Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
1999-2000

agiis
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University of Colorado at Denver


AURARIA LIBRARY
August 23 September 6
November 25
November 26
December 6-11 December 13-18 December 18 December 18
First day of classes Labor Day holiday (campus closed) Thanksgiving holiday (campus closed) (campus open, no classes) Preparation week Finals week End of semester Commencement
Registration See the Spring Schedule of Courses
January 17 Martin Luther King Jr. holiday (campus open, no classes)
January 18 first day of classes
March 20-25 Spring break (campus open, no classes)
May 1-6 Preparation week
May 8-13 Finals week
May 13 End of semester
May 13 Commencement
Summer 2000
Registration See the Summer
Schedule of Courses
May 29
May 30 July 4
Memorial Day holiday (campus closed)
First day of classes Independence holiday (campus closed)
July 31-August 5 Finals week August 5 End of term
1 The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time. Consult the Schedule of Courses for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs and registration dates and procedures.
Contents
Welcome............................................................2
Administration...................................................... 3
Degree Programs........................................................4
eneral Information..................................................5
Undergraduate Admissions..........................................8
Graduate School..................................................14
Tuition and Fees.................................................19
Financial Aid....................................................23
Registration.....................................................25
Core Curriculum Chart............................................26
Academic Policies and Regulations................................30
Special Programs and Facilities..................................32
Centers and Institutes...........................................53
University Policies..............................................36
Student Services.................................................43
The Career Center................................................48
Library Services.................................................48
Media Services...................................................50
College of Architecture and Planning.......................................51
College of Arts & Media....................................................63
College of Business and Administration and
Graduate School of Business Administration.......................73
School of Education........................................................95
College of Engineering and Applied Science................................115
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences......................................133
Military Science..........................................................183
Millennium College........................................................187
Graduate School of Public Affairs.........................................189
Course Descriptions.......................................................197
Faculty ..................................................................339
Index ....................................................................353
Produced by: Office of Public Relations & Publications at CU-Denver Director: Marshall L. Collins
Photos: Publications file photographs unless otherwise noted
Cover design: Stevinson Design


AURARIA CAMPUS
cu
IN THE
CITY


cu
IN THE
CITY
IJCD COT
1999 - 2Q00 UCD CflTft 02/11/99
DERI 9/86900016 ISO
7155 $5.00
Periodicals
Postage
PAID
at the Post Office Boulder, Colorado
at
Denver
University of Colorado
Campus Box 167 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364


cu
IN THE
CITY
Undergraduate and Graduate
University of Colorado Catalog (USPS 651-060)
3100 Marine Street, Room A220, Campus Box 584 Boulder, Colorado 80309-0584 Volume 1999, No. 3, May/June Published 7 times a year: January/February,
March/April, May, May/June, August, December, December Periodicals postage paid at Boulder, Colorado POSTMASTER: Send address changes to University of Colorado Catalog, CU-Denver Publications, Boulder, Colorado 80302.
1999-2000
University of Colorado at Denver
SPEER AT LARIMER P.O. BOX 173364
DENVER, COLORADO 80217-3364
Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, degree offerings and degree titles, course offerings and course descriptions, and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice or obligation. The University claims no responsibility for errors that may have occurred during the typesetting, printing or production of this catalog. The University of Colorado at Denver is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. For current calendars, tuition rates, requirements, deadlines, etc., students should refer to a copy of the Schedule of Courses for the semester in which they intend to enroll.
The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curriculum. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester, and the faculty teaching a particular course or program may vary from time to time. The instructor may alter the content of a course or program to meet particular class needs. Courses are listed by college or school.
Alternative format available upon request.
Call 303-556-4493 (voice);
303-556-6204 (TTY); 303-556-2678 (fax) E-mail: ombuds@carbon.cudenver.edu


1 A I elcome to the University of 1/1 / Colorado at Denver. As an urban â– f W university campus, CU-Denver * * creates and maintains strong
linkages to the greater Denver region. This forms a challenging educational environment, and your decision to learn at Denver’s only public university shows a willingness to embrace the fast-paced and rewarding academic experience our faculty and staff provide.
CU-Denver is one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system. We offer bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs, and the prestige and distinction of the University of Colorado degree. We have achieved recognition nationally and internationally because of our outstanding academic programs, top-ranked faculty, and dedicated alumni. CU-Denver thrives as an intellectual environment that encourages commitment, curiosity and imagination.
We’re nestled near the Denver skyline, and we take advantage of this prime location to blend a cosmopolitan attitude into a dynamic Western setting. This urban perspective is an integral theme in our academic programming, orientation of our faculty, and identity of our student body.
We boast an enrollment that has grown to nearly 11,000. Our students engage in some 40 degree and degree option programs at the baccalaureate level and more than 60 degree and degree option programs at the post-baccalaureate level. Each is designed to provide you the foundation on which to build your intellectual, aesthetic, and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens. Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a complement to classroom study.
CU-Denver’s seven academic areas — Arts & Media, Business and Administration, Public Affairs, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, Education, and Architecture and Planning — provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the opportunities for gaining the knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your lives.
We at CU-Denver take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs. This is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the real-world research aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems. Our outreach has become international, as we encourage cultural and technical exchange through an array of programs that serve our students.
We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars and dedicated staff. We will challenge you, as you challenge us. I look forward to your graduation, where we will award you your University of Colorado diploma.
Georgia E. Lesh-Laurie
Chancellor
University of Colorado at Denver


The University of Colorado seal, adopted in 1908, depicts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed in laurel is placed beside him. The Greek inscription means “Let your light shine.” According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civilization “stands as the criterion of culture.” The laurel symbolizes honor or success, the youth of the figure suggests the “morning of life,” and the scroll represents written language.
aTotalLearning
environment
Administration / 3
cu
IN THE
CITY
ADMINISTRATION
BOARD OF REGENTS
HENRY “Hank” ANTON, Pueblo, term expires 2000 MAUREEN JOHNSON, Denver, term expires 2002 SUSAN KIRK, Denver, term expires 2004
THOMAS J. LUCERO, JR., Johnstown, term expires 2004 JIM MARTIN, Boulder, term expires 2004 NORWOOD L. ROBB, Littleton, term expires 2002
JERRY G. RUTLEDGE, Colorado Springs, term expires 2000 ROBERT SIEVERS, Boulder, term expires 2002 PETER STEINHAUER, Boulder, term expires 2000
Staff
MILAGROS CARABALLO, Secretary of the Board of Regents and of the University. B.A., M.S., State University of New York at Albany; M.A., Webster University.
UNIVERSITY-WIDE OFFICERS
JOHN C. BUECHNER, President of the University; Professor of Public Affairs.
B.A., College of Wooster; M.P.A.,
Ph.D., University of Michigan.
JOHN W. BLISS, Vice President for Budget and Finance. B.S., M.P.A., University of Colorado.
DAVID A. GROTH, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Research and Dean of the System Graduate School.
B.S., M.S., Iowa State University;
Ph.D., Michigan State University.
CHARLES V. SWEET, Vice President and University Counsel. B.A., Duke University; J.D., University of Virginia School of Law.
STUART TAKEUCHI, Vice President for Administration. B.A., Occidental College; M.P.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of Colorado.
CU-DENVER OFFICERS
GEORGIA E. LESH-LAURIE, Chancellor; Professor of Biology. B.S., Marietta College (Ohio); M.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University.
JOHN A. BERNHARD, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.A., Stanford University; M.B.A., Columbia University, Graduate School of Business.
MARGARET B. COZZENS, Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs; Professor of Mathematics. B.A., University of Rochester; M.S., Ph.D., Rutgers University.
FERNIE BACA, Associate Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative Activities; Associate Professor of Education.
B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado.
MARK GELERNTER, Associate Vice
Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs; Professor of Architecture.
B.Arch., Montana State University; Ph.D., Bartlett School of Architecture and Planning, University College (London).
KENNETH HERMAN, Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.S., University of Colorado.
DANNY E. MARTINEZ, Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs. B.A., M.A., University of Colorado.


4 / Degree Programs
Undergraduate Degrees COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA Bachelor of Arts - B.A., Bachelor of Fine Arts
B.FA, and Bachelor of Science - BJS.
Fine Arts (B.A.)
Emphases in Art History, Studio Arts Fine Arts (B.F.A.)
Emphases in Drawing/Painting, Film/Video, Multimedia Studies, Photography, Sculpture Music (B.S.)
Emphases in Music Engineering, Music Industry Studies, Music Management, Performance, Scoring & Arranging Theatre (B.A.)
Emphases in Acting/Directing, Design/ Technical, Integrated Theatre
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND
ADMINISTRATION
Business Administration - B.S.
Areas of Emphasis Accounting Finance
Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business Management Marketing
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE Bachelor of Science - B.S.
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Computer Science and Engineering (B.S.) Electrical Engineering (B.S.)
Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES Bachelor of Arts - B.A.
Bachelor of Science - B.S.
Anthropology (B.A.)
Biology (B.S.)
Chemistry (B.S.)
Communication (B.A.)
Economics (B.A.)
English (B.A.)
English Writing Program (B.A.)
French (B.A.)
Geography (B.A.)
Geology (B.S.)
German (B.A.)
History (B.A.)
Individually Structured Major (B.A.) Mathematics (B.S.)
Philosophy (B.A.)
Physics (B.S.)
Political Science (B.A.)
Psychology (B.A., B.S.)
Sociology (B.A.)
Spanish (B.A.)
Graduate Degrees THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING
Architecture (M.ARCH.)
Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.)
Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.)
Urban Design (M.U.D.)
Design and Planning (Ph.D.)
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION
Accounting (M.S.)
Business Administration (M.B.A.)
Executive Program Individualized Program Cohort Program Finance (M.S.)
Health Administration (M.S.)
Executive Program Information Systems (M.S.)
International Business (M.S.I.B.)
Management and Organization (M.S.) Marketing (M.S.)
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Certification Program:
Teacher Certification in Elementary Education (K-6th Grade) and Secondary Education (7th-12th Grade); Type D Certification Administration, Supervision, Curriculum Development (M.A.)
Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education (M.A.)
Curriculum and Instruction (M.A.)
Early Childhood Education (M.A.)
Educational Psychology (M.A.)
Information and Learning Technologies (M.A.) Special Education (M.A.)
Administration, Supervision, Curriculum Development (Ed.S.)
School Psychology (Ed.S.)
Educational Leadership and Innovation (Ph.D.)
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE
Civil Engineering (M.S.)
Computer Science (M.S.)
Electrical Engineering (M.S.)
Engineering (M.E.)
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.)
Civil Engineering (Ph.D.)
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Anthropology (M.A.)
Applied Mathematics (M.S.)
Basic Science (M.B.S.)
Biology (M.A.)
Chemistry (M.S.)
Communication (M.A.)
Economics (M.A.)
English (M.A.)
Environmental Sciences (M.S.)
History (M.A.)
Humanities (M.H.)
Political Science (M.A.)
Psychology (M.A.)
Social Science (M.S.S.)
Sociology (M.A.)
Technical Communication (M.S.)
Applied Mathematics (Ph.D.)
Health and Behavioral Science (Ph.D.)
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Criminal Justice (M.C.J.)
Public Administration (M.P.A.)
Executive Program Public Administration (Ph.D.)
Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration, Colorado State Board of Education, Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board, National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, National Architectural Accrediting Board, Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, National Association of Schools of Music, Planning Accreditation Board, National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration.
You may obtain information about these degrees by contacting us.
Mailing Address:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364
Location:
1200 Larimer Street or 1250 14th Street Annex 303-556-3287
Web Address: www.cudenver.edu


General Information
Situated near the heart of downtown Denver, and looking west toward the majestic Rocky Mountain front range, the University of Colorado at Denver is the only public university in Colorado’s capital city. Its proximity to the commercial and governmental hub of Denver enables CU-Denver to offer its students the combined excellence of its faculty and the opportunities afforded by this metropolitan environment.
One of four campuses in the University of Colorado system, CU-Denver is a non-residential campus offering 31 undergraduate degrees and 43 master’s degrees. Ph.D. degrees are offered in public affairs, applied mathematics, design and planning, health and behavioral sciences, civil engineering, and educational leadership. Classes are offered during weekday and evening hours, on weekends, and at off-campus sites.
With students’ ages ranging between 17 and 75, the average student age at CU-Denver is 29. Seventy-eight percent of our students are employed and 53 percent attend part-time. Forty-six percent of our nearly 11,000 students are enrolled in graduate-level courses.
CU-Denver’s faculty actively promote the special role of an urban institution in meeting the needs of students. They are alert to the challenges and opportunities of the urban environment and are responsive to the needs of students and the community. The combination of our talented faculty and highly motivated students creates a vital and exciting educational environment, combining practical experience with academic excellence.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO SYSTEM
In 1876, the same year Colorado became the nation’s 38th state, the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder. Opening its doors on September 5,1877, the university began with 44 students, a president, and one instructor. Nearly a century later, in 1974, the University of Colorado had grown to four campuses in three Colorado cities-Denver, Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder.
With combined enrollments totaling nearly 45,000 students, the University of Colorado ranks 17th among public universities and colleges in overall research expenditures and 10th among public universities in federally funded research. Awards for research within the university system total approximately $292 million, with funding provided by federal agencies, appropriations from the state of Colorado, and private foundations and donors.
Each of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system has its own chancellor and campus administration. The chancellors, in turn, report to the president of the CU System. The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approves the overall direction provided by the president of the system. The system president is both the chief academic and chief administrative officer of the university. The president has responsibility for the administration of the entire university under the policies described by the Board of Regents or under law.
The University of Colorado at Boulder now serves approximately 25,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs.
The Health Sciences Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, dental, nursing, pharmacy, and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 6,500 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs.
Total Learning Environment
In 1996, CU’s current president, John C. Buechner, introduced the Toted Learning Environment (TLE) initiative for the University of Colorado system. The TLE initiative is CU’s blueprint for creating the university of the 21st century, a university directly involved with its many constitu-encies-including students, businesses, and communities-and their success.
CU recognizes that learning will be the new form of labor for the 21st century-that is, the key asset that will determine success in the classroom, in the workplace, and
in the community. For that reason, the TLE is designed to add value to CU’s already outstanding faculty and excellent academic programs.
The TLE adds value to CU and everyone associated with us by:
• breaking down barriers within the university’s culture, as well as those barriers that inhibit access to CU by individuals, businesses, other educational institutions, and communities;
• supporting even greater innovations in teaching and creative scholarship;
• using and developing new technologies to enhance learning; and
• positioning CU as a key player in personal, professional, community, and corporate success.
CU-Denver has long been known for its
innovative approach toward connecting its academic programs to the needs of the community. The Denver campus continues this tradition in support of the TLE initiative by developing exciting new ways to learn, paying attention to the needs of our non-traditional students, creating partnerships with the community, and utilizing state-of-the art technology to revitalize classrooms.
THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to becoming the nation’s premier urban university. In urban environments, universities have a particular responsibility to adapt their traditional roles toward the development, assessment, transmission, and preservation of knowledge to urban needs while maintaining the highest standards of education and scholarship.
By drawing upon the riches of its traditional store of learning and disciplined thought, the university serves as Denver’s intellectual center and as a community resource ready to respond to the enormous urban challenges and opportunities facing its local and global environment.
History
In 1912, the University of Colorado’s Department of Correspondence and


6 / General Information
Extension was established in Denver to meet the needs of the capital city’s burgeoning population. As the breadth of course offerings expanded, so did the demand for degree-granting status. From 1956 until 1976, the Denver Extension Center operated out of the former Denver Tramway Company Building at 14th and Arapahoe Streets. This brick and terra cotta Renaissance Revival-style landmark, with marble and brass interior work, had housed the corporate offices and car barns of a huge streetcar system discontinued in 1950. Designated a landmark on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994, the “Tramway Building” was recently renovated into a distinctive hotel and restaurant.
The Denver Extension Center was renamed the University of Colorado-Denver Center in 1965, and by 1969,
23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study were offered. In 1972, the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria campus, CU-Denver’s current site. That same year, the “Denver Center” was renamed the University of Colorado at Denver.
1974 marked the first year CU-Denver granted degrees designated as the University of Colorado at Denver. We celebrate 25 years of degree-granting status during the 1999-2000 academic year.
Between 1973 and 1976, the state built the Auraria Higher Education Center, shared by the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. In 1988, CU-Denver moved into its first custom-made new home, the 257,000-square-foot North Classroom Building, located between Speer Boulevard and Twelfth Street, and Larimer and Lawrence Streets. Hoover, Berg, Desmond, a Denver architectural firm, designed this postmodern red brick structure featuring a distinctive glass brick atrium and large outdoor clocks.
Role and Mission
In the Colorado Revised Statutes, the University of Colorado at Denver is defined as follows:
The Denver campus of the University of Colorado shall be a comprehensive baccalaureate liberal arts and sciences institution with high admission standards. The Denver campus shall provide selected professional programs and such graduate programs at the master’s and doctoral level as will serve the needs of the Denver
metropolitan area, emphasizing those professional programs not offered by other institutions of higher education.
Cities, and their urban areas, are complex centers of commerce, education, government, and the arts. CU-Denver serves a unique role within the university system in providing professional, preprofessional, and liberal arts training in the context of a strong multidisciplinary and applied agenda for research and creative activities in the Denver metropolitan area. With our strategic placement amid such an urban environment, CU-Denver is singularly equipped to:
• educate students of ail ages to become visionary, responsible citizens of cities, both nationally and globally;
• develop educational programs that integrate learning and the solution of significant urban, contemporary problems;
• develop ways to bring the skills, talents, and knowledge of the university to the solution of significant urban, contemporary problems; and
• conduct research, create, and disseminate relevant knowledge to solve urban problems.
CU-Denver views its location as a fertile
ground for advancing and disseminating knowledge, and treats its role and mission as a covenant with the people and institutions of the urban community. As an urban institution, its boundaries are flexible and permeable, with knowledge flowing to and from the institution and the community. Our view is global rather than parochial as we seek to link teaching, research, and service to urban issues and needs of the state, the nation, and the world.
Academic Structure
The chancellor of CU-Denver represents the Denver campus and manages campus goal-setting, policy development, academic affairs, and budget and financial matters. The vice chancellor for academic and student affairs is responsible for all academic programs, academic support programs, student enrollment services, the Graduate School, and sponsored programs. The vice chancellor for administration and finance is responsible for the campus budget and the offices of financial and business services, human resources, planning and institutional research, computing services, and voice communications.
Academic Programs
CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the residents of Denver and the
region. With the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. CU-Denver comprises seven distinct academic units:
College of Architecture and Planning College of Arts & Media College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education College of Engineering and Applied Science
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Graduate School of Public Affairs The undergraduate colleges of arts & media, business, engineering, and liberal arts and sciences admit freshman and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, engineering, and music.
A solid foundation of academic skills and general education is assured through a comprehensive core curriculum. Students may pursue graduate education through all of the campus’ colleges and schools. Pre-professional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health careers are also available. CU-Denver currently employs 444 regular, full-time faculty members.
The colleges and schools sections of this catalog provide a complete listing of bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degree programs, policies on requirements for graduation, course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions, and similar information.
At CU-Denver, faculty explore and incorporate both novel and traditional methods of instruction. Telecommunications and other electronic media are an integral part of the way CU-Denver transcends geographic space, making instruction more stimulating and available, and connecting faculty, students, alumni and state, regional, national, and international leaders.
In keeping with the TLE initiative, CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education which leads to improved professional opportunity in the 21st century. Many programs emphasize practical business world applications, and specific computer-oriented academic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs.


Undergraduate Admissions / 7
About Our Students
CU-Denver students, both undergraduate and graduate, are well grounded in the professional and academic disciplines, making them ideal candidates for recruitment by organizations and advanced degree programs throughout the nation. They develop the leadership, reflection, ethics, and future-orientation to enable them to become preeminent in their fields and to provide active leadership for the revitalization of cities everywhere.
To instill these values in its students, the University of Colorado at Denver excels in building instructional experiences around problems of urban, contemporary life as well as traditional disciplines. Students and faculty are actively engaged in seeking solutions, through research and service, to these problems.
The diversity of our student body is a source of deep pride. Classes include traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school, transfer students, older students who have delayed college entry, and professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appreciation of the world around them.
In addition to the stimulating environment of Denver’s urban setting, CU-Denver students also have access to the library resources of all CU campuses, as well as cultural and athletic events sponsored within the university system.
Accreditation
The University of Colorado at Denver is institutionally accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Many professional organizations have also granted accreditation to CU-Denver colleges and schools, and include:
Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business American Chemical Society Colorado State Board of Education Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board
National Architectural Accrediting Board
National Association of Schools of Music
National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education National Planning Accreditation Board
Research and Other Creative Pursuits
CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledge through the research and creative efforts of its faculty. Research and creative activities not only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and professional practice.
In addition, these activities constitute an important component of CU-Denver’s service to the community at large. Therefore, externally funded projects are a major priority at CU-Denver.
Research projects, training, and public service programs at CU-Denver encompass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study with a focus on issues that relate to city, state, national, and international issues. During 1997-98, CU-Denver faculty and staff received external grants and contracts totaling $16,108,821 for research, training, and public service programs. The benefits for the campus in the years ahead will be substantial. Externally funded activities assist in sustaining scholarly discourse, enable faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge, provide the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern to society, and enhance the education of students. Many students actively participate in projects overseen by faculty members.
As a key shaper of CU’s Total Learning Environment, CU-Denver conducts research and other creative activities that encompass both a multidisciplinary and applied nature. Research in every school and college at CU-Denver addresses questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region.
Its role within a thriving metropolitan area also serves as a base for exploring topics of national and even international import. But not all research at CU-Denver yields solutions of immediate practical significance. Exploration of topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplines is carried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that knows no national boundaries.
This exploration may yield insights that eventually open the way to practical applications in the next century.
Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary
economic, political, educational, engineering, mathematical, scientific, and environmental needs. Financial support has been obtained for program and service development in the areas of computational mathematics, early childhood and special education, health administration, international affairs, internships and cooperative education, and employment and training institutes.
Other projects include statewide investigations of economic development, welfare reform, air quality, and transportation. Computer-related projects include artificial intelligence, multilevel algorithms, fast parallel processing, competitive graphs, and modeling. Research projects range from investigations of dinosaur tracksites to neurotoxicology and water transportation.
In addition, a great deal of research at the university is conducted without substantial external support. This research also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publications, presentations, exhibits, performances, and professional activities. Many members of the faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits bring recognition to the university, establish the credibility of its faculty, and enhance the value of the degrees it confers.
AURARIA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER
The Auraria Higher Education Center is the site for the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share a library (which is administered by CU-Denver), classrooms, and related facilities on the 127-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered.
On the Auraria campus are administrative and classroom buildings, the Auraria Library, the student union, book center, child care and development centers, physical education facilities, science building, and service buildings.
The new buildings share the campus with the reminders of Denver’s past-historic Ninth Street Park, St. Cajetan’s Church/Performing Arts Center, St. Elizabeth’s Church, Emmanuel-Sherith Chapel/Synagogue/Art Gallery, and Golda Meir House. The former Tivoli Brewery, which dates back to 1866, was renovated into a complex of specialty shops, restaurants, and entertainment


8 / General Information
facilities, and has recently become the campus student union.
An innovative new Academic and Performing Arts Center is scheduled to open in July 2000, featuring a 350-seat courtyard theater, a five-story concert hall (550 seats), a recital hall (200 seats), and performance support space. The building will also house 29 classrooms and seven enhanced classrooms and computer labs.
UNDERGRADUATE
ADMISSIONS
CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program of study successfully. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being:
1. Level of previous academic performance;
2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests; and
3. Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success. CU-Denver may deny admission to
new applicants or readmission to former students whose credentials indicate an inability to assume obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University.
After completing the application process, official notification of one’s admissions status as an undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions. Letters from various schools and colleges indicating acceptance into a particular program are pending, subject to official notification of admission to the institution by the Admissions office.
Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents or with unofficial documents will be permitted one term to submit the documents. If temporarily waived official documents are not received by the end of the initial term of attendance, registration for subsequent terms will be denied. If at any time additional credentials are received which affect the student’s qualifications, the University reserves the right to change the admission decision.
Applicants who have not decided upon a major field of study will be considered for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences as undetermined majors. Students admitted as undetermined majors should declare a major as quickly as possible and no later than the end of their sophomore year.
All questions and correspondence regarding admission to CU-Denver and requests for application forms should be directed to:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 303-556-3287
admissions@carbon.cudenver.edu
Admission Deadlines
The University may change document/ credential deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands. For the best scholarship and registration time considerations, applicants should apply and be admitted as early as possible. For an applicant to be considered for a specific term, all documents required for admission must be received in the Office of Admissions by the deadline for that term. Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to be considered for a later term. Transfer students are reminded that they should allow sufficient time to have transcripts sent from institutions they have previously attended. International students are advised that it usually takes 60 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions from international locations. Advance planning and early application is necessary for the timely admission of international students.
Application deadline for priority consideration
Fall Spring Summer
July 22 December 1 May 3
Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS)
Students entering the University of Colorado who graduated from high school in 1988 or later are required to meet the following Minimum Academic Preparation Standards: 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics), 3 years of natural science,
2 years of social science (including one year of U.S. or world history), 3 years of a single foreign language, and 1 year of the arts.
Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade-point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS
prior to graduation from the University. Two levels of deficiency will be recognized.
1. One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student meets other admission standards and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation from the University. Courses taken to make up a deficiency will count toward graduation, provided the CU-Denver college accepts those course credits toward graduation.
2. A student having more them one unit of deficiency may be admitted, provided that the student meets other standards of the University. The student must make up additional deficiencies before graduation by taking an expanded program of studies. The student may satisfy the MAPS requirements by successful completion of:
1) Courses taken at CU;
2) Courses taken at other institutions of higher education;
3) Additional high school credits;
4) Credit-by-examination programs; or
5) Other requirements as approved by each CU-Denver college.
Admission Requirements for Freshmen
Freshman admission standards define the level of success and achievement necessary to be admitted to the University of Colorado and include factors that predict academic success, such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school course work, and the grade-point average. Both the subjects the student has studied and how the student has performed will be factors that determine admission to the University.
New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Arts & Media, Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, or Liberal Arts and Sciences.
The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test.
Preference for admission is given to applicants who rank in the top 30% of their high school graduating class and present a composite score of 21 or higher on the American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 950 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).
Business applicants will receive priority consideration if they graduated in the top 25% of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. Applicants


Undergraduate Admissions / 9
who do not meet the admission requirements for direct admission to the College of Business will be automatically considered for admission as pre-business majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Engineering applicants will receive priority consideration if they graduated in the top 20% of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT, with 28 on the mathematics section, or 1100 total on the SAT, with 600 on the mathematics section. Applicants who do not meet the admissions requirements for direct admission to the College of Engineering will be automatically considered for admission as a pre-engineering major in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
New freshmen seeking admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) and College of Arts & Media must meet College requirements for MAPS instituted by the University of Colorado. Applicants are required to satisfy 16 units of high school level courses in English, foreign language, mathematics, sciences, humanities, and social sciences. Students are eligible for admission to the Colleges with up to two units of deficiency in a foreign language and no more than one additional deficiency in the remaining areas. The Colleges will allow graduation credit toward the bachelor’s degree for courses satisfying MAPS deficiencies only if these courses are allowed for graduation credit under current College policy.
All music performance majors in the College of Arts & Media are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area. Two years of prior piano training are recommended. An audition is required. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the College of Arts & Media, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications.
Applicants for all departments who do not satisfy the requirements for priority consideration are reviewed on an individual basis.
COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA Years
English (literature, composition, grammar), one year of speech/
debate strongly recommended .....4
Mathematics (excluding business
and consumer mathematics)........3
Natural science.....................3
Social science......................2
Foreign language (all units must
be in a single language) ............3
Academic elective................... 1
Total ............................. 16
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS
AND ADMINISTRATION Yec
English (one year of speech/debate and two years of composition are strongly
recommended).......................4
Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one year
of geometry) ......................4
Natural science (includes two years
of laboratory science) ............3
Social science (including history)....2
Foreign language (all units must
be in a single language) ..........3
Academic electives................... 1
(additional courses in English, foreign language, mathematics, natural or social science, not to include business courses)
Total .............................. 17
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE
Years
English (literature, composition, grammar), one year of speech/
debate strongly recommended .......4
Mathematics distributed as follows:
Algebra............................2
Geometry...........................1
Trigonometry and
Analytical Geometry................1
Natural sciences......................3
(to include 1 unit physics and 1 unit chemistry; also to include 2 units of laboratory science)
Foreign language......................2
Social science........................2
Electives............................ 1
Total .............................. 16
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
English (literature, composition, grammar), one year of speech/
debate strongly recommended.......4
Mathematics (excluding business
and consumer mathematics).........3
Natural science......................3
Social science.......................2
Foreign language (all units must
be in a single language) .........3
Academic elective................... 1
Total .............................. 16
HOW TO APPLY
1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor or from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application must be completed and sent to the Office of Admissions with a $40 (subject to change) non-refundable fee. For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term, the $40 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions is informed
of the intent to enroll for a later term.
3. Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Hand 4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to have a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate sent directly from the certifying agency to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions (see Admissions Requirements for Non-High School Graduates).
5. Students also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)
and request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4875). High school students may obtain ACT and SAT test dates and locations from their counselors. Students who took one of these tests while in high school may use the test scores reported on their official high school transcripts as an official test score report.
Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver as the recipient of the scores must notify the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. A Request for Additional Score Report may be requested from any of the offices listed below.
American College Testing Program (ACT)
P.O. Box 168 Iowa City, Iowa 52243 (319) 337-1270
The College Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 6201
Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6201 (609) 771-7600


10/ General Information
6. International students must submit proof of proficiency in the English language (see Requirements for International Students).
APPLICANTS NOT GRANTED ADMISSION
An applicant who is not granted admission as an entering freshman may wish to consider transferring to the University after successful study elsewhere. The Office of Admissions urges such students to complete at least one full semester (12-15 credit hours) of college-level course work at another college or university, giving special attention to courses that will provide sound academic preparation for future transfer to CU-Denver. These courses should include any Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS) not met in high school (see the MAPS requirements).
Students who are not admissible will be encouraged to participate in a Redirect Program that CU-Denver has established with community colleges.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate all previously attended institutions will be denied admission to, or will be disenrolled from, the University.
New Student Orientation
An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, during the week prior to the first day of classes. The orientation program provides information to new students about activities and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process, parking, and securing ID cards is also provided. Academic advising sessions are held before registration for the term. Students should contact their schools and colleges for additional information on advising, as well as special orientation sessions that may be held for their programs.
Admission Requirements for Non-High School Graduates
An individual who has not graduated but has passed the General Education Development (GED) test may be considered for admission. The application for undergraduate admission must be accompanied by a $40 non-refundable application fee and an official transcript showing completed high
school courses. An applicant must also submit GED scores and scores from either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT) Program. The admission decision is based on the student’s potential for academic success at CU-Denver.
Admission Requirements for Transfer Students
Applicants are considered transfer students for admission purposes if they have completed at least 12 semester hours of college course work since graduating from high school. Applicants are not considered transfer students if the only college-level classes they have taken were before high school graduation.
Any applicant not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended will be refused admission. To meet the minimum transfer admission standards at CU-Denver, students must meet one of the following conditions:
1. Have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade-point average:
a. 2.5 GPA (on a 4.0 scale); or
b. 2.0 GPA if transferring from Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, University of Colorado
at Boulder, or University of Colorado at Colorado Springs.
2. Have earned 30 or more collegiate semester hours with a 2.0 GPA.
Transfer students are given priority
consideration for admission as follows:
1. College of Business and Administration. To be considered for transfer admission, students must have completed at least 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Priority consideration for admission will be granted to transfer applicants with a minimum cumulative overall GPA of 3.0 for all work applicable to a B.S. in Business Administration degree, including a minimum 2.0 GPA in business courses.
Students may also be admitted if they have a 3.0 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work, a 2.0 GPA in business courses, and at least a 2.0 overall cumulative GPA in courses applicable to a B.S. in Business Administration degree.
Transfer applicants who do not meet either of the priority admission standards are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA earned in the last 24 hours. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available, or are
referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration, where they will be advised as pre-business majors.
Applicants with at least a 2.6 GPA in applicable course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with less than a 2.6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration, where they will be advised as pre-business majors.
2. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants to the College
of Engineering should have at least a 2.75 cumulative grade-point average for all math and science course work attempted, at least 24 hours of college course work including two semesters each of calculus and physics.
3. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average for all work attempted. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average.
4. College of Arts & Media. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average for all work attempted. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music major applicants (except those entering the Music Industry Studies program) also must pass an audition. Contact the Department of Performing Arts for audition information, 303-556-4652. Important Note: Applicants who do not meet the above grade-point average
or credit hour requirements will be considered for admission, but on an individual basis.
The primary factors used when considering students individually are:
1) Probability of success in the academic program to which admission is desired;
2) The quality of prior academic work;
3) Age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and
4) Time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges.
HOWTO APPLY
1. The student should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application form must be completed and returned with the required $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee.


CU SUCCEED, AP, AND IB CREDIT EQUIVALENCY CHART (1,2)
CU-DenverCore CU-Succeed Advanced Placement Credits International Baccalaureate Credits © (H)
Requirements Silver/Gold Courses Cr (see note 3) Cr (see note 4) Cr Cr
English/Communications ENGL 1020 3 English Language English A1 3 3
Proficiency ENGL 2030 3 & Composition 3
(6-9 hours) ENGL 2154 3 English Literature
CMMU2101 3 & Composition 3
Mathematics MATH 1070/1080 3 Calculus AB 4 Advanced Mathematics 4
Proficiency (3 hours) MATH 1110/1120 3 Calculus BC 8 Math Higher Level 8
MATH 1401/2411 4 Computer Science AB 4 Math Methods 4
MATH 2422/2423 4 Statistics 3 Math Studies 4
MATH 1350/2000 3 Computer Science 4 4
Natural & Physical ANTH1303 4 Biology 8 Biology 4 8
Sciences (8 hours) BIOL 1550/1560 4 Chemistry 8 Chemistry 4 8
CHEM147X 4 Physics B 4 Environmental Sys 4 8
ENVS1042 4 Physics C- Mechanics 4 Physics 4 8
GEOL1072/1082 4 Physics C- Electromag 4
PHYS1000/1052 4 Environmental Science 4
Behavioral Sciences ANTH 2102 3 Social Anthropology 3 6
(3-6 hours) CMMU1011 3
CMMU1021 3
PSY1000/1005 3 Psychology 3 Psychology 3 6
Social Sciences ECON 2012 3 Economics-Macro 3 Economics 3 6
(3-6 hours) ECON 2022 3 Economics-Micro 3
GEOG1102/2202 3 Geography 3 6
PSC1001 3 American Government 3
PSC1101 3 Gov’t. & Politics: Amer. 3
SOC1001 3 Gov’t. & Politics: Comp. 3
SOC 2462 3
Humanities ENGL 1601 3 English Lit. & Comp. 3 English A1 3 3
(6 hours) ENGL 2600 3 English Lang. & Comp. 3 Philosophy 3 6
HIST 1381 3 Classics: Any Area 3
HIST 1382 3 History-U.S. or Europe 6 History-Any Area 3 6
PHIL 1012 3 French Literature 3
PHIL 1020 3 German Literature 3
Spanish Literature 3
Arts (3 hours) ARTS 1000 3 Art: History 3 Art/Design 3 3
FA 1001 3 Art: Studio 3
PMUS1001 3 Music Theory 3 Music 3 3
THTR1001 3 Music Listening & Literature 3 Theatre Arts 3 3
Foreign Language FR/GER/SPAN1010 5 French Language 3 Language A2,B 3 6
(see note 5) FR/GER/SPAN1020 5 German Language 3 Language ab initio 3 6
FR/GER/SPAN 2110 3 Spanish Language 3 Classical Languages 3 6
NOTES: 1. Maximum of 30 semester hours of credit from combination of AP and IB sources.
2. Application of AP or IB credit toward the major is based on an evaluation by the major department.
3. Students shall receive credit for advanced placement if they achieve (a) an AP examination score of 4 or 5 or (b) an AP examination score of 3 AND
a grade of "A" in the second semester of the AP course.
4. Students shall receive credit for international baccalaureate if they achieve a minimum IB examination score of 4. Two levels of IB credit are
awarded: standard (S) and higher (H).
5. Credit available in any classic or modern langauge. Students satisfying AP or IB foreign language credit requirements also receive foreign language
proficiency. Rev. Sept. 1999


12 / General Information
3. The student is required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P.0. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Hand If a student is currently enrolled at another institution, an incomplete transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. (Transcripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accompanied by a certified literal English translation.)
Arts & Media and Liberal Arts applicants with fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of college work completed also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores.
Engineering and Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts andACT/SAT scores.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate all previously attended institutions will be denied admission to, or will be disenrolled from, the University.
TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT
Course work taken at any regionally-accredited institution of higher education will be considered for transfer to CU-Denver. Courses are considered for transfer on the basis of having similar content to those offered by CU-Denver. General education “core” courses are usually accepted. Developmental, remedial, vocational, technical, religious, doctrinal, orientation, independent study, special topics, and cooperative education courses are not accepted. Only courses in which a grade of \C- or better was earned are considered for transfer. Courses in which a grade of Pass (P) was earned are considered for transfer only if a grade of Pass at the sending institution is defined as a C- or better. Students wishing to appeal transfer credit decisions should
contact their CU-Denver academic department.
After all official transcripts have been received and the student is admitted as a degree student, the Office of Admissions will prepare a transfer credit report indicating which courses have been accepted in transfer by CU-Denver. A copy of this report is mailed to the student as well as to the student’s academic department at CU-Denver. Upon receipt of this transfer credit report, students should contact their academic department to meet with an advisor, who will determine how transferred credit applies to specific CU-Denver degree requirements.
The Office of Admissions considers course work for transfer regardless of the age of the academic credit. Individual departments, however, may have specific guidelines and policies about age of credit and make the final decision about application of credit toward a degree program. Students are expected to have current working knowledge of prerequisite courses, regardless of when prerequisite courses were taken. Students who have transferred extension or correspondence course work should contact their academic departments regarding credit hour limits in these areas.
The College of Business and Administration generally limits its transfer of business course credits to those business courses which are offered as lower-division courses at CU-Denver. Students who have taken upper-division business courses from an American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited College of Business may request review of these courses for possible transfer by contacting the College of Business advising office.
All courses taken in the business area of emphasis must be completed at CU-Denver.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science, in general, requires that engineering course transfer credit must come from an Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) accredited engineering program to be acceptable for degree purposes. Engineering technology courses are not considered equivalent to engineering courses.
A maximum of 72 semester hours is acceptable in transfer to CU-Denver from community colleges. Students who completed the Colorado Community College Core Curriculum program, and whose transcripts contain the statement “core curriculum completed,” may transfer this core curriculum as a package and receive
credit for the lower-division component of CU-Denver’s core curriculum. The College of Business and the College of Engineering have specific courses required of all students which may be taken as part of, or in addition to, the community college core curriculum.
A Comprehensive Guide to Student Transfer document containing Colorado community college advising plans and admission information is available from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. In addition, a CU-Denver admissions representative keeps regular office hours at Denver metropolitan area community colleges to assist students with planning a transfer program. Representatives also visit other Colorado community colleges. Call the CU-Denver Successful Transitions Coordinator at 303-556-4950 for additional information.
OTHER TRANSFER CREDIT
Credit granted through programs listed below appears on the CU-Denver transcript. The academic department determines how this credit applies to degree requirements.
See CU Succeed, AP, and IB Credit Equivalency Chart on preceding page.
Accelerated Baccalaureate Program (CAB)
The CAB (Curriculum for an Accelerated Baccalaureate) program is a unique partnership between CU-Denver and select high schools which enables students to accelerate their progress toward a college degree. Students from participating high schools can earn up to 30 hours of CU-Denver core curriculum course credits while in high school by: 1) taking regular college courses in the high school, taught by CU-Denver faculty or college-qualified high school faculty, through the CU Succeed program; 2) concurrently enrolling in designated courses on the CU-Denver campus; and/or 3) obtaining acceptable scores on the Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate (higher and subsidiary levels) examinations. Students can begin work on college courses leading to a baccalaureate degree from CU-Denver’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and College of Arts & Media beginning in their junior year of high school.
Advanced Placement Program
The Advanced Placement (AP) Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and


Undergraduate Admissions /13
then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency, and are granted advanced standing in those areas. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also grants AP credit for scores of 3 plus a course grade of A - in corresponding subject. For more information, contact your high school counselor or the Office of Admissions at CU-Denver.
College-Level Examination Program
Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have demonstrated college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing service.
Students who are interested in how CLEP examination credit applies to the CU-Denver degree requirements should contact their academic advisor.
International Baccalaureate Diploma Program
Entering students may receive college credit from the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program available at select high schools. The International Baccalaureate (IB) program is a rigorous, pre-university course of study emphasizing liberal arts from an international perspective. In general, students may receive college credit for higher level and standard level course subjects in which a minimum examination score of 4 (out of 7) is achieved. Students with IB high school credit should contact the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Advising Office, NC 2024,303-556-2555, for advising on course-specific credit for IB course work.
Military Service and Schooling
To have credit for educational experience evaluated, applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application:
1) A copy of DD Form 214, and
2) DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Educational Experience During Military Service. USAF personnel may present two official transcripts from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of DD Form 295.
Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education, to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver.
Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions.
Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC)
Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for non-business elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business, and then only if the ROTC program is completed.
Intra-University Transfer
CU-Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver Intra-University Transfer forms may be obtained from the Records Office. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Courses. Decisions on intrauniversity transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer.
Students in Extended Studies programs wishing to enroll in regular CU-Denver courses or degree programs should contact the Office of Admissions for a degree application.
Readmission Requirements for Former Students
CU-Denver students who have not registered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year or longer, and who have not attended another institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmission. An additional application fee is required only if you are changing from undergraduate to graduate or non-degree to degree status.
Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions.
Students who have attended another college or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as transfer students and meet the transfer student deadlines for receipt of documents. This requires payment of the $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee and submission of two official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended. Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to:
Office of Admissions
University of Colorado at Denver
Campus Box 167, P. 0. Box 173364
Denver, CO 80217-3364
Students who last attended another CU campus must formally apply for readmission. An application fee is not required unless you are going from undergraduate to graduate or from non-degree to degree status. Application forms are available from the Office of Admissions.
Admission for Non-Degree Students
Persons who have reached the age of twenty and who want to take University courses, but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree, may be admitted as non-degree students provided they are eligible to return to all collegiate institutions previously attended. Correspondence and questions regarding admission as a non-degree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions. Those seeking admission as non-degree students for the purpose of teacher licensure should contact the School of Education, 303-556-2717.
Each school/college limits the number of semester hours taken as a non-degree student that may be transferred to a degree program.
Students considering changing from non-degree to degree status should contact the school/college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the number of hours that may be taken as a non-degree student.
Courses taken for credit as a nondegree student can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional development.
Note: International students are not admitted as non-degree students, except for summer sessions. They must hold a valid student visa.
Students with a baccalaureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree


14 / General Information
programs may enroll for course work as non-degree students. They must complete a non-degree application for admission. Students in a non-degree status who have a previous degree pay graduate tuition rates.
To apply for admission as a non-degree student, obtain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office of Admissions. Return the completed application by the deadline for the term desired. A $25 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee is required. No additional credentials are required. Applicants who seek teacher licensure must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials. Non-degree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space-available basis.
Continuation as a non-degree student with no prior undergraduate degree is contingent upon maintaining an overall grade-point average of 2.0 upon completion of 12 or more semester hours.
Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined on the application for degree admission form. They should contact their academic advisor regarding the process of transferring credit from non-degree to degree status.
Admission for Students Seeking a Second Undergraduate Degree
Students who already hold a bachelor’s degree may apply for admission to a program in which they can earn a second undergraduate degree. Applicants for a second undergraduate degree must meet CU-Denver admissions standards. These students may apply to the College of Arts & Media, College of Engineering and Applied Science or the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Persons who already hold an undergraduate degree in any discipline generally may not apply for a second undergraduate degree in business. Rather, they should apply to a graduate M.B.A. or M.S. business program. Contact the Graduate School of Business at 303-556-5900. Education is a graduate program. Interested students should contact the School of Education office for information, 303-556-2717.
HOW TO APPLY
1. Obtain an application for undergraduate admission from the Office
of Admissions.
2. Complete the application and send it to the Office of Admissions with a $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee.
3. Have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Hand Transcripts from the institution where the first undergraduate degree was earned must have final grades posted for the semester that the student graduated and have the official notation of the degree awarded.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. Students who do not declare all previously attended institutions are subject to disciplinary action and/or dismissal.
Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores will be denied admission to, or will be disenrolled from, the University.
High School Concurrent Enrollment
High school juniors and seniors with demonstrated academic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for one term only. This approved may be renewed. Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program.
For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions, 303-556-2704.
Admission Requirements for International Students
The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to undergraduate and graduate school.
Undergraduate: Admission requirements for CU-Denver’s schools and colleges vary, and international students seeking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which they are applying.
In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 525. Prospective students should request an International Student Applica-
tion packet from the Office of Admissions. Requirements for each CU-Denver college and school can be found in this catalog.
Deadlines for receipt of documents have been established to allow for the timely mailings of 1-20’s. These are:
Fall Spring Summer
July 22 December 1 May 3
Graduate: International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an undergraduate bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 500 before CU-Denver will process the application for admission. However, many departments require a TOEFL score higher than 500 when granting admission to a graduate program. Applications are available from the Office of Admissions. These applications should be received six months prior to the term for which the student is applying.
Note: Except for summer sessions, international students must be enrolled in a degree-seeking program.
The University provides an Intensive English Program for international students preparing to pass the TOEFL, through the American Language Center. See Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section for a complete description.
GRADUATE SCHOOL
Office: CU-Denver Building, Room 750 Telephone: 303-556-6536
For specific information and degree requirements for graduate study, please refer to the department/program descriptions in the schools and colleges sections of this catalog.
Information About the Graduate School
Quality graduate programs are synonymous with the University of Colorado. Professors are actively involved in research or creative activity and, as teachers and scholars, continue to study and absorb new data, ideas, and techniques, eventually bringing these experiences to the classroom. Graduate students at CU-Denver gain not only from interactions with the graduate faculty, but also from other students.


Graduate School /15

CU-Denver’s graduate students bring practical experience gained in the Denver community to the classroom, and are ready to relate the realities of practice to the models presented.
The CU-Denver Graduate School includes the following colleges and schools:
College of Architecture and Planning College of Arts & Media College of Engineering and Applied Science
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education Graduate School of Public Affairs
Degrees Offered
The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through the Graduate School at CU-Denver:
Master of Arts (M.A.) in:
Anthropology
Biology
Communication
Economics
English
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
Master of Arts (M.A. Education) in: Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education Curriculum and Instruction Early Childhood Education Educational Psychology Information and Learning Technology Special Education
Master of Science (M.S.) in:
Accounting Applied Mathematics Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Sciences Finance
Health Administration Information Systems International Business Management and Organization Marketing
Mechanical Engineering Technical Communication
Master of Architecture (M.Arch.)
Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.)
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.)
Master of Business Administration (M.B A) Executive Option
Master of Criminal Justice (M.C.J.)
Master of Engineering (M.E.)
Master of Science in Health Administration (M.S.H.A.)
Executive Option
Master of Humanities (M.H.)
Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.)
Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.)
Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) Executive Option
Master of Social Science (M.S.S.)
Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.)
Master of Urban Design (M.U.D.)
Specialist in Education (Ed.S.)
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in: Applied Mathematics Civil Engineering Design and Planning Educational Leadership and Innovation Health and Behavioral Sciences Public Administration
Requirements for Admission
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS
Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, applicants for admission as regular degree students must:
1. Hold a bachelor’s degree or master’s degree from an accredited college or university.
2. Present a combination of the following: a cumulative undergraduate grade-point average (GPA) of 2.5 or better
on a scale where A is equal to 4.0, standardized examinations, prior professional experience, portfolios, or other indicators.
3. Meet the specific requirements as established by the program faculty.
Seniors will not be eligible for financial aid, scholarships, or fellowships as a graduate student until the equivalent of the minimum requirements for the bachelor’s degree have been satisfied.
APPLICATION PROCEDURES
Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the Office
of Admissions concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications.
Once a student has decided to apply for a graduate program, a completed application must be in the major department or in the Office of Admissions before the deadline date.
An applicant for admission must present:
1. Parts I and II of the CU-Denver Graduate School Application Form, including the Tuition Classification form, which may be obtained from the departmental program coordinator.
2. Two official transcripts for all academic work in colleges and universities completed to date.
3. Three letters of reference. Please have nominators include applicant’s name and social security number in their letter of reference.
4. A nonrefundable application fee (check or money order) of $50 (international student application fee is $60). No application will be processed until
this fee is paid.
5. Any other material required specifically by the program faculty. This may include scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or other examination. Check with program coordinators in the departments
for additional information that may be required.
When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson or a student admissions committee of the department will decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and make that decision known to the Office of Admissions.
Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award (e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship) should contact their department before the application deadline date for information, since deadlines are usually earlier for aid requests.
Readmission/Changing Programs
Former and current students who wish to be readmitted or change from one degree program to another must meet the requirements of the new degree program and provide all items required of students applying to the Graduate School at CU-Denver for the first time. These applicants, however, may petition the program to which they were initially admitted in order to secure a release of transcripts and letters of recommendation supplied at the time of their initial application.


16 / General Information
Transferring
Students transferring from another CU campus to CU-Denver must apply and be accepted to the new campus.
Doctoral Application
A student who has completed a master’s program at CU-Denver must resubmit Parts I and II of the graduate application for acceptance into the doctoral program.
International Applicants
Prospective international students should contact the Office of Admissions for submission deadlines. The application packet should include:
$60 fee
TOEFL scores
Financial documentation
Graduate Record Examination scores
Official English translation of all school records
Other documents as noted in the previous section on application procedures
Acceptable TOEFL Scores: The TOEFL is the Test of English as a Foreign Language.
If a student’s native language is not English, or the student has not attended a British or American university for at least one year and achieved satisfactory grades, then he/she must take the TOEFL. All programs within arts and sciences, education, and doctoral programs require a minimum score of 500 for regular admission.
In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 500 before CU-Denver will process the application for admission. However, many departments require a TOEFL score higher than 500 when granting admission to a graduate program.
The University provides an Intensive English Program for international students preparing to pass the TOEFL, through the American Language Center. See Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section for a complete description.
Graduate Qualifying Examinations
At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) may be required of applicants for admission to the graduate program or for assistantships prior to determining student status.
Students who are applying for assistantships for the fall semester should take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the selection committee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by the department.
Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions or The Educational Testing Service; Box 1502; Berkeley, California 94701 or Box 955; Princeton, New Jersey 08540.
Other tests may be required by the school or college. Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain information on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) from the college or school requiring the test.
New Student Orientation
An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, during the week prior to the first day of classes. The orientation program provides information to new students about activities and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process, parking, and securing ID cards is also provided. Academic advising sessions are held before registration for the term. Students should contact their schools and colleges for additional information on advising, as well as special orientation sessions that may be held for their programs.
Registration
On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to a graduate program are required to complete appropriate registration procedures.
Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted as graduate students. If unable to attend that semester, they must notify the Office of Admissions and Records, in addition to the department that has accepted them.
CHANGES IN REGISTRATION
A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should follow the drop/add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Courses'). After the tenth week of classes graduate students may not drop, add, or change a course to no-credit status without presenting a letter to the dean of their school or college, stating the exceptional circum-
stances that justify the change. This letter, endorsed by the instructor of the course, must accompany the properly signed and completed drop/add card or no-credit option form.
WITHDRAWAL
Graduate students who desire to withdraw from the University must apply to the dean of their school or college for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official withdrawal will be marked as having failed the course. After the tenth week of the class, the student must have the Associate Dean’s signature to drop a course.
Tuition and Fees
For information, see Tuition and Fees section.
Financial Aid for Graduate Study
COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT
The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the state of Colorado. Grant awards are announced each semester for the following term. Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid, 303-556-2886.
COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise and to continuing students on the basis of academic success. Please contact the department for information about this fellowship.
GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS
Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructorship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. Please contact the department for further information.


Graduate School /17
RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS
Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Please contact the department for further information.
LOAN FUNDS
Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college work-study program should submit an application for financial aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March 31. This office also provides short-term loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Application should be made directly to the Office of Financial Aid, 303-556-2886.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work, either through conventional employment or through the college work-study program.
Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy.
Requirements for Advanced Degrees
QUALITY OF GRADUATE WORK
A student is expected to maintain at least an overall 3.0 average in all work attempted while enrolled in a graduate program.
For all graduate degrees, a course mark below C is unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward the minimum requirements for these degrees.
CREDIT BY TRANSFER
A limited amount of high quality resident graduate work done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere within the time allowed may be accepted, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the school or college dean. The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University is 9 semester hours or 30%
of the number of credits required for the degree, whichever is higher for master’s degrees, and 18 hours for performance and Ph.D. degrees.
The school or college shall determine if graduate classes taken by an undergraduate can be transferred to a graduate program. They shall also determine if courses taken in the University of Colorado system are considered resident or transfer courses.
Courses taken as pass/fail or satisfactory/unsatisfactory will not be transferred. In addition, a grade of B-or above must be earned for a course to be transferred. Courses over 10 years old will not be transferred.
USE OF ENGLISH
A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of standard English in all oral and written work may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance.
Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate’s proficiency.
GRADUATE APPEALS
Final action on appeals submitted by graduate students concerning action taken by faculty members, programs, or administrative officials rests with the campus Graduate Council.
Master's Degree
A student regularly admitted to a graduate program and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master’s degrees will be recommended for the degree only after certain requirements have been met.
The requirements stated below are minimum requirements; additional conditions may be set by the individual programs.
Departments or program committees may have deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student’s responsibility to ascertain and meet these requirements.
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
The minimum requirements of graduate work for the degrees Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by completing a minimum of 30 semester
credits for master’s degrees, of which no more than six may be thesis hours.
LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS
Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as each department requires. See specific departmental requirements.
GRADUATE CREDIT
Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above, and that are offered by professors who are members of the graduate faculty. Courses at the 4000 level may be counted for graduate credit, but a minimum of 18 semester hours must be taken at the 5000 level. No course below the 4000 level may be counted for graduate credit. Departmental approval must be obtained for the courses taken by a student to count toward the degree plan.
Students are advised that not all courses listed in this catalog are available at any one time. Some are given in alternate years, and this should be considered when developing degree plans.
MASTER'S THESIS CREDIT
Every graduate student working toward a master’s degree who expects to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree must register for thesis credit with a maximum of 6 semester hours. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an In Progress (IP) will be reported.
THESIS REQUIREMENTS
A thesis may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type. Every thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must:
1. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field.
2. Be based upon independent study and investigation.
3. Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work.
4. Receive the approval of the major department.
5. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given.
6. Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in Directions for Preparing Master’s and Doctoral Theses, which is obtainable from the Graduate School office, and have received a preliminary thesis format approval.


18 / General Information
All theses must be signed by the thesis advisor and other committee members. Approved theses are kept on file in the Auraria Library and in the student’s department. The thesis binding fee must be paid by check when the thesis is submitted to the Graduate School office.
TIME LIMIT
Master’s degree students have seven years from the date of the start of course-work to complete all degree requirements.
Doctor of Philosophy
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University. To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued.
Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work in this field; furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge. The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules.
Studies leading to the Ph.D. degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments.
The criterion as to what constitutes an acceptable field of study shall be that the student’s work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University.
MINIMUM COURSE/DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS
A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph.D. degree.
Course Work Requirement. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses numbered 5000 or above is required for the
degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum.
Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the Ph.D., a student must complete a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than ten of these credit hours taken during any single semester.
A minimum of five dissertation hours must be registered for each fall and spring semester following successful completion of the colloquium or comprehensive examination. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above.
Course work and work on the dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program.
RESIDENCE
The student must be properly registered to earn residence credit. The minimal residence requirement shall be three semesters of scholarly work.
EXAMINATIONS
Each Ph.D. program will require at least comprehensive and final examinations. Notice of all examinations must be filed with the Dean of the Graduate School at least two weeks prior to administration.
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
The student must pass a comprehensive examination in the field of concentration and related fields. This examination may be oral, written, or both, and will test the student’s mastery of a broad field of knowledge, not merely the formal course work completed.
The examination shall be conducted by an examining board. The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to total a minimum of four members of the graduate faculty, one of whom is outside the primary department.
CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DOCTORAL CANDIDATES
Following successful completion of the comprehensive examination, students must register continuously. These students will register for and be charged for a minimum of five hours of dissertation credit each fall and spring semester.
A maximum of 10 hours of dissertation credit may be registered for in any one semester. Continuous registration during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense.
It is expected that the student and advisor will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classification identified above.
DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS
A dissertation based upon original investigation, showing mature scholarship, critical judgment, and familiarity with the tools and methods of research must be written upon a subject approved by the student’s major department. To be acceptable, this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student’s special field.
In mechanical features, all dissertations must comply with the specifications as outlined in the Directions for Preparing Master’s and Doctoral Theses, which may be obtained from the Graduate School office. The final draft must be reviewed and approved for format by the Graduate School prior to final copies being made.
Three formally approved, typewritten copies of the dissertation, including abstract, plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in the Graduate School office. The thesis binding fee and microfilm fee must be paid by check when the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School office.
The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International. The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department.
All approved dissertations are kept on file in the Auraria Library. One copy is deposited in the reference section and the other in the archives section of the library. The third copy is sent to student’s department.
When the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School office, the candidate must sign an agreement with University Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform.
FINAL EXAMINATION/DEFENSE
After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dissertation and related topics will be conducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral, the oral portion


Tuition and Fees /19
being open to anyone. The examination will be conducted by a committee consisting of at least four members of the graduate faculty, one of whom must be from outside the student’s department.
Notice of all examinations must be filed with the Dean of the Graduate School at least two weeks prior to administration.
TIMELIMIT
An eight-year maximum limit is in effect for doctoral studies.
TUITION AND FEES
All tuition and fee charges are established by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually by the Colorado General Assembly. The Regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee rates at any time. The following rates were for the 1998-99 academic year, and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating costs. Rates are currently being revised for the 1999-2000 academic year. Please refer to the Schedule of Courses for the term in which you register for current tuition and fees information.
Payment of Tuition and Fees
All tuition and fees (except the application fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, according to guidelines in the current Schedule of Courses. Students may select one of the payment plans that are available at CU-Denver. Specific information on the deferred payment plans is included in the Schedule of Courses published before each semester or summer session. Students who fail to pay tuition and fees in full or make payment arrangements by the published deadlines will be dropped from all classes.
Students who register in a non-degree status, and who later apply and are admitted to a degree status for that term, are responsible for the difference in tuition between the non-degree program and their applicable degree program and will be billed accordingly. Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even if they drop out of school. Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Courses. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, to be issued transcripts, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special
1998-1999 Tuition
TUITION IS BASED ON STUDENT STATUS. IT IS NOT BASED ON THE LEVEL OF COURSES
THIS DOES NOT INCLUDE TUITION FOR ONUNE COURSES. SEE THE FOLLOWING PAGE FOR DETAILED INFORMATION.
UNDERGRADUATE RESIDENT TUITION RATES
Credit hours Liberal Arts Arts & Media Business Engineering Non-Degree*
and Sciences
0-1 $ 120 $ 138 $ 138 $ 138 $ 120
2 240 276 276 276 240
3 360 414 414 414 360
4 480 552 552 552 480
5 600 690 690 690 600
6 720 828 828 828 720
7 840 966 966 966 840
8 960 1,104 1,104 1,104 960
9-15 985 1,146 1,146 1,146 985
each credit
hour over 15 120 138 138 138 120
UNDERGRADUATE NON-RESIDENT TUITION RATES
Credit hours Liberal Arts Arts & Media Business Engineering Non-Degree*
and Sciences
0-1 $ 646 $ 672 $ 672 $ 672 $ 646
2 1,292 1,344 1,344 1,344 1,292
3 1,938 2,016 2,016 2,016 1,938
4 2,584 2,688 2,688 2,688 2,584
5 3,230 3,360 3,360 3,360 3,230
6 3,876 4,032 4,032 4,032 3,876
7 5,380 5,600 5,600 5,600 5,380
8 5,380 5,600 5,600 5,600 5,380
9-15 5,380 5,600 5,600 5,600 5,380
each credit
hour over 15 646 672 672 672 646
GRADUATE RESIDENT TUITION RATES
Credit hours Liberal Arts Architecture Education Engineering Business Non-Degree*
and Sciences and Planning Public Affairs
0-1 $ 181 $ 192 $ 199 $ 212 $ 225 $ 192
2 362 384 398 424 450 384
3 543 576 597 636 675 576
4 724 768 796 848 900 768
5 905 960 995 1,060 1,125 960
6 1,086 1,152 1,194 1,272 1,350 1,152
7 1,267 1,344 1,393 1,484 1,575 1,344
8 1,448 1,536 1,592 1,696 1,800 1,536
9-15 1,498 1,598 1,765 1,765 1,877 1,598
each credit
hour over 15 181 192 199 212 225 192
GRADUATE NON-RESIDENT TUITION RATES
Credit hours Liberal Arts Architecture Education Engineering Business Non-Degree*
and Sciences and Planning Public Affairs
0-1 $ 717 $ 764 $ 764 $ 764 $ 777 $ 764
2 1,434 1,528 1,528 1,528 1,554 1,528
3 2,151 2,292 2,292 2,292 2,331 2,292
4 2,868 3,056 3,056 3,056 3,108 3,056
5 3,585 3,820 3,820 3,820 3,885 3,820
6 4,302 4,584 4,584 4,584 4,662 4,584
7 5,977 6,361 6,361 6,361 6,481 6,361
8 5,977 6,361 6,361 6,361 6,481 6,361
9-15 5,977 6,361 6,361 6,361 6,481 6,361
each credit
hour over 15 717 764 764 764 777 764
*Non-degree students who have previously earned a baccalaureate degree are classified as graduate
students and assessed graduate tuition regardless of the level of the class(es) they are taking.


20 / General Information
Tuition for Online Courses
Online tuition rates apply to all online courses, whether or not on-campus courses are taken. This means that the flat tuition rate (9-15 hrs) for regular courses does not apply to online courses. The tuition for an online course is based on student’s residency status, the level of the course (undergraduate or graduate), and the school or college offering the course (not the School or college to which student was admitted.) A $ 100 online course fee will be assessed for each online course in addition to the tuition listed below. If enrolled
for 9 to 15 credits of online course work in the same college, student will be charged tuition for 9 credits plus $100 per course. Students registering for only online courses will be required to pay the Information Technology Fee of $10.00 and the Student Information System (SIS) fee of $5.00. Other student fees will
be waived. Other course-based fees may apply.
ONLINE UNDERGRADUATE RESIDENT TUITION RATES
Credit hours Liberal Arts and Sciences Arts & Media Business Engineering
0-1 $ 120 $ 138 $ 138 $ 138
2 240 276 276 276
3 360 414 414 414
4 480 552 552 552
5 600 690 690 690
6 720 828 828 828
7 840 966 966 966
8 960 1,104 1,104 1,104
9-15 985 1,146 1,146 1,146
each credit hour over 15 120 138 138 138
ONLINE UNDERGRADUATE NON-RESIDENT TUITION RATES
Credit hours Liberal Arts and Sciences Arts & Media Business Engineering
0-1 $ 646 $ 672 $ 672 $ 672
2 1,292 1,344 1,344 1,344
3 1,938 2,016 2,016 2,016
4 2,584 2,688 2,688 2,688
5 3,230 3,360 3,360 3,360
6 3,876 4,032 4,032 4,032
7 5,380 5,600 5,600 5,600
8 5,380 5,600 5,600 5,600
9-15 5,380 5,600 5,600 5,600
each credit hour over 15 646 672 672 672
ONLINE GRADUATE RESIDENT TUITION RATES
Credit hours Liberal Arts Architecture Education Engineering Business
and Sciences and Planning Public Affairs
0-1 $ 181 $ 192 $ 199 $ 212 $ 225
2 362 384 398 424 450
3 543 576 597 636 675
4 724 768 796 848 900
5 905 960 995 1,060 1,125
6 1,086 1,152 1,194 1,272 1,350
7 1,267 1,344 1,393 1,484 1,575
8 1,448 1,536 1,592 1,696 1,800
9-15 1,498 1,598 1,765 1,765 1,877
each credit hour over 15 181 192 199 212 225
ONLINE GRADUATE NON-RESIDENT TUITION RATES
Credit hours Liberal Arts Architecture Education Engineering Business
and Sciences and Planning Public Affairs
0-1 $ 717 $ 764 $ 764 $ 764 $ 777
2 1,434 1,528 1,528 1,528 1,554
3 2,151 2,292 2,292 2,292 2,331
4 2,868 3,056 3,056 3,056 3,108
5 3,585 3,820 3,820 3,820 3,885
6 4,302 4,584 4,584 4,584 4,662
7 5,977 6,361 6,361 6,361 6,481
8 5,977 6,361 6,361 6,361 6,481
9-15 5,977 6,361 6,361 6,361 6,481
each credit
hour over 15 717 764 764 764 777
The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado reserves the right to change tuition and fees at any time.
Please contact the Bursar’s Office with questions regarding tuition and/or fees
certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after graduation. Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation. Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable to the bank will be assessed an additional service charge. Students may also pay tuition and fees by credit card.
Tuition Appeals
Exceptions to financial obligations incurred will be reviewed by the Tuition Appeals Committee. The Committee will only consider appeals when a student has been medically disabled, has experienced a death in the family, or has a change in employment hours or location beyond the student’s control. Each condition requires a specific form. Contact the Student Retention Office to obtain proper Tuition Petition Forms. It is absolutely required that all conditions be documented.
Exceptions will not be considered when the student has failed to comply with published deadlines or where conditions were under control of the student.
NOTE: Students will have one year to file a Tuition Petition beginning with the last day of the term for which the appeal is filed. Tuition Petition Forms are available in the CU-Denver Building, Suite 100, 1250 14th Street, 303-556-2324.
1998-99 Tuition
REQUIRED FEES:
Auraria Bond Fee $39.50
The Auraria Bond Fee is assessed in order to retire the construction bonds used for the Student Union, the Child Care Center, the Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER) facilities, and the Tivoli facility on the Auraria Campus. This fee was approved by student referendum and is required of all students at CU-Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver.
Auraria Student RTD Bus
Pass Fee.................... $16.70
The Auraria Student RTD Bus Pass provides for Denver local service in the Denver Metro area and Central Corridor Light Rail Service with no additional fare payment; a $.75 cash payment ($1.25 discount) on all Denver Metro Express Service; and a $ 1.75 cash payment ($ 1.25 discount) on all Denver Metro Regional Service. The Pass is valid between the end of one semester and the start of the next semester and may be used seven


Tuition and Fees / 21
days a week. The Pass is NOT valid for either the Access-A-Ride or Guaranteed Ride Home programs.
Cultural Events Fee $1.00
The Cultural Events Fee provides funding for the University of Colorado at Denver’s College of Arts & Media to allow for reduced admission rates for CU-Denver students to attend theatrical and other cultural events.
Information Technology Fee $10.00
The Information Technology Fee provides funding for acquisition of computer systems to support student computing laboratories, including networks and networking infrastructure and facilities directly accessible by students.
Student Activity Fee $7.35
The Student Activity Fee provides funding for student activities, student government, student clubs and organizations and special events.
Student Health Center Fee $19.00
The Student Health Center Fee provides funding for an accessible outpatient, direct-care service that is devoted to meeting student health care needs. Health education and counseling are available as well as treatment and referral for medical problems. The Student Health Center is tri-institutional and is administered by Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Student Information
System (SIS) Fee $5.00
The Student Information System (SIS) Fee provides funding for continued improvement of the computer system used in supporting such functions as admission application processing, telephone registration and grade reporting, degree audit and graduation checkout, awarding of financial aid, payment of tuition and fees and production of transcripts.
Student Newspaper Fee $3.00
The Student Newspaper Fee provides funding for the University of Colorado at Denver student newspaper, The Advocate.
Student Recreation Fee............ $4.50
The Student Recreation Fee provides funding for the recreational facilities and programs in the Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER)
Building as well as the campus playing fields and club sport programs.
Recreation is a tri-institutional program administered by Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Student Services Fee $24.00
The Student Services Fee provides funds for programs and events offered through The Career Center, Center for Educational Opportunity Programs, Learning Assistance Center, Office of Legal Services, Office of Student Life, Student Advocacy Center, Office of Student Retention, and CU-Denver Counseling Center. The Office of Legal Services is administered by Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Matriculation fee of $25.00 is a one-time non-refundable fee required of all new students at the time of their first registration. This fee covers the costs of official transcripts.
Candidate for Degree fee: equal to one credit hour of resident tuition is required for all graduate students who are not registered during the term that they are taking comprehensive examinations. Students must register as “candidate for degree” and pay for one hour of corresponding resident tuition plus the SIS fee and the Information Technology fee for one term only.
COURSE FEES
Online Courses
A $100.00 course fee is assessed for each online course taken.
College of Architecture and Planning
All majors and non-majors registered in Studio, Computer, Photography and Furniture Design courses are required
to pay the following facilities fees.
ARCH 5110 Intro: Architectural
Design Studio I ............... 40.00
ARCH 5120 Intro: Architectural
Design Studio II............... 40.00
ARCH 5130 Architectural
Design Studio III.............. 40.00
ARCH 5140 Architecture
Design Studio IV............... 40.00
ARCH 6150 Architecture
Design Studio V ............... 40.00
ARCH 6160 Design Photography .... 45.00
ARCH 6162 Furniture Design........ 45.00
ARCH 6410 Introduction to
Computer Graphics.............. 30.00
ARCH 6411 Computer Applications
in Architecture................ 30.00
ARCH 6490 S T in Professional Studies (Computers) ........... 30.00
All ENVD majors are required to pay a $60 computer technology fee.
ENVD 1002 Environmental Media .. 95.00 ENVD 2000 Environmental Design & Commu Studio .................. 90.00
ENVD 2052 Computers in
Arch. & Planning.............. 30.00
ENVD 2110 Architecture Studio I .... 90.00
ENVD 2120 Planning Studio 1....... 90.00
ENVD 2152 GIS for Planners...... 30.00
ENVD 3002 Design Theory
& Methods....................... 30.00
ENVD 3022 Technical Photography 45.00 ENVD 3052 Intro to Computer
Methods - ENVD.................. 30.00
ENVD 3152 Intro to Computer
Graphic Applications............ 30.00
ENVD 3210 Architecture Studio II . 90.00
ENVD 3220 Planning Studio II.... 90.00
ENVD 3252 Computer Graphic
Applications.................... 30.00
ENVD 4122 Advanced Technical
Photography .................... 45.00
ENVD 4152 Computer Graphic
Applications.................... 30.00
ENVD 4252 Advanced Computer
Graphic Programming............. 30.00
ENVD 4310 Architecture Studio III 90.00
ENVD 4320 Planning Studio III... 90.00
ENVD 4322 Model Building ......... 50.00
ENVD 4340 Landscape Arch Studio 40.00
ENVD 4352 Special Topics:
Computer Methods................ 30.00
ENVD 4410 Architecture Studio IV . 90.00
L A 5500 Intro to Landscape
Arch Design Studio I ........... 40.00
L A 5501 Intro to Landscape
Arch Design Studio II .......... 40.00
L A 6600 Landscape Arch
Design Studio III............... 40.00
L A 6601 Landscape Arch
Design Studio IV................ 40.00
L A 6641 Computer Applctns
in Landscape Architecture..... 30.00
L A 6700 Advanced Landscape
Arch Design Studio V............ 40.00
L A 6701 Advanced Landscape
Arch Design Studio VI .......... 40.00
U D 6600 Transformation/
Decomposition Studio............ 40.00
U D 6601 Composition Studio..... 40.00
U D 6602 City of Exploration
& Experimentation Studio...... 40.00
URP 6612 Geographic Information
Systems for Planners ........... 30.00
URP 6630 Planning Studio I ....... 40.00
URP 6631 Planning Studio II..... 40.00
College of Arts & Media Fine Arts
FA 1001 Introduction to Art ...... 15.00
FA 1100 Basic Drawing............. 20.00
F A1200 Basic Painting............ 20.00
FA2000DrawingII................... 20.00
F A 2150 Foundations in
Photography I .................. 65.00
FA2200PaintingII.................. 20.00
F A 2400 Visual Studies........... 15.00
F A 2500 Metal Sculpture & Casting 65.00


22 / General Information
F A 2510 Wood Sculpture & Casting . 65.00
F A 2600 Art History I Survey .. 15.00
F A 2610 Art History II Survey.. 15.00
F A 3000 Intermediate Drawing... 20.00
F A 3020 Intermediate Life Drawing . 20.00
FA 3110 Imaging & Identity ..... 65.00
FA 3180 Photo Criticism ........ 15.00
F A 3190 Photography II ........ 65.00
F A 3200 Intermediate Painting.. 20.00
FA 3210 Intermediate Painting .. 20.00
F A 3220 Intermediate Watercolor .. 20.00 F A 3500 Intermediate Sculpture .... 65.00 F A 3510 Intermediate Sculpture .. 65.00 F A 3630 History of Photography ... 15.00 F A 3645 Topics: Enhancing
Art Experience .............. 15.00
F A 4000 Advanced Drawing ...... 20.00
F A 4020 Advanced Life Drawing . . 20.00
F A 4140 Topics in Photography.. 65.00
FA 4150 Photography III ........ 65.00
F A 4190 Photography IV......... 65.00
F A 4200 Advanced Painting ..... 20.00
FA4210 Advanced Painting ....... 20.00
F A 4220 Advanced Watercolor.... 20.00
F A 4500 Advanced Sculpture
Studio ...................... 65.00
F A 4510 Advanced Sculpture
Studio ...................... 65.00
F A 4524/5524 Topics in Art History. 15.00 F A 4650/5650 Nineteenth
Century Art.................. 15.00
FA 4660/5660 20th Century Art .. 15.00
F A 4690 Renaissance Art ....... 15.00
FA 4790/5790 Methods
in Art History............... 15.00
FA 4800 Art Seminar ............ 20.00
F A 5000 Graduate Drawing....... 20.00
F A 5020 Graduate Life Drawing . 20.00
FA5190PhotographyV.............. 65.00
F A 5200 Graduate Painting ..... 20.00
FA5210 Graduate Painting ....... 20.00
F A 5220 Graduate Watercolor.... 20.00
F A 5500 Graduate Sculpture .... 65.00
F A 5510 Graduate Sculpture..... 65.00
Music
Facilities Fee for all music majors ... 30.00
Non-majors are assessed this fee for the following courses:
MUS 2470 Music on the
Personal Computer............ 30.00
MUS 2560 Music Technology II ... 30.00
MUS 3540 Rec. Studio Maint.
& Calibration ............... 30.00
MUS 3820 Digital Music
Techniques .................. 30.00
MUS 4506 Audio Sweetening Lab .... 30.00 MUS 4510 Music Engineering I Lab .. 30.00 MUS 4570/5570 Music Engineering II.................. 30.00
Engineering Studio Materials Fee
MUS 2520 Music Technology II Lab 7.00 MUS 3540 Rec. Studio Maint & Calibration.................... 7.00
MUS 4506 Audio Sweetening Lab.......... 7.00
MUS 4510 Music Engineering I Lab ... 7.00 MUS 4530/5530 Music Engineering II Lab ............... 7.00
Performance Music
PMUS 1023 Piano Class I, II, III, IV.. 30.00
PMUS1033 Piano Class:
Piano Majors ................. 30.00
Theatre Course Materials Fee
THTR1001 Intro to Theatre......... 7.00
THTR1111 Freshman Seminar.............. 7.00
THTR 2520 Voice and Diction............ 7.00
THTR 2530 Acting 1........77........... 7.00
THTR 2531 Acting for
Non-Theatre Majors ............ 7.00
THTR 2610 Survey of Dramatic Lit. . .. 7.00 THTR 2712 Theatrical Design,
Aesthetics & Production I ..... 7.00
THTR 2713 Theatrical Design,
Aesthetics & Production II .... 7.00
THTR 3510 Oral Interp. Of Poetry....... 7.00
THTR 3520 Stage Accents
& Movement .................... 7.00
THTR 3530 Acting II............... 7.00
THTR 3540 Directing I .......... 7.00
THTR 3560 Topics in Theatre....... 7.00
THTR 3610 History of Theatre ..... 7.00
THTR 3611 Drama of Diversity...... 7.00
THTR 4530 Acting III ............. 7.00
THTR 4540 Directing II............ 7.00
THTR 4550/5550 Playwriting:
Short Form..................... 7.00
THTR 4570/5570 Creative Drama..... 7.00
THTR 4610/5610 Drama Theory
& Criticism.................... 7.00
THTR 4760 Topics in Design ....... 7.00
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Anthropology
Laboratory courses in Anthropology require a student fee to cover expendable
items.
ANTH 1302 Introduction to
Archaeology.................. 10.00
ANTH 1303 Biological
Anthropology ................ 10.00
ANTH 4390 Research Methods
in Archaeology............... 30.00
ANTH 4910 Field Experience
in Archaeology............... 35.00
ANTH 5910 Field Experience
in Archaeology............... 35.00
ANTH 6317 Archaeology Research Design & Analysis............ 35.00
Biology
Laboratory courses in Biology require a student fee to cover expendable items
including dissection specimens.
BIOL 1550 Basic Biology 1......... 5.00
BIOL 1560 Basic Biology II........ 10.00
BIOL 2071 General Biology Lab I... 5.00
BIOL 2081 General Biology Lab II.... 10.00 BIOL 3225 Human Physiology 15.00
BIOL 3244 Human Anatomy ........ 25.00
BIOL 3654 Microbiology ......... 15.00
Chemistry 20.00
Laboratory courses in Chemistry require a student fee to cover expendable items.
Physics......................... 10.00
Laboratory courses in Physics require a student fee to cover expendable items.
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
Tuition classification is governed by Colorado statutes that apply to all state-funded institutions in Colorado. Institutions are bound by the provisions of this statute and are not free to make exceptions to the rules set forth.
Students are initially classified as instate or out-of-state for tuition purposes at the time of application. The classification is based upon information furnished by the student and from other relevant sources. After the student’s status is determined, it remains unchanged in the absence of satisfactory evidence to the contrary.
Once a student is classified as a nonresident for tuition purposes, the student must petition for a change in classification. Petitions must be submitted NO LATER THAN THE FIRST OFFICIAL DAY OF CLASSES of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a resident. It is preferred that petitions be received 30 days prior to the beginning of the term. Late petitions will not be considered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions.
The final decision regarding tuition status rests with the University. Questions regarding residence (tuition) status should be referred only to the Tuition Classification Officer. Opinions of other persons are not official or binding upon the University. Additional information is available in the brochure, Classification of Students for Tuition Purposes, which may be obtained from the Admissions Office.
BASIC REQUIREMENTS
The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a legal domiciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classification is being sought. Persons over 23 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 23 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court-appointed legal guardian. An une-


Financial Aid / 23
mancipated minor’s parent must, therefore, have a legal domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes.
ESTABLISHING DOMICILE
Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one’s true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colorado domicile on the person seeking to establish the domicile. The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connections with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado for tuition purposes begins the day after connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evidence one’s intent. The most common ties with the state are
(1) change of driver’s license to Colorado;
(2) change of automobile registration to Colorado; (3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado; and most important, (5) payment of state income taxes as a resident by one whose income is sufficient to be taxed. Caution; payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroactive to the time filed. In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term, the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question. If one’s 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, instate tuition cannot be granted until the next semester.
Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel
The Colorado Legislature approved resident tuition for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. ELIGIBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM. Students obtain a completed verification form from the base education officer, and submit the form with their military ID to the Records Office after they have registered, but before the end of the drop/add period. At the time the verification form is certified in the Records Office, the student’s bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate. Students who have been certified remain classified as non-residents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Colorado.
FINANCIAL AID
Director Elbe Miller Office: NC 1030 Telephone: 303-556-2886 E-mail Address: finaid@carbon.cudenver.edu World Wide Web Address: http://finaid.cudenver.edu
The Office of Financial Aid offers over $30 million in financial aid awards to qualified students each year. If the student’s financial aid application materials are received before the March 31 priority date, then the student is considered for a package of need-based grant, work-study (part-time employment) and/or long-term loan funds. If the financial aid application materials are received after the March 31 priority date, then the student is usually considered only for a Federal Pell Grant and for outside student loans (Federal Stafford Loan or Federal Parents Loan).
Applicants for Colorado Graduate Fellowship, Colorado Deans Scholars award, and Colorado Regents Scholars award are subject to different deadlines and are reviewed by other CU-Denver departments (the Graduate School, undergraduate deans’ offices, and the Office of Admissions, respectively).
All other applicants for financial aid are notified of their award status in writing by the Office of Financial Aid.
Eligibility
Each student must qualify for CU-Denver financial aid as follows:
1. Be a U.S. citizen or be admitted to the U.S. by the INS on a permanent basis.
2. Be classified as a degree-seeking student by the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. Teacher certification students are eligible to apply for financial aid and are considered as undergraduate students according to federal guidelines.
3. Be enrolled for a minimum number of credits as specified on the financial aid award letter and/or student loan planning letter.
4. Meet the minimum requirements of Financial Aid Academic Standards.
5. Apply for financial aid by submitting all of the required documentation. The need analysis form is required for all programs except the Colorado Graduate Fellowship, Colorado Scholars award, Colorado Deans Scholars award, Colorado Regents Scholars award, and the Emergency Student Loan Program.
6. Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes for the following programs: Colorado Student Grant, Colorado Student Incentive Grant, Colorado Graduate Grant, Colorado Work-Study, Colorado Regents Scholars award, Colorado Deans Scholars award, and Colorado Scholars award.
7. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant.
8. Be registered for the draft or be enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selective Service.
Application
Each applicant must complete the financial aid application materials for submission to the Office of Financial Aid. Complete information must be available to the office before eligibility can be determined.
Limited Funds-The majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis to eligible students who document significant financial need and who complete their application materials in the Office of Financial Aid by the March 31 priority date. Application completion is defined as having all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) into the Office of Financial Aid. General financial aid is awarded to needy students who meet the priority date until all of the funds are committed for the year. If the file is completed after March 31, then awards will probably be limited to Federal Pell Grant (for needy first undergraduate students only) and /or outside student loans (Federal Stafford Loan or Federal Parents Loan). Application for financial aid must be made each year; application materials are available in January of each year.
It is the student’s responsibility to be sure application materials are complete. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for application forms and complete details. All financial aid policies and procedures are subject to change due to revisions in federal and state laws, regulations, and guidelines.
Qualification
Financial Need- Most financial aid awards are based on the concept of financial need. Financial need is calculated as: cost of attendance (tuition, fees, books, living expenses) minus family contribution (student/spouse contribution and parents’ contribution for dependent students).


