Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library
University of Colorado Denver

Full Text
University of Colorado Catalog
Denver


University of Colorado at Denver
P.0. Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364
Second Class
Postage
Paid
at the Post Office Boulder, Colorado


CONTENTS
Academic Calendar.......................................................... 2
Message from the Chancellor................................................ 4
Administration ............................................................ 5
General Information ....................................................... 7
Undergraduate Admissions.................................................. 35
The Graduate School 41
The New College of Architecture and Planning.............................. 51
College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration................................................ 59
School of Education....................................................... 77
College of Engineering and Applied Science................................ 99
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................... 119
Military Science......................................................... 163
Graduate School of Public Affairs...................................... 167
Course Descriptions...................................................... 175
Faculty ................................................................. 303
Index.................................................................... 315


ACADEMIC CALENDAR1
Fall 1994 August 15-19 August 22 September 5 November 24 November 25 December 17 Orientation - Registration First day of classes Labor Day holiday (campus closed) Thanksgiving holiday (campus closed) (campus open, no classes) End of semester
Spring 1995 January 9-13 January 16 January 17 March 20-25 May 13 Orientation - Registration Martin Luther King Jr. holiday (campus open, no classes) First day of classes Spring break (campus open, no classes) End of semester
Summer 1995 May 22-26 May 29 May 30 July 4 August 5 Orientation - Registration Memorial Day holiday (campus closed) First day of classes Independence holiday (campus closed) End of term
Photos: Shock Photography
Design: Publications Department, University of Colorado at Denver
The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time. Consult the Schedule of Courses for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs and registration dates and procedures.


Undergraduate and Graduate Catalog
1994-95
University of Colorado at Denver
Speer at Larimer
P.O. Box 173364
Denver, Colorado 80217-3364
Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, degree offerings and degree titles, course offerings and course descriptions, and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice or obligation. The University claims no responsibility for errors that may have occurred during the typesetting, printing or production of this catalog. The University of Colorado at Denver is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. For current calendars, tuition rates, requirements, deadlines, etc., students should refer to a copy of the Schedule of Courses for the semester in which they intend to enroll.
The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curriculum. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester, and the faculty teaching a particular course or program may vary from time to time. The instructor may alter the content of a course or program to meet particular class needs.
Courses are listed by college or school.
University of Colorado Catalog.
(USPS 651-060)
3100 Marine Street, Room A220, Campus Box 584 Boulder, Colorado 80309-0584 Volume 1994, No. 3, May/June Published 4 times a year: January/February March/ April, May/June, August/September Second class postage paid at Boulder, Colorado. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to University of Colorado Catalog, CU-Denver Publications, Boulder, Colorado 80302.


Message From the Chancellor
Dear Student:
Welcome to the University of Colorado at Denver. On behalf of the faculty, staff, and students, I offer to you the challenging environment of one of Colorado’s premier institutions of higher education. Your decision to attend CU-Denver shows your willingness to learn at Denver’s only urban public university.
CU-Denver is one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system. As a vital part of that system, offering baccalaureate, master’s, and doctoral programs, we have achieved distinction nationally and internationally because of the high quality of our programs, faculty, and alumni. Located in downtown Denver, the University challenges its students both academically and personally in an intellectual environment that encourages commitment, curiosity, and imagination.
A distinguishing characteristic of CU-Denver is our urban perspective that is an integral theme in our academic programming, the orientation of our faculty, and the identity of our student body. Our enrollment has grown to nearly 11,000 students.
The University offers some 40 degree and degree option programs at the baccalaureate level and over 60 degree and degree option programs at the postbaccalaureate level designed to provide you with a foundation on which to build your intellectual, aesthetic, and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens. Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a complement to classroom study. The University’s seven academic areas (Business, Public Affairs, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, School of the Arts, Education, and Architecture and Planning) and The Graduate School provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the opportunities for gaining knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your economic and personal lives.
We at the CU-Denver campus take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs.
This is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the real-world research aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems. Our continuing expansion of international programs is designed to serve the career needs of a variety of students.
We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars and dedicated staff. I promise a rich intellectual environment and a challenging educational experience. Most of all, I look forward to seeing you at graduation and awarding you the CU-Denver degree.
My best wishes to you and to your future.
John C. Buechner
Chancellor
University of Colorado at Denver


Administration / 5
ADMINISTRATION Board of Regents
KATHY ARNOLD, Littleton, term expires 1994 PETER C. DIETZE, Boulder, term expires 1996 GUY KELLY, Ft. Collins, term expires 1998 SUSAN KIRK, Denver, term expires 1998 JIM MARTIN, Boulder, term expires 1998 HARVEY W. PHELPS, Pueblo, term expires 1994 NORWOOD L ROBB, Littleton, term expires 1996 ROBERT SIEVERS, Boulder, term expires 1996 DAVID W. WINN, Colorado Springs, term expires 1994
Staff
MILAGROS CARABALLO, Secretary of the Board of Regents and of the University. B.A., M.S., State University of New York at Albany; M.A., Webster University.
University-Wide Officers
JUDITH ALBINO, President of the University; Professor of Psychology; Professor of Applied Dentistry. B.J., Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin.
GLEN R. STINE, Vice President for Budget and Finance. B.S., Michigan State; M.P.A., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Ed.D., Harvard University.
CHARLES V. SWEET, University Counsel. BA, Duke University; J.D., University of Virginia.
CHRIS ZAFIRATOS, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Research; Professor of Physics; Associate Vice Chancellor for Budget and Planning; B.S., Lewis and Clark College; Ph. D., University of Washington.
CU-Denver Officers
JOHN C. BUECHNER, Chancellor; Professor of Public Affairs. B.A., College of Wooster; M.P.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. JOHN A. BERNHARD, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.A., Stanford University; M.B.A., Columbia University, Graduate School of Business.
GEORGIA LESH-LAURIE, Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs; Professor of Biology. B.S., Marietta College (Ohio); M.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University.
FERNIE BACA, Dean of The Graduate School; Assistant Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative Activities; Associate Professor of Education. B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado.
DAVID A. GROTH, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs. B.S., M.S., Iowa State University; Ph. D., Michigan State University.
KENNETH HERMAN, Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.S., University of Colorado. BARBARA L. SCHNEIDER, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs. B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., Colorado State University.
The University of Colorado seal, adopted in 1908, depicts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed in laurel is placed beside him. The Greek inscription means "Letyour light shine.” According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civilization "stands as the criterion of culture.” The laurel symbolizes honor or success, the youth of the figure suggests the “morning of life, ” and the scroll represents written language.




General Information
The University of Colorado at Denver is the only public university in the Denver metropolitan area. CU-Denver, one of four institutions in the University of Colorado system, is an urban, non-residential campus located in downtown Denver. Major civic, cultural, business, and governmental activities are in close proximity.
CU-Denver offers 29 undergraduate degrees and 41 master’s degrees. Ph.D. degrees are offered in public affairs, applied mathematics, health and behavioral sciences, and educational administration. Special emphasis is placed on programs that will help assure students’ professional opportunities after graduation. All programs are tailored to meet the needs of the diverse student population. Classes are offered during weekday and evening hours, on weekends, and at off-campus sites.
Students’ ages range between 17 and 75. The average student age is 29. Seventy-four percent are employed and 54 percent attend part-time. Forty-four percent of the nearly 11,000 students are enrolled in graduate level courses.
CU-Denver’s faculty actively promote the special role of an urban institution in meeting the needs of students. Many faculty bring their work experiences to the classroom. They are alert to the challenges and opportunities of the urban environment and responsive to the needs of students and the community. The combination of CU-Denver’s talented faculty and highly motivated students creates a vital and exciting educational environment. Students are offered the unique educational opportunity to combine real world experience with academic excellence.
History
In 1876, just over a century ago, the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder. In 1912, the University of Colorado’s Department of Correspondence and Extension was established in Denver to meet the needs of the burgeoning population. As the breadth of course offerings expanded, so did the demand for degreegranting status. The Denver Extension Center was renamed the University of Colorado-Denver Center in 1965, and, by 1969,23 fields of undergraduate study and
11 of graduate study were offered. In 1972, the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria Campus, CU-Denver’s current site. The same year the Denver “Center” was renamed CU-Denver. Two years later the University of Colorado was reorganized into four campuses-Denver, Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder.
University of Colorado System
As one of four campuses of the University of Colorado system, CU-Denver has a special role and mission in Colorado higher education. The University of Colorado at Boulder now serves about 25,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. The Health Sciences Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, dental, nursing, pharmacy, and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 5,700 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. CU-Denver’s role within the University system is primarily to address the needs for undergraduate and graduate instruction in the Denver metropolitan area. Emphasis is given to professional, preprofessional, and liberal arts training in the context of a strong multidisciplinary and applied agenda for research and creative activities. CU-Denver students have access to the library resources of all campuses and cultural and athletic events sponsored within the University system.
Academic Structure
Each of the four campuses of the University of Colorado System-Denver, Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Health Sciences in Denver-has its own Chancellor and campus administration. The Chancellors, in turn, report to the President of the CU System. The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approve the overall direction provided by the President of the System. The System President represents the University of Colorado and manages the planning for development of the System, apportionment of resources across campuses, the
System-wide Graduate School, and general policy regarding academic standards, instructional initiatives, and faculty and staff personnel matters, and is supported by a System-wide Faculty Senate. CU-Denver, as well, has its own faculty governance structure, as well. Students also have their own governance institutions.
The Chancellor of CU-Denver represents CU-Denver and manages campus goal-setting, policy development, academic affairs, and budget and financial matters. The Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs, and the Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance assist the Chancellor. Each vice chancellor is responsible for the essential components of the campus enterprise. The Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs is responsible for all academic programs, academic support programs, student enrollment services, the Graduate School, and Sponsored Programs. The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance is responsible for the campus budget, Office of Financial and Business Services, Human Resources, Computing, Information and Network Services, Planning and Institutional Research, and Voice Communications.
The CU-Denver Graduate School is a component of the CU System-wide Graduate School. All graduate units reside within The Graduate School except Architecture and Planning, Business, and the professional programs in Public Affairs.
Academic Programs
CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the citizens of Denver and the region. With the rapid development of the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. Today CU-Denver is composed of seven distinct academic units:
The New College of Architecture and Planning
College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
School of Education


8 / General Information
College of Engineering and Applied Science
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
School of the Arts
Graduate School of Public Affairs
These units now employ over 348 regular, full-time faculty members. The diversity of the student body is a source of deep pride. Classes include traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school, older students who have delayed college entry, and professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appreciation of the world around them.
The undergraduate colleges of business, engineering, and liberal arts and sciences admit freshman and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, engineering, and music. A solid foundation of academic skills and general education is assured through a comprehensive core curriculum. Students may pursue graduate education through all of the campuses’ colleges and schools. Pre-professional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health careers are also available. CU-Denver faculty also participate in other doctoral programs offered at CU-Boulder.
A complete listing of bachelor’s and master’s degree programs offered by CU-Denver is provided in the college and school sections of this catalog. The college and school sections describe specific policies on requirements for graduation, course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions, and similar information.
CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education which leads to improved professional opportunity in the “Information Age.” Many programs emphasize practical business world applications, and all CU-Denver students are given the opportunity to attain computer literacy. Specific computer-oriented academic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs.
The Future
CU-Denver is committed to the highest standards of education, scholarship, and service to the community. From this commitment springs the vital energy that infuses every campus pursuit. The pace is fast, perhaps unprecedented. Under-
graduate studies are varied, challenging, and rewarding. CU-Denver is reaching out to all who can benefit from the high quality education it has to offer. It is seeking to develop alternative locations to deliver programs, innovative course schedules, and modern telecommunications delivered instruction. New highly innovative applied and professional graduate degrees are being developed that address the emerging needs of the region’s economy. CU-Denver has numerous Centers that are generating state-of-the-art research and service to provide important practical solutions to some of Colorado’s and the nation’s most serious social, economic, environmental, and technological problems. New programs and opportunities in international education bring the world and its global economy into the classroom. Throughout history, urban civilization and the arts and humanities have evolved in a rich synergy. CU-Denver-an urban campus-is deeply involved in enriching the cultural milieu of the Denver area. Clearly, the University of Colorado at Denver is on the move.
Accreditation
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration Colorado State Board of Education Engineering (see the College of Engineering section)
Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board
National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education National Architectural Accrediting Board
National Association of Schools of Music
Planning Accreditation Board National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
Auraria Higher Education Center
The Auraria Higher Education Center is the site for the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share library (which is administered by CU-Denver), classroom, and related facilities on the 171-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered.
On the Auraria campus are administrative and classroom buildings, the Auraria Library, the student union, book center, child care and development centers, physical education facilities, science building, and service buildings.
The new buildings share the campus with the reminders of Denver’s past-historic Ninth Street Park, restored church buildings, and the Tivoli brewery, built in 1882. The Tivoli, renovated into a complex containing specialty shops, restaurants, and entertainment, will become the student union sometime in the near future.
Research and Other Creative Pursuits
CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledge through the research and creative efforts of its faculty. Research and creative activities not only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and professional practice. In addition, these activities constitute an important component of CU-Denver’s service to the community at large. Therefore, externally funded projects are a major priority at CU-Denver.
Research projects, training, and public service programs at CU-Denver encompass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study with a focus on issues that relate to city, state, national, and international issues. During 1992-93, CU-Denver faculty and staff received external grants and contracts totaling $10,556,971 for research, training, and public service programs. The benefits for the campus in the years ahead will be substantial. Externally funded activities assist in sustaining scholarly discourse, enable faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge, provide the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern to society, and enhance the education of students. Many students actively participate in projects overseen by faculty members.
An important aspect of research and other creative activities at CU-Denver is their multidisciplinary and applied nature. Research in every school and college at CU-Denver addresses questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region. Its role within a thriving metropolitan area also serves as a base for exploring topics of national and even international import. But not all research


Centers and Institutes / 9
at CU-Denver yields solutions of immediate practical significance. Exploration of topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplines are carried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that knows no national boundaries. This exploration may yield insights that eventually open the way to practical applications in the next century.
Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary economic, political, educational, engineering, mathematical, scientific, and environmental needs. Financial support has been obtained for program and service development in the areas of computational mathematics, bilingual and special education, health administration, international affairs, executive seminars, and internships and cooperative education, as well as institutes on aging and veterans’ employment and training.
Other projects include statewide investigations of economic development, child care, literacy, air quality, water control, and transportation. Computer-related projects include multilevel algorithms, fast parallel processing, algorithms in linear programming, and modeling. Research projects range from investigations of dinosaur tracksites to neurotoxicology to growth equations for sporangiophores.
In addition, a great deal of research at the University is conducted without substantial external support. This research also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publications, presentations, exhibits, performances, and professional activities. Many members of the faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits bring recognition to the University, establish the credibility of its faculty, and enhance the value of the degrees it confers.
CENTERS AND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE, AND TRAINING
First Amendment Congress
The mission of the First Amendment Congress is to unite Americans of every persuasion to support freedom of expression, and provide America with a continuing forum to discuss and debate the First Amendment as our cornerstone of liberty. To reach this goal, the Congress sponsors national forums, seminars, and congresses to forge new understanding of First Amendment issues; develops curriculum materials to increase students’
understanding of the First Amendment; delivers special messages to various audiences reminding them of their duties to uphold First Amendment freedoms; publishes materials; and supports public awareness campaigns on First Amendment issues.
Center for Human Investment Policy
This Center conducts policy research, provides training and technical support, works with policy makers, and develops avenues for increasing attention to human investment and health issues. The Center particularly focuses on issues affecting children, youth, and families and consults with state and local government agencies, other state governments, federal agencies, and national organizations. In conjunction with the University of Denver, the Center also addresses ethical and policy problems in medical care from the perspective of the patient, the health care provider, and the policy maker.
Center for Applied Psychology
This Center promotes research and educational programs in four areas: organizational effectiveness, public mental health, psychology and the law, psychology and public health. Services include grant writing, applied research, research briefs for practitioners, training, and educational programming. The Center represents a cooperative relationship among higher education, government, business, mental health agencies, public health institutions, and the citizenry of the state of Colorado.
Center for Research in Applied Language
Established in 1991 with a grant from the President’s Fund for the Humanities, the Center for Research in Applied Language conducts research into language-based problems in real-life contexts. It orients its research projects humanistically and socio-culturally and underpins them with knowledge of the various branches of language theory. Faculty and students carry out projects that both contribute to our understanding of how and why language is implicated in social and individual problems, and propose solutions to or ameliorations of those problems. Reports of research projects conducted through the Center are published on an occasional basis and are obtainable from the English department office.
Colorado Principals’ Center
The Center is a staff development, renewal, and training center for practicing principals, assistant principals, central
office supervisors, and others in instructional leadership positions.
Colorado Center for Community Development
The Colorado Center for Community Development provides technical, educational, and applied research assistance to organizations, neighborhoods, and communities that cannot afford or do not have access to professional services. The Center targets its assistance efforts to rural small towns, low income and/or minority communities, and non-traditional, community-based service or development organizations.
Center for Environmental Sciences
The Center fosters and promotes disciplinary and interdisciplinary research in the environmental sciences. Affiliated faculty within the Center represent more them ten natural and social science disciplines within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, as well as several other disciplines, including engineering.
The Center houses the Analytical Laboratory, which specializes in research in environmental chemistry. Ongoing projects within the Center include studies of air pollution, the global sulfur cycle, heavy meted pollution of soils and its relation to human health, and pollutant nitrogen impacts on coniferous and deciduous forests. The services of the laboratory are available to CU-Denver faculty and graduate students, especially those in the M.S. in Environmental Sciences Program, as well as (through joint projects) to the public and private sector.
Center for Urban Transportation Studies
This Center assumes a leading role in the Rocky Mountain region in developing research and interdisciplinary programs in transportation and providing a central resource for information concerning transportation problems in the Rocky Mountain region. The Center makes available University expertise to outside organizations.
Land and Water Information Systems Group
The Group was created to advance the education and training, research, and public service missions of CU-Denver in the areas of urban and regional information systems, geographic-oriented databases, water resources systems, and built facilities management.


10 / General Information
The Centers-Center for the Improvement of Public Management and Center for Public-Private Sector Cooperation
Goals are to improve public sector management and to engage the public, private, and non-profit sectors in devising solutions to community problems. The Centers offer management and leadership training for state and local public officials and emerging leaders in the public and private sectors. They conduct research on public policy issues, analyze policy alternatives and evaluate public and nonprofit programs. The Centers provide strategic planning, conflict management, and facilitation services, as well as other forms of technical assistance to federal, state and local jurisdictions.
Center for Collaborative Educational Leadership
The CCEL was chartered in 1993 in response to the growing need for collaboration between the School of Education, P-12 schools and related community agencies. The Center’s purpose is to bring increasing coherence, support, and continuity to existing University-community partnerships and to expand collaborative efforts that are responsive to local needs and research and development opportunities. Current major programs in the Center are: (1) The Region VIII Resource Access Project, which provides training and technical assistance to Head Start centers throughout a six-state region to help them serve children with disabilities more effectively in regular Head Start classrooms; (2) The Colorado Educational Policy Consortium (CEPC), which conducts evaluative and descriptive projects that provide information and support to Colorado’s educational policy leaders; and (3) The Colorado Principals’ Center, which promotes professional and personal renewal of principals in the metropolitan area, supports collaborative school improvement projects, and encourages creative problem solving to improve the education of all students.
Center for Computational Mathematics
The Center for Computational Mathematics at CU-Denver is composed of faculty members who have an interest in computational mathematics, the study of the process of solving mathematical problems with computers. The Center resides in the Department of Mathematics, but includes members from various other departments and other campuses. Members of the Center conduct research in computational mathematics and maintain a strong educational program at all levels. The Center has extensive ties with industry along the Front Range, and with
government laboratories throughout the nation. It offers students an excellent opportunity to receive training and experience in this exciting new field.
National Leadership Institute on Aging
The National Leadership Institute on Aging is devoted to promoting the leadership skills of men and women who design and deliver human services in our aging society.
Created in 1988, the Institute provides opportunities for executives from the public, private, and non-profit sectors to address the complex policy and program issues prompted by America’s changing demographics. It challenges them to think innovatively, act with greater strategic skill, and forge new coalitions and partnerships to meet the needs of aging America.
The Institute’s activities include residential leadership development programs, mini-institutes and consulting activities.
Institute for International Business
The Institute for International Business (IIB) was created in 1988 by the Board of Regents of the University of Colorado to serve as a center for the advanced study and teaching of international business. In 1993, the Institute was designated a Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) by the U.S. Department of Education, one of only 25 such centers of excellence in the U.S. Through the CIBER and other funding sources, the Institute strives to help the faculties of the College of Business and other University departments in internationalizing curriculum, programs, certificates or with other student-oriented endeavors. The IIB works in other ways to support faculty in their teaching, research, and development activities. In addition, the Institute designs and facilitates customized international programs and training for business, cooperates with other organizations to offer seminars and conferences, and publishes a quarterly newsletter to familiarize the Denver and regional communities with international business issues. Such initiatives help faculty, students, and the business community to acquire the skills and expertise needed to be successful in our increasingly global economy. The Institute also conducts and promotes research on the global economic aspects of competitiveness.
International Center for Administration and Policy
The International Center was created in 1990 through a grant from the Rockefeller
Foundation. For three years it has operated as the international outreach arm of one of this country’s finest schools of public administration. During this time the Center has been supported by both private and public sector grants, and has developed major programmatic initiatives in the former Soviet Union, The Peoples’ Republic of China, and Mexico. This brief overview of the Center’s work is amplified in five published reports on its major initiatives. A listing of the Center’s Advisory Board Members and resumes of the key staff members are all available upon request.
National Veterans Training Institute
The Institute provides a series of training courses to further develop and enhance the professional skills of the Job Service’s national network of veterans employment and training representatives who deliver services to America’s veterans. The NVTI’s Resource Center provides materials and information to trainees and other service providers on topics supporting their professional efforts. The Institute is operated as a joint effort of the University of Colorado at Denver and the U.S. Department of Labor’s Veterans Employment and Training Service.
Fourth World Center for the Study of Indigenous Law and Politics
This Center provides a research clearinghouse to students and faculty at CU-Denver on legal and political issues that affect indigenous peoples (the 4th World). In addition to supporting a modest library of rare books and periodicals on indigenous issues, the Center also stocks video and audio cassettes on subjects of indigenous politics, and a substantial newsfile archive on current developments in the Fourth World. Currently, the Center is expanding the number of course offerings in the area of Fourth World studies.
Region VIII Resource Access Project
Under a contract funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Resource Access Project provides training, technical assistance, and resources to Head Start programs throughout a six-state region. This project’s focus is children with disabilities.
TUITION AND FEES
All tuition and fee charges are established by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually (usually in the spring) by the Colorado General Assembly. The Regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee


Tuition and Fees /II
rates at any time. A tuition schedule is published prior to registration for each term, and students should contact the Records Office for further information on the tuition and fee charges for a particular term.
Payment of Tuition and Fees
All tuition and fees (except the application fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, according to guidelines in the current Schedule of Courses. Students who register for 7 or more credit hours may arrange at the time of registration to defer payment of part of the charges. Specific information on deferred payment is included in the Schedule of Courses published before each semester or summer session. Students who fail to complete payment by the published deadlines, or who fail to file the required promissory note, will be assessed a $50 penalty.
Students who register in a non-degree status, and who later change to a degree status for that term, are responsible for the difference in tuition between the non-degree program and their applicable degree program and will be billed accordingly.
Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even though they may drop out of school. Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Courses. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, to be issued transcripts, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after graduation.
Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation. Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable to the bank will be assessed an additional service charge. Students may pay tuition and fees by credit card.
The following rates are for the 1993-94 academic year and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating cost.
1993-94 Tuition
(LISTED FOR PLANNING PURPOSES ONLY)
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES and non-degree students without an undergraduate degree
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $104 $ 504
2 208 1,008
3 312 1,512
4 416 2,016
5 520 2,520
6 624 3,024
7 728 4,202
8 832 4,202
9-15 870 4,202
each credit hour over 15 104 504
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS IN THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 121 $ 525
2 242 1,050
3 363 1,575
4 484 2,100
5 605 2,625
6 726 3,150
7 847 4,373
8 968 4,373
9-15 1,012 4,373
each credit hour over 15 121 525
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the College of Liberal Arts anaSciences
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 158 $ 560
2 316 1,120
3 474 1,680
4 632 2,240
5 790 2,800
6 948 3,360
7 1,106 4,667
8 1,264 4,667
9-15 1,318 4,667
each credit hour over 15 158 560
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with programs in the New College of Architecture and Planning ana NON-DEGREE graduate students and non-Denver campus programs*
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 169 $ 596
2 338 1,192
3 507 1,788
4 676 2,384
5 845 2,980
6 1,014 3,576
7 1,183 4,968
8 1,352 4,968
9-15 1,406 4,968
each credit hour over 15 169 596
*Non-degree students who have previously earned a baccalaureate degree are classified as graduate students and assessed graduate tuition regardless of the level of the class(es) they are taking.
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the Graduate School of Business Administration
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 198 $ 607
2 396 1,214
3 594 1,821
4 792 2,428
5 990 3,035
6 1,188 3,642
7 1,386 5,061
8 1,584 5,061
9-15 1,652 5,061
each credit
hour over 15 198 607
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: with
programs in and the Grai the College of Engineering
duate School of Public
Affairs
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 186 $ 596
2 372 1,192
3 558 1,788
4 744 2,384
5 930 2,980
6 1,116 3,576
7 1,302 4,968
8 1,488 4,968
9-15 1,553 4,968
each credit
hour over 15 186 596


12 / General Information
GRADUATE DEGREE STUDENTS: in the School of Education
Credit Hrs. Resident Non-resident
0-1 $ 174 $ 596
2 348 1,192
3 522 1,788
4 696 2,384
5 870 2,980
6 1,044 3,576
7 1,218 4,968
8 1,392 4,968
9-15 1,553 4,968
each credit hour over 15 174 596
Graduate degree students who are registered as “candidate for degree” will be assessed the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour plus the Student Information System Fee.
THE BOARD OF REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE TUITION AND FEES AT ANY TIME.
Fees'
1. Student Activity Fee (required of all students):
Each term................... $53.00
This fee supports the activities of the student government, campus legal services, recreational activities, student health services, the student newspaper, Counseling and Testing Center, and various student organizations. The fee is approved by student referendum and is required of all students at the University of Colorado at Denver. (The fee includes a Student Health fee.)
2. Auraria Bond Retirement Fee (required
of all students):
Each term.....................$39.50
3. Student Information System Fee (a non-refundable fee required of all students each term):..............$5.00
4. Matriculation Fee (mandatory for the first term for all new students): $25.00 This is a non-refundable fee charged at the student's first registration to cover costs of generating transcripts.
5. Information Technology Fee: .... $10.00 The Information Technology Fee provides for capital acquisition of new and/or upgraded systems to support student computing laboratories, including networks and networking infrastructure and facilities directly accessible by students each term.
6. Doctoral dissertation fee (mandatory for all students certified by The Graduate School for enrollment for doctoral
‘Subject to change.
dissertation). Students should contact The Graduate School for guidelines established for charges for enrollment.
7. Comprehensive examination fee: Any student in The Graduate School, the Graduate School of Business Administration, or Graduate School of Public Affairs must be enrolled during the term in which the Comprehensive Examination for a master’s degree is completed. Students who are not taking regular courses during that term must enroll as “Candidate for Degree.” Students enrolled only as “Candidate for Degree" pay the corresponding resident tuition for one credit hour, plus the SIS fee and the Information Technology Fee (for one term only). The charge varies by the school in which the student is matriculated.
8. Laboratory breakage fee (mandatory for students enrolled in a chemistry laboratory course):
Breakage deposit ..............$20.00
An $8 deduction is assessed for expendable items. After accounting for breakage, the unused portion is returned at the end of the semester.
9. Music, Theater, and Fine Arts Fees:
• Music facilities fee: All accepted music majors must pay a $30 Music Facilities Fee each semester. Courses requiring this fee for non-majors are designated in the Schedule of Courses.
• Engineering Studio Fees: Courses which use the recording studios require a $7.00 fee. These courses are designated in the Schedule of Courses.
• Theater Studio Fee: All stagecraft and design courses require a $15 lab fee as indicated in the Schedule of Courses.
• Theater Ticket Fee: Theater courses which require attendance at off-campus theater performances require a $ 15 ticket fee.
• Fine Arts Studio Fee: All courses taught in painting and drawing studios require a $5.00 fee as designated in the Schedule of Courses.
• Fine Arts Lab Fee: All courses requiring use of the photo lab require a $45 fee.
• Fine Arts Sculpture Lab Fee: All courses taught in the sculpture lab (including casting) require $40 lab fee as designated in the Schedule of Courses.
• Fine Arts Art History/Slide Library Fee: For designated courses which require use of the slide library, there is a $2 fee.
10. Architecture and Planning facilities fees:
• Studio courses fee is $40.
• Computer courses fee is $30.
• Photography/furniture design courses which require the use of the photographic lab or the model shop, there is a fee of $45.
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
Tuition classification is governed by CRS 23-7-101, et. seq. (1973) as amended.1 Institutions of higher education are bound by the provisions of this statute and are not free to make exceptions to the rules set forth.
The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a legal domiciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classification is being sought. Persons over 22 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 22 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court-appointed legal guardian. An unemancipated minor’s parent must, therefore, have a legal domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes.
Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one’s true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colorado domicile on the person seeking to establish the domicile. The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connections with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado, for tuition purposes, begins the day after connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evidence one’s intent. The most common ties with the state are (1) change of driver’s license to Colorado; (2) change of automobile registration to Colorado; (3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado; (5) and most important, payment of state income taxes as a resident by one whose income is sufficient to be taxed. Caution: payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroactive to the time filed.
'A copy of the Colorado Revised Statutes (1973), as amended, is available in the University of Colorado at Denver Admissions Office.


Financial Aid /13
In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term, the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question. If one’s 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, in-state tuition cannot be granted until the next semester.
Once the student’s tuition classification is established, it remains unchanged unless satisfactory information to the contrary is presented. A student who, due to subsequent events, becomes eligible for a change in classification from resident to nonresident or vice versa must inform the Tuition Classification Officer within 15 days after such a change occurs. An adult student or emancipated minor who moves outside of Colorado must send written notification to the Tuition Classification Officer within 15 days of the change.
Once a student is classified as non-resident for tuition purposes, the student must petition for a change in classification. Petitions must be submitted NO LATER THAN THE FIRST DAY OF CLASSES of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a non-resident. It is preferred that petitions be received 30 days prior to the beginning of the term. Late petitions will not be considered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions.
The final decision regarding tuition status rests with the University. Questions regarding residence (tuition) status should be referred only to the Tuition Classification Officer. Opinions of other persons are not official or binding upon the University. Additional information (including the entire text ofCRS23-7-101) is available in the brochure, Classification of Students for Tuition Purposes, which may be obtained from the Admissions Office.
Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel
The Colorado Legislature approved resident tuition beginning with the Fall 1986 semester for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. ELIGIBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM. Students obtain a completed verification form from the base education officer, and submit the form with their military ID to the Records Office after they have registered, but before the end of the drop/add period. At the time the verification form is certified in the Records Office, the student’s bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate. Students who have been certified remain
classified as non-residents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Colorado.
Tuition Appeals
Exceptions to financial obligations incurred may be granted by the Tuition Appeals Committee. The Committee will only consider appeals when a student has been medically disabled, has experienced a death in the family, or has a change in employment hours or location beyond the student’s control. Documentation of these conditions will be required. Exceptions will not be considered for a student’s failure to comply with published deadlines, or changes in employment under the student’s control.
Please note: tuition appeals must be filed within four months of the end of the term for which the appeal is filed.
NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION
An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, prior to the first day of classes. The orientation program conducted by the Office of Student Life provides information to new students about some of the activities and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process and degree requirements also is provided. Academic orientation advising sessions are held during the term, before registration for the next term. Dates and times of new student orientations are published in the Schedule of Courses.
FINANCIAL AID
Director: Ellie Miller Office: NC 1030 Telephone: 556-2886
The Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment offers over $20 million in financial aid awards to qualified students each year. If the student’s financial aid application materials are received before the April 1,1994 priority date, then the student is considered for a package of need-based grant, work-study (part-time employment) and/or long-term loan funds. If the financial aid application materials are received after the 4/1/94 priority date, then the student is usually considered only for Federal Pell Grant and for outside student loans (Federal Stafford Loan, or Federal Parents Loan).
Applicants for Colorado Graduate Fellowship, Colorado Deans Scholars award, and Colorado Regents Scholars award are subject to different deadlines and are reviewed by other CU-Denver departments (the Graduate School, undergraduate deans’ offices, and the Office of Admissions, respectively). All other applicants for financial aid are notified of their award status in writing by the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
Eligibility
Each student must qualify for CU-Denver financial aid as follows:
1. Be a U.S. citizen or be admitted to the U.S. by the INS on a permanent basis.
2. Be classified as a degree-seeking student by the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. Teacher certification students are eligible to apply for financial aid and are considered as undergraduate students according to federal guidelines.
3. Be enrolled for a minimum number of credits as specified on the financial aid award letter and/or student loan planning letter.
4. Maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined for the financial aid programs.
5. Apply for financial aid by submitting all of the required documentation. The need analysis form is required for all programs except the Colorado Graduate Fellowship, Colorado Scholars award, Colorado Deans Scholars award, Colorado Regents Scholars award, and the Emergency Student Loan Program.
6. Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes for the following programs: Colorado Student Grant, Colorado Student Incentive Grant, Colorado Graduate Grant, Colorado Work-Study, Colorado Regents Scholars award, Colorado Deans Scholars award, and Colorado Scholars award.
7. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant.
8. Be registered for the draft or be enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selective Service.
Application
Each applicant must complete the financial aid application materials for submission to the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. Complete information must be available to the office before eligibility can be determined.
Limited Funds-The majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis to eligible


14 / General Information
students who document significant financial need and who complete their application materials in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment by the 4/1/94 priority date. Application completion is defined as having all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) into the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. General financial aid is awarded to needy students who meet the priority date until all of the funds are committed for the year. If the file is completed after 4/1/94, then awards will probably be limited to Federal Pell Grant (for needy first undergraduate students only) and /or outside student loans (Federal Stafford Loan or Federal Parents Loan). Application for financial aid must be made each year; application materials are available in January of each year.
It is the student’s responsibility to be sure application materials are complete. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for application forms and complete details. All financial aid application procedures are subject to change due to revisions in federal and state laws, regulations, and guidelines.
Qualification
Financial Need-Most financial aid awards are based on the concept of financial need. Financial need is calculated as: cost of attendance (tuition, fees, books, living expenses) minus family contribution (student/spouse contribution and parents’ contribution for dependent students).
The cost of attendance is the estimated cost to attend CU-Denver, including tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment determines standard budgets based upon average tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.
For 1993-94, the following budgets were used for room and board, transportation, and personal expenses: $430 for students living at home with parents; $880 for students not living with parents. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student were approximately $1,000 per semester and non-resident tuition and fees were approximately $4,300 per semester. These amounts will probably increase by approximately 5% for the 1994-95 school year.
Independent Student-The federal government provides specific guidelines that define a self-supporting student for
financial aid purposes. If a student is classified as self-supporting, then the student’s parental information is not considered when the calculation of family contribution is made. For 1994-95, a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old (born before 1/1/71) or one who meets one of the following conditions:
1. Graduate student
2. Married student
3. Student with legal dependents other
than a spouse
4. Veteran of the U.S. armed forces
5. Orphan or ward of the court
These conditions may be appealed
to the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment if unusual circumstances exist. Contact the office for appeal guidelines.
If the student/spouse contribution plus the parents’ contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance, then you will not qualify for need-based financial aid.
The contributions from the student/ spouse and from the parents are calculated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income, savings and other assets, family size, number of children in postsecondary school, and other factors. Students may appeal for special consideration if they are experiencing unusual circumstances. Financial aid is intended to supplement and not replace financial contributions from the student and parents.
Course Loads-General financial aid undergraduate recipients usually must enroll for at least 12 credits per semester, and graduate students usually must enroll for at least 5 credits per semester. Federal Pell Grant and outside student loan recipients must carry at least a half-time credit load (6 hours for undergraduates per semester and 3 hours for graduates per semester). Minimum course loads for the summer session are pro-rated. For deferment of student loans, please refer to the Schedule of Courses each term for specific information. Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please check award letter and/or student loan planning letter for the exact number of credits required).
Satisfactory Academic Progress -CU-Denver students must make satisfactory academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment in order to be eligible and remain eligible for financial aid. Students should review the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for Financial Aid, available in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
Non-Degree Students-Non-degree students are eligible to be considered only for the Advantage Scholarship Program. Please refer to separate brochure for application procedures. Teacher certification students may apply for financial aid and are considered as undergraduate students for financial aid purposes.
Residency Status-A student is required to be a resident of Colorado for a full year before the Office of Admissions can consider classification as a resident for tuition purposes. Non-resident students are encouraged to obtain additional information from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident status. As a resident, a student is eligible for the State of Colorado financial aid programs, and tuition is significantly less than for nonresident.
Refunds and Repayments-Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal or reclassification of tuition status must be applied to the recipient’s financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Students may also be expected to repay a portion of their financial aid awards if they withdraw from CU-Denver.
Appeals-Students may appeal all decisions of the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment by completing a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office. Appeals are considered within three weeks and a written response is mailed to the student.
Reapply Each Year-Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each year. Application materials for the next summer term are available beginning January 1st.
Award
Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 8-12 weeks after all application materials have been received in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment. If awarded, an award letter is mailed to the student; it includes the types and amounts of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours required each term. A student loan planning letter is mailed to the student after the outside student loan application^) have been processed.
Types of Aid
The following aid programs are funded by the federal government:
1. Federal Pell Grant-Eligibility for the
Federal Pell Grant is determined before
any other aid is awarded. Awards are


Registration /15
defined by a strict need-based formula provided by the federal government, and award amounts vary depending upon amount of financial need, enrollment status, residency status, and whether the student is living with parents. Students are eligible for Federal Pell Grant consideration if they have not received their first baccalaureate degree by 6/1/94.
2. Outside Student Loans-Eligibility for all other types of assistance should be determined prior to applying for outside student loans. The Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan program requires that students show financial need in order to qualify. Most single students who are working full-time do not document sufficient financial need to qualify for the subsidized program. Interest on the subsidized loan is paid for the student by the federal government as long as the student remains enrolled at least half-time and for a six-month grade period after dropping below half-time enrollment. The Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loan program does not require that you document financial need. Eligibility is calculated as the cost of attendance minus other financial aid awarded. Interest is not paid by the federal government for the unsubsidized program and the student may elect to pay the interest currently or to allow the interest to be added to the total loan amount. Interest rates for the Federal Stafford Loan programs vary between 6-8%, depending on when the student first borrowed a Federal Stafford Loan. Parents of dependent students are eligible to borrow under the Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students program (PLUS). The PLUS program is unsubsidized, and interest payments become the responsibility of the borrower at the time of disbursement.
The interest rate varies on the PLUS program, depending upon the current Treasury bill rates, and the interest rate is capped at 10%.
3. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)-This is a need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a baccalaureate degree.
4. Federal Perkins Loan -This need-based loan program, with an interest rate currently at 5%, is based at CU-Denver. No repayment of interest or principal is due until six or nine months (time period differs depending upon when student first received Perkins Loan) after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time.
5. Federal College Work-Study-Work-study is a need-based program that allows students to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at non-profit agencies to help meet their educational costs.
The State of Colorado funds the following programs:
1. Colorado Student Grant-A need-based grant for resident undergraduate students.
2. Colorado Student Incentive Grant-A need-based grant for resident undergraduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor’s degree. This grant is funded 50% by the federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado.
3. Colorado Graduate Grant-A need-based grant for resident graduate students.
4. Colorado Work-Study-A program similar to the College Work-Study program but limited to resident undergraduate students.
Scholarships
Following is a list of the major scholarships that are offered at CU-Denver. The first listing is for awards funded by the State of Colorado:
1. Regents Scholars award is offered to qualified new freshmen and transfer students by the Office of Admissions. New students will automatically be considered for this program.
2. Colorado Scholars award is for undergraduate resident students who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least 3.2 for at least 12 CU hours. The deadline for applying is April 1,1994. Contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for application procedures.
3. Deans Scholars award is awarded by undergraduate deans’ offices. Contact appropriate dean’s office for more information.
The following programs are funded by CU-Denver:
1 .Advantage Scholarship is for minority and/or first generation college students who meet the specified income guidelines. Contact the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment for applications.
2. Nelson/Running Wolf Scholarship funds are available for needy American Indian students. Contact the Office of American Indian Student Services (556-2860) for more information.
3. Ahlin Fund assistance is available for mobility-impaired students. Contact the Center for Student Counseling (556-2815) for applications.
Other scholarship information is available from the Office of Financial Aid/ Student Employment, the Auraria Library Scholarship InfoBank in the reference section, and the Center for Student Counseling.
Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment opportunities are listed in the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment, the Career Resource Center, and the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education. Students who participate in CMEA/MESA, the Pre-Collegiate Development Program, the Minority Scholars Program, or those who apply for Advantage Scholarships are automatically considered for Challenge Scholarships. Graduate students should inquire about additional types of financial aid through their academic departments. Students should be aware that Emergency Student Loans are available through the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment as well as the Office of Emergency Student Loans. American Indian students should request information about Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships from the Office of Financial Aid/Student Employment.
REGISTRATION
Students should review the sections of this catalog that describe in detail the academic programs available at CU-Denver.
Undergraduate students who need assistance in planning an academic program or in selecting courses should contact the academic unit in which they are enrolled to arrange for an advising appointment prior to registration. Graduate students should contact their respective graduate program for assistance.
Courses available during a particular semester are listed in the Schedule of Courses, which is published every semester prior to registration. The Schedule of Courses is available from the Office of Records and Registration.
CU-Denver students can register for courses through the Voice Registration Response (VRR) system from any touch-tone telephone. Specific instructions are published in the Schedule of Courses. Registration is by time assignment only, and students may register at or after their assigned time. Grades may also be obtained through the Telephone Registration Response (VRR) system approximately two weeks after the end of the term.
The following policies for add/drop, pass/fail registration, and withdrawal from


16 / General Information
PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS
College General 16 Hours Maximum Transfer Students
Business and Administration Only non-business electives may be taken pass/fail Only 6 semester hours may be taken pass/fail Only 6 semester hours may be taken pass/fail
Engineering and Applied Science Required courses may not be taken pass/fail. Upper division humanities and social sciences electives are acceptable; otherwise, major department approval is required Includes courses taken in the honors program
Liberal Arts and Sciences May be restricted in certain majors; not included in 30 hours of C or better work required for major. No more than 6 hours P/F any semester Does not include courses taken in honors, physical education, cooperative education, and certain teacher certification courses; also does not include ENGL 1000 Proficiency Test or MATH 1000 Test College requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of courses with letter grades
the University have been standardized for all academic units of the University.
Add/Drop
Specific add/drop deadlines are announced in each semester’s Schedule of Courses.
1. Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 12 (8 in the summer) days of full-term classes, provided there is space available. Instructor approval may be required after the first day/week of classes.
2. Students may drop courses without approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (the first eight days of the summer session). Tuition will not be charged for the courses which are dropped as long as the student is not withdrawing. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student’s permanent record.
3. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer session), the instructor’s signature is required, and the instructor must indicate whether the student is passing or failing. If the student is passing, the
course will appear on the student’s permanent record with the grade of W. If the student is failing, the course will appear on the permanent record with the grade of F.
4. After the tenth week of the fall and spring semesters (the eighth week for summer session) any adjustments to your schedule require a petition and special approval from the dean’s office.
5. Dropping all courses requires an official withdrawal for the term from the University.
Deadlines for module courses and intensive courses are published in the Schedule of Courses each term.
Auditing Courses
To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the University or have outstanding financial obligations to the University. The Records Office does not
keep any record of courses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where special equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor. An auditor’s card is issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor when requesting permission to attend a class.
Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges, and are not eligible for other student services.
Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) may audit classes at no charge. Contact the Division of Enrollment and Student Affairs at 556-8427,1250 14th Street, Suite 130.
Course Load/Restrictions
Students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer session) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. Students should petition their academic dean.
No more than 15 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a fall or spring semester can be applied toward a graduate degree.
No more than 10 semester hours taken by a graduate student during a given summer session can be applied to a graduate degree.
Credit/No Credit
Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college. File the no-credit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop/add period. Students who register for a course on a no-credit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade. Students may not register again for a course which has already been taken on a no-credit basis.
Definition of Full-Time and Half-Time Status
Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in the student’s financial aid award letter.


