Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library

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Full Text
University of Colorado
2001-2002 Catalog


AURARIA LIBRARY
ACADEMIC CAL
1116701
753^30
itents
Registration See the Fall Schedule
of Courses
August 20 First day of classes
September 3 Labor Day holiday (campus closed)
November 22 Thanksgiving holiday (campus closed)
November 23 (campus open, no classes)
December 3-8 Preparation week
December 10-15 Finals week
December 15 End of semester
December 15 Commencement

Registration See the Spring Schedule of Courses
January 21 Martin Luther King Jr. holiday (campus open, no classes)
January 22 First day of classes
March 25-29 Spring break (campus open, no classes)
May 6-11 Preparation week
May 13-18 Finals week
May 18 End of semester
May 18 Commencement
Summer 2002
Registration May 27
See the Summer Schedule of Courses
Memorial Day holiday (campus closed)
May 28 First day of classes
July 4 Independence holiday
(campus closed)
July 29-August 3 Finals week August 3 End of term
Degree Programs.........................................................2
Administration..........................................................4
Our University, Our Campus..............................................5
Undergraduate Admissions................................................8
Graduate School........................................................15
Tuition, Fees and Financial Aid........................................20
Registration...........................................................29
Academic Policies and Regulations......................................34
University Policies....................................................37
Instructional Technologies and Services................................45
Student Services, Support and Organizations............................46
International Student Services.........................................52
Campus Resources.......................................................53
Extended Studies.......................................................55
Centers and Institutes.................................................56
College of Architecture and Planning...................................59
College of Arts & Media...............................................71
College of Business and Administration and
Graduate School of Business Administration........................81
School of Education...................................................103
College of Engineering and Applied Science............................123
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.................................141
Military Science......................................................205
Millennium College....................................................209
Graduate School of Public Affairs....................................211
Course Descriptions...................................................219
Faculty...............................................................377
Index................................................................391
1 The University reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time. Consult the Schedule of Courses for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs and registration dates and procedures.
Produced by:
CU-Denver Office of Marketing Communications Marshall L. Collins, Director Photos:
Cover photo by Ron Ruhoff, other photos by Shock Photography and from Marketing Communications files Cover design Stevinson Design


Auraria Campus


University of Colorado at Denver
Campus Box 167
P.O. Box 173364
Denver, CO 80217-3364
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Undergraduate and Graduate 2001-02 Catalog
University of Colorado at Denver
SPEER AT LARIMER P.O. BOX 173364
DENVER, COLORADO 80217-3364
Although this catalog was prepared using the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, degree offerings and degree titles, course offerings and course descriptions, and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice or obligation. The University claims no responsibility for errors that may have occurred during the typesetting, printing or production of this catalog. The University of Colorado at Denver is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. For current calendars, tuition rates, requirements, deadlines, etc., students should refer to the Schedule of Courses for the -semester in which they intend to enroll.
The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curricula. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester, and faculty teaching particular courses or programs may vary from time to time. The content of a course or program may be altered to meet particular class needs. Courses are listed by college or school.
Alternative format available upon request.
Call 303-556-4493 (voice);
303-556-6204 (TTY); 303-556-2678 (fax) E-mail: ombuds@carbon.cudenver.edu
University of Colorado Catalog (USPS 651-060)
3100 Marine Street, 584 UCB Boulder, Colorado 80309-0584 Volume 2001, No. 3, May/June Published 8 times a year:
January/February, March/April, May, May/June, August, 3 times in December.
Periodicals postage paid at Boulder, Colorado. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the University of Colorado at Denver Office of Admissions/Campus Box 167 P.O. Box 173364/Denver, Colorado 80217-3364


2 / Degree Programs
Picture yourself at an urban university campus near the
heart of downtown Denver, where history meets the future in your surroundings as well as your studies.
The city of Denver and its metropolitan region has become the center of communication and information technology in the Rocky Mountain West. New ventures open each week, from telecommunications to biotechnology to website development— companies that incorporate the latest technologies and research, and look for employees who can fulfill their needs.
. Business studies, applied science, engineering, mathematics, information technology, technical communication—all have potential for lucrative employment. Yet there also is a concurrent need for professionals with the knowledge of public affairs, social sciences, humanities, and the arts, so essential to both high-tech companies and their employees. Each burgeoning technology creates new demands for employees of the future in all areas of human knowledge.
The University of Colorado at Denver is dedicated to preparing university graduates who will be well qualified to attain positions in such companies, as well as in the profes-
DEGREE PROGRAM
Undergraduate Degrees
COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA Bachelor of Arts in Fine Arts (B.A.)
Art History Studio Arts
Bachelor of Arts in Theatre (B.A.)
Acting/Directing Design/Technical Integrated Studies Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)
Drawing
Film/Video Production Multimedia Studies Painting Photography Sculpture
Bachelor of Science in Music (B.S.)
Music Industry Studies Music Management Music Performance Music Technology
sions that foster their development. The strength and prestige of the University of Colorado degree is known worldwide, and graduates from CU-Denver have become leaders in corporations, institutions, governments, and organizations.
CU-Denver’s faculty excel in crafting their instruction around issues of contemporary life, as well as the traditional disciplines. They are alert to the challenges and opportunities of the urban environment and are responsive to the needs of students and the community. The combination of our talented faculty and highly motivated students creates an exciting educational environment, combining real-world experience with academic excellence.
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND
ADMINISTRATION
Business Administration (B.S.)
Areas of Emphasis Accounting Finance
Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business Management Marketing
Our non-residential campus features historic buildings from Denver’s pioneer beginnings, alongside “smart” classroom buildings incorporating 21st century multimedia. CU-Denver’s diverse student body has plenty of exciting, challenging and entertaining opportunities for personal and professional growth. There are more than 60 student organizations, ranging from the American Marketing Association to the Society of Women Engineers. Students also take part in classic film screenings, theater and musical performances, intramural sports, and fascinating lectures by nationally recognized speakers.
Downtown Denver offers ample amenities for students to round out their classroom experiences. Cultural opportunities abound, with a nationally recognized performing arts center, museums, and Colorado’s new aquarium only minutes away. City, state and federal government centers are just blocks from campus. Located at the hub of Colorado’s professional sports industry, the campus is within walking distance of the Pepsi Center, the new Broncos stadium, and Coors Field. CU-Denver is accessible from any part of the metropolitan Denver area, via expanded highways and a comprehensive light rail and city bus system.
CU-Denver provides you with challenges and opportunities that will shape your future and prepare you for a lifetime of learning.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE Bachelor of Science (B.S.)
Civil Engineering (B.S.)
Computer Science and Engineering (B. Electrical Engineering (B.S.) Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)
Bachelor of Science (B.S.)
Anthropology (B.A.)
Biology (B.S.)
Chemistry (B.S.)
Biochemistry Communication (B.A.)
Economics (B.A.)
English (B.A.)
English Writing (B.A.)
French (B.A.)


Degree Programs / 3
eography (B.A.)
Earth and Environmental Science eology (B.S.)
Environmental Science Education or Business erman (B.A.) istory (B.A.)
ividually Structured Major (B.A.) thematics (B.S.)
.ctuarial Science pplied Mathematics Computer Science Math Education Probability and Statistics Pure Mathematics lilosophy (B.A.) ysics (B.S.) pplied Physics edical Physics ure Physics litical Science (B.A.) ublic Policy and Administration Professional programs in: hild Health Associate Cental Hygiene dentistry w
dedicine, allelopathic and osteopathic ursing harmacy hysical Therapy A2 Teacher Licensure 'eterinarian hology (B.A., B.S.) ology (B.A.) ish (B.A.)
dergraduate Minors
Iducational Studies nvironmental Science Ithics
Ithnic Studies llm Studies Iteractive Media Iternational Affairs (eligious Studies . jssian
Fechnical and Professional Communication ►'omen’s Studies
[otalLearnin;
environment
Graduate Degrees
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING
Architecture (M.ARCH.)
Design and Planning (Ph.D.)
Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.)
Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.)
Urban Design (M.U.D.)
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Accounting (M.S.)
Business Administration (M.B.A.)
Executive Program Finance (M.S.)
Health Administration (M.S.)
Executive Program Information Systems (M.S.)
International Business (M.S.l.B.)
Management and Organization (M.S.) Marketing (M.S.)
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Licensure Program:
Teacher Licensure in Elementary Education (K-6th Grade) and Secondary Education (7th-12th Grade); Special Education (ages 5-21); Type D Certification Administrative Leadership and Policy Studies (M.A.) (Ed.S.)
Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education (M.A.)
Curriculum and Instruction (M.A.)
Early Childhood Education (M.A.)
Educational Leadership and Innovation (Ph.D.) Educational Psychology (M.A.)
Information and Learning Technologies (M.A.) School Psychology (Ed.S.)
Special Education (M.A.)
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE
Civil Engineering (M.S.) (Ph.D.)
Computer Science (M.S.)
Electrical Engineering (M.S.)
Engineering (M.Eng.)
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.)
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Anthropology (M.A.)
Applied Mathematics (M.S.) (Ph.D.)
Basic Science (M.B.S.)
Biology (M.A.)
Chemistry (M.S.)
Communication (M.A.)
Economics (M.A.)
English (M.A.)
Environmental Sciences (M.S.)
Health and Behavioral Science (Ph.D.)
History (M.A.)
Humanities (M.H.)
Political Science (M.A.)
Psychology (M.A.)
Social Science (M.S.S.)
Sociology (M.A.)
Technical Communication (M.S.)
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Criminal Justice (M.C.J.)
Public Administration (M.P.A.)
Public Affairs (Ph.D.)
Executive Program
Accreditation:
North Central Association of Colleges and
Secondary Schools
30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
Chicago, 1L 60602-2504
1-800-621-7440
Fax: 312-263-7462
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration, Colorado State Board of Education, Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board, National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, National Architectural Accrediting Board, Accreditation^ Board for Engineering and Technology, Nation-Association of Schools of Music, Planning Accreditation Board, National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration.
You can obtain information about these degrees by contacting us.
Mailing Address:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 P.O. Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364
Location:
1200 Larimer Street or 1250 14th Street Annex 303-556-2704
Web Address: www.cudenver.edu


The University of Colorado seal, adopted in 1908, depicts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed in laurel is placed beside him. The Greek inscription means “Let your light shine. ” According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design urns used because Greek civilization “stands as the criterion of culture.” The laurel symbolizes honor or success, the youth of the figure suggests the “morning of life," and the scroll represents written language.
Welcome to the University of Colorado at Denver. As
an urban university campus, CU-Denver creates and maintains strong linkages to the greater Denver region. This forms a challenging educational environment, and your decision to learn at Denver’s only public university shows a willingness to embrace the fast-paced and rewarding academic experience our faculty and staff provide.
CU-Denver is one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system. We offer bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs, and the prestige and distinction of the University of Colorado degree. We have achieved recognition nationally and internationally because of our outstanding academic programs, top-ranked faculty, and dedicated alumni. CU-Denver thrives as an intellectual environment that encourages commitment, curiosity and imagination.
We’re nestled near the Denver skyline, and we take advantage of this prime location to blend a cosmopolitan attitude into a dynamic Western setting. This urban perspective is an integral theme in our academic programming, orientation of our faculty, and identity of our student body.
We boast an enrollment that has grown to 11,000. Our students engage in more than 80 degree programs, from undergraduate, to masters, to doctorates. Each is designed to provide the foundation on which to build your intellectual, aesthetic, and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens. Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a complement to classroom study.
CU-Denver’s seven academic areas—Arts & Media, Business and Administration, Public Affairs, Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering and Applied Science, Education, and Architecture and Planning — provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the opportunities for gaining the knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your lives.
We at CU-Denver take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs. This is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the real-world research aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems. Our outreach has become international, as we encourage cultural and technical exchange through an array of programs that serve our students.
We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars and dedicated staff. We will challenge you, as you challenge us. I look forward to your graduation, where we will award you your University of Colorado diploma.
Georgia E. Lesh-Laurie Chancellor
University of Colorado at Denver
BOARD OF REGENTS
MAUREEN EDIGER, Denver, term expires 2002 SUSAN KIRK, Denver, term expires 2004 THOMAS J. LUCERO, JR., Johnstown, term expires 2004
JIM MARTIN, Boulder, term expires 2004 NORWOOD L. ROBB, Littleton, term expires 2002 JERRY G. RUTLEDGE, Colorado Springs, term expires 2006
GAIL SCHWARTZ, Aspen, term expires 2006 ROBERT SIEVERS, Boulder, term expires 2002 PETER STEINHAUER, Boulder, term expires 2006
Staff
MILAGROS CORTEZ. Secretary of the Board of Regents and of the University. B.A., M.S., State University of New York at Albany; M.A., Webster University.
UNIVERSITY-WIDE OFFICERS j
ELIZABETH HOFFMAN, President of the University. B.A., Smith College; M.A. University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology. |
JOHN W. BUSS, Vice President for Budget and j
Finance. B.S., M.P.A., University of Colorado. â„¢
JAY GERSHEN, Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs and Research. D.D.S., University of Maryland; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles.
CHARLES V. SWEET, Vice President and University Counsel. B.A., Duke University; J.D., University of Virginia School of Law.
CU-DENVER OFFICERS
GEORGIA E. LESH-LAURIE, Chancellor; Professor of Biology. B.S., Marietta College (Ohio); M.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph D., Case Western Reserve University.
JOHN A. BERNHARD, Vice Chancellor for
Administration and Finance. B.A., Stanford University; M.B.A., Columbia University, Graduate School of Business.
MARGARET B. COZZENS, Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs; Professor of Mathematics. B.A., University of Rochester; M.S., Ph.D., Rutgers University. (
FERNIE BACA, Associate Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative Activities; Associate Professor of Education. B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado.
MARK GELERNTER, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs; Professor of Architecture. B.Arch., Montana State 1
University; Ph.D., Bartlett School of Architecture and Planning, University College (London).
KENNETH HERMAN, Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.S., University of. Colorado.
DANNY E. MARTINEZ, Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs. B.A., M.A., University of Colorado.


Our University, Our Campus
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO SYSTEM
In 1876, the same year Colorado became the nation’s 38th state, the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder. Opening its doors on September 5,1877, the university began with 44 students, a president, and one instructor. Nearly a century later, in 1974, the University of Colorado had grown to four campuses in three Colorado cities-Denver, Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder.
With combined enrollments totaling more than 46,000 students, the University of Colorado ranks 12th among public universities and colleges in overall research expenditures and 6th among public universities in federally funded research. Awards for research within the university system total approximately $420 million, with funding provided by federal agencies, appropriations from the state of Colorado, and private foundations and donors.
Each of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system has its own chancellor and campus administration. The chancellors, in tum, report to the president of the CU System. The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approves the overall direction provided by the president of the system. The system president is both the chief academic and chief administrative officer of the university. The president has responsibility for the administration of the entire university under the policies described by the Board of Regents or under law.
^ The University of Colorado at Boulder serves more than 26,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. The Health Sciences •Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, dental, nursing, pharmacy, and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado springs serves more than 6,600 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs.
CU-Denver's 11,000 students enroll in â– undergraduate and graduate studies, as well as innovative professional programs.
Total Learning Environment
In 1996 the University of Colorado system began the development of the Total Learning Environment (TLE) initiative. The TLE initiative is CU’s blueprint for creating the university of the 21st century, a university directly involved with its many constituencies-including students, businesses, and communities-and their success.
CU recognizes that learning will be the new form of labor for the 21st century-that is, the key asset that will determine success in the classroom, in the workplace, and in the community. For that reason, the TLE is designed to add value to CU’s already outstanding faculty and excellent academic programs.
The TLE adds value to CU and everyone associated with the university by:
• breaking down barriers within the university’s culture, as well as those barriers that inhibit access to CU by individuals, businesses, other educational institutions, and communities;
• supporting even greater innovations in teaching and creative scholarship;
• using and developing new technologies to enhance learning; and
• positioning CU as a key player in personal, professional, community, and corporate success.
CU-Denver has long been known for its
innovative approach toward connecting its academic programs to the needs of the community. The Denver campus continues this tradition in support of the TLE initiative by developing exciting new ways to learn, paying attention to the needs of our non-traditional students, creating partnerships with the community, and utilizing state-of-the art technology to revitalize classrooms.
THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
Situated near the heart of downtown Denver, and looking west toward the majestic Rocky Mountain Front Range, the University of Colorado at Denver is the only public university in Colorado’s capital city. Its proximity to the commercial and governmental hub of Denver enables CU-Denver to offer its students the combined excellence of its faculty
and the opportunities afforded by this metropolitan environment.
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to becoming the nation’s premier urban university. In urban environments, universities have a particular responsibility to adapt their traditional roles toward the development, assessment, transmission, and preservation of knowledge to urban needs while maintaining the highest standards of education and scholarship.
By drawing upon the riches of its traditional store of learning and disciplined thought, the university serves as Denver’s intellectual center and as a community resource ready to respond to urban challenges and opportunities facing its local and global environment.
CU-Denver offers more than 80 degree programs, from bachelor’s to doctoral levels. There also are numerous professional development programs offerd by individual colleges and schools. Classes are offered during weekday and evening hours, on weekends, and at off-campus sites.
History
In 1912, the University of Colorado’s Department of Correspondence and Extension was established in Denver to meet the needs of the capital city’s burgeoning population. As the breadth of course offerings expanded, so did the demand for degree-granting status. From 1956 until 1976, the Denver Extension Center operated out of the former Denver Tramway Company Building at 14th and Arapahoe Streets. This building had housed the corporate offices and car barns of a huge streetcar system discontinued in 1950. Designated a landmark on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994, the Tramway Building was renovated into a hotel and restaurant.
The Denver Extension Center was renamed the University of Coiorado-Denver Center in 1965, and by 1969,
23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study were offered. In 1972, the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria Campus, CU-Denver’s current site. That same year the Denver Center was renamed the University of Colorado at Denver. In
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


VISION
AS the Denver campus of the University of Colorado system, CU-Denver interprets its mission as advancing the creation, dissemination, and application of knowledge in a total learning environment. Its boundaries are flexible and permeable, with knowledge flowing to and from the schools and colleges, the community, and the world. This view is global rather than provincial as CU-Denver seeks to link teaching, research, and service to the major issues of the 21st century.
VALUES
CU-Denver values:
❖ Mutual respect for all members of the university community—students, faculty, and staff;
❖ Excellence in all areas;
❖ Collaboration among faculty, students, staff, and the community in the learning process;
❖ The power of the community in teaching, learning, and scholarship;
❖ Creativity, innovation, and flexibility;
❖ Service to the public good;
❖ Personal growth and professional success; and
❖ Cultural diversity and enrichment.
GOALS
CU-Denver's general goals are to:
Build partnerships to strengthen core academic programs;
Build and focus resources on academic goals; and Foster academic innovations and excellence by defining a clear niche.
In addition to the general goals are goals specific to the next five years, designed to create a TOTAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT at CU-Denver. They are:
Attract a greater number of undergraduate and international students by strategically expanding and enhancing a quality curriculum to be more responsive to the learning needs of the students;
Enhance quality graduate and professional programs that contribute to solving problems of urban contemporary life; Provide accessible, convenient and affordable educational opportunities to students of all ages and backgrounds; Utilize technology effectively in the classroom and through expanded distance delivery of instruction, focusing on multiple learning modes and community resources; and Encourage faculty excellence in providing interdisciplinary, integrative, and community partnership approaches to teaching, research, and service.
CU-Denver has the following organizational abilities: Organizational entrepreneurship;
Innovations in support of learning;
Ability to create effective partnerships; and Ability to assess what it does.
CU-Denver has the ability to create the following organizational structures:
Streamlines process and policies to reduce barriers Fair and equitable compensation system;
Forums to create extramural alliances across colleges, the community, and the world; and An incubator to develop new interdisciplinary projects and programs.
The top two priorities for the first two years of this Academic Strategic Plan are the following:
1. Improve learning through better teaching and increased opportunities for students to engage in work-related research and professional experiences;
2. Increase enrollment and retention, especially in high demand areas.
1974 CU-Denver began granting degrees designated as the University of Colorado at Denver.
Between 1973 and 1976, the state built the Auraria Higher Education Center, shared by the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. In 1988, CU-Denver moved into its first custom-made, new home, the 257,000-square-foot North Classroom Building, located between Speer Boulevard and 12th Street, and Larimer and Lawrence Streets. Hoover Berg Desmond, a Denver architectural firm, designed this postmodern, red brick structure, featuring a distinctive glass block atrium and large outdoor clocks.
Role and Mission
In the Colorado Revised Statutes, the University of Colorado at Denver is defined as follows:
The Denver campus of the University of Colorado shall be a comprehensive baccalaureate liberal arts and sciences institution with high admission standards. The Denver campus shall provide selected professional programs and such graduate programs at the master’s and doctoral level as will serve the needs of the Denver metropolitan area, emphasizing those professional programs not offered by other institutions of higher education.
The fundamental purposes of CU-Denver are to:
1. Provide students with learning opportunities that will enhance the quality of
their lives, that will make them well-educated citizens, that will lead to rewarding careers, and that will provide Denver and Colorado with a workforce able to compete in the global economy.
2. Develop research, scholarship and creative work that will advance the base of knowledge in our disciplines and that will contribute to the vitality of our culture and/or economy.
3. Apply the university's skills and knowledge to real problems in the Denver metro area.
4. Build and maintain an institutional culture of plurality, collegiality, integration and customer service.
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


CU-Denver Campus Information / 7
Academic Structure
The Chancellor of CU-Denver represents the Denver campus and manages campus goal-setting, policy development, academic affairs, community relations, and budget and financial matters. The Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs is responsible for all academic programs, academic support programs, student enrollment services, the Graduate School, and sponsored programs. The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance is responsible for the campus budget and the offices of financial and business services, human resources, planning and institutional research, computing services, and voice communications.
Academic Programs
CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the residents of Denver and the region. With the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. CU-Denver comprises seven distinct academic units:
College of Architecture and Planning College of Arts & Media College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration School of Education College of Engineering and Applied Science
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Graduate School of Public Affairs The undergraduate colleges of arts & media, business, engineering, and liberal arts and sciences admit freshman and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, and engineering. A solid foundation of academic skills and general education is assured through a comprehensive core curriculum. Students may pursue graduate education through all of the campus’ colleges and schools. Pre-professional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health careers also are available. CU-Denver employs more than 460 regular instructional faculty.
The colleges and schools sections of i this catalog provide a listing of bachelor’s,
V master’s, and doctoral degree programs,
B policies on requirements for graduation,
â–  course requirements for various majors,
â–  course load policies, course descriptions,
â–  and similar information.
At CU-Denver, faculty explore and incorporate both novel and traditional methods of instruction. Telecommunications and other electronic media are an integral part of the way CU-Denver transcends geographic space, making instruction more stimulating and available, and connecting faculty, students, alumni and state, regional, national, and international leaders.
In keeping with CU's TLE initiative, CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education which leads to improved professional opportunity in the new century. Many programs emphasize practical, business-world applications, and specific computer-oriented academic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs.
About Our Students
CU-Denver students, both undergraduate and graduate, are well grounded in the professional and academic disciplines, making them ideal candidates for recruitment by organizations and advanced degree programs throughout the nation. They develop the leadership, reflection, ethics, and future-orientation to enable them to become preeminent in their fields and to provide active leadership for the revitalization of cities everywhere.
To instill these values in its students, the University of Colorado at Denver excels in building instructional experiences around problems of urban, contemporary life as well as traditional disciplines. Students and faculty are actively engaged in seeking solutions, through research and service, to these problems.
The diversity of our student body is a source of deep pride. Ethnic minority students comprise one-fifth of the student population. Classes include traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school, transfer students, older students who have delayed college entry, and professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appreciation of the world around them.
With students’ ages ranging between 17 and 75, the average undergraduate student age at CU-Denver is 25, while our graduate students average age 33. They represent a distinctive mix of ages and backgrounds, wearing anything from faded jeans to corporate suits. Around 80 percent of our students are employed and 52 percent attend part-time. Forty-three percent are enrolled in graduate-level
courses. All take advantage of the convenience of course offerings at times that meet their schedules, enjoying an enviable student-to-faculty ratio of 14:1.
Accreditation
The University of Colorado at Denver is institutionally accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. This organization can be contacted at:
30 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 2400 Chicago, IL 60602-2504 Phone: 1-800-621-7440 E-mail: info@ncacihe.org Web site: www.ncacihe.org Many professional organizations have also granted accreditation to CU-Denver colleges and schools, including: Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business American Chemical Society Colorado State Board of Education Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board
National Architectural Accrediting Board National Association of Schools of Music National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education National Planning Accreditation Board
Research and Other Creative Pursuits
CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledge through the research and creative efforts of its faculty. Research and creative activities not only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and professional practice. In addition, these activities constitute an important component of CU-Denver’s service to the community at large. Therefore, externally funded projects are a major priority at CU-Denver.
Research projects, training, and public service programs at CU-Denver encompass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study with a focus on issues that relate to city, state, national, and international issues. During 1999-00, CU-Denver faculty and staff received external grants
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8 / Our University, Our Campus
and contracts totaling $18.7 million for research, training, and public service programs. The benefits for the campus in the years ahead will be substantial. Externally funded activities assist in sustaining scholarly discourse, enable faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge, provide the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern to society, and enhance the education of students. Many students actively participate in projects overseen by faculty members.
As a key shaper of CU’s Total Learning Environment, CU-Denver conducts research and other creative activities that encompass both a multidisciplinary and applied nature. Research in every school and college at CU-Denver addresses questions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region. Its role within a thriving metropolitan area also serves as a base for exploring topics of national and international import. But not all research at CU-Denver yields solutions of immediate practical significance. Exploration of topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplines is carried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that knows no national boundaries. This exploration may yield insights that eventually open the way to practical applications in the next century.
Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary economic, political, educational, engineering, mathematical, scientific, and environmental needs. Financial support has been obtained for program and service development in the areas of computational mathematics, early childhood and special education, health administration, international affairs, internships and cooperative education, and employment and training institutes.
Other projects include statewide investigations of economic development, welfare reform, air quality, and transportation. Computer-related projects include artificial intelligence, multilevel algorithms, fast parallel processing, competitive graphs, and modeling. Research projects range from investigations of dinosaur tracksites to neurotoxicology and water transportation.
In addition, a great deal of research at the university is conducted without substantial external support. This research also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publications, presentations, exhibits, performances, and professional activities. Many members of the faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits bring recognition to the university, establish the credibility of its faculty, and enhance the value of the degrees it confers.
AURARIA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER
The University of Colorado at Denver is located on the Auraria Higher Education Center campus, also home to the Metropolitan State College of Denver and the Community College of Denver.
The three institutions share a library (operated by CU-Denver), administrative and classroom buildings equipped with cutting-edge technologies, and related facilities on the 127-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered among the Auraria educational institutions.
Because we share academic facilities, our students have the level of resources found within much larger public universities. The campus library blends
Undergraduate Admissions
CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program of study. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being:
1. Level of previous academic performance;
2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests; and
3. Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success. CU-Denver may deny admission to
new applicants or readmission to former
students whose credentials indicate an inability to assume obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the University.
After completing the application process, official notification of one’s admissions status as an undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office of Admissions. Letters from various schools and colleges indicating acceptance into a particular program are pending, subject to official notification of admission to the institution by the Admissions office.
its book-filled shelves with computer laboratories that help students link to resources they need for success in the classroom. Professional child care and development centers provide high-quality and reasonable on-campus day care for the preschool children of students. CU-Denver students may take physical education courses as well as participate in numerous recreation and intramural athletics programs at Auraria's state-of-the-art fitness facilities.
The campus bookstore, located in the historic Tivoli Student Union, boasts being the largest in the Rocky Mountain region. Housed in a renovated brewery originally built in the1860s, the Tivoli Student Union also provides restaurants, specialty shops, student government offices and many comfortable areas for studying.
In addition to the Tivoli Union, the Auraria campus contains other reminders of Denver’s past-historic Ninth Street Park, St. Cajetan’s Church/Performing Arts Center, St. Elizabeth’s Church, Emmanuel-Sherith Chapel/Synagogue/
Art Gallery, and Golda Meir House.
The historic is complemented by the new on the Auraria campus. All classroom buildings are being upgraded to include Internet access, network connections, acoustic and lighting enhancements, and a full range of multimedia equipment to facilitate high-tech studies. The innovative King Academic and Performing Arts Center features a 300-seat courtyard theater, a five-story concert hall (550 seats), a recital hall (200 seats), and performance support space. The building also houses 29 classrooms and seven enhanced classrooms and computer labs.
Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents or with unofficial documents will be permitted one term to submit the documents. If temporarily waived official documents are not received by the end of the initial term of attendance, registration for subsequent terms will be denied. If at any j time additional credentials are received which affect the student’s qualifications, the University reserves the right to change the admission decision.
Applicants who have not decided upon a major field of study will be considered
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


Undergraduate Admissions / 9
or admission to the College of Liberal \.rts and Sciences as undetermined najors. Students admitted as undeter-nined majors should declare a major as juickly as possible and no later than the ;nd of their sophomore year.
All questions and correspondence egarding admission to CU-Denver and equests for application forms should )e directed to:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 303-556-3287
admissions@cudenver.edu
\dmission Deadlines
The University may change document/ ;redential deadlines in accordance with inrollment demands. For the best scholarship and registration time considerations, ipplicants should apply and be admitted is early as possible. For an applicant to >e considered for a specific term, all iocuments required for admission must )e received in the Office of Admissions jy the deadline for that term. Applicants vho are unable to meet the deadline may ilect to be considered for a later term. Transfer students are reminded that they should allow sufficient time to have transcripts sent from institutions they have jreviously attended. International students are advised that it usually takes 50 days for credentials to reach the Dffice of Admissions from international ocations. Advance planning and early ipplication is necessary for the timely idmission of international students.
\pplication deadline for priority :onsideration
'•a// Spring Summer
luly 22 December 1 May 3
Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS)
Students entering the University of Colorado who graduated from high school n 1988 or later are required to meet the ollowing Minimum Academic Preparation standards: 4 years of English (with emphasis on composition), 3 years of :ollege preparatory mathematics 'excluding business and consumer nathematics), 3 years of natural science,
2 years of social science (including one /ear of U.S. or world history), 3 years of a single foreign language, and 1 year of the arts.
Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade-point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University. Two levels of deficiency will be recognized.
1. One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student meets other admission standards and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation from the University. Courses taken to make up a deficiency will count toward graduation, provided the CU-Denver college accepts those course credits toward graduation.
2. A student having more them one unit of deficiency may be admitted, provided that the student meets other standards of the University. The student must make up additional deficiencies before graduation. The student may satisfy the MAPS requirements by successful completion of:
1) Courses taken at CU;
2) Courses taken at other institutions of higher education;
3) Additional high school credits;
4) Credit-by-examination programs; or
5) Other requirements as approved by each CU-Denver college.
Admission Requirements for Freshmen
Freshman admission standards define the level of success and achievement necessary to be admitted to the University of Colorado and include factors that predict academic success, such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school course work, and the grade-point average. Both the
subjects the student has studied and how the student has performed will be factors that determine admission to the University.
New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Arts & Media, Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, or Liberal Arts and Sciences.
The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test.
Preference for admission is given to applicants who rank in the top 30% of their high school graduating class and present a composite score of 21 or higher on the American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 950 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).
Business applicants will receive priority consideration if they graduated in the top 25% of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. Applicants who do not meet the admission requirements for direct admission to the College of Business will be automatically considered for admission as pre-business majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Engineering applicants will receive priority consideration if they graduated in the top 20% of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT, with 28 on the mathematics section, or 1100 total on the SAT, with 600 on the mathematics section. Applicants who do not meet the admissions requirements for direct admission to the College of Engineering will be automatically considered for admission as a pre-engineering major in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
New freshmen seeking admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) and College of Arts & Media must meet College requirements for MAPS instituted by the University of Colorado. Applicants are required to satisfy 16 units of high school level courses in English, foreign language, mathematics, sciences, humanities, and social sciences. Students are eligible for admission to the Colleges with up to two units of deficiency in a foreign language and no more than one additional deficiency in the remaining areas. The Colleges will allow graduation credit toward the bachelor’s degree for courses satisfying MAPS deficiencies only if these courses are allowed for graduation credit under current College policy.
All music performance majors in the College of Arts & Media are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area. Two years of prior piano training are recommended. An audition is required. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the College of Arts & Media, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications.
Applicants for all departments who do not satisfy the requirements for priority consideration are reviewed on an individual basis.
COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA Years
English (literature, composition,
grammar), one year of speech/
debate strongly recommended 4
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10 / Our University, Our Campus
Mathematics (excluding business
and consumer mathematics).........3
Natural science......................3
Social science.......................2
Foreign language (all units must
be in a single language) .........3
Academic elective................... 1
Total ............................. 16
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS
AND ADMINISTRATION YeQ
English (one year of speech/debate and two years of composition are strongly
recommended) .....................4
Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one year
of geometry)......................4
Natural science (includes two years
of laboratory science) ...........3
Social science (including history)...2
Foreign language (all units must
be in a single language) .........3
Academic electives.................. 1
(additional courses in English, foreign language, mathematics, natural or social science, not to include business courses)
Total ............................. 17
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE
Years
English (literature, composition, grammar), one year of speech/
debate strongly recommended .......4
Mathematics distributed as follows:
Algebra ...........................2
Geometry...........................1
Trigonometry and
Analytical Geometry............... 1
Natural sciences......................3
(to include 1 unit physics and 1 unit chemistry; also to include 2 units of laboratory science)
Foreign language......................2
Social science........................2
Electives............................ 1
Total .............................. 16
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
English (literature, composition, grammar), one year of speech/
debate strongly recommended ......4
Mathematics (excluding business
and consumer mathematics).........3
Natural science.....................3
Social science......................2
Foreign language (all units must
be in a single language) .........3
Academic elective.................. 1
Total ............................ 16
HOW TO APPLY
1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor or from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application must be completed and sent to the Office of Admissions with a $40 (subject to change) non-refundable fee. For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term, the $40 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions is informed
of the intent to enroll for a later term.
3. Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Hand 4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to have a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate sent directly from the certifying agency to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions (see Admissions Requirements for Non-High School Graduates).
5. Students also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)
and request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4875). High school students may obtain ACT and SAT test dates and locations from their counselors. Students who took one of these tests while in high school may use the test scores reported on their official high school transcripts as an official test score report.
Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver as the recipient of the scores must notify the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. A Request for Additional Score Report may be requested from any of the offices listed below.
American College Testing Program (ACT)
P.O. Box 168
Iowa City, Iowa 52243
(319)337-1270
The College Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 6201
Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6201 (609) 771-7600
6. International students must submit proof of proficiency in the English language (see Requirements for International Students).
APPLICANTS NOT GRANTED ADMISSION
An applicant who is not granted admission as an entering freshman may wish to consider transferring to the University after successful study elsewhere. The Office of Admissions urges such students to complete at least one full semester (12-15 credit hours) of college-level course work at another college or university, giving special attention to courses that will provide sound academic preparation for future transfer to CU-Denver. These courses should include any Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS) not met in high school (see the MAPS requirements' Students who are not admissible will be encouraged to participate in a Redirec Program that CU-Denver has established with community colleges.
All credentials presented for admissior become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate all previously attended institutions will be denied admission to, or will be disenrolled from, the University.
New Student Orientation
An orientation program for new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, during the week prior to the first day of classes. Additional orientation sessions for new freshmen are offered in late spring and through the summer. The orientation program provides information to new students about activities and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process, parking, and securing ID cards is also provided. Academic advising sessions are held before registration for the term. Students should contact their schools and colleges for additional information on advising, as well as special orientation sessions that may be held for their programs. New freshmen should contact the Academic Advising Center (303-352-3522).
Admission Requirements for Non-High School Graduates
An individual who has not graduated but has passed the General Education
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


CU SUCCEED, AP, AND IB CREDIT EQUIVALENCY CHART (1,2)
CU-DenverCore CU-Succeed Advanced Placement Credits International Baccalaureate Credits © (H)
Requirements Silver/Gold Courses Cr (see note 3) Cr (see note 4) Cr Cr
Engiish/Communicatio ns ENGL 1020 3 English Language English A1 3 3
Proficiency ENGL 2030 3 & Composition 3 •
(6-9 hours) ENGL 2154 3 English Literature
CMMU2101 3 & Composition 3
Mathematics MATH 1070/1080 3 Calculus AB 4 Advanced Mathematics 4
Proficiency (3 hours) MATH 1110/1120 3 Calculus BC 8 Math Higher Level 8
MATH 1401/2411 4 Computer Science AB 4 Math Methods 4
MATH 2422/2423 4 Statistics 3 Math Studies 4
MATH 1350/2000 3 Computer Science 4 4
Natural & Physical ANTH1303 4 Biology 8 Biology 4 8
Sciences (8 hours) BIOL 1550/1560 4 Chemistry 8 Chemistry 4 8
CHEM1474 4 Physics B 4 Environmental Sys 4 8
ENVS1042 4 Physics C- Mechanics 4 Physics 4 8
GEOL1072/1082 4 Physics C- Electromag 4
PHYS1000/1052 4 Environmental Science 4
Behavioral Sciences ANTH 2102 3 Social Anthropology 3 6
(3-6 hours) CMMU1011 3
CMMU1021 3
PSY1000/1005 3 Psychology 3 Psychology 3 6
Social Sciences ECON 2012 3 Economics-Macro 3 Economics 3 6
(3-6 hours) ECON 2022 3 Economics-Micro 3
GEOG1102/2202 3 Geography 3 6
PSC1001 3 American Government 3
PSC1101 3 Gov't. & Politics: Amer. 3
SOC1001 3 Gov’t. & Politics: Comp. 3
SOC 2462 3
Humanities ENGL 1601 3 English Lit. & Comp. 3 English A1 3 3
(6 hours) ENGL 2600 3 English Lang. & Comp. 3 Philosophy 3 6
HIST 1381 3 Classics: Any Area 3
HIST 1382 3 History-U.S. or Europe 6 History-Any Area 3 6
PHIL 1012 3 French Literature 3
PHIL 1020 3 German Literature 3
Spanish Literature 3
Arts (3 hours) ARTS 1000 3 Art: History 3 Art/Design 3 3
FA 1001 3 Art: Studio 3
PMUS1001 3 Music theory 3 Music 3 3
THTR1001 3 Music Listening & Literature 3 Theatre Arts 3 3
Foreign Language FR/GER/SPAN1010 5 French Language 3 Language A2,B 3 6
(see note 5) FR/GER/SPAN1020 5 German Language 3 Language ab initio 3 6
FR/GER/SPAN 2110 3 Spanish Language 3 Classical Languages 3 6
NOTES: 1. Maximum of 30 semester hours of credit from combination of AP and IB sources.
2. Application of AP or IB credit toward the major is based on an evaluation by the major department.
3. Students shall receive credit for advanced placement if they achieve (a) an AP examination score of 4 or 5 or (b) an AP examination score of 3 AND
a grade of “A” in the second semester of the AP course.
4. Students shall receive credit for international baccalaureate if they achieve a minimum IB examination score of 4. Two levels of IB credit are
awarded standard (5) and higher (H).
5. Credit available in any classic or modem langauge. Students satisfying AP or IB foreign language credit requirements also receive foreign language
proficiency. Rev. Sept. 1999


12 / Our University, Our Campus
Development (GED) test may be considered for admission. The application for undergraduate admission must be accompanied by a $40 non-refundable application fee and an official transcript showing completed high school courses. An applicant must also submit GED scores and scores from either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT} Program.
The admission decision is based on the student’s potential for academic success at CU-Denver.
Admission Requirements for Transfer Students
Applicants are considered transfer students for admission purposes if they have completed college course work since graduating from high school. Applicants are not considered transfer students if the only college-level classes they have taken were before high school graduation.
Any applicant not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended will be refused admission. To meet the minimum transfer admission standards at CU-Denver, students must meet one of the following conditions:
1. Have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade-point average:
a. 2.5 GPA (on a 4.0 scale); or
b. 2.0 GPA if transferring from Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, University of Colorado
at Boulder, or University of Colorado at Colorado Springs.
2. Have earned 30 or more collegiate semester hours with a 2.0 GPA.
Transfer students are given priority
consideration for admission as follows:
1. College of Business and Administration. To be considered for transfer admission, students must have completed at least 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Priority consideration for admission will be granted to transfer applicants with a minimum cumulative overall GPA of 3.0 for all work applicable to a B.S. in Business Administration degree, including a minimum 2.0 GPA in business courses.
Students may also be admitted if they have a 3.0 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work, a 2.0 GPA in business courses, and at least a 2.0 overall cumulative GPA in courses applicable to a B.S. in Business Administration degree.
Transfer applicants who do not meet either of the priority admission standards are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA earned in the last 24 hours. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available, or are referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration, where they will be advised as pre-business majors.
Applicants with at least a 2.6 GPA in applicable course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with less than a 2.6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration, where they will be advised as pre-business majors.
2. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants to the College
of Engineering should have at least a 2.75 cumulative grade-point average for all math and science course work attempted, at least 24 hours of college course work including two semesters each of calculus and physics.
3. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average for all work attempted. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average.
4. College of Arts & Media. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average for all work attempted. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music major applicants (except those entering the Music Industry Studies program) also must pass an audition. Contact the Department of Performing Arts for audition information, 303-556-4652. Important Note: Applicants who do not meet the above grade-point average
or credit hour requirements will be considered for admission, but on an individual basis.
The primary factors used when considering students individually are:
1. Probability of success ift the academic program to which admission is desired;
2. The quality of prior academic work;
3. Age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and
4. Time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges.
HOW TO APPLY
1. The student should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions.
2. The application form must be completed and returned with the required $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee.
3. The student is required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Hand-carried or faxed copies are not official.
If a student is currently enrolled at another institution, an incomplete transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. (Transcripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accompanied by a certified literal English translation.)
Arts & Media and Liberal Arts applicants with fewer them 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of college work completed also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores.
Engineering and Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate all previously attended institutions will be denied admission to, or will be disenrolled from, the University.
TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT
Course work taken at any regionally-accredited institution of higher education will be considered for transfer to CU-Denver. Courses are considered for transfer on the basis of having similar content to those offered by CU-Denver. General education “core” courses are usually accepted. Developmental, remedial, vocational, technical, religious, doctrinal, orientation, independent study, special topics, and cooperative education
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


Undergraduate Admissions /13
jurses are not accepted. Only courses in hich a grade of C- or better was earned •e considered for transfer. Courses in hich a grade of Pass (P) was earned are Dnsidered for transfer only if a grade of iss at the sending institution is defined > a C-or better. Students wishing to rpeal transfer credit decisions should jntact their CU-Denver academic apartment.
After all official transcripts have been iceived and the student is admitted as a egree student, the Office of Admissions ill prepare a transfer credit report indi-iting which courses have been accepted i transfer by CU-Denver. A copy of this :port is mailed to the student as well as ) the student’s academic department at U-Denver. Upon receipt of this transfer 'edit report, students should contact leir academic department to meet ith an advisor, who will determine ow transferred credit applies to specific U-Denver degree requirements.
The Office of Admissions considers aurse work for transfer regardless of le age of the academic credit. Individual epartments, however, may have specific jidelines and policies about age of redit and make the final decision about pplication of credit toward a degree rogram. Students are expected to ave current working knowledge of rerequisite courses, regardless of when rerequisite courses were taken.
The College of Business and Adminis-ation generally limits its transfer of usiness course credits to those business ourses which are offered as lower-ivision courses at CU-Denver. Students ho have taken upper-division business ourses from an American Assembly of ollegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) ccredited College of Business may iquest review of these courses for ossible transfer by contacting the ollege of Business advising office.
11 courses taken in the business rea of emphasis must be completed t CU-Denver.
The College of Engineering and pplied Science, in general, requires lat engineering course transfer credit lust come from an Accreditation oard for Engineering and Technology \BET) accredited engineering program i be acceptable for degree purposes, ngineering technology courses are not onsidered equivalent to engineering ourses.
A maximum of 72 semester hours is cceptable in transfer to CU-Denver from ommunity colleges. Students who com-leted the Colorado Community College
Core Curriculum program, and whose transcripts contain the statement “core curriculum completed,” may transfer this core curriculum as a package and receive credit for the lower-division component of CU-Denver’s core curriculum. The College of Business and the College of Engineering have specific courses required of all students which may be taken as part of, or in addition to, the community college core curriculum.
A Comprehensive Guide to Student Transfer document containing Colorado community college advising plans and admission information is available from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. In addition, a CU-Denver admissions representative keeps regular office hours at metropolitan Denver area community colleges to assist students with planning a transfer program. Representatives also visit other Colorado community colleges. Call the CU-Denver Successful Transitions Coordinator at 303-556-4950 for additional information.
OTHER TRANSFER CREDIT
Credit granted through programs listed below appears on the CU-Denver transcript. The academic department determines how this credit applies to degree requirements.
See CU Succeed, AP, and IB Credit Equivalency Chart on preceding page.
Accelerated Baccalaureate Program (CAB)
The CAB (Curriculum for an Accelerated Baccalaureate) program is a unique partnership between CU-Denver and select high schools which enables students to accelerate their progress toward a college degree. Students from participating high schools can earn up to 30 hours of CU-Denver core curriculum course credits while in high school by: 1) taking regular college courses in the high school, taught by CU-Denver faculty or college-qualified high school faculty, through the CU Succeed program; 2) concurrently enrolling in designated courses on the CU-Denver campus; and/or 3) obtaining acceptable scores on the Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate (higher and subsidiary levels) examinations. Students can begin work on college courses leading to a baccalaureate degree from CU-Denver’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and College of Arts & Media beginning in their junior year of high school.
Advanced Placement Program
The Advanced Placement (AP) Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency, and are granted advanced standing in those areas. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also grants AP credit for scores of 3 plus a course grade of A- in corresponding subject. For more information, contact your high school counselor or the Office of Admissions at CU-Denver.
College-Level Examination Program
Incoming CU-Denver students may earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have demonstrated college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing service.
Students who are interested in how CLEP examination credit applies to the CU-Denver degree requirements should contact their academic advisor.
International Baccalaureate Diploma Program
Entering students may receive college credit from the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program available at select high schools. The International Baccalaureate (IB) program is a rigorous, pre-university course of study emphasizing liberal arts from an international perspective. In general, students may receive college credit for higher level and standard level course subjects in which a minimum examination score of 4 (out of 7) is achieved. Students with IB high school credit should contact the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Advising Office, NC 2024,303-556-2555, for advising on course-specific credit for IB course work.
Military Service and Schooling
To have credit for educational experience evaluated, applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application:
1. A copy of DD Form 214, and
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14 / Our University, Our Campus
2. DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Educational Experience During Military Service. USAF personnel may present two official transcripts from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of DD Form 295.
Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education, to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver.
Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions.
Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC)
Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements. The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used for credit only for non-business elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business, and then only if the ROTC program is completed.
Intra-University Transfer
CU-Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver Intra-University Transfer forms may be obtained from the Records Office. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Courses. Decisions on intrauniversity transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer.
Students in Extended Studies programs wishing to enroll in regular CU-Denver courses or degree programs should contact the Office of Admissions for a degree application.
Readmission Requirements for Former Students
CU-Denver students who have not registered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year or longer, and who have not
attended another institution since CU, are returning students and must formally apply for readmission. An additional application fee is required only if you are changing from undergraduate to graduate or non-degree to degree status. Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions.
Students who have attended another college or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as transfer students and meet the transfer student deadlines for receipt of documents. This requires payment of the $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee and submission of two official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended. Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P. O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Students who last attended another CU campus must formally apply for readmission. An application fee is not required unless you are going from undergraduate to graduate or from non-degree to degree status. Application forms are available from the Office of Admissions.
Admission for Non-Degree Students
Persons who have reached the age of twenty and who want to take University courses, but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree, may be admitted as non-degree students provided they are eligible to return to all collegiate institutions previously attended. Correspondence and questions regarding admission as a non-degree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions. Those seeking admission as non-degree students for the purpose of teacher licensure should contact the School of Education, 303-556-2717.
Each school/college limits the number of semester hours taken as a non-degree student that may be transferred to a degree program.
Students considering changing from non-degree to degree status should contact the school/college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the number of hours that may be taken as a non-degree student.
Courses taken for credit as a nondegree student can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional development.
Note: International students are not admitted as non-degree students, except for summer sessions. They must hold a valid student visa.
Students with a baccalaureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for course work as non-degree students. They must complet a non-degree application for admission. Students in a non-degree status who hav a previous degree pay graduate tuition rates.
To apply for admission as a non-degre< student, obtain a Non-degree Student Application form from the Office of Admi sions. Return the completed application by the deadline for the term desired. A $25 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee is required. No additional credentials are required. Applicants who seek teacher licensure must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials. Non-degree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space-available basis.
Continuation as a non-degree student with no prior undergraduate degree is contingent upon maintaining an overall grade-point average of 2.0 upon completion of 12 or more semester hours.
Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined on the application for degree admission form. They should contact their academic advisor regarding the process of transferring credit from non-degree to degree status.
Admission for Students Seeking a Second Undergraduate Degree
Students who already hold a bachelor’s degree may apply for admission to a program in which they can earn a second undergraduate degree. Applicants for a second undergraduate degree must meet CU-Denver admissions standards. These students may apply to the College of Arts & Media, College of Engineering and Applied Science or the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Persons who already hold an undergraduate degree in any discipline generally may not apply for a second undergraduate degree in business Rather, they should apply to a graduate M.B.A. or M.S. business program. Contact the Graduate School of Business at 303-556-5900. Education is a graduate program. Interested students should contact the School of Education office for information, 303-556-2717.
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IOW TO APPLY
. Obtain an application for undergraduate admission from the Office of Admissions.
. Complete the application and send it to the Office of Admissions with a $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee.
. Have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Hand Transcripts from the institution where le first undergraduate degree was earned lust have final grades posted for the emester that the student graduated and ave the official notation of the degree warded.
All credentials presented for admission ecome the property of the University f Colorado and must remain on file, tudents who do not declare all previ-usly attended institutions are subject a disciplinary action and/or dismissal. Students who knowingly falsify ranscripts or test scores will be 1enied admission to, or will be 'isenrolled from, the University.
Graduate School
lean: Mark Gelernter
)ffice: CU-Denver Building, Room 700
elephone: 303-556-6536
For specific information and degree equirements for graduate study, please efer to the department/program descrip-ions in the schools and colleges sections f this catalog.
nformation About he Graduate School
Quality graduate programs are ynonymous with tne University of 'olorado. Professors are actively involved i research or creative activity and, as eachers and scholars, continue to study nd absorb new data, ideas, and echniques, eventually bringing these
High School Concurrent Enrollment
High school juniors and seniors with demonstrated academic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for one term only. This approval may be renewed. Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program.
For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions, 303-556-2704.
Admission Requirements for International Students
The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to undergraduate and graduate school.
Undergraduate: Admission requirements for CU-Denver’s schools and colleges vary, and international students seeking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which they are applying.
In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 525 (or 197 on the computer-based test). Prospective students should request an International Student Application packet from the Office of Admissions. Requirements for each CU-Denver college and school can be found in this catalog.
For best processing, all information should be sent at least five months before the semester in which you wish
to enroll. For undergraduate application materials, please have materials sent by the following dates:
____________Desired______Final_______
Summer January 15 May 3
Fall March 15 July 22
Spring August 15 December 1
Graduate: International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an undergraduate bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 500 (or 173 on the computer-based test) before CU-Denver will process the application for admission. However, many departments require a TOEFL score higher than 500 when granting admission to a graduate program. Applications are available from the Office of Admissions. These applications should be received six months prior to the term for which the student is applying.
Note: Except for summer sessions, international students must be enrolled in a degree-seeking program.
The University provides an Intensive English Program for international students preparing to pass the TOEFL, through the American Language Center. See Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section for a complete description.
experiences to the classroom. Graduate students at CU-Denver gain not only from interactions with the graduate faculty, but also from other students. CU-Denver’s graduate students bring practical experience gained in the Denver community to the classroom, and are ready to relate the realities of practice to the models presented.
The CU-Denver Graduate School includes the following colleges and schools:
College of Architecture and Planning College of Arts & Media College of Engineering and Applied Science
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Graduate School of Business Administration
School of Education Graduate School of Public Affairs
Degrees Offered
The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through the Graduate School at CU-Denver:
Master of Arts (M.A.) in:
Anthropology
Biology
Communication
Economics
English
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
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Master of Arts (M.A. Education) in: Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education Curriculum and Instruction Early Childhood Education Educational Psychology Information and Learning Technologies Special Education
Master of Science (M.S.) in:
Accounting Applied Mathematics Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Sciences Finance
Information Systems Management and Organization Marketing
Mechanical Engineering Technical Communication
Master of Architecture (M.Arch.)
Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.)
Master of Science International Business
Master of Criminal Justice (M.C.J.)
Master of Engineering (M.Eng.)
Master of Science in Health Administration (M.S.)
Executive Option
Master of Humanities (M.H.)
Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.)
Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.)
Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) Executive Option
Master of Social Science (M.S.S.)
Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.)
Master of Urban Design (M.U.D.)
Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) Administration, Supervision, Curriculum Development School Psychology
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in: Applied Mathematics Civil Engineering Design and Planning Educational Leadership and Innovation Health and Behavioral Sciences Public Administration
Requirements for Admission
Please note that the following are minimum requirements. School and college regulations, if more stringent, take precedence over the minimum guidelines as set forth by the Graduate School.
REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS
Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, applicants for admission as regular degree students must:
1. Present a combination of the following: a cumulative undergraduate grade-point average (GPA) of 2.5 or better
on a scale where A is equal to 4.0, standardized examinations, prior professional experience, portfolios, or other indicators.
2. Meet the specific requirements as established by the program faculty.
PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS
Applicants who do not meet the requirements for admission as a regular degree student may be considered for admission to a master’s program as a provisional degree student upon the recommendation of the program faculty. Programs may admit students under a provisional agreement subject to the following requirements:
1. The term of the provisional period shall not exceed two years.
2. The student must complete each semester’s course work with a GPA of 3.0 or higher on all work taken (whether applied to the master’s degree or not).
3. The provisioned agreement should clearly state any additional program requirements.
Failure to meet the conditions of the provisional agreement will be cause for suspension.
APPLICATION PROCEDURES
Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the Office of Admissions concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications.
Once a student has decided to apply for a graduate program, a completed application must be submitted before the deadline date. Please contact the specific program of study for deadline dates.
An applicant for admission must present:
1. Parts I and II of the CU-Denver Graduat School Application Form, including the Tuition Classification form, which may be obtained from the departmental program coordinator.
2. Two official transcripts for all academi work in colleges and universities completed to date.
3. Three letters of reference. Please have nominators include applicant’s name and social security number in their letter of reference.
4. A nonrefundable application fee (checl or money order) of $50 (international student application fee is $60). No application will be processed until
this fee is paid.
5. Any other material required specificall; by the program faculty. This may include scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or other examination. Check with program coordinators in the departments
for additional information that may be required.
When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson or a student admissions committee of the department will decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and make that decision known to the Office of Admissions.
Check with the program to determine the deadline for submitting application and application fee.
Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award (e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship) should contact their department before the application deadline date for information, since deadlines are usually earlier for aid requests.
Readmission/Changing Programs
Former and current students who wish to be readmitted or change from one degree program to another must mee the requirements of the new degree program and provide all items required of students applying to the Graduate School at CU-Denver for the first time. These applicants, however, may petition the program to which they were initially admitted in order to secure a release of transcripts and letters of recommendation supplied at the time of their initial application.
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Transferring
Students transferring from another CU campus to CU-Denver must apply and be accepted to the new campus.
Doctoral Application
A student who has completed a master’s program at CU-Denver must resubmit Parts I and II of the graduate application for acceptance into the doctoral program.
Non-Degree Students
A student who wishes to take graduate courses, but is not interested in earning a specific advanced degree, may apply as a non-degree student. Contact the Office of Admissions at 303-556-2704 for further information. Non-degree students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted.
Non-degree students who later desire to pursue a graduate degree program at this university are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and supporting credentials to their department as soon as possible. Please note that the grade-point average (GPA) for courses taken as a non-degree student is calculated separately, and is not incorporated in the official graduate GPA.
A department may recommend the transfer of as many as nine credit hours toward the requirements of a master’s degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a non-degree student at the University of Colorado, or a combination.
A grade of B- or better must be earned. A ten-year time limit is in effect.
International Applicants
Prospective international students should contact the Office of Admissions for submission deadlines. The application packet should include:
$60 fee
TOEFL scores
Financial documentation
Graduate Record Examination scores
Official English translation of all school records
Other documents as noted in the previous section on application procedures
Acceptable TOEFL Scores: The TOEFL is the Test of English as a Foreign Language. If a student’s native language is not English, or the student has not attended a British or American university for at least one year and achieved satisfactory grades, then he/she must take the TOEFL. All programs within arts and sciences,
education, and doctoral programs require a minimum score of 500 for regular admission.
In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 500 before CU-Denver will process the application for admission. However, many departments require a TOEFL score higher than 500 when granting admission to a graduate program.
The University provides an Intensive English Program for international students preparing to pass the TOEFL, through the American Language Center. See Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section for a complete description.
Graduate Qualifying Examinations
At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) may be required of applicants for admission to the graduate program or for assistantships prior to determining student status.
Students who are applying for assistantships for the fall semester should take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the selection committee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by the department.
Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from the Assessment Center, 303-556-3677.
Students may also contact the Educational Testing Service at 609-771-7670; via the web at www.gre.org; or by writing to GRE-ETS, P.O. Box 6000, Princeton, NJ 08541-6000.
Other tests may be required by the school or college. Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain information on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) from the college or school requiring the test.
New Student Orientation
An orientation program for new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, during the week prior to the first day of classes. The orientation program provides information to new students about activities and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process, parking, and securing ID cards is also provided. Academic advising sessions are held
before registration for the term. Students should contact their schools and colleges for additional information on advising, as well as special orientation sessions that may be held for their programs.
Registration
On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to a graduate program are required to complete appropriate registration procedures.
Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted as graduate students. If unable to attend that semester, they must notify the Office of Admissions and Records, in addition to the department that has accepted them.
CHANGES IN REGISTRATION
A student who wishes to drop a course or take it for no credit should follow the drop/add standard procedure (see current Schedule of Courses'). After the tenth week of classes, graduate students may not drop, add, or change a course to no-credit status without presenting a letter to the dean of their school or college, stating the exceptional circumstances that justify the change. This letter, endorsed by the instructor of the course, must accompany the properly signed and completed drop/add card or no-credit option form.
WITHDRAWAL
Graduate students who desire to withdraw from the University must apply to the dean of their school or college for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official withdrawal will be marked as having failed the course. After the tenth week of the class, the student must have the Associate Dean’s signature to drop a course.
Tuition and Fees
For information, see Tuition and Fees section of this catalog.
Financial Aid for Graduate Study
COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT
The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of
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the state of Colorado. Grant awards are announced each semester for the following term. Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid, 303-556-2886.
COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise and to continuing students on the basis of academic success. Please contact the department for information about this fellowship.
GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS
Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructorship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate master’s degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. Please contact the department for further information.
RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS
Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Please contact the department for further information.
LOAN FUNDS
Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college work-study program should submit an application for financial aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March 1. This office also provides shortterm loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Application should be made directly to the Office of Financial Aid, 303-556-2886.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The University maintains an employment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work, either through conventional employment or through the college work-study program.
Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness, a policy which avoids favor
or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy.
Requirements for Advanced Degrees
QUALITY OF GRADUATE WORK
A student is expected to maintain at least an overall 3.0 average in all work attempted while enrolled in a graduate program.
For all graduate degrees, a grade below Cis unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward the minimum requirements for these degrees.
CREDIT BY TRANSFER
A limited amount of high-quality resident graduate work done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere within the time allowed may be accepted, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the school or college dean. The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University is nine semester hours or 30% of the number of credits required for the degree, whichever is higher for master’s degrees, and 18 hours for performance and Ph.D. degrees.
The school or college shall determine if graduate classes taken by an undergraduate can be transferred to a graduate program. They shall also determine if courses taken in the University of Colorado system are considered resident or transfer courses.
Courses taken as pass/fail or satisfactory/unsatisfactory will not be transferred. In addition, a grade of B-or above must be earned for a course to be transferred. Courses over 10 years old will not be transferred.
USE OF ENGLISH
A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of standard English in all oral and written work may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance.
Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports, examinations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate’s proficiency.
GRADUATE APPEALS
The Graduate Council shall review grievances related to procedural issues which cannot be resolved at the school or college level. Appeals of grades or other academic issues are conducted according to the procedures of the schools and colleges, with final resolution residing with the dean of the college/school.
Master's Degree
A student regularly admitted to a graduate program and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master’s degrees will be recommended for the degree only after certain requirements have been met.
The requirements stated below are minimum requirements; additional conditions may be set by the individual programs.
Students planning to graduate should ascertain current deadlines with their graduate program. It is the graduate student’s and the department’s responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notification of final examinations, etc.).
Departments or program committees may have deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student’s responsibility to ascertain and meet these requirements.
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
The minimum requirements of graduate work for a master’s degree may be fulfilled by completing a minimum of 30 semester credits, of which no more than nine may be thesis or independent study hours.
A course mark below C is unsatisfactory and will not count toward the minimum requirements for a master’s degree.
A student on probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation.
Program requirements may be more stringent than these minimum requirements, in which case program requirements supercede the requirements of the Graduate School.
LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS
Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and/or modern languages as each department requires. See specific departmental requirements.
GRADUATE CREDIT
Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above, and that are offered by professors who
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re members of the graduate faculty, bourses at the 4000 level may be counted ar graduate credit, but a minimum of 8 semester hours must be taken at the 000 level. No course below the 4000 level nay be counted for graduate credit, iepartmental approval must be obtained Dr the courses taken by a student to ount toward the degree plan.
Students are advised that not all ourses listed in this catalog are available t any one time. Some are given in alter-ate years, and this should be considered /hen developing degree plans.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY
A student who wishes to become a andidate for a master’s degree must file completed Application for Admission
0 Candidacy in the Graduate School or
1 the student’s graduate program, by he appropriate deadline for graduating hat semester.
The application must be signed by the tudent’s advisor and the program chair >r director, certifying that the student’s /ork is satisfactory and that the program mtlined in the application meets the equirements set for the student.
MASTER'S THESIS CREDIT
Every graduate student working toward master’s degree who expects to present thesis in partial fulfillment of the require-aents for the degree must register for hesis credit with a maximum of nine emester hours. The final grade will be /ithheld until the thesis is completed.
: the thesis is not completed at the nd of the term in which the student > so registered, an In Progress (IP) will >e reported.
HESIS REQUIREMENTS
A thesis may be of a research, exposi-Dry, critical, or creative type. Every hesis presented in partial fulfillment if the requirements for an advanced iegree must:
. Deal with a definite topic related to the major field.
. Be based upon independent study and investigation..
. Represent the equivalent of no more them nine semester hours of work.
. Receive the approval of the major department.
. Be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given.
. Comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in Directions for Preparing Master’s and Doctoral
Theses, which is obtainable from the
Graduate School office, and have
received thesis format approval.
All theses must be approved and signed by the thesis advisor and other committee members. Three copies of the final thesis must be submitted to the Graduate School by the specified deadline. The thesis binding fee must be paid by check when the thesis is submitted to the Graduate School. Approved theses are kept on file in the Auraria Library and in the student’s department.
TIMELIMIT
Master’s degree students have seven years from the date of the start of course work to complete all degree requirements.
Doctor of Philosophy
The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University. To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading, because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued.
Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work in this field. Furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge. The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules.
Studies leading to the Ph.D. degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments.
The criterion as to what constitutes an acceptable field of study shall be that the student’s work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University.
MINIMUM COURSE/DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS
A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph.D. degree.
Course Work Requirement. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses numbered 5000 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum.
Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the Ph.D., a student must complete a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than ten of these credit hours taken during any single semester.
A minimum of five dissertation hours must be registered for each fall and spring semester following successful completion of the colloquium or comprehensive examination. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above.
Course work and work on the dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program.
RESIDENCE
The student must be properly registered to earn residence credit. The minimal residence requirement shall be three semesters of scholarly work.
EXAMINATIONS
Each Ph.D. program will require at least comprehensive and final examinations. Notice of all examinations must be filed with the Dean of the Graduate School at least two weeks prior to administration.
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
The student must pass a comprehensive examination in the field of concentration and related fields. This examination may be oral, written, or both, and will test the student’s mastery of a broad field of knowledge, not merely the formal course work completed.
The examination shall be conducted by an examining board. The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to total a minimum of four members of the graduate faculty, one of whom is outside the primary department.
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CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DOCTORAL CANDIDATES
Following successful completion of the comprehensive examination, students must register continuously. These students will register for and be charged for a minimum of five hours of dissertation credit each fall and spring semester.
A maximum of 10 hours of dissertation credit may be registered for in any one semester. Continuous registration during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense (excluding summer). It is expected that the student and advisor will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classification identified above.
DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS
A dissertation based upon original investigation, showing mature scholarship, critical judgment, and familiarity with the tools and methods of research must be written upon a subject approved by the student’s major department. To be acceptable, this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student’s special field.
In mechanical features, all dissertations must comply with the specifications as
outlined in the Directions for Preparing Master’s and Doctoral Theses, which may be obtained from the Graduate School office. The final draft must be reviewed and approved for format by the Graduate School prior to final copies being made.
Three formally approved and signed, typewritten copies of the dissertation (including abstract), plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in the Graduate School office. The thesis binding fee and microfilm fee must be paid by check when the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School office.
The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International. The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department.
All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than four members who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction and are members of the graduate faculty.
All approved dissertations are kept on file in the Auraria Library. One copy is deposited in the reference section and the other in the archives section of the library. The third copy is sent to the student’s department.
When the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School office, the candidate must sign an agreement with University
Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform.
FINAL EXAMINATION/DEFENSE
After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dissertation and related topics will be conducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral, the oral portion being open to anyone. The examination will be conducted by & committee consist ing of at least four members of the graduate faculty, one of whom must be from outside the student’s department.
Notice of all examinations must be filec with the Dean of the Graduate School at least two weeks prior to administration.
TIME LIMIT
An eight-year maximum limit is in effect for doctoral studies.
Tuition, Fees and Financial Aid
TUITION AND FEES
All tuition and fee charges are established by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually by the Colorado General Assembly. The Regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee rates at any time. The following rates were for the 2000-2001 academic year, and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating costs. Rates are currently being revised for the 2001-2002 academic year. Please refer to the Schedule of Courses for the term in which you register for current tuition and fees information.
Payment of Tuition and Fees
All tuition and fees (except the application fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, according to guidelines in the current Schedule of Courses. Students may select one of the payment plans that are available at CU-Denver. Specific information on the
deferred payment plans is included in the Schedule of Courses published before each semester or summer session. Students who fail to pay tuition and fees in full or make payment arrangements by the published deadlines will be dropped from all classes.
Students who register in a non-degree status, and who later apply and are admitted to a degree status for that term, are responsible for the difference in tuition between the non-degree program and their applicable degree program and will be billed accordingly. Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even if they drop out of school. Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Courses. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, to be issued transcripts, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after
graduation. Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation. Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable to the bank will be assessed an additional service charge. Students may also pay tuition and fees by credit card.
Tuition Appeals
Exceptions to financial obligations incurred will be reviewed by the Tuition Appeals Committee. The Committee will only consider appeals when a student has been medically disabled, has experienced a death in the family, or has a change in employment hours or location beyond the student’s control. Each condition requires
a specific form. Contact the Student Retention Office to obtain proper Tuition Petition Forms. It is absolutely required that all conditions be documented.
Exceptions will not be considered when the student has failed to comply with published deadlines or where conditions were under control of the student.
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


Tuition, Fees and Financial Aid / 21
NOTE: Students will have one year to file a Tuition Petition beginning with the last day of the term for which the appeal is filed. Tuition Petition Forms are available in the CU-Denver Building, Suite 100, 1250 14th Street, 303-556-2324.
Required Fees
Auraria Bond Fee $58.00
Assessed to retire the construction bonds used for the Student Union, the Child Care Center, the Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER) facilities, and Tivoli facility on the Auraria Campus. Fee was approved by student referendum and is required of all students at CU-Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver.
Auraria Student RTD Bus
Pass Fee...................... $16.70
Provides for Denver local service in the Denver Metro area and Central Corridor Light Rail Service with no additional fare payment: a $.75 cash payment ($1.25 discount) on all Denver Metro Express Service; and a $1.75 cash payment ($1.25 discount) on all Denver Metro Regional Service. The Pass may be used seven days a week, and is valid between the end of one semester and the start of the next semester. The Pass is NOT valid for either the Access-A-Ride or Guaranteed Ride Home programs.
Cultural Events Fee.............. $1.00
Provides funding for CU-Denver’s College of Arts & Media to allow for reduced admission rates for CU-Denver students to attend theatrical and other cultural events.
Information Technology Fee $4.00
per credit hour
Provides funding for acquisition of computer systems to support student computing laboratories, including networks and networking infrastructure and facilities directly accessible by students. (Maximum charge $60.00)
Student Activity Fee $10.00
Provides funding for student activities, student government, student clubs and organizations and special events.
Student Health Center Fee $24.00
Provides funding for an accessible outpatient, direct-cajre service that is devoted to meeting Student health care needs. Health education and counseling are available, as well as treatment and referral for medical problems. The Student Health Center is tri-institutional and is administered by Metropolitan
State College of Denver. The payment of this fee does not cover the Health Insurance Plan at CU-Denver. Please call 303-556-6273 to receive information on Student Health Insurance.
Student Information
System (SIS) Fee ........... $10.00
Provides funding for continued improvement of the computer system used in supporting such functions as admission application processing, telephone registration and grade reporting, degree audit and graduation checkout, awarding of financial aid, payment of tuition and fees and production of transcripts.
Student Newspaper Fee $4.00
Provides funding for the CU-Denver student newspaper, The Denver Free Press.
Student Recreation Fee $5.00
Provides funding for the recreational facilities and programs in the Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER) Building, as well as the campus playing fields and club sport programs. Recreation is a tri-institutional program administered by Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Student Services Fee $30.00
Provides funds for programs and events offered through The Career Center, Center for Educational Opportunity Programs, Learning Assistance Center, Office of Legal Services, Office of Student Life, Student Advocacy Center, Office of Student Retention, and CU-Denver Counseling Center. The Office of Legal Services is administered by Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Matriculation Fee ............. $25.00
A one-time non-refundable fee required of all new students at the time of their first registration. This fee covers the costs of official transcripts.
Candidate for Degree Fee
Equal to one credit hour of resident tuition, is required for all graduate students who are not registered during the term that they are taking comprehensive examinations. Students must register as “candidate for degree” and pay for one hour of corresponding resident tuition plus the SIS fee and the Information Technology fee for one term only.
COURSE FEES
Online Courses
A $100.00 course fee is assessed for each online course taken.
A $50.00 course fee is assessed for each online lab taken.
College of Architecture and Planning
All majors and non-majors registered in Studio, Computer, Photography and Furniture Design courses are required to pay the following facilities fees.
Architecture
ARCH 5110 Intro: Architectural
Design Studio 1 ............... 40.00
ARCH 5120 Intro: Architectural
Design Studio II............... 40.00
ARCH 5130 Architectural Design
Studio III .................... 40.00
ARCH 5140 Architecture Design
Studio IV...................... 40.00
ARCH 6150 Architecture Design
Studio V....................... 40.00
ARCH 6160 Design Photography .... 45.00
ARCH 6162 Furniture Design ....... 45.00
ARCH 6190 ST in Design Studies
(photography) ................. 45.00
ARCH 6410 Introduction to
Computer Graphics.............. 30.00
ARCH 6411 Computer Applications
in Architecture................ 30.00
ARCH 6490 ST in Professional
Studies (Computers) ........... 30.00
ARCH 6490 ST in Professional Studies (Furniture) ........... 45.00
Environmental Design
All ENVD majors are required to pay: a $60 Computer Technology fee. a $40 instructional Media Center fee. a $50 instructional Model Shop fee.
ENVD 1002 Environmental Media .. 45.00 ENVD 3022 Technical Photography. 45.00 ENVD 4122 Advanced Technical
Photography ................. 45.00
Landscape Architecture
L A 5500 Intro to Landscape
Arch Design Studio I ........ 40.00
L A 5501 Intro to Landscape Arch Design Studio 11 40.00
L A 6600 Landscape Arch
Design Studio 111............ 40.00
L A 6601 Landscape Arch
Design Studio IV............. 40.00
L A 6641 Computer Applctns
in Landscape Architecture.... 30.00
L A 6700 Advanced Landscape
Arch Design Studio V ........ 40.00
LA 6701 Advanced Landscape Arch Design Studio VI ....... 40.00
Urban Design
U D 6600 Transformation/
Decomposition Studio......... 40.00
UD 6601 Composition Studio .... 40.00
U D 6602 City of Exploration & Experimentation Studio 40.00
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


22 / Our University, Our Campus
Urban and Regional Planning
URP 6612 Geographic Information
Systems for Planners ......... 30.00
URP 6630 Planning Studio I ..... 40.00
URP 6631 Planning Studio II 40.00
College of Arts & Media Fine Arts
FA 1001 Introduction to Art .... 15.00
FA 1100 Basic Drawing .......... 20.00
F A1150 Photography Foundations 65.00 F A 1400 Two Dimensional Design . 15.00 F A1500 Three Dimensional Design. 65.00
F A 2000 Drawing II............. 20.00
F A 2155 Photo Foundations II:
Adv Black & White ............ 65.00
F A 2200 Basic Painting......... 20.00
FA 2210 Painting II................ 20.00
F A 2500 Metal Sculpture & Casting 65.00 F A 251Q Wood Sculpture & Casting 65.00
F A 2600 Art History I Survey... 15.00
FA2610 Art History II Survey ... 15.00
F A 3000 Intermediate Drawing... 20.00
F A 3020 Intermediate Life Drawing .. 20.00
FA 3110 Imaging & Identity......... 65.00
F A 3155 Intermediate
Photography I: Digital .......... 65.00
F A 3160 Intermediate
Photography II: Color............ 65.00
F A 3165 Concepts & Processes
in Photography................... 65.00
F A 3180 Photo: Modern Era/
Criticism & Theory .............. 15.00
F A 3200 Intermediate Painting.. 20.00
FA 3210 Intermediate Painting... 20.00
F A 3220 Intermediate Watercolor .. 20.00
FA3340Topics ...................... 20.00
F A 3500 Intermediate Sculpture ... 65.00
FA 3510 Intermediate Sculpture .... 65.00
F A 3630 History of Photography.... 15.00 F A 3645 Topics: Enhancing Art
Experience....................... 15.00
F A 4000 Advanced Drawing....... 20.00
FA 4020 Advanced Life Drawing ... 20.00
FA 4140 Topics in Photography... 65.00
F A 4195 Advanced Photography I . 65.00
F A 4196 Advanced Photography II . 65.00
F A 4200 Advanced Painting ........ 20.00
FA4210 Advanced Painting .......... 20.00
F A 4220 Advanced Watercolor.... 20.00
FA4340Topics ...................... 20.00
F A 4500 Advanced Sculpture
Studio .......................... 65.00
F A 4510 Advanced Sculpture
Studio .......................... 65.00
F A 4524/5524 Topics in
Art History...................... 15.00
F A 4650/5650 Nineteenth
Century Art...................... 15.00
F A 4660/5660 Twentieth
Century Art...................... 15.00
F A 4690 Renaissance Art .......... 15.00
FA 4730 Arts of Japan.............. 15.00
FA4790/5790 Methods in
Art History................... 15.00
F A 4800 Art Seminar ........... 20.00
F A 5000 Graduate Drawing....... 20.00
F A 5020 Graduate Life Drawing.. 20.00
FA 5190 Graduate Photography .... 65.00
F A 5200 Graduate Painting ..... 20.00
FA 5210 Graduate Painting....... 20.00
F A 5220 Graduate Watercolor.... 20.00
F A 5500 Graduate Sculpture .... 65.00
FA 5510 Graduate Sculpture ..... 65.00
Film
FILM 3100 History of Film
Production & Technology I .... 30.00
FILM 3150 History of Film
Production & Technology II.... 30.00
FILM 3111 Shooting Action
& Physical Effects............ 50.00
FILM 3207 Acting/Directing
Workshop...................... 50.00
FILM 3222 The Film/Video
Business ..................... 30.00
FILM 3270 Film/Video
Production III................ 50.00
FILM 3275 Film/Video Post
Production III................ 50.00
FILM 3300 Advanced Lighting
for Film & Video.............. 50.00
FILM 3350 Editing Aesthetics.... 50.00
FILM 3400 Intermediate Screenwriting for Feature Film .. 30.00 FILM 4209 Advanced Production
Management ................... 30.00
FILM 4270 Film/Video
Production IV: Career Tracks.. 50.00
FILM 4280 Film/Video Pst Prdctn IV:
Avd Video Cmpsr .............. 50.00
FILM 4400 Advanced Screenwriting for Feature Film . . 30.00
Multimedia
MUME 1100 Basics of Multimedia ... 20.00 MUME1110 Basics of Multimedia
for Non-Majors ............... 20.00
MUME 1200 Multimedia Studio..... 50.00
MUME 1500 Trends in Multimedia .. 20.00 MUME 1510 Trends in Multimedia . 20.00 MUME 1520 Trends in Multimedia . 20.00 MUME 2410 Mltmd Digital Image
Manipultn/Typgrphy ........... 50.00
MUME 3410 Multimedia Authoring/
Interface Design.............. 50.00
MUME 3420 Mltmd Project
3-Digital Video & Audio....... 50.00
MUME 3430 Mltmd Proj 4-Motion Graphics/3d Creatn.............. 50.00
MUME 3500 Trends in Multimedia .. 20.00 MUME 3510 Trends in Multimedia . 20.00 MUME 3520 Trends in Multimedia . 20.00 MUME 3530 Trends in Multimedia 20.00
MUME 4410 Multimedia Career
Project 1 .................... 50.00
MUME 4420 Multimedia Career Project 2 ...................... 50.00
MUME 4505/5505 Web Mltmd
Dsgn-Educ Instrctn ........... 50.00
MUME 4510/5510 Adv Web Mltmd
Dsgn-Educ Instrctn ........... 50.00
MUME 4700/5700 Topics in
Multimedia ................... 50.00
MUME 4840/5840 Independent
Study......................... 50.00
MUME 4999 Senior Portfolio Preparation................. 50.00
Music
Facilities Fee for all music majors ... 30.00
Course fees are assessed to all students for the following courses, not to exceed a total of $90.
MUS 1180 Synthesis Proseminar .... 30.00 MUS 2180 Intro to Scoring
& Arranging I ................ 30.00
MUS 2190 Intro to Scoring
& Arranging II................ 30.00
MUS 2300 Intro to Songwriting .. 30.00
MUS 2470 Music on the Personal
Computer-Beginning ........... 30.00
MUS 2500 Integrated Performing
Arts:Hist& Prdctn ............ 30.00
MUS 2560 Music Technology II.... 30.00
MUS 3030 Applied Scoring
& Arranging I ................ 30.00
MUS 3200 Elementary
Composition................... 30.00
MUS 3540 Recording Studio
Maintenance & Calibration .... 30.00
MUS 3670 Junior Project:
Music Technology ............. 30.00
MUS 3710 Music and the Media ... 10.00
MUS 3730 Music Industry
Financial Management ......... 10.00
MUS 3740 Business of Independent
Record Production ............ 10.00
MUS 3750 Publicity & Promotion
in the Music Business ........ 10.00
MUS 3770 Independent Record
Production.................... 10.00
MUS 3790 Video Production
in the Arts: Music ........... 30.00
MUS 3820 Digital Music Techniques ..30.00 MUS 4030 Applied Scoring
& Arranging II................ 30.00
MUS 4200 Advanced Composition .. 30.00 MUS 4400/5400 Tpcs in Electronic
& Computer Music.............. 30.00
MUS 4500/5550 Topics in Music
Technology.................... 30.00
MUS 4505 Audio Sweetening ...... 30.00
MUS 4550/5550 Music Engineering I 30.00 MUS 4570/5570 Music Engineering II 30.00 MUS 4580/5580 Music Engineering Seminar ........................ 30.00
MUS 4720/5720 Music Management 10.00 MUS 4730/5730 Music Production .. 10.00 MUS 4740 Music Business Analysis . 10.00
Performance Music
PMUS 1023 Piano Class I, II, III, IV .... 30.00
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


Tuition, Fees and Financial Aid / 23
PMUS1033 Piano Class:
Piano Majors .................. 30.00
Theatre
THTR1001 Intro to Theatre......... 7.00
THTR 1111 Freshman Seminar ....... 7.00
THTR 2520 Voice and Diction....... 7.00
THTR 2530 Acting I................ 7.00
THTR 2531 Acting for Non-Theatre
Majors......................... 7.00
THTR 2610 Survey of Dramatic Lit ... 7.00 THTR 2710 Theatrical Design
Aesthetics & Production 1 ..... 7.00
THTR 2712 Theatrical Design
Aesthetics & Production II .... 7.00
THTR 2720 Lighting Design ........ 7.00
THTR 3510 Oral Interpretation
of Poetry ..................... 7.00
THTR 3520 Stage Accents
& Movement .................... 7.00
THTR 3530 Acting II............... 7.00
THTR 3531 Theatre of Social
Responsibility ................ 7.00
THTR 3540 Directing I ............ 7.00
THTR 3560 Topics in Theatre....... 7.00
THTR 3610 History of Theatre...... 7.00
THTR 3611 Drama of Diversity...... 7.00
THTR 3720 Advanced Lighting
Design ........................ 7.00
THTR 4530 Acting III ............. 7.00
THTR 4540 Directing II............ 7.00
THTR 4550/5550 Playwriting:
Short Form..................... 7.00
THTR 4560 Topics: Major Credit 7.00
THTR 4570/5570 Creative Drama..... 7.00
THTR 4610/5610 Drama Theory
& Criticism.................... 7.00
THTR 4760 Topics in Design ....... 7.00
School of Education
School Psychology
SPSY 6150 Psychoeducational
Assessment! ................. 40.00
"SPSY 6160 Psychoeducational
Assessment II................ 40.00
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Anthropology
laboratory courses in anthropology require a student fee to cover expendable
â– terns.
ANTH 1302 Introduction to
Archaeology................... 25.00
ANTH 1303 Biological Anthropology 25.00 ANTH 4101 Applied Statistics
using SAS and SPSS I.......... 10.00
ANTH 4102 Applied Statistics *
using SAS and SPSS II ........ 10.00
ANTH 4390 Research Methods
in Archaeology . . . ;........ 30.00
ANTH 4910/5910 Field Experience
in Archaeology................ 40.00
~ANTH 6317 Archaeology Research
Design & Analysis............. 35.00
Biology
Laboratory courses in biology require a student fee to cover expendable items
including dissection specimens.
BIOL 1550 Basic Biology I ...... 20.00
BIOL 1560 Basic Biology II ..... 20.00
BIOL 2071 General Biology Lab I .... 10.00 BIOL 2081 General Biology Lab II 20.00
BIOL 3225 Human Physiology...... 30.00
BIOL 3244 Human Anatomy ........ 50.00
BIOL 3654 Microbiology ......... 35.00
BIOL 4838/5838 Laboratory in Genetics..................... 35.00
Chemistry
Each laboratory course in chemistry requires a student fee to cover expendable items................. $20.00
Communication
CMMU 2800 Technology for
Communication Majors ......... 10.00
CMMU 4011 Research Methods:
Quantitative.................. 10.00
CMMU 4212/5212 Software
Documentation ................ 30.00
CMMU 4300/5300 Multimedia
Authoring..................... 50.00
CMMU 4290/5290 Web Design....... 30.00
Economics
ECON 3801 Introduction to
Mathematical Economics ........ 5.00
ECON 3811 Statistics with
Computer Applications ........ 10.00
ECON 4150 Economic Forecasting .. 10.00 ECON 4811 Introduction to
Econometrics ................. 10.00
ECON 4101 Applied Statistics
using SAS and SPSS I.......... 10.00
ECON 4102 Applied Statistics
using SAS and SPSS II ........ 10.00
ECON 5150 Economic Forecasting .. 15.00
ECON 5813 Econometrics I ....... 15.00
ECON 5823 Econometrics II....... 15.00
ECON 6073 Research Seminar...... 15.00
ECON 6810 Econometrics and Forecasting................. 15.00
English
ENGL 2030 Core Composition II .. 20.00
Environmental Sciences
ENVS Introduction to Environmental Science........... 25.00
Geography
GEOG1202 Introduction to
Physical Geography ........... 20.00
GEOG 3062 Map Reading
& Elementary Surveying ....... 20.00
GEOG 3080 Intro to Cartography
& Computer Mapping............ 30.00
GEOG 3232 Weather and Climate ... 15.00 GEOG 4050 Environmental Analysis 20.00 GEOG 4060/5060 Remote Sensing I:
Intro to Environmental
Remote Sensing................ 30.00
GEOG 4080/5080 Geographic
Information Systems .......... 30.00
GEOG 4240 Principles of Geomorphology................. 20.00
Geology
GEOL 1072 Physical Geology:
Surface Processes ............ 25.00
GEOL 1082 Physical Geology:
Internal Processes ........... 25.00
GEOL 3011 Mineralogy............. 20.00
GEOL 3121 Structural Geology..... 20.00
GEOL 3231 Introductory Petrology . 20.00 GEOL 3411 Introductory
Paleontology ................. 20.00
GEOL 3421 Sedimentation
and Stratigraphy.............. 20.00
GEOL 4111 Field Geology ......... 25.00
Mathematics
MATH 1350 Computers in the
Arts and Sciences............. 25.00
MATH 1999 Math Resource Lab ..... 25.00
MATH 4101 Applied Statistics
using SAS and SPSS I.......... 10.00
MATH 4102 Applied Statistics using SAS and SPSS II ........ 10.00
Modern Languages
All Modern Languages courses Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Nepalese, Russian, and Spanish, except 2939/3939 ... 10.00
Physics
Each laboratory course in physics requires a student fee to cover
expendable items.............. $24.00
Political Science
P SC 3011 Research Methods........ 10.00
P SC 4101 Applied Statistics
using SAS and SPSS I........... 10.00
P SC 4102 Applied Statistics using SAS and SPSS II 10.00
Psychology
PSY 2090 Introduction to Statistics . 10.00 PSY 2130 Research Methods
in Experimental Psych.......... 10.00
PSY 2140 Lab in Experimental
Psychology..................... 10.00
PSY 4101 Applied Statistics
using SAS and SPSS I........... 10.00
PSY 4102 Applied Statistics
using SAS and SPSS II ......... 10.00
PSY 5713 Advanced Statistical Methods ....................... 15.00
Sociology
SOC 4101 Applied Statistics
using SAS and SPSS I........... 10.00
SOC 4102 Applied Statistics using SAS and SPSS II ......... 10.00
Technical Communication
TC 4210/5210 Software
Documentation ................. 30.00
TC 4290/5290 Web Design .......... 30.00
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


