Citation
Undergraduate and graduate catalog

Material Information

Title:
Undergraduate and graduate catalog
Cover title:
Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies
Cover title:
Undergraduate and graduate studies
Creator:
University of Colorado at Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, Colo
Publisher:
University of Colorado at Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
32 v. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Universities and colleges -- Curricula -- Catalogs -- Colorado -- Denver ( lcsh )
Education -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Curricula ( fast )
Universities and colleges -- Graduate work ( fast )
Colorado -- Denver ( fast )
Genre:
Catalogs. ( fast )
Catalogs ( fast )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title varies: 1987-88, Catalog of undergraduate and graduate studies; 1988-89, Undergraduate and graduate studies.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Colorado at Denver.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
19093218 ( OCLC )
ocm19093218
Classification:
LD1192 .A2 ( lcc )

Related Items

Succeeded by:
University of Colorado Denver Downtown Campus catalog

Auraria Membership

Aggregations:
Auraria Library

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

lit. ~ -•
Hits;

L' â– â– : *,k.. ii A.-MiwrV M*'"* 1
University of Colorado at Denver
2 0 0 4
2005 CATALOG


ar*
diion
See the Fall Web SMART pages August 23 First Day of Classes September 6 Labor Day Holiday (campus closed) November 21-27 Fall Break (no classes) November 25 Thanksgiving Holiday (campus dosed) November 26 (campus open, no classes) December 13-18 Finals Week December 18 End of Term December 18 Commencement
Spring 2005
Registration
See the Spring Web SMART pages January 17 Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday (campus open, no classes) January 18 First Day of Classes March 21-27 Spring Break (campus open, no classes)
May 9—14
Finals Week
May 14
End of Semester May 14
Commencement
Summer 2005
Registration
See the Summer Web SMART pages
May 30
Memorial Day Holiday (campus closed) May 31 First Day of Classes July 4
Independence Day Holiday (campus closed) August 6 End of Term
‘The university reserves the right to alter the Academic Calendar at any time.
Consult the Web Schedule Planner for application deadline dates, deadlines for changing programs, and registration dates and procedures.
U16701
753cnb3
--6«aii
Contents
Lifetime of Learning........................................................2
Degree Programs ............................................................3
Administration .............................................................4
Our University, Our Campus..................................................5
Undergraduate Admissions................................................9
Graduate School........................................................14
CU Online..............................................................19
Professional and Continuing Education................................. 19
Centers and Institutes.................................................20
Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid.......................................21
Four-Year Graduation Guarantee.........................................25
Registration...........................................................26
Academic Policies and Regulations......................................29
University Policies....................................................34
Student Services, Support, and Organizations...........................46
International Education Services.......................................51
Campus Resources.......................................................51
College of Architecture and Planning.......................................55
College of Arts & Media ...................................................69
Business School............................................................83
School of Education.......................................................105
College of Engineering and Applied Science ..............................123
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences......................................145
Military Science..........................................................211
Millennium College .......................................................215
Graduate School of Public Affairs.........................................217
Course Descriptions.......................................................225
Faculty ..................................................................383
Index ....................................................................394
Contact Information.......................................................399
Produced by the CU-Denver Office of Marketing Communications, Marshall L. Collins, Director, (over photos by Shock Photography and Larry George Photography.
(over design by Davis Creative Inc.


AURARIA CAMPUS
| CAMPUS RUILD1NGS
â–¡ OPEN PARKING
â–¡ COVERED PARKING


Campus Box 167 P.O.Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364
University of Colorado at Denver
ucd cm
2004 rn poos nco cor 07/09/04
nrpr 97M9nnniAKA
7155 $5.00


CATALOG
2004-2005


Fax
303-556-5855
E-mail
ombuds@carbon.cudenver.edu
Although this catalog was prepared using the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, degree offerings and degree titles, course offerings and course descriptions, and statements of tuition and fees) is subject to change ivithout notice or obligation. The university claims no responsibility for errors that may have occurred during the typesetting, printing, or production of this catalog. For current calendars, tuition rates, requirements, deadlines, etc., students should refer to the Web Schedule Planner for the semester in which they intend to enroll.
The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curricula. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester, and faculty teaching particular courses or programs may vary from time to time. The content of a course or progam may be altered to meet particular class needs. Courses are listed by college or school. The University of Colorado at Denver is an affirmative action/ equal opportunity employer and educator committed to excellence through inclusiveness.


Accreditation
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400 Chicago, IL 60602-2504 1-800-621-7440 Fax: 312-263-7462
American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration, Colorado State Board of Education, Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board, National Council for the Accreditation ofTeacher Education, National Architectural Accrediting Board, Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, National Association of Schools of Music, Planning Accreditation Board, National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
You can obtain information about our degrees by contacting us:
Mailing Address
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167 PO. Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364
Location
1200 Larimer Street or 1250 14th Street Annex 303-556-2704
Web Address
www.cudenver.edu
A Lifetime of Learning
Picture yourself at an urban university campus near the heart of downtown Denver, where history meets the future in your surroundings as well as your studies.
The city of Denver and its metropolitan region have become the center of communication and information technology in the Rocky Mountain West. From telecommunications to biotechnology to website development, Denver companies incorporate the latest technologies and research, and look for employees who can fulfill their needs.
Business studies, applied science, engineering, mathematics, information technology, technical communication—all have potential for lucrative employment. Yet there is also a need for professionals with knowledge of public affairs, social sciences, humanities, and the arts—so essential to both high-tech companies and their employees. Burgeoning technology creates new demands for employees of the future in all areas of human knowledge.
The University of Colorado at Denver is dedicated to preparing graduates who will be well qualified to attain positions in such companies, as well as in the professions that foster their development. The strength and prestige of the University of Colorado degree is known worldwide, and graduates from CU-Denver have become leaders in corporations, institutions, governments, and organizations.
CU-Denver’s faculty excel in crafting their instruction around issues of contemporary life as well as the traditional disciplines. They are alert to the challenges and opportunities of the urban environment and responsive to the needs of our students and community. The combination of our talented faculty and highly motivated students creates an exciting educational environment, combining real-world experience with academic excellence.
Our non-residential campus features historic buildings from Denvers pioneer beginnings, along with “smart” classroom buildings incorporating 21st-century multimedia. CU-Denver’s diverse student body enjoys plenty of exciting, challenging, and entertaining opportunities for personal and professional growth. There are more
than 60 student organizations, ranging from the American Marketing Association to the Society of Women Engineers. Students also take part in classic film screenings, theatre and musical performances, intramural sports, and fascinating lectures by nationally recognized speakers.
Downtown Denver offers ample amenities for students to round out their classroom experiences. Cultural opportunities abound, with a nationally recognized performing arts center and museums only minutes away. City, state, and federal government centers are just blocks from campus. Located at the hub of Colorado’s professional sports industry, the campus is within walking distance of the Pepsi Center, the new Broncos stadium, and Coors Field. CU-Denver is easily accessible from any part of the metropolitan Denver area, via expanded highways and a comprehensive light rail and city bus system.
Enjoy your learning experience at CU-Denver. We’ll provide you with challenges and opportunities that will shape your future and prepare you for a lifetime of learning.
CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05


DEGREE PROGRAMS Undergraduate
COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA
Bachelor of Arts in Fine Arts (BA)
Art History Studio Arts
Bachelor of Arts in Theatre (BA) Acting/Directing Design/Technical Integrated Studies Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)
Drawing
Film/Video Production Multimedia Studies Painting Photography Sculpture
Theatre, Film & Television Bachelor of Science in Music (BS)
Music Industry Studies Music Management Music Performance Music Technology
BUSINESS SCHOOL
Business Administration (BS)
Accounting
Finance
Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business Management Marketing
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE
Civil Engineering (BS)
Computer Science and Engineering (BS) Electrical Engineering (BS)
Mechanical Engineering (BS)
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Anthropology (BA)
Biology (BS)
Chemistry (BS)
Communication (BA)
Economics (BA)
English (BA)
Creative Writing Film Studies Literary Studies English Writing (BA)
Creative Writing Film Studies General Writing French (BA)
Geography (BA)
Earth and Environmental Science History (BA)
Individually Structured Major (BA) International Affairs Mathematics (BS)
Actuarial Science Applied Mathematics Computer Science Math Education Probability and Statistics Pure Mathematics Philosophy (BA)
Physics (BS)
Applied Physics Medical Physics Pure Physics Political Science (BA)
Public Policy and Administration Psychology (BA, BS)
Sociology (BA)
Spanish (BA)
Graduate
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING
Architecture (MArch)
Design and Planning (PhD)
Landscape Architecture (MLA)
Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) Urban Design (MUD)
COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA
Recording Arts (MS)
BUSINESS SCHOOL
Accounting (MS)
Business Administration (MBA)
Executive Program Finance (MS)
Health Administration (MS)
Executive Program Information Systems (MS)
International Business (MSIB)
Management and Organization (MS) Marketing (MS)
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Administrative Leadership and Policy Studies (MA, EdS)
(Licensure—Type D/School Principal & Administrator, K-12)
Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education (MA)
(Licensure—Public School Counselor, Elementary, Secondary, K-12)
Curriculum and Instruction (MA) (Endorsement—Bilingual Education, Elementary, Secondary, K-12) (Endorsement—English as a Second Language, Elementary, Secondary, K-12) (Endorsement—Reading Teacher, Elementary, Secondary, K-12)
(Licensure—Elementary Education, K-6) (Licensure—Secondary Education, 7-12) Early Childhood Education (MA)
(Licensure—Early Childhood Special Education, Ages 0-5)
Educational Leadership and Innovation (PhD) Educational Psychology (MA)
Information and Learning Technologies (MA) (Licensure—School Library Media, Elementary, Secondary, K-12)
School Psychology (EdS)
(Ed.S/Licensure—School Psychologist, K-12) Special Education (MA)
(Licensure—Special Education, Ages 5-21)
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE
Civil Engineering (MS, PhD)
Computer Science (MS)
Electrical Engineering (MS)
Engineering (MEng)
Mechanical Engineering (MS)
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES
Anthropology (MA)
Applied Mathematics (MS, PhD)
Biology (MA)
Chemistry (MS)
Communication (MA)
Economics (MA)
English (MA)
Environmental Sciences (MS)
Health and Behavioral Science (PhD)
History (MA)
Humanities (MH)
Integrated Science (MIS)
Political Science (MA)
Psychology (MA)
Social Science (MSS)
Sociology (MA)
Technical Communication (MS)
GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS
Criminal Justice (MCJ)
Public Administration (MPA)
Public Affairs (PhD)
Executive Program
JOINT DEGREE
Computer Science and Infonnation Systems (PhD through Business School and College of Engineering and Applied Science)
CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05


The University of Colorado seal, adopted in 1908, depicts a male Greek classical figure seated against a pillar and holding a scroll. A burning torch framed in laurel is placed beside him. The Greek inscription means “Let your light shine.” According to Denver designer Henry Reed, the classical design was used because Greek civilization “stands as the criterion of culture.” The laurel symbolizes honor or success, the youth of the figure suggests the “morning of life,” and the scroll represents written language.
Welcome to the University of Colorado at Denver.
We are one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system, which prides itself on being a university without walls, one based on collaboration between campuses, disciplines, and departments, between faculty and students. Our outstanding academic programs, top-ranked faculty, and dedicated alumni have received national and international recognition. Were happy you’ve decided to join us in ourpursuit of excellence.
We make the most of our prime downtown Denver location by blending a cosmopolitan attitude with a dynamic Western setting. This urban perspective informs our curriculum and our identity. One stroll across our campus and you’ll see how CU-Denver reflects the city we serve—both of us growing, diverse and energetic.
We boast an enrollment that has increased to more than 12,200 students, but we serve nearly 24,000 through a variety of regular, extended studies and noncredit classes. We offer 80 degree programs including bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral and education specialist degrees — all with the distinction and prestige of the University of Colorado, and all designed to provide the foundation on which to build your future.
CU-Denver’s seven academic areas—Architecture and Planning, Arts and Media, Business, Education, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts, and Public Affairs — provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of knowledge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. Were committed to giving you the opportunities to gain the knowledge, training, skills and credentials that will enhance your life. That’s why we offer an enriched baccalaureate education and real-world research through graduate and professional work. Our academic programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues while providing a humanistic understanding of social needs andproblems and encouraging cultural and technical exchange.
We look forward to working with you as you join our community of scholars and dedicated staff. We will challenge you just as you challenge us. I look forward to your time with us—and to your graduation.
Q-A-J --
fames H. Shore
Interim Chancellor, University of Colorado at Denver Chancellor, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
University-wide Office
Elizabeth Hoffm;
President of the Universi BA, Smith Collt MA, PhD, University ofPennsylvan PhD, California Institute ofTechnolo
Jack O. Bur
Vice President for Academic Affa and Resear BA, MA, University ofMassachuse CPA, MLE Certificate, Harvard Univers, PhD, Indiana Universe Stephen T. Goldii Vice President for Budget and Finan BA, Washington Collt MA, University of Delawt, Charles V. Swe Vice President and University Coun: BA, Duke Univers, JD, University ofVirginia School ofLi,
CU-Denver Office
James H. Sho
Interim Chancell BS, MD, Duke Univers, Dana Gibs< Vice Chancellor for Administrath and Finan
BS, MBA, Texas Woman’s Univers< PhD, University of Texas atArlingt, Mark A. Heckl Vice Chancellor for Academic ai Student Affa BA, Elizabethtown Collt MFA, Catholic Univers, Rodney Anderst Interim Associate Vice Chancellor f Enrollment and Student Affa Assistant Vice Chancellor for Stude Administrative Servic BA, University of Minnesota atMankc, MPA, University of Colorado at Dem Laura Goodw Interim Associate Vice Chancell for Faculty Affa BA, MA, University of Santa Cla PhD, University of Colora, Dorothy Lest Associate Vice Chancellor f Administration and Finan BA, Hartwick Collt EdM, EdD, Harvard Univers, Frank Edl
Assistant Vice Chancellor for Computii Information and Network Servic BS, MS, Colorado State Univers, Robert Tolsr Assistant Vice Chancellor for Acaderr Technology and Extended Studi BPh, Thomas Jefferson College, Grand Vah State Univers, MA, Catholic University of Amen Dorothy Yat Interim Assistant Vice Chancell for Research and Administratii BS, University ofthe State of New Yo MBA, University ofWashingt, ABD, Saint Louis Univers,


