Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library

Full Text


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University of Colorado Catalog
Denver â–  1993-94 I



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University of Colorado at Denver
P.O. Box 173364
Denver, Colorado 80217-3364
I Second Class Postage Paid
at the Post Office Boulder, Coloradc
$5.00


CONTENTS
Academic Calendar 2
Message from the Chancellor 4
Administration 5
General Information 7
Undergraduate Admissions 35
The Graduate School 41
The New College of Architecture and Planning 51
College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration 67
School of Education 95
College of Engineering and Applied Science 129
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 161
Military Science....................................................... 267
Graduate School of Public Affairs 271
Faculty ............................................................... 281
Index 291


ACADEMIC CALENDAR’
Fall 1993
August 16-20 August 23 September 6 November 25 November 26 December 18
Spring 1994
January 10-14 January 17 January 18 March 21-26 May 14
Summer 1994
May 23-27 May 30 June 1 July 4 August 6
Orientation-Registration
First day of classes
Labor Day holiday (campus closed)
Thanksgiving holiday (campus closed)
(campus open, no classes)
End of semester
Orientation-Registration
Martin Luther King Jr. holiday (campus open, no classes) First day of classes
Spring break (campus open, no classes)
End of semester
Orientation-Registration Memorial Day holiday (campus closed) First day of classes
Independence holiday (campus closed) End of term
Photos: Bob Fader
Cover, Pages 6,50,94,266,270,295 Jason Jones Page 269
Design: Publications Department, University of Colorado at Denver
The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time. Consult the Schedule of Courses for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs and registration dates and procedures.


Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog
1993-94
University of Colorado at Denver
Speer at Larimer
P.O. Box 173364
Denver, Colorado 80217-3364
Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, degree offerings and degree titles, course offerings and course descriptions, and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice or obligation. The University claims no responsibility for errors that may have occurred during the typesetting, printing or production of this catalog. The University of Colorado at Denver is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. For current calendars, tuition rates, requirements, deadlines, etc., students should refer to a copy of the Schedule of Courses for the semester in which they intend to enroll.
The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curriculum. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester, and the faculty teaching a particular course or program may vary from time to time. The instructor may filter the content of a course or program to meet particular class needs.
Courses are listed by college or school.
University of Colorado Catalog.
(USPS 651-060)
262 Stadium Building, Campus Box 384,
Boulder, Colorado 80309-0384 Volume 1993, No. 3, May/June Published 4 times a year: January/February March/April, May/June, August/September Second class postage paid at Boulder, Colorado. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to University of Colorado Catalog, CU-Denver Publications, Boulder, Colorado 80302.


Message From the Chancellor
Dear Student:
Welcome to the University of Colorado at Denver. On behalf of the faculty, staff, and students, 1 offer to you the challenging environment of one of Colorado’s premier institutions of higher education. Your decision to attend CU-Denver shows your willingness to learn at Denver’s only urban public university.
CU-Denver is one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system. As a vital part of that system, offering baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral programs, we have achieved distinction nationally and internationally because of the high quality of our programs, faculty, and alumni. Located in downtown Denver, the University challenges its students both academically and personally in an intellectual environment that encourages commitment, curiosity, and imagination.
A distinguishing characteristic of CU-Denver is our urban perspective that is an integral theme in our academic programming, the orientation of our faculty, and the identity of our student body. Our enrollment has grown to nearly 11,000 students.
The University offers some 40 degree and degree option programs at the baccalaureate level and over 60 degree and degree option programs at the postbaccalaureate level designed to provide you with a foundation on which to build your intellectual, aesthetic, and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens. Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a complement to classroom study. The University’s seven colleges and schools (Business, Public Affairs, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, School of the Arts, Education, and Architecture and Planning) and The Graduate School provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the opportunities for gaining knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your economic and personal lives.
We at the CU-Denver campus take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs. This is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the applied aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems.
We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars/teachers and dedicated staff. I promise a rich intellectual environment and a challenging educational experience. Most of all, I look forward to seeing you at graduation and awarding you the CU-Denver degree.
My best wishes to you and to your future.
John C. Buechner
Chancellor
University of Colorado at Denver


Administration / 5
ADMINISTRATION loard of Regents
ATHY ARNOLD, Littleton, term expires 1994 ETER C. DIETZE, Boulder, term expires 1996 IUY KELLY, Ft. Collins, term expires 1998 USAN KIRK, Denver, term expires 1998 1M MARTIN, Boulder, term expires 1998 IARVEY W. PHELPS, Pueblo, term expires 1994 (ORWOOD L ROBB, Littleton, term expires 1996 IOBERT SIEVERS, Boulder, term expires 1996 (AVID W. WINN, Colorado Springs, term expires 1994
itaff
1ILAGROS CARABALLO, Secretary of the Board of Regents :nd of the University. B.A., M.S., State University of New York t Albany; M.A., Webster University.
Jniversity-Wide Officers
UDITH ALBINO, President of the University; Professor if Psychology; Professor of Applied Dentistry. B.J., Ph.D., Jniversity of Texas, Austin.
1LEN R. STINE, Vice President for Budget and Finance. B.S., Michigan State; M.P.A., University of North Carolina, Chapel lill; Ed.D., Harvard University.
UCHARD A. THARPE, Vice President and University Coun-el. B.A., DePauw University; J.D., University of Colorado. JHRIS ZAFIRATOS, Vice President for Academic Affairs and tesearch; Professor of Physics; Associate Vice Chancellor or Budget and Planning; B.S., Lewis and Clark College; Ph. D., Jniversity of Washington.
IU-Denver Officers
(OHN C. BUECHNER, Chancellor; Professor of Public Affairs. S.A., College of Wooster; M.P.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. tRUCE W. BERGLAND, Executive Vice Chancellor; Associate 'rofessor of Education. B.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Itanford University.
IOHN A. BERNHARD, Vice Chancellor for Administration ind Finance. B.A., Stanford University; M.B.A., Columbia Jniversity, Graduate School of Business.
GEORGIA LESH-LAURIE, Vice Chancellor for Academic iffairs; Professor of Biology. B.S., Marietta College (Ohio);
4.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph.D., Case Western teserve University.
â– ERNIE BACA, Dean of The Graduate School; Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative Activities; Associate 'rofessor of Education. B.A., University of Northern Colorado; LA., Ph.D., University of Colorado.
>AVID A. GROTH, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic iffairs. B.S., M.S., Iowa State University; Ph. D., Michigan State Jniversity.
lENNETH HERMAN, Associate Vice Chancellor for administration and Finance. B.S., University of Colorado. iHELIA Mi HOOD, Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services. B.A., M.A., Colorado tate University.
The University of Colorado seal, adopted in 1908, depicts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed in laurel is placed beside him. The Greek inscription means “Let your light shine. "According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civilization “stands as the criterion of culture." The laurel symbolizes honor or success, the youth of the figure suggests the “morning of life, "and the scroll represents written language.




General Information
The University of Colorado at Denver lolds the unique distinction of being the inly public university in the Denver netropolitan area. CU-Denver, one of four istitutions in the University of Colorado ystem, is an urban, non-residential cam-ius located in downtown Denver. Major :ivic, cultural, business, and governmen-al activities are in close proximity.
CU-Denver offers 29 undergraduate legrees and 41 master’s degrees. Ph.D. legrees are offered in public affairs, pplied mathematics, and educational dministration. Doctoral studies also are vailable in engineering and other fields n cooperation with CU-Boulder. Special, emphasis is placed on programs that will lelp assure students’ professional oppor-unities after graduation. All programs are ailored to meet the needs of the diverse tudent population. Classes are offered luring weekday and evening hours, and >n weekends.
Students’ ages range between 17 and '5. The average student age is 30. Two-hirds hold full-time jobs and 54 percent ittend part-time. Forty-five percent of he nearly 11,000 students are enrolled a graduate level courses.
CU-Denver’s faculty actively promote he special role of an urban institution in neeting the needs of students. Many fac-llty bring their work experiences to the dassroom. They are alert to the chal-enges and advances of the urban envi-onment and responsive to the needs of tudents and the community. The combi-lation of CU-Denver’s talented faculty and lighly motivated students creates a vital ind exciting educational environment. Students are offered the unique educa-ional opportunity to combine real world xperience with academic excellence.
History
In 1876, just over a century ago, the Jniversity of Colorado was founded in Soulder. In 1912, the University of Colo-ado’s Department of Correspondence nd Extension was established in Denver o meet the needs of the burgeoning popu-ition. As the breadth of course offerings xpanded, so did the demand for degree-yanting status. The Denver Extension Center was renamed the University of
Colorado-Denver Center in 1965, and, by 1969,23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study were offered. In 1972, the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria Campus, CU-Denver’s current site. The same year the Denver “Center” was renamed CU-Denver. Two years later the University of Colorado was reorganized into four campuses-Denver, Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder.
University of Colorado System
As one of four campuses of the University of Colorado system, CU-Denver has a special role and mission in Colorado higher education. The University of Colorado at Boulder now serves about 25,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. The Health Sciences Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, dental, nursing, and allied health personnel.
The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 5,700 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. CU-Denver’s role within the University system is primarily to address the needs for undergraduate and graduate instruction in the Denver metropolitan area. Emphasis is given to professional, preprofessional, and liberal arts training in the context of a strong multidisciplinary and applied agenda for research and creative activities. CU-Denver students have access to the library resources of all campuses and cultural and athletic events sponsored within the University system.
Academic Structure
Each of the four campuses of the University of Colorado System-Denver, Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Health Sciences in Denver-has its own Chancellor and campus administration. The Chancellors, in turn, report to the President of the CU System. The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approve the overall direction provided by the President of the System. The System President represents the University of Colorado and manages the planning for development of the System, apportionment of resources
across campuses, the System-wide Graduate School, and general policy regarding academic standards, instructional initiatives, and faculty and staff personnel matters, and is supported by a System-wide Faculty Senate. CU-Denver, as well, has its own faculty governance structure, as well. Students also have their own governance institutions.
The Chancellor of CU-Denver represents CU-Denver and manages campus goal-setting, policy development, academic affairs, and budget and financial matters. The Executive Vice Chancellor, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, and the Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance assist the Chancellor. Each vice chancellor is responsible for the essential components of the campus enterprise. The Executive Vice Chancellor is responsible for Admissions and Records, Enrollment Management, Planning and Institutional Research, and Student Services. The Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs is responsible for all academic programs, the Graduate School, and Sponsored Programs. The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance is responsible for the campus budget, Office of Financial and Business Services, and Personnel Services. The CU-Denver Graduate School is a component of the CU System-wide Graduate School. All graduate units reside within The Graduate School except Architecture and Planning, Business, and the professional programs in Public Affairs.
Academic Programs
CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the citizens of Denver and the region. With the rapid development of the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. Today CU-Denver is composed of seven distinct academic units:
College of Architecture and Planning
College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
School of Education


8 / General Information
College of Engineering and Applied Science
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
School of the Arts
Graduate School of Public Affairs
These units now accommodate over 11,000 students taught by about 320 regular, full-time faculty members. The diversity of the student body is a hallmark of CU-Denver and a source of deep pride. Among them are traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school. There also are older students who, perhaps for financial reasons or the press of family commitments or because they’ve only lately recognized the value of a college education, have delayed entry. And there are professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appreciation of the world around them.
The undergraduate colleges admit freshman and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, engineering, and music. A solid foundation of academic skills and general education is assured through a comprehensive core curriculum. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also provides pre-professional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health sciences. The School of Education offers graduate programs leading to careers in education. The Graduate School offers master’s programs in the arts, sciences, humanities, engineering, education, and music to students with baccalaureate degrees. The College of Architecture and Planning offers master’s programs leading to careers in architecture, planning, and landscape architecture, as well as undergraduate experiences in environmental design through the Boulder campus. The Graduate School of Business Administration and the Graduate School of Public Affairs provide programs leading to master’s degrees in their specialized areas. CU-Denver doctoral programs are available in public affairs, education, and applied mathematics. Doctoral work in engineering also is available in cooperation with CU-Boulder. CU-Denver faculty also participate in other doctoral programs offered at CU-Boulder.
A complete listing of bachelor’s and master’s degree programs offered by CU-Denver is provided in the college and school sections of this catalog. The college and school sections describe specific policies on requirements for graduation, course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions, and similar information.
CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education which leads to improved professional opportunity in the “Information Age.” Many programs emphasize practical business world applications, and all CU-Denver students are given the opportunity to attain computer literacy. Specific computer-oriented academic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs.
The Future
CU-Denver is committed to the highest standards of education, scholarship, and service to the community. From this commitment springs the vital energy that infuses every campus pursuit. The pace is fast, perhaps unprecedented. Undergraduate studies are varied, challenging, and rewarding. CU-Denver is reaching out to all who can benefit from the high quality education it has to offer. New highly innovative applied and professional graduate degrees are being developed that address the emerging needs of the region’s economy. CU-Denver has numerous Centers that are generating state-of-the-art research and service to provide important practiced solutions to some of Colorado’s and the nation’s most serious social, economic, environmental, and technological problems. New programs and opportunities in international education bring the world and its global economy into the classroom. Throughout history, urban civilization and the arts and humanities have evolved in a rich synergy. CU-Denver-an urban campus-is deeply involved in enriching the cultural milieu of the Denver area. Clearly, the University of Colorado at Denver is on the move.
Accreditation
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration Colorado State Board of Education Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education
National Architectural Accrediting Board
National Association of Schools of Music
Planning Accreditation Board
National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
Auraria Higher Education Center
The Auraria Higher Education Center is the site for the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share library (which is administered by CU-Denver), classroom, and related facilities on the 171-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered.
On the Auraria campus are administrative and classroom buildings, the Auraria Library, the student union, book center, child care and development centers, phys ical education facilities, science building, and service buildings.
The new buildings share the campus with the reminders of Denver’s past-historic Ninth Street Park, restored church buildings, and the Tivoli brewery, built in 1882. The Tivoli, renovated into a complex containing specialty shops, restaurants, and entertainment, will become the student union for the fall semester, 1994.
Research and Other Creative Pursuits
CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledge through the research and creative efforts of its faculty Research and creative activities not only advance knowledge and enhance the qual ity of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and professional practice. In addition, these activities constitute an important component of CU-Denver’s service to the commu nity at large. Therefore, externally funded projects are a major priority at CU-Denver
Research projects, training, and public service programs at CU-Denver encompass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study with a focus on issues that relate to city, state, national, and international issues. During 1991-92, CU-Denver faculty and staff received external grants and contracts totaling $8,666,519 for


Centers and Institutes / 9
research, training, and public service programs. The benefits for the campus in the years ahead will be substantial. Externally funded activities assist in sustaining scholarly discourse, enable faculty members to engage in the advancement of tnowledge, provide the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of irital concern to society, and enhance the education of students. Many students ictively participate in projects overseen oy faculty members.
An important aspect of research and Dther creative activities at CU-Denver is its nultidisciplinary and applied nature. Research in every school and college at 2U-Denver addresses questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and he larger region. Its role within a thriving netropolitan area also serves as a base for exploring topics of national and even nternational import. But not all research it CU-Denver yields solutions of immedi-ite practical significance. Exploration )f topics on the cutting edge of the basic iisciplines are carried out within the rich fialogue of scholarship that knows no lational boundaries. This exploration nay yield insights that eventually open he way to practical applications in the lext century.
Current externally funded research ■fforts address a variety of contemporary economic, political, educational, engineer-ng, mathematical, scientific, and environ-nental needs. Financial support has been ibtained for program and service devel-ipment in the areas of computational aathematics, bilingual and special educa-ion, health administration, international iffairs, and executive seminars, as well as nstitutes on aging and veterans’ employ-nent and training.
Other projects include statewide inves-igations of economic development, child are, literacy, air quality, water control, nd transportation. Computer-related pro-jets include multilevel algorithms, fast larallel processing, algorithms in linear irogramming, and modeling. Projects in asic research range from investigations f dinosaur tracksites to neurotoxicology } growth equations for sporangiophores.
In addition, a great deal of research at ae University is conducted without sub-tantial external support. This research Iso yields important insights that are onveyed to a national audience through iculty publications, presentations, xhibits, performances, and professional ctivities. Many members of the faculty re leaders within the national scholarly ommunity. All these pursuits bring ^cognition to the University, establish
the credibility of its faculty, and enhance the value of the degrees it confers.
CENTERS AND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE, AND TRAINING
First Amendment Congress
The mission of the First Amendment Congress is to unite Americans of every persuasion to support freedom of expression, and provide America with a continuing forum to discuss and debate the First Amendment as our cornerstone of liberty. To reach this goal, the Congress sponsors national forums, seminars, and congresses to forge new understanding of First Amendment issues; develops curriculum materials to increase students’ understanding of the First Amendment; delivers special messages to various audiences reminding them of their duties to uphold First Amendment freedoms; publishes materials; and supports public awareness campaigns on First Amendment issues.
Center for Health Ethics and Policy
The Center analyzes and develops constructive courses of action concerning policy and ethics aspects of health-related problems facing Colorado and the nation. The Center’s goal is to increase public and private sector attention to these issues and contribute to the making of informed and sound public policy decisions.
Center for Applied Psychology
This Center promotes research and educational programs in four areas: public mental health, psychology and the law, psychology and public health, and organizational effectiveness and decision making. The Center represents a cooperative relationship among higher education, government, business, mental health agencies, public health institutions, and the citizenry of the state of Colorado.
Center for Research in Applied Language
Established in 1991 with a grant from the President’s Fund for the Humanities, the Center for Research in Applied Language conducts research into language-based problems in real-life contexts. It orients its research projects humanistically and socio-culturally and underpins them with knowledge of the various branches of language theory. Faculty and students carry out projects that both contribute to our understanding of how and why language is implicated in social and individual problems, and propose solutions to or ameliorations
of those problems. Reports of research projects conducted through the Center are published on an occasional basis and are obtainable from the English department office.
Colorado Principals’ Center
The Center is a staff development, renewal, and training center for practicing principals, assistant principals, central office supervisors, and others in instructional leadership positions.
Colorado Center for Community Development
The Colorado Center for Community Development provides technical, educational, and applied research assistance to organizations, neighborhoods, and communities that cannot afford or do not have access to professional services. The Center targets its assistance efforts to rural small towns, low income and/or minority communities, and non-traditional, community-based service or development organizations.
Center for Environmental Sciences
The Center fosters and promotes disciplinary and interdisciplinary research in the environmental sciences. Although the Center is in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, affiliated faculty represent several different schools and colleges and more than ten academic disciplines, including engineering and the natural and social sciences.
The Center houses the Analytical Laboratory, which specializes in research in environmental chemistry. Projects to date in conjunction with the Analytical Laboratory include studies of air pollution, the global sulfur cycle, and the chemistry of alpine lakes. The services of the laboratory are available to UCD faculty and graduate students, especially those in the M.S. in Environmental Sciences Program.
Center for Urban Transportation Studies
This Center assumes a leading role in the Rocky Mountain region in developing research and interdisciplinary programs in urban transportation and providing a central resource for information concerning urban transportation problems in the Rocky Mountain region. The Center makes available University expertise to outside organizations.
Land and Water Information Systems Group
The Group was created to advance the education and training, research, and public service missions of CU-Denver in the areas of urban and regional information systems, geographic-oriented databases,


10 / General Information
water resources systems, and built facilities management.
The Centers-Center for the Improvement of Public Management and Center for Public-Private Sector Cooperation
Goals are to improve public sector management and to engage the public, private, and non-profit sectors in devising solutions to community problems. The Centers offer management and leadership training for state and local public officials and emerging leaders in the public and private sectors. They conduct research on public policy issues, analyzing policy alternatives and evaluating programs. The Centers provide strategic planning, conflict management, and facilitation services, as well as other forms of technical assistance to state and local jurisdictions.
Center for Computational Mathematics
The Center for Computational Mathematics at CU-Denver is composed of faculty members who have an interest in computational mathematics, the study of the process of solving mathematical problems with computers. The Center resides in the Department of Mathematics, but includes members from various other departments. The primary goal of the Center is to foster research in computational mathematics and to maintain a strong educational program at all levels.
It has extensive ties with industry along the Front Range, and with government laboratories throughout the nation. It offers students an excellent opportunity to receive training and experience in this exciting new field.
National Leadership Institute on Aging
The National Leadership Institute on Aging is devoted to promoting the leadership skills of men and women who design and deliver human services in our aging society.
Created in 1988, the Institute provides opportunities for executives from the public, private, and non-profit sectors to address the complex policy and program issues prompted by America’s changing demographics. It challenges them to think innovativeiy, act with greater strategic skill, and forge new coalitions and partnerships to meet the needs of aging America.
The Institute’s activities include residential leadership development programs, mini-institutes and consulting activities.
Institute for International Business
The Institute for International Business was created in 1988 to serve as a center for
the advanced study and teaching of international business. The Institute serves as an umbrella organization for international programs of the College of Business and as a bridge to business professionals and academic researchers from around the world who are interested in global business issues. Through courses, seminars, workshops and conferences, the Institute and the College of Business offer undergraduates, graduate students and business executives the opportunity to acquire the skills and expertise needed to be successful in our increasingly global economy. The Institute also conducts and promotes research on the global economic aspects of competitiveness.
National Veterans Training Institute
The Institute provides a series of training courses to further develop and enhance the professional skills of the Job Service’s national network of veterans employment and training representatives who deliver services to America’s veterans. The NVTl’s Resource Center provides materials and information to trainees and other service providers on topics supporting their professional efforts. The Institute is operated as a joint effort of the University of Colorado at Denver and the U.S. Department of Labor’s Veterans Employment and Training Service.
Fourth World Center for the Study of Indigenous Law and Politics
This Center provides a research clearinghouse to students and faculty at CU-Denver on legal and political issues that affect indigenous peoples (the 4th World). In addition to supporting a modest library of rare books and periodicals on indigenous issues, the Center also stocks video and audio cassettes on subjects of indigenous politics, and a substantial newsfile archive on current developments in the Fourth World. Currently, the Center is expanding the number of course offerings in the area of Fourth World studies.
Region VIII Resource Access Project
Under a contract funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Resource Access Project provides training, technical assistance, and resources to Head Start programs throughout a six-state region.
TUITION AND FEES
All tuition and fee charges are established by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted
annually (usually in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly. The Regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee rates at any time. A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term, and students should contact the Records Office for further information on the tuition and fee charges for a particular term.
Payment of Tuition and Fees
All tuition and fees (except the application fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, according to guidelines in the current Schedule of Courses. Students who register for 7 or more credit hours may arrange at the time of registration to defer payment of part of the charges. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Schedule of Courses published before each semester or summer session. Students who fail to complete payment by the published deadlines, or who fail to file the required promissory note, will be assessed a $50 penalty.
Students who register in a non-degree status, and who later change to a degree status for that term, are responsible for the difference in tuition between the non-degree program and their applicable degree program and will be billed accordingly.
Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even though they may drop out of school. Refunc policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in iheSchedul of Courses. A student with financial obliga tions to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, to be issued transcripts, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves loan and other types of indebtedness which are due after graduation.
Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation. Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable to the bank will be assessed an additional service charge. Students may pay tuition and fees by credit card.
The following rates are for the 1992-93 academic year and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating cost


