summer . Auditors, whether resident or nonreside nt , pay resident tuition f or th e audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and libr ary privileges only . Auditors do not receive student park ing privileges, and are not eligible for other student services. Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes Tuition classification is governed by CRS 23-7-101, et. seq . (1973) as amended.1 Insti tutions o f h igher education are bound to the provisions of this statute and are not free t o make exceptions to the rules set forth . The statute provides that an in-state stu dent is one who has been a legal domiciliary of Col orad o for one year or more immediately preceding the begin ning of the term for which the in-state classification is being sought. Persons over 22 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domi cile. Those who are und er 22 years o f age and unemancipated a ssume the domicile of their parent or c ourt appointed legal guardian . An un e mancipated minor ' s parent must, th e refore , have a legal 'A co p y o f th e Col o r ad o R e vised Statutes ( 1 9 73), as a m e nd ed , i s avail a bl e in th e Univ e rsit y o f Col o rad o a t D e nv e r Admissi o n s O ffice.

PAGE 20

18 /Genera/Information domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes. Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one's true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colorado domicile on the person seeking to estab lish th e domicile. The question of intent i s one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connect ions with th e state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado, for tuition purposes, begins the day after connec tions with Colorad o are made sufficient to evidence one's intent. The most common ties with the state are (1) change of driver's license to Colorado; (2) change of automobile registration to Colorado; (3) Colorad o voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado; (5) and most important, payment of state income taxes as a resident by one whose i ncome is sufficient to be taxed. Caution: payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to estab lish legal domicile retroactive to th e time filed. In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term, the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for th e term in question. If one's 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, in-state tuition cannot be granted until the next semester. Once the student's tuition classification is established, it remains unchanged unless satisfactory information to th e contrary is presented. A student who, due to subse quent events, becomes e ligible for a change in classification from resident to nonresident or vice versa must inform the Tuition Classification Officer within 15 days after such a change occurs. An adult student or emancipated minor who moves outside of Colorado must send written notification to the Tuition Classification Officer within 15 days of the change. Once a student is classified as non resident for tuition purposes, the student must petition for a change in classifica tion. Petitions must be submitted NO LATER THAN THE FIRST DAY OF CLASSES of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a non resident. It is preferred for petitions to be received 30 days prior to the beginning of the term . Late petitions will not be consid ered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions Processing. The final decision regarding tuition status rests with the University Questions regarding residence (tuition) status should be referred only to the Tuition Classifica tion Officer. Opinions of other persons are not official or binding upon the University . Additio nal information (including the entire t ext of CRS 23-7-101} is available in the brochure Classification of Students for Tuition Purposes which may be obtained from the Admissions Processing Office. Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel The Colorado Legislature approved resident tuition beginning with the Fall 1986 Semester for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents . ELIGIBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTI FIED EACH TERM. Students ob t ain a comp let ed verificat ion form from the base educat ion officer, and submit the f orm with their military ID to the Records Office after they have registered , but before the end of the drop / add period. At that time the st ud ent's bill will be adjusted to reflect th e resident tuition rate. Students who have been certified remain classif ied as non-residents for tuition pur poses and must petition to change their status once they es t ablish permanent ties to Color ado. FINANCIAL AID Director: Ellie Miller Office: NC 1030 Telephone: 556-2886 The Office of Financial Aid / Student Employment considers qualified students for financial aid awards. If the student's app lication materials are received before the March 29 , 1991, priority date, then the student is considered for a package of need-based gran t , work-study (part-time emp loym ent) , and / or long-term loan funds . For the past several years, these packages have consisted of approximately 50 % grant funds and 50 % of self-help funds (work-study, loan , unmet need). (Graduate students have on l y been receiv ing approximately 10% in grant funds.) If applica tions are received after the March 29 priority date, the studen t is usually conside red only for Pell Grant and for out side student loans (Stafford Loan formerly Guaranteed Student Loan or GSL, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Studen ts, and Supplemental Loan for Stude nts). These funds are not allocated to CU-Denver; they are available throughout the year to students who qualify. There are three separate deadlines for applying for Advantage Scholarship; r efer to the separa te br ochure for further inform ation. App licant s for Colorad o Fellowship , Deans Scholars , and Regents Scholars are subjec t to different deadlines and are reviewed by other CU-Denver depart ments (The Graduate School, undergradu ate dean's offices , and the Office of Admiss ion s respectively). All other stu dents are notified of th eir award status in writing by the Office of Financial Aid / Student Employment. Eligibility Each student must qualify for CU Denver financial aid as follows: 1. Be a U.S. citizen or be admi tt ed to the U.S. by the INS on a permanent basis (except for Colorado Fellowship). 2. Be classified as a degree-seeking stu dent (except for stude nt s applying for Advantage Scholarships). Teacher certifica tion st udent s are eligible to apply as undergraduate studen ts for outside student loans (Stafford Loan, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students , or Supplemental Loan for Students). 3. Be enrolled for a specified minimum number of credits. 4 . Maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined for the financial aid programs. 5. Apply for financial aid by submitting all of the required documentation includ ing the n eed analysis form (except for Colorado Fellowship, Col orado Scholars , Deans Scholars , Regents Scholars , and Emergency Short Term Loans) . 6. Document financial need (except for the programs listed in #S and the following ones which do not require documented need: Advantage Scholarship , Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, and Supplemental Loan for Students). 7 . Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes for the following programs: Colo rado Student Grant, Colorado Student Incentive Grant , Colorado Graduate Grant, Colora do Work-Study, Regents Scholarship, Deans Scholars, and Colorado Scholars. 8. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant. 9 . Be registered for the draft or enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selec tive Se rvice . Application Each applicant must complete the finan cial aid application materials for submission to the Office of Financial Aid. Complete informa tion must be available to the financia l aid counselors before eligibility can be det ermined.

PAGE 21

Limited Funds . The majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a firstcome, first-served basis to eligible students who document financial need and com plete their application process as soon as possible after January 1, 1991. Application comp letion is defined as havin g all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (ACT Family Financial State ment , CSS Financial Aid Form , USAF Sin glefile Form or the AFSA) into the Office of Financial Aid / Student Employment. General financial aid is awarded to eligible students until all of the funds are commit ted for the year. If you complete your file after March 29, 1991, your awards will probably b e limited to the Pell Grant (for first undergraduate students only) and/or outside student loans (Stafford Loan, Sup plemental Loans for Students, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students). Please remember to reapply for financial aid each year. It is the student's responsibility to be sure application materials are complete . Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for application forms and refer to the Financial Aid Fact Sheets for complete details regarding financial aid. All financial aid application procedures are subject to change at any time due to revisions in federal and state laws, regulations, and guidelines. Qualification Financial Need. Most financial aid is based on the concep t of financial need. Your financial aid counse lor calculates financial need as : 1) cost of attendance, minus family contribution which is 2) stu dent / spouse contribution, and 3) parents' contribution (for dependent students only). The cost of attendance is the cost to attend CU-Denver, including tuition and fees , room and board , books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid / Student Employment determines standard budgets for students based upon average tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education. Independent Student. The federal government has specific guidelines that must be followed to define a self supporting student (one who reports only his / her own income and assets when app lying for aid). For 1991-92, a self supporting student is one who is 24 yea r s old or older as of December 31, 1992. If you are under 24, you are considered self-supporting if you fall into one of the following categories: 1. Single undergraduate s tudent with no dependents who was not claimed as a dependent on your parents' 1989 and 1990 federal income tax returns. Also, you must demonstrate that you are selfsufficient by having total income (includ ing financial aid) of at least $4,000 annu ally for the two calendar years prior to your first receipt of federal financial aid. 2 . Graduate or professional student who will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents' 1991 federal income tax return. 3. Married and will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents' 1991 federal income tax return . 4. Student with l ega l dependents other than a spouse. 5 . Veteran of the U.S. armed forces. 6. Orphan or ward of the court. 7. Have unusual circumstances and be approved by the Financial Aid Committee. Contact the Office of Financial Aid / Stu dent Employment for appeal guidelines. If your student/spouse contribution plus your parents' contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance , you will not qualify for need-based financial aid . For 1990-91, the following budgets were used for room and board, transporta tion, and personal expenses per month : sing le students living with parents $330 / month; single students not living with parents $730 / month. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student was approximately $820 per semester, and non-resident tuition was approximately $3300 . These amounts will probably increase by about 5 % for the 1991-92 school year. The contributions from the stu dent / spouse and from the parents of dependent students are calculated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income, savings and other assets , family size, number of children in postsecondary school, medical expenses, and other fac tors. You may appeal for special considera tion of your situation and in some cases the standardized contribution may be adjusted by recommendation of the Finan cial Aid Committee. FINANCIAL AID IS INTENDED 1D SUPPLEMENT (Naf REPLACE) FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS FROM YOU AND YOUR PARENTS. Course Loads. General financial aid (work-study, grants , Perkins Loans) under graduate recipients usually must carry at least 12 credit hours per semester and graduate students usually must carry at least five graduate credits per semester during the academic year (fall/ spring). Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please Finan cial Aid/ 19 check your award letter for the exact number of hours required). Pell Grant (available only to first undergraduates) and outside student loan recipients must car ry at least six credits per semester for under graduates and three graduate credits for graduates. Summer Term 1991 minimum course loads are as follows: Full-time: undergraduate-8 hours, graduate-3 graduate hours; Half-time: undergraduate-4 hours, graduate-2 gradua t e hours. Higher or l ower standards may be required for individual awards. For further information contact the Office of Financial Aid / Student Employment. Satisfactory Academic Progress. CU Denver students must make satisfacto ry academic progress as defined by the Office o f Financial Aid / Student Employ ment in order to be eligib l e and remain eligib l e for financial aid. Students are referred to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid, avai l able in the Office of Financial Aid. Non-Degree Students. Non-degree stu dents are not pursuing a degree in a tech nical sense and, therefore, are only eligible to apply for one type of financial aid at this time-Advantage Scholarship. Continuing Education / Community Col lege of Denver Courses. Classes offered through th e CU-Denver Division of Extended Studies or through the Commu nity College of Denver cannot be included when minimum course loads and satisfac tory academic progress are determined. The exception to'this policy is MATH 112 offered by the Community College of Denver. Residency Status . You are required to be a resident of Col orado for a full calendar year before the Office of Admissions can consider classifying you as a resident for tuition purposes . Non-resident students are encouraged to obtain additional informa tion from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident status. As a resident student, you are potentially eligible for more financial aid programs since you can be considered for the State of Colorado aid funds. Refunds and Repayments . Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from with drawa l or reclassification of tuition status must be applied against the recipient ' s financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Students may be expected to repay a portion of their award if they withdraw from CU-Denver. Appeals. Students may appeal all deci sions of th e Office of Financial Aid/ Stu dent Employment by completing a Request for Review form and submitting it to th e office . Appea l s are considered within three weeks .

PAGE 22

20 / General Information R eapply Each Year. Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each year. Award Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 6-12 weeks after all application documents have been received in the Office of Finan cial Aid. If awarded, an awa r d letter is mailed which includes information such as the type(s) and amount(s) of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours that are required for the award(s). Types of Aid The following are federal programs: I. Pell Grant . Your eligibili ty for the Pell Grant (federally funded) is determin ed before any other aid is awarded. Awards are defined by a strict formula provided by the federal government and amounts vary depending on the student's eligibility index, enrollment status, residency classifi cation, and living status. Students are eligi ble for a Pell Grant if they have not received their first bachelor's degree by June 1, 1991. 2. Outside Student Loans. Your eligibility for all other types of aid should be determined prior to applying for outside student loans . The STAFFORD LOAN (formerly Guaranteed Student Loan) pro gram requires that you show financial need in order to qualify . Most single stu dents who are working full time do not document sufficient financial need to qualify for the Stafford Loan. The primary purpose of this program is to make lowinterest, long-term loans available to s tudents to help them meet t heir post secondary educational expenses. The SUPPLEMENTAL LOAN FOR STUDENTS is a long-term loan program for students who do not document financial need for the Stafford Loan or who need additional funds. Undergraduate dependent studen t s may not borrow the SLS because their parents are eligible to borrow under the same terms. The program for parents is called th e PARENTS LOAN FOR UNDER GRADUATE STUDENTS (PLUS). 3. Supplemental Education Opportu nity Grant (SEOG). A need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a bachelor's degree . 4. Perkins Loan (formerly National Direct Student Loan). The interest rate on this l ong-term loan is 5% and no payments are due until six or nine months (this tim e differs depending on when you first receive a Perkins Loan) after the stu-dent ceases to be enrolled at least half time . 5. College Work-Study . A program that allows students to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at non profit agencies to help meet their educa tional costs. The State of Colorado funds the follow ing programs . 1. Colorado Student Grant. A need based grant for resident undergraduate stu dents . 2. Colorado Student Inc e nti ve Grant. A need-based grant for resident undergradu ates who have not yet obtained a bachelor's degree. This grant is funded 50% by th e federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado. 3. Colorado Graduate Grant. A need based grant for r es ident grad uate studen ts . 4. Colorado Work-Study. A program sim ilar t o the College Work-Study pro gram, but limited to resident undergraduate students. Scholarships Following is a list of the major scholar ships that are offered at CU-Denver . The first listing is for awards funded by the State of Colorado: I. R egents Scholarship is offered to new freshmen and transfer students by the Office of Admissions (556-2704). To qualify, freshmen candidates must rank in the top 20 percent of their high schoo l class and/or have a composite score of 26 or higher on the ACT or a combined score of 1200 on the SAT. Transfer students must have earned a total cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher for at least 1 2 semester hours. The deadline for app lying is March 29, 1991. 2. Colorado Scholars is for undergraduate resident students who have a minimum of 3.0 cumulativ e grade point average for at least 12 CU hours. Contact the Office of Financial Aid / Student Employment for the application proce dures. The deadline for applying is March 29 , 1991. 3. Deans Scholarships are awarded by undergraduate deans offices. Contact your dean's office for more information. The following programs are funded by CU-Denver: I. Advantage Scholarship is for minority and/or first generation college students who meet the income guidelines. Contact the Office of Financial Aid / S tudent Employment for applications. 2. Nelson / Running Wolf Scholarship funds are provided to needy American Indian students. Contact the Office of Student Retention Services (556-2324) for information. 3. Ahlin Fund assistance is available for mobility impaired students. Contact Student Counseling and Testing (556-2815) for applications. Other scholarship information is avail able from the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment, the Auraria Library Scholarship lnfoBank in the reference sec tion, and the Office of Student Counseling and Testing. Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment opportunities are listed in the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment, the Auraria Student Assistance Center, and the Center for Internships and Coo perativ e Education. Full-time undergraduate resident students who apply for College Work-Study and who do not document sufficient financial need may be consi dered for Colorado NoNeed Work-Study. Students who participate in CMEA/MESA, the Pre-Collegiate Development Program, the Minority Scho lars Program, or who apply for Advantage Scho larships are automatically considered for Challeng e Scho larships . Graduate stu dents should inquire about additio nal types of aid through their academic department. Students should be aware that Emergency Student Loans are avail able through the Office of Financial Aid / Student Employment as well as Financial Aid Advances. American Indian studen ts should inquire in the Office of Financial Aid / Student Employment for informa tion about Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships. REGISTRATION Selecting an Academic Program and Courses Students should review the following sections of this catalog that describe the academic programs available at CU Denver, and that provide information by school or college on the various majors availab le, course requirements by major, course load policies, and other pertinent information. Courses available during a particular semester or summer term are listed in the Schedu l e of Classes, published three months before the beginning of each term. Schedules are available from the Records Office. Undergraduate students who need assistance in planning an academic program or in selecting courses should contact the academic unit in which they

PAGE 23

are enrolled to arrange for an advising appoin tm ent prior to registration. Gradu ate students should con t ac t their respec tive grad u ate program for assistanc e . Course Abbreviations In general, the abbreviation preceding the course numb er identifies the depart ment offering the course. Th e first digit in the course numb er indica t es the recom mended class level of the course: The digit after the dash in the course number denotes the credit-hour value of the course. The !-credit lecture/recitation period is 50 minutes long. Hence a stu dent enrolled in a 3-credit hour course will attend class for 150 minutes per week during a 1 &week term. A 3-credit hour course will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class. A laboratory credit includes from two to four hours per week in the laboratory credit includes from two to four hours per week in the laboratory, drafting room or field. Unless the course descriptions specify laboratory work, it is understood that the classes consist of lectures and discussions. Level of Courses 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 Student Classification Lower division Lc ter division Upper division Upper division Graduate students or qualified seniors who have instructor ' s or dean's permission Graduate degree students Master's and Ph .D. graduate students 8000 Ph.D. graduate students Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are: Coreq. -Corequisite Hrs.-Hours Lab.-Laboratory Lect.-Lecture Rec.-Recitation Sem.-Semester Wk.-Week Thus, the description of CHEM. 1020-5 signifies that the course is offered by the chemistry department at the freshman level, and that it carries 5 semester hours of credit (3 hours of lecture credit, 1 hour of recitation credit , and 1 hour of labora tory credit). Further, the student must have completed CHEM. 1010 (the prereq uisite) before enrolling. Graduate School policy permits specifi cally approved courses to be offered concurrently at the 4000 and 5000 levels. Students shou l d expect work at the graduate (5000) l evel to involve demonstration of grea t er maturity and c riti ca l skills than a t the (4000) undergraduate level. Orientation An orientation program for all new stu dents is held at the beginning of the fall and spri n g semesters, prior to the first day of classes. The orientatio n program con ducted by the Office of Student Life pro vides information to new students about some of the activities and services avail able at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process and degree require ments a lso is provided. Academic orienta tion advising sessions are held during the term, before registration for the next term. Dates and times of new student orientations are published in the Schedule of Classes. Registration CU-Denver students can register from any touch-tone telephone. Students will be assigned a time to register and may register at or after their assigned time. REGISTRATION PRIORITIES Registration is by time assignment only. Continuing students, and new students admitted by the priority deadline, will have first priority in the following order: graduate students, new freshmen, fifth year seniors, seniors, juniors, sophomores, freshmen, and non-degree students. All students admitted after the priority dead line will be allowed to register in the order they are admitted. Non-degree students who apply late should be prepared with alternate choices or classes because students in degree pro grams will register first. All non-degree students should contact the academic advisors of the degree programs in which they are interested in order to ensure that their classes will fulfill the requirements of the program . Please note: some courses are not open for registration by non-degree students without special permission. Non-degree students should check the restrictions listed for each course in the Schedule of Classes. POOLED COURSES AT METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with Registration / 21 similar courses at Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD). CU-Denver under grad uate students may register for any of the poo l ed courses lis t ed in the CU Denver Schedule of Classes. Pooled Course Restrictions 1. CU-Denver gra duate students are not eligible to r egister for MSC common pool courses. 2. MSC courses will not be included in the University of Colorado grade-point average. MSC courses will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will count in the hours toward graduation. 3. MSC courses cannot be used to meet specific course requirements toward the major without prior approval of the stu dent's dean. The last 30 semester hours applied toward the bacca l aureate degree must be taken in residence at CU-Denver . MSC common pool courses will not satisfy this residence requirement. INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION CU-Denver degree students may enroll in courses offered by the Community College of Denver, Front Range Commu nity College, and Red Rocks Community College . Students must be enrolled at CU Denver for at least one course during the semester or summer term to be eligible to register interinstitutionally. Registration is on a space available basis. Interinstitu tional courses are evaluated for transfer credit and are not included in a CU Denver student's grade-point average. CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of Colorado cam puses concurrently must contact their school or college on their home campus. Concurrent registration is available only during fall and spring semesters . A degree student registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours {whichever is greater) on another CU campus if: 1. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean. 2 . The course is a required course for the student's degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver. 3. The student obtains approval from the academic dean . 4. There is space available at the other {host) campus. 5 . The student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CU-Denver rates.

PAGE 24

22 / General Information 6. The home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes . 7 . The concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses. Students may not register for an independent study course through concur rent registration. Students may not take courses pass /fail or for "nCH:redit" through concurrent registration. To drop a concurrent course during the host campus drop / add period, arrange the drop at the home campus school or co l lege office. To drop a concurrent course after the end of the host campus drop/add deadline, drop the course at the host campus Records Office . Study Abroad The Office of International Education on the Boulder campus offers study abroad programs that are available for all CU stu dents. More than 30 programs are offered around the world . Resident credit at lower division, upper division, or graduate levels can be earned depending on the program selected and , if appropriate, can be applied to the CU-Denver degree. Students also can apply their financial aid to CU Boulder sponsored study abroad pro grams. Information is available from the Study Abroad Programs, 492-7741. Course Loads Students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer term) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. Students should petition their academ i c dean. Remember that a three-semester-hour course during a fall or spring semester will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class; a three semester-hour course during a summer term will require nine to thirteen hours of work each week outside of class. Suggested maximum course loads for the fall and spring semesters for under graduate students who are employed: Employed 40 or more hours per week: 3-6 semester hours 30-39 hours per week: 5-8 semester hours 20-29 hours per week : 7-11 semester hours 10-19 hours per week: 9-15 semester hours Students should consider their other obligations-academic, professional, and personal-before registering for courses. GRADUATE RESTRICTIONS No more than 15 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a fall or spring semester can be applied toward a graduate degree. No more than 10 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a given sum mer term can be applied to a graduate degree. DEFINITION OF FULL-AND HALFTIME STATUS FOR FINANCIAL AID AND LOAN DEFERMENT: FALL AND SPRING Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in the student's financial aid award letter . Fall and Spring: effective Fall 1987 Undergraduates and non-degree students: Full-time ..... 12 or more semester hours Half-time ...... 6 or more semester hours Graduate degree students: Full-time: 5 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number-5000 +) 8 or more hours of mixed level classes 0 hours as candidate for degree I or more hours of thesis (not master's reports , or thesis preparation) Half-time: 3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number-5000) 4 or more hours of mixed level classes Summer (10 week term) Undergraduates and non-degree students: Full-time Half-time Full-time: 8 or more semester hours 4 or more semester hours 3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number-5000+) 5 or more hours of mixed level classes 0 hours as candidate for degree 1 or more hours of thes i s (not master's reports , preparation) Half-time : 2 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number-5000+) 3 or more hours of mixed l eve l classes Enrollment status for a term cannot be certified until the end of the drop / add period. These hours do not include interinstitu tional hours from CCD or hours at MSC, nor do they include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration. Students receiving veteran's benefits must contact the Veterans Affairs coordi nator for definition of full-time status for summer terms. ceo courses are not considered for fullor half-time status. Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are considered for financial aid pur poses by the Financia l Aid Committee . Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid. SHORT TERM COURSES Courses are also offered in five-week modules in special weekend courses , and in seminars. Topics in Science modular courses are self-contained units designed to cover specific problems or issues in science . Students should contact the college / school office for information on short-term courses offered each semester. ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS Advanced Standing and Advanced Placement Credit Undergraduate students may obtain credit for lower-division courses in which they demonstrate proficiency by examina tion. By passing an examination, the stu dent will be given credit for the course to satisfy lower division requirements and may be eligible to enroll in higher level courses than indicated by the student's formal academic experience . Credit granted for courses by examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate. There are three types of exami nations as described below . Advanced Placement Program The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be exa mined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Place ment Examination are generally given col l ege credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency and are granted advanced standing in those areas. Students with scores below 4 may be considered for advanced place-

PAGE 25

ment by the discipline concerned. All credit must be validated by subsequent academic performance. For more informa tion contact your high school counselor or the Director of Outreach and Recruitment at CU-Denver. Credit By Examination Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade-point average of at least 2 . 0 , and be currently registered. Examinations are arranged through the Records Office, and a nonrefundable fee is charged . Students should contact the office of the dean of the academic unit in which they are enrolled . College-level Examination Program Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credit by examination in sub ject areas in which they have demon strated college-level proficiency . Interested students are encouraged to take appropri ate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examinations Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examina tion Board testing service. For more infor mation call the CU-Denver Testing Center at 556-2861. Students who are interested in credit for CLEP examinations must contact the office of their school or college. Credit for Military Service and Schooling and ROTC MILITARY SERVICE AND SCHOOLING To have credit for educational experiences evaluated , applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application: (1) a copy of DO Form 214 and (2) DO Form 295, Appli cation for the Evaluation of Education Experience During Military Service. USAF personnel may present an official tran script from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of the DO Form 295. Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver. Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions. RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (Rare) Students enrolled in Army or Air Force Rare programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of Rare course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of Rare credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that Rare courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore Rare courses . Further more, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business and then only if the Rare program is completed. Grading System and Policies The following grading system and poli cies for pass /fail registration, dropping and adding courses, and withdrawal from the University have been standardized for all academic units of the University. GRADE SYMBOLS The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol (A, B , C, D, F, IF, IW, or IP) is to be assigned. Special sym bols (NC, W, and • • *) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass /fail desig nations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, explained under Pass /Fail Procedure. A-superior/excellent-4 credit points per credit hour. B-good/ b e tter than average-3 points per credit hour. C-competent/average-2 credit points per hour. D-minimum passing-] credit point per credit hour. F-Failing-no credit points per credit hour. Beginning with the Spring 1984 Semester, the University approved the use of a PLUS/MINUS grading system, where a B+ corresponds to 3.3 credit points per credit hour, and a B-corresponds to 2 .7 credit points per credit hour. Instructors may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS sys tem, but are not required to do so. IF-incomplete-becomes an F if not completed within one year. IW-incomplete-regarded as W if not completed within one year. /P-in progress-thesis at the graduate level only. Policies and Regulations / 23 P/F-pass/fail-P grade is not included in the grade-point average; the F grade is included; up to 16 hours of pass /fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor's degree . H / P/F-honors / pass / fail-intended for honors courses; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in th e grade-point average. Special Symbols NC-indicates r eg istration on a no-credit basis . W-indicates withdrawal without credit. • * • -indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed. Graduate students enrolled at the 5000 level of a 4000 / 5000 course will be expected to complete additional work and be evaluated according to the gradu ate standards specified by the course instructor. An incomplete grade is only awarded when special circumstances prevent a stu dent's completing a course during the term . Students have one year to complete an INCOMPLETE. After one year, an IW is regarded as a DROP-PASSING; an IF as a DROP-FAILING. Students should not reregister for courses in which they have received INCOMPLETES. Most schools and colleges r equire a con tract between the instructor and student outlining the work necessary to "com plete" the incomplete. MID-TERM GRADES Beginning with the Spring 1990 Semester, instructors will be asked to ass ign mid-term grades for a small popula tion of students. Students who may be in some academic difficulty may be con tacted and counseled about support serv ices available to them . Pleas e note : academic support services are available to all students through the Office of Student Retention Services, NC 2012, 556-2324. PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE 1. Students who wish to register for a course on a pass /fail basis must do so during the regular registration . Changes to or from a pass /fail basis may be made only during the regular drop / add period . 2 . Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass /fail basis and credited toward the bachelor's degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass /fail in any given semester. 3. Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of pass /fail registration. All students who register for a pass /fail appear on the regular class roster , and

PAGE 26

24 / General Information a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office, those registrations with a pass /fail designation are automati cally converted by the grade application system. Grades of D and above convert to grades of P Courses taken pass /fail will be included in hours toward graduation . Pass grades are not included in a student's grade-point average . An F g r ade in a course taken pass /fail will be included in the grade-point average . 4. The record of pass /fail registration is maintained by the Records Office. 5. Exceptions to the pass /fail regula tions are permitted for speci f ied courses offered by the School of Education , the Division of Extended Studies, and Study Abroad Programs. 6 . Graduate degree students can exer cise the P/F option for unde r graduate courses only. A grade of P will not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement. 7 . Students who register for a course on a pass /fail basis, may not later decide to receive a letter grade . Each school and college limits the hours and courses for which students may register on a pass /fail basis . Please note: many other institutions will not accept a "P" grade for transfer credit. College Business and Administration Engineering and Applied Science Liberal Arts and Sciences Music PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS 1 6 Hours General Maximum Transfer Students On l y non-business Only 6 semester Only 6 semester electives may be hours may be taken hours may be taken taken pass /fail pass /fail pass /fail Req uired courses Includes courses Maximum of I may not be taken taken in the honors semester hour of pass /fail. Upper program pass /fail may be division humanities applied toward and social sciences graduation for every electives are accept9 semester hours able, otherwise taken in the college major department approval is required ; students without a major are not elig i ble to take courses pass /fail. Recommended maximum one cou r se / semester. May be restricted in Does not include May not be used by certain majors; not courses taken in students graduating included in 30 hours honors, physical with only 30 of C or better work education, cooperasemester hours required for major. tive education and taken at the No more than 6 certain teacher cer University hours P / F any tification courses ; semester. also does not include ENGL. 1002 Proficiency Test or MATH. 1002 Test Only non-music Includes courses electives may be taken in the honors taken pass /fail. No program. more than 6 hours P / F any semester

PAGE 27

NO CREDIT Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and th e dean of their school or college. File the no credit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop / add period . Students who register for a course on a no credit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade . Students may not register again for a course which has already been taken on a no credit basis. SENIOR CITIZENS Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) may audit classes for no charge. Contact the Division of Enrollment and Student Serv ices at 556-8427 , NC 2204. GRADE-POINT AVERAGE The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example , B = 3) by the number of hours for each course , totaling the hours and the credit points , and dividing the total points by the total hours . Grades of P, NC, * * W, IP, IW, and IF are not included in the grade-point average. If an IF grade has not been completed within one year , the course is regarded as failed and a grade of F is automatically calculated in the grade-point average at the end of the one-year grace period. If an IW grade has not been completed within one year , the course is regarded as dropped . If a course is repeated , all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point average . The University of Colorado grade-point average does not include courses taken at other institutions. The grade-point average of graduate students includes only courses, credit hours, and credit points accumulated while enrolled in a Graduate School Program . The grade-point average does not appear on official transcripts issued from the Records Office but does appear on the Grade Report issued each semester . Students should consult with the dean of their college or school for explanation of any exceptions made to the University uniform grade-point average. Undergraduates and non-degree stu dents must maintain a 2.0 grade-point average to remain in good standing. Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain in good standing. Students whose GPA falls below the 2 . 0 / 3 . 0 level are subject to probation or suspension . Such students will be notified by their school or college. GRADE REPORTS Grade reports are mailed to CU-Denver students approximately two weeks after the end of the term. To obtain replace ment reports, students must present picture identification at the Records Office . Student Classification Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed: Freshman 0-29 hours Sophomore 30-59 hours Junior 60-89 hours Senior 90+ hours All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado. Graduation Undergraduates . Students who have completed 80 or more semester hours should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or college to determine what requirements remain for graduation. Students intending to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their graduation term . Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated . After students have been certified to graduate they must reapply to return to CU-Denver . Graduates . Students must file an Application for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with The Graduate School on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term . Check with The Gradu ate School for more complete information . Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated. After students have been certified to graduate , they must reapply to return to CU-Denver. Commencement . Letters will be mailed in early April to students eligible to partic ipate in the spring commencement. Information will be provided about ordering special display diplomas, being fitted for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree recorded . Students graduating at the end of the summer term or the end of the fall semester may participate in the following spring commencement. Transcripts Transcripts of academic record at the University of Colorado (all campuses) may Fblicies and Regulations I 25 be ordered in person or by mail from the University of Colorado at Denver , Transcript Office , 1200 Larimer St., Campus Box 167, Denver , CO 80204 . Official tran scripts will not be available until approxi mately four weeks after final examinations . A transcript on which a degree is to be recorded will not be available until approximately eight weeks after final examinations. Requests should include the following: 1. Student's full name (include given or other name if applicable}. 2 . Student number. 3 . Birthdate. 4 . The last term and campus the stu dent attended . 5 . Whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordered near the end of a term . Whether the request should be held until a degree is recorded. 6. Agency , college, or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included . Transcripts sent to students are labeled "issued to student: ' 7 . Student's signature. (This is the stu dent's authorization to release the records to the designee . ) There is no charge for individual official transcripts. Transcripts are prepared only at the student's request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Official transcript s r e quire five to seven working days to be generated. Unofficial copies of transcripts sent to CU Denver from other institutions can be requested at the Records Office . Official transcripts should be requested directly from the issuing institution . Unofficial CU transcripts are available to students in the CU-Denver Records Office. Students must present picture ID. Adding and Dropping Courses1 ADDING COURSES Students may add courses to their origi nal registration during the first 12 (8 in the summer) days of full-term classes, provided there is space available. Instruc tor approval may be required after the first week of classes. DROPPING COURSES 1. Students may drop courses without approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (8th day of the 'For the exact dates, check th e S c h e dul e of Classe s for the appropriate t e rm .