Registration /17
Fall and Spring:
Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students:
Full-time .... 12 or more semester hours Half-time......6 or more semester hours
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
5 or more hours
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
3 or more hours
Summer (10 week-term):
Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students:
Full-time......8 or more semester hours
Half-time......4 or more semester hours
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
3 or more hours
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
2 or more hours
3 or more hours of mixed-level classes
Enrollment status for a term cannot be certified until the end of the drop/add period.
These hours do not include interinstitu-tional hours from CCD or hours at MSCD, nor do they include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration. CCD courses are not considered for full- or half-time status.
Students receiving veterans’ benefits must contact the Veterans Affairs coordinator for definition of full-time status for summer sessions.
Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are considered for financial aid purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid.
Pass/Fail Procedure
1. Students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis must do so during the drop/add period. Changes to or from a pass/fail basis may be made only during the regular drop/add period.
2. Up to 16 semester hours of regular course work may be taken on a pass/ fail basis and credited toward the
bachelor’s degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass/fail in any given semester. [Note: Individual schools and colleges may have additional restrictions as to pass/fail credits. See chart on page 16 for additional information.]
3. Academic deans and faculty will not be informed of pass/fail registration. All students who register for a pass/fail appear on the regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office, those registrations with a pass/fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D and above convert to grades of P. Courses taken pass/fail will be included in hours toward graduation. Pass grades are not included in a student’s grade-point average. An F grade in a course taken pass/fail will be included in the grade-point average.
4. The record of pass/fail registration is maintained by the Records Office.
5. Exceptions to the pass/fail regulations are permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education, the Division of Extended Studies, and Study Abroad Programs.
6. Graduate degree students can exercise the P/Foption for undergraduate courses only. A grade of P will not
be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement.
7. Students who register for a course on a pass/fail basis may not later decide to receive a letter grade. Each school and college limits the hours and courses for which students may register on a pass/fail basis.
Please note: many other institutions will not accept a “P" grade for transfer credit.
SHORT TERM COURSES
Courses are also offered in five-week modules, in special weekend courses, and in seminars. Topics in Science modular courses are self-contained units designed to cover specific problems or issues in science. Students should contact the col-lege/school office for information on short-term courses offered each semester.
Other Registrations
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of Colorado campuses concurrently must contact their school or college on their home campus.
Concurrent registration is available only during fall and spring semesters.
A degree student registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if:
1. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean.
2. The course is a required course for the student’s degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver.
3. The student obtains approval from the academic dean.
4. There is space available at the other (host) campus.
5. The student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CU-Denver rates.
6. The home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes.
7. The concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses. Students may not register for an independent study course through concurrent registration. Students may not take courses pass/fail or for no credit through concurrent registration.
To drop a concurrent course during the host campus drop/add period, arrange the drop at the home campus Records Office. To drop a concurrent course after the end of the host campus drop/add deadline, drop the course at the host campus Records Office.
INTERINSTITUTIONAL
REGISTRATION
CU-Denver degree students may enroll in courses offered by the Community College of Denver, Front Range Community College, and Red Rocks Community College. Students must be enrolled at CU-Den-ver for at least one course during the semester or summer session to be eligible to register interinstitutionally. Registration is on a space available basis. Interin-stitutional courses are evaluated for transfer credit and are not included in a CU-Denver student’s grade-point average.
POOLED COURSES AT METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER
Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with similar courses at Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD). CU-Denver undergraduate students may register for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU-Denver Schedule of Courses. Listed below are restrictions that apply to the pooled courses:


io / uerierai information
1. CU-Denver graduate students are not eligible to register for MSCD pooled courses.
2. MSCD courses will not be included in the University of Colorado grade-point average. MSCD courses will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will count in the hours toward graduation.
3. MSCD courses cannot be used to meet specific course requirements toward the major without prior approval of the student’s dean. The last 30 semester hours applied toward the baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence at CU-Denver. MSCD pooled courses will not satisfy this residence requirement.
Withdrawal from the University
To withdraw from the University, students must obtain approval from their academic dean’s office, the Bursar’s Office, and the Records Office. The withdrawal date is recorded on the student’s permanent record. If the withdrawal date is during the first 12 days of the semester (8 days for the summer session), the courses will not appear on the student’s permanent record. If the withdrawal date is after the 12th day, the courses will appear with Wgrades. Students may not withdraw after the 10th week of the semester (7th week of the summer session) except under documented circumstances clearly beyond their control.
Students who are receiving veteran’s benefits or financial aid also must obtain the required signature of those respective offices. International students must obtain clearance from the Office of International Education.
A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receive grades of F for all course work enrolled for during that term, and be liable for all tuition and fees.
To withdraw from the University, graduate students must apply to the dean of their Graduate Program for permission to withdraw in good standing. Students who withdraw without communicating with the dean and without filing the appropriate Withdrawal Form will be marked as having failed their courses for the term.
Deadlines for module courses and intensive courses, as well as specific requirements and tuition adjustment, appear in the Schedule of Courses published prior to the beginning of each term.
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed: Freshman 0-29 hours
Sophomore 30-59 hours
Junior 60-89 hours
Senior 90+ hours
All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado.
Grading System and Policies
The following grading system and policies have been standardized for all academic units of the University.
GRADE SYMBOLS
The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol (A, B, C, D, F, IF, IW, or IF) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC, W, and ***) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, explained under Pass/Fail Procedure.
A -superior/excellent-4 credit points per credit hour
B-good/better than average-3 credit points per credit hour
C-competent/average-2 credit points per hour
D-minimum passing-1 credit point per credit hour
F-Failing-no credit points per credit hour
Beginning with the Spring 1984 semester, the University approved the use of a PLUS/MINUS grading system, where a B+ corresponds to 3.3 credit points per credit hour, and a B- corresponds to 2.7 credit points per credit hour. Instructors may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS system, but are not required to do so.
IF-incomplete- becomes anFif not completed within one year IW—incomplete-regarded as Wi( not completed within one year IP-in progress-thesis at the graduate level only
P/F-pass/fail-P grade is not included in the grade-point average; the F grade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor’s degree H/P/F-honors/pass/fail- intended for honors courses; credit hours count
toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average
AC-indicates registration on a nocredit basis
^-indicates withdrawal without credit
* * ’-indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed.
An incomplete grade is only awarded when special circumstances prevent a student’s completing a course during the term. Students have one year to complete an incomplete. After one year, an IW is regarded as a DROP-PASSING; an IF is a FAILING grade. Students should not reregister for courses in which they have received incompletes.
Most schools and colleges require a contract between the instructor and student outlining the work necessary to complete the incomplete.
GRADE-POINT AVERAGE
The grade-point average is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course, totaling the hours and the credit points, and dividing the total points by the total hours.
Grades ofP, NC, ***, W, IP, IW, and IF are not included in the grade-point average.
If an IF grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as failed and a grade of Fis automatically calculated in the grade-point average at the end of the one-year grace period.
If an IW grade has not been completed within one year, the course is regarded as dropped.
If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point average. The University of Colorado grade-point average does not include courses taken at other institutions.
The grade-point average of graduate students includes only courses, credit hours, and credit points accumulated while enrolled in a Graduate School Program.
The grade-point average appears on official transcripts issued from the Records Office.
Students should consult with the deem of their college or school for explanation of any exceptions made to the University uniform grade-point average.
Undergraduates and non-degree students must maintain a 2.0 grade-point average to remain in good standing. Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 GPA to remain in good standing. Students whose GPA falls below the 2.0/3.0 level are subject to probation or suspension. Such


Academic Policies /19
students will be notified by their school or college.
Mid-Term Grades
Instructors will assign mid-term grades for certain populations of students. Students who may be in academic difficulty may be contacted and counseled about support services available to them. Please note: academic support services are available to all students through the Center for Educational Opportunity Programs,
NC 2012,556-2065, or the Student Advocacy Center, NC 2204,556-2546.
Originality of Work
In all academic areas it is imperative that either work be original, or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons’ ideas or language. Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the University.
Graduation
Undergraduates. Students who have completed 80 or more semester hours should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or college to determine what requirements remain for graduation. Students intending to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their graduation term. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated. After students have been certified to graduate they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Graduates. Students must file an Application for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with The Graduate School on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term. Check with The Graduate School for more complete information. Students will not be finally certified to graduate until final grades have been evaluated. After students have been certified to graduate, they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Commencement. Letters will be mailed in early April to students eligible to participate in the spring commencement. Information will be provided about ordering special display diplomas, being fitted for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree recorded.
Students graduating at the end of the summer session or the end of the fall semester may participate in the following spring commencement. Beginning with the 1994 commencement exercise, individual undergraduate names will not be read.
Transcripts
Transcripts of academic record at the University of Colorado (all campuses) may be ordered in person or by mail from the University of Colorado at Denver, Transcript Office, Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364. Official transcripts will not be available until approximately three weeks after final examinations. A transcript on which a degree is to be recorded will not be available until approximately eight weeks after final examinations. Requests should include the following:
1. Student’s full name (include given or other name if applicable).
2. Student number.
3. Birthdate.
4. The last term and campus the student attended.
5. Whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordered near the end of a term.
6. Whether the request should be held until a degree is recorded.
7. Agency, college, or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included. Transcripts sent to students are labeled “issued to student.”
8. Student’s signature. (This is the student’s authorization to release the records to the designee.)
There is no charge for individual official transcripts. Transcripts are prepared only at the student’s request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Official transcripts require five to seven working days to be generated. Unofficial copies of transcripts sent to CU-Denver from other institutions can be requested at the Records Office. Official transcripts should be requested directly from the issuing institution. Unofficial CU transcripts are available to students in the CU-Denver Records Office when the request is made 48 hours prior to pickup. Students must present picture ID.
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
Periodically, but not less than annually, the University of Colorado informs students of the Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act, with which the institution intends to comply fully. The Act was designed to protect the privacy of educational records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their educational records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings. Students also have the right to file complaints with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA) concerning alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.
Local policy explains in detail the procedures to be used by the institution for compliance with the provisions of the Act. Copies of the policy can be found in the library on each of the several campuses of the University of Colorado.
The following items of student information have been designated by the University of Colorado as public or directory information: student name, address, telephone number, dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study, awards, honors, degree(s) conferred, past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities, physical factors (height, weight) of athletes. This information may be disclosed by the University for any purpose at its discretion.
Currently enrolled students may withhold disclosure of information under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. To withhold disclosure, written notification must be received in the Records Office on the appropriate campus prior to the end of the drop/add period in the term. Forms requesting the withholding of directory information are available in the Records Office.
The request to withhold disclosure will remain in effect until the student provides written notification to the Records Office. The University of Colorado assumes that when a student fails to request to have directory information withheld, the student is indicating approval for disclosure of information for that term and following terms until otherwise requested.
Questions concerning the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act may be referred to the Records Office, 556-2389.
University of Colorado at Denver Confidentiality of Academic Records
STUDENTS:
DO have the right to view and inspect their educational records (excluding any financial records of their parents).


20 / General Information
DO have the right to have Directory Information withheld from all persons or organizations outside the University.
Directory Information includes:
address, telephone number dates of attendance, registration status, class, major field of study awards, honors, degree(s) conferred past and present participation in officially recognized sports and activities
physical characteristics (height, weight) of athletes
DO NOT have the right to obtain their grades, or other information not considered Directory Information, by telephone.
PARENTS:
DO have the right to obtain the educational records of their child only if they provide a signed statement that their son or daughter is a dependent as defined by the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. The Records Office, in NC 1003,556-2389, has forms available to parents for such requests. Parents are, however, encouraged to obtain final grades with a written approval from the student.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO PERSONNEL:
DO have the right to use educational records of students in the normal exercise of their duties.
DO NOT have the right to use educational records of students for employment purposes, for social organizations, for personal reasons, or for other non-educational interests, without written consent of the student.
PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS OUTSIDE THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO:
DO have the right to obtain the Directory Information listed above, unless the student has made a request for nondisclosure. When the term microfiche or the computer terminal on-line file of the Student Information System indicates PRIVATE, inquirers will be told that no information can be released without the student’s written consent.
PERSONS OR ORGANIZATIONS PROVIDING FINANCIAL AID TO STUDENTS:
DO have the right to educational records of students only as necessary in determining and enforcing terms of financial aid.
PERSONS IN AN EMERGENCY:
DO have the right to obtain confidential academic records necessary to protect the health or safety of students and oth-
ers, but such information will only be released by the Office of the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs, 556-8427.
These regulations are required by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (the Buckley Amendment). For further information, please call the Records Office at 556-2389.
Student records will be released only to the student with current, appropriate identification or upon written authorization of the student whose records are being requested.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES
Alumni Association
The CU-Denver Alumni Association provides programs and services which stimulate interest in, increase support for, and builds life-long commitment to the University of Colorado at Denver among its alumni, students, and the community. Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon graduation. Friends and non-degree former students are also welcome to participate. The governing board is composed of alumni representing all schools and colleges on campus.
Horizons, a newspaper published three times a year, is mailed to all graduates. Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/or activities which might interest them. The Alumni Mack Easton Award, the Alumni Recognition Award, and the Alumni Legislative Award are bestowed each year at commencement and are sponsored by the Association.
A program for alumni use of the campus recreation center is available through the office, 556-2549.
Auraria Book Center
Student Union: Ground level, 556-3230
Hours: M-Th, 8-6; F, 8-5; Sat., 10-3 except vacation and interim periods.
The Auraria Book Center carries academic, technical, reference, and exam preparation books in support of your higher education. Best sellers, new releases, and gift book selections change frequently and are often accompanied by displays of special value books in many subjects. For additional savings on general reading books, join the Auraria Book Club at the Book Information desk. Special orders and out of print searches are available at no charge.
Students: Bring your course printouts to locate textbooks! Subjects are arranged alphabetically; departmental abbreviations, course and section numbers are printed on a shelf tag below each required or optional textbook. When available, used textbooks sell for 75 percent of the new book price. A full refund is given for new and used books accompanied by your receipt and returned within the first three weeks of class for regular semesters and during the first week of class for short terms. Please read the refund policy attached to your receipt.
Macintosh and Dell personal computer systems and a variety of software are offered to Auraria campus students at educational discount prices. A current, validated Auraria ID must be presented at the time of purchase. Rounding out the educational supply/campus life areas are insignia sportswear, gifts and cards, and supplies for school, office, art, and design.
The Convenience Store is located near the main store in the Student Union lower mall, and has extended hours for those wishing to buy snacks, magazines, sundries, and school supplies. Used texts are bought back from students throughout the year, and merchandise refunds and exchanges also are performed here.
Auraria Reprographics offers full-service copying in the Convenience Store, M-Th, 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. and F, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Special papers, color copying, transparencies, reductions and enlargements, lamination and other options may be specified for jobs of all sizes. Worldwide FAX service and shipping of packages by UPS and Federal Express also are available.
A current picture ID is required for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard, VISA, and American Express charges.
Computing, Information and Network Services
Computing, Information and Network Services supports computer and network use for both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. All centralized administrative systems are developed, maintained, and processed by University Management Systems in Boulder, with output processing and user support provided by Computing, Information and Network Services in Denver. Denver campus administrative applications are developed, maintained, and processed by Computing, Information and Network Services. Most academic processing is either done on campus or through one of


Special Programs and Facilities / 21
several networks available through Computing, Information and Network Services.
The Denver campus maintains a number of minicomputer systems including: a Vax 8800, a MicroVax 3100, a DEC Alpha, a SparcStation and DEC Station 5000/240. The Vax 8800 and the MicroVax provide the VMS operating system. The other minicomputers use various versions of the Unix operating systems. A communications network allows access to all campus minicomputers and connection to CARL (Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries) on-line library services. The VMS and UNIX computers are connected to an Ethernet backbone and are nodes on the growing Colorado SuperNet which provides access to other Colorado universities and colleges, as well as the Westnet regional network, Bitnet, and the Internet for national and international communications. There are over 1,800 personal computers located on the campus in twelve teaching laboratories, four public labs, individual laboratories, and in offices.
Computing, Information, and Network Services provides an online campus information service called OASIS (Online Auraria Shared Information System).
OASIS also is a distributed document delivery service which allows novice users to explore, search, and retrieve information residing in different locations worldwide in a seamless fashion. A number of network tools are available to facilitate the task of locating and retrieving information resources, enabling the utilization of text, data, software, and information for public access. OASIS is accessible to all CU-Denver students, staff, and faculty through the University computer system, and also through several user-friendly OASIS computer kiosks located around the campus.
Specific information of interest to students and faculty includes: academic calendars, CINS lab schedules, course availability, faculty evaluations, worldwide access to libraries, networks, the diversity network, and specific subject networks such as PINET-American Institute of Physics, Project Hermes (Supreme Court Decisions), RAPID-ESRC database of Research Abstracts and Products, Social Sciences Data Archive, Hebrew University, and the World Bank socio-econlmic data, as well as other campus information systems throughout the world.
Computing, Information and Network Services staff provide assistance to academic and administrative users on all available computing systems. Advisors and a full-time academic user services
staff assist students and faculty with questions regarding software packages, programming, the use of computer systems, and software availability. Administrative users are assisted with planning, systems design, programming, and day-to-day computing activities by Computing, Information and Network Services user services and operations personnel. The Computing, Information and Network Services staff operates and maintains campus minicomputers, telecommunications equipment, and four of the CU-Denver computing laboratories. These laboratories provide students with access to Macintosh and IBM-type personal computers and software as well as access to the campus network and minicomputers. This staff also maintains personal computers and is available to assist faculty and staff with hardware and software planning, acquisitions, questions, and problems.
The goal of Computing, Information and Network Services is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work. For further information and an informative booklet about computing at CU-Denver, please call 556-2583.
Division of Extended Studies
Extended Studies is a special unit within the University of Colorado at Denver system whose purpose is to provide opportunities for regular students (as well as other students) to access certain classes and to augment their regular academic program.
Extended Studies can be potentially helpful to virtually any student. However, it can be especially helpful when a student is confronted with certain types of problems, such as:
Not formally admitted to the University. When prospective students have not completed or, in some cases, have not even started their process for admission to the University, they can enroll in classes for credit through Extended Studies.
Late registration. Even if a student has been formally admitted to the University, he/she may have missed the registration deadline for a given semester. Extended Studies can assist in registration for credit.
All credits earned through classes in which a student has registered through Extended Studies are shown sis regular classes on the student’s CU-Denver transcript.
In addition to classes offered on campus, Extended Studies will always have
a variety of credit courses which are being offered at various off-campus sites. Generally, these courses will be listed in the regular Schedule of Courses. For an up-to-date listing of all Extended Studies classes, however, you should call the Division of Extended Studies. Students should always check with an advisor as to whether a particular course will meet specific major or minor degree requirements.
Teachers often use off campus Extended Studies credit courses for recertification purposes.
Extended Studies also offers non-credit courses which may augment a student’s personal or professional growth needs.
The Division of Extended Studies is located at the northeast corner of Larimer and 14th streets on the ground floor of the CU-Denver Building. (556-2735)
University of Colorado Foundation, Inc.
The chief goal of the University of Colorado Foundation, Inc. is to advance the University of Colorado’s mission to educate tomorrow’s citizens, to expand knowledge through significant research, and
to serve Colorado through civic-minded commitments.
The University’s academic leadership establishes priorities for private support. Professional fundraisers generate interest and enthusiasm for the University, recruit and organize volunteers, solicit gifts, and assist donors in gift planning.
Established in 1967 as an independent nonprofit corporation, the CU Foundation raises and manages private funds to benefit students and faculty by raising funds for scholarships, enriching academic programs, purchasing equipment, and upgrading facilities. In 1981 the CU Foundation established a Denver campus office.
Office of International Education
The University of Colorado at Denver, through its Office of International Education (OIE), provides a variety of globally-focused programs, educational opportunities, and services for international and domestic students, foreign scholars, faculty, staff, and the greater Denver community.
The Office oversees student study abroad programs, expedites the exchange of students and faculty, hosts foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with


22 / General Information
foreign universities, and advises graduate students and faculty for Fulbright scholarships. OIE functions as a recruiting, retention, and advisory office for international students. The office coordinates many services for international students before and after they have been accepted to CU-Denver, including: new student orientation, visa and INS advice, and help for those international students who need assistance with a variety of questions and difficulties. Additionally, OIE coordinates the International Affairs Program, where students may receive information and preliminary advising concerning CU-Denver’s individually structured major, minor, and certificate programs in International Affairs. OIE seeks to increase community awareness of international issues by sponsoring lectures and programs open to the general public.
The goals of OIE are to raise international awareness on the CU-Denver campus and, in particular, to provide an opportunity for all students to gain the global competency needed in today’s interdependent world.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
Each of the schools and colleges at CU-Denver provides international opportunities for students. (Please see individual school and college descriptions in this catalog.) The International Affairs Program in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences is an interdisciplinary program open to all undergraduates. Students may pursue an individually structured major, minor or certificate in International Affairs, where they are given the maximum opportunity to design their own personalized course of study in cooperation with an International Affairs faculty advisor. See International Affairs under College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in this catalog for further details or contact an advisor in the Office of International Education (OIE).
The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration offer a number of courses in various aspects of international business. These courses can be taken on a selective basis. Alternatively, a set of courses can be taken to achieve an Area of Emphasis in International Business, either in connection with a bachelor’s degree or in connection with an M.B.A. Available courses and requirements for Areas of Emphasis are described in this catalog under the College of Business/Graduate School of Business. For more information, students interested in international business studies should contact an advisor in
the College of Business or the Graduate graduate student fellowships and faculty
School of Business. visiting lectureships at foreign universities.
STUDY ABROAD
OIE provides information and advising for students wishing to make foreign study a part of their college experience. Currently, OIE is working with the colleges and departments of CU-Denver to create and facilitate new study abroad and travel-study opportunities.
Some of the study abroad programs are of the traditional junior year abroad variety in which students are placed directly in foreign universities for an academic year. For students unable to spend an academic year abroad, programs for a single semester or summer are available with various emphases. Special summer programs, e.g., architecture study in Italy or Russian language study in Moscow, are organized with specific departments.
With successful programs already established in Germany, Russia, Mexico, and China, OIE is in the process of coordinating programs in Australia, Canada,
Costa Rica, and France.
Students are enrolled at the University of Colorado at Denver while participating in many of these study abroad programs. The applicability of credit in particular departments and colleges of CU-Denver is up to the individual colleges and departments. A “B” average with the equivalent of two years of college level work in the appropriate language is required for many of the academic year programs. Financial aid can be applied to program costs in most cases.
FOREIGN STUDENT ADVISING AND SUPPORT SERVICES
All foreign students must meet with the Foreign Student Advisor in OIE upon arrival in Denver to have visas and other paperwork reviewed and copied. OIE realizes that the first few months in a new country and a new city are particularly difficult for foreign students. OIE provides a friendly ear and a place to ask questions and express concerns about all kinds of issues including U.S. social customs and other such concerns. OIE also provides an avenue for communicating with other CU-Denver foreign students by sponsoring international student clubs and social activities.
GRADUATE STUDENT AND FACULTY FULBRIGHT INFORMATION
OIE serves as the University clearinghouse for information on the Fulbright
CONFERENCES AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH SERVICES
During the year, OIE sponsors a number of guest lectures, small conferences and special seminars focused on topics of current international interest. Most of these activities are open to the public as well as the CU-Denver community. OIE works closely with West High School, the Denver Public School System magnet school for International Studies. OIE is also an active participant in a number of Denver community international programs and events.
More information about these and other programs is available from the Office of International Education.
Phone: (303) 556-3489
Fax: (303)556-4562
Office: CU-Denver Bldg., Annex
Suite 100
Director: Peter deLeon
Advisor: Joyce Espinosa
Study Abroad Coordinator: TroyPeden
Auraria Student Services
The Auraria Student Services Division offers the following:
1 .Auraria Student Union-556-3185 The Student Union, located at 9th and Lawrence, houses a cafeteria, information desk, Book Center, study lounges, gameroom, ticket service, housing referral service, offices for student government and organizations, convenience store, copy center, exhibit space, locker rentals, lost and found, meeting and conference facilities, and the Mission Bar and Grill.
2. Conference Services-Student Union, Room 210,556-2755
Through the Conference Services office, campus space can be reserved for all non-academic purposes.
3. Disability Services Office-Mi Arts Building, 556-8387
This office provides the following academic support services to students who have physical, learning, or psychi-atric/emotional disabilities:
Taped textbooks
Sign language and oral interpreters
Notetakers
Scribing
Testing accommodation Sale of handicap parking permits Disability-related counseling Advocacy


University Policies / 23
4. Auraria Child Care Center-556-3188 The Auraria Child Care Center serves the child care needs of Auraria Campus students, staff and faculty by providing high quality early childhood education and care programs. The Child Care Center is located on the southwest corner of the campus. Its programs are consistently recognized by the educational community for their high quality early childhood care and education. Develop-mentally appropriate practices for young children guide the educational programs that are provided. Curriculum planning is flexible and based on children’s interests. Experiences are planned in accordance with “Key Experiences” adapted from the High/ Scope Cognitively Oriented Curriculum. Supervising and assistant teachers in the Child Care Centers are all degreed teachers meeting the certification guidelines of the National Academy
of Early Childhood programs.
Children aged 18 months to six years are served at the Auraria Child Care Center. The Center also has a fully accredited kindergarten program.
5. Emmanuel/Library Galleries-556-8337 The Emmanuel and Library Galleries host exhibits of students, faculty and nationally known artists. Stop in for a relaxing break.
6. Information Centers
Students and visitors can find information and directions at the Information Desk in the Student Union, and at the Tivoli Student Union.
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
EEO/AA/Title IX/Americans with Disabilities Act
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to enhancing the diversity of its work force and its student body. Diversity among faculty, staff, administrators, and students is essential to educational excellence and to accomplishing CU-Denver’s mission. Just as diversity in academic programs and scholarly perspectives enriches the University, so too does diversity among faculty, staff, administrators, and students. Diversity among faculty, staff, and administrators provides role models and mentors for students, who will become future leaders in academe and in the larger society, and ensures that a broad array of experiences and world views will inform and shape teaching, research, service, and decision making at CU-Denver.
As the only public university serving the Denver metropolitan area, CU-Denver recognizes, acknowledges, and accepts its central role in education to take explicit affirmative action to employ, retain, and advance in employment qualified applicants and employees, and to admit, retain, and advance qualified applicants and students regardless of their race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, or veteran status.
Alternative formats of this statement are available upon request.
CU-Denver has adopted an affirmative action plan to implement these commitments. For information, contact the Office of Affirmative Action, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 700,556-2509.
Program Access for Persons with Disabilities
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing reasonable accommodation and access to programs and services to persons with disabilities. Any person requiring accommodation in order to access programs and services, either on or off the campus, should request accommodation from the individual or office responsible for providing the program or service. This request should be made in a timely fashion to allow the individual or office adequate opportunity to provide reasonable accommodation. The time frame for notification will vary according to the circumstances and the nature of the accommodation. For further information or for assistance in obtaining reasonable accommodation, contact the Ombuds Officer, CU-Denver Building,
Suite 700,556-4493, TDD 556-6204.
Ombuds Office
The Ombuds Office helps to enhance the clarity and dissemination of information, to simplify decision making and communication, to assist with the process of change and with adjustment to change, and to improve understanding among staff, students, faculty, and administrators.
The Ombuds Office provides information about programs, policies, services, and procedures affecting members of the University community; makes referrals to appropriate state, CU system, and CU-Denver resources; serves as consultant in the preparation and review of policies and procedures; and assists in the solution of problems and the resolution of disputes.
Ombuds Office services are informed, impartial, confidential, and independent
of administrative authorities. These services do not replace or circumvent existing channels, but help them work more effectively. For further information or assistance, contact the Ombuds Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 700,556-4493.
University Policy Regarding A Drug-Free Workplace
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing a drug-free workplace and environment. The University prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of any controlled substance in the workplace. Those individuals who are found to be in violation are engaged in serious misconduct and subject to disciplinary action consistent with the Faculty Handbook (1988), the applicable rules of the State Personnel System, the University’s Unclassified Staff Handbook, and the Student’s Discipline and Review Procedures.
Academic Honor Code and Discipline Policies
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
A university’s reputation is built on a standing tradition of excellence and scholastic integrity. As members of the University of Colorado at Denver academic community, faculty and students accept the responsibility to maintain the highest standards of intellectual honesty and ethical conduct in completing all forms of academic work at the University.
FORMS OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
Students are expected to know, understand, and comply with the ethical standards of the University. In addition, students have an obligation to inform the appropriate official of any acts of academic dishonesty by other students of the University. Academic dishonesty is defined as a student’s use of unauthorized assistance with intent to deceive ari instructor or other such person who may be assigned to evaluate the student’s work in meeting course and degree requirements. Examples of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to the following:
A. Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the use of another person’s distinctive ideas or words without acknowledgement. The incorporation of another person’s work into one’s own


24 / General Information
requires appropriate identification and acknowledgement, regardless of the means of appropriation. The following are considered to be forms of plagiarism when the source is not noted:
1. Word-for-word copying of another person’s ideas or words
2. The mosaic (the interspersing of one’s own words here and there while, in essence, copying another’s work)
3. The paraphrase (the rewriting of another’s work, yet still using their fundamental idea or theory)
4. Fabrication (inventing or counterfeiting sources)
5. Submission of another’s work as one’s own
6. Neglecting quotation marks on material that is otherwise acknowledged.
Acknowledgement is not necessary when the material used is common knowledge.
B. Cheating
Cheating involves the possession, communication, or use of information, materials, notes, study adds, or other devices not authorized by the instructor in any academic exercise, or communication with another person during such an exercise. Examples of cheating are:
1. Copying from another’s paper or receiving unauthorized assistance from another during an academic exercise or in the submission of academic material
2. Using a calculator when its use has been disallowed
3. Collaborating with another student or students during an academic exercise without the consent of the instructor
C. Fabrication and Falsification
Fabrication involves inventing or counterfeiting information, i.e., creating results not obtained in a study or laboratory experiment. Falsification, on the other hand, involves the deliberate alteration or changing of results to suit one’s needs in an experiment or other academic exercise.
D. Multiple Submission
This is the submission of academic work for which academic credit has already been earned, when such submission is made without instructor authorization.
E. Misuse of Academic Materials
The misuse of academic materials includes, but is not limited to, the following:
1. Stealing or destroying library or reference materials or computer programs
2. Stealing or destroying another student’s notes or materials, or having such materials in one’s possession without the owner’s permission
3. Receiving assistance in locating or using sources of information in an assignment when such assistance has been forbidden by the instructor
4. Illegitimate possession, disposition, or use of examinations or answer keys to examinations
5. Unauthorized alteration, forgery, or falsification of academic records
6. Unauthorized sale or purchase of examinations, papers or assignments
F. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty
Complicity involves knowingly contributing to another’s acts of academic dishonesty.
PROCEDURES IN CASES OF SUSPECTED ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
All matters of academic policy, including academic dishonesty, are under the jurisdiction of each of the University’s schools and colleges pursuant to Article 1X2.B and Article VI.C of the Laws of the Regents. Accordingly, each school and college has established procedures for addressing matters of academic dishonesty and for determining the severity and consequences of each infraction. Students should contact their school or college for standards and/or procedures specific to their school or college. As a general rule, all school and college procedures contain the following requirements and provisions:
A. Faculty staff members, or students may submit charges of academic dishonesty against students.
A student who has evidence that another student is guilty of academic dishonesty should inform the instructor or the dean of the college in writing of the charge.
B. A faculty member who has evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty should confront the student with the evidence. In cases of academic dishonesty, the faculty member has the authority to reprimand the student appropriately, which could include
the issuance of a failing grade (F). If the faculty member elects to reprimand the student for academic dishonesty by issuing a failing grade, the faculty member shall submit a written report to the dean of the appropriate college within five (5) working days. The report shall include, but is not limited to, the time, place, nature of the offense(s), the name(s) of the accused, the name(s) of the accuser(s), and witnesses (if any). If the faculty member feels that her/his reprimand is an insufficient sanction for a particular case of academic dishonesty, the faculty member may recommend to the dean of the appropriate college that further action be taken.
C. In cases where the faculty member has recommended further action in a case of academic dishonesty, the dean or a designated committee shall schedule a disciplinary hearing as soon as possible. The student(s) accused of academic dishonesty shall be notified in writing of the specific charge(s). The student(s) also has (have) the right to be represented by legal counsel and
to be present during the proceedings. The student(s) must notify the dean of the appropriate college five (5) working days before the hearing of the intent to have legal counsel present at the hearing.
D. The dean or the designated committee may take any of the following actions:
• Place the student(s) on disciplinary probation for a specified period
of time
• Suspension of registration for a specified period of time
• Expulsion: No opportunity to return to the school or college in which the infraction occurred
• Take no further action against the accused student(s)
A record of the action taken shall be kept in the committee’s confidential file and a copy sent to the Registrar
E. In all cases, the student(s) shall be notified of the dean’s or committee’s decision within seven (7) working days.
F. If a student wishes to appeal a case, the student should request the procedures for doing so from his or her school or college.
G. Students who are taking courses at the University of Colorado at Denver, but are enrolled at one of the other educational institutions on the Auraria campus and are charged with academic dishonesty, are subject to the same procedures and sanctions outlined above.


University Policies / 25
SUMMARY
Questions regarding academic integrity should be directed to the dean’s office of the college or school in which the student is enrolled.
Code of Student Conduct (Student Rights and Responsibilities and Procedures for Disciplinary Review and Action)
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR WHICH ACTION MAY BE TAKEN IF A VIOLATION OCCURS
All persons on University property are required, for reasonable cause, to identify themselves when requested by University or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers, the University reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to University personnel or property and those who interfere with its function as an educational institution.
All persons on CU-Denver/Auraria property who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applicable to University students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations.
The behaviors outlined below will not be tolerated, because they threaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the University and the personal rights and freedoms of its members.
1. Intentional obstruction, disruption, or interference with teaching, research, disciplinary proceedings, or other University activities, including its public service and administrative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denver/Auraria premises.
2. Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, school officials, employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
3. Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CU-Denver/Auraria Higher Education Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the University, or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person.
4. Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms, which includes, but is not limited to, striking, laying hands upon, threatening with violence, or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure;
or other treatment of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature. (This includes, but is not limited to, demeaning behavior of an ethnic, sexist, or racist nature, unwanted sexual advances, or intimidations.)
5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilities, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU-Denver/Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimental to the University.
6. Forgery, fraud (to include computer fraud), falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification with intent to gain any unentitled advantage.
7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver/ Auraria property and the private property of students, University officials, employees, and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denver/Auraria buildings or facilities. This includes the possession of known stolen property.
8. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus. This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University, or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee. (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, firearms, explosives, BB guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles, Bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switchblades. A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm, explosive, or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly included within the meaning of the terms firearms, explosive, or dangerous weapon.)
9. Sale, distribution, use, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
10. Physical restriction, coercion, or harassment of any person; significant theft; sale/manufacture of illegal drugs (includes possession of a sufficient quantity with intent to sell); damage, theft, or unauthorized possession of University property; or forgery, falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records or instruments of
identification to gain any unentitled
advantage.
UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS
As a member of the University community, you are held accountable not only for upholding civil and criminal laws, but University standards as well. Enrollment does not confer either immunity or special consideration with reference to civil and criminal laws. Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to challenge or postponement on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced, or are pending in civil or criminal court.
In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a student violates a standard and withdraws from the University before administrative action is final.
USE OF UNIVERSITY/AURARIA PROPERTY OR FACILITIES
Nothing in this Code of Conduct shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the voicing of concerns or grievances. The University is dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge through a free exchange of ideas, and this shall be a cardinal principle in the determination of whether or not a proposed use of University facilities is appropriate.
The Auraria Higher Education Center has established campus regulations and procedures governing the use of CU-Denver/Auraria grounds, buildings, and other facilities. Such regulations are designed to prevent interference with University functions and activities.
Except where otherwise specifically authorized, or when members of the public are invited, the use of CU-Denver/ Auraria facilities shall be limited to faculty, staff, and students of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus, and to organizations having chapters, local groups, or other recognized University-connected representation among faculty, staff, or students of the three academic institutions on the Auraria campus.
CLASSROOM CONDUCT
Students are expected to conduct themselves appropriately in classroom situations. If disruptive behavior occurs in a classroom, an instructor has the authority to ask the disruptive student to leave the classroom. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist, the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Public Safety and/or the appropriate Dean’s


26 / General Information
office. The appropriate Dean or his/her representative may withdraw a student from a particular class for disruptive behavior, while the Student Discipline Committee may recommend to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services to suspend, permanently expel, and/or permanently exclude the student from the campus. Appeal questions concerning disruptive behavior should be directed to the Academic Dean’s office when withdrawal from a class is involved, and to the Director of Student Life when suspension or expulsion from the University is involved.
NON-ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE POLICIES
Violations of Standards of Conduct should be reported to the Director of Student Life during working hours. Auraria Public Safety should be contacted during non-duty hours.
If a violation occurs on campus and it is not in a specific building, Auraria Public Safety and/or the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
If emergency help is needed when on campus, contact Auraria Public Safety; for help off campus, contact the Denver Police.
Actions available to campus officials include, but are not limited to: asking those involved in inappropriate behavior to cease and desist; requesting offenders) to leave the Auraria campus; denying or restricting use of facilities or services; calling Auraria Public Safety for assistance; billing offenders) for any physical damages; pressing civil charges; and referring student(s) to the Director of Student Life. The chart that follows illustrates the overall structure involved.
DISCIPLINE STRUCTURE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
1. Violations observed may be resolved
by any of the following:
• University departments such as:
a. Admissions
b. Student Union
c. University/Auraria Public Safety
d. Financial Aid
e. Veterans Affairs
• Faculty/Staff
• Students
• Non-University Members
2. If violation warrants further attention
contact:
• Director of Student Life
a. If student(s) desires a review by the Director of Student Life. Academic dishonesty discipline
falls under the jurisdiction of the individual colleges and schools, b. If violation warrants possible suspension or expulsion.
• Student Discipline Committee
3. Final review (may request only in cases of suspension/expulsion). Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services
STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
When one of the ten Standards of Conduct listed in this code is violated, the student may be referred to the Director of Student Life. Any person may refer a student or student group suspected of violating this code to the Director of Student Life. Persons making such referrals will be asked to provide information pertinent to the case. The Director of Student Life will make a determination as to the seriousness of the case. This will be done in most situations by asking the student(s) involved in the case to come in for an administrative interview to determine what actions, if any, will be taken by the University. Students will be notified in writing of the results of such administrative reviews.
The Director of Student Life has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no further action other than talking with the accused student(s).
3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student’s behavior has been inappropriate, and any further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University.
5. Refer cases to the Student Discipline Committee when the above sanctions are determined to be inadequate.
6. Take other actions including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violators) provides compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
STUDENT DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Disciplinary proceedings shall be conducted as administrative proceedings and not as judicial proceedings. The University is not a part of the judicial branch of state government. The University has authority to promulgate and enforce internal rules of behavior that shall be administered in a fair and impartial manner in harmony with its educational objectives
and administrative nature. As part of the administrative nature of the committee’s proceedings, fundamental rules of fairness will be followed. Copies of these procedures are available in the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services.
This committee, composed of students, faculty, and staff members, makes the decision whether students charged with violations of the student conduct code may continue to attend the University of Colorado at Denver.
The Student Discipline Committee has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no action other than talking with the accused student.
3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student’s behavior has been inappropriate, and further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University.
5. Recommend suspension of a student from the University for disciplinary reasons. This suspension may be for various lengths of time ranging from one semester to an indefinite period of time. After the period of disciplinary suspension has expired, a student may apply in writing to have the notation on the student’s record removed.
6. Recommend expulsion of a student from the University; notation on the student’s record will be kept permanently. When a student is suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons, an additional sanction may include being excluded from the Auraria campus.
7. Take other actions including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violators) provides compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
Student(s) must be notified in writing of the disciplinary action taken within five (5) days.
REVIEW PROCEDURES
A student may submit a request to review the recommendation of suspension or expulsion by the Student Discipline Committee within seven (7) working days to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services. Except in cases involving the exercise of the power of summary suspension (see below), the sanctions of suspension or expulsion for disciplinary reasons shall be effective only after the administrative


University Policies / 27
review by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services has been exhausted or waived. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services’ decision shall be in writing to the student(s), with a copy to the Student Discipline Committee. Copies of review procedures may be obtained from the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Services.
SUMMARY SUSPENSION
Summary suspension is a suspension from the University which begins immediately upon notice from the appropriate University official without a formal hearing by the Student Discipline Committee.
A hearing before the Student Discipline Committee is then scheduled as soon as possible (usually within seven calendar days) to determine the disposition of the case. Summary suspension may also include a physical exclusion from the campus if deemed necessary.
The Chancellor and/or a Vice Chancellor have the authority to suspend summarily any student when in their opinions such suspension is necessary to:
1. Maintain order on the campus.
2. Preserve the orderly functioning of the University.
3. Stop interference in any manner with the public or private rights of citizens on CU-Denver/Auraria owned or controlled property.
4. Stop actions that are threatening to the health or safety of any person.
5. Stop actions that are destroying or damaging property of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus, its students, faculty, staff, or guests.
PERMANENT RECORD NOTATIONS
While disciplinary proceedings are pending or contemplated, a temporary hold may be placed on the student’s academic record. It will not be released until all actions and appeal procedures have been completed or finalized by the University. Only in those cases where suspension, deferred suspension, or permanent expulsion results from disciplinary action will notations be placed on the academic record.
RELEASE OF DISCIPLINARY INFORMATION
Access to any student’s academic transcript or disciplinary file shall be governed by provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Only the student charged or those University officials who have a legitimate
educational interest in disciplinary information may have access to the files. All other inquiries, including but not limited to employers, governmental agencies, news media, friends, or Denver Police, must have a written release from the student to gain access to University disciplinary files.
Every effort will be made by the University to respect the privacy of the student. However, where the identity of the student has been publicly disclosed in the news media, the University reserves the right to respond as it deems appropriate to describe fairly and accurately the disposition of disciplinary matters.
REFUND POLICY AFTER DISCIPLINARY ACTION
Submission of registration materials obligates the student to pay the assessed tuition and fees for that term. If a student is suspended or expelled from the University, the amount of tuition/fees which would be refunded would be the same as when a student voluntarily withdraws from a term. See the General Information section of this catalog or the Schedule of Courses for more information.
The official withdrawal date applicable for tuition/fee refund purposes will be the date of the Student Discipline Committee’s decision. In the event that circumstances are such that the accused student has registered for a subsequent term before the final decision is made, that student does so at his/her own risk and may be liable for payment of tuition and fees for both terms. The Committee will make the decision as to when official suspension or expulsion begins. Failure to make the required payment will result in the following actions: students will become ineligible for all University services; no grades will be issued for courses in progress; no transcripts, diplomas, certification, or registration materials will be issued for the student until the bill is paid in full; a late payment charge in addition to the interest on the unpaid balance, will be assessed.
TRI-INSTITUTIONAL VIOLATIONS
Procedures in deciding violations of the Code of Student Conduct involving students from other academic institutions on the Auraria campus have been developed by CU-Denver and the institution^) involved. In such cases, the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
Ethical Use of Computing at CU-Denver
Access to CU-Denver computing systems, and use of CU-Denver computing resources, is a privilege granted to members of the CU-Denver community for scholarly, research, and administrative purposes. Those who use computing services on the CU-Denver campus are expected to do so in an effective, efficient, ethical, and legal manner.
As a condition of using computer resources on the CU-Denver campus, users are expected to respect the intellectual effort and creativity of others, to respect the privacy of other users, to respect the integrity of the computer systems and other users’ data, and to use computer resources in an efficient and productive manner.
It is the responsibility of ail users to respect copyright protection of licensed computer software. Users do not have the right to copy licensed software programs or documentation without the specific permission of the copyright holder, or to use unauthorized copies of licensed software. Unauthorized use, duplication, or distribution of computer software is a violation of University policy and federal law.
CU-Denver is connected to other universities and organizations through Bitnet and the Internet. Use of these networks is a privilege granted to all CU-Denver computer users. The networks must be utilized in an ethical and legal manner.
Sexual Harassment
The University of Colorado at Denver is a collegial academic community whose mission requires an open learning and working environment for students, faculty, staff, and administrators. An open learning and working environment values and protects individual dignity and the integrity of human relationships. CU-Denver’s educational process is based upon mutual trust, freedom of inquiry, freedom of expression, and the absence of intimidation and exploitation. As a place of work and study, CU-Denver must be free of inappropriate and disrespectful conduct and communication of a sexual nature, of sexual harassment, and of all forms of sexual intimidation and exploitation. Such behavior is reprehensible because it subverts the mission of CU-Denver, poisons the environment, and threatens the careers, educational experiences, and well-being of students, faculty, staff, and administrators.


