Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
University of Colorado Catalog
1992 'Denver* 1993
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University of Colorado at Denver
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Denver, Colorado 80217-3364
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CONTENTS
Academic Calendar 2
Message from the Chancellor 4
Administration 5
General Information 7
The Graduate School 41
School of Architecture and Planning 51
College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration 69
School of Education...................................................... 95
College of Engineering and Applied Science 131
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 161
Military Science 261
Graduate School of Public Affairs 265
Faculty................................................................. 275
Index................................................................... 285


ACADEMIC CALENDAR1
Fall 19922
August 17-21 August 24 September 7 November 26 November 27 December 19
Orientation-Registration
First day of classes
Labor Day Holiday (campus closed)
Thanksgiving Holiday (campus closed)
(campus open, no classes)
End of semester
Spring 19932
January 11 January 18 January 19 March 22-26 May 8
Summer 19932
May 25-28 May 31 June 1 July 5 August 8
Orientation - Registration
Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday (campus open, no classes) First day of classes
Spring break (campus open, no classes)
End of semester
Orientation - Registration Memorial Day Holiday (campus closed) First day of classes
Independence Holiday (campus closed) End of term
Photos: Bob Fader
Cover, Page 40 Jason Jones
Pages 6,50,55,68,129,130,
160,260,263,264,274,284
Design: Publications Department, University of Colorado at Denver
1 The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time.
2 Consult the Schedule of Classes for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs and registration dates and procedures.


Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog
1992-93
University of Colorado at Denver
jpeer at Larimer
LO. Box 173364
Denver, Colorado 80217-3364
Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, degree offerings and degree titles, course offerings and course descriptions, and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice or obligation. The University claims no responsibility for errors that may have occurred during the typesetting, printing or production of this catalog. The University of Colorado at Denver is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. For current calendars, tuition rates, requirements, deadlines, etc., students should refer to a copy of the Schedule of Classes for the semester in which they intend to enroll.
The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curriculum. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester, and the faculty teaching a particular course or program may vary from time to time. The instructor may alter the content of a course or program to meet particular class needs.
Courses are listed by college or school.
niversity of Colorado Catalog.
ISPS 651-060)
52 Stadium Building, Campus Box 384,
Dulder, Colorado 80309-0384 ilume 1992, No. 3, May/June iblished 4 times a year: January/February arch/April, May/June, August/September :cond class postage paid at Boulder, Colorado. DSTMASTER: Send address changes to niversity of Colorado Catalog, CU-Denver jblications, Boulder, Colorado 80302.


Message From the Chancellor
Dear Student:
Welcome to the University of Colorado at Denver. On behalf of the faculty, staff, and students, 1 offer to you the challenging environment of one of Colorado’s premier institutions of higher education. Your decision to attend CU-Denver shows your willingness to learn at Denver’s only urban public university.
CU-Denver is one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system. As a vital part of that system, offering baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral programs, we have achieved distinction nationally and internationally because of the high quality of our programs, faculty, and alumni. Located in downtown Denver, the University challenges its students both academically and personally in an intellectual environment that encourages commitment, curiosity, and imagination.
A distinguishing characteristic of CU-Denver is our urban perspective that is an integral theme in our academic programming, the orientation of our faculty, and the identity of our student body. Our enrollment has grown to nearly 11,000 students.
The University offers some 40 degree and degree option programs at the baccalaureate level and over 60 degree and degree option programs at the postbaccalaureate level designed to provide you with a foundation on which to build your intellectual, aesthetic, and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens. Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a complement to classroom study. The University’s seven colleges and schools (Business, Public Affairs, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, School of the Arts, Education, and Architecture and Planning) and The Graduate School provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the opportunities for gaining knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your economic and personal lives.
We at the CU-Denver campus take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs. This is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the applied aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems.
We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars/teachers and dedicated staff. 1 promise a rich intellectual environment and a challenging educational experience. Most of all, I look forward to seeing you at graduation and awarding you the CU-Denver degree.
My best wishes to you and to your future.
John C. Buechner
Chancellor
University of Colorado at Denver


Administration / 5
ADMINISTRATION Board of Regents
KATHY ARNOLD, Littleton, term expires 1994 RICHARD J. BERNICK, Littleton, term expires 1992 ROBERT E. CALDWELL, Colorado Springs, term expires 1992 PETER C. DIETZE, Boulder, term expires 1996 HARVEY W. PHELPS, Pueblo, term expires 1994 NORWOOD L. ROBB, Littleton, term expires 1996 ROY H. SHORE, Greeley, term expires 1992 ROBERT SIEVERS, Boulder, term expires 1996 DAVID W. WINN, Colorado Springs, term expires 1994
University-Wide Officers
JUDITH ALBINO, President of the University; Professor of Psychology; Professor of Applied Dentistry. B.J., Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin.
GLEN R. STINE, Vice President for Budget and Finance. B.A., Michigan State; M.A., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Ed.D., Harvard University.
THEO. VOLSKY, JR., Executive Vice President for Administration; Professor of Psychology. B.S., M.S., Kansas State University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.
CHRIS ZAFIRATOS, Acting Vice President for Academic Affairs; Professor of Physics; Associate Vice Chancellor for Budget and Planning; B.S., Lewis and Clark College; Ph. D., University of Washington.
H.H. ARNOLD, Executive Secretary of the Board of Regents and of the University. B.A., LL.B., University of Colorado. JAMES A. STROUP, Treasurer for the University and Assistant Vice President for Budget and Finance. B.S., Michigan Technical University; M.B.A., Michigan State University.
CU-Denver Officers
JOHN C. BUECHNER, Chancellor; Professor of Public Affairs. B.A., College of Wooster; M.P.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. BRUCE W. BERGLAND, Executive Vice Chancellor; Associate Professor of Education. B.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Stanford University.
JOHN A. BERNHARD, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.A., Stanford University; M.B.A., Columbia University, Graduate School of Business.
GEORGIA LESH-LAURIE, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Professor of Biology. B.S., Marietta College (Ohio);
M.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University.
MARK A. EMMERT, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Associate Professor of Public Affairs. B.A., University of Washington; M.P.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University.
KENNETH HERMAN, Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.S., University of Colorado. SHELIA M. HOOD, Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services. B.A., M.A., Colorado State University.
FERNIE BACA, Dean of The Graduate School; Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative Activities; Associate Professor of Education. B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado.
JULIE CARNAHAN, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Planning and Information Resources Management. B.A., M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., University of Michigan.
The University of Colorado seal, adopted in 1908, depicts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed in laurel is placed beside him. The Greek inscription means “Let your light shine. "According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civilization “stands as the criterion of culture." The laurel symbolizes honor or success, the youth of the figure suggests the “morning of life, ” and the scroll represents written language.




General Information
The University of Colorado at Denver is one of the most important educational resources in the Denver metropolitan area. CU-Denver, one of four institutions in the University of Colorado system, is an urban, non-residential campus located in downtown Denver. Major civic, cultural, business, and governmental activities are in close proximity.
CU-Denver offers undergraduate degrees in more than 40 fields and graduate degrees in more them 60. Ph.D. degrees are offered in public affairs, applied mathematics, and educational administration. Doctoral studies also are available in engineering and other fields in cooperation with CU-Boulder. Special emphasis is placed on programs that will help assure students professional opportunities after graduation. All programs are tailored to meet the needs of the diverse student population. Classes are offered during weekday and evening hours, and on weekends.
Students' ages range between 17 and 75. The average student age is 29. Two-thirds hold full-time jobs and 60 percent attend part time. Sixty-two percent are enrolled at the upper division or graduate levels.
CU-Denver’s faculty actively promote the special role of an urban institution in meeting the needs of students. Many faculty bring their work experiences to the classroom. They are alert to the challenges and advances of the urban environment and responsible to the needs of students and the community. The combination of CU-Denver’s talented faculty and highly motivated students creates a vital and exciting educational environment. Students are offered the unique educational opportunity to combine real world experience with academic excellence.
History
Just over a century ago the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder, in 1876. In 1912, the University of Colorado’s Department of Correspondence and Extension was established in Denver, to meet the needs of the burgeoning population. As the breadth of course offerings expanded, so did the demand for degreegranting status. The Denver Extension Center was renamed the University of
Colorado-Denver Center in 1965, and by 1969,23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study were offered. In 1972 the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria Campus, CU-Denver’s current site. And in this same year the Denver “Center” was renamed CU-Denver. Two years later the University of Colorado was reorganized into four campuses-Denver, Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder.
University of Colorado System
As one of four campuses of the University of Colorado, CU-Denver has a special role and mission in Colorado higher education. The University of Colorado at Boulder now serves about 24,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. The Health Sciences Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, dental, nursing and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 5,900 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. CU-Denver’s role within the University system is primarily to address the needs for undergraduate and graduate instruction in the Denver metropolitan area. Emphasis is given to professional, preprofessional, and liberal arts training in the context of a strong multidisciplinary and applied agenda for research and creative activities. CU-Denver students have access to the library resources of all campuses and cultural and athletic events sponsored within the University system.
Academic Structure
Each of the four campuses of the University of Colorado System—Denver, Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Health Sciences in Denver—has its own Chancellor and campus administration. The Chancellors, in turn, report to the President of the CU-System. The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approve the overall direction provided by the President of the System. The System President represents the University of Colorado and manages the planning for development of the System, apportionment of resources
across campuses, the System-wide Graduate School, and general policy regarding academic standards, instructional initiatives, and faculty and staff personnel matters, and is supported by a system-wide Faculty Senate. CU-Denver, as well, has its own faculty governance structure. Students also have their own governance institutions.
The Chancellor of CU-Denver represents CU-Denver and manages campus goal-setting, policy development, academic affairs, and budget and financial matters. The Executive Vice Chancellor, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, and the Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance assist the Chancellor. Each vice chancellor is responsible for the essential components of the campus enterprise. The Executive Vice Chancellor is responsible for Admissions and Records, Enrollment Management, Planning and Institutional Research, and Student Services. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs is responsible for all academic programs, the Graduate School, and Sponsored Programs. The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance is responsible for the campus budget, Office of Financial and Business Services, and Personnel Services. The CU-Denver Graduate School is a component of the CU System-wide Graduate School. All graduate units reside within The Graduate School except Architecture and Planning, Business, and Public Affairs.
Academic Programs
CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the citizens of Denver and the region. With the rapid development of the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. Today CU-Denver is composed of seven distinct academic units:
School of Architecture and Planning College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education College of Engineering and Applied Science


8 / General Information
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
School of the Arts
Graduate School of Public Affairs
General Information
These units now accommodate over 10,000 students taught by about 360 regular, full-time faculty members. The diversity of the student body is a hallmark of CU-Denver and a source of deep pride. Among them are traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school. There also are older students who, perhaps for financial reasons or the press of family commitments or because they’ve only lately recognized the value of a college education, have delayed entry. And there are professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appreciation of the world around them.
The undergraduate colleges admit freshman and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, engineering, and music. A solid foundation of academic skills and general education is assured through a comprehensive core corriculum. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also provides pre-professional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health sciences. The School of Education offers programs leading to teacher education. The Graduate School offers master’s programs in the arts, sciences, humanities, engineering, education, and music to students with baccalaureate degrees. The School of Architecture and Planning, the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leading to master’s degrees in their specialized areas. CU-Denver doctoral programs are available in public affairs, education, and applied mathematics. Doctoral work in engineering also is available in cooperation with CU-Boulder. CU-Denver faculty also participate in other doctoral programs offered at CU-Boulder.
A complete listing of bachelor’s and master’s degree programs offered by CU-Denver is provided in the college and school sections of this catalog. The college and school sections describe specific policies on requirements for graduation, , course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions, and similar information.
CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education which leads to improved professional opportunity in the Information Age. Many programs empha-
size practical business world applications, and all CU-Denver students are given the opportunity to attain computer literacy. Specific computer-oriented academic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs.
The Future
CU-Denver is committed to the highest standards of education, scholarship, and service to the community. From this commitment springs the vital energy that infuses every campus pursuit. The pace is fast, perhaps unprecedented. Undergraduate studies are at once becoming more and more varied, challenging, and rewarding. CU-Denver is reaching out to all who can benefit from the high quality education it has to offer. New highly innovative applied and professional graduate degrees are being developed that address the emerging needs of the region’s economy. Centers for state-of-the-field research at CU-Denver are generating important practical solutions to some of Colorado’s and the nation’s most serious social, economic, environmental, and technological problems. New programs and opportunities in international education bring the world and its global economy into the classroom. Throughout history, urban civilization and the arts and humanities have evolved in a rich synergy. CU-Denver -an urban campus-is deeply involved in enriching the cultural milieu of the Denver area. Clearly, the University of Colorado at Denver is on the move.
Accreditation
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration Colorado State Board of Education Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education National Architectural Accrediting Board
National Association of Schools of Music
Planning Accreditation Board National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
Auraria Higher Education Center
The Auraria Higher Education Center is the site for the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share library (which is administered by CU-Denver), classroom, and related facilities on the 171-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered.
On the Auraria campus are administrative and classroom buildings, the Auraria Library, the student union, book center, child care and development centers, physical education facilities, science building, and service buildings.
The new buildings share the campus with the reminders of Denver’s past-historic Ninth Street Park, restored church buildings, and the Tivoli brewery built in 1882. The Tivoli renovated into a complex containing specialty shops, restaurants, and entertainment, will become the student union for the fall semester, 1992.
Research and Other Creative Pursuits
CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledge through the research and creative efforts of its faculty. Research and creative activities not only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and professional practice. In addition, these activities constitute an important component of CU-Denver’s service to the community at large. Therefore, externally funded projects are a major priority at CU-Denver.
Research projects, training, and public service programs at CU-Denver encompass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study with a focus on issues that relate to city, state, national, and international issues. During 1990-91, CU-Denver faculty and staff received external grants and contracts totalling $8,451,735 for research, training, and public service programs. The benefits for the campus in the years ahead will be substantial. Externally funded activities assist in sustaining scholarly discourse, enable faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge, provide the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern for society, and enhance the education of students. Many students actively participate in projects overseen by faculty members.


Centers and Institutes / 9
An important aspect of research and other creative activities at CU-Denver is its multidisciplinary and applied nature. Research in every school and college at CU-Denver addresses questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region. Its role within a thriving metropolitan area also serves as a base for exploring topics of national and even international import. But not all research at CU-Denver yields solutions of immediate practical significance. Major efforts now explore topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplines which are carried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that knows no national bounds. These efforts may yield insights that eventually open the way to practical applications in the next century.
Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary economic, political, educational, engineering, mathematical, scientific, and environmental needs. Financial support has been obtained for program and service development in the areas of computational mathematics, bilingual and special education, health administration, international affairs, and executive seminars as well as institutes on aging and veterans’ employment and training.
Other projects include statewide investigations of economic development, poverty, literacy, air quality, water control, and transportation. Computer related projects include multilevel algorithms, fast parallel processing, algorithms in linear programming, and modeling. Projects in basic research range from investigations of earthquakes to neurotoxicology to growth equations forsporangiophores.
In addition, a great deal of research at the University goes on without substantial external support. This effort also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publications, presentations, exhibits, performances, and professional activities. Many members of the faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits bring recognition to the University, establish the credibility of its faculty, and enhance the value of the degrees it confers.
CENTERS AND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE, AND TRAINING
First Amendment Congress
The mission of the First Amendment Congress is to unite Americans of every persuasion to support freedom of expression, and provide America with a continuing forum to discuss and debate the First Amendment as our cornerstone of liberty. To reach this goal, the Congress sponsors national forums, seminars, and congresses to forge new understanding of First Amendment issues; develops curriculum materials to increase students’ understanding of the First Amendment; delivers special messages to various audiences reminding them of their duties to uphold First Amendment freedoms; publishes materials, and supports public awareness campaigns on First Amendment issues.
Center for Health Ethics and Policy
The Center analyzes and develops constructive courses of action concerning policy and ethics aspects of health-related problems facing Colorado and the nation. The Center’s goal is to increase public and private sector attention to these issues and contribute to the making of informed and sound public policy decisions.
Center for Applied Psychology
This Center promotes research and educational programs in four areas: public mental health, psychology and the law, psychology and public health, and organizational effectiveness and decision making. The Center represents a cooperative relationship among higher education, government, business, mental health agencies, public health institutions, and the citizenry of the state of Colorado.
Center for Research in Applied Language
Established in 1991 with a grant from the President’s Fund for the Humanities, the Center for Research in Applied Language conducts research into language-based problems in real-life contexts. It orients its research projects humanistically and socio-culturally and underpins them with knowledge of the various branches of language theory. Faculty and students carry out projects that both contribute to our understanding of how and why language is implicated in social and individual problems, and propose solutions to or ameliorations of those problems. Reports of research projects conducted through the Center are published on an occasional basis
and are obtainable from the English department office.
Colorado Principals’ Center
The Center is a staff development, renewal, and training center for practicing principals, assistant principals, central office supervisors, and others in instructional leadership positions.
Colorado Center for Community Development
The Colorado Center for Community Development provides technical, educational, and applied research assistance’to organizations, neighborhoods, and communities that cannot afford or do not have access to professional services. The Center targets its assistance efforts to rural small towns, low income and/or minority communities, and non-traditional, community-based service or development organizations.
Center for Environmental Sciences
The Center fosters and promotes disciplinary and interdisciplinary research in the environmental sciences. Although the Center is in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, affiliated faculty represent several different schools and colleges and more than ten academic disciplines, including engineering and the natural and social sciences.
The Center houses the Analytical Laboratory, which specializes in research in environmental chemistry. Projects to date in conjunction with the Analytical Laboratory include studies of air pollution, the global sulfur cycle, and the chemistry of alpine lakes. The services of the laboratory are available to UCD faculty and graduate students, especially those in the M.S. in Environmental Sciences Program.
Center for the Study of Racism and Ethnic Violence
Activities of this Center include research and educational services related to prejudice and hate violence. The research scope of the Center ranges from local to international levels. Educational and training programs are provided for those interested in learning or teaching about the nature and reduction of prejudice, discrimination, and scapegoating. The Center’s CSREVBulletin is published biannually.
Center for Urban Transportation Studies
This Center assumes a leading role in the Rocky Mountain region in developing research and interdisciplinary programs in urban transportation and providing a central resource for information concerning urban transportation problems in the Rocky Mountain region. The Center makes


10 / General Information
available University expertise to outside organizations.
Land and Water Information Systems Group
The Group was created to advance the education and training, research, and public service missions of CU-Denver in the areas of urban and regional information systems, geographic-oriented databases, water resources systems, and built facilities management.
The Centers-Center for the Improvement of Public Management and Center for Public-Private Sector Cooperation
Goals are to improve public sector management and to engage the public, private, and non-profit sectors in devising solutions to community problems. The Centers offer management and leadership training for state and local public officials and private and nonprofit sector emerging leaders. They conduct research on public policy issues, analyzing policy alternatives and evaluating programs. The Centers provide strategic planning, conflict management, and facilitation services as well as other forms of technical assistance to state and local jurisdictions.
Computational Mathematics Group
The Computational Math Group at CU-Denver is a broad-based response to the rapid and dramatic changes in the various fields of computation. The group resides in the Department of Mathematics, but is intended to be a highly interdisciplinary organization with associates in other departments at CU-Denver, on other campuses of the Front Range, and within the business and research communities of greater Denver. The primary goal of the Group is to further its international recognition as a site at which computational mathematics thrives and is advanced.
This is accomplished through the coordinated development of educational opportunities, active research, and direct access to advanced computers.
National Leadership Institute on Aging
The National Leadership Institute on Aging is devoted to promoting the leadership skills of men and women who design and deliver human services in our aging society.
Created in 1988, the Institute provides opportunities for executives from the public, private, and non-profit sectors to address the complex policy and program issues prompted by America’s changing demographics. It challenges them to think innovatively, act with greater strategic skill, and forge new coalitions and partnerships to meet the needs of aging America.
The Institute’s activities include residential leadership development programs, mini-institutes and consulting activities.
Institute for International Business
The Institute for International Business was created in 1988 to serve as a center for the advanced study and teaching of international business. The Institute serves as an umbrella organization for international programs of the College of Business and as a bridge to business professionals and academic researchers from around the world who are interested in global business issues. Through courses, seminars, workshops and conferences, the Institute and the College of Business offer undergraduates, graduate students and business executives the opportunity to acquire the skills and expertise needed to be successful in our increasingly global economy. The Institute also conducts and promotes research on the global economic aspects of competitiveness.
National Veterans Training Institute
The Institute provides a series of training courses to further develop and enhance the professional skills of the Job Service’s national network of veterans employment and training representatives who deliver services to America’s veterans. The NVTI’s Resource Center provides materials and information to trainees and other service providers on topics supporting their professional efforts. The Institute is operated as a joint effort of the University of Colorado at Denver and the U.S. Department of Labor’s Veterans Employment and Training Service.
4th World Center for the Study of Indigenous Law and Politics
This Center provides a research clearinghouse to students and faculty at CU-Denver on legal and political issues that affect indigenous peoples (the 4th World). In addition to supporting a modest library of rare books and periodicals on indigenous issues, the Center also stocks video and audio cassettes on subjects of indigenous politics, and a substantial newsfile archive on current developments in the 4th World. Currently, the Center is expanding the number of course offerings in the area of 4th World studies.
Region VIII Resource Access Project
Under a contract funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Resource Access Project provides training and technical assistance to HeadStart centers throughout a six-state region.
Center for Research in Rhetoric
The Center conducts original and applied research in rhetoric, broadly conceived, and engages in projects that involve faculty and students who carry out research studies that contribute to our understanding of rhetoric and discourse in the broad realm of human affairs. Reports presenting the results of research projects are published by the Center and are available in the English department office.
ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
All questions and correspondence regarding admission to CU-Denver and requests for application forms should be directed to:
Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 P. 0. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 (303) 556-3287
General Policies
CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program successfully. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being:
1. Level of previous academic performance.
2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests.
3. Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success. CU-Denver may deny admission to new
applicants or readmission to former students whose credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University in order to carry out its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
Applicants who request degree programs that are not available at CU-Denver will be considered for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with an undetermined major. Students admitted with an undetermined major are expected to declare a major by the time they have completed 60 hours toward graduation.


Admissions /11
Admission of Undergraduate Degree Students
The University may change documents/ credentials deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands. Applicants should apply as early as possible. Updated information is available from the Office of Admissions Processing (303) 556-2704.
For an applicant to be considered for a specific term, ALL documents required for admission must be received in the Office of Admissions Processing by the DEADLINE for that term. Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to be considered for a later term. Transfer students are reminded that they should allow sufficient time to have transcripts sent from institutions they have previously attended. Foreign students are advised that it usually takes 60 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions Processing from international locations.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN
New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, or Liberal Arts and Sciences.
General Requirements. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test.
Specific College Requirements:
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION
English (one year of speech/debate and
two years of composition are strongly
recommended).......................4
Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one year
of geometry) ......................4
Natural sciences (includes two years
of laboratory science) ............3
Social sciences (including history).2
'See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalog for more specific information.
Foreign language (both units in
a single language) .................2
Academic electives .................... 1
(Additional courses in English, foreign language, mathematics, natural or social sciences, not to include business courses.)
Total............................. 16
SCIENCE1
English (literature, composition,
grammar)...........................4
Mathematics distributed as follows:
Algebra ...........................2
Geometry.......................... 1
Additional mathematics
(trigonometry recommended) 1
Natural sciences including one year of physics and one year of chemistry .3
Social Science........................2
Foreign language (both units in a single
language)..........................2
Academic electives................... 1
Total............................ 16
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
English (literature, composition,
grammar)...........................4
Mathematics (excluding business
and consumer mathematics)..........3
Natural sciences......................3
Social science........................2
Foreign language
(both units in a single language).2
Academic elective.................... 1
Total............................ 15
All music majors in the School of the Arts are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area.
Two years of prior piano training are recommended.
An audition is required of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the School of the Arts, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications.
RECEIPT OF DOCUMENTS DEADLINES
Undergraduate Fall Spring Summer
Students
New Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Transfer Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Former University of Colorado Students July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Intra-university Transfer Students 60 days prior to the beginning of the term
International Students
Undergraduate: July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
Graduate: May 26 Oct. 27 March 10
MINIMUM ACADEMIC PREPARATION STANDARDS
(MAPS)
Freshmen entering the University of Colorado who have graduated from high school in 1988 or later are required to meet the following Minimum Academic Preparation Standards: 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics), 3 years of natural science, 3 years of social science including one year of U.S. or world history, 2 years of a single foreign language and 1 year of the arts.
The MAPS focus on subject areas the student has studied in preparation for college. Freshman admission standards define the level of success and achievement necessary to be admitted to the University of Colorado and include factors that predict academic success such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school course work, and the grade-point average. Both the subjects the student has studied and how the student has achieved will be factors that determine admission to the University.
Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade-point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University.
Two levels of deficiency will be recognized.
1. One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student meets other admission standards and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation from the University. Courses taken to make up a deficiency will count toward graduation, provided the CU-Denver college accepts those course credits toward graduation.
2. In some cases a student having more than one unit of deficiency may be admitted, provided that the student meets other standards of the University. The student must make up additional deficiencies before graduation by taking an expanded program of studies. The student may satisfy the MAPS requirements by successful completion of 1) courses taken at CU, 2) courses taken at other institutions of higher education,
3) additional high school credits, 4) credit-by-examination programs, or 5) other requirements as approved by each CU-Denver college.


12 / General Information
Preferred consideration for admission is given to applicants who rank in the top 30% of their high school graduating class and present a composite score of 26 or higher on the American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 1070 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Business applicants will receive preferred consideration if they graduated in the top 25 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1070 on the SAT. Engineering applicants will receive preferred consideration if they graduated in the top 20 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT and a 28 on the mathematics or a 1100 total on the SAT with a 600 on the mathematics. Applicants who do not meet the admissions requirements for direct admission to Engineering are encouraged to apply as a pre-engineering major in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Music major applicants also must successfully pass a music audition.
Applicants who do not satisfy the requirements for preferred consideration are reviewed on an individual basis.
How to Apply
1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor or from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions Processing.
2. The application must be completed in full and sent to the Office of Admissions Processing with a $30 (subject to change) non-refundable fee. For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term, the $30 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions Processing is informed of the intent to enroll for a later term.
3. Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions Processing. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly
to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions Processing. Hand 4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to have a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate sent from the certifying agency to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions Processing.
5. Students also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and
request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4-4875). High school students may obtain ACT and SAT test dates and locations from their counselors. Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver as the recipient of the scores must request the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. A Request for Additional Score Report may be obtained from any of the offices listed below.
Registration Department American College Testing Program (ACT)
P.O. Box 414 Iowa City, Iowa 52240
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 592
Princeton, New Jersey 0854
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 1025 Berkeley, California 94704
6. International students must submit proof of proficiency in the English language (see Requirements for International Students).
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
Admission Requirements for Transfer Students
Transfer students may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, and Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students interested in the field of education should contact the School of Education office for information (556-2717).
Established under the auspices of the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and the Colorado Community College and Occupational Education System, transfer agreements have been made with Arapahoe Community College, Front Range Community College, Community College of Aurora, Community College of Denver, and Red Rocks Community College enabling students of these institutions to be directly admitted to CU-Denver. Students should contact the Office of Admissions Processing for complete details.
Minimum transfer admission standards have been developed for all public four-year institutions in Colorado. However, transfer applicants who meet these standards are not guaranteed admission. They
also must meet the admissions standards of the University of Colorado and its individual colleges. To meet the minimum standards at the University of Colorado at Denver, students must meet one of the following conditions:
1. Have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade-point average:
a. 2.0 GPA if transferring from Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, University of Colorado at Boulder, or University of Colorado at Colorado Springs.
b. 2.5 GPA if transferring from any other postsecondary institution.
2. Be enrolled in a CCHE-approved guaranteed transfer agreement and meet the minimum academic qualifications of the agreement.
3. Have earned fewer than 30 collegiate semester hours and meet the firsttime FRESHMAN standards for the institution.
Transfer students are given priority consideration for admission as follows:
1. College of Business and Administration. To be considered for new transfer admission, students must have completed at least 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Applicants with an overall GPA of 3.0 in applicable course work will be automatically admitted. Students with less than a 3.0 overall GPA, but with a 3.25 in
the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work attempted, will be automatically admitted.
Applicants with at least a 2.6 in applicable course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with less than a 2.6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration.
No applicant will be accepted who is not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
2. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants to the College of Engineering should have at least a 2.75 cumulative grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted, should have completed two semesters each of calculus and physics, and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
3. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average (on a 4.0 scale) for all work attempted and must be eligible to


Admissions /13
return to all institutions previously attended. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music major applicants also must pass an audition. Contact the School of the Arts for audition information (556-2727).
Important Note: Applicants who do not meet the above grade-point average or credit hour requirements will be considered for admission, but on an individual basis.
The primary factors used when considering students individually are (1) probability of success in the academic program to which admission is desired; (2) the quality of prior academic work; (3) age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and (4) time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges.
3W TO APPLY
The student should obtain a transfer application from the CU-Denver Office af Admissions Processing.
The application form must be completed and returned with the required 530 (subject to change) nonrefundable ipplication fee.
The student is required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office )f Admissions Processing from each col-egiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing nstitution directly to the CU-Denver Iff ice of Admissions Processing. Hand-arried copies are not official. If a stu-lent is currently enrolled at another nstitution, an incomplete transcript isting all courses except those taken in he final term should be sent. Another ranscript must be submitted after com-iletion of the final term. (Transcripts rom foreign institutions must be iresented in the original language nd accompanied by a certified literal English translation.) tudents who have attended a two-ear school or community college, nd were enrolled in the Guaranteed ransfer Program to transfer to CU-•enver, should submit a copy of the iuaranteed Transfer “contract” with teir application.
iberal arts and music major applicants i fewer than 12 semester hours (18 rter hours) of college work completed > must submit a high school transcript ACT or SAT test scores, ngineering applicants with fewer than emester hours also must submit high ool transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Applicants to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should be aware that the College requires elementary proficiency in a foreign language for graduation. Applicants to the College have fulfilled this requirement if they have completed three years of any classical or modern foreign language in high school and present a high school transcript to the College Advising Office for verification. For further information, students should contact the College Advising Office, 556-2555.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. Students who do not declare all previously attended institutions are subject to disciplinary action and/or dismissal.
TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT
After all official transcripts have been received and the applicant has been admitted as a degree student, the Office of Admissions Processing and the appropriate academic unit will determine which courses taken at other institutions are applicable to a degree program at CU-Denver. In general transfer credit will be accepted insofar as it meets the degree and grade requirements at CU-Denver.
College-level credit may be transferred to the University if it was earned at a college or university of recognized standing, by CLEP or advanced placement examinations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education; if a grade of C- or higher was attained; and if the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution. Courses taken pass/fail are transferred when a grade of C- or higher is required to pass.
The University may accept a maximum of 72 semester credits (108 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution toward the baccalaureate degree requirements and may accept up to 112 semester credits (153 quarter hours) from a four-year college or university. No credit is allowed for vocational/technical, remedial, or religious/ doctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met.
The College of Business and Administration generally limits its transfer credit for business courses taken at the lower division level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado. A maximum of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. All correspondence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability, and business courses may not be taken through correspondence.
The College of Engineering and Applied . Science, in general, requires that engineering course transfer credit must come from an ABET accredited engineering program to be acceptable for degree purposes. Engineering technology courses are not considered equivalent to engineering courses.
Readmission Requirements for Former and Returning Students
CU-Denver students who have not registered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year or longer, and who have not attended another institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmission. Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions Processing.
Students who have attended another college or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as transfer students and meet the transfer student deadlines for receipt of documents. This requires payment of the $30 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee and submission of official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended. Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to CU-Denver, Admissions Processing, Campus Box 167, P. 0. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364.
Students who have not attended the University for up to one year but have attended another college or university in the interim are required to pay a $30 (subject to change) transfer application fee. Transcripts must be requested by the student and sent by the registrar of the other institution^) to CU-Denver, Admissions Processing, Campus Box 167, P. O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364.
Students who last attended another CU campus (including the Division of Extended Studies) must formally apply for readmission. Application forms are available from the Office of Admissions Processing.


14 / General Information
Admission Requirements for International Students
The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to undergraduate and graduate programs.
Undergraduate: Admission requirements for CU-Denver’s schools and colleges vary, and international students seeking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Prospective students should request an International Student Application packet from the Office of Admissions Processing. Information about requirements for each CU-Denver college and school can be found in this catalog.
Deadlines for receipt of documents have been established to allow for the timely mailings of I-20’s. Contact the Office of Admissions Processing for these dates.
Graduate: International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an undergraduate bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Applications are available from The Admissions Processing Office six months prior to the term for which the student is applying.
Note: Except for summer terms, international students must be in a degreeseeking status. They may attend summer terms as non-degree students. This exception is strictly limited to summer terms.
CU-Denver Intra-University Transfer or Change of Campus (Including Extended Studies)
CU-Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver Intra-university Transfer Forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Classes. Decisions on intra-university transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer.
CU-Denver students may change University of Colorado campuses by applying directly to the Admissions Processing Office of the campus to which they wish to transfer. Change of Campus applications and deadline information also must be obtained from the campus to which the student is applying.
Extended Studies students wishing to enroll in regular CU-Denver courses or degree programs should contact the Office of Admissions Processing.
High School Concurrent Enrollment
High school juniors and seniors with demonstrated academic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for one term only. This approval may be renewed. Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions Processing (303-556-2704).
Admission of Graduate Degree Students
All correspondence and questions regarding admission to the graduate program at CU-Denver should be directed to the following:
Programs in Business Graduate Business Programs Graduate School of Business Administration 595-4007
Programs in Architecture and Planning School of Architecture and Planning 556-3382
Programs in Public Affairs Graduate School of Public Affairs 820-5600
All Other Programs The Graduate School 556-2663
GRADUATE PROGRAMS
Graduate degree programs are offered through The Graduate School by its member schools and colleges (School of Education, College of Engineering and Applied Science, and College of Liberal Arts and Sciences), and by the Graduate School of Business Administration, the School of Architecture and Planning, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs.
GRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION DEADLINES
Admission requirements and application deadlines vary according to the individual graduate program. The Graduate School has general admission requirements which are supplemented by specific requirements of the major departments of graduate study (e.g., electrical engineering, education, English, etc.). Applicants should consult the general information section of The Graduate School portion of this catalog, as well as the college or school sections, for requirements and deadlines for specific programs.
Admission of Non-Degree Students
Persons who have reached the age of twenty and who want to take University courses but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree at this time may be admitted as non-degree students provided that they are academically eligible and admissible. Correspondence and questions regarding admission as a nondegree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions Processing. Those seeking admission as non-degree students for the purpose of teacher certification should contact the School of Education, 556-2717. Each school/college limits the number of semester hours that are transferable to a degree program. Students considering changing from non-degree to degree status should contact the school/ college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the number of hours that may be taken as a non-degree student.
Courses taken as a non-degree student are for credit and can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional improvement.
Note: International students are not admitted as non-degree students, except for summer terms. They must hold a valid visa.
Students with the baccalaureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for course work as non-degree students. There are several types of these students. Among them are teachers who seek renewal of certification; students who wish to take additional course work for professional or personal improvement; and students who feel a need to make up deficiencies before entering a specific program.
Non-degree students should be aware that generally only a limited number of


UNDERGRADUATE AND NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION INFORMATION'23
Type of Applicant Criteria for Admission Required Credentials When to Apply Notes
FRESHMAN (Student seeking bachelor’s degree who has never attended a collegiate institution) IN GENERAL: a) Ranks in top 30% of high school graduating class. b) Has 15 units of acceptable high school work. c) Test scores: ACT comp: 25 or SAT comb: 1050 Complete application $30 applicable fee Official high school transcript showing rank-in-class, date of graduation, 6th semester grades, courses in progress, Official ACT or SAT score report Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Seniors who meet or exceed all admission criteria may apply as early as Oct. 1 for following fall. For specific requirements refer to the college sections of this bulletin. For example: Music requires an audition.
Note: Business and Engineering applicants are expected to have higher test scores, class rank, and number of academic units.
TRANSFER (Student seeking a bachelor’s degree who has attended a collegiate institution other than CU) IN GENERAL: Must be in good standing and eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Applicants must have minimum 2.0 GPA on all work attempted if they have completed 30 or more semester hours. Business and Engineering applicants will be required to have a higher GPA.' Complete application $30 application fee Two official transcripts sent from each college attended Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Liberal Arts and Music transfers with fewer than 12 sem. hrs. of college work. Business transfers with fewer than 24 sem. hrs., and Engineering, transfers with fewer than 24 sem. hrs. must also submit all freshman credentials.
NON-DEGREE (Student is not seeking a degree at this institution) Must be high school graduate or have a G.E.D. Must be at least 20 years old Complete application $15 application fee Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Applications will also be accepted after these deadlines if space allows. Non-degree students who have earned a baccalaureate degree should see Graduate School section for additional information.
RETURNING CU STUDENT (Returning non-degree and or degree student who has not attended another institution since CU) Must be in good standing Completed degree Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Applications also will be accepted after these deadlines if space allows Will be admitted to their previous major unless a new major is requested. Students under academic suspension in certain schools or colleges at the University of Colorado may enroll during the summer terms to improve their grade-point averages.
FORMER CU STUDENT (Degree student who has attended another institution since attending CU) Same as for transfer Complete application $30 application fee Two official transcripts from each intervening college Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Will be admitted to previous major unless a different major is requested on application.
CHANGE OF STATUS: NON-DEGREE TO DEGREE (CU non-degree student who wishes to enter a degree program) Same as for transfer Complete application $30 application fee CU transcript Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Must meed the same criteria as transfer student.
2ND UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE (Students who have received a bachelor’s degree from CU or any other college or university.) Same as for transfer Complete application $30 application fee transcript
CHANGE OF STATUS: DEGREE TO NON-DEGREE (Former CU degree student who has graduated and wishes to take additional work) Must have completed degree Non-degree student application $15 application fee Not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Only students who have completed and received degrees are eligible to change to nondegree status.
INTERCAMPUS TRANSFER (Student who has been enrolled on one CU campus and wishes to take courses on another) Must be in good standing Completed degree Transfer to Denver, not later than: July 22 for fall Dec. 1 for spring May 3 for summer Transfer from Denver: refer to the bulletin for other campus. Transfers from Denver to another campus of CU should refer to the bulletin of the campus to which they are applying for additional requirements. Will be admitted to previous major unless a different major is requested on application.
INTRAUNIVERSITY TRANSFER (Students who wish to change from one CU college to another, e.g., from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences to the College of Business) Same as for transfer. Must be a continuing student enrolled on the campus to which you are applying. Intrauniversity transfer application CU transcript 60 days prior to the beginning of the term
'Requirements for individual schools or colleges may vary. Foreign students should see International Students in the Admissions section of this catalog. 'Applicants who have earned 12-29 semester hours must meet freshman standards or have a minimum transfer GPA of 2.5. (Applicants transferring from Colorado School of Mines, CSU, UNC, UCB, or UCCS must have a minimum transfer GPA of 2.0.)


16 / General Information
course credits taken by a non-degree student may be applied later toward a degree program at CU-Denver.
To continue registration as a nondegree student, a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 must be maintained.
HOW TO APPLY FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION
To apply for admission as a non-degree student, obtain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office of Admissions Processing. Return completed application by the deadline for the term desired. A $15 (subject to change) nonre-fundable application fee is required.
No additional credentials are required. Applicants who seek teacher certification must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials. Non-degree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space available basis.
CHANGING STATUS FROM NONDEGREE TO DEGREE STUDENT
Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined in the Non-degree to Degree procedures available from the Office of Admissions. Academic credentials (i.e., transcripts and/or test scores) and a $30 (subject to change) nonrefundable application fee also must be submitted. Nondegree students who are accepted as undergraduate degree students may generally transfer a limited number of semester hours for courses taken as a non-degree student to an undergraduate degree program with the approval of their academic dean. Non-degree students should consult with the college to which they are applying during the first semester of their enrollment for the maximum number of semester credit hours acceptable toward a degree program as a non-degree student. (Students enrolled as non-degree students prior to the Fall Semester of 1970 are subject to the policies in effect between January of 1969 and August of 1970.)
Non-degree students may apply for admission to a graduate program by completing the application required by the particular program. The graduate dean, upon recommendation by the department, may accept up to 8 semester hours of credit toward the requirements for a master’s degree for courses taken as a non-degree student at the University or at another recognized graduate school, or some combination thereof. The department may recommend acceptance of
additional credit for courses taken as a non-degree student during the semester the student has applied for admission to the desired degree program.
Official Notification of Admission
Official notification of admission to CU-Denver as an undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions Processing. Letters from various schools and colleges indicating acceptance into a particular program are pending subject to official notification of admission to the institution. Applicants who do not receive official notification of admission within a reasonable period of time (approximately 3 weeks) after submitting all application materials should contact the Office of Admissions Processing (303) 556-2704.
Tentative Admission. Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents will be permitted one term to submit the documents. If temporarily waived official documents are not received by the end of the initial term of attendance, registration for subsequent terms will be denied. If at any time additional credentials are received which affect your qualifications, the University reserves the right to change the admission decision.
TUITION AND FEES General Information
All tuition and fee charges are established by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually (usually in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly. The Regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee rates at any time. A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term, and students should contact the Records Office for further information on the tuition and fee charges for a particular term. The following rates are for the 1991-92 academic year and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating cost.
Other Fees'
1. Student Activity Fee (required for all
students):
For each term ..............$37.00
This fee supports the activities of the student government and helps provide legal services, recreational activities, student health services, the student newspaper, the Center for Student Counseling and Testing, and various student organizations. The fee is approved by student referendum and is required of all students at the University of Colorado at Denver. (The fee includes a Student Health fee.)
2. Auraria Bond Retirement Fee (required for all students):
Each term......................$35.50
3. Student Information System Fee (a non-refundable fee required of
all students each term) ....... $5.00
4. Matriculation Fee (mandatory for the first term
for all new students):.........$25.00
This is a non-refundable fee charged at the student’s first registration to cover costs of generating transcripts.
5. Information Technology Fee ... $10.00
The Information Technology Fee provides for capital acquisition of new and/or upgraded systems to support student computing laboratories to include networks and networking infrastructure and facilities directly accessible by students each term.
6. Doctoral dissertation fee (mandatory for all students certified by The Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral dissertation). Students should contact The Graduate School for guidelines established for charges for enrollment.
7. Comprehensive examination fee: Any student in The Graduate School, the Graduate School of Business Administration, or Graduate School of Public Affairs must be enrolled during the term in which the Comprehensive Examination for a master’s degree is completed. Students who are not taking regular courses during that term must enroll as “Candidate for Degree.” Students enrolled only as “Candidate for Degree” pay the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour. The charge varies • by the school in which the student is matriculated.
8. Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course):
Breakage deposit ............. $20.00
An $8 deduction is assessed for expendable items. After accounting for breakage, the unused portion is returned at the end of the semester.
'Subject to change.


Tuition and Fees / 17
9. Music laboratory fee (mandatory for music majors and others enrolled in certain music courses):
Music fee...................... $24.00
Music majors and others enrolled in piano, sound recording and reinforcement, and electronic music must pay this fee. No student is charged more than one $24 fee during a given term.
10. South African Scholarship Fund. The Regents have authorized the University of Colorado to accept voluntary student contributions of $ 1.00 per student per semester to be dedicated to scholarship and bursaries for the higher education of needy South African students at South African universities or at the University of Colorado. Students who wish to contribute to this fund should submit a contribution card to the Bursar’s Office before the end of the drop/add period each semester.
Payment of Tuition and Fees
All tuition and fees (except the application fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, according to guidelines in the current Schedule of Classes. Students who register for 7 or more credit hours may arrange at the time of registration to defer payment of part of the charges. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Schedule of Classes published before each semester or summer term. Students who fail to complete payment by the published deadlines, or who fail to file the required promissory note, will be assessed a $50 penalty.
Students who register in a non-degree status and who later change to a degree status for that term, are responsible for the difference in tuition between the non-degree program and their applicable degree program and will be billed accordingly.
Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even though they may drop out of school. Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Classes. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, to be issued transcripts, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after graduation.
Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation. Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable
to the bank will be charged an additional service charge. Students may pay tuition and fees by credit card.
Tuition Appeals
Exceptions to financial obligations incurred may be granted by the Tuition Appeals Committee. The Committee will only consider appeals when a student has been medically disabled, has experienced a death in the family, or has a change in employment hours or location beyond the student’s control. Documentation of these conditions will be required. Exceptions will not be considered for a student’s failure to comply with published deadlines, or changes in employment under the student’s control.
Please note: tuition appeals must be filed within four months of the end of the term for which the appeal is filed.
FALL AND SPRING 1991 -92 TUITION
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES and non-degree students without an undergraduate degree
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $97 $429
2 194 858
3 291 1,287
4 388 1,716
5 485 2,145
6 582 2,574
7 679 3,573
8 776 3,573
9-15 809 3,573
each credit
hour over 15 97 429
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE
STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF
BUSINESS AND THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $112 $446
2 224 892
3 336 1,338
4 448 1,784
5 560 2,230
6 672 2,676
7 784 3,719
8 896 3,719
9-15 940 3,719
each credit
hour over 15 112 446
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $142 $476
2 284 952
3 426 1,428
4 568 1,904
5 710 2,380
6 852 2,856
7 994 3,969
8 1,136 3,969
9-15 1,185 3,969
each credit hour over 15 142 476
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the School of Architecture and Planning and NON-DEGREE graduate students and non-Denver campus programs*
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $152 $507
2 304 1,014
3 456 1,521
4 608 2,028
5 760 2,535
6 912 3,042
7 1,064 4,225
8 1,216 4,225
9-15 1,264 4,225
each credit hour over 15 152 507
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the Graduate School of Business Administration
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $178 $517
2 356 1,034
3 534 1,551
4 712 2,068
5 890 2,585
6 1,068 3,102
7 1,246 4,304
8 1,424 4,304
9-15 1,486 4,304
each credit hour over 15 178 517


18 / General Information
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College of Engineering, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $168 $507
2 336 1,014
3 504 1,521
4 672 2,028
5 840 2,535
6 1,008 3,042
7 1,176 4,225
8 1,344 4,225
9-15 1,397 4,225
each credit hour over 15 168 507
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the School of Education
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $156 $507
2 312 1,014
3 468 1,521
4 624 2,028
5 780 2,535
6 936 3,042
7 1,092 4,225
8 1,248 4,225
9-15 1,397 4,225
each credit hour over 15 156 507
Graduate degree students who are registered as “candidate for degree” will be assessed the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour plus the Student Information System Fee.
*Non-degree students who have previously earned a baccalaureate degree are classified as graduate students and assessed graduate tuition regardless of the level of the class(es) they are taking.
THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE TUITION AND FEES AT ANY TIME.
Audit
To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the University or have outstanding financial obligations to the University. The Records Office does not keep any record of courses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those
courses with laboratories or where special equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor. Auditor’s cards are issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor when requesting permission to attend a class.
Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges, and are not eligible for other student services.
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
Tuition classification is governed by CRS 23-7-101, et. seq. (1973) as amended.' Institutions of higher education are bound to the provisions of this statute and are not free to make exceptions to the rules set forth.
The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a legal domiciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classification is being sought. Persons over 22 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 22 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court appointed legal guardian. An unemancipated minor’s parent must, therefore, have a legal domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes.
Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one’s true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colorado domicile on the person seeking to establish the domicile. The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connections with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado, for tuition purposes, begins the day after connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evidence one’s intent. The most common ties with the state are (1) change of driver’s license to Colorado; (2) change of automobile registration to Colorado;
(3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado; (5) and most important, payment of state income
'A copy of the Colorado Revised Statutes (1973), as amended, is available in the University of Colorado at Denver Admissions Office.
taxes as a resident by one whose income is sufficient to be taxed. Caution: payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroactive to the time filed.
In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term, the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question. If one’s 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, in-state tuition cannot be granted until the next semester.
Once the student’s tuition classification is established, it remains unchanged unless satisfactory information to the contrary is presented. A student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification from resident to nonresident or vice versa must inform the Tuition Classification Officer within 15 days after such a change occurs. An adult student or emancipated minor who moves outside of Colorado must send written notification to the Tuition Classification Officer within 15 days of the change.
Once a student is classified as nonresident for tuition purposes, the student must petition for a change in classification. Petitions must be submitted NO LATER THAN THE FIRST DAY OF CLASSES of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a non-resident. It is preferred for petitions to be received 30 days prior to the beginning of the term. Late petitions will not be considered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions Processing.
The final decision regarding tuition status rests with the University. Questions regarding residence (tuition) status should be referred only to the Tuition Classification Officer. Opinions of other persons are not official or binding upon the University. Additional information (including the entire text of CRS 23-7-101) is available in the brochure Classification of Students for Tuition Purposes which may be obtained from the Admissions Processing Office.
Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel
The Colorado Legislature approved resident tuition beginning with the Fall 1986 Semester for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. ELIGIBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM. Students obtain a completed verification form from the base education officer, and submit the form with their military ID to the Records Office after they


Financial Aid /19
have registered, but before the end of the drop/add period. At that time the student’s bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate. Students who have been certified remain classified as non-residents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Colorado.
FINANCIAL AID
Director Ellie Miller Office: NC 1030 Telephone: 556-2886
The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment considers qualified students for financial aid awards. If the student’s application materials are received before the March 31,1992, priority date, then the student is considered for a package of seed-based grant, work-study (part-time employment), and/or long-term loan unds. If applications are received after he March 31 priority date, the student is isually considered only for Pell Grant and or outside student loans (Stafford Loan-ormerly Guaranteed Student Loan or GSL, 3arents Loan for Undergraduate Students, md Supplemental Loan for Students). These funds are not allocated to CU-)enver; they are available throughout he year to students who qualify. There ire three separate deadlines for applying or Advantage Scholarship; refer to the eparate brochure for further information. Applicants for Colorado Fellowship, leans Scholars, and Regents Scholars are ubject to different deadlines and are eviewed by other CU-Denver depart-nents (The Graduate School, undergradu-te dean’s offices, and the Office of idmissions respectively). All other stu-lents are notified of their award status in writing by the Office of Financial Aid/ tudent Employment.
iligibility
Each student must qualify for CU-'enver financial aid as follows:
. Be a U.S. citizen or be admitted to the U.S. by the INS on a permanent basis (except for Colorado Fellowship).
Be classified as a degree-seeking student (except for students applying for Advantage Scholarships). Teacher certification students are eligible to apply as undergraduate students for outside student loans (Stafford Loan, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students, or Supplemental Loan for Students).
Be enrolled for a specified minimum number of credits.
4. Maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined for the financial aid programs.
5. Apply for financial aid by submitting all of the required documentation including the need analysis form (except for Colorado Fellowship, Colorado Scholars, Deans Scholars, Regents Scholars, and Emergency Short Term Loans).
6. Document financial need (except for the programs listed in #5).
7. Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes for the following programs: Colorado Student Grant, Colorado Student Incentive Grant, Colorado Graduate Grant, Colorado Work-Study,
Regents Scholarship, Deans Scholars, and Colorado Scholars.
8. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant.
9. Be registered for the draft or enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selective Service.
Application
Each applicant must complete the financial aid application materials for submission to the Office of Financial Aid. Complete information must be available to the financial aid counselors before eligibility can be determined.
Limited Funds. The majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis to eligible students who document financial need and complete their application process as soon cis possible after January 1,1992. Application completion is defined as having all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (ACT Family Financial Statement, CSS Financial Aid Form, USAF Singlefile Form or the AFSA) into the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. General financial aid is awarded to eligible students until all of the funds are committed for the year. If you complete your file after March 31,1992, your awards will probably be limited to the Pell Grant (for first undergraduate students only) and/or outside student loans (Stafford Loan, Supplemental Loans for Students, Parents Loan for Undergraduate Students). Please remember to reapply for financial aid each year.
It is the student’s responsibility to be sure application materials are complete. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for application forms for complete details regarding financial aid. All financial aid application procedures are subject to change at any time due to revisions in federal and state laws, regulations, and guidelines.
Qualification
Financial Need. Most financial aid is based on the concept of financial need. Your financial aid counselor calculates financial need as: 1) cost of attendance, minus family contribution which is
2) student/spouse contribution, and
3) parents’ contribution (for dependent students only).
The cost of attendance is the cost to attend CU-Denver, including tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses.. The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment determines standard budgets for students based upon average tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.
Independent Student. The federal government has specific guidelines that must be followed to define a self-supporting student (one who reports only his/her own income and assets when applying for aid). For 1992-93, a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old or older as of December 31,1992. If you are under 24, you are considered self-supporting if you fall into one of the following categories:
1. Single undergraduate student with no dependents who was not claimed as a dependent on your parents’ 1990 and 1991 federal income tax returns. Also, you must demonstrate that you are self-sufficient by having total income (including financial aid) of at least $4,000 annually for the two calendar years prior to your first receipt of federal financial aid.
2. Graduate or professional student who will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents’ 1992 federal income tax return.
3. Married and will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents’ 1992 federal income tax return.
4. Student with legal dependents other than a spouse.
5. Veteran of the U.S. armed forces.
6. Orphan or ward of the court.
7. Have unusual circumstances and be approved by the Financial Aid Committee. Contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for appeal guidelines.
If your student/spouse contribution plus your parents’ contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance, you will not qualify for need-based financial aid. For 1991-92, the following budgets were used for room and board, transportation, and personal expenses per month: single students living with parents $347/month; single students not liv-


20 / General Information
ing with parents $765/month. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student was approximately $860 per semester, and non-resident tuition was approximately $3470. These amounts will probably increase by about 5% for the 1992-93 school year.
The contributions from the student/ spouse and from the parents of dependent students are calculated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income, savings and other assets, family size, number of children in postsecondary school, medical expenses, and other factors. You may appeal for special consideration of your situation and in some cases the standardized contribution may be adjusted by recommendation of the Financial Aid Committee. FINANCIAL AID IS INTENDED TO SUPPLEMENT (NOT REPLACE) FINANCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS FROM YOU AND YOUR PARENTS.
Course Loads. General financial aid (work-study, grants, Perkins Loans) undergraduate recipients usually must carry at least 12 credit hours per semester and graduate students usually must carry at least five graduate credits per semester during the academic year (fall/spring). Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please check your award letter for the exact number of hours required). Pell Grant (available only to first undergraduates) and outside student loan recipients must carry at least six credits per semester for undergraduates and three graduate credits for graduates. Summer Term 1992 minimum course loads are as follows: Full-time: undergraduate-8 hours, gradu-ate-3 graduate hours; Half-time: under-graduate-4 hours, graduate-2 graduate hours. Higher or lower standards may be required for individual awards. For further information contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
Satisfactory Academic Progress. CU-Denver students must make satisfactory academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment in order to be eligible and remain eligible for financial aid. Students are referred to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid, available in the Office of Financial Aid.
Non-Degree Students. Non-degree students are not pursuing a degree in a technical sense and, therefore, are only eligible to apply for one type of financial aid at this time-Advantage Scholarship.
Continuing Education/Community College of Denver Courses. Classes offered through the CU-Denver Division of
Extended Studies or through the Community College of Denver cannot be included when minimum course loads and satisfactory academic progress are determined. The exception to this policy is MATH 112 offered by the Community College of Denver.
Residency Status. You are required to be a resident of Colorado for a full calendar year before the Office of Admissions can consider classifying you as a resident for tuition purposes. Non-resident students are encouraged to obtain additional information from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident status. As a resident student, you are potentially eligible for more financial aid programs since you can be considered for the State of Colorado aid funds.
Refunds and Repayments. Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal or reclassification of tuition status must be applied against the recipient’s financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Students may be expected to repay a portion of their award if they withdraw from CU-Denver.
Appeals. Students may appeal all decisions of the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment by completing a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office. Appeals are considered within three weeks.
Reapply Each Year. Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each year.
Award
Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 6-12 weeks after all application documents have been received in the Office of Financial Aid. If awarded, an award letter is mailed which includes information such as the type(s) and amount(s) of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours that are required for the award(s).
Types of Aid
The following are federal programs:
1. Pell Grant. Your eligibility for the Pell Grant (federally funded) is determined before any other aid is awarded. Awards are defined by a strict formula provided by the federal government and amounts vary depending on the student’s eligibility index, enrollment status, residency classification, and living status. Students are eligible for a Pell Grant if they
have not received their first bachelor’s degree by June 1,1992.
2. Outside Student Loans. Your eligibility for all other types of aid should be determined prior to applying for outside student loans. The STAFFORD LOAN (formerly Guaranteed Student Loan) program requires that you show financial need in order to qualify. Most single students who are working full time do not document sufficient financial need to qualify for the Stafford Loan. The primary purpose of this program is to make low-interest, long-term loans available to students to help them meet their postsecondary educational expenses. The SUPPLEMENTAL LOAN FOR STUDENTS is a long-term loan program for students who do not document financial need for the Stafford Loan or who need additional funds. Undergraduate dependent students may not borrow the SLS because their parents are eligible to borrow under the same terms. The program for parents is called the PARENTS LOAN FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS (PLUS).
3. Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG). A need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a bachelor’s degree.
4. Perkins Loan (formerly National Direct Student Loan). The interest rate on this long-term loan is 5% and no payments are due until six or nine months (this time differs depending on when you first receive a Perkins Loan) after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half time.
5. College Work-Study. A program that allows students to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at nonprofit agencies to help meet their educational costs.
The State of Colorado funds the following programs.
1. Colorado Student Grant. A need-based grant for resident undergraduate students.
2. Colorado Student Incentive Grant. A need-based grant for resident undergraduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor’s degree. This grant is funded 50% by the federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado.
3. Colorado Graduate Grant. A need-based grant for resident graduate students.
4. Colorado Work-Study. A program similar to the College Work-Study program, but limited to resident undergraduate students.


Registration / 21
Scholarships
Following is a list of the major scholarships that are offered at CU-Denver. The first listing is for awards funded by the State of Colorado:
1. Regents Scholarship is offered to new freshmen and transfer students by the Office of Admissions (556-2704). New students will be automatically considered for this program.
2. Colorado Scholars is for undergraduate resident students who have a minimum of 3.2 cumulative grade-point average for at least 12 CU hours. Contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for the application procedures. The deadline for applying is March 31,1992.
3. Deans Scholarships are awarded by undergraduate deans offices. Contact your dean’s office for more information.
The following programs are funded by CU-Denver:
1. Advantage Scholarship is for minority and/or first generation college students who meet the income guidelines. Contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for applications.
2. Nelson/Running Wolf Scholarship funds are provided to needy American Indian students. Contact the Office of American Indian Student Services Services (556-2860) for information.
3. Ahlin Fund assistance is available for mobility impaired students. Contact Student Counseling, Testing and Career Services (556-2815) for applications. Other scholarship information is available from the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment, the Auraria Library Scholarship InfoBank in the reference section, and the Office of Student Counseling, Testing, and Career Services.
Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment opportunities are isted in the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment, the Auraria Student Assistance Center, and the Center for nternships and Cooperative Education. •uU-time undergraduate resident students vho apply for College Work-Study and vho do not document sufficient financial leed may be considered for Colorado No-deed Work-Study. Students who partici->ate in CMEA/MESA, the Pre-Collegiate development Program, the Minority icholars Program, or who apply for advantage Scholarships are automatically onsidered for Challenge Scholarships, iraduate students should inquire about dditional types of aid through their aca-lemic department. Students should be
aware that Emergency Student Loans are available through the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment as well as Financial Aid Advances. American Indian students should inquire in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for information about Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships.
REGISTRATION
Selecting an Academic Program and Courses
Students should review the following sections of this catalog that describe the academic programs available at CU-Denver, and that provide information by school or college on the various majors available, course requirements by major, course load policies, and other pertinent information.
Courses available during a particular semester or summer term are listed in the Schedule of Classes, published three months before the beginning of each term. Schedules are available from the Records Office.
Undergraduate students who need assistance in planning an academic program or in selecting courses should contact the academic unit in which they are enrolled to arrange for an advising appointment prior to registration. Graduate students should contact their respective graduate program for assistance.
Course Abbreviations
In general, the abbreviation preceding the course number identifies the department offering the course. The first digit in the course number indicates the recommended class level of the course:
The digit after the dash in the course number denotes the credit-hour value of the course. The 1-credit lecture/recitation period is 50 minutes long. Hence a student enrolled in a 3-credit hour course will attend class for 150 minutes per week during a 16-week term. A 3-credit hour course will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class. A laboratory credit includes from two to four hours per week in the laboratory, drafting room or field. Unless the course descriptions specify laboratory work, it is understood that the classes consist of lectures and discussions.
Level of Courses Student Classification 1000 Lower division
2000 Lower division
3000 Upper division
4000 Upper division
5000 Graduate students or
qualified seniors who have instructor’s or dean’s permission 6000 Graduate degree
students
7000 Master’s and Ph.D.
graduate students
8000 Ph.D. graduate students
Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are:
Coreq.-Corequisite Hrs. -Hours Lab. -Laboratory Lect. -Lecture Rec. -Recitation Sem. -Semester Wk. - Week
Thus, the description of CHEM 1020-5 signifies that the course is offered by the chemistry department at the freshman level, and that it carries 5 semester hours of credit (3 hours of lecture credit, 1 hour of recitation credit, and 1 hour of laboratory credit). Further, the student must have completed CHEM 1010 (the prerequisite) before enrolling.
Graduate School policy permits specifically approved courses to be offered concurrently at the 4000 and 5000 levels. Students should expect work at the graduate (5000) level to involve demonstration of greater maturity and critical skills than at the (4000) undergraduate level.
Orientation
An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, prior to the first day of classes. The orientation program conducted by the Office of Student Life provides information to new students about some of the activities and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process and degree requirements also is provided. Academic orientation advising sessions are held during the term, before registration for the next term. Dates and times of new student orientations are published in the Schedule of Classes.
Registration
CU-Denver students can register from any touch-tone telephone. Students will be assigned a time to register and may register at or after their assigned time.


22 / General Information
REGISTRATION PRIORITIES
Registration is by time assignment only. Continuing students, and new students admitted by the priority deadline, will have first priority in the following order: graduate students, new freshmen, fifth year seniors, seniors, juniors, sophomores, freshmen, and non-degree students. All students admitted after the priority deadline will be allowed to register in the order they are admitted.
Non-degree students who apply late should be prepared with alternate choices or classes because students in degree programs will register first. All non-degree students should contact the academic advisors of the degree programs in which they are interested in order to ensure that their classes will fulfill the requirements of the program.
Please note: some courses are not open lor registration by non-degree students without special permission. Non-degree students should check the restrictions listed for each course in the Schedule of Classes.
POOLED COURSES AT METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER
Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with similar courses at Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD). CU-Denver undergraduate students may register for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU-Denver Schedule of Classes.
Pooled Course Restrictions
1. CU-Denver graduate students are not eligible to register for MSCD common pooled courses.
2. MSCD courses will not be included in the University of Colorado grade-point average. MSCD courses will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will count in the hours toward graduation.
3. MSCD courses cannot be used to meet specific course requirements toward the major without prior approval of the student’s dean. The last 30 semester hours applied toward the baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence at CU-Denver. MSCD common pooled courses will not satisfy this residence requirement.
INTERINSTITUTIONAL
REGISTRATION
CU-Denver degree students may enroll in courses offered by the Community College of Denver, Front Range Community
College, and Red Rocks Community College. Students must be enrolled at CU-Denver for at least one course during the semester or summer term to be eligible to register interinstitutionally. Registration is on a space available basis. Interinstitu-tional courses are evaluated for transfer credit and are not included in a CU-Denver student’s grade-point average.
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of Colorado campuses concurrently must contact their school or college on their home campus. Concurrent registration is available only during fall and spring semesters.
A degree student registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if:
1. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean.
2. The course is a required course for the student’s degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver.
3. The student obtains approval from the academic dean.
4. There is space available at the other (host) campus.
5. The student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CU-Denver rates.
6. The home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes.
7. The concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses. Students may not register for an independent study course through concurrent registration. Students may not take courses pass/fail or for “no-credit” through concurrent registration.
To drop a concurrent course during the tost campus drop/add period, arrange the drop at the home campus school or college office. To drop a concurrent course after the end of the host campus drop/add deadline, drop the course at the host campus Records Office.
Study Abroad
The Office of International Education on the Boulder campus offers study abroad programs that are available for all CU students. More than 30 programs are offered around the world. Resident credit at lower division, upper division, or graduate levels can be earned depending on the program selected and, if appropriate, can be applied to the CU-Denver degree. Students also can apply their financial aid to
CU-Boulder sponsored study abroad programs. For more information on the Denver campus, see the section on International Education on page 28.
Course Loads
Students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer term) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. Students should petition their academic dean.
Remember that a three-semester-hour course during a fall or spring semester will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class; a three-semester-hour course during a summer term will require nine to thirteen hours of work each week outside of class.
Suggested maximum course loads for the fall and spring semesters for undergraduate students who are employed:
Employed
40 or more hours per week:
3-6 semester hours
30-39 hours per week:
5-8 semester hours
20-29 hours per week:
7-11 semester hours
10-19 hours per week:
9-15 semester hours
Students should consider their other obligations-academic, professional, and personal-before registering for courses.
GRADUATE RESTRICTIONS
No more than 15 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a fall or spring semester can be applied toward a graduate degree.
No more than 10 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a given summer term can be applied to a graduate degree.
DEFINITION OF FULL-AND HALFTIME STATUS FOR FINANCIAL AID AND LOAN DEFERMENT: FALL AND SPRING
Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in the student’s financial aid award letter.
Fall and Spring: effective Fall 1987 Undergraduates and non-degree students:
Full-time.... 12 or more semester hours
Flalf-time 6 or more semester hours


Academic Policies and Regulations / 23
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
5 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number-5000+)
8 or more hours of mixed level classes
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports, or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number-5000)
4 or more hours of mixed level classes
Summer (10 week term)
Undergraduates and non-degree students:
Full-time.....8 or more semester hours
Half-time.....4 or more semester hours
Full-time:
3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number-5000+)
5 or more hours of mixed level classes
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports, preparation)
Half-time:
2 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number-5000+)
3 or more hours of mixed level classes
Enrollment status for a term cannot be certified until the end of the drop/ add period.
These hours do not include interinstitu-tional hours from CCD or hours at MSC, nor do they include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration.
Students receiving veteran’s benefits must contact the Veterans Affairs coordinator for definition of full-time status for summer terms.
CCD courses are not considered for full-or half-time status. Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are considered for financial aid purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid.
SHORT TERM COURSES
Courses are also offered in five-week nodules in special weekend courses, and n seminars. Topics in Science modular :ourses are self-contained units designed o cover specific problems or issues in icience. Students should contact the :ollege/school office for information on ;hort-term courses offered each semester.
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
Advanced Standing and Advanced Placement Credit
Undergraduate students may obtain credit for lower-division courses in which they demonstrate proficiency by examination. By passing an examination, the student will be given credit for the course to satisfy lower division requirements and may be eligible to enroll in higher level courses than indicated by the student’s formal academic experience. Credit granted for courses by examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate. There are three types of examinations as described below.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM
The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency and are granted advanced standing in those areas. Students with scores below 4 may be considered for advanced placement by the discipline concerned. All credit must be validated by subsequent academic performance. For more information contact your high school counselor or the Office of Admissions at CU-Denver.
CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade-point average of at least 2.0, and be currently registered. Examinations are arranged through the Records Office, and a nonrefundable fee is charged.
Students should contact the office of the dean of the academic unit in which they are enrolled.
COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM
Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have demonstrated college-level proficiency.
Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examinations Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing service. For more information call the CU-Denver Testing Center at 556-2861.
Students who are interested in credit for CLEP examinations must contact the office of their school or college.
Credit for Military Service and Schooling and ROTC
MILITARY SERVICE AND SCHOOLING
To have credit for educational experiences evaluated, applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application: (1) a copy of DD Form 214 and (2) DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Education Experience During Military Service. USAF personnel may present an official transcript from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of the DD Form 295.
Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver.
Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions.
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC)
Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business and then only if the ROTC program is completed.
Grading System and Policies
The following grading system and policies for pass/fail registration, dropping


24 / General Information
and adding courses, and withdrawal from the University have been standardized for all academic units of the University.
GRADE SYMBOLS
The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol (A, B, C, D, F, IF, IW, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (AC, W and * **) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, explained under Pass/Fail Procedure.
A -superior/excellent-4 credit points per credit hour.
B-good/better than average-3points per credit hour.
C-competent/average-2 credit points per hour.
D-minimum passing-1 credit point per credit hour.
F-Failing-no credit points per credit hour.
Beginning with the Spring 1984 semester, the University approved the use of a PLUS/MINUS grading system, where a B+ corresponds to 3.3 credit points per credit hour, and a B- corresponds to 2.7 credit points per credit hour. Instructors may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS system, but are not required to do so.
IF-incomplete-becomes an Fif not completed within one year.
IW—incomplete- regarded as IT if not completed within one year.
IP-in progress-thesis at the graduate level only.
P/F-pass/fail-P grade is not included in the grade-point average; the F grade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor’s degree.
H/P/F-honors/pass/fail-intended for honors courses; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average.
Special Symbols
/VC-indicates registration on a nocredit basis.
W7-indicates withdrawal without credit.
* * *-indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed. Graduate students enrolled at the 5000 level of a 4000/5000 course will be expected to complete additional work and be evaluated according to the graduate standards specified by the course instructor.
An incomplete grade is only awarded when special circumstances prevent a student’s completing a course during the
PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS
College General 16 Hours Maximum Transfer Students
Business and Administration Only non-business electives may be taken pass/fail Only 6 semester hours may be taken pass/fail Only 6 semester hours may be taken pass/fail
Engineering and Applied Science Required courses may not be taken pass/fail. Upper division humanities and social sciences electives are acceptable, otherwise major department approval is required Includes courses taken in the honors program
Liberal Arts and Sciences May be restricted in certain majors; not included in 30 hours of C or better work required for major. No more than 6 hours P/F any semester Does not include courses taken in honors, physical education, cooperative education and certain teacher certification courses; also does not include ENGL 1000 Proficiency Test or MATH 1000 Test College requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of courses with letter grades
term. Students have one year to complete an INCOMPLETE. After one year, an IW is regarded as a DROP-PASSING; an IF is a FAILING grade. Students should not reregister for courses in which they have received INCOMPLETES.
Most schools and colleges require a contract between the instructor and student outlining the work necessary to “complete” the incomplete.
MID-TERM GRADES
Beginning with the Spring 1990 semester, instructors will be asked to assign mid-term grades for a small population of students. Students who may be in some academic difficulty may be contacted and counseled about support services available to them. Please note: academic support services are available to all students through the Office of Student Retention Services, NC 2012,556-2324.
PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE
1. Students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis must do so during the drop/add period. Changes to or from a pass/fail basis may be made only during the regular drop/add period.
2. Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/ fail basis and credited toward the bachelor’s degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass/fail in any given semester.
3. Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of pass/fail registration. All students who register for a pass/fail appear on the regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office, those registrations with a pass/fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D and above convert to grades of P. Courses taken pass/fail will be included in hours toward graduation. Pass grades are not included in a student's grade-point average. An F grade in a course taken pass/fail will be included in the grade-point average.
4. The record of pass/fail registration is maintained by the Records Office.
5. Exceptions to the pass/fail regulations are permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education, the Division of Extended Studies, and Study Abroad Programs.


Academic Policies and Regulations / 25
6. Graduate degree students can exercise theP/Foption for undergraduate courses only. A grade of P will not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement.
7. Students who register for a course on a pass/fail basis may not later decide to receive a letter grade. Each school and college limits the hours and courses for which students may register on a pass/ fail basis.
Please note: many other institutions will not accept a “P” grade for transfer credit.
NO CREDIT
Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college. File the no credit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop/add period. Students who register for a course on a no credit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade. Students may not register again for a course which has already been taken on a no credit basis.
SENIOR CITIZENS
Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) may audit classes for no charge. Contact the Division of Enrollment and Student Services at 556-8427, NC 2204.
GRADE-POINT AVERAGE
The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course, totaling the hours and the credit points, and dividing the total points by the total hours.
Grades of P,NC,***,W, IP, IW, and /Pare not included in the grade-point average.
If an /Fgrade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as failed and a grade of Pis automatically calculated in the grade-point average at the end of the one-year grace period.
If an IW grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as dropped.
If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point average. The University of Colorado grade-point average does not include courses taken at other institutions.
The grade-point average of graduate students includes only courses, credit hours, and credit points accumulated ivhile enrolled in a Graduate School Program.
The grade-point average does not appear on official transcripts issued from
the Records Office but does appear on the Grade Report issued each semester.
Students should consult with the dean of their college or school for explanation of any exceptions made to the University uniform grade-point average.
Undergraduates and non-degree students must maintain a 2.0 grade-point average to remain in good standing. Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain in good standing. Students whose GPA falls below the 2.0/3.0 level are subject to probation or suspension. Such students will be notified by their school or college.
GRADE REPORTS
Grade reports are mailed to CU-Denver students approximately two weeks after the end of the term. To obtain replacement reports, students must present picture identification at the Records Office.
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed: Freshman 0-29 hours
Sophomore 30-59 hours
Junior 60-89 hours
Senior 90+ hours
All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado.
Graduation
Undergraduates. Students who have completed 80 or more semester hours should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or college to determine what requirements remain for graduation. Students intending to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their graduation term. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated. After students have been certified to graduate they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Graduates. Students must file an Application for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with The Graduate School on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term. Check with The Graduate School for more complete information. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated. After students have been certified to graduate, they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Commencement. Letters will be mailed in early April to students eligible to participate in the spring commencement. Information will be provided about ordering special display diplomas, being fitted for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree recorded. Students graduating at the end of the summer term or the end of the fall semester may participate in the following spring commencement.
Transcripts
Transcripts of academic record at the University of Colorado (all campuses) may be ordered in person or by mail from the University of Colorado at Denver, Transcript Office, Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364. Official transcripts will not be available until approximately four weeks after final examinations. A transcript on which a degree is to be recorded will not be available until approximately eight weeks after final examinations. Requests should include the following:
1. Student’s full name (include given or other name if applicable).
2. Student number.
3. Birthdate.
4. The last term and campus the student attended.
5. Whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordered near the end of a term.
Whether the request should be held until a degree is recorded.
6. Agency, college, or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included. Transcripts sent to students are labeled “issued to student.”
7. Student’s signature. (This is the student’s authorization to release the records to the designee.)
There is no charge for individual official transcripts. Transcripts are prepared only at the student’s request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Official transcripts require five to seven working days to be generated. Unofficial copies of transcripts sent to CU-Denver from other institutions can be requested at the Records Office. Official transcripts should be requested directly from the issuing institution. Unofficial CU transcripts are available to students in the CU-Denver Records Office with the request made 48 hours prior to pickup. Students must present picture ID.


26 / General Information
Adding and Dropping Courses1
ADDING COURSES
Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 12 (8 in the summer) days of full-term classes, provided there is space available. Instructor approval may be required after the first day/week of classes.
DROPPING COURSES
1. Students may drop courses without approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term). Tuition will not be charged for the courses which are dropped as long as the student is not withdrawing. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student’s permanent record.
2. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term), the instructor’s signature is required and the instructor must indicate whether the student is passing or failing. If the student is passing, the course will appear on the student’s permanent record with the grade of W. If the student is failing, the course will appear on the permanent record with an F.
3. Dropping all courses requires an official University withdrawal form.
Deadlines for module courses and intensive courses are published in the Schedule of Classes each term.
Withdrawal from the University
To withdraw from the University, students must obtain approval from their academic dean’s office, the Bursar’s Office, and the Records Office. The withdrawal date is recorded on the student’s permanent record page. If the withdrawal date is prior to the 13th day of the semester (9th day of the summer term), the courses will not appear on the student’s permanent record. If the withdrawal date is after the 12th day, the courses will appear with Wgrades. Students may not withdraw after the 10th week of the semester (7th week of the summer term) except under documented circumstances clearly beyond their control.
Students who are receiving veteran’s benefits or financial aid also must obtain the required signature of those respective
'For the exact dates, check the Schedule of Classes for the appropriate term.
offices. International students must obtain clearance from the Office of International Students.
A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receive grades of F for all course work enrolled for during that term.
To withdraw from the University, graduate students must apply to the dean of their Graduate Program for permission to withdraw in good standing. Students who withdraw without communicating with the dean and without filing the appropriate Withdrawal Form will be marked as having failed their courses for the term.
Deadlines for module courses and intensive courses, as well as specific requirements and tuition adjustment, appear in the Schedule of Classes published prior to the beginning of each term.
Originality of Work
In all academic areas it is imperative that either work be original or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons’ ideas or language. Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the University.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
Periodically, but not less than annually, the University of Colorado informs students of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, with which the institution intends to comply fully. The Act was designed to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.
Local policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the Act. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on each of the several campuses of the University of Colorado.
The following items of student information have been designated by the University of Colorado as public or directory
information: student name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study, awards, honors, degree(s) conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical factors (height, weight) of athletes, date and place of birth. This information may be disclosed by the University for any purpose at its discretion.
Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of information under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. To withhold disclosure, written notification must be received in the Records Office on the appropriate campus prior to the end of the drop/add period in the term. Forms requesting the withholding of directory information are available in the Records Office.
The request to withhold disclosure will remain in effect until the student provides written notification to the Records Office. The University of Colorado assumes that when a student fails to request to have directory information withheld, the student is indicating approval for disclosure of information for that term and following terms until otherwise requested.
Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Records Office, 556-2389.
University of Colorado at Denver Confidentiality of Academic Records
STUDENTS:
DO have the right to view and inspect their educational records (excluding any financial records of their parents).
DO have the right to have Directory Information withheld from all persons or organizations outside the University.
Directory Information includes:
address, telephone number date and place of birth dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study awards, honors, degree(s) conferred past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities
physical characteristics (height, weight) of athletes
DO NOT have the right to obtain their grades, or other information not considered Directory Information, by telephone.


Special Programs and Facilities / 27
PARENTS:
DO have the right to obtain the educational records of their child only if they provide a signed statement that their son or daughter is a dependent as defined by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. The Records Office, in NC 1003,556-2389, has forms available to parents for such requests. Parents are, however, encouraged to obtain final grades with a written approval from the student.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO PERSONNEL:
DO have the right to use educational records of students in the normal exercise of their duties.
DO NOT have the right to use educational records of students for employment purposes, for social organizations, for personal reasons, or for other non-educational interests, without written consent of the student.
PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO:
DO have the right to obtain the Directory Information listed above, unless the student has made a request for nondisclosure. When the term microfiche, or the computer terminal on-line file of the Student Information System indicates PRIVATE, inquirers will be told that no information can be released without the student’s written consent.
PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING FINANCIAL AID TO STUDENTS:
DO have the right to educational records of students only as necessary in determining and enforcing terms of financial aid.
PERSONS IN AN EMERGENCY:
DO have the right to obtain confidential academic records necessary to protect the health or safety of students and others, but such information will only be released by the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services, 556-8427.
These regulations are required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (the Buckley Amendment). For further information, please call the Records Office at (303) 556-2389.
Student records will be released only to the student with current, appropriate identification or upon written authorization of the student whose records are being requested.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES
Alumni Association
The CU-Denver Alumni Association provides programs and services which stimulate interest in, increases support for, and builds life-long commitment to the University of Colorado at Denver among its alumni, students, and the community. Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon graduation. Friends and non-degree former students are also welcome to participate. The governing board is comprised of alumni representing all schools and colleges on campus.
Horizons, a newspaper published three times a year, is mailed to members of the association. Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/or activities which might interest them. The Alumni Mack Easton Award, the Alumni Recognition Award, and the Alumni Legislative Award are bestowed each year at commencement and are sponsored by the Association.
A program of alumni use of the campus recreation center and parking lots is also available through the Association.
Auraria Book Center
Student Union: ground level, 556-3230
Hours: M-Th 8-6, F8-5, Sat. 10-3 except vacation and interim periods.
The Auraria Book Center carries academic, technical, reference, and exam preparation books in support of your higher education. Best sellers, new releases, and gift book selections change frequently and are often accompanied by displays of special value books in many subjects. For additional savings on general reading books, join the Auraria Book Club at the Book Information desk. Special orders and out of print searches are available at no charge.
Students: Bring your course printouts to locate textbooks! Subjects are arranged alphabetically; departmental abbreviations, course and section numbers are printed on a shelf tag below each required or optional textbook. When available, used textbooks sell for 75 percent of the new book price. A full refund is given for new and used books accompanied by your receipt and returned within the first three weeks of class for regular semesters and during the first week of class for short terms. Please read the refund policy attached to your receipt!
Macintosh, IBM, Zenith, and NeXT personal computer systems and a variety of
software are offered to Auraria campus students at educational discount prices.
A current, validated Auraria ID must be presented at the time of purchase. Rounding out the educational supply/campus life areas are insignia sportswear, gifts and cards, and supplies for school, office, art and design.
The Convenience Store is located near the main store in the Student Union lower mall and has extended hours for those wishing to buy snacks, magazines, sundries and school supplies. Used texts are bought back from students throughout the year, and merchandise refunds and exchanges also are performed here.
Auraria Reprographics offers full-service copying in the Convenience Store, M-Th 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. and F 7:30 a.m. -5 p.m. Special papers, color copying, transparencies, reductions and enlargements, lamination and other options may be specified for jobs of all sizes. Worldwide FAX service and shipping of packages by UPS and Federal Express also are available.
A current picture ID is required for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard, VISA, and American Express charges.
Computing Services
Computing, Information and Network Services supports computer and network use for both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. All centralized administrative systems are developed, maintained, and processed by University Management Systems in Boulder with output processing and user support provided by Computing, Information and Network Services in Denver. Denver campus administrative applications are developed, maintained, and processed by Computing Services. Most academic processing is either done on campus or through one of several networks available through Computing Services.
The Denver campus maintains a VAX 8800 under VMS, and a 10-processor Sequent Symmetry under UNIX. A communications network allows access to all campus minicomputers and connection to CARL (Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries) on-line library services. The VMS and UNIX computers are connected to an Ethernet backbone and are nodes on the growing Colorado SuperNet which provides access to other Colorado universities and colleges, as well as the Westnet regional network, Bitnet and the Internet for national and international communications. There are over 1,400


28 / General Information
personal computers located on the campus in ten teaching laboratories, three public labs, individual laboratories, and in offices.
Computing, Information and Network Services staff provide assistance to academic and administrative users on all available computing systems. Advisors and a full-time academic user services staff assist students and faculty with questions regarding software packages, programming, the use of computer systems, and software availability. Administrative users are assisted with planning, systems design, programming, and day-to-day computing activities by Computing, Information and Network Services user services and operations personnel. The Computing, Information and Network Services staff operates and maintains campus minicomputers, telecommunications equipment, and public laboratories. This staff also maintains personal computers and is available to assist faculty and staff with hardware and software planning, acquisitions, questions, and problems.
The goal of Computing, Information and Network Services is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work. For further information and an informative booklet about computing at CU-Denver, please call 556-2583.
Division of Extended Studies
The Division of Extended Studies offers a wide variety of programs for individuals interested in continuing their personal and professional education. These programs include courses for academic credit, noncredit, and certificate courses for professional development and personal enrichment.
Extended Studies credit courses supplement the University’s general course offerings and include weekend and evening options. Credit received for these courses appears on a CU-Denver transcript and can be applied toward degree programs. Tuition is charged separately from that for courses in the regular program. Noncredit courses explore a wide array of topics including: personal and professional development, test preparation, foreign languages, computers, fine arts, writing and literature, and recreation.
Extended Studies offers University resources to employees in business, industry, governmental agencies, and professional organizations. A blend of education and training is provided in a variety of program areas, both credit and noncredit, through customized training,
targeted short courses, seminars and workshops.
Individuals interested in obtaining a copy of the Division of Extended Studies Bulletin or other information are invited to call Extended Studies at 556-2735.
University of Colorado Foundation, Inc.
The University of Colorado Foundation, Inc. was established in 1967 by the Board of Regents to solicit, receive and administer gifts from private sources. In 1981 the CU Foundation established a Denver campus office.
The chief goal of the University of Colorado Foundation is to promote the general welfare, development, growth and wellbeing of the University of Colorado.
The University’s academic leadership establishes priorities for private support. The Foundation then raises and manages private funds in support of CU’s missions in teaching, research, and public service. Professional fundraisers generate interest and enthusiasm for the University, recruit and organize volunteers, solicit gifts, and assist donors in gift planning.
International Education
The University of Colorado at Denver through its Office of International Education (OIE) provides a variety of international-focused programs, educational opportunities and services for students, foreign scholars, faculty, staff, and the greater Denver community. The Office oversees student study abroad programs, provides foreign student advising and assists foreign students with cultural/ lifestyle concerns, expedites the exchange of students and faculty, hosts foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, sponsors public lectures, and advises graduate students and faculty concerning Fulbright scholarships.
The goals of OIE are to raise international awareness on the CU-Denver campus and, in particular, to provide an opportunity for students to gain the global competency needed in today’s interdependent world.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Each of the schools and colleges at CU-Denver provides international opportunities for students. (Please see individual school and college descriptions in this catalog.) The International Affairs Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is an interdisciplinary program open to all undergraduates. Students may
pursue an Individually Structured Major, Minor or Certificate in International Affairs where they are given the maximum opportunity to design their own personalized course of study in cooperation with an international affairs faculty advisor. See International Affairs under College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in this catalog for further details or contact an advisor in the Office of International Education (OIE).
The College of Business and Administration and the Graduate School of Business Administration offer a number of courses in various aspects of international business. These courses can be taken on a selective basis. Alternatively, a set of courses can be taken to achieve an Area of Emphasis in International Business, either in connection with a bachelor’s degree or in connection with an M.B.A. Available courses and requirements for Areas of Emphasis are described in this catalog under the College of Business/Graduate School of Business. For more information, students interested in international business studies should contact an advisor in the College of Business or the Graduate School of Business.
STUDY ABROAD
OIE provides an information clearinghouse and advising center for students wishing to make foreign study a part of their college experience. OIE works with the schools and colleges of CU-Denver in creating and facilitating new study abroad opportunities for students. CU-Denver students are also eligible for a number of study abroad programs offered through the University of Colorado at Boulder.
Some of the study abroad programs are of the traditional junior year abroad variety in which students are placed directly in foreign universities for an academic year. For students unable to spend an academic year abroad, programs for a single semester or summer are available with various emphases. Special summer programs, e.g., architecture study in Italy or Russian language study in Moscow, are organized with specific departments.
Students are enrolled at the University of Colorado while participating in many of these study abroad programs. The applicability of credit in particular departments and colleges of CU-Denver is up to the individual colleges and departments. A “B” average with the equivalent of two years of college level work in the appropriate language is required for many of the academic year programs. Financial aid can be applied to program costs in most cases.