PAGE 28

26 / General Information summer term) . Tuition will not be charged for the courses which are dropped as long as the student is not withdrawing. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student's permanent record . 2. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term) , the instructor ' s signature is required and the instructor must indicate whether the student is passing or failing. If the student is passing, the course will appear on the student's permanent record with the grade of W If the student is failing , the course will appear on the permanent record with an F 4. Dropping all courses requires an offi cial University withdrawal form. Deadlines for module courses and inten sive courses are published in the Schedule of Classes each term . Withdrawal from the University To withdraw from the University, stu dents must obtain approval f rom their academic dean ' s office, the Bursar ' s Office, and the Records Office. The withdrawal date is recorded on the student's perma nent record page. If the withdrawal date is prior to the 13th day of the semester (9th day of the summer term), the courses will not appear on the student's permanent record . If the withdrawal date is after the 12th day , the courses will appear with W grades. Students may not withdraw after the lOth week of the semester (7th week of the summer term) except under documented circumstances clearly beyond their control. Students who are receiving veteran's benefits or financial aid also must obtain the required signature of those respective offices. International students must obtain clearance from the Office of International Students . A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receiv e grades ofF for all course work enrolled for during that term. To withdraw from the University, a graduate students must apply to the dean of their Graduate Program for permission to withdraw in good standing . Students who withdraw without communicating wit h the dean and without filing the appropriate Withdrawal Form will be marked as having failed their courses for the term. Deadlines for module courses and inten sive courses, as well as specific require ments and tuition adjustment , appear in the Schedule of Classes published prior to the beginning of each term. Originality of Work In all academic areas it is imperative that either work be original or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons ' ideas or language . Student s should consult with instructors to learn specific proc e dures appropriate for documentin g the work of others in each given field . Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the University . Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Periodically, but not less than annually , the University of Colorado informs stu dents of the Family Educational Rights a nd Privacy Act, with which the institu tion intends to comply fully. The Act was designed to protect the privacy of educa tional records , to establish t he right of stu dents to inspect and review their educational records, and to provide guide lines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through inf ormal and for mal hearings. Students also have the right to fil e complaints with the Family Educa tional Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act. Local policy explains in detail the proce dures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the Act. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on eac h of the seve r al campuses of the University of Col orado . The following items of student informa tion have been designated b y the Univer sity of Colorado as public or directory information: student name, address , tele phone number , dates of attendance, regis tration status , class, major field of study , awards, honors, degree(s) conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities , physical factors (height, weight) of athletes , date and place of birth. This information may be disclosed by the University for any pur pose at its discretion. Currently enrolled students may with hold disclosure of any category of infor mation under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. To withhold dis closure , written notification must be received in the Records Office on the appropriate campus prior to the end of the drop / add period in the term . Forms requesting the withholding of directory information are avai l able in the Records Office . The request to withhold disclosure will remain in effect until the student provides written notification to the Records Office . The University of Colorado assumes that when a student fails to request to have directory information withheld, the stu dent is indicating approval for disclosur e of information for that term and following terms until otherwise requested. Questions concerning the Family Educa tional Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Records Office , 556-2389 . University of Colorado at Denver Confidentiality of Academic Records STUDENTS: DO have the right to view and inspect their educational records (excluding any financial records of their parents) . DO have the right to have Directory Infor mation withheld from all persons or organizations outside the Univ ersity. Directory Information includes : name, address , telephone number date and place of birth dates of attendance, registration status, class, major fiel d of study awards, honors, degree(s) conferred past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities physical characteristics (height , weight) of athletes DO NOT have the right to obtain their grades, or other information not consid ered Directory Information , by telephone . PARENTS: DO have the right to obtain the educa tional records of their child only if they provide a signed statement that their son or daughter is a dependent as defined by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. The Records Office , in NC 1003 , 556-2389, has forms available to parents for such requests. Parents are, however, encouraged to obtain final grades with a written approval from the student. UNIVERSITY OF COWRADO PERSONNEL: DO have the right to use educational records of students in the normal exercise of their duties. DO NOT have the right to use educational records of students for employment pur poses, for social organizations , for personal

PAGE 29

reaso ns, o r for other no n-ed ucational interes ts, without writte n consent of t h e s tud e nt. PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS OliTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY OF COWRADO : DO have th e right to obta i n the Directory Informatio n l isted above, unl ess t he stu den t h as m ade a req u es t for non disclosu r e . When the term microfiche, or the comp uter termina l onl ine file of t h e Student Information Syste m indicates PRIVATE, i nquirers will be tol d that no infor mation ca n be released wit hout the student's written consent. PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING FINANCIAL AID 10 STUDENTS: DO have the right to educational records of stude n ts only as necessa r y in determin ing and enforcing terms of financial aid. PERSONS IN AN EMERGENCY : DO have th e right to obta in confidentia l academic records necessary to protect the healt h or safety of stude nt s and others , b u t such information will only be released by the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services, 556-8427. These reg u lations are required by t he Famil y Edu cational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 {the Buckley Amendment). For further information, please call the Records Office at (303) 556-2389. Student records will be released only to the st u de n t with current, appropriate iden tifica tion o r upon written a u thorization of the stude n t whose records are being requested. SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES Alumni Association The CU-Denver Alumni Association supports the development and awareness of the U n iversity through a variety of networks and activities. Founded in 1976, students a ut omatically become members upo n graduation. F riend s a n d non-degree former students are also welcome to participate. Horizo ns, a newspaper p u blished three times a year, is mailed to members of the association. Alumni are invited to attend perio dic reunions and/or activities w h ich might int erest them. T h e Alumni Mack Easton Award, the Alumni R ecognition Award, a n d the Alumni Legislative Award are b estowed each year at commencement a nd are sponsored b y the Associa tion. A prog ram of alu mni use of t h e ca mpu s rec reatio n ce nt e r , libr a ry, a nd parkin g l o t s is also available th roug h t h e Associa t ion. The governing board i s comprise d o f alumni rep resenting all schools and co l leges on campus. This group plans events, imp l eme n ts prog r ams, a nd raises fund s with th e goa l of advanci n g and increasing the visibility of the Unive r s ity. Auraria Book Center S tud e nt Union : groun d l evel, 556-3230 Hours : M:fh 8-6, F 8-5, Sat. 10-3 except vacation and interim per i ods. The A ur a ria Boo k Cent e r carries aca demic, tec hn ical, reference, and exam preparation books in support of your higher education . Best sellers, new releases, and gift book se l ections change frequently and are often accompanied by displays of special value books in many subjects. For additiona l sav i ngs on genera l reading books , join the Auraria Book Club at t h e Book Informa t ion desk. Spe cial orders and out of print searches are available at no charge. Students: Bring your course printouts to locate t extbooks! Subject areas are marked on each set of shel ves; depart mental ab b reviations, course and sect i on numbers are printed on a shelf tag be l ow each required or optiona l textbook. When available, u sed textbooks sell for 75 per cent of t h e new book price. A full refund is given for new and used books accom panied by your receipt and returned within t h e f irst three weeks of class for regular semesters and during the first week of class for short terms . Please read the refund policy attached to your receipt! Macintosh , IBM, Zenith, NeXT, and Toshiba personal computer systems and a variety of software are offered to Auraria campus students at educational discount prices . A current , validated Auraria ID must be presented at the t ime of pur chase. Rounding out the educational sup ply /c ampus life areas are insignia sportswear , gifts and cards, and supplies for sch oo l , office, art and design . The Convenience Store is located near the main store in the Student Union lower mal l and h as extended h ours for those wishing to buy snacks, magazines , s undries and school supplies. Used texts are bought back from students throughout t h e year, and merchandise refunds and exchanges also are performed here. Auraria Reprograp h ics of f ers full-serv i ce copying in the Convenience Store, M:fh 7:30 a.m . -6 p.m. and F 7:30 a.m. 5 p.m. Special papers, co l or copying , transparen -S peci a l Prog ram s and F acilit ies/ 27 cies, red u ctions and enlargements, lamination a nd o t her optio n s may be specified for j o b s o f all sizes. W o rld w i de FAX se r vice a n d s hipp ing of pac k ages by U P S an d Federa l Express also are available . Two IDs are req u ire d f o r purchases paid for by c h eck. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard , VISA, and American Express c h arges. Computing Services Computing Services supports computer and network use by both the academic and adm i nistrative comm u nities at CU Denver. All centralized administrative sys tems are developed, maintained, and processe d by University Managemen t Systems in Boulder with data entry, output processing, and user support provided by Comput i ng Services in Denver. Most Den ver campus administrative applications are developed, maintained, and processed by Computing Services. Most academic processing is either done on campus or thro u gh o n e of several networks availab l e through Computing Services. The Denver campus maintains a VAX 8800 under VMS, a 10-processor Sequent Symmetry under UNIX and Intel 16-processor Hypercube a l so under UNIX. A communications network allows access to all camp u s minicompu t e r s as well as connect i on to the CARL on-line library card-<:atalog . The VMS and UNIX com puters are connected to the Ethernet backbone and are nodes on the growing Colorado SuperNet which provides access to many academic computing networks (ARPANET, NSFNET, JVNCNET, CSNET, etc.) as well as high-speed connections to the Colorado School of Mines, University of Denver, Colorado Springs and Bou lder CU campuses , and Colorado State University. CU-Denver also is a BITNET site. There are over 1100 personal computers located on the campus in ten teaching laborator ies, three pub lic l abs, individ ual l aboratories, and in offices. Computing Services staff provides assistance to academic and administrative users on all available computing systems. Advisors and a full-time academic user services staff assist students and faculty with ques t ions regarding software pack ages, programming, the u se of computer systems and software availability. Adminis trative users are assisted with planning, systems design, programming and day-to day computing activities by Computing Services user services and operations per sonnel. Campus computi n g systems are maintained by an opera t ions staff who also assist faculty and staff with hardware planning, acquisitions, q u estions, and

PAGE 30

28 / General Informatio n problems. This staff also operates cam pu s minicomputers and telecommunicatio n s equipment. The goal of Computing Services is t o assist all members of the CU-Denver com munit y in using computing as an ef f ective t oo l in t heir work . For further information and an informative book l et about com puting at CU-Denver, please call 556-2583. Division of Extended Studies The Division of Extended Studies offers a wide variety of programs for individuals interested in continuing their persona l and professional ed ucation . These programs include courses for academic credit, non credit, and ce rtifi cate courses for profes sional d evelopment and personal e nrichm ent. Extended Studies credit courses supp lement the University's genera l course offer ings and include weekend and evening options. Credit received for these courses appears on a CU-Denver transcript and can be applied toward degree programs. Tuition is charged separa tely from that for courses in the regular program. Noncredit courses explore a wide array of topics including: personal and professional devel opment, test preparation, foreign lan guages, computers, fine arts , writing and literature, and recreation. Extended Studies offers University resources to employees in business, industry, governmental agenc ies, and profes sional organizations. A blend of education and training is provided in a variety of program areas, both credit and noncredit, through customized training, targeted short courses, seminars and workshops . Individuals interested in obtaining a copy of the Division of Extended Studies Bulletin or other information are invited to call Extended Studies at 556-2735. University of Colorado Foundation, Inc. The University of Colorado Foundation , Inc. was established in 1967 by the Board of Regents to solicit, receive and administer gifts from private sources. In 1981 the CU Foundation established a Denver campus office. The chief goal of the University of Colorado Foundation, Inc. is to promote the general welfare, development , growth and well-being of the University of Colorado . The Foundation raises and manages pri vate funds in support of CU's missions in teaching, research, and public service. The CU Foundation staff works with adminis tration and faculty to match academic nee d s with private support, generates interest and enthusiasm for the University, recruits and organizes volunteers, solicits gifts, and assists donors in planning gifts. International Education/Study Abroad The University of Colorado at Denver offers students a variety of opportunities for international education and study abroad. Academic programs in each of the schools and co lleg es of CU-Denver provide international opportunities for stu dents . For example the International Affairs program is a n interdisciplinary program open to all under gra duates and the Ins t itute for Int ernationa l Business within the College of Business and Administration focuses on g lobal business issues. Students interested i n int ernationa l programs and study should contact their advisors. The Office of International Education on the Boulder campus expedites the exchange of students and faculty, hosts foreign visitors, promotes special relation ships with foreign universities, and adv ises foreign students and scholars for Fulbright and other scholarships at CU-Boulder. The office also arranges study abroad pro grams and offers over 30 different programs aro und the globe. Students on any CU campus can participate in most of these programs. Some of the study abroad programs are of the traditional junior year abroad vari ety, in which students are placed directly in foreign universities for an academic year. Such programs are available at the University of Lancaster, England; the University of Bordeaux, France; the Universi t y of Costa Rica in San Jose; the American University in Cairo, Egypt; the University of Regensburg, Germany; the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel; the Institute of Higher Education and Technology in Monterrey, Mexico ; and Tunghai University in Taiwan. For students unable to spend an aca demic year abroad, programs for a single semester or summer are available with various emphases, including intensive lan guage learning. Single semester programs are offered in Rennes, France; Guadalajara and Monterrey, Mexico; Norwich, Engla nd ; San Jose, Costa Rica; Alicante , and Madrid, Spain; and Taichung, Taiwan. Summer programs are located in Kassel, Germany; Annecy, France; and London, England. Spec ial summer programs, e.g., art history in Italy, are organized with specific depart ments upon request. Students are enrolled at the University of Colorado while participating in these study abroad progra ms . Th e applicability of cre dit in particular d epartmen t s and colleges of CU-Denve r is up to the d epart ments and colleges. A B average wit h the equiva lent of two years of college l evel work in th e appro priate language is required f or most o f the academic year programs. Financial aid from CU-Denver can be applied to program costs i n most cases. More information a bout study abroad programs is availab l e in the Office of International Education, Boulder campus, 492-7741. Auraria Student Assistance Center Division The Auraria Studen t Assistance Center Division (ASACD) is composed of nine offices offering specialized assistance to staff, facu lty, and all present a nd prospec tive students on the Auraria Higher Edu cation Center campus. 1. Office of the Division Dean (ODD). The office is responsible for the supervi sion of th e administra tive and program functions of the Division. 2. Office of Information and Referral, Housing, and Disability Services (0/RHDS). This offi ce provides the following services to stude nts , prospective stu dents, faculty, and staff: Information about each of the three Auraria institutions, including tuition rates, admissions criteria, and informa tion about specific courses Campus tours Assistance in locating shortand long term housing To students who have physical, learning, orpsyc hiatri c/emotiona l disabilities, this office provides the following academic suppor t services: Taped textbooks Sign l anguage and oral interpreters Notetakers Scribing Test accommodation Sale of handicap parking permits Disability-related counseling Advocacy 3. Office of Career Services (OCS) . The Office of Career Services offers assistance to studen ts and alumn i in planning their careers and seeking employmen t through the provision of on-campus employer interviews, current job vacancy listings, resume referrals , career counseling , Campus Career Library, career testing, and a computerized career guidance sys tem (Discover). The student employment office within the OCS maintains a listing of part-time and temporary job openings for currently enrolled students. Workshops

PAGE 31

and se min ars are offere d on suc h topics as resume writing, inte rvi e w preparati o n , job sea rch strategies, mock intervi ews, skills in the work environment, va l ue s and the work e nvironm ent , researching your caree r , and deci s i o n making . 4 . Office of Inte rnationa l Program s {OIP). The Office of Int e rnational Pro grams assists int e rnationa l students on camp u s from approximate l y 80 countries by providing s upp o rt se rvices and aiding in bridging th e cu ltur a l gaps whic h many experie n ce when ente ring th e comm unity to atte nd college. Servi ces include ori e nta tion for new students, co un seling on immigration issues, host family accom mo d a tion , support for personal adjustme nt , acc ulturation and peer interaction, a n international stude nt rece pti on and potluck dinner s during th e year , and post a dmissions follow-up. In a dditi on, OIP offers se rvic es for Auraria students wishing to s tudy abroad, coo rdin ating the Int e rnational Student Exchange Program OSEP) of CU-Denver, and pro viding infor mation on o ther study abroad programs. The office also acts as liaison with co n s u lates, missions, embassies, and foreign orga nization s . 5. Spring International Language Center {SILC}. Spring Int e rn at i ona l Language Center (SILC) has been operating an Eng lish l anguage program on the Auraria campus since August 1 987 . This cen ter off ers intensive English l anguage i n s truction (25 hours p e r week) to foreign st ud e nts. I t is authorized by INS to issue l-20's in order for students to apply for F-1 visa s t a tus . In addition, SILC provides l anguage proficiency testing services on request for students hoping to enter CU Denver, CCD or MSCD. SILC classes are used for observation and research by indiv iduals b eing trained on campus to become English as a second l anguage teachers. SILC provides ext ensive support services t o its students including a host family program , housing information, counseling services, and social activit i es designed to make the foreign student feel at home in the United S t ates. SILC work s closely with the ASACD/ Office of Inter nationa l Programs to further enhance the services offered to all international students on campus . 6. O ffice of Colorado Rehabilitation Services (CRS). The Office of Colorado Rehabilitation Services helps individuals with handicaps to prepare for, secure, and maintain suitable employment. Eligibility for services is based upon the presence of a physical or mental disability , which for the individual constitutes or results in a substa nti a l h andicap to employment. In addition , there must be a reasonable expectation the Rehabilitation Services may b e nefit th e individual in t erms of emp loyability . The specific services that will be r e nder e d in a particular case will d epe nd upon th e ind ividual ne eds o f th e client. Counse l ing and guidance Physical and mental restoration serv i ces Vocational an d other trainin g services Occupational lice ns es Rehabilitation engineering services Telecommuni ca tion s , technol ogica l aids Placement in sui t able e mplo yment, cons istent with th e client's capacities/abilities 7 . A uraria Child Care Center /Auraria Osage Child Care Center (CCC/CCC Osage) The Auraria Child Care Center/A urari a Osage C hild Care Center serves the child car e needs of stude nts , staff and facult y o f the Auraria cam pus by providing high quality early childhoo d educatio n and care programs. The c hild care pro grams are offere d a t two sites: The Auraria Child Car e Center (southwes t corne r of th e campus) a nd the Auraria Osage Child Care Center (1lll Osage). The child care programs are consistently recognized by the educa tional co mmunity for their high quality early chi ldh oo d care and education . Developmentally appropri ate pra c tices for yo un g c hildren guide th e educatio nal programs that are provided . Curri c ulum planning is flexibl e and based on c hildr e n's interests. Experiences are planned in accordance with "Key Experie n ces" adapted from the Hig h / Scope Cognitively Oriented Curriculum. Supervising and assisting t eachers in the Child Care Centers are all degree d teachers meeting the certification guide lines of the National Academy of Early Childhood programs. Children aged 18 months to six years are served at the Auraria Child Care Center . The Center also h as a fully accredited k indergarten program . Childr en aged six weeks to five years are served at the Auraria Osage Child Care Center. Auraria Student Union The Student Union, located at 9th and Lawre n ce, h ouses a cafeteria, the campus Book Center , a study lounge , game room , offices for student government and organi zations , a copy center , exhibit space , locker rentals , meeting and conf e rence facilit ies, and a tavern. University Fblicies / 29 UNIVERSITY POLICIES Affirmative Action/Equa l Opportu nityffitle I X The University of Colorado at Denver is co mmitted to enhancing the diversity of its work force and its s tud ent body . Diver sity amo ng faculty, staff, administrators, a nd students is esse ntial to educatio nal excelle n ce and to acco mpli shing CU Denver's miss i on. Just as diversity in aca demic pro grams an d scholarly perspec tives e nri c h es the University, so too does diversity amo n g faculty, s taff, administra tors, a nd students. Diversity among faculty, staff, and adm inistr ators provides ro l e models an d mentors f o r stude nts , who will b ecome future l eaders in aca deme a nd in the l arge r society, and ens ur es that a broad array of exper i e n ces and world views will inform and shape teaching , research, service, and decision making at CU-Denver. As the only public university serving th e Denver m etropolitan area, CU-Denver recognizes, acknow l e dg es, and acce pts its central role in education to take explicit affirma tiv e action to emp loy, retain, a nd advance in employme nt qualified appli cants and employees, and to admit, retain, and advance qualified applicants a nd students regardless of their race, co l o r , religion, national ori gin, gender , age, disability, or veteran sta tus. In employment and educational pro grams , CU-Denver does n ot discriminate and will not tolerate discrimination on the basis of race , gender , age, color , nat i ona l origin , disability , or ve t eran status. CU-Denver has adopted an affirmative action plan to implement these commit ments. For information , contact the Office of Affirmative Action, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 700, 556-2509. Ombuds Office I n any l arge organizatio n , misunder standings and disagreements may occur. The Ombuds Office helps to enhance the clarity and dissemination of information, to simplify decision making and communi cation, to assist with the process of change and with adjustment to change , and to improve understanding among staff , s tud ents, faculty, and administrators. The Ombuds Office provides informa tion about programs, policies , services, and procedures affecting members of the University community ; makes referrals to appropriate state , CU system, and CU Denver resources; serves as consultant in the preparation and review of policies and

PAGE 32

30 / General Information procedures; and assists in the solution of problems and the resolution of disputes. Ombuds Office services a r e informal, impartial, confidential, and independent of administrative authorities . These services do not replace or circumvent existing channels, but help them work more effectively. For further information or assistance, contact the Ombuds Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 850, 55M493. University Policy Regarding A Drug-Free Workplace The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing a drug-free work place and environment. The University prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distri bution, dispensation, possession, or use of any controlled substance in the workp l ace. Those individuals who are found to be in violation are engaged in serious miscon duct and subject to disciplinary action consistent with the Faculty Handbook (1988), the applicable rules of the State Personnel System, the University ' s Unclas sified Staff Handbook, and the Student's Discipline and Review Procedures. Academic Honor Code and Discipline Policies Members of the University of Colorado at Denver feel it is an historically estab lished rule of education that instructors have the authority to conduct classes, make assignments , require examinations or other exercises , and make judgments about the academic performance of students . Maintaining the quality and high perfor mance of students makes it imperative that the academic work completed at the University be original and completed honestly. It is the concern of every stu dent and faculty member that such stan dards be maintained. A university ' s reputation depends on the highest stan dards of intellectual honesty and ethical conduct. Academic disciplinary matters are con cerns to be addressed by schools or co l leges, allowing each school/college to determine the severity and consequences of each infraction . Under the Laws of the Regents, Article IX 2.8 and Article VI.C, all matters of educational policy affecting the school or college including academic requirements for admission, for continu ance and for graduation shall be under the jurisdiction of each school or college . In addition, the college or school shall have jurisdiction over matters of academic ethics/academic dishonesty . Each college and school is required to maintain a standing committee to decide cases of academic dishonesty as defined in this document. Students and faculty are urged to understand what constitutes aca demic dishonesty in order to better sup port and maintain high standards of academic scholarship and co nduct. FORMS OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY As members of the academic community, students and faculty accept the responsibility to conduct themselves with integrity in a manner compatible with the University ' s function as an educational institution . Furthermore, all members of the academic community have a specia l responsibility to ensure that the Univer sity's ethical standards are maintained. One of these standards is academic honesty. Many students underestimate how strongly most faculty and peers feel about academic honesty . Academic dishonesty is defined as a student's using unauthorize d assistance with intent to deceive an instructor or such other person who may be assigned to evaluate the student's work, in meeting course and degree requirements. Examples of aca demic dishonesty include , but are not limited to the following: A. Plagiarism Plagiarism is the use of distinctive ideas or words belonging to another person without providing adequate acknowledge ment of that person ' s contribution . Regardless of the means of appropriation, incorporating another's wo r k into one's own requires adequate identification and acknow ledgement. Plagiarism is doubly unethical because it deprives the true author of the rightful credit and gives that credit to someone who has not earned it. It is the theft of intellectual property. However, acknowledgement is not neces sary when the material used is common knowledge. When the source is not noted, the following would constitute plagiarism: l. Word-for-word copying . 2 . The mosaic (to intersperse a few words of one ' s own here and there while, in essence, copying another's work) . 3. The paraphrase (the rewriting of others ' work, yet still using their fun damental idea or theory) . 4 . Fabrication (inventing or counterfeit ing sources) . 5. Ghost-written material (submitting another's effort as one's own). It is also plagiarism to neglect quotation marks on material that is otherwise acknowledged. B. Cheating Cheating involves intentionally possess ing, communicating, using (or attempting to use) materials , information , notes, study aides, cheat sheets , or other devices not authorized by the instructor in any aca demic exercise , or the communication with any other person during such an exercise. Examp les: l. Copying from another ' s paper or receiving unauthorized assistance from another during an academic exercise or in the submission of academic material. 2 . Using a calculator when the use has been specifically disallowed. 3. Collaborating with another student or students during an academic exercise without the consent of the instructor. C Fabrication and Fal sification This is the intentional and unauthorized alteration or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise. Examples: l. Fabrication involves inventing or cou nterfeiting information ; i.e., creating results not obtained , as in a laboratory experiment. 2. Fal sification invo l ves altering results, deliberately changing information to suit one's needs . D. Multipl e Submission This is the submission of substantial por tions of either written or oral academic work which has previously earned credit when such submission is made without instructor authorization. E. Misuse of Academic Materials This is intentionally or knowingly des troying, stealing, or making inaccessible , library or other academic resource material. Examples: l. Stea l ing or destroying library or refer ence materials or computer programs or files. 2. Stealing or destroying another stu dent's notes or materials, or having in pos session such materials without the owner's permission. 3. Receiving assistance in locating or using sources of information in an assign ment where such assistance has been forbidden by the instructor.

PAGE 33

4. Illegitimate possession and disposition of exami n a t ions or answer keys to tests and exam i nations . 5. Unaut h orized alteration, forgery, or falsification of official academic records . 6. Unauthorized selling or purchasing of examinations , papers , or assignments. F Complicity in Academic Dishonesty This i s intentionally or knowingly con tributing t o the academic dishonesty of another. These examples of academic dishonesty shall not be construed to be comprehen sive and infractions will be dealt with on an indiv i d ual basis. It is the obligation of each student to assist in the enforcement of academic standards; infractionswhether by students or faculty-should be first brought to the attention of the ins t ructor . PROCEDURES I N CASES OF SUSPECTE D ACADEMIC DISHONEST Y Students concerned about academic dishonesty should contact their school or col lege for more specific information. Faculty and staff members or students may submit charges of academic dishonesty against students. A student who has evidence that another student is gui l ty of academic dishonesty s h ould inform t he instructor or the Dean of the appropriate college in writing of the charge . A faculty member w h o has evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty should confront the student with the evidence . In cases of academic dishonesty, the faculty member has the authority to reprimand the student appropriately, which could include the issuance of a failing grade (F). In s u c h case of issuance of failing grade for academic dishones t y , the faculty mem ber shall s u bmit a written report to the Dean of t h e appropriate college within five (5) working days. The report shall include, but is not limited to, the time, place , nature of offense(s), the name(s) of the accused, the accuser(s), witnesses (if any) . If the faculty member feels that his or her reprimand or action is an insuffi cient sanction for a particular case of aca demic dishonesty , the facu l ty member may recommend to the Dean of the appropria t e college that further action be taken . If this signed report recommends further action, the Dean or a committee designated shall schedule a disciplinary hearing as soon as possible. The student has the right to be represented by legal counsel and to be present during the committee ' s proceedings. Student(s) must notify the Dean of the appropriate college five (5) working days in advance of the hearing tha t he / she intends to have legal counsel present. The Dean or the commi t tee des i gnated may take any of the following actions : I . Take no further action against the accused student(s) . 2 . Place student(s) on disciplinary proba tion for a specified period of time. The record of this would be kept in the com mittee's confidential files and the student's academic f i l e . 3. Suspension of registration for a specified period of time. A record of this shall be kept in the committee's confidential file and a copy sent to the Registrar. 4 . Expu l sion: no opportunity to return to the college in which the infraction occurred. A record of this shall be kept p e rmanently in the committee's confiden tial file and a copy sent to the Registrar. Notificatio n to Stud e nt(s) In all cases, the student(s) should be notified of the hearing after seven work ing days, in writing of the Dean's or the designated committee's decision . Interinstitu tional A p pea l P rocedures Students who are taking courses at CU Denver, but are enrolled at other educa tional inst i tutions on t h e Auraria campus and are charged with dishonesty , are sub ject to the same procedures outlined above. Code of S tudent Conduct (Student Rig hts and R espons ibili ties and Procedures for Disciplinary R eview and Action) STA NDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR WHICH ACTION MAY B E TAKEN IF A VIOlATION OCCURS All persons on University property are required for reasonable cause to identify themselves when requested by University or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers , the University reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to University per sonne l or property and those who inter fere with its function as an educational institution . All persons on CU-Denver / Auraria property who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applica ble to University students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations . U n ivers i ty Policies/ 3 1 The behaviors outlined below will not be tolerated because they t h reaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose o f t he University and the per sonal rights and freedoms of its members. I. Intentional obstruction, disruption , or interference with teaching, research , disc iplinary proceedings, or other University activities, including its pub lic service and administrative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denver / Auraria premises . 2. Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of stu dents , school officials , employe es, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU Denver / Auraria campus. 3 . Physical abus e of any person on property owned or controlled by the CU Denver / Auraria Higher Education Center o r at functions sponsored or supervised by the University , or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person . 4 . Verbal or physical harassment and / or hazing in all forms , which includes , but is not limited to, striking, laying hands upon , threatening with violence , or offering to do bodily h arm to another person with intent to punish or injure; or other treat ment of a tyrannical, abusive , shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature. (This includes , but is not limited to , demeaning behavior of an ethnic, sexist , or racist nature, unwanted sexual advances or intimidations . ) 5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU Denver / Auraria facilities, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU Denver / Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimental to the University. 6 . Forgery , fraud (to include computer fraud), falsification , alterat i on , or use of University documents, records, or instru ments of identification with intent to gain any unentitled advantage. 7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver / Auraria property and the private property of students, University officials , employees , and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denver / Auraria buildings or facilities. This includes the possession of known sto l en property . 8. Possession of firearms , explosives, or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds , buildings, or any other facilities of the CU Denver / Auraria campus. This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University , or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee . (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons

PAGE 34

32 / General Informat i on may include , but are not l imited to, firearms, explosives, BB Guns, s l ingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles, bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or swi t chblades. A harmless i n strument des i gned to l ook like a firearm, expl os i ve , or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is express l y included within the meaning of the terms firearms, exp l osive , or dangerous weapon.) 9. Sale, distribution , use, possession , or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds , buildings , or any other facilities of the CU Denve r/A uraria campus. 10. Physical restriction , coercion, or harassment of any person; significant theft; sale/manufacture of illeg a l drugs (include s poss ess ion o f a sufficient quan tity with intent t o sell); damage, theft, or unauth orize d po ssessio n o f University property; or forgery, fals ification , altera tion, or u se of University documents, r eco rds or instruments of identifica tio n to gai n any une ntitled advantage. UNIVERSITY STANDARD S AND C RIMI NAL V I OLATI ONS As a member of the University community, you are he l d accountable not only for upholding civil and criminal laws, but University Standards as well . Enrollment does not confer either immunity or spe cial consideration with reference to civil and criminal laws. Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to challenge or postponement on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced, or are pending in civil or crimi nal court. In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a student violates a standard and withdraws from the Univers i ty before administrative action is final. USE OF UNIVERSITY/AURARIA P ROPERTY OR FACILITIES Nothing in this Code of Conduct shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the voicing of concerns or grievances. The University i s dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge through a free exchange of ideas, and this shall be a cardinal principle in the determination of whether or not a proposed use of Univer sity facilities is appropriate. The Auraria Higher Education Center h as established campus regulations and procedures governing the u se of CU Denver / Auraria groun ds , buildings, and other facilities. Such regulations are d es igned to prevent interference with University functions and activities. Except where otherwise specifically authorized, or when members of the public are invite d , the use of CU-Denver / Auraria facilities shall be limited to faculty, staff, and students of the CU-Denver / Auraria camp us, and to o r ganizations h aving chapters, local groups, or other recognized University connected representation among faculty , staff, or students of the three academic institutions on the Auraria camp us. CLASSROOM CONDUO You are expected to conduct yourself appropriately in classroom situations. If disruptive behavior occurs in a classroom , a n instructor has the authority to ask you to leave the classroom. Should such dis orderly or disruptive conduct persist, the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Public Safety and /or the appropri a te Dean's office. The appropriate Dean or his / her representative may withdraw a student from a particular class for disrup tive behavior , whi l e the Student Discipline Committee may recommend to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services to suspend, perma nently expel, and/or permanently exclude the student from the camp u s . Appeal questions concerning disruptive behavior sho uld be directed to the Academic Dean's office when withdrawal from a class is involved, and to the Director of Student Life when suspe nsion or expulsion from the University is involved. NONACADEMIC DISCIPLINE POLIC IES Violation s of Standards of Conduct s hould be reported to the Director of Stu dent Life during working hours . Auraria Public Safety should be contacted during non-
PAGE 35

5. R e f e r cases to t h e S tud ent Disciplin e Committ ee where th e a b o v e sanctions a r e dete rmin e d t o be ina d e qu a t e or t h e stu dent(s) desires an a ppeal. 6 . Tak e o th er act i ons including but no t limited t o counseling, ins urin g the vio lator(s ) pr o vid es compe n satio n for theft or damage, and /o r placing s t ops on regis t ratio n . STUDENT DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE POLICIES AND PROCEDUR E S Discip l inary proceedings shall be con ducted as administrative proce e ding s and not as jud i cia l pro cee dings. Th e Universi t y is not a part of th e judicial branch of state governme nt. The Univ ersi ty has authority to promulgate and enforce int e rnal rules of behavior that shall b e administered in a fair and impartial manner in h armo n y with its ed u cational objec t ives and a dministrativ e nature. As part o f th e a dministrative natur e o f the com mittee's proce e dings, fundamental rules of fairness will b e followed . Copies of th ese proce dures are available in the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services. This committee, composed of students, faculty, and staff members, makes the decision whether students charged with violations of th e student conduct code may continue to attend the University of Colorado at Denver . The Student Discipline Committee has the authority to: 1. Dismiss the case. 2. Take no action other than talking with the accused student. 3. Issue a University warning (a state ment that a student's behavior has been inappropriate and further violation of Univers i ty rules will result in stronger disciplinary action). 4. Place th e student on disciplinary pro bation , a violation of th e terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University. 5. Recommend suspension of a student from the University for disciplinary rea sons. This suspension may b e for various lengths of tim e ranging from one semester to an indefinite period of time ; after the period of disciplinary suspension has expired a student may apply in writ ing to have the notation on the stu d e nt' s record removed . 6. Recomm end expuls ion of a studen t permanent l y from the University; notation on the stu den t's record will be kept per manently. When a student is suspended or expelled for disciplinary reason s an additional sanc tion may include being excl ud e d from the Auraria campus. 7. O th e r sanctions i ncludin g b ut n o t limi te d t o co u nse l i ng, insurin g t h e vio lat or(s ) pro vides co mp e n sa tion f o r t h eft o r damage, and/or p l aci n g s t o p s on registratio n . Stude nt(s) mus t b e n otifie d in wr itin g of th e disciplinary ac tion t aken within five (5) days. REVIEW PROCEDURES A student may reques t a review of t h e r ecomme n dation of suspe n sion or expul sion by the Student Discipline Committee within seven (7) working days to the Associate Vice Chancello r for Enrollment and Student Services. Except in cases invo lvin g th e exercise of the power of summary suspension (see below) , the sanctions of suspension or expulsion for disciplinary reasons shall be effective only after t he administrative review by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services has been exhausted or waived . The Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services' deci sion shall be in writing to the student(s) with a copy to the Student Discipline Committee. Copies of review procedures may be obtained from the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services. SUMMARY SUSPENSION Summary suspension is a suspension from the University which begins immedi a tely upon notic e from the appropriate U niversity official without a formal hear ing by the Student Discipline Committee. A hearing before the Student Disciplin e Committee is th e n scheduled as soon as possible (usually within seven calendar days) to determine the disposition of the case. Summary s uspension may also include a physical exclusion from the campus i f deem e d necessary. The Chancellor and/or a Vice Chancel lor have the authority to suspend sum marily any student when in their opinions suc h suspension is necessary to: 1 . Maintain orde r on the campus. 2. Preserve th e orderly functioning of the University. 3. Stop interference in any manner with the public or private rights of c itiz e ns on CU-Denve r / Auraria owne d or controlled property. 4 . Stop actions that are thr eatening to the health or safety of any person. 5. Stop actions that are destroying or damaging prop erty of th e CU Denver / Auraria campus, its students, faculty , staf f , or guests. Uni ve rsity Fblic ies I 3 3 PERMANENT RECORD NOTATIONS Whil e disc i plinary p r oceedings ar e pe ndin g o r contempla t e d , a tempo ra ry hold will b e place d on t h e stude n t's aca demic reco rd. I t will n o t b e release d until all ac tion s and appea l proce d ures have been completed or fina l ized by the Unive rsit y . O nly i n th ose cases w h e re s us pension , d eferred suspension, or permanen t expulsion resu l ts f rom disciplinary actio n will notations be p l aced on t h e aca demic r ecord. RELEASE OF DISCIPLINARY INFORMATION Access t o any student's academic t ran script or disciplinary file shall be governed by provisions of the Fami l y Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Only the student charged or those University officials who have a legitimate educational interest in disciplinary information may have access to the files. All other inquir i es including but not limited to employers, governmental agencies, news media , friends, or Denv er Police must have a written release from the student to gain access to University disciplinary files. Every effort will be made by the University to respec t the privacy of the s tudent. However, where the identity of the student has been pub l icly disclosed in the news media , the University reserves the right to respond as it deems appropri ate to describe fairly and accurately the disposition of disciplinary matters. REFUND PO LICY AFTER D I SCIPLINARY ACTION Subm i ssion of registration materials obligates the student to pay the assessed tuition and fees for that term. If a student is suspended or e xpell e d from th e Univer sity , the amount of tuition / fees which would b e refunded would be th e same as when a student voluntarily withdr aws from a t e rm . See the General Infor mation sec tion of this ca talog or the Schedule of Classes for mor e information. The official withdrawal date app licabl e for tuition /fee refund purposes will be the date o f the Student Disc ipline Committee ' s decision. In the even t that c ircum s tances are suc h that the accused student has registered f o r a subsequent t e rm b efore the final d ecision is made, that stu dent does so at his/ her own risk and may be liable for payment of tuition and fees f o r both t e rms . Th e Com mitte e will make th e decision as to when offici a l suspension or exp ulsion begins. Failure to mak e the