28 / General Information
It is a violation of CU-Denver’s Sexual Harassment Policy for anyone who is authorized to recommend or take action affecting faculty, staff, students, or administrators to make any unwelcome sexual advances, to request sexual favors, or to engage in any other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or status in a course, program, or activity; or (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for employment or educational decisions affecting that individual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or educational experience, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for working or learning.
For further information, contact the Sexual Harassment Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Room 700,556-4493.
STUDENT SERVICES
To meet the needs of the diverse student population, CU-Denver provides programs and activities designed to complement students’ academic programs and to enhance their total educational experience. Students are provided opportunities to develop, experience, and participate in student government, social, cultural, intellectual, and recreational programs. These programs create an environment in which students are:
• Assisted in developing leadership ability through opportunities to practice decision making, management and marketing, interpersonal and group communication, and relationship skills.
• Encouraged and aided in developing social, cultural, intellectual, recreation, and governance programs that expand involvement with the campus community and society and lead to mature appreciation of these pursuits.
• Encouraged to explore self-directed activities that provide opportunities for personal growth in individual and group settings.
• Exposed to various cultures and experiences, ideas and issues, art and musical forms, and styles of life.
• Informed about institutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities.
• Aided in the awareness and utilization of campus facilities and other resources.
• Assisted in developing community spirit through creative interaction
among staff, faculty, students, and members of the local community. Students
are encouraged to involve their families
in campus events and activities.
Programs and services provided by the Associated Students of CU-Denver, the Division of Enrollment and Student Affairs of CU-Denver, and the Auraria Student Services Division contribute to the fulfillment of this philosophy.
The Advocate
The purpose of the student newspaper, The Advocate, is to provide students with information about campus issues and events. The newspaper strives to include good investigative reporting, feature articles, and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is a tool to encourage and develop writers, journalists, artists, and other student members of its general management and production staff. The office is in the Student Union, Room 153, (303) 556-8321.
American Indian Student Services
The American Indian Student Services program provides access and educational opportunities to American Indian students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. American Indian Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns of the American Indian community. The office is located in the North Classroom 2012, (303) 556-2680.
Asian American Student Services
The Asian American Student Services program provides access and educational opportunities to Asian American students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. Asian American Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns of the Asian American community. The office is
located in the North Classroom 2012,
(303) 556-2578.
Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD)
The Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal University structure. ASCU-Denver assists students with information concerning student clubs and organizations, campus events, issues concerning student status, and other information of general interest to students. ASCU-Denver also provides students assistance with grievances and the opportunity to become more closely involved with the University community, through active participation in student government itself, or through service on University, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees. More information concerning services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Student Union, Room 341, (303) 556-2510.
Black Student Services
The Black Student Services program provides access and educational opportunities to Black students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts.
The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. Black Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns of the Black community. The office is located in the North Classroom 2010,(303)556-2701.
Career Resource Center
The Career Resource Center offers career planning and placement assistance. Located in the Arts Building, Room 177, the office is open year-round to serve University students and alumni. Services offered by the Center are listed below. Phone (303) 556-4542.
CAREER PLANNING
Career Counseling. Professional career counselors are available for individual appointments to help students with career decisions, develop job search strategies, or critique their resume.


Student Services / 29
Career Assessment Inventories. Interest, personality, and values inventories are available for students at a reasonable fee to assess career objectives. Group interpretations are provided.
Workshops. Group discussions focus on employment skills, including: Resumes That Work, Job Search Strategies, and Interviewing Skills. Workshops are offered monthly.
Campus Career Library. Professional job vacancy listings are organized in notebooks for review. Many new vacancies are posted daily. Volumes of resources to help students with career planning and the job search process are available. Included are employer profiles and directories, salary surveys, job profiles, career information, and career assessment materials. COCIS, Colorado Career Information System, is a computerized guidance system which includes specific occupation information, career quest, and nationwide college information. The Campus Career Library is located in the Arts Building, Room 177.
Alumni Career Network. CU-Denver alumni have volunteered to talk with students about their career fields. The Network book is available in the Campus Career Library.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
Students are encouraged to register for employment services early in their senior year. The following services are available:
• Resume Referral Network
• On-Campus Interviewing
• Individual “Mock” Interviews Career development is an important
process, and students are encouraged to participate in all these services throughout their academic experience at the University.
Clubs and Organizations
ACM Computing Club American Institute of Architecture Students
American Planning Association American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Landscape Architecture
American Society of Mechanical Engineers Anthropology Club Art Club
Association of Black Students Auraria French Club Auraria Transnational Student Association
Beta Alpha Omega (Counseling/ Education)
Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Honor Society)
Chi Epsilon
Chinese Student Association College Republicans Equiponderance Pre-Law Club Etta Kappa Nu Feminist Alliance
Financial Management Association GSPA Association
Golden Key National Honor Society Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Kappa Delta Pi M.E.C.H.A.
Master of Social Sciences Club Model United Nations Conference Organization
National Society of Black Engineers Native American Student Organization Phi Alpha Theta (History)
Phi Chi Theta (Business)
Philosophy Club Pi Tau Sigma Psi Chi (Psychology)
Russian Culture & Language Club Sigma Tau Delta (English)
Society of Accounting Students Society of Women Engineers Student Association of Musicians Tau Beta Phi (Engineering)
Vietnamese Student Organization
Emergency Student Loan Program
The Emergency Student Loan Program is designed to meet the emergency financial needs of students. The program provides interest-free, short-term loans for up to $250. Upon request by the student, Auraria Book Vouchers are available for textbook purchases.
Applications for short-term loans will be accepted throughout the fall, spring, and summer semesters. Applicants are required to meet the minimum requirements listed below:
Students receiving financial aid are eligible if:
• Financial aid or scholarship eligibility has been determined by the Office of Financial Aid
• Financial aid is verified by presenting recent copy of award letter, or letter from financial aid counselor
• Amount of aid covers costs of tuition and loan
Students not receiving financial aid are eligible if:
• Tuition balance is paid in full
• Monthly income is verified by presenting recent check stub, or letter from employer
• Income indicates ability to repay loan
within six weeks.
Hispanic Student Services
The Hispanic Student Services program provides access and educational opportunities to Hispanic students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. Hispanic Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns of the Hispanic community. The office is located in the North Classroom 2012, (303) 556-2777.
Learning Assistance, The Center for
The Center for Learning Assistance is designed to promote student success in the academic setting. Services are available to till CU-Denver students, and include tutoring, workshops, academic and institutional credit courses, consulting, and a minority resource library. First-generation college students may be eligible for more intensive services through the Student Support Services component of the Center. The Center is located in NC 2006, (303) 556-2802.
Tutoring. Free tutoring is available in many subject areas (some limitations apply). Tutoring is held on weekdays and evenings. Scheduled tutoring is from Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m.-9 p.m. and Friday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Open lab tutoring is from Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. and Friday, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Workshops. Math placement exam workshops (algebra-based) are scheduled two weeks prior to the start of each term (fall, spring, summer). Study skills workshops are provided on such topics as memory techniques, critical thinking, time/stress management, test anxiety/test taking, essay writing, study strategies, active reading, learning styles, overcoming fears, and listening/note taking.
Consulting. Academic, financial aid, and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy is available to students eligible for the Student Support Services Program.
Library. The Center maintains a small periodical and book collection authored by, and/or about, minorities; these


30 / General Information
resources are available for student research and leisure.
Courses. Courses are offered in a small group format in the areas of college survival skills, computer word processing, English as a second language, and problem solving.
ENGL 1006-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languages. This course is designed for ESL students who need to improve their reading and vocabulary skills. Students will increase their reading ability through vocabulary building, word attack strategies, and reading analysis.
ENGL 1007-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. This is the first course in the ESL composition sequence. Writing begins with sentence-level development and continues with the development of paragraphs based on Western rhetorical patterns. Grammar appropriate to students’ needs will be incorporated into the class.
ENGL 1008-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. This is a three-credit-hour course and follows ENGL 1007 in the ESL sequence of writing classes.
The course provides continued work on grammar, syntax, usage and the mechanics of writing. Writing begins with paragraphs and moves into essay writing. Special attention is paid to the aspects of the English language which pose particular problems for the non-native speaker of English.
ENGL 1009-3. Advanced ESL Writing Skills. This is the third course in the ESL composition sequence. Emphasis is placed on more complex grammatical problems and on the development of longer compositions. Prereq: ENGL 1008 or coordinator’s approval.
STSK 0705-1. Problem Solving. This course is designed to improve investigative and problem-solving skills. Scientific theory, empirical methodology, and research methods will be utilized. Individual topics of investigation will be assigned.
STSK 0707-1. College Survival Skills. This course is designed to promote success in the academic setting. Topics covered will include university resources, conquering the university system, listening and note-taking, study and memory techniques, test-taking skills, time management, library research strategies, and word processing.
STSK 0708-1. Introduction to Word Processing. This course will thoroughly familiarize the student with an easy-to-use word processing program that will assist in the process of writing, text revision and rearrangement, and the production of “letter-perfect” documents. (The word
processing program used will be one that is available in the open student-use computer lab areas.)
STSK 0800-1. Research Process for ESL Students. This is a one-credit-hour course designed for students who are unfamiliar with the process of academic research. The class covers the steps involved in producing a research paper, including resource evaluation skills. Grammar is covered as necessary according to student needs.
STSK 0801-1. Communication Skills for ESL Students. This course meets twice a week to improve the oral communication skills of students whose first language is not English. Skills include use of idiomatic English, cross-cultural awareness, cross-cultural problems in communications, and pronunciation.
Pre-Col legiate Development, The Center for
Programs offered by the Center serve to motivate minority high school students to pursue post-secondary education and provide them the academic skills needed to be successful in their college endeavors. The Center is located in NC 2013, (303)556-2322.
PRE-COLLEGIATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
This program enables high school students to participate in a wide range of university activities throughout the academic year and during a full-time, five-week summer program. The academic year component offers monthly study skills and career orientation workshops, advising, tutoring, and a variety of cultural enrichment experiences. The five-week summer session for students in the 9th through 11th grades consists of accelerated classes for which students receive elective high school credit, career orientation, and engage in cultural activities.
CU-DENVER MINORITY SCHOLARS PROGRAM
The MSP is an early college enrollment program for college-bound, high-achieving minority students who are enrolled in their junior year of high school. The program enables students to begin their college studies by taking one course at CU-Denver during the fall term of their senior year in high school. The credit earned in the course can be applied toward a bachelor’s degree. While enrolled in the program, students participate in monthly workshops
designed to acclimate them to the University and prepare them for college study.
Student Advocacy Center
The Student Advocacy Center provides support services to CU-Denver students, particularly during their first year on campus. Services are designed to help students make a smooth transition to life at CU-Denver and to succeed in their college studies. Professional staff and student peer advocates provide information about campus resources and assist students with class scheduling, academic policies and procedures, and problem solving. The Center also houses an extensive scholarship library. The Center is located in NC 2204, (303) 556-2546.
Student Counseling, The Center for
The Center for Student Counseling provides free short-term counseling as well as relationship counseling for CU-Denver students. If a client’s needs are such that they would benefit more from an alternative form of counseling or therapy, appropriate referrals will be made to community-based professionals.
Other services provided by the Center for Student Counseling include:
• support and therapy groups
• advocacy, support services, and scholarships for women
• re-entry services for students returning to school after an interruption
• a small lending library (personal growth, career information)
• resource and referral information for community services
• educational programs and workshops (stress management, assertiveness training, etc.)
Statement of Philosophy:
The purpose of counseling at the Center for Student Counseling at CU-Denver is to:
• help students grow in self-understanding,
• provide support in crisis situations, and
• support students in attaining their personal and educational goals.
CU-Denver Student Counseling is
located in the CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 130.
Student Legal Services
Student legal services are available to assist students with off-campus legal problems through the provision of legal advice, litigation preparation, document interpretation, and assistance in negotiation. The service will not represent students in


Internships and Cooperative Education / 31
court. This student fee-funded program is provided free of charge to CU-Denver students; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred, such as copying, typing, etc. For further details, contact the office in the CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 130, (303) 556-6061.
Student Life, Office of
The Office of Student Life is the advising, coordinating, resource, and general information center for student clubs and organizations, student government (ASCUD), student programs, and the academic honor societies. Student Life coordinates new student orientation programs. The office is responsible for the administration of the student fee budget and monitors all student fee expenditures to assure compliance with CU-Denver and State of Colorado regulations and procedures. The Director of Student Life represents the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees and maintains effective lines of communication with MSCD, CCD, and AHEC. The director administers the student conduct and discipline procedures as described in the Code of Student Conduct. The Office of Student Life is located in the Student Union, Room 255, (303) 556-3399.
Student Retention Services
The Office of Student Retention Services offers an array of services and programs designed to foster cultural diversity within the CU-Denver student body, help students adjust to the social and intellectual environment of the campus, and provide the academic support students need to succeed in their studies and derive maximum benefit from their college campus experience. Outreach and retention services are provided by professional staff in four centers, which include The Student Advocacy Center, The Center for Learning Assistance, The Center for Pre-Collegiate Development, and The Career Resource Center. Student Retention Services is located in North Classroom 2204,
(303) 556-2324.
Veterans Affairs, Office of
The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veterans and dependent students attending CU-Denver who wish to utilize Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists students with filling out VA
paperwork and in solving problems associated with receiving VA-related benefits.
The OVA maintains proper certification for eligible students to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements for attendance, course load and content, and other regulations necessary to receive educational benefits payments.
In addition, the OVA provides VA Vocational Rehabilitation referrals, information on VA tutorial assistance, and VA work/ study positions for qualified veterans.
For further information, contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at (303) 556-2630,
NC 4015.
CENTER FOR INTERNSHIPS AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
Director: Janet Michalski Assistant Director and Coordinator,
Engineering: Diane Berkley Assistant Director and Coordinator,
Liberal Arts and Sciences:
Cherrie Grove
Assistant Director and Coordinator,
Business and Administration:
Wayne Sundell
Office: 1047 Ninth Street Historic Park Telephone: 556-2892
The Center for Internships and Cooperative Education, established at CU-Denver in 1973, provides students with an opportunity to supplement their academic classroom learning with on-the-job work experiences, internships, or community service experience related to their academic studies. Students are placed either as paid co-op trainees or as interns for academic credit with corporations, businesses, or government agencies in the Denver metropolitan area as well as out-of-state. Short-term community service experiences also are available for students enrolled in courses requiring some community service.
Faculty coordinators from each of the University’s colleges and schools act as liaisons between the Center and the academic departments. The Center currently places some 600 students each year with some 300 participating employers. Over 30 percent of all students placed are graduate students.
Cooperative Education
Cooperative education is an educational method which combines classroom study with paid, career-related, off-cam-pus work. The purpose is to give students
the opportunity to apply what they have learned in the classroom to real world situations, and to bring that experience back to the classroom as a learning tool.
Cooperative education offers students paid long-term positions (two or more semesters). Students alternate semesters of full-time work with semesters of fulltime school, or work part time year round. Co-op experiences may be eligible for academic credit, and many positions lead to permanent career positions upon graduation.
Internships
Internships offer students short-term positions (one semester) and they are often nonpaid. Internships are always done for academic credit and are popular with students who like to explore a variety of careers. Many students complete two, three, or even four internships before graduation. Internships, like co-op jobs, are related to the student’s academic studies and/or career goals.
CU-SERVES/Service Learning
CU-Denver’s new community service/ service learning program, CU-SERVES, was established in 1991 to develop community service opportunities for any CU-Denver course that incorporates a community service option or requirement. CU-SERVES also sponsors 2-3 service days throughout the year which attract 100+ CU-Denver students, faculty, staff and alumni who join together to provide volunteer service to Denver’s needy communities.
Student Eligibility
To qualify for placement in a co-op or internship position, students must be enrolled at least half time in any CU-Denver college or school, have completed their freshman year, have maintained a grade-point average of 2.5 or higher, and have completed at least 12 hours in residence (6 hours for graduate students). Some employers have additional requirements, i.e., U.S. citizenship, willingness to travel, and specific course work.
Participation in any CU-SERVES service day is open to all students. Participation in a service learning placement requires enrollment in a course with a service option or requirement.


32 / General Information
Academic Credit for Work Experience
Undergraduate students placed by the Center in paid or non-paid positions, as well as students who have obtained their own positions, can apply to earn academic credit through courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the College of Business and Administration, and the College of Engineering and Applied Science. Graduate students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, School of Education, Graduate School of Public Affairs, Graduate School of Business Administration, and College of Architecture and Planning can earn internship, experiential learning, field study, or practicum credit through courses established for this purpose.
Why Students Participate
• Students recognize the value of combining theory with practice and find greater relevance in their studies.
• Work experience allows students to test classroom teaching in the laboratory of the real world.
• The program teaches students valuable job-search skills such as resume writing and interviewing techniques.
• Co-op positions provide a means of financial assistance that is available to all students, regardless of family income levels or other financial aid arrangements, and does not leave students burdened with educational debts.
• The inclusion of a work component and the contribution from co-op earnings are major factors in encouraging first-generation college students to pursue a college degree.
Why Employers Participate
• Students are an excellent resource for special projects and peak loads or busy seasons.
• The employer can assess an individual's potential for employment after graduation, thus saving entry-level recruiting costs.
• Student workers can increase productivity of full-time professional staff.
• Students are highly motivated, productive, and dependable workers.
• Students bring knowledge about the latest academic research to their employers.
• As verified by many studies, co-op student interns subsequently become full-time employees with far lower turnover rates and better promotion
potential than the average entry-level professional.
Facts About Cooperative Education
• Cooperative education programs have been established in over 80 percent of the Fortune 500 corporations. All of the top ten Fortune 500 companies are involved in cooperative education.
• The last three presidents of General Motors at one time were cooperative education students.
• Cooperative education has been conducted successfully in the U.S. since 1906.
• Over 1,000 colleges and universities currently have cooperative education programs.
• An estimated 200,000 U.S. college students are enrolled in cooperative education, and gross annual earnings are calculated to be in excess of $200,000,000.
Typical Participating Employers
Employers who hire CU-Denver students for internship positions include: AT&T Bell Labs Bloomsbury Review Cactus Communications Cellular, Inc.
City of Denver, Mayor’s Office of Art, Culture & Film Colorado AIDS Project Decisioneering
Denver Center for the Performing Arts Denver City Attorney, Domestic Violence Unit Denver General Hospital EG&G
Environmental Protection Agency
Federal Highway Administration
Greater Denver Chamber of Commerce
Hughes Aircraft Company
IBM Corporation
KCNC-TV
KWGN-TV
MacNeil/Lehrer Newshour National Park Service National Renewable Energy Laboratory Office of the Governor, State of Colorado
Peat Marwick Main & Co.
Pena Investment Advisors U S WEST Communications U.S. Bureau of Land Management U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Urban Drainage & Flood Control Walt Disney World, Inc.
Western Area Power Administration
LIBRARY SERVICES Auraria Library
Dean and Director: Camila Alire Associate Directors: Jean F. Hemphill, Glenda A. Thornton Office: Auraria Library, Lawrence at 11th Street
Telephone: - Administration: 556-2805 Information: 556-2741
FACULTY
Associate Professors: Camila Alire,
Jean F. Hemphill
Assistant Professors: Dene L. Clark,
Terry Ann Leopold, Robert L. Wick, Rutherford W. Witthus Instructors: Curtis Allred, Orlando Archibeque, Kerranne Biley, Anthony J. Dedrick, Steve Green, Florence Jones, Elaine Jurries, Marit S. MacArthur,
Nikki Me Caslin, Ellen Metter, Lori Oling, Jay Schafer, Anita Schuneman, Mara L. Sprain, Glenda Thornton, Linda D. Tietjen, Louise Treff, Diane Turner
FRIENDS OF AURARIA LIBRARY
The Friends of Auraria Library is an association formed in 1976 to promote the development of Auraria Library as a center for learning, study, and research for the students and faculty of the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The Friends of Auraria Library’s ongoing objectives are:
To promote awareness of and good will toward Auraria Library on the campus, in the metropolitan area, and in the region.
To increase Library resources through contributions, solicitations, grants, bequests, and gifts of books and other appropriate materials.
LIBRARY SERVICES
Access to information is essential to academic success. The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus, provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The Library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver.
THE COLLECTION
The Auraria Library has a collection of approximately 600,000 volumes. In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection, the Library also has over 2,700 journal and newspaper subscriptions and a film/videotape collection. The Library is a select depository for U.S.


Library and Media Services / 33
government publications and a depository for Colorado state documents. The Auraria Library’s collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally through interlibrary loan services.
THE CARL ONLINE PUBLIC ACCESS CATALOG
Access to the Auraria Library's collection is through the online CARL (Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries) public access catalog, a user-friendly system that also allows for searching of the collections of many other libraries throughout the state, the region, and the nation. The CARL system has received national recognition for being on the cutting edge of information technology. The system allows faster and more comprehensive searches than were possible with the traditional card catalog. Through its UnCover project, it also offers current indexing to over 10,000 periodical titles.
In addition to using CARL at the Library, patrons may obtain dial-up access through a home or office computer with a modem (758-1551); CARL also appears as a menu item on the CU-Denver mainframe computer.
CIRCULATION SERVICES
Library materials are checked out from the Circulation Desk with a current Auraria l.D. or other valid identification. Undergraduate students may check out books for 28 days and graduate students for 60 days. An Auraria student with a valid student l.D. can check out up to 75 books from the general collection.
Up to three renewals may be made in person or by phone (556-2639). Charges are assessed when books are returned past their due date.
REFERENCE SERVICES
The Auraria Library Reference Department strives to provide excellent service in assisting students and faculty with their research needs. The Reference Desk is staffed during most hours the Library is open. Additionally, an Information Desk is staffed during certain peak hours to assist patrons with general information and to direct them to the appropriate service desks. Telephone reference is provided for quick questions such as, “Does the Auraria Library own a particular book?”
COMPUTER ASSISTED RESEARCH
(CAR)
Online database searching, for which there is a fee, can save many hours of researching printed abstracts and indexes. In some cases, it provides the only access to certain materials. The Library has access to well over 400 databases. In addition to bibliographic information, databases also may contain directory and financial information, scientific data, and full text. Questions about the Computer Assisted Research service should be directed to the CAR manager, 556-2827.
INTERLIBRARY LOAN (ILL)
ILL links the Auraria Library to libraries worldwide by providing access to needed materials otherwise unavailable locally. Materials, once requested, can take from one to three weeks for in-state borrowing or three weeks or longer for out-of-state borrowing. A fee may be required in order to obtain journal articles or books. Request forms are available in the library or through the CU-Denver Computing Services VAX 8800 system. Contact the Interlibrary Loan Department Office at 556-2562 for additional information.
LIBRARY INSTRUCTION
The Library is committed to providing information skills through its instruction program. The program is varied, ranging from basic, introductory-level material to advanced research methodology for graduate students. Demonstrations on the CARL system are important components of the Library Instruction Program. For more information about the Library’s instructional offerings, contact the Library Instruction office at 556-3303.
RESERVES/MEDIA
The Reserves/Media Department (located in the southeast corner of the first floor) provides special short-term circulation of books, pamphlets, articles and other materials needed for class instruction. Reserved media items, such as films and videos, are also found here. Other media items, including films, videos, CDs, filmstrips, kits, cassettes, games, LP records and slides are also located in this department. There is playback equipment.
The loan periods for “reserved” items are short and overdue follow-up is prompt, so that large numbers of students may have access to the material. These materials include not only titles owned by the Library but also personal copies made available by the faculty. Most “reserved” material may be checked out for a few days, with the exception of media items. The length of check-out is determined by the professor. Materials will be checked out with appropriate picture l.D.
ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING LIBRARY
The Library’s main collection is supplemented by the material housed at the nearby Architecture and Planning Library. With a collection of over 20,000 books,
90 periodical subscriptions, and 9,000 slides, this library offers specialized information to students of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning. The library is open to any student who needs access to these materials.
SERVICES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
The Library is committed to making its resources and services available to all students. Through the Reserves/Media Department, a wide variety of adaptive equipment is available to assist persons with disabilities. Library services to assist persons with disabilities include orientation to the physical layout of the Library, retrieval of materials, and some assistance with use of CARL, the online public access catalog, periodicals, and indexes.
ADDITIONAL FACILITIES
Coin-operated typewriters, photocopiers, microform reader/printers, a copy center, a change machine, pay phones, and study rooms are all available at the Library.
INTERNSHIPS
The Library offers internships, practi-cums, independent studies, and volunteer opportunities to students interested in librarianship and information management.


34 / General Information
MEDIA SERVICES Auraria Media Center
Muriel E. Woods, Director
The Auraria Media Center offers a full range of media services, including the management of the Library’s film and videotape collection. These materials are listed in the online public access catalog.
The Media Center operates a 24-channel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus; faculty members may request the transmission of a film or videotape directly into the classroom over this system. Students may request transmission of a film or videotape from one of the media viewing and listening carrels in the Library. This system also can transmit live programs from St. Cajetan’s, the Student Union, and the
Media Center’s television studios to other locations on campus. A self-service graphics lab and a self-service VHS editing suite also are available for student use in the Media Center’s Production Department. Finally, an Internship Program is available to students who are interested in converting knowledge gained in electronics and/or television production courses to practical experience.


Undergraduate Admissions
CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program successfully. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being:
1. Level of previous academic performance.
2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests.
3. Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success. CU-Denver may deny admission to new
applicants or readmission to former students whose credentials indicate an inability to assume those obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University in order to carry out its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
Applicants who request degree programs that are not available at CU-Denver will be considered for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences with an undetermined major. Students admitted with an undetermined major are expected to declare a major by the time they have completed 60 hours toward graduation.
Official notification of admission to CU-Denver as an undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions. Letters from various schools and colleges indicating acceptance into a particular program are pending subject to official notification of admission to the institution.
Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents or with unofficial documents will be permitted one term to submit the documents. If temporarily waived official documents are not received by the end of the initial term of attendance, registration for subsequent terms will be denied. If at any time additional credentials are received which affect the student’s qualifications, the University reserves the right to change the admission decision.
All questions and correspondence regarding admission to CU-Denver and requests for application forms should be directed to:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 P. 0. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 (303) 556-3287
ADMISSION DEADLINES
The University may change documents/ credentials deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands. For the best registration time considerations, applicants should apply and be admitted as early as possible. Information is available from the Office of Admissions, (303) 556-2704. For an applicant to be considered for a specific term, all documents required for admission must be received in the Office of Admissions by the deadline for that term. Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to be considered for a later term. Transfer students are reminded that they should allow sufficient time to have transcripts sent from institutions they have previously attended. Foreign students are advised that it usually takes 60 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions from international locations. Advance planning and application is necessary.
APPLICATION DEADLINE FOR PRIORITY CONSIDERATION
Fall Spring Summer
July 22 December 1 May 3
MINIMUM ACADEMIC PREPARATION STANDARDS (MAPS)
Students entering the University of Colorado who graduated from high school in 1988 or later are required to meet the following Minimum Academic Preparation Standards: 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics), 3 years of natural science, 3 years of social science (including one year of U.S. or world history), 2 years of a single foreign language, and 1 year of the arts.
The MAPS focus on subject areas the student has studied in preparation for college. Freshman admission standards define the level of success and achievement necessary to be admitted to the University of Colorado and include factors that predict academic success, such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school course work, and the grade-point average. Both the subjects the student has studied and how the student has performed will be factors that determine admission to the University.
Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade-point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University.
Two levels of deficiency will be recognized.
1. One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student meets other admission standards and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation from the University. Courses taken to make up a deficiency will count toward graduation, provided the CU-Denver college accepts those course credits toward graduation.
2. In some cases, a student having more than one unit of deficiency may be admitted, provided that the student meets other standards of the University. The student must make up additional deficiencies before graduation by taking an expanded program of studies. The student may satisfy the MAPS requirements by successful completion of:
1) courses taken at CU; 2) courses taken at other institutions of higher education; 3) additional high school credits;
4) credit-by-examination programs; or
5) other requirements as approved by each CU-Denver college.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FRESHMEN
The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test.


36 / Undergraduate Admissions
New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, or Liberal Arts and Sciences.
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION
Years
English (one year of speech/debate and two years of composition are strongly
recommended) .....................4
Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one year
of geometry) .....................4
Natural science (includes two years
of laboratory science) ...........3
Social science (including history)...2
Foreign language (both units in
a single language) ...............2
Academic electives.................. 1
(additional courses in English, foreign language, mathematics, natural or social science, not to include business courses)
Total ............................. 16
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE1
Years
English (literature, composition,
grammar)...........................4
Mathematics distributed as follows:
Algebra............................2
Geometry...........................1
Additional mathematics
(trigonometry recommended).........1
Natural science (including one year of physics and one year of chemistry) ... 3
Social science........................2
Foreign language
(both units in a single language)..2
Academic electives......................1
Total .............................. 16
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Years
English (literature, composition,
grammar)..........................4
Mathematics (excluding business
and consumer mathematics).........3
Natural science......................3
Social science.......................2
Foreign language
(both units in a single language).2
Academic elective................... 1
Total ............................. 15
Preference for admission is given to applicants who rank in the top 30% of their high school graduating class and present a composite score of 26 or higher
'See the College ol Engineering and Applied Science section ol this catalog for more specific information.
on the American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 1070 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Business applicants will receive priority consideration if they graduated in the top 25 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1070 on the SAT. Engineering applicants will receive priority consideration if they graduated in the top 20 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT, with 28 on the mathematics section, or 1100 total on the SAT, with 600 on the mathematics section. Applicants who do not meet the admissions requirements for direct admission to Engineering are encouraged to apply as a pre-engineering major in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Music major applicants also must successfully pass a music audition.
All music majors in the School of the Arts are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area. Two years of prior piano training are recommended. An audition is required of all entering freshmen and undergraduate transfer students. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the School of the Arts, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications.
Applicants who do not satisfy the requirements for priority consideration are reviewed on an individual basis.
How to Apply
1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor or from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application must be completed in full and sent to the Office of Admissions with a $30 (subject to change) non-refundable fee. For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term, the $30 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions is informed of the intent to enroll for a later term.
3. Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions; Campus Box 167; P.O. Box 173364; Denver, CO 80217-3364. Hand 4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to have a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate sent directly from the certifying agency to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. (See Admissions Requirements for Non-High School Graduates).
5. Students also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4875). High school students may obtain ACT and SAT test dates and locations from their counselors.
Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver as the recipient of the scores must notify the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. A Request for Additional Score Report may be requested from any of the offices listed below.
American College Testing Program (ACT)
P.O. Box 168 Iowa City, Iowa 52243 (319) 337-1270
The College Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 6201
Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6201 (609) 771-7600
6. International students must submit proof of proficiency in the English language (see Requirements for International Students).
Applicants Not Granted Admission
An applicant who is not granted admission as an entering freshman may wish to consider transferring to the University after successful study elsewhere. The Office of Admissions urges such students to complete at least one full semester (12-15 credit hours) of college-level course work at another college or university, giving special attention to courses that will provide sound academic preparation for future transfer to CU-Denver. These courses should include any Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS) not met in high school. See the MAPS requirements.
Students who are not admissible will be encouraged to participate in a ReDirect Program that CU-Denver has established with community colleges.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.


Undergraduate Admissions / 37
Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate all previously attended institutions will be denied admission to the university.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR NON-HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES
An individual who has not graduated may be considered for admission. The application for undergraduate admission must be accompanied by a $30 non-refundable application fee and an official transcript showing completed high school courses. An applicant must also submit scores from the General Education Development (GED) Test, and scores from either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT) Program. The admission decision is based on the student’s academic potential for academic success at the University of Colorado at Denver.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS
Applicants are considered transfer students if they have enrolled for any college-level course work (at another institution, at another campus of the University of Colorado, or as non-degree students at the Denver campus) since graduating from high school. Applicants are not considered transfer students if the only college-level classes they have taken were while enrolled in high school.
To meet the minimum transfer admission standards at the University of Colorado at Denver, students must meet one of the following conditions:
1. Have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade-point average:
a. 2.5 GPA (on a 4.0 scale); or
b. 2.0 GPA if transferring from Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, University of Colorado at Boulder, or University of Colorado at Colorado Springs.
2. Have earned 30 or more collegiate semester hours with a 2.0 GPA.
Transfer students are given priority
consideration for admission as follows:
1. College of Business and Administration. To be considered for new transfer admission, students must have completed at least 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Applicants with an overall GPA of 3.0
in applicable course work will be automatically admitted. Students with less than a 3.0 overall GPA, but with a 3.25 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work attempted, will be automatically admitted. Applicants with at least a 2.6 in applicable course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with less than a
2.6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration, where they will be advised as Pre-Business majors.
No applicant will be accepted who is not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
2. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants to the College of Engineering should have at least a 2.75 cumulative grade-point average for all work attempted, should have completed two semesters each of calculus and physics, and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended.
3. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Transfer applicants must have at least a
2.0 cumulative college grade-point average for all work attempted, and must be eligible to return to all institutions previously attended. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music major applicants also must pass an audition. Contact the School of the Arts for audition information (556-2727).
Important Note: Applicants who do not meet the above grade-point average or credit hour requirements will be considered for admission, but on an individual basis.
The primary factors used when considering students individually are: (1) probability of success in the academic program to which admission is desired; (2) the quality of prior academic work; (3) age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and (4) time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges.
How to Apply
1. The student should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application form must be completed and returned with the required $30 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee.
3. The student is required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office of
Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions; Campus Box 167; P.O. Box 173364; Denver, CO 80217-3364. Hand-carried or faxed copies are not official.
If a student is currently enrolled at another institution, an incomplete transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. (Transcripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accompanied by a certified literal English translation.)
Liberal arts and music major applicants with fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of college work completed also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores.
Engineering applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
Applicants to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences should be aware that the College requires elementary proficiency in a foreign language for graduation. Applicants to the College have fulfilled this requirement if they have completed three years of any classical or modern foreign language in high school and present a high school transcript to the College Advising Office for verification. For further information, students should contact the College Advising Office, 556-2555.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate all previously attended institutions will be denied admission to the University.
Transfer of College-Level Credit
The Colorado community college core curriculum agreement as signed by CU-Denver assures that students entering the College of Arts and Sciences who complete the core at their community college and have it certified by the community college will receive credit equivalent to the lower-division degree requirements of the college. If students have not completed the core, they will have courses evaluated on a course-by-course basis.


38 / Undergraduate Admissions
Students transferring to a program outside of the College of Arts and Sciences need to work with advisors and use the transfer guide to assure that appropriate courses are taken prior to transfer.
After all official transcripts have been received and the applicant has been admitted as a degree student, the Office of Admissions and the appropriate academic unit will determine which courses taken at other institutions are applicable to a degree program at CU-Denver. In general, transfer credit will be accepted if it meets the degree and grade requirements at CU-Denver.
College-level credit may be transferred to the University if it was earned at a college or university of recognized standing, by CLEP or advanced placement examinations, or in military service or schooling as recommended by the Commission on Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education; if a grade of C- or higher was attained; and if the credit is for courses appropriate to the degree sought at this institution. Courses taken pass/fail are transferred when a grade of C- or higher is required to pass.
The University may accept a maximum of 72 semester credits (108 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution toward the baccalaureate degree requirements. No credit is allowed for vocational/techni-cal, remedial, or religious/doctrinal work. A maximum of 60 semester credits of extension and correspondence work (not to include more than 30 semester credits of correspondence) may be allowed if the above conditions are met.
The College of Business and Administration generally limits its transfer credit for business courses taken at the lower division level. All courses in the area of emphasis must be taken at the University of Colorado. A maximum of 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of work from a two-year institution may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. All correspondence courses are evaluated to determine their acceptability, and business courses may not be taken through correspondence.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science, in general, requires that engineering course transfer credit must come from an Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology accredited engineering program to be acceptable for degree purposes. Engineering technology courses are not considered equivalent to engineering courses.
In addition, other courses beyond the core are identifiable and listed in Transfer Guides which are available in Colorado
community college advising offices. These guides provide information on CU-Denver admission requirements and course equivalencies. Potential transfer students may want to contact the coordinator of the Successful Transition Program in the CU-Denver Admissions office at 556-4950 for assistance.
Other Transfer Credit
Credit granted for courses by examination is treated as transfer credit without a grade but does count toward graduation and other requirements for which it is appropriate.
ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM
The Advanced Placement Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency, and are granted advanced standing in those areas. All credit must be validated by subsequent academic performance. For more information, contact your high school counselor or the Office of Admissions at CU-Denver.
CREDIT BY EXAMINATION
Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade-point average of at least 2.0, and be currently registered. Examinations are arranged through the Records Office, and a non-refundable fee is charged.
Students interested in Credit By Examination should contact the office of the dean of the CU-Denver school or college in which they are enrolled.
COLLEGE-LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM
Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have demonstrated college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examinations Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing service.
Students who are interested in credit for CLEP examinations should contact the
office of the CU-Denver school or college in which they are enrolled.
MILITARY SERVICE AND SCHOOLING
To have credit for educational experiences evaluated, applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application: (1) a copy of DD Form 214 and (2) DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Education Experience During Military Service. USAF personnel may present two official transcripts from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of the DD Form 295.
Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education, to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver.
Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions.
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS (ROTC)
Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for nonbusiness elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business, and then only if the ROTC program is completed.
INTRA-UNIVERSITY
TRANSFER
CU-Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver Intra-University Transfer Forms may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Courses. Decisions on intra-university transfers are made by the


Undergraduate Admissions / 39
college or school to which the student wishes to transfer.
Division of Extended Studies students wishing to enroll in regular CU-Denver courses or degree programs should contact the Office of Admissions.
READMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR FORMER STUDENTS
CU-Denver students who have not registered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year or longer, and who have not attended another institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmission. An additional application fee is not required unless you are going from undergraduate to graduate or non-degree to degree. Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions.
Students who have not attended the University for up to one year, but have attended another college or university in the interim, are required to pay a $30 (subject to change) non-refundable transfer application fee.
Students who have attended another college or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as transfer students and meet the transfer student deadlines for receipt of documents. This requires payment of the $30 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee and submission of two official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended. Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to CU-Denver Office of Admissions; Campus Box 167; P. 0. Box 173364; Denver, CO 80217-3364.
Students who last attended another CU campus (including the Division of Extended Studies) must formally apply for readmission. Application forms are available from the Office of Admissions.
ADMISSION FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENTS
Persons who have reached the age of twenty and who want to take University courses, but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree at this time, may be admitted as non-degree students provided that they are academically eligible and admissible. Correspondence and questions regarding admission as a nondegree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions. Those seeking admission as non-degree students for the purpose of teacher certification should contact the School of Education, 556-2717.
Each school/college limits the number of semester hours that are transferable to a degree program.
Students considering changing from non-degree to degree status should contact the school/ college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the number of hours that may be taken as a non-degree student.
Courses taken as a non-degree student are for credit and can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional improvement.
Note: International students are not admitted as non-degree students, except for summer sessions. They must hold a valid student visa.
Students with a baccalaureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for course work as non-degree students. Students in a nondegree status who have a previous degree pay graduate non-degree tuition rates. There are several types of these students. Among them are teachers who seek renewal of certification; students who wish to take additional course work for professional or personal improvement; and students who feel a need to make up deficiencies before entering a specific graduate program.
To apply for admission as a non-degree student, obtain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office of Admissions. Return completed application by the deadline for the term desired. A $15 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee is required. No additional credentials are required. Applicants who seek teacher certification must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials. Nondegree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space available basis.
To continue registration as a nondegree student, a minimum grade-point average of 2.0 must be maintained.
Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined in the Non-degree to Degree procedures available from the Office of Admissions. Academic credentials (i.e., transcripts and/or test scores) and a $30 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee also must be submitted. Nondegree students who are accepted to an undergraduate degree program may generally, with the approval of their academic dean, transfer a limited number of credit hours for courses taken as a nondegree student to the degree program. During the first semester of their enroll-
ment, non-degree students should consult with the college to which they are applying for the maximum number of semester credit hours transferable toward a degree program.
ADMISSION FOR STUDENTS SEEKING A SECOND UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE
Students who already hold a bachelor’s degree may apply for admission to a program in which they can earn a second undergraduate degree. These students may apply to the College of Engineering and Applied Science or Liberal Arts and Sciences. The College of Business and Administration does not allow students to apply for a second undergraduate degree. Students interested in the field of education should contact the School of Education office for information (556-2717).
Applicants for a second undergraduate degree must meet the admissions standards of the University of Colorado at Denver.
How to Apply
1. Obtain an application for undergraduate admission from the Office of Admissions.
2. Complete the application in full and send it to the Office of Admissions with a $30 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee.
3. Have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions; Campus Box 167; P.0. Box 173364; Denver, CO 80217-3364. Handcarried or faxed copies are not official. Transcripts from the institution where the first undergraduate degree was earned must have final grades posted for the semester that the student graduated and have the official notation of the degree awarded.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. Students who do not declare all previously attended institutions are subject to disciplinary action and/ or dismissal.
Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate all previously attended institutions will be denied admission to the University.


40 / Undergraduate Admissions
HIGH SCHOOL CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
High school juniors and seniors with demonstrated academic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for one term only. This approval may be renewed. Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program. For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions, (303) 556-2704.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to undergraduate and graduate programs.
Undergraduate: Admission requirements for CU-Denver’s schools and colleges vary, and international students seeking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Prospective students should request an International Student Application packet from the Office of Admissions. Information about requirements for each CU-Denver college and school can be found in this catalog.
Deadlines for receipt of documents have been established to allow for the timely mailings of 1-20’s. These are:
Fall Spring Summer
July 22 December 1 May 3
Graduate: International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an undergraduate bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score of 525. Some graduate departments may require a higher score. Applications are available from the Office of Admissions. These applications should be received six months prior to the term for which the student is applying.
Note: Except for summer sessions, international students must be in a degreeseeking status. They may attend summer sessions as non-degree students. This exception is strictly limited to summer sessions.