24 / General Information
The cost of attendance is the estimated cost to attend CU-Denver, including tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid determines standard budgets based upon average tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.
For 1998-99, the following monthly budgets were used for room and board, transportation, and personal expenses: $570 for students living at home with parents; $960 for students not living with parents. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student were approximately $1,115 per semester and non-resident tuition and fees were approximately $5,510 per semester. These amounts will probably increase by approximately 2% for the 1999-2000 school year.
Independent Student-The federal government provides specific guidelines that define a self-supporting student for financial aid purposes. If a student is classified as self-supporting, then the student’s parental information is not considered when the calculation of family contribution is made. For 1999-2000, a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old (born before 1/1/76) or one who meets one of the following conditions:
1. Graduate student
2. Married student
3. Student with legal dependents other
than a spouse
4. Veteran of the U.S. armed forces
5. Orphan or ward of the court
These conditions may be appealed
to the Office of Financial Aid if unusual circumstances exist. Contact the office for appeal guidelines.
If the student/spouse contribution plus the parents’ contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance, then the student will not qualify for need-based financial aid.
The contributions from the student/ spouse and from the parents are calculated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income, savings and other assets, family size, number of children in postsecondary school, and other factors. Students may appeal for special consideration if they are experiencing unusual circumstances. Financial aid is intended to supplement and not replace financial contributions from the student and parents.
Course Loads -General financial aid undergraduate recipients usually must enroll for at least 12 credits per semester,
and graduate students usually must enroll for at least 5 credits per semester. Federal Stafford Loan recipients must carry at least a half-time credit load (6 hours for undergraduates per semester and 3 hours for graduates per semester). For deferment of student loans, please refer to the Schedule of Courses each term for specific information. Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please check award letter and/or student loan planning letter for the exact number of credits required).
Academic Progress - CU-Denver students must make academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid in order to be eligible and remain eligible for financial aid. Students should review the Financial Aid Academic Standards policy, available in the Office of Financial Aid.
Non-Degree Students-Non-degree students are eligible to be considered only for the Advantage Scholarship Program. Please refer to separate brochure for application procedures. Teacher certification students may apply for financial aid and are considered as undergraduate students for financial aid purposes.
Residency Status-A student is required to be a resident of Colorado for a full year before the Office of Admissions can consider classification as a resident for tuition purposes. Non-resident students are encouraged to obtain additional information from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident status. As a resident, a student is eligible for the State of Colorado financial aid programs, and tuition is significantly less than for non-resident.
Refunds and Repayments-Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal or reclassification of tuition status must be applied to the recipient’s financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Students may also be expected to repay a portion of their financial aid awards if they withdraw from CU-Denver.
The institution must determine the refund amount of Title IV financial aid funds (Federal Stafford Loan, Federal PLUS Loan, Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Program, and/or State Student Incentive Grant). In addition to the institution’s refund policy, the federal refund policy must also be applied.
Federal Refund Policy-This federal policy is applicable to Title IV recipients.
Once the refund is determined, it must then be returned to the financial aid programs that the student received (excluding the Federal and State College Work-Study Programs). Refunds are allo-
cated to financial assistance programs up to the amount the student received before any funds are returned to the student.
Repayments -Financial aid recipients can receive assistance for non-institu-tional costs, such as living expenses, as well as for institutional charges. When a student withdraws, the institution must determine if the disbursement the student received for non-institutional costs exceeds the amount of living expenses incurred. If the institution determines that the student was overpaid, then the student will be required to repay a portion of his or her non-institutional financial aid (excluding Federal/State College Work-Study, Federal Stafford Loans, and Federal PLUS Loans).
For a complete description of federal, state, and institutional requirements, please request a copy of the Refund and Repayment Policy from the Office of Financial Aid.
Appeals-Students may appeal all decisions of the Office of Financial Aid by completing a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office. Appeals are considered within three weeks and a written response is mailed to the student.
Reapply Each Tear-Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each year. Application materials for the next summer term are available beginning January 1.
Award
Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 8-12 weeks after all application materials have been received in the Office of Financial Aid. If awarded, an award letter is mailed to the student; it includes the types and amounts of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours required each term. A student loan planning letter is mailed to the student after the outside student loan application^) have been processed.
Grants and Loans
The following aid programs are funded by the federal government:
1. Federal Pell Grant-Eligibility for the Federal Pell Grant is determined before any other aid is awarded. Awards are defined by a strict need-based formula provided by the federal government, and award amounts vary depending upon amount of financial need and enrollment status. Students are eligible for Federal Pell Grant consideration


Registration / 25
if they have not received their first baccalaureate degree by June 1 of the award year.
2. Outside Student Loans - Eligibility for all other types of assistance should be determined prior to applying for outside student loans. The subsidized Federal Stafford Loan program requires that students show financial need in order to qualify. Interest on the subsidized loan is paid for the student by the federal government as long as the student remains enrolled at least half-time and for a six-month grace period after dropping below half-time enrollment. The unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan program does not require the student to document financial need. Eligibility is calculated as the cost of attendance minus other financial aid awarded. Interest is not paid by the federal government for the unsubsidized program, and the student may elect to pay the interest currently or to allow the interest to be added to the total loan amount. Interest rates for the Federal Stafford Loan programs are variable, and are capped at 8.25%. Parents of dependent students are eligible to borrow under the Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students program (PLUS). The PLUS program is unsubsidized, and interest payments become the responsibility of the borrower at the time of disbursement. The interest rate varies on the PLUS program, and
is capped at 9%.
3. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)-This is a need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a baccalaureate degree. Students must be eligible for a Federal Pell Grant to be considered for SEOG.
4. Federal Perkins Z.oan-This need-based loan program, with an interest rate currently at 5%, is based at CU-Denver. No repayment of interest or principal is due until six or nine months (time period differs depending upon when student first received Perkins Loan) after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time.
5. Federal College Work-Study- Work-study is a need-based program that allows students to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at non-profit agencies to help meet their educational costs.
The State of Colorado funds the
following programs:
1. Colorado Student Grant-A need-based grant for resident undergraduate students.
2. Colorado Student Incentive Grant-A need-based grant for resident undergraduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor’s degree. This grant is funded 50% by the federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado.
3. Colorado Graduate Grant-A need-based grant for resident graduate students.
4. Colorado Work-Study-A program similar to the College Work-Study program but limited to resident undergraduate students.
Scholarships
Following is a list of the major scholarships that are offered at CU-Denver.
The following programs are funded by the General Assembly of the State of Colorado:
1. Regents Scholars award is offered to qualified new freshmen and transfer students by the Office of Admissions. New students will automatically be considered for this program.
2. Colorado Scholars award is for undergraduate resident students who have a minimum cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.5 for a minimum of 12 CU credit hours. The deadline for applying is March 31. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for application procedures.
3. Deans Scholars award is awarded by undergraduate deans’ offices. Contact appropriate dean’s office for more information.
The following programs are funded by CU-Denver:
1 .Advantage Scholarship is for minority and/or first generation college students who meet the specified income guidelines. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for applications.
2. Nelson/Running Wolf Scholarship funds are available for needy American Indian students. Contact the Office of American Indian Student Services, 303-556-2860, for more information.
3. Ahlin Fund assistance is available for mobility-impaired students.
Contact Student Retention Services, 303-556-2324, for applications.
Other scholarship information is available from the Office of Financial Aid, the Auraria Library Scholarship InfoBank in the reference section, and the Student Advocacy Center.
Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment opportunities are listed in the Student Employment Office and The Career Center. Students who participate in the Pre-Collegiate
Development Program are automatically considered for Challenge Scholarships. Graduate students should inquire about additional types of financial aid through their academic departments. Students should be aware that Emergency Student Loans are available through the Bursar’s Office. American Indian students should request information about Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships from the Office of Financial Aid.
REGISTRATION
Students should review the sections of this catalog that describe in detail the academic programs available at CU-Denver.
Undergraduate students should contact their school or college to arrange for an advising appointment prior to registration. Graduate students should contact their respective graduate program for assistance.
A Schedule of Courses is made available every semester prior to registration by the Office of Records and Registration. CU-Denver students register for courses via the Student Information web page (see below) or through the Voice Response (VR) Registration system from any touch-tone telephone. Specific instructions are included in the Schedule of Courses. Students will be sent an Invitation to Register that includes registration information and a registration time assignment. Registration is by time assignment only. Students may register at or after their assigned time.
Online Registration and Student Information
CU-Denver students can register and obtain information regarding their personal records by accessing a secure site at: http://hydra.cusys.edu/pinnacle/ sishome l.dn.htm. This site can also be reached from the CU-Denver home page (http://www.cudenver.edu/) by choosing “Office of the Registrar" under “Students” and then choosing “Student Information.” A student number and personal identification number (PIN) are required to access the registration or student record options.
Online registration allows the student to check the availability of specific courses prior to their registration time and to search for available courses by department, course level, or meeting time. If registration in a course is denied, the web registration system will specify the reason. Online payment is currently not available.


26 / General Information
Student information available online currently includes: address verification (or change); admission application status; financial aid information; schedule by semester; grades by semester; unofficial transcript; account balance; and degree audit (for some programs). For security reasons, none of the student information screens will display a student’s name or student number.
The CU-Denver catalog and Schedule of Courses, as well as additional information regarding programs, faculty, courses, and policies, are available at the CU-Denver home page: http://www.cudenver.edu/.
Definition of Full-Time and Half-Time Status
Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in the student’s financial aid award letter.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER CORE CURRICULUM
The faculty of the colleges of Arts & Media, Business, Engineering and Liberal Arts established a core curriculum for all undergraduate students. It is the objective of the CU-Denver core curriculum to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual competencies in mathematics, reading, writing, oral communication, information literacy, and critical thinking. Furthermore, the core curriculum promotes an awareness of cultural diversity. For details on the core curriculum, students should contact their college advising office.
Campus Core College of Business College of Arts & Media College of Liberal Arts & Sciences College of Engineering
Intellectual Competencies
A. English Composition/Oral Communication'-9 semester hours from the following courses: ENGL 1020-3 Core Comp I and one of ENGL 2030-3 Core Comp II ‘CMMU/ENGL/TC 3154-3 Techn Wtg ENGL 3170-3 Business Wtg and one of the following: CMMU 2050-3 Bus & Profess Speaking CMMU 2101-3 Presentational Speaking ENGL 2030-3 Core Comp II ENGL 2154-3 Intro to Crtv Wtg ENGL 3001-3 Critical Wtg ENGL 3084-3 Adv Comp ‘CMMU/ENGL/TC 3154-3 Techn Wtg TC/CMMU 3120-3 Techn Comm ENGL 3170-3 Business Wtg ENGL4190-3ST in Rhet&Wtg PHIL 2441-3 Logic and Language 9 semester hours ENGL 1020-3 Core Comp I CMMU 2050-3 Bus & Profess Speaking ENGL 3170-3 Business Wtg •NOTE: ENGL 3154, T C 3154 & CMMU 3154 are equivalent SAME AS CAMPUS CORE 9 semester hours ENGL 1020-3 Core Comp I CMMU 2101-3 Presentational Speaking and either *CMMU/ENGL/TC 3154-3 Techn Wrtg or ENGL 2030-3 Core Comp II
B. Mathematics1-3 semester hours Any math course except MATH 3040 or a passing mark on the Math Proficiency exam MATH 1070-3 SAME AS CAMPUS CORE Completed by fulfilling major requirements.
Knowledge Areas
A. Natural & Physical Sciences-8 semester hours from the following courses: ANTH 1303-4 Intro: Biological Anth BIOL 1550-4 Basic Biology I BIOL 1560-4 Basic Biology 11 CHEM 147X-4 Core Chemistry (selected modules) ENVS 1042-4 Intro to Env. Sci GEOL 1072-4 Phys Geology I GEOL 1082-4 Phys Geology II PHYS 1000-4 Intro to Physics PHYS 1052-4 Gen Astronomy I SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE2 Completed by fulfilling major requirements.


Financial Aid / 27
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER CORE CURRICULUM (Continued)
Campus Core
College of Business
College of Arts & Media
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences
College of Engineering
Knowledge Areas (continued)
B. Behavioral Sciences/Social Sciences-9 semester hours from the following courses: At least 3 of the hours must be completed in courses from the Behavioral Sciences course list, and 3 of the hours completed from the Social Sciences course list. The remaining 3 hours can be from either Behavioral Sciences or Social Sciences.
Behavioral Sciences Courses: ANTH 2102-3 Cult & Hum Exp CMMU 1011-3 Fund of Comm CMMU 1021-3 Fund Mass Comm PSY 1000-3 Intro to Psych I PSY 1005-3 Intro to Psych II Social Science Courses:
ECON 2012-3 Macroeconomics ECON 2022-3 Microeconomics GEOG 1102-3 World Reg Geog GEOG 2202-3 Natural Hazards P SC 1001-3 Intro to Pol Sci P SC 1101-3 Am Political Sys SOC 1001-3 Intro to Sociology SOC 2462-3 Intro to Soc Psych
Students must complete PSY 1000-3 or PSY 1005-3
Students must complete ECON 2012-3 and ECON 2022-3
SAME AS CAMPUS CORE2
SAME AS CAMPUS CORE2
3 semester hours from the Campus Core Behavioral Sciences course list.
6 semester hours in the same Social Sciences discipline, selected from the following courses:
ECON 2012-3 and ECON 2022-3 or
PSC 1001-3 and P SC 1101-3 or
SOC 1001-3 and SOC 2462-3
C. Humanities-6 semester hours from the following courses:
ENGL 1601-3 Telling Tales:
Narrative Art in Lit and Film ENGL 2600-3 Grt Works in Brit & Am Lit
GER1000-3 Germany and the Germans HIST 1381-3 Paths to Present I HIST 1382-3 Paths to Present II PHIL 1012-3 Intro Philosophy PHIL 1020-3 Intro Ethics & Soc RUSS 1000-3 Russ/Rsn:Life/Cult/Art RUSS 2000-3 Masterpieces of Russian Culture
SAME AS CAMPUS CORE
SAME AS CAMPUS CORE2
6 semester hours from the same Humanities discipline, selected from the following courses: ENGL 1601-3 and ENGL 2600-3 or
HIST 1381-3 and HIST 1382-3 or
PHIL 1012-3 and PHIL 1020-3
D. Arts-3 semester hours from the following courses:
ARTS 1000-3 Arts in Our Time FA 1001-3 Intro to Art PMUS 1001-3 Music Appreciation THTR 1001-3 Intro to Theatre
SAME AS CAMPUS CORE
SAME AS CAMPUS CORE2
SAME AS CAMPUS CORE
E. Cultural Diversity-3 semester hours from the following courses: ANTH 3142-3 Cult Div in Mod Wld ANTH 4200-3 Gender Cr-Cult Persp. CMMU 3271-3 Comm & Diversity ECON 3100-3 Econ of Race & Gndr ENGL/ETST 3794-3 Ethnic Diversity in Amer Lit
ENGR 3400-3 Technology & Culture ETST 3704-3 Culture, Racism, and Alienation
FA 3110-3 Imaging and Identity HIST 3345-3 lmmig& Eth in Am Hist MGMT 4100-3 Mngng Cultural Diversity PHIL 3500-3 Ideology & Culture PMUS 3110-3 Soc & Pol Impl of Am Mus
SAME AS CAMPUS CORE
SAME AS CAMPUS CORE2
3 semester hours from the following list in the same discipline chosen to meet the Social Science or Humanities core curriculum requirement: ECON 3100-3 ENGL 3794-3 HIST 3345-3 PHIL 3500-3 P SC 3034-3 PSC 3035-3 SOC 3020-3 or
ENGR 3400-3


28 / General Information
FALL AND SPRING:
Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students:
Full-time .... 12 or more semester hours Half-time.....6 or more semester hours
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
5 or more hours
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
3 or more hours
SUMMER (TEN-WEEK TERM):
Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students:
Full-time.....8 or more semester hours
Half-time.....4 or more semester hours
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
3 or more hours
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
2 or more hours
3 or more hours of mixed-level classes Notes:
Enrollment verification including full-time/half-time attendance can be certified after the drop/add period.
Hours for calculating full-time/half-time attendance do not include interinstitu-tional hours, nor do they include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration.
Students receiving veterans benefits should contact the Veterans Affairs coordinator for definition of full-time status for summer sessions.
Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are considered for financial aid purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid.
Add/Drop
Specific add/drop deadlines are announced in each semester’s Schedule of Courses.
1. Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 12 (eight in the summer) days of full-
term classes, provided there is space available.
2. Students may drop courses without approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (the first eight days of the summer session). Tuition will not be charged. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student’s permanent record.
3. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (eighth day of the summer session), the instructor’s signature is required for all drops. The instructor’s signature and dean’s signature are required for all adds. No tuition adjustment will be made.
4. After the tenth week of the fall and spring semesters (the fifth week for summer session) any schedule adjustments require a petition and special approval from the dean’s office.
5. Dropping all courses after the 12th day (eighth in the summer) requires an official withdrawal from the term.
No tuition refunds are available. Deadlines for module courses and intensive courses are published in the Schedule of Courses each term.
Auditing Courses
To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the University or have outstanding financial obligations to the University. The Records Office does not keep any record of courses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where special equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor.
An auditor’s card is issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor. Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges, and are not eligible for other student services. For more information, contact the Bursar’s Office.
Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) may audit classes at no charge. Contact the Division of Enrollment and Student Affairs at 1250 14th Street, 303-556-8427.
Correspondence Study
Correspondence courses are offered by the CU-Boulder Division of Continuing Education. Applicability toward a degree program should be sought from the student’s degree advisor prior to registration.
Course Load/Restrictions
In most cases, students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer session) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. Consult the individual college or school for specific guidelines as to course load restrictions.
Credit By Examination
Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade-point average of at least 2.0, and be currently registered. Contact the Records Office for instructions. A non-refundable fee is charged. Students should contact their degree advising office to determine whether the credit will apply to their degree.
No Credit
Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college. Students enrolling for no credit are required to pay regular tuition. File the no-credit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop/add period. Students who register for a course on a no-credit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade.
Pass/Fail Procedure
1. Students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis (or to revert from pass/fail to graded status) may do so only during the drop/add period.
2. Up to 16 semester hours of course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor’s degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass/fail in any given semester. [Note: Individual schools and colleges may have additional restrictions as to pass/fail credits. See the accompanying chart for an overview.]
3. Instructors will not be informed of pass/fail registration. All students who register for a pass/fail appear on the regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor.


Registration / 29
When grades are received in the Records Office, those registrations with a pass/fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D- and above convert to grades of P. Courses taken pass/fail will be included in hours toward graduation. Pass grades are not included in a student’s grade-point average. An Fgrade in a course taken pass/fail will be included in the grade-point average.
4. Pass/fail registration records are maintained by the Records Office.
5. Exceptions to the pass/fail regulations are permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education, the Extended Studies Programs,
and Study Abroad Programs.
6. Graduate degree students can exercise the P/Foption for undergraduate courses only. A grade of P will not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement.
7. Students who register for a course on
a pass/fail basis may not later (after the drop/add period) decide to receive a letter grade.
Please note: many other institutions will not accept a P grade for transfer credit.
Short Term Courses
Courses are also offered in five-week modules, in special weekend courses, and in seminars. Students should contact the college/school for information on shortterm courses offered each semester.
Other Registrations
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of Colorado campuses concurrently must obtain permission from their school or college on their home campus. A student in a degree program registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if:
1. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean or the Records Office.
2. The course is a required course for the student’s degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver.
3. The student obtains approval from the academic dean.
4. There is space available at the other (host) campus.
5. The student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CU-Denver rates.
6. The home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes.
7. The concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses. Students may not register for an independent study course through concurrent registration. Students may not take courses pass/fail or for no credit through concurrent registration.
To drop a concurrent course during the host campus drop/add period, arrange the drop at the home campus Records Office. To drop a concurrent course after the end
PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS Core Curriculum courses used to satisfy Intellectual Competencies cannot be taken on pass/fail basis.
College General Maximum
Business and Administration Only non-business electives may be taken pass/fail Only 6 semester hours may be taken pass/fail
Engineering and Applied Science Required courses may not be taken pass/fail. Upper division humanities and social sciences electives are acceptable; otherwise, major department approval is required A maximum of 16 credit hours may be taken pass/fail. Includes courses taken in the honors program
Liberal Arts and Sciences College requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of courses with letter grades. Courses used to satisfy major, minor, or foreign language cannot be taken on a pass/fail basis. No more than 6 hours pass/fail any semester. A maximum of 16 semester hours may be taken pass/fail.
of the host campus drop/add deadline, drop the course at the host campus Records Office.
INTERINSTITUTIONAL
REGISTRATION
CU-Denver degree students may enroll in courses offered by the Community College of Denver and Red Rocks Community College. Students must be enrolled at CU-Denver for at least one course during the term to be eligible to register interinstitutionally. Registration is on a space available basis. Inter-institutional courses are evaluated for transfer credit and are not included in a CU-Denver student’s grade-point average.
POOLED COURSES AT METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER
Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with similar courses at Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD). CU-Denver undergraduate students may register for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU-Denver Schedule of Courses. Listed below are restrictions that apply to the pooled courses:
1. CU-Denver graduate students are not eligible to register for MSCD pooled courses.
2. MSCD courses will not be included in the University of Colorado grade-point average. MSCD courses will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will count in the hours toward graduation.
3. MSCD courses cannot be used to meet specific course requirements toward the major without prior written approved of the student’s dean.
4. CU-Denver students who wish to take non-pooled MSCD classes must apply directly as a non-degree student to MSCD, and pay tuition and fees to MSCD. Non-pooled classes will not appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will not be used in determining course loads for financial aid eligibility. Students may request an MSCD transcript to be sent to CU-Denver at the end of the term to determine if credit can be transferred.
5. MSCD common pool courses will not satisfy residence requirements at CU-Denver. The last 30 semester hours applied toward the baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence
at CU-Denver.


30 / General Information
6. CU-Denver students taking MSCD common pool courses are subject to the MSCD grading policy and student code of conduct.
Withdrawal from the University
To withdraw from the University of Colorado at Denver, students must drop all courses for the semester. During the first twelve days of the semester (eight days for the summer) students must use the telephone registration system to drop courses. Consult the Schedule of Courses for information on using the telephone registration system. Courses dropped during this period are not recorded on the student’s permanent record.
After the twelfth day of the semester (eighth day in the summer), through the tenth week (seventh week for summer), students must submit a withdrawal form with the instructor’s approval. Courses dropped during this period will be recorded on the student’s permanent record with a grade of “ W\
Students seeking to withdraw after the tenth week (seventh week for summer) must petition the associate dean of their school or college.
A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receive grades of “F’ for all course work during that term.
Deadlines for dropping module and intensive courses appear in the Schedule of Courses.
ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed: Freshman 0-29 hours
Sophomore 30-59 hours
Junior 60-89 hours
Senior 90+ hours
All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado.
Grading System and Policies
The following grading system and policies have been standardized for all academic units of the University.
GRADE SYMBOLS
The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol (A, B, C, D,F,IF,IW, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC, W, and ***) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, as explained under Pass/Fail Procedure.
Standard Grades Quality Points
A = superior/excellent 4.0
A(~) = 3.7
B(+) = 3.3
B = good/better than average 3.0
B(~)~ 2.7
C(+) - 2.3
c = competent/average 2.0
C(-) = 1.7
D(+) = 1.3
D = minimum passing 1.0
DC-)- 0.7
F = failing 0.0
Instructors may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/M1NUS system, but are not required to do so.
IF-incomplete-changed to anFif not completed within one year.
IW-incomplete-changed to a Wif not completed within one year.
IP-in progress - thesis at the graduate level only.
P/F-pass/fail-P grade is not included in the grade-point average; the Fgrade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor’s degree.
H/P/F-honors/pass/fail - intended for honors courses; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average.
AC indicates registration on a no-credit basis.
Windicates withdrawal without credit.
*** indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed.
EXPLANATION OF /FAND IW
An IF or IW is an incomplete grade. Policies with respect to IF/IW grades are available in the individual college and school dean’s offices. Use of the IF or IW is at the option of the course instructor and/or the academic dean’s office.
An IF or IW\s given only when students, for reasons beyond their control, have been unable to complete course requirements. A substantial amount of work must have been satisfactorily completed before approval for such a grade is given.
The instructor who assigns an IF or IW sets the conditions under which the course work can be completed and the time limit for its completion. The student is expected to complete the requirements within the established deadline and not retake the entire course.
It is the instructor’s and/or the student’s decision whether a course should be retaken. If a course is retaken, it must be completed on the Denver campus or in CU-Denver Extended Studies classes. The student must re-register for the course and pay the appropriate tuition.
The final grade (earned by completing the course requirements or by retaking the course) does not result in deletion of the IF or IW from the transcript. A second entry is posted on the transcript to show the final grade for the course.
At the end of one year, IF and IW grades for courses that are not completed or repeated are changed to an For W, respectively.
Good Academic Standing
Good academic standing requires a minimum grade-point average that is determined by the student’s school or college. Grades earned at another institution are not used in calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado.
Degree students should consult the academic standards section of their school or college for degree program requirements.
Continuation as a non-degree student is contingent upon maintaining an overall grade-point average of 2.0 upon completion of 12 or more semester hours.
Failure to maintain the required average will result in a non-degree student being suspended. The suspension is for an indefinite period of time and becomes part of the student’s permanent record at the University. While under suspension, enrollment at the University is restricted to summer terms or courses offered through Extended Studies.
Non-degree students are not placed on academic probation prior to being suspended.
GRADE-POINT AVERAGE
The grade-point average (GPA) is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course. Total the hours, toted the credit points, and divide the total points by the total hours. Grades of FAC, ***, W, IP, IW, and /Fare not included in the grade-point average.


Academic Policies and Regulations / 31
IFs that are not completed within one year are calculated as Fin the GPA.
If a course is repeated, all grades earned Eire used in determining the grade-point average. Grades received at another institution are not included in the University of Colorado GPA.
Undergraduate, graduate, and nondegree graduate GPAs are calculated separately.
Students should refer to their academic dean’s office for individual grade-point average calculations as they relate to academic progress and graduation from their college or school.
Grade Reports
Grade reports are normally available within two weeks after the end of the semester. Grade reports are automatically mailed at the end of each semester to student’s permanent mailing address. Grades posted to the computer can be obtained using the phone system or on the Student Information web page. See the Schedule of Courses or the Online Student Information section for more information.
Mid-Term Grades
Instructors will assign mid-term grades for certain populations of students. Students in academic difficulty may be contacted and counseled about support services available to them. Please note: academic support services are available to all students through the Center for Educational Opportunity Programs,
NC 2012,303-556-2065; the Student Advocacy Center, NC 2012,303-556-2546; or the Center for Learning Assistance,
NC 2006,303-556-2802.
Originality of Work
In all academic areas it is imperative that either work be original, or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons’ ideas or language. Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the University.
Graduation
Undergraduates. Students should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or college to determine
what requirements remain for graduation. Students intending to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their graduation term. Students will not be officially certified to graduate until a final audit of the student’s record has been completed approximately six weeks after the end of the term. After students have been certified to graduate they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Graduates. Students must file an Application for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with the Graduate School Office on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term. Check with the Graduate School for more complete information. Students will not be officially certified to graduate until a final audit of the student’s record has been completed approximately six weeks after the end of the term. After students have been certified to graduate, they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Commencement. In early March, informational brochures will be mailed to students eligible to participate in the May spring semester commencement.
In early October, information regarding the December commencement will be mailed to students who graduated in summer term or expect to graduate in fall term. Information will be provided about ordering special display diplomas, fittings for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree recorded.
Official Transcripts
The official transcript includes the complete undergraduate and graduate academic record of courses taken at all campus locations or divisions of the University of Colorado. It contains the signature of the registrar and the official seal of the University.
Official transcripts are available approximately three weeks after final exams.
A transcript on which a degree is to be recorded is available approximately eight weeks after final exams.
On the Denver campus, transcripts may be ordered in person, by Fax (303-556-4829), or by mail from the Transcript Office, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364.
Requests should include the following:
1. Student’s full name (include given or
other name if applicable)
2. Student number
3. Birth date
4. The last term and campus the student attended
5. Whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordered near the end of a term
6. Whether the request should be held until a degree is recorded
7. Agency, college, or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included. Transcripts sent to students are labeled “issued to student.”
8. Student’s signature. (This is the student’s authorization to release the records.)
There is no charge for individual official transcripts. Transcripts are prepared only at the student’s written request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Official transcripts require five to seven working days.
Notification of Rights Under FERPA at University of Colorado at Denver
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their educational records. They are:
1. The right to inspect and review the student’s educational records within 45 days of the day that the University receives a request for access. Students should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department,
or other appropriate official written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The University official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the University official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s educational records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it
is inaccurate or misleading. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student


32 / General Information
of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
3. The right to consent to disclosure
of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s educational records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an educational record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request, the University discloses educational records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.
4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of Colorado to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA are:
Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202-4605
The following items are designated “Directory Information,” and may be released at the discretion of the University of Colorado unless a student files a request to prevent their disclosure:
Name
Address
E-mail Address
Telephone Number
Dates of Attendance
Registration Status
Class
Major
Awards
Honors
Degrees conferred
Past and present participation in officially recognized sports and non-curricular activities
Physical factors (height, weight) of athletes
Forms to prevent Disclosure of Directory Information can be obtained at the Student Service Center in North Classroom 1003. Questions regarding student rights under FERPA should be directed to the Records Office, 303-556-2389.
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES
Alumni Association
The CU-Denver Alumni Association provides programs and services which stimulate interest in, increase support for, and build life-long commitment to the University of Colorado at Denver among its alumni, students, and the community. Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon graduation. Friends and non-degree former students are also welcome to participate in alumni activities. The governing board is composed of alumni representing all schools and colleges on campus.
CU on the Horizon, a newspaper published twice a year, is mailed to all graduates. Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/or activities which might interest them. The Alumni Mack Easton, Recognition, Appreciation, Leadership, and Legislative Awards are bestowed each year at commencement and are sponsored by the Association. A program for alumni use of the campus recreation center is available through the office, 303-556-2549.
The Alumni Association provides financial support for students through scholarships and academic recognition for students through the Academic Athlete Program.
Auraria Book Center
Tivoli Student Union, 303-556-3230
Hours: M-Th, 8a.m.-6p.m.; F, 8a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Please call for hours during vacation and interim periods.
The Auraria Book Center -your campus store-is located in the historic Tivoli Student Union. The Book Center provides textbooks for the Auraria schools, plus a complete general book department that is especially strong in technical and reference areas. Best sellers, new releases, and gift book selections change
frequently, and are often accompanied by displays of special value books on many subjects. For additional savings on general reading books, join the Auraria Book Club at the Customer Service desk.
Students need to bring course printouts to locate textbooks. Books are located by school; subjects are arranged alphabeti-cally-departmental abbreviations, with course and section numbers-and prices are printed on the shelf tag below. Each title has the designation of Required, Preferred, Optional, or Available.
Used textbooks sell for 75 percent of the new book price. The Auraria Book Center carries more used textbooks them any other book store in Colorado, but shop early as used books are the first to go.
A full refund is given for new and used books accompanied by the receipt and returned within the first three weeks of class for regular semesters and during the first week of class for short terms.
Please read the refund policy attached to the receipt.
When a course ends, the textbook may still have value and may be bought back by the Book Center. The buy-back policy on used texts is to pay half of the new price on books that will be used again next semester on this campus. Other texts are purchased at lower percentages. The Auraria Book Center’s buy-back services are dedicated to its student customers.
A validated Auraria student or campus ID is required to complete a buy-back transaction. Books are bought for this campus throughout the semester; however, buyers from national text book companies are on hand at the end of each semester to purchase used books which may be required at other schools.
Campus Computers, 303-556-3726, offers the latest in hardware and software technology. An educational discount is offered to Auraria campus students; a current, validated Auraria ID must be presented at the time of purchase. A full line of computer reference books and accessories is also available as well as calculators and other small electronics. Campus Computers hours are M-Th, 8a.m.-6p.m.; F, 8a.m.-5p.m.; Sat,
10a.m.-3p.m.
Auraria Reprographics offers the campus community a wide variety of copying, printing, and graphic services, and has copy centers throughout the campus: Tivoli Copies, 303-556-3702, located in the Tivoli Student Union;
North Copies, 303-556-2291, located in the North Classroom Building; and Library Copies, 303-556-2571, located in the Auraria Library. All offer quick and


Special Programs and Facilities / 33
reasonably priced copies, transparencies, reduction/enlargements, laminating, and binding services. Please call individual copy centers for hours and specialty services.
A current photo ID is required for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard, VISA, and American Express.
Look for our website at: www.aurariabooks.com
The Auraria Book Center is owned by the State of Colorado and supports the Student Bond Fund.
CU Online
The virtual campus of the University of Colorado system, CU Online comprises eleven collegiate and professional development programs offering more than 100 credit and non-credit courses via the World Wide Web. You can search our course catalogs, register and pay for courses, order text books and other course materials, and complete all course work-all over the Internet-making CU Online one of the most comprehensive online institutions of higher education in the world.
CU Online offers core curriculum and elective courses in a variety of disciplines, all the same high-quality courses taught throughout the University of Colorado system. Though it is not self-paced, with CU Online you will enjoy more flexibility of scheduling them in a traditional classroom, logging into class a couple of times each week at the times of your choice.
Instructors delivering their courses through CU Online make use of cutting-edge technology for presenting course content, such as streaming audio, video, and multimedia slide shows. A number of technologies allow students to interact with the instructor and their peers-these include threaded discussions in a bulletin board-type area, live discussions in an online classroom, e-mail, and collaborative workspaces.
As you take courses with CU Online, you’ll gain valuable skills for using the Internet as a tool for learning, research, and communication, taking you far beyond the boundaries of the traditional educational environment. You will have the opportunity to participate in the new global classroom, a world of higher education at your fingertips.
Contact CU Online at 303-556-6505 or visit our website at: www.cuonline.edu
Computing; Information and Network Services
Computing, Information and Network Services (C1NS) supports computer and network use for both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. All centralized administrative systems are developed, maintained, and processed by University Management Systems in Boulder, with output processing and user support provided by CINS in Denver. Denver campus administrative applications are developed, maintained, and processed by CINS. Most academic processing is either done on campus or through one of several networks available through CINS.
The Denver campus maintains a communications network with over 2,500 connections. This network provides access to all campus minicomputers and connection to the Auraria Library Online Information System, the World Wide Web, and the Internet. There are over 2,500 personal computers located on the campus in 21 teaching laboratories, four public labs, individual laboratories, and in offices.
CINS maintains the campus World Wide Web, where information is kept for reference by students, faculty, staff, and others interested in CU-Denver.
CINS staff provide assistance to academic and administrative users on all available computing systems. Advisors and a full-time academic user services staff assist students and faculty with questions regarding software packages, programming, the use of computer systems, and software availability. Administrative users are assisted with planning, systems design, programming, and day-to-day computing activities by CINS user services, technical services, and operations personnel. The CINS staff operates and maintains campus minicomputers, telecommunications equipment, and four of the CU-Denver computing laboratories. These laboratories provide students with access to Macintosh and IBM-type personal computers and software as well as access to the campus network and minicomputers. This staff also maintains personal computers and is available to assist faculty and staff with hardware and software planning, acquisitions, questions, and problems.
The goal of CINS is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work. For further information, please call 303-556-4307.
Extended Studies Programs
The Extended Studies Programs at CU-Denver offer continuing and non-traditional education. They employ both alternative delivery systems and traditional methods to make high-quality learning experiences accessible to Colorado’s diverse population. Extended Studies Programs are responsible for the administration of all classes conducted off the Auraria campus as well as many of those conducted in non-traditional formats on campus, such as weekends. Although they are not academic units and do not grant degrees, courses and programs offered through Extended Studies Programs do enhance and supplement traditional degree programs at the University. Students with certain registration or scheduling difficulties can take courses applicable to their degree programs through Extended Studies. Courses offered through Extended Studies are identical to those offered through the regular Schedule of Courses and are recorded on a standard CU-Denver transcript along with any other classes taken through the University.
Students may want to consider taking classes through the Extended Studies programs under the following circumstances:
1. Not formally admitted to the University. Prospective CU-Denver students need not wait for formal admission to the University to begin taking classes if they enroll in Extended Studies courses. Students who have not been formally admitted to the University can, in many cases, enroll in Extended Studies classes and transfer those credit hours (with departmental approved) to a degree program when they are formally admitted. (Students planning to explore this option should check with the department through which they intend to pursue their degrees to determine how many Extended Studies credits will
be transferable.)
2. Scheduling conflicts. Students who are balancing family and work obligations, in addition to college, can take Extended Studies courses that fit their schedules. Many classes are offered in the evenings and on weekends. Depending upon the student's choice of degree programs, it may be possible to obtain an undergraduate degree from CU-Denver by attending only evening and/ or weekend classes through Extended Studies. Students are encouraged to contact an academic advisor in their chosen discipline or an advisor in the Extended Studies programs to discuss the options available to them.


34 / General Information
3. Academic suspension. Each academic unit of the University has established its own policies regarding students who are placed on academic suspension. When those policies allow, students on academic suspension may take a certain number of credit hours (as established by the appropriate academic unit) through Extended Studies to improve their grade-point averages. Students must check with an academic advisor in their chosen discipline to determine whether this option is open to them.
In addition to credit courses, Extended Studies Programs offer a variety of noncredit courses for both personal enrichment and professional credentialing. Practicing professionals in business, engineering, public affairs, architecture and planning, and education are encouraged to contact the appropriate CU-Denver school or college for information on courses applicable to continuing professional education, certification, and licensure.
Following are Extended Studies and Professional Development contacts: College of Architecture and Planning 303-556-3382
College of Business and Administration (Professional Development Programs) 303-556-5826 School of Education 303-556-6361
College of Engineering and Applied Science
(Continuing Engineering Education) 303-556-4907
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences 303-556-2735
Graduate School of Public Affairs 303-556-5970
Intensive English Program (IEP)
The University’s American Language Center offers an on-campus Intensive English Program (IEP) for international students who need to pass the TOEFL or who want English language training for professional purposes. IEP offers six levels of intensive academic language instruction plus TOEFL preparation classes, as well as a University of Colorado 1-20 for the F-l student visa. Eight-week programs start every January, March, June, August, and October. International students may attend the IEP in preparation for meeting the University’s TOEFL requirements prior to entering University undergraduate or graduate programs. Acceptance into the Intensive English
Program does not guarantee acceptance into the University degree programs. E-mail contact: iep@carbon.cudenver.edu Website: http://www.cudenver.edu/ public/extend/IEP/
Office of
International Education
Director: Lawrence Bell, 303-556-4925 International Student Advisor: Joyce
Espinosa, 303-556-4924 Study Abroad Coordinator: Karen
Goubleman, 303-556-3388 Office: CU-Denver Building, Suite 140,
1250 14th Street
The University of Colorado at Denver, through the Office of International Education (OIE), provides a variety of international programs, educational opportunities, and services for international and domestic students, overseas scholars, faculty, staff, and the greater Denver community. The goals of OIE are to raise international awareness on the CU-Denver campus and, in particular, to provide Em opportunity for all students to gain the global competency needed in today’s interdependent world.
OIE arranges student study abroad programs, expedites the exchange of students and faculty, hosts international visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and advises students and faculty on Fulbright and National Security Exchange Program (NSEP) and other scholarship opportunities. OIE also functions as a recruiting, retention, Emd advisory office for international students and coordinates many services for them before and after they have been accepted to CU-Denver, including: new student orientation, visa and Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) advice, and help for those international students who need assis-tEmce with a variety of questions and potential difficulties. In addition, OIE seeks to increase community awareness of international issues by periodically sponsoring lectures and programs that Eire open to the general public.
STUDY ABROAD
OIE assists students wishing to make international study an integral part of their college experience. Study abroad programs vary in length from two weeks to one academic year, and are also offered during the summer and winter breaks. Although many programs are for language study, a substantial number of programs are taught in English; thus, foreign
language is not always required for participation. These programs are available to students in all disciplines, from architecture to business to liberal arts, in a variety of countries worldwide. Students csm pay CU-Denver tuition and study abroad on an exchange program for an academic semester or year. Either CU-Denver or transfer credit can be earned abroad, giving students the opportunity to fulfill degree requirements while experiencing a new culture.
Since tuition and program fees are generally affordable and financial aid is available and csm be used for study abroad, it is a feasible option for almost every CU-Denver student. Information and advice on scholarships such as Fulbright and NSEP, as well as volunteer and work opportunities abroad are available.
New programs are continually developing, so call or check the OIE website to learn more about our progrsims. Logon to our website at http://studyabroad.cuden-ver.edu for further information.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADVISING AND SUPPORT SERVICES
Since the first few months in a new country and a new city can be particularly difficult for international students, OIE offers a number of special services in order to ease this transition, such as a full-day orientation for new international students, answers to visa questions, and help in finding housing. All international students meet with the International Student Advisor (ISA) in OIE upon arrival in Denver to have visas and other paperwork reviewed, in order to assist in personalized advising. OIE provides a friendly ear and a place to ask questions and express concerns about all kinds of issues, including U.S. social customs, as well as an avenue for communicating with other CU-Denver international student clubs and organizing social activities.
The OIE also works with the University’s American Language Center, which offers an Intensive English Program for international students preparing to pass the TOEFL or who need further English help after starting their degree studies.
See Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section for a complete description.
GRADUATE STUDENT AND FACULTY FULBRIGHT INFORMATION
OIE serves as the University clearinghouse for information on various scholarships and fellowships for study and research abroad, including Fulbright


Centers and Institutes / 35
graduate student and faculty visiting lectureships at foreign universities.
COMMUNITY OUTREACH SERVICES
During the year, OIE sponsors periodic guest lectures and special seminars focused on topics of current international interest. Most of these activities are open to the public as well as the CU-Denver community. OIE is also an active participant in a number of Denver community international programs and events.
For more information about these and other programs, contact the OIE office at 303-556-3489.
University of Colorado Foundation, Inc.
The chief goal of the University of Colorado Foundation, Inc. is to advance the University of Colorado’s mission to create a Total Learning Environment focusing on CU-Denver’s goal of becoming the premier public institution of higher learning in the nation.
The University’s academic leadership establishes priorities for private support. Professional fundraisers generate interest and enthusiasm for the University, recruit and organize volunteers, solicit gifts, and assist donors in gift planning.
Established in 1967 as an independent, privately governed, nonprofit corporation, the CU Foundation raises and manages private funds to benefit students and faculty by raising funds for scholarships, enriching academic programs, purchasing equipment, and upgrading facilities. In 1981, the CU Foundation established a Denver campus office: Campus Box 174; P.O. Box 173364; Denver, CO 80217-3364; Phone 303-556-4301.
CENTERS AND INSTITUTES FOR RESEARCH, SERVICE, AND TRAINING
Center for Applied Psychology
(for information see Psychology in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Center for Collaborative Educational Leadership
(for information see the School of Education section in this catalog)
Center for Computational Mathematics
(for information see Mathematics in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Center for Environmental Sciences
(for information see Environmental Sciences in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Center for Ethics and Community
(for information see Philosophy in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Center for Geotechnical Engineering Science
(for information see the College of Engineering and Applied Science section in this catalog)
Center for Research in Health and Behavioral Sciences
(for information see Health and Behavioral Sciences in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Center for Research on Economic and Social Policy
(for information see Economics in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Colorado Center for Community Development
The Colorado Center for Community Development provides technical, educational, and applied research assistance to organizations, neighborhoods, and communities that cannot afford or do not have access to professional services. The Center targets its assistance efforts to rural small towns, low income and/ or minority communities, and non-traditional, community-based service or development organizations.
Fourth World Center for the Study of Indigenous Law and Politics
(for information see Political Science in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Institute for International Business
(for information see the College of Business and Administration section in this catalog)
International Training Academy
The International Training Academy (ITA) was developed in 1994 to assist public and private agencies throughout the global community in realizing their training goals. This mission is reflected in such Academy projects as Foundations of Counseling, a post-graduate counseling psychology course that ITA offers on the Internet, and the DAV Training Academy, a program that provides disabled veterans the training they need to become National Service Officers and promote the needs of their fellow veterans. These and other training endeavors help promote education and advancement among individuals for whom such opportunities are not always readily available.
ITA is also an active contributor to the Total Learning Environment of the CU system. Older, well-established programs like the National Veterans' Training Institute (NVTI) combine with enterprising new ones such as Colorado Works (welfare reform training for staff of the Colorado Department of Human Services) and the Latino/a Research and Policy Center (LRPC) to give something back to the people and communities who host ITA and the University so well. These programs aim to help develop the knowledge and skills that people in Denver and beyond need to build their urban communities into strong, sustainable metropolitan areas.
Funding for all of these and other programs implemented by the International Training Academy has come from a variety of sources. Federal agencies like the United States (U.S.) Department of Defense, U.S. Department of Labor, and the Department of Veterans Affairs have sponsored ITA programs, as have state agencies like the Colorado Department of Human Services. These public sector efforts have been complemented by contracts and grants from private sector entities such as the Disabled American Veterans and other nonprofit organizations. The International Training Academy both gives to and receives from many different social groups and institutions in the global community.


36 / General Information
TeleMedia Center
(for information see the College of Engineering and Applied Science section in this catalog)
Transportation Research Center
(for information see the College of Engineering and Applied Science section in this catalog)
UNIVERSITY POLICIES
Inclusiveness and Non-Discrimination
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to enhancing the inclusiveness of its work force and its student body. Inclusiveness among students, faculty, staff, and administrators is essential to educational excellence and to accomplishing CU-Denver’s urban mission. Inclusiveness among faculty, staff, and administrators provides role models and mentors for students, who will become leaders in academe and in the larger society, and ensures that a broad array of experiences and world views inform and shape teaching, research, service, and decision making at CU-Denver.
CU-Denver employs, retains, and advances in employment qualified applicants and employees, and admits, retains, and advances in education qualified applicants and students regardless of their race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, or veteran status. CU-Denver does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, or veteran status and complies with all local, state, and federal laws and regulations related to education, employment, and contracting.
For further information, contact the Office of Academic and Student Affairs, CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 700; 303-556-2550, TTY 303-556-6204, Fax 303-556-2678; e-mail: marylou.fenili@cudenver.edu.
Program Access for Persons with Disabilities
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing reasonable accommodation and access to programs and services to persons with disabilities. Students should contact the Disability Services Office, Arts Building 177, 303-556-8387, TTY 303-556-8484. Any other person requiring accommodation
in order to access programs and services of the University of Colorado at Denver, either on or off the campus, should request accommodation from the individual or office responsible for providing the program or service. This request should be made in a timely fashion to allow the individual or office adequate opportunity to provide reasonable accommodation. The time frame for notification will vary according to the circumstances and the nature of the accommodation. For further information or for assistance, contact the Ombuds Office, CU-Denver Building, Suite 700; 303-556-4494,
TTY 303-556-6204; Fax 303-556-2678; e-mail: ombuds@carbon.cudenver.edu.
Sexual Harassment
The University of Colorado at Denver is a collegial academic community whose mission requires an open learning and working environment for students, faculty, staff, and administrators. An open learning and working environment values and protects individual dignity and the integrity of human relationships. CU-Denver’s educational process is based upon mutual trust, freedom of inquiry, freedom of expression, and the absence of intimidation and exploitation. As a place of work and study, CU-Denver must be free of inappropriate and disrespectful conduct and communication of a sexual nature, of sexual harassment, and of all forms of sexual intimidation and exploitation. Such behavior is reprehensible because it subverts the mission of CU-Denver, poisons the environment, and threatens the careers, educational experiences, and well-being of students, faculty, staff, and administrators.
It is a violation of CU-Denver’s Sexual Harassment Policy for anyone who is authorized to recommend or take action affecting faculty, staff, students, or administrators to make any unwelcome sexual advances, to request sexual favors, or to engage in any other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or status in a course, program, or activity; (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for employment or educational decisions affecting that individual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work performance or educational experience, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for working or learning.
For further information, contact the Sexual Harassment Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 700; 303-556-4493, TTY 303-556-6204, Fax 303-556-2678; e-mail: marylou.fenili@cudenver.edu
University Policy on Drugs and Alcohol
The University of Colorado at Denver recognizes the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol, and is committed to providing a drug-free educational environment and drug-free workplace which supports the research, teaching, and service mission of the University. This Denver Campus policy statement on drugs and alcohol is designed to address the University’s concerns about substance abuse and to ensure the CU-Denver community complies with the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 (the “Drug-Free Workplace Act”) and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 (the “Drug-Free Schools Act”). These Acts require the University, as a recipient of federal funds, to take measures to combat the abuse of drugs and alcohol. The continuation of federal financial support for our campus’ students, as well as our academic programs and academic support services programs, is based upon compliance with these statutes and their regulations.
The University of Colorado at Denver Policy on Drugs and Alcohol prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of any controlled substance (illicit drugs of any kind or amount) and the abuse of alcohol by students and employees on University property or as part of any of its activities. This prohibition covers any individual’s actions which are part of any University activities, including those occurring while on University property or in the conduct of University business away from the campus.
It is a violation of University policy for any member of the faculty, staff, or student body to jeopardize the operation or interest of the University of Colorado at Denver through the use of alcohol or drugs. Those individuals found to be in violation are engaged in serious misconduct and are subject to legal sanctions under local, state, or federal law, and are also subject to disciplinary action consistent with the Code of Student Conduct, the Faculty Handbook (1988), applicable rules of the State Personnel System, and the University’s Unclassified Staff Handbook. Sanctions that will be imposed by the


University Policies / 37
University of Colorado at Denver for employees who are found to be in violation of this policy may include requiring satisfactory participation in a substance abuse treatment, counseling, or education program as a condition of continued employment, suspension or termination of employment, and referral for prosecution. To acquaint members of the CU-Denver community with the applicable laws, the University Counsel has prepared a description of local, state, and federal laws concerning drugs and alcohol. This information is available for direct immediate 24-hour-per-day access to all students, faculty, and staff on the World Wide Web CU-Denver Homepage, located under Administrative Offices, Center for Human Resources, Policies and Procedures for UCD. The World Wide Web address for a copy of the Chancellor’s policy statement is:
http://www.cudenver.edu/public/chr/
drugs.html
The World Wide Web address for expanded information on Substance Abuse Prevention Resources is: http://www.cudenver.edu/public/chr/ abusepreventionresources.html
All University faculty and staff members, as well as any students employed at the University, acknowledge they will, as a condition of their employment, abide by the terms of this University of Colorado at Denver policy. In addition, any employee who is convicted of a violation of any criminal drug law occurring in the workplace must report that conviction to his or her immediate supervisor within five days. The Drug-Free Workplace Act makes strict compliance with this policy statement a condition of employment on all federal grants and contracts. Within ten days of learning of a drug conviction resulting from workplace activities of any individual engaged in work under grants or contracts funded by a federal agency, the University of Colorado at Denver is required to notify the relevant funding agency that a violation of this policy statement has occurred.
Students and University employees are encouraged to learn about the dangers of substance and alcohol abuse, and may obtain more detailed information about treatment and counseling options available to the University community. This preventive information is available for direct and immediate 24-hour-per-day access to all students, faculty, and staff on the World Wide Web CU-Denver Homepage, located under Administrative Offices, Center for Human Resources, Policies and Procedures for UCD. The World Wide Web address for expanded
information on Substance Abuse Prevention Resources is: http://www.cudenver.edu/public/chr/ abusepreventionresources.html
University employees may also contact the Center for Human Resources (CU-Denver Building, Suite 830,303-556-2868) for more information regarding resources, programs, and services that are available. CU-Denver students may contact the Counseling and Family Therapy Center at 303-556-4372 (North Classroom 4036), or the Student Health Center at 303-556-2525 (Plaza Bldg., Room 150), for confidential information and/or referrals. Information may also be obtained by calling the National Institute on Drug Abuse Hotline at 1-800-662-HELP or the National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information at 1-301-468-2600.
Academic Honor Code and Discipline Policies
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
A university’s reputation is built on a standing tradition of excellence and scholastic integrity. As members of the University of Colorado at Denver academic community, faculty and students accept the responsibility to maintain the highest standards of intellectual honesty and ethical conduct in completing all forms of academic work at the University.
FORMS OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
Students are expected to know, understand, and comply with the ethical standards of the University. In addition, students have an obligation to inform the appropriate official of any acts of academic dishonesty by other students of the University. Academic dishonesty is defined as a student’s use of unauthorized assistance with intent to deceive an instructor or other such person who may be assigned to evaluate the student’s work in meeting course and degree requirements. Examples of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to, the following:
A. Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the use of another person’s distinctive ideas or words without acknowledgement. The incorporation of another person’s work into one’s own requires appropriate identification and acknowledgement, regardless of the means of appropriation. The following are considered to be forms of plagiarism when the source is not noted:
1. Word-for-word copying of another person’s ideas or words
2. The mosaic (the interspersing of one’s own words here and there while, in essence, copying another’s work)
3. The paraphrase (the rewriting of another’s work, yet still using their fundamental idea or theory)
4. Fabrication (inventing or counterfeiting sources)
5. Submission of another’s work as one’s own
6. Neglecting quotation marks on material that is otherwise acknowledged
Acknowledgement is not necessary when the material used is common knowledge.
B. Cheating
Cheating involves the possession, communication, or use of information, materials, notes, study aids, or other devices not authorized by the instructor in any academic exercise, or communication with another person during such an exercise. Examples of cheating are:
1. Copying from another’s paper or receiving unauthorized assistance from another during an academic exercise or in the submission of academic material
2. Using a calculator when its use has been disallowed
3. Collaborating with another student or students during an academic exercise without the consent of the instructor
C. Fabrication and Falsification
Fabrication involves inventing or counterfeiting information, i.e., creating results not obtained in a study or laboratory experiment. Falsification, on the other hand, involves the deliberate alteration or changing of results to suit one’s needs in an experiment or other academic exercise.
D. Multiple Submission
This is the submission of academic work for which academic credit has already been earned, when such submission is made without instructor authorization.
E. Misuse of Academic Materials
The misuse of academic materials includes, but is not limited to, the following:
1. Stealing or destroying library or reference materials or computer programs


38 / General Information
2. Stealing or destroying another student’s notes or materials, or having such materials in one’s possession without the owner’s permission
3. Receiving assistance in locating or using sources of information in an assignment when such assistance has been forbidden by the instructor
4. Illegitimate possession, disposition, or use of examinations or answer keys to examinations
5. Unauthorized alteration, forgery, or falsification of academic records
6. Unauthorized sale or purchase of examinations, papers, or assignments
F. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty
Complicity involves knowingly contributing to another’s acts of academic dishonesty.
PROCEDURES INCASES OF SUSPECTED ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
All matters of academic policy, including academic dishonesty, are under the jurisdiction of each of the University’s schools and colleges pursuant to Article 1X2.B and Article VI.C of the Laws of the Regents. Accordingly, each school and college has established procedures for addressing matters of academic dishonesty and for determining the severity and consequences of each infraction. Students should contact their school or college for standards and/or procedures specific to their school or college. As a general rule, all school and college procedures contain the following requirements and provisions:
A. Faculty, staff members, or students may submit charges of academic dishonesty against students. A student who has evidence that another student is guilty of academic dishonesty should inform the instructor or the dean of the college of the charge in writing.
B. A faculty member who has evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty should confront the student with the evidence. In cases of academic dishonesty, the faculty member has the authority to reprimand the student appropriately, which could include the issuance of a failing grade (F). If the faculty member elects to reprimand the student for academic dishonesty by issuing a failing grade, the faculty member shall submit a written report to the dean of the appropriate college within five (5) working days. The report shall include, but is not limited to, the time, place, nature of the offense(s), the name(s) of the accused, the name(s)
of the accuser(s), and witnesses (if any). If the faculty member feels that her/his reprimand is an insufficient sanction for a particular case of academic dishonesty, the faculty member may recommend to the dean of the appropriate college that further action be taken.
C. In cases where the faculty member has recommended further action in a case of academic dishonesty, the dean or a designated committee shall schedule a disciplinary hearing as soon as possible. The student(s) accused of academic dishonesty shall be notified in writing of the specific charge(s). The student(s) also has (have) the right to have a representative present for advice, and to be present during the proceedings. The student(s) must notify the dean of the appropriate college five (5) working days before the hearing of the intent to have legal counsel present at the hearing.
D. The dean or the designated committee may take any of the following actions:
• Place the student(s) on disciplinary probation for a specified period
of time
• Suspension of registration at CU-Denver, including Extended Studies, for a specified period of time
• Expulsion: No opportunity to return to the school or college in which the infraction occurred
• Take no further action against the accused student(s)
A record of the action taken shall be kept in the committee’s confidential file and a copy sent to the Registrar
E. In all cases, the student(s) shall be notified of the dean’s or committee’s decision within seven (7) working days.
F. If a student wishes to appeal a case, the student should request the procedures for doing so from his or her school or college.
G. Students who are taking courses at the University of Colorado at Denver, but are enrolled at one of the other educational institutions on the Auraria campus and are charged with academic dishonesty, are subject to the same procedures and sanctions outlined above.
SUMMARY
Questions regarding academic integrity should be directed to the dean’s office of the college or school in which the student is enrolled.
Code of Student Conduct (Student Rights and Responsibilities and Procedures for Disciplinary Review and Action)
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR WHICH ACTION MAY BE TAKEN IF A VIOLATION OCCURS
All persons on University property are required, for reasonable cause, to identify themselves when requested by University or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers, the University reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to University personnel or property and those who interfere with its function as an educational institution.
All persons on CU-Denver/Auraria property who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applicable to University students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations.
The behaviors outlined below will not be tolerated, because they threaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the University and the personal rights and freedoms of its members.
1. Intentional obstruction, disruption, or interference with teaching, research, disciplinary proceedings, or other University activities, including its public service and administrative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denver/Auraria premises.
2. Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, school officials, employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
3. Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CU-Denver/Auraria Fligher Education Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the University, or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person.
4. Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms, which includes, but is not limited to, striking, laying hands upon, threatening with violence, or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure; or other treatment of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature. (This includes, but is not limited to, demeaning behavior of an ethnic, sexist, or


University Policies / 39
racist nature, unwanted sexual advances, or intimidations.)
5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilities, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU-Den-ver/Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimental to the University.
6. Forgery, fraud (to include computer fraud), falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification with intent to gain any unentitled advantage.
7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver/Auraria property and the private property of students, University officials, employees, and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denver/Auraria buildings or facilities. This includes the possession of known stolen property.
8. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus. This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University, or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee. (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, firearms, explosives, BB guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles, Bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switchblades. A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm, explosive, or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly included within the meaning of the terms firearms, explosive, or dangerous weapon.)
9. Sale, distribution, use, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
10. Physical restriction, coercion, or harassment of any person; significant theft; sale/manufacture of illegal drugs (includes possession of a sufficient quantity with intent to sell); damage, theft, or unauthorized possession of University property; or forgery, falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification to gain any unentitled advantage.
UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS
As a member of the University community, you are held accountable not only for upholding civil and criminal laws, but University standards as well. Enrollment does not confer either immunity or special consideration with reference to civil and criminal laws. Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to challenge or postponement on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced, or are pending in civil or criminal court.
In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a student violates a standard and withdraws from the University before administrative action is final.
USE OF UNIVERSITY/AURARIA PROPERTY OR FACILITIES
Nothing in this Code of Conduct shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the voicing of concerns or grievances. The University is dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge through a free exchange of ideas, and this shall be a cardinal principle in the determination of whether or not a proposed use of University facilities is appropriate.
The Auraria Higher Education Center has established campus regulations and procedures governing the use of CU-Denver/Auraria grounds, buildings, and other facilities. Such regulations are designed to prevent interference with University functions and activities.
Except where otherwise specifically authorized, or when members of the public are invited, the use of CU-Denver/ Auraria facilities shall be limited to faculty, staff, and students of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus, and to organizations having chapters, local groups, or other recognized University-connected representation among faculty, staff, or students of the three academic institutions on the Auraria campus.
CLASSROOM CONDUCT
Students are expected to conduct themselves appropriately in classroom situations. If disruptive behavior occurs in a classroom, an instructor has the authority to ask the disruptive student to leave the classroom. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist, the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Public Safety and/or the appropriate Dean’s office. The appropriate Dean or his/her representative may withdraw a student from a particular class
for disruptive behavior, while the Student Discipline Committee may recommend to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs to suspend, permanently expel, and/or permanently exclude the student from the campus. Appeal questions concerning disruptive behavior should be directed to the Academic Dean’s office when withdrawal from a class is involved, and to the Director of Student Life when suspension or expulsion from the University is involved.
NON-ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE POLICIES
Violations of Standards of Conduct should be reported to the Director of Student Life during working hours. Auraria Public Safety should be contacted during non-duty hours.
If a violation occurs on campus and it is not in a specific building, Auraria Public Safety and/or the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
If emergency help is needed when on campus, contact Auraria Public Safety; for help off campus, contact the Denver Police.
Actions available to campus officials include, but are not limited to: asking those involved in inappropriate behavior to cease and desist; requesting offenders) to leave the Auraria campus; denying or restricting use of facilities or services; calling Auraria Public Safety for assistance; billing offenders) for any physical damages; pressing civil charges; and referring student(s) to the Director of Student Life. The chart that follows illustrates the overall structure involved.
DISCIPLINE STRUCTURE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
1. Violations observed may be resolved
by any of the following:
• University departments such as:
a. Admissions
b. Student Union
c. University/Auraria Public Safety
d. Financial Aid
e. Veterans Affairs
• Faculty/Staff
• Students
• Non-University Members
2. If violation warrants further attention,
contact:
• Director of Student Life
a. If student(s) desire(s) a review by the Director of Student Life. Academic dishonesty discipline falls under the jurisdiction of the individual colleges and schools.


40 / General Information
b. If violation warrants possible suspension or expulsion.
• Student Discipline Committee
3. Final review (may request only in cases of suspension/expulsion) by Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs.
STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
When one of the ten Standards of Conduct listed in this code is violated, the student may be referred to the Director of Student Life. Any person may refer a student or student group suspected of violating this code to the Director of Student Life. Persons making such referrals will be asked to provide information pertinent to the case.
The Director of Student Life will make a determination as to the seriousness of the case. This will be done in most situations by asking the student(s) involved in the case to come in for an administrative interview to determine what actions, if any, will be taken by the University. Students will be notified in writing of the results of such administrative reviews.
The Director of Student Life has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no further action other than talking with the accused student(s).
3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student’s behavior has been inappropriate, and any further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University.
5. Refer cases to the Student Discipline Committee when the above sanctions are determined to be inadequate.
6. Take other actions, including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violator(s) provide(s) compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
STUDENT DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Disciplinary proceedings shall be conducted as administrative proceedings and not as judicial proceedings. The University is not a part of the judicial branch of state government. The University has authority to promulgate and enforce internal rules of behavior that shall be administered in a fair and impartial manner in harmony with its educational objectives and administrative
nature. As part of the administrative nature of the committee’s proceedings, fundamental rules of fairness will be followed. Copies of these procedures are available in the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs.
This committee, composed of students, faculty, and staff members, makes the decision whether students charged with violations of the student conduct code may continue to attend the University of Colorado at Denver.
The Student Discipline Committee has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no action other than talking with the accused student.
3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student's behavior has been inappropriate, and further violation
of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University.
5. Recommend suspension of a student from the University for disciplinary reasons. This suspension may be for various lengths of time ranging from one semester to an indefinite period
of time. After the period of disciplinary suspension has expired, a student may apply in writing to have the notation on the student’s record removed.
6. Recommend expulsion of a student from the University; notation on the student’s record will be kept permanently. When a student is suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons, an additional sanction may include being excluded from the Auraria campus.
7. Take other actions, including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violators) provide(s) compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
Student(s) must be notified in writing of the disciplinary action taken within five (5) days.
REVIEW PROCEDURES
A student may submit a request to review the recommendation of suspension or expulsion by the Student Discipline Committee within seven (7) working days to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs. Except in cases involving the exercise of the power of summary suspension (see below), the sanctions of suspension or expulsion for disciplinary reasons shall be effective only after the administrative review by the
Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs has been exhausted or waived. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs decision shall be in writing to the student(s), with a copy to the Student Discipline Committee. Copies of review procedures may be obtained from the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs.
SUMMARY SUSPENSION
Summary suspension is a suspension from the University which begins immediately upon notice from the appropriate University official without a formal hearing by the Student Discipline Committee.
A hearing before the Student Discipline Committee is then scheduled as soon as possible (usually within seven calendar days) to determine the disposition of the case. Summary suspension may also include a physical exclusion from the campus if deemed necessary.
The Chancellor and/or a Vice Chancellor has (have) the authority to suspend summarily any student when in their opinion(s) such suspension is necessary to:
1. Maintain order on the campus.
2. Preserve the orderly functioning of the University.
3. Stop interference in any manner with the public or private rights of citizens on CU-Denver/Auraria-owned
or -controlled property.
4. Stop actions that are threatening to the health or safety of any person.
5. Stop actions that are destroying or damaging property of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus, its students, faculty, staff, or guests.
PERMANENT RECORD NOTATIONS
While disciplinary proceedings are pending or contemplated, a temporary hold may be placed on the student’s academic record. It will not be released until all actions and appeal procedures have been completed or finalized by the University. Only in those cases where suspension, deferred suspension, or permanent expulsion results from disciplinary action will notations be placed on the academic record.
RELEASE OF DISCIPLINARY INFORMATION
Access to any student’s academic transcript or disciplinary file shall be governed by provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Only the student charged or those


University Policies / 41
University officials who have a legitimate educational interest in disciplinary information may have access to the files. All other inquiries, including but not limited to employers, governmental agencies, news media, friends, or Denver Police, must have a written release from the student to gain access to University disciplinary files.
Every effort will be made by the University to respect the privacy of the student. However, where the identity of the student has been publicly disclosed in the news media, the University reserves the right to respond as it deems appropriate to describe fairly and accurately the disposition of disciplinary matters.
REFUND POLICY AFTER DISCIPLINARY ACTION
Submission of registration materials obligates the student to pay the assessed tuition and fees for that term. If a student is suspended or expelled from the University, the amount of tuition/fees which would be refunded would be the same as when a student voluntarily withdraws from a term. See the Tuition and Fees section of this catalog or the Schedule of Courses for more information.
The official withdrawal date applicable for tuition/fee refund purposes will be the date of the Student Discipline Committee’s decision. In the event that circumstances are such that the accused student has registered for a subsequent term before the final decision is made, that student does so at his/her own risk and may be liable for payment of tuition and fees for both terms. The Committee will make the decision as to when official suspension or expulsion begins. Failure to make the required payment will result in the following actions: students will become ineligible for all University services; no grades will be issued for courses in progress; no transcripts, diplomas, certification, or registration materials will be issued for the student until the bill is paid in full; and a late payment charge, in addition to the interest on the unpaid balance, will be assessed.
TRI-INSTITUTIONAL VIOLATIONS
Procedures in deciding violations of the Code of Student Conduct involving students from other academic institutions on the Auraria campus have been developed by CU-Denver and the institution^) involved. In such cases, the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
Ethical Use of Computing at CU-Denver
POLICY STATEMENT
CU-Denver honors the University-wide Information Technology Policies. Access to and use of CU-Denver’s computing resources is a privilege granted to members of the CU-Denver community for scholarly, research, academic, and administrative purposes. Computing resources are defined as facilities, equipment, systems, and personnel. Use of these resources includes World Wide Web pages, listservs, email, application software, and any other electronic communication. Members of the CU-Denver community who use computing resources are expected to do so in an effective, efficient, appropriate, ethical, and legal manner. Use of CU-Denver’s computing resources depends upon mutual respect and cooperation to ensure that till members of the CU-Denver community have equal access, privileges, privacy, and protection from interference and harassment.
CU-Denver computing resources shall be used in a manner consistent with the instructional, research, and administrative objectives of the academic community in general and with the purpose for which such use of resources and facilities is intended. All activities inconsistent with these objectives axe considered to be inappropriate and may jeopardize continued use of CU-Denver's computing resources.
CU-Denver computing resources are for the use of authorized individuals only and for use only in a manner consistent with each individual’s authority. CU-Denver’s computing resources may not be used in any manner inconsistent with an individual's authority, prohibited by licenses, contracts, University policies, or local, state, or federal law. No one may grant permission for inappropriate use of computing resources, nor does the ability to perform inappropriate actions constitute permission to do so.
USER AGREEMENT
Each user of CU-Denver computing resources is responsible for knowing and complying with all applicable laws, policies, and procedures. CU-Denver reserves the right to monitor, record, and store computing activities of anyone using computing resources. If such monitoring, recording, and storage reveals possible evidence of inappropriate, unethical, or illegal activity, computing system personnel may provide the evidence obtained
from monitoring to appropriate university and civic authorities.
A. Each user agrees to make appropriate use of computing resources including, but not limited to:
1. Respecting the intended purposes of computing resources, facilities, and equipment (for scholarly, research, academic, administrative and CU-Denver-sponsored community service purposes).
2. Respecting the stated purpose of computer accounts (for scholarly, research, academic, administrative, and CU-Denver-sponsored community service purposes) and to use computer accounts only for the specified purposes.
3. Respecting the dignity and privacy of other users.
4. Respecting the integrity of the systems.
5. Respecting the resource controls of the systems and managing appropriately use of disk space.
6. Respecting the privileges associated with having network connectivity.
7. Respecting the copyright protection of licensed software and documentation.
8. Following all University of Colorado and CU-Denver policies, and local, state, and Federal laws related to computing.
B. Each user agrees to refrain from inappropriate uses of computing resources, including, but not limited to:
1. Using any other individual’s computer account or password.
2. Using computing resources, facilities, and equipment for personal commercial gain.
3. Intentionally seeking information on, obtaining copies of, modifying, or tampering with files, tapes, passwords, or any type of data belonging to other users unless specifically authorized to do so by those other users.
4. Using resources to develop or execute programs that could harass other users, infiltrate the systems, damage or alter the software components of the systems,
or disrupt CU-Denver activities.
5. Violating any network-related policy, whether set by the University of Colorado, CU-Denver, or a network governing body.
6. Altering or avoiding accounting for the use of computing resources, facilities, and equipment.


42 / General Information
7. Making excessive use of resources, controlled or otherwise.
8. Misrepresenting oneself or others through e-mail or other electronic communication.
9. Using, duplicating, or distributing licensed software and documentation without the express written permission of the original copyright owner.
10. Using unauthorized copies of licensed software.
11. Abusing, harassing, intimidating, threatening, stalking, or discriminating against others through the use of computing resources.
12. Sending obscene, abusive, harassing, or threatening messages to any other individual.
13. Engaging in vandalism or mischief that incapacitates, compromises, or destroys CU-Denver resources.
WORLD WIDE WEB POLICY
Access to the World Wide Web (WWW) and the ability to create web pages on CU-Denver computing systems are privileges provided to members of the CU-Denver community. CU-Denver users must conduct their activities in a courteous and professional manner.
I. Servers
Computing, Information, and Network Services (C1NS) supports and maintains designated WWW servers for general campus usage. All web servers connected to the Internet through CU-Denver networking are to be registered with the CU-Denver Webmaster, webmaster® carbon.cudenver.edu. This includes all web servers located outside of the C1NS department. The WWW Policy applies to all web servers using CU-Denver as the Internet Service Provider (ISP).
II. Individual WWW Pages
Appropriate use policies for CU-Denver computer accounts also apply to individual home pages. Individuals who create home pages are responsible for adhering to the following guidelines:
A. Individual home pages are encouraged
for the following purposes:
1. Presenting personal non-commercial information (resumes, family, etc.).
2. Experimenting with available Web technologies and authoring tools.
3. Publishing and disseminating academic work.
4. Linking to cultural, scientific, or historical sites.
5. Posting announcements, news bulletins, and other general information.
B. Individual home pages may not be put to inappropriate uses, which include, but are not limited to:
1. Use of copyrighted materials in any form without the express written permission of the original copyright owner.
2. Personal, commercial uses which could result in a financial benefit for the page owner or his/her associates.
3. Use of audio, images (i.e., photographs, paintings, or derivatives thereof), videos, or movies of individuals without their express written consent.
4. Use of any personal information that is not public record pertaining to other individuals without their express written permission.
5. Use of any images or data that are abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminatory.
6. Use of any images or data that violate other University of Colorado or CU-Denver policies (e.g., Sexual Harassment Policy) or local, state, or Federal laws.
7. Creation of direct hypertext links to abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminatory material.
8. Use of materials whose nature or volume compromise the ability of the system to serve other users’ documents and web pages.
9. Any use which constitutes academic dishonesty.
10. Use of individual home pages to engage in illegal activity.
III. Departmental WWW Pages
Appropriate use policies for CU-Denver computer accounts also apply to departmental web pages. All departmental web pages are expected to adhere to the CU-Denver Authoring Standards.
A. Departmental pages are encouraged for the following purposes:
1. Disseminating general departmental information (goals, office hours, point of contact, etc.).
2. Highlighting departmental programs or activities.
3. Introducing faculty or staff and/or hyper-linking to their personal pages.
B. Departmental pages may not be put to inappropriate uses, which include, but are not limited to:
1. Use of copyrighted materials in any form without the express written permission of the original copyright owner.
2. Personal, commercial uses which could result in a financial benefit for the page owner or his/her associates.
3. Use of audio, images (i.e., photographs, paintings, or derivatives thereof), videos, or movies of individuals without their express written consent.
4. Use of any personal information that is not public record pertaining to other individuals without their express written permission.
5. Use of any images or data that are abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminatory.
6. Use of any images or data that violate other University of Colorado or CU-Denver policies (e.g., Sexual Harassment Policy) or local, state, or Federal laws.
7. Creation of direct hypertext links to abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminatory material.
8. Use of materials whose nature or volume compromise the ability of the system to serve other users’ documents and web pages.
9. Any use which constitutes academic dishonesty.
10. Use of departmental pages to engage in illegal activity.
POLICY VIOLATIONS
WWW Committee
The Chancellor shall appoint a WWW Committee to (1) manage the CU-Denver website, (2) set policies for and oversee the use of electronic communication at CU-Denver, and, (3) in conjunction with Computing, Information, and Network Services (C1NS), handle violations of CU-Denver Computing Policies.
Reporting
Any individuals who become aware of inappropriate, unethical, or illegal use of CU-Denver computing resources, inappropriate content of an individual home page, or any inappropriate electronic communication should notify the CU-Denver Webmaster, webmaster@carbon.cudenver.edu.
Child Pornography
Any material which appears to contain child pornography will be immediately referred to the Denver Police Department, and will also be subject to the procedures which follow.


Student Services / 43
Notification of Policy Violation
The CU-Denver Webmaster will notify the user who is alleged to have violated CU-Denver’s computing policies of the nature of the alleged violation and will provide the user with a copy of CU-Denver’s Computing Policies.
Suspension of Privileges During Investigation
During the investigation of an alleged policy violation, a user’s computing and network access may be suspended. CU-Denver reserves the right to examine a user’s recorded and stored information in the course of investigating an alleged policy violation.
Procedures
1. The CU-Denver Webmaster will review the material alleged to be in violation of CU-Denver’s Computing Policies. If the CU-Denver Webmaster believes that the material violates the policies, the CU-Denver Webmaster will request that the user remove the offending material.
2. If the alleged violator fails or refuses to comply with the CU-Denver Webmaster’s request, the CU-Denver Webmaster may refer the matter to the CU-Denver WWW Committee for action.
3. If the alleged violator disagrees with the CU-Denver Webmaster, the user may file a written petition requesting that the WWW Committee review the case.
4. The Chair of the CU-Denver WWW Committee will appoint a three-person subcommittee of the WWW Committee to review the case. Two members of the subcommittee must be selected from the membership of the WWW Committee. The Chair may select the third member from the WWW Committee
or from Faculty Assembly, Staff Council, or the Associated Students.
5. After consulting with the alleged violator and with the Webmaster, the subcommittee will determine (a) if a policy violation has occurred, and
(b) if a policy violation has been found, what action should be taken to remedy the policy violation.
Consequences of Policy Violations
Violations of CU-Denver Computing Policies may result in disciplinary action, including, but not limited to, suspension of access to the WWW, suspension of e-mail privileges, suspension of computing privileges, suspension or expulsion from the University, suspension or termination of employment, imposition of fines, and referral for legal action.
The CU-Denver WWW Committee may recommend to the Director of Student Life that a student be suspended or expelled from the University, or to the appropriate appointing authority that an employee be suspended or terminated. The WWW Committee may impose all other sanctions specified above.
STUDENT SERVICES
To meet the needs of the diverse student population, CU-Denver provides programs and activities designed to complement students’ academic programs and to enhance their total educational experience. Students are provided opportunities to develop, experience, and participate in student government, social, cultural, intellectual, and recreational programs. These programs create an environment in which students are:
• Assisted in developing leadership ability through opportunities to practice decision making, management and marketing, interpersonal and group communication, and relationship skills.
• Encouraged and aided in developing social, cultural, intellectual, recreation, and governance programs that expand involvement with the campus community and society and lead to mature appreciation of these pursuits.
• Encouraged to explore self-directed activities that provide opportunities for personal growth in individual and group settings.
• Exposed to various cultures and experiences, ideas and issues, art and musical forms, and styles of life.
• Informed about institutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities.
• Aided in the awareness and utilization of campus facilities and other resources.
• Assisted in developing community spirit through creative interaction among staff, faculty, students, and members of the local community. Students are encouraged to involve their families in campus events and activities.
Programs and services provided by the Associated Students of CU-Denver, the Office of Academic and Student Affairs of CU-Denver, and Auraria Campus Student Services contribute to the fulfillment of this philosophy.
The Advocate
The purpose of the student newspaper, The Advocate, is to provide students with information about campus issues and events. The newspaper strives to include good investigative reporting, feature articles, and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is a tool to encourage and develop writers, journalists, artists, and other student members of its general management and production staff. The office is in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 345, 303-556-2535.
American Indian Student Services
The American Indian Student Services program provides access and educational opportunities to American Indian students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. American Indian Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns of the American Indian community. The office is located in North Classroom 2013, 303-556-2860.
Asian American Student Services
Asian American Student Services provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student leadership development, and organization sponsorship. Supportive services are tailored to meet the specific needs of students. Asian American Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus and community, providing current information on issues and concerns of Asian Americans. The office is located in North Classroom 2012, 303-556-2578 or 303-556-2065.
Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD)
The Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal University structure. ASCU-Denver


44 / General Information
assists students with information concerning student clubs and organizations, campus events, issues concerning student status, and other information of general interest to students. ASCU-Denver also provides students assistance with grievances and the opportunity to become more closely involved with the University community, through active participation in student government itself, or through service on University, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees. More information concerning services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Tivoli Student Union, Room 301,303-556-2510.
Auraria Campus Student Services
AURARIA CHILD CARE CENTER
The Auraria Child Care Center, 303-556-3188, serves the child care needs of Auraria’s students, staff, and faculty by providing high quality early childhood education and care programs. The Child Care Center is located on the southwest corner of the campus. Its programs are consistently recognized by the educational community for their high-quality early childhood care and education. Developmentally appropriate practices for young children guide the educational programs that are provided. Curriculum planning is flexible and based on children’s interests. Experiences are planned in accordance with “Key Experiences” adapted from the High/ Scope Cognitively Oriented Curriculum. Supervising teachers in the Child Care Centers are all degreed teachers meeting the certification guidelines of the National Academy of Early Childhood programs. Children aged 12 months to 6 years are served at the Center. The Center also has a fully accredited kindergarten program. Hours: M-F, 7a.m.-6p.m.
DISABILITY SERVICES OFFICE
Arts Building, Room 177,303-556-8387. The Disability Services Office (DSO) was created to serve the needs of a large and diverse community of students with disabilities attending the University of Colorado at Denver and Metropolitan State College of Denver. The office has a strong commitment to providing equal access and a wide range of support services to students with disabilities.
The DSO staff also works closely with faculty and staff members in an advisory capacity, assisting in the development of reasonable instructional accommodations
that allow students wtih disabilities to fully participate in the academic programs offered on this campus. Services to students include:
Adaptive Computer Lab
Testing Accommodations
Notetaking Services
Student Advocacy
Sign Language and Oral Interpreters
Orientation for Incoming Students
Priority Registration
Sale of Handicapped Parking Permits
Resource Library
EMMANUEL GALLERY
Located next to southwest corner of PE Bldg., 303-556-8337.
The Emmanuel Gallery hosts exhibits of students, faculty, and nationally known artists. Stop in for a relaxing break. Gallery hours are 11a.m. to 5p.m., M-F.
GAY, LESBIAN, BISEXUAL, TRANS (GLBT) STUDENT SERVICES
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans Student Services is open to all Auraria campus students as a resource for exploring sexual orientation issues. This program offers a variety of support, education, and advocacy services for the entire campus community:
• Support for those who may have questions about their own sexual orientation or that of a friend or family member
• Advocacy for students experiencing discrimination or harassment based on a real or perceived GLBT identity
• Speakers for events, workshops, and classes on various aspects of sexual orientation
• Training programs and workshops about working with the gay, lesbian, and bisexual communities more effectively and combating homophobia
• Resource library for research papers, personal reading, and off-campus resource information
• Programs such as Gay, Lesbian,
Bisexual, Trans Awareness Month and other forums providing information and dialogue about GLBT issues.
The GLBT Student Services office
is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 311, and is staffed by a director with the support of student employees and volunteers. Input and involvement from the entire campus community is welcomed. For additional information, call 303-556-6333.
STUDENT HEALTH CENTER
All CU-Denver students are entitled to medical services at the Student Health Center, and student health insurance is NOT required to use this facility. Physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiological technologists, and medical assistants staff the facility. Students will be asked to complete a sign-in sheet and show a current semester ID card each time they check in.
Services include treatment of illness and injuries, lab testing, medications, physicals, annual GYN exams, sexually transmitted disease information/testing, birth control information/services, minor surgery, cholesterol screening, immunizations, HIV testing, blood pressure checks, casting, suturing, and x-ray. All services listed above are low cost. Payment is required at time of service, except for students who participate in the Student Health Insurance Program. Classes regarding health-related topics are taught each semester and are offered free to students.
Walk-in services begin at 8 a.m., Monday-Friday. Access is on a first-come, first-served basis. Walk-in varies daily, contingent upon when all patient slots have been filled; thus, the daily closure time for walk-in care is variable. Patients are encouraged to check in as early as possible. The Student Health Center is located in the Plaza Building, room 150, on the lower level. Brochures with additional information are available at the health center. For further details and information regarding Night Students (Night Owl Advantage Program) and Extended Campus Students (Satellite Advantage Program), call 303-556-2525.
TIVOLI STUDENT UNION
Tivoli Administration, Room 325, 303-556-6330.
The Tivoli Student Union is located at 9th and Auraria Parkway on the Auraria Campus. Inside this historic building, which was once a brewery, students will find a vast array of retail shops and restaurants, as well as the Auraria Book Center; copy center, hair salon, travel agency, the University of Colorado Federal Credit Union, and the Tivoli AMC 12 Theaters.
Visit the Tivoli Student Union website. http://www.tivoli.org
Also housed in the Tivoli Student Union are the Club Hub, Conference Services,
ID Program/Commuter and Housing Services, and Sigi’s Pool Hall and Arcade. Information Desk, Located in second floor
lobby, 303-556-6329.