Board of Regents
Cindy Carlisle
Boulder
term expires 2007
Pat Hayes
Aurora
term expires 2007
Susan Kirk
Denver term expires 2004
Thomas J. Lucero, Jr.
Johnstown term expires 2004
Jim Martin
Boulder
term expires 2004
Jerry G. Rutledge
Colorado Springs term expires 2006
PaulSchauer
Centennial term expires 2007
Gail Schwartz
Aspen term expires 2006
Peter Steinhauer
Boulder
term expires 2006
Staff Milagros Cortez
Secretary of the Board of Regent^ and the University BA,. MS, State University o] New York at Albany Ms, Webster University
Our University, Our Campus
In 1876, the same year Colorado became the nations 38th state, the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder. Opening its doors on September 5, 1877, the university began with 44 students, a president, and one instructor. Nearly a century later, in 1974, the University of Colorado had grown to four campuses in three Colorado cities— Denver, Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder.
With combined enrollments totaling more than 46,000 students, the University of Colorado ranks 12th among public universities and colleges in overall research expenditures and 6th among public universities in federally funded research. Awards for research within the university system total approximately $420 million, with funding provided by federal agencies, appropriations from the state of Colorado, and private foundations and donors.
Each of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system has its own chancellor and campus administration. The chancellors, in turn, report to the president of the CU System. The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado approves the overall direction provided by the president of the system. The system president is both the chief academic and chief administrative officer of the university. The president has responsibility for the administration of the entire university under the policies described by the Board of Regents or under law.
The University of Colorado at Boulder serves more than 26,000 students enrolled in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. The Health Sciences Center in Denver provides education and training to medical, dental, nursing, pharmacy, and allied health personnel. The University of Colorado at Colorado Springs serves more than 6,600 students in the Pikes Peak region, offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs.
CU-Denver’s 12,200 students enroll in undergraduate and graduate studies, as well as innovative professional programs.
CU 2010: A Vision for the Future
Vision CU 2010 is a bold systemwide agenda intended to map the future of the University of Colorado for the next decade. CU 2010 consists of five actions: creating a university without walls, creating a culture of excellence,
increasing resources and using them wisely, supporting diversity, and integrating our infrastructure.
Creating a University Without Walls—
We must focus on multidisciplinary efforts that involve all four CU campuses and serve as models for the university of the 21 st Century. The university of the future must break down the walls that separate the disciplines, colleges, and campuses within the system, the walls that separate students and researchers, campus and community.
Creating a Culture of Excellence—Since it’s impossible to be great at everything all at once, each campus is working to target areas for national prominence. Boulder should be among the top 10 percent of public institutions without a medical school in the AAU rankings. Colorado Springs should be the number one comprehensive regional university in the United States with an enrollment of 10,000 to 12,000 students by the year 2010. CU-Denver should be one of the top 10 urban research universities in the country. And the Health Sciences Center should be the number one public health sciences center in the nation within 10 years.
Increasing Resources and Using Them Wisely—CU needs to provide more scholarship money to attract Colorado’s best and brightest students. We also need to fund more endowed chairs and professorships, to build and retain our outstanding faculty—our number one human resource. We must also leverage our expertise in technology to help fund
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


6 / Our University, Our Campus
VISION
As the Denver campus of the University of Colorado system, CU-Denver interprets its mission as advancing the creation, dissemination, and application of knowledge in a culture of excellence. Its boundaries are flexible and permeable, with knowledge flowing to and from the schools and colleges, the community, and the world. This view is global rather than local as CU-Denver seeks to link teaching, research, and service to the major issues of the 21st Century.
VALUES
❖ mutual respect for all members of the university community-students, faculty, and staff
❖ excellence in all areas
❖ collaboration among faculty, students, staff, and the community in the learning process
❖ the power of community in teaching, learning, and scholarship
❖ creativity, innovation, and flexibility
❖ service to the public good
❖ personal growth and professional success
❖ cultural diversity and enrichment
GOALS
❖ to build partnerships to strengthen core academic programs
❖ to build and focus resources on academic goals
❖ to foster academic innovations and excellence by defining a clear niche
In addition to these general goals, Vision CU 2010 is a bold systemwide agenda intended to map the future of the University of Colorado for the next decade:
❖ creating a university without walls
❖ creating a culture of excellence
❖ increasing resources and using them wisely
❖ supporting diversity
❖ integrating our infrastructure
For details on Vision CU 2010, see previous page.
Organizational Abilities and Structures
❖ organizational entrepreneurship
❖ innovations in support of learning
❖ ability to create effective partnerships
❖ ability to assess actions
❖ streamlined processes and policies to reduce barriers
❖ fair and equitable compensation system
❖ forums to create extramural alliances across colleges, the community, and the world
❖ an incubator to develop new interdisciplinary projects and programs
state-of-the-art technology for our students, faculty, and staff. The university will refocus its fund-raising campaign to address these goals, and we’ll continue to work in close partnership with the state of Colorado and with our delegation in Washington to increase federal support. Supporting Diversity—By the second quarter of the 21st Century, there will be no majority population in the United States. That’s why it’s so important for CU to educate all of the citizens of Colorado—and the world—who meet our qualifications for admission. Our programs should also reflect our global community in international program offerings, such as expanded opportunities for students, faculty, and staff exchanges and jointly sponsored degrees with universities around the world.
Integrating Our Infrastructure—CU will work toward an integrated student information system, so our students can easily transfer to or take courses on other campuses. An integrated student services system will enhance our systemwide technology and human resources services. We will expand CU Online so students can take a much broader variety of courses and complete more requirements and degree programs online. And we will benchmark CU’s business practices with the best models from the corporate world.
Our plan is ambitious—and for good reason. With the rapid pace of progress that defines our world, the year 2010 will be here sooner than we think. Now is the time to envision our future and set our goals. The decade ahead will be the most exciting one yet.
THE UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER
Situated near the heart of downtown Denver and looking west toward the majestic Rocky Mountains, the University of Colorado at Denver is the only public university in Colorado’s capital city. Its proximity to the commercial and governmental hub of Denver enables CU-Denver to offer its students the combined excellence of its faculty and the opportunities afforded by this metropolitan environment.
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to becoming the nation’s premier urban university. In urban environments, universities have a particular responsibility to adapt their traditional roles to the development, assessment, transmission, and preservation of knowledge to urban needs while maintaining the highest standards of education and scholarship.
By drawing upon the riches of its traditional store of learning and disciplined thought, the university serves as Denver’s intellectual center and as a community resource ready to respond to urban challenges and opportunities facing its local and global environment.
CU-Denver offers 80 degree programs, from bachelor’s to doctoral levels, as well as numerous professional development programs through the individual colleges and schools. Classes are held during weekday and evening hours, on weekends, and at off-campus sites.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


CU-Denver Campus Information / 7
History
In 1912, the University of Colorado’s Department of Correspondence and Extension was established in Denver to meet the needs of the capital city’s burgeoning population. As the breadth of course offerings expanded, so did the demand for degree-granting status. From 1956 until 1976, the Denver Extension Center Operated out of the former Denver Tramway Company Building at 14tfy and Arapahoe Streets. This building had housed the corporate offices and car barns of a huge streetcar system discontinued in 1950. Designated a landmark on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994, the Tramway Building was later renovated into a hotel and restaurant!
The Denver Extension Center was renamed the University of Colorado-Denver Center ijn 1965, and by 1969, 23 fields of undergraduate study and 11 of graduate study were offered. In 1972, the Colorado General Assembly appropriated support to build the Auraria Campus, CU-Denver’s current site. That same year the Denver Center was renamed the University of Coloradcj at Denver. In 1974 CU-Denver began granting degrees designated as the University of Colorado at Denver.
Between 1973 and 1976, the state built the Auraria Higher Education Center, shared lj>y the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. In 1988, CU-Derjver moved into its first custom-made new home, the 257,000-squarerfoot North Classroom Building, located between Speer Boulevard qnd 12 th Street, Larimer and Lawrence Streets. Hoover Berg Desmond, a Denver architectural firm, designed this post-modern, red brick structure, featuring a distinctive glass block atrium and large outdoor clocks.
Role and Mission
In the Colorado Revisec} Statutes, the University of Colorado at Denver is defined as follow s:
The Denver campus ofth e University of Colorado shall be a comprehensive baccalaureate liberal ar a and sciences institution with high admission standards. The Denver cam1 tus shall provide selectedprofessionalprograms and such graduate programs at the master’s and doctoral Level as will serve the needs of the Denver met) opolitan area, emphasizing those professional programs not offered by othe r institutions of higher education.
The fundamental purpe ses of CU-Denver are to:
1. Provide students witl l learning opportunities that will enhance the quality of their lives, t tat will make them well- educated citizens, that will lead to rewar ling careers, and that will provide Denver and Colorado with a workforce able to compete in the global economy.
2. Develop research, scholarship, and creative work that will advance the base of knowledge in our disciplines and that will contribute to the vitality of our cult are and/or economy.
3. Apply the university’; skills and knowledge to real problems in the Denver metro area.
4. Build and maintain a^i institutional culture of plurality, collegiality, integration, and customer service.
Administrative Structure
The Chancellor of CU-Denver represents the Denver campus and manages campus goal-setting, policy development, academic affairs, community relations, and budget and financial matters. The Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs is responsible for all academic programs, academic support programs, student enrollment services, the Graduate School, and sponsored programs. The Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance is responsible for the campus budget and the offices of financial and business services, human resources, planning and institutional research, computing services, and voice communications.
Academic Programs
CU-Denver is, above all, devoted to the needs of the residents of Denver and the region. With the national recognition earned by its graduate faculty, it is not surprising that an increasing number of advanced students from across the nation and overseas elect to pursue their studies here. CU-Denver comprises seven distinct academic units:
College of Architecture and Planning
College of Arts & Media
The Business School
School of Education
College of Engineering and Applied Science
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Graduate School of Public Affairs
The undergraduate Colleges of Arts & Media, Engineering, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Business School admit freshman and transfer students and offer programs leading to the baccalaureate degree in the arts, sciences, humanities, business, and engineering. A solid foundation of academic skills and general education is assured through a comprehensive core curriculum. Students may pursue graduate education through all of the campus’ colleges and schools. Pre-professional training in the fields of education, law, journalism, and the health careers also are available. CU-Denver employs more than 460 regular instructional faculty.
The colleges and schools sections of this catalog provide a listing of bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degree programs, policies on requirements for graduation, course requirements for various majors, course load policies, course descriptions, and similar information.
At CU-Denver, faculty explore and incorporate both novel and traditional methods of instruction. Telecommunications and other electronic media are an integral part of the way CU-Denver transcends geographic space, making instruction more stimulating and more widely available, and connecting faculty, students, alumni, and state, regional, national, and international leaders.
In keeping with CU’s Vision 2010, CU-Denver has kept pace with the demand for education that leads to improved professional opportunity in the new century. Many programs emphasize practical, business-world applications, and specific computer-oriented academic programs are offered in the computer science (engineering), applied mathematics (liberal arts and sciences), and information systems (business) programs.
About Our Students
CU-Denver students, both undergraduate and graduate, are well grounded in the professional and academic disciplines, making them ideal candidates for recruitment by employers and advanced degree programs throughout the nation. They develop the leadership, critical thinking, ethics, and future-orientation to enable them to become preeminent in their fields and to provide active leadership for the revitalization of cities everywhere.
To instill these values in its students, the University of Colorado at Denver excels in building instructional experiences around problems of contemporary urban life as well as traditional disciplines. Students and faculty are actively engaged in seeking solutions, through research and service, to these problems.
The diversity of our student body is a source of deep pride. Ethnic minority students make up one-fifth of the student population. Classes include traditional students who have elected to pursue college degrees immediately after high school, transfer students, older students who have delayed college entry, and professionals who seek to strengthen their base of skills or broaden their appreciation of the world around them.
With students’ ages ranging between 17 and 75, the average undergraduate student age at CU-Denver is 25, while our graduate students average 33. They represent a distinctive mix of ages and backgrounds, coming to class in faded jeans to corporate attire. Around 80 percent of our students are employed, and 52 percent attend part-time. Forty-three
CU-Denver Catalog2004—05