The Graduate School
Dean: Fernie Baca
Office: CU-Denver Bldg, (formerly Dravo), Room 720
Telephone: (303) 556-2663
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
Quality graduate programs are synonymous with the University of Colorado. Professors are actively involved in research or creative activity and, as teacher/schol-ars, continue to study and absorb new data, ideas, and techniques, eventually bringing these experiences to the classroom. Graduate students at CU-Denver gain not only from interactions with the graduate faculty, but also from other students. Because most of CU-Denver’s graduate students are older and employed, they bring practical experience gained in the Denver community to the classroom and are ready to relate the realities of practice to the models presented.
The CU-Denver Graduate School is part of the University-wide Graduate School. The CU-Denver Graduate School administers all master’s and doctoral programs approved for the Denver campus.
Degrees Offered
The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through the Graduate School at CU-Denver.
The Master of Arts (M.A.) in:
Anthropology
Biology
Communication and Theatre
Economics
English
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
The Master of Arts (M.A. Education) in: Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education
Early Childhood Education Education Instruction and Curriculum Educational Psychology Special Education
The Master of Science (M.S.) in:
Applied Mathematics Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Science Mechanical Engineering Technical Communication
The Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.)
The Master of Engineering (M.E.)1 The Master of Humanities (M.H.)
The Master of Social Science (M.S.S.)
The Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in: Applied Mathematics Educational Leadership and Innovation Health and Behavioral Sciences Public Administration Course work is available at the Denver campus in the programs listed below. Student residents on the Denver campus studying in these areas may take advantage of the multi-campus activities of The Graduate School.
Biology
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Communication
Computer Science
Electrical Engineering
English
Mechanical Engineering Psychology
The Graduate School at CU-Denver
An average of 4,950 students are enrolled in graduate programs at CU-Denver each fall and spring semester. This figure includes 1,008 non-degree students taking graduate courses. Approximately 74 percent of enrolled graduate students are part-time students.
Computing Services
The Computing, Information, and Network Services supports computer use by both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. For a complete description of services offered, see Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section of this catalog.
Financial Aid for Graduate Study
COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT
The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the state of Colorado. Grant awards are announced each semester for the following term. Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid.
COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and continuing regular degree doctored students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise and to continuing students on the basis of academic success.
GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS
Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructorship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course.
A half-time appointment for an instructor is considered to be equal to 6 class contact hours; a half-time teaching assistant is appointed for 20 hours per week. Compensation is based on the number of hours per week. Teaching assistants and instructors must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/graduate, 1 hour of thesis or dissertation, or as a candidate
'Awarded through CU-Bou!der


42 / The Graduate School
for degree) in good standing for the full period of their appointment.
RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS
Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Assistants must be enrolled as full-time students (registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed undergraduate/ graduate, 1 hour of thesis or dissertation, or as a candidate for degree).
LOAN FUNDS
Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college workstudy program should submit an Application for Financial Aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March
1. This office also provides short-term loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Application should be made directly to the Office of Financial Aid.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work, either through conventional employment or through the college workstudy program.
Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy.
International Education
The Office of International Education expedites the exchange of students and faculty, entertains foreign visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and acts as advisor for the Fulbright and other student fellowships.
The office also arranges study abroad programs. Students remain enrolled at the University of Colorado while taking regular courses in the foreign universities. A B average with the equivalent of two years of college-level work in the appropriate language is required. There also are occasional summer programs offering academic credit.
Peace Corps information may also be obtained from the Office of International Education.
For additional information contact the Office of International Education at 556-3489.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION
General Requirements
Students may be admitted to The Graduate School in either of the two categories described below.
REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS
Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, applicants for admission as regular degree students must:
1. Hold a baccalaureate degree from a college or university of recognized standing, or have work experience equivalent to that required for such a degree and equivalent to the degree given at this university.
2. Show promise of ability to pursue advanced study and research, as judged by their previous scholastic record.
3. Have adequate preparation to enter graduate study in the field chosen.
4. Have at least a 2.75 undergraduate grade-point average on all work taken.
5. Meet additional requirements for admission as established by major departments.
Regular degree students must maintain at least a 3.0 grade-point average each semester or summer session on all work taken, whether it is to be applied toward the intended advanced degree or not. Students who fail to maintain this standard of performance will be subject to suspension from The Graduate School.
PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS
Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as regular degree students may be admitted as provisional degree students upon the recommendation of the major department. A department may admit provisioned students for a probationary term which may not exceed two consecutive calendar years. At the end of the probationary period, provisional degree students must either be admitted to regular degree status or be dropped from the graduate program. Credit earned by persons in provisional degree status may count toward a degree at this University.
According to the terms of their provisional admission, provisional degree students are required to maintain a 3.0 grade-point average or higher, each semester or summer session on all work taken, whether or not it is to be applied toward the advanced degree sought. Students who fail to maintain such a standard of performance will be subject to suspension from the Graduate School.
Note: All provisional applicants must have completed a minimum of six semester hours of graduate-level course work or must take the Graduate Record Examination and submit scores as part of the application.
The University reserves the right to deny admission to applicants whose total credentials reflect an inability to assume the standards of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University and relevant to any of its lawful missions, processes, and functions as an educational institution.
SENIORS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO
A senior at this university who has satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements, and who needs not more than 6 semester hours of advanced subject and 12 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor’s degree, may be admitted to the Graduate School by special permission of the dean.
A University of Colorado senior enrolled in the College of Engineering and Applied Science who needs not more than 18 semester hours or 36 credit points to meet the requirements for a bachelor’s degree may be admitted to the Graduate School, but is not eligible for financial aid, scholarships, or fellowships as a graduate student until the equivalent of the minimum requirements for the bachelor’s degree have been satisfied.
Application Procedures
Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the Office of Admissions concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications.
An applicant for admission must present a completed Application Form (Parts 1 and II). which may be obtained from the Office of Admissions, and two official transcripts from each institution attended.
The application must be accompanied by a nonrefundable application fee of $40 (check or money order) when the application is submitted. No application will be processed unless this fee is paid. Many departments require scores from the Graduate Record Examination, and all


Graduate Admission / 43
departments require three or four letters of recommendation.
When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson of each department or a student admissions committee shall decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and shall make that decision known to the Office of Admissions, which will inform the student. Persons not wishing to work toward an advanced degree are referred to as non-degree students (see Non-Degree Students in this section).
A completed application must be in the office of the major department at least 90 days prior to the term for which admission is sought or earlier as may be required by the major department.
Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award for the academic year 1994-95, e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship, must file a completed application with the department before the announced departmental deadline.
RE-ADMISSION OF FORMER AND SUSPENDED STUDENTS
Students who were previously admitted to a graduate degree program, but did not complete that degree program, and have not been registered for one year or more at the University must:
1. Clarify their status with the department or school/college to determine their eligibility to return and pursue the same degree.
2. After receiving departmental approval as indicated above, submit a new application Part I to the Office of Admissions before departmental deadlines have passed for the term in which they expect to return to the University. A $40 application fee is required. Application deadlines are available from the department.
Former students who wish to change from undergraduate to graduate status or from one major to another must apply to the new department.
Students transferring from one campus to another must apply and be accepted to the new campus.
A student admitted to The Graduate School for the master’s program must reapply for the doctoral program.
A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student’s major department and the school/college dean. In case of lack of agreement between the department and the dean or in the case of appeal by the student, the final decision will be made by the Graduate Council.
FOREIGN APPLICANTS
Prospective foreign students should have completed applications on file in the Office of Admissions prior to December 1 for the summer session, March 1 for the fall semester, and July 1 for the spring semester. The application packet should include the $50 fee, TOEFL scores, financial documentation, Graduate Record Examination scores, official English translation of all school records, and other documents as noted in the previous section on Application Procedures.
Acceptable TOEFL Scores. The TOEFL is the Test of English as a Foreign Language.
If a student’s native language is not English, or the student has not attended a British or American university for at least one year and achieved satisfactory grades, then he/she must take the TOEFL. All programs within CU-Denver’s Graduate School-arts and sciences, education, engineering, and doctoral programs -require a minimum score of 525 for regular admission. Those earning less than 525 will normally be referred to the Spring International Language Center (on campus) for further language study. During that time, students will study on an 1-20 from Spring International, but may take classes as non-degree students at CU-Denver. They may subsequently be granted regular admission to the Graduate School. All international students who take the TOEFL and are granted regular admission to CU-Denver’s Graduate School will be asked to take both the Michigan and SPEAK tests during their first semester of study. Those whose TOEFL scores fall between 525 and 550 will be required to take additional language training in light of whatever deficiencies may be revealed by these diagnostic tests. Those whose TOEFL exceeds 550 will be encouraged, but not required, to undertake additional training in light of their performance on these tests. Students seeking admission to all other graduate programs, including those in architecture and planning, business, and public affairs, should consult those program descriptions for language requirements.
GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION
At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination may be required of applicants for admission to the graduate program or for assis-tantships prior to determining student status.
Students who are applying for assis-tantships for the fall semester should take
the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the selection committee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by an institution.
Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from The Educational Testing Service, Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701, or Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
OTHER GRADUATE QUALIFYING EXAMINATIONS
Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain information at the Student Testing Center on the following examinations: Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), Graduate Record Examination (GRE), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (LSAT).
NON-DEGREE STUDENTS
A student not wishing to earn an advanced degree from the University of Colorado at Denver should apply to the Office of Admissions, Campus Box 167,
P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364. Non-degree students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted.
Non-degree students desiring to pursue a graduate degree program at this university are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and supporting credentials as soon as possible.
A department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of as many as 9 credit hours toward the requirements of a master’s degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a non-degree student at the University of Colorado, or both.
In addition, the department may recommend to the graduate dean the acceptance of credit courses taken as a non-degree student at this university during the term for which the student applied for admission to the Graduate School, provided such admission date was delayed through no fault of the student. A grade of B or better must be obtained in any course work transferred in this manner.


44 / The Graduate School
REGISTRATION
Course Work and Examinations
On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to the Graduate School and who expect to study in the Graduate School are required to complete appropriate registration procedures.
Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted into the Graduate School. If unable to attend that semester, they must notify the department that has accepted them and submit the necessary forms to the Office of Admissions and Records at CU-Denver in order to attend the following semester.
Changes in Registration
A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should follow the drop/add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Courses). After the tenth week of classes graduate students may not drop, add, or change a course to nocredit status without presenting a letter to the dean of their school/college, stating the exceptional circumstances that justify the change. This letter, endorsed by the instructor of the course, must accompany the properly signed and completed drop/add card or no-credit option form.
Withdrawal
Graduate students who desire to withdraw from the University must apply to the dean of their school/college for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official withdrawal will be marked as having failed the course. The withdrawal form must be signed by the instructor of the course andpass/fail must be indicated with the instructor’s initials.
Master's Thesis
Graduate students working toward master’s degrees, and planning to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree, must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Limitation of Registration
FULL LOAD
A graduate student will be considered to be carrying a full load during a regular semester for purposes of determining residence credit, if the student is registered for at least 5 credit hours of mixed under-graduate/graduate, 1 hour of thesis/dis-sertation, or as a candidate for degree.
A maximum of two-thirds of a semester of resident credit may be earned during the summer if a student registers for three semester hours of other graduate work or any number of thesis hours.
For the number of hours required for financial aid, see “Financial Aid at the University of Colorado at Denver” in the General Information section of this catalog. A graduate student may contact the school/ college dean’s office for information on the appeal process regarding the full load requirement for financial aid purposes.
MAXIMUM LOAD
No graduate student may receive credit toward a degree for more them 15 hours in a regular semester. The maximum number of graduate credits that may be applied toward a degree during a summer term at CU-Denver is 10 hours per 10-week summer term. A graduate student may contact the school/college dean’s office for information on the appeal process regarding an overload.
UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES
Full-time employees of the University may not undertake more than 6 credit hours per semester. Part-time employees, including assistants, may take the number of credit hours approved by the major department.
TUITION AND FEES
The schedule of tuition and fees is given in the General Information section of this catalog.
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADVANCED DEGREES
Quality of Graduate Work
Although the work for advanced degrees is specified partly in terms of credit hours, an advanced degree will not be conferred merely for the completion of a specified period of residence and the passing of a given number of courses. Students should not expect to obtain all the training, knowledge, and grasp of
ideas necessary to meet the requirement for an advanced degree from formal courses. They should work on their own initiative, reading widely and thoughtfully, reaching their own conclusions, and acquiring a sense of values, perspective, and proportion.
All studies offered for credit toward an advanced degree (except those in deficiencies) must be of graduate status.
A student is expected to maintain at least a B average in all work attempted while enrolled in the Graduate School.
For the M.A., M.H., M.S., M.S.S.,
a course mark below C is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward the minimum requirements for these degrees.
For the Ph.D., a course mark below B is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward fulfilling the minimum requirements for the degree.
A student who fails to do satisfactory work will be subject to suspension from the Graduate School by the dean, with the approval of the major department.
Appeal may be made to the Graduate Council. The Council’s decision shall be final. A suspended student is eligible to apply for readmission after one year. Approval or rejection of this application rests jointly with the student’s major department and the dean.
Repeating a Course
A graduate student who receives a grade of C, D, or Fin a course may repeat the course once, upon written recommendation to the dean by the chairman of the student’s advisory committee and major department, provided the course has not previously been applied toward a degree.
In calculating a student’s grade-point average for Graduate School purposes, the grade for a repeated course will substitute for the old grade. Grades earned in courses taken as an undergraduate or as a non-degree student, as well as grades earned in first- and second-year foreign language courses, will not be used in calculating the Graduate School grade-point average; however, all grades received will appear on the student’s transcript.
Change of Department or Major
A graduate student wishing to change department or major must submit a new Part /and Part Hoi the graduate application to the new department or school and request that the former department forward recommendations and credentials. The student must be formally accepted by the new department.


Master’s Degree / 45
Use of English
A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of standard English in all oral and written work may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated sis an attainment of major importance.
Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate’s proficiency.
Graduate Appeals
Final action on appeals submitted by graduate students concerning action taken by faculty members, programs, or administrative officials rests with the campus Graduate Council, unless such appeal involves a matter affecting two or more campuses. In such a case, the final action rests with the Executive Committee of the System-Wide Graduate School.
MASTER'S DEGREE
A student regularly admitted to the Graduate School and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master’s degrees will be recommended for the degree only after the following requirements have been met.
In general, only graduates of an approved institution who have a thorough preparation for their proposed field of study and who do graduate work of high quality are able to attain the degree with the minimum amount of work specified below. All studies offered toward the minimum requirement for the degree must be of graduate rank. Necessary additional work required to make up deficiencies or prerequisites may be partly or entirely undergraduate courses.
The requirements stated below are minimum requirements; additional conditions set by the department will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make further regulations not inconsistent with the general rules.
Students planning to graduate should ascertain current deadlines of the Graduate School. It is the graduate student’s and the department’s responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e. changing of IWgrades, notifying the Graduate School of final examinations, etc.).
Departments or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student’s responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Requirements
The minimum requirements of graduate work for the degrees Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by following either Plan I or Plan II below.
Plan I: By presenting 24 semester hours of graduate work, including a thesis. At least 18 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above.
Plan II: By presenting 30 semester hours of graduate work, without a thesis. At least 16 semester hours of this work must be at the 5000 level or above.
Plan II does not represent a free option for the student. A candidate for the master’s degree may be allowed to select Plan II only on the recommendation of the department concerned.
Graduate Credit
Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above and that are offered by professors who are members of the graduate faculty, or that have otherwise been approved by the dean of the Graduate School. No assurance can be given that work taken by a student will count toward a higher degree unless the student has the approval of the department.
Not all courses listed are available at any one time; some are given in alternate years.
Courses taken during the Fall Semester 1975 and thereafter will have graduate rank if they are taught by members of The Graduate School faculty and are in one of the following categories:
1. Courses within the major program at the 5000 level or above.
2. Courses outside the major program at the 4000 level, provided they have been approved for a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean.
3. Courses that are outside the major program, provided they are approved for
a specific degree plan by the faculty of the degree-granting program and by the campus graduate dean.
4. The Master of Basic Science program (M.B.S.) has approved for 3000- and 4000-level courses if approved by the
department and the dean of the Graduate School.
This does not change the minimum number of courses that must be taken at the 5000 level or above; however, as a result, most students who include 4000-level courses of other departments in their program will not exceed those minimum requirements for graduation.
Field of Study
Studies leading to a master’s degree may be divided between major and minor subjects at the discretion of the faculty of the degree-granting program.
Status
After students have made a satisfactory record in this university for at least one semester or summer term, and after they have removed any deficiencies that were determined at the time of admission (or by qualifying examinations or otherwise), they should confer with their major department and request that a decision be made on their status. This definite status must be set by the major department before students may make application for admission to candidacy for an advanced degree.
Students who are inadequately prepared must make up without credit toward a graduate degree all prerequisites required by the department concerned.
Language Requirements
Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as each department requires. See specific departmental requirements.
Credit by Transfer
A limited amount of high quality resident graduate work done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere within the time allowed may be accepted, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the dean of the school/college.
Course work taken more than 6 years prior to the completion of fined requirements (comprehensive exam and/or filing of thesis) will not be accepted for the degree unless validated by a special examination.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this university is 9 semester hours.


46 / The Graduate School
Credit will not be transferred until the student has established in The Graduate School of this university a satisfactory record of at least one semester in residence; such transfer will not reduce the residence at this university, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses.
Work already applied toward a master’s degree received from another institution cannot be accepted for transfer toward the master’s degree at the University of Colorado; courses with “Pass/Fail” or “Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory” grades will not be transferred; extension work completed at another institution cannot be transferred; and correspondence work, except to make up deficiencies, is not recognized.
Excess undergraduate credits from another institution may not be transferred to the Graduate School. Seniors at this University may, however, transfer a limited amount of advanced resident work (up to 9 semester hours), provided such work:
1. Is completed with distinction in the senior year at this university.
2. Comes within the four-year time limit.
3. Is no lower than a C.
4. Has not been applied toward another degree.
5. Is recommended for transfer by the department concerned and approved by the dean of the school/college. Requests for transfer of credit to be
applied toward an advanced degree must be made on the form specified for this purpose, and submitted to the school/college by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which the student will be graduated. For more information, contact your graduate advisor. To be eligible for courses to be considered for transfer, a student must have an overall B average in all courses taken at the University of Colorado in the Graduate School.
Continuing Education Course Work
Students may use courses offered through the Division of Extended Studies in the pursuit of graduate study only if they obtain proper academic approval from the major department and the school/college dean in advance.
Residence
In general, the residence requirements can be met only by residence at the University for at least two semesters or at
least three summer terms. For full residence, a student must be registered within the time designated at the beginning of a semester and must carry the equivalent of not fewer than 5 semester hours of work in courses numbered 5000 or above, or at least a combination of other course work acceptable for graduate credit. See Limitation of Registration, Full Load, for requirements for full residence credit during the summer. Students who are noticeably deficient in their general training, or in the specific preparation indicated by each department as prerequisite to graduate work, cannot expect to obtain a degree in the minimum time specified.
Graduate assistants and other employees of the University may fulfill the residence requirements of one year in two semesters, provided their duties do not require more than half-time. Full-time employees may not satisfy the residence requirements of one year in fewer than four semesters.
Admission to Candidacy
A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master’s degree must file application in the graduate dean’s office two weeks prior to the completion of the comprehensive final examination. The number of hours to be presented for the degree must be determined before this application may be filed. See previous section on Status.
This application must be made on forms obtainable from the Graduate School dean’s office and in various departments, and must be signed by the major department, certifying that the student’s work is satisfactory and that the program outlined in the application meets the requirements set for the student.
A student on Graduate School probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation.
Master's Thesis Credit
Every graduate student working toward a master’s degree who expects to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree must register for thesis for a minimum of 4 semester hours or a maximum of 6 semester hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence, but the total number of hours for all semesters must equal the number of credits the student expects to receive for the thesis. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis
is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an in progress (IP) will be reported. (The student may not register again for any portion of thesis credit on which an IP grade has been submitted.)
Thesis Requirements
A thesis, which may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type, is required of every master’s degree candidate under Plan I. Every thesis presented in partied fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must:
1. Deed with a definite topic related to the major field.
2. Be based upon independent study and investigation.
3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work.
4. Receive the approval of the major department not later than 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the commencement at which the degree is to be conferred.
5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given.
6. Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in Directions for Preparing Masters ’ and Doctoral Theses, which is obtainable from the Graduate School.
Two weeks prior to the date on which the degree is to be conferred, three formally approved, printed or typewritten copies of the thesis must be filed in The Graduate School. The thesis must be complete with abstract.
All theses must be signed by the thesis advisor and the second reader. All approved theses are kept on file in the library. The thesis binding fee must be paid when the thesis is submitted to The Graduate School.
Credit hours earned for the thesis will not be accepted toward the requirements for a degree unless such credit has previously been registered. A student working toward a master’s degree must register for thesis for a specific number of hours. The student may register for any specific number of hours in any semester of residence,but the total registered credit for thesis must total a minimum of 4 or a maximum of 6 semester hours, the total number of hours depending upon how much credit is to be given for the thesis.
The final grade will be withheld until the thesis or report is completed. An IP (in progress) will be reported for terms during which the student is registered for thesis prior to completion of the thesis.


Doctor of Philosophy / 47
Comprehensive Final Examination
All candidates for a master’s degree are required to take a comprehensive final examination after the other requirements for the degree have been completed. This examination may be given near the end of their last semester of residence while they are still taking required courses for the degree, provided they are making satisfactory progress in those courses.
The following rules applying to the comprehensive final examination must be observed:
1. Students must be registered when they take the examination.
2. Notice of the examination must be filed by the major department in the Graduate School office at least one week in advance of the examination.
3. The examination is to be given by a committee of three graduate faculty members appointed by the department concerned, in consultation with the dean.
4. The examination, which may be oral, written, or both, must cover the thesis, which should be essentially complete at the time, as well as other work done in the University in formal courses and seminars in the major field.
5. An examination in the minor work taken at this university is optional with the major and minor departments.
6. The examination must include all work presented for the degree not done in residence at the University of Colorado, whether in the major or minor field.
The examination on transferred work will be given by representatives of the corresponding fields of study in this university.
7. A student who fails the comprehensive final examination may not attempt the examination again until at least three months have elapsed and until such work as may be prescribed by the examining committee has been completed. The student may retake the examination only once.
Supplemental Examinations
Supplemental examinations should be simply an extension of the original comprehensive examination and given afterward. If the student fails the supplemental examination, three months must elapse before attempting the comprehensive examination again.
Course Examinations
The regular written examinations for each semester except the last must be taken. Course examinations for the last semester, which come after the comprehensive final examination has been passed, may be omitted with the consent of the instructor.
Time Limit
Master’s degree students have 5 years, from the date of the start of course work, to complete all degree requirements. For students who fail to complete the degree in this 5-year period, it will be necessary for the program director to file an annual statement with the graduate dean stating the reasons why the program faculty believe the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. Students who do their work exclusively in summer terms must complete all degree requirements within 72 months from the start of course work.
A student who does not complete all degree requirements within the specified period of time must validate, by special examination^), any course work taken more than 6 years prior to taking the master’s comprehensive examination or completing the thesis defense, depending on which plan is elected.
Deadlines for Master's Degree Candidates Expecting to Graduate During 1994-95
Deadline dates for the following can be obtained by calling the Graduate School office, 556-2663.
1. Last day for requesting transfer of credit.
2. Applications for admission to candidacy. Students are urged to submit this form by the beginning of the semester prior to that in which they expect to receive the degree. (The form may be picked up in the department or in the Graduate School office.)
3. Last day for thesis to be approved by department.
4. Last day for scheduling of comprehensive final examination.
5. Last day for taking comprehensive final examination.
6. Last day for submitting thesis to the Graduate School. At the time of submission, the thesis must be complete in all respects and must meet thesis specifications in order to be accepted by the Graduate School. Candidates whose theses are received after 5 p.m. on the indicated date will be graduated at the commencement following that for which the deadline is indicated.
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University. To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued. Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work in this field; furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge. The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules.
Studies leading to the Ph.D. degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments. The criterion as to what constitutes am acceptable field of study shall be that the student’s work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University.
Students planning to graduate should obtain current deadline dates in the office of the Graduate School. It is the graduate student’s and the department’s responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notifying the Graduate School of final examinations, etc.).
Department or program committees may have additional deadlines that must be met by graduate students in that department or program. It is the student’s


48 / The Graduate School
responsibility to ascertain such requirements and to meet them as designated by the department or program chair.
Minimum Course/Dissertation Requirements
A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph.D. degree.
Course Work Requirement A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses numbered 5000 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum. At least 20 of the required hours must be in graduate courses taken at this university. Students who have been admitted to the Graduate School with deficiencies may expect to receive little or no residence credits until the deficiencies have been removed.
Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the Ph.D., a student must register for a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than 10 of these credit hours in any one semester. Not more than 10 dissertation hours may be taken preceding the semester of taking comprehensive examinations. In addition, up to 10 hours may be taken in the semester in which the student passes comprehensives. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above and will not be included in calculation of the student’s grade-point average. Only the grades of A, B and IP shall be used.
Course work and work on the dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program; however, at no time shall a doctoral student register for more them 15 hours of 5000-level and above courses. Normally, a student must have earned at least three and not more than six semesters of residency before admission to candidacy.
Advisory Committee
As soon as the field of specialization has been chosen, the candidate will request the faculty member with whom the committee wishes to work to act as chair of the advisory committee. The chair, with the advice and approval of the chair of the department, may select two or more additional members to serve on the committee, so that the several fields related to the student’s special interest will be represented. A purpose of the advisory committee (beyond guiding the student through
graduate study) is to ensure against specialization that is too narrow. The student shall obtain the signature of the chair of the committee (thereby signifying his or her willingness to act) on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form. Any change in the membership of the advisory committee is to be similarly reported.
Residence
The student must be properly registered to earn residence credit. The minimal residence requirement shell] be six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor’s degree. Mere attendance shall not constitute residence as the word is here used. Residence may be earned for course work completed with distinction, for participation in seminars, or for scholarly research performed here or elsewhere under the auspices of the University of Colorado.
As a guiding policy in determining residence credit for employed students, those who are employed in three-fourths to full-time work that does not contribute directly to their program toward a degree may not earn more than one-half residence credit in any semester. Students who are employed more than one-fourth time and less than three-fourths time in work that does not contribute directly to the degree may earn not more than three-fourths residence credit. Those who have one-fourth time employment or less may earn full residence credit. (All these provisions are subject to the definition of residence credit given in the preceding paragraph.) In case the interpretation of residence credit for any student needs to be clarified, a decision will be made by the chair of the student’s advisory committee, the chair of the student’s major department, and the dean of the Graduate School.
Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master’s degree from another institution of approved standing, but at least four semesters of residence credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work (course and/or dissertation) taken at this university.
A part of the residence requirement for the Ph.D. degree may be spent in another graduate institution, or in field work in absentia (provided that prior approval for work is given by the student’s program director and provided that the student’s registration is maintained for that period away from the campus).
Preliminary Examination
Each department will satisfy itself (by examination or other means) that students who signify intent to undertake study for the Ph.D. degree are qualified to do so. The means by which each department makes this evaluation shall be specified in departmental requirements. Students who are thus evaluated will be notified immediately of the results. The results of this preliminary evaluation shall be reported to the Graduate School office on the Application for Admission to Candidacy form filed by the student at least two weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
Language Requirement
The decision on foreign language requirements for Ph.D. degrees is the responsibility of the graduate faculty of each graduate program.
Credit by Transfer
Resident graduate work of high quality earned in another institution of approved standing will not be accepted for transfer to apply toward the doctorate until the student has established a satisfactory record in residence in this Graduate School, but such credit must be transferred before the student makes application for admission to candidacy for the degree. Such transfer will not reduce the minimum residence requirement at this university, but it may reduce the amount of work to be done in formal courses.
The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this university for the Ph.D. is 30 semester hours.
Application for Admission to Candidacy
A student must make formal application for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree on forms supplied by the Graduate School office at least 2 weeks before the comprehensive examination is attempted.
A student shall have earned at least three semesters of residence, and shall have passed the comprehensive examination before admission to candidacy for the degree.
Continuous Registration Requirements for Doctoral Candidates
Following successful completion of comprehensive examinations, students


Doctor of Philosophy / 49
must register continuously. Students admitted to candidacy for degree will register for and be charged for seven hours of credit for each full-time term of doctoral work. For each term of part-time enrollment, students will be charged for seven hours of dissertation credit, except that students not making use of campus facilities may petition The Graduate School for three-credit-hour status. Continuous registration during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense. It is expected that the student and advisor will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classification identified above.
Comprehensive Examination
Before admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree, the student must pass a comprehensive examination in the field of concentration and related fields. This examination may be oral, written, or both, and will test the student’s mastery of a broad field of knowledge, not merely the formal course work completed. The oral part is open to members of the faculty.
The student must be registered at the time the comprehensive examination is attempted.
The examination shall be conducted by an examining board appointed by the chair of the department concerned and be approved by the campus graduate dean. The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to total a minimum of five.
A successful candidate must receive the affirmative votes of a majority of the members of the examination board. In case of failure, the examination may be attempted once more after a period of time determined by the examining board.
Dissertation Requirements
A thesis based upon original investigation, showing mature scholarship, critical judgment, and familiarity with the tools and methods of research must be written upon a subject approved by the student’s major department. To be acceptable, this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student’s special field. It must be finished and submitted in typewritten form at least 30 days (in some departments, 90 days) before the day of the final examination, and must be formally approved and made available for inspection by the examining committee before the final examination may be taken.
In mechanical features, all dissertations must comply with the specifications of The Graduate School as outlined in the Directions for Preparing Masters ’ and Doctoral Theses, which may be obtained from The Graduate School.
It is the student’s responsibility to notify The Graduate School of the exact title of the dissertation at least six weeks prior to the commencement at which the student will graduate. This title will be printed in the commencement program (May graduation only).
Two formally approved, typewritten copies of the dissertation, including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in The Graduate School office at least two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred.
The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International. The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department.
All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than two members of the major department staff who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction.
All approved dissertations are kept on file in the library.
When the dissertation is deposited in The Graduate School, the candidate must pay the thesis-binding fee and sign an agreement with University Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform.
Final Examination
After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dissertation and related topics will be conducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral, the oral portion being open to anyone. The examination will be conducted by a committee consisting of at least five persons, one of whom must be from outside the student’s department. More than one dissenting vote will disqualify the candidate in the finail examination.
Arrangements for the final examination must be made in the graduate dean's office at least two weeks in advance. The examination must be scheduled not later
than two weeks before the date on which the degree is to be conferred. A student must be registered at the time of the final examination.
Time Limit
If a student fails to complete all requirements for the degree within the prescribed number of years from the date of the start of course work in the doctoral program, a second examination similar to the first will be required before the candidate may take the final examination. The number of years allowed for completion is normally six, but in some programs it may be seven. If the comprehensive examination is failed, it may be attempted once more after not fewer than eight months of further work. For students who fail to complete the degree in this six-year period, it will be necessary for the department to file an annual statement indicating that the program director believes the student is making adequate progress and should be allowed to continue in the program. This request must be signed by three members of the graduate faculty who serve on the student’s thesis advisory committee. If approved by the campus graduate dean, the student may continue his/her studies for one additional year. If not approved, the student may be dropped from the program.




The New College of Architecture and Planning
Interim Dean: Bruce W. Bergland Office: CU-Denver Building., Third Floor Telephone: (303) 556-3382
Faculty
Professors: Spenser Havlick, George Hoover, Yuk Lee, Dwayne Nuzum,
John Prosser, Peter Schneider,
Raymond Studer, Jr., Luis Summers, Willem van Vliet
Associate Professors: Ernesto Arias,
Lois Brink, Thomas Clark, Joan Draper, Phillip Gallegos, Harry Garnham, Mark Gelernter, Marvin Hatami, Bernard Jones, Joseph Juhasz, Raymond McCall, Jr., Paul Saporito Assistant Professors: Carmela Canzonieri, Mark Gross, Julee Herdt, Michael Holleran, Taisto Makela, Hans Morgenthaler, Bennett Neiman,
Won Jin Tae, Diane Wilk, Ping Xu Senior Instructors: Ned Collier, Douglas Darden, Robert Flanagan, John Frankhouser, Allen Harlow, Lawrence Loftin III, Anthony Pellecchia
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
The New College of Architecture and Planning at the University of Colorado at Denver is unique in that it offers its 800 students exceptional educational experiences in two distinctive and different locations. The College’s graduate programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban design and urban and regional planning are taught on the Denver campus of the University of Colorado in the heart of a vital downtown, and its undergraduate pre-professional environmental design program is offered on the Boulder campus in an environment ideally suited to the needs of undergraduate students.
The College is one of few design schools in the United States which offers the full range of design programs, and which celebrates the important connections between the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture, urban design and urban and regional planning at the graduate level and through its interdisciplinary pre-professional program in environmental design. The diverse and highly qualified faculty of the College provide
students with a broad range of learning opportunities at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and are committed to not only excellence in their teaching, but also excellence in their research, scholarship, and professional work.
Special Activities and Programs
The College provides a diverse range of opportunities which enrich and enhance the education of its students.
In addition to its lecture series, visiting critic series, and its exhibits and publications, the College effectively supports its student organizations. It promotes a range of activities and functions which facilitate contacts between student, faculty, and members of the design professions. It has promoted and supported a summer foreign study program in Rome and Prague for the past two summers. It encourages its students not only to participate in its own study-travel programs, but also to consider the broad range of study opportunities present in similar programs offered by other accredited programs. It offers to its students a range of scholarships and fellowships, some of which are specifically intended to provide enrichment opportunities. It supports an active and focused internship program for its students, giving them access to elective internship opportunities in the Denver metropolitan area. Finally, it encourages and empowers its students to take responsibility for finding ways to enrich their own educational experiences, and supports them in any way that it can to ensure that these are implemented.
School Facilities
The major studio, lecture, seminar, exhibition, laboratory, and office spaces for the graduate programs offered by the New College of Architecture and Planning are located on the third, fourth, and fifth floors of the University of Colorado at Denver Building. The building is located at 14th and Lawrence Streets in downtown Denver, on the north edge of the Auraria campus. All the spaces were reorganized and renovated in the summer of 1991, resulting in greatly improved quality.
Their location at the edge of both the campus and Denver’s active downtown is of significant benefit to the College’s professional programs. The third floor is the locus of the College’s administrative and faculty offices, exhibit spaces, conference and seminar rooms, and the large design studio for the first and second-year students in architecture and landscape architecture. Two large design studios on the fifth floor are set aside for the use of the third-year students in architecture and landscape architecture, as well as the post-professional students in architecture and urban design. There are dedicated pin-up and jury spaces on both the third and the fifth floors adjacent to the studio spaces. The fourth floor is the resource floor for the College’s programs and students, and houses its dedicated lecture rooms, the Architecture and Planning Library, the Darkroom and Photo Studio, the Model Shop, and the program’s state-of-the-art Computer Imaging Laboratory.
Architecture and Planning Library
Librarian: Robert Wick Library Technician: Toby Visoon
The Architecture and Planning Library, a branch of the Auraria Library (administered by the University of Colorado at Denver), serves as a learning resource center in the fields of architecture and planning. It contains the following collections: reference, circulating, documentary (planning documents issued by local, regional, state, and national agencies with an emphasis on planning materials pertaining to Colorado communities and concerns), periodicals, reserve, and nonprint media, including architectural slides.
The Architecture and Planning Library staff consists of a one-third time librarian, library technician, and several student assistants. The Library provides a number of services, including reference and research assistance, and library-use instruction. Additional services, such as interlibrary loan and computer-assisted research, are provided through the Auraria Library.


52 / The New College of Architecture and Planning
Scholarships/Financial Aid
Scholarships and other student assistance funding for the New College of Architecture and Planning and its programs comes from a range of sources, both within the institution and from external sources. Scholarship assistance available to students in the College from these sources totals almost $ 100,000 annually, excluding federal and state financial aid funds. Federal and state financial aid is available through the University’s Office of Financial Aid, which administers these programs. To apply for federal and state financial aid, students should contact: Office of Financial Aid, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 125,
P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364 (303) 556-2886. For information on the availability of scholarships and graduate tuition awards, please contact the program secretary.
ACADEMIC POLICIES Academic Standing
The College requires a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in the graduate programs to remain in good standing and for graduation. If a student’s GPA for a semester is below 3.0, the student shall be placed on probation beginning the following semester. If the student’s overall GPA is below 3.0 following the probationary semester, the student may be dismissed from the College.
Appeals
Academic decisions arising in the course of a class or related academic situation may be appealed. The student should first informally discuss the issue with the relevant faculty member and then with the Program Director. If the matter is not resolved this way, the student may initiate an appeal by writing to the faculty member outlining the reasons for the appeal. Copies are to be forwarded to the Program Director and the Dean.
The faculty member must respond in writing to the student’s written appeal, with copies to the Program Director and the Dean.
An Appeals Committee consisting of three faculty members of the academic program will review the written appeal. The chair of the Appeals Committee will convey its recommendation in writing to the student who has appealed, with copies to the Instructor, Program Director, and Dean.
Attendance and Timeliness of Work
Attendance at all courses is expected. Excessive unexcused absences may result in grade reduction at the discretion of the instructor. Absence from a course will be excused for verified medical reasons and extreme personal emergencies. The student may be required to furnish evidence.
Students’ assignments are to be completed in a timely manner. Any assignment turned in late may have its grade reduced by an amount set at the discretion of the instructor. An assignment may be turned in late without penalty for verified medical reasons and extreme personal emergencies. Students must have their instructor’s written permission to turn an assignment in late. Students with excused late work have up to the end of the quiet week as a grace period to turn in these assignments. Otherwise, the grade “IF’ will be assigned.
Course Sequencing and Advancement
Programs in the College are structured such that certain courses must be taken concurrently or sequentially. Students can be excluded from a course if the course prerequisites have not been met.
Originality of Work
All academic work submitted by a student must represent his or her own effort. Where other sources are used in a student submission, they are to be clearly identified and referenced. The University considers plagiarism and similar acts of falsification a serious matter and grounds for suspension or expulsion. Information on codes of conduct and grievance procedures are available from the University of Colorado at Denver’s Office of Student Academic Services.
ADMISSIONS General Requirements
Applicants to the New College of Architecture and Planning are required to submit the following credentials:
• University of Colorado Application for Graduate Admission form.
• Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended. Transcripts must be mailed by the institution directly to the College. A certified literal English translation must also be submitted for documents that are not in English.
• Letters of recommendation, U.S. resi-dents-three letters; International Applicants-four letters.
• Statement of purpose.
• Portfolio (6-12 pages, bound, 8.5" x 11") Slides not accepted. A portfolio is an orderly presentation of one’s work. This includes examples of creative and analytical work including but not limited to essays, papers, photographs, and photographic reproduction of artistic work such as sculpture, drawings, painting, musical composition, and other fine arts. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must be included for return of portfolio.
• Application fee, non refundable ($40.00 U.S. residents; $50.00 international applicants).
• Graduate Record Exam’s (general) are required in the Urban and Regional Planning Program and recommended for all other programs if student’s GPA is below 3.0.
International Applicants
International applicants are required
to submit the following documents in
addition to the credentials listed under
general requirements.
• TOEFL score. The New College of Architecture and Planning requires a minimum TOEFL score of 550 for students from non-English speaking countries. However, the College will consider applications from students with strong academic credentials whose TOEFL scores are slightly below 550. If accepted, these students will be required to register for an English course. An Official TOEFL Score Report is required; Institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable.
• Financial Resources Statement. International applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds available. To provide this evidence, each international applicant should follow these instructions:
a. If applicant’s own money is to be used: In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement, applicant’s bank must certify that the full amount of money is on deposit in his or her account to meet tuition and expenses.
b. If applicant is sponsored by a family member or friend: The sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. Sponsor’s bank must also certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money


Programs of Study / 53
applicant will need for tuition and expenses.
c. If applicant has been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed.
Statements used for other institutions will not be accepted. Photocopied documents are not accepted unless signed by the originator; signatures must be original.
Application Dates and Deadlines
Fall Semester-March 15 All programs
Spring Semester- November 1
Architecture Program: M. Arch II, MAUD and advanced standing M. Arch Landscape Architecture Program: Advanced standing and postprofessional
Urban and Regional Planning Program Applications received after these dates will be considered only on a space-available basis.
Confirmation Deposit
A non-refundable confirmation deposit of $200 is required to secure an applicant’s place in the program. The deposit is due at the time the applicant accepts the program’s offer of admission. The deposit will be applied to the first semester’s tuition when the student registers for classes.
ADDITIONAL
INFORMATION
To request additional information, please write to: Office of the Dean, The New College of Architecture and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 126, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364, (303) 556-3382. Individuals who wish to visit the College should contact the Architecture and Urban Design Programs at (303) 556-2877, the Landscape Architecture Program at (303) 556-4090, and the Urban and Regional Planning Program at (303) 556-4867, to arrange for an appointment.
PROGRAMS OF STUDY Architecture
Program Director Peter A. Schneider Telephone: (303) 556-2877
The architecture program’s mission is to lead in the discovery, communication, and application of knowledge in the
discipline of architecture. The program’s goals are to excel in the education of its students, in the research and creative endeavors of its faculty, and in its service to the broad range of communities and people central to its role as a regional focus for professional design education.
To respond to this mission and to these goals, the program has developed a distinctive framework which establishes the program’s unique intellectual, educational, and architectural culture. The program celebrates its place in a very special set of landscapes-the urban matrix of Denver, and the spectacular natural landscape of the high plains and the Colorado Rockies. It is committed to an education which considers the building as the primary focus of the architect’s concern, but which also places a high value on the study of the interactions between buildings and their urban and natural settings. Through placing value on these building/ landscape interactions, the program concerns itself with the ethics of architectural interventions: with issues of propriety, of stewardship, of sustainability, and of accountability.
As a result of these dominant concerns, the program’s focus is rooted in the creation of an academic environment which is both intellectually stimulating and educationally challenging, and in and through which the program's students are empowered to become architects who:
• will promote the practice of design as the basis of their architectural and intellectual method;
• will assert responsibility for their important role as designers of buildings in their urban and natural settings;
• will understand and value the importance of the influences of history, theory, ideology, context, technology, and practice on the form-and quality-of the urban and rural landscapes;
• will define their obligations, their status and their roles as members of an established design discipline and design profession;
• will accept, apply, and extend the important professional, intellectual, and design traditions of the discipline; and who
• will be creative, thoughtful, and critical design leaders in the discipline and profession of architecture.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
The professional program in architecture offered by the University of Colorado at Denver through its New College of Architecture and Planning is a Master of Architecture degree program. It is
accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board. Students with an unrelated bachelor’s or master’s degree must complete a seven-semester sequence of course work and accumulate a minimum of 114 semester hours of credit to graduate from the program with the accredited first-professional degree. Students with a related pre-professional bachelor’s degree are given advanced standing in the three-and-one-half year program, and must complete a minimum of four semesters of course work and accumulate at least 72 semester hours of credit to graduate from the program with the accredited first-professional degree. The course work which makes up the program’s curriculum is grouped into four major component areas: the 45 semester-credit-hour Design Studies component, an 18 semester-credit-hour Liberal Studies component, a 27 semester-credit-hour Professional Studies component, and a 24 semester-credit-hour elective component which includes the completion of 3 semester-credit-hours in each of the areas of history/theory, graphics and internship.
COURSE SEQUENCE
FIRST YEAR
Fall Semester-15 semester credit hours
ARCH 5500-6.
ARCH 5510-3.
ARCH 5520-3. ARCH 5532-3.
Introduction to Architectural Design Studio 1
Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism Building Technology 1
Spring Semester-18 semester credit hours
ARCH 5501-6.
ARCH 5521-3.
ARCH 5530-3. ARCH 6660-3.
Elective-3.
Introduction to Architectural Design Studio II
Survey of Architectural History Structures I Human and Social Dimensions of Design
SECOND YEAR
Fall Semester-18 semester credit hours
ARCH 5502-6.
ARCH 5531-3. ARCH 5533-3.
ARCH 6620-3.
LA 6632-3.
Architectural Design Studio III Structures II Environmental Control Systems I
Architecture in the 18th Through 20th Centuries Site Planning


54 / The New College of Architecture and Planning
Spring Semester-18 semester credit hours
ARCH 6600-6. Architectural Design Studio IV
ARCH 6621-3. History of Architectural
Theory
ARCH 6630-3. Structures III ARCH 6631-3. Environmental Control Systems II
Elective-3.
Summer Semester-12 semester credit hours
ARCH 6601-6. Architectural Design Studio V
ARCH 6636-3. Building Technology II U D 6620-3. Architecture of the City
THIRD YEAR
Fall Semester-18 semester credit hours
ARCH 6700-6. Advanced Architectural Design Studio VI
ARCH 6750-3. Professional Practice Electives-9.
Spring Semester-15 semester credit hours
ARCH 6701-6. Advanced Architectural Design Studio VII
Electives-9.
Advanced Studies in Architecture and Urbanism
The New College of Architecture and Planning has two programs which offer students with established design backgrounds opportunities for advanced study in the fields of architecture and urban design: The Master of Architecture II and the Master of Architecture in Urban Design. Each of these programs has a research orientation and agenda, and their general intent is to create an educational context within which the fundamental practices of architecture and urbanism may be examined, advanced, and extended. The advanced study programs have been designed to be both flexible and interdisciplinary, and through this they provide students with a broad range of options which can accommodate and respond to each student’s own interests and study agenda.
The Master of Architecture II
The Master of Architecture II is an advanced degree program which provides its students with a range of opportunities for exploring and extending their knowledge of the practice of architecture. Students applying for admission to the program must have been awarded a five-or six-year first-professional degree in architecture, and may enter the Master
of Architecture II program in any semester of the academic year. The Master of Architecture II program currently offers five defined focus areas for advanced study:
Design, which asks its students to further their knowledge and understanding of design, design theory and criticism, and advanced design methods and techniques;
Computers in Design, which asks its students to extend their knowledge and understanding of the computer as an effective tool for design generation and development;
Technology, which asks its students to extend their knowledge of the building technologies, and to investigate the impact of current and emerging technologies on the form of buildings;
Real Estate, which asks its students to extend their understanding of the role of politics, finance, and economics as major determinants of design approach and the form of buildings;
Practice, which asks its students to extend their understanding of the forces and processes which affect the ways in which architecture can and should be practiced.
Each of these options requires students to complete 36 semester hours of credit in required, recommended, and elective course work to qualify for the award of the Master of Architecture degree. To be eligible for graduation from the program, students must complete 12 semester credit hours in the degree project sequence, and 12 semester credit hours in required and/or recommended focus area course work particular to their area of study. The remaining 12 semester credit hours are elective course work. A typical sequence of course work within a focus area leading to the award of the Master of Architecture degree is:
COURSE SEQUENCE
SEMESTER ONE
Degree project proposal Focus-area required/
recommended course work Elective course work
SEMESTER TWO
Degree project research Focus-area required/
recommended course work Elective course work
SEMESTER THREE
Degree project Elective course work
The Master of Architecture in Urban Design
The Master of Architecture in Urban Design program is a research-oriented, advanced degree program which provides its students with a range of opportunities for exploring and extending their knowledge of the design of the urban environment. The program makes full use of its setting in the heart of downtown Denver, using the city as the laboratory for many of its projects and investigations. The urban design program asks its students to investigate, explore and examine the form, morphology, and structure of the city, and to test the range of processes and strategies which guide and inform any interventions in the urban landscape. The program also asks its students to question existing methods and models of intervention, and to develop and propose alternative ideologies and strategies which can be used to resolve the broad range of concerns impacting the growth and evolution of the contemporary city and its complex urban landscape.
There are two options and plans of study for students wishing to enter the urban design program-a 36 semester-credit-hour program and a 60 semester-credit-hour program. Entry into a particular option is determined by prior academic degree and experience. Students applying for admission to the 36 semester-credit-hour program leading to the award of the degree of Master of Architecture in Urban Design must have been awarded a five- or six-year first-professional degree in architecture, and may enter the Urban Design program in any semester of the academic year. To be eligible for graduation from the 36 semester-credit-hour program, students must complete 12 semester credit hours in the degree project sequence, and 15 semester credit hours in required and/or recommended course work in urban design.
The remaining 9 semester credit hours are elective course work. The typical sequence of course work within the 36 semester-credit-hour option leading to the award of the Master of Architecture in Urban Design degree is:
COURSE SEQUENCE
SEMESTER ONE
Degree project proposal 3 credits
Urban design course work 9 credits
SEMESTER TWO
Degree project research 3 credits
Urban design course work 6 credits
Elective course work 3 credits
3 credits
6 credits 3 credits
3 credits
6 credits 3 credits
6 credits 6 credits


Programs of Study / 55
SEMESTER THREE
Degree project 6 credits
Elective course work 6 credits
Students who have design degrees other than the first-professional degree in architecture may be admitted to the urban design program after evaluation of their academic and design credentials, and will be required to complete a minimum of 60 semester hours of credit to be eligible for the award of the Master of Architecture in Urban Design degree. To be eligible for graduation from the 60 semester-credit-hour program, students must complete 12 semester credit hours of credit in designated design courses, 9 semester credit hours in designated history and theory courses, 12 semester credit hours in the degree project sequence, and 15 semester credit hours in required and/or recommended course work in urban design.
The remaining 12 semester credit hours are elective course work. The typical sequence of course work within the 60 semester-credit-hour option leading to the award of the Master of Architecture in Urban Design degree is:
COURSE SEQUENCE
SEMESTER ONE
Designated design studio Designated history or theory course work
SEMESTER TWO
Designated design studio Designated history or theory course work Elective course work
SEMESTER THREE
Degree project proposal Urban design course work
SEMESTER FOUR
Degree project research Urban design course work Elective course work
SEMESTER FIVE
Degree project Elective course work
6 credits 6 credits
6 credits
3 credits 3 credits
3 credits 9 credits
3 credits 6 credits 3 credits
6 credits 6 credits
Landscape Architecture
Program Director Lois A. Brink Telephone: (303) 556-4090
The primary mission of the program is to imbue the student with a design ethic for landscape architecture-in its holistic sense of landscape intervention-as a relationship between the abstract and the real, between architecture and landscape,
and between art and ecology. The underlying premise or baseline is that the landscape architect strives to design places for people to inhabit, in the artful sense of the word, with a relentless commitment of quality, ethics, and appropriateness. Students will develop a thorough competence in design, design process, and knowledge of landscape technology. The program features particular emphasis upon the holistic understanding of exploration, experimentation, and synthesis as it relates to professional practice, design management, and professional ethics.
The dynamic setting of the University-the urban matrix of Denver and the interface between the Rocky Mountains and the high plains-offers a stimulating educational climate for its students and its faculty. The program places importance on its academic achievements and on its service to the diverse range of cultures, communities, and people as a regional focus for professional design education.
The program prepares the student to enter into the profession with a thorough understanding of its precepts and capability of making judgments through a design process-a method by which one can determine the appropriateness and integration of the natural, aesthetic, social, and cultural parameters of landscape intervention. It infuses the student with a rigor and discipline necessary to execute, implement, evaluate, and critique her or his actions.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
The professional program in landscape architecture offered by the University of Colorado at Denver through its New College of Architecture and Planning is a Master of Landscape Architecture degree program. It is fully accredited by the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB).
Students with an unrelated bachelor’s degree must complete a six-semester sequence of course work and accumulate a minimum of 90 semester hours of credit to graduate from the program with the accredited first-professional degree. Students with a related pre-professional bachelor’s degree are given advanced standing in the three-year program and must accumulate at least 65 semester hours of credit to graduate from the program with the accredited first-professional degree. The curriculum consists of core and elective course work. Core courses are grouped into four components: Design Studies,
42 semester credit hours; History and Theory, 15; Science and Technology,
15; and Professional Practice, 3, totaling
75 semester credit hours. The remaining 15 semester credit hours are devoted to electives.
COURSE SEQUENCE
FIRST YEAR
Fall Semester-15 semester credit hours
LA 5500-6.
LA 5510-3.
LA 5532-3. ARCH 5520-3.
Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio I Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I Landscape Technology I Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism
Spring Semester-15 semester credit hours
L A 5501-6. Introduction to
Landscape Architectural Design Studio II
L A 5511-3. Elements of Design
Expression and Presentation II
L A 5521-3. History of Landscape Architecture
L A 5572-3. Landscape Ecology
SECOND YEAR
Fall Semester-15 semester credit hours
LA 6600-6.
LA 6632-3. LA 6670-3. ARCH 6620-3.
Landscape Architectural Design Studio III Site Planning Plants in Design Architecture in the 18th Through 20th Centuries
Spring Semester-15 semester credit hours
LA 6601-6. Landscape Architectural
Design Studio IV
L A 6631-3. Landscape Technology II
Electives-6.
THIRD YEAR
Fall Semester-15 semester credit hours
LA 6700-6.
LA 6750-3. Elective-3. Elective-3.
Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio V
Professional Practice LA Theory
Computer Tech Elective
Spring Semester-15 semester credit hours
L A 6701-6. Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio VI
Electives-9.