PAGE 36

34 / General Information required payment will result in the following action: students will become ineligible for all University services; no grades will be issued for courses in progress; no tran scripts, diplomas, certification, or registra tion materials will be issued for the student until the bill is paid in full; a l ate payment charged in addition to the interest on the unpaid balance will be assessed. TRI-INSTITUTIONAL VIOLATIONS Procedures in deciding violations of the Code of Student Conduct involving stu dents from other academic i nstitutions on the Auraria campus have been developed by CU-Denver and the institution(s) involved. In such cases, the Director of Student Life should be contacted. Responsibilities of Computing Services Users Access to CU-Denver computing systems, and use of CU-Denver computing resources, is a privilege granted to members of the CU-Denver community for scholarly, research, and administra tive purposes. Those who use computi ng services on th e CU-Denver campus are expected to do so in a n effective, efficient, ethical , and le gal manner. As a condition of using computer resources on the CU-Denver campus, users are expected to respect the int ellectua l effort and creativity of others, to respect the privacy of other users, to respect the integrity of the compu ter systems and other users' data, and to use computer resources in an efficien t and productive manner. It is the responsibility of all u sers to respect copyright protection of l icensed computer software. Users do not have th e right to copy licensed software programs or documentation without the specific per mission of the copyrig ht holder , or to use unauthorized copies of licensed softwa re. Unauthorized use , duplication, or distribu tion of computer software is a violation of University policy and Federal law . (fhis statement is adapted from material in the CU-Denver Computing Service News, the University of Colorado Administrative Policy Statement on Copying Com puter Software, and the CU-Boulder Academic Computing Services Statement of Responsibilities of Users.) Sexual Harassment The University of Colorado at Denver is a collegial academic comm un ity whose mission requires an open learning and working environment for students , faculty, staff, and administrators . An open learning and working environment values and pro tects individual dignity and the integrity of human relationships . CU-Denver ' s educa tional process is based upon mutual trust , freedom of inquiry, freedom of express ion , and the absence of intimidation and exp loitati on. As a place of work and study, CU-Denver must be free of inappropriate and disrespectful conduct and communica tion of a sexua l nature, of sexua l harass ment, and of all forms of sexua l intimi dat i on and exploitation. Such behavior is reprehensible because it subverts the mis sion of CU-Denver , poisons the environ ment , and threatens the careers , educational experiences , and well-being of students, faculty, staff, and administrators. It i s a violation of CU-Denver's Sexual Harassment Policy for anyone who is author ized to recommend or take action affecti ng faculty , staff, students, or adm inistrator s to make any unwelcome sexual advances, to request sexual favors, or to engage in any other verbal or physi cal conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submiss i on to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employm ent or status in a co urse, program, or activity; or (2) sub mission to or rejection of such conduc t is used as the basis for empl oyment or educational decisions af f ecting that individual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfer ing with an individual's work performance or educational experience , or creates an intimidating , hostile , or offensive environ ment for working or l earning. For further information, contact the Sex ual Harassm e nt Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 850, 55&-4493. STUDENT SERVICES Associate Vice Chancellor for Enroll ment and Student Services: Shelia Hood Student life Students at CU-Denver reflect the diver sity of its environment: many a r e older than tho se considered to be traditional co llege students; have employment and family responsibilities in addition to their aca demic programs; include substantial numbers of minorities, women , and single parents; and are most often enrolled part time . To meet the needs of this diverse stu dent population , CU-Denver provides stu dent life programs and activities designed t o com plem ent st ud e nt s' academic pro grams and to enhance their total educa tional experience. Students are provided opportunities to develop , experience, and participate in student government , social , cultura l , intellectual , and recreational pro grams. Student life programs crea t e an environment in which students are: • Assis t ed in developing leadership through opportunities to practice deci sion making, management and market ing, int erpersona l and group communication, a nd relationship skills . • Encouraged and aided in developing social, cultural , intellectual , recreation and govern a nce programs that expand involvement with the campus commu nity and society and lead to mature app r eciation of these pursuits. • Encouraged to exp lor e self-directed activities that provide opportunities for personal growth in individual and group sett ing s . • Exposed to various cultures and exper i ences, ideas and issues , art and musical forms, and styles of life. • Informed about institutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities . • Aided in the awareness and utilization of campus facilities and other resources. • Ass i sted in developing community spiri t through creative interaction among staff, faculty , studen ts, and members of the l ocal commun ity . Students are encouraged to involve their families in campus events a nd activities. Programs and se rvice s provided by the Associated Students of CU-Denver, the Division of Enrollment and Student Serv ices of CU-Denver, and the Auraria Stu dent Assistance Center Division co ntribute to the fulfillment of this philosophy. Clubs and Organizations ACM Computing Club ACS Student Advisory Council Alpha Kappa Delta (Sociology) American Institute of Architecture S tud ents American Planning Association American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Landscape Architecture American Socie t y of Mechanical Engineers Ant hr opology Club Asian Cultural Enrichment Society Association of Black Students Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs Associated Engineering Students Auraria Transnational Student Association

PAGE 37

BACCHUS Beta Alpha Omega (Counseling / Education) Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Honor Society) Club Hillel Denver Society of Black Engineers and Scien t ists Equiponderance Pre-Law Club Feminist Alliance Gol den Key National Honor Society Hispanic Student Organization Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Korean Christian Fellowship Master of Social Sciences Club MBA Association Native American Student Organization Palestinian Solidarity Committee Phi A l p h a Theta (History) Phi Chi Theta (Business) Philosophy Club Pi Tau Sigma (Mechanical Engineering) Psi Chi (Psychology) Second Stage Theatre Club Society of Accounting Students Society of Hispanic Engineers and Scie n tists Society of Women Engineers Student Association of Musicians Tau Beta Phi (Engineering) Vietnamese Student Organization Associated Students o f the Uni versity of Colora d o at Denver (ASCUD) The Associated Students of the Univer sity of Colorado at Denver (ASCU-Denver) serves as a voice for students and pro vides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal University structure. ASCU-Denver assists students with information concerning stu dent clubs and organizations , campus events , issues concerning student status and other information of interest to stu dents in general . ASCU-Denver also pro vides students with assistance with grievances and with the opportunity to become more closely involved with the University community through active par ticipation in student government itself or through service on University , tri institutional, and AHEC committees. More information concerning services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Student Union, Room 340, 55&-2510. Student legal Services Student legal services are available to assist students with off-campus legal problems t hrough the provision of lega l advice, litigation preparat i on, document interpre t ation, and assistance in negot iation. The service will not represent stu dents in court. This student fee funded program i s provided free of charge to CU Denver students; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred such as copying, typing, etc . Contact the office for further details at 55&-3333, Student Union , Room 255. T h e Adv ocate The purpose of the student newspaper is to provide students with information about campus issues and events. The newspaper strives to include good inves tigative reporting, feature articles, and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is a tool to encourage and develop writers, journalists, artists, and other student mem bers of its general management and production staff. The office is in the Stu dent Union, Room 151, 55&-8321. Office of Studen t Life The Office of Student Life is the advis ing , coordinating , resource, and general information center for student clubs and organizations, student government (ASCUD), student programs, and the aca demic honor societies. Student Life coor dinates new student orientation programs. The office is responsible for the adminis tration of the student fee budget and monitors all student fee expenditures to assure compliance with CU-Denver and the state of Colorado regulations and procedures. The Director of Student Life represents the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional , and AHEC committees and maintains effective lines of communication with MSC, CCD, and AHEC. The director administers the student conduct and discipline procedure as described in the Code of Student Con duct. The Office of Student Life is located in the Student Union, Room 255, 55&-3399. O ffice o f Veterans Affair s The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veteran and dependent students attending CU Denver utilizing Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists stu dents with filling out VA paperwork and in solving problems associated with receiving VA-related benefits. S t udent Services I 35 The OVA maintains proper certification for eligib l e students to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements for attendance , course load and content, and other regulations neces sary to receive educational benefits payments. In addit i on, the OVA provides VA Voca tional Reh abilitation referrals, and infor mation on VA tutorial assistance , and VA work / study positions for qualified vete rans. For further information , contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 55&-2630, NC 40l5 . Student Counseling a n d Testin g Center Phone: 55&-2815 Office: NC 2013 The Student Counseling and Testing Center provides a variety of support pro grams and services to CU-Denver stu dents. Our mission is to help students grow in self understanding, to help make their college years a satisfying and productive experience , and to facilitate meaningful preparation for future goals. Our offerings include the following: Counseling Services . Students may obtain short term personal counseling provided by professional staff. We also will assist students and others in locating appropriate counseling / mental health services in the community . The office also sponsors professionally-facilitated counseling groups. Programs and Workshops. The office sponsors a variety of FREE or low-cost programs and workshops on a variety of topics such as assertiveness training, stress management , college survival skills, drug and alcohol awareness , etc . These pro grams are open to the entire CU-Denver community. Career Development Services . The office provides career development work shops and programs , and career interest testing to CU-Denver students. Career tests offered include Strong Campbell Interest Inventory, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and Career Orientation Placement and Evaluation Survey . Womens Programs and Services. Offer ings in this area include: advocacy , pro grams such as Self Defense for Women , and Dealing with Sexual Harassment; scholarship offerings; and referral / resource information Re-Entry Program. The Center offers an intensive one-day program each semester which is geared to assisting the returning adult student as he or she makes the transition to university life.

PAGE 38

36 / General Information Testing Services. The Student Counsel ing and Testing Center hous es a full service Testing Center which provides test ing for all levels of postsecondary educa tion, and professional certification. Tests offered include: ACT American College Test CAT California Achievement Test GRE Graduate Record Examination GMAT Graduate Management Admi s sions Test GSFLT Graduate Schoo l Foreign Lang u age Test MAT Miller Analogy T est MCAT Medical College Admission Test lDEFL Test of English as a Foreign Language CLEP College Level Examination Program For f ur ther information on Testing Serv i ces, call 556-2861. The off i ce is located in NC 2006. Office of Student Retention Services The Office of Student Retention Services offers an array of services and programs designed to foster cultura l diversity within the CU-Denver student body, help stude nt s adj ust to the social and intellectual env ironment of the campus, and provide the aca demi c s upp ort students n eed to succeed in their studies and derive maxi mum benefit from their college experience. Outreach and retention serv ices are provided by professional staff in four cen t ers. These include the Center for First-Year Students , Center for Learning Assistance , Center for Educational Oppor tunity and Cultu ral Diversity, and the Cent e r for Pre-Collegiate Development. The Office o f S tud ent Retention Services i s located in NC 2012, 556-2324. CENTER FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS The Center for First-Year Students offers individualized support services to help freshman students adjust to college life and succeed in their college studies. Personal advisors in the Center provide orientation to the campus a nd its pro grams, assist students in int e rpr eting aca demic policies and requirements, assis t in the se l ection of classes an d academic pro grams commensu r ate with students' educational and career interests , refer students to other campus resources , and provide advocacy, if necessary. The Cent er is located in NC 2012, 556-2546 . CENTER FOR EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY The Center for Educationa l Opportunity and Cultural Diversity prov i d es access and educat i o nal opportunities to ethnic minority students through services con duc i ve to the student's retention and gra du ation. The Cent er houses f our dis tinct programs, eac h of which provides aca d e mic advisi ng, sc h o l arshi p informa tion, c ultur a l programs , advocacy, and other s upp ort serv i ces tailo r ed to the specific needs of thei r students. The Center i s located in NC 2012, 556-2324. American Indian Student Services Program Asian American Stud ent Services Program Black Student Services Program Hispanic Student Services Program CENTER FOR PRE-COLLEGIATE DEVELOPMENT Programs offered by the Center serve to motivate minority high school students to pursue post-secondary education and pro vide them the academic skills needed to be s u ccessfu l in th eir college en d eavors. The Center is located in NC 2014, 556-2322. Pre-Collegiat e Dev e l opment Program. This program enab l es s tud ents in grades 9 through 12 to engage in a wide range o f univers ity activities thr oughout the aca demic year and during a full-time , five week summer program. The academic year component offers monthly study skills and career orientation workshops, advising, tut oring, and a variety of cul tura l e nri chment experiences. The five wee k summer sess i on for s tud e nt s in the lOth and 11th grades consis t s of acceler ated classes for which students receive elective high school credit, career orienta tion, and engage in cultural activities. Minority Scholars Program. The MSP is an early college enro llm ent program for college bound , high achieving minority stu dents who are comp l eting their fina l year of high school. The program enables stu dents to begin t h eir college studies by taking one course at CU-Denver during the s ummer term prior to their senior year in high school. The credit earned in the course can be applied toward a bachelor's degree. While enrolled in the program, students participate in work shops designed to acclimate them to the University and prepare them for college study. CENTER FOR LEARNING ASSISTANCE The Center for Lear nin g Assistance i s designe d to promote student success in the aca demi c setti ng . Services are avai l able t o all CU-Denver students . The Center's services include tut ori ng, work shops, aca d emic instit utional credit courses, consulting, and a minority resource library. First-generation college students may be e ligible f or more inten sive se rvic es through the Student Support Services component of the Cen ter . The Center is l ocated in NC 2004, 556-2802. Tutoring. Free tutoring is available in many subject areas (some limitations apply). Scheduled sessions are held on weekdays/evenings. Both schedu l ed and open lab , walk-in tutoring are avai l ab l e at establis h e d times throughout each term (M-F,9 a.m.9 p.m.). Wor kshops . Study skills workshops are provide d on s u ch topics as test-taking , memory and study techniques , notetaking, listening and tim e management. Consulting. Academic, financial aid, and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy i s available to students eligible for the St udent Suppo rt Services Program . Library. The Center maint ains a small periodical and book collection aut hor ed by , and /or about, minoriti es; these reso urc es are avai labl e for stu d e nt research a nd leisure. Courses. Courses are offered in a small group format in the areas of college sur vival skills (study skills and computer word processing) , Eng lish as a second l an guage, and problem so lving. CMMU. 1400-3 . Reading for Speakers of Other Languages. This course is designed for ESL students who n eed to improve their reading and vocabu lar y skills. Students will increase th eir reading ability through vocabu lary building, work attack strategies, and reading analysis. CMMU. 1410-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. This is the first course in th e ESL compo sition seq u e n ce . Writing b egins with se nt ence-level develop ment and continues with the development of paragraphs based on Western rhetorical patterns. Grammar appropr i ate to s tudents ' needs will be incorpora t e d into the class. CMMU. 1420-3 . Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. Continue d work on grammar, syntax, and the mechanics of writing. Writing begins with paragraphs and moves into essay writing. Prereq : CMMU. 1410 or ESL co ordinator's approval.

PAGE 39

CMMU. 1430-3. Advanced E S L Wri ting Skills. This is the third course in the ESL compos ition sequence. Emphasis is placed on more complex grammatical probter:n.s and on the development of longer compositions. Prereq: CMMU. 1420 or ESL coordinator ' s approval. STSK. 07051 . Problem Solving . This course is designed to improve investigative and prob l em solving skills . Scientific theory , empirica l methodology, and research . methods will be utilized. Individual top 1 cs of investigation will be assigned . STSK. 0707-1. College Surviva l Skills. Thi s course is designed to promote success in the academic setting. Topics covered will include university resources, conquering the univer sity system, listening and and memory techniques, test-taking skills, time management , library research strategies, and word processing. STSK. 0708-1. Introduction t o Word Processing. This course will thoroughly familiarize the student with an easy-to-use word processing program that will assist in the process of writing text revision and rearrangement , and the production of_ letter perfect documents. (fhe word . program used will be one that IS ava1lable m the open student-use computer lab areas.) STSK. 0800-1. Advanced ESL G rammar/ Compositio n . This class meets for two hours a week . It is designed for students who do not feel competent with their English composition skills. This class is highly individualized in order to focus on those grammar and writing structures that pose particu lar problems for ESL students. S T S K . 0801-1. Com municati o n Skills for ESL S tudents. This course meets twice a week to improve the oral communication skills of students whose first language is not english. Skills includ e use of idiomatic English, cross-cultural awareness, cross cultural problems in communications, and pronunciation . STSK . 0802-1. Impro ving Academic Readin g S k ills for ESL Students. This class meets twice a week . The aim of the class is to improve th e student's ability to read academic texts. Skills practiced include skimming / scanning, reading for the main idea , and critical reading. STSK. 0806-1. Study Skill s for ESL Stude nts. This class is designed for ESL students to improve those skills needed for effective participation in the college class room . Emphasis will be on academic reading and writing skills, as well as notetaking skills . S T S K . 0810. T o pics. Special topics in study skills to be selected by instructor. CENTER FOR INTERNSHIPS AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION Director : Janet Micha l sk i Assistant Direc tor and Coo r dinator , Eng i neering: Diane Berk l ey C oordinator , Li beral Art s and Sc i e nc e s : Cherrie Grove Coordinator , Busin ess and Administra tion: Wayne Sundell Senior Secr e t ary: Char lene Michae l Office: 104 7 Ninth Stree t H istoric Park Telephone: 556-2892 The Center for Interns h ips and Coopera tive Education, established at CU-Denver in 1973, provides students with an oppor tunity to supplement their academic classroom learning with on-the-job work . experi ences or internshi p s related to the 1 r academic studies. Students are placed either as paid co-op trainees or as interns for academic credit with corporations, businesses, or government agencies in the Denver metropolitan area as well as out of state. Faculty coordinators from each of the University's colleges and schools act as liaisons between the Center and the aca demic departments. The Center currently places over 400 students each year with some 250 participating employers. Over 30 percent of all co-op students are gradu ate students. Coopera t i v e Education Cooperative education is an educational method which combines classroom study with paid , career related, off-campus work. The purpose is to give students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to real world situations, and to bring that experience back to the classroom as a learning tool. Cooperative education offers students paid long-term positions (two or more semesters) during which students alternate semesters of full-time work with semesters of full-time school , or work part time year round. Co-op experiences may be eligible for academic credit, and many jobs lead to permanent career positions upon graduation. Internships Internships offer students short-term positions (one semester) and they may or may no t be paid. Internships are usually done for academic credit and are popular with students who like to explore a vari ety of careers. Many students complete I nternshi p s and Cooperat i ve Educatio n I 37 two, three, or even four internships before graduation. Internships, l i ke co-op jobs, are rela t ed to the student's academic studies a n d /or career goals. Eligibility for Placement The Center is open t o all students enrolled at least half time in any CU Denver college or school who have com ple ted th e i r freshman year, have main tained a grade-point average of 2 . ?, have comp leted at least 12 hours m resi dence (6 hours for g r adua t e studen ts). Some employers have additional require ments, i.e., U.S. citizenship, willingness to travel, and specific course work . A cademic Credit for Work E xperienc e Undergraduate students placed by the Center in paid or non-paid positions , as well as students who have obtained their own jobs, can apply to earn academic credit through courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sc i ences, and the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, School of Edu cation, Graduate School of Public and Schoo l of Architecture and Planmng can earn internship, experiential learning, field study, or practicum credit through courses established for this purpose. W h y S tudents Participate i n Cooperative Educat i o n • Students recognize the value of combin ing theory with practice and find greater relevance in their studies . • Co-op education allows students to test classroom teaching in the laboratory of the real world . • The program teaches students job-search skills such as resume wntmg and interviewing techniques . • Co-op provides a means of financial assistance that is available to all students , regardless of family income levels or other financial aid arrangements, and does not leave students burdened with educational debts. • The inclusion of a work componen t and the contribution from co-op earn ings are major factors in encouraging first generation college students to pur sue a college degree . • Beca u se work experiences involve s tu dents with co-workers who come from a var iety of backgro u nds, students deve l op a deeper understanding of other people and greater skills in human relations .

PAGE 40

38 I Genera/Information Why Employers Participate in Co-op Programs • Co-op stu d e nts are an excellent sou rc e of t empo rar y manp owe r f or specia l proj ec ts a nd peak loads or busy seasons. • Co-op allows the employer to assess an indi v idu al's potential for employment after grad u a tion , thus saving entry-leve l recruiting cos ts. • Co-Dp st ud en t s can increase produc tivity of full-time professional staff. • CO-Dp students are highly motivated, pr oductive, and dependab le. • CU-Denver students bring knowledge a bout the l atest acade mic research to their employers. • As verified by many studies, co-Dp s tu dents subsequently become full-time employees with far lower t urn over rates and better pr omotio n pot e nti a l than th e average entry l eve l professional. Facts About Cooperative Education • Cooperative education programs have been established in over 80 percent of th e F ort un e 500 corpo rations. All o f th e top 10 Fortune 500 co mpani es are involved in coope r ative education. • The last three presidents of General Motors at one time were cooperative education students. • Cooperative education has been con ducted successfully in the U.S. since 1906 . • Over 1 , 000 colleges and universities c urr ently have cooperative education programs. • An estimated 200,000 college stude nt s are enrolle d in coopera tiv e ed u catio n and gross annual earni ng s are calcu l ated to be in excess of $200,000,000. Co-op Employers Employers who recruit CU-Denver stu dents for cooperative education positions include: Martin Marietta IBM Corporation Hughes Aircraft Company MacNeil /Lehrer Newshour National Park Service Rockwell International U.S. Bureau of Reclamation U S WEST Communications Walt Disney World , Inc . Office of the Governor , State of Colorado Peat Marwick Main & Co. Kyle Belding Gallery Natio nal Burea u of Standards KCNC:f\1 Los Angeles Times U.S. General Accounting Offi ce Denver General H ospital E nvironm enta l Protection Agency Denver Center f or th e Performing Arts Walters & T heis Law Firm Bloomsbury R eview Colorado H ousi n g & Finance Authority Hospi ce of Metro Denver U.S. Bureau of Land Management Denver Public Defender ' s Office Col ora d o Association of Commerce and I ndustry Col ora d o Association of Public Emp l oyees LIBRARY SERVICES Auraria library Dean and Director: Camila Alire Associate Director: Jean F. Hemphill Assista nt Director for Media and Acting Assistant Director for Library Services: J ay Schafer Offices: Aura r ia Libr a ry , llth a nd Lawre n ce S ts. Telephone: -Administration: 556-2805 Telephone: -Information: 556-2741 Faculty: Associate Professors: Camila Alire , Jean F. Hemphill, Martin A . Tessmer Assistant Professors: Dene L. Clark , Patric i a A. Eskoz, Brian D . Holtz, Elnora M. Mercado , Terry Ann Leopold , Robert L. Wick, Rutherford W. Witthus, Muriel E. Wood s Instructors: Orlando Archibeque, An th ony J. Dedrick , Nikki Dil garde, Kerranne Gilmour , Marit S. MacArthur , Lori Oling , Jay Schafer , Mara L. Sprain , James K. Straub , Louise T. Stwalley , Linda D. Tietjen , Diane Turner , Liz Willis, Eveline L. Yang Friends of Auraria Library The Friends of A u raria Library is an assoc iation formed in 1976 to promote the development of Auraria Library . The Friends of Auraria Library ' s ongoing objectives are: • To promote awaren es s of and good will toward the Auraria Library on the campus , in the metropolitan area , and i n the region . • To increase Library resources through contributions and solicitations or gra nt s , beques ts, a nd gifts o f books and othe r appropria t e materials. Access t o information is essential to aca demic s u ccess. The A ur aria Library , located at the ce nter of the camp us, pro v i des a wid e range o f l earni n g resources and se rvi ces to suppo rt academ i c pro grams. Th e Library is administered by the Unive r s ity of Colorado a t Denver . The Collection The Auraria Library h as a collection of over 600,000 volumes. In addit i on t o a strong, up-t o-date book collection, the Library a l so has ove r 2,000 journal and newspaper subscr iption s and a film/ video tape collection. The Library is a se l ect depos itory for U.S. gove rnm ent publica t ions a nd a depository for Col orado sta t e documents . The A uraria Library ' s collectio n is supp l e m ented by providing access to other libr aries withi n th e state and nation ally through interlibrary l oan services. The CARL Online Public Access Catalog Access t o the A uraria Librar y's collec tion is thr o u gh the online CARL (Color ado Alliance of Research Libr aries) public access ca tal og, a user-friendly system that also allows for searching of the collections of many other libraries throughout the state , the region, and the nation. The CARL system has received national recog nition for being on the cutting edge of information technology. The system allows faster and more compre h ensive searches than were possible w ith the traditio n a l card ca t a l og . In additi o n to using CARL at the Library, patrons may obtain dial-up access through a home or office computer with a modem; CARL a l so appears as a menu i tem on the CU-Denver mainframe c omputer. Reference Services The Auraria Library R eference Depart ment strives to provide excellent service i n assis tin g students a nd faculty with th eir i nformation needs. The Reference Desk is staffed during all hours th e Library is open . A dditi onal l y , an Information Desk is staffed during peak hours to welcome patrons to the library and to direct them to the appropriate service desks. Tele phone reference is provided for quick questions such as , Does the Auraria Library own a particular book? A special effort is made to serve the information needs of disabled pa t rons.

PAGE 41

Computer Assisted Research Online database searching, for which there is a fee, can save many hours of researchi n g printed abstracts and indexes. In some cases, it provides the only access to certain materials . The Library has access to well over 200 databases. In addition to bibliographic information, databases also may contain directory and financial infor mation, sci entific data, and full text. Questions about the Computer Assisted Research service should be directed to the CAR office, 556-2624 . Information Retrieval Service The information retrieval service was instituted as a special aid for busy researchers. For a reasonable fee, Library staff can assist patrons in locating the library materials they need. Working from the patron's bibliography , staff can : locate and check out books owned by the Library; photocopy articles from journals owned by the Library ; s ubmit interlibrary loan requests for materials which the Library does not own; and deliver the materials to the patron ' s hom e or office . Inquiries about this time-saving service should be directed to the Information Retrieval Service , 556-3538. library Instruction The Library is committed to teaching information skills through its instruction program. The program is varied, ranging from basic, introductory-level material to advance d research methodology for gra du ate students . For more information about the Library ' s instructional offerings , contact the Library Instructi on office at 556-3303. Architecture and Planning library The Library ' s main collection is sup plemented by the material housed at the nearby Architecture and Planning Library . With a collection of over 13,000 books , 90 periodical subscriptions, and 14,000 s lides, this library offers specia lized information to students of arc hit ect ure, lands cape architec ture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The libr ary is open to any student who needs access to these materials. Services for Persons with Disabilities The Library is committed to making its resources and services available to all stu dents . Through the Media Distribution Department , a wide variety of adaptive equipment is available to assist persons with disabilities including a Kurzweil Reading Machine , a Voyager VTEK magnifier, a Braille dictionary, th e World Book Encyclopedia in Braille and on cassette , the Perkins Brailler, and several large print dictionaries. Library services to assist per sons with disabilities include orientation to the physical layout of the Library , retrieval of materials, and assis t ance with use of CARL, the online public access cata l og , periodica ls, indexes, and special adaptive equipment. Additional Facilities Coin-operated typewriters , photocopiers, microform copiers, a copy center, a change machine, and study rooms are all available at the Library. Internships The Library offers internships, practi cums, and ind epen dent studies to stude nt s interested in telecommunications or infor mation management. Media Services Assistant Director for Media and Telecommunications Services: Muriel E. Woods The Media and Telecommunications Division of the Library offers a full range of media services . The Media Distribution Department manages the Library's media collection, which consists of videotapes, audio tapes, records, 16mm films, and kits. These materials are listed in the online public access catalog . This Department also houses media viewing and listening facilities. The Division operates a 24 chan nel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus; faculty members may request the trans mission o f a film or videotape directly into the classroom over thi s system. Students may request transmission of a film or videotape from one o f the carrels in Media Distribution. This system also can Library I 39 transmit live programs from St. Cajetan's, the Student Union, and th e Division ' s tele vision s tudi os to other locations on campus. A self-service graphics lab also is availab l e for student use in the Media and Telecommunications Division. Finally, a Practicum Program is available to students who are interested in converting knowledge gained in electronics and / or television production courses to practical experience .

PAGE 43

Acting Dean : Fernie Baca Office: CU-Denver Bldg., (formerly Dravo) Room 710 Telephone: 556-2663 INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL Quality graduate programs are synony mous with the University of Colorado. Professors are actively involved in research or creative activity and, as teacher / scholars, continue to study and absorb new data, ideas , and techniques, eventually bringing these experiences to the classroom. Graduate students at CU Denver gain not only from interactions with the graduate faculty , but also from other students in the classroom . Because most of CU-Denver's graduate students are older and employed , they bring practical experience gained in the Denver commu nity to the classroom and are ready to relate the realities of practice to the models presented in the classroom. The Graduate School is a University wide body that authorizes programs within its constituent colleges and schools. At CU-Denver, Education, Engineering, and Liberal Arts and Sciences are colleges or schools whose graduate programs are offered through The Graduate School. In concept, there is a single Graduate School regardless of campus. In practice , most master'sl evel programs are specific to the campus where the student is admitted, insofar as particular options and advisors are concerned . Doctoral-level programs in a discipline are viewed as the responsibility of the entire University community of that dis cipline . Doctoral-level programs on the CU-Denver campus are coordinated either through the office of the system grad uat e dean or through the corresponding Den ver or Boulder department. There are several doctoral-level degree programs offered through CU-Denver . Degrees Offered The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through The Graduate School at CU-Denver . The Master of Arts (M.A. ) in : Anthropology Biology Communication and Theatre Economics English History Political Science Psychology Sociology The Master of Arts (M.A. Education) in: Administration, Supervision and Curriculum Developmen t Counseling and Guidance Early Childhood Education Education Instruction and Curriculum Educational Psychology Special Education The Master of Science (M.S. ) in: Applied Mathematics Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Science Mechanical Engineering Technical Communication The Master of Basic Science (M.RS.) The Master of Engineering (M.E.)1 The Master of Humanities (M.H.) The Master of Social Science (M.S.S.) The Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in: Applied Mathematics Administration, Supervision and Curriculum Development Public Administration Course work is available at the Denver camp us in the programs listed below . Students may be resident on the Denver campus studying in these areas in order to take advantage of the multi-campus activities of The Graduate School. Biology Chemistry Civil Engineering Communication ' Award e d thr o u g h CU-Bould e r Computer Science Electrical Engineering English Mechanical Engineering Psychology The Graduate School at CU-Denver An ave r age of 4,712 students are enrolled in graduate programs at CU Denver each fall and spring semester, which includ es 1,140 non-degre e students taking graduate courses . Approximately 74 percent of enrolled graduate students are part-time students . Computing Services The Computing Services department supports computer use by both the aca demic and administrative communities at CU-Denver . For a complete description of services offered see Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information sec tion of this catalog. Financial Aid for Graduate Study COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by The Office of Financial Aid. Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of th e State of Colorado . Grant awards are announced each semester for the following term . Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid. COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and con tinuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise and to continuing students on the basis of aca demic success .

PAGE 44

42 / The Graduate School GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teach ing assistants. The instructorship is reserved for those advanced graduate stu dents already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. A half-time appointment for an instruc tor is considered to be equal to 6 class contact hours ; a half-time teaching assis tant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Compensation is based on the number of hours per week. Teaching assistants and instructors must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate / g r aduate / thesis or dissertation) in good standing for the full period of their appointment. RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Assistants must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergradu ate/graduate /thesis or dissertation). LOAN FUNDS Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college workstudy program should submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March 1. This office also provides short term l oan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in resi dence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emerge n cies. Appli cants should go directly to the Office of Financial Aid. EMPLOYMENT OPPORfUNlTIES The University maintains an employ ment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work eit h er through conventional employment or throu gh the college work-study program. Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fit ness, a policy which avoids favor or dis crimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. Stu dents are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy. International Education The Office of International Education expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors , pro motes special relationships with foreign universities , and acts as advisor for the Fulbright and other fellowships. The office also arranges study abroad programs . Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while taking regu lar courses in the foreign universities. A B a verage with the equivalent of two years o f college-level work in the appropriate language is required. There also are occa siona l summer programs offering aca demic credit. Peace Corps information may be obtained from the Office of International Education. For additional information contact the Office of International Programs, Auraria Higher Education Center, 556-3660 , or the Office of International Education, Boulder campus , 492-7741. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION General Requirements Students may be admitted to The Graduate School in either of the two categories described below . REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS Qualified students are admitted to regu lar degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, applicants for admission as regu lar degree students must: 1 . Hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recognized stand ing , or have work experience equivalent to that required for such a degree and equiva l ent to the degree given at this university. 2 . Show promise of ability to pursue advanced study and research, as judged by their previous scholastic record. 3. Have adequate preparation to enter graduate study in the field chosen . 4. Have at least a 2 .75 undergraduate grade-point average on all work taken. 5. Meet additiona l requirements for admission as established by major departments. Regular degree s tud ents must maintain at least a 3.0 grade-point average each semes t e r or summer t erm on all work taken, whether it is to be applied toward the intended advanced degree or not. Students who fail to maintain this stan dard of performance will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School. PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular degree students may be admitted as provi sional degree students upon the recom mendation of the major department. Upon the recommendation of the Admis sions Committee and concurrence of the dean of The Graduate School, a depart ment may admit provisional students for a probationary term which may not exceed two co n secutive ca lendar years. At the end of th e probationary period, provi sional degree students must either be admitted to regular degree status or be dropped from the graduate program. Credit earned by persons in provisional degree s t atus may count toward a degree at this University. Provisional degree students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average or higher, according to the terms of their provisional admission, each semester or summe r term on all work taken, whether or not it i s to be applied toward the adva n ced degree so ught. Students who fail to maintain such a standard of perfor mance will be subjec t to suspension from The Graduate School. Note: All provisional applicants must have completed a minimum of six semester hours of graduate-level course work or must take the Graduate Record Examination and s ubmit scores as part of the application. The University reserves th e right to deny admiss ion to applicants whose total creden tial s reflect an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed esse nti al by the Univer sity and relevant to any of its lawful mis sions, pro cesses, and functions as an educationa l institution. SENIORS IN THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO A sen ior in this University who has satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements, and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced sub ject and 12 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degree, may be admitted to The Graduate School by special permission of the dean . A University of Colorado senior enrolled in the College of Engineering and Applied Science who needs not more than 1 8

PAGE 45

semester hour s or 36 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degree may be admitted to The Graduate School, but is not eligible for financial aid, scholar ships, or fellowships as a graduate student until the equivalent of the minimum requirements for the bachelor's degree have been satisfied. Application Procedures Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the Office of Admissions concerning procedures for for warding completed applications . An applicant for admission must present a completed Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the Office of Admissions, and two official tran scripts from each instit ution attended. The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable applica tion fee of $30 (check or money order) when the applica tion i s submitted . No application will be processed unless this fee is paid. Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination, and all departments require three or four letters of recommendation. When a prospective degree student applies for admission , the chairperson of each department or a student admissions committee shall decide whether the appli cant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to the Office of Admissions, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as non degree students (see Non-degree Students in this sect ion) . A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 90 days prior to the term for which admis sion is so u ght or earlier as may be required by the major department. Students who wish to apply for a gradu ate student award for the academic year 1991-92, e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, must file a completed appli cation with the department before the announced departmental deadline. RE-ADMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS Students who were previously admi tt ed to a graduate degree program but did not complete that degree program and have not been registered for one year or more at the University must: I. Clarify their status with the d e part ment or school /co llege to determine their eligibility to return and pursue the same degree. 2. After receiving departmental approva l as indicated above, submit a n ew applica tion Part I to th e Office of Admis sions before departmental deadlines are passed for the term in which they expect to return to the Univers ity . A $30 applica tion fee is required. Application deadlines are available from the department. Former students who wish to change from undergraduate to graduate status or from one major to another must apply to the new department. Students transferring from one campus to another must apply and be accepted to the new campus . A studen t admitted to The Graduate School for th e master's program must reapply for the doctoral program . A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student's major department and the dean . In case of l ac k of agreement between the department and the dean or in the case of appea l by the student, the final decision will be made by the Graduate Council. FOREIGN APPLICANTS Prospective foreign st ud ents should hav e completed applications on file in Office of Admissions prior to December 1 for the Summer Term , March 1 for the Fall Semester, and July 1 for the Spring Semester . The application packet should include the $50 fee, 1DEFL scores, finan cial documentation , Graduate Record Examination scores, officia l English trans lation of all school records, and other documents as noted in the previous sec tion on Application Procedures. Acceptable 1DEFL Scores. The 1DEFL is the Test of English as a Foreign Lan guage. If your native language is not English, or you have not attended a Brit ish or American university for at l east one year and achieved satisfactory grades, then you must take the 1DEFL. All pro grams within CU-Denver's Graduate School-arts and sciences, education, engi neering, and doctoral programs-require a minimum score of 525 for regular admis sion. Those earning less than 525 will nor mally be referred to the Spring Inter national Language Center (on campus) for further language study. During that time, students will study on an 1-20 from Spring International , but may take classes as non degree students at CU-Denver. They may subsequently be granted regular admis sion to The Graduate School. All interna tional students who take the 1DEFL and are granted regular admission t o CU Denver's Graduate Schoo l will b e asked Graduate Admission I 43 to take both the Michigan and SPEAK tests during their first semester of study. Those whose 1DEFL fell between 525 and 550 will be required to take additional language training in light of whatever deficiencies may be revealed by these diagnostic t ests. Those whose 1DEFL excee ds 550 will be e ncourag ed, but not required, to undertake additional training in light of their performance on these tests. Students seeki ng admission to all othe r graduate programs, including those in architecture and planning, business, and public affairs, sho uld consult those program descriptions for lan guage requirements. GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for admission to the graduate program or for assistantships prior to d e termining student status. Students who are applying for assista nt ships for th e fall semester take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the selec tion committee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an institution. Information regarding these examina tions may be obtaine d from the CU Denver Testing Center, or from The Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. aTHER GRADUATE QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain informa tion at the Student Testing Center on the following examinations: Graduate Manage ment Admissions Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Miller Analo gies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (LSAT). NON-DEGREE STUDENTS A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado at Denv e r should apply to the Office of Admissions , Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364 , Denver, CO 80217-3364. Non-degree students will be allowed to register on l y on the campus to which th ey have been admitted. Non-degree students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this Univer sity are encouraged to submit th e com plete graduate application and supporting credentials as soon as possible .