8 / Our University, Our Campus
percent are enrolled in graduate-level courses. All take advantage of the convenience of course offerings at times that meet their schedules, enjoying an enviable student-to-faculty ratio of 14:1.
Accreditation
The University of Colorado at Denver is institutionally accredited by the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. This organization can be contacted at:
30 N. LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
Chicago, IL 60602-2504
Phone: 1-800-621-7440
E-mail: info@ncacihe.org
Website: www.ncacihe.org
Many professional organizations have also granted accreditation to CU-Denver colleges and schools, including:
• Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration
• American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business
• American Chemical Society
• Colorado State Board of Education
• Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs
• Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology
• Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board
• National Architectural Accrediting Board
• National Association of Schools of Music
• National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
• National Council for the Accreditation ofTeacher Education
• National Planning Accreditation Board
Research and Other Creative Pursuits
CU-Denver is strongly committed to the pursuit of new knowledge through the research and creative efforts of its faculty. Such activities not only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life, but also strengthen teaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and professional practice. In addition, these activities constitute an important component of CU-Denver’s service to the community at large. Therefore, externally funded projects are a major priority at CU-Denver.
Research projects, training and public service programs at CU-Denver encompass both traditional and nontraditional fields of study, focusing on issues important at all levels — city, state, national and international. The benefits to campus are substantial. Externally funded activities assist in sustaining scholarly discourse, enable faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge, provide the foundation for solving pressing practical problems of vital concern to society, and enhance the education of students. Many students, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels, actively participate in projects overseen by faculty members at CU-Denver.
Our faculty conduct both basic and applied research and creative activities funded by local and state governments, federal, private and international sponsors. Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary economic, political, educational, engineering, mathematical, scientific and environmental needs. Examples of currently funded projects include development of disaster management simulations, bilingual education reform, prevention of domestic violence, transportation improvement and development projects, geographical information systems, nanoscience studies and cancer prevention in minority populations.
Financial support has been obtained for program and service development in the areas of computational mathematics, early childhood and special education, health administration, international affairs, internships and cooperative education, and employment and training institutes.
In addition, a great deal of research at the university is conducted without substantial external support. This research also yields important insights that are conveyed to a national audience through faculty publications, presentations, exhibits, performances, and professional activities. Many members of the faculty are leaders within the national scholarly community. All these pursuits bring recognition to the university, establish the credibility of its faculty and enhance the value of the degree it confers.
AURARIA HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER
The University of Colorado at Denver is located on the Auraria Higher Education Center campus, also home to Metropolitan State College of Denver and the Community College of Denver. The three institutions share a library (operated by CU-Denver), administrative and classroom buildings equipped with cutting-edge technologies, and related facilities on the 127-acre Auraria campus. Certain courses and programs are offered cooperatively by the Auraria educational institutions.
Because we share academic facilities, our students have the level of resources found at much larger public universities. The campus library blends its book-filled shelves with computer laboratories that help students link to resources they need for success in the classroom. Professional child care and development centers provide high-quality, reasonably priced on-campus day care for students’ preschool children. CU-Denver students may take physical education courses as well as participate in numerous recreation and intramural athletics programs at Auraria’s state-of-the-art fitness facilities.
The campus bookstore, located in the historic Tivoli Student Union, is the largest in the Rocky Mountain region. Housed in a renovated brewery originally built in the 1860s, the Tivoli Student Union also provides restaurants, student services and government offices, and many comfortable areas for studying.
In addition to the Tivoli Student Union, the Auraria campus contains other reminders of Denvers past—historic Ninth Street Park, St. Cajetans Church/Performing Arts Center, St. Elizabeths Church, Emmanuel-Sherith Chapel/Synagogue/Art Gallery, and Golda Meir House.
The historic is complemented by the modern on the Auraria campus. All classroom buildings are being upgraded to include Internet access, network connections, acoustic and lighting enhancements, and a full range of multimedia equipment to facilitate high-tech studies. The innovative King Academic and Performing Arts Center features a 300-seat courtyard theatre, a five-story concert hall (550 seats), a recital hall (200 seats), and performance support space. The building also houses 29 classrooms and 7 enhanced classrooms and computer labs.
CU-Denver Catalog2004- 05


Undergraduate Admissions
CU-Denver seeks to identify applicants who are likely to complete an academic program of study. Admission decisions are based on many factors, the most importan: being:
1. level of previous acadi :mic performance
2. evidence of academic ability and accomplishment as indicated by scores on national aptitude tests
3. evidence of maturity, motivation, and potential for academic success CU-Denver may deny admission to new applicants or readmission to
former students whose credentials indicate an inability to assume obligations of performance and behavior deemed essential by the university.
After completing the application process, official notification of one’s admissions status as an unc ergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office o] Admissions. Letters from various schools and colleges indicating acce ptance into a particular program are pending, subject to official notification of admission to the institution by the Admissions Office.
Students who are admitted pending receipt of additional documents or with unofficial documents will be permitted one term to submit the documents. If temporarily waived official documents are not received by the end of the initial ter jn of attendance, registration for subsequent terms will be denied. If at any time additional credentials are received that affect the student’s qu; lifications, the university reserves the right to change the admission decision.
Applicants who have not decided upon a major field of study will be considered for admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences as undetermined majors. Students admitted as undetermined majors should declare a major as qaickly as possible and no later than the end of their sophomore year.
All questions and corres] rondence regarding admission to CU-Denver and requests for application forms should be directed to:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado it Denver Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-336 4 303-556-2704 admissions@cudenver. edi:
Admission Deadlines
' chat ig<
The university may accordance with enrollmer registration time considerate as early as possible. For an all documents required for Admissions by the deadlini: meet the deadline may students are reminded that transcripts sent from institu planning and early applicai i international students. Int takes 60 days for credentials Education from internatio should complete the Trans! i application packet.
;e document/credential deadlines in t demands. For the best scholarship and ons, applicants should apply and be admitted pplicant to be considered for a specific term, admission must be received in the Office of for that term. Applicants who are unable to t to be considered for a later term. Transfer they should allow sufficient time to have tions they have previously attended. Advanced ion are necessary for the timely admission of (^national students are advised that it usually :o reach admissions in the Office of International pal locations. International transfer students er Information Request form found in the
Application Deadline for Priority Consideration
Fall Spring Summer
July 22 December 1 May 3
Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS)
Students entering the University of Colorado who graduated from high school in 1988 or latej are required to meet the following Minimum
Undergraduate Admissions / 9
Academic Preparation Standards: four years of English (with emphasis on composition), three years of college preparatory mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics), three years of natural science, two years of social science (including one year of U.S. or world history), three years of a single foreign language, and one year of the arts.
Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the university provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies prior to graduation from the university. Two levels of deficiency will be recognized.
1. One unit of deficiency will be allowed, provided the student meets other admission standards and provided the student makes up the deficiency before graduation from the university. Courses taken to make up a deficiency will count toward graduation, provided the CU-Denver college accepts those course credits toward graduation.
2. A student having more than one unit of deficiency may be admitted, provided that the student meets other standards of the university. The student must make up additional deficiencies before graduation. The student may satisfy the MAPS requirements by successful completion of:
• courses taken at CU
• courses taken at other institutions of higher education
• additional high school credits
• credit-by-examination programs
• other requirements as approved by each CU-Denver college
Admission Requirements for Freshmen
Freshman admission standards define the level of success and achievement necessary to be admitted to the University of Colorado and include factors that predict academic success, such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school coursework, and the grade point average. Both the subjects the student has studied and how the student has performed will be factors that determine admission to the university.
New freshmen may apply for admission to the Colleges of Arts & Media, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Business School.
The applicant must be a high school graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate by completing the General Education Development (GED) Test.
Preference for admission is given to applicants who rank in the top 30 percent of their high school graduating class and present a composite score of 21 or higher on the American College Test (ACT) or a combined score of950 or higher on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).
Business applicants will receive priority consideration if they graduated in the top 25 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1100 on the SAT. Applicants who do not meet the admission requirements for direct admission to the Business School will be automatically considered for admission as pre-business majors in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Engineering applicants will receive priority consideration if they graduated in the top 25 percent of their high school class and achieved a composite score of at least 26 on the ACT, with 28 on the mathematics section, or 1100 total on the SAT, with 600 on the mathematics section. Applicants who do not meet the admissions requirements for direct admission to the College of Engineering will be automatically considered for admission as a pre-engineering major in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
New freshmen seeking admission to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) and College of Arts & Media must meet college requirements for MAPS instituted by the University of Colorado. Applicants are required to satisfy 16 units of high school-level courses
CU-Denver Catalog 2004- 05


10 / Our University, Our Campus
in English, foreign language, mathematics, sciences, humanities, and social sciences. Students are eligible for admission to the colleges with up to two units of deficiency in a foreign language and no more than one additional deficiency in the remaining areas. The colleges will allow graduation credit toward the bachelors degree for courses satisfying Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS) deficiencies only if these courses are allowed for graduation credit under current college policy.
All music performance majors in the College of Arts & Media are expected to have had previous experience in an applied music area. Two years of prior piano training are recommended. An audition is required. Applicants may substitute tape recordings (about 10 minutes in length) and a statement of excellence from a qualified teacher in lieu of the personal audition. Interested students should write to the College of Arts & Media, CU-Denver, for audition information and applications.
Applicants for all departments who do not satisfy the requirements for priority consideration are reviewed on an individual basis.
COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA „
Years
English (literature, composition, grammar), one year
of speech/debate strongly recommended......................4
Mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics).....3
Natural science...............................................3
Social science................................................2
Foreign language (all units must be in a single language).....2
Academic elective............................................ 1
Total........................................................15
BUSINESS SCHOOL „
Years
English (one year of speech/debate and two years
of composition are strongly recommended)...................4
Mathematics (including at least two years
of algebra and one year of geometry).......................4
Natural science (includes two years of laboratory science)....3
Social science (including history)............................2
Foreign language (all units must be in a single language).....3
Academic electives (additional courses in English,............1
foreign language, mathematics, natural or social science, not to include business courses)
Total........................................................17
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE
Years
English (literature, composition, grammar), one year
of speech/debate strongly recommended........................4
Mathematics distributed as follows:
Algebra......................................................2
Geometry.....................................................1
Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry.........................1
Natural sciences (to include 1 unit physics and.................3
1 unit chemistry; also to include 2 units of laboratory science)
Foreign language................................................2
Social science..................................................2
Electives...................................................... 1
Total..........................................................16
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES „
Years
English (literature, composition, grammar),.....................4
one year of speech/debate strongly recommended
Mathematics (excluding business and consumer mathematics).......3
Natural science ................................................3
Social science..................................................2
Foreign language (all units must be in a single language).......2
Academic elective.............................................. 1
Total..........................................................15
CU-Denver Catalog2004—05
HOW TO APPLY
1. Students should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from a Colorado high school counselor, from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions, or at www.cudenver.edu.
2. The application must be completed and sent to the Office of Admissions with a $40 (subject to change) non-refundable fee. For applicants who are granted admission but are unable to enroll for that term, the $40 application fee will remain valid for 12 months, provided the Office of Admissions is informed of the intent to enroll for a later term.
3. Students are required to have their high school send an official transcript of their high school grades, including class rank, to the Office of Admissions. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to: Office of Admissions, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364
Hand-carried or faxed copies are not official.
4. Students who did not graduate from high school are required to have a copy of their GED test scores and GED certificate sent directly from the certifying agency to the CU-Denver Office of Admissions (see Admissions Requirements for Non-High School Graduates).
5. Students also are required to take either the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) and request that test scores be sent to CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 4875). High school students may obtain ACT and SAT test dates and locations from their counselors.
Students who took one of these tests while in high school may use the test scores reported on their official high school transcripts as an official test score report.
Applicants who took one of these tests and did not designate CU-Denver as the recipient of the scores must notify the testing agency to send scores to CU-Denver. A Request for Additional Score Report may be requested from any of the offices listed below.
American College Testing Program (ACT)
P.O. Box 168
Iowa City, Iowa 52243
(319)337-1270
The College Board (SAT)
P.O. Box 6201
Princeton, New Jersey 08541-6201 (609) 771-7600
6. International students must submit proof of proficiency in the English language (see Requirements for International Students).
APPLICANTS NOT GRANTED ADMISSION
An applicant who is not granted admission as an entering freshman may wish to consider transferring to the university after successful study elsewhere. The Office of Admissions urges such students to complete at least one full semester (12-15 credit hours) of college-level coursework at another college or university, giving special attention to courses that will provide sound academic preparation for future transfer to CU-Denver. These courses should include any Minimum Academic Preparation Standards (MAPS) not met in high school (see the MAPS requirements).
Students who are not admissible will be encouraged to participate in a Redirect Program that CU-Denver has established with Colorado community colleges.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate allpreviously attended institutions will be denied admission to, or will be disenrolled from, the university.