CU-DENVER TUITION AND FEES FOR SPRING 2001
Tuition is based on student status. It is not based on the level of your courses. This does not include tuition for online courses
or Weekend College courses. See the Online and Weekend College tuition sections for further information.
UNDERGRADUATE TUITION RATES
RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT
All Freshmen & Sophomores; Juniors & Seniors in All Freshmen & Sophomores; Juniors & Seniors in
Credit Hours also Juniors & Seniors in Arts & Media, Business, also Juniors & Seniors in Arts & Media, Business,
Liberal Arts, and Non-Degree* and Engineering Liberal Arts, and Non-Degree* and Engineering
0-1 $ 130 $ 145 $ 699 $ 717
2 260 290 1,398 1,434
3 390 435 2,097 2,151
4 520 580 2,796 2,868
5 650 725 3,495 3,585
6 780 870 4,194 4,302
7 910 1,015 5,821 5,970
8 1,040 1,160 5,821 5,970
9 1,065 1,208 5,821 5,970
10 1,093 1,223 5,821 5,970
11 1,121 1,239 5,821 5,970
12-15 1,149 1,254 5,821 5,970
each credit
hour over 15 130 145 699 717
GRADUATE TUITION RATES
RESIDENT
Credit hours Liberal Arts Architecture & Planning Education Arts & Media, Engineering Business
and Sciences and Non-Degree* and Public Affairs
0-1 $ 190 $ 203 $ 210 $ 223 $ 237
2 380 406 420 446 474
3 570 609 630 , 669 711
4 760 812 840 892 948
5 950 1,015 1,050 1,115 1,185
6 1,140 1,218 1,260 1,338 1,422
7 1,330 1,421 1,470 1,561 1,659
8 1,520 1,624 1,680 1,784 1,896
9-15 1,579 1,683 1,859 1,859 1,978
each credit
hour over 15 190 203 210 223 237
NON-RESIDENT
Credit hours Liberal Arts Architecture & Planning, Arts & Media, Education, Business
and Sciences Engineering, Public Affairs, and Non-Degree*
0-1 $ 764 $ 814 $ 828
2 1,528 1,628 1,656
3 2,292 2,442 2,484
4 3,056 3,256 3,312
5 3,820 4,070 4,140
6 4,584 4,884 4,968
7-15 6,371 6,781 6,909
each credit
hour over 15 764 814 828
*Non-degree students who have previously earned a baccalaureate degree are classified as graduate students and assessed graduate tuition regardless of the level of the class(es) they are taking.
_______________________________WEEKEND COLLEGE TUITION_______________________________________________________
The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers courses on weekends at the Auraria campus. Weekend College credit is identical to that for other CU-Denver courses. Students must be officially admitted to CU-Denver in order to register for Weekend College courses.
Weekend College tuition rates apply to all Weekend College courses whether or not on-campus courses are taken. Weekend College tuition is based on the level of the course(s). Tuition for Weekend College courses does not fall within the campus or online tuition windows. The flat tuition (12-15 hrs) for regular courses does not apply. Tuition for Weekend College courses is in addition to tuition for regular courses. Students are responsible for any related university and/or course fees.
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES GRADUATE COURSES
Credit Hours RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT Credit Hours RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT
0-1 $ 130 $ 699 0-1 $ 190 $ 764
2 260 1,398 2 .380 1,528
3 390 2,097 3 570 2,292
4 520 2,796 4 760 3,056
5 650 3,495 5 950 3,820
6 780 4,195 6 1,140 4,584
7 910 5,821 7 1,330 6,371
8 1,040 5,821 8 1,520 6,371
9 1,065 5,821 9-15 1,579 6,371
10 1,093 5,821 each credit hour over 15 190 764
11 1,121 5,821
12-15 1,149 5,821
:redit hour over 15 130 699
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


______________________________TUITION FOR ONLINE COURSES________________________________________
inline tuition rates apply to all online courses whether or not on-campus or Weekend College courses are taken. Online tuition is based on the college ind level of the course. A $ 100 online course fee will be assessed for each online course, and a $50 online lab course fee will be assessed for each online ab in addition to the tuition listed below. Students registering only for online courses will be required to pay the Information Technology Fee and the student Information System (SIS) fee. Other student fees will be waived. Course-based fees may apply.
ONLINE TUITION FOR 1000 AND 2000 LEVEL COURSES
RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT
Credit hours Liberal Arts Arts & Business Enaineerina Liberal Arts Arts & Business Engineering
and Sciences Media and Sciences Media
0-1 $ 130 $ 130 $ 130 $ 130 $ 699 $ 699 $ 699 $ 699
2 260 260 260 260 1,398 1,398 1,398 1,398
3 390 390 390 390 2,097 2,097 2,097 2,097
4 520 520 520 520 2,796 2,796 2,796 2,796
5 650 650 650 650 3,495 3,495 3,495 3,495
6 780 780 780 780 4,194 4,194 4,194 4,194
7 910 910 910 910 5,821 5,821 5,821 5,821
8 1,040 1,040 1,040 1,040 5,821 5,821 5,821 5,821
9 1,065 1,065 1,065 1,065 5,821 5,821 5,821 5,821
10 1,093 1,093 1,093 1,093 5,821 5,821 5,821 5,821
11 1,121 1,121 1,121 1,121 5,821 5,821 5,821 5,821
12-15* 1,149 1,149 1,149 1,149 5,821 5,821 5,821 5,821
each credit
hour over 15 130 130 130 130 699 699 699 699
ONLINE TUITION FOR 3000 AND 4000 LEVEL COURSES
RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT
Credit hours Liberal Arts Arts & Business Enaineerina Liberal Arts Arts& Business Engineering
and Sciences Media and Sciences Media
0-1 $ 130 $ 145 $ 145 $ 145 $ 699 $ 717 $ 717 $ 717
2 260 290 290 290 1,398 1,434 1,434 1,434
3 390 435 435 435 2,097 2,151 2,151 2,151
4 520 580 580 580 2,796 2,868 2,868 2,868
5 650 725 725 725 3,495 3,585 3,585 3,585
6 780 870 870 870 4,194 4,302 4,302 4,302
7 910 1,015 1,015 1,015 5,821 5,970 5,970 5,970
8 1,040 1,160 1,160 1,160 5,821 5,970 5,970 5,970
9 1,065 1,208 1,208 1,208 5,821 5,970 5,970 5,970
10 1,093 1,223 1,223 1,223 5,821 5,970 5,970 5,970
11 1,121 1,239 1,239 1,239 5,821 5,970 5,970 5,970
12-15* 1,149 1,254 1,254 1,254 5,821 5,970 5,970 5,970
each credit
hour over 15 130 145 145 145 699 717 717 717
ONLINE TUITION FOR 5000 LEVEL AND HIGHER COURSES
RESIDENT
Credit hours Jberal Arts Architecture Education Arts & Engineering Public Affairs Business
i nd Sciences and Planning Media
0-1 $ 190 $ 203 $ 210 $ 223 $ 223 $ 223 $ 237
2 380 406 420 446 446 446 474
3 570 609 630 669 669 669 711
4 760 812 840 892 892 892 948
5 950 1,015 1,050 1,115 1,115 1,115 1,185
6 1,140 1,218 1,260 1,338 1,338 1,338 1,422
7 1,330 1,421 1,470 1,561 1,561 1,561 1,659
8 1,520 1,624 1,680 1,784 1,784 1,784 1,896
9-15* 1,579 1,683 1,859 1,859 1,859 1,859 1,978
each credit
hour over 15 190 203 210 223 217 217 237
NON-RESIDENT
Credit hours Jberal Arts Architecture Education Arts & Engineering Public Affairs Business
E ind Sciences and Planning Media
0-1 $ 764 $ 814 $ 814 $ 814 $ 814 $ 814 $ 828
2 1,528 1,628 1,628 1,628 1,628 1,628 1,656
3 2,292 2,442 2,442 2,442 2,442 2,442 2,484
4 3,056 3,256 3,256 3,256 3,256 3,256 3,312
5 3,820 4,070 \ 4,070 4,070 4,070 4,070 4,140
6 4,584 4,884 4,884 4,884 4,884 4,884 4,968
7-15* 6,371 6,781 6,781 6,781 6,781 6,781 6,909
each credit
hour over 15 764 814 814 814 814 814 828
If you enroll for 12-15 credits (for residents) or 7-15 credits (for non-residents) of online course work in the same college and at the same course level, you will be charged tuition for 12 resident or 7 non-resident credit hours respectively, plus $100 per course.
he Board of Regents of the University of Colorado reserves the right to change tuition and fees at any time. Please contact the Bursar’s Office, 303-556-2710, you have questions regarding tuition and/or fees.
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


26 / Our University, Our Campus
TC 4300/5300 Multimedia
Authoring.................. 50.00
TC4805/5805Graphics........... 30.00
The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado reserves the right to change tuition and fees at any time. Please contact the Bursar’s Office, 303-556-2710, if you have questions regarding tuition and/or fees.
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
Tuition classification is governed by Colorado statutes that apply to all state-funded institutions in Colorado. Institutions are bound by the provisions of this statute and are not free to make exceptions to the rules set forth.
Students are initially classified as instate or out-of-state for tuition purposes at the time of application. The classification is based upon information furnished by the student and from other relevant sources. After the student’s status is determined, it remains unchanged in the absence of satisfactory evidence to the contrary.
Once a student is classified as a nonresident for tuition purposes, the student must petition for a change in classification. Petitions must be submitted NO LATER THAN THE FIRST OFFICIAL DAY OF CLASSES of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a resident. It is preferred that petitions be received 30 days prior to the beginning of the term. Late petitions will not be considered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions.
The final decision regarding tuition status rests with the University. Questions regarding residence (tuition) status should be referred only to the Tuition Classification Officer. Opinions of other persons are not official or binding upon the University. Additional information is available in the brochure, Classification of Students for Tuition Purposes, which may be obtained from the Admissions Office.
BASIC REQUIREMENTS
The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a legal domiciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classification is being sought. Persons over 23 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 23 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or
court-appointed legal guardian. An unemancipated minor’s parent must, therefore, have a legal domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes.
ESTABLISHING DOMICILE
Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one’s true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colorado domicile on the person seeking to establish the domicile. The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connections with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado for tuition purposes begins the day after connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evidence one’s intent. The most common ties with the state are
(1) change of driver’s license to Colorado;
(2) change of automobile registration to Colorado; (3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado; and most important, (5) payment of state income taxes as a resident by one whose income is sufficient to be taxed. Caution: payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroactive to the time filed. In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term, the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question. If one’s 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, instate tuition cannot be granted until the next semester.
Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel
The Colorado Legislature approved resident tuition for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. ELIGIBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM. Students obtain a completed verification form from the base education officer, and submit the form with their military ID to the Records Office after they have registered, but before the end of the drop/add period. At the time the verification form is certified in the Records Office, the student’s bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate. Students who have been certified remain classified as non-residents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Colorado.
FINANCIAL AID
Director: Ellie Miller Office: NC 1030 Telephone: 303-556-2886 E-mail Address: finaid@carbon.cudenver.edu World Wide Web Address: http://finaid.cudenver.edu
The Office of Financial Aid offers over $30 million in financial aid awards to quali fied students each year. If the student’s financial aid application materials are received before the March 31 priority date, then the student is considered for a package of need-based grant, work-study (part-time employment) and/or long-term loan funds. If the financial aid application materials are received after the March 31 priority date, then the student is usually considered only for a Federal Pell Grant and for outside student loans (Federal Stafford Loan or Federal Parents Loan).
Applicants for Colorado Graduate Fellowship, Colorado Deans Scholars award, and Colorado Regents Scholars award are subject to different deadlines and are reviewed by other CU-Denver departments (the Graduate School, undergraduate deans’ offices, and the Office of Admissions, respectively).
All other applicants for financial aid are notified of their award status in writing by the Office of Financial Aid.
Eligibility
Each student must qualify for CU-Denver financial aid as follows:
1. Be a U.S. citizen or be admitted to the U.S. by the INS on a permanent basis.
2. Be classified as a degree-seeking student by the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. Teacher certification students ar eligible to apply for financial aid and ar< considered as undergraduate students according to federal guidelines.
3. Be enrolled for a minimum number of credits as specified on the financial aid award letter and/or student loan planning letter.
4. Meet the minimum requirements of Financial Aid Academic Standards.
5. Apply for financial aid by submitting all of the required documentation. The need analysis form is required for all programs except the Colorado Graduate Fellowship, Colorado Scholars award, Colorado Deems Scholars award Colorado Regents Scholars award, and the Emergency Student Loan Program.
6. Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes for the following programs: Colorado Student Grant, Colorado
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


Tuition, Fees and Financial Aid/ 27
Student Incentive Grant, Colorado Graduate Grant, Colorado Work-Study, Colorado Regents Scholars award, Colorado Deans Scholars award, and Colorado Scholars award.
J. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant.
i. Be registered for the draft or be enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selective Service.
\pplication
Each applicant must complete the inancial aid application materials for iubmission to the Office of Financial Aid. Complete information must be available o the office before eligibility can be letermined.
Limited Funds-The majority of general inancial aid funds are awarded on a irst-come, first-served basis to eligible tudents who document significant inancial need and who complete their Lpplication materials in the Office of 'inancial Aid by the March 31 priority late. Application completion is defined is having all of the required documents ind the results of the need analysis (Free vpplication for Federal Student Aid) nto the Office of Financial Aid. General inancial aid is awarded to needy students yho meet the priority date until all of the unds are committed for the year. If the file 3 completed after March 31, then awards dll probably be limited to Federal Pell irant (for needy first undergraduate tudents only) and /or outside student Dans (Federal Stafford Loan or Federal 'arents Loan). Application for financial id must be made each year; application laterials are available in January of ach year.
It is the student’s responsibility to be ure application materials are complete, 'lease contact the Office of Financial Jd for application forms and complete etails. All financial aid policies and procedures are subject to change due 3 revisions in federal and state laws, sgulations, and guidelines.
Qualification
Financial Need -Most financial aid wards are based on the concept of nancial need. Financial need is calcu-ited as: cost of attendance (tuition, fees, ooks, living expenses) minus family ontribution (student/spouse contribu-on and parents’ contribution for ependent students).
The cost of attendance is the estimated ost to attend CU-Denver, including tuition
and fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid determines standard budgets based upon average tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.
For 1999 -2000, the following monthly budgets were used for room and board, transportation, and personal expenses: $570 for students living at home with parents; $960 for students not living with parents. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student were approximately $1,115 per semester and non-resident tuition and fees were approximately $5,510 per semester. These amounts will probably increase by approximately 2% for the 2000-2001 school year.
Independent Student-The federal government provides specific guidelines that define a self-supporting student for financial aid purposes. If a student is classified as self-supporting, then the student’s parental information is not considered when the calculation of family contribution is made. For 1999-2000, a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old (born before 1/1/76) or one who meets one of the following conditions:
1. Graduate student
2. Married student
3. Student with legal dependents other
than a spouse
4. Veteran of the U.S. armed forces
5. Orphan or ward of the court
These conditions may be appealed
to the Office of Financial Aid if unusual circumstances exist. Contact the office for appeal guidelines.
If the student/spouse contribution plus the parents’ contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance, then the student will not qualify for need-based financial aid.
The contributions from the student/ spouse and from the parents are calculated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income, savings and other assets, family size, number of children in postsecondary school, and other factors. Students may appeal for special consideration if they are experiencing unusual circumstances. Financial aid is intended to supplement and not replace financial contributions from the student and parents.
Course Loads-General financial aid undergraduate recipients usually must enroll for at least 12 credits per semester, and graduate students usually must enroll for at least 5 credits per semester. Federal
Stafford Loan recipients must carry at least a half-time credit load (6 hours for undergraduates per semester and 3 hours for graduates per semester). For deferment of student loans, please refer to the Schedule of Courses each term for specific information. Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please check award letter and/or student loan planning letter for the exact number of credits required).
Academic Progress-CU-Denver students must make academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid in order to be eligible and remain eligible for financial aid. Students should review the Financial Aid Academic Standards policy, available in the Office of Financial Aid.
Non-Degree .Students-Non-degree students are eligible to be considered only for the Advantage Scholarship Program. Please refer to separate brochure for application procedures. Teacher certification students may apply for financial aid and are considered as undergraduate students for financial aid purposes.
Residency Status-A student is required to be a resident of Colorado for a full year before the Office of Admissions can consider classification as a resident for tuition purposes. Non-resident students are encouraged to obtain additional information from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident status. As a resident, a student is eligible for the State of Colorado financial aid programs, and tuition is significantly less than for non-resident.
Refunds and Repayments-Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal or reclassification of tuition status must be returned to the recipient’s financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Beginning with the fall 2000 term, if a recipient of federal financial aid withdraws from all classes on or before the 60% point in time in the term, that student may be required to repay a portion of his/her financial aid. The federal government has defined that the recipient has only earned a portion of their financial aid, and the earned aid is directly proportional to the percentage of time the student attended classes up to and including the 60% point in time in the term. The rest of the financial aid is defined as unearned financial aid and must be returned to the federal financial aid programs. Unearned aid includes both the amount allocated to tuition and fees and the amount allocated to the student for other educational expenses. For a complete description of these requirements, please request
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


28 / Our University, Our Campus
a copy of the Financial Aid Repayment Policy from the Office of Financial Aid.
Appea/s-Students may appeal all decisions of the Office of Financial Aid by completing a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office. Appeals are considered within three weeks and a written response is mailed to the student.
Reapply Each Fear-Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each year. Application materials for the next summer term are available beginning January 1.
Award
Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 8-12 weeks after all application materials have been received in the Office of Financial Aid. If awarded, an award letter is mailed to the student; it includes the types and amounts of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours required each term. A student loan planning letter is mailed to the student after the outside student loan application^) have been processed.
Grants and Loans
The following aid programs are funded by the federal government:
1. Federal Pell Grant-Eligibility for the Federal Pell Grant is determined before any other aid is awarded. Awards are defined by a strict need-based formula provided by the federal government, and award amounts vary depending upon amount of financial need and enrollment status. Students are eligible for Federal Pell Grant consideration
if they have not received their first baccalaureate degree by June 1 of the award year.
2. Outside Student Loans-Eligibility for all other types of assistance should be determined prior to applying for outside student loans. The subsidized Federal Stafford Loan program requires that students show financial need in order to qualify. Interest on the subsidized loan is paid for the student by the federal government as long as the student remains enrolled at least half-time and for a six-month grace period after dropping below half-time enrollment. The unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan program does not require the student to document financial need. Eligibility
is calculated as the cost of attendance minus other financial aid awarded. Interest is not paid by the federal
government for the unsubsidized program, and the student may elect to pay the interest currently or to allow the interest to be added to the total loan amount. Interest rates for the Federal Stafford Loan programs are variable, and are capped at 8.25%. Parents of dependent students are eligible to borrow under the Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students program (PLUS). The PLUS program is unsubsidized, and interest payments become the responsibility of the borrower at the time of disbursement. The interest rate varies on the PLUS program, and is capped at 9%.
3. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)-This is a need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a baccalaureate degree. Students must be eligible for a Federal Pell Grant to be considered for SEOG.
4. Federal Perkins Loan-This need-based loan program, with an interest rate currently at 5%, is based at CU-Denver. No repayment of interest or principal is due until six or nine months (time period differs depending upon when student first received Perkins Loan) after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time.
5. Federal College Wor/e-Study-Work-study is a need-based program that allows students to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at non-profit agencies to help meet their educational costs.
The State of Colorado funds the
following programs:
1. Colorado Student Grant-A need-based grant for resident undergraduate students.
2. Colorado Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership Grant-A need-based grant for resident undergraduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor’s degree. This grant is funded 50% by the federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado.
3. Colorado Graduate Grant-A need-based grant for resident graduate students.
4. Colorado Work-Study-A program similar to the College Work-Study program but limited to resident undergraduate students.
5. Governor’s Opportunity Scholarship-A need-based grant program for firsttime resident freshmen who have a zero family contribution or whose parents earn less than $26,000.
Scholarships
Following is a list of the major scholarships that are offered at CU-Denver.
The following programs are funded by the General Assembly of the State of Colorado:
1. Regents Scholars award is offered to qualified new freshmen and transfer students by the Office of Admissions. New students will automatically be considered for this program.
2. Colorado Scholars award is for undergraduate resident students who have a minimum cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.5 for a minimum of 12 CU credit hours. The deadline for applying is March 31. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for application procedures.
3. Deans Scholars award is awarded by undergraduate deans’ offices. Contact appropriate dean’s office for more information.
The following programs are funded by CU-Denver:
1. Advantage Scholarship is for minority and/or first generation college students who meet the specified income guidelines. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for applications.
2. Nelson/Running Wolf Scholarship funds are available for needy America Indian students. Contact the Office of American Indian Student Services, 303-556-2860, for more information.
3. Ahlin Fund assistance is available for mobility-impaired students. Contact Student Retention Services, 303-556-2324, for applications.
Other scholarship information is available from the Office of Financial Aid the Auraria Library Scholarship InfoBan in the reference section, and the Student Advocacy Center.
Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment opportunities are listed in the Student Employment Office and The Career Center. Students who participate in the Pre-Collegiate Development Program are automatical!} considered for Challenge Scholarships. Graduate students should inquire about additional types of financial aid through their academic departments. Students should be aware that Emergency Studen Loans are available through the Bursar’s Office. American Indian students should request information about Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships from the Office of Financial Aid.
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


Registration
Students should review the sections f this catalog that describe in detail le academic programs available at U-Denver.
Undergraduate students should contact leir school or college to arrange for an 1 vising appointment prior to registra-on. Graduate students should contact leir respective graduate program for ssistance.
A Schedule of Courses is made available /ery semester prior to registration by le Office of Records and Registration. U-Denver students register for courses a the Student Information web page lee below) or through the Voice esponse (VR) Registration system om any touch-tone telephone. Specific istructions are included in the Schedule (Courses. Students will be sent an ivitation to Register that includes :gistration information and a registration me assignment. Registration is by time ssignment only. Students may register : or after their assigned time.
)nline Registration nd Student Information
CU-Denver students can register id obtain information regarding their irsonal records by accessing a secure te at: http://hydra.cusys.edu/pinnacle/ shome l.dn.htm. This site can also be ached from the CU-Denver home page ittp://www.cudenver.edu/) by choosing Registration and Grades” under tudents.” A student number and irsonal identification number (PIN) e required to access the registration student record options.
Online registration allows the student check the availability of specific >urses prior to their registration time id to search for available courses by ipartment, course level, or meeting ne. If registration in a course is denied, e web registration system will specify e reason. Online payment is currently >t available.
Student information available online irrently includes: address verification r change); admission application status; lancial aid information; schedule by mester; grades by semester; unofficial inscript; account balance; and degree idit (for some programs). For security asons, none of the student information reens will display a student’s name student number.
The CU-Denver catalog and Schedule of Courses, as well as additional information regarding programs, faculty, courses, and policies, are available at the CU-Denver home page: http://www.cudenver.edu/.
Definition of Full-Time and Half-Time Status
Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in the student’s financial aid award letter.
FALL AND SPRING:
Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students:
Full-time .... 12 or more semester hours Half-time.....6 or more semester hours
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
5 or more hours
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
3 or more hours
SUMMER (TEN-WEEK TERM):
Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students:
Full-time.....8 or more semester hours
Half-time.....4 or more semester hours
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
3 or more hours
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
2 or more hours
3 or more hours of mixed-level classes Notes:
Enrollment verification including full-time/half-time attendance can be certified after the drop/add period.
Hours for calculating full-time/half-time attendance do not include interinstitu-tional hours, nor do they include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration.
Registration / 29
Students receiving veterans benefits should contact the Veterans Affairs coordinator for definition of full-time status for summer sessions.
Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are considered for financial aid purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid.
Add/Drop
Specific add/drop deadlines are announced in each semester’s Schedule of Courses.
1. Students may add courses to their original registration during the first 12 (eight in the summer) days of full-term classes, provided there is space available.
2. Students may drop courses without approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (the first eight days of the summer session). Tuition will not be charged. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student’s permanent record.
3. After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (eighth day of the summer session), the instructor’s signature is required for all drops. The instructor’s signature and dean’s signature are required for all adds. No tuition adjustment will be made.
4. After the tenth week of the fall and spring semesters (the fifth week for summer session) all schedule adjustments require a petition and special approval from the dean’s office.
5. Dropping all courses after the 12th day (eighth in the summer) requires an official withdrawal from the term.
No tuition refunds are available.
Drop deadlines for module courses
and intensive courses are published in the Schedule of Courses each term.
Administrative Drop
An administrative drop is implemented by University officials in the registrar’s office or the dean’s office. A student may be administratively dropped from one or more classes or withdrawn from all classes for any of the following reasons:
1. Failure to meet certain preconditions, including, but not limited to:
a. Failure to pay tuition and fees by designated deadlines
b. Class cancellations
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30 / Our University, Our Campus
c. Failure to meet course prerequisites
2. Whenever the safety of the student, faculty member, or other students in a course would be jeopardized.
3. Academic suspension, including, but not limited to, failure to attain or maintain a required grade-point average (GPA).
4. Disciplinary suspension for having been found to have violated the Student Code of Conduct.
5. Disruptive behavior determined by the chair and/or associate dean to be detrimental to the progress of the course and the education of other students.
Auditing Courses
To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the University or have outstanding financial obligations to the University. The Records Office does not keep any record of courses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where special equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor.
An auditor’s card is issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor. Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges, and are not eligible for other student services. For more information, contact the Bursar’s Office.
Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) may audit classes at no charge. Contact the Division of Enrollment and Student Affairs at 1250 14th Street, 303-556-8427.
Correspondence Study
Correspondence courses are offered by the CU-Boulder Division of Continuing Education. Applicability toward a degree program should be sought from the student’s degree advisor prior to registration.
Course Load/Restrictions
In most cases, students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer session) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. Consult the individual college or school for specific guidelines as to course load restrictions.
Credit By Examination
Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade-point average of at least 2.0, and be currently registered. Contact the Records Office for instructions. A non-refundable fee is charged. Students should contact their degree advising office to determine whether the credit will apply to their degree.
No Credit
Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college. Students enrolling for no credit are required to pay regular tuition. File the no-credit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop/add period. Students who register for a course on a no-credit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade.
Pass/Fail Procedure
1. Students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis (or to revert from pass/fail to graded status) may do so only during the drop/add period.
2. Up to 16 semester hours of course work may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor’s degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass/fail in any given semester. [Note: Individual schools and colleges may have additional restrictions as to pass/fail credits. See the accompanying chart for an overview.]
3. Instructors will not be informed of pass/fail registration. All students who register for a pass/fail appear on the regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office, those registrations with a pass/fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D- and above convert to grades off. Courses taken pass/fail will be included in hours toward graduation. Pass grades are not included in a
student’s grade-point average. An Fgrade in a course taken pass/fail will be included in the grade-point average.
4. Pass/fail registration records are maintained by the Records Office.
5. Exceptions to the pass/fail regulations are permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education, the Extended Studies Programs,
and Study Abroad Programs.
6. Graduate degree students can exercise the P/Foption for undergraduate courses only. A grade of P will not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement.
7. Students who register for a course on
a pass/fail basis may not later (after the drop/add period) decide to receive a letter grade.
Please note: many other institutions will not accept a P grade for transfer credit.
Short Term Courses
Courses are also offered in five-week modules, in special weekend courses, and in seminars. Students should contact the college/school for information on shortterm courses offered each semester.
Other Registrations
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of Colorado campuses concurrently must obtain permission from their school or college on their home campus. A student in a degree program registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if:
1. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean or the Records Office.
2. The course is a required course for the student’s degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver.
3. The student obtains approval from the academic dean.
4. There is space available at the other (host) campus.
5. The student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CU-Denver rates.
6. The home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes.
7. The concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses. Students may not register for an independent study course through concurrent registration. Students may not take
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


Registration / 31
ourses pass/fail or for no credit through oncurrent registration.
To drop a concurrent course during the ost campus drop/add period, arrange the rop at the home campus Records Office.
0 drop a concurrent course after the end f the host campus drop/add deadline, rop the course at the host campus ecords Office.
NTERINSTITUTIONAL
EGISTRATION
CU-Denver degree students may enroll
1 courses offered by the Community ollege of Denver and Red Rocks ommunity College. Students must be nrolled at CU-Denver for at least one ourse during the term to be eligible to jgister interinstitutionally. Registration ; on a space available basis. Inter-lstitutional courses are evaluated
>r transfer credit and are not included 1 a CU-Denver student’s grade-point verage.
OOLED COURSES AT tETROPOLITAN STATE OLLEGE OF DENVER
Certain courses in the College of Liberal rts and Sciences have been pooled with milar courses at Metropolitan State Col-:ge of Denver (MSCD). CU-Denver under-'aduate students may register for any 1 the pooled courses listed in the CU-enver Schedule of Courses. Listed below re restrictions that apply to the pooled Durses:
1. CU-Denver graduate students are not eligible to register for MSCD pooled courses.
2. MSCD courses will not be included in the University of Colorado grade-point average. MSCD courses will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will count in the hours toward graduation.
3. MSCD courses cannot be used to meet specific course requirements toward the major without prior written approval of the student’s deem.
4. CU-Denver students who wish to take non-pooled MSCD classes must apply directly as a non-degree student to MSCD, and pay tuition and fees to MSCD. Non-pooled classes will not appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will not be used in determining course loads for financial aid eligibility. Students may request an MSCD transcript to be sent to CU-Denver at the end of the term to determine if credit can be transferred.
5. MSCD common pool courses will not satisfy residence requirements at CU-Denver. The last 30 semester hours applied toward the baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence
at CU-Denver.
6. CU-Denver students taking MSCD common pool courses are subject to the MSCD grading policy and student code of conduct.
PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS Core Curriculum courses used to satisfy Intellectual Competencies cannot be taken on pass/fail basis.
College General Maximum
Business and Only non-business Only 6 semester hours
Administration electives may be taken pass/fail may be taken pass/fail
Engineering and Required courses may not A maximum of 16 credit
Applied Science be taken pass/fail. Upper division humanities and social sciences electives are acceptable; otherwise, major department approval is required hours may be taken pass/fail. Includes courses taken in the honors program
Liberal Arts and Sciences College requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of courses with letter grades. Courses used to satisfy major, minor, or foreign language cannot be taken on a pass/fail basis. No more them 6 hours pass/fail any semester. A maximum of 16 semester hours may be taken pass/fail.
Withdrawal from the University
To withdraw from the University of Colorado at Denver, students must drop all courses for the semester. During the first twelve days of the semester (eight days for the summer) students must use either the telephone or web registration system to drop courses. Consult the Schedule of Courses for information on using the telephone registration system. Courses dropped during this period are not recorded on the student’s permanent record.
After the twelfth day of the semester (eighth day in the summer), through the tenth week (seventh week for summer), students must submit a withdrawal form with the instructor’s approval. Courses dropped during this period will be recorded on the student’s permanent record with a grade of “W".
Students seeking to withdraw after the tenth week (seventh week for summer) must petition the associate deem of their school or college.
A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receive grades of “f" for all course work during that term.
Deadlines for dropping module and intensive courses appear in the Schedule of Courses.
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


UNIVERSITY OF COLORADC
The faculty of the Colleges of Arts & Media, Business, Engineering and Liberal Arts establishe< curriculum to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual competencies ii Furthermore, the core curriculum promotes an awareness of cultural diversity. For details oi
INTELLECTUAL COMPETENCIES
English Composition/ Oral Communication1 Mathematics Natural & Physical Sciences
CAMPUS CORE 9 semester hours from the following courses: 3 semester hours: 8 semester hours from the following courses:
ENGL 1020-3 Core Composition 1 and one of ENGL 2030-3 Core Composition 11 ENGL 3154-3 Technical Writing ENGL 3170-3 Business Writing and one of the following: CMMU 2050-3 Bus/Profess Speaking CMMU 2101-3 Present Speaking ENGL 2030-3 Core Composition II ENGL 2154-3 Intro Creative Writing ENGL 3001-3 Critical Writing ENGL 3084-3 Adv Composition CMMU 3120-3 Tech Comm ENGL 3154-3 Technical Writing ENGL 3170-3 Business Writing ENGL 4190-3 Rhetoric and Language PHIL 2441-3 Logic and Language Any math course except MATH 3040 or a passing mark on the Math Proficiency exam ANTH 1303-4 Intro: Biological Anth BIOL 15504 Basic Biology I BIOL 15604 Basic Biology II CHEM 14744 Core Chemistry: Chemistry for the Consumer ENVS 10424 Intro to Environ Sci GEOL10724 Phys Geology I GEOL10824 Phys Geology 11 PHYS 10004 Intro to Physics PHYS 10524 Gen Astronomy I
COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE3
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 9 semester hours, as follows: ENGL 1020-3 Core Composition I CMMU 2050-3 Bus/Profess Spkng ENGL 3170-3 Business Writing MATH 1070-3 SAME AS CAMPUS CORE
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 9 semester hours, as follows: ENGL 1020-3 Core Composition 1 CMMU 2101-3 Present Speaking and either ENGL 3154-3 Technical Writing or ENGL 2030-3 Core Composition 11 or CMMU 3120-3 Technical Comm Completed by fulfilling major requirements Completed by fulfilling major requirements
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE2
1. All courses must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or higher.
2. CLAS students are exempt from the Knowledge Area Courses in the CU-Denver Core Curriculum defined by their major.
3. An additional 3 credit hours is required in these areas, as defined by the CAM Distributed Core. Contact an advisor for details.
4. Cultural Diversity courses are restricted, requiring junior-level standing or the consent of the instructor prior to registration.


AT DENVER CORE CURRICULUM_________________________________
a core curriculum for all undergraduate students. It is the objective of the CU-Denver core mathematics, reading, writing, oral communication, information literacy, and critical thinking, the core curriculum, students should contact their college advising office.
KNOWLEDGE AREAS
Behavioral/Social Sciences Humanities Arts Cultural Diversity4
9 semester hours, as follows: 6 semester hours from the 3 semester hours from 3 semester hours from the
One behavioral science course: following courses: the following courses: following courses:
ANTH 2102-3 Culture & Human CHIN 1000-3 China: Central ARTS 1000-3 Arts in Our ANTH 3142-3 Cult Divers-Mod World
Experience States to Nation States Time ANTH 4200-3 Gender Cross-Cult Persp
CMMU 1011-3 Fund of Comm ENGL 1601-3 Telling Tales: FA 1001-3 Intro to Art CMMU 3271-3 Comm & Diversity
CMMU 1021-3 Fund/Mass Comm Narrative Art in Lit and Film PMUS 1001-3 Music ECON 3100-3 Econ of Race & Gender
PSY 1000-3 Intro to Psych I ENGL 2600-3 Great Works in Appreciation ENGL/ETST 3794-3 Ethnic Diversity
PSY 1005-3 Intro to Psych 11 British & American Lit THTR1001-3 Intro to in Amer Lit
One social science course: ECON 2012-3 Macroeconomics ECON 2022-3 Microeconomics GEOG 1102-3 World Regional Geography GEOG 2202-3 Natural Hazards P SC 1001-3 Intro-Political Sci P SC 1101-3 Amer Political Syst SOC 1001-3 Intro to Sociology SOC 2462-3 Intro-Social Psych Plus one additional course chosen from either of the above disciplines FR 1000-3 Intro to Cultures of French-Speaking World GER 1000-3 Germany & the Germans HIST 1381-3 Paths to Present 1 HIST 1382-3 Paths to the Present II PHIL 1012-3 Intro Philosophy PHIL 1020-3 Intro to Ethics & Society RUSS 1000-3 Russia & the Russians: Life/Culture/Art RUSS 2000-3 Masterpieces of Russian Culture Theatre ENGR 3400-3 Technology & Culture ETST 3704-3 Culture, Racism & Alien. FA 3110-3 Imaging and Identity HIST 3345-3 Immig/Ethn in Amer Hist MGMT 4100-3 Manag. Cultured Divers PHIL 3500-3 Ideology & Culture PMUS 3110-3 Social/Polit Implications of American Music PMUS 3111-3 American Voice Revisit P SC 3034-3 Race/Gndr/Law/Pub Plcy P SC 3035-3 Pol Move: Race/Gender PSY 4485-3 Psych of Cultural Divers SOC 3020-3 Race/Ethnicity in U.S. THTR 3611-3 Drama of Diversity
SAME AS CAMPUS CORE11 SAME AS CAMPUS CORE 3 SAME AS CAMPUS CORE
Students must complete the following 3 courses: PSY 1000-3 Intro to Psych 1 or PSY 1005-3 Intro to Psych II ECON 2012-3 Macroeconomics ECON 2022-3 Microeconomics SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE
3 semester hours from the 6 semester hours from the SAME AS CAMPUS CORE 3 semester hours from the following
Campus Core behavioral same humanities discipline list in the same discipline chosen to
science course list selected from: meet social science or humanities
and ENGL 1601-3 and ENGL 2600-3 core curriculum requirement:
6 semester hours from: or ECON 3100-3
ECON 2012-3 and ECON 2022-3 HIST 1381-3 and HIST 1382-3 ENGL 3794-3
or or ENGR 3400-3
PSC 1001-3 and P SC 1101-3 or SOC 1001-3 and SOC 2462-3 j PHIL 1012-3 and PHIL 1020-3 HIST 3345-3 PHIL 3500-3 PSC 3034-3 PSC 3035-3 SOC 3020-3
! SAME AS CAMPUS CORE2 ————JL— SAME AS CAMPUS CORE2 - .... SAME AS CAMPUS CORE2 SAME AS CAMPUS CORE2
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34 / Our University, Our Campus
Academic Policies and Regulations
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed: Freshman 0-29 hours
Sophomore 30-59 hours
Junior 60-89 hours
Senior 90+ hours
All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado.
Grading System and Policies
The following grading system and policies have been standardized for all academic units of the University.
GRADE SYMBOLS
The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol (A, B, C, D, F, IF, IW, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC, W and ***) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, as explained under Pass/Fail Procedure.
Standard Grades Quality Points
A = superior/excellent 4.0
A(-) = 3.7
B(+) = 3.3
B = good/better than average 3.0
B(-) = 2.7
C(+) = 2.3
C = competent/average 2.0
C(-) = 1.7
D(+) = 1.3
D = minimum passing 1.0
D(-) = 0.7
F = failing 0.0
Instructors may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS system, but are not required to do so.
IF-incomplete-changed to an F if not completed within one year.
IW-incomplete-changed to a IT if not completed within one year.
IP- in progress - thesis at the graduate level only.
P/F-pass/fail-P grade is not included in the grade-point average; the Fgrade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor’s degree.
H/P/F-honors/pass/fail-intended for honors courses; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average.
AC indicates registration on a no-credit basis.
Windicates withdrawal without credit.
*** indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed.
EXPLANATION OF IF AND IW
An IF or IW is an incomplete grade. Policies with respect to IF/IW grades are available in the individual college and school dean’s offices. Use of the IF or IW is at the option of the course instructor and/or the academic dean’s office.
An IF or IW is given only when students, for reasons beyond their control, have been unable to complete course requirements. A substantial amount of work must have been satisfactorily completed before approval for such a grade is given.
The instructor who assigns an IF or IW sets the conditions under which the course work can be completed and the time limit for its completion. The student is expected to complete the requirements by the established deadline and not retake the entire course.
It is the instructor’s and/or the student’s decision whether a course should be retaken. If a course is retaken, it must be completed on the Denver campus or in CU-Denver Extended Studies classes. The student must re-register for the course and pay the appropriate tuition.
The final grade (earned by completing the course requirements or by retaking the course) does not result in deletion of the IF or IW from the transcript. A second entry is posted on the transcript to show the final grade for the course.
At the end of one year, IF and IW grades for courses that are not completed or repeated are changed to an For W, respectively.
Good Academic Standing
Good academic standing requires a minimum grade-point average that is determined by the student’s school or college. Grades earned at another institution are not used in calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado.
Degree students should consult the academic standards section of their school or college for degree program requirements.
Continuation as a non-degree student is contingent upon maintaining an overall
grade-point average of 2.0 upon completion of 12 or more semester hours.
Failure to maintain the required average will result in a non-degree student being suspended. The suspension is for an indefinite period of time and becomes part of the student’s permanent record at the University. While under suspension, enrollment at the University is restricted to summer terms or courses offered through Extended Studies.
Non-degree students are not placed on academic probation prior to being suspended.
GRADE-POINT AVERAGE
The grade-point average (GPA) is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course. Total the hours, total the credit points, and divide the total points by the total hours. Grades of P, NC, ***, W, IP, IW, and IF axe not included in the grade-point average. IFs that are not completed within one year are calculated as Fin the GPA.
If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point average. Grades received at another institution are not included in the University of Colorado GPA.
Undergraduate, graduate, and nondegree graduate GPAs are calculated separately. Enrollment in a second undergraduate or graduate program will not generate a second undergraduate or graduate GPA.
Students should refer to their academic dean’s office for individual grade-point average calculations as they relate to academic progress and graduation from their college or school.
Grade Reports
Grade reports are normally available within two weeks after the end of the semester. Grade reports are automatically mailed at the end of each semester to student’s permanent mailing address. Grades posted to the computer can be obtained using the phone system or on the Student Information web page. See the Schedule of Courses or the Online Student Information section for more information.
Mid-Term Grades
Instructors will assign mid-term grades for certain populations of students. Students in academic difficulty may be
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Academic Policies and Regulations / 35
contacted and counseled about support services available to them. Please note: academic support services are available to all students through the Center for Educational Opportunity Programs,
NC 2012,303-556-2065; the Student Advocacy Center, NC 2012,303-556-2546; or the Center for Learning Assistance,
NC 2006,303-556-2802.
Originality of Work
In all academic areas it is imperative that work be original, or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons’ ideas or language. Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the University.
Graduation
Undergraduates. Students should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or college to determine what requirements remain for graduation. Students intending to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their graduation term. Students will not be officially certified to graduate until a final audit of the student’s record has been completed approximately six weeks after the end of the term. After students have been certified to graduate, they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Graduates. Students must file an Application for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with the Graduate School Office on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term. Check with the Graduate School for more complete information. Students will not be officially certified to graduate until a final audit of the student’s record has been completed approximately six weeks after the end of the term. After students have been certified to graduate, they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
Commencement. In early March, informational brochures will be mailed to students eligible to participate in the May spring semester commencement.
In early October, information regarding the December commencement will be mailed to students who graduated in summer term or expect to graduate in fall term. Information will be provided about ordering special display diplomas,
fittings for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree recorded.
Official Transcripts
The official transcript includes the complete undergraduate and graduate academic record of courses taken at all campus locations or divisions of the University of Colorado. It contains the signature of the registrar and the official seal of the University.
Official transcripts are available approximately three weeks after final exams.
A transcript on which a degree is to be recorded is available approximately eight weeks after fined exams.
On the Denver campus, transcripts may be ordered in person, by Fax (303-556-4829), or by mail from the Transcript Office, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364.
Requests should include the following:
1. Student’s full name (include given or other name if applicable)
2. Student number
3. Birth date
4. The last term and campus the student attended
5. Whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordered near the end of a term
6. Whether the request should be held until a degree is recorded
7. Agency, college, or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. Complete mailing addresses should be included. Transcripts sent to students are labeled “issued to student.”
8. Student’s signature. (This is the student’s authorization to release the records.)
There is no charge for individual official transcripts. Transcripts are prepared only at the student’s written request. A student with financial obligations to the University that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Official transcripts require five to seven working days.
Notification of Rights Under FERPA at University of Colorado at Denver
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their educational records. They are:
1. The right to inspect and review the student’s educational records within 45 days of the day that the University receives a request for access. Students
should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The University official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the University official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s educational records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the University official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it
is inaccurate or misleading. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
3. The right to consent to disclosure
of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s educational records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an educational record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request, the University discloses educational records without consent to officials
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36 / Our University, Our Campus
of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.
4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of Colorado to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA are:
Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202^1605
The following items are designated “Directory Information,” and may be released at the discretion of the University of Colorado unless a student files a. request to prevent their disclosure:
Name
Address
E-mail Address
Telephone Number
Dates of Attendance
Registration Status
Class
Major
Awards
Honors
Degrees conferred Past and present participation in officially recognized sports and non-curricular activities Physical factors (height, weight) of athletes
Forms to prevent Disclosure of Directory Information can be obtained at the Student Service Center in North Classroom 1003. Questions regarding student rights under FERPA should be directed to the Records Office, 303-556-2389.
Academic Honor Code and Discipline Policies
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
A university’s reputation is built on a standing tradition of excellence and scholastic integrity. As members of the University of Colorado at Denver academic community, faculty and students accept the responsibility to maintain the highest standards of intellectual honesty and ethical conduct in completing all forms of academic work at the University.
FORMS OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
Students are expected to know, understand, and comply with the ethical standards of the University. In addition, students have an obligation to inform
the appropriate official of any acts of academic dishonesty by other students of the University. Academic dishonesty is defined as a student’s use of unauthorized assistance with intent to deceive an instructor or other such person who may be assigned to evaluate the student’s work in meeting course and degree requirements. Examples of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to, the following:
A. Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the use of another person’s distinctive ideas or words without acknowledgement. The incorporation of another person’s work into one’s own requires appropriate identification and acknowledgement, regardless of the means of appropriation. The following are considered to be forms of plagiarism when the source is not noted:
1. Word-for-word copying of another person’s ideas or words
2. The mosaic (the interspersing of one’s own words here and there while, in essence, copying another’s work)
3. The paraphrase (the rewriting of another’s work, yet still using their fundamental idea or theory)
4. Fabrication (inventing or counterfeiting sources)
5. Submission of another’s work as one’s own
6. Neglecting quotation marks on material that is otherwise acknowledged
Acknowledgement is not necessary when the material used is common knowledge.
B. Cheating
Cheating involves the possession, communication, or use of information, materials, notes, study aids, or other devices not authorized by the instructor in any academic exercise, or communication with another person during such an exercise. Examples of cheating are:
1. Copying from another’s paper or receiving unauthorized assistance from another during an academic exercise or in the submission of academic material
2. Using a calculator when its use has been disallowed
3. Collaborating with another student or students during an academic exercise without the consent of the instructor
C. Fabrication and Falsification
Fabrication involves inventing or counterfeiting information, i.e., creating
results not obtained in a study or laboratory experiment. Falsification, on the other hand, involves the deliberate alteration or changing of results to suit one’s needs in an experiment or other academic exercise.
D. Multiple Submission
This is the submission of academic work for which academic credit has already been earned, when such submission is made without instructor authorization.
E. Misuse of Academic Materials
The misuse of academic materials includes, but is not limited to, the following:
1. Stealing or destroying library or reference materials or computer programs
2. Stealing or destroying another student’s notes or materials, or having such materials in one’s possession without the owner’s permission
3. Receiving assistance in locating or using sources of information in an assignment when such assistance has been forbidden by the instructor
4. Illegitimate possession, disposition, or use of examinations or answer keys to examinations
5. Unauthorized alteration, forgery, or falsification of academic records
6. Unauthorized sale or purchase of examinations, papers, or assignments
F. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty
Complicity involves knowingly contributing to another’s acts of academic dishonesty.
PROCEDURES IN CASES OF SUSPECTED ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
All matters of academic policy, including academic dishonesty, are under the jurisdiction of each of the University’s schools and colleges pursuant to Article 1X2.B and Article VI.C of the Laws of the Regents. Accordingly, each school and college has established procedures for addressing matters of academic dishonesty and for determining the severity and consequences of each infraction. Students should contact their school or college for standards and/or procedures specific to their school or college. As a general rule, all school and college procedures contain the following requirements and provisions:
A. Faculty, staff members, or students may submit charges of academic dishonesty
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University Policies / 37
against students. A student who has evidence that another student is guilty of academic dishonesty should inform the instructor or the dean of the college of the charge in writing.
B. A faculty member who has evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty should confront the student with the evidence. In cases of academic dishonesty, the faculty member has the authority to reprimand the student appropriately, which could include the issuance of a failing grade (F). If the faculty member elects to reprimand the student for academic dishonesty by issuing a failing grade, the faculty member shall submit a written report to the deem of the appropriate college within five (5) working days. The report shall include, but is not limited to, the time, place, nature of the offense(s), the name(s) of the accused, the name(s) of the accuser(s), and witnesses (if any). If the faculty member feels that her/his reprimand is an insufficient sanction for a particular case of academic dishonesty, the faculty member may recommend to the dean of the
University Policies
Inclusiveness and Non-Discrimination
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to enhancing the inclusiveness of its work force and its student body. Inclusiveness among students, faculty, staff, and administrators is essential to educational excellence and to accomplishing CU-Denver’s urban mission. Inclusiveness among faculty, staff, and administrators provides role models and mentors for students, who will become leaders in academe and in the larger society, and ensures that a broad array of experiences and world views inform and shape teaching, research, service, and decision making at CU-Denver.
CU-Denver employs, retains, and advances in employment qualified applicants and employees, and admits, retains, and advances in education qualified applicants and students regardless of their race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, or veteran status. CU-Denver does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, gender, age, disability, or veteran status and complies with all local, state,
appropriate college that further action be taken.
C. In cases where the faculty member has recommended further action in a case of academic dishonesty, the dean or a designated committee shall schedule a disciplinary hearing as soon as possible. The student(s) accused of academic dishonesty shall be notified in writing of the specific charge(s). The student(s) also has (have) the right to have a representative present for advice, and to be present during the proceedings. The student(s) must notify the dean of the appropriate college five (5) working days before the hearing of the intent to have legal counsel present at the hearing.
D. The dean or the designated committee may take any of the following actions:
• Place the student(s) on disciplinary probation for a specified period
of time
• Suspension of registration at CU-Denver, including Extended Studies, for a specified period of time
• Expulsion: No opportunity to return to the school or college in which the infraction occurred
• Take no further action against the accused student(s)
A record of the action taken shall be kept in the committee’s confidential file and a copy sent to the Registrar
E. In all cases, the student(s) shall be notified of the dean’s or committee’s decision within seven (7) working days.
F. If a student wishes to appeal a case, the student should request the procedures for doing so from his or her school or college.
G. Students who are taking courses at the University of Colorado at Denver, but are enrolled at one of the other educational institutions on the Auraria campus and are charged with academic dishonesty, are subject to the same procedures and sanctions outlined above.
SUMMARY
Questions regarding academic integrity should be directed to the dean’s office of the college or school in which the student is enrolled.
and federal laws and regulations related to education, employment, and contracting.
For further information, contact the Office of Academic and Student Affairs, CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 700; 303-556-2550, TTY 303-556-6204, Fax 303-556-5855; e-mail: marylou.fenili@cudenver.edu.
Program Access for Persons with Disabilities
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing reasonable accommodation and access to programs and services to persons with disabilities. Students should contact the Disability Services Office, Arts Building 177; 303-556-8387, TTY 303-55^8484. Any other person requiring accommodation in order to access programs and services of the University of Colorado at Denver, either on or off the campus, should request accommodation from the individual or office responsible for providing the program or service. This request should be made in a timely fashion to allow the individual or office adequate opportunity to provide reasonable accommodation. The time frame for notification will vary according to the circumstances and the nature of the accommodation. For
further information or for assistance, contact the Ombuds Office, CU-Denver Building, Suite 700; 303-556-4493,
TTY 303-556-6204, Fax 303-556-5855; e-mail: ombuds@carbon.cudenver.edu.
University Policy on Sexual Harassment
The University of Colorado is committed to fostering a positive learning, working, and living environment. The University will not condone sexual harassment or related retaliation of or by any employee or student.
I. Sexual Harassment Policy
A. Sexual harassment and related retaliation are prohibited.
1. For the purposes of this Policy, sexual harassment means unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when: (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment, living conditions, and/or educational evaluation; (2) submission to or rejection
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38 / Our University, Our Campus
of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for tangible employment or educational decisions affecting such individual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or academic performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or educational environment.
Hostile environment sexual harassment, described in subpart (3) above, is unwelcome sexual conduct that is sufficiently severe or pervasive that it alters the conditions of education or employment and creates an environment that a reasonable person would find intimidating, hostile, or offensive.
The determination of whether an environment is “hostile” must be based on all of the circumstances. These circumstances could include the frequency of the conduct, its severity, and whether it is threatening or humiliating.
Examples of Policy violations include: a professor offers a higher grade to a student if the student submits to the professor’s sexual advances; a supervisor implicitly or explicitly threatens termination if a subordinate refuses the supervisor’s sexual advances; and repeated and unwelcome physical touching or severe and pervasive comments of a sexual nature that create an intimidating and offensive work or classroom environment.
2. For the purposes of this Policy, retaliation means adverse actions against individuals because they have, in good faith, reported instances of sexual harassment or participated in or have been witnesses in any procedure to redress a complaint of sexual harassment.
Examples include: tin employee who makes a report under this Policy about a supervisor’s behavior is given an unsatisfactory performance review by that supervisor that is inconsistent with the employee’s actual performance; a student is notified of a report under this Policy made by another student and
subsequently sends threatening messages to the student who made the report.
B. Making false complaints or providing false information regarding a complaint is prohibited.
It is a violation of this Policy for anyone to make an intentionally false accusation of sexual harassment or related retaliation or to provide intentionally false information regarding a complaint.
C. Individuals who violate this Policy will be disciplined or subjected
to corrective action, up to and including termination or expulsion.
II. Obligation to Report
A. General Obligation to Report In order to take appropriate corrective action, the University must be aware of sexual harassment or related retaliation. Therefore, anyone who believes that s/he has experienced or witnessed sexual harassment or related retaliation should promptly report such behavior to a campus sexual harassment officer (see end of this section) or any supervisor (see part B below).
B. Supervisor’s Obligation to Report Any supervisor who experiences, witnesses, or receives a written or oral report or complaint of sexual harassment or related retaliation shall report it to a campus sexual harassment officer. This section of the Policy does not obligate a supervisor who is required by the supervisor’s profession and University responsibilities to keep certain communications confidential (e.g., a professional counselor or ombudsperson) to report responsibilities. Each campus shall designate in its campus appendix to this Policy the supervisory positions that qualify under this exception.
III. Procedures
A. Reports or complaints under this Policy will be addressed and resolved as promptly as practicable after the complaint or report is made. It is the responsibility of the sexual harassment officer(s) to determine the most appropriate means for addressing the report or complaint. Options include (1) investigating the report or complaint in accordance with paragraph C below, (2) with the agreement of the parties, attempting to resolve the report or com-
plaint through a form of alternative dispute resolution (e.g., mediation), or (3) determining that the facts of the complaint or report, even if true, would not constitute a violation of this Policy. The campus sexual harassment officer(s) may designate another individual (either from within the University, including an administrator, or from outside the University) to conduct the investigation or to manage an alternative dispute resolution process. Anyone designated to address an allegation must adhere to the requirements of this Policy and confer with the sexual harassment officer(s) about his or her progress.
B. All reports or complaints shall be made as promptly as feasible after the occurrence. (A delay in reporting may be reasonable under some circumstances, as determined on a case-by-case basis. An unreasonable delay in reporting, however, is an appropriate consideration in evaluating the merits of a complaint or report.)
C. If an investigation is conducted, the alleged victim and the respondent shall have the right to:
1. At the commencement of the investigation, receive written notice of the report or complaint, including a statement of the allegations;
2. Present relevant information to the investigators); and
3. Receive, at the conclusion of the investigation, a copy of the investigator’s report, to the extent permitted by law.
D. At the conclusion of an investigation, the investigator shall prepare a written report which shall include a statement of factual findings, and a determination of whether this Policy has been violated. The report will be presented for review to the person or committee designated by the Chancellor, or, in the case of System Administration, the President.
E. The reviewing person or committee may consult with the investigator, consult with the parties, request that further investigation be done by the same or another investigator, or request that the investigation be conducted again by another investigator. The reviewing person or committee may adopt the investigator’s report as his/its own or may prepare a separate
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report based on the findings of the investigation. The reviewing person or committee may not, however, conduct its own investigation or hearing. Once the reviewing person or committee has completed its review, the report(s) shall be sent to the campus sexual harassment officer(s), the alleged victim, and the respondent, to the extent permitted by law. The report shall also be sent to the Chancellor, or, in the case of System Administration, to the President. If a chancellor is the respondent or alleged victim, the report shall be sent to the President. If the President or the Secretary of the Board of Regents is the respondent or alleged victim, the report shall be sent to the Board of Regents.
F. If a Policy violation is found, the report(s) shall be sent to the disciplinary authority for the individual found to have violated the Policy, and the disciplinary authority must initiate formal action against that individual. The disciplinary authority may have access to the records of the investigation.
G. When formal action is initiated against an individual found to have violated the Policy, the sexual harassment officer shall ensure that the victim is appropriately advised of the resolution of that action.
H. A report of the action taken against an individual for violation of this Policy shall be retained permanently in the individual’s personnel file or student educational file. Other investigation records shall be maintained for a minimum of three (3) years or for as long as any administrative or legal action arising out of the complaint is pending.
I. All records of sexual harassment reports and investigations shall be considered confidential and shall not be disclosed publicly except to the extent required by law.
J. Complaints Involving Two or More Campuses: When an alleged Policy violation involves more than one campus, the complaint shall be handled by the campus with disciplinary authority over the respondent. The campus responsible for the investigation may request the involvement or cooperation of any other affected campus and should advise appropriate officials of the affected campus
of the progress and results of the investigation.
K. Complaints By and Against University Employees and Students Arising in an Affiliated Entity: University employees and students sometimes work or study at the work site or program of another organization affiliated with the University. When a Policy violation is alleged by or against University employees or students in those circumstances, the complaint shall be handled as provided in the affiliation agreement between the University and the other entity. In the absence of an affiliation agreement or a provision addressing this issue, the University may, at its discretion, choose to
(1) conduct its own investigation,
(2) conduct a joint investigation with the affiliated entity, (3) defer to the findings of an investigation by the affiliated entity where the University has reviewed the investigation process and is satisfied that it was fairly conducted, or (4) use the investigation and findings of the affiliated entity as a basis for further investigation.
IV. No Limitation on Existing Authority No provision of this Policy shall be construed as a limitation on the authority of a disciplinary authority under applicable policies and procedures to initiate disciplinary action.
If an individual is disciplined for conduct that also violates this Policy, the conduct and the discipline imposed shall be reported to a campus sexual harassment officer.
If an investigation is conducted under this Policy and no policy violation is found, that fact does not prevent discipline of the alleged perpetrator for unprofessional conduct under other applicable policies and procedures.
V. Information and Education
A. The President’s office shall provide an annual report documenting:
1. the number of reports or complaints of Policy violations;
2. the categories (i.e., student, employee, or other) and genders of the parties involved;
3. the number of Policy violations found; and
4. examples of sanctions imposed for Policy violations.
B. Each campus shall broadly disseminate this Policy, distribute a list of resources available on the
campus to respond to concerns of sexual harassment and related retaliation, and develop and present appropriate educational programs. Each campus shall maintain information about these efforts, including a record of how the Policy is distributed and the names of individuals attending training programs.
VI. Related Policies
A. Administrative Policy Statement “University Policy on Amorous Relationships Involving Evaluative Authority” provides that an amorous relationship between an employee and a student or between two employees constitutes a conflict of interest when one of the individuals has direct evaluative authority over the other and requires that the direct evaluative authority must be eliminated.
B. For related complaint, grievance, or disciplinary processes, refer to Article II, 3, B.7 of the Rules
of the Faculty Senate (for faculty), State Personnel Board Rules (for classified employees), and campus student disciplinary policies and procedures (for students).
VII. Review of the University Policy The President shall initiate a review of this Policy within two years.
For further information, contact the Sexual Harassment Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 700; 303-556-4493, TTY 303-556-6204, Fax 303-556-5585; e-mail: marylou.fenili@cudenver.edu
Drugs and Alcohol Policy
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing a drug-free educational environment and drug-free workplace. This policy statement on drugs and alcohol is designed to ensure that the University of Colorado at Denver complies with the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989. These Acts require the University, as a recipient of federal funds, to take measures to combat the abuse of drugs and alcohol. The continuation of federal financial support for students academic programs, and academic support services programs, is based upon compliance with these statutes and their regulations.
The University of Colorado at Denver prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession,
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or use of any controlled substance (illicit drugs of any kind or amount) and the abuse of alcohol by students and employees on University property or as part of any of its activities. This prohibition covers any individual’s actions which are part of any University activities, including those occurring while on University property or in the conduct of University business away from the campus.
It is a violation of University policy for any member of the faculty, staff, or student body to jeopardize the operation or interest of the University of Colorado at Denver through the use of alcohol or drugs. Individuals found to be in violation are subject to legal sanctions under local, state or federal law and to disciplinary action consistent with the Code of Student Conduct, the Faculty Handbook (2000 online), and the State Personnel System. Sanctions to be imposed on employees who are found to be in violation of this policy may include requiring satisfactory participation in a substance abuse treatment, counseling, or education program as a condition of continued employment, suspension or termination of employment, and referral for prosecution.
The Office of University Counsel has prepared a description of local, state, and federal laws concerning drugs and alcohol. This information is available on the Web at: chr.cudenver.edu/html/ Iegal_sanctions.html
A copy of the Chancellor’s policy statement is available on the Web at: chr.cudenver.edu/html/ chancellorspolicy.html
All faculty, staff and students employed at the University acknowledge that they will, as a condition of their employment, abide by the terms of this policy. Any employee convicted of a violation of any criminal drug law occurring in the workplace must report that conviction to his/her immediate supervisor within five days. The Drug-Free Workplace Act makes strict compliance with this policy statement a condition of employment on all federal grants and contracts.
The University is required to notify the relevant funding agency within 10 days of learning that a violation of this policy has occurred.
Students and University employees can learn about the dangers of substance and alcohol abuse and obtain more detailed information about treatment and counseling options available to the University community through the Web at:
www.cudenver.edu/public/ abusepreventionresources.html University employees can also contact the Center for Human Resources, CU-Denver Building, Suite 830,303-556-2868, for more information regarding available resources, programs and services. CU-Denver students can contact the Counseling and Family Therapy Center at 303-556-4372, North Classroom 4036, or the Student Health Center at 303-556-3132, for confidential information and/or referrals. Information also can be obtained by calling the National institute on Drug Abuse Hotline at 1-800-662-HELP or the National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information at 1-301-468-2600.
Code of Student Conduct (Student Rights and Responsibilities and Procedures for Disciplinary Review and Action)
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR WHICH ACTION MAY BE TAKEN IF A VIOLATION OCCURS
All persons on University property are required, for reasonable cause, to identify themselves when requested by University or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers, the University reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to University personnel or property and those who interfere with its function as an educational institution.
All persons on CU-Denver/Auraria property who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applicable to University students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations.
The behaviors outlined below will not be tolerated, because they threaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the University and the personal rights and freedoms of its members.
1. Intentional obstruction, disruption, or interference with teaching, research, disciplinary proceedings, or other University activities, including its public service and administrative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denver/Auraria premises.
2. Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, school officials, employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
3. Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CU-Denver/Auraria Higher Education Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the University, or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person.
4. Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms, which includes, but is not limited to, striking, laying hands upon, threatening with violence, or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure; or other treatment of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature. (This includes, but is not limited to, demeaning behavior of an ethnic, sexist, or racist nature, unwanted sexual advances, or intimidations.)
5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilities, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU-Denver/Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimental to the University.
6. Forgery, fraud (to include computer fraud), falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification with intent to gain any unentitled advantage.
7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver/Auraria property and the private property of students, University officials, employees, and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denver/Auraria buildings or facilities. This includes the possession of known stolen property.
8. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus. This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University, or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee. (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, firearms, explosives, BB guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles, Bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switchblades. A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm, explosive, or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly included within the meaning of the terms firearms, explosive, or dangerous weapon.)
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9. Sale, distribution, use, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
10. Physical restriction, coercion, or harassment of any person; significant theft; sale/manufacture of illegal drugs (includes possession of a sufficient quantity with intent to sell); damage, theft, or unauthorized possession of University property; or forgery, falsification, alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification to gain any unentitled advantage.
UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS
As a member of the University community, you are held accountable not only for upholding civil and criminal laws, but University standards as well. Enrollment does not confer either immunity or special consideration with reference to civil and criminal laws. Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to challenge or postponement on the grounds that criminal charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced, or are pending in civil or criminal court.
In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a student violates a standard and withdraws from the University before administrative action is final.
USE OF UNIVERSITY/AURARIA PROPERTY OR FACILITIES
Nothing in this Code of Conduct shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the voicing of concerns or grievances. The University is dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge through a free exchange of ideas, and this shall be a cardinal principle in the determination of whether or not a proposed use of University facilities is appropriate.
The Auraria Higher Education Center has established campus regulations and procedures governing the use of CU-Denver/Auraria grounds, buildings, and other facilities. Such regulations are designed to prevent interference with University functions and activities.
Except where otherwise specifically authorized, or wh^n members of the public are invited, the use of CU-Denver/ Auraria facilities shall be limited to faculty, staff, and students of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus, and to organizations having chapters, local groups, or other recognized University-connected representation among faculty, staff, or students
of the three academic institutions on the Auraria campus.
CLASSROOM CONDUCT
Students are expected to conduct themselves appropriately in classroom situations. If disruptive behavior occurs in a classroom, an instructor has the authority to ask the disruptive student to leave the classroom. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist, the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Public Safety and/or the appropriate Dean’s office. The appropriate Deem or his/her representative may dismiss a student from a particular class for disruptive behavior, while the Student Discipline Committee may recommend to the Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs to withdraw, suspend, permanently expel, and/or permanently exclude the student from the campus. Appeal questions concerning disruptive behavior should be directed to the Academic Dean’s office when withdrawal from a class is involved, and to the Director of Student Life when suspension or expulsion from the University is involved.
NON-ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE POLICIES
Violations of Standards of Conduct should be reported to the Director of Student Life during working hours. Auraria Public Safety should be contacted during non-duty hours.
If a violation occurs on campus and it is not in a specific building, Auraria Public Safety and/or the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
If emergency help is needed when on campus, contact Auraria Public Safety; for help off campus, contact the Denver Police.
Actions available to campus officials include, but are not limited to: asking those involved in inappropriate behavior to cease and desist; requesting offenders) to leave the Auraria campus; denying or restricting use of facilities or services; calling Auraria Public Safety for assistance; billing offenders) for any physical damages; pressing civil charges; and referring student(s) to the Director of Student Life.
STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
When one of the ten Standards of Conduct listed in this code is violated, the student may be referred to the Director of Student Life. Any person may refer a
student or student group suspected of violating this code to the Director of Student Life. Persons making such referrals will be asked to provide information pertinent to the case.
The Director of Student Life will make a determination as to the seriousness of the case. This will be done in most situations by asking the student(s) involved in the case to come in for an administrative interview to determine what actions, if any, will be taken by the University. Students will be notified in writing of the results of such administrative reviews.
The Director of Student Life has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no further action other than talking with the accused student(s).
3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student’s behavior has been inappropriate, and any further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University.
5. Refer cases to the Student Discipline Committee when the above sanctions are determined to be inadequate.
6. Take other actions, including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violators) provide(s) compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
STUDENT DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Disciplinary proceedings shall be conducted as administrative proceedings and not as judicial proceedings. The University is not a part of the judicial branch of state government. The University has authority to promulgate and enforce internal rules of behavior that shall be administered in a fair and impartial manner in harmony with its educational objectives and administrative nature. As part of the administrative nature of the committee’s proceedings, fundamental rules of fairness will be followed. Copies of these procedures are available in the Office of Student Life.
This committee, composed of students, faculty, and staff members, makes the decision whether students charged with violations of the student conduct code may continue to attend the University of Colorado at Denver.
The Student Discipline Committee has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
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2. Take no action other them talking with the accused student.
3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student’s behavior has been inappropriate, and further violation
of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University.
5. Recommend suspension of a student from the University for disciplinary reasons. This suspension may be for various lengths of time ranging from one semester to an indefinite period of time. After the period of disciplinary suspension has expired, a student may apply in writing to have the notation on the student’s record removed.
6. Recommend expulsion of a student from the University; notation on the student’s record will be kept permanently. When a student is suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons, an additional sanction may include being excluded from the Auraria campus.
7. Take other actions, including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violators) provide(s) compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
Student(s) must be notified in writing of the disciplinary action taken within five (5) days.
REVIEW PROCEDURES
A student may submit a request to review the recommendation of suspension or expulsion by the Student Discipline Committee within seven (7) working days to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs. Except in cases involving the exercise of the power of summary suspension (see below), the sanctions of suspension or expulsion for disciplinary reasons shall be effective only after the administrative review by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs has been exhausted or waived. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs decision shall be in writing to the student(s), with a copy to the Student Discipline Committee. Copies of review procedures may be obtained from the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs.
SUMMARY SUSPENSION
Summary suspension is a suspension from the University which begins immediately upon notice from the appropriate University official without a formal hear-
ing by the Student Discipline Committee. A hearing before the Student Discipline Committee is then scheduled as soon as possible (usually within seven calendar days) to determine the disposition of the case. Summary suspension may also include a physical exclusion from the campus if deemed necessary.
The Chancellor and/or a Vice Chancellor or Associate Vice Chancellor has (have) the authority to suspend summarily any student when in their opinion(s) such suspension is necessary to:
1. Maintain order on the campus.
2. Preserve the orderly functioning of the University.
3. Stop interference in any manner with the public or private rights of citizens on CU-Denver/Auraria-owned
or -controlled property.
4. Stop actions that are threatening to the health or safety of any person.
5. Stop actions that are destroying or damaging property of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus, its students, faculty, staff, or guests.
PERMANENT RECORD NOTATIONS
While disciplinary proceedings are pending or contemplated, a temporary hold may be placed on the student’s academic record. It will not be released until all actions and appeal procedures have been completed or finalized by the University. Only in those cases where suspension, deferred suspension, or permanent expulsion results from disciplinary action will notations be placed on the academic record.
RELEASE OF DISCIPLINARY INFORMATION
Access to any student’s academic transcript or disciplinary file shall be governed by provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Only the student charged or those University officials who have a legitimate educational interest in disciplinary information may have access to the files. All other inquiries, including but not limited to employers, governmental agencies, news media, friends, or Denver Police, must have a written release from the student to gain access to University disciplinary files.
Every effort will be made by the University to respect the privacy of the student. However, where the identity of the student has been publicly disclosed in the news media, the University reserves the right to respond as it deems appropri-
ate to describe fairly and accurately the disposition of disciplinary matters.
REFUND POLICY AFTER DISCIPLINARY ACTION
Submission of registration materials obligates the student to pay the assessed tuition and fees for that term. If a student is suspended or expelled from the University, the amount of tuition/fees which would be refunded may be the same as when a student voluntarily withdraws from a term. See the Tuition and Fees section of this catalog or the Schedule of Courses for more information.
The official withdrawal date applicable for tuition/fee refund purposes will be the date of the Student Discipline Committee’s decision.
TRI-INSTITUTIONAL VIOLATIONS
Procedures in deciding violations of the Code of Student Conduct involving students from other academic institutions on the Auraria campus have been developed by CU-Denver and the institution(s) involved. In such cases, the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
Ethical Use of Computing at CU-Denver
POLICY STATEMENT
CU-Denyer honors the University-wide Information Technology Policies. Access to and use of CU-Denver’s computing resources is a privilege granted to members of the CU-Denver community for scholarly, research, academic, and administrative purposes. Computing resources are defined as facilities, equipment, systems, and personnel. Use of these resources includes World Wide Web pages, listservs, email, application software, and any other electronic communication. Members of the CU-Denver community who use computing resources are expected to do so in an effective, efficient, appropriate, ethical, and legal manner. Use of CU-Denver’s computing resources depends upon mutual respect and cooperation to ensure that all members of the CU-Denver community have equal access, privileges, privacy, and protection from interference and harassment.
CU-Denver computing resources shall be used in a manner consistent with the instructional, research, and administrative objectives of the academic community in general and with the purpose for which such use of resources and facilities is intended. All activities inconsistent
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with these objectives are considered to be inappropriate and may jeopardize continued use of CU-Denver's computing resources.
CU-Denver computing resources are for the use of authorized individuals only and for use only in a manner consistent with each individual's authority. CU-Denver’s computing resources may not be used in any manner inconsistent with an individual's authority, prohibited by licenses, contracts, University policies, or local, state, or federal law. No one may grant permission for inappropriate use of computing resources, nor does the ability to perform inappropriate actions constitute permission to do so.
USER AGREEMENT «
Each user of CU-Denver computing resources is responsible for knowing and complying with all applicable laws, policies, and procedures. CU-Denver reserves the right to monitor, record, and store computing activities of anyone using computing resources. If such monitoring, recording, and storage reveals possible evidence of inappropriate, unethical, or illegal activity, computing system personnel may provide the evidence obtained from monitoring to appropriate university and civic authorities.
A. Each user agrees to make appropriate
use of computing resources including,
but not limited to:
1. Respecting the intended purposes of computing resources, facilities, and equipment (for scholarly, research, academic, administrative and CU-Denver-sponsored community service purposes).
2. Respecting the stated purpose of computer accounts (for scholarly, research, academic, administrative, and CU-Denver-sponsored community service purposes) and to use computer accounts only for the specified purposes.
3. Respecting the dignity and privacy of other users.
4. Respecting the integrity of the systems.
5. Respecting the resource controls of the systems and managing appropriately use of disk space.
6. Respecting the privileges associated with having network connectivity.
7. Respecting the copyright protection of licensed software and documentation.
8. Following all University of Colorado and CU-Denver policies, and local, state, and Federal laws related to computing.
B. Each user agrees to refrain from
inappropriate uses of computing
resources, including, but not limited to:
1. Using any other individual’s computer account or password.
2. Inappropriate, unethical, or illegal use of another individual’s computer.
3. Using computing resources, facilities, and equipment for personal commercial gain.
4. Intentionally seeking information on, obtaining copies of, modifying, or tampering with files, tapes, passwords, or any type of data belonging to other users unless specifically authorized to do so by those other users.
5. Using resources to develop or execute programs that could harass other users, infiltrate the systems, damage or alter the software components of the systems,
or disrupt CU-Denver activities.
6. Violating any network-related policy, whether set by the University of Colorado, CU-Denver, or a network governing body.
7. Altering or avoiding accounting for the use of computing resources, facilities, and equipment.
8. Making excessive use of resources, controlled or otherwise.
9. Misrepresenting oneself or others through e-mail or other electronic communication.
10. Using, duplicating, or distributing licensed software and documentation without the express written permission of the original copyright owner.
11. Using unauthorized copies of licensed software.
12. Abusing, harassing, intimidating, threatening, stalking, or discriminating against others through the use of computing resources.
13.Sending obscene, abusive,
harassing, or threatening messages to any other individual.
14.Engaging in vandalism or mischief that incapacitates, compromises, or destroys CU-Denver resources.
WORLD WIDE WEB POLICY
Access to the World Wide Web (WWW) and the ability to create web pages on CU-Denver computing systems are privileges provided to members of the CU-Denver community. CU-Denver users must conduct their activities in a courteous and professional manner.
I. Servers
Computing, Information, and Network Services (CINS) supports and maintains designated WWW servers for general campus usage. All web servers connected to the Internet through CU-Denver networking are to be registered with the CU-Denver Webmaster, webmaster@ carbon.cudenver.edu. This includes all web servers located outside of the CINS department. The WWW Policy applies to all web servers using CU-Denver as the Internet Service Provider (ISP).
II. Individual WWW Pages
Appropriate use policies for CU-Denver computer accounts also apply to individual home pages. Individuals who create home pages are responsible for adhering to the following guidelines:
A. Individual home pages are encouraged
for the following purposes:
1. Presenting personal non-commercial information (resumes, family, etc.).
2. Experimenting with available Web technologies and authoring tools.
3. Publishing and disseminating academic work.
4. Linking to cultural, scientific, or historical sites.
5. Posting announcements, news bulletins, and other general information.
B. Individual home pages may not be put
to inappropriate uses, which include,
but are not limited to:
1. Use of copyrighted materials in any form without the express written permission of the original copyright owner.
2. Personal, commercial uses which could result in a financial benefit for the page owner or his/her associates.
3. Use of audio, images (i.e., photographs, paintings, or derivatives thereof), videos, or movies of individuals without their express written consent.
4. Use of any personal information that is not public record pertaining to other individuals without their express written permission.
5. Use of any images or data that are abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminatory.
6. Use of any images or data that violate other University of Colorado or CU-Denver policies (e.g., Sexual Harassment Policy) or local, state, or Federal laws.
7. Creation of direct hypertext links to abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminatory material.
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8. Use of materials whose nature or volume compromise the ability of the system to serve other users’ documents and web pages.
9. Any use which constitutes academic dishonesty.
10. Use of individual home pages to engage in illegal activity.
III. Departmental WWW Pages
Appropriate use policies for CU-Denver computer accounts also apply to departmental web pages. All departmental web pages are expected to adhere to the CU-Denver Authoring Standards.
A. Departmental pages are encouraged
for the following purposes:
1. Disseminating general departmental information (goals, office hours, point of contact, etc.).
2. Highlighting departmental programs or activities.
3. Introducing faculty or staff and/or hyper-linking to their personal pages.
B. Departmental pages may not be put to
inappropriate uses, which include, but
are not limited to:
1. Use of copyrighted materials in any form without the express written permission of the original copyright owner.
2. Personal, commercial uses which could result in a financial benefit for the page owner or his/her associates.
3. Use of audio, images (i.e., photographs, paintings, or derivatives thereof), videos, or movies of individuals without their express written consent.
4. Use of any personal information that is not public record pertaining to other individuals without their express written permission.
5. Use of any images or data that are abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminatory.
6. Use of any images or data that violate other University of Colorado or CU-Denver policies (e.g., Sexual Harassment Policy) or local, state, or Federal laws.
7. Creation of direct hypertext links to abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminatory material.
8. Use of materials whose nature or volume compromise the ability of the system to serve other users’ documents and web pages.
9. Any use which constitutes academic dishonesty.
10. Use of departmental pages to engage in illegal activity.
POLICY VIOLATIONS
WWW Committee
The Chancellor shall appoint a WWW Committee to (1) manage the CU-Denver website, (2) set policies for and oversee the use of electronic communication at CU-Denver, and, (3) in conjunction with Computing, Information, and Network Services (C1NS), handle violations of CU-Denver Computing Policies.
Reporting
Any individuals who become aware of inappropriate, unethical, or illegal use of CU-Denver computing resources, inappropriate content of an individual home page, or any inappropriate electronic communication should notify the CU-Denver Webmaster, webmaster@carbon.cudenver.edu.
Child Pornography
Any material which appears to contain child pornography will be immediately referred to the Denver Police Department, and will also be subject to the procedures which follow.
Notification of Policy Violation
The CU-Denver Webmaster will notify the user who is alleged to have violated CU-Denver’s computing policies of the nature of the alleged violation and will provide the user with a copy of CU-Denver’s Computing Policies.
Suspension of Privileges During Investigation
During the investigation of an alleged policy violation, a user’s computing and network access may be suspended. CU-Denver reserves the right to examine a user’s recorded and stored information in the course of investigating an alleged policy violation.
Procedures
1. The CU-Denver Webmaster will review the material alleged to be in violation of CU-Denver’s Computing Policies. If the CU-Denver Webmaster believes that the material violates the policies, the CU-Denver Webmaster will request that the user remove the offending material.
2. If the alleged violator fails or refuses to comply with the CU-Denver Webmaster’s request, the CU-Denver Webmaster may refer the matter to the CU-Denver WWW Committee for action.
3. If the alleged violator disagrees with the CU-Denver Webmaster, the user may file a written petition requesting that the WWW Committee review the case.
4. The Chair of the CU-Denver WWW Committee will appoint a three-person subcommittee of the WWW Committee to review the case. Two members of the subcommittee must be selected from the membership of the WWW Committee. The Chair may select the third member from the WWW Committee
or from Faculty Assembly, Staff Council, or the Associated Students.
5. After consulting with the alleged violator and with the Webmaster, the subcommittee will determine (a) if a policy violation has occurred, and
(b) if a policy violation has been found, what action should be taken to remedy the policy violation.
Consequences of Policy Violations
Violations of CU-Denver Computing Policies may result in disciplinary action, including, but not limited to, suspension of access to the WWW, suspension of e-mail privileges, suspension of computing privileges, suspension or expulsion from the University, suspension or termination of employment, imposition of fines, and referral for legal action.
The CU-Denver WWW Committee may recommend to the Director of Student Life that a student be suspended or expelled from the University, or to the appropriate appointing authority that an employee be suspended or terminated. The WWW Committee may impose all other sanctions specified above.
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Instructional Technologies and Services
Instructional Technology and the Information Technology Initiative (ITI)
Students enrolled at the University of Colorado at Denver benefit from the university’s large investment in computer technology, infrastructure, smart classrooms, specialized computer classrooms, and computer labs. Over $9 million has been invested in instructional technology from 1999 to 2001 by the Information Technology Initiative (ITI), a capital construction grant awarded by the State of Colorado.
The Macro-Environment: Every enrolled student is entitled to a free email account. Students can access the Internet, periodicals and books, and online data resources from the Auraria Library remotely at home. Students also can use the free computer labs located throughout the Auraria Campus.
A new computer lab with facilities for students with disabilities is in the Auraria Library as a result of ITI funding.
CU-Denver is a member of Internet II. The CU-Denver network backbone has been upgraded to support high bandwidth activities. The modem pool located on the campus has been upgraded to 56 kbps modems, and the number of modems has been increased to 138.
Smart Classrooms: Students enrolled at CU-Denver will benefit from a uniform instructional environment of high technology smart classrooms that began coming online in Fall 2000. ITI funds coupled with the Classroom Improvement Project (CIP), a complementary grant awarded in 1999 by the State of Colorado, have made it possible to retrofit virtually all classrooms on the Auraria Campus as smart classrooms.
Smart classrooms have state-of-the-art media equipment, including: AMX system, Internet and cable TV access, laptop plug-in, ceiling mounted data projector, mini stereo, DVD player, VHS player, and document camera. In addition, each classroom has a new lectern, media rack, lighting configuration, and sound system.
Computer Classrooms and Labs: CU-Denver students also benefit from the following new specialized computer classrooms and labs funded by the ITI grant:
• School of Architecture and Planning Computer Lab (CU 460): This newly remodeled computer lab has a mixture of 35 PC/Mac workstations designed
specifically for architecture students. The lab has new furniture, chairs, lighting and two ceiling mounted projectors for class instruction.
• College of Business Computer Classroom (King 113): This tiered new classroom with 44 PC workstations is designed specifically for instruction to business graduate and undergraduate students.
• College of Business Computer Lab (King 216): This new computer lab for business students is equipped with 66 PC workstations, two HP LaserJet printers, new furniture, and chairs.
• CINS Computer Lab (NC 1206/1208):
This newly remodeled computer lab open to all CU-Denver students is equipped 81 PC workstations, two HP laser jet printers, new furniture, chairs, and lighting. The lab has special seating for disabled students.
• School of Education Computer Lab (NC 5032A and 5032C): Each newly remodeled lab has a mixture of
22 PC/Mac workstations with new furniture, chairs, and lighting. Each lab also has a ceiling mounted data projector so it can be used as a smart classroom.
• School of Education Multimedia Teaching Classroom (NC 4014): This state-of-the-art smart classroom is equipped with seven Mac workstations and video cameras so students can film themselves in the teaching environment. It also has been outfitted with
all the media equipment of a smart classroom.
• College of Engineering Raytheon Lab (NC 2606/2608): ITI funds coupled with a generous grant from Raytheon Corporation has allowed CU-Denver to open a newly remodeled smart classroom and lab for engineering students. The smart classroom contains 33 Unix workstations, sound system, VHS
and DVD players, and ceiling mounted projector. The lab includes 19 collaborative Unix workstations, lounge area, new furniture, chairs, and lighting for engineering students.
• CLAS English Computer Classroom (King 114): This new tiered classroom with 51 portable laptop computers with a ceiling mounted data projector is designed specifically for instruction by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences English department.
Instructional Technologies and Services / 45
• GIS Lab (CU 115): This newly designed, state of the art lab for the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) program is divided into a classroom and project work area. The GIS classroom has
32 Pentium NT workstations, NT server, two color printers, and mounted ceiling projector for use as a smart classroom. The project work area has 12 collaborative workstations, lockers, and a portable projector for student presentations.
• GSPA Multimedia Smart Classroom (5th Floor Lawrence Street Center): Students in the Graduate School of Public Affairs benefit from a newly remodeled smart classroom. This state of the art classroom is equipped with an AMX system, mini stereo, computer, DVD and VHS players, mounted ceiling projector, and desktop videoconferencing equipment.
• CLAS Social and Behavioral Sciences Computer Lab (NC 2028): This newly remodeled lab designed specifically for students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has been equipped with 55 PC workstations, new furniture, chairs, and lighting. A section of the lab can be easily converted into a computer classroom with 28 workstations, mini stereo, sound system, and ceiling mounted data projector.
CU Online-Denver
CU Online-Denver offers over 200 credit and non-credit courses delivered to you over the Internet. These are the same high quality courses taught in the traditional campus classroom and they are taught by some of our best faculty.
You can complete the CU Denver Core Curriculum requirements, take elective courses and even complete a degree program-all “Online.” In addition to course delivery, CU Online enables students to search course catalogs, register for courses, and order textbooks, with more student and academic services being added online all the time.
Complete online degree programs include:
• Bachelor of Arts in Sociology
• Master of Business Administration
• Master in Engineering Management
• Master in Geographic Information Systems
• Master in Public Affairs
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46 / Our University, Our Campus
With CU Online, students enjoy more flexibility with scheduling their class times than in a traditional classroom. Students can access their class sites each week at times they choose. Instructors use cutting-edge technology for presenting course content, such as streaming audio, video, and multimedia slide shows. A number of technologies allow students to interact with the instructor and their peers-these include threaded discussions in a bulletin board-type area, live discussions in an online virtual classroom, email, and collaborative workspaces. A “help-desk" is available 24 hours a day should you ever need technical assistance.
HYBRID COURSES
In addition to fully online courses,
CU Online offers Hybrid courses, where the class meets on campus for part of the class time, and then meets online for the remainder of the class. Students taking hybrid courses have the added interaction of face-to-face meetings with their instructor, but may only need to come to campus one day a week, instead of two or three.
SUPPLEMENTAL COURSES
CU Denver Online also supports faculty using web-based courseware to augment their traditional classes. More and more faculty are using instructional technology to post their syllabus, lecture notes, hold online quizzes and practice exams, and to coordinate relevant resources available on the web, in the libraries and through other media.
As students take courses with CU Online, they gain valuable skills for using the Internet as a tool for learning, research, and communication, taking them far beyond the boundaries of the traditional educational environment.
They have the opportunity to participate in the new global classroom, with a world of higher education at their fingertips.
We are well on our way to achieving the goal of providing students with the most comprehensive set of online courses, services and resources, coupled with the best online learning experience of any institution of higher education in the world. Participation in web-based learning positions students to become life long learners, and helps them to develop invaluable skills to take advantage of global learaning opportunities for their entire career.
Contact CU Online at 303-556-6505 or visit our web site at www.cuonline. cudenver.edu.
Computing, Information and Network Services
Computing, Information and Network Services (CINS) supports computer and network use for both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. All centralized administrative systems are developed, maintained, and processed by University Management Systems in Boulder, with output processing and user support provided by CINS in Denver.
The Denver campus maintains a communications network with over
Student Services, Support and Organizations
STUDENT SERVICES Academic Advising Center
Director: Cindy Anderson Office: North Classroom 1503 Phone: 303-352-3520
Academic advising is the foundation of a successful college career and an important component in major selection and career planning. The University has established the Academic Advising Center (AAC) to provide a variety of services to students.
ACADEMIC ADVISING
New freshmen and transfer students will be assigned an advisor who will
meet with them every semester to plan a schedule, discuss academic support services and assist with referrals to other on-campus resources. Frequent contact with an advisor is encouraged.
TRANSFER ADVISING
Services are provided for students who are transferring to CU-Denver, as well as those who want to explore other universities and colleges in Colorado and other states. Transcript evaluation and access to catalogs and degree requirements for other institutions are among the services provided to transfer students.
2,500 connections. This network provides access to all campus minicomputers and connection to the Auraria Library Online Information System, the World Wide Web, and the Internet. There are over 2,500 personal computers located on the campus in 21 teaching laboratories, two public labs, individual laboratories, and in offices.
CINS maintains the campus World Wide Web, where information is kept for reference by students, faculty, staff, and others interested in CU-Denver.
The CINS Help Desk provides assistance to students, faculty, and staff. The Help Desk technicians maintain personal computers and are available to assist with hardware and software planning and installation, acquisitions, Internet connectivity, troubleshooting, and general questions.
The CINS staff operates and maintains campus minicomputers, telecommunications equipment, and two of the CU-Denver computing laboratories.
These laboratories provide students with access to Macintosh and Intel-based personal computers and software as well as access to the campus network and minicomputers.
The goal of CINS is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work. For further information, please call the CINS Help Desk at 303-556-6100.
ADVISING FOR TEACHER LICENSURE
Students who intend to seek teacher licensure in Colorado should contact the Advising Center for course requirements early in their academic career. An Education advisor is available to answer questions, suggest courses and facilitate the admission process to the School of Education. In addition, transcript evaluation and analysis for degreed students who anticipate application to the Initial Teacher Licensure Program is provided.
PRE-PROFESSIONAL ADVISING
Students who intend to apply to the Colleges of Business and Administration, Engineering and Applied Science, or Arts
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& Media at the University of Colorado at Denver should be advised for intrauniversity transfer through the AAC. Liaison advising service? are provided by advisors and faculty mentors in the colleges. Transfer students or students who have earned degrees can be advised about pre-requisite course requirements for various professional graduate programs at CU-Denver and other institutions.
ADDITIONAL SERVICES
Other support services are provided in the academic advising center. Contact the center for more information.
CAREER PLANNING
The AAC provides referrals to The Career Center in the Tivoli Student Union. The Career Center provides a full spectrum of services to assist students in establishing a career path. Successful completion of a college degree is the beginning of this path; selecting appropriate work-related experiences enhances the student’s ability to identify the right career.
To meet the needs of the diverse student population, CU-Denver provides programs and activities designed to complement students’ academic programs and to enhance their total educational experience. Students are provided opportunities to develop, experience, and participate in student government, social, cultural, intellectual, and recreational programs. These programs create an environment in which students are;
• Assisted in developing leadership ability through opportunities to practice decision making, management and marketing, interpersonal and group communication, and relationship skills.
• Encouraged and aided in developing social, cultural, intellectual, recreation, and governance programs that expand involvement with the campus community and society and lead to mature appreciation of these pursuits.
• Encouraged to explore self-directed activities that provide opportunities for personal growth in individual and group settings.
• Exposed to various cultures and experiences, ideas and issues, art and musical forms, and styles of life.
• Informed about institutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities.
• Aided in the awareness and utilization of campus facilities and other resources.
• Assisted in developing community spirit through creative interaction among staff, faculty, students, and members of the local community Students are encouraged to involve their families in campus events and activities.
Programs and services provided by the Associated Students of CU-Denver, the Office of Academic and Student Affairs of CU-Denver, and Auraria Campus Student Services contribute to the fulfillment of this philosophy.
The Career Center
Office: Tivoli Student Union, Suite 260 Telephone: 303-556-2250 Website: Ccu-eers.cudenver.edu
Director: Lissa Gallagher Associate Director/
Internship Programs:
Cherrie Grove Assistant Director/
Career Planning Services:
Jonne Kraning Assistant Director/
Employment Services:
Joanne Wambeke
Program Assistant: Kate Kielsmeier
The Career Center offers a full array of services that prepare students for career success. Students are assisted in choosing a major; selecting a career path; gaining experience through internships, cooperative education, and service learning; researching career and employer information; developing job search skills; and finding employment upon graduation. Students are encouraged to access services as early as freshman year to begin planning their career and charting a course toward success!
CAREER PLANNING SERVICES
• Career counseling
• Career assessment inventories
• Resume assistance
• Interviewing skills coaching
• Self-directed job search coaching
• Career planning courses: Introduction to Career Planning and Career Success: Strategies for the 21st Century
INTERNSHIP AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM
• Part-time academic year positions
• Full-time alternating semester or summer positions
• Course credit at undergraduate and graduate levels
• Out-of-state/international internships
• Most positions are paid
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
• Online job postings for career positions internships student employment
• On-campus recruiting
• Resume referrals
• Career fairs
CAREER LIBRARY
• Occupational information
• Employer information
• Career computer lab
• Career Advisor Network Program
Pre-Collegiate Programs,
The Center for
Programs offered by the Center serve to motivate high school students to pursue post-secondary education and provide them the academic skills necessary to be successful in their college endeavors. The Center is located in NC 2204,303-556-2322.
PRE-COLLEGIATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
The Pre-Collegiate Development Program is a systemwide institutionally funded academic enhancement program for high school students. It is designed to motivate and prepare high school students who are first generation and from an underrepresented group in higher education to complete high school on a timely basis. The primary focus of the program is to prepare youth (grades 9-12) for professional careers of specific interest to them. The program includes academic advising (by parents and guidance counselors working together) regarding high school course selections that will best help students attain their desired career objectives. In addition, during the academic year, students will take part in relevant Saturday Academies in basic study skills, interpersonal skills development, and topics related to student preparation for the 21st century. Between their sophomore and junior years, students will participate in a two-week session designed to enhance study and library research skills, and provide a thorough introduction to college placement exams and career fields. Between their junior and senior years, students will attend a five-week academically intense Summer Academic Program.
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48 / Our University, Our Campus
Students will experience university life on a firsthand basis and enhance their secondary school academics by taking courses designed to augment high school academic requirements (e.g., mathematics, sciences, writing, computer science, social sciences.) Students also enroll in a three-credit college course.
CU-DENVER SCHOLARS PROGRAM
This is an early college enrollment program for college-bound, high-achieving students, first generation and/or from an underrepresented group in higher education, who are enrolled in their senior year of high school. The program enables students to begin their college studies by taking one course at CU-Denver during the fall term of their senior year in high school. The credit earned in the course can be applied toward a bachelor’s degree. While enrolled in the program, students participate in monthly workshops designed to acclimate them to the university and prepare them for college study.
Learning Assistance,
The Center for
The Center for Learning Assistance is designed to promote student success in the academic setting. Available to CU-Denver undergraduate and graduate students, services include English as a second language and study skills courses, tutoring, study skills seminars, peer advocacy, a test file, consulting, and a minority resource library. First-generation college students may be eligible for intensive services through the Student Support Services and Ronald E. McNair Federal Grant Programs within the Center. In addition, the Center houses two federal Upward Bound projects serving eligible students enrolled at Denver’s West High School. The Center is located in NC 2006, 303-556-2802.
Tutoring. Free tutoring is available in many subject areas (some limitations apply). Tutoring is held on weekdays and evenings. Scheduled tutoring is available Monday through Thursday, 8a.m.-7 p.m.,and Friday, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Open lab tutoring is available Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., and Friday, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.
Seminars. Study skills seminars are provided on such topics as critical thinking, time/stress management, test anxiety/test taking, essay writing, study strategies, active reading, learning styles, and listening/note taking.
Consulting. Academic, financial aid, and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy is available to students eligible for the Student Support Services Program.
Library. The Center maintains a small periodical and book collection authored by, and/or about, minorities; these resources are available for student research and leisure.
Courses. Courses are offered in a small group format in the areas of college survival skills, introduction to word processing, English as a second language, problem solving, and Excel. See course description section in this catalog for detailed information on courses.
ENGL 1006-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languages.
ENGL 1007-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I.
ENGL 1008-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages 11.
ENGL 1009-3. Advanced ESL Writing Skills.
STSK 0705-1. Problem Solving.
STSK 0707-1. College Survival Skills. STSK 0708-1. Introduction to Word Processing.
STSK 0800-1. Research Process for ESL Students.
STSK 0801-1. Communication Skills for ESL Students.
STSK 0802-1. Advanced Academic Reading Skills for ESL.
STSK 0803-1. Speech Presentation for ESL. STSK 0804-1. Listening and Note-taking for ESL Students.
STSK 0806-1. Study Skills for ESL Students. STSK 0810-1 to 3. Topics.
STSK 0811-1. Excel.
STSK 0820-1. Social Science Partnership for ESL.
SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS AND OPERATIONS
American Indian Student Services
The American Indian Student Services program provides access and educational opportunities to American Indian students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. American Indian Student Services also serves as a
resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns of the American Indian community. The office is located in North Classroom 2013, 303-556-2860.
Asian American Student Services
Asian American Student Services provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, and student leadership development. Supportive services are tailored to meet the specific needs of students. Asian American Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus and community, providing current information on issues and concerns of Asian Americans. The office is located in North Classroom 2012, 303-556-2578 or 303-556-2065.
Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD)
The Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal University structure. ASCU-Denver assists students with information concerning student clubs and organizations, campus events, issues concerning student status, and other information of general interest to students. ASCU-Denver also provides students assistance with grievances and the opportunity to become more closely involved with the University community, through active participation in student government itself, or through service on University, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees. More information concerning services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Tivoli Student Union, Room 301,303-556-2510.
Black Student Services
The Black Student Services program provides access, educational opportunities, and information to students of African descent through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. Black Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus,
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providing current information on issues and concerns affecting the community of Africans in America.The office is located in North Classroom 2010,303-556-2701.
Hispanic Student Services
The Hispanic Student Services program provides access and educational opportunities to Hispanic students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. Hispanic Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns of the Hispanic community. The office is located in North Classroom 2012, 303-556-2777.
Clubs and Organizations
This is only a sampling of clubs recognized in the past and is not necessarily current.
ACM Computing Club American Institute of Architecture Students
American Marketing Association American Planning Association American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Landscape Architecture
American Society of Mechanical Engineers Anthropology Club Art Club
Association of Black Students Auraria French Club Auraria Transnational Student Association
Beta Alpha Omega (Counseling/ Education)
Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting Honor Society)
Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Honor Society)
Chi Epsilon
Chinese Student Association College Republicans CSPA-Colorado Society for Personnel Administration
CU Venture Network-Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs Equiponderance Pre-Law Club Etta Kappa Nu Feminist Alliance
Financial Management Association GSPA Association
Golden Key National Honor Society
HASO-Health Administration Student Organization
IBSA-International Business Student Association
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Kappa Delta Pi M.E.C.H.A.
Master of Social Sciences Club MBA/MS Association (Graduate Business)
Model United Nations Conference Organization
The Robert E. Moore Collegiate Chapter of the American Marketing Association
National Society of Black Engineers Native American Student Organization Phi Alpha Theta (History)
Phi Chi Theta (Business/Economics) Philosophy Club Pi Tau Sigma Psi Chi (Psychology)
Russian Culture & Language Club Sigma Iota Epsilon (Management Honor Society)
Sigma Tau Delta (English)
SAS-Society of Accounting Students Society of Women Engineers Student Association of Musicians Tau Beta Phi (Engineering)
Vietnamese Student Organization
Counseling and Family Therapy Center
The CU-Denver Counseling and Family Therapy Center staff provides services at no charge to students for personal, educational, and relationship concerns through individual, couples, family, and group counseling, stress management, alcohol and drug prevention, and crisis intervention. If a client’s needs are such that they would benefit more from an alternative form of counseling or therapy, appropriate referrals will be made to community-based professionals.
Also, by request, staff provide consultation, lectures, and workshops to student, faculty, and staff groups, clubs, and classes on diversity, mental health topics, organizational, and student development issues.
The CU-Denver Counseling and Family Therapy Center is located in the North Classroom Building, room 4036, 303-556-4372.
Denver Free Press
The purpose of the student newspaper, Denver Free Press, is to provide students with information about campus issues
and events. The newspaper strives to include good investigative reporting, feature articles, and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is a tool to encourage and develop writers, journalists, artists, and other student members of its general management and production staff. The office is in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 345, 303-556-2535.
Disability Support Services Office
The Disability Services Office (DSO) serves the needs of a large and diverse community of students with disabilities who attend The Metropolitan State College of Denver and the University of Colorado at Denver. The DSO staff have a strong commitment to providing equal access and a wide range of support services to students with disabilities.
The DSO staff also work closely with faculty and staff in an advisory capacity, assisting in the development of reasonable accommodations that allow students with disabilities to participate in the programs offered on this campus. Advocacy and support services are provided including: testing accommodations, assistance in identifying volunteer notetakers, academic skill-building workshops, interpreters, priority registration, sale of handicapped parking permits and a resource library. For assistance and/or information, please contact our office: Arts Building,
Room 177; Phone: 303-556-8387;
TTY: 303-556-8484.
Emergency Student Loan Program
The Emergency Student Loan Program is designed to meet the emergency financial needs of students. The program provides interest-free, short-term loans for up to $400.00.
Applications for short-term loans will be accepted throughout the fall and spring semesters and summer session. Applicants are required to meet the minimum requirements listed below:
Students receiving financial aid are eligible if:
• Financial aid or scholarship eligibility
has been determined by the Office of
Financial Aid
• Financial aid is verified by presenting
recent copy of award letter, or letter
from financial aid counselor
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• Amount of aid covers costs of tuition and loan
Students not receiving financial aid are eligible if:
• Tuition balance is paid in full
• Monthly income is verified by presenting recent check stub or letter from employer
• Income indicates ability to repay loan within six weeks.
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans (GLBT) Student Services at Auraria
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans Student Services is open to all Auraria campus students as a resource for exploring sexual orientation issues. This program offers a variety of support, education, and advocacy services for the entire campus community:
• Support for those who may have questions about their own sexual orientation or that of a friend or family member
• Advocacy for students experiencing discrimination or harassment based on a reed or perceived GLBT identity
• Speakers for events, workshops, and classes on various aspects of sexual orientation
• Programs and workshops about working with the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and trans communities more effectively and combating misinformation, misconceptions, and homophobia
• Resource library of 500 books and
90 videos (documentary and cinema) available for research and leisure. Also available is a multitude of free literature regarding other organizations and services throughout Denver and Colorado that provide outreach, services, and advocacy.
• Programs such as Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans Awareness Month and other forums providing information and dialogue about GLBT issues.
The GLBT Student Services office
is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 311, and is staffed by a director with the support of student employees and volunteers. Input and involvement from the entire campus community are welcomed. For additional information, call 303-556-6333.
Ombuds Office
The Ombuds Office helps to enhance the clarity and dissemination of information, to simplify decision making and communication, to assist with the process
of change and with adjustment to change, and to improve understanding among students, faculty, staff, and administrators.
The Ombuds Office provides information about programs, policies, services, and procedures affecting members of the University community; makes referrals to appropriate state, CU system, and CU-Denver resources; serves as consultant in the preparation and review of policies and procedures; and assists in the solution of problems and the resolution of disputes. Ombuds Office services do not replace or circumvent existing channels, but help them work more effectively.
Ombuds Office services are informal, impartial, confidential, and independent of administrative authorities. The issues and identities of persons who consult with the Ombuds Office are not divulged to anyone without express permission to do so, except to the extent required by law.
For further information or assistance, contact the Ombuds Office, CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 700; 303-5564493, TTY 303-556-6204, Fax 303-556-5855; e-mail: ombuds@carbon.cudenver.edu
Student Advocacy Center
The Student Advocacy Center provides support services to CU-Denver students, particularly during their first year on campus. Services are designed to help students make a smooth transition to life at CU-Denver and to succeed in their college studies. Professional staff and student peer advocates provide information about campus resources and assist students with class scheduling, academic policies and procedures, and problem solving. The Center also houses an extensive scholarship library. The Center is located in NC 2012,303-556-2546.
Student Legal Services
Student legal services are available to assist students with off-campus legal problems through the provision of legal advice, litigation preparation, document interpretation, and assistance in negotiation. The service will not represent students in court. This student fee-funded program is provided free of charge to CU-Denver students; however, a charge may be assessed for actual costs incurred, such as copying, typing, etc. For further details, contact the office in the Tivoli Student Union, Suite 315,303-556-6061.
Student Life, Office of
The Office of Student Life is the advising, coordinating, resource, and general information center for student clubs and organizations, student government (ASCUD), student programs, and the academic honor societies. The office is responsible for the administration of the student fee budget and monitors all student fee expenditures to assure compliance with CU-Denver and State of Colorado regulations and procedures. The Director of Student Life represents the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees and maintains effective lines of communication with MSCD, CCD, and AHEC. The director administers the student conduct and discipline procedures as described in the Code of Student Conduct. The Office of Student Life is located in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 303, 303-556-3399.
Veterans Affairs, Office of
The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veterans and dependent students attending CU-Denver who wish to utilize Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists students with filling out VA paperwork and in solving problems associated with the receipt of VA-related educational benefits.
The OVA maintains proper certification for eligible students to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements for attendance, course load and content, and other regulations necessary to receive educational benefits payments.
In addition, the OVA provides VA Vocational Rehabilitation referrals, information on VA tutorial assistance, and VA work/ study positions for qualified veterans.
For further information, contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 303-556-2630, CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 100F.
CAMPUS SERVICE FACILITIES Auraria Child Care Center
The Auraria Child Care Center, 303-556-3188, serves the child care needs of Auraria’s students, staff, and faculty by providing high quality early childhood education and care programs. The Child Care Center is located on the southwest corner of the campus. Its programs are consistently recognized by the
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educational community for their high-quality early childhood care and education. Developmentally appropriate practices for young children guide the educational programs that are provided. Curriculum planning is flexible and based on children’s interests. Experiences are planned in accordance with “Key Experiences” adapted from the High/ Scope Cognitively Oriented Curriculum. Supervising teachers in the Child Care Centers are all degreed teachers meeting the certification guidelines of the National Academy of Early Childhood programs. Children aged 12 months to 6 years are served at the Center. The Center also has a fully accredited kindergarten program. Hours: M-F, 7a.m.-6p.m.
Auraria Event Center
The Auraria Campus Event Center is a 2,800-seat facility for team and individual sport activities, academic programs, events and conferences. Funds from the Student Recreation Fee support the use by students of the many health and recreation facilities found within the building. Adjacent to the building are softball fields, tennis courts and a track.
Emmanuel Gallery
Located next to southwest corner of PE Bldg., 303-556-8337.
The Emmanuel Gallery hosts exhibits of students, faculty, and nationally known artists. Stop in for a relaxing break. Gallery hours are 11a.m. to 5p.m., M-F.
Student Health Center
All CU-Denver students are entitled to medical services at the Student Health Center, and student health insurance is NOT required to use this facility. Physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiological technologists, and medical assistants staff the facility. Students will be asked to complete a sign-in sheet and show a current semester ID card each time they check in.
Services include treatment of illness and injuries, lab testing, medications, physicals, annual GYN exams, sexually transmitted disease information/testing, birth control information/services, minor surgery, cholesterol screening, immunizations, HIV testing, blood pressure checks, casting, suturing, and x-ray. All services listed above are low cost. Payment is required at time of service, except for students who participate in the Student Health Insurance Program. Classes regarding health-related topics are taught each semester and are offered free to students.
Walk-in services begin at 8 a.m., Monday-Friday. Access is on a first-come, first-served basis. Walk-in varies daily, contingent upon when all patient slots have been filled; thus, the daily closure time for walk-in care is variable. Patients are encouraged to check in as early as possible. The Student Health Center is located in the Plaza Building, room 150, on the lower level. Brochures with additional information are available at the health center. For further details and information regarding Night Students (Night Owl Advantage Program) and Extended Campus Students (Satellite Advantage Program), call 303-556-2525.
Tivoli Student Union
Tivoli Administration, Room 325, 303-556-6330.
The Tivoli Student Union is located at 9th and Auraria Parkway on the Auraria Campus. Inside this historic building, which was once a brewery, students will find a vast array of retail shops and restaurants, as well as the Auraria Book Center; copy center, hair salon, travel agency, the University of Colorado Federal Credit Union, and the Tivoli AMC 12 Theaters.
Visit the Tivoli Student Union website. http://www.tivoli.org
Also housed in the Tivoli Student Union are the Club Hub, Conference Services,
ID Program/Commuter and Housing Services, and Sigi’s Pool Hall and Arcade. Information Desk, Located in second floor lobby, 303-556-6329.
Information on Tivoli Student Union hours, locations, events, and services can be found here, as well as information about the Auraria Campus and Denver community.
Club Hub, Room 346,303-556-8094.
This uniquely designed club space on the third floor of the Tivoli features work space for over 60 clubs, mailboxes for campus clubs, a limited number of lockers, club bulletin boards, meeting rooms, and lounge area for larger group meetings. This office works closely with the Student Advisory Committee to the Auraria Board (SACAB), the Student Union Advisory Board (SUAB), and the Student Activities/Life offices.
Tivoli Conference Services, Room 325, 303-556-2755.
Through the Conference Services office, Tivoli meeting rooms and conference space can be reserved for non-academic purposes, including meetings, weddings, and receptions. The conference service department has tour caterers to choose from for all catering needs.
ID Program/Commuter and Housing Services, Room 243,303-556-8385. Auraria students can have their I.D. cards made here, which are necessary for parking in some campus lots and checking out library books. Student IDs also serve as an RTD bus pass. The lounge provides lockers, RTD bus maps, ride boards, pop machine, and a microwave oven. In addition, information about off-campus housing is provided here, including referrals, apartment complex lists, and a courtesy phone.
Sigi's Pool Hall and Arcade, Room 145, 303-556-3645.
Sigi’s, named after the founder of the Tivoli Brewery, Moritz Sigi, houses 31 video game machines, 12 billiard tables, and one snooker table. Sigi’s is open to the entire Auraria campus population as well as the public. The student-friendly atmosphere encourages community socialization and relaxation.
Tivoli Tickets, Room 261C, 303-556-3315.
Tickets for campus events may be purchased here. Tivoli Tickets is also an authorized Ticketmaster outlet.
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52 / Our University, Our Campus
International Student Services
American Language Center: Intensive English Program (IEP)
The University’s American Language Center (ALC) offers an on-campus Intensive English Program (IEP) for international students who need to pass the TOEFL or who want English language training for professional purposes. The IEP offers six levels of intensive academic language instruction plus TOEFL preparation classes, as well as a University of Colorado 1-20 for students needing an F-l student visa. Nine-week programs start every January, March, June, August, and October. International students may attend the IEP in preparation for meeting the University’s TOEFL requirements prior to entering University undergraduate or graduate programs. Acceptance into the Intensive English Program does not guarantee acceptance into the University degree programs. E-mail contact: alc@cudenver.edu;
Website: www.cimericamlcinguagecenter.net; 303-556-4290.
Office of International Education
Director Lawrence Bell, 303-556-4925 International Student Advisor Deborah
Durkee, 303-5564924 Study Abroad Coordinator Karen
Goubleman, 303-556-3388 Office: CU-Denver Building, Suite 140,
1250 14th Street
E-mail: international@carbon.cudenver.edu Website: http://international.cudenver.edu
The University of Colorado at Denver, through the Office of International Education (OIE), provides a variety of international programs, educational opportunities, and services for international and domestic students, scholars, faculty, staff, and the greater Denver community. The goals of OIE are to raise international awareness on the CU-Denver campus and, in particular, to provide an opportunity for all students to gain the global competency needed in today’s interdependent world.
OIE arranges student study abroad programs, expedites the exchange of students and faculty, hosts international visitors, promotes special relationships
with foreign universities, and advises students and faculty on Fulbright and National Security Exchange Program (NSEP) and other scholarship opportunities. OIE also functions as a recruiting, retention, and advisory office for international students and coordinates many services for them before and after they have been accepted to CU-Denver, including: new student orientation, visa and Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) advice, and help for those international students who need assistance with a variety of questions and potential difficulties, including the offering of a semester-long orientation course (CLAS 1100). In addition, OIE seeks to increase community awareness of international issues by periodically sponsoring lectures and programs that are open to the general public.
STUDY ABROAD
OIE assists students wishing to make international study an integral part of their college experience. Study abroad programs vary in length from two weeks to one academic year, and are also offered during the summer and winter breaks. Although many programs are for language study, a substantial number of programs are taught in English; thus, foreign language is not always required for participation. These programs are available to students in all disciplines, from architecture to business to liberal arts, in a variety of countries worldwide. Students can pay CU-Denver tuition and study abroad on an exchange program for an academic semester or year. Either CU-Denver or transfer credit may be earned abroad, giving students the opportunity to fulfill degree requirements while experiencing a new culture.
Since tuition and program fees are generally affordable and financial aid is available and can be used for study abroad, it is a feasible option for almost every CU-Denver student. Information and advice on scholarships such as Fulbright and NSEP, as well as volunteer and work opportunities abroad are available.
New programs are continually developing, so call or check the OIE website to learn more about our programs. Logon to our website at http://studyabroad.cuden-ver.edu for further information.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADVISING AND SUPPORT SERVICES
Since the first few months in a new country and a new city can be particularly difficult for international students, OIE offers a number of special services in order to ease this transition, such as an orientation program for new international students, answers to visa questions, and help in finding housing. All international students meet with the International Student Advisor (ISA) in OIE upon arrival in Denver to have visas and other paperwork reviewed, in order to assist in personalized advising. OIE provides a friendly ear and a place to ask questions and express concerns about all kinds of issues, including U.S. social customs, as well as an avenue for communicating with other CU-Denver international student clubs and organizing social activities.
The OIE also works with the University’s American Language Center, which offers an Intensive English Program for international students preparing to pass the TOEFL or who need further English help after starting their degree studies.
See Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section for a complete description.
GRADUATE STUDENT AND FACULTY FULBRIGHT INFORMATION
OIE serves as the University clearinghouse for information on various scholarships and fellowships for study and research abroad, including Fulbright graduate student and faculty visiting lectureships at foreign universities.
COMMUNITY OUTREACH SERVICES
During the year, OIE sponsors periodic guest lectures and special seminars focused on topics of current international interest. Most of these activities are open to the public as well as the CU-Denver community. OIE is also an active participant in a number of Denver community international programs and events.
For more information about these and other programs, contact the OIE office at 303-556-3489.
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