University Policies / 29
FOREIGN STUDENT INFORMATION SERVICES
OIE realizes that the first few months in a new country and a new city are particularly difficult for foreign students. We provide a friendly ear and a place to ask immigration and visa questions as well as questions about lifestyle, U.S. customs, classroom expectations, and other such concerns. OIE also provides a center for networking with other CU-Denver foreign students.
FACULTY FOREIGN EXCHANGE PROGRAMS
OIE develops programs designed to increase faculty foreign research opportunities. Current efforts include agreements with Moscow University, Charles University in Prague in the Czech and Slovak Republic; Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany; Monash University in Melbourne, Australia; and Yunnan University in Kunming, China.
GRADUATE STUDENT AND FACULTY FULBRIGHT INFORMATION
OIE serves as the clearinghouse for information on the Fulbright graduate student fellowships and faculty visiting lectureships at foreign universities.
CONFERENCES AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH SERVICES
During the year, OIE sponsors a number of guest lectures, small conferences and special seminars focused on topics of current international interest. Most of these activities are open to the public as well as the CU-Denver community. OIE works closely with West High School, the Denver Public School System magnet school for International Studies. OIE is also an active participant in a number of Denver community international programs and events.
More information about these and other programs is available from the Office of International Education, (303) 556-3489.
Auraria Student Services
The Auraria Student Services Division offers the following:
1. Auraria Student Union-556-3185 The Student Union, located at 9th and Lawrence, houses a cafeteria, information desk, Book Center, study lounges, gameroom, ticket service, housing referral service, offices for student government and organizations, convenience store, copy center, exhibit space, locker rentals, lost and found,
meeting and conference facilities, and the Mission Bar and Grill.
2. Conference Services-Student Union, Room 210,556-2755
Through the Conference Services office, campus space can be reserved for all non-academic purposes.
3. Disability Services Office-177 Arts Building, 556-8387
This office provides the following academic support services to students who have physical, learning, or psychi-atric/emotional disabilities:
Taped textbooks
Sign language and oral interpreters
Notetakers
Scribing
Testing accommodation Sale of handicap parking permits Disability-related counseling Advocacy
4. Career Resources Center-Yll Arts Building, 556-3477
The Career Resources Center offers assistance to students and alumni in planning their careers and seeking employment through the provision of on-campus employer interviews, current job vacancy listings, Campus Career Library, and a computerized career guidance system. The student employment office maintains a listing of part-time and temporary job openings for currently enrolled students. Additional services are offered in the same office by CU-Denver career counselors.
5. Auraria Child Care Center-556-3188 The Auraria Child Care Center serves the child care needs of Auraria Campus students, staff and faculty by providing high quality early childhood education and care programs. The Child Care Center is located on the southwest corner of the campus. Its programs are consistently recognized by the educational community for their high quality early childhood care and education. Develop-mentally appropriate practices for young children guide the educational programs that are provided. Curriculum planning is flexible and based on children’s interests. Experiences are planned in accordance with “Key Experiences” adapted from the High/ Scope Cognitively Oriented Curriculum. Supervising and assistant teachers in the Child Care Centers are all degreed teachers meeting the certification guidelines of the National Academy
of Early Childhood programs.
Children aged 18 months to six years are served at the Auraria Child Care Center. The Center also has a fully accredited kindergarten program.
6. Spring International Language Center-Si, Francis Center, 556-4255
This center offers intensive English language instruction to foreign students. It is authorized by INS to issue I-20s in order for students to apply for F-l visa status. In addition, SILC provides language proficiency testing services on request for students hoping to enter CU-Denver, MSCD or CCD. SILC classes are used for observation and research by individuals being trained on campus to become English as a Second Language teachers. SILC provides extensive support services to its students including a host family program, housing information, counseling services, and social activities designed to make the foreign student feel at home in the United States.
7. Emmanuel/Library Galleries-556-8337 The Emmanuel and Library Galleries host exhibits of students, faculty and nationally known artists. Stop in for a relaxing break.
8. Information Centers
Students and visitors can find information and directions at the Information Desk in the Student Union, and at the Visitor Information Centers at Lawrence Way and at the St. Francis Center.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity/Title IX
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to enhancing the diversity of its work force and its student body. Diversity among faculty, staff, administrators, and students is essential to educational excellence and to accomplishing CU-Den-ver’s mission. Just as diversity in academic programs and scholarly perspectives enriches the University, so too does diversity among faculty, staff, administrators, and students. Diversity among faculty, staff, and administrators provides role models and mentors for students, who will become future leaders in academe and in the larger society, and ensures that a broad array of experiences and world views will inform and shape teaching, research, service, and decision making at CU-Denver.
As the only public university serving the Denver metropolitan area, CU-Denver recognizes, acknowledges, and accepts its central role in education to take explicit affirmative action to employ, retain, and advance in employment qualified applicants and employees, and to admit, retain, and advance qualified applicants and stu-


30 / General Information
dents regardless of their race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, or veteran status.
In employment and educational programs, CU-Denver does not discriminate and will not tolerate discrimination on the basis of race, gender, age, color, national origin, disability, or veteran status.
CU-Denver has adopted an affirmative action plan to implement these commitments. For information, contact the Office of Affirmative Action, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 700,556-2509.
Ombuds Office
In any large organization, misunderstandings and disagreements may occur. The Ombuds Office helps to enhance the clarity and dissemination of information, to simplify decision making and communication, to assist with the process of change and with adjustment to change, and to improve understanding among staff, students, faculty, and administrators.
The Ombuds Office provides information about programs, policies, services, and procedures affecting members of the University community; makes referrals to appropriate state, CU system, and CU-Denver resources; serves as consultant in the preparation and review of policies and procedures; and assists in the solution of problems and the resolution of disputes.
Ombuds Office services are informal, impartial, confidential, and independent of administrative authorities. These services do not replace or circumvent existing channels, but help them work more effectively. For further information or assistance, contact the Ombuds Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 850,556-4493.
University Policy Regarding A Drug-Free Workplace
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing a drug-free workplace and environment. The University prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of any controlled substance in the workplace. Those individuals who are found to be in violation are engaged in serious misconduct and subject to disciplinary action consistent with the Faculty Handbook (1988), the applicable rules of the State Personnel System, the University’s Unclassified Staff Handbook, and the Student’s Discipline and Review Procedures.
Academic Honor Code and Discipline Policies
Members of the University of Colorado at Denver feel it is an historically established rule of education that instructors have the authority to conduct classes, make assignments, require examinations or other exercises, and make judgments about the academic performance of students.
Maintaining the quality and high performance of students makes it imperative that the academic work completed at the University be original and completed honestly. It is the concern of every student and faculty member that such standards be maintained. A university’s reputation depends on the highest standards of intellectual honesty and ethical conduct.
Academic disciplinary matters are concerns to be addressed by schools or colleges, allowing each school/college to determine the severity and consequences of each infraction. Under the Laws of the Regents, Article IX 2.B and Article VI.C, all matters of educational policy affecting the school or college including academic requirements for admission, for continuance and for graduation shall be under the jurisdiction of each school or college. In addition, the college or school shall have jurisdiction over matters of academic ethics/academic dishonesty.
Each college and school is required to maintain a standing committee to decide cases of academic dishonesty as defined in this document. Students and faculty are urged to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty in order to better support and maintain high standards of academic scholarship and conduct.
FORMS OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
As members of the academic community, students and faculty accept the responsibility to conduct themselves with integrity in a manner compatible with the University’s function as an educational institution. Furthermore, all members of the academic community have a special responsibility to ensure that the University’s ethical standards are maintained. One of these standards is academic honesty. Many students underestimate how strongly most faculty and peers feel about academic honesty. Academic dishonesty is defined as a student’s using unauthorized assistance with intent to deceive an instructor or such other person who may be assigned to evaluate the student’s work, in meeting course and degree requirements. Examples of academic
dishonesty include, but are not limited to the following:
A. Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the use of distinctive ideas or words belonging to another person without providing adequate acknowledgement of that person’s contribution. Regardless of the means of appropriation, incorporating another’s work into one’s own requires adequate identification and acknowledgement. Plagiarism is doubly unethical because it deprives the true author of the rightful credit and gives that credit to someone who has not earned it.
It is the theft of intellectual property. However, acknowledgement is not necessary when the material used is common knowledge. When the source is not noted, the following would constitute plagiarism:
1. Word-for-word copying.
2. The mosaic (to intersperse a few words of one’s own here and there while, in essence, copying another’s work).
3. The paraphrase (the rewriting of others’ work, yet still using their fundamental idea or theory).
4. Fabrication (inventing or counterfeiting sources).
5. Ghost-written material (submitting another’s effort as one’s own).
It is also plagiarism to neglect quotation marks on material that is otherwise acknowledged.
B. Cheating
Cheating involves intentionally possessing, communicating, using (or attempting to use) materials, information, notes, study aides, cheat sheets, or other devices not authorized by the instructor in any academic exercise, or the communication with any other person during such an exercise.
Examples:
1. Copying from another’s paper or receiving unauthorized assistance from another during an academic exercise or in the submission of academic material.
2. Using a calculator when the use has been specifically disallowed.
3. Collaborating with another student or students during an academic exercise without the consent of the instructor.
C. Fabrication and Falsification
This is the intentional and unauthorized alteration or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise.
Examples:
1. Fabrication involves inventing or counterfeiting information; i.e., creating


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results not obtained, as in a laboratory experiment.
2. Falsification involves altering results, deliberately changing information to suit one’s needs.
D Multiple Submission
This is the submission of substantial portions of either written or oral academic work which has previously earned credit when such submission is made without instructor authorization.
E. Misuse of Academic Materials
This is intentionally or knowingly destroying, stealing, or making inaccessible, library or other academic resource material.
Examples:
1. Stealing or destroying library or reference materials or computer programs or files.
2. Stealing or destroying another student’s notes or materials, or having in possession such materials without the owner’s permission.
3. Receiving assistance in locating or using sources of information in an assignment where such assistance has been forbidden by the instructor.
4. Illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations or answer keys to tests and examinations.
5. Unauthorized alteration, forgery, or falsification of official academic records.
6. Unauthorized selling or purchasing of examinations, papers, or assignments.
F. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty
This is intentionally or knowingly contributing to the academic dishonesty of another.
These examples of academic dishonesty shall not be construed to be comprehensive and infractions will be dealt with on an individual basis. It is the obligation of each student to assist in the enforcement of academic standards; infractions-whether by students or faculty-should be first brought to the attention of the instructor.
PROCEDURES IN CASES OF SUSPECTED ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
Students concerned about academic dishonesty should contact their school or college for more specific information.
Faculty and staff members or students may submit charges of academic dishonesty against students. A student who has evidence that another student is guilty of academic dishonesty should inform the
instructor or the Dean of the appropriate college in writing of the charge. A faculty member who has evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty should confront the student with the evidence. In cases of academic dishonesty, the faculty member has the authority to reprimand the student appropriately, which could include the issuance of a failing grade (F). In such case of issuance of failing grade for academic dishonesty, the faculty member shall submit a written report to the Dean of the appropriate college within five (5) working days. The report shall include, but is not limited to, the time, place, nature of offense(s), the name(s) of the accused, the accuser(s), witnesses (if any). If the faculty member feels that his or her reprimand or action is an insufficient sanction for a particular case of academic dishonesty, the faculty member may recommend to the Dean of the appropriate college that further action be taken.
If this signed report recommends further action, the Dean or a committee designated shall schedule a disciplinary hearing as soon as possible. The student has the right to be represented by legal counsel and to be present during the committee’s proceedings. Student(s) must notify the Dean of the appropriate college five (5) working days in advance of the hearing that he/she intends to have legal counsel present. The Deem or the committee designated may take any of the following actions:
1. Take no further action against the accused student(s).
2. Place student(s) on disciplinary probation for a specified period of time. The record of this would be kept in the committee’s confidential files and the student’s academic file.
3. Suspension of registration for a specified period of time. A record of this shall be kept in the committee’s confidential file and a copy sent to the Registrar.
4. Expulsion: no opportunity to return to the college in which the infraction occurred. A record of this shall be kept permanently in the committee’s confidential file and a copy sent to the Registrar.
Notification to Student(s)
In all cases, the student(s) should be notified of the hearing after seven working days, in writing of the Dean’s or the designated committee’s decision.
Interinstitutional Appeal Procedures
Students who are taking courses at CU-Denver, but are enrolled at other educational institutions on the Auraria
campus and are charged with dishonesty, are subject to the same procedures outlined above.
Code of Student Conduct (Student Rights and Responsibilities and Procedures for Disciplinary Review and Action)
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR WHICH ACTION MAY BE TAKEN IF A VIOLATION OCCURS
All persons on University property are required for reasonable cause to identify themselves when requested by University or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers, the University reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to University personnel or property and those who interfere with its function as an educational institution.
All persons on CU-Denver/Auraria property who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applicable to University students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations.
The behaviors outlined below will not be tolerated because they threaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the University and the personal rights and freedoms of its members.
1. Intentional obstruction, disruption, or interference with teaching, research, disciplinary proceedings, or other University activities, including its public service and administrative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denver/Auraria premises.
2. Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, school officials, employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
3. Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CU-Denver/Auraria Higher Education Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the University, or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person.
4. Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms, which includes, but is not limited to, striking, laying hands upon, threatening with violence, or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure; or other treatment of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating


32 / General Information
nature. (This includes, but is not limited to, demeaning behavior of an ethnic, sexist, or racist nature, unwanted sexual advances or intimidations.)
5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilities, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU-Den-ver/Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimental to the University.
6. Forgery, fraud (to include computer fraud), falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification with intent to gain any unentitled advantage.
7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver/ Auraria property and the private property of students, University officials, employees, and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denver/Auraria buildings or facilities. This includes the possession of known stolen property.
8. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus. This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University, or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee. (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, firearms, explosives, BB guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles, Bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switchblades. A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm, explosive, or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly included within the meaning of the terms firearms, explosive, or dangerous weapon.)
9. Sale, distribution, use, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU Denver/Auraria campus.
10. Physical restriction, coercion, or harassment of any person; significant theft; sale/manufacture of illegal drugs (includes possession of a sufficient quantity with intent to sell); damage, theft, or unauthorized possession of University property; or forgery, falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records or instruments of identification to gain any unentitled advantage.
UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS
As a member of the University community, you are held accountable not only for upholding civil and criminal laws, but University standards as well. Enrollment does not confer either immunity or special consideration with reference to civil and criminal laws. Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to challenge or postponement on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced, or are pending in civil or criminal court.
In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a student violates a standard and withdraws from the University before administrative action is fined.
USE OF UNIVERSITY/AURARIA PROPERTY OR FACILITIES
Nothing in this Code of Conduct shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the voicing of concerns or grievances. The University is dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge through a free exchange of ideas, and this shall be a cardinal principle in the determination of whether or not a proposed use of University facilities is appropriate.
The Auraria Higher Education Center has established campus regulations and procedures governing the use of CU-Denver/Auraria grounds, buildings, and other facilities. Such regulations are designed to prevent interference with University functions and activities. Except where otherwise specifically authorized, or when members of the public are invited, the use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilities shall be limited to faculty, staff, and students of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus, and to organizations having chapters, local groups, or other recognized University connected representation among faculty, staff, or students of the three academic institutions on the Auraria campus.
CLASSROOM CONDUCT
You are expected to conduct yourself appropriately in classroom situations. If disruptive behavior occurs in a classroom, an instructor has the authority to ask you to leave the classroom. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist, the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Public Safety and/or the appropriate Dean’s office. The appropriate Dean or his/her representative may withdraw a student from a particular class for disruptive behavior, while the Student Discipline Committee may recommend to the
Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services to suspend, permanently expel, and/or permanently exclude the student from the campus. Appeal questions concerning disruptive behavior should be directed to the Academic Dean’s office when withdrawal from a class is involved, and to the Director of Student Life when suspension or expulsion from the University is involved.
NONACADEMIC DISCIPLINE POLICIES
Violations of Standards of Conduct should be reported to the Director of Student Life during working hours. Auraria Public Safety should be contacted during non-duty hours.
If a violation occurs on campus and it is not in a specific building, Auraria Public Safety and/or the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
If emergency help is needed when on campus, contact Auraria Public Safety and when off campus contact the Denver Police.
Actions available to campus officials include, but are not limited to: asking those involved in inappropriate behavior to cease and desist; requesting offenders) to leave the Auraria campus; denying or restricting use of facilities or services; calling Auraria Public Safety for assistance; billing offenders) for any physical damages; pressing civil charges; and referring student(s) to the Director of Student Life. The chart that follows illustrates the overall structure involved.
DISCIPLINE STRUCTURE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
(1) Violations observed may be resolved
by any of the following:
• University Departments such as:
a. Admissions
b. Student Union
c. University/Auraria Public Safety
d. Financial Aid
e. Veterans Affairs
• Faculty/Staff
• Students
• Non-University Members
(2) If violation warrants further attention
contact:
• Director of Student Life
a. If student(s) desires a review by the Director of Student Life. Academic dishonesty discipline falls under the jurisdiction of the individual colleges and schools.
b. If violation warrants, possible suspension or expulsion
• Student Discipline Committee


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(3) Final review (may request only in cases of suspension/expulsion).
• Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
When one of the 10 Standards of Conduct listed in this code is violated, the student may be referred to the Director of Student Life. Any person may refer a student or student group suspected of violating this code to the Director of Student Life. Persons making such referrals will be asked to provide information pertinent to the case. The Director of Student Life will make a determination as to the seriousness of the case. This will be done in most situations by asking the student(s) involved in the case to come in for an administrative interview to determine what actions, if any, will be taken by the University. Students will be notified in writing of the results of such administrative reviews.
The Director of Student Life has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no further action other than talking with the accused student(s).
3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student’s behavior has been inappropriate and any further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University.
5. Refer cases to the Student Discipline Committee where the above sanctions are determined to be inadequate or the student(s) desires an appeal.
6. Take other actions including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violators) provides compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
STUDENT DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Disciplinary proceedings shall be conducted as administrative proceedings and not as judicial proceedings. The University is not a part of the judicial branch of state government. The University has authority to promulgate and enforce internal rules of behavior that shall be administered in a fair and impartial manner in harmony with its educational objectives and administrative nature. As part of the administrative nature of the committee’s proceedings, fundamental rules of fairness will be followed. Copies of these procedures are available in the Office of the
Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services.
This committee, composed of students, faculty, and staff members, makes the decision whether students charged with violations of the student conduct code may continue to attend the University of Colorado at Denver.
The Student Discipline Committee has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no action other than talking with the accused student.
3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student’s behavior has been inappropriate and further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University.
5. Recommend suspension of a student from the University for disciplinary reasons. This suspension may be for various lengths of time ranging from one semester to an indefinite period of time; after the period of disciplinary suspension has expired a student may apply in writing to have the notation on the student’s record removed.
6. Recommend expulsion of a student permanently from the University; notation on the student’s record will be kept permanently. When a student is suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons an additional sanction may include being excluded from the Auraria campus.
7. Other sanctions including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violators) provides compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
Student(s) must be notified in writing of the disciplinary action taken within five (5) days.
REVIEW PROCEDURES
A student may request a review of the recommendation of suspension or expulsion by the Student Discipline Committee within seven (7) working days to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services. Except in cases involving the exercise of the power of summary suspension (see below), the sanctions of suspension or expulsion for disciplinary reasons shall be effective only after the administrative review by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services has been exhausted or waived. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services’ decision shall be in writing to the student(s) with a
copy to the Student Discipline Committee. Copies of review procedures may be obtained from the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services.
SUMMARY SUSPENSION
Summary suspension is a suspension from the University which begins immediately upon notice from the appropriate University official without a formal hearing by the Student Discipline Committee.
A hearing before the Student Discipline Committee is then scheduled as soon as possible (usually within seven calendar days) to determine the disposition of the case. Summary suspension may also include a physical exclusion from the campus if deemed necessary.
The Chancellor and/or a Vice Chancellor have the authority to suspend summarily any student when in their opinions such suspension is necessary to:
1. Maintain order on the campus.
2. Preserve the orderly functioning of the University.
3. Stop interference in any manner with the public or private rights of citizens on CU-Denver/Auraria owned or controlled property.
4. Stop actions that are threatening to the health or safety of any person.
5. Stop actions that are destroying or damaging property of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus, its students, faculty, staff, or guests.
PERMANENT RECORD NOTATIONS
While disciplinary proceedings are pending or contemplated, a temporary hold will be placed on the student’s academic record. It will not be released until all actions and appeal procedures have been completed or finalized by the University. Only in those cases where suspension, deferred suspension, or permanent expulsion results from disciplinary action will notations be placed on the academic record.
RELEASE OF DISCIPLINARY INFORMATION
Access to any student’s academic transcript or disciplinary file shall be governed by provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Only the student charged or those University officials who have a legitimate educational interest in disciplinary information may have access to the files. All other inquiries including, but not limited to, employers, governmental agencies, news media, friends, or Denver Police


34 / General Information
must have a written release from the student to gain access to University disciplinary files.
Every effort will be made by the University to respect the privacy of the student. However, where the identity of the student has been publicly disclosed in the news media, the University reserves the right to respond as it deems appropriate to describe fairly and accurately the disposition of disciplinary matters.
REFUND POLICY AFTER DISCIPLINARY ACTION
Submission of registration materials obligates the student to pay the assessed tuition and fees for that term. If a student is suspended or expelled from the University, the amount of tuition/fees which would be refunded would be the same as when a student voluntarily withdraws from a term. See the General Information section of this catalog or the Schedule of Classes for more information.
The official withdrawal date applicable for tuition/fee refund purposes will be the date of the Student Discipline Committee's decision. In the event that circumstances are such that the accused student has registered for a subsequent term before the final decision is made, that student does so at his/her own risk and may be liable for payment of tuition and fees for both terms. The Committee will make the decision as to when official suspension or expulsion begins. Failure to make the required payment will result in the following action: students will become ineligible for all University services; no grades will be issued for courses in progress; no transcripts, diplomas, certification, or registration materials will be issued for the student until the bill is paid in full; a late payment charged in addition to the interest on the unpaid balance will be assessed.
TRI-INSTITUTIONAL VIOLATIONS
Procedures in deciding violations of the Code of Student Conduct involving students from other academic institutions on the Auraria campus have been developed by CU-Denver and the institution^) involved. In such cases, the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
Responsibilities of Computing Services Users
Access to CU-Denver computing systems, and use of CU-Denver computing resources, is a privilege granted to members of the CU-Denver community for
scholarly, research, and administrative purposes. Those who use computing services on the CU-Denver campus are expected to do so in an effective, efficient, ethical, and legal manner.
As a condition of using computer resources on the CU-Denver campus, users are expected to respect the intellectual effort and creativity of others, to respect the privacy of other users, to respect the integrity of the computer systems and other users’ data, and to use computer resources in an efficient and productive manner.
It is the responsibility of all users to respect copyright protection of licensed computer software. Users do not have the right to copy licensed software programs or documentation without the specific permission of the copyright holder, or to use unauthorized copies of licensed software. Unauthorized use, duplication, or distribution of computer software is a violation of University policy and federal law.
CU-Denver is connected to other universities and organizations through Bitnet and the Internet. Use of these networks is a privilege granted to all CU-Denver computer users. The networks must be utilized in an ethical and legal manner.
Sexual Harassment
The University of Colorado at Denver is a collegial academic community whose mission requires an open learning and working environment for students, faculty, staff, and administrators. An open learning and working environment values and protects individual dignity and the integrity of human relationships. CU-Denver’s educational process is based upon mutual trust, freedom of inquiry, freedom of expression, and the absence of intimidation and exploitation. As a place of work and study, CU-Denver must be free of inappropriate and disrespectful conduct and communication of a sexual nature, of sexual harassment, and of all forms of sexual intimidation and exploitation. Such behavior is reprehensible because it subverts the mission of CU-Denver, poisons the environment, and threatens the careers, educational experiences, and well-being of students, faculty, staff, and administrators.
It is a violation of CU-Denver’s Sexual Harassment Policy for anyone who is authorized to recommend or take action affecting faculty, staff, students, or administrators to make any unwelcome sexual advances, to request sexual favors, or to engage in any other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) sub-
mission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or status in a course, program, or activity; or (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for employment or educational decisions affecting that individual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or educational experience, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for working or learning.
For further information, contact the Sexual Harassment Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 850,556-4493.
STUDENT SERVICES
Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services: Shelia Hood
Student Life
Students at CU-Denver reflect the diversity of its environment: many are older than those considered to be traditional college students; have employment and family responsibilities in addition to their academic programs; include substantial numbers of minorities, women, and single parents; and are most often enrolled part time.
To meet the needs of this diverse student population, CU-Denver provides student life programs and activities designed to complement students’ academic programs and to enhance their total educational experience. Students are provided opportunities to develop, experience, and participate in student government, social, cultural, intellectual, and recreational programs. Student life programs create an environment in which students are:
• Assisted in developing leadership through opportunities to practice decision making, management and marketing, interpersonal and group communication, and relationship skills.
• Encouraged and aided in developing social, cultural, intellectual, recreation and governance programs that expand involvement with the campus community and society and lead to mature appreciation of these pursuits.
• Encouraged to explore self-directed activities that provide opportunities for personal growth in individual and group settings.
• Exposed to various cultures and experiences, ideas and issues, art and musical forms, and styles of life.


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• Informed about institutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities.
• Aided in the awareness and utilization of campus facilities and other resources.
• Assisted in developing community spirit through creative interaction among staff, faculty, students, and members of the local community. Students are encouraged to involve their families in campus events and activities. Programs and services provided by the
Associated Students of CU-Denver, the Division of Enrollment and Student Services of CU-Denver, and the Auraria Student Assistance Center Division contribute to the fulfillment of this philosophy.
Clubs and Organizations
ACM Computing Club ACS Student Advisory Council American Institute of Architecture Students
American Planning Association American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Landscape Architecture
American Society of Mechanical Engineers Anthropology Club Association of Black Students Auraria Transnational Student Association
Beta Alpha Omega (Counseling/ Education)
Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Honor Society)
Chi Epsilon
Equiponderance Pre-Law Club Golden Key National Honor Society Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Master of Social Sciences Club M.E.C.H.A.
National Society of Black Engineers Native American Student Organization Phi Alpha Theta (History)
Phi Chi Theta (Business)
Philosophy Club
Pi Tau Sigma
Psi Chi (Psychology)
Russian Culture & Language Club Sigma Tau Delta (English)
Sis Journal
Society of Accounting Students Society of Women Engineers Student Association of Musicians Tau Beta Phi (Engineering)
Vietnamese Student Organization
Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD)
The Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCU-Denver) serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal University structure. ASCU-Denver assists students with information concerning student clubs and organizations, campus events, issues concerning student status and other information of interest to students in general. ASCU-Denver also provides students with assistance with grievances and with the opportunity to become more closely involved with the University community through active participation in student government itself or through service on University, tri-institu-tional, and AHEC committees. More information concerning services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Student Union, Room 340, 556-2510.
Student Legal Services
Student legal services are available to assist students with off-campus legal problems through the provision of legal advice, litigation preparation, document interpretation, and assistance in negotiation. The service will not represent students in court. This student fee funded program is provided free of charge to CU-Denver students; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred such as copying, typing, etc. Contact the office for further details at 620-4828, CU Administration Building, Suite 130.
The Advocate
The purpose of the student newspaper is to provide students with information about campus issues and events. The newspaper strives to include good investigative reporting, feature articles, and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is a tool to encourage and develop writers, journalists, artists, and other student members of its general management and production staff. The office is in the Student Union, Room 153,556-8321.
Office of Student Life
The Office of Student Life is the advising, coordinating, resource, and general information center for student clubs and organizations, student government
(ASCUD), student programs, and the academic honor societies. Student Life coordinates new student orientation programs. The office is responsible for the administration of the student fee budget and monitors all student fee expenditures to assure compliance with CU-Denver and the state of Colorado regulations and procedures. The Director of Student Life represents the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees and maintains effective lines of communication with MSC, CCD, and AHEC. The director administers the student conduct and discipline procedure as described in the Code of Student Conduct. The Office of Student Life is located in the Student Union, Room 255,556-3399.
Office of Veterans Affairs
The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veteran and dependent students attending CU-Denver utilizing Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists students with filling out VA paperwork and in solving problems associated with receiving VA-related benefits.
The OVA maintains proper certification for eligible students to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements for attendance, course load and content, and other regulations necessary to receive educational benefits payments.
In addition, the OVA provides VA Vocational Rehabilitation referrals, and information on VA tutorial assistance, and VA work/study positions for qualified veterans. For further information, contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 556-2630, CU Administration Building, Suite 130.
Student Counseling, Testing, and Career Services
Phone: Counseling: 556-2815
Testing: 556-2861
Career 556-3477
Office: Counseling: NC2013
Testing: NC 2204
Careen Arts 177
Student Counseling, Testing, and Career Services provides a variety of support programs and services to CU-Denver students. Our mission is to help students grow in self understanding, to help make their college years a satisfying and productive experience, and to facilitate meaningful preparation for future goals. Our offerings include the following:


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Counseling Services. Students may obtain short term personal counseling provided by professional staff. We also will assist students and others in locating appropriate counseling/mental health services in the community. The office also sponsors professionally facilitated counseling groups. For more information, call 556-2815. The office is located in NC 2013.
Programs and Workshops. The office sponsors a variety of FREE or low-cost programs and workshops on a variety of topics such as assertiveness training, stress management, college survival skills, drug and alcohol awareness, etc. Also offered is PREP (Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program), an intensive communications workshop for couples. These programs are open to the entire CU-Denver community.
Call 556-2815.
Career Development Services. The office provides individual career counseling, career development and employment workshops, and career testing to CU-Denver students and alumni. Career tests offered include the Strong Interest Inventory, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and The Values Scale. The office also sponsors a variety of career placement services, including on-campus interviewing, and an extensive career resource library. For more information on career services, call 556-3477. The office is located in Arts 177.
Women's Programs and Services. Offerings in this area include: advocacy, programs such as Self Defense for Women, and Dealing with Sexual Harassment; scholarship offerings; and referral/ resource information. Call 556-2815.
Re-Entry Program. The Center offers an intensive one-day program each semester which is geared to assisting the returning adult student as he or she makes the transition to university life. Call 556-2815.
Student Employment Experience Program. This program provides basic employment training for all new college work-study student employees. For more information, call 556-2815.
Testing Services. The Testing Center provides testing for all levels of postsecondary education, and professional certification. Tests offered include:
ACT American College Test
CAT California Achievement Test
GRE Graduate Record Examination
GMAT Graduate Management
Admissions Test
GSFLT Graduate School Foreign Language Test MAT Miller Analogy Test MCAT Medical College Admission Test
TOEFL Test of English as a Foreign Language
CLEP College Level Examination Program
For further information on Testing Services, call 556-2861. The office is located in NC 2204.
Office of Student Retention Services
The Office of Student Retention Services offers an array of services and programs designed to foster cultural diversity within the CU-Denver student body, help students adjust to the social and intellectual environment of the campus, and provide the academic support students need to succeed in their studies and derive maximum benefit from their college experience. Outreach and retention services are provided by professional staff in four centers. These include the Center for First-Year Students, Center for Learning Assistance, Center for Educational Opportunity and Cultural Diversity, and the Center for Pre-Collegiate Development. The Office of Student Retention Services is located in NC 2012,556-2324.
CENTER FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS
The Center for First-Year Students offers individualized support services to help freshman students adjust to college life and succeed in their college studies. Personal advisors in the Center provide orientation to the campus and its programs, assist students in interpreting academic policies and requirements, assist in the selection of classes and academic programs commensurate with students’ educational and career interests, refer students to other campus resources, and provide advocacy, if necessary. The Center is located in NC 2012,556-2546.
CENTER FOR EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY
The Center for Educational Opportunity and Cultural Diversity provides access and educational opportunities to ethnic minority students through services conducive to the student’s retention and graduation. The Center houses four distinct programs, each of which provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, and other support services tailored to the specific needs of their students. The Center is located in NC 2012,556-2324.
American Indian Student Services Program
Asian American Student Services Program
Black Student Services Program
Hispanic Student Services Program
CENTER FOR PRE-COLLEGIATE DEVELOPMENT
Programs offered by the Center serve to motivate minority high school students to pursue post-secondary education and provide them the academic skills needed to be successful in their college endeavors. The Center is located in NC 2014, 556-2322.
Pre-Collegiate Development Program. This program enables students in grades 9 through 12 to engage in a wide range of university activities throughout the academic year and during a full-time, five-week summer program. The academic year component offers monthly study skills and career orientation workshops, advising, tutoring, and a variety of cultural enrichment experiences. The five-week summer session for students in the 9th through 11th grades consists of accelerated classes for which students receive elective high school credit, career orientation, and engage in cultural activities.
CU-Denver Minority Scholars Program. The MSP is an early college enrollment program for college bound, high achieving minority students who are enrolled in their junior year of high school. The program enables students to begin their college studies by taking one course at CU-Denver during the fall term during their senior year in high school. The credit earned in the course can be applied toward a bachelor’s degree. While enrolled in the program, students participate in monthly workshops designed to acclimate them to the University and prepare them for college study.
CENTER FOR LEARNING ASSISTANCE
The Center for Learning Assistance is designed to promote student success in the academic setting. Services are available to all CU-Denver students. The Center’s services include tutoring, workshops, academic and institutional credit courses, consulting, and a minority resource library. First-generation college students may be eligible for more intensive services through the Student Support Services component of the Center. The Center is located in NC 2006,556-2802.
Tutoring. Free tutoring is available in many subject areas (some limitations apply). Scheduled sessions are held on weekdays/evenings. Scheduled and


Internships and Cooperative Education / 37
open lab (walk-in) tutoring are available at established times throughout each term (M-R, 8 am-9 pm. & F, 8 am-5 pm and M-R, 9am-7 pm &F, 9 am-5 pm respectively).
Workshops. Study skills workshops are provided on such topics as test-taking, memory and study techniques, notetaking, listening and time management.
Consulting. Academic, financial aid, and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy is available to students eligible for the Student Support Services Program.
Library. The Center maintains a small periodical and book collection authored by, and/or about, minorities; these resources are available for student research and leisure.
Courses. Courses are offered in a small group format in the areas of college survival skills, computer word processing, English as a second language, and problem solving.
ENGL 1006-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languages. This course is designed for ESL students who need to improve their reading and vocabulary skills. Students will increase their reading ability through vocabulary building, work attack strategies, and reading analysis.
ENGL 1007-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. This is the first course in the ESL composition sequence. Writing begins with sentence-level development and continues with the development of paragraphs based on western rhetorical patterns. Grammar appropriate to students’ needs will be incorporated into the class.
ENGL 1008-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. Continued work on grammar, syntax, and the mechanics of writing. Writing begins with paragraphs and moves into essay writing. Prereq: ENGL 1007 or coordinator’s approval. ENGL 1009-3. Advanced ESL Writing Skills. This is the third course in the ESL composition sequence. Emphasis is placed on more complex grammatical problems and on the development of longer compositions. Prereq: ENGL 1008 or CMMU 1420 or coordinator’s approval. STSK 0705-1. Problem Solving. This course is designed to improve investigative and problem solving skills. Scientific theory, empirical methodology, and research methods will be utilized. Individual topics of investigation will be assigned. STSK 0707-1. College Survival Skills. This course is designed to promote success in the academic setting. Topics covered will include university resources, conquering the university system, listening and notetaking, study and memory techniques,
test-taking skills, time management, library research strategies, and word processing.
STSK 0708-1. Introduction to Word Processing. This course will thoroughly familiarize the student with an easy-to-use word processing program that will assist in the process of writing text revision and rearrangement, and the production of “letter-perfect” documents. (The word processing program used will be one that is available in the open student-use computer lab areas.)
STSK 0800-1. Advanced ESL Grammar/ Composition. This class meets for two hours a week. It is designed for students who do not feel competent with their English composition skills. This class is highly individualized in order to focus on those grammar and writing structures that pose particular problems for ESL students.
STSK 0801-1. Communication Skills for ESL Students. This course meets twice a week to improve the oral communication skills of students whose first language is not English. Skills include use of idiomatic English, cross-cultural awareness, cross-cultural problems in communications, and pronunciation.
STSK 0802-1. Improving Academic Reading Skills for ESL Students. This class meets twice a week. The aim of the class is to improve the student’s ability to read academic texts. Skills practiced include skimming/scanning, reading for the main idea, and critical reading.
STSK 0806-1. Study Skills for ESL Students. This class is designed for ESL students to improve those skills needed for effective participation in the college classroom. Emphasis will be on academic reading and writing skills, as well as on notetaking skills.
STSK 0810-3. Topics. Special topics in study skills to be selected by instructor. STSK 0820-1. Social Science Partnership for ESL. This class is designed to provide a basic understanding of American culture and its underlying values. Students will develop critical thinking skills as well as have opportunities for additional practice in reading and writing skills to include vocabulary in social science areas (i.e., sociology, history, political science, economics, psychology).
CENTER FOR INTERNSHIPS AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
Director Janet Michalski Assistant Director and Coordinator, Engineering: Diane Berkley
Coordinator, Liberal Arts and
Sciences: Cherrie Grove Coordinator, Business and Administration: Wayne Sundell Senior Secretary: Charlene Michael Office: 1047 Ninth Street
Historic Park Telephone: 556-2892
The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education, established at CU-Denver in 1973, provides students with an opportunity to supplement their academic classroom learning with on-the-job work experiences, internships, or community service opportunities related to their academic studies. Students are placed either as paid co-op trainees or as interns for academic credit with corporations, businesses, or government agencies in the Denver metropolitan area as well as out of state. Short-term community service experiences also are available for students enrolled in courses requiring some community service.
Faculty coordinators from each of the University’s colleges and schools act as liaisons between the Center and the academic departments. The Center currently places some 500 students each year with some 250 participating employers. Over 30 percent of all students placed are graduate students.
Cooperative Education
Cooperative education is an educational method which combines classroom study with paid, career related, off-cam-pus work. The purpose is to give students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to real world situations, and to bring that experience back to the classroom as a learning tool.
Cooperative education offers students paid long-term positions (two or more semesters). Students alternate semesters of full-time work with semesters of fulltime school, or work part time year round. Co-op experiences may be eligible for academic credit, and many positions lead to permanent career positions upon graduation.
Internships
Internships offer students short-term positions (one semester) and they are often nonpaid. Internships are always done for academic credit and are popular with students who like to explore a variety of careers. Many students complete two, three, or even four internships before graduation. Internships, like co-op jobs,


38 / General Information
are related to the student’s academic studies and/or career goals.
CU-SERVES/Service Learning
CU-Denver’s new community service/ service learning program, CU-SERVES, was established in 1991 to develop community service opportunities for any CU-Denver course that incorporates a community service option or requirement. CU-SERVES also sponsors 2-3 service days throughout the year which attract 100+ CU-Denver students, faculty, staff and alumni who join together to provide volunteer service to Denver’s needy communities.
Student Eligibility
To qualify for placement in a co-op or internship position students must be enrolled at least half time in any CU-Den-ver college or school, have completed their freshman year, have maintained a grade-point average of 2.5 or higher, and have completed at least 12 hours in residence (6 hours for graduate students). Some employers have additional requirements, i.e., U.S. citizenship, willingness to travel, and specific course work.
Participation in any CU-SERVES service day is open to all students. Participation in a service learning placement requires enrollment in a course with a service option or requirement.
Academic Credit for Work Experience
Undergraduate students placed by the Center in paid or non-paid positions, as well as students who have obtained their own positions, can apply to earn academic credit through courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, School of Education, Graduate School of Public Affairs, and School of Architecture and Planning can earn internship, experiential learning, field study, or practicum credit through courses established for this purpose.
Why Students Participate
• Students recognize the value of combining theory with practice and find greater relevance in their studies.
• Work experience allows students to test classroom teaching in the laboratory of the real world.
• The program teaches students valuable job-search skills such as resume writing and interviewing techniques.
• Co-op positions provide a means of financial assistance that is available to all students, regardless of family income levels or other financial aid arrangements, and does not leave students burdened with educational debts.
• The inclusion of a work component and the contribution from co-op earnings are major factors in encouraging first-generation college students to pursue a college degree.
Why Employers Participate
• Students are an excellent resource for special projects and peak loads or busy seasons.
• The employer can assess an individual’s potential for employment after graduation, thus saving entry-level recruiting costs.
• Student workers can increase productivity of full-time professional staff.
• Students are highly motivated, productive, and dependable workers.
• Students bring knowledge about the latest academic research to their employers.
• As verified by many studies, co-op student interns subsequently become full-time employees with far lower turnover rates and better promotion potential than the average entry level professional.
Facts About Cooperative Education
• Cooperative education programs have been established in over 80 percent of the Fortune 500 corporations. All of the top 10 Fortune 500 companies are involved in cooperative education.
• The last three presidents of General Motors at one time were cooperative education students.
• Cooperative education has been conducted successfully in the U.S. since 1906.
• Over 1,000 colleges and universities currently have cooperative education programs.
• An estimated 200,000 college students are enrolled in cooperative education and gross annual earnings are calculated to be in excess of $200,000,000.
Typical Participating Employers
Employers who recruit CU-Denver students for cooperative education positions include:
Amoco Production Company Bloomsbury Review City of Denver, Mayor’s Office of Art, Culture & Film
Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry
Colorado Association of Public Employees
Colorado Housing & Finance Authority Denver Center for the Performing Arts Denver City Attorney, Domestic Violence Unit Denver General Hospital EG&G
Environmental Protection Agency Federal Highway Administration Hughes Aircraft Company IBM Corporation KCNC-TV Los Angeles Times MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour National Renewable Energy Laboratory Office of the Governor, State of Colorado
Peat Marwick Main & Co.
U S WEST Communications U.S. Bureau of Land Management U.S. Bureau of Reclamation U.S. General Accounting Office Walt Disney World, Inc.
Walters & Theis Law Firm Western Area Power Administration
LIBRARY SERVICES Auraria Library
Dean and Director: Camila Alire Associate Directors: Jean F. Hemphill, Glenda A. Thornton Office: Auraria Library, Lawrence at 11th Street
Telephone:-Administration: 556-2805 Telephone:-Information: 556-2741
Faculty:
Associate Professors: Camila Alire,
Jean F. Hemphill
Assistant Professors: Dene L. Clark, Patricia A. Eskoz, Terry Ann Leopold, Robert L. Wick, Rutherford W. Witthus Instructors: Orlando Archibeque, Kerranne Biley, Anthony J. Dedrick, Nikki Dilgarde, Steve Green, Marit S. MacArthur, Ellen Metter, Lori Oling, Dodie Ownes, Jay Schafer, Mara L. Sprain, Louise T. Stwalley, Glenda Thornton, Linda D. Tietjen, Diane Turner, Liz Willis, Eveline L. Yang


Library Services / 39
FRIENDS OF AURARIA LIBRARY
The Friends of Auraria Library is an association formed in 1976 to promote the development of Auraria Library as a center for learning, study, and research for the students and faculty of the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The Friends of Auraria Library’s ongoing objectives are:
To promote awareness of and good will toward Auraria Library on the campus, in the metropolitan area, and in the region.
To increase Library resources through contributions, solicitations, grants, bequests, and gifts of books and other appropriate materials.
LIBRARY SERVICES
Access to information is essential to academic success. The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus, provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The Library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver.
THE COLLECTION
The Auraria Library has a collection of approximately 600,000 volumes. In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection, the Library also has over 2,000 journal and newspaper subscriptions and a film/videotape collection. The Library is a select depository for U.S. government publications and a depository for Colorado state documents. The Auraria Library’s collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally through interlibrary loan services.
THE CARL ONLINE PUBLIC ACCESS CATALOG
Access to the Auraria Library’s collection is through the online CARL (Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries) public access catalog, a user-friendly system that also allows for searching of the collections of many other libraries throughout the state, the region, and the nation. The CARL system has received national recognition for being on the cutting edge of information technology. The system allows faster and more comprehensive searches than were possible with the traditional card catalog. Through its UnCover project it also offers current indexing to over 10,000 periodical titles.
In addition to using CARL at the Library, patrons may obtain dial-up access through a home or office computer with a modem; CARL also appears as
a menu item on the CU-Denver mainframe computer.
CIRCULATION SERVICES
Library materials are checked out from the Circulation Desk with a current Auraria I.D. or other valid identification. Undergraduate students may check books out for 28 days and graduate students for 60 days. An Auraria student with a valid student I.D. can check out up to 75 books from the general collection. Renewals may be made in person or by phone (556-2639). Charges are assessed when books are returned past their due date.
REFERENCE SERVICES
The Auraria Library Reference Department strives to provide excellent service in assisting students and faculty with their research needs. The Reference Desk is staffed during most hours the Library is open. Additionally, an Information Desk is staffed during peak hours to assist patrons with general information and to direct them to the appropriate service desks. Telephone reference is provided for quick questions such as, “Does the Auraria Library own a particular book?”
COMPUTER ASSISTED RESEARCH
(CAR)
Online database searching, for which there is a fee, can save many hours of researching printed abstracts and indexes. In some cases, it provides the only access to certain materials. The Library has access to well over 200 databases. In addition to bibliographic information, databases also may contain directory and financial information, scientific data, and full text. Questions about the Computer Assisted Research service should be directed to the CAR manager, 556-3464.
INTERLIBRARY LOAN (ILL)
ILL links the Auraria Library to libraries worldwide by providing access to needed materials otherwise unavailable locally. Materials, once requested, can take from one to three weeks for in-state borrowing or three weeks or longer for out-of-state borrowing. A fee may be required in order to obtain journal articles or books. Request forms are available in the library or through the CU-Denver Computing Services VAX 8800 system. Contact the Interlibrary Loan Department Office at 556-2562 for additional information.
LIBRARY INSTRUCTION
The Library is committed to providing information skills through its instruction program. The program is varied, ranging from basic, introductory-level material to advanced research methodology for graduate students. For more information about the Library’s instructional offerings, contact the Library Instruction office at 556-3303.
RESERVES
The Reserves Department provides special short-term circulation of books, pamphlets, articles and other materials needed for class instruction. The loan periods are short and overdue follow-up is prompt so that large numbers of students can have access to the material. These materials include not only titles owned by the Library but also personal copies made available by the faculty.
The Reserves Department is located at the Circulation Desk. Material will be checked out to Auraria students with an appropriate I.D.
ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING LIBRARY
The Library’s main collection is supplemented by the material housed at the nearby Architecture and Planning Library. With a collection of over 20,000 books,
90 periodical subscriptions, and 25,000 slides, this library offers specialized information to students of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The library is open to any student who needs access to these materials.
SERVICES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
The Library is committed to making its resources and services available to all students. Through the Media Distribution Department, a wide variety of adaptive equipment is available to assist persons with disabilities including a Kurzweil Reading Machine, a Voyager VTEK magnifier, a Braille dictionary, the World Book Encyclopedia in Braille and on cassette, and the Perkins Brailler. Several large print dictionaries are in Reference.
Library services to assist persons with disabilities include orientation to the physical layout of the Library, retrieval of materials, and assistance with use of CARL, the online public access catalog, periodicals, indexes, and special adaptive equipment.


40 / General Information
ADDITIONAL FACILITIES
Coin-operated typewriters, photocopiers, microform reader/printers, a copy center, a change machine, pay phones, and study rooms are all available at the Library.
INTERNSHIPS
The Library offers internships, practi-cums, independent studies, and volunteer opportunities to students interested in librarianship and information management.
MEDIA SERVICES Auraria Media Center
Muriel E. Woods, Director
The Auraria Media Center offers a full range of media services including the management of the Library’s film and videotape collection. These materials are listed in the online public access catalog. The Media Center operates a 24 channel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus; faculty members may request the transmission of a film or videotape directly into the classroom over this system. Students may
request transmission of a film or videotape from one of the media viewing and listening carrels in the Library. This system also can transmit live programs from St. Cajetan’s, the Student Union, and the Media Center’s television studios to other locations on campus. A self-service graphics lab and a self-service VHS editing suite also are available for student use in the Media Center’s Production Department. Finally, an Internship Program is available to students who are interested in converting knowledge gained in electronics and/or television production courses to practical experience.


The Graduate School
Acting Dean: Fernie Baca
Office: CU-Denver Bldg, (formerly Dravo),
Room 710
Telephone: 556-2663
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
Quality graduate programs are synonymous with the University of Colorado. Professors are actively involved in research or creative activity and, as teacher/scholars, continue to study and absorb new data, ideas, and techniques, eventually bringing these experiences to the classroom. Graduate students at CU-Denver gain not only from interactions with the graduate faculty, but also from other students in the classroom. Because most of CU-Denver’s graduate students are older and employed, they bring practical experience gained in the Denver community to the classroom and are ready to relate the realities of practice to the models presented in the classroom.
The Graduate School is a Universitywide body that authorizes programs within its constituent colleges and schools. At CU-Denver, Education, Engineering, and Liberal Arts and Sciences are colleges or schools whose graduate programs are offered through The Graduate School. In concept, there is a single Graduate School regardless of campus. In practice, most master’s-level programs are specific to the campus where the student is admitted, insofar as particular options and advisors are concerned.
Doctoral-level programs in a discipline are viewed as the responsibility of the entire University community of that discipline. Doctoral-level programs on the CU-Denver campus are coordinated either through the office of the system graduate dean or through the corresponding Denver or Boulder department. There are several doctoral-level degree programs offered through CU-Denver.
Degrees Offered
The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through The Graduate School at CU-Denver.
The Master of Arts (M.A.) in: Anthropology Biology
Communication and Theatre
Economics
English
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
The Master of Arts (M.A. Education) in: Administration, Supervision and Curriculum Development Counseling and Guidance Early Childhood Education Education Instruction and Curriculum Educational Psychology Special Education
The Master of Science (M.S.) in:
Applied Mathematics Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Science Mechanical Engineering Technical Communication
The Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.)
The Master of Engineering (M.E.)1 The Master of Humanities (M.H.)
The Master of Social Science (M.S.S.)
The Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in: Applied Mathematics Administration, Supervision and Curriculum Development Public Administration Course work is available at the Denver campus in the programs listed below. Student residents on the Denver campus studying in these areas may take advantage of the multi-campus activities of The Graduate School.
Biology
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Communication
Computer Science
Electrical Engineering
English
Mechanical Engineering Psychology
'Awarded through CU-Boulder
The Graduate School at CU-Denver
An average of 4,839 students are enrolled in graduate programs at CU-Denver each fall and spring semester, which includes 1,057 non-degree students taking graduate courses. Approximately 74 percent of enrolled graduate students are part-time students.
Computing Services
The Computing Services department supports computer use by both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. For a complete description of services offered see Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section of this catalog.
Financial Aid for Graduate Study
COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT
The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by The Office of Financial Aid. Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the State of Colorado. Grant awards are announced each semester for the following term. Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid.
COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise and to continuing students on the basis of academic success.
GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS
Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructorship is reserved for those advanced graduate


42 / The Graduate School
students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course.
A half-time appointment for an instructor is considered to be equal to 6 class contact hours; a half-time teaching assistant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Compensation is based on the number of hours per week. Teaching assistants and instructors must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate/ thesis or dissertation) in good standing for the full period of their appointment.
RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS
Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Assistants must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/ graduate/thesis or dissertation).
LOAN FUNDS
Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college workstudy program should submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March 1. This office also provides shortterm loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Application should be made directly to the Office of Financial Aid.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work either through conventional employment or through the college workstudy program.
Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy.
International Education
The Office of International Education expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and acts as advisor for the Fulbright and other student fellowships.
The office also arranges study abroad programs. Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while taking regular courses in the foreign universities.
A B average with the equivalent of two years of college-level work in the appropriate language is required. There also are occasional summer programs offering academic credit.
Peace Corps information may be obtained from the Office of International Education.
For additional information contact the office of International Admissions and Student Services at 556-2659 or the Office of International Education at 556-3489.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
General Requirements
Students may be admitted to The Graduate School in either of the two categories described below.
REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS
Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, applicants for admission as regular degree students must;
1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recognized standing, or have work experience equivalent to that required for such
a degree and equivalent to the degree given at this university.
2. Show promise of ability to pursue advanced study and research, as judged by their previous scholastic record.
3. Have adequate preparation to enter graduate study in the field chosen.
4. Have at least a 2.75 undergraduate grade-point average on all work taken.
5. Meet additional requirements for admission as established by major departments.
Regular degree students must maintain at least a 3.0 grade-point average each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether it is to be applied toward the intended advanced degree or not. Students who fail to maintain this standard of performance will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS
Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular degree students may be admitted as provisional degree students upon the
recommendation of the major department. Upon the recommendation of the Admissions Committee and concurrence of the dean of The Graduate School, a department may admit provisional students for a probationary term which may not exceed two consecutive calendar years. At the end of the probationary period, provisional degree students must either be admitted to regular degree status or be dropped from the graduate program.
Credit earned by persons in provisional degree status may count toward a degree at this University.
Provisional degree students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average or higher, according to the terms of their provisional admission, each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether or not it is to be applied toward the advanced degree sought. Students who fail to maintain such a standard of performance will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
Note: All provisional applicants must have completed a minimum of six semester hours of graduate-level course work or must take the Graduate Record Examination and submit scores as part of the application.
The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume the standards of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
SENIORS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
A senior at this University who has satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements, and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subject and 12 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor’s degree, may be admitted to The Graduate School by special permission of the dean.
A University of Colorado senior enrolled in the College of Engineering and Applied Science who needs not more than 18 semester hours or 36 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor’s degree may be admitted to The Graduate School, but is not eligible for financial aid, scholarships, or fellowships as a graduate student until the equivalent of the minimum requirements for the bachelor’s degree have been satisfied.


Graduate Admission / 43
Application Procedures
Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the Office of Admissions concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications.
An applicant for admission must present a completed Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the Office of Admissions, and two official transcripts from each institution attended.
The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable application fee of $30 (check or money order) when the application is submitted. No application will be processed unless this fee is paid. Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination, and all departments require three or four letters of recommendation.
When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson of each department or a student admissions committee shall decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to the Office of Admissions, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as nondegree students (see Non-degree Students in this section).
A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 90 days prior to the term for which admission is sought or earlier as may be required by the major department.
Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1993-94, e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, must file a completed application with the department before the announced departmental deadline.
RE-ADMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS
Students who were previously admitted to a graduate degree program but did not complete that degree program and have not been registered for one year or more at the University must:
1. Clarify their status with the department or school/college to determine their eligibility to return and pursue the same degree.
2. After receiving departmental approval as indicated above, submit a new application Part I to the Office of Admissions before departmental deadlines are passed for the term in which they expect to return to the University.
A $30 application fee is required. Application deadlines are available from the department.
Former students who wish to change from undergraduate to graduate status or from one major to another must apply to the new department.
Students transferring from one campus to another must apply and be accepted to the new campus.
A student admitted to The Graduate School for the master's program must reapply for the doctoral program.
A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student’s major department and the school/college dean. In case of lack of agreement between the department and the dean or in the case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Graduate Council.
FOREIGN APPLICANTS
Prospective foreign students should have completed applications on file in the Office of Admissions prior to December 1 for the Summer Term, March 1 for the Fall Semester, and July 1 for the Spring Semester. The application packet should include the $50 fee, TOEFL scores, financial documentation, Graduate Record Examination scores, official English translation of all school records, and other documents as noted in the previous section on Application Procedures.
Acceptable TOEFL Scores. The TOEFL is the Test of English as a Foreign Language. If your native language is not English, or you have not attended a British or American university for at least one year and achieved satisfactory grades, then you must take the TOEFL. All programs within CU-Denver’s Graduate School-arts and sciences, education, engineering, and doctoral programs-require a minimum score of 525 for regular admission. Those earning less than 525 will normally be referred to the Spring International Language Center (on campus) for further language study. During that time, students will study on an 1-20 from Spring International, but may take classes as non-degree students at CU-Denver. They may subsequently be granted regular admission to The Graduate School. All international students who take.the TOEFL and are granted regular admission to CU-Denver’s Graduate School will be asked to take both the Michigan and SPEAK tests during their first semester of study. Those whose TOEFL fell between 525 and 550 will be required to take additional language training in light of whatever deficiencies may be revealed by these diagnostic tests. Those whose TOEFL exceeds 550 will be encouraged, but not required, to under-
take additional training in light of their performance on these tests. Students seeking admission to all other graduate programs, including those in architecture and planning, business, and public affairs, should consult those program descriptions for language requirements.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS
At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for admission to the graduate program or for assistant-ships prior to determining student status.
Students who are applying for assis-tantships for the fall semester take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the selection committee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an institution.
Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from the CU-Denver Testing Center, or The Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
OTHER GRADUATE QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS
Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain information at the Student Testing Center on the following examinations: Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).
NON-DEGREE STUDENTS
A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado at Denver should apply to the Office of Admissions, Campus Box 167,
P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364. Non-degree students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted.
Non-degree students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this University are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and supporting credentials as soon as possible.
A department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as many as 9 credit hours toward the requirements of a master’s degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a non-degree student at the University of Colorado, or both.
In addition, the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance


44 / The Graduate School
of credit courses taken as a non-degree student at this University during the term for which the student applied for admission to The Graduate School, provided such admission date was delayed through no fault of the student. A grade of B or better must be obtained in any coursework transferred in this manner.
REGISTRATION
Course Work and Examinations
On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to The Graduate School and who expect to study in The Graduate School are required to complete appropriate registration procedures.
Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted into The Graduate School. If unable to attend that semester, they must notify the department that has accepted them and submit the necessary forms to the Office of Admissions and Records at CU-Denver in order to attend the following semester.
Changes in Registration
A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should follow the drop/add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Classes). After the tenth week of classes graduate students may not drop, add, or change a course to nocredit status without presenting a letter to the dean of their school/college, stating the exceptional circumstances that justify the change. This letter, endorsed by the instructor of the course, must accompany the properly signed and completed drop/add card or no-credit option form.
Withdrawal
Graduate students who desire to withdraw from the University must apply to the dean of their school/college for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official withdrawal will be marked as having failed the course.
The withdrawal form must be signed by the instructor of the course and pass/fail must be indicated with the instructor’s initials.
Master's Thesis
Graduate students working toward master’s degrees, if they expect to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for
thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Limitation of Registration
FULL LOAD
A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit if the student is registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate/thesis or dissertation hours.
A maximum of two-thirds of a semester of resident credit may be earned during the summer if a student registers for three semester hours of other graduate work or any number of thesis hours.
For the number of hours required for financial aid, see Financial Aid at the University of Colorado at Denver in the General Information section of this catalog.
A graduate student may contact the school/college dean’s office for information on the appeal process regarding the full load requirement for financial aid purposes.
MAXIMUM LOAD
No graduate student may receive credit toward a degree for more than 15 hours in a regular semester.
The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at CU-Denver is 10 hours per 10-week summer term. A graduate student may contact the school/college dean’s office for information on the appeal process regarding an overload.
UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES
Full-time employees of the University may not undertake more than 6 credit hours per semester. Part-time employees, including assistants, may take the number of credit hours approved by the major department.
TUITION AND FEES
The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information section of this catalog.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES
Quality of Graduate Work
Although the work for advanced degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours, an advanced degree will not be conferred merely for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses. Students should not expect to obtain all the training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirement for an advanced degree from formal courses. They should work on their own initiative, reading widely and thoughtfully, reaching their own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of values, perspective, and proportion.
All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficiencies) must be of graduate status.
A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted while enrolled in The Graduate School.
For the Ph.D., a course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree.
A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School by the dean with the approval of the major department.
Appeal may be made to the Graduate Council. The committee’s decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student’s major department and the dean. In case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Graduate Council.
Repeating a Course
A graduate student who receives a grade of C, D, or F in a course may repeat the course once, upon written recommendation to the dean by the chairman of the student’s advisory committee and major department, provided the course has not previously been applied toward a degree.
In calculating a student’s grade-point average for Graduate School purposes, the grade for a repeated course will substitute for the old grade. Grades earned in courses taken as an undergraduate or as a non-degree student, as well as grades earned in first- and second-year foreign language courses, will not be used in calculating The Graduate School grade-point average; however, all grades received will appear on the student’s transcript.


Master’s Degree / 45
Change of Department or Major
A graduate student wishing to change department or major must submit a new Parti and Part Iloi the graduate application to the new department or school and request the former department to forward recommendations and credentials. The student must be formally accepted by the new department.
Use of English
A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of standard English in all oral and written work may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance.
Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate’s proficiency.
Graduate Appeals
Final action on appeals submitted by graduate students concerning action taken by faculty members, programs, or administrative officials rests with the campus Graduate Council, unless such appeal involves a matter affecting two or more campuses. In such a case, the final action rests with the Executive Committee of the System-Wide Graduate School.
MASTER'S DEGREE
A student regularly admitted to The Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master’s degrees will be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met.
In general, only graduates of an approved institution who have a thorough preparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below. All studies offered toward the minimum requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank. Necessary additional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequisites may be partly or entirely undergraduate courses.
The requirements stated below are minimum requirements; additional conditions set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate depart-
ments. Any department may make further regulations not inconsistent with the general rules.
Students planning to graduate should ascertain current deadlines of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student's and the department’s responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e. changing of IWgrades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.).
Departments or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student’s responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Requirements
The minimum requirements of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by following either Plan I or Plan II below.
Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a thesis. At least 18 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above.
Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis. At least 16 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above.
Plan II does not represent a free option for the student. A candidate for the master’s degree may be allowed to select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned.
Graduate Credit
Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above and that are offered by professors who are members of the graduate faculty, or that have otherwise been approved by the dean of The Graduate School. No assurance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless the student has the approval of the department.
Not all courses listed are available at any one time; some are given in alternate years.
Courses taken during the Fall Semester 1975 and thereafter will have graduate rank if they are taught by members of The Graduate School faculty and are in one of the following categories:
1. Courses within the major program at the 5000 level or above.
2. Courses outside the major program at the 4000 level provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by
the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean.
3. The Master of Basic Science program (M.B.S.) has approval for 3000- and 4000-level courses if approved by the department and the dean of The Graduate School.
4. Courses outside the major program, provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean.
This does not change the minimum number of courses that must be taken at the 5000 level or above; however, • as a result, most students who include 4000 level courses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation.
Field of Study
Studies leading to a master’s degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program.
Status
After students have made a satisfactory record in this University for at least one semester or summer term, and after they have removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission or by qualifying examinations or otherwise, they should confer with their major department and request that a decision be made on their status. This definite status must be set by the major department before students may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree.
Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without credit toward a graduate degree all prerequisites required by the department concerned.
Language Requirements
Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as each department requires. See specific departmental requirements.
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere and coming within the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the dean of the school/college.


46 / The Graduate School
Course work taken more than 6 years prior to the completion of final requirements (comprehensive exam and/or filing of thesis) will not be accepted for the degree unless validated by a special examination.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University is 9 semester hours.
Credit will not be transferred until the student has established in The Graduate School of this University a satisfactory record of at least one semester in residence; such transfer will not reduce the residence at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated.
Work already applied toward a master’s degree received from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the master’s degree at the University of Colorado; courses with “Pass/Fail” or “Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory” grades will not be transferred; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recognized.
Excess undergraduate credits from another institution may not be transferred to The Graduate School. Seniors in this University may, however, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 9 semester hours) provided such work:
1. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this University.
2. Comes within the four-year time limit.
3. Is no lower than a C.
4. Has not been applied toward another degree.
5. Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and approved by the dean of the school/college. Requests for transfer of credit to be
applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to the school/college by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. For more information contact your graduate advisor. To be eligible for courses to be considered for transfer, a student must have an overall B average in all courses taken at the University of Colorado in The Graduate School.
Continuing Education Course Work
Students may use the resources of the Division of Extended Studies in the pursuit of graduate study only if they obtain proper academic approval from the major department and the school/college dean in advance.
Residence
In general, the residence requirements can be met only by residence at the University for at least two semesters or at least three summer terms. For full residence, a student must be registered within the time designated at the beginning of a semester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses numbered 5000 or above, or at least a combination of other course work acceptable for graduate credit. See Limitation of Registration, Full Load, for requirements for full residence credit during the summer. Students who are noticeably deficient in their general training or in the specific preparation indicated by each department as prerequisite to graduate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified.
Graduate assistants and other employees of the University may fulfill the residence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than half-time. Full-time employees may not satisfy the residence requirements of one year in fewer than four semesters.
Admission to Candidacy
A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master’s degree must file application in the graduate dean’s office 10 weeks prior to the completion of the comprehensive final examination. The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be determined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status.
This application must be made on forms obtainable from the Graduate School dean’s office and in various departments and must be signed by the major department, certifying that the student’s work is satisfactory and that the program outlined in the application meets the requirements set for the student.
A student on Graduate School probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation.
Thesis Requirements
A thesis, which may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type, is required of every master’s degree candidate under Plan I. Every thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must:
1. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field.
2. Be based upon independent study and investigation.
3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work.
4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred.
5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given.
6. Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in Directions for Preparing Masters 'and Doctoral Theses, which is obtainable from The Graduate School.
Two weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred, two formally approved, printed or typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in The Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract.
All theses must be signed by the thesis advisor and the second reader. All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid when the thesis is deposited in The Graduate School.
Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been registered. A student working toward a master’s degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence,but the total registered credit for thesis must total a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis.
The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. An IP (in progress) will be reported for terms during which the student is registered for thesis prior to completion of the thesis.
Comprehensive Final Examination
All candidates for a master's degree are required to take a comprehensive final examination after the other requirements


Doctor of Philosophy / 47
for the degree have been completed. This examination may be given near the end of their last semester of residence while they are still taking required courses for the degree, provided they are making satisfactory progress in those courses.
The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed:
1. Students must be registered when they take the examination.
2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean’s office at least 3 days in advance of the examination.
3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned in consultation with
the dean.
4. The examination, which may be oral, written, or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essentially complete at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field.
5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments.
6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or minor field.
The examination on transferred work will be given by representatives of the corresponding fields of study in this University.
7. A student who fails the comprehensive final examination may not attempt the examination again until at least three months have elapsed and until such work as may be prescribed by the examining committee has been completed. The student may retake the examination only once.
Supplemental Examinations
Supplemental examinations should be simply an extension of the original examination and given immediately. If the student fails the supplemental examination, three months must elapse before attempting the comprehensive examination again.
Course Examinations
The regular written examinations of each semester except the last must be taken. Course examinations of the last semester, which come after the comprehensive final examination has been passed, may be omitted with the consent of the instructor.
Master's Thesis Credit
Every graduate student working toward a master’s degree who expects to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported.
(The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Time Limit
Master’s degree students have 5 years, from the date of the start of course work, to complete all degree requirements. For students who fail to complete the degree in this 5 year period, it will be necessary for the program director to file an annual statement with the graduate dean stating the reasons why the program faculty believe the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. Students who do their work exclusively in summer terms must complete all degree requirements within 72 months from the start of course work.
A student who does not complete all degree requirements within the specified period of time must validate, by special examination(s), any course work taken more than 6 years prior to taking the masters comprehensive examination or completing the thesis defense, depending on which plan is elected.
Deadlines for Master's Degree Candidates Expecting to Graduate During 1992-93
Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling The Graduate School office, 556-2663.
1. Last day for requesting transfer of credit.
2. Applications for admission to candidacy. Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (The form may
be picked up in the department or in The Graduate School office.)
3. Last day for thesis to be approved by department.
4. Last day for scheduling of comprehensive final examination.
5. Last day for taking comprehensive final examination.
6. Last day for filing thesis in The Graduate School. At the time of filing, the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by The Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p.m. on the indicated date will be graduated at the commencement following that for which the deadline
is indicated.
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University. To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued. Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work in this field; furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge. The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules.
Studies leading to the Ph.D. degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments. The criterion as to what constitutes an acceptable field of study shall be that the student’s work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University.
Students planning to graduate should obtain current deadline dates in the office of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student’s and the department’s responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW


48 / The Graduate School
grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.).
Department or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by graduate students in that department or program. It is the student’s responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Course/Dissertation Requirements
A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph.D. degree.
Course Work Requirement. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses numbered 5000 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum. At least 20 of the required hours must be in graduate courses taken at this University. Students who have been admitted to The Graduate School with deficiencies may expect to receive little or no residence credits until the deficiencies have been removed.
Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the Ph.D., a student must register for a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than 10 of these credit hours in any one semester. Not more than 10 dissertation hours may be taken preceding the semester of taking comprehensive examinations. In addition, up to 10 hours may be taken in the semester in which the student passes comprehensives. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above and will not be included in calculation of the student’s grade-point average. Only the grades of A, B and IP shall be used.
Course work and work on the dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program; however, at no time shall a doctoral student register for more than 15 hours of 5000-level and above courses. Normally a student must have earned at least three and not more than six semesters of residency before admission to candidacy.
Advisory Committee
As soon as the field of specialization has been chosen, the candidate will request the faculty member with whom the committee wishes to work to act as chair of the advisory committee. The chair, with the advice and approval of the chair of
the department, may select two or more additional members to serve on the committee, so that the several fields related to the student’s special interest will be represented. A purpose of the advisory committee (beyond guiding the student through graduate study) is to ensure against specialization that is too narrow. The student shall obtain the signature of the chair of the committee (thereby signifying his or her willingness to act) on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form. Any change in the membership of the advisory committee is to be similarly reported.
Residence
The student must be properly registered to earn residence credit. The minimal residence requirement shall be six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor’s degree. Mere attendance shall not constitute residence as the word is here used. Residence may be earned for course work completed with distinction, for participation in seminars, or for scholarly research performed here or elsewhere under the auspices of the University of Colorado.
As a guiding policy in determining residence credit for employed students, those who are employed in three-fourths to fulltime work that does not contribute directly to their program toward a degree may not earn more than one-half residence credit in any semester. Students who are employed more than one-fourth time and less than three-fourths time in work that does not contribute directly to the degree may earn not more than three-fourths residence credit. Those who have one-fourth time employment or less may earn full residence credit. (All these provisions are subject to the definition of residence credit given in the preceding paragraph.) In case the interpretation of residence credit for any student needs to be clarified, a decision will be made by the chair of the student’s advisory committee, the chair of the student’s major department, and the dean of The Graduate School.
Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master’s degree from another institution of approved standing, but at least four semesters of residence credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work (course and/or dissertation) taken at this University.
A part of the residence requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be spent in another graduate institution, or in field work in
absentia (provided that prior approval for work is given by the student’s program director and provided that the student’s registration is maintained for that period away from the campus).
Preliminary Examination
Each department will satisfy itself (by examination or other means) that students who signify intent to undertake study for the Ph.D. degree are qualified to do so. The means by which each department makes this evaluation shall be specified in departmental requirements. Students who are thus evaluated will be notified immediately of the results. The results of this preliminary evaluation shall be reported to The Graduate School office on the Application for Candidacy form filed by the student at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
Language Requirement
The decision on foreign language requirements for Ph.D. degrees is the responsibility of the graduate faculty of each graduate program.2
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality earned in another institution of approved standing will not be accepted for transfer to apply toward the doctorate until the student has established a satisfactory record in residence in this Graduate School, but such credit must be transferred before the student makes application for admission to candidacy for the degree. Such transfer will not reduce the minimum residence requirement at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University for the Ph.D. is 30 semester hours.
Application for Admission to Candidacy
A student must make formal application for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree on forms supplied by The Graduate School office at least 2 weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
A student shall have earned at least three semesters of residence, and shall
Approved by a vote of the system-wide graduate faculty on February 7, 1990.


Doctor of Philosophy / 49
have passed the comprehensive examination before admission to candidacy for the degree.
Continuous Registration Requirements tor Doctoral Candidates
Following successful completion of comprehensive examinations, students must register continuously. Students admitted to candidacy for degree will register for and be charged for seven hours of credit for each full-time term of doctoral work. For each term of part-time enrollment, students will be charged for seven hours of dissertation credit, except that students not making use of campus facilities may petition The Graduate School for three-credit-hour status. Continuous registration during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense. It is expected that the student and advisor will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classification identified above.
Comprehensive Examination
Before admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, the student must pass a comprehensive examination in the field of concentration and related fields. This examination may be oral, written, or both, and will test the student’s mastery of a broad field of knowledge, not merely the formal course work completed. The oral part is open to members of the faculty.
The student must be registered at the time the comprehensive examination is attempted.
The examination shall be conducted by an examining board appointed by the chair of the department concerned and be approved by the campus graduate dean. The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to total a minimum of five.
A successful candidate must receive the affirmative votes of a majority of the members of the examination board. In case of failure, the examination may be attempted once more after a period of time determined by the examining board.
Dissertation Requirements
A thesis based upon original investigation, showing mature scholarship, critical judgment, and familiarity with the tools and methods of research, must be written upon some subject approved by the student’s major department. To be
acceptable, this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student’s special field. It must be finished and submitted in typewritten form at least 30 days (in some departments,
90 days) before the day of the final examination and must be formally approved and made available for inspection by the examining committee before the final examination may be taken.
In mechanical features, all dissertations must comply with the specifications of The Graduate School as outlined in the Directions for Preparing Masters ’and Doctoral Theses which may be obtained from The Graduate School.
It is the student’s responsibility to notify The Graduate School of the exact title of the dissertation at least six weeks prior to the commencement at which the student will graduate. This title will be printed in the commencement program (May graduation only).
Two formally-approved, typewritten copies of the dissertation, including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred.
The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International. The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department.
All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than two members of the major department staff who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction.
All approved dissertations are kept on file in the library.
When the dissertation is deposited in The Graduate School, the candidate must pay the thesis-binding fee and sign an agreement with University Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform.
Final Examination
After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dissertation and related topics will be conducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral, the oral part being open to anyone. The examination will be
conducted by a committee consisting of at least five persons, one of whom must be from outside the student’s department. More than one dissenting vote will disqualify the candidate in the final examination.
Arrangements for the final examination must be made in the graduate dean’s office at least two weeks in advance. The examination must be scheduled not later than two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. A student must be registered at the time of the final examination.
Time Limit
If a student fails to complete all requirements for the degree within the prescribed number of years from the date of the start of course work in the doctoral program, a second examination similar to the first will be required before the candidate may take the final examination. The number of years allowed for completion is normally six, but in some programs it may be seven. If the comprehensive examination is failed, it may be attempted once more after not fewer than eight months of further work. For students who fail to complete the degree in this 6 year period, it will be necessary for the department to file an annual statement indicating that the program director believes the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. This request must be signed by three members of the graduate faculty who serve on the student’s thesis advisory committee. If approved by the campus graduate dean, the student may continue his/her studies for one additional year. If not approved, the student may be dropped from the program.