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Information on Tivoli Student Union hours, locations, events, and services can be found here, as well as information about the Auraria Campus and Denver community.
Club Hub, Room 346,303-556-8094.
This uniquely designed club space on the third floor of the Tivoli features work space for over 60 clubs, mailboxes for campus clubs, a limited number of lockers, club bulletin boards, meeting rooms, and lounge area for larger group meetings. This office works closely with the Student Advisory Committee to the Auraria Board (SACAB), the Student Union Advisory Board (SUAB), and the Student Activities/Life offices.
Tivoli Conference Services, Room 325,
303-556-2755.
Through the Conference Services office, Tivoli meeting rooms and conference space can be reserved for non-academic purposes, including meetings, weddings, and receptions. The conference service department has four caterers to choose from for all catering needs.
ID Program/Commuter and Housing
Services, Room 243,303-556-8385.
Auraria students can have their l.D. cards made here, which are necessary for parking in some campus lots and checking out library books. Student IDs also serve as an RTD bus pass. The lounge provides lockers, RTD bus maps, ride boards, pop machine, and a microwave oven. In addition, information about off-campus housing is provided here, including referrals, apartment complex lists, and a courtesy phone.
Sigi’s Pool Hall and Arcade, Room 145,
303-556-3645.
Sigi’s, named after the founder of the Tivoli Brewery, Moritz Sigi, houses 31 video game machines, 12 billiard tables, and one snooker table. Sigi’s is open to the entire Auraria campus population as well as the public. The student-friendly atmosphere encourages community socialization and relaxation.
Tivoli Tickets, Room 261C, 303-556-3315.
Tickets for campus events may be purchased here. Tivoli Tickets is also an authorized Ticketmaster outlet.
Black Student Services
The Black Student Services program provides access, educational opportunities, and information to students of African descent through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultured programs, advocacy, student organization
sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. Black Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns affecting the community of Africans in America.The office is located in North Classroom 2010,303-556-2701.
Clubs and Organizations
This is only a sampling of clubs recognized in the past and is not necessarily current.
ACM Computing Club American Institute of Architecture Students
American Marketing Association American Planning Association American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Landscape Architecture
American Society of Mechanical Engineers Anthropology Club Art Club
Association of Black Students Auraria French Club Auraria Transnational Student Association
Beta Alpha Omega (Counseling/ Education)
Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting Honor Society)
Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Honor Society)
Chi Epsilon
Chinese Student Association College Republicans CSPA-Colorado Society for Personnel Administration
CU Venture Network-Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs Equiponderance Pre-Law Club Etta Kappa Nu Feminist Alliance
Financial Management Association GSPA Association Golden Key National Honor Society HASO-Health Administration Student Organization
IBSA-International Business Student Association
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Kappa Delta Pi M.E.C.H.A.
Master of Social Sciences Club MBA/MS Association (Graduate Business)
Model United Nations Conference Organization
The Robert E. Moore Collegiate Chapter of the American Marketing Association
National Society of Black Engineers Native American Student Organization Phi Alpha Theta (History)
Phi Chi Theta (Business/Economics) Philosophy Club Pi Tau Sigma Psi Chi (Psychology)
Russian Culture & Language Club Sigma Iota Epsilon (Management Honor Society)
Sigma Tau Delta (English)
SAS-Society of Accounting Students Society of Women Engineers Student Association of Musicians Tau Beta Phi (Engineering)
Vietnamese Student Organization
Counseling and Family Therapy Center
The CU-Denver Counseling and Family Therapy Center staff provides services at no charge to students for personal, educational, and relationship concerns through individual and group counseling, stress management, alcohol and drug prevention, and crisis intervention. If a client’s needs are such that they would benefit more from an alternative form of counseling or therapy, appropriate referrals will be made to community-based professionals.
Also, by request, staff provide consultation, lectures, and workshops to student, faculty, and staff groups, clubs, and classes on diversity, mental health topics, organizational, and student development issues.
The CU-Denver Counseling and Family Therapy Center is located in the North Classroom Building, room 4036, 303-556-4372.
Emergency Student Loan Program
The Emergency Student Loan Program is designed to meet the emergency financial needs of students. The program provides interest-free, short-term loans for up to $400.00.
Applications for short-term loans will be accepted throughout the fall and spring semesters and summer session. Applicants are required to meet the minimum requirements listed below: Students receiving financial aid are eligible if:
• Financial aid or scholarship eligibility has been determined by the Office of Financial Aid


46 / General Information
• Financial aid is verified by presenting recent copy of award letter, or letter from financial aid counselor
• Amount of aid covers costs of tuition and loan
Students not receiving financial aid are eligible if:
• Tuition balance is paid in full
• Monthly income is verified by presenting recent check stub or letter from employer
• Income indicates ability to repay loan within six weeks.
Hispanic Student Services
The Hispanic Student Services program provides access and educational opportunities to Hispanic students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. Hispanic Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns of the Hispanic community. The office is located in North Classroom 2012, 303-556-2777.
Learning Assistance,
The Center for
The Center for Learning Assistance is designed to promote student success in the academic setting. Available to CU-Denver undergraduate and graduate students, services include English as a second language and study skills courses, tutoring, study skills seminars, peer advocacy, a test file, consulting, and a minority resource library. First-generation college students may be eligible for intensive services through the Student Support Services Federal Grant Program within the Center. The Center is located in NC 2006, 303-556-2802.
Tutoring. Free tutoring is available in many subject areas (some limitations apply). Tutoring is held on weekdays and evenings. Scheduled tutoring is available Monday through Thursday,
8 a.m.-7 p.m„ and Friday, 8 a.m.-l p.m. Open lab tutoring is available Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., and Friday, 8a.m.-l p.m.
Seminars. Study skills seminars are provided on such topics as critical thinking, time/stress management, test anxiety/test taking, essay writing, study strategies, active reading, learning styles, and listening/note taking.
Consulting. Academic, financial aid, and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy is available to students eligible for the Student Support Services Program.
Library. The Center maintains a small periodical and book collection authored by, and/or about, minorities; these resources are available for student research and leisure.
Courses. Courses are offered in a small group format in the areas of college survival skills, introduction to word processing, English as a second language, problem solving, and Excel.
ENGL 1006-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languages. This course is designed for ESL students who need to improve their reading and vocabulary skills. Students will increase their reading ability through vocabulary building, word attack strategies, and reading analysis.
ENGL 1007-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. This is the first course in the ESL composition sequence. Writing begins with sentence-level development and continues with the development of paragraphs based on Western rhetorical patterns. Grammar appropriate to students’ needs will be covered.
ENGL 1008-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. A three-credit-hour course that follows ENGL 1007 in the ESL sequence of writing classes.
The course provides continued work on grammar, syntax, usage, and the mechanics of writing. Writing begins with paragraphs and moves into essay writing. Special attention is paid to the aspects of the English language which pose particular problems for the non-native speaker of English.
ENGL 1009-3. Advanced ESL Writing Skills. This is the third course in the ESL composition sequence. Emphasis is placed on more complex grammatical problems and on the development of longer compositions.
STSK 0705-1. Problem Solving. Designed to improve investigative and problemsolving skills. Scientific theory, empirical methodology, and research methods will be utilized. Individual topics of investigation will be assigned.
STSK 0707-1. College Survival Skills.
Designed to promote success in the academic setting. Topics covered will include university resources, conquering the university system, listening and note-taking, study and memory techniques, test-taking skills, time management, library research strategies, and word processing.
STSK 0708-1. Introduction to Word Processing. Thoroughly familiarizes the student with an easy-to- use word processing program that will assist in the process of writing, text revision, and rearrangement, and the production of “letter-perfect” documents. The word processing program used will be one that is available in the open student-use computer lab areas. STSK 0800-1. Research Process for ESL Students. A one-credit-hour course designed for students who are unfamiliar with the process of academic research. The class covers the steps involved in producing a research paper, including resource evaluation skills. Grammar is covered as necessary according to student needs.
STSK 0801-1. Communication Skills for ESL Students. Meets twice a week to improve the oral communication skills of students whose first language is not English. Skills include use of idiomatic English, cross-cultural awareness, cross-cultural problems in communications, and pronunciation.
STSK 0802-1. Advanced Academic Reading Skills for ESL. The aim of this course is to improve the student’s ability to read academic texts. The focus is on analysis and interpretation.
STSK 0803-1. Speech Presentation for ESL. A one-credit-hour course which follows STSK 0801 in the oral communication skills sequence. The course focuses on the structure used in formal speech presentation along with continued improvement in pronunciation. Prereq: STSK 0801. STSK 0804-1. Listening and Note-taking for ESL Students. Designed to help ESL students improve their academic lecture comprehension and note-taking skills. Students will learn how to listen to a lecture and take effective notes. Practice lectures will cover a wide range of academic fields. STSK 0806-1. Study Skills for ESL Students. Designed for ESL students to improve those skills needed for effective participation in the college classroom. Emphasis will be on academic reading and writing skills, as well as on note-taking skills.


Student Services / 47
STSK 0810-1. Topics. Special topics in study skills to be selected by instructor. STSK 0820-1. Social Science Partnership for ESL. Designed to provide a basic understanding of American culture and its underlying values. Students will develop critical thinking skills as well as have opportunities for additional practice in reading and writing skills to include vocabulary in social science areas (i.e., sociology, history, political science, economics, psychology).
Ombuds Office
The Ombuds Office helps to enhance the clarity and dissemination of information, to simplify decision making and communication, to assist with the process of change and with adjustment to change, and to improve understanding among students, faculty, staff, and administrators.
The Ombuds Office provides information about programs, policies, services, and procedures affecting members of the University community; makes referrals to appropriate state, CU system, and CU-Denver resources; serves as consultant in the preparation and review of policies and procedures; and assists in the solution of problems and the resolution of disputes. Ombuds Office services do not replace or circumvent existing channels, but help them work more effectively.
Ombuds Office services are informal, impartial, confidential, and independent of administrative authorities. The issues and identities of persons who consult with the Ombuds Office are not divulged to anyone without express permission to do so, except to the extent required by law.
For further information or assistance, contact the Ombuds Office, CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 700; 303-556-4493, TTY 303-556-6204, Fax 303-556-2678; e-mail: ombuds@c2irbon.cudenver.edu
Pre-Col legiate Development, The Center for
Programs offered by the Center serve to motivate high school students to pursue post-secondary education and provide them the academic skills necessary to be successful in their college endeavors. The Center is located in NC 2204,303-556-2322.
PRE-COLLEGIATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
The Pre-Collegiate Development Program is a systemwide institutionally funded academic enhancement program for high school students. It is designed to motivate and prepare high school students who are first generation and/ or from an underrepresented group in higher education to complete high school on a timely basis. The primary focus of the program is to prepare youth (grades 9-12) for professional careers of specific interest to them. The program includes academic advising (by parents and guidance counselors working together) regarding high school course selections that will best help students attain their desired career objectives. In addition, during the academic year, students will take part in relevant Saturday Academies in basic study skills, interpersonal skills development, and topics related to student preparation for the 21st century. Between their sophomore and junior years, students will participate in a two-week session designed to enhance study and library research skills, and provide a thorough introduction to college placement exams and career fields. Between their junior 2ind senior years, students will attend a five-week academically intense Summer Academic Program. Students will experience university life on a firsthand basis and enhance their secondary school academics by taking courses designed to augment high school academic requirements (e.g., mathematics, sciences, writing, computer science, social sciences.) Students also enroll in a three-credit college course.
CU-DENVER SCHOLARS PROGRAM
This is cui early college enrollment program for college-bound, high-achieving students, first generation and/or from 2m underrepresented group in higher education, who are enrolled in their senior year of high school. The program enables students to begin their college studies by taking one course at CU-Denver during the fall term of their senior year in high school. The credit earned in the course can be applied toward a bachelor’s degree. While enrolled in the program, students participate in monthly workshops designed to acclimate them to the university 2md prepare them for college study.
Student Advocacy Center
The Student Advocacy Center provides support services to CU-Denver students, particularly during their first year on campus. Services are designed to help students make a smooth transition to life at CU-Denver and to succeed in their college studies. Professional staff and student peer advocates provide information about campus resources and assist students with class scheduling, academic policies and procedures, and problem solving. The Center also houses an extensive scholarship library. The Center is located in NC 2012,303-556-2546.
Student Legal Services
Student legal services are available to assist students with off-campus legal problems through the provision of legail advice, litigation preparation, document interpretation, and assistance in negotiation. The service will not represent students in court. This student fee-funded program is provided free of charge to CU-Denver students; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred, such as copying, typing, etc. For further details, contact the office in the Tivoli Student Union, Suite 315,303-556-6061.
Student Life, Office of
The Office of Student Life is the advising, coordinating, resource, and general information center for student clubs and organizations, student government (ASCUD), student programs, and the academic honor societies. The office is responsible for the administration of the student fee budget and monitors cdl student fee expenditures to assure compliance with CU-Denver and State of Colorado regulations and procedures. The Director of Student Life represents the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional, 2md AHEC committees and maintains effective lines of communication with MSCD, CCD, and AHEC. The director administers the student conduct and discipline procedures as described in the Code of Student Conduct. The Office of Student Life is located in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 303, 303-556-3399.


48 / General Information
Veterans Affairs, Office of
The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veterans and dependent students attending CU-Denver who wish to utilize Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists students with filling out VA paperwork and in solving problems associated with the receipt of VA-related educational benefits.
The OVA maintains proper certification for eligible students to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements for attendance, course load and content, and other regulations necessary to receive educational benefits payments.
In addition, the OVA provides VA Vocational Rehabilitation referrals, information on VA tutorial assistance, and VA work/ study positions for qualified veterans.
For further information, contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 303-556-2630, CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 100F.
THE CAREER CENTER
Director Janet Michalski Associate Director and Career Counselor Lissa Gallagher Assistant Director and Coordinator, Internships and Career Fairs:
Diane Lopez
Assistant Director and Coordinator, Internships and CU SERVES:
Cherrie Grove
Coordinator, Internships and Writer/ Editor, Bulletin and Connections:
Kristy Adams
Coordinator, Career Employment Services: Donna Ferguson Coordinator, Career Employment Services: Beth Kipp Career Counselor Joanne Wambeke Career Counselor Sara Lohaus Program Assistant and UROP Coordinator Marcia Baker Office: Tivoli Student Union, Suite 260 Telephone: 303-556-2250
The Career Center at CU-Denver offers a full array of services that supplement the student’s educational experience and promote success upon graduation. Students are assisted in choosing a major; selecting a career path; gaining experience through internships, cooperative education, service learning, and undergraduate research activities; researching career and employer information; developing job search
skills; and finding a career upon graduation. Students are encouraged to access services as early as the freshman year to begin planning their career and charting a course toward success!
Career Planning Services
• Career Counseling
• Career Assessment Inventories
• Resume Assistance
• Interviewing Skills
• Self-directed Job Search
• Career Management Certificate
Internships and Cooperative Education
• Part-time academic year positions
• Full-time alternating semester or summer positions
• Course credit at undergraduate and graduate levels
• Out-of-state/international internships
• Most positions are paid
Career Employment Services
• On-campus recruiting
• Resume referral
• Career vacancy listings
• Career fairs
CU Serves
• America Reads
• CU SERVES Tutors
• Service Learning Course Support
Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP)
• Research grants for undergraduate students
• Opportunities to participate at Research Day
Career Center Website
• Job links
• Career information
• Employer Web links
Career Library
• Career and employer information
• Career computer lab
• Career Advisor Network Program
LIBRARY SERVICES Auraria Library
Dean/Director: David Gleim Associate Director: Jean F. Hemphill Office: Auraria Library, 1100 Lawrence Street Telephone:
Administration: 303-556-2805 Information: 303-556-2740 Reference: 303-556-2585
FACULTY
Associate Professors: David Gleim,
Ellen Greenblatt, Jean F. Hemphill,
Terry Ann Leopold
Assistant Professors: Anthony J. Dedrick, Robert L. Wick
Instructors: Orlando Archibeque, Meg Brown-Sica, Elizabeth D’Antonio-Gan, Vera Gao, Stephen Green, Cynthia Hashert, Florence Jones, Elaine Jurries, Sarah Landeryou, Susan Maret, Marit S. MacArthur, Nikki Me Caslin, Ellen Metter, Mara L. Sprain, Linda D. Tietjen, Louise Treff-Gangler, Diane Turner, Judith Valdez, Robb Waltner,
Eveline Yang
LIBRARY SERVICES
Access to information is essential to academic success. The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus, provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The Library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver.
THE COLLECTION
The Auraria Library has a collection of approximately 600,000 volumes. In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection, the Library also has over 3,200 journal and newspaper subscriptions, access to more than 5,000 electronic journals, and a film/videotape collection. The Library is a selective depository for U.S. Government Publications and a depository for Colorado State documents. The Auraria Library’s collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally through interlibrary loan services.


Library Services / 49
AURARIA LIBRARY ONLINE INFORMATION SYSTEM
Auraria Library Online Information System is the new online information system purchased from III (Innovative Interfaces, Inc.) for the Auraria Library (http://carbon.cudenver.edu/pubIic/ library). It provides access to the following information resources:
Skyline-The Auraria Library online catalog of books, journal holdings, videos, and government publications owned by the Library. Course reserves information is also available.
Indexes and Journal Article Resources-Provides access to both text-based and web-based versions of a variety of periodical and article databases, many of which include electronic full text of the articles. Reference Tools-Connects to reference tools (dictionaries, encyclopedias, almanacs, atlases, etc.) and other Internet resources including government publications and Auraria Library Archives.
Other Libraries-Allows users to search other library catalogs, in Colorado and beyond, and OCLC WorldCat. Information Delivery/Interlibrary
Loan-Provides an electronic interlibrary request form, ZAP, and information about other document delivery services.
Auraria Library Information-General library information, including library instruction guides, remote access information, hours, policies, and other resources.
CIRCULATION SERVICES
Library materials are checked out from the Circulation Desk with a current Auraria ID or other valid identification. Undergraduate students may check out books for 28 days and graduate students for 60 days. An Auraria student can check out up to 75 items from the general collection. Items can be renewed three times if not requested by another borrower online using Skyline's View Your Own Record, in person, or by phone, 303-556-2639. Other services include patron-placed holds in Skyline for checked-out items and e-mail circulation notices that allow for e-mail renewals. Fines are assessed when books are renewed or returned past their due date, and replacement charges will be assessed if items are 28 days overdue.
REFERENCE SERVICES
The Auraria Library Reference Department strives to provide excellent service in assisting students and faculty with their research needs. The Reference Desk is staffed during most hours the Library is open, and has librarians and staff trained in all subject areas in order to assist students with online and print sources of information.
INFORMATION DELIVERY/ INTERLIBRARY LOAN
This department participates in a worldwide electronic interlending network with other libraries and commercial document suppliers. This service enables the user to obtain needed materials not available at Auraria Library. Once requested, most materials can take two days to two weeks to obtain, depending on where the lender is.
LIBRARY INSTRUCTION
The Library is committed to providing information skills through its instruction program. The program is varied, ranging from basic, introductory-level material to advanced research methodology for graduate students. Information on other electronic resources is an important component of the Library Instruction Program. For more information about the Library’s instructional offerings, contact the Library Instruction office at 303-556-3683.
RESERVES/MEDIA
The Reserves/Media Department (located in the northwest corner of the first floor) provides special short-term circulation of books, pamphlets, articles, and other materials needed for class instruction. Except for films and videos, all other types of media are housed in Reserves/Media, along with playback equipment. Films and videos (including those on reserve) are located in Media Equipment Services, first floor, southeast corner.
The loan periods for “reserved” items are short, and overdue follow-up is prompt, so that the maximum number of students may have access to the materials. These materials include not only titles owned by the Library, but also personal copies made available by the faculty. Most “reserved” material may be checked out for a few days, with the exception of media items. The length of check-out is determined by the professor. Materials will be checked out with appropriate picture l.D.
ARCHIVES AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
The Archives and Special Collections Department of the Auraria Library acts as the archival repository for materials produced by the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, Community College of Denver, and the Auraria Higher Education Center. These materials include documents such as college catalogs, student newspapers, budgets, and fact books. Manuscript collections at the Auraria Library focus on public policy issues and public affairs. Examples of manuscript holdings include the records from organizations such as the American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado, the National Municipal League, and the American Association of University Women of Colorado. The Library's special collections area contains books on many different subjects, including Colorado and Denver history, theses and dissertations from CU-Denver, science fiction, rhetoric, and juvenile literature. For information and hours, call 303-556-8373.
SERVICES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
The Library is committed to making its resources and services available to all students. Library services to assist persons with disabilities include orientation to the physical layout of the Library, retrieval of materials, and some assistance with use of the online public access catalog, periodicals, and indexes.
Adaptive computer equipment and software have been installed in the Reference area and in the Computer Access Lab to assist a number of students with varying disabilities. This equipment connects to the online public access catalog, the Internet, and other electronic access systems.
ADDITIONAL FACILITIES
Photocopiers, microform reader/ printers, a copy center, pay phones, and study rooms are all available at the Library.


50 / General Information
FRIENDS OF AURARIA LIBRARY
The Friends of Auraria Library is an association formed in 1976 to promote the development of Auraria Library as a center for learning, study, and research for the students and faculty of the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The Friends of Auraria Library’s ongoing objectives are:
1. To promote awareness of and good will toward Auraria Library on the campus, in the metropolitan area, and in the region; and
2. To increase Library resources through contributions, solicitations, grants, bequests, and gifts of books and other appropriate materials.
MEDIA SERVICES Auraria Media Center
Interim Director James K. Straub Office: Auraria Media Center, Lawrence
at 11th Street, Room 015 Telephone: 303-556-2426
The Auraria Media Center offers a full range of media services, including the management of the Library’s film and videotape collection. These materials are listed in the online public access catalog. The Media Center operates a 26-channel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus. Faculty members may request the transmission of a film or videotape directly into the classroom over this system. Students may request transmission of a film or videotape from one of the media viewing
and listening carrels in the Library. This system also can transmit live programs from St. Cajetan’s, the Student Union, and the Media Center’s television studios to other locations on campus. A self-service graphics lab and two self-service VHS editing suites also are available for student use in the Media Center’s Production Department. Finally, an Internship Program is available to students who are interested in converting knowledge gained in electronics, graphics, or television production courses to practical experience.


College of Architecture and Planning
Dean: Patricia O’Leary Office: CU-Denver Building, Third Floor Main Telephone: 303-556-3382 College Web site: http://carbon. cudenver.edu/public/AandP/
FACULTY
Professors: Gene Bressler, Thomas Clark, Mark Gelernter, Spenser Havlick,
George Hoover, Joseph Juhasz, Yuk Lee, Dwayne Nuzum, Patricia O’Leary, John Prosser, Fahriye Sancar, Peter Schneider, Raymond Studer, Jr.,
Luis Summers, Willem van Vliet Associate Professors: Ernesto Arias,
Lois Brink, Joan Draper, Phillip Gallegos, Harry Garnham, Mark Gross, Marvin Hatami, Taisto Makela, Raymond McCall, Jr., Hans Morgenthaler, Bennett Neiman,
Randall Ott, Diane Wilk, Ping Xu Assistant Professors: Barbara Ambach, Alan Berger, Robert Flanagan, Julee Herdt, Michael Holleran, Ann Komara, Lawrence Loftin III, Eric Morris, Brian Muller, Doris Sung, Ekaterini Vlahos Senior Instructors: John Frankhouser, Allen Harlow, Michael Jenson,
E.J. Meade
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
The College of Architecture and Planning at the University of Colorado at Denver prepares students for careers in architecture, planning, landscape architecture, and urban design. The College offers the only undergraduate and graduate education in these fields in the state of Colorado. Students intending to enter the design and planning professions normally first complete the College’s undergraduate degree as preparation for entry into the College’s graduate- level professional programs. Graduate programs are also available for those who already hold an undergraduate degree in a field unrelated to design or planning. A unique feature of the College is that it offers its 900 students exceptional educational experiences in two distinctive locations. The College’s graduate programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban and regional planning, and urban design are taught on
the Denver campus of the University of Colorado in the heart of a vital downtown; its undergraduate programs are offered on the Boulder campus in an environment ideally suited to the needs of undergraduate students. A multi-disciplinary Ph.D. in Design and Planning is offered across the two campuses. With a diverse faculty committed to excellence in teaching, research, scholarship, and professional work, the College provides students with a broad range of learning opportunities. For detailed information on the undergraduate programs, see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog.
Special Activities and Programs
The College provides a diverse range of opportunities which enrich and enhance the education of its students. Through activities and functions-including a lecture series, a visiting critic series, exhibits, publications, and active student organizations-the College encourages contact among students, faculty, and members of the design professions. Each summer, the College offers foreign study-travel programs, which in recent years have traveled to Finland, France, Mexico, Prague, Rome, and Russia. The College makes available a range of scholarships and fellowships, some of which are based on need, others on performance, and still others of which are specifically intended to provide enrichment opportunities. The College supports an active and focused internship program for its students, giving them access to elective internship opportunities in the Denver metropolitan area and beyond. Finally, the College encourages students to take control of their own education and supports, within its ability, any reasonable proposals from students that would enrich their own educational experiences.
College Facilities
The College’s administrative headquarters and graduate programs are located at 1250 14th Street in downtown Denver, on the northeastern edge of the Auraria campus. This favorable location gives easy access both to the extensive campus
facilities, and to the urban amenities of Denver’s lively lower downtown. Most of the major professional design offices in Denver, and many planning firms and agencies, are within easy reach of the College. These provide many opportunities for contact between students and practitioners. College facilities include studio spaces for students, lecture and seminar rooms, design jury spaces, exhibition spaces, and faculty offices.
The College also provides a photographic darkroom and studio, a model and furniture-making woodshop, and an extensive computer lab whose focus is computer-aided design (CAD), computer 2-D and 3-D imaging, and analytic tools for planning. Also located in the College is a Geographic Information System (GIS) computer lab, which is open to all students of the University of Colorado at Denver.
Scholarships/Financial Aid
Students in the College have access to a number of scholarships and other financial assistance funds. Some of these funds are provided by the institution itself, while others are provided by external sources like the American Institute of Architects Education Fund, the American Planning Association, the American Society of Landscape Architects, and the Rocky Mountain Masonry Institute. For further information on these scholarships and graduate tuition awards, please contact the College’s student services officer at 303- 556- 3387. For information on federal and state financial aid, contact the Office of Financial Aid, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 125, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364,303- 556-2886.
ACADEMIC POLICIES Academic Standing
Students must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in the graduate programs to remain in good standing and to graduate. If a student’s GPA falls below a 3.0, then he or she will be placed on academic probation beginning the following semester. If the GPA remains below a 3.0 after the probationary semester, then he or she may be dismissed from the College.


52 / College of Architecture and Planning
Appeals
Any student may appeal the grades he or she receives in a class. The student should first informally discuss the issue with the relevant faculty member and then with the department chair or program director. If the matter is not resolved this way, the student may initiate an appeal by writing to the faculty member outlining the reasons for the appeal. Copies are to be forwarded to the department chair or program director and the dean. The faculty member must respond in writing to the student’s written appeal, with copies to the department chair or program director and the dean. An appeals committee consisting of three faculty members of the relevant academic program will review the written appeal. The chair of the appeals committee will convey its recommendation in writing to the student who has appealed, with copies to the instructor, the program chair or director, and dean.
Attendance and Timeliness of Work
Students are expected to attend all meetings of classes. Excessive unexcused absences may result in a grade reduction at the discretion of the instructor.
Absence from a class will be excused for verified medical reasons or for extreme personal emergencies. The student may be required to furnish evidence.
Students’ assignments are to be completed in a timely manner. Any assignment turned in late may have its grade reduced by an amount set at the discretion of the instructor. An assignment may be turned in late without penalty for verified medical reasons or for extreme personal emergencies. Students must have their instructor’s written permission to turn an assignment in late. Students with excused late work may turn in the assignment by the end of finals week without penalty. Otherwise, the grade “IP will be assigned.
Course Sequencing and Advancement
Programs in the College are structured so that certain courses must be taken concurrently, others sequentially. Students will not be allowed to enroll in a course if its co-requisites or prerequisites have not been satisfied.
Originality of Work
Students must submit their own work. Where other sources are used in a student submission, they are to be clearly identified and referenced. The University considers plagiarism and similar acts of falsification to be a serious matter which may result in suspension or expulsion. Information on codes of conduct and grievance procedures are available from the University of Colorado at Denver’s Office of Enrollment and Student Affairs.
ADMISSIONS General Requirements
Applicants to the College of Architecture and Planning are required to submit the following credentials:
• University of Colorado Application for Graduate Admission form.
• Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended. Transcripts must be mailed by the institution directly to the College.
A certified literal English translation must also be submitted for documents that are not in English.
• Letters of recommendation. U.S. residents-three letters; international applicants-four letters.
• Statement of purpose. Applicants to all programs must submit a statement summarizing career objectives and reasons for pursuing the intended program of study. Applicants to the Ph.D. program must also indicate a proposed area of specialization and,
if possible, a potential faculty mentor.
• Supporting materials: Applicants to the architecture and landscape architecture programs are required to submit a portfolio (6-12 bound pages, 8.5 x 11 inches). Slides are not accepted. A portfolio is an orderly presentation of one’s work. This includes examples of creative and analytical work including, but not limited to, essays, papers, photographs, and photographic reproductions of artistic work such
as sculptures, drawings, paintings, musical compositions, and other fine arts. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must be included for return of the portfolio. Applicants to the urban and regional planning program should submit, in an 8.5 * 11-inch bound document, their statement of purpose, a resume, and a copy of a student or professional paper or project. Applicants to the Ph.D. program must submit a sample of written work and any other evidence
relevant to admission to the program, in accordance with submission guidelines which can be obtained from the College.
• Application fee. Non refundable ($50.00-U.S. residents; $60.00-international applicants).
• Applicants to the urban and regional planning program are encouraged to submit Graduate Record Exam (general) scores. Those whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0 are required to submit GRE scores. Applicants to architecture and landscape architecture are encouraged to submit GRE scores if their GPAs are below 3.0. Applicants to the Ph.D program are required to submit GRE scores.
International Applicants
International applicants are required to submit the following documents in addition to the credentials listed under general requirements.
• TOEFL score. For the professional programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning, the College of Architecture and Planning requires a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 550 for students from non-English-speaking countries. However, the College will consider applications from students with strong academic credentials whose TOEFL scores are slightly below 550. If accepted, these students will be required to register for an English course when they arrive at the University of Colorado at Denver. Applicants to the Ph.D. in Design and Planning must have achieved a TOEFL score of at least 575. Note that an Official TOEFL Score Report is required; institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable.
• Financial Resources Statement. International applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds available. To provide this evidence, each international applicant should follow these instructions:
a. If an applicant’s own money is to be used: In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement, applicant’s bank must certify that the full amount of money is on deposit in his or her account to meet tuition and expenses.
b. If an applicant is sponsored by a family member or friend: The sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. The


Master of Architecture / 53
sponsor’s bank must also certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money applicant will need for tuition and expenses,
c. If an applicant has been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed.
Statements used for other institutions will not be accepted. Photocopied documents are not accepted unless signed by the originator; signatures must be original.
Application Dates and Deadlines
Fall Semester
All professional programs-March 15 Ph.D. in Design and Planning-by February 1 to be considered for financial support
Spring Semester
All programs - October 1 (In architecture, urban design, and landscape architecture, students starting in the spring will only be able to select from a reduced set of courses, and will get on track starting the next fall)
Applications received after these dates will be considered only if space is still available.
Confirmation Deposit
A non-refundable confirmation deposit of $200 is required to secure an applicant’s place in the architecture and landscape architecture programs, and in the Ph.D. program. The deposit is due at the time the applicant accepts the program’s offer of admission. The deposit will be applied to the first semester’s tuition when the student registers for classes.
ADDITIONAL
INFORMATION
To request additional information, or to arrange a visit to the College, please phone or e-mail:
Undergraduate programs: 303-492-7711; A&P-Undergrad-info@carbon. cudenver.edu
Graduate professional programs:
303-556-3382; A&P-Grad-info@ carbon.cudenver.edu Ph.D. program: 303-492-7711; A&P-Phd-info@carbon.cudenver.edu
You may also write to:
Office of the Dean, College of Architecture and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 126, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364.
For periodical updates on all aspects of the College, see our website at http://car-bon.cudenver.edu/public/AandP/
PROGRAMS OF STUDY Architecture
Chair, Department of Architecture:
George Hoover, FAIA Telephone: 303-556-3382
The architecture program’s mission is to lead in the discovery, communication, and application of knowledge in the discipline of architecture. The program aims to excel in the education of its students, in the research and creative endeavors of its faculty, and in service to the community. To respond to this mission, the program has developed a unique intellectual, educational, and architectural culture.
First of all, the program celebrates its place in a very special set of landscapes-urbanized Denver and the Front Range, and the spectacular natural landscape of the high plains and the Colorado Rockies. The architecture program therefore focuses not only on the design of buildings, but also on the interactions between buildings and their urban and natural settings.
Secondly, the program examines the interplay between architectural form and the complex cultural and technological context in which architects operate. As a result of these dominant concerns, the program has created an academic environment that is intellectually stimulating and educationally challenging, and that aims to educate students who will become leaders in the discipline and profession of architecture.
The Department of Architecture, along with the Department of Planning and Design, offers a Bachelor of Environmental Design (B.Envd.) on the Boulder campus. The Department of Architecture also offers two graduate degrees on the Denver campus: the Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) and the Master of Urban Design (M.U.D.). The following statement from the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is responsible for accrediting all architecture programs in the United States, should help a student choose the appropriate degree program:
“Most states require that an individual intending to become an architect hold an accredited degree. There are two types of degrees that are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board:
(1) The Bachelor of Architecture, which requires a minimum of five years’ study, and (2) The Master of Architecture, which requires a minimum of three years of study following an unrelated bachelor’s degree or two years following a related pre-professional bachelor’s degree. These professional degrees are structured to educate those who aspire to registration and licensure to practice as architects. The four-year, pre-professional degree, where offered, is not accredited by NAAB. The pre-professional degree is useful to those wishing a foundation in the field of architecture, as preparation for either continued education in a professional degree program or for employment options in fields related to architecture.”
The pre-professional degree offered by the College of Architecture and Planning is the B.Envd. The professional degree offered by the College is the Master of Architecture (M.Arch.), which is fully accredited by the NAAB.
The Master of Architecture, the College’s accredited professional degree for students intending to seek licensure as architects, offers two distinct paths. One track, the M.Arch./4+2, is offered to students who have completed the College’s B.Envd. or any other preprofessional design degree from any NAAB accredited institution. A second track, the M.Arch./3.5, is available to students who have completed an unrelated undergraduate or graduate degree, or to students who hold professional architecture degrees from other countries, but who seek to obtain an NAAB-accredited architecture degree. Students holding professional architecture degrees from foreign institutions will be given advanced standing commensurate with their previous educational experiences.
The Master of Urban Design (M.U.D.) is an advanced research-oriented program for students who already hold a professional architecture degree or an architecturally related degree.
These two graduate programs-the M.Arch. and M.U.D.-are explained in greater detail below.
THE MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE
(M.ARCH)
M.Arch./ 4+2
The M.Arch./4+2 is intended for students who have completed the College’s B.Envd. or any other pre-professional architecture degree from any NAAB-accredited institution. This six-year plan


54 / College of Architecture and Planning
of study, with completion of both the four-year undergraduate B.Envd offered on the Boulder campus and the accredited two-year M.Arch. on the Denver campus of CU, has been fully endorsed by the NAAB.
Program Requirements
Students completing the College’s Bachelor of Environmental Design (B.Envd.) on the Boulder campus-or completing a pre-professional degree from another NAAB-accredited institution-complete a minimum of four semesters of course work (60 hours of credit) after entry into the M.Arch. program. For further details on the B.Envd., and for descriptions of the pre-professional courses outlined below, please see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog.
Term by Term: Six-year M.Arch Curriculum
Undergraduate Sequence
Four years at Boulder-32 credits per year (approx.)
128 total credits
FIRST YEAR
Fall (15 credit hours)
ENVD 1014-3. Intro to ENVD ENVD 2003-3. Ecology and Design Social Science-3, (see list of options) Humanities-3. (see list of options) Elective-3. Non-ENVD Elective
THIRD YEAR
Fall (15 credit hours)
AREN 4035-3. ENVD 3115-3. Elective-3. Electives-6.
Architectural Structures 1 Intro Build Mat/Systems ENVD Elective ENVD or Non-ENVD
Spring (16 credit hours)
AREN 4045-3. ENVD 3002-4.
ENVD 3210-6. Elective-3.
Architectural Structures 2 Design Theory and Methods Arch Studio II ENVD Elective
FOURTH YEAR
Fall (16 credit hours)
AREN 3050-3.
ENVD 3112-3.
ENVD 4310-6. Elective-4.
Environmental Systems for Buildings 1 Research Issues and Programming for Arch Arch. Studio III ENVD Elective
Spring (16 credit hours)
AREN 3060-3.
ENVD 4410-6.
Elective-3.
Elective-4.
Environmental Systems For Buildings 2 Arch. Studio IV ENVD Elective ENVD or Non-ENVD
Graduate Sequence
Two years at Denver-30 credits per year (approx.)
60 total credits
Spring (16 credit hours)
ENVD 1002-4. ENVD 2001-3.
UWRP 1150-3. Electives-6.
ENVD Media Intro to Social Factors in ENVD
Expository Writing Non-ENVD Electives
SECOND YEAR
FIFTH YEAR Fall (15 credit hours)
ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar
LA 6632-3. Site Planning Electives-6.*
Fall (17 credit hours)
ARCH 3114-3.
ENVD 2000-6. ENVD 3001-3.
MATH 1300-5.
History and Theories of Arch I ENVD Studio Environment and Behavior
Analytic Geometry and Calculus
Spring (17 credit hours)
ARCH 3214-3.
ENVD 2110-6. PHYS 2010-5. Elective-3.
History and Theories of Arch II ARCH Studio I General Physics I ENVD Elective
Spring (18 credit hours)
ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio
ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design
Seminar
Electives-9.* (Take ARCH 6950-6.
Thesis Preparation if undertaking a thesis in the next semester)
SIXTH YEAR
Fall (15 credit hours)
ARCH 5410-3. Professional Practice ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio or ARCH 6951 Thesis (6) ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design
Seminar or nothing if thesis taken
Electives-6.* (Take ARCH 6950-6.
Thesis Preparation if undertaking a thesis in the next semester)
Spring (15 credit hours)
Electives-15*
* As of fall 1998, new students must take 9 credits each in cultural studies and professional studies, and 6 credits in technology studies.
The remaining 9 credits may be taken in any architecturally related electives on campus.
M.Arch./3.5
The M.Arch./3.5 is intended for those students who have completed an unrelated undergraduate or graduate degree, or for students who hold professional architecture degrees from other countries. This three-and-one-half-year plan of study on the CU-Denver campus has been fully accredited by the NAAB.
Prerequisites
Students must complete the prerequisites of college level trigonometry and physics before enrolling in ARCH 5310. Introduction to Building Technology.
Since this class should be taken in the first semester in order to stay on track for graduation, students are strongly encouraged to complete the trigonometry and physics requirements before beginning the M.Arch. program. Students are also expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy, and should be familiar with PC or Apple operating systems.
Program Requirements
Students with a bachelor’s or master’s degree unrelated to architecture must complete a seven- or eight-semester sequence of course work and accumulate a minimum of 114 semester hours of credit. Advanced standing will be given to students who have completed a non-NAAB-accredited professional architecture degree in another country, and who wish to obtain the NAAB-accredited degree from this College. These students will work with the chair of the department to develop an individualized plan of study commensurate with their previous degrees and experience, and will have to complete at least 30 hours of credit in residence within the College of Architecture and Planning.


Landscape Architecture / 55
Course Sequence
THIRD YEAR
The M.Arch program is divided into five major components: design studies,
45 credit hours; cultural studies, 12 credit hours; technology studies, 18 credit hours; professional studies, 6 credit hours; and electives! 33 credit hours.
A wide array of electives in these areas allows students to tailor their graduate studies to their own interests.
FIRST YEAR
Fall Semester (15 credit hours)
ARCH 5110-6. ARCH 5111-3. ARCH 5210-3.
ARCH 5310-3.
Design Studio I Design Seminar I Introduction to Architecture Introduction to Building Technology
Spring Semester (18 credit hours) ARCH 5120-4. Design Studio II
ARCH 5121-2. ARCH 5220-3. ARCH 5240-3. ARCH 5320-3.
Elective-3.*
SECOND YEAR
Design Seminar II History of Architecture I Human Factors in Design Building Construction and Methods
Fall Semester (18 credit hours) ARCH 5130-4. Design Studio III
ARCH 5131-2.
ARCH 5230-3.
ARCH 5330-3.
LA 6632-3.
Elective-3.*
Spring Semester (18 credit hours)
Design Seminar III History of Architecture II Environmental Control Systems I Site Planning
Design Studio IV Design Seminar IV Environmental Control Systems II Structures I Professional Practice
ARCH 5140-4.
ARCH 5141-2.
ARCH 5340-3.
ARCH 5350-3.
ARCH 5410-3.
Elective-3.*
Summer Semester (12 credit hours)
ARCH 6150-4. ARCH 6151-2. Electives-6.*
Advanced Design Studio**
Advanced Design Seminar
Fall Semester (18 credit hours)
ARCH 5360-3. Structures II
ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio
ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design
Seminar
Electives-9.* or ARCH 6950-6. Thesis Preparation and Electives-3.
Spring Semester (15 credit hours)
ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio
ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design
Seminar
Electives-9.*
or:
ARCH 6951-6. Thesis
Electives-9.*
* Students must take 9 elective credits in cultural studies, 9 elective credits in professional studies, 6 elective credits in technology studies, and 9 elective credits in any architecturally related electives on campus.
**Some students may opt for a travel abroad program. To count for the studio requirement, a course taken abroad must be approved as a studio substitution.
MASTER OF URBAN DESIGN
The Master of Urban Design is a research-oriented, advanced degree program in which students explore issues in urban design. The program makes full use of its setting in the heart of downtown Denver, using the city as the laboratory for many of its projects. There are two plans of study: a 30-credit-hour program for students who have received a five- or six-year professional degree in architecture; and a 60-credit-hour program for students who hold a pre-professional design degree.
Course Sequence (30-hour M.U.D. for students with a pre-professional design degree)
Students applying for admission to the 30-credit-hour program may enter in any semester of the academic year. Students in this option must complete 12 credit hours working on a degree project, and 15 credit hours in required and/or recommended course work in urban design.
The remaining 3 credit hours are elective course work. The typical sequence of course work is:
SEMESTER ONE
Degree project proposal 6 credits Urban design course work 9 credits SEMESTER TWO
Degree project research 6 credits Urban design course work 6 credits Elective course work 3 credits
Course Sequence (60-hour M.U.D. for students without a professional architecture degree)
Students applying to the 60-credit-hour program may also enter in any semester of the academic year. Students in this option must complete 12 credit hours in designated design courses, 9 credit hours in designated history and theory courses,
12 credit hours working on a degree project, and 15 credit hours in required and/or recommended course work in urban design. The remaining 12 semester credit hours are elective course work.
The typical sequence of course work is:
SEMESTER ONE
Design studio 6 credits
History/theory courses 6 credits
SEMESTER TWO
Design studio 6 credits
History/theory courses 3 credits
Elective courses 3 credits
SEMESTER THREE
Degree project proposal 3 credits
Urban design courses 9 credits
SEMESTER FOUR
Degree project research 3 credits
Urban design courses 6 credits
Elective courses 3 credits
SEMESTER FIVE
Degree project 6 credits
Elective course work 6 credits
Landscape Architecture
Program Director Gene Bressler Telephone: 303-556-3382
The mission of the landscape architecture program is to advance the profession and discipline of landscape architecture through design education, research and creative work, and service. CU-Denver’s strategic location in Denver, Colorado, a transitional place between mountains and plains that includes urban and non-urban settings and spans past into future timeframes, provides opportunities to define and engage compelling issues of the landscape at their forefront.


56 / College of Architecture and Planning
The program’s philosophy, embodied in its faculty and students, is to challenge the status quo of landscape architecture. Building upon and questioning accepted solutions for the profession’s future, faculty and students frame questions and discover answers in ways that promote inventiveness in the classroom as well as in the field.
Inquiry, both individually and collectively, is viewed as the means to invent, energize, inform, and evaluate design ideas, processes, and results.
The curriculum emphasizes and values design and the design process as the vehicle for studying landscape architecture. Regional, civic, neighborhood, and site-specific issues are explored to demonstrate and apply design concepts, methods, and skills uniting natural and cultural systems with built form. The curriculum prepares students for the rigor of professional practice as it is presently known. It provides the tools, depth, and energy enabling students to evolve and redefine the profession in order to more successfully and responsively advance the knowledge and capability of the profession.
The sequence of courses is intended to present material in a pedagogically logical manner. The curriculum consists of sequential and integrated design studios, core lecture and seminar courses, and elective opportunities, including a professional internship. Students develop capabilities in design within studio courses. Core themes, theories, precedents, technologies, and skills of the profession are developed in the lecture and seminar courses. Curriculum integration is achieved through deliberate coordination efforts with other programs within the College of Architecture and Planning as well as other CU-Denver colleges and schools. The curriculum provides opportunities to facilitate the offering and testing of new courses, and to respond to timely interests of faculty and students.
The objectives of the landscape architecture program are:
1) To develop excellence in the design process and design. Particular emphasis is given to exploring the strategies, methods, and skills necessary to study, synthesize, experiment with, make and evaluate design precedents, landscape design, and design processes;
2) To learn and develop core themes of the profession that include landscape architectural theory and precedent, technologies and materials, natural and cultural systems, and communications
and inquiry media. Particular emphasis is placed on studying the means to develop one’s ideas, to convey one’s values and to criticize one’s work;
3) To provide a working knowledge of the institutional framework within which the design process occurs. Particular emphasis is placed on building a strong understanding of and the skills required in professional practice, including management, leadership, marketing, ethical conduct, and legal issues; and
4) To engage service in ways that apply and extend course work, research, and creative works to real world situations. Particular emphasis is placed on participating with and involving others in opportunities to implement, enhance, demonstrate, communicate, and evaluate ideas and skills, and that provide measurable benefits. Professional practitioners, representing
regionally, nationally, and internationally recognized consulting firms and governmental agencies, teach courses, participate in reviews, host internships and office visits, give presentations and exhibit their works, mentor students and faculty, and share in the life of the program.
Successful graduates are pursuing diverse practices in public and private arenas, and continue making positive differences in the quality of our environment. The landscape architecture program values and welcomes colleagues who are eager to learn, generate and develop ideas, and arrive at critical judgements about the worth of those ideas.
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (M.L.A.)
Boulder Campus-or completing an undergraduate design degree at another institution-are given advanced standing in the three-year program and must complete at least 65 semester hours of credit.
The advanced professional degree program, for qualified students having already earned a first professional degree in landscape architecture or related discipline, requires 48 credit hours. Advanced standing may be commensurate with prior academic accomplishment.
Course Sequence (90-credit M.L.A. for students without a professional degree in landscape architecture or related profession.)
The curriculum consists of core and elective course work. Core courses are grouped into six components: design studies, 36 credit hours; history and theory, 12 credit hours including 3 elective credit hours; landscape architectural technology, 14 credit hours including 3 elective credit hours; plants,
6 credit hours; media, 4 credit hours; and professional practice, 3 credit hours, totaling 75 credit hours. The remaining semester credit hours are for additional elective courses.
FIRST YEAR
Fall Semester-16 credit hours
ARCH 5210-3. LA 5500-6.
LA 5510-4.
LA 5572-3.
Introduction to Architecture Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio 1 Elements of Design Expression and Presentation I Landscape Ecology
Spring Semester-15 credit hours
Prerequisites
Students are expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy.
Program requirements
The landscape architecture program offers professional and advanced professional graduate degree curricula leading to the degree Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A). The professional degree program, requiring a six-semester sequence of course work totaling 90 credit hours, is fully accredited by the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB) and recognized by the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA). Students completing the College’s Bachelor of Environmental Design on the
LA 5501-6. Introduction to
Landscape Architectural Design Studio II
LA 5521-3. History of Landscape
Architecture LA 6632-3. Site Planning
Elective-3.
SECOND YEAR
Fall Semester-16 credit hours
LA 5532-4. Landscape Technology I
LA 6600-6. Landscape Architectural
Design Studio III LA 6670-3. Plants in Design
Elective-3.


Landscape Architecture / 57
Spring Semester-16 credit hours
LA 6601-6. Landscape Architectural
Design Studio IV
LA 6620-3. Landscape Architectural
Theory and Criticism LA 6631-4. Landscape Technology II
Elective-3.
THIRD YEAR
Fall Semester-15 credit hours
LA 6700-6. Advanced Landscape
Architectural Design Studio V
LA 6750-3. Professional Practice
Electives-6.
Spring Semester-12 credit hours
LA 6701-6. Advanced Landscape
Architectural Design Studio VI
EIectives-6.
Course Sequence (48-hour M.L.A. for students with a professional degree in landscape architecture or related disciplines.)
This route requires 48 credit hours and typically two years of full-time study. The core curriculum consists of two groups: design, 30 credit hours; history and theory, 12 credit hours, for a total of 42 credit hours; plus 6 credit hours of electives.
Students may pursue one or more concentrations within the required 21 elective hours, of which 15 are non-group related. Students are encouraged to consult with their assigned faculty advisor or other mentors as they make their decisions. (Note: six elective credit hours are to fulfill requirements in each of landscape architectural technologies and history and theory group.)
Urban Design
Denver, the surrounding metropolitan areas, and the newly emerging urban areas within the greater region provide limitless issues, topics and situations fueling interests in urban design. The field of urban design is complex and crosses many disciplines including architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, real estate development, law, engineering, and the social sciences. Students interested in this concentration ctre urged to seek and enroll in courses that provide:
• An analytical understanding of the urban/built environment
• The understanding and skills from which to develop, synthesize, create, and test responsive implementation strategies
Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to:
Concentration areas
The curriculum delivers required courses that enable students to learn and develop core themes of the profession inclusive of LAAB standards with emphasis placed on studying the means to develop one’s ideas, to convey one’s values, and to criticize one’s work. In addition, the curriculum offers four concentration areas from which to choose elective courses offered by the program and other units within the College and University in order to explore advanced topics, challenge normative paradigms, and develop new knowledge and capabilities. Majors from other areas are invited to enroll in landscape architecture electives.
The four areas of concentration Eire: Urban Design
Advanced Landscape Technologies Landscape Planning History, Theory, and Criticism These broadly defined areas of concentration reflect topics and issues related to the program’s location and context in Denver and its larger metropolitan Emd regionEil contexts. They also reflect faculty interests Emd resources available from within the College, University, and area.
CE 5622-3. LA 6686-3. LA 6930-3.
SOC 4230-3. UD 6620-3. UD 6621-3. UD 6686-3.
URP 5520-3. URP 6633-3. URP 6634-3.
URP 6635-3.
URP 6665-3. URP 6670-3.
URP 6676-3.
Urban Transportation Planning
Special Topics: Open Space in Urban Design Landscape Architecture Internship (requires pre-approval by advisor/director)
City and Region Architecture of the City The City as an Artifact Special Topics in Urban Design Urban SpatiEil Analysis Urban Form Theory Preservation Theory and Practice History of American City Building Urbsm Market Analysis Urban Economic Development Urbsm Housing
Advanced Landscape Technologies
Many students will work within any variety of venues involving built works. Familiarity, competence, smd interest in learning, using, evaluating, and developing existing and new technologies is compelling. These technologies include: computer applications, design-build/learn
by building, materials, and construction processes. Students interested in expanding their knowledge, skills, and future applications of technologies are encouraged to seek and enroll in courses that provide them with:
• Significant exposure and facility with applied technologies
• Appreciation for the value, strengths, weaknesses, and potential of the technologies to develop, implement, and evaluate their design works
Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to:
ARCH 5310-3.
ARCH 6390-3.
ARCH 6410-3. ARCH 6411-3.
LA 6641-3.
LA 6686-3.
LA 6686-3.
LA 6930-3. URP 6612-3.
Introduction to Building Technology
Special Topics in Technology Computer Graphics Computer Applications in Practice
Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture Special Topics: Advanced Landscape Architectural Technologies Special Topics: Computer Applications (VARIES) Landscape Architecture Internship GIS for Planners
Landscape Planning
Landscape planning is an area in which landscape architects play an increasing and vital role, particulEirly in this region, resulting from pressures to develop non-urbanized or undeveloped lands and to develop and manage public lands. Study within this concentration area addresses development and advancing knowledge Emd capability of the profession in: Ecological systems Urbsm and regional growth Land use
Real estate development and finance Environmental impact assessment Planning and development processes
Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but sire not limited to:
LA 6622-3. LA 6641-3.
LA 6930-3.
URP 5530-3. URP 6612-3. URP 6640-3.
URP 6641-3.
Visusd Quality Analysis Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture Landscape Architecture Internship Planning Law GIS for Planners Community Development Process Socisil Planning


58 / College of Architecture and Planning
URP 6642-3.
URP 6650-3.
URP 6651-3.
URP 6652-3. URP 6653-3.
URP 6660-3.
URP 6661-3.
URP 6664-3. URP 6671-3.
URP 6673-3.
Neighborhood Planning Environmental Planning II
Environmental Impact
Assessment
Growth Management
Natural Resource
Management
and Planning
Real Estate Development
Process
Recil Estate Development Finance
Fiscal Impact Analysis Regional Economic Development Transportation Planning 1
History, Theory, and Criticism
Advanced study in history, theory, and criticism of design is fundamental to the landscape architect’s knowledge of the built environment, the intellectual forces that create it, and the theoretical construct of historic precedents in design influencing decisions.
Advancing knowledge and capability of the profession in this area of concentration is compelling and serves:
• To better inform designers eager to learn, generate, and develop ideas, and arrive at critical judgements about the worth of these ideas
• To enhance and inform one’s perspective in a context of economic boom where new development is flourishing Courses available to landscape
architecture students include, but are not limited to:
LA 6686-3. Special Topic: Landscape Architect History
LA 6686-3. Special Topic: Modernism in Landscape Architecture
LA 6686-3. Special Topic: Architecture and the Landscape-Exploration in Boundary
LA 6686-3. Special Topic: Contemporary Theories and Criticism of Landscape Architecture
LA 6686-3. Special Topic: Representations of Landscape Architecture
LA 6686-3. Open Space in Urban Design
LA 6930-3. Landscape Architecture Internship
ARCH 5230-3. History of Architecture II
ARCH 6161-3. Precedents in Architecture
ARCH 6210-3. ARCH 6212-3. ARCH 6220-3. ARCH 6221-3. ARCH 6910-3.
History of American
Architecture
History of Modern
Architecture
History of Architectural
Theory
Post-Structuralist Architecture Teaching Assistantship
Urban and Regional Planning
Chair, Department of Planning
and Design: Raymond G. Studer Head, Graduate Program in Urban and
Regional Planning: Thomas Clark Telephone: 303- 556-3382
Urban and regional planners in the United States and other countries seek to identify social needs and environmental capacities, anticipate change and its impact on communities, shape the pattern of human settlements, provide essential infrastructure, maintain viable economies, and achieve and preserve sustainable communities that are suitably fit to their natural surroundings. Study in planning considers how social needs are legitimated, knowledge about communities and regions is compiled and analyzed, possible courses of action are evaluated, plans are formulated, implementation is transacted through the means of education, investment, negotiation and regulation, and how plans’ consequences are tracked over time.
These tasks require a high order of ability: to amass and manipulate information, to represent and model essential phenomena and processes, to simulate futures, and to judge outcomes having diverse dimensions. They also require the ability to portray and communicate key concepts, diagnoses, and actions, and to harness knowledge about all the key actors on the scene in order to understand their needs, motives, and possible responses to the public actions that plans provoke. Underlying these classes of abilities is a base of knowledge that easily overreaches the bounds of any one discipline.
Planners must understand theories regarding urban and regional process, concepts of presentation, communication and negotiation, technologies for the depiction and manipulation of spatial information, means by which to document, judge, and forecast change in urban systems, private economic motives and constraints, the behavioral inclinations of all the major classes of players on the urban scene, the mesh of laws that empower planning and govern private
action, and the broader political economy of regional systems.
Needless to say, the education of planners can only begin in the university. It must be a life-long pursuit, and planning programs, including this one, are becoming increasingly supportive of the continuing education needs of professionals. It is the intellectual excitement of this ongoing pursuit of knowledge that draws many to the field.
The Department of Planning and Design, along with the Department of Architecture, offers a Bachelor of Environmental Design (B.Envd.) degree on the Boulder campus. The Department of Planning and Design also offers the Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) graduate degree on the Denver campus. The Master of Urban and Regional Planning is fully accredited by the National Planning Accreditation Board, and prepares students for professional careers in planning.
For further details on the B.Envd., see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog. Further details on the master’s program follow.
THE MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (M.U.R.P.)
Prerequisites
Students are expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy, and should be familiar with PC or Apple operating systems.
Program Requirements
The Master of Urban and Regional Planning is the College’s accredited degree for students intending to practice as planners. With no advanced standing, candidates for the M.U.R.P. degree must complete a minimum of 51 credit hours of graduate work, including all core courses (27 credit hours), a concentration (15 credit hours minimum), and additional electives (9 credit hours). Entering students who have engaged in the study or practice of planning elsewhere may petition the faculty during their initial semester to determine whether any credit will be awarded or degree requirements relaxed as a result of these prior activities. A maximum of 27 credits of course work can be applied for advanced standing.
Students who receive the College’s Bachelor of Environmental Design (B. Envd) degree on the Boulder campus and who have maintained a GPA of at least 3.0 will be admitted to the M.U.R.P. with advanced standing. These students can earn the M.U.R.P. degree after completing


Ph. D. in Design and Planning / 59
a minimum of 42 credit hours, which will include the core courses and an approved concentration. Students holding the College’s B. Envd degree who also completed the undergraduate planning option with a GPA of at least 3.0 (and with a grade of at least 3.0 in ENVD 4320, Planning Studio HI) will, in addition, receive a waiver with credit for URP 6630, Planning Studio I. These students will earn the MURP degree upon completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours, including 21 credit hours of core courses and all requirements for an approved concentration. The above conditions for advanced standing apply only to students who graduated from the College’s undergraduate program within the last five years. Those who graduated earlier may receive advanced standing at the discretion of the head of the graduate program in urban and regional planning, in consultation with program faculty.
Core Courses
URP 5501-3. Planning Issues and
Processes
URP 5510-3. Planning Methods I
URP 5511-3. Planning Methods II
URP 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis
URP 5530-3. Planning Law
URP 6630-6. Planning Studio I
URP 6631-6. Planning Studio II
A thesis option (URP 6950, Thesis Research and Programming, and URP 6951, Thesis) is available primarily for students who are interested in pursuing more advanced academic training in planning or related fields. Thesis work will substitute for Studio II.
Areas of Concentration
The concentrations and elective courses enable students to explore in depth an area of special interest. Students should, however, build on the expertise which they already possess. This can be done by either focusing on a related specialty, or by increased specialization in a previously acquired area of expertise. The program currently supports three official concentrations: (1) physical planning, (2) environmental planning, and (3) economic development planning. A set of “foundation courses” is identified in each concentration, plus additional electives.
Physical Planning Concentration:
Physical planning addresses the spatial arrangement of the environment, from the scale of the project to the scale of the region, and its fitness for human activities. Physical planners establish the policy and regulatory context for design
development, practicing as land use or comprehensive planners, or in specialties such as preservation, transportation or open space planning, real estate development, and urban design.
Environmental Planning Concentration: All urban and regional planning actions impact on the environment in some manner, and environmental planners must manage these impacts, both pro-actively and re-actively. The environmental planning concentration introduces planners to the policy and legislative issues surrounding the environmental implications of planning actions, as well as to methods for their assessment, control, and mitigation.
Economic Development Planning Concentration: Economic development aims to amass within communities and regions the resources-jobs, capital, tax base-needed to sustain or improve the quality of life and insure opportunities for all within the private economy, facilitated through appropriate public actions and services. Planners foster economic change as diagnosticians, strategists, and promoters; gauge growth’s effect in light of environmental capacities; manage its social benefits, mitigate its negative consequences, and fashion its imprint on the physical landscape of localities, regions, states, and nations. Students pursuing this concentration should seek as well to become conversant with the essentials of physical or environmental planning.
In addition to the three official concentrations, students have the choice of defining their own concentration. Students may also enroll in joint degree programs with public administration (M.P.A.-M.U.R.P.) and landscape architecture (M.L.A.-M.U.R.P). At this writing, dual degrees combining the M.U.R.P. Degree with the study of both law (JD) and business (M.B.A.) are being explored. Students may also take up to six credits of independent study, after first assembling a plan of study with one of the regular faculty. Up to three credits of internship may be applied to the 51-credit program.
Course Sequence
FIRST YEAR
Fall Semester (12 credit hours)
URP 5501-3. Planning Issues
and Processes
URP 5510-3. Planning Methods I
URP 5530-3. Planning Law
Elective-3 credits.
Spring Semester (12 credit hours)
URP 5511-3. Planning Methods II
URP 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis
URP 6630-6. Planning Studio 1
SECOND YEAR
Fall Semester (15 credit hours)
Concentration Courses-9 credits. Electives-6 credits.
Spring Semester (12 credit hours)
URP 6631-6. Planning Studio II
Concentration Courses-6 credits.
Inter-Departmental Program
Telephone: 303-492-7711
The Department of Architecture, the Department of Planning and Design, and the program in landscape architecture share the idea that the complex problems of the built environment are best addressed through collaboration among the various design and planning disciplines, and through developing bodies of knowledge about the built environment. To further these ends, the departments and program jointly offer the advanced research degree, the Ph.D. in Design and Planning.
Ph.D. in Design and Planning
Program Director Willem Van Vliet Telephone: 303-492-5015
The College’s interdisciplinary doctoral program examines the complex factors that help shape the planned and constructed environment. The program offers three areas of specialization:
1. Land Use and Environmental Planning and Design
Work in this area focuses on purposeful intervention in the physical environment, including mechanisms and procedures such as land use controls, design review processes and standards, and environmental policies. It also deals with the planning and design of housing, neighborhoods, cities, regions, and the interrelationships among residential, economic, recreational, and transportation systems.
2. Design and Planning Processes and Practices
Work in this area focuses on the theory and methods of planning and design and the development of models and tools to understand and support decision processes and design practices. This


60 / College of Architecture and Planning
area of specialization also includes the examination of practice-related issues such as the development of alternative and appropriate building technologies, energy-efficient designs, manufactured housing, and the design/build process.
3. History, Theory, and Criticism of
the Environment
Work in this area involves critical analysis of architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, and planning, and of the theories, processes, and policies that have regulated these fields. Whether focusing on contemporary or past environments, the aim is to understand and explain them in relation to individual and cultural values, and in their cultural and technological contexts.
PREREQUISITES
Applicants must hold at least a bachelor’s degree, although most will have also completed a master’s degree. Field specialization and background are open, and may include architecture, landscape architecture, architectural engineering, urban design, geography, urban economics, environmental law, urban sociology, real estate, management science, computer science, public administration, or environmental psychology.
A successful applicant will have an undergraduate grade-point average of at least 3.0 (out of a possible 4 points), and a graduate grade-point average of 3.5 or better.
If students do not hold a professional or a pre-professional degree in a design or planning field, they will have to completed hours of upper-level undergraduate course work in the College of Architecture and Planning. They will have to obtain in each of these courses a grade of B or higher. These courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor, and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program.
A student must have completed 12 hours in an undergraduate program in one of the following prerequisites. The one which applies will depend upon the student’s intended area of specialization. In exceptional cases, a student may complete this requirement by taking additional undergraduate courses and gaining a grade of B or higher in each course. The courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor, and are to be completed within two years of admission to the
program. They may count toward fulfilling the degree requirements.
• Social and Behavioral Sciences
• Environmental and Natural Sciences
• Engineering
• Humanities
A student must also have completed one of the following prerequisites. The one which applies will depend upon the student’s intended area of specialization. In exceptional cases, a student may complete this requirement by taking additional undergraduate courses and gaining a grade of B or higher in each of these courses. The courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor, and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program. They may count toward fulfilling the degree requirements.
• Statistics. Including probability theory, parametric and nonparametric methods, and acquaintance with basic multivariate techniques. A minimum of 3 hours.
• Mathematics. Including differential equations, finite mathematics, algor data structures, or other appropriate courses. A minimum of 3 hours.
• Language. Ability to read at least one foreign language relevant to the intended dissertation.
• Computer. Background in computer-aided design (CAD) or geographic information systems (GIS). A minimum of 3 hours.
The applicability of a student’s prior course work will be decided by the graduate studies committee upon review of a student’s transcript and additional materials. If the student does not have the requisite educational background, grade-point average, or GRE scores, the student may be admitted on a conditional or provisional basis, and additional course work may be required in accordance with Graduate School rules.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
The Ph.D. requires 76 credit hours. Up to 18 transfer credits may be approved for students admitted with a master’s degree. Students in the program will also have to meet the academic residency requirement, which requires six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor’s degree.
Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master’s degree from another institution of approved standing. However, at least four semesters of resident credit, two of which must
be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work taken at this University. Completion of the program therefore takes 3 or 4 years, depending on prior course work.
The Ph.D. program has five components: (1) Core Curriculum, (2) Research Specialization, (3) Minor Field of Study,
(4) Electives, and (5) Dissertation. The Core of ten hours consists of seminars and colloquia on the theories and research methods in the fields of design and planning. All students, no matter what their specialization, must take the core in the first two years of their residence.
For the Research Specialization, each student must take at least 12 hours of course work in one of the program’s three specialization areas; i.e., land use and environmental planning and design; design and planning processes and practices; and history, theory, and criticism of the built environment. One of the courses must be an advanced methods class. The Minor Field of Study provides students with a strong background that supports their chosen research emphasis. It requires completion of at least 12 hours of related course work that provides in-depth knowledge in a relevant area. Elective course work consists of 12 hours of additional study in areas related to the dissertation topic. For the research specialization, the minor field of study, and the electives, students develop an individualized course of study to reflect their specific foci and career aspirations. The required course work is determined jointly by the student, the faculty advisor, and committee members. The Dissertation requires 30 hours of course work. Students are expected to define a research question in planning and design, to identify the research strategy to be used for answering this question, to conduct the research, and to write up the project in the form of a dissertation.
A student is guided in this process by a dissertation advisor, and by the additional members who comprise the student’s dissertation committee.
EVALUATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS
Successful candidates for the Ph.D. in Design and Planning pass four points of evaluation: (1) Preliminary Exam,
(2) Comprehensive Exam, (3) Doctoral Dissertation, and (4) Final Exam. By the end of the first semester of residence, the student devises a degree plan which is approved by the graduate studies committee. A Preliminary Exam then evaluates the student’s initial progress


Ph. D. in Design and Planning / 61
through the program. The Comprehensive Exam is an examination based on papers prepared by the candidate which survey the literature of the field, and which set out a proposed dissertation. This exam takes place after two semesters of residency, and before the student becomes a candidate for the Ph.D. degree.
After advancement to candidacy, the student prepares a Doctoral Dissertation, which offers original research in the student’s chosen field. When the College’s dissertation committee approves the final dissertation submission, it conducts a Final Exam based on the student’s research. This exam is open to the public.
COURSE SEQUENCE
FIRST YEAR
Students develop their degree plan, take five semester hours of the required core curriculum, take additional courses in their specialty area, make up any prerequisite courses, and take the preliminary exam.
SECOND YEAR
Students take the remaining core courses, continue to take electives in their minor and specialty areas, begin literature surveys, and prepare for their comprehensive exam.
THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR
Students complete their literature surveys, prepare a dissertation proposal, and take the comprehensive exam. After completion of the comprehensive exam, the rest of the third and fourth years is spent researching and writing the dissertation. Once the dissertation has been accepted, students take the final exam.




College of Arts & Media
Dean: Mark Alan Heckler Associate Dean: Frank Jermance College Administrative Office: AR 176 Administrative Office Phone:
303-556-2279
College Advising Office: 303-556-8302
COLLEGE MISSION
The College of Arts & Media maintains that, by their power to illuminate ideas and move the human spirit, the arts are both an essential element of individual and social life and a means of knowing about one’s self and the world. The College is a conservator of culture where proficiencies in a chosen discipline Eire developed, artistic expression tmd experimentation are encouraged, and new technologies explored.
The College serves a student body of diverse interests and cultural backgrounds. In addition to students from the Denver metropolitan area, the College is an educational destination for nonresident, international, and trEmsfer students. Included in the student population are individuals seeking their first degree, older students considering a career change, and students of all ages who come for personal growth and enrichment.
In response to the complex needs of its student body, the College offers programs which emphasize excellence in visual and performing arts, preparation in commercial art applications, and multidisciplinary studies. Off-campus classes are offered at various metropolitEm locations, Eind international progrEims are available in conjunction with universities located around the world. Consistent with its commitment to be innovative and inclusive, the College uses distance-learning technologies to provide educational experiences for students whose personEil circumstances make access to the campus difficult.
The College of Arts & Media serves as a center for cultural and community activity by hosting symposia and workshops by recognized artists, critics, and historians, as well eis leaders in the fields of technology and commerce. The College acknowledges its social responsibilities
by establishing cooperative relationships with civic groups, regional arts agencies, museums, galleries, performance venues, area public schools and community colleges, professional societies, and the business community.
COLLEGE GOALS
1. The College of Arts & Media aims
to instill, inspire, and model creativity founded upon the accumulated knowledge of human civilization.
2. The College serves eis an intersection of art, technology, and commerce.
3. The College seeks to develop the artist committed to social responsibility and the citizen who will advocate for the role of the artist in society.
4. The College strives to become a center of cross-cultural exchange and understEmding.
5. The College works to enrich the quality of life in the larger community, to foster community partnerships, and to encourage mentorship.
6. The College aims to integrate interdisciplinary modes of learning and creating.
7. The College adapts to meet future needs of diverse student constituencies.
UNDERGRADUATE
PROGRAMS
Degree Programs
Students can earn baccalaureate degrees in the following Etreas:
Performing Arts Department:
Bachelor of Arts in Theatre Bachelor of Science in Music Emphasis in Performance Professional Studies Department: Bachelor of Fine Arts Emphasis in Multimedia Studies Emphasis in Film/Video Writing, Producing & Directing, Film/
Video Post Production, Cinematography/Videography Bachelor of Science in Music Emphasis in Scoring & Arranging Emphasis in Music Engineering Emphasis in Music Management Emphasis in Music Industry Studies
Visual Studies Department:
Bachelor of Arts Emphasis in Studio Arts Emphasis in Art History Bachelor of Fine Arts Emphasis in Drawing/Painting Emphasis in Photography Emphasis in Sculpture
MINOR PROGRAMS
Most CU-Denver departments have developed minor programs. A minor is not required for graduation. Students interested in completing a minor should contact the individual departments regarding requirements.
DOUBLE MAJORS
Students may graduate with more than one major by completing all requirements for each major.
SECOND DEGREES
Students who have been awarded a bachelor’s degree may be granted a second bachelor’s degree provided that (a) all general requirements for that degree have been met; (b) the major for the second bachelor’s degree is different from the major for the first; and (c) the College and major department residence requirements are satisfied. A second degree from the college requires a minimum of 30 additional semester hours of credit.
DOUBLE DEGREES
Students may earn two degrees in the College of Arts & Media or from two different schools or colleges of the University of Colorado at Denver simultEmeously by fulfilling all requirements for both degrees. Students must complete a minimum of 150 semester hours applied toward the two degrees.
Requirements for Admission
NEW FRESHMEN
Students planning to enter the College of Arts & Media must meet the requirements described in the Undergraduate Admissions section of this catsdog.


64 / College of Arts and Media
TRANSFER STUDENTS
Students who have attended another college or university are expected to meet general requirements for admission of transfer students as described in the Undergraduate Admissions section.
MUSIC AUDITION
All entering freshmen and transfer students applying for admission to music degree programs, with the exception of the Music Industry Studies program, must complete an audition. Contact the Department of Performing Arts, 303-556-2727, for information on scheduling an audition.
Academic Policies
Students are referred to the General Information section of this catalog for a description of academic policies that apply to all undergraduate students at CU-Denver. The policies which follow apply specifically to the College of Arts
& Media (CAM).
ACADEMIC ADVISING
As soon as students have determined a major, they should meet with a faculty advisor in their major department.
The faculty advisor will be responsible for advising and for certifying the completion of the major program for graduation. For each spring semester, a STOP is placed on registration for all majors in the College of Arts & Media. Students must see a major department advisor before they will be allowed to register.
The College also has a student advisor to assist students with meeting core requirements and general academic policies. To make an advising appointment, contact the College administrative office at 303-556-2279.
ACADEMIC PROBATION AND SCHOLASTIC SUSPENSION
Good academic standing in the College requires a cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 on all University of Colorado course work. Grades earned in another college or school within the University of Colorado system are used in determining the student’s scholastic standing and progress toward the degree. Grades earned outside the University of Colorado system are not used in calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado.
Academic Probation
Students whose cumulative grade-point average falls below a 2.0 at the end of an academic term will be placed on academic probation. Students are informed in writing of scholastic probation. Students on academic probation will be required to achieve a minimum 2.2 grade-point average each semester until their cumulative grade-point average is at least a 2.0, at which time students will be removed from probation.
There is no restriction on the length of time a student can remain in a probation status; however, students must achieve a minimum 2.0 cumulative CU GPA to meet graduation requirements.
Scholastic Suspension
Students on academic probation who do not meet the 2.2 minimum required grade-point average in the succeeding semester will be suspended from the College. Students are informed in writing of scholastic suspension.
A student’s suspension status is permanently indicated on the official University of Colorado transcript, and registration restrictions are imposed.
First Suspension
Students who first fail to meet the academic conditions of probation are placed on first suspension for one calendar year. Students on first suspension may only register for CU-Denver courses offered through the Extended Studies program or during the summer semester.
A student under first suspension may be readmitted before the end of the normal suspension period only if the student has demonstrated academic improvement in one of the following ways:
1. raise the cumulative CU GPA to a minimum of 2.0;
2. achieve a minimum semester GPA of 2.5 with a minimum of 6 semester hours of University of Colorado course work; or
3. attend another college/university and raise to a minimum 2.0 the combination of cumulative CU GPA and cumulative GPA from another institution. Students are removed from first suspension after one year upon written request to the CAM Academic Affairs Committee.
Second Suspension
Students who fail to meet the conditions of continued probation for a second time or fail to meet the semester GPA requirements while on first suspension are placed on second suspension for an indefinite period of time.
Students on second suspension may be readmitted to the College only by petition to the CAM Academic Affairs Committee. Students will not be considered for readmission unless they have demonstrated improved academic performance at a college/university level.
PETITIONING FOR EXCEPTIONS TO ACADEMIC POLICY
The CAM Academic Affairs Committee is responsible for the administration of the academic policies of the College as established by the faculty. The committee is empowered to grant exceptions to the academic policies of the College. Students wishing to petition an exception to academic policy should submit a letter of request to the Dean’s Office.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
Students who are juniors, seniors or graduates may register for independent study with the written approval of the appropriate faculty member and associate dean. The amount of credit to be given for an independent study project shall be determined at the time of registration.
A maximum of 12 credits in independent study may apply toward the bachelor’s degree.
INTERNSHIPS/COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
Students seeking academic credit from employment experience should consult The Career Center section of this catalog.
Undergraduates must have attained junior standing and have a minimum 2.75 GPA. A maximum of three hours of internship credit per semester and nine hours overall is allowed.
GRADUATION
REQUIREMENTS
General Requirements
1. A minimum of 120 semester hours passed
2. A minimum 2.0 cumulative grade-point average
3. A minimum of 45 semester hours of upper division work for all B.A. and B.F.A. degrees
4. A minimum of 30 semester hours with letter grades at CU-Denver
5. Fulfillment of all College and major requirements.