Campus Resources
AURARIA LIBRARY
Dean/Director: David Gleim Associate Dean: Anthony J. Dedrick Associate Director Jean F. Hemphill Office: Auraria Library, 1100 Lawrence Street Telephone:
Administration: 303-556-2805 Information: 303-556-2740 Reference: 303-556-2585
FACULTY
Associate Professors: David Gleim,
Ellen Greenblatt, Jean F. Hemphill,
Terry Ann Leopold
Assistant Professors: Anthony J. Dedrick, Robert L. Wick
Instructors: Orlando Archibeque,
Eric Baker, Jeffrey Beall, Thomas J.
Beck, Gayle Bradbeer, Meg Brown-Sica, Larraine Evans, Rosemary Evetts,
Vera Gao, Cynthia Hashert, Florence Jones, Elaine Jurries, Susan Maret,
Nikki McCaslin, Ellen Metter,
Marit S. Taylor, Linda D. Tietjen,
Louise Treff-Gangler, Diane Turner, Judith Valdez, Robb Waltner,
Eveline Yang
LIBRARY SERVICES
Access to information is essential to academic success. The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus, provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The Library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver.
THE COLLECTION
The Auraria Library has a collection of approximately 600,000 volumes. In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection, the Library also has over 3,200 journal and newspaper subscriptions, access to more than 5,000 electronic journals, and a film/videotape collection. The Library is a selective depository for U.S. Government publications and a depository for Colorado State documents, with a collection of over 450,000 documents. The Auraria Library’s collection is supplemented by providing access :o other libraries within the state and rationally through interlibrary loan services.
AURARIA LIBRARY ELECTRONIC RESOURCES
Auraria Library provides on- and off-campus access to a wide variety of electronic resources available through the Library’s home page: http://library. auraria. edu Available resources include:
Skyline: Auraria Library’s online catalog provides access to books, journal holdings, media, and government publications owned by the Library. Reserve materials for courses are also listed.
Prospector Global Catalog: Auraria patrons can expand their searches for materials with Prospector, a catalog of fourteen Colorado Libraries. Prospector has 12 million holdings including public and academic libraries. You may request items that are checked out or missing from Skyline and if the Prospector item you need is checked out, you may place a hold. Materials are requested online and delivered to Auraria Library Circulation within 2^1 days. Items are checked out for 3 weeks with one renewal. Try this popular service by clicking on the “Search Prospector” tab in a Skyline catalog search or directly at: www.prospector. coalliance, org.
Article databases: Over 100 databases provide access to full text articles and journal citations in a variety of fields. Available on-campus to all and off-campus to current students, faculty, and staff.
Reference resources: Dictionaries, encyclopedias, almanacs, and numerous other reference resources. Web resources: Internet resources in all fields that have been selected and evaluated by librarians.
Auraria Library information: Instruction guides, subject guides, instructions for off-campus access, hours, policies, and other library information.
CIRCULATION SERVICES
Library materials are checked out from the Circulation Desk with a current Auraria ID or other valid identification. Undergraduate students may check out books for 28 days, and graduate students for 60 days. An Auraria student can check out up to 75 items from the general collection. Items can be renewed three times if not requested by another borrower online using Skyline’s View Your Own Record, in
Campus Resources / 53
person, or by phone, 303-556-2639. Other services include patron-placed holds in Skyline for checked-out items and e-mail circulation notices that allow for e-mail renewals. Fines are assessed when books are renewed or returned past their due date, and replacement charges will be assessed if items are 28 days overdue.
REFERENCE SERVICES
The Auraria Library Reference Department strives to provide excellent service in assisting students and faculty with their research needs. The Reference Desk is staffed during most hours the Library is open, and has librarians and staff trained in all subject areas in order to assist students with online and print sources of information. Contact the Reference Desk at 303-556-2585.
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
Most U.S. and Colorado government publications are in a separate location in the Library and are available all the hours the Library is open. Specialized assistance is available during weekday hours and at the Reference Desk evenings and weekends. Call 303-556-8372 for information and hours.
INFORMATION DELIVERY/ INTERLIBRARY LOAN
Auraria Library participates in a worldwide electronic borrowing and lending network with other libraries. This service enables all Auraria campus students, faculty, and staff to obtain materials not available at the Auraria Library. Requests from registered users can be initiated electronically through the Auraria Library’s Home Page using the WebZap service. This department also loans material to institutions throughout Colorado and around the world. Access to materials from other Colorado libraries is available via Prospector.
LIBRARY INSTRUCTION
The Library is committed to providing information skills through its instruction program. The program is varied, ranging from basic, introductory-level material to advanced research methodology for graduate students. Information on other electronic resources is an important component of the Library Instruction Program. For more information about the Library’s instructional offerings, contact the Library Instruction office at 303-556-3683.
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54 / Our University, Our Campus
RESERVES/MEDIA
The Reserves/Media Department (located in the northwest corner of the first floor) provides special short-term circulation of books, pamphlets, articles, and other materials needed for class instruction. Except for films and videos, all other types of media are housed in Reserves/Media, along with CDs/ records and appropriate players. Films and videos (including those on reserve) are located in Media Equipment Services, first floor, southeast corner.
The loam periods for "reserved” items are short, and overdue follow-up is prompt, so that the maximum number of students may have access to the materials. These materials include not only titles owned by the Library, but also personal copies made available by the faculty. “Reserve” material may be checked out for two hours, one day or three days, with the exception of media items, which may be checked out for two weeks. The length of check-out is determined by the professor. Materials will be checked out with either a student
I.D. or a Colorado driver’s license.
ARCHIVES AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
The Archives and Special Collections Department of the Auraria Library acts as the archival repository for materials produced by the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, Community College of Denver, and the Auraria Higher Education Center. These materials include documents such as college catalogs, student newspapers, budgets, and fact books. Manuscript collections at the Auraria Library focus on public policy issues and public affairs. Examples of manuscript holdings include the records from organizations such as the American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado, the National Municipal League, and the American Association of University Women of Colorado. The library's special collections area contains books on many different subjects, including Colorado and Denver history, theses and dissertations from CU-Denver, science fiction, rhetoric, and juvenile literature. For information and hours, call 303-556-8373.
COMPUTER COMMONS
Word processing, spreadsheet production, web browsing, and email are available for students and faculty in the Library’s Computer Commons lab.
The lab is also equipped with document
scanners and printers. It is available whenever the library is open.
SERVICES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
The library is committed to making its resources and services available to all students. Library services to assist persons with disabilities include orientation to the physical layout of the library, retrieval of materials, and some assistance with use of the online public access catalog, periodicals, and indexes.
Adaptive computer equipment and software have been installed in the reference area and in the Combined Computer Access Center to assist a number of students with varying disabilities. This equipment connects to the online public access catalog, the Internet, and other electronic access systems.
ADDITIONAL FACILITIES
Photocopiers, microform reader/ printers, a copy center, pay phones, and study rooms are all available at the library.
FRIENDS OF AURARIA LIBRARY
The Friends of Auraria Library is an association formed in 1976 to promote the development of Auraria Library as a center for learning, study, and research for the students and faculty of the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The Friends of Auraria Library’s ongoing objectives are:
1. To promote awareness of and good will toward Auraria Library on the campus, in the metropolitan area, and in the region; and
2. To increase library resources through contributions, solicitations, grants, bequests, and gifts of books and other appropriate materials.
For more information about the Friends of Auraria Library, call 303-556-2805.
AURARIA MEDIA CENTER
Director: James K. Straub Assistant Director Randy L. Tatroe Office: Auraria Media Center,
1100 Lawrence Street, Room 015 Telephone: 303-556-2426
The Auraria Media Center offers a full range of media services, including the management of the Library’s film and videotape collection. These materials are listed in the online public access catalog. The Media Center operates a 28-channel
television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus. Faculty members may request the transmission of a film or videotape directly into the classroom over this system. Students may request transmission of a film or videotape from one of the media viewing and listening carrels in the Library. This system also can transmit live programs from St. Cajetan’s, the Student Union, and the Media Center’s television studios to other locations on campus. A self-service graphics lab and two self-service VHS editing suites also are available for student use in the Media Center’s Production Department. Finally, an Internship Program is available to students who are interested in converting knowledge gained in electronics, graphics, or television production courses to practical experience.
AURARIA BOOK CENTER
Tivoli Student Union, 303-556-3230
Hours: M-Th, 8a.m.-6p.m.; F, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Please call for hours during vacation and interim periods.
The Auraria Book Center, a department of Student Auxiliary Services -your campus store-is located in the historic Tivoli Student Union. The Book Center provides textbooks for the Auraria schools, plus a complete general book department that is especially strong in technical and reference areas. Best sellers, new releases, and gift book selections change frequently, and are often accompanied by displays of special value books on many subjects. For additional savings on general reading books, join the Auraria Book Club at the Customer Service desk.
Students need to bring course printouts to locate textbooks. Books are located by school; subjects are arranged alphabet-ically-departmental abbreviations, with course and section numbers-and prices are printed on the shelf tag below. Each title has the designation of Required, Preferred, Optional, or Available. You can also order books online at www.aurariabooks.com.
Used textbooks sell for 75 percent of the new book price. The Auraria Book Center carries more used textbooks than any other book store in Colorado, but shop early as used books are the first to go.
A full refund is given for new and used books accompanied by the receipt and returned within the first three weeks of class for regular semesters and during the first week of class for short terms.
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Extended Studies / 55
Please read the refund policy attached to the receipt.
When a course ends, the textbook may still have value and may be bought back by the Book Center. The buy-back policy on used texts is to pay half of the new price on books that will be used again next semester on this campus. Other texts are purchased at lower percentages. The Auraria Book Center’s buy-back services are dedicated to its student customers.
A validated Auraria student or campus ID is required to complete a buy-back transaction. Books are bought for this campus throughout the semester; however, buyers from national text book companies are on hand at the end of each semester to purchase used books which may be required at other schools.
Campus Computers, 303-556-3726, offers the latest in hardware and software technology. An educational discount is offered to Auraria campus students; a current, validated Auraria ID must be presented at the time of purchase. A full line of computer reference books and accessories is also available as well as calculators and other small electronics. Campus Computers hours are M-Th, 8a.m.-6p.m.; F, 8a.m.-5p.m.; Sat,
10 a.m. -3 p.m. It is located on the second floor of the Auraria Book Center.
Extended Studies
The Extended Studies Programs at CU-Denver offer continuing and non-traditional education. They employ both alternative delivery systems and traditional methods to make high-quality learning experiences accessible to Colorado's diverse population. Extended Studies Programs are responsible for the administration of all classes conducted off the Auraria campus as well as many of those conducted in non-traditional formats on campus, such as weekends. Although they are not academic units and do not grant degrees, courses and programs offered through Extended Studies Programs do enhance and supplement traditional degree programs at the University. Students with certain registration or scheduling difficulties can take courses applicable to their degree programs through Extended Studies. Courses offered through Extended Studies are identical to those offered through the regular Schedule of
A current photo ID is required for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard, VISA, and American Express.
Look for our website at: www.aurariabooks.com
The Auraria Book Center is owned by the State of Colorado and supports the Student Bond Fund.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
The CU-Denver Alumni Association provides programs and services which stimulate interest in, increase support for, and build life-long commitment to the University of Colorado at Denver among its alumni, students, and the community. Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon graduation. Friends and non-degree former students also are welcome to participate in alumni activities. The governing board is composed of alumni representing all schools and colleges on campus.
CU on the Horizon, a newsletter published twice a year, is mailed to all graduates. Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/or activities which might interest them. The Appreciation, Leadership, Legislative, Alumni Mack Easton, and Recognition Awards are bestowed each year at commencement and are sponsored by the Association.
A program for alumni use of the campus
Courses and are recorded on a standard CU-Denver transcript along with any other classes taken through the University.
Students may want to consider taking classes through the Extended Studies programs under the following circumstances:
1. Not formally admitted to the University. Prospective CU-Denver students need not wait for formal admission to the University to begin taking classes if they enroll in Extended Studies courses. Students who have not been formally admitted to the University can, in many cases, enroll in Extended Studies classes and transfer those credit hours (with departmental approval) to a degree program when they are formally admitted. (Students planning to explore this option should check with the department through which they intend to pursue their degrees to determine how many Extended Studies credits will be transferable.)
recreation center is available through the office, 303-556-2549.
The Alumni Association provides financial support for students through scholarships and academic recognition for students through the Academic Athlete Program.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO FOUNDATION, INC.
The chief goal of the University of Colorado Foundation, Inc. is to advance the University of Colorado’s mission to become the premier public institution of higher learning in the nation.
The University’s academic leadership establishes priorities for private support. Professional fundraisers generate interest and enthusiasm for the University, recruit and organize volunteers, solicit gifts, and assist donors in gift planning.
Established in 1967 as an independent, privately governed, nonprofit corporation, the CU Foundation raises and manages private support to benefit students and faculty by raising funds for scholarships, enriching academic programs, purchasing equipment, and upgrading facilities. In 1981, the CU Foundation established a Denver campus office: Campus Box 174;
P.0. Box 173364; Denver, CO 80217-3364; Phone 303-556-4301.
2. Scheduling conflicts. Students who are balancing family and work obligations, in addition to college, can take Extended Studies courses that fit their schedules. Many classes are offered in the evenings and on weekends. Depending upon the student's choice of degree programs, it may be possible to obtain an undergraduate degree from CU-Denver by attending only evening and/ or weekend classes through Extended Studies. Students are encouraged to contact an academic advisor in their chosen discipline or an advisor in the Extended Studies programs to discuss the options available to them.
3. Academic suspension. Each academic unit of the University has established its own policies regarding students who are placed on academic suspension. When those policies allow, students on academic suspension may take a certain number of credit hours (as established by the appropriate academic unit)
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56 / Our University\ Our Campus
through Extended Studies to improve their grade-point averages. Students must check with an academic advisor in their chosen discipline to determine whether this option is open to them.
In addition to credit courses, Extended Studies Programs offer a variety of noncredit courses for both personal enrichment and professional credentialing. Practicing professionals in business, engineering, public affairs, architecture and planning, and education are encouraged to contact the appropriate CU-
Centers and Institutes
Center for Applied Psychology
(for information see Psychology in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Center for Collaborative Educational Leadership
(for information see the School of Education section in this catalog)
Center for Computational Mathematics
(for information see Mathematics in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Center for Environmental Sciences
(for information see Environmental Sciences in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Center for Ethics and Community
(for information see Philosophy in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Center for Geotechnical Engineering Science
(for information see the College of Engineering and Applied Science section in this catalog)
Center for Research in Health and Behavioral Sciences
(for information see Health and Behavioral Sciences in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Denver school or college for information on courses applicable to continuing professional education, certification, and licensure.
Following are Extended Studies and Professional Development contacts:
College of Architecture and Planning 303-556-3382
College of Business and Administration (Professional Development Programs) 303-556-5826
School of Education 303-556-6361
College of Engineering and Applied Science
(Continuing Engineering Education) 303-556-4907
College of Liberal Arts & Sciences 303-556-2735
Graduate School of Public Affairs 303-556-5970
Center for Research on Economic and Social Policy
(for information see Economics in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Colorado Center for Community Development
The Colorado Center for Community Development provides technical, educational, and applied research assistance to organizations, neighborhoods, and communities that cannot afford or do not have access to professional services. The Center targets its assistance efforts to rural small towns, low income and/ or minority communities, and non-traditional, community-based service or development organizations.
Fourth World Center for the Study of Indigenous Law and Politics
(for information see Political Science in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog)
Institute for International Business
(for information see the College of Business and Administration section in this catalog)
International Training, Education, and Research Academy (ITERA)
The International Training, Education, and Research Academy (ITERA) was developed in 1994 to assist public and private agencies throughout the globed community in realizing their training
goals. This mission is reflected in such Academy projects as Foundations of Counseling, a post-graduate counseling psychology course that ITERA offers on the Internet, and the DAV Training Academy, a program that provides disabled veterans the training they need to become National Service Officers and promote the needs of their fellow veterans. These and other training endeavors help promote education and advancement among individuals for whom such opportunities are not always readily available.
ITERA is also an active contributor to the Total Learning Environment of the CU system. Older, well-established programs like the National Veterans’ Training Institute (NVTI) combine with enterprising new ones such as the Latino/a Research and Policy Center (LRPC) to give something back to the people and communities who host ITERA and the University so well. These programs aim to help develop the knowledge and skills that people in Denver and beyond need to build their urban communities into strong, sustainable metropolitan areas.
Funding for all of these and other programs implemented by the International Training, Education, and Research Academy has come from a variety of sources. Federal agencies like the United States (U.S.) Department of Defense, U.S. Department of Labor, and the Department of Veterans Affairs have sponsored ITERA programs, as have state agencies like the Colorado Department of Human Services. These public sector efforts have been complemented by contracts and grants from private sector entities such as the Disabled American Veterans and other nonprofit organizations. The International Training, Education, and Research Academy both gives to and receives from many different social groups and institutions in the global community.
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Centers and Institutes / 57
TeleMedia Center
(for information see the College of Engineering and Applied Science section in this catalog)
Transportation Research Center
(for information see the College of Engineering and Applied Science section in this catalog)
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02




College of Architecture and Planning
Dean: Patricia O’Leary Office: CU-Denver Building, Third Floor Main Telephone: 303-556-3382 Fax: 303-556-3687 College Web site: http://carbon. cudenver.edu/public/AandP/
FACULTY
Professors: Ernesto Arias, Gene Bressler, Thomas Clark, Mark Gelernter, Spenser Havlick, George Hoover, Joseph Juhasz, Yuk Lee, Dwayne Nuzum, Patricia O’Leary, John Prosser, Fahriye Sancar, Peter Schneider, Raymond Studer, Jr., Luis Summers, Willem van Vliet Associate Professors: Lois Brink,
Joan Draper, Phillip Gallegos, Marvin Hatami, Michael Holleran, Taisto Makela, Raymond McCall, Jr., Hans Morgenthaler, Bennett Neiman,
Randall Ott, Ping Xu Assistant Professors: Barbara Ambach, Alan Berger, Robert Flanagan, Julee Herdt, Ann Komara, Lawrence Loftin III, Eric Morris, Brian Muller, Doris Sung, Ekaterini Vlahos
Senior Instructors: Javier Gomez Alvarez-Tostado, Tim Castillo, John Frankhouser, Allen Harlow, Michael Jenson, Richard Margerum, E.J. Meade, Ronald Rael
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE
The College of Architecture and Planning at the University of Colorado at Denver prepares students for careers in architecture, urban and regional planning, landscape architecture, and urban design. The College offers the only undergraduate and graduate education in these fields in the state of Colorado. Students intending -"to enter the design and planning professions normally first complete the College’s •■undergraduate degree as preparation or entry into the College’s graduate-evel professional programs. Our graduate urograms are also available for those vho already hold an undergraduate legree in a field unrelated to design >r planning. A unique feature of the
college is that it offers its 900 students exceptional educational experiences in two distinctive locations. The College’s graduate programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban and regional planning, and urban design are taught on the Denver campus of the University of Colorado in the heart of a vital downtown; its undergraduate programs are offered on the Boulder campus in an environment ideally suited to the needs of undergraduate students.
A multi-disciplinary Ph.D. in Design and Planning is offered across the two campuses. With a diverse faculty committed to excellence in teaching, research, scholarship, and professional work, the College provides students with a broad range of learning opportunities.
For detailed information on the undergraduate programs, see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog and the college’s website.
Special Activities and Programs
The College provides a diverse range of opportunities which enrich and enhance the education of its students. Through activities and functions-including a lecture series, a visiting critic series, exhibits, publications, and active student organizations-the College encourages contact among students, faculty, and members of the design professions. Each summer, the College offers foreign study-travel programs, which in recent years have traveled to Finland, France, Mexico, Prague, Rome, and Russia. The College makes available a range of scholarships and fellowships, some of which are based on need, others on performance, and still others of which are specifically intended to provide enrichment opportunities. The College supports an active and focused internship program for its students, giving them access to elective internship opportunities in the Denver metropolitan area and beyond. Finally, the College encourages students to take control of their own education and supports, within its ability, any reasonable proposals from students that would enrich their own educational experiences.
College Facilities
The College’s administrative headquarters and graduate programs are located at 1250 14th Street in downtown Denver, on the northeastern edge of the Auraria campus. This favorable location gives easy access both to the extensive campus facilities, and to the urban amenities of Denver’s lively lower downtown. Most of the major professional design offices in Denver, and many planning firms and agencies, are within easy reach of the College. These provide many opportunities for contact between students and practitioners. College facilities include studio spaces for students, lecture and seminar rooms, design jury spaces, exhibition spaces, and faculty offices.
The College also provides a photographic darkroom and studio, a model and furniture-making woodshop, and an extensive computer lab whose focus is computer-aided design (CAD), computer 2-D and 3-D imaging, and analytic tools for planning. Also located in the College is a Geographic Information System (GIS) computer lab, which is open to all students of the University of Colorado at Denver.
Scholarships/Financial Aid
Students in the College have access to a number of scholarships and other financial assistance funds. Some of these funds are provided by the institution itself, while others are provided by external sources like the American Institute of Architects Education Fund, the American Planning Association, the American Society of Landscape Architects, and the Rocky Mountain Masonry Institute. For further information on these scholarships and graduate tuition awards, please contact the College’s student services officer at 303- 556- 3387. For information on federal and state financial aid, contact the Office of Financial Aid, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 125, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364,303- 556-2886.
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60 / College of Architecture and Planning
ADMISSIONS General Requirements
Applicants to the College of Architecture and Planning are required to submit
the following credentials:
• University of Colorado Application for Graduate Admission form.
• Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended. Transcripts must be mailed by the institution directly to the College.
A certified literal English translation must also be submitted for documents that are not in English.
• Letters of recommendation. U.S. residents-three letters; international applicants-four letters.
• Statement of purpose. Applicants to all programs must submit a statement summarizing career objectives and reasons for pursuing the intended program of study. Applicants to the Ph.D. program must also indicate a proposed area of specialization and,
if possible, a potential faculty mentor.
• Supporting materials for architecture and landscape architecture: Applicants to the graduate architecture and landscape architecture programs
are required to submit a portfolio (6-12 bound pages, 8.5 x 11 inches). Slides are not accepted. A portfolio is an orderly presentation of one’s work. This includes examples of creative and analytical work including, but not limited to, essays, papers, photographs, and photographic reproductions of artistic work such as sculptures, drawings, paintings, musical compositions, and other fine arts. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must be included for return of the portfolio. Applicants to architecture and landscape architecture are encouraged to submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores if their GPAs are below 3.0.
• Supporting materials for urban and regional planning: Applicants to the urban and regional planning program should submit, in an 8.5 x 11-inch bound document, their statement of purpose, a resume, and a copy of a student
or professional paper or project. Applicants to the urban and regional planning program are encouraged to submit GRE (general) scores; those whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0 are required to submit GRE scores.
• Supporting materials for the Ph.D.: Applicants to the Ph.D. program must submit a sample of written work and
any other evidence relevant to admission to the program, in accordance with submission guidelines which can be obtained from the College. Applicants to the Ph.D. program are required to submit GRE scores.
• Application fee. Non refundable ($50.00-U.S. residents; $60.00-international applicants).
International Applicants
International applicants are required to submit the following documents in addition to the credentials listed under general requirements.
• TOEFL score. For the professional programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning, the College of Architecture and Planning requires a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 525 for students from non-English-speaking countries. However, the College requires students with Toefl scores between 525 and 550 to register for an English course when they arrive at the University of Colorado at Denver. Applicants to the Ph.D. in Design and Planning must have achieved a TOEFL score of at least 575. Note that an Official TOEFL Score Report is required; institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable.
• Financial Resources Statement. International applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds available. To provide this evidence, each international applicant should follow these instructions:
a. If an applicant’s own money is to be used: In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement, applicant’s bank must certify that the full amount of money is on deposit in his or her account to meet tuition and expenses.
b. If an applicant is sponsored by a family member or friend: The sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. The sponsor’s bank must also certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money applicant will need for tuition and expenses.
c. If an applicant has been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed.
Statements used for other institutions will not be accepted. Photocopied documents are not accepted unless signed by the originator; signatures must be original.
Application Dates and Deadlines
Fall Semester
All professional programs-March 15 Ph.D. in Design and Planning-by March 1 to be considered for financial support
Spring Semester
All programs-October 1 (In architecture, urban design, and landscape architecture, students starting in the spring will only be able to select from a reduced set of courses, and will get on track starting the next fall)
Applications received after these dates will be considered only if space is still available.
Confirmation Deposit
A non-refundable confirmation deposit of $200 is required to secure an applicant’s place in the architecture and landscape architecture programs, and in the Ph.D. program. The deposit is due at the time the applicant accepts the program’s offer of admission. The deposit will be applied to the first semester’s tuition when the student registers for classes.
ADDITIONAL
INFORMATION
To request additional information, or to arrange a visit to the College, please phone or e-mail:
Undergraduate programs: 303-492-7711; A&P-Undergrad-info@carbon. cudenver.edu
Graduate professional programs:
303-556-3382; A&P-Grad-info@ carbon.cudenver.edu Ph.D. program: 303-492-7711; phddandp@spot.colorado.edu
You may also write to:
Office of the Dean, College of Architecture and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 126, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364.
For periodical updates on all aspects of the College, see our website at http:// carbon.cudenver.edu/public/AandP/
ACADEMIC POLICIES Academic Standing
Students must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in the graduate programs to remain in good standing and to graduate. If a student’s GPA falls below a
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3.0, then he or she will be placed on academic probation beginning the following semester. If the GPA remains below a 3.0 after the probationary semester, then he or she may be dismissed from the College.
Appeals
Any student may appeal the grades he or she receives in a class. The student should first informally discuss the issue with the relevant faculty member and then with the department chair or program director. If the matter is not resolved this way, the student may initiate an appeal by writing to the faculty member outlining the reasons for the appeal. Copies are to be forwarded to the department chair or program director and the dean. The faculty member must respond in writing to the student’s written appeal, with copies to the department chair or program director and the dean.
An appeals committee consisting of three faculty members of the relevant academic program will review the written appeal. The chair of the appeals committee will convey its recommendation in writing to the student who has appealed, with copies to the instructor, the program chair or director, and dean.
Attendance and Timeliness of Work
Students are expected to attend all meetings of classes. Excessive unexcused absences may result in a grade reduction at the discretion of the instructor.
Absence from a class will be excused for verified medical reasons or for extreme personal emergencies. The student may be required to furnish evidence.
Students’ assignments are to be completed in a timely manner. Any assignment turned in late may have its grade reduced by an amount set at the discretion of the instructor. An assignment may be turned in late without penalty for verified medical reasons or for extreme personal emergencies. Students must have their instructor’s written permission to turn an assignment in late. Students with excused late work may turn in the assignment by the end of finals week without penalty. Otherwise, the grade “IF” will be assigned.
Course Sequencing and Advancement
Programs in the College are structured so that certain courses must be taken concurrently, others sequentially.
Students will not be allowed to enroll in a
course if its co-requisites or prerequisites have not been satisfied.
Originality of Work
Students must submit their own work. Where other sources are used in a student submission, they are to be clearly identified and referenced. The University considers plagiarism and similar acts of falsification to be a serious matter which may result in suspension or expulsion. Information on codes of conduct and grievance procedures are available from the University of Colorado at Denver’s Office of Enrollment and Student Affairs.
PROGRAMS OF STUDY Architecture
Chair, Department of Architecture:
George Hoover, FA1A Telephone: 303-556-3382
The architecture program’s mission is to lead in the discovery, communication, and application of knowledge in the discipline of architecture. The program aims to excel in the education of its students, in the research and creative endeavors of its faculty, and in service to the community. To respond to this mission, the program has developed a unique intellectual, educational, and architectural culture.
First of all, the program celebrates its place in a very special set of landscapes-urbanized Denver and the Front Range, and the spectacular natural landscape of the high plains and the Colorado Rockies. The architecture program therefore focuses not only on the design of buildings, but also on the interactions between buildings and their urban and natural settings.
Secondly, the program examines the interplay between architectural form and the complex cultural and technological context in which architects operate. As a result of these dominant concerns, the program has created an academic environment that is intellectually stimulating and educationally challenging, and that aims to educate students who will become leaders in the discipline and profession of architecture.
The Department of Architecture, along with the Department of Planning and Design, offers a Bachelor of Environmental Design (B.Envd.) on the Boulder campus. The Department of Architecture also offers two graduate degrees on the Denver campus: the Master of Architec-
ture (M.Arch.) and the Master of Urban Design (M.U.D.). The following statement from the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is responsible for accrediting all architecture programs in the United States, should help a student choose the appropriate degree program:
“Most states require that an individual intending to become an architect hold an accredited degree. There are two types of degrees that are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board: (1) The Bachelor of Architecture, which requires a minimum of five years’ study, and (2) The Master of Architecture, which requires a minimum of three years of study following an unrelated bachelor’s degree or two years following a related pre-professional bachelor’s degree. These professional degrees are structured to educate those who aspire to registration and licensure to practice as architects. The four-year, pre-professional degree, where offered, is not accredited by NAAB. The pre-professional degree is useful to those wishing a foundation in the field of architecture, as preparation for either continued education in a professional degree program or for employment options in fields related to architecture.”
The pre-professional degree offered by the College of Architecture and Planning is the B.Envd. The professional degree offered by the College is the Master of Architecture (M.Arch.), which is fully accredited by the NAAB.
The Master of Architecture, the College’s accredited professional degree for students intending to seek licensure as architects, offers two distinct paths. One track, the M.Arch./4+2, is offered to students who have completed the College’s B.Envd. or any other preprofessional design degree from any NAAB-accredited institution. A second track, the M.Arch./3.5, is available to students who have completed an unrelated undergraduate or graduate degree, or to students who hold professional architecture degrees from other countries, but who seek to obtain an NAAB-accredited architecture degree. Students holding professional architecture degrees from foreign institutions will be given advanced standing commensurate with their previous educational experiences.
THE MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (M.ARCH)
M.Arch./4+2
The M.Arch./4+2 is intended for students who have completed the College’s B.Envd. or any other pre-professional
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62 / College of Architecture and Planning
architecture degree from any NAAB-accredited institution. This six-year plan of study, with completion of both the four-year undergraduate B.Envd offered on the Boulder campus and the accredited two-year M.Arch. on the Denver campus of CU, has been fully endorsed by the NAAB.
Program Requirements
Students completing the College’s Bachelor of Environmental Design (B.Envd.) on the Boulder campus-or completing a pre-professional degree from another NAAB-accredited institution-complete a minimum of four semesters of course work (60 hours of credit) after entry into the M.Arch. program. For further details on the B.Envd., and for descriptions of the pre-professional courses outlined below, please see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog.
Term by Term: Six-year M.Arch Curriculum
Undergraduate Sequence
Four years at Boulder-30 credits per year (approx.)
120 total credits
FIRST YEAR
YEAR THREE
Fall (15 credit hours)
AREN 4035-3. Structures I
ENVD 3210-6. Arch Studio II
ENVD 3352-3. Arch Computer Media
Elective-3. ENVD Elective (ending in ‘4’)
Spring (15 credit hours)
AREN 4045-3. Architectural Structures II
Elective-3. ENVD Elective (ending in ‘5’)
Electives-6. ENVD Electives
Elective-3. Non-ENVD Elective
YEAR FOUR
Fall (15 credit hours)
AREN 3050-3. Environmental Systems I
ENVD 4310-6. Arch Studio III
ENVD 3115-3. Building Materials and Systems
Elective-3. ENVD Elective (ending in ‘2’)
Spring (15 credit hours)
AREN 3060-3. Environmental Systems II
ENVD 44106. Arch. Studio IV
ARCH 4314-3. Arch Theory
Elective-3. ENVD Elective
Fall (15 credit hours)
ENVD 1004-6. ENVD 2003-3. UWRP 1150-3. Elective-3.
Intro to ENVD Ecology and Design Expository Writing Non-ENVD Elective
Spring (15 credit hours)
ENVD 2002-3. ENVD Media ENVD 2001-3. Intro to Social Factors in ENVD
Social Science-3, (see list of options) Humanities-3. (see list of options)
Electives-3. Non-ENVD Elective
YEAR TWO
Fall (16 credit hours)
ARCH 3114-3.
ENVD 2110-6. MATH 1300-5. Elective-2.
History and Theories of Arch I Arch Studio I Calculus I Non-ENVD Elective
Spring (14 credit hours)
ARCH 3214-3.
ENVD 3001-3.
PHYS 2010-5. Elective-3.
History and Theories of Arch II Environment and Behavior College Physics I ENVD Elective
Graduate Sequence
Two years at Denver-30 credits per year
(approx.)
60 total credits
FIFTH YEAR
Fall (15 credit hours)
ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio
ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar
LA 6632-3. Site Planning
EIectives-6.*
Spring (18 credit hours)
ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio
ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar
Electives-9.* (Take ARCH 6950-6.
Thesis Preparation if undertaking a thesis in the next semester)
SIXTH YEAR
Fall (15 credit hours)
ARCH 5410-3. ARCH 6150-4.
ARCH 6151-2.
Electives-6.*
Professional Practice Advanced Design Studio or ARCH 6951 Thesis (6) Advanced Design Seminar or nothing if thesis taken (Take ARCH 6950-6. Thesis Preparation if undertaking a thesis in the next semester)
Spring (15 credit hours)
Electives-15*
* As of fall 1998, new students must take 9 credits each in cultural studies and professional studies, and 6 credits in technology studies.
The remaining 9 credits may be taken in any architecturally related electives on campus.
M.Arch./3.5
The M.Arch./3.5 is intended for those students who have completed an unrelated undergraduate or graduate degree, or for students who hold professional architecture degrees from other countries. This three-and-one-half-year plan of study on the CU-Denver campus has been fully accredited by the NAAB.
Prerequisites
Students must complete the prerequisites of college-level trigonometry and physics before enrolling in ARCH 5310. Introduction to Building Technology.
Since this class should be taken in the first semester in order to stay on track for graduation, students are strongly encouraged to complete the trigonometry and physics requirements before beginning the M.Arch. program.
ARCH 5000 Math and Physics for Architects is offered in the summer on a pass/fail basis. This class meets the prerequisite requirements.
A Graphics Workshop is recommended for students who do not have a background in architectural drawing and model building. This class is offered each year before the beginning of the fall semester.
Students are also expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy, and should be familiar with PC or Apple operating systems.
Program Requirements
Students with a bachelor’s or master’s degree unrelated to architecture must complete a seven- or eight-semester sequence of course work and accumulate a minimum of 114 semester hours of credit. Advanced standing will be given to students who have completed a non-NAAB-accredited professional architecture degree in another country, and who wish to obtain the NAAB-accredited degree from this College. These students will work with the chair of the department to develop an individualized plan of study commensurate with their previous degrees and experience, and will have to complete at least 60 hours of credit
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in residence within the College of Architecture and Planning.
Course Sequence
The M.Arch program is divided into five major components: design studies,
45 credit hours; cultural studies, 12 credit hours; technology studies, 18 credit hours; professional studies, 6 credit hours; and electives, 33 credit hours.
A wide array of electives in these areas allows students to tailor their graduate studies to their own interests.
FIRST YEAR
Fall Semester (15 credit hours)
ARCH 5110-6. Design Studio I
ARCH 5111-3. Design Seminar I
ARCH 5210-3. Introduction to
Architecture
ARCH 5310-3. Introduction to Building Technology
Spring Semester (18 credit hours)
ARCH 5120-4. Design Studio II
ARCH 5121-2. Design Seminar II
ARCH 5220-3. History of Architecture I
LA 6632-3. Site Planning
ARCH 5320-3. Building Construction
and Methods
Elective-3.*
SECOND YEAR
Fall Semester (18 credit hours)
ARCH 5130-4. Design Studio III
ARCH 5131-2. Design Seminar III
ARCH 5230-3. History of Architecture II
ARCH 5330-3. Environmental Control
Systems I
ARCH 5240-3. Human Factors in Design Elective-3.*
Spring Semester (18 credit hours)
ARCH 5140-4. Design Studio IV
ARCH 5141-2. Design Seminar IV
ARCH 5340-3. Environmental Control
Systems II
ARCH 5350-3. Structures I
ARCH 5410-3. Professional Practice
Elective-3.*
Summer Semester (12 credit hours)
\RCH 61504. Advanced Design Studio
\RCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar
llectives-6.*
THIRD YEAR
Fall Semester (18 credit hours)
ARCH 5360-3. Structures II ARCH 61504. Advanced Design Studio ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar
Electives-9.* or ARCH 6950-6. Thesis Preparation and Electives-3.
Spring Semester (15 credit hours)
ARCH 61504. Advanced Design Studio ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar
Electives-9.*
or:
ARCH 6951-6. Thesis
Electives-9.*
* Students must take 9 elective credits in cultural studies, 9 elective credits in professional studies, 6 elective credits in technology studies, and 9 elective credits in any architecturally related electives on campus.
POST-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS
The Post-Professional Program
The Post-Professional Degree Program is a mid-career, post-professional intensive course for those individuals in the design fields who seek to expand their knowledge and to advance their professional careers. In this program, students have the opportunity to study recent developments in their design fields resulting from advances in information technology, new theories and methods, and emergent discoveries and associations. The program currently offers two primary areas of study, the Master of Architecture II and the Master of Urban Design degree programs. Each of these programs has a research orientation and agenda, and their general intent is to create an educational context within which the fundamental practices of architecture and urbanism cam be examined, advanced, and extended.
The programs have been designed to be both flexible and interdisciplinary so as to provide students with a broad range of options which can accommodate and respond to each student’s own interests and study agenda through course work, independent study, or optional training.
Post-Professional Program:
The Master of Architecture II
The Master of Architecture II is an advanced degree program which provides its students with a range of opportunities
for exploring and extending their knowledge of the practice of architecture. Students applying for admission to the program must have been awarded a five-year or six-year first-professional degree in architecture. They may enter the Master of Architecture II program in any semester of the academic year.'
The Master of Architecture II program does not offer an NAAB first-professional degree; it is an advanced studies program for those who already hold this first-professional degree.
Students in the program must complete 30 hours of credit in required, recommended, and elective course work to qualify for the Master of Architecture II degree. To be eligible for graduation from the program, students must complete 12 credit hours of advanced design studio (ARCH 6150/6151 or UD 6600/6601) in the degree project sequence and 12 credit hours in required and/or focus-area course work particular to their area of study. The remaining six credit hours are elective course work. A typical sequence of course work within a focus area leading to the award of the Master of Architecture II degree is as follows;
SEMESTER ONE
Design Studio: 6 credits
Focus-area required/ recommended course work: 6 credits Elective course work: 3 credits
SEMESTER TWO
Design Studio: 6 credits
Focus-area required/ recommended course work: 6 credits Elective course work: 3 credits
Landscape Architecture
Chair, Department of Landscape
Architecture: Gene Bressler Telephone: 303-556-3382
The mission of the landscape architecture program is to explore design as the means to engage a range of evolving interactions between the ethics, places, and methods of landscape intervention and transformation. Our studies focus on compelling issues inherent to the urban, suburban, rural, and wilderness environments of the Rocky Mountain region. The insights and possibilities generated from these local studies provide an understanding of landscape design that is transferable at many scales and to other lands and cultures.
Specific objectives of the landscape architecture program are:
1. To develop excellence in the design
process and design: exploring the
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64 / College of Architecture and Planning
strategies, methods, and skills to study, synthesize, experiment with, make, and evaluate design precedents, landscape design, and design processes;
2. To learn and extend core themes of the profession that include landscape architectural theory and precedents, technologies and materials, natural and cultural systems, and communications and inquiry media: studying the means to inform and develop one’s ideas, to convey one’s values, and to criticize one’s work;
3. To provide a working knowledge of the institutional framework within which the design process occurs: building a strong understanding of and the skills required in professional practice, including management, leadership, marketing, ethical conduct, and legal issues; and
4. To engage service in ways that apply and integrate course work, research, and creative works to real world situations-participating with and involving others in opportunities to implement, enhance, demonstrate, communicate, and evaluate ideas and skills-and that provide measurable benefits.
We aim to link theory with practice, history with change, technology with invention, and designers with their constituents.
The curriculum prepares students for landscape architectural practice and research as presently known, and provides the setting to question, invent, test, and advance knowledge and capability of the profession. It consists of sequential and integrated design studios, core lecture and seminar courses, and elective opportunities, including a professional internship. Students develop capabilities in design within studio courses. Core themes, theories, precedents, technologies, and skills of the profession are developed in the lecture and seminar courses. Curriculum integration is achieved through deliberate internal coordination efforts and collaboration with other programs within the College as well as other CU-Denver colleges and schools. The curriculum provides opportunities that facilitate the offering and testing of new courses, which respond to timely interests of faculty and students.
Professional practitioners representing consulting firms and governmental agencies of regional, national, and international distinction share in and contribute to the life of the program.
They teach courses, participate in reviews, host internships and office visits,
give presentations, exhibit their works, and mentor with students and faculty.
Successful graduates pursue diverse practices in public and private arenas, and make positive differences in the quality of our environment.
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (M.L.A.)
Prerequisites
Students are expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy. A Graphics Workshop is recommended for students who do not have a background in drawing and model building. The workshop is scheduled each year before the beginning of the fall semester.
Program requirements
The landscape architecture program offers professional and advanced professional graduate degree curricula leading to the degree Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.). The first-professional degree program, requiring a six-semester sequence of course work totaling 90 credit hours, is fully accredited by the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB) and recognized by the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA). Students completing the College’s Bachelor of Environmental Design on the Boulder Campus-or completing an undergraduate design degree at another institu-tion-are given advanced standing in the three-year program and must complete at least 65 semester hours of credit.
The advanced professional degree program, for qualified students having already earned a first professional degree in landscape architecture or related discipline, requires 48 credit hours. Advanced standing may be commensurate with prior academic accomplishment.
Course Sequence (90-credit M.L.A. for students without a professional degree in landscape architecture or related profession.)
The curriculum consists of core and elective course work. Core courses are grouped into six components: design studies, 36 credit hours; history and theory, 12 credit hours including 3 elective credit hours; landscape architectural technology, 14 credit hours including 3 elective credit hours; plants,
6 credit hours; media, 4 credit hours; and professional practice, 3 credit hours, totaling 75 credit hours. The remaining semester credit hours are for additional elective courses.
Typical 90-credit-hour program of study in required courses for the first professional M.L.A. degree.
FIRST YEAR
Fall Semester-16 credit hours
ARCH 5210-3. Introduction to Architecture
LA 5500-6. Introduction to
Landscape Architectural Design Studio I
LA 5510-4. Graphic Media in
Landscape Architecture LA 5572-3. Landscape Ecology
Spring Semester-15 credit hours
LA 5501- 6. Introduction to
Landscape Architectural Design Studio II
LA 5521-3. History of Landscape
Architecture LA 6632-3. Site Planning
Elective-3.
SECOND YEAR
Fall Semester-16 credit hours
LA 5532-4. Landscape Technology I
LA 6600-6. Landscape Architectural
Design Studio III
LA 6620-3. Landscape Architectural
Theory and Criticism
Elective-3.
Spring Semester-16 credit hours
LA 6601-6. Landscape Architectural
Design Studio IV
LA 6631-4. Landscape Technology II
LA 6670-3. Plants in Design
Elective-3.
THIRD YEAR
Fall Semester-15 credit hours
LA 6700-6. Advanced Landscape
Architectural Design Studio V
LA 6750-3. Professional Practice
Electives-6.
Spring Semester-12 credit hours
LA 6701-6. Advanced Landscape
Architectural Design Studio VI
Electives-6.
Course Sequence (48-hour M.L.A. for students with a professional degree in landscape architecture or related disciplines.)
This route requires 48 credit hours and typically two years of full-time study. The core curriculum consists of two groups: design, 30 credit hours; history and theory, 12 credit hours, for a total of 42 credit hours; plus 6 credit hours
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Landscape Architecture / 65
of electives. The program director will advise each student engaged in this program of study.
Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to:
Concentration areas
The curriculum delivers required courses that enable ^students to learn and develop core themes of the profession inclusive of LAAB standards, with emphasis placed on studying the means to develop one’s ideas, to convey one’s values, and to criticize one’s work. In addition, the curriculum offers four concentration areas! from which to choose elective courses offered by the program and other units within the College and University in order to explore advanced topics, challenge normative paradigms, and develop new knowledge and capabilities. Majors from other areas are invited to enroll in landscape architecture electives.
The four areas of concentration are: Urban Design
Advanced Landscape Architectural Technologies
Landscape Planning and Management History, Theory, arid Criticism These broadly defined areas of concentration reflect topics and issues related to the program’s location and context in Denver and its larger metropolitan and regional contexts. They also reflect faculty interests and resources available from within the College, University, and area. Students may pursue one or more concentrations within the required 21 elective hours, of which 15 are non-group related. Students are encouraged to consult with their assigned faculty advisor or other mentors as they make their decisions. (Note: six elective credit hours are to fulfill requirements in each of landscape architectural technologies and history and theory group.)
Urban Design
Denver, the surrounding metropolitan areas, and the newly emerging urban areas within the greater region provide limitless issues, topics, and situations fueling interests in urban design. The field of urban design is complex and crosses many disciplines, including architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, real estate development, law, engineering, and the social sciences. Students interested in this concentration are urged to seek and enroll in courses that provide:
• An analytical understanding of the urban/built environment
* The understanding and skills from which to develop, synthesize, create, and test responsive implementation strategies
CE 5622-3. LA 6686-3. LA 6930-3.
SOC 4230-3. UD 6620-3. UD 6621-3. UD 6686-3.
URP 5520-3. URP 6633-3. URP 6634-3.
URP 6635-3.
URP 6665-3. URP 6670-3.
URP 6676-3.
Urban Transportation Planning
Special Topics: Open Space in Urban Design Landscape Architecture Internship (requires pre-approval by advisor/director)
City and Region Architecture of the City The City as am Artifact Special Topics in Urban Design Urban Spatial Analysis Urban Form Theory Preservation Theory and Practice History of American City Building Urban Market Analysis Urban Economic Development Urban Housing
Advanced Landscape Architectural Technologies
Many students will work within a variety of venues involving built works. Familiarity, competence, and interest in learning, using, evaluating, and developing existing and new technologies are compelling. These technologies include: computer applications, design-build/learn by building, materials, and construction processes. Students interested in expanding their knowledge, skills, and future applications of technologies are encouraged to seek and enroll in courses that provide them with:
• Significant exposure and facility with applied technologies
• Appreciation for the value, strengths, weaknesses, and potential of the technologies to develop, implement, and evaluate their design works
Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to:
ARCH 5310-3.
ARCH 6390-3.
ARCH 6410-3. ARCH 6411-3.
LA 6641-3.
LA 6686-3.
Introduction to Building Technology Special Topics in Technology Computer Graphics Computer Applications in Practice
Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture Special Topics: Advanced Landscape Architectural Technologies
LA 6686-3. LA 6930-3. URP 6612-3.
Special Topics: Computer Applications (VARIES) Landscape Architecture Internship GIS for Planners
Landscape Planning and Management
Landscape planning is an area in which landscape architects play an increasing and vital role, particularly in this region, resulting from pressures to develop non-urbanized or undeveloped lands and to develop and manage public lands. Study within this concentration area addresses development and advancing knowledge and capability of the profession in: Ecological systems Urban and regional growth Land use
Real estate development and finance Environmental impact assessment Planning and development processes
Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to:
LA 6622-3. LA 6641-3.
LA 6930-3.
URP 5530-3. URP 6612-3. URP 6640-3.
URP 6641-3. URP 6642-3.
URP 6650-3.
URP 6651-3.
URP 6652-3. URP 6653-3.
URP 6660-3.
URP 6661-3.
URP 6664-3. URP 6671-3.
URP 6673-3.
Visual Quality Analysis
Computer Applications in
Landscape Architecture
Landscape Architecture
Internship
Planning Law
GIS for Planners
Community Development
Process
Social Planning
Neighborhood
Planning
Environmental
Planning II: Policy
and Law
Environmental Impact
Assessment
Growth Management
Natural Resource
Management
and Planning
Real Estate Development
Process
Real Estate Development Finance
Fiscal Impact Analysis Regional Economic Development Transportation Planning I: Transport Network Analysis
History, Theory, and Criticism
Advanced study in history, theory, and criticism of design is fundamental to the landscape architect’s knowledge of the built environment, the intellectual forces that create it, and the theoretical construct of historic precedents in design influencing decisions.
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66 / College of Architecture and Planning
Advancing knowledge and capability of the profession in this area of concentration is compelling and serves:
• To better inform designers eager to learn, generate, and develop ideas, and arrive at critical judgements about the worth of these ideas
• To enhance and inform one’s perspective in a context of economic boom where new development is flourishing Courses available to landscape
architecture students include, but are not limited to:
ARCH 5230-3. History of Architecture II
ARCH 6161-3. Precedents in Architecture
ARCH 6210-3. History of American Architecture
ARCH 6212-3. History of Modern Architecture
ARCH 6220-3. History of Architectural Theory
ARCH 6221-3. Post-Structuralist Architecture
ARCH 6910-3. Teaching Assistantship
LA 6686-3. Special Topic: Architecture and the Landscape - Exploration in Boundary
LA 6686-3. Special Topic: Contemporary Theories and Criticism of Landscape Architecture
LA 6686-3. Special Topic: Landscape Architectural History
LA 6686-3. Special Topic: Modernism in Landscape Architecture
LA 6686-3. Special Topic: Open Space in Urban Design
LA 6686-3. Special Topic: Representations of Landscape Architecture
LA 6930-3. Landscape Architecture Internship
Urban and Regional Planning
Chair, Department of Planning
and Design: Dwayne Nuzum Telephone: 303- 556-3382
Urban and regional planners in the United States and other countries seek to identify social needs and environmental capacities, anticipate change and its impact on communities, shape the pattern of human settlements, provide essential infrastructure, maintain viable economies, and achieve and preserve sustainable communities that are suitably fit to their natural surroundings. Study in planning considers how social needs are
legitimated, knowledge about communities and regions is compiled and analyzed, possible courses of action are evaluated, plans are formulated, implementation is transacted through the means of education, investment, negotiation and regulation, and how plans’ consequences are tracked over time.
These tasks require a high order of ability: to amass and manipulate information, to represent and model essential phenomena and processes, to simulate futures, and to judge outcomes having diverse dimensions. They also require the ability to portray and communicate key concepts, diagnoses, and actions, and to harness knowledge about all the key actors on the scene in order to understand their needs, motives, and possible responses to the public actions that plans provoke. Underlying these classes of abilities is a base of knowledge that easily overreaches the bounds of any one discipline.
Planners must understand theories regarding urban and regional process, concepts of presentation, communication and negotiation, technologies for the depiction and manipulation of spatial information, means by which to document, judge, and forecast change in urban Systems, private economic motives and constraints, the behavioral inclinations of all the major classes of players on the urban scene, the mesh of laws that empower planning and govern private action, and the broader political economy of regional systems.
Needless to say, the education of planners can only begin in the university. It must be a life-long pursuit, and planning programs, including this one, are becoming increasingly supportive of the continuing education needs of professionals. It is the intellectual excitement of this ongoing pursuit of knowledge that draws many to the field.
The Department of Planning and Design, along with the Department of Architecture, offers a Bachelor of Environmental Design (B.Envd.) degree on the Boulder campus. The Department of Planning and Design also offers the Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) graduate degree on the Denver campus. The Master of Urban and Regional Planning is fully accredited by the national Planning Accreditation Board, and prepares students for professional careers in planning and for further study.
For further details on the B.Envd., see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog. Additional details about the master’s program follow.
THE MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (M.U.R.P.)
Prerequisites
Students are expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy, and should be familiar with PC or Apple operating systems. A Graphic Workshop is recommended for students who do not have a background in drawing and model building. The workshop is scheduled each year before the beginning of the fall semester.
Program Requirements
The Master of Urban and Regional Planning is the College’s accredited degree for students intending to practice as planners. With no advanced standing, candidates for the M.U.R.P. degree must complete a minimum of 51 credit hours of graduate work, including all core courses (27 credit hours), a concentration (15 credit hours minimum), and additional electives (9 credit hours). Entering students who have engaged in the study or practice of planning elsewhere may petition the faculty during their initial semester to determine whether any credit will be awarded or degree requirements relaxed as a result of these prior activities. A maximum of 27 credits of course work can be applied for advanced standing.
Students who receive the College’s Bachelor of Environmental Design (B. Envd.) degree on the Boulder campus and who have maintained a GPA of at least
3.0 will be admitted to the M.U.R.P. with advanced standing. These students can earn the M.U.R.P. degree after completing a minimum of 42 credit hours, which will include the core courses and an approved concentration. Students holding the College’s B. Envd. degree who also completed the undergraduate planning option with a GPA of at least 3.0 (and with a grade of at least 3.0 in ENVD 4320, Planning Studio HO will, in addition, receive a waiver with credit for URP 6630, Planning Studio I. These students will earn the M.U.R.P. degree upon completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours, including 21 credit hours of core courses and all requirements for an approved concentration. The above conditions for advanced standing apply only to students who graduated from the College’s undergraduate program within the last five years. Those who graduated earlier may receive advanced standing at the discretion of the head of the graduate program in urban and regional planning, in consultation with program faculty.
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Ph. D. in Design and Planning / 67
ore Courses
RP 5501-3. Planning Issues and
Processes
RP 5510-3. Planning Methods I
RP 5511-3. Planning Methods II
RP 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis
RP 5530-3. Planning Law
RP 6630-6. Planning Studio I
RP 6631-6. Planning Studio II
A thesis option (URP 6950, Thesis esearch and Programming, and URP 151, Thesis) is available primarily for stu-ents who are interested in pursuing more ivanced academic training in planning r related fields. Thesis work will substi-ite for Studio II.
reas of Concentration
The concentrations and elective jurses enable students to explore in spth an area of special interest. Students lould, however, build on the expertise hich they already possess. This can ; done by either focusing on a related )ecialty, or by increased specialization a previously acquired area of expertise, ne program supports four official mcentrations: (1) physical planning,
) environmental planning, (3) economic :velopment planning, and (4) urban ;sign. A set of “foundation courses” identified in each concentration, us additional supporting electives. Physical Planning Concentration: lysical planning addresses the spatial rangement of the environment, from e scale of the project to the scale of the gion, and its fitness for human activities, lysical planners establish the policy id regulatory context for design ivelopment, practicing as land use comprehensive planners, or in special-:s such as preservation, transportation open space planning, real estate devel-iment, and urban design. Environmental Planning Concentra-m: All urban and regional planning tions impact the environment in me manner, and environmental anners must manage these impacts, ith pro-actively and re-actively. The vironmental planning concentration traduces planners to the policy and *islative issues surrounding the vironmental implications of planning tions, as well as to methods for their sessment, control, and mitigation. Economic Development Planning mcentration: Economic development ns to amass within communities and £>ions the resources-jobs, capital, tax se-needed to sustain or improve the lality of life and insure opportunities for
all within the private economy, facilitated through appropriate public actions and services. Planners foster economic change as diagnosticians, strategists, and promoters; gauge growth’s effect in light of environmental capacities; manage its social benefits, mitigate its negative consequences, and fashion its imprint on the physical landscape of localities, regions, states, and nations. Students pursuing this concentration should seek as well to become conversant with the essentials of physical or environmental planning.
Urban Design Concentration:
Planners are called upon with increasing frequency to organize spaces at a scale greater than that of a building site, but less them that of an entire community. This concentration provides the essential abilities needed to contribute to the development of these intermediate-scale spaces. Among these are skills in spatial analysis, design synthesis, real estate finance, and graphic expression. In addition to the four official concentrations, students have the choice of defining their own concentration.
DUAL DEGREE OPTIONS
Students may also enroll in dual degree programs with public administration (M.P.A.-M.U.R.P), law (JD), and business (M.B.A.). In addition, dual degree options are also available combining the M.U.R.P. with landscape architecture (M.L.A.) and architecture (M.Arch.). Students may also take up to six credits of independent study, after first assembling a plan of study with one of the regular faculty. Up to three credits of internship may be applied to the 51-credit program.
Course Sequence
FIRST YEAR
Fall Semester (12 credit hours)
URP 5501-3. Planning Issues
and Processes
URP 5510-3. Planning Methods I
URP 5530-3. Planning Law
Elective-3 credits.
Spring Semester (12 credit hours)
URP 5511-3. Planning Methods II
URP 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis
URP 6630-6. Planning Studio I
SECOND YEAR
Fall Semester (15 credit hours)
Concentration Courses-9 credits. Electives-6 credits.
Spring Semester (12 credit hours)
URP 6631-6. Planning Studio II Concentration Courses-6 credits.
Inter-Departmental Programs
The Department of Architecture, the Department of Planning and Design, and the Department of Landscape Architecture share the idea that the complex problems of the built environment are best addressed through collaboration among the various design and planning disciplines, and through developing bodies of knowledge about the built environment. To further these ends, the departments and program jointly offer the advanced research degree, the Ph.D. in Design and Planning.
Ph.D. in Design and Planning
Program Director: Willem Van Vliet Telephone: 303- 492-5015
The College’s interdisciplinary doctoral program examines the complex factors that help shape the planned and constructed environment. The program offers three areas of specialization:
1. Land Use and Environmental Planning
and Design
Work in this area focuses on purposeful intervention in the physical environment, including mechanisms and procedures such as land use controls, design review processes and standards, and environmental policies. It also deals with the planning and design of housing, neighborhoods, cities, regions, and the interrelationships among residential, economic, recreational, and transportation systems.
2. Design and Planning Processes and
Practices
Work in this area focuses on the theory and methods of planning and design and the development of models and tools to understand and support decision processes and design practices. This area of specialization also includes the examination of practice-related issues such as the development of alternative and appropriate building technologies, energy-efficient designs, manufactured housing, and the design/build process.
3. History, Theory, and Criticism of
the Environment
Work in this area involves critical analysis of architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, and planning, and of the theories, processes, and policies that have regulated these fields.
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68 / College of Architecture and Planning
Whether focusing on contemporary or past environments, the aim is to understand and explain them in relation to individual and cultural values, and in their cultural and technological contexts.
PREREQUISITES
Applicants must hold at least a bachelor’s degree, although most will have also completed a master’s degree. Field specialization and background are open, and may include architecture, landscape architecture, architectural engineering, urban design, geography, urban economics, environmental law, urban sociology, real estate, management science, computer science, public administration, or environmental psychology.
A successful applicant will have an undergraduate grade-point average of at least
3.0 (out of a possible 4 points), and a graduate grade-point average of 3.5 or better.
If students do not hold a professional or a pre-professional degree in a design or planning field, they will have to completed hours of upper-level undergraduate course work in the College of Architecture and Planning. They will have to obtain in each of these courses a grade of B or higher. These courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor, and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program.
A student must have completed 12 hours in an undergraduate program in one of the following prerequisites. The one which applies will depend upon the student’s intended area of specialization.
In exceptional cases, a student may complete this requirement by taking additional undergraduate courses and gaining a grade of B or higher in each course. The courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor, and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program. They may count toward fulfilling the degree requirements.
• Social and Behavioral Sciences
• Environmental and Natural Sciences
• Engineering
• Humanities
A student must also have completed one of the following prerequisites. The one which applies will depend upon the student’s intended area of specialization.
In exceptional cases, a student may complete this requirement by taking additional undergraduate courses and gaining a grade of B or higher in each of these courses. The courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation
with the student’s faculty advisor, and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program. They may count toward fulfilling the degree requirements.
• Statistics. Including probability theory, parametric and nonparametric methods, and acquaintance with basic multivariate techniques. A minimum of 3 hours.
• Mathematics. Including differential equations, finite mathematics, algor data structures, or other appropriate courses. A minimum of 3 hours.
• Language. Ability to read at least one foreign language relevant to the intended dissertation.
• Computer. Background in computer-aided design (CAD) or geographic information systems (GIS). A minimum of 3 hours.
The applicability of a student’s prior course work will be decided by the graduate studies committee upon review of a student’s transcript and additional materials. If the student does not have the requisite educational background, grade-point average, or GRE scores, the student may be admitted on a conditional or provisional basis, and additional course work may be required in accordance with Graduate School rules.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
The Ph.D. requires 76 credit hours. Up to 18 transfer credits may be approved for students admitted with a master’s degree. Students in the program will also have to meet the academic residency requirement, which requires six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor’s degree.
Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master’s degree from another institution of approved standing. However, at least four semesters of resident credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work taken at this University. Completion of the program therefore takes 3 or 4 years, depending on prior course work.
The Ph.D. program has five components: (1) Core Curriculum, (2) Research Specialization, (3) Minor Field of Study,
(4) Electives, and (5) Dissertation. The Core of ten hours consists of seminars and colloquia on the theories and research methods in the fields of design and planning. All students, no matter what their specialization, must take the core in the first two years of their residence.
For the Research Specialization, each student must take at least 12 hours of
course work in one of the program’s three specialization areas; i.e., land use and environmental planning and design; design and planning processes and practices; and history, theory, and criticism of the built environment. One of the courses must be an advanced methods class. The Minor Field of Study provides students with a strong background that supports their chosen research emphasis. It requires completioi of at least 12 hours of related course worl that provides in-depth knowledge in a relevant area. Elective course work consists of 12 hours of additional study in areas related to the dissertation topic. For the research specialization, the minoi field of study, and the electives, students develop an individualized course of stud} to reflect their specific foci and career aspirations. The required course work is determined jointly by the student, the faculty advisor, and committee members The Dissertation requires 30 hours of course work. Students are expected to define a research question in planning am design, to identify the research strategy to be used for answering this question, to conduct the research, and to write up the project in the form of a dissertation.
A student is guided in this process by a dissertation advisor, and by the additional members who comprise the student’s dissertation committee.
Students must register for a minimum of five dissertation credits each semester of their dissertation work. If unable to register for at least five credits, they must request a leave of absence from the Ph.D. program until able to complete the minimum dissertation requirement. Students may take up to a year’s leave of absence before they are disenrolled from the program.
EVALUATIONS AND EXAMINATION!
Successful candidates for the Ph.D. in Design and Planning pass four points of evaluation: (1) Preliminary Exam,
(2) Comprehensive Exam, (3) Doctoral Dissertation, and (4) Final Exam. By the end of the first semester of residence, the student devises a degree plan which is approved by the graduate studies committee. A Preliminary Exam then evaluates the student’s initial progress through the program. The Comprehensiv Exam is an examination based on papers prepared by the candidate which survey the literature of the field, and which set out a proposed dissertation. This exam takes place after two semesters of residency, and before the student becomes a candidate for the Ph.D. degre<
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Post-Professional Program / 69
After advancement to candidacy, the tudent prepares a Doctoral Dissertation, diich offers original research in the tudent’s chosen field. When the College’s lissertation committee approves the nal dissertation submission, it conducts Final Exam based on the student’s esearch. This exam is open to the public.
IOURSE SEQUENCE
1RST YEAR
Students develop their degree plan, ake five semester hours of the required ore curriculum, take additional courses 1 their specialty area, make up any irerequisite courses, and take the reliminary exam.
ECONDYEAR
Students take the remaining core ourses, continue to take electives in leir minor and specialty areas, begin terature surveys, and prepare for their omprehensive exam.
H1RD AND FOURTH YEAR
Students complete their literature urveys, prepare a dissertation proposal, nd take the comprehensive exam. After ompletion of the comprehensive exam, le rest of the third and fourth years : spent researching and writing the issertation. Once the dissertation as been accepted, students take the nal exam.
ost-Professional Program
HE MASTER OF URBAN DESIGN
rogram Information: Dwayne Nuzum elephone: 303-556-3382
The Master of Urban Design is an inter-isciplinary advance degree program i which students articulate issues hich integrate the fields of architecture, ndscape architecture, urban planning, ansportation, real estate and political fairs. The mission is to address the total :alm of urbanization through research, Elaboration and leadership developed within the inclusive “public domain.” le program makes full use of its setting the core of downtown Denver, and cplores the evolving environments of :ttlements, villages, towns, cities, etropolises, and megalopolises in Eorado as wide ranging planning boratories for the studio-based •ojects or thesis studies. The urban ;sign problem solving opportunities
are further enhanced by the extensive public-private connections the College has established throughout a rapidly growing state.
There are three general plans of study:
1) a 30 credit hour program for students who have received a five or six year professional degree in architecture, landscape architecture or planning (i.e. B.Arch, M.Arch., M.L.A., M.U.R.P.);
2) for international students, a four year accredited professional degree and other accepted qualifications would permit entry into a modified one calendar year long program that requires 39 credit hours for graduation; 3) a 66 credit hour program, including six hours of summer internship, is also available for students who hold a pre-professional (non-accredited design) degree; 4) for students from all other undergraduate degree programs, a customized three year curriculum of 96 credit hours is required including an internship component of
six credit hours during one summer.
In all cases fall semester is the preferred entry time.
The emphases of the urban design degree focuses on three primary concerns that affect both horizontal and vertical developments in tactical and strategic timeframes.
I. History and theory of urbanization in the inclusive public domain.
II. Systems and processes used in the making of the urbanized public domain.
III. Designing the urban public domain.
The ultimate goal of the program is to educate students to be effective in the public domain as problem originators, venture designers, idea linkers and decision makers. These urban design degree graduates through creative problem solving, management, advocacy and implementation can achieve outstanding ends in the professional, public and development process.
Course Sequence
(30 credit hours with professional degrees)
Semester One (15 credit hours)
I. History, Theory
URP 6633 -3. Urban Form Theory
II. Systems, Processes
URP 6651-3 Environmental Impact
Assessment
URP 6660-3 Real Estate Development
Process
II. Design*
UD 6600-6 Transformation
Decomposition Studio (Integrated team taught course)
This course is being revised to be as follows:
Urbanization Transformation Studio-4 cr. Urbanization Methodologies Seminar-2 cr.
Semester Two (15 credit hours)
I. History, Theory
Elective 3-6. History, Theory
Selected List
II. Systems, Processes
UD 6686-3. ST: Urban Design
Seminar
Elective-3. Systems, Processes
Selected List
III. Design*
UD 6601-6. Composition Studio
This course is being revised to be as follows:
Interdisciplinary Studio-6 cr.
* Summer options
a) complete thesis commitment begun in semester one with prior approval of subject and three semester sequence of (1) thesis prep, (2) research and conceptual stages,
(3) final documentation completion. This selected thesis sequence is an adjustment of the one year or the last year course progression. After the advisor and student have agreement on the thesis subject the study sequence is then modified.
First semester (third or fifth semester):
Substitute thesis prep and an integrated thesis seminar course for the design course.
Second semester (fourth or sixth semester):
The studio content combines thesis research transitioning into concept-schematic design scenarios.
Summer semester is a combination of interrelated independent study and thesis studio conclusion courses.
Note: To pursue the thesis option, written and phone subject proposals must be completed with the advisor before enrollment.
b) Skip spring selected elective (six hours) for overseas study (six hours)
c) Summer internships and/or third studio
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70 / College of Architecture and Planning
Course Sequence
(66 credit hours with only preprofessional degrees)
Semester One (15 credit hours)
I. History, Theory
URP 6633-3. Urban Form Theory
II. Systems, Processes
LA 6632-3. Site Planning
URP 6651-3. Environmental Impact
Assessment
III. Design
URP 6630-6. Planning Studio I
Semester Two (15 credit hours)
I. History, Theory
ARCH 6220-3. History of Architectural
Theory
LA 6620-3. LA Theory and Criticism
II. Systems, Processes
LA 5572-3. Landscape Ecology
III. Design
URP 6631-3. Planning Studio II
Semester Three (Summer; six credit hours) II. Systems, Processes UD 6840-6. Independent Study
(Internship or overseas study for six hours)
Semester Four (15 credit hours)
I. History, Theory
URP 6670-3. Urban Economic
Development
II. Systems Processes
UD 6686-3. ST: Urban Design
Seminar
URP 6660-3. Real Estate Development
III. Design*
UD 6600-6. Transformation
Decomposition Studio (Integrated team taught course)
This course is being revised to be as follows:
Urbanization Transformation Studio-4 cr. Urbanization Methodologies Seminar-2 cr.
Semester Five (15 credit hours)
I. History, Theory Electives 3-6. History, Theory
Selected List
II. Systems, Processes
Electives 3-6. Systems, Processes Selected List
III. Design*
UD 6601-6. Composition Studio This course is being revised to be as follows:
Interdisciplinary Studio-6 cr.
* see one year summer options above Selected Electives
Recommended
History, Theory (I)
ENVD 4233-3.
ARCH 5220-3. ARCH 5230-3. ARCH 6220-3.
LA 5521-3.
LA 6620-3. URP 6635-3.
System, Processes (II)
Environmental
Aesthetics
History of Architecture I History of Architecture II History of Architectural Theory
History of Landscape Architecture LA Theory and Criticism History of American City Building
LA 5572-3. LA 6632-3. URP 5530-3. URP 6661-3/
URP 6673-3.
URP 6686-3. Suggested
Landscape Ecology Site Planning Planning Law Real Estate Development and Finance
Transportation Planning I: Transport Network Analysis
ST: Design Review
History, Theory (I)
ARCH 6161-3. Precedents in Architecture
L A 6686-3. Special Topics in LA URP 6670-3. Urban Economic Development
System, Processes (II)
ARCH 5240-3. ARCH 6410-3. LA 6686-3. URP 6612-3.
Human Factors in Design Computer Graphics Special Topics in LA Geographic Information Systems for Planners
URP 6664-3. Fiscal Impact Analysis
URP 6665-3. Urban Market Analysis
URP 6674-3. Transportation Planning
II: Urban Transportation Planning
Graduate Certificate in Historic Preservation
The College of Architecture and Planning together with the History Department in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers a graduate certificate in Historic Preservation. The certificate can be earned as part of an M.Arch., M.L.A., M.U.R.P., or an M.A. in History.
It requires a total of 18 credit hours.
Two preservation courses are required:
HIST 5232-3. Historic Preservation
URP 6634-3: Preservation Theory anc
Practice
These are core courses on preservatior theory and practice from the architect and planner’s perspective of intervening through design and regulation and from the historian’s perspective of how the past might guide the future.
A thesis or studio (6 cr.) is required.
Students choose their remaining courses from a selection of courses in the following categories:
History of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, or Historic Places (3 cr.)
Preservation Methods (3 cr.), including Preservation Technology, Documentatior of sites and structures, Visual research methods, and other subjects.
Students are encouraged but not requirei to take an internship in preservation.
Preservation certificate students work out with their advisor a selection of courses appropriate to their needs and the requirements of their degree program. For more information, contact Professor Tom Noel in the History Department (303-556-4830, tnoel@carbon cudenver.edu) or Associate Professor Michael Holleran (303-556-3688, michael. holleran@cudenver.edu) in the College of Architecture and Planning.
CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02