School of Architecture and Planning
Acting Dean: Peter Schneider Office: CU-Denver Bldg, (formerly Dravo), Third Floor Telephone: 556-3382 Faculty Professors: Yuk Lee, George Hoover, John Prosser, Peter Schneider, Hamid Shirvani
Associate Professors: Soontorn Boonyatikarn, Lois Brink, Thomas Clark, Phillip Gallegos, Harry Garnham, Marvin Hatami, David Hill, Paul Saporito, Peter Schaeffer Assistant Professors: Theresa Cameron, Ned Collier, Michael Holleran, Taisto Makela, Hans Morgenthaler, Bennett Neiman, Diane Wilk Shirvani, Won Jin Tae, Ping Xu
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The School of Architecture and Planning offers first and post-professional programs leading to master’s degrees. The primary mission of the School is education, research, and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning. Students are required to search into the existing abundance of architecture and planning knowledge in order to generate effective, forceful, spirited forms, ideas, and proposals. Faculty and students are engaged in investigation, education, exploration, and generation of new ideas, forms, and proposals to create more humane living environments. As El Lissitzky (1930) stated: “Our work is not philosophy, neither is it a system relating to a specific theory of nature; it is part of nature and must therefore itself be regarded as an object of knowledge.”
In doing so, the School questions existing connections of teaching and practice and is in search of future alternatives. The School’s activities are thus geared toward preparation of future architects and planners who are not only able to draw, to calculate, or to propose, but also to question, to explore, and to experiment.
The curricula are based on a wide range of cultural views of architecture and planning reflective of our faculty and student body. The faculty direct, guide, and encourage students to develop their individual interests with a prerequisite commitment intended to equip the graduate
with a lasting ability to produce architecture and planning responsive to the changing needs of society.
It is on these premises that our School is in constant search of the manifest, ideas, and forms for the betterment of the living environments. A community of culturally diverse educators and practitioners centered in an island by the backdrop of the Rocky Mountains provides a unique opportunity for intense study of architecture and planning.
Mission and Organization
The School is composed of three graduate degree programs in architecture, landscape architecture, and urban and regional planning (M.Arch., M.L.A., M.U.R.P.). It also offers urban design as an area of specialization in the architecture program (M.Arch. in Urban Design). As a unit of graduate professional education with three professional degree programs and a mandate for national excellence and recognition, the School expects to go beyond training students in basic skills for entry-level positions. The School’s overall mission is to develop the design capabilities of the individuals and the design professions as a whole as well as provide the intellectual framework which supports design.
Considering this mission, the School emphasizes basic professional training and education necessary for entering professional practice in its first professional degree programs. The post-professional and advanced degree programs are directed toward professionals at various career stages and focus on research and specialization.
The School supports interdisciplinary work in its programs and focuses on professional education and research concerning the design and planning of the built environment. Within this interdisciplinary approach, it recognizes the professional community input and the role of the other academic disciplines such as humanities, social sciences, and engineering.
In the School’s degree programs, various architecture and planning ideologies and views are examined with respect to their historical setting. This examination is combined with critical reviews of design
work, dialogues, and methods to form the essential ingredient of design education. Through this dialectic of analyzing and synthesizing, students gain increased understanding of those humanistic ideals underlying the architecture and planning of buildings and spaces and relate them to their own developing personal aspirations.
The School is committed to design as its central intellectual concern and is the largest graduate school of architecture in the western region. Design is used in its broadest sense to include a full range of philosophies, ideologies, theories, and methods. The School’s mission is education, research, and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning.
Academic Programs
The three graduate programs are interdisciplinary, and, in the design fields, both first and post-professional degrees are offered. In addition, it is possible for students to obtain two degrees, M.Arch. and M.U.R.R for example, and reduce the time required for doing so by coordinating their programs.
The first professional degree programs are structured for full-time graduate study. For students with employment obligations, most of these programs can be taken on a part-time basis. Usually the first year of the full-time program must be completed before it can be taken part-time.
Within any of the programs, the School of Architecture and Planning offers opportunities to develop a self-tailored area of concentration through its varied offerings in architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. Electives ordinarily can be taken from any program in the School and from another school in the University with the approval of the student’s advisor.
The School maintains membership in:
Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture
Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning
Council of Landscape Architecture Educators
Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board


52 / School of Architecture and Planning
Planning Accreditation Board
Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society
Sigma Delta Lambda Honor Society
Academic Environment and Student Body
In addition to its regular curriculum programs, the School supports or sponsors a variety of events and activities that enlarge and broaden the learning environment in the School. Student internships for credit are available during the academic year. A summer international study program is offered. The School sponsors three receptions-at the beginning of the academic year, before Christmas, and at the end of the academic year-along with a Beaux Arts Ball in the spring, for students and the local professional community. Finally, the School sponsors several exhibitions of design and art works.
There are about 275 full-time students in the School. The student body is diverse, representing many academic disciplines and a wide variety of previous academic institutions. Students have previous degrees from a number of universities around the world.
Lecture Series
Guest critics are frequently invited to the School. In addition, the School has an official lecture series every year. The Lecture Series is composed of distinguished practitioners, critics, and scholars of national and international stature. Visiting critics and speakers include: Stanley Allen, Amy Anderson, Nader Ardalan,
Ann Bergren, Jennifer Bloomer, Christine Boyer, James Corner, Livio Dimitriu,
Peter Eisenman, Tzann Hour Fang, Kenneth Frampton, Mario Gandelsonas, Diane Ghirardo, Michael Hays, Mark Johnson, Keith Loftin, Greg Lynn,
Rodolfo Machado, Art McDonald, Ian McHarg, John Meunier, David Niland,
John Novack, Patrick Quinn, Dennis Radford, George Ranalli, Frank E. Sanchis, Thomas Schumacher, Robert Segrest, Werner Seligman, Bahrain Shirdel, Vladimir Slapeta, Michael Sorkin,
John R. Stilgoe, Harry Teague, William Turnbull, Anne Vernez-Moudon, Anthony Vidler, Peter Waldman, Peter Walker, Michael Web, Morgan Dix Wheelock, and Lebbeus Woods.
SCHOOL FACILITIES
The School’s studios, library, Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory, Auto-Cadd Computer Laboratory, photo laboratory and darkroom, model shop, gallerias, and offices are housed in three
floors of the CU-Denver Bldg, in 50,000 square feet of space. The laboratories and facilities were developed through an endowment by noted architect Temple Hoyne Buell, FAIA.
Architecture and Planning Library
Librarian: Robert Wick Library Technician: Toby Visoon
The Architecture and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library (administered by the University of Colorado at Denver), serves as a learning resource center in the fields of architecture and planning. It contains the following collections: reference, circulating, documentary (planning documents issued by local, regional, state and national agencies with an emphasis on planning materials pertaining to Colorado communities and concerns), periodicals, reserve, and non-print media including architectural slides. The Architecture and Planning Library has over 15,000 volumes of books and monographs, professional references, 9,000 slides, and 99 periodical subscriptions.
The Architecture and Planning Library staff consists of a one-third time librarian, library technician, and several student assistants. The Library provides a number of services including reference and research assistance, and library-use instruction. Additional services, such as inter-library loan and computer-assisted research, are provided through the Auraria Library.
Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory
The Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory is dedicated to the promotion of design innovation and exploration with the Macintosh computer. The laboratory is equipped with 15 Macintosh II computers with high resolution color monitors; a Macintosh II file; an E-size, Hewlett-Packard plotter; LaserWriter II printer; and Image Writer II dot matrix printers. The laboratory utilizes software including Architrion (an advanced 3-dimensional modeling program), VersaCad, MacDraw II, SuperPaint, PixelPaint, Adobe Illustrator 88, VideoWorks, Canvas, MiniCad, Mac3D, Photoshop II (an advanced graphic manipulation program that interfaces with the 3-D modelling packages), and a broad range of other sophisticated graphic simulation software. This state-of-the-art laboratory has been developed through a contribution by Apple Computer, Inc.
CADD Computer Laboratory
The CADD Laboratory of the School of Architecture and Planning is located adjacent to the Macintosh Architecture Laboratory and supports advanced computer-aided design and drafting with a microcomputer based network which has been modified and expanded. The laboratory is equipped with 10 state-of-the-art DOS based units with high resolution graphic monitors, and all the peripherals and software needed for advanced two and three dimensional modeling.
Building Technology Laboratory
The Building Technology Laboratory functions as a teaching and research facility for both students and outside practitioners. For the student, through hands-on experiment and physical demonstration, it is used to facilitate the learning process as well as bridge the gap between theoretical concepts and practical applications. For practitioners, this facility is used to enhance their practice and update their knowledge.
Some examples of equipment and facilities available include data acquisition systems, lighting research equipment, Macintosh visual input package, windflow simulation table, video equipment, and data logging equipment.
The windflow simulation table allows the designer to analyze various windflow patterns on two-dimensional forms. By allowing water to flow continuously in a given direction and by adding an even distribution of ink to identify the flow patterns, an immediate study can be encountered on a given site configuration. The data logging equipment allows an automatic collection of data for a specific time and period. When furnished with the appropriate sensors, the following data can be obtained: temperature (surface temperature, air temperature, and subsurface temperature), moisture (wet-bulb temperature and relative humidity), solar radiation, lighting intensity, and wind speed.
Photo Laboratory. Our new photography lab, with the latest state-of-the-art equipment, is used for architectural photography classes and by students to produce material for their portfolios. There are separate areas for developing, enlarging, drying, and copying.
Model-Making Laboratory. Students have an 800-square-foot model shop in which to build projects for their classes. Table saws, jig saws, drill presses, jointers


Admissions / 53
and a full range of hand tools will allow the student to build models of wood, plastic, and steel. An adjacent paint spray room is equipped with a ventilated paint booth and vapor-proof lighting.
ADMISSIONS General Requirements
The School of Architecture and Planning has an Academic Affairs Office. Primary responsibilities of this office include answering admission inquiries, process-ng admissions applications, awarding :uition scholarships, enforcing studio and aboratory rules, hearing student grade appeals, overseeing students’ rights and ■esponsibilities, approving new course proposals, enforcing academic policies, and processing graduation applications.
Each applicant for admission into any >f the programs of the School of Architec-ure and Planning must submit:
1. The University of Colorado Application
for Graduate Admission forms.
!. Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended.
I. Three letters of recommendation.
1. A statement of purpose.
i. Examples of creative work (see below).
>. The application fee.
Special requirements for international tpplicants are described in a following ection.
Examples of Creative Work. In architec-ure, landscape architecture, and urban lesign, applicants are expected to present amples of their creative and analytic York, commonly referred to as a portfolio, i portfolio is an orderly presentation of me’s work. This includes examples of cre-itive and analytical work including but not imited to essays, papers, photographs ind photographic reproduction of artistic York such as sculpture, drawings, paint-tigs, musical composition, and other fine irts. The format must be 8'/" x 11", bound Yith not more than twelve pages (exclud-ng papers). Slides are not accepted. All lortfolios must be identified by the stu-lent’s full name and program to which he student is applying. A stamped, self-ddressed envelope must be included ar return of portfolio.
In general, a minimum of 3.00 grade-ioint average (GPA) on a 4.00 scale (or quivalent) in the prior undergraduate >r graduate degree is required for admis-ion. Applicants with a GPA under 3.00 nay be reviewed for admission; in such ases, submission of strong supporting naterials is advised. For applicants Yith a GPA under 3.00, GRE scores are
normally required for the Urban and Regional Planning Program and strongly recommended for applicants to the other programs.
The admissions decision is made weighing a variety of factors including academic preparation, quality of work experience and portfolio, appropriateness of the applicant’s purpose, and overall likelihood of success in the program. Applicants may be admitted as nondegree students or with special conditions. Because of space limitations, not all qualified applicants may be accepted. Specific requirements for each program are listed below.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (First professional degree; three and one-half year program)
The three and one-half year (114 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with a bachelor’s degree and no prior training or background in architecture or related field. Prerequisites are one year of college-level physics and college mathematics through a first course in calculus. For those without these prerequisites, courses are held in the summer term preceding the first semester.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (First professional degree; three and one-half year program with advanced standing)
Admission to the three and one-half year program with advanced standing is appropriate for applicants with a non-professional bachelor’s degree in architecture or a bachelor’s degree in a related field (engineering, design, art). Depending on their undergraduate record, qualified applicants with a non-professional architectural degree (the first part of a 4 ± 2 program) would ordinarily be given advanced standing of up to one curriculum year in the program. Applicants with degrees in related fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of preparation but may be required to take all the courses in the architectural design sequence. The number of credits and exact point of entry into the program will be determined by the program director.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (Post-professional degree)
The one-year (36 semester hours) postprofessional degree program is appropriate for applicants holding a Bachelor of Architecture or equivalent first professional degree or diploma in architecture.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE IN URBAN DESIGN
(One-year post-professional degree)
The one-year (36 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with a first professional design degree in architecture (e.g. B.Arch., M.Arch.).
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECTURE
(First professional degree)
The three-year (90 semester hours) first professional degree program is appropriate for those with a bachelor’s degree and no training or background in landscape architecture or a related design field.
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (Post-professional degree)
The two-year (48 semester hours) postprofessional degree program is appropriate for applicants with a first professional design degree (B.S.L.A., B.L.A., B.Arch., for example). Applicants without a prior Landscape Architecture degree may be required to take additional core requirements in Plant Materials and Ecology.
MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING
The two-year (51 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with bachelor’s degrees in either design, humanities, social, or physical sciences.
International Applicants
Competence in oral and written English is expected in the School. The School of Architecture and Planning requires a minimum of 550 TOEFL score for international students from non-English speaking countries. However, the School will consider applications from students with strong academic credentials whose TOEFL scores are slightly below 550. If accepted, these students will be required to register and successfully complete a one credit hour technical writing workshop. This one credit hour cannot be used to fulfill part of the degree requirements.
Submission Requirements. International applicants must submit:


54 / School of Architecture and Planning
1. An International Student application and Graduate Admission forms.
2. Two official transcripts from each United States collegiate institution the applicant has attended.
3. Two certified copies of official academic records from each collegiate institution the applicant has attended outside the United States. A certified literal English translation must accompany documents that are not in English.
4. Four letters of recommendation.
5. A statement of purpose.
6. A portfolio of academic, creative, and professional work.
7. A nonrefundable $50 application fee.
8. A current CU-Denver Financial Resources Statement. Statements used for other institutions will not
be accepted. Photocopied documents are not acceptable unless signed by the originator; signatures must not be photocopies.
9. Official TOEFL Score Report to establish English language proficiency. Institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable. Additional supporting documents may
subsequently be required by the office of Admissions. All international applicants who are admitted to CU-Denver must have a valid visa and must enroll for and maintain a full course of study (12 or more semester hours) leading to the completion of a master’s degree.
Financial Requirements. International applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds available to attend the University of Colorado at Denver. To provide this evidence each international applicant should follow these instructions:
1. Complete the Financial Resources Statement. You must prove that you have sufficient money to pay your expenses by submitting the Financial Resources Statement as a part of your application.
a. If you are using your own money, your bank must certify that you have the full amount of money on deposit to meet tuition and expense costs.
In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement, your bank must certify that the money the applicant needs is on deposit in your account.
b. If you are being sponsored by a family member, or a friend, your sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. Your sponsor’s bank must certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money you will need.
c. If you have been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed.
2. An incomplete statement of financial resources or failure to prove the availability of the necessary money will delay or cause the denial of your admission to the University. Be sure your Financial Resources Statement is accurate and complete.
Dates and Deadlines
All programs in the School admit for all semesters. However, acceptance for the Spring and Summer Semesters will be on a space-available basis only. See the Academic Calendar in this catalog or the Schedule of Classes for specific dates.
To be considered for Fall Semester admission, all application materials must be received by the previous March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1. To be considered for Spring Semester admission, all application materials must be received by the previous November 1. Applications received after March 15 or November 1 may be considered for non-degree status only.
Deadlines for submission of application materials:
March 15 - for Fall Semester regular admission
April 15 - for Summer Term regular admission
November 1 - for Spring Semester regular admission
Applications after these dates will be considered only on a space-available basis.
Persons interested in any of the programs or in visiting the School are invited to call the Architecture and Urban Design Programs at (303) 556-2877, and the Landscape Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Programs at (303) 556-3479 to arrange an appointment. For application forms or additional information, please write to:
Office of the Dean
School of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 126 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 (303) 556-3382
PROGRAMS OF STUDY Architecture
Program Director: Peter A. Schneider Office: CU-Denver Bldg., Third Floor Telephone: 556-2877
The architecture program offers curricula leading to both first and postprofessional Master of Architecture degrees. The first professional Master of Architecture (M.Arch.I) is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) and is composed of five basic core areas: Architectural Design, History and Theory, Environmental Context, Science and Technology, and Professional Practice.
Most states require that an individual intending to become an architect hold an accredited degree. There are two types of degrees that are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board: (1) The Bachelor of Architecture, which requires a minimum of five years of study, and (2) The Master of Architecture, which requires a minimum of three years of study following an unrelated bachelor’s degree or two years following a related preprofessional bachelor’s degree. These professional degrees are structured to educate those who aspire to registration/licensure as architects.
The four-year, preprofessional degree, where offered, is not accredited by NAAB. The preprofessional degree is useful for those wishing a foundation in the field of architecture, as preparation for either continued education in a professional degree program or for employment options in architecturally related areas.
The program’s primary objective is to prepare students to enter the practice of architecture with a thorough foundation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop: an awareness of and sensitivity to the quality of the human environment: architectural context; deep understanding of architectural history, theory and criticism; thorough knowledge of architectural and building technology; competence in design process and expression with particular emphasis on exploration, experimentation, and synthesis; understanding of the institutional framework within which architecture takes place; and skills and understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct.
The ultimate goal of the program is to provide the architecture student with a deep appreciation of architecture, while


Architecture / 55
acquiring critical capacity, through comprehension of all facets of architecture. This is achieved through five groups of courses, organized in sequences within five coordinated modules.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE I (First professional degree)
Three and one-half year program. The first professional Master of Architecture degree program is a 114 semester hour program requiring three and one-half years (six semesters and a summer term) of full-time study. The curriculum consists of a core of five related course components and 21 semester hours of electives that may be used for a concentration.
The program is taught at three levels, each with a theme. The first level involves the theme principles, definitions, communication, and design abstraction and takes the first two semesters. The next level takes three semesters and involves a dual theme-architecture in context and applications of methodologies. The theme of the final level in the third year is synthesis rnd professional competency.
The Curriculum-Three and One-Half Tear Program
DESIGN:
18 semester hours
\RCH 5500 (6) \RCH 5501 (6) SiRCH 5502 (6) KRCH 6600 (6) ^RCH 6601 (6) U*CH 6700 (6) WCH 6701 (6) U*CH5510(3)
^RCH 5511 (3)
Introduction to Architectural Design Studio I Introduction to Architectural Design Studio II Architectural Design Studio III
Architectural Design Studio IV
Architectural Design Studio V
Advanced Architectural Design Studio VI Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II
1ISTORYAND THEORY: 5 semester hours
tRCH 5520 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism tRCH 5521 (3) Survey of Architectural History
tRCH 6620 (3) Architecture in the 18th through 20th Centuries
ARCH 6621 (3) History of Architectural Theory
Theory Electives: 6 semester hours
ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT:
6 semester hours
LA 6632 (3) Site Planning
UD6620(3) Architecture of the City
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: 21 semester hours
ARCH 5530 (3) ARCH 5531 (3) ARCH 5532 (3) ARCH 5533 (3)
ARCH 6630 (3) ARCH 6631 (3)
ARCH 6636 (3)
Structures I Structures II Building Technology I Environmental Control Systems I Structures III Environmental Control Systems II
Building Technology II
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
3 semester hours
ARCH 6750 (3) Professional Practice
ELECTIVES:
18 semester hours


56 / School of Architecture and Planning
COURSE SEQUENCE: FIRST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN HISTORY/ THEORY ENVIRON- MENTAL CONTEXT SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
FALL ARCH 5500 (6) ARCH 5510 (3) ARCH 5520 (3) ARCH 5530 (3) 15
YEAR I SPRING ARCH 5501 (6) ARCH 5511(3) ARCH 5521 (3) ARCH 5531 (3) 15
SUMMER ARCH 5502 (6) ARCH 5532 (3) ARCH 5533 (3) 12
YEAR II FALL ARCH 6600 (6) ARCH 6620 (3) LA 6632 (3) ARCH 6630 (3) ARCH 6631 (3) 18
SPRING ARCH 6601 (6) ARCH 6621 (3) ELECTIVES (3) ARCH 6636 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 18
YEAR III FALL ARCH 6700 (6) ELECTIVES (3) UD 6620 (3) ARCH 6750 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 18
SPRING ARCH 6701 (6) ELECTIVES (12) 18
48 18 6 21 3 18 114
Advanced Standing in the three and one-half year program. Students admitted with advanced standing to the first professional degree program follow a course of study based on an evaluation of their academic credentials which takes place during the admissions process. Students who have degrees in related fields may be exempt from certain required courses. Students who have completed a preprofessional bachelor’s degree in an accredited 4 ± 2 program will be given advanced standing of up to one curriculum year in the program. The number of credits and exact point of entry into the program will be determined by the Program Director.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE II (Post-professional program)
The post-professional program in architecture is an advanced curriculum which focuses on research and specialization. The program offers four options of study: 1) Architectural Experimentation, 2) Architecture and Design with Macintosh, 3) Building Technology, and 4) Real Estate Development. The first option, Architectural Experimentation, is suited for students intending to further their knowledge in theory and criticism of architecture. Students are guided to investigate, explore, and experiment with ideas of non-conventional nature and to advance their design ability.
The second option, Architecture and Design with Macintosh, is designed to prepare the student for specialization in computer application in design generation and development.
The third option, Building Technology, prepares students for specialization in
building performance studies utilizing the School’s sophisticated Building Technology Laboratory. Solar, thermo, acoustics, and lighting studies are several main specializations offered by the faculty.
The fourth option, Real Estate Development, focuses on architecture and development process utilizing the expertise of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Program faculty.
Option 1: Architectural Experimentation Option II: Architecture and Design with the Macintosh
Option III: Building Technology Option IV: Real Estate Development
URP 6660 (3) Real Estate Development Process
URP6661 (3) Real Estate Development Finance
URP 6662 (3) Real Estate Market Analysis
URP 6664 (3) Fiscal Impact Analysis
Courses:
ARCH 6622 (3) ARCH 6623 (3)
ARCH 6627 (3)
ARCH 6628(3) ARCH 6632 (3)
ARCH 6633 (3) ARCH 6640(3)
ARCH 6641 (3)
ARCH 6642 (3)
ARCH 6643 (3)
ARCH 6704 (6) ARCH 6705 (6) ARCH 6950(6) ARCH 6951 (6)
Modern Architecture
Investigations in
Architecture
Post-Structuralist
Architecture
Theories of Avant Garde
Building Performance
Analysis
Lighting
Introduction to Computer Graphics
Computer Applications in Architecture Design and Architecture with the Macintosh Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh Architectural Experimentation I Architectural Experimentation II Thesis Research and Programming Architecture Thesis


Architecture / 57
COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION I, ARCHITECTURAL EXPERIMENTATION ARCHITECTURE ELECTIVES:
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN STUDIO THEORY ELECTIVES Ancri oohu uesign rnuiugiapiiy L ARCH 6610 (3) Furniture Design ARCH 6622 (3) Modern Architecture
YEAR I FALL ARCH 6704 (6) ARCH 6622 (3) ARCH 6627 (3) 12 ARCH 6623 (3) Investigations in Architecture
SPRING ARCH 6705 (6) ARCH 6623 (3) ARCH 6628(3) , 2 ARCH 6624 (3) The Built Environment in Other Cultures I:
SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 Research Design
12 12 12 3g ARCH 6910 (6) The Built Environment
in wuier v.until to 11. Field Experience COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION II, ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN WITH THE MACINTOSH ARCH 6627 (3) Post-Structuralist Architecture
COURSE SEQUENCE RESEARCH PROJECT ORTHESIS THEORY ELECTIVES ARCH 6628 (3) Theories of Avant Garde CREDIT ARCH 6632 (3) Building Performance HRS. Analysis
YEAR I FALL ARCH 6704 (6) OR ARCH 6950 (6) ARCH 6640 (3) ARCH 6642 (3) ARCH 6633 (3) Lighting 12 ARCH 6634 (3) Materials and Detailing I: Residential
SPRING ARCH 6705 (6) OR ARCH 6951 (6) ARCH 6641 (3) ARCH 6643 (3) AKLH boob {^jj Materials anci Detailing 11. „ Commercial ARCH 6640 (3) Introduction to Computer
SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) ARCH 6641 (3) Computer Applications
12 12 12 36 in Architecture
ARCH 6642 (3) Design and Architecture with the Macintosh ZOURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION III, BUILDING TECHNOLOGY ARCH 6643 (3) Advanced Design
COURSE SEQUENCE RESEARCH PROJECT ORTHESIS THEORY ELECTIVES the Macintosh CREDIT ARCH 6683 (3) Teaching Methods HRS- in Architecture
YEAR I FALL ARCH 6704 (6) OR ARCH 6950 (6) ARCH 6632 (3) ARCH 6642 (3) ARCH 6704 (6) Architectural 12 Experimentation I ARCH 6705 (6) Architectural
SPRING ARCH 6705 (6) OR ARCH 6951 (6) ARCH 6633 (3) ARCH 6643 (3) Experimentation II 12 ARCH 6720 (3) American Art and Architecture
SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 ARCH 6721 (3) Art and Architecture
12 12 12 ol Islam db APr*-I £799 rTV I afrir* Amoriran Art
and Architecture ARCH 6723 (3) Oriental Art and Arrhitprtiirp :OURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION IV, REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT ARCH 6740 (3) Computer Aided Design
COURSE SEQUENCE RESEARCH PROJECT ORTHESIS THEORY ELECTIVES aklh tiy.iu ) Arcmtecture internsnip rpcniT ARCH 6931 (3) Architecture Internship LHRS ARCH 6950 (6) Thesis Research and
YEAR I FALL ARCH 6704 (6) OR ARCH 6950 (6) URP 6660 (3) URP 6662 (3) ARCH 6951 (6) Architecture Thesis 12
SPRING ARCH 6705 (6) OR ARCH 6951 (6) URP 6661 (3) URP 6664 (3) 12
SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12
12 12 12 36


58 / School of Architecture and Planning
Architecture Courses
ARCH 5050-3. Applied Mathematics for Designers 1. This class is designed for the student with little or no college MATH experience. It begins with arithmetic skills and short-cuts, continues through college level algebra, and ends with trigonometry. This class is part of the required mathematics for students of architecture, but is recommended for anyone of non-technical background.
ARCH 5051-3. Applied Mathematics for Designers II. A continuation of ARCH 5050, this class will begin with analytical geometry and continue through differential and integral calculus. The course completes the mathematics requirement for students of architecture and is open to those who have credit for or feel competent in the material covered in ARCH 5050. ARCH 5052-3. Environmental Science for Designers. This course is designed to meet the requirements of the school of architecture and planning for entrance into the graduate program in architecture. The basic principles of physics will be covered in a practical way. The course includes the mechanics of bodies at rest, dynamics, electricity, heat, light, and sound. The course is recommended for anyone who needs a working knowledge of science.
ARCH 5500-6. Introduction to Architectural Design Studio I. The introductory studio focuses on the basic strategies and techniques of design production. Students are introduced to architectonics, design analysis and criticism, and the significance of the elements of design. Emphasis is placed on development of an awareness of the role of architectural theory and history in the design process. Prereq: ARCH 5050, 5051, and 5052; coreq: ARCH 5510, 5520 and 5530.
ARCH 5501-6. Introduction to Architectural Design Studio II. The second introductory design studio continues the examination of the issues raised in the first semester and begins investigation of more complex issues related to building design and landscape. Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic approach to design while simultaneously dealing with the development of theory and intellectual inquiry. Prereq: ARCH 5500; coreq: ARCH 5511,5521, and 5531.
ARCH 5502-6. Architectural Design Studio III. The first intermediate studio in architecture focuses on the interrelationship between architectural design and the art of construction. The course acts as a transition between the abstract and theoretical concerns of the introductory studios and the thoughtful realization or
practice of ideas. The emphasis is placed on development of how a building is put together as a material conceptual construct. Prereq: ARCH 5501; coreq: ARCH 5532 and 5533.
ARCH 5510-3. Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I. This course covers the basic principles of descriptive geometry (technical drawing). Basic principles of orthographic projection, axono-metric projection, perspective, and photographic reproduction methods (portfolio) are examined. Emphasis is placed on defining abstract forms and real objects in terms of line, light, shade, and shadow.
ARCH 5511-3. Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II. This course builds upon the basic principles and issues in the previous semester. Craft and precision are stressed, but with an emphasis toward design articulation and individual expression. Students are introduced to a wide range of compositional techniques and methods and selection of media and materials. The subjects covered are: drawing as analysis; drawing as representation; principles of color interaction; and means of representing architectural space in terms of color, light, shade, and shadow gradation and value distinction.
ARCH 5520-3. Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism. This course examines the evolution of ideals and principles in modern architecture, design, landscape, and urbanism and traces the historical development of theoretical issues through a study of selected writing. The course provides an overview of the literature in design theories and explores the relationship between design and the writings that include its interpretation and production.
ARCH 5521-3. Survey of Architectural History. The second course in the his-tory/theory sequence, beginning with architecture and urbanism in antiquity, stresses the origin and interpretation of built form as symbol and the problems of early building technology and development of tradition in European architecture and urbanism. It examines the emergence of building types and settlement patterns and their relationship to social institutions. Case studies are drawn from pre-classical, classical, and late antiquity, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque architecture.
ARCH 5530-3. Structures I. The course introduces the analysis and design of structural elements and focuses on fundamental principles of statics and strength of materials. Areas covered are equilibrium, movement, trusses, three force
members, properties of structural materials including wood and steel, stress-strain relationships, and an introduction into the design and analysis of structural elements made of wood and steel in tension, shear, and bearing.
ARCH 5531-3. Structures II. The course is a continuation of Structures I, focusing on study of stress determination of structures, and general principles involved in the design of wood, steel, and concrete members. Problems in design of building elements subjected to direct stress, beveling, and combined stress, deflection, methods of fabrication, and details of connections are explored.
ARCH 5532-3. Building Technology I. This course addresses issues in building construction and focuses on interrelationships between architectural concepts and objectives and building construction techniques through lectures, case study presentations, and exercises. It focuses on the wide range of materials and construction techniques available to meet design objectives.
ARCH 5533-3. Environmental Control Systems I. This course focuses on study of environmental control systems in building, including the thermal behavior of buildings, climate as a major determinant of building design, energy use in buildings strategies for designing buildings as complete environmental control systems, mechanical means of environmental controls, heating, ventilation, air-conditioning, plumbing, electrical, and communication systems, water supply, and sanitation systems.
ARCH 5540-3. Design Photography.
This course will introduce architectural students to the basics of photography anc architectural photography. Class will be a combination of lecture/demonstration and student assignments followed by eval uation. The course will enable the student to produce his or her own working photographs of drawings, models, and buildings.
ARCH 6600-6. Architectural Design Studio IV. The second intermediate studk sequence focuses on exploration of architecture in the urban context and examination of typological form and cultured constructs which will provide a basis for the inclusion of new spaces and forms within the fabric of the city. Emphasis is placed on methodological study of site, program, and elements of architecture which are used to facilitate work.
ARCH 6601-6. Architectural Design Studio V. The final intermediate studio sequence focuses on examination of impacts of large-scale urban projects that


Architecture Courses / 59
include commercial, office, and residential uses in an existing urban fabric. Issues such as typology, character, and monu-mentality are considered in relation to the design of buildings of civic significance. Emphasis is placed on relationship of the role of the building to the morphology of the city and the building’s expression in architectural form.
ARCH 6610-3. Furniture Design. The focus of this studio/lecture course is to explore the effects and responses of physical human factors, material characteristics, structure, joinery, and history in the design of furniture. Design process, programming, design and presentation techniques, along with drawing and model building skills are emphasized in this project oriented course.
ARCH 6620-3. Architecture in the 18th Through 20th Centuries. The third course in the history/theory sequence focuses on the breakdown of the Baroque synthesis and the coming of classical and romantic historicism in architecture and the birth of modern architecture. The impact of technology, industrialization and social changes on architecture and urbanism, changing attitudes toward the treatment of architectural space and the formation of new critical concepts, and the emergence of Art Nouveau and the roots of the “Modern Movement” in architecture are examined.
ARCH 6621-3. History of Architectural Theory. This course investigates architectural thought from antiquity to the present. It begins with a review of greek ideals and then proceeds — through an appreciation of architecture and its texts as an essential cultural constituent — with a survey of major themes such as Renaissance Humanism, Enlightenment Rationalism, Romantic Historicism, Neo-Medievalism, the varieties of Modernism, Neo-Eclecticism, and the most recent directions.
ARCH 6622-3. Modem Architecture.
This course examines modern architecture from De Stijl and Bauhaus to Le Corbusier. Emphasis is placed on critical evaluation of this developmental stage and its impact on discipline of architecture and city design.
\RCH 6623-3. Investigations in Architecture. This course focuses on examination af the historical development of theoretical issues through a study of selected writings and the evolution of ideas and design arinciples in architecture, landscape architecture, and urbanism. It explores he pedagogic relationship between fesign and the cultural roots that influ-;nce its interpretation and production.
ARCH 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures I: Research Design.
This course intends to broaden students’ perspectives by asking them to examine design within another culture. Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a statement of the problem to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken, and the nature of the report produced.
ARCH 6627-3. Post Structuralist Architecture. This course examines theories of post-structuralism and their implications to architectural exploration and experimentations. Drawing from Russell, Descartes, Derrida, Husserl, Heidegger, Barthes, Foucault, and other leading authorities, the course focuses on development of a theoretical discourse for architecture.
ARCH 6628-3. Theories of Avant Garde.
This course examines the origin and evolution of the Avant Garde theories from Russian constructivism to Futurism, Dadaism, Surrealism, and De Stijl. Emphasis is placed on investigation of the implication of historic Avant Garde to present modes of architectural exploration.
ARCH 6629-3. History of Interior Design. This course is a survey and critical analysis of major 20th century interiors. It begins the process of relating interior environments from antiquity to contemporary by focusing on furnishings, the decorative arts, interior architectural detailing, and interior architectural spaces. The special focus is on critical evaluation and analysis of historical precedents.
ARCH 6630-3. Structures III. This course examines theoretical and conceptual bases for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of indeterminate structures. Course topics include continuity, movement distribution, reinforced concrete elements, precast and prestressed elements, walls, columns, footings, earthquake loads on buildings, and detailing of structural systems.
ARCH 6631-3. Environmental Control Systems II. The course focuses on lighting and acoustics. Illumination quantity and quality, day lighting and electric lighting, lighting design and applications are covered. The behavior and effect of daylight are studied through the construction of models. Techniques such as preparation of working drawings and specifications are covered.
ARCH 6632-3. Building Performance Analysis. This course addresses issues in performance integration of overall building components and the ability to predict architectural design performance in
advance. Students will experience the use of up-to-date technology, laboratory facilities, guided hands-on experiments, on-site observation, and computer simulation. ARCH 6633-3. Lighting. This introductory course in lighting investigates the processes and the objectives of lighting and provides the vocabulary and mechanics necessary to the understanding and interpretation of lighting needs in design. Strategies and criteria for lighting are the focus of this course, covering both theoretical and practical issues.
ARCH 6634-3. Materials and Detailing I: Residential.This course provides students with the opportunity to explore theory and application of materials used in residential interiors. The course focuses on study of composition and characteristics of individual finish materials as well as conventional methods of representing them graphically.
ARCH 6635-3. Materials and Detailing II: Commercial. The goals and parameters of this course are the same as those outlined for Materials and Detailing I; however, the focus will be commercial interiors. Prereq: ARCH 6634.
ARCH 6636-3. Building Technology II.
This course is a continuation of Building Technology I. It focuses on the range of building construction systems and techniques that can be organized to achieve specific design intentions. The course provides this framework to organize and research construction documents with specific performance and design criteria. Prereq: ARCH 5530,5531,5532.
ARCH 6640-3. Introduction to Computer Graphics. This course provides a hands-on introduction to the personal computer and the disk operating system. The fundamentals of drawing with a computer will be taught with the production of moderate-sized drawings. Basic two-dimensional cadd concepts such as symbols and layering will be explored. Students will learn to use a digitizer for input and output graphics to a plotter.
ARCH 6641-3. Computer Applications in Architecture. This course builds upon the basics learned in ARCH 6640. Customizing applications to increase productivity will be stressed. Linking of graphics and text databases through the use of attributes will be investigated. Three-dimensional modeling will be used to visualize the design process.
ARCH 6642-3. Design and Architecture With the Macintosh. This course introduces the Macintosh computer as a powerful exploratory design tool which has the potential for exploration and generation of new architectural ideas and forms.


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The Macintosh is seen as an extension or amplification of the human brain. The course does not require the user to learn computer programming or complicated command structures; a non-technical, intuitive, word of mouth, trial and error mode of learning is possible. Once basic skills are mastered, production is immediate. Emphasis is placed on analysis, self criticism, revision, and refinement of design intentions with the computer tool. ARCH 6643-3. Advanced Design Applications With the Macintosh. This course builds upon experiences gained from the introductory course, ARCH 6642. The course requires the students to have an extensive knowledge of the Macintosh system. The course will devote the entire semester to work with the three-dimensional modeling programs. Emphasis is placed on techniques of exploration and innovation in three-dimensional spatial representation of design and architectural constructions.
ARCH 6660-3. Human and Social Dimensions of Design. This course focuses on the introduction of basic social and psychological processes relevant to changing environmental conditions, human factors, and problems of the built environment. Emphasis is placed on techniques of interface problems in design; the relationship between human use and perception of space, cognitive mapping, preferences and attitudes toward environmental settings; and the evaluation of particular environments and developing architectural programs.
ARCH 6683-3. Teaching Methods in Architecture. This course is designed to develop teaching and academic capabilities in the context of architecture. The student works with a faculty member in an instructional context eight hours per week.
ARCH 6686-3. Special Topics. Various topical concerns are offered in architecture history, theory, elements, concepts, methods and implementation strategies, and other related areas.
ARCH 6700-6. Advanced Architectural Design Studio VI. The studio focuses on students’ elaboration and substantiation of personal ideas through complex design exercises and by critically addressing the status of contemporary architectural theory. Emphasis is placed on a comprehensive design project that is structured to test students on integration of structural aspects, mechanical systems, site planning, and climate considerations within their design solutions.
ARCH 6701-6. Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII. The final design studio
continues the comprehensive approach through a full range of design investigation and strategies at all scales from program and conception to construction detail. Students must demonstrate abilities to synthesize all previous work through an application of a complex architectural design project.
ARCH 6704-6. Architectural Experimentation I. An advanced architectural design studio focusing on design explorations and stressing theorization and development of ideologies in architectural design. Emphasis is placed on experimentation with various art medias such as painting, sculpture, music, linguistics, film making, and others.
ARCH 6705-6. Architectural Experimentation II. As a continuation of ARCH 6704, this studio stresses a culminative effort toward synthesis and contribution of original proposed for development of architectural theory. Emphasis is placed on architectural transformation as a major indicator of the original contribution of this studio.
ARCH 6720-3. American Art and Architecture. This course focuses on major developments in american art from 1750-1950. Painting and sculpture, as well as important developments in architecture, will be discussed. The work of such artists and architects as Copley, Peale, Whistler, Cassatt, Hopper, O’Keeffe, Thomas Jefferson, Louis Sullivan, and Frank Lloyd Wright will be studied.
ARCH 6721-3. Art and Architecture of Islam. This course focuses on study and examination of the art and architecture of the Islamic cultures from the death of Muhammad through the 18th century from Spain to India.
ARCH 6722-3. Latin American Art and Architecture. This course focuses on study and examination of the art and architecture of the colonies of Spain and Portugal in the western hemisphere from 1492 to the present.
ARCH 6723-3. Oriental Art and Architecture. This is an introductory survey of oriental art and architecture. The course aims to uncover the relationship between east Asian art and architecture and its accompanying theories.
ARCH 6740-3. Computer Aided Design. The course explores the relationship between design, mathematics, and computation. The concepts of finite mathematics will be introduced using building design examples. Problem-solving methods in design and computation will be explored. The analysis of plan types will be related to topology and geometry; symmetry and combinatorial
groups will be introduced. Computer projects and readings will be assigned to explore the concepts.
ARCH 6750-3. Professional Practice. This course introduces the student to the essential elements of professional practice through subject areas such as internship, licensing, services, modes of practice, fees, marketing, documents, specifications, and production procedures. One three-hour lecture per week. Prereq: final year in program or approval of instructor.
ARCH 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study.
Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to architecture.
ARCH 6910-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures II: Field Experience. Students will travel to their respective cities and undertake the agreed upon study proposals. The course intends not only to help students consider their own design and planning attitudes, but also help them see the world from a more balanced perspective.
ARCH 6930-3. Architecture Internship.
This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to students anc is composed of eight hours per week work in a practicing professional’s office during the regular semester. The student is placed in an architectural and/or design office by the school and receives credit instead of pay. Students must complete second year level before taking this course.
ARCH 6931-3. Architecture Internship.
This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to students anc is composed of eight hours per week work in a practicing professional’s office during the regular semester. The student is placed in an architectural and/or design office by the school and receives credit instead of pay. Students must complete second year level before taking this course.
ARCH 6950-6. Thesis Research and Programming.
ARCH 6951-6. Architecture Thesis.
Urban Design
A city no longer inhabited, not simply left behind, but haunted by meaning and culture. This state of being haunted, which keeps the city from returning to nature, is perhaps the general mode of the presence or absence of the thing itself in pure language. (Derrida 1978)
Cities are in reality great camps of the living and the dead where many


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elements remain like signals, symbols, cautions. When the holiday is over, what remains of the architecture is scarred, and the sand consumes the street again. There is nothing left but to resume with a certain obstinacy the reconstruction of elements and instruments in expectation of another holiday. (Aldo Rossi 1981)
The Urban Design Program at the School of Architecture and Planning is intended to be a non-conventional research program leading to the degree of Master of Architecture in Urban Design. The premise of the program is investigation, exploration, experimentation, and representation of ideas and proposals regarding the development of the city. Unlike the classical mode of inquiry, the Urban Design Program takes a relatively more radical approach to the analysis of architecture of the city. The curriculum is designed for the questioning of the existing connections and searching for alternative ideologies and proposals for the city’s architecture through a structured sequence of lecture and design studios.
There are two options of study which extend over a two semester or three semester course of study. There are three curriculum steps involved in these plans. The first step of the curriculum engages students in studying the fundamentals of theory and criticism concerning the structure of present architectural text and discourses. Simultaneously, the student also
OPTION I: ONE ACADEMIC YEAR
is introduced to the process of decomposition. This step is necessary for the understanding of the interrelationship between architectural text as a language and architectural text as an artifact. The second step of the curriculum engages the student in studying the recomposition of the city, a process that is in reverse order of the first step. Recomposition involves a sequence of activities that begins with the questioning of the traditions, followed by an investigation of the metaphysics of origins and presence, and ends with the formulation of new design strategies for the architecture of the city. The third and final step is intended to be a cumulative experience where the student pursues individual interest in urban design.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE IN URBAN DESIGN
The Master of Architecture in Urban Design Program is a one-year post-professional degree and is suited for students who have completed a first professional degree in Architecture (B.Arch., M.Arch.). The program requires completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours.
Core Curriculum
The core curriculum consists of six graduate courses for a total of 21 credit hours. Some students entering the program may be advised to take additional
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN STUDIO THEORY ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
YEAR I FALL UD 6600 (6) UD 6620 (3) ARCH 6622 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 18
SPRING UD 6601 (6) UD 6621 (3) ARCH 6623 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 18
12 12 12 36
OPTION II: ONE YEAR CALENDAR YEAR
courses depending on their educational backgrounds. The core curriculum consists of the following courses:
UD 6600 (6)
UD 6601 (6) UD 6602 (6)
UD 6620 (3) UD 6621 (3) ARCH 6622 (3) ARCH 6623 (3)
Transformation and Decomposition Studio Composition Studio City of Exploration and Experimentation Studio (Optional)
Architecture of the City City as an Artifact Modern Architecture Investigations in Architecture
ELECTIVES:
LA 5521(3)
URP 5532 (3) URP 6680 (3)
URP 6682 (3)
ARCH 6621 (3)
ARCH 6627 (3)
ARCH 6628 (3) ARCH 6640 (3)
ARCH 6641 (3)
ARCH 6642 (3)
ARCH 6643 (3)
ARCH 6683 (3) ARCH 6720 (3) ARCH 6721 (3) ARCH 6722 (3) ARCH 6723 (3) ARCH 6740 (3)
History of Landscape Architecture Urban Form History Urbanization in Developing Countries Housing in Developing Countries
History of Architectural Theory
Post-Structuralist Architecture Theories of Avant Garde Introduction to Computer Graphics
Computer Applications in Architecture Design and Architecture with the Macintosh Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh Teaching Methods in Architecture American Art and Architecture Art and Architecture of Islam
Latin American Art and Architecture Oriental Art and Architecture Computer Aided Design
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN STUDIO THEORY ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
FALL UD 6600 (6) UD 6620 (3) ARCH 6622 (3) 12
YEAR I SPRING UD6601 (6) UD 6621 (3) ARCH 6623 (3) 12
SUMMER UD 6602 (6) ELECTIVES (6) 12
18 12 6 36
Urban Design Courses
U D 6600-6. Transformation Decomposition Studio. The first studio of a two-studio sequence introduces the process of decomposition in urban structure through analysis of landscape and structures in search of ordinary and non-ordinary elements of the city. The studio then is an attempt to restore immanent conditions-the suspension between origin and effect, between positive and negative elements of urban structure.


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U D 6601-6. Composition Studio. This studio builds upon the analytical investigations conducted in the previous semester and explores the process of composition or recomposition in the architecture of the city. Drawing upon deconstructionist theory, the studio presents a challenge to the hegemony of traditional design studios and is a search for authenticity. Considering architecture as text, the studio is a means to represent an invention, an invited speculation on the conditions of architecture of city.
U D 6602-6. City of Exploration and Experimentation Studio. This is an optional independent studio where individual students pursue their individual interests with an emphasis on interaction between architecture and other disciplines. This studio is structured as a cumulative synthesis of knowledge and skills into an original proposal for the betterment of city conditions.
U D 6620-3. Architecture of the City. This course focuses on interpretation of architecture of the city and its landscape, articulation and disarticulation, discontinuity of order, immanence and memory. Drawing from contemporary writers such as Derrida, Barthes, Adorno, Habermas, Heidegger, Husserl, and others, the course examines the questions of replication, representation, and signification in the city.
U D 6621-3. The City as an Artifact. This course focuses on study of ordinary and non-ordinary architecture and its implications to urban context. Beginning by examination of classical representation and refutation, the course attempts to present denial and possibility in architecture by investigating tradition and metaphysics of origins and presence.
U D 6686-3. Special Topics in Urban Design. Various topical concerns are offered in urban design history, theory, elements, concepts, methods, and implementation strategies and other related areas.
U D 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to urban design.
U D 6950-6. Thesis Research and Programming.
U D 6951-6. Urban Design Thesis.
Landscape Architecture
Program Director: Lois A. Brink
The Landscape Architecture Program offers both first and post-professional Master of Landscape Architecture degrees. The first professional Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) is fully accredited by the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB) and is recognized by the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture.
The primary mission of the program is to imbue the student with a design ethic for Landscape Architecture-in its wholis-tic sense of landscape intervention-as a balance or harmony between the abstract and the real, between architecture and landscape, and between art and ecology. The underlying premise or baseline is that the landscape architect strives to design places for people to inhabit, in the artful sense of the word, with a relentless commitment to quality, ethics and appropriateness.
The program prepares the student to enter into the profession of Landscape Architecture with a thorough understanding and capability of making judgments through a design process. The design process is the method by which one can determine the appropriateness and integration of the natural, aesthetic, social and cultural parameters of landscape intervention. It infuses the student with a rigor and discipline necessary to execute-implement-evaluate and critique his or her actions.
More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop a thorough competence in design, the design process, and knowledge of landscape technology with particular emphasis on exploration, experimentation, and synthesis, and understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct.
The Curriculum-Three Year Program
DESIGN:
42 semester hours
LA 5500 (6)
LA 5501 (6)
LA 6600 (6) LA 6601 (6) LA 6700 (6)
LA 6701 (6)
LA 5510 (3)
LA 5511(3)
Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio 1 Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio 11 Landscape Architectural Design Studio III Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio V
Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio VI
Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II
HISTORY AND THEORY: 15 semester hours
Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism History of Landscape Architecture Architecture in the 18th through 20th Centuries Plants in Design
ARCH 5520 (3)
LA 5521 (3)
ARCH 6620 (3)
LA 6670 (3)
LA Theory Elective: 3 semester hours
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY:
15 semester hours
LA 5532 (3) Landscape Technology I
LA 5572 (3) Landscape Ecology
LA 6631 (3) Landscape Technology II
LA 6632 (3) Site Planning
Technology Elective: 3 semester hours of computer applications
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE I (First professional degree)
Three year program. The first professional M.L.A. degree requires 90 semester hours and three years of full-time study. The curriculum consists of a core of four related course components: Design,
42 credit hours; History and Theory, 15; Science and Technology, 15; and Professional Practice, 3, totaling 75 credit hours, and 15 semester hours of electives.
PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE:
3 semester hours
LA 6750 (3) Professional Practice
ELECTIVES:
15 semester hours
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE II
(Post-professional degree)
Two year program. The postprofessional degree program requires 48 semester hours and two years of full-time study.


Landscape Architecture / 63
COURSE SEQUENCE: MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE I
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN HISTORY/ THEORY SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
YEAR I FALL LA 5500 (6) LA 5510 (3) ARCH 5520 (3) LA 5532 (3) 15
SPRING LA 5501 (6) LA 5511 (3) LA 5521 (3) LA 5572 (3) 15
YEAR II FALL LA 6600 (6) ARCH 6620 (3) LA 6670 (3) LA 6632 (3) 15
SPRING LA 6601 (6) ELECTIVES (3) LA 6631 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 15

YEAR 111 FALL LA 6700 (6) ARCH 6750 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 15
SPRING LA 6701 (6) ELECTIVES (9) 15
42 15 15 3 15 90
COURSE SEQUENCE: TWO YEAR PROGRAM
COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN HISTORY/ THEORY ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
YEAR I FALL LA 5500 (6) LA 5510 (3) ARCH 5520 (3) 12
SPRING LA 6601 (6) LA 5511 (3) ARCH 5521 (3) 12
YEAR 11 FALL LA 6700 (6) ELECTIVES (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12
SPRING LA 6701 (6) ELECTIVES (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12
30 12 6 48
The core curriculum consists of two groups: Design, 30 credit hours; and History/Theory, 12; for a total of 42 credit hours, and 6 semester hours of electives.
ARCH 5521 (3) Survey of Architectural History
LA Theory Electives: 6 semester hours in advanced LA theory
The Curriculum-Two Year Program
DESIGN:
30 semester hours
LA 5500 (6)
LA 6601 (6) LA 6700 (6)
LA 6701 (6)
LA 5510 (3)
LA 5511(3)
Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio I Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio V
Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio VI
Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II
HISTORY AND THEORY:
12 semester hours
ARCH 5520 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism
ELECTIVES:
6 semester hours
ELECTIVES:
LA 6622 (3) LA 6624 (3)
LA 6641 (3)
LA 6686 (3)
LA 6840 (1-3) LA 6910 (6)
LA 6930 (3)
ARCH 5540 (3) ARCH 6622 (3) ARCH 6623 (3)
ARCH 6627 (3)
ARCH 6628 (3) ARCH 6629 (3)
Visual Quality Analysis The Built Environment in Other Cultures I: Research Design Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture Special Topics in Landscape Architecture Independent Study The Built Environment in Other Cultures II: Field Experience
Landscape Architecture
Internship
Design Photography
Modern Architecture
Investigations in
Architecture
Post-Structuralist
Architecture
Theories of Avant Garde
History of Interior Design
ARCH 6640 (3) ARCH 6641 (3) ARCH 6642 (3) ARCH 6643 (3)
ARCH 6683 (3)
ARCH 6704 (6)
ARCH 6705 (6)
ARCH 6720 (3)
ARCH 6721 (3)
ARCH 6722 (3)
ARCH 6723 (3)
ARCH 6740 (3) URP 5520 (3) URP 5532 (3) URP 6649 (3)
URP 6650 (3)
URP 6660 (3)
URP 6661 (3)
URP 6662 (3)
URP 6664 (3)
Introduction to Computer Graphics
Computer Applications in Architecture Design and Architecture with the Macintosh Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh Teaching Methods in Architecture Architectural Experimentation I Architectural Experimentation II
American Art and Architecture Art and Architecture of Islam
Latin American Art and Architecture Oriental Art and Architecture Computer Aided Design Urban Spatial Analysis Urban Form History Environmental Planning I: Ecology
Environmental Planning II: Policy and Law Real Estate Development Process
Real Estate Development Finance
Real Estate Market Analysis
Fiscal Impact Analysis
A thesis option [LA 6950 (6): Thesis Research and Programming and LA 6951 (6): Landscape Architecture Thesis] is available primarily for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced academic training in landscape architecture or related fields.


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Landscape Architecture Courses
LA 5500-6. Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio I. The introductory studio focuses on the basic strategies and techniques of design production. Students are introduced to architectonics, design analysis and criticism, and the significance of the elements of design. Emphasis is placed on development of an awareness of the role of theory and history in the design process.
L A 5501-6. Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio II. The second introductory design studio continues the examination of the issues raised in the first semester and begins investigation of more complex issues related to building design and landscape. Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic approach to design while simultaneously dealing with the development of theory and intellectual inquiry.
L A 5510-3. Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I. This course covers the basic principles of descriptive geometry (technical drawing). Basic principles of orthographic projection, axono-metric projection, perspective, and photographic reproduction methods (portfolio) are examined. Emphasis is placed on defining abstract forms and real objects in terms of line, light, shade, and shadow.
L A 5511-3. Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II. This course builds upon the basic principles and issues in the previous semester. Craft and precision are stressed, but with an emphasis toward design articulation and individual expression. Students are introduced to a wide range of compositional techniques and methods and selection of media and materials. The subjects covered are: drawing cis analysis; drawing as representation; principles of color interaction; and means of representing architectural space in terms of color, light, shade, and shadow gradation and value distinction.
L A 5521-3. History of Landscape Architecture. This course investigates architectural thought from antiquity to the present. It begins with a review of greek ideals and then proceeds - through an appreciation of landscape and nature as essential cultural constituents - with a survey of major themes such as renaissance humanism, enlightenment, rationalism, romantic historicism, neo-medievalism, the varieties of miderism, neo-electicism, and the most recent directions in landscape and garden design.
L A 5532-3. Landscape Technology I. This course will address the fundamental techniques of landscape architecture, including drafting skills, surveying and grading, and the natural systems as they affect construction. The application of road design and utility systems for site development will also be covered.
LA 5572-3. Landscape Ecology. This course is focused on the study of physiography, cultural factors, and aesthetic criteria in relation to landscape, spatial organization, and urban and regional structure. Emphasis is placed on continuity and change in and ecology of both natural and man-made landscape.
L A 6600-6. Landscape Architectural Design Studio III. The first intermediate studio focuses upon the exploration of landscape as context and its integration of objects. Emphasis is placed on exploration of landscape and experimentation with spatial organization and manipulation of context.
L A 6601-6. Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV. The second intermediate studio sequence focuses on larger scale development projects dealing with more complex spatial arrangement of buildings and other objects within the landscape, functional needs and requirements within the framework of a variety of social, economic, and natural/physical constraints.
L A 6620-3. Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism. This course focuses on exploration and assessment of the current state of theory in landscape architecture and related design disciplines, and the ideas undergoing contemporary design approaches. Narrative and explanatory theories are the objects of study. Emphasis is placed on history and pedagogic theories and their relationships to other disciplines such as art, ecology, geography, architecture, and anthropology.
L A 6622-3. Visual Quality Analysis. This course introduces students to a range of philosophies, methods, and techniques in visual landscape analysis. Emphasis is placed on application of methods and techniques to urban and regional context and scale, and visual impact assessment and simulation.
L A 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures I. Research Design. This course intends to broaden students’ perspectives by asking them to examine design within another culture. Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a statement of the problem to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken, and the nature of the report produced.
L A 6631-3. Landscape Technology II.
This course is a continuation of L A 5532 and focuses on the study of materials and methods employed in construction of site features and evolution of palette, techniques and theory of detailed design including pavements, fences, walk, stairs, revetments, basins, and fountains.
L A 6632-3. Site Planning. The course focuses on the site planning process including research and data gathering, data analysis and synthesis, design analysis and its relationship to building program and concept, and design synthesis of site and preparation of site plan. Emphasis is placed on design through grading, representation, manipulation and calculation of road work, utilities and other site features. Vertical and horizontal alignment, earthwork and cost computation, and integration with existing and proposed features or systems are all covered.
L A 6641-3. Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture. The course introduces problem solving methods, and the relationship between those methods, and the application of a computer to design problems. Introductory problems are given in basic using the graphics package, a high-level language such as pascal is used to explore language in more depth, and to conclude, a series of assignments introduces the graphics unit or high-level language. Assignments in programming cad problems are required.
LA 6670-3. Plants in Design. This course focuses on the study of design methods used in landscape architecture. Formal design principles, spatial sequencing, and plant functions are applied in design studies, based on botanical aesthetic traits and physical requirements of a wide variety of plant material.
L A 6686-3. Special Topics in Landscape Architecture. Various topical concerns are offered in landscape architecture history, theory, elements, concepts, methods, implementation strategies, and other related areas.
L A 6700-6. Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio V. This studio will focus upon the students’ elaboration and substantiation of personal ideas through complex design exercise which critically address contemporary landscape architectural theory. Emphasis is based upon a comprehensive landscape design project structured to test student ability to investigate ecological, socio-cultural aesthetics and dimension in their design solutions.
L A 6701-6. Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio VI. The final studio is comprehensive in its approach. The major goal is to present a full range of


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complex design investigations and implementation strategies at various scales, while allowing the students to demonstrate their ability to synthesize all previous academic work.
L A 6750-3. Professional Practice. The course focuses on studies in the professional practice of landscape architecture and related professions, and case problems in initiating and managing a professional practice. It explores the essential elements of professional practice and equips students with the fundamental knowledge and skills requisite to an understanding of, and participation in, the conduct of practice in landscape architecture. The course covers organization of the landscape office, professional services of landscape architects, fee structures and fee management, contracts, legal rights and responsibilities, and management.
L A 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to landscape architecture or urban design. LA 6910-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures: Field Experience. Students will travel to their respective cities and undertake the agreed upon study proposals. The course intends not only to help students consider their own design and planning attitudes, but also to help them see the world from a more balanced perspective.
L A 6930-3. Landscape Architecture Internship. This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to students, and is composed of eight hours per week work in a practicing professional's office during the regular semester. The student is placed in a landscape architectural and/or design office by the school and receives credit instead of pay. Students must complete the second year level before taking this course.
L A 6950-6. Thesis Research and Programming.
L A 6951-6. Landscape Architecture Thesis.
Urban and Regional Planning
Program Director Peter V. Schaeffer
Urban and regional planning in the United States and other countries is involved in activities aimed at shaping the pattern of human settlements and providing housing, public services, and other crucial support systems that help support a decent urban living environment. Planning encompasses not only a concern for the structure and image of the built envi-
ronment, but also a desire to harness logical forces that give meaning to the everyday lives of men and women in residential, work, and recreational settings.
More specifically, urban and regional planning is concerned with: identifying social needs and designing and providing services and facilities to meet those needs; anticipating change and its impact on how people can and do live; understanding the way plans are made, decisions implemented, and actions evaluated and the means by which these processes can be improved; stimulating, guiding, and influencing actions of the private sector with respect to land use and land use transitions in urban, suburban, and rural areas; identifying potentially adverse impacts of human activities on the natural environment and mitigating those impacts; designing the city and the surrounding region to facilitate activities in which people need and desire to engage.
The Urban and Regional Planning Program at the University of Colorado at Denver is designed to prepare students for professional practice in urban and regional planning as well as for more advanced academic training in planning and related fields. The degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) is awarded after successful completion of a course of study normally requiring about two years of full-time course work.
The objectives of the Urban and Regional Planning Program are: to clarify the behavioral and perceptual sources of urban and regional problems; to foster the appropriate use of policy, planning, design, and legal devices for creating urban and regional environments responsive to human needs and ecological principles; and to develop methods for evaluating urban programs, policies, and plans which have important human and natural environmental consequences.
MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING
The Urban and Regional Planning Program offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.), which requires two years of full-time study and a minimum of 51 credit hours. The M.U.R.P. degree program is accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board. It consists of a core of 27 semester hours of courses in: Theory, Planning Methods, Spatial Analysis, Planning Law, History, Planning Studio, Site Planning, and at least 24 semester hours of elective courses.
All planning courses qualify as electives. The student should select courses, however, that build on each other and together form a strong specialization.
The Urban and Regional Planning Program requires that students see an advisor at least once a semester before registration to obtain approval for the course selection. Each student is assigned a member of the faculty as an advisor and mentor.
The particular strength of the Urban and Regional Planning Program is Physical Planning with emphasis on Environmental Planning and Land Development. Students are encouraged to consider appropriate courses in the Landscape Architecture Program to achieve greater skills and depth of knowledge. A dual Master of Urban and Regional Planning and Master of Landscape Architecture degree is offered.
Applicants to the Urban and Regional Planning Program are expected to present their application materials in a portfolio. The portfolio should include a resume which describes the applicant’s educational and professional background, a statement of professional goals and objectives, a list of courses that the applicant has taken which relate to planning, and a copy of a student or professional project or paper with a note explaining why the
COURSE SEQUENCE
COURSE SEQUENCE CORE ELECTIVES CREDIT HRS.
YEAR I FALL URP 5501 (3) URP 5510 (3) URP 5530 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12
SPRING URP 5511(3) URP 5520 (3) LA 6632 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12
FALL URP 6630 (4) ELECTIVES (9) 13
YEAR 11 SPRING URP 6631 (4) URP 6632 (1) ELECTIVES (9) 14
27 24 51


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particular item was selected. The applicant may submit other relevant materials. The format must be 8'//'x 11" and bound. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must be included if the portfolio is to be returned.
Core Courses
URP 5501 (3)
URP 5510 (3) URP 5511 (3) URP 5520 (3) URP 5530 (3) URP 6630 (4) URP 6631 (4) URP 6632(1)
LA 6632 (3)
Planning History and Theory Planning Methods 1 Planning Methods 11 Urban Spatial Analysis Planning Law Planning Studio I Planning Studio II Preparation for Professional Certification Site Planning
A thesis option (URP 6950 Thesis Research and Programming and URP 6951 Thesis) is available primarily for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced academic training in planning or related fields.
Specialized Courses
The elective courses enable students to explore in depth an area of special interest. Students should build on the expertise which they already possess. This can be done by learning about a related specialty, or by increased specialization in an already existing area of expertise. The Urban and Regional Planning faculty have particular strengths in Urban Economic Development, Land Use, Environmental Planning, and Real Estate and Land Development. Students must take at least 24 hours of elective courses.
Urban and Regional Planning Courses
URP 5500-3. Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning. This course focuses on the principles of urban and regional planning, theories of planning, community organization, basic techniques, changing philosophies in modern society, and the process of shaping community form.
URP 5501-3. Planning History and Theory. This course provides an overview of planning history and theory. The philosophical, political, and economic roots of the various theories are discussed. Ideas are placed in the context of the planning profession’s history and its present aims, interests, and ethics.
URP 5510-3. Planning Methods I. This course focuses on the application of statistical, quantitative, and mathematical techniques, and computer applications
for urban and regional planning and policy development. Major topics include types of data, sampling, basic probability distributions, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and an introduction to multi-variate and cluster analysis. Applications in planning and development are emphasized.
URP 5511-3. Planning Methods II. This course continues the development and applications of techniques introduced in URP 5510, as well as other planning methods, models, and techniques. These include physical, social, and economic models, urban land use and development models, decision-making techniques, and linear and dynamic programming. Prereq: URP 5510 or consent of instructor.
URP 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis. This course is an examination of the spatial structure of the urban system. The urban system is analyzed in terms of the “system of cities” and “city as a system.” Major topics discussed include the economic theory of the origin of city, the rank-size and primate distributions, the location pattern and hierarchical structure of cities, functional classification of cities, urban growth and economic base, movement of population within and between cities, spatial pattern of land use and economic activities, spatial pattern of urban population density, and urban social space and urban cognition.
URP 5530-3. Planning Law. This course focuses on the legal setting for urban and regional planning in the United States and major constitutional issues in the effectuation of planning policy. Contemporary controversies are put into the larger context of attempts by the judicial system to redefine the balance between individual rights and governmental power in an increasingly weakened society.
URP 5532-3. Urban Form History. An analysis of urban physical form from the origin of cities to the present. The emphasis is on cities of western civilization and American urban planning. Major shifts in urban ideas, architecture, transportation, landscapes, and energy systems are discussed and evaluated using a slide-lecture format.
URP 5533-3. Urban Form Theory. A
description and analysis of contemporary schools of thought on urban physical form. Theories will be evaluated according to the accuracy of their explanations of present urban form, the quality of their images of future form, and the practicality of their strategies for implementing their ideal using a slide/lecture/ discussion format.
URP 6624-3. The Build Environment in Other Cultures I: Research Design. This course intends to broaden student’s perspective by asking them to examine design within another culture. Each student will prepare a proposal of study including a statement of the problem to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken, and the nature of the report produced.
URP 6630-4. Planning Studio I. This course focuses on plan design in urban and regional planning and explores basic concepts, techniques, and issues related to urban planning, urban design, site planning, and environmental awareness.
URP 6631-4. Planning Studio II. The focus of studio II is on plan making related to urban and regional planning. An understanding of the plan-making process is emphasized. Students will have direct experience with the various steps in planning, including data-gathering, goal-set-ting, identification of alternatives, analysis, synthesis, and presentation of the plan. The plan may be for a city sector, a neighborhood, an entire community, a region, or it may be a policy plan. Where possible, students will work with an actual client. Prereq: URP 6630.
URP 6632-1. Preparation for Professional Certification. This course is taken in the student’s final semester before graduation. It provides a comprehensive review of the planning literature and practice.
The course coverage follows that of the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) examination. Only open for planning students in their last semester or consent from the program director.
URP 6640-3. Community Development Process. This course introduces community development, a field closely allied with planning, in its devotion to working with people to strengthen their communities in accordance with locally determined goals. Emphasis is placed on understanding groups, organizations, and communities and on developing skills in such areas as community analysis, goal setting, group facilitation, and problem solving.
URP 6641-3. Social Planning. An increasingly important specialty in contemporary planning practice is social planning. This course covers the process of formulating public policies and designing, implementing, and evaluating programs in such areas as social services, housing, health care, employment, and education. Attention is given to the historical perspective and the present-day social and political context within which social policy formation and social planning occurs.


Urban and Regional Planning Courses / 67
URP 6642-3. Neighborhood Planning. An
introduction to small area planning including survey of neighborhood and community theory, examination and critique of research and analytical techniques involved in neighborhood planning. Examines and analyzes existing plans of local neighborhoods.
URP 6649-3. Environmental Planning I: Ecology. This course studies the physiography, cultural factors, and aesthetic criteria in relation to landscape and spatial organization and structure. It will cover data sources and interpretation, and it will look at environmental factors in development and siting analysis. Prereq: URP 5510 or consent of instructor.
URP 6650-3. Environmental Planning II: Policy and Law. This course provides a comprehensive perspective on environmental planning policy. It focuses on major environmental issues and problems, methods of evaluation, and legislative responses. Prereq: URP 5530 or consent of instructor.
URP 6651-3. Environmental Impact Assessment. The objective of this course is to provide the foundation for understanding the environmental impact assessment process, its legal context, and the criteria and methods for procedural and substantive compliance. Prereq:
URP 5530 or consent of instructor.
URP 6652-3. Growth Management. This course examines environmental and land regulations such as zoning, subdivision controls, and growth management systems in the context of public policy. Emphasis is placed on case studies, the analysis of past and present practices, the improvement of existing systems, and the design of new regulatory systems. Prereq: URP 5530 or consent of instructor.
URP 6653-3. Natural Resources Planning and Management. This course focuses on the study of the economic organization and use of natural resources. It covers the study of property rights and their impact on resource use, optimal depletion of nonrenewable and use and management of renewable resources, applications to fisheries, forests, mineral resources, etc. As well as developing criteria for evaluation of environmental amenities; explores conflicts between growth and environmental quality.
URP 6660-3. Real Estate Development Process. This course is a detailed analysis' of components of the real estate process and its relationship to the design profession and other key participants. Students will learn what variables are within the real estate development business, how
they interrelate, and why projects succeed or fail.
URP 6661-3. Real Estate Development Finance. This course focuses on financial analysis of real estate investments. The course covers topics including measures of value, capitalization rate, capital budgeting, debt and equity markets, and taxation. Cash flow and appraisal techniques, complex deal structuring, innovations in debt financing, syndications, tax shelters, tax exempt financing, and micro-computer applications also are covered.
URP 6662-3. Real Estate Market Analysis. This course focuses on examination of techniques of market analysis. Topics include business and construction cycles, regional and urban growth trends, restructuring of urban space, commercial and industrial location theories, and demographic analysis and projection techniques. Prereq: URP 5510 and 5511, or consent of instructor.
URP 6664-3. Fiscal Impact Analysis. This course is designed to provide an introduction to fiscal impact analysis procedures to students interested in the land development process. Several methodologies will be reviewed and assessed for their relevance in diverse circumstances. Prereq: URP 5510 and 5511, or consent of instructor.
URP 6670-3. Urban Economic Development. This course is an analysis of the public/private partnership in urban economic development including analysis of potentials, problems, and projects; financing urban economic development through federal grant programs, tax increment financing and other means; and economic theory of urban development.
URP 6671-3. Regional Economic Development. This course is an analysis of regional patterns and processes of economic development. Theories and models for location patterns and processes of economic activities; labor, industrial, and commercial site requirement; and economic development and growth strategies are emphasized. Prereq: URP 5520, or consent of instructor.
URP 6672-3. Urban Labor Market. This course provides a study of the organization and functioning of urban labor markets and covers labor market segmentation, human capital theory, labor mobility, labor market signaling, and discrimination in labor markets, (offered infrequently.) URP 6673-3. Transportation Planning I: Transport Network Analysis. The focus of this course is on the examination of several important aspects of the transport network: accessibility and connectivity of nodes and linkages and the volume and
direction of flow of a transport network. Descriptive, predictive, and planning methods and models discussed include graph theoretical measures, connectivity matrices, gravity model, abstract mode model, entropy-maximization, trip generation model, and flow allocation models. Prereq: URP 5510, or consent of instructor. URP 6674-3. Transportation Planning II: Urban Transportation Planning. This course is a follow-up of the transport network analysis and involves an examination of major issues of urban transportation in the U.S. These include the role of transportation in urban development, the urban transportation system, relationship between land use planning and transportation planning, urban transportation planning process, and selected case studies. Prereq: URP 5511 and 6673, or consent of instructor.
URP 6675-3. Planning and Public Finance. This course focuses on recent trends in financing local governments, revenue and expenditure analysis, budgeting for local governments with particular emphasis in the capital improvement budget, financing capital improvements through bond issues, and capital improvement and its relationship to long-term planning.
URP 6676-3. Urban Housing. This course involves an examination of planning and other aspects of urban housing, focusing primarily on U.S. Urban housing conditions with some references to international conditions and comparisons. Major topics of the course include aggregate trends and patterns, housing in spatial context, the allocation process of housing markets and submarkets (supply/finance, demand/mobility/demographic change), housing problems and failures (substandardness, inequitable distribution, special group needs, segregation and discrimination, market problems), the role of government, and alternative approaches.
URP 6680-3. Urbanization in Developing Countries. A description, analysis, and evaluation of urbanization and planning in less developed countries. The special problems of planning, housing, transportation, environmental quality, and economic development in cities of these countries are addressed. Comparisons are made among cities of third-world countries and between third-world countries and first-world countries.
URP 6682-3. Housing in Developing Countries. This course examines housing problems in developing countries and explores alternative policies, programs, and plans. Emphasis is placed on population growth and the impact housing and


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urban development, housing demand, shelter, and services for the urban poor, the squatting and squatter-built housing, and comparison of government policies and programs addressing housing problems.
URP 6686-3. Special Topics in Urban and Regional Planning. Various topical concerns are offered in urban and regional planning, theory, concepts, methods, case studies, and practice.
URP 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to
investigate a special topic or problem related to urban and regional planning. URP 6910-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures: Field Experience. Students will travel to their respective cities and undertake the agreed upon study proposals. The course intends not only to help students consider their own design and planning attitudes, but also to help them see the world from a more balanced perspective. Prereq: URP 6624. URP 6930-3. Planning Internship. This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to students in urban and regional planning. The emphasis is on
actual work experience in settings with client groups as the students assist them in determining solutions to their problems. Program director’s approval is required.
URP 6950-3. Thesis Research and Programming. Prereq: minimum of 24 credit hours earned toward completion of master of urban and regional planning degree. URP 6951-3. Urban and Regional Planning Thesis.


College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Acting Dean: Gary A. Kochenberger Associate Dean for Faculty:
Jean-Claude Bosch
Associate Dean for Academic Programs:
Peter G. Bryant Office: 1250 14th Street Telephone: 595-4007
Director of the Executive Health Administration Program:
John P. Young
Director of the Executive M.B.A.
Program: John P. Young Academic Director, Health Administration Program: Richard W. Foster
Faculty
Professors: Marcelle V. Arak (Finance), Gordon G. Barnewall (Marketing), Wayne F. Cascio (Management), Lawrence F. Cunningham (Marketing), Michael A. Firth (Accounting),
H. Michael Hayes (Marketing and Strategic Management), Gary A. Kochenberger (Operations Management), James R. Morris (Finance), William D. Murray (Information Systems), Bruce R. Neumann (Accounting and Health Administration), Edward J. O’Connor (Management), Donald L. Stevens (Finance), Dean G. Taylor (Finance). Associate Professors: W. Graham Astley (Management), Jean-Claude Bosch (Finance), Peter G. Bryant (Management Science and Information Systems),
Kang Rae Cho (Management and International Business), Edward J. Conry (Business Law and Ethics),
E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr. (Business Economics), Richard W. Foster (Finance and Health Administration), James H. Gerlach (Information Systems), Jahangir Karimi (Information Systems), Dennis F. Murray (Accounting), John C. Ruhnka (Management and Business Law), Clifford E. Young (Marketing), Raymond F. Zammuto (Management). Assistant Professors: Stephen P. Allen (Accounting), Ajeyo Banerjee (Finance), Ben-Hsien Bao (Accounting), Kenneth L. Bettenhausen (Mangagement), Heidi Boerstler (Health Administration),
Lloyd Brodsky (Information Systems), Richard E. Cook (Finance), Marlene C. Fiol (Management), Kenneth A. Hunt
(Marketing), Susan M. Keaveney (Marketing), Deborah L. Kellog (Operations Management), Sarah Kovoor (Management), Feng Yang Kuo (Information Systems), Moonkyu Lee (Marketing), Chandrasekaran Rajam (Management), Manuel G. Serapio, Jr. (International Business), Marlene A. Smith (Quantitative Methods).
Senior Instructors: Cindy Fischer (Accounting), Charles M. Franks (Quantitive Methods), Gary L. Giese (Management), Robert E. Moore (Marketing), Paul J. Patinka (Management), Barbara A. Pelter (Finance), Jerry Turner (Accounting), John Turner (Finance),
Instructors: Errol Biggs (Health Administration), John F. Falkenberg (Finance), Robert D. Hockenbury (Accounting), Chen Ji (Finance), Lawrence F. Johnston (Finance),
Charles A. Rice (Management), Eric J. Thompson (Information Systems), Marianne Westerman (Finance). Lecturer: Franklin E. Grange (Operations Managment)
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain business community, the College of Business and Administration at the University of Colorado at Denver provides its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective, responsible business professionals. This level of excellence in higher education is achieved by bringing together nationally recognized faculty and highly motivated, mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment.
CU-Denver’s College of Business is a “research institution,” and our faculty are nationally recognized for their contributions to scholarly research. The information contained in university textbooks is first conceived through faculty research and is usually published in textbooks about six years later. Thus, a research-oriented faculty is writing and teaching concepts years before they are typically seen in textbooks. Accordingly, our students have the opportunity to be on the
leading edge of business management theory and practice.
Our class schedules offer flexibility to meet the needs of full- and part-time students, with both day and evening classes. Whether you are an experienced working professional seeking an advanced degree, or preparing for a new career in the business world, you will gain the knowledge necessary to succeed in today’s challenging business environment.
CU-Denver’s College of Business can give you an edge over your competition.
College of Business and Administration Educational Goals
CU-Denver’s College of Business and Administration defines the goals of its degree program as follows:
1. The refinement of basic skills essential for success in business; these include writing, speaking, calculating, computing, making high quality decisions, and managing others.
2. The transmission of knowledge essential for success in business. This includes a broad understanding of our social, economic, ethical and political systems derived from education outside the college. Learning within the college, common to all students, focuses on mastery of accounting, finance, marketing, information systems, business law, quantitative methods, and production.
3. The development of professional views appropriate to fulfilling the manager’s responsibility to self, colleagues, employer, and society.
Faculty
Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about their teaching and research. They hold degrees from the nation’s leading business schools, such as Berkeley, Harvard, Stanford, University of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania, UCLA, and Yale.
Many of them also bring years of valuable experience in private industry. Their interdisciplinary expertise, academic achievements, scholarly research, and business


70 / College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
experience provide students with a dynamic learning environment.
Students
Unlike the students at a traditional college campus, many of our students are adult, working professionals who maintain full-time employment. Their success and experience enrich class discussions and interactions among students. Although a high percentage attend evening classes, a significant number are full-time students attending classes offered during the day. Following the current national trend, women constitute about one half of the student body. Since admission standards are among the highest in the region, the student body is unusually motivated and talented.
This rich mix of backgrounds, experience, and perspectives, when coupled with the strengths of our excellent faculty, fosters stimulating classroom interaction and keen competition among the students.
Accreditation
While there are approximately 800 recognized schools of business nationwide, fewer than one third are accredited by the national accreditation agency for university schools of business-the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). CU-Denver’s College of Business is one of the few schools in the state accredited by the AACSB. Business Week wrote recently, “Today, just having the degree isn’t as important as where you get it.. .As corporations become sawier buyers of... talent, they are giving more weight to the AACSB seal... Accreditation shows that a Business School cares about the quality of its program.” In addition, many national fellowship programs accept only students from accredited programs.
In a similar manner, our program in health administration is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA). This agency ensures that health administration programs meet demanding requirements for quality education in the health administration area.
Cooperative Education
Cooperative Education is a program designed to provide students with practical work experience in a business setting. Through Co-op, students put classroom education into use. Many variables contribute to an individual’s success. On-
the-job experience is one of those variables. Cooperative Education provides students with first-hand experience in a real job setting.
HOW CO-OP WORKS
Working with the College of Business and Administration, the CU-Denver Center for Internships and Cooperative Education places business students as paid Co-op trainees with corporations, businesses, or government agencies in positions that complement their academic work. Many Co-op positions lead to permanent career appointments upon graduation.
ELIGIBILITY FOR PLACEMENT
Cooperative Education is open to all students who have completed their freshman year, have maintained a grade-point average of 2.5, and have completed at least 12 hours of course work at CU-Denver (6 hours for graduate students). Some employers have additional requirements, i.e., U.S. citizenship, willingness to travel, and completion of specific course work.
Scholarships and Financial Aid
Many programs for financial aid are administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Call 556-2886 for detailed information. In addition, the College of Business awards some departmental and general scholarships. The amounts of the awards and the number of awards vary each year. For additional information, contact the College of Business, 595-4007.
Each year, a number of undergraduate students are awarded Deans’ Scholarships, Colorado Scholarships, and Regents Scholarships. These provide financial support for a portion of the students’ tuition and fees.
The Purchasing Management Association of Denver awards an annual scholarship to students interested in careers in purchasing, and the Colorado Chapter of the American Production and Inventory Control Society awards up to two annual scholarships to students interested in careers in operations management. For information contact the operations management faculty advisor in the College of Business.
Graduate tuition awards are available to students admitted to the Graduate School of Business Administration, based on a number of factors including academic performance. For additional information contact the Graduate Programs Office at 628-1276.
Student Organizations
Opportunity for association with other College of Business and Administration students in varied activities intended to stimulate professional interest and to give recognition to scholastic attainment is provided by the following student organizations:
Beta Gamma Sigma-national honorary scholastic fraternity in business CSPA-Colorado Society for Personnel Administration (student chapter) for students interested in personnel or industrial relations
CUAMA-student chapter of the American Marketing Association CU Venture Network-campus chapter of the Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs, open to all CU-Denver students HASO-Health Administration Student Organization
MBA/MS Association-University of Colorado at Denver association of master’s students in business Phi Chi Theta-national professional business and economics fraternity Sigma Iota Epsilon-professional and honorary management fraternity SAS-Society of Accounting Students
Institute for International Business
The Institute for International Business was created in August 1988 to help stimulate new business ventures through partnerships with foreign business schools and executives. It has three goals:
• To collaborate with business and government in promoting international economic development opportunities for Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region.
• To provide hands-on training to foreign executives doing business with American firms.
• To support research on competitiveness issues in the global economy of the 1990’s.
The Institute will offer programs for senior management in business and government. The programs will identify and interpret trends affecting business in the global marketplace and the skills needed to conduct business in these markets. The programs also will put senior managers in contact with internationalists who are shaping the political, economic, and social environment for international business.