Tuition and Fees /II
1992-93 Tuition
LISTED FOR PLANNING PURPOSES ONLY)
JNDERGRADUATE DEGREE iTUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF IBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES and
ion-degree students without an jndergraduate degree
'redit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $102 $ 471
2 204 942
3 306 1,413
4 408 1,884
5 510 2,355
6 612 2,826
7 714 3,927
8 816 3,927
9-15 853 3,927
:ach credit lourover 15 102 471
JNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF IUSINESS AND THE COLLEGE )F ENGINEERING
'redit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $118 $ 490
2 236 980
3 354 1,470
4 472 1,960
5 590 . 2,450
6 708 2,940
7 826 4,087
8 944 4,087
9-15 992 4,087
ach credit
our over 15 118 490
'.RADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with rograms in the College of Liberal Arts nd Sciences
redit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 155 $ 523
2 310 1,046
3 465 1,569
4 620 2,092
5 775 2,615
6 930 3,138
7 1,085 4,362
8 1,240 4,362
9-15 1,292 4,362
ich credit aur over 15 155 523
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the School of Architecture and Planning and NON-DEGREE graduate students and non-Denver campus programs*
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 166 $ 557
2 332 1,114
3 498 1,671
4 664 2,228
5 830 2,785
6 996 3,342
7 1,162 4,643
8 1,328 4,643
9-15 1,378 4,643
each credit hour over 15 166 557
*Non-degree students who have previously earned a baccalaureate degree are classified as graduate students and assessed graduate tuition regardless of the level of the class(es) they are taking.
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the Graduate School of Business Administration
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 194 $ 568
2 388 1,136
3 582 1,704
4 776 2,272
5 970 2,840
6 1,164 3,408
7 1,358 4,730
8 1,552 4,730
9-15 1,620 4,730
each credit
hour over 15 194 568
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with
programs in the College of Engineering
and the Graduate School of Public
Affairs
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 183 $ 557
2 366 1,114
3 549 1,671
4 732 2,228
5 915 2,785
6 1,098 3,342
7 1,281 4,643
8 1,464 4,643
9-15 1,523 4,643
each credit
hour over 15 183 557
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the School of Education
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 170 $ 557
2 340 1,114
3 510 1,671
4 680 2,228
5 850 2,785
6 1,020 3,342
7 1,190 4,643
8 1,360 4,643
9-15 1,523 4,643
each credit hour over 15 170 557
Graduate degree students who are registered as “candidate for degree” will be assessed the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour plus the Student Information System Fee.
THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE TUITION AND FEES AT ANY TIME.
Fees'
1. Student Activity Fee (required of all students):
For each term ................$51.00
This fee supports the activities of the student government and helps provide legal services, recreational activities, student health services, the student newspaper, the Center for Student Counseling, and various student organizations. The fee is approved by student referendum and is required of all students at the University of Colorado at Denver. (The fee includes a Student Health fee.)
2. Auraria Bond Retirement Fee (required of all students):
Each term.....................$39.50
3. Student Information System Fee (a non-refundable fee required of
all students each term):......$ 5.00
4. Matriculation Fee (mandatory for the first term
for all new students):........$25.00
This is a non-refundable fee charged at the student’s first registration to cover costs of generating transcripts.
5. Information Technology Fee:...$10.00
The Information Technology Fee provides for capital acquisition of new and/or upgraded systems to support student computing laboratories, including networks and networking infrastructure and facilities directly accessible by students each term.
'Subject to change.


12 / General Information
6. Doctoral dissertation fee (mandatory for all students certified by The Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral dissertation). Students should contact The Graduate School for guidelines established for charges for enrollment.
7. Comprehensive examination fee: Any student in The Graduate School, the Graduate School of Business Administration, or Graduate School of Public Affairs must be enrolled during the term in which the Comprehensive Examination for a master’s degree is completed. Students who are not taking regular courses during that term must enroll as “Candidate for Degree.” Students enrolled only as “Candidate for Degree” pay the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour, plus the SIS fee and the Information Technology Fee (for one term only). The charge varies by the school in which the student is matriculated.
8. Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course):
Breakage deposit ..............$20.00
An $8 deduction is assessed for expendable items. After accounting for breakage, the unused portion is returned at the end of the semester.
9. Music, Theater, and Fine Arts Fees:
• Music facilities fee: All accepted music majors must pay a $30 Music Facilities Fee each semester. Courses requiring this fee for nonmajors are designated in the Schedule of Courses.
• Engineering Studio Fees: Courses which use the recording studios require a $7.00 fee. These courses are designated in the Schedule of Courses.
• Theater Studio Fee: All stagecraft and design courses require a $15 lab fee as indicated in the Schedule of Courses.
• Theater Ticket Fee: Theater courses which require attendance at off-campus theater performances require a $15 ticket fee.
• Fine Arts Studio Fee: All courses taught in painting and drawing studios require a $5.00 fee as designated in the Schedule of Courses.
• Fine Arts Lab Fee: All courses requiring use of the photo lab require a $45 fee.
• Fine Arts Sculpture Lab Fee: AW courses taught in the sculpture lab (including casting) require $40 lab fee as designated in the Schedule of Courses.
• Fine Arts Art History/Slide Library Fee: For designated courses which require use of the slide library, there is a $2 fee.
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
Tuition classification is governed by CRS 23-7-101, et. seq. (1973) as amended.1 Institutions of higher education are bound by the provisions of this statute and are not free to make exceptions to the rules set forth.
The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a legal domiciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classification is being sought. Persons over 22 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 22 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court-appointed legal guardian. An unemancipated minor’s parent must, therefore, have a legal domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes.
Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one’s true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colorado domicile on the person seeking to establish the domicile. The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connections with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado, for tuition purposes, begins the day after connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evidence one’s intent. The most common ties with the state are (1) change of driver’s license to Colorado; (2) change of automobile registration to Colorado;
(3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado; (5) and most important, payment of state income taxes as a resident by one whose income is sufficient to be taxed. Caution: payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroactive to the time filed.
In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term, the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day
'A copy of the Colorado Revised Statutes (1973), as amended, is available in the University of Colorado at Denver Admissions Office.
of classes for the term in question. If one’s 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, in-state tuition cannot be granted until the next semester.
Once the student’s tuition classificatior is established, it remains unchanged unless satisfactory information to the cor trary is presented. A student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for e change in classification from resident to nonresident or vice versa must inform th< Tuition Classification Officer within 15 day: after such a change occurs. An adult student or emancipated minor who moves outside of Colorado must send written notification to the Tuition Classification Officer within 15 days of the change.
Once a student is classified as nonresident for tuition purposes, the student must petition for a change in classification. Petitions must be submitted NO LATER THAN THE FIRST DAY OF CLASSEl of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a non-resident. It is pre ferred that petitions be received 30 days prior to the beginning of the term. Late petitions will not be considered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admission:
The final decision regarding tuition statu rests with the University. Questions regarding residence (tuition) status should be referred only to the Tuition Classification Officer. Opinions of other persons are not official or binding upon the University. Additional information (including the entire text of CRS 23-7-101) is available in the brochure, Classification of Students for Tuition Purposes which may be obtained from the Admissions Processing Office.
Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel
The Colorado Legislature approved re: ident tuition beginning with the Fall 1986 Semester for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. ELIGIBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIF1E! EACH TERM. Students obtain a complete verification form from the base educatioi officer, and submit the form with their m itary ID to the Records Office after they have registered, but before the end of the drop/add period. At that time the student’s bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate. Students who have been certified remain classified as non-residents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Colorado.


Financial Aid /13
ruition Appeals
Exceptions to financial obligations icurred may be granted by the Tuition ippeals Committee. The Committee will nly consider appeals when a student has een medically disabled, has experienced death in the family, or has a change in mployment hours or location beyond the tudent’s control. Documentation of these onditions will be required. Exceptions dll not be considered for a student’s fail-re to comply with published deadlines, r changes in employment under the tudent’s control.
Please note: tuition appeals must be led within four months of the end of the jrm for which the appeal is filed.
INANCIAL AID
irecton Ellie Miller Iffice: NC 1030 elephone: 556-2886
The Office of Financial Aid/Student mployment offers over $ 18 million in nancial aid awards to qualified students ach year. If the student’s financial aid pplication materials are received before le March 31,1993, priority date, then le student is considered for a package f need-based grant, work-study (part-me employment) and/or long-term loan inds. If the financial aid application laterials are received after the 3/31/93 riority date, then the student is usually jnsidered only for Federal Pell Grant id for outside student loans (Federal afford Loan, Federal Parents Loan, or sderal Supplemental Loan for Students), here are three separate deadlines to pply for the Advantage Scholarship rogram; refer to the separate brochure >r further information.
Applicants for Colorado Graduate Fel-wship, Colorado Deans Scholars award, id Colorado Regents Scholars award e subject to different deadlines and •e reviewed by other CU-Denver depart-ents (the Graduate School, undergrad-ite deans’ offices, and the Office of Emissions respectively). All other appli-ints for financial aid are notified of their vard status in writing by the Office of nancial Aid/Student Employment.
ligibility
Each student must qualify for CU-;nver financial aid as follows:
Be a U.S. citizen or be admitted to the U.S. by the INS on a permanent basis (except for Colorado Graduate Fellowship).
2. Be classified as a degree-seeking student by the CU-Denver Office of Admissions (except for students applying only for Advantage Scholarship). Teacher certification students are eligible to apply for financial aid and are considered as undergraduate students according to federal guidelines.
3. Be enrolled for a minimum number of credits as specified on the financial aid award letter and/or student loan planning letter.
4. Maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined for the financial aid programs.
5. Apply for financial aid by submitting all of the required documentation. The need analysis form is required for all programs except the Colorado Graduate Fellowship, Colorado Scholars award, Colorado Deans Scholars, Colorado Regents Scholars award, and the Emergency Student Loan Program.
6. Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes for the following programs: Colorado Student Grant, Colorado Student Incentive Grant, Colorado Graduate Grant, Colorado Work-Study, Colorado Regents Scholars award, Colorado Deans Scholars Award, and Colorado Scholars Award.
7. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant.
8. Be registered for the draft or be enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selective Service.
Application
Each applicant must complete the financial aid application materials for submission to the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. Complete information must be available to the office before eligibility can be determined.
Limited Funds-The majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis to eligible students who document significant financial need and who complete their application materials in the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment by the 3/31/93 priority date. Application completion is defined as having all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) into the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. General financial aid is awarded to needy students who meet the priority date until all of the funds are committed for the year. If the file is completed after 3/31/93, then awards will probably be limited to Federal Pell Grant (for needy first undergraduate students only)
and /or outside student loans (Federal Stafford Loan, Federal Parents Loan, or Federal Supplemental Loan). Application for financial aid must be made each year; application materials are available in January of each year.
It is the student’s responsibility to be sure application materials are complete. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for application forms and complete details. All financial aid application procedures are subject to change due to revisions in federal and state laws, regulations, and guidelines.
Qualification
Financial Need-Most financial aid awards are based on the concept of financial need. Financial need is calculated as: cost of attendance (tuition, fees, books, living expenses) minus family contribution (student/spouse contribution and parents’ contribution for dependent students).
The cost of attendance is the estimated cost to attend CU-Denver, including tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment determines standard budgets based upon average tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.
For 1992-93, the following budgets were used for room and board, transportation, and personal expenses: $415 for students living at home with parents; $850 for students not living with parents. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student were approximately $1,000 per semester and non-resident tuition and fees were approximately $3,800 per semester. These amounts will probably increase by approximately 5% for the 1993-94 school year.
Independent Student-The federal government provides specific guidelines that define a self-supporting student for financial aid purposes. If a student is classified as self-supporting, then the student’s parental information is not considered when the calculation of family contribution is made. For 1993-94, a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old (born before 1/1/70) or one who meets one of the following conditions:
1. Graduate student
2. Married student
3. Student with legal dependents other
than a spouse
4. Veteran of the U.S. armed forces
5. Orphan or ward of the court


14 / General Information
These conditions may be appealed to the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment if unusual circumstances exist. Contact the office for appeal guidelines.
If the student/spouse contribution plus the parents’ contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance, then you will not qualify for need-based financial aid.
The contributions from the student/ spouse and from the parents are calculated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income, savings and other assets, family size, number of children in postsecondary school, and other factors. Students may appeal for special consideration if they are experiencing unusual circumstances. Financial aid is intended to supplement and not replace financial contributions from the student and parents.
Course Loads-General financial aid undergraduate recipients usually must enroll lor at least 12 credits per semester, and graduate students usually must enroll for at least 5 credits per semester. Federal Pell Grant and outside student loan recipients must carry at least a half-time credit load (6 hours for undergraduates per semester and 3 hours for graduates per semester). Minimum course loads for the summer session are pro-rated. For deferment of student loans, please refer to the Schedule of Courses each term for specific information. Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please check award letter and/or student loan planning letter for the exact number of credits required).
Satisfactory Academic Progress -CU-Denver students must make satisfactory academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment in order to be eligible and remain eligible for financial aid. Students should review the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid, available in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
Non-Degree Students-Non-degree students are eligible to be considered only for the Advantage Scholarship Program. Please refer to separate brochure for application procedures. Teacher certification students may apply for financial aid and are considered as undergraduate students for financial aid purposes.
Residency Status-A student is required to be a resident of Colorado for a full calendar year before the Office of Admissions can consider classification as a resident for tuition purposes. Non-resident students
are encouraged to obtain additional information from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident status.
As a resident, a student is eligible for the State of Colorado financial aid programs, and tuition is significantly less than for non-resident.
Refunds and Repayments-Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal or reclassification of tuition status must be applied to the recipient’s financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Students may also be expected to repay a portion of their financial aid awards if they withdraw from CU-Denver.
Appea/s-Students may appeal all decisions of the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment by completing a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office. Appeals are considered within three weeks and a written response is mailed to the student.
Reapply Each Tear-Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each year. Application materials for the next summer term are available beginning January 1st.
Award
Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 8-12 weeks after all application materials have been received in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. If awarded, an award letter is mailed to the student; it includes the types and amounts of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours required each term. A student loan planning letter is mailed to the student after the outside student loan applications) have been processed.
Types of Aid
The following aid programs are funded by the federal government:
1. Federal Pell Grant-Eligibility for the Federal Pell Grant is determined before any other aucL is awarded. Awards are defined by a strict need-based formula provided by the federal government, and award amounts vary depending upon amount of financial need, enrollment status, residency status, and whether the student is living with parents. Students are eligible for Federal Pell Grant consideration if they have not received their first baccalaureate degree by 6/1/93.
2. Outside Student Loans-Eligibility for all other types of assistance should be determined prior to applying for
outside student loans. The Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan program requires that students show financial need in order to qualify. Most single students who are working full-time do not document sufficient financial need to qualify for the subsidized program. Interest on the subsidized loan is paid for the student by the federal government as long as the student remains enrolled at least half-time and for a six-month grade period after dropping below half-time enrollment. The Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan program does not require that you document financial need. Eligibility is calculated as the cost of attendance minus other financial aid awarded. Interest is not paid by the federal government for the unsubsidized program and the student may elect to pay the interest currently or to allow the interest to be added to the total loar amount. Interest rates for the Federal Stafford Loan programs vary between 7-9%, depending on when the student first borrowed a Federal Stafford Loan. The Federal Supplemented Loan for Students (SLS) is another outside loan program for students who do not document financial need or who need additional funds after applying for the two types of Federal Stafford Loan. Undergraduate dependent students may not borrow the SLS because their parents are eligible to borrow under the Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students program (PLUS). Both the SLS and the PLUS programs are unsubsidized, and interest payments become the responsibility of the borrower at the time of disbursement. The interest rate varies on the SLS and PLUS programs, depending upon the current Treasury bill rates, and the interest rate is capped at 10-12%.
3. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)-This is a need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a baccalaureate degree.
4. Federal Perkins Loan-This need-based loan program, with an interest rate currently at 5%, is based at CU-Denver. No repayment of interest or principal is du until six or nine months (time period di fers depending upon when student first received Perkins Loan) after the studer ceases to be enrolled at least half-time.
5. Federal College Work-Study- Work-stud is a need-based program that allows students to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at non-profit agencies to help meet their educationa costs.


Registration /15
The State of Colorado funds the following programs:
1. Colorado Student Grant-A need-based grant for resident undergraduate students.
2. Colorado Student Incentive Grant-A need-based grant for resident undergraduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor’s degree. This grant is funded 50% by the federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado.
3. Colorado Graduate Grant-A need-based grant for resident graduate students.
4. Colorado Work-Study-A program similar to the College Work-Study program but limited to resident undergraduate students.
Scholarships
Following is a list of the major scholarships that are offered at CU-Denver. The first listing is for awards funded by the State of Colorado:
1. Regents Scholars award is offered to qualified new freshmen and transfer students by the Office of Admissions. New students will automatically be considered for this program.
2. Colorado Scholars award is for undergraduate resident students who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least 3.2 for at least 12 CU hours. The deadline for applying is March 31,1993. Contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for application procedures.
3. Deans Scholars award are awarded by undergraduate deans offices. Contact appropriate dean’s office for more information.
The following programs are funded by CU-Denver:
1. Advantage Scholarship is for minority and/or first generation college students who meet the specified income guidelines. Contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for applications.
2. Nelson/Running Wolf Scholarship funds are available for needy American Indian students. Contact the Office of American Indian Student Services (556-2860) for more information.
3. Ahlin Fund assistance is available for mobility-impaired students. Contact the Center for Student Counseling (556-2815) for applications.
Other scholarship information is available from the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment, the Auraria Library Scholarship InfoBank in the reference section, and the Center for Student Counseling.
Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment opportunities are listed in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment, the Auraria Student Assistance Center, and the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education. Students who participate in CMEA/MESA, the Pre-Collegiate Development Program, the Minority Scholars Program, or those who apply for Advantage Scholarships are automatically considered for Challenge Scholarships. Graduate students should inquire about additional types of financial aid through their academic departments. Students should be aware that Emergency Student Loans are available through the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment as well as the Office of Emergency Student Loans. American Indian students should request information about Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships from the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
REGISTRATION
Selecting an Academic Program and Courses
Students should review the following sections of this catalog that describe the academic programs available at CU-Denver, and that provide information by school or college on the various majors available, course requirements by major, course load policies, and other pertinent information.
Courses available during a particular semester or summer session are listed in the Schedule of Courses, published three months before the beginning of each term. Schedules are available from the Records Office.
Undergraduate students who need assistance in planning an academic program or in selecting courses should contact the academic unit in which they are enrolled to arrange for an advising appointment prior to registration. Graduate students should contact their respective graduate program for assistance.
Course Abbreviations
In general, the abbreviation preceding the course number identifies the department offering the course. The first digit in the course number indicates the recommended class level of the course:
The digit after the dash in the course number denotes the credit-hour value of the course. The 1-credit lecture/recitation period is 50 minutes long. Hence a student
enrolled in a 3-credit hour course will attend class for 150 minutes per week during a 16-week term. A 3-credit hour course will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class. A laboratory credit includes from two to four hours per week in the laboratory, drafting room, or field. Unless the course descriptions specify laboratory work, it is understood that the classes consist of lectures and discussions.
Level of Courses Student Classification 1000 Lower division
2000 Lower division
3000 Upper division
4000 Upper division
5000 Graduate students or
qualified seniors who have instructor’s or dean’s permission 6000 Graduate degree
students
7000 Master’s and Ph.D.
graduate students
8000 Ph.D. graduate students
Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are:
Coreq.-Corequisite Hrs. -Hours Lab. -Laboratory Lect. -Lecture Rec. -Recitation Sem. -Semester Wk. - Week
Thus, the description of CHEM 1020-5 signifies that the course is offered by the chemistry department at the freshman level, and that it carries 5 semester hours of credit (3 hours of lecture credit, 1 hour of recitation credit, and 1 hour of laboratory credit). Further, the student must have completed CHEM 1010 (the prerequisite) before enrolling.
Graduate School policy permits specifically approved courses to be offered concurrently at the 4000 and 5000 levels. Students should expect work at the graduate (5000) level to involve demonstration of greater maturity and critical skills than at the undergraduate level (4000).
Orientation
An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, prior to the first day of classes. The orientation program conducted by the Office of Student Life provides information to new students about some of the activities and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process and degree requirements also is provided. Academic orientation advising sessions are held during


16 / General Information
the term, before registration for the next term. Dates and times of new student orientations are published in the Schedule of Courses.
Registration
CU-Denver students can register from any touch-tone telephone. Students will be assigned a time to register and may register at or after their assigned time.
REGISTRATION PRIORITIES
Registration is by time assignment only. Continuing students, and new students admitted by the priority deadline, will have first priority in the following order: graduate students, new freshmen, fifth year seniors, seniors, juniors, sophomores, freshmen, and non-degree students. All students admitted after the priority deadline will be allowed to register in the order they are admitted.
Non-degree students who apply late should be prepared with alternate choices or classes because students in degree programs will register first. All non-degree students should contact the academic advisors of the degree programs in which they are interested in order to ensure that their classes will fulfill the requirements of the program.
Please note: some courses are not open for registration by non-degree students without special permission. Non-degree students should check the restrictions listed for each course in the Schedule of Courses.
POOLED COURSES AT METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER
Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with similar courses at Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD). CU-Denver undergraduate students may register for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU-Denver Schedule of Courses.
Pooled Course Restrictions
1. CU-Denver graduate students are not eligible to register for MSCD common pooled courses.
2. MSCD courses will not be included in the University of Colorado grade-point average. MSCD courses will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will count in the hours toward graduation.
3. MSCD courses cannot be used to meet specific course requirements toward the major without prior approval of
the student’s dean. The last 30 semester hours applied toward the baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence at CU-Denver. MSCD common pooled courses will not satisfy this residence requirement.
INTERINSTITUTIONAL
REGISTRATION
CU-Denver degree students may enroll in courses offered by the Community College of Denver, Front Range Community College, and Red Rocks Community College. Students must be enrolled at CU-Denver for at least one course during the semester or summer session to be eligible to register interinstitutionally. Registration is on a space available basis. Interin-stitutional courses are evaluated for transfer credit and are not included in a CU-Denver student’s grade-point average.
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of Colorado campuses concurrently must contact their school or college on their home campus. Concurrent registration is available only during fall and spring semesters.
A degree student registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if:
1. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean.
2. The course is a required course for the student’s degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver.
3. The student obtains approval from the academic dean.
4. There is space available at the other (host) campus.
5. The student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CU-Denver rates.
6. The home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes.
7. The concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses. Students may not register for an independent study course through concurrent registration. Students may not take courses pass/fail or for “no-credit” through concurrent registration.
To drop a concurrent course during the host campus drop/add period, arrange the drop at the home campus school or college office. To drop a concurrent course after the end of the host campus drop/add deadline, drop the course at the host campus Records Office.
Study Abroad
The Office of International Education on the Boulder campus offers study abroad programs that are available for all CU students. More than 30 programs are offered around the world. Resident credit at lower division, upper division, or graduate levels can be earned depending on the program selected and, if appropriate, can be applied to the CU-Denver degree. Students also can apply their financial aid to CU-Boulder sponsored study abroad programs. For more information on the Denver campus, see the section on International Education on page 22.
Course Loads
Students wishing to take more them 18 semester hours (12 in the summer session) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. Students should petition their academic dean.
Remember that a three-semester-hour course during a fall or spring semester will require six to nine hours of work each week outside of class; a three-semester-hour course during a summer session will require nine to thirteen hours of work each week outside of class.
Suggested maximum course loads for the fall and spring semesters for undergraduate students who are employed:
Employed
40 or more hours per week:
3-6 semester hours
30-39 hours per week:
5-8 semester hours
20-29 hours per week:
7-11 semester hours
10-19 hours per week:
9-15 semester hours
Students should consider their other obligations-academic, professional, and personal-before registering for courses.
GRADUATE RESTRICTIONS
No more than 15 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a fall or spring semester can be applied toward a graduate degree.
No more than 10 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a given summer session can be applied to a graduate degree.