56 / The New College of Architecture and Planning
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE II (POST-PROFESSIONAL DEGREE)
The post-professional degree program requires 48 semester credit hours and two years of full-time study. The core curriculum consists of two groups: Design, 30 semester credit hours; History/Theory, 12; for a total of 42 semester credit hours; plus 6 semester credit hours of electives.
LA 6686-3. ARCH 6640-3. ARCH 6641-3. ARCH 6643-3.
ARCH 6740-3. URP 6686-3.
Special Topics: Computer Simulation Introduction to Computer Graphics Computer Applications in Architecture Advanced Design Applications with the Macintosh
Computer Aided Design Special Topics: Introduction to GIS
The Curriculum-Two Year Program
DESIGN:
30 semester credit hours
LA 5500-6.
LA 6601-6. LA 6700-6.
LA 6701-6.
LA 5510-3.
LA 5511-3.
Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio I Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio V
Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio VI
Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I Elements of Design Expression and Presentation II
HISTORY AND THEORY: 12 semester credit hours
ARCH 5520-3.
ARCH 5521-3.
Electives-6.
Electives-6.
Introduction to Design Theory and Criticism Survey of Architectural History
Advanced LA Theory
LAND AND REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT
URP 6660-3. Real Estate Development Process
URP 6661-3. Real Estate Development Finance
URP 6662-3. Real Estate Market Analysis
URP 6670-3. Urban Economic Development
URP 6671-3. Regional Economic Development
URP 6686-3. Special Topics: Capital Budgeting and Fiscal Impact
LANDSCAPE PLANNING
LA 6622-3. Visual Quality Analysis
LA 6686-3. Special Topics: Ecological Design-Fact or Fiction
URP 5530-3. Planning Law
URP 6642-3. Neighborhood Planning
URP 6650-3. Environmental Planning II: Policy and Law
URP 6651-3. Environmental Impact Assessment
URP 6653-3. Natural Resource Planning and Management
Concentration Electives
URBAN DESIGN
U D 6620-3. Architecture of the City
U D 6621-3. The City as an Artifact
LA 6686-3. Special Topics: Open
Space in Urban Design URP 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis
URP 5533-3. Urban Form Theory
URP 6686-3. Special Topics: Historic
Preservation
URP 6686-3. Special Topics: History of American City Building URP 6686-3. Special Topics: Urban
Market Analysis
COMPUTERS AND COMPUTER-AIDED PLANNING AND DESIGN
L A 6641-3. Computer Applications in
Landscape Architecture
Urban and Regional Planning
Program Director: Raymond G. Studer Telephone: (303) 556-4867
Urban and regional planning in the United States and other countries is involved in activities aimed at shaping the pattern of human settlements and providing housing, public services, and other support systems required to realize a viable urban living environment. Planning encompasses not only a concern for the structure and image of the built environment, but also the related social and economic structures and processes that give meaning to the everyday lives of men and women in residential, work, recreational, and other human settings.
More specifically, urban and regional planning is concerned with: identifying social needs and designing and providing
services and facilities to meet those needs; anticipating change and its impact on how people can and do live; understanding the way plans are made, decisions implemented, and actions evaluated, as well as the means by which these processes can be improved; stimulating, guiding, and influencing actions of the private sector with respect to land use and land use transitions in urban, suburban, and rural areas; identifying the potentially adverse impact of human activities on the natural environment and mitigating that impact; designing the city and the surrounding region to facilitate activities in which people need and desire to engage.
The objectives of the MURP Program are: to clarify the behavioral and perceptual sources of urban and regional problems; to foster the appropriate use of policy, planning, design, and legal devices for creating urban and regional environments responsive to human needs and ecological principles; and to develop methods for evaluating urban programs, policies, and plans which have important human and natural environmental consequences.
The Urban and Regional Planning Program offers a curriculum leading to the degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP), which requires two years of full-time study and a minimum of 51 credit hours. The MURP degree program is accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board. It consists of:
(1) a core of 27 semester credit hours of courses in History and Theory, Planning Methods, Spatial Analysis, Planning Law, and Planning Studio; (2) a concentration which includes a minimum of 15 semester credit hours; and (3) planning-related elective courses.
All planning courses qualify as electives. The student should, however, select courses that build on each other and together form a strong specialization.
The program currently supports three official concentrations: (1) Environmental Planning, (2) Physical Planning, and (3) Urban and Regional Economic Development. In addition to the three official concentrations, students have the choice of defining their own, “tailor-made” concentration. Students may also enroll in our joint degree programs with Public Administration (MPA-MURP), and Landscape Architecture (MLA-MURP).
Applicants to the Urban and Regional Planning Program are expected to present their application materials in a portfolio. The portfolio should include a resume which describes the applicant’s educational and professional background, a


Programs of Study / 57
statement of professional goals and objectives, a list of courses that the applicant has taken which relate to planning, and a copy of a student or professional project or paper with a note explaining why the particular item was selected. The applicant may submit other relevant materials. The format must be 8 1/2" x 11" and bound. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must be included if the portfolio is to be returned. CORECOURSES URP 5501-3. Planning History and Theory URP 5510-3. Planning Methods I URP 5511-3. Planning Methods II URP 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis URP 5530-3. Planning Law URP 6630-6. Planning Studio 1 URP 6631-6. Planning Studio 11 A thesis option (URP 6950, Thesis Research and Programming, and URP 6951, Thesis) is available primarily for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced academic training in planning or related fields. SPECIALIZED COURSES The concentrations and elective courses enable students to explore in depth an area of special interest. Students should build on the expertise which they already possess. This can be done by learning about a related specialty, or by increased specialization in an already existing area of expertise.




College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Dean: Yash P. Gupta Associate Dean for Faculty:
Jean-Claude Bosch
Associate Dean for Academic Programs:
James R. Morris Office: CU-Denver Building,
1250 14th Street, 2nd Floor Telephone: (303) 628-1200
Associate Dean for Executive Programs:
Susan K. Bunker
Academic Director, Health Administration Program: Richard W. Foster
Faculty
Professor Emeritus: Gordon G. Barnewall (Marketing), William D. Murray (Information Systems).
Professors: Marcelle V. Arak (Finance), Jean-Claude Bosch (Finance), Peter G. Bryant (Management Science and Information Systems), Wayne F.
Cascio (Management), Lawrence F. Cunningham (Marketing and Transportation), E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr. (Business Economics), Yash P. Gupta (Management), H. Michael Hayes (Marketing and Strategic Management), Gary A. Kochenberger (Operations Management), James R. Morris (Finance), Dennis F. Murray (Accounting), Bruce R. Neumann (Accounting and Health Administration), Edward J. O’Connor (Management), John C. Ruhnka (Management and Business Law), Donald L. Stevens (Finance),
Dean G. Taylor (Finance), Raymond F. Zammuto (Management).
Associate Professors: Heidi Boerstler (Health Administration), Kang Rae Cho (Management and International Business), Edward J. Conry (Business Law and Ethics), Richard W. Foster (Finance and Health Administration), James H. Gerlach (Information Systems), Jahangir Karimi 0nformation Systems), Feng Yang “Bob” Kuo (Information Systems), Marlene A. Smith (Quantitative Methods), Clifford E. Young (Marketing).
Assistant Professors: Ajeyo Banerjee (Finance), Ben-Hsien Bao (Accounting), Kenneth L. Bettenhausen (Management), Gary J. Colbert (Accounting), Richard E. Cook (Finance), C. Marlena Fiol (Management), Blair D. Gifford
(Management and Health Administration), Franklin E. Grange (Operations Management), Kenneth A. Hunt (Marketing), Susan M. Keaveney (Marketing), Deborah L. Kellog (Operations Management), Sarah Kovoor Misra (Management),
Moonkyu Lee (Marketing), Manuel G. Serapio, Jr. (International Business). Senior Instructors: Cindy 0. Fischer (Accounting), Charles M. Franks (Quantitative Methods), Gary L. Giese (Business Law and Management), Robert D. Hockenbury (Accounting), Paul J. Patinka (Management),
Barbara A. Pelter (Finance), Eric J. Thompson (Information Systems),
John Turner (Finance).
Instructors: Bobbe M. Barnes (Accounting), Errol L. Biggs (Health Administration), Connie R. Boyer (Accounting), Elizabeth S. Conner (Accounting),
John F. Falkenberg (Finance), Michael Harper (Operations Management),
Chen Ji (Finance), Lawrence F. Johnston (Finance), David O. Pavlich (Information Systems), Charles A. Rice (Management), Marianne Westerman (Finance).
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain business community, the College of Business and Administration at the University of Colorado at Denver provides its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective, responsible business professionals. This level of excellence in higher education is achieved by bringing together nationally recognized faculty and highly motivated, mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment.
CU-Denver’s College of Business is a “research institution,” and our faculty are nationally recognized for their contributions to scholarly research as well as for their teaching skills. Accordingly, our students have the opportunity to be on the leading edge of business management theory and practice.
Our class schedules and curriculum offer flexibility to meet the needs of full-and part-time students, with both day and evening classes. Whether you are
an experienced working professional seeking an advanced degree, or preparing for a new career in the business world, you will gain the knowledge and perspective necessary to succeed in today’s challenging business environment.
CU-Denver’s College of Business can give you an edge over your competition.
College of Business and Administration Educational Goals
CU-Denver’s College of Business and Administration is committed to superb teaching, connecting theory to practice that focuses on:
• current and relevant knowledge and skills necessary for success in the highly competitive global business environment;
• experience in cooperative and team-based work skills;
• integrated professional and functional expertise;
• sensitivity to cultural and ethnic diversity.
Our graduate programs serve both traditional and non-traditional students who have extensive work experience. The MBA serves the needs of students who desire a general management education. The professionally oriented MS degrees serve the needs of students who desire greater specialization, and particularly students who have already obtained an undergraduate business degree. Large segments of our graduate students will be drawn from national and international locales.
Our undergraduate program, which also serves both traditional and non-tradi-tional students, leads to a baccalaureate degree in business with a substantial liberal arts component. The program is closely linked, through articulation agreements, to lower division programs offered by Colorado’s four-year and community colleges. The majority of undergraduates come from the Denver metropolitan area.


60 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Key elements of our academic programs are the provision of quality career advising and placement services, and flexible schedules and programs to meet a wide range of student needs. We are committed to assisting our students’ efforts to pursue rewarding careers.
Faculty
Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about its teaching and research. Faculty members hold degrees from the nation’s leading business schools, including Berkeley, Harvard, Stanford, University of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania, UCLA, and Yale.
Many of them also bring years of valuable experience in private industry. Their interdisciplinary expertise, academic achievements, scholarly research, and business experience provide students with a dynamic learning environment.
Students
Unlike the students at a traditional college campus, many of our students are adult, working professionals who maintain full-time employment. Their success and experience enrich class discussions and interactions among students. Although a high percentage attend evening classes, a significant number are full-time students attending classes offered during the day. Following the current national trend, women constitute about one-half of the student body. Since admission standards are among the highest in the region, the student body is unusually motivated and talented.
This rich mix of backgrounds, experience, and perspectives, when coupled with the strengths of our excellent faculty, fosters stimulating classroom interaction and keen competition among the students.
Accreditation
CU-Denver’s College of Business is one of the few schools in the state accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). Business Week wrote recently, “Today, just having the degree isn’t as important as where you get it.... As corporations become sawier buyers of... talent, they are giving more weight to the AACSB seal.... Accreditation shows that a Business School cares about the quality of its program.” In addition, many national fellowship programs accept only students from accredited programs.
In a similar manner, our program in health administration is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA). This agency ensures that health administration programs meet demanding requirements for quality education in the health administration area.
Cooperative Education
Cooperative Education is a program designed to provide students with practical work experience in a business setting. Through Co-op, students put classroom education into use. The work experience gained through an internship can contribute to an individual’s success.
HOW CO-OP WORKS
In partnership with the CU-Denver Center for Internships and Cooperative Education, the College of Business and Administration offers a selective program allowing students to receive up to three semester hours of elective credit (undergraduate or graduate) for internships with participating organizations. Internships complement the academic program, and may lead to permanent career opportunities upon graduation.
ELIGIBILITY FOR PLACEMENT
The general requirements for internships are as follows:
• Undergraduate students must be admitted to the College, be in good standing with at least a 3.2 cumulative GPA, and have completed at least 15 hours of the business core at CU-Denver.
• Graduate students must be admitted to the School, be in good standing with at least a 3.3 GPA, and have completed 21 semester hours of graduate work. Interested students should contact
their academic advisor or the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education for other details about the program.
Scholarships and Financial Aid
Many programs for financial aid are administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Call 556-2886 for detailed information. The College of Business awards some departmental and general scholarships. The amounts of the awards and the number of awards vary each year. For additional information, contact the College of Business, 628-1200.
Each year, a number of undergraduate students are awarded Deans’ Scholarships, Colorado Scholarships, and
Regents Scholarships. These provide financial support for a portion of the students’ tuition and fees.
Graduate tuition awards are available to students admitted to the Graduate School of Business Administration, based on a number of factors, including academic performance. For more information contact the Graduate Programs Office at 628-1276.
Student Organizations
Opportunity for association with other College of Business and Administration students in varied activities intended to stimulate professional interest and to give recognition to scholastic attainment is provided by the following student organizations:
Beta Gamma Sigma-national honorary scholastic fraternity in business CSPA-Colorado Society for Personnel Administration (student chapter) for students interested in personnel or industrial relations
CUAMA-student chapter of the American Marketing Association CU Venture Network-campus chapter of the Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs, open to all CU-Denver students
HASO-Health Administration Student Organization
FMA-largest student chapter of the Financial Management Association, a national organization MBA/MS Association-University of Colorado at Denver association of master’s students in business Phi Chi Theta- national professional business and economics fraternity Sigma Iota Epsilon - professional and honorary management fraternity SAS-Society of Accounting Students
Institute for International Business
The Institute for International Business (IIB) was created by the Regents of the University of Colorado in 1988 to serve as a center for the advanced study and teaching of international business. It has three goals:
• To promote competency in international management
• To facilitate the exchange of ideas among scholars, executives and policy makers, and
• To conduct and disseminate research on global business issues
The Institute serves as an umbrella organization for international programs


Academic Policies / 61
of the College of Business at the University of Colorado at Denver and as a bridge to business professionals and academic researchers from around the world who are interested in global business issues.
The Institute offers programs to business executives which identify and interpret trends affecting business in the globed marketplace and assists them in obtaining the skills needed to successfully conduct business in these markets.
GENERAL ACADEMIC POLICIES
Academic policies which apply to all CU-Denver students are described in the General Information section of this catalog. The policies outlined on the following pages are relevant for both undergraduate students in the College of Business and Administration and graduate students in the Graduate School of Business Administration. Individual policies appropriate only to undergraduate or graduate students are described under separate headings.
Each student is responsible for knowing and complying with the academic policies and regulations established for the College. The College cannot assume responsibility for problems resulting from a student’s failure to follow the policies stated in this catalog. Similarly, students are responsible for all deadlines, rules, and regulations stated in the Schedule of Courses.
Academic Ethics
Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and integrity. Cheating, plagiarism, illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations, alteration, forgery, or falsification of official records, and similar acts or any attempt to engage in such acts are grounds for suspension or expulsion from the University. Also, actions which disrupt the administrative process, such as misrepresentation of credentials or academic status, other forms of deception, or verbal abuse of College staff are grounds for suspension or probation. All reported acts of dishonesty must be referred to the College of Business Internal Affairs Committee. In particular, students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act involving the offering of the work of someone else as the student’s own. It is recommended that students consult with the instructors as to the proper preparation of reports,
papers, etc. in order to avoid this and similar offenses.
Admission to Business Classes
Enrollment in business classes is limited to students who have been admitted to business degree programs, and to other students as described in the separate undergraduate and graduate policy sections. The course registration criteria are designed to meet a number of objectives:
1. To assure access to business courses for students seeking a business degree.
2. To serve students in other colleges who have business-related education objectives or requirements.
3. To service non-degree students who have specific career or education goals.
Please refer to the Schedule of Courses each term for course availability.
Attendance Regulations
Students are required to attend classes on a regular basis. Absences must be arranged with the instructor and must conform with university and instructor’s policies on attendance.
Prerequisites
Students are expected to know and fulfill all prerequisite requirements, including any prerequisite information when registering. The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who enroll without the correct prerequisites. Generally, students who are administratively dropped or withdrawn will not receive tuition refunds.
Course Numbering
The course numbering system used at the University of Colorado at Denver identifies the class standing required for enrollment. Students are expected to take 1000-level courses in their freshman year, 2000-level courses in their sophomore year, 3000-level courses in their junior year and 4000-level courses in their senior year. Courses at the 5000 and 6000 level are restricted to graduate business students.
Adding Courses
Students may add classes to their original schedule through census date (first 12 days of the fall or spring semester, first 8 days of summer session). Instructor approval may be required to add a course after the first day/week of classes.
Dropping Courses
Students may drop a class through census date and it will not appear on the transcript. After census a student who wishes to drop/passing must obtain written approval from both the instructor and Academic Dean. The course and a grade of Wwill appear on the transcript. In order to drop/passing beyond the 10th week it will also be necessary to document circumstances beyond a student’s control. Any student who is failing a class will not be allowed to drop, and an F will be recorded on the transcript.
Withdrawal
See the General Information section of this catalog for University-wide withdrawal policies. Note that the College of Business normally requires instructors’ signatures on withdrawal forms before the Academic Dean’s approved is granted.
Administrative Drop
The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who are incorrectly enrolled in business courses. Instructors also may recommend to the programs coordinator that students who fail to meet expected course attendance or course prerequisites be dropped from the course. Generally, students who are administratively dropped will not receive tuition refunds.
Appeal Procedure
Students should contact a staff advisor in the College of Business and Administration programs office for appeal and petition procedures pertaining to rules and regulations of the College.
General Grading Policies
Plus/Minus Grading. College of Business faculty have the option to use plus/minus grading.
Incomplete Grades. The only incomplete grade given in the College is IF. An IF grade is assigned only when documented circumstances clearly beyond the student’s control prevent completion of course requirements (exams, papers, etc.). Students must sign a contract outlining how they will make up the missing work with the instructor giving the IF. Students may not register for the class a second time.
All IF grades must be made up within the contract period (which may not exceed one year), or the /Fwill automatically be changed to the grade of F.


62 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Also, IF grades must be completed and recorded at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor concerning the removal of incomplete grades.
Grade Changes. Grades as reported by instructors are final. Grade changes will be considered only in cases of documented clerical errors or when a student is making up an incomplete grade (IF).
All changes must be made within one year after the course has been taken, unless highly unusual circumstances can be documented and the change has been approved by the Undergraduate Programs and Curriculum Committee for undergraduate courses, or the Graduate Programs and Curriculum Committee for graduate courses. Normally, grade changes will not be considered for any circumstances after three years.
Pass-Fail or No Credit (Audit). With the exception of internships, the College of Business does not permit election of pass-fail grading for any business course required for the degree. Only non-degree status students may petition to audit a business class for a grade of NC (no credit).
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
A carefully designed curriculum to prepare students for success in business management is available for the student seeking either an undergraduate or graduate degree. The College offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration), Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), and the Master of Science (M.S.) degrees. The particular programs offered are:
Areas of Emphasis (B.S. in Business Administration)
Accounting
Finance
Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business Management Marketing
Graduate Programs
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) Master of Science in Accounting Master of Science in Finance Master of Science in Health Administration
Master of Science in Information Systems
Master of Science in Management and Organization
Master of Science in Marketing
A dual degree combination of the M.B.A. with any M.S. program may also be selected.
Executive Programs
Master of Business Administration for Executives Master of Science in Health Administration for Executives
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Associate Dean: James R. Morris Programs Coordinator: Nancy Reed
The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree is intended to help the student achieve the following general objectives:
1. An understanding of the activities that constitute a business enterprise and the principles underlying administration of those activities.
2. The ability to think logically and analytically about the kind of complex problems encountered by management.
3. Facility in the arts of communication.
4. A comprehension of human relationships involved in an organization.
5. Awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in administrative positions.
6. Skill in the art of learning that will help the student continue self-education after leaving the campus.
Undergraduate Admissions
Telephone: 628-1277
Admission of Freshman Students. Freshman applicants must have completed the college preparatory curriculum in high school, graduated in the top 25% of their high school class, and achieved a score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. See the General Information section of this catalog for further information on freshman admission.
Admission of Transfer Students. Applicants who have completed work at other collegiate institutions should review the information on transfer students in the General Information section of this catalog. In addition to University policies, the College of Business and Administration evaluates course work to determine its appropriateness for the degree of
Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Students who have completed more than 30 semester hours of transferable course work are evaluated for admission on the basis of their college grade-point average (GPA) without regard to their high school performance.
To be fully considered for admission to the College of Business and Administration, a transfer student must have a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale for all college coursework attempted. Transfer applicants seeking priority admission must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for all work applicable to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree, and a 2.0 GPA in business courses. Students with less than an overall 3.0 GPA can be admitted if they have a 3.0 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work, a 2.0 GPA in business courses, and at least a 2.0 overall GPA in courses applying to the degree.
Transfer applicants who do not meet either of the priority admission standards are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA earned in the last 24 hours. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available. For information about specific policies on transfer of credit, consult an undergraduate business staff advisor.
Intra-university Transfer. Students who want to transfer to the College of Business and Administration from another college or school of the University of Colorado at Denver must formally apply to the College of Business. Transfer deadlines are August 1 for fall semester, December 1 for spring semester, and May 1 for the summer session.
Students will be evaluated only on course work that applies to the business degree program. Generally, this will exclude course work of a technical or vocational nature and courses in activity PE and remedial subjects. Students who have completed at least 30 applicable semester hours will be evaluated on their college work; students with fewer than 30 transferable hours will be evaluated on the basis of both high school and college work.
Students will be considered lor admission on either their overall GPA in applicable course work from CU and all previous institutions or on their last 24 hours. Applicants with less than a 2.0 GPA in business courses (from CU or other institutions) and overall CU GPA of less than
2.0 will be denied admission even though they meet the minimum requirements for consideration.


Undergraduate Programs / 63
Students will receive priority consideration for admission to the College of Business if they have an overall GPA of 3.0 or an overall GPA of 3.0 on their last 24 hours. All other applicants meeting the minimum requirements for admission as stated above will be pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA in the last 24 hours. Pooled applicants will be offered admission as space is available.
To apply for an intra-university transfer, students must submit an Intra-University Transfer form and CU-Denver transcripts to a business staff advisor. Transfer forms are available at CU-Denver Admissions or the College of Business office; transcript request forms are available at CU-Denver Records. The transcript must include the student’s most recent semester at the University. Students with previous course work from other institutions are also required to submit a copy of their transfer credit evaluations (advanced standings).
Former Students. A CU student from another campus, or a CU-Denver student who has not registered for three consecutive semesters (summers included), is considered a former student and must reapply for admission. Former CU-Denver business degree students will be automatically readmitted to the College for up to three years from the semester they last attended if they are in good standing (not on probation or suspension) in the College. Students who have not attended for more than three years, or who have completed the equivalent of 12 or more semester hours at another institution of higher education, must meet the admission and degree requirements applicable at the time they reapply.
Old Work Policy. For students newly admitted to the College of Business and former business students readmitted to the College after an absence of three semesters, applicable credits up to five years old will be counted toward business degree requirements. Courses more than five years old will be evaluated individually for their current relevance to the degree program. Students may be required to update their knowledge by taking additional courses when past courses are outdated; in such cases, credit will be given for both courses. Generally, business courses more than ten years old will not apply toward degree credit.
Second Undergraduate Degree. Students may apply to the College of Business and Administration to earn a second undergraduate degree, provided the first undergraduate degree is in a field other than business. Students who are accepted for
the second undergraduate degree will be required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a business degree. For example, if a student registered for a second degree has not had the required mathematics or general education courses, these must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses. Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken before a student begins to pursue the major field. Applications are available through the Office of Admissions and Records.
If a student applying for a second undergraduate degree has an academic record that justifies consideration for the graduate program, that student is encouraged to consider one of the Graduate School of Business Administration master’s degree programs.
Minor in Business Administration. Students in other undergraduate schools and colleges at CU-Denver wishing to take a minor in business administration should consult their college advising office for details and requirements.
Double Degree Programs. Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason, students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields. Combined programs have been developed for engineering and business, and may be arranged for other professional combinations as well. For additional information, contact an undergraduate business staff advisor at 628-1277.
Undergraduate Advising and Academic Planning
Admissions Advising. Persons not yet admitted to the College of Business can receive advising on course selection, admission requirements, and other matters from an undergraduate staff advisor. To make an appointment, call 628-1277.
Admitted Students. Upon admission to the College, students execute a Degree Plan which identifies the courses required to graduate. This plan contains all the information needed to select courses and monitor progress toward completion of requirements for the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Business students are expected to assume responsibility for self advising. This includes scheduling courses each term, being familiar with all the policies and procedures of the College, and otherwise managing the student’s academic career.
Staff advisors are available to answer questions about unusual situations.
Career advising is available from business faculty and from the CU-Denver Career Resource Center, 556-4542.
Undergraduate Core Curriculum-University of Colorado at Denver
The faculty of the College of Business Administration, College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have established a core curriculum for undergraduate students. All undergraduate students who entered CU-Denver in Fall 1990 or later are required to complete the undergraduate core curriculum independent of their college or major. Undergraduate students admitted prior to Fall 1990 will have a choice of either the new core curriculum or the requirements of their college in effect at the time of admission to the college.
The undergraduate core curriculum seeks to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual competencies in mathematics and computation, writing, oral communication, information literacy, and critical thinking. It also requires all students to develop basic knowledge in the areas of natural and physical sciences, behavioral sciences, social sciences, humanities, and arts. Furthermore, the core curriculum promotes an awareness of cultural and racial diversity. The majority of the core curriculum is designed to be completed during a student’s freshman and sophomore years in order to provide the foundation for specific training in a student’s major discipline.
The undergraduate core curriculum for CU-Denver is outlined in the following table, and the CU-Denver core requirements for business students are specified in the section labeled Business Program Requirements.


64 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
CU-Denver Undergraduate Core Curriculum
Specific requirements for the B.S. degree in Business are included in the catalog text.
Knowledge Areas
a. Writing/Speech 9 hours
b. Mathematics 3 hours
c. Natural and
Physical Sciences 8 hours
(Biology, Chemistry,
Geology, and Physics)
d. Behavioral Sciences
AND Social Sciences 9 hours
(Behavioral Sciences 3-6 hours: Anthropology, Communication, and Psychology)
(Social Sciences 3-6 hours: Economics, Geography,
Political Science, and Sociology)
e. Humanities 6 hours
(History, Languages,
Literature, and Philosophy)
f. Arts 3 hours
(Fine Arts, Music,
and Theatre)
g. Multicultural Diversity 3 hours
Total Core 41 hours
Graduation Requirements
The Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree requires the following:
Total Credits. A total of 120 semester hours.
Competencies. Demonstration (by course work or testing) of a satisfactory level of competency in computer literacy, geography, and one foreign language.
Area of Emphasis or Non-Business Minor. Completion of at least 9-15 semester hours of approved courses in the area of emphasis or completion of at least 15 semester hours in an approved non-business minor. Students who select a non-business minor must complete an additional three-hour business elective to earn the required number of hours in business.
Residence. At least 30 semester hours of business courses (including the business area of emphasis) must be completed after a student’s admission to the College.
The 30 hours for residence must include BLAW 4120 and MGMT 4500, and 24 hours in other 4000-level business courses (including area of emphasis courses if an area is selected).
Grade-Point Average Requirement. To graduate, a student must maintain a minimum cumulative scholastic grade-point average of 2.0 for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business Administration) degree, 2.0 for all business courses, and 2.0 for courses in the student’s area of emphasis or non-business minor.
Undergraduate Honors. Upon recommendation of the faculty, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Students must achieve an overall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to be considered for cum laude. Those who achieve an overall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado will be considered for magna cum laude.
Filing for Graduation. A senior audit is completed on all students who have completed 90 or more semester hours. Students must file an Undergraduate Candidacy form and Diploma Card, and request a graduation evaluation prior to registering for their final semester. Failure to do so will delay graduation. Also, students desiring to change their area of emphasis after filing for graduation must have the change approved by the graduation supervisor prior to registering for their final semester. Changes after that time will delay graduation.
Business Program Requirements
Satisfaction of all the following:
Program Requirements Semester Hours
College competencies............. 0-19
CU-Denver core..................... 41
Mathematics..........................3
Business core...................... 42
International studies................6
Area of emphasis or
non-business minor ............. 15
Other courses.....................0-13
Total Semester Hours Required.... 120
Detailed descriptions of degree course plans which satisfy program requirements follow:
I. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS REQUIRED COMPETENCIES: 0-19 HOURS
A minimum level of competency must be demonstrated in computer literacy, geography, and in one foreign language. Students may satisfy the competency requirements by taking courses as described below or by testing. New freshmen and transfer students should (1) satisfy the English, computer literacy, and geography requirements within their first semester of enrollment at the College; and (2) meet the language competency requirement within the first one, two, or three semesters of enrollment as dictated by the number of courses required.
To clear competency requirements, students must either be competent in each specific area or complete the following courses with a letter grade (transfer students may use equivalent graded course work):
MATH 1350-3. Computers in the Arts
and Sciences or C SC 1950-3. Macintosh
Mind Tools I ................... 0-3
GEOG 1102-3. World Regional
Geography....................... 0-3
Third semester language........... 0-13
Students who must meet all the competency requirements through course work may find it necessary to complete more than 120 semester hours in order to earn their degree.
II. CU-DENVER BUSINESS CORE REQUIREMENTS: 41 SEMESTER HOURS
A. Writing/Speech-9 semester hours. ENGL 1020. Core Composition I .... ENGL 2030. Core Composition II .
CMMU 2101. Speechmaking.......
B. Mathematics-3 semester hours.
MATH 1070. Algebra for Social Sciences
and Business (*)...............3
(*) Note: The sequence MATH 1070 and MATH 1080 may be satisfied by a 6-hour calculus sequence. College Algebra does not apply to the business degree.
C. Natural and Physical Sciences-8 semester hours.
Two of the following courses (a sequence in the same discipline or courses in two different disciplines):
BIOL 1550. Basic Biology I ........4
BIOL 1560. Basic Biology II........4
CHEM 1450. Real World Chemistry I ... 4 CHEM 1460. Real World Chemistry II 4
GEOL 1072. Physical Geology I .....4
GEOL 1082. Physical Geology II ....4
PHYS 1052. General Astronomy I.....4
PHYS 1062. General Astronomy 11....4
CO CO O'}


Business Requirements / 65
D. Behavioral Sciences and Social Sciences-9 semester hours.
PSY 1000. Introduction to
Psychology I.....................3
ECON 2012. Principles of Economics:
Macroeconomics ..................3
ECON 2022. Principles of Economics: Microeconomics..................3
E. Humanities-6 semester hours.
Two courses from the following:
ENGL 1601. Telling Tales: Narrative
Art in Literature and Film .......3
ENGL 2550. Masterpieces of
Literature in English I...........3
ENGL 2750. Masterpieces of
Literature in English II..........3
PHIL 1012. Introduction to Philosophy: Relationship of the Individual
to the World .....................3
PHIL 1020. Introduction to Ethics and Society: The Person and
the Community.....................3
HIST 1211. Western Civilization I..3
HIST 1212. Western Civilization II .3
HIST 1361. U.S. History to 1876 ....3
HIST 1362. U.S. History Since 1876 .3
HIST 1381. Paths to the Present I..3
HIST 1382. Getting Here: Paths to the Present II ..............3
F. Arts-3 semester hours.
One course from the following:
ARTS 1000. Arts in our Time.........3
FA 1001. Introduction to Art .......3
MUS 1001. Music Appreciation.......3
THTR1001. Introduction to Theatre ........................3
G. Multicultural Diversity-3 semester hours.
One course from the list specified for
the CU-Denver Core Curriculum.
Ml. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS MATH REQUIREMENT: 3 SEMESTER HOURS
MATH 1080. Polynomial Calculus (*).3
(*)Note: The sequence MATH 1070 and MATH 1080 may be satisfied by a 6-hour calculus sequence. College Algebra does not apply to the business degree.
IV. BUSINESS CORE: 42 SEMESTER HOURS
Accounting (ACCT 2200 and
ACCT2220).........................6
Business Law (BLAW 3000,
BLAW 4120)........................6
Finance (FNCE 3100, FNCE 3200)......6
Information Systems (ISMG 3000) ....3
Management (MGMT 3300,
MGMT4370) ........................6
Marketing (MKTG 3000, MKTG 3050) ... 6 Operations Management (OPMG 3000) .. 3
Quantitative Methods (QUAN 2010)....3
Capstone Course (MGMT 4500).........3
V. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES:
6 SEMESTER HOURS
A. International Non-Business-One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses:
ECON 4410, ECON 4420; HIST 4026,
HIST 4030, HIST 4031, HIST 4052, HIST 4054, HIST 4071, HIST 4083, HIST 4220, HIST 4411, HIST 4421, HIST 4431, HIST 4441, HIST 4451, HIST 4461, HIST 4601; PSC 3042, PSC 3135, PSC 3656, PSC 4216, PSC 4236, PSC 4246, PSC 4266, PSC 4286, PSC 4726, PSC 4736, PSC 4746, PSC 4756, PSC 4766, PSC 4776.
B. International Business-One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses:
FNCE 4370-3. International Financial Management
MGMT 4400-3. Introduction to
International Business * MKTG 4200-3. International Marketing MKTG 4580-3. International Transportation
* Prerequisite to ECON 4410, which fulfills the non-business international requirement.
VI. AREA OF EMPHASIS OR NONBUSINESS MINOR: 15 SEMESTER HOURS
Students may choose a general business degree with a non- business minor, or a business degree with an area of emphasis in Accounting, Finance, Human Resources Management, Information Systems, International Business, Management, or Marketing.
A. General Business with Non-Business Minor: General Business students must take an approved non-business minor of at least 15 semester hours. The courses must form an integrated sequence and be approved by the College of Business. Up to 6 semester hours of the sequence may be in courses used to satisfy the general (CU-Denver core) requirements, but the number of “Other Courses”
(see below) will be correspondingly increased to meet the 120-hour total requirement for the degree. Students selecting a non-business minor must complete an additional three-hour business elective to earn the required number of hours in business. This credit appears under “Other Courses.” Students interested in completing a minor should contact the individual academic departments regarding requirements.
B. Areas of Emphasis: Areas of Emphasis must consist of at least 15 semester hours, including any business core courses. For most areas, this will mean
9 semester hours beyond two courses in the business core. For areas with special requirements or areas with only one course in the core, it may mean 12 or more semester hours beyond the business core. Any hours in excess of 9 are included in the Other Courses category described below.
VII. OTHER COURSES:
4-13 SEMESTER HOURS
Students may choose Other Courses freely, subject to the following general rules: (1) Only non-remedial (college-level, as determined by the College of Business) courses will count toward the B.S. degree; (2) All students receiving the B.S. degree in Business must take at least 48 semester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses). Students in General Business will usually need to take at least one business course in the Other Courses category to meet this requirement; (3) At most, 60 semester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses) may be counted toward the 120 credit hours required for the B.S. degree in Business; (4) Any business area of emphasis courses required by specific areas in excess of the 9 hours listed under Areas of Emphasis above are included in the Other Courses category; (5) At least 50% of the business credits applied to the degree must be taken at CU-Denver.
Guidelines for Elective Credits. Elective credits should be selected carefully because not all classes are acceptable. Generally, to be acceptable, electives must be taught by regular University of Colorado faculty, must have a form of assessment such as a term paper and/or examinations, and must be regular classroom-type classes. Course coverage must be college level, not repetitious of other work applied toward the degree, must be academic as opposed to vocational or technical, and must be part of the regular University offerings.
Specifically, the College will accept:
a. A maximum of 6 hours of the theory of physical education, theory of recreation, and/or theory of dance, and
b. A maximum of 6 hours of approved independent study, internships, experimental studies, choir, band, music lessons, art lessons, and
c. A maximum of 12 hours of advanced ROTC, providing the student is enrolled in the program and completes the total program.
The College will nor accept:
Activity physical education classes, recreation, workshops, orientations,


66 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
dance, teaching methods, practicums, and courses reviewing basic skills in computers, English composition, mathematics, and chemistry.
Areas of Emphasis
See individual areas of emphasis in this section for specific courses required.
ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SELECTING COURSES
Registration. Instruction for registering for courses is contained in another publication called the Schedule of Courses, which is available before each semester. That publication lists the times when registration occurs and the courses offered.
Maximum Units Per Term. The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate business student is 15 semester hours, with a maximum of 18 hours allowed during the fall/spring semesters and 12 hours allowed during the summer session. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Continuing Education, CU-Boulder, or CU-Denver Division of Extended Studies, whether in classes or through correspondence, are included in the student’s term load.
Repeating Courses. A failed course (grade of F) may be repeated; however, the /•'will be included in the grade-point average and will appear on the transcript. A course in which a grade of D or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from a business program advisor. Courses repeated without approval may not be used in the business grade-point average calculation.
Courses From Other Institutions. Business students must have the written approval of a business program advisor to register for courses (excluding MSCD pooled courses) offered by other institutions, including other CU campuses. Credit will not be given for courses taken without approval. Grades of C or better must be earned to receive business degree credit. Generally, only non-business electives or lower division, non-business requirements are acceptable for transfer from other institutions once a student has been admitted to the College of Business. Students who, after admission to the College, take more than 12 semester hours from another institution, must reapply for admission to the College as transfer students and must meet the current admission requirements.
Metropolitan State College of Denver Courses. Business students may select their non-business required and elective
courses from those offered by MSCD. Grades of C or better must be earned to receive business degree credit; however, the grade is not computed in the CU grade-point average and is treated like other transfer credits. MSCD business courses may not be taken for CU-Denver business degree credit.
Graduate Level Courses. With prior written approval of a business program advisor, students may take up to a maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate level non-business elective credits. Students must earn grades of B or better in graduate courses in order to apply the credits toward business degree requirements.
Pass/Fail. Only internships, independent studies, and non-business elective courses may be taken pass/fail. Required business and non-business courses (including the CU-Denver core) may not be taken pass/fail. A maximum of 6 hours pass/fail credit may be applied toward the business degree. Courses taken in excess of the maximum will not be applied toward degree credit. Pass/fail determination must be made within the posted deadlines (at census dates) and may not be rescinded (unless approved by the Undergraduate Committee).
Correspondence Courses. Only six semester hours of credit taken through correspondence study (from regionally accredited institutions) will be applied toward the business degree. Business courses may not be taken by correspondence. All correspondence courses must be evaluated by a business program advisor to determine their acceptability toward degree requirements, and the program advisor’s written approval is required prior to the student’s registering for courses. Students may contact the Division of Continuing Education, CU-Boulder, for correspondence course offerings and registration procedures.
Independent Study. Junior or senior business students desiring to work beyond regular course coverage may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) as non-business electives under the direction of an instructor who approves the project, but the student must have the appropriate approval before registering.
A maximum of 3 semester hours of independent study course work may be taken in any one semester; a maximum of 6 semester hours may be applied toward degree requirements.
An Independent Study Request Form must be signed by the student, instructor, area coordinator, and the Associate Dean for Academic Programs.
Study Abroad. Transfer credit from study abroad programs requires prior written approval from the Associate Dean for Academic Programs. Students must meet with a business staff advisor to determine course acceptability prior to the semes-ter in which they intend to study abroad. Information on the various programs is available at the Office of International Education.
ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SUSPENSION AND PROBATION
To be in good standing, students must maintain an overall CU grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C= 2.0) or better for all course work attempted, and a 2.0 GPA or better for all business courses attempted.
PE activity courses, remedial course work, MSCD courses, and repeated courses not approved by a business advisor are not included in these averages.
When semester grades become available, students falling below the 2.0 GPA will be notified of 1) probationary status or 2) suspension. Students are responsible for being aware of their academic status at all times; late grades and/or late grade notification does not waive this responsibility. College rules governing probation and suspension are as follows:
1. Any student whose overall GPA, or business course GPA, is less than 2.0 will
be placed on probation immediately.
A student may be removed from probation when the overall GPA and business GPA have been raised to 2.0.
2. A student may remain on probation as long as the student maintains normal degree progress each semester as determined by the College and each term while on probation obtains an overall term GPA of 2.5, and term business course GPA of 2.5, with no grade below a C. Failure to meet probationary provisions will result in suspension. Probationary status may continue only until the student has completed a maximum of 12 semester hours or four terms, whichever comes first; summer is considered a term. The student will be suspended if the GPA deficiency is not cleared within this time.
3. Suspended students may not attend any campus of the University of Colorado or any division of the University (including Continuing Education or Extended Studies credit classes).
4. Students on suspension may petition for readmission to the College after waiting a minimum of one year from the term in which they were suspended. Generally,