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GENERAL ACADEMIC POLICIES
Academic policies which apply to all CU-Denver students are described in the General Information section of this catalog. The policies described below apply to both undergraduate students in the College of Business and Administration and graduate students in the Graduate School of Business Administration. Policies applying separately to undergraduate and graduate students are described under separate headings.
Each student is responsible for knowing and complying with the academic policies and regulations established for the College. The College cannot assume responsibility for problems resulting from a student’s failure to follow the policies stated in this catalog. Similarly, students are responsible for all deadlines, rules, and regulations stated in the Schedule of Classes.
Academic Ethics
Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and integrity. Cheating, plagiarism, illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations, alteration, forgery, or falsification of official records, and similar acts or the attempt to engage in such acts are grounds for suspension or expulsion from the University. Also, actions which disrupt the administrative process, such as misrepresentation of credentials or academic status, other forms of deception, or verbal abuse of College staff are grounds for suspension or probation. All reported acts of dishonesty must be referred to the College of Business Committee on Student Faculty Relations. In particular, students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act involving the offering of the work of someone else as the student’s own. It is recommended that students consult with the instructors as to the proper preparation of reports, papers, etc. in order to avoid this and similar offenses.
Admission to Business Classes
Admission to business classes is limited to students who have been admitted to the business program, and to other students as described in the separate undergraduate and graduate policy sections. The course admission criteria are designed to meet a number of objectives:
1. To assure access to business courses
for students seeking a business degree.
2. To serve students in other colleges who have business-related education objectives or requirements.
3. To service non-degree students who have specific career or education goals. Please refer to the Schedule of Classes each term for course availability.
Attendance Regulations
Students are required to attend classes on a regular basis. Absences must be arranged with the instructor and must conform with the instructor’s policy on attendance.
Prerequisites
Students are expected to know and fulfill all prerequisite requirements, including any prerequisite information when registering. The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who enroll without the correct prerequisites. Generally, students who are administratively dropped will not receive tuition refunds.
Course Numbering
The course numbering system used at the University of Colorado at Denver identifies the class standing required for enrollment. Students are expected to take 1000 level courses in their freshman year, 2000 level courses in their sophomore year, 3000 level courses in their junior year and 4000 level courses in their senior year. Courses at the 5000 and 6000 level are restricted to graduate business students.
I
Adding and Dropping Courses
See the General Information section of this catalog for the University-wide drop/add policies.
Withdrawal
See the General Information section of this catalog for University-wide withdrawal policies. Note that the College of Business normally requires instructors’ signatures on all withdrawal forms before the Dean’s approval is granted.
Administrative Drop
The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who are incorrectly enrolled in business courses. Instructors also may recommend to the College of Business and Administration
office that students who fail to meet expected course attendance or course prerequisites be dropped from the course. Generally, students who are administratively dropped will not receive tuition refunds.
Appeal Procedure
Students should contact a business advisor in the College of Business and Administration office for appeal and petition procedures pertaining to rules and regulations of the College.
General Grading Policies
Plus/Minus Grading. College of Business faculty have the option to use plus/minus grading. For example, B+ corresponds to 3.3 credit points (for each semester hour), B- corresponds to 2.7 credit points.
Incomplete Grades. The only incomplete grade given in the College is IF. An IF grade is assigned only when documented circumstances clearly beyond the student’s control prevent the student from completing course requirements (exams, papers, etc.). Generally, students must make up the missing work and may not retake the entire course. Students should not register for the class a second time but should make up the work with the instructor giving the IF. All IF grades must be made up within one year, or the /Fwill be automatically changed to the grade of F.
Also, any such grades must be completed and recorded at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor concerning the removal of incomplete grades.
Grade Changes. Grades as reported by instructors are final. Grade changes will be considered only in cases of documented clerical errors and when a student is making up an incomplete grade (IF).
All changes must be made within one year after the course has been taken unless highly unusual circumstances can be documented and the change has been approved by the Undergraduate Appeals Committee for undergraduate courses, or the Graduate Appeals Committee for graduate courses. Normally, grade changes will not be considered for any circumstances after three years.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
A carefully designed curriculum to prepare students for success in business management is available for the student


72 / College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
seeking either an undergraduate or graduate degree. The College offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration), Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), and the Master of Science (M.S.) degrees. The particular programs offered are:
Areas of Emphasis (B.S. in Business Administration)
Accounting
Finance
Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business Management Marketing
Operations Management
Graduate Programs
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) Master of Science in Accounting Master of Science in Finance Master of Science in Health Administration
Master of Science in information Systems Master of Science in Management and Organization Master of Science in Marketing
Executive Programs
Master of Business Administration for Executives Master of Science in Health Administration for Executives
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Associate Dean: Peter G. Bryant Program Coordinator: Nancy Reed
The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree is intended to help the student achieve the following general objectives:
1. An understanding of the activities that constitute a business enterprise and the principles underlying administration of those activities.
2. The ability to think logically and analytically about the kind of complex problems encountered by management.
3. Facility in the arts of communication.
4. A comprehension of human relationships involved in an organization.
5. Awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in administrative positions.
6. Skill in the art of learning that will help
the student continue self-education
after leaving the campus.
Undergraduate Admissions
Telephone: 628-1277
Admission of Freshman Students. Freshman applicants must have completed the college preparatory curriculum in high school, graduated in the top 25% of their high school class, and achieved a score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. See the General Information section of this catalog for further information on freshman admission.
Admission of Transfer Students. Applicants who have completed work at other collegiate institutions should review the information on transfer students in the General Information section of this catalog. In addition to University policies, the College of Business and Administration evaluates course work to determine its appropriateness for the degree of Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Students who have completed more than 24 semester ho.urs of transferable course work are evaluated for admission on the basis of their college grade-point average (GPA) without regard to their high school performance. To be automatically admitted, students must have a 3.0 overall GPA in the courses which would apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration), and a 2.0 overall GPA in busiViess courses. Students with less than
3.0 overall will be admitted if they have a
3.0 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work, a 2.0 overall GPA in business courses, and at least a 2.0 overall GPA in courses applying to the degree.
Students who do not meet either of these admission standards, but with a 2.6 in the last 24 hours of applicable work, are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA in the last 24 hours. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available. For information about specific policies on transfer of credit, consult an undergraduate business program specialist.
Intra-university Transfer. Students who want to transfer to the College of Business and Administration from another college or school of the University of Colorado at Denver must formally apply at the College of Business office. Transfer deadlines are August 1 for Fall Semester, December 1 for Spring Semester, and May 1 for the Summer Term.
Students will be evaluated only on course work that applies to the business degree program. Generally, this will
exclude course work of a technical or vocational nature and courses in activity PE and remedial subjects. Students who have completed at least 24 applicable semester hours will be evaluated on their college work; students with fewer than 24 transferable hours will be evaluated on the basis of both high school and college work.
Students will be considered for admission on either their overall GPA in applicable course work from CU and all previous institutions or on their last 24 hours. Applicants with less than a 2.0 GPA in business courses (from CU or other institutions) and overall CU GPA of less than
2.0 will be denied admission even though they meet the minimum requirements for consideration.
Students will be automatically admitted to the College of Business if they have an overall GPA of 3.0 or an overall GPA of 3.00 on their last 24 hours. All other applicants meeting the minimum requirements for admission as stated above will be pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA in the last 24 hours. Pooled applicants will be offered admission as space is available.
To apply for an intra-university transfer, students must submit an Intra-University Transfer form and CU-Denver transcripts to a business program specialist. Transfer forms are available at CU-Denver Admissions or the College of Business office; transcript request forms are available at CU-Denver Records. The transcript must include the student’s most recent semester at the University. Students with previous course work from other institutions are also required to submit a copy of their transfer credit evaluations (advanced standings).
Former Students. A CU student from another campus or a CU-Denver student who has not registered for three consecutive semesters (summers included) is considered a former student and must reapply for admission as a former student. Former CU-Denver business students may be automatically readmitted to the College for up to three years from the semester they last attended (/they are in good standing (not on probation or suspension) in the College. Students who have not attended for more than three years, or who have completed 12 or more semester hours at another institution of higher education, must reapply as other former students and meet the admission and degree requirements applicable at the time they reapply.
Old Work Policy. This policy applies to students newly admitted to the College of Business and former business students


Undergraduate Program / 73
readmitted to the College after an absence of three semesters. Applicable credits up to five years old will be counted toward business degree requirements. Courses more than five years old will be evaluated individually for their current relevance to the degree program. Students may be required to update their knowledge by taking additional courses when past courses are outdated; in such cases, credit will be given for both courses. Generally, business courses more than eight years old will not apply toward degree credit.
Second Undergraduate Degree. Students may apply to the College of Business and Administration to earn a second undergraduate degree, provided the first undergraduate degree is in a field other than business. Students who are accepted for the second undergraduate degree will be required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a business degree. For example, if a student registered for a second degree has not had the required mathematics or general education courses, these must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses. Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken before a student begins to pursue the major field. Applications are available through the Office of Admissions and Records.
If a student applying for a second undergraduate degree has an academic record that justifies consideration for the graduate program, that student will be encouraged to consider one of the master’s degree programs.
Minor in Business Administration. Students in other undergraduate schools and colleges at CU-Denver wishing to take a minor in business administration should consult their college advising office for details and requirements.
Double Degree Programs. Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason, students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields. Combined programs have been developed for engineering and business, and may be arranged for other professional combinations as well. For additional information, contact an undergraduate business program specialist at 628-1277.
Undergraduate Advising and Academic Planning
Admissions Advising. Persons not yet admitted to the College of Business can receive advising on course selection, admission requirements, and other matters from an undergraduate program specialist. To make an appointment, call 628-1277.
Admitted Students. Upon admission to the College, students execute a Degree Contract which identifies the courses required to graduate. This contract contains all the information needed to select courses and monitor progress toward completion of requirements for the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Business students are expected to assume responsibility for self advising. This includes scheduling courses each term, being familiar with all the policies and procedures of the College, and otherwise managing the student’s academic career. Program specialists are available to answer questions about unusual situations; however, they do not provide ongoing information about course selection and scheduling.
Career advising is available from business faculty and from the CU-Denver Office of Career Planning and Placement Services, 556-3477.
Undergraduate Core Curriculum-University of Colorado at Denver
The faculty of the College of Business Administration, College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have established a new core curriculum for undergraduate students. Beginning with the Fall 1990 Semester, all undergraduate students entering CU-Denver will be required to complete the undergraduate core curriculum independent of their college or major. Undergraduate students admitted prior to Fall 1990 will have a choice of either the new core curriculum or the requirements of their college in effect at the time of admission to the college.
The new undergraduate core curriculum seeks to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual competencies in mathematics and computation, writing, oral communication, information literacy, and critical thinking. It also requires all students to come to terms with the basic knowledge areas of the natural and physical sciences, behavioral sciences, social sciences, humanities, and arts. Furthermore, the core curriculum
promotes an awareness of cultural and racial diversity. The majority of the new core curriculum is designed to be completed during a student’s freshman and sophomore years in order to provide the foundation for specific training in a student’s major discipline.
The new undergraduate core curriculum for CU-Denver is outlined in the table below. Each college may augment the campus core curriculum. CU-Denver core requirements for business students are specified under Program Requirements in the following section.
CU-Denver Undergraduate Core Curriculum
1. Intellectual Competencies a. Writing/Speech b. Mathematics 9 hours 3 hours
2. Knowledge Areas a. Natural and Physical Sciences 8 hours
Biology, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics
Behavioral Sciences AND Social Sciences 9 hours
b. Behavioral Sciences Anthropology, Communication, and Psychology 3-6 hours
c. Social Sciences Economics, Geography, Political Science, and Sociology 3-6 hours
d. Humanities History, Languages, Literature, and Philosophy 6 hours
e. Arts Fine Arts, Music, and Theatre 3 hours
f. Multicultural Diversity 3 hours
Graduation Requirements
The Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree requires the following:
Total Credits. A total of 120 semester hours.
Competencies. Demonstration (by course work or testing) of a satisfactory level of competency in computer literacy, geography, and one foreign language.
Area of Emphasis or Non-Business Minor. Completion of at least 15 semester hours of approved courses in the area of empha-


74 / College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
sis or completion of at least 15 semester hours in an approved non-business minor.
Residence. At least 30 semester hours of business courses (including any business area of emphasis) must be completed after a student’s admission to the College. The 30 hours for residence must include BLAW. 4120 and MGMT. 4500, and 24 hours in other business courses (including area of emphasis courses if an area is selected).
Grade-Point Average Requirement. To graduate, a student must maintain a minimum cumulative scholastic grade-point average of 2.0 for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business Administration) degree, 2.0 for all business courses, and 2.0 for courses in the student’s area of emphasis or nonbusiness minor.
Undergraduate Honors. Upon recommendation of the faculty, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Students must achieve an overall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to be considered for cum laude. Those who achieve an overall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado will be considered for magna cum laude.
Filing for Graduation. Students must file an Undergraduate Candidacy form and Diploma Card, and request a graduation evaluation (senior audit) prior to registering for their final semester. Failure to do so will delay graduation. Also, students desiring to change their area of emphasis after filing for graduation must have the change approved by the graduation supervisor prior to registering for their final semester. Changes after that time will delay graduation.
Business Program Requirements. Satisfaction of all the following requirements:
Program Requirements Semester Hours
College competencies.............. 0-9
CU-Denver core..................... 41
Mathematics..........................3
Business core...................... 42
International studies................6
Area of emphasis or
non-business minor.............. 15
Other Courses ................... 4-13
Total Semester Hours........... 120
Detailed descriptions of courses which satisfy program requirements are presented below:
I. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS REQUIRED COMPETENCIES: 0-9 HOURS
A minimum level of competency must be demonstrated in computer literacy, geography, and in one foreign language. Students may satisfy the competency requirements by taking courses as described below or by testing. New freshmen and transfer students should (1) satisfy the English, computer literacy, and geography requirements within their first semester of enrollment at the College, and (2) meet the language competency requirement within the first one, two or three semesters of enrollment as dictated by the number of courses required.
A maximum of 9 semester-hours taken to satisfy the competencies may be counted toward the degree (see Other Courses); other hours taken to satisfy the competencies are not applied toward the 120 semester hours required for the degree. To satisfy competency requirements students must be competent in each specific area or complete the following courses (or their equivalents for transfer students):
MATH 1350 Computers in the Arts
and Sciences or CSC. 1950-3 Computer
Mind Tools I, or test........... 0-3
GEOG 1102 World Regional Geography
or test......................... 0-3
3rd semester language or test 0-13
II. CU-DENVER CORE REQUIREMENTS: 41 SEMESTER HOURS
A. Intellectual Competencies-9 semester hours.
ENGL 1020 Writing Workshop II........3
ENGL 2024 Intermediate Composition 3 CMMU 2101 Speechmaking...............3
B. Mathematics - 3 semester hours.
MATH 1070 Algebra for Social Sciences
and Business (*)..................3
(Note additional Mathmatics requirements in section III below).
C. Knowledge Areas - 29 semester hours.
1. Natural and Physical Sciences.....8
Two of the following courses (a sequence
in the same discipline or courses in two different disciplines):
BIOL 1550-4 Basic Biology 1 BIOL 1560-4 Basic Biology II CHEM 1450-4 Real World Chemistry 1 CHEM 1460-4 Real World Chemistry II GEOL 1072-4 Physical Geology I GEOL 1082-4 Physical Geology II PHYS 1052-4 Astronomy I PHYS 1062-4 Astronomy II
2. Behavioral Sciences
PSYCH 1002 Introduction to Psychology...........................3
3. Social Sciences
ECON 2012 Principles of Economics:
Macroeconomics......................3
ECON 2022 Principles of Economics: Microeconomics......................3
4. Humanities
HIST 1021 Western Civilization
Since 1500..........................3
HIST 1011 or HIST. 1361 or HIST. 1371.3
5. Arts................................3
One course from the following:
ARTS 1000-3 Arts in our Time
FA 1001-3 Introduction to Arts MUS 1001-3 Music Appreciation THTR 1001-3 Introduction to Theatre
6. Multicultural Diversity..........3
One course from list to be approved by College of Business.
III. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS MATH REQUIREMENT: 3 SEMESTER HOURS
MATH 1080 Polynomial Calculus (*)...3
(*)Note: The sequence MATH. 1070 and MATH 1080 may be satisfied by a 6-hour calculus sequence.
IV. BUSINESS CORE: 42 SEMESTER HOURS
Accounting (ACCT 2100 and ACCT 2110
or 2120)..........................6
Business Law (BLAW 3000, BLAW 4120) 6
Finance (FNCE 3100, FNCE 3200).......6
Information Systems (ISMG 3000) .....3
Management (MGMT 3300, MGMT 4370) 6 Marketing (MKTG 3000, MKTG 3050) 6
Operations Management (OPMG 3000) . 3
Quantitative Methods (QUAN 2010).....3
Capstone Course (MGMT 4500)..........3
Students may replace MKTG 3050 with an alternate marketing course with the permission of the marketing area.
V. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES:
6 SEMESTER HOURS
A. International Non-Business-One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses:
ECON 4410, ECON 4420, ECON 4500, HIST 3160, HIST 4030/ 5030, HIST 4040/5040, HIST 4330, HIST 4440, HIST 4450, HIST 4460, HIST 4730, HIST 4750, HIST 4780, HIST 4820, PSC 3006, PSC 3042, PSC 3135, PSC 3656, PSC 4216, PSC 4236, PSC 4246, PSC 4266, PSC 4286, PSC 4726, PSC 4736, PSC 4746, PSC 4756, PSC 4766, PSC 4776.
B. International Business - One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses:
FNCE 4370 International Financial Management
MGMT 4400 Introduction to
International Business


Academic Policies / 75
MKTG 4200 International Marketing
MKTG 4580 International Transportation
VI. AREA OF EMPHASIS OR NONBUSINESS MINOR: 15 SEMESTER HOURS
Students may choose a general business degree with a non- business minor, or a business degree with an area of emphasis in Accounting, Finance,
Human Resources Management, Information Systems, International Business, Management, Marketing, or Operations Management.
A. General Business: Students in General Business must take an approved non-business minor of at least 15 semester hours. The courses must form an integrated sequence and be approved by the College of Business. Up to 6 semester hours of the sequence may be in courses used to satisfy the general (CU-Denver core) requirements but the number
of Other Courses (see below) will be correspondingly increased to meet the 120 hours total requirement for the degree. Students interested in completing a minor should contact the individual departments regarding requirements.
B. Areas of Emphasis: Areas of Emphasis must consist of at least 15 semester hours, including any business core courses. For most areas, this will mean 9 semester hours beyond the two courses in the business core. For areas with special requirements or areas with only one course in the core, it may mean 12 or more semester hours beyond the business core. Any hours in excess of 9 are included in the Other Courses described below.
VII. OTHER COURSES:
4-13 SEMESTER HOURS
Students may choose their Other Courses freely, subject to the following general rules: (1) Only non-remedial (college-level, as determined by the College of Business) courses will count toward the B.S. degree; (2) All students receiving the B.S. degree in Business must take at least 48 semester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses). Students in General Business will generally need to take at least one business course in the Other Courses category to meet this requirement;
(3) At most 72 semester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses) may be counted toward the 120 credit hours required for the B.S. degree in Business; (4) Any business area of emphasis courses required by specific areas in excess of the 9 hours listed under Area
of Emphasis above are included in the Other Courses category; (5) At most 9 semester hours of college-level course work devoted to satisfying the basic competency requirements may be applied toward the B.S. degree in Business.
Guidelines for Elective Credits. Elective credits should be selected carefully because not all classes are acceptable. Generally, to be acceptable, electives must be taught by regular University of Colorado faculty, must have a form of assessment such as a term paper and/or examinations, and must be regular classroom-type classes. Course coverage must be college level, not repetitious of other work applied toward the degree, must be academic as opposed to vocational or technical, and must be part of the regular University offerings.
Specifically, the College will accept:
a. A maximum of 6 hours of the theory of physical education, recreation, and dance, and
b. A maximum of 6 hours of approved independent study, experimental studies, choir, band, music lessons, art lessons, and
c. A maximum of 12 hours of advanced ROTC, providing the student is enrolled in the program and completes the total program.
The College will not accept:
Activity physical education classes, recreation, workshops, internships, orientations, dance, teaching methods, practicums, and courses reviewing basic skills in computers, English composition, mathematics, and chemistry.
Areas of Emphasis
See individual areas of emphasis in this section for specific courses required.
ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SELECTING COURSES
Registration. Instruction for registering for courses is contained in another publication called the Schedule of Classes, which is available before each semester. That publication lists the times when registration occurs, the place, and the courses offered.
Maximum Units Per Term. The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate business student is 15 semester hours, with a maximum of 18 hours during the fall/ spring semesters and 12 hours during the summer term. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Extended Studies, whether in classes or through correspondence, are included in the student’s load.
Repeating Courses. A failed course (grade of E) may be repeated; however, the F will be included in the grade-point average and will appear on the transcript. A course in which a grade of D- or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from a business program specialist. Courses repeated without approval may not be used in the grade-point average calculation.
Courses From Other Institutions. Business students must have the written approval of a business program specialist to register for courses (excluding MSC pooled courses) offered by other institutions. Credit will not be given for courses taken without approval. Grades of C or better must be earned to receive business degree credit. Generally, only nonbusiness electives or lower division, nonbusiness requirements are acceptable for transfer from other institutions once a student has been admitted to the College of Business. Business students who take more than 12 semester hours from another institution must reapply for admission to the College as transfer students and meet the current admission requirements.
MSC Courses. Business students may select their non-business required and elective courses from those offered from MSC. Grades of C or better must be earned to receive business degree credit; however, the grade is not computed in the CU grade-point average and is treated like other transfer credits. MSC business courses may not be taken for CU-Denver business degree credit.
Graduate Level Courses. With prior written approval of a business program specialist, students may take up to a maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate level non-business elective credits. Students must earn grades of B or better in graduate courses in order to apply the credits toward business degree requirements.
Pass/Fail. Only non-business elective courses may be taken pass/fail. Required business and non-business courses (including the CU-Denver core) may not be taken pass/fail. A maximum of 6 hours pass/fail credit may be applied toward the business degree. Courses taken in excess of the maximum will not be applied toward degree credit. Pass/fail determination must be made within the posted deadlines (at census dates) and may not be rescinded (unless approved by the Undergraduate Appeals Committee).
Correspondence Courses. Only 6 semester hours of credit taken through correspondence study (from regionally accredited institutions) will be applied


76 / College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
toward the business degree. Business courses may not be taken by correspondence. All correspondence courses must be evaluated by a business program specialist to determine their acceptability toward degree requirements, and the program specialist’s written approval is required prior to the student’s registering for courses. Students should contact the Division of Extended Studies for course offerings and registration procedures.
Independent Study. Junior or senior business students desiring to work beyond regular course coverage may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) as non-business electives under the direction of an instructor who approves the project, but the student must have the appropriate approval before registering.
A maximum of 3 semester hours of independent study courses may be taken in any one semester; a maximum of 6 semester hours may be applied toward degree requirements.
An independent study request form must be signed by the student, instructor, department coordinator, and the Associate Dean for Programs.
Study Abroad. Transfer credit from study abroad programs is generally limited to non-business elective credit. Students must meet with a business program specialist to determine course acceptability and for written approval prior to the semester in which they intend to study abroad. Information on the various programs is available at the Office of International Education.
ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SUSPENSION AND PROBATION
To be in good standing, students must have an overall CU grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C=2.0) or better for all course work attempted, and a 2.0 GPA or better for all business courses attempted. PE activity courses, remedial course work, MSCD courses, and repeated courses not approved by a business advisor are not included in these averages.
When semester grades become available, students below the 2.0 GPA will be notified of 1) probationary status or 2) suspension. Students are responsible for being aware of their academic status at all times; late grades and/or late notification does not waive this responsibility. College rules governing probation and suspension are as follows:
1. Any student whose overall GPA, or business course GPA, is less than 2.0 will be
placed on probation immediately. A
student may be removed from probation when the overall GPA and business GPA have been raised to 2.0.
2. A student may remain on probation
as long as the student maintains normal degree progress each semester as determined by the College and obtains each term on probation a term GPA of 2.5, and term business course GPA of 2.5, with no grade below a C. Failure to meet probationary provisions will result in suspension. Probationary status may continue only until the student has completed a maximum of 12 semester hours or four terms, whichever comes first; summer is considered a term. The student will be suspended if the GPA deficiency is not cleared within this time.
3. Suspended students may not attend the University of Colorado or any division of the University (including Extended Studies).
4. Students on suspension may petition for readmission to the College after a minimum of one year from the term in which they were suspended. Generally, petitions are granted only in unusual circumstances. Any suspended student readmitted to the College will be under contract and placed on a continued probation status until the GPA deficiency has been cleared. Such students will be automatically suspended if,
at any time, their overall GPA or business GPA again falls below 2.0.
5. Students earning all failing grades or no academic credit for a semester will have a stop placed on their record and will not be permitted to register without a business advisor’s approval.
6. Combined degree students are required to maintain the same standards of performance as College of Business students in order to be continued in
a combined program.
AREAS OF EMPHASIS
Each candidate for the B.S. (Business Administration) degree must complete the prescribed courses in an area of emphasis comprising a minimum of 15 semester hours taken at the University of Colorado at Denver. A 2.0 grade-point average is required for area courses. Typically, students select an area of emphasis after taking several of the core courses. They then complete the hours required for their selected area.
Information about each area of emphasis is given below.
Accounting
Advisor Michael Firth Telephone: 628-1220
Accounting courses are offered in several fields of professional accountancy at the intermediate, advanced and graduate levels. They provide preparation for practice in one or more of the following fields:
Accounting and management control systems Auditing
Financial accounting Managerial accounting Tax accounting Teaching and research
In all of these fields a thorough knowledge of the social, legal, economic, and political environment is needed. A high degree of analytical ability and communication skill is indispensable.
Courses in English composition, speech, ethics and logic are desirable. Courses in statistics and information systems, beyond the required College of Business core courses, are highly recommended.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACCT 3220. Intermediate Financial
Accounting 1.........................3
ACCT 3230. Intermediate Financial
Accounting II........................3
ACCT 3320. Intermediate Cost
Accounting...........................3
Accounting elective (at the 4000 level) 6
Students planning to pursue accounting as a career usually take more than the above required hours. Many students take a total of about 30 hours of accounting, often taking two courses each semester in their junior and senior years. Students should work closely with the accounting faculty and business advisors in planning their accounting programs.
Accounting students often specialize in a particular topical area of accounting beyond the core. Examples of these specializations include the following recommended courses:
Financial Accounting and Auditing ACCT 4240. Advanced Financial
Accounting
ACCT 4410. Income Tax Accounting
ACCT 4420. Advanced Income
Tax Accounting ACCT 4620. Auditing
Managerial Accounting and Systems ACCT 4330. Managerial Accounting,
Problems and Cases. ACCT 4540. Accounting Systems
and Data Processing ACCT 4620. Auditing


Areas of Emphasis / 77
ACCT 4800. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations
Graduate study in accounting is receiving increasing emphasis by professional organizations and employers. Students meeting admission requirements should consider continuing their education at the graduate level.
Finance
Advisor: John Turner Telephone: 628-1226
The principal areas of study in finance are financial management, financial institutions, investments, and international finance. The study of finance is intended to provide an understanding of fundamental theory and practice pertaining to finance and to develop the ability to make sound financial management decisions. Every endeavor is made to train students to think logically about financial problems and to formulate sound financial decisions and policies. It is necessary to understand the importance of finance in the economy and the functions and purposes of monetary systems, credit, prices, money markets, and financial institutions. Emphasis is placed on financial policy, management, control, analysis, and decision making. Numerous job opportunities exist with financial institutions and in the field of business finance. ACCT. 2100 and ACCT. 2110 are required prerequisites for the finance area.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FNCE 4320. Corporate Financial
Decisions..........................3
FNCE 4330. Investment and
Portfolio Management ..............3
FNCE 4350. Financial Markets and Institutions...................3
Recommended Electives
FNCE 4340. Security Analysis.........3
FNCE 4360. Management of
Financial Institutions.............3
FNCE 4370. International Financial Management.........................3
Students should note that all finance courses are not offered every semester. Finance majors are encouraged to take additional accounting courses as business electives.
Human Resources Management
Advisor Prof. Wayne F. Cascio Telephone: 628-1215
Human resources management offers opportunities for students to develop professional competence in the areas of personnel administration and labor relations. Students acquire an understanding of and skills in developing and implementing human resources systems including recruitment, selection, evaluation, training, motivation, and union-management relations.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGMT 4340. Labor and Employee
Relations......................3
MGMT 4380. Human Resources Management: Employment 3
MGMT 4410. Human Resources Management: Compensation
Administration....................3
Recommended Electives MGMT 3350. Managing Individuals
and Work Groups...................3
MGMT 4370. Organization Design......3
PSY 3135. Organizational Psychology 3
PSY 3155. Industrial Psychology.........3
PSY 4405. Theories of Social
Psychology..........................3
OPMG 4440. Quality and Productivity 3
ACCT 2100. Introduction to
Managerial Accounting...............3
1SMG 3500. Logical Data Structures
and Data Base Management Systems 3 QUAN 3000. Intermediate Statistics 3
SOC 3052. Sociology of Work 3
ECON 4610. Labor Economics.........3
Information Systems
Advisor: James Gerlach Telephone: 628-1250
The information systems area is designed for those who wish to prepare themselves for careers as professional data processing managers or as technical specialists in business and government. The student develops those technical skills and administrative insights required for analysis of information systems, the design and implementation of systems, and the management of data processing operations. The emphasis is on management information systems-systems for the collection, organization, accessing, and analysis of information for the planning and control of operations. The automation of data processing is also studied extensively. Students should note that not all courses are offered each semester. ISMG. 2200 is a required
prerequisite for the information systems area and applies as a business elective.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ISMG 2200. Business Programming with COBOL 3
ISMG 3200. Data Structures 3
ISMG 3700. Computer Technology 3 ISMG 4500. Data Base Management
Systems.............................3
ISMG 4600. Systems Analysis and Design..........................3
Students planning to pursue an information systems career may wish to study the role of information systems in operations management and accounting. The following courses are recommended as free electives:
ISMG 3300. Operations Research
for Decision Support. OPMG 4440. Quality and Productivity.
ACCT 4540. Accounting Systems and
Data Processing.
International Business
Advisor Kang Rae Cho Telephone: 628-1280
Increasingly, businesses are reorienting their thinking, planning, and operations to capitalize on opportunities that exist in the world marketplace. Every phase of business is affected by this reorientation. For individuals with the appropriate skills, training, and interest, international business provides excellent career opportunities.
The international business curriculum is designed to enhance and build on thorough training in basic business skills and to provide students with additional skills and knowledge appropriate to international business.
ECON 4410 (International Trade and Finance) is a required prerequisite for the international business area and applies as an international studies elective.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FNCE 4370. International Financial
Management..........................3
MKTG 4580. International
Transportation .....................3
MKTG 4200. International Marketing 3
MGMT 4400. International Business 3
Students should see an academic advisor for course scheduling.
A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended. The course requirements for a second area can be included as part of the business and free elective hours. In addition, serious consideration should be given to either a minor or a certificate in international affairs,


78 / College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and to advanced study of a foreign language.
Management
Advisor: W. Graham Astley Telephone: 628-1211
The management curriculum provides the foundation for careers in supervision and general management in a wide variety of organizations. It develops skills in management practice through an understanding of general management principles, individual and group behavior, organizational change and design, and human resources management.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGMT 3350. Managing Individuals
and Work Groups...................3
MGMT 4350. Conflict and Change
in Organizations..................3
MGMT 4370. Organization Design .....3
MGMT 4380. Human Resources Management: Employment............3
Recommended Electives MGMT 4340. Labor and Employee
Relations ...........................3
MGMT 4400. Introduction to
International Business...............3
MGMT 4410. Human Resources Management: Compensation
Administration.......................3
MGMT 4950. Topics in Business.........3
Marketing
Advisor Gordon G. Barnewall Telephone: 628-1296
Marketing is concerned with directing the activities of the organization toward the satisfaction of customer wants and needs. This involves understanding customers, identifying those wants and needs which the organization can best serve, guiding the development of specific products or services, planning and implementing ways to take products or services to the market, securing the customer’s order, and finally, monitoring customer response in order to guide future activities.
In most organizations, marketing is a major functional area that provides a wide variety of career opportunities in such fields as personal selling and sales management, advertising and sales promotion, public relations, marketing research, physical distribution, product management, market management, marketing information systems, and retail management. Increasingly, career opportunities exist in service businesses and not-for-profit organizations.
Required Courses Semester Hours
(The following two courses)
MKTG 3100. Market Research.............3
MKTG 4800. Marketing Strategies
and Policies .......................3
(Choose two of the following courses)
MKTG 3200. Consumer Behavior..........3
MKTG 4000. Advertising.................3
MKTG 4100. Physical Distribution
Management..........................3
MKTG 4200. International Marketing....3
MKTG 4500. Advertising Management and
Public Relations....................3
MKTG 4580. International
Transportation .....................3
MKTG 4600. Business Marketing .........3
MKTG 4700. Personal Selling and Sales Force Management .............3
In addition to the four required courses, students may select marketing electives, business electives, and non-business electives that support their particular career orientations. The marketing faculty advisor can assist the student in choosing an appropriate set of electives to fit career objectives.
Operations Management
Advisor: Gary A. Kochenberger Telephone: 628-1205
Operations management studies are designed to prepare students for careers as operations manager, management analyst, or systems analyst in such private sector organizations as manufacturing, banking, insurance, hospitals, and construction, as well as in a variety of municipal, state, and federal organizations.
Operations managers may be charged with the design, implementation, operation, and maintenance of thq core operational system. Managerial activities could include forecasting demand, inventory planning and control, scheduling labor and equipment, job design and labor standards, quality control, purchasing, and facilities location and layout.
The outlook for jobs in this area continues to be strong. This placement is aided by the student chapter of the American Production and Inventory Control Society and work intern programs provided to qualified students. Participation in live case research and consulting projects with local organizations is usually an integral part of this course of study.
Students whose major areas of emphasis are information systems, transportation management, accounting, or engineering will find the operations management 4000-level courses to be particularly well related to their courses of study. Students should plan their schedules
carefully as required courses are not offered every semester.
Required Courses Semester Hours
(The following three courses)
1SMG 3300. Operations Research
for Decision Support ..............3
OPMG 4400. Planning and Control
Systems............................3
OPMG 4440. Quality and Productivity ... 3 (One of the following courses)
OPMG 4470. Strategic Analysis in
Operations Management .............3
OPMG 4600. Purchasing, Materials Management, and Negotiation .......3
Recommended Electives
1SMG 2200. Business Programming:
Structured COBOL ..................3
MGMT 3350. Managing Work Groups . . . 3 MGMT 4340. Labor and Employee
Relations .........................3
MGMT 4370. Organization Design .......3
MGMT 4380. Human Resources
Management: Employment.............3
QUAN 3000. Intermediate Statistics..3
GEOG 3411. Economic Geography:
Manufacturing......................3
GEOG 4650. Location Analysis..........3
Students planning to take the APICS (American Production and Inventory Control Society) or NAPM (National Association for Purchasing Management) certification examinations should consult with an advisor to determine which elective should be taken.
Courses
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES -ACCOUNTING
ACCT 2100-3. Introduction to Managerial Accounting. Fall, Spring, Summer. An introduction to accounting terminology, published financial statements and managerial accounting. Emphasis will be placed on the uses of accounting information for managerial decision making. Prereq: sophomore standing.
ACCT 2110-3. Financial Accounting and Financial Statement Analysis. Fall, Spring, Summer. The financial accounting process role of the accounting profession, and the analysis of financial statements. For non-accounting majors only. Accounting majors should not take this course but should take ACCT 2120. Prereq:
ACCT 2100.
ACCT 2120-3. Introduction to Financial Accounting. Fall, Spring, Summer. The preparation and interpretation of the principal financial statements of the business enterprise, with emphasis on asset and liability valuation problems and the


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determination of net income. For accounting majors only. Prereq: ACCT 2100.
ACCT 3220-3. Intermediate Financial Accounting I. Fall, Spring, Summer. Intensive analysis of generally accepted accounting principles, accounting theory, and preparation of annual financial statements for public corporations. Prereq: ACCT 2000 or 2120 and junior standing. ACCT 3230-3. Intermediate Financial Accounting II. Fall, Spring, Summer. Continuation of ACCT 3220. Prereq:
ACCT 3220.
ACCT 3320-3. Intermediate Cost Accounting. Fall, Spring, Summer. Cost analysis for purposes of control and decision making. Analysis of cost behavior, role of accounting in planning and control, and managerial uses of cost accounting data. Includes use of computer assisted decision models. Prereq: ACCT 3310 or 2120 and QUAN 2010.
ACCT 4240-3. Advanced Financial Accounting. Fall, Spring, Summer. Advanced financial accounting concepts and practices with emphasis on accounting for partnerships, business combinations, and consolidations. Prereq:
ACCT 3230.
ACCT 4330-3. Managerial Accounting
Problems and Cases. Critical analysis of advanced topics in managerial accounting. Considerable use of cases and current readings. Prereq: ACCT 3320.
ACCT 4410-3. Income Tax Accounting. Fall, Spring, Summer. Provisions and procedures of federal income tax laws and requirements affecting individuals and business organizations, including the management problems of tax planning and compliance. Prereq: ACCT 3220 or 3320.
ACCT 4420-3. Advanced Income Tax Accounting. Fall, Spring. Continuation of ACCT 4410, with special emphasis on the income tax problems of partnerships and corporations. Prereq: ACCT 4410.
ACCT 4540-3. Accounting Systems and Data Processing. Fall. The design and analysis of accounting information systems, automated data processing methods with special emphasis on computers and computer programming, and the role of accounting in the management process. Prereq: ACCT 3320.
ACCT 4620-3. Auditing. Fall, Spring, Summer. Generally accepted auditing standards and the philosophy supporting them; auditing techniques available to the independent public accountant. Pertinent publications of the AICPA reviewed. Prereq: ACCT 3230.
ACCT 4800-3. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations.
Spring. Planning and control of government and nonprofit organizations.
Includes program budgets, responsibility accounting, and fund accounting. Prereq: ACCT 3320 or 3220.
ACCT 4840-1 to 8. Independent Study. ACCT 4950-3. Special Topics. Research methods and results, special topics, and professional developments in accounting. Prerequisites vary according to topic and instructor requirements.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES-BUSINESS LAW
BLAW 3000-3. Legal, Ethical, and Social Environments of Business I. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course addresses the most fundamental ways the legal, ethical and social environments of business affect managers. Students are taught to identify legal issues, make ethical judgments about business conduct, and understand the ways ethical and social issues are developed. Topics include factual analysis of legal, ethical and social issues; ethical theory and its application; law making processes; contracts (and related topics); torts; product liability; corporate social responsibility, social audits, and corporate political action. Prereq: junior standing.
BLAW 4120-3. Legal, Ethical, and Social Environments of Business II. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course presents additional knowledge about the ways the legal, ethical and social environments of business affect managers. Students are taught to identify legal issues, make ethical judgments about business conduct, and understand the ways social processes influence, and are influenced by, business. Relations among legal, ethical and social issues are developed. Skills in factual analysis and the application of ethical theory are advanced and refined. Topics include advanced ethical theory, property law and environmental issues, agency, business organizations and governance, employment law and discrimination, administrative regulation, stockholder analysis and international law. Prereq: BLAW 3000. BLAW 4500-3. Legal Issues for CPA’s. Fall, Spring. This course is designed for those taking the business law section of the CPA exam. In addition to expanded coverage of some topics covered in BLAW 3000 and BLAW 4120, this course covers additional topics addressed by the CPA examination. Prereq: BLAW 3000 and 4120.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES -FINANCE
FNCE 3100-3. Principles of Finance I. Fall, Spring, Summer. This is an introduction to money and capital formation including the role of banks and other financial intermediaries; the Federal Reserve system and government regulation; financial markets and instruments; and stock and securities exchanges. Also covered are foreign currency exchange rates, risk management, and emerging financial, economic and regulatory trends. Discussion includes both domestic and international aspects. This course is part of the required business core. Prereq: ECON 2012,2022, ACCT 2100, QUAN 2010 and junior standing.
FNCE 3200-3. Principles of Finance II.
Fall, Spring, Summer. This course focuses on the basic principles governing the management of capital in the business firm. Topics include financial statement analysis, costs and sources of financing, international financial management, capital budgeting, and project selection methodology. This course is part of the required business core. Prereq: FNCE 3100 and either ACCT 2110 or 2120.
FNCE 4320-3. Corporate Financial Decisions. Fall, Spring. This course develops the analytical and decision-making skills of students in solving financial management problems. Topics include planning, control, and financing of current operations and longer term capital commitments; management of income; evaluation of capital investments; and expansion. Case method of instruction. Prereq:
FNCE 3200
FNCE 4330-3. Investment and Portfolio Management. Fall, Spring. This course discusses investment problems and policies and the methodology for solution and implementation. Topics include portfolio analysis, selection of investment media, and measurement of performance.
Prereq: FNCE 3100.
FNCE 4340-3. Security Analysis. Analysis of the financial condition of the firm, valuation of debt and equity securities, and the selection of investment media for portfolios. Prereq: FNCE 4330.
FNCE 4350-3. Financial Markets and Institutions. Fall, Spring. This course focuses on the supply and demand for loanable funds, the process of money creation, the structure of interest rates, and the role of the central bank. Special attention is devoted to the impact of monetary and fiscal policies on interest rates, the flow of funds, and economic activity. Prereq: FNCE 4310.


80 / College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
FNCE 4360-3. Management of Financial Institutions. An analysis of structure, markets, regulations, and chartering commercial banks. Problems and policies of the internal management of funds, loan practices and procedures, investment behavior, deposit and capital adequacy, liquidity, and solvency. Analytical methodology for these problems is developed. Prereq: FNCE 4310.
FNCE 4370-3. International Financial Management. Fall, Spring, Summer. Financial management in the international environment. Topics include international capital movements; international operations as they affect the financial functions; foreign and international institutions; the foreign exchange process. Also considers financial requirements, problems, sources, and policies of firms doing business internationally. Prereq: FNCE 3200. FNCE 4840-1 to 8. Independent Study. FNCE 4950-3. Special Topics. Research methods and results, special topics, and professional development in finance. Prerequisites vary according to topic and instructor requirements.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES -INFORMATION SYSTEMS
ISMG 2200-3. Business Programming with Cobol. Fall, Spring, Summer. A first course in programming using the COBOL language. Basic elements of the language are discussed and demonstrated through business applications. Structured programming is emphasized. Prereq: MATH 1080 or six hours of nonremedial mathematics; computer literacy as defined by College of Business requirements.
ISMG 3000-3. Business Information Systems. Fall, Spring, Summer. A study of business information systems focusing upon computer hardware and software as they relate to business information, includes computer programming, computer systems, and computer applications. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the concepts, vocabulary, and function of business information systems and the computer. Prereq: MATH 1080 or 6 hours nonremedial college mathematics; computer literacy as defined by college of business requirements.
ISMG 3200-3. Data Structures. Fall,
Spring. This course builds upon the programming foundation laid in ISMG 2200 and focuses on data structures and their use in business applications. The Pascal programming language will be used as the vehicle for investigating a variety of data structure topics. Case studies may be used to illustrate applications of the
material. Prereq: ISGM 2200 or instructor consent, QUAN 2010 is recommended. ISMG 3300-3. Operations Research for Decision Support. Fall. This course studies the various methods and models of operations research and their application to managerial settings. Typical topics include inventory models, simulation, linear programming, and queuing. Prereq: QUAN 2010.
ISMG 3700-3. Computer Technology. This course provides a conceptual framework in areas of computer architecture, operating systems, programming translators, and telecommunications. It emphasizes concepts needed to communicate effectively with computer technicians. Prereq: ISMG 2200 or consent of instructor.
ISMG 4500-3. Database Management Systems. Spring. This course focuses on both the technical aspects of DBMS and their management implications. It emphasizes analysis, design, and implementation of database applications. Topics include file structures, data modeling, administration of DBMS, DBMS evaluation, data integrity and data security. Prereq:
ISMG 3200.
ISMG 4600-3. System Analysis and Design. Fall. This course covers the application development process by focussing on structured analysis and design processes and tools. The structured analysis and design process is discussed within the context of the system development life cycle, and other approaches to application development, e.g., prototyping. Topics to be covered include requirement analysis, feasibility study, general and detailed design, system testing, and implementation procedures. Prereq: ISMG 3200. ISMG 4840-1 to 8. Independent Study. ISMG 4950-3. Special Topics. Seldom Offered. This course varies from offering to offering. Typically, it is a research-oriented course exploring new developments in information systems. Prerequisites vary according to topic.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES -MANAGEMENT
MGMT 1000-3. Introduction to Business.
Fall, Spring, Summer. Nature of business enterprise. Role of business in our society; problems confronting business management, career opportunities in business. Business students are advised to take this course during their freshman year, but may not take it in the junior or senior years. Open only to freshmen, sophomores, and non-degree students, and music majors at all levels.
MGMT 3300-3. Management and Organization Behavior. Fall, Spring, Summer. Emphasizes the application of behavioral science knowledge to understanding people and organizations. Motivation, authority, politics, and the role of groups in contemporary organizations are some of the topics covered. Prereq: junior standing.
MGMT 3350-3. Managing Individuals and Work Groups. Fall, Spring, Summer. Examines what makes small groups effective in organizations. Develops the ability to analyze interpersonal and group behavior, and improve group functioning. Builds interpersonal and small group leadership skills. Prereq: MGMT 3300.
MGMT 4340-3. Labor and Employee Relations. Fall, Spring. Analysis of legal, political, social, and managerial aspects of collective bargaining and employee relations. Prereq: MGMT 3300.
MGMT 4350-3. Conflict and Change in Organizations. Spring. This course is designed to help students understand common types of conflict within organizations and the strategies useful for resolving conflict. Techniques for managing change also are stressed. Prereq:
MGMT 3300.
MGMT 4370-3. Organization Design. Fall, Spring. Examines how to structure organizations to perform effectively. Emphasis is placed on the role of the task, technology, and environment as constraints on organization design. Prereq: MGMT 3300.
MGMT 4380-3. Human Resources Management: Employment. Fall, Spring. Study of the development and implementation of personnel systems for recruiting, selecting, placing, developing, and evaluating human resources. Prereq: QUAN 2010 and MGMT 3300.
MGMT 4400-3. Introduction to International Business. Fall, Spring. An overview of the international business environment, the impact of environmental factors on international business operations, and the identification and analysis of complex managerial issues facing international business firms. Prereq: ECON 4410 and junior standing or consent of instructor. MGMT 4410-3. Human Resources Management: Compensation Administration. Spring. Study of planning and administration of compensation systems, including government, union and labor market influences on pay; development of pay systems and employee benefits for non-managerial, managerial, and overseas employees. Prereq: QUAN 2010 and MGMT 4380.


Undergraduate Courses / 81
V1GMT 4500-3. Business Policy and Strategic Management. Fall, Spring, Summer. Emphasis is on integrating the economic, market, social/political, technological, and competition components of :he external environment with the internal :haracteristics of the firm; and deriving hrough analysis the appropriate interac-:ion between the firm and its environment :o facilitate accomplishment of the firm’s objectives. Open only to business students in their graduation semester.
^rereq: completion of all business :ore courses.
V1GMT 4840-1 to 8. Independent Study. WGMT 4950-3. Special Topics in Management. A number of different current topes in management will be offered under :his course number. Consult the schedule of classes for current course offerings. dGMT 5840-1 to 8. Independent Study.
JNDERGRADUATE COURSES -MARKETING
HKTG 3000-3. Principles of Marketing.
7all, Spring, Summer. Provides a marketing nanagement approach to the considera-ion of product planning, pricing, promo-ion, and distribution of goods and iervices. Emphasizes the role of the con-;umer and the social responsibility of narketing. Prereq: ACCT 2000 and junior itanding.
4KTG 3050-3. Applied Marketing Management. Fall, Spring, Summer. This :ourse is offered as the second course in a iequence, following the principles of marketing course (MKTG 3000). The course is lesigned to enhance the student’s ability o formulate and implement a marketing >Ian, and to better understand the rela-ionship of marketing to other business unctions. It will emphasize application of narketing concepts through the use of :ases, simulations or projects. In addition t will provide further treatment of a num->er of marketing areas, such as interna-ional marketing and services marketing, •rereq: MKTG 3000.
4KTG 3100-3. Marketing Research. Fall, ipring. Provides practical experience in esearch methodologies, planning as nvestigation, designing a questionnaire, electing a sample, interpreting results, md making a report. Techniques focus on iroduct analysis, motivation research,
:ost analysis, and advertising effective-less. Prereq: MKTG 3000, QUAN 2010. 4KTG 4000-3. Advertising. Fall, Spring. analyzes principles and practices in idvertising from a managerial viewpoint. Considers the reasons to advertise, predict and market analysis as the planning ihase of the advertising program, media
selection, creation and production of advertisements, copy testing, and development of advertising budgets. Prereq: MKTG 3000.
MKTG 4100-3. Physical Distribution Management. Infrequently Offered. Investigation and analysis of logistics of distribution systems for firms engaged in manufacturing and marketing. Component parts of each system are studied and analytical tools are presented for selecting alternatives which will attain distribution goals of the firm. Prereq: MKTG 3000. MKTG 4200-3. International Marketing. Fall, Spring. Studies managerial marketing policies and practices of firms marketing their products in foreign countries. Analytical survey of institutions, functions, policies, and practices in international marketing. Relates marketing activities to market structure and environment. Prereq: MKTG 3000.
MKTG 4400-3. Marketing Institutions and Retailing. Emphasis placed on functions and strategies of all aspects of retail management including site selection, merchandising, pricing and promotion and inventory control. Also includes the examination of wholesaling and broker activities. Prereq: MKTG 3000.
MKTG 4500-3. Advertising Management and Public Relations. Infrequently Offered. Focuses on advertising issues from an agency point of view. Considers issues of stimulating primary and selective demand, media selection, developing the advertising program or campaign, establishing budgets, evaluating results, and managing agency relations. Public relations issues incorporated in the campaign include effective publicity techniques, lobbying and stockholder and community relations. Prereq: MKTG 4000.
MKTG 4580-3. International Transportation. (Formerly TRMG 4580.) Fall. Analysis of international transportation (primarily sea and air) in world economy. Detailed study of cargo documentation and freight rate patterns. Included are liability patterns, logistics, economics, and national policies of transportation. Prereq: senior standing.
MKTG 4600-3. Business Marketing. Infrequently Offered. Considers the problems of marketing goods and services to organizations buying for their own use or for incorporation in an end product. Focuses heavily on organizational buying behavior and analysis of demand for goods and services in both profit and not-for-profit organizations. Emphasizes development of marketing programs in the context of organizational demand for goods and services. Prereq: MKTG 3000.
MKTG 4700-3. Personal Selling and Sales Management. Fall. Introduces the student to principles of personal selling and issues in managing the field sales force. Focuses on models of personal selling, recruiting, selection, training, compensation, supervision and motivation, as well as organizing the field sales force, sales analysis, forecasting, and budgeting.
MKTG 4800-3. Marketing Strategies and Policies. Fall, Spring. Focuses on process of formulating and implementing marketing channels and product analysis. A case approach is utilized to develop the, student’s analytical ability to integrate all major areas of marketing. Prereq: MKTG 3000 and six additional hours in marketing.
MKTG 4840-1 to 8. Independent Study. MKTG 4950-3. Special Topics. Courses offered on an irregular basis for the purpose of presenting new subject matter in marketing. Prerequisites will vary depending upon the particular topic and instructor requirements.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES -OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
OPMG 3000-3. Operations Management.
Fall, Spring, Summer. An introduction to the design and analysis of operating systems in manufacturing, services, and public sector organizations. Topics include facility layout and location, job design, work standards, quality and productivity, inventory planning and control, simulation, waiting line analysis, and linear programming. Prereq: ACCT 2000, QUAN 2010. It is important to take this course in the junior year.
OPMG 4400-3. Planning and Control Systems. Fall. Study of the design, implementation, and control of integrated operations, scheduling, and inventory planning systems. Topics include demand forecasting, aggregate planning, capacity planning, master scheduling, inventory management, material requirements planning, stockless systems, and operations control. Organizations studied include manufacturing, service, and public sector. Prereq: OPMG 3000.
OPMG 4440-3. Quality and Productivity.
Spring. Study of the various techniques to measure quality and productivity in organizations and the practical management issues related to implementing quality and productivity systems. Topics include statistical quality control, total factor productivity, quality circles, total quality control, work design and measurement, and quality and productivity management systems. Prereq: OPMG 3000 and MGMT3300.


82 / College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
OPMG 4470-3. Strategic Analysis in Operations Management. Spring. Study of the analysis and formulation of operations management strategy and policy. Emphasis will be on the role of the operations function in the strategic processes of the organization. Decision making will be stressed through the use of case studies and the analysis of actual business situations. Prereq: OPMG 4400 and 4440.
OPMG 4600-3. Purchasing, Materials Management and Negotiation. Seldom Offered. Study of the purchasing function in manufacturing, service, and public organizations. Topics include source selection, make-buy analysis, material quality standards and specifications, value analysis, negotiations, and legal aspects. Prereq: OPMG 3000.
OPMG 4840-1 to 8. Independent Study. OPMG 4950-3. Special Topics. A number of different current topics in operations management will be discussed in the course. Consult the Schedule of Classes or contact the area coordinator for further information.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES -QUANTITATIVE METHODS
QUAN 2010-3. Business Statistics. Fall, Spring, Summer. Statistical applications in business. Includes descriptive statistics, time series analysis, index numbers, probability and sampling distributions, statistical inference, simple regression, and decision analysis without sampling. Prereq: MATH 1070 and 1080 and ismg 2000. Students are encouraged to take QUAN 2010 in the semester following completion of ISMG 2000.
QUAN 3000-3. Intermediate Statistics.
Seldom Offered. Intermediate treatment of regression and forecasting models in business and research, statistical quality control in manugacturing, sampling and analysis of variance, parametric and nonparametric statistical inferences, decision analysis with sampling. Prereq: QUAN 2010.
GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS (M.B.A./M.S.)
Associate Dean: Peter G. Bryant
The Graduate School of Business Administration offers programs leading to the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), and the Master of Science (M.S.) in specific fields of business and health administration. In addition, the Master of Business Administration for Executives (Executive M.B.A.) is offered as a multicampus program of the Graduate School
of Business Administration, and the Executive Program in Health Administration (Executive M.S.H.A.) is offered through the Executive Programs.
The M.B.A., the Executive M.B.A., and the M.S. degrees in business are accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). The M.S. in Health Administration is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA).
Requirements for Admission to the M.B.A. and M.S. Programs
Admission to the graduate program in business administration (M.B.A. and M.S.) is granted only to students showing high promise of success in graduate business study. Admission is based on the following indicators of the candidate’s likelihood to succeed in the program.
Academic Record. The bachelor’s degree must be from a regionally accredited university. The total academic record is considered, including the grade-point average, the course of study, and the quality of the program.
Testing. The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is required. The GMAT test is given four times each year at numerous centers throughout the world. For information and to make application for the test, write to: Graduate Management Admission Test, Educational Testing Service, CN 6103, Princeton, New Jersey, 08541 or phone (609) 771-7330. The code number for CU-Denver’s graduate business program is 4819.
Work Experience. A record of appropriate employment at increasing levels of responsibility is considered a positive indicator of the likelihood of successful completion of graduate work.
Seniors in this University who have satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements, and who need no more than 6 semester hours overall to meet requirements for a bachelor’s degree, may be admitted to the Graduate School of Business Administration by special permission of the associate dean. They must meet regular admission criteria and submit complete applications by deadlines listed below.
Background Requirements. Students applying for graduate programs in business do not need to have taken their undergraduate degrees in business. The M.B.A. program is specifically designed so that the required courses cover the material needed for completion of the degree. There are no prerequisites
needed to enter the M.B.A. program. Students with non-business backgrounds have completed the program successfully. It is expected, however, that students have a minimum level of basic personal computer proficiency as well as a good working knowledge of basic algebra. Should you feel inadequate in either area, please contact the Graduate School of Business Administration for information.
Applicants for the M.S. degree, however may be required to take prerequisite courses, depending on the individual’s academic and professional background. For more detailed information contact a graduate student advisor, telephone 628-1276.
THE ADMISSION PROCESS
To be considered for admission, applicants for graduate programs other than Health Administration and Executive Program must:
1. Submit a completed application along with all required transcripts and supporting materials and the nonrefundable application fee of $40 ($30 for M.S. applicants, $70 for dual M.B.A./M.S. applicants) prior to the application deadlines: April 1 for Summer Term admission.
July 1 for Fall Semester admission. November 1 for Spring Semester
admission.
International students must fill out special applications and meet earlier deadlines. Contact the graduate office at 628-1276 for details.
Early applications are recommended, as they receive early priority in registration and class enrollment. Applications received after these dates or without complete supporting documentation and transcripts will not be considered for admission in that term or semester.
2. Have GMAT scores forwarded to the program by the Educational Testing Service. The code for CU-Denver’s graduate business program is 4819.
3. Have two official transcripts (not student copies) sent from each college attended to the address below.
Personal interviews are not required. The mailing address for applications is: Graduate Admissions
Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 165, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364
Applicants for the Executive M.B.A. and M.S. in Health Administration programs should consult the relevant sections for application information.


Master of Business Administration / 83
Academic Policies for Graduate Students
Advising. Prospective graduate students are encouraged to learn about admissions and program requirements by attending one of the regularly held prospective student orientations. In addition, as soon as possible after admission, students should schedule an appointment with a graduate advisor to discuss general degree requirements. Master of Science students should consult with an advisor to determine any background course work that may be required. All M.S. students need to file a formal degree plan during their first term in residence. All M.B.A. students must file a formal degree plan as soon as electives are considered. These plans, with appropriate signatures, will be filed with the Graduate School of Business Administration.
Course Load. The normal course load for full-time graduate students is 9-15 semester hours. However, because many students also are pursuing a career, it is possible to attend classes on a part-time Dasis at times convenient to the individ-jal’s work schedule. Graduate courses are offered primarily in the evening hours to accommodate the working student.
Transfer of Credit. Upon approval of the Graduate Appeals Committee, a maximum af 6 semester hours of graduate work may ae transferred from another AACSB-iccredited master's program.
Time Limit. M.B.A. students must com-alete the curriculum within five years rom the date of first enrollment in the program. Courses older than 5 years generally will not be accepted for the degree anless they have been validated by the specific department. M.S. students must inish courses beyond those in the com-non body of knowledge list within 5 years and with reasonable continuity.
Students who have not been enrolled or three consecutive semesters must eapply for admission to the program and aay the application fee. Readmitted stu-lents are required to complete degree equirements in effect at the date of their eadmission.
Graduation. Students must file an appli-:ation for Admission to Candidacy and a )iploma Card with the Graduate School >f Business Administration no later than ieptember 1 for December graduation, lanuary 1 for May graduation, and June 1 or August graduation.
Minimum Grade-Point Average. A mini-num cumulative grade-point average of 1.0 must be achieved and maintained in :ourses taken for a graduate business
degree. All courses taken to meet the degree requirements, except transfer hours, are included in the grade-point average. If the student’s cumulative grade-point average falls below 3.0, the student will be placed on academic probation and normally given one calendar year or 9 semester hours of work (whichever comes first) in which to achieve the required 3.0 cumulative average. Failure to achieve the required average within the allotted time period will result in suspension.
Any grade below a C- (1.7) is a failing grade for graduate students. Graduate students must repeat a course for which they have received a grade below a C-. Both the original grade and the grade for the repeated course count in the computation of the grade-point average.
To earn a grade of W (withdrawal without credit) in a course, a student must be earning a grade of C or better in the course. Students will not be permitted to withdraw from courses after the tenth week of the semester without the approval of the associate dean. The approval of the instructor will also be required.
Admission to Graduate Business Courses
Admission to graduate level courses is reserved for students admitted to the graduate programs in business. Nondegree students and graduate students from other University of Colorado schools or colleges may be permitted to attend only with written permission of the associate dean and on a space available basis.
6000-level courses are reserved exclusively for graduate students. 5000-level courses may be offered simultaneously with 4000-level courses. Students should check with a graduate advisor to confirm acceptability of 5000-level courses prior to registering.
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (M.B.A.)
The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) program provides a general background in management and administration. This background enables the student to have the breadth of exposure and depth of knowledge required for an advanced level management career. The program is devoted to developing the concepts, analytical tools, and communications skills required for competent and responsible administration of an enterprise viewed
in its entirety, within its social, political, and economic environment.
The M.B.A. program is available in three different configurations: the INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. program, the COHORT M.B.A. program, and the EXECUTIVE M.B.A. program (see following section). The INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. and the COHORT M.B.A. both have the same curriculum requirements; they differ only in the flexibility of course scheduling and the time required to complete the program.
The INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. allowsthe scheduling of classes with maximum flexibility so students can progress through the program at their own pace by taking as little as one class per semester, or as many as five classes per semester, at times that are convenient to their work schedule. The program can be completed in as little as 16 months, or as long as 5 years.
The COHORT M.B.A. enables the student to complete the program in 3 years and one semester, taking 2 courses fall and spring semester and one in the summer term. Each group of entering students moves through the core courses as a cohort, taking prescribed core courses two nights per week, thus sharing their educational and professional experience. Electives are taken as available to meet individual objectives. For working professionals who can meet the time requirements of the COHORT program, it provides a unique and rewarding educational experience.
Candidates in both the individualized and the COHORT M.B.A. programs must complete specific requirements consisting of 16 courses (48 semester hours) as follows:
Core Requirements Semester Hours
BUSN 6000. Accounting for Managers 3 BUSN 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis ...........................3
BUSN 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations.......................3
BUSN 6060. Marketing Management .......3
BUSN 6080. Management of
Operations .........................3
BUSN 6100. Management Information
Systems.......................
BUSN 6120. Managerial Economics .
BUSN 6140. Financial Management BUSN 6160. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business ............3
BUSN 6180. Economic Environment
of Business.........................3
BUSN 6200. Business Policy and
Strategic Management .............. 3
Total Required Core Semester Hours 33
CO CO CO


84 / College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Electives:
One graduate course from each of three of the five following areas: Accounting, Finance, Information Systems/Operations Management,
Marketing, or Management.............9
Free electives ........................ 6
Total Elective Semester Hours......... 15
Total Required Semester Hours for M.B.A. degree ................. 48
Notes and Restrictions
Core. Depending on demonstration of a strong background in one area, a maximum of one course may be waived in the core, although the 48 hour requirement is not reduced. An additional elective will then be substituted.
Electives. No more than nine hours of elective graduate courses may be taken for credit in any one discipline or area of emphasis. Students may elect not to take any emphasis. Three hours maximum may be taken outside the Graduate School of Business Administration, but only with prior written approval of the associate dean.
Subject to the above distribution requirements, students have a wide range of options available in selecting the 15 hours of electives. No area of emphasis is required for the M.B.A. degree, permitting students to choose a combination of courses appropriate for their individual career needs. If a student wishes to pursue an area of emphasis, several are available including accounting, finance, information systems, international business, operations management, management, and marketing. Areas of emphasis all require 9 semester hours of electives (5000 or 6000 level) in addition to the area core courses. Consult a graduate advisor for detailed requirements. No thesis or comprehensive exam is required for the M.B.A. program.
For additional information about the M.B.A. program contact a graduate student advisor at 628-1276.
MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAMS
Master of Science degrees (M.S.) are offered in the fields of accounting, finance, health administration, marketing, management, and information systems.
The M.S. degree affords the opportunity for specialization and depth of training within a particular major field and, where allowed or required, a minor field. The specialization and expertise developed with the M.S. program prepares the
student for more specialized staff positions in industry, the non-profit sector, and government.
The course requirements for the M.S. degree in each of the fields are divided into two components-common background and graduate core requirements. The common background requires at least 21 semester hours of business courses to develop general breadth and competence in the fields of business administration. These requirements may differ among degree programs. The common background requirements may be satisfied by equivalent graduate level work, or through undergraduate course work as approved by the advisor. Generally, an undergraduate degree in business administration from an AACSB accredited university will meet most of those requirements. The graduate core requires at least 30 semester hours of graduate level courses as prescribed by the different major programs. Of the 30 hours, a minimum of 18 hours must be at the 6000 level.
Master of Science in Accounting
Advisors: Michael Firth Telephone: 628-1220
The Master of Science in Accounting is a flexible program that provides the student with a thorough understanding of both financial and managerial accounting. The combination of required and elective courses allows the student to design a course of study with the advisor’s approval, leading to a successful career in either public accounting, governmental or non-profit accounting, or management accounting.
The M.S. in accounting requires the completion of components A, B, and C as shown below:
A. COMMON BACKGROUND COURSE WORK
Courses Required Semester Hours
ACCT 2100. Introduction to
Managerial Accounting............3
ACCT 2120. Introduction to
Financial Accounting.............3
BUSN 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis ........................3
BUSN 6060. Marketing Management 3
BUSN 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations....................3
BUSN 6120. Managerial Economics....3
BUSN 6140. Financial Management....3
BLAW 3000. Business Law........... 3
TOTAL ......................... 24
It may be possible to satisfy some of these requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work with the approval of the advisor.
It is recommended that students should have a minimal competency in mathematics and computer software applications. Possible courses at CU-Denver are ISMG 3000, CSC 1100, CSC 1410, and MATH 1070, 1080. The required courses in Parts B and C (below) will also help meet these objectives. Self-study or review (workshops) also may be used to attain minimal competency levels.
B. ACCOUNTING COURSES BACKGROUND
Courses Required Semester Hours
ACCT 3220 and 3230. Intermediate Financial Accounting, I and II 6
ACCT 3320. Intermediate Cost
Accounting.......................3
ACCT 4410 and 4420. Income Tax and Advanced Income Tax Accounting 6
C. GRADUATE COREIN ACCOUNTING
Courses Required Semester Hours
ACCT 6250. Seminar: Accounting
Theory............................3
ACCT 6260. Seminar: Managerial
Accounting........................3
ACCT “core.” Any 2 advanced accounting courses (numbered higher than ACCT 6260) 6
BUSN 6100. Management Information
Systems...........................3
Sub total.......................... 15
Electives. (5) Five elective courses may be selected................. 15
Total Graduate Core Semester Hours 30
Certain graduate courses in accounting are offered only once a year. Consult a current Schedule of Classes for information about current course offerings. Note that ACCT 5540 and 6250 are usually offered in the fall and other advanced courses are usually offered in the spring.
Comprehensive Examinations. No comprehensive examinations are required in the major field of accounting.
Master of Science in Finance
Advisor: E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr. Telephone: 628-1297
The M.S. degree in Finance provides the student with the necessary specialized expertise in the field to meet the need of businesses for staff specialists, and to prepare the student for further graduate work in the field of finance.


Graduate Programs / 85
The M.S. program in finance consists of two components-the common background and the graduate core required courses.
A. COMMON BACKGROUND COURSE WORK
Courses Required Semester Hours
BUSN 6000. Accounting for Managers 3 BUSN 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis ........................3
BUSN 6040. Human Behavior in Organizations 3
BUSN 6060. Marketing Management 3 BUSN 6120. Managerial Economics 3 BUSN 6160. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business .........3
BUSN 6180. Economic Environment
of Business .................... 3
Total Semester Hours Required 21
It may be possible to satisfy some of the common background requirements by other graduate or undergraduate course work, with the approval of an advisor.
B. GRADUATE CORE IN FINANCE
The M.S. finance core will consist of 30 semester hours (10 courses) beyond the common background requirements. At least six of these courses must be at the 6000 level or higher. A minimum of 21 semester hours (7 courses) must be chosen from regularly scheduled graduate finance courses (excluding independent study); the remaining 9 semester hours (3 courses) may be in finance or in related fields, as approved by the student’s M.S. advisor in finance. A student can elect to include a minor field with at least 9 semester hours approved by a minor field advisor, but a minor is not required.
The 21 hour finance requirement is met by the following requirements and options:
1. Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6140. Financial Management 3
FNCE 6310. Decisions and Policies
in Financial Management .........3
FNCE 6330. Investment Management Analysis............3
2. Choose at least 4 courses in finance from the list of regularly scheduled graduate classes in this catalog in consultation with the graduate advisor.
Notes and Restrictions
BUSN 6140 can be waived if a student has taken at least 9 semester hours of upper division undergraduate finance courses within the last 5 years from an AACSB accredited university. However,
the student must still take at least 21 hours in finance at the graduate level.
The 9 semester hours (3 course) requirement, beyond the minimum 21 hours (7 courses) of finance courses, can include courses related to the finance major as approved by the M.S. advisor. Areas of study that normally would enhance the study of finance would include economics, mathematics, statistics, accounting, information systems, and computer science. Other fields also could be approved based on the student’s needs and objectives.
No comprehensive examination in finance is required.
Master of Science in Health Administration
Advisor Richard W. Foster Telephone: 628-1286
The goal of the Master of Science in Health Administration (M.S.H.A.) degree is to prepare men and women who, after appropriate practical experience in responsible managerial positions, are capable of assuming positions as chief executive officers or senior administrators in complex, multi-service health care organizations or in organizations’ purchasing and health services.
The curriculum is a synthesis of management concepts and techniques that are applicable to any economic organization and tools that can be specifically applied to health and health services systems. The program emphasizes skills which heighten basic analytic and decision-making processes used by top level managers in selecting broad strategies for the institutions and by junior managers in administering sub-units of health care organizations. The faculty guide the students in their mastery of theoretical, conceptual, and quantitative topics.
The M.S.H.A. program has enjoyed continuous accreditation by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA) since 1970.
The typical course of study is 57 semester hours of graduate level course work for students entering without an undergraduate degree in business from an AACSB accredited program. The curriculum is based on a series of structured learning sequences with M.B.A. courses comprising the majority of the first full year, supplemented by several core health administration courses. It may be possible to satisfy some of the common background requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work.
Students should discuss their options with an advisor.
The second academic year provides the student with advanced training in health administration. Within the 57 semester hours, the student must choose 9 semester hours of elective courses.
Required Business Core Courses Hours
BUSN 6000. Accounting for Managers 3
BUSN 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis ..........................3
BUSN 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations......................3
BUSN 6060. Marketing Management - 3
BUSN 6080. Management of
Operations ........................3
BUSN 6100. Management Information
Systems............................3
BUSN 6120. Managerial Economics 3
BUSN 6140. Financial Management 3
BUSN 6200. Business Policy and Strategic Management 3
Required M.S.H.A. Core Courses Hours
HLTH 6010. Medical Care Organization 3
HLTH 6020. Health Economics........ 3
HLTH 6026. Institutional Management 3
HLTH 6030. Health Sciences...........3
HLTH 6040. Management Accounting
for Health Care Organizations......3
HLTH 6050. Legal and Ethical Problems in Health Care Administration .....3
Electives
HLTH Electives 6
Free Electives................... 6
Total Semester Hours 57
Electives. Elective courses are available in the fields of accounting, finance, marketing, management, organizational development, health policy and planning. In addition, elective courses are available that focus on practice settings such as hospital administration, ambulatory care administration, or long-term care administration.
Management Residency. A management residency is optional, but recommended for all students, especially those with limited health care experience. The faculty of the program provide assistance to students in securing the residency, as well as regular consultation during the residency period. Information on the full range of local, regional, and national residencies is available in the program office.
Length of Program. The didactic portion of the degree will take at least two academic years since H.A. courses are offered only once each year and many require prerequisites. Part-time study is facilitated by courses being scheduled for late afternoon or evening hours.


86 / College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
ADMISSIONS PROCESS
Requirements for Admission. Selection of students is a multi-step process. When making application to the program for the M.S.H.A., candidates should send their applications to:
Graduate Admissions Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 165, P.0. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80127-3364
Credentials or Requirements
1. Completed Application for Graduate Admission Parts 1 and II.
2. Four letters of recommendation from professional or academic acquaintances who are familiar with the applicant’s academic/professional competence.
3. Satisfactory test score-Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is required. When registering for the GMAT use the code for the University of Colorado at Denver MBA program.
4. $30 application fee.
5. Two (2) official transcripts sent directly from each college or university attended. A minimum baccalaureate degree is required.
6. A well formulated career plan articulated in a brief essay, and summarizing the applicant’s reason(s) for seeking the degree.
7. Experience in the field of health services administration (preferred but not absolutely necessary).
Admission to the M.S.H.A. degree program is on a competitive basis. Therefore, these admission criteria represent minimum entrance qualifications expected
of all students.
Deadlines. All credentials should be submitted at the latest by July 1 for Fall Semester, November 1 for Spring Semester, and April 1 for Summer Term. Applications will be reviewed in the order they are received. Early application increases the probability of acceptance.
For further information, brochures, and application materials, contact the Graduate Program in Health Administration, Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Colorado at Denver, (303) 628-1276.
HEALTH ADMINISTRATION SCHOLARSHIPS/LOANS
Financial assistance is available for new and continuing students directly from
the Graduate Program in Health Administration. Each year the following scholar-ships/loans may be awarded:
Eugenie Sontag Award Kaiser-Permanente Scholarship/ Residency
Healthcare Financial Management Assn.
Continuing Student Scholarship Foster G. McGaw Scholarship Loan Fund
Foster G. McGaw Scholarship Federation of American Hospitals’ Foundation
Colorado Health Administration Alumni Association Scholarship Fund U.S. Dept, of Health and Human Services Traineeships
In addition, students are eligible to apply for financial aid directly from the University of Colorado Financial Aid Office. Call 556-2886.
Master of Science in Information Systems
Advisor: James Gerlach Telephone: 628-1250
The Master of Science degree in information systems prepares students for management roles in the information systems field and for such careers as systems analysts, software engineers, data base administrators, and data processing managers. The curriculum emphasizes the application of computer technology within the business context.
The M.S. degree requires the student to complete the common background courses and the graduate core described below.
A. COMMON BACKGROUND COURSE WORK
Courses Required Semester Hours
BUSN 6000. Accounting for Managers .... 3 BUSN 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis .........................3
BUSN 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations.....................3
BUSN 6060. Marketing Management ....3
BUSN 6120. Managerial Economics.....3
BUSN 6140. Financial Management.....3
BUSN 6160. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business ......... 3
Total Semester Hours ........... 21
All students admitted to the M.S. in information systems should possess computer literacy at least equivalent to that attained by taking ISMG 2200 or CSC 1410.
It may be possible to satisfy some of the common background requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work, with the approval of the advisor.
B. GRADUATE CORE IN MANAGEMENT SCIENCE AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Thirty semester hours of approved graduate work are required. Each student’s plan of study is developed by the student and the faculty advisor, considering the student’s interests and background. The 30 semester hours may be taken entirely in information systems and closely related areas or may be divided between information systems(21 hours) and a minor field (9 hours). At least 7 courses (21 hours) must be taken in information systems. Courses available for the major include:
BUSN 6100. Management Information Systems
ISMG 6020. Business Programming and Data Structures
ISMG 6060. Systems Analysis and Design I
ISMG 6080. Data Base Management Systems
ISMG 6100. Computer Technology
ISMG 6120. Data Communication
ISMG 6140. Systems Analysis and Design II
ISMG 6160. Decision Support Systems/Expert Systems
ISMG 6180. Information Systems Policy
ISMG 6800. Special Topics
ISMG 6840. Independent Study
ISMG 6950. Master’s Thesis
All of the above courses are 3 semester hours except ISMG 6840, which is variable credit. A required course may be waived based on a faculty advisor’s signature, but must be replaced with an information systems course. Minor fields may be chosen from a variety of business and non-business areas, in consultation with the student’s advisor. A maximum of 6 semester hours of approved graduate work at other institutions may be included in the 30 semester hours. For business-related courses, the program must be accredited by the AACSB. Candidates for the M.S. degree are not required to take a comprehensive examination or to complete a thesis in the major field.
Master of Science in Management and Organization
Advisor: W. Graham Astley Telephone: 628-1237
The objective of the Master of Science in Management and Organization program is to prepare individuals with prior work


Graduate Programs / 87
experience for significant managerial responsibilities in private and public sector organizations. The program provides students with a basic understanding of how to manage interpersonal dynamics, effectively design organizations, implement planned change, and develop and maintain the human resources necessary for effective performance. It also provides students with the opportunity to learn about specific managerial problems and issues, such as how to turn around poorly performing organizations, implement new technologies, etc. The degree is particularly appropriate for students having an undergraduate degree in a functional area of business, such as accounting, finance, information systems, or in a technical area, such as engineering or computer science.
The Master of Science in Management and Organization consists of two components: the common background and the specialized courses that constitute the graduate core.
A. COMMON BACKGROUND COURSE WORK
Students in the M.S. in management and organization program can satisfy the common background requirements by taking the following courses:
Course Semester Hours
BUSN 6000. Accounting for Managers 3
BUSN 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis .........................3
BUSN 6060. Marketing Management 3
BUSN 6100. Management Information
Systems...........................3
BUSN 6120. Managerial Economics.....3
BUSN 6140. Financial Management 3
BUSN 6160. Legal and Ethical
Environment in Business ......... 3
Total Semester Hours ........... 21
It may be possible to satisfy some of the :ommon background requirements by Dther graduate or undergraduate course vork with the approval of the advisor.
3. GRADUATE COREIN MANAGEMENT AND 3RGANIZATION
The core will consist of 30 semester rours (10 courses) beyond the common background requirements.
At least 7 of the courses must be 6000-evel courses. A minimum of 21 semester lours must be chosen from regularly icheduled management courses (exclud-ng independent study).
The remaining 9 semester hours 3 courses) may be in management ind organization or in related fields, as
approved by the student’s M.S. advisor in management and organization. A student can elect to include a single minor field with at least 9 semester hours approved by a minor field advisor, but a minor is not required.
The 21-hour requirement is met by the following requirements and options:
Courses Required Semester Hours
BUSN 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations.....................3
MGMT 6320. Organizational
Development.......................3
MGMT 6360. Designing Effective
Organizations.....................3
MGMT 6800. Special Topics............9
MGMT 6810. Human Resources
Management .......................3
C. MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION ELECTIVES
Choose at least 9 hours of course work from the selections offered under the course designation MGMT 6800, Special Topics in Management. Usually, two MGMT 6800 sections will be offered each semester. Consult with the advisor for the year’s special topics offerings.
Students can substitute a 6000-level management course for BUSN 6040 if they have taken an equivalent upper division organizational behavior course within the last five years from an AACSB accredited university. In that case, students must complete 21 hours of management courses.
The 9 hour minor, if a student should choose to complete a minor, may be taken in another functional area of business, such as marketing, finance, management science and information systems or in another related discipline, such as psychology, sociology, or public administration. Other fields or combinations of courses can be approved based on a student's needs and career objectives.
Students are not required to take a comprehensive examination or complete a thesis in the major field.
Master of Science in Marketing
Advisor (for general academic advising):
Susan M. Keaveney Telephone: 628-1221
Students with specific questions concerning formal requirements, degree plans, etc. should consult an advisor in the graduate programs office (628-1276) rather than the faculty advisor.
The objective of the Master of Science in Marketing is to prepare individuals with prior work experience for significant
management responsibilities in the field of marketing, either in the private or the public sector. The degree is particularly appropriate for individuals who have an undergraduate degree in business.
The degree consists of two components: the common body of knowledge and the specialized courses that constitute the core of the M.S. in marketing.
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Students in the program must satisfy the AACSB Common Body of Knowledge requirements. These are met by the following courses:
Courses Required Semester Hours
BUSN 6000. Accounting for Managers 3
BUSN 6020. Quantitative Business
Analysis .........................3
BUSN 6040. Human Behavior in
Organizations.....................3
BUSN 6100. Management Information
Systems...........................3
BUSN 6140. Financial Management.....3
BUSN 6160. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business ..........3
BUSN 6180. The Economic
Environment of Business ......... 3
Total Semester Hours ........... 21
It may be possible to satisfy some of these requirements with other graduate or undergraduate course work. Contact a graduate student advisor for information.
B. GRADUATE CORE IN MARKETING
The M.S. in Marketing requires 30 semester hours beyond the Common Body of Knowledge. Twenty-one (21) semester hours must be in marketing at the 6000 A level. The remaining 9 semester hours may be in marketing or in related fields as approved by the student’s advisor. A student may elect to take these 9 semester hours in a single minor field. However, a minor is not required.
(Note: a minimum of 18 of the required 30 semester hours must be taken in courses reserved exclusively for graduate students.)
The 21 semester hour marketing requirement is met by the following requirements and electives:
Required Courses-9 hours BUSN 6060. Marketing Management
(Students with extensive undergraduate course work in marketing may petition to substitute a marketing elective for BUSN 6060.)
MKTG 6010. Marketing Strategy,
Evaluation, and Development


88 / College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
MKTG 6050. Marketing Research
Marketing Electives-12 hours MKTG 6020.
MKTG 6030.
MKTG 6040. MKTG 6060. MKTG 6070.
MKTG 6080.
MKTG 6090.
MKTG 6800. PSY 6710.
International Marketing Sales and Sales Force Management Services Marketing Buyer Behavior Advertising and Promotion Management Marketing Function, Organization and Strategy in Deregulating Industries Transportation and Physical Distribution Systems in the Modern Economy Special Topics in Marketing
Quantitative Methods II
methods to provide students with tools useful in their present positions and applicable to more advanced responsibilities as they progress in their management careers.
The Executive Program consists of four semesters over twenty-two months.
It begins the last week of August and runs through mid-June for two years. Classes meet for a full day, once a week, on alternating Fridays and Saturdays, making it possible for those who live outside the Denver area to participate.
Two courses are taken simultaneously throughout the program. The program is supplemented by an intensive seminar orientation at the beginning, and a two-day seminar at the conclusion of the first academic year. A second-year seminar is held at an international business center.
The 9 hour minor, should a student choose to complete one, may be taken in another functional area of business such as finance or management science and information systems. Alternatively, it may be taken in a related discipline such as international affairs, economics, social psychology, or public administration. Other fields or combinations of courses can be approved, based on the student’s needs and career objectives.
Students are not required to take a comprehensive examination or to complete a thesis.
EXECUTIVE PROGRAMS
Master of Business Administration for Executives
Administrative Director: W. Scott Guthrie Telephone: (303) 623-1888 or
(800) 228-5778
The Executive M.B.A. Program provides executive-level students with a broad, rigorous two-year academic experience leading to the Master of Business Administration degree. The program is designed for persons who hold managerial positions in the private and public sectors. It builds upon the knowledge and experience of these executives with a sophisticated, challenging curriculum which can be pursued simultaneously with a management career.
The Executive M.B.A. Program emphasizes corporate planning; the organization in a complex, international environment; and the applied tools of management. Courses are taught through a variety of methods. Case studies, lectures, and computer simulation are combined with research projects and other teaching
FACULTY AND RESOURCES
The faculty are senior members of regular faculty of the Graduate School of Business Administration from all three of the University’s campuses. The Executive M.B.A. Program is offered jointly by the Graduate Schools of Business Administration in Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Denver. Faculty are nationally recognized, and all possess both practical managerial experience and a demonstrated ability to work effectively with executive-level students.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
The Executive M.B.A. Program is designed for men and women who have ten years of business or administrative experience, including at least three years in a managerial position. Applicants should be part of senior management in a small organization or senior or middle management in a larger one, hold at least a baccalaureate degree, and have the ability to do graduate work.
In the selection process, significant attention will be given to the depth and breadth of the candidate’s managerial experience, progression in job responsibility, total work experience, and ability to benefit from this integrative classroom/ work environment. The Admissions Committee will base its decision on the application, former academic record, relevant test scores, the employer’s nominating letter, other letters of recommendation, and a personal interview.
FOR APPLICATION AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Executive M.B.A. Program Graduate School of Business Administration University of Colorado P.O.Box 480006 Denver, CO 80248-0006.
Executive Program in Health Administration
Administrative Director:
Dennis M. Becker Telephone: (303) 623-1888 or (800) 228-5778
PROGRAM SPONSORS
The Executive Program in Health Administration is a cooperative program of the University of Colorado at Denver and the Western Network for Education in Health Administration.
The University of Colorado at Denver serves as the degree-granting institution for the Executive Program. The University of Colorado’s Graduate Program in Health Administration is located in the Graduate School of Business Administration.
The Western Network for Education in Health Administration is a regional educational consortium representing health care executives and academic faculty from major health administration graduate programs in the western United States, including the University of California at Berkeley, University of California at Los Angeles, University of Southern California, San Diego State University, University of Washington, Arizona State University, and University of British Columbia.
DISTINCTIVE FEATURES OF THE EXECUTIVE PROGRAM IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
1. Drawing on the expertise represented by the faculties of a consortium of western universities, the program offers the highest quality course content and instructors that typically are not available from a single university.
2. The Executive Program facilitates learning for professionals who have continuing career and family responsibilities. The program is especially tailored for working individuals, allowing students to remain on their jobs while completing their educational program.
3. The program employs innovation in the technology of educational delivery. Learning methods include:
• Computer-assisted instruction and self-paced learning packages.


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• Computer conferencing and electronic case analyses.
• On-campus sessions.
FOR APPLICATION AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:
Executive Program in Health Administration Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver P.0. Box 480006 Denver, CO 80248-0006
Dual Degree Programs
M.S.H.A./M.B.A.
Students may obtain the M.B.A. degree as well as the M.S.H.A. by completing a 66 credit hour program. In addition to the courses required for the M.S.H.A., students also must complete the following:
Additional Business Core Courses BUSN 6160. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business .........3
BUSN 6180. Economic Environment of Business.........................3
The dual degree program also requires an additional 3 credit hours of electives and places additional restrictions on how electives may be taken.
Electives
One graduate course from each of three of the five following areas: Accounting, Finance, Management Science and Information Systems, Operations Manage-
ment, or Marketing..................9
HLTH Elective ........................3
M.B.A./B.A.
This program enables qualified students to earn a bachelor’s degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS), and a Master of Business Administration from the Graduate School of Business Administration in five years.
The program combines undergraduate general education with the graduate business curriculum.
Bachelor's candidates may major in any CLAS field (English, political science, biology, or fine arts are examples), and they must fulfill all the requirements for graduation from CLAS. During the senior year, the student begins taking graduate level courses in the M.B.A. program; these courses count as electives in the bachelor’s program.
For further information about this program and the admission requirements,
contact the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Advising Office.
M.B.A./M.S.-NURSING
ADMINISTRATION
The goal of the dual degree program (M.B.A./M.S. -Nursing Administration) is to prepare nurses who are capable of assuming senior level and CEO health administration positions in government, consulting, traditional health care organizations, and alternative delivery systems. The 66 credit curriculum is a synthesis of advanced management, health administration, and nursing content.
For information contact the program director in nursing administration, 394-8136.
M.B.A./M.S.
The Graduate School of Business Administration also offers M.B.A./M.S. dual degree programs for each function of business. Each program consists of a minimum of 66 semester hours of graduate work and leads to both an M.B.A. degree and an M.S. degree, which must be completed within seven years. Contact a graduate advisor for details.
M.B.A./M. A.-PSYCHOLOGY
Students may enroll in a dual degree program to earn both the M.B.A. from the Graduate School of Business Administration and the Master of Arts in Psychology from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This program requires the completion of 67 credit hours. Contact a graduate advisor for details.
GRADUATE COURSES
M.B.A. Core or M.S. Common Background Courses
The following graduate courses are open only to admitted graduate degree students.
BUSINESS
BUSN 6000-3. Accounting for Managers.
Fall, Spring, Summer. This course focuses on the use of accounting information in managerial decision making. Primary emphasis for the first half of the course will be on interpretation of financial statements, understanding accounting conventions and principles underlying the preparation of the statements, and current controversies regarding generally accepted accounting principles. The remainder of the course will stress
managerial uses of accounting techniques such as budgeting, cost, volume, profit models, and performance measurement. BUSN 6020-3. Quantitative Business Analysis. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course will provide the student with basic quantitative analysis tools and techniques necessary for the analysis of business related problems. Topics covered include statistics, probability, sampling, regressing, inference testing, and additional topics such as correlation, contingency tables, non-parametric techniques, and time series analysis.
BUSN 6040-3. Human Behavior in Organizations. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course focuses on applications of behavioral science concepts to the management of organizations. This course emphasizes analysis and understanding of human behavior in organizations, and using the results of such analyses to select appropriate strategies for managing. The course includes topics such as motivation, leadership, power and conflict, group dynamics, technology, organizational design, and other factors affecting human performance. Special emphasis is placed on concepts used by managers in all functional areas of organization, such as accounting, production, finance, marketing, and engineering.
BUSN 6060-3. Marketing Management. Fall, Spring, Summer. The course has two major objectives for the students: (1) understanding basic marketing concepts involving buyer behavior, product planning, pricing, channels for distribution and promotion, and (2) developing marketing decision-making capabilities based on strategic management and analytical skills. The overall objective is to integrate all the functional aspects of marketing with other functional areas of the firm and with the environment, particularly consumption markets, competition, the economy, legal and regulatory environment, and social evolution. Prereq: BUSN 6000. BUSN 6080-3. Management of Operations. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course will study the tools and techniques of the management of the operations functions in business organizations. Topics covered will include resource management, linear programming, decision trees, scheduling and control systems, quality assurance techniques, productivity measurement, simulation, and the international elements of the operations function. Significant attention will be devoted to study of the application of these tools to service organizations. Prereq: BUSN 6020.