Undergraduate Admissions /II
New Student Orientation
A welcome and general information program open to all new students is held at the beginning of t^e fall and spring semesters. The program provides an introduction tcj the campus, information about student services and student activities available through CU-Denver, and services provided to all students on the Auraria Campus, including information on getting ID and parking.
Transfer and graduate students should contact their schools and colleges for additional information on academic advising, as well as special orientation sessions that may be held for a particular program.
New freshmen will receive separate information regarding placement testing, academic advising, and specific orientation sessions for students and parents.
For more information, c^ll 303-352-3520 or visit North Classroom, Room 1503.
Admission Requirements for Non-High School Graduates
An individual who has not graduated but has passed the General Education Development (GED) test may be considered for admission. The application for undergraduate admission must be accompanied by a $40 non-refundable application fee and an official transcript showing completed high school courses. An applicant must also submit GED scores and scores from the American College Test (ACT) Program.
The admission decision i£ based on the student’s potential for academic success at CU-Denver.
Admission Requirements for Transfer Students
Applicants are considered transfer students for admission purposes if they have completed college coursework since graduating from high school. Applicants are not considered transfer students if the only college-level classes they have takerj were before high school graduation.
Any applicant not eligible to return to all institutions previously attended will be refused admission. To meet the minimum transfer admission standards at CU-Denver, students must meet one of the following conditions:
1. have earned 12-29 collegiate semester credit hours and have the following grade pointjaverage:
a. 2.5 GPA (on a 4.0 scale)
b. 2.0 GPA if transferring from Colorado School of Mines, Colorado State University, University of Colorado at Boulder, or University of Colorad|o at Colorado Springs
2. have earned 30 or mc|re collegiate semester hours with a 2.0 GPA
Transfer students are giv^n priority consideration for admission
as follows:
1. Business School. To bejconsidered for transfer admission, students must have completed jat least 24 semester hours that will apply to the bachelor of scienc^ (business administration) degree. Priority consideration for adrrjission will be granted to transfer applicants with a minimum cumulative overall GPA of 3.0 for all work applicable to a BA in business administration degree, including a minimum 2.0 GPA in business courses.
Students may also tye admitted if they have a 3.0 GPA in the last 24semester hours ofa[ plicable coursework, a 2.0 GPA in business courses, and at least a 2.0 overall cumulative GPA in courses applicable to a BA in business administration degree.
Transfer applicants (who do not meet either of the priority admission standards ire pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA earned in the last 24 semester hours. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available, or are referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration, where they will be advised as pre-business majors.
Applicants with at leasts. 2.6 GPA in applicable coursework in the last 24 semester hours will be considered as space is available. Students with less than a 2.6 GPA in the last 24 semester hours of
applicable coursework will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission consideration, where they will be advised as pre-business majors.
2. College of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants to the College of Engineering should have at least a 2.75 cumulative grade point average for all math and science coursework attempted, at least 24 hours of college coursework including two semesters each of calculus and calculus-based physics.
3. College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade point average for all work attempted. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average.
4. College of Arts dr Media. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 cumulative college grade point average for all work attempted. Course work in progress cannot be used in calculating the cumulative average. Music major applicants (except those entering the Music Industry Studies program) also must pass an audition. Contact the Department of Music for audition information, 303-556-2727 or www. cudenver. edu!'academics/'colleges/CAM.
Important Note: Applicants who do not meet the above grade point average or credit hour requirements will be considered for admission, but on an individ-ual basis.
The primary factors used when considering students individually are:
• probability of success in the academic program to which admission is desired
• the quality of prior academic work
• age, maturity, and noncollegiate achievements
• time elapsed since last attendance at previous colleges Transfer students with 60 credits of earned college credit must select
a major at the time of application. “Undeclared” is not a major.
HOWTO APPLY
1. The student should obtain an application for undergraduate admission from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions or the CU-Denver website.
2. The application form must be completed and returned with the required $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee.
3. The student is required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to-. Office of Admissions, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 167, RO. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364 Hand-carried or faxed copies are not official.
If a student is currently enrolled at another institution, an official transcript listing all courses except those taken in the final term should be sent. Another transcript must be submitted after completion of the final term. (Transcripts from foreign institutions must be presented in the original language and accompanied by a certified literal English translation.)
Applicants to the Colleges of Arts & Media and Liberal Arts and Sciences who have fewer than 12 semester hours (18 quarter hours) of college work completed must also submit a high school transcript and ACT or SAT test scores.
Engineering and business applicants with fewer than 24 semester hours also must submit high school transcripts and ACT/SAT scores.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file.
Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate allpreviously attended institutions will be denied admission to, or will he disenrolledfrom, the university.
TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT
Course work taken at any regionally accredited institution of higher education will be considered for transfer to CU-Denver. Courses are
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


12 / Our University, Our Campus
considered for transfer on the basis of having similar content to those offered by CU-Denver. Statewide guaranteed transfer courses are always accepted and apply to core requirements. Developmental, remedial, vocational, technical, religious, doctrinal, orientation, independent study, special topics, and cooperative education courses are not accepted. Only courses in which a grade of C- or better was earned are considered for transfer. Courses in which a grade of Pass (P) was earned are considered for transfer only if a grade of Pass at the sending institution is defined as a C- or better. Students wishing to appeal transfer credit decisions should contact their CU-Denver academic department.
After all official transcripts have been received and the student is admitted as a degree student, the Office of Admissions will prepare a transfer credit report indicating which courses have been accepted in transfer by CU-Denver. A copy of this report is mailed to the student as well as to the student s academic department at CU-Denver. Upon receipt of this transfer credit report, students should contact their academic department to meet with an advisor, who will determine how transferred credit applies to specific CU-Denver degree requirements.
The Office of Admissions considers coursework for transfer regardless of the age of the academic credit. State guaranteed general education courses will be accepted in transfer and applied to graduation requirements for a period of at least 10 years after course completion. Individual departments, however, may have specific guidelines and policies about age of credit for courses not listed as “state guaranteed” and make the final decision about application of credit toward a degree program. Students are expected to have current working knowledge of prerequisite courses, regardless of when prerequisite courses were taken.
The Business School generally limits its transfer of business course credits to those that are offered as lower division courses at CU-Denver. Students who have taken upper division business courses from an American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accredited college of business may request review of these courses for possible transfer by contacting CU-Denver’s Business School advising office.
All courses taken in the business area of emphasis must be completed at CU-Denver.
The College of Engineering and Applied Science, in general, requires that engineering course transfer credit must come from an Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)—accredited engineering program to be acceptable for degree purposes. Engineering technology courses are not considered equivalent to engineering courses.
A maximum of 60 semester hours is acceptable in transfer to CU-Denver from community or junior colleges.
Colorado Community College Transfer
In compliance with Colorado’s Statewide Transfer Policy, students may transfer credit from a Colorado community college on a course-by-course basis or by completing an Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree. Students who complete an AA/AS degree may be guaranteed full transfer of the associate degree (60 credits maximum) and completion of a BA/BS degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences or the College of Arts & Media with 60 additional credits at CU-Denver. This guaranteed transfer program is referred to as the “60 plus 60” transfer program.
The 60 plus 60 program applies only to students who began Colorado community college studies in fall 2003 or later and who meet the following requirements:
• complete an AA/AS degree, which includes 35 credits of state-guaranteed general education courses
• earn credit only at Colorado community colleges within the last 10 years
• earn a grade of C or better in each course
• follow the CU-Denver transfer guide, which lists required courses to be taken as part of the AA/AS degree
• declare a major in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences or the College of Arts & Media (changes of major and/or completion of professional prerequisites or minors are not included in this program)
If students meet these criteria and their graduation evaluation shows they need more than 60 credits for a BA/BS degree, they can file an appeal. See www.state.co.us/ccbe/stuinf.htmKot details.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05
Statewide articulation agreements are in place governing transfer of students from Colorado community colleges into programs in the Business School, the College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the Elementary Education Teacher Licensure program.
A Comprehensive Guide to Student Transfer document containing Colorado community college advising plans and admission information is available from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. In addition, a CU-Denver admissions representative can assist students with planning a transfer program. Representatives regularly visit Colorado community colleges. Call the CU-Denver Transfer Service Coordinator at 303-556-4950 or transfer@cudenver.edu for additional information.
Advanced Placemenl Program
The Advanced Placement (AP) Program of the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) allows students to take advanced work while in high school and then be examined for credit at the college level. Students who take advanced placement courses and subsequently receive scores of 4 or 5 on the CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are generally given college credit for lower-level courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency, and are granted advanced standing in those areas. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences also grants AP credit for scores of 3 plus a course grade of A- in the corresponding subject. For more information, contact your high school counselor or the Office of Admissions at CU-Denver.
College-Level Examination Program
Incoming CU-Denver students may earn university credit by examination in subject areas in which they have demonstrated college-level proficiency. Interested students are encouraged to take appropriate subject examinations provided in the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of the College Entrance Examination Board testing service.
Students who are interested in how CLEP examination credit applies to the CU-Denver degree requirements should contact their academic advisor.
International Baccalaureate Diploma Program
The International Baccalaureate Diploma Program (IB), available at select high schools, is a rigorous, pre-university course of study emphasizing liberal arts from an international perspective.
In accordance with HB 03-1108, the University of Colorado at Denver will grant at minimum 24 semester hours of credit for any student who has graduated from high school having successfully completed an International Baccalaureate (IB) Diploma program. No tuition will be charged for awarding of this academic credit. To receive the maximum credit hours, a student must have a score of at least 4 on each examination administered as part of the IB diploma program. If a score below 4 is earned on an examination, credit awarded may be reduced. Credit may be granted for individual IB courses where examinations are completed with at least a score of 4 for students who do not complete an IB Diploma program. Students should consult their academic advisors for information about applying IB credit to their degree programs.
Military Service and Schooling
To have credit for educational experience evaluated, applicants with military experience should submit the following with their application:
• AcopyofDD Form214
• DD Form 295, Application for the Evaluation of Educational Experience During Military Service (USAF personnel may present two official transcripts from the Community College of the Air Force in lieu of DD Form 295)
Credit will be awarded as recommended by the Commission on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Council on Education, to the extent that the credit is applicable to the degree the student is seeking at CU-Denver.
Credit for courses completed through the U.S. Armed Forces Institute will be evaluated on the same basis as transfer credit from collegiate institutions.