Academic Policies and Regulations / 17
DEFINITION OF FULL-AND HALFTIME STATUS FOR FINANCIAL AID AND LOAN DEFERMENT:
FALL AND SPRING
Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in the student’s financial aid award letter.
Fall and Spring: effective Fall 1987
Undergraduates and non-degree students:
Full-time....... 12 or more semester hours
Half-time.......6 or more semester hours
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
5 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number-5000+)
8 or more hours of mixed level classes
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports, or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number-5000)
4 or more hours of mixed level classes
Summer (10 week term)
Undergraduates and non-degree students:
Full-time.......8 or more semester hours
Half-time....... 4 or more semester hours
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
3 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number-5000+)
5 or more hours of mixed level classes
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports, preparation)
Half-time:
2 or more hours of graduate level classes (course number-5000+)
3 or more hours of mixed level classes
Enrollment status for a term cannot be certified until the end of the drop/ add period.
These hours do not include interinstitu-tional hours from CCD or hours at MSCD, nor do they include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration. CCD courses are not considered for full-or halftime status.
Students receiving veteran’s benefits must contact the Veterans Affairs coordinator for definition of full-time status for summer sessions.
Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are considered for financial aid purposes by the
Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid.
SHORT TERM COURSES
Courses are also offered in five-week modules, in special weekend courses, and in seminars. Topics in Science modular courses are self-contained units designed to cover specific problems or issues in science. Students should contact the college/school office for information on short-term courses offered each semester.
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed:
Freshman 0-29 hours
Sophomore 30-59 hours
Junior 60-89 hours
Senior 90+ hours
All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado.
Grading System and Policies
The following grading system and policies for pass/fail registration, dropping and adding courses, and withdrawal from the University have been standardized for all academic units of the University.
GRADE SYMBOLS
The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol (A, B, C, D, F, IF, IW, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC', W, and ***) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, explained under Pass/Fail Procedure.
A-superior/excellent-4 credit points per credit hour
B-good/better than average-3 points per credit hour
C-competent/average-2 credit points per hour
D-minimum passing-1 credit point per credit hour
F-Failing-no credit points per credit hour
Beginning with the Spring 1984 semester, the University approved the use of a PLUS/MINUS grading system, where a B+ corresponds to 3.3 credit points per credit
hour, and a B- corresponds to 2.7 credit points per credit hour. Instructors may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS system, but are not required to do so.
IF-incomplete-becomes an Fif not completed within one year
IW—incomplete -regarded as 1C if not completed within one year
IP-in progress-thesis at the graduate level only
P/F-pass/fail-P grade is not included in the grade-point average; the Fgrade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor’s degree
H/P/F-honors/pass/fail-intended for honors courses; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average
AC-indicates registration on a nocredit basis
IT-indicates withdrawal without credit
’*‘-indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed.
An incomplete grade is only awarded when special circumstances prevent a student’s completing a course during the term. Students have one year to complete an incomplete. After one year, an IW is regarded as a DROP-PASSING; an IF is a FAILING grade. Students should not reregister for courses in which they have received incompletes.
Most schools and colleges require a contract between the instructor and student outlining the work necessary to “complete” the incomplete.
Graduate students enrolled at the 5000 level of a 4000/5000 course will be expected to complete additional work and be evaluated according to the graduate standards specified by the course instructor.
GRADE-POINT AVERAGE
The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course, totaling the hours and the credit points, and dividing the total points by the total hours.
Grades of P,NC,***,W, IP, IW, and IF are not included in the grade-point average.
If an IF grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as failed and a grade of Fis automatically calculated in the grade-point average at the end of the one-year grace period.
If an IW grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as dropped.
If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point


18 / General Information
PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS
College General 16 Hours Maximum Transfer Students
Business and Administration Only non-business electives may be taken pass/fail Only 6 semester hours may be taken pass/fail Only 6 semester hours may be taken pass/fail
Engineering and Applied Science Required courses may not be taken pass/fail. Upper division humanities and social sciences electives are acceptable, otherwise major department approval is required Includes courses taken in the honors program
Liberal Arts and Sciences May be restricted in certain majors; not included in 30 hours of C or better work required for major. No more than 6 hours P/F any semester Does not include courses taken in honors, physical education, cooperative education and certain teacher certification courses; also does not include ENGL 1000 Proficiency Test or MATH 1000 Test College requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of courses with letter grades
average. The University of Colorado grade-point average does not include courses taken at other institutions.
The grade-point average of graduate students includes only courses, credit hours, and credit points accumulated while enrolled in a Graduate School Program.
The grade-point average does not appear on official transcripts issued from the Records Office but does appear on the Grade Report issued each semester.
Students should consult with the dean of their college or school for explanation of any exceptions made to the University uniform grade-point average.
Undergraduates and non-degree students must maintain a 2.0 grade-point average to remain in good standing. Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain in good standing. Students whose GPA falls below the 2.0/3.0 level are subject to probation or suspension. Such students will be notified by their school or college.
MID-TERM GRADES
Beginning with the Spring 1990 semester, instructors will be asked to assign mid-term grades for a small population of students. Students who may be in some
academic difficulty may be contacted and counseled about support services available to them. Please note: academic support services are available to all students through the Office of Student Retention Services, NC 2012,556-2324.
PASS/FAIL PROCEDURE
1. Students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis must do so during the drop/add period. Changes to or from a pass/fail basis may be made only during the regular drop/add period.
2. Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/ fail basis and credited toward the bachelor’s degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass/fail in any given semester. [Note: Individual schools and colleges may have additional restrictions as to pass/fail credits. See chart on this page for additional information.]
3. Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of pass/fail registration.
All students who register for a pass/ fail appear on the regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office, those
registrations with a pass/fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D and above convert to grades of P. Courses taken pass/fail will be included in hours toward graduation. Pass grades are not included in a student’s grade-point average. An F grade in a course taken pass/fail will be included in the grade-point average.
4. The record of pass/fail registration is maintained by the Records Office.
5. Exceptions to the pass/fail regulations are permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education, the Division of Extended Studies, and Study Abroad Programs.
6. Graduate degree students can exercise the P/Foption for undergraduate courses only. A grade of P will not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement.
7. Students who register for a course on a pass/fail basis may not later decide to receive a letter grade. Each school and college limits the hours and courses for which students may register on a pass/ fail basis.
Please note: many other institutions will not accept a “F” grade for transfer credit.
AUDITING COURSES
To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they sire under suspension from the University or have outstanding financial obligations to the University. The Records Office does not keep any record of courses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where special equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor. Auditor’s cards are issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor when requesting permission to attend a class.
Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges, and are not eligible for other student services.
Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) may audit classes for no charge. Contact the Division of Enrollment and Student Services at 556-8427, NC 2204.


Academic Policies /19
NO CREDIT
Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college. File the no credit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop/add period. Students who register for a course on a no credit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade. Students may not register again for a course which has already been taken on a no credit basis.
Adding and Dropping Courses1
ADDING COURSES
Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 12 (8 in the summer) days of full-term classes, provided there is space available. Instructor approved may be required after the first day/week of classes.
DROPPING COURSES
1. Students may drop courses without approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer session). Tuition will not be charged for the courses which are dropped as long as the student is not withdrawing. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student’s permanent record.
2. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer session), the instructor’s signature is required, and the instructor must indicate whether the student is passing or failing. If the student is passing, the course will appear on the student’s permanent record with the grade of W. If the student is failing, the course will appear on the permanent record with an F.
3. Dropping all courses requires an official University withdrawal form.
Deadlines for module courses and intensive courses are published in the Schedule of Courses each term.
Withdrawal from the University
To withdraw from the University, students must obtain approval from their icademic dean’s office, the Bursar’s Dffice, and the Records Office. The withdrawal date is recorded on the student’s permanent record page. If the withdrawal
For the exact dates, check the Schedule of Courses for he appropriate term.
date is during the first 12 days of the semester (9 days for the summer session), the courses Will not appear on the student’s permanent record. If the withdrawal date is after the 12th day, the courses will appear with W grades. Students may not withdraw after the 10th week of the semester (7th week of the summer session) except under documented circumstances clearly beyond their control.
Students who are receiving veteran’s benefits or financial aid also must obtain the required signature of those respective offices. International students must obtain clearance from the Office of International Education.
A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receive grades of F for all course work enrolled for during that term, and be liable for all tuition and fees.
To withdraw from the University, graduate students must apply to the dean of their Graduate Program for permission to withdraw in good standing. Students who withdraw without communicating with the dean and without filing the appropriate Withdrawal Form will be marked as having failed their courses for the term.
Deadlines for module courses and intensive courses, as well as specific requirements and tuition adjustment, appear in the Schedule of Courses published prior to the beginning of each term.
Originality of Work
In all academic areas it is imperative that either work be original, or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons’ ideas or language. Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the University.
Graduation
Undergraduates. Students who have completed 80 or more semester hours should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or college to determine what requirements remain for graduation. Students intending to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their graduation term. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final
grades have been evaluated. After students have been certified to graduate they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Graduates. Students must file an Application for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with The Graduate School on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term. Check with The Graduate School for more complete information. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been e valuated. After students have been certified to graduate, they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Commencement. Letters will be mailed in early April to students eligible to participate in the spring commencement. Information will be provided about ordering special display diplomas, being fitted for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree recorded. Students graduating at the end of the summer session or the end of the fall semester may participate in the following spring commencement. Beginning with the 1994 commencement exercise, individual undergraduate names will not be read.
Transcripts
Transcripts of academic record at the University of Colorado (all campuses) may be ordered in person or by mail from the University of Colorado at Denver, Transcript Office, Campus Box 167, RO. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364. Official transcripts will not be available until approximately four weeks after final examinations. A transcript on which a degree is to be recorded will not be available until approximately eight weeks after final examinations. Requests should include the following:
1. Student’s full name (include given or other name if applicable).
2. Student number.
3. Birthdate.
4. The last term and campus the student attended.
5. Whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordered near the end of a term.
6. Whether the request should be held until a degree is recorded.
7. Agency, college, or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included. Transcripts sent to students are labeled “issued to student.”
8. Student’s signature. (This is the student’s authorization to release the records to the designee.)
There is no charge for individual official transcripts. Transcripts are prepared only


20 / General Information
at the student’s request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Official transcripts require five to seven working days to be generated. Unofficial copies of transcripts sent to CU-Denver from other institutions can be requested at the Records Office. Official transcripts should be requested directly from the issuing institution. Unofficial CU transcripts are available to students in the CU-Denver Records Office when the request is made 48 hours prior to pickup. Students must present picture ID.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
Periodically, but not less than annually, the University of Colorado informs students of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, with which the institution intends to comply fully. The Act was designed to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.
Local policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the Act. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on each of the several campuses of the University of Colorado.
The following items of student information have been designated by the University of Colorado as public or directory information: student name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study, awards, honors, degree(s) conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical factors (height, weight) of athletes, date and place of birth. This information may be disclosed by the University for any purpose at its discretion.
Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of information under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. To withhold disclosure, written notification must be received in the Records Office on the appropriate campus prior to the end of the drop/add period in the term. Forms requesting the withholding of directory information are available in the Records Office.
The request to withhold disclosure will remain in effect until the student provides written notification to the Records Office. The University of Colorado assumes that when a student fails to request to have directory information withheld, the student is indicating approval for disclosure of information for that term and following terms until otherwise requested.
Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Records Office, 556-2389.
University of Colorado at Denver Confidentiality of Academic Records
STUDENTS:
DO have the right to view and inspect their educational records (excluding any financial records of their parents).
DO have the right to have Directory Information withheld from all persons or organizations outside the University.
Directory Information includes:
address, telephone number date and place of birth dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study awards, honors, degree(s) conferred past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities
physical characteristics (height, weight) of athletes
DO NOT have the right to obtain their grades, or other information not considered Directory Information, by telephone.
PARENTS:
DO have the right to obtain the educational records of their child only if they provide a signed statement that their son or daughter is a dependent as defined by the U.S. Interned Revenue Service. The Records Office, in NC 1003,556-2389, has forms available to parents for such requests. Parents are, however, encouraged to obtain final grades with a written approval from the student.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO PERSONNEL:
DO have the right to use educational records of students in the normal exercise of their duties.
DO NOT have the right to use educational records of students for employment purposes, for social organizations, for personal reasons, or for other non-
educational interests, without written consent of the student.
PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO:
DO have the right to obtain the Directory Information listed above, unless the student has made a request for nondisclosure. When the term microfiche, or the computer terminal on-line file of the Student Information System indicates PRIVATE, inquirers will be told that no information can be released without the student’s written consent.
PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING FINANCIAL AID TO STUDENTS:
DO have the right to educational records of students only as necessary in determining and enforcing terms of financial aid.
PERSONS IN AN EMERGENCY:
DO have the right to obtain confidential academic records necessary to protect the health or safety of students and others, but such information will only be released by the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services, 556-8427.
These regulations are required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (the Buckley Amendment). For further information, please call the Records Office at (303) 556-2389.
Student records will be released only to the student with current, appropriate identification or upon written authorization of the student whose records are being requested.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES
Alumni Association
The CU-Denver Aumni Association provides programs and services which stimulate interest in, increase support for, and builds life-long commitment to the University of Colorado at Denver among its alumni, students, and the community. Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon graduation. Friends and non-degree former students are also welcome to participate. The governing board is composed of alumni representing all schools and colleges on campus.
Horizons, a newspaper published three times a year, is mailed to all graduates. Aumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/or activities which might


Special Programs and Facilities / 21
interest them. The Alumni Mack Easton Award, the Alumni Recognition Award, and the Alumni Legislative Award are bestowed each year at commencement and are sponsored by the Association.
A program for alumni use of the campus recreation center is available through the office, 556-2549.
Auraria Book Center
Student Union: Ground level, 556-3230
Hours: M-Th, 8-6; F, 8-5; Sat., 10-3 except vacation and interim periods.
The Auraria Book Center carries academic, technical, reference, and exam preparation books in support of your higher education. Best sellers, new releases, and gift book selections change frequently and are often accompanied by displays of special value books in many subjects. For additional savings on general reading books, join the Auraria Book Club at the Book Information desk. Special orders and out of print searches are available at no charge.
Students: Bring your course printouts to locate textbooks! Subjects are arranged alphabetically; departmental abbreviations, course and section numbers are printed on a shelf tag below each required or optional textbook. When available, used textbooks sell for 75 percent of the new book price. A full refund is given for new and used books accompanied by your receipt and returned within the first three weeks of class for regular semesters and during the first week of class for short terms. Please read the refund policy attached to your receipt.
Macintosh, IBM, Zenith, and NeXT personal computer systems and a variety of software are offered to Auraria campus students at educational discount prices.
A current, validated Auraria ID must be presented at the time of purchase. Rounding out the educational supply/campus life areas are insignia sportswear, gifts and cards, and supplies for school, office, art, and design.
The Convenience Store is located near :he main store in the Student Union lower mall, and has extended hours for those A'ishing to buy snacks, magazines, sundries, and school supplies. Used texts are bought back from students through-aut the year, and merchandise refunds and exchanges also are performed here.
Auraria Reprographics offers full-serv-ce copying in the Convenience Store, M-Th, 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. and F, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Special papers, color copying, ransparencies, reductions and enlargements, lamination and other options
may be specified for jobs of all sizes. Worldwide FAX service and shipping of packages by UPS and Federal Express also are available.
A current picture ID is required for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard, VISA, and American Express charges.
Computing, Information and Network Services
Computing, Information and Network Services supports computer and network use for both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. All centralized administrative systems are developed, maintained, and processed by University Management Systems in Boulder, with output processing and user support provided by Computing, Information and Network Services in Denver. Denver campus administrative applications are developed, maintained, and processed by Computing, Information and Network Services. Most academic processing is either done on campus or through one of several networks available through Computing, Information and Network Services.
The Denver campus maintains a VAX 8800 under VMS, and a 10-processor Sequent Symmetry under UNIX. A communications network allows access to ail campus minicomputers and connection to CARL (Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries) on-line library services. The VMS and UNIX computers are connected to an Ethernet backbone and are nodes on the growing Colorado SuperNet which provides access to other Colorado universities and colleges, as well as the Westnet regional network, Bitnet, and the Internet for national and international communications. There are over 1,400 personal computers located on the campus in ten teaching laboratories, three public labs, individual laboratories, and in offices.
Computing, Information and Network Services staff provide assistance to academic and administrative users on all available computing systems. Advisors and a full-time academic user services staff assist students and faculty with questions regarding software packages, programming, the use of computer systems, and software availability. Administrative users are assisted with planning, systems design, programming, and day-to-day computing activities by Computing, Information and Network Services user services and operations personnel. The Computing, Information and Network Services staff operates and maintains
campus minicomputers, telecommunications equipment, and public laboratories. This staff also maintains personal computers and is available to assist faculty and staff with hardware and software planning, acquisitions, questions, and problems.
The goal of Computing, Information and Network Services is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work. For further information and an informative booklet about computing at CU-Denver, please call 556-2583.
Division of Extended Studies
Extended Studies is a special unit within the University of Colorado at Denver system whose purpose is to provide opportunities for regular students (as well as other students) to access certain classes and to augment their regular academic program.
Extended Studies can be potentially helpful to virtually any student. However, it can be especially helpful when a student is confronted with certain types of problems, such as:
Not formally admitted to the University. When prospective students have not completed or, in some cases, have not even started their process for admission to the University, they may still be able to enroll in classes for credit through Extended Studies.
Late registration. Even if a student has been formally admitted to the University, he/she may have missed the registration deadline for a given semester. Extended Studies may be able to assist in registration for credit.
All credits earned through classes in which a student has registered through Extended Studies are on his/her CU-Denver transcript.
In addition to classes offered on campus, Extended Studies will always have a variety of credit courses which are being offered off campus. Generally, these courses are not listed in the regular Schedule of Courses, and the student must call the Extended Studies office for a listing of such courses. Any off campus credit course is on the student’s CU-Denver transcript. Students should check with an advisor as to whether a particular course will meet specific major or minor degree requirements.
Teachers may use off campus Extended Studies credit courses for recertification.
Extended Studies also offers an extensive list of non-credit courses which may augment a student’s personal or professional growth needs.