College of Arts & Media
Dean: Mark Alan Heckler Associate Dean: Frank Jermance College Administrative Office: AR 176 Administrative Office:
Phone: 303-556-2279
Fax: 303-556-2335
College Advising Office: 303-556-8302 Web: www.cudenver.edu/CAM
COLLEGE MISSION
The College of Arts & Media maintains that, by their power to illuminate ideas and move the human spirit, the arts are both an essential element of individual and social life and a means of knowing about one’s self and the world. The College is a conservator of culture where proficiencies in a chosen discipline are developed, artistic expression and experimentation are encouraged, and new technologies explored.
The College serves a student body of diverse interests and cultural backgrounds. In addition to students from the Denver metropolitan area, the College is an educational destination for nonresident, i'nternational, and transfer students. Included in the student population are individuals seeking their first degree, older students considering a career change, and students of all ages who come for personal growth and enrichment.
In response to the complex needs of its student body, the College offers programs which emphasize excellence in visual and performing arts, preparation in commercial art applications, and multidisciplinary studies. Off-campus classes are offered at various metropolitan locations, and international programs are available in conjunction with universities located around the world. Consistent with its commitment to be innovative and inclusive, the College uses distance-learning technologies to provide educational experiences for students whose personal circumstances make access to the campus difficult.
The College of Arts & Media serves as a center for cultural and community activity by hosting symposia and workshops by recognized artists, critics, and historians, as well as leaders in the fields
of technology and commerce. The College acknowledges its social responsibilities by establishing cooperative relationships with civic groups, regional arts agencies, museums, galleries, performance venues, area public schools and community colleges, professional societies, and the business community.
COLLEGE GOALS
1. The College of Arts & Media aims
to instill, inspire, and model creativity founded upon the accumulated knowledge of human civilization.
2. The College serves as an intersection of art, technology, and commerce.
3. The College seeks to develop the artist committed to social responsibility and the citizen who will advocate for the role of the artist in society.
4. The College strives to become a center of cross-cultural exchange and understanding.
5. The College works to enrich the quality of life in the larger community, to foster community partnerships, and to encourage mentorship.
6. The College aims to integrate interdisciplinary modes of learning and creating.
7. The College adapts to meet future needs of diverse student constituencies.
UNDERGRADUATE
PROGRAMS
Degree Programs
Students can earn baccalaureate degrees, including areas of emphasis listed below, in the following areas: Bachelor of Arts in Fine Arts (B.A.)
Art History Studio Art
Bachelor of Arts in Theatre (B.A.) Acting/Directing Design/Technical Integrated Studies Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)
Drawing
Film/Video Production Multimedia Studies Painting Photography Sculpture
Bachelor of Science in Music (B.S.) Music Industry Studies Music Management Music Performance Music Technology
MINOR PROGRAMS
Most CU-Denver departments have developed minor programs. A minor is not required for graduation. Students interested in completing a minor should contact the individual departments regarding requirements. A minimum of 12 credit hours in residence is required for all minors.
DOUBLE MAJORS
Students may graduate with more than one major by completing all requirements for each major.
SECOND DEGREES
Students who have been awarded a bachelor’s degree may be granted a second bachelor’s degree provided that (a) all general requirements for that degree have been met; (b) the major for the second bachelor’s degree is different from the major for the first; and (c) the College and major department residence requirements are satisfied. A second degree from the college requires a minimum of 30 additional semester hours of credit.
DOUBLE DEGREES
Students may earn two degrees in the College of Arts & Media or from two different schools or colleges of the University of Colorado at Denver simultaneously by fulfilling all requirements for both degrees. Students must complete a minimum of 150 semester hours applied toward the two degrees.
Requirements for Admission
A student matriculating in the College of Arts and Media must be admitted at three levels: (1) as a student of the University of Colorado at Denver,
(2) as a student in the College of Arts & Media, and (3) as a student within a College of Arts & Media department.
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72 / College of Arts & Media
Admission to the College of Arts & Media is selective, based upon a variety of factors. Factors for consideration in the admission process may include a careful evaluation of secondary school records, (which may include recommendations from guidance counselors, advisors, teachers, and others); scores on standardized tests; and a creative review in the form of an audition, portfolio review or other program-based incoming assessment. Applicants should be able to indicate evidence of a level of character and maturity essential in potential students who hope to benefit fully from the unique offerings of the University and its urban environment. The College also views participation in meaningful school and community activities as an indicator of potential success.
A student applying to the College of Arts & Media must indicate the particular degtee program that he or she wishes to enter. Admission to the College of Arts & Media is based on a two-part application and evaluation: academic and creative/artistic. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions at the University of Colorado at Denver evaluates the academic application. Additionally, all undergraduate programs at the College of Arts & Media require an incoming artistic/creative assessment, which may take the form of an audition, the submission of a creative portfolio, a writing sample, interview or other such measure. The artistic/creative review is conducted by the appropriate department or program, (see specific programs for more information). Both the academic application and the artistic/ creative review are evaluated as a whole to determine admission and must be completed before an admissions decision can be made. Creative material should be mailed directly to the specific department or program. No admission decision will be made until the candidate’s file is complete and the department has forwarded artistic/creative review results to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.
Note: Please be aware that CU-Denver does not return creative materials and will not assume any liability or responsibility for original materials submitted by an applicant that are lost or damaged while in its possession. Candidates are urged to complete and file their applications as soon as possible, especially those who are seeking financial aid. Applicants will be notified promptly if additional information is required. No admission decision will be made without complete information.
Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade-point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University. Two levels of deficiency will be recognized.
TRANSFER STUDENTS
The departments and programs of the College of Arts & Media evaluate course work taken at other institutions to determine their equivalency for transfer to degree programs. Students who have completed more than 15 semester hours of transferable course work are evaluated for admission on the basis of their college grade-point average (GPA) without regard to their high school performance.
To be considered for admission to the College of Arts & Media, a transfer student must have a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a
4.0 scale for all college course work attempted. Transfer applicants seeking priority admission must have a minimum 2.5 GPA for all work applicable to the undergraduate degree, and a 3.0 GPA
in specific program-related courses. Students with less than an overall 2.5 GPA can be admitted if they have at least a
2.0 GPA on the last 15 semester hours of applicable course work, at least
a 2.0 GPA in CAM-based courses, and at least a 2.0 overall GPA in courses applying to the degree.
Transfer applicants who do not meet either of the priority admission standards are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA earned in the last 15 credit hours. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available. For information about specific policies on transfer of credit, consult a CAM advisor.
INTRA-UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
Students who want to transfer to the College of Arts & Media from another college or school of the University of Colorado at Denver must formally apply to the College of Arts & Media.
Students will be evaluated only on course work that applies to the degree program. Generally, this will exclude course work of a vocational nature and courses in activity PE and remedial subjects. Students who have completed at least 15 applicable semester hours will be evaluated on their college work; students with fewer them 15 transferable hours will be evaluated on the basis of both high school and college work.
Students will be considered for admission on either their overall GPA in applicable course work from CU and all previous institutions or on their last 15 credit hours. Applicants with less them a 2.0 GPA in related courses (from CU or other institutions) and overall CU GPA of less than 2.0 will be denied admission even though they may meet other requirements for consideration.
TRANSFER OF MAJOR WITHIN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND MEDIA
Undergraduate students who wish to transfer from one department to another within the college must submit a Change of Major form, which may be obtained in any CAM department. The form is reviewed by the CAM advisor. Students will be contacted if there are major-specific requirements (ie. audition, etc.) that need to be met prior to change of major approval.
MUSIC AUDITION
All entering freshmen and transfer students applying for admission to music degree programs, with the exception of the Music Industry Studies program, must complete an audition. Contact the Department of Music & Entertainment Studies, 303-556-2727, for information on scheduling an audition.
Academic Policies
Students are referred to the General Information section of this catalog for a description of academic policies that apply to all undergraduate students at CU-Denver. The policies which follow apply specifically to the College of Arts & Media (CAM).
ACADEMIC ADVISING
New freshmen and transfer students with fewer than 40 hours will start at the Academic Advising Center (303-352-3520) for their initial advising. There the student will be introduced to the University and its policies, as well as the University Core requirements. Basic degree requirements will be explained, although the student should consult the Major advisor or the College of Arts & Media (CAM) advisor for specific questions.
The CAM advisor assists in the transition from the advising center to the College. The CAM advisor will explain specific degree and College requirements, and any remaining Core requirements.
The CAM advisor will assist with graduation check-out procedures and any
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general CAM advising questions. To make an appointment with the CAM advisor, contact the CAM Dean’s Office at 303-556-2279.
If and when the student has determined a major, they should meet with a faculty advisor in their major department. The faculty advisor will be responsible for advising as well as verifying the completion of the major program for graduation. Students should contact the department to determine their major advisor.
For each Spring semester, an advising STOP is placed on each College of Arts & Media student’s registration. Students must see their major advisor before the hold is released and they are allowed to register.
ACADEMIC PROBATION AND SCHOLASTIC SUSPENSION
Good academic Standing in the College requires a cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 on all University of Colorado course work. Grades earned in another college or school within the University of Colorado system are used in determining the student’s scholastic standing and progress toward the degree. Grades earned outside the University of Colorado system are not used in calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado.
Academic Probation
Students whose cumulative grade-point average falls below a 2.0 at the end of an academic term will be placed on academic probation. Students are informed in writing of academic probation. Students on academic probation will be required to achieve a minimum 2.2 grade-point average each semester until their cumulative grade-point average is at least a 2.0, at which time students will be removed from probation.
There is no restriction on the length of time a student can remain on probation status; however, students must achieve a minimum 2.0 cumulative CU GPA to meet graduation requirements.
Academic Suspension
Students on academic probation who do not meet the 2.2 minimum required grade-point average in the succeeding semester will be suspended from the College. Students are informed in writing of academic suspension.
A student’s suspension status is permanently indicated on the official University of Colorado transcript, and registration restrictions are imposed.
First Suspension
Students who first fail to meet the academic conditions of probation are placed on first suspension for one calendar year. Students on first suspension may only register for CU-Denver courses offered through the Extended Studies program.
A student under first suspension may be readmitted before the end of the normal suspension period only if the student has demonstrated academic improvement in one of the following ways:
1. raise the cumulative CU GPA to a minimum of 2.0;
2. achieve a minimum semester GPA of 2.5 with a minimum of 6 semester hours of University of Colorado course work; or
3. attend another college/university and raise to a minimum 2.0 the combination of cumulative CU GPA and cumulative GPA from another institution. Students are removed from first suspension after one year upon written request to the CAM Academic Policies Committee.
Second Suspension
Students who fail to meet the conditions of continued probation for a second time or fail to meet the semester GPA requirements while on first suspension are placed on second suspension for an indefinite period of time.
Students on second suspension may be readmitted to the College only by petition to the CAM Academic Policies Committee. Students will not be considered for readmission unless they have demonstrated improved academic performance at the college/university level.
PETITIONING FOR EXCEPTIONS TO ACADEMIC POLICY
The CAM Academic Policies Committee is responsible for the administration of the academic policies of the College as established by the faculty. The committee is empowered to grant exceptions to the academic policies of the College. Students wishing to petition an exception to academic policy should submit a letter of request to the Dean’s Office.
INDEPENDENT STUDY
Students who are juniors, seniors or graduates may register for independent study with the written approval of the appropriate faculty member and Associate Deem. The amount of credit to be given for an independent study project shall be determined at the time of registration. A maximum of 12 credits in independent study may apply toward the bachelor’s degree.
1. Must be taken with full-time, tenured or tenure-track faculty.
2. May not be taken as substitute for regularly scheduled courses.
3. Must be approved by program directors or department chair.
4. Non-CAM majors: Independent studies are generally only available to CAM majors. However, exceptions may
be granted to non-CAM majors in approved academic minors, individually structured majors, and interdisciplinary Master of Humanities programs. Associate Dean’s approval required for non-CAM majors.
INTERNSHIPS/COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
Students seeking academic credit from employment experience should consult The Career Center section of this catalog.
Undergraduates must have attained junior standing and have a minimum 2.75 GPA. A maximum of three hours of internship credit per semester and nine hours overall is allowed.
INCOMPLETE GRADE POLICIES
1. Reason for Incomplete must be verified, compelling, and extraordinary circumstance beyond student’s control which made completion of the course impossible.
2. The majority of course requirements (75%) must have been completed with a passing grade to be eligible for Incomplete.
3. CAM Course Completion Agreement must be signed by both instructor and student, with final approval by Associate Dean.
4. All course work must be completed within one calendar year of original course: NO EXCEPTIONS!
5. Students may not retroactively change letter grades to Incomplete.
GRADUATION
REQUIREMENTS
General Requirements
1. A minimum of 120 semester hours passed
2. A minimum 2.0 cumulative grade-point average
3. A minimum of 45 semester hours of upper division work for all B.A. and
B.F.A. degrees
4. A minimum of 30 semester hours with letter grades at CU-Denver
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74 / College of Arts & Media
5. Fulfillment of all College and major requirements.
Core Curriculum
I. INTELLECTUAL COMPETENCIES
Competency is satisfied by a letter grade of C (2.0) or higher.
II. KNOWLEDGE AREAS
CU-Denver Knowledge Area core courses are identified in each Schedule of Courses by a “D” prefix in the course title.
Students may not use independent study, cooperative education, internships, CLEP, or courses in their major to satisfy Knowledge Area requirements.
A.English Composition/Oral Communication-9 credit hours
One course from each of the three sections below:
1. ENGL 1020-3. Core Composition I
2. ENGL 2030-3. Core Composition II CMMU/ENGL/
TC 3154-3. Technical Writing
ENGL 3170-3. Business Writing
3. CMMU 2050-3. Business and
Professional Speaking CMMU 2101-3. Presentational Speaking
ENGL 2030-3. Core Composition II ENGL 2154-3. Introduction to Creative Writing ENGL 3084-3. Advanced
Composition
ENGL 3154-3. Technical Writing ENGL 3170-3. Business Writing ENGL 4190-3. Special Topics: Rhetoric/Writing
A.Natural and Physical Sciences, Mathematics-11 credit hours
3 credit hours from a course in ANTH (approved), BIOL, CHEM, ENVS, GEOL, PHYS or MATH (intellectual competency course excluded)
8 credit hours from the following laboratory core courses:
ANTH 1303-4. Intro, to Biological Anthropology BIOL 15504. Basic Biology I BIOL 1560-4. Basic Biology II CHEM 147X4. Core Chemistry:
(selected modules) ENVS 10424. Intro, to Environmental Sciences
GEOL 10724. Physical Geology: Surface Processes GEOL 10824. Physical Geology: Internal Processes
PHYS 10004. Introduction to Physics PHYS 10524. General Astronomy I
B. Mathematics-3 credit hours
Any CU-Denver mathematics course, with the exception of MATH 3040.
Students who are not required to take mathematics as part of the major may consider:
MATH 1350-3. Computers in the Arts and Sciences
MATH 2000-3. Mathematics for the Liberal Arts
C. Foreign Language-third semester
proficiency, 0-13 credit hours
Students must demonstrate foreign language proficiency. This is accomplished through completion of third-semester-level course (2110 or equivalent) with a minimum grade of C (2.0), satisfactory proficiency testing, or completion of third-year (Level III) high school course with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or better. For additional information, see the Modern Languages section in this catalog.
Students pursuing a B.S. in Music are not required to fulfill the foreign language proficiency.
B. Behavioral and Social Sciences-12 credit hours
6 credit hours in behavioral sciences 6 credit hours in social sciences
9 of 12 credit hours must come from the following combined behavioral sciences and social sciences core courses:*
Behavioral Sciences
ANTH 2102-3. Culture and the Human Experience
CMMU 1011-3. Fundamentals of Communication
CMMU 1021-3.Fundamentals of Mass Communication
PSY1000-3. Introduction to Psychology I
PSY 1005-3. Introduction to Psychology II
Social Sciences
ECON 2012-3. Principles of Econ.: Macroeconomics
ECON 2022-3. Principles of Econ.: Microeconomics
GEOG 1102-3. World Regional Geography
GEOG 2202-3. Natural Hazards
PSC 1001-3. Introduction to Political Science: Quest For Freedom & Justice P SC 1101-3. American Political System
SOC 1001-3. Introduction to Sociology SOC 2462-3. Introduction to Social Psychology
* Remaining 3 credit hours: please consult CAM advisor.
C. Humanities-6 credit hours
6 credit hours from the following core courses:
ENGL 1601-3. Telling Tales: Narrative Art in Literature and Film ENGL 2600-3. Great Works in British
and American Literature GER 1000-3. Germany and the Germans
HIST 1381-3. Paths to the Present I HIST 1382-3. Getting Here: Paths to the Present II PHIL 1012-3. Introduction to
Philosophy: Relationship of Individual to World PHIL 1020-3. Introduction to Ethics and Society: Person & Community
RUSS 1000-3. Russia and Russians:
Life, Culture and Arts RUSS 2000-3. Masterpieces of Russian Culture
D. Arts-3 credit hours
3 credit hours from a course in any arts discipline other than the student’s major ■
E. Multicultural Diversity-3 credit hours
3 credit hours from the following core courses:
ANTH 3142-3. Cultural Diversity in the Modern World
ANTH 4200-3. Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective
CMMU 3271-3. Communication and Diversity
ECON 3100-3. Economics of Race & Gender
ENGL/
ETST 3794-3. Ethnic Diversity
in American Literature ENGR 3400-3. Technology and Culture ETST 3704-3. Culture, Racism,
& Alienation
FA 3110-3. Imaging and Identity HIST 3345-3. Immigration & Ethnicity in American History MGMT 4100-3. Managing Cultural Diversity
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PHIL 3500-3. Ideology and Culture: Racism/Sexism
PMUS 3110-3. Social & Political Implications of American Music
PMUS 3111-3. American Voice
Revisited: Cultural Diversity or Social Identity?
P SC 3034-3. Race, Gender, Law,
& Public Policy
P SC 3035-3. Political Movements:
Race and Gender
PSY 4485-3. Psychology of Cultural Diversity
SOC 3020-3. Race and Ethnicity in U.S.
THTR 3611-3. Drama of Diversity
Major Requirements
In addition to completing the College core requirements, students must declare a major by the time they have accumulated 60 credit hours, and fulfill all requirements of the major department. Departments require that ail course work in the major be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or above. A minimum of one-third of the required course work in the major must be completed at CU-Denver.
The department is responsible for determining when a student has successfully completed the major requirements and for certifying the completion to the Dean of the College.
Graduation Application
Students expecting to graduate are required to complete a Graduation Packet by the census date (last day to drop and add) of the semester in which they intend to complete the degree. Graduation Packets must be submitted to the CAM advisor in AR176. Failure to file a Graduation Packet with the College will result in delayed graduation.
Academic Honors
A student can be awarded honors based upon cumulative grade-point average at the time of graduation. To be eligible for honors, a student must have completed a minimum of 45 semester hours at the University of Colorado (on any CU campus). A GPA of 3.65 will receive cum laude, 3.75 magna cum laude, and 3.85 and above summa cum laude honors designations on degrees.
DEAN'S LIST
Following each fall and spring semester, the College publishes a Dean’s List
Theatre, Film, and Video Production / 75
honoring students who demonstrate high scholastic achievement. To earn a place on the list, student must achieve a 3.75 grade-point average in all CU hours taken during the semester, with a minimum of 9 credit hours.
There are three areas of focus: acting/ directing, design/technical, and integrated theatre. Each student is required to complete a comprehensive series of core courses in theatre and the allied fields and then concentrate in one of the areas of focus.
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE, FILM, AND VIDEO PRODUCTION
Chair. Kathryn Maes Office: AD 210-A Phone: 303-556-4652 Fax: 303-556-6504
Faculty
Professors: Mark Alan Heckler Associate Professors: J. Brad Bowles,
Laura Cuetara, Kathryn Maes Assistant Professors: Richard Finkelstein,
Frederic Lahey
Instructors: Carol Bloom, Jane Nelson-
Rud, Nate Thompson
The Department of Theatre, Film, and Video Production prepares students to become leaders in the theatrical and film and video arts within the context of a liberal arts education. These unique programs offer professional experience through laboratory and studio courses, theatre production, film and video projects, and fieldwork in the Denver area and throughout Colorado. Our graduates are prepared to expand their own career possibilities as responsible citizens of the arts.
The department offers courses in the disciplines of Theatre (THTR) and Film and Video Studies (FILM). Students wishing to study theatre may choose to earn the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre. Students wishing to study film and video may pursue the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree.
Theatre
The Bachelor of Arts in Theatre is designed to train the diversified theatre artist-writer, director, performer, designer, teacher-and to provide opportunities for a broad range of production process and performance experiences in courses, laboratory workshops, full productions, and field work in the Denver area. The goal of the theatre program is an understanding of the potential of the theatre as an expressive medium in the context of its culture and as a collaborative art form in relationship to literature, fine arts, and music.
THEATRE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Theatre Core Courses Credit Hours
THTR 2530. Acting 1 ...................3
THTR 2610. Dramatic Literature Survey . 3 THTR 2710/2711. Theatrical Design
Aesthetics, and Prod. I/Lab.........4
THTR 2712/2713. Theatrical Design,
Aesthetics, and Prod. II/Lab........4
THTR 2820. Departmental Production ... 3
THTR 3540. Directing I.................3
THTR 3610. History of Theatre .........3
THTR 3820. Departmental Production .3
THTR 3939. Internship..................2
THTR 4610. Drama Theory
and Criticism.......................3
THTR 4999. Senior Project............. 2
Total Semester Hours................. 33
Other Arts Credit Hours
ENGL 3661. Shakespeare or
ENGL 4300. History of British Drama or
ENGL 4350. History of American
Drama.............................3
F A 1001. Introduction to Art........3
PMUS 1001. Music Appreciation....... 3
Total Semester Hours................ 9
Acting/Directing Focus Credit Hours
THTR 2520. Voice and Diction I ......2
THTR 2560. Topics in Theatre (Voice) 2
THTR 3520. Stage Movement I .........2
THTR 3530. Acting II ................3
THTR 4530. Acting III................3
THTR 4540. Directing II ............_3
Total Semester Hours............... 15
THTR 3521. Stage Movement II (2 credits) is also recommended
Design/Technical Focus Credit Hours
THTR 3720. Advanced Lighting Design 4
THTR 3730. Scene Design..............4
THTR 4730. Advanced Scenic Design 4
THTR 4760. Topics in Design ........ 3
Total Semester Hours................ 15
THTR 2740. Costume and Make-up Design (3 credits) is also recommended
Integrated Theatre Focus Credit Hours
THTR Electives*..................... 15
* The selection of these courses must be done in consultation with and approval of the student’s faculty advisor.
Totcil Semester Hours............... 15
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76 / College of Arts & Media
Film and Video Studies
The Film and Video Studies program at the University of Colorado at Denver is intended for students seeking professional preparation for careers in film, video, and related industries. Program delivery is realized in a unique “2 + 2” offering with Red Rocks Community College through the Colorado Film Video Instructional studios (CFVI), located at the Higher Education Advanced Technology (HEAT) campus at the former Lowry Air Force base. The program is designed to award B.F.A. degrees with emphases in film/video writing, producing and directing, film/video post production, or cinematography/videography, and to supply advanced training to professionals already working in the film and video industries.
Upon completion of the B.F.A. course of study, students will be prepared for employment in the television, industrial video, educational video, and feature film production industries, or for entry into graduate study programs. Students may choose to focus their concentration on documentary or narrative styles while finding their own balance of technical and creative concerns. Employment opportunities lie in writing, producing, directing, production management, production design, camera, lighting, audio for film and video, audio post for film and video, post production graphics and animation, editing, and multimedia production and integration, as well as a host of business management opportunities in the cable, network, and film industries. As Denver is the world capital of the cable television industry, graduates may work locally or seek employment in the national or world markets.
The initial two years of film/video technology (Red Rocks, FVT) courses give students the fundamental understanding of technical, creative, and storytelling issues and exposure to disparate paths of study and future employment. The second two years of film and video (CU-Denver, FILM) provide students the opportunity to focus and hone their craft, find their own expressive “voice,” and to graduate with a professional quality “show reel” of work, production credits, and/or completed screenplays, teleplays, and project proposals.
Students may satisfy core requirements at the Auraria campus or other approved locations, while nearly all film and video classes are conducted at the CFVI studios facility at HEAT. This arrangement allows
for the maximization of equipment and facility resources available to the student by the Red Rocks/CU partnership. The CFVI facility includes a 17,000-square-foot primary building, the Avid Center at the $7 million all-digital ETTC building, and the 600-seat HEAT movie theater. Dormitory space is available to full-time film and video students at the HEAT Center campus at Lowry.
All students interested in applying for film and video major status must apply to the CFVI program director. Continued major status is subject to annual review.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS W/EMPHASIS IN FILM/VIDEO WRITING & DIRECTING
Red Rocks courses:
FVT 105. Video Production 1..........3
FVT 150. Development of Film
Expression ........................3
FVT 153. Intro, to Film Production..3
FVT 160. Video Post Production I....3
FVT 200. Video Production II.........3
FVT 206. Film/Video Lighting & Grip .3
FVT 209. Production Management
Techniques.........................3
FVT 215. Video Post Production II...3
FVT 220.16mm Production .............3
FVT 250. Introduction to Screenwriting .. 3 FVT 290/117. Understanding the
Actor’s Process ................ 3
Total ...................... 33 credits
CU-Denver courses:
FILM 3100. History of Narrative Film 1.... 3 FILM 3150. History of Narrative Film II ... 3 FILM 3207. Acting/Directing Workshop . 3
FILM 3270. Film/Video Production III.3
FILM 3275. Film/Video Post
Production III .....................3
FILM 3400. Intermediate Screenwriting
for Feature Films...................3
FILM 4209. Advanced Production
Management..........................3
FILM 4400. Advanced Screenwriting
for Feature Films...................3
FILM 4270. Film/Video Production IV ... 3 FILM 4280. Film/Video Post
Production IV.......................3
FILM 4910. Film/Video Production
Internship..........................3
FILM Electives........................6
FILM 4999. Senior Portfolio
Preparation........................ 1
Total ....................... 39 credits
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS W/EMPHASIS IN FILM/VIDEO POST PRODUCTION
Red Rocks courses:
FVT 105. Video Production 1...........3
FVT 150. Development of
Film Expression.....................3
FVT 153. Intro, to Film Production...3
FVT 160. Video Post Production I.....3
FVT 200. Video Production II..........3
FVT 206. Lighting for Film & Video...3
FVT 208. Sound for Film & Video.......3
FVT 209. Production Management
Techniques..........................3
FVT 215. Video Post Production II....3
FVT 254. Intro, to Digital Editing....3
FVT 290/264. Intro to Digital FX .... 3
Total ....................... 33 credits
CU-Denver courses:
FILM 3100. History of Narrative Film I.... 3 FILM 3150. History of Narrative Film II ... 3
FILM 3264. Advanced Digital FX .......3
FILM 3270. Film/Video Production III.3
FILM 3275. Film/Video Post
Production III .....................3
FILM 3350. Editing Aesthetics.........3
MUS 4505. Audio Sweetening ...........3
FILM 4270. Film/Video Production IV .... 3 FILM 4280. Film/Video Post
Production IV ......................3
FILM 4910. Film/Video Production
Internship..........................3
FILM Electives .......................9
FILM 4999. Senior Portfolio
Preparation........................ 1
Total ....................... 39 credits
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS W/EMPHASIS IN CINEMATOGRAPHY/ VIDEOGRAPHY
Red Rocks courses:
FVT 105. Video Production 1..........3
FVT 150. Development of Film
Expression ........................3
FVT 153. Intro, to Film Production...3
FVT 160. Video Post Production I.....3
FVT 200. Video Production II.........3
FVT 205. Camera Equipment
& Techniques ......................3
FVT 206. Film/Video Lighting & Grip .3
FVT 209. Production Management
Techniques.........................3
FVT 215. Video Post Production II....3
FVT 220.16mm Production .............3
FVT 290/117. Understanding the
Actor’s Process .................. 3
Total ...................... 33 credits
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CU-Denver courses:
FILM 3100. History of Narrative Film I. . . . 3 FILM 3111. Shooting Action
& Physical Effects .......................3
FILM 3150. History of Narrative Film II ... 3
FILM 3270. Film/Video Production III........3
FILM 3275. Film/Video Post
Production III ...........................3
FILM 3300. Advanced Lighting
for Film & Video..........................3
FILM 4209. Advanced Production
Management ...............................3
FILM 4270. Film/Video Production IV ... 3
FILM 4280. Film/Video Post
Production IV.............................3
FILM 4910. Film/Video Production
Internship ...............................3
FILM Electives .............................9
FILM 4999. Senior Portfolio
Preparation......................:.__1
Total ....................... 39 credits
Contact the Department of Theatre,
Film, and Video Production in AD 210-A for Red Rocks FVT courses and FILM course descriptions which do not appear in this catalog.
DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY STUDIES
Chair: Stan Soocher Office: AR 288 Phone: 303-556-2727 Fax:303-556-6612
Faculty
Professor. Zoe Erisman, Roy A. Pritts Associate Professors: Frank J. Jermance, Richard Sanders, Stan Soocher, Gregory Walker, Richard Weissman Assistant Professor William Clark, Sigmund Rothschild Professor Emeritus: Franz Roehmann
The Department of Music and Entertainment Industry Studies combines studies in music technology, multimedia, music business, and music performance in order to prepare students for the global marketplace. Through partnerships with entrepreneurs, corporations, and non-profit organizations, we aspire to a leading position in the region and nation in the planning and realization of current and future media.
The Department of Music and Entertainment Industry Studies offers courses in the disciplines of Music (MUS) and Performance Music (PMUS). Students interested in studying music will pursue the Bachelor of Science in Music with areas of emphasis in performance,
music technology, music management, or music industry studies.
Music
The music program at the University of Colorado at Denver is intended for students seeking preparation for professional careers in music related to performance, recording, broadcast business, and the entertainment industries. The four-year music program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music.
The specialized curricula offered by the program lead graduates to local, regional, and national positions in audio research, production companies, arts administration, and audio engineering, as well as graduate studies at leading universities and conservatories. Additionally, many graduates establish careers as owners of booking agencies, publishing companies, and recording studios.
All music applicants, except those entering the Music Industry Studies program, must pass an entrance audition before being accepted to the program. Contact the department for information on the music audition.
Music Technology: This area of study addresses contemporary technology in studio recording, sound reinforcement, and electronic music. It is intended to develop skills for creative musicians, producers, and technicians, using both analog and digital technology.
Music Management: This program prepares graduates for careers in such fields as artist management, music publishing, music merchandising, concert promotion, record production, and the development of skills relative to the rapidly expanding telecommunications industry.
Music Industry Studies: This program prepares the student to work in the music industry. Courses include a non-performance music core with selected classes in music business and music technology. It is intended to develop a broad range of skills in management, promotion, publishing, producing, and audio engineering.
Performance Music
Students gain performance skills in classical, jazz, commercial, and experimental music styles. The program includes specialized courses in large and small performance ensembles, applied study, contemporary improvisation, and analysis, culminating in the presentation of a junior and senior recital. Students wishing to declare a major in the performance emphasis must audition
for entry at the time of their Sophomore Proficiency Exam.
ENSEMBLES
All music majors enrolled in an applied music course are required to register for an ensemble. Non-music majors are invited to audition for any of the CU-Denver music ensembles. Each ensemble carries 1 semester hour of credit.
APPLIED MUSIC
All applied music courses are restricted to music majors, and minors (only upon completion of the entrance audition) enrolled in a minimum of 7 other credit hours. Students may only be enrolled in one applied music course in any given semester. Non-music majors must register for applied music studies through Extended Studies.
All students taking an applied music course must also register for an ensemble and PMUS 1500: General Recital. Students in applied music courses are also required to perform in a Performance Jury at the end of each semester of applied study and to pass a Sophomore Proficiency Examination at the end of their fourth semester of study.
All majors taking applied music must perform in a solo or solo with accompaniment capacity at least once a semester in a General Recital. General Recitals are scheduled throughout the semester.
FACILITIES FEE
All music majors are required to pay a $30 facilities fee each semester at the time of registration. Non-music majors will be assessed a facilities fee when registering for selected courses, as noted in the course descriptions.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR PERFORMANCE, MUSIC ENGINEERING, AND MUSIC MANAGEMENT
Required Courses
in Music Credit Hours
PMUS 1100. Music Theory I ...........3
PMUS 1110. Ear Training/Sight Sing I.. 1
PMUS 1200. Music Theory II...........3
PMUS 1210. Ear Training/Sight Sing II. 1
PMUS 2100. Music Theory 111..........3
PMUS 2110. Ear Training/Sight Sing III 1 PMUS 2200. Contemporary Styles 3
PMUS 3830. History and Literature
of Music 1 .......................3
PMUS 3831. History and Literature
of Music II ......................3
Music History Elective...............3
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PMUS 1023. Piano Class (see note 1) ... 1-4
Applied Music (see note 2)...........8
Ensembles ...........................6
MUS 2700. The Music Business I.......3
MUS 2710. The Music Business II .....3
MUS 2540. Music Technology 1.........3
MUS 2470. Music on the Personal
Computer .........................3
PMUS 1500. General Recital
(4 semesters).................. 0
Total........................... 51-54
Credits in Area of Study ....... 27-29
Total Semester Hours Required 125-130 Note 1: Guitar majors are required to take 2 semesters of PMUS 1093/1094, Commercial Guitar Styles, in addition to applied
requirement.
Emphasis in Performance
PMUS 3283. Contemp. Improvisation .2
MUS 4060. Analysis I .................2
Applied Music Courses .............. 12
Ensemble Courses .....................2
Music Electives.......................7
MUS 4710. Research Project........... 2
Total .............................. 27
Vocal performance majors are also required to take two semesters of foreign language. This requirement is waived if student has taken three years of a language in high school or is able to pass a competency exam based on translating foreign language song texts.
Emphasis in Music Technology
MUS 2560. Music Technology II........3
MUS 2520. Music Technology II Lab... 1
MUS 3540. Recording Studio
Maint. & Calibration..............3
MUS 4510. Music Engr. 1 Lab......... 1
MUS 4550. Music Engineering 1........3
MUS 4570. Music Engineering II.......3
MUS 4530. Music Engr. II Lab........ 1
Music Electives......................5
Music Engineering Electives .........3
MUS 3670. Junior Project: Music Tech.. . . 3 MUS 4670. Senior Project: Music Tech.. _3 Total ............................. 29
Elective Studies in Music Management
MGMT 1000. Intro, to Business .......3
MUS 4720. Music Management...........3
MUS 4730. Music Production...........3
MUS 4740. Music Business Analysis...3
MUS 3730. Music Industry
Financial Management..............3
MKTG 3000. Principles of Marketing ..3
MUS 2560. Music Technology II........3
MUS 2520. Music Tech. II Lab ....... 1
Music Electives......................3
MUS 4700. Research Project.........._4
Total.............................. 29
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR MUSIC INDUSTRY STUDIES
PMUS 1010. Music Fundamentals .......3
PMUS 1023. Piano Class .............. 1
OR
PMUS 1093. Guitar Class............. 1
MUS 2300. Intro, to Songwriting .....3
PMUS 2831. History of Music II.......3
Music History Elective...............3
Music Distributed Studies............6
Music Electives......................6
MUS 2700. Music Business I...........3
MUS 2710. Music Business II .........3
MUS 2540. Music Technology I.........3
MUS 2560. Music Technology II........3
MUS 2520. Music Tech. II Lab ....... 1
Music Management or Music
Engineering Seminar................3
MUS 3939. Internship ................2
Music Industry Elective Studies** .. 37
Total semester credit hours ....... 80
** NOTE: Courses to fulfill the music industry elective studies are to be selected from a list of approved classes, in conjunction with and the approval of a faculty advisor.
DEPARTMENT OF VISUAL ARTS
Chair. John Hull Office: AR 185
Phone: 303-5564891
Faculty
Professors: John Hull, Ernest O. Porps Associate Professor Kent Homchick Assistant Professors: Joann Brennan, Quintin Gonzalez, Scott Massey,
Karen Mathews, James McElhinney, Moyo Okediji
Professors Emeritus: Jerry Johnson, Charles Moone
The Department of Visual Arts offers professional instruction in five interrelated areas of study: art history, drawing/ painting, photography, sculpture, and multimedia studies. The department provides an educational environment where artists and art historians of promise and motivation can explore the horizons of their own talents in the midst of intense critical dialogue. This dialogue is generated by their peers; by distinguished visiting artists, scholars, and critics; and by a faculty comprising artists and art historians of acknowledged accomplishment.
The primary educational experience for the student is centered on the knowledge and skills gained from rigorous and
structured courses offered by the various areas of the Visual Arts Department, as well as the rich academic offerings throughout the university. Each student is routinely exposed to many aesthetic or academic positions through encounters with faculty members and visitors. The Visual Arts Department’s efforts are devoted not only to the refinement of visual skills, but to the articulation and cultivation of the mind. Students must bring creative force and imagination to their own development, for these qualities cannot be taught-they can only be stimulated and appreciated.
Education in the visual arts encompasses a comprehensive knowledge of and direct experience with the various media of drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, multimedia, and other forms. Supporting this enterprise is the development of an understanding of art theory, a knowledge of the methods and materials of art making, and examination of the diverse approach to examining the art object in history. Central to the practice of art history are critical writing and analysis.
A variety of opportunities are open to the visual arts major. The degree can be specific preparation for graduate study or a more general background for fields related to the arts, including arts administration, museum and gallery work, and art conservation. Internships are available for student majors with a number of organizations in the Denver area, and an Art Resource Center has been established in the department to serve as a clearinghouse for information about study abroad programs, jobs, and continuing education in the visual arts.
Graduating seniors receiving the B.F.A. degree are required to have a thesis show during their last semester of study. These exhibitions are scheduled in the fall and spring terms only.
Fine Arts
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FINE ARTS
Required Fine Arts Core Courses:
FA 1100. Drawing Foundations........3
FA 1150. Photo Foundations..........3
FA 1400. Two Dimensional
Design Foundations.................3
FA 1500. Three Dimensional Design Foundations FA 2200. Basic Painting
FA 2600. History of Art I (survey)
FA 2610. History of Art II (survey)
Semester hours in fine arts core .. 21
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Visual Arts / 79
Emphasis in Studio Art:
FA 4800. Art Seminar..................3
Upper division art history electives.6
Studio art electives ............ 12-18
(12 credits must be upper division) Semester hours in studio art emphasis..................... 21-27
Emphasis in Art History:
FA 4790. Methods in Art History.......3
FA 4650.19th Century Art .............3
FA 4660.20th Century Art .............3
FA 4690. Renaissance Art..............3
Elective credits in art history ....6-9
Elective credits in art history
or Studio........................3-6
(9 of the above 9-15 elective hours must be upper division)
Semester hours in art history emphasis........................ 21-27
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS
Required Fine Arts Core Courses
FA 1100. Drawing Foundations..........3
FA 1150. Photo Foundations............3
FA 1400. Two Dimensional Design
Foundations........................3
FA 1500. Three Dimensional
Design Foundations ................3
FA 2200. Basic Painting ..............3
FA 2600. History of Art I (survey)....3
FA 2610. History of Art II (survey) . 3
FA 4800. Art Seminar..................3
FA 4950. BFA Thesis ................._1
Semester hours in fine arts core.... 25
Emphasis in Drawing:
FA 2000. Drawing II ..................3
FA 3000. Intermediate Drawing ........3
FA 3020. Intermediate Life Drawing...3
FA 4000. Advanced Drawing.............3
FA 4020. Advanced Life Drawing........3
Upper division art history electives..6
Upper division painting electives ....9
Art electives..................... 6-15
Semester hours in drawing emphasis........................ 36-45
Emphasis in Painting:
FA 2210. Painting II .................3
FA 3200. Intermediate Painting........3
FA 3210. Intermediate Painting........3
FA 4200. Advanced Painting............3
FA 4210. Advanced Painting............3
Upper division art history electives..6
Upper division drawing electives......9
Art electives..................... 6-15
Semester hours in painting emphasis......................... 36-45
Emphasis in Photography:
FA 2155. Photography Foundations II/
Advanced Black & White.............3
FA 3155. Intermediate Photography 1/
Digital............................3
FA 3160. Intermediate Photography 11/
Color..............................3
FA 3180. Photography The Modern Era/
Criticism and Theory ..............3
FA 3630. History of Photography ......3
FA 4195.Advanced Photography I .......3
FA 4196. Advanced Photography II .....3
Upper division art history electives..6
Upper division photo electives... 6-12
Art electives...................... 6-9
Semester hours in photography emphasis......................... 39-48
Emphasis in Sculpture:
FA 2500. Sculpture I .................3
FA 3500. Sculpture 1IA................3
FA 3510. Sculpture I1B................3
FA 4500. Sculpture IIIA ..............3
FA 4510. Sculpture 1IIB ..............3
Upper division art history electives..6
Upper division drawing electives......9
Art electives..................... 6-15
Semester hours in sculpture emphasis......................... 36-45
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS-MULTIMEDIA STUDIES EMPHASIS
Required Fine Arts Core Courses
FA 1100. Drawing Foundations........3
FA 1150. Photo Foundations..........3
FA 1400.Two Dimensional
Design Foundations.................3
FA 1500. Three Dimensional Design Foundations
FA 2600. Art History I (survey)......
FA 2610. Art History II (survey).....
Upper division art history electives .... _ Semester hours in fine arts core .... S
Emphasis in Multimedia:
PMUS 1001. Music Appreciation........
MUME 1100. Basics of Multimedia......
MUME 1200. Multimedia Studio ........
MUME 1250. Multimedia Layout
& Usability ......................
MUME 1500. Trends in Multimedia......
MUME 1510. Trends in Multimedia......
MUME 1520. Trends in Multimedia......
MUME 3400. Multimedia Image
Manipulation......................
MUME 3410. Multimedia Authoring......
MUME 3420. Multimedia Video/Audio . MUME 3430. Multimedia 3D/Animation .
MUME 3440. Multimedia Digital
Illustration .......................3
MUME 3450. Multimedia Digital
Painting............................3
MUME 3500. Trends in Multimedia...... 1
MUME 3510. Trends in Multimedia...... 1
MUME 3520. Trends in Multimedia...... 1
MUME 3939. Multimedia Internship.....3
MUME 4410. Multimedia Thesis .........3
Upper division multimedia-related
electives...........................9
Semester hours in multimedia emphasis ......................... 51
CLJ-Denver Catalog 2001-02
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College of Business and Administration Graduate School of Business Administration
Dean: Sueann Ambron Dean of Faculty and Executive Associate Dean: Jean-Claude Bosch Associate Dean for Academic Programs:
Kenneth L. Bettenhausen Office: CU-Denver Building,
1250 14th Street, 2nd Floor Telephone: 303-556-5801
College Advising:
Undergraduate: 303-556-5800 Graduate: 303-556-5900 Fax: 303-556-5904 Graduate Programs Admissions: 303-556-5900
Web site: www.business.cudenver.edu
FACULTY
Professors: Marcelle V. Arak (Finance), Heidi Boerstler (Health Administration), Jean-Claude Bosch (Finance), Peter G. Bryant (Management Science and Information Systems), Wayne F. Cascio (Management), Lawrence F. Cunningham (Marketing and Transportation), E. Woodrow Eckard, Jr. (Business Economics), Richard W. Foster (Finance and Health Administration), James H. Gerlach (Information Systems), Jahangir Karimi (Information Systems), Susan M. Keaveney (Marketing), Gary A. Kochenberger (Operations Management), James R. Morris (Finance), Dennis F. Murray (Accounting), Bruce R. Neumann (Accounting and Health Administration), Edward J. O’Connor (Management), John C. Ruhnka (Management and Business Law), Donald L. Stevens (Finance),
Dean G. Taylor (Finance), Clifford E. Young (Marketing), Raymond F. Zammuto (Management).
Associate Professors: Herman Aguinis (Management), Ajeyo Banerjee (Finance), Kenneth L. Bettenhausen (Management), Kang Rae Cho (Management and International Business), Gary J. Colbert (Accounting), Edward J. Conry (Business Law and Ethics), Elizabeth S. Cooperman (Finance), C. Madlena Fiol (Management), Blair D. Gjfford (Management and Health Administration), Deborah L. Kellogg (Operations Management), Sarah Kovoor Misra (Management), Michael Manning (Information
Systems), Stuart Rosenstein (Finance), Manuel G. Serapio, Jr. (International Business and Management), Marlene A. Smith (Quantitative Methods). Assistant Professors: David A. Forlani (Marketing), Kun Shin Im (Information Systems), Vicki R. Lane (Marketing), Linda G. Levy (Accounting), L. Ann Martin (Accounting), Madhavan Parthasarathy (Marketing), Judy Scott (Information Systems), Steven Walczak (Information Systems).
Senior Instructors: Elizabeth S. Conner (Accounting), Charles M. Franks (Quantitative Methods), Gary L. Giese (Business Law and Management), Robert D. Hockenbury (Accounting), Barbara A. Pelter (Finance), Marianne Plunkert (Finance), Eric J. Thompson (Information Systems), John Turner (Finance).
Instructors: Errol L. Biggs (Health Administration), Michael D. Harper (Operations Management), Chen Ji (Finance), Jeffrey R. Nystrom (Management), Charles A. Rice (Management), Gary R. Schornack (Marketing), Mary Lee Stansifer (Marketing).
Professors Emeritus: Gordon G. Barnewall (Marketing), H. Michael Hayes (Marketing and Strategic Management), William D. Murray (Information Systems).
INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE/SCHOOL
Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain business community, the College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration at the University of Colorado at Denver provides its students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective, responsible business professionals. This level of excellence in higher education is achieved by bringing together nationally recognized faculty and highly motivated, mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment.
CU-Denver’s College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration is a “research institution,” and our faculty are nationally recognized for their contributions to
scholarly research as well as for their teaching skills. Accordingly, our students have the opportunity to be on the leading edge of business management theory and practice.
Our class schedules and curriculum offer flexibility to meet the needs of full-and part-time students, with both day and evening classes. Whether they are experienced working professionals seeking advanced degrees, or preparing for new careers in the business world, students will gain the knowledge and perspective necessary to succeed in today’s challenging business environment.
CU-Denver’s College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration can give students an edge over their competition.
College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration Educational Goals
CU-Denver’s College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration is committed to superb teaching, connecting theory to practice that focuses on:
• current and relevant knowledge and skills necessary for success in the highly competitive global business environment;
• experience in cooperative and team-based work skills;
• integrated professional and functional expertise; and
• sensitivity to cultural and ethnic diversity.
Our graduate programs serve both traditional and non-traditional students who have extensive work experience.
The M.B.A. serves the needs of students who desire a general management education. The professionally oriented M.S. degrees serve the needs of students who desire greater specialization, and particularly students who have already obtained an undergraduate business degree. Large segments of our graduate students will be drawn from national and international locales.
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Our undergraduate program, which serves both traditional and non-traditional students, leads to a baccalaureate degree in business with a substantial liberal arts component. The program is closely linked, through articulation agreements, to lower-division programs offered by Colorado’s four-year and community colleges. The majority of undergraduates come from the Denver metropolitan area.
Key elements of our academic programs are the provision of quality career advising and placement services, and flexible schedules and programs to meet a wide range of student needs. We are committed to assisting our students’ efforts to pursue rewarding careers.
Faculty
Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about its teaching and research. Faculty members hold degrees from the nation’s leading business schools, including Berkeley, Harvard, Stanford, University of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania, UCLA, and Yale. Many of them also bring years of valuable experience in private industry. Their interdisciplinary expertise, academic achievements, scholarly research, and business experience provide students with a dynamic learning environment.
Students
Unlike the students at a traditional college campus, many of our students are adult, working professionals who maintain full-time employment. Their success and experience enrich class discussions and interactions among students. Although a high percentage attend evening classes, a significant number are full-time students attending classes offered during the day. Following the current national trend, women constitute about one-half of the student body. Since admission standards are among the highest in the region, the student body is unusually motivated and talented.
This rich mix of backgrounds, experience, and perspectives, when coupled with the strengths of our excellent faculty, fosters stimulating classroom interaction and keen competition among the students.
Accreditation
CU-Denver’s College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration is one of the few schools in the state accredited by AACSB,
the International Association for Management Education. Business Week wrote recently, “Today, just having the degree isn’t as important as where you get it....
As corporations become sawier buyers of... talent, they are giving more weight to the AACSB seal... Accreditation shows that a Business School cares about the quality of its program.” In addition, CU-Denver’s accounting program has received separate accreditation by AACSB. Prospective students should note that only two state-funded schools in Colorado have received such additional accreditation of their accounting programs.
In a similar manner, our program in health administration is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA). This agency ensures that health administration programs meet demanding requirements for quality education in the health administration area.
Entrepreneurship
The Richard H. and Pamela S. Bard Center for Entrepreneurship Development offers a three-course certificate program, internships, and accelerated courses designed to develop the kind of entrepreneurial skills required by businesses of all types. The program may be taken for college credit by degreeseeking graduate students. Additional courses beyond the three initial offerings provide further entrepreneurial problemsolving skills. These courses serve as graduate electives for business and nonbusiness students and appeal to those who desire to start a business, grow a business, become more entrepreneurial as a corporate manager, or apply entrepreneurial decision making within other disciplines. The Leadership Council is available for mentorship, and a venture capital fund will help graduates launch their own businesses. Anyone interested is invited to visit the Center, located on the Downtown Denver Mall in the Masonic Building, 535 16th Street, Suite 300; or call the Bard Center at 303-620-4050.
Professional Development
The College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration offers credit, certificate, and non-credit public programs and in-house, customized training programs which provide a functional business education to Denver metropolitan area businesses and individuals. Experienced
instructors teach a variety of high-quality, practical classes that are designed to meet the specific needs of business.
For more information, go to the College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration web site at www.business.cudenver.edu and click on Professional Centers.
Internships
Internships/Cooperative Education is a program designed to provide students with practical work experience in a business setting. This program allows students to put classroom education into use. The work experience gained through an internship can contribute to an individual’s success.
HOW INTERNSHIPS WORK
In partnership with the CU-Denver Career Center, the College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration offers a selective program allowing students to receive a maximum of three semester hours of elective credit (undergraduate or graduate) for internships with participating organizations. Internships complement the academic program, and may lead to permanent career opportunities.
Upon successful completion, a grade of P (Pass) is recorded.
Note: Business students are limited to completing a maximum of six semester hours of individualized instruction which includes independent study credits in combination with internship credits.
ELIGIBILITY FOR PLACEMENT
The general requirements for internships are as follows:
• Undergraduate students must be admitted to the College, be in good standing with at least a 3.2 cumulative GPA, and have completed at least
15 hours of the business core at CU-Denver.
• Graduate students must be admitted to the School, be in good standing with at least a 3.3 GPA, and have completed 21 semester hours of graduate work. Interested students should contact
the appropriate program director or the Career Center for further details about the program.
Scholarships and Financial Aid
Many programs for financial aid are administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Call 303-556-2886 for detailed information.
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Thanks to the generous support of the Colorado business community and others, the College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration has a significant number of scholarships to offer its students. Scholarships are awarded on the basis of merit and/or financial need. The amount of the award and the number of awards available vary. Scholarship monies are typically used to support all or some of a student's tuition and fees, although certain scholarships allow remaining scholarship funds to be spent at the student's discretion.
Thirty different scholarships are available to eligible College of Business students. Scholarships such as the Virginia T. Schuman and the Ford Motor Company Scholarships are open to all business students. Other scholarships are open to students in specific degree programs:
Undergraduate scholarships include the Board of Advisors, the College of Business Undergraduate Excellence, the Carolyn Lee Henderson, the Robert E. Moore Memorial, the College of Business Sustaining Student, the Dean’s Community Scholarships, the Scholarship for International Study, and the Dean’s Scholarship for Undergraduate Business Students.
The MBA Outstanding Scholar Award, the MBA Opportunity Scholarship, the MBA Faculty’s Scholarship, and the Virginia T. Schuman Scholarship for MBA Students are given to qualifying M.B.A. students.
Accounting scholarships for both graduate and undergraduate accounting students include the Deloitte & Touche, Accounting Progralm, and Coopers & Lybrand Scholarships, as well as the Price Waterhouse Scholarship for undergraduate junior accounting majors only.
M.S. Finance scholarships are the M.S. Finance Fellows and the Carolyn Lee Henderson Scholarships (also open to eligible undergraduate finance students.)
M.S. Health Adminstration scholarships include the Abbott Fellows, AUPHA/ McGaw, CU-Denver M.S. Health Administration, Eugenie D. Sontag, Leland R.
Kaiser, Medical Group Management, and the M.S. Health Administration Alumni Scholarships.
M.S. Information Systems students may apply for the Dean's Scholarship in Information Systems.
The M.S. International Business Merit Scholarship is open to students in the CU-Denver M.S. International Business program.
M.S. Management or Human Resources Management students may apply for the Excellence in Management Scholarship.
M.S. Marketing students may apply for the M.S. Marketing Sustaining Student, M.S. in Marketing Fellows, and Robert E. Moore Memorial Scholarships (also open to undergraduate marketing students).
Finally, four scholarships are available to students who take courses in entrepreneurial studies at the Richard H. and Pamela S. Bard Center for Entrepreneurship Development. These are the Coulter Foundation Scholarship in Entrepreneurial Studies and Business, and the Dean’s Pursuit of Excellence, Mehalchin, and Rockies Venture Club Scholarships.
Further information about these scholarships, including eligibility criteria and application forms, may be obtained by visiting the College of Business website at www.business.cudenver.edu (click on scholarships) or by calling 303-556-5900.
Student Organizations
Opportunity for association with other College of Business and Administration students in varied activities intended to stimulate professional interest and to give recognition to scholastic attainment •is provided by the following student organizations:
AABSA-African American Business Student Alliance
Beta Alpha Psi-national honorary scholastic fraternity in accounting
Beta Gamma Sigma-national honorary scholastic fraternity in business
CSHRM-Colorado Society for Human Resources Management (student chapter) for students interested in personnel or industrial relations
The Robert E. Moore Collegiate Chapter of the American Marketing Association
CU Venture Network-campus chapter of the Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs, open to all CU-Denver students
HASO- Health Administration Student Organization
IBSA-International Business Students Association-open to CU-Denver business students
ISA-Information Systems Association
FMA-Financial Management Association, a national organization
M. B .A./M .S. Association - Uni vers ity of Colorado at Denver association of master’s students in business
Phi Chi Theta- national professional business and economics fraternity
Sigma lota Epsilon - professional and honorary management fraternity
SAS-Society of Accounting Students
USAB-Undergraduate Student Advisory Board
Study Abroad
Transfer credit from study abroad programs requires prior written approval from the undergraduate or graduate programs directors. Students must meet with a business staff advisor to determine course acceptability prior to the semester in which they intend to study abroad. Information on the various programs is available at the Office of International Education.
Institute for International Business
The Institute for International Business (1IB) was created in 1988 by the Board of Regents of the University of Colorado to serve as a center for the advanced study and teaching of international business. In 1993, the Institute was designated a Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) by the U.S. Department of Education, one of only 25 such centers of excellence in the U.S. Through the CIBER and other funding sources, the Institute strives to help the faculties of the College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration and other University departments in internationalizing curriculum, programs, certificates, or other student-oriented endeavors. The IIB works in other ways to support faculty in their teaching, research, and development activities. In addition, the Institute designs and facilitates customized international programs and training for business, cooperates with other organizations to offer seminars and conferences, and publishes a quarterly newsletter to familiarize the Denver and regional communities with international business issues. Such initiatives help faculty, students, and the business community to acquire the skills and expertise needed to be successful in our increasingly global economy. The Institute also conducts and promotes research on the global economic aspects of competitiveness.
Call 303-556-4738 for information.
GENERAL ACADEMIC POLICIES
Academic policies which apply to all CU-Denver students are described in
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84 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
the General Information section of this catalog. The policies outlined on the following pages are relevant for both undergraduate students in the College of Business and Administration and graduate students in the Graduate School of Business Administration. Individual policies appropriate only to undergraduate or graduate students are described under separate headings.
Each student is responsible for knowing and complying with the academic policies and regulations established for the College. The College cannot assume responsibility for problems resulting from a student’s failure to follow the policies stated in this catalog. Similarly, students are responsible for all deadlines, rules, and regulations stated in the Schedule of Courses.
Academic Ethics
Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and integrity. Cheating, plagiarism, illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations, alteration, forgery, or falsification of official records, and similar acts or any attempt to engage in such acts are grounds for suspension or expulsion from the University. In particular, students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act involving the offering of the work of someone else as the student’s own.
It is recommended that students consult with the instructors as to the proper preparation of reports, papers, etc. in order to avoid this and similar offenses. Also, actions which disrupt the administrative process, such as misrepresentation of credentials or academic status, other forms of deception, or verbal abuse of College staff are grounds for suspension or probation. All reported acts of dishonesty must be referred to the College of Business Internal Affairs Committee.
Admission to Business Classes
Enrollment in business classes is limited to students who have been admitted to business degree programs, and to other students as described in the separate undergraduate and graduate policy sections. The course registration criteria are designed to meet a number of objectives:
1. To assure access to business courses
for students seeking a business degree.
2. To serve students in other colleges who have business-related education objectives or requirements.
3. To serve non-degree students who have specific career or education goals.
Please refer to the Schedule of Courses each term for course availability and course prerequisites.
Attendance Regulations
Students are required to attend classes on a regular basis. Absences must be arranged with the instructor and must conform with university and instructor’s policies on attendance.
Prerequisites
Students are expected to know and fulfill all prerequisite requirements, including any prerequisite information when registering. The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who enroll without the correct prerequisites. Generally, students who are administratively dropped or withdrawn will not receive tuition refunds.
Course Numbering
The course numbering system used at the University of Colorado at Denver identifies the class standing required for enrollment. Students are expected to take 1000-level courses in their freshman year, 2000-level courses in their sophomore year, 3000-level courses in their junior year, and 4000-level courses in their senior year. Courses at the 5000 and 6000 level are restricted to graduate business students.
Adding Courses
Students may add classes to their original schedule through census date (first 12 days of the fall or spring semester, first 8 days of summer session). Instructor approval may be required to add a course after the first day/week of classes.
Dropping Courses
Students may drop a class through census date and it will not appear on the transcript. After census, a student who wishes to drop must obtain written approval from both the instructor and Academic Dean or designate. The course and a grade of W will appear on the transcript. In order to drop beyond the 10th week it will also be necessary to document circumstances beyond a student’s
control. Any student who is failing a class will not be allowed to drop, and an /-’will be recorded on the transcript.
Withdrawal
See the General Information section of this catalog for University-wide withdrawal policies. Note that the College of Business normally requires instructors’ signatures on withdrawal forms before the Academic Dean’s approval is granted.
Administrative Drop
The College reserves the right to administratively drop students who are incorrectly enrolled in business courses. Instructors also may recommend that students who fail to meet expected course attendance or course prerequisites be dropped from the course. Generally, students who are administratively dropped will not receive tuition refunds.
Appeal Procedure
Students should contact a staff advisor in the College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration programs office for appeal and petition procedures pertaining to rules and regulations of the College.
General Grading Policies
Plus/Minus Grading. College faculty have the option to use plus/minus grading.
Incomplete Grades. The only incomplete grade given in the College is IF. An IF grade is assigned only when documented circumstances clearly beyond the student’s control prevent completion of course requirements (exams, papers, etc.). Students must sign a contract outlining how they will make up the missing work with the instructor giving the IF. Students may not register for the class a second time. All IF grades must be made up within the contract period (which may not exceed one year), or the IF will automatically be changed to the grade of F.
Also, IF grades must be completed and recorded at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor concerning the removal of incomplete grades.
Grade Changes. Grades as reported by instructors are final. Grade changes will be considered only in cases of documented clerical errors or when a student is making up an incomplete
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grade (IF). All changes must be made within one year after the course has been taken, unless highly unusual circumstances can be documented and the change has been approved by the College. Normally, grade changes will not be considered for any circumstances after three years.
Pass-Fail or No Credit (Audit). With the exception of internships and independent studies, the College does not permit election of pass-fail grading for any business course required for the degree. Only non-degree status students may petition to audit a business class for a grade of NC (no credit).
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
A carefully designed curriculum to prepare students for success in business administration is available for the student seeking either an undergraduate or graduate degree. The College offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration),
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), and the Master of Science (M.S.) degrees. The particular programs offered are:
Areas of Emphasis (B.S. in Business Administration)
Accounting
Finance
Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business Management Marketing
Graduate Programs
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) Individualized Cohort option E-Business option Health Administration option 11-month option (Full time)
Master of Science ih Accounting Master of Science in Finance Master of Science in Health Administration
Master of Science in Information Systems Master of Science in International Business Master of Science in Management and Organization
Master of Science in Marketing
A dual degree combination of the M.B.A. with any M.S. program may also be selected, as well as dual M.S. degrees in any two fields of business. The M.S. Finance/Economics dual degree is also available. Dual degrees of the M.B.A. and
nursing, psychology, architecture, M.D., Thunderbird, and urban planning can be pursued.
Executive Programs
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) for Executives Master of Science in Health Administration for Executives
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Associate Dean: Kenneth L. Bettenhausen Program Director: Clifford E. Young Program Coordinator: Nancy A. Reed
The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree is intended to help the student achieve the following general objectives:
1. An understanding of the activities that constitute a business enterprise and the principles underlying administration
of those activities.
2. The ability to think logically and analytically about the kind of complex problems encountered by management.
3. Facility in the arts of communication.
4. A comprehension of human relationships involved in an organization.
5. Awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in administrative positions.
6. Skill in the art of learning that will help the student continue self-education after leaving the campus.
Undergraduate Admissions
Telephone: 303-556-5800 Fax: 303-556-5904
ADMISSION OF FRESHMAN STUDENTS
Freshman applicants must have completed the college preparatory curriculum in high school, graduated in the top 25% of their high school class, and achieved a score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. See the General Information section of this catalog for further information on freshman admission.
ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS
Applicants who have completed work at other collegiate institutions should review the information on transfer students in the General Information section of this catalog. In addition to
University policies, the College of Business and Administration evaluates course work to determine its appropriateness for the degree of Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Students who have completed more than 24 semester hours of transferable course work are evaluated for admission on the basis of their college grade-point average (GPA) without regard to their high school performance.
To be fully considered for admission to the College of Business and Administration, a transfer student must have a minimum cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale for all college course work attempted. Transfer applicants seeking priority admission must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for all work applicable to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree, and a 2.0 GPA in business courses. Students with less than an overall 3.0 GPA will be considered if they have a 2.6 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work, a 2.0 GPA in business courses, and at least a 2.0 overall GPA in courses applying to the degree.
Transfer applicants who do not meet either of the priority admission standards are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA earned in the last 24 hours, if the GPA in the last 24 hours is at least 2.6. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available. For information about specific policies on transfer of credit, consult the undergraduate business program coordinator.
INTRA-UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
Students who want to transfer to the College of Business and Administration from another college or school of the University of Colorado at Denver must formally apply to the College of Business. Transfer deadlines are August 1 for fall semester, December 1 for spring semester, and May 1 for the summer session.
Students will be evaluated only on course work that applies to the business degree program. Generally, this will exclude course work of a technical or vocational nature and courses in activity PE and remedial subjects. Students who have completed at least 24 applicable semester hours will be evaluated on their college work; students with fewer them 24 transferable hours will be evaluated on the basis of both high school and college work.
Students will be considered for admission on either their overall GPA in applicable course work from CU and all previous institutions or on their last
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24 hours. Applicants with less than a
2.0 GPA in business courses (from CU
or other institutions) and overall CU GPA of less than 2.0 will be denied admission even though they meet the minimum requirements for consideration.
Students will receive priority consideration for admission to the College of Business if they have an overall GPA of
3.0 or an overall GPA of 3.0 on their last 24 hours. All other applicants meeting the minimum requirements for admission as stated above will be pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA in the last 24 hours, if the GPA in the last 24 hours is at least 2.6. Pooled applicants will be offered admission as space is available.
To apply for an intra-university transfer, students must submit an Intra-University Transfer form and the CU-Denver transcripts to the business program coordinator. Transfer forms are available at CU-Denver Office of Admissions or the College of Business office; transcript request forms are available at the CU-Denver Records Office. The transcript must include the student’s most recent semester at the University. Students with previous course work from other institutions are also required to submit a copy of their transfer credit evaluations (advanced standings).
FORMER STUDENTS
A CU student from another campus, or a CU-Denver student who has not registered for three consecutive semesters (summers included), is considered a former student and must reapply for admission. Former CU-Denver business degree students will be automatically readmitted to the College for up to three years from the semester they last attended if they are in good standing (noton probation or suspension) in the College. Students who have not attended for more than three years, or who have completed the equivalent of 12 or more semester hours at another institution of higher education, must meet the admission and degree requirements applicable at the time they reapply.
OLD WORK POLICY
For students newly admitted to the College of Business and Administration and former business students readmitted to the College after an absence of three semesters, applicable credits up to five years old will be counted toward business degree requirements. Courses more than five years old will be evaluated individually for their current relevance to the degree program. Students may be
required to update their knowledge by taking additional courses when past courses are outdated; in such cases, credit will be given for both courses. Generally, business courses more than ten years old will not apply toward degree credit.
SECOND UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE
Students may apply to the College of Business and Administration to earn a second undergraduate degree, provided the first undergraduate degree is in a field other than business. Persons who have already earned an undergraduate degree in business may not apply for a second undergraduate degree in business. Applications are available through the Office of Admissions.
If a student has an academic record that justifies consideration for a graduate program, that student is encouraged to apply for one of the Graduate School of Business Administration master’s degree programs. Call 303-556-5900 for information or refer to the Graduate Business Programs section of the catalog.
Students who are accepted for the second undergraduate degree will be required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a business degree. For example, if a student registered for a second degree has not had the required mathematics or general education courses, these must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses. Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken before a student begins to pursue the major field.
MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Students in other undergraduate schools and colleges at CU-Denver wishing to take a minor in business administration must have a 2.0 GPA to enter as a business minor, and must have a 2.0 GPA at the time of graduation to receive a minor in business. Prerequisites to the business minor are: 1SMG 2000, MATH 1070 or a higher level math course, QUAN 2010 or a statistics class approved by the College of Business, and ECON 2022. Required courses for a business minor are MGMT 1000, ACCT 2200, BLAW 3000, MKTG 3000, FNCE 3100, and MGMT 3000. Twelve of these 18 hours: (a) must be taken while in residence at CU-Denver, and (b) after admission to the business minor program. If the student has already taken the equivalent of one or more of these courses, other higher level business courses may be substituted with College
of Business approval. Up to six of the 18 required business courses may be taken at another institution. Transfer credit will be granted on the same basis that transfer credit is granted for courses taken by business majors.
DOUBLE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason, students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields. For additional information, contact an undergraduate business staff advisor at 303-556-5800.
Undergraduate Advising and Academic Planning
ADMISSIONS ADVISING
Persons not yet admitted to the College of Business can receive advising on course selection, admission requirements, and other matters from an undergraduate staff advisor. To make an appointment, call 303-556-5800.
ADMITTED STUDENTS
Upon admission to the College, students execute a Degree Plan which identifies the courses required to graduate. This plan contains all the information needed to select courses and monitor progress toward completion of requirements for the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Business students are expected to assume responsibility for their own advising. This includes scheduling courses each term, being familiar with all the policies and procedures of the College, and otherwise managing their own academic careers. Staff advisors are available to answer questions about unusual situations.
Career advising is available from business faculty and from the CU-Denver Career Center, 303-556-2250.
Undergraduate Core Curriculum-University of Colorado at Denver
The faculty of the College of Business Administration, College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have established a core curriculum for undergraduate students.
All undergraduate students who entered CU-Denver in Fall 1990 or later are requirec to complete the undergraduate core
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curriculum independent of their college or major. Undergraduate students admitted prior to Fall 1990 have a choice of either the new core curriculum or the requirements of their college in effect at the time of admission to the college.
The undergraduate core curriculum for CU-Denver is outlined in the following table, and the CU-Denver core requirements for business students are specified in the section labeled Business Program Requirements.
The undergraduate core curriculum seeks to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual competencies in mathematics and computation, writing, oral communication, information literacy, and critical thinking. It also requires all students to develop basic knowledge in the areas of natural and physical sciences, behavioral sciences, social sciences, humanities, and arts. Furthermore, the cre curriculum promotes an awareness of cultural and racial diversity. The majority of the core curriculum is designed to be completed during a student’s freshman and sophomore years in order to provide the foundation for specific training in a student’s major discipline.
CU-Denver Undergraduate Core Curriculum for B.S. in Business
Specific requirements for the B.S. degree in Business are included in the catalog text.
Knowledge Areas a. Writing/Speech 9 hours
b. Mathematics 3 hours
c. Natural and Physical Sciences (Biology, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics) 8 hours
d. Behavioral Sciences AND Social Sciences (Psychology and Economics) 9 hours
e. Humanities (History, Literature, and Philosophy) 6 hours
f. Arts (Fine Arts, Music, and Theatre) 3 hours
g. Cultural Diversity 3 hours
Total Core 41 hours
Graduation Requirements
The Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree requires the following:
Total Credits. A toted of 120 semester hours.
A minimal level of proficiency must be demonstrated in one foreign language or in regional expertise. Students may satisfy the proficiency requirement by taking courses as described below.
Area of Emphasis or Non-Business Minor. Completion of at least 9-15 semester hours of approved courses in the area of emphasis or completion of at least 15 semester hours in an approved non-business minor. Students who select a non-business minor must complete an additional three-hour business elective to earn the required number of hours in business.
Residence. At least 30 semester hours of business courses (including the business area of emphasis) must be completed after a student’s admission to the College of Business. The 30 hours for residence must include BLAW 4120 and MGMT 4500, and 24 hours in other 4000-level business courses (including area of emphasis courses if an area is selected).
Grade-Point Average Requirement.
To graduate, a student must maintain a minimum cumulative scholastic grade-point average of 2.0 for all courses attempted at the University acceptable toward the B.S. (Business Administration) degree, 2.0 for all business courses, and
2.0 for courses in the student’s area of emphasis or non-business minor.
Undergraduate Honors. Upon recommendation of the faculty, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Students must achieve an overall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3.3 and a grade-point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to be considered for cum laude. Those who achieve an overall University of Colorado grade-point average of 3.5 and a grade-point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado will be considered for magna cum laude. Those who achieve a 3.7 overall grade-point average and a 3.85 GPA in all business courses will be considered for summa cum laude.
Filing for Graduation. A senior audit is completed on all students who have completed 90 or more semester hours. Students must file an Undergraduate Candidacy form and Diploma Card, and request a graduation evaluation prior to registering for their final semester. Failure to do so will delay graduation. Also,
students desiring to change their area of emphasis after filing for graduation must have the change approved by the graduation supervisor prior to registering for their final semester. Changes after that time will delay graduation.
Business Program Requirements
Satisfaction of all the following:
Program Requirements Semester Hours College proficiencies
or other courses ..............0-13
CU-Denver core..................... 41
Mathematics..........................6
Business core...................... 36
International studies................3
Cornerstone courses .................6
Area of emphasis or
non-business minor ............. 15
Total Semester Hours Required..... 120
Detailed descriptions of degree course plans which satisfy program requirements follow:
I. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION REQUIRED SEMESTER HOURS PROFICIENCY: 0-13
The business student must demonstrate either proficiency in a foreign language or in regional expertise. The requirement can be met in the following ways:
A. Foreign Language
The language proficiency can be met by:
1. Completion of the third year of high school course work in a single language. Students must complete three years of high school credit in one language. A C (2.0) or higher must be earned in the final semester of the third year high school course to show proficiency.
2. Completion of three semesters of college-level course work in a single foreign language. The third semester course (college level) in one language requires a grade of C or better to complete the proficiency. The Pass/Fail option cannot be used when completing the requirement
at CU-Denver.
3. Examination. Students may show their level of proficiency by taking the placement proficiency exam given by the Language Laboratory in CN 220. The languages tested are French, German, and Spanish. For information about other languages, students should consult with their business advisor, 303-556-5800. The number
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of times the student may attempt the examination is once per semester.
B. Regional Expertise The regional expertise option is available as an alternative to Foreign Language Proficiency. This requires the student to develop expertise about a region of the world other than North America.
The student must complete a minimum of 9 credit hours of course work from an approved list that relates to history, arts, culture, politics, or the economy of a single defined region of the world outside North America. Courses used in the expertise area must meet the College of Business guidelines. These courses can be chosen from the list specified by the College of Business. Students should contact their business advisor to outline their program, 303-556-5800.
Students who must meet all the proficiency requirements through course work may find it necessary to complete more than 120 semester hours in order to earn the B.S. in Business Administration. The proficiency requirement must be completed during the first three terms in attendance at CU-Denver.
II. CU-DENVER BUSINESS CORE REQUIREMENTS: 41 SEMESTER HOURS
A. Writing/Speech-9 semester hours.
ENGL 1020. Core Composition 1.......3
ENGL 3170. Business Writing.........3
CMMU 2050. Business and
Professional Speaking.............3
B. Mathematics-3 semester hours.
MATH 1070. Algebra for Social Sciences
and Business .....................3
Note: The required sequence MATH 1070 and MATH 1080 may be satisfied by a 6-hour calculus sequence.
C. Natural and Physical Sciences -8 semester hours.
Two of the following courses (a sequence in the same discipline or courses in two different disciplines):
ANTH 1303. Intro, to Biological
Anthropology ....................4
BIOL 1550. Basic Biology I .........4
BIOL 1560. Basic Biology II.........4
CHEM 1470. Core Chemistry:
Eat, Drink, Man, Woman...........4
CHEM 1471. Core Chemistry:
Risky Business ..................4
ENVS 1042. Intro, to Environmental
Sciences ........................4
GEOL 1072. Physical Geology I ......4
GEOL 1082. Physical Geology II .....4
PHYS 1000. Intro, to Physics........4
PHYS 1052. General Astronomy 1......4
D. Behavioral Sciences and Social Sciences-9 semester hours.
PSY1000. Introduction to
Psychology I......................3
or
PSY 1005. Introduction to
Psychology II.....................3
ECON 2012. Principles of Economics:
Macroeconomics ...................3
ECON 2022. Principles of Economics: Microeconomics.................3
E. Humanities-6 semester hours.
Two courses from the following:
ENGL 1601. Telling Tales: Narrative
Art in Literature and Film .......3
ENGL 2600. Great Works in British
and American Literature...........3
GER1000. Germany and the Germans . 3
HIST 1381. Paths to the Present I..3
HIST 1382. Getting Here: Paths
to the Present II ................3
PHIL 1012. Introduction to Philosophy: Relationship of the Individual
to the World .....................3
PHIL 1020. Introduction to Ethics and Society: The Person and
the Community.....................3
RUSS 1000. Russia and the Russians:
Life, Culture, and Arts ..........3
RUSS 2000. Masterpieces of Russian Culture................3
F. Arts-3 semester hours.
One course from the following:
ARTS 1000. Arts in our Time.........3
FA 1001. Introduction to Art .......3
PMUS 1001. Music Appreciation......3
THTR1001. Introduction to Theatre .......................3
G. Cultural Diversity-3 semester hours. One course from the list specified
for the CU-Denver Core Curriculum (see General Information section of this catalog).
III. COLLEGE OF BUSINESS SPECIFIC GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
A. MATH 1080. Polynomial Calculus.....3
Note: The required sequence MATH 1070 and MATH 1080 may be satisfied by a 6-hour calculus sequence.
B. QUAN 2010. Business Statistics.....3
C. ISMG 2000. Computer and Business
Information Systems..................3
Note: ISMG 2000 is a cornerstone course and must be completed prior to starting the Business core course sequence.
D. MGMT 3000. Managing Individuals
and Teams........................3
Note: MGMT is a cornerstone course and should be completed early in the student’s schedule.
E. OTHER. MATH 1070, ECON 2012, ECON 2022, PSY 1000, ENGL 3170 (or ENGL 2030), and CMMU 2050 may be taken as
part of the CU-Denver Core. The College of Business strongly encourages students to take ENGL 2030 before completing ENGL 3170. However, if other courses in their respective areas are taken to satisfy CU-Denver core requirements, then these required courses must still be completed to meet graduation requirements.
IV. BUSINESS CORE: 36 SEMESTER HOURS
Students are required to complete the Business Core in the order listed below:
ACCT 2200. Financial Accounting
and Financial Statement Analysis....3
ACCT 2220. Managerial Accounting
and Professional Issues..............3
BLAW 3000. Legal, Ethical, and Social
Environments of Business I...........3
FNCE 3100. Principles of Finance I......3
ISMG 3000. Management Information
Systems..........................
MKTG 3000. Principles of Marketing .
OPMG 3000. Operations Management
MKTG 3050. Applied Marketing
Management .......................3
FNCE 3200. Principles of Finance II.3
MGMT 4350. Conflict and Change in Organizations or
MGMT 4370. Organization Design ......3
BLAW 4120. Legal and Ethical
Environments of Business II.......3
MGMT 4500. Business Policy and Strategic Management...............3
Note: Accounting majors are not required to take ISMG 3000, MGMT 4350 (or 4370), and MKTG 3050.
V. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES:
3 SEMESTER HOURS
International Business-One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses:
International Financial Management Introduction to International Business * International Marketing International Transportation
Prerequisite: ECON 4410-3. International Trade.
FNCE 4370-3.
MGMT 4400-3.
MKTG 4200-3. MKTG 4580-3.
VI. AREA OF EMPHASIS OR NONBUSINESS MINOR: 9-15 SEMESTER HOURS
Students may choose a general business degree with a non- business minor, or a business degree with an area of emphasis in Accounting, Finance, Human Resources Management, Information Systems,
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International Business, Management, or Marketing.
A. General Business with Non-Business Minor: General Business students must take an approved non-business minor of at least 15 semester hours. The courses must form an integrated sequence and be approved by the College of Business. Up to 6 semester hours of the sequence may be in courseis used to satisfy the general (CU-Denver core) requirements, but the number of “Other Courses”
(see below) will be correspondingly increased to meet the 120-hour total requirement for the degree. Students selecting a non-business minor must complete an additional three-hour business elective to earn the required number of hours in business. This credit appears under “Other Courses.” Students interested in completing a minor should contact the individual academic departments regarding requirements.
B. Areas of Emphasis: Areas of Emphasis must consist of at least 15 semester hours, including any business core courses. For most areas, this will mean 9 semester hours beyond two courses in the business core. For areas with special requirements or areas with only one course in the core, it may mean
21 or more semester hours beyond the business core. Any hours in excess of 9 are included in the Other Courses category described below.
VII.OTHER COURSES:
0-13 SEMESTER HOURS
Students may choose Other Courses freely, subject to the following general rules: (1) Only non-remedial (college-level, as determined by the College of Business) courses will count toward the B.S. degree; (2) All students receiving the B.S. degree in Business must take at least 48 semester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses). Students in General Business will usually need to take at least one business course in the Other Courses category to meet this requirement;
(3) At most, 60 semester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses) may be counted toward the 120 credit hours required for the B.S. degree in Business; (4) Any business area of emphasis courses required by specific areas in excess of the 9 hours listed under Areas of Emphasis above are included in the Other Courses category; (5) At least 50% of the business credits applied to the degree must be taken at CU-Denver.
Guidelines for Elective Credits. Elective credits should be selected carefully because not all classes are acceptable. Generally, to be acceptable, electives must be taught by regular University of Colorado faculty, must have a form of assessment such as a term paper and/or examinations, and must be regular classroom-type classes. Course coverage must be college level, not repetitious of other work applied toward the degree, must be academic as opposed to vocational or technical, and must be part of the regular University offerings.
Specifically, the College will accept:
a. A maximum of 6 hours of the theory of physical education, theory of recreation, and/or theory of dance, and
b. A maximum of 6 hours of approved independent study, internships, experimental studies, choir, band, and/or music lessons, art lessons, and
c. A maximum of 12 hours of advanced ROTC, providing the student is enrolled in the program and completes the total program.
The College will not accept:
Activity physical education classes, recreation, workshops, orientations, dance, teaching methods, practicums, and courses reviewing basic skills in computers, English composition, mathematics, and chemistry.
Areas of Emphasis
See individual areas of emphasis in this section for specific courses required.
ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SELECTING COURSES
Registration
Instruction for registering for courses is contained in another publication called the Schedule of Courses, which is available before each semester. That publication lists the times when registration occurs and the courses offered.
Maximum Units Per Term
The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate business student is 15 semester hours, with a maximum of 18 hours allowed during the fall/spring semesters and 12 hours allowed during the summer session. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Continuing Education, CU-Boulder, or CU-Denver Extended Studies Programs, whether in classes or
through correspondence, are included in the student’s term load.
Repeating Courses
A failed course (grade of F) may be repeated; however, the /•’will be included in the grade-point average and will appear on the transcript. A course in which a grade of D or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from the business program coordinator. Courses repeated without approval may not be used in the business grade-point average calculation.
Courses From Other Institutions
Business students must have the written approval of the business program coordinator to register for courses (excluding MSCD pooled courses) offered by other institutions, including other CU campuses. Credit will not be given for courses taken without approval. Grades of C or better must be earned to receive business degree credit. Generally, only nonbusiness electives or lower division, non-business requirements are acceptable for transfer from other institutions once a student has been admitted to the College of Business. Students who, after admission to the College, take more than 12 semester hours from another institution, must reapply for admission to the College as transfer students and must meet the current admission requirements.
Metropolitan State College of Denver Courses
Business students may select their non-business required and elective courses from those offered by MSCD. Grades of C or better must be earned to receive business degree credit; however, the grade is not computed in the CU grade-point average and is treated like other transfer credits. MSCD business courses may not be taken for CU-Denver business degree credit.
Graduate Level Courses
With prior written approval of the business program coordinator, students may take a maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate level non-business elective credits. Students must earn grades of B or better in graduate courses in order to apply the credits toward business degree requirements.
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Pass/Fail
Only internships, independent studies, and non-business elective courses may be taken pass/fail. Required business and non-business courses (including the CU-Denver core) may not be taken pass/fail. A maximum of 6 hours pass/fail credit may be applied toward the business degree. Courses taken in excess of the maximum will not be applied toward degree credit. Pass/fail determination must be made within the posted deadlines (at census dates) and may not be rescinded (unless approved by the Undergraduate Committee).
Correspondence Courses
Only six semester hours of credit taken through correspondence study (from regionally accredited institutions) will be applied toward the business degree. Business courses may not be taken by correspondence. All correspondence courses must be evaluated by the business program coordinator to determine their acceptability toward degree requirements, and the program coordinator’s written approval is required prior to the student’s registering for courses. Students may contact the Division of Continuing Education, CU-Boulder, for correspondence course offerings and registration procedures.
Independent Study
Junior or senior business students desiring to work beyond regular course coverage may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) as non-business electives under the direction of an instructor who approves the project, but the student must have the appropriate approval before registering. A maximum of 3 semester hours of independent study course work may be taken in any one semester; a maximum of 6 semester hours may be applied toward degree requirements.
An Independent Study Request Form must be signed by the student, instructor, area coordinator, and the Associate Dean for Academic Programs.
ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SUSPENSION AND PROBATION
To be in good standing, students must maintain an overall CU grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C= 2.0) or better for all course work attempted, and a 2.0 GPA or
better for all business courses attempted.
PE activity courses, remedial course work, MSCD courses, and repeated courses not approved by a business advisor are not included in these averages.
When semester grades become available, students falling below the 2.0 GPA will be notified of 1) probationary status or 2) suspension. Students are responsible for being aware of their academic status at all times; late grades and/or late grade notification does not waive this responsibility. College rules governing probation and suspension are as follows:
1. Any student whose overall GPA, or business course GPA, is less than
2.0 will be placed on probation immediately. A student may be removed from probation when the overall GPA and business GPA have been raised to 2.0.
2. A student may remain on probation as long as the student maintains normal degree progress each semester as determined by the College and each term, while on probation, obtains
an overall term GPA of 2.5, and term business course GPA of 2.5, with no grade below a C. Failure to meet probationary provisions will result in suspension. Probationary status may continue only until the student has completed a maximum of 12 semester hours or four terms, whichever comes first; summer is considered a term.
The student will be suspended if the GPA deficiency is not cleared within this time.
3. Suspended students may not attend any campus of the University of Colorado or any division of the University (including Continuing Education or Extended Studies credit classes).
4. Students on suspension may petition for readmission to the College after waiting a minimum of one year from the term in which they were suspended. Generally, petitions are granted only in unusual circumstances. Any suspended student readmitted to the College will be under contract and placed on a continued probation status until the GPA deficiency has been cleared. Such students will be automatically suspended if, at any time, their overall GPA or business GPA again falls below 2.0.
5. Students earning all failing grades for a semester will have a dean’s stop placed on their record and will not be permitted to register without a business advisor’s approval.
6. Combined degree students are required to maintain the same standards of
performance as College of Business students in order to be continued in a combined program.
AREAS OF EMPHASIS
Each candidate for the B.S. (Business Administration) degree must complete the prescribed courses in an area of emphasis comprising a minimum of 15 semester hours taken at the University of Colorado at Denver. A 2.0 grade-point average is required for area courses. Typically, students select an area of emphasis after taking several of the core courses. They then complete the hours required for their selected area.
All B.S. (Business Administration) students must declare a major area of emphasis by the time they have accumulated 60 credit hours.
Information about each area of emphasis follows:
Accounting
Program Director: Bruce Neumann Telephone: 303-556-5884
Accounting courses are offered in several fields of professional accountancy at the intermediate, advanced, and graduate levels. They provide preparation for practice in one or more of the following fields:
Management control systems Auditing
Financial accounting Managerial accounting Tax accounting Teaching and research
In all of these fields a thorough knowledge of the social, legal, economic, and political environment is needed.
A high degree of analytical ability and communication skill is indispensable.
Courses in English composition, speech, ethics and logic are desirable. Courses in statistics and information systems, beyond the required Business Core courses, are highly recommended.
Accounting majors are not required to complete ISMG 3000, MGMT 4370, and MKTG 3050 as part of the College of Business Core.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACCT 3054. Accounting Systems
and Data Processing ...............3
ACCT 3220. Intermediate Financial
Accounting 1.......................3
ACCT 3230. Intermediate Financial
Accounting II..................... 3
ACCT 3320. Intermediate Cost Accounting........................3
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ACCT 4410. Income Tax Accounting.......3
ACCT 4620. Auditing....................3
ACCT free elective (4000 level) .......3
Students planning to pursue accounting as a career may take more them the above required hours. Many students complete a total of 30 hours of accounting, often taking two accounting courses each semester in their junior and senior years. Students should work closely with the accounting faculty and business advisors in planning their accounting programs.
The Accounting Program offers several 4000/5000-level courses. Students with credit for a 4000-level course cannot receive credit for the corresponding 5000-level course. Graduate students should take 5000-level courses.
Accounting students often specialize in a particular topical area of accounting. Examples of these specializations include:
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
Recommended Electives ACCT 4240-3. Advanced Financial Accounting
ACCT 4800-3. Accounting for Government and Non-Profit Organizations
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
Recommended Electives ACCT 4330-3. Managerial Accounting Problems and Cases ACCT 4800-3. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations
Graduate study in accounting is receiving increasing emphasis by professional organizations and employers. Students meeting admission requirements should consider continuing their education at the graduate level.
Finance
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
The principal areas of study in finance are financial management, financial institutions, investments, and international finance. The study of finance is intended to provide an understanding of fundamental theory and practice pertaining to finance and to develop the ability to make sound financial management decisions. Every endeavor is made to train students to think logically about financial problems and to formulate sound financial decisions and policies.
It is necessary to understand the
importance of finance in the economy and the functions and purposes of monetary systems, credit, prices, money markets, and financial institutions. Emphasis is placed on financial policy, management, control, analysis, and decision making. Numerous job opportunities exist with financial institutions and in the field of business finance. ACCT 2200 and ACCT 2220 are required prerequisites for the finance emphasis. Finance majors are encouraged to take additional accounting courses as business electives.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FNCE 4320. Corporate Financial
Decisions.........................3
FNCE 4330. Investment and Portfolio
Management .......................3
FNCE 4350. Financial Markets and Institutions..................3
Recommended Elective FNCE 4370-3. International Financial Management
Students should note that all finance courses are not offered every semester.
Human Resources Management
Program Director Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
Human resources management offers opportunities for students to develop professional competence in the areas of personnel administration and development. Students acquire an understanding of and skills in developing and implementing human resources systems, including recruitment, selection, evaluation, training, motivation, and compensation.
Required courses. MGMT 3310 and six hours from the following: MGMT 4450, Human Resources Management: Compensation Administration; MGMT 4430, Training; or MGMT 4420, Staffing.
Recommended Electives ECON 4610-3. Labor Economics MGMT 4950-3. Special Topics in Management
PSY 3135-3. Organizational Psychology
Information Systems
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
The information systems area is designed for those who wish to prepare themselves for careers as professional
data processing managers or as technical specialists in business and government. The student develops those technical skills and administrative insights required for analysis of information systems, the design and implementation of systems, and the management of data processing operations. The emphasis is on management information systems-systems for the collection, organization, access, and analysis of information for the planning and control of operations. Students should note that not all courses are offered each semester. ISMG 2200 is a required prerequisite for the information systems area and applies as a business elective.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ISMG 2200. Business Programming.....3
ISMG 3200. Data Structures ...........3
ISMG 4500. Database Management
Systems............................3
ISMG 4600. Systems Analysis
and Design ........................3
ISMG 4700. Data Communications......3
International Business
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
Increasingly, businesses are reorienting their thinking, planning, and operations to capitalize on opportunities that exist in the world marketplace. Every phase of business is affected by this reorientation. For individuals with the appropriate skills, training, and interest, international business provides excellent career opportunities.
The international business curriculum is designed to enhance and build on thorough training in basic business skills and to provide students with additional skills and knowledge appropriate to international business. Please note that ECON 4410 is a prerequisite for MGMT 4400.
Required Courses Semester Hours
FNCE 4370. International Financial
Management.........................3
MKTG 4200. International Marketing..3
MKTG 4580. International
Transportation ....................3
MGMT 4400. Introduction to
International Business.............3
A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended. In addition, serious consideration should be given to advanced study of a foreign language and to either a minor or a Certificate in International Affairs, offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
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92 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Management
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
The management curriculum provides the foundation for careers in supervision and general management in a wide variety of organizations. It develops skills in management practice through an understanding of general management principles, individual and group behavior, organizational change and design, and human resources management.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MGMT 3310. Introduction to
Human Resources...................3
MGMT 4350. Conflict and Change
in Organizations or MGMT 4370*....3
Management elective.................3
(*) MGMT 4350 and MGMT 4370-one course may be used in the Business Core while the second course is considered part of the area of emphasis.
Recommended Electives MGMT 4400-3. Introduction to
International Business MGMT 4410-3. Human Resources Management: Compensation Administration
MGMT 4950-3. Special Topics in Management
Marketing
Program Director Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816
Marketing is concerned with directing the activities of the organization toward the satisfaction of customer wants and needs. This involves understanding customers, identifying those wants and needs which the organization can best serve, guiding the development of specific products or services, planning and implementing ways to take products or services to the market, securing the customer’s order, and finally, monitoring customer response in order to guide future activities.
In most organizations, marketing is a major functioned area that provides a wide variety of career opportunities in such fields eis personed selling and sales management, advertising and sales promotion, public relations, marketing research, physical distribution, product management, market management, marketing information systems, and retail memagement. Increasingly, ceireer opportunities exist in service businesses and non-profit organizations.
Required Courses Semester Hours
MKTG3100. Marketing Research.......3
MKTG required courses (*)..........6
*Two courses MKTG 3200-3 MKTG 4000-3. MKTG 4100-3.
MKTG 4200-3. MKTG 4500-3.
MKTG 4580-3.
MKTG 4600-3. MKTG 4700-3.
from the following list:
Buyer Behavior Advertising Physical Distribution Management International Marketing Advertising Management and Public Relations International Transportation Business Marketing Personal Selling and Sales Management
In addition to the three required courses beyond the core, students may select marketing electives, business electives, and non-business electives that support their particular career orientations. The marketing faculty advisor can assist the student in choosing an appropriate set of electives to fit career objectives.
GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS (M.B.A./M.S.)
Associate Dean: Kenneth L. Bettenhausen Program Coordinator: Linda J. Olson
The Graduate School of Business Administration offers programs leading to the Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), and the Master of Science (M.S.) in specific fields of business and health administration. In addition, the Master of Business Administration for Executives (Executive M.B.A.) is offered as a multicampus program of the Graduate School of Business Administration, and the Executive Program in Health Administration (Executive M.S.H.A.) is offered through the Executive Programs division.
The M.B.A., the Executive M.B.A., and the M.S. degrees in business are accredited by the International Association for Management Education (AACSB). The M.S. in Health Administration is also accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA).
Requirements for Admission to the M.B.A. and M.S. Programs
Telephone: 303-556-5900 Fax: 303-556-5904
ADMISSIONS ADVISING
Persons contemplating graduate study are encouraged to learn about admission
and program requirements by attending one of the regularly scheduled prospective student information meetings. Please phone 303-556-5900 to reserve a seat.
Admission to the graduate program in business administration (M.B.A. and M.S.) is granted only to students showing high promise of success in graduate business study. Admission is based on the following indicators of the candidate’s likelihood to succeed in the program:
ACADEMIC RECORD
The bachelor’s degree must be earned from a regionally accredited university. The toted academic record is considered, including the grade-point average, the course of study, and the quality of the program.
REQUIRED TESTING
The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is required for admission consideration for any applicant who does not have a post-baccalaureate degree.
A minimum score of 400 is necessary for admission consideration. The GMAT test is administered several times each year at numerous centers throughout the world. For information and to make application for the test, write to: Graduate Management Admission Test, Educational Testing Service, CN 6103, Princeton, New Jersey 08541; or phone 1-800-GMATNOW; or visit their web site at: www.gmat.org. The code number for CU-Denver’s graduate business programs is 4819.
WORK EXPERIENCE
A record of appropriate employment at increasing levels of responsibility is considered a positive indicator of the likelihood of successful completion of graduate work.
BACKGROUND REQUIREMENTS
Students applying for graduate programs in business do not need to have taken their undergraduate degrees in business. The MiB.A. program is specifically designed so that the required courses cover the material needed for completion of the degree. There are no prerequisites needed to start the M.B.A. program. Applicants for the M.S. degree, however, may be required to take background or Common Body of Knowledge prerequisite courses, depending on the individual's academic and professional background. Students with non-business backgrounds have completed the program successfully. For more detailed information, phone a graduate staff advisor, 303-556-5900.
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Graduate Business Programs / 93
It is expected that students have an adequate level of personal computer proficiency in a word processing and spreadsheet package, as well as a good working knowledge of basic algebra and proper English!
THE ADMISSION PROCESS
Mailing address forj applications:
Graduate Admissions Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 165, P.0. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364
Students seeking admission to the EBUSINESS, 11-MONTH M.B.A., M.S. in unance, Health Administration, or Executive Programs should consult with the relevant catalog sections or additional application criteria >r requirements.
Application Requirements
i. Complete Parts I and 11 of the Application for Graduate Admission. Include a well-formulated career plan articulated in a brief essay, and summarizing the applicant’s academic achievements, any applicable work history, and reason(s) for seeking the degree.
!. Have required GMAT scores sent directly to the graduate business admissions office from the Educational Testing Service. The code for CU-Denver’s graduate business programs is 4819.
Have two official transcripts (not student copies) mailed directly from each school, college, and university ever attended. Transcripts must be sent even if credit course work completed was not part of a degree program or was taken after an undergraduate degree was earned.
. Enclose a check for $50 for the M.B.A. or M.S. programs, or $80 for the dual M.B.A./M.S. or dual M.S./M.S., made payable to the University of Colorado. Personal interviews are not required, except for the 11-month M.B.A. and our E-Business M.B.A.
Deadlines. To be considered for admission, applicants for graduate programs must submit all materials prior to the following dates:
April 1 for summer session admission;
June 15 for fall semester admission; and
November 1 for spring semester admission. The E-BUSINESS and 11-MONTH M.B.A. options only admit students each fall.
Early applications are encouraged because, if admitted, the student receives priority for registration time assignment. Applications received after published deadlines with complete supporting documentation, scores, fees, and transcripts will be considered, but do not receive priority handling.
International Students. Foreign applicants must fill out special forms, score at least 525 on the TOEFL exam, pay a $60 fee ($80 for dual M.B.A./M.S.), and meet significantly earlier deadlines, December 1 for summer session admission; March 1 for fall semester admission; and July 1 for spring semester admission.
Academic Policies for Graduate Students
ADVISING
As soon as possible after being admitted, students should schedule an appointment with a graduate staff advisor to discuss general degree requirements, plus determine if any background course work may be required and/or what Common Body of Knowledge courses might be waived for the M.S. degree.
DEGREE PLAN
All students are encouraged to formulate a degree plan with a staff advisor during their first term in residence. Students must petition before receiving degree credit for any course changes.
COURSE LOAD
The normal course load for full-time graduate students is 9-15 semester hours. However, because many students also are pursuing a career, it is possible to attend classes on a part-time basis by enrolling for 3-6 semester hours. Graduate courses are scheduled primarily in the evening in order to accommodate the working student.
TRANSFER OF CREDIT
Upon approval of the Program Director, a maximum of 12 semester hours of graduate business course work may be transferred to the M.B.A. (nine semester hours for M.S. degrees) from another AACSB-accredited master’s program, if completed within the last five years with at least a grade of B (not B-). Courses taken at other CU campuses are considered transfer hours and are included in the transfer limit. Transfer of quarter hours of graduate business credit may
satisfy a course requirement, but may not satisfy the total hours requirement, i.e.: 1 quarter hour equals .667 semester hours. Course work already applied toward a master’s degree will not be accepted.
TIMELIMIT
M.B.A. students must finish the curriculum within five years plus one semester from the first term of enrollment in the program. Courses older than 5 years generally will not be accepted for the degree unless they have been revalidated by petition to the specific department.
M.S. students must complete courses beyond those in the Common Body of Knowledge list within 5 years, and with reasonable continuity. Students enrolled in a Dual Degree will have seven years to finish their curriculum.
FORMER STUDENTS
Any CU-Denver student who has not been enrolled for three consecutive semesters (summers included) is considered a former student, and must reapply for admission to the program by submitting Part 1 of the Application for Graduate Admission and must pay the applicable fee. Readmitted students must conform to degree requirements in effect during the term in which they are readmitted. If the new requirements differ significantly from the former degree plan, a petition may be submitted for any exceptions.
GRADUATION
Deadlines for filing an Application for Admission to Candidacy and a Diploma Card with the Graduate School of Business Administration Programs Office are July 15 for December graduation, November 15 for May graduation, and April 15 for August graduation. Early application prior to registering for the last term is encouraged, to detect possible last-minute problems requiring petitions or course schedule changes.
MINIMUM GRADE-POINT AVERAGE
A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 must be achieved and maintained for courses taken toward a graduate business degree. All CU-Denver graduate courses completed to meet business degree requirements are computed in the graduate business grade-point average. Transfer hours and grades from other institutions, including University of Colorado courses taken at the Boulder, Health Sciences, Colorado
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94 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
Springs, Continuing Education, and/or Extended Studies campuses are not computed in the business GPA, although degree credit is awarded.
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION
If a student has completed nine or more credit hours toward degree requirements without maintaining a 3.00 GPA, s/he shall be placed on probation.
Probation will be released only when the cumulative GPA has been raised to at least 3.00. If the GPA deficiency is not cleared within one calendar year (three semesters) or completion of as many as nine credit hours, whichever occurs first, s/he will be suspended. Students with unusual circumstances who are unable to meet the time limits will have 30 days from the date of suspension activation to petition for a prolonged probationary period. Suspended students may not attend any campus of the University of Colorado including Continuing Education/ Extended Studies. Suspended students may seek to be re-admitted after waiting 12 months (three semesters) from the term in which they were suspended.
A Petition Form plus new Graduate Application Part I must be submitted along with the appropriate fee. Generally, petitions prove successful only on rare occasions.
PASSING GRADES
Any grade below a C(2.0) is a failing grade for graduate students. Graduate students must repeat a required course for which they have received a grade below a C. Both the original grade and the grade for the repeated course count in the computation of the business grade-point average.
REPEATING COURSES
A failed course may be repeated; however, the failed grade will be included in the grade-point average and will appear on the transcript. A course in which a grade of C or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from the Graduate Programs Coordinator. Courses repeated without approval may not be used in the business grade-point average calculation.
DROP/WITHDRAWAL
Classes dropped prior to census date will not appear on the transcript; thereafter, to drop with a grade of W, a student must be earning a grade of C or better; otherwise, an Fwill appear on the transcript. Students will not be permitted to drop a course or
withdraw from all courses after the tenth week of the semester, unless circumstances outside the student’s control are documented. The petition to drop or withdraw must be approved by the Associate Dean for Academic Programs and the course instructors).
Registration for Graduate Business Courses
Enrollment in graduate level business courses is normally reserved only for students admitted to graduate degree programs in business. Occasionally, non-degree students and graduate students from other University of Colorado schools or colleges may be permitted to attend on a space-available basis by obtaining a non-degree application form from the Graduate Programs office, telephone 303-556-5900.
6000-level courses are reserved exclusively for graduate students. Graduate 5000-level courses may be offered simultaneously with undergraduate 4000-level courses. Students should check with a graduate advisor to confirm acceptability of 5000-level courses for degree requirements, prior to registering.
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (M.B.A.)
Program Director Ajeyo Banerjee Telephone: 303-556-5838
The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) program provides a general background in management and administration. This background enables the student to have the breadth of exposure and depth of knowledge required for an advanced level management career.
The program is devoted to developing the concepts, analytical tools, and communication skills required for competent and responsible administration of an enterprise viewed in its entirety, within its social, political, and economic environment.
The M.B.A. program is available in different configurations: INDIVIDUALIZED, COHORT, 11-MONTH (full time), Health Administration, E-BUSINESS, and the EXECUTIVE M.B.A. program (see relevant section). All M.B.A.s have the same curriculum requirements; they differ only in their focus, the flexibility of course scheduling and the time required to complete the program. The E-BUSINESS,
11-MONTH, and Executive M.B.A.S are lockstep programs (no open electives,
no specialized tracks), where all the students complete all program requirements together. No course transfers, waivers, or substitutions are permitted.
The INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. allows the scheduling of classes with maximum flexibility so students can progress through the program at their own pace, by taking as little as one class per semester, or as many as five classes per semester, at times that are convenient to their work schedule. The program can be completed in as little as 16 months, or as long as 5 years plus one semester.
Online courses add additional flexibility. You can complete all degree requirements online or combine online and campus courses to broaden your choice of electives or to fit your business travel schedule or personal learning style.
The COHORT M.B.A. enables the student to complete the program in 3 years plus one semester, taking two courses each during fall and spring semester and one course during the summer. Fall or spring, a new group of entering students moves through the core courses as a cohort, taking prescribed core courses two nights per week, thus sharing their educational and professional experience. Electives are taken as available to meet individual objectives. For working professionals, who can meet the time requirements, the COHORT program provides a unique and rewarding educational experience.
Developed in conjunction with the Center for Information Technology Innovation-a CU-Denver cooperative of 32 Chief Information Officers and IT Executives-the E-BUSINESS M.B.A. prepares students for a leadership role in a technology-dependent business. The program integrates knowledge and skills from both traditional M.B.A. and Information Technology (IT) disciplines.
A graduate should be prepared to manage a company’s IT infrastructure or its IT dependent business functions. The E-BUSINESS M.B.A. program is truly a program designed by CIO’s for educating tomorrow’s technological business leaders. For additional information call 303-556-6610.
The 11-MONTH M.B.A. is an accelerated full-time program. It enables students to focus their energies in a concentrated, total-immersion program of study and earn a nationally accredited, 48-credit-hour M.B.A. in just under a year. All 11-MONTH M.B.A. classes meet during the business day in the historic Masonic Temple Building on the 16th Street Mall in Denver, which houses the innovative
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Richard H. and Pamela S. Bard Center for Entrepreneurship Development. For additional information call 303-556-5911.
11-MONTH and E-BUSINESS M.B.A. courses may be transferred to the INDIVIDUALIZED M.B.A. program. Candidates for all M.B.A. programs complete a total of 16 classes (48 semester hours) comprised of 10 required courses (30 hours), one International Business
elective (3 hours), and five elective graduate business courses (15 hours).
Core Requirements Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals and
Teams.............................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for
Managers..........................3
BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business ..........3
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting
Accounting Information ...........3
BUSN 6560. Marketing Management .....3
BUSN 6610. Business Systems Design ... 3 BUSN 6620. Applied Economics
for Managers......................3
BUSN 6630. Management of
Operations .......................3
BUSN 6640. Financial Management......3
BUSN 6710. Strategic Management .... 3
Total Required Core Hours.......... 30
Electives:
International elective...............3
Free electives ..................... 15
Total Elective Hours............... 18
Total M.B.A. Hours ................ 48
Notes and Restrictions
Core Substitution. Students with extensive and comparable course work in a particular core subject area may petition to waive a graduate core class on the basis of prior undergraduate or graduate course work taken at a regionally accredited college or university for the corresponding core class. This does not waive the 48-hour requirement. If a core course is waived, another graduate-level course in the same functional area must be used as a substitute so that the student completes a total of 48 semester hours.
International Elective. One 3-hour course must be completed from the following list:
ACCT 6370-3. FNCE 6370-3.
INTB 6000-3.
INTB 6020-3.
International Accounting International Financial Management Introduction to International Business Cross-Cultural Management
INTB 6040-3.
INTB 6060-3.
INTB 6080-3. INTB 6200-3.
ISMG 6200-3.
MKTG 6020-3.
Managing People in Global Markets The Legal Aspects of International Business Globed Competition International Business Policy Global Information Systems
International Marketing
Or, with prior approval of the Graduate Programs Coordinator, a special topics graduate business course with an international emphasis may be substituted.
Electives. The M.B.A. curriculum allows for 15 hours of elective credit which can be chosen without restriction from graduate level courses offered by the Graduate School of Business Administration. A maximum of 3 semester hours of graduate level course work completed at CU-Denver outside the School may be applied to the M.B.A. degree, but only with prior written approved of the M.B.A. Program Director.
Note: Electives for the 11-MONTH and E-BUSINESS M.B.A. programs are pre-selected for all students.
M.B.A. Specialized Tracks
Graduate students will have an opportunity to take specialized tracks within the M.B.A. program by completing a pre-specified program of elective courses. The following 12 tracks are available.
Business-to-Consumer Marketing track Business-to-Business Marketing track Change Management track Human Resources management track Entrepreneurship track Investment Management track Information Systems track Services Management track Business Strategy track International Business track Corporate Financial Management track Financial Analyst track
For additional information about the M.B.A. program, contact a graduate student advisor at 303-556-5900.
Master of Business
Administration-Health
Administration
Program Director Errol L. Biggs Telephone: 303-556-5845
ADMISSION PROCESS
Requirements for Admission. Selection of students is a multi-step process. When making application to the program for the
M.B.A.-H.A., candidates should send their applications to:
Graduate Admissions Graduate School of Business Administration
University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 165, RO. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80127-3364
Application Requirements
1. Complete the Application for Graduate Admission, Parts I and II, and submit by published deadlines.
2. Have two (2) letters of recommendation sent from professional or academic acquaintances who are familiar with the applicant’s academic/professional competence.
3. Have required Graduate Management Admission Test scores sent directly to the graduate office from the Educational Testing Service. When registering for the GMAT, use code 4819.
4. Pay the $50 application fee.
5. Have two (2) official transcripts sent directly from each school, college, or university previously attended.
A minimum baccalaureate degree is required.
6. Include a well-formulated career plan, articulated in a brief essay.
7. Document any experience in the field of health services administration (preferred but not required).
Admission to the M.B.A.-H.A. degree
program is on a competitive basis. Therefore, these admission criteria represent minimum entrance qualifications expected of all students.
For further information, brochures, and application materials, contact the Graduate Program in Health Administration, Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Colorado at Denver, 303-556-5900.
HEALTH ADMINISTRATION SCHOLARSHIPS/LOANS
Financial assistance is available for qualified students. Students should apply directly to the University of Colorado at Denver Office of Financial Aid. Call 303-556-2886 for information and forms.
In addition, some funds are available only to students in the graduate program in health administration. These include:
• U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Administration Traineeships
• Foster G. McGaw Scholarship
• CU-Denver M.S. and M.B.A. Health Administration Scholarship
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96 / College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration
• Colorado Health Administration Alumni Association Scholarship
Enrollment in the program also makes students eligible to apply for some nationally competitive scholarships from professional organizations.
Call 303-556-5900 for applications or visit our website www.business.cudenver.edu.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The curriculum of the graduate program in health administration is a synthesis of management concepts and techniques that are applicable to any economic organization, and tools that can be specifically applied to health services systems. The program emphasizes skills which strengthen basic analytic and decision-making processes used by top-level managers in selecting broad strategies and by junior managers in administering subunits in health care organizations.
Students enrolled in the Master of Business Administration-Health Administration must complete a minimum of 48 semester hours of graduate-level course work to receive their degree. The curriculum is based on a series of structured learning sequences. Most of the courses are available in the evening to enable working students to pursue the degree on a part-time basis. The specific course requirements are as follows (recommended sequence):
YEAR ONE
• BUSN 6520-3. Managing Individuals
and Teams
• BUSN 6530-3. Data Analysis for
Managers
• BUSN 6550-3. Analyzing and
Interpreting Accounting Information
• HLTH 6010-3. Health Care Systems I
• BUSN 6541-3. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business
• BUSN 6610-3. Business Systems Design
• BUSN 6621-3. Applied Economics for
Managers
• HLTH 6030-3. Health Care Systems II YEAR TWO
• HLTH 6040-3. Management Accounting
for Health Care Organizations
• BUSN 6640-3. Financial Management
• BUSN 6650-3. Marketing Management
• International Elective (Health)
• BUSN 6630-3. Management of
Operations
• BUSN 6711-3. Strategic Management
• HLTH 6911-3. Health Field Studies
• Health Elective
Notes and Restrictions
Electives. Elective courses are available in the fields of accounting, finance, marketing, management, organizational development, health policy, and planning. In addition, elective courses are available that focus on practice settings such as hospital administration, ambulatory care administration, or long-term care administration.
Administrative Residency. An administrative residency is optional but recommended for students with limited health care experience. The program faculty provide assistance to students in securing the residency, as well as regular consultation during the residency period. The program has been very successful in placing graduates in administrative residencies.
Length of program. A maximum of five years is allowed to complete the health administration programs.
THE CURRICULUM-MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
The Master of Science in Health Administration (M.S.H.A.) also requires a minimum of 48 semester hours. The curricula are very similar. Students enrolled in the M.S.H.A. program are not required to take BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals and Teams, BUSN 6711. Strategic Management, and the international elective. These students will take three electives (two of which must be in health).
MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAMS
Master of Science degrees (M.S.) are offered in the fields of accounting, finance, health administration, marketing, management, information systems, and international business.
The M.S. degree affords the opportunity for specialization and depth of training within a particular major field and, where allowed, a minor field. The specialization and expertise developed within the M.S. program prepares the student for more specialized staff positions in industry, the non-profit sector, and government.
The course requirements for the M.S. degree in each of the fields are divided into two components-Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) and graduate core requirements. The common background requires at least 18 semester hours of business courses to develop general breadth and competence in the fields of business administration. These require-
ments may differ among degree programs. Some common background requirements may be waived if evidence of equivalent undergraduate or graduate level course work is shown and the course work is no more than 10 years old. Generally, an undergraduate degree in business administration earned from an AACSB or regionally accredited university will meet most of the CBK requirements. The graduate core requires at least 30 semester hours of graduate level courses as prescribed by the different major programs. Of the 30 hours, a minimum of 18 hours must be completed at the 6000 level. BUSN courses lower than 6800 may not be used as free electives in the M.S. programs. Contact a graduate staff advisor for any exceptions.
Satisfying a CBK requirement by waiver is not necessarily the same as meeting specific course prerequisite requirements. M.S. students must file a degree plan prior to taking any elective course and must meet specific prerequisites.
No comprehensive exams are required.
Master of Science in Accounting
Program Director: Bruce Neumann Telephone: 303-556-5884
The Master of Science in Accounting is a flexible program that provides the student with a thorough understanding of auditing, financial, and managerial accounting. The combination of required and elective courses allows the student to design a course of study with the advisor’s approval, leading to a successful career in either public accounting, governmental or non-profit accounting, managerial accounting, or taxation.
The M.S. in accounting requires the completion of the following:
A. COMMON BODY OF KNOWLEDGE
Required Courses Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals
and Teams........................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for Managers . 3 BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical
Environment of Business I........3
BUSN 6560. Marketing Management ...3
BUSN 6620. Applied Economics
for Managers.....................3
BUSN 6640. Financial Management.. 3
Total CBK Hours................... 18
The Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) may be waived as follows:
A. It will be waived if the student has completed an undergraduate business
CU-Den ver Catalog 2001-02