PAGE 46

44 / The Graduate Sch oo l A department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as many as 9 credit hours toward the requirements of a master's degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a non-degree student at the University of Colorado, or both. I n addition, the department may recom m end to the graduate dean the acceptance o f credit courses taken as a non-degree stu dent at this University du r i ng the te r m f or which the student appl i ed for admissio n to The Graduate School , provided such admission date was de l ayed through no fault of the student. A grade of B or bet ter must be obtained in any coursework transferred in this manner. REGISTRATION Course Work and E xaminations On the regular registrat i on days of each semester, students who have been admit ted to The Graduate School and who expect to study in The Graduate School are required to complete appropriate registration procedures. Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted into The Graduate School. If unab l e to attend that semester , they must notify the department that has accepted them and submit the necessary form s to the Office of Admis sions and Records at CU-Denver in order to attend the following semester. Cha nges in Registration A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should follow the drop/add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Classes). After the tenth week of classes graduate students may not drop , add, or change a course to nCKre dit status without presenting a letter to the dean of their school/college, stating the excep tional circumstances that justify the change. This letter , endorsed by the instructor of the course , must accompany the properly signed and completed drop / add card or nCKredit option form. Withdrawal Graduate students who desire to with draw from the University must apply to the dean of their school/college for per mission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official w i thdrawal will be marked as having failed t h e course. T h e withdrawal form must be signed by the instructor of the course and pass/ fail must be indicated with the instructor's initia ls. Master' s Thesis Graduate students working toward master's degrees, if they expect to present a thesis in part ial ful fillment of the requirements for the degree, must regis t e r for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours . The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed . If the thesis is not comple t ed at the end of the term in which t he student is so registered , an in p rogress (IP) will be reported . (The studen t may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.) Limitation of Registration FULL LOAD A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load dur i ng a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit if the student is registered for at l east 5 credit hours of mixed under graduate / graduate / thesis or dissertation hours. A maximum of two-thirds of a semester o f resident credit may be earned during the summer if a student registers for three semester hours of other graduate work or any number of thesis hours. For the number of hours required for financial aid, see Financial Aid at the Univers i ty of Colorado at Denver in th e General Information section of this cata log . A graduate student may contact the school/college dean's office for informa tion on the appeal process regarding the full load requirement for financial aid purposes. MAXIMUM LOAD No graduate student may receive cre dit toward a degre e for more than 15 hours in a regular semester. The maximum number of graduate cred i ts t hat may be applied toward a deg ree during a summer term at CU Denver i s 10 hours per 10-week summer term. A graduate student may contact the school/college dean's office for informa tion on the appeal process regarding an overload. UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES Fullt ime employees of the University may not u ndertake m ore than 6 credit hours per semester. P art-time empl oyees , inclu din g assistants, m ay take the number of cre dit h ours approved by the major depar t ment. TUITION AND FEES The schedule of tui t ion and fees is given in the General Information section of this catalog. REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES Quality o f Gr aduate Work Although the work for advance degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours , an advanced degree will not be conferred merely for the comp l e t ion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses. Students should not expect to obtain all the training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirement for an advanced degree from formal courses. They should work on their own initiative , reading wide l y and thoughtfully, reaching their own conclusions , and acquiring a sense of values, perspe c tive, and proportion. All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficien cies) must be of graduate status. A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted while enrolled in The Graduate School. For the Ph.D., a course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum require ments for the degree. A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School by the dean with the approval of the major department. Appeal may be made to the Graduate Council. The committee's decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year . Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student's major depart m ent and the d ean. In case of appea l by the student, t he fina l decision will be made by the Graduate Council.

PAGE 47

Repeating a Course A graduate student who receives a grade of C, D, or F in a course may repeat the course once, upon written recommen dation to the dean by the chairman of the student's advisory committee and major department, provided the course has not previously been applied toward a degree . In calcu l ating a student's grade-point average for Graduate School purposes, the grade for a repeated course will substitute for the old grade. Grades earned in courses taken as an undergraduate or as a non-degree student, as well as grades earned in first-and second-year foreign language courses , will not be used in cal culating The Graduate School grade-point average; however, all grades received will appear on the student's transcript. Change of Department or Major A graduate student wishing to change department or major must s ub mit a new Part I and Part II of the graduate applica tion to the new department or school and request the former department to forward recommendations and credentials. The student must be formally accepted by the new department. Use of English A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of standard English in all oral and written work may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado . Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance. Each department will judge the qualifi cations of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, exam inati ons , and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate's proficiency . Graduate Appeals Final action on appeals submitted by graduate students concerning action taken by faculty members, programs , or administrative officials rests with the campus Graduate Counci l , unless such appea l involves a matter affecting two or more campuses . In such a case, the final action rests with the Executive Committee of the System-Wide Graduate School. MASTER'S DEGREE A student regularly admitted to The Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master's degrees will be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met. In genera l , only gradua t es of an approved institution who have a thorough preparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below. All studies offered toward the mini mum requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank . Necessary additional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequisites may be partly or entirely undergraduate courses. The requirements stated below are mini mum requirements; additional conditions set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate departments . Any department may make further regu lations not inconsistent with the general rules. Students planning to graduate should ascertain current deadlines of The Gradu ate School. It is the graduate student's and the department's responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met O.e. changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of fina l examinations, etc.) . Departments or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascertain such require ments a nd to meet them as designated by the department or program chair . Minimum Requirements The minimum requirements of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by following either Plan I or Plan II below. Plan 1 : By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work , including a thesis. At least 12 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above. Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis . At least 16 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above . Plan II does not represent a free option for the student. A candidate for the master ' s degree may be allowed to select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned. Master's Degree I 45 Graduate Credit Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above and that are offered by professors who are members of the graduate faculty, or that have otherwise been approved by the dean of The Graduate School. No assur ance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless the student has the approval of the department. Not all courses listed are available at any one time ; some are given in alternate years. Courses taken during the Fall Semester 1975 and thereafter will have graduate rank if they are taught by members of The Graduate Schoo l faculty and are in one of the following categories: 1 . Courses within the major program at the 5000 level or above . 2 . Courses outside the major program at the 4000 level provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean. 3 . The Master of Basic Science program (M.RS.) has approval for 3000and 4000-level courses if approved by the department and the dean of The Graduate School. 4. Courses outside the major program, provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree granting program and by the campus graduate dean. This does not change the minimum number of courses that must be taken at the 5000 level or above; however, as a result , most students who include 4000 level courses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation. Field of Study Studies leading to a master's degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program . Status After students have made a satisfactory record in this University for at least one semester or summer term , and after they have removed any defi c iencies that were determined at the time of admission or by qualifying examinations or otherwise , they should confer with their major depart ment and request that a decision be made on their status . This definite status must

PAGE 48

46 I The Graduate Schoo l be set by the major department before students may make appl i cation for admis sion to candidacy for an advanced degree. Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without credi t toward a graduate degree all prereq u i sites req uir ed by the department concerned. languag e Requirements Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as each department requires. See specific depart mental requirements. Credit by Transfer Resident graduate work o f high quality done in a recognized grad u ate schoo l elsewhere and coming with i n the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended by the department co ncerned and approved by the dean of the school/college. Course work taken more than 6 years prior to the completion of final require ments (comprehensive exam and/or filing of thesis) will not be accepted for the degree unless validated by a special examination. The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University is 9 semester hours. Credit will not be transferred until th e student has established in The Graduate School of this University a satisfactory record of at least one semester in resi dence; such transfer will not reduc e the residence at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal co urses. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beg i nning of t h e semester prior to that in which the stu dent will be graduated . Work already applied toward a master's degree r ece iv e d from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the master's degree at the University of Colorado; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred; and correspondence work , except to make up deficiencies, is not recognized. Excess undergraduate cre dits from another institution may not be transferred to The Graduate School. Seniors in this University may , however , transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 9 semester hours) provided such work: I. Is completed with distinction in t h e senior year at this University. 2. Comes within the four-year time l imit. 3. Has not been applied toward another degree. 4. I s recommended for transfer by the department concerned and approved by the dean of the sc h ool/college. Requ ests for transfer of credit t o be app lied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to t h e school/co l lege by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. For more information contact your g r aduate advisor. To be eligible for courses to be considered f or transfer, a student must have an overall B average in all courses t ake n at the University of Colo rado in The Gradua t e School. Continuing Education Course Work Students may use the resources of the Division of Extended Studies in the pursuit of graduate study only if they obtain proper academic approval from th e major department and the school/college dean in advance. Reside nce In general, the residenc e requirements ca n be met only by resid e nce at the University for at least two se mesters or at least three summer terms. For full resi dence, a student must be r egistered with i n the time designated at th e beginning of a se mester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses numbered 5000 or above, or at l east a combination of other course work acceptable for graduate credit. See Limita tion of Registration, Full Load, for require ments for full residence credit during the summer . Students who are notic eably de ficient i n their general training or in the specific preparation indicat e d by each d epa rtment as prerequisite to graduate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified. Graduate assistants and other emp loyees of the University may fulfill th e r es idence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than halftime. Full-time emp l oyees may not satisfy the residence requ i rements of one year in fewer than four semesters. Admission to Candidacy A student who wishes to become a can didate for a master's degree must file app l ication in th e graduate dean's office 10 weeks prior to the completion of the comp r e h ensive fina l examination. The numbe r of hours to be presented for the degree must be determined before this application may be fil ed. See previous sec tion o n Status . Th i s application m u s t be made on forms obta i nab l e from the G r aduate School dean's offi ce and in various departments and must be signed by the major depart ment, certifying that the student's work is satisfactory and that t h e program outlined in the application meets the requirements se t for t he student. A st u dent on Graduate School probation is not eligible to be awarded a degre e until he or she is removed from probation. Thesi s Requirements A thesis , which may be of a research, ex pository , critical, or creative type, is required of every master's degree candi date under Plan I. Every thesis presented in part i a l fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must: I. Deal with a definite topic related to the ma j or field. 2. Be based upon independent study and investigation . 3. Represent the eq u ivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work. 4. Receiv e the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departm ents, 90 days) before th e com mencement at which the degr ee is to be conferred. 5. Be essentially complete at the tim e the comprehensive final examination is given. 6. Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in Dir ec tions for Preparing Masters ' and Doctoral Theses, which is obtainable from The Graduate School. Two week s prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred , two formally approved, printed or typewritt e n copies of the thesis must be filed in The Graduate School. The thesis must be com plete with abstract. All theses must be signed by the thesis adv isor and the second reader . All a pproved theses are kept on file in the library. The th esis bind i ng fee must be paid when the th esis is deposited in The Graduate School. Credi t hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless s u ch credit has previously been registered . A student working toward a master's degree must regis t er for thesis for a specific n u mber of hours . The student may register for any specific num ber of hours in any semester of resi dence,but the total registered credit for

PAGE 49

thesis must total a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. An IP (in progress) will be reported for terms during which the student is registered for thesis prior to completion of the thesis . Comprehensive Final Examination All candidates for a master's degree are required to take a compre h ensive final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examina tion may be given near the end of their last semester of residence while they are still taking required courses for the degree, provided they are making satisfactory progress in those courses. The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed: 1. Students must be registered when they take th e examination. 2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean's office at least three days in advance of the examination. 3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty mem bers appointed by the department con cerned in consultation with th e dean. 4 . The examination, which may be oral , written, or both , must cover the thesis, which should be essentially complete at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and semi nars in the major field. 5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments . 6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in th e major or minor field. The examination on transferred work will be given by repr esenta tives of the cor responding fields of study in this University. 7. A student who fails the comprehen sive final examination may not attempt the examination again until at least three months have elapsed and until such work as may be prescribed by the examining committee has been completed. The student may retake the examination only once. Supplemental Examinations S uppl emental examinat ion s should be simply an extension of the or i ginal exami nation and given immediately . If the stu dent fails the supplemental examination, three months must elapse before attempt ing the comprehensive examination again. Course Examinations The regular written examinations of each semester except the last must be taken. Course examinations of the last semester, which come after the compre hensive final examination has been passed, may be omitted with the consent of the instructor . Master's Thesis Credit Every graduate student working toward a master ' s degree who expects to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours . The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of resi dence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of cred its th e student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be with held until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed a t the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (/P) will be reported. (fhe student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submi tted . ) Time Limit Master's degr ee students have 5 years, from the date of the sta rt of course work, to complete all degree requirements. For st udents who fail to complete the degree in this 5 year period, it will be necessary for the program director to file an annual statement with the graduate dean stating the reasons why the program faculty believe the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to con tinue in the program . Students who do their work exclusively in summer terms must com plete all degree requirements within 72 months from the start of course work. Doctor of Philosophy I 47 A student who does not complete all degree requirements within the specified period of time must validate, by special examination(s), any course work taken more than 6 years prior to taking the masters comprehensive examination or co mpleting the thesis defense , depending on which plan is elected. Deadlines for Master's Degree Candidates Expecting to Graduate During 1991-92 Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling The Graduate School office, 556-2663. 1. Last day for requesting transfer of c redit. 2. Applications for admission to candidacy. Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (fhe form may be picked up in the department or in The Graduate School office.) 3. Last day for thesis to be approved by department. 4. Last day for scheduling of compre hensive final examination. 5. Last day for taking comprehensive final examination. 6. Last day for filing thesis in The Graduate School. At the time of filing, the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by The Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p.m . on the indicated date will be graduated at the commencement following that for which the deadline is indicated. DOGOR OF PHILOSOPHY The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the high es t academic degree conferred by the University . To state the require ments for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued . Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can criti cally eva luate work in this field; further more, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribu tion of significance to the advancement

PAGE 50

48 / The Graduate School of knowledge . The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree ; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules. Studies leading to the Ph.D. degree mu s t be chosen so as to contribute to special com pet ence a nd a high order of scholar ship in a broad field o f knowledge. A field of study c ho sen by the student may b e in one department or it may includ e two o r more closely r e l ated departments. The criterion as to what co nstitutes a n accept able field of study shall be that the student' s work must contribute to an organized pro gram of study a nd research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University. Students planning to graduate sho uld ob tain current deadline dates in the office of The Graduate School. It is the grad u ate student's and th e department's responsibil ity to see that all requirements and dead lines are met (i.e. changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.). Department or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by graduate studen ts in that department or program . It is the stude n t's responsibility to ascertain such r eq uire ments and to meet them as designated by th e de partm en t or program chair. Minimum Course/Dissertation Requirements A minimum of 30 semester h o urs of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of diss e rtation credit are requir ed for th e Ph.D. degr ee. Course Work R e quirement. A minim u m of 30 semester h ours of courses numb e r ed 5000 or above i s required for th e degree, but th e numb e r of hours of formal co ur ses will ordinarily excee d this minimum. At l eas t 20 of the required hour s must be in gra duat e cou r ses taken at this University. Students who h ave been admitted to Th e Graduate School with defici enc ie s may ex p ec t t o receive little or n o residence c re dits until th e d eficie ncies hav e been remov e d . Diss e rtati o n Hours Requir e m en t . To comple t e the requirements for the Ph.D., a student must r egister for a total of at l east 30 h o ur s o f doctoral dissertation credit , with n ot more than 10 o f these credi t hours in any one semester. Not more than 10 dissertation hours may be tak en preceding the semester of takin g compre hensive examinations. In addition, up t o 10 hours may be taken in the semester in which the student passes comprehensives . Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above and will not be included in calculation of t he student's grade-point average . Only the grades of A, B, C and IP shall be used . Course work and work on the disserta tion may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program; however, at no time shall a doct ora l s tudent register for more than 15 hours of 5000-level and above co urses . Normally a student must have ea rned at least three and not more than six se mest ers of residency before admis sion to candidacy. Advisory Committee As soon as the field of specializatio n has been chosen , the candidat e will request the faculty member with whom the com mittee wishes to work to ac t as chair of the advisory committee. The c hair , with the advice and approval o f the chair of the departm e nt , may selec t two or more additional memb e r s to serve o n the com mittee, so that the several fields related to the student's special int erest will be r e presented . A purpose of the advisory comm ittee (beyond guiding th e student through graduate study) is to ens ur e against spe c ialization that is too narrow. The student shall obtain the signature of the chair of the commit tee (thereby sig nifying his or her willingness to act) on the Application for Admission to Can didacy f orm. Any c hang e in the m e mber ship o f th e adviso ry comm ittee i s to be similarl y reported. Residence T h e student must b e properly r egis tered to ea rn r es id e n ce c redit . The minimal resi de nce requirem e nt s h all b e six semesters of sc holarl y work b eyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor's degr ee. Mere atte nd a n ce shall n o t const itut e residence as th e word is here u sed. R esi dence may be earned for course work com plet e d w ith distin ction, for participation in semi nars, or for sc holarly research p erfo rmed here or elsewhere under the auspices of th e University of Colorado. As a guiding policy in d e t e rmining resi dence credit for emp l oyed students, those w ho are employed in three-fourths to full time work that does not contribute directly to their program toward a degree may not earn more than onehalf resi dence credit in any semester. Stu d e nt s who a re employed more than one-four th time a nd less than thr ee-fourt h s time in work that does not contribute directly to the degree may earn not more than three fourths residence credit. Those who have one-fourth time employment or less may earn full residence credit. (All these provi sions are subject to the definition of resi dence credit given in the preceding paragraph.) In case the interpretation of residence credit for any student needs to be clarified , a decision will be made by the chair of th e student's advisory com mittee, th e chair of the student's major department , and the dean of The Gradu ate School. Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master's degree from ano ther institution of approved standing , but a t le as t four semes ters of residence cre dit , two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earn ed for work (cour se and/or dissertation) t aken at this University. A part of th e residence requirement for the Ph .D. degree may be spent in another graduate institution, or in field work in absentia (provided that prior approval for work is given by the student's program director and provided that the stud e nt's registrat ion is maintained for that period away from the cam pus) . Preliminary Examination Each department will satisfy itself (by examination or o th e r means) th a t students who s ignify intent to undert a k e s tudy f or the Ph .D. d eg ree are qualified to do so. The means by which each dep a rtm e nt makes this evaluation shall be specified in departmental requirements. Students who are thus evaluated will be notified imm e diately of the result s. The results of this preliminary eva luati on shall b e repo rted to Th e Graduate Schoo l office on th e Application for Candidacy form filed by th e student at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is atte mpted . Language Requirement The d ec i sio n o n foreign languag e requirements for Ph . D . degrees i s th e respo n sibility of the graduate fac ulty of eac h graduate prog r am.1 Credit by Transfer Resident graduate work of high quality earned in another institution of approved standi n g will not be accepted for transfer ' Approv e d by a vote of the sys t em-wid e graduat e faculty on February 7 , 1 990.

PAGE 51

to apply toward the doctorate until the student has established a satisfactory record in residence in this Graduate School, but such credit must be trans ferred before the student makes applica tion for admission to candidacy for the degree. Such will not reduce the minimum residence requirement at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses . The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University for the Ph.D . is 30 semester hours . Application for Admission to Candidacy A student must make formal application for admission to candidacy for the Ph .D. degree on forms supplied by The Graduate Schoo l office at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted. A stude n t shall have earned at least three semesters of residence, and shall have passed the comprehensive examination before admission to candidacy for the degree. Continuous Reg istration Requireme nts for Doctoral Candidates Following successful completion of com prehensive examinations, students must register continuously. Students admitted to candidacy for degree will register for and be charged for seven hours of credit for each full-time term of doctoral work. For each term of part-time enrollment, stu dents will be charged for seven hours of dissertation credit, except that students not making use of campus facilities may petition The Graduate School for three credit-hour status. Continuous registration during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense. It is expected that the student and advisor will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classification identified above . Comprehensive Examina t ion Before admission to candidacy for the Ph .D. degree, the student must pass a comprehensive examination in the field of concentration and related fields. This examinat i on may be ora l , written, or both, and will test the student's mastery of a broad field of know l edge, not merely the formal course work completed . The oral part is open to members of the faculty . The student must be registered at the time the comprehensive examination is attempted. The examination shall be conducted by an examining board appo i nted by the chair of the department concerned and be approved by the campus graduate dean . The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to total a minimum of five. A successful candidate must receive the affir mative votes of a majority of the mem bers of the examination board. In case of failure, the examination may be attempted once more after a period of time deter mined by the examining board. Dissertation Require ments A thesis based upon original investiga tion, showing mature scholarship, critical judgment, and familiarity with the too l s and methods of research, must be written upon some subject approved by the stu dent's major department. To be accepta ble , this dissertation shou l d be a worthwhi l e contribution to knowledge in the student's special field. It must be finished and submitted in typewritten form at least 30 days (in some depart ments, 90 days) before the day of the final examination and must be formally approved and made available for inspec tion by the examining committee before the final examination may be taken. In mechanical features, all dissertations must comply with the specifications of The Graduate School as outlined in the Direct i ons for Prepa r ing Masters' and Doctora l Theses which may be obtained from The Graduate School. It is t h e s t udent's responsibility to notify The Graduate School of the exact title of the disserta t ion at l east six weeks prior to the commencement at which the student will graduate. This title will be printed in the commencement program (May gradu ation on ly). Two formally-approved, typewritten copies of the dissertation, including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page a n d abstract m u st be fil ed in The Graduate School office at least two weeks be f ore the date on which the degree is to be conferred. The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts Doctor of Philosophy / 49 International . The determination of what constit u tes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department. All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than two members of the major department staff who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction . All approved dissertations are kept on file in the library . When the dissertation is deposited in The Graduate School, the candidate must pay the thesis-binding fee and sign an agreement with University Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International and to gran t University Microfilms Interna tional the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the disserta tion by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform. Fina l Examination After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dis sertation and related topics will be con ducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral , the oral part being open to anyone. The examination will be con ducted by a committee consisting of at least five persons, one of whom must be from outside the student's department. More than one dissenting vote will dis qualify the candidate in the final examination . Arrangements for the final examination must be made in the graduate dean ' s office at least two weeks in advance. The examination must be scheduled not later than two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. A student must be registered at the time of the final examination. Time limit If a student fails to complete all require ments for the degree within the prescribed number of years from the date of the start of course work in the doctora l program, a second examination similar to the first will be requ i red before the candi date may take the final examination. The number of years allowed for compl et i o n is normally six, but in some programs it may be seven. If the comprehensive examination is failed, it may be attempted

PAGE 52

50 I The Graduate Schoo l once more after not fewer than eight months of further work. For students who fail to complete the degree i n this six-year period , it will be necessary for the depart ment to file an annual statement indicat ing that the program direc t o r believes the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the pro gram . This request must be signed by three members of the graduate faculty who serve on the student's thesis advisory committee . If approved by the campus graduate dean , the student may c ontinue his/ her studies for one addit i onal year . If not approved , the student may be dropped from the program.

PAGE 55

Acting D ean: P e t e r Schn eide r Associate Dean: Yuk Lee Office: C U D e n ve r Bldg. (fo rm e rly Drav o ) , Thi r d Floor Telephone: 556-3382 Faculty Professors : Yuk Lee, Geo r ge H oover, Jo h n Prosser, P e t e r Schneid e r , H a mid Shirva n i Associate Professors: Soo nt orn Boo n ya tik arn, Lois Brink , Thomas C l ark, Phillip Gallegos, H arry Gar n ham, Mar vin H atami, David Hill, Paul Sapori to, Pete r Sch ae ffer Assistant Professors: T eresa Cameron, Ned Collier, Michael H olle r an, Tai sto Make la, H ans Morgen th aler, Bennett Neiman, D iane Wilk Shirvani , Won Jin Tae, Ping Xu INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL The School of Architecture and Plan ning offers first and post professional pro grams leading to master ' s degrees. The primary mission of the School is educa tion, research, and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning. Students are required to search into the existing abundance of architecture and planning knowledge in order to generate effective , forceful , spirited forms, ideas , and proposals . Faculty and students are engaged in investigation, education , explo ration, and generation of new ideas , forms, and proposals to create more humane living environments . As El Lissitzky (1930) stated: "Our work is not philosophy, neither is it a system relating to a specific theory of nature ; it is part of nature and must therefore itself be regarded as an object of knowledge: In doing so , the School questions exist ing connections of teaching and practice and is in search of future alternatives . The School ' s activities are thus geared toward preparation of future architects and plan ners who are not only able to draw, to calculate , or to propose , but also to ques tion, to explore , and to experiment. The curricula are based on a wide range of cultural views of architecture and planning reflective of our faculty and student body . The faculty direct, guide , and encourage students to develop their individual interests with a prerequisite commitment intended to equip the gradua t e with a l as t i n g a bility t o p ro du ce arc hit ec tur e and pla nnin g r es p o n s i ve t o the c hangin g n e ed s o f s ociety. It i s o n th ese pr emises th a t o ur Sch oo l is i n co n s t an t sea r c h o f th e m anifes t , i d eas, a nd f o r ms for th e b e tt e r me nt o f th e livin g e nv iron men ts. A co mmunit y o f cul t ur ally diver se e du ca t ors a nd pr actitio n ers ce nt e re d in a n isl a nd b y th e b ack drop o f the R ocky Mountai n s p rovi d es a uniqu e oppo rtun i t y for intense st u dy of architec ture a nd p l anning. Mission and Organization The Sch ool is composed of three gradu ate degree programs i n architecture, landscape arc h itecture, a n d urban and regiona l p l anning (M. A r c h., M.L.A. , M.U.R.P.). It also offers urban design as an area of special i zation in the a r chitecture program (M.Arch. in Urban Design). As a unit of graduate professional education with three professional degree programs and a mandate for national excellence and recognition, the School expects to go beyond training students in basic skills for entry-level positions. The School's overall mission is to develop the design capabili ties of the individuals and the design professions as a whole as well as provide the intellectual framework which supports design . Considering this mission , the School emphasizes basic professional training and education necessary for entering profes sional practice in its first professional degree programs . The post-professional and advanced degree programs are directed toward professionals at various career stages and focuses on research and specialization. The School supports interdisciplinary work in its programs and focuses on professional education and research con cerning the design and planning of the built environment. Within this interdiscipli nary approach , it recognizes the profes sional community input and the role of the other academic disciplines such as humanities, social sciences , and engineering . In the School's degree programs , various architecture and planning ideologies and views are examined with respect to their historical setting . This examination is com bined with critical reviews of design work, dia l og u e s , and m e th o d s to f o r m t he e s se n tia l i n g redi e nt o f d es i g n e du ca tion . Through this dialectic o f an a l yzing and sy nth e sizing, s tud e nt s gain inc rease d und e r s tandin g o f th ose hum anis tic ideals u nd erlying th e architec ture and p l a nnin g of b u i lding s a nd spaces a nd relate th e m t o t h eir o wn develo pin g p erso n a l asp irati o ns. Th e S cho o l i s co mm i tt e d t o desig n as its ce ntral int ellectua l co n ce rn an d is the l ar gest gra du a t e schoo l of arc h itecture i n t h e wes t e rn regio n . Desig n is u sed in i ts broa d es t se n se to incl ud e a full range of phi l oso phies, ideolog ies, th eor ies, a nd meth o ds. Th e School's m ission is ed u ca tion, resea r ch, and develo p ment of arts and scie n ces of arch i tecture and plann i ng. A c ademic Programs The three graduate programs are int er discip l inary, and, in the design fields , both first and post professional degrees are offered . I n addition , it is possible for stu dents to obtain two degrees, M.Arch . and M.U.R.P. for example , and reduce the t ime required for doing so by coordinating their programs. The first professional degree programs are structured for full-time graduate study. For students with emp l oyment obligat i ons, most of these programs can be taken on a part-time basis. Usually the first year of the full-time program must be completed before it can be taken part-time . Within any of the programs , the School of Architecture and Planning offers oppor tunities to develop a self-tailored area of concentration through its varied offerings in architecture , landscape architecture , urban design , and urban and regional planning . Electives ordinarily can be taken from any program in the School and from another school in the University with the approval of the student's advisor. The School maintains membership in: Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning Council of Landscape Architecture Educators Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board Planning Accreditation Board Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society Sigma Delta Lambda Honor Society

PAGE 56

54/ School of Architecture and Planning Academic Environment and Student Body In addition to its reg ula r c urr iculum pro grams, the Schoo l suppo rt s or sponso r s a variety of even ts and activities that enlarge and broaden the learnin g environment in the Sch ool. Stude nt internships for credi t are available during th e aca d emic year. A summer international s tud y program is offered. The School sponsors three receptions-at the beginning of th e academic year, before C hr istmas, and at the end of the academic year-along with a Beaux Arts Ball in the spring , for stude nts and the l ocal professional community. Finally, the School s pon sors severa l exhibiti ons of design an d art works. Ther e are abo ut 275 full-time stude nt s in th e School. The stude nt bod y is diverse, repr esent ing many aca demic discipli n es a nd a wide var i e t y of previous academ i c institutions. Students have p re vious degrees from a numb er of uni versities around th e world. lecture Series Guest critics are frequently invited to th e School. In addition, the School has an official lecture series eve ry year. The Lectur e Series is compose d of distin g uished practition ers, c ritic s , and scholars of national and international nature. Visiting critics and spea ker s include: Stanley Allen, Amy Anderson, Nader Ardalan, Ann Bergr e n , Jennifer Bloomer , Christine Boyer , Jam es Corner , Livio Dimitriu , P e ter Eisenman, Tzann H our Fang , K enne th Frampton , Mario Gandelsonas, Dia ne Ghirardo, Michael Hays , Mark J o hnson , Keith Loftin , Greg Lynn, Rodolfo Machado, Art McDonald, Ian McHarg, John Meunier, David Niland , John Novack, Patrick Quinn , Dennis Radford , Geo r ge Ranalli, Frank E. Sanchis, Thomas Schumacher, Robert Segrest, Werner Seligman, Bahram Shirdel, Vladimir Slapeta, Micha e l Sorkin, John R. Stilgoe, Harry Teague , William Turnbull , Anne Vernez-Moudon, Anthony Vidler , P ete r Waldman , Peter Walker, Michael W eb, Morgan Dix Whe e lock , and Lebbeus Woods . SCHOOL FACILITIES The School's studios, library, Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory , Auto Cadd Computer Laboratory, photo labora tory and darkroom , model shop , gallerias, and offices are housed in three floors of the CU-Denver Bldg. in 50,000 square feet of space. The laboratories and facilities were developed through an endowment by noted architec t T e mpl e Hoyn e Buell, FAIA. Architecture and Planning library Ubrarian: Robert Wick The Architecture and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library (admini stered by the Universi t y of Colo rado a t Denver) , se rv es as a l earning resource center in the fields of architec ture a nd planning. It contains the following collections : reference , circulating , documentary (pl an nin g documents issued by local, regional, state and national agen cies with an emp ha s i s on p l a nnin g materials pertaining t o Colorado communities and conce rn s ) , periodicals, reserve , an d non-print media including architec tural slides. The Architecture a nd Plannin g Library h as over 1 3,000 volum es of books and mon og r ap hs, prof essiona l references, 15,000 slides, an d 99 periodical sub scri ptions . The Architecture a nd Planning Library staff consists of a half tim e librari a n , library technici a n , and severa l student assis tants . The Library provides a number of services including reference and research assistance, and library-use instruction. Additional services, such as inter-library loan and comp ut er -assisted research , are provided thr o ugh th e Aura ria Library . MACINTOSH ARCHITEGURE AND DESIGN LABORATORY The Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory i s dedicated to the promotion of design innovation and exploration with the Macintosh computer . The newly acq uired lab ora tory contains 15 Macintosh II computers with megabyt e internal hard drive and hig h reso lution color monitors ; a Macintosh II file server with 80 mega byte internal hard drive; an E-size, Hewlett-Packard Draftmast e r I pen plotter; LaserWriter II printer; Ima ge Writer II dot matrix printer ; and Thund e rScan image digitizer . The laboratory is presently experimenting with variou s drawing and painting so ftware including MacArchitrion professional 3-dimensional modeling soft ware, VersaCad , MacDraw II, SuperPaint, PixelPaint, Adobe Illustrator 88, Video Works, Canvas, MiniCad, and Mac3D. This statEX>f-the-art laboratory has been deve loped through a contribution by Apple Computer, Inc. CADD COMPUTER LABORATORY T h e CADD Labo rator y of the School of Ar c hitecture and Planning is located adja c ent to the Macin t os h Architecture Labora tor y and is eq uipp ed for upscaled c ompu t er-aided design and drafting with a microco mputer based n etworking system which i s being modified and expa nded . Six Zenith 2200 PC/ATs, in add ition to four IBM PC/XTs with high resolution monitors and digit i z ing t ablets, are now linked with a Novell central file server and 120 megabyte hard disk drive for storage. This network and six additional PC/AT works t ations are linked through the addi tion of AutoCAD co mp atible software that exten d s and enha n ces th e ongoing use of AutoCAD and AE/CADD. Additional capa bilities a re offere d thro u g h AutoWord, an int eractive word processing package for editing and displaying t ext of drawings; Auto CoGo, a coor dinat e geome try pr ogram that allows entry of s ur vey and e n gineering data for site planning and e ngin eering ; LandSoft, a system for intr od ucing land scape architec tural sy mb ols and dr afting exte n sion into the AutoCAD and AE/CADD utilities; and Generic T empla t e , a means of c ustomizin g or c reating unique d es ign an d drafting templates. Also avai l able are th e Comp ut erVision syste m which includes th e Perso n a l Architec t and Personal Designer packages , Gould Colorwriter 6320, and H ew l e tt Packard plott ers. A dditional com puting facilities are avai lable at other sites o n campus. BUILDING TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY The Building Technology Laboratory functions as a teaching and research f acility for both s tud e nts and ou tsid e practi tioners. For th e s tudent, through hands-on expe riment and physical d emo nstration , it is u se d to facili tate the learning proce ss as well as bridge the gap between theoretical conce pts and pra c tica l applications . For practitioners, this facility is used to enhance their practice and update their knowledge. Some examples of equipment a nd facilities available include data acquisition sys t e ms , lighting research equipment, Macintosh visual input package , windflow simulation table, video equipment, and data logging equipment. Data acquisition sys tems includes the following compo nents: data logger Model 21X-L with 40K internal memory (RAM) and sealed