Undergraduate Admissions /13
Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC)
Students enrolled in Arrjiy or Air Force ROTC programs should consult with their college or school regarding the application of ROTC course credit toward graduation requirements. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences allows a ijnaximum of 6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be applied toward) baccalaureate degree requirements. The Business School stipulates jhat ROTC courses may be used for credit only for non-business elective requirements and that no credit may be given for freshman and sophomore ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 12 semester fjours may be applied toward baccalaureate degree requirements in business, and then only if the ROTC program is completed.
Intro-University Transfer
CU-Denver students may change colleges or schools within CU-Denver provided they are ajccepted by the college or school to which they wish to transfer. CU-Denver Intra-University Transfer forms may be obtained from the Records Office. Decisions on intra-university transfers are made by the college or school to which the student wishes to transfer.
Students in Extended Stpdies programs wishing to enroll in regular CU-Denver courses or degree programs should contact the Office of Admissions for a degree application.
Readmission Requirements for Former Students
CU-Denver students who have not registered and attended classes at CU-Denver for one year of longer and who have not attended another institution since CU are considered returning students and must formally apply for readmission. An additional application fee is required only if you are changing from undergraduate to graduate or non-degree to degree status. Application forms are available at the Office of Admissions and at www. cudenver. edu.
Students who have atterjded another college or university since last attending the University of Colorado must apply as transfer students and meet the transfer student deadlines for receipt of documents. This requires payment of the $4)0 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee and submission of |two official transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended. Transcripts must be sent directly from the issuing institution to:
Office of Admissions
University of Colorado it Denver
Campus Box 167, P. O.IBox 173364
Denver, CO 80217-3364
Students who last attended another CU campus must formally apply for readmission. An application fee is not required unless you are going from undergraduate to grajduate or from non-degree to degree status. Application forms are available from the Office of Admissions and at www. cudenver. edu.
Admission for Non-Degree Students
Persons who have reached the age of 20 and who want to take university courses, but do not plan ta work toward a University of Colorado degree, may be admitted ai non-degree students provided they are eligible to return to all collegiate institutions previously attended. A 2.0 cumulative grade point average for all institutions attended is required to be a non-degree student). Questions regarding admission as a nondegree student should be directed to the Office of Admissions. Each school/ college limits the dumber of semester hours taken as a nondegree student that may be transferred to a degree program.
Students considering changing from non-degree to degree status will need to meet the admission requirements for degree-seeking students.
Courses taken for credit as a non-degree student can be used for transfer to other institutions or for professional development.
Note: International students are not admitted as non-degree students.
Students with a baccalaureate degree who are not accepted to specific degree programs may enroll for coursework as non-degree students. They must complete a non-degree application for admission. Students in a non-degree status who have a previous degree pay graduate tuition rates.
To apply for admission as a non-degree student, obtain a Non-Degree Student Application form from the Office of Admissions. Return the completed application by the deadline for the term desired. A $25 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee is required. No additional credentials are required. Non-degree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space-available basis.
Continuation as a non-degree student with no prior undergraduate degree is contingent upon maintaining an overall grade point average of 2.0 upon completion of 12 or more semester hours.
Non-degree students may apply for admission to an undergraduate degree program by following the instructions outlined on the application for degree admission form.
Admission for Students Seeking a Second Undergraduate Degree
Students who already hold a bachelors degree may apply for admission to a program in which they can earn a second undergraduate degree. Applicants for a second undergraduate degree must meet CU-Denver admissions standards. These students may apply to the College of Arts & Media, College of Engineering and Applied Science, or the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Persons who already hold an undergraduate degree in any discipline generally may not apply for a second undergraduate degree in business. Rather, they should apply to a graduate MBA or M.S. business program. Contact the Graduate School of Business at 303-556-5900. Education is a graduate program. Interested students should contact the School of Education office for information, 303-556-2717.
HOW TO APPLY
1. Obtain an application for undergraduate admission from the Office of Admissions or at www.cudenver.edu.
2. Complete the application and send it to the Office of Admissions with a $40 (subject to change) non-refundable application fee.
3. Have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each collegiate institution attended. Official transcripts are those sent by the issuing institution directly to:
Office of Admissions University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 167, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364 Hand-carried or faxed copies are not official.
Transcripts from the institution where the first undergraduate degree was earned must have final grades posted for the semester that the student graduated and have the official notation of the degree awarded.
All credentials presented for admission become the property of the University of Colorado and must remain on file. Students who do not declare all previously attended institutions are subject to disciplinary action and/or dismissal.
Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores will be denied admission to, or will be disenrolled from, the university.
High School Concurrent Enrollment
High school juniors and seniors with demonstrated academic abilities may be admitted to CU-Denver with special approval for one term only. This approval may be renewed. Credit for courses taken may subsequently be applied toward a university degree program. For more information and application instructions, contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions, 303-556-2873.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


14 / Our University, Our Campus
Admission Requirements for International Students
The University of Colorado at Denver encourages international students to apply for admission to undergraduate and graduate programs. All international applicants must submit a formal application and pay the non-refundable international application fee of $75.
Undergraduate. Admission requirements for CU-Denvers schools and colleges vary, and international students seeking admission must meet the requirements of the program to which they are applying.
In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 525 (or 197 on the computer-based test). Prospective students should request an International Student Application packet from the Office of International Education. Requirements for each CU-Denver college and school can be found in this catalog.
For best processing, all information should be sent at least five months before the semester in which you wish to enroll. For undergraduate application materials, have materials sent by the following dates:
Preferred Final
Summer January 15 May 3
Fall March 15 July 22
Spring August 15 December 1
Graduate. International students who wish to pursue graduate study at CU-Denver must have earned an undergraduate bachelors degree, or its equivalent, and must fulfill all other requirements of the graduate program to which they are applying. In addition, all international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 500 (or 173 on the computer-based test) before CU-Denver will process the application for admission. However, many departments require a TOEFL score higher than 500 when granting admission to a graduate program. Applications are available from the Office of International Education. These applications should be received six months prior to the term for which the student is applying for priority consideration.
Note: Except for summer sessions, international students must be enrolled in a degree-seeking program.
Graduate School
Interim Dean: Tom Clark
Office: CU-Denver Building, 1250 14th Street, Suite 320 Telephone: 303-556-3687
For specific information and degree requirements for graduate study, refer to the department/program descriptions in the schools and colleges sections of this catalog.
Information About the Graduate School
Quality graduate programs are synonymous with the University of Colorado. Professors are actively involved in research and creative activity and, as teachers and scholars, continue to study and absorb new data, ideas, and techniques, eventually bringing these experiences to the classroom. Graduate students at CU-Denver gain not only from interactions with the graduate faculty, but also from other students. CU-Denver’s graduate students bring practical experience gained in the Denver community to the classroom, and they are ready to relate the realities of practice to the models presented.
The CU-Denver Graduate School includes the following colleges and schools:
College of Architecture and Planning College of Arts & Media Business School
College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Liberal Arts and Sciences School of Education Graduate School of Public Affairs
Degrees Offered
The following graduate programs are authorized for completion through the Graduate School at CU-Denver:
Master of Arts (MA)
Anthropology
Biology
Communication
Economics
English
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05
Master of Arts (MA Education)
Administration, Supervision, and Curriculum Development
Counseling Psychology and Counselor Education
Curriculum and Instruction
Early Childhood Education
Educational Psychology
Information and Learning Technologies
Special Education
Master of Science (MS)
Accounting Applied Mathematics Chemistry Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical Engineering Environmental Sciences Finance
Information Systems Management and Organization Marketing
Mechanical Engineering Recording Arts Technical Communication
Master of Architecture (MArch)
Master of Integrated Science (MIS)
Master of Science International Business Master of Criminal Justice (MCJ)
Master of Engineering (MEng)
Master of Science in Health Administration (MS)
Executive Option
Master of Humanities (MH)
Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA)
Master of Public Administration (MPA)
Master of Public Administration (MPA)
Executive Option
Master of Social Science (MSS)
Master of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP)


Graduate School /15
Master of Urban Design (t|lUD) Specialist in Education (Ec S)
sion, Curriculum Development
Administration, Supervi School Psychology
Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)
Applied Mathematics Civil Engineering
Computer Science and Information Systems Design and Planning Educational Leadership and Innovation Health and Behavioral Sciences Public Administration
Requirements for Admission
tre minimum requirements. School and stringent, take precedence over the minimum e Graduate School.
Note that the following college regulations, if more guidelines as set forth by th)<
REGULAR DEGREE STUDENTS
Qualified students are admitted to regular degree status by the appropriate department. Irj addition to departmental approval, applicants for admission as] regular degree students must:
1. Present a combinatiorj of the following: a cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 2.5 or better on a scale where A is equal to 4.0, standardized examinations, prior professional experience, portfolios, or other indicators.
2. Meet the specific requirements as established by the program faculty.
PROVISIONAL DEGREE STUDENTS
Applicants who do not rfieet the requirements for admission as a regular degree student mayi be considered for admission to a master’s program as a provisional dt gree student upon the recommendation of the program faculty. Programs may admit students under a provisional agreement subject to the following requirements:
1. The term of the provisional period shall not exceed two years.
2. The student must conjtplete each semester’s coursework with a GPA of 3.0 or higher on all Work taken (whether applied to the masters degree or not).
3. The provisional agreement should clearly state any additional program requirements.
Failure to meet the conditions of the provisional agreement will be cause for suspension.
APPLICATION PROCEDURES
Graduate students who Expect to study at CU-Denver should contact the Office of Admissions concerning procedures for forwarding completed applications.
Once a student has decided to apply for a graduate program, a completed application mujt be submitted before the deadline date. Contact the specific prograin of study for deadline dates.
An applicant for admission must present:
1. Parts I and II of the CU-Denver Graduate School Application form, including the Tdition Classification form, which may be obtained from the departmental program coordinator.
2. Two official transcripts for all academic work in colleges and universities completed] to date.
3. Three letters of reference. Have nominators include applicant’s name and social security number in their letter of reference.
4. A nonrefundable application fee (check or money order) of $50 (international student application fee is $60). No application will be processed until tit is fee is paid.
5. Any other material required specifically by the program faculty. This may include scores from the Graduate Record Examination
(GRE) or other examination. Check with program coordinators in the departments for additional information that may be required.
When a prospective degree student applies for admission, the chairperson or a student admissions committee of the department will decide whether the applicant shall be admitted and make that decision known to the Office of Admissions.
Check with the program to determine the deadline for submitting the application and application fee.
Students who wish to apply for a graduate student award (e.g., fellowship, scholarship, assistantship) should contact their department before the application deadline date for information, since deadlines are usually earlier for aid requests.
Readmission/Changing Programs
Former and current students who wish to be readmitted or change from one degree program to another must meet the requirements of the new degree program and provide all items required of students applying to the Graduate School at CU-Denver for the first time. These applicants, however, may petition the program to which they were initially admitted to secure a release of transcripts and letters of recommendation supplied at the time of their initial application.
Transferring
Students transferring from another CU campus to CU-Denver must apply and be accepted to the new campus.
Doctoral Application
A student who has completed a master’s program at CU-Denver must resubmit Parts I and II of the graduate application for acceptance into the doctoral program.
Non-Degree Students
A student who wishes to take graduate courses, but is not interested in earning a specific advanced degree, may apply as a non-degree student. Contact the Office of Admissions at 303-556-2704 for further information. Non-degree students will be allowed to register only on the campus to which they have been admitted.
Non-degree students who later desire to pursue a graduate degree program at this university are encouraged to submit the complete graduate application and supporting credentials to their department as soon as possible. Note that the grade point average (GPA) for courses taken as a non-degree student is calculated separately, and is not incorporated in the official graduate GPA.
A department may recommend the transfer of as many as 9 credit hours toward the requirements of a master’s degree for courses taken either as a student at another recognized graduate school, as a non-degree student at the University of Colorado, or a combination.
A grade of B- or better must be earned. A 10-year time limit is in effect.
International Applicants
Prospective international students should contact the Office of International Education for submission deadlines. The application packet should include:
• $75 fee
• TOEFL scores
• financial documentation
• Graduate Record Examination scores
• official English translation of all school records
• other documents as noted in the previous section on application procedures
Acceptable TOEFL Scores: The TOEFL is the Test of English as a Foreign Language. If a student’s native language is not English, or the student has not attended a British or American university for at least one year and achieved satisfactory grades, then he/she must take the TOEFL.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