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Registration August 20 September 3 See the Fall Schedule of Courses First day of classes Labor Day holiday (campus closed) November 22 Thanksgiving holiday (campus closed) November 23 (campus open, no classes) December 3-8 Preparation week December 10-15 Finals week December 15 End of semester December 15 Commencement Registration January 21 January 22 March 25-29 May 6-11 May 13-18 May 18 May 18 Registration May 27 May 28 July 4 See the Spring Schedule of Courses Martin Luther King Jr. holiday (campus open, no classes) First day of classes Spring break (campus open, no classes) Preparation week Finals week End of semester Commencement See the Summer Schedule of Courses Memorial Day holiday (campus closed) First day of classes Independence holiday (campus closed) July 29-August 3 Finals week August 3 End of term 1 The Universit y reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time . Consult the Schedule o f Courses for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs and registration dates and procedures. Produce d by: CUD e nver Office of Marketi n g Communications Marshall L. Collins , Director Pho tos: Cover photo by Ron Ruhoff, ot h e r photos by hoc k Photography and from Marketing Communications files Cover design: Stevinson Design Degree Programs .............. ........................................................................................ 2 Administration ............................................................ .............................................. 4 Our University, Our Campus .................................................................................. 5 Undergraduate Admissions ...................................................................................... 8 Graduate School ....................................................................................................... l 5 Tuition, Fees and Financial Aid ............................................................................. 20 R egistratio n ......................................................................... ..................................... 29 Academic Policies and Regulations ...................................................................... 34 University Policies ................................................................................................... 37 Instru ctional T echno logies and Services ............................................................. 45 Student Services, Support and Organizations .................................................... 46 International Student Services .............................................................................. 52 Campus Resources .................................................................................................. 53 Extended Studies ............................................................. ........................................ 55 Center s and Institutes ............................................................................................. 56 College of Architecture and Planning ................................................................ 59 College of Arts & Media ........................................................................................ 7 1 College of Business and Administration and Graduate School of Business Administration ........................................... 8 1 School of Education ............................................................................................. 103 College of Engineering and Applied Science ................................................. 123 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences ................................................................ 1 4 1 Military Science .................................................................................................... 205 Millennium College .............................................................................................. 209 Graduate School of Public Affairs .................................................................... 211 Course Descriptions ............................................................................................. 219 Faculty ..................................................................................................................... 377 Index ........................................................................................................................ 391

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Auraria Campus

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University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 P . O . Box 173364 Denve r , CO 80217-3364 I Periodicals Postage PAI D at the Post Office Boulder, Colorado

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U dergraduate and Graduate 200 -02 Catalog University of Colorado at Denver SPEER AT LARIMER P.O. BOX 173364 DENVER, COLORADO 80217-3364 Although this catalog was prepared using the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, degree offerings and degree titles , course offerings and course descriptions , and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change without notice or obligation. The University claims no responsibility for errors that may have occurred during the typesetting, printing or production of this catalog. The University of Colorado at Denver is an affirmative action/equal opportunity institution. For current calendars , tuition rates , requirements , deadlines , etc., students should refer to the Schedule of Courses for the -semester in which they intend to enroll. The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curricula. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester , and faculty teaching particular courses or programs may vary from time . to time. The content of a course or program may be altered to meet particular class needs. Courses are listed by college or school. Alternative format available upon request. Call 303-556-4493 (voice); 303-556-6204 (TTY); 303-556-2678 (fax) E-mail: ombuds@carbon.cudenver.edu University of Colorado Catalog (USPS 651.000) 3100 Marine Street, 584 UCB Boulder, Colorado Volume 2001, No.3, May/June Published 8 times a year: January/February, March/April, May, May/June , August, 3 times in December. Periodicals postage paid at Boulder, Colorado. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the University of Colorado at Denver Office of Admissions/Campus Box 167 P . O . Box 173364/Denver, Colorado 80217-3364

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2 I Degree Programs P icture yourself at an urban university campus near the heart of downtown Denver, where history meets the future in your surro undings as well as your studies. The city of Denver and its metropolitan region has become the center of communication and information technology in the Rocky Mountain West. New ventures open each week, from telecommunications to biotechnology to website development-companies that incorporate the latest technologies and research , and look for employees who can fulfill their needs. • Business studies, applied science, engineering, mathematics, information technology, technical have potential for lucrative employment. Yet there also is a concurrent need for professionals with the knowledge of public affairs, social sciences, humanities, and the arts, so essential to both high-tech companies and their employees. Each burgeoning technology creates new demands for employees of the future in all areas of human knowledge. The University of Colorado at Denver is dedicated to preparing university graduates who will be well qualified to attain positions in such companies, as well as in the professions that foster their developmen.t. The strength and prestige of the University of Colorado degree is known worldwide, and graduates from CU-Denver have become leaders in corporations, institutions, governments, and organizations. CU-Denver' s faculty excel in crafting their instruction around issues of contemporary life, as well as the traditional disciplines. They are alert to the challenges and opportunities of the urban environment and are responsive to the needs of students and the community. The combination of our talented faculty and highly motivated students creates an exciting educational environment, combining real-world experience with academic excellence. Our non-residential campus features historic buildings from Denver' s pioneer beginnings, alongside "smart" classroom buildings incorporating 21st century multimedia. CU-Denver's diverse student body has plenty of exciting, challenging and entertaining opportunities for personal and professional growth. There are more than 60 student organizations, ranging from the American Marketing Association to the Society of Women Engineers. Students also take part in classic film screenings, theater and musical performances, intramural sports, and fascinating lectures by nationally recognized speakers. Downtown Denver offers ample amenities for students to round out their classroom experiences. Cultural opportunities abound, with a nationally recognized performing arts center , museums, and Colorado's new aquarium only minutes away. City, state and federal government centers are just blocks from campus. Located at the hub of Colorado's professional sports industry, the campus is within walking distance of the Pepsi Center, the new Broncos stadium, and Coors Field. CU-Denver is accessible from any part of the metropolitan Denver area, via expanded highways and a comprehensive light rail and city bus system. CU-Denver provides you with challenges and opportunities that will shape your future and prepare you for a lifetime of learning. U n dergraduate Degrees C OLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA Bachelor of Arts in Fme Arts (B.A.) Art History Studio Arts Bachelor of Arts in Theatre (B.A.) Acting/Directing Design/Technical Integrated Studies Bachelor of Fme Arts (B.F.A.) Drawing Film/Video Production Multimedia Studies Painting Photography Sculpture Bachelor of Science in Music (B.S.) Music Industry Studies Music Management Music Performance Music Technology COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION Business Administration (B.S.) Areas of Emphasis Accounting Finance Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business Management Marketing COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPUED SCIENCE Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Civil Engineering (B.S.) Computer Science and Engineering (B. Electrical Engineering (B. S . ) Mechanical Engineering (B.S.) COLLEGE OF UBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES Bach elor of Arts (B.A.) Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Anthropology (B.A. ) Biology (B.S. ) Chemistry (B.S.) Biochemistry Communication (B.A.) Economics (B.A.) English (B. A . ) English Writing (B.A. ) French (B.A.)

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otal environment ? Graduate Degrees COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTIJRE AND PlANNING Architecture (M.ARCH.) Design and Planning (Ph.D.) Landscape Architecture (M.L.A. ) Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) Urban Design (M.U.D.) GRADUATE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Accounting (M. S . ) Business Administration (M.B.A. ) Executive Program Finance (M.S.) Health Administration (M.S.) Executive Program Information Systems (M. S . ) International Business (M. S .l.B. ) Management and Organization (M. S.) Marketing (M. S . ) SCHOOL OF EDUCATION licensure PrograriJ.: Teacher Licensure in Elementary Education (K-6th Grade) and Secondary Education (7th-12th Grade); Special Education (ages 5-21); TypeD Certification Administrative Leadership and Policy Studies (M. A . ) (Ed.S. ) Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education (M.A.) Curriculum and Instruction (M.A. ) Early Childhood Education (M.A.) Educational Leadership and Innovation (Ph.D. ) Educational Psychology (M. A . ) Information and Learning Technologies (M.A.) School Psychology (Ed. S . ) Special Education (M. A . ) Degree Programs I 3 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPUED SCIENCE Civil Engineering (M.S.) (Ph. D . ) Computer Science (M.S. ) Electrical Engineering (M.S.) Engineering (M.Eng.) Mechanical Engineering (M.S.) COLLEGE OF UBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES Anthropology (M.A.) Applied Mathematics (M. S . ) (Ph.D.) Basic Science (M. B . S . ) Biology (M.A. ) Chemistry (M.S. ) Communication (M.A.) Economics (M.A.) English (M.A.) Envirohmental Sciences (M.S.) Health and Behavioral Science (Ph. D . ) History (M. A . ) Humanities (M.H.) Political Science (M.A.) Psychology (M.A. ) Social Science (M. S . S . ) Sociology (M.A. ) Technical Communication (M.S.) GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBUC AFFAIRS Criminal Justice (M. C .J.) Public Administration (M.P.A.) Public Affairs (Ph. D . ) Executive Program Accreditation: North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 30 North LaSalle Street , Suite 2400 Chicago, IL 60602-2504 l.SOO-Q21-7440 Fax: 312-263-7462 American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration, Colorado State Board of Education, Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board, National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, National Architectural Accrediting Board, ArrrPfllltatJnn.<' Board for Engineering and Technology, Association of Schools of Music, Planning Accreditation Board, National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. You can obtain info rmation about these degrees by contacting us. Mailing Address: Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 P . O . Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 Location: 1200 Larimer Street or 1250 14th Street Annex 303-556-2704 Web Address: www.cudenver.edu

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The University of Colorado seal, adopted in 1908, depicts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed in laurel i s placed beside him. The Greek inscription means "Let your light shine." According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civilizatio n "stands as the criterion of cultur e." The laure l symbolizes honor or success, the youth of the figure suggests the "morning of life," and the scroll represents written language. Welcome to the University of Colorado at Denver. As an urban university campus, CU-Denver creates and maintains strong linkages to the greater Denver region. This forms a challenging educational environment, and your decision to learn at Denver's only public university shows a willingness to embrace the fast-paced and rewarding academic experience our faculty and staff provide. CU-Denver is one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system. We offer bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs, and the prestige and distinction of the University of Colorado degree. We have achieved recognition nationally and internationally because of our outstanding academic programs, top-ranked faculty, and dedicated alumni. CU Denver thrives as an intellectual environment that encourages commitment, curiosity and imagination. We're nestled near the Denver skyline, and we take advantage of this prime location to blend a cosmopolitan attitude into a dynamic Western setting. This urban perspective is an integral theme in our academic programming, orientation of our faculty, and identity of our student body. We boast an enrollment that has grown to 11,000. Our students engage in.more than 80 degree programs, from undergraduate, to masters, to doctorates . Each is designed to provide the foundation on which to build your intellectual , aesthetic , and moral capacities as individuals and as citizens. Components of this educational experience include student involvement in independent study, research, and the creative process as a complement to classroom study. CU-Denver's seven academic areas-Arts & Media, Business and Administration, Public Affairs, Liberal Arts and Sciences , Engineering and Applied Science , Education , and Architecture and Planning -provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We are committed to making available to you the opportunities for gaining the knowledge, training, skills, and credentials which will enhance your lives. We at CU-Denver take great pride in the diversity of our students and our ability to serve their varied needs. This is reflected in a commitment to an enriched baccalaureate education and the real-world research aspects of graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues and also seek to provide a humanistic understanding of social needs and problems. Our outreach has become international, as we encourage cultural and technical exchange through an array of programs that serve our students . We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars and dedicated staff. We will challenge you, as you challenge us.llook forward to your graduation, where we will award you your University of Colorado diploma. Georgia E. Lesh-Laurie Chancellor University of Colorado at Denver BOARD OF REGENTS MAUREEN EDIGER, Denver, term expires 2002 SUSAN KIRK, Denver, term expires 2004 THOMAS J. LUCERO, JR., Johnstown , term expires 2004 JIM MARTIN, Boulder, term expires 2004 NORWOOD L ROBB, Littleton, term expires 2002 JERRY G. RUTLEDGE, Colorado Springs, term expires 2006 GAIL SCHWARTZ, Aspen, term expires 2006 ROBERT SIEVERS, Boulder, term expires 2002 PETER STEINHAUER, Boulde r , term expires 2006 Staff MILAGROS CORTEZ, Secre tary of the Board of Regents and of the University. B . A., M .S., State University of New York at Albany; M.A., Webster University. UNIVERSITY-WIDE OFFICERS EUZABETH HOFFMAN, President of the University. B.A., Smith College; M.A. University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology. JOHN W. BUSS, Vice President for Budget and Finance. B . S., M . P . A., University of Colorado. JAY GERSHEN, Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs and Research. D.D.S., University of Maryland; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles. ' CHARLES V. SWEET, Vice President and University Counsel. B . A., Duke University; J.D., University of Virginia School of Law. CU-DENVER OFFICERS GEORGIA E . LESH-LAURIE, Chancellor; Professor of Biology. B . S., Marietta College (Ohio); M . S., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph. D., Case Western Reserve University. JOHN A. BERNHARD, Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B.A., Stanford University; M .B.A., Columbia University, Graduate School of Business. MARGARET B. COZZENS, Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs; Professor of Mathematics. B . A., University of R ochester ; M . S., Ph.D., Rutgers University. FERNIE BACA, Associate Vice Chancellor for Research and Creative Activities; Associate Professor of Education. B.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.A., Ph.D., University of Colorado. MARK GELERNTER, Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs; Professor of Architecture. B.Arch., Montana State University; Ph. D., Bartlett School of Architecture and Planning, University College (London). KENNETH HERMAN, Associate Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance. B .S., University of Colorado. DANNY E. MARTINEZ, Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs. B.A. , M . A., University of Colorado.

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UNIVERSITY OF, COLORADO SYSTEM In 1876, the same year Colorado became the nation's 38th state, lthe University of Colorado was founded in Boulder . Opening its doors on 5 , 1877, the univer sity began with 44 students, a president , and one instructor. Necl.rly a century later, in 197 4, the University p f Colorado had grown to four campusE'ls in three Colorado cities-Denver, Colorado Springs , Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder . With combined enropments totaling more than 46,000 students, the Uni versity of Colorado ranks 12th1 among public universities and colleges in overall research expenditures and 6th among public universities in federally fund e d research. Awards for research within the university system total approximately $420 million, with funding provided by federal agencies , appropriations from the state of Colorado , and private foundations and donors. Each of the four campuses of the University of Coloradd system has its own chancellor and campu administration . The chancellors , in tu , report to the president of the CU Sy tern . The Board of Regents of the Univ rsity of Colorado approves the overall d ection provided by the president of the sy tern. The system president is both the c ief academic and chief administrative o i<::er of the univ er sity. The president h responsibility for the administration of the entire university under the policies desf ribed by the Board of Regents or under Jar,. The University of Cqlorado at Boulder serves more than 26, 000 students enrolled in undergraduate , graduate, and profes sional programs. The Health Sciences enter in Denver des education and training to dental, nursing , pharmacy, and allied personnel. he University of Colorado at Colorado prings serves more t * an 6 , 600 students in the Pikes Peak region , offering under graduate, graduate , and professional programs. J CU-Denver's 11, 000 ftudents enroll in ndergraduate and graduate studies, as well as innovative pro f essional programs . Total Learning Environment In 1996 the Univ e rsity of Colorado system began the development of the Total Learning Environment (fLE) initiative . The TLE initiative is CU's blueprint for creating the university of the 21st century, a university dir e ctly involved with its many constituenciesincluding students, businesses, and communities-and their success. CU recognizes that learning will be the new form of labor for the 21st centurythat is , the key asset that will determine success in the classroom , in the work place , and in the community . For that reason, the TLE is designed to add value to CU' s already outstanding faculty and excellent academic programs. The TLE adds valu e to CU and everyone associated with the university by : • breaking down barriers within the university ' s culture , as well as those barriers that inhibit access to CU by individuals , businesses , other educa tional institutions , and communities ; • supporting even greater innovations in teaching and creative scholarship ; • using and developing new technologies to enhance learning; and • positioning CU as a key player in personal, professional , community , and corporate success. CU-Denver has long been known for its innovative approach toward connecting its academic programs to the needs of the community. The Den ver campus continues this tradition in support of the TLE ini tia tive by developing e xciting new ways to learn , paying attention to the needs of our non-traditional students, creating partnerships with the community , and utilizing state-of-the art technology to revitalize classrooms . THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER Situated near the heart of downtown Denver , and looking west toward the majestic Rocky Mountain Front Range , the University of Colorado at Denver is the only public university in Colorado ' s capital city . Its proximity to the commercial and governmental hub of Denver enables CU-Denver to offer its students the combined excell e n c e of its faculty and the opportunities afforded by this metropolitan environment. The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to becoming the nation ' s premier urban university . In urban environments , universities have a particular responsibil ity to adapt thei r traditional roles toward the development , assessment, transmis sion , and preservation of knowledge to urban needs while maintaining the highest standards of education and scholarship. By drawing upon the riches of its tradi tional store of learning and disciplined thought, the university serves as Denver's intellectual cente r and as a community resource ready t o respond to urban challenges and opportunities facing its local and global environment . CU-Denver offers more than 80 degree programs, from bachelor ' s to doctoral levels . There also are numerous professional development programs offerd by individual colleges and schools. Classes are offered during weekday and evening hours , on weekends , and at off-campus sites . History In 1912, the University of Colorado ' s Department of Correspondence and Extension was established in Denver to meet the needs of the capital city ' s burgeoning population. As the breadth of course offerings expanded, so did the demand for degree-granting status. From 1956 until 1976 , the Denver Extension Center operated out of the Denver Tramway Company Building at 14th and Arapahoe Streets. This building had housed the corporate offices and car barns of a huge streetcar system discontinued in 1950 . Designated a landmark on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994 , the Tramway Building was renovated into a hotel and restaurant. The Denver Extension Center was renamed the University of Colorado Denver Center in 1965 , and by 1969 , 23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study were offered . ln 1972, the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria Campus, CU-Denver's current site. That same year the Denver Center was renamed the UniversitY of Colorado at Denver . In CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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VISION AS the Denver campus of the University of Colorado system, CU-Denver interprets its mission as advancing the creation, dissemination, and application of knowledge in a total learning environment. Its boundaries are flexible and permeable, with knowledge flowing to and from the schools antl colleges, the community, and the world . This view is global rather than provincial as CU-Denver seeks to link teaching , research , and service to the major issues of the 21st century. • VALUES CU-Denver values: •!• Mutual respect for all members of the university community-students, faculty , and staff ; •!• Excellence in all areas ; •!• Collaboration among faculty , students, staff, and the community in the learning process; •!• The power of the community in teaching , learning, and scholarship ; •!• Creativity , innovation, and flexibility ; •!• Service to the public good; •!• Personal growth and professional success ; and •!• Cultural diversity and enrichment. GOALS CU-Denver ' s general goals are to : CU-Denver has the following organizational abilities: Build partnerships to strengthen core academic programs ; Build and focus resources on academic goals ; and Foster academic innovations and excellence by defining a clear niche . In addition to the general goals are goals specific to the next five years, designed to create a TOTAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENT at CU-Denver. They are: Attract a greater number of undergraduate and international students by strategically expanding and enhancing a quality curriculum to be more responsive to the learning needs of the students; Enhance quality graduate and professional programs that contribute to solving problems of urban contemporary life ; Provide accessible, convenient and affordable educational opportunities to students of all ages and backgrounds; Utilize technology effectively in the classroom and through expanded distance delivery of instruction, focusing on multiple learning modes and community resources ; and Encourage faculty excellence in providing interdisciplinary , integrative , and community partnership approaches to teaching , research, and service. Role and Mission Organizational entrepreneurship ; Innovations in support of learning ; Ability to create effective partnerships ; and Ability to assess what it does. CUDenver has the ability to create the following organizational structures : Streamlines process and policies to reduce barriers Fair and equitable compensation system; Forums to create extramural alliances across colleges, the community, and the world; and An incubator to develop new interdisciplinary projects and programs . The top two priorities for the first two years of this Academic Strategic Plan are the following: 1. Improve learning through better teaching and increased opportunities for students to engage in work-related research and professional experiences; 2 . Increase enrollment and retention , especially in high demand areas. 1974 CU-Denver began granting degrees designated as the University of Colorado at Denver. Between 1973 and 1976, the state built the Auraria Higher Education Center, shared by the University of Colorado at Denver , Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver . In 1988, CU-Denver moved into its first custom-made , new home , the 257,000square-foot North Classroom Building, located between Speer Boulevard and 12th Street, and Larimer and Lawrence Streets. Hoover Berg Desmond , a Denver architectural firm , designed this post modern , red brick structure, featuring In the Colorado Revised Statutes , the University of Colorado at Denver is defined as follows: their lives , that will make them welleducated citizens, that will lead to rewarding careers, and that will provide Denver and Colorado with a workforce able to compete in the global economy . a distinctive glass block atrium and large outdoor clocks. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 The Denver campus of the University of Colorado shall be a comprehensive baccalaureate liberal arts and sciences institution with high admission standards . The Denver campus shall provide selected professional programs and such graduate programs at the master's and doctoral level as will serve th e needs of the Denver metropolitan area , emphasizing those professional programs not offered by other institutions of higher education . The fundamental purposes of CU-Denver are to: 1. Provide students with learning opportu nities that will enhance the quality of 2 . Develop research, scholarship and creative work that will advance the of knowledge in our disciplines and that will contribute to the vitality of our culture and/or economy. 3 . Apply the university ' s skills and knowl edge to real problems in the Denver metro area. 4 . Build and maintain an institutional culture of plurality, collegiality, integration and customer service.

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Academic Stru The Chancellor of -Denver repre sents the Denv e r cam us and manages campus goal-setting , olic y development , academic affairs , comb unity relations, and budget and finan dial matters. The Vice Chancellor for A
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8 / Our University, Our Campus and contracts totaling $18.7 million for research, training, and public service programs. The benefits for the campus in the years ahead will be substantial. Externally funded activities assist in sustaining scholarly discourse, enable faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge, provide the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern to society, and enhance the education of students. Many students actively participate in projects overseen by faculty members. As a key shaper of CU's Total Learning Environment, CU-Denver conducts research and other creative activities that encompass both a multidisciplinary and applied nature . Research in every school and college at CU-Denver addresses ques tions of great significance for the welfare of Denver and the larger region. Its role within a thriving metropolitan area also serves as a base for exploring topics of national and international import . But not all research at CU-Denver yields solutions of immediate practical significance . Explo ration of topics on the cutting edge of the basic disciplines is carried out within the rich dialogue of scholarship that knows no national boundiifies. This exploration may yield insights that eventually open the way to practical applications in the next century. Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary economic, political, educational, engineering, mathematical , scientific , and environmental needs. Financial support has been obtained for program and serv ice development in the areas of computa tional mathematics , early childhood and special education, health administration, international affairs, internships and cooperative education, and employment and training institutes . CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program of study. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most important being: 1. Level of previous academic performance; 2. Evidence of academic ability and accomplishment as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests ; and 3. Evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success. CU-Denver may deny admission to new applicants or readmission to former CU-Denuer Catalog 2001-02 Other projects include statewide inves tigations of economic development, welfare reform, air quality, and transportation. Computer-related projects include artifi cial intelligence , multilevel algorithms , fast parallel processing , competitive graphs, and modeling . Research projects range from investigations of dinosaur tracksites to neurotoxicology and water transportation . In addition , a great deal of research at the university is conducted without substantial external support. This research also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publications, presenta tions, exhibits , performances, and pro fessional activities. Many members of the faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community . All these pursuits bring recognition to the university , establish the credibility of its faculty, and enhance the value of the degrees it confers. AURARIA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER The University of Colorado at Denver is located on the Auraria Higher Education Center campus, also home to the Metropolitan State College of Denver and the Community College of Denver . The three institutions share a library (operated byCU-Denver) , administrative and classroom buildings equipped with cutting-edge technologies, and related facilities on the 127-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are cooperatively offered among the Auraria educational institutions. Because we share academic facilities, our students have the level of resources found within much larger public universities . The campus library blends students whose credentials indicate an inability to assume obligations of perfor mance and behavior deemed essential by the University . After completing the application process, official notification of one's admissions status as an undergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is pro vided by the Office of Admissions . Letters from various schools and colleges indicat ing acceptance into a particular program are pending, subject to official notification of admission to the institution by the Admissions office. its book-filled shelves with computer laboratories that help students link to resources they need for success in the classroom . Professional child care and development centers provide high-quality and reasonable on-campus day care for the preschool children of students. CU-Denver students may take physical education courses as well as participate in numerous recreation and intramural athletics programs at Auraria's state of-the-art fitness facilities . The campus bookstore, located in the historic Tivoli Student Union, boasts being the largest in the Rocky Mountain region. Housed in a renovated brewery originally built in the1860s, the Tivoli Student Union also provides restaurants , specialty shops, student government offices and many comfortable areas for studying . In addition to the Tivoli Union, the Auraria campus contains other reminders of Denver ' s past-historic Ninth Street Park, St. Cajetan's Church/Performing Arts Center , St. Elizabeth ' s Church, Emmanuel-Sherith Chapel/Synagogue / Art Gallery , and Golda Meir House. The historic is complemented by the new on the Auraria campus . All classroom buildings are being upgraded to include Internet access, network connections , acoustic and lighting enhancements , and a full range of multimedia equipment to facilitate high-tech studies. The inno vative King Academic and Performing Arts Center features a 300-seat courtyard theater, a five-story concert hall (550 seats), a recital hall (200 seats) , and performance support space. The building also houses 29 classrooms and seven enhanced classrooms and computer labs. Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents or with unofficial documents will be permitted one term to submit the documents. If temporarily waived official documents are not received by the end of the initial term of attendance, registration for sub sequent terms will be denied . if at any time additional credentials are received which affect the student's qualifications , the University reserves the right to change the admission decision. Applicants who have not decided upon a major field of study will be considered

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or admission to the C liege of Liberal \rts and Sciences as uhdetermined najors. Students adm tted as undeter nined majors should declare a major as }Uickly as possible an no later than the of their sophomo . e yea r . All questions and c rrespondence egarding admission t b CU-Denver and equests for applicati 9 n forms should > e directed to: Office of Admission University of Color'tdo at Denver Campus Box 167, P . v . Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 303-556-3287 admissions@cudenver.edu \dmission The University document / :redential deadlines in accordance with mrollment demands . for the best scholar ;hip and registration ' ime considerations, 1pplicants should apply and be admitted 1s early as possible. For an applicant to >e considered for a specific term , all iocuments required for admission must >e received in the Offce of Admissions >y the deadline for that term. Applicants .vho are u nab l e to the deadline may to be considered for a later term. rransfer students are reminded that they ;hould allow sufficient time to have tran ;cripts sent from institutions they have >reviously attended. International stu ients are advised it usually takes )0 days for credential}' to reach the )ffice of Admissions international ocations. Advanc e pl,anning and early lpplication is necessary for the timely 1.dmission of internat1onal students. \pp l i cation deadlin for priority :onsideration Spri luly 22 Decemb r 1 Summ e r May3 Aca demic Preparation S t andards ( MAPS ) . Students entering te University of : olorado who gradu ted from high school . n 1988 or later are re uired to meet the ' ollowing Minimum $ademic Preparation )tandards: 4 years of nglish (with on compos tion) , 3 years of :ollege preparatory athematics : excluding business d consumer nathematics), 3 yearf of natural science, 2 years of social scier}ce (including one year of U.S. or world IiJistory) , 3 years o f a single foreign lan g uage , and 1 year o f the arts. Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores , rank in high school class, grade-point average ) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University. Two leve l s of deficiency will be recognized. 1. One unit of deficiency will be allowed provided the student meets other admission standards and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation from the University. Courses taken to make up a deficiency will count toward graduation , provided the CU Denver college accepts those course credits toward graduation . 2 . A student having more than one unit of deficiency may be admitted , provided that the student meets other standards of the University . The student must make up additional deficiencies before graduation . The student may satisfy the MAPS requirements by successful completion of : 1) Courses taken at CU; 2) Courses taken at other institutions of higher education ; 3) Additional high school credits ; 4) Credit-by-examination programs; or 5) Other requirements as approved by each CU-Denver college. Admission Requi r emen t s for Freshmen Freshman admission standards define the level of success and achievement necessary to be admitted to the Univer sity of Colorado and include factors that predict academic success , such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school course work , and the grade-point average. Both the subjects the student has studied and how the student has performed will be factors that determine admission to the University . New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Arts & Media , Business and Administration , Engineering and Applied Science , or Liberal Arts and Sciences . The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test. Preference for admission is given to applicants who rank in the top 30% of their high school graduating class and present a composite score of 21 or higher on the American College Test (ACT), or a combined score of 950 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT). Undergraduate Admissions I 9 Business applicants will receive priority consideration if they graduated in the top 25% of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. Applicants who do not meet the admission req u ire ments for d i rect admission to the College of Business will be automatically consid ered for admission as pre-business majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . Engineering applicants will receive priority consideration if they graduated in the top 20% of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT, with 28 on the mathematics section , or 1100 total on the SAT, with 600 on the mathematics section. Applicants who do not meet the admissions require ments for direct admission to the College of Engineering will be automatically con sidered for admission as a pre-engineering major in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences . New freshmen seeking admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) and College of Arts & Media must meet College requirements for MAPS instituted by the University of Colorado. Applicants are required to satisfy 16 units of high school level courses in English, foreign language , mathematics , sciences , humanities , and social sciences. Students are eligible for admission to the Colleges with up to two units of deficiency in a foreign language and no more than one additional deficiency in the remaining areas. The Colleges will allow graduation credit toward the bachelor ' s degree for courses satisfying MAPS deficiencies only if these courses are allowed for gradua tion credit under current College policy . All music performance majors in the College of Arts & Media are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area . Two years of prior piano training are recommended . An audition is required. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the College of Arts & Media , CU-Denver, for aud i tion information and applications. Applicants for all departments who do not satisfy the requirements for priority consideration are reviewed on an individual basis. COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA English Qiterature , composition, grammar ), one year of speech/ Years debate strongly recommended ........ 4 CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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10 / Our University , Our Campus Mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics) .......... . 3 Natural science . . ........................... 3 Social science .............................. . 2 Foreign language (all units must be in a single language) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Academic elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Total .... . ......... ....... . ................ 16 COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND ADMINISTRATION Years English (one year of speech/debate and two years of composition are strongly recommended) ................ ........ . . 4 Mathematics (including at least two years of algebra and one year of geometry) . . . . .. .. .. . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . 4 Natural science (includes two years of laboratory science) .................. 3 Social science (including history) ........ 2 Foreign language (all units must be in a single language) . ................ 3 Academic electives . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 (additional courses in English , foreign language, mathematics, natural or social science, not to include business courses) Total ............ ............... . COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE English Oiterature, composition, grammar), one year of speech/ . 17 Years debate strongly recommended ........ 4 Mathematics distributed as follows: Algebra .................................. . 2 Geometry ................................. 1 Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry .... . ............... 1 Natural sciences .... ........................ 3 (to include 1 unit physics and 1 unit chemistry; also to include 2 units of lab-oratory science) . Foreign language ............ . . . . ........... 2 Social science .. ............. . . .............. 2 Electives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Total ......................... .............. 16 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES English Oiterature , composition, grammar), one year of speech/ Years debate strongly recommended . . 4 Mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics) . . . ....... . 3 Natural science ............. .. . ............. 3 Social science ......... . .......... ..... . ..... 2 Foreign language (all units must be in a single language) ................. 3 Academic elective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Total .................... . . . ............... . 16 CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 HO\'Y TO APPLY 1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor or from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions . 2. The application must be completed and sent to the Office of Admissions with a $40 (subject to change) non-refundable fee . For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term, the $40 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions is informed of the intent to enroll for a later term. 3. Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions . Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to: Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 , P .O. Box 173364 Denver , CO 80217 3364 Hand,;arried or faxed copies are not official. 4 . Students who did not graduate from high school are required to have a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate sent directly from the certify ing agency to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions (see Admissions Requirements for Non-High School Graduates). 5 . Students also are required to take either the American College Test (AC1) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test ( SA1) and request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4875). High school students may obtain ACT and SAT test dates and locations from their counselors. Students who took one of these tests while in high school may use the test scores reported on their official high school transcripts as an official test score report. Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver as the recipient of the scores must notify the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. A Request for Additional Score Report may be requested from any of the offices listed below. American College Testing Program (AC1) P.O. Box 168 Iowa City, Iowa 52243 (319) 337-1270 The College Board ( SA1) P . O . Box6201 Princeton, New Jersey 08541-S201 ( 609 ) 771-7600 6. International students must submit proof of proficiency in the English language (see Requirements for International Students) . APPLICANTS NOT GRANTED ADMISSION An applicant who is not granted admission as an entering freshman may wish to consider transferring to the University after successful study else where. The Office of Admissions urges such students to complete at least one full semester (12-15 credit hours) of college-level course work at another college or university, giving special attention to courses that will provide sound academic preparation for future transfer to CU-Denver. These courses should include any Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS) not met in high school (see the MAPS Students who are not admissible will be encouraged to participate in a Redirec Program that CU-Denver has established with community colleges . All credentials presented for admissio( become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate all previously attended institutions will be denied admission to, or will be disenrolled from, the University. New Student Orientation An orientation program for new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, during the week prior to the first day of classes. Additional orientation sessions for new freshmen are offered in late spring and through the summer. The orientation program provides information to new students about activities and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process, parking, and securing 10 cards is also provided. Academic advising sessions are held before registration for the term. Students should contact their schools and colleges for additional information on advising, as well as special orientation sessions that may be held for their programs. New freshmen should contact the Academic Advising Center (303-352-3522) . Admission Requirements for Non-High School Graduates An individual who has not graduated but has passed the General Education

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I , -CU SUCCEED, AP, AND 18 CREDIT EQUIVALENCY CHART (1,2) CU-Denver Core CU-Succeed Advanced Placement Credits International Baccalaureate Credits (S) (H) Requirements Silver/Gold Courses Cr (seenote3) Cr (seenote4) Cr Cr English/Communicatior s ENGL 1020 3 English Language EnglishA1 3 3 Proficiency ENGL2030 3 & Composition 3 . (6-9hours) ENGL2154 3 English Uterature CMMU2101 3 & Composition 3 Mathematics I MATH 1070/1080 3 CalculusAB 4 Advanced Mathematics 4 Proficiency (3 hours) MATH 1110/1120 3 CalculusBC 8 Math Higher Level 8 MATH 1401/2411 4 Computer AB 4 Math Methods 4 MATH 2422/2423 4 Statistics 3 Math Studies 4 MATH 1350/2000 3 Computer Science 4 4 Natural & Physical ANTH1303 4 Biology 8 Biology 4 8 Sciences (8 hours) BlOL 1550/1560 4 Chemistry 8 Chemistry 4 . 8 CHEM 1474 4 Physics B 4 Environmental Sys 4 8 ENVS 1042 4 Physics CMechanics 4 Physics 4 8 GEOL 1072/1082 4 Physics CElectromag 4 PHYS 1000/1052 4 Environmental Science 4 Behavioral Sciences ANTH2102 3 Social Anthropology 3 6 (3-6hours) CMMU1011 3 CMMU 1021 3 I PSY 1000/1005 3 Psychology 3 Psychology 3 6 Social Sciences ECON2012 3 &o'nomics-Macro 3 Economics 3 6 (3-6hours) ECON2022 3 Economics-Micro 3 GEOG 1102/2202 3 Geography 3 6 PSC 1001 3 American Government 3 PSC 1101 3 Gov't. &Politics: Amer. 3 soc 1001 3 Gov't. & Politics: Comp. 3 SOC2462 3 Humanities ENGL 1601 3 English Ut. & Comp. 3 EnglishA1 3 3 . (6hours) ENGL2600 3 English Lang. & Comp. 3 Philosophy 3 6 HIST 1381 3 Classics: Any Area 3 HIST 1382 3 History-U.S. or Europe 6 History-Any Area 3 6 PHIL 1012 3 French Uterature 3 PHIL 1020 3 German Uterature 3 Spanish Uterature 3 Arts (3 hours) ARTS 1000 3 Art: History 3 Art/Design 3 3 FA 1001 3 Art: Studio 3 PMUS 1001 3 Musiciheory 3 Music 3 3 THTR1001 3 Listening & Literature 3 Theatre Arts 3 3 Foreign Language FR/GER/SPAN 1010 5 French Language 3 Language A2, B 3 6 (see noteS) FR/GER/SPAN 1020 5 German Language 3 Language ab initio 3 6 FR/GER/SPAN 2110 3 Spanish Language 3 Classical Languages 3 6 NOTES: 1. MaximJm of 30 semester hours of credit from combination of AP and IB sources. 2 . Application of AP or IB credit toward the major is based on an evaluation by the major department. 3. StudentS shall receive credit for advanced placement if they achieve (a) an AP examination score of 4 or 5 or (b) an AP examination score of 3 AND a grade f "A" in the second semester of the AP course. 4. Stud shall receive credit for international baccalaureate if they achieve a minimum IB examination score of 4. Two levels of lB credit are awardef: standard (S) and higher (H). 5. ailable in any classic or modem langauge. Students satisfying AP or lB foreign language credit requirements also receive foreign language proficiercy. R 5 999 ev. e pt . l l j

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12 / Our University, Our Campus Development (GED) test may be considered for admission. The application for undergraduate admission must be accompanied by a $40 non-refundable applica tion fee and an official transcript showing completed high school courses. An applicant must also submit GED scores and scores from either the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the American College Test (ACT) Program. The admission decision is based on the student's potential for academic success at CU-Denver. Admission Requirements for Transfer Students Applicants are considered transfer students for admission purposes if they have completed college course work since graduating from high school. Applicants are not considered transfer students if the only college-level classes they have taken were before high school graduation. Any applicant not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended will be refused admission. To meet the minimum transfer admission standards at CU-Denver, students must meet one of the following conditions: 1. Have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade-point average: a. 2.5 GPA (on a 4.0 scale); or b . 2.0 GPA if transferring from Colorado School of Mines , Colorado State University, University of Colorado at Boulder, or University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. 2. Have earned 30 or more collegiate semester hours with a 2.0 GPA. Transfer students are given priority consideration for admission as follows: 1. Colleg e of Business and Administration. To be considered for transfer admis sion, students must have completed at least 24 semester hours which will apply to the degree, Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Priority Consideration for admission will be granted to transfer applicants with a minimum cumulative overall GPA of 3.0 for all work applicable to a B.S. in Business Administration degree, including a minimum 2.0 GPA in business courses. Students may also be admitted if they have a 3.0 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work, a 2.0 GPA in business courses, and at least a 2.0 overall cumulative GPA in courses applicable to a B.S. in Business Administration degree. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 Transfer applicants who do not meet either of the priority admission standards are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA earned in the last 24 hours. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available , or are referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration , where they will be advised as pre-business majors. Applicants with at least a 2.6 GPA in applicable course work in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with less than a 2.6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of applicable course work will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration, where they will be advised as pre-business majors. 2. College of Engineering and Applied Science . Applicants to the College of Engineering should have at least a 2. 75 cumulative grade-point average for all math and science course work attempted, at least 24 hours of college course work including two semesters each of calculus and physics. 3. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average for all work attempted. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. 4. College of Arts & Media. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade-point average for all work attempted. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music major applicants (except those entering the Music Industry Studies program) also must pass an audition. Contact the Department of Performing Arts for audition information , 303-5564652 . Important Note: Applicants who do not meet th e above grade-point average or credit hour requirements will be considered for admission , but on an individual basis. The primary factors used when considering students individually are: 1. Probability of success the academic program to which admission is desired; 2. The quality of prior academic work; 3. Age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements; and 4. Time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges. HOW TO APPLY 1. The student should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. 2 . The application form must be completed and returned with the required $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee. 3. The student is required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to: Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 , P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Hand-arried or faxed copies are not official. If a student is currently enrolled at another institution, an incomplete transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. (franscripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accompanied by a certified literal English translation.) Arts & Media and Liberal Arts applicants with fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of college work completed also must submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores. Engineering and Business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores. All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate all previously attended institutions will be denied admission to, or will be disenrolled from, the University. TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT Course work taken at any regionallyaccredited institution of higher education will be considered for transfer to CO Denver. Courses are considered for transfer on the basis of having similar content to those offered by CU-Denver . General education "core" courses are usually accepted. Developmental, remedial, vocational, technical, religious , doctrinal, orientation, independent study, special topics, and cooperative education

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mrses are not accept d . Only courses in hich a ?rade of C -or eetter was earned e considered for tran;sfer. Courses in hich a grade of Pass (!f) was earned are msidered for transfe t only if a grade of ass at the sending is defined ; a C-or better. Students wishing to Jpeal transfer credit decisions should mtact their academic e partment. After all official transcripts have been !Ceived and the student is admitted as a e gree student , the Office of Admissions ill prepare a transfer credit report indi lting which courses have been accepted 1 transfer by CU-DenJer. A copy of this !port is mailed to the student as well as 1 the student's acadeJUic department at U-Denver. Upon receipt of this transfer r ed it report , should contact 1eir academic departr.;ent to meet ith an advisor, who will determine ow transferred credit applies to specific U-Denver degree requirements. The Office of considers o urse work for transfer regardless of 1e age of the academ i c credit. Individual epartments , however , may have specific u idelines and policies about age of redit and make the decision about pplication of credit toward a degree rogram. Students are expected to ave current working fr!owledge of rerequisite courses , regardless of when rerequisite courses were taken . The College of Busi 1 ess and Adminis ation generally its transfer of usiness course cred'ts to those business o urses which are off red as low erivision courses at Students • ho have taken uppef -division business ourses from an can Assembly of ollegiate Schools of usiness (MCSB) c credited College of usiness may review of the e courses for ossible transfer by cpntacting the allege of Business am vising office . ll courses taken in tne business rea of emphasis must be completed t CU-Denver. The College of Engineering and .pplied Science , in g ' neral , requires 1at engineering counse transfer credit 1ust come from an A creditation oard for Engineerin and Technology accredited e gineering program J be acceptable for egree purposes . ngineering techno! gy courses are not onsidered equivale t to engineering ourses. A maximum of 72 s mester hours is cceptable in transfer to CU-Denver from ommunity colleges . Students who com i leted the Colorado Community College Core Curriculum program , and whose transcripts cont'ain the statement "core curriculum completed , " may transfer this core curriculum as a package and receive credit for the lower-division component of CU-Denver ' s core curriculum . The College of Business and the College of Engineering have specific courses required of all students which may be taken as part of , or in addition to, the community college core curriculum. A Comprehensive Guide to Student Transfer document containing Colorado community college advising plans and admission information is available from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions . In addition , a CU-Denver admissions repre sentative keeps regular office hours at metropolitan Denver area community colleges to assist students with planning a transfer program . Representatives also visit other Colorado community colleges. Call the CU-Denver Successful Transitions Coordinator at 303-556-4950 for additional informaJ:ion. OTHER TRANSFER CREDIT Credit granted through programs listed below appears on the CU-Denver transcript. The academic department determines how this credit applies to degree requirements. See CU Succeed , AP, and 18 Credit Equiv alency Chart on preceding page. Accelerated Baccalaureate Program (CAB) The CAB (Curriculum for an Acceler ated Baccalaureate) program is a unique partnership between CU-Denver and select high schools which enables stu dents to accelerate their progress toward a college degree. Students from participat ing high schools can earn up to 30 hours of CU-Denver core curriculum course credits while in high school by: 1) taking regular college courses in the high school , taught by CU-Denver faculty or college qualified high school faculty , through the CU Succeed program ; 2) concurrentLy enrolling in designated courses on the CU-Denver campus; and /or 3) obtaining acceptable scores on the Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate (higher and subsidiary levels) examina tions. Students can begin work on college courses leading to a baccalaureate degree from CUDenver ' s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and College of Arts & Media beginning in their junior year of high school. Undergraduate Admissions I 13 Advanced Placement Program The Advanced Placement (AP) Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced place ment courses and subsequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency , and are granted advanced standing in those areas. The Colleg e of Liberal Arts and Sciences also grants AP credit for scores of 3 plus a course grade of A -in corresponding subject. For more information , contact your high school counselor or the Office of Admissions at CU-Denver. College-level Examination Program Incoming CU-Denver students m a y earn University credit by examination in subject areas in which they have demonstrated college-level proficiency : Interested students are encouraged to tak e appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing servic e . Students who are interested in how CLEP examination credit applies to the CU-Denver degree requirements should contact their academic advisor . International Baccalaureate Diploma Program Entering students may receive college credit from the International Baccalaureate Diploma Program available at select high schools . The International Baccalaureate (IB) program is a rigorous , pre-university course of study emphasiz ing liberal arts from an international perspective . In general , students may receive college credit for higher level and standard level course subjects in which a minimum examination score of 4 (out of 7) is achieved. Students with 18 high school credit should contact the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Advising Office , NC 2024, 303-556-2555, for advising on course-specific credit for 18 course work . Military Service and Schooling To have credit for e ducational experi ence evaluated , applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application : 1. A copy of DD Form 214, and CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

PAGE 18

14 / Our University, Our Campu s 2 . DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Educational Experience During Military Service. USAF personnel may present two official transcripts from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of DD Form 295. Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education , to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-benver . Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions. Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) Students enrolled in Army or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a maximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements . The College of Business and Administration stipulates that ROTC courses may be used fo.r credit only for non-business elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Further more, a maximum of 12 semester hours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business, and then only if the ROTC program is completed. Intra-University Transfer CU-Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are accepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver Intra-University Transfer forms may be obtained from the Records Office. Students should observe application deadlines indicated in the current Schedule of Courses . Decisions on intra university transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer. Students in Extended Studies programs wishing to enroll in regular CU-Denver courses or degree programs should contact the Office of Admissions for a degree application . Readmission Requirements for Former Students CU-Denver students who hav e not regis tered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year or longer , and who have not CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 attended another institution since CU, are (eturning students and must formally apply for readmission. An additional application fee is required only if you are changing from undergraduate to graduate or non-degree to degree status. Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions. Students who have attended another college or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as . transfer students and meet the transfer student deadlines for receipt of docu ments . This requires payment of the $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee and submission of two official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended . Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to: Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P . 0. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Students who last attended another CU campus must formally apply for read mission. An application fee is not required unless you are going from undergraduate to graduate or from non-degree to degree status. Application forms are available from the Office of Admissions. Admission for Non-Degree Students Persons who have reached the age of twenty and who want to take University courses, but do not plan to work toward a University of Colorado degree, may be admitted as non-degree students provided they are eligible to return to all collegiate institutions previously attended. Correspondence and questions regarding admission as a non-degree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions . Those seeking admission as non-degree students for the purpose of teacher licensure should contact the School of Education, 303-556-2717. Each school/college limits the number of semester hours taken as a non-degree student that may be transferred to a degree program. Students considering changing from non-degree to degree status should contact the school/college to which they will be applying (as a degree student) for information about the number of hours that may be taken as a non-degree student. Courses taken for credit as a non degree student can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional development. Note : International students are not admitted as non-degree students, excep1 for summer sessions. They must hold a valid student visa . Students with a baccalaureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for course work as non-degree students. They must complet a non-degree application for admission. Students in a non-degree status who hav' a previous degree pay graduate tuition rates . To apply for admission as a student, obtain a Non-degree Student App lication form from the Office of Admi sions. Return the completed application by the deadline for the term desired. A $25 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee is required . No additional credent ials are required. Applicants who seek teacher licensure must apply separately to the School of Education and submit the required credentials. Non-degree students are advised that regis tration for co urses is on a spaceavailable basis . Continuation as a non-degree student with no prior undergraduate degree is contingent upon maintaining an overall grade-point average of 2.0 upon comple tion of 12 or more semester hours. Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined on the application for degree admiss ion form . They should contact their academic advisor regarding the process of transferring credit from non-degree to degree status. Admission for Students Seeking a Second Undergraduate Degree Students who already hold a bachelor'! degree may apply for admission to a program in which they can earn a second undergraduate degree. Applicants for a second undergraduate degree must meet CU-Denver admissions standards . These students may apply to the College of Arts & Media , College of Engineering and Applied Science or the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Persons who already hold an undergraduate oegree in any discipline generally may not apply for a second und ergraduate degree in busines! Rather, they should apply to a graduate M.B.A. or M.S. business program . Contact the Graduate School of Business at 303-556-5900. Education is a graduate program. Interested students should contact the School of Education office for information, 303-556-2717.