22 / General Information
The Division of Extended Studies is located at the northeast corner of Larimer and 14th streets on the ground floor of the CU-Denver Building. (556-2735)
University of Colorado Foundation, Inc.
The chief goal of the University of Colorado Foundation, Inc. is to advance the University of Colorado’s mission to educate tomorrow’s citizens, to expand knowledge through significant research, and to serve Colorado through civic-minded commitments.
The University’s academic leadership establishes priorities for private support. Professional fundraisers generate interest and enthusiasm for the University, recruit and organize volunteers, solicit gifts, and assist donors in gift planning.
Established in 1967 as an independent nonprofit corporation, the CU Foundation raises and manages private funds to benefit students and faculty by raising funds for scholarships, enriching academic programs, purchasing equipment, and upgrading facilities. In 1981 the CU Foundation established a Denver campus office.
Office of International Education
The University of Colorado at Denver, through its Office of International Education (OIE), provides a variety of globally-focused programs, educational opportunities, and services for international and domestic students, foreign scholars, faculty, staff, and the greater Denver community.
The Office oversees student study abroad programs, expedites the exchange of students and faculty, hosts foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and advises graduate students and faculty for Fulbright scholarships. OIE functions as a recruiting, retention, and advisory office for international students. The office coordinates many services for international students before and after they have been accepted to CU-Denver, including: new student orientation, visa and INS advice, and help for those international students who need assistance with a variety of questions and difficulties. Additionally, OIE coordinates the International Affairs Program, where students may receive information and preliminary advising concerning CU-Denver’s individually structured major, minor, and certificate programs in International Affairs. OIE seeks to increase
community awareness of international issues by sponsoring lectures and programs open to the general public.
The goals of OIE are to raise international awareness on the CU-Denver campus and, in particular, to provide an opportunity for all students to gain the global competency needed in today’s interdependent world.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Each of the schools and colleges at CU-Denver provides international opportunities for students. (Please see individual school and college descriptions in this catalog.) The International Affairs Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is an interdisciplinary program open to all undergraduates. Students may pursue an individually structured major, minor or certificate in International Affairs, where they are given the maximum opportunity to design their own personalized course of study in cooperation with an International Affairs faculty advisor. See International Affairs under College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in this catalog for further details or contact an advisor in the Office of International Education (OIE).
The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration offer a number of courses in various aspects of international business. These courses can be taken on a selective basis. Alternatively, a set of courses can be taken to achieve an Area of Emphasis in International Business, either in connection with a bachelor’s degree or in connection with an M.B.A. Available courses and requirements for Areas of Emphasis are described in this catalog under the College of Business/Graduate School of Business. For more information, students interested in international business studies should contact an advisor in the College of Business or the Graduate School of Business.
STUDY ABROAD
OIE provides information and advising for students wishing to make foreign study a part of their college experience. Currently, OIE is working with the colleges and departments of CU-Denver to create and facilitate new study abroad opportunities. A formal contract with CU-Boulder’s Office of International Education will make that campuses’ programs even more accessible to CU-Denver students and provide additional funds for more study abroad programming.
Some of the study abroad programs are of the traditional junior year abroad variety in which students are placed directly
in foreign universities for an academic year. For students unable to spend an academic year abroad, programs for a single semester or summer are available with various emphases. Special summer programs, e.g., architecture study in Italy or Russian language study in Moscow, are organized with specific departments.
With successful programs already established in Russia and China, OIE is in the process of coordinating programs in Australia, Canada, Costa Rica, The Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, and Mexico.
Students are enrolled at the University of Colorado at Denver while participating in many of these study abroad programs. The applicability of credit in particular departments and colleges of CU-Denver is up to the individual colleges and departments. A “B" average with the equivalent of two years of college level work in the appropriate language is required for many of the academic year programs. Financial aid can be applied to program costs in most cases.
FOREIGN STUDENT ADVISING AND SUPPORT SERVICES
All foreign students must meet with the International Student Advisor in OIE upon arrival in Denver to have visas and other paperwork reviewed and copied. OIE realizes that the first few months in a new country and a new city are particularly difficult for foreign students. We provide a friendly ear and a place to ask questions and express concerns about all kinds of issues including U.S. social customs and other such concerns. OIE also provides an avenue for networking with other CU-Denver foreign students by sponsoring international student clubs and social activities.
GRADUATE STUDENT AND FACULTY FULBRIGHT INFORMATION
OIE serves as the clearinghouse for information on the Fulbright graduate student fellowships and faculty visiting lectureships at foreign universities.
CONFERENCES AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH SERVICES
During the year, OIE sponsors a number of guest lectures, small conferences and special seminars focused on topics of current international interest. Most of these activities are open to the public as well as the CU-Denver community. OIE works closely with West High School, the Denver Public School System magnet school for International Studies. OIE is also an active


University Policies / 23
Darticipant in a number of Denver commu-lity international programs and events.
More information about these and other programs is available from the Office of nternational Education.
Phone: (303) 556-3489
Fax: (303) 556-4562
Office: CU-Denver Bldg., Annex
Suite 100
Director: Stephen C. Thomas
Asst. Director and Foreign Student
Advisor: Joan Van Becelaere
Study Abroad
Coordinator: Jerald R. Wagenman Information
Desk: Andrea Suun
Vur,aria Student Services
The Auraria Student Services Division iffers the following:
. Auraria Student Union-556-3185 The Student Union, located at 9th and Lawrence, houses a cafeteria, information desk, Book Center, study lounges, gameroom, ticket service, housing referral service, offices for student government and organizations, convenience store, copy center, exhibit space, locker rentals, lost and found, meeting and conference facilities, and the Mission Bar and Grill.
. Conference Serwce.s-Student Union, Room 210,556-2755
Through the Conference Services office, campus space can be reserved for ail non-academic purposes.
. Disability Services Office-177 Arts Building, 556-8387
This office provides the following academic support services to students who have physical, learning, or psychi-atric/emotional disabilities:
Taped textbooks
Sign language and oral interpreters
Notetakers
Scribing
Testing accommodation Sale of handicap parking permits Disability-related counseling Advocacy
Career Resource Center-Yll Arts Building, 556-4542 The Career Resource Center offers assistance to students and alumni in planning their careers and seeking employment through the provision of on-campus employer interviews, current job vacancy listings, Campus Career Library, and a computerized career guidance system. The student
employment office maintains a listing of part-time and temporary job openings for currently enrolled students. Additional services are offered in the same office by CU-Denver career counselors.
5. Auraria Child Care Center-556-3188 The Auraria Child Care Center serves the child care needs of Auraria Campus students, staff and faculty by providing high quality early childhood education and care programs. The Child Care Center is located on the southwest corner of the campus. Its programs are consistently recognized by the educational community for their high quality early childhood care and education. Develop-mentally appropriate practices for young children guide the educational programs that are provided. Curriculum planning is flexible and based on children’s interests. Experiences are planned in accordance with “Key Experiences” adapted from the High/ Scope Cognitively Oriented Curriculum. Supervising and assistant teachers in the Child Care Centers are all degreed teachers meeting the certification guidelines of the National Academy
of Early Childhood programs.
Children aged 18 months to six years are served at the Auraria Child Care Center. The Center also has a fully accredited kindergarten program.
6. Emmanuel/Library Galleries-556-8337 The Emmanuel and Library Galleries host exhibits of students, faculty and nationally known artists. Stop in for a relaxing break.
7. Information Centers
Students and visitors can find information and directions at the Information Desk in the Student Union, and at the Visitor Information Center at Lawrence Way.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
EEO/AA/Title IX/Americans with Disabilities Act
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to enhancing the diversity of its work force and its student body. Diversity among faculty, staff, administrators, and students is essential to educational excellence and to accomplishing CU-Denver’s mission. Just as diversity in academic programs and scholarly perspectives enriches the University, so too does diversity among faculty, staff, administrators, and students. Diversity among faculty, staff, and administrators provides role models and mentors for students, who will become future leaders in
academe and in the larger society, and ensures that a broad array of experiences and world views will inform and shape teaching, research, service, and decision making at CU-Denver.
As the only public university serving the Denver metropolitan area, CU-Denver recognizes, acknowledges, and accepts its central role in education to take explicit affirmative action to employ, retain, and advance in employment qualified applicants and employees, and to admit, retain, and advance qualified applicants and students regardless of their race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, or veteran status.
Alternative formats of this statement are available upon request.
CU-Denver has adopted an affirmative action plan to implement these commitments. For information, contact the Office of Affirmative Action, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 700,556-2509.
Ombuds Office
In any large organization, misunderstandings and disagreements may occur. The Ombuds Office helps to enhance the clarity and dissemination of information, to simplify decision making and communication, to assist with the process of change and with adjustment to change, and to improve understanding among staff, students, faculty, and administrators.
The Ombuds Office provides information about programs, policies, services, and procedures affecting members of the University community; makes referrals to appropriate state, CU system, and CU-Denver resources; serves as consultant in the preparation and review of policies and procedures; and assists in the solution of problems and the resolution of disputes.
Ombuds Office services are informal, impartial, confidential, and independent of administrative authorities. These services do not replace or circumvent existing channels, but help them work more effectively. For further information or assistance, contact the Ombuds Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 700, 556-4493.
University Policy Regarding A Drug-Free Workplace
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing a drug-free workplace and environment. The University prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of any controlled substance in the workplace. Those individuals who are


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found to be in violation are engaged in serious misconduct and subject to disciplinary action consistent with the Faculty Handbook (1988), the applicable rules of the State Personnel System, the University’s Unclassified Staff Handbook, and the Student’s Discipline and Review Procedures.
Academic Honor Code and Discipline Policies
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
A university’s reputation is built on a standing tradition of excellence and scholastic integrity. As members of the University of Colorado at Denver academic community, faculty and students accept the responsibility to maintain the highest standards of intellectual honesty and ethical conduct in completing all forms of academic work at the University.
FORMS OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
Students are expected to know, understand, and comply with the ethical standards of the University. In addition, students have an obligation to inform the appropriate official of any acts of academic dishonesty by other students of the University. Academic dishonesty is defined as a student’s use of unauthorized assistance with intent to deceive an instructor or other such person who may be assigned to evaluate the studei it’s work in meeting course and degree requirements. Examples of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to the following:
A. Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the use of another person’s distinctive ideas or words without acknowledgement. The incorporation of another person’s work into one’s own requires appropriate identification and acknowledgement, regardless of the means of appropriation. The following are considered to be forms of plagiarism when the source is not noted:
1. Word-for-word copying of another person’s ideas or words
2. The mosaic (the interspersing of one’s own words here and there while, in essence, copying another’s work)
3. The paraphrase (the rewriting of another’s work, yet still using their fundamental idea or theory)
4. Fabrication (inventing or counterfeiting sources)
5. Submission of another’s work as one’s own
6. Neglecting quotation marks on material that is otherwise acknowledged.
Acknowledgement is not necessary when the material used is common knowledge.
B. Cheating
Cheating involves the possession, communication, or use of information, materials, notes, study aids, or other devices not authorized by the instructor in any academic exercise, or communication with another person during such an exercise. Examples of cheating are:
1. Copying from another’s paper or receiving unauthorized assistance from another during an academic exercise or in the submission of academic material
2. Using a calculator when its use has been disallowed
3. Collaborating with another student or students during an academic exercise without the consent of the instructor
C. Fabrication and Falsification
Fabrication involves inventing or counterfeiting information, i.e., creating results not obtained in a study or laboratory experiment. Falsification, on the other hand, involves the deliberate alteration or changing of results to suit one’s needs in an experiment or other academic exercise.
D. Multiple Submission
This is the submission of academic work for which academic credit has already been earned, when such submission is made without instructor authorization.
E. Misuse of Academic Materials
The misuse of academic materials includes, but is not limited to, the following:
1. Stealing or destroying library or reference materials or computer programs
2. Stealing or destroying another student’s notes or materials, or having such materials in one’s possession without the owner’s permission
3. Receiving assistance in locating or using sources of information in an assignment when such assistance has been forbidden by the instructor
4. Illegitimate possession, disposition, or use of examinations or answer keys to examinations
5. Unauthorized alteration, forgery, or falsification of academic records
6. Unauthorized sale or purchase of examinations, papers or assignments
F. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty
Complicity involves knowingly contributing to another’s acts of academic dishonesty.
PROCEDURES IN CASES OF SUSPECTED ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
All matters of academic policy, including academic dishonesty, are under the jurisdiction of each of the University’s schools and colleges pursuant to Article IX2.B and Article VI.C of the Laws of the Regents. Accordingly, each school and college has established procedures for addressing matters of academic dishonesty and for determining the severity and consequences of each infraction. Students should contact their school or college for standards and/or procedures specific to their school or college. As a general rule, all school and college procedures contain the following requirements and provisions:
A. Faculty, staff members, or students ma; submit charges of academic dishonest] against students.
A student who has evidence that another student is guilty of academic dishonesty should inform the instructo or the dean of the college in writing of the charge.
B. A faculty member who has evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty should confront the student with the evidence. In cases of academii dishonesty, the faculty member has the authority to reprimand the student appropriately, which could include the issuance of a failing grade (F). If the faculty member elects to reprimand the student for academic dishonesty by issuing a failing grade, the faculty member shall submit a written report to the dean of the appropriate college within five (5) working days. The repor shall include, but is not limited to, the time, place, nature of the offense(s), the name(s) of the accused, the name(s of the accuser(s), and witnesses (if any). If the faculty member feels that her/his reprimand is an insufficient sanction for a particular case of academic dishonesty, the faculty member may recommend to the dean of the appropriate college that further action be taken.
C. In cases where the faculty member has recommended further action in a


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case of academic dishonesty, the dean or a designated committee shall schedule a disciplinary hearing as soon as possible. The student(s) accused of academic dishonesty shall be notified in writing of the specific charge(s). The student(s) also has (have) the right to be represented by legal counsel and to be present during the proceedings. The student(s) must notify the deem of the appropriate college five (5) working days before the hearing of the intent to have legal counsel present at the hearing.
D. The dean or the designated committee may take any of the following actions:
• Place the student(s) on disciplinary probation for a specified period
of time
• Suspension of registration for a specified period of time
• Expulsion: No opportunity to return to the school or college in which the infraction occurred
• Take no further action against the accused student(s)
A record of the action taken shall be kept in the committee’s confidential file and a copy sent to the Registrar
E. In all cases, the student(s) shall be notified of the dean’s or committee’s decision within seven (7) working days.
F. If a student wishes to appeal a case, the student should request the procedures for doing so from his or her school or college.
G. Students who are taking courses at the University of Colorado at Denver, but are enrolled at one of the other educational institutions on the Auraria campus and are charged with academic dishonesty, are subject to the same procedures and sanctions outlined above.
SUMMARY
Questions regarding academic integrity should be directed to the dean’s office of he college or school in which the student s enrolled.
Code of Student Conduct ^Student Rights and Responsibilities and Procedures for Disciplinary Review and Action)
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR WHICH ACTION MAY BE TAKEN FA VIOLATION OCCURS
All persons on University property are equired, for reasonable cause, to identify hemselves when requested by University
or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers, the University reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to University personnel or property and those who interfere with its function as an educational institution.
All persons on CU-Denver/Auraria property who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applicable to University students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations.
The behaviors outlined below will not be tolerated, because they threaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the University and the personal rights and freedoms of its members.
1. Intentional obstruction, disruption, or interference with teaching, research, disciplinary proceedings, or other University activities, including its public service and administrative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denver/Auraria premises.
2. Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, school officials, employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
3. Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CU-Denver/Auraria Higher Education Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the University, or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person.
4. Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms, which includes, but is not limited to, striking, laying hands upon, threatening with violence, or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure; or other treatment of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature. (This includes, but is not limited to, demeaning behavior of an ethnic, sexist, or racist nature, unwanted sexual advances, or intimidations.)
5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilities, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU-Denver/Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimental to the University.
6. Forgery, fraud (to include computer fraud), falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification with intent to gain any unentitled advantage.
7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver/ Auraria property and the private property of
students, University officials, employees, and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denver/Auraria buildings or facilities. This includes the possession of known stolen property.
8. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus. This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University, or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee. (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, firearms, explosives, BB guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles, Bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switchblades. A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm, explosive, or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly included within the meaning of the terms firearms, explosive, or dangerous weapon.)
9. Sale, distribution, use, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
10. Physical restriction, coercion, or harassment of any person; significant theft; sale/manufacture of illegal drugs (includes possession of a sufficient quantity with intent to sell); damage, theft, or unauthorized possession of University property; or forgery, falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records or instruments of identification to gain any unentitled advantage.
UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS
As a member of the University community, you are held accountable not only for upholding civil and criminal laws, but University standards as well. Enrollment does not confer either immunity or special consideration with reference to civil and criminal laws. Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to challenge or postponement on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced, or are pending in civil or criminal court.
In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a student violates a standard and withdraws


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from the University before administrative action is final.
USE OF UNIVERSITY/AURARIA PROPERTY OR FACILITIES
Nothing in this Code of Conduct shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the voicing of concerns or grievances. The University is dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge through a free exchange of ideas, and this shall be a cardinal principle in the determination of whether or not a proposed use of University facilities is appropriate.
The Auraria Higher Education Center has established campus regulations and procedures governing the use of CU-Denver/Auraria grounds, buildings, and other facilities. Such regulations are designed to prevent interference with University functions and activities.
Except where otherwise specifically authorized, or when members of the public are invited, the use of CU-Denver/ Auraria facilities shall be limited to faculty, staff, and students of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus, and to organizations having chapters, local groups, or other recognized University-connected representation among faculty, staff, or students of the three academic institutions on the Auraria campus.
CLASSROOM CONDUCT
Students are expected to conduct themselves appropriately in classroom situations. If disruptive behavior occurs in a classroom, an instructor has the authority to ask the disruptive student to leave the classroom. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist, the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Public Safety and/or the appropriate Dean’s office. The appropriate Dean or his/her representative may withdraw a student from a particular class for disruptive behavior, while the Student Discipline Committee may recommend to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services to suspend, permanently expel, and/or permanently exclude the student from the campus. Appeal questions concerning disruptive behavior should be directed to the Academic Dean’s office when withdrawal from a class is involved, and to the Director of Student Life when suspension or expulsion from the University is involved.
NON-ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE POLICIES
Violations of Standards of Conduct should be reported to the Director of
Student Life during working hours. Auraria Public Safety should be contacted during non-duty hours.
If a violation occurs on campus and it is not in a specific building, Auraria Public Safety and/or the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
If emergency help is needed when on campus, contact Auraria Public Safety; for help off campus, contact the Denver Police.
Actions available to campus officials include, but are not limited to: asking those involved in inappropriate behavior to cease and desist; requesting offenders) to leave the Auraria campus; denying or restricting use of facilities or services; calling Auraria Public Safety for assistance; billing offenders) for any physical damages; pressing civil charges; and referring student(s) to the Director of Student Life. The chart that follows illustrates the overall structure involved.
DISCIPLINE STRUCTURE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
1. Violations observed may be resolved by any of the following:
• University departments such as:
a. Admissions
b. Student Union
c. University/Auraria Public Safety
d. Financial Aid
e. Veterans Affairs
• Faculty/Staff
• Students
• Non-University Members
2. If violation warrants further attention contact:
• Director of Student Life
a. If student(s) desires a review by the Director of Student Life. Academic dishonesty discipline falls under the jurisdiction of the individual colleges and schools.
b. If violation warrants possible suspension or expulsion.
• Student Discipline Committee
3. Final review (may request only in cases of suspension/expulsion). Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services
STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
When one of the ten Standards of Conduct listed in this code is violated, the student may be referred to the Director of Student Life. Any person may refer a student or student group suspected of violating this code to the Director of Student Life. Persons making such referrals will
be asked to provide information pertinent to the case. The Director of Student Life will make a determination as to the seriousness of the case. This will be done in most situations by asking the student(s) involved in the case to come in for an administrative interview to determine what actions, if any, will be taken by the University. Students will be notified in writing of the results of such administrative reviews.
The Director of Student Life has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no further action other them talking with the accused student(s).
3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student’s behavior has been inappropriate, and any further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University.
5. Refer cases to the Student Discipline Committee when the above sanctions are determined to be inadequate.
6. Take other actions including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violators) provides compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
STUDENT DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Disciplinary proceedings shall be conducted as administrative proceedings and not as judicial proceedings. The University is not a part of the judicial branch of state government. The University has authority to promulgate and enforce internal rules of behavior that shall be administered in a fair and impartial manner in harmony with its educational objectives and administrative nature. As part of the administrative nature of the committee’s proceedings, fundamental rules of fairness will be followed. Copies of these procedures are available in the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services.
This committee, composed of students, faculty, and staff members, makes the decision whether students charged with violations of the student conduct code may continue to attend the University of Colorado at Denver.
The Student Discipline Committee has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no action other than talking with the accused student.


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3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student’s behavior has been inappropriate, and further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
i. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University.
5. Recommend suspension of a student from the University for disciplinary reasons. This suspension may be for various lengths of time ranging from one semester to an indefinite period of time. After the period of disciplinary suspension has expired, a student may apply in writing to have the notation on the student’s record removed.
S. Recommend expulsion of a student from the University; notation on the student’s record will be kept permanently. When a student is suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons, an additional sanction may include being excluded from the Auraria campus.
7. Take other actions including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violators) provides compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
Student(s) must be notified in writing of :he disciplinary action taken within five ’5) days.
REVIEW PROCEDURES
A student may submit a request to -eview the recommendation of suspension or expulsion by the Student Disci-Dline Committee within seven (7) working lays to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services. Except in cases involving the exercise of the sower of summary suspension (see selow), the sanctions of suspension or :xpulsion for disciplinary reasons shall be iffective only after the administrative eview by the Associate Vice Chancellor or Enrollment and Student Services has seen exhausted or waived. The Associate /ice Chancellor for Enrollment and Stu-lent Services’ decision shall be in writing o the student(s), with a copy to the Stu-lent Discipline Committee. Copies of eview procedures may be obtained from he Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor or Enrollment and Student Services.
SUMMARY SUSPENSION
Summary suspension is a suspension rom the University which begins immedi-itely upon notice from the appropriate Jniversity official without a formal hear-ng by the Student Discipline Committee.
V hearing before the Student Discipline
Committee is then scheduled as soon as possible (usually within seven calendar days) to determine the disposition of the case. Summary suspension may also include a physical exclusion from the campus if deemed necessary.
The Chancellor and/or a Vice Chancellor have the authority to suspend summarily any student when in their opinions such suspension is necessary to:
1. Maintain order on the campus.
2. Preserve the orderly functioning of the University.
3. Stop interference in any manner with the public or private rights of citizens on CU-Denver/Auraria owned or controlled property.
4. Stop actions that are threatening to the health or safety of any person.
5. Stop actions that are destroying or damaging property of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus, its students, faculty, staff, or guests.
PERMANENT RECORD NOTATIONS
While disciplinary proceedings are pending or contemplated, a temporary hold will be placed on the student’s academic record. It will not be released until all actions and appeal procedures have been completed or finalized by the University. Only in those cases where suspension, deferred suspension, or permanent expulsion results from disciplinary action will notations be placed on the academic record.
RELEASE OF DISCIPLINARY INFORMATION
Access to any student’s academic transcript or disciplinary file shall be governed by provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Only the student charged or those University officials who have a legitimate educational interest in disciplinary information may have access to the files. All other inquiries, including but not limited to employers, governmental agencies, news media, friends, or Denver Police, must have a written release from the student to gain access to University disciplinary files.
Every effort will be made by the University to respect the privacy of the student. However, where the identity of the student has been publicly disclosed in the news media, the University reserves the right to respond as it deems appropriate to describe fairly and accurately the disposition of disciplinary matters.
REFUND POLICY AFTER DISCIPLINARY ACTION
Submission of registration materials obligates the student to pay the assessed tuition and fees for that term. If a student is suspended or expelled from the University, the amount of tuition/fees which would be refunded would be the same as when a student voluntarily withdraws from a term. See the General Information section of this catalog or the Schedule of Courses for more information.
The official withdrawal date applicable for tuition/fee refund purposes will be the date of the Student Discipline Committee’s decision. In the event that circumstances are such that the accused student has registered for a subsequent term before the final decision is made, that student does so at his/her own risk and may be liable for payment of tuition and fees for both terms. The Committee will make the decision as to when official suspension or expulsion begins. Failure to make the required payment will result in the following actions: students will become ineligible for all University services; no grades will be issued for courses in progress; no transcripts, diplomas, certification, or registration materials will be issued for the student until the bill is paid in full; a late payment charge in addition to the interest on the unpaid balance, will be assessed.
TRI-INSTITUTIONAL VIOLATIONS
Procedures in deciding violations of the Code of Student Conduct involving students from other academic institutions on the Auraria campus have been developed by CU-Denver and the institution(s) involved. In such cases, the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
Ethical Use of Computing at CU-Denver
Access to CU-Denver computing systems, and use of CU-Denver computing resources, is a privilege granted to members of the CU-Denver community for scholarly, research, and administrative purposes. Those who use computing services on the CU-Denver campus are expected to do so in an effective, efficient, ethical, and legal manner.
As a condition of using computer resources on the CU-Denver campus, users are expected to respect the intellectual effort and creativity of others, to respect the privacy of other users, to respect the integrity of the computer systems and other users’ data, and to