Graduation Requirements / 65
Core Curriculum
I. INTELLECTUAL COMPETENCIES
Competency is satisfied by a letter grade of C (2.0) or higher.
A.English Composition/Oral Communication-9 credit hours
One course from each of the three sections below:
1. ENGL 1020-3.
2. ENGL 2030-3. CMMU/ENGL/ TC 3154-3. ENGL 3170-3.
3. CMMU 2050-3.
CMMU 2101-3.
ENGL 2030-3. ENGL 2154-3.
ENGL 3084-3.
ENGL 3154-3. ENGL 3170-3. ENGL 4190-3.
Core Composition 1 Core Composition II
Technical Writing Business Writing Business and Professional Speaking Presentational Speaking
Core Composition II Introduction to Creative Writing Advanced Composition Technical Writing Business Writing Special Topics: Rhetoric/Writing
B.Mathematics-3 credit hours
Any CU-Denver mathematics course, with the exception of MATH 3040. Students who are not required to take mathematics as part of the major may consider:
MATH 1350-3. Computers in the Arts and Sciences
MATH 2000-3. Mathematics for the Liberal Arts
C.Foreign Language-third semester
proficiency, 0-13 credit hours
Students must demonstrate foreign language proficiency. This is accomplished through completion of third-semester-level course (2110 or equivalent) with a minimum grade of C (2.0), satisfactory proficiency testing, or completion of third-year (Level III) high school course with a minimum grade of C(2.0) or better. For additional information, see the Modern Languages section in this catalog.
Students pursuing a B.S. in Music are not required to fulfill the foreign language proficiency.
II. KNOWLEDGE AREAS
Arts & Media students are exempt from the Knowledge Area defined by their major. CU-Denver Knowledge Area core
courses are identified in each Schedule of Courses by a “D” prefix in the course title.
Students may not use independent study, cooperative education, internships, CLEP, or courses in their major to satisfy Knowledge Area requirements.
A.Natural and Physical Sciences, Mathematics-11 credit hours
3 credit hours from a course in ANTH (approved), BIOL, CHEM, ENVS, GEOL, PHYS or MATH (intellectual competency course excluded)
8 credit hours from the following laboratory core courses:
ANTH 1303-4.
BIOL 1550-4. BIOL 1560-4. CHEM 147X-4.
ENVS 1042-4.
GEOL 1072-4.
GEOL 1082-4.
PHYS 1000-4. PHYS 1052-4.
Intro, to Biological Anthropology Basic Biology I Basic Biology II Core Chemistry: (selected modules) Intro, to Environmental Sciences
Physical Geology: Surface Processes Physical Geology: Internal Processes Introduction to Physics General Astronomy I
B. Behavioral and Social Sciences-12 credit hours
6 credit hours in behavioral sciences 6 credit hours in social sciences
9 of 12 credit hours must come from the following combined behavioral sciences and social sciences core courses:
Behavioral Sciences
ANTH 2102-3. Culture and the Human Experience
CMMU 1011-3. Fundamentals of Communication
CMMU 1021-3. Fundamentals of Mass Communication PSY 1000-3. Introduction to Psychology 1
PSY 1005-3. Introduction to Psychology II
Social Sciences
ECON 2012-3.
ECON 2022-3.
GEOG1102-3.
GEOG 2202-3. PSC 1001-3.
Principles of Econ.: Macroeconomics Principles of Econ.: Microeconomics World Regional Geography Natural Hazards Introduction to Political Science: Quest For Freedom & Justice
P SC 1101-3. American Political System
SOC 1001-3. Introduction to Sociology SOC 2462-3. Introduction to Social Psychology
C. Humanities-6 credit hours
6 credit hours from the following core courses:
ENGL 1601-3. Telling Tales: Narrative Art in Literature and Film ENGL 2600-3. Great Works in British and American Literature GER1000-3. Germany and the Germans
HIST 1381-3. Paths to the Present I HIST 1382-3. Getting Here: Paths to the Present II PHIL 1012-3. Introduction to
Philosophy: Relationship of Individual to World PHIL 1020-3. Introduction to Ethics and Society: Person & Community
RUSS 1000-3. Russia and Russians:
Life, Culture and Arts RUSS 2000-3. Masterpieces of Russian Culture
D. Arts-3 credit hours
3 credit hours from a course in any discipline of arts other than the student’s major
E. Multicultural Diversity-3 credit hours
3 credit hours from the following core courses:
A course in the major department may be used.
ANTH 3142-3. Cultural Diversity in the Modern World
ANTH 4200-3. Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
CMMU 3271-3. Communication and Diversity
ECON 3100-3. Economics of Race & Gender
ENGL/
ETST 3794-3. Ethnic Diversity
in American Literature ENGR 3400-3. Technology and Culture ETST 3704-3. Culture, Racism,
& Alienation
FA 3110-3. Imaging and Identity HIST 3345-3. Immigration & Ethnicity in American History MGMT 4100-3. Managing Cultural Diversity
PHIL 3500-3. Ideology and Culture: Racism/Sexism


66 / College of Arts and Media
PMUS 3110-3. Social & Political Implications of American Music
PMUS 3111-3. American Voice
Revisited: Cultural Diversity or Social Identity?
P SC 3034-3. Race, Gender, Law,
& Public Policy
P SC 3035-3. Political Movements:
Race and Gender
PSY 4485-3. Psychology of Cultural Diversity
SOC 3020-3. Race and Ethnicity in U.S.
THTR 3611-3. Drama of Diversity
Major Requirements
In addition to completing the College core requirements, students must declare a major by the time they have accumulated 60 credit hours, and fulfill all requirements of the major department. Departments require that all course work in the major be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or above. A minimum of one-third of the required course work in the major must be completed at CU-Denver.
The department is responsible for determining when a student has successfully completed the major requirements and for certifying the completion to the Deem of the College.
Graduation Application
Students expecting to graduate are required to complete an Application for Diploma card by the census date (last day to drop and add) of the semester in which they intend to complete the degree. Diploma cards must be submitted to the College student advisor in AR176. Failure to file a Diploma Card with the College will result in delayed graduation.
Academic Honors
A student can be awarded honors based upon cumulative grade-point average at the time of graduation. To be eligible for honors, a student must have completed a minimum of 45 semester hours at the University of Colorado (on any CU campus). A GPA of 3.65 will receive cum laude, 3.75 magna cum laude, and 3.85 and above summa cum laude honors designations on degrees.
DEAN'S LIST
Following each fall and spring semester, the College publishes a Dean’s List honoring students who demonstrate high scholastic achievement. To earn a
place on the list, student must achieve a 3.75 grade-point average in all CU hours taken during the semester, with a minimum of 9 credit hours.
fields and then concentrate in one of the areas of focus.
THEATRE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT
Chain Kathryn Maes Office: AR 288
Phone: 303-556-2727
Faculty
Professors: Zoe Erisman, Mark Alan Heckler
Associate Professors: J. Brad Bowles, Laura Cuetara, Kathryn Maes,
Gregory Walker
Assistant Professors: Donna Bogard, Richard Finkelstein
Instructors: Carol Bloom, William Clark
The Department of Performing Arts prepares students to become leaders in the musical and theatrical arts within the context of a liberal arts education.
This unique program offers professional experience through laboratory and studio courses, concerts and productions, and fieldwork in the Denver area and throughout Colorado. Our graduates are prepared to expand their own career possibilities as responsible citizens of the arts.
The Department of Performing Arts offers courses in the disciplines of Theatre (THTR) and Performance Music (PMUS). Students wishing to study theatre may choose to earn the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre. Students wishing to study music performance may pursue the performance emphasis within the Bachelor of Science in Music.
Theatre
The Bachelor of Arts in Theatre is designed to train the diversified theatre artist-writer, director, performer, designer, teacher-and to provide opportunities for a broad range of production process and performance experiences in courses, laboratory workshops, full productions and field work in the Denver area. The goal of the theatre program is an understanding of the potential of the theatre as an expressive medium in the context of its culture and as a collaborative art form in relationship to literature, fine arts, and music.
There are three areas of focus: acting/ directing, design/technical, and integrated theatre. Each student is required to complete a comprehensive series of core courses in theatre and the allied
Theatre Core Courses Credit Hours
THTR 2530. Acting I ....................3
THTR 2610. Dramatic Literature Survey . 3
THTR 2712. Theatrical Design,
Aesthetics, and Prod. I..............4
THTR 2713. Theatrical Design,
Aesthetics, and Prod. II ............4
THTR 2820. Departmental Production .3
THTR 3540. Directing I..................3
THTR 3610. History of Theatre...........3
THTR 3820. Departmental Production . . . 3
THTR 3939. Internship...................2
THTR 4610. Drama Theory
and Criticism........................3
THTR 4999. Senior Project.............. 2
Total Semester Hours........... 33
OtherArts CreditHours
ENGL 3661. Shakespeare or
ENGL 4300. History of British Drama or
ENGL 4350. History of American
Drama.............................3
FA 1001. Introduction to Art.........3
PMUS 1001. Music Appreciation ...... 3
Total Semester Hours................ 9
Acting/Directing Focus Credit Hours
THTR 2520. Voice and Diction I ......2
THTR 2560. Topics in Theatre (Voice) ... 2
THTR 3520. Stage Movement I .........2
THTR 3530. Acting II ................3
THTR 4530. Acting III................3
THTR 4540. Directing II ............_3
Total Semester Hours............... 15
THTR 3521. Stage Movement II (2 credits) is also recommended
Design/Technical Focus Credit Hours THTR 3720. Advanced Lighting Design .. 4
THTR 3730. Scene Design..............4
THTR 4730. Advanced Scenic Design ... 4
THTR 4760. Topics in Design......... 3
Total Semester Hours............... 15
THTR 2740. Costume and Make-up Design (3 credits) is also recommended
Integrated Theatre Focus Credit Hours
THTR Electives*.................... 15
* The selection of these courses must be done in consultation with and approval of the student’s faculty advisor.
Total Semester Hours............... 15
Performance Music
Students gain performance skills in classical, jazz, commercial, and experimental music styles. The program


Programs of Study / 67
includes specialized courses in large and small performance ensembles, applied study, contemporary improvisation, and analysis, culminating in the presentation of a junior and senior recital. Students wishing to declare a major in the performance emphasis must audition for entry at the time of their Sophomore Proficiency Exam.
ENSEMBLES
All music majors enrolled in an applied music course are required to register for an ensemble. Non-music majors are invited to audition for any of the CU-Denver music ensembles. Each ensemble carries 1 semester hour of credit.
APPLIED MUSIC
All applied music courses are restricted to music majors, and minors (only upon completion of the entrance audition) enrolled in a minimum of 7 other credit hours. Students may only be enrolled in one applied music course in any given semester. Non-music majors must register for applied music studies through Extended Studies.
All students taking an applied music course must also register for an ensemble and PMUS 1500: General Recital. Students in applied music courses are also required to perform in a Performance Jury at the end of each semester of applied study and to pass a Sophomore Proficiency Examination at the end of their fourth semester of study.
All majors taking applied music must perform in a solo or solo with accompaniment capacity at least once a semester in a General Recital. General Recitals are scheduled throughout the semester.
FACILITIES FEE
All music majors are required to pay a $30 facilities fee at the time of registration. Non-music majors will be assessed a similar fee when registering for selected technical courses (see course descriptions).
PERFORMANCE MUSIC DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Required Courses
in Music Credit Hours
PMUS 1100. Music Theory I.............3
PMUS 1110. Ear Training/Sight Sing 1 . 1
PMUS 1200. Music Theory II............3
PMUS 1210. Ear Training/Sight Sing II. 1
PMUS 2100. Music Theory III...........3
PMUS 2110. Ear Training/Sight Sing III . . . . 1 PMUS 2200. Contemporary Styles.....3
PMUS 2830. History and Literature
of Music I ........................3
PMUS 2831. History and Literature
of Music II .......................3
Music History Elective................3
PMUS 1023. Piano Class (see note 1) ... 1-4
Applied Music (see note 2)............8
Ensembles ............................6
MUS 2700. The Music Business 1........3
MUS 2710. The Music Business II ......3
MUS 2540. Music Technology I..........3
MUS 2470. Music on the Personal
Computer ..........................3
PMUS 1500. General Recited
(4 semesters).................... 0
Total............................ 51-54
Credits in Area of Study ........ 28-29
Total Semester Hours Required 126-130 Note 1: Piano majors must take 3 semesters of PMUS 1033,
Piano Class for Piano Majors, in place of this requirement.
Note 2: Guitar majors are required to take 2 semesters of PMUS 1093/1094, Fingerboard Harmony/Melody Class, in addition to applied requirement.
Emphasis in Performance
PMUS 3283. Contemp. Improvisation .... 2
MUS 4060. Analysis I .................2
Applied Music Courses .............. 12
Ensemble Courses .....................2
Music Electives.......................7
MUS 4710. Research Project........... 2
Total .............................. 27
Vocal performance majors are also required to take two semesters of foreign language. This requirement is waived if student has taken three years of a language in high school or is able to pass a competency exam based on translating foreign language song texts.
PROFESSIONAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT
Chain Richard Weissman Office: AR 274 Phone: 303-556-4652
Faculty
Professor Roy A. Pritts Associate Professors: Kent Homchick, Frank J. Jermance, Richard Sanders, Richard Weissman Assistant Professor Frederic Lahey
The Department of Professional Studies combines studies in music technology, multimedia, scoring and arranging, music business, and film and video production in order to prepare students for the global
marketplace. Through partnerships with entrepreneurs, corporations, and non-profit organizations we aspire to a leading position in the region and nation in the planning and realization of current and future media.
The Department of Professional Studies offers courses in the disciplines of Music (MUS), Multimedia (MUME), and Film and Video (FILM). Students interested in studying music will pursue the Bachelor of Science in Music with areas of emphasis in Scoring and Arranging, Music Engineering, Music Management, or Music Industry Studies. (NOTE: See the Department of Performing Arts for information on the Music Performance degree emphasis).
Music
The music program at the University of Colorado at Denver is intended for students seeking preparation for professional careers in music related to music writing and performance, recording, broadcast business, and the entertainment industries. The four-year music program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music.
The specialized curricula offered by the program lead graduates to local, regional, and national positions in audio research, production companies, arts administration, and audio engineering, as well as graduate studies at leading universities and conservatories. Additionally, many graduates establish careers as owners of booking agencies, publishing companies, and recording studios.
All music applicants, except those entering the Music Industry Studies program, must pass an entrance audition before being accepted to the program. Contact the Department of Performing Arts for information on the music audition.
Scoring and Arranging: This emphasis consists of courses which focus on music writing in small and extended form in both classical and popular styles, analysis and counterpoint, as well as digital processing of musical information. The curriculum presents a blend of traditional knowledge together with practical application for the aspiring composer/arranger.
Music Engineering: This area of study addresses contemporary technology in studio recording, sound reinforcement, and electronic music. It is intended to develop skills for creative musicians, producers, and technicians, using both analog and digital technology.
Music Management: This program prepares graduates for careers in such fields


68 / College of Arts and Media
as artist management, music publishing, music merchandising, concert promotion, record production, and the development of skills relative to the rapidly expanding telecommunications industry.
Music Industry Studies: This program prepares the student to work in the music industry. Courses include a non-performance music core with selected classes in music business and music technology. It is intended to develop a broad range of skills in management, promotion, publishing, producing, and audio engineering.
FACILITIES FEE
All music majors are required to pay a $30 facilities fee each semester at the time of registration. Non-music majors will be assessed a facilities fee when registering for selected courses, as noted in the course descriptions.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR SCORING AND ARRANGING,
MUSIC MANAGEMENT, AND MUSIC ENGINEERING
Required Courses
in Music Credit Hours
PMUS 1100. Music Theory 1.............3
PMUS 1110. Ear Training/Sight Sing I .1
PMUS 1200. Music Theory II............3
PMUS 1210. Ear Training/Sight Sing II. 1
PMUS 2100. Music Theory HI............3
PMUS 2110. Ear Training/Sight Sing III . . . . 1
PMUS 2200. Contemporary Styles........3
PMUS 2830. History and Literature
of Music I ........................3
PMUS 2831. History and Literature
of Music II .......................3
Music History Elective................3
PMUS 1023. Piano Class (see note 1) ... 1-4
Applied Music (see note 2)............8
Ensembles ........................... 6
MUS 2700. The Music Business 1........3
MUS 2710. The Music Business II ......3
MUS 2540. Music Technology I..........3
MUS 2470. Music on the Personal
Computer ..........................3
PMUS 1500. General Recital
(4 semesters).................... 0
Total............................ 51-54
Credits in Area of Study ........ 28-29
Total Semester Hours Required 126-130 Note I: Piano majors must take 3 semesters of PMUS 1033,
Piano Class for Piano Majors, in place of this requirement.
Note 2: Guitar majors are required to take 2 semesters of PMUS 1093/1094, Fingerboard Harmony/Melody Class, in addition to applied requirement.
Emphasis in Scoring
andArranging CreditHours
MUS 2180. Intro to Scoring and Arr.l ..2
MUS 2190. Intro to Scoring and Arr. II.2
MUS 3200. Elementary Composition ....2
MUS 4200. Advanced Composition.........2
MUS 3030. Applied Scoring and Arr I .2
MUS 4030. Applied Scoring and Arr II .... 2
MUS 2560. Music Technology II........3
MUS 2520. Music Technology II Lab...... 1
Distributed Music Studies............8
Select from:
Digital Music Techniques Songwriting Analysis Orchestration
Sixteenth-Century Counterpoint Eighteenth-Century Counterpoint Applied Music
Music Electives....................._4
Total .............................. 28
Emphasis in Music Engineering
MUS 2560. Music Technology II........3
MUS 2520. Music Technology II Lab...1
MUS 3540. Recording Studio
Maint. & Calibration..............3
MUS 4510. Music Engr. I Lab......... 1
MUS 4550. Music Engineering 1........3
MUS 4570. Music Engineering II.......3
MUS 4530. Music Engr. II Lab........ 1
Music Electives......................5
Music Engineering Electives .........3
MUS 3670. Junior Project: Music Tech.... 3 MUS 4670. Senior Project: Music Tech.. 3 Total.............................. 29
Elective Studies in Music Management
MGMT1000. Intro, to Business.........3
MUS 4720. Music Management...........3
MUS 4730. Music Production...........3
MUS 4740. Music Business Analysis...3
MUS 3730. Music Industry
Financial Management..............3
MKTG 3000. Principles of Marketing..3
MUS 2560. Music Technology II........3
MUS 2520. Music Tech. II Lab ........1
Music Electives......................3
MUS 4700. Research Project.........._4
Total.............................. 29
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR MUSIC INDUSTRY STUDIES
PMUS 1010. Music Fundamentals........3
PMUS 1023. Piano Class...............1
or
PMUS 1093. Guitar Class............. 1
MUS 2300. Intro, to Songwriting .....3
PMUS 2831. History of Music II.......3
Music History Elective...............3
Music Distributed Studies............6
Music Electives......................6
MUS 2700. Music Business I...........3
MUS 2710. Music Business II .........3
MUS 2540. Music Technology I.........3
MUS 2560. Music Technology II........3
MUS 2520. Music Tech. II Lab ........1
Music Management or Music
Engineering Seminar...............3
MUS 3939. Internship ................2
Music Industry Elective Studies** .. 37
Total semester credit hours ....... 80
NOTE: Courses to fulfill the Music Industry Elective Studies are to be
selected from a list of approved classes, in conjunction with and the approved of a faculty advisor.
Multimedia Studies
The Multimedia Studies program is concerned with the history, conceptual process, artistic and intuitive design, technical proficiency, authoring environments, marketing, and legal aspects as applied to the creation of electronic media.
The Multimedia Studies program will appeal to the student who may not be inclined toward the traditional degree track, but wishes to gain and update specific skills in the production of electronic media; or to the student who wishes to attain a four-year undergraduate B.F.A. degree in multimedia featuring a strong core component in the liberal arts.
Certificate programs in multimedia studies which are designed to instruct individuals in a selection of specific skills can be established with local business environments. The program also offers a series of courses which culminates in a minor in multimedia studies.
The program of study is based on a foundation of five groupings of courses:
1. Courses which comprise a core of instruction within the liberal arts.
2. Courses which build a foundation in the visual and performing arts.
3. Courses in the usage of technology tools for the production of multimedia.
4. Courses which provide the student with rudimentary business marketing skills, business ethics, and a knowledge of current media law.
5. Courses in internship and portfolio presentation which seek to fine-tune a student’s professional marketability or to help prepare the student for application to select graduate schools. Admission: Incoming freshmen and
transfer students will not be given the chance to apply for recognition as a multi-media major until they have completed a successful assessment interview with the director of the program. All prospective majors must complete at least one multi-media core course (MUME prefix) prior


Programs of Study / 69
to application for major status, so that the faculty can determine if the student possesses the skills and work ethic expected of majors in the program. Acceptance into the Multimedia Studies program is not guaranteed, and is strongly dependent on demonstrated ability, evidence of personal motivation, the ability to create and work within a group dynamic, and a clear indication that the student is interested in assuming the responsibility for learning new techniques.
The range of transfer credits accepted for credit toward graduation will be determined upon review by the director of the Multimedia Studies program and the administrative advising assistant for the College of Arts & Media.
All students interested in applying for multimedia major status are encouraged to develop creative work which is of an electronic nature as well as in the traditional arts: photqgraphy, music, painting, video and film, drawing, painting, and sculpture.
Personal Technology: Students are not required to purchase their own personal computer although it is highly recommended that they do so. The purchase of any computer should take into account the speed, memory, and storage capacity required to effectively produce and view multimedia content. The choice of a specific computer operating platform need not be specifically limited to either the Macintosh or the Windows operating systems.
Academic Policies: All students majoring in multimedia must participate in a jury at the end of each academic year, at which time the faculty will assess and advise each student on all areas of their progress in the program. Faculty evaluation will result in one of three assessment outcomes: satisfactory progress, probation, or discontinuation in the program.
Each MUME major must take the “Trends In Multimedia” seminar course each semester unless: 1) they are completing their internship requirement, 2) they have taken the required seven-course sequence of "Trends” courses, or 3) by permission of their advisor.
All MUME majors must maintain a B (3.0) grade-point average in all MUME-specific courses. All MUME core courses must be completed with a grade of C+
(2.5) or better. Students falling below this standard will be subject to academic probation in the multimedia program and possible loss of major status.
Fees: Selected courses in multimedia will have materials fees assessed. These fees will vary by course. For more information, see Tuition and Fees under the General Information section of this catalog.
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS-MULTIMEDIA STUDIES CORE
PMUS 1001. Music Appreciation.......3
CMMU 1021. Fundamentals of
Mass Communication................3
FA 1100. Basic Drawing...............3
MUME 1100. Basics of Multimedia......3
MUME 1200. Multimedia Studio.........3
MUME 1500. Trends In Multimedia..... 1
MUME 1510. Trends In Multimedia .....1
MUME 1520. Trends In Multimedia......1
FA 2400. Visual Studies .............3
MUME 2410. Multimedia Project I-Programming and Interface Design . . . . 3
FA 2600. History of Art I (survey)...3
FA 2610. History of Art II (survey)..3
MUME 3410. Multimedia Project II-Digital Image Manipulation,
Graphic& Typography Design .......3
MUME 3420. Multimedia Project 111-
Digital Video& Audio .............3
MUME 3430. Multimedia Project IV-
Motion Graphics S 3D Creation.....3
MUME 3500. Trends In Multimedia..... 1
MUME 3510. Trends In Multimedia .....1
MUME 3520. Trends In Multimedia......1
MUME 3530. Trends In Multimedia......1
MUME 3939. *t Multimedia Internship .5 MUME 4410.* Multimedia Career
Project 1.........................3
MUME 4420.* Multimedia Career
Project II........................3
TC 4510. Usability Testing...........3
CMMU 4680. Communication, Law,
and Mass Media Public Policy......3
MUME 4999.* Senior Portfolio
Preparation...................... 3
Totcil ............................ 63
*These courses must be completed while in residence at CU-Denver.
tContact the Department of Professional Studies office in AR 274 for MUME course descriptions which do not appear in this catalog.
In addition to the required courses which comprise the multimedia core, majors need to complete a minimum of 10 credit hours of electives. Multimedia advisors will work in consultation with each student to determine the selection of elective courses which will most effectively compliment that student’s studies in multimedia. Some or all elective requirements may be satisfied after review of a student’s approved transfer credits.
Film/Video Studies
The Film/Video Studies program at the University of Colorado at Denver is intended for students seeking professional preparation for careers in film, video, and related industries. Program delivery is realized in a unique “2 + 2” offering with Red Rocks Community College through the Colorado Film Video Instructional studios (CFV1), located at the Higher Education Advanced Technology (HEAT) campus at the former Lowry Air Force base. The program is designed to award B.F.A. degrees with emphases in film/video writing, producing and directing, film/video post production, or cinematography/videography, and to supply advanced training to professionals already working in the film and video industries.
Upon completion of the B.F.A. course of study, students will be prepared for employment in the television, industrial video, educational video, and feature film production industries, or for entry into graduate study programs. Students may choose to focus their concentration on documentary or narrative styles while finding their own balance of technical and creative concerns. Employment opportunities lie in writing, producing, directing, production management, production design, camera, lighting, audio for film and video, audio post for film and video, post production graphics and animation, editing, and multimedia production and integration, as well as a host of business management opportunities in the cable, network, and film industries. As Denver is the world capital of the cable television industry, graduates may work locally or seek employment in the national or world markets.
The initial two years of film/video technology (Red Rocks, FVT) courses give students the fundamental understanding of technical, creative, and storytelling issues and exposure to disparate paths of study and future employment. The second two years of film and video (CU-Denver, FILM) provide students the opportunity to focus and hone their craft, find their own expressive “voice,” and to graduate with a professional quality “show reel” of work, production credits, and/or completed screenplays, teleplays, and project proposals.
Students may satisfy core requirements at the Auraria campus or other approved locations, while nearly all film and video classes are conducted at the CFVI studios facility at HEAT. This arrangement allows


70 / College of Arts and Media
for the maximization of equipment and facility resources available to the student by the Red Rocks/CU partnership. The CFVI facility includes a 17,000-square-foot primary building, the Avid Center at the $7 million all-digital ETTC building, and the 600-seat HEAT movie theater. Dormitory space is available to full-time film and video students at the HEAT Center campus at Lowry.
All students interested in applying for film and video major status must apply to the CFVI program director. Continued major status is subject to annual review.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS W/EMPHASIS IN FILM/VIDEO WRITING & DIRECTING
Red Rocks courses 1
FVT 105. Video Production I...........3
FVT 150. Development of Film
Expression ........................3
FVT 153. Intro, to Film Production....3
FVT 160. Video Post Production I......3
FVT 200. Video Production II..........3
FVT 206. Film/Video Lighting & Grip ..3
FVT 209. Production Management
Techniques.........................3
FVT 215. Video Post Production II ....3
FVT 220.16mm Production...............3
FVT 250. Introduction to Screenwriting .. 3 FVT 290. Understanding the
Actor’s Process .................. 3
Total ...................... 33 credits
CU-Denver courses
FILM 3100.t History of Narrative Film I. . . 3 FILM 3150-t History of Narrative Film II .. 3 FILM 3207.f Acting/Directing Workshop. 3
FILM 3270. Film/Video Production III.3
FILM 3275.t Film/Video Post
Production III .....................3
FILM 3400. Intermediate Screenwriting
for Feature Films...................3
FILM 4209.t Advanced Production
Management .........................3
FILM 4400. Advanced Screenwriting
for Feature Films...................3
FILM 4270.t Career Track: Film/Video
Production IV.......................3
FILM 4280.t Career Track: Film/Video
Post IV ............................3
FILM 4910.1 Film/Video Production
Internship .........................3
FILM Electives ..................... 0-6
FILM 4999.t Senior Portfolio
Preparation........................ 1
Total..................... 34-40 credits
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS W/EMPHASIS IN FILM/VIDEO POST PRODUCTION
Red Rocks courses f
FVT 105. Video Production 1...........3
FVT 150. Development of
Film Expression....................3
FVT 153. Intro, to Film Production...3
FVT 160. Video Post Production I.....3
FVT 200. Video Production II..........3
FVT 206. Sound for Film & Video.......3
FVT 215. Video Post Production II ....3
FVT 220.16mm Production...............3
FVT 254. Intro, to Digital Editing...3
GAT 120. Adobe Photoshop I............3
FVT 290. Advanced Digital Editing.... 3
Total ...................... 33credits
CU-Denver courses
FILM 3100.f History of Narrative Film I... 3 FILM 3150.1" History of Narrative Film II . 3
FILM 3270. Film/Video Production III.3
FILM 3275.t Film/Video Post
Production III ....................3
FILM 3350. Editing Aesthetics.........3
MUS 4505. Audio Sweetening ...........3
FILM 4270.1 Career Track:.............3
FILM 4280. j Career Track: Film/Video
Post IV ...........................3
FILM 4910.t Film/Video Production
Internship.........................3
FILM Electives.................... 6-12
FILM 4999.t Senior Portfolio
Preparation....................... 1
Total..................... 34-40 credits
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS W/EMPHASIS IN CINEMATOGRAPHY/ VIDEOGRAPHY
Red Rocks courses t
FVT 105. Video Production I..........3
FVT 150. Development of Film
Expression .......................3
FVT 153. Intro, to Film Production..3
FVT 160. Video Post Production I....3
FVT 200. Video Production II.........3
FVT 205. Camera Equipment
& Techniques .....................3
FVT 206. Film/Video Lighting & Grip .3
FVT 209. Production Management
Techniques........................3
FVT 215. Video Post Production II ...3
FVT 220.16mm Production..............3
FVT 290. Understanding the
Actor’s Process ................. 3
Total ...................... 33 credits
CU-Denver courses
FILM 3100.1" History of Narrative Film I... 3 FILM 3111. Shooting Action
& Physical Effects ................
FILM 3150.1 History of Narrative Film II ..
FA 3170. Color Photography I .......
FILM 3270. Film/Video Production III
FILM 3275-1" Film/Video Post
Production III ....................3
FILM 3300. Advanced Lighting
for Film & Video...................3
FILM 4209.t Advanced Production
Management ........................3
FILM 4270.1 Career Track: Film/
Video Production IV................3
FILM 4280.1 Career Track:.............3
FILM 4910.1 Film/Video Production
Internship.........................3
FILM Electives..................... 0-6
FILM 4999.1 Senior Portfolio
Preparation....................... 1
Total..................... 34-40 credits
1 Contact the Department of Professional Studies office in AR 274 for Red Rocks FVT courses and FILM course descriptions which do not appear in this catalog.
VISUAL ARTS DEPARTMENT
Chair: John Hull Office: AR 185 Phone: 303-556-4891
Faculty
Professors: John Hull, Ernest 0. Porps Associate Professor Lorre Hoffman Assistant Professors: Joann Brennan, Debra Goldman, Scott Massey,
Karen Mathews, James McElhinney Senior Instructor Bob Nauman Professors Emeritus: Jerry Johnson, Charles Moone
The Department of Visual Arts offers professional instruction in four interrelated areas of study: art history, drawing/ painting, photography, and sculpture.
The department provides an educational environment where artists and art historians of promise and motivation can explore the horizons of their own talents in the midst of intense critical dialogue. This dialogue is generated by their peers; by distinguished visiting artists, scholars, and critics; and by a faculty comprising artists and art historians of acknowledged accomplishment.
The primary educational experience for the student is centered on the knowledge and skills gained from rigorous and structured courses offered by the various
CO CO CO CO


Programs of Study / 71
areas of the visual arts department, as well as the rich academic offerings throughout the university. Each student is routinely exposed to many aesthetic or academic positions through encounters with faculty members and visitors.
The visual arts department’s efforts are devoted not only to the refinement of visual skills, but to the articulation and cultivation of the mind. Students must bring creative force and imagination to their own development, for these qualities cannot be taught-they can only be stimulated and appreciated.
Education in the visual arts encompasses a comprehensive knowledge of and direct experience with the various media of drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, and other forms. Supporting this enterprise is the development of an understanding of art theory, a knowledge of the methods and materials of art making, and examination of the diverse approach to examining the art object in history. Central to the practice of art history are critical writing and analysis.
A variety of opportunities are open to the visual arts major. The degree can be specific preparation for graduate study or a more general background for fields related to the arts, including arts administration, museum and gallery work, and art conservation. Internships are available for student majors with a number of organizations in the Denver area, and an Art Resource Center has been established in the department to serve as a clearinghouse for information about study abroad programs, jobs, and continuing education in the visual arts.
Graduating seniors1 receiving the B.F.A. degree are required to have a thesis show during their last semester of study. These exhibitions are scheduled in the fall and spring terms only.
Fine Arts
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FINE ARTS
Required Fine Arts Core Courses:
FA 1100. Basic Drawing................3
FA 1200. Basic Painting ..............3
FA 1500. Basic Sculpture..............3
FA 2150. Foundations in Photo I......3
FA 2400. Visual Studies .............3
FA 2600. History of Art I (survey)...3
FA 2610. History of Art II (survey). 3
Semester hours in Fine Arts Core.... 21
Emphasis in Studio Art:
FA 4800. Art Seminar.................3
Upper Division Art History Electives.6
Studio Art Electives............. 12-18
(12 credits must be upper division) Semester hours in Studio Art Emphasis .................... 21-27
Emphasis in Art History:
FA 4790. Methods in Art History.......3
FA 4650.19th Century Art .............3
FA 4660.20th Century Art .............3
FA 4690. Renaissance Art..............3
Elective credits in Art History 6-9
Elective credits in Art History
or Studio........................3-6
(9 of the above 9-15 elective hours must be upper division)
Semester hours in Art History Emphasis...................... 21-27
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS
Required Fine Arts Core Courses
FA 1100. Basic Drawing................3
FA 1200. Basic Painting ..............3
FA 1500. Basic Sculpture..............3
FA 2150. Foundations in Photo 1.......3
FA 2400. Visual Studies ..............3
FA 2600. History of Art I (survey)....3
FA 2610. History of Art II (survey)...3
FA 4800. Art Seminar..................3
FA 4950. BFA Thesis ................_1
Semester hours in Fine Arts Core... 25
Emphasis in Drawing:
FA 2000. Drawing II ..................3
FA 3000. Intermediate Drawing ........3
FA 3020. Intermediate Life Drawing....3
FA 4000. Advanced Drawing.............3
FA 4020. Advanced Life Drawing........3
Upper Division Art History electives..6
Upper Division Painting electives ....9
Art electives..................... 6-15
Semester hours in Drawing Emphasis......................... 36-45
Emphasis in Painting:
FA 2200. Painting II .................3
FA 3200. Intermediate Painting........3
FA 3210. Intermediate Painting........3
FA 4200. Advanced Painting............3
FA 4210. Advanced Painting............3
Upper Division Art History electives..6
Upper Division Drawing electives .....9
Art electives..................... 6-15
Semester hours in Painting Emphasis......................... 36-45
Emphasis in Photography:
FA 3190. Foundations in Photo II .....3
FA 4150. Intermediate Photography.....3
FA 4160. Concepts & Processes in Photo. 3
FA 4190. Advanced Photography I.......3
FA 4194. Advanced Photography II .....3
FA3180. Photo Criticism...............3
FA 3630. History of Photography ......3
Upper Division Art History electives..6
Upper Division Photo electives... 6-12
Art electives...................... 6-9
Semester hours in Photography Emphasis......................... 39-48
Emphasis in Sculpture:
FA 2500. Metal Sculpture and Casting .3
FA 3500. Intermediate Sculpture.......3
FA 3510. Intermediate Sculpture.......3
FA 4500. Advanced Sculpture...........3
FA 4510. Advanced Sculpture ..........3
Upper Division Art History electives..6
Upper Division Drawing electives .....9
Art electives..................... 6-15
Semester hours in Sculpture Emphasis......................... 36-45




College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Dean: Yash P. Gupta Associate Dean for Faculty:
Jean-Ciaude Bosch
Associate Dean for Academic Programs:
Marlene A. Smith Office: CU-Denver Building,
125014th Street, 2nd Floor Telephone: 303-556-5858 Fax: 303-556-5899
Program Director, Health Administration Program: Errol L. Biggs Director of Professional Development Programs: Ruth Crowley Web site: http://carbon.cudenver.edu/ public/business
FACULTY
Professor Emeritus: Gordon G. Barnewall (Marketing), H. Michael Hayes (Marketing and Strategic Management), William D. Murray (Information Systems).
Professors: Marcelle V. Arak (Finance), Heidi Boerstler (Health Administration), Jean-Claude Bosch (Finance), Peter G. Bryant (Management Science and Information Systems), Wayne F. Cascio (Management), Lawrence F. Cunningham (Marketing and Transportation), E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr. (Business Economics), Richard W. Foster (Finance and Health Administration), Yash P. Gupta (Management), Jahangir Karimi (Information Systems), Gary A. Kochenberger (Operations Management), James R. Morris (Finance), Dennis F. Murray (Accounting), Bruce R. Neumann (Accounting and Health Administration), Edward J. O’Connor (Management), John C. Ruhnka (Management and Business Law), Donald L. Stevens (Finance),
Dean G. Taylor (Finance), Raymond F. Zammuto (Management).
Associate Professors: Herman Aguinis (Management), Ajeyo Banerjee (Finance), Kenneth L. Bettenhausen (Management), Kang Rae Cho (Management and International Business), Edward J. Conry (Business Law and Ethics), Elizabeth S.
Cooperman (Finance), C. Marlena Fiol (Management), James H. Gerlach (Information Systems), Susan M.
Keaveney (Marketing), Feng Yang “Bob” Kuo (Information Systems), Michael Mannino (Information Systems),
Stuart Rosenstein (Finance), Manuel G. Serapio, Jr. (International Business and Management), Marlene A. Smith (Quantitative Methods), Naomi Soderstrom (Accounting), Clifford E. Young (Marketing).
Assistant Professors: Anol Bhattacherjee (Information Systems), Gary J. Colbert (Accounting), David A. Forlani (Marketing), Blair D. Gifford (Management and Health Administration), Michele L. Henney (Accounting), John Jacob (Accounting), Deborah L. Kellogg (Operations Management), Kathleen Knoll (Information Systems), Vicki R. Lane (Marketing), Linda G. Levy (Accounting), L. Ann Martin (Accounting), Sarah Kovoor Misra (Management), Madhavan Parthasarathy (Marketing), Steven Walczak (Information Systems).
Senior Instructors: Elizabeth S. Conner (Accounting), Charles M. Franks (Quantitative Methods), Gary L. Giese (Business Law and Management), Robert D. Hockenbury (Accounting), Lawrence F. Johnston (Finance), Paul J. Patinka (Management), Barbara A. Pelter (Finance), Marianne Plunkert (Finance), Eric J. Thompson (Information Systems), John Turner (Finance). Instructors: Errol L. Biggs (Health Administration), Michael D. Harper (Operations Management), Chen Ji (Finance), Charles A. Rice (Management), Gary R. Schornack (Marketing), Mary Lee Stansifer (Marketing), M. Catherine Volland (Management).
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain business community, the College of Business and Administration at the University of Colorado at Denver provides its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective, responsible business professionals. This level of excellence in higher education is achieved by bringing together nationally recognized faculty and highly motivated,
mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment.
CU-Denver’s College of Business is a “research institution,” and our faculty are nationally recognized for their contributions to scholarly research as well as for their teaching skills. Accordingly, our students have the opportunity to be on the leading edge of business management theory and practice.
Our class schedules and curriculum offer flexibility to meet the needs of full-and part-time students, with both day and evening classes. Whether they are experienced working professionals seeking advanced degrees, or preparing for new careers in the business world, students will gain the knowledge and perspective necessary to succeed in today’s challenging business environment.
CU-Denver’s College of Business can give students an edge over their competition.
College of Business and Administration Educational Goals
CU-Denver’s College of Business and Administration is committed to superb teaching, connecting theory to practice that focuses on:
• current and relevant knowledge and skills necessary for success in the highly competitive global business environment:
• experience in cooperative and team-based work skills;
• integrated professional and functional expertise; and
• sensitivity to cultural and ethnic diversity.
Our graduate programs serve both traditional and non-traditional students who have extensive work experience.
The M.B.A. serves the needs of students who desire a general management education. The professionally oriented M.S. degrees serve the needs of students who desire greater specialization, and particularly students who have already obtained an undergraduate business degree. Large segments of our graduate students will be drawn from national and international locales.


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Our undergraduate program, which also serves both traditional and non-traditional students, leads to a baccalaureate degree in business with a substantial liberal arts component. The program is closely linked, through articulation agreements, to lower-division programs offered by Colorado’s four-year and community colleges. The majority of undergraduates come from the Denver metropolitan area.
Key elements of our academic programs are the provision of quality career advising and placement services, and flexible schedules and programs to meet a wide range of student needs. We are committed to assisting our students’ efforts to pursue rewarding careers.
Faculty
Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about its teaching and research. Faculty members hold degrees from the nation’s leading business schools, including Berkeley, Harvard, Stanford, University of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania, UCLA, and Yale. Many of them also bring years of valuable experience in private industry. Their interdisciplinary expertise, academic achievements, scholarly research, and business experience provide students with a dynamic learning environment.
Students
Unlike the students at a traditional college campus, many of our students are adult, working professionals who maintain full-time employment. Their success and experience enrich class discussions and interactions among students. Although a high percentage attend evening classes, a significant number are full-time students attending classes offered during the day. Following the current national trend, women constitute about one-half of the student body. Since admission standards are among the highest in the region, the student body is unusually motivated and talented.
This rich mix of backgrounds, experience, and perspectives, when coupled with the strengths of our excellent faculty, fosters stimulating classroom interaction and keen competition among the students.
Accreditation
CU-Denver’s College of Business is one of the few schools in the state accredited by the International Association for Management Education (AACSB).
Business Week wrote recently, “Today, just having the degree isn’t as important as where you get it.... As corporations become sawier buyers of... talent, they are giving more weight to the AACSB seal... Accreditation shows that a Business School cares about the quality of its program.” In addition, CU-Denver’s accounting program has also received separate accreditation by AACSB. Prospective students should note that only two state-funded schools in Colorado have received such additional accreditation of their accounting programs.
In a similar manner, our program in health administration is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA). This agency ensures that health administration programs meet demanding requirements for quality education in the health administration area.
Entrepreneurship
The Richard H. and Pamela S. Bard Center for Entrepreneurship Development offers a three-course certificate program, internships, and accelerated courses designed to develop the kind of entrepreneurial skills required by businesses of all types. The program may be taken for college credit by degreeseeking graduate students. Additional courses beyond the three initial offerings provide further entrepreneurial problemsolving skills. These courses serve as graduate electives for business and nonbusiness students and appeal to those who desire to start a business, grow a business, become more entrepreneurial as a corporate manager, or apply entrepreneurial decision making within other disciplines. The Leadership Council is available for mentorship, and a venture capital fund will help graduates launch their own businesses. Anyone interested is invited to visit the Center, located on the Downtown Denver Mall in the Masonic Building, 535 16th Street, Suite 300; or call the Bard Center at 303-620-4050.
Professional Development
The College of Business offers credit, certificate, and non-credit public programs and in-house, customized training programs which provide a functional business education to Denver metropolitan area businesses and individuals. Experienced instructors teach a variety of high-quality, practical classes that are designed to meet the specific needs of business. For more information, contact
the Director of Professional Development, Ruth Crowley, at 303-556-5826 or fax to 303-556-5920.
Internships
Internships/Cooperative Education is a program designed to provide students with practical work experience in a business setting. This program allows students to put classroom education into use. The work experience gained through an internship can contribute to an individual’s success.
HOW INTERNSHIPS WORK
In partnership with the CU-Denver Center for Internships and Cooperative Education, the College of Business and Administration offers a selective program allowing students to receive a maximum of three semester hours of elective credit (undergraduate or graduate) for internships with participating organizations. Internships complement the academic program, and may lead to permanent career opportunities. Upon successful completion, a grade of P (Pass) is recorded.
Note: Business students are limited to completing a maximum of she semester hours of individualized instruction which includes independent study credits in combination with internship credits.
ELIGIBILITY FOR PLACEMENT
The general requirements for internships are as follows:
• Undergraduate students must be admitted to the College, be in good standing with at least a 3.2 cumulative GPA, and have completed at least
15 hours of the business core at CU-Denver.
• Graduate students must be admitted to the School, be in good standing with at least a 3.3 GPA, and have completed 21 semester hours of graduate work. Interested students should contact
the appropriate program director or the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education for further details about the program.
Scholarships and Financial Aid
Many programs for financial aid are administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Call 303-556-2886 for detailed information.
Thanks to the generous support of the Colorado business community and others, the College of Business has a significant number of scholarships to


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offer its students. Scholarships are awarded on the basis of merit and/or financial need. The amount of the award and the number of awards available vary. Scholarship monies are typically used to support all or some of a student's tuition and fees, although certain scholarships allow remaining scholarship funds to be spent at the student's discretion.
Thirty different scholarships are available to eligible College of Business students. Scholarships such as the Virginia T. Schuman and the Ford Motor Company Scholarships are open to all business students. Other scholarships are open to students in specific degree programs:
Undergraduate scholarships include the Board of Advisors, the College of Business Undergraduate Excellence, the Carolyn Lee Henderson, the Robert E. Moore Memorial, the College of Business Sustaining Student, the Dean’s Community Scholarships, and the Dean’s Scholarship for Undergraduate Business Students.
The MBA Outstanding Scholar Award is given to qualifying MBA students.
Accounting scholarships for both graduate and undergraduate accounting students include the Deloitte & Touche, Accounting Program, and Coopers & Lybrand Scholarships, as well as the Price Waterhouse Scholarship for undergraduate junior accounting majors only.
M.S. Finance scholarships are the M.S. Finance Fellows and the Carolyn Lee Henderson Scholarships (also open to eligible undergraduate finance students.)
M.S. Health Adminstration scholarships include the Abbott Fellows, AUPHA/ McGaw, CU-Denver M.S. Health Administration, Eugenie D. Sontag, Leland R.
Kaiser, Medical Group Management, and the M.S. Health Administration Alumni Scholarships:
M.S. Information Systems students may apply for the Dean's Scholarship in Information Systems.
The M.S. International Business Merit Scholarship is open to students in the CU-Denver M.S. International Business program.
M.S. Management dr Human Resources Management students may apply for the Excellence in Management Scholarship.
M.S. Marketing students may apply for the M.S. Marketing Sustaining Student,
M.S. in Marketing Fellows, and Robert E. Moore Memorial Scholarships (also open to undergraduate marketing students).
Finally, four scholarships are available to students who take courses in entrepreneurial studies at the Richard
H. and Pamela S. Bard Center for
Entrepreneurship Development. These are the Coulter Foundation Scholarship in Entrepreneurial Studies and Business, and the Dean’s Pursuit of Excellence, Mehalchin, and Rockies Venture Club Scholarships.
Further information about these scholarships, including eligibility criteria and application forms, may be obtained by visiting the College of Business website at http://carbon.cudenver.edu/public/ business/scholarships.html or by calling 303-556-5900.
Student Organizations
Opportunity for association with other College of Business and Administration students in varied activities intended to stimulate professional interest and to give recognition to scholastic attainment is provided by the following student organizations:
AABSA-African American Business Student Alliance
Beta Alpha Psi-national honorary scholastic fraternity in accounting Beta Gamma Sigma-national honorary scholastic fraternity in business CSPA-Colorado Society for Personnel Administration (student chapter) for students interested in personnel or industrial relations
The Robert E. Moore Collegiate Chapter of the American Marketing Association CU Venture Network-campus chapter of the Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs, open to all CU-Denver students
HASO-Health Administration Student Organization
IBSA-International Business Students Association-open to CU-Denver business students
ISA-Information Systems Association FMA-largest student chapter of the Financial Management Association, a national organization M.B.A./M.S. Association-University of Colorado at Denver association of master’s students in business Phi Chi Theta- national professional business and economics fraternity Sigma Iota Epsilon - professional and honorary management fraternity SAS-Society of Accounting Students USAB-Undergraduate Student Advisory Board
Study Abroad
Transfer credit from study abroad programs requires prior written approval from the undergraduate or graduate
programs directors. Students must meet with a business staff advisor to determine course acceptability prior to the semester in which they intend to study abroad. Information on the various programs is available at the Office of International Education.
Institute for International Business
The Institute for International Business (IIB) was created in 1988 by the Board of Regents of the University of Colorado to serve as a center for the advanced study and teaching of international business. In 1993, the Institute was designated a Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) by the U.S. Department of Education, one of only 25 such centers of excellence in the U.S. Through the CIBER and other funding sources, the Institute strives to help the faculties of the College of Business and other University departments in internationalizing curriculum, programs, certificates, or other student-oriented endeavors. The IIB works in other ways to support faculty in their teaching, research, and development activities. In addition, the Institute designs and facilitates customized international programs and training for business, cooperates with other organizations to offer seminars and conferences, and publishes a quarterly newsletter to familiarize the Denver and regional communities with international business issues. Such initiatives help faculty, students, and the business community to acquire the skills and expertise needed to be successful in our increasingly global economy. The Institute also conducts and promotes research on the global economic aspects of competitiveness.
Call 303-556-4738 for information.
GENERAL ACADEMIC POLICIES
Academic policies which apply to all CU-Denver students are described in the General Information section of this catalog. The policies outlined on the following pages are relevant for both undergraduate students in the College of Business and Administration and graduate students in the Graduate School of Business Administration. Individual policies appropriate only to undergraduate or graduate students are described under separate headings.
Each student is responsible for knowing and complying with the academic policies and regulations established for the


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College. The College cannot assume responsibility for problems resulting from a student’s failure to follow the policies stated in this catalog. Similarly, students are responsible for all deadlines, rules, and regulations stated in the Schedule of Courses.
Academic Ethics
Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and integrity. Cheating, plagiarism, illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations, alteration, forgery, or falsification of official records, and similar acts or any attempt to engage in such acts are grounds for suspension or expulsion from the University. Also, actions which disrupt the administrative process, such as misrepresentation of credentials or academic status, other forms of deception, or verbal abuse of College staff are grounds for suspension or probation. All reported acts of dishonesty must be referred to the College of Business Internal Affairs Committee.
In particular, students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act involving the offering of the work of someone else as the student’s own. It is recommended that students consult with the instructors as to the proper preparation of reports, papers, etc. in order to avoid this and similar offenses.
Admission to Business Classes
Enrollment in business classes is limited to students who have been admitted to business degree programs, and to other students as described in the separate undergraduate and graduate policy sections. The course registration criteria are designed to meet a number of objectives:
1. To assure access to business courses
for students seeking a business degree.
2. To serve students in other colleges
who have business-related education
objectives or requirements.
3. To serve non-degree students who have
specific career or education goals.
Please refer to the Schedule of Courses each term for course availability.
Attendance Regulations
Students are required to attend classes on a regular basis. Absences must be arranged with the instructor and must conform with university and instructor’s policies on attendance.
Prerequisites
Students are expected to know and fulfill all prerequisite requirements, including any prerequisite information when registering. The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who enroll without the correct prerequisites. Generally, students who are administratively dropped or withdrawn will not receive tuition refunds.
Course Numbering
The course numbering system used at the University of Colorado at Denver identifies the class standing required for enrollment. Students are expected to take 1000-level courses in their freshman year, 2000-level courses in their sophomore year, 3000-level courses in their junior year, and 4000-level courses in their senior year. Courses at the 5000 and 6000 level are restricted to graduate business students.
Adding Courses
Students may add classes to their original schedule through census date (first 12 days of the fall or spring semester, first 8 days of summer session). Instructor approval may be required to add a course after the first day/week of classes.
Dropping Courses
Students may drop a class through census date and it will not appear on the transcript. After census, a student who wishes to drop/passing must obtain written approval from both the instructor and Academic Dean. The course and a grade of IVwill appear on the transcript.
In order to drop/passing beyond the 10th week it will also be necessary to document circumstances beyond a student’s control. Any student who is failing a class will not be allowed to drop, and an /•'will be recorded on the transcript.
Withdrawal
See the General Information section of this catalog for University-wide withdrawal policies. Note that the College of Business normally requires instructors’ signatures on withdrawal forms before the Academic Dean’s approval is granted.
Administrative Drop
The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who are
incorrectly enrolled in business courses. Instructors also may recommend to the programs coordinator that students who fail to meet expected course attendance or course prerequisites be dropped from the course. Generally, students who are administratively dropped will not receive tuition refunds.
Appeal Procedure
Students should contact a staff advisor in the College of Business and Administration programs office for appeal and petition procedures pertaining to rules and regulations of the College.
General Grading Policies
Plus/Minus Grading. College of Business faculty have the option to use plus/minus grading.
Incomplete Grades. The only incomplete grade given in the College is IF. An IF grade is assigned only when documented circumstances clearly beyond the student’s control prevent completion of course requirements (exams, papers, etc.). Students must sign a contract outlining how they will make up the missing work with the instructor giving the IF. Students may not register for the class a second time. All IF grades must be made up within the contract period (which may not exceed one year), or the /Fwill automatically be changed to the grade of F.
Also, IF grades must be completed and recorded at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor concerning the removal of incomplete grades.
Grade Changes. Grades as reported by instructors are final. Grade changes will be considered only in cases of documented clerical errors or when a student is making up an incomplete grade (IF). All changes must be made within one year after the course has been taken, unless highly unusual circumstances can be documented and the change has been approved by the College. Normally, grade changes will not be considered for any circumstances after three years.
Pass-Fail or No Credit (Audit). With the exception of internships and independent studies, the College of Business does not permit election of pass-fail grading for any business course required for the degree. Only non-degree status students may petition to audit a business .class for a grade of NC (no credit).


Undergraduate Programs / 77
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
A carefully designed curriculum to prepare students for success in business administration is available for the student seeking either an undergraduate or graduate degree. The College offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration),
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), and the Master of Science (M.S.) degrees. The particular programs offered are:
Areas of Emphasis (B.S. in Business Administration)
Accounting
Finance
Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business Management Marketing
Graduate Programs
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) Master of Science in Accounting Master of Science in Finance Master of Science in Health Administration
Master of Science in Information Systems Master of Science in International Business Master of Science in Management and Organization
Master of Science in Marketing
A dual degree combination of the M.B.A. with any M.S. program may also be selected, as well as dual M.S. degrees in any two fields of business. The M.S. Finance/Economics dual degree is also available. Dual degrees of the M.B.A. and nursing, psychology, architecture, M.D., and urban planning can be pursued.
Executive Programs
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) for Executives Master of Science in Health Administration for Executives
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Associate Dean: Marlene A. Smith Program Director Clifford E. Young Program Coordinator Nancy A. Reed
The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree is intended to
help the student achieve the following general objectives:
1. An understanding of the activities that constitute a business enterprise and the principles underlying administration
of those activities.
2. The ability to think logically and analytically about the kind of complex problems encountered by management.
3. Facility in the arts of communication.
4. A comprehension of human relationships involved in an organization.
5. Awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in administrative positions.
6. Skill in the art of learning that will help the student continue self-education after leaving the campus.
Undergraduate Admissions
Telephone: 303-556-5800 Fax: 303-556-5904
ADMISSION OF FRESHMAN STUDENTS
Freshman applicants must have completed the college preparatory curriculum in high school, graduated in the top 25% of their high school class, and achieved a score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. See the General Information section of this catalog for further information on freshman admission.
ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS
Applicants who have completed work at other collegiate institutions should review the information on transfer students in the General Information section of this catalog. In addition to University policies, the College of Business and Administration evaluates course work to determine its appropriateness for the degree of Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Students who have completed more than 24 semester hours of transferable course work are evaluated for admission on the basis of their college grade-point average (GPA) without regard to their high school performance.
To be fully considered for admission to the College of Business and Administration, a transfer student must have a minimum cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale for all college course work attempted. Transfer applicants seeking priority admission must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for all work applicable to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree, and a 2.0 GPA in business courses. Students
with less than an overall 3.0 GPA will be considered if they have a 2.6 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work, a 2.0 GPA in business courses, and at least a 2.0 overall GPA in courses applying to the degree.
Transfer applicants who do not meet either of the priority admission standards iire pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA earned in the last 24 hours, if the GPA in the last 24 hours is at least 2.6. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available. For information about specific policies on transfer of credit, consult an undergraduate business staff advisor.
INTRA-UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
Students who want to transfer to the College of Business and Administration from another college or school of the University of Colorado at Denver must formally apply to the College of Business. Transfer deadlines are August 1 for fall semester, December 1 for spring semester, and May 1 for the summer session.
Students will be evaluated only on course work that applies to the business degree program. Generally, this will exclude course work of a technical or vocational nature and courses in activity PE and remedial subjects. Students who have completed at least 24 applicable semester hours will be evaluated on their college work; students with fewer than 24 transferable hours will be evaluated on the basis of both high school and college work.
Students will be considered for admission on either their overall GPA in applicable course work from CU and all previous institutions or on their last 24 hours. Applicants with less than a
2.0 GPA in business courses (from CU
or other institutions) and overall CU GPA of less than 2.0 will be denied admission even though they meet the minimum requirements for consideration.
Students will receive priority consideration for admission to the College of Business if they have an overall GPA of
3.0 or an overall GPA of 3.0 on their last 24 hours. All other applicants meeting the minimum requirements for admission as stated above will be pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA in the last 24 hours, if the GPA in the last 24 hours is at least 2.6. Pooled applicants will be offered admission as space is available.
To apply for an intra-university transfer, students must submit an Intra-University Transfer form and the CU-Denver transcripts to a business staff advisor. Transfer forms are available at CU-Denver


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Office of Admissions or the College of Business office; transcript request forms are available at the CU-Denver Records Office. The transcript must include the student’s most recent semester at the University. Students with previous course work from other institutions are also required to submit a copy of their transfer credit evaluations (advanced standings).
FORMER STUDENTS
A CU student from another campus, or a CU-Denver student who has not registered for three consecutive semesters (summers included), is considered a former student and must reapply for admission. Former CU-Denver business degree students will be automatically readmitted to the College for up to three years from the semester they last attended if they are in good standing (noton probation or suspension) in the College. Students who have not attended for more than three years, or who have completed the equivalent of 12 or more semester hours at another institution of higher education, must meet the admission and degree requirements applicable at the time they reapply.
OLD WORK POLICY
For students newly admitted to the College of Business and former business students readmitted to the College after an absence of three semesters, applicable credits up to five years old will be counted toward business degree requirements. Courses more than five years old will be evaluated individually for their current relevance to the degree program. Students may be required to update their knowledge by taking additional courses when past courses are outdated; in such cases, credit will be given for both courses. Generally, business courses more than ten years old will not apply toward degree credit.
SECOND UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE
Students may apply to the College of Business and Administration to earn a second undergraduate degree, provided the first undergraduate degree is in a field other than business. Persons who have already earned an undergraduate degree in business may not apply for a second undergraduate degree in business. Applications are available through the Office of Admissions.
If a student has an academic record that justifies consideration for a graduate program, that student is encouraged to apply for one of the Graduate School of Business Administration master’s degree programs. Call 303-556-5900 for information or refer to the Graduate Business Programs section of the catalog.
Students who are accepted for the second undergraduate degree will be required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a business degree. For example, if a student registered for a second degree has not had the required mathematics or general education courses, these must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses. Further, the basic business Courses (core courses) must be taken before a student begins to pursue the major field.
MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Students in other undergraduate schools and colleges at CU-Denver wishing to take a minor in business administration must have a 3.0 GPA to enter as a business minor, and must have a 2.0 GPA at the time of graduation to receive a minor in business. Prerequisites to the business minor are: ISMG 2000, MATH 1070 or a higher level math course, QUAN 2010 or a statistics class approved by the College of Business, and ECON 2022. Required courses for a business minor are MGMT 1000, ACCT 2200, BLAW 3000, MKTG 3000, FNCE 3100, and MGMT 3000. Twelve of these 18 hours: a) must be taken while in residence at CU-Denver, and b) after admission to the business minor program. If the student has already taken the equivalent of one or more of these courses, other higher level business courses may be substituted with College of Business approval. Up to six of the 18 required business courses may be taken at another institution. Transfer credit will be granted on the same basis that transfer credit is granted for courses taken by business majors.
DOUBLE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason, students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields. For additional information, contact an undergraduate business staff advisor at 303-556-5800.
Undergraduate Advising and Academic Planning
ADMISSIONS ADVISING
Persons not yet admitted to the College of Business can receive advising on course selection, admission requirements, and other matters from an undergraduate staff advisor. To make an appointment, call 303-556-5800.
ADMITTED STUDENTS
Upon admission to the College, students execute a Degree Plan which identifies the courses required to graduate. This plan contains all the information needed to select courses and monitor progress toward completion of requirements for the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Business students are expected to assume responsibility for their own advising. This includes scheduling courses each term, being familiar with all the policies and procedures of the College, and otherwise managing their own academic careers. Staff advisors are available to answer questions about unusual situations.
Career advising is available from business faculty and from the CU-Denver Career Center, 303-556-2250.
Undergraduate Core Curriculum-University of Colorado at Denver
The faculty of the College of Business Administration, College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have established a core curriculum for undergraduate students.
All undergraduate students who entered CU-Denver in Fall 1990 or later are required to complete the undergraduate core curriculum independent of their college or major. Undergraduate students admitted prior to Fall 1990 have a choice of either the new core curriculum or the requirements of their college in effect at the time of admission to the college.
The undergraduate core curriculum for CU-Denver is outlined in the following table, and the CU-Denver core requirements for business students are specified in the section labeled Business Program Requirements.
The undergraduate core curriculum seeks to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual competencies in mathematics and computation, writing, oral communication, information literacy, and critical thinking. It also


Undergraduate Programs / 79
requires all students to develop basic knowledge in the areas of natural and physical sciences, behavioral sciences, social sciences, humanities, and arts. Furthermore, the core curriculum promotes an awareness of cultural and racial diversity. The majority of the core curriculum is designed to be completed during a student’s freshman and sophomore years in order to provide the foundation for specific training in a student’s major discipline.
CU-Denver Undergraduate Core Curriculum for B.S. in Business
Specific requirements for the B.S. degree in Business are included in the catalog text.
Knowledge Areas a. Writing/Speech 9 hours
b. Mathematics 3 hours
c. Natural and Physical Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics) 8 hours
d. Behavioral Sciences AND Social Sciences (Psychology and Economics) 9 hours
e. Humanities (History, Literature, and Philosophy) 6 hours
f. Arts (Fine Arts, Music, and Theatre) 3 hours
g. Cultural Diversity 3 hours
Total Core 41 hours
Graduation Requirements
The Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree requires the following:
Total Credits. A total of 120 semester hours.
A minimal level of proficiency must be demonstrated in one foreign language or in regional expertise. Students may satisfy the proficiency requirement by taking courses as described below.
Area of Emphasis or Non-Business Minor. Completion of at least 9-15 semester hours of approved courses in the area of emphasis or completion of at least 15 semester
hours in an approved non-business minor. Students who select a non-business minor must complete an additional three-hour business elective to earn the required number of hours in business.
Residence. At least 30 semester hours of business courses (including the business area of emphasis) must be completed after a student’s admission to the College. The 30 hours for residence must include BLAW 4120 and MGMT 4500, and 24 hours in other 4000-level business courses (including area of emphasis courses if an area is selected).
Grade-Point Average Requirement.
To graduate, a student must maintain a minimum cumulative scholastic grade-point average of 2.0 for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business Administration) degree, 2.0 for all business courses, and
2.0 for courses in the student’s area of emphasis or non-business minor.
Undergraduate Honors. Upon recommendation of the faculty, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Students must achieve an overall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to be considered for cum laude. Those who achieve an overall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado will be considered for magna cum laude. Those who achieve a 3.7 overall grade-point average and a 3.85 GPA in all business courses will be considered for summa cum laude.
Filing for Graduation. A senior audit is completed on all students who have completed 90 or more semester hours. Students must file an Undergraduate Candidacy form and Diploma Card, and request a graduation evaluation prior to registering for their final semester. Failure to do so will delay graduation. Also, students desiring to change their area of emphasis after filing for graduation must have the change approved by the graduation supervisor prior to registering for their final semester. Changes after that time will delay graduation.
Business Program Requirements
Satisfaction of all the following:
Program Requirements Semester Hours
College proficiencies
or other courses .............. 0-13
CU-Denver core.................... 41
Mathematics..........................6
Business core...................... 36
International studies................3
Cornerstone courses 6
Area of emphasis or
non-business minor ............. 15
Total Semester Flours Required.... 120
Detailed descriptions of degree course plans which satisfy program requirements follow:
I. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION REQUIRED SEMESTER HOURS PROFICIENCY: 0-13
The business student must demonstrate either proficiency in a foreign language or in regional expertise. The requirement can be met in the following ways:
A. Foreign Language
The language proficiency can be met by:
1. Completion of the third year of high school course work in a single language. Students must complete three years of high school credit in one language. A C (2.0) or higher must be earned in the fined semester of the third year high school course to show proficiency.
2. Completion of three semesters of college-level course work in a single foreign language. The third semester course (college level) in one language requires a grade of C or better to complete the proficiency. The Pass/Fail option cannot be used when completing the requirement
at CU-Denver.
3. Examination. Students may show their level of proficiency by taking the placement proficiency exam given by the Language Laboratory in CN 220. The languages tested are French, German, and Spanish. For information about other languages, students should consult with their business advisor, 303-556-5800. The number
of times the student may attempt the examination is once per semester.
B. Regional Expertise
The regional expertise option is available as an alternative to Foreign Language Proficiency. This requires the student to develop expertise about a region of the world other than North America.
The student must complete a minimum of 9 credit hours of course work from an approved list that relates to history, arts, culture, politics, or the economy of a single defined region of the world outside North America. Courses used in the expertise area must meet the


80 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
College of Business guidelines. These courses can be chosen from the list specified by the College of Business. Students should contact their business advisor to outline their program, 303-556-5800.
Students who must meet all the proficiency requirements through course work may find it necessary to complete more than 120 semester hours in order to earn the B.S. in Business Administration. The proficiency requirement must be completed during the first three terms in attendance at CU-Denver.
II. CU-DENVER BUSINESS CORE REQUIREMENTS: 41 SEMESTER HOURS
A. Writing/Speech-9 semester hours.
1. ENGL 1020. Core Composition I ...3
2. ENGL 2030. Core Composition II
or
ENGL 3170. Business Writing (preferred) .................3
3. CMMU 2050. Business and Professional Speaking (preferred)
or
CMMU 2101. Presentational Speaking.....................3
B. Mathematics-3 semester hours.
MATH 1070. Algebra for Social Sciences
and Business .....................3
Note: The required sequence MATH 1070 and MATH 1080 may be satisfied by a 6-hour calculus sequence.
C. Natural and Physical Sciences-8 semester hours.
Two of the following courses (a sequence in the same discipline or courses in two different disciplines): ANTH 1303. Intro, to Biological
Anthropology ....................4
BIOL 1550. Basic Biology I ........4
BIOL 1560. Basic Biology II........4
CHEM 1470. Core Chemistry:
Eat, Drink, Man, Woman...........4
CHEM 1471. Core Chemistry:
Risky Business ..................4
ENVS 1042. Intro, to Environmental
Sciences ........................4
GEOL 1072. Physical Geology I .....4
GEOL 1082. Physical Geology II ....4
PHYS 1000. Intro, to Physics.......4
PHYS 1052. General Astronomy I.....4
D. Behavioral Sciences and Social Sciences-9 semester hours.
PSY 1000. Introduction to
Psychology I.....................3
or
PSY 1005. Introduction to
Psychology II....................3
ECON 2012. Principles of Economics: Macroeconomics ................3
ECON 2022. Principles of Economics: Microeconomics.................3
E. Humanities-6 semester hours.
Two courses from the following:
ENGL 1601. Telling Tales: Narrative
Art in Literature and Film .......3
ENGL 2600. Great Works in British
and American Literature...........3
GER1000. Germany and the Germans . 3
HIST 1381. Paths to the Present I....3
HIST 1382. Getting Here: Paths
to the Present II ................3
PHIL 1012. Introduction to Philosophy: Relationship of the Individual
to the World .....................3
PHIL 1020. Introduction to Ethics and Society: The Person and
the Community.....................3
RUSS 1000. Russia and the Russians:
Life, Culture, and Arts...........3
RUSS 2000. Masterpieces of Russian Culture................3
F. Arts-3 semester hours.
One course from the following:
ARTS 1000. Arts in our Time..........3
FA 1001. Introduction to Art ........3
PMUS 1001. Music Appreciation .......3
THTR1001. Introduction to Theatre .......................3
G. Cultured Diversity-3 semester hours. One course from the list specified
for the CU-Denver Core Curriculum (see General Information section of this catalog).
III. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS SPECIFIC GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
A. MATH 1080. Polynomial Calculus......3
Note: The required sequence MATH 1070 and MATH 1080 may be satisfied by a 6-hour calculus sequence.
B. QUAN 2010. Business Statistics.......3
C. ISMG 2000. Computer and Business
Information Systems .................3
Note: ISMG 2000 is a cornerstone course and must be completed prior to starting the Business core course sequence.
D. MGMT 3000. Managing Individuals
and Teams..........................3
Note: MGMT is a cornerstone course and should be completed early in the student’s schedule.
E. OTHER. MATH 1070, ECON 2012, ECON 2022, PSY 1000, ENGL 3170 (or ENGL 2030), and CMMU 2050 (or CMMU 2101) may be taken as part of the CU-Denver Core. The College of Business strongly encourages students to take ENGL 3170 instead of ENGL 2030, and to take CMMU 2050 instead of CMMU 2101. However, if other courses in their respective areas are taken to satisfy CU-Denver core requirements, then these required courses must still
be completed to meet graduation requirements.
IV. BUSINESS CORE: 36 SEMESTER HOURS
Students are required to complete the Business Core in the order listed below:
ACCT 2200. Financial Accounting
and Financial Statement Analysis.....3
ACCT 2220. Managerial Accounting
and Professional Issues..............3
BLAW 3000. Legal, Ethical, and Social
Environments of Business I...........3
FNCE 3100. Principles of Finance I......3
ISMG 3000. Management Information
Systems..........................
MKTG 3000. Principles of Marketing
OPMG 3000. Operations Management .
MKTG 3050. Applied Marketing
Management .......................3
FNCE 3200. Principles of Finance II.3
MGMT 4350. Conflict and Change in Organizations or
MGMT 4370. Organization Design ......3
BLAW 4120. Legal and Ethical
Environments of Business II.......3
MGMT 4500. Business Policy and Strategic Management ..............3
Note: Accounting majors are not required to take ISMG 3000, MGMT 4350 (or 4370), and MKTG 3050.
V. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES:
3 SEMESTER HOURS
International Business-One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses:
FNCE 4370-3. International Financial Management
MGMT 4400-3. Introduction to
International Business * MKTG 4200-3. International Marketing MKTG 4580-3. International Transportation
* Prerequisite: ECON 4410-3. International Trade.
VI. AREA OF EMPHASIS OR NONBUSINESS MINOR: 9-15 SEMESTER HOURS
Students may choose a general business degree with a non- business minor, or a business degree with an area of emphasis in Accounting, Finance, Human Resources Management, Information Systems, International Business, Management, or Marketing.
A. General Business with Non-Business Minor: General Business students must take an approved non-business minor of at least 15 semester hours. The courses must form an integrated sequence and
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Academic Policies / 81
be approved by the College of Business. Up to 6 semester hours of the sequence may be in courses used to satisfy the general (CU-Denver core) requirements, but the number of “Other Courses”
(see below) will be correspondingly increased to meet the 120-hour total requirement for the degree. Students selecting a non-business minor must complete an additional three-hour business elective to earn the required number of hours in business. This credit appears under “Other Courses.” Students interested in completing a minor should contact the individual academic departments regarding requirements.
B. Areas of Emphasis: Areas of Emphasis must consist of at least 15 semester hours, including any business core courses. For most areas, this will mean 9 semester hours beyond two courses in the business core. For areas with special requirements or areas with only one course in the core, it may mean 21 or more semester hours beyond the business core. Any hours in excess of 9 are included in the Other Courses category described below.
VII.OTHER COURSES:
0-13 SEMESTER HOURS
Students may choose Other Courses freely, subject to the following general rules: (1) Only non-remedial (college-level, as determined by the College of Business) courses will count toward the B.S. degree; (2) All students receiving the B.S. degree in Business must take at least 48 semester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses). Students in General Business will usually need to take at least one business course in the Other Courses category to meet this requirement;
(3) At most, 60 semester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses) may be counted toward the 120 credit hours required for the B.S. degree in Business; (4) Any business area of emphasis courses required by specific areas in excess of the 9 hours listed under Areas of Emphasis above are included in the Other Courses category; (5) At least 50% of the business credits applied to the degree must be taken at CU-Denver.
Guidelines for Elective Credits. Elective credits should be selected carefully because not all classes are acceptable. Generally, to be acceptable, electives must be taught by regular University of Colorado faculty, must have a form of assessment such as a term paper and/or examinations, and must be regular
classroom-type classes. Course coverage must be college level, not repetitious of other work applied toward the degree, must be academic as opposed to vocational or technical, and must be part of the regular University offerings.
Specifically, the College will accept:
a. A maximum of 6 hours of the theory of physical education, theory of recreation, and/or theory of dance, and
b. A maximum of 6 hours of approved independent study, internships, experimental studies, choir, band, and/or music lessons, art lessons, and
c. A maximum of 12 hours of advanced ROTC, providing the student is enrolled in the program and completes the total program.
The College will not accept:
Activity physical education classes, recreation, workshops, orientations, dance, teaching methods, practicums, and courses reviewing basic skills in computers, English composition, mathematics, and chemistry.
Areas of Emphasis
See individual areas of emphasis in this section for specific courses required.
ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SELECTING COURSES
Registration
Instruction for registering for courses is contained in another publication called the Schedule of Courses, which is available before each semester. That publication lists the times when registration occurs and the courses offered.
Maximum Units Per Term
The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate business student is 15 semester hours, with a maximum of 18 hours allowed during the fall/spring semesters and 12 hours allowed during the summer session. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Continuing Education, CU-Boulder, or CU-Denver Extended Studies Programs, whether in classes or through correspondence, are included in the student’s term load.
Repeating Courses
A failed course (grade of F) may be repeated; however, the /’will be included in the grade-point average and will appear
on the transcript. A course in which a grade of D or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from a business pro-gram advisor.
Courses repeated without approval may not be used in the business grade-point average calculation.
Courses From Other Institutions
Business students must have the written approval of the business program coordinator to register for courses (excluding MSCD pooled courses) offered by other institutions, including other CU campuses. Credit will not be given for courses taken without approval. Grades of Cor better must be earned to receive business degree credit. Generally, only nonbusiness electives or lower division, non-business requirements are acceptable for transfer from other institutions once a student has been admitted to the College of Business. Students who, after admission to the College, take more than 12 semester hours from another institution, must reapply for admission to the College as transfer students and must meet the current admission requirements.
Metropolitan State College of Denver Courses
Business students may select their non-business required and elective courses from those offered by MSCD. Grades of C or better must be earned to receive business degree credit; however, the grade is not computed in the CU grade-point average and is treated like other transfer credits. MSCD business courses may not be taken for CU-Denver business degree credit.
Graduate Level Courses
With prior written approval of the business program coordinator, students may take a maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate level non-business elective credits. Students must earn grades of B or better in graduate courses in order to apply the credits toward business degree requirements.
Pass/Fail
Only internships, independent studies, and non-business elective courses may be taken pass/fail. Required business and non-business courses (including the CU-Denver core) may not be taken pass/fail. A maximum of 6 hours pass/fail


82 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
credit may be applied toward the business degree. Courses taken in excess of the maximum will not be applied toward degree credit. Pass/fail determination must be made within the posted deadlines (at census dates) and may not be rescinded (unless approved by the Undergraduate Committee).
Correspondence Courses
Only six semester hours of credit taken through correspondence study (from regionally accredited institutions) will be applied toward the business degree. Business courses may not be taken by correspondence. All correspondence courses must be evaluated by the business program coordinator to determine their acceptability toward degree requirements, and the program coordinator’s written approval is required prior to the student’s registering for courses. Students may contact the Division of Continuing Education, CU-Boulder, for correspondence course offerings and registration procedures.
Independent Study
Junior or senior business students desiring to work beyond regular course coverage may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) as non-business electives under the direction of an instructor who approves the project, but the student must have the appropriate approval before registering. A maximum of 3 semester hours of independent study course work may be taken in any one semester; a maximum of 6 semester hours may be applied toward degree requirements.
An Independent Study Request Form must be signed by the student, instructor, area coordinator, and the Associate Dean for Academic Programs.
ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SUSPENSION AND PROBATION
To be in good standing, students must maintain an overall CU grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C = 2.0) or better for all course work attempted, and a 2.0 GPA or better for all business courses attempted.
PE activity courses, remedied course work, MSCD courses, and repeated courses not approved by a business advisor are not included in these averages.
When semester grades become available, students falling below the 2.0 GPA will be notified of 1) probationary
status or 2) suspension. Students are responsible for being aware of their academic status at all times; late grades and/or late grade notification does not waive this responsibility. College rules governing probation and suspension are as follows:
1. Any student whose overall GPA, or business course GPA, is less than
2.0 will be placed on probation immediately. A student may be removed from probation when the overall GPA and business GPA have been raised to 2.0.
2. A student may remain on probation as long as the student maintains normal degree progress each semester as determined by the College and each term, while on probation, obtains
an overall term GPA of 2.5, and term business course GPA of 2.5, with no grade below a C. Failure to meet probationary provisions will result in suspension. Probationary status may continue only until the student has completed a maximum of 12 semester hours or four terms, whichever comes first; summer is considered a term.
The student will be suspended if the GPA deficiency is not cleared within this time.
3. Suspended students may not attend any campus of the University of Colorado or any division of the University (including Continuing Education or Extended Studies credit classes).
4. Students on suspension may petition for readmission to the College after waiting a minimum of one year from the term in which they were suspended. Generally, petitions are granted only in unusual circumstances. Any suspended student readmitted to the College will be under contract and placed on a continued probation status until the GPA deficiency has been cleared. Such students will be automatically suspended if, at any time, their overall GPA or business GPA again falls below 2.0.
5. Students earning all failing grades for a semester will have a dean’s stop placed on their record and will not be permitted to register without a business advisor’s approval.
6. Combined degree students are required to maintain the same standards of performance as College of Business students in order to be continued in
a combined program.
AREAS OF EMPHASIS
Each candidate for the B.S. (Business Administration) degree must complete the prescribed courses in an area of
emphasis comprising a minimum of 15 semester hours taken at the University of Colorado at Denver. A 2.0 grade-point average is required for area courses. Typically, students select an area of emphasis after taking several of the core courses. They then complete the hours required for their selected area.
All B.S. (Business Administration) students must declare a major area of emphasis by the time they have accumulated 60 credit hours.
Information about each area of emphasis follows:
Accounting
Program Director Dennis Murray Telephone: 303-556-5891
Accounting courses are offered in several fields of professional accountancy at the intermediate, advanced, and graduate levels. They provide preparation for practice in one or more of the following fields:
Management control systems Auditing
Financial accounting Managerial accounting Tax accounting Teaching and research
In all of these fields a thorough knowledge of the social, legal, economic, and political environment is needed.
A high degree of analytical ability and communication skill is indispensable.
Courses in English composition, speech, ethics and logic are desirable. Courses in statistics and information systems, beyond the required Business Core courses, are highly recommended.
Accounting majors are not required to complete ISMG 3000, MGMT 4370, and MKTG 3050 as part of the College of Business Core.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACCT 3054. Accounting Systems
and Data Processing ...............3
ACCT 3220. Intermediate Financial
Accounting 1.......................3
ACCT 3230. Intermediate Financial
Accounting II......................3
ACCT 3320. Intermediate Cost
Accounting....................
ACCT 4410. Income Tax Accounting
ACCT 4620. Auditing..............
ACCT free elective (4000 level) .
Students planning to pursue accounting as a career may take more than the above required hours. Many students complete a toted of 30 hours of accounting, often taking two accounting courses each semester in their junior and senior years. Students should work closely with the accounting
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Undergraduate Areas of Emphasis / 83
faculty and business advisors in planning their accounting programs.
The Accounting Program offers several 4000/5000-level courses. Students with credit for a 4000-level course cannot receive credit for the corresponding 5000-level course. Graduate students should take 5000-level courses.
Accounting students often specialize in a particular topical area of accounting. Examples of these specializations include:
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
Recommended Electives ACCT 4240-3. Advanced Financial Accounting
ACCT 4800-3. Accounting for Government and Non-Profit Organizations
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
Recommended Electives ACCT 4330-3. Managerial Accounting Problems and Cases ACCT 4800-3. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations
Graduate study in accounting is receiving increasing emphasis by professional organizations and employers. Students meeting admission requirements should consider continuing their education at the graduate level.
Finance
Program Director Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
The principal areas of study in finance are financial management, financial institutions, investments, and international finance. The study of finance is intended to provide an understanding of fundamental theory and practice pertaining to finance and to develop the ability to make sound financial management decisions. Every endeavor is made to train students to think logically about financial problems and to formulate sound financial decisions and policies.
It is necessary to understand the importance of finance in the economy and the functions and purposes of monetary systems, credit, prices, money markets, and financial institutions. Emphasis is placed on financial policy, management, control, analysis, and decision making. Numerous job opportunities exist with financial institutions and in the field of business finance. ACCT 2200 and ACCT 2220 are required prerequisites for the finance emphasis. Finance majors are encouraged
to take additional accounting courses as business electives.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FNCE 4320. Corporate Financial
Decisions..........................3
FNCE 4330. Investment and Portfolio
Management ........................3
FNCE 4350. Financial Markets and Institutions..................3
Recommended Elective FNCE 4370-3. International Financial Management
Students should note that all finance courses are not offered every semester.
Human Resources Management
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
Human resources management offers opportunities for students to develop professional competence in the areas of personnel administration and development. Students acquire an understanding of and skills in developing and implementing human resources systems, including recruitment, selection, evaluation, training, motivation, and compensation.
Required courses. MGMT 3310 and two courses from the following: MGMT 4410, Human Resources Management: Compensation Administration; and MGMT 4950, Special Topics in Management: Training, Performance Management, or Staffing.
Recommended Electives ECON 4610-3. Labor Economics MGMT 4950-3. Special Topics in Management
PSY 3135-3. Organizational Psychology
Information Systems
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
The information systems area is designed for those who wish to prepare themselves for careers as professional data processing managers or as technical specialists in business and government. The student develops those technical skills and administrative insights required for analysis of information systems, the design and implementation of systems, and the management of data processing operations. The emphasis is on management information systems-systems for the collection, organization, access, and analysis of information for the planning and control of operations. Students should note that not till courses tire
offered each semester. ISMG 2200 is a required prerequisite for the information systems area and applies as a business elective.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ISMG 2200. Business Programming
with COBOL........................3
ISMG 3200. Data Structures ..........3
ISMG 4500. Database Management
Systems...........................3
ISMG 4600. Systems Analysis
and Design .......................3
ISMG 4700. Data Communications.......3
International Business
Program Director Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
Increasingly, businesses are reorienting their thinking, planning, and operations to capitalize on opportunities that exist in the world marketplace. Every phase of business is affected by this reorientation. For individuals with the appropriate skills, training, and interest, international business provides excellent career opportunities.
The international business curriculum is designed to enhance and build on thorough training in basic business skills and to provide students with additional skills and knowledge appropriate to international business. Please note that ECON 4410 is a prerequisite for MGMT 4400.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FNCE 4370. International Financial
Management........................3
MKTG 4200. International Marketing..3
MKTG 4580. International
Transportation ...................3
MGMT 4400. Introduction to International Business............3
A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended. In addition, serious consideration should be given to advanced study of a foreign language and to either a minor or a Certificate in International Affairs, offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Management
Program Director Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
The management curriculum provides the foundation for careers in supervision and general management in a wide variety of organizations. It develops skills in management practice through an understanding of general management principles, individual and group behavior, organizational change and design, and human resources management.


84 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGMT 3310. Introduction to
Human Resources...................3
MGMT 4350. Conflict and Change in Organizations or MGMT 4370*.......3
(*) MGMT 4350 and MGMT 4370-one course may be used in the Business Core while the second course is considered part of the area of emphasis.
Recommended Electives MGMT 4400-3. Introduction to
MGMT 4410-3.
MGMT 4950-3.
International Business
Human Resources
Management:
Compensation
Administration
Special Topics in
Management
Marketing
Program Director; Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
Marketing is concerned with directing the activities of the organization toward the satisfaction of customer wants and needs. This involves understanding customers, identifying those wants and needs which the organization can best serve, guiding the development of specific products or services, planning and implementing ways to take products or services to the market, securing the customer’s order, and finally, monitoring customer response in order to guide future activities.
In most organizations, marketing is a major functional area that provides a wide variety of career opportunities in such fields as personal selling and sales management, advertising and sales promotion, public relations, marketing research, physical distribution, product management, market management, marketing information systems, and retail management. Increasingly, career opportunities exist in service businesses and non-profit organizations.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MKTG 3100. Marketing Research ........3
MKTG required courses (*).............6
*Two courses from the following list:
MKTG 3200-3. Buyer Behavior MKTG 4000-3. Advertising MKTG 4100-3. Physical Distribution Management
MKTG 4200-3. International Marketing MKTG 4500-3. Advertising Management and Public Relations MKTG 4580-3. International Transportation
MKTG 4600-3. Business Marketing
MKTG 4700-3. Personal Selling and Sales Management
In addition to the three required courses beyond the core, students may select marketing electives, business electives, and non-business electives that support their particular career orientations. The marketing faculty advisor can assist the student in choosing an appropriate set of electives to fit career objectives.
GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS (M.B.A./M.S.)
Associate Dean: Marlene A. Smith Programs Coordinator Connie Cornwell
The Graduate School of Business Administration offers programs leading to the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), and the Master of Science (M.S.) in specific fields of business and health administration. In addition, the Master of Business Administration for Executives (Executive M.B.A.) is offered as a multicampus program of the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the Executive Program in Health Administration (Executive M.S.H.A.) is offered through the Executive Programs division.
The M.B.A., the Executive M.B.A., and the M.S. degrees in business are accredited by the International Association for Management Education (AACSB). The M.S. in Health Administration is also accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA).
Requirements for Admission to the M.B.A. and M.S. Programs
Telephone: 303-556-5900 Fax: 303-556-5904
ADMISSIONS ADVISING
Persons contemplating graduate study are encouraged to learn about admission and program requirements by attending one of the regularly scheduled prospective student information meetings. Please phone 303-556-5900 to reserve a seat.
Admission to the graduate program in business administration (M.B.A. and M.S.) is granted only to students showing high promise of success in graduate business study. Admission is based on the following indicators of the candidate’s likelihood to succeed in the program:
ACADEMIC RECORD
The bachelor’s degree must be earned from a regionally accredited university.
The total academic record is considered, including the grade-point average, the course of study, and the quality of the program.
REQUIRED TESTING
The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is required for admission consideration for any applicant who does not have a post-baccalaureate degree.
A minimum score of 400 is necessary for admission consideration. The GMAT test is administered several times each year at numerous centers throughout the world. For information and to make application for the test, write to: Graduate Management Admission Test, Educational Testing Service, CN 6103, Princeton, New Jersey 08541; or phone (609) 771-7330. The code number for CU-Denver’s graduate business programs is 4819.
WORK EXPERIENCE
A record of appropriate employment at increasing levels of responsibility is considered a positive indicator of the likelihood of successful completion of graduate work.
BACKGROUND REQUIREMENTS
Students applying for graduate programs in business do not need to have taken their undergraduate degrees in business. The M.B.A. program is specifically designed so that the required courses cover the material needed for completion of the degree. There are no prerequisites needed to start the M.B.A. program. Applicants for the M.S. degree, however, may be required to take background or Common Body of Knowledge prerequisite courses, depending on the individual’s academic and professional background. Students with non-business backgrounds have completed the program successfully. For more detailed information, phone a graduate staff advisor, 303-556-5900.
It is expected that students have an adequate level of personal computer proficiency in a word processing and spreadsheet package, as well as a good working knowledge of basic algebra and proper English.
THE ADMISSION PROCESS
Mailing address for applications:
Graduate Admissions
Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver
Campus Box 165, P.O. Box 173364
Denver, CO 80217-3364


Graduate Business Programs/ 85
Students seeking admission to Health Administration or Executive Programs should consult with the relevant catalog sections for additional application criteria or requirements.
Application Requirements
1. Complete Parts 1 a!nd II of the Application for Graduate Admission. Include a well-formulated career plan articulated in a brief essay, and summarizing the applicant’s academic achievements, any applicable work history, and reason(s) for seeking the degree.
2. Have required GMAT scores sent directly to the graduate business admissions office from the Educational Testing Service. The code for CU-Denver’s graduate business programs is 4819.
3. Have two official transcripts (not student copies) mailed directly from each school, college, and university ever attended. Transcripts must be sent even if credit course work completed was not part of a degree program or was taken after an undergraduate degree was earned.
4. Enclose a check for $50 for the M.B.A. or M.S. programs, or $80 for the dual M.B.A./M.S. or dual M.S./M.S., made payable to the University of Colorado. Personal interviews are not required. Deadlines. To be cbnsidered for admission, applicants for graduate programs must submit all materials prior to the following dates:
April 1 for summer session admission;
July 1 for fall semester admission; and
November 1 for spring semester admission.
Early applications are encouraged because, if admitted, the student receives priority for registration time assignment. Applications received after published deadlines or without complete supporting documentation, scores, fees, and transcripts will not be considered for admission in that term.
International Students. Foreign applicants must fill out special forms, score at least 525 on the TOEFL exam, pay a $60 fee ($80 for dual M.B.A./M.S.), and meet significantly earlier deadlines. Contact the graduate admissions office at 303-556-5900 for details.
Academic Policies for Graduate Students
ADVISING
As soon as possible after being admitted, students should schedule an appointment with a graduate staff advisor to discuss general degree requirements,
plus determine if any background course work may be required and/or what Common Body of Knowledge courses might be waived for the M.S. degree.
DEGREE PLAN
All students are encouraged to formulate a degree plan with a staff advisor during their first term in residence, and must file a plan before they register for any elective course. After the plan is approved and filed with the Graduate School of Business Administration Programs Office, students must petition before receiving degree credit for any course changes.
COURSE LOAD
The normal course load for full-time graduate students is 9-15 semester hours. However, because many students also are pursuing a career, it is possible to attend classes on a part-time basis by enrolling for 3-6 semester hours. Graduate courses are scheduled primarily in the evening in order to accommodate the working student.
TRANSFER OF CREDIT
Upon approval of the Program Director, a maximum of 12 semester hours of graduate business course work may be transferred to the M.B.A. from another AACSB-accredited master’s program, if completed within the last five years with at least a grade of B (not B~). A maximum of nine hours of graduate business courses may be transferred to the M.S. degree. Courses taken at other CU campuses are considered transfer hours and are included in the transfer limit. Transfer of quarter hours of graduate business credit may satisfy a course requirement, but may not satisfy the total hours requirement, i.e.: 1 quarter hour equals .667 semester hours.
TIMELIMIT
M.B.A. students must finish the curriculum within five years plus one semester from the first term of enrollment in the program. Courses older than 5 years generally will not be accepted for the degree unless they have been revalidated by petition to the specific department.
M.S. students must complete courses beyond those in the Common Body of Knowledge list within 5 years, and with reasonable continuity.
FORMER STUDENTS
Any CU-Denver student who has not been enrolled for three consecutive
semesters (summers included) is considered a former student, and must reapply for admission to the program by submitting Part 1 of the Application for Graduate Admission and must pay the applicable fee. Readmitted students must conform to degree requirements in effect during the term in which they are readmitted. If the new requirements differ significantly from the former degree plan, a petition may be submitted for any exceptions.
GRADUATION
Deadlines for filing an Application for Admission to Candidacy and a Diploma Card with the Graduate School of Business Administration Programs Office are July 15 for December graduation, November 15 for May graduation, and April 15 for August graduation. Early application prior to registering for the last term is encouraged, so that graduation check-out may detect possible last-minute problems requiring petitions or course schedule changes.
MINIMUM GRADE-POINT AVERAGE
A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 must be achieved and maintained for courses taken toward a graduate business degree. All CU-Denver graduate courses completed to meet business degree requirements are computed in the graduate business grade-point average. Transfer hours and grades from other institutions, including University of Colorado courses taken at the Boulder, Health Sciences, Colorado Springs, Continuing Education, and/or Extended Studies campuses are not computed in the business GPA, although degree credit is awarded.
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION
If the student’s cumulative graduate business grade-point average falls below a 3.0 after completion of 9 semester hours, the student will be placed on academic probation and normally given three semesters (one calendar year) or 9 semester hours of course work (whichever occurs first) in which to achieve the required 3.0 cumulative average. Failure to achieve the required GPA within the allotted time period will result in suspension.
PASSING GRADES
Any grade below a C- (1.7) is a failing grade for graduate students. Graduate students must repeat a required course for which they have received a grade


86 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
below a C-. Both the original grade and the grade for the repeated course count in the computation of the business grade-point average.
REPEATING COURSES
A failed course may be repeated; however, the failed grade will be included in the grade-point average and will appear on the transcript. A course in which a grade of C- or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from the Graduate Programs Coordinator. Courses repeated without approval may not be used in the business grade-point average calculation.
DROP/WITHDRAWAL
Classes dropped prior to census date will not appear on the transcript; thereafter, to drop with a grade of W, a student must be earning a grade of C-or better; otherwise, an Fwill appear on the transcript. Students will not be permitted to drop a course or withdraw from all courses after the tenth week of the semester, unless circumstances outside the student’s control are documented. The petition to drop or withdraw must be approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Programs and the course instructors).
Registration for Graduate Business Courses
Enrollment in graduate level business courses is normally reserved only for students admitted to graduate degree programs in business. Occasionally, non-degree students and graduate students from other University of Colorado schools or colleges may be permitted to attend on a space-available basis by obtaining written permission from the Graduate Programs Coordinator, telephone 303-556-5900.
6000-level courses are reserved exclusively for graduate students. Graduate 5000-level courses may be offered simultaneously with undergraduate 4000-level courses. Students should check with a graduate advisor to confirm acceptability of 5000-level courses for degree requirements, prior to registering.
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (M.B.A.)
The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) program provides a general background in management and administration. This background enables the
student to have the breadth of exposure and depth of knowledge required for an advanced level management career.
The program is devoted to developing the concepts, analytical tools, and communication skills required for competent and responsible administration of an enterprise viewed in its entirety, within its social, political, and economic environment.
The M.B.A. program is available in four different configurations: the INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. program, the COHORT M.B.A. program, the 11-MONTH M.B.A. program, and the EXECUTIVE M.B.A. program (see relevant section).
The INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A., 11-MONTH M.B.A., and the COHORT M.B.A. have the same curriculum requirements; they differ only in the flexibility of course scheduling and the time required to complete the program.
The INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. allows the scheduling of classes with maximum flexibility so students can progress through the program at their own pace, by taking as little as one class per semester, or as many as five classes per semester, at times that are convenient to their work schedule. The program can be completed in as little as 16 months, or as long as 5 years plus one semester.
The COHORT M.B.A. enables the student to complete the program in 3 years plus one semester, taking two courses each during fall and spring semester and one course during the summer. Fall or spring, a new group of entering students moves through the core courses as a cohort, taking prescribed core courses two nights per week, thus sharing their educational and professional experience. Electives are taken as available to meet individual objectives. For working professionals who can meet the time requirements of the COHORT program, it provides a unique and rewarding educational experience.
The 11-MONTH M.B.A. Program is an accelerated full-time program. It is the only one of its kind in the region that enables students to focus their energies in a concentrated, total-immersion program of study and earn a nationally accredited, 48-credit-hour M.B.A. in just under a year. All 11-MONTH M.B.A. classes meet during the business day in the historic Masonic Temple Building on the 16th Street Mall in Denver, which houses the innovative Richard H. and Pamela S. Bard Center for Entrepreneurship Development.
Candidates for the INDIVIDUALIZED, the 11-MONTH, and the COHORT M.B.A. programs must complete specific
requirements consisting of 16 courses (48 semester hours), as follows:
Core Requirements Semester Hours
BUSN 6510. Managerial
Communications ...................3
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals and
Teams.............................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for
Managers..........................3
BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business ..........3
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information ...........3
BUSN 6560. Marketing Management .....3
BUSN 6610. Business Systems Design .3 BUSN 6620. Applied Economics
for Managers......................3
BUSN 6630. Management of
Operations .......................3
BUSN 6640. Financial Management......3
BUSN 6710. Strategic Management ... JS
Total Required Core Hours.......... 33
Electives:
International elective...............3
Free electives ..................... 12
Total Elective Hours............... 15
Total M.B.A. Hours ................ 48
Note: Electives for the 11-MONTH M.B.A. program are pre-selected for all students.
Notes and Restrictions
Core Substitution. Students with extensive and comparable course work in a particular core subject area may petition to waive a graduate core class on the basis of prior undergraduate or graduate course work taken at a regionally accredited college or university for the corresponding core class. This does not waive the 48-hour requirement. If a core course is waived, another graduate level course must be used as a substitute so that the student completes a total of 48 semester hours. In addition, the resulting 48-hour degree plan, with any transfer credit, must include course work in five of the following six areas: accounting, finance, information systems, management, marketing, and operations management.
International Elective. One 3-hour course must be completed from the following list:
ACCT 6370-3. FNCE 6370-3.
INTB 6000-3.
1NTB 6020-3.
INTB 6040-3.
International Accounting International Financial Management Introduction to International Business Cross-Cultural Management Managing People in Global Markets