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BUSN 6100-3. Management Information Systems. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course provides an introduction to information systems from a managerial perspective. Topics include basic computer concepts such as hardware, software, data file design, structured computer languages, systems analysis and design, and decision support systems. Managerial, organizational and decision-making implications are stressed.
BUSN 6120-3. Managerial Economics.
Fall, Spring, Summer. This course introduces the student to the usefulness of microeconomic theory at the firm level. Through economic analysis, output demand and cost characteristics can be evaluated, thereby allowing for production and marketing decisions consistent with overall firm goals. An additional focus is the operation of competitive economic markets and the effects of such competition on the firm. Topics include cost and price theory, demand estimation and forecasting, production theory, and pricing practices. The course is also designed to aid students' understanding of the business manager’s role in light of organizational and societal objectives. Prereq: BUSN 6000 and 6020.
BUSN 6140-3. Financial Management.
Fall, Spring, Summer. The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the tools and techniques for making a firm’s investment and financing decisions.
These include the mathematics of interest, risk analysis, financial theory of valuation, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and financial analysis. The emphasis is on developing an analytic framework for financial decision making. The class utilizes current literature, text, and cases. Prereq: BUSN 6000, 6020, and 6120.
BUSN 6160-3. Legal and Ethical Environment of Business. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course focuses on public, administrative, and regulatory law; and on the relation of business to the legal structure and ethical value systems which determine the parameters of business decisions. Topics include litigation, domestic and multinational trade regulation, the allocation of liability for products and environmental injuries, consumer and employee protection, regulation of capital markets, and business torts.
BUSN 6180-3. Economic Environment of Business. Fall, Spring, Summer. This course provides the student with an understanding of how economic policy affects and is affected by the national and international economic environment of business. As such, it focuses on the interaction of business and government as it
relates to broader societal objectives. Measures of aggregate economic activity are introduced as a basis for discussion of monetary and fiscal policy. Concerns over economic growth, employment, prices, and interest rates are seen as motivations for stabilization and industrial policy. Market power, economic externalities, and other market failures are studied as motivations for antitrust policy and regulation of industry entry conditions, product pricing, and production methods. Prereq: BUSN 6120.
BUSN 6200-3. Business Policies and Strategic Management. Fall, Spring, Summer. The goal of this course is to develop a general management perspective on issues of management of the total enterprise. An important objective is the integration of knowledge acquired across functional area courses. Objectives of the course include the introduction of strategic concepts, analytical tools, and methodology. The primary focus is to provide the student with both strategy formulation and implementation skills. Prereq: BUSN 6000,6020,6040,6060,
6080,6100,6120,6140,6160, and 6180.
M.B.A. Electives/M.S. Courses
ACCOUNTING
ACCT 5240-3. Advanced Financial Accounting. Fall, Spring, Summer. Advanced financial accounting concepts and practice with emphasis on accounting for partnerships, business combinations, and consolidations. Prereq: ACCT 3230. ACCT 5330-3. Advanced Managerial Accounting. Critical analysis of advanced topics in managerial accounting. Prereq: ACCT 3320.
ACCT 5540-3. Accounting Systems and Data Processing. Fall. The design and analysis of accounting information systems, automated data processing methods with special emphasis on computers and computer programming, and the role of accounting on the management process. Prereq: ACCT 3320.
ACCT 5620-3. Auditing. Fall, Spring, Summer. Generally accepted auditing techniques and the philosophy supporting them; auditing techniques available to the independent public accountant. Pertinent publications of the A1CPA reviewed. Prereq: ACCT 3230 or 6030.
ACCT 5800-3. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations. Spring. Planning and control of government and non-profit organizations. Includes program budgets, responsibility accounting, and fund accounting Prereq: ACCT 3320 or 3220.
ACCT 6030-3. Financial Accounting Issues and Cases. Accelerated analysis of contemporary accounting issues and problems, the development of accounting thought and principles, and critical review of generally accepted accounting principles. Not recommended for candidates planning to sit for the CPA examination. Prereq: BUSN 6000.
ACCT 6070-3. Management Accounting.
Fall, Spring. This course is designed to provide M.B.A. Students with a foundation in management accounting models and information, with emphasis on management decision-making uses of accounting information. Not recommended for candidates planning to sit for the CPA examination. Prereq: BUSN 6000 or equivalent. Students who have taken ACCT 3310 or 3320 or their equivalents may not take this course.
ACCT 6140-3. Tax Planning for Managers.
Spring. A federal tax survey course with an emphasis on tax planning for the M.B.A. student who wants to understand the impact of taxation on individual and business transactions. Course materials emphasize the application of individual, partnership, and corporate tax principles to the decision-making process. Students who have taken ACCT 4410 may not take this course. Prereq: BUSN 6000.
ACCT 6250-3. Seminar Accounting Theory. Fall. Nature and origin of accounting theory and the development of postulates, principles, and practices. Methodology appropriate to development and evaluation of accounting theory, with special emphasis on accepted research standards and procedures. Prereq: ACCT 3230 and 4620/5620.
ACCT 6260-3. Seminar: Managerial Accounting. Spring. This course focuses upon the conceptual foundations of managerial accounting. Behavioral and quantitative approaches regarding information for decision making, planning, control, performance evaluation, and other issues will be investigated. Prereq: ACCT 3320 or 6070 or equivalent.
ACCT 6270-3. Seminar: Income Determination. Critical analysis of problems and theory of measurement and reporting of periodic net income of business organizations. Net income models, research efforts, and role of professional accounting organizations. Current issues and problems given special attention. Prereq: ACCT 6250.
ACCT 6290-3. Management Control Systems. This course focuses on the design and use of control systems which ensure that people in organizations behave consistent with the goals of the


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organization. Controls for communication, motivation, and performance evaluation-along with informational require-ments-will be stressed through analysis of cases and classroom discussion.
Prereq: BUSN 6000 or equivalent.
ACCT 6350-3. Current Issues in Professional Accounting. In-depth analysis of current issues in the accounting profession, including ethics development, and validity of standards and regulations. Prereq: ACCT 3230 and 4620 (or 5620) or consent of instructor.
ACCT 6410-3. Advanced Tax for Individuals. An advanced federal individual income tax course stressing the methodology used in tax research and in tax planning. Includes use of specialized tax software to address compliance with planning issues by solving complex case type real life situations. Prereq: ACCT 4410. ACCT 6420-3. Advanced Tax for Businesses. An advanced federal tax course stressing research and tax planning issues of corporate and partnership entities. Includes use of specialized tax software to address compliance and planning issues by solving complex case type real life situations. Prereq: ACCT 4420.
ACCT 6450-3. Research Problems in Income Tax Accounting. A study of the methodology used in tax research and in tax planning, together with a study of some aspects of tax administration and tax practice, and of some aspects of the current law and proposals for its revision. Prereq: ACCT 4410 or 6410; or 6420 or consent of instructor.
ACCT 6620-3. Advanced Auditing Theory. Spring. Development of auditing as a profession, including evolution of standards and audit reports. Historical and contemporary literature in the field reviewed. Prereq: ACCT 4620 or 5620. ACCT 6800-3. Special Topics. Research methods and results, special topics, and professional developments in accounting. Prerequisites vary according to topics and instructor requirements. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for semester offerings.
ACCT 6840-1 to 8. Independent Study. ACCT 6950-1 to 8. Master’s Thesis.
FINANCE
FNCE 6310-3. Decisions and Policies in Financial Management. Fall, Spring. This course emphasizes investment and financing decisions, and the analysis of the financial condition of the firm. Specific topics include capital budgeting, cost of capital, financing mix and strategy, firm valuation, and management of working
capital. This course is required for the M.S. in finance. Prereq: BUSN 6140.
FNCE 6330-3. Investment Management Analysis. Fall, Spring. The theory of investment management, security valuation, and portfolio management, including the analysis of investment risks and constraints on investment policies and objectives. Also includes the analysis and use of investment information; and the development and application of the tools for determining security values. Required for the M.S. in finance. Prereq: BUSN 6140 and 6180.
FNCE 6340-3. Security Analysis. This course focuses on the analysis of the financial condition of the firm, valuation of debt and equity securities, and the selection of investment media for portfolios. Prereq: FNCE 6330.
FNCE 6350-3. Financial Innovations. This course focuses on financial innovations in fixed income securities including zero coupon instruments, floating rate instruments, collateralized mortgage obligations, stripped mortgage backed securities, eurobonds, interest rates and currency swaps. How these securities are priced in the marketplace and how they respond to changes in the market interest rate are the focus of the course. In addition, the course covers how these securities fit into a portfolio of fixed income securities, why they were invented and who is likely to find them attractive. Prereq: FNCE 6330.
FNCE 6360-3. Management of Financial Institutions. Fall, Spring. This course presents an analysis of structure, markets, regulation, chartering of commercial banks and other financial institutions. Topics include problems and policies of the internal management of funds, loan practices and procedures, investment behavior, deposit and capital adequacy, liquidity, and solvency. Analytical methodology for these problems is developed. Prereq: BUSN 6140 and 6180.
FNCE 6370-3. International Financial Management. Fall, Spring. This course addresses financial management in an international context that considers international capital movements and foreign exchange problems, and international operations as they affect the financial functions. It reviews foreign and international institutions and the foreign exchange process. Considers financial requirements, problems, sources, and policies of firms doing business internationally. Prereq: BUSN 6140.
FNCE 6380-3. Futures and Options. Fall, Spring. The course explains how futures are related to the underlying commodities; describes how to hedge, and what pit-falls to watch for. Stock index futures and interest rates futures get particular attention. How options are priced, how they perform and how to judge whether an option is expensive or cheap will be covered. Bull spreads, bear spreads, straddles and strangles - popular strategies that option traders use - will be discussed. Prereq: FNCE 6330.
FNCE 6390-3. Advanced Finance Seminar. This course is an advanced survey of the theory of finance and the empirical research developed from the theory. The student will study the quantitative models that are the basis for theory, and the empirical methods that have been used to confirm or disprove the hypothesis presented by the theory. The material will be presented through lectures and will be supplemented with student research, presentations, and recitation. This course is recommended for students preparing for Ph.D. programs in finance. Prereq: FNCE 6310 and 6330.
FNCE 6800-3. Special Topics. Experimental course offered irregularly for the purpose of presenting new subject matter in finance. Prerequisites will vary, depending upon topics covered. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for course offerings. FNCE 6840-1 to 8. Independent Study. With the consent of instructor under whose direction the study is undertaken.
HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
HLTH 6010-3. Medical Care Organization.
Fall. An introduction to the structure and function of the medical care delivery system. Includes basic concepts and measures of health, disease, quality, values, needs, and utilization; issues in health care manpower, institutions, and system organization; general issues in policy, reimbursement, and regulation; and1>road community and organizational considerations in medical care organization.
HLTH 6015-3. General Systems Theory. Fall. General systems theory is presented as a conceptual tool in health administration. Health is viewed as a subsystem of society, and interfaces among health and other social subsystems are analyzed. Broad social and cultural issues form a context for meaningful discussion of health planning and administration in the current and future decades.
HLTH 6020-3. Health Economics. Fall.
An intensive analysis of issues in health economics. Particular attention is given to “market failure” in health insurance and to


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alternative methods of containing health care costs, including both regulatory and market approaches. Prereq: BUSN 6120. HLTH 6026-3. Institutional Management. Spring. A colloquium designed to integrate major topics in the general management curriculum into relevant health administration issues. Current policies, problems, and issues across the broad spectrum of health service administration are covered. Prereq: HLTH 6010,6015,6020,6030.
HLTH 6030-3. Health Sciences. Fall. This course introduces the student to principles of epidemiology. The student will demonstrate the application of epidemiology analyses to the prediction of health care service needs of a population; to identify and integrate contemporary service delivery issues such as access, quality of care, cost of care, program and system development, and evaluation. The course will assist the student in development of program planning and evaluation skills. Prereq: HLTH 6010 and BUSN 6020.
HLTH 6040-3. Management Accounting for Health Care Organizations. Spring. Designed to build on the accounting concepts introduced in BUSN 6000 and to develop proficiency in the decisionmaking process of health care providers. Problems, cases, and computer software programs will be used to develop the practical application of management accounting techniques such as cost/ volume/profit and standard cost models, budgeting, and analysis of variances. Prereq: BUSN 6000,6020 or consent of instructor.
HLTH 6050-3. Legal and Ethical Problems in Health Care Administration.
Spring. Designed to acquaint the student with legal issues experienced by the health administrator. Special emphasis is placed on issues such as malpractice, informed consent, medical staff appointments, directors’ and administrators’ liability, medical records, and refusal of treatment. The course should make the student aware of the multitude of legal and ethical problems which confront the health administrator on a daily basis. Prereq: HLTH 6010.
HLTH 6630-3. Management Control in Non-Profit Organizations. This course is designed to develop a basic understanding of the management control process and the unique characteristics of nonprofit organizations. Topic areas include budgeting, programming, operational control, and pricing policies. Cases will be the primary means to integrate didactic materials with practical applications. Prereq: HLTH 6040 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
HLTH 6650-3. Advanced Topics in Health Care Financial Management. The primary focus of this course will be an in-depth research report on a current problem in health care financial management. A health care simulation exercise will be utilized to integrate the financial management concepts introduced in the preceding accounting and finance courses. Prereq: HLTH 6040 or consent of instructor.
HLTH 6720-3. Ambulatory Care Administration. The health administration student is exposed to the rapidly developing field of ambulatory care and HMO management. By examination of various ambulatory care and HMO settings, problems in the planning, implementation, administration, and evaluation of ambulatory care are developed. Prereq: HLTH 6010, or consent of instructor.
HLTH 6740-3. Multi-Institutional Management. Multi-institutional management is a developing trend in health administration. Students are exposed to both profit and non-profit hospital, nursing home, etc., networks. Shared services, merger, management contracts, hospital acquisitions, and satellite clinics are studied and discussed. Prereq: HLTH 6010 or consent of instructor.
HLTH 6760-3. Rural Health Systems.
Introduces the student to the history and evolution of rural health care in the United States. Also to be examined are past attempts to improve rural health and the impact of past national programs affecting rural health. The present status of rural health in the U.S. will be explored. The course will end with a review of private, local, state, and federal programs directed toward solutions for rural health problems. Prereq: Consent of instructor. HLTH 6780-3. Health Care Marketing.
The application of marketing concepts and techniques to health care delivery. Discussion will focus on the implications of a changing regulatory/competitive environment for marketing health services. The use of specific concepts and tools, and an understanding of the variety of marketing applications to the planning of health delivery systems. Prereq: BUSN 6060 or consent of instructor.
HLTH 6800-3. Special Topics. Research methods and results, special topics, and professional developments in health administration. Offered irregularly. Prerequisites vary according to topics and instructor requirements. Consult the current Schedule of Classes for semester offerings.
HLTH 6840-1 to 8. Independent Study. HLTH 6950-1 to 8. Master’s Thesis.
INFORMATION SYSTEMS
ISMG 6020-3. Business Programming and Data Systems. Fall, Spring. An accelerated introductory course on programming business applications, with emphasis on file processing. Topics include COBOL and Pascal programming languages.
ISMG 6060-3. Systems Analysis and Design I. Spring. This course emphasizes information systems analysis and the logical specification of the system. The life cycle concept is used as the basic framework for development, but there is a recognition of alternatives in this development process. Management, organizations, technology and economic perspectives are considered. Prereq:
ISMG 6020 and BUSN 6100. Students will normally use a case tool to develop systems specifications.
ISMG 6080-3. Database Management Systems. Spring. The database management course focuses on the analysis, design, and implementation of database systems to support business operations. Current database models and database administration issues are discussed. The INGRESS data base language is covered in detail. Prereq: ISMG 6020.
ISMG 6100-3. Computer Technology. Fall. This course provides a conceptual foundation in the areas of computer architecture, operating systems, programming translators, and fourth-generation languages. Students will study various computer architectures ranging from microcomputers to mainframe computers and operating systems such as Unix, VMS, DOS and OS/VS. Assembly and C programming languages are taught. Prereq:
ISMG 6020.
ISMG 6120-3. Data Communications.
Spring. Develops skill and knowledge for communication system design, dealing with network protocols, wide-area network, local-area network, and management implications. Course has a project orientation. Prereq: ISMG 6100.
ISMG 6140-3. Systems Design. This course is designed to provide a strong introduction to the formalization of information systems analysis and design processes and to explore the state of the art in systems specification and design techniques. Topics included are real-time structured analysis and design and object-oriented analysis and design.
ISMG 6160-3. Decision Support Systems and Expert Systems. Fall. An introductory course in how to design and construct decision support systems and expert systems. Knowledge representation and decision-making techniques discussed along with artificial intelligence languages


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such as VP-expert and Prolog. Prereq: ISMG6080.
ISMG 6180-3. Information Systems Policy. Summer. Designed for understanding the overall information needs of an organization and the role of computer based information systems. Topics considered are strategic planning of information systems, management of computer center and technical personnel, systems development management, and social and legal issues. Prereq: BUSN 6060 and 6080. ISMG 6800-3. Special Topics. Spring.
A variety of advanced topics are offered in this course. Past topics include the human-computer interface, software engineering, artificial intelligence and project management. Consult the current Schedule of Classes or the area coordinator for current offerings.
ISMG 6840-1 to 8. Independent Study. ISMG 6950-1 to 8. Master’s Thesis.
MANAGEMENT
MGMT 6320-3. Organizational Development. Fall, Spring, Summer. Instruction in the analysis, diagnosis, and resolution of problems in organizing people at work. Models of organizational change are examined. Group experiences, analyses of cases and readings are stressed.
Prereq: BUSN 6040.
MGMT 6330-3. Introduction International Business. Fall, Spring. An overview of the international business environment, the impact of environmental factors on international business operations, and the identification of current and complex managerial issues facing organizations engaged in international business. Prereq: 9 graduate credit hours or consent of instructor.
MGMT 6340-3. International Business Policy. The objective of this course is to develop competence relevant to strategy formulation and implementation in a multinational enterprise and in an international context. It aims to provide students with the theoretical knowledge, skills and sensitivities that will help them deal effectively with the strategic and managerial problems of managing in a global environment. Prereq: MGMT 6330 and 18 hours in a graduate business program.
MGMT 6360-3. Designing Effective Organizations. Fall, Spring. Examines how to design organizations within the context of environmental, technological, and task constraints. The emphasis is on learning how to recognize and correct structural problems through the analysis of existing organizations in which the students are involved. Prereq: BUSN 6040.
MGMT 6800-3. Special Topics in Management. Fall, Spring, Summer. A number of different current topics in management will be offered each semester under this course number. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for specific course offerings. MGMT 6810-3. Human Resources Management. Fall, Spring. This course focuses on the management of human resources in organized settings. It is oriented toward the practical application of human resources management principles in the following areas: equal employment opportunity, affirmative action, human resources planning, recruitment, managerial selection, compensation and benefits, labor relations, training, career management, performance appraisal, and occupational health and safety.
MGMT 6840-1 to 8. Independent Study. MGMT 6950-1 to 8. Master’s Thesis.
MARKETING
MKTG 6010-3. Marketing Strategy, Evaluation and Development. Fall, Spring, Summer. Focuses on marketing strategy and marketing planning. Addresses the formulation and implementation of marketing plans within the context of the overall strategies and objectives of both profit and not-for-profit organizations. There is heavy emphasis on group projects and presentations. Prereq: BUSN 6060.
MKTG 6020-3. International Marketing. Fall, Spring. Explores problems, practices and strategies involved in marketing goods and services internationally. Emphasizes analysis of uncontrollable environmental forces, including cultures, governments, legal systems, and economic conditions, as they affect international marketing planning. Prereq:
BUSN 6060.
MKTG 6030-3. Sales and Sales Force Management. Spring. Focuses on issues in personal selling and managing the field sales force. Deals with organization, sales analysis, forecasting, budgeting, and operating, with particular emphasis on the selling task, recruiting, selection, training, compensation, supervision, and motivation. Prereq: BUSN 6060.
MKTG 6040-3. Services Marketing. Fall, Spring. This course will inform students of basic modifications to marketing concepts as the U.S. economy changes in emphasis from physical products to services. It also will distinguish between function, organization, and structure in product versus service orientated firms. Lastly, it will concentrate on identifying difficulties in developing marketing plans and strategies in the service environment. Cases and projects with businesses will be used to
demonstrate these concepts. Prereq:
BUSN 6060.
MKTG 6050-3. Marketing Research. Fall, Spring. The objectives of this course relate to effective marketing information management. Objectives include: (1) developing an understanding of the techniques and procedures that can be used to generate timely and relevant marketing information; (2) gaining experience in developing and analyzing information that is decision oriented; and (3) gaining experience in making recommendations and decisions based on relevant and timely information. Computer analysis and projects are employed. Prereq: BUSN 6020 and 6060. MKTG 6060-3. Buyer Behavior. Fall Spring. Explores theory and application of consumer and industrial buying behavior. Internal decision-making processes are examined including perception, motivation, information processing, and attitude information and change. External influences on buyers’ decisions such as culture, family, intra- and inter-organizational influences, and marketing efforts also are investigated. Prereq: BUSN 6060.
MKTG 6070-3. Advertising and Promotion Management. Spring or Summer. Treats tactical planning and management of mass marketing communications including advertising and sales promotion. The course focuses on advertising and promotion objectives, legal considerations, segmentation and target marketing, creative and media selection and scheduling strategies, agency relations, advertising and promotion research, testing and evaluation, budgeting, and trial and purchase stimulation through sales promotion tactics. The focus is on the managerial aspects of marketing communications as opposed to the creative functions. Prereq: BUSN 6060.
MKTG 6080-3. Marketing Function, Organization, and Strategy in Deregulating Industries. Infrequently Offered. This course will deal with the development of the marketing function and competition in a host of deregulating industries including transportation, telecommunications, financial services, and health care. The objective of the course will be to demonstrate to students how marketing functions evolve and change as industries move from a regulatory umbrella to a competitive environment. Students will have an opportunity to see how regulation impacts the marketing function and strategy, and how the marketing strategy and function reacts to environments of limited or full competition. Prereq: BUSN 6060.


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MKTG 6090-3. Transportation, Physical Distribution Systems and Modern Economy. Infrequently Offered. This course will deal with the nature of transportation and logistical systems in the current manufacturing and service oriented economy. It will basically teach students the characteristics, economics, and current concerns of transportation systems, as well as the basics of logistical systems as they operate in modern corporations today.
It will seek to provide students with concepts regarding these issues, as well as practical group projects. Prereq:
BUSN 6060.
MKTG 6800-3. Topics in Marketing and Transportation. Courses offered irregularly for the purpose of presenting new subject matter in marketing and transportation. Prereq: BUSN 6060.
MKTG 6840-1 to 8. Independent Study. MKTG 6950-1 to 8. Master’s Thesis.
OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT
OPMG 5400-3. Planning and Control Systems. Fall. Study of the design, implementation, and control of integrated operations, scheduling, and inventory planning systems. Topics include demand forecasting, aggregate planning, capacity planning, master scheduling, inventory management, material requirement planning, stockless systems, and operations control. Organizations studied include manufacturing, service and public sector. Prereq: BUSN 6080.
OPMG 5470-3. Strategic Analysis in Operations Management. Spring. Study of the analysis and formulation of operations management strategy and policy. Emphasis will be on the role of the operations function in the strategic processes of the organization. Decision making will be stressed through the use of case studies and the analysis of actual business situations. Prereq: BUSN 6080.
OPMG 5600-3. Purchasing, Materials Management and Negotiation. Seldom Offered. Study of the purchasing function in manufacturing, service, and public organizations. Topics include source selection, make-buy analysis, material quality standards and specifications, value analysis, negotiations, and legal aspects. Prereq: BUSN 6080.
OPMG 6400-3. Planning and Control Systems. Fall. Study of the design, implementation, and control of integrated operations, scheduling and inventory planning systems. Topics include demand forecasting, aggregate planning, capacity planning, master scheduling, inventory management, material requirements planning, stockless systems, and operations
control. Organizations studied include manufacturing, service and public sector. Prereq: BUSN 6080.
OPMG 6440-3. Quality and Productivity.
Spring. Study of the various techniques to measure quality and productivity in organizations and the practical management issues related to implementing quality and productivity systems. Topics include statistical quality control, total factor productivity, quality circles, total quality control, work design and measurement, and quality and productivity management systems. Prereq: BUSN 6080 and 6040.
OPMG 6600-3. Purchasing, Materials Management and Negotiation. Seldom Offered. Study of the purchasing function in manufacturing, service, and public organizations. Topics include course selection, make-buy analysis, material quality standards and specifications, value analysis, negotiations, and legal aspects. Prereq: BUSN 6080.
OPMG 6800-3. Special Topics. Seldom Offered. A number of different current topics in operations management will be discussed in this course. Consult the current schedule of classes or contact the advisor for further information. Prerequisites will vary depending on topic and instructor requirements.
OPMG 6840-1 to 8. Independent Study.
QUANTITATIVE METHODS
QUAN 6010-3. Deterministic Models.
Seldom Offered. Linear programming and its application, network analysis, including scheduling models, dynamic programming, integer programming, non-linear programming. Prereq: BUSN 6020 and 6080.
QUAN 6020-3. Stochastic Models. Seldom Offered. Probability theory, queuing theory, inventory theory, Markov decision processes, simulation, decision analysis. Prereq: BUSN 6020 and 6080.
QUAN 6030-3. Seminar in Quantitative Methods. Seldom Offered. Application of quantitative methods to problems of business and industry, with emphasis on the function fields of marketing, financial management, and production. Prereq: QUAN 6010 and 6020 or consent of instructor. One of the prerequisite courses may be taken as a corequisite.
QUAN 6040-3. Multivariate Analysis. Seldom Offered. Topics in multivariate data analysis of particular interest to those engaged in business research. Includes techniques such as multivariate discriminate analysis, factor analysis, and multiple regression, and the use of standard multivariate statistical packages
such as the spss package. Prereq:
BUSN 6020.
QUAN 6800-3. Special Topics. Seldom Offered. A number of different topics in quantitative methods will be discussed in this course. Consult the current schedule of classes or contact the advisor for further information. Prerequisites will vary depending on topic and instructor requirements.
QUAN 6840-1 to 8. Independent Study.


School of Education
Dean: William F. Grady Assistant Deans: Dr. Duane K. Troxel, Charles Rufien
Acting Director for Teacher Education:
Dr. Nancy Shanklin Office: NC 4001 Telephone: 556-2717 Dean’s Advisory Council
Kathy Archuletta, The Hunt Alternatives Fund
Kirk Brady, President, Jefferson County School Board
Dr. Roscoe Davidson, Superintendent, Englewood School District #1 Dr. Evie Dennis, Superintendent, Denver Public Schools
Dr. Gerry Difford, Executive Director,
C.A.S.E.
Mary Gittings, Program Director, Piton Foundation
William Grady, Dean, School of Education, CU-Denver
The Honorable Regis Groff Tom Howerton, Member, Colorado State Board of Education Robert Tschirki, Superintendent,
Cherry Creek Public Schools Dick Jonsen, Director of Communications, WICHE
Dennis Jones, President, NCHEMS Gail Klapper, Attorney at Law Karen Layton, Education Specialist,
KCNC, channel 4
Carole McCotter, Board Member, Denver Public Schools
lim McCotter, Senior Vice President, Public Service Company The Hon. A1 Meiklejohn, Colorado State Senate
loan Mobley, Senior Vice President, Denver Chamber of Commerce "rank Newman, President, Education Commission of the States Rachel Noel, Former Chair, African American Studies, MSC, and Former Member, CU Board of Regents lane Prancan, Executive Director U S West Foundation Dr. Randy Quinn, Executive Director,
C.A.S.B.
Dr. William Randall, Commissioner of Education, C.D.E.
Dan Rodriguez, President, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce lea Romer, First Lady of Colorado
Mark Swanson, Vice President of Public Affairs, United Banks of Colorado Ben Trujillo, President of J.B. Trujillo,
CLU, ChFC
Ron Montaya, Chairman of the Board & CEO, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The School of Education offers master’s degrees in 7 program areas:
• Administration, Supervision and Curriculum Development (Administration or Educational Technology Emphasis)
• Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education
• Curriculum and Instruction (emphasis possible in Elementary, Secondary or ESL/Bilingual Education, Foundations, Reading and Writing)
• Early Childhood Education
• Educational Psychology
• Library Media
• Special Education
Other graduate degree offerings include the Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) and Ph.D degree, in Educational Administration and Supervision (also with Technology emphasis).
The School of Education is fully accredited by the Colorado Department of Education (CDE), the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools (NCA) and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) in Agency Counseling, School Counseling and Marriage and Family Therapy.
Every faculty member in the School holds a doctorate and is a member of the graduate faculty. The faculty has a distinguished record of research, publication and teaching. Since 1980 the faculty has authored hundreds of refereed journal articles, as well as over a hundred books and chapters in books. Currently, the Educational Forum, an internationally recognized journal in education, is housed within the School and its editor is a member of the faculty.
The School prepares a large percentage of teachers certified to teach in Colorado’s
K-12 schools. The Teacher Education Program is a graduate level program designed to prepare elementary and secondary teachers for a variety of school settings through academic work, professional studies, classroom teaching experiences and community field experiences.
At CU-Denver, initial teacher certification is available in the following areas:
1. Elementary Education (K-6th grade)
2. Secondary Education (7th-12th grade) in the following fields:
a. English
b. Foreign Language (French,
German and Spanish)
c. Mathematics
d. Science
e. Social Studies
3. Early Childhood Special Education The Early Childhood Special Education Program prepares individuals for careers working with young children with disabilities, birth to five years.
4. Special Education
The Special Education Program has several options including:
Teacher I: Students with mild/ moderate needs.
Teacher II: Students with severe affective, cognitive or communication needs.
Teacher III: Students with profound (multiple) needs.
5. School Psychology
AFFILIATED PROGRAMS Urban Access Program
The CU Teacher Access Program is administered by William F. Grady, Dean. Total degree programs will be offered in the seven-county Denver metropolitan area. Contact Lorrie Spears in the Dean’s office for information about the courses and applying to the Access Program.
Total degree programs are offered in counseling psychology and counselor education, curriculum and instruction, Type D certificate in administration and supervision, and educational administration with an emphasis in instructional technology. A certificate program is offered in Teacher of the Linguistically


96 / School of Education
Different. Most courses are held at community colleges in the seven-county metropolitan Denver area.
Rural Access Programs/
School of Education
Beginning in 1990-1991, three rural programs were approved and are now available: the M.A. in counseling psychology and counselor education in Rifle, Glen-wood Springs, and Steamboat Springs; the certificate program in Library Media offered in Rifle and Steamboat Springs; and the certification program in early childhood education/special education offered in LaJunta, Cortez, Durango, Trinidad, Canon City, Montrose, Delta,
Vail, and Steamboat Springs.
Center for the Study of Racism and Ethnic Violence
Director: Milton Kleg
Activities of the Center for the Study of Racism and Ethnic Violence (CSREV) include research and education related to prejudice and hate violence. The scope of the Center ranges from local to international levels. Fields of inquiry include:
• The Study of the Causes and Consequences of Ethnic and Racial Conflict
• The Study and Monitoring of Racial and Ethnic Conflict, Hate Groups, and Their Members
• The Development, Collection, and Analysis of Education Materials Designed for Prejudice Reduction Education
• Research Related to Racial and Ethnic Attitudes
Educational and training programs are provided for those interested in learning or teaching about the nature of prejudice, discrimination, and scapegoating. The Center’s CSREV Bulletin is published biannually.
Additional information about the Center, its research, educational, or service activities may be obtained by writing to: The Center for the Study of Racism and Ethnic Violence, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 106, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364 or calling (303) 556-3365.
Colorado Principals' Center
Director: Dick Koeppe
The primary mission of the Center is to enable principals to shape their professional intellectual development. Activities include topical seminars, panel
discussions, round table discussions, and ongoing special interest groups.
Topical seminars feature individual presenters (primarily principals) who provide information on promising or successful practices, demonstrations or models, and opportunities for participant interaction. Panel discussions highlight current high-relevance topics, with panel and participant interaction in formal and informal settings. Special interest groups facilitate exploration of relevant problems and issues through brainstorming, literature review, and idea sharing during a series of meetings.
The Center also focuses on conducting and disseminating research. Projects have included a study of administrator role perceptions in school reform, the effects of principal peer coaching and reflection to improve instructional leadership, and a study of the developing professional identity of first year high school principals.
Graduate students are hired by the Center as research assistants.
Storytelling Conference
Since 1978, the School has sponsored annual Storytelling Conferences which present poets, artists, and yarnspinners from throughout the U.S. Conference organizer is Norma J. Livo, Professor of Education. The two-day conference, held in Denver, attracts up to 500 participants-many register for graduate credit. Nationally known storytellers are featured, presenting tales and poems of other cultures, regions, and times. According to Dr. Livo, storytelling has surged in popularity in recent years as the public and educators recognize its power both to captivate audiences and its uses as a teaching tool.
It satisfies a need for one of the oldest forms of human communication and also contains unconscious levels of meaning that are not always obvious.
Region VIII Resource Access Project
Director: Harriet Able-Boone
Under a contract funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Resource Access Project provides training and technical assistance to HeadStart centers throughout a six-state region. The Region VIII project, which serves 71 HeadStart organizations, is only one of ten such projects in the U.S.
Through the project, HeadStart staff will learn how to integrate handicapped children into regular HeadStart classrooms more effectively.
ADMISSION (DEGREE PROGRAMS)
Note: Students interested in teacher cer tification should refer to Teacher Education Programs in this section of the catalog for requirements and application procedures.
Prospective degree candidates (master’s, specialist, Ph.D.) should requesl application forms from the program area to which they are applying. The application packet contains application materials and information regarding admission requirements for each program area as well as testing requirements and recommendation forms. Listed below are program areas and phone numbers.
Bilingual/ESL, 556-4366 Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education, 556-8367 Curriculum and Instruction, 556-2290 Foundations, 556-4366 Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood/Special Education, 556-3535
Educational Administration and Supervision, 556-4857 Educational Psychology, 556-3535 Instructional Technology, 556-4881 Reading and Writing, 556-4366 Special Education, 556-9262
Application papers and all supporting documents (including two official transcripts from each college or university attended, four letters of recommendation, GRE or MAT scores, and the $30 application fee) must be submitted to the Office of Student Services by March 1 for summer term, May 1 for fall semester, or October 1 for spring semester.
Official transcripts must be sent directly from each college or university to the School of Education. They may not be submitted by the student.
Application materials and fee, transcripts, and recommendations must be submitted by the appropriate deadline to:
University of Colorado at Denver School of Education Campus Box 106 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364
Degrees and Areas of Specialization
The following programs, offered by the School of Education, cover a wide range of professional and academic interests.


Teacher Education Programs / 97
M.A.
Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education, options include:
• College Student Personnel
• Community/Agency Counseling
• Counseling and Human Resource Development
• Public School Counseling
• Marriage and Family Therapy Curriculum and Instruction, options include:
• Elementary Education
• Secondary Education
• Bilingual/ESL
• Foundations
• Reading and Writing
Early Childhood Education (regular or special education emphasis), options include:
• Infant Specialization
• Family Specialization Administration, Supervision and Curriculum Development
Emphasis possible in Educational Technology, options include:
• Corporate Instructional Training and Development
• Instructional Computing
• Instructional Technologist
• Master Resource Teacher
• Higher Education
• School Library Media Specialist Educational Psychology, options include:
• Child Growth and Development
• Human Learning
• Research and Evaluation
Methodology
• School Psychology
• Individualized Special Education
Teacher I: Students with Mild/ Moderate Needs Teacher II: Students with Severe Affective Needs or Severe Cognitive Needs or Severe Communication Needs Teacher III: Students with Profound (multiple) Needs
Ed.S (Specialist in Education) Administration, Supervision and Curriculum Development Emphasis possible in Educational Technology
PhD.
Administration, Supervision and Curriculum Development Emphasis possible in Educational Technology
Outlines of each graduate program are listed in the following pages of the School of Education section. Since many of the graduate degree plans are flexible and can be designed around individual
student needs, it is highly desirable that the prospective candidate discuss tentative programs of studies with appropriate faculty members prior to submitting applications.
Degree Requirements
Two Master of Arts degree plans are available, each comprising one academic year or more of graduate work beyond the bachelor’s degree.
1. M.A. -Plan I (With Thesis). The program consists of 36 semester hours or more, including 4 semester hours for the master’s thesis. While the inclusion of a minor field is not required by The Graduate School, a student and advisor may agree on a minor, in which 4 to 8 semester hours can be applied toward degree requirements.
The M.A. thesis is written in accordance with the specifications set by The Graduate School and under the supervision of the student’s advisor.
2. M.A. -Plan II (Without Thesis). The Plan 11 program includes 36 or more semester hours of graduate credit, and may include 4 to 10 hours for a minor. The minor is highly recommended in some fields of study.
Comprehensive Examinations
The advisor and student will decide upon one of the following alternatives in the semester before the comprehensive examination is scheduled. Any option taken will require that at least one professor other than the advisor will sign off on the Comprehensive Examination Report that goes to The Graduate School. Identification of this “second reader” should be made at the same time the option is chosen so that the “second reader” can be a part of the planning for the examination.
1. Written Examination. The advisor arranges test questions for the student to write in a four-hour examination. This treatment varies among advisors: some advisors work out questions in advance with the student-other advisors will select final questions for the examination from among those discussed with students. In other cases, the advisor may select questions for the examination and present them to the student
at the time of the examination.
2. Take-Home Examination. This option allows the advisor to construct questions with or without input from the student. The student completes the examination at home and turns in the finished product on or before the
day of the scheduled comprehensive examination.
3. Oral Examination. This option requires dialogue between students and at least three of their professors over the course work taken in the master’s degree program.
4. Written/Oral Combination Examination. This option combines any of the written options noted above and a shortened oral examination during which a committee may ask for clarification of or elaboration on the written examination.
5. Master’s Report. This option allows the student to write a synthesizing paper of considerable length (20-30 pages). The project might elaborate on a curriculum plan to be implemented, describe an in-service project, be in the form of a grant proposal or a pilot/feasibility study for future work, or propose an action research project. While practical in nature, the project should demonstrate sufficient theoretical underpinnings to indicate mastery of knowledge assumed for a candidate for a master’s degree.
6. Field Study Project. The student develops and implements a field study and prepares a project report.
Transfer Credit
Credit earned before formal admission is transfer credit. Nine master’s level transfer hours may be counted toward the M.A. degree. (Transfer credit and nondegree credit may total only 9 hours.)
TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAMS
Acting Director of Teacher Education:
Nancy Shanklin Director of Clinical Programs:
Marilyn Scamman Office: NC 4001 Campus Box 106 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Telephone: 556-4387
Program Overview
The Teacher Education Program at CU-Denver is a graduate certificate program designed to prepare elementary and secondary teachers for a variety of public school settings through academic work, professional studies, and school-based field experiences. Candidates must hold a baccalaureate degree, or have completed at least 90 credit hours in the CU-Denver College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, to apply for admission.


98 / School of Education
The University of Colorado at Denver is fully accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools (NCA), the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the Colorado Department of Education (CDE) and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).
Certification Availability
Teacher certification is available in the following areas at CU-Denver:
• Elementary Education (K-6th grade)
• Secondary Education (7th-12th grade) in the following teaching fields:
English
Foreign Language (French,
German and Spanish) Mathematics Science Social Studies
Application Deadlines
Application deadlines for the Teacher Education Program are May 1 for fall semester, October 1 for Spring semester and March 1 for summer term. These deadlines are strictly enforced and students must submit all required materials prior to these deadlines.
Orientation/lnformation
Sessions
The School of Education offers weekly orientation sessions to provide information regarding requirements and procedures for applying to the Teacher Education Program. The sessions are held most Mondays at 12 noon and 4:30 p.m. (holidays excluded) and last approximately one hour. Immediately after the noon session candidates may meet with an advisor to discuss program requirements, review transcripts and discuss a tentative plan for completing certification at UCD. Candidates should call the School of Education, Student Services Office for information regarding orientation times and location (556-4387).
Advising
Applicants may schedule an advising appointment after making application to the Program. During this session students are provided with academic and professional assistance in planning a program of study leading to teacher certification. To make an appointment phone 556-4387
or schedule in person in Room 4001 of the North Classroom Bldg.
All students must have a planned program signed by a certification advisor prior to beginning course work in the Teacher Education Program.
Students must meet with an advisor at least twice during their course of study to keep appraised regarding requirements and deadlines and jointly monitor progress.
Coordinating a Master's Degree with Certification
Teacher Certification at CU-Denver is offered as a separate (non-degree) program as some individuals are interested in certification but are not interested in pursuing an advanced degree.
However, many students wish to be certified to teach and earn a master’s degree. For these students CU-Denver offers a combined certification/master’s program. Approximately half the semester hours required for certification are also applicable toward a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction. Although several other master’s degree programs are available, curriculum and instruction is the only master’s degree directly coordinated with the certificate program.
Certification students who are also interested in earning a C & 1 master’s degree should apply by the end of their first semester in the Teacher Education Program. The C&I Master’s Degree requires 36 semester hours.
Teacher certification students who are eligible for financial aid will receive limited aid unless also enrolled in a master’s degree program. Students are encouraged to apply to the M.A. program as soon as possible to increase their award.
Course Restrictions
Most courses in the Teacher Education Program are restricted to students who have met all entrance requirements and have been accepted to the program. This applies to graduate students, undergraduates who are beginning the certification program as seniors, and to certified teachers seeking a second endorsement.
Non-Degree Students
Individuals desiring to take courses as a non-degree student apply directly to the Office of Admissions and bypass entirely the application procedures and requirements of the School of Education.
Non-degree student status is designed for teachers seeking recertification credit or individuals who wish to take an exploratory course. It provides a quick entry for those who are not seeking to enter a program of study leading to certification or a master’s degree.
Individuals seeking teacher certification, a second endorsement, or a master’s degree should apply for regular admission through the School of Education.
Because of Colorado state rules governing teacher certification, students who plan to enter the Teacher Education Program at CU-Denver may take only one semester as a non-degree student. Students beginning their second semester must have been accepted to the Teacher Education Program and must have met all state mandated admission requirements.
Undergraduates
Since the School of Education is a graduate school, students are normally required to have a baccalaureate degree to apply for admission. However, through a special arrangement with the CU-Denver College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, CLAS seniors may complete up to 15 credit hours of course work in education, provided they have applied and have met all entrance requirements. No more than 15 semester hours of graduate education courses may be taken as an undergraduate. All or part of these 15 semester hours may be applied toward an undergraduate degree. However, courses applied toward the baccalaureate degree may not also be applied toward a master’s degree.
While CLAS undergraduates are permitted to take 15 hours of course work in the School of Education, undergraduate students are not officially admitted to the Teacher Education Program until they submit proof of graduation.
CLAS undergraduates should attend an orientation session offered by the School of Education early in their undergraduate program so they are knowledgeable about teaching field requirements as well as Colorado state and university requirements pertaining to certification. Students should work carefully with both their CLAS and Education advisors in planning their liberal arts and education programs. Undergraduates must have a signed advising sheet before beginning course work in the School of Education. This indicates that the student has a planned program for completing certification.


Full Text

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO CATALOG 1992 • DENVER • 1993

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University of Colorado at Denver P.O. Box 173364 Denv er, Colorado 80217,3364 $2.00 I econ d C l a Postage Paid a t t h e Post Offic1 B oulder , Col orad

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CONTENTS Academic Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Message from the Chancellor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Administration ....... .... . . . . ... . .... .... .... . . ................. . ... ........... .... . . . . ..... ............. 5 Generallnformation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 The Graduate School . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 School of Architecture and Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 School of Education ...... . .... . ... ...... . ..... ..... ....... ... . . ............ . ............ . ... ... ... . . . . 95 College of Engineering and Applied Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 College of Uberal Arts and Sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Military Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Graduate School of Public Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 265 Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Index ...... ........ ........ . ... .... ... ... .... . ..... ... . ............ ... ........ . ..... . .......... . . . ......... ... 285

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Fall19922 August 17-21 August 24 September7 November26 November27 December 19 Spring 19932 January 11 January 18 January 19 March22-26 May8 Summer 19932 May25 -28 May31 June 1 JulyS AugustS Photos : Bob Fader Cover, Page 40 Jason Jones ACADEMIC CALENDAR1 OrientationRegistration First day of classes Labor Day Holiday (campus closed) Thanksgiving Holiday (campus closed) (cam pus open, no classes) End of semester OrientationRegistration Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday (campus open, no classes) First day of classes Spring break (campus open, no classes) End of semester OrientationRegistration Memorial Day Holiday (campus closed) First day of classes Independence Holiday (campus closed) End of term Pages 6 , 50, 55, 68, 129, 130, 160,260,263 , 264 , 274 , 284 Design : Publications Department, University of Colorado at Denver ' The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at anytime. 2 Consult the Schedule of Classes for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs and registration dates and procedures.

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University of Colorado at Denver ) peer at Larimer ) .0. Box 1 73364 ) enver, Colorado 80217-3364 Undergraduate and G raduate Catalog 1992 93 Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (incl u ding the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements , degree offerings and degree titles, course offerings and course descrip tions , and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice or obliga tion . The University claims no responsibility for errors that may have occurred during the typesetting , printing or production of this catalog . The University of Colorado at Denver is an affirmative action/ equal opportunity institution. For current calendars, tuition rates, requirements , deadlines, etc., students should refer to a copy of the Sch ed u le of Classes for the semester in which they intend to enroll . The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curriculum . Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester , and the faculty teaching a particular course or program may vary from time to time . The instructor may alter the content of a course or program to meet particular class needs. Courses are listed by college or school. niversity of Colorado Catalog . JSPS 651-060) i2 Stadium Building , Campus Box 384 , l>Uider, Colorado 80309-0384 )lume 1992, No.3, May/ June Jblished 4 times a year : January/February arch/April, May/June , August/September class postage paid at Boulder , Colorado . )STMASTER : Send address changes to niversity of Colorado Catalog , CU-Denver Jblications, Boulder, Colorado 80302.

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Message From the Chancellor Dear Student: Welcome to the University of Colorado at Denver. On behalf of the faculty , staff, and students, I offer to you the challenging environment of one of Colorado ' s premier institutions of higher education . Your decision to attend CU-Denver shows your willingness to learn at Denver ' s only urban public university. CU-Denver is one o f the four campuses of the University of Colorado system . As a vital part of that system , offering baccalaureate , master's , and doctoral programs, we have achieved distinction nationally and internationally because of the high quality of our programs, faculty , and alumni. Located in downtown Denver, the Univers ity challenges its students both academically and personally in an intellectual environment that encourages commitment , curiosity, and imagination . A distinguishing characteristic of CU-Denver is our urban perspective t h at is an integral theme in our academic programming , the orientation of our faculty , and the identity of our student body . Our enrollment has grown to nearly 11,000 students. The University offers some 40 degree and degree option programs at t he baccalaureate level and over 60 degree and degree option programs at the post baccalaureate level designed to provide you with a foundation on which to build your intellectual , aesthetic , and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens . Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research , and the creative process as a complement to classroom study. The University ' s seven colleges and schools (Business, Public Affairs , Liberal Arts and Sciences , Engineering and Applied Science , School of the Arts , Education, and Architecture and Planning) and The Graduate School provide instruction and research programs that focus on the funda mental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the opportunities for gaining knowledge , training, skills , and credentials which will enhance your economic and personal lives . We at the CUDenver campus take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs . This is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the applied aspects of graduate and professional work . Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems. We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars/ teachers and dedicated staff. I promise a rich intellectual environment and a challenging educational experience . Most of all , I look forward to seeing you at graduation and awarding you the CU-Denver degree. My best wishes to you and to your future . John C. Buechner Chancellor University of Colorado at Denver I c

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ADMINISTRATION Board of Regents KATHY ARNOLD, Littleton , term expires 1994 RICHARD J. BERNICK, Littleton , term expires 1992 ROBERT E. CALDWELL, Colorado Springs , term expires 1992 PETER C. DIETZE, Boulder , term expires 1996 HARVEY W. PHELPS, Pueblo , term expires 1994 NORWOOD L ROBB, Littleton, term expires 1996 ROY H. SHORE, Greeley , term expires 1992 ROBERT SIEVERS, Boulder , term expires 1996 DAVID W. WINN, Colorado Springs, term expires 1994 University-Wide Officers JUDITH ALBINO, President of the University; Professor of Psychology; Professor of Applied Dentistry . B.J., Ph.D., University of Texas , Austin . GLEN R. STINE, Vice President for Budget and Finance . B.A., Michigan State ; M.A., University of North Carolina , Chapel Hill; Ed. D., Harvard University . THEO. VOLSKY, JR., Executive Vice President for Administration; Professor of Psychology . B . S., M . S., Kansas State University ; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. CHRIS ZAFIRATOS, Acting Vice President for Academic Affairs; Professor of Physics; Associate Vice Chancellor for Budget and Planning ; B.S., Lewis and Clark College; Ph . D . , University of Washington . H.H. ARNOLD, Executive Secretary of the Board of Regents and of the University . B.A., LL.B., University of Colorado. JAMES A. STROUP, Treasurer for the University and Assistant Vice President for Budget and Finance . B . S., Michigan Techni cal University ; M .B.A., Michigan State University . CU-Denver Officers C. BUECHNER, Chancellor ; Professor of Public Affairs . B.A., College of Wooster ; M .P.A. , Ph. D., University of Michigan . BRUCE W. BERGLAND, Executive Vice Chancellor; Associate Professor of Education . B.S., Iowa State University ; Ph . D., Stanford University. JOHN A. BERNHARD, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.A., Stanford University ; M.B.A., Columbia University, Graduate School of Business . GEORGIA LESH-LAURIE, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs ; Professor of Biology . B . S., Marietta College (Ohio) ; M.S., University of Wisconsin , Madison; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University . MARK A. EMMERT, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs; Associate Professor of Public Affairs . B.A., University of Washington ; M . P . A., Ph. D., Syracuse University . KENNETH HERMAN, Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.S., University of Colorado . SHEUA M. HOOD, Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services . B.A., M.A., Colorado State University . FERNIE BACA, Dean of The Graduate School ; Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative Activities ; Associate Professor of Education . B.A., University of Northern Colorado ; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado. JUUE CARNAHAN, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Planning and Information Resources Management. B . A . , M .A., University of Colorado ; Ph . D., University of Michigan . Adminis tration I 5 The University of Colorado seal , adopte d in 1908 , d e picts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll . A burning torch fram e d in laurel i s placed beside him. The Greek inscription m e ans "Let your light shine . " According to Denver designer H enry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civiliz ation " stands as the criterion of culture ." The laure l s y mbolizes honor or success , the youth of th e figure suggests the "morning of life, " and the scroll r epresents written language .

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The University of Colorado at Denver is one of the most important educational resources in the Denver metropolitan area. CU-Denver, one of four institutions in the University of Colorado system , is an urban, non-residential campus located in downtown Denver . Major civic , cultural, business, and governmental activities are in close proximity. CU-Denver offers undergraduate degrees in more than 40 fields and gradu ate degrees in more than 60. Ph .D. degrees are offered in public affairs, applied math ematics, and educational administration. Doctoral studies also are available in engineering and other fields in coopera tion with CU-Boulder . Special emphasis is placed on programs that will help assure students professional opportuni ties after graduation. All programs are tailored to meet the needs of the diverse student population. Classes are offered during weekday and evening hours , and on weekends . Students ' ages range between 17 and 75. The average student age is 29. Two-thirds hold full-time jobs and 60 percent attend part time . Sixty-two percent are enrolled at the upper division or graduate levels . CU-Denver's faculty actively promote the special role of an urban institution in meeting the needs of students. Many fac ulty bring their work experiences to the classroom. They are alert to the chal lenges and advances of the urban environ ment and responsible to the needs of students and the community . The combi nation of CU-Denver's talented faculty and highly motivated students creates a vital and exciting educational environment. Students are offered the unique educa tional opportunity to combine real world experience with academic excellence . History Just over a century ago the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder, in 1876.1n 1912, the University of Colorado ' s Department of Correspondence and Extension was established in Denver , to meet the needs of the burgeoning popula tion . As the breadth of course offerings expanded, so did the demand for degree granting status. The Denver Extension Center was renamed the University of Colorado-Denver Center in 1965, and by 1969, 23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study were offered .ln 1972 the Colorado General Assembly appropri ated support to build the Auraria Campus , CU-Denver ' s current site . And in this same year the Denver " Center " was renamed CU-Denver. Two years later the University of Colorado was reorganized into four campuses-Denver, Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver) , and Boulder . University of Colorado System As one of four campuses of the Univer sity of Colorado , CUDenver has a special role and mission in Colorado higher e du cation . The University of Colorado at Boulder now serves about 24,000 students enrolled in undergraduate , graduate , and professional programs . The Health Sci ences Center in Denver provides educa tion and training to medical, dental , nursing and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 5 ,900 students in the Pikes Peak region , offering under graduate , graduate , and professional pro grams . CU-Denver ' s role within the University system is primarily to address the needs for undergraduate and graduate instruction in the Denver metropolitan area. Emphasis is given to professional , preprofessional , and liberal arts training in the context of a strong multidisciplinary and applied agenda for research and cre ative activities . CU-Denver students have access to the library resources of all cam puses and cultural and athletic events sponsored within the University system. Academic Structure Each of the four campuses of the University of Colorado Syst em-Denver, Boulder , Colorado Springs , and Health Sci ences in Denver-has its own Chancellor and campus administration . The Chancel lors , in turn , report to the President of the CU-System . The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approve the over all direction provided by the President of the System. The System President represents the University of Colorado and man ages the planning for development of th e System , apportionment of resources across campuses, the System-wide Gradu ate School , and general policy regarding academic standards, instructional initia tives , and faculty and staff personnel mat ters , and is supported by a system-wide Faculty Senate . CU-Denver , as well , has its own faculty governance structure. Students also have their own governance institutions. The Chancellor of CU-Denver represents CU-Denver and manages campus goal-setting, policy development , aca demic affairs , and budget and financial matters . The Executive Vice Chancellor, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, and the Vice Chancellor for Administra tion and Finance assist the Chancellor . Each vice chancellor is responsible for the essential components of the campus enterprise. The Executive Vice Chancellor is responsible for Admissions and Records , Enrollment Management , Plan ning and Institutional Research, and Stu dent Services . The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs is responsible for all academic programs , the Graduate School , and Sponsored Programs . The Vice Chan cellor for Administration and Finance is responsible for the campus budget , Office of Financial and Business Services, and Personnel Services . The CU-Denver Gradu ate School is a component of the CU System-wide Graduate School. All gradu ate units reside within The Graduate School except Architecture and Planning, Business , and Public Affairs . Academic Programs CUDenver is , above all, devoted to the needs of the citizens of Denver and the region . With the rapid development of the national recognition earned by its gradu ate faculty , it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. Today CU Denver is composed of seven distinct academic units : School of Architecture and Planning College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education College of Engineering and Applied Science

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8 / Genera/Information College of Liberal Arts and Sciences School of the Arts Graduate School of Public Affairs General Information These units now accommodate over 10,000 students taught by about 360 regu lar , full-time faculty members. The diver sity of the student body is a hallmark of CU-Denver and a source of deep pride. Among them are traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school. There also are older students who , perhaps for finan cial reasons or the press of family commit ments or because they've only lately recognized the value of a college educa tion , have delayed entry. And there are professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appre ciation of the world around them . The undergraduate colleges admit freshman and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences , humanities, business, engineering , and music . A solid foundation of academic skills and general education is assured through a compre hensive core corriculum. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also provides pre-professional training in the fields of education , law , journalism , and the health sciences . The School of Education offers programs leading to teacher education . The Graduate School offers master ' s pro grams in the arts, sciences , humanities , engineering, education, and music to stu dents with baccalaureate degrees . The School of Architecture and Planning , the Graduate School of Business Administra tion, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leadin g to mas ter's degrees in their specialized areas . CU-Denver doctoral programs are avail able in public affairs , education , and applied mathematics . Doctoral work in engineering also is available in coopera tion with CU-Boulder . CU-Denver faculty also participate in other doctoral pro grams offered at CU-Boulder . A complete listing of bachelor ' s and master's degree programs offered by CU-Denver is provided in the college and school sections of this catalog. The col lege and school sections describe specific policies on requirements for graduation ,,. course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions , and similar information. CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education which leads to improved professional opportunity in the Information Age . Many programs emphasize practical business w o rld applications , and all CUDenver students are given the opportunity to attain computer literacy. Specific computer-oriented academic pro grams are offered in the computer science (engineering) , applied mathematics (lib eral arts and sciences ), and information systems (business ) programs. The Future CU-Denver is committe d to the highest standards of education , scholarship , and service to the community . From this com mitment springs the vital energy that infuses every campus pursuit. The pace is fast , perhaps unprecedented . Undergrad uate studies are at once becoming more and more varied , challenging , and reward ing . CU-Denver is reaching out to all who can benefit from the high quality educa tion it has to offer . New highly innovative applied and professional graduate degrees are being developed that address the emerging needs of the re g ion ' s economy . Centers for state-of-the-fi eld research at CU-Denver are generating important prac tical solutions to some of Colorado ' s and the nation's most serious social, eco nomic, environmental , and technological problems . New programs and opportuni ties in international education bring the world and its global economy into the classroom . Throughout history , urban civilization and the arts and humanities have evolved in a rich synergy . CU-Denver -an urban campus -is deeply involved in enriching the cultural milieu of the Denver area. Clearly , the University of Colorado at Denver is on the move . Accreditation North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration Colorado State Board of Education Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education National Architectural Accrediting Board National Association of Schools of Music Planning Accreditation Board National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration Auraria Higher Education Center TheAuraria Higher Education Center is the site for the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share library (which is administered by CO Denver), classroom, and related facilities on the 171-acreAurariacampus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered. On the Auraria campus are administra tive and classroom buildings, the Auraria Library , the student union , book center, child care and development centers , phys ical education facilities, science building, and service buildings. The new buildings share the campus with the reminders of Denver's pasthistoric Ninth Street Park , restored church buildings , and the Tivoli brewery built in 1882. The Tivoli renovated into a complex containing specialty shops, restaurants , and entertainment, will become the student union for the fall semester, 1992. Research and Other Creative Pursuits CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledge through the research and creative efforts of its faculty. Research and creative activities not only advance knowledge and enhance the qual ity of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and professional practice. In addition, these activities constitute an important compo nent of CU-Denver's service to the commu nity at large . Therefore, externally funded projects are a major priority at CU-Denver. Research projects , training , and public service programs at CU-Denver encom pass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study with a focus on issues that relate to city , state, national, and interna tional issues. During 1990-91, CU-Denver faculty and staff received external grants and contracts totalling $8,451,735 for research, training , and public service pro grams . The benefits for the campus in the years ahead will be substantial. Externally funded activities ,assist in sustaining scholarly discourse, enable faculty mem bers to engage in the advancement of knowledge , provide the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern for society , and enhance the education of students. Many students actively participate in projects overseen by faculty members .

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An important aspect of research and other creative activities at CU-Denver is its multidisciplinary and applied nature. Research in every school and college at CU-Denver addresses questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region . Its role within a thriving metropolitan area also serves as a base for exploring topics of national and even international import. But not all research at CU-Denver yields solutions of immedi ate practical significance. Major efforts now explore topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplines which are carried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that knows no national bounds. These efforts may yield insights that eventually open the way to practical applications in the next century. Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary economic, political, educational, engineer ing, mathematical, scientific, and environ mental needs. Financial support has been obtained for program and service devel opment in the areas of computational mathematics, bilingual and special educa tion, health administration , international affairs , and executive seminars as well as institutes on aging and veterans' employ ment and training. Other projects include statewide inves tigations of economic development, poverty, literacy, air quality, water control, and transportation . Computer related pro jects include multilevel algorithms, fast parallel processing, algorithms in linear programming, and modeling. Projects in basic research range from investigations of earthquakes to neurotoxicology to growth equations for sporangiophores . In addition, a great deal of research at the University goes on without substantial external support. This effort also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publica tions, presentations , exhibits, perfor mances, and professional activities. Many members of the faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits bring recognition to the University, establish the credibility of its faculty, and enhance the value of the degrees it confers . CENTERS AND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE, AND TRAINING Fli'St Amendment Congress The mission of the First Amendment Congress is to unite Americans of every persuasion to support freedom of expres sion, and provide America with a continu ing forum to discuss and debate the First Amendment as our cornerstone of liberty. To reach this goal, the Congress sponsors national forums , seminars , and con gresses to forge new understanding of First Amendment issues ; develops cur riculum materials to increase students' understanding of the First Amendment; delivers special messages to var;ious audi ences reminding them of their duties to uphold First Amendment freedoms; pub lishes materials, and supports public awareness campaigns on First Amend ment issues. Center for Health Ethics and Policy The Center analyzes and develops con structive courses of action concerning policy and ethics aspects of health-related problems facing Colorado and the nation. The Center's goal is to increase public and private sector attention to these issues and contribute to the making of informed and sound public policy decisions . Center for Applied Psychology This Center promotes research and edu cational programs in four areas: public mental health , psychology and the law, psychology and public health , and organi zational effectiveness and decision mak ing . The Center represents a cooperative relationship among higher education , gov ernment, business , mental health agen cies, public health institutions, and the citizenry of the state of Colorado . Center for Research in Applied Language Established in 1991 with a grant from the President's Fund for the Humanities, the Center for Research in Applied Language conducts research into language based problems in real-life contexts . lt orients its research projects humanisti cally and socio-culturally and underpins them with knowledge of the various branches of language theory. Faculty and students carry out projects that both contribute to our understanding of how and why language is implicated in social and individual problems, and pro pose solutions to or ameliorations of those problems. Reports of research projects conducted through the Center are published on an occasional basis Centers and Institutes I 9 and are obtainable from the English department office. Colorado Principals' Center The Center is a staff development, renewal, and training center for practicing principals, assistant principals, central office supervisors , and others in instruc tional leadership positions . Colorado Center for Community Development The Colorado Center for Community Development provides technical, educa tional , and applied research assistance to organizations, neighborhoods , and com munities that cannot afford or do not have access to professional services. The Cen ter targets its assistance efforts to rural small towns, low income and/or minority communities, and non-traditional, com munity-based service or development organizations. Center for Environmental Sciences The Center fosters and promotes disci plinary and interdisciplinary research in the environmental sciences. Although the Center is in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences , affiliated faculty represent sev eral different schools and colleges and more than ten academic disciplines, including engineering and the natural and social sciences . The Center houses the Analytical Labo ratory , which specializes in research in environmental chemistry . Projects to date in conjunction with the Analytical Labora tory include studies of air pollution, the global sulfur cycle , and the chemistry of alpine lakes. The services of the laboratory are available to UCD faculty and grad uate students, especially those in the M.S. in Environmental Sciences Program . Center for the Study of Racism and Ethnic Violence Activities of this Center include research and educational services related to preju dice and hate violence. The research scope of the Center ranges from local to international levels. Educational and training programs are provided for those interested in learning or teaching about the nature and reduction of prejudice, discrimination, and scapegoating . The Center ' s CSREV Bulletin is published biannually . Center for Urban Transportation Studies This Center assumes a leading role in the Rocky Mountain region in developing research and interdisciplinary programs in urban transportation and providing a central resource for information concern ing urban transportation problems in the Rocky Mountain region. The Center makes

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10 / Genera/Information available University expertise to outside organizations. Land and Water Infonnation Systems Group The Group was creat ed to advance the education and training, research , and pub lic service missions of CU-Denver in the areas of urban and reg i onal information systems, geographic-oriented databases , water resources systems, and built facili ties management. The Centers-Center for the Improve ment of Public Management and Center for Public-Private Sec tor Cooperation Goals are to improve public sector man agement and to engage the public , private, and non-profit sectors in devising solu tions to community problems . The Cen ters offer management and leadership training for state and local public officia l s and private and nonprofit sector emerging leaders . They conduct research on public policy issues, analyzing policy alterna tives and evaluating programs . The Cen ters provide strategic planning , conflict management, and facilitation services as well as other forms of technical assistance to state and local jurisdictions. Computational Mathematics Group The Computational Math Group at CU Denver is a broad-based response to the rapid and dramatic changes in the various fields of computation. The group resides in the Department of Mathematics , but is intended to be a highly interdisciplinary organization with associates in other departments at CU-Denver, on other cam puses of the Front Range, and within the business and research communities of greater Denver . The primary goal of the Group is to further its international recog nition as a site at which computational mathematics thrives and is advanced. This is accomplished through the coordi nated development of educational oppor tunities , active research , and direct access to advanced computers . National Leadership Institute on Aging The National Leadership Institut e on Aging is devoted to promoting the leader ship skills of men and women who design and deliver human services in our aging society. Created in 1988, the Institute provides opportunities for executives from the pub lic, private , and non-profit sectors to address the complex policy and program issues prompted by America's changing demographics . It challenges them to think innovatively , act with greater strategic skill, and forge new coalitions and part nerships to meet the needs of aging America . The Institute's activities include resi dential leadership development pro grams, mini-institutes and consulting activities . Institute for International Business The Institute for International Business was created in 1988 to serve as a center for the advanced study and teaching of inter national business. The Institute serves as an umbrella organization for international programs of the College of Business and as a bridge to business professionals and academic researchers from around the world who are interested in global busi ness issues . Through courses , seminars, workshops and conferences , the Institute and the College of Business offer under graduates , graduate students and busi ness executives the opportunity to acquire the skills and expertise needed to be successful in our increasingly globa l economy. The Institute also conducts and promotes research on the global eco nomic aspects of competitiveness. National Veterans Training Institute The Institute provides a series of train ing courses to further develop and enhance the professional skills of the Job Service ' s national network of veterans employment and training representatives who deliver services to America's veter ans. The NVTI's Resource Center provides materials and information to trainees and other service providers on topics support ing their professional effo r ts. The Institute is operated as a joint effort of the Univer sity of Colorado at Denver and the U.S. Department of Labor ' s Vet erans Employ ment and Training Service . 4th World Center for the Study of Indigenous Law and Politics This Center provides a research clear inghouse to students and faculty at CU Denver on legal and political issues that affect indigenous peoples (the 4th World). In addition to supporting a modest library of rare books and periodicals on indige nous issues, the Center also stocks video and audio cassettes on subjects of indige nous politics , and a substantial newsfile archive on current developments in the 4th World. Currently, the Center is expanding the number of course offeri ngs in the area of 4th World studies. Region VIII Resource Access Project Under a contract funded by the U . S . Department of Health and Human Serv ices , the Resource Access Project pro vides training and technical assistance to HeadS tart centers throughout a six-state region. Center for Research in Rhetoric The Center conducts original and applied research in rhetoric , broadly con ceived, and engages in projects that involve faculty and students who carry out research studies that contribute to our understanding of rhetoric and dis course in the broad realm of human affairs. Reports presenting the results of research projects are published by the Center and are available in the English department office. ADMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES All questions and correspondence regarding admission to CU-Denver and requests for application forms should be directed to : Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 P . 0. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 (303) 5563287 General Policies CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program successfully. Admission deci sions are based on many factors, the most important being: 1. Level of previous academic performance . 2. Evidence of academic ability and accom plishment as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests. 3 . Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success. CU-Denver may deny admission to new applicants or readmission to former stu dents whose credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essen tial by the University in order to carry out its lawful missions, processes , and func tions as an educational institution. Applicants who request degree pro grams that are not available at CU-Denver will be considered for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with an undetermined major. Students admit ted with an undetermined major are expected to declare a major by the time they have completed 60 hours toward graduation .

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Admission of Undergraduate Degree Students The University may change documents/ credentials deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands . Applicants should apply as early as possible. Updated infor mation is available from the Office of Admissions Processing (303) 556-2704. For an applicant to be considered for a specific term , ALL documents required for admission must be received in the Office of Admissions Processing by the DEAD LINE for that term . Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to be considered for a later term. Transfer students are reminded that they should allow sufficient time to have transcripts sent from institutions they have previ ously attended . Foreign students are advised that it usually takes 60 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admis sions Processing from international locations. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Adminis tration, Engineering and Applied Science, or Liberal Arts and Sciences. General R equirements. The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Edu cation Development (GED) Test. Specific College Requirements: COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION English (one year of speech/debate and two years of composition are strongly recommended) . .. .. . .. .. . . .. . .. .. .. . .. . 4 Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one year of geometry) ............................. 4 Natural sciences (includes two years of laborator y science) .. ................ 3 Social sciences (including history) ..... .. 2 ' See the Co ll ege o f Engineering and Applied Science section of this catal og for more spec ifi c information. Foreign language (both units in a sing l e langu age) ...... . Academic e l ectives ....... . ( Additional courses in English , foreign language , mathematics , natural or social sciences, not to include business courses.) .... 2 . 1 Total ......................... 16 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE' English (literature , composition, grammar)......................... 4 Mathematics distributed as follows : Algebra ................................... 2 Geometry ............................... . 1 Additiona l mathematics (trigonome tr y recommended ) ......... 1 Natural sciences including one year of physics and one year of chemistry . ... 3 Social Science . . . . . . . . . . .. .................. 2 . Foreign language (both units in a single language) ............................... 2 Academic e l ectives . . . . . . . 1 Total.................... . .............. 16 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES English (literature , composition, grammar) .. . ....... 4 Mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics) ........... 3 Natural sciences . .. .............. 3 Social science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 2 Foreign lan guage (both units in a single langu age) . . . . 2 Academic elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Total........... 15 All music majors in the School of the Arts are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area. Two years of prior piano training are recommended. An audition is required of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audi tion. Interested students should write to the School of the Arts, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications . RECEIPT OF DOCUMENTS DEADLINES Undergraduat e Students New Students Transfer Students Former University of Colorado Students Intra-university Transfer Students Int ernational Students Undergraduate: Graduate : Fall Spring Summer July 22 Dec . 1 May 3 July 22 Dec . 1 May 3 July 22 Dec . 1 May 3 60 days prior to the beginning of the term July 22 May26 Dec.1 Oct. 27 May3 March 10 Admissions I 11 MINIMUM ACADEMIC PREPARATION STANDARDS (MAPS) Freshmen entering the University of Colorado who have grad uated from high school in 1988 or later are required to meet the following Minimum Academic Preparation Standards : 4 years of Englis h ( with emphasis on compos ition ), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathe matics) , 3 years of natural science, 3 years of social science includi ng one year of U.S. or world history , 2 years of a single foreign language and 1 year of the arts. The MAPS focus on subject areas the student has studied in preparation for col lege . Freshman admission standards define the level of success and achieve ment necessary to be admit ted to the University of Colorado and include factors that predict academic success such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school course work , and the grade-point average. Both the subjects the student has studied and how the student has achieved will be factors that determine admission to the University. Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the Univers ity provided they meet the other admission standards (e .g., test scores, rank in high school class , grade-poi nt average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University. Two levels of deficiency will be recognized . 1 . One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student meets other admission standards and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation from the University . Courses taken to make up a deficiency will count toward graduation , provided the CUDenver college accepts those course credi t s toward graduatio n . 2. In some cases a student having more than one unit of deficiency may be admitted, provided that the student meets other standards of th e University. The student must make up additional deficiencies before grad uation by taking an expanded program of studies. The student may satisfy the MAPS require ments by successful comp leti on of 1) courses taken at CU, 2) courses taken at other institutions of higher education, 3) addit ional high school credits, 4) credit-by-examination programs, or 5) other requirements as approved by each CU-Denver college.

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12/ Genera/Information Preferred consideratio n tor admission is given to applicants who rank in the top 30 % of their high school graduating class and present a composite score of 26 or higher on the America n College Test (ACl), or a combined s core of 1070 or higher on the Scholasti c Aptitude Test (SAl) . Business applicants will receive preferred consideration if they graduated in the top 25 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1070 on the SAT. Engineering applicants will receive pre ferred consideration if they graduated in the top 20 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT and a 28 on the mathe matics or a 1100 total on the SAT with a 600 on the mathematics. Applicants who do not meet the admissions requirements for direct admission to E ngineering are encouraged to apply as a pre-engineering major in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . Music major applicants also must successfully pass a music audition . Applicants who do not satisfy the requirements for preferred consideration are reviewed on an individual basis . How t o Apply 1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor or from the CUDenver Office of Admissions Processing . 2. The application must be completed in full and sent to the Office of Admissions Processing with a $ 3 0 (subject to change) non-refunda b le fee . For appli cants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term , the $30 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided t he Office of Admissions Processing is informed of the intent to enroll for a later term . 3 . Students are required to have their high school send an offici a l transcript of their high school grades , including class rank , to the Office of Admissions Pro cessing . Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution dire ctly to th e CU-Denver Offic e of Admissions Processing . Hand,;arried copies are not official. 4. Students who did not graduate from high school are fequi r ed to have a copy of their GED test score s and GED certifi cate sent from the certifying agency to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions Processing . 5 . Students also are required to take either the American College Test ( ACl) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAl) and request that test scores be sent to CU Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4-4875). High school students may obtain ACT and SAT tes t dates and locations from their counselors. Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver as the recipient of the scores must request the testing agency to send scores to CU Denver . A Request for Additional Score Report may be obtained from any of the offices listed below . Registration Department American College Testing Program (ACl) P . O . Box414 Iowa City, Iowa 52240 College Entrance Examination Board (SAl) P . O . Box592 Princeton, New Jersey 0854 College Entrance Examination Board (SAl) P . O . Box 1025 Berkeley , California 94 704 6 . International students must submit proof of proficiency in the English lan guage (see Requiremen t s for Interna tional Students). All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file . Admission Requirements for Transfe r S tudents Transfer students may apply for admis sion to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science , and Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students interested in the field of educa tion should contact the School of Educa tion office for information (556-2717) . Established under the auspices of the Colorado Commission on Higher Educa tion and the Colorado Community College and Occupational Education System , t r ansfer agreements have been made with Arapahoe Community College , Front Range Community College, Community C ollege of Aurora , Community College of Denver, and Red Rocks Community Col lege enabling students of these institu tions to be direct l y admitted to CU-Denver . Students should contact the Office of Admissions Processing for complete details . Minimum transfer admission standards have been developed for all public four year institutions in Colorado . However , transfer applicants who meet these stan dards are not guaranteed admission . They also must meet the admissions standards of the University of Colorado and its indi vidual colleges . To meet the minimum standards at the University of Colorado at Denver, students must meet one of the fol lowing conditions : 1. Have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade-point average : a . 2.0 GPA if transferring from Colorado School of Mines , Colorado State Uni versity , University of Colorado at Boulder , or University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. b. 2 . 5 GPA if transferring from any other postsecondary institution . 2 . Be enrolled in a CCHE-approved guaran teed transfer agreement and meet the minimum academic qualifications of the agreement. 3 . Have earned fewer than 30 collegiate semester hours and meet the first time FRESHMAN standards for the institution . Transfer students are given priority consideration for admission as follows : 1. College of Business and Administration. To be considered for new transfer admission , students must have com pleted at least 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree , Bachelor of Sci ence (Business Administration). Appli cants with an o verall GPA of 3 . 0 in applicable course work will be automat ically admitted . Students with less than a 3 . 0 overall GPA, but with a 3 .25 in the last 24 sem e st e r hours of applicable c ourse work att e mpted , will be automati cally admitted . Applicants with at l e ast a 2 . 6 in applica ble course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with less than a 2 . 6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sci ences for admission consideration . No applicant will be acc epted who is not eligible to return to all institutions previ ously attend ed. 2 . College of Engine ering and Applied S c i ence . Applicants to the College of Engi neering should have at least a 2 . 75 cumulative grade-point average (on a 4 . 0 scal e) for all work attempted, should have completed two semesters each of calculus and physics, and must be eligi ble to return to all institutions previ ously attended. 3 . College of Liberal Arts and Scienc e s . Transfer applicants must have at least a 2 . 0 cumulative college grade-point average (on a 4 . 0 scale ) for all work attempted and must be eligible to

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return to all institutions previously attended. Course work in progress can not be used in calculating the cumula tive average. Music major applicants also must pass an audition . Contact the School of th e Arts for audition information (556-2727) . Important Note: Applicants who do not meet the above grade-point average or credit hour requirem e nts will be con sidered for admission , but on an individual basis. The primary factors used when consider ing students individually are (I) probability of success in th e academic program to which admission is desired; (2) the quality of prior academic work; (3) age , maturity, and nonc ollegiate achieve ments ; and (4) time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges. JWTOAPPLY fhe student should obtain a transfer 1pplication from the CU-Denver Office )f Admissions Processing . fhe application form must be com and returned with the required (subject to change) nonrefundable lpplication fee. rhe student is required to have two >fficial transcripts sent to the Office >f Admissions Processing from each col egiate institut i on attended . Official tran i cripts are those sent by the issuing nstitution directly to the CU-Denver )ffice of Admissions Processing. Hand :arried copies are not officia l . lf a stu l ent is currently enrolled at another nstitution, an incompl e te transcript isting all courses except those taken in h e final term should be sent. Another ranscript must be submitted after com •letion of the final term. (franscripts rom foreign instituti ons must be •resen t ed in the original language nd accompanied by a certified literal : nglish translation.) tudents who have attended a two ' ear school or community college, nd were enrolled in the Guaranteed 'ransfer Program to transfer to CU•enver, should submit a copy of the : uaranteed Transfer "contract" with 1eir application. iberal arts and music major applicants 1 fewer than 12 semester hours (18 rter hours) of college work completed 1 must submit a high school transcript ACT or SAT test scores. n gineering applicants with fewer than , emester hours also must submit high ool transcripts and ACT/SAT scores. Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores . Applicants to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should be aware that the College requires elementary proficiency in a foreign language for graduation . Appli cants to the College have fulfilled this requirement if they have completed three years of any classical or modern foreign language in high school and present a high school transcript to the College Advising Office for verification . For further informa tion , students should contact the College Advising Office , 556-2555 . All c r eden tials pre sented for admission . become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. Students who do not declare all previous l y attended institutions are subject to disciplinary action and/or dismissa l . TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT After all official transcripts have been received and the applicant has J]een admitted as a degre e student, the Office of Admissions Processing and the appro priate academic unit will determine which courses taken at other institutions are applicable to a degree program at CU Denver. In general transfer credit will be accepted insofar as it meets the degree and grade requirements at CU-Denver. College-level credit may be transferred to the Unive rsity if it was earned at a col l ege or university of recognized standing , by CLEP or advanced placement examina tions , or in military service or sch ooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education; if a grade of C-or higher was attained; and if the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution. Courses taken pass/fail are transferred when a grade of C -or higher is required to pass . The University may accept a maximum of 72 semester credits (108 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution toward the baccalaureate degree requirements and may accept up to 112 semester credits (153 quarter hours) from a four-year col lege or university. No credit is allowed for vocational/technical , remedial, or reli gious/ doctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspon dence) may be allowed if the above condi tions are met. Admissi ons I 13 The College of Business and Administration generally limits its trans fer credit for business co urses t aken at the lower divi sion level. All co u rses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado. A maximum of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours ) of work from a tw o-year insti tuti on may be applied toward baccalaureate degree require ments. All correspondence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability , a nd business courses may no t be taken through correspondence. The College of Engineering and Applied Science , in general, requires that engineering course transfer credit must come from an ABET accredited engineering program to be acceptab l e for degree purposes . Engineering technology courses are not considered equivalent to engineering courses . Readmission Requirements for Former and Returning Students CU-Denver students who have not regis tered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year or longer , and who have not attended anot her institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmission . Application f orms are available at the Office of Admissions Processing . Students who have attended another college or university since last at t ending the University of Colorado must apply as tran sfer students and meet the transfer stu dent deadlines for receipt of documents . This requires payment of the $30 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee and submission of official transcripts from all colleges and universiti es previously attended. Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to CU Denver , Adm i ssions Processing, Campus Box 167, P . 0. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364. Students who have not attended the University for up to one year but have attended another college or univ ersity in the interim are required to pay a $30 (s ub ject to change) transfer application fee . Transcripts must be requested by the stu dent and sent by th e registrar of the other institution(s) to CU-Denver , Admissions Processing , Campus Box 167, P . 0. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364. Students who last attended another CU campus (includin g the Division of Extended Studies) must formally apply for readmis sion. Application forms are availabl e from th e Office of Admi ssions Processing .