28 / General Information
use computer resources in an efficient and productive manner.
It is the responsibility of all users to respect copyright protection of licensed computer software. Users do not have the right to copy licensed software programs or documentation without the specific permission of the copyright holder, or to use unauthorized copies of licensed software. Unauthorized use, duplication, or distribution of computer software is a violation of University policy and federal law.
CU-Denver is connected to other universities and organizations through Bitnet and the Internet. Use of these networks is a privilege granted to all CU-Denver computer users. The networks must be utilized in an ethical and legal manner.
Sexual Harassment
The University of Colorado at Denver is a collegial academic community whose mission requires an open learning and working environment for students, faculty, staff, and administrators. An open learning and working environment values and protects individual dignity and the integrity of human relationships. CU-Denver’s educational process is based upon mutual trust, freedom of inquiry, freedom of expression, and the absence of intimidation and exploitation. As a place of work and study, CU-Denver must be free of inappropriate and disrespectful conduct and communication of a sexual nature, of sexual harassment, and of all forms of sexual intimidation and exploitation. Such behavior is reprehensible because it subverts the mission of CU-Denver, poisons the environment, and threatens the careers, educational experiences, and well-being of students, faculty, staff, and administrators.
It is a violation of CU-Denver’s Sexual Harassment Policy for anyone who is authorized to recommend or take action affecting faculty, staff, students, or administrators to make any unwelcome sexual advances, to request sexual favors, or to engage in any other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or status in a course, program, or activity; or (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for employment or educational decisions affecting that individual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or educational experience, or
creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for working or learning.
For further information, contact the Sexual Harassment Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 700,556-4493.
STUDENT SERVICES
Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services: Shelia Hood
Student Life
To meet the needs of this diverse student population, CU-Denver provides student life programs and activities designed to complement students’ academic programs and to enhance their total educational experience. Students are provided opportunities to develop, experience, and participate in student government, social, cultural, intellectual, and recreational programs. Student life programs create an environment in which students are:
• Assisted in developing leadership ability through opportunities to practice decision making, management and marketing, interpersonal and group communication, and relationship skills.
• Encouraged and aided in developing social, cultural, intellectual, recreation and governance programs that expand involvement with the campus community and society and lead to mature appreciation of these pursuits.
• Encouraged to explore self-directed activities that provide opportunities for personal growth in individual and group settings.
• Exposed to various cultures and experiences, ideas and issues, art and musical forms, and styles of life.
• Informed about institutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities.
• Aided in the awareness and utilization of campus facilities and other resources.
• Assisted in developing community spirit through creative interaction among staff, faculty, students, and members of the local community. Students are encouraged to involve their families in campus events and activities. Programs and services provided by
the Associated Students of CU-Denver, the Division of Enrollment and Student Services of CU-Denver, and the Auraria Student Services Division contribute to the fulfillment of this philosophy.
Clubs and Organizations
ACM Computing Club American Institute of Architecture Students
American Planning Association American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Landscape Architecture
American Society of Mechanical Engineers Anthropology Club Art Club
Association of Black Students Auraria French Club Auraria Transnational Student Association
Beta Alpha Omega (Counseling/ Education)
Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Honor Society)
Chi Epsilon
Chinese Student Association College Republicans Equiponderance Pre-Law Club Etta Kappa Nil Feminist Alliance
Financial Management Association GSPA Association Golden Key National Honor Society Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Kappa Delta Pi M.E.C.H.A.
Master of Social Sciences Club Model United Nations Conference Organization
National Society of Black Engineers Native American Student Organization Phi Alpha Theta (History)
Phi Chi Theta (Business)
Philosophy Club
Pi Tau Sigma
Psi Chi (Psychology)
Russian Culture & Language Club Sigma Tau Delta (English)
Society of Accounting Students Society of Women Engineers Student Association of Musicians Tau Beta Phi (Engineering)
Vietnamese Student Organization
Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD)
The Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal University structure. ASCU-Denver assists students with information concerning student clubs and organizations, campus


Student Services / 29
events, issues concerning student status, and other information of general interest to students. ASCU-Denver also provides students assistance with grievances and the opportunity to become more closely involved with the University community, through active participation in student government itself, or through service on University, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees. More information concerning services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Student Union, Room 340,556-2510.
Student Legal Services
Student legal services are available to assist students with off-campus legal problems through the provision of legal advice, litigation preparation, document interpretation, and assistance in negotiation. The service will not represent students in court. This student fee-funded program is provided free of charge to CU-Denver students; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred, such as copying, typing, etc. For further details, contact the office in the CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 130,620-4828.
The Advocate
The purpose of the student newspaper, The Advocate, is to provide students with information about campus issues and events. The newspaper strives to include good investigative reporting, feature articles, and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is a tool to encourage and develop writers, journalists, artists, and other student members of its general management and production staff. The office is in the Student Union, Room 153,556-8321.
Office of Student Life
The Office of Student Life is the advising, coordinating, resource, and general information center for student clubs and arganizations, student government [ASCUD), student programs, and the academic honor societies. Student Life coordinates new student orientation programs. The office is responsible for the administration of the student fee budget and monitors all student fee expenditures :o assure compliance with CU-Denver and State of Colorado regulations and procedures. The Director of Student Life represents the Associate Vice Chancellor for enrollment and Student Services on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional, and U4EC committees and maintains effective
lines of communication with MSCD, CCD, and AHEC. The director administers the student conduct and discipline procedures as described in the Code of Student Conduct. The Office of Student Life is located in the Student Union, Room 255, 556-3399.
Office of Veterans Affairs
The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veteran and dependent students attending CU-Denver utilizing Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists students with filling out VA paperwork and in solving problems associated with receiving VA-related benefits.
The OVA maintains proper certification for eligible students to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements for attendance, course load and content, and other regulations necessary to receive educational benefits payments.
In addition, the OVA provides VA Vocational Rehabilitation referrals, information on VA tutorial assistance, and VA work/ study positions for qualified veterans. For further information, contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 556-2630, NC 4015.
Student Retention Services
The Office of Student Retention Services offers an array of services and programs designed to foster cultural diversity within the CU-Denver student body, help students adjust to the social and intellectual environment of the campus, and provide the academic support students need to succeed in their studies and derive maximum benefit from their college campus experience. Outreach and retention services are provided by professional staff in six centers, which include, The Center for First-Year Students, The Center for Learning Assistance, and The Center for Pre-Collegiate Development. Student Retention Services phone number is 556-2324.
THE CENTER FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS
The Center for First-Year Students offers support services to new freshman, new transfer, new non-degree and new graduate students. These services are designed to help new students adjust to life at CU-Denver and to succeed in their college studies. Professional staff and student peer advocates provide information about campus resources and assist students with class scheduling, interpret-
ing academic policies and requirements, scholarship information, and problem solving. The Center is located in NC 2204, 556-2546.
THE CENTER FOR PRE-COLLEGIATE DEVELOPMENT
Programs offered by the Center serve to motivate minority high school students to pursue post-secondary education and provide them the academic skills needed to be successful in their college endeavors. The Center is located in NC 2014, 556-2322.
Pre-Collegiate Development Program
This program enables students in grades 9 through 12 to engage in a wide range of university activities throughout the academic year and during a full-time, five-week summer program. The academic year component offers monthly study skills and career orientation workshops, advising, tutoring, and a variety of cultural enrichment experiences. The five-week summer session for students in the 9th through 11th grades consists of accelerated classes for which students receive elective high school credit, career orientation, and engage in cultural activities.
CU-Denver Minority Scholars Program
The MSP is an early college enrollment program for college-bound, high-achieving minority students who are enrolled in their junior year of high school. The program enables students to begin their college studies by taking one course at CU-Denver during the fall term during their senior year in high school. The credit earned in the course can be applied toward a bachelor’s degree. While enrolled in the program, students participate in monthly workshops designed to acclimate them to the University and prepare them for college study.
THE CENTER FOR STUDENT COUNSELING
The Center for Student Counseling provides free short-term counseling as well as relationship counseling for CU-Denver students. If a client's needs are such that they would benefit more from an alternative form of counseling or therapy, appropriate referrals will be made to community-based professionals.
Other services provided by the Center for Student Counseling include:
• support and therapy groups
• advocacy, support services, and scholarships for women


30 / General Information
• re-entry services for students returning to school after an interruption
• a small lending library (personal growth, career information)
• resource and referral information for community services
• educational programs and workshops (stress management, assertiveness training, etc.)
Statement of Philosophy:
The purpose of counseling at the Center for Student Counseling at CU-Denver is to:
• help students grow in selfunderstanding,
• provide support in crisis situations, and
• support students in attaining their personal and educational goals.
CU-Denver Student Counseling, CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 130,556-2815.
THE CENTER FOR TESTING AND CAREER RESOURCES
Career Development Services
The Center provides individual career counseling, career development and employment workshops, and career testing to CU-Denver students ad alumni. Career tests offered include the Strong Interest Inventory, Myers-Briggs Type indicator, and The Values Scale. The Center also sponsors a variety of career placement services, including on-campus interviewing, and an extensive career resource library. For more information on career services, call 556-4542. The office is located in Arts 177.
Testing Services
The Testing Center provides testing for all levels of post-secondary education and professional certification. Tests offered
include:
ACT American College Test
CAT California Achievement Test
GRE Graduate Record Examination
GMAT Graduate Management Admissions Test
GSFLT Graduate School Foreign Language Test
MAT Miller Analogy Test
MCAT Medical College Admission Test
TOEFL Test of English as a Foreign Language
CLEP College Level Examination Program
For further information on Testing Services, call 556-2861. The office is located in NC 2204.
The Center for Testing and Career Resources includes a Student Emergency
Loan Program, located in North Classroom 2204-D. For more information, call 556-4832.
THE CENTER FOR LEARNING ASSISTANCE
The Center for Learning Assistance is designed to promote student success in the academic setting. Services are available to all CU-Denver students and include tutoring, workshops, academic and institutional credit courses, consulting, and a minority resource library. First-generation college students may be eligible for more intensive services through the Student Support Services component of the Center. The Center is located in NC 2006, 556-2802.
Tutoring. Free tutoring is available in many subject areas (some limitations apply). Scheduled sessions are held on weekdays/evenings. Scheduled and open lab (walk-in) tutoring are available at established times throughout each term (M-R, 8 a.m.-9 p.m.; F, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; F, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. respectively).
Workshops. Math placement exam workshops (algebra-based) are scheduled two weeks prior to the start of each term (fall, spring, summer). Study skills workshops are provided on such topics as memory techniques, critical thinking, time/stress management, test anxiety/ test taking, essay writing, study strategies, active reading, learning styles, overcoming fears, and listening/note taking.
Consulting. Academic, financial aid, and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy is available to students eligible for the Student Support Services Program.
Library. The Center maintains a small periodical and book collection authored by, and/or about, minorities; these resources are available for student research and leisure.
Courses. Courses are offered in a small group format in the areas of college survival skills, computer word processing, English as a second language, and problem solving.
ENGL 1006-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languages. This course is designed for ESL students who need to improve their reading and vocabulary skills. Students will increase their reading ability through vocabulary building, word attack strategies, and reading analysis.
ENGL 1007-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. This is the first course in the ESL composition sequence. Writing begins with sentence-level development and continues with the development of paragraphs based on Western
rhetorical patterns. Grammar appropriate to students’ needs will be incorporated into the class.
ENGL 1008-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. This is a three-credit hour course and follows ENGL 1007 in the ESL sequence of writing classes.
The course provides continued work on grammar, syntax, usage and the mechanics of writing. Writing begins with paragraphs and moves into essay writing. Special attention is paid to the aspects of the English language which pose particular problems for the non-native speaker of English.
ENGL 1009-3. Advanced ESL Writing Skills. This is the third course in the ESL composition sequence. Emphasis is placed on more complex grammatical problems and on the development of longer compositions. Prereq: ENGL 1008 or CMMU 1420 or coordinator’s approval. STSK 0705-1. Problem Solving. This course is designed to improve investigative and problem solving skills. Scientific theory, empirical methodology, and research methods will be utilized. Individual topics of investigation will be assigned. STSK 0707-1. College Survival Skills. This course is designed to promote success in the academic setting. Topics covered will include university resources, conquering the university system, listening and notetaking, study and memory techniques, test-taking skills, time management, library research strategies, and word processing.
STSK 0708-1. Introduction to Word Processing. This course will thoroughly familiarize the student with an easy-to-use word processing program that will assist in the process of writing text revision and rearrangement, and the production of “letter-perfect” documents. (The word processing program used will be one that is available in the open student-use computer lab areas.)
STSK 0800-1. Research Process for ESL Students. This is a one-credit hour course designed for students who are unfamiliar with the process of academic research. The class covers the steps involved in producing a research paper, including resource evaluation skills. Grammar is covered as necessary according to student needs.
STSK 0801-1. Communication Skills for ESL Students. This course meets twice a week to improve the oral communication skills of students whose first language is not English. Skills include use of idiomatic English, cross-cultural awareness, cross-cultural problems in communications, and pronunciation.


Internships and Cooperative Education / 31
STSK 0802-1. Advanced Academic Reading Skills for ESL. The aim of this course is to improve the student’s ability to read academic texts. The focus is on analysis and interpretation.
STSK 0806-1. Study Skills for ESL Students. This class is designed for ESL students to improve those skills needed for effective participation in the college classroom. Emphasis will be on academic reading and writing skills, as well as on notetaking skills.
STSK 0810-3. Topics. Special topics in study skills to be selected by instructor. STSK 0820-1. Social Science Partnership for ESL. This class is designed to provide a basic understanding of American culture and its underlying values. Students will develop critical thinking skills as well as have opportunities for additional practice in reading and writing skills, to include vocabulary in social science areas (i.e., sociology, history, political science, economics, psychology).
Center for Educational Opportunity Programs
The Center for Educational Opportunity Programs (C.E.O.P.) provides access and educational opportunities to ethnic minority and other students through specialized recruitment and services conducive to the students’ retention and graduation. C.E.O.P. houses four distinct programs, each of which provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of their students. The Center is located in the North Classroom Bldg., Room 2012,556-2065.
American Indian Student Services Theresa Gutierrez North Classroom 2012-A 556-2860
Asian American Student Services Peggy Lore
North Classroom 2012-C 556-2578
Black Student Services Rene Rabouin North Classroom 2010 556-2701
Hispanic Student Services Paul Encinias North Classroom 2012-B 556-2777
If you have questions regarding our programs, services, or outreach, please contact us individually or through the Center.
CENTER FOR INTERNSHIPS AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
Director: Janet Michalski Assistant Director and Coordinator,
Engineering: Diane Berkley Coordinator, Liberal Arts and
Sciences: Cherrie Grove Coordinator, Business and Administration: Wayne Sundell Senior Secretary: Charlene Michael Office: 1047 Ninth Street Historic Park Telephone: 556-2892
The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education, established at CU-Denver in 1973, provides students with an opportunity to supplement their academic classroom learning with on-the-job work experiences, internships, or community service experience related to their academic studies. Students are placed either as paid co-op trainees or as interns for academic credit with corporations, businesses, or government agencies in the Denver metropolitan area as well as out-of-state. Short-term community service experiences also are available for students enrolled in courses requiring some community service.
Faculty coordinators from each of the University’s colleges and schools act as liaisons between the Center and the academic departments. The Center currently places some 500 students each year with some 250 participating employers. Over 30 percent of all students placed are graduate students.
Cooperative Education
Cooperative education is an educational method which combines classroom study with paid, career-related, off-campus work. The purpose is to give students the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to real world situations, and to bring that experience back to the classroom as a learning tool.
Cooperative education offers students paid long-term positions (two or more semesters). Students alternate semesters of full-time work with semesters of fulltime school, or work part time year round. Co-op experiences may be eligible for academic credit, and many positions lead to permanent career positions upon graduation.
Internships
Internships offer students short-term positions (one semester) and they are often nonpaid. Internships are always
done for academic credit and are popular with students who like to explore a variety of careers. Many students complete two, three, or even four internships before graduation. Internships, like co-op jobs, are related to the student’s academic studies and/or career goals.
CU-SERVES/Service Learning
CU-Denver’s new community service/ service learning program, CU-SERVES, was established in 1991 to develop community service opportunities for any CU-Denver course that incorporates a community service option or requirement. CU-SERVES also sponsors 2-3 service days throughout the year which attract 100+ CU-Denver students, faculty, staff and alumni who join together to provide volunteer service to Denver’s needy communities.
Student Eligibility
To qualify for placement in a co-op or internship position, students must be enrolled at least half time in any CU-Denver college or school, have completed their freshman year, have maintained a grade-point average of 2.5 or higher, and have completed at least 12 hours in residence (6 hours for graduate students). Some employers have additional requirements, i.e., U.S. citizenship, willingness to travel, and specific course work.
Participation in any CU-SERVES service day is open to all students. Participation in a service learning placement requires enrollment in a course with a service option or requirement.
Academic Credit for Work Experience
Undergraduate students placed by the Center in paid or non-paid positions, as well as students who have obtained their own positions, can apply to earn academic credit through courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, School of Education, Graduate School of Public Affairs, and School of Architecture and Planning can earn internship, experiential learning, field study, or practicum credit through courses established for this purpose.


32 / General Information
Why Students Participate
• Students recognize the value of combining theory with practice and find greater relevance in their studies.
• Work experience allows students to test classroom teaching in the laboratory of the real world.
• The program teaches students valuable job-search skills such as resume writing and interviewing techniques.
• Co-op positions provide a means of financial assistance that is available to all students, regardless of family income levels or other financial aid arrangements, and does not leave students burdened with educational debts.
• The inclusion of a work component and the contribution from co-op earnings are major factors in encouraging first-generation college students to pursue a college degree.
Why Employers Participate
• Students are an excellent resource for special projects and peak loads or busy seasons.
• The employer can assess an individual’s potential for employment after graduation, thus saving entry-level recruiting costs.
• Student workers can increase productivity of full-time professional staff.
• Students are highly motivated, productive, and dependable workers.
• Students bring knowledge about the latest academic research to their employers.
• As verified by many studies, co-op student interns subsequently become full-time employees with far lower turnover rates and better promotion potential than the average entry-level professional.
Facts About Cooperative Education
• Cooperative education programs have been established in over 80 percent of the Fortune 500 corporations. All of the top ten Fortune 500 companies are involved in cooperative education.
• The last three presidents of General Motors at one time were cooperative education students.
• Cooperative education has been conducted successfully in the U.S. since 1906.
• Over 1,000 colleges and universities currently have cooperative education programs.
• An estimated 200,000 U.S. college students are enrolled in cooperative education, and gross annual earnings are calculated to be in excess of $200,000,000.
Typical Participating Employers
Employers who hire CU-Denver students for internship positions include: American Telephone & Telegraph Co. Bloomsbury Review Cactus Communications City of Denver, Mayor’s Office of Art, Culture & Film
Colorado Association of Commerce and Industry
Colorado Association of Public Employees
Colorado Housing & Finance Authority Decisioneering
Denver Center for the Performing Arts Denver City Attorney, Domestic Violence Unit Denver General Hospital EG&G
Environmental Protection Agency
Federal Highway Administration
Greater Denver Chamber of Commerce
Hughes Aircraft Company
IBM Corporation
KCNC-TV
KWGN-TV
MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour National Renewable Energy Laboratory Office of the Governor, State of Colorado
Peat Marwick Main & Co.
Pena Investment Advisors U S WEST Communications U.S. Bureau of Land Management U.S. Bureau of Reclamation U.S. General Accounting Office Walt Disney World, Inc.
Western Area Power Administration
LIBRARY SERVICES Auraria Library
Dean and Director Camila Alire Associate Directors: Jean F. Hemphill, Glenda A. Thornton Office: Auraria Library, Lawrence at 11th Street
Telephone:-Administration: 556-2805 Information: 556-2741
Faculty:
Associate Professors: Camila Alire,
Jean F. Hemphill
Assistant Professors: Dene L. Clark, Patricia A. Eskoz, Terry Ann Leopold, Robert L. Wick, Rutherford W. Witthus
Instructors: Orlando Archibeque, Kerranne Biley, Anthony J. Dedrick, Nikki Dilgarde, Steve Green, Florence Jones, Elaine Jurries, Marit S. MacArthur, Ellen Metter, Lori Oling,
Jay Schafer, Mara L. Sprain, Louise T. Stwalley, Glenda Thornton, E. Ross Thrasher, Linda D. Tietjen, Diane Turner, Liz Willis
FRIENDS OF AURARIA LIBRARY
The Friends of Auraria Library is an association formed in 1976 to promote the development of Auraria Library as a center for learning, study, and research for the students and faculty of the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The Friends of Auraria Library’s ongoing objectives are:
To promote awareness of and good will toward Auraria Library on the campus, in the metropolitan area, and in the region.
To increase Library resources through contributions, solicitations, grants, bequests, and gifts of books and other appropriate materials.
LIBRARY SERVICES
Access to information is essential to academic success. The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus, provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The Library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver.
THE COLLECTION
The Auraria Library has a collection of approximately 600,000 volumes. In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection, the Library also has over 2,000 journal and newspaper subscriptions and a film/videotape collection. The Library is a select depository for U.S. government publications and a depository for Colorado state documents. The Auraria Library’s collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally through interlibrary loan services.
THE CARL ONLINE PUBLIC ACCESS CATALOG
Access to the Auraria Library’s collection is through the online CARL, (Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries) public access catalog, a user-friendly system that also allows for searching of the collections of many other libraries throughout the state, the region, and the nation.