PAGE 57

rechargeable battery from Campbell Scientific ; IBM PC-AT with 30 m ega byt e hard disk and 1.2 megabyte RAM; casse tte tape recorder and casse tte tape interface (for a remote applicat i on); analog and digi tal control cord; and n ecessary software for read / write access, d ata interfacing, and data manipulation. Lighting R esearch Equipment includes: quantum / radiometer / photometer , two units of pyron ometer model Ll-200SB-50, six units of photometric sensor -mode l Ll-210SB, and luminance meter at one degree spot. The Macintosh package allows a direct input of visual image from any object into com puter for further study. This equip ment includes: Macintosh II computer, Macvision digitizer board and supporte d software , and visual camera model lCD-200 from IKEGAMI. The windflow simulation table allows the designer to analyze various windflow patterns on two-dimensional forms. By allowing water to flow cont inuously in a given direction and by ad d ing an even dis tribution of ink to identify th e flow pat terns , an immediate study can be encountered on a given site configuration. Video equipment includes : video camera RGB, video monitor, and high quality four head VHS recorder . Data logging equipment allows an auto matic collection of data for a specific time and period . When furnished with the appropriate sensors, the following data can be obtained: temperature (surface temperature , air temperature, and subsur face temperature) , moisture (wetbulb tem perature and relative humidity) , solar radiation, lighting intensity, and wind s p eed . Photo Laboratory. Our new photogra phy l a b , w ith the l atest state-of-the-art equipmen t , is used for architectural pho tography classes and b y st ud ents to produce material for their portfolios. There are separate a r eas for developing, en l argi ng, drying , and copying. Model-Making Laboratory. Studen t s will have an 800-square-foot model shop in which t o build projects f or their classes . Table saws, jig saws, drill pr esses, jointers, and a full range of hand tools will allow the student to build mod e l s of wood , plas tic, and steel. An a dja ce nt paint spray room is equipped with a ventilated paint booth a nd vapor-proof lighting . ADMISSI ONS G enera l Requirements The School of Architecture and Plan ning has an Academic Affairs Office. Primary re sponsibilities of this office include answering admission inquiries, processing admissions applications, award ing tuition scholarships, enforcing s tudio and l a bor a t ory rules , h earing st ud en t grade a ppeals, overseei n g studen ts' rig ht s and responsibilities , approving new course proposals, enforcing academic policies , and processing graduation applications. Each applicant for a dmissi on into a n y of th e programs of the School of Architec ture a nd Planning must s ubmit: 1 . The University of Colorado Applica tion for Graduate Admission forms . 2 . Two official transcripts from each institution th e applicant has attended. 3. Three letters of recommendation. 4. A sta tement of purpose . 5 . Examples of crea tiv e work (see below) . 6 . The application fee. Special requirements for international applicants are des cr ibed in a following section. Examp les of Creative Work. In architec ture, l andscape architecture , and urban design , applicants are expected to present samples of their creative and analytic work , commonly referred to as a portfolio. A portfolio is an orderly presentation of o ne's work . This includes examples of creative and analytica l work including but not limited to essays, papers , photograp h s and photographic repro du ction of artistic work such as sculpture, drawings, paint ings , musical composi tion , and other fine arts. The format must be 8-1/2" x 11", bound with not more than twelve pages (excluding papers) . S l ides are not accepted. All portfolios must be identified by the student's full name and program to which the student i s applying. A s tamp ed, self-addressed envelope must be inclu d ed for return of portfolio . In general , a minimum of 3 .00 grade point average (GPA) on a 4 .00 scale (or equivalent) in the prior undergraduate or graduate d egree is re quir ed for admission. Applicants with a GPA under 3 .00 may be reviewed for admissio n ; in such cases, sub mission of strong supporting materials is advised. For applicants with a GPA under 3.00, GRE scores are normally required for the Urban an d R egiona l Planning Pro gram an d strongly recommended for applicants to the o ther progr ams. The a dmi ssions decision is made weigh ing a variety of factors including academic preparation , quality o f work experience and portfolio , appropr iat eness of the appli cant's purp ose, and ove r all likelihood of success in th e program. Applicants may b e a dmitted as non-degree students or with special co nditions . Because of space limitations, n o t all qualified applica nts may be accep ted. Specific requir ements f o r Admissio ns I 55 eac h progr am are listed below . Maste r of Architectu r e (first professional degree; three and one-hal f year program) The three and onehalf year (114 semeste r h ours) program is appropriate for applicants with a bachelor ' s degree a nd no pri or training or background in arc hit ec tur e or related field. Prerequisi tes are o ne year of collegel evel physics and college mathematics thr ough a first cou r se in calculus. For those without these prerequ i sites , courses are held in the sum mer term prec edi ng the first semester . Master of Architecture (first professional degree; three and one-half year program with advanced standing) Admission to the three and one-half year program with advanced stan ding is appropr i ate for applicants with a non profess i onal bachelor ' s degre e in architec ture or a bach elor's degree in a re l ated field (engineering , design, art). Depending on their undergraduate record , qualified applicants with a non-professional architectural degree (the first part of a 4 + 2 program) would ordinarily be given adva nc e d s t anding of up to one curric u lum year in the program. Applicants with degrees in relat e d fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of preparation but may be required to take all the courses in the architectural design sequence. The number of credits and exact p oint of e ntry into the prog r am will be determined by the pr ogram director. Master of Architecture (post-professional degree) The one-year (36 semester hours) post professional degree program is appropri ate for applicants holding a Bache l or o f Archi te c tur e or equivalent first profes sion al d egree or diploma in archi tec ture. Master of Architecture in Urban Design (one-year post-professional degree) T h e one-year (36 se m ester hours) pro g ram is appropriate for applicants with a first profe ssional design degree in arc hitec ture (e.g. RArch., M.Arch.). Master of Landscape Architecture (first professional degree) The thr ee-year (90 semester hours) first professional degree program is appropri ate for thos e with a ba che lor's degree and

PAGE 58

56 I School of Architecture and Planning no training or background in landscape architecture or a related design field. Master of Landscape Archi tecture (post-professional degree) The two-year (48 semester hours) post professional degree program is appropri ate for applicants with a first professional design degree (B.S.L.A., B.L.A., B.Arch., for example). Applicants without a prior Land scape Architecture degree may be required to take additional core require ments in Plant Materials and Ecology. Master of Urban and Regional Planning The two-year (51 semester hours) pro gram is appropriate for applicants with bachelor's degrees in either design, humanities , social, or physica l sciences. International Applicants Competence in oral and written English is expected in the School. The School of Architecture and Planning requires a minimum of 550 1DEFL score for international students from non-English speaking coun tries. However, the School will consider applications from students wit h strong academic credentials whose 1DEFL scores are slightly below 550 . If accepted, these students will be required to register and successfully complete a one credit hour technical writing workshop . This one credit hour cannot be used to fulfill part of the degree requirements. Submission Requirements. International applicants must submit : 1. An International Student application and Graduate Admission forms. 2. Two official transcripts from each United States collegiate institution the applicant has attended. 3. Two certified copies of official aca demic records from each collegiate institu tion the applicant has attended outside the United States. A certified literal English translation must accompany docu ments that are not in English. 4 . Four letters of recommendation. 5. A statement of purpose. 6. A portfolio of academic, creative, and professional work. 7. A nonrefundable $50 application fee. 8. A current CU-Denver Financial Resources Statement. Statements used for other institutions will not be accepted . Photocopied documents are not accepta ble unless signed by the originator; signa tures must not be photocopies . 9. OfficiallDEFL Score Report to estab lish English language proficiency . Institu tional 1DEFL reports are not acceptable. Additional supporting documents may subsequently be required by the office of Admissions. All international applicants who are admitted to CU-Denver must have a valid visa and must enroll for and maintain a full course of study (12 or more semester hours) leading to the com pletion of a master's degree . Financial R e quir e m ents. International applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds available to attend the University of Colorado at Denver. To provide this evidence each interna tional applicant should follow these instructions : 1. Complete the Financial Resourc es Statement. You must prove t hat you have sufficient money to pay you r expenses by submitting the Financial Resources State ment as a part of your application . a. If you are using your own money , your bank must certify that you have the full amount of money on deposit to meet tuition and expense costs. In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement, your bank must certify that the money the applicant needs is on deposit in your account. b. If you are being sponsored by a family member, or a friend, your sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. Your sponsor's bank must certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money you will need . c. If you have been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed . 2 . An incomplete statement of financial resources or failure to prove the availabil ity of the necessary money will delay or cause the denial of your admission to the University . Be sure your Financial Resources Statement is accurate and comp lete. Dates and Deadlines All programs in the Schoo l admit students for all semesters. However , accep tance for the Spring and Summer Semesters will be on a space-available basis only. See the Academic Calendar in this catalog or the Schedule of Classes for specific dates. To be considered for Fall Semester admission , all application materials must be received by the previous March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1. To be considered for Spring Semester admission, all application materials mus t be received by the previous November 1. Applications received after March 15 or November 1 may be considered for non-degree status only . Deadlines for submission of application materials: March 15-for Fall Semester regular admission April 15-for Summer Term regular admission November 1-for Spring Semester regular admission Applications after these dates will only be considered on a space-available basis. Persons interested in any of the pro grams or in visiting the School are invited to call the Architecture and Urban Design Programs at (303) 556-2877 , and the Land scape Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Programs at (303) 556-3479 to arrange an appointment. For application forms or additional informa tion, please write to: Office of the Dean School of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 126 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 (303) 556-3382 Programs of Study ARCHITECTURE Program Director: Peter A. Schneider Office: CU-Denver Bldg., Third Floor Telephone: 556-2877 The architecture program offers curric ula leading to both first and post profes sional Master of Architecture degrees. The first professional Master of Architecture (M.Arch.l) is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) and is composed of five basic core areas: Architectural Design, History and Theory, Environmental Context, Science and Technology, and Professional Practice. The program ' s primary objective is to prepare students to enter the practice of archi tecture with a thorough foundation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop : an aware ness of and sensitivity to the quality of the human environment; architectural co ntext; deep understanding of architec tural history, theory and criticism ; thorough knowledge of architectural and building technology ; competence in design process and expression with partic ular emphasis on exploration, experimen tation, and systhesis; understanding of the institutional framework within which architecture takes place; and skills and

PAGE 59

understanding of professional practice including management an d professional conduct. The ultimate goal of the program is to provide the architecture student with a deep appreciation of architecture, while acquiring critical capacity, through com prehension of all facets of architecture . This is achieved through five groups of courses, o r ganized in sequences within five coord i nated modules . M aster of Architecture I (First professional degree) Three a n d one-half year program. The first professional Master of Architecture degree p r og r am is a 114 semester ho u r program requiring three and one-half years (six semesters and a summer term) of full-time study . The curriculum consists of a core o f five re l ated course compo nents and 21 semester hours of electives that may be used for a concentration. The program is taught at three levels, each wit h a theme . The first level involves the theme principles , definitions, commu nication, and design abstraction and takes the first two semesters. T h e next level takes three semesters and i n volves a dual theme-architecture in context and appli cations of methodologies. The theme of the final l evel in the third year is synt h esis and professional competency. THE CURRICULUM THREE A N D ONE-HALF YEAR PROGRAM DESIGN 48 semester hours ARCH . 5500 (6) Introduction to Architec tural Design Studio I ARCH. 5501 (6) Introduction to Architec tural Design Studio II ARCH. 5502 (6) Architectural Design Studio lll ARCH. 6600 (6) Architectural Design Studio I V ARCH. 6601 (6) Architectural Design Studio V ARCH. 6700 (6) Advanced Architectural Design Stu dio VI ARCH. 6701 (6) Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII ARCH. 5510 (3) Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I ARCH. 5511 (3) Elements of Design Expression and Presenta t ion II HISTORY AND THEORY. 15 semester hours ARCH. 5520 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism ARCH. 5521 (3) Survey of Architectural History ARCH. 6620 (3) Architecture in the 18t h through 20th Centuries ARCH. 6621 (3) History of Archit ec tural Theory Theory Electives: 6 semester hours ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT 6 semes t er hours LA. 5530 (3) UD. 6620 (3) Site Planning Architecture of the City SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 21 semester hours ARCH. 5530 (3) Structures I ARCH . 5531 (3) Struct u res II ARCH. 5532 (3) Building Technology I ARCH. 5533 (3) Environmental Control Systems I ARCH. 6630 (3) Structures lll ARCH. 6631 (3) Environmental Control Systems II ARCH . 6636 (3) Building Technology II PROFESS I ONAL PRACTICE: 3 semester hours ARCH. 6750 (3) Professional Practice ELECT I VES : 18 semester hours Architecture I 57

PAGE 60

58 I School of Architecture and Planning COURSE SEQUENCE: FIRST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE ENVIRONCOURSE HISTORY/ MENTAL SCIENCE & SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY CONTEXT TECHNOLOGY FALL ARCH. 5500 (6) ARCH. 5520 (3) A R C H . 5530 (3) ARCH. 5510 (3) YEAR 1 SPRING ARCH. 5501 (6) ARCH. 5511 (3\ ARCH. 5521 (3) A R CH. 5531 (3) SUMMER ARCH. 5502 (6) ARCH. 5532 (3) ARCH . 5533 (3\ FALL ARCH. 6600 (6) ARCH. 6620 (3) LA. 5530 (3) ARCH. 6630 (3) ARCH. 6631 (3) YEAR II SPRING ARCH. 6601 (6) ARCH. 6621 (3) ELECTIVES (3) ARCH. 6636 (3) YEAR III FALL ARCH. 6700 (6) SPRING ARCH. 6701 (6) 48 Advanc ed Standing in the t hr ee and onehalf year program . Students admit t ed with advanced standing to th e firstprofessional d egree program follows a course of study based on a n evaluation of their academic credent ials which takes place during the admissions process. Students who have degrees i n related fields may be exempt from certain required courses. Students who have completed a pre-professiona l bachelor's degree in an accredited 4 + 2 program will be given advanced standing of up t o one cur riculum year in the program. The number of credits and exact point of en try int o the program will be determined by the Program Director. Master of Architecture II (Post-professional program) Th e post professional program in architecture is an a dvance d curriculum whic h focuses on research and specializa tion . The program offers four options of study: 1) Architectural Experimentation, 2) Architecture and Design with Macintosh , 3) Building Technology, and 4) Real Estat e Development. The first option , Architec tural Experimentation , is suited for student s intending to further their knowledge in th eory and c riticism of archi t ec ture. Students are guide d to investigate, exp lore , and ex perim e nt with ideas of nonconventional nature an d to adva n ce their design ability. The second option, Architecture a nd Design with Macintosh, is design ed to prepare the student for specialization in computer application in design g e ner a tion and development. ELECTIVES (3) UD. 6620 (3' 18 6 21 The third option, Building Technology, prepares students for specia l ization in building performance studies utilizing the School's sophisticated Buildin g Technology Laboratory. Solar, th ermo, aco ustics, an d lighting studies are several main speciali zations offered by the faculty. The fourth option, Real Estate Develop ment , focuses on architecture and deve l opment proc ess utilizing the expertise of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Program faculty. Opt i on 1: Architectural Experimentation Option II: Architecture and Design with the Macintosh Option III: Building T ec hnology Option IV: Real Est ate Developm en t COURSES: ARCH . 6622 (3) Modern Architecture ARCH . 6623 (3) Investigations in Architecture ARCH . 6627 (3) Post-Structuralist Architecture ARCH . 6628 (3) Theories o f Avant Gard e ARCH. 6632 (3) Building Performance Analysis ARCH . 6633 (3) Lighting ARCH . 6640 (3) Introdu ction t o Computer Graphics ARCH . 6641 (3) Comput er Applications in Architecture ARCH . 6642 (3) Design and Archit ec tur e with th e Macintosh ARCH. 6643 (3) Advanced Design Applications with th e Macintosh ARCH . 6704 (6) Architectural Experimentation I ARCH. 6705 (6) Architectural Experimentation II ARCH. 6950 (6) Thesi s Resea rch and Progra mming PROFESSIONAL CREDIT PRACTICE ELECTIVES HRS. 15 15 12 18 ELECTIVES (3) 18 ARCH. 6750 (3) ELECTiVES (3) 1 8 ELECTIVES (12) 18 3 1 8 114 ARCH. 6951 (6) URP. 6660 (3) Architecture Thesis Real Estate Development Process URP. 6661 (3) URP. 6662 (3) URP. 6664 (3) Real Estate Devel opment Finance Real Estate Market Ana lysis Fiscal Impact Analysis

PAGE 61

COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION I , ARCHITECTURAL EXPERIMENTATION COURSE DESIGN CREDIT SEQUENCE STUDIO THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. FALL ARCH. 6704 (6) ARCH. 6622 (3) ARCH. 6627 (3) 1 2 YEAR 1 SPRING ARCH. 6705 (6) A R C H . 6623 (3) ARCH. 6628 (3) 12 SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 1 2 1 2 12 36 COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION II, ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN WITH THE MACINlDSH RESEARCH COURSE PROJECT CREDIT SEQUENCE O R THESIS THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. ARCH. 6704 (6) ARCH . 6640 (3) FALL OR 1 2 ARCH. 6950 ( 6 ) ARCH. 6642 (3) ARCH. 6705 (6) ARCH. 6641 (3) YEAR 1 SPRING OR 1 2 ARCH. 6951 (6) ARCH. 6643 (3) SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 12 12 12 36 COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION IH, BUILDING TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH COURSE PROJECT CREDIT SEQUENCE OR THESIS THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. ARCH. 6704 (6) ARCH. 6632 (3) FALL OR 12 ARCH. 6950 (6) ARCH. 6642 (3) ARCH. 6705 (6) ARCH. 6633 (3) YEAR 1 SPRING OR 12 ARCH. 6951 (6) ARCH. 6643 ( 3 ) SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 1 2 12 12 12 36 COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION IV, REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH COURSE PROJECT CREDIT SEQUENCE OR THESIS THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. ARCH. 6704 (6) URP 6660 (3) FALL OR 12 ARCH. 6950 (6) URP. 6662 (3) ARCH. 6705 (6) URP 6661 (3) YEAR 1 SPRING OR 1 2 ARCH. 6951 (6) URP 6664 (3) SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 12 12 12 36 Architecture / 59 A R CHITECTURE ELECTIVES: A R C H . 5540 (3) Design Photography ARCH. 6610 (3) Furnitur e Design A R C H . 6622 (3) Modern Architecture A R C H . 6623 (3) Investigations in Architectur e ARCH. 6624 (3) The Built Environmen t in Other Cultur es 1 : Research Design A R CH. 6910 (6) The Built Environment in Other Cultures II: Field Experience ARCH. 6627 (3) Post-Structuralist Architecture A R C H . 6628 (3) Theories of Avant Garde ARCH . 6632 (3) Building Performance Analysis ARCH. 6633 (3) Lighting ARCH . 6634 (3) Materials and Detailing 1 : Residential ARCH. 6635 (3) Materials and Detailing II: Commercia l ARCH . 6640 (3) Introduction to Computer Graphics ARCH. 6641 (3) Computer Applications in Architectur e ARCH. 6642 (3) Design and Architecture with th e Macintosh A R C H . 6643 (3) Advanced Design Applica tions with the Macintosh ARCH. 6683 (3) Teaching M ethods in Architecture ARCH. 6704 (6) Architectural Experimentation I ARCH. 6705 (6) Architec tural Experimentation II ARCH. 6720 (3) American Art an d Architecture ARCH. 6721 (3) Art and Architecture of I slam ARCH. 6722 (3) Latin American Art and Architecture ARCH. 6723 (3) Oriental Art and Architecture ARCH. 6740 (3) Comput e r Aided Design ARCH. 6930 (3) Architecture Inte rnship ARCH. 6931 (3) Architecture Inte rnship ARCH. 6950 (6) Thesis Resear c h and Programmin g ARCH. 6951 (6) Architecture Thesis

PAGE 62

60 /Sch oo l o f A r chitecture and Pl a nnin g ARCHITEGURE COURSES ARCH. 5050-3. Applied Mathematics for Designers I. This class i s d esig n e d for th e s tud e nt w ith little or n o college m a t h ex p erie n ce . It b eg i ns w i th arithm e tic skills a nd s h o rt -cuts, co ntin ues thr o u g h college l eve l alge b ra, an d en d s with trigon ome try. This class i s p ar t o f t h e r e quir e d m a th e m atics f or s tud ent s o f ar c hit ec t u re, but i s r eco m men d e d for anyo n e of n o n techni cal b ac k gro und. ARCH 5051-3. Applied Mathematics for Designer s II. A con t i n uation of ARCH 50 50 , this class will begi n with a n alytical geome t ry and continue through differ e ntial and int egra l calculus. The cou rse comp l etes t he ma th e m atics requi r ement for s t udents of archi t ec ture and is open to th ose who have c r e dit for or feel compe t ent i n the materia l covered in ARCH. 5050. ARCH . 50523. E nvironmental Sci e nce for Des igner s . Th i s course is des i g n ed to mee t the r eq u ireme n ts of the Schoo l of Architec ture and Planning for entrance into the gradua t e program in architec t ure. The basic principles of physics will be covered in a practical way. The course includes the mechanics of bodies at rest, dynamics, elec tricity, heat , light, and sound. The course is recommended for anyone who needs a work i ng knowledge of science. A R CH. 5500-6. Int rodu c tion to Arch i tec tura l D esig n St udio I . The introductory studio focuses on the basic stra t egies and techniques of design production. Students are introduced to architectonics, design analysis and criticism , and the significance of the elements of design. Emphasis is placed on development of an awareness of the role of architectural theory and history in the design process. Prereq: ARCH. 5050 , 5051, and 5052; coreq : ARCH. 5510, 5520 and 5530. ARCH. 5501-6. Introduction to Architec tural Design Stud i o II. The second introductory design studio continues the examination of the issues raised in the first semester and begins investigation of more complex issues related to building design and landscape. Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic approach to design while simultaneously dealing with th e devel opment of theory and intellectual inquiry . Prereq: ARCH. 5500 ; coreq: ARCH. 5511, 5521, and 5531. ARCH. 5502-6. Architectural Design St u dio Ill. The first intermediate studio in architecture focuses on the interrelationship between architectural design and the art of construction . The course acts as a transition between the abstract and theoretical con cerns of the introductory studios and the thoughtful realization or practice of ideas. The emphasis is placed on development of how a building is put together as a material conceptual construct. Prereq: ARCH. 5501; coreq: ARCH. 5532 and 5533. ARCH. 5510-3. Elements of Design E x pression and Presentat ion I. This co ur se cove r s t h e basic principles o f d escr ipti ve geo m e try ( t echnica l dr aw ing). Basi c pr i n cip l es o f o rth ogr aphi c proj ectio n , axo no me tri c projection, p e r s p ective, an d pho t ogra phic r e pr oduc tion m e th o d s (portfolio) ar e examine d . Emph asis i s place d on d efining a b s tra c t f o rm s an d r e al objec t s i n t e rm s o f l ine, lig ht , s h a de, and shad o w . ARCH. 5511-3. Elements of Design E x pres s ion and Presentation II. Thi s co u rse builds up on the bas i c p rincip l es an d issues in the p rev i o u s semes ter. C r aft a nd p recis i on are s tr essed, b ut with a n emp h as i s t owar d des i gn artic u lation an d i ndividua l express i o n . Stude nt s are introd u ced to a wid e ra n ge o f compositional techniq u es and methods and selectio n of media and materia ls. The sub jects covered are: drawi n g as analysis; draw ing as re p resentat i on; princip l es o f color interactio n ; and mea n s of represen t ing architec tural space in t erms of col or , l ight, shade, an d shadow gra d ation a n d value distinc tion . ARCH. 5 5 2 03 . Introdu c ti o n to D es i g n T h eory and Critici s m . This course examines the evo l ution of ideals and principles in modern architecture , design, landscape, and urbanism and traces the historical develop ment of t heoretical issues through a study of selec t ed writing. The course provides an overview of the literature in design theories and exp l ores the relationship between design and the writings that include its interpreta tion and production. ARCH. 5521-3. Sur vey of Architect u ra l History. The second course in the history / theory sequence , beginning with architecture and urbanism in antiquity, stresses the origin and interpretation of built form as symbol and the problems of early building tech nology and development of tradition in European architecture and urbanism . It examines the emergence of building types and settlement patterns and their relation ship to social institutions. Case studies are drawn from pre-classical, classical , and late antiquity, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque ar c hitecture . ARCH. 5530-3. Structures I. The course introduces the analysis and design of struc tural elements and focuses on fundamental principles of statics and stren g th of materials. Areas covered are equilibrium, movement , trusses, three force members, properties of structural materials including wood and steel , stress-strain relationships, and an introduction into the design and analysis of structural elements made of wood and steel in tension , shear, and bearing . ARCH. 5531-3. Structures II. The course is a continuation of Structures I, focusing on study of stress d e termination of structures, and general principles involved in the design of wood, steel, and concrete members. Problems in design of building elements sub jected to direct stress, beveling , and comb i ne d s tr ess, d eflectio n , m e th o d s o f f a b r i ca tion, a nd d e tails of co nn ectio n s are explo r e d . ARCH. 5532-3 . Building Technology I. This co ur se a d dresse s issu es in buildin g con s tru ctio n and f ocu ses on int e rr e l a tion s hip s be tw ee n archit ec tural c on ce pt s and objec tives and build i n g co nstru ctio n t ec hniqu es t hro u g h l ec tur es, case stud y pr ese ntati o ns, a nd exercises. It focuse s on th e wid e r a n ge o f ma t eria l s a nd co n s tructi on tec hniqu es available to m ee t d esign objectives. ARCH . 5533-3. Environmental Control System s I. This co ur se foc u ses o n stud y of environ m e ntal co ntrol syst e m s in building, inclu din g th e t he r mal b e h avior of build ings, clima t e as a majo r d e t e rm i n an t of buildin g desig n , e n ergy use in build ings, stra t egies for desig n i n g b uildings as co m p l ete environmen tal con tr o l systems, mec h anical means of environ m e ntal contro ls, h eating, ventil ation , air-co nditi o n ing , plu mb i ng, e l ectrica l , and comm uni cation syste ms, water supp ly, and sani t atio n sys t ems. ARCH. 5540-3. Des ign Pho t ography . This course will introduce ar ch i t ectural s tu de n ts to the b asics of photogr a phy and architec tural photography . Class will be a combina tion of l ect u re/demonst r a tion and student assignments followed by evaluation. The course will enable the student to produce his or her own working photographs of drawings, models, and buildings. A R C H . 6600-6. Architectu ral Desi g n I V . The second intermedia t e studio sequence focuses on exploration of architecture in the urban context and examination of typologi cal form and cultural constructs which will provide a basis for the inclusion of new spaces and forms within the fabric of the city . Emphasis is placed on methodological study of site, program , and elements of architecture which are used to facilitate work . ARCH. 6601-6. Architectural Desig n Studio V. The final intermediate studio sequence focuses on examination of impacts of large-sca l e urban projects that include commercial, office, and residential uses in an e xisting urban fabric. Issues such as typol ogy , character, and monumentality are con sidered in relation to the design of buildings of civic significance. Emphasis is placed on r e lationship of the role of the building to the morphology of the city and the building ' s e xpression in architectural form. ARCH. 6610-3. Furniture Design. The focus of this studio / lecture cours e is to explore the effects and responses of physical human factors, material characteristics, struc ture, joinery, and history in the design of fur niture . Design process, programming , design and presentation techniques, along with drawing and model building skills are e mphasized in this project oriented course. ARCH. 6620-3. Architecture in the 18th Through 20th Centuries. The third course in the history / theory sequence focuses on the breakdown of the Baroque synthesis and

PAGE 63

the coming of classical and romantic histor i cism in architecture and the birth of modern architecture. The impact of technology, industrialization and social changes on architecture and urbanism , changing atti tudes toward the treatment of architectural space and the formation of new critical con cepts, and the emergence of Art ouveau and the roots of the Modern Movement in architecture are examined. A R C H. 6621-3 . History of Architectural T heory. This course investigates architectural thought from antiquity to the present. It begins with a review of Greek ideals and then proceeds-through an appreciation of architecture and its texts as an essential cul tural constituent-with a survey of major themes such as Renaissance Humanism, Enlightenment Rationalism , Romantic Historicism, Neo-Medievalism, the varieties of Modernism, Neo-Eclecticism , and the most recent directions. A RCH . 6622-3. Mod e rn Ar c h itecture. This course examines modern architecture from De Stijl and Bauhaus to Le Corbusier. Emphasis is placed on critical evaluation of this developmental stage and its impact on discipline of architecture and city design. ARCH . 662 3-3. Invest i gations i n Ar c hit ec ture . Th i s course focuses on examination of the historical development of theoretical issues through a study of selected writings and the evo l ution of ideas and design prin ciples in architecture , landscape architecture, and urba nism. It exp l ores the pedagogic relationsh i p between des ign and the cultural roots tha t influence its interpretation and prod u ctio n . ARCH . 66243. Th e Built Env ir onme nt in Othe r Cultures 1: Resear c h Design. This course intends to broaden st u dents' perspec tives by asking them to examine design within another culture . Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a state ment of the problem to be addressed, the type of fiel d research to be undertaken, and the nat u re of the report produced. ARCH . 6627-3. Post St ructura l ist A rc hi tec ture. This course examines theories of post structuralism and their implications to architectural exploration and experimenta tions. Drawing from Russell, Descartes, Derrida, Husser! , Heidegger, Barthes, Foucault, and other leading authorities, the course focuses on development of a theoreti cal discourse for architecture. A R CH. 6628-3. Theories of Avant Garde. This course examines the origin and evolu tion of the Avant Garde theories from Russian Constructivism to Futurism, Dadaism, Surrealism , and De Stijl. Emphasis is placed on investigation of the implication of historic Avant Garde to present modes of architectural exploration. ARCH. 6629-3. History of Interior Design. This course is a survey and critical analysis of major 20th century interiors. It begins the process of relating interior environments from antiquity to contemporary by focusing on furnishings, the decorative arts, interior architectural detailing , and interior architectural spaces. The special focus is on critical evaluation and analysis of historical precidents . A R C H . 6630-3. Structures Ill . This course examines theoretical and conceptual bases for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of indeterminate structures . Course topics include continuity, movement distribution, reinforced concrete elements, precast and prestressed elements, walls, columns, foot ings, earthquake loads on buildings, and detailing of structural systems. A RCH . 6631-3. E n v i ronme ntal Contro l Systems II. The course focuses on lighting and acoustics. Illumination quantity and quality , day lighting and electric lighting , lighting design and applications are covered. The behavior and effect of daylight are studied through the construction of mode ls. Techniques such as preparat i on of working drawings and specifications are covered. A R C H . 6632-3. Build i n g Pe r form a nce A n a lysi s . This course addresses issues i n performance integration of overall bui l ding components and the ability to predict architectural design performance in advance. Students will experience the use of up-to date techno logy, laboratory facilities, guided hands-on experiments, on-site observation, and computer simu l ation. A RCH . 6633-3. Lig htin g . This introductory course in lighting investigates the processes and t h e objectives of light i n g and provides the vocabulary and mechanics necessary to the understanding and interpretation of light ing needs in design. Strategies and criter i a for lighting are the focus of this course , covering both theoretical and practical issues. A R C H. 6634-3 . Ma t eria l s and Detailin g 1 : Resid e n t i a l This course provides students with the opportunity to explore theory and applica tion of materials used in residential interiors. The course focuses on study of composition and characteristics of individual finish materials as well as conventional methods of representing them graphically . A R C H . 6635 3. Mater ia l s a n d Detailin g II: Commercial. The goals and parameters of this course are the same as those outlined for Materials and Detailing I; however , the focus will be commerical interiors. Prereq : ARCH. 6634. ARCH. 6636-3. Bui l di n g Technology II. This course is a continuation of Building Technology I. It focuses on the range of building construction systems and techniques that can be organized to achieve specific design intentions. The course provides this framework to organize and research con struction documents with specific perfor mance and design criteria. Prereq : ARCH. 5530, 5531, 5532. ARCH. 6640-3. Introduction to Computer Graphics. This course provides a hands-on introduction to the Personal Computer and Architecture Courses I 61 the Disk Operating System. The fundamen tals of drawing with a computer will be taught with the production of moderate-sized drawings . Basic two-dimensional CADD con cepts such as symbols and layering will be explored. Students will learn to use a digitizer for input and output graphics to a plotter. A R CH. 6641-3. Computer Applicatio n s i n Arc h itect u re. This course builds upon the basics learned in ARCH. 6640. Customizing applications to increase productivity will be stressed. Linking of graphics and text data bases through the use of attributes will be investigated . Three-dimensional modeling will be used to visualize the design process. A R C H . 6642-3 . Desi g n a nd Arc h itecture with t h e Macintos h . This course introduces the Macintosh computer as a powerful exploratory design tool which has the poten tial for exploration and generation of new architectural ideas and forms. The Macintosh is seen as an extension or amplification of the human brain. The course does not require the user to learn computer program ming or complicated command structures; a non-technical , intuitive, word of mouth, tr ial and error mode of learning is possible. Once basic skills are mastered, production is immedia te. Emphasis is placed on analysis, self criticism, revision, and refinement of design intentions with t he computer tool. A RCH . 6643-3. Adva n ced Desi g n A p plic a tio n s w i t h t h e Maci n t o s h . This course builds upo n experiences gained from t he introductory course, ARCH. 6642. The course requires the students to have an extensive knowledge of the Macintosh sys tem. The course will devote the entire semester to work with the three-dimensional modeling programs. Emphasis is placed on techniques of exploration and innovation in three-dimensional spatial representation of design and architectural constructions. ARCH. 6660-3. Huma n and Socia l D im e n s ion s of Desi g n . This course focuses on the introduction of basic social and psychological processes relevant to changing environmental conditions, human factors, and prob l ems of the built environment. Emphasis is placed on techniques of inter face problems in design; the relationship between human use and perception of space, cognitive mapping , preferences and attitudes toward environmental settings; and the eva l uation of particular environments and developing architectural programs. ARCH. 6683-3. Teac h i n g Methods i n Architect u re. This course is designed to develop teaching and academic capabilities in the context of architecture. The student works with a faculty member in an instruc tional context eight hours per week. ARCH. 6686-3. Special Topics. Various topical concerns are offered in architecture history, theory , elements, concepts, methods and implementation strategies, and other relat e d areas .