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14/ Genera/Information Admission Requirements for International Students The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to undergraduate and graduate programs . Undergraduate : Adm i ssion require ments for CU-Denver ' s schools and col leges vary, and international students seeking admission must meet the require ments of the program to which they are applying. In addition , all international stu dents whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a For eign Language) score of 525. Prospective students should request an International Student Applica tion packet from the Office of Admissions Processing . Information about require ments for each CU-Denver college and school can be found in this catalog . Deadlines for receipt of documents have been established to allow for the timely mailings of !-20' s . Contact the Office of Admissions Processing for these dates . Graduate : International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU Denver must have earned an undergradu ate bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are applying . In addition , all international stu dents whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Applications are available from The Admissions Processing Office six months prior to the term for which the student is applying . Note : Except for summer terms , inter national students must be in a degree seeking status. They may attend summer terms as non-degree students. This excep tion is strictly limited to summer terms. CU-Denver Intra-University Transfer or Change of Campus (Including Extended Studies) CU-Denver students may change col leges or schools within CU-Denver pro vided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer . CU-Denver Intra-university Transfer Forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions . Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Classes. Decisions on intra-university transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer . CU-Denver students may change University of Colorado campuses by applying directly to the Admissions Processing Office of the campus to which they wish to transfer. Change of Campus applica tions and deadline information also must be obtained from the campus to which the student is applying . Extended Studies students wishing to enroll in regular CU-Denver courses or degree programs should contact th e Office of Admissions Processing . High School Concurrent Enrollment High school juniors and seniors with demonstrated academic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for one term only . This approval may be renewed . Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program . For more information and application instructions , contact the CU-Denver Office of Admis sions Processing ( 303-556 2704). Admission of Graduate Degree Students All correspondence and questions regarding admission to the graduate pro gram at CU-Denver should be directed to the following : Programs in Business Graduate Business Programs Graduate School of Business Administration 595-4007 Programs in Architecture and Planning School of Architecture and Planning 556-3382 Programs in Public Affairs Graduate School of Public Affairs 820-5600 All Other Program s The Graduate School 556-2663 GRADUATE PROGRAMS Graduate degree programs are offered through The Graduate School by its member schools and colleges (School of Edu cation , College of Engineering and Applied Science, and College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) , and by the Graduate School of Business Administration , the School of Architecture and Planning , and the Gradu ate School of Public Affairs . GRADUATE ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND APPLICATION DEADLINES Admission requirements and applica tion deadlines vary according to the indi vidual graduate program . The Graduate School has general admission require ments which are supplemented by spe cific requirements of the major depart ments of graduate study (e.g., electrical engineering , education , English, etc.). Applicants should consult the general information section of The Graduate School portion of this catalog , as well as the college or school sections, for requirements and deadlines for specific programs . Admission of Non-Degree Students Persons who have reached the age of twenty and who want to take University courses but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree at this time may be admitted as non-degree students provided that they are academically eligi ble and admissible . Correspondence and questions regarding admission as a non degree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions Processing. Those seeking admission as non-degree students for the purpose of teacher certification should contact the School of Education , 556-2717. Each school / college limits the number of semester hours that are trans ferable to a degree program . Students con sidering changing from non-degree to degree status should contact the school / college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the number of hours that may be taken as a non-degree student. Courses taken as a non-degree student are for credit and can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional improvement. Note: International students are not admitted as non-degree students, except for sumrper terms . They must hold a valid visa . Students with the baccalaureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for course work as non-degree students. There are several types of these students. Among them are teachers who seek renewal of certifica tion ; students who wish to take additional course work for professional or personal improvement ; and students who feel a need to make up deficiencies before enter ing a specific program . Non-degree students should be aware that gener ally only a limited number of

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UNDERGRADUATE AND NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION INFORMATION'2.3 Type of Applicant Criteria for Admission Required Credentials When to Apply Notes FRFSHMAN IN GENERAL: Complete application Not l a t e r than: For specific requirements refer (Student seeking bachelor ' s a) Ranks in top 30% of high $30 applicable fee July 22 for fall to the college sections of this degree who has never school graduat ing class. Official high school transcript Dec . I for spring bulletin. For example : Music attended a collegiate b) Has 15 units of acceptable showing rank-in-class , date May 3 for summer requires an audition . institution) high school work. of graduation , 6th semester Seniors who meet or exceed c) Test scores : grades, courses in progress , all admission criteria may ACT comp: 25 or Official ACT or SAT score apply as early as Oct. I for SAT comb: 1050 report following fall. Note: Business and Engineering applicants are expected to have higher test scores , class rank , and number of academic units . TRANSFER IN GENERAL: Complete application Not later than : Uberal Arts and Music trans(Student seeking a bachelor's Must be In good standing and $30 application fee July 22 for fall fers with fewer than 12 sem. degree who has attended a eligible to return to all instituTwo official transcripts sent Dec. I for spring hrs. of college work, Business collegiate institution other lions previously attended . from each college attended May 3 for summer transfers with fewer than 24 thanCU) Applicants must hav e minimum sem . hrs., and Engineering. 2 . 0 GPA on all work attempted transfers with fewer than 24 if they have completed 30 or sem . hrs. must also submit a ll more semester hours . Bus!freshman credentials . ness and Engineering applicants will be r equired to have a higher GPA.' NON-DEGREE Must be high school graduate Complete application Not later than: Non-
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16 / General Informati on course credits taken by a non-degree stu dent may be applied later toward a degree program at CU-Denver. To continue registration as a non degree student, a minimum grade-point average of 2 . 0 must be maintained . HOW TO APPLY FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENT ADMISSION To apply for admission as a non-degree student , obtain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office of Admis sions Processing . Return completed appli cation by the deadline for the term desired . A $15 (subjec t to change) nonre fundable application fee is required . No additional credentials are required . Applicants who seek teacher certification must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required cre dentials . Non-degre e students are advised that registration for c ourses is on a space available basis . CHANGING STATUS FROM NON DEGREE TO DEGREE STUDENT Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined in the Non-degree to Degree procedures available from the Office of Admissions . Academic credentials (i.e . , transcripts and /or test scores ) and a $30 (subject to change ) nonrefundable appli cation fee also must b e submitted . Non degree students who are accepted as undergraduate degree students may gen erally transfer a limited number of semester hours for courses taken as a non-degree student to an undergraduate degree program with the approval of their academic dean . Non-degree students should consult with the college to which they are applying during the first semester of their enrollment for the maximum num ber of semester credit hours acceptable toward a degree program as a non-degree student. (Students enrolled as non-degree students prior to the Fall Semester of 1970 are subject to the policies in effect between January of 1969 and August of 1970.) Non-degree students may apply for admission to a graduate program by com pleting the application required by the particular program. The graduate dean, upon recommendatio n by the depart ment, may accept up to 8 semester hours of credit toward the requirements for a master's degree for courses taken as a non-degree student at t he University or at another recognized graduate school, or some combination t h ereof. The depart ment may recommend acceptance of additional credit for courses taken as a non-degree student during the semester the student has applied for admission to the desired degree program . Official Notification of Admission Official notification of admission to CU-Denver as an undergraduate , graduate , or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions Processing . Letters from various schools and colleges indicat ing acceptance into a particular program are pending subject to official notification of admission to the institution. Applicants who do not receive official notification of admission within a reasonable period of time (approximately 3 weeks) after sub mitting all application m a terials should contact the Office of Admissions Process ing (303) 556-2704. Tentati v e Admission. Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents will be permitted one term to submit the documents. If temporarily waived official documents are not received by the end of the initial term of attendance , registration for subse quent terms will be denied .lf at any time additional credentials are received which affect your qualifications , the University reserves the right to change the admission decision . TUITION AND FEES General Information All tuition and fee charges are estab lished by the Board of Regents , the gov erning body of the University of Colorado , in accordance with legislation enacted annually (usually in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly . The Regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee rates at any time . A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term , and students should contact the Records Office for further information on the tuition and fee charges for a partic ular term . The following rates are for the 1991-92 academic year and are pro vided to assist prospective students in anticipating cost. Other Fees1 1 . Student Activity F e e ( required for all students): For each term . .. ...... . ........... $37.00 ' S ubj ect t o c h ange. This fee supports the activities of the student government and helps provide legal services , recreational activities, student health services , the student newspaper , the Center for Student Counseling and Testing, and various student organizations . Th'e fee is approved by student referendum and is required of all students at the Univer sity of Colorado at Denver . (The fee includes a Student Health fee.) 2 . Auraria Bond Retirement Fee ( required for all students) : Each term ... . ... ................. .. $35.50 3 . Student Information System Fee (a non-refundable fee required of all students each term) ........... $ 5 .00 4. Matriculation Fee (mandatory for the first term for all new students) : ............. $25.00 This is a non-refundable fee charged at the student' s first registration to cover costs of generating transcripts . 5 . Information Technology Fee ...... $10.00 The Information Technology Fee pro vides for capital acquisition of new and/or upgraded systems to support student computing laboratories to include networks and networking infrastructure and facilities directly accessible by students each term . 6 . Doctoral dissertation fee (mandatory for all students certified by The Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral dis sertation ). Students should contact The Graduate School for guidelines established for charges for enrollment. 7 . Comprehensive examination fee : Any student in The Graduate School , the Graduate School of Business Adminis tration , or Graduate School of Public Affairs must be enrolled during the term in which the Comprehensive Examina tion for a master ' s degree is completed . Students who are not taking regular courses during that term must enroll as " Candidate for Degree Students enrolled only as " Candidate for Degree " pay the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour . The charge varies by the school in which the student is matriculated . 8 . Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in a chemistry labora tory course) : Breakage deposit ................. $20.00 An $8 deduction is assessed for expend able items . After accounting for break age , the unused portion is returned at the end of the semester .

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9 . Music laboratory fee (mandatory for music majors and others enrolled in certain mu sic courses): Musicfee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ........ $24.00 Music majors and others enrolled in piano, sound recording and reinforce ment, and electronic music must pay this fee. No student is charged more than one $24 fee during a given term . 10.South African Scholarship Fund. The Regents h ave authorized the University of Colorad o to accept vo luntary stu dent contributions of $1.00 per student per semester to be dedicated to schol arship and bursaries for the higher edu cation of needy South African students at Sou th African universities or at the University of Colorado. St u dents who wish to contribute to this fund should submit a contribution card to the Bur sar's Office before the e nd of the drop/add period each semester . Payment of Tuition and Fees All tuition and fees (except the applica t ion fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, accord ing to guidelines in the current Schedule of Classes . Students who register for 7 or more credit hours may arrange at the time of registration to defer payment of part of the charges. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Sched ule of Classes published before each semester or summer term . Students who fail to comp let e payment by the published deadlines, or who fail to file the required promissory note , will be assessed a $50 penalty . Students who register in a n on-degree status and who later change to a degree status for that term, are responsible for the difference in tuition between the non-degree program and their applica ble degree program and will be billed accordingly. Students who register for co urses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even th ough they may drop out of school . Refund polici es for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Classes . A student with financial obliga tions to the University will not be permit ted to register for any subsequent term , to be grad uat ed, to be issued transcripts , or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after graduation . Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation. Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable \ to the bank will be charge d an additional service charge. Students may pay tuition and fees by credit card. Tuition Appeals Exceptions to financial obligations incurred may be granted by the Tuition Appeals Committee . The Committee will only consider appeals when a student has been med i cally disabled , has experienced a death in the family , or has a change in employment hours or location beyond the student's control. Documentation of these conditions will be required. Exceptions will not be considered for a student' s fail ure to comp l y with publis hed deadlines, or changes in employmen t under the student's control. Please n ote : tuition appeals must be filed wit hin four months o f the end of the term for which the appeal is filed . FALL AND SPRING 1991-92 TUITION UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES and non-degree students without an undergraduate degree Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident 0-1 $97 $429 2 194 858 3 291 1 ,287 4 388 1 ,716 5 485 2,145 6 582 2 , 574 7 679 3 ,573 8 776 3 , 573 9-15 809 3 , 573 each credit hour over 15 97 429 UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Credit Hrs . Resident Non-resident 0-1 $112 $446 2 224 892 3 336 1,338 4 448 1 ,784 5 560 2,230 6 672 2,676 7 784 3 ,719 8 896 3 ,719 9-15 940 3 ,719 each credit hour over 15 112 446 Tuition and Fees I 1 7 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College of liberal Arts and Sciences Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident 0-1 $142 $476 2 284 952 3 426 1,428 4 568 1 , 904 5 710 2 , 380 6 852 2,856 7 994 3 , 969 8 1 ,136 3 , 969 9-15 1 ,185 3 , 96S each credit hourover15 142 476 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the School of Arch1tecture and Planning and NON-DEGREE graduate students and non-Denver campus programs* Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident 0-1 $152 $ 507 2 304 1 ,014 3 456 1 ,521 4 608 2 , 028 5 760 2 , 535 6 912 3,Q42 7 1 , 064 4 ,225 8 1 ,216 4 ,225 9-15 1,264 4 ,225 each credit hour over 15 152 507 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the Graduate School of Business Administration Credit Hrs . Resident Non-resident 0-1 $178 $517 2 356 1 , 034 3 534 1,551 4 712 2 , 068 5 890 2 , 585 6 1 , 068 3 ,102 7 1 ,246 4 , 304 8 1,424 4,304 9-15 1 ,486 4,304 each credit hourover15 178 517

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18/ Genera/Information GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College of Engineering, and the Graduate School of Public Affairs Credit Hrs . Resident Non-resident 0-1 $168 $507 2 336 1,014 3 504 1,521 4 672 2,028 5 840 2,535 6 1,008 3,042 7 1 ,176 4 ,225 8 1 , 344 4,225 9-15 1,397 4,225 each credit hour over 15 168 507 GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the School of Education Credit Hrs . Resident Non-resident 0-1 $156 $507 2 312 1,014 3 468 1 ,521 4 624 2 ,028 5 780 2,535 6 936 3 ,042 7 1 ,092 4 ,225 8 1 ,248 4 ,225 9-15 1 , 397 4 ,225 each credit hour over 15 156 507 Graduate degree stu dents who are registered as "candidate for degree" will be assessed the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour plus the Stu dent lnfonnation System Fee. *Non-degree students who have previ ously earned a baccalaureate degree are classified as graduate students and assessed graduate tuition regardless of the level of the class( es) they are taking. THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO RESERVFS THE RIGHT TO CHANGE TUITION AND FEES AT ANY TIME. Audit To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester , a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar . Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses dur ing the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the University or have outstanding financia l obligations to the University . The Records Office does not keep any record of courses audi t ed; therefore , credit for these courses cannot be established . Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where spe cial equipment is used) , provided they have received permission from each instructor. Auditor ' s cards are issued after classes begin. This card should be pre sented to the instructor when requesting permission to attend a class . Auditors, whether resident or nonresi dent, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only . Auditors do not rece i ve student parking privileges , and are not eligible for other student services . Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes Tuition classification is governed by CRS 23-7-101, et. seq. (1973) as amended . ' Institutions of higher education are bound to the provisions of this statute and are not free to make except i ons to the rules set forth. The statute provides that an in-state stu dent is one who has been a legal domicil iary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classifica tion is being sought. Persons over 22 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 22 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court appointed legal guardian . An une mancipated minor's parent must, there fore, have a legal domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes . Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one's true, fixed , and permanent home and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colo rado domicile on the person seeking to establish the domicile . The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connec tions with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado , for tuition purposes , beg i ns the day after connections with Colorado are made suffi cient to evidence one's intent. The most common ties with the state are (1) change of driver's license to Col orado ; (2) change of automobile registration to Colorado; (3) Colorado voter registration; (4) perma nent employment in Col orado; (5) and most important , payment of state income ' A copy of the Colorado Revis e d Statutes (1973), as amended , is availabl e in the Univ e rsit y o f Colorado at D enve r Admis si o n s O ffi ce . taxes as a resident by one whose income is sufficient to be taxed. Caution : payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroactive to the time filed. In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term , the 12-month waiting period (whic h begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question . If one ' s 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, in-state tuition cannot be grante d until the next semester. Once the student's tuition classification is established, it remains unchanged unless satisfactory information to the contrary is presented . A student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification from resident to nonresident or vice versa must inform the Tuition Classification Officer within 15 days after s uch a change occurs. An adult stu dent or emancipated minor who moves ou tsid e of Colorado must send written notification to the Tuition Classification Officer within 15 days of the change . Once a student is classified as non resident for tuition purposes, the student must petition for a change in classifica tion . Petitions must be submitted NO LATER THAN THE FIRST DAY OF CLASSES of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a non-resident. It is pre ferred for petitions to be received 30 days prior to the beginni n g of the term. Late petitions will not be considered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions Processing. The final decision regarding tuition stat u s rests with the University. Questions regard ing residence (tuition) status should be referred only to the Tuition Classification Officer. Opinions of other persons are not officia l or binding upon the University . Addi tiona/ information (including the entire text ofCRS 23-7-101) is available in the brochure Classification of Students for Tuition Pur poses which may be obtained from the Admissions Processing Office. Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel The Colorado Legislature approved res ident tuition beginning with the Fall 1986 Semester for active duty military person nel on permanent duty assignment in Col orado and for their dependents. ELIGIBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM. Students obtain a completed veri fication form from the base education officer, and submit th e form with their military ID to the1Records Office after they

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have registered , but before the end of the drop / add period . At that time the student's bill will b e a djusted to reflect the resident tuition rate . Students who have been certified r e main classified as non-residents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish p e rmanent tie s to Colorado. FINANCIAL AID Director: Ellie Miller Office: NC 1030 Telephone: 556-2886 The Office of Finan cial Aid/ Student Employment consid e rs qualified students for financial aid awards . If the student' s application materi als are received before t he March 31, 1992, priority date, the n the ;tudent is consider e d for a package of grant , work-study (part-time and /or long-term loan 'unds . If applications are received after : he March 31 priority date, the student is Jsually considered only for Pell Grant and 'or outside student loans ( Stafford Loanormerly Guaranteed Student Loan or GSL 'arents Loan for Undergraduate Students.' md Supplemental Loan for Students ). rhese funds are not allocated to CU)enver ; they are available throughout he year to students who qualify . There tre three separate deadlines for applying or Advantage Scholarship ; refer to the . eparate brochure for further information . Applicants for Colorado Fellowship , >eans Scholars , and Regents Scholars are ubject to different deadlines and are eviewed by other CU-Denver depart (The Graduate School , undergradu .te dean ' s offices, and the Office of •dmissions respectively). All other stu l ents are notified of the ir award status in rriting by the Office of Financial Aid/ tudent Employment. :ligibility Each student must qualify for CU I enver financial aid a s follows : . Be a U . S . citizen or b e admitted to the U.S. by the INS on a permanent basis (except for Colorado Fellowship ). . Be classified as a degree-seeking stu dent ( except for stude nts applying for Advantage Scholarships ) . Teacher certi fication students are eligible to apply as under g raduate stud e nts for outside stu dent loans (Stafford Loan , Parents Loan for Undergraduat e Students , or Supple mental Loan for Stud e nts). Be enrolled for a specified minimum number of cre dits . 4. Maintain satisfactory academic prog ress as defined for the financial aid programs . 5 . Apply for financial aid by submitting all of the required documentation includ ing the need analysis form (except for Colorado Fellowship , Colorado Schol ars, Deans Scholars , Regents Scholars, and Emergency Short Term Loans ) . 6 . Document finan cial ne e d (except for the programs listed in #5 ). 7. B e classified as a resident for tuition purposes for the following programs : Colorado Student Grant , Colorado Stu dent Incentive Grant, Colorado Gradu ate Grant , Colorado Work-Study , Regents Scholarship , Deans Scholars , and Colorado Scholars . 8 . Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant. 9 . Be registered for the draft or enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selec tive Service. Application Each applicant must complete the finan cial aid application materials for submis sion to the Office of Financial Aid. Complete information must be available to the financial aid counselors before eligibil ity can be determined . Limited Funds . The majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a firstcome, first-served basis to eligible stu dents who document financial need and complete their application process as soon as possible after January 1 , 1992. Application completion is defined as hav ing all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (ACT Family Financial Statement , CSS Financial Aid Form , USAF Singlefile Form or the AFSA) into the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. General financial aid is awarded to eligible students until all of the funds are committed for the year . If you complete your file after March 31, 1992, your awards will probably be limited to the Pell Grant (for first undergraduate stu dents only) and /or outside student loans (Stafford Loan , Supplemental Loans for Students , Parents Loan for Under g raduate Students). Please remember to reapply for financial aid each year . It is the student' s responsibility to be sure application materials are complete . Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for application forms for complet e details regarding financial aid . All financial aid application procedures are subject to change at any time due to revisions in federal and state laws , regulations , and guid e l i n e s . Financial Aid I 19 Qualification Financial Ne ed. Most financial aid is based on the concept of financial need . Your financial aid counselor calculates financial need as : 1 ) cost of attendance, minus family contribution which is 2) student /spouse contribution , and 3 ) parents ' contribution (for dependent students only ). The cost of attendance is the cost to attend CU-Denver , including tuition and fees , room and board , books and supplies , transportation , and personal expenses .. The Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment determines standard bud gets for students based upon average tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education . Independent Student . The federal gov ernment has specific g uidelines that must be followed to define a self-supporting stu dent (one who reports only his / her own income and assets wh e n applying for aid ). For 1992-93, a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old or older as of December 31, 1992.1f you are under 24, you are considered self-supporting if you fall into one of the following categories : 1 . Single undergraduate student with no dependents who was not claimed as a dependent on your parents ' 1990 and 1991 federal income tax returns. Also , you must demonstrate that you are self-sufficient by having total income (including financ ial aid ) of at least $4, 000 annually for the two calendar years prior to your first receipt of federal financial aid . 2. Graduate or professional student who will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents ' 1992 federal income tax return . 3 . Married and will not be claimed as a dependent on your parents ' 1992 federal income tax return . 4 . Student with legal dependents other than a spouse. 5 . Veteran of the U.S. armed forces . 6 . Orphan or ward of the court. 7. Have unusual circumstances and be approved by the Financial Aid Commit tee . Contact the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment for appeal guidelines . If your student /spouse contribution plus your parents ' contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance , you will not qualify for need-based finan cial aid . For 1991-92 , th e following bud gets were used for room and board , transportation , and personal expenses per month : single stude nts living with par ents $ 347 / month ; single students not liv-

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20 / Genera/Information ingwith parents $765 / month. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student was approximately $860 per semester, and non resident tuition was approximately $3470 . These amounts will probably increase by about 5 % for the 1992-93 school year. The contributions from the student/ spouse and from the parents of dependent students are calculated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income , savings and other assets, family size, number of children in postsecondary school, medi cal expenses , and other factors . You may appeal for special consideration of your situation and in some cases the standard ized contribution may be adjusted by recommendation of the Financial Aid Committee . FINANCIAL AID IS INTENDED TO SUPPLEMENT (NOT REPLACE) FINAN CIAL CONTRIBUTIONS FROM YOU AND YOUR PARENTS. Course Loads . General financial aid ( work-study , grants , Perkins Loans ) undergraduate recipients usually must carry at least 12 credit hours per semester and graduate students usually must carry at least five graduate credits per semes ter during the academic year (fall / spring). Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please check your award letter for the exact number of hours required). Pell Grant (avail able only to first undergraduates) and outsid e student loan r e cipients must carry at least six credits per semester for undergraduates and three graduate credits for graduates . Summer Term 1992 minimum course loads are as follows: Full-time : undergraduate-S hours , graduate-3 graduate hours; Half-time : undergraduate-4 hours, graduate-2 graduate hours . Higher or lower standards may be required for individual awards . For further information contact the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment. Satis fa ctory Academic Progress . CU Denver students must make satisfactory academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employ ment in order to be eligib l e and remain eligible for financi a l aid . Students are referr e d to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid, available in the Office of Financia l Aid. Non-D e gree Student s . Non-degree stu dents are not pursuing a degree in a tech nical sense and , therefore, are only eligible to apply for one type of financial aid at this time-Advantage Scholarship. C ontinuing Edu c ation / Community C ollege o f D e n ve r C o urs e s . Class e s offered throu g h th e CU-De nver Division of Extenqed Studies or through the Commu nity College of Denver cannot be include d when minimum course loads and satisfactory academic progress are determined. The exception to this policy is MATH 112 offered by the Community College of Denver . Residency Status . You are required to be a resident of Colorado for a full calendar year before the Office of Admissions can consider classifying you as a resident for tuition purposes . Non-resident students are encouraged to obtain additional infor mation from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident status. As a resident student, you are potentially eligi ble for more financial aid programs since you can be considered for the State of Colorado aid funds . Refunds and Repayments . Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal or reclassification of tuition status must be applied against the recipient ' s financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Students may be expected to repay a portion of their award if they with draw from CU-Denver . Appeals . Students may appeal all deci sions of the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment by completing a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office. Appeals are considered within three weeks . Reapply Each Year. Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each year . Award Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 6-12 weeks after all application documents have been received in the Office of Finan cial Aid. If awarded , an award letter is mailed which includes information such as the type(s) and amount(s) of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours that are required for the award(s). Types of Aid The following are federal programs : 1. Pel/ Grant . Your eligibility for the Pell Grant (federally funded) is determined before any other aid is awarded . Awards are defined by a strict f ormula provided by the federal government and amounts vary depending on the student' s eligibil ity index , enrollment status, residency classification, and living status. Stu dents are eligible for a Pell Grant if they have not received their first bachelor ' s degree by June 1 , 1992. 2 . Outside Student Loans . Your eligibility for all other types of aid should be determined prior to applying for out side student loans. The STAFFORD LOAN (formerly Guaranteed Student Loan) program requires that you show financial need in order to qualify . Most sing le students who are working full time do not document sufficient financial need to qualify for the Stafford Loan . The primary purpose of this pro gram is to make low-interest , long-term loans available to students to help them meet their postsecondary educational expe ns es . The SUPPLEMENTAL LOAN FOR STUDENTS is a lon g-term loan pro gra m for students who do not docu ment financial need for the Stafford Loan or who need additional funds . Undergraduate dependent students may not borrow the SLS because their parents are eligible to borrow under the same terms . The program for parents is calle d the PARENTS LOAN FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS (PLUS). 3. Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (SEOG) . A need-based grant pro gram for students who have not yet obtained a bachelor's degree. 4. Perkins Loan (formerly National Direct Student Loan). The interest rate on this long-term loan is 5 % and no payments are due until six or nine months (this time differs depending on when you first receive a Perkins Loan) after the student ceases to be enrolled at least halftime. 5. College Work Study . A program that allows students to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at non profit agencies to help meet their educa tional costs. The State of Colora d o funds the follow ing programs . 1 . Colorado Student Grant . A need-based grant for resident undergraduate stu dents. 2 . Colorado Student In centive Grant. A need-based grant for resident under graduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor ' s degree. This grant is funded 50% by the federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado. 3. Colorado Graduate Grant . A need-based grant for resident g raduate students. 4 . Colorado Work-Study. A program similar to the College Work-Study program , but limit ed to resident undergraduate students.

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Scholarships Following is a list of th e major scholar ships that are offered at CU-Denver. The first listing is for awards funded by the State of Colorado : I. Regents Scholarship is offered to new freshmen and transfer students by the Office of Admissions (556-2704). New students will be automatically consid ered for this program . 2. Colorado Scholars is for undergraduate resident students who have a mini mum of 3.2 cumulative grade-point average for at least 12 CU hours . Con tact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for the application proce dures. The deadline for applying is March 31, 1992. 3 . Deans Scholarships are awarded by undergraduate deans offices . Contact your dean ' s office for more information . The following programs are funded by CU-Denver : 1 . Advantage Scholarship is for minority and /or first generation college students who meet the income guidelines . Con tact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for applications . 2 . Nelson / Running Wolf Scholarship funds are provided to needy American Indian s t udents. Contact the Office of Ameri can Indian Student Services Services (556-2860) for information . 3. Ahlin Fund assistance is available for mobility impaired students . Contact S t udent Counseling, Testing and Career Services (556-2815) for applications. Other schol arship information is available from the Office of Financial Aid/ Stu dent Employment , the Aura ria Library Scholarship Info Bank in the referenc e sec tion , and the Office of Student Counseling, resting , and Career Services . Other Sou rces of Finan cial Aid. There are ;everal other sources of financial aid for ;tudents. Employment opportunities are is ted in the Office of Financial Aid/ Stu1ent Employment , the Auraria Student \ssistance Center, and the Center for n t ernships and Cooperative Education . undergraduat e resident students apply for College Work-Study and do not document sufficient financial 1eed may be considered for Colorado No Work S t udy . Students who partici , ate in CMENMESA, th e Pre-Collegiat e )evelopment Program , the Minority > cholars Program, or who apply for Scholarships are automatically : onsidered for Challenge Scholarships . iraduate students should inquire about .dditiona l types of aid through th eir aca l emic department. Students should be aware that Emergency Student Loans are available through the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment as well as Finan cial Aid Advances . American I ndian stu dents should inquire in the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment for information about Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships. REGISTRATION Selecting an Academic Program and Courses Students should review the following sections of this catalog that describe the academic programs available at CU Denver , and that provide information by school or college on the various majors available , course requirements by major , course load policies , and other pertinent information . Courses available during a particular semester or summer term are listed in the Schedule of Classes , published three months before the beginning of each term . Schedules are available from the Records Office. Undergraduate students who need assistance in planning an academic pro gram or in selecting courses should contact the academic unit in which they are enrolled to arrange for an advising appointment prior to registration . Gradu ate students should contact their respec tive graduate program for assistance. Cour s e Abbreviations In general, the abbreviation preceding th e course number identifies the depart ment offering the course. Th e first digit in the course number indicates the recom mended class level of the course: The digit after the dash in the course number denotes the credit-hour value of the course. The !-credit lecture / recitation period is 50 minutes long . Hence a student enrolled in a 3-credit hour course will attend class for 150 minutes per week dur ing a 16-week term . A 3-credit hour course will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class. A laboratory credit includ es from two to four hours per week in the laboratory , drafting room or field . Unless the course descriptions specify laboratory work , it is understood that the classes consist of le ct ur es and dis c ussions . L evel of Courses 1000 2000 3000 Student Classification Lower division Lower division Upper division 4000 5000 6000 7000 Registration I 21 Upper division Graduate students or qualified seniors who have instructor ' s or dean's permission Graduate degree students Master ' s and Ph . D . graduate students 8000 Ph . D . graduate students Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are: Coreq . -Corequisite Hrs .-Hours Lab. -Laboratory Lect . -Lecture Rec. -Recitation Sem . -Semester Wk.-Week Thus , the description of CHEM 1020-5 signifies that the course is offered by the chemistry department at the freshman level , and t hat it carries 5 semester hours of credit (3 hours of lecture credit , 1 hour of recitation credit, and 1 hour of labora tory credit). Further, the student must have completed CHEM 1010 (the prerequi site) before enrolling. Graduate School policy permits specifi cafly approved courses to be offered con currently at the 4000 and 5000 levels . Students should expect work at the gradu ate (5000) l evel to involve demonstration of greater ma t urity and critical skills than at the ( 4000) undergraduate level. Orientation An orientation program for all new stu dents is he l d at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters , prior to the first day of classes . The orientation program con ducted by the Office of Student Life pro vides info r mation to new students about some of the activities and services avail able at CU-Denver. Information on the reg istration process and degree require ments also is provided . Academic orienta tion advising sessions are held during the term , before registration for the nex t term . Dates and times of new student ori entations are published in the Schedule of Classes . Registration CU-Denver s t udents can register from any tou c h-tone telephone . Students will be assigned a time to register and may register at or after their assigned time .

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22 / Genera/Information REGISTRATION PRIORITIES Registration is by time assignment only . Continuing students, and new students admitted by the priority deadline, will have first priority in the following order: graduate students, new freshmen, fifth year seniors , seniors , juniors , sopho mores , freshmen , and non-degree stu dents . All students admitted after the priority deadline will be allowed to register in the order they are admitted. Non-degree students who apply late should be prepared with alternate choices or classes because students in degree programs will register first. All non-degree students should contact the academic advisors of the degree programs in which they are interested in order to ensure that their classes will fulfill the requirements of the program. Please note : some courses are not open for registration by non-degree students without special permission . Non-degree students should check the restrictions listed for each course in the Schedule of Classes. PO OLED COURSES AT METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with similar courses at Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD). CU-Denver undergraduate students may register for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU-Denver Schedule of Classes . Poo led Course Restrictions 1. CU-Denver graduate students are not eligible to register for MSCD common pooled courses . 2. MSCD courses will not be included in the University of Colorado grade-point average. MSCD courses will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will count in the hours toward graduation . 3. MSCD courses cannot be used to meet specific course requirements toward the major without prior approval of the student's dean . The last 30 semes ter hours applied toward the baccalau reate degree must be taken in residence at CU-Denver . MSCD common pooled courses will not satisfy this residence requirement. I NTERINST ITUTIONAL REG I STRATION CU-Denver degree students may enroll in courses offered by the Community Col lege of Denver , Front Range Community College, and Red Rocks Community Col lege. Students must be enrolled at CU Denver for at least one course during the semester or summer term to be eligib l e to register interinstitutionally. Registration is on a space available basis . Interinstitu tional courses are evaluated for transfer credit and are not included in a CU-Denver student's grade-point average. CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of Colorado cam puses concurrently must contact their school or college on thei r home campus. Concurrent registration is available on l y during fall and spring semesters. A degree student registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if: 1. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the aca demic dean. 2 . The course is a required cou rse for the student' s degree ( not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver . 3. The student obtains approval from the academic dean. 4. There is space available at the other (host) campus . 5. The student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CU-Denver rates . 6. The home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes. 7 . The concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses. Students may not register for an independent study course through concurrent registration . Students may not take courses pass /fail or for "no-credit" through concurrent registration. To drop a concurrent course during the host campus drop / add period, arrange the drop at the home campus school or col lege office . To drop a concurrent course after the end of the host campus drop/add deadline , drop the course at the host cam pus Records Office . S tudy Abroad The Office of International Education on the Boulder campus offers study abroad progr a ms that are available for all CU stu dents . More than 30 programs are offered around the world . Resident credit at l ower division , upper division , or graduate lev els can be earned depending on the pro gram selected and , if appropriate , can be applied to the CU-Denver degr ee. Students also can apply their financial aid to CU-Boulder sponsored study abroad pro grams. For more information on the Denver campus , see the section on Inter national Education on page 28. Course Load s Students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer term) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. Students should petition their academic dean. Remember that a three-semester-hour course during a fall or spring semester will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class; a three-semester hour course during a summer term will requ i re nine to thirteen hours of work each week outside of class. Suggested maximum course loads for the fall and spring semesters for under gradua t e students who are emp l oyed: Employed 40 or more hours per week: 3-6 semester hours 30-39 hours per week : 5-8 semester hours 20-29 hours per week : 7-11 semester hours 10-19 hours per week: 9-15 semester hours Students should consider their other obligations-academic, professional, and personal-before registering for courses. G R ADUATE RESTRICTIONS No more than 15 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a fall or spring semester can be applied toward a graduate degree. No more than 10 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a given sum mer term can be applied to a graduate degree . D E FINITION OF F ULL-AND HALF TIME S T ATUS F OR F INANCIAL AID AND LOAN DEFERMENT : FALL AND SPRING Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below . The exact requirements for financial afd will be listed in the student's financial aid award l etter. Fal l and Spring: effective Fall 1987 Undergraduates and non-degree students: Full-time . . . . . . . 12 or more semester hours Half-ti me ....... 6 or more semester hours

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Graduate degree students: Full-time: 5 or more hours of graduate l evel classes (course number-5000+) 8 or more hours of mixed level classes 0 hours as candidate for degree 1 or more hours of th esis ( not master's reports, or thesis preparation) Half-time: 3 or more hours of graduate l evel classes (course number-5000) 4 or more hours of mixed l evel classes Summer (10 week term) Undergraduates and non-degree students: Full-time . . . .. 8 or more semester hours Half-tim e ........ 4 or more semester hours Full-time : 3 or more hours of gradua t e level classes (course number -5000+) 5 or more hours of mixed level classes 0 hours as candidate for degree 1 or more hours of thesis ( not master's reports, preparation) Half-time: 2 or more hours of g raduate level classes (course number-5000+) 3 or more hours of mixed l evel classes Enro llment status for a term cannot be certifi e d until the end of the drop / add period. These hours do not include interinstitu ti onal hours from CCD or hours at MSC, nor do they includ e hours on another CU campus , unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration . Students rec eiving veteran's benefits must contact the Veterans Affairs coordi nator for definition of full-time status for summer terms . ceo courses are not considered for full or half-time status. Individual exceptions to the minimum gradua t e co urs e load lev e ls are co nside red for financial aid pur pos es b y the Financial Aid Committee . Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid. TERM COURSES Cours es are also offered in five-week nodules in special weekend courses, and n seminars. Topics in Science modular :ourses are self-contained units designed o cover specific problems or issu es in icience. Stu d ents should contact the : ollege jsc hool office for information on ; hort-term courses offered each semester. ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS Advanced Standing and Advanced Placement Credit Undergraduate students may obtain credit for lower-division courses in which they demonstrate proficiency by examina tion. By passing an examination, the stu dent will be given credit for the course to satisfy lower division requirements and may be eligib l e to enroll in higher level courses than indi cated by the student's formal academic experience. Credit granted for courses by examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but does count toward grad u ation and other requirements for which it is appro priate . There are three types of examina tions as described below. ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency and are granted advanced standing in those areas. Students with scores below 4 may be consi dered for advanced placem en t by the discipline concerned . All credit must be validated by subsequent academic per formance . For more information contact your high school counselor or the Office of Admissions at CU-Denver . CREDIT BY EXAMINATION Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade-point average of at least 2.0, and be currently registered. Examinations are arranged through the Records Office, and a nonrefundable fee is charged . Students should contact the office of the dean of t h e academic unit in which they are enrolled. COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM Incoming CU-Denver students may earn Universi ty credit by examination in subject areas in which they have demonstrated college-level proficiency. Academi c Poli cies and Regulati ons I 23 Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examina tions Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testi ng service . For more information call the CU-Denvel' Testing Center at 556-2861. Students who are interested in credit for CLEP examinations must contact the office of their school or college . Credit for Military Service and Schooling and ROTC MILITARY SERVICE AND SCHOOLING To have credit for educational experi ences evaluated , applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application : (1) a copy of DO Form 214 and (2) DO Form 295, Applica tion for the Evaluation of Education Expe rience During Military Service . USAF personnel may present an official tran script from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of the DO Form 295. Credit will be awarded as recom mended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver . Credit for courses com pleted through th e U . S . Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions. RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC) Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the applica tion of ROTC course credit toward gradua tion requirements . The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements . The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses . Further more , a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business and then only if the ROTC program is completed . Grading System and Policies The following grading system and poli cies for pass /fail registration , dropping

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24 / Genera/Information and adding courses, and withdrawal from the University have been standardized for all academic units of the University. GRADE SYMBOLS The instructor is responsible for what ever grade symbol (A, B , C. D , F, IF, IW, or IP) is to be assigned . Special symbols (NC, W. and * * *) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor . Pass/fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system , explained under Pass/Fail Procedure . A -superior / excellent-4 credit points per credit hour. B-good/ betterthan average-3 points per credit hour. C-competent /average-2 credit points per hour. D-minimum passing-! credit point per credit hour. F-Failing-no credit points per credit hour. Beginning with the Spring 1984 semes ter , the University approved the use of a l>LUS/MINUS grading system, where a B+ corresponds to 3 . 3 credit points per credit hour, and a B-corresponds to 2. 7 credit points per credit hour. Instructors may , at their discretion , use the PLUS/MINUS sys tem , but are not required to do so. IF-incomplete-becomes an Fif not completed within one year . IW-incomplete-regarded as Wif not completed within one year. !P-in progress-thesis at the graduate level only. P/F-pass / fail-Pgrade is not included in the grade-point average ; the F grade is included ; up to 16 hours of pass /fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor ' s degree . HIP I F -honors / pass / fail-intended for honors courses; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average. Special Symbols NC-indicates ' registration on a no credit basis . W-indicates withdrawal without credit. ***-indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were pro cessed. Graduate students enrolled at the 5000 level of a 4000/5000 course will be expected to complete additional work and be evaluated according to the gradu ate standards specified by the course instructor . An incomplete grade is only awarded when special circumstances prevent a stu dent's completing a course during the PASS/FAIL OPTION RFSTRICfiONS College Business and Administration Engineering and Applied Science Liberal Arts and Sciences General Only non-business electives may be taken pass /fail Required courses may not be taken pass/fail. Upper division humani ties and social sci ences electives are acceptable, other wise major depart ment approval is r equired May be restricted i n certain majors; not included in 30 hours of Cor bet ter work required for major. No more t han 6 hours P/F any semester term. Students have one year to complete an INCOMPLETE. After one year, an IW is regarded as a DROP-PASSING; an IF is a FAILING grade. Students should notreregister for courses in which they have received INCOMPLETES. Most schools and colleges require a contract between the instructor and student outlining the work necessary to " complete " the incomplete. MID-TERM GRADES Beginning with the Spring 1990 semester, instructors will be asked to assign mid-term grades for a small population of students . Students who may be in some academic difficulty may be contacted and counseled about support services avail able to them. Please note : academic support services are available to all students through the Office of Student Retention Services , NC 2012, 556-2324 . PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE 1. Students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis must do so during the drop / add period . Changes to or from a pass/fail basis may be made only during the regular drop / add period . 16Hours Maximum Only 6 semester hours maybe taken pass/fail Includes courses taken in the honors program Does not include courses taken in honors, physicat education, cooper ative education and certain teacher cer tification courses; also does not include ENGL 1000 Proficiency Test or MATH 1000 Test Transfer Students Only 6 semester hours maybe taken pass/fail College requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of courses with letter grades 2 . Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/ fail basis and credited toward the bach elor's degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass /fail in any given semester. . 3 . Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of pass/fail registration. All students who register for a pass/fail appear on the regular class roster , and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office , those registrations with a pass /fail designation are auto matically converted by the grade appli cation system. Grades of D and above convert to grades of P. Courses taken pass/fail will be included in hours toward graduation . Pass grades are not included in a student's grade-point average . An F grade in a course taken pass/fail will be included in the grade point average. 4. The record of pass/fail registration is maintained by the Records Office . 5 . Exceptions to the pass /fail regulations are permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education , the Division of Extended Studies, and Study Abroad Programs .

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6. Graduate degree students can exercise the P / F option for undergraduate courses only. A grade of P will not be acceptable for graduate credit to sat isfy any Graduate School requirement. 7 . Students who register for a course on a pass/fail basis may not later decide to receive a letter grade . Each school and college limits the hours and courses for which students may register on a pass/ fail basis. Please note : many other institutions will not accept a " P ' grade for transfer credit. NO CREDIT Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college . File the no credit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop / add period . Students who register for a course on a no credit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade. Students may not register again for a course which has already been taken on a no credit basis . SENIOR CITIZENS Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) may audit classes for no charge. Contact the Division of Enrollment and Student Serv ices at 556-8427 , NC 2204 . GRADE-POINT AVERAGE The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course, totaling the hours and the credit points, and dividing the total points by the total hours. Grades of P, NC, * ... , W, /P, IW, and IF are not included in the grade-point average. If an IF grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as failed and a grade ofF is automatically cal culated in the grade-point average at the end of the one-year grace period . If an IW grade has not been completed within one year , the course is regarded as dropped. If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point average. The University of Colorado average does not include courses taken at other institutions . The grade-point average of graduate :;tudents includes only courses, credit hours, and credit points accumulated while enrolled in a Graduate School P rogram . The grade-point average does not ippear on official transcripts issued from the Records Office but does appear on the Grade Report issued each semester. Students should consult with the dean of their college or school for explanation of any exceptions made to the University uniform grade-point average. Undergraduates and non-degree stu dents must maintain a 2 . 0 grade-point average to remain in good standing. Grad uate students must maintain a 3 . 0 GPA to remain in good standing . Students whose GPA falls below the 2 . 0/3 . 0 level are sub ject to probation or suspension . Such students will be notified by their school or college . GRADE REPORTS Grade reports are mailed to CU-Denver students approximately two weeks after the end of the term . To obtain replace ment reports, students must present pic ture identification at the Records Office. Student Classification Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed : Freshman 0-29 hours Sophomore 30-59 hours Junior 60-89 hours Senior 90+ hours All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado . Graduation Undergraduates. Students who have completed 80 or more semester hours should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or college to determine what requirements remain for graduation . Students intending to gradu ate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their graduation term . Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated . After stu dents have been certified to graduate they must reapply to return to CU-Denver . Graduates. Students must file an Appli cation for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with The Graduate School on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term. Check with The Gradu ate School for more complete information. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been eval uated . After students have been certified to graduate, they must re a pply to return to CU-Denver . Academic Policies and Regulations I 25 Commencement . Letters will be mailed in early April to students eligible to partic ipate in the spring commencement. Infor mation will be provided about ordering special display diplomas, being fitted for caps and gowns , and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree recorded. Students graduating at the end of the sum mer term or the end of the fall semester may participate in the following spring commencement. Transcripts Transcripts of academic record at the University of Colorado (all campuses) may be ordered in person or by mail from the University of Colorado at Denver, Transcript Office , Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364 . Offi cial transcripts will not be available until approximately four weeks after final exam inations . A transcript on which a degree is to be recorded will not be available until approximately eight weeks after final examinations . Requests should include the following : 1 . Student's full name (include given or other name if applicable). 2 . Student number . 3 . Birthdate. 4. The last term and campus the student attended. 5 . Whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordered near the end of a term . Whether the request should be held until a degree is recorded. 6 . Agency, college , or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included . Transcripts sent to students are labeled " issued to student." 7. Student's signature . (fhis is the stu dent's authorization to release the records to the designee.) There is no charge for individual official transcripts . Transcripts are prepared only at the student's request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript . Official transcripts require five to seven working days to be generated. Unofficial copies of transcripts sent to CU Denver from other insti tutions can be requested at the Records Office . Official transcripts should be requested directly from the issuing institution . Unofficial CU transcripts are available to students in the CU-Denver Records Office with the request made 48 hours prior to pickup . Students must present picture ID.

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26 / Gen e r a/Information Adding and Dropping Courses1 ADDING C OUR S E S Students may add courses to their origi nal registration during th e first 12 (8 in the summer ) days of full-term classes, pro vided there is space available . Instructor approval may be required after the first day / week of classes . DROPPING C O URSES 1 . Students may drop courses witho u t approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term). Tuition will not be charged for the courses which are dropped as long as the student is not withdrawing. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student's per manent record . 2. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer term) , the instructor ' s signa t ure is required and the instructor must indicate whether the student is passing or failing. If the student is passing , the course will appear on the s t udent's permanent record with the grade of W If the student is failing , t he course will appear on the permanent record with an F . 3. Dropping all courses requires an official University withdrawal form . Deadlines for modu l e courses and inten sive courses are published in the Schedul e of Classes each term . Withdrawal from the Universit y To withdraw from the University , stu dents must obtain approval from their academic dean ' s office, the Bursar ' s Office, and the Records Office. The with drawal date is recorded on the student's permanent record page . If the withdrawal date is prior to the 13th day of the semester (9th day of t h e summer term), the courses will not appear on the stu dent's permanent record.lf the with drawal date is after the 12th day , the courses will appear with W grades. Stu dents may not withdraw after the lOth week of the semester (7th week of the summer term ) except under documented circumstances clear l y beyond their control. Students who are receiving veteran's b enefits or financial aid a l so must obtain the required signature of those respective ' F o r the ex act dat es , ch ec k th e Sche dul e o f Clas ses ! o r the appropriat e t e rm . offices . lnternational students must obtain clearance from the Office of International Students . A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the Uni versity will receive grades ofF for all course work enrolled for during that term . To withdraw from the University, gradu ate students must apply to the dean of their Graduate Program for permission to withdraw in good standing. Students who withdraw without communicating with the dean and without filing the appropri ate Withdrawal Form will be marked as having failed their courses for the term. Deadlines for module courses and inten sive courses, as well as specific require: ments and tuition adjustment, appear in the Schedule of Classes published prior to the beginning of each term. Ori ginality o f Work I n all academic areas it is imperative that either work be original or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons ' ideas or language. Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field . Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to perma nent compulsory withdrawal from the University . Family Educationa l Rights and P rivac y Act Periodically , but not less than annually, the University of Colorado informs stu dents of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act , with which the institution intends to comply fully. The Act was designed to protect the privacy of educa tional records , to establish the right of students to inspect and review their edu cational records , and to provide guide lines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the rig h t to file complaints with the Family Educa tional Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act. Local policy explains in detail the proce dures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the Act. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on each of the several campuses of the University of Colorado. The following items of student informa tion have been designated by the Univer sity of Colorado as public or directory information : student name, address, te lephone number , dates of attendance, regis tration status , class, major field of study, awar d s, honors , deg r ee(s) con f erred, pas t and present participation in officially rec ognized sports and activities, p h ysical f ac tors (height, weight) of athletes, date and place o f birth. This i n formation may be disclosed by the University for any pur pose at its discretion. Currently enrolled students may with hold disclosure o f i nformation under t h e Fami l y Educational Rights and Privacy Act. To withhol d d i sclosure , written notifi cation must be received in the Records Office on the appropriate camp u s prior t o the end of the drop/add period in the term. Forms requesting the withholding of directo r y information are availab l e in the Records Office . The request to withhold disclosure will remai n in effect until the student provides written notification to the Records Office. The University of Colorado assumes that when a student fails to reques t t o have directory information withheld , the stu dent is indicating approval for d isclosure of inf ormation for that term an d following terms until otherwise requested. Questions concerning the Family Edu cational Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Records Office, 556-2389. University of Colorado at Denver Confidentiality of Academic Records STIJDENTS: DO have the right to view and inspect their educational records (excluding any financial records of t heir parents). DO have the righ t to have Directory Infor mation withheld f r om all persons or organizations outside the University . Direc tory Information includes : a d dress, telepho n e number date and place of b irth dates of attendance, registration statu s, class, major fiel d of study awards, honors, d egree(s) conferred past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities physical characteristics (height , weight) of athletes DO NOT have the right to obtain their grades, or other information not consid ered D i rectory I nformation, by telephone.

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PARENTS: DO have the right to obtain the educa tional records of their child only if they provide a signed statement that their son or daughter is a dependent as defined by the U.S.Internal Revenue Service. The Records Office , in NC 1003, 556-2389, has forms available to parents for such requests. Parents are, however , encour aged to obtain final grades with a written approval from the student. UNIVERSilY OF COLORADO PERSONNEL: DO have the right to use educational records of students in the normal exercise of their duties . DO NOT have the right to use educational records of students for employment purposes, for social organizations, for personal reasons , or for other non educational interests , without written consent of the student. PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSilY OF COLORADO: DO have the right to obtain the Directory Information listed above, unless the stu dent has made a request for nondisclo sure. When the term microfiche , or the computer terminal on-line file of the Student Information System indicates PRJVATE, inquirers will be told that no information can be released without the student's written consent. PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING FINANCIAL AID TO STIJDENTS: DO have the right to educational records of students only as necessary in determin ing and enforcing terms of financial aid . PERSONS IN AN EMERGENCY: DO have the right to obtain confidential academic records necessary to protect the health or safety of students and oth ers , but such information will only be released by the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services , 556-8427 . These regulations are required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (the Buckley Amendment). For fur ther information, please call the Records Office at (303) 556-2389. Student records will be released only to the student with current , appropriate identification or upon written authoriza tion of the student whose records are being requested . SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES Alumni Association The CU-Denver Alumni Association pro vides programs and services which stimu late interest in, increases support for , and builds life-long commitment to the Univer sity of Colorado at Denver among its alumni , students, and the community . Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon graduation . Friends and non-degree form e r students are also welcome to participate . The gov erning board is comprised of alumni representing all schools and colleges on campus . Horizons , a newspaper published three times a year, is mailed to members of the association. Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and /or activities which might interest them. The Alumni Mack Easton Award , the Alumni Recognition Award, and the Alumni Legislative Award are bestowed each year at commencement and are sponsored by the Association. A program of alumni use of the campus recreation center and parking lots is also available through the Association. Aura ria Book Center Student Union: ground level , 556-3230 Hours: M-Th 8 6 , F 8-5, Sat. 10-3 except vacation and interim periods . The Auraria Book Center carries aca demic , technical , reference , and exam preparation books in support of your higher education . Best sellers, new releases , and gift book seJections change frequently and are often accompanied by displays of special value books in many subjects . For additional savings on general reading books, join theAuraria Book Club at the Book Information desk . Special orders and out of print searche s are avail able at no charge. Students : Bring your course printouts to locate textbooks! Subjects are arranged alphabetically ; departmental abbrevia tions , course and section numbers are printed on a shelf tag below each required or optional textbook. When available , used textbooks sell for 75 percent of the new book price. A full refund is given for new and used books accompanied by your receipt and returned within the first three weeks of class for regular semesters and during the first week of class for short terms . Please read the refund policy attached to your rec eipt! Macintosh , IBM, Zenith , and NeXT per sonal computer systems and a variety of Special Prog ram s and Fac ilities I 27 software are offered to Auraria campus students at educational discount prices . A current, validated Auraria ID must be presented at the time of purchase . Round ing out the educational supply/campus life areas are insignia sportswear , gifts and cards, and supplies for school, office , art and design . The Convenience Store is located near the main store in the Student Union lower mall and has extended hours for those wishing to buy snacks , magazines, sun dries and school supplies . Used texts are bought back from students throughout the year , and merchandise refunds and exchanges also are performed here. Auraria Reprographics offers full-serv ice copying in the Convenience Store, M-Th 7:30 a .m .-6 p .m . and F 7:30a.m . 5 p.m . Special papers , color copying, transparencies , reductions and enlarge ments , lamination and other options may be specified for jobs of all sizes . Worldwide FAX service and shipping of packages by UPS and Federal Express also are available . A current picture ID is required for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard, VISA, and Ameri can Express charges . Computing Services Computing , Information and Network Services supports computer and network use for both the academic and administra tive communities at CU-Denver . All cen tralized administrative systems are developed , maintained , and processed by University Management Systems in Boulder with output processing and user sup port provided by Computing, Information and Network Services in Denver . Denver campus administrative applications are developed , maintained , and processed by Computing Services . Most academic pro cessing is either done on campus or through one of several networks available through Computing Services . The Denver campus maintains a VAX 8800 under VMS, and a 10processor Sequent Symmetry under UNIX. A commu nications network allows access to all campus minicomputers and connection to CARL (Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries) on-line library services . The VMS and UNIX computers are connected to an Ethernet backbone and are nodes on the growing Colorado SuperNet which provides access to other Colorado universities and colleges , as well as the West net regional network , Bitnet and the Internet for national and international communications . There are over 1 , 400

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28 / Genera/Information personal computers located on the cam pus in ten teaching laboratories, three public labs , individual laborat ories , and in offices . Computing, Information and Network Services staff provide assistance to aca demic and administrative users on all available computing systems. Advisors and a full-time academic user services staff assist students a nd faculty with ques tions regarding software packages, pro gramming , the use of computer systems , and software availability . Administrative users are assisted with planning, systems design, programming, and day-to-day computing activities by Computing, Infor mation and Network Services user serv ices and operations personnel. The Computing, Information and Network Services staff operates and maintains campus minicomputers, telecommunica tions equipment, and public laboratories . This staff also maintains personal comput ers and is available to assist faculty and staff with hardware and software planning , acquisitions , questions, and problems. The goal of Computing, Information and Network Services is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effect ive tool in their work. For further information and an informative booklet about computing at CU-Denver , please call556-2583 . Division of Extended Studies The Division of Extended Studies offers a wide variety of programs for individuals interested in continuing their personal and professional education. These pro grams include courses for academic credit , noncredit , and certificate courses for professional development and per sonal enrichment . Extended Studies credit courses supple ment the University's general course offer ings and include weekend and evening options . Credit received for these courses appears on a CU-Denver transcript and can be applied toward degree programs. Tuition is charged separately from that for courses in the regular program . Noncredit courses explore a wide array of top ics including : personal and professional development, test preparation , foreign langua ges, computers, fine arts, writing and literature, and recreation. Extended Studies offers University resources to employees in business, industry, governmental agencies, and professional organizations . A blend of edu cation and training is provided in a variety of program areas, bo t h credit and non credit, through customized training, targeted short courses , seminars and workshops. Individuals interested in obtaining a copy of the Division of Extended Studies Bulletin or other information are invited to call Extended Studies at 556-2735 . University of Colorado Foundation, Inc. The University of Colorado Foundation, Inc . was established in 1967 by the Board of Regents to solicit, receive and adminis ter gifts from private sources.ln 1981 the CU Foundation established a Denver cam pus office . The chief goal of the University of Colo rado Foundation is to promote the general welfare , development , growth and well being of the University of Colorado . The University ' s academic leadership establishes priorities for private support. The Foundation then raises and manages private funds in support of CU's missions in teach ing , research, and public service. Professional fundraisers generate interest and enthusiasm for the U niversity , recruit and organize volunteers , solicit gifts, and assist donors in gift planning. International Education The University of Colorado at Denver through its Office of International Educa tion (OlE) provides a va r iety of interna tional-focused programs , educational opportunities and services for students, foreign scholars , faculty , staff, and the greater Denver community. The Office oversees student study abroad programs, provides foreign !!tudent advising and assists foreign students with cultural/ lifestyle concerns, expedites the exchange of students and faculty , hosts foreign visi tors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities , sponsors public lec tures , and advises graduate students and faculty concerning Fulbright scholarships . The goals of OlE are to raise interna tional awareness on the CU-Denver cam pus and , in particular , to provide an opportunity for students to gain the global competency needed in today ' s interdependent world . ACADEMIC PROGRAMS Each of the schools and colleges at CU Denver provides international opportuni ties for students. (Pleas e see individual school and college descriptions in this catalog . ) The International Affairs Pro gram in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is an interdisciplinary program open to all undergradu a tes . Students may pursue an Individually Structured Major, Minor or Certificate in International Affairs where they are given the maximum opportunity to design their own personal ized course of study in cooperation with an international affairs faculty advisor . See International Affairs under College of Lib eral Arts and Sciences in this catalog for further details or contact an advisor in the Office of International Education (OlE). The College of Business and Administra tion and the Graduate School of Business Administration offer a number of courses in various aspects of international busi ness . These courses can be taken on a selective basis . Alternatively, a set of courses can be taken to achieve an Area of Emphasis in International Business , either in connection with a bachelor ' s degree or in connection with an M .B.A. Available courses and requirements for Areas of Emphasis are described in this catalog under the College of Business/Graduate School of Business . For more information, students interested in international busi ness studies should contact an advisor in the College of Business or the Graduate School of Business . STUDY ABROAD OlE provides an information clearinghouse and advising center for students wishing to make foreign study a part of their college experience . OlE works with the schools and colleg es of CU-Denver in creating and facilitating new study abroad opportunities for students. CU-Denver stu dents are also eligible for a number of study abroad programs offered through the University of Colorado at Boulder. Some of the study abroad programs are of the traditional junior year abroad vari ety in which students are placed directly in foreign universities for an academic year . For students unable to spend an aca demi t year abroad, programs for a single semester or summer are available with various emphases . Special summer pro grams, e.g. , architecture study in Italy or Russian language study in Moscow, are organized with specific departments. Students are enrolled at the University of Colorado while participating in many of these study abroad programs . The appli cability of credit in particular depart ments and colleges of CU-Denver is up to the individual colleges and depart ments. A "B" average with the equivalent of two years of college level work in the appropriate language is required for many of the academic year programs . Financial aid can be applied to program costs in most cases .

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FOREIGN STUDENT INFORMATION SERVICES OlE realizes that the first few months in a new country and a new city are particu larly difficult for foreign students. We provide a friendly ear and a place to ask immigration and visa questions as well as questions about lifestyle , U . S . customs, classroom expectations , and other such concerns. OlE also provides a center for networking with other CU-Denver foreign students. FACULTY FOREIGN EXCHANGE PROGRAMS OlE develops programs designed to increase faculty foreign research opportunities. Current efforts include agreements with Moscow University , Charles Univer sity in Prague in the Czech and Slovak Republic; Humboldt University in Berlin , Germany; Monash University in Melbourne, Australia ; and Yunnan University in Kunming , China . GRADUATE STUDENT AND FACULTY FULBRIGHT INFORMATION OlE serves as the clearinghouse for information on the Fulbright graduate student fellowships and faculty visiting lectureships at foreign universities . CONFERENCES AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH SERVICES During the year, OlE sponsors a number of guest lectures , small conferences and special seminars focused on topics of current international interest. Most of these activities are open to the public as well as the CU-Denver community. OlE works closely with West High School, the Denver Public School System magnet school for International Studies . OlE is also an active participant in a number of Denver commu nity internat ional programs and events. More information about these and other programs is available from the Office of International Education, (303) 556-3489 . Auraria Student Services The Auraria Student Services Division offers the following : 1. Auraria Student Union-556-3185 The Student Union, located at 9th and Lawrence, houses a cafeteria, informa tion desk, Book Center , study lounges, gameroom, ticket service, housing refer ral service, offices for student government and organizations, convenience store, copy center, exhibit space, locker rentals , lost and found, meeting and conference facilities , and the Mission Bar and Grill. 2 . Conference Services-Student Union, Room 210, 556-2755 Through the Conference Services office, campus space can be reserved for all non-academic purposes. 3. Disability Services Office-177 Arts Building, 556-8387 This office provides the following aca demic support services to students who have physical, learning , or psychi atric / emotional disabilities: Taped textbooks Sign language and oral interpreters Notetakers Scribing Testing accommodation Sale of handicap parking permits Disability-related counseling Advocacy 4 . Career Resour ces Center-177 Arts Building, 556-3477 The Career Resources Center offers assistance to students and alumni in planning their careers and seeking employment through the provision of on-campus employer interviews , cur rent job vacancy listings , Campus Career Library, and a computerized career guidance system. The student employmen t office maintains a listing of part-time and temporary job openings for currently enrolled students. Addi tional services are offered in the same office by CU-Denver career counselors . 5. Aura ria Child Care Center-556-3188 The Auraria Child Care Center serves the child care needs of Auraria Campus students, staff and faculty by providing high quality early childhood education and care programs . The Child Care Cen ter is located on the southwest corner of the campus. Its programs are consis tently recognized by the educational community for their high quality early childhood care and education. Develop mentally appropriate practices for young children guide the educational programs that are provided . Curriculum planning is flexible and based on chil dren' s interests. Experiences are planned in accordance with "Key Experiences" adapted from the High / Scope Cognitively Oriented Curriculum . Supervising and assistant teachers in the Child Care Centers are all degreed teachers meeting the certification guidelines of the National Academy of Early Childhood programs. Children aged 18 months to six years are served at the Auraria Child Care Center. The Center also has a fully accredited kindergarten program . University Polic i es I 29 6 . Spring International Language CenterSt. Francis Center , 556-4255 This center offers intensive English lan guage instruction to foreign students. It is authorized by INS to issue l-20s in order for students to apply for F-1 visa status. In addition , SILC provides lan guage proficiency testing services on request for students hoping to enter CU-Denver , MSCD or CCD. SlLC classes are used for observation and research by individuals being trained on campus to become English as a Second Language teachers. SILC provides extensive support services to its students includ ing a host family program , housing information , counseling services , and social activities designed to make the foreign student feel at home in the United States. 7. Emmanuel / Library Galleries-556-8337 The Emmanuel and Library Galleries host exhibits of students, faculty and nationally known artists. Stop in for a relaxing break . 8 . Information Centers Students and visitors can find informa tion and directions at the Information Desk in the Student Union, and at the Visitor Information Centers at Lawrence Way and at the St. Francis Center . UNIVERSITY POLICIES Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity/Title IX The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to enhancing the diversity of its work force and its student body. Diver sity among faculty , staff, administrators , and students is essential to educational excellence and to accomplishing CU-Den ver's mission . Just as diversity in aca demic programs and scholarly perspectives enriches the University, so too does diversity among faculty , staff , administrators , and students. Diversity among faculty, staff , and administrators provides role models and mentors for stu dents, who will become future leaders in academe and in the larger society , and ensures that a broad array of experiences and world views will inform and shape teaching , research, service, and decision making at CU-Denver. As the only public university serving the Denver metropolitan area, CU-Denver recognizes, acknowledges, and accepts its central role in education to take explicit affirmative action to employ , retain , and advance in employment qualified applicants and employees , and to admit , retain , and advance qualified applicants and stu-

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30 / Genera/Information dents regardless of their race, color, reli gion , national origin , gender , age , disability, or veteran status. In employment and educational pro grams, CU-Denver does not discriminate and will not tolerate discrimination on the basis of race , gender , age , color , national origin , disability, or veteran status . CU-Denver has adopted an affirmative action plan to implement these commit ments . For information , contact the Office of Affirmative Action, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 700,556-2509. Om buds Office In any large organization, misunder standings and disagreements may occur. The Om buds Office helps to enhance the clarity and dissemination of information, to simplify decision making and communi cation, to assist with the process of change and with adjustment to change , and to improve understanding among staff , stu dents, faculty, and administrators . The Om buds Office provides informa tion about programs, policies, services, and procedures affecting members of the University community; makes referrals to appropriate state, CU system, and CU-Den ver resources; serves as consultant in the preparation and review of policies and procedures; and assists in the solution of problems and the resolution of disputes. Om buds Office services are informal, impartial , confidential, and independent of administrative authorities. These serv ices do not replace or circumvent existing channels, but help them work more effec tively. For further information or assis tance, contact the Om buds Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 850, 556-4493 . University Policy Regarding A Drug-Free Workplace The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing a drug-free work place and environment. The University prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distri bution , dispensation, possession, or use of any controlled substance in the work place. Those individ u als who are found to be in violation are engaged in serious mis conduct and subject t o disciplinary action consistent with the Faculty Handbook (1988), the applicable rules of the State Personnel System, the University ' s Unclas sified Staff Handbook, and the Student's Discipline and Review Procedures. Academic Honor Code and Discipline Policies Members of the Unive r sity of Colorado at Denver feel it is an historically estab lished rule of education that instructors have the authority to conduct classes, make assignments, requ i re examinations or other exercises, and make judgments about the academic performanc e of students. Maintaining the quality and high perfor mance of students makes it imperative that the academic work completed at the University be original and completed hon estly. It is the concern of every student and faculty member that such standards be maintained . A university ' s reputation depends on the highest standards of intel lectual honesty and ethical conduct. Academic disciplinary matters are con cerns to be addressed by schools or col leges, allowing each school/college to determine the severity and consequences of each infraction. Under the Laws of the Regents , Article IX 2 . B and Article VI.C, all matters of educational policy affecting the school or college including academic requirements for admission , for continu ance and for graduation shall be under the jurisdiction of each school or college. In addition , the college or school shall have jurisdiction over matters of academic ethics/academic dishonesty. Each college and school is required to maintain a standing committee to decide cases of academic dishonesty as defined in this document. Students and faculty are urged to understand what constitutes aca demic dishonesty in order to better support and maintain high standards of academic scholarship and conduct. FORMS OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY As members of the academic commu nity, students and faculty accept the responsibility to conduct themselves with integrity in a manner compatible with the University's function as an educational institution. Furthermore, all members of the academic community have a special responsibility to ensure that the Univer sity' s ethical standards are maintained . One of these standards is academic hon esty. Many students underestimate how strongly most faculty and peers feel about academic honesty . Aca d emic dishonesty is defined as a student's using unautho rized assistance with intent to deceive an instructor or such other person who may be assigned to evaluate t he student's work, in meeting course and degree requirements . Examples of academic dishonesty include , but are not limited to the following : A. Plagiarism Plagiarism is the use of distinctive ideas or words belonging to another person without providing adequate acknowledge ment of that person's contribution . Regardless of the means of appropriation, incorporating another's work into one's own requires adequate identification and acknowledgement. Plagiarism is doubly unethical because it deprives the true author of the rightful credit and gives that credit to someone who has not earned it. It is the theft of intellectual property. However , acknowledgement is not necessary when the material used is common knowl edge. When the source is not noted , the following would constitute plagiarism: 1. Word-for-word copying . 2 . The mosaic (to intersperse a few words of one's own here and there while, in essence, copying another's work). 3 . The paraphrase (the rewriting of others' work, yet still using their fundamental idea or theory). 4. Fabrication (inventing or counterfeiting sources). 5 . Ghost-written material (submitting another ' s effort as one's own). It is also plagiarism to neglect quotation marks on material that is otherwise acknowledged . B . Cheating Cheating involves intentionally possess ing, communicating, using (or attempting to use) materials , information, notes, study aides , cheat sheets, or other devices not authorized by the instructor in any academic exercise, or the commu nication with any other person during such an exercise. Examples : 1. Copying from another ' s paper or receiv ing unauthorized assistance from another during an academic exercise or in the submission of academic material. 2 . Using a calculator when the use has been specifically disallowed. 3 . Collaborating with another student or students during an academic exercise without the consent of the instructor. C Fabrication and Falsification This is the intentional and unauthorized alteration or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise. Examples: 1. Fabrication involves inventing or coun terfeiting information ; i.e., creating

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results not obtained, as in a laboratory experiment. 2 . Falsification involves altering results, deliberately changing information to suit one's needs. D . Multiple Submission This is the submission of substantial portions of either written or oral academic work which has previously earned credit when such submission is made without instructor authorization. E. Misuse of Academic Materials This is intentionally or knowingly destroying, stealing , or making inaccessi ble, library or other academic resource material. Examples : 1. Stealing or destroying library or reference materials or computer programs or files . 2. Stealing or destroying another student's notes or materials , or having in possession such materials without the owner's permission. 3 . Receiving assistance in locating or using sources of information in an assignment where such assistance has been forbidden by the instructor. 4. Illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations or answer keys to tests and examinations . 5 . Unauthorized alteration , forgery , or fal sification of official academic records. 6 . Unauthorized selling or purchasing of examinations, papers, or assignments. F Complicity in Academic Dishonesty This is intentionally or knowingly contributing to the academic dishonesty of another. These examples of academic dishonesty shall not be construed to be comprehensive and infractions will be dealt with on an individual basis. It is the obligation of each student to assist in the enforcement of academic standards; infractionswhether by students or faculty-should be first brought to the attention of the instructor. PROCEDURES IN CASES OF SUSPECTED ACADEMIC DISHONESTY Students concerned about academic dishonesty should contact their school or college for more specific information. Faculty and staff members or students may submit charges of academic dishonesty against students. A student who has evidence that another student is guilty of academic dishonesty should inform the instructor or the Dean of the appropriate college in writing of the charge. A faculty member who has evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty should confront the student with the evidence. In cases of academic dishonesty, the faculty member has the authority to reprimand the student appropriately, which could include the issuance of a failing grade (F) . In such case of issuance of failing grade for academic dishonesty, the faculty member shall submit a written report to the Dean of the appropriate college within five (5) working days. The report shall include, but is not limited to, the time, place, nature of offense(s), the name(s) of the accused, the accuser(s), witnesses (if any).lf the faculty member feels that his or her reprimand or action is an insufficient sanction for a particular case of academic dishonesty, the faculty member may recommend to the Dean of the appro priate college that further action be taken. If this signed report recommends further action , the Dean or a committee des ignated shall schedule a disciplinary hearing as soon as possible. The student has the right to be represented by legal counsel and to be present during the committee' s proceedings. Student(s) must notify the Dean of the appropriate college five (5) working days in advance of the hearing that he/she intends to have legal counsel present. The Dean or the committee designated may take any of the follow ing actions: 1. Take no further action against the accused student( s). 2 . Place student(s) on disciplinary probation for a specified period of time. The record of this would be kept in the committee' s confidential files and the student's academic file . 3 . Suspension of registration for a speci fied period of time. A record of this shall be kept in the committee's confidential file and a copy sent to the Registrar. 4 . Expulsion: no opportunity to return to the college in which the infraction occurred. A record of this shall be kept permanently in the committee's confi dential file and a copy sent to the Registrar. Notification to Student(s) In all cases, the student(s) should be notified of the hearing after seven working days, in writing of the Dean ' s or the designated committee' s decision. Interinstitutional Appeal Procedures Students who are taking courses at CU-Denver , but are enrolled at other educational institutions on the Auraria Unive rsity P olic i e s I 31 campus and are charged with dishonesty, are subject to the same procedures outlinedabove. Code of Student Conduct (Student Rights and Responsibilities and Procedures for Disciplinary Review and Action) STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR WHICH ACTION MAY BE TAKEN IF A VIOLATION OCCURS All persons on University property are required for reasonable cause to identify themselves when r equested by University or Auraria Public Safety officials a c ting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers , the University reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to University personnel or property and those who inter fere with its function as an educational institution . All persons on CUDenver / Auraria property who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applicable to Univer sity students and to abide by Univ e rsity policies and campus regulations . The behaviors outlined below will not be tolerated because they threate n the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the University and the personal rights and freedoms of its members. 1 . Intentional obstruction, disruption, or interference with t eaching, research, disciplinary procee dings , or other University acti v ities , i ncluding its public service and administrative fun c tions or authorized activiti e s on the C U-Den ver/ Auraria premises. 2 . Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, school officials , employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU-Den ver 1 Auraria campus. 3 . Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled b y the CU Denver / Auraria High e r Edu c ation Center or at functions sponsore d or supervised by the University , or conduct that threatens or endange rs the health or safety of any such person. 4 . Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms , which includes , but is not limited to, striking, laying hands upon, threatening with violence , or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure ; or other treatment of a tyrannical , abu sive , shameful, insulting , or humiliating

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32 / Genera/Information nature. (fhis includes, but is not lim ited to , demeaning behavior of an eth nic , sexist, or racist nature , unwanted sexual advances o r intimidations.) 5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU Denver/Auraria facilities , defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU-Den ver/ Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimen tal to the University. 6 . Forgery , fraud ( to include computer fraud), falsification, alteration, or use of University documents , records, or instruments of identi fication with intent to gain any unentitled advantage. 7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver / Auraria property and the private property of students, University officials, employ ees , and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denver / Auraria buildings or facili ties . This includes the possession of known stolen property. 8. Possession of firearms , explosives, or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings , or any other facilities of the CU-Den ver / Auraria campus . This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University , or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee . (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include , but are not limited to , firearms, explosives, BB guns , slingshots , martial arts devices, brass knuckles , Bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switchblades. A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm , explosive, or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly included within the meaning of the terms firearms , explo sive , or dangerous weapon.) 9 . Sale , distribution , use , possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds , buildings, or any other facilities of the CU Denver / Auraria campus . 10. Physical restriction, coercion , or harassment of any person ; significant theft ; sale / manufacture of illegal drugs (includes possession of a sufficient quantity with intent to sell) ; damage , theft, or unauthorized possession of University property ; or forgery , falsifi cation, alteration, or us e of University documents, records or instruments of identification to gain any unentitled advantage . UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS As a member of the University commu nity, you are held accountable not only for upholding civil and criminal laws, but U niversity standards as well. Enrollment does not confer either immunity or spe cial consideration with reference to civil and criminal laws . Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to chal lenge or postponement on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced , or are pending in civil or criminal court. In addition , the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a stu dent violates a standard and withdraws from the University before administrative action is final. USE OF UNIVERSITY/AURARIA PROPERTY OR FACILITIES Nothing in this Code of Conduct shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the voicing of concerns or grievances . The University is dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge through a free exchange of ideas , and this shall be a car dinal principle in the det ermination of whether or not a proposed use of Univer sity facilities is appropriate . The Auraria Higher Education Center has established campus regulations and procedures governing the use of CU-Den ver / Auraria grounds, buildings , and other facilities . Such regulations are designed to prevent interference with University func tions and activities . Except where other wise specifically authorized , or when members of the public are invited , the use of CU-Denver / Auraria facilities shall be limited to faculty, staff, and students of the CU-Denver / Auraria campus, and to organi zations having chapters , local groups, or other recognized Unive r sity connected representation among faculty , staff, or stu dents of the three academic institutions on the Auraria campus . CLASSROOM CONDUCT You are expected to conduct yourself appropriately in classroom situations . If disruptive behavior occurs in a class room , an instructor has the authority to ask you to leave the classroom. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist , the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Public Safety and /or the appropriate Dean ' s office. The appropriate Dean or his / her representative may with draw a student from a particular class for disruptive behavior, while the Student Dis cipline Committee may recommend to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services to suspend, perma nently expel , and /or permanently exclude the student from the campus. Appeal questions concerning disruptive behavior should be directed to the Academic Dean's office when withdrawal from a class is involved , and to the Director of Student Life when suspension or expul sion from the University is involved . NONACADEMIC DISCIPLINE POLICIES Violations of Standards of Conduct should be reported to the Director of Stu dent Life during working hours. Auraria Public Safety should be contacted during non-duty hours . If a violation occurs on campus and it is not in a specific building , Auraria Public Safety and/or the Director of Student Life should be contacted. If emergency help is needed when on campus , contact Auraria Public Safety and when off campus contact the Denver Police. Actions available to campus officials include, but are not limited to : asking those involved in inappropriate behavior to cease and desist; requesting offender(s) to leave the Auraria campus; denying or restricting use of facilities or services ; calling Auraria Public Safety for assistance; billing offender(s) for any physical damages ; pressing civil charges; and referring student(s) to the Director of Student Life. The chart that follows illus trates the overall structure involved . DISCIPLINE STRUCTURE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER (l)Violations observed may be resolved by any of the following: • University Departments such as: a. Admissions b. Student Union c . University / Auraria Public Safety d . Financial Aid e . Veterans Affairs • Faculty / Staff • Students • Non-University Members (2)If violation warrants further attention contact: • Director of Student Life a . If student(s) desires a review by the Director of Student Life. Academic dishonesty discipline falls under the jurisdiction of the individual colleges and schools . b . If violation warrants, possible suspension or expulsion • Student Discipline Committee

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(3)Final review (may request only in cases of suspension / expulsion). • Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services POLICIES AND PROCEDURES When one of the 10 Standards of Con duct listed in this code is violated , the student may be referred to the Director of Student Life. Any person may refer a student or student group suspected of violat ing this code to the Director of Student Life. Persons making such referrals will be asked to provide information pertinent to the case. The Director of Student Life will make a determination as to the seriousness of the case. This will be done in most situations by asking the student(s) involved in the case to come in for an administrative interview to determine what actions , if any , will be taken by the University . Students will be notified in writing of the results of such administra tive reviews . The Director of Student Life has the authority to : 1. Dismiss the case. 2. Take no further action other than talk ing with the accused student(s). 3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student's behavior has been inap propriate and any further violation of rules will result in stronger diSCiplinary action) . 4 . Place the student on disciplinary proba tion, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University . 5 . Refer cases to the Student Discipline Committee where the above sanctions are determined to be inadequate or the student(s) desires an appeal . 6 . Take other actions including but not limited to counseling , insuring the viola tor(s) provides compensation for theft or damage , and /or placing stops on registration . STUDENT DISCIPLINE COMMITIEE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Disciplinary proceedings shall be conducted. as proceedings and not as JUdtcwl proceedings. The Univer sity is not a part of the judicial branch of state government. The University has authority to promulgate and enforce inter nal rules of behavior that shall be adminis tered in a fair and impartial manner in harmony with its educational objectives and administrative nature. As part of the administrative nature of the committee ' s proceedings , fundamental rules of fair ness will be followed . Copies of these pro cedures are available in the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services. This committee, composed of students, faculty , and staff members, makes the decision whether students charged with violations of the student conduct code may continue to attend the University of Colorado at Denver . The Student Discipline Committee has the authority to : 1 . Dismiss the case. 2 . Take no action other than talking with the accused student. 3 . Issue a University warning (a statement that a student's behavior has been inap propriate and further violation of Uni versity rules will result in stronger disciplinary action). 4. Place the student on disciplinary proba tion , a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University . 5 . Recommend suspension of a student from the University for disciplinary rea sons. This suspension may be for various lengths of time ranging from one semester to an indefinite period of time; after the period of disciplinary suspen sio .n. has expired a student may apply in wntmg to have the notation on the student's record removed . 6 . Recommend expulsion of a student per manently from the University ; notation on the student' s record will be kept per manently . When a student is suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons an additional sanction may include being excluded from the Auraria campus. 7. Other sanctions including but not lim ited to counseling , insuring the viola tor(s) provides compensation for theft or damage , and /or placing stops on reg istration. Student(s) must be notified in writing of the disciplinary action taken within five (5) days. REVIEW PROCEDURES A student may request a review of the recommendation of suspension or expul sion by the Student Discipline Committee within seven (7) working days to the Asso ciate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services . Except in cases involv ing the exercise of the power of summary suspension (see below ), the sanctions of suspension or expulsion for disciplinary reasons shall be effective only after the administrative review by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Stu dent Services has been exhausted or waived . The Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services ' decision shall be in writing to the student(s) with a University Policies I 33 copy to the Student Discipline Commi ttee . Copies of review procedures may be obtained from the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services . SUMMARY SUSPENSION Summary suspension is a suspension from the University which begins immedi ately upon notice from the appropriate University official without a formal hear ing by the Student Discipline Committee. A hearing before the Student Discipline Committee is then scheduled as soon as possible (usually within seven calendar days) to determine the disposition of the Summary suspension may also mclude a physical exclusion from the campus if deemed necessary. The Chancellor and/or a Vice Chancel lor have the authority to suspend sum marily any student when in their opinions such suspension is necessary to : 1. Maintain order on the campus. 2 . Preserve the orderly functioning of the University . 3 . Stop interference in any manner with the public or private rights of citizens on CU-Denver / Auraria owned or con trolled property. 4. Stop actions that are threatening to the health or safety of any person. 5 . Stop actions that are destroying or damaging property of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus, its students, faculty, staff, or guests . PERMANENT RECORD NOTATIONS While disciplinary proceedings are pending or contemplated , a temporary hold will be placed on the student's aca demic record. It will not be released until all actions and appeal procedures have been completed or finalized by the Univer sity . Only in those cases where suspen sion , deferred suspension, or permanent expulsion results from disciplinary action will notations be placed on the academic record. RELEASE OF DISCIPLINARY INFORMATION Access to any student's academic transcript or disciplinary file shall be gov erned by provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Only the student charged or those University officials who have a legitimate educational interest in disciplinary infor mation may have access to the files . All other inquiries including, but not limited to , employers, governmental agencies , news media, friends , or Denver Police

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34 / Genera/Info r matio n m ust have a writt e n rel ease from t h e stu dent to gain access to University disci plinary files . Every effort will be made by the Univer si t y to respect the privacy of the stu dent . However , where the identity of the stu dent has been publicl y disclosed in the news media , the University reserves the right to respond as it deems appropriate to describe fairly and accurately the dis position of disciplinary matters . REFUND POLI C Y AFTER DISCIPLINARY ACTION Submission of registration materials obligates the student to pay the assessed tuition and fees for that term . If a student is suspended or expelled from the Univer sity , the amount of tu i tion / fees which would be refunded wou l d be the same as when a student volu n tarily withdraws from a term . See the General Information section of this catalog or the Schedule of Classes for more information . The official withdrawal date applicable for tuition / fee refund purposes will be the date of the Student Discipline Committee ' s decision. In the event that circumstances are such that the accused studen t h as reg istered for a subsequent term before the final decision is made, that student does so at his / her own risk and may be liable for payment of tuitio n and fees for both terms . The Committee will make the deci sion as to when official suspension or expulsion begins . Failure to make the required payment will result in t h e f ollow ing action : students will become i n eligible for all University services ; no gra d es will be issued for courses in progress ; no tran scripts , diplomas , certification , or regis tration materials will be issued for the student until the bill is paid in f ull; a l ate payment charged in addition to the inter est on the unpaid balance will be assessed . TRII NSTIT U TIONAL VIOLATIONS Procedures in deciding violations of the Code of Student Conduct involving stu dents from other academic instit u tions on the Auraria campus have been developed by CU-Denver and the institution(s) involved. In such cases , the Director of Student Life should be contacted . Responsibilities of Computing Services Users Access to CU-Den ver computing sys tems , and use of CU-Denver comp u ting r e sources , is a privilege granted to mem bers of the CU-Denver community for sch o l arly , research, and administrative p ur poses . Those who use computing services on the CU-Denver campus are expected to do so in an e f fective , efficient , ethical , and lega l manner . As a condition of using computer resources on the CU-Denver campus , users are expected to respect the intellec tua l effort and creativity of others , to respect the privacy of other users , to res p ect the integrity of the compu ter systems and other us e rs ' data, and to use computer resources in an efficient and productive manner . It is the responsibility of all users to respect copyright protection of licensed computer software . Use r s do not have t he right to copy licensed software programs or d ocumentation without the specific permission of the copyr i ght holde r , or to use u nauthorized copies of licensed soft ware . Unauthorized use , duplication , or d i s t ribution of computer software is a vio lation of University policy and federal law. CU-Denver i s connected to o t her univer sities and organizations through Bitnet an d the Internet. Use of these networks is a privilege granted to all CU-Denver computer use r s. The networks must be u tilized in an ethical and l ega l manner . Sexual Harassment The University of Colorado at Denve r is a collegial academic comm unit y whose mission requires an open learning and working environment for students, faculty, staff , and administrators . An open learn i ng and working environment values and protects individual dignity and the int egrity of human relationships . CU Denver ' s educational process is based u p on mutua l t r ust, freedom of inquiry , freedom of expression, and the absence of intimidation and exploitation . As a p l ace of work and study, CU-Denver must be free of inap p ropriate and disrespectful conduct and communi c ation of a sexual nature , of sexua l harassment, and of all forms of sexual intimidation and exploita t ion . Such behavior is reprehensible because it su b verts the mission of CU Denver , poisons the environment , and threatens the careers , e ducational experiences , and well-being of students , f aculty , staff, and administrators . It i s a viola t ion of CU-Denver ' s Sexual H arassment Policy for anyone who is author i zed to recommend or take action affecting facu lty, staff , students , or admin istrators to make any unwelcome sexual a d vances , to req u est sexua l favors, or to engage in any other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission to such conduct is made e ither explicitly or implici tl y a term or condition of an individual's employment or s t atus in a course , program , or activity ; or (2) sub mission t o or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for employment or education a l decisions affecting that indi vid ual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interferi n g with an individual ' s work performance or edu catio nal experience, or creates an intimi dating , hostile , or offensive environment for working or learning. For further information , contact the Sexual H arassme n t Officer, CUDenver Bldg., R oom 850, 556-4493 . STUDENT SERVICES Associat e Vice Chance llo r for EnroUment and Stud ent Se rvices : Shelia H ood Student Life Students at CU-Denver re.flect the diver sity of its environment: many are older than those considered to be traditional college students; have employme n t and family responsibilities in addition to their acad emic progra ms; include s ub s t antial numbers of minorities , women , and singl e parents ; and are most often enrolled part time . To meet the nee d s of this diverse stu de n t population, CU-Denver provides stud ent life programs and activit i es designed to complement students' aca demic programs and to enhance their tota l educational experience . Students are provided opportunities to develop, experience , and participate in student government , social, cultural, intellectual , and recreational programs . Student life programs create an environment in which students are: • Assisted in developing leadership t hrough opportunities to practice deci s i on making, management an d market ing , interpersonal and group communication, and relations hip skills. • Encouraged and aided in deve l oping social, cultura l , intellectual , recreation and governance programs that expand invo l vement with the camp u s commu nity and society and lead to mature appreciation of these pursuits . • Encouraged to explore self-directed activities that p rovide opportu nities for personal growt h in individ ual and group settings . • Exposed to various cultures and experi ences , ideas and issues , art and musical forms, an d sty l es of life .