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lOW TO APPLY . Obtain an for under graduate admission f rom the Office of Admissions . . Complete the applic tion and send it to the Office of Admissions with a $40 (subjec t to change) on-refundable application fee . . Have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institutiory attended . Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to: Office of Admissions University of at benver Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO Hand-carried or faxj copies are not official. Transcripts from th institution where ae first undergraduafje degree was earned mst have final grades posted for the emester that the student graduated and ave the official notation of the degree warded. . 1 All credentials presented for admission ecome the property 1 f the University r f Colorado and must/remain on file. tudents who do eclare all previ ins _ tit tions are subject o diSCiplmary action and/or dismissal . Students who knowingly falsify ranscripts or test scores will be renied admission to, or will be lisen rolled from, the University. lean: Mark Gelernt J r )ffice: CU-Denver Building , Room 700 ' elephone: 303-556-6536 For specific information and degree equirements for graduate study, please efer to the department/ program descrip ions in the schools and colleges sections , f this catalog. I nformation About he Graduate !chool Quality graduate rograms are ynonymous with t e University of : olorado . Professo , s are actively involved 11 research or creatre activity and, as eachers and scholars , continue to study llld new datr,, ideas, and echmques, eventually bringing these High School Concurrent Enrollment High school juniors and seniors with demonstrated academic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for one term only . This approval may be renewed. Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a University degree program . For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions , 303-556-2704 . Admission Requirements for International Students The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to undergraduate and graduate school. Undergraduate : Admission requirements for CU-Denver's schools and colleges vary , and international students seeking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which they are applying . In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (J'OEFL) score of 525 (or 197 on the computer based test). Prospective students should request an International Student Applica tion packet from the Office of Admissions. Requirements for each CU-Denver college and school can be found in this catalog. For best processing , all information should be sent at least five months before the semester in which you wish experiences to the classroom. Graduate students at CU-Denver gain not only from interactions with the graduate faculty, but also from other students. CU-Denver ' s graduate students bring practical experience gained in the Denver community to the classroom, and are ready to relate the realities of practice to the models presented. The CU-Denver Graduate School includes the following colleges and schools : College of Architecture and Planning College of Arts & Media College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Graduate School of Business Administration Graduate School I 15 to enroll. For undergraduate application materials, please have materials sent by the following dates: Summer Fall Spring Desired January 15 March 15 August 15 Final May3 July22 December 1 Graduate: International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an under graduate bachelor ' s degree , or its equivalent , and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are applying . In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (J'OEFL) score of 500 (or 173 on the computer-based test) before CU-Denver will process the appli cation for admission . However , many departments require a TOEFL score higher than 500 when granting admission to a graduate program . Applications are available from the Office of Admissions. These applications should be received six months prior to the term for which the student is applying. Note : Except for summer sessions , international students must be enrolled in a degree-seeking program . The University provides an Intensive English Program for international students preparing to pass the TOEFL, through the American Language Center. See Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section for a complete description . School of Education Graduate School of Public Affairs Degrees Offered The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through the Graduate School at CU-Denver: Master of Arts (M.A.) in: Anthropology Biology Communication Economics English History Political Science Psychology Sociology CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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16 /Our University, Our Campus Master of Arts (M.A. Education) in: Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education Curriculum and Instruction Early Childhood Education Educational Psychology Information and Learning Technologies Special Education Master of Science (M.S.) in: Accounting Applied Mathematics Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Sciences Finance Information Systems Management and Organization Marketing Mechanical Engineering Technical Communication Master of Architecture (M.Arch . ) Master of Basic Science (M.B.S.) Master of Science International Business Master of Criminal Justice (M.C.J.) Master of Engineering (M.Eng.) Master of Science in Health Administration (M. S.) Executive Option Master of Humanities (M.H.) Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) Master of Public Administration (M.P.A.) Executive Option Master of Social Science (M.S.S.) Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P.) Master of Urban Design (M.U.D.) Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) Administration , Supervision , Curriculum Development School Psychology The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in: Applied Mathematics Civil Engineering Design and Planning Educational Leadership and Innovation Health and Behavioral Sciences Public Administration CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 Requirements for Admission Please note that the following are minimum requirements. School and college regulations , if more stringent, take precedence over the minimum guidelines as set forth by the Graduate School. REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. In addition to departmental approval, applicants for admission as regular degree students must: 1. Present a combination of the following: a cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 or better on a scale where A is equal to 4.0, standardized examinations , prior professional experience, portfolios, or other indicators . 2 . Meet the specific requirements as established by the program faculty. PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS Applicants who do not meet the require ments for admission as a regular degree student may be considered for admission to a master's program as a provisional degree student upon the recommendation of the program faculty. Programs rriay admit students under a provisional agreement subject to the following requirements : 1 . The term of the provisional period shall not exceed two years. 2. The student must complete each semester's course work with a GPA of 3.0 or higher on all work taken (whether applied to the master ' s degree or not). 3. The provisional agreement should clearly state any additional program requirements . Failure to meet the conditions of the provisional agreement will be cause for suspension. APPLICATION PROCEDURES Graduate students who expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the Office of Admissions concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications. Once a student has decided to apply for a graduate program , a completed application must be submitted before the deadline date. Please contact the specific program of study for deadline dates. An applicant for admission must present: 1. Parts I and II of the CU-Denver Graduat School Application Form , including tht Tuition Classification form, which may be obtained from the departmental program coordinator. 2. Two official transcripts for all academi ' work in colleges and universities completed to date. 3. Three letters of reference . Please have nominators include applicant's name and social security number in their letter of reference. 4. A nonrefundable application fee ( checl or money order) of $50 (international student application fee is $60). No application will be processed until this f ee is paid . 5. Any other material required specificall : by the program faculty. Thls may include scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or other examination. Check with program coordinators in the departments for additional information that may be required . When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson or a student admissions {:ommittee of the department will decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and make that decision known to the Office of Admissions . Check with the program to determine the deadline for submitting application and application fee. Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award (e.g., fellowship , scholarship , assistantship) should contact their department before the application deadline qate for information , since deadlines are usually earlier for aid requests . Readmission/Changing Programs Former and current students who wish to be readmitted or change from one degree program to another must mee the requirements of the new degree program and provide all items required of students applying to the Graduate School at CU-Denver for the first time. These applicants , however , may petition the program to which they were initially admitted in order to secure a release of transcripts and letters of recommenda tion supplied at the time of their initial application.

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Transferring Students transferri g from another CU campus to CU-Den er must apply and be accept e d to thJ new campus. Doctoral Applicatio l A student who has ompleted a mas ter ' s program at must resubmit Parts I and II of the graduate application for acceptance into thf doctoral program . Non-Degree Students A student wh o wishes to take graduate courses , but is not i nterested in earning a specific advan c ed may apply as a non-degree student. I Contact the Office of Admissions a t 303-556-2704 for further i nformation. Non-degree students will be allowed to r eg ister only on the campus to which they have been admitted . Non-degree who later desire to pursue a graduate degree program at this university are en d ouraged to submit the complete application and supporting cre d e nt i als to their depart ment as soon as possible . Please note that the grade-point a erage (GPA) for courses taken a s a noa-degree student is calculated separately , and is not transfer of as many as / nine credit hours toward the requirements of a master ' s degree for cours e s either as a student at anoth e r re
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18/ Our University, Our Campus the state of Colorado. Grant awards are announced each semester for the follow ing term. Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid, 303-556-2886. COLORADO GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise and to continuing students on the basis of academic success. Please contact the department for information about this fellowship. GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructorship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate master's degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. Please contact the department for further information . RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS Research activities provide opportuni ties for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Please contact the department for further information. LOAN FUNDS Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college work-study program should submit an application for financial aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March 1. This office also provides short term loan assistance to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Applica tion should be made directly to the Office of Financial Aid, 303-556-2886 . EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES The University maintains an employ ment service in the Office of Financial Aid to help students obtain part-time work, either through conventional employment or through the college work-study program . Students employed by the University are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness , a policy which avoids favor CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin . Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy. Requirements for Advanced Degrees QUALITY OF GRADUATE WORK A student is expected to maintain at least an overall3 . 0 average in all work attempted while enrolled i!1 a graduate program . For all graduate degrees, a grade below Cis unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward the minimum requirements for these degrees . CREDIT BY TRANSFER A limited amount of high-quality resi dent graduate work done in a recognized graduate schoo l elsewhere within the time allowed may be accepted, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the school or college dean . The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this University is nine semester hours or 30% of the number of credits required for the degree, whichever is higher for master's degrees, and 18 hours for performance ' and Ph.D . degrees . The school or college shall determine if graduate classes taken by an under graduate can be transferred to a graduate program. They shall also determine if courses taken in the University of Colorado system are considered resident or transfer courses. Courses taken as pass/fail or satisfactory /unsatisfactory will not be transferred. In addition , a grade of Bor above must be earned for a course to be transferred . Courses over 10 years old will not be transferred. USE OF ENGLISH A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of standard English in all oral and written work may not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado . Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance . Each department will judge the qualifi cations of its advanced students in the use of English. Reports , examinations, and speech wiH be considered in estimating the candidate ' s proficiency. GRADUATE APPEALS The Graduate Council shall review grievances related to procedural issues which cannot be resolved at the school or college level. Appeals of grades or other academic issues are conducted according to the procedures of the schools and colleges, with final resolution residing with the dean of the college/school. Master's Degree A student regularly admitted to a graduate program and later accepted as a candidate for the Master of Arts, Master of Science, or other master's degrees will be recommended for the degree only after certain requirements have been met. The requirements stated below are min imum requirements; additional conditions may be set by the individual programs. Students planning to graduate should ascertain current deadlines with their graduate program . lt is the graduate stu dent's and the department's responsibility to see that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW grades, notification of final examinations, etc.) . Departments or program committees may have deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program.lt is the student's responsibility to ascertain and meet these requirements. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS The minimum requirements of graduate work for a master's degree may be fulfilled by completing a minimum of 30 semester credits, of which no more than nine may be thesis or independent study hours. A course mark below C is unsatisfactory and will not count toward the minimum requirements for a master's degree. A student on probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation . Program requirements may be more stringent than these minimum requirements, in which case program requirements supercede the requirements of the Graduate School. LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and/or modern languages as each department requires. See specific departmental requirements. GRADUATE CREDIT Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above, and that are offered by professors who

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tre members of the graduate faculty . :ourses at the 4000 level may be counted or graduate credit , but a minimum of 8 semester hours must be taken at the 1000 level. No course below the 4000 level nay be counted for graduate credit. lepartmental approval must be obtained :>r the courses taken by a student to ount toward the degree plan. Students are advised that not all ourses listed in this catalog are available , t any one time. Some are given in alter tate years, and this should be considered fhen developing degree plans. TO CANDIDACY A student who wishes to become a , andidate for a master's degree must file . completed Application for Admission o Candidacy in the Graduate School or l the student's graduate program , by he appropriate deadline for graduating hat semester. The application must be signed by the tudent' s advisor and the program chair •r director , certifying that the student ' s vork is satisfactory and that the program 1utlined in the application meets the equirements set for t he student. THESIS CREDIT Every graduate student working toward . master's degree who expects to present , thesis in partial fulfillment of the require nents for the degree must register for hesis credit with a maid mum of nine em ester hours . The final grade will be vithheld until the thesis is completed . i the thesis is not completed at the :nd of the term in w9ich the student ; so registered, an 1 Progress (IP) will 1e reported. .HESIS REQUIRE A thesis may be of a research , exposi ory , critical , or crea ive type . Every hesis presented in partial fulfillment 1 f the requirements or an advanced I egree must : . Deal with a definite topic related to the major field . . Be based upon independent study and investigation. . . Represent the eq ivalent of no more than nine semest r hours of work . . Receive the appr al of the major department. . Be essentially co plete at the time the comprehensi e final examination is given . . Comply in mechar,ical features with specifications outlined in Directions for Preparing Master's and Doctoral Theses , which is obtainable from the Graduate School office , and have received thesis format approval. All theses must be approved and signed by the thesis advisor and other committee members. Three copies of the final thesis must be submitted to the Graduate School by the specified deadline . The thesis binding fee must be paid by check when the thesis is submitted to the Graduate School. Approved theses are kept on file in the Auraria Library and in the student's department . TIME LIMIT Master's degree students have seven years from the date of the start of course work to complete ali degree requirements . Doctor of Philosophy The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph . D . ) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the University. To state the require ments for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading , because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued . Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they t:an critically evaluate work in this field . Furthermore , they must have shown the ability to work independently in their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge . The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments . Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules . Studies leading to the Ph.D . degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholar ship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments. The criterion as to what constitutes an acceptable field of study shall be that the student' s work must contribute to an orgii!lized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the University . Graduate School I 19 MINIMUM COURSE/DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the Ph .D. degree. Course Work Requirement . A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses num bered 5000 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum. Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the Ph.D., a student must complete a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than ten of these credit hours taken during any single semester. A minimum of five dissertation hours must be registered for each fall and spring semester following successful completion of the colloqu i um or comprehensive examination . Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required course work specified above. Course work and work on the disserta tion may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program . RESIDENCE The stqdent must be properly registered to earn residence credit . The minimal residence requirement shall be three semesters of scholarly work. EXAM I NATIONS Each Ph . D . program will require at least comprehensive and final examinations. Notice of all examinations must be filed with the Dean of the Graduate School at least two weeks prior to administration. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION The student must pass a comprehen sive examination in the field of concentra tion and related fields . This examination may be oral , written , or both , and will test the student' s mastery of a broad field of knowledge, not merely the formal course work completed . The examination shall be conducted by an examining board . The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to total a minimum of four members of the graduate faculty , one of whom is outside the primary department . CUDenver Catalog 2001-02

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20 / Our University, Our Campus CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DOCTORAL CANDIDATES Following successful completion of the comprehensive examination, students must register continuously. These students will register for and be charged for a minimum of five hours of dissertation credit each fall and spring semester. A maximum of 10 hours of dissertation credit may be registered for in any one semester. Continuous registration during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense (excluding summer).lt is expected that the student and advisor will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register , consis tent with the classification identified above. DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS A dissertation based upon original investigation, showing mature scholar ship, critical judgment, and familiarity with the tools and methods of research must be written upon a subject approved by the student's major department. To be acceptable, this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student's special field. In mechanical features, all dissertations must comply with the specifications as TUITION AND FEES All tuition and fee charges are established by the Board of Regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually by the Colorado General Assembly . The Regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee rates at any time. The following ' rates were for the 2000-2001 academic year , and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating costs. Rates are currently being revised for the 2001-2002 academic year. Please refer to the Schedule of Courses for the term in which you register for current tuition and fees information. Payment ofT uition and Fees All tuition and fees (excep t the applica tion fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, accord ing to guidelines in the current Schedule of Courses. Students may select one of the payment plans that are available at CU-Denver . Specific information on the CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 outlined in the Directions for Preparing Master's and Doctoral Theses, which may be obtained from the Graduate School office. The final draft must be reviewed and approved for format by the Graduate School prior to final copies being made. Three formally approved and signed, typewritten copies of the dissertation (incl uding abstract), plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in the Graduate School office. The thesis binding fee and microfilm fee must be paid by check when the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School office. The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International . The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department. All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than four members who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction and are members of the grad uate faculty. All approved dissertations are kept on file in the Auraria Library. One copy is deposited in the reference section and the other in the archives section of the library . The third copy is sent to the student's department. When the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School office, the candidate must sign an agreement with University deferred payment plans is included in the Schedule of Courses published before each semester or summer session. Students who fail to pay tuition and fees in full or make payment arrangements by the published deadlines will be dropped from all classes . Students who register in a non-de gree status, and who later apply and are admit ted to a degree status for that term, are responsible for the difference in tuiti on between the non-degree program and their applicable degree program and will be billed accordingly. Students who register for co urs es are liable for payment of tuition and fees even if they drop out of school. Refund policies for students who withdraw from the University are included in the Schedule of Courses. A student with financial obligations to the University will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, to be. issued transcripts, or to be listed among those recei.ving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves loans and other types of indebtedness which are due after Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform. FINAL EXAMINATION/DEFENSE After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dissertation and r e lated topics will be conducted . This examination will be wholly or partially oral, the oral portion being open to anyone. The examination will be conducted by A committee consis1 ing of at least four members of the gradu ate faculty, one of whom must be from outside the student's department. Notice of all examinations must be filed with the Dean of the Graduate School at least two weeks prior to administration . TIME LIMIT An eight-year maximum limit is in effec l for doctoral studies . graduation. Personal checks are accepted for any University obligation . Any student who pays with a check that is not accept able to the bank will be assessed an additional service charge. Students may also pay tuition and fees by credit card. Tuition Appeals Exceptions to financial obligations incurred will be reviewed by the Tuition Appeals Committee . The Committee will only consider appeals when a student has been medically disabled , has experienced a death in the family, or has a change in employment hours or loc ation beyond the student's control . Each condition requires a specific form . Contact the Student Retention Office to obtain proper Tuition Petition Forms. It is absolutely required that all conditions be docum ented . Exceptions will not be considered when the student has failed to comply with published deadlines or where conditions were under control of the student .

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NOTE: Students will rave one year to file a Tuition Petition beginning with the last day of the term for which the appeal is filed. Tuition Petition Forms are avail able in the CU-Denver Building, Suite 100, 1250 14th Street , 303-5p6-2324. Required Fees Auraria Bond Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $58.00 Assessed to retire tl)e construction bonds used for the St4dent Union , the Child Care Center , the !Health , Physical Education and Recreation (HPER) facili ties, and Tivoli facility on the Auraria Campus . Fee was approved by student referendum and is of all students at CU-Denver, Metropoli t an State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. Auraria Student RTDI Bus Pass Fee ..... ' .......... $16.70 Provides for Denver local service in the Denver Metro area and Central Corridor Light Rail Service no additional fare payment ; a $. 75 cash payment ($1.25 discount) on all Denver Metro Express Service ; and a $1.75 payment ($1.25 discount) on all Denver Metro Regional Service. The Pass may be used seven days a week, and is valid between the end of one semester and the start of the next semester. The Pi;\ss is NOT valid for either the Access-A-Ride or Guaranteed Ride Home programs Cultural Events Fee J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.00 Provides funding f r CU-Denver's College of Arts & Me ia to allow for reduced admission r r tes for CU-Denver students to attend th atrical and other cultural events . Information Techno ogy Fee . . . . . . . $4.00 per credit hour Provides funding f r acquisition of computer systems t support student computing laborato es, including networks and netwo king infrastructure and facilities direct! accessible by students. (Maximu charge $60.00 ) Student Activity F . . . ............ $10.00 Provides funding f r student activities , student government student clubs and organizations and s ecial events . Student Health Ceo er Fee . . . . . . . . $24.00 Provides funding ran accessible outpatient, direct-cfe service that is devoted to meeting . tudent health care needs . Health educ ion and counseling are available , as wei as treatment and referral for medical rroblems. The Student Health Center is tri-institutional and is administered y Metropolitan State College of Denver . The payment of this fee does not cover the Health Insurance Plan at CU-Denver . Please call303-556-6273 to receive information on Student Health Insurance . • Student Information System (SIS) Fee ................. $10.00 Provides funding for continued improvement of the computer system used in supporting such functions as admission application processing , telephone registration and grade reporting , degree audit and graduation checkout, awarding of financial aid , payment of tuition and fees and production of transcripts . Student Newspaper Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . $4.00 Provides funding for the CU-Denver student newspaper, The Denver Free Press. Student Recreation Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.00 Provides funding for the recreational facilities and programs in the Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER) Building , as well as the campus playing fields and club sport programs . Recreation is a tri-institutional program administered by Metropolitan State College of Denver. Student Services Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30.00 Provides funds for programs and events offered through The Career Center, Center for Educational Opportunity Programs , Learning Assistance Center , Office of Legal Services , Office of Student Life, Student Advocacy Center , Office of Student Retention , and CUDenver Counseling Center. The Office of Legal Services is administered by Metropolitan State College of Denver . Matriculation Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25.00 A one-time non-refundable fee required of all new students at the time of their first registration. This fee covers the costs of official transcripts . Candidate for Degree Fee Equal to one credit hour of resident tuition , is required for all graduate students who are not registered during the term that they are taking compre hensive examinations. Students must register as " candidate for degree" and pay for one hour of corresponding resident tuition plus the SIS fee and the Information Technology fee for one term only. COURSE FEES Online Courses A $100.00 course fee is assessed for each online course taken. Tuition, F e es and Financ ial Aid I 21 A $50.00 course fee is assessed for each online lab taken. College of Architecture and Planning All majors and non-majors registered in Studio , Computer , Photography and Furniture Design courses are required to pay the following facilities fees. Architecture ARCH 5110 lntro : Architectural Design Studio I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.00 ARCH 5120 Intro: Architectural Design Studio II ..................... 40.00 ARCH 5130 Architectural Design Studio lii . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.00 ARCH 5140 Architecture Design ............................ ARCH 6150 Architecture Design Studio V . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.00 ARCH 6160 Design Photography . .. . 45.00 ARCH 6162 Furniture Design 45.00 ARCH 6190 ST in Design Studies (photography ) ..................... 45.00 ARCH 6410 Introduction to Computer Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 ARCH 6411 Computer Applications in Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 ARCH 6490 ST in Professional Studies (Computers) . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 ARCH 6490 ST in Professional Studies (Furniture) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45.00 Environmental Design All ENVD majors are required to pay : a $60 Computer Technology fee . a $40 instructional Media Center fee . a $50 instructional Model Shop fee. ENVD 1002 Environmental Media . . . 45.00 ENVD 3022 Technical Photography . 45.00 ENVD 4122 Advanced Technical Photography ....................... 45.00 Landscape Architecture LA 5500 Intro tq Landscape Arch Design Studio I .......... .. . . 40.00 LA 5501 Intro to Landscape Arch Design Studio 11 .............. 40.00 LA 6600 Landscape Arch Design Studio III . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 40.00 L A 6601 Landscape Arch Design Studio W .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. . . 40.00 LA 6641 Computer Applctns in Landscape Architecture . 30.00 LA 6700 Advanced Landscape Arch Design Studio V ............. 40.00 LA 6701 Advanced Landscape Arch Design Studio VI . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.00 Urban Design U D 6600 Transformation / Decomposition Studio............ 40.00 U D 6601 Composition Studio . . . . .. . 40.00 U D 6602 City of Exploration & Experimentation Studio ....... 40.00 CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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22 /Our University , Our Campus Urban and Regional Planning URP 6612 Geographic Information Systems for Planners .............. 30.00 URP 6630 Planning Studio I .......... 40.00 URP 6631 Planning Studio II ......... 40.00 College of Arts & Media FmeArts FA 100llntroduction to Art .. .... 15.00 FA 1100 Basic Drawing .............. 20.00 FA 1150 Photography Foundations . 65.00 FA 1400 Two Dimensional Design .. 15.00 FA 1500 Three Dimensional Design . 65.00 FA 2000 Drawing II .................... 20.00 FA 2155 Photo Foundations II: Adv Black & White .. .. .. .. . . .. 65.00 FA 2200 Basic Painting ............... 20.00 FA 2210 Painting II .................... 20.00 FA 2500 Metal Sculpture & Casting . 65.00 FA 2510. Wood Sculpture & Casting . 65.00 FA 2600 Art History I Survey . . . . . . . . 15.00 F A2610 Art History II Survey ....... 15.00 FA 3000 Intermediate Drawing . . . . . . 20.00 FA 3020 Intermediate Life Drawing .. 20.00 FA 3110 Imaging & Identity . . . . . . . . . . 65.00 FA 3155 Intermediate Photography 1: Digital . . . . . . . . . . . . 65.00 FA 3160 Intermediate Photography II: Color . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65.00 F A3165 Concepts &Processes in Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65.00 FA 3180 Photo : Modern Era / Criticism & Theory .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 15.00 FA 3200 Intermediate Painting . . . . . . 20.00 FA 3210 Intermediate Painting . . . . . . 20.00 FA 3220 Intermediate Watercolor . . 20.00 FA 3340 Topics .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. . 20.00 FA 3500 Intermediate Sculpture . ... 65.00 FA 3510 Intermediate Sculpture . . . . 65.00 FA 3630 History of Photography... . 15.00 FA 3645 Topics : Enhancing Art Experience . . . . .... . ...... .......... . 15.00 FA 4000 Advanced Drawing . . . . . . . . . 20.00 FA 4020 Advanced Life Drawing . ... 20.00 FA 4140 Topics in Photography . . . . . 65.00 FA 4195 Advanced Photography I . . 65.00 F A4196Advanced Photography II . 65.00 FA 4200 Advanced Painting . . . . . . . . . 20.00 F A4210Advanced Painting ......... 20.00 FA 4220 Advanced Watercolor . . . . . . 20.00 FA 4340 Topics . . .. . . .. . . . .. ......... 20.00 FA 4500 Advanced Sculpture Studio . .. .. .. . . . . .. .. .. . .. .. . . .. . . . 65.00 F A4510 Advanced Sculpture Studio ... .. ........ . 65.00 FA 4524/5524 Topics in Art History ............. . 15.00 FA 4650/5650 Nineteenth Century Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.00 FA 4660/5660 Twentieth Century Art . .. ............ . FA 4690 Renaissance Art .. FA 4 730 Arts of Japan ...... CU-Denve r Catalog 2001-02 15.00 15.00 15.00 FA 4 790/ 5 790 Methods in Art History............ . ............. 15.00 FA 4800 Art Seminar .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 20.00 FA 5000 Graduate Drawing . . . . . . . . . . 20.00 FA 5020 Graduate Life Drawing ..... 20.00 FA 5190 Graduate Photography . . . . 65.00 FA 5200 Graduate Painting . . . . . . . . . . 20.00 FA 5210 Graduate Painting . . . . . . . . . . 20.00 FA 5220 Graduate Watercolor ....... 20.00 FA 5500 Graduate Sculpture . . . . . . . . 65.00 FA 5510 Graduate Sculpture ........ 65.00 film FILM 3100 History of Film Production & Technology I 30.00 FILM 3150 History of Film Production & Technology II . . . . . . . 30.00 FILM 3111 Shooting Action & Physical Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 FILM 3207 Acting/Directing Workshop . . . .. .. .. . . . . .. . .. . 50.00 FILM 3222 The Film/Video Business ............................ 30.00 FILM 3270 Film/Video Production III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 FILM 3275 Film/Video Post Production III ....................... 50.00 FILM 3300 Advanced Lighting for Film & Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 FILM 3350 Editing Aesthetics ........ 50.00 FILM 3400 Intermediate Screenwriting for Feature Film . . . 30.00 FILM 4209 Advanced Production Management . . .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 30.00 FILM 4270 Film/Video Production IV: Career Tracks 50.00 FILM 4280 Film/Video Pst Prdctn IV: Avd Video Cmpsr .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 50.00 FILM 4400 Advanced Screen writing for Feature Film . . . 30.00 Multimedia MUME 1100 Basics of Multimedia . . . 20.00 MUME 1110 Basics of Multimedia for Non-Majors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20.00 MUME 1200 Multimedia Studio ...... 50.00 MUME 1500 Trends in Multimedia .. 20.00 MUME 1510 Trends in Multimedia . . 20.00 MUME 1520 Trends in Multimedia .. 20.00 MUME 2410 Mltmd Digita] Image Manipultn/Typgrphy . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 MUME 3410 Multimedia Authoring / Interface Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 MUME 3420 Mltmd Project 3-Digital Video &Audio ........... 50.00 MUME 3430 Mltmd Proj 4-Motion Graphics / 3d Creatn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 MUME 3500 Trends in Multimedia .. 20.00 MUME 3510 Trends in Multimedia .. 20.00 MUME 3520 Trends in Multimedia . . 20.00 MUME 3530 Trends in Multimedia ...... 20.00 MUME 4410 Multimedia Career Project 1 ............................ 50.00 MUME 4420 Multimedia Career Project 2 .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. . . .. .. .. 50.00 MUME 4505/5505 Web Mltmd . Dsgn-Educ Instrctn . . . . ... 50.00 MUME 4510/5510 Adv Web Mltmd Dsgn-Educ Instrctn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 MUME 4 700/5700 Topics in Multimedia ......................... 50.00 ' MUME 4840/5840 Independent Study . .. ........... 50.00 MUME 4999 Senior Portfolio Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 Music Facilities Fee for all music majors . . . 30.00 Course fees are assessed to all students for the following courses , not to exceed a total of $90. MUS 1180 Synthesis Proseminar .. .. 30.00 MUS 2180 lntro to Scoring &Arranging! . .. .. .. .. .. . .. ...... 30.00 MUS 2190 lntro to Scoring &Arranging II ....................... 30.00 MUS 2300 lntro to Songwriting . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 2470 Music on the Personal Computer-Beginning .............. 30.00 MUS 2500 Integrated Performing Arts : Hist & Prdctn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 2560 Music Technology II . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 3030 Applied Scoring & Arranging I .. . .. ............... .. 30.00 MUS 3200 Elementary Composition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 3540 Recording Studio Maintenance & Calibration . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 3670 Junior Project : Music Technology . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 3710 Music and the Media ..... 10.00 MUS 3730 Music Industry Financial Management . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.00 MUS 3740 Business of Independent Record Production . . . ............. 10.00 MUS 3750 Publicity & Promotion in the Music Business . . . . . . . . . . . 10.00 MUS 3770 Independent Record Production .......... ................ 10.00 MUS 3790 Video Production in the Arts : Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 3820 Digital Music Techniques .. 30.00 MUS 4030 Applied Scoring &Arranging II .................. . .... 30.00 MUS 4200 Advanced Composition . . 30.00 MUS 4400/5400 Tpcs in Electronic & Computer Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 4500/5550 Topics in Music Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 4505 Audio Sweetening . . . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 4550/5550 Music Engineering I 30.00 MUS 4570/5570 Music Engineering II 30.00 MUS 4580/5580 Music Engineering Seminar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 MUS 4720/5720 Music Management 10.00 MUS 4730/5730 Music Production .. 10.00 MUS 4 7 40 Music Business Analysis . 10.00 Performance Music PMUS 1023 Piano Class I , II, lll , IV .... 30.00

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PMUS 1033 Piano Class : Piano Majors . . . . . . . . . .. . . . 30.00 Theatre THTR 1001 Intro to The tre ........... 7.00 THTR 1111 Freshman Seminar ...... . 7.00 THTR 2520 Voice and Diction . . . . . . . . . 7 . 00 THTR 2530 Acting I ............ . .. . . .... 7 . 00 THTR 2531 Acting for Non-Theatre Majors .... ....... . . . J ............... 7.00 THTR 2610 Survey of Lit . . . 7 . 00 THTR 2710 Theatrical esign Aesthetics &Produc ion I .......... 7.00 THTR 2712 Theatrical Aesthetics &Produc ion 11 ....•.... 7 . 00 THTR 2720 Lighting De ign . . . . . . . . . . . 7 . 00 THTR 3510 Oral Interp etation of Poetry ............................ 7 . 00 THTR 3520 Stage Accents & Movement ......................... 7.00 THTR 3530 Acting II ...... .. . . .......... 7 . 00 THTR 3531 Theatre of $ocial Responsibility ..... . ................ 7 . 00 THTR 3540 Directing I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 . 00 THTR 3560 Topics in TJ:teatre ......... 7 . 00 THTR 3610 History ofJheatre ........ 7 . 00 THTR3611 DramaofD1 versity ........ 7 . 00 THTR 3720 Advanced I!.ighting Design .. ................... . ......... . 7 . 00 THTR 4530 Acting III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.00 THTR 4540 Directing II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 . 00 THTR 4550/5550 Short Form ....................... .... 7 . 00 THTR 4560 Topics: Ma for Credit .. . .. . 7 . 00 THTR 4570/5570 Creat ive Drama . . . . . 7.00 THTR 4610/ 5610 Drama Theory & Criticism ......... 1............ 7 . 00 THTR4760 Topics in Design .......... 7 . 00 School of Education School Psychology SPSY 6150 Psychoedu ational Assessmentl .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. 40.00 PSY 6160 Psychoedu atlonal Assessment II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40.00 ollege of Liberal Aritj s and Sciences boratory courses in anthropology equire a student fee o cover expendable terns. -\NTH 1302lntroducti n to 1\NTH 4101 Applied S atistics using SAS and SPSS I ............... 10.00 -\NTH 4102 Applied S atistics • using SAS and SPSS II .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 10.00 1\NTH 4390 Research ethods in Archaeology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 \NTH 4910 / 5910 Fie! Experience in Archaeology ..................... 40.00 -"\NTH 6317 Archaeol gy Research Design &Analysis . ...... . .......... 35.00 Biology Laboratory courses in biology require a student fee to cover expendable items including dissection specimens. BIOL 1550 Basic Biology I ........ .. . . 20.00 BIOL 1560 Basic Biology II . . . . . . . . . . 20.00 BIOL 2071 General Biology Lab I . . .. 10. 00 BIOL 2081 General Biology Lab II .... 20 . 00 BIOL 3225 Human Physiology . . . . . . . 30.00 BIOL 3244 Human Anatomy . . . . . . . . . 50 . 00 BIOL 3654 Microbiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35.00 BIOL 4838 / 5838 Laboratory in Genetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35.00 Chemistry Each laboratory course in chemistry requires a student fee to cover expendable items ................. $20.00 Communication CMMU 2800 Technology for Communication Majors . . . . . . 10.00 CMMU 4011 Research Methods: Quantitative .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . 10.00 CMMU 4212 / 5212 Software Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 CMMU 4300 / 5300 Multimedia Authoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 CMMU 4290 / 5290 Web Design . . . . . . . 30.00 Economics ECON 3801lntroduction to Mathematical Economics .......... 5.00 ECON 3811 Statistics with Computer Applications . .. . ....... 10.00 ECON 4150 Economic Forecasting .. 10.00 ECON 4811 Introduction to Econometrics . .. . .. .. . .. . .. .. .. . . .. 10.00 ECON 4101 Applied Statistics using SAS and SPSS I .. . .. .. .. .. . .. . 10. 00 ECON 4102 Applied Statistics u sing SAS and SPSS II .. ............ 10.00 ECON 5150 Economic Forecasting .. 15. 00 ECON 5813 Econometrics I ...... . . .. 15. 00 ECON 5823 Econometrics II........ .. 15. 00 ECON 6073 Research Seminar . . . . . . 15.00 ECON 6810 Econometrics and Forecasting .. . .. .. .. .. .. . . .. . 15. 00 English ENGL 2030 Core Composition II 20 . 00 Environmental Sciences ENVS Introduction to Environmental Science . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 . 00 Geography GEOG 1202 Introduction to Physical Geography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 .00 GEOG 3062 Map Reading & Elementary Surveying . . . . . . . . . . 20 . 00 GEOG 3080 lntro to Cartography & Computer Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 . 00 GEOG 3232 Weather and Climate . . . 15. 00 GEOG 4050 Environmental Analysis 20.00 GEOG 4060 / 5060 Remote Sensing 1: lntro to Environmental Remote Sensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 . 00 Tuition , F ee s and Financial Aid I 23 GEOG 4080/5080 Geographic Information Systems . . . . . . . 30 . 00 GEOG 4240 Principles of Geomorph?logy................. . 20 . 00 Geology GEOL 1072 Physical Geology : Surface Processes .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. . 25.00 GEOL 1082 Physical Geology: Internal Processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25.00 GEOL 3011 Mineralogy .. . .. .. .. . .. .. . 20 . 00 GEOL 3121 Structural Geology ... .' . 20 . 00 GEOL 3231 Introductory Petrology . 20.00 GEOL 3411 Introductory Paleontology ....................... 20.00 GEOL 3421 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 . 00 GEOL 4111 Field Geology . .. .. .. .. .. . 25.00 Mathematics MATH 1350 Computers in the Arts and Sciences .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. . 25.00 MATH 1999 Math Resource Lab ..... 25.00 MATH 4101 Applied Statistics using SAS and SPSS I .. .. .. .. . 10.00 MATH 4102 Applied Statistics using SAS and SPSS II .. . .. .. . 10.00 Modern I.anguages All Modern Languages courses Chinese , French , German , Italian , Japanese, Nepalese , Russian, and Spanish , except 2939 / 3939 . 10.00 Physics Each laboratory course in physics requires a student fee to cover expendable items. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $24.00 Political Science . P SC 3011 Research Methods . .. .. .. 10.00 P SC 4101 Applied Statistics using SAS and SPSS I .. .. .. .. .. .. 10. 00 P SC 4102 Applied Statistics using SAS and SPSS II .. .. .. . .. .. 10.00 Psychology PSY 2090 Introduction to Statistics . 10.00 PSY 2130 Research Methods in Experimental Psych . . . . . . . . . . 10.00 PSY 2140 Lab in Experimental Psychology .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. 10. 00 PSY 4101 Applied Statistics using SAS and SPSS I .. . .. .. .. 10 . 00 PSY 4102 Applied Statistics using SAS and SPSS II .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 10.00 PSY 5713 Advanced Statistical Methods .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. . .. .. . 15.00 Sociology SOC 4101 Applied Statistics using SAS and SPSS I .. .. .. .. . .. . .. . 10.00 SOC 4102 Applied Statistics using SAS and SPSS II .. .. .. 10. 00 Technical Communication T C 4210/ 5210 Software Documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 T C 4290/ 5290 Web Design . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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CU-DENVER TUITION AND FEES FOR SPRING 2001 Tuitio n is b ase d o n student status . It is no t based on t h e l evel of yo ur cou r ses. This does n o t i n cl ude tui t ion for onl ine courses or Week e nd College courses. See the Onl i n e a n d Weekend College tuitio n sectio n s for furt h e r information. UNDERGRADU ATE TUffiON RATFS RFSIDENT N O N-RFSIDENT All F resh men & Sophomores; Juniors &Seniors in All Freshmen & Sophomores ; J uni o r s & Senior s i n Credit Hours a l so Jun i ors & Seniors in Arts & Media , Business , also Juniors & Seniors in Arts & Me d ia, Bu siness, Li b eral Arts , and Non-Degree * and E n g i neering Li beral Arts, and Non-Degree* an d Enginee r i n g 0-1 $ 130 $ 145 $ 699 $ 717 2 260 290 1, 398 1,434 3 390 435 2 , 097 2 ,151 4 520 580 2 , 796 2 , 868 5 650 725 3,495 3 , 585 6 780 870 4 , 194 4 , 302 7 910 1,015 5 , 821 5 , 970 8 1 , 040 1 , 160 5 , 821 5 , 970 9 1, 065 1 , 208 5,821 5 , 970 10 1 , 093 1 , 223 5,821 5 , 970 11 1 ,121 1 , 239 5 , 821 5 , 970 12-1 5 1,149 1, 254 5,821 5 , 970 eac h cre dit hour ove r 15 130 145 699 717 GRADUATE TUm ON RATFS RFSIDENT Credit hours Liberal Arts Architecture & P l anning Education Arts & Media , Engineering , Business and Sciences and Non-Degree * and Public Affairs 0-1 $ 190 $ 203 $ 210 $ 223 $ 237 2 380 406 420 446 474 3 570 609 630 669 711 4 760 812 840 892 948 5 950 1, 015 1, 050 1 , 115 1 , 185 6 1 , 140 1, 218 1 , 260 1, 338 1 ,422 7 1 , 330 1,421 1,470 1, 561 1 ,659 8 1 , 520 1 , 624 1 , 680 1,784 1, 896 9-15 1 , 579 1, 683 1 , 859 1 , 859 1 ,978 each c r edit hour over 15 190 203 210 223 237 N O N-RFSIDENT Credit hours Liberal Arts Architecture & P l a nn ing , Arts & Media , Education , B u si ness and Sciences Engine ering, Pub li c Affairs , and Non-Deg ree* 0-1 $ 764 $ 814 $ 828 2 1 , 528 1 , 628 1 ,656 3 2 , 292 2,442 2,484 4 3 , 056 3 , 256 3,312 5 3 , 820 4 , 070 4,140 6 4 , 584 4 , 884 4,968 7-1 5 6 ,371 6 ,781 6,909 each cre dit hour ove r 15 764 814 828 *Non-degree students who have previously earned a baccalaureate degree are class ifi ed as graduate students and assessed graduate t u i t i on r egard less of the l evel of the class(es) they are taking . WEEKEND COllEGE TUITION The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers courses on we e kends at the Auraria campus . Weekend College credit is identical to that for other C U -Denver cou rses. Students m u st be officially admitted to CU-Denver in orde r to register for Weekend College courses . W eekend College tuition r ates apply to all Weekend College courses w h ether or not o n-<:ampus courses are taken . Weekend College tuition is based on t he level of the course ( s ) . Tuition for Weekend College courses does not fall within the campus or online tuition windows. The flat t uition (12-15 hrs) for regular cou rses does not a pply. Tuition for Weekend College courses is in addition to tuition for regu lar courses . Student s are responsible for any r e l a ted unive r sity an d /or course fees. UNDERGRADUATE COURSF.S GRADUATE COURSF.S Credit Hours RFSIDENT N O N-RFSIDENT Cre dit Hours RFSIDENT N O N-RFSIDENT 0-1 $ 130 $ 699 0-1 $ 190 $ 764 2 260 1, 398 2 t 380 1 , 528 3 390 2 , 097 3 570 2 , 292 4 520 2 , 796 4 760 3 , 056 5 650 3,495 5 950 3 , 820 6 780 4 , 195 6 1 , 140 4,584 7 910 5 , 821 7 1,330 6,37 1 8 1 , 040 5 , 821 8 1 , 520 6 , 37 1 9 1 , 065 5,821 9-15 1 , 579 6,371 10 1 , 093 5,821 each credit hour over 15 190 764 II 1 ,121 5 , 821 12-15 1,149 5 , 821 each c r e d i t h our over 15 130 699 C U D e n ver Catal og 2001-02

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I I TUITION FOR ONLINE COURSES Jnlin e tuition rates apply to all o nlin e courses whether or not on-campus or Weekend College courses are taken. Online tuition is based on the college md level of the course. A online course fee will be assessed for each online course, and a $50 onlin e lab course fee will be assessed for each online , ab in a ddition to the tuition listed below . Students registering only for online courses will be required to pay the Information Tech nol ogy Fee and the )tudent Information (SIS) fee. Other student fees will be waived. Course-based fees may apply. ONUNE TUm ON FOR I 000 AND 2000 LEVEL COURSES RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT Credit hours Liberal Arts Arts& Business Engineering Liberal Arts Arts& Business Engineering and Sciences Media and Sciences Media G-1 $ 130 $ 130 $ 130 $ 130 $ 699 $ 699 $ 699 $ 699 2 260 260 260 260 1,398 1 , 398 1,398 1,398 3 390 390 390 390 2,097 2,097 2,097 2,097 4 520 520 520 520 2,796 2 , 796 2 , 796 2,796 5 650 650 650 650 3,495 3,495 3,495 3 , 495 6 780 780 780 780 4,194 4,194 4 , 194 4 ,194 7 910 910 910 910 5,821 5,821 5 ,821 5,821 8 1 ,040 1 , 040 1 , 040 1 , 040 5,821 5 ,821 5 ,821 5 ,821 9 1,065 1 , 065 1 , 065 1 , 065 5 ,821 5 ,821 5 ,821 5,821 10 1,093 1,093 1 , 093 1 , 093 5,821 5 ,821 5 ,821 5,821 11 1,121 1 ,121 1 ,121 1 ,121 5,821 5 ,821 5 ,821 5 ,821 12-15* 1 ,149 1,149 1,149 1 , 149 5,821 5 ,821 5 ,821 5 ,821 each credit hour over 15 130 130 130 130 699 699 699 699 ONUNE TUm ON FOR 3000 AND 4000 LEVEL COURSES RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT Credit hours Arts Arts& Business Engineering Liberal Arts Arts& Business E n gineering and Sc iences Media and Sciences Media G-1 $ 130 $ 145 $ 145 $ 145 $ 699 $ 717 $ 717 $ 717 2 260 290 290 290 1,398 1 , 434 1 , 434 1,434 3 390 435 435 435 2,097 2,151 2,151 2,151 4 520 580 580 580 2 , 796 2 , 868 2,868 2 , 868 5 650 725 725 725 3,495 3 , 585 3,585 3,585 6 780 870 870 870 4,194 4 , 302 4 , 302 4,302 7 910 1,015 1 , 015 1 , 015 5,821 5 , 970 5,970 5,970 8 1,040 1,160 1,160 1,160 5,821 5 , 970 5,970 5 , 970 9 1 , 065 1 , 208 1 , 208 1,208 5 ,821 5 , 970 5,970 5 , 970 10 1 , 093 1,223 1,223 1,223 5,821 5,970 5 , 970 5,970 11 , 1,121 1,239 1,239 1 , 239 5,821 5 , 970 5,970 5,970 12-15* 1,149 1 ,254 1 ,254 1,254 5,821 5 , 970 5,970 5,970 each c redit hour over 15 130 145 145 145 699 717 717 717 ONUNE TUm ON FOR 5000 LEVEL AND HIGHER COURSES RESIDENT Credit hours I;:beral Arts Architecture Edu cation Arts& Engineering Public Affairs Business d Sciences and Planning Media G-1 $ 190 $ 203 $ 210 $ 223 $ 223 $ 223 $ 237 2 380 406 420 446 446 446 474 3 570 609 630 669 669 669 711 4 760 812 840 892 892 892 948 5 950 1,015 1 ,050 1,115 1 , 115 1,115 1,185 6 1 , 140 1,218 1 , 260 1,338 1 , 338 1,338 1 , 422 7 1 , 330 1,421 1,470 1,561 1 ,561 1 ,561 1,659 8 1 , 520 1,624 1 , 680 1,784 1,784 1,784 1,896 9-15* 1 , 579 1,683 1,859 1,859 1,859 1 , 859 1 , 978 each credi t hour over 15 190 203 210 223 217 217 237 NON-RESIDENT Credit hours Liberal Arts Arch itecture Education Arts& Engineering Public Affairs Business find Sciences and Planning Media G-1 $ 764 $ 814 $ 814 $ 814 $ 814 $ 814 $ 828 2 1 , 528 1,628 1,628 1,628 1,628 1 , 628 1,6 56 3 2,292 2,442 2 , 442 2,442 2,442 2,442 2,484 4 3,056 3,256 3 , 256 3,256 3 , 256 3,256 3,312 5 3,820 4,070 4,070 4,070 4 , 070 4,070 4,140 6 4,584 4,884 4 , 884 4,884 4,884 4 , 884 4 , 968 7-15* 6,371 6,781 6 ,781 6,781 6,781 6,781 6,909 each credit hour over 15 764 814 814 814 814 814 828 If you enroll for 12-15 red its (for residents) or 7-15 credits ( for non-residents) of online course work in the same college and at the same course level , you will b e charged tJition for 12 resident or 7 non-resident credit hours respectively , plus $100 per course. 'he Board o f R egents University of Colorado reserves the right to change tuition and fees at any time . Please contact the Bursar's Office, 303-556-2710 , 'you have questions re arding tuition and/or fees. CU-Denver Catalo g 2001-02

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26 /Our University, Our Campus T C 4300/5300 Multimedia Authoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50.00 T C 4805/5805 Graphics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30.00 The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado reserves the right to change tuition and fees at any time . Please contact the Bursar's Office , 303-556-2710, if you have questions regardin g tuition and/or fees. Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes Tuition classification is governed by Colorado statutes that apply to all state funded institutions in Colorado . Institu tions are bound by the provisions of this statute and are not free to make excep tions to the rules set forth. Students are initially classified as instate or out-of-state for tuition purposes at the time of application. The classifica tion is based upon information furnished by the student and from other relevant sources. After the student's status is determined , it remains unchanged in the absence of satisfactory evidence to the contrary. Once a student is classified as a non resident for tuition purposes, the student must petition for a change in classifica tion . Petitions must be submitt ed NO LATER THAN THE FlRST OFFICIAL DAY OF CLASSES of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a resident. It is preferred that petitions be received 30 days prior to the beginning of the term . Late petitions will not be considered until the next semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office of Admissions . The final decision regarding tuition sta tus rests with the University . Questions regarding residence (tuition) status should be referred only to the Tuition Classification Officer . Opinions of other persons are not official or binding upon the University. Additional information is available in the brochure, Classification of Students for Tuition Purposes , which may be obtained from the Admissions Office. BASIC REQUIREMENTS The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a legal domi ciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding the beginning of the term for which the in-state classifica tion is being sought. Persons over 23 years of age or who are emancipated establish their own legal domicile. Those who are under 23 years of age and unemancipated assume the domicile of their parent or CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 court-appointed legal guardian. An une mancipated minor's parent must, there fore , have a legal domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may be classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes. ESTABLISHING DOMICILE Domicile is established when one has a permanent place of habitation in Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one ' s true, fixed, and permanent home and place of habitation . The tuition statute places the burden of establishing a Colo rado domicile on the person seeking to establish the domicile . The question of intent is one of documentable fact and needs to be shown by substantial connec tions with the state sufficient to evidence such intent. Legal domicile in Colorado for tuition purposes begins the day after connections with Colorado are made sufficient to evidence one ' s intent . The most common ties with the state are (1) change of driver ' s license to Colorado ; (2) change of automobile registration to Colorado; (3) Colorado voter registration; (4) permanent employment in Colorado; and most important, (5) payment of state income taxes as a resident by one whose income is sufficient to be taxed. Caution: payment or filing of back taxes in no way serves to establish legal domicile retroac tive to the time filed . In order to qualify for in-state tuition for a given term , the 12-month waiting period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) must be over by the first day of classes for the term in question. If one' s 12-month waiting period expires during the semester, instate tuition cannot be granted until the next semester. Resident Tuition for Active Duty Military Personnel The Colorado Legislature approved resident tuition for active duty military personnel on permanent duty assignment in Colorado and for their dependents. EUGrBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED EACH TERM. Students obtain a completed verification form from the base education officer, and submit the form with their military 10 to the Records Office after they have registered , but before the end of the drop/ add period . At the time the verification form is certified in the Records Office , the student's bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident tuition rate . Students who have been certified remain classified as non-residents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status once they establish permanent ties to Colorado. Fl NANCIAL AID Director: Ellie Miller Office: NC 1030 Telephone: 303-556-2886 Frmail Address: finaid@carbon.cudenver.edu World Wide Web Address: http:/ /finaid . cudenver.edu The Office of Financial Aid offers over $30 million in financial aid awards to quali tied students each year. If the student's financial aid application materials are received before the March 31 priority date, then the student is considered for a package of need-based grant, work-study (part-time employment) and/or long-term loan funds . If the financial aid application materials are received after the March 31 priority date, then the student is usually considered only for a Federal Pell Grant and for outside student loans (Federal Stafford Loan or Federal Parents Loan). Applicants for Colorado Graduate Fellowship , Colorado Deans Scholars award, and Colorado Regents Scholars award are subject to different deadlines and are reviewed by other CU-Denver departments (the Graduate School , undergraduate deans' offices, and the Office of Admissions, respectively ). All other applicants for financial aid are notified of their award status in writing by the Office of Financial Aid. Eligibility Each student must qualify for CU Denver financial aid as follows: 1. Be a U.S. citizen or be admitted to the U . S . by the INS on a permanent basis . 2 . Be classified as a degree-seeking student by the CU-Denver Office of Admis sions . Teacher certification students ar' eligible to apply for financial aid and arE considered as undergraduate students according to federal guidelines . 3 . Be enrolled for a minimum number of credits as specified on the financial aid award letter and/or student loan planning letter. 4. Meet the minimum requirements of Financial Aid Academic Standards . 5 . Apply for financial aid by submitting all of the required documentation. The need analysis form is required for all programs except the Colorado Graduate Fellowship , Colorado Scholars award , Colorado Deans Scholars award Colorado Regents Scholars award , and the Emergency Student Loan Program . 6. Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes for the following programs: Colorado Student Grant , Colorado

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I Student Incentive Grant, Colorado Graduate Grant , Colorado Work-Study, Colorado Regents Scholars award, Colorado Deans Scholars award, and Colorado Scholars award. 7. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant. Be registered for the draft or be enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selec tive Service. Each applicant must complete the inancial aid application materials for mbmission to the Office of Financial Aid. :omplete information must be available o the office before eligibility can be letermined. Limited Funds-The majority of general inancial aid funds are awarded on a irst-come , first-served basis to eligible 1tudents who document significant inancial need and wlw complete their tpplication the Office of 'inancial Aid by the 31 priority late. Application completion is defined ts having all of the required documents md the results of the need analysis (Free for Federal Student Aid) nto the Office of Financial Aid. General inancial aid is awarded to needy students vho meet the priority date until all of the unds are committed for the year. If the file s completed after ch 31, then awards v-iii probably be limit d to Federal Pell irant (for needy first undergraduate tudents only) and for outside student :>ans (Federal Stafforld Loan or Federal 'arents Loan) . Appli ation for financial id must be made ea revisions in federal and state laws , egulations , and guidelines. Financial Need-ost financial aid wards are based o the concept of nancial need . Fin cial need is calcu tted as: cost of atte dance (tuition , fees, ooks, living expens ) minus family ontribution (stude tjspouse contribu on and parents' co tribution for ependent students . The cost of atten ance is the estimated ost to attend CU-D 1nver , including tuition and fees , room and board , books and supplies , transportation, and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid determines standard budgets based upon average tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education. For 1999-2000, the following monthly budgets were used for room and board , transportation , and personal expenses : $570 for students living at home with parents; $960 for students not living with parents. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student-were approximately $1,115 per semester and non-resident tuition and fees were approximately $5 , 510 per semester . These amounts will probably increase by approximately 2 % for the 2000-2001 school year . Independent Student-The federal government provides specific guidelines that define a self-supporting student for financial aid purposes . If a student is classified as self-supporting, then the student's parental information is not considered when the calculation of family contribution is made. For 1999-2000, a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old (born before 1 / 1 / 76) or one who meets one of the following conditions : 1. Graduate student 2. Married student 3. Student with legal dependents other than a spouse 4. Veteran "of the U.S. armed forces 5. Orphan or ward of the court These conditions may be appealed to the Office of Financial Aid if unusual circumstances exist. Contact'the office for appeal guidelines. If the student/spouse contribution plus the parents ' contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance, then the student will not qualify for need based financial aid . The contributions from the student/ spouse and from the parents are calcu lated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law. The formula considers income , savings and other assets, family size , number of children in postsecondary school , and other factors. Students may appeal for special consideration if they are experiencing unusual drcumstances. Financial aid is intended to supplement and not replace financial contributions from the student and parents . Course Loads-General financial aid undergraduate recipients usually must enroll for at least 12 credits per semester , and graduate students usually must enroll for at least 5 credits per semester . Federal Tuition , Fees and Financial Aid I 27 Stafford Loan recipients must carry at least a half-time credit load (6 hours for undergraduates per semester and 3 hours for graduates per semester). For defer ment of student loans, please refer to the Schedule of Courses each term for specific information . Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (please check award letter and /or student loan planning letter for the exact number of credits required ). Academic Progress-CU -Denver stu dents must make academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid in order to be eligible and remain eligible for financial aid . Students should review the Financial Aid Academic Standards policy, available in the Office of Financial Aid. Non-Degree Students-Non-degree stu dents are eligible to be considered only for the Advantage Scholarship Program . Please refer to separate brochure for application procedures . Teacher certi fication students may apply for financial aid and are considered as undergraduate students for financial aid purposes. Residency Status-A student is required to be a resident of Colorado for a full year before the Office of Admissions can con sider classification as a resident for tuition purposes . Non-resident students are encouraged to obtain additional infor mation from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident status. As a resident , a student is eligible for the State of Colorado financial aid programs, and tuition is significantly less than for non-resident. R e funds and Repayments-Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal or reclassification of tuition status must be returned to the recipient's financial aid awards before any payment is made to the student. Beginning with the fall 2000 term , if a recipient of federal financial aid with draws from all classes on or before the 60 % point in time in the term, that student may be required to repay a portion of his/her financial aid . The federal govern ment has defined that the recipient has only earned a portion of their financial aid , and the earned aid is directly proportional to the percentage of time the student attended classes up to and including the 60 % point in time in the term. The rest of the financial aid is defined as unearned financial aid and must be returned to the federal financ ial aid programs. Unearned aid includes both the amount allocated to tuition and fees and the amount allocate d to the student for other educational expenses . For a complete description of these requirements , please request CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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28 / Our University, OurCampus a copy of the Financial Aid Repayment Policy from the Office of Finandal Aid. Appeals-Students may appeal all decisions of the Office of Financial Aid by completing a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office . Appeals are considered within three weeks and a written response is mailed to the student . Reapply Each Year-Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each year. Application materials for the next summer term are available beginning January 1. Award Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 8-12 weeks after all application materials have been received in the Office of Financial Aid. If awarded, an award letter is mailed to the student ; it includes the types and amounts of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours required each term. A student loan planning letter is mailed to the student after the outside student loan application(s) have been processed. Grants and loans The following aid programs are funded by the federal government: 1. Federal Pell Grant-Eligibility for the Federal Pell Grant is determined before any other aid is awarded . Awards are defined by a strict need-based formula provided by the federal government, and award amounts vary depending upon amount of financial need and enrollment status . Students are eligible for Federal Pell Grant consideration if they have not received their first baccalaureate degree by June 1 of the award year. 2. Outside Student Loans-Eligibility for all other types of assistance should be determined prior to applying for outside student loans. The subsidized Federal Stafford Loan program requires that students show financial need in order to qualify . Int erest on the subsi dized loan is paid for the student by the federal government as long as the stu dent remains enrolled at least half-time and for a six-month grace period after dropping below half-time enrollment . The unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan program does not require the student to document financial need. Eligibility is calculated as the cost of attendance minus other financial aid awarded. Interest is not paid by the federal CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 government for the unsubsidized pro gram , and the student may elect to pay the interest currently or to allow the interest to be added to the total loan amount. Interest rates for the Federal Stafford Loan programs are variable, and are capped at 8 .25%. Parents of dependent students are eligible to borrow under the Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students program (PLUS). The PLUS program is unsubsi dized , and interest payments become the responsibility of the borrower at the time of disbursement. The interest rate varies on the PLUS program, and is capped at 9%. 3. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)This is a need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a baccalau reate degree. Students must be eligible for a Federal Pell Grant to be considered forSEOG . 4 . Federal Perkins Loan-This need-based loan program , with an interest rate currently at 5%, is based at CU-Denver. No repayment of interest or principal is due until six or nine months (time period differs depending upon when student first received Perkins Loan) after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. 5. Federal College WorkStudy-Work-study is a need-based program that allows students to work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at non-profit agencies to help meet their educational costs. The State of Colorado funds the following programs : 1. Colorado Student Grant-A need-based grant for resident undergraduate students. 2 . Colorado Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership Grant-A need-based grant for resident under graduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor ' s degree. This grant is funded 50% by the federal government and 50% by the State of Colorado . 3. Colorado Graduat e Grant-Aneed-based grant for resident graduate students. 4 . Colorado WorkStudy-A program simi lar to the College Work-Study program but limited to resident undergraduate students . 5 . Governor's Opportunity S c holarshipA need-based grant program for first time resident freshmen who have a zero family contribution or whose parents earn less than $26,000. Scholarships Following is a list of the major scholar ships that are offered at CU-Denver. The following programs are funded by the General Assembly of the State of Colorado: 1 . Regents Scholars award is offered to qualified new freshmen and transfer students by the Office of Admissions . New students will automatically be considered for this program . 2 . Colorado Scholars award is for under graduate resident students who have a minimum cumulative grade-point average of at least 3 . 5 for a minimum of 12 CU credit hours. The deadline for applying is March 31. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for application procedures. 3 . Deans S c holars award is awarded by undergraduate deans ' offices. Contact appropriate dean's office for more information . The following programs are funded by CU-Denver : 1. Advantage Scholarship is for minority and/or first generation college stu dents who meet the specified income guidelines . Contact the Office of Financial Aid for applications . 2 . Nelson / Running Wolf Scholarship funds are available for needy Indian students. Contact the Office of American Indian Student Services , 303-556-2860, for more information. 3 . Ahlin Fund assistance is available for mobility-impaired students. Contact Student Retention 303-556-2324, for applications . Other scholarship information is available from the Office of Financial Aid the Auraria Library Scholarship Info Ban . in the reference section, and the Student Advocacy Center. Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment are listed in the Student Employment Office and The Career Center. Students who participate in the Pre-Collegiate Development Program are automaticall) consi dered for Challenge Scholarships. Graduate students should inquire about additional types of financial aid through their academic departments. Students should be aware that Emergency Stud en Loans are available through the Bursar ' s Office . American Indian students should request information about Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships from the Office of Financial Aid.

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Registration Students should re ew the sections f this catalog that des ribe in detail 1e academic program available at U-Denver. Undergraduate stud nts should contact 1eir school or college o arrange for an dvising appointment rior to registra on. Graduate stud en should contact 1eir respective gradu te program for ;sistance . A Schedule of is made available very semester prior to registration by 1e Office of Records Clfd Registration . U-Denver students register for courses I a the Student tion web page ;ee below) or throug the Voice esponse (VR) Regist ation system om any touch-tone t lephone. Specific t structions are inclu ed in the Sche dule FCourses. Students be sent an l vitation to Register that includes informati n and a registration me assignment. is by time ;signment only . Stuct.ents may register :or after their assigqed time. )nline Registra ion . nd Student lnllrmation CU-Denver student can register 1d obtain informati n regarding their records by ccessing a secure teat: http: / /hydra.c)Jsys.edu/pinnacle / shome I . dn . htm . THis site can also be t ached from the CU-Penver home page tttp: / / www . cudenv e r.edu /) by choosing legistration and Gr 1des " under >tudents. " A stud en number and identificati n number (PIN) e required to acces the registration student record op ions . Online registratio allows the student check the availabi ity of specific mrses prior to theit registration time td to search for avcviable courses by !partment , course \evel, or meeting ne. If registration i * a course is denied , e web registration ystem will specify e reason . Online p i yment is currently 1t available . Student informati n available online trrently includes: verification r change); n application status; tancial aid inform ion ; schedule by mester; grades by emester ; unofficial mscript ; account ?alance; and degree t dit (for some For security asons , none of the student information reens will display a student's name student number. 1 The CU-Denver catalog and Schedule of Courses, as well as additional information regarding programs, faculty , courses , and policies , are available at the CU-Denver home page: http :// www . cudenver . edu /. Definition of FullTime and Half-Time Status Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in the student's financial aid award letter. FALL AND SPRING: Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students: Full-time . . . . I2 or more semester hours Half-time . . . . . 6 or more semester hours Graduate degree students : Full-time : 5 or more hours 0 hours as candidate for degree I or more hours of thesis (not master ' s reports or thesis preparation ) Half-time : 3 or more hours SUMMER (TEN-WEEK TERM): Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students: Full-time . . . . . 8 or more semester hours Half-time . . . . . 4 or more semester hours Graduate students: Full-time : 3 or more hours 0 hours as candidate for degree I or more hours of thesis (not master ' s reports or thesis preparation) Half-time : 2 or more hours 3 or more hours of mixed-level classes Notes: Enrollment verification including fulltime / half-time attendance can be certified after the drop/add period. Hours for calculating full-time/half-time attendance do not include interinstitu tional hours , nor do they include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration . Registration I 29 Students receiving veterans benefits should contact the Veterans Affairs coor dinator for definition of full-time status for summer sessions . Individual exceptions to the minimum graduate course load levels are consid ered for financial aid purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the Office of Financial Aid. Add/Drop Specific add/ drop deadlines are an nounced in each semester ' s Schedule of Courses. I. Students may add courses to their original registration during the first I2 (eight in the summer) days of fullterm classes , provided there is space available. 2. Students may drop courses without approvals during the first I2 days of the fall or spring semester (the first eight days of the summer session). Tuition will not be charged . No record of the dropped course wiiJ appear on the student' s permanent record. 3 . After the 12th day of a fall or spring semester (eighth day of the summer session } , the instructor's signature is required for all drops. The instructor' s signature and dean's signature are required for all adds. No tuition adjustment will be made . 4 . After the tenth week of the fall and spring semesters (the fifth week for summer session) all schedule adjust ments require a petition and special approval from the dean's office. 5 . Dropping all courses after the 12th day (eighth in the summer) requires an official withdrawal from the term . No tuition refunds are available. Drop deadlines for module courses and intensive courses are published in the Schedule of Courses each term . Administrative Drop An administrative drop is implemented by University officials in the registrar's office or the dean's office. A student. may . be administratively dropped from one or more classes or withdrawn from all classes for any of the following reasons: 1. Failure to meet certain preconditions, including , but not limited to : a. Failure to pay tuition and fees by designated deadlines b. Class cancellations CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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30 / Our University, Our Campus c. Failure to meet course prerequisites 2. Whenever the safety of the student, faculty member, or other students in a course would be jeopardized. 3. Academic suspension, including, but not limited to, failure to attain or maintain a required grade-point average (GPA). 4. Disciplinary suspension for having been found to have violated the Student Code of Conduct. 5. Disruptive behavior determined by the chair and/or associate dean to be detrimental to the progress of the course and the education of other students. Auditing Courses To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the University or have outstanding financial obligations to the University. The Records Office does not keep any record of courses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where spe cial equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor. An auditor's card is issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor . Auditors, whether resident or nonresident , pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges, and are not eligible for other student services . For more information, contact the Bursar's Office. Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) may audit classes at no charge. Contact the Division of Enrollment and Student Affairs at 1250 14th Street , 303-556-8427. Correspondence Study Correspondence courses are offered by the CU-Boulder Division of Continuing Education . Applicability toward a degree program should be sought from the stu dent's degree advisor prior to registration. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 Course load/Restrictions In most cases, students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer session) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. Consult the individual college or school for specific guidelines as to course load restrictions. Credit By Examination Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver , have a grade-point average of at least 2 . 0 , and be currently registered. Contact the Records Office for instructions . A non refundable fee is charged. Students should contact their degree advising office to determine whether the credit will apply to their degree . No Credit Students may register for a course on a n<>-<:redit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college. Students enrolling for no credit are required to pay regular tuition . File the no-<:redit form in the Records Office before the end of the drop/ add period . Students who register for a course on a n<>-<:redit basis may not later decide that they want a letter grade . Pass/Fail Procedure I. Students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis (or to revert from pass /fail to graded status) may do so only during the drop / add period . 2 . Up to 16 semester hours of course work may be taken on a pass /fail basis and credited toward the bachelor ' s degree. Only 6 hours of course work may be taken pass/ fail in any given semester. [Note: Individual schools and colleges may have additional restrictions as to pass/fail credits . See the accompanying chart for an overview . ] 3 . lnstructors will not be informed of pass/fail registration . All students who register for a pass /fail appear on the regular class roster , and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor . When grades are received in the Records Office , those r egistrations with a pass /fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application syl! tem . Grades of D -and above convert to grades of P . Courses taken pass/fail will be included in hours toward graduation. Pass grades are not included in a student's grade-point average. An F grade in a course taken pass /fail will be included in the grade-point average . 4. Pass/fail registration records are maintained by the Records Office . 5 . Exceptions to the pass/fail regulations are permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education , the Extended Studies Programs , and Study Abroad Programs . 6 . Graduate degree students can exercise the P/F option for undergraduate courses only. A grade of Pwill not be acceptable for graduate credit to sat isfy any Graduate School requirement. 7 . Students who register for a course on a pass/fail basis may not later (after the drop/add period) decide to receive a letter grade . Please note : many other institutions will not accept a P grade for transfer crepit. Short Term Courses Courses are also offered in five-week modules, in special weekend courses , and in seminars . Students should contact the college/school for information on short term courses offered each semester. Other Registrations CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of Colorado cam puses concurrently must obtain permis sion from their school or college on their home campus . A student in a degree program registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if: I. The student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean or the Records Office. 2 . The course is a required course for the student's degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver. 3 . The student obtains approval from the academic dean . 4. There is space at the other (host) campus. 5 . The student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CU-Denver rates . 6 . The home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes. 7. The concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses . Students may not register for an independent study course through concurrent registration. Students may not take

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ourses pass/fail or for no credit through oncurrent registration . To drop a concurrent course during the ostcampus drop/add period, arrange the . rop at the home campus Records Office. o drop a course after the end f the host campus rop/add deadline, rop the course at t e host campus . ecords Office. 'IJTERI NSTITUTIONAL :EGISTRATION CU-Denver degree students may enroll 1 courses offered by the Community ollege of Denver and Red Rocks ommunity College . Students must be nrolled at CU-Denver for at least one ourse during the ter.m to be eligible to Registration : on a space availaqle basis.lnter lstitutional courses are evaluated >r transfer credit and are not included 1 a CU-Denver student's grade-point verage. OOLED COURSES AT tETROPOLITAN STATE :OLLEGE OF Certain courses in the College of Liberal rts and Sciences h'Jlve been pooled with l milar courses at Metropolitan State Col of Denver (MSCD). CU-Denver underr aduate students may register for any f the pooled courSEjS listed in the CU enver Schedule of Courses. Listed below r e restrictions that apply to the pooled Jurses : 1. CU-Denver graduate students are not eligible to register for MSCD pooled courses. 2 . MSCD courses will not be included in the University of Colorado grade-point average . MSCD courses will appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will count in the hours toward graduation . 3 . MSCD courses cannot be used to meet specific course requirements toward the major without prior written approval of the student's dean . 4. CU-Denver students who wish to take non-pooled MSCD classes must apply directly as a non-degree student to MSCD, and pay tuition and fees to MSCD. Non-pooled classes will not appear on the University of Colorado transcript and will not be used in determining course loads for financial aid eligibility . Students may request an MSCD transcript to be sent to CU-Denver at the end of the term to determine if credit can be transferred . 5 . MSCD common pool courses will not satisfy residence requirements at CU-Denver. The last 30 semester hours applied toward the baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence at CU-Denver. 6. CU-Denver students taking MSCD common pool courses are subject to the MSCD grading policy and student code of conduct . PASS/FAIL OPTION RFSTRICTIONS Core Curriculum co rses used to satisfy Intellectual Competencies can not be taken on pass /fail basis . College Business and Administration Engineering and Applied Science Liberal Arts and Sciences I General Only non-business electives may be taken pass /fail Required courses may not be taken pass/fail. Upper division humanities and social sciences electives are acceptable; otherwise, major department approval is required College requires a minimum of 30 semester hours of courses with Jetter grades. Courses used to satisfy major , minor , or foreign language carmot be taken on a pass/fail basis . Maximum Only 6 semester hours may be taken pass/fail A maximum of 16 credit hours may be taken pass /fail. Includes coursestakeninthe honors program No more than 6 hours pass /fail any semester . A maximum of 16 semester hours may be taken pass /fail. Withdrawal from the University Registration I 31 To withdraw from the University of Colorado at Denver, students must drop all courses for the semester . During the first twelve days of the semester (eight days for the summer) students must use either the telephone or web registration system to drop courses. Consult the Schedule of Courses for information on using the telephone registration system. Courses dropped during this period are not recorded on the student's permanent record . After the twelfth day of the semester (eighth day in the summer) , through the tenth week (seve nth week for summer), students must submit a withdrawal form with the instructor's approval. Courses dropped during this period will be recorded on the student's permanent record with a grade of " W' . Students seeking to withdraw after the tenth week (seventh week for summer) must petition the associate dean of their school or-college . A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the University will receive grades of "F' for all course work during that term . Deadlines for dropping module and intensive courses appear in the Schedule of Courses. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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UNIVERSITY OF COLORADC The fac ulty of the Colleges of Arts & Media, Business, Engineering and Liberal Arts establishe< curriculum to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual competencies i1 Furthermore, the core curriculum promotes an aware ness of cultural diversity. For details 01 INTEU.ECfUAL COMPETENCIES English Composition/ Mathematics Natural & Physical Sciences Oral Communication 1 CAMPUS CORE 9 semester hours from the 3 semester hours: 8 semester hours from the following courses : following courses: ENGL 102(}.3 Core Composition I Any math course except ANTH 13034Intro : Biological Anth and one of MATH 3040 or a passin g BIOL 15504 Basic Biology I ENGL 203(}.3 Core Composition II mark on the Math BIOL 15604 Basic Biology U ENGL 3154-3 Technical Writing Proficiency exam CHEM 14 74-4 Core Chemistry : ENGL 317(}.3 Business Writing Chemistry for the Consumer and one of the following: ENVS 10424 lntro to Environ Sci CMMU 2050-3 Bus/Profess Speaking GEOL 10724 Phys Geology I CMMU 2101-3 Present Speaking GEOL 10824 Phys Geol ogy U ENGL 203(}.3 Core Composition II PHYS 10004 Intro to Physics ENGL 2154-3 Intro Creative Writing PHYS 10524 Gen Astronomy I ENGL 3001-3 Critical Writing ENGL 3084-3 Adv Composition CMMU 312(}.3 Tech Comm ENGL 3154-3 Technical Writing ENGL 317(}.3 Business Writing ENGL 419(}.3 Rhetoric and Language PHIL 2441-3 Logic and Language : : COU.EGE OF ARTS SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAMEASCAMPUSCORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE 3 &MEDIA : COU.EGE OF BUSINESS 9 semester hours , as MATH 1070-3 SAME AS CAMPUS CORE follows: ENGL 1020-3 Core Composition I CMMU 205(}.3 Bus/Profess Spkng . ENGL 317(}.3 Business Writing I COU.EGEOF 9 semester hours , as Completed by fulfilling Completed by fulfilling major I ENGINEERING follows: major requirements requirements ENGL 1020-3 Core Composition I CMMU 2101-3 Present Speaking and either ENGL 3154-3 Technical Writing or ENGL 2030-3 Core Composition II or CMMU 312(}.3 Technical Comm i COU.EGEOFUBERAL SAME AS CAMPUS CORE l SAMEASCAMPUSCORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE2 I ARTS AND SCIENCES l I 1. All courses must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or higher. 2. CLAS students are exempt from the Knowledge Area Courses in the CU-Denver Core Curriculum defined by their major. 3 . An additional3 credit hours is required in these areas, as defined by the CAM Distributed Core . Contact an advisor for details . 4. Cultural Diversity courses are restr icted, requiring junior-level standing or the consent of the instructor prior to registration .