16 / Our University, Our Campus
All programs within arts and sciences, education, and doctoral programs require a minimum score of 500 for regular admission, before CU-Denver will process the application for admission. However, many departments require a TOEFL score higher than 500 when granting admission to a graduate program.
The university provides an Intensive English Program for international students preparing to pass the TOEFL, through the American Language Center. See Special Programs and Facilities in the General Information section for a complete description.
Graduate Qualifying Examinations
At the option of any department, the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) may be required of applicants for admission to the graduate program or for assistantships prior to determining student status.
Students who are applying for assistantships for the fall semester should take the GRE no later than the December testing date so that their scores will be available to the selection committee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE scores to be received by the department.
Information regarding these examinations may be obtained from the Assessment Center, 303-556-3677. Students may also contact the Educational Testing Service at 609-771-7670, via the web at www.gre.org, or by writing to GRE-ETS, P.O. Box 6000, Princeton, NJ 08541-6000.
Other tests may be required by the school or college. Students entering professional schools and special programs may obtain information on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Dopplet, and Law School Admissions Test (LSAT) from the college or school requiring the test.
New Student Orientation
An orientation program for new students is held at the beginning of the fall and spring semesters, during the week prior to the first day of classes. The orientation program provides information to new students about activities and services available at CU-Denver. Information on the registration process, parking, and securing ID cards is also provided. Academic advising sessions are held before registration for the term. Students should contact their schools and colleges for additional information on advising, as well as special orientation sessions that may be held for their programs.
Registration
On the regular registration days of each semester, students who have been admitted to a graduate program are required to complete appropriate registration procedures.
Students should register for classes the semester they are accepted as graduate students. If unable to attend that semester, they must notify the Office of Admissions and Records, in addition to the department that has accepted them.
CHANGES IN REGISTRATION
A student who wishes to drop a course should follow the standard drop/add procedure. After the 10th week of classes, graduate students may not drop or add a course without presenting a letter to the dean of the appropriate school or college, stating the exceptional circumstances that justify the change. This letter, endorsed by the instructor of the course, must accompany the properly signed and completed drop/add form.
WITHDRAWAL
Graduate students who desire to withdraw from the university must apply to the dean of their school or college for permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who discontinues attendance in a course without official withdrawal will be marked as havingfailed the course. After the
1 Oth week of the class, the student must have the associate deans signature to drop a course.
Tuition and Fees
For information, see Tuition and Fees section of this catalog.
Financial Aid for Graduate Study
COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT
The Colorado Graduate Grant is administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Competition for these funds is based on demonstrated need and is open to graduate students who are residents of the state of Colorado. Applications are available from the Office of Financial Aid, 303-556-2886.
COLORADO GRADUATE MERIT AWARDS
Colorado Graduate Fellowships are awarded primarily to entering and continuing regular degree doctoral students. These are awarded to entering students on the basis of academic promise and to continuing students on the basis of academic success. Contact the department for information about this fellowship.
GRADUATE STUDENTTEACHING APPOINTMENTS
Many departments employ graduate students as part-time instructors or teaching assistants. The instructorship is reserved for those advanced graduate students already possessing an appropriate masters degree who may be independently responsible for the conduct of a section or course. Contact the department for further information.
RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS
Research activities provide opportunities for graduate students to obtain part-time work as research assistants in many departments. Contact the department for further information.
LOAN FUNDS
Graduate students wishing to apply for long-term loans and for part-time jobs through the college work-study program should submit an application for financial aid to the Office of Financial Aid by March 1. Short-term loan assistance is available to students who have completed one or more semesters in residence. Short-term loans are designed to supplement inadequate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. Application should be made directly to the Student Service Center, NC1001.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
The university maintains an employment service to help students obtain part-time work, either through conventional employment or through the college work-study program.
Students employed by the university are hired solely on the basis of merit and fitness, a policy that avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, creed, sex, age, handicap, or national origin. Students are also referred to prospective employers in accordance with this policy.
Requirements for Advanced Degrees
QUALITY OF GRADUATE WORK
A student is expected to maintain at least an overall 3.0 average in all work attempted while enrolled in a graduate program.
For all graduate degrees, a grade below Cis unsatisfactory and will not be counted toward the minimum requirements for these degrees.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Graduate School /17
CREDIT BY TRANSFER
LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS
A limited amount of high-quality resident graduate work done in a recognized graduate school elsewhere within the time allowed may be accepted, provided it is recommended by the department concerned and approved by the school or college dean. The maximum amount of work that may be transferred to this university is 9 semester hours or 30 percent of the number of credits required for the degree, whichever is higher for master’s degrees, and 18 hours for performance and PhD degrees.
The school or college sfjall determine if graduate classes taken by an undergraduate can be transferred to a graduate program. They shall also determine if courses taken in the University of Colorado system are considered resident or transfeij courses.
Courses taken as pass/fijil or satisfactory/unsatisfactory will not be transferred. In addition, a grade of B- or above must be earned for a course to be transferred. Courses over 10 years old will not be transferred.
USE OF ENGLISH
Candidates must have such knowledge of ancient and/or modern languages as each department requires. See specific departmental requirements.
GRADUATE CREDIT
Graduate credit is given for courses that are listed at the 5000 level or above, and that are offered by professors who are members of the graduate faculty. Courses at the 4000 level may be counted for graduate credit, but a minimum of 18 semester hours must be taken at the 5000 level.
No course below the 4000 level may be counted for graduate credit. Departmental approval must be obtained for the courses taken by a student to count toward the degree plan.
Students are advised that not all courses listed in this catalog are available at any one time. Some are given in alternate years, and this should be considered when developing degree plans.
A student who is noticeably deficient in the use of standard English in all oral and written work njiay not obtain an advanced degree from the University of Colorado. Ability to use the language with precision and distinction should be cultivated as an attainment of major importance.
The university reserves jhe right to test English proficiency for nonnative speakers of English jo confirm and validate sufficiency for creditbearing coursework and degree programs.
Each department will judge the qualifications of its advanced students in the use of English. Repcjrts, examinations, and speech will be considered in estimating the candidate’s proficiency.
GRADUATE APPEALS
The Graduate Council dhall review grievances related to procedural issues that cannot be resolved at the school or college level. Appeals of grades or other academic issues are conducted according to the procedures of the schools and ccjlleges, with final resolution residing with the dean of the college/school.j
Master's Degree
A student regularly admitted to a graduate program and later accepted as a candidate forj the master of arts, master of science, or other master’s degrees will be recommended for the degree only after certain requirements have been mjt.
The requirements stated below are minimum requirements; additional conditions may be set by the individual programs.
Students planning to graduate should ascertain current deadlines with their graduate program. It is the graduate student’s and the department’s responsibility to see! that all requirements and deadlines are met (i.e., changing of IW gradejs, notification of final examinations, etc.).
Departments or prograrjt committees may have deadlines that must be met by the graduate students in that department or program. It is the student’s responsibility to Ascertain and meet these requirements.
MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
The minimum requirements of graduate work for a master’s degree may be fulfilled by completing a minimum of 30 semester credits, of which no more than 9 may be thesis or independent study hours.
A course mark below Cis unsatisfactory and will not count toward the minimum requirements for a master’s degree.
A student on probation is not eligible to be awarded a degree until he or she is removed from probation.
Program requirements may be more stringent than these minimum requirements, in which case program requirements supercede the requirements of the Graduate School.
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY
A student who wishes to become a candidate for a master’s degree must file a completed Application for Admission to Candidacy in the Graduate School or in the student’s graduate program by the appropriate deadline for graduating that semester.
The application must be signed by the student’s advisor and the program chair or director, certifying that the student’s work is satisfactory and that the program outlined in the application meets the requirements set for the student.
MASTER'S THESIS CREDIT
Every graduate student working toward a master’s degree who expects to present a thesis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree must register for thesis credit with a maximum of 9 semester hours. The final grade will be withheld until the thesis is completed. If the thesis is not completed at the end of the term in which the student is so registered, an In Progress (IP) will be reported.
THESIS REQUIREMENTS
A thesis may be of a research, expository, critical, or creative type. Every thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for an advanced degree must:
1. deal with a definite topic related to the major field
2. be based upon independent study and investigation
3. represent the equivalent of no more than 9 semester hours of work
4. receive the approval of the major department
5. be essentially complete at the time the comprehensive final examination is given
6. comply in mechanical features with specifications outlined in Directions for Preparing Master’s and Doctoral Theses, which is obtainable from the Graduate School office, and have received thesis format approval
All theses must be approved and signed by the thesis advisor and other committee members. Three copies of the final thesis must be submitted to the Graduate School by the specified deadline. The thesis binding fee must be paid by check when the thesis is submitted to the Graduate School. Approved theses are kept on file in the Auraria Library and in the student’s department.
TIMELIMIT
Master’s degree students have seven years from the date of the start of coursework to complete all degree requirements.
CU-Denver Catalog2004—05


18 / Our University, Our Campus
Doctor of Philosophy
The doctor of philosophy (PhD) degree is the highest academic degree conferred by the university. To state the requirements for the degree in terms of credit hours would be misleading, because the degree is not conferred merely upon the satisfactory completion of a course of study, however faithfully pursued.
Students who receive this degree must demonstrate that they are proficient in some broad subject of learning and that they can critically evaluate work in this field. Furthermore, they must have shown the ability to work independendy in their chosen field and must have made an original contribution of significance to the advancement of knowledge. The technical requirements stated below are minimal requirements for all candidates for the degree; additional conditions set by the departments will be found in the announcements of separate departments. Any department may make additional regulations consistent with these general rules.
Studies leading to the PhD degree must be chosen so as to contribute to special competence and a high order of scholarship in a broad field of knowledge. A field of study chosen by the student may be in one department or it may include two or more closely related departments. The criterion as to what constitutes an acceptable field of study shall be that the student’s work must contribute to an organized program of study and research without regard to the organization of academic departments within the university.
MINIMUM COURSE/DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS
A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate courses and 30 semester hours of dissertation credit are required for the PhD degree.
Course Work Requirement. A minimum of 30 semester hours of courses numbered 5000 or above is required for the degree, but the number of hours of formal courses will ordinarily exceed this minimum.
Dissertation Hours Requirement. To complete the requirements for the PhD, a student must complete a total of at least 30 hours of doctoral dissertation credit, with not more than 10 of these credit hours taken during any single semester. A minimum of 5 dissertation hours must be registered for each fall and spring semester following successful completion of the colloquium or comprehensive examination. Dissertation credit does not apply toward the minimum 30 hours of required coursework specified above.
Course work and work on the dissertation may proceed concurrently throughout the doctoral program.
RESIDENCE
The student must be properly registered to earn residence credit. The minimal residence requirement shall be three semesters of scholarly work.
EXAMINATIONS
Each PhD program will require at least comprehensive and final examinations. Notice of all examinations must be filed with the dean of the Graduate School at least two weeks prior to administration.
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION
The student must pass a comprehensive examination in the field of concentration and related fields. This examination may be oral, written, or both, and will test the student’s mastery of a broad field of knowledge, not merely the formal coursework completed.
The examination shall be conducted by an examining board. The board shall consist of the advisory committee and additional members as necessary to total a minimum of four members of the graduate faculty, one of whom is outside the primary department.
CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DOCTORAL CANDIDATES
Following successful completion of the comprehensive examination, students must register continuously. These students will register for and be charged for a minimum of 5 hours of dissertation credit each fall and spring semester. A maximum of 10 hours of dissertation credit may be registered for in any one semester. Continuous registration during the academic year will be required until completion of the dissertation defense (excluding summer). It is expected that the student and advisor will consult each semester as to the number of hours for which the student will register, consistent with the classification identified above.
DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS
A dissertation based upon original investigation, showing mature scholarship, critical judgment, and familiarity with the tools and methods of research must be written upon a subject approved by the student’s major department. To be acceptable, this dissertation should be a worthwhile contribution to knowledge in the student’s special field.
In mechanical features, all dissertations must comply with the specifications as outlined in the Directions for Preparing Master’s and Doctoral Theses, which may be obtained from the Graduate School office. The final draft must be reviewed and approved for format by the Graduate School prior to final copies being made.
Three formally approved and signed, typewritten copies of the dissertation (including abstract), plus one additional copy of the title page and abstract must be filed in the Graduate School office. The thesis binding fee and microfilm fee must be paid by check when the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School office.
The abstract, not to exceed 350 words, will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International. The determination of what constitutes an adequate abstract shall rest with the major department.
All dissertations must be signed by no fewer than four members who are regularly engaged in graduate instruction and are members of the graduate faculty.
All approved dissertations are kept on file in the Auraria Library. One copy is deposited in the reference section and the other in the archives section of the library. The third copy is sent to the student’s department.
When the dissertation is submitted to the Graduate School office, the candidate must sign an agreement with University Microfilms International to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International and to grant University Microfilms International the right to reproduce and sell (a) copies of the manuscript in microform and/or (b) copies of the manuscript made from microform. The author retains all rights to publish and/or sell the dissertation by any means at any time except by reproduction from negative microform.
FINAL EXAMINATION/DEFENSE
After the dissertation has been accepted, a final examination of the dissertation and related topics will be conducted. This examination will be wholly or partially oral, the oral portion being open to anyone. The examination will be conducted by a committee consisting of at least four members of the graduate faculty, one of whom must be from outside the student’s department.
Notice of all examinations must be filed with the dean of the Graduate School at least two weeks prior to administration.
TIMELIMIT
An eight-year maximum limit is in effect for doctoral studies.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Professional and Continuing Education /19
CU Online
Office: CU-Denver Building 800, 14th & Larimer Telephone: 303-556-6505 E-mail: i nquiry@cuon 1 ino.edu
Website: www.cuonline.edu
CU Online is the virtual! campus of the University of Colorado at Denver, with a variety of collegiate and professional development programs offering more than 200 courses via the Internet. CU Online offers core curriculum and elective courses in a variety of disciplines, all the same high-quality courses taught throughout the University of Colorado system.
As students take courses with CU Online, they gain valuable skills for using the Internet as a toc|l for learning, research, and communication, taking them far beyond tljie boundaries of the traditional educational environment. They have the opportunity to participate in the new global classroom, with a world of higher education at their fingertips.
We are well on our way tfi achieving the goal of providing students with the most comprehensive $et of online courses, services and resources, coupled with the best onLine learning experience of any institution of higher education in the World. Participation in web-based learning positions students to become life long learners, and helps them to develop invaluable skills to take advantage of global learning opportunities for their entire career.
DELIVERY MEDIA
Students taking online courses through CU Online enjoy a greater scheduling flexibility than in a traditional classroom by logging into class a couple of times each week at the times of their choice.
Instructors delivering their courses through CU Online utilize cutting-edge technology, such as steaming audio, video, and multimedia slide shows for presenting course content. A number of technologies allow students to interact with the instructor and their peers: threaded discussions in a bulletin board-type area, live discussions in an online classroom, e-mail, and collaborative workspaces.
PROGRAMS
CU Online offers courses in liberal arts and sciences, arts and media, business, education, engineering, public affairs, and architecture and
Professional and Continuing Education
Continuing your education is key to staying competitive in todays job market, enhancing yjtur personal knowledge and skills, and staying ahead of new developments in your field.
The Division of Professional and Continuing Education at CU-Denver offers complete degree programs, certificate/certification courses, professional development programs, precollegiate outreach programs, and personal Enrichment courses across the state of Colorado. Courses are offered in a yariety of formats, including traditional on-campus, off-campus, online, hybrid, weekend, evening, short and condensed courses and many others.
Registration and tuition varies by school or college. Contact the corresponding school of college listed below to learn about current program and course offerings, or contact the Academic Technology and Extended Learning Office at 303-556-2040 or visit our website at www. cuden ver. edu!learn.
planning. Complete online degree programs, including a Bachelor of Arts in sociology, and master’s degrees in business, engineering (Geographic Information Systems) and public administration, with more programs under development (check the website for latest developments). All of the courses may be applied to a degree program at the University of Colorado at Denver or may be transferred to a student’s home institution, pending approval.
FACULTY
Online courses follow the same faculty governance policies as the established on-campus courses. All CU Online faculty members are approved by the department and usually teach on-campus courses as well. Many of the instructors are experts who are working in the field in which they teach and bring vast knowledge and resources from their industry to their online teaching.
HYBRID COURSES
Students taking online courses through CU Online enjoy a greater scheduling flexibility, but sometimes feel they need more of the structured environment found in a traditional classroom. This is why CU Online now offers a hybrid between these two learning environments. A Hybrid course is one which uses technology delivered instruction (web, cd-rom, etc.) as a substitute for a portion of the instruction that a student would otherwise receive in a campus classroom or lab. Hybrid courses meet approximately 50 percent of the normal classroom hours on campus where students do the remainder of their work online.
SUPPLEMENTAL COURSES
CU Denver Online also supports faculty using web-based courseware to augment their traditional classes. More and more faculty are using instructional technology to post their syllabus, lecture notes, hold online quizzes and practice exams, and to coordinate relevant resources available on the web, in the libraries and through other media.
Contact CU Online at 303-556-6505, visit our website at www.cuonline.edu, or send e-mail to inquiry@cuonline.edu.
Academic Technology and Extended Learning, 303-556-2040 College of Architecture and Planning, 303-556-3382 College of Arts & Media, 303-556-2279
Business School (Professional Development Programs), 303-556-5826
School of Education, 303-556-6044
College of Engineering and Applied Science (Continuing Engineering Education), 303-556-4907
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 303-556-2040
Graduate School of Public Affairs, 303-556-5970
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