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INTB 6060-3. The Legal Aspects of International Business INTB 6080-3. Global Competition
INTB 6200-3. International
Business Policy
ISMG 6200-3. Global Information Systems
MKTG 6020-3. International Marketing
Or, with prior approval of the Graduate Programs Coordinator, a special topics graduate business course with an international emphasis may be substituted.
Electives. The M.B.A. curriculum allows for 12 hours of elective credit which can be chosen without restriction from graduate level courses offered by the Graduate School of Business Administration. A maximum of 3 semester hours of graduate level course work completed at CU-Denver outside the School may be applied to the M.B.A. degree, but only with prior written approval of the M.B.A. Program Director.
Subject to the distribution requirements, students have a wide range of options available in selecting the 12 hours of electives. No area of emphasis is required for the M.B.A. degree, permitting students to choose a combination of courses appropriate for their individual career needs. Students seeking specialization in a functional area of business are advised to consider pursuing an M.S. degree or a dual M.B.A./M.S. degree program. No thesis or comprehensive exam is required for the M.B.A. program.
For additional information about the M.B.A. program, contact a graduate student advisor at 303-556-5900.
MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAMS
Master of Science degrees (M.S.) are offered in the fields of accounting, finance, health administration, marketing, management, information systems, and international business.
The M.S. degree affords the opportunity for specialization and depth of training within a particular major field and, where allowed, a minor field. The specialization and expertise developed within the M.S. program prepares the student for more specialized staff positions in industry, the non-profit sector, and government.
The course requirements for the M.S. degree in each of the fields are divided into two components-Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) and graduate core requirements. The common background requires at least 18 semester hours of business courses to develop general breadth and competence in the fields of business administration. These requirements may differ among degree programs.
Some common background requirements may be waived if evidence of equivalent undergraduate or graduate level course work is shown and the course work is no more than 10 years old. Generally, an undergraduate degree in business administration earned from an AACSB or regionally accredited university will meet most of the CBK requirements. The graduate core requires at least 30 semester hours of graduate level courses as prescribed by the different major programs. Of the 30 hours, a minimum of 18 hours must be completed at the 6000 level. Normally, BUSN courses may not be used as free electives in the M.S. programs. Contact a graduate staff advisor for any exceptions.
Satisfying a CBK requirement by waiver is not necessarily the same as meeting specific course prerequisite requirements. M.S. students must file a degree plan prior to taking any elective course and must meet specific prerequisites.
Master of Science in Accounting
Program Director; Dennis Murray Telephone: 303-556-5891
The Master of Science in Accounting is a flexible program that provides the student with a thorough understanding of both financial and managerial accounting. The combination of required and elective courses allows the student to design a course of study with the advisor’s approval, leading to a successful career in either public accounting, governmental or non-profit accounting, or management accounting.
The M.S. in accounting requires the completion of the following:
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams......................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for Managers . 3 BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business ........3
BUSN 6560. Marketing Management ...3
BUSN 6620. Applied Economics
for Managers...................3
BUSN 6640. Financial Management. 3
Total CBK Hours................. 18
B. ACCOUNTING BACKGROUND COURSES
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACCT 2200. Financial Accounting and Financial Statement Analysis.3
ACCT 2220. Managerial Accounting
and Professional Issues ...........3
ACCT 3054. Accounting Systems
and Data Processing ...............3
ACCT 3220. and 3230. Intermediate
Financial Accounting, 1 and II.....6
ACCT 3320. Intermediate Cost
Accounting.........................3
ACCT 4410. Income Tax Accounting .... _3 Total Background Hours.............. 21
An advisor may approve waivers for some of the background and Common Body of Knowledge requirements upon transcript evidence of previous equivalent undergraduate or graduate course work.
It is recommended that students have a minimum competency in mathematics and computer software applications. Possible preparatory courses at CU-Denver are ISMG 2000, C SC 1100, C SC 1410, MATH 1070, and MATH 1080.
C. GRADUATE COREIN ACCOUNTING
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACCT 6250. Seminar: Accounting
Theory..........................3
ACCT 6260. Seminar: Managerial
Accounting................
ACCT Electives ..............
Free Electives...............
Non-Accounting Electives.....
Total ACCT Core Hours ............. 30
Notes and Restrictions
ACCT Electives. Choose 3 accounting courses numbered higher than ACCT 6260.
Free Electives. Electives may be chosen at the 5000 or 6000 level, but may not include ACCT 6030,6070,6140, or most BUSN courses. Since half of the program courses are electives, students can choose courses and/or minor areas that meet a variety of objectives.
Certain graduate courses in accounting are offered only once a year. Consult a Schedule of Courses for information about current course offerings. Note that ACCT 6250 is usually offered in the fall and other advanced courses are usually offered in the spring.
No comprehensive examinations are required in the major field of accounting.
Master of Science in Finance
Program Director Dean Taylor Telephone: 303-556-5888
The Master of Science in Finance provides the necessary specialized expertise
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88 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
to meet the need of businesses for financial managers and staff specialists.
The M.S. program in finance consists of two components-the Common Body of Knowledge and the graduate core required courses.
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams.........................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for
Managers *........................3
BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business ..........3
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information ...........3
BUSN 6560. Marketing Management ....3
BUSN 6620. Applied Economics
for Managers* ................... 3
Total CBK Hours.................... 18
* BUSN 6530 (or other statistics requirement) and BUSN 6620 are not normally waived by a bachelor degree in business.
An advisor may approve waivers for some of the Common Body of Knowledge requirements upon transcript evidence of previous equivalent undergraduate or graduate course work.
B. GRADUATE CORE IN FINANCE
The M.S. finance core consists of 30 semester hours (10 courses) beyond the CBK requirements. At least six of these courses must be taken at the 6000 level or higher. A minimum of 21 semester hours (7 courses) must be chosen from regularly scheduled graduate finance courses (excluding independent study); the remaining 9 semester hours (3 courses) may be in finance or in related fields, as approved by the student’s M.S. finance advisor. A student can elect to include a minor field with at least 9 semester hours approved by a minor field advisor, but a minor is not required.
The M.S. finance degree requirements are met by the following courses and options:
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6640. Financial Management....3
FNCE 6300. Macroeconomics
and Financial Markets.............3
FNCE 6330. Investment
Management Analysis...............3
FNCE Electives ................... 12
Free Electives..................... 9
Total FNCE Core Hours ............ 30
Notes and Restrictions
Finance Electives. Choose 4 courses in finance from the list of regularly scheduled graduate classes in consultation with an advisor.
Free Electives. Choose 3 courses in finance or other graduate business fields. Areas of study that normally would enhance the study of finance would include economics, mathematics, statistics, accounting, and information systems. Other fields also could be approved by the advisor based on the student’s needs and objectives.
No comprehensive examination in finance is required.
Master of Science in Health Administration
Program Director Errol L. Biggs Telephone: 303-556-5845
ADMISSION PROCESS
Requirements for Admission. Selection of students is a multi-step process. When making application to the program for the M.S.H.A., candidates should send their applications to:
Graduate Admissions Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 165, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80127-3364
Application Requirements
1. Complete the Application for Graduate Admission, Parts 1 and II, and submit by published deadlines.
2. Have four (4) letters of recommendation sent from professional or academic acquaintances who are familiar with the applicant’s academic/professional competence.
3. Have required Graduate Management Admission Test scores sent directly to the graduate office from the Educational Testing Service. When registering for the GMAT, use code 4819.
4. Pay the $50 application fee.
5. Have two (2) official transcripts sent directly from each school, college, or university previously attended.
A minimum baccalaureate degree is required.
6. Include a well-formulated career plan, articulated in a brief essay, and summarizing the applicant’s reason(s) for seeking the degree.
7. Document any experience in the field of health services administration (preferred but not absolutely necessary).
Admission to the M.S.H.A. degree program is on a competitive basis. Therefore, these admission criteria represent minimum entrance qualifications expected of all students.
For further information, brochures, and application materials, contact the Graduate Program in Health Administration, Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Colorado at Denver, 303-556-5900.
HEALTH ADMINISTRATION SCHOLARSHIPS/LOANS
Financial assistance is available for new and continuing students directly from the Graduate Program in Health Administration. Each year, the following scholarships/loans may be awarded: Eugenie Sontag Award Kaiser-Permanente Scholarship/ Residency
Healthcare Financial Management Assn.
Continuing Student Scholarship Foster G. McGaw Scholarship Loan Fund
Foster G. McGaw Scholarship Colorado Health Administration Alumni Association Scholarship Fund U.S. Dept, of Health and Human Services Traineeships
In addition, students are eligible to apply for financial aid directly to the University of Colorado at Denver Financial Aid Office. Call 303-556-2886 for information and forms.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The goal of the Master of Science in Health Administration (M.S.H.A.) degree is to prepare men and women who, after appropriate practical experience in responsible managerial positions, are capable of assuming positions as chief executive officers or senior administrators in complex, multi-service health care organizations or in organizations’ purchasing and health services.
The curriculum is a synthesis of management concepts and techniques that are applicable to any economic organization and tools that can be specifically applied to health and health services systems. The program emphasizes skills which heighten basic analytic and decision-making processes used by top level managers in selecting broad strategies for the institutions and by junior managers in administering sub-units of


Master of Science Programs / 89
health care organizations. The faculty guide the students in their mastery of theoretical, conceptual, and quantitative topics.
The M.S.H.A. program has enjoyed continuous accreditation by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA) since 1970.
The typical course of study is 57 semester hours of graduate level course work for students entering without an undergraduate degree in business from an AACSB-accredited program. The curriculum is based on a series of structured learning sequences, with M.B.A. courses comprising the majority of the first full year, supplemented by several core health administration courses.
The second academic year provides the student with advanced training in health administration. Within the 57 semester hours, the student must choose nine semester hours of elective courses.
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams....... ...................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for Managers . 3 BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information .............3
BUSN 6560. Marketing Management ......3
BUSN 6610. Business Systems Design . . . . 3 BUSN 6620. Applied Economics
for Managers........................3
BUSN 6630. Management of Operations . 3
BUSN 6640. Financial Management.......3
BUSN 6710. Strategic Management ..... 3
Total CBK Hours..................... 27
It may be possible for an advisor to approve waivers for some of the Common Body of Knowledge requirements upon transcript evidence of previous equivalent undergraduate or graduate course work. Students should discuss their options with an advisor.
B. GRADUATE CORE IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
Required Courses Semester Hours
HLTH 6010. Health Care Systems .......3
HLTH 6020. Health Economics...........3
HLTH 6026. Institutional Management .3
HLTH 6030. Health Sciences............3
HLTH 6040. Management Accounting
for Health Care Organizations.......3
HLTH 6050. Legal and Ethical Problems
in Health Care Administration ......3
HLTH 6911. Health Field Studies ......3
HLTH Elective ........................3
Free Electives......................... 6
Total HLTH Core Hours ................. 30
Notes and Restrictions
Electives. Elective courses are available in the fields of accounting, finance, marketing, management, organizational development, health policy, and planning. In addition, elective courses are available that focus on practice settings such as hospital administration, ambulatory care administration, or long-term care administration.
Management Residency. A management residency is optional, but recommended for all students, especially those with limited health care experience. The faculty of the program provide assistance to students in securing the residency, as well as regular consultation during the residency period. Information on the full range of local, regional, and national residencies is available in the program office.
Length of Program. The didactic portion of the degree will take at least two academic years, since several H.A. courses are offered only once each year, and many require prerequisites. Part-time study is facilitated by courses being scheduled for late afternoon or evening hours.
Master of Science in Information Systems
Program Director: Jahangir Karimi Telephone: 303-556-5881 Website: http://www.cudenver.edu/
public/business/msinfosys.html
The Master of Science in Information Systems prepares students for managerial and technical roles in information systems management, development, and maintenance. Students electing to specialize in the management of information systems are prepared to serve as project managers, database administrators, local area network administrators, systems analysts, system designers, software engineers, systems integrators, web developers, and application programmers. The program is designed for students without a strong computer background who are interested in starting a career in information systems. Students with extensive information system experience benefit from advanced course offerings. Flexible degree requirements enable students to design a program of study that complements their individual interests and prior education and work experiences.
All students admitted to the M.S. program in Information Systems should
possess knowledge of business programming. ISMG 4950 is a possible preparatory course that may be taken at CU-Denver.
The M.S. program in Information Systems requires the completion of the Common Body of Knowledge and core requirements as follows:
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6510. Managerial
Communications ....................3
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams..........................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for Managers . 3 BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business............3
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information ............3
BUSN 6560. Marketing Management.... 3 Total CBK Hours.................... 18
An advisor may approve waivers for some of the Common Body of Knowledge requirements upon transcript evidence of previous equivalent undergraduate or graduate course work.
The Common Body of Knowledge may be waived in whole or in part as follows:
• It will be waived in whole if the student has completed an undergraduate business degree from a regionally accredited college or university within the last ten years.
• Specific courses may be waived based on a case-by-case evaluation of an undergraduate or graduate business degree from a regionally accredited college or university within the last ten years.
• Waiver of the Common Body of Knowledge does not waive specific courses that are required as background or as prerequisites
to other courses.
B. GRADUATE COREIN INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Required Courses Semester Hours
ISMG Electives..................... 21
Free Electives...................... 9
Total INFS Core Hours.............. 30
Notes and Restrictions
Each student’s plan of study is developed by the student and the graduate advisor, considering the student’s interests and background. The required 30 core hours may be taken entirely in information systems, or may be divided between information systems (21 hours) and


90 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
free electives (9 hours). At least 7 courses (21 hours) must be taken in information systems. Courses available for the major include:
ISMG 6020-3.
ISMG 6040-3. ISMG 6060-3.
ISMG 6080-3.
ISMG 6120-3. ISMG 6140-3.
ISMG 6180-3.
ISMG 6200-3.
ISMG 6220-3.
ISMG 6240-3.
ISMG 6260-3.
ISMG 6280-3.
ISMG 6800-3. ISMG 6840-1 to 8. ISMG 6950-1 to 8.
Object-Oriented Business Programming Business Systems Design Systems Analysis and Design
Database Management Systems
Data Communications Distributed Object System Development Information Systems Policy
Global Information Systems Organizational Computing
Interactive Multimedia Systems
Software Project Management Systems Integration and Client Server Computing Special Topics Independent Study Master’s Thesis
A maximum of 9 semester hours of approved graduate work taken at other institutions may be included in the 30 semester hours.
Candidates for the M.S. degree are not required to take a comprehensive examination or to complete a thesis in the major field.
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information ..........3
BUSN 6560. Marketing Management ...3
BUSN 6620. Applied Economics
for Managers.....................3
BUSN 6640. Financial Management.. 3
Total CBK Hours.................. 21
B. FOREIGN LANGUAGE COMPETENCY
Prior to graduation, students must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language (other than English). This is accomplished through completion of three semesters of college-level course work in a single foreign language with a grade of Cor better in all three terms, or by passing a proficiency exam.
C. GRADUATE CORE IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
Required Courses Semester Hours
INTB 6000. Introduction to International
Business.............................3
INTB 6020. Cross-Cultural
Management...........................3
INTB 6200. International
Business Policy......................3
INTB 6800. Special Topics
in International Business.......... 12
Free Elective...........................3
Advanced Study Requirements
in International Business........... 6
Total INBU Core Hours................. 30
Notes and Restrictions
Master of Science in International Business
International Topics Electives. Choose four courses (12 hours) from the following list:
Advisor: Manuel G. Serapio, Jr.
Telephone: 303-556-5832
The Master of Science in International Business prepares individuals for the challenges and opportunities facing business organizations in the global marketplace.
The M.S. program in international business requires the completion of the following:
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals and
Teams.............................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for
Managers..........................3
BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical Environment of Business...........3
ACCT 6370-3. FNCE 6370-3.
INTB 6040-3.
INTB 6060-3.
INTB 6080-3. INTB 6800-3.
ISMG 6200-3.
MKTG 6020-3. MKTG 6100-3.
MKTG 6800-3.
International Accounting International Financial Management Managing People in Globed Markets Legal Aspects of International Business Global Competition Special Topics in International Business Global Information Systems
International Marketing Marketing Strategies for Europe Topics in Marketing and Transportation
Please consult with an academic advisor or the current Schedule of Courses for special topics offerings.
Free Elective. One graduate level class may be selected from all functional areas
of business, including international business topics classes. BUSN 6510, Managerial Communications, can be used as an elective. International Business majors can petition for transfer of 3 semester hours of relevant non-business graduate courses offered at CU-Denver.
Advanced Study Requirements. These credit requirements may be fulfilled by a Master's Thesis, Research Internship, International Field Study/Study Abroad, or advanced courses in international business.
Master of Science in Management and Organization
Program Director: Herman Aguinis Telephone: 303-556-2512
The objective of the Master of Science in Management and Organization program is to prepare individuals with prior work experience for significant managerial responsibilities in private and public sector organizations. The program provides students with a basic understanding of how to manage interpersonal dynamics, effectively design organizations, implement planned change, and develop and maintain the human resources necessary for effective performance. It also provides students with the opportunity to learn about specific managerial problems and issues, such as how to turn around poorly performing organizations, implement new technologies, etc. The degree is particularly appropriate for students having an undergraduate degree in a functional area of business, such as accounting, finance, information systems, or in a technical area, such as engineering or computer science.
The Master of Science in Management and Organization consists of two components: the Common Body of Knowledge and the specialized courses that constitute the graduate core.
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams.........................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for Managers . 3 BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business ..........3
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information ...........3
BUSN 6560. Marketing Management.... 3 Total CBK Hours................... 15


Master of Science Programs / 91
An advisor may approve waivers for some of the Common Body of Knowledge requirements upon transcript evidence of equivalent previous undergraduate or graduate course work.
B. GRADUATE COREIN MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION
The core will consist of 33 semester hours (11 courses) beyond the CBK requirements. At least 8 of the courses must be 6000-level courses. A minimum of 24 semester hours must be chosen from regularly scheduled management courses (excluding independent study). The remaining 6 semester hours (2 courses) may be in management and organization or in related fields, as approved by the faculty advisor. A student can elect to include a single minor field with at least 9 semester hours approved by a minor field advisor, but a minor is not required.
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6710. Strategic Management ......3
INTB 6000. Introduction to
International Business.............3
MGMT 6320. Organizational
Development........................3
MGMT 6360. Designing Effective
Organizations......................3
MGMT 6380. Managing People for
Competitive Advantage..............3
MGMT, INTB, or ENTP Electives ...... 12
Free Electives....................... 6
Total MGMT Core Hours............... 33
Notes and Restrictions
Management Electives. Students must choose three courses from the MGMT 68XX-level series.
Typically, four MGMT 68XX courses will be offered during the fall and spring semesters. Consult a Schedule of Courses for information about current course offerings.
Free Electives. Students may select any two graduate business courses and are encouraged to include MGMT 5939, Management Internship. Free elective hours also may be completed in related disciplines such as psychology, sociology, or public administration.
International Emphasis. The course requirements described above provide an M.S. program with a traditional management emphasis. Students may select an international emphasis by completing three elective courses from the following list:
INTB 6020-3.
INTB 6040-3.
INTB 6060-3.
INTB 6080-3. INTB 6200-3.
Cross-Cultural Management Managing People in Global Markets The Legal Aspects of International Business Global Competition International Business Policy
Human Resources Management Emphasis. The course requirements described above provide an M.S. program with a traditional management emphasis. Students may select a Human Resources Management emphasis by completing three elective courses from the following list (at least one of the following courses is offered every semester):
MGMT 6710-3. MGMT 6720-3. MGMT 6730-3.
MGMT 6740-3.
Human Resources Management: Staffing Human Resources Management: Training Human Resources Management: Performance Management Human Resources Management: Compensation Administration
Students are not required to take a comprehensive examination or complete a thesis in the major field.
Master of Science in Marketing
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
Students with specific questions concerning formal requirements, degree plans, etc. should consult an advisor in the graduate programs office [303-556-5900] rather than the faculty advisor.
The objective of the Master of Science in Marketing is to prepare individuals with prior work experience for significant management responsibilities in the field of marketing, either in the private or the public sector. The degree is particularly appropriate for individuals who have an undergraduate degree in business.
The degree consists of two components: the Common Body of Knowledge and the specialized courses that constitute the core of the M.S. in marketing.
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Students in the program must satisfy the Common Body of Knowledge requirements. These are met by the following courses:
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams.........................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for
Managers..........................3
BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business...........3
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information ...........3
BUSN 6620. Applied Economics
for Managers......................3
BUSN 6640. Financial Management.... 3
Total CBK Hours..................... 18
An advisor may approve waivers for some of the Common Body of Knowledge requirements upon transcript evidence of equivalent previous undergraduate or graduate course work. Contact a graduate staff advisor for information.
B. GRADUATE CORE IN MARKETING
The M.S. in Marketing requires 30 semester hours beyond the CBK. Twenty-one (21) semester hours must be 6000-level marketing courses. The remaining 9 semester hours may be in marketing or in related fields as approved by the student’s advisor. A student may elect to take these 9 semester hours in a single minor field. However, a minor is not required.
The 30-semester-hour marketing requirement is met by the following requirements and electives:
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6560. Marketing Management ......3
MKTG 6010. Marketing Strategy,
Evaluation, and Development........3
MKTG 6050. Marketing Research.........3
MKTG Electives...................... 12
Free Electives....................... 9
Total MKTG Core Hours .............. 30
Notes and Restrictions
Students with extensive undergraduate course work in marketing may petition to substitute BUSN 6560 with a MKTG 6000-level course.
Marketing Electives. Choose 12 hours (4 courses) from the following list:
MKTG 6020-3. MKTG 6030-3.
MKTG 6040-3. MKTG 6060-3. MKTG 6070-3.
MKTG 6080-3.
International Marketing Sales and Sales Force Management Services Marketing Buyer Behavior Advertising and Promotion Management Marketing Function, Organization, and Strategy in Deregulating Industries


92 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
MKTG 6090-3. Transportation and Physical Distribution Systems in the Modern Economy
MKTG 6100-3. Marketing Strategies for Europe
MKTG 6800-3. Topics in Marketing and Transportation PSY 6710-3. Multivariate Statistics
Free Electives. Choose 3 additional courses in marketing or, should a minor be elected, take 9 hours in another functional area of business such as finance or information systems. Alternatively, a minor may be taken in a related discipline such as international affairs, economics, social psychology, or public administration. Other fields or combinations of courses can be approved, based on the student’s needs and career objectives.
Students are not required to take a comprehensive examination or to complete a thesis.
DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS M.B.A./M.S.
The Graduate School of Business Administration also offers M.B.A./M.S. dual degree programs for each function of business. The program consists of a minimum of 66 semester hours of graduate work, and leads to both an M.B.A. degree and an M.S. degree, which must be completed within seven years. Contact a graduate staff advisor for details, 303-556-5900.
M.S./M.S.
Students may concurrently pursue dual M.S. degrees in any two fields of business. The program consists of a minimum of 51 semester hours of core course work, which must be completed within a period of seven years. In addition, candidates for the dual degree must satisfy all the Common Body of Knowledge and background requirements prescribed for each degree. Waivers may be approved for some of the CBK or background upon transcript evidence of equivalent previous undergraduate or graduate course work. For more information contact a graduate staff advisor, 303-556-5900.
M.B.A./M.I.M.
This unique combined degree is offered in cooperation with the American Graduate School of International Management (the Thunderbird School) located in Glendale, Arizona, a suburb of Phoenix.
Thunderbird has established eight dual programs with universities in the United States. The student applies independently to both schools and, if admitted, earns the M.B.A. from CU-Denver and a Master of International Management degree from Thunderbird. The student begins the program at CU-Denver and, after completing 36 credit hours (12 courses) required for the M.B.A., transfers to the Thunderbird campus and takes a minimum of 30 credit hours (10 courses) for the M.I.M. When all dual degree requirements are finished, the student is awarded a diploma from each respective school. For more information about admission to the CU-Denver M.B.A., refer to the appropriate section of this catalog. For specifics about the dual M.I.M. application process, call Thunderbird’s Associate Dean of Admissions, Stephen R. Beaver,
(800) 848-9084.
M.B.A./M.S.H.A.
Students may obtain the M.B.A. degree as well as the M.S.H.A. by completing a 66-credit-hour program as follows:
MBA/HLTHRequirements Semester Hours
MBA Core .......................... 36
HLTH 6010. Health Care Systems ......3
HLTH 6020. Health Economics.........3
HLTH 6026. Institutional Management ... 3
HLTH 6030. Health Sciences..........3
HLTH 6040. Management Accounting
for Health Care Organizations.....3
HLTH 6050. Legal and Ethical Problems
in Health Care Administration .....3
HLTH 6911. Health Field Studies .....3
HLTH Elective .......................3
Free Electives..................... 6
Total MBA/HLTH Hours.............. 66
Electives. In addition to one required health elective, students are encouraged to complete additional health courses as free electives or may choose two courses from the following areas: accounting, finance, information systems, international business, management, marketing, or operations management.
M.B.A./M.S. - Nursing Administration
The goal of the dual degree program (M.B.A./M.S. - Nursing Administration) is to prepare nurses who are capable of assuming senior level and CEO health administration positions in government, consulting, traditional health care organizations, and alternative delivery systems. The 66-credit curriculum is a synthesis of advanced management,
health administration, and nursing content.
For information, contact CU Health Sciences Center, Student Services, 303-315-5592.
M.B.A./M.D.
The M.B.A./M.D. is for medical students at the University of Colorado School of Medicine who wish to pursue a career in administrative medicine or who seek additional training in administration or business. The program is designed to be completed in five years, at which time both the M.D. and M.B.A. degrees would be awarded. Candidates for the M.B.A./M.D. complete 42 semester hours of course work in the business school and all requirements for the M.D.
M.B.A./M.A. Psychology
Students may obtain joint M.B.A. and M.A. Psychology degrees by completing 67 semester hours, including a minimum of 36 semester hours in the M.B.A.
(33 semester hours of M.B.A. core courses and three semester hours of an international business elective). Applicants must apply simultaneously to the Graduate School of Business Administration and to the Department of Psychology. Students must be accepted into both programs to be eligible for the joint degree.
M.B.A./M.A. Architecture
In cooperation with the College of Architecture and Planning, the Graduate School of Business Administration offers a dual degree program combining the M.B.A. and M.A. Architecture. Students must complete 48 semester hours for the M.B.A. and all requirements for the M.A. Architecture degree.
M.B.A./M.U.R.P. (Urban and Regional Planning)
This dual degree enables students to obtain both the Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) offered by the College of Architecture and Planning and the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) offered by the Graduate School of Business Administration upon completion of 78 semester hours. The dual degree program is composed of the core curricula in each program plus a set of electives jointly approved by the student’s advisors.


Executive Programs / 93
M.S. Finance/M.A. Economics
Students may concurrently pursue an M.A. in Economics offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the M.S. in Finance offered by the Graduate School of Business Administration. Students must complete the 18 semester hours of Common Body of Knowledge courses required for the M.S. Finance program plus 24 semester hours of finance core requirements, of which 21 semester hours must be in finance. Students must also fulfill all of the requirements for the M.A. Economics program.
EXECUTIVE PROGRAMS
Master of Business Administration for Executives
Program Director W. Scott Guthrie Telephone: 303-623-1888 or
(800) 228-5778
The Executive M.B.A. Program provides executive-level students with a broad, rigorous twenty-two month academic experience leading to the Master of Business Administration degree. The program is designed for persons who hold managerial positions in the private and public sectors. It builds upon the knowledge and experience of these executives with a sophisticated, challenging curriculum which can be pursued simultaneously without career interruption.
The Executive M.B.A. Program emphasizes corporate planning; the organization in a complex, international environment; and the applied tools of management. Courses are taught through a variety of methods. Case studies, lectures, and computer simulation are combined with research projects and other teaching methods to provide students with tools useful in their present; positions and applicable to more advanced responsibilities as they progress in their management careers.
Each new session of the Executive M.B.A. Program begins the last week of August. Classes meet (or a full day, once a week, on alternating Fridays and Saturdays, making it possible for those who live outside the Denver area to participate.
Two courses are taken simultaneously throughout the program. The program is supplemented by an intensive orientation at the beginning, and a two-day seminar at the conclusion of the first academic year. A second-year seminar is held at an international business center.
FACULTY AND RESOURCES
The faculty are senior members of regular faculty of the Graduate School of Business Administration from three of the University’s campuses. The Executive M.B.A. Program is offered jointly by the Graduate Schools of Business Administration in Boulder, Colorado Springs, and Denver. Faculty are nationally recognized, and all possess both practical managerial experience and a demonstrated ability to work effectively with executive-level students.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
The Executive M.B.A. Program is designed for men and women who have eight years of business or administrative experience, including at least three years in a managerial position. In the selection process, significant attention will be given to the depth and breadth of the candidate’s experience, progression in job responsibility, total work experience, and ability to benefit from this integrative classroom/work environment. The Admissions Committee will base its decision on the application, former academic record, relevant test scores, the employer’s nominating letter, other letters of recommendation, and a personal interview.
FOR APPLICATION AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION WRITE TO:
Executive M.B.A. Program Graduate School of Business Administration University of Colorado P.O. Box 480006 Denver, CO 80248-0006
Executive Program in Health Administration
Program Manager Pete Taffe Telephone: 303-623-1888 or (800) 228-5778
PROGRAM SPONSORS
The Executive Program in Health Administration is a cooperative program of the University of Colorado at Denver and the Network for Healthcare Management.
The University of Colorado at Denver serves as the degree-granting institution for the Executive Program. The University of Colorado’s Graduate Program in Health Administration is located in the Graduate School of Business Administration.
The Network for Healthcare Management is an educational consortium representing health care executives and academic faculty from major health administration graduate programs in the United States and Canada, including Arizona State University, Northwestern University, Ohio State University, San Diego State University, the University of California at Berkeley, the University of California at Los Angeles, the University of Colorado at Denver, the University of Michigan, the University of Missouri, the University of North Carolina, the University of Southern California, the University of Toronto, the University of Washington, and Virginia Commonwealth University.
DISTINCTIVE FEATURES OF THE EXECUTIVE PROGRAM IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
1. Drawing on the expertise represented by the faculties of a consortium of western universities, the program offers high-quality courses taught
by instructors that are typically not available from a single university.
2. The Executive Program facilitates learning for professionals who have continuing career and family responsibilities. The program is especially tailored for working individuals, allowing students to remain on their jobs while completing their educational program.
3. The program employs innovation in the technology of educational delivery. Learning methods include:
• Computer-assisted instruction and self-paced learning packages.
• Computer conferencing and electronic case analyses.
• On-campus sessions.
FOR APPLICATION AND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, WRITE TO:
Executive Program in Health Administration Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver P.O. Box 480006 Denver, CO 80248-0006




School of Education
Dean: G. Thomas Bellamy Associate Deans: Lynn Rhodes,
Dian Walster Office: NC 5016 Telephone: 303-556-2844
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SCHOOL
As a graduate school in the heart of the city, the School of Education sees its mission as providing leadership for learning to support diverse individuals, communities, and organizations. Primary attention is given to the environments and personnel to support learning in the public schools, but learning is broadly defined to include human growth and development in the workplace, community services, and families.
What is leadership for learning? First of all, leadership is people - graduates of the School of Education who are experts in planning, organizing, motivating, and supporting learning throughout the community. The city depends on leaders who can make learning accessible to all its citizens, regardless of race, culture, economic status, or ability. The programs in the School of Education draw upon the rich and diverse resources of Denver’s communities and then return graduates to foster innovation and change within learning organizations.
Second, leadership for learning is new knowledge about the teaching and learning process. The School of Education emphasizes a scholarship of practice that links faculty, students, schools, community agencies, businesses, and families in common cause for improved learning.
Leadership is also involvement. Schools and other organizations are constantly challenged to adapt to the changing needs and priorities of the community. These challenges become opportunities for the School of Education to test and share new knowledge, teach in real settings, and apply new ideas. Through partnerships with schools and community services, the faculty work to ensure that both our programs of study and our scholarship have an impact on the difficult problems of practice in Denver’s communities.
The CU-Denver School of Education faculty is actively involved in current efforts to improve schools and teaching. We participate in national, state, and local reform efforts and attempt to create in our own teaching the kinds of learning environments proposed for schools at all levels.
Our programs and class schedules offer flexibility to meet the needs of adult students who balance graduate education with the demands of work, families, and other interests. At the same time, we value rigor and excellence needed to lead schools through challenging times.
Goals of Instructional Programs
Degree and licensing programs in the School of Education are designed to prepare students for leadership in professional practice. Our curriculum is developed through the study of responsibilities of practicing professionals and the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are needed for outstanding performance in professional roles. In our view, leadership in professional practice cannot be reduced to formulas or discrete skills. Rather, it requires that students develop deep repertoires of knowledge, abilities, and habits of critical reflection that support action in context. Our courses, assignments in practice settings, entrance requirements, and student evaluations all reflect the knowledge, skills, and dispositions we believe will support leadership in professional practice.
Accreditation
The School of Education is fully accredited by the Colorado Department of Education (CDE), the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools (NCA), and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) in Agency Counseling, School Counseling, and Marriage and Family Therapy.
Programs Leading to Degrees and Licenses
The School of Education offers a doctored program in Educational Leadership and Innovation, and master’s degrees in seven program areas. Students in these degree programs may pursue a variety of state licenses for teaching and school administration, or may elect to earn these licenses without pursuing a graduate degree. The School does not offer undergraduate programs in education, and encourages prospective students to pursue a rigorous baccalaureate major in their specialty area prior to commencing their professional preparation as an educator.
The School’s degree programs and the state licenses associated with each are shown in the table on the following page.
In addition, the School’s Initial Teacher Education (ITE) Program prepares elementary and secondary teachers for a variety of school settings through academic work, professional studies, classroom teaching experiences, and community field experiences.
Urban and Rural Access Programs
Through Access programs, the School of Education offers full degree programs in off-campus locations. In the metropolitan area, these include degree programs in counseling psychology and counselor education; administration, supervision, and curriculum development; information and learning technology; and special education. Elsewhere in the state, programs are available in counseling psychology and counselor education; administration, supervision, and curriculum development; early childhood education; and school psychology.
Extended Studies Programs
In cooperation with schools and other community agencies, the School of Education Extended Studies program offers a variety of graduate workshops, courses, and academies. While these are designed


96 / School of Education
Divisions Approved Degrees Program Emphases Potential Licenses and Endorsements
School-Wide (Lynn Rhodes, Coordinator) Phone:303-556-4387 Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction (C &I) Initial Teacher Education Program
Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education (CPCE) (Robert Smith, Coordinator) Phone: 303-556-8367 Master of Arts in CPCE Public School Counselor Marriage and Family Therapy Community Counseling Counseling and Human Resource Development College Student Personnel Elementary, Secondary, K-12
Curriculum and Pedagogy (C&P) (William Juraschek, Coordinator) Phone: 303-556-2290 Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) Elementary (Interdisciplinary Curriculum) Elementary (Math & Science) Foundations Mathematics Science Social Studies Elementary Secondary
Language, Literacy, and Culture (LLC) (Sally Nathenson-Mejia, Coordinator) Phone: 303-556-4366 Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) Bilingual/English as a Second Language English Education Literacy for Linguistically Diverse Populations Reading and Writing Teacher of the Linguistically Different Endorsement Reading Teacher, K-6,7-12, K-12
Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development (ASCD) (Rodney Muth, Coordinator) Phone: 303-556-4857 Master of Arts in ASCD Education Specialist in ASCD Elementary Secondary K-12 School Administration School Administration Superintendent Endorsement
Educational Psychology (EPSY) (William L. Goodwin, Coordinator) Phone: 303-556-3535 Master of Arts in EPSY Education Specialist in School Psychology Master of Arts in ECE Educational Psychology Early Childhood Education-Regular Early Childhood Education-Special Teacher 4, Special Education
Technology and Special Services (TSS) (Elizabeth Kozleski, Coordinator) Phone: 303-556-6022 Master of Arts in Information and Learning Technologies Master of Arts in Special Education Corporate Instructional Development and Training Instructional Computing Information and Learning Technology Interactive Technologies Design Special Education Library Media-K-6, 7-12, K-12 School Psychologist, K-12 Special Education Teacher 1,2,3
School-Wide (Mark Clarke, Coordinator) Phone: 303-556-2842 Ph. D. in Educational Leadership and Innovation Curriculum Learning & Technology Educational Policy & Administration Integrated Services for Children and Families


Full Text

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University of Colorado at Denver 1999-2000

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Registration See the Fall Schedule of Courses August 23 First day of classes September 6 Labor Day holiday (campus closed) November 25 Thanksgiving holiday (campus closed) November 26 (campus open, no classes) December 6-11 Preparation week December 13-18 Finals week December 18 End of semester December 18 Commencement Registration January 17 January 18 March 20-25 May 1-6 May 8-13 May 13 May 13 Registration May 29 May30 July4 See the Spring Schedule of Courses Martin Luther King Jr. holiday (campus open, no classes) First day of classes Spring break (campus open, no classes) Preparation week Finals week End of semester Commencement See the Summer Schedule of Courses Memorial Day holiday (campus closed) First day of classes Independence holiday (campus closed) July 31-August 5 Finals week August 5 End of term 1 The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time. Consult the Schedule of Courses for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs and registration dates and procedures. Information ..................................................................................................... 5 Undergraduate Admissions .................. ...................................................... ......... 8 Graduate School .................................................................................................. 14 Tuition and Fees ....................................................................................... . .......... 19 Financial Aid ........................................................................................................ . 23 Registration .......................................................................................................... 25 Core Curriculum Chart ....................................................................................... 26 Academic Policies and Regulations .................................................................. 30 Special Programs and Facilities ........................................................................ 32 Centers and Institutes ......................................................................................... 53 University Policies ............................................................................................... 36 Student Services ............................................................................. ..................... 43 The Career Center ............................................................................................... 48 Library Services ................................................................................................... 48 Media Services ..................................................................................................... 50 College of Architecture and Planning ................................................................................... 51 College of Arts & Media .......................................................................................................... 63 College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration ................................................. 73 School of Education ................................................................................................................. 95 College of Engineering and Applied Science ..................................................................... 115 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................................................. 133 Military Science ...................................................................................................................... 183 Millennium College ................................................................................................................ 187 Graduate School of Public Affairs ....................................................................................... 189 Course Descriptions .............................................................................................................. 197 Faculty .................................................................................................................................. 339 Index .................................................................................................................................. 353 Produced by: Office of Public Relations & Publications at CU-Denver Director: Marshall L. Collins Photos: Publications file photographs unless otherwise noted Cover design : Stevinson Design

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AURA liD EJ s

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University of Colorado at D e nver Campus Box 167 P . O . Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 cu IN THE c IJCO f.AT 1Y99 -2000 UCO CATA 02111/99 llllllll l l lllllll lllllllllllll DEPT 9786900016150 7155 $5.00 I Periodicals Postage PAID at the Post Office Boulder, Colorado

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cu IN THE CITY ilndergraduate and Graduate Univel'llity of Colorado ca og (.USPS 651.000) 3100 Marine Street, Room 20, Campus Box 584 Boulder, Colorado 80309-0 Volume 1999, No.3, May/Ju Published 7 times a year: January/February, March/April, May, May/June August, December, December Periodicals postage paid at Boulder, Colorado POSTMASTER: Send address changes to University of Colorado Catalog, ClJ.Denver Publications, Boulder, Colorado 80302. 1999-2000 University of Colorado at Denver SPEER AT LARIMER P . O . BOX 173364 DENVER, COLORADO 80217-3364 Although this catalog was prepared on the basis of the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, degree offerings and degree titles, course offerings and course descriptions, and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice or obligation. The University claims no responsibility for errors that may have occurred tluring the typesetting , printing or production of this catalog. The University of Colorado at Denver is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. For current calendars, tuition rates, requirements, deadlines, etc., students should refer to a copy of the Schedule of Courses for the semester in which they intend to enroll. The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curriculum. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester, and the faculty teaching a particular course or program may vary from time to time. The instructor may alter the content of a course or program to meet particular class needs. Courses are listed by college or school. Alternative format available upon request. Call 303-556-4493 (voice); 303-556-6204 (TTY); 303-556-2678 (fax) E-mail: ombuds@carbon.cudenver.edu

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elcome to the University of Colorado at Denver. As an urban university campus , CU-Denve r creates and maintains strong linkages to the greater Denver region. This forms a challenging educational environment, and your decision to learn at Denver' s only public university shows a wiUingness to embrace the fast-paced and rewarding academic experience our faculty and staff provide . CU-Denver is one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system. We offer bachelor' s , master' s , and doctoral programs, and the prestige and distinction of the University of Colorado degree. We have achieved recognition nationally and internationally because of our outstanding academic programs, top-ranked faculty, and dedicated alumni. CU-Denver thrives as an intellectual environment that encourages commitment, curiosity and imagination. We're nestled near the Denver skyline, and we take advantage of this prime location to blend a cosmopolitan attitude into a dynamic Western setting . This urban perspect ive is an integral theme in our academic programming, orientation of our faculty, and identity of our student body. We boast an enrollment that has grown to nearly 11,000. Our students engage in some 40 degree and degree option programs at the baccalaureate level and more than 60 degree and degree option programs at the post-baccalaureate level. Each is designed to provide you the foundation on which to build your intellectual, aesthetic , and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens. Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a complement to classroom study. CU-Denver' s seven academic areas -Arts & Media, Business and Admi nistration , Public Affairs, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, Education, and Architecture and Planning -provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the opportunities for gaining the knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your lives. We at CU-Denver take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs. This is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the real-world research aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems. Our outreach has become international, as we encourage cultural and technical exchange through an array of programs that serve our students . We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars and dedicated staff. We will challenge you, as you challenge us. I look forward to your graduation, where we will award you your University of Colorado diploma. . c_ GeorgitE . Lesh-Laurie Chancellor University of Colorado at Denver

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The University of Co orado seal, adopted in 1908, depf.ts a male Greek classical figure seate against a pillar and holding a scroll. burning torch framed in laurel is pi ced beside him. The Greek "Let your light shine." Accardi g to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Gr k civilization "stands as the criteri n of culture." The laurel symbolizes ho or or success , the youth of the figure s ggests the "morning of life," an the scroll represents written I nguage. earning env1ro1nment ADMINISTRATION BOARD OF REGENTS HENRY "Hank" ANTON, Pueblo, term expires 2000 MAUREEN JOHNSON, Denver, term expires 2002 SUSAN KIRK, Denver, term expires 2004 THOMAS J. LUCERO, JR., Johnstown, term expires 2004 JIM MARTIN, Boulder, term expires 2004 NORWOOD L. ROBB, Littleton, term expires 2002 JERRY G. RUTLEDGE, Colorado Springs, term expires 2000 ROBERT SIEVERS, Boulder, term expires 2002 PETER STEINHAUER, Boulder, term expires 2000 Staff MILAGROS CARABALLO, Secretary of the Board of Regents and of the University. B.A., M.S., State University of New York at Albany; M . A., Webster University. UNIVERSITY-WIDE OFFICERS JOHN C. BUECHNER, President of the University; Professor of Public Affairs. B.A., College of Wooster; M.P.A., Ph. D., University of Michigan. JOHN W. BUSS, Vice President for Budget and Finance. B.S., M.P.A., University of Colorado. DAVID A. GROTH, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Research and Dean of the System Graduate School. B.S., M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Michigan State University. Administration I 3 cu IN THE CITY CHARLES V. SWEET, Vice President and University Counsel. B.A., Duke University; J.D., University of Virginia School of Law. STUART TAKEUCHI, Vice President for Administration. B.A., Occidental College; M.P.A., Cornell University; Ph.D., University of Colorado. CU-DENVER OFFICERS GEORGIA E. LESH-LAURIE, Chancellor; Professor of Biology. B .S., Marietta College (Ohio); M.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University. JOHN A. BERNHARD, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.A., Stanford University; M .B.A., Columbia University, Graduate School of Business. MARGARET B. COZZENS, Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs; Professor of Mathematics. B.A., University of Rochester; M.S., Ph.D., Rutgers University. FERNIE BACA, Associate Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative Activities; Associate Professor of Education. B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado. MARK GELERNTER, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs; Professor of Architecture. B .Arch., Montana State University; Ph.D., Bartlett School of Architecture and Planning, University College (London). KENNETH HERMAN, Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.S., University of Colorado. DANNY E. MARTINFZ, Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs. B.A., M.A., University of Colorado.

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4 I Degree Programs cu IN THE CITY Undergraduate Degrees COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA Bachelor of Arts -B.A., Bachelor of Fme Arts -B.F.A., and Bachelor of ScienceB.S. Fine Arts (B.A.) Emphases in Art History, Studio Arts Fine Arts (B.F.A.) Emphases in Drawing/Painting, Film/Video, Multimedia Studies, Photography, Sculpture Music (B.S.) Emphases in Music Engineering, Music Industry Studies, Music Management, Performance, Scoring & Arranging Theatre (B.A.) Emphases in Acting/Directing, Design/ Technical, Integrated Theatre COLLEGE OF BUSINFSS AND ADMINISTRATION Business Administration -B.S. Areas of Emphasis Accounting Finance Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business Management Marketing COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPUED SCIENCE Bachelor of Science -B.S. Civil Engineering (B. S . ) Computer Science and Engineering (B.S.) Electrical Engineering (B.S.) Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) COLLEGE OF UBERAL ARfS AND SCIENCES Bachelor of Arts -B.A. Bachelor of Science -B.S. Anthropology (B.A.) Biology (B.S.) Chemistry (B.S.) Communication (B.A.) Economics (B.A.) English (B.A.) English Writing Program (B.A.) French (B.A.) Geography (B. A . ) Geology (B. S . ) German (B.A.) History (B.A.) Individually Structured Major (B.A.) Mathematics (B.S.) Philosophy (B.A.) Physics (B.S. ) Political Science (B.A.) Psychology (B.A., B.S.) Sociology (B.A.) Spanish (B.A.) Graduate Degrees THE COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING Architecture (M.ARCH. ) Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) Urban and Regional Planning (M.U. R . P . ) Urban Design (M.U. D.) Design and Planning (Ph. D.) GRADUATE SCHOOL OFBUSINFSS AND ADMINISTRATION Accounting (M.S.) Business Administration (M.B.A.) Executive Program Individualized Program Cohort Program Finance (M.S.) Health Administration (M.S.) Executive Program Information Systems (M. S.) International Business (M.S.I.B.) Management and Organization (M.S.) Marketing (M.S. ) SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Certification Program: Teacher Certification in Elementary Education (K.Sth Grade) and Secondary Education (7th-12th Grade); TypeD Certification Administration, Supervision, Curriculum Development (M.A.) Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education (M.A.) Curriculum and Instruction (M.A.) Early Childhood Education (M.A.) Educational Psychology (M. A . ) Information and Learning Technologies (M.A.) Special Education (M.A.) Administration, Supervision, Curriculum Development (Ed.S. ) School Psychology (Ed. S . ) Educational Leadership and Innovation (Ph. D . ) COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPUED SCIENCE Civil Engineering (M.S.) Computer Science (M.S.) Electrical Engineering (M.S.) Engineering (M.E.) Mechanical Engineering (M. S . ) Civil Engineering (Ph. D . ) AND SCIENCES Anthropology (M.A.) Applied Mathematics (M.S.) Basic Science (M.B.S.) Biology (M.A.) Chemistry (M.S.) Communication (M.A.) Economics (M.A.) English (M. A . ) Environmental Sciences (M.S. ) History (M.A. ) Humanities (M.H.) Political Science (M.A.) Psychology (M.A.) Social Science (M.S.S.) Sociology (M.A.) Technical Communication (M.S.) Applied Mathematics (Ph.D.) Health and Behavioral Science (Ph.D.) GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBUC AFFAIRS Criminal Justice (M.C.J.) Public Administration (M.P.A.) Executive Program Public Administration (Ph. D.) Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration, Colorado State Board of Education, Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board, National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, National Architectural Accrediting Board, Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, National Association of Schools of Music, Planning Accreditation Board, National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. You may obtain information about these degrees by contacting us. Mailing Address: Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 Location: 1200 Larimer Street or 1250 14th Street Annex 1 303-556-3287 Web Address: www.cudenver.edu

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Situated near the h art of downtown Denver , and looking st toward the majestic Rocky Moun ain front range , the University of Colo ado at Denver is the only public unive ity in Colorado ' s capital city . Its proxi ity to the commer cial and governmenta hub of Denver enables CU-Denver to offer its students the combined excelle ce of its faculty and the opportunitie afforded by this metropolitan environ ent. One of four campus s in the University of Colorado system, C -Denver is a non residential campus of ering 31 under graduate degrees and 3 master ' s degrees . Ph.D. degrees are offe ed in public affairs , applied mathematics , design and planning , health and behavior sciences , civil engineering , and edu ationalleadership . Classes are offered d ring weekday and evening hours, on we kends , and at off-campus sites . With students ' age ranging between 17 and 75, the averag student age at CU-Denver is 29. Seve ty-eight percent of our students are e ployed and 53 per cent attend part-time Forty-six percent of our nearly 11,000 s udents are enrolled in graduate-level cou ses . CU-Denver ' s facul actively promote the special role of an rban institution in meeting the needs of tudents . They are alert to the challenger and opportunities of the urban environTent and are respon sive to the needs of stjUdents and the community . The compination of our talented faculty and Highly motivated students creates a vithl and exciting educational environ 1 ent , combining practical experience "th academic excellence. UNIVERSITY F COLORADO S STEM In 1876, the same y ar Colorado became the nation ' s 38th stat , the University of Colorado was foun ed in Boulder . Opening its doors on September 5 , 1877, the university began "th 44 students , a president, and one nstructor . Nearly a century later , in 19 , the University of Colorado had gro n to four campuses in three Colorado cities-Denver , Colorado Springs , Health Sciences (Denver ), and Boulder. With combined enrollments totaling nearly 45,000 students , the University of Colorado ranks 17th among public universities and colleges in overall research expenditur e s and lOth among public universities in fed e rally funded research . Awards for research within the university system total approximately $292 million , with funding provided by federal agencies , appropriations from the state of Colorado , and private foundations and donors . Each of the four campuses of t he University of Colorado system has its own chancellor and campus administration . Th e chancellors , in turn , report to the president of the CU System . The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approves the overall direction provided by the president of the system . The system president is both the chief academic and chief administrativ e officer of the un i versity . The president has responsibility for the administration of the entire university under the policies described by the Board of Regents or under law . The University of Colorado at Boulder now serves approximately 25,000 students enrolled in undergraduate , graduate , and professional programs . The Health Sciences Center in Denver provides education and training to medical , dental , nursing , pharmacy , and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 6,500 students in the Pikes Peak region , offering under graduate , graduat e, and professional programs . Total Learning Environment In 1996, CU's current president , John C . Buechner , introduced the Total Learning Environment (fLE) initiative for the University of Colorado system. The TLE initiative is CU' s blueprint for creating the university of the 21st century , a university directly involved with its many constitu encies-including students , businesses , and communities-and their success . CU recognizes that learning will be the new form of labor for the 21st century-that is, the key asset that will determine success in the classroom , in the workplace , and in the community . For that reason , the TLE is designed to add value to CU's already outstanding faculty and excellent academic programs . The TLE adds value to CU and everyone associated with us by: • breaking down barriers within the university ' s culture, as well as those barriers that i nhibit access to CU by individuals , businesses , other educa tional institutions , and communities ; • supportin g e ven greater innovations in teachin g and creativ e scholarship; • using and developing new technologies to enhance learning ; and • positioning CU as a key player in personal , professional , community, and corporate success . CU-Denver has long been known for its innovative approach toward connecting its academic programs to the needs of the community . The Denver campus continues this tradition in support of the TLE initiative by developing exciting new ways to learn , paying attention to the needs of our non-traditional students , creating partne rships with the com munity , and utilizing state-of -the art technology to r e vitalize classrooms . THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to becoming the nation's premier urban university . In urban environments , universities have a particular responsibility to adapt their traditional roles toward the development , assessment, transmission , and preservation of knowledge to urban needs while maintaining the highest standards of education and scholarship . By drawing upon the rich e s of its traditional store of learning and disciplined thought , the university serves as Denver ' s intellectual center and as a community resource ready to respond to the enormous urban challenges and opportunities facing its local and global environment. History In 1912, the University of Colorado's Department of Correspondence and

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6 / Genera/Information Extension was established in Denver to meet the needs of the capital city's burgeoning population . As the breadth of course offerings expanded , so did the demand for degree-granting status. From 1956 until1976 , the Denver Extension Center operated out of the former Denver Tramway Company Building at 14th and Arapahoe Streets. This brick and terra cotta Renaissance Revival-style landmark , with marble and brass interior work , had housed the corporate offices and car barns of a huge streetcar system discontinued in 1950. Designated a landmark on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994, the " Tramway Building " was recently renovated into a distinctive hotel and restaurant . The Denver Extension Center was renamed the University of Colorado Denver Center in 1965, and by 1969, 23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study w e re offered. In 1972, the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria campus , CU-Denver ' s current site . That same year , the " Denver Center " was renamed the University of Colorado at Denver . 197 4 marked the first year CU-Denver granted degrees designated as the University of Colorado at Denver . We celebrate 25 years of degree-granting status during the 1999-2000 academic year. Between 1973 and 1976, the state built the Auraria Higher Education Center , shared by the University of Colorado at Denver , Metropolitan State College of Denver , and the Community College of Denver . In 1988, CU-Denver moved into its first custom-made new home , the 257,000square-foot North Classroom Building , located between Speer Boulevard and Twelfth Street, and Larimer and Lawrence Streets . Hoover, Berg , Desmond , a Denver architectural firm , designed this post modern red brick structure featuring a distinctive glass brick atrium and large outdoor clocks. Role and Mission In the Colorado Revised Statutes , the University of Colorado at Denver is defined as follows: The Denver campus of the University of Colorado shall be a comprehensive baccalaureate liberal arts and sciences institution with high admission standards . The Denver campus shall provide selected professional programs and such graduate program s at the mast e r's and doctoral level as will serve th e needs of the Denver metropolitan area , emphasizing those professional programs not offered by other institutions of higher education. Cities , and their urban areas , are complex centers of commerce , education , government , and the arts. CU-Denver serves a unique role w i thin the university system in providing professional , pre professional , and liberal arts training in the context of a strong multidisciplinary and applied agenda for research and creative activities in the Denver metro politan area. With our strategic placement amid such an urban environment , CU-Denver is singularly equipped to : • educate students of all ages to b e come visionary , responsibl e citizens of cities, both nationally and globally; • develop educational programs that integrate learning and the solution of significant urban , contemporary problems ; • develop ways to bring the skills , talents, and knowledge of the university to the solution of significant urban , contemporary problems ; and • conduct research , create , and disseminate relevant knowledge to solve urban problems . CU-Denver views its location as a fertile ground for advancing and disseminating knowledge , and treats its role and mission as a covenant with the people and institu tions of the urban community . As an urban institution, its boundaries are flexible and permeable , with knowledge flowing to and from the institution and the community . Our view is global rather than parochial as we seek to link teaching , research , and service to urban issues and needs of the state, the nation , and the world . Academic Structure The chancellor of CU-Denver represents the Denver campus and manages campus goal-setting , policy development, academic affairs , and budget and financial matters . The vice chancellor for academic and stu dent affairs is responsible for all academic programs , academic support programs , student enrollment services, the Graduate School , and sponsored programs. The vice chancellor for administration and finance is responsible for the campus budget and the offices of financial and business services , human resources , planning and institutional research, computing services , and voice communications . Academic Programs CU-Denver is , above all, devoted to the needs of the residents of Denver and the region. With the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. CU-Denver comprises seven distinct academic units: College of Architecture and Planning College of Arts & Media College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education College of Engineering and Applied Scienc e College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Graduate School of Public Affairs The undergraduate colleges of arts & media , business, engineering, and liberal arts and sciences admit freshman and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business , engineering, and music . A solid foundation of academic skills and general education is assured through a comprehensive core curriculum . Students may pursue graduate education through all of the campus ' colleges and schools . Pre-professional training in the fields of education , law , journalism , and the health careers are also available . CU-Denver currently employs 444 regular , full-time faculty members. The colleges and schools sections of this catalog provide a complete listing of bachelor ' s , master's , and doctoral degree programs , policies on requirements for graduation , course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions, and similar information. At CU-Denver, faculty explore and incorporate both novel and traditional methods of instruction . Telecommu nications and other electronic media are an integral part of the way CUDenver transcends geographic space, making instruction more stimulating and available , and connecting faculty, students, alumni and state, regional, national , and international leaders. In keeping with the TLE initiative , CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education which leads to improved professional opportunity in the 21st century. Many programs j emphasize practical business world applications , and specific computerj oriented academic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and J sciences), and information systems l (business) programs.

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About Our Students CU-Denver students, both under graduate and graduate, are well grounded th.e academic dtsctphnes, makmg t?em ideal candidates for recruitment by organizations and advanced degree prdgrams throughout the nation. They the leadership, reflection, ethics , an
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8 / Genera/Information facilities, and has recently become the campus student union. An innovative new Academic and Performing Arts Center is scheduled to open in July 2000 , featuring a 350-seat courtyard theater, a five-story concert hall (550 seats), a recital hall (200 seats), and performance support space. The building will also house 29 classrooms and seven enhanced classrooms and computer labs. UNDERGRADUATE ADMISSIONS CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program of study successfully . Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being: 1. Level of previous academic performance ; 2 . Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests; and 3. Evidence of maturity, motivation , and potential for academic success. CU-Denver may deny admission to new applicants or readmission to former students whose credentials indicate an inability to assume obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University. After completing the application process, official notification of one' s admissions status as an undergraduate, graduate , or non-degree student is pro vided by the Office of Admissions . Letters from various schools and colleges indicat ing acceptance into a particular program are pending, subject to official notification of admission to the institution by the Admissions office. Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents or with unofficial documents will be permitted one term to submit the documents. If temporarily waived official documents are not received by the end of the initial term of attendance, registration for sub sequent terms will be denied . If at any time additional credentials are received which affect the student' s qualifications, the University reserves the right to change the admission decision . Applicants who have not decided upon a major field of study will be considered for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences as undetermined majors. Students admitted as undeter mined majors should declare a major as quickly as possible and no later than the end of their sophomore year. All questions and correspondence regarding admission to CU-Denver and requests for application forms should be directed to: Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P .O. Box 173364 Denver , CO 80217 336 4 303-556-3287 admissions@carbon.cudenver .edu Admission Deadlines The University may change document/ credential deadlines in accordance with enrollment demands. For the best scholarship and registration time considerations, applicants should apply and be admitted as early as possible. For an applicant to be considered for a specific term, all documents required for admission must be received in the Office of Admissions by the deadline for that term. Applicants who are unable to meet the deadline may elect to be considere d for a later term. Transfer students are reminded that they should allow sufficient time to have transcripts sent from institutions they have previously attended. lnternational students are advised that it usually takes 60 days for credentials to reach the Office of Admissions from international locations . Advance planning and early application is necessary for the timely admission of international students. Application deadline for priority consideration Fall July22 Spring December 1 Summer May3 Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS) Students entering the University of Colorado who graduated from high school in 1988 or later are required to meet the following Minimum Academic Preparation Standards: 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of college preparatory mathematics ( excluding business and consumer mathematics), 3 years of natural science, 2 years of social science (including one year of U .S. or world history) , 3 years of a single foreign language, and 1 year of the arts. Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admission standards ( e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade-point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University . Two levels of deficiency will be recognized. 1. One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student meets other admission standards and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation from the University. Courses taken to make up a deficiency will count toward graduation, provided the CU Denver college accepts those course credits toward graduation . 2 . A student having more than one unit of deficiency may be admitted , provided that the student meets other standards of the University . The student must make up additional deficiencies before graduation by taking an expanded program of studies. The student may satisfy the MAPS requirements by successful completion of : 1) Courses taken at CU; 2) Courses taken at other institutions of higher education; 3) Additional high school credits; 4) Credit-by-examination programs; or 5) Other requirements as approved by each CUDenver college. Admission Requirements for Freshmen Freshman admission standards define the level of success and achievement necessary to be admitted to the University of Colorado and include factors that pre dict academic success, such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school course work , and the grade-point average . Both the subjects the student has studied and how the student has performed will be factors that determine admission to the University . New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Arts & Media , Business and Administration , Engineering and Applied Science , or Liberal Arts and Sciences . The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test. Preference for admission is given to applicants who rank in the top 30% of their high school graduating class and present a composite score of 21 or higher on the American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 950 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Business applicants will receive priority consideration if they graduated in the top 25% of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. Applicants

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who do not meet the !dml"lon .equl"> ments for direct adm i ssion to the College of Business will be automatically considered for admission as pre-business majors in the College of Libe l;u Arts and Sciences. Engineering will receive priority consideratio h if they graduated in the top 20% of thei t high school class and achieved a comppsite score of at least 26 on the ACT, with 2 ? on the mathematics section, or 1100 total n the SAT, with 600 on the mathematics ection . Applicants who do not meet the fidmissions require ments for direct admission to the College of Engineering will b automatically con sidered for admissiJ as a pre-engineering major in the College f Liberal Arts and Sciences. New freshmen see ing admission to the College of Liber Arts and Sciences (CLAS) and College of Arts & Media must meet College requirefnents for MAPS instituted by the Uni ersity of Colorado . Applicants are requi ed to satisfy 16 units of high school level courses in English , foreign language , matJlematics , sciences , humanities, and socilll sciences . Students are eligible for admission to the Colleges with up to two units b f deficiency in a foreign language an no more than one additional deficienc)\ in the remaining areas. The Colleges will allow graduation credit toward the ba helor ' s degree for courses satisfying MAPS deficiencies only if these courses are llowed for graduation credit under current College policy . All music performF.ce majors in the College of Arts & Media are expected to have had experience in an applied music area. wo years of prior piano training are re ommended. An audition is required. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length j and a statement of excellence from a teacher in lieu of the persondi audition . Interested students should wri t e to the College of Arts & Media, CU-f:enver , for audition information and apA !cations. Applicants for all epartments who do not satisfy the req uirements for priority considerati i are reviewed on an individual basis. COLLEGE OF ARTS MEDIA Years English (literature , mposition , grammar), one year of speech/ debate strongly r+,:ommended ........ 4 Mathematics busines!! and consumer mathematics) ........... 3 Natural science .. . . . ............. .......... 3 Social science . . . . . . . ..... .. ................ 2 Foreign language (all units must be in a single language) ............... . . 3 Academic elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Total .................... .. .. ............... 16 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION Years English (one year of speech/debate and two years of composition are strongly recommended) ........................ .. 4 Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one year of geometry ) .. ........................... 4 Natural science (includes two years of laboratory science) ................. . 3 Social science (including history) ........ 2 Foreign language (all units must be in a single language) .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. . 3 Academic electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 ( additional courses in English , foreign language , mathematics , natural or social science , not to include business courses) Total ....................................... 17 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPUED SCIENCE English (literature, composition , grammar) , one year of speech/ Years debate strongly recommended ........ 4 Mathematics distributed as follows : Algebra ................................... 2 Geometry ............. .................... 1 Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. . 1 Natural sciences ......... ... ............... . 3 (to include 1 unit physics and 1 unit chemistry; also to include 2 units of lab oratqry science ) Foreign language ........... . .............. . 2 Social science ............................. . . 2 Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Total ....................................... 16 COLLEGE OF UBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES English (literature , composition , grammar), one year of speech/ Years debate strongly recommended .. ...... 4 Mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics) ........... 3 Natural science . ........................ .. .. 3 Social science . ........... ................... 2 Foreign language (all units must be in a single language) ............... .. 3 Academic elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Total ....................................... 16 Undergraduate Admissions I 9 HOW TO APPLY 1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor or from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. 2 . The application must be completed and sent to the Office of Admissions with a $40 (subject to change) non-r e fundable fee. For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term, the $40 application fee will remain valid for 12 months , provided the Office of Admissions is informed of the intent to e nroll for a later term. 3 . Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades , including class rank, to the Office of Admissions. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to: Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P . O . Box 173364 Denver , CO 80217-3364 Hand-<:arr ie d or faxed copie s are not official. 4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to have a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate sent directly from the certify ing agency to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions (see Admissions Requirements for Non-High School Graduates). 5 . Students also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4875 ). High school students may obtain ACT and SAT test dates and locations from their counselors. Students who took one of these tests while in high school may use the test scores reported on their official high school transcripts as an official test score report. Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver as the recipient of the scores must notify the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver . A Request for Additional Score Report may be requested from any of the offices listed below . American College Testing Program (ACT) P . O . Box 168 Iowa City, Iowa 52243 (319) 337-1270 The College Board (SAT) .P.O. Box620 1 Princeton , New Jersey08541-6201 (609 ) 7717600

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IO /Genera/Information 6 . International students must submit proof of proficien c y in the English language (see Requirements for International Students). APPLICANTS NOT GRANTED ADMISSION An applicant who is not granted admission as an entering freshman may wish to consider transferring to the University after successful study else where. The Office of Admissions urges such students to complete at least one full semester (12-15 c redit hours) of college-level course work at another college or university , giving special attention to courses that will provide sound academic preparation for future transfer to CU-Denver . These courses should include any Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS) not met in high school (see the MAPS requirements). Students who are not admissible will be encouraged to participate in a Redirect Program that CU-Denver has established with community colleges. All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file . Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate all previously attended institutions will be denied admission to, or will be disenrolled from, the University. New Student Orientation An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, during the week prior to the first day of classes. The orientation program provides information to new students about activities and serv ices available at CU-Denver . Information on the registration process, parking, and securing ID cards i s also provided . Academic advising sessions are held before registration for the term. Students should contact their schools and colleges for additional informat ion on advising, as well as special orientation sessions that may be held for their programs. Admission Requirements for Non-High School Graduates An individual who has not graduated but has passed the General Education Development (GED) test may be considered for admission . The application for undergraduate admission must be accompanied by a $40 non-refundable application fee and an official transcript showing completed high school courses. An applicant must also submit GED scores and scores from either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT) Program. The admission decision is based on the student's potential for academic success at CU-Denver . Admission Requirements for Transfer Students Applicants are considered transfer students for admission purposes if they have completed at least 12 semester hours of college course work since graduating from high school. Applicants are not considered transfer students if the only college-level classes they have taken were before high school graduation. Any applicant not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended will be refused admission . To meet the minimum transfer admission standards at CU-Denv e r , students must meet one of the following conditions: 1. Have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade-point average : a . 2.5 GPA (on a4.0 scale); or b . 2.0 GPA if transferring from Colorado School of Mines , Colorado State University , University of Colorado at Boulder , or University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. 2 . Have earned 30 or more collegiate semester hours with a 2 . 0 GPA. Transfer students are given priority consideration for admission as follows: 1 . College of Business and Administration. To be considered for transfer admis sion, students must have completed at least 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Priority consideration for admission will be granted to transfer applicants with a minimum cumulative overall GPA of 3 . 0 for all work applicable to a B .S. in Business Administration degree, including a minimum 2 . 0 GPA in business courses. Students may also be admitted if they have a 3.0 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work, a 2 . 0 GPA in business courses, and at least a 2.0 overall cumulative GPA in courses applicable to a B.S. in Business Administration degree. Transfer applicants who do not meet either of the priority admission standards are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA earned in the last 24 hours. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available, or are referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission considera tion, where they will be advised as pre-business majors . Applicants with at least a 2 . 6 GPA in applicable course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with less than a 2.6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideratiOI:l, where they will be advised as pre-business majors. 2 . College of Engineering and Applied Science . Applicants to the College of Engineering should have at least a 2 . 75 cumulative grade-point average for all math and science course work attempted, at least 24 hours of college course work including two semesters each of calculus and physics. 3 . College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . Transfer applicants must have at least . a 2 . 0 cumulative college grade-point average for all work attempted. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. 4 . College of Arts & Media. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2 . 0 cumula tive college grade-point average for all work attempted. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music major applicants (except those entering the Music Industry Studies program) also must pass an audition. Contact the Department of Performing Arts for audition information, 303-556-4652 . Important Note : Applicants who do not meet the above grade-point average or credit hour requirements will be considered for admission , but on an individual ba sis. The primary factors used when considering students individually are: 1 ) Probabilityof success in the academic program to which admission is desired; 2) The quality of prior academic work; 3)Age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and 4) Time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges . HOW TO APPLY 1. The student should obtain an applica tion for undergraduate admission from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions . 2. The application form must be com pleted and returned with the required $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee .

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CU SUCCEED, AP, AND IB CREDIT EQUIVALENCY CHART ( 1 , 2 l CU-Denver Core CU&cceed Advanced Placement Credits International Baccalaureate Credits (S) (H) Requirements Silver/Gold Courses Cr (seenote3) Cr (seenote4) Cr Cr English/Communicat i ns ENGL1020 3 English Language EnglishA1 3 3 Proficiency ENGL2030 3 & Composition 3 (6-9hours) ENGL2154 3 English Uterature CMMU2101 3 & Composition 3 Mathematics MATH 1070/1080 3 CalculusAB 4 Advanced Mathematics 4 Proficiency (3 hours) MATH lll0/1120 3 Calculus BC 8 Math Higher Level 8 MATH 1401/2411 4 Computer Science AB 4 Math Methods 4 MATH 2422/2423 4 Statistics 3 Math Studies 4 MATH 1350/2000 3 Computer Science 4 4 Natural & Physical ANTH 1303 4 Biology 8 Biology 4 8 Sciences (8 hours) BIOL 1550/1560 4 Chemistry 8 Chemistry 4 8 CHEM147X 4 PhysicsB 4 Environmental Sys 4 8 ENVS 1042 4 Physics CMechanics 4 Physics 4 8 GEOL 1072/1082 4 Physics CElectromag 4 PHYS 1000/1052 4 Environmental Science 4 Behavioral Sciences ANTH2102 3 Social Anthropology 3 6 (3-6hours) CMMU1011 3 CMMU1021 3 PSY 1000/1005 3 Psychology 3 Psychology 3 6 Social Sciences ECON2012 3 Economics-Macro 3 Economics 3 6 (3-6hours) ECON2022 3 Economics-Micro 3 GEOG 1102/2202 3 Geography 3 6 PSC 1001 3 American Government 3 PSC 1101 3 Gov't. & Politics: Amer. 3 soc 1001 3 Gov't. & Politics: Comp. 3 SOC2462 3 Humanities ENGL 1601 3 English Lit. & Comp. 3 EnglishA1 3 3 (6hours) ENGL2600 3 English Lang. & Comp. 3 Philosophy 3 6 HIST 1381 3 Classics: Any Area 3 HIST 1382 3 History-U.S. or Europe 6 History-Any Area 3 6 PHIL 1012 3 French Literature 3 PHIL 1020 3 German Literature 3 Spanish Literature 3 Arts (3 hours) ARTS 1000 3 Art: History 3 Art/Design 3 3 FA 1001 3 Art: Studio 3 PMUS 1001 3 Music Theory 3 Music 3 3 TiffR 1001 3 Music Listening & Literature 3 Theatre Arts 3 3 Foreign Language FR/GER/SPAN 1010 5 French Language 3 Language A2, B 3 6 (see noteS) FR/GER/SPAN 1020 5 German Language 3 Language ab initio 3 6 FR/GER/SPAN 2110 3 Spanish Language 3 Classical Languages 3 6 NOTES: I. Maxin um of 30 semester hours of credit from combination of AP and IB sources. 2. Appli ation of AP or IB credit toward the major is based on an evaluation by the major department. 3 . Students shall receive credit for advanced placement if they achieve (a) an AP examination score of 4 or 5 or (b) an AP examination score of 3 AND a graqe of "A" in the second semester of the AP course. 4 . Students shall receive credit for international baccalaureate if they achieve a minimum IB examination score of 4. Two levels of IB credit are standard (S) and higher (H). 5 . Credi available in any classic or modern langauge. Students satisfying AP or IB foreign language credit requirements also receive foreign language proficiency. R s 1999 I I

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12 / Genera/Information 3 . The student is required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended . Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to : Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denv e r Campus Box 167, P . O . Box 173364 Denver , CO 80217-3364 Hand-carried or faxe d copies are not official. If a student is currently enrolled at another institution , an incomplete transcript listing all courses except thos e taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term . (franscripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accompanied by a certified literal English translation.) Arts & Media and Liberal Arts applicants with fewer than 1 2 semester hours (18 quarter hours ) of college work completed also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores . Engineering and Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores . All cre d e ntials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must r e main on file. Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate all previously attended institutions will be denied admission to, or will be disenrolled from, the University. TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT Course work taken at any regionally accredited institution of higher education will be considered for transfer to CU Denver . Courses are considered for transfer on the basis of having similar content to those offer e d by CUD e nv e r . General education " core " cours e s are usually accepted . Developmental , remedial , vocational , technical , religious , doctrinal , orientation , independent study, special topics, and cooperative education courses are not accepted. Only courses in which a grade of \C-or better was earned are considered for transfer. Courses in which a grade of Pass ( P) was earned are considered for transfer only if a grade of Pass at the sending institution is defined as a C-or better. Students wishing to appeal transfer credit decisions should contact their CU-Denve r academic department. After all official transcripts have been received and the stud e nt is admitted as a degree student, the Offic e of Admissions will prepare a transf e r c redit report indi cating wh ich cours es hav e bee n accepted in transfer by CU-De nv er. A copy of this report is mailed to the student as well as to the student' s acad e mic d epartment at CUDenver . Upon r eceipt of this transfer credit report, students should contact their academic departm e nt to meet with an advisor , who will determine how transferred credit applies to specific CU-Denver degree requirements. The Office of Admissions considers course work for transfer regardless of the age of the academ ic credit. individual departme nts , howev e r , may have specific guidelines and policies about age of credit and make the final decision about application of credit t o ward a degree program . Students are ex p e ct e d to have current working knowledge of prerequisite cours e s , r e gardless of when prerequisite courses were taken . Students who have transferred extension or correspondence cours e work should contact their academic departments regarding credit hour limits in these areas. The College of Bus i n ess and Adminis tration generally limits its transfer of business course credits to those business courses which are offe red as lower division courses at C U-De nver. Students who have taken upp e r-division business courses from an American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited College of Business may request review of the s e courses for possible transfer by contacting the College of Business advising office. All courses taken in the business area of emphasis must be completed at CU-Denver . The Colle ge of Engine erin g and Applied Science , in g e n e ral , requires that engineering cours e transfer credit must come from an Accreditation Board for Eng ineerin g a nd Technology (ABET) accredited engineering program to be acceptable for degree purposes. Engineering technolo gy cours e s are not considered equivalent to engineering courses . A maximum of 72 s e mester hours is acceptable in transfer to CUDenver from community colleges . Students who com pleted the Colorado Community College Core Curriculum program , and whose transcripts contain th e statem e nt " core curriculum completed," may transfer this core curriculum as a package and receive credit for the lower-division component of CUDenver's core curriculum . The College of Business and the College of Engineering have specific courses required of all students which may be taken as part of, or in addition to, the community college core curriculum. A Compr e hensive Guide to Student Transfer document containing Colorado community college advising plans and admission information is available from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.ln addition , a CUDenver admissions repre sentative keeps regular office hours at Denver metropolitan area community colleges to assist students with planning a transfer program. Representatives also visit other Colorado community colleges. Call the CU-Denver Successful Transitions Coordinator at 303-556 4950 for additional information. OTHER TRANSFER CREDIT Credit granted through programs listed below appears on the CU-Denver transcript. The academic department determines how this credit applies to degree requirements. See CU Succeed, AP, and 18 Credit Equivalency Chart on preceding page . Accelerated Baccalaureate Program (CAB) The CAB ( Curriculum for an Acceler ated Baccalaureate ) program is a unique partnership between CU-Denver and select high schools which enables stu dents to accelerate their progress toward a college degree . Students from participat ing high schools can earn up to 30 hours of CU-Denver core curriculum course credits while in high school by: 1) taking regular college courses in the high school , taught by CU-Denver faculty or college qualified high school faculty, through the CU Succeed program ; 2) concurrently enrolling in designated courses on the CU-Denver campus ; and /or 3) obtaining acceptable scores on the Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate (higher and subsidiary levels) examina tions . Students can begin work on college courses leading to a baccalaureate degree from CU-Denver's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and College of Arts & Media beginning in their junior year of high school. Advanced Placement Program The Advanced Placement (AP) Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and

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then be examined for f.redit at the college level. Students who tfce advanced place ment courses and su sequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on th CEEB Advanced Placement Examinatl' n are generally given college credit f r lower -level courses in which the have demonstrated proficiency, and are g anted advanced standing in those are s . The College of Liberal Arts and Scie ces also grants AP credit for scores of 3 wlus a course grade of A-in corresponding subject. For more information, contact t1 our high school counselor or the Offi e of Admissions at CU-Denver. College-Level Exam nation Program Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have demonstrated college-level proficiency . Interested students a{e encouraged to take appropriate subJect examinations provided in the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of tqe College Entrance Examination Board testing service . Students who are interested in how CLEP examination Crfdit applies to the CU-Denver degree requirements should contact their acade ic advisor. International Bacciaureate Diploma Program Entering students ay receive college credit from tr.e International Baccalaureate Diplo a Program available at select high school . The International Baccalaureate (IB) p ogram is a rigorous , pre-university cours of study emphasiz ing liberal arts from r. international perspective. In gene al, students may receive college credi for higher level and standard level subjects in which a minimum ex ination score of 4 (out of 7) is achiev d. Students with IB high school credit j should contact the College of Arts and Sciences Advising Office, NC 24, 303-556-2555 , for advising on cour e-specific credit for IB course work. Military Service an Schooling To have credit for ducational experience evaluated, with military experience should s bmit the following with their applicatio : 1) AcopyofDD F rm 214, and 2) DO Form 295, Pip plication for the Evaluation of Experi ence During Military Service. USAF personnel may present two official transcripts from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of DDForm295 . Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education, to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver. Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions . Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements . The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for non-business elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses . Further more, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business, and then only if the ROTC program is completed. Intra-University Transfer CU..Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer . CU-Denver Intra-University Transfer forms may be obtained from the Records Office. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Courses. Decisions on intra university transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer. Students in Extended Studies programs wishing to enroll in regular CU..Denver courses or degree programs should contact the Office of Admissions for a degree application . Readmission Requirements for Former Students CU-Denver students who have not regis tered and attended classes at CU-Denver .for one year or longer, and who have not attended another institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmission. An additional application fee is required only if you are changing from undergraduate to graduate or non-degree to degree status. Undergraduate Admissions I 13 Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions. Students who have attended another college or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as transfer students and meet the transfer student deadlines for receipt of docu ments. This requires payment of the $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee and submission of two official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended . Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to : Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P. 0 . Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Students who last attended another CU campus must formally apply for read mission . An application fee is not required unless you are going from undergraduate to graduate or from non-degree to degree status. Application forms are available from the Office of Admissions . Admission for Non-Degree Students Persons who have reached the age of twenty and who want to take University courses, but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree , may be admitted as non-degree students provided they are eligible to return to all collegiate institutions previously attended . Correspondence and questions regarding admission as a non-degree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions. Those seeking admission as non-degree students for the purpose of teacher licensure should contact the School of Education, 303-556-2717. Each school/college limits the number of semester hours taken as a non-degree student that may be transferred to a degree program . Students considering changing from non-degree to degree status should contact the school/college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the number of hours that may be taken as a non-degree student. Courses taken for credit as a non degree student can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional development . Note: International students are not admitted as non-degree students, except for summer sessions. They must hold a valid student visa. Students with a baccalaureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree

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14/ Genera /Inform ation programs may enroll for course work as non-d egree students. They must complete a non-degree application for admission. Students in a non-degree status who have a previous degree pay graduate tuition rates . To apply for admission as a non-degree student, obtain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office of Admis sions . Return the completed application by the deadline for the term desired. A $25 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee is required . No additional credentials are required. Applicants who seek teacher licensure must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials. Non-degree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space available basis. Continuation as a non-degree student with no prior undergraduate degree is contingent upon maintaining an overall grade-point average of 2.0 upon comple tion of 12 or more semester hours . Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by followin g the instructions outlined on the application for degree admission form. They should contact their academic advisor regarding the process of transferring credit from non-degree to degre e status. Admission for Students Seeking a Second Undergraduate Degree Students who already hold a bachelor's degree may apply for admission to a program in which they can earn a second undergraduate degree . Applicants for a second undergraduate degree must meet CU-Denver admissions standards. These students may apply to the College of Arts & Media, College of Engineering and Applied Science or the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . Persons who already hold an undergraduate degree in any discipline generally may not apply for a second undergraduate degree in business. Rather , they should apply to a graduate M.BA or M .S. business program. Contact the Graduate School of Business at 303-556-5900 . Education is a graduate program . Interested students should contact the School of Education office for information, 303-556-2717. HOW TO APPLY 1. Obtain an application for under graduate admission from the Office of Admissions. 2. Complete the application and send it to the Office of Admissions with a $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee. 3 . Have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institut ion directly to : Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364 Denver , CO 80217-3364 Hand
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CU-Denver's graduate tudents bring practical experience g 'ned in the Denver community to the clas room, and are ready to relate the re ities of practice to the models present d . The CUDenver Gra uate School includes the following olleges and schools: College of Architect e and Planning College of Arts & M dia College of Engineer! g and Applied Science College of Liberal ts and Sciences Graduate School of Administration SchoolofEducatio Graduate School of ublic Affairs Degrees Offered The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through the Graduate School at CU-Denver: Master of Arts (M.A.) in: Anthropology Biology Communication Economics English History Political Science Psychology Sociology Master of Arts (M.A. ducation) in: Administration, Su ervision, and Curriculum evelopment Counseling Psychology and Counselor Educ Curriculum and Ins ruction Early Childhood E ucation Educational Psych logy Information and Le ning Technology Special Education Master of Science (M. Accounting Applied Mathemat cs Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineer ng Environmental Sci nces Finance Health Administration Information Syste1s International Busi ess Management and rganization Marketing Mechanical Enginiring Technical Commu I cation Master of Architectu e (M.Arch.) Master of Basic Scie ce (M.B.S.) Master of Bus.iness Administration (M.B.A.) Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) Executive Option Master of Criminal Justice (M.C.J.) Master of Engineering (M.E.) Master of Science in Health Administration (M.S.H.A.) Executive Option Master of Humanities (M.H.) Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) Master of Public Administration (M.P.A. ) Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) Executive Option Master of Social Science (M. S . S.) Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) Master of Urban Design (M.U. D.) Specialist in Education (Ed . S.) The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph .D.) in: Applied Mathematics Civil Engineering Design and Planning Educational Leadership and Innovation Health and Behavioral Sciences Public Administration Requirements for Admission GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, applicants for admission as regular degree students must : 1. Hold a bachelor's degree or master ' s degree from an accredited college or university . 2. Present a combination of the following : a cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 2 . 5 or better on a scale where A is equal to 4.0, standardized examinations, prior professional experience, portfolios , or other indicators. 3 . Meet the specific requirements as established by the program faculty. Seniors will not be eligible for financial aid , scholarships , or fellowships as a graduate student until the equivalent of the minimum for the bachelor's degree have been satisfied . APPLICATION PROCEDURES Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the Office Graduate School I 15 of Admissions concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications. Once a student has decided to apply for a graduate program, a completed application must be in the major department or in the Office of Admissions before the deadline date. An applicant for admission must present: 1. Parts I and II of the CU-Denver Graduate School Application Form, including the Tuition Classification form, which may be obtained from the departmental program coordinator. 2 . Two official transcripts for all academic work in colleges and universities completed to date. 3 . Three letters of reference. Please have nominators include applicant's name and social security number in their letter of reference. 4. A nonrefundable application fee (check or money order) of $50 (international student application fee is $60). No application will be processed until this fee is paid. 5 . Any other material required specifically by the program faculty . This may include scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or other examination . Check with program coordinators in the departments for additional information that may be required. When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson or a student admissions committee of the department wiii decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and make that decision known to the Office of Admissions . Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award (e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship) should contact their department before the applica tion deadline date for information, since deadlines are usually earlier for aid requests . Readmission/Changing Program s Former and current students who wish to be readmitted or change from one degree program to another must meet the requirements of the new degree program and provide all items required of students applying to the Graduate School at CU-Denver for the first time. These applicants , however, may petition the program to which they were initially admitted in order to secure a release of transcripts and letters of recommenda tion supplied at the time of their initial application .