PAGE 64

62 /School of Architecture a n d Planning ARCH . 6700-6. Advanced Architectural Design Studio VI. The s tudio foc u ses on st ud e nt s' e lab o ration and substantiation of p e rsonal ideas throu gh co mplex design exer c i ses and by cr itic ally addressing th e stat us of co ntemp orary a r c hit ec tural t h eory. Empahsis is placed on a comprehensive d es i g n projec t that i s struct ur e d t o test s tudents on integration o f structural aspec ts, m ec h a nic a l sys t e ms, site plann i ng, a nd cli m a t e co nsid era tion s within th eir d es ign so luti o ns. ARCH. 6701-6. Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII. The final d esig n studio co ntinu es the co mpr e hensive approach throu gh a full range of design investi ga tion an d s tr ategies a t all scales from pro g ram and co n ception to co nstru c tion detail. Studen t s must demonstrate abilities t o synthesize all previous work thr ough an appli ca tion o f a comp l ex architec tural d es ign proj ect. ARCH. 6704-6. Architectural Experimentaton I. An a d vanced a r chi tectural design s tudio focusing o n d es i g n exp l o r ations a nd stressing th eor ization and d eve lopm e nt of ideologies in archi t ec tur a l design . Emphasis is place d on experimentatio n with various art medias such as p a inting, scu l pture, music , linguistics, film making, and o t hers. ARCH. 6705-6 . Architectural Experimentation II. As a continuation of ARCH 6704, this studio st r esses a culminative effort toward synthesis an d con tribution of ori gina l proposal for dev e l opment of architectura l theory . Empa h sis is placed o n a r chitectura l transformation as a major indi cator of the or i gina l contribution of this s tudio. ARCH. 6720-3. American Art and Architecture. Thi s course focuses on major developements in American art from 1750-1950. Painting and scu lpture, as well as important developments in arc hit ecture, will be dis c u ssed. The work of s u ch artists a nd architec t s as Cop ley, Peale, Whistler , Cassa tt , Hopper, O ' Keefe , Thomas Jefferson, Louis Sullivan, and Frank Lloyd Wright will be st udi ed. ARCH. 6721-3. Art and Architecture of Islam. This co ur se focuses on s tud y and exa minati o n of th e art an d architecture of the Isl amic cultures from the d eat h of Muhammad through the 18th ce ntu ry from Spain to India . ARCH. 6722-3 . Latin American Art and Architecture. This course f oc us es on s tudy and exa m inatio n o f the art and archite c tur e of th e co l onies o f Spain and P o rtu gal in the western h emisphere from 1492 t o th e present. ARCH. 6723-3 . Oriental Art and Architec ture. Thi s is an introductory s ur vey of orien tal ar t and archite c ture . The course aims to unc over the relationship between East Asian art and arc hit ec tur e and its acco mp anying th eor ies. ARCH. 6740-3. Computer Aided Design. The co ur se exp l ores the relationship between design, mathematics , and computation . The conce pt s of finite m a thematics will b e intr od u ced u sing buildin g d es i gn exa mp l es . Problem-so l v i n g m e thods in d es i g n a nd comp ut at ion will be explored. The ana lysis of plan t y p es will b e r e l a t ed t o topology and geo m e try; symmetry a nd com binatorial groups will b e intr od u ced. Com put e r proj ects a nd readings will b e ass i g n ed to exp lor e th e conce pts. ARCH. 6750-3. Professional Practice. This co urse introduces th e s tud ent t o th e esse nti a l e l e ments of professional practic e throu gh subjec t areas such as int ernship, licensing, serv i ces, mod es of pr actice, f ees, marketing , docu m e nts, spe cifications, a nd production procedures. One three-hour l ec tur e per week. Prereq : fina l year in progra m or approva l of instructor . ARCH. 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study. Studies initiated by s tud ents or fac ulty and spo nsor e d by a fac ulty member to inves tiga te a special topic or probl e m related to arc hite c ture. ARCH. 6910-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures II: Field Experience. Students will travel to th e ir respective cities and undertak e th e agreed upon study proposa ls. Th e co ur se int ends not on l y to help stu d ents co nsid e r th eir ow n d es i gn a nd planning attitudes, but a l so h elp th em see the wo rld from a more balanced persp ec tive. ARCH. 6930-3. Architecture Internship . This course is d es i gned t o provide profes siona l practi ce experi e n ce to s tudents and i s composed of e i g ht hours per wee k work in a practicing prof ess i o n al's office during th e regular semester. The s tud ent is placed in an architec tur al and/or d es i gn office b y th e Schoo l a nd r ece i ves c redit instead of pay. Students must comp l e t e second year l eve l before t a kin g this co ur se. ARCH . 6931-3. Architecture Internship. This co ur se is designed to provide profes sional practice experie nc e t o s tudents and is com p osed of eigh t ho ur s per week work in a practicing professional's office durin g th e r eg ular semester. The student is placed in a n archi t ec tur al and/or d es ign office by the Schoo l a nd receives c r edit instead of pay . Stu d e nts mu s t co mplete second year l eve l before takin g thi s course. ARCH. 6950-6. Thesis Research and Programming. ARCH. 6951-6. Architecture Thesis. URBAN DESIGN Program Coordinator: Paul Saporito A c ity n o l o ng e r inhabited, not simply left b ehind, but haunt ed by meaning and culture . This state of b e in g haunted, whic h keeps the c ity from returning t o nature, is perhaps the gen e ral mode of the pres e nc e or abse nc e of th e thin g itself in pure language. (Derr ida 1 978) Cities are in reality great campuses of the liv i ng and the dead where many e l e m ents r e main like signals, symbols , cautious. Whe n th e holida y is over, w hat r e main s o f the architecture i s scarre d , and the sand consumes the st reet again. There is nothin g l e ft but t o resum e with a certain obstinacy the reconstruction o f e l e m ents and in s trum ents in e xpectation o f another holiday (A/do Rossi 1981) T h e Urban Design Program a t the Schoo l of Architecture and Planning is int e nd e d to be a non-conventional research program leadin g to the degree of Master of Architecture in Urban Design . The premi se of the program i s in vestiga tion, explor ation, experimentation , and r epresent ation of ideas and proposals regarding th e development of the city. Unlike th e classica l mode of inquiry, the Urban Design Program takes a relatively more radical approach to the anal ysis of architecture of the city . The curric ulum is designe d for the questionin g of the exist in g co nnections a nd searching for alterna tiv e ideologies and proposals f o r the c it y's archi tecture throug h a structured sequence of lecture and design st udi os. There are two optio ns of study which extend over a two semester or three semester course of study. The re are three c urri c ulum steps invo lved in these pl a ns. The first s tep of the c urriculum e n gages student s in studying the fund amentals of theory and criticism concerning the struc ture o f present architectural text and dis courses. Simultaneously, the stu d e nt also is introduced t o the process of decomposi tion . This s t e p is necessary for the under standing of the interrelationship between arc hitectural text as a language and archi tectural text as a n artif act. The second step of the c urriculum engages the student in studying the recomposition o f the city, a process that i s i n r everse order of the f i rst step . Recomposition in vo lves a sequ e nce of activities that begins with the questioning of the tradi t ions, followed by an investigation of the metaphysics of ori gins and prese n ce, and ends with the f or mulation of new design strategies for the architecture of the c ity . The third and fina l step is intended t o be a cumulative experi ence where the student pursues individual interest in urban design. Master of Architecture in Urban Design The Master of Architecture in Urban Design Program is a one-year post professional degree and is suited for st ud e nts who have completed a first-

PAGE 65

professional degree in Architectur e (B.Arch . , M.Arch . ) . The program requires completion of a minimum of 36 cre dit hours . CORE CURRICULUM The core curri c ulum consists o f six graduate courses for a total of 21 cre dit hours . Some s tudents entering the pro-gram may be advised to take additional c ourses depe nding on their e ducati o nal backgrounds. The core c urriculum c onsists of the following courses : UD. 6600 (6) Transformation a nd Decomposition Studio UD. 6601 (6) Composition Studio UD. 6602 (6) City of Exploration and Experimentation Studio (Optional) UD. 6620 (3) Ar c hitectur e of the City UD. 6621 (3) City as an Artifact ARC H . 6622 (3) Modern Ar c h i te cture A R CH. 6623 (3) Inv e stigation s in Ar c hitectur e O PTION 1 : ONE ACADEMIC YEAR COURSE DESIGN SEQUENCE STUDIO FALL U D . 6600 (6) YEAR 1 SPRIN G UD. 6601 (6) 12 OPT ION II: ONE YEAR CAL ENDAR YEAR COURSE DESIGN SEQUENCE S T UDIO FALL UD. 6600 (6) YEA R 1 SPRJNG UD. 6601 (6) SUMMER UD. 6602 (6) 18 ELECfiVES : LA . 6621 (3) URP. 5532 (3) URP 6680 (3) URP. 6682 ( 3 ) ARCH . 6621 (3) ARCH. 6627 (3) ARCH. 6628 (3) ARCH . 6640 (3) ARCH . 6641 (3) ARCH . 6642 ( 3 ) ARCH . 6643 (3) ARCH . 6683 (3) T HEORY UD. 6620 ( 3 ) A R C H . 6622 (3) UD. 6621 (3) A R C H . 6623 _Q) 1 2 T HEORY UD. 6620 (3) ARCH. 6622 (3) UD. 6621 (3) ARCH . 6623 (3) 12 History of Landscape Architecture Theory Urban Form History Urbanization in Developing Countries Housing in Developing Countries History of Ar c hite c tural Theory Post-Structuralist Ar c hitectur e Theories of Avant Garde Intr o duction to Computer Graphics Computer Applications in Architectur e Design and Architecture with the Macintosh Advanced Design Applic ations with the Macintosh T e achin g M etho d s in Ar c hit ecture C R E DIT E LECfi VES HRS . ELECfiVES (6) 18 ELECf iVES (6) 1 8 1 2 36 C R EDIT ELECf i VES HRS. 12 12 ELECf iVES (6) 12 6 36 Urban Design Courses / 63 ARCH . 6720 (3) American Art and Architecture ARCH . 6721 (3) Art and Ar c hitecture of Islam ARCH . 6722 (3) Latin Americ a n Art and Ar c hitecture ARCH . 6723 (3) Ori e ntal Art and Arc hite c tur e ARCH . 6740 (3) C ompute r Aid e d Design URBAN DESIGN COURSES UD. 660o-6. Transformation Decomposi tion Studio. Th e first s tudi o of a two-studio se qu e nce introduc es the proc e ss o f decom position in urb an stru c ture throu g h analysi s o f landscape and s tru c tures in searc h of o riginary and n o n-ori g inary e lem e nts of th e city . Th e studio th e n i s an att e mpt t o restor e immanent condi tio ns-the sus pen s i o n b e tw ee n origin a nd effect, b e tween p o sitive an d n e gativ e e l e m e nt s o f urban s tru c ture. UD. 6601-6. Composition Studio. Thi s s tudi o builds up o n th e analyti cal investiga tio n s co ndu c ted in th e pr e vious semes t e r an d explo r es th e proce ss of co mp os ition o r r eco mpositi o n in t h e a r chitec tur e of th e c ity . Dra wing up o n d eco n s tru c tivi s t th eo ry, th e studio pr ese n ts a chal l e nge t o th e hege m o n y o f tr a dition a l d es i g n s tudi os a nd is a sea r c h for a u t h enticity. Con side r ing architect ur e as text, the s tudi o is a mea n s t o represe nt a n inve nti o n , a n i nvite d s p eculatio n on th e con ditions of archi t ecture of city. UD. 6602-6. Cit y of Exploration and Experimentation Studio . Thi s i s an optio n a l indepe nd en t s t udio w h e r e ind i v i d ual s tud e nt s pu r sue t h eir individual interests with an emph as i s o n int eractio n b e t ween architec ture and ot her discip l i nes. T his studio is structured as a cummu l ative synthesis of know l edge and skills into an or i ginal pro posal for the betterment of city condit i ons. UD. 662o3 . Ar c hite cture of the City . T his course focu ses on interpretation of archi tec ture of the city and its landscape, articulation and disarticulation, discont i nuity of order, immanence and memo ry. Drawing from con temporary writers such as Derrida, Barthes, Adorno, H abermas, Heid egger, Husser ! , an d others, the course examines t he questions of replicat i o n , representation, and significat i on in the city. UD. 6621-3 . Th e Cit y a s an Art ifac t. This course focuses on study of orginary and non orginary architecture and its impl i cations to urban co n text. Beginning b y examinatio n o f classical representation and refutation, the course a tt e mp ts to p r ese nt d enial and possi bility in architecture by investigating tradi tio n an d m e t a p hysics o f origins and prese nce. UD. 6686-3. Special Topics in Urban Design . Vario u s to p ical co n ce rn s are offe r e d in urban d esig n his t o ry , th e ory , e l e m e nts, co n ce pts, m e th o ds, an d impl e m e n ta tion s tr a t eg i e s and o th e r r e lat e d areas.

PAGE 66

64 I School of Architecture and Planning UD. 684G-1 to 3. Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to inves tigate a special topic or problem related to urban design . UD. 695G-6. Thesis Research and Programming. UD. 6951-6. Urban Design Thesis. LANDSCAPE ARCHITEGURE Program Director: Lois A. Brink The Landscape Architecture Program offers both first and post-professional Master of Landscape Architecture degrees. The first professional Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) is fully accredited by the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB) and is recognized by the Council of Landscape Architecture Educators. The program's primary objective is to prepare students to enter the practice of landscape architecture with a thorough founrlation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop : an awareness of and sensitivity to the quality of landscape and built environment; spatial context; und ers tand ing of history, theory, and criticism of architecture and landscape ; thorough knowledge of landscape technology; com petence in design process and expression with particular emphasis on exploration, experimentation, and synthesis; and understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct. The ultimate goal of the program is to provide the student with a deep apprecia tion of landscape as context within which objects are placed , the integration of land scape and objects, critical capacity, and comprehension of the art of landscape design . Master of Landscape Architecture I (First professional degree) Three year program. The first profes sional M.L.A. degree requires 90 semester hours and three years of full-time study. The curriculum consists of a core of four related course components: Design , 42 credit hours; History and Theory, 12; Science and Technology , 12; and Profes sional Practice, 3, totaling 69 credit hours, and 21 semester hours of electives. THE CURRICULUM-THREE YEAR PROGRAM DESIGN: 42 semester hours LA. 5500 (6) Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio I LA. 5501 (6) Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio II LA. 6600 (6) Landscape Architectural Design Studio Ill LA. 6601 (6) Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV LA. 6700 (6) Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio v LA. 6701 (6) Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio VI LA. 5510 (3) Elements of Design Expres sion and Presentation I LA. 5511 (3) Elements of Design Expres sion and Presentation II HISTORY AND THEORY 12 semester hours ARCH. 5520 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism ARCH. 5521 (3) Survey of Architectural History ARCH. 6620 (3) Architecture in the 18th through 20th Centuries LA. 6621 (3) History of Landscape Architecture Theory SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 12 semester hours LA. 5530 (3) Site Planning LA. 5570 (3) Plants in Design LA. 6630 (3) Landscape Technology I LA. 6631 (3) Landscape Technology II PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 3 semester hours LA. 6750 (3) Professional Practice ELECTIVES : 21 semester hours Master of Landscape in Architecture II (Post-professional degree) Two year program . Th e post professional degree program requires 48 semester hours and two years of full-time study . The core c urriculum consists of two groups: Desig n , 30 credit hours; and His tory/Theory , 12; for a total of 42 credit hours, and 6 semester hours of electives. THE CURRICULUM-TWO YEAR PROGRAM DESIGN: 30 semes ter hours LA. 5500 (6) Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio I LA. 5501 (6) Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio II LA. 6700 (6) Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio v LA. 6701 (6) Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio VI LA. 5510 (3) Elements of Design Expres sion and Pres e ntation I LA. 5511 (3) Elements of Design Expres sion and Presentation II HISTORY AND THEORY 12 semester hours ARCH. 5520 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism ARCH. 5521 (3) Survey of Architectural History ARCH. 6620 (3) Architecture in the 18th through 20th Centuries LA. 6621 (3) History of Landscape Architecture Theory

PAGE 67

COURSE SEQUENC:E: MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE I PROFES-COURSE HISTORY/ SCIENCE & SIONAL SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY TECHNOLOGY PRACTICE FALL LA. 5500 (6) ARCH. 5520 (3) LA. 5530 (3) YEAR I LA. 5510(3) SPRING LA. 5501 (6) LA. 5511 {3) ARCH. 5521 (3) LA. 5570 (3) FALL LA. 6600 (6) ARCH. 6620 (3) LA. 6630 (3) YEAR II SPRING LA. 6601 (6) LA. 6621 (3) LA. 6631 (3) YEAR III FALL LA. 6700 (6) ARCH. 6750 (3) SPRING LA. 6701 (6) 42 12 12 3 COURSE SEQUENCE: TWO YEAR PROGRAM HISTORY/ CREDIT COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. FALL LA. 5500 (6) LA. 5510 (3) ARCH. 5520 (3) 12 YEAR I LA. 5501 (6) SPRING LA. 5511 {3) ARCH. 5521 (3) 12 FALL LA. 6700 (6) ARCH. 6620 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12 YEAR II SPRING LA. 6701 (6) LA. 6621 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12 30 12 6 48 ELECTIVES: ARCH. 6643 (3) Advanced Design Appli-ca tions with the LA. 6622 (3) Visual Quality Analysis Macintosh LA. 6624 (3) The Built Environment in ARCH. 6683 (3) Teaching Methods in O ther Cultures 1 : Architecture Research D esign ARCH. 6704 (6) Architectural Experimen-LA. 6910 (6) The Built Environment in tation I Other Cultures II: Field ARCH. 6705 (6) Architectural ExperimenExperience tation II LA. 6641 ( 3 ) Computer Applications in ARCH. 6720 (3) American Art and Landscape Architecture Architecture LA. 6686 (3) Special Topics in LandARCH. 6721 (3) Art and Architecture of scape Architecture Islam LA. 6840 (1-3) Indep en dent Study ARCH. 6722 (3) Latin American Art and LA. 6930 (3) Landscape Architecture Architecture Internship ARCH. 6723 (3) Oriental Art and ARCH. 5540 (3) Design Photography Architecture ARCH. 6622 (3) Modern Architecture ARCH. 6740 (3) Computer Aided Design ARCH. 6623 (3) Investigations in URP. 5520 (3) Urban Spatial Analysis Architecture URP 5532 (3) Urban Form History ARCH. 6627 (3) Post-Stru cturalist URP. 6649 (3) Environmental Planning Architecture 1 : Ecology ARCH. 6628 (3) Theories of Avant Garde URP. 6650 (3) Environmental Planning ARCH. 6629 (3) History of Interior II: Policy and Law Design URP. 6660 (3) Real Esta t e Development ARCH . 6640 (3) Introduction to Compu t er Process Graphics URP. 6661 (3) Real Estate Development ARCH . 6641 (3) Comp ut er Applications in Finance Architecture URP. 6662 (3) Real Estate Market ARCH. 6642 (3) Design and Architecture Analysis with the Macintosh URP. 6664 (3) Fiscal Impact Analysis Landscape Arc hit ec tur e Courses I 65 CREDIT ELECTIVES HRS. 15 15 ELECTIVES (3) 15 ELECTIVES (3) 15 ELECTIVES (6) 15 ELECTIVES (9) 15 21 90 A thesis option [LA. 6950 (6): Thesis Research and Programming and LA. 6951 (6): Landscape Architecture Thesis] is available primarily for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced aca demic training in l andscape architec tur e or related fields. LANDSCAPE ARCHITEQURE COURSES LA. 5500-6. Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio I. The introductory studio focuses on the basic strategies and techniques of design produc tion. Students are introduced to architec tonics, design analysis and criticism, and the significance of the elements of design. Emphasis is placed on development of an awareness of the role of theory and history in the design process. LA. 5501-6. Introduction to Landscape Architect ural Design Studio II. The second introductory design studio continues the examinatipn of the issues raised in the first semester and begins investigation of more complex issues related to building design and landscape. Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic approach to design while simultaneously dealing with the devel opment of th eory and intellectual inquiry. LA. 5510-3. Elements of Design Expres sion and Presentation I. This course covers the basic principles of descriptive geometry (technical drawing). Basic principles of ortho graphic projection , axonometric projection, perspective , and photographic reproduction methods (portfolio) are examined . Emphasis is placed on defining abstract forms and real objects in terms of line, light, shade, and shadow . LA. 5511-3. Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II. This course builds upon the basic principles and issues in the previous semest e r . Craft and precision are stressed , but with an emphasis toward design

PAGE 68

66 / School of Architecture and Planning articulation and individual expression. Students are introduced to a wide range of compositional techniques and methods and select i on of media and materials. The sub jects covered are: drawing as analysis; draw ing as representation; principles of color int eraction; and means of representing architectural space in terms of color , light, shade, and shadow gradation and value distinction. LA. 5530-3. Site Planning. The course focuses on the site planning pro cess includ ing research and data gathering, data analysis and synthesis, design analysis and its relationship to building program and concept, and design synthesis of site and prepa ration of site plan. Emphasis i s placed on design through grading, representation , manipulation and calculation of road work, utilities and other site features. Vertical and horizontal alignment, earthwork and cos t computation, and integration with existing and proposed f eatures or systems are all covered. LA. 5570-3. Plants in Design. This course focuses on the study of design methods u sed in landscape architecture. Formal design principles, spatial sequencing , and plant functions are applied in design studies, based on botanical aesthetic traits and physical requirements of a wide variety of plant material. LA. 6600-6. Landscape Architectural Design Studio Ill. The first intermediate studio focuses upon the exp lor ation of land scape as context and its integration of objects . Emphasis is placed on exploratio n of landscape and experimentation with spatia l organization and manipulation of context. LA. 6601-6. Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV. The second intermediate studio sequence focuses on larger scale development projects dealing with more comp l ex spatial arrangement of buildings and other objects within the l andscape, functional needs and requirements within the framework of a variety of social, econom ic, and natural / physical constraints. LA. 6620-3. Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism. This course focuses on exploration and assessment of the cur r ent state of theory in land scape architecture and related design disciplines, and the ideas undergoing contemporary design approac hes. Narrative and explanatory theories are the ob j ects of study. Emphasis is placed on history and pedagogic theories and their relationships to other disciplines such as art, eco logy, geography, architecture , and ant hropol ogy . LA. 6621-3. History of Landscape Architecture Theory . This course inves tigates architectural thought from antiquity to the present. It begins with a review of Greek ideals and then proceeds through an appreciation of land scape and nature as esse ntial cultural constituents with a survey of major themes such as Renaissance Humanism , Enlightenment, Rationalism, Romantic Historicism, Neo-Medievalism, th e varieties of Modernism, Neo-Eclecticism, and the most recent directions in landscap e an d gar den design. LA. 6622-3. Visual Quality Analysis. This course introdu ces students to a range of philosophies , methods, and techniques in visual land scape ana lysis. Emphasis i s placed on application of methods and techniques to urban and regional context and scale, and visua l imp act assessment and simulation. LA. 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures 1: Research Design. This course intends to broaden studen ts ' perspec tives by asking them to examine design within another culture. Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a state ment o f the problem to be addressed , the type of field research to be undertaken , and the nature of the report produced. LA. 6630-3. Landscape Technology I. This course will address the fundamental tech niques of landscape architecture, includin g drafting skills, surveying and grading , and the natural systems as they affect construc tion. The application of road design and utility systems for site development will also be covered. LA. 6631-3. Landscape Technology II. This course is a continuation of LA. 6630 and focuses on the study of materials and methods employed in construction of site features and evo lution of palette , techniques and th eory of detailed design including pave men ts, f ences , walk, s tairs , revetments, basins, and fountains. LA. 6641-3. Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture. The course introduces problem solving methods, and the relationship between those methods, and the applicat i on of a computer to design prob l ems . Introductory problems are given in BASIC using the graphics package, a highlevel language such as pascal is used to exp lor e language in more depth , and to con clude, a series of ass ignm ents introduces the graphics unit or high-level language. Assign men t s in programming CAD problems are require d . LA. 6686-3. Special Topics in Landscape Architecture. Vari ous topical concerns are offered in landscape architecture history, the ory , elements, concepts, methods, implemen tation strategies, and other related areas. LA. 6700-6 . Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio V. This studio will focus upon the students' e labor ation a nd substa nti ation of personal ideas throu gh comp l ex design exercise which critically address contemporary land scape architec tural theory. Emphasis is based upon a com prehensive landscape design project structured to test student ability to inves tigate ecological, soci
PAGE 69

logical forces that give meaning to the everyday lives of men and women in residential, work , and recreational settings. More specifically, urban and regional planning is concerned with: identifying social needs and designing and providing services and facilities to meet those needs; anticipating change and its impact on how people can and do live; und erstanding the way plans are made, decisions implemented, and actions evaluated and the means by which these processes can be improved; stimulating, guiding, and influencing actions of the private sector with respect to land use and land use transitions in urban , suburban, and rural areas; identifying potentially adverse impacts of human activi ties on the natural environment and mitigating those impacts; desi gning the city and the s ur rounding region to facilitate activities in which people need and desire to engage. The Urban and Regional Planning Pro gram at the University of Colorado at Denver is designed to prepare students for professional practice in urban and regional planning as well as for more advanced academic training in planning and related fields. The degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) is awarded after successful completion of a course of study normally requiring about two years of full-time course work. The objectives of the Urban and Regional Planning Program are : to clarify the behavioral and perceptual sources of urban and regional problems ; to foster the appropriate use of policy , planning , design , and legal devices for creating urban and regional environments respon sive to human needs and ecological prin ciples; and to develop methods for evaluating urban programs, policies, and plans which have important human and natural environmental consequences. Master of Urban and Regional Planning The Urban and R egiona l Planning Pro gram offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.), which requires two years of full-time study and a minimum of 51 credit hours. The M.U.R.P. degree program is accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board. It consists of a core of 27 semes ter hours of courses in: Theory , Planning Methods, Spatial Analysis, Planning Law, History , Planning Studio, Site Planning , and at least 24 semester hour s of elective courses. All planning courses qualify as electives. The student should select courses, however, that build on each other and together form a strong specialization. The Urban and R egiona l Plannin g Program requires that students see an advisor at least once a semester before registration to obtain approval for the course selec tion . Each student is assigned a member of the faculty as an advisor and mentor . The particular stre ngth of the Urban and R egio nal Planning Program is Physical Planning with emphasis on Environmental Planning and Land Development. Students are e ncourag ed to cons ider appropriate courses in th e Landscape Architecture Program to achieve greater skills and depth of knowledge. A dual Master of Urban and R egional Planning and Master of Landscape Architecture degree is offere d . Applicants to the Urban and Regional Planning Program are expected to present their application materials in a portfolio . The portfolio should include a resume which describes the applicant's educa tional and professional background , a statement of professional goals and ob j ec tives , a list of courses that the applicant has taken which relate to planning , and a copy of a student or professional project COURSE SEQUENCE COURSE SEQUENCE CORE Urban and Regional Planning I 67 or paper with a note exp lainin g why the particular item was selected. The appli cant may submit other relevant materials. The format must be 8Y2 11 x 11 11 and bound . A s t amped, self-addressed enve lope must be included if the portfolio is to be returned . CORE COURSES URP. 5501 (3) Planning His t ory and Theory URP. 5510 (3) Planning Methods I URP. 5511 (3) Planning Methods II URP. 5520 (3) Urban Spatial Analysis URP. 5530 (3) Planning Law URP. 6630 (4) Planning Studio I URP. 6631 (4) Planning Studio II URP. 6632 (1) Preparation for Professional Certification LA. 5530 (3) Site Planning A thesis option (URP. 6950 Thesis Research and Programming and URP. 6951 Thesis) is availab l e primarily for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced academic training in planning or related fields . CREDIT ELECTIVES HRS. URP. 5501 (3) FALL URP. 5510 (3) YEAR I URP. 5530 (3) URP. 5511 (3) SPRING URP. 5520 (3) LA. 5530 (3) FALL URP. 6630 (4) YEAR II URP. 6631 (4) SPRING URP. 6632 (1) 27 SPECIALIZED COURSES The elective courses enable students to exp lore in-depth an area of special interest. Students should build on the expertise which they already possess. This can be done by learning about a related specialty, or by increased specialization in an already existing area of expertise. The Urban and Regional Planning faculty have particular strengths in Urban Economic Development, Land Use, Environmenta l Planning, and Real Estate and Land Devel opment. Students must take at least 24 h o urs of elective courses. ELECTIVES (3) 12 ELECTIVES (3) 12 ELECTIVES (9) 13 ELECTIVES (9) 14 24 51

PAGE 70

68 I School of Archit ec ture and Planning URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING COURSES URP. 5500-3. Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning. This co urs e focuses on the principles of urb a n and regional plan ning , theories of planning , c ommunity o rganization , basic tec hniques , changing philosophies in modern soc i e ty, and th e process of shaping co mmunity form . URP. 5501-3. Planning History and Theory. This course provides an overview of planning history and th eory. The philosophi ca l , politi cal, and econom i c roots of the vari ous theories are discuss e d . Ideas ar e placed in th e context of the planning profession's history and its pr ese nt aims, int e r ests, and e thics . URP. 5510-3. Planning Methods I . This course f oc u ses on th e a pplication of s tatisti ca l , quantitative, and mathematical t ech niques, and co mputer a pplication s f or urban a nd regional planning a nd policy d eve lop ment. M a jor topi cs include t ypes of data , sampling, basic probability distributions , hypothesi s t es ting, r egress ion and correla tion , and an introdu ction t o multi-vari a te and cluster ana lysis . Applications in planning and d eve lopm e nt are e mphasiz e d . URP. 5511-3. Planning Methods II. This co urs e co ntinu es the development an d appli ca tions of techniques introduced in URP. 5510, as well as other planning methods, models, and techniques. These includ e physi ca l , social, a nd economic models, urban land u se a nd deve l op m ent models, d ecision making techniques, a nd linear and dynamic pr og ramm ing . Prereq: URP . 5510 or co n se nt of instructor. URP. 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis. Thi s co urs e i s an examinat i on of th e spatial struc tur e of th e urban sys t em. Th e urb an system i s analyzed i n terms of the syst em of cities a nd city as a syst em. Major topic s discussed includ e th e eco n omic theory o f th e origin of city, th e rank-s i ze and primate distributions, the locatio n pattern a nd hierarchical struc ture of cities, functional classification of cities, urb an grow th and eco nomi c base, mov ement of population within and between cities, spat i a l pattern of land use and eco n om i c activities, spatial pattern of urban popul ation d e n sity, and urban socia l space a nd urb an cog niti o n . URP. 5530-3. Planning Law. Thi s co ur se f ocuses on the l ega l se ttin g for urb an an d regional planning in the United States a nd major co n s titutional issues in t h e effect u atio n of plannin g policy. Contempo r ary controver s i es a r e put into th e l arger co nt ex t of a tt e mpt s by th e judici a l system t o redefine the b a l ance between individual rights a nd gove rnm e ntal power in a n increasing l y weakened soc iety. URP. 5532-3. Urban Form History. An a n a lysis o f urb a n physical form from the ori gin of cities t o the pr esent. The emp h asis i s o n th e cities of W es t ern civilizat i on and Ame r i c an urban planning . Major shifts in urban ideas, architecture, transport a tion , landscapes, and e n e rgy syst e ms are dis c ussed and eva luated using a slide-lecture format. URP. 5533-3. Urban Form Theory. A descr iption an d analys i s of contemporary sc hools of th o ught on urban physical form . Theor i es will b e eva luat ed according t o th e acc uracy of their ex planati o ns of prese nt urban form , th e quality of their imag es of future form , and th e practi c ality of th ei r s trategies for impl e menting their ideal usin g a slide/l ecture/disc ussion format. URP. 6624-3 . The Built Environment in Other Cultures 1: Research Design. This co urse intend s to broad e n studen t s' p erspec tive by asking them to exa mine design within another cu lture. Each s tudent will prepare a proposal o f study including a state ment of th e prob l e m to b e addressed, the typ e of field r esearc h to b e undertaken, and the natur e of th e report produced . URP. 66304. Planning Studio I . This co urse f ocuses on plan d es ign in urban a nd reg ional plannin g and ex plor es basic con cepts, t ec hniques, and issu es r e l ated t o urban planning, urban d es ign , site p lanning, an d e nvironm enta l awareness. URP. 6631-4. Planning Studio II. The focus of Stud i o II i s o n plan makin g related to urban and regional pla nning. An und ers tand ing of th e plan-making process i s emph a size d . Students will h ave direct ex peri e n ce w ith th e various steps in planning, including data-ga th ering, goal-se tting, identificatio n o f alte rn atives, analys is, sy nth esis, and pr ese nta tion of th e plan. Th e plan may be f or a cit y sector, a neighborhood, an en tir e co mmu nity, a r egion, o r it may b e a policy plan. Whe r e p ossib le, stu d e nts will work with a n act u a l client. Prereq: URP. 6630. URP. 6632-1. Preparation for Professional Certification. This co ur se i s taken in the stud e nt's fina l semes ter before grad u ation. It provides a compre h e n s i ve review of the planning literature a nd practice . The co ur se coverage follows that of the American Insti tute of Certified Planners (AICP) examina tion. (Only open for planning s tud e nt s in their l as t semes ter o r consent from the pro gra m dir ec tor.) URP. 6640.3. Community Development Process . This course intr oduces community deve l opment, a field close l y allie d with plan ning , in its devotion t o working with people to s tr engthen their communities in accor da n ce with l ocal l y d e t ermined goa ls. Empha sis i s p l aced on understanding gro ups, organizations, and communities a nd on deve lopin g skills in s u c h areas as community analysis, goal setting, group facilitation , a nd problem so l ving. URP . 6641-3. Social Planning. A n increas ingly important s p ecialty in com temp orary p l an nin g practice i s social p l a nning. This course covers th e process of formulating public poli cies and d es i gning, impl ement ing , and eva l uating programs in suc h areas as socia l se rvi ces, h o u s ing, h ealth care, emp loy m e nt , and e ducation . Attention is given to the historical perspective and the present day social and political context within which socia l policy formation and social planning occurs. URP. 6642-3. Neighborhood Planning . An introduction t o smal l area planning including survey of n eighborhoo d and comm unity th eory, examination and critique of r e search and a n a lyti cal t ec hniques involved in neigh b o rhood planning . Examines and analyzes ex isting plans of local n e i ghborhoods. URP. 6649-3 . Environmental Planning 1: Ecology. This course studies the physiography , c ultural factors, and aesthetic criteria in rela tion to l andscape and spatial organization a nd s tructur e . It will cover data sources and int e rpretation , and it will l ook a t environ menta l f actors in development and siting a nalysis. Pre req: URP. 5510 or co nsent of instruc tor . URP. 6650.3. Environmental Planning II: Policy and Law. This cours e provid es a com prehensive p erspec tiv e on environmental planning policy . It focuse s on major e nviron m e nt a l issues and problems, methods of eva luation , and legis l a tiv e responses. Pr ereq: URP. 5530 or consen t of ins tru ctor. URP. 6651-3. Environmental Impact Assessment. Th e objective of thi s course i s t o provide the f o undation for und e r s tanding the Environmental Impact Assessment process, its l ega l co nt ext, and the criteria and methods f or procedural and s ub s t a nti ve comp liance. Prereq: URP. 5530 or co n se nt of instructor. URP. 6652-3. Growth Management. This course examines e n v ironm ental a nd l and regulations such as zo ning, subdiv i s ion con trols, a nd growth management systems in th e co nt ex t o f public policy . Emp hasis is placed on case s tudies, th e analysi s of past and present practices, the impr ove m e nt o f e xisting systems, an d the design o f n ew r eg ulatory systems. Pr ereq: URP. 5530 o r conse nt o f ins t ructor. URP. 6653-3. Natural Resources Planning and Management. This course f oc u ses on th e s tud y o f th e eco n omic organiza tion and use o f n a tural resources. It covers the st ud y of pro p e rt y rights a nd th eir impact on resource use, optima l d epletion of non renewab l e a nd use and m anageme nt o f renewable resources, a ppli catio n s t o fis h eries, forests , min eral resources, etc . As well as developing criteria for evaluation of environ menta l amenities ; explor es conflicts betw een growt h an d environme nt a l quality. URP. 6660-3. Real Estate Development Process. This course is a detailed analysis of compo nent s o f the real es t ate process and its relationship to the design profession and other k ey participants. Students will l earn what variables are within th e real es t ate development business, how they interrelate, and why projects s u ccee d or fail. URP. 6661-3. Real Estate Development Finance. Thi s course focus es on financi a l

PAGE 71

analysis of real estate investments. The course covers topics including measures of value, capit i lization rate , capital budgeting , debt and equity markets, and taxation . Cash flow and appraisal techniques, complex deal structuring, innovations in debt financing, syndications, tax she l ters, tax exempt financ ing, and micro-computer applications also are covered. URP. 6662-3. R eal E sta t e M a rket An a l ysis . This course focuses on examination of tech niques of market analysis. Topics include business and construction cycles, regional and urba n growth trends, restructuring of urban space, commercial and industrial loca tion theories, and demographic analysis and projection t echniques. Prereq: URP 5510 and 5511, or consent of instructor. URP. 66643 . Fiscal Imp act An a lysis. This course is designed to provide an introduction to fiscal impac t analysis proce dures to students interested in the land deve l opment process. Severa l methodo l ogies will be r eviewed and assessed for their relevance in diverse circumstances. Prereq: URP. 5510 and 5511, or consent of instructor . URP . 6670-3 . Urban E conomic Dev e lop ment. This course is an a n alysis of the public/private partnership in urban eco nomic deve l opement i nclud i n g analysis of potentiais, problems, and projects ; financing urban economic development through federa l gran t prog r ams, tax incremen t financing and other means; and economic th eory of urban deve l opment. URP. 6671-3. R egio n a l Economic D eve lop m ent. This course is an analysis of regional patterns and processes of economic develop ment. Theories and models for location pat terns and processes of economic activities; labor , industrial , and commercial site require ment; and economic development and growth strategies are emphasi zed. Prereq: URP. 5520, or consent of instructor . URP. 6672-3. Urban Labo r M arket. This course provides a study of the organization and functioning of urban labor markets and covers labor market segmentation, human capital theory , labor mobility, labor market signaling, and discrimination in labor mar kets. (Offer ed infrequently.) URP. 6673 3. Tra nsportation Planning 1 : Tra n s port Network A n a l ysis . The focus of this course is on the examination of several important aspects of the transport network: access i bility and connectivity of nodes and linkages and the volume and direction of flow of a transport network . Descriptive, predictive, and planning methods and models discussed include graph theoreti cal measures, connectivity matrices, gravity model, abstract mode model , entropy maximization , trip generation model , and flow allocation models . Pr e req: URP. 5510 , or consent of instructor . URP. 6674-3 . Trans portation P lann in g II: Ur b a n T ra n s portati o n Pla nn ing. This course is a follow-up of the transport n et work analysis and involves an examination of major issues of urban transportation in the U.S. T h ese include the role of transporta tion in urban development, the urban trans portation system , relationship between lan d use p l ann i ng and transportation planning, urban transportation plann i ng process, and selec t ed case studies. Prereq: URP. 5511 and 6673, or consent of instructor . URP. 667 53. Pla nnin g and Publi c Fina n ce. This course focuses on recent trends in financing local governments, revenue a n d expenditure analysis, budgeting for local governments with particular emphasis i n the capita l improvement b u dge t , financing capital improvements through bond issues, and capita l improvement and its re l ationship to long-term p l anning. URP. 6676-3 . U r b a n Hous ing. This course involves an examination of p l anning and other aspects of urban hous i ng , focusing primarily on U.S. urban ho u sing conditions with some references to internationa l condi tions and comparisons. Major topics of the course include aggregate trends and pat terns, housing in spatia l context, the alloca tion process of housing markets and submarkets (supply / finance, demand / mobility/demographic c h ange), housing problems and failures (substandardness, inequ i table d istribution, specia l group needs, segregatio n and discrimination , market problems), the role of government, and alternative approaches . URP. 6680-3. Urb a nization in D eve lopin g Countries. A descr i ption , a n alysis, and evaluation of urbanization and planning in less developed countries. The special prob l ems of planning , housing, transporta tion , environmental quality, and economic development in cities of t h ese countries are addressed. Comparisons are made among cities of third-world countr i es and between third-wor l d countries and fir st-world countries. U RP. 6 6 8 2-3. Housin g i n D eve l o p i n g Countries. This course examines housing problems in developing countries and explores a l ternative policies, programs, and plans. Emphasis is placed on population growth and the impact housing and urban development, housing demand , shelter, and services for the urban poor , the squatting and squatter-built housing, and comparison of government policies and programs addressing housing problems . URP. 6686-3 . Specia l Topi cs in Urban and Regiona l Planning. Various topical concerns are offered in urban and regional planning , theory , co ncepts, methods, case studies, and practice . URP. 6840-1 to 3. Independ e n t Stu d y . Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to inves tigate a special topic or problem related to urban and regional planning . URP. 691 06 . The Bui l t E nvironment i n Other C ultures II: F ield Exp erience. Students will trav e l to th eir resp ec tive cities and undertake the agreed upon study Urban and Regional Plan n ing Courses I 69 proposa ls. The course intends not only to help students consider their own design and planning attitudes, but also to help them see the wor l d from a more ba l anced perspective. Prereq: URP. 6624. URP. 69303 . Pla nnin g In ternshi p . This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to students in urban and regional planning . The emphasis is on actua l work experience in settings with client groups as the students assist them in deter mining so l utions to their problems. Program director's approval is required . URP . 69503. T hes i s Researc h a n d Pro g r amming . Prereq: minimum of 24 credit hours earned toward completion of Master of Urban and Regional Planning degree . URP. 69513. Urban and Region a l Pla nnin g Th esis .