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AT DENVER CORE CURR ICU L U M a core curriculum for all undergraduate students. It is the objective of the CU-Denver core mathematics , reading, writing, oral communication , information literacy, and critical thinking. the core curri2ulum, students should contact their college advising office. Behavioral/Social Sciences 9 semester hours, as follows: One behavioral science course: ANTH 2102-3 &Human Experience CMMU 1011-3 Fund of Comm CMMU 1021-3 Fund/Mass Comm PSY 1000-3 Intro r o Psych I PSY 1005-3 Intro f o Psych II One social science course: ECON 2012-3 Macroeconomics ECON 2022-3 Microeconomics GEOG 1102-3 World Regional Geography GEOG 2202-3 Nar,ral Hazards P SC 1001-3 Intr
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34 /Our University , Our Campus Student Classification Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed: Freshman 0-29 hours Sophomore 30-59 hours Junior 60-89 hours Senior 90+ hours All transfer students will be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit accepted by the University of Colorado. Grading System and Policies The following grading system and poli cies have been standardized for all aca demic units of the University. GRADE SYMBOLS The instructor is responsible for what ever grade symbol (A, B , C, D, F, IF, Jw, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC, W, and***) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor . Pass/fail designations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically converted by the grade application system, as explained under Pass/Fail Procedure . Standard Grades A = superior/excellent A(-)= B(+)= Quality Points 4.0 3 . 7 B = good / better than average B(-)= 3 . 3 3.0 2.7 C(+ ) = C = competent / average C(-) = D(+)= D = mmtmum pa ss ing D(-)= F =failing 2 . 3 2 . 0 1.7 1.3 1 .0 0 . 7 0 . 0 Instructors may, at their discretion , use the PLUS/MINUS system , but are not required to do so. IFincomplete-changed to an F if not completed within one year . IW-incomplete-changed to a Wit not completed within one year. !P-in progress -thesis at the graduate level only. P/F-pass / faii-Pgrade is not included in the grade-point average; theFgrade is included ; up to 16 hours of pass /fail course work may be credited toward a bachelor 's degree. HIP IF -honors / pass / fail-intended for honors courses ; credit hours count toward the degree but are not included in the grade-point average. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 NC indicates registration on a no-<:redit basis . Windicates withdrawal without credit. ***indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades were processed . EXPLANATION OF IF AND IW An IF or !Wis an incomplete grade . Policies with respect to IF/ IW grades are available in the individual college and school dean ' s offices . Use of the IF or fW is at the option of the course instructor and/or the academic dean ' s office . An IF or !Wis given only when students, for reasons beyond their control , have been unable to complete course require ments. A substantial amount of work must have been satisfactorily completed before approval for such a grade is given . The instructor who assigns an IF or fW sets the conditions under which the course work can be completed and the time limit for its completion. The student is expected to complete the requirements by the established deadline and not retake the entire course. It is the instructor ' s and/or the student's decision whether a course should be retaken.lf a course is retaken , it must be completed on the Denver campus or in CU-Denver Extended Studies classes. The student must re-register for the course and pay the appropriate tuition. The final grade (earned by completing the course requirements or by retaking the course) does not result in deletion of the IF or fW from the transcript . A second entry is posted on the transcript to show the final grade for the course. At the end of one year, IF and fW grades for courses that are not completed or repeated are changed to an For w; respectively . Good Academic Standing Good academic standing requires a minimum grade-point average that is deter mined by the student's school or college. Grades earned at another institution are not used in calculating the grade-point average at the University of Colorado. Degree students should consult the academic standards section of their school or college for degree program requirements. Continuation as a non-degree student is contingent upon maintaining an overall grade-point average of 2.0 upon comple tion of 12 or more semester hours. Failure to maintain the required average will result in a non-degree student being suspended. The suspension is for an indefinite period of time and becomes part of the student' s permanent record at the University . While under suspension , enrollment at the University is restricted to summer terms or courses offered through Extended Studies. Non-degree students are not placed on academic probation prior to being suspended. GRADE-POINT AVERAGE The grade-point average (GPA) is compute d by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course. Total the hours, total the credit points , and divide the total points by the total hours. Grades of P, NC, .. "*, W, IP, Jw, and IF are not incl uded in the grade-point average. !Fs that are not completed within one year are calculated as Fin the GPA. If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade-point average. Grades received at another insti tution are not included in the University of Colorado GPA. Undergraduate , graduate, and non degree graduate GPAs are calculated separately . Enrollment in a second undergraduate or graduate program will not generate a second undergraduate or graduate GPA. Students should refer to their academic dean's office for individual grade-point average calculations as they relate to academic progress and graduation from their college or school. Grade Reports Grade reports are normally available within two weeks after the end of the semester. Grade reports are automatically mailed at the end of each semester to student's permanent mailing address. Grades posted to the computer can be obtained using the phone system or on the Student Information web page. See the Schedule of Courses or the Online Student Information section for more information. Mid-Term Grades Instructors will assign mid-term grades for certain populations of students . Students in academic difficulty may be

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contacted and about support services available to them. Please note: academic support services are available to all students the Center for Educational Opportunity Programs, NC 2012, 303-556-2d65; the Student Advocacy Center , NC 2012, 303-556-2546; or the Center for LEjarning Assistance , NC 2006, Originality of Work In all academic it is imperative that work be originjll, or explicit acknowl edgment be given f?r the use of other persons' ideas or language. Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedure appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breach s of academic honesty can result in discip l inary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulbory withdrawal from the University . Graduation Undergraduates. Students should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or to determine what requirements remain for graduation . Students intending to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their grad uation term. Students will not be officially certified to graduatr; until a final audit of the student's recortl has been completed approximately six weeks after the end of the term . After s dents have been certified to graduat , they must reapply to return to Graduates. Stud:rts must file an Application for and a Diploma Card with the Grad ate School Office on the Denver campu during the first week of their graduation erm . Check with the Graduate School fo more complete information. Students will not be officially certified to until a final audit of the student's recor
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36 / Our University , Our Campus of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. 4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of Colorado to comply with the require ments of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA are: Family Policy Compliance Office U . S . Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue , SW Washington , D .C. 20202-4605 The following items are designated "Directory Information, " and may be released at the discretion of the University of Colorado unless a student files a request to prevent their Name Address E-mail Address Telephone Number Dates of Attendance Registration Status Class Major Awards Honors Degrees conferred Past and present participation in officially recognized sports and non-<:urricular activities Physical factors (height , weight) of athletes Forms to prevent Disclosure of Directory Information can be obtained at the Student Service Center in North Classroom 1003. Questions regarding student rights under FERPA should be directed to the Records Office , 303-556-2389. Academic Honor Code and Discipline Policies ACADEMIC INTEGRITY A university ' s reputation is built on a standing tradition of excellence and scholastic integrity. As members of the University of Colorado at Denver aca demic community, faculty and students accept the responsibility to maintain the highest standards of intellectual honesty and ethical conduct in completing all forms of academic work at the University . FORMS OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY Students are expected to know, understand , and comply with the ethical standards of the University . In addition , students have an obligation to inform CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 the appropriate official of any acts of academic dishonesty by other students of the University. Academic dishonesty is defined as a student' s use of unauthorized assistance with intent to deceive an instructor or other such person who may be assigned to evaluate the student' s work in meeting course and degree requirements . Examples of academic dishonesty include , but are not limited to, the following : A. Plagiarism Plagiarism is the use of another per son's distinctive ideas or words without acknowledgement. The incorporation of another person's work into one ' s own requires appropriate identification and acknowledgement, regardless of the means of appropriation. The following are considered to be forms of plagiarism when the source is not noted: 1. Word-for-word copying of another person ' s ideas or words 2. The mosaic (the interspersing of one's own words here and there while, in essence , copying another ' s work ) 3 . The paraphrase (the rewriting of another's work , yet still using their fundamental idea or theory) 4. Fabrication (inventing or counterfeiting sources) 5 . Submission of another ' s work as one ' s own 6. Neglecting quotation marks on material that is otherwise acknowledged Acknowledgement is not necessary when the material used is common knowledge . B. Cheating Cheating involves the possession , communication , or use of information , materials , notes, study aids , or other devices not authorized by the instructor in any academic exercise , or communica tion with another person during such an exercise. Examples of cheating are: 1. Copying from another ' s paper or receiving unauthorized assistance from another during an academic exercise or in the submission of academic material 2. Using a calculator when its use has been disallowed 3 . Collaborating with another student or students during an academic exercise without the consent of the instructor C. Fabrication and Falsification Fabrication involves inventing or counterfeiting information, i.e., creating results not obtained in a study or laboratory experiment. Falsification, on the other hand , involves the deliberate alter ation or changing of results to suit one's needs in an experiment or other academic exercise. D. Multiple Submission This is the submission of academic work for which academic credit has already been earned , when such sub mission is made without instructor authorization . E. Misuse of Academic Materials The misuse of academic materials includes , but is not limited to, the following : 1. Stealing or destroying library or refer ence materials or computer programs 2 . Stealing or destroying another student's notes or materials , or having such materials in one's possession without the owner's permission 3 . Receiving assistance in locating or using sources of information in an assignment when such assistance has been forbidden by the instructor 4. Illegitimate possession , disposition , or use of examinations or answer keys to examinations 5. Unauthorized alteration , forgery , or falsification of academic records 6 . Unauthorized sale or purchase of examinations, papers , or assignments F. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty Complicity involves knowingly con tributing to another ' s acts of academic dishonesty . PROCEDURES IN CASES OF SUSPECTED ACADEMIC DISHONESTY All matters of academic policy , includ ing academic dishonesty , are under the jurisdiction of each of the University ' s schools and colleges pursuant to Article IX2. B and Article VI.C of the Laws of the Regents. Accordingly , each school and college has established procedures for addressing matters of academic dishon esty and for determining the severity and consequences of each infraction. Students should contact their school or college for standards and/or procedures specific to their school or college. As a general rule , all school and college procedures contain the following requirements and provisions : A. Faculty , staff members , or students may submit charges of academic dishonesty

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against students. A student who has evi dence that anOther student is guilty of academic disHonesty should inform the instructor the dean of the college o f the charge in 'friting. B. A fac u lty member who has evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty should confront the student w ith the eviden q e . In cases of academic di s honesty, the member has the a u thority to the student appr opriately , w!hich could include the issuance of a failing grade (F). If the fa culty member elects to reprimand the student for dishonesty b y issu ing a failing grade , the faculty member shall submit a written report to the dean of the appropriate college wit hi n five ( 5) working days . The report shal l in clude , b J t is not limited to , the t ime, place , nature of the offense( s ), t h e name(s) oftlae accused , the name ( s ) of the accuser(s} , and witnesses (if any). If the faculty member feels that h e r /his reprimand is an insufficient sanc ti on for a case of aca d e m ic d i shonesty, the faculty member may recommend to the dean of the Inclusiveness and Non-Discrimination T h e University of Colorado at Denver is committed to enhancing the inclusive n e s s of its work fo e and its student b o dy. among students, fac ulty, staff , and a ministrators is e s sential to educa ional excellence and to a ccomplishing U Denver' s urban missi o n . lnclusivertess among faculty , s taf f , and administrators provides role mod e l s and mento s for students, who will become lead ens in academe and in t h e l arger society , ensures that a broad array of experiences and world view s inform and teaching, research, service, rd decision making iit CU-D enver. CU-D e nver empl ys, retains , and advan ces in qualified appli cants and and admits , retains , and a d vances in education qualified appli c an t s and regardless of their race, color, rtjligion , national origin , gende r , age , disabi ity , or veteran status. CU-De nver does n t discriminate on the basis o f race, colo religion , national o rigin , gender, age disability , or veteran status and compli s with all local, state, appropriate college that further action betaken. C . In cases where the faculty member has recommended further action in a case of academic dishonesty, the dean or a designated committee shall sched ule a disciplinary hearing as soon as possible . The student( s ) accused of academic dishonesty shall be notified in writing of the specific charge(s) . The student( s ) also has (have ) the right to have a representative present for advice , and to be present during the proceedings . The student( s ) must notify the dean of the appropriate college five ( 5) working days before the hearing of the intent to have legal counsel present at the hearing . D . The dean or the designated committee may take any of t h e following actions : • Place the student( s ) on disciplinary probation for a spe cified period of time • Suspension of registration at CU Denver , including Extended Studies , for a specified period of time and federal laws and regulations related to education , employment , and contracting. For further information, contact the Office of Academic and Student Affairs , CU-Denver Bldg. , Suite 700; 303-556-2550 , TTY 303-556-Q204, Fax 303-556-5855 ; e-mail : marylou.fenili @cudenver.edu. Program Access for Persons with Disabilities The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing reasonable accommodation and access to programs and services to persons with disabilities . Students should contact the Disability Services Office , Arts Building 177; 303-556-8387 , TTY 303-556-8484. Any other person requiring accommodation in order to access programs and services of the University of Colorado at Denver , either on or off the campus, should request accommodation from the individ ual or office responsible for providing the program or service . This request should be made in a timely fashion to allow the individual or office adequate opportunity to provide reasonable accommodation . The time frame for notification will vary according to the circumstances and the nature of the accommodation . For University Policies I 37 • Expulsion : No opportunity to return to the school or college in which the infraction occurred • Take no further action against the accused student( s) A record of the action taken shall be kept in the committee ' s confidential fil e and a copy sent to the Registrar E . In al l cases, the studen t(s) shall be notified of the dean's or committee's decision w i thin seven (7) working days. F. If a student wishes to appeal a case, the student should request the procedures for doing so from his or her school or college . G. Students who are taking courses at the University of Colorado at Denver, but are enrolled at one of the other educa tional institutions on the Auraria campus and are charged with academic dishonesty, are subject to the same procedures and sanctions outlined above. SUMMARY Questions regarding academic in t egrity shoul d be directed to the dean's office of the college or school in which the student is enrolled . further information or for assistance , contact the Om buds Office , CU-Denver Building, Suite 700; 303-556-4493, TTY 303-556-Q204, Fax 303-556-5855 ; e-mail: ombuds@carbon .cude nver .edu. University Policy on Sexual Harassment The University of Colorado is comm i tted to fostering a positive learning , working, and living environment. The University will not condone sexual harassment or related retaliation of or by any employee or stu dent. I. Sexual Harassment Policy A . Sexual harassment and related retaliation are prohibited . 1 . For the purposes of this Policy, sexual harassment means unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when: (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual ' s employment , living conditions , and /or educational evaluat ion; (2) submission to or rejec t ion CU-De nver Catalog 2001-02

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38 / Our University, Our Campus of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for tangible employment or epucational decisions affecting such individual ; or (3) such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual ' s work or academic performance or creating an intimidating , hostile , or offen sive working or educational environment. Hostile environment sexual harassment , described in sub part (3) above, is unwelcome sexual conduct that is suffi ciently severe or pervasive that it alters the conditions of educa tion or employment and creates an environment that a reason able person would find intimi dating , hostile , or offensive . The determination of whether an environment is " hostile" must be based on all of the circumstances . These circum stances could include the frequency of the condu c t , its severity , and whether it is threatening or humiliating . Examples of Policy violations include: a professor offers a higher grade to a student if the student submits to the professor ' s sexual advances; a supervisor implicitly or explicitly threatens t e rmination if a subordinate refuses the supervisor' s sexual advances ; and repeated and unwelcome physical touching or severe and pervasive comments of a sexual nature that create an intimidating and offensive work or classroom environment. 2 . For the purposes of this Policy , retaliation means adverse actions against individuals because they have , in good faith , reported instances of sexual harassment or participated in or have been witnesses in any procedure to redress a complaint of sexual harassment. Examples include: an employee who makes a report under this Policy about a supervisor's behavior is given an unsatisfactory performance review by that supervisor that is inconsistent with the employee's actual performance ; a student is noti fied of a report under this Policy made by another student and CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 subsequently sends threat e ning messages to the student who made the report . B . Making false complaints or provid ing false information regardin g a complaint is prohibited . It is a violation of this Policy for anyone to make an intentionally false accusation of sexual harass ment or related retaliation or to provide intentionally false informa tion r e garding a complaint. C. Individuals who violate this Policy will be disciplined or subjected to corrective action , up to and including termination or expulsion . II. Obligation to Report A General Obligation to Report In order to take appropriate corre ctive action , the University must be aware of sexual harass ment or related retaliation . There for e, anyone who believes that s /he has experienced or witnessed sex ual harassment or related retalia tion should promptly report such behavior to a campus sexual harassment officer (see end of this section) or any supervisor (see part B below ). B. Supervisor ' s Obligation to Report Any supervisor who experien c es , wit nesses, or rece i ves a written or oral report or complaint of sexual harassment or related retaliation shall report it to a campus sexual haras s ment officer . This section of the Policy does not obligate a supe rvisor who is required by the supervisor's profession and University responsibilities to keep c e rtain c ommun ic ations confiden tial ( e . g., a professional counselor or ombudsperson) to report responsibilities . Each campus shall designate in its campus appendi x to this Policy the supervisory positions that qualify und e r this exception . III. Procedures A Reports or complaints under this Polic y will be addressed and resolved as promptly as practicable after the complaint or report is made. It is the responsibility orthe sexual harassment officer(s) to determine the most appropriate means for addressi ng the report or complaint. Options include ( 1 ) investigating the report or complaint in accordance with paragraph C below , ( 2) with the agreement of the parties, attempt ing to resolve the report or complaint through a form of alternative dispute resolution ( e . g., mediation) , or (3) determining that the facts of the complaint or report, even if true, would not constitute a violation of this Policy. The campus sexual harassment officer(s) may designate another individual (either from within the University , including an administrator , or from outside the University ) to conduct the investigation or to manage an alternative dispute resolution pro cess. Anyone designated to address an allegation must adhere to the requirements of this Policy and confer with the sexual harassment officer(s) about his or her progress . B . All reports or complaints shall be made as promptly as feasible after the occurrence. (A delay in report ing may be reasonable under some circumstances, as determined on a case-by-case basis. An unreason able delay in reporting , however , is an appropriate consideration in evaluating the merits of a complaint or report.) C . If an investigation is conducted, the alleged victim and the respondent shall have the right to: 1 . At the commencement of the investigation , receive written notice of the report or com plaint , including a statement of the allegations ; 2 . Present relevant information to the investigator ( s) ; and 3. Receive , at the conclusion of the investigation , a copy of the investigator ' s report, to the extent permitted by law . D. At the conclusion of an investiga tion , the investigator shall prepare a written report which shall include a statement of factual findings , and a determination of whether this Policy has been violated. The report will be presented for review to the person or committee desig nated by the Chancellor, or, in the case of System Administration, the President. E . The reviewing person or committee may consult with the investigator , consult with the parties , request that further investigation be done by the same or another investiga tor , or request that the investiga tion be conducted again by another investigator . The reviewing person or committee may adopt the investigator ' s report as his/its own or may prepare a separate

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report on the findings of the investigation. The reviewin g person or committee may not , however , conduct its own investiga tion or hearing. Once the reviewing person or committee has completed its review , the r eport( s ) shall be sent to the campus sexual harassment officer (s ), the alleged victim , and the respondent , to the extent permitted by law . Th e report shall also be sent to the Chancellor , or, in the case of System Adminis tration, to President. If a chan cellor is the respondent or alleged victim , the report shall be sent to the If the President or the Secretary of the Board of Regents is the respondent or alleged victim , the report shall be sent to the Board of Regents . F. If a Policy vi9lation is found , the report( s ) shall be sent to the disci plinary authority for the individual found to have violated the Policy , and the disciplinary authority must initiate formhl action against that individual . The disciplinary author ity may have access to the records of the investigation. G . When formal action is initiated against an individual found to have violated the Policy , the sexual harassment _efficer shall ensure that the victim is appropriately advised of the resolution of that action . J H . A report of the action taken against an individual for violation of this Policy shallllie retained perma nently in the! individual ' s personnel file or educational file. Other investigation records shall be maintained f p r a minimum of three (3) years orrr as long as any administrati e or legal action aris ing out of th . complaint is pending . I. All records d f sexual harassment reports and mvestigations shall be considered aonfidential and shall not be disclosed publicly except to the required by law . J. Complaints Involving Two or More Campuses : an alleged Policy violation inv lves more than one campus, the complaint shall be handled by the campus with over the respondent. he campus respon sible for the nvestigation may request the i volvement or cooper ation of any ther affected campus and should dvise appropriate officials oft e affected campus of the progress and results of the investigation. K. Complaints By and Against Univer sity Employees and Students Arising in an Affiliated Entity: University employees and students sometimes work or study at the work site or program of another organization affiliated with the University . When a Policy violation is alleged by or against University employees or students in those ci r cumstances, the complaint shall be hand l e d as provided in the affiliation agreement between the University and the other entity. in the absence of an affiliation agree mentor a provision addressing this issue, the University may, at its discretion , choose to (1) conduct its own investigation , (2) conduct a joint investigation with the affiliated entity, (3) defer to the findings of an investigation by the affiliated entity where the University has reviewed the investi gation process and is satisfied that it was fairly conducted , or ( 4 ) use the investigation and findings of the affiliated entity as a basis for further investigation . IV. No Limitation on Existing Authority No provision of this Policy shall be construed as a limitation on the authority of a disciplinary authority under applicable policies and proce dures to initiate disciplinary action . If an individual is disciplined for conduct that also violates this Policy , the conduct and the discipline imposed shall be reported to a campus sexual harassment officer. If an investigation is conducted under this Policy and no policy violation is found , that fact does not prevent discipline of the alleged perpetrator for unprofessional conduct under o t her applicable policies and procedures . V. Information and Education A. The President ' s office shall provide an armual report documenting: 1. the number of reports or complaints of Policy violations; 2 . the categories (i.e. , student, employee, or other) and genders of the parties involved; 3. the number of Policy violations found; and 4. examples of sanctions imposed for Policy violations . B . Each campus shall broadly disseminate this Policy , distribute a list of resources available on the University Policies I 39 campus to respond to concerns of sexual harassment and related retaliation , and develop and pre sent appropriate educational pro grams. Each campus shall maintain informatien about these efforts, including a record of how the Policy is distributed and the names of individuals attending training programs. VI. Related Policies A. Administrative Policy Statement " University Policy on Amorous Relationships I nvo l ving Evaluative Authority" provides that an amorous relationship between an employee and a student or between two employees constitutes a conflict of interest when one of the individuals has direct evaluative authority over the other and requires that the direct evaluative authority must be eliminated. B . For related complaint , grievance , or disciplinary processes , refer to Ar t icle II, 3, B . 7 of the Rules of the Faculty Senate ( for faculty) , State Personnel Board Rules (for classified employees) , and campus student disciplinary policies and procedures ( for students) . VII. Review of the University Policy The President shall initiate a review of this Policy within two years . For further information , contact the Sexual Harassment Officer, CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 700; 303-556-4493, T1Y 303-556-6204, Fax 303-556-5585; e-mail : marylou.fenili@cudenver . edu Drugs and Alcohol Policy The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing a drug-free edu cational environment and drug-free workplace . This policy statement on drugs and alcohol is designed to ensure that the University of Colorado at Denver complies with the Federal Drug-Free Work place Act of 1988 and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amend ments of 1989. These Acts require the University , as a recipient of federal funds, to take measures to combat the abuse of drugs and alcohol. The continuation of federal financial support for students academic program s , and academic support services p r ograms , is based upon compliance w ith these statutes and their regulations. The University of Colorado at Denver prohibits the unlawful manufacture , distribution, dispensation , possession , CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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40 / Our University, Our Campus or use of any controlled substance ( illicit drugs of any kind or amount) and the abuse of alcohol by students and employ ees on University property or as part of any of its activities . This prohibition covers any individual's actions which are part of any University activities , including those occurring while on University property or in the conduct of University business away from the campus . It is a violation of University policy for any member of the faculty , staff , or student body to jeopardize the operation or interest of the University of Colorado at Denver through the use of alcohol or drugs.lndividuals found to be in violation are subject to legal sanctions under local , state or federal law and to disciplinary action consistent with the Code of Student Conduct , the Faculty Handbook (2000 online ), and the State Personnel System . Sanctions to be imposed on employees who are found to be in violation of this policy may include requiring satisfactory participation in a substance abuse treat ment , counseling , or education program as a condition of continued employment , suspension or termination of employ ment , and referral for prosecution . The Office of University Counsel has prepared a description of local , state, and federal laws concerning drugs and alcohol. This information is available on the Web at: chr.cudenver.edu/html/ legal_sanctions.html A copy of the Chancellor ' s policy statement is available on the Web at: chr.cudenver.edufhtml/ chancellorspolicy.html All faculty , staff and students employed at the University acknowledge that they will, as a condition of their employment , abide by the terms of this policy . Any employee convicted of a violation of any criminal drug law occurring in the workplace must report that conviction to his/her immediate supervisor within five days. The Drug-Free Workplace Act makes strict compliance with this policy statement a condition of employment on all federal grants and contracts . The University is required to notify the rel evant funding agency within 10 days of learning that a violation of this policy has occurred. Students and University employees can learn about the dangers of substance and alcohol abuse and obtain more detailed information about treatment and counseling options available to the University community through the Web at: CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 www. cudenver . edu j public / abusepreventionresources.html University employees can also contact the Center for Human Resources , CU Denver Building , Suite 830, 303-556-2868, for more information regarding available resources , programs and services . CU-Denver students c an contact the C ounseling and Family Therapy Center at 303-556-4372, North Classroom 4036 , or the Student Health Center at 303-556-3132, for confidential information and /or refer rals . Information also can be obtained by calling the National institute on Drug Abuse Hotline at 1-800-662-HELP or the National Clearinghous e for Alcohol and Drug Information at 1 -301-468-2600. Code of Student Conduct (Student Rights and Responsibilities and Procedures for Disciplinary Review and Action) STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR WHICH ACTION MAY BE TAKEN IF A VIOLATION OCCURS All persons on University property are required , for reasonable cause , to identify themselves when requested by University or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers , the University reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to University per sonnel or property and those who inter fere with its function as an educational institution . All persons on CU-Denver / Auraria property who are not students or employees of the University are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applicable to Univer sity students and to abide by University policies and campus regulations . The behaviors outlined below will not be tolerated , because they threaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the University and the per sonal rights and freedoms of its members. 1. Intentional obstruction , disruption , or interferenc e with teaching , research , disciplinary proceedings , or other University activities , including its public service and administrative functions or authorized activities on the CU-Denver / Auraria premises . 2 . Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students , school officials , employees , and invited guests to all fac ilities of the CU Denver / Auraria campus . 3 . Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CUDenver / Auraria Higher Education Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the University, or con duct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person . 4. Verbal or physical harassment and /or hazing in all forms , which includes , but is not limited to, striking , laying hands upon, threatening with violence , or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure; or other treatment of a tyrannical , abusive , shameful , insulting , or humiliating nature. (This includes , but is not limited to, demeaning behavior of an ethnic , sexist , or racist nature , unwanted sexual advances , or intimidations.) 5 . Prohibited entry to or use of CU Denver / Auraria facilities , defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU-Den ver/Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimen tal to the University . 6 . Forgery , fraud (to include computer fraud) , falsification , alteration , or use of University documents , records, or instruments of identification with intent to gain any unentitled advantage . 7 . Theft or damage to CUDenver / Auraria property and the private property of students , University officials , employ ees , and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denver / Auraria buildings or facili ties. This includes the possession of known stolen property . 8 . Possession of firearms , explosives , or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus . This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the University , or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee. (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, firearms , explosives , BB guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles , Bowie knives , daggers or similar knives , or switchblades . A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm , explosive , or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on another person is expressly included within the meaning of the terms firearms , explo sive, or dangerous weapon.)

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9. Sale, distribution , use, possession , or manufacture of illegal drugs within or on the grounds , buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus. lO. Physical restriction , coercion, or harassment of any person ; significant theft; sale/manufacture of illegal drugs (includes possession of a sufficient quantity with intent to sell); damage, theft, or unauthorized possession of University property; or forgery, falsifi cation, alteration, or use of University documents, records, or instruments of identification to gain any unentitled advantage . UNIVERSITY AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS As a member of the University commu nity, you are held not only for upholding civil and criminal laws, but University standards as well. Enrollment does not confer either immunity or spe cial consideration with reference to civil and criminal laws . Disciplinary action by the University will not be subject to chal lenge or postponement on the grounds that criminal charges ' involving the same incident have been dismissed , reduced, or are pending in clvil or criminal court . In addition, the University reserves the right to pursue disciplinary action if a stu dent violates a standard and withdraws from the University before administrative action is final. USE OF PROPERTY OR FACILITIES Nothing in this ode of Conduct shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the v icing of concerns or grievances. The UJ?iversity is dedicated to the pursuit of krlowledge through a free exchange of ideas , and this shall be a cardinal principle in the determination of whether or not a proposed use of University facilities is appropriate . The Auraria Higher Education Center has established regulations and procedures goven ; ting the use of CU Denver /Auraria grbunds, buildings, and other facilities. Such regulations are designed to preve t interference with University functio s and activities . Except where oth rwise specifically authorized , or wh n members of the public are invited, he use of CU-Denver/ Auraria facilities s all be limited to faculty , staff , and students of the CU-Denver / Auraria campus , d to organizations having chapters, I cal groups, or other recognized Univer?ity-connected repre sentation among faculty, staff , or students of the three academic institutions on the Auraria campus. CLASSROOM CONDUCT Students are expected to conduct themselves appropriately in classroom situations. If disruptive behavior occurs in a classroom , an instructor has the authority to ask the disruptive student to leave the classroom. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist , the instructor should report the matter to Auraria Public Safety and/or the appropriate Dean ' s office . The appropri ate Dean or his /her representative may dismiss a student from a particular class for disruptive behavior , while the Student Discipline Committee may recommend to the Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs to withdraw, suspend, permanently expel , and /or permanently exclude the student from the campus . Appeal questions concerning disruptive behavior should be directed to the Academic Dean ' s office when withdrawal from a class is involved, and to the Director of Student Life when suspension or expulsion from the University is involved . NON-ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE POLICIES Violations of Standards of Conduct should be reported to the Director of Student Life during working hours . Auraria Public Safety should be contacted during non-duty hours. If a violation occurs on campus and it is not in a specific building , Auraria Public Safety and/or the Director of Student Life should be contacted. If emergency help is needed when on campus , contact Auraria Public Safety; for help off campus, contact the Denver Police . Actions available to campus officials include , but are not limited to: asking those involved in inappropriate behavior to cease and desist ; requesting offender(s) to leave the Auraria campus; denying or restricting use of facilities or services; calli ng Auraria Public Safety for assistance; billing offender(s) for any physical damages; pressing civil charges; and referring student(s) to the Director of Student Life. STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES When one of the ten Standards of Conduct listed in this code is violated , the student may be referred to the Director of Student Life. Any person may refer a University Policies I 41 student or student group suspected of violating this code to the Director of Student Life. Persons making such referrals will be asked to provide information pertinent to the case. The Director of Student Life will make a determination as to the seriousness of the case. This will be done in most situations by asking the student(s) involved in the case to come in for an administrative interview to determine what actions, if any, will be taken by the University . Students will be notified in writing of the results of such administrative reviews . The Director of Student Life has the authority to: 1 . Dismiss the case. 2 . Take no further action other than talking with the accused student(s). 3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student's behavior has been inappropriate , and any further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action ). 4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University. 5 . Refer cases to the Student Discipline Committee when the above sanctions are determined to be inadequate . 6. Take other actions , including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violator(s ) provide(s) compensation for theft or damage , and /or placing stops on registration . STUDENT DISCIPLINE COMMITIEE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Disciplinary proceedings shall be conducted as administrative proceedings and not as judicial proceedings . The University is not a part of the judicial branch of state government. The University has authority to promulgate and enforce internal rules of behavior that shall be administered in a fair and impartial manner in harmony with its educational objectives and administrative nature. As part of the administrative nature of the committee's proceedings, fundamental rules of fairness will be followed. Copies of these procedures are available in the Office of Student Life. This committee, composed of students, faculty , and staff members , makes the decision whether students charged with violations of the student conduct code may continue to attend the University of Colorado at Denver . The Student Discipline Committee has the authority to: 1. Dismiss the case. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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42 / Our University, Our Campus 2. Take no action other than talking with the accused student. 3. Issue a University warning (a statement that a student's behavior has been inappropriate , and further violation of University rules will result in stronger disciplinary action) . 4. Place the student on disciplinary probation , a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the University . 5. Recommend suspension of a student from the University for disciplinary reasons. This suspension may be for various lengths of time ranging from one semester to an indefinite period of time. After the period of disciplinary suspension has expired, a student may apply in writing to have the notation on the student's record removed . 6 . Recommend expulsion of a student from the University ; notation on the student's record will be kept perma nently. When a student is suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons, an additional sanction may include being excluded from the Auraria campus. 7. Take other actions , including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violator(s) provide(s) compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration. Student(s) must be notified in writing of the disciplinary action taken within five (5) days. REVIEW PROCEDURES A student may submit a request to review the recommendation of suspen sion or expulsion by the Student Disci pline Committee within seven (7) working days to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs. Except in cases involving the exercise of the power of summary suspension (see below ), the sanctions of suspension or expulsion for disciplinary reasons shall be effective only after the administrative review by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs has been exhausted or waived. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs deci sion shall be in writing to the student( s ), with a copy to the Student Discipline Committee. Copies of review procedures may be obtained from the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs. SUMMARY SUSPENSION Summary suspension is a suspension from the University which begins immedi ately upon notice from the appropriate University official without a formal hearCU-Den ver Catalog 2001-02 ing by the Student Discipline Committee. A hearing before the Student Discipline Committee is then scheduled as soon as possible (usually within seven calendar days) to determine the disposition of the case. Summary suspension may also include a physical exclusion from the campus if deemed necessary. The Chancellor and/or a Vice Chan cellor or Associate Vice Chancellor has (have) the authority to suspend summarily any student when in their opinion(s) such suspension is necessary to: 1. Maintain order on the campus. 2 . Preserve the orderly functioning of the University. 3 . Stop interference in any manner with the public or private rights of citizens on CU-Denver I Auraria-owned or -controlled property. 4. Stop actions that are threatening to the health or safety of any person. 5. Stop actions that are destroying or damaging property of the CU-Denver I Auraria campus, its students, faculty , staff , or guests . PERMANENT RECORD NOTATIONS While disciplinary proceedings are pending or contemplated, a temporary hold may be placed on the student's academic record . It will not be released until all actions and appeal procedures have been completed or finalized by the University. Only in those cases where suspension, deferred suspension, or permanent expulsion results from disciplinary action will notations be placed on the academic record . RELEASE OF DISCIPLINARY INFORMATION Access to any student' s academic transcript or disciplinary file shall be governed by provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 197 4. Only the student charged or those University officials who have a legitimate educational interest in disciplinary information may have access to the files . All other inquiries , including but not limited to employers, governmental agencies, news media, friends, or Denver Police, must have a written release from the student to gain access to University disciplinary files . Every effort will be made by the University to respect the privacy of the student. However, where the identity of the student has been publicly disclosed in the news media , the University reserves the right to respond as it deems appropri-ate to describe fairly and accurately the disposition of disciplinary matters. REFUND POLICY AFTER DISCIPLINARY ACTION Submission of registration materials obligates the student to pay the assessed tuition and fees for that term. If a student is suspended or expelled from the Univer sity , the amount of tuition/fees which would be refunded may be the same as when a student voluntarily withdraws from a term. See the Tuition and Fees section of this catalog or the Schedule of Courses for more information . The official withdrawal date applicable for tuition/fee refund purposes will be the date of the Student Discipline Commit tee' s decision . TRI -INSTITUTIONAL VIOLATIONS Procedures in deciding violations of the Code of Student Conduct involving stu dents from other academic institutions on the Auraria campus have been developed by CU-Denver and the institution(s) involved. In such cases, the Director of Student Life should be contacted. Ethical Use of Computing at CU-Denver POLICY STATEMENT CU-Denver honors the University-wide Information Technology Policies. Access to and use of CU-Denver's computing resources is a privilege granted to members of the CU-Denver community for scholarly , research, academic, and administrative purposes. Computing resources are defined as facilities, equipmen t , systems, and personnel. Use of these resources includes World Wide Web pages , listservs , email , application software, and any other electronic com munication. Members of the CU-Denver community who use computing resources are expected to do so in an effective, efficient, appropriate, ethical, and legal manner. Use of CU-Denver's computing resources depends upon mutual respect and cooperation to ensure that all mem bers of the CU-Denver community have equal access, privileges , privacy, and pro tection from interference and harassment. CU-Denver computing resources shall be used in a manner consistent with the instructional , research, and administra tive objectives of the academic commu nity in general and with the purpose for which such use of resources and facilities is intended. All activities inconsistent

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with these are considered to be inappropriate arid may jeopardize continued use of C -Denver ' s computing resources . CU-Denver ting resources are for the use of authoriz d individuals only and for use only in a manner consistent with each individual ' s authority . CO-Denver's computing resources may not be used in any manner inconsjstent with an individ ual's authority, prohibited by licenses , contracts , Univers 'ty policies, or local , state, or federalla"r. No one may g rant permission for use of computing resources , nor does the ability to perform inappropriate actions constitute permission to do so. Each user of CU-Denver computing resources is responsible for knowing and complying with all applicable laws , poli cies, and procedurbs . CU-Denver reserves the right to monitor, record, and store computing activities of anyone using computing resour ses .lf such monitoring , recording , and storage reveals possible evidence of inappropriate, unethical , or illegal activity , computing system person nel may provide the evidence obtained from monitoring to1 appropriate university and civic authorities . A. Each user agrees to make appropriate use of computing resources including, but not limited to : 1. Respecting the intended purposes of computing resources, facilities, and (for scholarly, research, acapemic, administrative and CO-Denver-sponsored commu nity service purposes) . 2. Respecting tqe stated purpqse of computer acqounts (for scholarly , research, acapemic, administrative, and CO-Denver-sponsored commu nity service and to use computer accounts only for the specified purposes. 3. Respecting the dignity and privacy of other users . 4. Respecting integrity of the systems . 5. Respecting the resource controls of the and managing appropriately use of disk space. 6. Respecting tl}e privileges associated with having n'etwork connectivity. 7. Respecting t e copyright protection of licensed software and docume tation . 8. Following all University of Colorado and CU-Denvkr policies, and local, state, and Federal laws related to computing . B. Each user agrees to refrain from inappropriate uses of computing resources , including, but not limited to: 1 . Using any other individual ' s computer account or password. 2. Inappropriate , unethical , or illegal use of another individual's computer . 3 . Using computing resources, facilities , and equipment for personal commercial gain. 4. Intentionally seeking information on, obtaining copies of, modifying , or tampering with files, tapes, . passwords , or any type of data belonging to other users unless specifically authorized to do so by those other users. 5. Using resources to develop or execute programs that could harass other users, infiltrate the systems, damage or alter the software components of the systems, or disrupt CU-Denver activities. 6. Violating any network-related policy , whether set by the University of Colorado, CU-Denver, or a network governing body. 7. Altering or avoiding accounting for the use of computing resources , facilities , and equipment. 8 . Making excessive use of resources , controlled or otherwise . 9 . Misrepresenting oneself or others through e-mail or other electronic communication . 10. Using , duplicating , or distributing licensed software and documenta tion without the express written permission of the original copyright owner. 11. Using unauthorized copies of licensed software. 12. Abusing , harassing , intimidating , threatening , stalking, or discriminat ing against others through the use of computing resources . 13.Sending obscene, abusive, harassing , or threatening messages to any other individual. 14. Engaging in vandalism or mischief that incapacitates, compromises, or destroys CU-Denver resources . WORLD WIDE WEB POLICY Access to the World Wide Web (WWW) and the ability to create web pages on CO Denver computing systems are privileges provided to members of the CU-Denver community . CU-Denver users must con duct their activities in a courteous and professional manner . University Policies I 43 I. Servers Computing, Information , and Network Services (CINS) supports and maintains designated WWW servers for general campus usage. All web servers connected to the Internet through CU-Denver net working are to be registered with the CU-Denver Web master , webmaster@ carbon.cudenver . edu . This includes all web servers located outside of the CINS department. The WWW Policy applies to all web servers using CU-Denver as the Internet Service Provider (ISP). II. Individual WWW Pages Appropriate use policies for CU-Denver computer accounts also apply to individ ual home pages . Individuals who create home pages are responsible for adhering to the following guidelines : A. Individual home pages are encouraged for the following purposes: 1. Presenting personal non-<:ommercial information (resumes, family , etc.). 2 . Experimenting with available Web technologies and authoring tools. 3 . Publishing and disseminating academic work . 4. Linking to cultural, scientific , or historical sites . 5 . Posting announcements , news bulletins , and other general information. B.lndividual home pages may not be put to inappropriate uses , which include, but are not limited to: 1. Use of copyrighted materials in any form without the express written permission of the original copyright owner. 2. Personal , commercial uses which could result in a financial benefit for the page owner or his/her associates . 3 . Use of audio , images (i.e., pho tographs , paintings , or derivatives thereof) , videos, or movies of individuals without their express written consent. 4. Use of any personal information that is not public record pertaining to other individuals without their express written permission. 5. Use of any images or data that are abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening , or discriminatory . 6. Use of any images or data that violate other University of Colorado or CU-Denver policies (e.g., Sexual Harassment Policy) or local , state, or Federal laws . 7. Creation of direct hypertext links to abusive, obscene , harassing, threat ening, or discriminatory material. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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44 /Our University , Our Campus 8. Use of materials whose nature or volume compromise the ability of the system to serve other users ' documents and web pages . 9. Any use which constitutes academic dishonesty . 10. Use of individual home pages to engage in illegal activity . m. Departmental WWW Pages Appropriate use policies for CU-Denver computer accounts also apply to depart mental web pages . All departmental web pages are expected to adhere to the CU-Denver Authoring Standards . A . Departmental pages are encouraged for the following purposes: 1 . Disseminating general departmental information (goals, office hours , point of contact , etc.). 2 . Highlighting departmental programs or activities . 3 . Introducing faculty or staff and/or hyper-linking to their personal pages . B. Departmental pages may not be put to inappropriate uses, which includ e, but are not limited to: 1 . Use of copyrighted materials in any form without the express written permission of the original copyright owner . 2 . Personal , commercial uses which could result in a financial benefit for the page owner or his /her associates . 3. Use of audio , images (i.e., pho tographs , paintings, or derivatives thereof), videos , or movies of individuals without their express written consent. 4 . Use of any personal information that is not public record pertaining to other individuals without their express written permission . 5 . Use of any images or data that are abusive , obscene, harassing , threatening , or discriminatory. 6. Use of any images or data that violate other University of Colorado or CU-Denver policies (e . g., Sexual Harassment Policy) or local , state, or Federal laws. 7 . Creation of direct hypertext links to abusive , obscene, harassing , threat ening , or discriminatory material. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 8 . Use of materials whose nature or volume compromise the ability of the system to serve other users ' documents and web pages. 9 . Any use which constitutes academic dishonesty . 10. Use of departmental pages to engage in illegal activity . POLICY VIOLATIONS WWW Committee The Chancellor shall appoint a WWW Committee to (1) manage the CU-Denver website , (2) set policies for and oversee the use of electronic communication at CUDenver , and , (3 ) in conjunction with Computing, Information, and Network Services (CINS), handle violations of C U-Denver Computing Policies . Reporting Any individuals who become aware of inappropriate , unethical , or illegal use of CU-Denver computing resources , inappropriate c ontent of an individual home page , or any inappropriat e electronic communication should notify the CU-Denver Webmaster , webmaster@carbon.cudenver .edu. Child Pornography Any material which appears to contain child pornography will be immediately referred to the Denver Police Department , and will also be subject to the procedures which follow . Notification of Policy Violation The CU-Denver Web master will notify the user who is alleged to have violated CU-Denver ' s c o mputing policies of the nature of the alleged violation and will provide the user with a copy of C U-Denver ' s Computing Policies . Suspension of Privileges During Investigation During the investigation of an alleged policy violation , a user ' s computing and network access may be suspe nded. CU-Denver reser v es the right to e xamine a user ' s recorded and stored information in the course of investigating an alleged policy violation . Procedures 1 . The CU-Denver Webmaster will review the material alleged to be in violation of CUDenver ' s Computing Policies . If the CU-Denver Webmaster believes that the material violates the policies , the CU Denver Webmaster will request that the user remove the offending material. 2. If the alleged violator fails or refuses to comply with the CU-Denver Webmaster ' s request, the CU-Denver Webmaster may refer the matter to the CU-Denver WWW Committee for action. 3 . If the alleged violator disagrees with the CUDenver Web master , the user may file a written petition requesting that the WWW Committee review the case. 4 . The Chair of the CU-Denver WWW Committee will appoint a three-person subcommittee of the WWW Committee to review the case. Two members of the subcommittee must be selected from the membership of the WWW Commit tee. The Chair may select the third member from the WWW Committee or from Faculty Assembly , Staff Council, or the Associated Students. 5 . After consulting with the alleged violator and with the Webmaster, the subcommittee will determine (a) if a policy violation has occurred, and (b ) if a policy violation has been found , what action should be taken to remedy the policy violation. Consequences of Policy Violations Violations of CUDenver Computing Policies may result in disciplinary action , including , but not limited to, suspension of access to the WWW, suspension of e-mail privileges , suspension of comput ing privileges , suspen!)ion or expulsion from the University , suspension or termi nation of employment , imposition of fines, and referral for legal action. The CU-Denver WWW Committee may recommend to the Director of Student Life that a student be suspended or expelled from the University , or to the appropriate appointing authority that an employee be suspended or terminated . The WWW Committee may impose all other sanc tions specified above.

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Instructional and the Information Techno ogy Initiative (Ill) Students enrolle at the University of Colorado at Den er benefit from the university's large in computer technology , infrastliucture, smart classrooms , speciajized computer classrooms , and computer labs . Over $9 million has been invested in instructional technology from to 2001 by the Information Technology Initiative (ITO, a capital construction grant awarded by the State of Colo yado. The Macro-Envir:onment Every enrolled student is r ntitled to a free email Students
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46 / Our University, Our Campus With CU Online , students enjoy more flexibility with scheduling their class times than in a traditional classroom. Students can access their class sites each week at times they choose . Instructors use cutting-i!dge technology for presenting course content , such as stream ing audio , video , and multimedia slide shows . A number of technologies allow students to interact with the instructor and their peers-these include threaded discussions in a bulletin board type area , live discussions in an online virtual classroom, email , and collabora tive works paces . A " help-desk" is available 24 hours a day should you ever need technical assistance . HYBRID COURSES In addition to fully online courses , CU Online offers Hybrid courses , where the class meets on campus for part of the class time , and then meets online for the remainder of the class. Students taking hybrid courses have the added inter action of face-to-face meetings with their instructor , but may only need to come to campus one day a week , instead of two or three. SUPPLEMENTAL COURSES CU Denver Online also supports faculty using web-based courseware to augment their traditional classes. More and more faculty are using instructional technology to post their syllabus , lecture notes, hold online quizzes and practice exams , and to coordinate relevant resources available on the web , in the libraries and through other media . STUDENT SERVICES Academic Advising Center Director: Cindy Anderson Office: North Classroom 1503 Phone: 303-352-3520 Academic advising is the foundation of a successful college career and an important -component in major selection and career planning. The University has established the Academic Advising Center (AAC) to provide a variety of services to students . ACADEMIC ADVISING New freshmen and transfer students will be assigned an advisor who will CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 As students take courses with CU Online, they gain valuable skills for using the Internet as a tool for learning , research, and communication, taking them far beyond the boundaries of the traditional educational environment. They have the opportunity to participate in the new global classroom, with a world of higher education at their fingertips. We are well on our way to achieving the goal of providing students with the most comprehensive set of online courses , services and resources , coupled with the best online learning experience of any institution of higher education in the world. Participation in web-based learning positions students to become life long learners , and helps them to develop invaluable skills to take advantage of globallearaning opportunities for their entire career. Contact CU Online at 303-556-6505 or visit our web site at www.cuonllne. cudenver.edu . Computing, Information and Network Services Computing, Information and Network Services (CINS).supports computer and network use for both the academic and administrative communities at CU-Denver. All centralized administrative systems are developed , maintained, and processed by University Management Systems in Boulder, with output process ing and user support provided by CINS in Denver. The Denver campus maintains a communications network with over meet with them every semester to plan a schedule , discuss academic support services and assist with referrals to other on-campus resources . Frequent contact with an advisor is encouraged. TRANSFER ADVISING Services are provided for students who are transferring to CU-Denver , as well as those who want to explore other universities and colleges in Colorado and other states. Transcript evaluation and access to catalogs and degree requirements for other institutions are among the services provided to transfer students . 2,500 connections. This network provides access to all campus minicomputers and connection to the Auraria Library Online Information System, the World Wide Web , and the Internet. There are over 2,500 personal computers located on the campus in 21 teaching laboratories , two public labs , individual laboratories , and in offices . CINS maintains the campus World Wide Web, where information is kept for reference by students, faculty, staff, and others interested in CU-Denver. The CINS Help Desk provides assistance to students , faculty, and staff. The Help Desk technicians maintain personal computers and are available to assist with hardware and software planning and installation , acquisitions, Internet connectivity , troubleshooting , and general questions. The CINS staff operates and maintains campus minicomputers, telecommuni cations equipment, and two of the CU-Denver computing laboratories. These laboratories provide students with access to Macintosh and In tel-based personal computers and software as well as access to the campus network and minicomputers. The goal of CINS is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work. For further information , please call the CINS Help Desk at 303-556-6100 . ADVISING FOR TEACHER LICENSURE Students who intend to seek teacher licensure in Colorado should contact the Advising Center for course requirements early in their academic career . An Education advisor is available to answer questions , suggest courses and facilitate the admission process to the School of Education . In addition , transcript evaluation and analysis for degreed students who anticipate application to the Initial Teacher Licensure Program is provided. PRE-PROFESSIONAL ADVISING Students who intend to apply to the Colleges of Business and Administration , Engineering and Applied Science, or Arts

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& Media at the Uni ersity of Colorado at Denver should b advised for intra the AAC. Liruson adviSing are provided by advisors and fa ulty mentors in the colleges. Transfer or students who have earned degrees can be advised about pre-requisitJ course requirements for various professional graduate programs at CU-Dehver and other institutions. I ADDITIONAL SERVICES Other supports rvices are provided in the academic act'vising center . Contact . the center for mor j information. CAREER The AAC provides referrals to The Career Center in the Tivoli Student Union. The Career enter provides a full spectrum of servioes to assist students in establishing a career path. Successful copege degree is the begmnmg of this path; selecting . k I appropnate wor -related experiences enhances the student's ability to identify the right career . To meet the of the diverse student populatiOn , CU-Denver provides programs and activities designed to complement students' academic programs and to enhance their total educational exper j ence. Students are provided to develop , experience, and participate in student government, cultural, intellectual , and recreational p ograms. These programs create environment in which students arr,: • in deviloping leadership abihtythrough qpportunities to prac tice decision making, management and marketing , inter ersonal and group communication , and relationship skills . • Encouraged and aided in developing social, cultural, I ntellectual, recreation, and governancE1programs that expand involvement wilih the campus commu nity and society and lead to mature appreciation of these pursuits. • Encouraged to explore self-directed activities that opportunities for personal groWth in individual and group settings.} • Exposed to vari us cultures and experience s , ideas an issues , art and musical forms , and sty! of life. • Informed about nstitutional policies and procedures and how these are related to their lives and activities. • Aided in the awcl.reness and utilization of campus facilities and other resources. Student Services , Support and Organizations I 4 7 • Assisted in developing community spirit through creative interaction among staff, faculty , students, and members of the local community: Students are encouraged to involve their families in campus events and activities . Programs and services provided by the Associated Students of CU-Denver the Office of Academic and Student ' Affairs of CU-Denver , and Auraria Campus Student Services contribute to the fulfillment of this philosophy. The Career Center Office: Tivoli Student Union, Suite 260 Telephone: 303-556-2250 Website: careers . cudenver.edu Director: Lissa Gallagher Associate Director/ Internship Programs: Cherrie Grove Assistant Director/ Career Planning Services: Jonne Kraning Assistant Director/ Employment Services: Joanne Wambeke Program Assistant: Kate Kielsmeier The Career Center offers a full array of services that prepare students for career success. Students are assisted in choosing a major; selecting a career path ; gaining experience through internships, cooperative education, and service learning ; researching career and employer information ; developing job search skills; and finding employment upon graduation. Students are encour aged to access services as early as freshman year to begin planning their career and charting a course toward success! CAREER PLANNING SERVICES • Career counseling • Career assessment inventories • Resume assistance • Interviewing skills coaching • Self-directed job search coaching • Career planning courses: Introduction to Career Planning and Career Success: Strategies for the 21st Century INTERNSHIP AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM • Part-time academic year positions • Full-time alternating semester or summer positions • Course credit at undergraduate and graduate levels . • Out-of-state/international inte rnships • Most positions are paid EMPLOYMENT SERVICES • Online job postings for career positions internships student employment • On-campus recruiting • Resume referrals • Career fairs CAREER LIBRARY • Occupational information • Employer information • career computer lab • Career Advisor Network Program Pre-Collegiate Programs, The Center for Programs offered by the Center serve to motivate high school students to pursue post-secondary education and provide them the academic skills necessary to be successful in their college endeavors. The Center is located in NC 2204, 303-556-2322. PRE-COLLEG lATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM The Pre-Collegiate Development Program is a systemwide institutionally funded academic enhancement program for high school students. It is designed to motivate and prepare high school students who are first generation and from an underrepresented group in higher education to complete high school on a timely basis. The primary focus of the program is to prepare youth (grades 9-12) for professional careers of specific interest to them . The program includes academic advising (by parents and guidance counselors working together) regarding high school course selections that will best help students attain their desired career objectives . In addition, during the academic year, students will take part in relevant Saturday Academies in basic study skills, interpersonal skills development , and topics related to student preparation for the 21st century. Between their sophomore and junior years , students will participate in a two week session designed to enhance study and library research skills, and provide a thorough introduction to college place ment exams and career fields . Between their junior and senior years , students will attend a five-week academically intense Summer Academic Program. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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48 / Our University, Our Campus Students will experience university life on a firsthand basis and enhance their secondary school academics by taking courses designed to augment high school academic requirements (e.g . , mathemat ics , sciences , writing, computer science, social sciences . ) Students also enroll in a three-credit college course. CU-DENVER SCHOLARS PROGRAM This is an early college enrollment pro gram for college-bound, high-achieving students, first generation and/or from an underrepresented group in higher educa tion, who are enrolled in their senior year of high school. The program enables stu dents to begin their college studies by taking one course at CU-Denver during the fall term of their senior year in high school. The credit earned in the course can be applied toward a bachelor ' s degree. While enrolled in the program, students participate in monthly workshops designed to acclimate them to the university and prepare them for college study. Learning Assistance, The Center for The Center for Learning Assistance is designed to promote student success in the academic setting. Available to CU-Denver undergraduate and graduate students, services include English as a second language and study skills courses, tutoring , study skills seminars , peer advo cacy , a test file, consulting, and a minority resource library . First-generation college students may be eligible for intensive services through the Student Support Services and Ronald E. McNair Federal Grant Programs within the Center. In addition, the Center houses two federal Upward Bound projects serving eligible students enrolled at Denver's West High School. The Center is located in NC 2006, 303-556-2802. Tutoring. Free tutoring is available in many subject areas (some limitations apply). Tutoring is held on weekdays and evenings. Scheduled tutoring is available Monday through Thursday , 8 a.m.-7 p .m., and Friday, 8 a.m .-1 p .m. Open lab tutoring is available Monday through Thursday , 8 a . m .-7 p . m . , and Friday , 8 a.m. -1 p.m . Seminars. Study skills seminars are provided on such topics as critical thinking, time/stress management , test anxiety/test taking , essay writing , study strategies , active reading , learning styles, and listening/note taking. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 Consulting. Academic, financial aid , and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy is available to students eligible for the Student Support Services Program . Library. The Center maintains a small periodical and book collection authored by , and/or about, minorities ; these resources are available for student research and leisure . Courses. Courses are offered in a small group format in the areas of college survival skills, introduction to word processing , English as a second language, problem solving , and Excel. See course description section in this catalog for detailed information on courses . ENGL 1006-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languages. ENGL 1007-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I. ENGL 1008-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II. ENGL 1009-3. Advanced FSL Writing Skills. STSK 0705-1. Problem Solving. STSK 0707-1. College Survival Skills. STSK 0708-1. Introduction to Word Processing. STSK 0800-1. Research Process for FSL Students. STSK 0801-1. Communication Skills for FSL Students. STSK 0802-1. Advanced Academic Reading Skills for FSL. SfSK 0803-1. Speech Presentation for FSL STSK 0804-1. listening and Note-taking for FSL Students. SfSK 0806-1. Study Skills for FSL Students. STSK 0810-1 to 3. Topics. STSK 0811-1. Excel. STSK 0820-1. Social Science Partnership forFSL. SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS AND OPERATIONS American Indian Student Services The American Indian Student Services program provides a,ccess and educational opportunities to American Indian students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts . The program provides academic advising , scholarship information , cultural programs, advocacy , student organization sponsorship , and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students . American Indian Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus , providing current information on issues and concerns of the American Indian community . The office is located in North Classroom 2013 , 303-556-2860. Asian American Student Services Asian American Student Services provides academic advising , scholarship information , cultural programs , advocacy, and student leadership development. Supportive services are tailored to meet the specific needs of students. Asian American Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus and community , providing current information on issues and concerns of Asian Americans. The office is located in North Classroom 2012, 303-556-2578 or 303-556-2065. Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) The Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal University structure . ASCU-Denver assists students with information con cerning student clubs and organizations , campus events , issues concerning student status, and other information of general interest to students . ASCU-Denver also provides students assistance with grievances and t he opportunity to become more closely involved with the University community , through active participation in student government itself , or through service on University , tri-institutional , and AHEC committees . More information concerning services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Tivoli Student Union , Room 301,303-556-2510. Black Student Services The Black Student Services program provides access, educational oppor tunities, and information to students of African descent through specialized r e cruitment and retention efforts . The program provides academic advising , scholarship information , cultural pro grams, advocacy , student organization sponsorship , and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students . Black Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus,

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providing current i formation on issues and concerns affecting the community of Africans in Amerid.The office is located in North Classroo 2010,303-556-2701. Hispanic Student Services The Hispanic St dent Services program provides access and edu c ational opportu nities to Hispanic students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts . The program provides academic advising , scholars q ip information , cultural student organization sponsorship , and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students . Hispanic St u dent Serv i ces serves as a resource to the campus , pro y iding current information on issues and concerns of the Hispanic community. The office is located in North C lassroom 2012, 303-556-2777. Clubs and Organiz ations Th i s is only a sampling of clubs recog nized in the past 31fd i s not necessarily current. ACM Computing Club American lnstit te of Architecture Students American Association American Plannirg Association American Societ f of Civil Engineers American Societ of Landscape Architecture American Society of Mechanical Engineers Anthropology Club Art Club Association of Students Auraria French lub Auraria Transna ional Student Association Beta Alpha Omega ( Counseling/ Education ) B eta Alpha Psi ( ccounting Honor Society) Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Honor Society ) Chi Epsilon Chinese Student Association College Republi ans CSPA-Colorado ociety for Personnel Administratio CU Vent u re Net ork-Association of Collegiate tre preneurs Equiponderanc Pre-Law Club Etta Kappa Nu Feminist Allianc Financial Manag ment Association GSPA Associatio Gold e n Key National Honor Society Student Ser v ices , Support and Organizations / 49 HASO-Health Administration Student Organization IBSA-lnternational Business Student Association Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Kappa D elta Pi M . E . C .H.A. Master of Social Sciences Club MBNMS Association ( Grac;tuate Business ) Model United Nations Conference Organization The Robert E . Moore Collegiate Chapter of the American Marketing Association National Society of Black Engineers Native American Student Organization Phi Alpha Theta (History) Phi Chi Theta (Business / Economics ) Philosophy Club Pi Tau Sigma Psi Chi (Psychology ) Russian Culture & Language Club Sigma Iota Epsilon (Management Honor Society ) Sigma Tau Delta (English ) SAS-Society of Accounting Students Society of Women Engineers Student Association of Musicians Tau Beta Phi (Eng i neering ) Vietnamese Student Organization Counseling and Family Therapy Center The CU-Denver Counseling and Family Therapy Center staff provides services at no charge to students for personal , educational , and relationship concerns through individual , couples , family , and group counseling , stress management , alcohol and drug prevention , and crisis intervention. If a client's needs are such that they would benefit more from an alternative form of counseling or therapy , appropriate referrals will be made to community-based professionals. Also , by request , staff provide consultation , lectures , and workshops to student, faculty , and staff groups , dubs, and classes on diversity , mental heaith topics , organizational, and student development issues . The CU-Denver Counseling and Family Therapy Center is located in the North Classroom Building , room 4036 , 303-556-4372. Denver Free Press The purpose of the student newspaper , Denver Free Press , is to provide students with i nformation about campus issues and events. The newspaper strives to include g ood investigative reporting , feature articles , and items of general interest to its campus r e adership . In addition , the newspaper is a tool to encourage and develop writers , jourqalists, artists , and other student members of i t s general management and production staff. The office is in the Tivoli Student Union , Room 345, 303-556-2535. Disability Support Services Office The Disability Services Office (DSO) serves the needs of a large and diverse community of students with disabilities who attend The Metropolitan State Colleg e of Denver and the University of Colorado at Denver . The DSO staff have a strong commitment to providing equal access and a wide range of support services to students with disabilit i es . The DSO staf f also work closely with faculty and staff in an advisory capacity , assisting in the development of reason able accommodations that allow students with disabilities to participate in the programs offered on this campu s . A d vo cacy and support services are provided including : testing accommodations , assistance in identifyin g volunteer notetakers , academic skill-building workshops , interpreters , priority registration , sale of handicapped parking permits and a resource library . For assistance and /or information , please contact our office: Arts Building , Room 177; Phone : 303-556-8387 ; TIY: 303-556-8484. Emergency Student Loan Program The E mergency Student Loan Prog r am is designed to meet the emergency financial needs of students . The prog r am provides interest-free , short-term loans for up to $ 400 .00. Applications for short-term loans will be accepted t hroughout the fall and spring semesters and summer sessi on . Applicants are required to meet the minimum requirements listed below: Students receiving financial aid are eligible if: • Financial aid or scholarship eligibility has been determined by the Office of Financial Aid • Financial aid is verified by prese n t i ng recent copy of award letter , or letter from financial aid counselor CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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50 / Our University, Our Campus • Amount of aid covers costs of tuition and loan Students not receiving financial aid are eligible if: • Tuition balance is paid in full • Monthly income is verified by present ing recent check stub or letter from employer • Income indicates ability to repay loan within six weeks. Cay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans (CLBT) Student Services at Auraria Gay , Lesbian , Bisexual, Trans Student Services is open to all Auraria campus students as a resource for exploring sex ual orientation issues . This program offers a variety of support, education , and advocacy s e rvices for the entire campus community : • Support for those who may have questions about their own sexual orientation or that of a friend or family member • Advocacy for students experiencing discrimination or harassment based on a real or perceived GLBT id e ntity • Speakers for events , workshops , and classes on various aspects of sexual orientation • Programs and workshops about working with the gay , lesbian , bisexual, and trans communities more effectively and combating misinformation , misconceptions , and homophobia • Resource library of 500 books and 90 videos ( documentary and cinema) available for research and leisure . Also available is a multitude of free literature regarding other organizations and services throughout Denver and Colorado that provide outreach, services , and advocacy . • Programs such as Gay , Lesbian , Bisexual, Trans Awareness Month and other forums providing information and dialogue about GLBT issues . The GLBT Student Services office is located in the Tivoli Student Union , room 311, and is staffed by a director with the support of student employees and volunteers . Input and involvement from the entire campus community are welcomed . For add i tional information , call 303-556-6333 . Ombuds Office The Om buds Office helps to enhance the clarity and dissemination of informa tion , to simplify decision making and communication , to assist with the process CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 of change and with adjustment to change, and to improve understanding among students, faculty , staff , and administrators. The Om buds Office provides informa tion about programs , policies, services , and procedures affecting members of the University community ; makes referrals to appropriate state, CU system , and CU-Denver resources ; serves as consultant in the preparation and review of policies and procedures ; and assists in the solution of problems and the resolution of disputes. Om buds Office services do not replace or circumvent exi sting channels , but help them work more effectively . Om buds Office services are informal , impartial , confidential , and independent of administrative authorities. The issues and identities of persons who consult with the Ombuds Office are not divulged to anyone without express permission to do so, e xcept to the extent required by law . For further information or assistance, contact the Om buds Office, CU-Denver Bldg. , Suite 700; 303-5564493 , TIY 303-556-6204, Fax em ail: ombuds@carbon. cudenver . edu Student Advocacy Center The Student Advocacy Center provides support services to CU-Denver students, particularly during their first year on campus. Services are designed to help students make a smooth transition to life at CUDenver and to succeed in their college studies . Professional staff and student peer advocates provide informa tion about campus resources and assist students with class scheduling , academic policies and procedures , and problem solving. The Center also houses an extensive scholarship library . The Center is located in NC 2012, Student Legal Services Student legal services are available to assist students with off
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educational community for their high-quality early childhood care and education. Developmentally appropriate practices for young children guide the educational progra,ms that are provided . Curriculum planning is flexible and based on children's interests . Experiences are planned in accordance with "Key Experiences " adapted from the High/ Scope Cognitively Oriented Curriculum. Supervising teachers in the Child Care Centers are all degreed teachers meeting the certification guidelines of the National Academy of Early Uhildhood programs . Children aged 12 months to 6 years are served at the Center . The Center also has a fully accredited kindergarten program . Hours: M-F, 7a .m.-6p.m. Auraria Event Center The Auraria Campus Event Center is a 2,800-seat facility f b r team and individual sport activities, academic programs , events and conferences . Funds from the Student Recreation Fee support the use by students of the many health and recreation facilities found within the building . Adjacent to the building are softball fields, tennis courts and a track. Emmanuel Gallery Located next to corner of PE Bldg., 303-556-8337 . The Emmanuel Gallery hosts exhibits of students, faculty , and nationally known artists . Stop in relaxing break. Gallery hours are 11a .m. to 5p.m., M-F. S tudent Center All CU-Denver students are entitled to medical services ai the Student Health Center , and studen health insurance is NOT required to pse this facility . Physicians, physicf assistants, nurse practitioners , radi logical technologists , and medical assist ts staff the facility . Students will be asked to complete a sign-in sheet and show a current semester ID card each time they check in. Student Services , Support and Organizations I 51 Services include treatment of illness and injuries , lab testing , medications , physicals, annual GYN exams , sexually transmitted disease information/testing, birth control information/services, minor surgery, cholesterol screening, immuniza tions , HIV testing, blood pressure checks , casting, suturing , and x-ray. All services listed above are low cost. Payment is required at time of service , except for students who participate in the Student Health Insurance Program. Classes regard ing health-related topics are taught each semester and are offered free to students. Walk-in services begin at 8 a . m., Monday-Friday. Access is on a first-come, first-served basis. Walk-in varies daily , contingent upon when all patient slots have been filled; thus, the daily closure time for walk-in care is variable. Patients are encouraged to check in as early as possible. The Student Health Center is located in the Plaza Building, room 150, on the lower level. Brochures with additional information are available at the health center. For further details and information regarding Night Students (Night Owl Advantage Program) and Extended Campus Students (Satellite Advantage Program) , call303-556-2525. Tivoli S tudent Union Tivoli Administration , Room 325 , 303-556-6330 . The Tivoli Student Union is located at 9th and Auraria Parkway on the Auraria Campus . Inside this historic building , which was once a brewery , students will find a vast array of retail shops and restau rants, as well as the Auraria Book Center; copy center, hair salon , travel agency, the University of Colorado Federal Credit Union, and the Tivoli AMC 12 Theaters . Visit the Tivoli Student Union website. http://www.tivoli.org Also housed in the Tivoli Student Union are the Club Hub , Conference Services, ID Program/Commuter and Housing Services , and Sigi's Pool Hall and Arcade. Information Desk , Located in second floor lobby , 303-556-6329. Information on Tivoli Student Union hours, loca t ions, events, and services can be found here , as well as information about the Auraria Campus and Denver community . Club Hub, Room 346 , 303-556-8094 . This uniquely designed club space on the third floor of the Tivoli features work space for over 60 clubs , mailboxes for campus clubs , a limited number of lockers , club bulletin boards , meeting rooms, and lounge area for larger group meetings. This office works closely with the Student Advisory Committee to the Auraria Board (SACAB), the Student Unio n Advisory Board (SUAB), and the Student Activities/Life offices. Tivoli Conference Services, Room 325, 303-556-2755 . Through the Conference Services office, Tivoli meeting rooms and conference space can be reserved for non-academic purposes, including meetings , weddings , and receptions . The conference service department has lour caterers to choose from for all catering needs. ID Program/ Commuter and Housing Services , Room 243, 303-556-8385. Auraria students can have their J.D. cards made here, which are necessary for parking in some campus lots and checking out library books. Student IDs also serve as an RTD bus pass. The lounge provides lockers, RTD bus maps, ride boards , pop machine , and a microwave oven . In addition , information about off-campus housing is provided here, including referrals, apartment complex lists , and a courtesy phone. Sigi's Pool Hall and Arcade, Room 145, 303-556-3645 . Sigi's , named after the founder of the Tivoli Brewery , Moritz Sigi, houses 31 video game machines, 12 billiard tabl es, and one snooker table. Sigi' s is open to the entire Auraria campus population as well as the public. The student-friendl y atmosphere encourages community socialization and relaxation . Tivoli Tickets , Room 261C, 303-556-3315. Tickets for campus events may be purchased here. Tivoli Tickets is also an authorized Ticketmaster outlet. CU-Den ver Catalog 2001-02

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52 / Our University, Our Campus American Language Center: Intensive English Program (IEP) The University's American Language Center CALC) offers an on-campus Intensive English Program (IEP) for international students who need to pass the TOEFL or who want English language training for professional purposes . The IEP offers six levels of intensive academic language instruction plu$ TOEFL prep aration classes , as well as a University of Colorado 1-20 for students needing an F-1 student visa . Nine-week programs start every January, March, June, August, and October. International students may attend the IEP in preparation for meeting the University's TOEFL requirements prior to entering University under graduate or graduate programs. Acceptance into the Intensive English Program does not guarantee acceptance into the University degree programs . E-mail contact: alc@cudenver . edu; Website: www.americanlanguagecenter.net; 303-556-4290. Office of International Education Director: Lawrence Bell, 303-556-4925 International Student Advisor: Deborah Durkee, 303-556-4924 Study Abroad Coordinator: Karen Goubleman , 303-556-3388 Office: CU-Denver Building, Suite 140, 1250 14th Street f.r.mail: international@carbon.cudenver.edu Website: http:/ /international.cudenver.ed u The University of Colorado at Denver, through the Office of International Education (OlE), provides a variety of international programs, educational opportunities , and services for interna tional and domestic students, scholars, faculty, staff, and the grea ter Denver community. The goals of OlE are to raise international awareness on the CU-Denver campus and, in particular, to provide an opportunity for all students to gain the global competency needed in today's interdependent world. OlE arranges student study abroad programs, expedites the exchange of students and faculty, hosts international visitors, promotes special relationships CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 with foreign universities, and advises students and faculty on Fulbright and National Security Exchange Program (NSEP) and other scholarship opportu nities. OlE also functions as a recruiting, retention, and advisory office for international students and coordinates many services for them before and after they have been accepted to CU-Denver, including: new student orientation , visa and Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) advice, and help for those international students who need assistance with a variety of questions and potential difficulties, including the offering of a semester-long orientation course (CLAS 1100) . In addition , OlE seeks to increase community awareness of international issues by periodically sponsoring lectures and programs that are open to the genera l public. STUDY ABROAD OlE assists students wishing to make international study an integral part of their college experience. Study abroad programs vary in length from two weeks to one academic year , and are also offered during the summer and winter breaks. Although many programs are for language study, a substantial number of programs are taught in English ; thus, foreign language is not always required for participation . These programs are available to students in all disciplines , from architecture to business to liberal arts, in a variety of countries worldwide. Students can pay CU-Denver tuition and study abroad on an exchange program for an academic semester or year. Either CU-Denver or transfer credit may be earned abroad , giving students the opportunity to fulfill degree requirements while experiencing a new culture. Since tuition and program fees are genera lly affordable and financial aid is available and can be used for study abroad, it is a feasible option for almost every CU-Denver student. Information and advice on scholarships such as Fulbright and NSEP, as well as volunteer and work opportunities abroad are available. New programs are continually develop ing , so call or check the OlE website to learn more about our programs. Logon to our website at http:/ /studyabroad.cuden ver.edu for further information. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADVISING AND SUPPORT SERVICES Since the first few months in a new country and a new city can be particularly difficult for international students, OlE offers a number of special services in order to ease this transition , such as an orientation program for new international students, answers to visa questions , and help in finding housing . All international students meet with the International Stu dent Advisor (!SA) in OIE upon arrival in Denver to have visas and other paperwork reviewed, in order to assist in personal ized advising . OlE provides a friendly ear and a place to ask questions and express concerns about all kinds of issues, including U.S. social customs, as well as an avenue for communicating with other CU Denver international student clubs and organizing social activities. The OlE also works with the Univer sity's American Language Center , which offers an Intensive English Program for international students preparing to pass the TOEFL or who need further English help after starting their degree studies. See Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section for a complete description. GRADUATE STUDENT AND FACULTY FULBRIGHT INFORMATION OlE serves as the University clearing house for information on various scholarships and fellowships for study and research abroad , including Fulbright graduate student and faculty visiting lectureships at foreign universities. COMMUNITY OUTREACH SERVICES During the year , OlE sponsors periodic guest lectures and special seminars focused on topics of current international interest. Most of these activities are open to the public as well as the CU-Denver community. OlE is also an active participant in a number of Denver community international programs and events. For more information about these and other programs, contact the OlE office at 303-556-3489.

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AURARIA LIBRARY Dean/Director: Da id Gleim Associate Dean: Arithony J. Dedrick Associate Director: Jean F. Hemphill Office: Auraria Library , 1100 Lawrence Street Telephone: Administration: 03-556-2805 Information: 303-556-2740 Reference: 303-556-2585 FACULTY, Associate Professors: David Gleim, Ellen Greenblatt, F. Hemphill , Terry Ann Leopold Assistant Professors: Anthony J. Dedrick, Robert L. Wick Instructors: Orlando Archibeque , Eric Baker , Jeffrey Beall, Thomas J. Beck, Gayle Meg Brown-Sica, Larraine Evans , Evetts , Vera Gao , Cynthi Hashert , Florence Jones , Elaine Jurrjes , Susan Maret , Nikki McCaslin , Ellen Metter , Mar it S . Taylor, Linda D. Tietjen , Louise Treff-Gan g ler , Diane Turner , Judith Valdez , Rol:>b Waltner , Eveline Yang LIBRARY SERVICES Access to inform'ltion is essential to academic success . The Auraria Library , located at the center of the campus , provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs [ The Library is administered by University of Colorado at Denver. I THE The Auraria Library has a collection of approximately 600 , 000 volumes . In addition to a strong up-to-date book collection , the Library also has over 3 ,200 journal and newspaper subscriptions , access to more than 5 , 000 electronic journals , and a film/ videotape collection . The Library is a selective depository for U.S. Governmen t publications and a depository for Colo rado State documents, with a collection of 0ver 450,000 docu ments . The Auraria collection I s supplemented by roviding access t o other libraries wi hin the state and 11ationally through i terlibrary loan ;ervices. AURARIA LIBRARY ELECTRONIC RESOURCES Auraria Library provides on-and off-campus access to a wide variety of electronic resources available through the Library ' s home page : http./ / library.auraria . edu Available resources include: Skyline: Auraria Library's online catalog provides access to books , journal holdings , media , and government publications owned by the Library. Reserve materials for courses are also listed. Prospector Global Catalog: Auraria patrons can expand their searches for materials with Prospector, a catalog of fourteen Colorado Libraries . Prospec tor has 12 million holdings including public and academic libraries. You may request items that are checked out or missing from Sk y line and if the Prospector item you need is checked out , you may place a hold . Materials are requested online and delivered to Auraria Library Circulation within 2-4 days. Items are checked out for 3 weeks with one renewal. Try this popular service by clicking on the " Search Prospector " tab in a Sk y line catalog search or directly at: www.prospector. coal/iance . org. Article databases: Over 100 databases provide access to full text articles and journal citations in a variety of fields . Available on-campus to all and offcampus to current students, faculty , and staff . Reference resources: Dictionaries , encyclopedias, almanacs , and numerous other reference resources . Web resources: Internet resources in all fields that have been selected and evaluated by librarians. Auraria library information: Instruc tion guides , subject guides , instructions for off-campus access, hours , policies, and other library information . CIRCULATION SERVICES Library materials are checked out from the Circulation Desk with a current Auraria ID or other valid identification. Undergraduate students may check out books for 28 days , and graduate students for 60 days . An Auraria student can check out up to 75 items from the general collec tion. Items can be renewed three times if not requested by another borrower online using Sk y lines View Your Own Record , in Campus Resources I 53 person, or by phone, 303-556-2639 . Other services include patron-placed holds in Skyline for checked-out items and e-mail circulation notices that allow for e-mail renewals . Fines are assessed when books are renewed or returned past their due date, and replacement charges will be assessed if items are 28 day overdue. REFERENCE SERVICES . The Auraria Library Reference Depart ment strives to provide excellent service in assisting students and faculty with their research needs . The Reference Desk is staffed during most hours the Library is open , and has librarians and staff trained in all subject areas in order to assist students with online and print sources of information . Contact the Reference Desk at 303-556-2585. GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS Most U.S. and Colorado government publications are in a separate location in the Library and are available all the hours the Library is open. Specialized assistance is available during weekday hours and at the Reference Desk evenings and weekends. Cal1303-556-8372 for information and hours. INFORMATION DELIVERY/ INTERLIBRARY LOAN Auraria Library participates in a world wide electronic borrowing and lending network with other libraries . This service enables all Auraria campus students, faculty , and staff to obtain materials not available at the Auraria Library . Requests from registered users can be initiated electronically through the Auraria Library ' s Home Page using the WebZap service. This department also loans material to institutions throughout Colorado and around the world . Access to materials from other Colorado libraries is available via Prospector . LIBRARY INSTRUCTION . The Library is committed to providing information skills through its instruction program. The program is varied , ranging from basic , introductory-level material to advanced research methodology for graduate students. Information on other electronic resources is an important com ponent of the Library Instruction Program. For more information about the Library's instructional offerings, contact the Library Instruction office at 303-556-3683. CU-Den ver Catalog 2001-02

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54 / Our University, Our Campus RESERVES/MEDIA The Reserves/Media Department Oocated in the northwest corner of the first floor) provides special short-term circulation of books, pamphlets, articles, and other materials needed for class instruction. Except for films and videos, all other types of media are housed in Reserves /Media, along with CDs/ records and appropriate players . Films and videos (including those on reserve) are located in Media Equipment Services, first floor, southeast corner . The loan periods for " reserved " items are short, and overdue follow-up is prompt, so that the maximum number of students may have access to the materials. These materials include not only titles owned by the Library, but also personal copies made available by the faculty. " Reserve " material may be checked out for two hours , one day or three days, with the exception of media items , which may be checked out for two weeks . The length of check-out is determined by the professor. Materials will be checked out with either a student I.D. or a Colorado driver's license. ARCHIVES AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS The Archives and Special Collections Department of the Auraria Library acts as the archival repository for materials produced by the University of Colorado at Denver , Metropolitan State College of Denver , Community College of Denver, and the Auraria Higher Education Center. These materials include documents such as college catalogs, student newspapers , budgets , and fact books. Manuscript collections at the Auraria Library focus on public policy issues and public affairs . Examples of manuscript holdings include the records from organizations such as the American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado, the National Municipal League , and the American Association of Univer sity Women of Colorado . The library ' s special collections area contains books on many different subjects, including Colorado and Denver history , theses and dissertations from CU-Denver , science fiction, rhetoric, and juvenile literature. For information and hours, call303-556-8373. COMPUTER COMMONS Word processing, spreadsheet production , web browsing, and email are available for students and faculty in the Library's Computer Commons lab. The lab is also equipped with document CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 scanners and printers . It is available whenever the library is open . SERVICES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES The library is committed to making its resources and services availa ble to all students. Library services to assist per sons with disabilities include orientation to the physicallayput of the library, retrieval of materials , and some assistance with use of the online public access catalog , periodicals , and indexes . Adaptive computer equipment and software have been installed in the reference area and in the Combined Computer Access Center to assist a number of students with varying disabilities . This equipment connects to the online public access catalog , the Internet , and other electronic access systems . ADDITIONAL FACILITIES Photocopiers, microform reader / printers, a copy center , pay phones , and study rooms are all available at the library. FRIENDS OF AURARIA LIBRARY The Friends of Auraria Library is an association formed in 1976 to promote the development of Auraria Library as a center for learning , study, and research for the students and faculty of the University of Colorado at Denver , Metropolitan State College of Denver , and the Community College of Denver. The Friends of Auraria Library's ongoing objectives are : 1 . To promote awareness of and good will toward Auraria Library on the campus, in the metropolitan area, and in the region; and 2 . To increas e library resources through contributions, solicitations , grants, bequests, and gifts of books and other appropriate materials . For more information about the Friends of Auraria Library , call303-556-2805 . AURARIA MEDIA CENTER Director: James K. Straub Assistant Director: Randy L. Tatroe Office: Auraria Media Center , 1100 Lawrence Street , Room 015 Telephone: 303-556-2426 The Auraria Media Center offers a full range of media services , including the management of the Library ' s film and videotape collection . These materials are listed in the online public access catalog. The Media Center operates a 28-channel television distribution system which is wired into all classrooms on campus. Faculty members may request the trans mission of a film or videotape directly into the classroom over this system. Students may request transmission of a film or videotape from one of the media viewing and listening carrels in the Library . This system also can transmit live programs from St. Cajetan's, the Student Union , and the Media Center's television studios to other locations on campus. A self service graphics lab and two self-service VHS editing suites also are available for student use in the Media Center's Production Department. Finally, an Internship Program is available to students who are interested in converting knowledge gained in electronics, graphics, or television production courses to practical experience. AURARIA BOOK CENTER Tivoli Student Union, 303-556-3230 Hours: M-Th , 8a.m.-6p.m.; F , 8a.m . 5p.m. ; Sat, 10a.m.-3p.m. Please call for hours during vacation and interim periods. The Auraria Book Center , a department of Student Auxiliary Services-your campus store-is located in the historic Tivoli Student Union. The Book Center provides textbooks for the Auraria schools, plus a complete general book department that is especially strong in technical and reference areas. Best sell ers , new releases , and gift book selections change frequently, and are often accompa nied by displays of special value books on many subjects. For additional savings on general reading books , join theAuraria Book Club at the Customer Service desk . Students need to bring course printouts to locate textbooks. Books are located by school; subjects are arranged alphabet ically-departmental abbreviations, with course and section and prices are printed on the shelf tag below . Each title has the designation of Required , Preferred , Optional , or Available . You can also order books online at www.aurariabooks.com . Used textbooks sell for 75 percent of the new book price. The Auraria Book Center carries more used textbooks than any other book store in Colorado, but shop early as used books are the first to go . A full refund is given for new and used books accompanied by the receipt and returned within the first three weeks of class for regular semesters and during the first week of class for short terms.

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Please read the refund policy attached to the receipt. j When a course erds, the textbook may still have value anCij may be bought back by the Book Center1 The buy-back policy on used texts is to pay half of the new price on books that will be used again next semester on this c;fnpus. Other texts are purchased at percentages. The Auraria Book CentE!r's buy-back services are dedicated to its! student customers. A validated student or campus ID is required to complete a buy-back trans action. Books are b ught for this campus throughout the Selljlester ; however, buy ers from national book companies are on hand at the end of each semester to purchase used bo . oks which may be required at other schools . Campus 303-556-3726, offers the latest in hardware and software technology . An educational discount is offered to Auraria qampus students; a current, validated Auraria ID must be presented at the tiljle of purchase . A full line of computer reference books and accessories is also vailable as well as calculators and other small electronics. Campus Computer hours are M-Th , I 8a.m.-6p.m.; F, 8a.pt.-5p.m.; Sat, 10 a.m. -3 p.m . It is located on the second floor of the Book Center. The Extended Studies Programs at CU-Denver offer co?tinuing and noh traditional educati n. They employ both alternative deliver)j systems and tradi tional methods to make high-quality learning experiencqs accessible to Colorado ' s diverse population. Extended Studies Programs are responsible for the administration of all classes conducted off the Auraria as well as many of those conducted in non-traditional formats on campus such as weekends. Although they are ot academic units and do not grant de rees, courses and programs offered through Extended Studies Programs d enhance and supplement traditi nal degree programs at the University . St dents with certain registration or sch uling difficulties can take courses a licable to their degree programs ough Extended Studies . Courses o ered through Extended Studies e identical to those offered through the regular Schedule of A current photo 10 is required for purchases paid for by check. The Book Center also accepts MasterCard, VISA, and American Express. Look for our website at: www.aurariabooks.com The Auraria Book Center is owned by the State of Colorado and supports the Student Bond Fund. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION The CU-Denver Alumni Association provides programs and services which stimulate interest in, increase support for, and build life-long commitment to the University of Colorado at Denver among its alumni , students, and the community. Founded in 1976, students automatically become members upon graduation . Frien ds and non-degree former students also are welcome to participate in alumni activities. The governing board is composed of alumni representing all schools and colleges on campus . CU on the Horizon, a newsletter published twic . e a year , is mailed to all graduates. Alumni are invited to attend periodic reunions and/or activities which might interest them. The Appreciation, Leadership , Legislative , Alumni Mack Easton, and Recognition Awards are bestowed each year at commencement and are sponsored by the Association . A program for alumni use of the campus Courses and are recorded on a standard CU-Denver transcript along with any other classes taken through the University. Students may want to consider taking classes through the Extended Studies pro grams under the following circumstances: 1. Not formally admitted to the University Prospective CU-Denver students need not wait for formal admission to the University to begin taking classes if they enroll in Extended Studies courses . Students who have not been formally admitted to the University can, in many cases , enroll in Extended Studies classes and transfer those credit hours (with departmental approval) to a degree program when they are formally admit ted. (Students planning to explore this option should check with the depart ment through which they intend to pursue their degrees to determine how many Extended Studies credits will be transferable.) Extended Studies I 55 recreation center is available through the office, 303-556-2549. The Alumni Association provides financial support for students through scholarships and academic recognition for students through the Academic Athlete Program. UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO FOUNDATION, INC. The chief goal of the University of Colorado Foundation, Inc . is to advance the University of Colorado's mission to become the premier public institution of higher learning in the nation . The University's academic leadership establishes priorities for private support. Professional fundraisers generate interest and enthusiasm for the University, recruit and organize volunteers, solicit gifts, and assist donors in gift planning. Established in 1967 as an independent, privately governed, nonprofit corpora tion, the CU Foundation raises and manages private support to benefit students and faculty by raising funds for scholarships, enriching academic programs , purchasing equipment, and upgrading facilities. In 1981, the CU Foundation established a Denver campus office: Campus Box 174; P.O. Box 173364; Denver , CO 80217-3364; Phone 303-556-430 1. 2. Scheduling conflicts . Students who are balancing family and work obligations, in addition to college, can take Extended Studies courses that fit their schedules. Many classes are offered in the evenings and on weekends. Depend ing upon the student's choice of degree programs, it may be possible to obtain an undergraduate degree from CU Denver by attending only evening and/ or weekend classes through Extended Studies. Students are encouraged to contact an academic advisor in their chosen discipline or an advisor in the Extended Studies programs to discuss the options available to them. 3. Academic suspension. Each academic unit of the University has established its own policies regarding students who are placed on academic suspension. When those policies allow , students on academic suspension may take a certain number of credit hours (as established by the appropriate academic unit) Cu-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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56 / Our University, Our Campus through Extended Studies to improve their grade-point averages . Students must check with an academic advisor in their chosen discipline to determine whether this option is open to them . In addition to credit courses , Extended Studies Programs offer a variety of non credit courses for both personal enrich ment and professional credentialing . Practicing professionals in business , engineering , public affairs , architecture and planning , and education are encour aged to contact the appropriate CUCenter for Applied Psychology (for information see Psychology in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog ) Center for Collaborative Educational Leadership (for information see the School of Education section in this catalog ) Center for Computational Mathematics (for information see Mathematics in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog ) Center for Environmental Sciences (for information see Environmental Sciences in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog ) Center for Ethics and Community (for information see Philosophy in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog) Center for Geotechnical Engineering Science (for information see the College of Engineering and Applied Science section in this catalog) Center for Research in Health and Behavioral Sciences (for information see Health and Behav ioral Sciences in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalog) CU-Denv er Catalog 2001-02 Denver school or college for information on courses applicable t o continuing professional education , certification , and licensure. Followin g are Extended Studies and Professional Development contacts: College of Architecture and Pianning 303-556-3382 College of Business and Administration (Professional Development Programs) 303-556-5826 Center for Research on Economic and Social Policy ( for information see Economics in the Liberal Art s and Sciences section in this catalog ) Colorado Center for Community Development The Colorado Center for Community Development provides technical, educa tional , and applied research assistance to organizations, neighborhoods, and communities that cannot afford or do not have a c cess to professional services . The Center targets its assistance efforts to rural small towns , low income and / or minority communiti e s , and non traditional , community-based service or development organizations. Fourth World Center for the Study of Indigenous Law and Politics ( for in1ormation see Political Science in the Liberal Arts and Sciences section in this catalo g) Institute for International Business ( for information see the College of Business and Administr a tion section in this catalog ) International Training, Education, and Research Academy (ITERA) The Int erna tional Training , Education , and Resear c h Academ y (ITERA) was developed in 1994 to assist public and private agencies throughout the global commun i ty in realizing their training School of Education 303-556-6361 College of Engineering and Applied Science ( Continuing Engineering Education) 303-5564907 College of Liberal Arts &Sciences 303-556-2735 Graduate School of Public Affairs 303-556-5970 goals . This mission is reflected in such Academy projects as Foundations of Counseling , a post-graduate counseling psychology course that ITERA offers on the Internet , and the DAY Training Academy , a program that provides disabled veterans the training they need to become National Service Officers and promote the needs of their fellow veter ans. These and other training endeavors help promote education and advance ment among individuals for whom such opportunities are not always readily avail able. ITERA is also an active contributor to the Total Learning Environment of the CU system . Older, well-established programs like the National Veterans ' Training Institute (NVTI) combine with enter prising new ones such as the Latino / a Research and Policy Center (LRPC) to give something back to the people and communities who host ITERA and the University so well. These programs aim to help develop the knowledge and skills that people in Denver and beyond need to build their urban communities into strong , sustainable metropolitan areas . Funding for all of these and other pro grams implemented by the International Training , Education, and Research Academy has come from a variety of sources . Federal agencies like the United States (U.S.) Department of Defense , U . S . Department of Labor , and the Department of Veterans Affairs have sponsored ITERA programs , as have state agencies like the Colorado Department of Human Services. These public sector efforts have been complemented by contracts and grants from private sector entities such as the Disabled American Veterans and other nonprofit organizations. The International Training , Education , and Research Academy both gives to and receives from many different social groups and institutions in the global community.