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• Informed about institutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities . • Aided in the awareness and utilization of campus facilities and other resources . • Assisted in developing community spirit through creative interaction among staff , faculty , students, and mem bers of the local community . Students are encouraged to involve their families in campus events and activities. Programs and services provided by the Associated Students of CU-Denver , the Division of Enrollment and Student Serv ices of CU-Denver , and the Aura ria Student Assistance Center Division contribute to the fulfillment of this philosophy. Clubs and Organizations ACM Computing Club ACS Student Advisory Council American Institute of Architecture Students American Planning Association American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Landscape Architecture American Society of Mechanical Engineers Anthropology Club Association of Black Students Auraria Transnational Student Association Beta Alpha Omega ( Counseling/ Education) Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Honor Society) Chi Epsilon Equiponderance Pre-Law Club . Golden Key National Honor Soc1ety Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Master of Social Sciences Club M.E. C . H .A. National Society of Black Engineers Native American Student Organization Phi Alpha Theta (History) Phi Chi Theta (Business) Philosophy Club Pi Tau Sigma Psi Chi (Psychology ) Russian Culture & Language Club Sigma Tau Delta (English) Sis Journal Society of Accounting Students Society of Women Engineers ,, .Student Association of Musi c ians Tau Beta Phi (Engineering) Vietnamese Student Organization Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) The Associated Students of the Univer sity of Colorado at Denver (ASCU-Denver) serves as a voice for students and pro vides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal Uni versity structure. ASCU-Denver ass . ists students with information concermng student clubs and organizations , campus events , issues concerning student status and other information of interest to students in general. ASCU-Denver also pro vides students with assistance with grievances and with the opportunity to become more closely involved with the University community through active par ticipation in student or through service on University , tn-mstitu tional and AHEC committees. More infor concerning services and activities can be obtained in the Student Govern ment Offices, Student Union , Room 340, 556-2510. Student Legal Services Student legal services are available to assist students with off-campus legal problems through the provision of legal advice, litigation preparation, interpretation, and assistance in negotia tion. The service will not represent students in court. This student fee funded program is provided free of charge to CU Denver students; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred such as copying , typing , etc. Contact the for further details at 620-4828 , CU Admm istration Building , Suite 130. The Advocate The purpose of the student newspaper is to provide students with information about campus issues and events . The newspaper strives to include good inves tigative reporting , feature articles , and items of general interest to its campus . readership . In addition , the newspaper IS a tool to encourage and develop writers , journalists , artists , and other student members of its general management and production staff. The office is in the Student Union , Room 153, 556-8321. Office of Student Life The Office of Student Life is the advis ing , coordinating , resource , and general information center for student clubs and organizations , student government Student Services I 35 (ASCUD), student programs, and .the aca demic honor societies . Student L1fe coor dinates new student orientation programs. The office is responsible for the administration of the student fee budget and monitors all student fee expenditures to assure compliance with CU-Denver and the state of Colorado regulations and pro cedures. The Director of Student Life represents the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional , and AHEC committees and maintains effective lines of communication with MSC, CCD, and AHEC. The director administers the student conduct and discipline procedure as described in the Code of Student Conduct . The Office of Student Life is located in the Student Union , Room 255, 556-3399 . Office of Veterans Affairs The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veteran and dependent students Denver utilizing Veterans Admm1strat10n educational benefits . This office assists students with filling out VA paperwork and in solving problems associated with receiving VA-rela ted benefits . . . . The OVA maintains proper cert1hcat10n for eligible students to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements for attendance, course load and content , and other regulations necessary to receive educational benefits payments . In addition , the OVA provides VA Voca tional Rehabilitation referrals, and infor mation on VA tutorial assistance, and VA work /study positions for qualified veter ans . For further information, contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 556-2630, CU Administration Building, Suite 130. Student Counseling, Testing, and Career Services Phone: Counseling: 556-2815 Testing: 556-2861 Career: 556-3477 Office: Counseling: NC2013 Testing: NC 2204 Career: Arts 177 Student Counseling, Testing, and Career Services provides a variety of support pro grams and services to CU-Denver students. Our mission is to help students grow in self understanding , to help make their college years a satisfying and pro ductive experience , and to facilitate mean ingful preparation for future goals . Our offerings include the following :

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36 / Genera/Information Counseling Servi ces. Students may obtain short term personal counseling provided by professional staff. We also ' will assist students and others in locating appropriate counseling/mental health services in the community . The office also sponsors professionally facilitated coun seling groups . For more information, call 556-2815. The office is located in NC 2013. Programs and Workshops. The office sponsors a variety of FREE or low-cost programs and workshops on a variety of topics such as assertiveness training, stress management , college survival skills, drug and alcohol awareness, etc . Also offered is PREP (Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program), an intensive communications workshop for couples . These programs are open to the entire CU-Denver community . Call556-2815. Career Development Services . The office provides individual career counseling, career development and employment workshops , and career testing to CU Denver students and alumni. Career tests offered include the Strong Interest Inven tory, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator , and The Values Scale . The office also sponsors a variety of career placement services, including on-campus interviewing , and an extensive career r esource library. For more information on career services , call 556-3477 . The office is located in Arts 177. Women :S Programs and Services . Offer ings in this area include: advocacy , programs such as Self Defense for Women, and Dealing with Sexual Harassment; scholarship offerings; and referral/ resource information. Call556-2815. ReEntry Program. The Center offers an intensive one-day program each semester which is geared to assisting the returning adult student as he o r she makes the tran sition to university life. Call556-2815 . Student Employment Experience Program. This program provides basic employment traini ng for all new college work-study student employees . For more information, call556-2815. Testing Services . The Testing Center provides testing for all levels of postsec ondary education , and professional certi fication. Tests offered include : ACT American College Test CAT California Achievement Test GRE Graduate Record Examination GMAT Graduate Management Admissions Test GSFLT Graduate School Foreign Language Test MAT Miller Analogy Test MCAT Medical College Admission Test TOEFL Test of English as a Foreign Language CLEP College Level Examination Program For further information on Testing Serv ices, call556-2861 . The office is located inNC 2204. Office of Student Retention Services The Office of Student Retention Services offers an array of services and programs designed to foster cultural diversity within the CU-Denver student body, help stu dents adjust to the social and intellectual environment of the campus, and provide the academic support students need to succeed in their studies and derive maxi mum benefit from their college experi ence. Outreach and retention services are provided by professional staff in four centers. These include the Center for First Year Students , Center for Learning Assis tance , Center for Educational Opportunity and Cultural Diversity, and the Cehter for Pre-Collegiate Development. The Office of Student Retention Services is located in NC 2012, 556-2324 . CENTER FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS The Center for First-Year Students offers individualized support services to help freshman students adjust to college life and succeed in their college studies . Per sonal advisors in the Center provide orien tation to the campus and its programs, assist students in interpreting academic policies and requirements , assist in the selection of classes and academic pnr grams commensurate with students' educational and career interests, refer students to other campus resources, and provide advocacy , if necessary . The Center is located in NC 2012, 556-2546 . CENTER FOR EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY The Center for Educational Opportunity and Cultural Diversity provides access and educational opportunities to ethnic minority students through services con ducive to the student's retention and grad uation . The Center houses four distinct programs, each of which provides aca demic advising , scholarship information , cultural programs , advocacy , and other support services tailored to the specific needs of their students . The Center is located in NC 2012, 556-2324. American Indian Student Services Program Asian American Student Services Program Black Student Services Program Hispanic Student Services Program CENTER FOR PRE-COLLEGIATE DEVELOPMENT Programs offered by the Center serve to motivate minority high school students to pursue post-secondary education and provide them the academic skills needed to be successful in their college endeav ors. The Center is located in NC 2014, 556-2322 . Pre-Collegiate Development Program. This program enables students in grades 9 through 12 to engage in a wide range of university activities throughout the academic year and during a full-time, five week summer program . The academic year component offers monthly study skills and career orientation workshops, advising , tutoring, and a variety of cultural enrichment experiences. The five-week summer session for students in the 9th through 11th grades consists of acceler ated classes for which students receive elective high school credit, career orienta tion, and engage in cultural activities . CU-Denver Minority Scholars Program. The MSP is an early college enrollment program for college bound, high achieving minority students who are enrolled in their junior year of high school. The pro gram enables students to begin their col lege studies by taking one course at CU Denver during the fall term during their senior year in high school. The credit earned in the course can be applied toward a bachelor ' s degree. While enrolled in the program, students partici pate in monthly workshops designed to acclimate them to the University and prepare them for college study. CENTER FOR LEARNING ASSISTANCE The Center for Learning Assistance is designed to promote student success in the academic setting . Services are avail able to all CU-Denver students. The Center's services include tutoring, work shops, academic and institutional credit courses , consulting , and a minority resource library . First-generation college students may be eligible for more inten sive services through the Student Suppor1 Services component of the Center. The Center is located in NC 2006, 556-2802. Tutoring. Free tutoring is available in many subject areas (some limitations apply). Scheduled sessions are held on weekdays / evenings . Scheduled and

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open lab (walk-in ) tutoring are available at established times throughout each term (M-R, 8 am-9 pm . & F , 8 am-5 pm and M-R, 9 am-7 pm &F , 9 am-5 pm respectively) . Workshops . Study skills workshops are provided on such topics as test-taking, memory and study techniques , notetak ing , listening and time management . Consulting . Academic , financial aid, and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy is available to students eligible for the Student Support Services Program . Library. The Center maintains a small periodical and book collection authored by, and/or about , minorities ; these resources are available for student research and leisure . Courses. Courses are offered in a small group format in the areas of college sur vival skills, computer word processing , English as a second language, and prob lem solving. ENGL 1006-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languages. This course is designed for ESL students who need to improve their reading and vocabulary skills . Stu dents will increase their reading ability through vocabulary building, work attack strategies, and reading analysis . ENGL 1007-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. This is the first course in the ESL composition sequence. Writing begins with sentence-level devel opment and continues with the develop ment of paragraphs based on western rhetorical patterns. Grammar appropriate to students ' needs will be incorporated into the class. ENGL 1008-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. Continued work on grammar, syntax , and the mechanics of writing. Writing begins with paragraphs and moves into essay writing. Prereq : ENGL 1007 or coordinator's approval . ENGL 1009-3. Advanced FSL Writing Sldlls. This is the third course in the ESL composition sequence . Emphasis is placed on more complex grammatical problems and on the development of longer compositions . Prereq : ENGL 1008 or CMMU 1420 or coordinator's approval. STSK 0705-1. Problem Solving. This course is designed to improve investiga tive and problem solving skills . Scientific theory, empirical methodology, and research methods will be utilized . lndir.id ual topics of investigation will be assigned . STSK 0707-1. College Survival Skills. This course is designed to promote success in the academic setting . Topics covered will include university resources, conquering the university system , listening and note taking , study and memory techniques , test-taking skills , time management , library research strategies, and word processing. STSK 0708-1. Introduction to Word Pro cessing. This course will thoroughly famil iarize the student with an easy-to-use word processing program that will assist in the process of writing text revision and rearrangement , and the production of " letter-perfect " documents . (The word processing program used will be one that is available in the open studentuse computer lab areas.) STSK 0800-1. Advanced FSL Grammar/ Composition. This class meets for two hours a week. It is designed for students who do not feel competent with their English composition skills. This class is highly individualized in order to focus on those grammar and writing structures that pose particular problems for ESL students. STSK 0801-1. Communication Skills for FSL Students. This course meets twice a week to improve the oral communication skills of students whose first language is not English. Skills include use of idiomatic English , cross-cultural awareness , cross cultural problems in communications , and pronunciation. STSK 0802-l.lmproving Academic Reading Sldlls for FSL Students. This class meets twice a week. The aim of the class is to improve the student's ability to read academic texts. Skills practiced include skimming/scanning , reading for the main idea , and critical reading. STSK 0806-1. Study Skills for FSL Stu dents. This class is designed for ESL stu dents to improve those skills needed for effective participation in the college class room . Emphasis will be on academic read ing and writing skills , as well as on notetaking skills . STSK 0810-3. Topics. Special topics in study skills to be selected by instructor . STSK 0820-1. Social Science Partnership for FSL. This class is designed to provide a basic understanding of American culture and its underlying values. Students will develop critical thinking skills as well as have opportunities for additional practice in reading and writing skills to include vocabulary in social science areas (i.e . , sociology , history, political science, economics, psychology). CENTER FOR INTERNSHIPS AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION Director: Janet Michalski Assistant Director and Coordinator, Engineering: Diane Berkley Internships and Cooperative Education I 37 Coordinator, liberal Arts and Sciences: Cherrie Grove Coordinator, Business and Administration: Wayne Sundell Senior Secretary: Charlene Michael Office: 1047 Ninth Street Historic Park Telephone: 556-2892 The Center for Internships and Cooper ative Education , established at CU-Denver in 1973, provides students with an oppor tunity to supplement their academic classroom learning with on-the-job work experiences , internships , or community service opportunities related to their academic studies . Students are placed either as paid co-op trainees or as interns for academic credit with corporations, businesses , or government agencies in the Denver metropolitan area as well as out of state. Short-term community serv ice experiences also are available for stu dents enrolled in courses requiring some community service . Faculty coordinators from each of the University's colleges and schools act as liaisons between the Center and the aca demic departments . The Center currently places some 500 students each year with some 250 participating employers . Over 30 percent of all students placed are grad uate students. Cooperative Education Cooperative education is an educa tional method which combines classroom study with paid , career related , off-cam pus work . The purpose is to give students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to real world sit uations, and to bring that experience back to the classroom as a learning tool. Cooperative education offers students paid long-term positions (two or more semesters). Students alternate semesters of full-time work with semesters of fulltime school , or work part time year round . Co-op experiences may be eligible for academic credit , and many positions lead to permanent career positions upon graduation . Internships Internships offer students short-term positions (one semester) and they are often nonpaid. Internships are always done for academic credit and are popular with students who like to explore a variety of careers . Many students complete two, three, or even four internships before graduation . Internships , like co-op jobs ,

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38 / Genera/Information are related to the student's academic studies and /or career goa ls . CU-SERVES/Service learning CU-Denver's new community service/ service learning program, CU-SERVES, was established in 1991 to develop community service opportunities for any CU-Denver course that incorporates a community service option or require ment. CU-SERVES also sponsors 2-3 serv ice days throughout the year which attract 100+ CU-Denver students, faculty , staff and alumni who join together to provide volunteer service to Denver ' s needy communities . Student Eligibilit y To qualify for placement in a co-op or internship position students must be enrolled at least half time in any CU-Den ver college or school, have completed their freshman year , have maintained a grade-point average of 2 . 5 or higher, and have completed at least 12 hours in residence (6 hours for graduate students). Some employers have additional require ments , i.e., U . S . citizenship , willingness to trav el, and specific course work. Participation in any CU-SERVES service day is open to all students. Participation in a service learning placement requires enrollment in a course with a service option or requirement. Academic Credit for Work Experience Undergraduate students placed by the Center in paid or non-paid positions, as well as students who have obtained their own positions, can apply to earn aca demic credit through courses in the Col lege of Liberal Arts and Sciences , and the College of Engineering and Applied Sci ence . Graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, School of Edu cation , Graduate School of Public Affairs, and School of Architecture and Planning can earn internship , ex periential learning, field study, or practicum credit through courses established for this purpose. Why Students Participate • Students recognize the value of combin ing theory with practice and find greater relevance in their studies. • Work experience allows students to test classroom teaching in the laboratory of the real world . • The program teaches students valuable job-search skills such as resume writing and interviewing techniques . • Co-op positions provide a means of financial assistance that is available to all students, regardless of family income levels or other financial aid arrangements , and does not leave stu dents burdened with educational debts. • The inclusion of a work component and the contribution from co-op earnings are major factors in encouraging first generation college students to pursue a college degree . Why Employers Participate • Students are an excellent resource for special projects and peak loads or busy seasons. • The employer can assess an individual's potential for employment after grad uation , thus saving entry-level recruitingcosts. • Student workers can increase produc tivity of full-time professional staff. • Students are highly motivated , produc tive, and dependable workers . • Students bring knowledge about the latest academic research to their employers . • As verified by many studies , co-op student interns subsequently become full-time employees with far lower turnover rates and better promotion potential than the average entry level professional . Facts About Cooperative Education • Cooperative education programs have been established in over 80 percent of the Fortune 500 corporations . All of the top 10 Fortune 500 companies are involved in cooperative education . • The last three presidents of General Motors at one time were cooperative education students. • Cooperative education has been conducted successfully in the U.S. since 1906. • Over 1 , 000 colleges and universities currently have cooperative education programs. • An estimated 200, 000 college students are enrolled in cooperative education and gross annual earnings are calcu lated to be in excess of $200,000,000 . Typical Participating Employers Employers who recruit CU-Denver stu dents for cooperative education positions include : Amoco Production Company Bloomsbury Review City of Denver , Mayor's Office of Art , Culture & Film Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry Colorado Association of Public Employees Colorado Housing & Finance Authority Denver Center for the Performing Arts Denver City Attorney, Domestic Violence Unit Denver General Hospital EG&G Environmental Protection Agency Federal Highway Administration Hughes Aircraft Company IBM Corporation KCNC-TV Los Angeles Times MacNeil / Lehrer Newshour National Renewable Energy Laboratory Office of the Governor , State of Colorado Peat Marwick Main & Co . US WEST Communications U.S. Bureau of Land Management U.S. Bureau of Reclamation U .S. General Accounting Office Walt Disney World, Inc . Walters & Theis Law Firm Western Area Power Administration LIBRARY SERVICES Auraria library Dean and Director: Camila Alire Associate Directors: Jean F. Hemphill , Glenda A. Thornton Office: Auraria Library , Lawrence at 11th Street Telephone:-Administration : 556-2805 Telephone : -information : 556-2741 Faculty: Associate Professors: Camila Alire , Jean F . Hemphill Assistant Professors: Dene L. Clark, Patricia A . Eskoz, Terry Ann Leopold, Robert L. Wick, Rutherford W. Witthus Instructors: Orlando Archibeque , Kerranne Biley, Anthony J . Dedrick, Nikki Dilgarde , Steve Green , Marit S. MacArthur , Ellen Metter , Lori Oling, Dodie Ownes , Jay Schafer, Mara L. Sprain, Louise T. Stwalley, Glenda Thornton , Linda D . Tietjen , Diane Turner, Liz Willis, Eveline L. Yang

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FRIENDS OF AURARIA LIBRARY The Friends of Auraria Library is an association formed in 1976 to promote the development of Auraria Library as a cen ter for learning, study, and research for the students and faculty of the Uni ersity of Colorado at Denver , Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver . The Friends of Auraria Library ' s ongoing objectives are: To promote awareness of and good will toward Auraria Library on the campus , in the metropolitan area , and in the region . To increase Library resources through contributions , solicitations, grants, bequests , and gifts of books and other appropriate materials. LIBRARY SERVICES Access to information is essential to academic success . The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus , pro vides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic pro grams. The Library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver . THE COLLECTION The Auraria Library has a collection of approximately 600,000 volumes . In addi tion to a strong , up-to-date book collec tion , the Library also has over 2 , 000 journal and newspaper subscriptions and a film/ videotape collection . The Library is a select depository for U .S. government publications and a depository for Colo rado state documents . The Auraria Library's collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally through interli brary loan services . THE CARL ONLINE PUBLIC ACCESS CATALOG Access to the Auraria Library ' s collec tion is through the online CARL ( Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries) public access catalog , a user-friendly system that also allows for searching of the collections of many other libraries throughout the state, the region , and the nation . The CARL system has received national r e cog nition for being on the cutting e dge of information technology. The system allows faster and more comprehensive searches than were possible with the traditional card catalog. Through its UnCover project it also offers current indexing to over 10,000 periodical titles . In addition to using CARL at the Library , patrons may obtain dial-up access through a home or office computer with a modem ; CARL also appears as a menu item on the CU-Denver mainframe computer . CIRCULATION SERVICES Library materials are checked out from the Circulation Desk with a curre nt Auraria I. D . or other valid identification . Undergraduate students may check books out for 28 days and graduate students for 60 days. An Auraria student with a valid student I. D . can check out up t o 75 books from the general collection . Renewals may be made in person or by phone (556-2639). Charges are assessed when books are returned past their due date. REFERENCE SERVICES The Auraria Library Reference Depart ment strives to provide excellent service in assisting students and faculty with their research needs . The Reference Desk is staffed during most hours the Library is open. Additionally , an Information Desk is staffed during peak hours to assist patrons with general information and to dire c t them to the appropriate service desks. Telephone reference is provided for quick questions such as , " Does the Auraria Library own a particular book? " COMPUTER ASSISTED RESEARCH (CAR) Online database searching, for which there is a fee , can save many hours of researching printed abstracts and indexes . In som e cases , it provides the only access to certain materials. The Library has access to well over 200 databases. In addition to bibliographic information , databases also may contain directory and financial information, scientific data, and full text . Questions about the Computer Assisted Research service should be dir e cted to the CAR manager , 556 3464 . INTERLIBRARY LOAN (Ill) ILL links the Auraria Library to libraries worldwide by providing access to needed materials otherwise unavailable locally . Materials , once requested, can take from one to three weeks for in-state borrowing or three weeks or longer for out-of-state borrowing . A fee may be required in order to obtain journal articles or books . Request forms are available in the library or through the CU-Denver Computing Services VAX 8800 system . Contact the Interlibrary Loan Department Office at 556-2562 for additional information . Library Seroices I 39 LIBRARY INSTRUCTION The Library is committed to providing information skills through its instruction program . The program is varied , ranging from basic, introductory-level material to advanced research methodology for graduate students. For more information about the Library ' s instructional offerings , contact the Library Instruction office at 556-3303 . RESERVES The Reserves Department provides special short-term circulation of books, pamphlets , articles and other materials needed for class instruction . The loan periods are short and overdue follow-up is prompt so that large numbers of stu dents can have access to the material. These materials include not only titles owned by the Library but also p e rsonal copies made available by the faculty . The Reserves Department is located at the Circulation Desk. Material will be checked out to Auraria students with an appropriate I. D . ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING LIBRARY The Library ' s main collection is supple mented by the material housed at the nearby Architecture and Planning Library . With a collection of over 20,000 books , 90 periodical subscriptions , and 25,000 slides, this library offers specialized infor mation to students of architecture , landscape architecture , urban design , and urban and regional planning . Th e library is open to any student who needs access to these materials . SERVICES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES The Library is comm i tted to making its resources and services available to all stu dents . Through the Media Distribution Department , a wide variety of adaptive equipment is available to assist persons with disabilities including a Kurzweil Reading Machine , a Voyager VTEK magni fier , a Braille dictionary , the World Book Encyclopedia in Braill e and on cassette , and the Perkins Brailler . Several large print dictionaries are in Reference . Library services to assist persons with disabilities include orientation to the physical layout of the Library , retrieval of materials , and assistance with use of CARL, the online public access catalog , periodicals , indexes , and special adaptive equipment.

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40 / Genera/Information ADDITIONAL FACILITIES Coin-operated typewriters, photo copiers , microform reader / printers, a copy center , a change machine , pay phones , and study rooms are all available at the Library. INTERNSHIPS The Library offers internships , practi cums, independent studies , and volun teer opportunities to s t udents interested in librarianship and information management. MEDIA SERVICES Auraria Media Center Muriel E. Woods, Director The Auraria Media Cent er offers a full range of media services including the management of the Library' s film and videotape collection . These materials are listed in the online public access catalog. The Media Center operates a 24 channel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus ; faculty members may request the transmis sion of a film or videotape directly into the classroom over this system . Stud e nts may request transmission of a film or video tape from one of the media viewing and lis tening carrels in the Library. This system also can transmit live programs from St. Cajetan 's, the Student Union, and the Media Center's television studios to other on campus. A self-service graphICS lab and a self-service VHS editing suite also are available for student use in the Media Center ' s Production Department. Finally, an Internship Program is available to students who are interested in convert ing knowledge gained in electronics and /or te l evision production courses to practical experience .

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Acting Dean: Fernie Baca O ffice : CU-D e n ver B ldg. (fo r merly Dravo) , Roo m 710 Telepho ne: 5 56-2663 INFORM ATION ABOUT THE S C HOOL Qualit y g radu a t e prog r a m s are synony mou s with the Univ e r si t y o f Col orado . Prof essors a r e active l y invo l ved in r esea r c h o r creative activi t y and , as teac h e r /sch olars , contin u e to study and absorb n e w d ata , ideas , and techniques , e ventu ally bri n ging these experiences to the cla s s ro om. Gra du a t e s tu dents at CU-De nv e r g ain not only f rom interactions with th e g r a d ua t e faculty, bu t also from other stud ents in the classroom. Because m o s t o f CU-D e n ver ' s g r ad u a t e students are o ld e r a nd employed , they bring practi cal ex p erie nce gaine d in th e Denver com mun i t y t o the classroom and are ready to relat e th e r ealities of practice to the m o d e l s present ed in the classroom . Th e G r a du ate School is a University wid e b o dy that authorizes programs within its c onstituent colleges and s chools . At CU-Denver , Education , Engin ee r i n g , a nd Liberal Arts and Sciences are colleges o r sch ools whose graduate pro gram s a r e offered through The Graduate S c hool. In co n cept, t here is a sing l e Gradu at e S c ho o l r ega r dless of campus. In prac tic e, most master' s-leve l p r ograms are specific to th e campus w h e r e the student is a dm itte d , insofar as particular options and a dvi so r s are concerned . D oc tor a l -level p r ograms in a discip l ine are vie w e d a s the respo n sibility of the e ntir e Unive r si t y comm un i t y of tha t disci plin e. Doc t o r a l l evel programs on the CU-D e n ve r campus are coordinated either t h ro u g h the office of the sys t em graduate dean o r t hrou gh the corresponding D e nv e r o r B oulder department. Th e re are s e ver a l doct o r a l l eve l deg r ee programs offe r e d thro ugh CUDenver. De grees Offered Th e f ollo w ing graduate programs are author i z e d for completion th r ough The Gra duat e Sch ool at CU-D enver. The Master of Arts (M.A.) in: Anthropology Biology Communication and Theatre Economics English History Political Science Psycho l ogy Socio l ogy The Master of Arts (M.A. Education) in: Administration , Supervision and C urriculum Development Counseling and Guidance Early Childhood Education Education Instructio n and Curriculum Educational Psychology Special Education The Master of Science (M. S.) in: Applied Mathem a tics Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engine e ring Environmental Science Mechanical Engineering T e chnical Communication The Master of Basic Science (M. B . S.) The Master of Engine e ring (M. E.)' Th e Master of Humanities (M. H.) The Master of Social Scie nce (M. S . S.) The Special ist i n Education (Ed . S . ) The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph . D . ) in: Applied Math e m a tics Administration , Sup e rvision and C urriculum Development Public Administration Course work is available at the Denver campus in the programs listed below . Student residents on the Denver campus studying in these are as may take advan tage of the multi-<:ampus activities of The Graduate School. Biology Chemistry Civil Engineering Communication Computer Scienc e Electrica l Engineerin g English Mechanical Engineering Psycho l ogy ' Awa rd e d thro u g h CU-Bou l de r The Graduat e School at CU-Denver An average of 4 ,839 stu dents are enrolled in graduate programs at CU Denver each fall and spring semester, which includes 1 ,057 non-degree students taking graduate courses . Approximate l y 74 percent of enrolled graduate students are part-t i me students . Computing Services The Computing Services department supports computer use by both the aca demic and administrative communit i es at CU-Denver . For a complete desc r iptio n of services offered see Special Programs and Facilit i es in the Genera l Informa t ion section of this catalog . Financial Aid for Graduate Study C OLORADO G R A DUATE GRANT The Colorado Graduate Grant is admin istered by The Office of Financial Aid. Competition for these funds is based o n demonstrated need and is open to gradu ate students who are residents of the S t a t e of Colorado . awards are announced each semester for the following term . Applications are availab l e from the Office of Financial Aid. C O LORA DO GRADUATE FELLOWS HIPS Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to en t ering and co ntin uing regular degree doctoral s tu den t s. These are awarded to entering students on th e basis of academic promise and to continuing students on the basis of a c ademic success . GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS Many departments emp l oy graduate students as parttime instructors or teaching assistants . The instructorship is reserved for those advanced gradua t e

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42 I The Graduate Schoo l students already possessing an appropri ate M.A. degree who may be indepen dently respons i ble for the conduct of a section or course. A half-time appointment for an instruc tor is considered to be equal to 6 class contact hours ; a half-time teaching assis tant is appoin ted for 20 hours per week. Compensation is based on the number of hours per week. T e aching assistants and instructors must be enrolled as full-time students ( registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate / graduate / thesis or dissertation ) in good standing for the full period of their appointment . RESEARC H ASS ISTANTSHIPS Research activities prov i de opportunities for graduate student s t o obtain part time work as research assistants in many departments. Assistants must be enrolled as full-time students ( registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate / graduate / thesis or dissertation ). LOAN FUNDS Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college workst u dy program shoul d submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Office of Financia l Aid by March 1. This office also provides short term loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence . Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emet gencies . Application should be made directly to the Office of Financial Aid. EMPLOY M E N T OPPORTUNITIES The University maintains an employ ment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work either through conventional employ ment or through the college workstudy program . Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness , a policy which avoids favor or dis crimination because of race, color , creed, sex, age, handicap , or national origin . Students are also referred t o prospective employers in accordance with this policy . Internationa l Education The Office of International Education expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors , pro motes special relationships with foreign universities , and acts as advisor for the Fulbright and other student fellowships . The office also arranges study abroad programs . Students remain enrolled at the University of C lorado while taking regu lar courses in the foreign universities . A B average with the equivalent of two years of college-level work in the appropri ate language is required. There also are occasional summer programs offering academic credit. Peace Corps information may be obtained from the Office of International Education . For additional information contact the office of International Admissions and Student Services at 556-2659 or the Office of International Education at 556-3489 . REQUIR E MEN T S FOR ADMISSION General R e quir e ment s Students may be admitted to The Grad uate School in either of th e two categories described below . REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS Qualified are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, applicants for admission as regular degree students must: 1 . Hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recognized standing , or have work experience equivalent to that required for such a degree and equivalent to the degree given at this university . 2 . Show promise of ability to pursue advanced study and research, as judged by their previous scholastic record . 3 . Have adequate preparation to enter graduate study in the fiel d chosen . 4. Have at least a 2. 75 undergraduate grade-point average on all work taken. 5 . Meet additional requirements for admission as established by major departments . Regu lar degree students must maintain at least a 3 . 0 grade-point average each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether it is to be applied toward the intended advanced degree or not. Stu dents who fail to maintain this standard of performance will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School. PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular degree students may be admitted as provisional degree students upon the recommendation of the major depart ment. Upon the recommendation of the Admissions Committee and concurrence of the dean of The Graduate School , a department may admit provisional students for a probationary term which may not exceed two con secu t ive calendar years . At the end of t h e probationary period, provisional degree students must either be admitted to regular degree status or be dropped from the graduate program . Credit earned by persons in provisional degree status may count toward a degree at this University . Provisional degree students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average or higher , according to t h e terms of thei r p r ovisional admission, each semester or summer term on all work taken , whether or not it is to be applied toward the advanced degree sought. Stu dents who fail to maintain such a standard of performance will be subject to suspen sion from The Graduate School. Note : All provisional applicants must have completed a minimum of six semester hours of graduate-level course work or must take the Graduate Record Exam i nation and submi t scores as part of the application. The University reserves the r i g h t to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume the standards of performance and behav ior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions , processes , and functions as an educa tional institution. SENIORS AT T H E UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO A senior at this University who has sat isfied the u ndergraduate residence requirements, and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced sub ject and 12 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degree , may be admitted to The Graduate School by special permission of the dean . A University of Colorado senior enrolled in the College of Engineering and Applied Science who needs not more than 18 semester hours or 36 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor's degree may be admitted to The Graduate School, but is not eligible for financial aid, scholar ships , or fellowships as a graduate stu dent until the equivalent of the minimum requirements for the bachelor ' s degree have been satisfied .

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Application Procedures G r a du a t e students who expect to stu d y at CU-Denver should contact the Office of Admissio n s concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications . An applicant for admission must pre sent a completed Application Form (Parts I and II), which may be obtained from the Office of Admissions , and two official tran scripts from each institution attended . The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable application fee of $30 (check or money order) when the applica tion is submitted. No application will be processed unless this fee is paid. Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination , and all departments require three or four letters of recommendation . W h en a prospective deg r ee student applies for admission, the chairperson of each depar tment or a student admissions committee shall decide whether the appli cant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to the Office of Admis sions, whic h will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as non degree students (see Non-degree Students in this sec t ion). A comp l e t ed application must be in the office of the major department at least 90 days prior to the term for which admis sion is sought or earlier as may be requi r ed by the major department. Stud ents who wish to apply for a gradu ate studen t award for the academic year 1993-94, e . g . , fellowship, scholarship , assistants h ip, must file a completed appli cation with the department before the annou n ced departmental deadline. RE-ADMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS Studen t s who were previously admitted to 1'1 g r ad u ate degree program but did not co m p l e t e that degree program and have not been registered for one year or more a t t h e University must: 1. Clarify their status with the department or school/college to determine their elig i bility to return and pursue the same d egree . 2. After receiving departmental approval as i ndi cated above, submit a new appli cation Part I to the Office of Admissions bef o r e dep artmental deadlines are passed for the term in which they expect to return to the University . A $30 application fee is required . Application deadlines are available from the department. Former students who wish to change from underg r aduate to graduate status or from one major to another must apply to the new department. Students transferring from one campus to anothe r must apply and be accepted to the new campus . A stu den t admi t ted to The Graduate School for the master ' s program must reapp l y for t he doctoral program. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year . Approva l or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student' s major depart ment and t h e school/college dean . In case of lack of agreement between the depart ment and the dean or in the case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Graduate Council. FOREIGN APPLICANTS Prospective foreign students should have completed applications on file in the Office of Admissions prior to December 1 for the Summer Term, March I for the Fall Semester , and July 1 for the Spring Semester. The application packet shou l d include the $50 fee, TOEFL scores, finan cial documentation , Graduate Record Examination scores, official English trans lation of all school records , and other doc uments as noted in the previous section on Application Procedures . Acceptable TOEFL Scores . The TOEFL is the Test o f English as a Foreign Language. If your native language is not English , or you have n ot attended a Brit ish or Amer i can university for at least one year and achieved sat isfactory grades , then you must take the TOEFL. All programs within CU-Denver ' s Graduate School-arts and sciences , education , engineering , and doc toral programs-require a m i nimum score of 525 for regular admission. Those earn ing less than 525 will normally be referre d to the Spring International Language Cen ter (on campus) for further language study. During that time , stu dents will study on an 1-20 from Spring International , but may take classes as non-degree stu dents at CU-Denver. They may subse quently be granted regular admission to The Graduate School. All international stu dents w h o take . the TOEFL and are grante d regular admission to CUDenver ' s Gradu ate School will be asked to take both the Michigan and SPEAK tests during their first semes ter of study. T hose whose TOEFL fell between 525 and 550 will be require d to take additional l anguage train ing in light of whatever deficiencies may be revea led by these diagnostic tests . Those whose TOEFL exceeds 550 will be enco ur aged, but not required, to unde r -Graduate Admission I 43 take additional training in light of their performance on these tests . Students seeking admission to all other graduate progra ms , including those i n architect ur e and planning , business, and public affair s, should consult those program descrip tions for language requirements . GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATIONS At the option of any department , the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for admission to the grad u ate program or for assistant ships prior to determining student status . Students who are applying for assis tantships for the fall semester take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be availab l e to the sel ection committee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an institution. Information regarding these examina tions may be obtained from the CU-Denver Testing Center , or The Educational Testi n g Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94 701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. OTHER GRADUATE QUALIFY I N G EXAMINATIONS Students entering professional school s and special programs may obtain informa tion at the Student Testing Center on the following examinations: Graduate Manage ment Admissions Test (GMAT), Grad u a t e Record Examination (GRE), Miller Analo gies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (LSAT). NON-DEGREE STUDENTS A studen t not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado at Denver should apply to the Office of Admissions , Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364. Non-degree students will b e allowed t o register only on the campus to which they have been admitted . Non-degree students desiring to pursue a gradua t e degree program at this Unive r sity are encouraged to submit the com plete graduate application and support i n g credentials as soon as possible . A department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as many as 9 cred it hours toward the requiremen t s of a mas ter' s degree for courses taken either as a student at anot her recognize d graduate school , as a non-degree studen t at the University of Colorado , or bo t h . In addition , the department may recom mend to the graduate dean the acceptance

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44 I The Graduate School of credit courses taken as a non-degree student at this University during the term for which the student applied for admis sion to The Graduate School, provided such admission date was delayed through no fault of the student. A grade of B or b et ter must be obtained in any coursework transferred in this manner . REGIST RATION Course W o r k and E xami nations On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admit ted to The Graduate School and who expect to study in The Graduate School are required to complete appropriate registration proc edures. Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted into The Grad uate School. If unable to attend that semester, they must notify the depart ment that has accepted them and submit the necessary forms to the Office of Admissions and Records at CUDenver in order to attend the following semester. Changes in Registration A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should follow the drop / add standard procedure (see cur rent Schedule of Classes). After the tenth week of classes graduate students may not drop , add, or change a course to no credit status without presenting a letter to the dean of their school/college, stating the exceptional circumstances that justify the change. This letter , endorsed by the instructor of the course, must accompany the properly signed and completed drop/ add card or no-credit option form . Withd r awal Graduate students who desire to with draw from the University m ust apply to the dean of their school/college for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who dis co ntinues attendance in a course without official withdrawal will be marked as having failed the course . The withdrawal form must be signed by th e instructor of the course and pass /fail must be indicated with the instr u ctor's initials . Maste r' s T hesis Graduate students working toward mas ter's degrees, if they expect to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the require ments for the degree , must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours . The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed . If the thesis i s not com pleted at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported . (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an JP grade has been submitted.) Limitation o f Regi s tration FULL L OAD A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit if the student is regis tered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate / graduate/thesis or disser tation hours. A maximum of two-thirds of a semester of resident credit may be earned during the summer if a student registers for three semester hours of other graduate work or any number of thesis hours . For the number of hours required for financial aid , see Financial Aid at the Uni versity of Colorado at Denver in the Gen eral Information section of this catalog. A graduate student may contact the school/college dean 's office for informa tion on the appeal process regarding the full load requirement for financial aid purposes . MAXIMUM LOAD No graduate student may receive credit toward a degree for more than 15 hours in a regular semester . The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at CU Denver is 10 hours per 10-week summer term . A graduate student may contact the school/college dean's office for infor mation on the appeal process regarding an over l oad. UNIVE RSITY EMPLOYEES Full-time employees of the University may not undertake more than 6 credit hours per semester. Part-time employees, including assistants , may take the number of credit hours approved by the major department. T UITION AND F E E S The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information section of this catalog . REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES Quality of Graduate Work Although the work for advanced degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours, an advanced degre e will not be conferred merely for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses. Students should not expect to obtain all the training, knowledge , and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirement for an advanced degree from formal courses . They should work on their own initiative, reading widely and thoughtfully , reaching their own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of values , perspective , and proportion . All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in defi ciencies) must be of graduate status. A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted while enrolled in The Graduate School. For the Ph .D., a course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum require ments for the degree. A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School by the dean with the approval of the major department. Appea l may be made to the Graduate Council. The committee's decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to appl y for readmission after one year . Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student's major department and the dean. In case of appeal by the student , the final decision will be made by the Graduate Council. Repeating a Cour s e A graduate student who receives a grade of C, D , or Fin a course may repeat the course once , upon written recommen dation t o the dean by the chairman of the student's advisory committee and major department , provided the course has not previously been applied toward a degree. In calc u lating a student's grade-point average for Graduate School purposes, the grade for a repeated course will substi tute for the old grade . Grades earned in courses taken as an undergraduate or as a non-degree student, as well as grades earned in firstand second-year foreign language courses , will not be used in cal culating The Graduate School grade-point average; h owever , all grades received will appear on the student's transcript.

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Change of D e partment or Major A graduate student wishing to change department or major must submit a new Part I and Part II of the graduate applica tion to the new department or school and request the former department to forward recommendations and credentials . The student must be formally accepted by the new department. Use o f English A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of standard English in all oral and written work may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance . Each department will judge the qualifi cations of its advanced students in the use of English . Reports, examinations , and speech will be considered i n estimating the candidate ' s proficiency. Graduate Appeals Final action on appeals submitted by graduate students concerning action taken by faculty members , programs , or administrative officials rests with the cam pus Graduate Council , unless such appeal involves a matter affecting two or more campuses. In such a case, the final action rests with the Executive Committee of the System-Wide Graduate School. MASTER' S DECREE A student regularly admitted to The Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts , Master of Science, or other master's degrees will be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met. In general, only graduates of an approved institution who have a thorough preparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below . All studies offered toward the mini mum requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank. Necessary additional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequisites may be partly or entirely undergraduate courses . The requirements stated below are minimum requirements ; additional condi tions set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate departments . Any department may make further regulations not inconsistent with the general rules . Students planning to graduate should ascertain current deadlines of The Gradu ate School. It is the graduate student's and the department's responsibility to see that all requirements and dead lines are met ( i.e . changing of IW grades , notifying The Graduate School of final examinations , etc.). Departments or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascertain such require ments and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair . Minimum R equi r ements The minimum requirements of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Mas ter of Science may be fulfilled by following either P l an I or Plan II be low. Plan!' By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work , including a thesis . At least 18 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above . Plan If' By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work , without a thesis. At least 16 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above . Plan II does not represent a free option for the student. A candidate for the mas ter's degree may be allowed to select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned. Gr aduate Credit Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above and that are offered by professors who are members of the graduate faculty , or that have otherwise been approved by the dean of The Graduate School. No assur ance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless the student has the approval of the department. Not all courses listed are available at any one time ; some are given in alter nateyears. Courses taken during the Fall Semester 1975 and thereafter will have graduate rank if they are taught by members of The Graduate School faculty and are in one of the following categories : 1 . Courses within the major program at the 5000 level or above. 2 . Courses outside the major program at the 4000 level provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by Master's Degree I 45 the faculty of the degree-granting pro gram and by the campus graduate dean . 3 . The Master of Basic Science program (M.B.S.) has approval for 3000and 4000-level courses if approved by the department and the dean of The Graduate School. 4 . Courses outside the major program , provided they are approved for a spe cific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean . This does not change the minimum number of courses. that must be taken at the 5000 level or above ; however , as a result , most students who include 4000 level courses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation . Field of Study Studies leading to a master ' s degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program . Status After students have made a satisfactory record in this University for at least one semester or summer term , and after they have removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission or by qualifying examinations or other wise , they should confer with their major department and request that a decision be made on their status. This definite status must be set by the major depart ment before students may make applica tion for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree . Students who are inadequately pre pared must make up without credit toward a graduate degree all prerequisites required by the department concerned . language R e quirements Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as each department requires . See specific depart mental requirements . Credit by T r a nsfer Resident graduate work of high quality done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere and coming within the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount , provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the dean of the schooljcollege.

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46 I The Graduate School Course work taken more than 6 years prior to the completion of final require ments (comprehensive exam and /or filing of thesis) will not be accepted for the degree unless validated by a special examination. The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to t his University is 9 semester hours . Credit will not be transferred until the student has established in The Graduate School of this University a satisfactory record of at least one semester in resi dence; such transfer will not reduce the residence at this University , but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses . Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. Work already applied toward a master's degree received from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the master's degree at t he University of Colorado; courses with "Pass /Fail" or "Satisfactory / Unsatisfactory" grades will not be transferred; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred ; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recognized . Excess undergradua t e credits from another institution may not be trans ferred to The Graduate School. Seniors in this University may, however, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 9 semester hours) provided such work: l. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this University . 2. Comes within the four-year time limit. 3. Is no lower than a C. 4. Has not been applied toward another degree . 5. Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and approved by the dean of the school/college. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose and submitted to the school / college by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be gradu ated . For more information contact your graduate advisor . To be eligible for courses to be considered for transfer , a student must have an overall B average in all courses taken at the University of Colorado in The Graduate School. Continuing Education Course Work Students may use the resources of the Division of Extended Studies in the pursuit of graduate study only if they obtain proper academic approval from the major department and the school / college dean in advance . Residence In general , the residence requirements can be met only by residence at the University for at least two semesters or at least three summer terms . For full resi dence , a student must be registered within the time designated at the begin ning of a semester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses n umbered 5000 or above, or at least a combination of other course work acceptable for gradu ate credit. See Limitation of Registration, Full Load , for requirements for full resi dence credit during the summer . Students who are noticeably deficient in their general training or in the specific prepara tion indicated by each department as prerequisite to graduate work , cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified . Graduate assistants and other employ ees of the University may fulfill the resi dence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than half-time . Full-time employees may not satisfy the residence requirements of one year in fewer than four semesters . Admission to Candidacy A student who wishes to become a can didate for a master ' s degree must file application in the graduate dean's office 10 weeks prior to the completion of the comprehensive final examination . The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be determined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status . This application must be made on forms obtainable from the Graduate School dean's office and in various departments and must be signed by the major depart ment , certifying that the student' s work is satisfactory and that the program out lined in the application meets the require ments set for the student. A student on Graduate School probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation. Thesis Requirements A thesis , which may be of a research, expository , critical, or creative type , is required of every master's degree candi date under Plan I. Every thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must: 1 . Deal with a definite topic related to the major field. 2 . Be based upon independent study and investigation . 3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work. 4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments , 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred . 5 . Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given. 6 . Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in Directions for Preparing Masters ' and Doctoral Theses, which is obtainable from The Graduate School. Two weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred , two formally approved, printed or typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in The Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract. All theses must be signed by the thesis advisor and the second reader . All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid when the thesis is deposited in The Graduate School. Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previ ously been registered . A student working toward a master's degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours . The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of resi dence , but the total registered credit for thesis must total a minimum of 4 or a max imum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis . The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. An IP (in progress) will be reported for terms during which the student is registered for thesis prior to completion of the thesis . Comprehensive Final Examination All candidates for a master's degree are required to take a comprehensive final examination after the other requirements

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for the degree have been completed . This examination may be given near the end of their last semester of residence while they are still taking required courses for the degree , provided they are making satisfac tory progress in those courses. The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed: 1. Students must be registered when they take the examination . 2 . Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean's office at least 3 days in advance of the examination . 3 . The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned in consultat i on with the dean. 4. The examination, which may be oral , written , or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essentially complete at the time , as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field . 5 . An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments. 6 . The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or minor field . The examination on transferred work will be given by representatives of the corresponding fields of study in this University. 7. A student who fails the comprehensive final examination may not attempt the examination again unti l at least three months have elapsed and until such work as may be prescribed by the exam ining committee has been completed . The student may retake the examination only once . Supplemental Examinations Supplemental examinations should be simply an extension of the o r iginal exami nation and given immediately . If the student fails t h e supplemen t al examination , three mont h s must elapse before attempt ing the comprehensive examination again. Course Examinations The regular written examinations of each semester except the last must be taken . Course examinations of the last semester, which come after the compre hensive final examination has been passed, may be omitted with the consent of the instructor. Master's Thesis Credit Every graduate student working toward a master' s degree who expects to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis . The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed.lf the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress ( IP) will be reported. (fhe student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.) T ime Limit Master ' s degree students have 5 yea r s , from the date of the start of course work , to complete all degree requirements . For students who fail to complete the degree in this 5 year period , it will be necessary for the program director to file an annual statement with the graduate dean stating the reasons why the program faculty believe the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. Students who do their work exclusively in summer terms must complete all degree require ments within 72 months from the start of course work . A student who does not complete all degree requirements within the specified period of time must valida te, by special examination( s ), any course work taken more than 6 years prior to taking the masters comprehensive examination or completing the thesis defense , depending on which plan is elected. Deadline s for Degree Candidates E xpecting to Graduate Durmg 199293 Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling The Graduate School office, 556 2663 . 1. Last day for requesting transfer of credit. 2 . Applications for admission to candi dacy. Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (fhe form may be picked up in the department or in The Graduate School office . ) Doctor of Philosophy I 47 3 . Last day for thesis to be approved by department. 4 . Last day for scheduling of comprehen sive final examination . 5 . Last day for taking comprehensive final examination . 6 . Last day for filing thesis in The Graduate School. At the time of filing, the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by The Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p . m . on the indicated date will be graduated at the commencement . following that for which the deadline is indicated. DOCTOR OF PHILOS O PHY The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph .D.) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University . To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued. Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work in this field; furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an origi nal contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge . The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules. Studies leading to the Ph . D . degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge . A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments. The criterion as to what constitutes an accept able field of study shall be that the student's work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of aca demic departments within the University . Students planning to graduate should obtain current deadline dates in the office of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student' s and the department's responsi bility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e. , changing of IW

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48 I The Graduate Schoo l grades, notifying The Grad uate School of final examinations, etc.). Department or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by graduate stude nt s in that depar tme nt or program . It is t he stud e n t's responsibility to ascertain such require ments and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair . Minimum Course/Dissertation Requirements A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph.D. degree . Course Work Require m e nt . A minim u m of 30 semes ter hours of co ur ses num bered 5000 or above is req u ired for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this mini mum. At least 20 of the req u ired hours must be in graduate courses taken at this University. Students who have been admitted to The Graduate School with deficiencies may expect to receive little or no residence credits until the deficiencies have been removed . Dissertation Hours Req u irement . To com plete the requirements for t he Ph.D., a s tu dent must register for a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than 10 of these credit hours in any one semester . Not more than 10 dis sertation hours may be taken preceding the semester of taking comprehensive examinations. In addition, up to 10 hours may be taken in the semester in which the student passes comprehensives . Disserta tion credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above and will no t b e include d in calculation of the student's grade-poin t average. Only the grades of A , Band JP shall be used . Course work and work on the disserta tion may proceed concurrently through out the doctoral program; however, at n o time shall a doctoral student register for more than 15 hours of 5000-level and above courses . Normally a student must have earned at least three and not more than six semesters of residency before admission to candidacy . Advisory Committee As soon as the field of specialization has been chosen, the candidate will request the faculty member with whom the com mittee wishes to work to act as chair of the advisory committee . The chair , with the advice and approval of the chair of the department, may select two or more additional members to serve on the committee, so that the several fields related t o the student's special interest will be represented. A purpose of the advisory committee (beyond guiding the student through graduate study) is to ensure against specialization that is too narrow. The student shall obtain the signature of the chair of the committee (thereby signi fying his or her willingness to act) on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form. Any change in the membership of the advisory committee is to be similarly reported . Residence T h e student must be proper l y registered to earn residence credit . The minimal resi dence requirement shall be six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor ' s degree. Mere attendance shall not constitute residence as the word is here used. Residence may be earned for course work completed with distinction , for participation in seminars, or for scholarly research performed here or elsewhere under the auspices of the University of Colorado. As a g u iding policy in determining res i dence credit for employed students, those who are employed in three-fourths to fulltime work that does not contribute directly to their program toward a degree may not earn more than one-half resi dence credit in any semester. Students who are employed more than one-fourth time and less than three-fourths time in work that does not contribute directly to the degree may earn not more than three fourths residence credit. Those who have one-fourth time employment or less may earn full residence credit. (All these provi sions are subject to the definition of resi dence credit given in the preceding paragraph.) In case the interpretation of residence credit for any student needs to be clarified, a decision will be made by the chair of the student ' s advisory committee , the chair of the student's major department , and the dean of The Graduate School. Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master's degree from anot her institution of approved standing, but at l east four semesters of residence credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year , must be earned for work (course and /or dissertation) taken at this University . A part of the residence requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be spent in another graduate institution, or in field work in absentia (provided that prior approval for work is given by the student's program director and provided that the student's regist r ation is maintained for that period away from the campus). Preliminary Examination Each department will satisfy itself (by examination or other means) that students who signify intent to undertake study for the Ph .D. deg ree are qualified to do so. The means by which each depart ment makes this evaluation shall be specified in departmental requirements . Students who are thus evaluated will be notified immediately of the results . The results of this preliminary evaluation shall be repo r ted to The Graduate Sch ool office on the Application for Candidacy form filed by the student at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted . Language Requirement The decision on foreign language requirements for Ph . D . degrees is the respons i bility of the graduate faculty of each graduate program.2 Credit by Transfer Resident graduate work of high quality earned in another institution of approved standing will not be accepted for transfer to apply toward the doctorate until the student has established a satisfactory record in residence in this Graduate School, but such credit must be trans ferred before the student makes applica tion for admission to candidacy for the degree. Such transfe r will not reduce the minimum r esidence requirement at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses. The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University for the Ph .D. is 30 semester hours. Application for Admission to Candidacy A student must make formal application for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree on f orms supplied by The Gradu ate School office at least 2 weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted. A student shall have earned at least three semesters of residence , and shall 'Approve d by a vote of the syst emwide gradu a t e faculty on February 7, 1990.

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have passed the comprehensive exall}ina tion before admission to candidacy for the degree . Continuous Registration Requirements for Doctoral Candidates Following successful completion of comprehensive examinations, students must register continuously. Students admitted to candidacy for degree will reg ister for and be charged for seven hours of credit for each fulltime term of doctoral work . For each term of parttime enroll ment , students will be charged for seven hours of dissertation credit, except that students not making use of campus facili ties may petition The Graduate School for three-credit-hour status. Continuous reg istration during the academic year will be required until completion of the disserta tion defense. It is expected that the stu dent and advisor will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classification identified above. Comprehensive Examination Before admission to candidacy for the Ph .D. degree , the student must pass a comprehensive examination in the field of concentration and related fields. This examination may be oral , written , or both, and will test the student' s mastery of a broad field of knowledge , not merely the formal course work c ompleted . The oral part is open to members of the faculty . The student must be registered at the time the comprehensi ve examination is attempted. The examination shall be conducted by an examining board appointed by the chair of the department concerned and be approved by the campus graduate dean . The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to total a minimum of five. A successful candidate must receive the affirmative votes of a majority of the mem bers of the examination board. In case of failure , the examination may be attempted once more after a period of time deter mined by the examin i ng board . Dissertation Requirements A thesis based upon original investiga tion , showing mature scholarship , critical judgment , and familiarity with the tools and methods of research , must be writ ten upon some subject approved by the student's major department. To be acceptable , this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student' s special field . lt must be finished and submitted in typewritten form at least 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the day of the final exami nation and must be formally approved and made available for inspection by the examining committee before the final examination may be taken . In mechanical features , all dissertations must comply with the specifications of The Graduate School as outlined in the Directions for Preparing Masters' and Doctoral Theses which may be obtained from The Graduate School. It is the student's responsibility to notify The Graduate School of the exact title of the dissertation at least six weeks prior to the commencement at which the student will graduate . This title will be printed in the commencement program (May graduation only) . Two formally-approved, typewritten copies of the dissertation , including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred . The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International. The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department. All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than two members of the major department staff who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction . All approved dissertations are kept on file in the library. When the dissertation is deposited in The Graduate School , the candidate must pay the thesis-binding fee and sign an agreement with University Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and /or (b ) copies of the manuscript made from microform . The author retains all rights to publish and /or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform . Final Examination After the dissertation has been accepted , a final examination of the dis sertation and related topics will be con ducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral , the oral part being open to anyone. The examination will be Doctor of Philosophy I 49 conducted by a committee consisting of at least five persons, one of whom must be from outside the student' s department. More than one dissenting vote will disqualify the candidate in the final examination . Arrangements for the final examination must be made in the graduate dean ' s office at least two weeks in advance . The examination must be scheduled not later than two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. A student must be registered at the time of the examination. Time Limit If a student fails to complete all require ments for the degree within the pre scribed number of years from the date of the start of course work in the doctoral program, a second examination similar to the first will be required before the candidate may take the final examination . The number of years allowed for completion is normally six, but in some programs it may be seven. If the comprehensive examina tion is failed , it may be attempted once more after not fewer than eight months of further work. For students who fail to complete the degree in this 6 year period , it will be necessary for the department to file an annual statement indicating that the program director believes the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program . This request must be signed by three members of the graduate faculty who serve on the student's thesis advisory committee . If approved by the campus graduate dean, the student may continue his/her studies for one addi tional year. If not approved , the student may be dropped from the program .

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Acting Dean: Peter Schneider Office: CU-Denver Bldg. (formerly Dr avo) , Third Floor Telephone: 556-3382 Faculty Professors: Yuk Lee, George Hoover, John Prosser, Peter Schneider , Hamid Shirvani Associate Professors: Soon torn Boonyatikarn, Lois Brink , Thomas Clark, Phillip Gallegos, Harry Garnham, Marvin Hatami, David Hill, Paul Saporito, Peter Schaeffer Assistant P r o fessors: Theresa Cameron, Ned Collier, Michael Holleran, Taisto Makela, Hans Morgenthaler, Bennett Neiman, Diane Wilk Shirvani, Won Jin Tae, Ping Xu INFORMATION ABOUT THE S C HOO L The School of Architecture and Plan ning offers first and post-professional pro grams leading to master's degrees. The primary mission of the School is educa tion, research, and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning. Students are required to search into the existing abundance of architecture and planning knowledge in order to generate effective, forceful, spirited forms , ideas, and proposals. Faculty and students are engaged in investigation, education, exploration, and generation of new ideas, forms , and proposals to create more humane living environments. As El Lissitzky (1930) stated: "Our work is not philosophy, neither is it a system relating to a specific theory of nature; it is part of nature and must therefore itself be regarded as an object of knowledge . " In doing so, the School questions exist ing connections of teaching and practice and is in search of future alternatives. The School's activities are thus geared toward preparation of future architects and plan ners who are not only able to draw , to cal culate, or to propose, but also to question , to explore, and to experiment. The curricula are based on a wide range of cultural views of architecture and plan ning reflective of our faculty and student body. The faculty direct, guide, and encourage students to develop their indi l!idual interests with a prerequisite com mitment intended to equip the graduate with a lasting ability to produce architecture and planning responsive to the changing needs of society . It is on these premises that our School is in constant search of the manifest, ideas, and forms for the betterment of the living environments. A community of culturally diverse educators and practitioners centered in an island by the backdrop of the Rocky Mountains provides a unique opportunity for intense study of architecture and planning . Mission and Organization The School is composed of three gradu ate degree programs in architecture , landscape architecture, and urban and regional planning (M. Arch . , M .L.A., M . U .R.P.).It also offers urban design as an area of specialization in the architecture program (M.Arch . in Urban Design). As a unit of graduate professional education with three professional degree programs and a mandate for national excellence and recognition , the School expects to go beyond training students in basic skills for entry-level positions. The School's overall mission is to develop the design capabilities of the individuals and the design professions as a whole as well as provide the intellectual framework which supports design . Considering this mission, the School emphasizes basic professional training and education necessary for entering pro fessional practice in its first professional degree programs. The post-professional and advanced degree programs are directed toward professionals at various career stages and focus on research and specialization . The School supports interdisciplinary work in its programs and focuses on pro fessional education and research concern ing the design and planning of th e built environment. Within this interdisciplinary approach, it recognizes the professional community input and the role of the other academic disciplines such as humanities, social sciences, and engineering . In the School's degree programs , various architecture and planning ideologies and views are examined with respect to their historical setting. This examination is combined with critical reviews of design work , dialogues , and methods to form the essential ingredient of design educa tion. Through this dialectic of analyzing and synthesizing , students gain increased understanding of those humanistic ideals underlying the architecture and plan. ning of buildings and spaces and relate them to their own developing personal aspirations. The School is committed to design as its central intellectual concern and is the largest graduate school of architectur:e in the western region . Design is used in its broadest sense to include a full range of philosophies , ideologies , theories , and methods. The School ' s mission is educa tion , research , and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning. Academic Programs The three graduate programs are inter disciplinary , and, in the design fields , both first and post-professional degrees are offered . In addition, it is possible for stu dents to obtain two degrees, M.Arch . and M.U.R.P. for example , and reduce the time required for doing so by coordinating their programs. The first profess iona l degree programs are structured for full-time graduate study. For students with employment obligations , most of these programs can be taken on a part-time basis. Usually the first year of the full-time program must be completed befor e it can be taken part-time . Within any of the programs, the School of Architecture and Planning offers oppor tunities to develop a self-tailored area of concentration through its varied offerings in architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. Electives ordinarily can be taken from any program in the School and from another school in the University with the approval of the student's advisor. The School maintains membership in: Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning Council of Landscape Architecture Educators Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board

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52 I School of Architecture and Planning Planning Accredita t ion Board Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society Sigma Delta Lambda Honor Society Academic Environment and Student Body In addition to its regular curriculum programs , the School supports or spon sors a variety of events a n d activities t h a t enlarge and broaden the learning environ ment in the School. Student internships for credit are available during aca demic year. A summer international study program is offered. The School sponsors three receptions-at the beginning of the academic year , before Christmas , and at the end of the academic year-along with a Beaux Arts Ball in the spring , for stu dents and the local professional commu nity. Finally , the Schoo l sponsors several exhibitions of design and art works. There are about 275 full-time students in the School. The student body is diverse, representing many academic disciplines and a wide variety of previous academic institutions. Students have previous degrees from a number of universities around the world . lecture Series Guest critics are frequently invited to the School. In addition, the School has an official lecture series every year. T h e Lecture Series is composed of distinguished practitioners , critics, and scholars of national and international stature. Visit i ng critics and speakers include : Stanley Allen , Amy Anderson , Nader Ardalan, Ann Bergren , Jennifer Bloomer , Christine Boyer , James Corner, Livio Dimitriu , Peter Eisenman, Tzann Hour Fang, Kenneth Frampton , Mario Gandelsonas , Diane Ghirardo, Michae l Hays, Mark Johnson , Keith Loftin , Greg Lynn, Rodolfo Machado , Art McDonald,lan McHarg, John Meunier, David Niland, John Novack , Patrick Quinn , Dennis Radford , George Ranalli , Frank E . Sanchis, Thomas Schumacher , Robert Segrest , Werner Seligman , Batiram Shirdel , Vladimir Slapeta , Michael Sorkin , John R. Stilgoe , Har r y Teague , William Turnbull , Anne Vernez-Moudon , Anthony Vidler , Peter Waldman , Peter Walker , Michael Web, Morgan Dix Wheelock, and Lebbeus Woods . SCHOOL F AC ILITIES The School's studios, library, Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory, Auto-Cadd Computer Laboratory, photo laboratory and darkroom , model shop , gallerias , and offices are housed in three floors of the CU-Denver Bldg. in 50,000 square feet of space. The laboratories and facilities were developed through an endowment by noted architect Temple Hoyne Buell , FAIA. Archit ec ture and Planning library Ubrarian: Robert Wick U b rary Technician: Toby Visoon The Architecture and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library (adminis tered by the University of Colorado at Denver) , serves as a learning resource center in the fields of architecture and planning . It contains the following collec tions : reference, circulating , documentary (planning documents issued by local , regional , state and national agencies with an emphasis on planning materials per taining to Colorado communities and con cerns) , periodicals , reserve , and non-print media including architectural slides. The Architecture and Planning Library has over 15,000 volumes of books and mono graphs, professional references, 9,000 slides , and 99 periodical subscriptions . The Architecture and Planning Library staff consists of a one-third time librarian, library technician , and several student assistants . The Library provides a number of services including reference and research assistance, and library-use instruction . Additional services, such as inter library loan and computer-assisted research , are provided through the Auraria Library . Maci ntosh Archi t ectu r e and Des i g n laboratory The Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory is dedicated to the promotion of design innovation and exploration with the Macintosh computer . The laboratory is equipped with 15 Macintosh II comput ers with high resolution color monitQrs; a Macintosh II file; an E-size, Hewlett Packard plotter ; Laser Writer II printer; and Image Writer II dot matrix printers. The laboratory utilizes software including Architrion (an advanced 3-dimensional modeling program), V e rsa Cad, MacDraw II, SuperPaint, PixeiPa i nt, Adobe Illustra tor 88, Video Works , Canvas , MiniCad, Mac3D, Photoshop II (an advanced graphic manipulation program that interfaces with the 3-D modelling packages) , and a broad range of other sophisticated graphic simu lation software. This state-of-the-art l abo ratory has been deve l oped through a contribution by Apple Computer, Inc. CADD Computer laboratory The CADD Laboratory of the School of Architecture and Planning is located adja cent to the Macintosh Architecture Labo ratory and supports advanced computer-aided design and drafting with a microcomputer based network which has been modified and expanded . The labora tory is equipped with 10 state-of-the-art DOS based units with high resolution graphic monitors , and all the peripherals and software needed for advanced two and three dimensional modeling. Building T ec hnology laboratory The Building Technology Laboratory functions as a teaching and research facil ity for both students and outside practi tioners . For the student, through hands-on experiment and physical demonstration, it is used to facilitate the learning process as well as bridge the gap between theoret ical concepts and practical applications . For practitioners, this facility is used to enhance their practice and update their knowledge . Some examples of equipment and facili ties available include data acquisition systems, lighting research equipment, Macintosh visua l input package , windflow simulation table , video equipment , and data logging equipment. The wind flow simulation table allows the designer to analyze various windflow patterns on two-dimensional forms . By allowing water to flow continuously in a given direction and by adding an even distribution of ink to identify the flow patterns , an immediate study can be encountered on a given site configuration. The data logging equipment allows an automatic collection of data for a specific time and period . When furnished with the appropriate sensors, the following data can be obtained: temperature (surface temperature , air temperature, and subsurface temperature), moisture (wet bulb temperature and relative humidity) , solar radiation, lighting intensity , and wind speed. Photo Lab o rat o ry. Our new photogra phy l ab , with the latest state-of-the-art equipment , is used for architectural pho tography classes and by students to produce material for their portfolios . There are separate areas for developing , enlarging, drying , and copying . Mod e l -Making La bora to ry. Students have an 800-square-foot model shop in which to build projects for their classes. Table saws , jig saws , drill presses , jointen

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and a full range of hand tools will allow the student to build models of wood , plastic, and steel. An adjacent paint spray room is equipped with a ventilated paint booth and vapor-proof lighting . !\OMISSIONS General Requirements The School of Arc hitecture and Plan:ling has n Academic Affairs Office . Pri ;nary responsibilities of this office include mswering admission inquiries, process n g admissions applications , awarding : uition scho l arships , enforcing studio and aboratory rules, hearing student grade lppe als, overseeing students' rights and esponsibilities, approving new course >roposals, enfo r cing academic policies , md processing graduation applications . Each applicant for admission into any >f the programs of the School of Archi t ec ur e an d Planning mus t subm it: I . The Univers it y of Colorado Application for Graduate Admission forms . Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has at t e n ded . I. Three l et t ers of r e commendation . I. A statement of purpose. i . Examp l es of creative work (see below ). i. The application fee. Special requi r em e nts for international tpplicants are des c ribed in a following : ection . Examples of Creative Work . In architec ure , landscape architecture , and urban lesign , applicants are exp e cted to present . am pies of their creative and analytic vork, common l y referred to as a portfolio . is an orderly presen t ation of me' s work . This includes examples of cre t tiv e and ana lyti cal work including but not i mited to essays , papers , photographs tnd photographic reproduction of artistic vork such as sculpture , drawings , paint rlgs, musica l composition , and other fine 1 rts . The f ormat must be 8.W' x 11", bound vith not more than twe l ve pages ( exclud rlg papers). S lid es are not accepted . All 1 ortfolios must be identified by the stu lent's full n ame and program to which h e stu d ent is applying . A stamped, self .ddressed envelope must be included )r ret urn of portfolio . In genera l , a minimum of 3 .00 grade IOint average (GPA) on a 4 .00 scale (or quivalent) in the prior undergraduate •r graduate degree is requir e d for admis ion . Applicants with a GPA under 3 .00 r1ay be reviewed for admission ; in such ases , submission of strong supporting naterials is advised . For applicants vith a GPA under 3 .00, GRE scores are normally required for the Urban and R egional Planning Program a nd strongly recommended f o r applicants t o the other programs . The admiss i ons decision is made weighing a variety of factors including academic preparation , quality of work experience and portfolio , appropriateness of the applicant ' s purpose, and overall likelihood of success in the program . Applicants may be admitted as non degree student s or with special condi tions . Because of space limitations , not all qualified applicants may be accepted . Specific requirements for eac h program are listed below . MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (First professional degree; three and one-half year program) The three and one-half year (114 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with a bachelor ' s degree and no prior t ra inin g or backgro und in archi tecture or re l a t ed field . Prerequisites are one year of college-level physics and college mathematics through a first course in calc ulus . For those without these prerequisites , c ourses are held in the summer term preceding the first semester. MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (First professional degree; three and one-half year program with advanced standing ) Admission to the three and one-half year program with advanced standing is appropriate for applicants with a non-pro fessional bachelor ' s degree in architec ture or a bachelor ' s degree in a related field ( engineering, design , art). Depending on their undergraduate record , qualified applicants with a non-professional archi tectural d egree (the firs t part of a 4 2 program) wo uld ordinarily be g i ven advanced standing of up to one curriculum year in the program. Applicants with degrees in related fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of preparation but may be required to take all the courses in the architectural design sequence . The number of credits and exact point o f entry into the program will be determined by the program director. Admissi ons ! 53 MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE ( Post-professional degree) The one-year (36 semester hours ) post professional degree program is appropri ate for applicants holding a Bachelor of Architecture or equivalent first profes sional degree or diploma in architecture . MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE IN URBAN DESIGN post-professional degree ) The one-year ( 36 semester hours ) pro gram is appropriate for applicants with a first professional design degree in arc tecture ( e . g . B . Arch., M .Arc h.). MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (First professional degree ) The three-year (90 semester hours ) first professional degree program is appropri ate for those with a bachelor ' s degree and no training or b ackground in lands ca pe architecture or a relat e d design field. MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (Post-professional d eg ree) The two-year (48 semester hours ) post professional degree program is appropri ate for applicants with a first professional design degree (B. S . L.A., B. L.A., B .Arc h., for example). Applicants without a prior Landscape Architecture degree may be required to take additional core require ments in Plant Materials and Ecology . MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING The two-year (51 semester hours ) pro gram is appropriate for applicants with bachelor ' s degrees in either design , humanities, social , or physical sciences . International Applicants Competence in oral a n d written English is expected in the School. The School of Architecture and Planning requires a mini mum of 550 TOEFL score for internationa l students from non-English speaking coun tries . However , the School will consider applications from students with strong academic credentials whose TOEFL scores are slightly below 550. If accepted , these students will be required to registe r and successfully complete a one credit hour technical writing workshop . This one credit hour cannot be used to fulfill part of the degree requirements . Submission Requir e m e nts . International applicants must submit:

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54 1 School of Architecture and Planning 1. An International Student application and Graduate Admission forms. 2 . Two official transcripts from each United States collegiate institution the applicant has attended . 3. Two certified copies of official academic records from each collegiate institution the applicant has at tended outside the United States. A certified literal English translation must accompany docu ments that are not in English . . 4 . Four letters of recommendation. 5. A statement of purpose. 6. A portfolio of academic, creative, and professional work. 7 . A nonrefundable $50 application fee. 8. A current CU-Denver Financial Resources Statement. Statements used for other inst i tutions will not be accepted. Photocopied documents are not acceptable unless signed by the originator ; signatures must not be photocopies . 9. Official TOEFL Sco r e Report to establish English language proficiency . Institu tional TOEFL reports are not acceptable. Additional supporting documents may subsequently be required by the office of Admissions . All international applicants who are admitted to CU-Denver must have a valid visa and must enroll for and main tain a full course of study (12 or more semester hours) leading to the completion of a master's degree . Financial Requirem ents. Int ernational applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds available to attend the University of Colorado at Denver . To provide this evidence each interna tional applicant should follow these instructions: 1. Complete the Financial Resources State ment. You must prove that you have suf ficient money to pay your expenses by submitting the Financial Resources Statement as a part of your application . a. If you are using your own money , your bank must certify that you hav e the full amount of money on deposit to meet tuition and expense costs. In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement, your bank must certify that the money the applicant needs i s on deposit in your account. b .lf you are being sponsored by a family member, or a friend, your sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resour ces Statement in Part 2, Section 2 . Your sponsor's bank must certify that the sponsor has on de posit the amount of money you will ne ed. c. If you have been awarded a scholar ship , Part 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed. 2. An incomplete statement of financial resources or failure to prove the availability of the necessary money will delay or cause th e denial of your admission to the University. Be sure your Financial Resou rces Statement is accurate and com plete . Dates and Deadlines All programs in the School admit for all semesters. However, acceptance for the Spring and Summer Semesters will be on a space-avai labl e basis only. See the Academic Calendar in this catalog or the Schedule of Classes for specific dates . To be considered for Fall Semester admission , all application materials must be received by the previous March 15. Applicants will be notified concerning their acceptance prior to May 1 . To be considered for Spring Semester admis sion , all application materials must be received by the previous November 1 . Applications received after March 15 or November 1 may be considered for non-degree status only . Deadlines for submission of application materials: March 15-for Fall Semester regular admission April 15-for Summer Term regular admission November 1-for Spring Semester regular admission Applications after these dates will be considered only on a space-available basis. Persons interested in any of the pro grams or in visiting the School are invited to call the Architecture and Urban Design Programs at (303) 556-2877, and the Landscape Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Programs at (303) 556-34 79 to arrange an appointment. For appli cation forms or additional information , please write to: Office of the Dean School of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 126 P.O. Box 173364 Denver , Colorado 80217-3364 (303) 556-3382 PROGRAMS OF STUDY Architecture Program Director: Peter A. Schneider Office: CUDenver Bldg., Third Floor Telephone: 556-2877 The architecture program offers curricula leading to both first and post professional Master of Architecture degrees. The first professional Master of Architecture (M.Arch.J) is fully acc • redited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB) and is composed of five basic core areas: Architectural Design, History and Theory, Environmental Con text, Science and Technology, and Profes sional Pract ice. Most states require that an individual intending to become an architect hold an accredited degree. There are two types of degrees that are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board: (1) The Bachelor of Architecture , which requires a minimum of five years of study, and (2) The Master of Architecture, which requires a minimum of three years of study following an unrelated bachelor's degree or two years following a related preprofessional bachelor's degree. These professional degrees are structured to educate those who aspire to registration / licensure as architects. The four-year, preprofessional degree , where offered , is not accredited by NAAB. The preprofes sional degree is useful for those wishing a foundation in the field of architecture, as preparation for either conti nued education in a professional degree program or for employment options in architecturally related areas. The program ' s primary objective is to prepare students to enter the practice of architecture with a thorough foundation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop: an aware ness of and sensitivity to the quality of the human environment; architectural con text; deep understanding of architectural history , theory and criticism; thorough knowledge of architectural and building technology; competence in design proc ess and expression with particular empha sis on exploration, experimentation, and synthesis ; understanding of the institu tional fram ework within which architecture takes place; and skills and understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct. The ultimate goal of the program is to provide the architecture student with a deep appreciation of architecture, while

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acquiring cri tical capacity, through com prehension of all facets of architecture. This is achieved through five groups of courses , organized in sequences within five coordinated modules . M ASTER OF ARCHITECTU R E I ( First profession a l d egree) Three and one-half year program . The first professional Master of Architecture degree program is a 114 semester hour program requiring three and one-half years (six semesters and a summer term ) of full-time study. The curricu l um consists of a core of five related course components and 21 semester hours of electives that may be used for a concentration. The program is taught at three levels , each with a theme . The first level involves the theme principles , definitions , commu rlication , and design abstraction and takes the first two semesters. The next level t akes three semesters and involves a dual theme-architecture in context and appli c ations of methodologies . The theme of the final level in the third year is synthesis md professional competency. The Cu r r ic ulum Three an d One-Half Vear Pro g r a m fJESlGN: 18 semester hours \RCH 5500 (6) Introduction to Architec tural Design Studio I \RCH 5501 (6) Introduction to Architec tural Design Studio II \RCH 5502 (6) Architectural Design Studio Ill \RCH 6600 (6) Architectura l Design Studio IV \RCH 6601 (6) Architectural Design StudioV ' \RCH 6700 (6) Advanced Architectural Design Studio VI \RCH 6701 (6) Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII ffiCH 5510 (3) Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I ffiCH 5511 (3) Elements ofDesign Expression and Presentation II !!STORY AND THEORY. ' 5 semester hours lRCH 5520 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism lRCH 5521 (3) Survey of Ar2hitectural History lRCH 6620 (3) Architecture in the 18th through 20th Centuries ARCH 662 I (3) History of Architectural Theory Theory Electives : 6 semester hours ENVIRONMENTAL CONTEXT 6 semester hours LA6632 (3) UD6620 (3) Site Planning Architecture of the City SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 21 semester hours ARCH 5530 (3) Structures I ARCH 5531 (3) Structures II ARCH 5532 (3) Building Technology I ARCH 5533 (3) Environmental Control Systems I ARCH 6630 (3) Structures III ARCH 6631 (3) Environmental Control Systems II ARCH 6636 (3) Building Technology II PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 3 semes t er hours ARCH 6750 (3) Professional Practice ELECTIVES: 18 semester hours Architecture I 55

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56 I School of Architecture and Planning COURSE SEQUENCE: FIRST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE ENVIRONCOURSE HISTORY/ MENTAL SCIENCE& PROFESSIONAL CREDIT SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY CONTEXT TECHNOLOGY FALL ARCH 5500 (6) ARCH 5520 (3) ARCH 5530 (3) ARCH 5510 (3) YEAR I SPRING ARCH 5501 (6) ARCH 5511 (3) ARCH 5521 (3) ARCH 5531 (3) SUMMER ARCH 5502 (6) ARCH 5532 (3) ARCH 5533 (3) FALL ARCH 6600 (6) ARCH 6620 (3) LA6632 (3) ARCH 6630 (3) ARCH 6631 (3) YEAR II SPRING ARCH 6601 (6) ARCH 6621 (3) ARCH 6636 (3) ELECTIVES (3) YEAR III FALL ARCH 6700 (6) ELECTIVES (3) UD6620(3) SPRING ARCH 6701 (6) ' 48 Advanced Standing in the three and onehalf year program . Students admitted with advanced standing to the first profes sional degree program follow a course of study based on an evaluation of their academic credentials which takes place during the admissions process. Students who have degrees in related fields may be exempt from certain required courses. Students who have completed a pre professional bachelor' s degree in an accredited 4 2 program will be given advanced standing of up to one curricu lum year in the program. The number of credits and exact point of entry into the program will be determined by the Program Director . MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE II (Post-professional program) The post-professional program in architecture is an advanced curriculum which focuses on research and specializa tion. The program of fers four options of study: 1) Architectural Experimentation , 2) Architecture and Design with Macintosh, 3) Building Technology, and 4) Real Estate Development . The first option, Architectural Experimentation, is suited for students intending to further their knowledge in theory and criticism of architecture. Students are guided to investigate, explore, and experiment with ideas of non-conventional nature and to advance their design ability . The second option, Architecture and Design wjth Macintosh, is designed to prepare the student for specialization in computer application in design genera tion and development. The third option, Building Technology, prepares students for specialization in 18 6 21 building performance studies utilizing the School's sophisticated B uilding Technol ogy Laboratory. Solar, thermo, acoustics, and lighting studies are several main spe cializations offered by the faculty . The fourth option, Real Estate Development, focuses on architecture and devel opment process utilizing the expertise of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Program faculty. Option 1 : Architectural Experimentation Option II: Architecture and Design with the Macintosh Option Ill: Building Technology Option IV: Real Estate Development Courses: ARCH 6622 (3) Modern Architecture ARCH 6623 (3) Investigations in Architecture ARCH 6627 (3) Post-Structuralist Architecture ARCH 6628 (3) Theories of Avant Garde ARCH 6632 (3) Building Performance Analysis ARCH 6633 (3) Lighting ARCH 6640 (3) Introduction to Computer Graphics ARCH 6641 (3) Computer Applications in Architecture ARCH 6642 (3) Design and Architecture with the Macintosh ARCH 6643 (3) Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh ARCH 6704 (6) Architectural Experimentation I ARCH 6705 (6) Architectural Experimentation II ARCH 6950 (6) Th esis Research and Programming ARCH 6951 (6) Architecture Thesis PRACTICE ELECTIVES HRS. 15 15 12 18 ELECTIVES (3) 18 ARCH 6750 (3) ELECTIVES (3) 18 ELECTIVES (12) 18 3 18 114 URP 6660 (3) Real Estate Development Process URP 6661 (3) Real Estate Development Finance URP 6662 (3) Real Estate Market Analysis URP 6664 (3) Fiscal Impact Analysis

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COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION I , ARCHITECTURAL EXPERIMENTATION COURSE DESIGN CREDIT SEQUENCE STUDIO THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. FALL ARCH 6704 (6) ARCH 6622 (3) ARCH 6627 (3) 12 YEAR I SPRING ARCH 6705 (6) ARCH 6623 (3) 12 ARCH 6628 (3) SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 12 12 12 36 COURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION II, ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN WITH THE MACINTOSH RESEARCH COURSE PROJECT CREDIT SEQUENCE OR THESIS THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. ARCH 6704 (6) ARCH 6640 (3) FALL OR 12 ARCH 6950 (6) ARCH 6642 (3) YEAR I ARCH 6705 (6) ARCH 6641 E3) SPRING OR 12 ARCH 6951 (6) ARCH 6643 (3) SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 12 12 12 36 :OURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION III, BUILDING TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH COURSE PROJECT CREDIT SEQUENCE OR THESIS THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. ARCH 6704 (6) ARCH 6632 (3) FALL OR 12 ARCH 6950 (6) ARCH 6642 (3) YEAR I ARCH 6705 (6) ARCH 6633 (3) SPRING OR 12 ARCH 6951 (6) ARCH 6643 (3) SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 12 12 12 36 :OURSE SEQUENCE: OPTION IV, REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH COURSE PROJECT CREDIT SEQUENCE ORTiiESIS THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. ARCH 6704 (6) URP6660 (3) FALL OR 12 ARCH 6950 (6) URP6662 (3) YEAR I ARCH 6705 (6) URP6661 (3) SPRING OR 12 ARCH 6951 (6) URP6664 (3) • SUMMER ELECTIVES (12) 12 12 12 12 36 Architecture I 57 ARCHITECTURE ELECTIVES: ARCH 5540 (3) Design Photography ARCH 6610 (3) Furniture Design ARCH 6622 (3) Modern Architecture ARCH 6623 (3) Investigations in Architecture ARCH 6624 (3) The Built Environment in Other Cultures 1: Research Design ARCH 6910 (6) The Built Environment in Other Cultures ll: Field Experience ARCH 6627 (3) Post-Structuralist Architecture ARCH 6628 (3) Theories of Avant Garde ARCH 6632 (3) Building Performance Analysis ARCH 6633 (3) Lighting ARCH 6634 (3) Materials and Detailing 1: Residential ARCH 6635 (3) Materials and Detailing II: Commercial ARCH 6640 (3) Introduction to Computer Graphics ARCH 6641 (3) Computer Applications in Architecture ARCH 6642 (3) Design and Architecture with the Macintosh ARCH 6643 (3) Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh ARCH 6683 (3) Teaching Methods in Architecture ARCH 6704 (6) Architectural Experimentation I ARCH 6705 (6) Architectural Experimentation II ARCH 6720 (3) American Art and Architecture ARCH 6721 (3) Art and Architecture of Islam ARCH 6722 (3) Latin American Art and Architecture ARCH 6723 (3) Oriental Art and Architecture ARCH 6740 (3) Computer Aided Design ARCH 6930 (3) Architecture Internship ARCH 6931 (3) Architecture Internship ARCH 6950 (6) Thesis Research and Programming ARCH 6951 (6) Architecture Thesis

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58 / School of Architecture and Planning Architecture Courses ARCH 5050-3. Applied Mathematics for Designers I. This class is designed for the student with little or no college MATH experience. It begins with arithmetic skills and short-cuts, continues through college level algebra , and ends with trigonometry . This class is part of the required mathe matics for students of architecture, but is recommended for anyone of non-technical background . ARCH 5051-3. Applied Mathematics for Designers ll. A continuation of ARCH 5050 , this class will begin with analytical geometry and continue through differen tial and integral calculus . The course com pletes the mathematics requirement for students of architecture and is open to those who have credit for or feel compe tent in the material covered in ARCH 5050. ARCH 5052-3. Environmental Science for Designers . This course is designed to meet the requirements of the school of architecture and planning for entrance into the graduate program in architecture. The basic principles of physics will be covered in a practical way. The course includes the mechanics of bodies at rest, dynamics, electricity, heat , light , and sound. The course is recommended for anyone who needs a working knowledge of science. ARCH 5500-6. Introduction to Architec tural Design Studio I. The introductory studio focuses on the basic strategies and techniques of design production. Students are introduced to architectonics, design analysis and criticism, and the signifi cance of the elements of design . Emphasis is placed on development of an awareness of the role of architectural theory and his tory in the design process. Prereq: ARCH 5050,5051, and 5052; coreq: ARCH 5510, 5520 and 5530. ARCH 5501-6.1ntroduction to Architec tural Design Studio ll. The second intro ductory design studio continues the examination of the issues raised in the first semester and begins investigation of more complex issues related to building design and landscape . Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic approach to design while simultaneously dealing with the development of theory and intellec tual inquiry. Prereq: ARCH 5500 ; coreq: ARCH 5511,5521, and 5531. ARCH 5502-6. Architectural Design Studio III. The first intermediate studio in architecture focuses on the interrelation ship between architectural design and the art of construction. The course acts as a transition between the abstract and theo retical concerns of the introductory stu dios and the thoughtful realization or practice of ideas . Th e emphasis is placed on development of how a building is put together as a material conceptual con struct. Prereq : ARCH 5501; core q : ARCH 5532 and 5533. ARCH 5510-3. Elements of Design Expres sion and Presentation I. This course cov ers the basic principles of d es criptive geometry ( techni cal drawing ). Basic prin ciples of orthographic projection, axono metric projection , perspective, and photographic reproduction methods (portfolio) are examined. Emphasis is placed on defining abstract forms and real objects in terms of line , light , shade, and shadow. ARCH 5511-3. Elements of Design Expres sion and Presentation II. This course builds upon the basic principles and issues in the previous semester . Craft and precision are stressed, but with an empha sis toward design articulation and individ ual expression . Students are introduced to a wide range of compositional techniques and methods and selection of media and materials . The subjects covered are: draw ing as analysis ; drawing as representation; principles of color interaction ; and means of representing architectural space in terms of color, light , shade, and shadow gradation and value distinction . ARCH 5520-3. Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism. This course exam ines the evolution of ideals and principles in modern architecture , design , land scape, and urbanism and traces the his torical development of theoretical issues through a study of selected writing . The course provides an overview of the litera ture in design theories and explores the relationship between design and the writ ings that include its interpretation and production. ARCH 5521-3. Survey of Architectural History. The second course in the his tory / theory sequence, beginning with architecture and urban i sm in antiquity , stresses the origin and interpr e tation of built form as symbol and the problems of early building technology and develop ment of tradition in European architecture and urbanism . It examines th e emergence of building types and settlem e nt patterns and their relationship to social institu tions. Case studies are drawn from pre classical, classical, and late antiquity , Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque architecture. ARCH 5530-3. Structures I. Th e course introduces the analysis and design of structural elements and focuses on funda mental principles of statics and strength of materials . Areas covered are equilib rium , movement, trusses, three force members , properties of structural materi als including wood and steel, stress-strain relationships , and an introduction into the design and analysis of structural elements made of wood and steel in tension, shear, and bearing . ARCH 5531-3. Structures II. The course is a continuation of Structures I, focusing on study of stress determination of struc tures, and gene ral principles involved in the design of wood, steel, and concrete members. Problems in design of building elements subjected to direct stress, bevel ing , and combined stress, deflection , methods of fabrication , and details of connections are exp lor ed. ARCH 5532-3. Building Technology I. This course addresses issues in building construction and focuses on interrelation ships between architectural concepts and objectives and building construction tech niques through l ect ur es, case study pre sentation s , and exercises. It focuses on the wide range of materials and construc tion techniques available to meet design objectives . ARCH 5533-3. Environmental Control Systems I. This course focuses on study of environmental control systems in build ing, including the thermal behavior of buildings , climate as a major determinant of building design, energy use in buildings strategies for designing buildings as comp let e environmental control systems, mechanical means of environmental contro ls , heating, ventilation , air conditioning, plumbing, electrical, and communication systems, water supply, and sanitation systems . ARCH 5540-3. Design Photography. This course will introduce architectural students to the basics of photography anc architectural photography. Class will be a combination of lecture/demonstration and student assignments followed by eva! uation. The course will enable the stu dent to produce his or her own working photographs of drawings, models, and buildings. ARCH 6600-6. Architectural Design Studio IV. The second intermediate studi< sequence focuses on exploration of archi tecture in the urban context and examina tion of typological form and cultural co nstructs which will provide a basis for the inclusion of new spaces and forms within the fabric of the city. Emphasis is placed on methodological study of site, program, and elements of architecture whic h are used to facilitate work. ARCH 6601-6. Architectural Design Studio V. The final intermediate studio sequence focuses on examination of impacts of large-scale urban projects that

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include commercial , offic e, and residen tial uses in an existing urban fabric . Issues such as typology , charact e r , and monu mentality are consid e red in relation to the d esign o f b u ildings of civic significance . Emphasis is p l aced on relationship of the role of the building to the morphology of the city and the building ' s expression in architectura l form . ARCH 6610 3 . Furniture Design. The f ocus of this studio / lecture course is to ex p lore t h e effects and responses of phys ical human factors , material characteristics, stru c tu re, joinery , and history in the design of furniture . Design process , pro g r a m ming, design and presentation tech niques, along with drawing and model buil di n g skills are emphasized in this p roject oriented course. ARCH 66203 . Architecture in the 18th Through 20th Centuries. The third course in the history /theory sequence f ocuses on t h e breakdown of the Baroque synthesis and the coming of classical and ro mant i c historicism in architecture and the birth of modern architecture . The impact o f technology , industrialization and social changes on architecture and ur ban i sm, changing attitudes toward the t reatment of architectural space and the f o r mation of new critical concepts, and the emergence of Art Nouveau and the roots of the "Modern Movement " in a r c h itecture are examined . ARCH 6621-3. History of Architectural Theory . Th i s course investigates architec tural thought from antiquity to the pre sent. It begins with a review of greek ideals a nd then p roceeds-through an appreci ation of architecture and its texts as an essential cu ltu ral constituent-with a survey of major themes such as Renais sance Human i sm , Enlightenment R ationalism , Romantic Historicism , N eo-Me d ievalism, the varieties of Mod ernism, Neo-Eclecticism , and the most r ecent d ir ections. ARCH 6622-3 . Modem Architecture. T h i s cou rse examines modern architec tur e from De Stijl and Bauhaus toLe Cor b usier. Emphasis is placed on critical e valu ation of this developmental stage and its impact on discipline of architect ur e an d cit y design . ' i\RCH 6623-3 . Investigations in Architec ture. This course focuses on examination ::>f the his t orical development of theoreti :al issues through a study of selected writ I ngs and the evolution of ideas and design princi p les in architecture, landscape uchitectu re, and urbanism . It explores : h e pedagogic relationship between j es ign and the cultural roots that influ its interpretation and production . ARCH 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures 1: Research Design. This course intends to broad e n stude nts ' perspectives by a s kin g them to examine design within another culture. E ach stu dent will prepare a proposal of study including a statement of the problem to be addressed, the type of field resear c h to be undertaken , and the nature of th e report produced. ARCH 6627-3. Post Structuralist Architec ture. This cours e examines the ories of post-structuralism and their implicati o ns to architectural exploration and experi mentations. Drawing from Russ ell, Descartes , Derrida , Husser! , Heidegger , Barthes , Foucault , and other leading authorities , the course focuses on devel opment of a theoretical discours e for architecture. ARCH 6628-3. Theories of Avant Garde. This course examines the origin and evo lution of the Avant Gard e the ories fro m Russian constructivism to Futurism , Dadaism , Surrealism , a nd De Stijl. Empha sis is placed on investigation of the impli cation of historic Avant Garde to present modes of architectural exploration . ARCH 6629-3. History of Interior Design. This course is a survey and critical analy sis of major 20th century interiors . It begins the process of relating interior environments from antiquity to contem porary by focusing on furnishings , the decorative arts, interior architectural detailing , and interior architectural spaces. The special focus is on critical evaluation and analysis of historical precedents. ARCH 6630-3. Structures Ill. This course examines theoretical and conceptual bases for the qualit a tive and quantitative analysis of indeterminate structures. Course topics include continuity , move ment distri bution , reinforced concrete ele ments , precast and prestressed elements , walls , columns, footings , earthquake loads on buildings , and detailing of struc tural systems. ARCH 6631-3. Environmental Control Systems II. The course focuses on lighting and acoustics. Illumination quantity and quality, day lighting and electric lighting, lighting design and applications are cov ered. The behavior and effect of daylight are studied through the construction of models . Techniques such as preparation of working drawings and specifications are covered . ARCH 6632-3. Building Performance Analysis. This course addresses issues in performance integration of overall build ing components and the ability to predict architectural design performance in Architec ture Courses I 59 advance. Students will experience the u s e of up-to-date technology , laboratory facili ties , guided hands-on experiments, onsit e o bservation, and computer simulation . ARCH 6633-3. lightin g. This introduc to r y course in lighting investigates the processes and the objectives of lighting an d provides the vocabulary and mechanics necessary to the understanding and int er pretation of lighting needs in design . Strategies and criteria for lighting are the focus of this course, covering both theoretical and practical issues. ARCH 6634-3. Materials and Detailing 1: Residential.This course provides stu dents with the opportunity to explore theory and application of materials used in residential interiors . The course focuses on study of composition and characteristics of individ ual finish materi als as well as conventional methods of representing them graphically. ARCH 6635-3 . Materials and Detailing ll: Commercial. The goals and parameters o f this course are the same as those outline d for Materials and Detailing I; however, t h e focus will be commercial inter i ors. Pre r e q : ARCH6634 . ARCH 6636-3. Building Technology U . This course is a continuation of Buildi n g Technology I. It focuses on the range of building construction systems and tec h niques that can be organized to achieve specific design intentions. T h e course pro vides this framework to organize and r esearch construction docu ments with specific performance and design criteria. Prereq : ARCH 5530,5531,5532. ARCH 6640-3. Introduction to Computer Graphics. This course prov i des a han ds on introduction to the personal compute r and the disk operating system. The fun da mentals of drawing with a comp uter will be taught with the production of mode r ate-sized drawings . Basic two-dimensional cadd concepts such as symbols and layer ing will be explored . Stude nt s will lear n to use a digitizer for input and output gra ph ics to a plotter. ARCH 6641-3. Computer A pplications in Architecture. This course buil ds upo n the basics learned in ARCH 6640. Customizing applications to increase p rodu ctivity will be stressed. Linking of grap h ics and text databases through the use of attribut es will be investigated . Three-dime n sional modeling will be used to vis u alize the design process. ARCH 6642-3. Design and Archite c ture With the Macintosh. This course intro duces the Macintosh computer as a po w erful exploratory design tool which has the potential for exploratio n an d gene ra tion of new architectural ideas and form s.