Areas of Emphasis / 67
petitions are granted only in unusual circumstances. Any suspended student readmitted to the College will be under contract and placed on a continued probation status until the GPA deficiency has been cleared. Such students will be automatically suspended if, at any time, their overall GPA or business GPA again falls below 2.0.
5. Students earning all failing grades for a semester will have a dean’s stop placed on their record and will not be permitted to register without a business advisor’s approval.
6. Combined degree students are required to maintain the same standards of performance as College of Business students in order to be continued in a combined program.
AREAS OF EMPHASIS
Each candidate for the B.S. (Business Administration) degree must complete the prescribed courses in an area of emphasis comprising a minimum of 15 semester hours taken at the University of Colorado at Denver. A 2.0 grade-point average is required for area courses. Typically, students select an area of emphasis after taking several of the core courses. They then complete the hours required for their selected area.
Information about each area of emphasis follows:
Accounting
Advisor: Bruce R. Neumann Telephone: 628-1284
Accounting courses are offered in several fields of professional accountancy at the intermediate, advanced, and graduate levels. They provide preparation for practice in one or more of the following fields:
Accounting and management control systems Auditing
Financial accounting Managerial accounting Tax accounting Teaching and research
In all of these fields a thorough knowledge of the social, legal, economic, and political environment is needed. A high degree of analytical ability and communication skill is indispensable.
Courses in English composition, speech, ethics and logic are desirable. Courses in statistics and information systems, beyond the required College of Business core courses, are highly recommended.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACCT 3220. Intermediate Financial
Accounting 1........................3
ACCT 3230. Intermediate Financial
Accounting II.......................3
ACCT 3320. Intermediate Cost
Accounting..........................3
ACCT free elective (4000 level) ......3
Students planning to pursue accounting as a career usually take more than the above required hours. Many students complete a total of about 30 hours of accounting, often taking two accounting courses each semester in their junior and senior years. Students should work closely with the accounting faculty and business advisors in planning their accounting programs.
Accounting students often specialize in a particular topical area of accounting beyond the core. Examples of these specializations include:
Financial Accounting and Auditing
Recommended Electives
ACCT 4240-3. Advanced Financial Accounting
ACCT 4410-3. Income Tax Accounting
ACCT 4420-3. Advanced Income Tax Accounting
ACCT 4620-3. Auditing
Managerial Accounting and Systems
Recommended Electives
ACCT 4330-3. Managerial Accounting Problems and Cases
ACCT 4540-3. Accounting Systems and Data Processing
ACCT 4620-3. Auditing
ACCT 4800-3. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations
Graduate study in accounting is receiving increasing emphasis by professional organizations and employers. Students meeting admission requirements should consider continuing their education at the graduate level.
Finance
Advisor John Turner Telephone: 628-1226
The principal areas of study in finance are financial management, financial institutions, investments, and international finance. The study of finance is intended to provide an understanding of fundamental theory and practice pertaining to finance and to develop the ability to make sound financial management decisions. Every endeavor is made to train students to think logically about financial problems
and to formulate sound financial decisions and policies. It is necessary to understand the importance of finance in the economy and the functions and purposes of monetary systems, credit, prices, money markets, and financial institutions. Emphasis is placed on financial policy, management, control, analysis, and decision making. Numerous job opportunities exist with financial institutions and in the field of business finance. ACCT 2200 and ACCT 2220 are required prerequisites for the finance emphasis. Finance majors are encouraged to take additional accounting courses as business electives.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FNCE 4320. Corporate Financial
Decisions..........................3
FNCE 4330. Investment and Portfolio
Management..........................3
FNCE 4350. Financial Markets and Institutions...................3
Recommended Elective FNCE 4370-3. International Financial Management
Students should note that all finance courses are not offered every semester.
Human Resources Management
Advisor: Gary Giese Telephone: 628-1294
Human resources management offers opportunities for students to develop professional competence in the areas of personnel administration and labor relations. Students acquire an understanding of and skills in developing and implementing human resources systems, including recruitment, selection, evaluation, training, motivation, and union-management relations.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGMT 4340. Labor and Employee
Relations ........................3
MGMT 4380. Human Resources
Management: Employment............3
MGMT 4410. Human Resources Management: Compensation Administration......................3
Recommended Electives
MGMT 3350-3. Managing Individuals and Work Groups PSY 3135-3. Organizational
Psychology
ECON 4610-3. Labor Economics


68 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Information Systems
Advisor: James Gerlach Telephone: 628-1250
The information systems area is designed for those who wish to prepare themselves for careers as professional data processing managers or as technical specialists in business and government. The student develops those technical skills and administrative insights required for analysis of information systems, the design and implementation of systems, and the management of data processing operations. The emphasis is on management information systems - systems for the collection, organization, access, and analysis of information for the planning and control of operations. Students planning to pursue an information systems career may wish to study the role of information systems in operations management and accounting. Students should note that not all courses are offered each semester. ISMG 2200 is a required prerequisite for the information systems area and applies as a business elective.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ISMG 2200. Business Programming
with COBOL........................3
ISMG 3200. Data Structures .........3
ISMG 3700. Computer Technology .....3
ISMG 4500. Database Management
Systems...........................3
ISMG 4600. Systems Analysis
and Design .......................3
International Business
Advisor Kang Rae Cho Telephone: 628-1280
Increasingly, businesses are reorienting their thinking, planning, and operations to capitalize on opportunities that exist in the world marketplace. Every phase of business is affected by this reorientation. For individuals with the appropriate skills, training, and interest, international business provides excellent career opportunities.
The international business curriculum is designed to enhance and build on thorough training in basic business skills and to provide students with additional skills and knowledge appropriate to international business. The international business area of emphasis requires 12 hours of international courses beyond the six hour “International Studies” requirement. ECON 4410 is mandatory and applies under the International Studies non-business requirement.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FNCE 4370. International Financial
Management...........................3
MKTG 4580. International
Transportation ......................3
MKTG 4200. International Marketing.....3
MGMT 4400. Introduction to
International Business...............3
Students should see an academic advisor for course scheduling.
A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended. The course requirements for a second area can be included as part of the business and free elective hours. In addition, serious consideration should be given to advanced study of a foreign language and to either a minor or a Certificate in International Affairs, offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Management
Advisor: Gary Giese Telephone: 628-1294
The management curriculum provides the foundation for careers in supervision and general management in a wide variety of organizations. It develops skills in management practice through an understanding of general management principles, individual and group behavior, organizational change and design, and human resources management.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGMT 3350. Managing Individuals
and Work Groups....................3
MGMT 4350. Conflict and Change
in Organizations...................3
MGMT 4380. Human Resources Management: Employment.............3
Recommended Electives MGMT 4340-3. Labor and Employee Relations
MGMT 4400-3. Introduction to
International Business MGMT 4410-3. Human Resources Management: Compensation Administration
MGMT 4950-3. Special Topics in Management
Marketing
Advisor: Gary Schornack Telephone: 628-1254
Marketing is concerned with directing the activities of the organization toward the satisfaction of customer wants and needs. This involves understanding customers, identifying those wants and needs which the organization can best serve,
guiding the development of specific products or services, planning and implementing ways to take products or services to the market, securing the customer’s order, and finally, monitoring customer response in order to guide future activities.
In most organizations, marketing is a major functional area that provides a wide variety of career opportunities in such fields as personal selling and sales management, advertising and sales promotion, public relations, marketing research, physical distribution, product management, market management, marketing information systems, and retail management. Increasingly, career opportunities exist in service businesses and non-profit organizations.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MKTG 3100. Marketing Research ......3
MKTG required courses (*)...........6
*Two courses from the following list:
MKTG 3200-3. Buyer Behavior MKTG 4000-3. Advertising MKTG 4100-3. Physical Distribution Management
MKTG 4200-3. International Marketing MKTG 4500-3. Advertising Management and Public Relations MKTG 4580-3. International Transportation
MKTG 4600-3. Business Marketing MKTG 4700-3. Personal Selling and Sales Management
In addition to the three required courses beyond the core, students may select marketing electives, business electives, and non-business electives that support their particular career orientations. The marketing faculty advisor can assist the student in choosing an appropriate set of electives to fit career objectives.
GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS (M.B.A./M.S.)
Associate Dean: James R. Morris Programs Coordinator
Heather A. Bowdey
The Graduate School of Business Administration offers programs leading to the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), and the Master of Science (M.S.) in specific fields of business and health administration. In addition, the Master of Business Administration for Executives (Executive M.B.A.) is offered as a multicampus program of the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the Executive Program in Health Administration (Executive M.S.H.A.) is offered through the Executive Programs division.


M.B.A./M.S. Programs / 69
The the Executive and
the M.S. degrees in business are accredited by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). The M.S. in Health Administration is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA).
Requirements for Admission to the M.B.A. and M.S. Programs
Admissions Advising. Persons contemplating graduate study are encouraged to learn about admission and program requirements by attending one of the regularly scheduled prospective student information meetings. Please phone 628-1276 to reserve a seat.
Admission to the graduate program in business administration (M.B.A. and M.S.) is granted only to students showing high promise of success in graduate business study. Admission is based on the following indicators of the candidate’s likelihood to succeed in the program:
Academic Record. The bachelor’s degree must be earned from a regionally accredited university. The total academic record is considered, including the grade-point average, the course of study, and the quality of the program.
CU seniors who have satisfied the undergraduate residence requirements, and who need no more than 6 semester hours overall to meet requirements for a bachelor’s degree, may be admitted to the Graduate School of Business Administration by special permission of the associate dean. They must meet regular admission criteria and submit complete applications by published deadlines.
Required Testing. The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is required for admission consideration for any applicant who does not have either at least a 3.5 cumulative undergraduate grade-point average or post-baccalaureate degree.
The GMAT test is administered four times each year at numerous centers throughout the world. For information and to make application for the test, write to: Graduate Management Admission Test, Educational Testing Service, CN 6103, Princeton, New Jersey, 08541; or phone (609) 771-7330. The code number for CU-Denver’s graduate business programs is 4819.
Work Experience. A record of appropriate employment at increasing levels of responsibility is considered a positive indicator of the likelihood of successful completion of graduate work.
Background Requirements. Students applying for graduate programs in business do not need to have taken their undergraduate degrees in business. The M.B.A. program is specifically designed so that the required courses cover the material needed for completion of the degree. There are no prerequisites needed to start the M.B.A. program. Applicants for the M.S. degree, however, may be required to take background or Common Body of Knowledge prerequisite courses, depending on the individual’s academic and professional background. Students with non-business backgrounds have completed the program successfully. For more detailed information, phone a graduate staff advisor, 628-1276.
It is expected that students have a minimum level of basic personal computer proficiency in a wordprocessing and spreadsheet package, as well as a good working knowledge of basic algebra.
THE ADMISSION PROCESS
Mailing address for applications:
Graduate Admissions Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 165, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364
Students seeking admission to Health Administration or Executive Programs should consult with the relevant catalog sections for additional application criteria or requirements.
Application Requirements
1. Complete Parts I and II of the Application for Graduate Admission. Include a well-formulated career plan articulated in a brief essay, and summarizing the applicant’s academic achievements, any applicable work history, and reason(s) for seeking the degree.
2. Have required GMAT scores sent directly to the graduate business admissions office from the Educational Testing Service. The code for CU-Denver’s graduate business programs is 4819.
3. Have two official transcripts (not student copies) mailed directly from each school, college, and university ever attended. Transcripts must be sent even if credit course work completed was not part of a degree program or was taken after an undergraduate degree was earned.
4. Enclose a check for $40 for the MBA,
$30 for MS programs, or $70 for dual
MBA/MS made payable to the University of Colorado.
Personal interviews are not required.
Deadlines. To be considered for admission, applicants for graduate programs must submit all materials prior to the following dates:
April 1 for summer session admission.
July 1 for fall semester admission.
November 1 for spring semester admission.
Early applications are encouraged because, if admitted, the student receives priority for registration time assignment. Applications received after published deadlines or without complete supporting documentation, scores, fees, and transcripts will not be considered for admission in that term.
International Students. Foreign applicants must fill out special forms, score at least 500 on the TOEFL exam, pay a $50 fee, and meet significantly earlier deadlines. Contact the graduate admissions office at 628-1276 for details.
Academic Policies for Graduate Students
Advising. As soon as possible after being admitted, students should schedule an appointment with a graduate staff advisor to discuss general degree requirements, plus determine if any background course work may be required and/or what Common Body of Knowledge courses might be waived for the M.S. degree.
Degree Plan. All students are encouraged to formulate a degree plan with a staff advisor during their first term in residence, and must file a plan before they register for any elective course. After the plan is approved and filed with the Graduate School of Business Administration Programs Office, students must petition before receiving degree credit for any course changes.
Course Load. The normal course load for full-time graduate students is 9-15 semester hours. However, because many students also are pursuing a career, it is possible to attend classes on a part-time basis by enrolling for 3-6 semester hours. Graduate courses are scheduled primarily in the evening in order to accommodate the working student.
Transfer of Credit. Upon approval of the Graduate Committee, a maximum of 12 semester hours of graduate business course work may be transferred from another AACSB-accredited master’s program, if completed within the last five years with at least a grade of B (not B-). Courses taken at other CU campuses


70 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
are considered transfer hours and are included in the 12-hour limit. Transfer of quarter hours of graduate business credit may satisfy a course requirement, but may not satisfy the total hours requirement, i.e.: 1 quarter hour equals .667 semester hours.
Time Limit. M.B.A. students must finish the curriculum within five years plus one semester from the first term of enrollment in the program. Courses older than 5 years generally will not be accepted for the degree unless they have been revalidated by petition to the specific department. M.S. students must complete courses beyond those in the Common Body of Knowledge list within 5 years, and with reasonable continuity.
Former Students. Any CU-Denver student who has not been enrolled for three consecutive semesters (summers included) is considered a former student and must reapply for admission to the program by submitting Part 1 of the Application for Graduate Admission and must pay the applicable fee. Readmitted students must conform to degree requirements in effect during the term in which they are readmitted. If the new requirements differ significantly from the former degree plan, a petition may be submitted for any exceptions.
Graduation. Deadlines for filing an Application for Admission to Candidacy and a Diploma Card with the Graduate School of Business Administration Programs Office are September 1 for December graduation, January 1 for May graduation, and June 1 for August graduation. Early application prior to registering for the last term is encouraged, so that graduation check-out may detect possible last-minute problems requiring petitions or course schedule changes.
Minimum Grade-Point Average. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of
3.0 must be achieved and maintained for courses taken toward a graduate business degree. All CU-Denver classes completed to meet business degree requirements, including post-baccalaureate undergraduate background courses, are computed in the graduate business grade-point average. Transfer hours and grades from other institutions, including University of Colorado courses taken at the Boulder, Health Sciences, Colorado Springs, Continuing Education and/or Extended Studies campuses are not computed in the business GPA, although degree credit is awarded.
Probation and Suspension. If the student’s cumulative business grade-point average falls below 3.0, the student will be
placed on academic probation and normally given 3 semesters (one calendar year) or 9 semester hours of course work (whichever occurs first) in which to achieve the required 3.0 cumulative average. Failure to achieve the required GPA within the allotted time period will result in suspension.
Passing Grades. Any grade below a C-(1.7) is a failing grade for graduate students. Graduate students must repeat a course for which they have received a grade below a C-. Both the original grade and the grade for the repeated course count in the computation of the business grade-point average.
Drop/Withdrauial. Classes dropped prior to census date will not appear on the transcript; thereafter, to drop with a grade of W, a student must be earning a grade of C-or better; otherwise an Fwill appear on the transcript. Students will not be permitted to drop a course or withdraw from all courses after the tenth week of the semester, unless circumstances outside the student’s control are documented.
The petition to drop or withdraw must be approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Programs and the course instructors).
Registration for Graduate Business Courses
Enrollment in graduate level business courses is normally reserved only for students admitted to graduate degree programs in business. Occasionally, non-degree students and graduate students from other University of Colorado schools or colleges may be permitted to attend on a space-available basis by obtaining written permission from the graduate business programs coordinator, telephone 628-1276.
6000-level courses are reserved exclusively for graduate students. Graduate 5000-level courses may be offered simultaneously with undergraduate 4000-level courses. Students should check with a graduate advisor to confirm acceptability of 5000-level courses for degree requirements, prior to registering.
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (M.B.A.)
The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) program provides a general background in management and administration. This background enables the student to have the breadth of exposure and depth of knowledge required for an advanced level management career. The program is
devoted to developing the concepts, analytical tools, and communications skills required for competent and responsible administration of an enterprise viewed in its entirety, within its social, political, and economic environment.
The M.B.A. program is available in three different configurations: the INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. program, the COHORT M.B.A. program, and the EXECUTIVE M.B.A. program (see relevant section). Both the INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. and the COHORT M.B.A. have the same curriculum requirements; they differ only in the flexibility of course scheduling and the time required to complete the program.
The INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. allows the scheduling of classes with maximum flexibility so students can progress through the program at their own pace, by taking as little as one class per semester, or as many as five classes per semester, at times that are convenient to their work schedule. The program can be completed in as little as 16 months, or as long as 5 years plus one semester.
The COHORT M.B.A. enables the student to complete the program in 3 years plus one semester, taking two courses each during fall and spring semester and one course during the summer. Every term, a new group of entering students moves through the core courses as a cohort, taking prescribed core courses two nights per week, thus sharing their educational and professional experience. Electives are taken as available to meet individual objectives. For working professionals who can meet the time requirements of the COHORT program, it provides a unique and rewarding educational experience.
Candidates for both the INDIVIDUALIZED and the COHORT M.B.A. programs must complete specific requirements consisting of 16 courses (48 semester hours), as follows:
Core Requirements Semester Hours
BUSN6510. Managerial
Communications ...................3
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals and
Teams.............................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for
Managers..........................3
BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business...........3
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information .........
BUSN 6610. Business Systems Design ...
BUSN 6620. Financial Management....
BUSN 6630. Management of
Operations .......................3
BUSN 6640. Applied Economics for Managers.........................3
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Master of Science Programs / 71
BUSN 6650. Marketing Management ......3
BUSN 6710. Strategic Management ....._3
Total Required Core Hours........... 33
Electives:
International elective..............3
Free electives...................... 12
Total Elective Hours................ 15
Total M.B.A. Hours ................. 48
If a student wishes to pursue an area of emphasis, several are available, including accounting, finance, information systems, international business, operations management, management, and marketing.
No thesis or comprehensive exam is required for the M.B.A. program.
For additional information about the M.B.A. program contact a graduate student advisor at 628-1276.
Notes and Restrictions
Core Substitution. Students with extensive and comparable course work in a particular core subject area may petition to waive a graduate core class on the basis of prior undergraduate or graduate course work taken at a regionally accredited college or university for the corresponding core class. This does not waive the 48-hour requirement. If a core course is waived, another graduate level course must be used as a substitute so that the student completes a total of 48 semester hours. In addition, the resulting 48-hour degree plan, with any transfer credit, must include course work in five of the following six areas: Accounting, Finance, Information Systems, Management, Marketing, and Operations Management.
International Elective. One 3-hour course must be completed from the following list:
FNCE 6370-3. MGMT 6330-3. MGMT 6340-3. MKTG 6020-3.
International Financial Management Introduction to International Business International Business Policy International Marketing
or, with prior approval of the Graduate Programs Coordinator, a special topics graduate business course with an international emphasis.
Electives. The MBA curriculum allows for 12 hours of elective credit which can be chosen without restriction from graduate level courses offered by the Graduate School of Business Administration. A maximum of 3 semester hours of graduate level course work completed at CU-Denver outside the School may be applied to the MBA degree, but only with prior written approval of the Associate Dean for Academic Programs.
Subject to the distribution requirements, students have a wide range of options available in selecting the 12 hours of electives. No area of emphasis is required for the M.B.A. degree, permitting students to choose a combination of courses appropriate for their individual career needs.
MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAMS
Master of Science degrees (M.S.) are offered in the fields of accounting, finance, health administration, marketing, management, and information systems.
The M.S. degree affords the opportunity for specialization and depth of training within a particular major field and, where allowed or required, a minor field. The specialization and expertise developed within the M.S. program prepares the student for more specialized staff positions in industry, the non-profit sector, and government.
The course requirements for the M.S. degree in each of the fields are divided into two components-Common Body of Knowledge and graduate core requirements. The common background requires at least 21 semester hours of business courses to develop general breadth and competence in the fields of business administration. These requirements may differ among degree programs. Some common background requirements may be waived if evidence of equivalent undergraduate or graduate level course work is shown. Generally, an undergraduate degree in business administration earned from an AACSB or regionally accredited university will meet most of the CBK requirements. The graduate core requires at least 30 semester hours of graduate level courses as prescribed by the different major programs. Of the 30 hours, a minimum of 18 hours must be completed at the 6000 level.
Satisfying a CBK requirement by waiver is not necessarily the same as meeting specific course prerequisite requirements. MS students must file a degree plan prior to taking any elective course and must meet specific prerequisites.
Master of Science in Accounting
Advisors: Bruce R. Neumann Telephone: 628-1284
The Master of Science in Accounting is a flexible program that provides the student with a thorough understanding of both financial and managerial accounting. The combination of required and elective courses allows the student to design a course of study with the advisor’s approval, leading to a successful career in either public accounting, governmental or non-profit accounting, or management accounting.
The M.S. in accounting requires the completion of the following:
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Courses Required Semester Hours
ACCT 2200. Financial Accounting
and Financial Statement Analysis..3
ACCT 2220. Managerial Accounting
and Professional Issues ..........3
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams.........................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for Managers . 3 BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business...........3
BUSN 6620. Financial Management....3
BUSN 6640. Applied Economics
for Managers......................3
BUSN 6650. Marketing Management.... 3 Total CBK Hours................... 24
B. ACCOUNTING BACKGROUND COURSES
Courses Required Semester Hours
ACCT 3220. and 3230. Intermediate
Financial Accounting, I and II....6
ACCT 3320. Intermediate Cost
Accounting........................3
ACCT 4410. Income Tax Accounting .... _3 Total Background Hours............ 12
An advisor may approve waivers for some of the background and Common Body of Knowledge requirements upon transcript evidence of previous equivalent undergraduate or graduate course work.
It is recommended that students have a minimum competency in mathematics and computer software applications. Possible preparatory courses at CU-Denver are ISMG 3000, C SC 1100, C SC 1410, MATH 1070, and MATH 1080.


72 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
C. GRADUATE COREIN ACCOUNTING
Courses Required Semester Hours
ACCT 5540. Accounting Information
Systems...........................3
ACCT 6250. Seminar: Accounting
Theory............................3
ACCT 6260. Seminar: Managerial
Accounting........................3
ACCT Electives ......................6
Free electives..................... 15
Total ACCT Core Hours ............. 30
Notes and Restrictions
ACCT Electives. Choose 2 accounting courses numbered higher than ACCT 6260.
Free Electives. Choose 5 courses, of which at least 2 must be non-accounting courses.
Certain graduate courses in accounting are offered only once a year. Consult a Schedule of Courses for information about current course offerings. Note that ACCT 5540 and ACCT 6250 are usually offered in the fall and other advanced courses are usually offered in the spring.
No comprehensive examinations are required in the major field of accounting.
Master of Science in Finance
Advisor E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr. Telephone: 628-1297
The Master of Science in Finance provides the necessary specialized expertise to meet the need of businesses for financial managers and staff specialists, and to prepare the student for further graduate work in the field of finance.
The M.S. program in finance consists of two components-the Common Body of Knowledge and the graduate core required courses.
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Courses Required Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams.........................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for
Managers..........................3
BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business ..........3
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information ...........3
BUSN 6640. Applied Economics for Managers......................3
BUSN 6650. Marketing Management ...3
BUSN 6180. Economic Environment
of Business .................... 3
Total CBK Hours.................. 21
An advisor may approve waivers for some of the Common Body of Knowledge requirements upon transcript evidence of previous equivalent undergraduate or graduate course work.
B. GRADUATE CORE IN FINANCE
The M.S. finance core consists of 30 semester hours (10 courses) beyond the CBK requirements. At least six of these courses must be taken at the 6000 level or higher. A minimum of 21 semester hours (7 courses) must be chosen from regularly scheduled graduate finance courses (excluding independent study); the remaining 9 semester hours (3 courses) may be in finance or in related fields, as approved by the student’s M.S. finance advisor. A student can elect to include a minor field with at least 9 semester hours approved by a minor field advisor, but a minor is not required.
The M.S. finance degree requirements are met by the following courses and options:
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6620. Financial Management.......3
FNCE 6310. Financial Decisions
and Policies.......................3
FNCE 6330. Investment
Management Analysis................3
FNCE Electives ...................... 12
Free Electives....................... 9
Total FNCE Core Hours ............... 30
Notes and Restrictions
BUSN 6620 can be waived if a student has taken at least 9 semester hours of upper division undergraduate finance courses within the last 5 years from a regionally accredited university. However, the student must still take at least 21 hours in finance at the graduate level.
Finance Electives. Choose 4 courses in finance from the list of regularly scheduled graduate classes in consultation with an advisor.
Free Electives. Choose 3 courses in finance or other graduate business fields. Areas of study that normally would enhance the study of finance would include economics, mathematics, statistics, accounting, and information systems. Other fields also could be approved by the advisor based on the student’s needs and objectives.
No comprehensive examination in finance is required.
Master of Science in Health Administration
Advisor: Richard W. Foster Telephone: 628-1286
The goal of the Master of Science in Health Administration (M.S.H.A.) degree is to prepare men and women who, after appropriate practical experience in responsible managerial positions, are capable of assuming positions as chief executive officers or senior administrators in complex, multi-service health care organizations or in organizations’ purchasing and health services.
The curriculum is a synthesis of management concepts and techniques that are applicable to any economic organization and tools that can be specifically applied to health and health services systems. The program emphasizes skills which heighten basic analytic and decision-making processes used by top level managers in selecting broad strategies for the institutions and by junior managers in administering sub-units of health care organizations. The faculty guide the students in their mastery of theoretical, conceptual, and quantitative topics.
The M.S.H.A. program has enjoyed continuous accreditation by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA) since 1970.
The typical course of study is 57 semester hours of graduate level course work for students entering without an undergraduate degree in business from an AACSB-accredited program. The curriculum is based on a series of structured learning sequences, with M.B.A. courses comprising the majority of the first full year, supplemented by several core health administration courses.
The second academic year provides the student with advanced training in health administration. Within the 57 semester hours, the student must choose 12 semester hours of elective courses.
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Courses Required Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams.......................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for Managers . 3 BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information .........
BUSN 6610. Business Systems Design .
BUSN 6620. Financial Management...
BUSN 6630. Management of Operations BUSN 6640. Applied Economics
for Managers....................3
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Master of Science Programs / 73
BUSN 6650. Marketing Management ..3
BUSN 6710. Strategic Management . 3
Total CBK Hours................. 27
It may be possible for an advisor to approve waivers for some of the Common Body of Knowledge requirements upon transcript evidence of previous equivalent undergraduate or graduate course work. Students should discuss their options with an advisor.
B. GRADUATE CORE IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
Courses Required Semester Hours
HLTH 6010. Medical Care Organization .. 3
HLTH 6020. Health Economics.........3
HLTH 6026. Institutional Management ... 3
HLTH 6030. Health Sciences..........3
HLTH 6040. Management Accounting
for Health Care Organizations.....3
HLTH 6050. Legal and Ethical Problems
in Health Care Administration ....3
HLTH 6911. Health Field Studies ....3
HLTH Elective ............................3
Free Electives........................... 6
Total HLTH Core Hours................... 30
Notes and Restrictions
Electives. Elective courses are available in the fields of accounting, finance, marketing, management, organizational development, health policy, and planning. In addition, elective courses are available that focus on practice settings such as hospital administration, ambulatory care administration, or long-term care administration.
Management Residency. A management residency is optional, but recommended for all students, especially those with limited health care experience. The faculty of the program provide assistance to students in securing the residency, as well as regular consultation during the residency period. Information on the full range of local, regional, and national residencies is available in the program office.
Length of Program. The didactic portion of the degree will take at least two academic years, since H.A. courses are offered only once each year, and many require prerequisites. Part-time study is facilitated by courses being scheduled for late afternoon or evening hours.
ADMISSION PROCESS
Requirements for Admission. Selection of students is a multi-step process. When making application to the program for the M.S.H.A., candidates should send their applications to:
Graduate Admissions Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 165, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80127-3364
Application Requirements
1. Complete the Application for Graduate Admission, Parts I and II, and submit by published deadlines.
2. Have four (4) letters of recommendation sent from professional or academic acquaintances who are familiar with the applicant’s academic/professional competence.
3. Have required Graduate Management Admission Test scores sent directly to the graduate office from the Educational Testing Service. When registering for the GMAT, use code 4819.
4. Pay the $30 application fee.
5. Have two (2) official transcripts sent directly from each school, college, or university previously attended. A minimum baccalaureate degree is required.
6. Include a well-formulated career plan, articulated in a brief essay, and summarizing the applicant’s reason(s) for seeking the degree.
7. Document any experience in the field of health services administration (preferred but not absolutely necessary). Admission to the M.S.H.A. degree program is on a competitive basis. Therefore, these admission criteria represent minimum entrance qualifications expected
of all students.
For further information, brochures, and application materials, contact the Graduate Program in Health Administration, Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Colorado at Denver, (303) 628-1276.
HEALTH ADMINISTRATION SCHOLARSHIPS/LOANS
Financial assistance is available for new and continuing students directly from the Graduate Program in Health Administration. Each year the following scholar-ships/loans may be awarded:
Eugenie Sontag Award Kaiser-Permanente Scholarship/ Residency
Healthcare Financial Management Assn.
Continuing Student Scholarship Foster G. McGaw Scholarship Loan Fund
Foster G. McGaw Scholarship Federation of American Hospitals’ Foundation
Colorado Health Administration Alumni Association Scholarship Fund U.S. Dept, of Health and Human Services Traineeships
In addition, students are eligible to apply for financial aid directly to the University of Colorado at Denver Financial Aid Office. Call 556-2886.
Master of Science in Information Systems
Advisor; James Gerlach Telephone: 628-1250
The Master of Science degree in information systems prepares students for management roles in the information systems field and for such careers as systems analysts, software engineers, data base administrators, and data processing managers. The curriculum emphasizes the application of computer technology within the business context.
The M.S. degree requires the student to complete the Common Body of Knowledge and the graduate information systems core.
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Courses Required Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams.........................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for Managers . 3 BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business...........3
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information ...........3
BUSN 6620. Financial Management....3
BUSN 6640. Applied Economics for
Managers..........................3
BUSN 6650. Marketing Management.... 3 Total CBK Hours................... 21
All students admitted to the M.S. in information systems should possess computer literacy.
An advisor may approve waivers for some of the Common Body of Knowledge requirements upon transcript evidence of previous equivalent undergraduate or graduate course work.
B. GRADUATE CORE IN INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Courses Required Semester Hours
ISMG Electives.................... 21
Free Electives..................... 9
Total INF'S Core Hours............ 30


74 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Notes and Restrictions
Each student’s plan of study is developed by the student and the graduate advisor, considering the student’s interests and background. The required 30 core hours may be taken entirely in information systems, or may be divided between information systems (21 hours) and free electives (9 hours). At least 7 courses (21 hours) must be taken in information systems. Students are encouraged to take ISMG 6020 in their first semester. Courses available for the major include:
BUSN 6610-3. ISMG 6020-3.
ISMG 6060-3.
ISMG 6080-3.
ISMG 6120-3.
ISMG 6140-3.
ISMG 6180-3.
ISMG 6200-3.
ISMG 6220-3.
ISMG 6240-3.
ISMG 6260-3.
ISMG 6800-3. ISMG 6840-1 to 8. ISMG 6950-1 to 8.
Business Systems Design Business Programming and Data Structures Systems Analysis and Design
Database Management Systems
Data Communication and Client Server Systems Object-Oriented Systems Development Information Systems Policy
Global Information Systems Organizational Computing
Interactive Multimedia Systems
Software Metrics and Software Quality Assurance Special Topics Independent Study Master’s Thesis
A maximum of 6 semester hours of approved graduate work taken at other institutions may be included in the 30 semester hours.
Candidates for the M.S. degree are not required to take a comprehensive examination or to complete a thesis in the major field.
Master of Science in Management and Organization
Advisor: Gary Giese Telephone: 628-1294
The objective of the Master of Science in Management and Organization program is to prepare individuals with prior work experience for significant managerial responsibilities in private and public sector organizations. The program provides students with a basic understanding of how to manage interpersonal dynamics, effectively design organizations, imple-
ment planned change, and develop and maintain the human resources necessary for effective performance. It also provides students with the opportunity to learn about specific managerial problems and issues, such as how to turn around poorly performing organizations, implement new technologies, etc. The degree is particularly appropriate for students having an undergraduate degree in a functional area of business, such as accounting, finance, information systems, or in a technical area, such as engineering or computer science.
The Master of Science in Management and Organization consists of two components: the Common Body of Knowledge and the specialized courses that constitute the graduate core.
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Courses Required Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams.........................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for Managers . 3 BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business ..........3
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information ...........3
BUSN 6610. Business Systems Design .... 3
BUSN 6620. Financial Management.....3
BUSN 6650. Marketing Management .. 3 Total CBK Hours................... 21
An advisor may approve waivers for some of the Common Body of Knowledge requirements upon transcript evidence of equivalent previous undergraduate or graduate course work.
B. GRADUATE CORE IN MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION
The core will consist of 30 semester hours (10 courses) beyond the CBK requirements. At least 8 of the courses must be 6000-level courses. A minimum of 24 semester hours must be chosen from regularly scheduled management courses (excluding independent study). The remaining 6 semester hours (2 courses) may be in management and organization or in related fields, as approved by the faculty advisor. A student can elect to include a single minor field with at least 9 semester hours approved by a minor field advisor, but a minor is not required.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGMT 6320. Organizational
Development.......................3
MGMT 6330. Introduction to
International Business............3
MGMT 6360. Designing Effective
Organizations....................3
MGMT 6810. Human Resources
Management..................
BUSN 6710. Strategic Management
MGMT Electives................
Free Electives................
Total MGMT Core Hours.............. 30
Notes and Restrictions
Management Electives. Students must choose three courses from the following list:
MGMT 6340-3. International Business Policy
MGMT 6800-3. Special Topics in Management
Usually, two MGMT 6800 sections will be offered each semester. Consult with an advisor for a list of titles offered.
Free Electives. Students may select any two graduate business courses in management, and are encouraged to include MGMT 5939, Management Internship. Free elective hours may be completed in other functional areas of business (such as marketing, finance, and information systems) or in another related discipline (such sis psychology, sociology, or public administration). Other fields or combinations of courses can be approved based on a student’s needs and career objectives.
International Emphasis. The course requirements described above provide an MS program with a traditional management emphasis. An international emphasis may be added to the program by selecting those MGMT 6800 courses which focus on international business issues.
Students are not required to take a comprehensive examination or complete a thesis in the major field.
Master of Science in Marketing
Advisor Kenneth A. Hunt Telephone: 628-1229
Students with specific questions concerning formal requirements, degree plans, etc. should consult an advisor in the graduate programs office (628-1276) rather than the faculty advisor.
The objective of the Master of Science in Marketing is to prepare individuals with prior work experience for significant management responsibilities in the field of marketing, either in the private or the public sector. The degree is particularly appropriate for individuals who have an undergraduate degree in business.
The degree consists of two components: the Common Body of Knowledge
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Executive Programs / 75
and the specialized courses that consti- Marketing Electives. Choose 12 hours (4
tute the core of the M.S. in marketing. courses) from the following list:
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Students in the program must satisfy the Common Body of Knowledge requirements. These are met by the following courses:
Courses Required Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams.........................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for Managers . 3 BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business ..........3
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information ...........3
BUSN 6610. Business Systems Design . . . 3
BUSN 6620. Financial Management.....3
BUSN 6640. Applied Economics
for Managers .................... 3
Total CBK Hours.................... 21
An advisor may approve waivers for some of the Common Body of Knowledge requirements upon transcript evidence of equivalent previous undergraduate or graduate course work. Contact a graduate staff advisor for information.
B. GRADUATE CORE IN MARKETING
The M.S. in Marketing requires 30 semester hours beyond the CBK. Twenty-one (21) semester hours must be 6000-level marketing courses. The remaining 9 semester hours may be in marketing or in related fields as approved by the student’s advisor. A student may elect to take these 9 semester hours in a single minor field. However, a minor is not required. (Note: a minimum of 18 of the required 30 semester hours must be taken in courses reserved exclusively for graduate students.)
The 30-semester-hour marketing requirement is met by the following requirements and electives:
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6650. Marketing Management ......3
MKTG 6010. Marketing Strategy,
Evaluation, and Development........3
MKTG 6050. Marketing Research.........3
MKTG Electives...................... 12
Free Electives....................... 9
Total MKTG Core Hours .............. 30
Notes and Restrictions
Students with extensive undergraduate course work in marketing may petition to substitute BUSN 6650 with a MKTG 6000-level course.
MKTG 6020-3. MKTG 6030-3.
MKTG 6040-3. MKTG 6060-3. MKTG 6070-3.
MKTG 6080-3.
MKTG 6090-3.
MKTG 6100-3. MKTG 6800-3.
PSY 6710-3.
International Marketing Sales and Sales Force Management Services Marketing Buyer Behavior Advertising and Promotion Management Marketing Function, Organization, and Strategy in Deregulating Industries Transportation and Physical Distribution Systems in the Modern Economy
Marketing Strategies for Europe Special Topics in Marketing and Transportation Multivariate Statistics
Free Electives. Choose 3 additional courses in marketing or, should a minor be elected, take 9 hours in another functional area of business such as finance or information systems. Alternatively, a minor may be taken in a related discipline such as international affairs, economics, social psychology, or public administration. Other fields or combinations of courses can be approved, based on the student’s needs and career objectives.
Students are not required to take a comprehensive examination or to complete a thesis.
EXECUTIVE PROGRAMS
Master of Business Administration for Executives
Program Director: W. Scott Guthrie Telephone: (303) 623-1888 or
l<800>228-5778
The Executive M.B.A. Program provides executive-level students with a broad, rigorous twenty-two month academic experience leading to the Master of Business Administration degree. The program is designed for persons who hold managerial positions in the private and public sectors. It builds upon the knowledge and experience of these executives with a sophisticated, challenging curriculum which can be pursued simultaneously without career interruption.
The Executive M.B.A. Program emphasizes corporate planning; the organization in a complex, international environment; and the applied tools of management. Courses are taught through a variety of
methods. Case studies, lectures, and computer simulation are combined with research projects and other teaching methods to provide students with tools useful in their present positions and applicable to more advanced responsibilities as they progress in their management careers.
Each new session of the Executive M.B.A. Program begins the last week of August. Classes meet for a full day, once a week, on alternating Fridays and Saturdays, making it possible for those who live outside the Denver area to participate.
Two courses are taken simultaneously throughout the program. The program is supplemented by an intensive orientation at the beginning, and a two-day seminar at the conclusion of the first academic year.
A second-year seminar is held at an international business center.
FACULTY AND RESOURCES
The faculty are senior members of regular faculty of the Graduate School of Business Administration from till three of the University’s campuses. The Executive M.B.A. Program is offered jointly by the Graduate Schools of Business Administration in Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Denver. Faculty are nationally recognized, and all possess both practical managerial experience and a demonstrated ability to work effectively with executive-level students.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
The Executive M.B.A. Program is designed for men and women who have eight years of business or administrative experience, including at least three years in a managerial position. In the selection process, significant attention will be given to the depth and breadth of the candidate’s experience, progression in job responsibility, total work experience, and ability to benefit from this integrative classroom/work environment. The Admissions Committee will base its decision on the application, former academic record, relevant test scores, the employer’s nominating letter, other letters of recommendation, and a personal interview.
FOR APPLICATION AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION WRITE TO:
Executive M.B.A. Program
Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado
P.O. Box 480006
Denver, CO 80248-0006


76 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Executive Program in Health Administration
Program Manager: Pete Taffe Telephone: (303) 623-1888 or l<800>228-5778
PROGRAM SPONSORS
The Executive Program in Health Administration is a cooperative program of the University of Colorado at Denver and the Western Network for Education in Health Administration.
The University of Colorado at Denver serves as the degree-granting institution for the Executive Program. The University of Colorado’s Graduate Program in Health Administration is located in the Graduate School of Business Administration.
The Western Network for Education in Health Administration is a regional educational consortium representing health care executives and academic faculty from major health administration graduate programs in the western United States, including CU-Denver, the University of California at Berkeley, University of California at Los Angeles, University of Southern California, San Diego State University, University of Washington, and Arizona State University.
DISTINCTIVE FEATURES OF THE EXECUTIVE PROGRAM IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
1. Drawing on the expertise represented by the faculties of a consortium of western universities, the program offers high-quality courses taught by instructors that are typically not available from a single university.
2. The Executive Program facilitates learning for professionals who have continuing career and family responsibilities. The program is especially tailored for working individuals, allowing students to remain on their jobs while completing their educational program.
3. The program employs innovation in the technology of educational delivery. Learning methods include:
• Computer-assisted instruction and self-paced learning packages.
• Computer conferencing and electronic case analyses.
• On-campus sessions.
FOR APPLICATION AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION WRITE TO:
Executive Program in Health Administration Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver P.O. Box 480006 Denver, CO 80248-0006
Dual Degree Programs
M.B.A./M.S.H.A.
Students may obtain the M.B.A. degree as well as the M.S.H.A. by completing a 66-credit-hour program as follows:
MBA/HLTH Requirements Semester Hours
HLTH Common Body of Knowledge .... 27 BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business...........3
BUSN 6640. Applied Economics
for Managers......................3
HLTH 6010. Medical Care Organization .. 3
HLTH 6020. Health Economics..........3
HLTH 6026. Institutional Management ... 3
HLTH 6030. Health Sciences...........3
HLTH 6040. Management Accounting
for Health Care Organizations.....3
HLTH 6050. Legal and Ethical Problems
in Health Care Administration ....3
HLTH 6911. Health Field Studies .....3
HLTH Electives ......................6
Free Electives...................... 6
Total MBA/HLTH Hours............... 66
Electives. In addition to two health electives, students must complete one graduate course from two of the six following areas: Accounting, Finance, Information Systems, Management, Marketing or Operations Management.
M.B.A./B.A.
This program enables qualified students to earn a bachelor’s degree from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS), and a Master of Business Administration from the Graduate School of Business Administration in five years. The program combines undergraduate general education with the graduate business curriculum.
Bachelor’s candidates may major in any CLAS field (English, political science, biology, or fine arts are examples), and they must fulfill all the requirements for graduation from CLAS. During the senior year, the student begins taking graduate level courses in the M.B.A. program; these courses count as electives in the bachelor’s program.
For further information about this program and the admission requirements, contact the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Advising Office, 556-2555.
M.B.A./M.S.-NURSING ADMINISTRATION
The goal of the dual degree program (M.B.A./M.S.-Nursing Administration) is to prepare nurses who are capable of assuming senior level and CEO health administration positions in government, consulting, traditional health care organizations, and alternative delivery systems. The 66-credit curriculum is a synthesis of advanced management, health administration, and nursing content.
For information, contact CU Health Sciences Center, Student Services, 270-5592.
M.B.A./M.S.
The Graduate School of Business Administration also offers M.B.A./M.S. dual degree programs for each function of business. The program consists of a minimum of 66 semester hours of graduate work, and leads to both an M.B.A. degree and an M.S. degree, which must be completed within seven years. Contact a graduate staff advisor for details.
M.B.A./M.A.-PSYCHOLOGY
Students may enroll in a dual degree program to earn both the M.B.A. from the Graduate School of Business Administration and the Master of Arts in Psychology from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This program requires the completion of 67 credit hours. Contact a graduate staff advisor for details.