20 / Our University, Our Campus
Centers and Institutes
Centers and Institutes
Many centers and institutes are housed at the University of Colorado at Denver. Each has a focus, whether advancing a specific academic area, serving as a practicum for various curricular programs, extending the university’s reach into the community, or partnering with other organizations, nonprofits, and government agencies to make our city and state a better place to live and learn. These centers and institutes are listed below by the college or academic unit in which they are housed.
College of Arts & Media
• Center for Arts and Public Policy..........303-556-6588
Business School
• Bard Center for Entrepreneurship Development.. 303-620-4050
• Center for Global Health...................303-556-5866
• Center for Health Administration...........303-556-5845
• Center for Information Technology Innovation ... 303-989-7575
• Institute for International Business.......303-556-4738
School of Education
• Center for Collaborative Educational Leadership.. 303-556-6632
• Front Range Board of Cooperative............ 303-556-6028
Educational Services (BOCES)
College of Engineering and Applied Science
• Center for Geotechnical Engineering Science.303-5 56-2810
• Fast Lab.....................................303-556-2372
• Transportation Research Center...............303-556-2831
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
• Center for Computational Mathematics.........303-556-8460
• Center for Environmental Sciences............303-556-2963
• Center for Ethics and Community .............303-556-3223
• Center for Health and Behavioral Sciences....303-556-4300
• Center for Research on Economic and Social Policy .. 303-556-8540
Center for Computational Biology
Director: Stephen Billups Phone: 303-556-8897
The Center for Computational Biology (CCB) is a multi-campus center aimed at catalyzing interdisciplinary research and developing educational programs in computational biology throughout the University of Colorado system. The center brings together faculty and students from a variety of fields, including mathematics, computer science, and the biosciences, to engage in interdisciplinary research aimed at advancing biological discovery through the development and application of computational tools and mathematical models and techniques. The center leads the development of new courses and educational programs for CU students. While coordinating degree programs at all levels, the CCB offers its own Certificate in Computational Biology aimed at retraining a Colorado workforce that will be able to contribute to the economic growth resulting from new biotechnology companies. This includes a broad base of educational activities that form partnerships with companies and laboratories, such as internships. All programs led by CCB initiative integrate education with research; students are introduced to research as part of their education.
Graduate School of Public Affairs
• Center for Affordable Housing and ............303-820-5650
Educational Policy
• Institute for Policy Research and Implementation .. 303-820-5650
• Center for Human Investment Policy......303-820-5631
• Center for the Improvement of
Public Management.........................303-820-5662
• Center for Public/Private Sector Cooperation ... 303-820-5662
• CU/CU Health Ethics and Policy Consortium . 303-820-5650
• Center for Administration ..............303-820-5650
and Policy
• Wells Fargo Public Policy Research Program.303-820-5628
• Wirth Chair for Environment and Community .. 303-820-5676
Development Policy
Office of Academic and Student Affairs
• Colorado Center for Community Development... 303-556-6650
• Fourth World Center for the Study of...... 303-556-2850
Indigenous Law and Politics
• International Training, Education, and.... 303-352-3700
Research Academy (ITERA)
• National Veterans Training Institute....303-352-3737
• Latino/a Research and Policy Center....303-352-3700
Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid
TUITION AND FEES
All tuition and fee charges are established by the board of regents, the governing body of the University of Colorado, in accordance with legislation enacted annually by the Colorado General Assembly. The regents reserve the right to change tuition and fee rates at any time. The following rates were for the 2003-2004 academic year, and are provided to assist prospective students in anticipating costs. Special tuition rates are available for non-degree graduate students taking undergraduate courses only. Non-degree students who have previously earned a baccalaureate degree and are taking undergraduate courses only may be assessed
undergraduate tuition. Students must contact the Office of Records and Registration at 303-556-2389 to request this special tuition rate. Rates are currently being revised for the 2004-2005 academic year. Please refer to the Web Schedule Planner for the term in which you register for current tuition and fees information.
Payment of Tuition and Fees
All tuition and fees (except the application fee) are assessed and payable when the student registers for the term, according to guidelines in the current Web Schedule Planner. Students may select one of the
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid / 21
payment plans that are available at CU-Denver. Specific information on the deferred payment plans is included in the Web Schedule Planner published before each semester or summer session. Students who fail to pay tuition and fees in full or make payment arrangements by the published deadlines will he dropped from all classes.
Students who register ifi a non-degree status, and who later apply ind are admitted to a degree status for that term, are responsible for the difference in tuition between the non-degree program and their ipplicable degree prograrh and will be billed accordingly. Students who register for courses are liable for payment of tuition and fees even if they drop out of school. Refurld policies for students who withdraw from the university are included in; the Web Schedule Planner. A student with
CU-DENVER TUITION AND FEES FOR SPRING 2004
Tuition is based on student status. It is not based on the level of your courses.
It does not include tuition for Extended Studies courses (contact Extended Studies for further information).
UNDERGRADUATE TUITION RATES
RESIDENT NON-RESIDENT
All Freshmen & Sophomores; Juniors & Seniors in All Freshmen & Sophomores; Juniors & Seniors in
Credit Hours also Juniors & Seniors in Arts & Media, Business, also Juniors & Seniors in Arts & Media, Business,
Liberal Arts Engineering andNon-Degree* Liberal Arts Engineering and Non-Degree*
0-1 $ 161 $ 179 $ 880 $ 903
2 322 358 1,760 1,806
3 483 537 2,640 2,709
4 644 716 3,520 3,612
5 805 895 4,400 4,515
6 966 1,074 5,280 5,418
7 1,127 1,253 7,328 7,516
8 1,288 1,432 7,328 7,516
9 1,449 1,611 7,328 7,516
10 1,471 1,624 7,328 7,516
11 1,493 1,637 7,328 7,516
12-15 1,514 1,650 7,328 7,516
each credit
hour over 15 161 179 880 903
GRADUATE TUITION RATES
RESIDENT
Credit hours Liberal Arts Architecture Education Arts & Media, Engineering, Business,
and Sciences & Planning and Public Affairs Non-Degree*
0-1 $ 231 $ 246 $ 255 $ in $ 288
2 462 492 510 544 576
3 693 738 765 816 864
4 924 984 1,020 1,088 1,152
5 1,155 1,230 1,275 1,360 1,440
6 1,386 1,476 1,530 1,632 1,728
7 1,617 1,722 1,785 1,904 2,016
8 1,848 1,968 2,040 2,176 2,304
9-15 1,918 2,044 2,258 2,258 2,403
each credit
hour over 15 231 246 255 111 288
NON-RESIDENT
Credit hours Liberal Arts Architecture & Planning, Arts & Media, Busines,
and Sciences Education, Engineering, and Public Affairs Non-Degree*
0-1 $ 961 $ 1,025 $ 1,043
2 1,922 2,050 2,086
3 2,883 3,075 3,129
4 3,844 4,100 4,172
5 4,805 5,125 5,215
6 5,766 6,150 6,258
7-15 8,021 8,537 8,698
each credit
hour over 15 961 1,025 1,043
* Non-degree students wjio have previously earned a baccalaureate degree are classified as graduate students and assessed graduate tuition regardless of the level of
the course(es) they are taking. However, if students are taking undergraduate courses ONLY, they may be assessed undergraduate tuition. Students must contact the
Office of Records and Registration at 303-556-2389 to request this special tuition rate.
The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado reserves the right to change tuition andfees at any time. Please contact the Bursar's Ojfice, 303-556-2710, if you have
questions regarding tuition andJorfees.
CU-Denver Catalog2004- 05
financial obligations to the university will not be permitted to register for any subsequent term, to be graduated, to be issued transcripts, or to be listed among those receiving a degree or special certificate. The only exception to this regulation involves loans and other types of indebtedness that are due after graduation. Personal checks are accepted for any university obligation. Any student who pays with a check that is not acceptable to the bank will be assessed an additional service charge. Students may also pay tuition and fees by credit card.
Tuition Appeals
For information contact the Office ofTuition Appeals, 303-556-2324.