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60 I School of Architecture and Planning The Macintosh is seen as an extension or amplification of the human brain . The course does not require the user to learn computer programming or complicated command structures; a non-technical , intuitive, word of mouth , trial and error mode of learning is possible . Once basic skills are mastered , production is immedi ate. Emphasis is placed on analysis , self criticism , revision , and refinement of design intentions with the computer tool. ARCH 6643-3. Advanced Design Applica tions With the Macintosh. This course builds upon experiences gained from the introductory course, ARCH 6642. The course requires the students to have an extensive knowledge of the Macintosh system. The course will devote the entire semester to work with the three-dimen sional modeling programs . Emphasis is placed on techniques of exploration and innovation in three-dimensional spatial representation of design and architectural constructions . ARCH 6660-3. Human and Social Dimen sions of Design. This course focuses on the introduction of basic social and psy chological processes relevant to changing environmental conditions , human factors, and problems of the built environment. Emphasis is placed on techniques of inter face problems in des i gn ; the relationship between human use and perception of space, cognitive mapping, preferences and attitudes toward environmental set tings ; and the evaluation of particular environments and developing architec tural programs . ARCH 6683-3. Teaching Methods in Architecture. This course is designed to develop teaching and academic capa bilities in the context of architecture. The student works with a faculty member in an instructional context eight hours per week. ARCH 6686-3. Special Topics. Various topical concerns are offered in architec ture history , theory, elements , concepts, methods and implementation strategies, and other related areas. ARCH 6700-6. Advanced Architectural Design Studio VI. The studio focuses on students' elaboration and substantiation of personal ideas through complex design exercises and by critically addressing the status of contemporary the ory. Emphasis is placed on a comprehen sive design project that is structured to test students on integration of structural aspects, mechan i cal systems , site plan ning , and climate considerations within their design solutions. ARCH 6701-6. Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII. The final design studio continues the comprehensive approach through a full range of design investigation and strategies at all scales from program and conception to construction detail. Students must demonstrate abilities to synthesize all previous work through an application of a complex architectural design project. ARCH 6704-6. Architectural Experimen tation I. An advanced architectural design studio focusing on design explorations and stressing theorization and develop ment of ideologies in architectural design . Emphasis is placed on experimentation with various art medias such as painting , sculpture , music , linguistics , film making , and others . ARCH 6705-6. Architectural Experimen tation II. As a continuation of ARCH 6704, this studio stresses a culminative effort toward synthesis and contribution of orig inal proposal for development of architec tural theory. Emphasis is placed on architectural transformation as a major indicator of the original contribution of this studio . ARCH 6720-3. American Art and Archi tecture. This course focuses on major developments in american art from 1750-1950. Painting and sculpture , as well as important developmen t s in architecture , will be discussed . The work of such artists and architects as Copley, Peale , Whistler , Cassatt, Hopper , O'Keeffe, Thomas Jeffer son, Louis Sullivan , and Frank Lloyd Wright will be studied. ARCH 6721-3. Art and Architecture of Islam. This course focuses on study and examination of the art and architecture of the Islamic cultures from the death of Muhammad through the 18th century from Spain to India . ARCH 6722-3. Latin American Art and Architecture. This course focuses on study and examination of the art and architecture of the colonies of Spain and Portugal in the western hemisphere from 1492 to the present. ARCH 6723-3. Oriental Art and Architec ture. This is an introductory survey of oriental art and architecture . The course aims to uncover the relationship between east Asian art and architecture and its accompanying theories . ARCH 6740-3. Computer Aided Design. The course explores the relationship between design, mathematics, and computation . The concepts of finite mathematics will be introduced using building design examples . Problem-solv ing methods in design and computation will be explored. The analysis of plan types will be related to topology and geometry ; symmetry and combinatorial groups will be introduced . Computer projects and readings will be assigned to explore the concepts . ARCH 6750-3. Professional Practice. course introduces the student to the essential elements of professional prac tice through subject areas such as intern ship , licensing , services , modes of practice , fees, marketing , documents, specifications , and production proce dures . One three-hour lecture per week. Prereq: final year in program or approval of instructor . ARCH 6840-1 to 3.Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to architecture . ARCH 6910-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures II: Reid Experience. Stu dents will travel to their respective cities and undertake the agreed upon study proposals . The course intends not only to help students consider their own design and planning attitudes, but also help them see the world from a more bal anced perspective. ARCH 6930-3. Architecture Internship. This course is designed to provide profes sional practice experience to students anc is composed of eight hours per week work in a practicing professional's office during the regular semester . The student is placed in an architectural and /or design office by the school and receives credit instead of pay . Students must complete second year level before taking this course. ARCH 6931-3. Architecture Internship. This course is designed to provide profes sional practice experience to students an< is composed of eight hours per week work in a practicing professional ' s office during the regular semester. The student is placed in an architectural and /or design office by the school and receives credit instead of pay. Students must complete second year level before taking this course. ARCH 6950-6. Thesis Research and Programming. ARCH 6951-6. Architecture Thesis. Urban Design A city no longer inhabited , not simply left behind , but haunted by meaning and culture. This state of being haunted, which keeps the city from returning to nature , is perhaps the general mode of the presence or absence of the thing itself in pure language . (Derrida 1978) Cities are in reality great camps of the living and the dead where many

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elements remain like signals, symbols, cautions. When the holiday is over; what remains of the architecture is scarred , and the sand consumes the street again. There is nothing left but to resume with a certain obstinacy the reconstruction of elements and instruments in expectation of another holiday. (A/do Rossi 1981) The Urban Design Program at the School of Architecture and Planning is intended to be a non-<:onventional research program leading to the degree of Master of Architecture in Urban Design. The premise of the program is investiga tion , exploration, experimentation , and representation of ideas and proposals regarding the development of the city. Unlike the classical mode of inquiry, the Urban Design Program takes a relatively more radical approach to the analysis of architecture of the city. The curriculum is designed for the questioning of the exist ing connections and seat:.ching for alterna tive ideologies and proposals for the city's architecture through a structured sequence of lecture and design studios. There are two options of study which extend over a two semester or three semester course of study. There are three curriculum steps involved in these plans . The first step of the curriculum engages students in studying the fundamentals of theory and criticism concerning the structure of present architectural text and dis courses. Simultaneously, the student also OPTION 1 : ONE ACADEMIC YEAR COURSE DESIGN SEQUENCE STUDIO FALL UD6600 (6) YEAR I SPRING UD6601 (6) 12 OPTION II: ONE YEAR CALENDAR YEAR COURSE DESIGN SEQUENCE STUDIO FALL UD6600 (6) YEAR I SPRING UD 6601 (6) SUMMER UD6602 (6) 18 is introduced to the process of decompo sition . This step is necessary for the understanding of the interrelationship between architectural text as a language and architectural text as an artifact. The second step of the curriculum engages the student in studying the recomposition of the city, a process that is in reverse order of the first step. Recomposition involves a sequence of activities that begins with the questioning of the traditions, followed by an investigation of the metaphysics of ori gins and presence, and ends with the for mulation of new design strategies for the architecture of the city . The third and fina l step is intended to be a cumulative experience where the student pursues individ ual interest in urban design. MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE IN URBAN DESIGN The Master of Architecture in Urban Design Program is a one-year post-profes sional degree and is suited for students who have completed a first professional degree in Architecture (B.Arch., M . Arch.). The program requires completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours. Core Curriculum The core curriculum consists of six graduate courses for a total of 21 credit hours. Some students entering the pro gram may be advised to take additional CREDIT THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. UD6620(3) ELECTIVES (6) 18 ARCH 6622 (3) UD6621 (3) ELECTIVES (6) 18 ARCH 6623 (3) 12 12 36 CREDIT THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. UD6620(3) ARCH 6622 (3) 12 UD 6621 (3) ARCH 6623 (3) 12 ELECTIVES (6) 12 12 6 36 Urban Design 161 courses depending on their educational backgrounds. The core curriculum consists of the following courses: UD 6600 (6) Transformation and UD6601 (6) UD6602 (6) UD6620 (3) UD6621 (3) ARCH 6622 (3) ARCH 6623 (3) ELECTIVES: LA5521 (3) URP 5532 (3) URP6680(3) URP6682 (3) ARCH 6621 (3) ARCH 6627 (3) ARCH 6628 (3) ARCH 6640 (3) ARCH 6641 (3) ARCH 6642 (3) ARCH 6643 (3) ARCH 6683 (3) ARCH 6720 (3) ARCH 6721 (3) ARCH 6722 (3) ARCH 6723 (3) ARCH 6740 (3) Decomposition Studio Composition Studio City of Exploration and Experimentation Studio (Optional) Architecture of the City City as an Artifact Modern Architecture Investigations in Architecture History of Landscape Architecture Urban Form History Urbanization in Developing Countries Housing in Developing Countries History of Architectural Theory Post-Structuralist Architecture Theories of Avant Garde Introduction to Computer Graphics Computer Applications in Architecture Design and Architecture with the Macintosh Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh Teaching Methods in Architecture American Art and Architecture Art and Architecture of Islam Latin American Art and Architecture Oriental Art and Architecture Computer Aided Design Urban Design Courses U D 6600-6. Transformation Decomposi tion Studio. The first studio of a two studio sequence introduces the process of decomposition in urban structure through analysis of landscape and structures in search of ordinary and non-ordinary elements of the city . The studio then is an attempt to restore immanent conditionsthe suspension between origin and effect, between positive and negative elements of urban structure.

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62 I School of Architecture and Planning U D 6601-6. Composition Studio. This stu dio builds upon th e analytical investiga tions conducted in the previous semes ter and explores the process of composition or recomposition in the architecture of the city. Drawing upon deconstructionist theory, the studio presents a challenge to the hegemony of traditional design stu dios and is a search for authenticity . Con sidering architecture as text , the studio is a means to represent an invention , an invited speculation on the conditions of architecture of city. U D 6602-6. City of Exploration and Experimentation Studio. This is an optional independent studio where indi vidual students pursue their individual interests with an emphasis on interaction between architecture and other disci plines . This studio is structured as a cumulative synthesis of knowledge an d skills into an original proposal for the betterment of city con ditions . U D 6620-3. Architecture of the City. This course focuses on interpretation of archi tecture of the city and its landscape, artic ulation and disarticulation , discontinuity of order, immanence and memory . Draw ing from contemporary writers such as Derrida, Barthes , Adorno, Haber mas, Heidegger , Husser!, and others , the course examines the questions of replication , rep resentation , and signification in the city . U D 6621-3. The City as an Artifact. This course focuses on study of ordinary and non-ordinary architect ure and its implica tions to urban context. Beginning by examination of classical representation and refutation, the course attempts to present denial and possibility in architec ture by investigating t r adition and meta physics of origins and presence . U D 6686-3. Special Topics in Urban Design. Various topical concerns are offered in urban design history, theory , elements, concepts , methods , and implementation strategies and other related areas . U D 6840-1 to 3.1ndependent Study. Stud ies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investi gate a special topic or problem related to urban design . U D 6950-6. Thesis Research and Programming. U D 6951-6. Urban Design Thesis. Landscape Architecture Program Director: Lois A. Brink The Landscape Architecture Program offers both first and post-professional Master of Landscape Architecture degrees . The first professional Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) is fully accredited by the Landscape Architec tural Accreditation Board (LAAB) and is recognized by the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture. The primary mission of the program is to imbue the student with a design ethic for Landscape Architecture-in its wholis tic sense of landscape intervention-as a balance or harmony between the abstract and the real , between architec ture and landscape, and between art and ecology . The underlying premise or baseline is that the landscape architect strives to design places for people to inhabit , in the artful sense of the word, with a relentless commitment to quality, ethics and appropriateness. The program prepares the student to enter into the profession of Landscape Architecture with a thorough understand ing and capability of making judgments through a design process . The design process is the method by which one can determine the appropriateness and inte gration of the natural , aesthetic , social and cultural parameters of landscape intervention . It infuses the student with a rigor and discipline necessary to executeimplement -evaluate and critique his or her actions . More specifically , the objectives of the program are to develop a thorough com petence in design , the design process , and knowledge of landscape technology with particular emphasis on exploration, experimentation, and synthesis , and understanding of professional practice including management and professional conduct. MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE I (First professional degree) Three year program . The first profes sional M .L.A. degree requires 90 semester hours and three years of full-time study . The curriculum consis ts of a core of four related course components: Design, 42 credit hours ; History and Theory, 15; Science and Technology , 15; and Profes sional Practice , 3 , totaling 75 credit hours , and 15 semester hours of electives . The CurriculumThree Year Program DESIGN: 42 semes ter hours LA5500 (6) LA5501 (6) LA6600 (6) LA6601 (6) LA6700 (6) LA6701 (6) LA5510 (3) LA5511 (3) Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio I Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio II Landscape Architectural Design Studio Ill Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV Advanced Landscape Architectural Design StudioV Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio VI Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II HISTORY AND THEORY 15 semester hours ARCH 5520 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism LA 5521 (3) History of Landscape Architecture ARCH 6620 (3) Architecture in the 18th through 20th Centuries LA 6670 (3) Plants in Design LA Theory Elective : 3 semester hours SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 15 semester hours LA 5532 (3) Landscape Technology I LA 5572 (3) Landscape Ecology LA 6631 (3) Landscape Technology II LA 6632 (3) Site Planning Technology Elective: 3 semester hours of com puter applications PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE: 3 semester hours LA6750(3) ELECTIVES: Professional Practice 15 semester hours MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE II (Post-professiona l degree) Two year program. The post professional degree program requires 48 semester hours and two years of full-time study.

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COURSE SEQUENCE: MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE I COURSE HISTORY/ SCIENCE& PROFESSIONAL SEQUENCE DESIGN THEORY TECHNOLOGY PRACTICE FALL LASSOO (6) ARCH SS20 (3) LASS32 (3) YEAR I LASSIO (3) SPRING LASSO! (6) LA SS21 (3) LASS72 (3) LASSll (3) FALL LA6600 (6) ARCH 6620 (3) LA6632 (3) YEAR II LA6670 (3) SPRING LA6601 (6) ELECTIVES (3) LA 6631 (3) ELECTIVES (3) YEAR Ill FALL LA 6700 (6) SPRING LA6701 (6) 42 COURSE SEQUENCE : TWO YEAR PROGRAM COURSE SEQUENCE DESIGN FALL LA SSOO (6) YEAR I LASSIO (3) SPRING LA6601 (6) LASSll (3) YEAR II FALL LA6700 (6) SPRING LA6701 (6) 30 The cor e c urriculum consists of two groups: Design , 30 credit hours; and History/Theory, 12; for a total of 42 credit hours, and 6 semeste r hours of electives. The Curriculum Two Year Program DESIGN: 30 semeste r hours LASSOO (6) LA6601 (6) LA6700 (6) LA6701 (6) LASSIO (3) LASSll (3) Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio I Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio V Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio VI Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II HISTORY AND THEORY I 2 semester hours A RCH SS20 (3) Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism ARCH 67SO (3}_ IS IS 3 HISTORY/ CREDIT THEORY ELECTIVES HRS. ARCH SS20 (3) 12 ARCH SS21 (3) 12 ELECTIVES (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12 ELECTIVES (3) ELECTIVES (3) 12 12 6 48 ARCH SS21 (3) Survey of Architectural History LA Theory Electives : 6 semester hours in advanced LA theory ELECTIVES: 6 semester hours ELECTIVES: LA 6622 (3) LA6624 (3) LA6641 (3) LA6686 (3) LA 6840 (I -3) LA6910 (6) LA6930 (3) ARCH SS40 (3) ARCH 6622 (3) ARCH 6623 (3) ARCH 6627 (3) Visual Quality Analysis The Built Environment in Other Cultures 1 : Research Desi gn Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture Special Topics in Landscape Architecture Independent Study The Built Environment in Ot her Cultures II: Field Experience Lan dscape Architecture Internship Design Photography Modern Architecture Investigations in Architecture Post-Structuralist Archi tectur e ARCH 6628 (3) Theories of Avant Garde ARCH 6629 (3) History o f Interior Design Landscape Architecture I 63 CREDI T ELECTIVES HRS. IS IS IS IS ELECTIVES (6) IS ELECTIVES (9) IS IS 90 ARCH 6640 (3) Introduction to Computer Graphics ARCH 6641 (3) Computer Applications in Architecture ARCH 6642 (3) Design and Architecture with the Macintosh ARCH 6643 (3) Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh ARCH 6683 (3) Teaching Methods in Architecture ARCH 6704 (6) Architectural Experimentation I ARCH 670S (6) Architectural Experimentation lf . ARC H 6720 (3) American Art and Architecture ARCH 6721 ( 3) Art and Architecture of Islam ARCH 6722 (3) Latin American Art and Architecture ARCH 6723 (3) Oriental Art and ARCH 6740 (3) URP SS20(3) URP SS32 (3) URP6649 (3) Architecture Computer Aided Design Urban Spatial Analysis Urban Form History Environmental Planning 1 : Ecology URP 66SO (3) Environmental Planning ll: Policy and Law URP 6660 (3) Real Estate Development Process URP 6661 (3) Real Estate Development Finance URP 6662 (3) Real Estate Market Analysis URP 6664 (3) Fiscal Impact Analysis A thesis option [LA 69SO (6): Thesis Research and Programming and LA 69S1 (6): Landscape Architecture Thesis] is availab l e primarily for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced academic training in landscape architecture or related fields .

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64 I School of Architecture and Planning Landscape Architecture Courses LA 5500-6. Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio I. The intro ductory studio focuses on the basic strategies and techniques of design pro duction . Students are introduced to archi tectonics , design analysis and criticism , and the significance of the elements of design . Emphasis is placed on development of an awareness of the role of theory and history in the design process . LA 5501-6. Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio D. The sec ond introductory design studio continues the examination of the issues raised in the first semester and begins investigation of more complex issues related to building design and landscape . Emphasis is placed on developing a systematic approach to design while simultaneously dealing with the development of theory and intellec tual inquiry . LA 5510-3. Elements of Design Expres sion and Presentation I. This course cov ers the basic principles of descriptive geometry (technical drawing) . Basic prin ciples of orthographic projection , axono metric projection, perspective , and photographic reproduction methods (portfolio) are examined. Emphasis is placed on defining abstract forms and real objects in terms of line , light , shade, and shadow . LA 5511-3. Elements of Design Expres sion and Presentation II. This course builds upon the basic principles and issues in the previous semester . Craft and precision are stressed, but with an empha sis toward design articulation and individ ual expression. Students are introduced to a wide range of compositional techniques and methods and selection of media and materials . The subjects covered are: draw ing as analysis; drawing as representation ; principles of color interaction ; and means of representing archi t ectural space in terms of color, light , shade, and shadow gradation and value distinction . LA 5521-3. History of Landscape Archi tecture. This course investigates architec tural thought from antiquity to the present. It begins with a review of greek ideals and then proceeds-through an appreciation of landscape and nature as essential cultural constituentswith a sur vey of major themes such as renaissance humanism, enlightenment , rationalism , romantic historicism , neo-medievalism, the varieties of miderism, neo-electicism , and the most recent directions in land scape and garden design. LA 5532-3. Landscape Technology I. This course will address the fundamental tech niques of landscape archite c ture, includ ing drafting skills, surveying and grading , and the natural systems as they affect con struction . The application of road design and utility systems for site development will also be covered. LA 5572-3. Landscape Ecology . This course is focused on the study of physiog raphy, cultural factors, and aesthetic crite ria in relation to landscape, spatial organization , and urban and regional structure. Emphasis is placed on continu ity and change in and ecology of both nat ural and man-made landscape. LA 6600-6. Landscape Architectural Design Studio Ill. The first intermediate studio focuses upon the exploration of landscape as context and its integration of objects . Emphasis is placed on e xplo ration of landscape and experimentation with spatial organization and manipula tion of context . LA 6601-6. Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV. The second intermediate studio sequence focuses on larger scale development projects dealing with more complex spatial arrangement of buildings and other objects within the landscape , functional needs and require ments within the framework of a variety of social , economic , and natural / physical constraints . LA 6620-3. Landscape Architecture The ory and Criticism. This course focuses on exploration and assessment of the current state of theory in landscape architecture and related design disciplines, and the ideas undergoing contemporary design approaches . Narrative and explanatory theories are the objects of study. Empha sis is placed on history and pedagogic the ories and their relationships to other disciplines such as art, ecology , geogra phy , architecture , and anthropology . LA 6622-3. Visual Quality Analysis. This course introduces students to a range of philosophies, methods , and techniques in visual landscape analysis . Emphasis is placed on application of methods and techniques to urban and regional context and scale , and visual impact assessment and simulation . LA 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures I. Research Design. This course intends to broaden students' per spectives by asking them to examine design within another culture . Each stu dent will prepare a proposal of study including a statement of the problem to be addressed , the type of field research to be undertaken , and the nature of the report produced . LA 6631-3. Landscape Technology II. This course is a continuation of LA 5532 and focuses on the study of materials and methods employ e d in construction of site features and e volution of palette , tech niques and theory of detailed design including pav e ments , fences, walk , stairs , revetments , basins , and fountains . LA 6632-3. Site Planning. The course focuses on the site planning process including research and data gathering , data analysis and synthesis , design analy sis and its r e lationship to building pro gram and c oncept , and design synthesis of site and preparation of site plan. Emphasis is placed on design through grading , rep resentation , manipulation and calculation of road work , utilities and other site fea tures. Vertical and horizontal alignment , earthwork and cost computation, and integration with existing and proposed features or systems are all covered . LA 6641-3. Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture . The course introduces problem solving m ethods, and the relationship between those methods , and the application of a computer to design problems . Introductory problems are given in basic using the graphics pack age , a high-level language such as pascal is used to explore language in more depth, and to conclude , a series of assignments introduces the graphics unit or high-level language. Assignments in programming cad problems are required . LA 6670-3. Plants in Design. This course focuses on the study of design methods used in landscape architecture . Formal design principles , spatial sequencing , and plant functions are applied in design stud ies, based on botanical aesthetic traits and physical requirements of a wide vari ety of plant material. LA 6686-3. Special Topics in Landscape Architecture. Various topical concerns are offered in landscape architecture his tory , theory, elements , concepts , meth ods, implementation strategies , and other related areas. LA 6700-6. Advanced Landscape Archi tectural Design Studio V. This studio will focus upon the students' elaboration and substantiation of personal ideas through complex design exercise which critically address contemporary landscape archi tectural theory. Emphasis is based upon a comprehensive landscape design project structured to test student ability to inves tigate ecological, socio-cultural aesthetics and dimension in their design solutions . LA 6701-6. Advanced Landscape Archi tectural Design Studio VI. The final studio is comprehensive in its approach . The major goal is to present a full range of

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complex design investigations and imple mentation strategies at various scales, while allowing the students to demonstrate their ability to synthesize all previous academic work. LA 6750-3. Professional Practice. The course focuses on studies in th e profes sional practice of landscape architecture and related professions , and case prob lems in initiating and managing a profes sional practice. It explores the essential elements of professional practice and equips students with the fundamental knowledge and skills requisite to an understanding of, and parti
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66 1 School of Architecture and Planning particular item was selected. The appli cant may submit other relevant materials . The format must be 8 '/{ ' x 11" and bound. A stamped , self-addressed envelope must be included if the portfolio is to be returned . Core Courses URP 5501 (3) URP 5510 (3) URP 5511 (3) URP5520 (3) URP5530 (3) URP6630 (4) URP 6631 (4) URP 6632 (1) Plann i ng History and T heory Plann i ng Methods I Plann ing Methods II Urban Spatial Analysis Plann i ng Law Planning Studio I Planning Studio II Preparation for Profes sional Certification LA 6632 (3) Site Planning A thesis option (URP 6950 Thesis Research and Programming and URP 6951 Thesis) is available primarily for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced academic training in planning or related fields. Specialized Courses The elective courses enable students to explore in depth an area of special interest. Students should build on the exper tise which they already possess . This can be done by learning about a related cialty , or by increased specialization in an already existing area of expertise. The Urban and Regional Planning faculty hav e particular strengths in Urban Economic Development, Land Use, Environmental Planning, and Real Estate and Land Devel opment. Students must take at least 24 hours of elective courses. Urban and Regional Planning Courses URP 5500-3. Introduction to Urban and Regional Planning. This course focuses on the principles of urban and regional planning , theories of planning , community organization , basic techniques , changing philosophies in modern society, and the process of shaping community form. URP 5501-3. Planning History and Theory . This course provides an overview of planning history and theory . The philo sophical, political , and economic roots of the various theories are discussed.ldeas are placed in the context of the planning profession's history and its present aims, interests, and ethics . URP 5510-3. Planning Methods I. This course focuses on the application of sta tistical, quantitative , and mathematical techniques, and computer applications for urban and regional planning and policy development. Major topics include types of data, sampling, basic probability distri butions, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and an introduction to multi-variate and cluster analysis . Applica tio ns in planning and development are em phasized . URP 5511-3. Plapning Methods II. This course continues th e development and applications of techniques introduced in URP 5510, as well as other planning meth ods, models , and techniques. These include physical, social , and economic models, urban land use and development models, decision-making techniques, and linear and dynamic programming . Prereq: URP 5510 or consent of instructor . URP 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis. This course is an examination of the spatial structure of the urban system. The urban system is analyzed in terms of the "sys tem of cities" and "city as a system. " Major top ics discussed include the economic ory of the origin of city, the rank-size and primate distributions, the location pattern and hierarchical structure of cities, func tional classification of cit i es, urban growth and economic base , movement of popula tion within and between cities, spatial pat tern of land use and economic activities, spatial pattern of urban population den sity, and urban social space and urban cognition . URP 5530-3. Planning Law. This course focuses on the legal setting for urban and regional planning in the United States and major constitutional issues in the effect ua tion of planning policy. Contemporary controversies are put into the lar ger con text of attempts by the judicial system to redefine the balance between individual rights and governmental power in an increasingly weakened society. URP 5532-3. Urban Fonn History. An analysis of urban physical form from the origin of cities to the present. The empha sis is on cities of western civilization and American urban planning. Major shifts in urban ideas, architecture , transportation, landscapes, and energy systems are discussed and evaluated using a lecture format. URP 5533-3. Urban Fonn Theory. A description and analysis of contemporary schools of thought on ur ban physical form. Theories will be evaluated accord ing to the accuracy of their explanations of present urban form , the quality of their images of future form , and the practicality of their strategies for implementing their ideal using a slide/lecture / discussion format. URP 6624-3. The Build Environment in Other Cultures 1: Research Design. This course intends to broaden student's per spective by asking them to examine design within another culture. Each student will prepare a proposal of study includi ng a statement of the problem to be addressed, the type of field research to be undertaken , and the nature of the report produced . URP 6630-4 . Planning Studio I. This course focuses on plan design in urban and regional planning and explores basic concepts, techniques, and issues related to urban planning , urban design , site plan ning, and environmental awareness . URP 6631-4. Planning Studio II. The focus of studio II is on plan making related to urban and regional planning . An und er standing of the plan-making process is emphasized . Students will have direct experience with the various steps in plan ning, including data-gathering , goal-set ting, identification of alternatives, analysis, synthesis , and presentation of the plan . The plan may be for a city sector, a neighborhood, an entire community, a region , or it may be a policy plan. Where possible, students will work with an actual client . Prereq : URP 6630. URP 6632-1. Preparation for Professional Certification. This course is taken in the student's final semester before gradua tion. It provides a comprehensive review of the planning literature and practice. The course coverage follows that of the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) examination. Only open for plan ning students in their last semester or consent from the program director . URP 6640-3. Community Development Process. This course introduces commu nity development, a field closely allied with planning, in its devotion to working with people to strengthen their communi ties in accordance with locally determined goals. Emphasis is placed on understand ing groups, organizations, and communi ties and on developing skills in such areas as community analysis, goal setting , group facilitation , and problem solving. URP 6641-3. Social Planning. An increas ingly important specialty in contempo rary planning practice is social planning. This course covers the process of formu lating public policies and designing, menting, and evaluating programs in such as social services, housing, health care, employment, and education. Atten tion is given to the historical perspective and the present-day social and political context within which social policy forma tion and social planning occurs. •

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URP 6642-3. Neighborhood Planning. An introduction to small area planning includ ing survey of neighborhood and commu nity theory , examination and critique of research and analytical techniques involved in neighborhood planning . Examines and analyzes existing plans of local neighborhoods . URP 6649-3. Environmental Planning I: Ecology. This course studies the physiog raphy, cultural factors , and aesthetic crite ria in relation to landscape and spatial organization and structure. It will cover data sources and interpretation , and it will look at environmental factors in develop ment and siting analysis . Prereq : URP 5510 or consent of instructor . URP 6650-3. Environmental Planning II: Policy and Law. This course provides a comprehensive perspective on environ mental planning policy . It focuses on major environmental issues and prob lems , methods of evaluation , and legisla tive responses. Prereq : URP 5530 or consent of instructor . URP 6651-3. Environmental Impact Assessment. The objective of this course is to provide the foundation for under standing the environmental impact assessment process, its legal context , and the criteria and methods for procedural and substantive compliance . Prereq : URP 5530 or consent of instructor. URP 6652-3. Growth Management. This course examines environmental and land regulations such as zoning , subdivision controls, and growth management sys tems in the context of public policy. Emphasis is placed on case studies , the analysis of past and present practices, the improvement of existing systems , and the design of new regulatory systems . Prereq: URP 5530 or consent of instructor . URP 6653-3. Natural Resources Planning and Management. This course focuses on the study of the economic organization and use of natural resources . It covers the study of property rights and their impact on resource use, optimal depletion of non renewable and use and management of renewable resources , applications to fish eries , forests , mineral resources , etc . As well as developing criteria for evaluation of environmental amenities; explores con flicts between growth and environmental quality. URP 6660-3. Real Estate Development Process. This course is a detailed'311alysis of components of the real estate process and its relationship to the design profes sion and other key participants . Students will learn what variables are within the real estate development business , how they interrelate , and why projects suc ceed or fail. URP 6661-3. Real Estate Development Fmance. This course focuses on financial analysis of real estate investments . The course covers topics including measures of value , capitalization rate, capital bud geting , debt and equity markets , and taxa tion . Cash flow and appraisal techniques , complex deal structuring , innovations in debt financing , syndications, tax shelters , tax exempt financing , and micr
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68 I School of Architecture and Planning urban development , housing demand, shelter , and services for the urban poor, the squatting and squatter-built housing , and comparison of government policies and programs addressing housing problems. URP 6686-3. Special Topics in Urban and Regional Planning . Various topical con cerns are offered in urban and regional planning, theory, conce pts , methods , case studies , and practice. URP 6840-1 to 3. Independent Study. Studies initiated by students or faculty and sponsored by a faculty member to investigate a special topic or problem related to urban and regional planning. URP 6910-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures: field Experience. tu dents will travel to their respective ci ties and undertake the agree d upon study proposals . The course intends not on l y to help students consider their own design and planning attitudes, but also to help them see t h e worl d from a more ba l anced perspective. Prereq: URP 6624. URP 6930-3 . Planning Internship. This course is designed to provide professional practice experience to students in urban and regional planning . The emphasis is on actua l work experience in settings with clien t groups as the students assist them in determining solutions to their prob lems. Program director's approval is req uired . URP 6950-3. Thesis Research and Pro gramming. Prereq : minimum of 24 credit hours earned toward completion of mas ter of urban and r egional planning degree. URP 6951-3. Urban and Regional Planning Thesis.

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Acting Dean: Gary A. Kochenberger Associate Dean for Faculty: Jean-Claude Bosch Associate Dean for Academic Programs: Peter G . Bryant Office: 1250 1 4th Street Telephone: 595-4007 Director of the Executive Health Administration Program: John P. Young Director of the Executive M.B.A . Program: John P. Young Academic Director , Health Administra tion Program: Richard W. Foster Faculty Professors: Marcelle V . Arak (Finance), Gordon G. Barnewall (Marketing), Wayne F. Cascio (Manage m ent), Lawrence F . Cunningham (Marketing) , Michael A. Firth (Accoun tin g), H . Michael Hayes (Marke tin g and Strategic Mana gement), Gary A . Kochenberger (Operatio ns Management) , James R. Morris (Finance) , William D . Murray (Information Systems) , Bruce R. Neumann (Accounting and Health Administration) , Edward J. O 'Connor (Management) , Donald L. Stevens (Finance) , Dean G. Taylor (Finance ). Associate Professors: W. Graham Astley (Management), Jean-Claude Bosch (Finance), Peter G. Bryant (Management Science and Information Systems), Kang Rae Cho (Management and International Business) , Edward J . Conry (Business Law and Ethics) , E . Woodrow Eckard , Jr . (Business Economics) , Richard W. Foster (Finance and Health Administration), James H . Gerlach (Information Systems), Jahangir Karimi (Information Systems), Dennis F. Murray ( Accounting) , John C. Ruhnka (Management and Business Law) , C lifford E. Young (Marketing) , Raymond F. Zammuto (Management). Assistant Professors: Stephen P . Allen (Accou nting ), Ajeyo Banerjee (Finance), Ben-Hsien Bao (Accounting), Kenneth L. Bettenhausen (Mangage m ent), Heidi Boers tier (Health Administration), Lloyd Brodsky (Informatio n Systems) , Richard E. Cook (Finance), M arlene C . Fiol (Management ), Kenneth A. Hunt College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration (Marketi ng), Susan M. Keav eney (Marketing) , Deborah L. Kellog (Operations Management) , Sarah Kovoor (Management), Feng Yang Kuo (Information Systems), Moonkyu Lee (Marketing), Chandrase karan Raj am (Management) , Manuel G. Serapio , Jr . (International Business). Marlene A. Smith (Quantitative Methods ). Senior Instructors: Cindy Fischer (Accounti n g), Charles M. Franks (Quantitive Methods ), Gary L. Giese (Management), Robert E. Moore (Marketing), Paul J . Patinka (Management), Barbara A. Pelter (Finance), Jerry Turner (Accounting), John Turner (Finance), Instructors: Errol Biggs (Health Administration), John F. Falkenberg (Finance), Robert D. Hockenbur y (Acco unting ), Chen Ji (Finance) , Lawrence F. Johnston (Finance) , Charles A. Rice (Management), Eric J. Thompson (Information Systems) , Marianne Westerman (Finance). Lecturer: Franklin E. Grange (Operations Managment) INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain business community, the Col lege of Business and Administration at the Universi t y of Colorado at Denver provides its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective , responsi ble business professionals . This level of excellence in higher education is achieved by bringing together nationally recog nized facu lty and highly motivated , mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment. CU-Denver's College of Business is a "research institution," and our faculty are nationally recognized for their contri butions to scholarly research . The infor mation contained in university textbooks is first conceived through faculty research and is usually published in textbooks about six years later. Thus, a research oriented f aculty is writing and t eaching concepts years before they are typically seen in textbooks . According ly, our students have the opportunity to be on the leading edge of business management theory and practice. Our class schedules offer flexibility to meet the needs of full-and part-time students, with both day and evening classes. Whether you are an experienced working professional seeking an advanced degree, or preparing for a new career in the busi ness world , you will gain the knowledge necessary to succeed in today's challeng ing business environment. CU-Denver ' s College of Business can give you an edge over your competition. College of Business and Administration Educational Goals CU-Denver's College of Business and Administration defines the goals of its degree program as follows : 1 . The refinement of basic skills essential for success in business ; these include writing, speaking , calcula ting, co mputing , making high quality decisions , and managing others . 2 . The transmission of knowledge essen tial for success in business . This includes a broad understanding of our social, economic, ethical and political systems derived from education out side the college . Learning within the college, common to all students, focuses on mastery of accounting, finance, marketing, information systems, business law, quantitative methods, and production. 3 . The development of professional views appropriate to fulfilling the man ager ' s responsibility to self , colleagues, employer, and society . Faculty Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about their te aching and research. They hold degrees from the nation's leading business schools, such as Berkeley, Harvard , Stanford, University of Chicago , Univer sity of Pennsylvania, UCLA, and Yale. Many of them also bring years of valuable experience in private industry . Their inter disciplinary expertise, academic achieve ments , scholarly research, and business

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70 I College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration experience provide students with a dynamic learning environment. Students Unlike the students at a traditional college campus, many of our students are adult, working professionals who maintain fulltime employment. Their success and experience enrich class discussions and interactions among stu dents . Although a high percentage attend evening classes , a significant number are full-time students attending classes offered during the day . Following the current national trend , women consti tute about one half of the student body. Since admission standards are among the high est in the region , the student body is unusually motivated and talented . This rich mix of backgrounds , experi ence, and perspectives, when coupled with the strengths of our excellent faculty , fosters stimulating classroom interaction and keen competition among the students . Accreditation While there are approximately 800 rec ognized schools of business nationwide, fewer than one third are accredited by the national accreditation agency for uni versity schools of business-the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). CUDenver ' s College of Business is one of the few schools in the state accredited by the AACSB. Business Week wrote recently , " Today, just having the degree isn't as important as where you get it . .. As corporations become savvier buyers of ... talent, they are giving more weight to the AACSB seal ... Accreditation shows that a Business School cares about the quality of its program . " In addition, many national fellowship programs accept only students from accredited programs . In a similar manner , our program in health administration is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA). This agency ensures that health administration programs meet demanding requirements for quality edu cation in the health administration area . Cooperative Education Cooperative Education is a program designed to provide students with practi cal work experience in a business setting . Through Co-op , students put classroom education into use . Many variables con tribute to an individual's success . Onthe-job experience is one of those vari ables . Cooperative Education provides students with first-hand experience in a real job setting. HOW CO-OP WORKS Working with the College of Business and Administration, the CU-Denver Center for Internships and Cooperative Educa tion places business students as paid Co-op trainees with corporations, busi nesses , or government agencies in posi tions that complement their academic work . Many Co-op positions lead to permanent career appointments upon graduation . ELIGIBILITY FOR PLACEMENT Cooperative Education is open to all students who have comple ted their fresh man year , have maintained a grade-point average of 2 . 5 , and have completed at least 12 hours of course work at CU-Denver (6 hours for graduate stu dents). Some employers have additiona l requirements, i.e . , U .S. citizenship, willing ness to travel, and completion of specific course work. Scholarships and Financial Aid Many programs for financial aid are administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Call556-2886 for detailed information. In addition , the College of Business awards some departmental and genera l scholarships . The amounts of the awards and the number of awards vary each year. For additional information, contact the College of Business, 595-4007 . Each year , a number of undergraduate students are awarded Deans' Scholar ships, Colorado Schol arships, and Regents Scholarships . These provide financial support for a portion of the students' tuition and fees . The Purchasing Management Associa tion of Denver awards an annual scholar ship to students interested in careers in purchasing, and the Colorado Chapter of the American Production and Inventory Control Society awards up to two annual scholarships to students interested in careers in operations management. For information contact the operations man agement faculty advisor in the College of Business . Graduate tuition awards are available to students admitted to the Graduate School of Business Administration , based on a number of factors includ i ng academic performance. For additional information contact the Graduate Programs Office at 628-1276. Student Organizations Opportunity for association with other College of Business and Administration students in varied activities intended to stimulate professional interest and to give recognition to scholastic attainment is provided by the following student organiza tion s : Beta Gamma Sigma-national honorary scholastic fraternity in business CSPA-Colorado Society for Personnel Administration (student chapter) for stu dents interested in personnel or industrial relations CUAMA-student chapter of the Ameri can Marketing Association CU Venture Network-campus chapter of the Association of Collegiate Entrepren eurs , open to all CU-Denver students HASO-Health Administration Student Organization MBNMS AssociationUniversity of Colorado at Denver association of master ' s students in business Phi Chi Theta-national professional business and economics fraternity Sigma Iota Epsilonprof essional and honorary management fraternity SAS-Society of Accounting Students Institute for International Business The Institute for International Business was created in August 1988 to help stimu late new business ventures through part nerships with foreign business schools and executives. It has three goals: • To collaborate with business and government in promoting international economic development opportunities for Colorado and the Rocky Mountain region. • To provid e hands-on training to foreign executives doing business with American firms. • To support research on competitive ness issues in the global economy of the 1990's . The Institut e will offer programs for senior management in business and government. The programs will identify and interpret trends affecting business in the global marketplace and the skills needed to conduct business in these mar kets . The programs also will put senior managers in contact with internationalists who are shaping the political, economic, and social environment for international business.

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GENERAL A C ADEMIC POLICIES Academic policies which apply to all CU-Denver students are described in the General Information section of this cata log . The policies described below apply to both undergraduate students in the College of Business and Administration and graduate students in the Graduate School of Business Administration . Poli cies applying separately to undergraduate and graduate students ar-e described under separate headings . Each student is responsible for knowing and complying with the academic policies and regulations established for the Col lege . The College cannot assume respon sibility for problems resulting from a student' s failure to follow the policies stated in this catalog . Similarly , students are respo n sible for all deadlines , rul e s, and regulations stated in the S c h edule of Classes . Academic Ethics Students are expected to conduct them selves in accordan c e with the highest standards of honesty and integrity . Cheat ing , plagiarism , illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations , alter ation , forgery, or falsification of official records , and similar acts or the a ttempt to engage in such acts are grounds for sus pension or expulsion from the Unive rsity . Also , actions which disrupt the adminis trative process , such a s misrepresenta tion of credentials or academic status, other forms of deception , or verbal abuse of College staff are grounds for suspension or probation . All reported acts of dishon esty must be referred to the College of Business Committee on Student Faculty Rel ations. In particular , students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act involving the offering of the work of someone else as the student's own . It is recommended that students consult with the instructors as to the proper prepara tion of reports , papers , etc . in order to avoid this and similar offenses . Admission to Busines s Classes Admission to business classes is limited to students who have been admitted to the business program , and to other stu dents as described in the separate under graduate and graduate policy sections. The course admission criteria are designed to meet a number of objectives : 1 . To assure access to business courses for students seeking a business degree . 2 . To serve stude nts in other coll e ges who h a ve business-related educ a tion objec tives or requirements . 3 . To service non-degree students who have specific career or education goals. Please refer to the S c hedule of Cla sses each term for course availability. Attendanc e Reg ulation s Students are r e quired to attend classes on a regular basis . Absences must be arranged with the instructor and must conform with the instructor ' s policy on attendance . Prerequis ites Students are e x pected to know and fulfill all prerequisite requirements , includ ing any prerequisite information when registering . The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who enroll without the correct prerequisites. Generally , students who are administra tively dropped will not receive tuition refunds . Course Numb ering The course numbering system used at the University of Colorado at D e nver identifies the class standing required for enrollment. Students are expect e d to take 1000 level courses in their freshman year , 2000 level courses in their sopho more year , 3000 level courses in their junior year and 4000 l e vel courses in their senior year . Courses at the 5000 and 6000 level are r e strict e d to graduate business students. Adding and Dropping Cour ses See the General Information section of this catalog for the University-wide drop / add policies . W i thdrawal See the General information section of this catalog for University wide with drawal policies . Note that the College of Business normally requires instructors ' signatures on all withdrawal forms before the Dean ' s approval is granted . Administrativ e Drop The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who are incorrectly enrolled in business courses . Instructors also may recommend to the College of Business and Administration A cademic Policies I 71 offic e that students who fail to meet exp e cted course attendance or course prerequisites be dropped from the course. Generally , students who are admin istratively droppe d will not rec e ive tuition refunds . Appeal Procedur e Students should contact a bus i ness advisor in the College of Business and Administration office for appeal and petition procedures pertaining to rules and regulations of the College . G eneral Grading Policies Plu s / Minus Grad i ng. College of Business faculty have the option to use plus / minus grading . For example , 8 + corresponds to 3 . 3 credit points (for each semester hour) , 8 -corresponds to 2 . 7 credit points . In comple te Grades. The only inc omplete grade given in the College is IF. An IF g rad e is assigned only when do c umented circumstances cl e arly beyond the stu dent's control pre vent the student from completing course requirements (exams , papers , etc.). Generally , students must make up the missing work and may not retake the entire co urs e . Students should not register for the class a second time but should make up the work with the instruc tor giving the IF. All IF grades must be made up within o ne year , or the IF will be a utomatically chan ged to the grade of F. Also , any such g rades must b e c om pleted and record e d at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. The stu dent is responsibl e for contactin g the instructor concerning the removal of incomplete grad e s . Grad e Changes. Grades as reported by instructors are final. Grad e changes will be considered only in cases of docu mented clerical errors and when a student is making up an incomplete grad e (IF). All changes must be made within one year after the course has been taken unless highly unusual circumstances can be documented and the change has been approved by the Undergraduate Appeals Committee for undergraduate courses , or the Graduate Appeals Committee for graduate courses . Normally , grade changes will not be considered for any circumstances aft e r three years. ACADEMIC PROGRAM S A carefully designed curriculum to prepare students for success in business management is available for the student

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721 College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration seek ing eit her an unde r g r ad u ate or g r a dua t e d eg r ee . The College offers courses l eading to the Bachelo r of Science (Busi ness Administration), Master of Business Adm i n i s tration (M.B.A.), and the Mas t e r of Science (M.S.) degrees . Th e particu lar p ro grams offered are : Areas of Emphasis (B.S. in Business Administration) Accounting Finance Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business Management M arketing Operations Management Graduate Programs Master of Business Admi n istration (M.B . A . ) Master of Science in Acco u nting Master of Science in Finance Master of Science in Health Administration Master of Science in Information Systems Master of Science in Management and Orga n ization Master of Science in Mar keting Executive Programs Master of Business Administration for Executives Master of Science in Health Administration for Executives UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS Associat e Dean : Peter G. Bryant Program Coord i nator: Nancy Reed The undergraduate c ur ricu lum lead ing to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree is intended to h e l p the student achieve the f ollowing genera l objectives : 1. An understanding of the activities that constitute a business enterprise and the principles underlying ad ministration of those activities . 2. T h e ability to t h ink log i c all y and a n a l ytically a b o ut the kind o f comp lex prob l ems encountered by m an agement. 3. Facility in the arts of communication. 4. A comprehension of human relation ships involved in an o r ganization. 5. Awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in administra tive positions . 6 . Skill in the art of learning that will help the student continue self-education after leaving the camp u s. Undergraduate Admissions Tele ph o ne: 628-1277 Admission of Freshman Students. Fresh man applicants must have completed the college preparatory curriculum in high. sch ool, graduated in the top 25% of thetr high school class , and achieved a score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. See the General Information section of this catalog for further information on fresh man admission. Admission of Transfer Students . Appli cants who have completed work at other collegiate institutions should review the i nformation on transfer students in the General Information section of this cata log. I n addition to University the College of Business and Admmistratwn evaluates course work to determine its appropriateness for the degree of Bache lor of Science (Business Administration). Students who have comp l eted more than 24 semester ho . urs of transferable course work are evaluated for admission on the 1 1 basis of their college grade-point average (GPA) without regard to t h eir high school performance . To be automatically admi t ted , students must have a 3 . 0 overall GPA in the courses which would apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business. Administration) , and a 2 . 0 overall GPA m busi'ness courses . Students with less than 3 . 0 overall will be admitted if they have a 3 . 0 in the last 24 semester hours of appli cable course work, a 2 . 0 overall GPA in business courses , and at least a 2 . 0 overal l GPA i n courses appl ying to the degree. S t u d ents who do not m eet either of these admission standards, but with a 2 . 6 in the last 24 hours of applicable work, are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA in the last 24 hours . Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available . For information specific policies on transfer of credtt , consult an undergraduate business pro gram specialist. Intra-university Transfer. Students who want to transfer to the College of Business an d A d ministration from anot her college or sch ool of the University of Colorado a t Denver must formally apply at the College of Business office . Transfer deadlines are August 1 for Fall Semester , December 1 for Spring Semester , and May 1 for the Summer Term . Students will be evalua t ed only on course work that applies t o the business degree program . Generally, this will exclude course work of a technical or vocational nature and courses in activity PE and remedial subjects. Students who have completed at least 24 applicable semester hours will be evaluated on their college work ; students with fewer than 24 transferable hours will be evaluated on the basis of botft high school and col lege work. Students will be considered for admis sion on either their overall GPA in applica ble course work from CU and all previous institutions or on their last 24 hours . Applicants with less than a 2.0 GPA in business courses (from CU or other insti tutions) and overall CU GPA of less than 2 . 0 will be denied admission even though they meet the minimum requirements for consideration . Students will be automatically admitted to the College of Business if they have an overall GPA of 3 . 0 or an overall GPA of 3 .00 on their last 24 hou r s. All other applicants meeting the minimum requirements for admission as stated above will be pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA in the last 24 hours . Pooled applicants will be offered admission as space is available. To apply for an intra-university transfer, student s must submi t an Intra-University Transfe r form and CU-Denver transcripts to a business program specialist. Transfer forms are available at CU-Denver Admis sions or the College of Business office ; transcript request forms are available at CU-Denver Records . The transcript must include the student's most recent semester at the University . Students with previous course work from other institu tions are also required to submit a copy of their transfer credit evaluations (advanced standings). For m e r Students. A CU student from another campus or a CU-Denver student who has not registered for three consecu tive semesters (summers included) is considered a former student and must reapply for admission as a former student. Former CU-Denver business students may be automatically readmitted to the College for up to three years from the semester they last attended if they are in good standing (not on probation or suspen sion) in the College . Students who have not atten ded for mo r e than three yea r s, or w h o h ave comp l e t e d 1 2 or more semester hours at another institution of higher education, must reapply as other former students and meet the admission and degree requirements applicable at the time they reapply. Old Work Policy . This policy applies to students newly admitted to the College of Business and former business students

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readmitted to the College after an absence of three semesters . Applicable credits up to five years old will be counted toward business degree requirements. Courses more than five years old will be evaluated individually for their current relevance to the degree program . Students may be required to update their knowledge by taking additional courses when past courses are outdated ; in such cases , credit will be given for both courses . Generally, business courses more than eight years old will not apply toward degree credit. Second Undergraduate Degree. Students may apply to the College of Business and Administration to earn a second under graduate degree, provided the first under graduate degree is in a field other than business . Students who are accepted for the second undergraduate degree will be required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a busi ness degree. For example, if a student reg istered for a second degree has not had the required mathematics or general edu cation courses , these must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses. Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken before a student begins to pursue the major field. Applications are available through the Office of Admissions and Records . If a student applying for a second under graduate degree has an academic record that justifies consideration for the gradu ate program, that student will be encour aged to consider one of the master's degree programs. Minor in Business Administration. Stu dents in other undergraduate schools and colleges at CU-Denver wishing to take a minor in business administration should consult their college advising office for details and requirements. Double Degree Programs. Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason , students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields . Combined programs have been developed for engineering and business , and may be arranged for other professional combina tions as well. For additional information, contact an undergraduate business pro gram specialist at 628-1277. Undergraduate Advising and Academic Planning Admissio n s Advising. Persons not yet admitted to the College of Business can receive advising on course selection, admission requirements , and other mat ters from an undergraduate program spe cialist. To make an appointment , call 628-1277. Admitted Students . Upon admission to the College, students execute a Degree Contract which identifies the courses required to graduate . This contract con tains all the information needed to select courses and monitor progress toward completion of requirements for the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Business students are expected to assume responsibility for self advising. This includes scheduling courses each term, being familiar with all the policies and procedures of the College, and otherwise managing the student's academic career . Program spe cialists are available to answer questions about unusual situations ; however , they do not provide ongoing information about course selection and scheduling . Career advising is available from busi ness faculty and from the CU-Denver Office of Career Planning and Placement Services , 556-3477 . Undergraduate Core Curriculum University of Colorado a t Denver The faculty of the College of Business Administration , College of Engineering and Applied Science , and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have estab lished a new core curriculum for under graduate students. Beginning with the Fall 1990 Semester, all undergraduate students entering CU-Denver will be required to complete the undergraduate core curricu lum independent of their college or major . Undergraduate students admitted prior to Fall 1990 will have a choice of either the new core curriculum or the requirements of their college in effect at the time of admission to the college . The new undergraduate core curricu lum seeks to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual compe tencies in mathematics and computation, writing, oral communication , information literacy, and critical thinking. It also requires all students to come to terms with the basic knowledge areas of the nat ural and physical sciences, behavioral sci ences , social sciences, humanities, and arts. Furthermore , the core curriculum Undergraduate Program I 73 promotes an awareness of cultural and racial diversity. The majority of the new core curriculum is designed to be com pleted during a student' s freshman and sophomore years in order to provide the foundation for specific training in a stu dent's major discipline . The new undergraduate core curricu lum for CU-Denver is outlined in the table below . Each college may augment the campus core curriculum. CU-Denver core requirements for business students are specified under Program Requirements in the following section. CU-Denver Undergraduate C ore Curric ulum I . Intellectual Competencies a . Writing/Speech b . Mathematics 2 . Knowledge Areas a. Natural and Physical Sciences Biology, Chemistry, Geology , and Physics Behavioral Sciences AND Social Sciences b . Behavioral Sciences Anthropology , Communication , and Psychology 9 hours 3 hours 8hours 9 hours 3-6hours c . Social Sciences 3-6 hours Economics , Geography , Political Science , and Sociology d. Humanities History , Languages, Literature , and Philosophy e . Arts Fine Arts, Music , and Theatre 6 hours 3 hours f. Multicultural Diversity 3 hours Graduation Requirements The Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree requires the following: Total Credits. A total of 120 semester hours . Competencies . Demonstration (by course work or testing) of a satisfactory level of competency in computer literacy , geography , and one foreign language. Area of Emphasis or Non-Business Minor. Completion of at least 15 semester hours of approved courses in the area of empha-

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74 I College of Busines s Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration sis or completion of at least 15 semester hours in an approved non-business minor . R esidence . At least 30 semester hours of business courses (inclu ding any business area of emphasis) must be completed after a student's admission to the College. The 30 hours for residence must include BLAW. 4120 and MGMT. 4500, and 24 hours in other business courses (including area of emphasis courses if an area is selected). Grade-Point Ave rage Requirem ent. To graduate , a student must maintain a mini mum cumulative scholastic grade-point average of 2.0 for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B . S . (Business Administration) degree , 2 . 0 for all business courses, and 2 . 0 for courses in the student's area of e mphasis or non business minor. Undergraduate Honors . Upon recom mendation of the faculty , students who demonstrate superior scholarsh ip are given special recognition at gradu a tion . Students must achieve an overall Unive r sity of Colorado grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3 . 5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to be co n sidered for c um laud e . Those who achieve an o verall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3. 7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado will be co nsidered tor magna cum laude . Filing for Graduation. Students must file an Undergraduate Candidacy form and Diploma Card, and request a graduation evaluation (senior audit) prior to register ing for their final semester. Failure to do so will delay graduation. Also , students desiring to change their area of emphasis after filing for graduation must have the change approved by the graduation super visor prior to registering for their final semester. Changes after that time will delay graduation. Business Program Requirements . Satis faction of all the following requirements : Progr am R equire m ents Semeste r Hours College competencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-9 CU-Denver core .......................... 41 Mathematics . . . . . .. ..... .. ........... 3 Business core . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 International studies .............. . .. . . . ... 6 Area of emphasis or non-business minor .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Other Courses .......................... 4-13 Total Semester Hours . . . .......... .. . 120 Detailed descriptions of courses which satisfy program requirements are presented below : I. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS REQUIRED COMPETENCIES: 0-9 HOURS A minimum level of competency must be demonstrated in computer literacy , geography, and in one foreign language . Students may satisfy the competency requirements by taking courses as described below or by testing . New fresh men and transfer students should (1) sat isfy the English , computer literacy , and geography requirements within their first semester of enrollment at the College, and (2) meet the language competency req uirem ent within the first one, two or three semesters of enrollment as dictated by the number of courses requir e d . A maximum of 9 semester-hours taken to satisfy the competenci e s may be counted toward the degree (see Other Courses) ; other hours taken to satisfy th e competen cies are not applied toward the 120 semester hours required f o r the degree . To satisfy competency require ments students must be competent in each specific area or complete th e follow ing courses (o r their equivalents for trans f e r students) : MATH 1350 Computers in the Arts and Sciences or CSC. 1950-3 Computer Mind Tools I , or test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 3 GEOG 1102 World Regional Geography or test . . .. ................. .. ........... 0-3 3rd semester language or test........ 0-13 II. CU-DENVER CORE REQUIREMENTS: 41 SEMESTER HOURS A. Intellectual Competencies-9 semester hours. ENGL 1020 Writing Workshop II ........... 3 ENGL 2024 Intermediat e Composition . .. 3 CMMU 2101 Speechmaking . ..... . . ..... 3 B. Mathematics3 semester hours. MATH 1070 Algebra for Social Sciences and Business (*) ......................... 3 (Note additional Mathmatics requirements in section lii below ). C . Knowledge Areas -29 semester hours. 1. Natural and Physical Sciences .......... 8 Two of the following courses (a sequence in the same discipline or courses in two different disciplines ): BIOL 1550-4 Basic Biology I BIOL 1560-4 Basic Biology II CHEM 14504 Real World Chemistry I CHEM 1460-4 Real World Chemistry II GEOL 1072-4 Physic a l Geology I GEOL 1082-4 Physical Geology II PHYS 1052-4 Astronomy I PHYS 1062-4 Astronomy II 2 . Behavioral Sciences PSYCH 1002 Introduction to Psychology ............................... . .. 3 3. Social Sciences ECON 2012 Principles of Economics : Macroeconomics . . . .. . . 3 ECON 2022 Principles of Economics : Microeconomics . . . . . . . . . . ...... 3 4. Humanities HIST 1021 Western Civilization Since 1500 .......................... .. . . .. . 3 HIST 1011 or HIST. 1361 or HIST. 1371 ..... 3 . ........ 3 One course from the following : ARTS 1000-3 Arts in our Time FA 1001-3 Introduction to Arts MUS 1001-3 Music Appreciation THTR 1001-3 Introduction to Theatre 6 . Multicultural Diversity . ................. 3 One course from list to be approved by College of Business. III.COLLEGE OF BUSINESS MATH REQUIREMENT: 3 SEMESTER HOURS MATH 1080 Polynomial Calculus(* ) ...... 3 (*) Note: The sequence MATH. 1070 and MATH 1080 may be satisfied by a 6-hour calcul us sequence. IV. BUSINESS CORE: 42 SEMESTER HOURS Accounting (ACCT 2100 and ACCT 2110 or 2120) . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Business Law (BLAW 3000 , BLAW 4120). . 6 Finance (FNCE 3100, FNCE 3200) . ..... .... 6 Information Systems OSMG 3000) .... .. . . 3 Management (MGMT 3300 , MGMT 4370) 6 Marketing (MKTG 3000 , MKTG 3050) .... 6 Operat ions Management (OPMG 3000) .. 3 Quantitative Methods (QUAN 2010) ...... 3 Capstone Course (MGMT 4500) ..... ..... . 3 Students may replace MKTG 3050 with an alternate marketing course with the per mission of the marketing area. V. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES: 6 SEMESTER HOURS A. International Non-Business-One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses: ECON 4410, ECON 4420 , ECON 4500 , HIST 3160, HIST 4030/5030, HIST 4040/5040 , HIST 4330, HIST 4440, HIST 4450, HIST 4460, HIST 4730, HIST 4750 , HIST 4780 , HIST 4820 , PSC 3006, PSC 3042, PSC 3135, PSC 3656 , PSC 4216, PSC 4236, PSC 4246 , PSC 4266 , PSC 4286, PSC 4 726, PSC 4 736, PSC 4 7 46, PSC 4 756, PSC 4 766, PSC 4 776. B . International BusinessOne course ( 3 semester hours) from the following list of courses: FNCE 4370 International Financial Management MGMT 4400 Introduction to International Business

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MKTG4200 MKTG4580 Internatio nal Market i ng International Transportation VI. AREA OF EMPHASIS OR NONBUSINESS MINOR: 1 5 SEMESTER HOURS Students may choose a general busi ness degree with a nonbusiness minor, or a business degree with an area of emphas i s in Accounting, Finance , Human Resources Management , Information Systems, International Business, Management , Marketing , or Opera t ions Management. A. Genera l B u siness : Studen t s in General Bus i ness must take an approved non-business minor of at l east 15 semester hours . The courses must form an inte grated sequence and be approved by the College of Business. Up to 6 semester hours of the sequence may be in courses used to satis f y the general (CU-Denver core) requirements but the number of Other Courses (see below) will be correspo n dingly increased to meet the 120 hours total requirement for the degree. Students interested in comp l eting a minor should contact the individual departments regarding requirements. B. Areas of Emphasis : Areas of Emphasis must consist of at least 15 semester hours , including a n y business core courses . For most areas, this will mean 9 semester hours beyond the two courses in the busi ness core. For areas with special require ments or areas with only one course in the core , it may mean 12 or more semester hours beyond the business core. Any hours in excess of 9 are incl u ded in the Other Courses described below . VII. OTHER COURSES: 4-13 SEMESTER HOURS Students may choose their Other Courses freely, subject to the following general rules: (1) Only non-remedial (college-level , as determined by the College of Business) courses will count toward t h e B.S. degree; (2) All students receiving the B.S. degree in Business must take at least 48 semester hours in busi ness (excl ud ing the economics core courses). Students in General Business will generally need to take at least one business course in the Other Courses category to meet this requirement; (3) At most 72 semester ho u rs in business (excluding the economics core courses) may be counted toward the 120 credit hours required for the B .S. degree in Busi ness ; (4) Any business area of emphasis courses required by specific areas in excess of the 9 hours listed under Area of Emphas i s above are included in the Other Cou rses category ; (5) At most 9 semester hours of collegel evel course work devoted to satisfying the basic com petency requirements may be applied toward t h e B.S. degree in Business . Guidelines for Elective Credits . Elective credits should be selected carefully because not all classes are acceptable . Generally, to be acceptable , electives must be taught by reg u lar University of Colorado faculty , must have a form of assessment such as a term paper and /or examinations, and must be regular class room-type classes . Course coverage must be college l evel , not repetitious of other work applied toward the degree , must be academic as opposed to vocational or technical , and must be part of the regular University offerings . Spec i fically , the College will accept : a . A maximum of 6 hours of the theory of physica l education , recreation, and dance , and b . A maximum of 6 hours of approved indepen d ent study, experimental stud ies , choir, band, music lessons , art lessons, and c . A maximum of 12 hours of advanced ROTC, providing the student is enrolled in the program and comp l etes the tota l program . The College will not accept: Activity physical education classes, recreation , workshops , internships , orien tations, da n ce, teaching methods , practicums , and courses reviewing basic skills in computers, English composition , mathematics , and chemistry . Areas of Emphasis See individual areas of emphasis in thi s section for specific courses required . ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SELECTING COURSES Registration. Instruction for registering for courses is contained in another publi cation called the Schedule of Classes , which is available before each semester . That p u blication lists the times when registration occurs , the place, and the courses offered . Maximum Units Per Term . The normal scholastic l oad of an undergraduate busi ness student is 15 semester hours, with a maximum of 18 hours during the fall/ spring semesters and 12 hours during the summer term . Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Extended Studies , whether in classes or through correspon dence , are included in the student's load. Academic Policies I 75 Repeating Courses . A failed course (grade of F) may be repeated; however , theFwill be included in the grade-point average and will appear on the transcript. A course in which a grade of D-or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from a business program specialist. Courses repeated without approval may not be used in the grade point average calculation . Courses From Other Institutions . Busi ness students must have the written approval of a business program specialist to register for courses (excluding MSC pooled courses ) offered by other institu tions . Credit will not be given for courses taken without approval. Grades of Cor better must be earned to receive business degree credit. Generally , only non business electives or lower division, non business requirements are acceptable for transfer from other institutions once a student has been admitted to the College of Business. Business students who take more than 12 semester hours from another institution must reapply for admission to the College as transfer students and meet the current admission requirements . MSC Courses . Business students may select their non-business required and elective courses from those offered from MSC. Grades of Cor better must be earned to receive business degree credit ; how ever, the grade is not computed in the CU grade-point average and is treated like other transfer credits . MSC business courses may not be taken for CU-Denver business degree credit. Graduate Level Courses . With prior written approval of a business program specialist , students may take up to a maxi mum of 6 semester hours of graduate level non-business elective credits . Students must earn grades of B or better in gradu ate courses in order to apply the credits toward business degree requirements . Pass /Fail. Only non-business elective courses may be taken pass/fail. Required business and non-business courses (including the CU-Denver core) may not be taken pass/fail. A maximum of 6 hours pass /fail credit may be applied toward the business degree . Courses taken in excess of the maximum will not be applied toward degree credit. Pass /fail determination must be made within the posted dead lines (at census dates) and may not be rescinded (unless approved by the Undergraduate Appeals Committee). Correspondence Courses. Only 6 semester hours of credit taken through correspondence study (from regionally accredited institutions) will be applied

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76 I College of Business Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration toward the business degree. Business courses may not be taken by correspon dence . All correspondence courses must be evaluated by a business program spe cialist to determine their acceptability toward degree requirements, and the program specialist's written approval is required prior to the student's registering for courses. Students should contact the Division of Extended Studies for course offerings and registration procedures. Independent Study. Junior or senior busi ness students desiring to work beyond regular course coverage may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) as non-business electives under the direc tion of an instructor who approves the project, but the student must have the appropriate approval before registering. A maximum of 3 semester hours of inde pendent study courses may be taken in any one semester; a maximum of 6 semester hours may be applied toward degree requirements . An independent study request form must be signed by the student, instructor , department coordinator, and the Associ ate Dean for Programs . Study Abroad. Transfer credit from study abroad programs is generally limited to non-business elective credit. Stu dents must meet with a business program specialist to determine course acceptabil ity and for written approval prior to the semester in which they intend to study abroad . Information on the various programs is available at the Office of International Education. ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SUSPENSION AND PROBATION To be in good standing, students must have an overall CU grade-point average (GPA) of 2 . 0 (C=2. 0 ) or better for all course work atte mpted , and a 2.0 GPA or better for all business cours e s attempted . PE activity courses , remedial course work , MSCD courses, and repeated courses not approved by a business advisor are not included in these averages. When semester grades become avail able , students below the 2.0 GPA will be notified of 1) probationary status or 2) suspension . Students are responsible for being aware of their academic status at all times ; late grades and /or late notification does not waive this responsibility . College rules governing probation and suspension are as follows: I. Any student whose overall GPA, or busi ness course GPA, is less than 2 . 0 will be placed on probation immediately . A student may be removed from proba tion when the overall GPA and business GPA have been raised to 2.0. 2 . A student may remain on probation as long as the student maintains normal degree progress each semester as determined by the College and obtains each term on probation a term GPA of 2.5, and term business course GPA of 2.5, with no grade below a C. Failure to meet probationary provisions will result in suspension . Probationary status may continue only until the student has completed a maximum of 12 semester hours or four terms, whichever comes first; summer is con sidered a term . The student will be sus pended if the GPA deficiency is not cleared within this time. 3 . Suspended students may not attend the University of Colorado or any division of the University (including Extended Studies). 4. Students on suspension may petition for readmission to the College after a minimum of one year from the term in which they were suspended. Generally, petitions are granted only in unusual circumstances . Any suspended student readmitted to the College will be under contract and placed on a continued probation status until the GPA defi ciency has been cleared. Such students will be automatically suspended if, at any time , their overall GPA or busi ness GPA again falls below 2.0. 5 . Students earning all failing grades or no academic credit for a semester will have a stop placed on their record and will not be permitted to register without a business advisor's approval. 6 . Combined degree students are required to maintain the same standards of performance as College of Business students in order to be continued in a combined program . AREAS OF EMPHASIS Each candidate for the B . S . (Business Administration) degree must complete the prescribed courses in an area of emphasis comprising a minimum of 15 semester hours taken at the University of Colorado at Denver . A 2.0 grade-point average is required for area courses. Typi cally, students select an area of emphasis after taking several of the core courses. They then complete the hours required for their selected area. Information about each area of empha sis is given below. Accounting Advisor: Michael Firth Telephone: 628-1220 Accounting courses are offered in sev eral fields of professional accountancy at the intermediate, advanced and graduate levels. They provide preparation for prac tice in one or more of the following fields: Accounting and management control systems Auditing Financial accounting Managerial accounting Tax accounting Teaching and research In all of these fields a thorough knowl edge of the social, legal, economic, and political environment is needed. A high degree of analytical ability and communi cation skill is indispensable. Courses in Eng.lish composition, speech, ethics and logic are desirable . Courses in statistics and information systems, beyond the required College of Business core courses, are highly recommended . Required Courses Semester Hours ACCT 3220. Intermediate Financial Accounting I . . ................... 3 ACCT 3230. Intermediate Financial Accounting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ACCT 3320. Intermediate Cost Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Accounting elective (at the 4000 level) ... 6 Students planning to pursue accounting as a career usually take more than the above required hours. Many students take a total of about 30 hours of accounting , often taking two courses each semester in their junior and senior years. Students should work closely with the accounting faculty and business advisors in planning their accounting programs. Accounting students often specialize in a particular topical area of accounting beyond the core. Examples of these spe cializations include the following recom mended courses : Financial Accounting and Auditing ACCT 4240. Advanced Financial ACCT4410. ACCT4420. ACCT4620. Accounting Income Tax Accounting Advanced Income Tax Accounting Auditing Managerial Accounting and Systems ACCT 4330 . Managerial Accounting, Problems and Cases. ACCT 4540 . Accounting Systems and Data Processing ACCT 4620 . Auditing

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ACCT4800 . Account in g for Govern ment and Nonprofit Organizations Graduate study in accounting is receiv ing increas i ng emphasis by professional organizations and employers. Students meeting admission requirements should consider continuing their education at the graduate level. Finance Ad visor: John Turner Tel e phone: 628-1226 The prin cipal areas of st udy in finance are financia l management , financial insti tutions , i nvestments, and international finance . The study of finance is intended to provide an understanding of fundamen tal t heory and practice pertaining to finance and to develop the ability to make sound financial management decisions. Every endeavor is made to train students to think log i cally about financial problems and to formu l ate sound fina n cial decis i ons and policies . It is necessary to understand the importance of finance in the economy and the f u nctions and purposes of monetary systems , credit, prices , money mar kets, and financial institutions . Emphas i s is placed on financial policy, management, control, anal ysis , and decision making. Numerous job opportunities exist with financial institutions and in t he field of business finance . ACCT. 2100 and ACCT. 2110 are required prerequisites for the finance area. Required Courses Semester Hours FNCE 4320. Corporate Financial Decisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FNCE 4330. I nvestment and Portfolio Management .. :. 3 FNCE 4350. Financial Markets and I nstitutions .... . ... 3 Recomme n d e d Electives FNCE 4340. Security Analysis . . .. 3 FNCE 4360. Management of Financial Institutions .................. . 3 FNCE 4370. I n ternational F i nancial Management. ............................. 3 S t udents s h ould note that all finance courses are not offered every semester. Finance majors are encouraged to take additiona l accounting courses as business electives. Human Resources Management Advisor: Prof . Wayne F. Cascio T e l e phone: 628-1215 Human resources management offers opportunities for studen t s to develop professiona l competence i n the areas of personnel administration and labor rela tions. Students acquire an understanding of and skills in developing and implement ing human resources systems including recruitment, sel ection , eva l uation , train ing, motivation , and union-management relations. Required Courses Semester Hours MGMT 4340. Labor and Emp l oyee Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 3 MGMT 4380. Human Resources Management: Employment . . . .... 3