PAGE 73

Dean: Donald L. Stevens Associate Dean: William D. Murray Associate Dean for Programs: Jean-Claude Bosch Office: 1250 14th Street Telephone: 595-4007 Director of the Executive Health Administration Program: John P. Young Director of the Executive M.B.A. Program: John P. Young Director, Health Administration Program: Richard W. Foster Executive Board of the Business Advisory Council Bob R . Baker , President AMC Cancer Research Center Kermit L. Darkey , President , Mountain States Employers Council Thomas J. Gibson , Exec utiv e Vice President, The Gates Corporation Gayle Greer, Vice President American Television and Communications Corporation N . Berne Hart , Chairman of the Board, United Banks of Colorado Del Hock, President and Chairman, Public Service Company Bruce M . Rockwell , Executive Director, The Colorado Trust Gail Schoettler , Treasurer , State of Colorado Faculty Professors: Marcelle V. Arak (Finance) , Gordon G. Barnewall (Marketing), Wayne E Cascio (Management), Lawrence E Cunningham (Marketing), Michael A. Firth (Accounting) , H . Michael H ayes (Marketing and Strategic Management), Gary A. Kochenberger (Operations Management), James R. Morris (Finance), William D. Murray Onformation Sys t ems), Bruce R. Neumann (Accounting and Health Administration) , Edward J. O'Connor (Management) , Donald L. Stevens (Finance), Dean G. Taylor (Finance) . Associate Professors: W. Graham Astley (Management) , Jean-Claude Bosch (Finance), Peter G . Bryant (Management College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration Science and Information Systems) , Kang Rae Cho (Management and International Business) , Edward J. Conry (Business Law and Ethics), E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr . (Business Economics), Richard W. Foster (Finance and Health Administration), Dennis E Murray (Accounting) , John C. Ruhnka (Management and Business Law), Clifford E . Young (Marketing), Raymond E Zammuto (Management). Assistant Professors: Stephen P. Allen (Accounting), Ajeyo Banerjee (Finance), Ben-Hsien Bao (Accounting), Heidi Boerstler (Health Administration), Lloyd Brodsky Onformation Systems), James H . Gerlach (Management Science and Information Systems) , Jeff E . Hey! (Operations Management), Kenneth A. Hunt (Marketing), Jahangir Karimi Onformation Systems), Susan M. Keaveney (Marketing), Feng Yang Kuo Onformation Systems), Anne Moeller (Management), Manuel G. Serapio, Jr . Onternational Business) , Marlene A. Smith (Information Systems). Senior Instructors: Jon L. Bushnell (Operations Management and Statistics), Cindy Fischer (Accounti ng), Lawrence F Johnston (Finance). Instructors: Errol Biggs (Health Adminis tration), Richard E. Cook (Finance), Charles M . Franks (Statistics), Robert D. H ockenbury (Accounting) , Chen Ji (Finance), Paul J. Patinka (Manage ment) , Barbara A. Pelter (Finance) , Chandrasekaran Rajam (Management), Charles A. Rice (Management) , John Turner (Finance), Marianne Westerman (Finance) . INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain business community, the College of Business and Administration at the University of Colorado at Denver provides its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective, responsible business professionals . This level of exce l lence in higher educatio n is achieved by bringing together nationally recognized faculty and highly motivated, mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment. CU-Denver's College of Busin ess is a " research institution; and our faculty are nationally recognized for their con tribu tions to scholarly research. The informa tion contained in university textbooks is first co nceived through faculty research and is usually published in textbooks about six years later . Thus, a research orie nted faculty is writing and teaching concepts years before they are typically seen in t ex tb ooks . Accordingly , our stu dents have the opportunity to be on the leading edge of business management theory and practice . Our class schedules offer flexibility to meet the needs of full-and part-time stu dents , with both day and evening classes. Whether you are an experienced working professional seeking an advanced degree, or preparing for a new career in the busi ness world , you will gain the knowledge necessary to succeed in today ' s challeng ing business environment. CU-Denver's College of Business can give you an edge over your competition. College of Business and Administration Educational Goals CU-Denv er's College of Business and Administration defines the goals of its degree program as follows: 1. The refinement of basic skills essen tial for success in business ; these include writing , speaking , calc ulating , comp utin g , making high quality deci sions , and managing others . 2. The transmission of knowledge essen tial for success in business. This includes a broad understanding of our social , economic, ethical and political sys t ems derived from education out side the college . Learning within the college , common to all students, focuses on mastery of accounting, finance, marketing, information sys tems, business law , quantitative methods , and production. Learning withi n an area-of-emphasis will be evaluated in later stages of outcome assessment. 3 . The development of professional views appropriate to fulfilling the manager ' s responsibility to self, colleagues , empl oyer, and society .

PAGE 74

72 I College of Busin ess and Administration and Graduat e School of Business Administration Faculty Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about their t eac hing and re sea rch. They hold degrees from the nation's leading bus i n ess schools, such as Berkeley, Harvard, Stanford, University of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania, UCLA, and Yale, many of them also bring years of va l uabl e ex p er i ence in private industry. Their int er disciplinary ex perti se, academic achieve ments, scholarly r esearch, and business exper i ence provide stude nt s with a dynamic learning environment. Students Unlike the s tud ents at a tr a diti onal college campus, many of o ur students are ad ult , working professionals who maintain full-time empl oyment. Their success and exper i ence enri c h class discussions and among stude nts. Although a htgh percentage attend evening classes, a significant number are full-time studen t s atten din g classes offered during the day. Following the current national trend, women cons titut e about o n e half of th e student body. Since admission standar d s are among the highest in the region, the student body is unusually motivated and talented. This rich mix of backgrounds, experience, and perspectives, when co u pled with the strengths of our excelle nt faculty, fosters stimulating classroom inter action and keen competition among the st ud ents . Accreditation While there are approxima t e l y 800 recognized schools of business nationwide, only 237 are accredited by t h e national accreditation agency for university schoo l s of business-the American Assemb l y of Collegiate Schoo l s of Business (AACSB). CU-Denver's College of Business is one of the few schools in the S t ate accredited by the AACSB. Business Week wrote recently ' Today, just having the degree isn' t as important as where you get it ... As cor pora tion s become savvier buyers of ... talent, they are g i ving more weight to th e AACSB seal ... Accreditation shows that a Business School cares about the quality of its progr am" In addition, many national fellowship programs accept only stude nt s from accredited programs. In a similar manner, our p r ogram in health adminis tr ation is the only such pro gram in the region accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACCEHSA). This agency e n s ures that health administration programs meet demanding req uirem ents for quality ed u ca tion in the health admin i s tration area. Cooperative Education Cooperative Education is a program designed to provide s tud ents with practi ca l work exper ien ce in a business setti ng. Through Co-op, students put classroom ed u ca tion into use. Many var i ab l es con tribute t o an individual's success. On-the job ex p erience is one of those variables. Cooperative Educa tion provides students w ith first-hand experie n ce i n a real job setti n g . How Co-op Works Working with th e College of Business and Administration, th e CU-Denver Center for Int ernships and Cooperative Education places bu siness students as paid Co-op trainees with cor por ations, businesses, or government agencies in positions that comp l ement their academic work. Many Co-op positions l ead to permanent career appointments upon graduation. Eligibility for Placement Cooperative Educat i on is open to all stu dents who have completed their freshma n year, have maintained a grade-point aver age o f 2 .5, and have completed at least 12 hours o f course work at CU-Denv er (6 hours for graduate students). Some have additional requirements, t.e., U.S. citizenship, willingness to travel, and completion of specific course work. Scholarships and Financial Aid Many programs for financial aid are administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Call 556-2886 for detailed informa tion. In addition, t h e College of Business awards some departmental and general scho l arships. The amounts of the awards and the number of awards vary each year. For additional information, contact the College of Business, 595-4007. Each year, a number of undergraduate students are awarded Deans' Scholarships, Colora d o Scholarships, and Regents Scho l arships. These provide financial sup port for a portion of the students ' tuition and f ees. The Purchasing Management Associa tion of Denver awards an an nual scholar ship t o students int erested in ca r eers in purchasing and th e Colorado Chapter of the American Production and Inventory Contro l Society awa rds up to two annual scho lar ships to students int erested in careers in operations man ageme nt. For information contact the operations management faculty a dvi sor in th e Col lege of Busin ess. Graduate tuition awards are ava ilable to stu dent s admitted to the G r adua t e School of Business Adminis tration , based on a number o f factors including academic per formance. For addi tional information con tact the Graduate Programs Office at 628-1271. Student Organizations Oppor tunit y for association with other College of Business a nd Administration studen ts , in varied activities intended to stimu lat e professional interest and to give recog nition t o scho l astic attainme nt , is provide d by the following studen t organizat i ons: Beta Gamma Sigma-national honorary scho l ast i c fraternity in business CSPA-Colorado Society for Personnel Admin i stration (student chapter) for stu dents interested in personnel or industrial relatio ns CUAMA-student chapter of the Ameri can Marketing Associat i on CU Venture Network-campus chapter of the Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs, open to all CU-Denver students HASO-Health Administration Student Organization ISC-Information Systems Club MBA Association-University of Colo rado at Denver association of master's stu dents in business Phi Chi Theta-national professional business and economics fraternity Sigma I ota Epsilon-professiona l and honorary management fraternity SAS-Society of Accounting Students Institute for International Business The Institute for International Business was crea t ed in August 1988 to help stimu late new business ventures through part nerships with foreign business schools and executives. It has three goals: • To co llab orate with business and govern men t in promoting int ernationa l economic development opportunities for Colo rad o and the Rocky Mountain region.

PAGE 75

• To be a n ational cente r f or providing hands-on tr a inin g to foreign exec utives doing business with A m erican firms . • To become int ernat ionall y recognized for res earch on compe titiv eness issues in the g lob a l economy o f th e 1 990's. The Institut e will offer pro grams for senior management in bu siness and gove rnm e nt. The programs will identify and interpret trends af f ec tin g business in the g lobal marketplace and th e skills needed to conduct business in these mar kets . The programs also will put senior managers in contact w ith internationalists who a r e s h aping th e political , economic, and social environme nt for international business. GENERAL ACADEMI C POLICIES Academic policies which app l y t o all CU-Denver students are described in the Genera l Information section of this cata log. Th e policies described bel ow app l y to both undergraduate students in the College of Business and Administration and grad u ate studen t s in th e Gradua t e School of Business Administration. Policies app l ying separately to undergraduate and gradua t e students are described under separa t e h eadings. Each s tud ent is responsible for knowing and complying with the academic policies and regulations establishe d for the College . The College cannot assume responsibility for problems resu ltin g from a stu d e nt' s failure t o follow the policies stated in this catalog. S i milarly, students are responsib l e for all deadlines , rules , and regulations stated in the Sch e dule of Classes. Academic Ethics Students are expected to conduct them selves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and int egrity . Chea t ing , plagiarism , illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations, alteration , f or gery , or falsification of official records , and similar acts or the attempt to engage in such ac t s a r e grounds for suspension or expuls i on from the Uni versity . Also , actions which disrupt the administrative process , such as misrepresentation of credentials or academic status , other forms of deception , or ve rb a l abuse of College staff are grounds for suspension or probat i o n . Any reported act of dishonesty may be referred to the College of Business Committee on Student Faculty Relations at the discretion of the dean, a member of the instructional staff , or other appropr i ate University representative. In particular , students are advised that plagiarism con sists of a n y act involving the offeri n g of the work of someo n e e lse as the st ud e nt's ow n . It is r ecom mend e d that s tud e nts consult with the i n s tru c tor s as to the prope r prep aration of r e ports, papers, e tc. in o rder to avoid thi s a nd similar offenses. Admission to Business Classes Admiss ion to business classes is limited to s tud e nt s who have b een admitted to the busines s program, and to o th e r students as described in the separate undergraduate and grad u ate policy sec tions. The course admission cri t eria are des i gned to meet a number of objectives . 1 . To assure access to business co ur ses for st ud e nts seeki ng a bu siness degree. 2. To serve st ud e nt s in other colleges who h ave business-re l ate d education object i ves or requirements. 3 . To service non-degree studen t s who have specific career or education goa l s . Please r efer to the Schedule of C lasses each t erm f or course availability . Attendance Regulations S tud ents are required t o attend classes on a regular basis. Absences must be arranged with the i nstr u c tor and must conform with the instructor's policy on attendance . Prerequisites Students are expected to know and ful fill all prerequisite requirements, including any prerequisite information when registering. The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who enroll without the correct prerequisites. Gene r ally, students who a r e admin i stra tively dropped will not receive tuition refunds. Course Numbering The course numbering system used at the University of Colorado at Denver iden tifies the class standing required for enroll ment. Stu d ents are expected to take 1000 level co ur ses in their freshman year, 2000 level courses in their sophomore year, 3000 level courses in their junior year and 4000 l eve l courses in their senior year . Courses at the 5000 and 6000 level are restricted to gradua t e business stude nts. Adding and Dropping Courses See the General Information section of this ca t a l og for the Unive rsity-wide drop / add policies . Academic Fblicies I 7 3 Withdrawal See the General Inform ation section of this ca t alog for Universi t y-wide wit hdrawal policies. Administrative Drop T h e College reserves the right to a dministr atively drop s tud ents who are incorrectly enrolled in business courses. Instructors also may recommend to the College of Business a nd Administration office that students who fail to meet expecte d course at t e ndan ce or co ur se prerequisites be dropped f rom the course. Generally, s tud ents who are admin i s tratively dropped will not receive tuition refunds. Appeal Procedure Students should contact a business advisor in the College of Business and Adminis tr ation office f o r appeal and peti tion procedures perta inin g to rules and regu l at i ons of the College. General Grading Policies Plus / Minus Grading. College of Busi ness f aculty have the option to use plus / minus grading . For example, B + corresponds to 3.3 credit points (for each semes ter hour) , B-corresponds to 2.7 credit points. Incomplete Grades. The only incom plete grade given in the College is IF An I F grade is assigned only when documented cir c umstances clearly beyond the student's control prevent the student from completing course requirements (exams, pap ers, etc . ) . Generally, students must make up the missing work and may not retake the entire course. Students should not register for th e cla ss a second time but should make up the work w i t h the instructor giving the IF AlifF grades must be made up within one y ear, or the IF will be automatically changed to the grade ofF All incomplet e g rades must be com pleted and record e d at the Office of Admiss ion s and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor concerning th e remova l of incomp l e t e grades. Grad e Chang es. Grades as repor t ed by inst ru ctors are final. Grade changes will be considered only in cases of documented clerica l errors and when a student is making up an incomplete grade (IW, IF). All c h a n ges must be made within one

PAGE 76

74 I College of Business and Administration and Graduate Schoo{ of Business Administration year after the course has been tak e n unl ess highly unusu a l circumstances ca n be docum e nt e d and th e c hang e h as been approved by th e Undergra du a t e Appea l s Committee for undergr a duat e courses, or the Graduate Appeals Commi ttee for graduate courses. Normally, g rad e changes will n o t be considered for any circum s tances after three years. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS A carefully d esig ned curriculum to pre pare students for s uc cess in b u siness management is availab l e for th e stude nt see kin g ei ther an undergraduate or g radu a t e degree. The College offers courses leading to the Bachelor o f Science (Busi ness Adminis trati on), Maste r of Business Administration (M.B.A.), an d the Maste r of Scie n ce (M.S.) degrees. The particular pro grams offered a re: Areas of Emphasis (B.S. in Business Administration) Accounting Fina n ce _ Human Resources Manageme nt Information Systems International Business Management Marketing Operations Management Graduate Programs Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) Master of Science in Accoun t ing Master of Science in Finance Master of Science in Health Administration Master of Science in Management Science Qnformation Systems Emphasis) Master of Science in Management and Organizat i on Master of Science in Marke tin g Exec uti ve Programs Master of Business Adminis tr ation for Executives Master of Science in Healt h Administration for Executives UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS Associate Dean: Jean-Claude Bosch Program Coordinator: Nancy Reed The undergraduate curricu lum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) d egree is intended to he l p the student achieve th e following genera l ob j ectives: 1. An und erstan din g of the act i vit i es that cons titut e a busin ess en t e rpri se and the principl es und e rlying a d ministrati o n o f th ose activities. 2. The ability to think log i cally and ana lyti cally abo ut th e kind o f co mplex prob l ems e n co unter ed by management. 3. F acility in th e ar t s of co mmuni catio n . 4. A compre h e nsion of hum a n relation shi ps inv olved in an o r ganizatio n . 5 . Awareness o f th e social and e thi ca l respo n s ibiliti es o f tho se in ad mini strative posi tions . 6 . Skill in the ar t of learn i ng that will he l p th e student co ntinu e self-e du cat i on after l eaving the campus. Undergraduate Admissions Telephone: 628-1277 Admission of Freshman Students . Fresh man applicants must have comp l eted the college preparatory curriculum in high school, graduated in the top 30 % o f their high schoo l class, and achieved a score of at l eas t 24 on the ACT or 1100 o n the SAT. See the Genera l Informat i o n section of this catalog for further informa t ion on freshman admission . Admission of Transfer Students. Appli cants who have comp l e t ed work at other collegia t e institut i o n s should review th e information on transfer students in the G e nera l Information section of this cata log. In addition to University policies, the College of Business and Adminis t ration evaluates course work to determine its a ppropriateness for the degree of Bache l o r of Science (Business Administra t i on) . St u dents who have comp l eted more than 24 semester hours of transferable course work are evaluated for admission on the basis of their college grade-point average (GPA) without regard to their high school performance. To be automatically admit t ed, students must have a 3.0 overall GPA in th e courses which would apply to the degree, Bache l or o f Science (Business Administration), and a 2 . 0 overall GPA in business courses. Students with l ess than 3.0 overall will be a dmitt ed if they have a 3.0 in the l ast 24 se m ester hours o f applicable course work, a 2.0 overall GPA in business courses, a nd at least a 2.0 overall GPA in courses applying to the degree . St ud en t s who do n o t meet eit h er of these admission s tand ards, but with a 2.6 in the l ast 24 hours of applicab l e work, are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA in the l as t 24 hours. Pooled applica nt s are offe r ed admission as space is avai l ab l e . For information about specific policies on tran s f e r of credit, co nsult an und erg raduat e business pr og r a m specialist. Intra-univ ersity Transfer. S t udents who want to tr ansfer to the College o f Busin ess and A dmini stration from anothe r colle ge or sc hool o f th e U niv ersity o f Col o r ado at Denver must formally apply at th e Col l ege of Busin ess off ice. Transfe r deadlines are August 1 f o r Fall Sem ester, December 1 for Spri n g Semeste r , and May 1 for th e Summer T erm. St ud e nt s will be e v aluated only on course work that a pplies t o the busines s degree pro gram . Generally , th i s will excl ud e course wor k of a technical or vocatio n a l natur e and courses in activity PE a nd remedial subjects. Stud e nt s who have co mpl e t ed at l eas t 24 applicable semes ter h ours will b e evaluate d o n th eir college work; studen t s with fewer th an 24 transferab l e hours will b e evalua t ed on the basis of both high sc hool a nd college work. Stude nt s will be con sidered for admis sion on e ith er their overall GPA in applica b l e course work from CU and all p revious institutions or on their l ast 24 hours. Applica nt s with less than a 2 . 0 GPA in business courses (from CU or other institu tions) a nd overall CU GPA of less than 2.0 will be denied admiss ion even though they meet th e minimum requirements for conside r ation. Stude nt s will be au t omatically admitted to the College of Business if they have an overall GPA of 3 . 0 o r an overall GPA of 3 . 00 on their last 24 hours . All other appli cants m eeting the minimum req uir ements for adm issi on as stated above will be pooled and ranked on th e basis of their GPA in the last 24 hours. Pooled appli cants will be offered a dmi ssion as space is availab le. To app l y f or an intra-university transfer , studen t s must submit a n Intra-University Transfe r form and CU-Denver transcripts to a business program specialist. Transfer forms a r e availab l e at CU-Denver Admis sions or the College of Business offi ce; transcri pt request forms are available at CU-Denver Records . The transcript must include the student's mo s t recent semester at the University. Stud ents with prev i ous course work from o ther institutions are also req u ired to submi t a copy of th eir t ransfer credit eva l uat i ons (advanced standings ) . For m e r Students. A CU stude nt from another campus or a CU-Denver student w h o h as not registere d for three consecu tive semesters (summe rs include d ) i s con sidered a f ormer st ud e nt and must reapp l y for admission as a former s tud ent. Former CU-Denver busi n ess studen t s may be a utom a t ically rea dmitt ed to th e College for up to thr ee years from the semeste r

PAGE 77

they last attended if they are in good standing (not on probation or suspension} in the College . Students who have not attended for more than three years , or who have completed 12 or more semester hours at another institution of higher edu cation, must reapply as other former stu dents and meet the admission and degree requirements applicable at the time they apply. O l d Work Policy. This policy applies to students newly admitted to the College of Business and former business students readmitted to the College after an absence of three semesters . Applicable credits up to five years old will be counted toward business degree requirements. Courses more than five years old will be evaluated individually for their current relevance to the degree program. Students may be required to update their knowledge by taking additional courses when past courses are outdated; in such cases, credit will be given for both courses . Generally, business courses more t han eight years old will no t apply toward degree credit. Secon d Undergraduate Degree . Students may apply to the College of Business and Administration to earn a second under grad u ate degree , provided the first under graduate degree is in a field other than business. Students who are accepted for the second undergraduate degree will be req u i r e d to pursue cou rses in the sequence normally required for a business degree . For example, if a student registered for a second d egree has not had t h e required mathe m atics or genera l educatio n courses, t hese must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses . Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken b efore a s t udent b egins to pur sue t h e major field. App l ications are avai l able through the Office of Admissions and Records. If a s tud ent applying for a second undergraduate degree has an academic record that justifies consideration for the graduate program , that student will be encouraged to consider one of the master ' s degree programs . Doubl e Degre e Programs . Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason, students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to comp l etion of degree requ i rements concurrently in two fields. Combi n ed programs have been developed for engineering and business, and may be arranged for other professional combina tions as well. For additional information, contact an undergraduate business pro gram specialist at 628-1277. Undergraduate Advising and Academic Planning Admissions Advising. Persons not yet admitted to the College of Business can receive advising on course selection, admission requirements, and other mat ters from an undergraduate program specialist. To make an appointment , call 628-1277. Admitt ed Students. Upon admission to the College , students execute a Gradua tion Contract which iden tifies the courses required to graduate. This contract con tains all t h e information needed to se l ec t courses and monitor progress toward com pletion of requirements for the degree, Bache l or of Science (Bu s i ness Administra tion). Business students are expected to assume responsibi l ity for sel f advising. This includes scheduling courses each term, being familiar with all the policies and procedures of the College, and other wise managing the student's academic career. Program specialis t s are available to answer questions about unusual situations ; however, they do not provide ongoing infor m a tion about co u rse selection a n d scheduling. Career advising is avai l able from busi ness facul ty and from the Auraria Office of Career Planning and Placement Serv ices, 556-3477 . Undergraduate Core Curri culum -University of Colorado at Denver The faculty of the College of Business Administration , College of Engineering and Applied Science , and t he College of Liberal Ar t s and Sciences have established a new core curriculum for undergraduate students. Beginning with the Fall 1990 Semes ter, all undergradua t e students entering CU-Denver will be required to comp l ete t he undergraduate core curricu lum independent of their college or major . Undergraduate students admitted prior to Fall 1990 will have a choice of either the new core curriculum or the requirements of their college in effect at the time of admission to the college . The new undergradua t e core curric u lum seeks to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual comp e tencies in mathematics and computation , writing, oral communication , information literacy, and critical thinking. I t a l so requires all students to come to terms with the basic knowledge areas of the natural and physi cal sciences, behavioral sciences , social sciences , humanities, and arts . Further more, the core curriculum promotes an Und e rgraduate Program I 75 awareness of cultural and racial diversity. The majority of the new core curriculum is designed to be c ompleted during a stu dent's freshman and sophomore years in order to provide the foundation for specific training in a student's majo r discipline . The new undergraduate cor e c urriculum for CUDenver is outlined in th e table below. Each colle ge may augment the camp u s core curricu l um . CU-Denver core requirements for business students are specified under Program Requirements in the following section.

PAGE 78

76 1 C o ll ege of Busin ess and Administration and Graduat e Schoo l of Busin ess Administration CU-Denver Undergraduate Core Curriculum I. Int ell e ctua l Compe t enc i es a. Writing / Speech 9 hour s 6-9 hours in English w ith libr ary component, 3-0 hours in Communi cation b. Mathematics 3 h o ur s any computation course or by examination 2 . Knowledg e Areas a. Natural and Physical Sciences 8 h o ur s two co u rses with laboratory , in one or t wo disciplines Biology , C h emis try, Geology , and Physics Behavioral Sciences AND Social Sciences 9 h o urs minim um on e c ourse in Behavioral and Social, maximum two in a discipline b. Behavio r al Sciences Anthropo l ogy , Com muni ca tion, a nd Psychology 3-6 h ours on e o r tw o courses i n o n e or two disciplines c. Socia l Scie n ces Economics, Geography, Political Science, and Socio l ogy 3-6 h o urs on e o r tw o courses in o n e or two disciplines d . Humanities 6 hour s two co ur ses in one or tw o disciplines History, Languages, Literature, and Philosophy e. Arts 3 hour s Fine Arts, Music, a nd Theatre f. Multicultural Diversity 3 hour s on e upp e r division co ur se from approved list Graduation Requirements The Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree requires the following: Total Credi t s . A total of 120 semeste r hours . Competencies. Demonstrat i on (by co urse work or testing) o f a minimum level o f competency in compu t er literacy, geog r aphy, and o n e foreign l anguage . A r ea of Emphasis or No n -Business Minor. Completion of a t least 15 semes t er hours of approve d courses in the area of emphasis o r completion o f a t l eas t 15 semes ter hours in an approved non business minor . Residence . At least 30 semester hours o f business courses m u st be completed after a student's admiss i on to the College . The 30 h o ur s for residence must include MGMT. 4110 and MGMT. 4500 , and 24 h o ur s in other business courses (core and /or e l ectives or area of emphasis c o urses if an area is se l ected). Grade-Point Average Requirement . To graduate, a student must maintain a .min i mum cumulative scholastic g r ade-pomt average of 2.0 f or all courses attempted at th e University acceptable toward the B.S. (Busin ess Admin i s tr ation) degree , 2 . 0 for all business co ur ses, and 2.0 for courses in the student's a rea o f emp h asis or non business minor. Unde r gradua t e Honors. Upon recom men d a tion of the f ac ulty, stu dent s who demonstrate super ior scho l a r shi p are give n special recognition at graduati?n. Stude nts must achieve a n overall Umver sity of Colorado g r a d e-poin t o f 3 . 3 and a g rad e-point average of 3.5 .m al.l busi n ess courses taken at the U mv ersity of Colora d o to b e cons id ered for cum l aude. Those w h o achieve an overall University of Color ado grade point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3 . 7.in al.l business courses taken at the U mv ersity of Colorado will be consider e d for magna cum laude. Filing f or Grad u a tion. Students must file an Undergraduate Candidacy form and Dipl oma Card, and r equest a graduation evalua tion (senior a udit ) prior t o register ing f or th eir final semester. Failur e to do so will delay graduation . Also, students . desiring t o change their area of emphas i s after filing for grad u ation must have the change approved by the graduation super visor prior to registering for t h eir final semes t e r . Changes af t er that time will delay g r aduation . . . Business Program R e qwrements. Satis fac tion of all the following requirements: Program R eq uir e m e nts Semester Hours College competencies ... ...... ..... 0-9 CU-Denv e r core ...... .......... . . . 41 Mathematics ..... .............. . . . 3 Business core . . ............... .. .. 42 International studies ................ 6 Area of emphasis or non-business minor ... . . .......... 1 5 Othe r Courses .............. . . ... 4-13 Total Semester Hours ............ 1 20 Detailed descriptions of courses which satisfy pro gram requirements are presented b elow: I. College of Business Required Competencies: 0 9 Hours A minimum level of competency must b e demonstrated in co mputer literacy , geogra phy, and in one forei gn language. Stude nts m ay satisfy th e competency require ment s by taking courses as describe d b elow or by test ing . New fresh men a nd tr ansfer st udent s sho uld (1) s atisfy th e English, geograp h y requirements Within their first semes ter of enrollme nt at the College, and (2) meet th e language competency require m e nt within th e first one, two or t hree se m es t ers of e nrollm ent as dictated by the numb er of co urs es required.

PAGE 79

A maximum of 9 semester-hours taken to satisfy the competencies may be counted toward the degree (see Other Courses); other hours taken to satisfy the competen cies are not applied toward the 120 semeste r hours required for the degree . To satisfy competency requirements must pass either co mpetency tests each specific area or complete the followmg courses (or their e quivalents for transfer stude nts): MATH . 1350 Computers in the Arts and Scie n ces or CSC. 1 950-3 Computer Mind Tool s I , or test .................. 0-3 GEOG. 1102 World Regional Geography or test ............ . ....... . . ..... 0-3 3rd semester language or t est .... . . 0-13 11. CU-Denver Core Requirement s : 41 Semester Hour s A. Intellectual Competencies -9 semester hours . ENGL. 1 020 Writing Workshop II ..... . 3 E GL. 2024 Int ermedia te Composition .. 3 CMMU. 2101 Speec hm aki n g . ..... .... . 3 B. Mathematics -3 semester hours. MATH. 1070 Algebra for Social Sciences and Business ( * ) ...... . .......... . 3 C. Knowledge Areas -29 semester hours. 1. Natura l and Physical Sciences ..... . . 8 Two of the following courses (a sequence in the same discipline or courses in two different disciplines) : BIOL. 1550-4 Basic Biology I BIOL. 1 560-4 Basic Biology II CHEM. 1450-4 Real World Chemistry I CHEM. 1460-4 Real World Chemistry II GEOL. 1072-4 Physical Geology I GEOL. 1082-4 Physical Geology II PHYS. 1052-4 Astronomy I PHYS. 1062-4 Astronomy II 2. Behavioral Sciences PSYCH. 1002 Introduction to Psychology ..................... 3 3. Soc ial Sciences ECON. 2012 Principles of Economics : Macroeconomics ....... . .......... 3 ECON. 2022 Principles of Economics : Microeconomics ............... . 3 4 . Humaniti es HIST. 1021 Western Civilization Since 1500 .................. ...... . . . 3 HIST. lOll or HIST. 1361 or HIST. 1371 .. 3 5. Arts ................... . 3 One course from the following : ARTS. 1000-3 Arts in our Time FA. 1001-3 Introdu ction to Arts MUS. 1001-3 Music Appreciation THTR. 1001-3 Introduction to Theatre 6. Multicultural Diversity ............. 3 One course from list to be approved by College of Business. Ill. College of Business Math Requirement: 3 Semester Hours MATH. 1080 Polynomial Calculus ( * ) .... 3 ( * ) Note: The sequence MATH. 1070 and MATH. 1080 may be sat i sfied by a 6-hour calculus sequence. IV. Business Core: 42 Semester Hours Accounting ......... . ......... . 6 Business and Society .... . ..... ..... 3 Business Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Finance . ..... . . . . . . ........ . 6 Information Systems ..... ..... . 3 Management ..................... 6 Marketing ........ ............... 6 Operatio n s Management ............. 3 Quantitative Methods ............... 3 Capstone Integrative Course ... ....... 3 Detailed information about these co urses will be published in the Fall 1991 Sched ule o f Courses. V. International Studies: 6 Semester Hours A. International on-Business One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses: ECON. 4410, ECO . 4420 , ECO . 4500 , HIST. 3160, HIST. 4750, HIST. 4030 / 5030, HIST. 4040 / 5040, HIST. 4330, HIST. 4440 , HIST. 4450, HIST. 4460 , HIST. 4730 , HIST. 4780, HIST. 4820, PSC. 3006, PSC. 3042, PSC. 3135, PSC. 3656, PSC. 4216 , PSC. 4236, PSC. 4246 , PSC. 4266 , PSC. 4286, PSC. 4726 , PSC. 4736, PSC. 4746, PSC. 4756 , PSC. 4766, PSC. 4776. B. International Business One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses: FNCE. 4370 International Financial Management MGMT. 4400 Int ernational Business MKTG. 4200 International Marketing MKTG. 4580 Int ernational Transportation VI. Area of Emphasis or Non-Business Minor: 15 Semester Hours Students may choose a general business degree with a nonbusiness minor , or a . business degree with an area of e mphasis in Accounting , Financ e , Hum an Resources Management , Information Systems , Inter national Business, Management , Market ing, or Operations Managemen.t. A. General Business : Students m General Business must take an approved non business minor of at l eas t 15 semester hours . The courses must form an inte grated sequence and be approved by Graduation Requir eme nts I 77 the College of Business. Up to 6 semester hours of the sequence may be in courses used to satisfy the genera l (CU-Denver core) requirements but the number of Other Courses (see below) will be cor respondingly increased to meet the 120 hours total requirement for the degree. Studen t s int erested in completing a minor should contact the individual departments regardi n g requirements. . B . Areas of Emphasis: Areas of Emphasis must consist of at least 15 semester hours, including any business core courses. For most areas, this will mean 9 semester . hours beyond the two courses .in the ?ust ness core. For areas with spectal reqUire ments or areas with only one course in the core, it may mean 12 or more semester hours beyond the business core. Any hours in excess of 9 are included in the Other Courses described below . VII. Other Cour ses : 4-13 Semester Hour s Studen t s may choose their Other Courses freely , subject to the following general rules: (1) Only non -remedia l (collegelev el, as determine? by the Col lege of Business) courses wtll count towards th e B.S. degree; (2) All students receiving the B.S. degree in Business must take at least 48 semester hours in business (excluding the core Studen ts in General Busmess wtll gener ally need to take at least one business course in the Other Courses category to meet this requirement ; (3) At most 72 se mester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses) may be counted toward the 120 credit hours r e quired for the B.S. degree in Business ; (4) Any . busi ness area of emphasis courses reqmred by specific areas in excess of 9 hours listed under Area of Emphasis above are included in the Other Courses ca tegory; (5) At most 9 se mest e r hours of college level course work devoted to satisfying the basic competency requirements may be app lied toward the BS degree in Guidelines for Electwe Cred1ts. Elective c redits should be selected carefully because not all classes are acceptable. G e nerally , to be acceptable, electives must b e taught by regular Univ e rsity of Colo rado faculty, must have a form of assess ment such as a term paper and / or examinations, and must be regular classroom-type classes. Course coverage must be college level, not repetitious of other work applied toward the degree , must b e academic as opposed to voca tional or technical, and must be part of the regular University offerings .