Library and Media Services / 33
'he CARL system has received national ecognition for being on the cutting edge if information technology. The system Hows faster and more comprehensive earches than were possible with the raditional card catalog. Through its InCover project, it also offers current idexing to over 10,000 periodical titles, i addition to using CARL at the Library, latrons may obtain dial-up access hrough a home or office computer dth a modem (758-1551); CARL also ppears as a menu item on the CU-ienver mainframe computer.
CIRCULATION SERVICES
Library materials are checked out rom the Circulation Desk with a current mraria I.D. or other valid identification. Jndergraduate students may check out ooks for 28 days and graduate students rr 60 days. An Auraria student with a alid student I.D. can check out up to 5 books from the general collection.
Jp to three renewals may be made in per-on or by phone (556-2639). Charges are ssessed when books are returned past heir due date.
1EFERENCE SERVICES
The Auraria Library Reference Depart-rent strives to provide excellent service r assisting students and faculty with their esearch needs. The Reference Desk is taffed during most hours the Library is ipen. Additionally, an Information Desk is taffed during certain peak hours to assist atrons with general information and to irect them to the appropriate service esks. Telephone reference is provided 3r quick questions such as, “Does the mraria Library own a particular book?”
IOMPUTER ASSISTED RESEARCH CAR)
Online database searching, for which nere is a fee, can save many hours of esearching printed abstracts and idexes. In some cases, it provides the nly access to certain materials. The ibrary has access to well over 300 atabases. In addition to bibliographic formation, databases also may contain irectory and financial information, cientific data, and full text. Questions bout the Computer Assisted Research ervice should be directed to the CAR lanager, 556-2827.
MTERLIBRARY LOAN (ILL)
ILL links the Auraria Library to libraries rorldwide by providing access to needed laterials otherwise unavailable locally.
Materials, once requested, can take from one to three weeks for in-state borrowing or three weeks or longer for out-of-state borrowing. A fee may be required in order to obtain journal articles or books. Request forms are available in the library or through the CU-Denver Computing Services VAX 8800 system. Contact the Interlibrary Loan Department Office at 556-2562 for additional information.
LIBRARY INSTRUCTION
The Library is committed to providing information skills through its instruction program. The program is varied, ranging from basic, introductory-level material to advanced research methodology for graduate students. Demonstrations on the CARL system are important components of the Library Instruction Program. For more information about the Library’s instructional offerings, contact the Library Instruction office at 556-3303.
RESERVES/MEDIA
The Reserves/Media Department (located in the southeast corner of the first floor) provides special short-term circulation of books, pamphlets, articles and other materials needed for class instruction. Reserved media items, such as films and videos, are also found here. Other media items, including films, videos, CDs, filmstrips, kits, cassettes, games, LP records and slides are also located in this department. There is playback equipment.
The loan periods for “reserved” items are short and overdue follow-up is prompt, so that large numbers of students may have access to the material. These materials include not only titles owned by the Library but also personal copies made available by the faculty. Most “reserved” material may be checked out for a few days, with the exception of media items. The length of check-out is determined by the professor. Materials will be checked out with appropriate picture I.D.
ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING LIBRARY
The Library’s main collection is supplemented by the material housed at the nearby Architecture and Planning Library. With a collection of over 20,000 books,
90 periodical subscriptions, and 9,000 slides, this library offers specialized information to students of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The library is open to any student who needs access to these materials.
SERVICES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
The Library is committed to making its resources and services available to all students. Through the Reserves/Media Department, a wide variety of adaptive equipment is available to assist persons with disabilities. Library services to assist persons with disabilities include orientation to the physical layout of the Library, retrieval of materials, and assistance with use of CARL, the online public access catalog, periodicals, indexes, and special adaptive equipment.
ADDITIONAL FACILITIES
Coin-operated typewriters, photocopiers, microform reader/printers, a copy center, a change machine, pay phones, and study rooms are all available at the Library.
INTERNSHIPS
The Library offers internships, practi-cums, independent studies, and volunteer opportunities to students interested in librarianship and information management.
MEDIA SERVICES Auraria Media Center
Muriel E. Woods, Director
The Auraria Media Center offers a full range of media services, including the management of the Library’s film and videotape collection. These materials are listed in the online public access catalog. The Media Center operates a 24-channel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus; faculty members may request the transmission of a film or videotape directly into the classroom over this system. Students may request transmission of a film or videotape from one of the media viewing and listening carrels in the Library. This system also can transmit live programs from St. Cajetan’s, the Student Union, and the Media Center’s television studios to other locations on campus. A self-service graphics lab and a self-service VHS editing suite also are available for student use in the Media Center’s Production Department. Finally, an Internship Program is available to students who are interested in converting knowledge gained in electronics and/or television production courses to practical experience.




Undergraduate Admissions
CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program successfully. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being:
1. Level of previous academic performance.
2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests.
3. Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success. CU-Denver may deny admission to new
applicants or readmission to former students whose credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University in order to carry out its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
Applicants who request degree programs that are not available at CU-Denver will be considered for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with an undetermined major. Students admitted with an undetermined major are expected to declare a major by the time they have completed 60 hours toward graduation.
Official notification of admission to ZU-Denver as an undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions. Letters from various schools and colleges indicating acceptance into a particular program are pend-ng subject to official notification of idmission to the institution.
Students who are admitted pending eceipt of additional documents or with inofficial documents will be permitted >ne term to submit the documents. If tem-lorarily waived official documents are not eceived by the end of the initial term of ttendance, registration for subsequent erms will be denied. If at any time addi-ional credentials are received which ffect the student’s qualifications, the Jniversity reserves the right to change he admission decision.
All questions and correspondence egarding admission to CU-Denver and equests for application forms should be irected to:
Office of Admissions and Records University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 P. O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 (303) 556-3287
ADMISSION DEADLINES
The University may change documents/ credentials deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands. Applicants should apply as early as possible. Updated information is available from the Office of Admissions (303) 556-2704. For an applicant to be considered for a specific term, all documents required for admission must be received in the Office of Admissions by the deadline for that term. Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to be considered for a later term. Transfer students are reminded that they should allow sufficient time to have transcripts sent from institutions they have previously attended. Foreign students are advised that it usually takes 60 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions from international locations.
RECEIPT OF DOCUMENTS DEADLINES
Fall Spring Summer
July 22 Dec. 1 May 3
MINIMUM ACADEMIC PREPARATION STANDARDS (MAPS)
Students entering the University of Colorado who graduated from high school in 1988 or later are required to meet the following Minimum Academic Preparation Standards: 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics), 3 years of natural science, 3 years of social science (including one year of U.S. or world history), 2 years of a single foreign language, and 1 year of the arts.
The MAPS focus on subject areas the student has studied in preparation for college. Freshman admission standards define the level of success and achievement necessary to be admitted to the
University of Colorado and include factors that predict academic success, such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school course work, and the grade-point average. Both the subjects the student has studied and how the student has achieved will be factors that determine admission to the University.
Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade-point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University.
Two levels of deficiency will be recognized.
1. One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student meets other admission standards and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation from the University. Courses taken to make up a deficiency will count toward graduation, provided the CU-Denver college accepts those course credits toward graduation.
2. In some cases, a student having more them one unit of deficiency may be admitted, provided that the student meets other standards of the University. The student must make up additional deficiencies before graduation by taking an expanded program of studies. The student may satisfy the MAPS requirements by successful completion of: 1) courses taken at CU; 2) courses taken at other institutions of higher education;
3) additional high school credits; 4) credit-by-examination programs; or 5) other requirements as approved by each CU-Denver college.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN
The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test.
New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, or Liberal Arts and Sciences.


36 / Undergraduate Admissions
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION
Years
English (one year of speech/debate and two years of composition are strongly
recommended).......................4
Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one year
of geometry) ......................4
Natural science (includes two years
of laboratory science) ............3
Social science (including history)....2
Foreign language (both units in
a single language) ................2
Academic electives .................. 1
(Additional courses in English, foreign language, mathematics, natural or social science, not to include business courses)
Total .............................. 16
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE'
Years
English (literature, composition,
grammar)...........................4
Mathematics distributed as follows:
Algebra............................2
Geometry.......................... 1
Additional mathematics
(trigonometry recommended)........ 1
Natural science (including one year of physics and one year of chemistry) ... 3
Social science........................2
Foreign language (both units in a single
language)..........................2
Academic electives................... 1
Total .............................. 16
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Years
English (literature, composition,
grammar)...........................4
Mathematics (excluding business
and consumer mathematics)..........3
Natural science.......................3
Social science........................2
Foreign language
(both units in a single language).2
Academic elective.................... 1
Total .............................. 15
All music majors in the School of the Arts are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area.
Two years of prior piano training are recommended.
An audition is required of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. Applicants may substitute tape
'See the College of Engineering and Applied Science section of this catalog for more specific information.
recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the School of the Arts, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications.
Preference for admission is given to applicants who rank in the top 30% of their high school graduating class and present a composite score of 26 or higher on the American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 1070 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Business applicants will receive preferred consideration if they graduated in the top 25 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1070 on the SAT. Engineering applicants will receive preferred consideration if they graduated in the top 20 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT, with a 28 on the mathematics section, or a 1100 total on the SAT, with a 600 on the mathematics section. Applicants who do not meet the admissions requirements for direct admission to Engineering are encouraged to apply as a preengineering major in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Music major applicants also must successfully pass a music audition.
Applicants who do not satisfy the requirements for preferred consideration are reviewed on an individual basis.
How to Apply
1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor or from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application must be completed in full and sent to the Office of Admissions with a $30 (subject to change) non-refundable fee. For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term, the $30 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions is informed of the intent to enroll for a later term.
3. Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions; Campus Box 167; P.O. Box 173364; Denver, CO 80217-3364. Hand 4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to have a copy
of their GED test scores and GED certificate sent from the certifying agency to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
5. Students also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4-4875). High school students may obtain ACT and SAT test dates and locations from their counselors. Applicants who took one of these tests
and did not designate CU-Denver as the recipient of the scores must request the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. A Request for Additional Score Report may be obtained from any of the offices listed below.
Registration Department American College Testing Program (ACT)
P.O. Box 414 Iowa City, Iowa 52240
College Entrance Examination Board
(SAT)
PO. Box 592
Princeton, New Jersey 08540
College Entrance Examination Board (SAT)
PO. Box 1025 Berkeley, California 94704
6. International students must submit proof of proficiency in the English language (see Requirements for International Students).
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS
Transfer students may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, and Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students interested in the field of education should contact the School of Education office for information (556-2717).
Established under the auspices of the Colorado Commission on Higher Education and the Colorado Community College and Occupational Education System, transfer agreements have been made with Arapahoe Community College, Front Range Community College, Community College of Aurora, Community College of Denver, and Red Rocks Community College enabling students of these institutions to be directly admitted to CU-Denver. Students should contact the Office of Admissions for complete details.


Undergraduate Admissions / 37
Minimum transfer admission standards have been developed for all public four-year institutions in Colorado. However, transfer applicants who meet these standards are not guaranteed admission. They also must meet the admissions standards of the University of Colorado and its individual colleges. To meet the minimum standards at the University of Colorado at Denver, students must meet one of the following conditions:
1. Have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade-point average:
a. 2.5 GPA (on a 4.0 scale); or
b. 2.0 GPA if transferring from Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, University of Colorado at Boulder, or University of Colorado at Colorado Springs.
2. Be enrolled in a CCHE-approved guaranteed transfer program and meet the minimum academic qualifications of the agreement.
3. Have earned 30 or more collegiate semester hours with a 2.0 GPA.
Transfer students are given priority
consideration for admission as follows:
1. College of Business and Administration. To be considered for new transfer admission, students must have completed at least 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Applicants with an overall GPA of 3.0 in applicable course work will be automatically admitted. Students with less than a 3.0 overall GPA, but with a 3.25 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work attempted, will be automatically admitted.
Applicants with at least a 2.6 in applicable course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with less than a 2.6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration.
No applicant will be accepted who is not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
1. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants to the College of Engineering should have at least a 2.75 cumulative grade-point average for all work attempted, should have completed two semesters each of calculus and physics, and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
i. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point
average for all work attempted, and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music major applicants also must pass an audition. Contact the School of the Arts for audition information (556-2727). Important Note: Applicants who do not meet the above grade-point average or credit hour requirements will be considered for admission, but on an individual basis.
The primary factors used when considering students individually are: (I) probability of success in the academic program to which admission is desired; (2) the quality of prior academic work; (3) age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and (4) time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges.
How to Apply
1. The student should obtain a transfer application from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application form must be completed and returned with the required $30 (subject to change) nonrefundable application fee.
3. The student is required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office
of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions; Campus Box 167; P.O. Box 173364; Denver, CO 80217-3364. Hand-carried copies are not official. If a student is currently enrolled at another institution, an incomplete transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. (Transcripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accompanied by a certified literal English translation.)
4. Students who have attended a two-year school or community college, and were enrolled in the guaranteed transfer program to transfer to CU-Denver, should submit a copy of the guaranteed transfer contract with their application.
Liberal arts and music major applicants with fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of college work completed also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores.
Engineering applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Applicants to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should be aware that the College requires elementary proficiency in a foreign language for graduation. Applicants to the College have fulfilled this requirement if they have completed three years of any classical or modern foreign language in high school and present a high school transcript to the College Advising Office for verification. For further information, students should contact the College Advising Office, 556-2555.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. Students who do not declare all previously attended institutions are subject to disciplinary action and/or dismissal.
Transfer of College-Level Credit
After all official transcripts have been received and the applicant has been admitted as a degree student, the Office of Admissions and the appropriate academic unit will determine which courses taken at other institutions are applicable to a degree program at CU-Denver. In general, transfer credit will be accepted insofar as it meets the degree and grade requirements at CU-Denver.
College-level credit may be transferred to the University if it was earned at a college or university of recognized standing, by CLEP or advanced placement examinations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education; if a grade of C- or higher was attained; and if the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution. Courses taken pass/fail are transferred when a grade of C- or higher is required to pass.
The University may accept a maximum of 72 semester credits (108 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution, and up to 112 semester credits (153 quarter hours) from a four-year college or university, toward the baccalaureate degree requirements. No credit is allowed for vocational/technical, remedial, or reli-gious/doctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include


38 / Undergraduate Admissions
more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met.
The College of Business and Administration generally limits its transfer credit for business courses taken at the lower division level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado. A maximum of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. All correspondence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability, and business courses may not be taken through correspondence.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science, in general, requires that engineering course transfer credit must come from an Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology accredited engineering program to be acceptable for degree purposes. Engineering technology courses are not considered equivalent to engineering courses.
Other Transfer Credit
Credit granted for courses by examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM
The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency, and cire granted advanced standing in those areas. Students with scores below 4 may be considered for advanced placement by the discipline concerned. All credit must be validated by subsequent academic performance. For more information, contact your high school counselor or the Office of Admissions at CU-Denver.
CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade-point average of at least 2.0, and be currently registered. Examinations are arranged through the Records Office, and a nonrefundable fee is charged.
Students should contact the office of the dean of the academic unit in which they are enrolled.
COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM
Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have demonstrated college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examinations Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing service. For more information call the CU-Denver Testing Center at 556-2861.
Students who are interested in credit for CLEP examinations must contact the office of their school or college.
MILITARY SERVICE AND SCHOOLING
To have credit for educational experiences evaluated, applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application: (1) a copy of DD Form 214 and (2) DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Education Experience During Military Service. USAF personnel may present an official transcript from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of the DD Form 295.
Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education, to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver.
Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions.
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC)
Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate
degree requirements in business, and then only if the ROTC program is completed.
INTRA-UNIVERSITY
TRANSFER
CU-Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver Intra-University Transfer Forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Courses. Decisions on intra-university transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer.
Division of Extended Studies students wishing to enroll in regular CU-Denver courses or degree programs should contact the Office of Admissions.
READMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FORMER STUDENTS
CU-Denver students who have not regis tered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year or longer, and who have not attended another institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmission. Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions.
Students who have attended another college or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as transfer students and meet the transfer stc dent deadlines for receipt of documents. This requires payment of the $30 (subject to change) non-refundable application fe( and submission of official transcripts fron all colleges and universities previously attended. Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to CU-Denver Office of Admissions; Campus Box 167; P. O. Box 173364; Denver, CO 80217-3364.
Students who have not attended the University for up to one year, but have attended another college or university in the interim, are required to pay a $30 (sul ject to change) transfer application fee. Transcripts must be requested by the stu dent and sent by the registrar of the othe institution^) to CU-Denver Office of Admissions; Campus Box 167; P. O. Box 173364; Denver, CO 80217-3364.
Students who last attended another CU campus (including the Division ofExtendei


Undergraduate Admissions / 39
Studies) must formally apply for readmission. Application forms are available from the Office of Admissions.
ADMISSION FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENTS
Persons who have reached the age of twenty and who want to take University courses, but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree at this time, may be admitted as non-degree students provided that they are academically eligible and admissible. Correspondence and questions regarding admission as a nondegree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions. Those seeking admission as non-degree students for the purpose of teacher certification should contact the School of Education, 556-2717. Each school/college limits the number of semester hours that are transferable to a degree program. Students considering changing from non-degree to degree status should contact the school/ college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the number of hours that may be taken as a nondegree student.
Courses taken as a non-degree student ire for credit and can be used for transfer :o other institutions or for professional mprovement.
Note: International students are not idmitted as non-degree students, except or summer terms. They must hold a ralid visa.
Students with the baccalaureate degree vho are not accepted to specific degree >rograms may enroll for course work as ion-degree students. There are several ypes of these students. Among them are eachers who seek renewal of certifica-ion; students who wish to take additional ourse work for professional or personal nprovement; and students who feel a eed to make up deficiencies before enter-lg a specific program.
Non-degree students should be aware lat generally only a limited number of ourse credits taken by a non-degree stu-ent may be applied later toward a degree rogram at CU-Denver.
To continue registration as a non-egree student, a minimum grade-point verage of 2.0 must be maintained.
To apply for admission as a non-degree udent, obtain a Non-degree Student pplication form from the Office of Admis-ons. Return completed application by le deadline for the term desired. A $15 ubject to change) nonrefundable appli-ition fee is required. No additional cre-intials are required. Applicants who
seek teacher certification must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials. Non-degree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space available basis.
Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined in the Non-degree to Degree procedures available from the Office of Admissions. Academic credentials (i.e., transcripts and/or test scores) and a $30 (subject to change) nonrefundable application fee also must be submitted. Nondegree students who are accepted to an undergraduate degree program may generally, with the approval of their academic dean, transfer a limited number of credit hours for courses taken as a non-degree student to the degree program. During the first semester of their enrollment, nondegree students should consult with the college to which they are applying for the maximum number of semester credit hours transferable toward a degree program. (Students enrolled as non-degree students prior to the fall semester of 1970 are subject to the policies in effect between January 1969 and August 1970.)
ADMISSION FOR STUDENTS SEEKING A SECOND UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE
Students who already hold a bachelor’s degree may apply for admission to a program in which they can earn a second undergraduate degree. These students may apply to the College of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, and Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students interested in the field of education should contact the School of Education office for information (556-2717).
Applicants for a second undergraduate degree must meet the admissions standards of the University of Colorado at Denver.
How to Apply
1. Obtain an application for undergraduate admission from the Office of Admissions.
2. Complete the application in full and send it to the Office of Admissions with a $30 (subject to change) non-refund-able fee.
3. Have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver
Office of Admissions; Campus Box 167; P.O. Box 173364; Denver, CO 80217-3364. Handcarried copies are not official. Transcript from institution at which first undergraduate degree was earned must register final grades from the semester the student graduated and carry official notation of the degree awarded.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. Students who do not declare all previously attended institutions are subject to disciplinary action and/or dismissal.
HIGH SCHOOL CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
High school juniors and seniors with demonstrated academic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approved for one term only. This approval may be renewed. Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions (303) 556-2704.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to undergraduate and graduate programs.
Undergraduate: Admission requirements for CU-Denver’s schools and colleges vary, and international students seeking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Prospective students should request an International Student Application packet from the Office of Admissions. Information about requirements for each CU-Denver college and school can be found in this catalog.
Deadlines for receipt of documents have been established to allow for the timely mailings of I-20’s. Contact the Office of Admissions for these dates.
Graduate: International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an undergraduate bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are


40 / Undergraduate Admissions
applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Applications are available from the Office of Admissions six months prior to the term for which the student is applying.
Note: Except for summer terms, international students must be in a degreeseeking status. They may attend summer terms as non-degree students. This exception is strictly limited to summer terms.


The Graduate School
Dean: Fernie Baca
Office: CU-Denver Bide, (formerly Dravo), Room 720
Telephone: 556-2663
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
Quality graduate programs are synonymous with the University of Colorado. Professors are actively involved in research or creative activity and, as teacher/scholars, continue to study and absorb new data, ideas, and techniques, eventually bringing these experiences to the classroom. Graduate students at CU-Denver gain not only from interactions with the graduate faculty, but also from other students in the classroom. Because most of CU-Denver’s graduate students are older and employed, they bring practical experience gained in the Denver community to the classroom and are ready to relate the realities of practice to the models presented in the classroom.
The CU-Denver Graduate School is part of the University-wide Graduate School. The CU-Denver Graduate School administers all master's and doctoral programs approved solely for the Denver campus.
With the exception of coordinated degrees, which are administered by the Deans of the University's undergraduate schools, Ph.D. degrees are the responsibility of the CU-Denver Graduate School. Currently, the campus has two undergraduate Ph.D. degrees and one coordinated Ph.D. degree.
Degrees Offered
The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through The Graduate School at CU-Denver.
The Master of Arts (M.A.) in:
Anthropology
Biology
Communication and Theatre
Economics
English
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
The Master of Arts (M.A. Education) in: Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education
Early Childhood Education Education Instruction and Curriculum Educational Psychology Special Education
The Master of Science (M.S.) in:
Applied Mathematics Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Science Mechanical Engineering Technical Communication The Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.)
The Master of Engineering (M.E.)1 The Master of Humanities (M.H.)
The Master of Social Science (M.S.S.)
The Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in: Applied Mathematics Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development Public Administration
Course work is available at the Denver campus in the programs listed below. Student residents on the Denver campus studying in these areas may take advantage of the multi-campus activities of The Graduate School.
Biology
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Communication
Computer Science
Electrical Engineering
English
Mechanical Engineering Psychology
'Awarded through CU-Boulder
The Graduate School at CU-Denver
An average of 4,950 students are enrolled in graduate programs at CU-Denver each fall and spring semester. This figure includes 1,008 non-degree students taking
graduate courses. Approximately 74 percent of enrolled graduate students are part-time students.
Computing Services
The Computing Services department supports computer use by both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. For a complete description of services offered, see Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section of this catalog.
Financial Aid for Graduate Study
COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT
The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the State of Colorado. Grant awards are announced each semester for the following term. Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid.
COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise and to continuing students on the basis of academic success.
GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS
Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructorship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course.
A half-time appointment for an instructor is considered to be equal to 6 class contact hours; a half-time teaching assistant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Compensation is based on the number of hours per week. Teaching assistants and


42 / The Graduate School
instructors must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate,
1 hour of thesis or dissertation, or as a candidate for degree) in good standing for the full period of their appointment.
RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS
Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Assistants must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/ graduate, 1 hour of thesis or dissertation, or as a candidate for degree).
LOAN FUNDS
Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college workstudy program should submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March 1. This office also provides shortterm loam assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Application should be made directly to the Office of Financial Aid.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work either through conventional employment or through the college workstudy program.
Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy.
International Education
The Office of International Education expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and acts as advisor for the Fulbright and other student fellowships.
The office also arranges study abroad programs. Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while taking regular courses in the foreign universities.
A B average with the equivalent of two years of college-level work in the appropriate language is required. There also are
occasional summer programs offering academic credit.
Peace Corps information may be obtained from the Office of International Education.
For additional information contact the Office of International Education at 556-3489.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
General Requirements
Students may be admitted to The Graduate School in either of the two categories described below.
REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS
Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approved, applicants for admission as regular degree students must:
1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recognized standing, or have work experience equivalent to that required for such
a degree and equivalent to the degree given at this university.
2. Show promise of ability to pursue advanced study and research, as judged by their previous scholastic record.
3. Have adequate preparation to enter graduate study in the field chosen.
4. Have at least a 2.75 undergraduate grade-point average on all work taken.
5. Meet additional requirements for admission as established by major departments.
Regular degree students must maintain at least a 3.0 grade-point average each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether it is to be applied toward the intended advanced degree or not. Students who fail to maintain this standard of performance will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS
Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular degree students may be admitted as provisional degree students upon the recommendation of the major department. Upon the recommendation of the Admissions Committee and concurrence of the dean of The Graduate School, a department may admit provisional students for a probationary term which may not exceed two consecutive calendar years. At the end of the probationary
period, provisional degree students must either be admitted to regular degree status or be dropped from the graduate program.
Credit earned by persons in provisional degree status may count toward a degree at this University.
Provisional degree students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average or higher, according to the terms of their provisional admission, each semester or summer term on all work taken, whether or not it is to be applied toward the advanced degree sought. Students who fail to maintain such a standard of performance will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
Note: All provisional applicants must have completed a minimum of six semester hours of graduate-level course work or must take the Graduate Record Examination and submit scores as part of the application.
The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume the standards of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
SENIORS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
A senior at this University who has satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements, and who needs not more them 6 semester hours of advanced subject and 12 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor’s degree, may be admitted to The Graduate School by special permission of the deem.
A University of Colorado senior enrollec in the College of Engineering and Applied Science who needs not more than 18 semester hours or 36 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor’s degree may be admitted to The Graduate School, but is not eligible for financial aid, scholarships, or fellowships as a graduate student until the equivalent of the minimum requirements for the bachelor’s degree have been satisfied.
Application Procedures
Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the Office of Admissions concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications.
An applicant for admission must present a completed Application Form (Parts I and 10, which may be obtained from the Office of Admissions, and two official transcripts from each institution attended.