School of Education
Dean: G. Thomas Bellamy Associate Deans: Laura Goodwin,
Lynn Rhodes Office: NC 5016 Telephone: (303) 556-2844
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
As a graduate school in the heart of the city, the School of Education sees its mission as providing leadership for learning in Denver’s diverse and thriving metropolitan community. Primary attention is given to the environments and personnel to support learning in the public schools, but learning is broadly defined to include human growth and development in the workplace, community services, and families.
What is leadership for learning? First of all, leadership is people - graduates of the School of Education who are experts in planning, organizing, motivating, and supporting learning throughout the community. The city depends on leaders who can make learning accessible to all its citizens, regardless of race, culture, economic status, or ability. The programs in the School of Education draw upon the rich and diverse resources of Denver’s communities and then return graduates to foster innovation and change within learning organizations.
Second, leadership for learning is new knowledge about the teaching and learning process. The School of Education emphasizes a scholarship of practice that links faculty, students, schools, community agencies, businesses, and families in common cause for improved learning.
Leadership is also involvement. Schools and other organizations are constantly challenged to adapt to the changing needs and priorities of the community. These challenges become opportunities for the School of Education to test and share new knowledge, teach in real settings, and apply new ideas. Through partnerships with schools and community services, the faculty work to ensure that both our programs of study and our scholarship have an impact on the difficult problems of practice in Denver’s communities.
The CU-Denver School of Education faculty is actively involved in current efforts to improve schools and teaching. We participate in national, state, and local reform efforts and attempt to create in our own teaching the kinds of learning environments proposed for schools at all levels.
Our programs and class schedules offer flexibility to meet the needs of adult students who balance graduate education with the demands of work, families, and other interests. At the same time, we value rigor and excellence needed to lead schools through challenging times.
Goals of Instructional Programs
Degree and licensing programs in the School of Education are designed to prepare students for competent professional practice. Our curriculum is developed through the study of responsibilities of practicing professionals and the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are needed for outstanding performance in professional roles. In our view, competent practice cannot be reduced to formulas or discrete skills. Rather, it requires that students develop deep repertoires of knowledge and abilities and habits of critical reflection that support action in context. Our courses, assignments in practice settings, entrance requirements, and student evaluations all reflect the knowledge, skills, and dispositions we believe will support competent professional practice.
Accreditation
The School of Education is fully accredited by the Colorado Department of Education (CDE), the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools (NCA), and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) in Agency Counseling, School Counseling, and Marriage and Family Therapy.
Programs Leading to Degrees and Licenses
The School of Education offers a doctoral program in Educational Leadership and Innovation, and master’s degrees in seven program areas. Students in these degree programs may pursue a variety of state licenses for teaching and school administration, or may elect to earn these licenses without pursuing a graduate degree. The School does not offer undergraduate programs in education, and encourages prospective students to pursue a rigorous baccalaureate major in their specialty area prior to commencing their professional preparation as an educator.
The School’s degree programs and the state licenses associated with each are shown in the table on the following page.
In addition to the degrees and licenses on the following table, the School’s Initial Teacher Education (1TE) Program prepares elementary and secondary teachers for a variety of school settings through academic work, professional studies, classroom teaching experiences, and community field experiences.
At CU-Denver, teacher licensure programs are available in the following areas:
1. Elementary Education (K-6th grade)
2. Secondary Education (7th- 12th grade)
in the following fields:
a. English
b. Foreign Language (French, German, and Spanish)
c. Mathematics
d. Science
e. Social Studies
3. Early Childhood Special Education
More information about the ITE program is in a separate section below.
Urban and Rural Access Programs
Through Access programs, the School of Education offers full degree programs in off-campus locations. In the metropolitan area, these include degree programs in counseling psychology and counselor education, curriculum instruction, and administration, supervision, and curriculum development, with emphases in both school administration and instructional


78 / School of Education
Divisions Approved Degrees Program Emphases State Certifications
Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development (ASCD) (Rodney Muth, Coordinator) Phone: 556-4857 Master of Arts in ASCD Education Specialist in ASCD Doctor of Philosophy in ASCD Elementary Secondary K-12 School Administration Instructional Technology School Administration Superintendent Endorsement
Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education (CPCE) (Robert Smith, Coordinator) Phone: 556-8367 Master of Arts in CPCE Public School Counselor Marriage and Family Therapy Community/Agency Counseling Counseling and Human Resource Development Elementary, Secondary, K-12
Curriculum and Pedagogy (C&P) (William Juraschek, Coordinator) Phone: 556-2290 Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) Elementary (Interdisciplinary Curriculum) Elementary (Math & Science) Foundations Math Science Social Studies Elementary Secondary
Educational Psychology (EPSY) (William L. Goodwin, Coordinator) Phone: 556-3535 Master of Arts in EPSY Master of Arts in ECE Educational Psychology Early Childhood Education-Regular Early Childhood Education-Special Teacher 4, Special Education
Instructional Technology (IT) (Scott Grabinger, Coordinator) Phone: 556-6022 Master of Arts in Library Media Corporate Instructional Development and Training Educational Computing Information and Learning Technology Production Development Library Media Specialist-Elementary, Secondary, K-12
Language, Literacy, and Culture (LLC) (Nancy Shanklin, Coordinator) Phone: 556-4366 Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction English Foreign Language Reading and Writing Literacy for Linguistically Diverse Populations Bilingual/English as a Second Language Secondary Elementary, Secondary, K-12
Special Education/School Psychology (SPSY) (Elizabeth Kozleski, Coordinator) Phone: 556-2962 Master of Arts in Special Education Special Education Inclusionary Practices Mental Health Special Education Teacher 1,2,3 School Psychologist, K-12
technology. Elsewhere in the state, master’s programs are available in Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education at Rifle, Glenwood Springs, Steamboat Springs, and Durango; Library media at Rifle and Steamboat Springs; and Special Education at Glenwood Springs. A postmaster’s licensing program in School Psychology is also provided for rural students statewide at sites in La Junta, Cortez,
Durango, Trinidad, Canon City, Montrose, Delta, Vail, and Steamboat Springs.
Extended Studies Programs
In cooperation with schools and other community agencies, the School of Education Extended Studies program offers a variety of graduate workshops, courses, and academies. While these are designed to meet specific education and training
needs of partner organizations, many of the Extended Studies programs articulate with the School’s regular master’s programs.
Center for Collaborative Educational Leadership (CCEL)
The CCEL was chartered in 1993 in response to the growing need for collaboration between the School of Education,


Teacher Education Programs / 79
P-12 schools, and related community agencies. The Center’s purpose is to bring increasing coherence, support, and continuity to existing university-community partnerships and to expand collaborative efforts that are responsive to local needs and research and development opportunities. Current major programs in the Center are:
• The Region VIII Resource Access Project. Under a contract from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Resource Access Project provides training and technical assistance to Head Start Centers throughout a six-state region. The project’s focus is on providing skills and support that help the region’s 71 Head Start organizations serve children with disabilities more effectively in regular Head Start classrooms.
• The Colorado Educational Policy Consortium (CEPQ. The purpose of CEPC is to contribute information and support to state leaders, thereby facilitating a more organized and informed debate on important policy issues facing schools in Colorado.
The Consortium links education policy faculty throughout the University of Colorado system in collaborative efforts to support state policymaking. Center projects are funded through a variety of grants to collect and interpret evaluation and descriptive data relevant to Colorado’s schools.
• The Colorado Principals’ Center.
The Colorado Principals’ Center is a collaborative effort among the Colorado Association of School Executives and the CU-Denver School of Education. The purpose of the Principals’ Center is to promote excellence in school-site leadership in the Denver metropolitan area. The Center provides opportunities for collaboration among school leaders across school districts and the School of Education, promotes professional and personal renewal of principals, and encourages creative problem solving to improve the education of all students. Activities of the Center focus on: professional development, including an induction program for new principals; research and program development through study groups composed of university faculty and principals; and networking among principals, with a current focus on electronic linkages among all schools in the metropolitan area.
ADMISSION (DEGREE PROGRAMS)
[Note: Students interested in teacher certification should refer to Initial Teacher Education Programs in this section of the catalog for requirements and application procedures.]
Prospective degree candidates (master’s, specialist, Ph.D.) should request application forms from the Division to which they are applying. The application packet contains application materials and information regarding admission requirements for each program area, as well as testing requirements and recommendation forms.
Application papers and all supporting documents (including two official transcripts from each college or university attended, four letters of recommendation, GRE or MAT scores, and the $40 application fee) must be submitted to the Division Office by February 15 for summer session 1995, April 15 for fall semester 1995, or September 15 for spring semester 1996.
Official transcripts must be sent directly from each college or university to the School of Education.
Application materials and fee, transcripts, and recommendations must be submitted by the appropriate deadline to the appropriate Division Office at:
University of Colorado at Denver School of Education Campus Box 106 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364
Degree Requirements
Outlines of each graduate program are listed in the following pages of the catalog. Since many of the graduate degree plans are flexible and can be designed around individual student needs, it is highly desirable that the prospective candidate discuss tentative programs of study with appropriate faculty members prior to submitting applications.
Two Master of Arts degree plans are available, each comprising one academic year or more of graduate work beyond the bachelor’s degree.
1. M.A. -Plan I (With Thesis). The program consists of 36 or more semester hours, including four semester hours for the master’s thesis. While the inclusion of a minor field is not required by The Graduate School, a student and advisor may agree on a minor, in which 4 to 8 semester hours can be applied toward degree requirements. The M.A. thesis is
written in accordance with the specifications set by The Graduate School and under the supervision of the student’s advisor.
2. M.A. -Plan II(Without Thesis). The Plan II program includes 36 or more semester hours of graduate credit, and may include 4 to 10 hours for a minor. The minor is highly recommended in some fields of study.
See the Graduate School section of this catalog for information about such topics as transfer credit and comprehensive exams.
INITIAL TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM
Dean: G. Thomas Bellamy Associate Dean for Teacher Education:
Lynn K. Rhodes Office: North Classroom 5012 Campus Box 106 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Telephone: 556-4387
Program Overview
The Initial Teacher Education Program, Teacher Leaders for Tomorrow’s Schools, is offered through the University of Colorado at Denver. Teacher candidates earn a Colorado Provisional Teaching License while concurrently working toward a master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction. Students also work in an area of specialization which may lead to a second endorsement.
The Initial Teacher Education Program is structured in such a way that full-time students may earn their elementary or secondary teaching certification in a year and a summer, enabling them to seek a teaching position for the following school year. Beginning teachers may then continue to work toward their master’s degree (requiring an additional ten semester hours) and in their area of specialization (usually requiring an additional year of course work) while receiving university support during their first two induction years.
Prior to beginning the program, each teacher candidate chooses a Leadership Area in which to specialize in addition to an area of endorsement (Elementary or Secondary in English, Foreign Language, Math, Science, or Social Studies). Candidates are asked to list three choices in the event that funding and/or enrollment necessitates modifications in the program. The Leadership Areas from which students may select include:


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• Bilingual/ESL (may result in a Teacher of the Linguistically Different endorsement with additional course work beyond the master’s degree)
• Inclusionary Practices (may result in a Special Education Teacher 1 - Mild/ Moderate Needs endorsement with additional course work beyond the master’s degree)
• Information and Learning Technologies
• Interdisciplinary Instruction
• Literacy (may result in a Reading Teacher endorsement with additional course work beyond the master’s degree)
• Math and Science
• Teaching for Mental Health
• The Young Child (may result in an Early Childhood endorsement with additional course work beyond the master’s degree)
The Initial Teacher Education Program requires 38 semester hours for licensure in elementary and secondary teaching fields. Passing scores on four state-adopted tests are also required before a candidate is eligible for a Provisional Teaching License in Colorado. These tests include: basic skills, liberal arts, pedagogy, and subject field. Additional credit hours, beyond the master’s degree, will be required to complete a second endorsement (in those leadership areas offering a second endorsement.
Candidates for the Initial Teacher Education Program must have a baccalaureate degree in order to apply for admission.
Certification Availability
Teacher certification is available in the following areas at CU-Denver:
Elementary Education (K-6th grade)
Secondary Education (7-12) (English, Foreign Language, Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies)
• Requirements for Admission to the Initial Teacher Certification Program. In addition to the application and $40 application fee, candidates must take the Graduate Record Exam or the Miller Analogy Test. Admission requirements also include Colorado state-mandated testing requirements in basic skills, liberal arts, and chosen teaching field. Prospective students are required to have recent work with children or youth and four recommendations. The above requirements must be met before a candidate’s application is eligible for faculty review. Candidates who successfully meet the paper requirements will be
required to participate in a half-day interview process which includes a writing sample, group exercise, and a role-play situation.
Candidates must attend an orientation session for detailed information regarding admission and liberal arts requirements. Orientations are usually held the first and third Mondays of the month at noon and again at 4:30 p.m. An advising workshop immediately follows each orientation session. Phone 556-4387 for additional information.
Application Deadlines are:
September 15 to begin spring semester
February 15 to begin summer session
Note: The program does not begin a group of students in the fall semester.
Courses in the teacher certification program are restricted to students accepted to the program. Students who register for courses with ITE/TED/ELED/ SECE prefixes will be administratively dropped from these classes if they have not been admitted to the Initial Teacher Education Program.
ITE Course Descriptions (Courses Required for Both Elementary and Secondary Candidates)
ITE 5000-1. Teacher Leaders for Tomorrow’s Schools. Introduction to major concepts of the program: how personal educational history influences views of teaching, characteristics of schools, students, the roles of teachers, voices that influence education in a democratic society, innovations in education, and the teaching responsibilities that teacher candidates will be expected to assume. ITE 5010-5. Learning to Observe and Observing to Learn. Foundational information is provided about learning, cognitive, linguistic, physical, and emotional/ social development, and developmental risk (K-12) as it occurs within the context of diverse cultural, socioeconomic, and linguistic communities. Emphasis will be placed on the utilization of theories and research to frame teacher observations in classrooms and other settings.
ITE 5030-3. Collaborative Cultures. This course covers the basic premises and values of collaboration in a school community comprising people who play diverse roles and come from a variety of social, economic, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds. Topics include: introduction to collaboration, skill development in communication, interaction processes, building and sharing knowledge, role
management, and specialized applications. Prereq: ITE 5000,5010,5020/21, or 5022, ITE 5910/11/12.
ITE 5040-4. Exploring Philosophy, Laws and Ethics in the Teaching Profession.
In addition to lecture and discussion, the course makes heavy use of case-based teaching in exploring different philosophies of education, historical and current knowledge of important legal issues in public schooling, the ethics of teacher decision making, and the meaning of profession as it relates to teaching.
ITE 5050-2. Leadership Seminar. This seminar serves as a transition from the role of teacher candidate to the role of teacher through completion and presentation of the teacher candidate portfolio and the initiation of the teaching portfolio. The course continues to explore the selected Leadership Area and assists the newly licensed teacher in planning for the first year of teaching. Prereq: ITE 5000, ITE 5010, ITE 5910/5911/5912, ITE 5020/21 or secondary methods & ITE 5022, ITE 5030. ITE 5060-2. Leadership Seminar. Supports first-year teaching and further exploration of the student’s Leadership Area, focusing on inquiry as well as change and collaboration efforts. Course participants engage in activities such as peer coaching, video analysis of teaching, and discussion of problems, all linked to continued development of teaching portfolios. Prereq: all courses leading to initial certification.
ITE 5070-3. Teacher Inquiry. First-year teachers will investigate questions that arise from their practice, observations, and experiences in schools. This course prepares teachers to examine their professional experiences using formal and informal methods of inquiry, and to reflect on the teaching and learning process and the nature of schooling more broadly. Prereq: all ITE courses with the exception of ITE 5060 and ITE 5080 or with instructor’s permission.
ITE 5080-3. Principles of Change and Collaboration. This course is also intended as support for teachers as they engage in their first year of full-time teaching. Teachers will read widely from the literature on the societal, institutional, managerial, and political contexts of schooling; examine their roles as instructional leaders, reflective practitioners and change agents as they compare scholarly treatment of these topics with their daily experiences. ITE 5910-2. School Residency and Leadership Seminar. Teacher candidates engage in systematic observation and


Teacher Education Programs / 81
reflection on school practices and participate in the activities of a school community (the school, its classrooms, and the community in which the school exists). The course requires the teacher candidate to spend a minimum of 22 days in an assigned school community, including the opening week of the school year. Prereq: ITE 5000, ITE 5010; concurrent enrollment in ITE 5020 or content-specific secondary methods courses.
ITE 5911-2. School Residency and Leadership Seminar. Teacher candidates engage in systematic observation and reflection on school practices and participate in the activities of a school community (the school, its classrooms, and the community in which the school exists). The course requires the teacher candidate to spend approximately 18 days in an assigned school community, at a grade level other than that experienced in the first school residency. Prereq: ITE 5000, ITE 5010, ITE 5910; concurrent enrollment in ITE 5021 or ITE 5022.
ITE 5912-9. School Residency and Leadership Seminar. In this third school residency, teacher candidates take on the full range of teaching responsibilities in the school community (the school, its classrooms, and the community in which the school exists). During the eighteen weeks of the public school semester, teacher candidates assume full-time teaching responsibilities four days a week for a period of twelve weeks. During the other six weeks, teacher candidates work in the school community two days a week. Prereq: ITE 5000, ITE 5010, ITE 5910, ITE 5911, ITE 5020/5021 or secondary methods course & ITE 5022; concurrent enrollment in ITE 5030.
ADDITIONAL COURSES REQUIRED FOR ELEMENTARY CANDIDATES
ITE 5020-6/ 5021-6. Integrating Learning In Elementary Education. Two “seamless” courses designed to help elementary teacher candidates acquire the knowledge necessary to create and manage classrooms conducive to the well-being and learning of a diverse student population, including students of varying racial, ethnic, linguistic, and socio-economic backgrounds or handicapping conditions. Includes methods, instructional strategies, materials and curriculum for teaching communicative skills in oral language, reading and writing, math, science, social studies, health, art, music, movement and physical education. Prereq: ITE 5000, ITE 5010.
ADDITIONAL COURSES REQUIRED FOR SECONDARECANDIDATES
ITE 5022-6. Learning and Literacy Strategies in the Secondary School. Secondary teacher candidates acquire the knowledge to create and manage classrooms conducive to the well-being and learning of a diverse student population, including students of varying racial, ethnic, linguistic, and socio-economic backgrounds or handicapping conditions. Specific literacy methods and instructional strategies for managing curriculum, instruction, classrooms, and individual behaviors are included. Prereq: ITE 5000, ITE 5010.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SECONDARY ENGLISH CAN Dl DATES
LLC 5740-3. Adolescent Literature.
Reading and evaluation of fiction and non-fiction appropriate for students in middle and senior school. Emphasis is on modern literature written for students from a variety of ethnic backgrounds. Course also appropriate for teachers working with adults to improve their reading.
LLC 5760-3. Theory and Methods of English Education. Focuses on teaching/learning theories and practical classroom strategies for teaching English Language Arts to adolescent learners in middle school, junior high school, and high school classes.
ADDITIONAL COURSES REQUIRED FOR SECONDARY SCIENCE CANDIDATES
ELED 5350-3. Science in Elementary School. Emphasis on experimental programs and implementation of the newer programs. Supervision and curriculum development considered.
SECE 5350-3. Issues and Problems in Science Education. Recent developments in theory, curriculum, methods, and materials in secondary science, examined for their contribution to the objectives of science education.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SECONDARY MATH CAN Dl DATES
SECE 5400-3. Curriculum in Secondary Mathematics. Investigation of curriculum in middle and high school mathematics, development, history and trends, and pertinent research. Participants construct and share curriculum relevant to their interest.
SECE 5401-3. Assessment in Mathematics Education. Curriculum-based assessment covering nature of assessment and its relation to evaluation and grading; teacher-made assessments; validity and authentic assessment; techniques for assessing learning of mathematical concepts, procedures, and problem solving. Emphasis on assessment practices of mathematics teachers.
SECE 5410-3. Advanced Methods and Strategies in Secondary Mathematics.
In-depth investigation of specific methods and strategies suitable for teaching mathematics for middle and senior high schools. Participants model and share various strategies, including the expository, cooperative discovery, laboratory and Socratic methods.
SECE 5420-3. Teaching Mathematics to Low Achievers. Problems and characteristics of low achievers, motivation, attitudes, use of materials, available materials, programs for low achievers, self-esteem, mathematics laboratory, activity approach to teaching mathematics. Appropriate for all grades.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SECONDARY SOCIAL STUDIES CANDIDATES
SECE 5460-3. Secondary Social Studies Methods and Curriculum Design. Recent developments in theory and materials in the social studies are examined, and present practices analyzed for their contribution to general goals of social studies education. Appropriate for secondary teachers and elementary teachers with a specialization in social studies.
SECE 5465-3. Teaching Critical Issues in Social Studies: An Interdisciplinary Approach. In-depth study of critical social issues related to (a) global/international;
(b) ethnicity, race, gender and minorities;
(c) cross-cultural studies; and (d) current societal problems. This course requires an interdisciplinary approach and covers the structure of the social science disciplines. Prereq: a minimum of 24 semester hours in history and the social sciences.
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SECONDARY FOREIGN LANGUAGE CANDIDATES
FR/GER/SPAN 5690-3. Methods of Teaching Modern Languages. Requirement for language majors in the teacher certification program, School of Education, CU-Denver. Normally taken immediately prior to student teaching. Methodology of teaching French, German, and Spanish


82 / School of Education
in an urban setting. Normally students should have completed all other requirements for the major.
LLC 5030-3. Language and Literacy: Acquisition, Processes, and Cognition, Part I. This course is the first part of a two-part sequence on language and literacy acquisition. The focus is on both first and second language acquisition and on the acquisition of oral and literary knowledge and skills. This first part lays the foundation for an understanding of the nature of language and its acquisition.
PROGRAMS OF STUDY
COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELOR EDUCATION
Program Area Coordinator Robert L. Smith
Office: NC 4028 Telephone: 556-8367
Faculty
Professors: Robert L. Smith Associate Professors: Andrew A. Helwig Assistant Professors: Joseph Lasky, Connie Schliebner, Patricia Stevens-Smith, Marsha Wiggins-Frame Emeritus: William Sean
The Master of Arts degree through the Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education Division prepares professionals for community/mental health agencies, private practice, public schools, universities, and business and industry. Students should obtain faculty advising regarding requirements.
All programs consist of 51 semester hours (with the exception of the Marriage and Family Therapy program, which is 63 hours). The major field sequence includes core requirements plus electives. All programs require a practicum (150 clock hours) and an internship (600 clock hours). The master’s degree is a two-year program. All beginning students enroll in CPCE 5010, Foundations of Counseling, a course requiring the completion of a ten-hour personal growth lab experience.
The community/agency, school counseling, and marriage and family therapy programs are accredited by CACREP, the Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs.
Courses
Note: During the regular academic year the following courses are open only to
graduate degree students and to those admitted for the purpose of pursuing professional counselor certification. Special service sections may be offered from time to time and are indicated as open. Nondegree students may be admitted with permission. See the current Schedule of Courses.
Program Areas
Students accepted into the master’s program follow one of five programs offered in the Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education division. The Marriage and Family Therapy program is 63 hours, and follows licensure requirements designated by Licensed Marriage and Family Therapy. The Community/ Agency program follows state licensure requirements for Licensed Professional Counselors.
CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS FOR PROGRAM AREAS ONE, TWO, THREE, FOUR AND FIVE (9 HOURS)
REM 5200-3. REM 5300-3. CPCE 5810-3.
EPSY 6200-3.
Introduction to Research Methods Introduction to Measurement Strategies of Multicultural Counseling Human Development Over the Lifespan
PROGRAM AREA ONE: COMMUNITY/ AGENCY COUNSELING (M.A.)*
CPCE 5010-3.
CPCE 5100-3.
CPCE 5110-3. CPCE 5150-3
CPCE 5280-3.
CPCE 5330-3.
CPCE 5400-3. CPCE 5810-3.
CPCE 5820-3.
Foundations of Guidance, Counseling and Personnel Service Theory and Techniques of Counseling Group Counseling Marital and Family Studies
Substance Abuse Counseling Professional Seminar in Counseling Career Development Strategies of Multicultural Counseling Strategies in Agency Counseling
*A teaching certificate (valid in Colorado) and two years of teaching experience are required for the Public School Counseling Certificate. Type E certification is available for professionals able to substitute related experiences for the teaching requirement.
CPCE 5910-3. Practicum
CPCE 5930- Internship
3 or 6.
Electives
PROGRAM AREA TWO:
PUBLIC SCHOOL COUNSELING CERTIFICATE (M.A.)*
CPCE 5010-3.
CPCE 5100-3.
CPCE 5110-3. CPCE 5280-3.
CPCE 5330-3.
CPCE 5400-3. CPCE 5420-3.
CPCE 5800-3.
CPCE 5810-3.
Foundations of Guidance, Counseling and Personnel Service Theory and Techniques of Counseling Group Counseling Substance Abuse Counseling Professional Seminar in Counseling Career Development Organizational Development Strategies in Public School Counseling Strategies of
Multicultural Counseling
Practicum
Internship
CPCE 5910-3 CPCE 5930-3 or 6.
Electives
Candidates seeking state certification must satisfy state requirements.
PROGRAM AREA THREE: MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY (M.A.)
CPCE 5010-3. Foundations of Guidance, Counseling and Personnel Service
CPCE 5100-3. Theory and Techniques of Counseling
CPCE 5110-3. Group Counseling
CPCE 5150-3. Marital and Family Studies
CPCE 5160-3. Theories and Techniques of Marital and Family Therapy
CPCE 5280-3. Substance Abuse Counseling
CPCE 5330-3. Professional Seminar in Counseling
CPCE 5400-3. Career Development
CPCE 5810-3. Strategies of Multicultural Counseling
CPCE 5830-3. Special Topics: Family Health and Pathology
CPCE 5831-3. Special Topics: Human Sexuality
CPCE 5832-3. Special Topics: Psychotherapy
CPCE 5910-3. Practicum
CPCE 5930-3 or 6. Internship
CPCE 6140-3. Adult-Child Relationships in Family Studies


Curriculum and Pedagogy / 83
CPCE 6160-3.
Electives CPCE 5140-3.
CPCE 5833-3.
CPCE 7680-3.
Advanced Assessment: Theory and Treatment in Family Systems
Systems Theory in Family Studies
Special Topics: Strategic Family Therapy Addictions: Advanced Treatment and Systemic Methods
PROGRAM AREA FOUR: COUNSELING AND HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT (M.A.)
CPCE 5010-3. Foundations of Guidance, Counseling and Personnel Service
CPCE 5100-3. Theory and Techniques of Counseling
CPCE 5150-3. Marital and Family Studies
CPCE 5240-3. Counseling and Human Resource Development
CPCE 5280-3. Substance Abuse Counseling
CPCE 5330-3. Professional Seminar in Counseling
CPCE 5400-3. Career Development
CPCE 5420-3. Organizational Development
CPCE 5810-3. Strategies of Multicultural Counseling
CPCE 5910-3. Practicum
CPCE 5930-3 or 6. Internship
CPCE 6240-3. Consultation Strategies
Outside course work (12 hours minimum) IS REQUIRED in areas such as Instructional Technology and Education Administration, with a minimum of two courses in business.
PROGRAM AREA FIVE: COLLEGE STUDENT PERSONNEL (M.A.)
CPCE 5010-3.
CPCE 5100-3.
CPCE 5110-3. CPCE 5120-3.
CPCE 5330-3.
CPCE 5400-3. CPCE 5420-3.
CPCE 5910-3. CPCE 5922-3.
Foundations of Guidance, Counseling and Personnel Service Theory and Techniques of Counseling Group Counseling The Student in Higher Education
Professional Seminar in Counseling Career Development Organizational Development Practicum
Readings in Counseling and Personnel Services Development
CPCE 5930- Internship 3 or 6.
Electives
Access Program in Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education
The Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education Program has an access program for students who wish to complete course work at an off-campus setting. Courses are held at selected colleges and other sites.
The quality of instruction and individual course requirements for these courses are identical to those on campus. Students should contact their advisor for further information.
CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGY
Division Coordinator William A.
Juraschek Office: NC 4022B Telephone: 556-2290 Faculty: Professors: Maurice Holt,
Milton Kleg
Associate Professors: JoAnn Canales, William A. Juraschek, Lyn Taylor Assistant Professors: Laraine Hong, Elizabeth Quattromani Adjunct Professors: Betty Foshee,
Gary Hillman
Professor Emeriti: Norma J. Livo,
Glenn McGlathery, Marie Wirsing
The Division of Curriculum and Pedagogy offers six program options leading to an advanced master’s degree in Curriculum and Instruction. All options require 36 semester hours, are built upon the C&P Core, and are designed for experienced teachers who are interested in becoming educational leaders. Elementary teachers may specialize in Interdisciplinary Curriculum or Math and Science. Secondary teachers may specialize in Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies. Each of these options is designed to prepare teachers to qualify for Master Certification from the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards. We also offer courses for those interested in tin option in Foundations of Education. Each option is described below.
CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGY CORE (REQUIRED IN ALL OPTIONS)
ELED/ Models of Teaching
SECE 5210-3.
ELED/ Curriculum Development
SECE 6110-3. and Implementation
FNDS 5050-3. Critical Issues in
American Education One course in research methodology, such as REM 5000
One course in Language, Literacy, and Culture, including:
LLC 5140-3. Social and Institutional
Contexts of Education LLC 5150-3. Culture of the Classroom
LLC 5430-3. Gender as Culture
INTERDISCIPLINARY CURRICULUM (ELEMENTARY)
Nine semester hours from interdisciplinary courses being developed One mathematics methods course and one science methods course Six hours of electives chosen with advisor approval
MATH AND SCIENCE (ELEMENTARY)
ELED 5440-3. Problem Solving and Geometry in the Elementary School
ELED 5410-3. Teaching Numbers and Arithmetic
ELED 5350-3. Science in the
Elementary School
ELED 5800- Curriculum Workshop for
1 to 4. Elementary Teachers
Nine hours of electives chosen with advisor approval
SCIENCE (SECONDARY)
SECE 5350-3. Issues and Problems in
Science Education ELED 5350-3. Science in the
Elementary School
SECE 5650-3. Environmental Education
Twelve hours of electives in science or education (one math-ed course recommended)
MATHEMATICS (SECONDARY)
Nine hours from
SECE 5410-3. Advanced Methods and Strategies in Secondary Mathematics Curriculum in Secondary Mathematics Teaching Mathematics to Low Achievers Curruculum Workshop for Secondary Teachers Six hours in mathematics (upper division or graduate)
Six hours of electives (Science education recommended)
SECE 5400-3.
SECE 5420-3.
SECE 5800-1 to 4.


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SOCIAL STUDIES (SECONDARY)
SECE 5460-3. Secondary Social Studies Methods and Curriculum Design
SECE 5465-3. Teaching Critical Issues in Social Studies: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Fifteen hours of electives chosen with
advisor approval
FOUNDATIONS
Twelve hours from the following: FNDS 5500-3. Contemporary
FNDS 5410-3.
FNDS 5420-3.
FNDS 5100-3.
FNDS 5800-3.
FNDS 5810-5814-1 to 3. FNDS 5840-1 to 3.
Philosophies of Education
History and Philosophy of Modern Education History and Philosophy of Education in 20th Century America Education in Other Countries
Seminar in Foundations of Education Special Topics
Independent Study in Foundations of Education Nine hours of electives chosen with advisor approval
COMPREHENSIVE PROJECT
All candidates for a degree must complete a comprehensive project that synthesizes the knowledge and skills acquired in their master’s degree courses. Several formats are available; see the C&P program handbook for details.
All courses offered toward a master’s degree must be taken within five years of the student’s graduation date.
LANGUAGE, LITERACY AND CULTURE
Coordinator: Nancy L. Shanklin Office: NC4001 Telephone: 556-4366
Faculty
Professor: Lynn K. Rhodes Associate Professors: Mark A. Clarke, Sally Nathenson-Mejia, Nancy L. Shanklin
Assistant Professors: Kathy Escamilla, Rene Galindo, Sheila M. Shannon Adjunct Professor Marge Erickson
The Division of Language, Literacy, and Culture offers master of arts degrees in Curriculum and Instruction with emphases in four areas: Bilingual/English
as a Second Language, English Education, Literacy for Linguistically Diverse Populations, Reading and Writing. In addition, the division is responsible for the Bilingual/ ESL and Literacy Leadership Areas in the Initial Teacher Education Program.
The faculty of the Language, Literacy, and Culture Division believe that effective teaching requires an awareness of and the ability to respond to individual differences. LLC faculty also emphasize the importance of teachers as scholars and reflective practitioners. In particular, teachers must understand how linguistic and cultural diversity affect their teaching. Two themes run throughout all program offerings. The first concerns the importance of recognizing a variety of Iiteracies-“home” literacies, school literacy, “mainstream” literacy, first and second language literacies-and to develop teaching practices which utilize an understanding of the complexity of literacy development across language contexts. The second theme involves the meaningful use of language and literacy to improve the quality of one’s life. As an approach to teaching, this theme emphasizes the creation of diverse, rich environments in which learners experience oral and written language as part of authentic tasks where activities are meaning-oriented, rather than skill-based, and where concern for the cultural and linguistic heritage of the students is evident.
Cumulative Master's Portfolio
To demonstrate development as educators, all LLC master’s candidates are required to compile cumulative portfolios over the course of their LLC degree program. These portfolios serve as final master’s degree evaluations. They must be turned in no later than the published date for comprehensive exams in the semester in which a student wishes to graduate. Portfolios will be reviewed by the student’s advisor and a minimum of one other LLC faculty member. Both faculty members must agree that the portfolio is acceptable for it to pass. It is imperative that students work on their portfolios throughout their degree program. Greater detail and work on portfolios will begin when students take LLC 5910, Field Experience in Language and Literacy Teaching, at the beginning of their program.
Bilingual Education/English as a Second Language
The Language, Literacy, and Culture Division offers a 36-hour program leading
to a Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction, in elementary or secondary education, with an emphasis in bilingual education or English as a second language (ESL).
The program provides a theoretical and practical foundation for those interested in teaching in bilingual education or ESL programs in the U.S. or abroad, with course work in language teaching methodology, language acquisition, applied linguistics, cross-cultural education, curriculum development, literacy, and other areas. The M.A. program has been developed as an advanced course of study for practicing teachers or individuals with some teaching experience, whether in BE/ESL or in other areas.
Each student completes an approved program, in consultation with an advisor, consisting of 36 hours of course work, a field experience, a seminar and practicum, and program portfolio. ESL teachers may select one elective.
Bilingual Education (requires additional passing of a language proficiency test)
(36 hours)
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CORE CURRICULUM (9 HOURS)
LLC 5160-3. Foundations of Bilingual/ Multicultural Education 3 hours from REM including REM 5000, REM 5200, REM 5400 3 hours from FNDS or EPSY including EPSY 5100,5140
ADDITIONAL LLC REQUIREMENTS
(27 HOURS)
LLC 5020-3. Workshop in Literacy and Language Teaching
LLC 5030-3. Language and Literacy Acquisition, Part I
LLC 5035-3. Language and Literacy Acquisition, Part II
LLC 5055-3. Linking Assessment and Instruction, Part 1
LLC 5070-3. Linguistic Analysis of English: Implications of Teaching
LLC 5820-3. Techniques in Teaching ESL
LLC 5825-3. Methods and Materials in Bilingual/Multicultural Education
LLC 5910-3. Field Experience in Literacy and Language Teaching


Language, Literacy and Culture / 85
LLC 6910-3. Seminar and Practicum
in Language and Literacy K-6or
LLC 6911-3. Seminar and Practicum
in Language and Literacy, Gr. 7-12 or
LLC 6912-3. Seminar and Practicum
in Literacy and Language, ESL and Bilingual Education
Your advisor will help you select the appropriate Seminar and Practicum based upon your teaching level, experience, and teaching context.
Students who complete the above Bilingual Education program also meet requirements for the ESL emphasis area of the Colorado endorsement.
English as a Second Language (ESL) (36 hours)
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CORE CURRICULUM (9 HOURS)
3 hours from LLC, including LLC 5140, LLC 5150, LLC 5430
3 hours from REM, including REM 5000, REM 5200, REM 5400 3 hours from FNDS or EPSY, including EPSY 5100, EPSY 5140, EPSY 5220
ADDITIONAL LLC REQUIREMENTS
(27 HOURS) LLC 5020-3. Workshop in Literacy and
LLC 5030-3. Language Teaching Language and Literacy
LLC 5035-3. Acquisition, Part I Language and Literacy
LLC 5055-3. Acquisition, Part II Linking Assessment and
LLC 5070-3. Instruction, Part I Linguistic Analysis of
LLC 5820-3. English: Implications for Teaching Techniques in Teaching
LLC 5910-3. ESL Field Experience in
LLC 6910-3. Literacy and Language Teaching Seminar and Practicum,
LLC 6911-3. Gr. K-6 or Seminar and Practicum,
LLC 6912-3. Gr. 7-12 or Seminar and Practicum in
LLC -3. Literacy and Language, Bilingual/ESL Elective
Your advisor will help you select an appropriate LLC elective and Seminar and Practicum based upon your teaching level, experience, and teaching context.
COLORADO ENDORSEMENT FOR TEACHERS OF THE LINGUISTICALLY DIFFERENT
The Language, Literacy, and Culture Division offers course work, field experiences, and a supervised practicum which satisfy standards established by the Colorado Department of Education for the endorsement to teach limited English proficient students.
This program has been designed for individuals who have a strong academic background, possess a valid Colorado teaching certificate, and are committed to quality education for culturally and linguistically different students. A minimum of 21 semester hours of course work is required, including appropriate field experiences.
Individuals applying for the bilingual education emphasis must be proficient in English and in a language other than English.
CURRICULUM (21 -24 HOURS)
Appropriate course work is selected with the approval of a teacher’s program advisor. Teachers need to select the appropriate number of hours from each of the following six areas. Teachers wishing to qualify for both the Bilingual Education and ESL emphases of the Teacher of the Linguistically Different Endorsement must take both LLC 5825 and LLC 5820. Those interested in only the ESL emphasis need only take LLC 5820.
Linguistics, Language Acquisition, Language Teaching (6-9 hours)
LLC 5820-3. Techniques in Teaching ESL
LLC 5825-3. Methods and Materials
in Bilingual/Multicultural Education and/or
LLC 5030-3. Language and Literacy
Acquisition, Part I or LLC 5035-3. Language and Literacy
Acquisition, Part II
Students wishing to complete the Bilingual emphasis area of the endorsement need to take both LLC 5825 and LLC 5820.
Structure of English (3 hours)
LLC 5070-3. Linguistic Analysis of
English: Implications for Teaching
Historical, Legal Foundations (3 hours)
LLC 5140-3. Social and Institutional
Contexts of Education or
LLC 5160-3. Foundations of Bilingual/
Multicultural Education
Cross-Cultural Insights (3 hours)
LLC 5150-3. Culture of the Classroom
or
LLC 5800-3. Sociolinguistics
Assessment (3 hours)
LLC 5055-3.
Linking Assessment and Instruction in Language and Literacy, Part I
Seminar and Practicum (3 hours)
LLC 6910-3. Seminar and Practicum
in Language and Literacy, K-6or
LLC 6911-3. Seminar and Practicum
in Language and Literacy, Gr. 7-12+or
LLC 6912-3. Seminar and Practicum
in Literacy and Language, ESL and Bilingual Education
ADDING A TEACHER OF THE LINGUISTICALLY DIFFERENT ENDORSEMENT TO INITIAL TEACHER EDUCATION, BILINGUAL/ESL LEADERSHIP AREA
Teachers who have completed the Bilingual/ESL Leadership Area in the Initial Teacher Education Program may complete a Colorado Endorsement for Teachers of the Linguistically Different by taking three additional core courses plus one elective course (12 hours total) as follows:
LLC 5030-3. Language and Literacy
Acquisition, Part I or LLC 5035-3. Language and Literacy
Acquisition, Part II
LLC 5055-3. Linking Assessment and
Instruction, Part I
LLC 6910-3. Seminar and Practicum
in Language and Literacy, K-6or
LLC 6911-3. Seminar and Practicum
in Language and Literacy, Gr. 7-12+
One elective from among the following or another related course with approved of advisor.
LLC 5070-3. Linguistic Analysis of
English: Implications for Teaching
LLC 5150-3. Culture of the Classroom


86 / School of Education
LLC 5800-3. Sociolinguistics:
Language Variation and its Implications for Teaching
English Education
The master’s program in English Education is designed to enhance the preparation of middle and high school English/Language Arts teachers. In addition to the Curriculum and Instruction core (9 hours), students complete course work in language development, assessment, and field experiences. With the help of their advisor, they also select specific courses from the English Department or within the School of Education that add further depth to their preparation as English teachers, especially in the areas of composition and/or literature. Special consideration is given to working with diverse ethnic populations.
Linguistically Different and Reading Teacher, K-6 or 7-12. Teachers holding this degree may work as ESL, bilingual (if they have passed the additional language proficiency test in their second language), special reading, or Chapter 1 teachers.
As ESL and bilingual teachers, they have additional special training in helping students with particular reading and writing problems. As reading teachers, they are capable of helping students for whom English is their second language with reading and writing problems.
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CORE CURRICULUM (9 HOURS)
LLC 5160-3. Foundations of Bilingual
Education
REM 5000-3. Introduction to Research,
Evaluation, and Measurement
3 hours from FNDS or EPSY, including EPSY 5100, EPSY 5140, EPSY 5220
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CORE CURRICULUM (9 HOURS)
REM 5000-3. Introduction to Research, Evaluation, and Measurement
3 hours from LLC, including LLC 5140,
LLC 5150, LLC 5430 3 hours from FNDS or EPSY 5140
ENGLISH EDUCATION (27 HOURS)
LLC 5760-3. Theory and Methods
of English Education LLC 5910-3. Field Experience in
Literacy and Language Teaching
LLC 5740-3. Adolescent Literature
LLC 5030-3. Language and Literacy
Acquisition, Part I or LLC 5035-3. Language and Literacy
Acquisition, Part II
LLC 5055-3. Linking Assessment and
Instruction, Part I
LLC 6911-3. Seminar and Practicum in
Language and Literacy,
Gr. 7-12+
English writing course, 5000 level or above (3 hours) with approval of advisor.
Two additional courses (6 hours) from the English Department or School of Education with approval of advisor.
LITERACY FOR LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE POPULATIONS, K-6, 7-12 (45 HOURS)
The master’s program in Literacy for Linguistically Diverse Populations, K-6 or 7-12, is designed to enable teachers to earn both endorsements as part of their master’s degree-Teacher of the
ADDITIONAL LLC REQUIREMENTS
(39 HOURS)
LLC 5020-3. Workshop in Literacy and
Language Teaching
LLC 5030-3. Language and Literacy
Acquisition, Part I
LLC 5035-3. Language and Literacy
Acquisition, Part II
LLC 5055-3. Linking Assessment and
Instruction in Language and Literacy, Part I
LLC 5060-3. Linking Assessment and
Instruction in Language and Literacy, Part II
LLC 5070-3. Linguistic Analysis of
English: Implications for Teaching
LLC 5710-3. Primary Literacy, Pre-3rd
Grade or
LLC 5720-3. Writing: Process,
Development and Teaching, Gr. 3-12+ or
LLC 5730-3. Language and Literacy
Across the Curriculum
LLC 5820-3. Techniques in Teaching
LLC 5825-3. LLC 5910-3. LLC 6910-3. LLC 6911-3
ESL
Methods and Materials
in Bilingual/Multicultural
Education
Field Experience in
Literacy and Language
Teaching
Seminar and Practicum in Language and Literacy, K-6 or
Seminar and Practicum in Language and Literacy,
Gr. 7-12+
Reading and Writing
The master’s program is designed to prepare teachers in K-6,7-12, or K-12. Reading is a credentialed program meeting the Colorado Department of Education requirements for Reading Teacher Endorsement. Therefore, students who obtain a master’s degree in reading education from CU-Denver are certified to hold positions in public and private schools as special developmental and remedial reading teachers in K-6,7-12, or for elementary and secondary teachers who wish to enhance reading and writing instruction in their classrooms.
By placing emphasis on the reading, writing, and oral language development of diverse student populations, the master’s program is at the forefront of the field. Reading, writing, and oral language are approached from a socio-psycholinguistic perspective that emphasizes learner’s construction of meaning rather than the learning of isolated skills. Importance is placed on using theory, inquiry, and personal reflection to inform classroom practice. The program prepares teachers to become decision makers capable of developing learner-centered curriculums where each student’s reading and writing abilities are assessed in order to address developmental or special needs.
CURRICULUM
Course offerings lead to an M.A. degree in curriculum and instruction with an emphasis in reading and writing with a Reading Teacher Endorsement at one of three levels: K-6, 7-12, or K-12.
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION CORE CURRICULUM (9 HOURS)
REM 5000-3. Introduction to Research, Evaluation, and Measurement
3 hours from LLC, including LLC 5140,
LLC 5150, LLC 5430 3 hours from FNDS or EPSY 5100,
EPSY 5140
READING AND WRITING CURRICULUM —K-6 ENDORSEMENT (30 HOURS)
LLC 5020-3. Workshop in Literacy
and Language Teaching LLC 5030-3. Language and Literacy
Acquisition, Part I
LLC 5035-3. Language and Literacy
Acquisition, Part II
LLC 5055-3. Linking Assessment and
Instruction in Language and Literacy, Part 1