PAGE 80

78 I College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration Specifically, the College will accept: a. A maximum of 6 hours of the theory of physical education, recreation, and dance, and b. A maximum of 6 hours of approved independent s tudy , experimental studies, choir, band, music lessons, art l essons, and c. A maximum of 12 hours of advance d ROTC providing the student is enrolled in the program and completes the total program. The College will not accept: Activity physical education classes, recreation, workshops, internships, orien tations, dance, teaching methods, practi cums, and courses reviewing basic skills in computers, English composition, mathematics, and chemistry. Areas of Emphasis See individual areas of emphasis in this section for specific courses required. ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SELEGING COURSES Registration. Instruction for registering for courses is contained in another publi cat ion called the Schedule of Classes , which is available before each semester. That publication lists the tim es when registration occurs, the place, and the courses offered. Maximum Units Per Term. The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate business student is 15 semester hours , with a maximum of 18 hours during th e fall/spring semesters and 12 hours during the summer term . Hours carried concur rently in the Division of Extended Stud ies, whether in classes or through correspon dence, are included in the student's load. Repeating Courses. A failed course (grade of F) may be repeated; however, the F will be included in the grade-point average and will appear on the transcript. A course in which a grade of D-or better is obtained may not be repeated withou t written approval from a business program specialist. Courses repeated without approval may not be used in the grade point average calculation . Courses From Other Institutions. Business students must have the written approval of a business program specialist to register for courses (excluding MSC pooled courses) offered by other institu tions. Credit will not be given for courses taken without approval. Grades of C or better must be earned to receive business degree credit. Generally , only non-business electives or l ower division, non-business requirements are acceptable for transfer from other institutions once a studen t has been admitted to the College of Business. Business students who take more than 12 semester hours from another institution must reapply for admission to th e College as transfer students and meet the current admission requirements. MSC Courses . Business stu d ents may selec t their non-business required and elective courses from tho se offered from MSC. Grades of C or better mu s t be earned to receive business degree credit; however, th e grade is not computed in the CU grade-point average and is treated like othe r tr ansfer credi ts. MSC business courses may not be taken for CU-Denver business degree credit. Graduate Level Courses. With prior wr itten approva l of a business program specialist, studen ts may take up to a maxi mum of 6 semester hours of graduate level non -business elective credi ts . Stu dents must earn grades of B or better in graduate courses in order to apply the cre dits toward business degree require ments. Pass /Fail. Only non-business e l ective courses may be taken pass /fail. Required business and non-business courses (natural science and social -hum anist i c elective included) may not be taken pass /fail. A maximum of 6 hours pass /fail credit may be applied toward the business degree. Courses taken in excess of the maximum will n o t be applied tow ard degree credit. Pass/fail determination must be made within the posted deadlines (at census dates) and may not be rescinded (unless approved by the Undergraduate Appeals Committee) . Correspondence Courses . Only 6 semes ter hours of credit taken through correspondence study (from regionally accredi t ed institutions) will be applied toward the business degree. Business courses may not be taken by correspon dence. All correspo nd ence courses must be eval u ated by a business program specialist to determine their acceptability toward degree requirements, and the pro gram specialist's written approval is required prior to the student's registering for courses . Students should contact the Division of Extended Studies for course offerings and registration procedures . Independent Study. Junior or senior business students desiring to work beyond regular course coverage may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) as non business electives under the direction of an instructor who approves the project, but the student must have the appropriate approva l before registering. A maximum of 3 semester hours of independent study courses may be taken in any one semester; a maximum of 6 semester hours may be applied toward degree requirements. An independent study request form must be signed by the student , instructor, department coordinator, and the Associate Dean for Progr ams . Study Abroad. Transfer credit from study abroad programs i s generally limited to non-business elective credit. Stu dents must meet with a bu siness program specialist to determine course acceptabil ity and for written approval prior to the semes ter in which they int end to study abroa d . Inform a tion on th e various pro grams is available at the Office of Interna tional Education on the Boulder campus . ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SUSPENSION AND PROBATION To be in good sta nding , students must have an overall CU grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C=2 .0) or better for all course work attempted, and a 2.0 GPA or better for all business courses attemp ted. PE activity courses, remedial course work , MSC courses, and repeated courses not approved by a business advisor are not included in th ese averages . When semester gra des become available, st udent s below the 2.0 GPA will be notified of 1) probationary status or 2) suspension. Students are responsible for being aware of their academic status at all times; late grades and/or late notification does not waive this responsibility. College rules governing probation and suspension are as follows: 1 . Any student whose overall GPA, or business course GPA, is less than 2.0 will be placed on probation immediately . A student may be removed from probation when the overall GPA and business GPA have been raised to 2.0. 2. A student may remain on probation as long as the student maintains normal degree progress each semester as deter mined by th e College and obtains each term on probation a term GPA of 2 . 5 , and term business course GPA of 2 .5, with no grade below a C. Failure to meet proba tionary provisions will result in suspen sion. Probationary status may continue only until th e student has comp l eted a maximum of 15 semes ter hours or five terms, whichever comes first; the student will be suspended if the GPA deficiency is not cleared within this time. 3 . Suspended students may not attend the Universit y of Colorado or any division of the University (including Extended Studies). 4. Students on suspension may petition for readmission to the College after a minimum of one year from the term in

PAGE 81

which th ey were s uspended . Generally, petitions are granted only in unusual cir cumstances. Any suspended s tud e nt re admitted to th e College will b e under con tract and placed o n a conti nued proba tion s tatus until the GPA defi c i ency has been clear e d . S uch students will b e a uto matically s uspended if, a t any time, their overall GPA or business GPA agai n falls below 2.0. 5 . Students earni ng all failing grades or no aca d emic c redit f o r a semester will have a s top placed on th e ir record and will not b e permitted to regi ste r without a business advisor's approval. 6 . Combined degree s tud ents are required to maintain the same standards of performance as College of Business stu dents in order to be co ntinu ed in a com bined pr ogram . Areas of Emphasis Eac h candidate for the B.S. (Business Administrati on) degree must comple t e th e prescribed courses in an area of emph asis compr isin g a minimum of 15 semester hours tak e n at the Unive r s ity of Col ora d o at Denver. A 2.0 grade-poi nt average is required for are a courses . Typically , stu dents select an area o f emphasis after t ak ing several of the core courses . They then comp lete the hours required for their se l ecte d area. Information about each ar e a of empha s i s is given below . Accounting Advisors: Stephen P . Allen , Ben-Hsien Bao , Michael Firth Telephone: 628-1244 , 628-1249 , 628-1220 Accou ntin g courses are offered in several fields of professio nal accountancy at the interm ediate , advanced and graduate levels. Th ey provide preparation for practice in one or more of the following fields : Accou ntin g and management contro l sys t ems Auditing Financial accoun t ing Managerial accounting Tax accounting Teaching and research In all o f these fields a thor ough knowledge of the social, l egal, econom i c , and political environment is needed. A high degree of analytica l a bilit y a nd co m munica tion skill is indispensable . Courses in Englis h co mpo sition, speech , ethics and logic a r e desirable . Courses in statistics and information systems , beyond th e required College of Business co re co urs es , are h ig hly r ecommended . ACCT. 3310 (Managerial Cost Account ing) i s a requir ed pr e r e qui site for the acco unting area and a ppli es as a business elec tive. Accou nting major s s h ould not take ACCT. 2020 . R e quir e d Courses Semester Hours ACCT. 3220. Int ermedia t e Financial Accounting I ..................... 3 ACCT. 3230. Int ermedia t e Financial Accounting Il . . . . .... . ........ ... 3 ACCT. 3320. I nte rm e diat e Cost Accounting ......... . ...... . ..... 3 Accou nting elective (at the 4000 l evel) . . 3 Studen t s planning t o pursue accounting as a career usually take more than th e above r eq uir ed hours. Many students take a to tal of about 30 hours of accounting , often t aking two courses eac h semester in their junior and se nior years . Stude nt s should work closely with th e accounting faculty and business advisors in planning their accounting pro g rams. Acco untin g students often spec ialize i n a par ticular topical area of accounting beyond the cor e . Examp l es of these specializations include the following recommended co u rses : Financial Accounting and Auditing ACCT. 4240 . Advanced Financial Accounting ACCT. 4410. Income Tax Accounting ACCT. 4420. Advanced Income Tax Accounting ACCT. 4620. Auditing Managerial Accounting and Systems ACCT. 4410. Income Tax Accounting ACCT. 4420. Adva n ced Income Tax Acco untin g ACCT . 4540. Acco untin g Systems a nd Data Processing ACCT. 4620 . Auditing ACCT. 4800 . A c counting for Government and Nonp rofit O r ganizatio n s Gra du a t e study in acco untin g is rece iving increasing emphasis by professional orga nizati ons and empl oyers . Students meeting a dmi ssion requirements should consider continuing their education a t the grad uat e l evel. Finance Advisor: E . Woodrow Eckard, Jr. Telephone: 628-1218 The principal areas of study in fina n ce are financial management , monetary policy , banking , investments, and interna tional finance . The study o f finance is intended to provide an understanding of Areas of Emphasis I 79 fundamental theory p er t a inin g to finance and t o d evelop the a bilit y to make so und financial m anagemen t d ec i s ions. Every e nd eavo r i s made to train s tud en ts to think l og i cally about financial problems a nd to formul ate so und financial decisions and policies . It is necessa ry to understand the importance of finance in the eco nomy a nd the functio n s a nd purpos es o f mone tary sys t ems, credit, prices , money mar kets, a nd financial instituti ons . Empha s i s i s placed o n financi a l policy , management, control, analysis, and decision mak ing . Numerous job oppor tuniti es exist with financial institutions a nd in th e field of business finance . ACCT. 2000 and ACCT. 2020 (or ACCT. 3310) a r e required prereq uisites for the finance area ; ACCT. 2020 will apply as a business e l ective. Required Courses S e mester H ours FNCE. 4310. Business Financ e I ........ 3 FNCE. 4320 . Business Finance Il .. ... . . 3 FNCE. 4330 . Investment and Portfolio Management ................. .... 3 FNCE. 4350 . Monetary and Fiscal Policy . 3 R e com m ended Electives FNCE. 4370 . I nternat i o n a l Financial Management .......... . . . . ...... . 3 FNCE. 4340 . Security Analysis . . . ...... 3 FNCE. 4360 . Bank Management ... . . . . 3 Stude nt s should note that all finance courses a r e not offe r e d every semes t er. Finance majors are enco ur aged to take addit i o nal accounting co ur ses as business electives. Human Resources Management Advisor: Prof. Wayne F Cascio Telephone: 628-1215 Human resources management off ers opportunities for students t o deve l op professional compete n ce in the areas o f personne l administrat i o n and labor rela tions . Students acq uir e a n und ersta ndin g of and skills in d e ve l opi n g and imp lement ing human resources sys t ems including recru itm e nt , se l ectio n , evaluation, training, motivat i on, and union-management relat i o ns . R e quired Course s Sem e ste r H ours MGMT. 4340. Labo r a nd Emp l oyee Relations ....................... . 3 MGMT. 4380. Human Resources Management: Employment ......... 3 MGMT. 4390. Human Resources Management: Legal a nd Social Issu es . 3 MGMT. 4410. Human Resources Management : Compensation Adminis tr ation . .................. 3

PAGE 82

80 / College of Busin e ss and Administration and Graduate Schoo l of Bu siness Administration R ecommende d Elec tives MGMT. 3350. Managing Individual s a nd Work Groups .................... 3 MGMT. 4350. Conflict a nd Change in Organizations .................... 3 MGMT. 4370. Organization Design ..... 3 PSY. 3 1 35 . Organizational P sycho l ogy ... 3 PSY. 3155. Industrial Psycho l ogy ....... 3 PSY. 4405 . Theori es of Socia l Psyc hology 3 OPMG. 4440. Quality a nd Productivity .. 3 ACCT. 2020 . Introdu ct i o n to Managerial Accounting .... .................. 3 ISMG. 3500. Logical Data S tru ctures and Data Base Management Systems ..... 3 OPMG. 300 0 . Int ermediate Statisti cs .... 3 SOC. 3052. Sociology of Work ... .... . 3 ECON. 4610. Labor Econom i c s .. ...... 3 Information Systems Advisor: Gary A. Kochenberger Telephone: 628-1212 The information systems a rea is designed for those who wish to prepare themselves for careers as profes s ional data processing managers or as technical sp ecia lists in business and government. The student develops those technical skills and administrative insights r equired for a n a lysis of information sys t ems, the design and impl ementation of sys t ems, and the management of data processing opera tions. The emphasis is on management information sys tems-syst ems for the co l lection , organization, accessing, and analys i s of information for the planning and co ntrol of operations. The automation of data processing is also s tudied extens ively . Students sho uld note that not all courses are offered eac h sem es ter. ISMG. 2200 and ISMG. 2210 are required prerequisites for th e information systems area and apply as business elec tives. Required Courses Semester Hours (fhe following two courses) ISMG. 4650 . Systems Analysis and Design I .... .................... 3 ISMG. 4660 . Systems Analysis and Design II ........................ 3 At l east two of the following five courses) QUAN. 3000. Int ermedia te Statistical Analysis for Decision Support (infrequently offered) .............. 3 ISMG. 3300 . Operations Research for Decision Support ................. 3 ISMG. 3500. Logical Data Structures a nd Database Management Systems ... ... 3 ISMG. 4700. Computer and Inform at ion Technology . ...... ............... 3 OPMG. 4400. Planning and Control Systems ............ .......... ... 3 International Business Advisor: Kang Rae Cho Telephone: 628-1214 Incr e asin g ly, busin esses are reorienting their thinking, planning , and operations to cap italize on oppor tuniti es that exist in th e world marketplace . Ev e ry pha se o f business i s af fected by thi s reorientation . For individuals with the appropr i ate skills, training, and interest, international busi ness provide s excellent career o pportunities . The intern a tion a l busines s curriculum is designed t o e nh a nce and build on thorough training in basic business s kills and to provid e students with additional skills and knowledge appropriate to inter nationa l business. ECON. 4410 Qnternationa l Trade and Finance) is a req uir ed prerequisite for the international business area and applies as a non-business e l ective. R e quired Courses Semester Hours FNCE. 4370 . International Financial Management ..................... 3 MKTG. 4580 . International Transportation ................... 3 MKTG. 4200 . International Marketing ... 3 MGMT. 4400 . International B usin ess .... 3 S tud e nt s should see an academic a dvi sor for course scheduling . A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended . The course req uir ements for a second area can be incl uded as part of th e business and free elective hours . In a ddition , serio u s con sidera tion should be given to ei ther a minor or a cer tificate in int e rnational affairs, offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and to the study of a foreign lan guage. Management Advisor: W Graham Astley Telephone: 628-1237 The management curriculum provid es the foundation for careers in supervision and general management in a wide vari ety o f organizations. It d eve lops skills in management practice thr ough an und er stan ding of g e neral management princi ples, individu al and group behavior, organizational change and design , and human re so urces management. R eq uired Courses Semester Hour s MGMT. 3350 . Managing Individuals and Work Groups ................. 3 MGMT. 4350 . Conflict and Cha nge in Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 MGMT. 4370 . Organization Design ..... 3 MGMT. 4380 . Human R esources Management: Emp loyment ..... .... 3 R ecommended Electives MGMT. 4340. Labor and Employee Relat ion s ............ . . .......... 3 MGMT. 4390. Human Resourc es Management: Legal and Social Issue s . 3 MGMT. 4400 . International Business .... 3 MGMT. 4950 . Topics in Business ....... 3 Marketing Advisor: Gord o n G . Barnewall Telephone: 628-1296 Marke ting i s concerned with directing th e ac tiviti es of the organization toward the satisfaction of customer wants and needs. This involves understanding cus tomers, identifying those wants and needs which the organiza tion can best serve, guiding th e development of specific produc ts or services, planning and implementing ways to take products or serv ices to the market, securing the cus tomer's order, and finally, monitoring cus tomer respons e in order to guide future activit i es. In most organizations, marketing is a major function a l a rea that provides a wid e variety of career oppo rtuniti es in such fields as personal selling and sa l es manageme nt , advertis ing and sales pro motion, publi c relations, marketing research, phy sical distribution , product management , market man ageme nt , mar keting information sys tems, and retail management. Increasi ngly , career oppor tunities ex ist in service bu sinesses and not-for-profit organiza tions. Required Courses S e mester Hour s (Fhe followin g two courses) MKTG. 3100. Market Research ......... 3 MKTG. 4800 . Marketing Strategies and Policies .......... ........... . ... 3 (Choose tw o of the following courses) MKTG. 3200 . Consumer Behavior ..... . 3 MKTG. 4000 . Adver tising .......... ... 3 MKTG. 4100. Physical Distribution Management ..................... 3 MKTG. 4200 . International Marketing ... 3 MKTG. 4500. Advert ising Management and Public Relations ........ . . ..... 3

PAGE 83

MKTG. 4580 . Internatio n a l Transportation3 MKTG. 4600 . Business Marketing ...... 3 MKTG. 4700. Personal Selling and Sales Force Management ........ ........ 3 In addition to the four r equired courses, students may select marketing electives, business e l ectives, and no n -business e l ec tives tha t support the i r par ticular career orientations . The marketi ng faculty advi sor can assist the student in c hoosing an approp r iate set of electives to fit career objectives. Operation s Mana g emen t Advisor: Gary A. Koche n berger Tel ephone : 628-1212 Operat i o n s management studies are designe d t o prepare stude nt s for careers as operations manager, management analyst, o r systems analys t in such private sector organizations as manufacturing , banking , insurance , hospi t als, and con struction, as well as i n a var iety of municipa l , state, and fede r al organizations . Ope r a tion s managers m ay be charged with the d esign, implementation , opera tion , a nd maintenance of t h e core oper a tional sys tem. Managerial activities cou l d include f orecasting demand, inventory plan nin g a n d control, sc h e d uling l abor and equ ipment , job des i gn and labor stan dards, qua l ity control, p ur chasing , and facilit ies location a n d layo ut. The outlook for job s i n t his area con tinues t o be strong . This placement is aided by the studen t chapter of t h e Ameri can Production and I nventory Con tro l Socie t y and work intern programs provide d t o qualified students . Participa tion i n live case researc h and consulting projects w ith local organizations is usually an integra l part of this cou r se of study. Stude nt s whose major a reas of empha sis are information systems, transportation management, accounting, or engineering will find t h e operations management 4000-Ievel courses to be particularly well related to their courses of study. Students shou l d p l an their schedules carefully as requi red courses are not offered every semester. Require d Cours es Semester Hours (Th e following three cour ses) ISMG. 3300. Operations Resear c h for Dec i sio n Support ....... ..... . . ... 3 OPMG. 4400. Planning and Control Systems . .... .................... 3 OPMG. 4440 . Quality and Productivity .. 3 (One of the following courses) OPMG. 4470. Strategic Ana l ysis in Operations Management .... ....... 3 OPMG. 4600 . Purchasing , Materials Management , and Negotiation ....... 3 R ecomme nded Electives ACCT. 3310. Manageria l Cost Accoun t ing ................. ..... 3 ISMG. 2200. Business Programming : Structured COBOL . . .............. 3 MGMT. 3350. Managing Work Groups ... 3 MGMT. 4370. Organization Design ..... 3 MGMT. 4340. Labor and Employee Relations ........................ 3 MGMT. 4380. Human Resources Management: Employment ......... 3 QUAN. 3000. Intermediate Statistics .... 3 GEOG. 34 11. Economic Geography : Manufacturing ................... 3 GEOG. 4650 . Location Analysis ........ 3 Students planning to take the AP ICS (Amer ican Product ion a n d I nventory Con trol Society) or NAPM (National Associa tion for Purchasing Management) certifica tion examinat i o n s should cons ult with an advisor to determine which elec tive should be taken . UNDERGRADUATE COURS ESACCOUNTING ACG. 20003 . Introdu c tion t o Fina n c i a l Acc ountin g . Fall, Spring , Summ e r . The preparat i on and interpretation of the prin cipal financial statements of the business enterprise , with e mphasis on asset and liabil ity valuation problems and the determina tion of net income . Prereq: sophomore standing. ACG. 20203. Introduction t o M a n ag eri a l Accounting . Fall, Spring. The analysis of cost behavior and the role of accounting in the planning and co ntrol of bus iness enter prises, with emphasis on managem e nt d e cision-makin g uses of accounting informa tion . Note: Finan ce majors must take this co urse and accounting majors may not take this course t o satisfy d eg ree requir e ments . Pre r e q : ACCT. 2000. ACG. 322 0-3. I n t e r medi a t e F i na n cia l Acco un ti n g I. Fall, Spring, Summer. Inte nsive analysis of generally accepted acco unting priniples, accounting theory , and preparation of annual financial statements for public corporations . Prer eq: ACCT. 2000 and junior standing . ACG. 3230-3. Intermed iate Financial Acco un ting II . Fall, Spring , Summer. Con tinuation o f ACCT. 3220 . Pre r eq: ACCT. 3220. ACG. 33103. Manageria l Cost Accou n t i ng. Fall, Spring , Summer. Measurement and repo rting of m a nuf ac turing and serv i ce costs . Identifi es and analyzes the role o f production costs in incom e determination. Includ es computer processing of cost d a ta. Non majors may tak e e ither ACCT. 2020 or 3310. Pr e r e q : ACCT. 2000 and ISMG. 2000. Undergraduate Courses I 8 1 ACG . 3 3203. I ntermedi a t e Cost Acc ountin g. Fall, Spring, Summer. Cost analysis for purposes of control a nd decision making. Analysis of cost b ehavior, role of accounting in planning and control, and managerial use s of cos t accounting data . Includes use of comp uter assisted decision models . Prereq : ACCT. 3310 and QUAN. 2010. ACG. 4 2 40-3. Adva nced Financia l Account in g . Fall, Spring. Advan ce d financial accounting concepts and practices with e mphasis on accounting for partner ships, bus i ness co mbinatio ns, and co nso li dations. Prereq : ACCT. 3220. ACG . 4 2 50-3 . F i na n cia l Accou n ti n g Issues a nd Cases. In-depth analysis of con t e mporary accounting issues and problems, the deve l opment of accounting thought and principles, and critical review of generally accepted accountin g princ i p les. Pr e r eq: ACCT. 3230 . ACG. 4 330-3 . Ma na geria l Accou ntin g Probl e m s a nd Cases . Critical analysis of a dvanced topics in managerial accounting. Considerable use of cases and current r ead ings. Prereq : ACCT. 3320 . ACG. 44103. In come T ax Accou nting. Fall, Spring, Summer . Provisions and proce dures of federal inco me tax laws and require ments affecting individuals and business organ i zatio ns, including the management problems of tax planning and compliance. Prereq : ACCT. 2020 or 3310. ACG. 4420-3 . Advance d Incom e Tax Acc ountin g. Fall, Spring. Continuation of ACCT. 4410, with special emphasis on th e income tax problems o f par t nerships and corporations. Prereq : ACCT. 4410. ACG. 45403 . Account in g S yste m s a nd D ata Proc essing . Fall . The design and analys i s of accounting information sys tems, automated data processing methods with special emphasis on computers and computer programming, and the role of acco unting in the management process. Prereq : ACCT. 3310 and 6 additional semester hours of accounting. ACG. 4620-3. A uditing. Fall , Spring, Summer. Generally accepted auditing standards and the philosophy supporting them; auditing techniques available to the independent publi c accountant. Pertinent publications of the AICPA revi ewed. Prereq : ACCT. 323 0 . ACG. 4800-3. Acco un t in g for G o ve rn ment a nd Nonprofit Orga nizati o n s . Spring . P l anning a nd co ntrol of gove rnm e nt and nonprofit organiza tions. Includ es pro gra m budgets , responsibi l i t y accounting, and fund accounting. Prereq: ACCT. 2020 or 3310. ACG. 4 8 40-variab l e c redi t. Independ e n t Study. ACG. 4 9 50-3. S peci a l T o p ics. R ese arch methods and r esul ts, special topics, and professiona l d evelo pments in accounting.

PAGE 84

82 I Colleg e of Busin ess a n d Administ rat ion and Graduat e Sc hool of Busin ess Administration Pr e requi sites vary acco rding to topi c and instru c tor r e quir e m e nts . UNDERGRADUATE COURSESBUS I NESS lAW BlAW. 3000-3. Business Law. Fall, S pr i ng. Summer. Provides a n und e rst a ndin g o f basi c areas of law import a n t to busin ess m anage r s a nd co nsum ers. T opics include litig ation, torts, con tr acts, a nd sa l es with overviews of co nsumer law, and l ega l as p ects of ba nking transactions. Prereq: junior s tandin g . BlAW. 4120-3. Advanced Business Law. Fall , Spring. Additional l ega l topics of importanc e to bu s iness, includin g agency partnerships, cor p o r atio ns , bankruptcy, sec ur e d tr ansac tions, real a nd p e r sona l property, an d sec uriti es r egulatio n . Stro ngly recommended f o r acco untin g m a jors. Prereq: BLAW. 3000. UNDERGRADUATE COURSESFINANCE FNCE. 3300-3. Basic Finance . Fall , Spring, Summer. Includ es a study o f the monetary sys t e m a nd other inst itutions comprising th e m o n ey and capita l markets; s tud y o f the financial manager's role in bu siness; th e inves tm en t of ca pit a l in assets; and financing the asset requirements o f busin ess firms . Prereq: ECON. 201 2 and 2022; ACCT. 2000; junior standing. FNCE. 4310-3. Business Finance I. Fall, Spring, Summer. Basic principles and practices governing financi a l management of ca pital in th e bu siness firm co n st itut e th e co r e of thi s co ur se . Determinants of ca pit a l requirements, m e th o d s o f obtaining cap ita l , problems of int e rn a l financia l m a n ageme n t , a nd m et hod s of financia l a nalysis. Financ i n g the busin ess cor p o r ation give n primary e mph asis . Prereq: FNCE. 3300 a nd ACCT. 2020. FNCE. 4320-3. Business Finance II. Fall, Spring. Develops analytical an d decision making skills o f studen t s in r e l a tion to problems that confront financial manage ment. Areas includ e planning, con tr o l , a nd financing o f c urr en t operatio n s and longer t e rm cap it al co mmitm en ts; m a na geme nt of income; evaluation of capi t a l inv estments; and expans i on . Case method o f instruct ion . Prereq: FNCE. 4310. FNCE. 4330-3. Investment and Portfolio Management. Fall, Spring. Discusses invest ment problems a nd policies an d th e metho d o l ogy for implementing them. Includes portfolio ana lysis, selection of i nvestment media , a nd measurement of p erformance. Pr ereq : FNCE. 4310. FNCE. 4340-3. Security Analysis. Analysis o f th e financia l co nditi on of th e firm, va lua tion of debt and equi ty securities, and th e se l ec tion of inv es tm ent media f or portfolios. Prereq: FNCE. 4310. FNCE. 4350-3 . Financial Markets and Inst ituti ons. Fall , Spring. This co ur se focuses on th e s upply a nd demand f or loanable funds , th e process of money c r eat i o n , th e str u c tur e of interest rates, and th e role o f th e ce ntr a l b a nk. Specia l a tt ent i o n is d evo t ed to the imp ac t of m o n e t a ry and fiscal p olicies on interest r a t es , the flow of funds, a nd eco nomic activity . Prereq: FNCE. 4310. FNCE. 4360-3. Ban k Management. An analys i s of struct ur e , m arke ts, r eg ulati o ns, and c hartering com m e r cia l banks . Pr ob l ems and po licies o f th e int erna l management o f funds, l oan practices a nd proce dures, inv estment behavior, d eposit and ca pit a l adeq uacy, liquidity, and so l ve ncy. Analytical m ethodology for th ese problems i s developed. Prereq: FNCE. 4310. FNCE. 4370-3. International Financial Management. Spring. A s tud y o f financia l ma nag ement in the int ernat i o n a l e nvir on ment that considers internatio nal capita l move m e nts. Problems of int e rn at i o n al ope rations as th ey affec t th e financial functions. Reviews f oreig n a nd international instit uti o n s an d th e f ore i g n exc hang e process. Con siders financial r eq uir e m e nts , probl e ms, sou rces, and p olicies of firm s doin g business interna tionally. Prereq: FNCE. 3300. FNCE. 4840-variable credit. Independent Study. FNCE. 4950-3. Special Topics. R esearch methods and res ults , special t opics, and professional deve l opment in fina nce. Prerequisites vary acco rdin g t o topic a nd instructor requirements. UNDERGRADUATE COURSESINFORMATION SYSTEMS ISMG. 2000-3. Business Information Sys tems and the Computer. Fall, Spring , Sum mer. A study of busin ess information sys t e m s focusing upon co mput e r hardware and sof t ware as th ey relate t o business information. Includes computer programming , compu ter syste ms , and com puter applicatio ns . The pur pose of th e course is t o introdu ce the stu dents t o th e concepts , vocabulary, and function of business inform a t io n systems a nd the co mputer. Prereq: MATH. 1070 a nd 1080 or 6 h o ur s of nonremedial college mathematics. ISMG. 2200-3. Busines s Programming 1: Structured COBOL Fall, Spring, Summer. An intr oductory course int ended to provide the s tud ent with a thorough programming foun d at ion in COBOL u sing str u c tur ed progra mmin g co n ce pts and techniques. The basic e l e m ents of th e lan guage are discussed and d emons tr ate d throu gh applications in a business enviro nm e nt. Pr ereq : ISMG. 2000 or co n se nt of instr u c tor . ISMG. 2210-3 . Business Programming II: Files and Data Structures. Fall , Spring. This co ur se is a co ntinu atio n of ISMG. 2200 . The student is intr o duc e d to a dv a n ced topics i n COBOL an d their a ppli ca tion in busin ess . Specia l e mph as i s i s p l aced up o n alte rnativ e physica l dat a and file structures, th e ir imp l e m e ntati on in COBOL, and th e ir u se in a business setting. Th e u se of sys t e m software and utiliti es will b e int egra t e d with the t op ics. Case stud i es may be used t o illustr ate app lication s of th e material. Prereq: ISMG. 2200 or consent of instru ctor. QUAN. 2010 is recommended. ISMG. 3300-3 . Operations Research for Decisio n Support. Fall. This course s tudi es the various methods a nd models of opera tions research and th eir applicat i o n t o managerial se ttings. Typica l t op i cs includ e inventory m ode l s , s imu l ation , linear programming, and queuing. Prereq: QUAN. 2010. ISMG. 3500-3. logical Data Structures and Database Management Systems. Spring. This cou r se i s an introduction to database m a n agement systems , o n -line query, and management contro l systems. It i s conce rn e d with database s tru ct ur e a nd design and th e i nt eg ration of the log i ca l v i ew of th e data wit h its ph ysica l s t o r age . Exte nsiv e us e may be m a d e of a co mm e r cia l DBMS in s tud e nt pro j ec t s t o develop a n apprec iation of the u se a nd organ i zational i ssues as w ell as the technical co nsid e rati ons. Prereq: ISMG. 2210. ISMG. 4650-3. System Analysis. Fall. This co ur se intr oduces the student to b as i c sys t em analysis tool s and t h e pro cedures f or conducting a system a na lysis. Topics t o b e cove r e d m ay includ e sys tem requirements , the initi a l analysis , th e general f eas ibilit y study, structured analys is, detailed a n a lysis, logical d es i gn, and ge n e r a l system proposal. The student will gain practical experie n ce through pr o j ects and/or case stud ies. Prereq: ISMG. 2210 or co n se nt of instruc t o r . ISMG . 4660-3. Systems Design. Spring. This co urs e i s a con tinuati on o f ISMG. 4650 and discusses topics such as st ru c tur ed design ; physical syste m d es i gn; detailed f easi bility a naly s is; specifica tion of input-output metho d s a nd formats; design of files, pro grams, and procedures; sys tem testing ; implementation procedures ; and system life cycle m a n agement. Th e s tud ent will implement these concep t s throu gh case s tudi es and / or proj ects. Prere q : ISMG. 4650, or con sent of instru ctor. ISMG. 4700-3. Computer and Information Technology . Fall. This course provides th e ISMG s tud ent with a co n ceptual foundation in the areas of comp ut e r architecture, operat ing sys t ems, programming tr ans l ators , a nd telecommunications . It is intended to serve as a f acilita tin g cou r se to allow the ISMG stu dent to mor e readily co mmuni ca t e with other technical members of the data pro cessing co mmunity. Prereq: ISMG. 2210 or con sent o f instru ctor. ISMG. 4840-variable credit. Independent Study. ISMG. 4950-3. Special Topics . Research methods are re s ults , special topics, and professional developments in information

PAGE 85

systems. Pr erequisites vary according to topics. UNDERGRADUATE COURSES MANAGEMENT MGMT. 1000..3. Introdu ction t o Bus ine ss. Fall , Spri ng, Summer. Nature of business en t erpri se . R o l e of bus i ness in our society; problems confronting business management, car ee r opportunities in b u siness. Business students are advised to take this course dur i ng the i r freshman year, but may not take it in t he j u n ior o r senior years. Open on l y t o freshmen , sophomores, and non-degree students, and mu sic major s at all levels. MGMT. 3300.. 3 . M a nagement and Organization B e h av i o r . Fall , Spring, Summer. Emphasizes the appli c ation of behav i o r a l scien