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TeleMedia Center (for information see the College of Engi neering and Applied Science section in this catalog) Transportation Research Center (for information see the College of Engin eeri n g and Applie1 Science section in this catalog) Centers and Institutes I 57 CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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Dean: Patricia O'Leah Office: CU-Denver Building, Third Floor Main Telephone: 303-556-3382 Fax: 303556-3687 College Web site: http: / / carbon . cudenver. edu/pu8lic/ AandP I FACULTY Professors: Ernesto Gene Bressler, Thomas Clark, Mark Gelernter , Spenser Havlick, George Hoover , Joseph Juhasz , Yuk Lee, Dwayne Nuzum , Patricia O'Leary, John Fahriye San car, Peter Schneider, Raymond Studer , Jr., Luis Summers , Willem van Vliet Associate Professors: Lois Brink , Joan Draper , Phillip Gallegos , Marvin Hatami, Michael H1olleran , Taisto Makela, Raymond McCall, Jr., Hans Morgenthaler, Benhett Neiman , Randall Ott, Ping Xu Assistant Barbara Ambach, Alan Berger, Flanagan , Julee Herdt, Ann Komara, Lawrence Loftin Ill, Eric Morris , Brian Muller , Doris Sung , Ekaterini Vlahos Senior Instructors: Javier Gomez Alvarez Tostado , Tim Castillo, John Frankhouser , Allen Harlow , Michael Jenson , Richard Margerum , E.J. Meade, Ronald Rael I INFORMATION ABOUT THE COLLEGE The College of Arc itecture and Planning at the University of Colorado at Denver prepares students for careers in architect11re, urban a'nd regional planning , landscape architect4re, and urban design . The College offers only undergraduate and graduate education in these fields in estate of Colorado [ Students intending o enter the design a1d planning profes ions normally the College ' s dergraduate degr as preparation :or entry into the Col ege ' s graduateeve) professional pr grams . Our graduate )rograms are also av Hable for those -vho already hold an ndergraduate 1egree in a field unre ated to design planning . A uniqu feature of the college is that it offers its 900 students exceptional educational experiences in two distinctive locations . The College ' s graduate programs in architecture, landscape architecture , urban and regional planning , and urban design are taught on the Denver campus of the University of Colorado in the heart of a vital downtown ; its undergraduate programs are offered on the Boulder campus in an environment ideally suited to the needs of undergraduate students. A multi-disciplinary Ph.D . in Design and Planning is offered across the two cam puses . With a diverse faculty committed to excellence in teaching , research , scholarship , and professional work, the College provides students with a broad range of learning opportunities . For detailed information on the under graduate programs, see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog and the college's website . Special Activities and Programs The College provides a diverse range of opportunities which enrich and enhance the education of its students. Through activities and functions-including a lecture series , a visiting critic series, exhibits , publications , and active student organizations-the College encourages contact among students, faculty, and members of the design professions . Each summer, .the College offers foreign study travel programs , which in recent years have traveled to Finland , France, Mexico , Prague, Rome , and Russia . The College makes available a range of scholarships and fellowships, some of which are based on need, others on performance, and still others of which are specifically intended to provide enrichment opportunities. The College supports an active and focused internship program for its students, giving them access to elective internship oppor tunities in the Denver metropolitan area and beyond . Finally , the College encour ages students to take control of their own education and supports, within its ability , any reasonable proposals from students that would enrich their own educational experiences . College Facilities The College's administrative headquar ters and graduate programs are located at 1250 14th Street in downtown Denver , on the northeastern edge of the Auraria campus. This favorable location gives easy access both to the extensive campus facilities , and to the urban amenities of Denver's lively lower downtown. Most of the major professional design offices in Denver , and many planning firms and agencies , are within easy reach of the College. These provide many opportuni ties for contact between students and practitioners . College facilities include studio spaces for students, lecture and seminar rooms, design jury spaces, exhibition spaces, and faculty offices. The College also provides a photographic darkroom and studio, a model and furni ture-making woodshop , and an extensive computer lab whose focus is computer aided design (CAD), computer 2-D and 3-D imaging, and analytic tools for planning. Also located in the College is a Geographic Information System (GIS) computer lab , which is open to all students of the University of Colorado at Denver . Scholarships/Financial Aid Students in the College have access to a number of scholarships and other finan cial assistance funds. Some of these funds are provided by the institution itself, while others are provided by external sources like the American Institute of Architects Education Fund , the American Planning Association , the American Society of Landscape Architects , and the Rocky Mountain Masonry Institute. For further information on these scholarships and graduate tuition awards , please contact the College ' s student services officer at 303-556-3387. For information on federal and state financial aid , contact the Office of Financial Aid, University of Colorado at Denver , Campus Box 125, P.O. Box 173364, Denver , CO 80217-3364 , 303556-2886. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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60 / College of Architecture and Planning ADMISSIONS General Requirements Applicants to the College of Architec ture and Planning are required to submit the following credentials : • University of Colorado Application for Graduate Admission form . • Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended. Transcripts must be mailed by the institution directly to the College. A certified literal English translation must also be submitted for documents that are not in English . • Letters of recommendation. U . S . residents-three letters ; international applicants-four letters . • Statement of purpose. Applicants to all programs must submit a statement summarizing career objectives and reasons for pursuing the intended program of study. Applicants to the Ph.D. program must also indicate a proposed area of specialization and , if possible , a potential faculty mentor. • Supporting materials for archit e cture and landscape architecture: Applicants to the graduate architecture and landscape architecture programs are required to submit a portfolio (6-12 bound pages , 8.5 x 11 inches ). Slides are not accepted. A portfolio is an orderly presentation of one ' s work. This includes examples of creative and analytical work including , but not limited to , essays, papers , photographs , and photographic reproductions of artistic work such as sculptures , drawings, paintings , musical compositions, and other fine arts. A stamped , self-addressed envelope must be included for return of the portfolio . Applicants to architec ture and landscape architecture are encouraged to submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores if their GPAs are below3.0 . • Supporting materials for urban and regional planning: Applicants to the urban and regional planning program should submit, in an 8 . 5 x 11-inch bound document , their statement of purpose , a resume , and a copy of a student or professional paper or project. Applicants to the urban and regional planning program are encouraged to submit GRE (general) scores ; those whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0 are required to submit GRE scores. • Supporting materials for the Ph.D.: Applicants to the Ph .D. program must submit a sample of written work and CU-Denv e r Catalog 200I-02 any other evidence relevant to admis sion to the program, i n accordance with submission guidelines which can be obtained from the Colle ge . Applicants to the Ph . D . program are required to submit GRE scores . • Application fee . Non refundable ($50.00-U . S . residents; $60.00 -international applicants ). International Applicants International applic an ts are required to submit the following documents in addition to the credentials listed under general requirements. • TOEFL score . For1the professional programs in architecture , landscape architecture , urban d e sign , and urban and regional planning , the College of Architecture and Planning requires a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Langua g e (TOEFL) sco re of 525 for students from non-English-speaking countries. However , the College requires students with Toefl scores between 525 and 550 t o register for an English course when they arrive at the University of Colorado at Denver . Applicants to the Ph .D. in Design and Planning must ha v e a c hieved a TOEFL score of at least 575. Note that an Official TOEFL Score Report is required ; institutional TOEFL reports are not acceptable . • Financial Resources Statement . Interna tional applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds avail able . To provide this evidence, each international applicant should follow these instructions: a . If an applicant ' s own money is to be used : In Part 2, Section 1 of the Finan cial Resources Statement , applicant's bank must certify that the full amount of money is on deposit in his or her account to meet tuition and expenses . b. If an applicant is sponsored by a fam ily member or friend : The sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2 , Section 2 . The sponsor's bank must also certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money applicant will need for tuition and expenses . c . If an applicant has been awarded a scholarship, Part 2 , Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed. Statements used for other institutions will not be accepted . Photocopied docu ments are not accepted unless signed by the originator; signatures must be original. Application Dates and Deadlines Fall Semester All professional programs-March IS Ph.D . in Design and Planning-by March I to be considered for financial support Spring Semester All programs-October I ( In architecture , urban design , and landscape architecture, students starting in the spring will only be able to sele c t from a reduced set of c ourses , and will get on track starting the next fall) Applications received after these dates will be considered only if space is still available . Confirmation Deposit A non-refundable confirmation deposit of $200 is required to secure an applicant's place in the architecture and landscape architecture programs, and in the Ph.D. program . The deposit is due at the time the applicant accepts the program's offer of admission . The deposit will be applied to the first semester's tuition when the student registers for classes . ADDITIONAL INFORMATION To request additional information, or to arrange a visit to the College, please phone or e-mail: Undergraduate programs: 303492-7711; A&P-Undergrad-info@carbon. cudenver.edu Graduate professional programs: 303-556-3382; A&P-Grad-info@ carbon . cudenver . edu Ph.D. program: 303492-7711 ; phddandp@spot.colorado.edu You may also write to: Office of the Dean , College of Architec ture and Planning , University of Colorado at Denver , Campus Box 126, P.O. Box 173364, Denver , CO 80217-3364 . For periodical updates on all aspects of the College , see our website at http:/ I carbon . cudenver.edu / public/ AandP I ACADEMIC POLICIES . Academic Standing Students must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in the graduate pro grams to remain in good standing and to graduate. If a student's GPA falls below a

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3.0, then he or she Wiill be placed on aca demic probation beginning the following semester . If the GPA remains below a 3.0 after the probationary semester , then he or she may be dismi ksed from the College . Appeals Any student may appeal the grades he or she receives ida class . The student should first informally discuss the issue with the relevant fa ulty member and then with the department chair or program director. If the matter is not resolved this way, the student may initia t e an appeal to the faculty member outlining t e reasons for the appeal. Copies are t be forwarded to the department chai'r or program director and the dean. The faculty member must respond in writing to the student's written appeal, with copies to the department chai r or program and the dean. An appeals committee consisting of three facu l ty members of the relevant academic program will review the written appeal. The chair of the appeals committee will convey its recommendation in writing to the student who Has appealed , with copi es to the instrudtor , the program chair or director , and dean . Attendance and Timeliness of vyork Students are expected to attend all meetings of classes . Excessive unexcused absences may result \ in a grade reduction at the discretion of the instructor . Absence from a will be excused for verified medical or for extreme personal The student may be required to furnisp evidence. Stu d ents' are to be com pleted in a timely maimer . Any assignment turned in late may have its grade reduced by an amount set at the discretion of the instructor . An assignlnent may be turned in late without penalty for verified medical reasons or for extrelljle personal emergen cies. Students must have their instructor's written permission an assignment in late. Students witrlj excused late work may turn in the by the end of finals week without enalty. Otherwise , the g r ade "IF" will be ssigned . Course Sequenfing and Advancement Programs in the C liege are structured o that certain cours f s must be taken oncurrently , others equentially . Students will not be lowed to enroll in a l course if its co-requisites or prerequisites have not been satisfied . Originality of Work Students must submit their own work. Where other sources are used in a student submission, they are to be clearly identified and referenced. The University con siders plagiarism and similar acts of falsification to be a serious matter which may result in suspension or expulsion . Information on codes of conduct and grievance procedures are available from the University of Colorado at Denver's Office of Enrollment and Student Affairs. PROGRAMS OF STUDY Architecture Chair, Department of Architecture: George Hoover, FAIA Telephone: 303-556-3382 The architecture program's mission is to lead in the discovery , communication , and application of knowledge in the disci pline of architecture. The program aims to excel in the education of its students , in the research and creative endeavors of its faculty , and in service to the community . To respond to this mission , the program has developed a unique intellectual , educational , and architec tural culture . First of all, the program celebrates its place in a very special set of landscapesurbanized Denver and the Front Range , and the spectacular natural landscape of the high plains and the Colorado Rockies . The architecture program therefore focuses not only on the design of build ings, but also on the interactions between buildings and their urban and natural settings. Secondly , the program examines the interplay between architectural form and the complex cultural and technological context in which architects operate. As a result of these dominant concerns, the program has created an academic envi ronment that is intellectually stimulating and educationally challenging , and that aims to educate students who will become leaders in the discipline and profession of architecture . The Department of Architecture , along with the Department of Planning and Design , offers a Bachelor of Environmen tal Design (B. Envd . ) on the Boulder campus. The Department of Architecture also offers two graduate degrees on the Denver campus: the Master of Architec-Architecture I 61 ture (M.Arch.) and the Master of Urban Design (M.U.D.). The following statement from the National Architectural Accredit ing Board (NAAB), which is responsible for accrediting all architecture programs in the United States , should help a student choose the appropriate degree program: "Most states require that an individual intending to become an architect hold an accredited degree. There are two types of degrees that are accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board: (I) The Bachelor of Architecture, which requires a minimum of five years' study, and (2) The Master of Architecture, which requires a minimum of three years of study following an unrelated bachelor's degree or two years following a related pre-professional bachelor ' s degree . These professional degrees are structured to educate those who aspire to registration and licensure to practice as architects . The four-year , pre-professional degree , where offered , is not accredited by NAAB. The pre-professional degree is useful to those wishing a foundation in the field of architecture , as preparation for either continued education in a professional degree program or for employment options in fields related to architecture. " The pre-professional degree offered by the College of Architecture and Planning is the B.Envd . The professional degree offered by the College is the Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) , which is fully accredited by the NAAB. The Master of Architecture , the College ' s accredited professional degree for students intending to seek licensure as archite c ts , offers two distinct paths. One track , the M.Arch ./4+2, is offered to students who have completed the College ' s B.Envd. or any other pre professional design degree from any NAAB-accredited institution . A second track, the M . Arch. / 3 .5, is available to stu dents who have completed an unrelated undergraduate or graduate degree, or to students who hold professional archi tecture degrees from other countries, but who seek to obtain an NAAB-accredited architecture degree . Students holding professional architecture degrees from foreign institutions will be given advanced standing commensurate with their previous educational experiences. THE MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (M.ARCH) M.Arch. I 4 + 2 The M . Arch ./4+2 is intended for stu dents who have completed the College's B.Envd . or any other pre-professional CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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62 / College of Architecture and Planning architecture degree from any NMB accredited institution. This six-year plan of study, with completion of both the four year undergraduate B.Envd offered on the Boulder campus and the accredited two year M.Arch. on the Denver campus of CU, has been fully endorsed by the NMB. Program Requirements Students completing the College ' s Bachelor of Environmental Design . (B.Envd.) on the Boulder campus-or completing a pre-professional degree from another NMB-accredited institution-complete a minimum of four semesters of course work (60 hours of credit ) after entry into the M . Arch . program . For further details on the B.Envd., and for descriptions of the pre-professional courses outlined below , please see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog . Term by Term: Six-year M.Arch Curriculum Undergraduate Sequence Four years at Boulder-30 credits per year (approx. ) 120 total credits FIRST YEAR Fall (I 5 credit hours) ENVD 1004-6. Intro to ENVD ENVD 2003-3. Ecology and Design UWRP 1150-3. Expository Writing Elective-3. Non-ENVD Elective Spring (I 5 credit hou rs) ENVD 2002-3. ENVD Media ENVD 2001-3. Intro to Social Factors inENVD Social Science-3. (see list of options) Humanities-3. (see list of options) Electives-3. Non-ENVD Elective YEAR TWO Fall (16 credit hours) ARCH 3114-3. History and Theories of Arch I ENVD 2110-6. Arch Studio I MATH 1300-5. Calculus I Elective-2. Non-ENVD Elective Spring (14 credit hours ) ARCH 3214-3. History and Theories of Arch II ENVD 3001-3. PHYS 2010-5. Elective-3 . Environment and Behavior College Physics I ENVD Elective CU-Denve r Catalog 2001-02 YEAR THREE Fall (I 5 credit hours) AREN 4035-3. Structures I ENVD 3210-6. Arch Studio II ENVD 3352-3. Arch Computer Media Elective-3 . ENVD Elective (ending in '4 ') Spring (I 5 credit hours ) AREN 4045-3. Architectural Structures II E lective-3 . ENVD Elective Electives-6. Elective-3. YEAR FOUR (ending in '5') ENVD Electives Non-ENVD Elective Fall (I 5 credit hours) AREN 3050-3. Environmental Systems I ENVD 4310-6. Arch Studio Ill ENVD 3115-3. Building Materials and Systems Elective-3. ENVD Elective (ending in '2') Spring (I 5 credit hours ) AREN 3060-3. Environmental Systems II ENVD 4410-6. Arch . Studio IV ARCH 4314-3. Arch Theory Elective-3 . ENVD Elective Graduate Sequence Two years at Denver-30 credits per year (approx.) 60 total credits FIFTH YEAR Fall (I 5 credit hours) ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar LA 6632-3. Site Planning Electives-6. * Spring (18 credit hours) ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar Electives-9. * (Take ARCH 6950-6. SIXTH YEAR Thesis Preparation if undertaking a thesis in the next semester) Fall (15 credit hours) ARCH 5410-3. Professional Practice ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio or ARCH 6951 Thesis (6) ARCH 6151-2. Advanced Design Seminar or nothing if thesis taken Electives-6. * (Take ARCH 6950-6. Thesis Preparation if undertaking a thesis in the next semester) Spring (I 5 credit hours) Electives-IS* • As of fall 1998, new students must take 9 credits each in cultural studies and professional studies , and 6 credits in technology studies. The remailiing 9 credits may be taken in any architecturally related electives on campus. M.Arch. I 3.5 The M.Arch ./3.5 is intended for those students who have completed an unre undergraduate or graduate degree , or for students who hold professional architecture degrees from other coun tries. This three-and-one-half-year plan of study on the CU-Denver campus has been fully accredited by the NMB. Prerequisites Students must complete the prerequi sites of college-level trigonometry and physics before enrolling in ARCH 5310 . Introduction to Building Technology. Since this class should be taken in the first semester in order to stay on track for graduation, students are strongly encouraged to complete the trigonometry and physics requirements before beginning the M . Arch. program. ARCH 5000 Math and Physics for Architects is offered in the summer on a pass/fail basis. This class meets the pre requisite requireme nts . A Graphics Workshop is recommended for students who do not have a back ground in architectural drawing and model building. This class is offered each year before the beginning of the fall semester. Students are also expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy, and should be familiar with PC or Apple operating systems. Program Requirements Students with a bachelor's or master's degree unrelated to architecture must complete a seven-or eight-semester sequence of course work and accumulate a minimum of 114 semester hours of credit. Advanced standing will be given to students who have completed a non NMB-accredited professional architec ture degree in another country, and who wish to obtain the NMB-accredited degree from this College. These students will work with the chair of the department to develop an individualized plan of study commensurate with their previous degrees and experience , and will have to complete at least 60 hours of credit

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in residence within the College of Architecture and Plcfuning. Course Sequence I . The M.Arch program is divided into five major componehts: design studies, 45 credit hours; studies, 12 credit hours; technology 18 credit hours; professional studies, 6 credit hours; and electives , 33 credit hours. A wide array of electives in these areas allows students to d ilor their graduate studies to their own Interests. FIRST YEAR I . . Fall Semester (1 5 hours) ARCH 5110-6 . Des ign Studio I ARCH 5111-3 . Des ign Seminar I ARCH 5210-3 . Intrrduction to Arc fitecture ARCH 5310-3. to Building Technology Spring Semester (18 )edit hours ) ARCH 5120-4. Des1gn Studio II ARCH 5121-2. Des i gn Seminar II ARCH 5220-3. of Architecture I LA 6632-3 . Site Ianning ARCH 5320-3 . Buil ing Construction Elective-3. * SECOND YEAR I Fall Semester (1 8 credit hours ) ARCH 5130-4. Design Studio III ARCH 5131-2 . Seminar III ARCH 5230-3 . History of Architecture II ARCH 5330-3. Envi ! onmental Control ARCH 5240-3. Hu an Factors in Design Syslmsi Elective-3. * .,Spring Semester (1 8 c edit hours ) ARCH 5140-4. Studio IV ARCH 5141-2 . Design Seminar IV !ARCH 5340-3 . Envi onmental Control Systems II fARCH 5350-3. Struftures I CH 5410-3 . Professional Practice ummer Semester (1 credit hours) CH 6150-4. Adv'rlced Design Stud " o CH 6151-2 . Adv ced Design Sem nar :Jectiv es-6. * THIRD YEAR Fall Semester (1 8 credit hours ) ARCH 5360-3. Structures 11 ARCH 6150-4. Advanced Design Studio ARCH 6151-2 : Advanced Design Seminar Electives-9. *or ARCH 6950-6. Thesis Preparation and Electives-3. Spring Semester (IS credit hours ) ARCH 6150-4 . Advanced Design Studio ARCH 6151-2 . Advanced Design Seminar Electives-9 . * or: ARCH 6951-6 . Thesis Electives-9 . * * Students must take 9 elective credits in cultural studies, 9 elective credits in professional studies, 6 elective credits in technology studies, and 9 elective credits in any architecturally related electives on campus. POST-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS The Post-Professional Program The Post-Professional Degree Program is a mid-career, post-professional inten sive course for those individuals in the design fields who seek to expand their knowledge and to advance their profes sional careers. In this program, students have the opportunity to study recent developments in their design fields resulting from advances in information technology, new theories and methods, and emergent discoveries and associa tions. The program currently offers two primary areas of study, the Master of Architecture 11 and the Master of Urban Design degree programs. Each of these programs has a research orientation and agenda, and their general intent is to create an educational context within which the fundamental practices of architecture and urbanism can be examined, advanced, and extended. The programs have been designed to be both flexible and interdisciplinary so as to provide students with a broad range of options which can accommodate and respond to each student's own interests and study agenda through course work, independent study, or optional training. Post-Professional Program: The Master of Architecture II The Master of Architecture ll is an advanced degree program which provides its students with a range of opportunities Landscape Architecture I 63 for exploring and extending their knowl edge of the practice of architecture. Students applying for admission to the program must have been awarded a live-year or six-year first-professional degree in architecture. They may enter the Master of Architecture II program in any semester of the academic year.' The Master of Architecture II pro gram does not offer an NAAB firstprofessional degree; it is an advanced studies program for those who already hold this first-professional degree. Students in the program must complete 30 hours of credit in required, recommended, and elective course work to qualify for the Master of Architecture II degree. To be eligible for graduation from the program, students must complete 12 credit hours of advanced design studio (ARCH 6150 /6151 or UD 6600 / 6601) in the degree project sequence and 12 credit hours in required and/or focus-area course work particular to their area of study. The remaining six cre dit hours are elective course work. A typical sequence of course work within a focus area leading to the award of the Master of Architecture II degree is as follows : SEMESTER ONE Design Studio: Focus-area required/ recommended course work: Elective course work: SEMESTER 1WO Design Studio: Focus-area required/ recommended course work: Elective course work: 6credits 6credits 3credits 6credits 6credits 3credits Landscape Architecture Chair, Deparbneot of Landscape Architecture: Gene Bressler Telephone: 303-556-3382 The mission of the landscape architecture program is to explore design as the means to engage a range of evolving interactions between the ethics, places, and methods of landscape intervention and transformation. Our studies focus on compelling issues inherent to the urban, suburban, rural , and wilderness environments of the Rocky Mountain region. The insights and possibilities generated from these local studies provide an understanding of landscape design that is transferable at many scales and to other lands and cultures. Specific objectives of the landscape architecture program are: 1. To develop excellence in the design process and design: exploring the CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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64 / Colleg e of Architectur e and Planning strategies , methods , and skills to study, synthesize , experiment with , make, and evaluate design precedents , landscape design , and design processes ; 2. To learn and extend core themes of the profession that include landscape architectural theory and precedents , technologies and materials , natural and cultural systems, and communications and inquiry media: studying the means to inform and develop one ' s ideas , to convey one ' s values , and to criticize one's work ; 3. To provide a working knowledge of the institutional framework within which the design process occurs: building a strong understanding of and the skills required in professional practice , including management , leadership, marketing , ethical conduct , and legal issues ; and 4. To engage service in ways that apply and integrate course work , research , and creative works to real world situa tions-participating with and involving others in opportunities to implement , enhance, demonstrate , communicate , and evaluate ideas and skills-and that provide measurable benefits. We aim to link theory with practice , history with change , technology with invention, and designers with their constituents . The curriculum prepares students for landscape architectural practice and research as presently known , and provides the setting to question, invent, test, and advance knowledge and capability of the profession . It consists of sequential and integrated design studios , core lecture and sem i nar courses , and elective opportunities , including a professional internship. Students develop capabilities in design within studio courses . Core themes, theories , precedents , technologies , and skills of the profession are developed in the lecture an
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of electives . The pr gram director will advise each studen engaged in this program of study . Concentration are s The curriculum d livers required courses that e nable tudents to learn and develop core theme of the profession inclusive of LAAB standards , w ith empha sis placed on studyi g the means to develop one ' s ideas to convey one's values , and to critic l ze one ' s work. In addition, the curric J lum offers four concentration which to choose elective cou ses offered by the program and ot er units within the College and U niversity in order to explore advanced topics , chfillenge normative paradigms , and devylop new knowledge and capabilities . Majors from other areas are invited to enroll in landscape architecture electiv f ' s . The four areas of oncentration are: Urban Design Advanced Landsc pe Archit ectural Technolog ies Landscap e Planni and Management History, The ory, and Criticism These broadly deijned areas of concen tration reflect and related to the program ' s and context in Denver and its metropolitan and regional contexts. T f ey also reflect faculty interests and resour feS available from within the College, y niversity , and area. Students may pursue one or more concen trations within the r quired 21 elective hours, of which 15 ate non-group related. Students are encourkged to consult with their assigned advisor or other mentors as they make their decisions. (Note: six elective crb dit hours are to fulfill requirements in each of landscape architectural techno ogies and history and theory group.) Urban Design Denver, the surro nding metropolitan areas, and the newly emerging urban areas within the region provide limitless issues, topip, and situations fueling interests in urban design. The field of urban design is co plex and crosses many disciplines , in luding architecture , landscape architect re , urban planning, real estate develop ent, law , engineering , and the social scien s . Students interested in this concen ation are urged to seek and enroll in co rses that provide: • An analytical und standing of the urban/built e nviro ment • The understandin and skills from which to develop, ynthesize, create, and test responsiv implementation strategies Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to: CE5622-3. l.A6686-3 . l.A6930-3. SOC4230-3. UD6620-3. UD 6621-3. UD6686-3. URP 5520-3. URP6633-3. URP6634-3. URP6635-3 . URP6665-3 . URP6670-3. URP6676-3. Urban Transportation Planning Special Topics: Open Space in Urban Design Landscape Architecture Internship (requires pre-approval by advisor /director) City and Region Architecture of the City The City as an Artifact Special Topics in Urban Design Urban Spatial Analysis Urban Form Theory Preservation Theory and Practice History of American City Building Urban Market Analysis Urban Economic Development Urban Housing Advanced Landscape Architectural Technologies Many students will work within a variety of venues involving built works . Familiarity, competence, and interest in learning, using, evaluating, and develop ing existing and new technologies are compelling. These technologies include: computer applications, design-build/learn by building, materials, and construction processes. Students interested in expanding their knowledge , skills, and future applications of technologies are encouraged to seek and enroll in courses that provide them with: • Significant exposure and facility with applied technologies • Appreciation for the value, strengths, weaknesses , and potential of the technologies to develop, implement, and evaluate their design works Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to: ARCH 5310-3. ARCH 6390-3. ARCH 6410-3. ARCH 6411-3. l.A 6641-3. l.A6686-3. Introduction to Building Technology Special Topics in Technology Computer Graphics Computer Applications in Practice Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture Special Topics: Advanced Landscape Architectural Technologies l.A6686-3 . l.A6930-3. URP6612-3 . Landscape Architecture I 65 Special Topics : Computer Applications (VARIES) Landscape Architecture Internship GIS for Planners Landscape Planning and Management Landscape planning is an area in which landscape architects play an increasing and vital role , particularly in this region, resulting from pressures to develop non urbanized or undeveloped lands and to develop and manage public lands . Study within this concentration area addresses development and advancing knowledge and capability of the profession in: Ecological systems Urban and regional growth Land use Real estate development and finance Environmental impact assessment Planning and development processes Courses available to landscape architecture students include , but are not limited to: l.A6622-3 . l.A6641-3. l.A6930-3. URP5530-3 . URP6612-3. URP6640-3. URP6641-3. URP6642-3. URP6650-3 . URP6651-3. URP6652-3. URP6653-3 . URP6660-3. URP6661-3. URP6664-3. URP6671-3. URP6673-3. Visual Quality Analysis Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture Landscape Architecture Internship Planning Law GIS for Planners Community Development Process Social Planning Neighborhood Planning Environmental Planning II: Policy and Law Environmental impact Assessment Growth Management Natural Resource Management and Planning Real Estate Development Process Real Estate Development Finance Fiscal impact Analysis Regional Economic Development Transportation Planning 1: Transport Network Analysis History, Theory, and Criticism Advanced study in history , theory, and criticism of design is fundamental to the landscape architect's knowledge of the built environment, the intellectual forces that create it, and the theoretical construct of historic precedents in design influencing decisions. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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66 / College of Architecture and Planning Advancing knowledge and capability of the profession in this area of concentra tion is compelling and serves: • To better inform designers eager to learn, generate, and develop ideas, and arrive at critical judgements about the worth of these ideas • To enhance and inform one's perspec tive in a context of economic boom where new development is flourishing Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to: ARCH 5230-3. ARCH 6161-3. ARCH 6210-3. ARCH 6212-3. ARCH 6220-3. ARCH 6221-3. ARCH 6910-3. LA6686-3. LA6686-3 . LA6686-3 . LA6686-3. LA6686-3. LA6686-3 . LA6930-3. History of Architecture II Precedents in Architecture History of American Architecture History of Modern Architecture History of Architectural Theory Post-Structuralist Architecture Teaching Assistantship Special Topic: Architecture and the Landscape-Exploration in Boundary Special Topic: Contemporary Theories and Criticism of Landscape Architecture Special Topic : Landscape Architectural History Special Topic : Modernism in Landscape Architecture Special Topic: Open Space in Urban Design Special Topic : Representations of Landscape Architecture Landscape Architecture Internship Urban and Regional Planning Chair, Deparbnent of Planning and Design: Dwayne Nuzum Telephone: 303556-3382 Urban and regional planners in the United States and other countries seek to identify social needs and environmental capacities, anticipate change and its impact on communities, shape the pattern of human settlements , provide essential infrastructure, maintain viable economies , and achieve and preserve sustainable communities that are suitably fit to their natural surroundings. Study in planning considers how social needs are CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 legitimated, knowledge about communi ties and regions is compiled and analyzed, possible courses of action are evaluated , plans are formulated, implementation is transacted through the means of educa tion, investment, negotiation and regula tion, and how plans' consequences are tracked over time. These tasks require a high order of ability: to amass and manipulate infor mation , to represent and model essential phenomena and processes , to simulate futures, and to judge outcomes having diverse dimensions . They also require the ability to portray and communicate key concepts , diagnoses , and actions, and to harness knowledge about all the key actors on the scene in order to understand their needs , motives , and possible . responses to the public actions that plans provoke. Underlying these classes of abilities is a base of knowledge that easily overreaches the pounds of any one discipline . Planners must understand theories regarding urban and regional process , concepts of presentation , communication and negotiation, technologies for the depiction and manipulation of spatial information , means by which to docu ment, judge, and forecast change in urban private economic motives and constraints , the behavioral inclinations of all the major classes of players on the urban scene, the mesh of laws that empower planning and govern private action , and the broader political economy of regional systems. Needless to say, the education of plan ners can only begin in the university. It must be a life-long pursuit, and planning programs , including this one, are becom ing increasingly supportive of the continu ing education needs of professionals.lt is the intellectual excitement of this ongoing pursuit of knowledge that draws many to the field. The Department of Planning and Design , along with the Department of Architec ture, offers a Bachelor of Environmental Design (B.Envd.) degree on the Boulder campus . The Depa,rtment of Planning and Design also offers the Master of Urban and Regional Planning (M.U.R.P. ) graduate degree on the Denver campus. The Master of Urban and Regional Planning is fully accredited by the national Planning Accreditation Board , and prepares students for professional careers in planning and for further study. For further details on the B.Envd. , see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog. Additional details about the master' s program follow . THE MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (M.U.R.P.) Prerequisites Students are expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy, and should be familiar with PC or Apple operating systems. A Graphic Workshop is recommended for students who do not have a background in drawing and model building . The workshop is scheduled each year before the beginning of the fall semester. Program Requirements The Master of Urban and Regional Planning is the College ' s accredited degree for students intending to practice as planners . With no advanced standing, candidates for the M.U.R.P. degree must complete a mjnimum of 51 credit hours of graduate work, including all core courses (27 credit hours), a concentration (15 credit hours minimum) , and additional electives (9 credit hours) . Entering students who have engaged in the study or practice of planning elsewhere may petition the faculty during their initial semester to determine whether any credit will be awarded or degree . requirements relaxed as a result of these prior activities. A maximum of 27 credits of course work can be applied for advanced standing. Students who receive the College ' s Bachelor of Environmental Design (B. Envd . ) degree on the Boulder campus and who have maintained a GPA of at least 3.0 will be admitted to the M.U.R.P. with advanced standing. These students can earn the M .U.R.P. degree after completing a minimum of 42 credit hours, which will include the core courses and an approved concentration. Students holding the Col lege's B. Envd . degree who also completed the undergraduate planning option with a GPA of at least 3.0 (and with a grade of at least 3 . 0 in ENVD 4320 , Planning Studio III) will , in addition, receive a waiver with credit for URP 6630, Planning Studio I. These students will earn the M.U.R.P. degree upon completion of a minimum of 36 credit hours, including 21 credit hours of core courses and all requirements for an approved concentration. The above conditions for advanced standing apply only to students who graduated from the College's undergraduate program within the last five years. Those who graduated earlier may receive advanced standing at the discretion of the head of the graduate program in urban and regional planning , in consultation with program faculty .

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ore Courses RP 5501-3. Planning Issues and Pr dcesses RP 5510-3. Methods I RP 5511-3. Methods II RP 5520-3. Spatial Analysis RP 5530-3. Plarning Law RP 6630-6. Plarning Studio 1 RP 6631-6. Pl<41ning Studio II A thesis option 6950 , Thesis esearch and Progrfunming , and URP )51, Thesis) is avai j able primarily for stu ents who are interested in pursuing more jvanced academicltraining in planning r related fields . Th J sis work will substilte for Studio II. I reas of Concentration The and elective mrses enable studb nts to explore in an area of interest. Students 10uld, however , build on the expertise hich they already This can by either focusing on a related >ecialty , or by incr Jased specialization a previously acquired area of expertise. 11e program supports four official mcentrations : (1) ji>hysical planning, ) environmental p ' anning , ( 3) economic ! velopment planning, and ( 4) urban !Sign. A set of " fourydation courses " identified in each concentration , us additional supifrting electives . Physical Planni"f/. Concentration: lYSical planning a9dresses the spatial rangement of the environment, from e scale of the to the scale of the gion, and its fitness for human activities. 1ysical planners e1ablish the policy 1d regulatory for design ! velopment , practi f ing as land use comprehensive or in special !S such as preservt tion , transportation open space plann 1 ng , real estate devel>ment, and urban q esign . Environmental Pfanning Concentram: All urban and regional planning : tions impact the ehvironment in me manner , and environmental anners must manage these impacts , 1th pro-actively and re-actively . The 1 vironmental ptan d ing concentration t roduces planners r o the policy and issues surrounding the . vironmental ations of planning tions, as well as to ethods for their sessment, control, and mitigation . Economic Develo ment Planning mcentration: Eco omic development ns to amass withi communities and gions the resource .:..jobs, capital , tax . se-needed to sus ain or improve the 1ality of life and ins re opportunities for all within the private economy, facilitated through appropriate public actions and services . Planners foster economic change as diagnosticians , strategists, and promoters ; gauge growth's effect in light of environmental capacities; manage its social benefits , mitigate its negative consequences, and fashion its imprint on the physical landscape of localities , regions , states, and nations . Students pursuing this concentration should seek as well to become conversant with the essentials of physical or environmental planning . Urban Design Concentration: Planners are called upon with increasing frequency to organize spaces at a scale greater than that of a building site, but less than that of an entire community . This concentration provides the essential abili ties needed to contribute to the development of these intermediate-scale spaces. Among these are skills in spatial analysis , design synthesis, real estate finance , and graphic expression . ln addi tion to the four official concentrations, students have the choice of defining their own concentration . DUAL DEGREE OPTIONS Students may also enroll in dual degree programs with public administration (M.P.A.-M.U.R.P.), law (JD) , and business (M.B.A.). In addition, dual degree options are also available combining the M.U.R.P. with landscape architecture (M,L.A.) and architecture (M.Arch.) . Students may also take up to six credits of independent study, after first assembling a plan of study with one of the regular faculty . Up to three credits of internship may be applied to the 51-<:redit program . Course Sequence FIRST YEAR Fall Semester (12 credit hours ) URP 5501-3. Planning Issues and Processes URP 5510-3. Planning.Methods I URP 5530-3. Planning Law Elective-3 credits . Spring Semester (12 credit hours) URP 5511-3 . Planning Methods II URP 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis URP 6630-6. Planning Studio I SECOND YEAR Fall Semester (15 credit hours) Concentration Courses-9 credits . Electives-6 credits . Ph. D . in Design and Planning I 67 Spring Semester (1 2 credit hours) URP 6631-6. Planning Studio II Concentration Courses-6 credits . Inter-Departmental Programs The Department of Architecture , the Department of Planning and Design , and the Department of Landscape Architecture share the idea that the complex problems of the built environment are best addressed through collaboration among the various design and planning disciplines , and through developing bodies of knowledge about the built environment. To further these ends, the departments and program jointly offer the advanced research degree , the Ph.D. in Design and Planning. Ph.D. in Design and Planning Program Director:' Will em Van Vliet Telephone: 303-492-5015 The College ' s interdisciplinary doctoral program examines the complex factors that help shape the planned and constructed environment. The program offers three areas of specialization : 1. Land Use and Environmental Planning and Design Work in this area focuses on purposeful intervention in the physical environment, including mechanisms and procedures such as land use controls , design review processes and standards, and environmental policies. It also deals with the planning and design of housing, neighborhoods, cities , regions, and the interrelationships among residential, economic , recreational, and transporta ti _ on systems. 2. Design and Planning Processes and Practices Work in this area focuses on the theory and methods of planning and design and the development of models and tools to understand and support decision processes and design practices. This area of specialization also includes the examination of practice-related issues such as the development of alternative and appropriate building technologies , energy-efficient designs , manufactured housing, and the design/build process. 3. History, Theory, and Criticism of the Environment Work in this area involves critical analysis of architecture , urban design, landscape architecture , and planning, and of the theories , processes , and policies that have regulated these fields. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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68 / College of Architecture and Planning Whether focusing on contemporary or past environments , the aim is to under stand and explain them in relation to individual and cultural values, and in their cultural and technological contexts . PREREQUISITES Applicants must hold at least a bachelor's degree , although most will have also completed a master ' s degree. Field specialization and background are open, and may include architecture, landscape architecture, architectural engi neering, urban design , geography , urban economics , environmental law , urban sociology , real estate , management science, computer science , public adminis tration, or environmental psychology . A successful applicant will have an under graduate grade-point average of at least 3.0 (out of a possible 4 points) , and a graduate grade-point average of 3 . 5 o ' r better. If students do not hold a professional or a pre-professional degree in a design or planning field , they will have to complete12 hours of upper-level under graduate course work in the College of Architecture and Planning. They will have to obtain in each of these courses a grade of B or higher . These courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student's faculty advisor , and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program . A student must have completed 12 hours in an undergraduate program in one of the following prerequisites . The one which applies will depend upon the student's intended area of specialization . In exceptional cases , a student may complete this requirement by taking addi tional undergraduate courses and gaining a grade of B or higher in each course . The courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student's faculty advisor , and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program . They may count toward fulfilling the degree requirements. • Social and Behavioral Sciences • Environmental and Natural Sciences • Engineering • Humanities A student must also have completed one of the following prerequisites . The one which applies will depend upon the student's intended area of specialization. In exceptional cases , a student may complete this requirement by taking additional undergraduate courses and gaining a grade of B or higher in each of these courses. The courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation CU-Deno e r Catalog 2001 02 with the student' s faculty advisor , and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program . They may count toward fulfilling the degree requirements . • Statistics . Including probability theory, parametric and non parametric methods, and acquaintance with basic multivariate techniques . A minimum of3 hours. • Mathematics . Including differential equations , finite mathematics , algor data structures , or other appropriate courses. A minimum of 3 hours . • Language . Ability to read at least one foreign language relevant to the intended dissertation . • Computer. Background in computer aided design (CAD) or geographic information systems (GIS). A minimum of3 hours . The applicability of a student's prior course work will be decided by the graduate studies committee upon review of a student's transcript and additional materials. If the student does not have the requisite educational background , grade point average , or GRE scores , the student may be admitted on a conditional or provisional basis , and additional course work may be required in accordance with Graduate School rules . PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS The Ph.D . requires 76 credit hours . Up to 18 transfer credits may be approved for students admitted with a master ' s degree. Students in the program will also have to meet the academic residency require ment , which requires six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor ' s degree. Two semesters of residence credit may be allowed for a master ' s degree from another institution of approved standing . However , at least four semesters of resident credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work taken at this University. Completion of the program therefore takes 3 or 4 years , depending on prior course work. The Ph.D . program has five compo nents: (1) Core Curriculum, (2) Research Specialization , (3) Minor Field of Study , (4) Electives , and (5) Dissertation. The Core of ten hours consists of seminars and colloquia on the theories and research methods in the fields of design and planning . All students, no matter what their specialization , must take the core in the first two years of their residence . For the Research Specialization, each student must take at least 12 hours of course work in one of the program's three specialization areas ; i.e.,land use and environmental planning and design ; design and planning processes and practices ; and history , theory, and criticism of the built environment . One of the courses must be an advanced methods class. The Minor Field of Study provides students with a strong back ground that supports their chosen research emphasis . It requires completio 1 of at least 12 hours of related course wor1 that provides in-depth knowledge in a relevant area. Elective course work consists of 12 hours of additional study in areas related to the dissertation topic . For the research specialization , the minot field of study , and the electives , students develop an individualized course of stud) to reflect their specific foci and career aspirations. The required course work is determined jointly by the student , the faculty advisor , and committee members . The Dissertation requires 30 hours of course work. Students are expected to define a research question in planning an ' design , to identify the research strategy to be used for answering this question , to conduct the research , and to write up the project in the form of a dissertation . A student is guided in this process by a dissertation advisor , and by the additional members who comprise the student's dissertation committee . Students must register for a minimum of five dissertation credits each semester of their dissertation work . If unable to register for at least five credits , they must request a leave of absence from the Ph . D . program until able to complete the mini mum dissertation requirement . Students may take up to a year's leave of absence before they ar e dis enrolled from the program . EVALUATIONS AND Successful candidates for the Ph.D. in Design and Planning pass four points of evaluation: (1) Preliminary Exam , ( 2 ) Comprehensive Exam , ( 3 ) Doctoral Dissertation , and ( 4) Final Exam . By the end of the first semester of residence , the student devises a degree plan which is approved by the graduate studies committee . A Preliminary Exam then evaluates the student's initial progress through the program . The Comprehensh Exam is an examination based on papers prepared by the candidate which survey the literature of the field , and which set out a proposed dissertation. This exam takes place after two semesters of residency , and before the student becomes a candidate for the Ph.D. degreE

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After advanceme?-t to candidacy, the t udent prepares a J?octoral Disserta tion, of fers in the tudent's chosen fie d. When the College's lisser t ation commi tee approves the Ina! dissertation su mission, it conducts . final Exam based on the student' s e s earch. T h is is open to the public . :OURSE SEQUE NCE 1RSTYEAR Stude nts develop heir degree plan, ake five semester hours of the required ore curriculum , take additional courses 1 thei r specialty area, make up any 1 r e requ isi t e courses, and take the 1 r eliminary exan1 . ECONDYEAR Stude nts take the emaining core o urses, continue t take electives in Jeir minor and specialty areas, begin terature surveys, and prepare for their h . I om pre enslve exrur . H IRD AND FOURTH YEAR Students their literature urveys, prepare a proposal , n d t ake the comprehensive exam. After om pl e tion of the comprehensive exam , 1 e res t of the third and fourth years ; spent researching and writing the i sser tation . Once the dissertation as been accepted, tudents take the nalexam. I ' ost-Professio 1al Program HE MASTER OF DESIGN rogram Information: Dwayne Nuzum elephone: T h e Master of Urbb Design is an inter lscip linary degree program 1 which students issues h ich i ntegrate the J;ields of architecture, n dscape architecture, urban planning , ansportation, real estate and political ' fairs . The mission is to address the total of urbanization through research, > llab o ration and leadership develop . ent within the incl 4 sive " public domain." h e program makes use of its setting the c o r e of downt@wn Denver, and c pl o r e s the evolvin environments of : ttlements, villages towns , cities , etropolises , and m galopolises in > lorado as wider ging planning b o ratori es for the tudio-based ojec t s or thesis st dies . The urban problem sol ng opportunities are further enhanced by the extensive public-private connections the College has established throughout a rapidly growing state. There are three general plans of study: I ) a 30 credit hour program for students who have received a five or six year professional degree in architecture, landscape architecture or planning (i. e. B.Arch , M.Arch., M .L.A., M . U .R.P.); 2 ) for international students, a four year accredited professional degree and other accepted qualifications would permit entry into a modified one calendar year long program that requires 39 credit hours for graduation; 3) a 66 credit hour pro gram , including six hours of summer internship , is also available for students who hold a pre-professional ( non accredited design) degree ; 4 ) for students from all other undergraduate degree programs , a customized three year curriculum of 96 credit hours is required including an internship component of six credit hours during one summer. In all cases fall semester is the preferred entry time . The emphases of the urban design degree focuses on three primary concerns that affect both horizontal and vertical developments in tactical and strategic timeframes . I. History and theory of urbanization in the inclusive public domain. II. Systems and processes used in the making of the urbanized public domain. Ill. Designing the urban public domain . The ultimate goal of the program is to educate students to be effectiv e in the public domain as problem originators, venture designe r s, idea linkers and decision makers. These urban design degree graduates through creative problem solving , management, advocacy and implementation can achieve outstanding ends in the professional , public and development process. Course Sequence (30 credit hours with professional degrees ) Semest e r One (15 credit hours ) I. History, Theory URP 6633-3 . Urban Form Theory II. Systems , Processes URP 6651-3 Environmentallmpact Assessment URP 6660-3 Real Estate Development Process II. Design * UD6600-6 Post-Profes sional Program I 69 Transformation Decomposition Studio Ontegrated team taught course) This course is being revised to be as follows : Urbanization Transformation Studio-4 cr. Urbanization Methodologies Seminar-2 cr. S e mester Two (15 c r e dit hours ) I. History , Theory Elective 3-6. History , Theory Selected List II. Systems , Processes UD 6686-3 . ST: Urban Design Elective-3 . III. Design * Seminar Systems , Processes Selected List UD 6601-6 . Composition Studio This course is being revised to be as follows : Interdisciplinary Studio-6 cr. * Summer options a) complete thesis commitment begun in semester one with prior approval of subject and three semester sequence of (1) thesis prep, (2) research and conceptual stages , (3) final documentation completion . This selected thesis sequence is an adjustment of the one year or the last year course progression. After the advisor and student have agreementon the thesis subject the study sequence i s then modified . First semester (third or fifth semester): Substitute thesis prep and an integrated thesis seminar course for the design course. Second semester (fourth or sixth semester) : The studio content combines thesis research transitioning into conceptschematic design scenarios. Summer semester is a combination of interrelated independent study and thesis studio conclusion courses. Note : To pursue the thesis option, written and phone subject proposals must be completed with the advisor b efore enrollment. b) Skip spring selected elective (six hours) for overseas study (six hours) c) Summer internships and/or third studio CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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70 / College of Architecture and Planning Course Sequence . (66 credit hours with only pre professional degrees) Semester One (J 5 credit hours) I. History, Theory URP 6633-3. Urban Form Theory II. Systems, Processes LA 6632-3. Site Planning URP 6651-3. Environmental impact Assessment Ill. Design URP 663().6. Planning Studio I Semester Two (J 5 credit hours) I. History, Theory ARCH 6220-3. History of Architectural Theory LA 6620-3. LA Theory and Criticism II. Systems, Processes LA 5572-3. Landscape Ecology Ill. Design URP6631-3. Planning Studio II Semester Three (Summer, six credit hours) II. Systems, Processes UD 684().6. Independent Study (Internship or overseas study for six hours) Semester Four (J 5 credit hours) I. History , Theory URP 6670-3. Urban Economic Development II. Systems Processes UD 6686-3. ST: Urban Design Seminar URP 6660-3. Real Estate Development III. Design * UD 660().6. Transformation Decomposition Studio (Integrated team taught course) This course is being revised to be as follows: . Urbanization Transformation Studio-4 cr. Urbanization Methodologies Seminar-2 cr. Semester Five (J 5 credit hours) I. History, Theory Electives 3-6. History, Theory Selected List CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 II. Systems , Processes Electives 3-6. Systems, Processes Selected List III. Design* UD 6601-6. Composition Studio This course is being revised to be as follows: Interdisciplinary Studio-6 cr. * see one year summer options above Selected Electives Recommended History, Theory (I) ENVD 4233-3. Environmental ARCH 5220-3. ARCH 5230-3. ARCH 6220-3. LA5521-3. LA6620-3. URP6635-3 . Aesthetics History of Architecture I History of Architecture II History of Architectural Theory History of Landscape Architecture LA Theory and Criticism History of American City Building System, Processes (ll) LA 5572-3. Landscape Ecology LA 6632-3. Site Planning URP 5530-3. Planning Law URP 6661-3: Real Estate Development URP6673-3 . URP6686-3 . Suggested and Finance Transportation Planning 1: Transport Network Analysis ST: Design Review History, Theory (I) ARCH 6161-3. Precedents in Architecture LA 6686-3. Special Topics in LA URP 6670-3. Urban Economic Development System, Processes (II) ARCH 5240-3. Human Factors in Design ARCH 6410-3. Computer Graphics LA 6686-3. Special Topics in LA URP 6612-3. Geographic Information Systems for Planners URP6664-3. URP6665-3. URP6674-3. Fiscal impact Analysis Urban Market Analysis Transportation Planning II: Urban Transportation Planning Graduate Certificate in Historic Preservation The College of Architecture and Planning together with the History Department in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers a graduate certificate in Historic Preservation. The certificate can be earned as part of an M.Arch . , M.L.A., M.U.R.P., or an M.A. in History . It requires a total of 18 credit hours. Two preservation courses are required: HIST 5232-3. Historic Preservation URP 6634-3: Preservation Theory anc Practice These are core courses on preservatior theory and practice from the architect and planner ' s perspective of intervening through design and regulation and from the historian's perspective of how the past might guide the future. A thesis or studio (6 cr. ) is required. Students choose their remaining courses from a selection of courses in the following categories: History of Architecture , Landscape Architecture , or Historic Places (3 cr.) Preservation Methods (3 cr.), including Preservation Technology, Documentatior , of sites and structures, Visual research methods, and other subjects . Students are encouraged but not to take an internship in preservation. Preservation certificate students work out with their advisor a selection of courses . appropriate to their needs and the requirements of their degree program. For more information, contact Professor Tom Noel in the History Department (303 556, tnoel@carbon cudenver.edu) or Associate Professor Michael Holleran (303, michael. holleran@cudenver.edu) in the College of Architecture and Planning.

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I Dean: Mark Alan Heckler Associate Dean: Jermance College Administtative Office: AR 176 Administrative Phone: 303-556-2279 Fax: 303-556-23 College Advising pmce: 303-556-8302 The College of Arts &Media maintains that, by their power to illuminate ideas and move the spirit , the arts are both an essential element of individual and social life and e means of knowing about one' s self and the world. The College is a conservator of culture where proficiencies in a chosen discipline are developed , artistic expression and experimentation are encouraged, and new technologies explored. The College serves a student body of diverse interests and cultural back grounds. In addition to students from the Denver metro8olitan area, the College is an educational for nonresident , and transfer stu dents. Included in he student population are individuals se g their first degree , older students co sidering a career change, and of all ages who come for personal growth and enrichment. In response to the complex needs of its student body, the d:ollege offers programs which emphasize Jxcellence in visual and performing arts, eparation in commer cial art applicatio s, and multidisciplinary studies. Off-camp s classes are offered at various metrop litan locations, and international programs are available in conjunction with universities located around the world . Consistent with its commitment to be innovative and inclu sive , the College uses distance-learning technologies to pn;>vide educational experiences for students whose personal circumstances m e access to the campus difficult. The College of ts & Media serves as a center for cult al and community activity by hosting symposia and work shops by recogniz d artists, critics , and historians , as well leaders in the fields of technology and commerce. The College acknowledges its social responsibilities by establisWng cooperative relationsWps with civic groups , regional arts agencies, museums , galleries, performance venues , area public schools and community colleges , professional societies , and the business community. COLLEGE COALS 1. The College of Arts & Media aims to instill , inspire, and model creativity founded upon the accumulated knowledge of human civilization . 2 . The College serves as an intersection of art, technology , and commerce. 3 . The College seeks to develop the artist committed to social responsibility and the citizen who will advocate for the role of the artist in society. 4. The College strives to become a center of cross-cultural exchange and understanding. 5 . The College works to enrich the quality of life in the larger community , to foster community partnerships, and to encourage mentorship. 6. The College aims to integrate interdisci plinary modes of learning and creating . 7. The College adapts to meet future needs of diverse student constituencies. UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS Degree Programs Students can earn baccalaureate degrees , including areas of emphasis listed below, in the following areas: Bachelor of Arts in Fine Arts (B.A.) Art History Studio Art Bachelor of Arts in Theatre (B.A.) Acting/Directing Design / Technical Integrated Studies Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.FA.) Drawing Film / Video Production Multimedia Studies Painting Photograph y Sculpture Bachelor of Science in Music (B.S.) Music Industry Studies Music Management Music Performance Music Technology MINOR PROGRAMS Most CU-Denver departments have developed minor programs. A minor is not required for graduation. Students interested in completing a minor should contact the individual departments regarding requirements . A minimum of 12 credit hours in residence is required for all minors . DOUBLE MAJORS Students may graduate with more than one major by completing all requirements for each major. SECOND DEGREES Students who have been awarded a bachelor's degree may be granted a second bachelor's degree provided that (a) all general requirements for that degree have been met ; (b) the major for the second bachelor' s degree is different from the major for the first ; and ( c) the College and major department residence requirements are satisfied. A second degree from the college requires a minimum of 30 additional semester hours of credit. DOUBLE DEGREES Students may earn two degrees in the College of Arts & Media or from two different schools or colleges of the University of Colorado at Denver simultaneously by fulfilling all require ments for both degrees . Students must complete a minimum of 150 semester hours applied toward the two degrees. Requirements for Admission A student matriculating in the College of Arts and Media must be admitted at three levels : (1) as a student of the University of Colorado at Denver , ( 2) as a student in the College of Arts & Media, and (3) as a student within a College of Arts & Media department. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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72 / College of Arts & Media Admission to the College of Arts & Media is selective, based upon a variety of factors . Factors for consideration in the admission process may include a careful evaluation of secondary school records, (which may include recommendations from guidance counselors, advisors , teachers , and others); scores on stan dardized tests; and a creative review in the form of an audition, portfolio review or other program-based incoming assessment . Applicants should be able to indicate evidence of a level of character and maturity essential in potential students who hope to benefit fully from the unique offerings of the University and its urban environment. The College also views participation in meaningful school and community activities as an indicator of potential success. A student applying to the College of Arts & Media must indicate the particular degtee program that he or she wishes to enter . Admission to the College of Arts & Media is based on a two-part application and evaluation: academic and creative/artistic. The Office of Under graduate Admissions at the University of Colorado at Denver evaluates the academic application. Additionally, all undergraduate programs at the College of Arts & Media require an incoming artistic/creative assessment, which may take the form of an audition , the submission of a creative portfolio , a writing sample, interview or other such measure . The artistic/creative review is conducted by the appropriate department or program, (see specific programs for more information). Both the academic application and the artistic/ creative review are evaluated as a whole to determine admission and must be completed before an admissions decision can be made . Creative material should be mailed directly to the specific or program. No admission decision will be made until the candidate's file is complete and the department has forwarded ar. tistic /creative review results to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. Note: Please be aware that CU-Denver does not return creative materials and will not assume any liability or responsibility for original materials submitted by an applicant that are lost or damaged while in its possession. Candidates are urged to complete and file their applications as soon as possible, especially those who are seeking financial aid. Applicants will be notified promptly if additional information is required. No admission decision will be made without complete information . CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the University provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores , rank in high school class, grade-point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the University. Two levels of deficiency will be recognized . TRANSFER STUDENTS The departments and programs of the College of Arts & Media evaluate course work taken at other institutions . to determine their equivalency for transfer to degree programs. Students who have completed more than 15 semester hours of transferable course work are evaluated for admission on the basis of their college grade-point average (GPA) without regard to their high school performance . To be considered for admission to the College of Arts & Media, a transfer student must have a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale for all college course work attem pted. Transfer applicants seeking priority admission must have a minimum 2.5 GPA for all work applicable to the undergraduate degree, and a 3.0 GPA in specific program-related courses . Students with less than an overall2.5 GPA can be admitted if they have at least a 2.0 GPA on the last 15 semester hours of applicable course work, at least a 2.0 GPA in CAM-based courses, and at least a 2.0 overall GPA in courses applying to the degr ee. Transfer applicants who do not meet either of the priority admission standards are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA earned in the last 15 credit hours. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available. For infor mation about specific policies on transfer of credit, consult a CAM advisor. INTRA-UNIVERSITY TRANSFER Students who want to transfer to the College of Arts & Media from another college or school of the University of Colorado at Denver must formally apply to the College of Arts & Media . Students will be evaluated only on course work that applies to the degree program. Generally, this will exclude course work of a vocational nature and courses in activity PE and remedial subjects. Students who have completed at least 15 applicable semester hours will be evaluated on their college work; students with fewer than 15 transferable hours will be evaluated on the basis of both high school and college work. Students will be considered for admission on either their overall GPA in applicable course work from CU and all previous institutions or on their last 15 credit hours. Applicants with less than a 2.0 GPA in related courses (from CU or other institutions) and overall CU GPA of less than 2.0 will be denied admission even though they may meet other requirements for consideration. TRANSFER OF MAJOR WITHIN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND MEDIA Undergraduate students who wish to transfer from one department to another within the college must submit a Change of Major form , which may be obtained in any CAM department. The form is reviewed by the CAM advisor. Students will be contacted if there are major specific requirements (ie. audition, etc.) that need to be met prior to change of major approval . MUSIC AUDITION All entering freshmen and transfer students applying for admission to music degree programs , with the exception of the Music Industry Studies program, must complete an audition. Contact the Department of Music & Entertainment Studies, 303-556-2727, for information on scheduling an audition. Academic Policies Students are referred to the General Information section of this catalog for a description of academic policies that apply to all undergraduate students at CU-Denver. The policies which follow apply specifically to the College of Arts & Media (CAM). ACADEMIC ADVISING New freshmen and transfer students with fewer than 40 hours will start at the Academic Advising Center (303-352-3520) for their initial advising. There the student will be introduced to the University and its policies, as well as the University Core requirements. Basic degree requirements will be explained, although the student should consult the Major advisor or the College of Arts &Media (CAM) advisor for specific questions. The CAM advisor assists in the transition from the advising center to the College. The CAM advisor will explain specific degree and College requirements, and any remaining Core requirements. The CAM advisor will assist with grad uation check-out procedures and any

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general CAM advi , ing questions . To make an appointment w'th the CAM advisor , contact the CAM ean ' s Office at 303-556-22 79. If and when the tudent has determined a major, they shou d meet with a faculty advisor in their m jor department. The faculty advisor wil be responsible for advising as well as verifying the completo determine theirl major advisor. For each Spring b ern ester, an advising STOP is placed on ach College of Arts & Media student' s egistration . Students must see their major advisor before the hold is released arid they are allowed to register . t ACADEMIC PROBATION AND SCHOLASTIC SUSPENSION Good academic standing in the College requires a cumula t ive grade-point average (GPA) of 2 . 0 on all University of Colorado course work. earned in another college or school1'ithin the University of Colorado system cve used in determining the student' s standing and progress toward t?e degree . Grades earned outside thl University of Colorado system are not us d in calculating the grade-point avera eat the University of Colorado . Academic Proba ion Students whose cumulative grade-point average falls belo a 2 . 0 at the end of an academic t e rm be placed on {\Cademic probation. Students are informed in writing of academ ' c probation . Students on academic prob f tion will be required to achieve a minimum 2.2 grade-point average each until their cumulative g rade-point average is at least a 2 . 0 , at wh ich tim y students will be removed from proration. There is no rest iction on the length of time a student on probation status ; however , s udents must achieve a minimum 2.0 cum lative CU GPA to meet graduation requir ments . Academic Susper.sion Students on aca ernie probation who do not meet the 2. minimum required grade-point avera e in the succeeding semester will be suspended from the College . Students re informed in writing of academic A student's sus ension status is perma nently indicated o the official University of transT:ipt , and registration restrictions are im r osed . First Suspension Students who first fail to meet the aca demic conditions of probation are placed on first suspension for one calendar year. Students on first suspension may only register for CU-Denver courses offered through the Extended Studies program. A student under first suspension may be readmitted before the end of the nor mal suspension period only if the student has demonstrated academic improve ment in one of the following ways : 1. raise the cumulative CU GPA to a minimum of 2.0; 2 . achieve a minimum semester GPA of 2 . 5 with a minimum of 6 semester hours of University of Colorado course work; or 3. attend another college / university and raise to a minimum 2 . 0 the combination of cumulative CU GPA and cumulative GPA from another institution . Students are removed from first suspension after one year upon written request to the CAM Academic Policies Committee . Second Suspension Students who fail to meet the condi tions of continued probation for a second time or fail to meet the semester GPA requirements while on first suspension are placed on second suspension for an indefinite period of time. Students on second suspension may be readmitted to the College only by petition to the CAM Academic Policies Committee . Students will not be considered for read mission unless they have demonstrated improved academic performance at the college / university level. PETITIONING FOR EXCEPTIONS TO ACADEMIC POLICY The CAM Academic Policies Committee is responsible for the administration of the academic policies of the College as established by the faculty . The committee is empowered to grant exceptions td the academic policies of the College. Students wishing to petition an exception to aca demic policy should submit a letter of request to the Dean ' s Office . INDEPENDENT STUDY Studen t s who are juniors , seniors or graduates may register for independent study with the written approval of the appropriate faculty member and Associ ate Dean . The amount of credit to be given for an independent study project shall be determined at the time of registration. A maximum of 12 credits in independent study may apply toward the bachelor's degree. Graduation Requirements I 73 1 . Must be taken with full-time , tenured or tenure-track faculty. 2. May not be taken as substitute for regularly scheduled courses. 3. Must be approved by program directors or department chair . 4. Non-CAM majors: Independent studies are generally only available to CAM majors . However , exceptions may be granted to non-CAM majors in approved academic minors , individual l y structured majors, and interdisciplinary Master of Humanities programs. Associate Dean's approval required for non-CAM majors . INTERNSHIPS/COOPERATIVE EDUCATION Students seeking academic credit from employment experience should consult The Career Center section of this catalog. Undergraduates must have attained junior standing and have a minimum 2. 75 GPA. A maximum of three hours . of internship credit per semester and nine hours overall is allowed. INCOMPLETE GRADE POLICIES 1. Reason for Incomplete must be verified , compelling , and extraordinary cir cumstance beyond student's control which made completion of the course impossible . 2 . The majority of course requirements (75% ) must have been completed with a pass i ng grade to be eligible for Incomplete . 3. CAM Course Completion Agreement must be signed by both instructor and student, with final approval by Associate Dean. 4 . All course work must be completed within one calendar year of original course: NO EXCEPTIONS! 5 . Students may not retroactively change letter grades to Incomplete . GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS General Requirements 1 . A minimum of 120 semester hours passed 2. A minimum 2 . 0 cumulative grade-point average 3. A minimum of 45 semester hours of upper division work for all B.A. and B .F.A. degrees 4 . A minimum of 30 semester hours with letter grades at CU-Denver CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02

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7 4 / College of Arts & Media 5. Fulfillment of all College and major requirements . Core Curriculum I. INTELLECTUAL COMPETENCIES Competency is satisfied by a Jetter grade of C (2.0) or higher . A.English Composition/Oral Communication9 credit hours One course from each of the three sections below: 1. ENGL 1020-3. Core Composition I 2. ENGL 2030-3. Core Composition II CMMU/ENGL/ TC 3154-3. Technical Writing ENGL 3170-3. Business Writing 3 . CMMU 2050-3. Business and Professional Speaking CMMU 2101-3. Presentational Speaking ENGL 2030-3. Core Composition II ENGL 2154-3. Introduction to Creative Writing ENGL 3084-3. Advanced Composition ENGL 3154-3 . Technical Writing ENGL 3170-3. Business Writing ENGL 4190-3. Special Topics : Rhetoric/Writing B.Mathematics-3 credit hours Any CU-Denver mathematics course, with the exception of MATH 3040 . Students who are not required to take mathematics as part of the major may consider: MATH 1350-3. Computers in the Arts and Sciences MATH 2000-3. Mathematics for the Liberal Arts C.Foreign Language-third semester proficiency, 0-13 credit hours Students must demonstrate foreign lan guage proficiency. This is accomplished through completion of third-semester level course (2110 or equivalent) with a minimum grade of C (2.0) , satisfactory proficiency testing , or completion of third year (Level III) high school course with a minimum grade of C (2.0) or better. For additional information, see the Modern Languages section in this catalog . Students pursuing a B.S. in Music are not required to fulfill the foreign language proficiency. CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 II. KNOWLEDGE AREAS CU-Denver Knowledge Area core courses are identified in each Schedule of Courses by a "D" prefix in the course title. Students may not use independent study, cooperative education , internships , CLEP, or courses in their major to satisfy Knowledge Area requirements . A. Natural and Physical Sciences, Mathematics-11 credit hours 3 credit hours from a course in ANTH (approved) , BIOL, CHEM, ENVS, GEOL, PHYS or MATH (intellectual competency course excluded) 8 credit hours from the following laboratory core courses: ANTH 1303-4. Intro. to Biological Anthropology BIOL 15504. Basic Biology I BIOL 15604 . Basic Biology II CHEM 147X-4. Core Chemistry: (selected modules) ENVS 1042-4. lntro. to Environmental Sciences GEOL 1072-4. Physical Geology: Surface Processes GEOL 1082-4. Physical Geology : Internal Processes PHYS 10004 . Introduction to Physics PHYS 1052-4. General Astronomy I B. Behavioral and Social Sciences12 credit hours 6 credit hours in behavioral sciences 6 credit hours in social sciences 9 of 12 credit hours must come from the following combined behavioral sciences and social sciences core courses: * Behavioral Sciences ANTH 2102-3. Culture and the Human Experience CMMU 1011-3. Fundamentals of Communication CMMU 1021-3.Fundamentals of Mass Communication PSY 1000-3. Introduction to Psychology I PSY 1005-3. Introduction to Psychology II Social Sciences ECON 2012-3 . Principles of Econ.: Macroeconomics ECON 2022 -3. Principles of Econ.: Microeconomics GEOG 1102-3. World Regional Geography GEOG 2202-3. Natural Hazards P SC 1001-3. Introduction to Political Science : Quest For Freedom &Justice P SC 1101-3. American Political System SOC 1001-3. Introduction to Sociology SOC 2462-3. Introduction to Social Psychology * Remaining 3 credit hours: please consult CAM advisor . C.Humanities-6 credit hours 6 credit hours from the following core courses: ENGL 1601-3. Telling Tales: Narrative Art in Literature and Film ENGL 2600-3. Great Works in British and American Literature GER 1000-3. Germany and the Germans HIST 1381-3. Paths to the Present I HIST 1382-3. Getting Here: Paths to the Present II PHIL 1012-3. Introduction to Philosophy : Relationship of Individual to World PHIL 1020-3 . Introduction to Ethics and Society: Person &Community RUSS 1000-3 . Russia and Russians: Life, Culture and Arts RUSS 2000-3. Masterpieces of Russian Culture D.Arts-3 credit hours 3 credit hours from a course in any arts discipline other than the student's major E. Multicultural Diversity3 credit hours 3 credit hours from the following core courses: ANTH 3142-3. Cultural Diversity in the Modern World ANTH 4200-3. Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective CMMU 3271-3. Communication and Diversity ECON 3100-3 . Economics of Race &Gender ENGL/ ETST 3794-3 . Ethnic Diversity in American Literature ENGR 3400-3. Technology and Culture ETST 3704-3. Culture, Racism, & Alienation FA 3110-3 . Imaging and Identity HIST 3345-3. Immigration & Ethnicity . in American History MGMT 4100-3.Managing Cultural Diversity

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PHIL 3500-3. I eo logy and Culture: R cism/Sexism PMUS 3110-3 . & Political Implica ti ns of American Music PMUS 31113 . erican Voice Cultural D versity or Social I entity? P SC 3034-3. R ce , Gender , Law , Policy P SC 3035-3. Movements: Race and Gender PSY 4485-3. Psychology of Cultural D ' versity SOC 3020-3. Race and Ethnicity in U.S. THTR 36113 . D1 ama ofD i versity Major Requirements In addition to c 9 mpleting the College core requirements, students must declare a major b the time they have accumulated 60 hours , and fulfill all requirements o the major department. Departments req re that all course work in the major e completed with a grade of C ( 2 .0) or above . A minimum of one-third of thet equired course work in the major must e completed at CU-Denver . The departmen is responsible for determining when a student has success fully completed th1e major requirements and for certifying the completion to the Dean of the Colleg . Graduation Application Students e x pec J ing to graduate are required to compl fte a Graduation Packet by the census date (last day to drop and add) of the semester in which they intend to complete the Graduation Packets must be to the CAM advisor in A!} 176. Failure to file a Graduation with the College will result in delay ' d graduation. Academic Honors A student can be awarded honors based upon cumulative grade-point average at the time of graduation . To be eligible for honors , a student must have completed a minimum of 45 hours at the University of (on any CU campus) . A GP.j\ of 3.65 will receive cum laude , 3 . 75 mCf!Jna cum laude , and 3.85 and above su ma cum laude honors designations on d grees. DEAN'S LIST Following each all and spring semester, the College publis es a Dean's List honoring students who demonstrate high scholastic achievement. To earn a place on the list, student must achieve a 3 . 75 grade-point average in all CU hours taken during the semester, with a minimum of 9 credit hours. DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE, FILM, AND VIDEO PRODUCTION Chair: Kathryn Maes Office: AD 21 0-A Phone: 303-5564652 Fax: 303-55!Hi504 Faculty Professors: Mark Alan Heckler Associate Professors: J. Brad Bowles , Laura Cuetara, Kathryn Maes Assistant Professors: Richard Finkelstein , Frederic Lahey Instructors: Carol Bloom , Jane Nelson Rud , Nate Thompson The Department of Theatre, Film, and Video Production prepares students to become leaders in the theatrical and film and video arts within the context of a liberal arts education. These unique programs offer professional experience through laboratory and studio courses, theatre production , film and video projects , and fieldwork in the Denver area and throughout Colorado. Our graduates are prepared to expand their own career possibilities as responsible citizens of the arts. The department offers courses in the disciplines of Theatre (fHTR) and Film and Video Studies (FILM). Students wishing to study theatre may choose to earn the Bachelor of Arts in Theatre. Students wishing to study film and video may pursue the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree. Theatre The Bachelor of Arts in Theatre is designed to train the diversified theatre artist-writer, director, performer , designer , teacher-and to provide oppor tunities for a broad range of production process and performance experiences in courses, laboratory workshops , full pro ductions, and field work in the Denver area . The goal of the theatre program is an understanding of the potential of the the atre as an expressive medium in the con text of its culture and as a collaborative art form in relationship to literature , fine arts, and music . Theatre , Film, and Video Production I 75 There are three areas of focus : acting/ directing , design/technical , and integrated theatre. Each student is required to complete a comprehensive series of core courses in theatre and the allied fields and then concentrate in one of the areas of focus . THEATRE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Theatre Core Courses Credit Hours THTR 2530 . Acting I ........................ 3 THTR 2610 . Dramatic Literature Survey . 3 THTR 2710 /2711. Theatrical Design Aesthetics , and Prod. ! / Lab ............. 4 THTR 2712/ 2713. Theatrical Design , Aesthetics , and Prod . 11/ Lab ............ 4 THTR 2820 . Departmental Production ... 3 THTR 3540 . Directing I ..................... 3 THTR 3610. History of Theatre ........... 3 THTR 3820 . Departmental Production ... 3 THTR3939 . Internship .......... . ...... .... 2 THTR 4610. Drama Theory and Criticism .................. . .......... 3 THTR 4999. Senior Project . ........ . ..... _l Total Semester Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Other Art s Credit Hours ENGL 3661. Shakespeare or ENGL 4300. History of British Drama or ENGL 4350 . History of American Drama .................................... 3 FA 100l.Introduction to Art . . .. . ....... 3 PMUS 1001. Music Appreciation . . . . . . . . 3 Total Semester Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Acting/Directing Focus Credit Hours THTR 2520 . Voice and Diction I ........... 2 THTR 2560. Topics in Theatre (Voice) ... 2 THTR 3520 . Stage Movement I ....... . ..... 2 THTR 3530 . Acting II . ............... . . .. . .. 3 THTR 4530 . Acting Ill ....................... 3 THTR 4540 . Directing II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Total Semester Hours ................... 15 > THTR 3521. Stage Movement 11 ( 2 credits) is also recommended Design / Technical Focus Credit Hours THTR 3720 . Advanced Lighting Design . 4 THTR 3730 . Scene Design ................. 4 THTR 4 730. Advanced Scenic Design .. . . 4 THTR 4 760. Topics in Design ............ ___1 Total Semester Hours .................... 15 THTR 2740 . Costume and Make-up Design (3 credits) is also recommended Integrated Theatre Focus Credit Hours THTR Electives* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 * The selection of these courses must be done in consuitation with and approval of the student's faculty advisor. Total Semester Hours .................... 15 CU.Denver Catalog 2001-02

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76 / College of Arts & Media Film and Video Studies The Film and Video Studies program at the University of Colorado at Denver is intended for students seeking profes sional preparation for careers in film, video , and related industries. Program delivery is realized in a unique "2 + 2 " offering with Red Rocks Community College through the Colorado Film Video Instructional studios (CFVl), located at the Higher Education Adva nced Technol ogy (HEAl) campus at the former Lowry Air Force base. The program is designed to award B .F.A. degrees with emphases in film/ video writing, producing and directing , film/ video post production , or cinematography / videography, and to supply advanced training to professionals already working in the film and video industries . Upon completion of the B.F.A. course of study, students will be prepared for employment in the television, industrial video , educational video , and feature film production industries , or for entry into graduate study programs . Students may choose to focus their concentration on documentary or narrative styles while finding their own balance of technical and creative concerns. Employment opportu nities lie in writing, producing , directing , production management, production design , camera, lighting , audio for film and video, audio post for film and video, post production graphics and animation , editing, and multimedia production and integration , as well as a host of business management opportunities in the cable, network , and film industries . As Denver is the world capital of the cable television industry, graduates may work locally or seek employment in the national or world markets . The initial two years of film/video technology (Red Rocks , FV1) courses give students the fundamental understanding of technical, creative , and storytelling issues and exposure to disparate paths of study and future employment. The second two years of film and video (CU-Denver, FILM) provide students the opportunity to focus and hone their craft , find their own expressive " voice," and to graduate with a professional quality "show reel " of work , production credits , and/or completed screenplays, teleplays, and project proposals . Students may satisfy core requirements at the Auraria campus or other approved locations , while nearly all film and video classes are conducted at the CFVI studios facility at HEAT. This arrangement allows CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 for the maximization of equipment and facility resources available to the student by the Red Rocks/CU partnership. The CFVI facility includes a 17, 000-square-foot primary building, the Avid Center at the $7 million all-digital ETTC building, and the 600-seat HEAT movie theater. Dormitory space is available to full-time film and video students at the HEAT Center campus at Lowry . All students interested in applying for film and video major status must apply to the CFVI program director. Continued major status is subject to annual review. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS W/EMPHASIS IN FILM/VIDEO WRITING & DIRECTING Red Rocks courses: FVT 105. Video Production I.. 3 FVT 150. Development of Film Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3 FVT 153. Intro. to Film Production ........ 3 FVT 160. Video Post Production I ........ 3 FVT 200. Video Production II . . .. 3 FVT 206. Film/Video Lighting & Grip . . .. 3 FVT 209. Production Management Techniques 3 FVT 215. Video Post Production II . . . 3 FVT 220. 16mm Production .... 3 FVT 250. Introduction to Screenwriting .. 3 FVT 290/117. Understanding the Actor's Process . .. . . .. . . .. . . . . . .. .. 3 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 credits aJ-Denver courses: FILM 3100 . History of Narrative Film I .... 3 FILM 3150. History of Narrative Film II . . 3 FILM 3207 . Acting/Directing Workshop . . 3 FILM 3270 . Film/Video Production III . . . . 3 FILM 3275. Film/Video Post Production Ill .. .. . .. .. . . .. .. .. .. .. . 3 FILM 3400 . Intermediate Screenwriting for Feature Films . ........................ 3 FILM 4209 . Advanced Production Management .. .. . . .. .. .. . . . . .. .. .. .. .. . . 3 FILM 4400 . Advanced Screenwriting for Feature Films . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FILM 4270 . Film/Video Production IV .... 3 FILM 4280 . Film/Video Post Production IV .. .. .. .. . . . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. 3 FILM 4910. Film/Video Production Internship . .. . .. .. . .. .. . . . .. .. .. .. 3 FILM Electives . . . .. . . .. . .. . . . .. 6 FILM 4999 . Senior Portfolio Preparation .. . .. .. .. . 1 Total .. .. . .. . .. . .. .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . 39 credits DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS W/EMPHASIS IN FILM/VIDEO POST PRODUCTION Red Rocks courses: FVT 105. Video Production I .. . 3 FVT 150. Development of Film Expression . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... 3 FVT 153. lntro . to Film Production .. 3 FVT 160. Video Post Production I . . . . 3 FVT 200 . Video Production II . . ..... . 3 FVT 206. Lighting for Film & Video ....... 3 FVT 208. Sound for Film & Video . . . . . . . . . 3 FVT 209. Production Management Techniques .. . .. .. . .. . .. . .. . .. . . 3 FVT 215. Video Post Production II . . . . . . 3 FVT 254. Intro . to Digital Editing . . . 3 FVT 290/264. lntro to Digital FX . . . . . . . . 3 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 credits CU-Denver courses: FILM 3100. History of Narrative Film I .... 3 FILM 3150. History of Narrative Film II 3 FILM 3264. Advanced Digital FX . . . .. 3 FILM 3270 . Film/Video Production Ill . 3 FILM 3275. Film/Video Post Production Ill . .. .. .. . .. . . .. .. .. 3 FILM 3350 . Editing Aesthetics . . . . . . 3 MUS 4505 . Audio Sweetening 3 FILM 4270 . Film/Video Production IV .... 3 FILM 4280. Film/Video Post Production IV .. . .. . .. .. . .. . . .. .. .. .. 3 FILM 4910. Film/Video Production Internship .. . .. . .. 3 FILM Electives .. .. .. . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . .. 9 FILM 4999. Senior Portfolio Preparation . .. . . .. .. .. .. . . .. . . . .. .. . .. 1 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 credits DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS W/EMPHASIS IN CINEMATOGRAPHY/ VIDEOGRAPHY Red Rocks courses: FVT 105. Video Production I .. FVT 150. Development of Film .. 3 Expression . . . . 3 FVT 153. Intro . to Film Production 3 FVT 160. Video Post Production I . . 3 FVT 200. Video Production II . . . . . ..... . . . 3 FVT 205. Camera Equipment & Techniques .. .. . .. . . . . .. .. . 3 FVT 206. Film/Video Lighting & Grip . . .. 3 FVT 209. Production Management Techniques .. . . . .. . . .. .. .. . .. . 3 FVT 215. Video Post Production II ....... 3 FVT 220. 16mm Production .. .. . ...... .. . 3 FVT 290/117. Understanding the Actor's Process 3 Total ....... . 33credits

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CU-Denver courser: FILM 3100. Narrative Film I .... 3 FILM 3111. ShootirW Action & Physical E ffects ....................... 3 FILM 3150. H istor 1 of Narr a tive Film II ... 3 FILM 3270. Film/Vioeo Production III ..... 3 FILM 3275. Film/Vi eo Post Production III . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 3 FILM 3300. Advan ed Lighting for Film & Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 FILM 4209. Advan qed Produc t ion Managem e n t .................... .. ....... 3 FILM 4270. F ilm/Video Production N .... 3 FILM 4280 . F ilm/Video Post Production N . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 FILM 4910. Film/Vi eo Production Internship ................................ 3 FILM Electiv e s .............................. 9 FILM 4999. Senior ortfolio Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 credits Contact the of Theatre, Film , and Video Prh duction i n AD 21 0-A I for Red Rocks FVT1courses and FILM course desc riptions which do not appear in this catalog. I DEPARTMEN[T OF MUSIC AND ENTER1AINMENT INDUSTRY srUDIES Chair: Stan Soocher Office: AR 288 j Phone: 303-556-27 7 Fax: 303-556-6612 Faculty Professor: Zoe Roy A. Pritts Associate Professbrs: Frank J. Jermance, Richard , Stan Soocher, Gregory Walker , Richard eissman Assistant r: William Clark , Sigmund Roths hild Professor Emeritus: Franz Roehmann The Departmen t of Music and Entertain ment Industry Stupies combines studies in music technology , multimedia , music business , and music performance in order to prepare s }udents for the global marketplace . Through partnerships with entrepreneurf, corporations, and non-profit organizftions , we aspire to a leading position irtthe region and nation in the planning and! realization of current and future media. The Departmen of Music and Enter tainment Industry Studies offers courses in the dis c iplines f Music (MUS) and Performance Mus \ c (PMUS). Students interested in study-ing music will pursue the Bachelor of Sc 'ence in Music with areas of emphasis in performance, music technology , music management, or music industry studies. Music The music program at the University of Colorado at Denver is intended for stu dents seeking preparation for professional careers in music related to performance, recording , broadcast business, and the entertainment industries . The four-year music program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music. The specialized curricula offered by the program lead graduates to local , regional , and national positions in audio research, production companies, arts administra tion , and audio engineering , as well as graduate studies at leading universities and conservatories. Additionally , many graduates establish careers as owners of booking agencies, publishing companies, and recording studios. All music applicants , except those entering the Music Industry Studies program , must pass an entrance audition before being accepted to the program . Contact the department for information on the music audition . Music Technology : This area of study addresses contemporary technology in studio recording , sound reinforcement , and electroni c music . It is intended to develop skills for creative musicians , pro ducers, and technicians , using both ana log and digital technology. Music Management : This program pre. pares graduates for careers in such fields as artist management , music publishing , music merchandising , concert promotion , record production, and the development of skills relative to the rapidly expanding telecommunications industry. Music Industry Studies : This program prepares the student to work in the music industry. Courses include a non-perfor mance music core with selected classes in music business and music technology . It is intended to develop a broad range of skills in management , promotion, publishing , producing , and audio engineering . Performance Music Students gain performance skills in classical , jazz , commercial , and experimental music styles. The program includes specialized courses in large and small performance ensembles, applied study, contemporary improvisa tion , and analysis , culminating in the presentation of a junior and senior recital. Students wishing to declare a major in the performance emphasis must audition Music and Entertainment Industry Studies I 77 for entry at the time of their Sophomore Proficiency Exam . ENSEMBLES All music majors enrolled in an applied music course are required to register for an ensemble. Non-music majors are invited to audition for any of the CU Denver music ensembles. Each ensemble carries 1 semester hour of credit. APPLIED MUSIC All applied music courses are restricted to music majors , and minors ( only upon completion of the entrance audition) enrolled in a minimum of 7 other credit hours. Students may only be enrolled in one applied music course in any given semester. Non music majors must register for applied music studies through Extended Studies. All students taking an applied music course must also register for an ensemble and PMUS 1500: General Recital. Students i n applied music courses are also required to perform in a Performance Jury at the end of each semester of applied study and to pass a Sophomor e Proficiency Examination at the end of their fourth semester of study. All majors taking applied music must perform in a solo or solo with accompani ment capacity at least once a semester in a General Recital. General Recitals are scheduled throughout the semester. FACILITIES FEE All music majors are required to pay a $30 facilities fee each semester at the time of registration. Non-music majors will be assessed a facilities fee when registering for selected courses, as noted in the course descriptions. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR PERFORMANCE, MUSIC ENGINEERING, AND MUSIC MANAGEMENT Required Courses in Music Credit Hours PMUS 1100. Music Theory I .......... 3 PMUS 1110. Ear Training / Sight Sing I ..... 1 PMUS 1200. Music Theory II .. .. . .......... 3 PMUS 1210. Ear Training / Sight Sing II ..... 1 PMUS 2100. Music Theory III .............. 3 PMUS 2110 . Ear Training / Sight Sing III ... 1 PMUS 2200 . Contemporary Styles ........ 3 PMUS 3830. History and Literature of Music I ......... ................... 3 PMUS 3831. History and Literature of Music II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Music History Elective .................. ... 3 CU-Denve r Catalog 2001-02

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78 / College of Arts & Media PMUS 1023. Piano Class (see note 1) ... 14 Applied Music (see note 2) ............... . 8 Ensembles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . 6 MUS 2700. The Music Business I .......... 3 MUS 2710 . The Music Business II ......... 3 MUS 2540. Music Technology I ............ 3 MUS 2470 . Music on the Personal Computer ..... . .......................... 3 PMUS 1500. General Recital (4 semesters) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 Total............................. 51-54 Credits in Area of Study ............... 27-29 Total Semester Hours Required 125-130 Note 1: Guitar majors are required to take 2 semesters of PMUS 1093/1094, Commercial Guitar Styles , in addition to applied requirement. Emphasis in Performance PMUS 3283 . Con temp. Improvisation .... 2 MUS 4060 . Analysis I ....................... 2 Applied Music Courses ...... . . . . . .. . . . . . 12 Ensemble Courses . .................... . . . . 2 Music Electives . ............................ 7 MUS 4710. Research Project . .. .......... _1 Total .................................... . . . 27 Vocal performance majors are also required to take two semesters of foreign language . This requirement is waived if student has taken three years of alanguage in high school or is able to pass a competency exam based on translating foreign language song texts . Emphasis in Music Technology MUS 2560 . Music Technology II . . 3 MUS 2520. Music Technology II Lab 1 MUS 3540 . Recording Studio Maint. & Calibration . .. ....... . ........ . . 3 MUS 4510 . Music Engr. I Lab . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . 1 MUS 4550 . Music Engineering I ............ 3 MUS 4570 . Music Engineering II . . . . . . 3 MUS 4530 . Music Engr. II Lab . . . . . 1 Music Electives .. ......................... .. 5 Music Engineering Electives . . . . . . . . . . ... 3 MUS 3670. Junior Project: Music Tech. . . 3 MUS 4670. Senior Project: Music Tech . . ThW ....................................... Elective Studies in Music Management MGMT 1000. Intro . to Business ......... . . 3 MUS 4 720. Music Management ............ 3 MUS 4730 . Music Production ...... ... . . . . . 3 MUS 4 7 40. Music Business Analysis ...... 3 MUS 3730 . Music Industry Financial Management .. . . ....... . ...... 3 MKTG 3000. Principles of Marketing . . . 3 MUS 2560. Music Technology II . . ... 3 MUS 2520 . Music Tech. II Lab ............. 1 Music Electives ............................. 3 MUS 4700 . Research Project . . . . __1 Total............. . . . .. . . ...... .. . . ..... 29 CU-Denver Catalog 2001-02 DECREE REQUIREMENTS FOR MUSIC INDUSTRY STUDIES PMUS 1010. Music Fundamentals ....... 3 PMUS 1023 . Piano Class .......... . ........ 1 OR PMUS 1093 . Guitar Class ................... 1 MUS 2300 . Intro. to Songwriting 3 PMUS 2831. History of Music II . . . . . . . . . ... 3 Music History Elective .................... .. 3 Music Distributed Studies . ................ 6 Music Electives ............................. 6 MUS 2700 . Music Business I . . . ............ 3 MUS 2710. Music Business II . . ........... 3 MUS 2540 . Music Technology I ............ 3 MUS 2560 . Music Technology II. . .......... 3 MUS 2520 . Music Tech . II Lab ......... .. 1 Music Management or Music Engineering Seminar ...... . . ....... 3 MUS 3939 . Internship ....... . Music Industry Elective Studies** .. Total semester credit hours . .. . . . . . . . .. 2 37 . 80 **NOTE: Courses to fulfill the music industry elective studies are to be selected from a list of approved classes , in conjunction with and the approval of a faculty advisor. DEPARTMENT OF VISUAL ARTS Chair: John Hull Office: AR 185 Phone: 303-5564891 Faculty Professors: John Hull , Ernest 0 . Porps Associate Professor: Kent Homchick Assistant Professors: Joann Brennan , Quintin Gonzalez, Scott Massey , Karen Mathews, James McElhinney , Moyo Okediji Professors Emeritus: Jerry Johnson , Charles Moone The Department of Visual Arts offers professional instruction in five interre lated areas of study: art history, drawing/ painting, photography, sculpture , and multimedia studies . The department provides an educational environment where artists and art historians of promise and motivation can explore the horizons of their own talents in the midst of intense critical dialogue . This dialogue is generated by their peers; by distinguished visiting artists, scholars, and critics ; and by a faculty comprising artists and art historians of acknowledged accomplishment. The primary educational experience for the student is centered on the knowl edge and skills gained from rigorous and structured courses offered by the various areas of the Visual Arts Department, as well as the rich academic offerings throughout the university . Each student is routinely exposed to many aesthetic or academic positions through encounters with faculty members and visitors. The Visual Arts Department ' s efforts are devoted not only to the refinement of visual skills , but to the articulation and cultivation of the mind. Students must bring creative force and imagination to their own development, for these qualities cannot be taught-they can only be stimulated and appreciated. Education in the visual arts encompasses a comprehensive knowledge of and direct experience with the various media of drawing, painting , photography, sculpture , multimedia, and other forms . Supporting this enterprise is the develop ment of an understanding of art theory, a knowledge of the methods and materials of art making, and examination of the diverse approach to examining the art object in history. Central to the practice of art history are critical writing and analysis. A variety of opportunities are open to the visual arts major. The degree can be specific preparation for graduate study or a more general background for fields related to the arts, including arts adminis tration, museum and gallery work, and art conservation. Internships are available for student majors with a number of organizations in the Denver area, and an Art Resource Center has been established in the department to serve as a clearinghouse for information about study abroad programs , jobs, and continuing education in the visual arts. Graduating seniors receiving the B .F.A. degree are required to have a thesis show during their last semester of study. These exhibitions are scheduled in the fall and spring terms only . Fine Arts BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FINE ARTS Required Fine Arts Core Courses : FA 1100. Drawing Foundations . .. ......... 3 FA 1150. Photo Foundations... . .. ..... 3 FA 1400. Two Dimensional Design Foundations . . . . . ...... 3 FA 1500. Three Dimensional Design Foundations .. . .......... . ...... . 3 FA 2200 . Basic Painting ........... . . . . .. : . . 3 FA 2600 . History of Art I (survey) ......... 3 FA2610 .HistoryofArtll(survey) ...... 3 Semester hours in fine arts core ........ 21

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Emphasis in Studiotrt: FA 4800. Art Semin r ........ .. ..... .. ..... . 3 Upper division art 1 is tory electives . . .. . . 6 Studio art elective! ............. ...... 12-18 (12 credits must e upper division) Semester hours in tudio __ art emphasis .. . . ................... 21-27 Emphasis in Art Hi tory: FA 4 790. Methods ih Art History .......... 3 FA 4650 . 19th Century Art ........... . .. . .. 3 FA 4660 . 20th Cent?ry Art ................. 3 FA 4690 . Renaissance Art .................. 3 Elective credits in art history . .......... 6-9 Elective credits in art history or Studio . . . . . . . ...................... 3-6 (9 of the above 15 elective hours must be upper division) Semester hours in art history emphasis .......................... 21-27 BACHELOR OF ARTS Required Fine Arts ore Courses FA 1100 . Drawing undations . . .. 3 FA 1150 . Photo Fo ndations .............. 3 FA 1400 . Two Dime sional Design Foundations .............................. 3 FA 1500 . Three Design Foundatx ns ..................... 3 FA 2200. Basic Pai ting .... ................ 3 FA 2600 . History o Art I (survey) ........ . 3 FA 2610. History of Art II (survey) ........ 3 FA 4800. Art Seminf ....................... 3 FA 4950 . BFA Thesi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Semester hours infne arts core . 2s Emphasis in Drawi g: FA 2000. Drawing I .. . .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .... 3 FA 3000 . Jntermedi te Drawing ........... 3 FA 3020 . lntermedikte Life Drawing .... .. 3 FA 4000 . . .. .. . . . .. 3 FA 4020. Advance Life Drawing . . . . . . . .. 3 Upper electives . . . .. 6 Upper d1V1s1on pru tmg electives . . . . . 9 Art electives .. .. . .. . .. .. . . .. .. . 6-15 Semester hours in __ emphasis ........................... 36-45 Emphasis in Painting: FA 2210. Painting II ......................... 3 FA 3200. Intermediate Painting ..... ....... 3 FA 3210.1ntermediate Painting . ........... 3 FA 4200 . Advanced Painting ............. :. 3 FA 4210. Advanced Painting ............... 3 Upper division art history electives ...... 6 Upper division drawing electives . ........ 9 Art electives .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 6-15 Semester hours in painting emphasis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36-45 Emphasis in Photography : FA 2155. Photography Foundations II/ Advanced Black & White ................ 3 FA 3155.lntermediate Photography I/ Digital . .. . .. .. ......... ...... . .. ........... 3 FA 3160 . Intermediate Photography II/ Color ....... .. ............................. 3 FA 3180. Photography The Modern Era / Criticism and Theory . . .. .. .. .. . .. . ..... 3 FA 3630 . History of Photography ......... 3 FA 4195.Advanced Photography I ........ 3 FA 4196. Advanced P