Graduate Admission / 43
The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable application fee of $40 (check or money order) when the application is submitted. No application will be processed unless this fee is paid. Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination, and all departments require three or four letters of recommendation.
When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson of each department or a student admissions committee shall decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to the Office of Admissions, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as nondegree students (see Non-degree Students in this section).
A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 90 days prior to the term for which admission is sought or earlier as may be required by the major department.
Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1993-94, e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, must file a completed application with the department before the announced departmental deadline.
RE-ADMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS
Students who were previously admitted to a graduate degree program, but did not complete that degree program, and have not been registered for one year or more it the University must:
1. Clarify their status with the department or school/college to determine their eligibility to return and pursue the same degree.
1. After receiving departmental approval as indicated above, submit a new application Part 1 to the Office of Admissions before departmental deadlines are passed for the term in which they expect to return to the University.
A $40 application fee is required. Application deadlines are available from the department.
Former students who wish to change rom undergraduate to graduate status or rom one major to another must apply to he new department.
Students transferring from one campus } another must apply and be accepted ) the new campus.
A student admitted to The Graduate chool for the master’s program must ;apply for the doctoral program.
A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student’s major department and the school/college dean. In case of lack of agreement between the department and the dean or in the case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Graduate Council.
FOREIGN APPLICANTS
Prospective foreign students should have completed applications on file in the Office of Admissions prior to December 1 for the summer session, March 1 for the fall semester, and July 1 for the spring semester. The application packet should include the $50 fee, TOEFL scores, financial documentation, Graduate Record Examination scores, official English translation of all school records, and other documents as noted in the previous section on Application Procedures.
Acceptable TOEFL Scores. The TOEFL is the Test of English as a Foreign Language.
If your native language is not English, or you have not attended a British or American university for at least one year and achieved satisfactory grades, then you must take the TOEFL. All programs within CU-Denver’s Graduate School-arts and sciences, education, engineering, and doctoral programs-require a minimum score of 525 for regular admission. Those earning less than 525 will normally be referred to the Spring International Language Center (on campus) for further language study. During that time, students will study on an 1-20 from Spring International, but may take classes as non-degree students at CU-Denver. They may subsequently be granted regular admission to The Graduate School. All international students who take the TOEFL and are granted regular admission to CU-Denver’s Graduate School will be asked to take both the Michigan and SPEAK tests during their first semester of study. Those whose TOEFL fell between 525 and 550 will be required to take additional language training in light of whatever deficiencies may be revealed by these diagnostic tests. Those whose TOEFL exceeds 550 will be encouraged, but not required, to undertake additional training in light of their performance on these tests. Students seeking admission to all other graduate programs, including those in architecture and planning, business, and public affairs, should consult those program descriptions for language requirements.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION
At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for admission to the graduate program or for assistant-ships prior to determining student status.
Students who are applying for assis-tantships for the fall semester take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the selection committee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an institution.
Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from the CU-Denver Testing Center, or The Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
OTHER GRADUATE QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS
Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain information at the Student Testing Center on the following examinations: Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).
NON-DEGREE STUDENTS
A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado at Denver should apply to the Office of Admissions, Campus Box 167,
P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364. Non-degree students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted.
Non-degree students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this University are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and supporting credentials as soon as possible.
A department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as many as 9 credit hours toward the requirements of a master’s degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a non-degree student at the University of Colorado, or both.
In addition, the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of credit courses taken as a non-degree student at this University during the term for which the student applied for admission to The Graduate School, provided such admission date was delayed through no fault of the student. A grade of B or better must be obtained in any coursework transferred in this manner.


44 / The Graduate School
REGISTRATION
Course Work and Examinations
On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to The Graduate School and who expect to study in The Graduate School are required to complete appropriate registration procedures.
Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted into The Graduate School. If unable to attend that semester, they must notify the department that has accepted them and submit the necessary forms to the Office of Admissions and Records at CU-Denver in order to attend the following semester.
Changes in Registration
A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should follow the drop/add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Courses'). After the tenth week of classes graduate students may not drop, add, or change a course to nocredit status without presenting a letter to the dean of their school/college, stating the exceptional circumstances that justify the change. This letter, endorsed by the instructor of the course, must accompany the properly signed and completed drop/add card or no-credit option form.
Withdrawal
Graduate students who desire to withdraw from the University must apply to the dean of their school/college for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official withdrawal will be marked as having failed the course.
The withdrawal form must be signed by the instructor of the course and pass/fail must be indicated with the instructor’s initials.
Master's Thesis
Graduate students working toward master’s degrees, and planning to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis
credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Limitation of Registration
FULL LOAD
A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit, if the student is registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate, 1 hour of thesis/ dissertation, or as a candidate for degree.
A maximum of two-thirds of a semester of resident credit may be earned during the summer if a student registers for three semester hours of other graduate work or any number of thesis hours.
For the number of hours required for financial aid, see Financial Aid at the University of Colorado at Denver in the General Information section of this catalog.
A graduate student may contact the school/college dean’s office for information on the appeal process regarding the full load requirement for financial aid purposes.
MAXIMUM LOAD
No graduate student may receive credit toward a degree for more than 15 hours in a regular semester.
The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at CU-Denver is 10 hours per 10-week summer term. A graduate student may contact the school/college dean’s office for information on the appeal process regarding an overload.
UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES
Full-time employees of the University may not undertake more than 6 credit hours per semester. Part-time employees, including assistants, may take the number of credit hours approved by the major department.
TUITION AND FEES
The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information section of this catalog.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES
Quality of Graduate Work
Although the work for advanced degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours,
an advanced degree will not be conferred merely for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses. Students should not expect to obtain all the training, knowledge, and grasp of ideas necessary to meet the requirement for an advanced degree from formal courses. They should work on their own initiative, reading widely and thoughtfully, reaching their own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of values, perspective, and proportion.
All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficiencies) must be of graduate status.
A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted while enrolled in The Graduate School.
For the Ph.D., a course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree.
A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School by the dean, with the approved of the major department.
Appeal may be made to the Graduate Council. The committee’s decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student’s major department and the dean. In case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Graduate Council.
Repeating a Course
A graduate student who receives a grade of C, D, or F in a course may repeat the course once, upon written recommen dation to the dean by the chairman of the student’s advisory committee and major department, provided the course has not previously been applied toward a degree.
in calculating a student’s grade-point average for Graduate School purposes, the grade for a repeated course will subst tute for the old grade. Grades earned in courses taken as an undergraduate or as a non-degree student, as well as grades earned in first- and second-year foreign language courses, will not be used in calculating The Graduate School grade-poinl average; however, all grades received will appear on the student’s transcript.
Change of Department or Major
A graduate student wishing to change department or major must submit a new Parti and Part II of the graduate application to the new department or school anc


Master's Degree / 45
request that the former department forward recommendations and credentials. The student must be formally accepted by the new department.
Use of English
A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of standard English in all oral and written work may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance.
Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate’s proficiency.
Graduate Appeals
Fined action on appeals submitted by graduate students concerning action taken by faculty members, programs, or administrative officials rests with the campus Graduate Council, unless such appeal involves a matter affecting two or more campuses. In such a case, the final action rests with the Executive Committee of the System-Wide Graduate School.
MASTER'S DEGREE
A student regularly admitted to The Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master’s degrees .vill be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met.
In general, only graduates of an approved institution who have a thorough oreparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with he minimum amount of work specified aelow. All studies offered toward the mini-num requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank. Necessary additional vork required to make up deficiencies >r prerequisites may be partly or entirely indergraduate courses.
The requirements stated below are ninimum requirements; additional condi-ions set by the department will be found n the announcements of separate depart-nents. Any department may make further egulations not inconsistent with the eneral rules.
Students planning to graduate should scertain current deadlines of The Gradu-te School. It is the graduate student’s nd the department’s responsibility
to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e. changing of IWgrades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc.).
Departments or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student’s responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Requirements
The minimum requirements of graduate work for the degree Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by following either Plan I or Plan II below.
Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a thesis. At least 18 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above.
Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis. At least 16 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above.
Plan II does not represent a free option for the student. A candidate for the master’s degree may be allowed to select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned.
Graduate Credit
Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above and that are offered by professors who are members of the graduate faculty, or that have otherwise been approved by the dean of The Graduate School. No assurance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless the student has the approval of the department.
Not all courses listed are available at any one time; some are given in alternate years.
Courses taken during the Fall Semester 1975 and thereafter will have graduate rank if they are taught by members of The Graduate School faculty and are in one of the following categories:
1. Courses within the major program at the 5000 level or above.
2. Courses outside the major program at the 4000 level, provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean.
3. The Master of Basic Science program (M.B.S.) has approval for 3000- and 4000-level courses if approved by the department and the dean of The Graduate School.
4. Courses outside the major program, provided they are approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean.
This does not change the minimum number of courses that must be taken at the 5000 level or above; however, as a result, most students who include 4000 level courses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation.
Field of Study
Studies leading to a master’s degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program.
Status
After students have made a satisfactory record in this University for at least one semester or summer term, and after they have removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission (or by qualifying examinations or otherwise), they should confer with their major department and request that a decision be made on their status. This definite status must be set by the major department before students may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree.
Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without credit toward a graduate degree all prerequisites required by the department concerned.
Language Requirements
Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as each department requires. See specific departmental requirements.
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere and within the time limit may be accepted up to a limited amount, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the desm of the school/college.
Course work taken more than 6 years prior to the completion of final requirements (comprehensive exam and/or filing of thesis) will not be accepted for the degree unless validated by a special examination.


46 / The Graduate School
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University is 9 semester hours.
Credit will not be transferred until the student has established in The Graduate School of this University a satisfactory record of at least one semester in residence; such transfer will not reduce the residence at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses. Requests for transfer of credit to be applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose, and submitted to The Graduate School by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated.
Work already applied toward a master’s degree received from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the master’s degree at the University of Colorado; courses with “Pass/Fail” or “Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory” grades will not be transferred; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recognized.
Excess undergraduate credits from another institution may not be transferred to The Graduate School. Seniors at this University may, however, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 9 semester hours), provided such work:
1. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this University.
2. Comes within the four-year time limit.
3. Is no lower than a C.
4. Has not been applied toward another degree.
5. Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and approved by the dean of the school/college. Requests for transfer of credit to be
applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose, and submitted to the school/college by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. For more information, contact your graduate advisor. To be eligible for courses to be considered for transfer, a student must have an overall B average in all courses taken at the University of Colorado in The Graduate School.
Continuing Education Course Work
Students may use courses offered through the Division of Extended Studies in the pursuit of graduate study only if they obtain proper academic approval
from the major department and the school/college dean in advance.
Residence
In general, the residence requirements can be met only by residence at the University for at least two semesters or at least three summer terms. For full residence, a student must be registered within the time designated at the beginning of a semester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses numbered 5000 or above, or at least a combination of other course work acceptable for graduate credit. See Limitation of Registration, Full Load, for requirements for full residence credit during the summer. Students who are noticeably deficient in their general training, or in the specific preparation indicated by each department as prerequisite to graduate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified.
Graduate assistants and other employees of the University may fulfill the residence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than half-time. Full-time employees may not satisfy the residence requirements of one year in fewer than four semesters.
Admission to Candidacy
A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master’s degree must file application in the graduate dean’s office 10 weeks prior to the completion of the comprehensive final examination. The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be determined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status.
This application must be made on forms obtainable from The Graduate School dean’s office and in various departments, and must be signed by the major department, certifying that the student’s work is satisfactory and that the program outlined in the application meets the requirements set for the student.
A student on Graduate School probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation.
Thesis Requirements
A thesis, which may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type, is required of every master’s degree candidate under Plan 1. Every thesis presented
in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must:
1. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field.
2. Be based upon independent study and investigation.
3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work.
4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred.
5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given.
6. Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in Directions for Preparing Masters' and Doctoral Theses, which is obtainable from The Graduate School.
Two weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred, two formally approved, printed or typewritten copies oi the thesis must be filed in The Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract.
All theses must be signed by the thesis advisor and the second reader. All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid when the thesis is deposited in The Graduate School.
Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been registered. A student working toward a master’s degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence,but the total registered credit for thesis must total a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis.
The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. An IP (in progress) will be reported for terms during which the student is registered for thesis prior to completion of the thesis.
Comprehensive Final Examination
All candidates for a master’s degree are required to take a comprehensive final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examination may be given near the end of their last semester of residence while they are still taking required courses for the degree, provided they are making satisfactory progress in those courses.


Doctor of Philosophy / 47
The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed:
1. Students must be registered when they take the examination.
2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the dean’s office at least 3 days in advance of the examination.
3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned in consultation with
the dean.
4. The examination, which may be oral, written, or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essentially complete at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field.
5. An examination in the minor work taken at this University is optional with the major and minor departments.
6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or minor field.
The examination on transferred work will be given by representatives of the corresponding fields of study in this University.
7. A student who fails the comprehensive final examination may not attempt the examination again until at least three months have elapsed and until such work as may be prescribed by the examining committee has been completed. The student may retake the examination only once.
Supplemental Examinations
Supplemental examinations should be simply an extension of the original comprehensive examination and given afterward. If the student fails the supplemental examination, three months must elapse before attempting the comprehensive examination again.
Course Examinations
The regular written examinations for each semester except the last must be taken. Course examinations for the last semester, which come after the comprehensive final examination has been passed, may be omitted with the consent of the instructor.
Master's Thesis Credit
Every graduate student working toward a master’s degree who expects to present
a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported.
(The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Time Limit
Master’s degree students have 5 years, from the date of the start of course work, to complete all degree requirements. For students who fail to complete the degree in this 5 year period, it will be necessary for the program director to file an annual statement with the graduate dean stating the reasons why the program faculty believe the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. Students who do their work exclusively in summer terms must complete all degree requirements within 72 months from the start of course work.
A student who does not complete all degree requirements within the specified period of time must validate, by special examination(s), any course work taken more than 6 years prior to taking the master’s comprehensive examination or completing the thesis defense, depending on which plan is elected.
Deadlines for Master's Degree Candidates Expecting to Graduate During 1993-94
Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling The Graduate School office, 556-2663.
1. Last day for requesting transfer of credit.
2. Applications for admission to candidacy. Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (The form may
be picked up in the department or in The Graduate School office.)
3. Last day for thesis to be approved by department.
4. Last day for scheduling of comprehensive final examination.
5. Last day for taking comprehensive final examination.
6. Last day for filing thesis in The Graduate School. At the time of filing, the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by The Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p.m. on the indicated date will be graduated at the commencement following that for which the deadline
is indicated.
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University. To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued. Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work in this field; furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge. The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules.
Studies leading to the Ph.D. degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments. The criterion as to what constitutes an acceptable field of study shall be that the student’s work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University.
Students planning to graduate should obtain current deadline dates in the office of The Graduate School. It is the graduate student’s and the department’s responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying The Graduate School of final examinations, etc).
Department or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by graduate students in that


48 / The Graduate School
department or program. It is the student’s responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Course/Dissertation Requirements
A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph.D. degree.
Course Work Requirement. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses numbered 5000 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum. At least 20 of the required hours must be in graduate courses taken at this University. Students who have been admitted to The Graduate School with deficiencies may expect to receive little or no residence credits until the deficiencies have been removed.
Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the Ph.D., a student must register for a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than 10 of these credit hours in any one semester. Not more than 10 dissertation hours may be taken preceding the semester of taking comprehensive examinations. In addition, up to 10 hours may be taken in the semester in which the student passes comprehensives. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above and will not be included in calculation of the student’s grade-point average. Only the grades of A, B and IP shall be used.
Course work and work on the dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program; however, at no time shall a doctoral student register for more than 15 hours of 5000-level and above courses. Normally, a student must have earned at least three and not more than six semesters of residency before admission to candidacy.
Advisory Committee
As soon as the field of specialization has been chosen, the candidate will request the faculty member with whom the committee wishes to work to act as chair of the advisory committee. The chair, with the advice and approval of the chair of the department, may select two or more additional members to serve on the committee, so that the several fields related to the student’s special interest will be represented. A purpose of the advi-
sory committee (beyond guiding the student through graduate study) is to ensure against specialization that is too narrow. The student shall obtain the signature of the chair of the committee (thereby signifying his or her willingness to act) on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form. Any change in the membership of the advisory committee is to be similarly reported.
Residence
The student must be properly registered to earn residence credit. The minimal residence requirement shall be six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor’s degree. Mere attendance shall not constitute residence as the word is here used. Residence may be earned for course work completed with distinction, for participation in seminars, or for scholarly research performed here or elsewhere under the auspices of the University of Colorado.
As a guiding policy in determining residence credit for employed students, those who are employed in three-fourths to fulltime work that does not contribute directly to their program toward a degree may not earn more than one-half residence credit in any semester. Students who are employed more than one-fourth time and less than three-fourths time in work that does not contribute directly to the degree may earn not more than three-fourths residence credit. Those who have one-fourth time employment or less may earn full residence credit. (All these provisions are subject to the definition of residence credit given in the preceding paragraph.) In case the interpretation of residence credit for any student needs to be clarified, a decision will be made by the chair of the student’s advisory committee, the chair of the student’s major department, and the dean of The Graduate School.
Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master’s degree from another institution of approved standing, but at least four semesters of residence credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work (course and/or dissertation) taken at this University.
A part of the residence requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be spent in another graduate institution, or in field work in absentia (provided that prior approval for work is given by the student’s program director and provided that the student’s registration is maintained for that period away from the campus).
Preliminary Examination
Each department will satisfy itself (by examination or other means) that students who signify intent to undertake study for the Ph.D. degree are qualified to do so. The means by which each department makes this evaluation shall be specified in departmental requirements. Students who are thus evaluated will be notified immediately of the results. The results of this preliminary evaluation shall be reported to The Graduate School office on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form filed by the student at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
Language Requirement
The decision on foreign language requirements for Ph.D. degrees is the responsibility of the graduate faculty of each graduate program.2
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality earned in another institution of approved standing will not be accepted for transfer to apply toward the doctorate until the student has established a satisfactory record in residence in this Graduate School, but such credit must be transferred before the student makes application for admission to candidacy for the degree. Such transfer will not reduce the minimum residence requirement at this University, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University for the Ph.D. is 30 semester hours.
Application for Admission to Candidacy
A student must make formal application for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree on forms supplied by The Graduate School office at least 2 weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
A student shall have earned at least three semesters of residence, and shall have passed the comprehensive examination before admission to candidacy for the degree.
Approved by a vote of the system-wide graduate faculty on February 7, 1990.


Doctor of Philosophy / 49
Continuous Registration Requirements for Doctoral Candidates
Following successful completion of comprehensive examinations, students must register continuously. Students admitted to candidacy for degree will register for and be charged for seven hours of credit for each full-time term of doctoral work. For each term of part-time enrollment, students will be charged for seven hours of dissertation credit, except that students not making use of campus facilities may petition The Graduate School for three-credit-hour status. Continuous registration during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense. It is expected that the student and advisor will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classification identified above.
Comprehensive Examination
Before admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, the student must pass a comprehensive examination in the field of concentration and related fields. This examination may be oral, written, or both, and will test the student’s mastery of a broad field of knowledge, not merely the formal course work completed. The oral part is open to members of the faculty.
The student must be registered at the time the comprehensive examination is attempted.
The examination shall be conducted by an examining board appointed by the chair of the department concerned and be approved by the campus graduate dean. The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to total a minimum of five.
A successful candidate must receive the affirmative votes of a majority of the members of the examination board. In case of failure, the examination may be attempted once more after a period of time determined by the examining board.
Dissertation Requirements
A thesis based upon original investigation, showing mature scholarship, critical judgment, and familiarity with the tools and methods of research must be written upon a subject approved by the student’s major department. To be acceptable, this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student’s special field. It must be finished and submitted in typewritten form at least
30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the day of the final examination, and must be formally approved and made available for inspection by the examining committee before the final examination may be taken.
In mechanical features, all dissertations must comply with the specifications of The Graduate School as outlined in the Directions for Preparing Masters ’ and Doctoral Theses, which may be obtained from The Graduate School.
It is the student’s responsibility to notify The Graduate School of the exact title of the dissertation at least six weeks prior to the commencement at which the student will graduate. This title will be printed in the commencement program (May graduation only).
Two formally-approved, typewritten copies of the dissertation, including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred.
The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International. The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department.
All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than two members of the major department staff who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction.
All approved dissertations are kept on file in the library.
When the dissertation is deposited in The Graduate School, the candidate must pay the thesis-binding fee and sign an agreement with University Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform.
Final Examination
After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dissertation and related topics will be conducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral, the oral portion being open to anyone. The examination will be conducted by a committee consisting of at least five persons, one of whom must be from outside the student’s department. More than one dissenting
vote will disqualify the candidate in the final examination.
Arrangements for the final examination must be made in the graduate dean’s office at least two weeks in advance. The examination must be scheduled not later than two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. A student must be registered at the time of the final examination.
Time Limit
If a student fails to complete all requirements for the degree within the prescribed number of years from the date of the start of course work in the doctoral program, a second examination similar to the first will be required before the candidate may take the fincil examination. The number of years allowed for completion is normally six, but in some programs it may be seven. If the comprehensive examination is failed, it may be attempted once more after not fewer them eight months of further work. For students who fail to complete the degree in this 6 year period, it will be necessary for the department to file an annual statement indicating that the program director believes the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. This request must be signed by three members of the graduate faculty who serve on the student’s thesis advisory committee. If approved by the campus graduate dean, the student may continue his/her studies for one additional year. If not approved, the student may be dropped from the program.