Early Childhood Education / 87
LLC 5060-3. Linking Assessment and Instruction in Language ELED 5310/ 5330-3. Children’s Literature
and Literacy, Part II LLC 5720-3. Writing: Process,
ELED 5310/ 5530-3. Children’s Literature Development and Teaching, Gr. 3-12+
LLC 5710-3. Primary Literacy, Pre-3rd Grade or LLC 5730-3. Language and Literacy Across the Curriculum
LLC 5720-3. Writing: Process, LLC 5740-3. Adolescent Literature
Development and Teaching, Gr. 3-12+ LLC 5910-3. Field Experience in Literacy and Language
LLC 5730-3. Language and Literacy Teaching
Across the Curriculum LLC 6910-3. Seminar and Practicum in
LLC 5910-3. Field Experience in Literacy and Language Language and Literacy, K-6
Teaching LLC 6911-3. Seminar and Practicum in
LLC 6910-3. Seminar and Practicum in Language and Literacy, K-6 Language and Literacy, Gr. 7-12+
READING AND WRITING CURRICULUM —7-12 ENDORSEMENT (30 HOURS)
LLC 5020-3. Workshop in Literacy
and Language Teaching LLC 5030-3. Language and Literacy
Acquisition, Part I
LLC 5035-3. Language and Literacy
Acquisition, Part II LLC 5055-3. Linking Assessment
and Instruction in Language and Literacy, Parti
LLC 5060-3. Linking Assessment
and Instruction in Language and Literacy, Part II
LLC 5720-3. Writing: Process,
Development and Teaching, Gr. 3-12+
LLC 5730-3. Language and Literacy
Across the Curriculum LLC 5740-3. Adolescent Literature
LLC 5910-3. Field Experience in
Literacy and Language Teaching
LLC 6911-3. Seminar and Practicum in
Language and Literacy,
Gr. 7-12+
ADDING A READING TEACHER ENDORSEMENT
Teachers may add a Reading Teacher Endorsement to an already earned master’s degree by taking those courses listed under the chosen endorsement level.
(In the State of Colorado, the Reading Teacher Endorsement cannot simply be added to a bachelor’s degree.) Also, two additional courses must be taken in other areas specified by the Colorado Department of Education. In many cases, previous master’s degree courses will satisfy this requirement.
Teachers who have completed the Literacy Leadership Area in the Initial Teacher Education Program may complete a Reading Teacher Endorsement by taking three additional core courses plus an elective course (12 hours total) as follows:
LLC 5055-3. Linking Assessment and
Instruction, Part I
LLC 5060-3. Linking Assessment and
Instruction, Part II
LLC 6910-3. Seminar and Practicum,
K-6or
LLC 6911-3. Seminar and Practicum,
7-12+
One elective with approval of advisor.
READING AND WRITING CURRICULUM —K-12 ENDORSEMENT (36 HOURS)
LLC 5020-3. LLC 5030-3. LLC 5035-3. LLC 5055-3.
LLC 5060-3.
Workshop in Literacy and Language Teaching Language and Literacy Acquisition, Part I Language and Literacy Acquisition, Part II Linking Assessment and Instruction in Language and Literacy, Part I Linking Assessment and Instruction in Language and Literacy, Part II
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY
Division Coordinator: William L. Goodwin Program Team Leaden Donna Wittmer Office: NC4025D Telephone: 556-3535
Faculty
Professor William L. Goodwin Assistant Professor Donna Wittmer Adjunct Professor Suzanne Adams
The early childhood education program is a graduate program leading to a master’s degree in early childhood education and/or certification in early childhood special education. Students may choose, via their course work and field experiences, to prepare for careers working with either young children with special needs, birth to five years, or young typical children, birth to eight years.
The program is interdisciplinary in focus, drawing upon university resources in educational psychology, special education, communication disorders, nursing, and multicultural education as well as early childhood education, and community resources for occupational/physical therapy, pediatrics, and social work.
There is a strong emphasis on field experiences in both regular and special education concentrations.
The program also offers students opportunities to pursue special focuses: infants birth to three; working with families from diverse sociocultural backgrounds; and/or social inclusion.
Curriculum
The master’s degree in early childhood education with a certification in special education requires 39 semester hours of course work and 4 hours of practicum. Thirty-one semester hours are required for certification only. The master’s degree in early childhood (regular education) typically requires 33 semester hours of course work and 3 semester hours of practicum.
The two programs share course content in:
• Normal child growth and development
• Learning approaches with young children
• Measurement and evaluation
• Basic statistics/research methods
• Multicultural Education
• Research and current issues
• Early childhood curriculum and program development for inclusive classrooms
• Working with parents and families
The early childhood special education program provides specialized training in:
• Developmental disorders, birth to five
• Screening and assessment of young children
• Intervention strategies with infants and preschoolers
• Behavior management
• Working as a member of the trans-disciplinaryteam


88 / School of Education
• Working collaboratively with families
• Cognitive and socioemotional development and disorders
• Language development and language disorders
• Treatment of children who have neurological impairment and chronic illness
The early childhood regular education program provides specialized training in:
• Language acquisition and development
• Reading and writing instruction
• Early childhood program administration
Infant Focus
Coordinator William L. Goodwin Office: NC4025 Telephone: 556-3535
FACULTY
Assistant Professor Donna Wittmer
The program is designed to provide students with the background and skills necessary for working with infants who are at risk or disabled and their families. The specialization is available to students in the early childhood special education certification and master’s degree programs, and the school psychology certification and master’s degree programs.
It also is available to interested graduate students in related fields, such as nursing, occupational and physical therapy, social work, and communication disorders.
The program is interdisciplinary in focus. University and community resources in communication disorders, counseling, nursing, occupational and physical therapy, pediatrics, school psychology, social work, and special education are utilized. Field work and site visits are planned in both health care and educational settings.
The specialization consists of four courses plus field work:
• Medical and physiological aspects of developmental disabilities, birth to three
• Screening and assessment of young children
• Early intervention strategies
• Working with parents and families of young children
• Infant practicum
Students in the early childhood master’s degree program (special education emphasis) would take these courses by advisement as part of their program
requirements of course work and practicum.
Students in the school psychology certification would take these courses by advisement, primarily as their electives. The certification program in school psychology requires 60 semester hours of course work, including 8 hours of field work.
Family Multicultural Focus
Project Director Donna Wittmer Project Coordinator Julie Henry Office: NC4025 Telephone: 556-3535
FACULTY
Assistant Professor Donna Wittmer
The family specialization provides an in-depth focus on families from diverse sociocultural backgrounds. Students are provided with the theoretical background and skills to work with families of young special needs children. Students earn a Master of Arts degree and/or choose to complete certification requirements in early childhood special education.
The specialization consists of three courses and specific practicum experience in community-based, family-focused programs.
The courses include:
• Working with parents and families of young children
• Multicultural education or culture in the classroom
• Family dynamics or multicultural counseling
Social Inclusion Focus
Project Director Donna Wittmer Project Coordinator Julie Henry Office: NC4025 Telephone: 556-3535
FACULTY
Assistant Professor Donna Wittmer
The social inclusion focus provides in-depth training in competencies needed to facilitate the social inclusion of young children with disabilities and their families through collaboration strategies in a variety of natural settings. As a result of the training program, students will function as social inclusion specialists with certification in early childhood special education, serving young children with disabilities and their families from diverse sociocultural backgrounds. Students earn a Master of Arts degree and/or choose to complete certification requirements in early childhood special education.
The specialization consists of one additional course: ECE 5040, Administrative Seminar: Emphasis on social inclusion and inclusive programs.
ADMINISTRATION, SUPERVISION, AND CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT
Division Coordinator: Rodney Muth Office: NC5024 Telephone: 556-4857
Faculty
Professors: G. Thomas Bellamy, William F.
Grady, Michael J. Murphy, Rodney Muth Associate Professors: Paul Bauman,
W. Michael Martin Assistant Professors: Sharon Ford,
L.A. Napier, Nancy Sanders Emeritus: Bob L. Taylor
The major responsibility of the Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development program faculty is to prepare leaders for public schools in Colorado and the nation. Currently, the Type D Administrator Certificate is required for people seeking building-level and district-level administrative positions in Colorado. After July 1,1994, new licensing requirements will be in effect.
The Program
The University of Colorado at Denver offers three degree programs in addition to the Administrator Certification (Type D) Program.
Doctor of Philosophy Degree: primarily an academic degree, the Ph.D. is for those who hold an M.A. and seek to enhance their understanding of issues related to education.
Specialist in Education Degree: available to those who hold an M.A. and now seek Colorado administrator certification or a specialized program.
Master of Arts Degree: designed for those who hold no graduate degree and who seek Colorado administrator certification or a specialized program in administration, supervision, and curriculum development.
Certification Only: available for those who hold a graduate degree and who seek only Colorado administrator certification.
Please Note: As of July 1,1994, the Type D certificate will not longer be granted by the State of Colorado, and students entering the M.A. or Ed.S. programs who seek an Administrator or Principal License will have to meet the state standards then in


Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development / 89
effect. Since the state standards had not been approved when this catalog was printed, inquiries about the ASCD licensing program should be directed to the program office. After the standards are approved, a supplement to this catalog will outline the new licensing degree requirements.
Admission Criteria/Guidelines
MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.), SPECIALIST IN EDUCATION (ED.S.), AND CERTIFICATION PROGRAMS
1. Grade-Point Average. Undergraduate-2.75 or better on a 4-point scale; Graduate - 3.0.
2. Examination Scores. Either, not both: Miller Analogy Test (MAT) - 44 or higher; Graduate Record Examination (GRE) - 900, or higher, combined verbal and quantitative scores.
3. Review of letters of recommendation and response to item six on the Application for Graduate Admission -Part II Form.
4. A writing sample may be required.
DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (PH.D.)
The criteria/guidelines are the same as those above, except:
1. GRE scores must be submitted. A minimum of 1,000 (combined verbal and quantitative scores) is required for consideration for regular admission.
2. Grade-Point Average. Graduate GPAs above 3.0 are required and expected. Degree of success in previous graduate studies is given careful consideration. Undergraduate GPAs are also considered.
3. Considerable weight will be given to the quality of the written responses submitted with the Part II (6) Application for Graduate Admission form, as above.
4. A writing sample may be required. Please Note: These criteria/guidelines
are considered by the faculty committee which reviews applications for admission to these programs. Neither failing to meet any one of the criteria nor meeting the minimum standards for all criteria automatically results in denial of or recommendation for admission. All application materials are reviewed together to determine the likelihood of success in a program, and admission decisions are made only after reviewing the material as a whole.
Program Information
Individuals interested in any of the programs are encouraged to contact ASCD faculty to discuss them. Conferences prior to application are encouraged and welcomed. Following admission, students are expected to maintain frequent contact with assigned advisors to plan and develop programs of study.
Master of Arts (M.A.)
The M.A. requires course work totaling 36 semester hours beyond the bachelor’s degree. Completion of the master’s degree program DOES NOT qualify persons for the Administrator Certificate. No thesis is required, but candidates must successfully complete a four-hour comprehensive examination.
COURSE PLAN
Level/. Core (9 semester hours total)
Students must select at least one course in each of the following three areas:
1. An advanced psychological foundations of education course (not EPSY 5000) or Special Education.
2. Social/Philosophical Foundations or Multicultural Education. Most foundations courses are acceptable (after approval from advisor) except FNDS 5000.
3. A research and evaluation methodology or statistical methods course (not REM 5000). (Required for M.A. but not for certification.)
EDUC 5834-3. Seminar: School Administration
Jhe Plan II Master of Arts degree does not require a thesis; however, a four-hour final written comprehensive examination is required.
Colorado Administrator Certification
Principals: Certification endorsement as a building-level principal is available for elementary, middle, and senior high school levels. Current Colorado Department of Education regulations require that specified competencies be met satisfactorily. Forty-three semester hours are required to meet these for senior and middle level certification. Fifty-one semester hours are required for both the M.A. degree and elementary certification. These semester hours must be beyond the B.A. A master’s degree is required prior to certification. The following courses (in addition to those listed under the M.A. degree) are required for endorsement at the various school levels.
Senior High School (8 semester hours)
EDUC 5090-3. Senior High School Curriculum
EDUC 7370-3. Administration and Supervision of Senior High School
EDUC 7931-2. Internship in Educational Administration and Supervision
Middle Level School (8 semester hours)
Level II. General Educational Administration (12 semester hours)
EDUC 5100-3. Curriculum Program Development and Evaluation
EDUC 5830-3. Governance and Administration of Education
EDUC 5831-3. School Law
EDUC 5832-3. Group Development and Training
Level III. Administrative Skills and
Technology (18 semester hours)
EDUC 5050-3. Computer Applications for Educational Management
EDUC 5833-3. School Business Management
EDUC 5835-3. Supervision of Instruction
EDUC 7420-3. Personnel Development and Training
EDUC 7430-3. School and Community Relations
EDUC 7120-3. Curriculum of Middle Level School
EDUC 7560-3. Administration and Supervision in the Junior High School and Middle School
EDUC 7931-2. Internship in Educational Administration and Supervision
Elementary School (11 semester hours)
EDUC 5070-3. Elementary School Curriculum
EDUC 7350-3. Elementary Principalship Intensive
EDUC 7360-3. Administration and Supervision of Elementary School
EDUC 7931-2. Internship in Educational Administration and Supervision
Superintendent: Administrator certification endorsement for the superintendency is also available. Such endorsement requires:


90 / School of Education
1. Sixty semester hours beyond the B.A. degree, including an M.A. or higher degree.
2. Colorado Administrator Certification, building-level endorsement.
3. Completion of at least the following courses in addition to a building-level administrator endorsement:
EDUC 7400-3. Doctoral Seminar in School Finance
EDUC 7410-3. Educational Facilities Planning
EDUC 7931- Internship in Educational 1 to 6. Administration and Supervision
4. Completion of 3 courses and any additional requirements at the University of Colorado as determined by advisor.
5. Formal admission to the ASCD program.
6. Eighteen credit hours minimum at CU-Denver.
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)
Depending on graduate work completed, students seeking the Ph.D. will be expected to complete forty semester hours of course work leading up to the comprehensive examination and admission to candidacy. In addition, thirty dissertation credits are required. The course plan will be developed in consultation with professors in the student’s proposed area(s) of concentration and with the approval of the student’s advisor and committee.
Transfer of doctoral work will be considered and requires the approval of the advisor and the Graduate School. Students may take elective course work in related University departments with advisor approval.
REQUIRED COURSES
1. Doctoral Seminar: Theory of Educational Administration (EDUC 7380).
2. Doctoral Seminar in Educational Leadership (EDUC 7825).
3. Introduction to Research Methods (REM 5200)
4. Intermediate Statistics. (Basic Statistics is a prerequisite and cannot be included in the degree plan.) (REM 7110)
5. Experimental Design, Survey Methods, Policy Studies, Naturalistic Research, or other advanced research methods course.
6. Doctoral Research Seminar: Education Administration, Curriculum, and Supervision (EDUC 7800).
Please Note: The Ph.D. program is being revised. A supplement that describes the new program’s requirements will be
available from the program office when the revisions have been completed.
Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)
The Ed.S. degree program affords the opportunity for advanced graduate study and/or administrator certification. Thirty semester hours of graduate credit beyond the M.A. degree are required. The program is intended to serve individuals who have a graduate degree and who now seek administrator preparation or certification, but who do not wish to pursue a doctorate. Completion of the Specialist in Education degree DOES NOT qualify persons for the Administrator Certificate. The Ed.S. degree does not require a thesis. A 12-hour final written comprehensive examination is required.
Access Program in Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development
For information about access programs, please call 556-4857.
INSTRUCTIONAL
TECHNOLOGY
Program Area Coordinator: R. Scott Grabinger
Office: NC5030C, Fifth Floor Telephone: 556-6022
Faculty
Associate Professors: R. Scott Grabinger, Duane K. Troxel, Brent Wilson Assistant Professors: Dian Walster Emeritus: Bettie R. Helser
Master of Arts
The administration, supervision, and curriculum development degree with an option in instructional technology and the M.A. in library media are awarded for study in the area of instructional technology. There are four program tracks under these degree programs. The School Library Media Specialist certification track leading to the M.A. in library media is designed to prepare school library media specialists for elementary and secondary school library media centers. Upon completion of the program, graduates meet the requirements for endorsement as school library media specialists by the Colorado Department of Education. The Corporate Instructional Development and Training track of the M.A. in administration, supervision, and curriculum development is designed to prepare trainers in corporate,
health, government, and military settings. The program of study is based upon nationally defined competencies and a regional needs assessment. The Instructional Computing track is designed to prepare teachers to use computing resources in the classroom and in other educational settings, and to provide computing leadership in their schools and districts. These individuals will be able to design, evaluate, and integrate computer-based learning materials into existing curricula and programs. The Interactive Technologies Design track provides the opportunity for students to specialize in the design and production of interactive materials. Specific skills include the production of instructional television programs, general audiovisual production, and skills related to producing computer-based applications including interactive videodisc, computer-based training, hypertext, and hypermedia.
SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA SPECIALIST PROGRAM TRACK
Three programs are offered to prepare certified teachers for library media specialist positions (school librarians) in elementary and secondary school library media centers. These programs are 29-semester-hour programs for a School Library Media Specialist at either the elementary (K-6) level or the secondary (7-12) level, and a master’s degree program for a School Library Media Specialist, K-12. Upon completion of either program, graduates meet the requirements for endorsement (Standard 8.02.5) as stated by the Colorado Department Of Education. In addition, the programs are accredited by the North Central Association (NCA) and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE).
To be endorsed as a School Library Media Specialist, an applicant shall hold or be eligible for a Type A or equivalent certificate and shall have completed the following requirements:
1. Hold a bachelor’s or higher degree from an accredited institution of higher education and have completed an approved upper division or graduate program in school library media in an accepted institution of higher education.
2. Have completed a minimum of one year teaching experience (not in school library media) while holding
a valid Colorado Type A or equivalent certificate.
3. Have knowledge and skills in the following areas:
a. Administration of school library media programs


Instructional Technology / 91
b. Cataloging and classification
c. Media production and design
d. Reference services
e. Selection, evaluation, and utilization of library media
f. Research and evaluation
g. Children and young adult’s literature
h. Curriculum development and instruction design
i. Automation and technology
4. Have completed a supervised practicum or internship in an elementary and/or secondary school at the appropriate grade level(s) for endorsement (elementary, secondary, or K-12). The practicum or internship may be waived upon demonstration of comparable media experience. The School Library Media Specialist track prepares candidates to meet these standards.
Admission Requirements
1. Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with a grade-point average of 2.75 or higher.
2. A Colorado Type A teaching certificate. A teaching certificate from another state may be accepted for admission, but the Colorado certificate must be acquired prior to completing 12 semester hours of instruction.
3. Completion of a minimum of one year teaching experience (not in library media) while holding a valid Colorado Type A or equivalent (may be completed concurrently, but requirement must be satisfied by the time the degree is awarded).
4. Four letters of recommendation from individuals who are in a position to evaluate the applicant’s professional competence as well as potential for graduate study.
5. A letter accompanying the application which details the applicant’s educational and professional experiences, reasons for pursuing the endorsement, and the professional contribution which one hopes to make after completing the program. There is no interview requirement, so this may be the only opportunity to convince the faculty of one’s verbal fluency and professional commitment.
Master’s degree candidates (K-12) must also submit Graduate Record Examination scores (verbal and quantitative) of 950 or higher OR Miller Analogy Test score of 45 or higher. Note: This requirement may be waived if a master’s degree in a related field has been earned prior to application to this program.
Program Requirements
A. SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA SPECIALIST, K-12, MASTER’S DEGREE
At least 37 semester hours of course work:
IT 5010-3.
IT 5020-3.
IT 5030-3.
IT 5040-3.
IT 5050-3.
IT 5310-3.
ELED 5310-3. LLC 5740-3. IT 5911-1 to 4
IT 5912-1 to 4.
IT 5520-3.
REM 5200-3.
LLC 5040-3.
Instructional Role of the Media Specialist Selection/Evaluation of Educational Media School Reference Service Cataloging/Classification of Educational Media Administration of Library Media Programs Producing of Educational Materials Children’s Literature Adolescent Literature Field Experience in Library Media: Elementary Field Experience in Library Media:
Secondary Computer Tools for Learning/Productivity Introduction to Research Methods
Multicultural Education
Comprehensive Examination. During the final semester of enrollment, student will complete a four-hour written examination covering the curriculum. The examination may be repeated once after a period of three months.
B. SCHOOL LIBRARY MEDIA SPECIALIST, K-6 OR 7-12 ENDORSEMENT
At least 29 semester hours of course work: IT 5010-3. Instructional Role of the
Media Specialist
IT 5020-3. Selection/Evaluation
of Educational Media IT 5030-3. School Reference Service
IT 5040-3. Cataloging/Classification
of Educational Media
IT 5050-3. Administration of Library
Media Programs IT 5310-3. Producing of
Educational Materials IT 5520-3. Computer Tools for
Learning/Productivity REM 5200-3. Introduction to Research
Methods
K-6 ENDORSEMENT ADD:
ELED 5310-3. Children’s Literature
IT 5911-1 to 4. Field Experience in Library Media: Elementary
7-12 ENDORSEMENT ADD:
LLC 5740-3. Adolescent Literature
IT 5912-1 to 4. Field Experience
in Library Media: Secondary
CORPORATE INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING TRACK
This program has been designed to meet the specific instructional needs of trainers in corporate settings. The competencies taught are based upon three separate needs assessments conducted by and with major professional associations in the field. In addition to traditional admission requirements, the program accepts only outstanding individuals with a professional commitment and outstanding written and interpersonal communication skills.
Graduates of this program will be prepared to assume positions as trainers and/or instructional developers in business, industry, government agencies, military, or other training facilities.
Admission Requirements
In order to be admitted to this program the applicant must provide evidence of each of the following:
1. Bachelor’s degree in a relevant field from an accredited institution of higher education with a grade-point average of 2.85 or higher.
2. Graduate Record Examination score (combined verbal + quantitative) of 950 or higher OR Miller Analogy Test score of 45 with a comparable GRE score or higher.
3. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who are in a position to evaluate the applicant’s professional competence as well as potential for graduate study.
4. A letter of application detailing previous educational and professional experiences, reasons for pursuing graduate study, and the professional contributions which the applicant hopes to
be able to make after completing the degree. There is no interview requirement for this program, so this may be the only opportunity to convince the faculty of one’s commitment.
5. At least two writing samples. These may be articles, instructional materials, reports, or proposals.
Professional and Personal Expectations
All students in the Instructional Technology program are expected to show a strong commitment to the program and to maintain high personal and professional


92 / School of Education
standards. Only students who exhibit high academic, personal, and professional standards are admitted to the program. Unprofessional conduct can be adequate cause for discipline or dismissal from the program.
Course Work
Complete 36 hours from the following program of study. Courses marked with an asterisk(*) reflect a typical student’s program of study.
CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING CORE
Complete the following courses (at least 22 hours) early in your program:
*EPSY 5240-3. Cognition and Instruction *IT 5100-3. Introduction to
Performance Technology ‘IT 5110-3. Instructional
Development Process ‘IT 6110-2. Managing Instructional
Development
‘IT 6130-2. Formative Evaluation of
Instructional Materials ‘IT 5600-3. Computer-based Lesson
Authoring *IT 6930-1 to 6. Internship
LEARNING FOUNDATIONS
Select at least 3 hours from the following courses:
*EPSY 5220-3. Adult Learning and Education
REM 5400-3. Introduction to
Evaluation of Programs and Persons
ORGANIZATIONS AND PEOPLE
Select at least 2 hours from the following courses:
BUSN 6040-3. *IT 6120-2.
MGMT 6810-3. MGMT 6320-3. PSY 5640-3.
Human Behavior in
Organizations
Instructional
Development
Consultation
Human Resource
Development
Organizational
Development
Training and
Development
INSTRUCTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
Select at least 5 hours from the following courses:
‘IT 5120-3. Instructional Models,
Strategies and Tactics *IT 5130-3. Instructional Message
Design
IT 5150-2. Analyzing Learner
Characteristics
IT 5410-2.
Designing Text and must be acquired prior to completing
Graphics for Instruction 12 semester hours of instruction.
PRODUCTION
Select at least 3 hours from the following courses:
IT 5310-3. IT 5370-3.
‘IT 5610-3. IT 5640-3.
IT 5990-3.
IT 6530-3.
Producing Educational Materials Portable Video Production for Instruction and Training Designing CBI and EPSS Hypermedia/Multimedia Learning Environments Special Topics: Desktop Publishing in Education Design and Production of Interactive Technologies
INSTRUCTIONAL COMPUTING TRACK
This track is intended to develop personnel in schools who are able to administer and apply technologies in classrooms and other instructional settings. The instructional computing graduate has responsibilities that include computer skills; curriculum planning and computer integration; staff development; hardware and software evaluation; design, production, and evaluation of courseware; and management of computers in the classroom.
Admission Requirements
1. Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution of higher education with a grade-point average of 2.85 or higher.
2. Graduate Record Examination score (combined verbal + quantitative) of 950 or higher OR Miller Analogy Test score of 45 or higher.
3. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who are in a position to evaluate the applicant's professional competence as well as potential for graduate study.
4. A letter accompanying the application which details previous educational and professional experiences, reasons for pursuing graduate study, and the professional contribution which the applicant hopes to make after completing the degree. There is no interview requirement, so this may be the only opportunity to convince the faculty of one’s verbal fluency and professional commitment.
Note: For applicants seeking a position in the public schools, a Colorado Type A teaching certificate is required. A teaching certificate from another state may be accepted, but the Colorado certificate
Program Requirements
Complete 36 semester hours from the following program of study. Courses marked with an asterisk(*) reflect a typical student’s program of study.
MASTER RESOURCE TEACHER CORE
Complete the following courses (22 semester hours):
*IT 5510-3.
‘IT 5110-3.
*EPSY 5240-3. ‘IT 5600-3.
‘IT 5520-3.
‘IT 5990-3.
‘IT 5710-3.
‘IT 5998-1.
Integrating Computers in the Curriculum The Instructional Development Process Cognition and Instruction Computer-based Lesson Authoring Computer Tools for Learning and Productivity Special Topics: Management of Learning Technologies Telecommunications and Networking in Education Professional Development Activities (Based upon attendance at a professional conference)
INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND FOUNDATIONS
Select at least 2 semester hours from the courses below:
IT 5120-3.
‘IT 5130-3.
IT 5150-2.
REM 5400-3.
EDUC 5830-3.
LLC 5040-3.
Instructional Models, Strategies and Tactics Instructional Message Design
Analyzing Learning Characteristics Introduction to Evaluation of Programs and Persons
Governance and Administration of Education
Multicultural Education
TOOLS AND APPLICATIONS
Select at least six semester hours from these or related courses:
‘IT 5990-3. Special Topics: Desktop Publishing in Education IT 6510-3. Computer Graphics Systems
IT 5310-3. Producing Educational Materials
IT 5370-3. Portable Video Production for Instruction and Training


Instructional Technology / 93
IT 6530-3. Design and Production of
Interactive Technologies
LANGUAGES
Select at least 3 semester hours from the courses below.
Math 5250-3. Problem Solving with
Pascal I
*IT 5640-3. Hypermedia/Multimedia
Learning Environments
MASTERS PORTFOLIO
Enroll for 2-4 semester hours of IT 6960: Master’s Project/Report.
MASTER RESOURCE TEACHER PORTFOLIO
In order to fulfill the comprehensive examination requirement, a comprehensive master’s portfolio is required. As you proceed through the program, you will participate in a number of projects that Eire relevant to a variety of applied settings. You will compile and document your work into a portfolio. The purpose of the portfolio is to demonstrate your ability to apply skills and knowledge in the following areas:
• Understand how technology can support learning
• Plan for the implementation of technology within classrooms, schools, or other learning settings
• Design and develop instructioncil innovations using technology
• Implement technology-supported instruction within a learning setting
• Evaluate technology-based programs, systems or materials in terms of their design amd potential for learning
• Manage technology resources and projects
For each product included in the portfolio, include the following:
• a description and rationale
• design documentation
• critique and evaluation
• lessons learned
INTERACTIVE TECHNOLOGIES DESIGN
This track focuses on the design and production of matericils for interactive technologies. Possible specialization may include:
• generalist skills in audiovisual, television, emd computer technologies
• computer-based technologies including interactive videodisc, CD-ROM, and computer-based training
• distance education
Admission Requirements
1. Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with a grade-point average of 2.85 or higher.
2. Graduate record Examination (GRE) score (verbal + quantitative) of 1000 or higher OR Miller Analogy Test score
of 45 or higher. Note: This requirement may be waived if you have completed a master’s degree in a related field prior to application in the program.
3. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who are in a position of evaluating your professional competence as well as your potential for graduate study.
4. A letter accompanying your application which details your educational and professional experiences, your reasons for pursuing graduate study, and the professional contributions which you hope to make after completing the degree. There is no interview requirement, so this may be your only opportunity to convince the faculty of your verbal fluency and your professional commitment.
5. One or two samples of work that demonstrate your writing ability. You may submit units of study, instructional materials, manuals, grant proposals, or programs.
6. For international students, TOEFL score of 550 or higher is required.
Program Requirements
Before taking smy courses, the student must consult with an advisor, who will help identify career aspirations of the student. Based upon those aspirations, the student and advisor will identify program committee faculty members speciedizing in the area of the Eispirations, then design a program of course work.
CORE REQUIREMENTS (19 semester hours)
IT 5100-3.
IT 5110-3.
IT 5130-3.
IT 5600-3.
IT 6120-2.
IT 6130-2. EPSY 5240-3.
Introduction to Performance Technology Instructional Development Process Instructional Message Design
Computer-based Lesson Authoring Instructional Development Consultation Formative Evaluation of Instructional Materials Cognition and Instruction
Electives
(at leEist 14 semester hours)
Master's Project or Thesis
.During the final semester, students perform either a master’s project or master’s thesis. In a master’s project, the student designs, develops, and evaluates an instructional system which synthesizes the student’s specialization. This usually entails developing interactive instructional materials. A master’s thesis is a research project in the area of interactive technologies that entails a quantitative or qualitative research project. This is particularly appropriate for any student thinking about a future doctorate degree. With the assistance and approval of the program committee, the student will identify a project or topic for research. The faculty will emphcisize the dissemination of this report in a journal or local, regioneil, or national conference.
Ph.D. Program
The Ph.D. in Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development with an emphasis in Instructional Technology is designed for advanced graduate study in this field. The program is intended for students who are professionally committed to the field, as evidenced by previous professional experience in public or higher education, corporate training and development, or educational technology. The program stresses close collegial and collaborative relationships between faculty Emd students in designing and carrying out development and research activities. Graduates of the IT Program Eissume leadership roles in business, universities, or other agencies committed to the meaningful application of various technologies to instruction.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
These criteria are used to evaluate each application. No single criterion is necessary or sufficient for admission.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
1. Mcister’s degree in a relevant field with a GPA of 3.2 or higher.
2. GPA of 2.9 in last 60 hours of bachelor’s degree.
3. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score (verbal + quantitative) of 1000 or higher OR Miller Analogy Test score of 45 or higher.
4. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who are in a position to evaluate your professional competence eis well eis your potential for graduate study.


94 / School of Education
5. A letter accompanying your application which details your educational and professional experiences, your reasons for pursuing graduate study, and the professional contributions which you hope to make after completing the degree.
6. Recent representative samples of your writing and scholarly ability. These may be units you have developed or papers or technical reports written.
7. For international students, a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 550 or higher is required.
Course Work
60 or more semester hours beyond the master’s, depending upon prior educational experience, including:
30 hours or more of course work 30 hours or more of dissertation credit
Residency
Enrollment in 8 or more semester hours for three consecutive semesters OR Enrollment in 24 semester hours within any 18-month period.
Additional residency experiences will be defined for the individual by his/her committee. Examples include graduate/ teaching assistantships and internships.
Preliminary Qualifying Examination
Taken after 8-12 semester hours of course work: written paper plus oral examination.
Comprehensive Examination
After completion of course work, two five-hour exams over six areas.
Dissertation Study and Oral Examination of Dissertation Study
PROGRAM OF STUDY
General Education Technology Core and Prerequisites
These courses, or their equivalents, must be completed prior to beginning the Doctoral Core. A student with a master’s in educational technology may not need to take some or all of these classes. The initial advisor helps determine the courses required.
IT 5110-3. Instructional
Development Process IT 5120-3. Instructional Models,
Strategies, and Tactics IT 5130-3. Instructional Message
Design
IT 5600-3 Computer-based
Lesson Authoring
REM 5300-3. Introduction to
Measurement
EPSY 5240-3. Cognition and Instruction
Doctoral Core
Four of the following seminars are required of all Ph.D. students. These courses are offered on a regular rotation. IT 6710-3. Theoretical Bases for
Instructional Technology IT 6720-3. Research in Instructional
Technology
IT 6730-3. Comparative Models
of Instructional Design IT 6740-3. Learning Processes
Applied to Instructional Technology
IT 6750-3. Current Trends and
Issues in Instructional Technology
IT 6760-3. Advanced Seminar in
Instructional Design and Development
Research Core
REM 7110-3. Intermediate Statistics
REM 6100-3. Methods of Qualitative
Inquiry
Electives
Other courses negotiated in consultation with the student’s program committee.
DIVISION OF
EDUCATIONAL
PSYCHOLOGY
Educational Psychology
Division Coordinator William L. Goodwin Program Team Leaden Ellen Stevens Office: NC4025 Telephone: 556-3535
Faculty
Professors: William L. Goodwin,
Kaoru Yamamoto Assistant Professors: Alan Davis,
Ellen Stevens, Kenneth Wolf
The M.A. program in educational psychology prepares students to facilitate the teaching/learning process. Thus, many students pursue the degree to enhance their skills as professional classroom teachers. The degree also provides skills necessary for a variety of roles where knowledge of learning, development, and research is essential. Other students seek the M.A. as preparation for certification in school psychology or for advanced study in educational psychology. (Students planning to continue graduate work
beyond the M.A. level should become familiar, before enrolling, with advanced program prerequisites and requirements so that their master’s program can be tailored to assure a smooth transition.)
Areas of Concentration
Five major areas of concentration are available - human learning, child growth and development, research and evaluation, preparation for school psychology, and individualized programs (such as adult learning). Regardless of the concentration area selected, all students must:
1. Take 9 hours of core courses required by the School of Education.
2. Demonstrate competence in educational psychology by successfully completing a minimum of 36 hours of relevant course work (9 of which are the core).
3. Complete either a master’s thesis
(4 semester hours, M.A. Plan I) or an independent study project (3 to 4 semester hours, M.A. Plan II), the latter involving the collection of data bearing on a given problem and its analysis and interpretation in writing.
4. Perform satisfactorily on a four-hour written comprehensive examination (typically taken during the last term enrolled in regular courses).
5. Complete the degree on a timely basis, usually within three years.
Research and Evaluation Methodology
Division Coordinator William L. Goodwin Program Team Leaden Alan Davis Office: NC4025 Telephone: 556-3535
Faculty
Professors: Laura D. Goodwin, William L. Goodwin
Assistant Professors: Alan Davis,
Kenneth Wolf
There is a REM emphasis track within the educational psychology master’s degree program. This area also provides classes to all education graduate programs, offering courses in research methods, evaluation, statistics, assessment, and measurement.


Special Education and School Psychology / 95
DIVISION OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
Special Education: Teacher I,
II, and III Programs
Division Coordinator: Elizabeth B.
Kozleski Office: NC 4023 Telephone: 556-2962
Faculty
Assistant Professors: Nancy French,
Debra Schell-Frank
Associate Professors: Elizabeth B.
Kozleski, Deanna J. Sands
The University of Colorado at Denver offers both master’s degree and endorsement-only special education programs in the areas of Teacher I: Students with Moderate Needs; Teacher II: Students with Severe Affective, Communicative, or Cognitive Needs; and Teacher III: Students with Profound Needs. Teachers completing the Teacher I program are trained to work with students (5-21) who have mild to moderate special education needs across all handicapping conditions. Teacher II graduates specialize in the affective, communicative, or cognitive area in order to work with students (5-21) with severe needs. Persons completing the Teacher III endorsement or master’s degree are trained to work with students who have profound needs from birth through 21 years of age.
The Special Education Program emphasizes training which prepares individuals to support inclusion of students with special needs. Families, regular educators, administrators, and student peers in both general and special education classrooms benefit from the integration experience. The CU-Denver Special Education program emphasizes experiential learning. In addition to traditional practicum, course requirements involve the application of information in school- and community-based programs. Students choosing this program must be prepared to try out new ideas in their own classrooms, or, alternatively, participate in a variety of field experiences. Some non-traditional practicum experiences are available on a limited basis. Also, students who already have been teaching in the special education field have the opportunity to request a reduction or waiver of their practicum experience. On-the-job practicums are available in coordination with the student’s administrative unit.
In fall and spring semesters, university courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening. Most courses are held once per week over 16-week semesters. Often, alternative course schedules are available, such as meeting on nine Saturdays for five hours each. During the summer session, courses are offered during the day over four- or eight-week sessions.
PROGRAM PHILOSOPHY
The Division faculty at CU-Denver has a strong commitment to the principles of normalization, community inclusion, the dignity of risk, and the centred role that persons with disabilities and their families must play in making choices about their lives and educational experiences. Students are challenged in each course to translate these ideals into reality in the schools. Individuals choosing the CU-Denver program will be expected to demonstrate knowledge and competencies in the following areas:
Constructivist Approaches to Learning Transition Planning for Life-Long Learning
Community Referenced Curriculum Nonaversive Behavior Management Integration of Regular and Special Education Services Family-School Partnerships Ecological Approaches to Assessment Consultation/Collaboration Skills Systematic, Data-Based Instruction
ENDORSEMENT PROGRAMS
Students can receive an endorsement in the Teacher I program by completing 34 hours of graduate level course work. It is suggested that Teacher I endorsement students should have or be eligible to hold a Colorado teaching certificate prior to admittance into the program. Individuals seeking a Teacher II endorsement in any of the three areas must have a master’s degree in special education or a related field. The Teacher II endorsement program requires approximately 38 hours of graduate study. The Teacher III program includes approximately 34 hours of graduate study. Applicants for any of the endorsement programs must meet the 24 hours of prerequisite undergraduate or graduate general education requirements.
MASTER'S PROGRAMS
In addition to completing the endorsement course work, master’s degree students complete a nine-semester-hour educational psychology core, bringing their graduate program hours to between 41 and 47 hours depending on the
endorsement being sought, in addition to the 24 hours of prerequisite course work in general education. Comprehensive examinations are required for all master’s degree students.
LICENSURE
Students who do not hold a Colorado license must complete all tests required for initial licensure within first semester of acceptance to the program.
Nine hours:
REM 5100-3. Basic Statistics
REM 5200-3. Introduction to Research
Methods
EPSY 5100-3. Advanced Child Growth and Development
or
EPSY 5140-3. Advanced Adolescent
Growth and Development
TEACHER I ENDORSEMENT
It is suggested that students hold or be eligible to hold a Colorado teaching license. Additionally, students must have completed the following 24 hours of prerequisites.
Three hours in each of the following:
Teaching Mathematics at the Elementary or Secondary Level Foundations of Education Human Growth and Development Instructional Technology Models of Teaching Introduction to Special Education
Six hours in Teaching Reading and Writing
Students must then complete the following 27 hours of graduate course work: LLC 5040-3. Multicultural Education
SPED 5010-3. Teaching Strategies for Students with Special Needs
SPED 5110-3. Nature and Needs
of Students with Mild/ Moderate Disabilities SPED 5120-3. Managing the Special Education Teaching Process
SPED 5140-4. Advanced Assessment
in Special Education SPED 5160-1. Medical/Physical
Challenges of Students with Special Needs
SPED 5180-3. Curriculum Planning for Students with Special Needs
SPED 5300-3. Consultation Skills for Special Education SPED 5400-3. Seminar in Special Education


96 / School of Education
One - Eight hours of Practicum Experience:
SPED 5910- Practicum: Students
1 to 8. with Mild/Moderate
Disabilities
TEACHER II ENDORSEMENT: SEVERE NEEDS: AFFECTIVE, COMMUNICATIVE, OR COGNITIVE
Students must have a graduate degree in special education or a related field. It is highly preferred that students also hold or be eligible to hold a Colorado teaching certificate at the elementary or secondary level. Additionally, students must have completed the following 24 hours of prerequisites.
Three hours in each of the following:
Teaching Mathematics at the Elementary or Secondary Level Foundations of Education Human Growth and Development Instructional Technology Models of Teaching Introduction to Special Education
Six hours in Teaching Reading and Writing
All students must then complete the following 24 hours of graduate course work: LLC 5040-3. Multicultural Education
SPED 5010-3. Teaching Strategies for Students with Special Needs
SPED 5120-3. Managing the Special Education Teaching Process
SPED 5140-4. Advanced Assessment in Special Education SPED 5160-1. Medical/Physical
Challenges of Students with Special Needs
SPED 5180-3. Curriculum Planning for Students with Special Needs
SPED 5300-3. Consultation Skills for Special Education SPED 5400-3. Seminar in Special Education
Students in the Severe Needs: Affective area also must complete 7-14 hours in the following courses:
Six hours
SPSY 6500-3. Identifying and Planning for the Mental Health of School-Aged Children EPSY 5170-3. Behavior Analysis and Intervention
One-Eight hours of Practicum Experience
SPED 5911- Practicum: Severe Needs:
1 to 8. Affective
Students in the Severe Needs: Cognitive area also must complete 7-14 hours in the following courses.
6 hours
SPED 5090-3. Nature and Needs of
Students with Cognitive Disabilities
SPED 5380-3. Methods for Students with Severe Cognitive Needs
SPED 5300-3. SPED 5400-3. SPED 6100-3.
SPED 6200-3.
Consultation Skills for Special Education Seminar in Special Education Communication Development for Students with Severe/Profound Needs Teaching Strategies for Students with Severe/Profound Needs
1-8 hours of Practicum Experience
SPED 5914- Practicum: Students with
1 to 8. Severe/Profound Needs
1-8 hours of Practicum Experience
SPED 5912- Practicum: Severe Needs:
1 to 8. Cognitive
Students in the Severe Needs: Communicative area also must complete 7-14
hours in the following areas:
Six hours
SPED 5130-3. Speech/Language Char-
acteristics of Students with Severe Communication Needs
SPED 6300-3 Teaching Methods for
Students with Severe Communication Needs
1-8 hours of Practicum Experience
SPED 5913- Practicum: Severe Needs:
1 to 8. Communication
TEACHER III: PROFOUND NEEDS
Teacher III students must complete the 24-hour general education prerequisite requirement. It is also recommended that Teacher III students hold or be eligible to hold a Colorado teaching certificate at the elementary or secondary level. In addition to completing the endorsement course work listed below, master’s degree students complete a 9-semester-hour educational psychology core. The 8-hour Teacher III practicum is completed in four settings: a neonatal setting, a preschool setting, an elementary, and a secondary setting.
3 hours in each of the following:
LLC 5040-3. ECE 5060-3.
ECE 6200-3.
SPED 5140-4.
SPED 5160-1.
SPED 5180-3.
Multicultural Education Working with Parents and Families Early Intervention Strategies
Advanced Assessment in Special Education Medical/Physical Challenges of Students with Special Needs Curriculum Planning for Students with Special Needs
School Psychology Program
Program Team Leaden Beth Doll Office: NC 4023B Telephone: 556-2962
FACULTY
Assistant Professor. Beth Doll Research Assistant Professor Anastasia
Kalamaros
The School Psychology Program offered by the University of Colorado at Denver leads to certification in School Psychology by the Colorado Department of Education and meets curricular and internship requirements for National Certification by the National School Psychology Certification Board. Certification in School Psychology is a 60-semester-hour graduate program which provides full-and part-time study opportunities. Students who do not hold a master’s degree in a related field will complete a Master of Arts Degree as part of the program. The diversity of the CU-Denver student community has required that the School Psychology program allow students to create individual plans for meeting certification requirements. Students are permitted to complete these on a full- or part-time basis, during summer and academic year terms, through rural access courses, and during evening hours.
The School Psychology faculty have adopted a preventive mental health model of school psychological services. Program students are trained to screen for and recognize the early warning signs of social, emotional, or academic risk; to conduct assessments of school students’ cognitive, social, emotioned, behavioral, and academic strengths and weaknesses; to participate in establishing and maintaining school building teams that enhance mental health and provide multidisciplinary services to students; to plan and implement preventive and remedial interventions that address students’ needs;


School Psychology / 97
to consult with parents and professionals; and to evaluate the effectiveness of educational services. This breadth of curriculum, and its emphasis on early identification and prevention strategies, will prepare the school psychologist to provide preventive mental health services to elementary and secondary students in regular and special education programs.
The School Psychology Program enrolls students of diverse professional, educational, and ethnic backgrounds. Students having completed graduate studies in a related field from CU-Denver or from another accredited institution of higher education may apply for a waiver of those certification course requirements that duplicate their prior graduate experiences. Although admitted with advanced standing, these students must meet all course requirements for certification (through approved waivers or course completion) and must complete at least one-half of their program (30 graduate semester hours) at the University of Colorado at Denver, including the practicum and internship in school psychology.
REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATION IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY
To complete the certification requirements in School Psychology, students must have completed an undergraduate or graduate course in Personality Theory and a second in Exceptional Children.
In addition, students will complete:
Three hours in
EPSY 5020-3.
EPSY 5100-3.
LLC 5040-3. CPCE 5100-3.
EPSY 5170-3. REM 5100-3. EPSY 5170-3.
REM 5300-3.
REM 7110-3. SPED 5400-3.
each of the following:
Advanced Psychological Foundations of Education Advanced Child Growth and Development Multicultural Education Theory and Techniques of Counseling Human Learning Basic Statistics Behavior Analysis and Intervention Introduction to Measurement Intermediate Statistics Seminar in Special Education
SPSY 6300-3. Legal and Professional Issues in School Psychology
SPSY 6500-3. Identifying and Planning for the Mental Health of School-Aged Children
SPSY 6400-3. Survey of School
Psychological Interventions
Four hours in each of the following:
SPSY 6150-4. Psychoeducational
Assessment 1
SPSY 6160-4. Psychoeducational
Assessment II
Four hours of Practicum Experiences:
SPSY 6911-4. School Psychology
Practicum
Eight hours of School Psychology
Internship:
SPSY 6930- School Psychology
1 to 6. Internship