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16/ Genera/Information Transferring Students transferring from another CU campus to CU-Denver must apply and be accepted to the new campus . Doctoral Application A student who has completed a master' s program at CU-Denver must resubmit Parts I and II of the graduate application for acceptance into the doctoral program . International Applicants Prospective international students should contact the Office of Admissions for submission deadlines. The application packet should include : $60fee TOEFL scores Financial documentation Graduate Record Examination scores Official English translation of all school records Other documents as noted in the previous section on application procedures Acceptable TOEFL Scores : The TOEFL is the Test of English as a Foreign Language . If a student's native language is not English , or the student has not attended a British or American university for at least one year and achieved satisfactory grades , then he/she must take the TOEFL. All programs within arts and sciences education , and doctoral programs ' require a minimum score of 500 for regular admission. In addition , all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (fOEFL ) score of 500 before CU-Denver will process the application for admission . However, many departments require a TOEFL score higher than 500 when granting admission to a graduate program . The University provides an Intensive English Program for international students preparing to pass the TOEFL, through the American Language Center . See Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section for a complete description . Graduate Qualifying Examinations At the option of any department , the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) may be required of applicants for admission to the graduate program or for assistantships prior to determining student status. Students who are applying for assistantships for the fall semester should take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that the ir scores will be available to the selection committee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by the department. Information regarding these examina tions may be obtained from the CUDenver Office of Admissions or The Educational Testing Service; Box 1502; Berkeley , California 94701 or Box 955 Princeton New Jersey 08540 . ' ' Other tests may be required by the school or college. Students entering pro fessional schools and special programs may obtain information on the Graduate Management Admiss ions Test (GMAl) , Miller Analogies Test (MAl), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (LSAl) from the college or school r e quiring the test. New Student Orientation An orientation program for all new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters , during the week prior to the firs t d a y of classes. The orientation program provides information to new students about ac tivities and serv ices available at CUD e nver. Information on the registration process, parking , and securing ID cards is also provided . Academ i c advising sessi ons are held before registration for the term . Students should contact their s c hools and colleges for additional information on advising , as well as special orientation sessions that may be held for t hei r programs . Registration On the regular regist r ation days of each semester, students who have been admitted to a graduat e program are required to complet e appropriate registration procedures . Students should reg i s ter for classes the semester they are accepted as graduate students. If unable to attend that semester , they must notify the Office of Admissions and Records , in addition to the department that has accepted them . CHANGES IN REGISTRATION A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit s hould follow the drop/ add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Courses). After the tenth week of classes graduate students may not drop, add , or change a course to no-credit status without presenting a letter to the dean of their school or college , stating the exceptional circumstances that justify the change. This letter, endorsed by the instructor of the course must accompany the properly signed and completed drop/add card or no-credit option form. WITHDRAWAL Graduate students who desire to with draw from the University must apply to the dean of their school or college for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official withdrawal will be marked as having failed the course . After the tenth week of the class, the s tudent must have the Associate Deans signature to drop a course. Tuition and Fees For information, see Tuition and Fees section . Financial Aid for Graduate Study COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the state of Colorado. Grant awards are announced each semester for the follow ing term . Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid, 303-556-2886. COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise and to continuing students on the basis of academic success. Please contact the department for information about this fellowship. GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructorship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate M.A. degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. Please contact the department for further information .

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RESEARCH Research provide opportuni ties for graduate stu?ents to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. lease contact the department for furtt er information. LOAN FUNDS Graduate student wishing to apply for long-term loans and or part-time jobs through the college r\'Ork-study program should submit an apflication for financial aid to the Office of Fi ancial Aid by March 31. This office alsop ovides short-term loan assistance to st dents who have completed one or m re semesters in residence. loans are designed to supplement inadE:jquate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Applica tion should be made directly to the Office of Financial Aid, 303-556-2886. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES The an employ ment service in the ffice of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work, either throug conventional employment or thro gh the college work-study progr . Students by the University are hired solely on t e basis of merit and fitness, a policy hich avoids favor or discrimination b a use of race, color, creed, sex, age, han icap, or national origin. Students are ilso referred to prospective in accordance with this policy . Requirements or Advanced Degrees QUALITY OF GRAjDUATE WORK A student is expe 9 ted to maintain at least an overall3 . 0 ar erage in all work attempted while enrplled in a graduate program . For all graduated grees, a course mark below Cis unsatisfa tory and will not be counted toward the minimum require ments for these deg ees . CREDIT BY TRAN FER A limited amount )f high quality resident graduate work ione in a recognized graduate school els where within the time allowed may bE accepted , provided it is recommended t y the department concerned and app oved by the school or college dean . The maximum amount of work that may be to this University is 9 semester hours or 30% of the number of credits required for the degree, whichever is higher for master's degrees, and 18 hours for performance and Ph .D. degrees. The school or college shall determine if graduate classes taken by an under graduate can be transferred to a graduate program. They shall also determine if courses taken in the University of Colorado system are considered resident or transfer courses. Courses taken as pass/fail or satisfactory/unsatisfactory will not be transferred. In addition, a grade of B or above must be earned for a course to be transferred. Courses over 10 years old will not be transferred. USE OF ENGLISH A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of standard English in all oral and written work may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado . Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance . Each department will judge the qualifi cations of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations , and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate's proficiency. GRADUATE APPEALS Final action on appeals submitted by graduate students concerning action taken by faculty members, programs, or administrative officials rests with the campus Graduate Council. Master's Degree A student regularly admitted to a graduate program and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master's degrees will be recommended for the degree only after certain requirements have been met. The requirements stated below are min imum requirements ; additional conditions may be set by the individual programs. Departments or program committees may have deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student's responsibility to ascertain and meet these requirements. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS The minimum requirements of graduate work for the degrees Master of Arts or Master of Science may be fulfilled by completing a minimum of 30 semester Graduate School I 17 credits for master's degrees, of which no more than six may be thesis hours . LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and modern languages as each department requires. See specific depart mental requirements. GRADUATE CREDIT Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above, and that are offered by professors who are members of the graduate faculty. Courses at the 4000 level may be counted for graduate credit, but a minimum of 18 semester hours must be taken at the 5000 level. No course below the 4000 level may be counted for graduate credit. Departmental approval must be obtained for the courses taken by a student to count toward the degree plan. Students are advised that not all courses listed in this catalog are available at any one time . Some are given in alter nate years , and this should be considered when developing degree plans. MASTER'S THESIS CREDIT Every graduate student working toward a master's degree who expects to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the require ments for the degree must register for the sis credit with a maximum of 6 semester hours. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed.lf the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an In Progress (IP) will be reported. THESIS REQUIREMENTS A thesis may be of a research, exposi tory, critical, or creative type. Every thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must: 1. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field. 2 . Be based upon independent study and investigation. 3 . Represent the equivalent of from 4 to 6 semester hours of work. 4. Receive the approva l of the major department. 5 . Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given. 6 . Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in Directions for Preparing Master' s and Doctoral Theses, which is obtainable from the Graduate School office, and have received a preliminary thesis format approval .

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18 / Genera/Information All theses must be signed by the thesis advisor and other committee members . Approved theses are kept on file in the Auraria Library and in the student ' s department. The thesis binding fee must be paid by check when the thesis is submitted to the Graduate School office. TIME LIMIT Master's degree students have seven years from the date of the start of course work to complete all degree requirements. Doctor of Philosophy The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph . D.) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University . To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued . Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work i n this field ; furthermore , they must have shown the ability to work independently i n their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge. The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in th e announcements of separate departments . Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules . Studies leading to the Ph.D. de gr ee must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholar ship in a broad field of knowledge . A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments . The criterion as to what constitutes an acceptable field of study shall be that the student' s work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University. MINIMUM COURSE/DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph .D. degree . Course Work R e quirement. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses num bered 5000 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum. Dissertation Hours Requir e m e nt . To complete the requirements for the Ph . D., a student must complete a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation cred i t , with not more than ten of these credit hours taken during any single semester. A minimum of five dissertation hours must be registered for each fall and spring semester following successful completion of the colloquium or comprehensive examination . Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above. Course work and work on the disserta tion may proceed concurrently through out the doctoral program . RESIDENCE The student must b e properl y r egis t e red t o earn residen c e credit . The minimal residence requirement shall be three semesters of scholarly work. EXAMINATIONS Each Ph.D. program will require at least comprehensive and final e x aminations. Notice of all examinations must be filed with the Dean of the Graduate School at least two weeks prior to administration. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION The student mqst pass a comprehen sive examination in the field of concentra tion and related fields. This e x amination may be oral , written , or both , and will test the student ' s mastery of a broad field of knowledge , not merely the formal c ourse work completed . The examination shall be conducted by an examining board. The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to total a minimum of four members of the graduate faculty , one of whom is outside the primary department . CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DOCTORAL CANDIDATES Following successful completion of the comprehensive examination , students must register continuously. These students will register for and be charged for a minimum of five hours of dissertation credit each fall and spring semester . A maximum of 10 hours of diss e rtation credit may be registered for in any one semester . Continuous r eg istration during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense. It is expected that the student and advisor will consult each semester as to the num ber of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classification identified above. DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS A dissertation based upon original investigation , showing mature scholar ship, critical judgment , and familiarity with the tools and methods of research must be written upon a subject approved by the student's major department . To be acceptable , this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student's special field . In mechanical features , all dissertations must comply with the specifications as outlined in the Directions for Preparing Master's and Doctoral Theses , which may be obtained from the Graduate School office. The final draft must be reviewed and approved for format by the Graduate School prior to final copies being made. Three formally approved , typewritten copies of the dissertation , including abstract , plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in the Graduate School office. The thesis binding fee and microfilm fee must be paid by check when the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School office. The abstract , not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts Jnternation'al. The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department. All approv e d dissertations are kept on file in the Auraria Library . One copy is deposited in the reference section and the other in the archives section of the library . The third copy is sent to student's department. When the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School office, the candidate must sign an agreement with University Microfilms Int e rnational to allow for publication in Diss ertation Abstracts International and to grant University Mic r ofilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b ) copies of the manuscript made from microform . The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any ' means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform . FINAL EXAMINATION/DEFENSE After the d i ssertation has been accepted , a final examination of the dissertation and related topics will be conducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral , the oral portion

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being open to anyone. The examination will be conducted by j a committee consist ing of at least four members of the gradu ate faculty, one of must be from outside the student ' department. Notice of all exami ations must be filed with the Dean of the raduate School at least two weeks prio to administration. TIME LIMIT An eight-year max)num limit is in effect for doctoral studies. TUITION AN[] FEES All tuition and fee , harges are established by the Board of Regents , the governing body jf the University of Colorado, in accord nee with legislation enacted annually by he Colorado General Assembly. The Rege ts reserve the right to change tuition an9 fee rates at any time. The following rates ':)'ere for the 1998-99 academic year, and eye provided to assist prospective in anticipating costs. Rates are being revised for the 1999-2000 ac ernie year. Please refer to the Schedule f Courses for the term in which you for current tuition and fees information. Payment of lui ion and Fees All tuition and fee (except the applica tion fee) are payable when the student register for the term , accord ing to guidelines in t e current Schedule of Courses. Students ay select one of the payment plans t at are available at CU-Denver. Specific ijlformation on the deferred payment pljins is included in the Schedule of Courses 1 ublished before each semester or summer session . Students who fail to pay tuitio and fees in full or make payment ar angements by the published deadlines be dropped from all classes. Students who regi ter in a non-degree status, and who later! apply and are admit ted to a degree statu! for that term , are responsible for the d ' fference in tuition between the ree program and their applicable program and will be billed accordingh. Students who regis ter for courses are li< ble for payment of tuition and fees even if they drop out of school. Refund polic es for students who withdraw from the Ujliversity are included in the Schedule of Co rses. A student with financial obligations o the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term , to be graduated, to be issued transcripts , or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special l Credit hours 0-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9-15 eac h c redit hour over 15 Credit hours 0-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9-15 each credit hour over 15 Credit hours 0-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9-15 each credit hourover15 Credit hours 0-1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9-15 each credit hour over 15 Tuition and Fees I 19 1998-1999 Tuition TUITION IS BASED ON SWDENT STATIJS. IT IS NOT BASED ON THE LEVEL OF COURSES THIS DOES NOT INCLUDE TUmON FOR ONUNE COURSES. SEE THE FOUOWING PAGE FOR DETAILED INFORMATION. UNDERGRADUATE RESIDENT 'fUITION RATES UberalArts Arts&Media Business Engineering Non-Degree • and Sciences $ 120 $ 138 $ 138 $ 138 $ 120 240 276 276 276 240 360 414 414 414 360 480 552 552 552 480 600 690 690 690 600 720 828 828 828 720 840 966 966 966 840 960 1,104 1 ,104 1 ,104 960 985 1,146 1,146 1 ,146 985 1 2 0 138 138 138 120 UNDERGRADUATE NON-RESIDENT TUITION RATES UberalArts Arts&Media Business Engineering Non-Degree* and Sciences $ 646 $ 672 $ 672 $ 672 $ 646 1,292 1,344 1,344 1 ,344 1,292 1 ,938 2,016 2,016 2,016 1,938 2,584 2,688 2,688 2 ,688 2,584 3,230 3,360 3 ,360 3,360 3,230 3,876 4,032 4,032 4,032 3,876 5,380 5 ,600 5,600 5 ,600 5,380 5,380 5,600 5,600 5 ,600 5 ,380 5,380 5,600 5,600 5 ,600 5,380 646 672 672 672 646 GRADUATE RESIDENT TUITION RATES UberalArts Architecture Education Engineering Business Non-Degree • and Sciences and Planning Public Affairs $ 181 $ 192 $ 199 $ 212 $ 225 $ 192 362 384 398 424 450 384 543 576 597 636 675 576 724 768 796 848 900 768 905 960 995 1,060 1 ,125 960 1,086 1 ,152 1,194 1,272 1,350 1,152 1,267 1,344 1,393 1,484 1,575 1,344 1,448 1,536 1,592 1,696 1,800 1 ,536 1,498 1,598 1,765 1,765 1,877 1 ,598 181 192 199 212 225 192 GRADUATE NON-RESIDENT TUITION RATES UberalArts Architecture Education Engineering Business Non-Degree • and Sciences and Planning Public Affairs $ 717 $ 764 $ 764 $ 764 $ 777 $ 764 1,434 1,528 1,528 1,528 1,554 1,528 2,151 2,292 2 ,292 2,292 2,331 2,292 2,868 3,056 3,056 3,056 3,108 3 ,056 3,585 3,820 3,820 3,820 3,885 3 ,820 4,302 4,584 4,584 4,584 4,662 4,584 5,977 6,361 6,361 6,361 6,481 6,361 5,977 6,361 6,361 6,361 6 ,481 6,361 5,977 6,361 6,361 6,361 6,481 6,361 717 764 764 764 777 764 *Non-
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20 / Genera/Information Tuition for Online Courses Online tuition rates apply to all online courses, whether or not on
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days a week. The Pas , s is NOT valid for either the Access-Ar ide or Guaranteed Ride Home program . Cultural Events Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.00 The Cultural Even s Fee provides funding for the Univ rsity of Colorado at Denver's College *Arts & Media to allow for reduced ad ission rates for CU-Denver students o attend theatrical and other cultural e ents. Information Technology Fee . . . . . $10.00 The Information 'f:f:chnology Fee provides funding for cquisition of computer systems t support student computing laborato ies, including networks and netwo king infrastructure and facilities direct! accessible by students. Student Activity Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7.35 The Student Activity Fee provides funding for student activities , student government, student clubs and organizations and special events. Student Health Ceo ,er Fee . . . . . . . . $19.00 The Student Center Fee provides funding for an outpatient, direct-care service t at is devoted to meeting student hea th care needs. Health education and coun eling are available as well as treatment an referral for medical problems . The Student Health Center is tri-institutional and i administered by Metropolitan State C p llege of Denver . Student lnfonnatior System (SIS) Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00 The Student System (SIS) Fee provides fun for continued improvement of the f Omputer system used in functions as admission applicati n processing, telephone registrati n and grade reporting, degree au pit and graduation checkout, awarding f f financial aid , payment of tuition fees and production of trans]c pts. Student Newspaper ee . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3.00 The Student News aper Fee provides funding for the Univ rsity of Colorado at Denver student new paper, The Advocate. Student Recreationffiee . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.50 The Student Recr tion Fee provides funding for the recre tiona! facilities and programs in the ealth, Physical Education and (HPER) Building as well as t e campus playing fields and club sport programs. Recreation is a tri-in titutional program administered by Me opolitan State College of Denver . l Student Services Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24.00 The Student Services Fee provides funds for programs and events offered through The Career Center, Center for Educational Opportunity Programs , Learning Assistance Center, Office of Legal Services , Office of Student Life, Student Advocacy Center , Office of Student Retention , and CU-Denver Counseling Center . The Office of Legal Services is administered by Metropolitan State College of Denver. Matriculation fee of $25.00 is a one-time non-refundable fee required of all new students at the time of their first regis tration. This fee covers the costs of official transcripts. Candidate for Degree fee: equal to one credit hour of resident tuition is required for all graduate students who are not registered during the term that they are taking comprehensive exami nations. Students must register as "candidate for degree " and pay for one hour of corresponding resident tuition plus the SIS fee and the Information Technology fee for one term only. COURSE FEES Online Courses A $100.00 course fee is assessed for each online course taken . College of Architecture and Planning All majors and non-majors registered in Studio , Computer , Photography and Furniture Design courses are required to pay the following facilities fees . ARCH 5110 lntro : Architectural Design Studio I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.00 ARCH 5120 lntro: Architectural Design Studio II ......... .. . .. ....... 40.00 ARCH 5130 Architectural Design Studio Ill . . .. . . .. .. . .. .. 40.00 ARCH 5140 Architecture Design Studio IV . . .. .. .. . .. . . . .. .. . 40.00 ARCH 6150 Architecture Design Studio V .................... 40.00 ARCH 6160 Design Photography .... 45.00 ARCH 6162 Furniture Design . . . . . . . . . 45.00 ARCH 6410 Introduction to Computer Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 ARCH 6411 Computer Applications in Architecture ....... .. . .. . . ....... 30.00 ARCH 6490 S Tin Professional Studies (Computers) .. ............ 30.00 All ENVD majors are required to pay a $60 computer technology fee . ENVD 1002 Environmental Media . . . 95.00 ENVD 2000 Environmental Design & Commu Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90.00 Tuition and Fees I 21 ENVD 2052 Computers in Arch. &Planning ................... 30.00 ENVD 2110 Architecture Studio I . . . . 90.00 ENVD 2120 Planning Studio I . ...... .. 90.00 ENVD 2152 GIS for Planners. . . 30.00 ENVD 3002 Design Theory & Methods .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. . . 30 . 00 ENVD 3022 Technical Photography . 45.00 ENVD 30521ntro to Computer Methods-ENVD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 ENVD 3152Intro to Computer Graphic Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 ENVD 3210 Architecture Studio II ... 90.00 ENVD 3220 Planning Studio II ........ 90.00 ENVD 3252 Computer Graphic Applications ........................ 30. 00 ENVD 4122 Advanced Technical Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45.00 ENVD 4152 Computer Graphic Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 ENVD 4252 Advanced Computer Graphic Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 ENVD 4310 Architecture Studio lll ... 90. 00 ENVD 4320 Planning Studio lll . . . . . . . 90. 00 ENVD 4322 Model Building .......... 50.00 ENVD 4340 Landscape Arch Studio . 40.00 ENVD 4352 Special Topics: Computer Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 ENVD 4410 Architecture Studio IV . . 90.00 LA 5500 lntro to Landscape Arch Design Studio I .............. 40. 00 LA 55011ntro to Landscape Arch Design Studio II .............. 40.00 LA 6600 Landscape Arch Design Studio lll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40. 00 LA 6601 Landscape Arch Design Studio IV ................... 40.00 LA6641 Computer Applctns in Landscape Architecture . . . . . . . . 30.00 LA 6700 Advanced Landscape Arch Design Studio V .. .. .. .. .. .. . 40.00 LA6701 Advanced Landscape Arch Design Studio VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.00 U D 6600 Transformation/ Decomposition Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.00 U D 6601 Composition Studio ........ 40.00 U D 6602 City of Exploration & Experimentation Studio .... . .... 40.00 URP 6612 Geographic Information Systems for Planners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 URP 6630 Planning Studio I . . . . . . . . . . 40.00 URP 6631 Planning Studio II . . . . . . . . . . 40.00 College of Arts & Media floe Arts FA 10011ntroduction to Art .. ...... . 15.00 FA 1100 Basic Drawing ............... 20.00 FA 1200 Basic Painting ............... 20.00 FA 2000 Drawing II .................... 20. 00 FA 2150 Foundations in Photography I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65.00 FA 2200 Painting II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20.00 FA 2400 Visual Studies .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. 15. 00 FA 2500 Metal Sculpture & Casting . 65. 00

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22 / Genera/Information FA 2510 Wood Sculpture & Casting . 65.00 FA 2600 Art History I Survey . . . . . . . . 15.00 FA 2610 Art History II Survey . . . . . . . . 15.00 FA 3000 Intermediate Drawing . . . . . . 20.00 FA 3020 Intermediate Life Drawing . 20.00 FA 3110 Imaging & Identity . . . . . . . . . . 65.00 FA 3180 Photo Criticism . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.00 FA 3190 Photography II .. .. . . ........ 65.00 FA 3200 Intermediate Painting . . . . . . 20.00 FA 3210 Intermediate Painting .. .. .. 20.00 FA 3220 Intermediate Watercolor . . 20.00 FA 3500 Intermediate Sculpture . . . . 65.00 FA 3510 Intermediate Sculpture .... 65.00 FA 3630 History of Photography . . . . 15.00 FA 3645 Topics: Enhancing Art Experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.00 FA 4000 Advanced Drawing . . . . . . . . . 20.00 FA 4020 Advanced Life Drawing . . . . 20.00 FA 4140 Topics in Photography ..... 65.00 FA 4150 Photography Ill ............. 65.00 FA 4190 Photography IV ............ . 65.00 FA 4200 Advanced Painting . . . . . . . . . 20.00 FA 4210 Advanced Painting ........ . 20.00 FA 4220 Advanced Watercolor ...... 20.00 FA 4500 Advanced Sculpture Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65.00 FA 4510 Advanced Sculpture Studio ............... .. . .. .. ......... 65.00 FA 4524/5524 Topics in Art History . 15.00 FA 4650/5650 Nineteenth Century Art . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.00 FA 4660/5660 20th Century Art . . . . . 15.00 FA 4690 Renaissance Art . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.00 FA 4790/5790 Methods in Art History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.00 FA 4800 Art Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20.00 FA 5000 Graduate Drawing . . . . . . . . . . 20.00 FA 5020 Graduate Life Drawing ..... 20.00 FA 5190 Photography V .... .......... 65.00 FA 5200 Graduate Painting ......... . 20.00 FA 5210 Graduate Painting .......... 20.00 FA 5220 Graduate Watercolor ....... 20.00 FA 5500 Graduate Sculpture . . . . . . . . 65.00 FA 5510 Graduate Sculpture ......... 65. 00 Music Facilities Fee for all music majors . . . 30.00 Non-majors are assessed this fee for the following courses: MUS 2470 Music on the Personal Computer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 2560 Music Technology II . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 3540 Rec. Studio Maint. & Calibration .. .. .. .. .. .. . 30.00 MUS 3820 Digital Music Techniques .. .. .. .. .. . . 30.00 MUS 4506 Audio Sweetening Lab . . . . 30 . 00 MUS 4510 Music Engineering I Lab .. 30.00 MUS 4570/5570 Music Engineering II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 Engineering Studio Materials Fee MUS 2520 Music Technology II Lab . . . 7.00 MUS 3540 Rec. Studio Maint & Calibration ........... .............. 7.00 MUS 4506 Audio Sweetening Lab ..... 7.00 MUS 4510 Music Engineering I Lab ... 7 .00 MUS 4530/5530 Music Engineering II Lab .................. . 7.00 Performance Music PMUS 1023 Piano Class I, II, lll, IV . . . . 30.00 PMUS 1033 Piano Class : Piano Majors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 .00 Theatre Course Materials Fee THTR 100llntro to Theatre .. .. . 7.00 THTR 1111 Freshman Seminar ....... 7 . 00 THTR 2520 Voice and Diction ........ 7 .00 THTR 2530 Acting 1.. ... .. ............ 7.00 THTR 2531 Acting for Non-Theatre Majors . . . 7 .00 THTR 2610 Survey of Dramatic Lit .. .. 7 .00 THTR 2712 Theatrical Design, Aesthetics &Production I .......... 7.00 THTR 2713 Theatrical Design , Aesthetics &Production II . ........ 7 . 00 THTR 3510 Orallnterp. Of Poetry..... 7 .00 THTR 3520 Stage Accents &Movement .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . .. .. .. 7.00 THTR3530 Acting II .................... 7 .00 THTR 3540 Directing I ................. 7.00 THTR 3560 Topics in Theatre ......... 7 .00 THTR 3610 History ofTheatre ........ 7 .00 THTR 3611 Drama of Diversity . . . . . . . . 7.00 THTR 4530 Acting Ill .. .. .. . . . .. .. . . .. .. 7.00 THTR 4540 Directing II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.00 THTR 4550 / 5550 Playwriting : Short Form .. .. . . .. .. .. .. . . .. .. .. .. . 7 .00 THTR4570/5570 Creative Drama . 7.00 THTR 4610/5610 Drama Theory & Criticism .......................... 7.00 THTR4760TopicsinDesign .......... 7.00 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Anthropology Laboratory courses in Anthropology require a student fee to cover expendable items. ANTH 13021ntroduction to Archaeology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.00 ANTH 1303 Biological Anthropology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.00 ANTH 4390 Research Methods in Archaeology .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. . 30.00 ANTH 4910 Field Experience in Archaeology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35.00 ANTH 5910 Field Experience in Archaeology .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 35.00 ANTH 6317 Archaeology Research Design &Analysis .................. 35.00 Biology Laboratory courses in Biology require a student fee to cover expendable items including dissection specimens. BIOL 1550 Basic Biology I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 .00 BIOL 1560 Basic Biology II. .. .. ...... . 10.00 BIOL 2071 General Biology Lab I ...... 5.00 BIOL 2081 General Biology Lab II . . . . 10.00 BIOL 3225 Human Physiology . . . . . . 15.00 BIOL 3244 Human Anatomy . . . . . . . . . 25.00 BIOL 3654 Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.00 Chemistry .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 20.00 Laboratory courses in Chemistry require a student fee to cover expendable items . Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.00 Laboratory courses in Physics require a student fee to cover expendable items. Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes Tuition classification is governed by Colorado statutes that apply to all state funded institutions in Colorado . Institu tions are bound by the provisions of this statute and are not free to make excep tions to the rules set forth. Students are initially classified as instate or out-Qf -state for tuition purposes at the time of application. The classifica tion is based upon information furnished by the student and from other relevant sources. After the student' s status is determined, it remains unchanged in the absence of satisfactory evidence to the contrary. Once a student is classified as a nonresident for tuition purposes, the student must petition for a change in classifica tion. Petitions must be submitted NO LATER THAN THE FIRST OFFICIAL DAY OF CLASSES of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a resident. It is preferred that petitions be received 30 days prior to the beginning of the term. Late petitions will not be considered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions. The final decision regarding tuition status rests with the University. Questions regarding residence (tuition) status should be referred only to the Tuition Classification Officer. Opinions of other persons are not official or binding upon the University . Additional information is available in the brochure, Classification of Students for Tuition Purposes , which may be obtained from the Admissions Office. BASIC REQUIREMENTS The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a legal domi ciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classifica tion is being sought. Persons over 23 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 23 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or court-appointed legal guardian . An une-

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mancipated minor ' s rent must, there fore, have a l egal dOJlli.Cile in Colorado for one year or more t>efore the minor may be classified as ah in-state student for tuition purposes. I ESTABLIS HI NG D 0/"1I CILE Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of in Colorado and the intention of Colorado one' s true, fixed , and permanent home and place of habitation . The tuition statute places the burden of a Colo rado domicile on the seeking to establish the domicile. The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connec tions with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado for tuition purposes begins the day after connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evidence one's intent. The most common ties wit h the state are (1) change of driver ' s license to Colorado; (2) change of automobile registration to Colorado; (3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado ; and most important, (5) payment of state income taxes as a res dent by one whose income is s u fficient t be taxed. Caution: payment or filing of taxes in no way s.erves to le al domicile retroac tive to the t1me filed . I order to qualify for in-state tuition for a gi en term, the 12-month waiting begins when the legal domicile is tablished) must be over by the first day o classes for the term in question .lf one's 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, instate tuition cannot b granted until the next semester. Resident Tuitio for Active Duty Military P ersonne l The Colorado Legis ature approved resident tuition for active duty military personnel on duty assignment in Colorado and for thb ir dependents. EUGIBLE BE CERTIFlED EACH TERM. Student obtain a completed verification form fro the base education officer , and submit th1form with their military ID to the Rec rds Office after they have registered , ut before the end of the drop/add periof, . At the time the verification form is ce tified in the Records Office, the student's b II will be adjusted to reflect the resident rate . Students who have been certifi e d remain classified as non-residents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Colorado. FINANCIA L AID D irect or: Ellie MiUer Office: NC 1030 Tele p h o ne: 303-556-2886 E-mail Address: finaid@carbon .cudenver.edu W o rld Wide Web Address: http: / / finaid .cudenver.edu The Office of Financial Aid offers over $30 million in financial aid awards to quali fied students each year. If the student's financial aid application materials are received before the March 31 priority date, then the student is considered for a package of need-based grant, work-study (part-time employment) and/or long-term loan funds.lf the financia l aid application materials are received after the March 31 priority date, then the student is usually considered only for a Federal Pell Grant and for outside student loans (Federal Stafford Loan or Federal Parents Loan) . Applicants for Colorado Graduate Fellowship , Colorado Deans Scholars award, and Colorado Regents Scholars award are subject to different deadlines and are reviewed by other CU-Denver departments (the Graduate School , undergraduate deans' offices , and the Office of Admissions , respectively ). All other applicants for financial aid are notified of their award status in writing by the Office of Financial Aid. E ligibility Each student must qualify for CU Denver financial aid as follows: 1 . Be a U.S. citizen or be admitted to the U.S. by the INS on a permanent basis . 2. Be classified as a degree-seeking student by the CU-Denver Office of Admis sions. Teacher certification students are eligible to apply for financial aid and are considered as undergraduate students according to federal guidelines . 3 . Be enrolled for a minimum number of credits as specified on the financial aid award letter and /or student loan planning letter . 4 . Meet the minimum requirements of Financial Aid Academic Standards . 5. Apply for financial aid by submitting all of the required documentation . The need analysis form is required for all programs except the Colorado Graduate FelJowship , Colorado Scholars award , Colorado Deans Scholars award , Colorado Regents Scholars award , and the Emergency Student Loan Program . Financial Aid I 23 6 . Be classified as a resident for tuition purpose s for the following programs: Colorado Student Grant, Colorado Student Incentive Grant, Colorado Graduate Grant , Colorado Work-Study , Colorado Regents Scholars award , Colorado Deans Scholars award , and Colorado Scholars award . 7 . Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant. 8 . Be registered for the draft or be enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selec tive Service. Application Each applicant must complete the financial aid application materials for submission to the Office of Financial Aid. Complete information must be available to the office before e ligibility can be determined . Limited Funds-T h e majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a first-come , first-s e rv e d basis to eligible students who document significant financial need and who complete their application materials in the Office of Financial Aid by the March 31 priority date. Application completion is defined as having all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (Free Application for F e deral Student Aid ) into the Office of Financial Aid . General financial aid is awarded to needy students who meet the priority date until all of the funds are committed for the year. II the file is completed after March 31, then awards will probably b e limited to Federal Pell Grant (for needy first undergraduate students only) and /or outside student loans (Federal Stafford Loan or Federal Parents Loan ). Appli c ation for financial aid must be made each year; application materials are av ai lable in January of each year. It is the student's responsibility to be sure application materials are complete . Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for application forms and complete details . All financial aid policies and procedures are subject to change due to revisions in federal and state laws , regulations, and g u i delines. Qualification F i nancial Need Most financial aid awards are based on the concept of finan cial nee d. Finan c i al need is calculated as : cost of attendance ( tuition , fees , books, living expenses ) m inus family contribu tion (student/spouse contribution and parents' contribut ion for dependent students).

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24 / Genera/Information The cost of attendance is the estimated cost to attend CU-Denver , including tuition and fees , room and board, books and supplies , transportation, and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid determines standard budgets based upon average tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education . For 1998-99 , the following monthly budgets were used for room and board , transportation, and personal expenses: $570 for students living at home with parents; $960 for students not living with parents . Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student were approximately $1,115 per semester and non-resident tuition and fees were approximately $5,510 per semester. These amounts will probably increase by approximately 2 % for the 1999-2000 school year . Independent Student-The federal government provides specific guidelines that define a self-supporting student for financial aid purposes. If a student i s classified as self-supporting , then the student' s parental information is not considered when the calculation of family contribution is made. For 1999-2000 , a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old (born before 1/1/70) or one who meets one of the following conditions : 1. Graduate student 2 . Married student 3 . Student with legal dependents other than a spouse 4. Veteran of the U.S. armed forces 5 . Orphan or ward of the court These conditions may be appealed to the Office of Financial Aid if unusual circumstances exist. Contact the office for appeal guidelines . If the student/spouse contribution plus the parents' contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance, then the student will not qualify for need based financial aid . The contributions from the student/ spouse and from the parents are calcu lated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income, savings and other assets, family size, number of children in postsecondary school, and other factors . Students may appeal for special consideration if they are experiencing unusual circumstances . Financial aid is intended to supplement and not replace financial contributions from the student and parents . Course Loads-General financial aid undergraduate recipients usually must enroll for at least 12 credits per semester, and graduate students usually must enroll for at least 5 credits per semester . Federal Stafford Loan recipients must carry at least a half-time credit load (6 hours for undergraduates per semester and 3 hours for graduates per semester). For defer ment of student loans, please refer to the Schedule of Courses each term for specific information. Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please check award letter and/or student loan planning letter for the exact number of credits required). Academic Progress-CU-Denver stu dents must make academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid in order to be eligible and remain eligible for financial aid . Students should review the Financial Aid Academic Standards policy, available in the Office of Financial Aid. Non-Degr ee Stud e nts-Non.
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if they have not their first baccalaureate by June 1 of the award year. 2. Outside Student Loqns-Eligibility for all other types of a sistance should be determined prior to applying for outside student loa'ns. The subsidized Federal Stafford; program requires that students sho financial need in order to qualify . lnt rest on the subsi dized loan is paid the student by the federal governmen as long as the student remains enrol ed at least half-time and for a six-month lgrace period after dropping below half-time enrollment. The unsubsidized Stafford Loan program does not require the student to document financial need. Eligibility is calculated as the cost of attendance minus other financial aid awarded. Interest is not paid py the federal government for the unsubsidized pro gram, and the student may elect to pay the interest currently or to allow the interest to be added to the total loan amount. Interest rates for the Federal Stafford Loan are variable, and are capped at Parents of dependent studeniare eligible to borrow under the deral Parent Loan for Undergraduate . tudents program (PLUS). The PLUS p ogram is unsubsi dized, and interest ayments become the responsibility the borrower at the time of disbursement. The interest rate varies on the PLUS program, and is capped at 9%. 3. Federal Supple men I Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)This is a need-based grant p ogram for students who have not yet a baccalaureate degree. Studehts must be eligible for a Federal Pell Gtt to be considered forSEOG. 4. Federal Perkins Lo -This need-based loan program, with an interest rate currently at 5 % , is bjased at CU-Denver . No repayment of interest or principal is due until six or nin months (time period differs depe9ding upon when student first received Perkins Loan) after the student to be enrolled at least half-time. 5 . Federal College Wo -StudyWork-study is a need-based pro ram that allows students to work o a part-time basis on campus or off c pus at non-profit agencies to help meel t their educational costs. The State of Colorado funds the following programs: I 1. Colorado Student Grant-A need-based grant for resident undergraduate students. 2. Colorado Student Incentive Grant-A need-based grant for resident undergraduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor's degree. This grant is funded 50 % by the federal government and 50 % by the State of Colorado. 3 . Colorado Graduate Grant-A need-based grant for resident graduate students. 4 . Colorado Work-Study-A program simi lar to the College Work-Study program but limited to resident undergraduate students. Scholarships Following is a list of the major scholarships that are offered at CU-Denver . The following programs are funded by the General Assembly of the State of Colorado: 1 . Regents Scholars award is offered to qualified new freshmen and transfer students by the Office of Admissions . New students will automatically be considered for this program. 2. Colorado Scholars award is for undergraduate resident students who have a minimum cumulative grade-point average of at least 3 . 5 for a minimum of 12 CU credit hours. The deadline for applying is March 31. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for application procedures. 3. Deans Scholars award is awarded by undergraduate deans' offices. Contact appropriate dean's office for more information . The following programs are funded by CU-Denver: 1. Advantage Scholarship is for minority and/or first generation college students who meet the specified income guidelines . Contact the Office of Financial Aid for applications. 2. Nelson / Running Wolf Scholarship funds are available for needy American Indian students. Contact the Office of American Indian Student Services , 303-556-2860, for more information . 3 . Ahlin Fund assistance is available for mobility-impaired students. Contact Student Retention Services , 303-556-2324, for applications. Other scholarship information is available from the Office of Financial Aid , the Auraria Library Scholarship lnfoBank in the reference section, and the Student Advocacy Center . Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment opportunities are listed in the Student Employment Office and The Career Center . Students who participate in the Pre-Collegiate Registration I 25 Development Program are automatically considered for Challenge Scholarships. Graduate students should inquire about additional types of financial aid through their academic departments. Students should be aware that Emergency Student Loans are available through the Bursar's Office. American Indian students should request information about Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships from the Office of Financial Aid . REGISTRATION Students should review the sections of this catalog that describe in detail the academic programs available at CU-Denver. Undergraduate students should contact their school or college to arrange for an advising appointment prior to registra tion. Graduate students should contact their respective graduate program for assistance. A Schedule of Courses is made available every semester prior to registration by the Office of Records and Registration. CU-Denver students register for courses via the Student Information web page (see below) or through the Voice Response (VR) Registration system from any touch-tone telephone. Specific instructions are included in the Schedule of Courses . Students will be sent an Invitation to Register that includes registration information and a registration time assignment. Registration is by time assignment only . Students may register at or after their assigned time . Online Registration and Student Information CU-Denver students can register and obtain information regarding their personal records by accessing a secure site at: http:/ /hydra.cusys.edu/pinnacle/ sishome l.dn.htm. This site can also be reached from the CU-Denver home page (http:/ / www.cudenver .edu/) by choosing u office of the Registrar " under ustudents" and then choosing ustudent Information. " A student number and personal identifica tion number (PIN) are required to access the registration or student record options. Online registration allows the student to check the availability of specific courses prior to their registration time and to search for available courses by department, course level , or meeting time .lf registration in a course is denied, the web registration system will specify the reason. Online payment is currently not available .

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26 / Genera/Information Student information available online currently includes : address verification (or change); admission application status ; financial aid information ; schedule by semester ; grades by semester; unofficial transcript; account balance; and degree audit (for some programs) . For security reasons , none of the student information screens will display a student's name or student number . The CU-Denver catalog and Schedule of Courses, as well as additional information regarding programs, faculty , courses, and policies, are available at the CU-Denver home page: http://www.cudenver . edu/. Definition of FullTime and Half-Time Status Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in the student's financial aid a war dl etter . UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER CORE CURRICULUM The faculty of the colleges of Arts & Media , Business, Engineering and Liberal Arts established a core curriculum for all undergraduate students. It is the objective of the CU-Denver core curriculum to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual competencies in mathematics, reading, writing, oral communication, information literacy, and critical thinking . Furthermore, the core curriculum promotes an awareness of cultural diversity . For details on the core curriculum, students should contact their college advising office. Campus Core College of Business Colle3e of Arts &Me ia College of Engineering of Liberal Arts Sciences INTELLECTUAL COMPETENCIES A. English Composition/Oral 9 semester hours SAME AS CAMPUS CORE 9 semester hours Communication'-9 semester hours from the following courses : ENGL 1020-3 Core Comp I ENGL 1020-3 Core Comp I ENGL 1020-3 Core Comp I and one of ENGL 2030-3 Core Comp II *CMMUjENGL{fC 3154-3 Techn Wtg ENGL 3170-3 Business Wtg and one of the following: CMMU 2050-3 Bus & Profess CMMU 2101-3 Presentational Speaking CMMU 2050-3 Bus & Profess Speaking Speaking and either CMMU 2101-3 Presentational Speaking ENGL 3170-3 Business Wtg *CMMUjENGL{fC 3154-3 Techn Wrtg ENGL 2030-3 Core Comp II or ENGL 2154-31ntro to Crtv Wtg ENGL 2030-3 Core Comp II ENGL 3001-3 Critical Wtg ENGL 3084-3 Adv Comp *CMMUjENGL{fC 3154-3 Techn Wtg *NOTE: ENGL 3154, T C 3154 & TC/CMMU 3120-3 Techn Comm CMMU 3154 are equivalent ENGL 3170-3 Business Wtg ENGL 4190-3 S Tin Rhet & Wtg PHIL 2441-3 Logic and Language B . Mathematics '-3 semester hours MATH1070-3 SAME AS CAMPUS CORE Completed by fulfilling Any math course except major requirements. MATH 3040 or a passing mark on the Math Proficiency exam KNOWLEDGE AREAS A Natural & Physical Sciences-SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE' Completed by fulfilling 8 semester hours from the major requirements. following courses: ANTH 1303-41ntro : Biological Anth BIOL 1550-4 Basic Biology I BIOL 1560-4 Basic Biology II CHEM 147X-4 Core Chemistry (selected modules) ENVS 1042-4 Intro to Env . Sci GEOL 1072-4 Phys Geology I GEOL 1082-4 Phys Geology II PHYS 1000-41ntro to Physics PHYS 1052-4 Gen Astronomy I I I ' I

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Financial Aid I 27 UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER CORE CURRICULUM (Continued) Campus Core College of Business KNOWLEDGE AREAS (CONTINUED) College of Arts &Me
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28 / Genera/Information FALL AND SPRING: Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students: Full-time .... 12 or more semester hours Half-time . . . . . 6 or more semester hours Graduate degree students: Full-time: 5 or more hours 0 hours as candidate for degree 1 or more hours of thesis (not master's reports or thesis preparation) Half-time: 3 or more hours . SUMMER (TEN-WEEK TERM): Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students: Full-time . . . . . 8 or more semester hours Half-time . . . . . 4 or more semester hours Graduate degree students: Full-time: 3 or more hours 0 hours as candidate for degree 1 or more hours of thesis (not master's reports or thesis preparation) Half-time: 2 or more hours 3 or more hours of mixed-level classes Notes: Enrollment verification including full time/half-time attendance can be certified after the drop/add period. Hours for calculating full-time/half-time attendance do not include interinstitu tional hours, nor do they include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration. Students receiving veterans benefits should contact the Veterans Affairs coor dinator for definition of full-time status for summer sessions. Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are consid ered for financial aid purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid . Add/Drop Specific add/drop deadlines are an nounced in each semester's Schedule of Courses . 1. Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 12 (eight in the summer) days of full-term classes, provided there is space available . 2. Students may drop courses without approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (the first eight days of the summer session). Tuition will not be charged. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student's permanent record. 3. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (eighth day of the summer session) , the instructor' s signature is required for all drops. The instruc tor's signature and dean' s signature are required for all adds. No tuition adjustment will be made. 4 . After the tenth week of the fall and spring semesters (the fifth week for summer session) any schedule adjust ments require a petition and special approval from the dean's office . 5 . Dropping all courses after the 12th day (eighth in the summer) requires an official withdrawal from the term. No tuition refunds are available . Deadlines for module courses and intensive courses are published in the Schedule of Courses each term. Auditing Courses To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the University or have outstanding financial obligations to the University . The Records Office does not keep any record of courses audited ; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where spe cial equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor. An auditor' s card is issued after classes begin . This card should be presented to the instructor. Auditors , whether resident or nonresident , pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only . Auditors do not receive student parking privileges, and are not eligible for other student services . For more information , contact the Bursar' s Office . Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) may audit classes at no charge. Contact the Division of Enrollment and Student Affairs at 1250 14th Street, 303-556-8427 . Correspondence Study Correspondence courses are offered by the CU-Boulder Division of Continuing Education . Applicability toward a degree program should be sought from the stu dent's degree advisor prior to registration . Course Load/Restrictions In most cases, students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer session) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. Consult the individual college or school for specific guidelines as to course load restrictions . Credit By Examination Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination , the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver , have a grade-point average of at least 2 . 0 , and be currently registered . Contact the Records Office for instructions. A non refundable fee is charged. Students should contact their degree advising office to determine whether the credit will apply to their degree. No Credit Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college. Students enrolling for no credit are required to pay regular tui tion . File the no-credit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop/add period. Students who register for a course on a no-credit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade. Pass/Fail Procedure 1 . Students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis (or to revert from pass/ fail to graded status) may do so only during the drop/add period. 2 . Up to 16 semester hours of course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor's degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass /fail in any given semester. [Note: Individual schools and colleges may have additional restrictions as to pass/fail credits. See the accompanying chart for an overview . ] 3. Instructors will not be informed of pass/fail registration. All students who register for a pass/fail appear on the regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor.

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When grades are r ceived in the Records Oifice , th se registrations with a pass/fail designa ion are automatically converted by the ;1 ade application sys tem. Grades of D-d above convert to grades of P . Cours taken pass/fail will be included in hours toward graduation. Pass grades are nof included in a student's grade-po nt average. An F grade in a course taken pass/fail will be included in the grade-point average . 4. Pass/fail registrati! records are maintained by the ecords Office . 5 . Exceptions to the ass/fail regulations are permitted for s ecified courses offered by the Sch ol of Education , the Extended Studies Programs , and Study Abroad frograms. 6 . Graduate degree students can exercise the P/F option for undergraduate courses only. A grade of Pwill not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement. 7 . Students who register for a course on a pass/fail basis may not later ( after the drop/add period) decide to receive a letter grade. Please note : many ther institutions will not accept a P grade f f r transfer credit. Short Term Courses are also of ered in five-week modules, in special w ekend courses, and in seminars. Student should contact the college/school for inf rmation on shortterm courses offered ach semester Other Registrations CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of Colorado cam puses concurrently must obtain permis sion from their school or college on their home campus. A student in a degree program registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if: 1. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean or the Records Office . 2. The course is a required course for the student's degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver . 3. The student obtains approval from the academic dean. 4 . There is space available at the other (host) campus. 5. The student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CUDenver rates. 6 . The home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes. 7. The concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses. Students may not register for an inde-pendent study course through concurrent registration. Students may not take courses pass/ fail or for no credit through concurrent registration. To drop a concurrent course during the host campus drop/add period, arrange the drop at the home campus Records Office . To drop a concurrent course after the end PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRicnONS Core Curriculum cou ses used t o satisfy In t ellec tual Competen cies cannot be t ake n on p ass/ f ail basis. College General Maximum Business and Only non-business Only 6 semester hours Administration electives may be taken may be taken pass/fail pass/fail Engineering and Required courses may not A maximum of 16 credit Applied Science be taken pass/fail. Upper hours may be taken division humanities and pass/fail. Includes social sciences electives coursestakeninthe are acceptable; otherwise , honors program major department approval is required Liberal Arts and Sci nces College requires a No more than 6 hours minimum of 30 semester pass/fail any semester. hours of courses with A maximum of 16 semester letter grades. Courses hours may be taken used to satisfy major, pass/fail. minor, or foreign language cannot be taken on a pass/fail basis. Registration I 29 of the host campus drop/add deadline, drop the course at the host campus Records Office . INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION CU-Denver degree students may enroll in courses offered by the Community College of Denver and Red Rocks Community College . Students must be enrolled at CU-Denver for at least one course during the term to be eligible to register interinstitutionally. Registration is on a space available basis . Inter institutional courses are evaluated for transfer credit and are not included in a CU-Denver student's grade-point average. POOLED COURSES AT METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with similar courses at Metropolitan State Col lege of Denver (MSCD). CU-Denver undergraduate students may register for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU Denver Schedule of Courses. Listed below are restrictions that apply to the pooled courses: 1. CU-Denver graduate students are not eligible to register for MSCD pooled courses. 2 . MSCD courses will not be included in the University of Colorado grade-point average. MSCD courses will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will count in the hours toward graduation . 3 . MSCD courses cannot be used to meet specific course requirements toward the major without prior written approval of the student's dean. 4 . CU-Denver students who wish to take non-pooled MSCD classes must apply directly as a non-degree student to MSCD, and pay tuition and fees to MSCD. Non-pooled classes will not appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will not be used in determining course loads for financial aid eligibility. Students may request an MSCD transcript to be sent to CU-Denver at the end of the term to determine if credit can be transferred. 5 . MSCD common pool courses will not satisfy residence requirements at CU-Denver . The last 30 semester hours applied toward the baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence at CU-Denver.

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30 / General Information 6. CU-Denver students taking MSCD common pool courses are subject to the MSCD grading policy and student code of conduct. Withdrawal from the University To withdraw from the University of Colorado at Denver, students must drop all courses for the semester. During the first twelve days of the semester (eight days for the summer) students must use the telephone registration system to drop courses. Consult the Schedule of Courses for information on using the telephone registration system. Courses dropped during this period are not recorded on the student's permanent record. After the twelfth day of the semester (eighth day in the summer), through the tenth week (seventh week for summer), students must submit a withdrawal form with the instructor ' s approval . Courses dropped during this period will be recorded on the student's permanent record with a grade of "W'. Students seeking to withdraw after the tenth week (seventh week for summer) must petition the associate dean of their school or college. A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receive grades of "F' for all course work during that term. Deadlines for dropping module and intensive courses appear in the Schedule of Courses. ACADEMIC POLICIES AND REGULATIONS Student Classification Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed: Freshman 0-29 hours Sophomore 30-59 hours Junior 60-89 hours Senior 90+ hours All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado. Grading System and Policies The following grading system and poli cies have been standardized for all aca demic units of the University. GRADE SYMBOLS The instructor is responsible for what ever grade symbol (A, B , C. D , F, IF, Jw, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC, W, and * * *) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor . Pass/fail designations are not assigned by the but are automatically converted by the grade application system, as explained under Pass/Fail Procedure. Standard Grades A =superior /exce llent A(-)= Quality Points 4 . 0 3 . 7 B(+) = B = good / better than average B(-) = C(+) = C = competent / average C(-) = D(+) = D = minimum passing D(-) = F =failing 3.3 3.0 2 .7 2.3 2 . 0 1.7 1.3 1.0 0.7 0 . 0 Instructors may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS system, but are not required to do so. IF-incomplete-changed to an F if not completed within one year . IW-incomplete-changed to a Wit not completed within one year. /P-in progress-thesis at the graduate level only. P ! F-pass/ fail-Pgrade is not included in the grade-point average ; theFgrade is included ; up to 16 hours of pass/fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor ' s degree . H I P IFhonors / pass / fail-intended for honors courses ; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average. . NCindicates registration on a no-credit basis. Windicates withdrawal without credit. * * * indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed . EXPLANATION OF IF AND IW An IF or IW is an incomplete grade. Policies with respect to IF / IW grades are available in the individual college and school dean 's offices . Use of the IF or IW is at the option of the course instructor and/or the academic dean' s office. An IF or IW is given only when students, for reasons beyond their control , have been unable to complete course require ments. A substantial amount of work must have been satisfactorily completed before approval for such a grade is given. The instructor who assigns an IF or IW sets the conditions under which the course work can be completed and the time limit for its completion. The student is expected to complete the requirements within the established deadline and not retake the entire course. It is the instructor's and/or the student's decision whether a course should be retaken. If a course is retaken, it must be comple ted on the Denver campus or in CU-Denver Extended Studies classes . The student must re-register for the course and pay the appropriate tuition . The final grade (earned by completing the course requirements or by retaking the course) does not result in deletion of the IF or IW from the transcript . A second entry is posted on the transcript to show the final grade for the course. At the end of one year, IF and IW grades for courses that are not completed or repeated are changed to an For W, respectively . Good Academic Standing Good academic standing requires a minimum grade-point average that is determined by the student's school or college. Grades earned at another institution are not used in calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado . Degree students should consult the academic standards section of their school or college for degree program requirements . Continuation as a non-degree student is contingent upon maintaining an overall grade-point average of 2 . 0 upon comple tion of 12 or more semester hours. Failure to maintain the required average will result in a non-degree student being suspended . The suspension is for an indefinite period of time and becomes part of the student's permanent at the University . While under suspension, enrollment at the University is restricted to summer terms or courses offered through Extended Studies. Non-degree students are not placed on academic probation prior to being suspended. GRADE-POINT AVERAGE The grade-point average (GPA) is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course. Total the hours , total the credit points, and divide the total points by the total hours . Grades of P, NC, * * * , W, IP, Jw, and IF are not included in the grade-point average .

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!Fs that are not within one year are calculated Fin the GPA. If a course is repe ted, all grades earned are used in determi ng the grade-point average . Grades rec . ived at another insti tution are not included in the University of Colorado GPA. Undergraduate , g duate, and non degree graduate GP are calculated separately. Students should r fer to their academic dean's office for indi " dual grade-point average calculations as they relate to academic progress d graduation from their college or scho I. Grade Reports Grade reports are ormally available within two weeks aft r the end of the semester. Grade rep rts are automatically mailed at the end of ach semester to student's permanen mailing address. Grades posted to th computer can be obtained using the p one system or on the Student Informat on web page . See the Schedule of Courses the Online Student Information section or more information. Instructors will as ign mid-term grades for certain populatio s of students. Students in academi difficulty may be contacted and counSj
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32 / General Information of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment . Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the r i ght to a hearing. 3. The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in the student's educational records, except to the that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent . One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclo sure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative , supervisory , academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff) ; a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney , auditor , or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees ; or a student serving on an official committee , such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an educational record in order to fulfill his or her pro fessional respons i bility . Upon request , the University discloses educational records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. 4. The right to file a complaint with the U .S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of Colorado to comply with the require ments of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA are: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D .C. 20202-4605 The following items are designated " Directory Information," and may be released at the discretion of the University of Colorado unless a student files a request to prevent their disclosure : Name Address E-mail Address Telephone Number Dates of Attendance Registration Status Class Major Awards Honors Degrees conferred Past and present participation in officially recognized sports and non-curricular activities Physical factors (height, weight) of athletes Forms to prevent Disclosure of Directory Information can be obtained at the Student Service Center in North Classroom 1003. Questions regarding student rights under FERPA should be directed to the Records Office, 303-556-2389 . SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND FACILITIES Alumni Association The CU-Denver Alumni Association provides programs and services which stimulate interest in, increase support for, and build life-long commitment to the University of Colorado at Denver among its alumni, students , and the community . Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon graduation . Friends and non-degree former students are also welcome to participate in alumni activities . The governing board is com posed of alumni representing all schools and colleges on campus. CU on the Horizon , a newspaper pub lished twice a year, is mailed to all gradu ates. Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/or activities which might interest them . The Alumni Mack Easton , Recognition, Appreciation , Leadership, and Legislative Awards are bestowed each year at commencement and are sponsored by the Association . A program for alumni use of the campus recreation center is available through the office , 303-556-2549. The Alumni Association provides financial support for students through scholarships and academic recognition for students through the Academic Athlete Program. Auraria Book Center Tivoli Student Union, 303-556-3230 Hours : M-Th , 8a. m .-6p. m.; F, 8a.m.-5 p . m.; Sat , 10 a . m . -3 p .m. Please call for hours during vacation and interim periods . The Auraria Book Center-your campus store-is located in the historic Tivoli Student Union . The Book Center provides textbooks for the Auraria schools , plus a complete general book department that is especially strong in technical and reference areas . Best sellers, new releases , and gift book selections change frequently, and are often accompanied by displays of special value books on many subjects . For additional savings on general reading books, join the Auraria Book Club at the Customer Service desk. Students need to bring course printouts to locate textbooks. Books are located by school ; subjects are arranged alphabeti cally-departmental abbreviations , with course and section numbers-and prices are printed on the shelf tag below . Each title has the designation of Required , Preferred , Optional , or Available. Used textbooks sell for 75 percent of the new book price. The Auraria Book Center carries more used textbooks than any other book store in Colorado, but shop early as used books are the first to go . A full refund is given for new and used books accompanied by the receipt and returned within the first three weeks of class for regular semesters and during the first week of class for short terms. Please read the refund policy attached to the receipt. When a course ends, the textbook may still have value and may be bought back by the Book Center. The buy-back policy on used texts is to pay half of the new price on books that will be used again next semester on this campus . Other texts are purchased at lower percentages. The Auraria Book Center's buy back services are dedicated to its student customers. A validated Auraria student or campus ID is required to complete a buy-back trans action. Books are bought for this campus throughout the semester; however, buy ers from national text book companies are on hand at the end of each semester to purchase used books which may be required at other schools. Campus Computers, 303-556-3726, offers the latest in hardware and software technology . An educational discount is offered to Auraria campus students; a current, validated Auraria ID must be presented at the time of purchase. A full line of computer reference books and accessories is also available as well as calculators and other small electronics . Campus Computers hours are M-Th, 8a.m.-6p. m . ; F , 8a.m.-5p.m.; Sat, 10a . m .-3p. m . Auraria Reprographics offers the campus community a wide variety of copying, printing, and graphic services , and has copy centers throughout the campus: Tivoli Copies, 303-556-3702 , located in the Tivoli Student Union; North Copies, 303-556-2291, located in the North Classroom Building; and Library Copies , 303-556-2571, located in the Auraria Library. All offer quick and

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reasonably priced transparencies , laminating , and binding services . Please call individual centers for s and specialty A current photo I is req u ired for purchases paid for '* check . The Book Center also accepts VISA, and American Look for our webs1te at: The Auraria Book enter is owned by the State of Colorado an supports the Student Bond Fund. C U Onlin e The virtual camp s of the University of Colorado system , CU Online comprises eleven collegiate and professional development programs offering more than 100 credit and non-<:redit courses via the Wor ld Wide Web. You can search our course catalogs, ) register and pay for courses, order text books and other course materials , and complete all course work-all over the Internet-making CU Online one of them st comprehensive online institutions o higher education in the world. CU Online offers c re curriculum and elective courses in a variety of disciplines , all the same high-qu ity courses taught throughout the Uni rsity of Colorado system. Though it is ot self-paced , with CU Online you will e joy more flexibility of scheduling than i a traditional class room, logging into a couple of times each week at the tifi\es of your choice. Instructors delivering their courses through CU Online use of cutting edge technology for presenting course content, such as streaming audio , video, and multimedia shows . A number of technologies allo'f students to interact with the instructor and their peers-these include threaded di cussions in a bulletin board-type area, liv discussions in an online classroom e-mail, and collaborative works aces. As you take cours with CU Online , you 'll gain valuable kills for using the Internet as a tool for earning, research , and communication taking you far beyond the bound ies of the traditional educational environ ent. You will have the opportunity to p ticipate in the new global classroofu , a world of higher education at your fi gertips. Contact CU Onlin f at 303-556-6505 or visit our website at : Computing, Inf o rmation and Network Services Computing , Information and Network Services (CINS) supports computer and network use for both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. All centralized administrative systems are developed , maintained , and processed by University Management Systems in Boulder , with output process ing and user support provided by CINS in Denver . Denver campus administrative applications are developed , maintained , and processed by CINS. Most academic processing is either done on campus or through one of several networks available through CINS. The Denver campus maintains a communications network with over 2 ,500 connections . This network provides access to all campus minicomputers and connection to the Auraria Library Online Information System , the World Wide Web, and the Internet. There are over 2 ,500 personal computers located on the campus in 21 teaching laboratories , four public labs , i ndividual laboratories , and in offices. CINS maintains the campus World Wide Web, where information is kept for reference by students , faculty, staff , and others interested in CUDenver . CINS staff provide assistance to academic and administrative users on all available computing systems . Advisors and a full-time academic user services staff assist students and faculty with questions regarding software packages , programming , the use of computer sys tems , and software availability . Adminis trative users are assisted with planning, systems design, programming, and day to-day computing activities by CINS user services , technical services , and opera tions personnel. The CINS staff operates and maintains campus minicomputers , telecommunications equipment, and four of the CU-Denver computing laboratories . These laboratories provide students with access to Macintosh and IBM-type personal computers and software as well as access to the campus network and minicomp u ters. This staff also maintains personal computers and is available to assist faculty and staff with hardware and software planning , acquisitions, questions, and problems . The goal of CINS is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work . For further information , please call303-556-4307 . Special Programs and Fa c ilities I 33 E xtende d Studies P rograms The Extended Studies Programs at CU-Denver offer continuing and non traditional education . They employ both alternative delivery systems and tradi tional methods to make high-quality learning experiences accessibl e to Colorado ' s diverse population . Extended Studies Programs are responsible for the administration of all classes conducted off the Auraria campus as well as many of those conducted in non-traditional formats on campus , such as week e nds . Although they are not academic units and do not grant degrees, courses and programs offered through Extend e d Studies Programs do enhance and supplement traditional degree programs at the University . Students with certain registration or scheduling difficulties can take courses applicable to t heir degree programs through Extended Studies. Courses offered throu g h Extended Studies are identical to those offered through the regular Schedule of Cours e s and are recorded on a standard CU-Denver transcript along with any other classes taken through the Univ e rsity . Students may want to consider taking classes through the Extended Studies pro grams under the following circumstances : 1 . Not formally admitted to th e University. Prospective CU-Denver students need not wait for formal admission to the University to begin taking classes if they enroll in Extended Studies courses . Students who have not been formally admitted to the University can , in many cases , enroll in Extended Studies classes and transfer those credit hours ( with departmental approval) to a degree program when they are formally admit ted . (Students planning to explore this option should check with the depart ment through which they int e nd to pursue their degrees to determine how many Extended Studies credits will be transferable.) 2 . Scheduling conflicts . Students who are balancing family and work obligations , in addition to college , can take Extended Studies courses that fit their schedules. Many classes are offered in the evenings and on weekends . Depend ing upon the student' s choice of degree programs , it may be possible to obtain an undergraduate degree from CO Denver by attending only evening and/ or weekend classes through Extended Studies . Students are encouraged to contact an academic advisor i n their chosen discipline or an advisor i n the Extended Studies programs to discuss the options available to them .

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34 / Genera/Information 3 . Academic suspension. Each academic unit of the University has established its own policies regarding students who are placed on academic suspension. When those policies allow , students on academic suspension may take a certain number of credit hours (as established by the appropriate academic unit) through Extended Studies to improve their grade-point averages. Students must check with an academic advisor in their chosen discipline to determine whether this option is open to them. In addition to credit courses , Extended Studies Programs offer a variety of non credit courses for both personal enrich ment and professional credentialing . Practicing professionals in business , engineering , public affairs, architecture and planning , and education are encour aged to contact the appropriate CO Denver school or college for information on courses applicable to continuing professional education , certification , and licensure . Following are Extended Studies and Professional Development contacts : College of Architecture and Planning 303-556-3382 College of Business and Administration (Professional Development Programs) 303-556-5826 School of Education 303-556-6361 College of Engineering and Applied Science (Continuing Engineering Education) 303-556-4907 College of Liberal Arts & Sciences 303-556-2735 Graduate School of Public Affairs 303-556-5970 Intensive English Program (IEP) The University ' s American Language Center offers an on-campus Intensive English Program (IEP) for international students who need to pass the TOEFL or who want English language training for professional purposes.IEP offers six levels of intensive academic language instruction plus TOEFL preparation classes , as well as a University of Colorado 1-20 for the F-1 student visa. Eight-week programs start every January, March, June, August, and October. International students may attend the IEP in prepara tion for meeting the University ' s TOEFL requirements prior to entering University undergraduate or graduate programs . Acceptance into the Intensive English Program does not guarantee acceptance into the University degree programs . E-mail contact : iep @ carbon.cudenver . edu Website: http: / j www.cudenv e r . edu / public/extend/lEP I Office of International Education Director: Lawrence Bell, 303-556-4925 International Student Advisor: Joyce Espinosa, 303-556-4924 Study Abroad Coordinator: Karen Goubleman , 303-556-3388 Office: CU-Denver Building , Suite 140, 1250 14th Street The University of Colorado at Denver, through the Office of International Education (OlE), provides a variety of international programs , educational opportunities , and services for interna tional and domestic students , overseas scholars , faculty , staff , and the greater Denver community . The goals of OlE are to raise international awareness on the CU-Denver campus and , in particular , to provide an opportunity for all students to gain the global competency needed in today's interdependent world . OlE arranges student study abroad programs , e x pedites the exchange of students and faculty , hosts international visitors , promotes special relationships with foreign universities , and advises students and faculty on Fulbright and National Security Exchange Program (NSEP) and other scholarship opportuni ties. OlE also functions as a recruiting , retention , and advisor y office for international students and coord i nates many services for them before and after they have been accepted to CU-Denver , including : new student orientation , visa and Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) advice , and help for those international students who need assis tance with a variety of questions and potential difficulties . In addition, OlE seeks to increase community awareness of international issues by periodically sponsoring lectures and programs that are open to the general public . STUDY ABROAD OlE assists students wishing to make international study an integral part of their college experienc e . Study abroad programs vary in length from two weeks to one academic year, and are also offered during the summer and winter breaks. Although many programs are for language study, a substantial number of programs are taught i n English ; thus , foreign language is not always required for participation. These programs are available to students in all disciplines , f rom architecture to business to liberal arts, in a variety of countries worldwide . Students can pay CUDenver tuition and study abroad on an exchange program for an academic semester or year . Either CU-Denver or transfer credit can be earned abroad, giving students the opportunity to fulfill degree requirements while experiencing a new culture. Since tuition and program fees are generally affordable and financial aid is available and can be used for study abroad, it is a feasible option for almost every CU-Denver student. Information and advice on scholarships such as Fulbright and NSEP, as well as volunteer and work opportunities abroad are a v ailable . New programs are continually develop ing, so call or check the OlE website to Jearn more about our programs . Logon to our website at http: / /studyabroad . cuden ver. edu for further information . INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADVISING AND SUPPORT SERVICES Since the first few months in a new country and a new city can be particularly difficult for international students, OlE offers a number of special services in order to ease this transition, such as a full-day orientation for new international students, answers to visa questions, and help in finding housing. All international students meet with the International Stu dent Advisor (ISA) in OlE upon arrival in Denver to have visas and other paperwork reviewed, in order to assist in personal ized advising . OlE provides a friendly ear and a place to ask questions and express concerns about all kinds of issues, including U.S. social customs , as well as an avenue for communicating with other CU-Denver international student clubs and organizing social activities. The OlE also works with the Univer s i ty ' s American Language Center, which offers an Intensive English Program for international students preparing to pass the TOEFL or who need further English help after starting their degree studies. See Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section for a complete description . GRADUATE STUDENT AND FACULTY FULBRIGHT INFORMATION OlE serves as the University clearinghouse for information on various scholarships and fellowships for study and research abroad, including Fulbright

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graduate student an faculty visiting lectureships at forei I universities . COMMUNITY SERVICES During the year , OlE sponsors periodic guest lectures and sptial seminars focused on topics of urrent international interest. Most of thes activities are open to the public as ell as the CU-Denver communii!Y. OlE is also an active participant n a number of Denver community i ternational programs and events For more informati n about these and other programs , on tact the OlE office at 303-556-3489 University of C'lorado Foundation, The chief goal of th University of Colorado Inc. is to advance the University of Col rado ' s mission to create a Total Learn! g Environment focusing on goal of becoming the premier public institution of higher learning in the nation The University 's a*demic leadership establishes priorities for private support. Professional fundrais rs generate interest and enthusiasm fort e University, recruit and organize solicit gifts, and assist donors in gift p anning. Established in 196 as an independent , privately governed , In profit corpora tion , the CU Foundati n raises and manages private fun s to benefit students and faculty by funds for scholar ships, enriching acadf!mic programs , purchasing equipment, and upgrading facilities . In 1981, the CU Foundation established a Denver j campus office: Campus Box 174; P .O. Box 173364; Denver, CO 80217-3364; Phone 303-556-4301. CENTERS AND ! INSTITUTES FOR SERVICE, ANDTRAININ Center for Appl ed Psychology (for information see sychology in the Liberal Arts and Scie ces section in this catalog) Center for Coli borative EducationaiLeJdership (for information see the School of Education section in this catalog) I Center for Computational Mathematics (for information see Mathematics in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog) Center for Environmental Sciences (for info rmation see Environmental Sciences in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog) Center for Ethics and Community (for information see ('hiJosophy in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog) Center for Geotechnical Engineering Science (for information see the College of Engineering and Applied Science section in this catalog) Center for Research in Health and Behavioral Sciences (for information see Health and Behav ioral Sciences in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog ) Center for Research on Economic and Social Policy (for information see Economics in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog) Colorado Center for Community Development The Colorado Center for Community Development provides technical, educa tional , and applied research assistance to organizations , neighborhoods, and communities that cannot afford or do not have access to professional services . The Center targets its assistance efforts to rural small towns, low income and/ or minority communities , and non traditional, community-based service or development organizations. Fourth World Center for the Study of law and Politics (for in1ormation see Political Science in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog) Centers and Institutes I 35 Institute for International Business (for information see the College of Business and Administration section in this catalog) International Training Academy The International Training Academy (ITA) was developed in 1994 to assist public and private agencies throughout the globa l community in realizing their training goals. This mission is reflected in such Academy projects as Foundations of Counseling , a post-graduate counseling psychology course that ITA offers on the Internet, and the DAY Training Academy, a program that provides disabled veterans the training they need to become National Service Officers and promote the needs of their fellow veterans . These and other training endeavors help promote educa tion and advancement among individ uals for whom such opportunities are not always readily available. ITA is also an active contributor to the Total Learning Environme nt of the CU system. Older , well-established programs like the National Veterans' Training Institute (NVTI) combine with enterpris ing new ones such as Colorado Works (welfare reform training for staff of the Colorado Department of Human Services) and the Latino/ a Research and Policy Center (LRPC) to give something back to the people and communities who host ITA and the University so well. These programs aim to help develop the knowledge and skills that people in Denver and beyond need to build their urban communities into strong , sustainable metropolitan areas . Funding for all of these and other pro grams implemented by the International Training Academy has come from a variety of sources. Federal agencies like the United States (U. S . ) Department of Defense, U.S. Department of Labor , and the Department of Veterans Affairs have sponsored ITA programs, as have state agencies like the Colorado Department of Human Services . These public sector efforts have been complemented by contracts and grants from private sector entities such as the Disabled American Veterans and other nonprofit organiza tions. The International Training Academy both gives to and receives from many different social groups and institutions in the global community .

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36 / Genera/Information TeleMedia Center (for information see the College of Engineering and Applied Science section in this catalog) Transportation Research Center (for information see the College of Engineering and Applied Science section in this catalog) UNIVERSITY POLICIES Inclusiveness and Non-Discrimination The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to enhancing the inclusive ness of its work force and its student body. Inclusiveness among students, faculty , staff, and administrators is essential to educational excellence and to accomplishing CU-Denver ' s urban mission. Inclusiveness among faculty , staff , and administrators provides role models and mentors for students , who will become leaders i n academe and in the larger society , and ensures that a broad array of experiences and world views inform and shape teaching , research , service , and decision making at CU-Denver . CU-Denver employs, retains , and advances in employment qualified appli cants and employees , and admits , retains , and advances in education qualified applicants and students regardless of their race, color , religion, national origin , gender , age, disability, or veteran status. CU-Denver does not discriminate on the basis of race, color , religion, national origin, gender, age , disability, or veteran status and complies with all local, state, and federal laws and regulations related to education , employment , and contracting. For further information , contact the Office of Academic and Student Affairs , CU-Denver Bldg. , Suite 700; 303-556-2550, TfY 303-556-6204 , Fax 303-556-2678 ; e-mail : marylou.fenili@cudenver . edu. Program Access for Persons with Disabilities The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing reasonable accommodation and access to programs and services to persons with disabilities. Students should contact the Disability Services Office , Arts Building 177, 303-556-8387 ' TfY 303-556-8484 . Any other person requiring accommodation in order to access programs and services of the University of Colorado at Denver, either on or off the campus , should request accommodation from the individ ual or office responsible for providing the program or service. This request should be made in a timely fashion to allow the individual or office adequate opportunity to provide reasonable accommodation . The time frame for notification will vary according to the circumstances and the nature of the accommodation. For further information or for assistance , contact the Om buds Office, CU-Denver Building , Suite 700; 303-556-4494, TfY 303-556-6204 ; Fax 303-556-2678 ; e-mail: ombuds@carbon.cudenver.edu . Sexual Harassment The University of Colorado at Denver is a collegial academic community whose mission requires an open learning and working environment for students, faculty , staff , and administrators . An open learning and working environment values and protects individual dignity and the integrity of human relationships . CU Denver's educational process is based upon mutual trust, freedom of inquiry, freedom of expression , and the absence of intimidation and exploitation . As a place of work and study, CU-Denver must be free of inappropriate and disrespectful conduct and communication of a sexual nature, of sexual harassment , and of all forms of sexual intimidation and exploita tion. Such behavior is reprehensible because it subverts the mission of CU Denver, poisons the environment , and threatens the careers, educational experiences , and well-being of students , faculty, staff , and administrators . It is a violation of CU-Denver ' s Sexual Harassment Policy for anyone who is authorized to recommend or take action affecting faculty, staff , students, or admin istrators to make any unwelcome sexual advances , to request sexual favors, or to engage in any other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or status in a course, program, or activity ; (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct is used as the basis for employ ment or educational decisions affecting that individual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work performance or educational experience, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment for working or learning. For further information, contact the Sexual Harassment Officer , CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 700; 303-556-4493 , TfY 303-556-6204 , Fax 303-556-2678 ; e-mail : marylou.fenili@cudenver.edu University Policy on Drugs and Alcohol The University of Colorado at Denver recognizes the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol , and is committed to providing a drug-free educational environment and drug-free workplace which supports the research, teaching, and service mission of the University. This Denver Campus policy statement on drugs and alcohol is designed to address the University's concerns about substance abuse and to ensure the CU-Denver community complies with the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 (the " Drug-Free Workplace Act ") and the Drug-Free Schoo ls and Communities Act Amend ments of 1989 (the " Drug Free Schools Act " ). These Acts require the University, as a recipient of federal funds , to take measures to combat the abuse of drugs and alcohol. The continuation of federal financial support for our campus' stu dents, as well as our academic programs and academic support services programs, is based upon compliance with these statutes and their regulations. The University of Colorado at Denver Policy on Drugs and Alcohol prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of any controlled substance (illicit drugs of any kind or amount) and the abuse of alcohol by students and employees on University property or as part of any of its activities . This prohibition covers any individual's actions which are part of any University activities, including those occurring while on University property or in the conduct of University business away from the campus. It is a violation of University policy for any member of the faculty, staff, or student body to jeopardize the operation or interest of the University of Colorado at Denver through the use of alcohol or drugs. Those individuals found to be in violation are engaged in serious misconduct and are subject to legal sanctions under local , state, or federal law, and are also subject to disciplinary action consis tent with the Code of Student Conduct, the Faculty Handbook (1988) , applicable rules of the State Personnel System , and the University ' s Unclassified Staff Handbook. Sanctions that will be imposed by the

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University of Colora o at Denver for employees who are und to be in viola tion of this policy m include requiring satisfactory particip tion in a substance abuse treatment, co nseling , or education program as a condition of continued employment , suspe9 sion or termination of employment , and eferral for prosecution . To acquaint me bers of the CO Denver community ith the applicable Jaws , the University ounsel has prepared a description of Joe , state, and federal laws concerning dru s and alcohol. This information is availa lefor direct immediate to all students, faculty , and staff on e World Wide Web CUDenver Homepa e , located under Administrative Offic s , Center for Human Resources , Policies d Procedures for UCD. The World Wid Web address for a copy of the Chancell r ' s policy statement is : http:/ drugs.hbnl The World Wide eb address for expanded informati non Substance Abuse Prevention R sources is : http://www.cudenv r r.edu/public/chr/ abusepreventionre'f:'!urces.hbnl All University and staff members, as well as any employed at the University , they will , as a condition of their ployment , abide by the terms of this Uni ersity of Colorado at Denver policy . In ad ition , any employee who is convicted violation of any crim inal drug law occurring in the workplace must report that co viction to his or her immediate supervis r within five days. The Drug-Free Workplace Act makes strict compliance with this policy statement a condition of emplo?'fent on all federal grants and contractl Within ten days of learning of a drug co viction resulting from workplace acti " ties of any individual engaged in work un er grants or contracts funded by a federal gency, the University of Colorado at Denv r is required to notify the relevant funding agency that a viola tion of this polic y st tement has occurred. Students and Uni ersity employees are encouraged to l earn[ bout the dangers of substance and alco ol abuse, and may obtain more detaile information about treatment and coun eling options avail able to the Universi community. This preventive informat on is available for direct and immediat 24-hour-per-day access to all faculty , and staff on the World Wide , ')'eb CU-Denver Homepage, located yoder Administrative Offices , Center for H u man Resources , Policies and Procedures for UCD. The World Wide Web address for expanded I information on Substance Abuse Prevention Resources is : http:/fwww.cudenver.edu/public/chr/ abusepreventionresources.hbnl University employees may also contact the Center for Human Resources (CUDenver Building , Suite 830 , 303-5562868) for more information regarding resources, programs, and services that are available. CU-Denver students may contact the Counseling and Family Therapy Center at 303-556-4372 (North Classroom 4036) , or the Student Health Center at 303-556-2525 (Plaza Bldg., Room 150 ), for confidential information and/or referrals. Information may also be obtained by calling the National Institute on Drug Abuse Hotline at 1-800-662 -HELP or the National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information at 1-301468-2600 . Academic Honor Code and Discipline Policies ACADEMIC INTEGRITY A university ' s reputation is built on a standing tradition of excellence and scholastic integrity . As members of the University of Colorado at Denver academic community, faculty and students accept the responsibility to maintain the highest standards of intellectual honesty and ethical conduct in completing all forms of academic work at the U niversity. FORMS OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY Students are expected to know , understand, and comply with the ethical standards of the University . 1n addi tion , students have an obligation to inform the appropriate official of any acts of academic dishonesty by other students of the University. Academic dishonesty i s defined as a student' s use of unauthorized assistance with intent to deceive an instructor or other such person who may be assigned to evaluate the student's work in meeting course and degree requirements. Examples of academic dishonesty include , but are not limited to, the following : A. Plagiarism Plagiarism is the use of another person' s distinctive ideas or words without acknowledgem e nt. The incorporation of another person' s work into one' s own requires appropriate identification and acknowledgement , regardless of the means of appropriation. The following are considered to be forms of plagiarism when the source is not noted: University Policies I 37 1. Word-for-word copying of another person's ideas or words 2. The mosaic (the interspersing of one' s own words here and there while, in essence, copying another's work) 3 . The paraphrase (the rewriting of another' s work, yet still using their fundamental idea or theory) 4. Fabrication (inventing or counterfeiting sources) 5 . Submission of another' s work as one's own 6 . Neglecting quotation marks on material that is otherwise acknowledged Acknowledgement is not necessary when the material used is common knowledge. 8. Cheating Cheating involves the possession, communication, or use of information , materials , notes, study aids , or other devices not authorized by the instructor in any academic exercise , or communica tion with another person during such an exercise . Examples of cheating are: 1 . Copying from another' s paper or receiving unauthorized assistance from another during an academic exercise or in the submission of academic material 2 . Using a calculator when its use has been disallowed 3 . Collaborating with another student or students duri ng an academic exercise without the consent of the instructor C. Fabrication and Falsification Fabrication involves inventin g or counterfeiting information, i.e., creating results not obtained in a study or laboratory experiment. Falsification , on the other hand, involves the deliberate alter ation or changing of results to suit one's needs in an experiment or other academic e x ercise. D. Multiple Submission This is the submission of academic work for which academic credit has already been earned, when such sub mission is made without instructor authorization. E. Misuse of Academic Materials The misuse of academic materials includes , but is not limited to, the following : 1. Stealing or destroying library or reference materials or computer programs

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38 / General Information 2 . Stealing or destroying another student's notes or materials , or having such materials in one' s possession without the owner's permission 3. Receiving assistance in locating or using sources of information in an assignment when such assistance has been forbidden by the instructor 4. Illegitimate possession, disposition, or use of examinations or answer keys to examinations 5. Unauthorized alteration, forgery , or falsification of academic records 6. Unauthorized sale or purchase of examinations , papers, or assignments F. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty Complicity involves knowingly con tributing to another' s acts of academic dishonesty. PROCEDURES IN CASES OF SUSPECTED ACADEMIC DISHONESTY All matters of academic policy , includ ing academic dishonesty, are under the jurisdiction of each of the University's schools and colleg e s pursuant to Article IX2.B and Article VI. C of the Laws of the Regents . Accordingly , each school and college has establish e d procedures for addressing matters of academic dishon esty and for determining the severity and consequences of each infraction . Students should contact their school or college for standards and/or procedures specific to their school or college . As a general rule , all school and college procedures contain the following requirements and provisions : A . Faculty, staff members, or students may submit charges of academic dishonesty against students. A student who has evidence that another student is guilty of academic dishonesty should inform the instructor or the dean of the college of the charge in writing. B . A faculty member who has evid e nce that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty should confront the student with the evidence . In cases of academic dishonesty , the faculty member has the authority to reprimand the student appropriately , which could include the issuance of a failing grade (F) . If the faculty member elects to reprimand the student for academic dishonesty by issuing a failing grade , the faculty member shall submit a written report to the dean of the appropriate college within five (5) working days . The report shall include , but is not limited to, the time, place , nature of the offense( s ), thename(s) of the accused , the name(s) of the accuser( s ) , and witnesses (if any).lf the faculty member feels that her/his reprimand is an insufficient sanction for a particular case of aca demic dishonesty , the faculty member may recommend to the dean of the appropriate c ollege that further action betaken. C . ln cases where the faculty member has recommended further action in a case of academic dishonesty , the dean or a designated committee shall sched ule a disciplinary hearing as soon as possible . The student( s) accused of academic dishonesty shall be notified in writing of the specific charge ( s ). The student( s ) also has (have ) the right to have a representative present for advice , and to be p resent during the proceedings . The student(s) must notify the dean of the appropriate college five (5) working days before the hearing of the intent to have legal counsel present at the hearing. D. The dean or the designated committee may take any of the following actions : • Place the student( s) on disciplinary probation for a specified period of time • Suspension of registration at CO Denver , including Extended Studies , for a specified period of time • Expulsion : No opportunity to return to the school or college in which the infraction occurred • Take no further action against the accused student( s) A record of the action taken shall be kept in the committee ' s confidential file and a copy sent to the Registrar E . In all cases, the student(s) shall be notified of the dean ' s or committee's decision within seven (7) working days . F. If a student wishes to appeal a case, the student should request the procedures for doing so from his or her school or college . G . Students who are taking courses at the University of Colorado at Denver , but are enrolled at one of the other educa tional institutions on the Auraria campus and are charged with academic dishonesty, are subject to the same pro cedures and sanctions outlined above . SUMMARY Questions regarding academic integrity should be d i rected to the dean's office of the college or school in which the student is enrolled . Code of Student Conduct (Student Rights and Responsibilities and Procedures for Disciplinary Review and Action) STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR WHICH ACTION MAY BE TAKEN IF A VIOLATION OCCURS All persons on University property are required, for reasonable cause, to identify themselves when requested by University or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties . Acting through its administrative officers , the University reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to University per sonnel or property and those who inter fere with its function as an educational institution. All persons on CU-Denver / Auraria prop erty who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applicable to Univer sity students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations . The behaviors outlined below will not be tolerated , because they threaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the University and the per sonal rights and freedoms of its members. 1. Intentional obstruction, disruption , or interference with teaching , research, disciplinary proceedings , or other University activities, including its public service and administrative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denver / Auraria premises . 2 . Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, school officials, employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU Denver/Auraria campus. 3 . Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CU-Denver I Auraria Higher Education Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the University , or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person. 4 . Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms , which includes, but is not limited to, striking , laying hands upon, threatening with violence, or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure ; or other treatment of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature. (This includes , but is not limited to, demeaning behavior of an ethnic, sexist, or

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racist nature, unwanted sexual advances, or 5 . Prohibited entry to or use of CU Denver/Auraria fac i lities, defined as unauthorized or use of CU-Den ver/Auraria properjtY or facilities for illegal purposes orpurposes detrimen tal to the 6. Forgery, fraud (to i elude computer fraud), falsification alteration, or use of University doc ents, records , or instruments of ide tification with intent to gain any u entitled advantage . 7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver/Auraria property and the p ivate property of students, Universi officials, employ ees , and invited gu sts when such property is locate upon or within CU-Denver/Aurari buildings or facili ties . This includes he possession of known stolen prop rty. 8 . Possession of fire;s, explosives , or other dangerous w a pons or materials within or upon the ounds , buildings or any other facilif s of the CU-Denver I Auraria campus . T is policy shall not apply to any polic officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University , r others authorized in writing by the C ief of the Auraria Public Safety or de ignee. (A dangerous weapon is an instr ment that is designed to or like! to produce bodily harm. Weapons m y include, but are not limited to, fire ms, explosives , BB guns , slingshots , arts devices, brass knuckles, Bo e knives, daggers or similar knives , o switchblades. A harmless instrum t designed to look like a firearm , expl ' sive, or dangerous weapon which is u ed by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly within the meaning of the ter s firearms, explo sive, or dangerous eapon.) 9 . Sale, distribution , use, possession , or manufacture of iUefal drugs within or on the grounds , bu I dings, or other facilities of the CUenver I Aurar1a campus. 10. Physical coercion , or harassment of any erson; significant theft; sale/manufa ture of illegal drugs (includes possess! n of a sufficient quantity with to sell); damage , theft, or unauthorifed possession University propercy; or forgery , falsifi cation, alteration , or use of University documents , records , or instruments of identification to ain any unentitled advantage. UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS As a member of the University commu nity , you are held accountable not only for upholding civil and criminal laws, but University standards as well . Enrollment does not confer either immunity or spe cial consideration with reference to civil and criminal laws . Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to chal l enge or postponement on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed , reduced , or are pending in civil or criminal court. In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a stu dent violates a standard and withdraws from the University before administrative action is final . USE OF UNIVERSITY/AURARIA PROPERTY OR FACILITIES Nothing in this Code of Conduct shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the voicing of concerns or grievances . The University is dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge through a free exchange of ideas , and this shall be a cardinal principle in the determination of whether or not a proposed use of University facilities is appropriate. The Auraria Higher Education Center has established campus regulations and procedures governing the use of CU Denver / Aurariagrounds , buildings, and other facilities. Such regulations are designed to prevent interference with University functions and activities. Except where otherwise specifically authorized, or when members of the public are invited, the use of CU-Denver/ Auraria facilities shall be limited to faculty, staff, and students of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus , and to organizations having chapters, local groups , or other recognized University-connected repre sentation among faculty, staff , or students of the three academic institutions on the Auraria campus. CLASSROOM CONDUCT Students are expected to conduct themselves appropriately in classroom situations.lf disruptive behavior occurs in a classroom, an instructor has the authority to ask the disruptive student to leave the classroom. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist , the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Public Safety and/or the appropriate Dean ' s office. The appropri ate Dean or his/her representative may withdraw a student from a particular class University Policies I 39 for disruptive behavior , while the Student Discipline Committee may recommend to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs to suspend, permanently expel, and/or permanently exclude the student from the campus. Appeal questions concerning disruptive behavior should be directed to the Academic Dean ' s office when withdrawal from a class is involved , and to the Director of Student Life when suspension or expulsion from the University is involved. NON-ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE POLICIES Violations of Standards of Conduct should be reported to the Director of Student Life during working hours . Auraria Public Safety should be contacted during non-duty hours. If a violation occurs on campus and it is not in a specific building , Auraria Public Safety and /or the Director of Student Life should be contact e d . If emergency help is needed when on campus , contact Auraria Public Safety; for help off campus , contact the Denver Police. Actions available to campus officials include , but are not limited to: asking those involved in inappropriate behavior to cease and desist ; requesting offender(s) to leave theAuraria camp us ; denying or restric ting use of facilities or services ; calling Auraria Public Safety for assistance; billing offender( s) for any physical damages ; pressing civil charges ; and referring student(s) to the Director of Student Life. The chart that follows illustrates the overall structure involved. DISCIPLINE STRUCTURE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER 1. Violations observed may be resolved by any of the following : • University departments such as: a. Admissions b . Student Union c . University / Auraria Public Safety d . Financial Aid e . Veterans Affairs • Faculty/Staff • Students • Non-University Members 2 . If violation warrants further attention , contact: • Director of Student Life a. If student( s ) desire(s) a review by the Director of Student Life. Academic dishonesty discipline falls under the jurisdiction of the individual colleges and schools .