The New College of Architecture and Planning
The School of Architecture and Planning is one of two academic units within The New College of Architecture and Planning recently established by the University of Colorado at Denver. Located in downtown Denver, it offers graduate professional and advanced degrees in the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The second unit-:he School of Environmental Design-:urrently offers an interdisciplinary andergraduate program leading to the award of the Bachelor of Environmental Design degree on the Boulder campus t>f the University of Colorado system.
Dean: Dwayne Nuzum Office: CU-Denver Bldg, (formerly Dravo), Third Floor Telephone: 556-3382 Faculty: Professors: Yuk Lee, George Hoover, Dwayne Nuzum, John Prosser, Peter Schneider
\ssociate Professors: Lois Brink, Thomas Clark, Phillip Gallegos, Harry Garnham, Marvin Hatami, Bernard Jones, Paul Saporito, Peter Schaeffer Assistant Professors: Theresa Cameron, Ned Collier, Michael Holleran, Taisto Makela, Hans Morgenthaler, Bennett Neiman, Won Jin Tae, Diane Wilk,
Ping Xu
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
The School of Architecture and Plan-ling offers first and post-professional jrograms leading to master’s degrees. Students are required to search into the existing abundance of architecture and banning knowledge in order to generate iffective, forceful, spirited forms, ideas, ind proposals. Faculty and students are engaged in investigation, education, :xploration, and generation of new ideas, orms, and proposals to create more lumane living environments. As El Jssitzky (1930) stated: “Our work is not >hilosophy, neither is it a system relating o a specific theory of nature; it is part if nature and must therefore itself be egarded as an object of knowledge.”
In doing so, the School questions exist-ng connections of teaching and practice
and is in search of future alternatives. The School’s activities are thus geared toward preparation of future architects and planners who are not only able to draw, to calculate, or to propose, but also to question, to explore, and to experiment.
The curricula are based on a wide range of cultural views of architecture and planning reflective of our faculty and student body. The faculty direct, guide, and encourage students to develop their individual interests with a prerequisite commitment intended to equip the graduate with a lasting ability to produce architecture and planning responsive to the changing needs of society.
It is on these premises that our School is in constant search of the manifest, ideas, and forms for the betterment of the living environments. A community of culturally diverse educators and practitioners centered in an island by the backdrop of the Rocky Mountains provides a unique opportunity for intense study of architecture and planning.
Mission and Organization
The School is composed of three graduate degree programs in architecture, landscape architecture, and urban and regional planning (M.Arch., M.L.A., M.U.R.P.). It also offers urban design as an area of specialization in the architecture program (M.Arch. in Urban Design). As a unit of graduate professional education with three professional degree programs and a mandate for national excellence and recognition, the School expects to go beyond training students in basic skills for entry-level positions. The School’s overall mission is to develop the design capabilities of the individuals and the design professions as a whole as well as provide the intellectual framework which supports design.
Considering this mission, the School emphasizes basic professional training and education necessary for entering professional practice in its first professional degree programs. The post-professional and advanced degree programs are directed toward professionals at various career stages and focus on research and specialization.
The School supports interdisciplinary work in its programs and focuses on professional education and research concerning the design and planning of the built environment. Within this interdisciplinary approach, it recognizes the professional community’s input and the role of the other academic disciplines such as humanities, social sciences, and engineering.
In the School’s degree programs, various architecture and planning ideologies and views are examined with respect to their historical setting. This examination is combined with critical reviews of design work, dialogues, and methods to form the essential ingredient of design education. Through this dialectic of analyzing and synthesizing, students gain increased understanding of those humanistic ideals underlying the architecture and planning of buildings and spaces and relate them to their own developing personal aspirations.
The School is committed to design as its central intellectual concern, and is the largest graduate school of architecture in the western region. Design is used in its broadest sense to include a full range of philosophies, ideologies, theories, and methods. The School’s mission is education, research, and development of arts and sciences of architecture and planning.
Academic Programs
The three graduate programs are interdisciplinary, and, in the design fields, both first and post-professional degrees are offered. In addition, it is possible for students to obtain two degrees, M.Arch. and M.U.R.R for example, and reduce the time required for doing so by coordinating their programs.
The first professional degree programs are structured for full-time graduate study. For students with employment obligations, most of these programs can be taken on a part-time basis. Usually the first year of the full-time program must be completed before it can be taken part-time.
Within any of the programs, the School of Architecture and Planning offers opportunities to develop a self-tailored area of concentration through its varied offerings


52 / The New College of Architecture and Planning
in architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. Electives ordinarily can be taken from any program in the School and from another school in the University with the approval of the student’s advisor.
The School maintains membership in:
Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture
Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning
Council of Landscape Architecture Educators
Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board
Planning Accreditation Board
Tau Sigma Delta Honor Society
Sigma Delta Lambda Honor Society
Academic Environment and Student Body
The School supports or sponsors a variety of events and activities that enhance the regular curriculum. Student internships for credit are available during the academic year. A summer international study program is offered. The School sponsors three receptions-at the beginning of the academic year, before Christmas, and at the end of the academic year. A Beaux Arts Ball is held in the spring for both students and the local professional community. Several exhibitions of design and art works are held throughout the year.
There are about 275 full-time students in the School. The student body is diverse, representing many academic disciplines and a wide variety of previous academic institutions. Students have previous degrees from a number of universities around the world.
Lecture Series
Guest critics are frequently invited to the School. In addition, the School has an official lecture series every year. The Lecture Series is composed of distinguished practitioners, critics, and scholars of national and international stature. Visiting critics and speakers include: Vito Acconci, Jack Beyer, Richard Fernau, Peter Forbes, Brendon Gill, Joan Goody, Kenneth Help-hand, Enrique Larranaga, Gary Lee, Mark Mack, Ian McHarg, Mary McLeon, Ross Miller, Samuel Mockbee, George Ranalli, Michael Sorkin, Carl Steinitz, Michael Van Valkenburg, Lebbeaus Woods, and Helmut Weihsmann.
SCHOOL FACILITIES
The School’s studios, library, Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory, Auto-Cadd Computer Laboratory, photo
laboratory and darkroom, model shop, gallerias, and offices are housed in three floors of the CU-Denver Bldg, in 50,000 square feet of space. The laboratories and facilities were developed through an endowment by noted architect Temple Hoyne Buell, FA1A.
Architecture and Planning Library
Librarian: Robert Wick Library Technician: Toby Visoon
The Architecture and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library (administered by the University of Colorado at Denver), serves as a learning resource center in the fields of architecture and planning. It contains the following collections: reference, circulating, documentary (planning documents issued by local, regional, state, and national agencies with an emphasis on planning materials pertaining to Colorado communities and concerns), periodicals, reserve, and non-print media, including architectural slides. The Architecture and Planning Library has over 15,000 volumes of books and monographs, professional references, 9,000 slides, and 99 periodical subscriptions.
The Architecture and Planning Library staff consists of a one-third time librarian, library technician, and severed student assistants. The Library provides a number of services, including reference and research assistance, and library-use instruction. Additional services, such as inter-library loan and computer-assisted research, are provided through the Auraria Library.
Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory
The Macintosh Architecture and Design Laboratory is dedicated to the promotion of design innovation and exploration with the Macintosh computer. The laboratory is equipped with 15 Macintosh II computers with high resolution color monitors; a Macintosh II file server; an E-size, Hewlett-Packard plotter; LaserWriter II printer; and Hewlett-Packard DeskWriter C printer. The laboratory utilizes software including Adobe Illustrator 3, Adobe Premiere, Architrion (an advanced 3-dimensional modeling program), Form Z version 2, Photoshop II (an advanced graphic manipulation program that interfaces with the 3-D modelling packages), Video Spigot, and a broad range of other sophisticated graphic simulation software. This state-of-the-art laboratory has been developed
through a contribution by Apple Computer, Inc.
CADD Computer Laboratory
The CADD Laboratory of the School of Architecture and Planning is located adjacent to the Macintosh Architecture Laboratory and supports advanced computer-aided design and drafting with a microcomputer based network which has been modified and expanded. The laboratory is equipped with 16 state-of-the-art DOS based units with high resolution graphic monitors, and all the peripherals and software needed for advanced two-and three-dimensioned modeling.
Building Technology Laboratory
The Building Technology Laboratory functions as a teaching and research facility for both students and outside practitioners. Hands-on experimentation and physical demonstration in the lab facilitate the learning process for the student, bridging the gap between theoretical concepts and practical applications. For practitioners, this facility is used to enhance their practice and update their knowledge.
Some examples of equipment and facilities available include data acquisition systems, lighting research equipment, Macintosh visual input package, windflow simulation table, and video equipment. The windflow simulation table allows the designer to analyze various windflow patterns on two-dimensional forms. By allowing water to flow continuously in a given direction and by adding an even distribution of ink to identify the flow patterns, an immediate study can be encountered on a given site configuration. In conjunction with the computer lab, a visual input package is available to capture computer generated images.
Photo Laboratory. Our new photography lab, with the latest state-of-the-art equipment, is used for architectural photography classes and by students to produce material for their portfolios. There are separate areas for developing, enlarging, drying, and copying.
Model-Making Laboratory. Students have an 800-square-foot model shop in which to build projects for their classes. Table saws, jig saws, drill presses, jointers, and a full range of hand tools will allow the student to build models of wood, plastic, and steel. An adjacent paint spray room is equipped with a ventilated paint booth and vapor-proof lighting.


Admissions / 53
ADMISSIONS General Requirements
The School of Architecture and Planning has tin Academic Affairs Office. Primary responsibilities of this office include answering admission inquiries, processing admissions applications, awarding tuition scholarships, enforcing studio and laboratory rules, hearing student grade appeals, overseeing students’ rights and responsibilities, approving new course proposals, enforcing academic policies, and processing graduation applications.
Each applicant for admission into any of the programs of the School of Architecture and Planning must submit:
1. The University of Colorado Application
for Graduate Admission forms.
2. Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended.
3. Three letters of recommendation.
4. A statement of purpose.
5. Examples of creative work (see below).
6. The application fee.
Special requirements for international applicants are described in a following section.
Examples of Creative Work. In architecture, landscape architecture, urban and regional planning, and urban design, applicants are expected to present samples of their creative and analytic work, commonly referred to as a portfolio. A portfolio is an orderly presentation of one’s work. This includes examples of creative and analytical work including but not limited to essays, papers, photographs, and photographic reproduction of artistic work such as sculpture, drawings, paintings, musical composition, and other fine arts. The format must be 8'A" x 11", bound with not more than twelve pages (excluding papers). Slides are not accepted. All portfolios must be identified by the student’s full name and program to which the student is applying. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must be included for return of portfolio.
In general, a minimum of 3.00 grade-point average (GPA) on a 4.00 scale (or equivalent) in the prior undergraduate or graduate degree is required for admission. Applicants with a GPA under 3.00 may be reviewed for admission; in such cases, submission of strong supporting materials is advised. For applicants with a GPA under 3.00, GRE scores are normally required for the Urban and Regional Planning Program and strongly recommended for applicants to the other programs.
The admissions decision is made weighing a variety of factors, including academic preparation, quality of work experience and portfolio, appropriateness of the applicant’s purpose, and overall likelihood of success in the program. Applicants may be admitted as nondegree students or with special conditions. Because of space limitations, not all qualified applicants may be accepted. Specific requirements for each program are listed below.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (First professional degree; three and one-half year program)
The three and one-half year (114 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with a bachelor’s degree and no prior training or background in architecture or related field. Prerequisites are one year of college-level physics and college mathematics through a first course in calculus. For those without these prerequisites, courses are held in the summer term preceding the first semester.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (First professional degree; three and one-half year program with advanced standing)
Admission to the three and one-half year program with advanced standing is appropriate for applicants with a non-professional bachelor’s degree in architecture or a bachelor’s degree in a related field (engineering, design, art). Depending on their undergraduate record, qualified applicants with a non-professional architectural degree (the first part of a 4 ± 2 program) would ordinarily be given advanced standing of up to one curriculum year in the program. Applicants with degrees in related fields may be exempted from courses in their specific areas of preparation, but may be required to take all the courses in the architectural design sequence. The number of credits and exact point of entry into the program will be determined by the program director.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (Post-professional degree)
The one-year (36 semester hours) postprofessional degree program is appropriate for applicants holding a Bachelor of Architecture or equivalent first professional degree or diploma in architecture.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE IN URBAN DESIGN
(One-year post-professional degree)
The one-year (36 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with a first professional design degree in architecture (e.g. B.Arch., M.Arch.).
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECTURE
(First professional degree)
The three-year (90 semester hours) first professional degree program is appropriate for those with a bachelor’s degree and no training or background in landscape architecture or a related design field.
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (Post-professional degree)
The two-year (48 semester hours) postprofessional degree program is appropriate for applicants with a first professional design degree (B.S.L.A., B.L.A., B.Arch., for example). Applicants without a prior Landscape Architecture degree may be required to take additional core requirements in Plant Materials and Ecology.
MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING
The two-year (51 semester hours) program is appropriate for applicants with bachelor’s degrees in either design, humanities, social, or physical sciences.
International Applicants
Competence in oral and written English is expected in the School. The School of Architecture and Planning requires a minimum of 550 TOEFL score for international students from non-English speaking countries. However, the School will consider applications from students with strong academic credentials whose TOEFL scores are slightly below 550. If accepted, these students will be required to register and successfully complete a one-credit-hour technical writing workshop. This one credit hour cannot be used to fulfill part of the degree requirements.
Submission Requirements. International applicants must submit:
1. An International Student application and Graduate Admission forms.
2. Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended. Transcripts must be mailed by the institution directly to the School. A certified literal English translation must also be submitted for documents that are not in English.


54 / The New College of Architecture and Planning
3. Four letters of recommendation.
4. A statement of purpose.
5. A portfolio of academic, creative, and professional work.
6. A nonrefundable $50 application fee.
7. A current CU-Denver Financial Resources Statement. Statements used for other institutions will not
be accepted. Photocopied documents are not acceptable unless signed by the originator; signatures must not be photocopies.
8. Official TOEFL Score Report to establish English language proficiency. Institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable. Additional supporting documents may
subsequently be required by the office of Admissions. All international applicants who are admitted to CU-Denver must have a valid visa and must enroll for and maintain a full course of study (12 or more semester hours) leading to the completion of a master’s degree.
Financial Requirements. International applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds available to attend the University of Colorado at Denver. To provide this evidence, each international applicant should follow these instructions:
1. Complete the Financial Resources Statement. The applicant must prove the existence of sufficient money to cover expenses by submitting the Financial Resources Statement as a part of the application.
a. If applicant’s own money is to be used: In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement, applicant’s bank must certify that the full amount of money is on deposit in his or her account to meet tuition and expense costs.
b. If applicant is being sponsored by a family member or friend: The sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. Sponsor’s bank must also certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money applicant will need for tuition and expenses.
c. If applicant has been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed.
2. An incomplete statement of financial resources or failure to prove the availability of the necessary money will delay or cause denial of admission to the University. Be sure the Financial Resources Statement is accurate and complete.
Dates and Deadlines
All programs in the School admit for all semesters. However, acceptance for the spring and summer semesters will be on a space-available basis only.
Deadlines for submission of application materials:
March 15 - for fall semester regular admission and summer semester space available
November 1 - for spring semester regular admission Applications received after these dates will be considered only on a space-available basis.
Persons interested in any of the programs or in visiting the School are invited to call the Architecture and Urban Design Programs at (303) 556-2877, and the Landscape Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Programs at (303) 556-3479, to arrange for an appointment. For application forms or additional information, please write to:
Office of the Dean
School of Architecture and Planning University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 126 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 (303) 556-3382
PROGRAMS OF STUDY Architecture
Program Director: Peter A. Schneider Office: CU-Denver Bldg., Third Floor Telephone: 556-2877
The architecture program offers curricula leading to both first and postprofessional Master of Architecture degrees. The first professional Master of Architecture (M.Arch.f) is fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), and is composed of five basic core areas: Architectural Design, History and Theory, Environmental Context, Science and Technology, and Professional Practice.
Most states require that an individual intending to become an architect hold an accredited degree. There are two types of degrees that are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board: (1) The Bachelor of Architecture, which requires a minimum of five years of study; and (2) The Master of Architecture, which requires a minimum of three years of study following an unrelated bachelor’s degree or two years following a related
preprofessional bachelor’s degree. These professional degrees are structured to educate those who aspire to registration/ licensure as architects.
The four-year, preprofessional degree, where offered, is not accredited by NAAB. The preprofessional degree is useful for those wishing a foundation in the field of architecture, as preparation for either continued education in a professional degree program or for employment options in architecturally related areas.
The program’s primary objective is to prepare students to enter the practice of architecture with a thorough foundation in the bodies of knowledge and applied methods. More specifically, the objectives of the program are to develop: an awareness of and sensitivity to the quality of the human environment; architectural context; deep understanding of architectural history, theory and criticism; thorough knowledge of architectural and building technology; competence in design process and expression with particular emphasis on exploration, experimentation, and synthesis; understanding of the institutional framework within which architecture takes place; and skills and understanding of professional practice, including management and professional conduct.
The ultimate goal of the program is to provide the architecture student with a deep appreciation of architecture, while acquiring critical capacity, through comprehension of all facets of architecture. This is achieved through five groups of courses, organized in sequences within five coordinated modules.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE I (First professional degree)
Three and one-half year program. The first professional Master of Architecture degree program is a 114 semester hour program requiring three and one-half years (six semesters and a summer term) of full-time study. The curriculum consists of a core of five related course components and 21 semester hours of electives that may be used for a concentration.
The program is taught at three levels, each with a theme. The first level involves the theme principles, definitions, communication, and design abstraction and takes the first two semesters. The next level takes three semesters and involves a dual theme-architecture in context and applications of methodologies. The theme of the final level in the third year is synthesis and professional competency.


Architecture / 55
he Curriculum-Three and One-Half ear Program
ESIGN:
3 semester hours
RCH 5500-6. RCH 5501-6. RCH 5502-6. RCH 6600-6. RCH 6601-6. RCH 6700-6. RCH 6701-6. RCH 5510-3.
RCH 5511-3.
Introduction to Architectural Design Studio I Introduction to Architectural Design Studio II Architectural Design Studio III
Architectural Design Studio IV
Architectural Design Studio V
Advanced Architectural Design Studio VI Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II
JSTORY AND THEORY: > semester hours
RCH 5520-3. Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism RCH 5521-3. Survey of Architectural History
RCH 6620-3. Architecture in the 18th through 20th Centuries RCH 6621-3. History of Architectural Theory
leory Elective: 3 semester hours
mRONMENTAL CONTEXT: semester hours
RCH 6660-3. Human and Social
Dimensions of Design V 6632-3. Site Planning
} 6620-3. Architecture of the City
:iENCEAND TECHNOLOGY: semester hours
RCH 5530-3. RCH 5531-3. ICH 5532-3. (CH 5533-3.
1CH 6630-3. RCH 6631-3.
RCH 6636-3.
Structures I Structures II Building Technology I Environmental Control Systems I Structures III Environmental Control Systems II
Building Technology II
IOFESSIONAL PRACTICE: semester hours
RCH 6750-3. Professional Practice
Advanced Standing in the three and one-half year program. Students admitted with advanced standing to the first professional degree program follow a course of study based on an evaluation of their academic credentials which takes place during the admissions process. Students who have degrees in related fields may be exempt from certain required courses. Students who have completed a preprofessional bachelor’s degree in an accredited 4 + 2 program will be given advanced standing of up to one curriculum year in the program. The number of credits and exact point of entry into the program will be determined by the Program Director.
MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE II (Post-professional program)
The post-professional program in architecture is an advanced specialized curriculum requiring students to complete a minimum of 36 semester hours of credit to qualify for graduation with the Master of Architecture II degree. Eighteen of the thirty-six hours must be completed in designated option courses. The remaining eighteen are completed as electives. Information on the requirements for each option is available by contacting the School or the Director of the architecture program. The program offers four options of study: 1) Architectural Experimentation, 2) Architecture and Design with Macintosh, 3) Building Technology, and 4) Real Estate Development.
The first option, Architectural Experimentation, is suited for students intending to further their knowledge in theory and criticism of architecture. Students are guided to investigate, explore, and experiment with ideas of non-conventional nature and to advance their design ability.
The second option, Architecture and Design with Macintosh, is designed to prepare the student for specialization in computer application in design generation and development.
The third option, Building Technology, prepares students for specialization in building performance studies utilizing the School’s sophisticated Building Technology Laboratory. Solar, thermo, acoustics, and lighting studies are several main specializations offered by the faculty.
The fourth option, Real Estate Development, focuses on architecture and development process utilizing the expertise of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning Program faculty.
Courses:
ARCH 6622-3. Modern Architecture
ARCH 6623-3. Investigations in Architecture
ARCH 6627-3. Post-Structuralist Architecture
ARCH 6628-3. Theories of Avant Garde
ARCH 6632-3. Building Performance Analysis
ARCH 6633-3. Lighting
ARCH 6640-3. Introduction to Computer Graphics
ARCH 6641-3. Computer Applications in Architecture
ARCH 6642-3. Design and Architecture with the Macintosh
ARCH 6643-3. Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh
ARCH 6704-6. Architectural Experimentation I
ARCH 6705-6. Architectural Experimentation II
ARCH 6950-6. Thesis Research and Programming
ARCH 6951-6. Architecture Thesis
URP 6660-3. Real Estate Development Process
URP 6661-3. Real Estate Development Finance
URP 6662-3. Real Estate Market Analysis
URP 6664-3. Fiscal Impact Analysis
ARCHITECTURE ELECTIVES:
ARCH 5540-3. Design Photography
ARCH 6610-3. Furniture Design
ARCH 6622-3. Modern Architecture
ARCH 6623-3. Investigations in Architecture
ARCH 6624-3. The Built Environment in Other Cultures I: Research Design
ARCH 6910-6. The Built Environment in Other Cultures II: Field Experience
ARCH 6627-3. Post-Structuralist Architecture
ARCH 6628-3. Theories of Avant Garde
ARCH 6632-3. Building Performance Analysis
ARCH 6633-3. Lighting
ARCH 6634-3. Materials and Detailing I: Residential
ARCH 6635-3. Materials and Detailing 11: Commercial
ARCH 6640-3. Introduction to Computer Graphics
ARCH 6641-3. Computer Applications in Architecture
ARCH 6642-3. Design and Architecture with the Macintosh
ECTJVES: semester hours