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40 / Genera/Information b .lf violation warrants possible suspension or expulsion . • Student Discipline Committee 3 . Final review (may request only in cases of suspension/expulsion) by Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs. STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES When one of the ten Standards of Conduct listed in this code is violated, the student may be referred to the Director of Student Life. Any person may refer a student or student group suspected of violating this code to the Director of Student Life. Persons making such referrals will be asked to provide information pertinent to the case . The Director of Student Life will make a determination as to the seriousness of the case. This will be done in most situations by asking the student( s ) involved in the case to come in for an administrative interview to determine what actions , if any , will be taken by the University . Students will be notified in writing of the results of such administrative reviews. The Director of Student Life has the authority to: 1. Dismiss the case. 2 . Take no further action other than talking with the accused student(s) . 3 . Issue a University warning (a statement that a student's behavior has been inappropriate , and any further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action). 4 . Place the student on disciplinary probation , a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University . 5. Refer cases to the Student Discipline Committee when the above sanctions are determined to be inadequate. 6 . Take other actions , including but not limited to counseling , insuring the violator(s) provide(s) compensation for theft or damage , and/or placing stops on registration. STUDENT DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Disciplinary proceedings shall be conducted as administrative proceedings and not as judicial proceedings . The University is not a part of the judicial branch of state government. The University has authority to promulgate and enforce internal rules of behavior that shall be administered in a fair and impartial manner in harmony with its educational objectives and administrative nature . As part of the administrative nature of the committee's proceedings , fundamental rules of fairness will be followed . Copies of these procedures are available in the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs. This committee , composed of students, faculty, and staff members , makes the decision whether students charged with violations of the student conduct code may continue to attend the University of Colorado at Denver . The Student Discipline Committee has the authority to : 1. Dismiss the case . 2 . Take no action other than talking with the accused student. 3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student' s behavior has been inappropriate , and further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action) . 4. Place the student on disciplinary probation , a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University . 5. Recommend suspension of a student from the University for disciplinary reasons . This suspension may be for various lengths of time ranging from one semester to an indefinite period of time . After the period of disciplinary suspension has expired, a student may apply in writing to have the notation on the student' s record removed. 6 . Recommend expulsion of a student from the University; notation on the student' s record will be kept perma nently . When a student is suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons , an additional sanction may include being excluded from the Auraria campus. 7 . Take other actions, including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violator (s ) provide(s) compensation for theft or damage , and/or placing stops on registration. Student(s) must be notified in writing of the disciplinary action taken within five (5) days. REVIEW PROCEDURES A student may submit a request to review the recommendation of suspen sion or expulsion by the Student Disci pline Committee within seven (7) working days to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs . Except in cases involving the exercise of the power of summary suspension (see below) , the sanctions of suspension or expulsion for disciplinary reasons shall be effective only after the administrative review by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs has been exhausted or waived . The Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs decision shall be in writing to the student( s ), with a copy to the Student Discipline Committee . Copies of review procedures may be obtained from the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs . SUMMARY SUSPENSION Summary suspension is a suspension from the University which begins immedi ately upon notice from the appropriate University official without a formal hear ing by the Student Discipline Committee. A hearing before the Student Discipline Committee is then scheduled as soon as possible (usually within seven calendar days) to determine the disposition of the case. Summary suspension may also include a physical exclusion from the campus if deemed necessary. The Chancellor and/or a Vice Chan cellor has (have) the authority to suspend summarily any student when in their opinion(s) such suspension is necessary to: 1. Maintain order on the campus . 2. Preserve the orderly functioning of the University . 3. Stop interference in any manner with the public or private rights of citizens on CU-Denver/Auraria-owned or -controlled property. 4. Stop actions that are threatening to the health or safety of any person. 5. Stop actions that are destroying or damaging property of the CU-Denver I Auraria campus , its students, faculty , staff , or guests . PERMANENT RECORD NOTATIONS While disciplinary proceedings are pending or contemplated, a temporary hold may be placed on the student's academic record . It will not be released until all actions and appeal procedures have been completed or finalized by the University . Only in those cases where suspension, deferred suspension, or permanent expulsion results from disciplinary action will notations be placed on the academic record. RELEASE OF DISCIPLINARY INFORMATION Access to any student's academic transcript or disciplinary file shall be governed by provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 197 4. Only the student charged or those

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University officials legitimate educational interest 1 ' dtsctphnary information may hav access to the files. All other inquiries , in luding but not limited to employers, overnmental agencies, news medi friends, or Denver Police, must have a Wfitten release from the student to gain access to University disciplinary files. Every effort will be ade by the University to respect he privacy of the student . However, the identity of the student has been publicly disclosed in the news media, thf University reserves the right to respond a5 it deems appropri ate to describe fairly nd accurately the disposition of disciplinary matters. REFUND POLICY . DISCIPLINARY . Submission of regiltration matenals obligates the student o pay the assessed tuition and fees forth t term. If a student is suspended or expeped from the Univer sity, the amount of tu tion/fees which would be refunded w0uld be the same as when a student voluntarily withdraws from a term. See the ] uition and Fees section of this catalog or the Schedule of Courses for more i q formation . The official withdrawal date applicable for tuition/fee refund purposes will be the date of the Dcipline Committee's decision. In the event that circumstances are such that the ace sed student has registered for a subs quent term before the final decision is ade, that student does so at his/her own risk and may be liable for payment of t uition and fees for both terms. The Committee will make the decision as to wh n official suspen sion or expulsion Failure to make the required paymen f will result in the following actions : will. become ineligible for all serv1ces ; no grades will be for courses in progress; no transcri ts , diplomas , certification, or regis ation materials will be is. sued for the tudent until the bill is paid in full; and a I e payment charge , in addition to the int est on the unpaid balance, will be TRI-INSTITUTION t L VIOLATIONS Procedures in ing violations of the Code of Student Con uct involving stu dents from other aca ernie institutions on the Auraria campus ave been developed by CU-Denver and th . institution( s) involved. In such cas 1 s , the Director of Student Life should t:k contacted. Ethical Use of Computing at CU-Denver POLICY STATEMENT CU-Denver honors the University-wide Information Technology Policies . Access to and use of CU-Denver's computing resources is a privilege granted to members of the CU-Denver community for scholarly, research, academic, and administrative purposes . Computing resources are defined as facilities , equipment , systems , and personnel. Use of these resources includes World Wide Web pages , listservs , email, application software, and any other electronic com munication . Members of the CU-Denver community who use computing resources are expected to do so in an effective , efficient, appropriate , ethical , and legal manner . Use of CU-Denver's computing resources depends upon mutual respect and cooperation to ensure that all mem bers of the CU-Denver community have equal access , privileges , privacy , and pro tection from interference and harassment. CU-Denver computing resources shall be used in a manner consistent with the instructional , research , and administra tive objectives of the academic commu nity in general and with the purpose for which such use of resources and facilities is intended . All activities inconsistent with these objectives are considered to be inappropriate and may jeopardize continued use of CUDenver ' s computing resources . CU-Denver computing resources are for the use of authorized individuals only and for use only in a manner consistent with each individual's authority. CU-Denver's computing resources may not be used in any manner inconsistent with an individ ual ' s authority , prohibited by licenses , contracts , University policies , or local , state , or federal law . No one may grant permission for inappropriate use of computing resources , nor does the ability to perform inappropriate actions constitute permission to do so. USER AGREEMENT Each user of CU-Denver computing resources is responsible for knowing and complying with all applicable laws , poli cies , and procedures . CU-Denver reserves the right to monitor , record , and store computing activities of anyone using computing resources. If such monitoring, recording , and storage reveals possible evidence of inappropriate , unethical , or illegal activity , computing system person nel may provide the evidence obtained University Policies I 41 from monitoring to appropriate university and civic authorities . A. Each user agrees to make appropriate use of computing resources including, but not limited to : 1 . Respecting the intended purposes of computing resources , facilities , and equipment (for scholarly , research , academic , administrative and CU-Denver-sponsored commu nity service purposes) . 2 . Respecting the stated purpose of computer accounts (for scholarly , research, academic , administrative , and CUDenver-sponsored commu nity service purposes) and to use computer accounts only for the specified purposes. 3 . Respecting the dignity and privacy of other users . 4 . Respectin g the integrity of the systems. 5 . Respecting the resource controls of the systems and managing appropriately use of disk space. 6 . Respecting the privileges associated with having network connectivity. 7 . Respecting the copyright protection of licensed software and documentation . 8 . Following all University of C olorado and CU-Denver policies, and local , state , and Federal laws related to computing. B . Each user agrees to refrain from inappropriate uses of computing resources , includ i ng , but not limited to : 1. Using any other individual ' s computer account or password . 2 . Using computing resources , facilities , and equipment for personal commercial gain . 3. Intentionally seeking information on , obtaining copies of, modifying , or tampering with files , tapes , passwords , or any type of data belonging to other users unless specifical l y authorized to do so by those other users . 4. Using resources to develop or execute programs that could harass other users , infiltrate the systems , damage or alter the software components of the systems , or disrupt CU-Denver activities. 5 . Violating any network-related policy, whether set by the University of Colorado , CU-Denver, or a network governing body . 6 . Altering or avoiding accounting for the use of computing resources , facilities , and equipment.

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42 / General Information 7. Making excessive use of resources, controlled or otherwise . 8 . Misrepresenting oneself or others through e-mail or other electronic communication. 9 . Using, duplicating, or distributing licensed software and documenta tion without the express written permission of the original copyright owner. 10. Using unauthorized copies of licensed software . ll.Abusing , harassing , intimidating, threatening , stalking , or discriminat ing against others through the use of computing resources. 12. Sending obscene, abusive , harassing , or threatening messages to any other individual. 13. Engaging in vandalism or mischief that incapacitates, compromises, or destroys CU-Denver resources. WORLD WIDE WEB POLICY Access to the World Wide Web (JVWW) and the ability to create web pages on CO Denver computing systems are privileges provided to members of the CU-Denver community. CU-Denver users must conduct their activities in a courteous and professional manner . I. Servers Computing , Information, and Network Services (CINS) supports and maintains designated WWW servers for general campus usage. All web servers connected to the Internet through CU-Denver net working are to be registered with the CU-Denver Webmaster , webmaster@ carbon.cudenver . edu. This includes all web servers located outside of the CINS department. The WWW Policy applies to all web servers using CUDenver as the Internet Service Provider OSP). II. Individual WWW Pages Appropriate use policies for CU-Denver computer accounts also apply to individ ual home pages . Individuals who create home pages are responsible for adhering to the following guidelines: A. Individual home pages are encouraged for the following purposes: 1. Presenting personal non-commercial information (resumes , family, etc . ). 2 . Experimenting with available Web technologies and authoring tools . 3. Publishing and disseminatin g academic work . 4. Linking to cultural, scientific , or historical sites. 5 . Posting announcements , news bulletins, and other general information . B.lndividual home pages may not be put to inappropriate uses , which include , but are not limited to: 1. Use of copyrighted materials in any form without the express written permission of the original copyright owner. 2. Personal , commercial uses which could result in a financial benefit for the page owner or his/her associates . 3 . Use of audio , images (i.e. , ph
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Notification of Poli y Violation The CU-Denver will notify the user who is to have violated CO-Denver's com put ng policies of the nature of the aile ed violation and will provide the ser with a copy of CO-Denver's Com uting Policies . Suspension of Privi eges During Investigation During the of an alleged policy violation , a usrr's computing and network access may pe suspended. CO Denver reserves the to examine a user' s recorded and tored information in the course of investi ating an alleged pol icy violation . Procedures 1. The CU-Denver W bmaster will review the material allegep to be in violation of CO-Denver's Comf.ting Policies . If the CU-Denver Webm ter believes that the material violates t e policies , the CO Denver Webmaste will request that the user remove the offending material . 2. If the alleged fails or refuses to comply with th CU-Denver Webmaster's requ st, the CU-Denver Web master may r fer the matter to the CU-Denver WWW ommittee for action . 3. If the alleged viola or disagrees with the CU-Denver Web master, the user may file a written petition tequesting that the WWW Committee eview the case. 4. The Chair of the CU-Denver WWW Committee will appoint a three-person subcommittee of the WWW Committee to review the easel Two members of the subcommittee m t be selected from the membership f the WWW Commit tee. The Chair rna select the third member from the Committee or from Faculty sembly, Staff Council, or the 5 . After consulting th the alleged violator and with e Webmaster , the subcommittee will determine (a) if a policy violation h* occurred, and (b) if a policy viol tion has been found , what action shoul be taken to remedy the policy violatio . Consequences of Pplicy Violations Violations of CU-oFnver Computing Policies may result i? disciplinary action , including , but not lirpited to, suspension of access to the wwyv. suspension of e-mail privileges , suspension of computing privileges , suspehsion or expulsion from the University , pension or termi nation of employment, imposition of fines, and referral for leg action. The CU-Denver WWW Committee may recommend to the Director of Student Life that a student be suspended or expelled from the University , or to the appropriate appointing authority that an employee be suspended or terminated. The WWW Committee may impose all other sanc tions specified above. STUDENT SERVICES To meet the needs of the diverse student population , CU-Denver provides programs and activities designed to complement students' academic programs and to enhance their total educational experience . Students are provided opportunities to develop , experience, and participate in student government, social , cultural, intellectual , and recreational programs. These programs create an environment in which students are: • Assisted in developing leadership ability through opportunities to prac tice decision making , management and marketing, interpersonal and group communication, and relationship skills. • Encouraged and aided in developing social , cultural , intellectual , recreation, and governance programs that expand involvemen t with the campus commu nity and society and lead to mature appreciation of these pursuits. • Encouraged to explore self-directed activities that provide opportunities for personal growth in individual and group settings . • Exposed to various cultures and experi ences, ideas and issues, art and musical forms , and styles of life. • Informed about institutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities. • Aided in the awareness and utilization of campus facilities and other resources. • Assisted in developing community spirit through creative interaction among staff , faculty, students, and members of the local community. Students are encouraged to involve their families in campus events and activities. Programs and services provided by the Associated Students of CU-Denver, the Office of Academic and Student Affairs of CU-Denver, and Auraria Campus Student Services contribute to the fulfillment of this philosophy. Student Services I 43 The Advocate The purpose of the student newspaper, The Advocate , is to provide students with information about campus issues and events. The newspaper strives to include good investigative reporting, feature arti cles , and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is a tool to encourage and develop writers, journalists , artists, and other student members of its general management and production staff. The office is in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 345, 303-556-2535. American Indian Student Services The American Indian Student Services program provides access and educational opportunities to American Indian students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. American Indian Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns of the American Indian community. The office is located in North Classroom 2013, 303-556-2860. Asian American Student Services Asian American Student Services provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student leadership development, and organization sponsorship. Supportive services are tailored to meet the specific needs of students. Asian American Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus and community, providing current information on issues and concerns of Asian Americans . The office is located in North Classroom 2012, 303-556-2578 or 303-556-2065. Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) The Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal University structure. ASCU-Denver

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44 / Genera/Information assists students with information con cerning student clubs and organizations , campus events , issues concerning student status, and other information of general interest to students. ASCU-Denver also provides students assistance with grievances and the opportunity to become more closely involved with the University community, through active participation in student government itself , or through service on University, tri-institutional , and AHEC committees . More information concerning services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Tivoli Student Union , Room 301,303-556-2510. Auraria Campus Student Servtces AURARIA CHILD CARE CENTER The Auraria Child Care Center , 303-556-3188, serves the child care needs of Auraria ' s students, staff, and faculty by providing high quality early childhood education and care programs . The Child Care Center is located on the southwest corner of the campus . Its programs are consistently recognized by the educational community for their high-quality early childhood care and education. Developmentally appropriate practices for young children guide the educational programs that are provided. Curriculum planning is flexible and based on children's interests. Experiences are planned in accordance with "Key Experiences" adapted from the High/ Scope Cognitively Oriented Curriculum . Supervising teachers in the Child Care Centers are all degreed teachers meeting the certification guidelines of the National Academy of Early Childhood programs. Children aged 12 months to 6 years are served at the Center. The Center also has a fully accredited kindergarten program . Hours: M-F, 7a.m.-6p.m . DISA!JILITY SERVICES OFFICE Arts Building , Room 177, 303-556-8387 . The Disability Services Office (DSO) was created to serve the needs of a large and diverse community of students with disabilities attending the University of Colorado at Denver and Metropolitan State College of Denver. The office has a strong commitment to providing equal access and a wide range of support services to students with disabilities . The DSO staff also works closely with faculty and staff members in an advisory capacity, assisting in the development of reasonable instructional accommodations that allow students wtih disabilities to fully participate in the academic programs offered on this campus. Services to students include : Adaptive Computer Lab Testing Accommodations Notetaking Services Student Advocacy Sign Language and Oral Interpreters Orientation for Incoming Students Priority Registration Sale of Handicapped Parking Permits Resource Library EMMANUEL GALLERY Located next to southwest corner of PE Bldg., 303-556-8337. The Emmanuel Gallery hosts exhibits of students, faculty , and nationally known artists. Stop in for a relaxing break. Gallery hours are lla. m . to 5p . m., M-F. GAY, LESBIAN, BISEXUAL, TRANS (GLBT) STUDENT SERVICES Gay, Lesbian , Bisexual , Trans Student Services is open to all Auraria campus students as a resource for exploring sex ual orientation issues. This program offers a variety of support, education, and advocacy services for the entire campus community: • Support for those who may have questions about their own sexual orientation or that of a friend or family member • Advocacy for students experiencing discrimination or harassment based on a real or perceived GLBT identity • Speakers for events , workshops , and classes on various aspects of sexual orientation • Training programs and workshops about working with the gay , lesbian , and bisexual communities more effectively and combating homophobia • Resource library for research papers, personal reading , and off-campus resource information • Programs such as Gay, Lesbian , Bisexual , Trans Awareness Month and other forums providing information and dialogue about GLBT issues . The GLBT Student Services office is located in the Tivoli Student Union , room 311, and is staffed by a director with the support of student employees and volunteers . Input and involvement from the entire campus community is welcomed . For additional information , call 303-556-6333 . STUDENT HEALTH CENTER All CU-Denver students are entitled to medical services at the Student Health Center, and student health insurance is NOT required to use this facility . Physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners , radiological technologists, and medical assistants staff the facility . Students will be asked to complete a sign-in sheet and show a current semester ID card each time they check in. Services include treatment of illness and injuries , lab testing, medications , physicals, annual GYN exams , sexually transmitted disease information/testing , birth control information/services , minor surgery, cholesterol screening , immuniza tions , HIV testing , blood pressure checks, casting, suturing , and x-ray . All services listed above are low cost. Payment is required at time of service, except for students who participate in the Student Health Insurance Program. Classes regarding health-related topics are taught each semester and are offered free to students. Walk-in services begin at 8 a .m., Monday-Friday . Access is on a first-come, first-served basis. Walk-in varies daily, contingent upon when all patient slots have been filled ; thus, the daily closure time for walk-in care is variable. Patients are encouraged to check in as early as possible. The Student Health Center is located in the Plaza Building , room 150, on the lower level. Brochures with additional information are available at the health center . For further details and information regarding Night Students (Night Owl Advantage Program) and Extended Campus Students (Satellite Advantage Program), call303-556-2525. TIVOLI STUDENT UNION Tivoli Administration, Room 325 , 303-556-6330 . The Tivoli Student Union is located at 9th and Auraria Parkway on the Auraria Campus . Inside this historic building, which was once a brewery, students will find a vast array of retail shops and restau rants , as well as the Auraria Book Center ; copy center , hair salon , travel agency, the University of Colorado Federal Credit Union, and the Tivoli AMC 12 Theaters. Visit the Tivoli Student Union website . http: / / www.tivoli.org Also housed in the Tivoli Student Union are the Club Hub , Conference Services , 10 Program/Commuter and Housing Services, and Sigi' s Pool Hall and Arcade. Information Desk , Located in second floor lobby, 303-556-6329 .

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Information on Tiv li Student Union hours, locations , events , and services can be found here, as well as information about the Auraria Campus and Denver community. Club Hub, Room 346, 303-556-8094. This uniquely designed club space on the third floor of the features work space for over 60 clu s, mailboxes for campus clubs, a limit d number of lockers, club bulletin boards, meeting rooms, and lounge area for larger group meetings . This office works closely with the Student Advisory Committee to the Auraria Board (SACAB), the Student Union Advisory Board (SUAB), and the Student Activities/Life offices , Tivoli Conference Seroices , Room 325 , 303-556-2755 . Through the Conference Services office , Tivoli meeting rooms; and conference space can be reserved for non-academic purposes, including meetings , weddings , and receptions . The conference service department has four caterers to choose from for all catering needs . ID Program/ Commut e r and Housing Seroices , Room 243, 303-556-8385 . Auraria students can have their I. D . J cards made here, whEh are necessary for parking in some c pus lots and checking out library , ooks. Student IDs also serve as an RTD pus pass. The lounge provides lockers , bus maps , ride boards , pop machinel. and a microwave oven. In addition , inf rmation about off.<:ampus housing provided here, including referrals , afartment complex lists, and a courtesy phone. Sigi 's Pool Hall and a de, Room 145, 303-556-3645. Sigi's, named after he founder of the Tivoli Brewery , Mori z Sigi, houses 31 video game machine , 12 billiard tables , and one snooker tabl r Sigi's is open to the entire Auraria clpus population as well as the public . he student-friendly atmosphere encoura es community socialization and Tivoli Tickets , Room f61C, 303-556-3315. Tickets for events may be purchased here . Tickets is also an authorized outlet. Black Student ervices The Black Student ervices program provides access , edrrational oppor tunities, and informa ion to students of African descent th ough specialized recruitment and reteption efforts . The program provides academic advising , scholarship information , cultural pr
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46 / Genera/Information • Financial aid is verified by presenting recent copy of award letter , or letter from financial aid counselor • Amount of aid covers costs of tuition and loan Students not receiving financial aid are eligible if: • Tuition balance is paid in full • Monthly income is verified by present ing recent check stub or letter from employer • Income indicates ability to repay loan within six weeks . Hispanic Student Services The Hispanic Student Services program provides access and educational opportu nities to Hispanic students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts . The program provides academic advising, scholarship information , cultural programs , advocacy , student organization sponsorship , and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. Hispanic Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus , providing current information on issues and concerns of the Hispanic community . The office is located in North Classroom 2012, 303-556-2777. learning Assistance, The Center for The Center for Learning Assistance is designed to promote student success in the academic setting. Available to CUDenver undergraduate and graduate students, services include English as a second language and study skills courses, tutoring, study skills seminars, peer advo cacy , a test file, consulting, and a minority resource library . First-generation college students may be eligible for intensive services through the Student Support Services Federal Grant Program within the Center. The Center is located in NC 2006, 303-556-2802. Tutoring . Free tutoring is available in many subject areas (some limitations apply). Tutoring is held on weekdays and evenings. Scheduled tutoring is available Monday through Thursday , 8 a.m.-7 p.m., and Friday, 8 a.m.-1 p . m . Open lab tutoring is available Monday through Thursday , 8 a . m .-7 p .m., and Friday , 8 a.m .-1 p.m. Seminars . Study skills seminars are provided on such topics as critical thinking , time /stress management , test anxiety /test taking , essay writing, study strategies , active reading, learning styles, and listening / note taking . Consulting . Academic , financial aid , and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy is available to students eligible for the Student Support Services Program. Library. The Center maintains a small periodical and book collection authored by, and/or about , minorities ; these resources are availabl e for student research a nd leisure . Courses. Courses a r e offered in a small group format in the ar e as of colleg e survival skills , introduction to word processing , English as a second language, problem solving , and Excel. ENGL 1006-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languages. This course is designed for ESL students who n eed to improve their reading and vocabulary skills. Stu dents will increase their reading ability through vocabulary building, word attack strategies , and reading analysis . ENGL 1007-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. This is the first course in the ESL composition sequence. Writing begins with sentence-level development and continues with the development of paragraphs based on Western rhetorical patterns. Grammar appropriate to students' needs will be covered. ENGL 1008-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. A three-credit hour course that follows ENGL 1007 in the ESL sequence of writing classes . The course provides continued work on grammar, syntax , usage, and the mechan ics of wr i ting. Writing begins with para graphs and moves into essay writing . Special attention is paid to the aspects of the English language which pose particular problems for the non-native speaker of English . ENGL 1009-3. Advanced FSL Writing Skills. This is the third course in the ESL composition sequence. Emphasis is placed on more complex grammatical problems and on the development of longer compositions. STSK 0705-1. Problem Solving. Designed to improve investigative and problem solving skills. Scientific theory, empirical methodology , and research methods will be utilized . Individual topics of investigation will be assigned. STSK 0707-1. College Survival Skills. Designed to promote success in the aca demic setting. Topics covered will include university resources, conquering the uni versity system , listening and note-taking, study and memory techniques, test-taking skills, time management, library research strategies , and word processing. STSK 0708-1. Introduction to Word Pro cessing. Thoroughly familiarizes the stu dent with an easy-touse word processing program that will assist in the process of writing, text revision, and rearrangement, and the production of "letter-perfect " doc uments. The word processing program used will be one that is available in the open student-use computer lab areas . STSK 0800-1. Research Process for FSL Students. A one-credit-hour course designed for students who are unfamiliar with the process of academic research . The class covers the steps involved in producing a research paper, including r esource evaluation skills . Grammar is covered as necessary according to student needs . STSK 0801-1. Communication Skills for FSL Students. Meets twice a week to improve the oral communication skills of students whose first language is not English . Skills include use of idiomatic English , cross-cultural awareness , cross cultural problems in communications, and pronunciat i on . STSK 0802-1. Advanced Academic Reading Skills for FSL. The aim of this course is to improve the student's ability to read academic texts . The focus is on analysis and interpretation. STSK 0803-1. Speech Presentation for FSL. A one-credit-hour course which follows STSK 0801 in the oral communication skills sequence. The course focuses on the structure used in formal speech pre sentation along with continued improve ment in pronunciation. Prereq : STSK 0801. STSK 0804-1. Listening and Note-taking for FSL Students. Designed to help ESL students improve their academic lecture comprehension and note-taking skills. Stu dents will learn how to listen to a lecture and take effective notes . Practice lectures will cover a wide range of academic fields. STSK 0806-1. Study Skills for FSL Stu dents. Designed for ESL students to improve those skills needed for effective participation in the college classroom. Emphasis will be on academic reading and writing skills , as well as on note-taking skills.

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SfSK 0810-1. Topics Special topics in study skills to be by instructor. SfSK 0820-1. Social Partnership for FSL Designed to1 provide a basic understanding of American culture and its underlying values. Students will develop critical thinking skills as well as have opportunities for additional practice in reading and writing skills to include vocabulary in social science areas (i.e., sociology, history, political science, economics , psychology). Ombuds The Om buds Offi1e helps to enhance the clarity and diSSEjmination of informa tion, to simplify decision making and communication, to assist with the process of change and with adj ustment to change, and to improve understanding among students, faculty , staff, and administrators. The Om buds Office provides informa tion about programs , policies , services , and procedures affecting members of the University community; makes referrals to appropriate state, CU system , and CU-Denver resources; serves as consultant in the preparation and review of policies and procedures ; and assists in the solution of problems and resolution of disputes . Om buds Office sel"V/ces do not replace or circumvent but help them work more effectively . Om buds Office are informal, impartial, confiden a1, and independent of administrative a thorities. The issues and identities of who consult with the Om buds Office fe not divulged to anyone without express permission to do so, except to the required by law. For further in for ation or assistance , contact the Om bud Office, CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 700; 303 1 556-4493 , 1TY 303-556-6204, Fax 3 ' 3-556-2678 ; e-mail : ombuds@c bon . cudenver . edu Pre-Collegiate Development, The Center fori Programs offere by the Center serve to motivate high sclool students to pursue post-se con ary education and provide them t e academic skills necessary to be su cessful in their college endeavors . The Ce ter is lo cated in NC 2204, 303-556-2322 . PRE-COLLEGIATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM The Pre-Collegiate Development Program is a systemwide institutionally funded academic enhancement program for high school students. It is designed to motivate and prepare high school students who are first generation and / or from an underrepresented group in higher education to complete high school on a timely basis . The primary focus of the program is to prepare youth (grades 9-12) for professional careers of specific interest to them . The program includes academic advising (by parents and guidance counselors working together) regarding high school course selections that will best help students attain their desired career objectives. In addition, during the academic year, students will take part in relevant Saturday Academies in basic study skills , interpersonal skills development , and topics related to student preparation for the 21st century. Between their sophomore and junior years, students will participate in a two week session designed to enhance study and library research skills , and provide a thorough introdu ction to college place ment exams and career fields . Between their junior and senior years, students will attend a five-week academically intense Summer Academic Program. Students will experience university life on a firsthand basis and enhance their secondary school academics by taking courses designed to augment high school academic requirements (e.g., mathemat ics, sciences , writing , computer science , social sciences.) Students also enroll in a three-credit college course. CU-DENVER SCHOLARS PROGRAM This is an early college enrollment pro gram for college-bound , high -achieving students, first generation and/or from an underrepresented group in higher educa tion, who are enrolled in their senior year of high school. The program enables stu dents to begin their college studies by taking one course at CU-Denver during the fall term of their senior year in high school. The credit earned in the course can be applied toward a bachelor ' s degree . While enrolled in the program, students parti cipate in monthly workshops designed to acclimate them to the university and prepare them for college study. Student Services I 47 Student Advocacy Center The Student Advocacy Center provides support services to CU-Denver students, particularly during their first year on campus . Services are designed to help students make a smooth transition to life at CU-Denver and to succeed in their college studies . Professional staff and student peer advocates provide informa tion about campus resources and assist students with clas s scheduling, academic policies and procedures , and problem solving. The Center also houses an extensive scholarship library . The Center is located in NC 2012, 303-556-2546. Student Legal Services Student legal services are available to assist students with off-campus legal prob lems through the provision of legal advice, litigation preparation, document interpre tation , and assistance in negotiation. The service will not represent students in court. This student fee-funded program is provided free of charge to CU-Denver students; however , a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred, such as copying, typing, etc . For further details , contact the office in the Tivoli Student Union , Suite 315, 303-556-6061. Student Life, Office of The Office of Student Life is the advis ing, coordinating , resource, and general information center for student clubs and organizations, student government (ASCUD), student programs, and the academic honor societies . The office is responsible for the administration of the student fee budget and monitors all student fee expenditures to assure com pliance with CU-Denver and State of Colo rado regulations and procedures . The Director of Student Life represents the Associate Vice Chance llor for Enrollment and Student Affairs on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees and maintains effective lines of communication with MSCD, CCD, and AHEC. The director administers the stu dent conduct and discipline procedures as described in the Code of Student Con duct. The Office of Student Life is located in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 303, 303-556-3399 .

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48 / Genera/Information Veterans Affairs, Office of The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veter ans and dependent students attending CU-Denver who wish to utilize Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists students with filling out VA paperwork and in solving problems associated with the receipt of VA-related educational benefits . The OVA maintains proper certification for eligible students to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements for attendance, course load and content , and other regulations necessary to receive educational benefits payments. In addition, the OVA provides VA Voca tional Rehabilitation referrals , information on VA tutorial assistance, and VA work/ study positions for qualified veterans. For further information , contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 303-556-2630 , CU-Denver Bldg., Suite lOOF. THE CAREER CENTER Director: Janet Michalski Associate Director and Career Counselor: Lissa Gallagher Assistant Director and Coordinator, Internships and Career Fairs: Diane Lopez Assistant Director and Coordinator , Internships and CU SERVFS: Cherrie Grove Coordinator, Internships and Writer/ Editor, Bulletin and Connections: Kristy Adams Coordinator, Career Employment Services: Donna Ferguson Coordinator, Career Employment Services: Beth Kipp Career Counselor: Joanne Wambeke Career Counselor: Sara Lohaus Program Assistant and UROP . Coordinator: Marcia Baker Office: Tivoli Student Union, Suite 260 Telephone: 303-556-2250 The Career Center at CU-Denver offers a full array of services that supplement the student's educational experience and promote success upon graduation. Students are assisted in choosing a major; selecting a career path; gaining experience through internships, cooperative education , service learning , and undergraduate research activities; researching career and employer information ; developing job search skills; and finding a career upon gradua tion. Students are encouraged to access services as early as the freshman year to begin planning their career and c harting a course toward success! Career Planning Services • Career Counseling • Career Assessment Inventories • Resume Assistance • Interviewing Skills • Self-directed Job Search • Career Management Certificate Internships and Cooperative Education • Part-time academic year positions • Full-time alternating semester or summer positions • Course credit at undergraduate and graduate levels • Out -of-state / international internships • Most positions are paid Career Employment Services • On-<:ampus recruiting • Resume referral • Career vacancy listings • Career fairs CU Serves • America Reads • CU SERVES Tutors • Service Learning Course Support Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program (UROP) • Research grants for undergraduate students • Opportunities to participate at Research Day Career Center Website • Job links • Career information • Employer Web links Career Library • Career and employer information • Career computer lab • Career Advisor Network Program Ll BRARY SERVICES Auraria Library Dean/Director: David Gleim Associate Director: Jean F. Hemphill Office: Auraria Library, llOO Lawrence Street Telephone: Administration : 303-556-2805 Information : 303-556-2740 Reference : 303-556-2585 FACULTY Associate Professors: David Gleim , Ellen Greenblatt, Jean F. Hemphill , Terry Ann Leopold Assistant Professors: Anthony J. Dedrick , Robert L. Wick Instructors: Orlando Archibeque , Meg Brown-Sica , Elizabeth D'Antonio-Gan, Vera Gao , Stephen Green , Cynthia Hashert , Florence Jones, Elaine Jurries , Sarah Landeryou , Susan Maret, Marit S . MacArthur , Nikki Me Caslin , Ellen Metter , Mara L. Sprain , Linda D. Tietjen , Louise Treff-Gangler, Diane Thrner , Judith Valdez , Robb Waltner , Eveline Yang LIBRARY SERVICES Access to information is essential to academic success . The Auraria Library , located at the center of the campus , provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs . The Library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver. THE COLLECTION The Auraria Library has a collection of approximately 600,000 volumes.ln addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection , the Library also has over 3,200 journal and newspaper subscriptions, access to more than 5 ,000 electronic journals, and a film/videotape collection . The Library is a selective depository for U.S. Government Publications and a depository for Colorado State documents . The Auraria Library's collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally through interlibrary loan services.

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AURARIA NLINE INFORMATION SY J TEM Auraria Library OnEne Information System is the new onl ne information system purchased fro Ill (Innovative Interfaces, Inc. ) for th f Auraria Library library) . It provides a cess to the following information resources : Skyline-The Aura ia Library online catalog of jo rna! holdings, videos, and govern ent publications owned by the Libra y. Course r eserves information is also vailable. Indexes and Jo Article ResourcesProvid access to both text-based and we based versions of a variety of and article databases, many ofwhich include electronic full text of the articles . Reference Tools-donnects to reference tools (dictionaries , encyclopedias, almanacs, atlases, etc.) and other Internet resources I ncluding govern ment publication41 d Auraria Library Archives. Other librarieslows users to search other library catal gs, in Colorado and beyond, and 0 LC World Cat. Information Deliv . ryflnterlibrary Loan-Provides an lectronic interlibrary reques form, ZAP, and information about ther document delivery services . Auraria Ubrary In ormation-General library information including library instruction guides , emote access information, hours policies , and other resources . CIRCULATION SER ICES Library materials e checked out from the Circulation esk with a current Auraria ID or other v lid identification . Undergraduate studepts may check out books for 28 days anlgraduate students for 60 days. An Aurar a student can check out up to 75 items frop1 the general collec tion . Items can be renewed three times if not requested by another borrower online using Skyline :S View Own Record, in person, or by phone, 03-556-2639 . Other services include patr n-placed holds in Skyline for checked-a t items and e-mail drculation notices thjlt allow for e-mail renewals. Fines are assessed when books are renewed or ed past their due date , and replaceme t charges will be assessed if items are 8 days overdue. REFERENCE SERVICES TheAuraria Library Reference Depart ment strives to provide excellent service in assisting students and faculty with their research needs . The Reference Desk is staffed during most hours the Library is open, and has librarians and staff trained in all subject areas in order to assist students with online and print sources of information . INFORMATION DELIVERY/ INTERLIBRARY LOAN This department participates in a worldwide electronic interlending net work with other libraries and commercial document suppliers. This service enables the user to obtain needed materials not available at Auraria Library. Once requested, most materials can take two days to two weeks to obtain, depending on where the lender is. LIBRARY INSTRUCTION The Library is committed to providing information skills through its instruction program . The program is varied , ranging from basic, introductory-level material to advanced research methodology for graduate students.lnformation on other electronic resources is an important com ponent of the Library Instruction Program. For more information about the Library's instructional offerings, contact the Library Instruction office at 303-556-3683. RESERVES/MEDIA The Reserves / Media Department (located in the northwest corner of the first floor) provides special short-term circulation of books , pamphlets, articles, and other materials needed for class instruction. Except for films and videos , all other types of media are housed in Reserves/Media , along with playback equipment. Films and videos (including those on reserve) are located in Media Equipment Services , first floor , southeast corner. The loan periods for "reserved" items are short, and overdue follow-up is prompt, so that the maximum number of students may have access to the materials . These materials include not only titles owned by the Library , but also personal copies made available by the faculty. Most " reserved " material may be checked out for a few days , with the exception of media items . The length of check-out is determined by the professor. Materials will be checked out with appropriate picture J.D. Library Services I 49 ARCHIVES AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS The Archives and Special Collections Department of the Auraria Library acts as the archival repository for materials produced by the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver , Community College of Denver , and the Auraria Higher Education Center . These materials incl ude documents such as college catalo gs , student newspapers, budgets, and fact books. Manuscript collections at the Auraria Library focus on public policy issues and public affairs . Examples of manuscript holdings incl ude the records from organizations such as the American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado , the National Municipal League, and the American Association of Univer sity Women of Colorado . The Library ' s special collections area contains books on many different subjects, including Colorado and Denver history, theses and dissertations from CU-Denver , science fiction , rhetoric , and juvenile literature. For information and hours , call303-556-8373 . SERVICES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES The Library is committed to making its resources and services available to all students. Library services to assist per sons with disabilities include orientation to the physical layout of the Library , retrieval of materials, and some assis tance with use of the online public access catalog, periodicals , and indexes . Adaptive computer equipment and soft ware have been installed in the Reference area and in the Computer Access Lab to assist a number of students with varying disabilities. This equipment connects to the online pub lic access catalog , the Inter net, and other electronic access systems . ADDITIONAL FACILITIES Photocopiers , microform reader / printers , a copy center , pay phones, and study rooms are all available at the Library.

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50/ General Information FRIENDS OF AURARIA LIBRARY The Friends of Auraria Library is an association formed in 1976 to promote the development of Auraria Library as a center for learning, study, and research for the students and faculty of the University of Colorado at Denver , Metropolitan State College of Denver , and the Community College of Denver . The Friends of Auraria Library's ongoing objectives are: 1. To promote awareness of and good will toward Auraria Library on the campus, in the metropolitan area, and in the region ; and 2 . To increase Library resources through contributions , solicitations , grants, bequests, and gifts of books and other appropriate materials. MEDIA SERVICES Auraria Media Center Interim Director: James K. Straub Office: Auraria Media Center, Lawrence at 11th Street , Room 015 Telephone: 303-556-2426 The Auraria Media Center offers a full range of media services, including the management of the Library's film and videotape collection . These materials are listed in the online public access catalog . The Media Center operates a 26-channel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus. Faculty members ma y request the trans mission of a film or videotape directly into the classroom over this system . Students may request transmission of a film or videotape from one of the media viewing and listening carrels in the Library . This system also can transmit live programs from St. Cajetan's, the Student Union, and the Media Center's television studios to other locations on campus . A self service graphics lab and two self-service VHS editing suites also are available for student use in the Media Center's Production Department. Finally, an Internship Program is available to students who are interested in converting knowledge gained in electronics, graphics , or television production courses to practical experience .

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Dean: Patricia O ' L Office: CU-Denver B ilding , Third Floor Main Telephone: 30 556-3382 CoUege Web site: h p:/ /carbon . cudenver.edu/pub ic/AandP/ FACULTY Professors: Gene Bressler, Thomas Clark, Mark Gelernter , Spenser Havlick, George Hoover , Joseph Juhasz, Yuk Lee, Dwayne Nuzum, Patricia O ' Leary, John Prosser, Fahriye Sancar , Peter Schneider, Raymond Studer , Jr., Luis Summers , Will em van Vliet Associate Professors: Ernesto Arias , Lois Brink, Joan Draper, Phillip Gallegos, Harry Garnham, Mark Gross, Marvin Hatami, Taisto Makela, Raymond McCall, Jr., Hans Morgenthaler , Benrett Neiman, Randall Ott , Diane Fcilk, Ping Xu Assistant Professors Barbara Ambach , Alan Berger , Robe t Flanagan, Julee Herdt, Michael Ho eran, Ann Komara, Lawrence Loftin Ill Eric Morris , Brian Muller, Doris Sung Ekaterini Vlahos Senior Instructors: J hn Frankhouser, Allen Harlow , Mic ael Jenson, E.J.Meade INFORMATIO ABOUT THE COLLEGE The College of Arc itecture and Planning at the Univ rsity of Colorado at Denver prepares stu ents for careers in architecture, planni g, landscape archi tecture, and urban The College offers the only underkt-aduate and gradu ate education in thes1 fields in the state of Colorado. Students i?tending to enter the design and planning professions normally first complete the copege's undergradu ate degree as preparation for entry into the College's graduat!e-level professional programs. are also available for those w o already hold an undergraduate degr e in a field unrelated to design or plannin . A unique feature of the College is that it offers its 900 students exceptional educati al experiences in two distinctive locations. The College's graduate programs i? architecture, landscape architecture , urban and regional planning, and urban tlesign are taught on the Denver campus of the University of Colorado in the heart of a vital downtown; its undergraduate programs are offered on the Boulder campus in an environment ideally suited to the needs of undergraduate students. A multi-disciplinary Ph . D . in Design and Planning is offered across the two campuses . With a diverse faculty committed to excellence in teaching , research, scholarship, and professional work, the College provides students with a broad range of learning opportunities. For detailed information on the under graduate programs , see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog. Special Activities and Programs The College provides a diverse range of opportunities which enrich and enhance the education of its students. Through activities and functions-including a lecture series, a visiting critic series , exhibits, publications , and active student organizations-the College encourages contact among students, faculty, and members of the design professions . Each summer, the College offers foreign study travel programs , which in recent years have traveled to Finland, France, Mexico, Prague , Rome , and Russia. The College makes available a range of scholarships and fellowships, some of which are based on need, others on performance , and still others of which are specifically intended to provide enrichment opportunities. The College supports an active and focused in ternship program for its students, giving them access to elective internship oppor tunities in the Denver metropolitan area and beyond. Finally , the College encour ages students to take control of their own education and supports, within its ability, any reasonable proposals from students that would enrich their own educational experiences. College Facilities The College ' s administrative headquar ters and graduate programs are located at 1250 14th Street in downtown Denver , on the northeastern edge of the Auraria campus. This favorable location gives easy access both to the extensive campus facilities , and to the urban amenities of Denver's lively lower downtown . Most of the major professional design offices in Denver , and many planning firms and agencies, are within easy reach of the College. These provide many opportuni ties for contact between students and practitioners . College facilities include studio spaces for students,lecture and seminar rooms , design jury spaces, exhibition spaces, and faculty offices. The College also provides a photographic darkroom and studio , a model and furni ture-making woodshop, and an extensive computer lab whose focus is computer aided design (CAD), computer 2-D and 3-D imaging, and analytic tools for planning . Also located in the College is a Geographic Information System (GIS) computer lab, which is open to all students of the University of Colorado at Denver . Scholarships/Financial Aid Students in the College have access to a number of scholarships and other finan cial assistance funds. Some of these funds are provided by the institution itself, while others are provided by external sources like the American Institute of Architects Education Fund , the American Planning Association, the American Society of Landscape Architects , and the Rocky Mountain Masonry Institute. For further information on these scholarships and graduate tuition awards, please contac t the College ' s student services officer at 303-5563387. For information on federal and state financial aid, contact the Office of Financial Aid, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 125, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364, 303-556-2886 . ACADEMIC POLICIES Academic Standing Students must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in the graduate pro grams to remain in good standin g and to graduate. If a student's GPA falls below a 3.0, then he or she will be placed on aca demic probation beginning the following semester. If the GPA remains below a 3.0 after the probationary semester, then he or she may be dismissed from the College.

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52 / College of Architecture and Planning Appeals Any student may appeal the grades he or she receives in a class . The student should first informally discuss the issue with the relevant faculty member and then with the department chair or program director. If the matter is not resolved this way, the student may initiate an appeal by writing to the faculty member outlining the reasons for the appeal. Copies are to be forwarded to the department chair or program director and the dean. The faculty member must respond in writing to the student ' s written appeal, with copies to the department chair or program director and the dean. An appeals committee consisting of three faculty members of the relevant academic program will review the written appeal. The chair of the appeals committee will convey its recommendation in writing to the student who has appealed , with copies to the instructor, the program chair or director, and dean. Attendance and Timeliness of Work Students are expected to attend all meetings of classes. Excessive unexcused absences may result in a grade reduction at the discretion of the instructor. Absence from a class will be excused for verified medical reasons or for extreme personal emergencies. The student may be required to furnish evidence . Students ' assignments are to be com pleted in a timely manner . Any assignment turned in late may have its grade reduced by an amount set at the discretion of the instructor . An assignment may be turned in late without penalty for verified medical reasons or for extreme personal emergen cies. Students must have their instructor's written permission to turn an assignment in late. Students with excused late work may turn in the assignment by the end of finals week without penalty. Otherwise, the grade "IF" will be assigned. Course Sequencing and Advancement Programs in the College are structured so that certain courses must be taken concurrently, others sequentially . Students will not be allowed to enroll in a course if its co-requisites or prerequisites have not been satisfied . Originality of Work Students must submit their own work. Where other sources are used in a student submission , they are to be clearly identi fied and referenced . The University con siders plagiarism and similar acts of falsification to be a serious matter which may result in suspension or expulsion. Information on codes of conduct and grievance procedures are available from the University of Colorado at Denver ' s Office of Enrollment and Student Affairs . ADMISSIONS General Requirements Applicants to the College of Architecture and Planning are required to submit the following credentials: • University of Colorado Application for Graduate Admission form . • Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended. Transcripts must be mailed by the institution directly to the College . A certified literal English translation must also be submitted for documents that are not in English. • Letters of recommendation. U.S. residents-three letters ; international applicants-four letters . • Statement of purpose. Applicants to all programs must submit a statement summarizing career objectives and reasons for pursuing the intended program of study. Applicants to the Ph.D . program must also indicate a proposed area of specialization and , if possible, a potential faculty mentor. • Supporting materials : Applicants to the architecture and landscape architecture programs are required to submit a portfolio (6-12 bound pages, 8.5 x 11 inches). Slides are not accepted. A portfolio is an orderly presentation of one's , work. This includes examples of creative and analytical work includ ing, but not limited to, essays , papers , photographs , and photographic reproductions of artistic work such as sculptures , drawings, paintings , musical compositions, and other fine arts. A stamped , self-addressed enve lope must be included for return of the portfolio. Applicants to the urban and regional planning program should sub mit , in an 8 . 5 x 11-inch bound document , their statem e nt of purpose, a resume , and a copy of a student or professional paper or project. Applicants to the Ph.D. program must submit a sample of written work and any other evidence relevant to admission to the program, in accordance with submission guide lines which can be obtained from the College. • Application fee . Non refundable ($50.00U . S . residents ; $60.00-international applicants). • Applicants to the urban and regional planning program are encouraged to submit Graduate Record Exam (general) scores. Those whose under graduate GPA is below 3 . 0 are required to submit GRE scores . Applicants to architecture and landscape architecture are encouraged to submit GRE scores if their GPAs are below 3.0. Applicants to the Ph.D program are required to submit GRE scores . International Applicants International applicants are required to submit the following documents in addition to the credentials listed under general requirements . • TOEFL score. For the professional programs in architecture , landscape architecture , urban design , and urban and regional planning, the College of Architecture and Planning requires a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 550 for students from non-English-speaking countries . However , the College will consider applications from students with strong academic credentials whose TOEFL scores are slightly below 550 .lf accepted, these students will be required to register for an English course when they arrive at the University of Colorado at Denver . Applicants to the Ph.D. in Design and Planning must have achieved a TOEFL score of at least 575. Note that an Official TOEFL Score Report is required; institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable . • Financial Resources Statement. Interna tional applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds available. To provide this evidence , each interna tional applicant should follow these instructions: a. If an applicant's own money is to be used : In Part 2, Section 1 of the Finan cial Resources Statement , applicant's bank must certify that the full amount of money is on deposit in his or her account to meet tuition and expenses . b .lf an applicant is sponsored by a fam ily member or friend : The sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. The

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sponsor's bank also certify that the sponsor as on deposit the amount of mone applicant will need for tuition a d expenses. c. If an applicant has been awarded a scholarship , Par 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed . Statements used fo other institutions will not be accepted. docu ments are not accept!fd unless signed by the originator ; signat l res must be original . Application Daies and Deadlines I Fall Semester All professional programs-March IS Ph.D . in Design and Planning-by February I to be c onsid e red for financial support Spring Semester All programs-October I (In architecture , urban design , and landscape architecttlre , students starting in the spring will only be able to select from a reduced s e t df courses , and will get on track starti ng the next fall) Applications received after these. dates will be considered only if space is still available. Confirmation D fposit A non-refundable deposit of $200 is required to ecure an applicant's place in the and landscape architecture program , and in the Ph . D . program. The deposit s due at the time the applicant accepts he program ' s offer of admission. The dep sit will be applied to the first semester ' s uition when the student registers for c asses. ADDITIONAL INFORMATIO To request additio information, or to arrange a visit to the ollege, please phone or e-mail : Undergraduate 303-492-7711; A&P-Undergrad-inf @carbon . cudenver . edu Graduate professiomil programs: 303-556-3382 ; carbon . cudenver.e u Ph.D. program: 303-4 2-7711; A&P-Phd-info@carbon.cudenver . edu You may also write to: Office of the Dean , College of Architecture and Planning , Uni versity of Colorado at Denver , Campus Box 126, P . O . Box 173364, Denver , CO 80f17-3364 . l For periodical updates on all aspects of the College, see our website at http:/ / carbon. cudenver.edu / public/ AandP I PROGRAMS OF STUDY Architecture Chair, Department of Architecture: George Hoover , FAlA Telephone: 303-556-3382 The architecture program's mission is to lead in the discovery , communication , and application of knowledge in the disci pline of architecture . The program aims to excel in the education of its students, in the research and creative endeavors of its faculty, and in service to the community . To respond to this mission , the program has developed a unique intellectual , educational , and architectural culture . First of all , the program celebrates its place in a very special set of landscapesurbanized Denver and the Front Range , and the spectacular naturallandlicape of the high plains and the Colorado Rockies. The architecture program therefore focuses not only on the design of build ings , but also on the interactions between buildings and their urban and natural settings. Secondly, the program examines the interplay between architectural form and the complex cultural and technological context in which architects operate. As a result of these dominant concerns , the program has created an academic envi ronment that is intellectually stimulating and educationally challenging , and that aims to educate students who will become leaders in the discipline and profession of architecture . The Department of Architecture , along with the Department of Planning and Design , offers a Bachelor of Environmen tal Design (B. Envd . ) on the Boulder campus . The Department of Architecture also offers two graduate degrees on the Denver campus : the Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) and the Master of Urban Design (M.U.D.). The following statement from the National Architectural Accredit ing Board (NAAB), which is responsible for accrediting all architecture programs in the United States , should help a student choose the appropriate degree program : " Most states require that an individual intending to become an architect hold an accredited degree . There are two types of degrees that are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board : Master of Architecture I 53 (1) The Bachelor of Architecture , which requires a minimum of five years ' study, and (2) The Master of Architecture , which requires a minimum of three years of study following an unrelated bachelor ' s degree or two years following a related pre-professional bachelor's degree. These professional degrees are structured to educate those who aspire to registration and licensure to practice as architects. The four-year , pre-professional degree, where offered , is not accredited by NAAB. The pre-professional degree is useful to those wishing a foundation in the field of architecture , as preparation for either continued education in a professional degree program or for employment options in fields related to architecture. " The pre-professional degree offered by the College of Architecture and Planning is the B.Envd. The professional degree offered by the College is the Master of Architecture (M. Arch . ), which is fully accredited by the NAAB. The Master of Architecture, the College ' s accredited professional degree for students intending to seek licensure as architects , offers two distinct paths. One track, the M . Arch ./4+2, is offered to students who have completed the College ' s B . Envd . or any other pre professional design degree from any NAAB accredited institution . A second track , the M.Arch ./3.5, is available to stu dents who have completed an unrelated undergraduate or graduate degree , or to students who hold professional architecture degrees from other countries, but who seek to obtain an NAAB-accredited architecture degree . Students holding professional architecture degrees from foreign institutions will be given advanced standing commensurate with their previous educational experiences . The Master o f Urban Design (M.U.D.) is an advanced research-oriented program for students who already hold a professional architecture degree or an architecturally related degree . These two graduate programs-the M.Arch . and M .U.D.-are explained in greater detail below. THE MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (M.ARCH) M.Arch. I 4+2 The M.Arch ./4+2 is intended for stu dents who have completed the College ' s B . Envd. or any other pre-professional architecture degree from any NAAB accredited institution . This six-year plan

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54/ College of Architecture and Planning of study, with completion of both the fouryear undergraduate B.Envd offered on the Boulder campus and the accredited two year M.Arch. on the Denver campus of CU, has been fully endorsed by the NAAB. Program Requirements Students completing the College's Bachelor of Environmental Design (B. Envd.) on the Boulder campus-or completing a pre-professional degree from another NMB-accredited institution-complete a minimum of four semesters of course work (60 hours of credit) after entry into the M.Arch . program . For further details on the B.Envd. , and for descriptions of the pre-professional courses outlined below, please see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog . Term by Term: Six-year M.Arch Curriculum Undergraduate Sequence Four years at Boulder-32 credits per year (approx.) 128 total credits FIRST YEAR Fall (15 credit hours ) ENVD 1014-3. lntro to ENVD ENVD 2003-3. Ecology and Design Social Science-3. (see list of options) Humanities-3. (see list of options) Elective-3. Non-ENVD Elective Spring (16 credit hours) ENVD 1002-4. ENVD Media ENVD 2001-3. lntro to Social Factors inENVD UWRP 1150-3. Expository Writing Electives-6 . Non-ENVD Electives SECOND YEAR Fall (17 credit hours ) ARCH 3114-3. History and Theories of Arch I ENVD 2000-6. ENVD Studio ENVD 3001-3. Environment and Behavior MATH 1300-5. Analytic Geometry and Calculus Spring (J 7 credit hours) ARCH 3214-3 . History and Theories ENVD 2110-6. PHYS 2010-5. Elective-3 . of Arch II ARCH Studio I General Physics I ENVD Elective THIRD YEAR Fall (J 5 credit hours ) AREN 4035-3. Architectural Structures 1 ENVD 3115-3. Intro Build Mat / Systems Elective-3 . ENVD Elective Electives-6 . ENVD or Non-ENVD Spring (16 c r e dit hours) AREN 4045-3. Architectural Structures 2 ENVD 3002-4 . Design Theory and Methods ENVD 3210-6 . Arch Studio II Elective-3 . ENVD Elective FOURTH YEAR Fall (16 cre dit hours ) AREN 3050 3 . Environmental Systems for Buildings 1 ENVD 3112-3. Research Issues and Programming for Arch ENVD 43106 . Arch . Studio Ill Elective-4 . ENVD Elective S pring (16 c redit hours ) AREN 3060 3 . Environmental Systems For Buildings 2 ENVD 4410-6. Arch. Studio IV Elective-3 . Elective-4 . ENVD Elective ENVD or Non-ENVD Graduate Sequence Two years at Denver-30 credits per year (approx.) 60 total credits FIFTH YEAR Fall (15 cre dit hours) ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar LA 6632-3. Site Planning Electives-6 . * Spring (18 cr e dit hours ) ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar Electives-9 . * (Take ARCH 6950 6 . SIXTH YEAR Thesis Preparation if undertaking a thesis in the next semester) Fall (J 5 credit hours) ARCH 5410-3. Professional Practice ARCH 6150-4 . Advanced Design Studio or ARCH 6951 Thesis (6) ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar or nothing if thesis taken Electives-6. * (Take ARCH 6950-6. Thesis Preparation if undertaking a thesis in the next semester) Spring (15 credit hours ) Electives-15 * *As of fall 1998, new students must take 9 credits each in cultural studies and professional studies, and 6 credits in technology studies. The remaining 9 credits may be taken in any architecturally related electives on campus. M.Arch. I 3.5 The M . Arch ./ 3 . 5 is intended for those students who have completed an unre lated undergraduate or graduate degree, or for students who hold professional architecture degrees from other coun tries . This three-and-one-half-year plan of study on the CU-Denver campus has been fully accredited by the NAAB. Prerequisites Students must complete the prerequi sites of college level trigonometry and physics before enrolling in ARCH 5310. Introduction to Building Technology . Since this class should be taken in the first semester in order to stay on track for graduation, students are strongly encouraged to complete the trigonometry and physics requirements before begin ning the M.Arch . program . Students are also expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy , and should be familiar with PC or Apple operating systems. Program Requirements Students with a bachelor' s or master' s degree unrelated to architecture must complete a seven-or eight-semester sequence of course work and accumulate a minimum of 114 semester hours of credit. Advanced standing will be given to students who have completed a non NMB-accredited professional architecture degree in another country, and who wish to obtain the NMB-accredited degree from this College . These students will work with the chair of the department to develop an individualized plan of study commensurate with their previous degrees and experience , and will have to complete at least 30 hours of credit in residence within the College of Architecture and Planning.

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Course Sequence The M.Arch progr is divided into five major com pone ts: design studies, 45 credit hours; cult raJ studies, 12 credit hours; technology s udies, 18 credit hours; professional tudies, 6 credit hours; and electives 33 credit hours. A wide array of elect ves in these areas allows students to tailor their graduate studies to their own nterests. FlRSTYEAR Fall Semester (I 5 ere it hours) ARCH 5110-6. Studio I ARCH 5111-3. Des gn Seminar I ARCH 5210-3. Intr duction to Architecture ARCH 5310-3. Introduction to Building Technology Spring Semester (I 8 credit hours) ARCH 5120-4. Des ign Studio II ARCH 5121-2. Design Seminar II ARCH 5220-3. His ory of Architecture I ARCH 5240-3. HuTan Factors in Design ARCH 5320-3. Builk::ling Construction and Methods Elective-3 . * SECOND YEAR Fall Semester (18 ere it hours) ARCH 5130-4. Des gn Studio lii ARCH 5131-2. Des gn Seminar III ARCH 5230-3. Hist ry of Architecture II ARCH 5330-3. En ronmental Control Sys ems! LA 6632-3. Site Ianning Elective-3. * Spring Semester(/8 q-ed it hours ) ARCH 5140-4. Studio IV ARCH 5141-2. Seminar IV ARCH 5340-3. Control Syst ms II ARCH 5350-3. Stru tures I ARCH 5410-3. Pro sional Practice Elective-3. * Summer Semester ( 1 credit hours) ARCH 6150-4. Adv need Design Stu io** ARCH 6151-2. Adv ced Design Sem nar Electives-6. * THIRD YEAR Fall Semester (I 8 credit hours ) ARCH 5360-3. Structures II ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar Electives-9. *or ARCH 6950-6. Thesis Preparation and Electives-3. Spring Semester (I 5 credit hours ) ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar Electives-9 . * or: ARCH 6951-6. Thesis Electives-9. * * Students must take 9 elective credits in cultural studies, 9 elective credits in professional studies , 6 elective in technology studies, and 9 elective credits in any architecturally related electives on campus. **Some students may opt for a travel abroad program . To count for the studio requirement, a course taken abroad must be approved as a studio substitution. MASTER OF URBAN DESIGN The Master of Urban Design is a research-oriented, advanced degree pro gram in which students explore issues in urban design . The program makes full use of its setting in the heart of downtown Denver, using the city as the laboratory for many of its projects. There are two plans of study: a 30-credit-hour program for students who have received a five-or six-year professional degree in architecture; and a 60-credit-hour program for students who hold a pre-professional design degree. Coone Sequence (30-hour M . U . D . for students with a pre-professional design degree) Students applying for admission to the 30-credit-hour program may enter in any semester of the academic year . Students in this option must complete 12 credit hours working on a degree project , and 15 credit hours in req uired and /or recom mended course work in urban design . The remaining 3 credit hours are elective course work. The typical sequence of course work is: Landscape Architecture I 55 SEMESTER ONE Degree project proposal 6 credits Urban design course work 9 credits SEMESTER lWO Degree project research 6 credits Urban design course work 6 credits Elective course work 3 credits Coone Sequence (60-hour M.U.D. for stu dents without a professional architecture degree) Students applying to the 60-credit-hour program may also enter in any semester of the academic year . Students in this option must complete 12 credit hours in desig nated design courses , 9 credit hours in designated history and theory courses, 12 credit hours working on a degree project , and 15 credit hours in required and /or recommended course work in urban design. The remaining 12 semester credit hours are elective course work . The typical sequence of course work is: SEMESTER ONE Design studio History/theory courses SEMESTER lWO Design studio History/theory courses Elective courses SEMESTER THREE Degree project proposal Urban design courses SEMESTER FOUR Degree project research Urban design courses Elective courses SEMESTER FlVE Degree project Elective course work 6credits 6credits 6credits 3credits 3 credits 3credits 9credits 3 credits 6 credits 3 credits 6credits 6credits Landscape Architecture Program Director: Gene Bressler Telephone: 303-556-3382 The mission of the landscape architec ture program is to advance the profess ion and discipline of landscape architecture through design education , research and creative work , and service . CU-Denver's strategic location in Denver, Colorado , a transitional place between mountains and plains that includes urban and non urban settings and spans past into future timeframes, provides opportunities to define and engage compelling issues of the landscape at their forefront.

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56 / College of Architecture and Planning The program ' s philosophy , embodied in its faculty and students , is to c hallenge the status quo of landscape architecture . Building upon and questioning accepted solutions for the profession ' s future, faculty and students frame questions and discover answers in ways that promote inventiveness in the classroom as well as in the field . Inquiry , both individually and collec tively, is viewed as the means to invent, energize, inform , and evaluate design i deas , processes , and results . The curriculum emphasizes and values design and the design process as the vehi cle for studying landscape architecture . Regional , civic, neighborhood , and site-specific issues are explored to demonstrate and apply design concepts, methods , and skills uniting natural and cultural systems with built form . The curriculum prepares students for the rigor of professional practice as it is presently known. It provides the tools , depth, and energy enabling students to evolv e and redefine the profession in order to more successfully and responsively advance the knowledge and capability of the profession. The sequence of courses is int e nded to present material in a pedagogically logical manner . The curriculum consists of sequential and int eg rated d e sign studios , core lectur e and seminar c ourses , and elective opportunities , including a professional int e rnship. Students develop capabilities in design within studio courses . Core themes, theories , prece dents , technologies , and skills of the profession are developed in the lecture and seminar courses . Curriculum integra tion is achieved through deliberate coordination efforts with other programs within the College of Architecture and Planning as well as other CU-Denver colleges and schools . The curriculum provides opportunities to facilitate the offering and testing of new courses , and to respond to timely interests of faculty and students. The objectives of the landscape archi tecture program are : 1) To develop ex cellence in the design process and design . Particular empha sis is given to exploring the strategies , methods , and skills necessary to study, synthesize , experiment with , make and evaluate design precedents , l a ndscape design , and design processes ; 2) To learn and develop core the mes of the profession that include landscape architectural theory and precedent, technologies and materials , natural and cultural systems , and communications and inquiry m e dia . Particular emphasis is placed on studying the means to develop one ' s ideas , to convey one ' s values and to criticize one' s work ; 3) To provide a working knowledge of the institutional framework within which the design process occurs . Particular emphasis is placed on building a strong understanding of and the skills required in professional practice, including man agement , leadership, marketing , ethical conduct, and legal issues ; and 4 ) To engage service in ways that apply and extend course work, research , and creative w o rks to real world situations . Particular emphasis is placed on participating with and involving others in opportunities to implement , enhance , demonstrate , communicate , and evaluate ide as and skms , and that provide measurabl e benefits . Professional practitioners , representing regionally , nationally , and internationally recognized consulting firms and governmental agencies , teach courses , participate in review s, host internships and office visits , give presentations and exhibit their works , mentor students and faculty , and share in the life of the program. Successful graduates are pursuing diverse practices in public and private arenas, and continue making positive differences in th e quality of our environ ment. The landscape architecture pro gram values and welcomes colleagues who are eager to learn , generate and develop ide a s, and arrive at critical judgements a bout the worth of those ideas . MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (M.L.A.) Prerequisites Students are expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy . Program requirements The landscape architecture program offers professional and advanced profes sional graduate degree curricula leading to the degree Master of Landscape Archi tecture (M.L.A.). The professional degree program , requiring a six-semester s e quence of course work totaling 90 credit hours , is fully accr e dited by the Land scape Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB) and recognized by the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA). Students completing the College's Bachelor of Environmental Design on the Boulder Campus-or completing an under graduate design degree at another institu tion-are given advanced standing in the thre e-year program and must complete at least 65 semester hours of credit . The advanced professional degree program, for qualified students having already earned a first professional degree in landscape architecture or related discipline , requires 48 credit hours . Advanced standing may be commensu rate with prior academic accomplishment . Course Sequence (9
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Spring Semester-16 hours LA 6601-6. Lan scape Architectural Des gn Studio IV LA 6620-3. Lan scape Architectural Thepry and Criticism LA 6631-4. Lantlscape Technology II Elective-3. THIRD YEAR Fall Semester-15 ere it hours LA6700-6. LA6750-3. Electives-6. Ad ced Landscape Arc itectural Design Stu ioV Pro essional Practice Spring Semester-12 redit hours LA 6701-6. Landscape Arctitectural Design Stu io VI Electives-6. Course Sequence ( 4 hour M .L.A. for stu dents with a professi nal degree in landscape architecture o related disciplines . ) This route 48 credit hours and typically two of full-time study. The core curriculum 1 onsists of two groups: design, 30 hours; history and theory, 12 creditrours, for a total of 42 credit hours ; plus 6 credit hours of electives. I Concentration areitf The curriculum delivers required I courses that enable;students to learn and develop core themes of the profession inclusive of LMB st dards with empha sis placed on stud yin the means to develop one's ideas, o convey one's values, and to criticize one's work. In addition, the curricul1 m offers four concentration areas from which to choose elective offered by the program and other units within the College and Universitbr in order to explore advanced topics, challenge normative paradigms, and deve op new knowledge and capabilities. Maj rs from other areas are invited to e1troll in landscape architecture elective . The four areas of c0ncentration are : Urban Design I Advanced LandscaJte Technologies Landscape Planning History, Theory, ant' Criticism These broadly deli ed areas of concen tration reflect topics d issues related to the program's location and context in Denver and its larger lne tropolitan and regional contexts. Thh also reflect faculty interests and resources available from within the College , University, and area. Students may pursue one or more concen trations within the required 21 elective hours, of which 15 are non-group related. Students are encouraged to consult with their assigned faculty advisor or other mentors as they make their decisions. (Note: six elective credit hours are to fulfill requirements in each of landscape architectural technologies and history and theory group . ) Urban Design Denver, the surrounding metropolitan areas , and the newly emerging urban areas within the greater region provide limitless issues, topics and situations fuel ing interests in urban design. The field of urban design is complex and crosses many disciplines including architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning , real estate development, law, engineering, and the social sciences. Students inter ested in this concentration are urged to seek and enroll in courses that provide: • An analytical understanding of the urban/built environment • The understanding and skills from which to develop, synthesize, create , and test responsive implementation strategies Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to: CE5622-3 . LA6686-3 . LA6930-3 . SOC4230-3. UD6620-3. UD6621-3. UD6686-3. URP5520-3. URP6633-3. URP6634-3. URP6635-3. URP6665-3. URP6670-3. URP6676-3. Urban Transportation Planning Special Topics: Open Space in Urban Design Landscape Architecture Internship (requires pre-approval by advisor I director ) City and Region Architecture of the City The City as an Artifact Special Topics in Urban Design Urban Spatial Analysis Urban Form Theory Preservation Theory and Practice History of American City Building Urban Market Analysis Urban Economic Development Urban Housing Advanced Landscape Technologies Many students will work within any variety of venues involving built works. Familiarity, competence, and interest in learning , using , evaluating, and develop ing exis ting and new technologies is compelling. These technologies include: computer applications , design-build/learn Landscape Architecture I 57 by building, materials, and construction processes. Students interested in expanding their knowledge , skills , and future applications of technologies are encouraged to seek and enroll in courses that provide them with : • Significant exposure and facility with applied technologies • Appreciation for the value, strengths, weaknesses , and potential of the technologies to develop, implement, and evaluate their design works Courses available to landscape architecture students include , but are not limited to: ARCH 5310-3. ARCH 6390-3. ARCH 6410-3. ARCH 6411-3. LA6641-3. LA6686-3 . Ll\6686-3. LA6930-3. URP6612-3. Introduction to Building Technology Special Topics in Technology Compute r Graphics Compute r Applications in Practice Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture Special Topics : Advanced Landscape Architectural Technologies Special Topics: Computer Applications (VARIES) Landscape Architecture Internship GIS for Planners Landscape Planning Landscape planning is an area in which landscape architects play an increasing and vital role , particular ly in this region, resulting from pressures to develop non urbanized or undeveloped land s and to develop and manage public lands . Study within this concentration area addresses development and advancing knowledge and capability of the profession in : Ecological systems Urban and regional growth Land use Real estate development and finance Environmental impact assessment Planning and development processes Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to: LA6622-3 . LA6641-3. LA6930-3. URP5530-3 . URP6612-3 . URP6640-3 . URP6641-3. Visual Quality Analysis Compute r Applications in Landscape Architecture Landscape Architecture Internship Planning Law GIS for Planners Community Development Process Social Planning

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58 / College of Architecture and Planning URP6642-3. URP6650-3. URP6651 3 . URP6652-3. URP6653-3 . URP6660-3. URP6661-3. URP6664-3. URP6671-3 . URP6673-3 . Neighborhood Planning Environmental Planning II Environmental Impact Assessment Growth Management Natural Resource Management and Planning Real Estate Development Process Real Estate Development Finance Fiscal Impact Analysis Regional Economic Development Transportation Planning 1 History, Theory, and Criticism Advanced study in history, theory, and criticism of design is fundamental to the landscape architect's knowledge of the built environment , the intellectual forces that create it, and the theoretical construct of historic precedents in design influencing decisions. Advancing knowledge and capability of the profession in this area of concentra tion is compelling and serves: • To better inform designers eager to learn , generate , and develop ideas, and arrive at critical judgements about the worth of these ideas • To enhance and inform one's perspec tive in a context of economic boom where new development is flourishing Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to: LA6686-3 . LA6686-3 . LA6686-3 . LA6686-3 . LA6686-3. LA6686-3. LA6930-3 . ARCH 5230-3. ARCH 6161-3. Special Topic : Landscape Architect History Special Topic : Modernism in Landscape Architecture Special Topic : Architecture and the Landscape-Exploration in Boundary Special Topic: Contemporary Theories and Criticism of Landscape Architecture Special Topic : Representations of Landscape Architecture Open Space in Urban Design Landscape Architecture Internship History of Architecture II Precedents in Architecture ARCH 6210-3. History of American Architecture ARCH 6212-3. History of Modern Architecture ARCH 6220-3. History of Architectural Theory ARCH 6221-3. Post-Structuralist Architecture ARCH 6910-3. Teaching Assistantship Urban and Regional Planning Chair, Department of Planning and Design: Raymond G. Studer Head, Graduate Program in Urban and Regional Planning: Thomas Clark Telephone: 303556-3382 Urban and regional planners in the United States and other countries seek to identify social needs and environmental capacities, anticipate change and its impact on communities, shape the pattern of human settlements, provide essential infrastructure, maintain viable economies, and achieve and preserve sustainable communities that are suitably fit to their natural surroundings . Study in planning considers how social needs are legitimated , knowledge about communi ties and regions is compiled and analyzed , possible courses of action are evaluated, plans are formulated, implementation is transacted through the means of educa tion , investment , negotiation and regula tion, and how plans' consequences are tracked over time. These tasks require a high order of ability : to amass and manipulate infor mation, to represent and model essential phenomena and processes , to simulate futures, and to judge outcomes having diverse dimensions . They also require the ability to portray and communicate key concepts , diagnoses, and actions , and to harness knowledge about all the key actors on the scene in order to under stand their needs, motives , and possible responses to the public actions that plans provoke. Underlying these classes of abilities is a base of knowledge that easily overreaches the bounds of any one discipline. Planners must understand theories regarding urban and regional process, concepts of presentation , communication and negotiation, technologies for the depiction and manipulation of spatial information, means by which to docu ment , judge, and forecast change in urban systems, private economic motives and constraints, the behavioral inclinations of all the major classes of players on the urban scene, the mesh of laws that empower planning and govern private action , and the broader political economy of regional systems. Needless to say, the education of plan ners can only begin in the university. It must be a life-long pursuit, and planning programs , including this one , are becom ing increasingly supportive of the continu ing education needs of professionals . It is the intellectual excitement of this ongoing pursuit of knowledge that draws many to the field. The Department of Planning and Design, along with the Department of Architecture, offers a Bachelor of Environmental Design (B.Envd.) degree on the Boulder campus . The Department of Planning and Design also offers the Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) graduate degree on the Denver campus. The Master of Urban and Regional Planning is fully accredited by the National Planning Accreditation Board , and prepares students for professional careers in planning . For further details on the B.Envd., see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog . Further details on the master's program follow . THE MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (M.U.R.P.) Prerequisites Students are expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy, and should be familiar with PC or Apple operating systems. Program Requirements The Master of Urban and Regional Planning is the College's accredited degree for students intending to practice as planners. With no advanced standing, candidates for the M.U.R.P. degree must complete a minimum of 51 credit hours of graduate work, including all core courses (27 credit hours), a concentration (15 credit hours minimum), and additional electives (9 credit hours). Entering students who have engaged in the study or practice of planning elsewhere may petition the faculty during their initial semester to determine whether any credit will be awarded or degree requirements relaxed as a result of these prior activities. A maximum of 27 credits of course work can be applied for advanced standing . Students who receive the College's Bachelor of Environmental Design (B. Envd) degree on the Boulder campus and who have maintained a GPA of at least 3.0 will be admitted to the M.U.R.P. with advanced standing. These students can earn the M.U.R.P. degree after completing

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a minimum of 42 credit hours , which will include the core es and an approved concentration . Stude ts holding the Col lege's B. Envd degree ho also completed the undergraduate pi ning option with a GPA of at least 3.0 C<;rd with a grade of at least 3 . 0 in ENVD Planning Studio III) will, in addition, recei:ve a waiver with credit for URP 6630, P anning Studio I. These students will earn the MURP degree upon completion of *'inimum of 36 credit hours, includi 21 credit hours of core courses and a I requirements for an approved con cent] tion. The above conditions for ad van d standing apply only to students who raduated from the College ' s undergradu te program within the last five years . Th se who graduated earlier may receive a vanced standing at the discretion of the ead of the graduate program in urban an regional planning, in consultation with p ogram faculty. Core Courses URP 5501-3. Planning Issues and sses URP 5510-3. Plan ing Methods I URP 5511-3. PI ing Methods II URP 5520-3. Urb Spatial Analysis URP 5530-3. Planning Law URP 6630-6. Planrting Studio I URP 6631-6. ing Studio II A thesis option 6950, Thesis Research and Progr ming, and URP 6951, Thesis) is primarily for stu dents who are in teres ed in pursuing more advanced academic t ning in planning or related fields . Thes s work will substi tute for Studio II. Areas of Concentrat n The concentrations and elective courses enable stude ts to explore in depth an area of specl I interest. Students should, however , buil on the expertise which they already po sess. This can be done by either focjing on a related specialty , or by increa ed specialization in a previously acquir d area of expertise. The program current! supports three official concentration : (1) physical planning , (2) ental planning , and (3) economic devjlopment planning. A set of "foundation c urses" is identified in each concentration , plus additional electives . Physical Planning foncentration: Physical plannin g the spatial arrangement of the environment , from the scale of the project to the scale of the region, and its fitness for human activities . Physical planners establish the policy and regulatory context for design I development, practicing as land use or comprehensive planners, or in special ties such as preservation, transportation or open space planning, real estate devel opment, and urban design . Environmental Planning Concentra tion: All urban and regional planning actions impact on the environment in some manner , and environmental planners must manage these impacts, both pro-actively and re-actively. The environmental planning concentration introduces planners to the policy and legislative issues surrounding the environmental implications of planning actions, as well as to methods for their assessment, control, and mitigation. Economic Development Planning Concentration: Economic development aims to amass within communities and regions the resources-jobs, capital, tax base-needed to sustain or improve the quality of life and insure opportunities for all within the private economy , facilitated through appropriate public actions and services . Planners foster economic change as diagnosticians, strategists, and promoters ; gauge growth's effect in light of environmental capacities; manage its social benefits, mitigate its negative consequences, and fashion its imprint on the physical landscape of localities , regions, states, and nations. Students pursuing this concentration should seek as well to become conversant with the essentials of physical or environmental planning. In addition to the three official concentrations, students have the choice of defining their own concentration. Students may also enroll in joint degree programs with public administration (M.P.A.-M.U.R.P.) and landscape architec ture (M.L.A.-M.U.R.P.). At this writing , dual degrees combining the M.U.R.P. Degree with the study of both law (JD) and business (M.B.A.) are being explored . Students may also take up to six credits of independent study, after first assembling a plan of study with one of the regular faculty. Up to three credits of internship may be applied to the 51-credit program. Course Sequence FIRST YEAR Fall Semester (12 credit hours) URP 5501-3. Planning Issues and Processes URP 5510-3. Planning Methods I URP 5530-3. Planning Law Elective-3 credits . Ph. D . in Design and Planning I 59 Spring Semester (1 2 credit hours) URP 5511-3. Planning Methods II URP 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis URP 6630-6. Planning Studio I SECOND YEAR Fall Semester (1 5 credit hours) Concentration Courses-9 credits. Electives-6 credits. Spring Semester (12 credit hours) URP 6631-6. Planning Studio II Concentration Courses-6 credits . Inter-Departmental Program Telephone: 303-492-7711 The Department of Architecture , the Department of Planning and Design , and the program in landscape architecture share the idea that the complex problems of the built environment are best addressed through collaboration among the various design and planning disci plines, and through developing bodies of knowledge about the built environment. To further these ends, the departments and program jointly offer the advanced research degree , the Ph.D. in Design and Planning. Ph.D. in Design and Planning Program Director: Will em Van Vliet Telephone: 303-492-5015 The College's interdisciplinary doctoral program examines the complex factors that help shape the planned and constructed environment. The program offers three areas of specialization : I. Land Use and Environmental Planning and Design Work in this area focuses on purposeful intervention in the physical environment, including mechanisms and procedures such as land use controls, design review processes and standards , and environmental policies.lt also deals with the planning and design of housing, neighborhoods, cities, regions, and the interrelationships among residential , economic, recreational, and transporta tion systems. 2. Design and Planning Processes and Practices Work in this area focuses on the theory and methods of planning and design and the development of models and tools to understand and support decis ion processes and design practices. This

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60 /College of Architecture and Planning area of specialization also includes the examination of practice-related issues such as the development of alternative and appropriate building technologies, energy-efficient designs, manufactured housing , and the design/build process. 3. History, Theory, and Criticism of the Environment Work in this area involves critical analysis of architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, and planning, and of the theories, processes, and policies that have regulated these fields. Whether focusing on contemporary or past environments, the aim is to understand and explain them in relation to individual and cultural values, and in their cultural and technological contexts. PREREQUISITES Applicants must hold at least a bachelor's degree , although most will have also completed a master's degree. Field specialization and background are open, and may include architecture, landscape architecture, architectural engineering, urban design, geography, urban economics, environmental law, urban sociology, real estate, management science, computer science, public admin istration, or environmental psychology. A successful applicant will hav e an undergraduate grade-point average of at least 3.0 (out of a possible4 points ), and a graduate grade-point average of 3.5 or better. If students do not hold a professional or a pre-professional degree in a design or planning field , they will have to complete12 hours of upper-level undergraduate course work in the College of Architecture and Planning. They will have to obtain in each of these courses a grade of B or higher . These courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student's faculty advisor, and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program. A student must have completed 12 hours in an undergraduate program in one of the following prerequisites. The one which applies will depend upon the student's intended area of specialization. In exceptional cases, a student may complete this requirement by taking addi tional undergraduate courses and gaining a grade of B or higher in each course. The courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student's faculty advisor , and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program . They may count toward fulfilling the degree requirements. • Social and Behavioral Sciences • Environmental and Natural Sciences • Engineering • Humanities A student must also have completed one of the following prerequisites . The one which applies will depend upon the student's intended area of specialization. In exceptional cases, a student may complete this requirement by taking additional undergraduate courses and gaining a grade of B or higher in each of these courses. The courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student's faculty advisor, and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program . They may count toward fulfilling the degree requirements. • Statistics. Including probability theory, parametric and nonparametric methods, and acquaintance with basic multivariate techniques . A minimum of 3 hours. • Mathematics . Including differential equations, finite mathematics , algor data structures, or other appropriate courses. A minimum of 3 hours. • Language. Ability to read at least one foreign language relevant to the intended dissertation . • Computer. Background in computer aided design (CAD) or geographic information systems (GIS). A minimum of3hours. The applicability of a student's prior course work will be decided by the graduate studies committee upon review of a student' s transcript and additional materials .lf the student does not have the requisite educational background, grade point average, or GRE scores, the student may be admitted on a conditional or provisional basis, and additional course work may be required in accordance with Graduate School rules. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS The Ph .D. requires 76 credit hours. Up to 18 transfer credits may be approved for students admitted with a master's degree. Students in the program will also have to meet the academic residency require ment, which requires six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor' s degree. Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master's degree from another institution of approved standing. However, at least four semesters of resident credit , two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work taken at this University. Completion of the program therefore takes 3 or 4 years, depending on prior course work. The Ph.D. program has five compo nents: (1) Core Curriculum, (2) Research Specialization, (3) Minor Field of Study, (4) Electives, and (5) Dissertation . The Core of ten hours consists of seminars and colloquia on the theories and research methods in the fields of design and planning. All students, no matter what their specialization, must take the core in the first two years of their residence. For the Research Specialization, each student must take at least 12 hours of course work in one of the program's three specialization areas; i.e., land use and environmental planning and design; design and planning processes and practices; and history, theory, and criticism of the built environment. One of the courses must be an advanced methods class. The Minor Field of Study provides students with a strong back gro und that supports their chosen research emphasis. It requires completion of at least 12 hours of related course work that provides in-depth knowledge in a relevant area. Elective course work consists of 12 hours of additional study in areas related to the dissertation topic. For the research specialization, the minor field of study, and the electives , students develop an individualized course of study to reflect their specific foci and career aspirations . The required course work is determined jointly by the student, the faculty advisor , and committee members. The Dissertation requires 30 hours of course work. Students are expected to define a research question in planning and design, to identify the research strategy to be used for answering this question , to conduct the research, and to write up the project in the form of a dissertation. A student is guided in this process by a dissertation advisor, and by the additional members who comprise the student's dissertation committee. EVALUATIONS AND EXAMINATIONS Successful candidates for the Ph.D . in Design and Planning pass four points of evaluation : (1) Preliminary Exam, (2) Comprehensive Exam, (3) Doctoral Dissertation , and ( 4) Final Exam. By the end of the first semester of residence, the student devises a degree plan which is approved by the graduate studies comm ittee. A Preliminary Exam then evaluates the student's initial progress

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through the progr . The Comprehensive Exam is an examina n based on papers prepared by the which survey the literature of the and which set out a proposed d ssertation . This exam takes place aft r two semesters of residency, and bef re the student becom . es a the Ph . D . degree. After advancemen to candidacy , the student prepares a oral Dissertation, which offers original esearch in the student's chosen fielp. When the College's dissertation approves the final dissertation su'fllission , it conducts a Hnal Exam based n the student ' s research. This exam s open to the public . COURSE SEQUENCE F1RSTYEAR Students develop their degree plan, take five semester hours of the required core curriculum, take additional courses in their specialty area, make up any prerequisite courses , and take the preliminary exam . SECOND YEAR Students take the remaining core courses, continue to take electives in their minor and specialty areas , begin literature surveys , And prepare for their comprehensive exam . Ph. D . in Design and Planning I 61 THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR Students complete their literature surveys , prepare a dissertation proposal, and take the comprehensive exam. After completion of the comprehensive exam, the rest of the third and fourth years is spent researching and writing the dissertation. Once the dissertation has been accepted , students take the final exam.

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Dean: Mark Alan Hec er Associate Dean: Fran Jermance College Administrativ. l e Office: AR 176 Administrative Office Phone: 303-556-2279 College Advising Offi e: 303-556-8302 COLLEGE MISSI N The College of Arts Media maintains that, by their power to Jluminate ideas and move the humans irit, the arts are both an essential elem r nt of and social life and a of knowmg about one's self and tlworld. The College is a conservat of . . where proficiencies in chosen dlSClphne are developed , artistic expression and experimentation are e couraged , and new technologies expl red . The College serves a student body of diverse interests an cultural back grounds . ln addition to students from the Denver metropolitan area, the College is an educational desti ation for non resident international , and transfer stu dents. in the student population are individuals seekin their first degree , older students conside ing a career change , and students df. all ages who come for personal growth enrichment. In response to the complex needs of its student body, the which emphasize excel ence m VIsual and performing arts, prep ation cial art applications, and muJtidlSClphnary studies . Off-campus cial>ses are offered at various metropolitarl locations , and international programs are available in conjunction with unive sities located around the world . with its commitment to be inno ative and inclu sive the College uses d l stance-learning technologies to provid educational experiences for stud en s whose personal circumstances make access to the campus difficult. The College of Arts Media serves as a center for cultural d activity by hosting sym os1a and work shops by recognized ar ists, and historians, as well as le ders m the fields of technology and com erce. The College acknowledges its social responsibilities by establishing cooperative relations? ips with civic groups , regional arts agenc1es , museums, galleries, performance venues, area public schools and community colleges , professional societies, and the business community. COLLEGE GOALS 1. The College of Arts & Media aims to instill , inspire , and model creativity founded upon the accumulated knowledge of human civilization . 2. The College serves as an intersection of art technology, and commerce. 3 . The College seeks to develop the artist committed to social responsibility and the citizen who will advocate for the role of the artist in society. 4 . The College strives to become a center of cross-cultural exchange and understanding . 5 . The College works to enrich the . quality of life in the larger commumty, to foster community partnerships , and to encourage mentorship . 6 . The College aims to integrate plinary modes of learning and creatmg . 7. The College adapts to meet future needs of diverse student constituencies . UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS Degree Programs Students can earn baccalaureate degrees in the following areas: Performing Arts Department: Bachelor of Arts in Theatre Bachelor of Science in Music Emphasis in Performance Professional Studies Department: Bachelor of Fine Arts Emphasis in Multimedia Emphasis in Film/Video Wntmg, Producing & Directing , Film/ Video Post Production, Cinematography / Videography Bachelor of Science in Music Emphasis in Scoring & Arranging Emphasis in Music Engineering Emphasis in Music Management Emphasis in Music Industry Stud1es Visual Studies Department: Bachelor of Arts Emphasis in Studio Arts Emphasis in Art History Bachelor of Fine Arts Emphasis in Drawing/Painting Emphasis in Photography Emphasis in Sculpture MINOR PROGRAMS Most CU-Denver departments have developed minor programs . A minor is not required for graduation. Students interested in completing a minor should contact the individual departments regarding requirements . DOUBLE MAJORS Students may graduate with more than one major by completing all requirements for each major. SECOND DEGREES Students who have been awarded a bachelor ' s degree may be granted a second bachelor's degree provided that ( a) all general requirements for that degree have been met ; (b) the major for the second bachelor ' s degree is different from the major for the first ; and (c) the College and major department residence requirements are satisfied. A second degree from the college requires a minimum of 30 additional semester hours of credit. DOUBLE DEGREES Students may earn two degrees in the College of Arts & Media or from two different schools or colleges of the University of Colorado at Denver simultaneously by fulfilling all require ments for both degrees. Students must complete a minimum of 150 semester hours applied toward the two degrees . Requirements for Admission NEW FRESHMEN Students planning to enter the College of Arts & Media must meet the require ments described in the Undergraduate Admissions section of this catalog .

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64 / College of Arts and Media TRANSFER STUDENTS Students who have attended another college or university are expected to meet general requirements for admission of transfer students as described in the Undergraduat e Admissions section . MUSIC AUDITION All entering freshmen and transfer students applying for admission to music degree programs , w ith the exception of the Music Industry Studies program , must complete an aud i tion . Contact the Depart ment of Performing Arts , 303-556-2727 , for information on scheduling an audition. Academic Policies Students are referred to the General Information section of this catalog for a description of academic policies that apply to all undergraduate students at CU-Denver. The policies which follow apply specifically to the College of Arts & Media (CAM). ACADEMIC ADVISING soon as students have determined a major, they should meet with a faculty advisor in the ir ma jor department. The faculty advisor will be responsible for advising and for certifying the completion of the major program for graduation . For each spring semester, a STOP is placed on registration for all majors in the College of Arts & Media . Students must see a major department advisor before they will be allowed to register . The College also has a student advisor to assist students with meeting core requirements and general academic poli cies. To make an advising appointment, contact the College administrative office at 303-556-2279. ACADEMIC PROBATION AND SCHOLASTIC SUSPENSION Good academic standing in the College requires a cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 on all University of Colorado course work. Grades earned in another college or school within the University of Colorado system are used in determining the student' s scholastic standing and progress toward the degree . Grades earned outs ide the University of Colorado system are not used in calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado. Academic Probation Students whose cumulative grade-point average falls below a 2 . 0 at the end of an academic term will be placed on academic probation . Students are informed i n writing of scholastic probation. Students on academic probat ion will be required to achieve a minimum 2 . 2 grade-point average e ach semester until thei r cumulative grade-point average is at least a 2 . 0 , at which time students will be removed from probation . There is no restriction on the length of time a student can remain in a probation status; however , students must achieve a minimum 2 . 0 cumulative CU GPA to meet graduation requirements. Scholastic Suspension Students on academic probation who do not meet the 2 . 2 minimum required grade-point average in the succeeding semester will be suspended from the College. Students are informed in writing of scholastic suspension . A student' s suspension status is perma nently i ndicated on the official Uni versity of Colorado transcript , and registration restrictions are imposed . First Suspension Students who first fail to meet the aca demic conditions of probation are placed on first suspension for one calendar year . Students on first suspension may only register for CU-Denver courses offered through the Extended Studies program or during the summer semester. A student under first suspension may be readm i tted before the end of the nor mal suspe nsion period only if the student has demonstrated academic improvement in one of the following ways : 1 . raise the cumulative CU GPA to a minimum of 2 . 0 ; 2 . achieve a minimum semester GPA of 2.5 with a minimum of 6 semester hours of University of Colorado course work ; or 3 . attend another college / university and raise to a minimum 2.0 the combination of cumulative CU GPA and cumulative GPA from another institution . Students are removed from first suspension after one year upon written request to the CAM Academic Affairs Committee . Second Suspension Students who fail to meet the conditions of continued probation for a second time or fail to meet the semester GPA requirements while on first suspension are placed on second suspension for an indefinite period of time . Students on second suspension may be readmitted to the College only by petition to the CAM Academic Affairs Committee . Students will not be cons idered for read mission unless they have demonstrated improved academic performance at a college/university level. PETITIONING FOR EXCEPTIONS TO ACADEMIC POLICY The CAM Academic Affairs Committee is responsible for the administration of the academic policies of the College as established by the faculty . The comm ittee is empowered to grant exceptions to the academic policies of the College. Students wishing to p e tition an exception to aca demic policy should submit a letter of request to the Dean ' s Office . INDEPENDENT STUDY Students who are juniors , seniors or graduates may register for independent study with the written approval of the appropri ate faculty member and associate dean. The amount of credit to be given for an independent study project shall be determined at the time of registration. A maximum of 12 credits in independent study may apply toward the bachelor ' s degree . INTERNSHIPS/COOPERATIVE EDUCATION Students seeking academic credit from employment experience should consult The Career Center section of this catalog. Undergraduates must have attained junior standing and have a minimum 2 . 75 GPA. A maximum of three hours of internship credit per semester and nine hours overall is allowed. GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS General Requirements 1. A minimum of 120 semester hours passed 2 . A minimum 2 . 0 cumulative grade-point average 3 . A minimum of 45 semester hours of upper division work for all B.A. and B . F . A . degrees 4. A minimum of 30 semester hours with letter grades at CU-Denver 5 . Fulfillment of all College and major requirements .

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Core Curriculu I. INTELLECTUAL C MPETENCIES Competency is by a letter grade of C (2.0) or hig er. A.English Communicationcredit hours One course from eal h of the three sections below : 1. ENGL 1020-3. Cc:ne Composition I 2. ENGL 2030-3. CJre Composition II CMMU/ENGL/ J TC 3154-3. chnical Writing ENGL 3170-3. B siness Writing 3 . CMMU 2050-3. B siness and Prp fessional Speaking CMMU 2101-3. Prrsentational SReaking ENGL 2030-3. Core Composition II ENGL 2154-3. Int roduction to Cr l eative Writing ENGL 3084-3 . Advanced C I "t" ompOSIIOn ENGL 3154-3. Ttfhnical Writing ENGL 3170-3. Business Writing ENGL4190-3. sdecial Topics : oric/Writing B.Mathematics-3 dit hours Any CU-Denver m matics course, with the exception o TH 3040. Students who are not required to take mathematics as part df the major may consider: I MATH 1350-3. Computers in the Arts and MATH 2000-3. Math,ematics for the Liberal Arts C.Foreign third semester proficiency, 0-13 it hours Students must dembnstrate foreign lan guage proficiency. Thik is accomplished through completion of third-semester level course (2110 or with a minimum grade of C (2.0), satisfactory proficiency testing , of thirdyear (Level Ill) high course with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or better. For additional see the Modern Languages section in tlhis catalog. Students pursuing a B ! S . in Music are not required to fulfill t e foreign language proficiency. II. KNOWLEDGE AREAS Arts & Media stude* ts are exempt from the Knowledge Area defined by their major . CU-Denver Kn wledge Area core courses are identified in each Schedule of Courses by a "D" prefix in the course title. Students may not use independent study, cooperative education, internships, CLEP, or courses in their major to satisfy Knowledge Area requirements . A.Natural and Physical Sciences, Mathematics-11 credit hours 3 credit hours from a course in ANTH (approved), BIOL, CHEM, ENVS, GEOL, PHYS or MATH (intellectual competency course excluded) 8 credit hours from the following laboratory core courses: ANTH 1303-4 . lntro . to Biological Anthropology BIOL 1550-4. Basic Biology I BIOL 1560-4. Basic Biology II CHEM 147X-4. Core Chemistry : (selected modules) ENVS 1042-4. Intro . to Environmental Sciences GEOL 1072-4. Physical Geology : Surface Processes GEOL 1082-4. Physical Geology: Internal Processes PHYS 1000-4. Introduction to Physics PHYS 1052-4. General Astronomy I B. Behavioral and Social Sciences12 credit hours 6 credit hours in behavioral sciences 6 credit hours in social sciences 9 of 12 credit hours must come from the following combined behavioral sciences and social sciences core courses: Behavioral Sciences ANTH 2102-3. Culture and the Human Experience CMMU 1011-3. Fundamentals of Communication CMMU 1021-3. Fundamentals of Mass Communication PSY 1000-3. Introduction to Psychology I PSY 1005-3. Introduction to Psychology II Social Sciences ECON 2012-3. Principles of Econ.: Macroeconomics ECON 2022-3. Principles of Econ. : Microeconomics GEOG 1102-3. World Regional Geography GEOG 2202-3. Natural Hazards P SC 1001-3. Introduction to Political Science: Quest For Freedom &Justice Graduation Requirements I 65 p sc 1101-3. soc 1001-3. SOC2462-3 . American Political System Introduction to Socio logy Introd uction to Social Psychology C.Humanities-6 credit hours 6 credit hours from the following core aourses: ENGL 1601-3. Telling Tales : Narrative Art in Literature and Film ENGL 2 600-3. Great Works in British and American Literature GER 1000-3. Germany and the Germans HJST 1381-3. Paths to the Present I HJST 1382-3. Getting Here : Paths to the Present II PHIL 1012-3. Introduction to Philosophy: Relationship of Individual to World PHJL 1020-3. Introduction to Ethics and Society: Person &Community RUSS 1000-3. Russia and Russians: Life, Culture and Arts RUSS 2000-3. Masterpieces of Russian Cultur e D.Arts-3 credit hours 3 credit hours from a course in any discipline of arts other than the student' s major E. Multicultural Diversity3 credit hours 3 credit hours from the following core courses: A course in the major department may be used. ANTH 3142-3. Cultural Diversity in the Modern World ANTH 4200-3. Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective CMMU 3271-3. Communication and Diversity ECON 3100-3. Economics of Race &Gender ENGL/ ETST 3794-3 . Ethnic Diversity in American Literature ENGR 3400-3. Technology and Culture ETST 3704-3 . Culture, Racism , &Alienation FA3110-3. Imaging and Identity HJST 3345-3 . Immigration & Ethnicity in American History MGMT 4100-3. Managing Cultural Diversity PHIL 3500-3 . Ideology and Culture: Racism/Sexism

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66 / College of Arts and Media PMUS 3110-3. PMUS 3111-3. PSC3034-3 . PSC 3035-3. PSY 4485-3. SOC3020-3 . THTR 3611-3. Social &Political implica tions of American Music American Voice Revisited : Cultural Diversity or Social Identity? Race, Gender , Law, & Public Policy Political Movements: Race and Gender Psychology of Cultural Diversity Race and Ethnicity in U.S. Drama of Diversity Major Requirements In addition to completing the College core requirements, students must declare a major by the time they have accumulated 60 credit hours, and fulfill all requirements of the major department. Departments require that all course work in the major be completed with a grade of C (2 . 0) or above. A minimum of one-third of the required course work in the major must be completed at CU-Denver. The department is responsible for determining when a student has success fully completed the major requirements and for certifying the completion to the Dean of the College . Graduation Application Students expecting to graduate are required to complete an Application for Diploma card by the census date (last day to drop and add) of the semester in which they intend to complete the degree . Diploma cards must be submitted to the College student advisor in AR 176. Failure to file a Diploma Card with the College will result in delayed graduation . Academic Honors A student can be awarded honors based upon cumulative grade-point average at the time of graduation. To be eligible for honors, a student must have completed a minimum of 45 semester hours at the University of Colorado (on any CU campus). A GPA of 3.65 will receive cum laude, 3. 75 magna cum laude, and 3 .85 and above summa cum laude honors designations on degrees. DEAN'S LIST Following each fall and spring semester, the College publishes a Dean ' s List honoring students who demonstrate high scholastic achievement. To earn a place on the list , student must achieve a 3 . 75 grade-point average in all CU hours taken during the semester, with a minimum of 9 credit hours. PERFORMING ARTS DEPARTMENT Chair: Kathryn Maes Office:AR288 Phone: 303-556-2727 Faculty Professors: Zoe Erisman, Mark Alan Heckler Associate Professors: J. Brad Bowles, Laura Cuetara , Kathryn Maes , Gregory Walker Assistant Professors: Donna Bogard, Richard Finkelstein Instructors: Carol Bloom, William Clark The Department of Performing Arts prepares students to become leaders in the musical and theatrical arts within the context of a liberal arts education. This unique program offers professional experience through laboratory and studio courses, concerts and productions , and fieldwork in the Denver area and throughout Colorado . Our graduates are prepared to expand their own career possibilities as responsible citizens of the arts. The Department of Performing Arts offers courses in the disciplines of Theatre (fHTR) and Performance Music (PMUS). Students wishing to study theatre may choose to earn the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre. Students wishing to study music performance may pursue the performance emphasis within the Bachelor of Science in Music. Theatre The Bachelor of Arts in Theatre is designed to train the diversified theatre artist-writer, director , performer, designer, teacher-and to provide oppor tunities for a broad range of production process and performance experiences in courses, laboratory workshops, full pro ductions and field work in the Denver area. The goal of the theatre program is an understanding of the potential of the the atre as an expressive medium in the con text of its culture and as a collaborative art form in relationship to literature, fine arts, and music . There are three areas of focus: acting/ directing, design/technical, and integrated theatre. Each student is required to complete a comprehensive series of core courses in theatre and the allied fields and then concentrate in one of the areas of focus . THEATRE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Theatre Core Courses Credit Hours THTR 2530 . Acting I ........... . ...... . ..... 3 THTR 2610. Dramatic Literature Survey . 3 THTR 2712. Theatrical Design , Aesthetics , and Prod. I ................ . . 4 THTR 2713. Theatrical Design , Aesthetics , and Prod. II ................. 4 THTR 2820 . Departmental Production . . . 3 THTR 3540 . Directing I . . ................... 3 THTR 3610. History of Theatre ............ 3 THTR3820. Departmental Production .. . 3 THTR3939.1nternship ......... ........... 2 THTR 4610. Drama Theory and Criticism .... . . .. . . ............... .. .. 3 THTR 4999. Senior Project ..... ......... _1 Total Semester Hours .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 33 Other Arts Credit Hours ENGL 3661. Shakespeare or ENGL 4300. History of British Drama or ENGL 4350. History of American Drama .................................... . 3 FA 1001.1ntroduction to Art .. .. ...... .... 3 PMUS 1001. Music Appreciation ........ _1 Total Semester Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Acting/Directing Focus Credit Hours THTR 2520 . Voice and Diction I ........... 2 THTR2560. Topics in Theatre (Voice) .. . 2 THTR 3520 . Stage Movement I . .. .. ....... 2 THTR 3530 . Acting II .. .. .. ................. 3 THTR 4530. Acting Ill ..... .................. 3 THTR 4540. Directing II ....... ........... _1 Total Semester Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 THTR 3521. Stage Movement II (2 credits) is also recommended Design/Technical Focus Credit Hours THTR 3720 . Advanced Lighting Design .. 4 THTR 3730. Scene Design .................. 4 THTR 4 730. Advanced Scenic Design . . . . 4 THTR 4 760. Topics in Design .. .......... _1 Total Semester Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 THTR 2740 . Costume and Make-up Design credits) is also recommended Integrated Theatre Focus Credit Hours THTRElectives*.. . .. ............... 15 * The selection of these courses must be done in consultation with and approval of the student' s faculty advisor. Total Semester Hours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Performance Music Students gain performance skills in classical , jazz , commercial, and experi mental music styles. The program

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includes specialized urses in large and small performan ensembles , applied study, improvisa tion , and analysis , in the presentation of a juni*r and senior recital. Students wishing to d clare a major in the performance emp as is must audition for entry at the time o their Sophomore Proficiency Exam . ENSEMBLES All music majors in an applied music course are req red to register for an ensemble. Non usic majors are invited to audition forlany of the CO Denver Each ensemble carries 1 semester hour of credit . APPLIED MUSIC I All applied music c urses are restricted to music majors , and minors (only upon completion of the ent ance audition) enrolled in a minimum of 7 other credit hours. Students may 1 nly be enrolled in one applied music co rse in any given semester . Non-music 1pajors must register for applied music stu ies through Extended Studies. All students taking an applied music course must also for an ensemble and PMUS 1500: Recital. Students in applied music cour es are also required to perform in a Perfonpance Jury at the end of each semester applied study and to pass a Sophombre Proficiency Examination at the of their fourth semester of study. All majors taking ap lied music must perform in a solo or s lo with accompani ment capacity at least once a semester in a General Recital . Gfneral Rec itals are scheduled throughou the semester. FACILITIES FEE All music majors are required to pay a $30 facilities fee t the time of registration. Non-mus E majors will be assessed a similar fee hen registering for selected technical ourses (see course descriptions). PERFORMANCE M SIC DEGREE REQUIRE ENTS Required Courses in Music Credit Hours PMUS 1100. Music Th ry 1.. .............. 3 PMUS lllO. Ear Traini g/Sight Sing I ..... 1 PMUS 1200. Music Th ory II ............... 3 PMUS 1210. Ear Training/Sight Sing U ..... 1 PMUS 2100. Music Theory lll .............. 3 PMUS 2110. Ear Sing III .... 1 PMUS 2200. Contemporary Styles .. ...... 3 PMUS 2830. History and Literature of Music I ............. .. ....... . .......... 3 PMUS 2831. History and Literature of Music II ................................ 3 Music History Elective ..................... 3 PMUS 1023. Piano Class (see note 1) . . . 1-4 Applied Music (see note 2) ................ 8 Ensembles .................................. 6 MUS 2700. The Music Business I .......... 3 MUS 2710. The Music Business II . . ... . .. . 3 MUS 2540 . Music Technology I ......... ... 3 MUS 2470 . Music on the Personal Computer .......... . .......... ........ ... 3 PMUS 1500. General Recital ( 4 semesters) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51-54 Credits in Area of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-29 Total Semester Hours Required 126-130 Note 1: Piano majors must take 3 semesters of PMUS 1033, Piano Class for Piano Majors , in place of this requirement. Note 2: Guitar majors are required to take 2 semesters of PMUS 1093/1094 , Fingerboard Harmony / Melody Class , in addition to applied requirement. Emphasis in Performance PMUS 3283. Contemp.lmprovisation ... . 2 MUS 4060 . Analysis I ..... ... ............... 2 Applied Music Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Ensemble Courses ...... .. ................. 2 Music Electives ............................. 7 MUS 4710. Research Project ............. _l Total ....................................... 27 Vocal performance majors are also required to take two semesters of foreign language. This requirement is waived if student has taken three years of a lan guage in high school or is able to pass a competency exam based on translating foreign language song texts. PROFESSIONAL STUDIES DEPARTMENT Chair. Richard Weissman Office:AR274 Phone: 303-556-4652 Faculty Professor: Roy A. Pritts Associate Professors: Kent Hom chick, Frank J. Jermance, Richard Sanders, Richard Weissman Assistant Professor: Frederic Lahey The Department of Professional Studies combines studies in music technology , multimedia, scoring and arranging , music business, and film and video production in order to prepare students for the global Programs of Study I 67 marketplace. Through partnerships with entrepreneurs , corporations, and non-profit organizations we aspire to a leading position in the region and nation in the planning and realization of current and future media . The Department of Professional Studies offers courses in the disciplines of Music (MUS), Multimedia (MUME), and Film and Video (FILM). Students interested in studying music will pursue the Bachelor of Science in Music with areas of emphasis in Scoring and Arranging, Music Engineer ing , Music Management, or Music Industry Studies. (NOTE: See the Department of Performing Arts for information on the Music Performance degree emphasis). Music The music program at the University of Colorado at Denver is intended for stu dents seeking preparation for professional careers in music related to music writing and performance, recording, broadcast business, and the entertainment indus tries. The four-year music program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music . The specialized curricula offered by the program lead graduates to local , regiona l , and national positions in audio research, production companies, arts administra tion, and audio engineering, as well as graduate studies at leading universities and conservatories . Additionally, many graduates establish careers as owners of booking agencies , publishing companies, and recording studios . All music applicants , except those entering the Music Industry Studies program, must pass an entrance audition before being accepted to the program . Contact the Department of Performing Arts for information on the music audition . Scoring and Arranging : This emphasis consists of courses which focus on music writing in small and extended form in both classical and popular styles, analysis and counterpoint, as well as digital processing of musical information. The curriculum presents a blend of traditional knowledge together with practical application for the aspiring composer/arranger . Music Engineering : This area of study addresses contemporary technology in studio recording , sound reinforc ement, and electronic music. It is intended to develop skills for creative musicians, pro ducers, and technicians, using both ana log and digital t echnology. Music Management: This program pre pares graduates for careers in such fields

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68 / College of Arts and Media as artist management , music publishing, music merchandising , concert promotion , record production, and the development of skills relative to the rapidly expanding telecommunications industry. Music Industry Studies : This program prepares the student to work in the music industry. Courses include a non-performance music core with selected classes in music business and music technology . It is intended to develop a broad range of skills in management , promotion, . publishing, producing, and audio engineering . FACILITIES FEE All music majors are required to pay a $30 facilities fee each semester at the time of registration . Non-music majors will be assessed a facilities fee when registering for selected courses, as noted in the course descriptions . DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR SCORING AND ARRANGING, MUSIC MANAGEMENT, AND MUSIC ENGINEERING Required Courses in Music Credit Hours PMUS 1100. Music Theory I . . . . 3 PMUS 1110. Ear Training/Sight Sing I ..... 1 PMUS 1200. Music Theory II ... 3 PMUS 1210. Ear Training/Sight Sing II ..... 1 PMUS 2100. Music Theory III .............. 3 PMUS 2110. Ear Training/Sight Sing Ill .... 1 PMUS 2200 . Contemporary Styles .. ...... 3 PMUS 2830 . History and Literature of Music I ....... .......................... 3 PMUS 2831. History and Literature of Music II ................................ 3 Music History Elective . . . . . . ... 3 PMUS 1023. P i ano Class (see note 1) ... 1-4 Applied Music (see note 2) . ............. .. 8 Ensembles ... . ... ................ ... . ... .... 6 MUS 2700. The Music Business I .......... 3 MUS 2710. The Music Business II ......... 3 MUS 2540. Music Technology I . .. ......... 3 MUS 2470. Music on the Personal Computer ..... ...... .. ................... 3 PMUS 1500. General Recital ( 4 semesters) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51-54 Credits in Area of Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28-29 Total Semester Hours Required 126-130 Note 1 : Piano majors must take 3 semesters of PMUS 1033, Piano Class for Piano Majors, in place of this requirement. Note 2 : Guitar majors are required to take 2 semesters of PMUS 1093/1094 , Fingerboard Harmony/Melody Class , in addition to applied requirement. Emphasis in Scoring and Arranging Credit Hours MUS 2180. lntro to Scoring and Arr . l ..... 2 MUS 2190.1ntro to Scoring and Arr .ll ..... 2 MUS 3200 . Elementary Composition ..... 2 MUS 4200 . Advanced Composition ....... 2 MUS 3030. Applied Scoring and Arr I ... .. 2 MUS 4030 . Applied Scoring and Arr II .... 2 MUS 2560 . Music Technology II . . ........ 3 MUS 2520 . Music Technology II Lab ...... 1 Distributed Music Studies ........... 8 Select from : Digital Music Techniques Songwriting Analysis Orchestration Sixteenth-Century Counterpoint Eighteenth-Century Counterpoint Applied Music Music Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Total . ... . . .. . . ....... .. .. . .. . ..... .. .... 28 Emphasis in Music Engineering MUS 2560 . Music Technology II . . . . . . . . . . 3 MUS 2520. Music Technology II Lab . . . . . 1 MUS 3540. Recording Studio Maint. & Calibration ..................... 3 MUS 4510. Music Engr . l Lab ............... 1 MUS 4550 . Music Engineering I ........... . 3 MUS 4570 . Music Engineering II ...... 3 MUS 4530 . Music Engr.ll Lab .............. 1 Music Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 5 Music Engineering Electives .............. 3 MUS 3670. Junior Project: Music Tech .... 3 . MUS 4670 . Senior Project: Music Tech . . 3 Total.................................... 29 Elective Studies in Music Management MGMT 1000. lntro . to Business .......... .. 3 MUS 4720. Music Management . . .. . . . .. .. . 3 MUS 4730 . Music Production .............. 3 MUS 4740 . Music Business Analysis ...... 3 MUS 3730 . Music Industry Financial Management ....... .. ....... . . 3 MKTG 3000 . Principles of Marketing ..... 3 MUS 2560 . Music Technology II ........... 3 MUS 2520 . Music Tech . II Lab ............. 1 Music Electives ..... ........................ 3 MUS 4700 . Research Project............. 4 Total.................................... 29 DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR MUSIC INDUSTRY STUDIES PMUS 1010. Music Fundamentals .. .. .. .. . 3 PMUS 1023. Piano Class .................... 1 or PMUS 1093. Guitar Class ................... 1 MUS 2300. Intro . to Songwriting ..... .. . .. 3 PMUS 2831. History of Music II ............ 3 Music History Elective .. .............. ..... 3 Music Distributed Studies . . . . . 6 Music Electives . . . . . . . . . ... 6 MUS 2700 . Music Business I . 3 MUS 2710. Music Business II . . . . . . . . 3 MUS 2540. Music Technology I ............ 3 MUS 2560 . Music Technology II ............ 3 MUS 2520. Music Tech. II Lab . ............ 1 Music Management or Music Engineering Seminar . ........... . MUS 3939 . Internship ............. . ...... 3 . .... 2 Music Industry Elective Studies** Total semester credit hours ........ . NOTE: Courses to fulfill the Music Industry Elective Studies are to be selected from a list of approved classes, in conjunction with and the approval of a faculty advisor . Multimedia Studies The Multimedia Studies program is concerned w ith the history, conceptual process, artistic and intuitive design, technical proficiency, authoring environments , marketing , and legal aspects as applied to the creation of electronic media. 37 80 The Multimedia Studies program will appeal to the student who may not be i nclined toward the traditional degree track, but wishes to gain and update spe cific skills in the production of electronic media; or to the student who wishes to attain a four-year undergraduate B.F.A. degree in multimedia featuring a strong core component in the liberal arts. Certificate programs in multimedia studies which are designed to instruct individuals in a selection of specific skills can be established with local business environments . The program also offers a series of courses which culminates in a minor in multimedia studies. The program of study is based on a foundation of five groupings of courses: 1 . Courses which comprise a core of instruction within the liberal arts. 2 . Courses which build a foundation in the visual and performing arts. 3 . Courses in the usage of technology tools for the production of multimedia . 4. Courses which provide the student with rudimentary business marketing skills, business ethics , and a knowledge of current media law . 5. Courses in internship and portfolio presentation which seek to fine-tune a student' s professional marketability or to help prepare the student for application to select graduate schools . Admission : Incoming freshmen and transfer students will not be given the chance to apply for recognition as a multi media major until they have completed a successful assessment interview with the director of the program. All prospective majors must complete at least one multi media core course (MUME prefix) prior

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to application for maj r status, so that the faculty can deterirtine if the student possesses the skills work ethic expected of majors in program . Acceptance into the program is not and 1s strongly dependent on demon trated ability, evidence of personal motivation , the ability to create and within a group dynamic , and a lear in?ication . that the student is int rested m assummg the responsibility new techniques . The range of transf r accepted for credit toward grad at10n Will be determined upon by the director of the Multimedia Studies program and the administrative adr.sing assistant for the College of Arts & Media. All students interes ed in applying for multimedia major status are encouraged to develop creative w rk which is of an electronic nature as well as in the traditional arts: photography, music, painting, video and film, drawing , painting , and sculpture. I Personal Technolog},: Students are not required to purchase their own personal computer although it ls highly recom mended that they do The purchase of any computer should take into account the speed, memory, storage capa_city required to effective!}\ produce and VIew multimedia content. he choice of a specific computer platform need not be specifical y limited to either the Macintosh r the Windows operating systems . . . Academic Policies : I in multimedia must p t1c1pate m a Jury at the end of each acatlemic year , at which time the faculty will rujsess and advise each student on all of their progress in the program. Faculzy evaluation will result in one of th ee assessment outcomes: probation, or discontihuat10n m the program. I Each MUME major 1pust take the "Trends In Multimedia " seminar course each semester unless 1) they are completing their int . el)Ilship requirement , 2) they have taken required sevencourse sequence " ends" courses, or 3) by permission o their advisor. All MUME majors ust maintain a B (3. 0) grade-point aver ge in all MUME specific courses. All UME core courses must be completed w th a grade of C+ (2. 5) or better . Studel\ts falling below this standard will be to academic probation in the multilnedia program and possible loss of ajor status. Fees: Selected courses in multimedia will have materials fees assessed. These fees will vary by course. For more information , see Tuition and Fees under the Gen eral information section of this catalog. BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS MULTIMEDIA STUDIES CORE PMUS 1001. Music Appreciation .......... 3 CMMU 1021. Fundamentals of Mass Communication ................... 3 FA 1100. Basic Drawing .................. . . . 3 MUME 1100. Basics of Multimedia ........ 3 MUME 1200. Multimedia Studio ........... 3 MUME 1500. Trends In Multimedia ....... 1 MUME 1510. Trends In Multimedia .. . .. .. 1 MUME 1520. Trends In Multimedia .. .. . . . 1 FA 2400. Visual Studies .. .. .............. .. 3 MUME 2410. Multimedia Project!-Programming and Interface Design .. . . 3 FA 2600 . History of Art I (survey) ......... 3 FA 2610. History of Art II (survey) ........ . 3 MUME 3410. Multimedia Project 11-Digitallmage Manipulation, Graphic & Typography Design . . . . . . . . 3 MUME 3420. Multimedia Project IllDigital Video &Audio . .................. 3 MUME 3430. Multimedia Project IVMotion Graphics &3D Creation ........ 3 MUME 3500. Trends In Multimedia . . ... . . 1 MUME 3510. Trends In Multimedia ....... 1 MUME 3520. Trends In Multimedia ....... 1 MUME 3530. Trends In Multimedia .. .. .. . 1 MUME 3939. *t Multimedia Internship . .. 5 MUME 4410. *Multimedia Career Project I ................................... 3 MUME 4420. * Multimedia Career Project II .................................. 3 TC 4510. Usability Testing .......... ... . .. . 3 CMMU 4680 . Communication , Law, and Mass Media Public Policy .......... 3 MUME 4999. * Senior Portfolio Preparation ........................... _. . Total . ..................... .. ............... 63 *These courses must be completed while in residence at CU-Denver . tContact the Department of Professional Studies office in AR 27 4 for MUME course descriptions which do not appear in this catalog. In addition to the required courses which comprise the multimedia core, majors need to complete a minimum of 10 credit hours of electives. Multimedia advisors will work in consultation with each student to determine the selection of elective courses which will most effectively compliment that student' s studies in multimedia . Some or all elective requirements may be satisfied after review of a student's approved transfer credits . Programs of Study I 69 Film/Video Studies The Film/Video Studies program at the University of Colorado at Denver is intended for students seeking profes sional preparation for careers in film, video, and related ind ustries . Program delivery is realized in a unique "2 + 2" offering with Red Rocks Community College through the Colorado Film Video Instructional studios (CFVI),Jocated at the Higher Education Advanced Technology (HEAT) campus at the former Lowry Air Force base. The program is designed to award B.F.A. degrees with emphases in film/video writing, producing and directing, film/video post production, or cinematography/videography , and to supply advanced training to professionals already working in the film and video industries. Upon completion of the B.F.A. course of study, students will be prepared employment in the television , industnal video, educational video, and feature film production industries , or for entry into graduate study prograins. may choose to focus their concentration on documentary or narrative styles while finding their own balance of technical and creative concerns . Employment opportu nities lie in writing , producing, directing, production management , production design, camera, lighting, audio for film and video, audio post for film and video, post production graphics and animation, editing , and multimedia production and integration, as well as a host of business management opportunities in the cable, network, and film industries. As Denver is the world capital of the cable television industry, graduates may work locally or seek employment in the national or world markets. The initial two years of film/video technology (Red Rocks , FVT) courses give students the fundamental understanding of technical , creative , and storytelling issues and exposure to disparate paths of study and future employment. The second two years of film and video (CU-Denver, FILM) provide the opportunity to focus and hone the1r craft, find their own expressive " voice, " and to graduate with a professional quality "show reel " of work, production credits, and/or completed screenplays, teleplays, and project proposals . Students may satisfy core requirements at the Auraria campus or other approved locations, while nearly all film and vide? classes are conducted at the CFVI stud1os facility at HEAT. This arrangement allows

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70 / College of Arts and Media for the maximization of equipment and facility resources available to the student by the Red Rocks/CU partnership. The CFVI facility includes a 17, 000-square-foot primary building , the Avid Center at the $7 million all-digital ETTC building, and the 600-seat HEAT movie theater. Dormitory space is availab le to full-time film and video students at the HEAT Center campus at Lowry. All students interested in applying for film and video major status must apply to the CFVI program director. Continued major status is subject to annual review. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS W/EMPHASIS IN FILM/VIDEO WRITING & DIRECTING Red Rocks coursesf FVT 105. Video Production I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FVT 150. Development of Film Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FVT 153. lntro. to Film Production ........ 3 FVT 160. Video Post Production I ......... 3 FVT 200. Video Production II .............. 3 FVT 206 . Film/Video Lighting & Grip ..... 3 FVT 209. Production Management Techniques . . . . . . . . . . .. ..... . ..... 3 FVT 215. Video Post Production II . . . 3 FVT 220 . 16mm Production . . ....... 3 FVT 250.1ntroduction to Screenwriting . . 3 FVT 290. Understanding the Actor ' s Process ........................ _] Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 credits C1J.Denver courses FILM 3100. f History of Narrative Film I ... 3 FILM 3150 . f History of Narrative Film II .. 3 FILM 3207. t Acting/Directing Workshop . 3 FILM 3270 . Film/Video Production Ill ..... 3 FILM 3275. t Film/Video Post Production Ill ............................ 3 FILM 3400 . Intermediate Screenwriting for Feature Films . . . . . .. ................ 3 FILM 4209 . t Advanced Production Management ............................. 3 FILM 4400. Advanced Screenwriting for Feature Films .... ... . .. ........ .. . .. .. 3 FILM 4270. t Career Track: Film/Video Production IV ............................ 3 FILM 4280. t Career Track: Film/Video PostlV .... . ................. 3 FILM 4910.f Film/Video Production Internship . . 3 FILM Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-6 FILM 4999. f Senior Portfolio Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-40 credits DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS W/EMPHASIS IN FILM/VIDEO POST PRODUCTION Red Rocks coursest FVT 105. Video Production I . 3 FVT 150 . Development of Film Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FVT 153.1ntro. to Film Production .. 3 FVT 160. Video Post Production I ....... .. 3 FVT 200. Video Production II . . . 3 FVT 206. Sound for Film & Video .......... 3 FVT 215. Video Post Production II ........ 3 FVT 220. 16mm Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FVT 254 . lntro. to Digital Editing .......... 3 GAT 120. Adobe Photoshop I ............ .. 3 FVT 290 . Advanced Digital Editing . ... . . _] Total . . . ...................... , . . . 33 credits CU-Denver courses FILM 3100. f History of Narrative Film I . .. 3 FILM 3150.f History of Narrative Film II .. 3 FILM 3270 . Film/Video Production Ill . .. .. 3 FILM 3275.f Film/Video Post Production Ill .. .. . .. ..................... 3 FILM 3350 . Editing Aesthetics ........... .. 3 MUS 4505. Audio Sweetening .. .. .. . .. . ... 3 FILM 4270. t Career Track: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FILM 4280.f Career Track: Film/Video Post IV. . .. . . .. . ... ..... .. . . . . 3 FILM 4910. t Film/Video Production Internsh i p . . . . .. . . . . . 3 FILM Electives . .. .. . .. .. . . ............... 6-12 FILM 4999.f Senior Portfolio Preparation ............................ . _ 1 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34-40 credits DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS W/EMPHASIS IN CINEMATOGRAPHY/ VIDEOGRAPHY Red Rocks coursesf FVT 105. Video Production I .. FVT 150 . Development of Film Expression ................... . FVT 153 . 1ntro. to Film Production .. FVT 160. Video Post Production I .... FVT 200. Video Production II ... FVT 205. Camera Equipment & Techniques ................ . . . FVT 206. Film/Video Lighting & Grip FVT 209. Production Management Techniques . . ............ .. ...... . FVT 215. Video Post Production II . 3 3 ..... 3 .... 3 ... 3 ... 3 . 3 .. 3 .3 FVT 220. 16mm Production ........ . ...... 3 FVT 290. Understanding the Actor's Process . ....... ...... . 3 Total . ......... .. ............. . 33credits C1J.Denver courses FILM 3100. t History of Narrative Film I ... 3 FILM 3111. Shooting Action & Physical Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 FILM 3150. f History of Narrative Film II . . 3 FA 3170. Color Photography I ...... . . .. . .. 3 FILM 3270. Film/Video Production Ill . . . . 3 FILM 3275. f Film/Video Post Production Ill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FILM 3300 . Advanced Lighting for Film & Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ... 3 FILM 4209.f Advanced Production Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 FILM 4270. t Career Track: Film/ Video Production IV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3 FILM 4280. t Career Track: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FILM 4910. t Film/Video Production Internship . . . . . . . .. .. . . . 3 FILM Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0-6 FILM 4999.f Senior Portfolio Preparation . . . . . ...................... . Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 34-40 credits fContact the Department of Professional Studies office in AR 27 4 for Red Rocks FVT courses and FILM course descriptions which do not appear in this catalog . VISUAL ARTS DEPARTMENT Chair: John Hull Office: AR 185 Phone: 303-556-4891 Faculty Professors: John Hull, Ernest 0. Porps Associate Professor: Lorre Hoffman Assistant Professors: Joann Brennan, Debra Goldman, Scott Massey, Karen Mathews, James McElhinney Senior Instructor: Bob Nauman Professors Emeritus: Jerry Johnson, Charles Moone The Department of Visual Arts offers professional instruction in four interre lated areas of study: art history, drawing/ painting , photography, and sculpture. The department provides an educational environment where artists and art historians of promise and motivation can explore the horizons of their own talents in the midst of intense critical dialogue . This dialogue is generated by their peers; by distinguished visiting artists, scholars, and critics ; and by a faculty comprising artists and art historians of acknowledged accomplishment. The primary educational experience for the student is centered on the knowl edge and skills gained from rigorous and structured courses offered by the various

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areas of the visual art department, as well as the rich ac demic offerings throughout the univ*1 sity. Each student is routinely exposed many aesthetic or academic positions rough encounters with faculty membeH and visitors . The visual arts dep tment's efforts are devoted not only o the refinement of visual skills, but to he articulation and cultivation of the mind. Students must bring creative force and imagination to their own developlnent , for these qualities cannot be can only be stimulated appreciated . Education in the visual arts encompasses a knowledge of and direct experience with the various media of drawing, paihting , photography, sculpture , and other forms. Supporting this enterprise is the development of an understanding of art iheory, a knowledge of the methods and ni aterials of art making , and examination of the diverse approach to examiniryg the art object in history . Central to thEf practice of art history are critical and analysis. A variety of opportunities are open to the visual arts major degree can be specific preparation pr graduate study or a more general ba9 kground for fields related to the arts, including arts administration, musehm and gallery work, and art conseJ'ation. Internships are available for majors with a number of organizati?ns in the Denver area, and an Art Resofrce Center has been established in department to serve as a clearinghopse for information about study abroad jobs , and continuing educatio @ in the visual arts. Graduating receiving the B.F.A. degree are required t p have a thesis show during their last semE(Ster of study. These exhibitions are sche uled in the fall and spring terms only . Fine Arts BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FINE ARTS Required Fine Arts Core Courses : FA 1100. Basic Drawing ..................... 3 FA 1200 . Basic Painting .................... 3 FA 1500 . Basic Sculpture .. ........ .. ....... 3 FA 2150. Foundations in Photo I .. ........ . 3 FA 2400. Visual Studies .................... 3 FA 2600 . History of Art I (survey ) ..... .. . 3 FA 2610. History of Art II (survey ) . ..... . _1 Semester hours in Fine Arts Core . . . . . . . 21 Emphasis in Studio Art: FA4800 . ArtSeminar ....................... 3 Upper Division Art History Electives ..... 6 Studio Art Electives................... 12-18 (12 credits must be upper division ) Semester hours in Studio Art Emphasis . .. .. .. . .. . .. .. . . . .. . .. 21-27 Emphasis in Art History: FA 4790 . Methods in Art History ...... .. . . 3 FA 4650 . 19th Century Art ..... .. .......... 3 FA 4660. 20th Century Art ................. 3 FA4690 . Renaissance Art .................. 3 Elective credits in Art History ........... 6-9 Elective credits in Art History or Studio ............................... . 3-6 (9 of the above 9-15 elective hours must be upper division) Semester hours in Art History Emphasis................. ..... . 21-27 BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS Required Fine Arts Core Courses FA 1100. Basic Drawing ..................... 3 FA 1200. Basic Painting .................... 3 FA 1500. Basic Sculpture ............ .. ..... 3 FA 2150. Foundations in Photo I ........... 3 FA 2400. Visual Studies .. . .. . .............. 3 FA 2600. History of Art I (survey ) . ...... .. 3 FA 2610. History of Art II (survey ) ......... 3 FA4800 . ArtSeminar ....................... 3 FA4950. BFA Thesis .. .. .. . . . .. .. . .. .. .. .. 1 Semester hours in Fine Arts Core . . . . . . . 25 Programs of Study I 71 Emphasis in Drawing: FA 2000 . Drawing II ..................... .. .. 3 FA 3000 . 1ntermediate Drawing .. ..... .. . . 3 FA 3020 . 1ntermediate Ute Drawing ...... . 3 FA 4000 . Advanced Drawing ............... 3 FA 4020 . Advanced Life Drawing .......... 3 Upper Division Art History electives .... . 6 Upper Division Painting electives . ....... 9 Art electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-15 Semester hours in Drawing Emphasis ............................ 36-45 Emphasis in Painting : FA2200. Painting II .................... .. . . . 3 FA 3200.1ntermediate Painting ........ .... 3 FA 3210. 1ntermediate Painting ............ 3 FA 4200 . Advanced Painting . ....... . ...... 3 FA 4210. Advanced Painting ............... 3 Upper Division Art History electives ..... 6 Upper Division Drawing electives ........ 9 Art electives .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. . 6-15 Semester hours in Painting Emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36-45 Emphasis in Photography : FA 3190. Foundations in Photo II ...... .. . . 3 FA4150.1ntermediatePhotography ...... 3 FA 4160. Concepts & Processes in Photo . 3 FA 4190. Advanced Photography I ........ 3 FA 4194. Advanced Photography II ....... 3 FA 3180. Photo Criticism ................. .. 3 FA 3630 . History of Photography ......... 3 Upper Division Art History electives ..... 6 Upper Division Photo electives...... 6-12 Art electives .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . 6-9 Semester hours i n Photography Emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39-48 Emphasis in Sculpture : FA 2500. Metal Sculpture and Casting .... 3 FA 3500. Intermediate Sculpture . ......... 3 FA 3510. Intermediate Sculpture .... . . .. . . 3 FA 4500. Advanced Sculpture .. ........... 3 FA 4510. Advanced Sculpture ........ . ... . 3 Upper Division Art History electives ..... 6 Upper Division Drawing electives ........ 9 Art electives .. .. .. . . . .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 6-15 Semester hours in Sculpture Emphasis ........................... 36-45

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Dean: Yash P . Gupta Associate Dean for Jean-Claude Associate Dean for Academic Programs: Marlene A. Smith Office: CU-Denver B ilding, 1250 14th Street, 2 d Floor Telephone: 303-556858 Fax: 303-556-5899 Program Director , Administration Program: Errol L. Director of Professi nal Development Programs: Ruth C,l owley Web site: http:/ jcarbbn. cudenver .edu/ public/business FACULTY Professor Emeritus: ordon G . Barnewall (Marketing) , H . Mi hael Hayes (Marketing and Sitegic Management), William D. Murray nformation Systems). Professors: Marcell V. Arak (Finance) , Heidi Boerstler Administra tion) , Jean-Claude osch (Finance) , Peter G. Bryant 1f.1agement Science and Information Wayne F. Cascio Lawrence F. Cunningham and Transportation) , EJ. Woodrow Eckard, Jr . (Business Econmtiics), Richard W. Foster (Finance Health Administra tion), Yash P . (Management), Jahangir Karimia formation Systems), Gary A. Kochenbe ger (Operations Management), J es R Morris (Finance), (Account ing), Bruce R. Neu ann (Accounting and Health Admin stration) , Edward J. O'Connor (Manag . ment) , John C . Ruhnka (Manage ent and Business Law) , Donald L. St1 vens (Finance) , Dean G. Taylor (Fi ance), Raymond F. Zammuto (ManagTment). Associate Herman Aguinis (Management) , Aj yo Banerjee (Finance), Kennet L. Bettenhausen (Management) , K g Rae Cho (Management an International Business) , Edwar J . Conry (Business Law and S . Cooperman (Fin ce), C. Marlena Fiol (Management , James H. Gerlach (Information Systems) , Susan M . College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration Keaveney (Marketing) , Feng Yang " Bob " Kuo (Information Systems) , Michael Mannino (Information Systems) , Stuart Rosenstein (Finance) , Manuel G. Serapio , Jr. (International Business and Management) , Marlene A. Smith (Quantitative Methods) , Naomi Soderstrom (Accounting), Clifford E . Young (Marketing). Assistant Professors: Anol Bhattacherjee (Information Systems), Gary J. Colbert (Accounting), David A. Forlani (Market ing), Blair D . Gifford (Management and Health Administration), Michele L. Henney (Accounting), John Jacob (Accounting), Deborah L. Kellogg (O perations Management) , Kathleen Knoll (Information Systems ), Vicki R. Lane (Marketing) , Linda G . Levy (Accounting) , L. Ann Martin ( Accounting) , Sarah Kovoor Misra (Management), Madhavan Parthasarathy (Marketing) , Steven Walczak (Information Systems) . Senior Instructors: Elizabeth S . Conner (Accounting), Charles M . Franks ( Quantitative Methods) , Gary L. Giese (Business Law and Management), Robert D . Hockenbury ( Accounting) , Lawrence F. Johnston (Finance) , Paul J. Patinka (Management) , Barbara A. Pelter (Finance), Marianne Plunkert (Finance), Eric J. Thompson (Informa tion Systems ), John Turner (Finance) . Instructors: Errol L. Biggs (Health Admin istration) , Michael D . Harper ( Opera tions Management ), Chen Ji (Finance), Charles A. Rice (Management) , Gary R. Schornack (Marketing), Mary Lee Stansifer (Marketing) , M . Catherine Volland (Management) . INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain business community , the College of Bus i ness and Administration at the University of Colorado at Denver provides its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective , responsible business professionals. This level of excellence in higher education is achieved by bringing together nationally recognized faculty and highly motivated , mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment . CU-Denver's College of Business is a "research institution," and our faculty are nationally recognized for their contributions to scholarly research as well as for their teaching skills . Accordingly, our students have the oppor tunity to be on the leading edge of busi ness management theory and practice. Our class schedules and curriculum offer flexibility to meet the needs of fulland part-time students, with both day and evening classes . Whether they are experienced working professionals seeking advanced degrees, or preparing for new careers in the business world, students will gain the knowledge and perspective necessary to succeed in today ' s challenging business environment. CU-Denver ' s College of Business can give students an edge over their competition. College of Business and Administration Educational Goals CU-Denver's College of Business and Administration is committed to superb teaching, connecting theory to practice that focuses on : • current and relevant knowledge and skills necessary for success in the highly competitive global business environment ; • experience in cooperative and teambased work skills; • integrated professional and functional exper tise ; and • sensitivity to cultural and ethnic diversity . Our graduate programs serve both traditional and non-traditional students who have extensive work experience. The M.B.A. serves the needs of students who desire a general management education . The professionally oriented M .S. degrees serve the needs of students who desire greater specialization, and particularly students who have already obtained an undergraduate business degree . Large segments of our graduate students will be drawn from national and international locales.

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74 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration Our undergraduate program , which also serves both traditional and non traditional students, leads to a baccalau reate degree in business with a substantial liberal arts component. The program is closely linked, through articulation agreements, to lower-division programs offered by Colorado ' s four-year and community colleges. The majority of undergraduates come from the Denver metropolitan area . Key elements of our academic programs are the provision of quality career advis ing and placement services , and flexible schedules and programs to meet a wide range of student needs. We are committed to assisting our students' efforts to pursue rewarding careers . Faculty Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about its teaching and research . Faculty members hold degrees from the nation ' s leading business schools , including Berkeley , Harvard , Stanford , University of Chicago , University of Pennsylvania, UCLA, and Yale. Many of them also bring years of valuable experience in private industry. Their interdisciplinary expertise , aca demic achievements , scholarly research, and business experience provide students with a dynamic learning environment. Students Unlike the students at a traditional college campus, many of our students are adult, working professionals who maintain full-time employment. Their success and experience enrich class discussions and interactions among students. Although a high percentage attend evening classes , a significant number are full-time students attending classes offered during the day . Following the current national trend, women constitute about one-half of the student body. Since admission standards are among the highest in the region , the student body is unusually motivated and talented . This rich mix of backgrounds , experi ence , and perspectives, when coupled with the strengths of our excellent faculty, fosters stimulating classroom interaction and keen competition among the students. Accreditation CO-Denver's College of Business is one of the few schools in the state accredited by the International Association for Management Education (MCSB) . Business Week wrote rec ently, " Today , just having the degree isn ' t as important as where you get it. ... As corporations become savvier buyers of .. . talent , they are giving more weight to the MCSB seal . . . Accreditation shows that a Business School cares about the quality of its program." In addition , CO-Denver ' s accounting program has also received separate accreditation by MCSB. Prospective students should note that only two state-funded schools in Colorado have received such additional accredita tion of their accounting programs . In a similar manner , our program in health administration is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA). This agency ensures that health adminis tration programs meet demanding requirements for quality education in the health administration area. Entrepreneurship The Richard H. and Pamela S . Bard Center for Entrepreneurship Development offers a three-course certificate program, internships , and accelerated courses designed to develop the kind of entrepreneurial skills required by businesses of all types . The program may be taken for college credit by degree seeking graduate students . Additional courses beyond the three initial offerings provide further entrepreneurial problem solving skills. These courses serve as graduate electives for business and non business students and appeal to those who desire to start a business, grow a business, become more entrepreneurial as a corporate manager , or apply entrepreneurial decision making within other disciplines . The Leadership Council is available for mentorship, and a venture capital fund will help graduates launch their own businesses . Anyone interested is invited to visit the Center , located on the Downtown Denver Mall in the Masonic Building , 535 16th Street , Suite 300 ; or call the Bard Center at 303-620-4050 . Professional Development The College of Business offers credit, certificate, and non-<:redit public pro grams and in-house, customized training programs which provide a functional business education to Denver metropoli tan area businesses and individuals . Experienced instructors teach a variety of high-quality , practical classes that are designed to meet the specific needs of bus i ness . For more information , contact the Director of Professional Development, Ruth Crowley , at 303-556-5826 or fax to 303-556 5920 . Internships Internships / Cooperative Education is a program designed to provide students with practical work experience in a busi ness setting . This program allows stu dents to put classroom education into use . The work experience gained through an internship can contribute to an individ ual ' s success . HOW INTERNSHIPS WORK In partnership with the CU-Denver Center for Internships and Cooperative Education , the College of Business and Administration offers a selective program allowing students to receive a maximum of three semester hours of elective credit ( undergraduate or graduate) for intern ships with participating organizations . Internships complement the academic program , and may lead to permanent career opportunities . Upon successful completion , a grade of P (Pass) is recorded. Note: Business students are limited to completing a maximum of six semester hours of individualized instruction which includes independent study credits in combination with internship credits . ELIGIBILITY FOR PLACEMENT The general requirements for intern ships are as follows: • Undergraduate students must be admitted to the College, be in good standing with at least a 3.2 cumulative GPA, and have completed at least 15 hours of the business core at CU-Denver . • Graduate students must be admitted to the School, be in good standing with at least a 3 . 3 GPA, and have completed 21 semester hours of graduate work. Interested students should contact the appropriate program director or the Center for Internships and Cooperative Education for further details about the program. Scholarships and Financial Aid Many programs for financial aid are administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Call303-556-2886 for detailed information . Thanks to the generous support of the Colorado business community and others, the College of Business has a significant number of scholarships to

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offer its students. Scholarships are awarded on the basis f merit and/or financial need. The aJ110unt of the award and the number of awrrds available vary . Scholarship monies a e typically used to support all or of a student's tuition and fees , althdugh certain scholar ships allow funds to be spent at the stu ent's discretion . Thirty different sc olarships are available to eligible C liege of Business students. ScholarshiBS such as the Virginia T. Schuman and the Ford Motor Company Scholarshi s are open to all business students . Other scholarships are open to students ' n specific degree programs: Undergraduate include the Board of Advisor , the College of Business Undergrad ate Excellence , the Carolyn Lee Hendersn . the Robert E. Moore Memorial , the Follege of Business Sustaining Student , Dean ' s Community Scholarships , and the Dean's Scholarship for Undergraduate B siness Students. The MBA Outstanding Scholar Award is given to qualifying MBA students. Accounting scholarships for both graduate and undergraduate accounting students include thefeloitte & Touche, Accounting Program and Coopers & Lybrand Scholarship , as well as the Price Waterhouse Sc olarship for under graduate junior acco nting majors only. MS. Finance schol
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76 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration College . The College cannot assume responsibility for problems resulting from a student's failure to follow the policies stated in this catalog. Similarly, students are responsible for all deadlines , rules, and regulations stated in the Schedule of Courses . Academic Ethics Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and integrity . Cheating , plagiarism , illegitimate possession and disposition of examina tions, alteration, forgery, or falsification of official records, and similar acts or any attempt to engage in such acts are grounds for suspension or expulsion from the University. Also, actions which disrupt the administrative process , such as misrepresentation of credentials or academic status , other forms of deception, or verbal abuse of College staff are grounds for suspension or probation . All reported acts of dishonesty must be referred to the College of Business Internal Affairs Committee . In particular , students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act involving the offering of the work of someone else as the student ' s own. It is recommended that students consult with the instructors as to the proper preparation of reports, papers , etc . in order to avoid this and similar offenses. Admission to Business Classes Enrollment in business classes is limited to students who have been admitted to business degree programs, and to other students as described in the separate undergraduate and graduate policy sections. The course registration criteria are designed to meet a number of objectives: 1. To assure access to business courses for students seeking a business degree . 2 . To serve students in other colleges who have business-related education objectives or requirements . 3. To serve non-degree students who have specific career or education goals . Please refer to the Schedule of Courses each term for course availability. Attendance Regulations Students are required to attend classes on a regular basis . Absences must be arranged with the instructor and must conform with university and instructor's policies on attendance. Prerequisites Students are expected to know and fulfill all prerequisite requirements , including any prerequisite information when registering . The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who enroll without the correct prerequisites. Generally , students who are administratively dropped or with drawn will not receive tuition refunds. Course Numbering The course numbering system used at the University of Colorado at Denver identifies the class standing required for enrollment. Students are expected to take 1000-level courses in their freshman year, 2000-level courses in their sophomore year , 3000-level courses in their junior year , and 4000-level courses in their senior year. Courses at the 5000 and 6000 level are restricted to graduate business students . Adding Courses Students may add classes to their original schedule through census date (first 12 days of the fall or spring semester , first 8 days of summer session).lnstructor approval may be required to add a course after the first day/w e ek of classes. Dropping Courses Students may drop a class through census date and it will not appear on the transcript. After census, a student who wishes to drop / passing must obtain written approval from both the instructor and Academic Dean . The course and a grade of W will appear on the transcript . In order to drop / passing beyond the lOth week it will also be necessary to document circumstances beyond a student's control. Any student who js failing a class will not be allowed to drop , and an Fwill be recorded on the transcript. Withdrawal See the General Information section of this catalog for University-wide with drawal policies . Note that the College of Business normally requires instructors ' signatures on withdrawal forms before the Academic Dean ' s approval is granted . Administrative Drop The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who are incorrectly enrolled in business courses . Instructors also may recommend to the programs coordinator that students who fail to meet expected course attendance or course prerequisites be dropped from the course. Generally , students who are administratively dropped will not receive tuition refunds . Appeal Procedure Students should contact a staff advisor in the College of Business and Adminis tration programs office for appeal and petition procedures pertaining to rules and regulations of the College. General Grading Policies Plus / Minus Grading . College of Business faculty have the option to use plus / minus grading . Incomplete Grades. The only incomplete grade given in the College is IF An IF grade is assigned only when documented circumstances clearly beyond the student's control prevent completion of course requirements (exams , papers , etc.). Students must sign a contract outlining how they will make up the missing work with the instructor giving the IF Students may not register for the class a second time . All IF grades must be made up within the contract period (which may not exceed one year) , or the IF will automatically be changed to the grade ofF Also, IF grades must be completed and recorded at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor concerning the removal of incomplete grades. Grade Changes . Grades as reported by instructors are final. Grade changes will be considered only in cases of documented clerical errors or when a student is making up an incomplete grade (IF). All changes must be made within one year after the course has been taken , unless highly unusual circumstances can be documented and the change has been approved by the College . Normally , grade changes will not be considered for any circum stances after three years. Pass-Fail or No Credit (Audit). With the exception of internships and indepen dent studies, the College of Business does not permit election of pass-fail grading for any business course required for the degree . Only non-degree status students may petition to audit a business . class for a grade of NC (no credit).

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ACADEMIC PRf.>GRAMS A carefully designl curriculum to prepare students for uccess in business administration is av able for the student seeking either an und b rgraduate or graduate degree . offers courses leading to th Bachelor of Science (Business Ad inistration ), Master of Business A1.ministration (M. B .A.), and the Mas.ter of Science (M. S . ) degrees . The !ticular programs offered are: Areas of Em ph is (B.S. in Business Admi 1istration) Accounting Finance Human Resources fvtanagement Information International Business Management Marketing Graduate Prog;ams Master of Business A ministration (M.B.A.) Master of Science in 1 ccounting Master of Science in Master of Science in m1 ealth Administration Master of Science in !formation Systems Master of Science in I ternational Business Master of Science in anagement and Organization Master of Science in arketing A dual degree of the M .B.A. with any M.S. may also be selected, as well as d}.lal M.S. degrees in any two fields of business . The M . S . Finance/Economics ual degree is also available. Dual degre s of the M.B. A . and nursing, psychology , architecture , M .D., and urban planning an be pursued. Master of Business ministration (M.B.A.) for Execu ives Master of Science in ealth Administration fo Executives UNDERGRAD ATE DEGREE PR09RAMS Associate Dean: Ma;J,'ene A. Smith Program Director: E . Young Program Coordinat r: Nancy A. Reed The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) deg tee is intended to help the student achieve the following general objectives: 1 . An understanding of the activities that constitute a business enterprise and the principles underlying administration of those activities . 2 . The ability to think logically and ana lytically about the kind of complex problems encountered by management. 3. Facility in the arts of communication. 4. A comprehension of human relation ships involved in an organization . 5. Awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in adminis trative positions . 6 . Skill in the art of learning that will help the student continue self-education after leaving the campus . Undergraduate Admissions Telephone: 303-556-5800 Fax: 303-556-5904 ADMISSION OF FRESHMAN STUDENTS Freshman applicants must have com pleted the college preparatory curriculum in high school , graduated in the top 25% of their high school class, and achieved a score of at least 26 on the ACT or llOO on the SAT. See the General Information section of this catalog for further information on freshman admission . ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS Applicants who have completed work at other collegiate institutions should review the information on transfer students in the General Information section of this catalog. In addition to University policies , the College of Business and Administration evaluates course work to determine its appropriate ness for the degree of Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) . Students who have completed more than 24 semester hours of transferable course work are evaluated for admission on the basis of their college grade-point average (GPA) without regard to their high school performance. To be fully considered for admission to the College of Business and Adminis tration, a transfer student must have a minimum cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 2 . 0 on a 4.0 scale for all college course work attempted . Transfer appli cants seeking priority admission must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for all work applicable to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree, and a 2 . 0 GPA in business courses . Students Undergraduate Programs I 77 with less than an overall3.0 GPA will be considered if they have a 2 . 6 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work , a 2 . 0 GPA in business courses , and at least a 2 . 0 overall GPA in courses applying to the degree. Transfer applicants who do not meet either of the pri ority admission standards are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA earned in the last 24 hours , if the GPA in the last 24 hours is at least 2.6. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available. For information about specific policies on transfer of credit, consult an undergraduate business staff advisor . INTRA-UNIVERSITY TRANSFER Students who want to transfer to the College of Business and Administration from another college or school of the University of Colorado at Denver must formally apply to the College of Business . Transfer deadlines are August 1 for fall semester, December 1 for spring semester, and May 1 for the summer session . Students will be evaluated only on course work that applies to the business degree program . Generally , this will exclude course work of a technical or vocational nature and courses in activity PE and remedial subjects . Students who have completed at least 24 applicable semester hours will be evaluated on their college work; students with fewer than 24 transferable hours will be evaluated on the basis of both high school and college work . Students will be considered for admis sion on either their overall GPA i n applicable course work from CU and all previous institutions or on their last 24 hours. Applicants with less than a 2 . 0 GPA in business courses (from CU or other institutions) and overall CU GPA of less than 2 . 0 will be denied admission even though they meet the min i mum requirements for consideration . Students will receive priority c onsider ation for admission to the College of Business if they have an overall GPA of 3 . 0 or an overall GPA of 3.0 on their last 24 hours . All other applicants meeting the minimum requirements for admission as stated above will be pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA in the last 24 hours, if the GPA in the last 24 hours is at least 2 .6. Pooled applicants will be offered admission as space is available . To apply for an intra-university transfer , students must submit an Intra-University Transfer form and the CU-Denver transcripts to a business staff advisor . Transfer forms are available at CU-Denver

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78 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration Office of Admissions or the College of Business office; transcript request forms are available at the CU-Denver Records Office . The transcript must include the student's most recent semester at the University. Students with previous course work from other institutions are also required to submit a copy of their transfer credit evaluations (advanced standings) . FORMER STUDENTS A CU student from another campus , or a CU-Denver student who has not registered for three consecutive semesters (summers included), is considered a former student and must reapply for admis sion . Former CU-Denver business degree students will be automatically readmitted to the College for up to three years from the semester they last attended if they are in good standing (not on probation or suspension) in the College . Students who have not attended for more than three years, or who have completed the equivalent of 12 or more semester hours at another institution of higher education , must meet the admission and degree requirements applicable at the time they reapply. OLD WORK POLICY For students newly admitted to the College of Business and former business students readmitted to the College after an absence of three semesters , applicable credits up to five years old will be counted toward business degree requirements. Courses more than five years old will be evaluated individually for their current relevance to the degree program . Stu dents may be required to update their knowledge by taking additional courses when past courses are outdated ; in such cases, credit will be given for both courses. Generally, business courses more than ten years old will not apply toward degree credit . SECOND UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE Students may apply to the College of Business and Administration to earn a second undergraduate degree, provided the first undergraduate degree is in a field other than business. Persons who have already earned an undergraduate degree in business may not apply for a second undergraduate degree in business . Applications are available through the Office of Admissions. If a student has an academic record that justifies consideration for a graduate program, that student is encouraged to apply for one of the Graduate School of Business Administration master's degree programs. Call303-556-5900 for information or refer to the Graduate Business Programs section of the catalog . Students who are accepted for the second undergraduate degree will be required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a business degree. For example , if a student registered for a second degree has not had the required mathematics or general education courses , these must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses. Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken before a student begins to pursue the major field . MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Students in other undergraduate schools and colleges at CU-Denver wishing to take a minor in business administration must have a 3.0 GPA to enter as a business minor, and must have a 2.0 GPA at the time of graduation to receive a minor in business . Prerequisites to the business minor are: JSMG 2000, MATH 1070 or a higher level math course, QUAN 2010 or a statistics class approved by the College of Business , and ECON 2022. Required courses for a business minor are MGMT 1000, ACCT 2200, BLAW 3000 , MKTG 3000, FNCE 3100, and MGMT 3000. Twelve of these 18 hours: a) must be taken while in residence at CU-Denver, and b) after admission to the business minor program. If the student has already taken the equivalent of one or more of these courses , other higher level business courses may be substituted with College of Business approval. Up to six of the 18 required business courses may be taken at another institution . Transfer credit will be granted on the same basis that transfer credit is granted for courses taken by business majors. DOUBLE DEGREE PROGRAMS Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason , students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields. For additional information , contact an undergraduate business staff advisor at 303-556-5800 . Undergraduate Advising and Academic Planning ADMISSIONS ADVISING Persons not yet admitted to the College of Business can receive advising on course selection , admission requirements , and other matters from an undergraduate staff advisor . To make an appointment , call303-556-5800. ADMITTED STUDENTS Upon admission to the College, students execute a Degree Plan which identifies the courses required to graduate . This plan contains all the information needed to select courses and monitor progress toward completion of requirements for the degree , Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Business students are expected to assume responsibility for their own advising . This includes sched uling courses each term, being familiar with all the policies and procedures of the College , and otherwise managing their own academic careers. Staff advisors are available to answer questions about unusual situations. Career advising is available from business faculty and from the CU-Denver Career Center , 303-556-2250. Undergraduate Core Curriculum-University of Colorado at Denver The faculty of the College of Business Administration , College of Engineering and Applied Science , and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have established a core curriculum for undergraduate students. All undergraduate students who entered CU-Denver in Fall1990 or later are required to complete the undergraduate core curriculum independent of their college or major . Undergraduate students admitted prior to Fall1990 have a choice of either the new core curriculum or the requirements of their college in effect at the time of admission to the college. The undergraduate core curriculum for CU-Denver is outlined in the following table , and the CU-Denver core require ments for business students are specified in the section labeled Business Program Requirements . The undergraduate core curriculum seeks to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual compe tencies in mathematics and computation, writing, oral communication, information literacy , and critical thinking . It also

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requires all students t:o develop basic knowledge in the are of natural and physical sciences , sciences , social sciences , humapities, and arts. Furthermore , the core curriculum promotes an awarem f S of cultural and racial diversity . The majority of the core curriculum is to be completed during a studen t's freshman and sophomore years in c rder to provide the foundation for sp . cific training in a student's major dis ipline. CU-Deover Core for B.S. in loess Specific for the B.S. degree in Business are included in the catalog text . I Knowledge Areas a. Writing/Spee h 9 hours b. Mathematics 3 hours c. Natural and Physical Sciences 8 hours (Biology, Chemistry, Geology , andt.hysics) d. Behavioral S iences AND Social S iences 9hours (Psychology nd Economics) e . Humanities 6 hours (lll"O'Y Ute['"'" and Philosop y) f . Arts 3hours (Fine Arts , M sic, and Theatre) g. Cultural Dive sity 3hours Total Core 41 hours . . Graduation The Bachelor of S 9 ience (Business Administration) deg ee requires the following: Credits . A of 120 semester A minimal lev el of roficiency must be demonstrated in on foreign language or in regional expertis Students may satisfy the proficiency requ rement by taking courses as described below. Area of Emphasis J r Non-Business Minor. Completion of at least 9-15 semester hours of approved the area of empha sis or completion of I t least 15 semester hours in an approved non-business minor. Students who select a non-business minor must complete an additional three-hour business elective to earn the required number of hours in business. Residence . At least 30 semester hours of business courses (including the business area of emphasis) must be completed after a student' s admission to the College . The 30 hours for residence must include BLAW 4120 and MGMT 4500, and 24 hours in other 4000-level business courses (including area of emphasis courses if an area is selected ). Grade-Point Average Requirement . To graduate, a student must maintain a minimum cumulative scholastic grade point average of 2.0 for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business Administration) degree, 2 . 0 for all business courses , and 2 . 0 for courses in the student's area of emphasis or non-business minor . Undergraduate Honors . Upon recom mendation of the faculty, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Students must achieve an overall Univer sity of Colorado grade-point average of 3 . 3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to be considered for cum laude. Those who achieve an overall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3 . 5 and a grade-point average of 3. 7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado will be considered for magna cum laude . Those who achieve a 3. 7 overall grade-point average and a 3.85 GPA in all business courses will be considered for summa cum laude . Filing for Graduation. A senior audit is completed on all students who have comple ted 90 or more semester hours. Students must file an Undergraduate Candidacy form and Diploma Card , and request a graduation evaluation prior to registering for their final semester. Failure to do so will delay graduation. Also , students desiring to change their area of emphasis after filing for graduation must have the change approved by the graduation supervisor prior to registering for their final semester. Changes after that time will delay graduation. Business Program Requirements Satisfaction of all the following : Program Requirements Semester Hours College proficiencies or other courses ..................... 0-13 CU-Denver core ........................... 41 Undergraduate Programs I 79 Mathematics ........ .. ...................... 6 Business core . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 International studies ....................... 3 Cornerstone courses ..........•........... 6 Area of emphasis or non-business minor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Total Semester Hours Required . . . . . . . 120 Detailed descriptions of degree course plans which satisfy program require ments follow : I. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION REQUIRED SEMESTER HOURS PROFICIENCY: 0-13 The business student must demon strate either proficiency in a for eign language or in regional expertise . The requirement can be met in the following ways: A. Foreign Language The language proficiency can be met by: 1. Completion of the third year of high school course work in a single language . Students must complete three years of high school credit in one language . A C (2.0) or higher must be earned in the final semester of the third year high school course to show proficiency. 2. Completion of three semesters of college-level course work in a single foreign language. The third semester course (college level) in one language requires a grade of Cor better to complete the proficiency . The Pass/Fail option cannot be used when completing the requirement at CU-Denver . 3. Examination . Students may show their level of proficiency by taking the placement proficiency exam given by the Language Laboratory in CN 220. The languages tested are Frenct:t , German, and Spanish . For informa tion about other languages , students should consult with their business advisor , 303-556-5800. The number of times the student may attempt the examination is once per semester. B. Regional Expertise The regional expertise option is avail able as an alternative to Foreign Language Proficiency . This requires the student to develop expertise about a region of the world otHer than North America . The student must complete a minimum of 9 credit hours of cours . e work from an approved list that relates to history, arts, culture, politics , or the economy of a single defined region of the world outside North America . Courses used in the expertise area must meet the

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80 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration College of Business guidelines. These courses can be chosen from the list specified by the College of Business. Students should contact their business advisor to outline their program , 303-556-5800. Students who must meet all the proficiency requirements through course work may find it necessary to complete more than 120 semester hours in order to earn the B.S. in Business Administration . The proficiency requirement must be completed during the first three terms in attendance at CU-Denver . II. CU-DENVER BUSINESS CORE REQUIREMENTS: 41 SEMESTER HOURS A. Writing/Speech-9 semester hours. 1. ENGL 1020. Core Composition I 3 2. ENGL 2030. Core Composition II or ENGL 3170. Business Writing (preferred) ............................ 3 3. CMMU 2050 . Business and Professional Speaking (preferred) or CMMU 2101. Presentational Speaking ...... .. ...................... 3 B. Mathematics-3 semester hours. MATH 1070. Algebra for Social Sciences and Business .. ...... .................. 3 Note : The required sequence MATH 1070 and MATH 1080 may be satisfied by a 6-hour calculus sequence. C . Natural and Physical Sciences-8 semester hours. Two of the following courses ( a sequence in the same discipline or courses in two different disciplines): ANTH 1303 . Intro . to Biological Anthropology ......................... 4 BIOL 1550 . Basic Biology I ...... . ....... 4 BIOL 1560 . Basic Biology II ... ........... 4 CHEM 1470. Core Chemistry: Eat , Drink, Man , Woman ........... . .. 4 CHEM 1471. Core Chemistry : Risky Business ........................ 4 ENVS 1042. Intro . to Environmental Sciences ............................... 4 GEOL 1072. Physical Geology I ........ . 4 GEOL 1082. Physical Geology II ........ 4 PHYS 1000.lntro. to Physics ........... . 4 PHYS 1052. General Astronomy I ....... 4 D. Behavioral Sciences and Social Sciences-9 semester hours. PSY 1000. Introduction to Psychology I . .. .. . . .. .. .. .. . 3 or PSY 1005. Introduction to Psychology II .. . .. .. . . .......... 3 ECON 2012. Principles of Economics: Macroeconomics ..................... 3 ECON 2022. Principles of Economics: Microeconomics ...................... 3 E . Humanities-6 semester hours. Two courses from the following: ENGL 1601. Telling Tales : Narrative Art in Literature and Film ............ 3 ENGL 2600. Great Works in British and American Literature ........... .. 3 GER 1000. Germany and the Germans . 3 HIST 1381. Paths to the Present I ....... 3 HIST 1382. Getting Here : Paths to the Present II ................. . .. . .. 3 PHIL 1012. Introduction to Philosophy: Relationship of the Individual to the World .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. . .. 3 PHIL 1020. Introduction to Ethics and Society: The Person and the Community .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. . .... 3 RUSS 1000. Russia and the Russians: Life, Culture , and Arts ....... .. ...... . 3 RUSS 2000. Masterpieces of Russian Culture .................. ..... 3 F. Arts-3 semester hours. One course from the following : ARTS 1000. Arts in our Time . .. . .. .. . . .. 3 FA 100l.Introduction to Art ............ 3 PMUS 1001. Music Appreciation ....... 3 THTR 1001. Introduction to Theatre .. ............................ 3 G. Cultural Diversity-3 semester hours. One course from the list specified for the CU-Denver Core Curriculum (see General Information section of this catalog) . Ill. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS SPECIFIC GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS A. MATH 1080. Polynomial Calculus ...... 3 Note: The required sequence MATH 1070 and.MATH 1080 may be satisfied by a 6-hour calculus sequence. B. QUAN 2010. Business Statistics ......... 3 C.lSMG 2000 . Computer and Business Information Systems .................... 3 Note : ISMG 2000 is a cornerstone course and must be completed prior to starting the Business core course sequence. D . MGMT 3000. Managing Individuals and Teams . .. .. ........................... 3 Note: MGMT is a cornerstone course and should be completed early in the student's schedule. E. OTHER. MATH 1070, ECON 2012, ECON 2022, PSY 1000, ENGL 3170 (or ENGL 2030) , and CMMU 2050 (or CMMU 2101) may be taken as part of the CU-Denver Core. The College of Business strongly encourages students to take ENGL 3170 instead of ENGL 2030, and to take CMMU 2050 instead of CMMU 2101. However , if other courses in their respective areas are taken to satisfy CU-Denver core requirements , then these required courses must still be completed to meet graduation requirements. IV. BUSINESS CORE: 36 SEMESTER HOURS Students are required to complete the Business Core in the order listed below: ACCT 2200 . Financial Accounting and Financial Statement Analysis ...... 3 ACCT 2220 . Managerial Accounting and Professional Issues ............ .. . . . 3 BLAW 3000 . Legal, Ethical , and Social Environments of Business I ....... ...... 3 FNCE 3100. Principles of Finance I ........ 3 ISMG 3000. Management Information Systems .......... ......................... 3 MKTG 3000 . Principles of Marketing . . .. . 3 OPMG 3000 . Operations Management ... 3 MKTG 3050 . Applied Marketing Management ........................... .. 3 FNCE 3200 . Principles of Finance II . . ..... 3 MGMT 4350 . Conflict and Change in Organizations or MGMT 4370. Organization Design .. . .. . . 3 BLAW 4120. Legal and Ethical Environments of Business II ............ 3 MGMT 4500 . Business Policy and Strategic Management . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... 3 Note : Accounting majors are not required to take ISMG 3000, MGMT 4350 (or 4370), and MKTG 3050. V. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES: 3 SEMESTER HOURS International Business-One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses: FNCE 4370-3 . International Financial Management MGMT 4400-3. Introduction to International Business * MKTG 4200-3. International Marketing MKTG 4580-3 . International Transportation * Prerequisite : ECON 4410-3. International Trade. VI. AREA OF EMPHASIS OR NONBUSINESS MINOR: 9-15 SEMESTER HOURS Students may choose a general business degree with a nonbusiness minor, or a business degree with an area of emphasis in Accounting, Finance, Human Resources Management , Information Systems, International Business, Management, or Marketing. A . General Business with Non-Business Minor: General Business students must take an approved non-business minor of at least 15 semester hours. The courses must form an integrated sequence and

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be approved by th College of Business . Up to 6 semester h (mrs of the sequence may be in courses j..tsed to satisfy the general (CU-Denve core) requirements , but the number of Other Courses " (see below) will be correspondingly increased to meet he 120-hour total requirement forth degree. Students selecting a non-bu;ness minor must complete an additi nal three-hour business elective t earn the required number of hours This credit appears un er "Other Courses." Students intereste in completing a minor should cont ct the individual academic depart ents regarding requirements . B . Areas of Emphasis : Areas of Emphasis must consist of at east 15 semester hours, including business core courses. For most areas, this will mean 9 semester hours beyond two courses in the business For areas with special requireme fts or areas with only one course in the 9ore, it may mean 21 or more semesl r hours beyond the business core. An hours in excess of 9 are included in t e Other Courses category described below . VII. OTHER COURJES: 0-13 SEMESTER HOURS Students may chJse Other Courses freely , subject to the ollowing general rules: (1) Only (college level , as determined y the College of Business) courses II count toward the B . S . degree ; (2) All st dents receiving the B.S. degree in Businef.s must take at least 48 semester hours business (excluding the economics core