22 / Our University; Our Campus
Required Fees
Auraria Bond Fee ............................................$58
Assessed to retire the construction bonds used for the Student Union, the Child Care Center, the Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER) facilities, and Tivoli facility on the Auraria Campus. Fee was approved by student referendum and is required of all students at CU-Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver.
Auraria Student RTD Bus Pass Fee.............................$20
Students displaying a current student ID card and decal will be allowed to: ride free on all Denver Local bus and Light Rail service, ride free on all Denver Metro Express or Regional Express Service, ride free on all other Regional Service, receive a $3.00 credit on all SkyRide routes. It is not valid for local service in Boulder and Longmont or on special services such as, but not limited to, BroncosRide, RockiesRide or Access-a-Ride.
Candidate for Degree Fee
Equal to one credit hour of resident tuition, is required for all graduate students who are not registered during the term that they are taking comprehensive examinations. Students must register as “candidate for degree” and pay for one hour of corresponding resident tuition plus the SIS fee.
Cultural Events Fee .........................................$4
Provides funding for CU-Denver’s College of Arts and Media to allow for reduced admission rates for CU-Denver students to attend theatrical and other cultural events.
Information Technology Fee ....................$5 per credit hour
Provides funding for acquisition of computer systems to support student computing laboratories, including networks and networking infrastructure and facilities directly accessible by students. (Maximum charge $75)
International Student Fee....................................$100
Holders of non-immigrant visa status are assessed the International Student Services Fee to provide funds for immigration advising, cross-cultural adjustment support, advocacy, programs and events offered through International Student and Scholar Services at the Office of International Education. It also funds operation and maintenance of systems to comply with the Student Exchange Visitor Information Systems (SEVIS).
Matriculation Fee ............................................$25
A one-time non-refundable fee required of all new students at the time of their first registration. This fee covers the costs of official transcripts.
Student Activity Fee..........................................$11
Provides funding for student activities, student government, student clubs and organizations and special events.
Student Health Center Fee ....................................$24
Provides funding for an accessible outpatient, direct-care service that is devoted to meeting student health care needs. Health education and counseling are available, as well as treatment and referral for medical problems. The Student Health Center is tri-institutional and is administered by Metropolitan State College of Denver. The payment of this fee does not cover the Health Insurance Plan at CU-Denver. Please call 303-556-6273 to receive information on Student Health Insurance.
Student Information System (SIS) Fee..........................$12
Provides funding for continued improvement of the computer system used in supporting such functions as admission application processing, telephone and web registration and grade reporting, degree audit and graduation checkout, awarding of financial aid, payment of tuition and fees and production of transcripts.
Student Newspaper Fee .........................................$4
Provides funding for the CU-Denver student newspaper, The Advocate.
Student Recreation Fee.........................................$5
Provides funding for the recreational facilities and programs in the Health, Physical Education and Recreation (HPER) Building, as well as the campus playing fields and club sport programs. Recreation is a tri-institutional program administered by Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Student Services Fee...............................................$36
Provides funds for programs and events offered through the Career Center, Center for Educational Opportunity Programs, Learning Assistance Center, Office of Legal Services, Office of Student Life, Student Advocacy Center, Office of Student Retention, and CU-Denve Counseling Center. The Office of Legal Services is administered by Metropolitan State College of Denver.
Instructional and Course Fees
Online Courses
A $100 course fee is assessed for each online course taken.
A $50 course fee is assessed for each online lab taken.
A $50 course fee is assessed for each hybrid course taken.
College of Architecture and Planning
All students registered for one or more Architecture and Planning course are required to pay a per credit hour instructional program fee for computer, studio, and photography equipment and materials.
Per credit hour ....................................$33
Maximum ............................................$297
College of Arts & Media
All students registered for one or more Arts and Media course are required to pay an instructional program fee for laboratories, studios
and technologies.
CAM Majors ..................................................$200
Non-CAM students .............................................$57
Business School
All students registered for one or more Business course are required to pay an instructional program fee for computer lab equipment, instructional materials, and technical assistance.....................................$51
School of Education
All students registered for one or more Education course are required to pay an instructional program fee for technology support, test protocols, and assessment instruments.............................................$ 15
College of Engineering and Applied Science
All students registered for one or more Engineering course are required to pay an instructional program fee for laboratory facility, equipment and technical assistance....................................................$50
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
All students registered for one or more Liberal Arts and Sciences course art required to pay an instructional program fee for equipment, technology, materials, and technical support........................................$64
Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes
Tuition classification is governed by Colorado statutes that apply to all state-funded institutions in Colorado. Institutions are bound by the provisions of this statute and are not free to make exceptions to the rules set forth.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Financial Aid / 23
Students are initially classified as in-state or out-of-state for tuition iirposes at the time of application. The classification is based upon iformation furnished by the student and from other relevant sources, fter the student’s status is determined, it remains unchanged in the rsence of satisfactory evidence to the contrary.
Once a student is classified as a non-resident for tuition purposes, le student must petition for a change in classification. Petitions must ; submitted NO LATERTHAN THE FIRST OFFICIAL DAY OF LASSES of the term for which the student wishes to be classified as a sident. It is preferred that petitions be received 30 days prior to the ;ginning of the term. Latje petitions will not be considered until the :xt semester. Specific information may be obtained from the Office r Admissions.
The final decision regarding tuition status rests with the university. Questions regarding residence (tuition) status should be referred only i the Tuition Classification Officer. Opinions of other persons are at official or binding upc n the university. Additional information is 'ailable in the brochure Classification of Studentsfor Tuition Purposes, hich may be obtained from the Admissions Office.
\SIC REQUIREMENTS
The statute provides that an in-state student is one who has been a gal domiciliary of Colorado for one year or more immediately preceding le beginning of the term for which the in-state classification is being lught. Persons over 23 ye ars of age or who are emancipated establish teir own legal domicile, ’hose who are under 23 years of age and aemancipated assume thje domicile of their parent or court-appointed gal guardian. An unemancipated minor’s parent must, therefore, have legal domicile in Colorado for one year or more before the minor may : classified as an in-state student for tuition purposes.
TABLISHING DOMICILE
Domicile is established! when one has a permanent place of habitation Colorado and the intention of making Colorado one’s true, fixed, and :rmanent home and place of habitation. The tuition statute places the irden of establishing a C dorado domicile on the person seeking to tablish the domicile. The question of intent is one of documen table ct and needs to be shown by substantial connections with the state ifficient to evidence sue! i intent. Legal domicile in Colorado for ition purposes begins tl e day after connections with Colorado are ade sufficient to evidence one’s intent. The most common ties with e state are (1) change of driver s license to Colorado, (2) change of immobile registration tc Colorado, (3) Colorado voter registration,
) permanent employment in Colorado, and most important, (5) lyment of state income taxes as a resident by one whose income is fficient to be taxed. Cat tion: payment or filing of back taxes in no ay serves to establish leg^l domicile retroactive to the time filed. In der to qualify for in-stal e tuition for a given term, the 12-month airing period (which begins when the legal domicile is established) ust be over by the first day of classes for the term in question. If one’s 1-month waiting period expires during the semester, in-state tuition nnot be granted until the next semester.
sident Tuition for Ac ive Duty Military Personnel
The Colorado Legislat ire approved resident tuition for active duty ilitary personnel on per manent duty assignment in Colorado and for eir dependents. ELIGIBLE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED \CH TERM. Students (obtain a completed verification form from the ise education officer, and submit the form with their military ID to e Records Office after they have registered, but before the end of the op/add period. At the time the verification form is certified in the ecords Office, the student’s bill will be adjusted to reflect the resident ition rate. Students who have been certified remain classified as non-sidents for tuition purposes and must petition to change their status ice they establish permanent ties to Colorado.
FINANCIAL AID
Director: Ellie Miller Office: NC 1030 Telephone: 303-556-2886 E-mail: finaid@carbon.cudenver.edu Website: httpd/www. cudenver. edu/finaid
The Office of Financial Aid offers more than $40 million in financial aid awards to qualified students each year. If the student’s financial aid application materials are received before the April 1 priority date, then the student is considered for a package of need-based grant, work-study (part-time employment), and/or long-term loan funds. If the financial aid application materials are received after the April 1 priority date, then the student is usually considered only for a Federal Pell Grant and for outside student loans (Federal Stafford Loan or Federal Parents Loan).
Applicants for Colorado Graduate Fellowships, Colorado Deans Scholars award, and Colorado Regents Scholars award are subject to different deadlines and are reviewed by other CU-Denver departments (the Graduate School, undergraduate deans’ offices, and the Office of Admissions, respectively). All other applicants for financial aid are notified of their award status in writing by the Office of Financial Aid.
Each student must qualify for CU-Denver financial aid as follows:
1. Be a U.S. citizen or be admitted to the U.S. by the INS on a permanent basis.
2. Be classified as a degree-seeking student by the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. Teacher certification students are eligible to apply for financial aid and are considered undergraduate students according to federal guidelines.
3. Be enrolled for a minimum number of credits as specified on the financial aid award letter and/or student loan planning letter.
4. Meet the minimum requirements of Financial Aid Academic Standards.
5. Apply for financial aid by submitting all of the required documentation. The need analysis form is required for all programs except the Colorado Graduate Merit Award, Colorado Scholars award, Colorado Deans Scholars award, Colorado Regents Scholars award, and the Emergency Student Loan Program.
6. Be classified as a resident for tuition purposes for the following programs: Colorado Student Grant, Colorado Leveraging Educational Assistance Program, Colorado Graduate Grant, Colorado Work-Study, Colorado Regents Scholars award,
Colorado Deans Scholars award, and Colorado Scholars award.
7. Not be in default on any student loan or owe a refund on any educational grant.
8. Be registered for the draft or be enlisted in the armed forces if required by Selective Service.
Application
Each applicant must complete the financial aid application materials for submission to the Office of Financial Aid. Complete information must be available to the office before eligibility can be determined.
Limited Funds —The majority of general financial aid funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis to eligible students who document significant financial need and who complete their application materials in the Office of Financial Aid by the April 1 priority date. Application completion is defined as having all of the required documents and the results of the need analysis (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) into the Office of Financial Aid. General financial aid is awarded to needy students who meet the priority date until all of the funds are committed for the year. If the file is completed after April 1, then awards will probably be limited to Federal Pell Grant (for needy undergraduate students only) and/or outside student loans (Federal Stafford Loan or
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


24 / Our University, Our Campus
Federal Parents Loan). Application for financial aid must be made each year; application materials are available in January of each year.
It is the student’s responsibility to be sure application materials are complete. Please contact the Office of Financial Aid for application forms and complete details. All financial aid policies and procedures are subject to change due to revisions in federal and state laws, regulations, and guidelines.
Qualification
Financial Need—Most financial aid awards are based on the concept of financial need. Financial need is calculated as cost of attendance (tuition, fees, books, living expenses) minus family contribution (stu-dent/spouse contribution and parents’ contribution for dependent students).
The cost of attendance is the estimated cost to attend CU-Denver, including tuition and fees, room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses. The Office of Financial Aid determines standard budgets based upon average tuition and fees charged and other budget items established by the Colorado Commission on Higher Education.
For 2002-2003, the following monthly budgets were used for room and board, transportation, and personal expenses: $530 for students living at home with parents; $ 1,057 for students not living with parents. Resident tuition and fees for a full-time student were approximately $ 1,500 per semester, and non-resident tuition and fees were approximately $6,800 per semester. These amounts will probably increase by approximately 5 percent for the 2003-2004 school year.
Independent Student—The federal government provides specific guidelines that define a self-supporting student for financial aid purposes. If a student is classified as self-supporting, then the student’s parental information is not considered when the calculation of family contribution is made. For 2003-2004, a self-supporting student is one who is 24 years old (born before 1/1/80) or one who meets one of the following conditions:
1. Graduate student
2. Married student
3. Student with legal dependents other than a spouse
4. Veteran of the U.S. armed forces
5. Orphan or ward of the court
These conditions may be appealed to the Office of Financial Aid if unusual circumstances exist. Contact the office for appeal guidelines.
If the student/spouse contribution plus the parents’ contribution is equal to or greater than the cost of attendance, then the student will not qualify for need-based financial aid.
The contributions from the student/spouse and from the parents are calculated by a standardized formula that is required by federal law.
The formula considers income, savings and other assets, family size, number of children in postsecondary school, and other factors. Students may appeal for special consideration if they are experiencing unusual circumstances. Financial aid is intended to supplement and not replace financial contributions from the student and parents.
Course Loads—General financial aid undergraduate recipients usually must enroll for at least 12 credits per semester, and graduate students usually must enroll for at least 5 credits per semester. Federal Stafford Loan recipients must carry at least a half-time credit load (6 hours for undergraduates per semester and 3 hours for graduates per semester).
For deferment of student loans, refer to the Web Schedule Planner each term for specific information. Higher or lower minimums may be required for individual awards (check award letter and/or student loan planning letter for the exact number of credits required).
Academic Progress—CU-Denver students must make academic progress as defined by the Office of Financial Aid to be eligible and remain eligible for financial aid. Students should review the Financial Aid Academic Standards policy, available in the Office of Financial Aid.
Non-Degree Students—Non-degree students are eligible to be considered only for the Advantage Scholarship Program. Refer to separate brochure for application procedures. Teacher certification students may apply for financial aid and are considered undergraduate students for financial aid purposes.
Residency Status—A student is required to be a resident of Colorado for a full year before the Office of Admissions can consider classificatioi as a resident for tuition purposes. Non-resident students are encouragei to obtain additional information from the Office of Admissions about appealing for resident status. As a resident, a student is eligible for the State of Colorado financial aid programs, and tuition is significantly less than for non-residents.
Refunds and Repayments—Any refund of tuition and fees resulting from withdrawal or reclassification of tuition status must be returned to the recipient’s financial aid awards before any payment is made to th< student. If a recipient of federal financial aid withdraws from all classes on or before the 60 percent point in time in the term, that student may be required to repay a portion of his/her financial aid. The federal government has defined that the recipient has only earned a portion of their financial aid, and the earned aid is directly proportional to the percentage of time the student attended classes up to and including the 60 percent point in time in the term. The rest of the financial aid is defined as unearned financial aid and must be returned to the federal financial aid programs. Unearned aid includes both the amount allocated to tuition and fees and the amount allocated to the student for other educational expenses. For a complete description of these requirements, request a copy of the Financial Aid Repayment Policy from the Office of Financial Aid.
Appeals—Students may appeal all decisions of the Office of Financi: Aid by completing a Request for Review form and submitting it to the office. Appeals are considered within three weeks and a written respons is mailed to the student.
Reapply Each Year—Financial aid awards are not automatically renewed each year. Students must reapply and meet priority dates each year. Application materials for the next summer term are available beginning January 1.
Award
Students are notified in writing of their financial aid eligibility approximately 8-12 weeks after all application materials have been received in the Office of Financial Aid. If awarded, an award letter is mailed to the student; it includes the types and amounts of aid awarded and the minimum number of credit hours required each term. A studei loan planning letter is mailed to the student after the outside student loan application(s) have been processed.
Grants and Loans
The following aid programs are funded by the federal government:
1. Federal Pell Grant—Eligibility for the Federal Pell Grant is determined before any other aid is awarded. Awards are defined by a strict need-based formula provided by the federal government and award amounts vary depending upon amount of financial neei and enrollment status. Students are eligible for Federal Pell Grant consideration if they have not received their first baccalaureate degree by June 1 of the award year.
2. Federal Stafford Loan—Eligibility for all other types of assistance should be determined prior to applying for outside student loans. The subsidized Federal Stafford Loan program requires that studen show financial need in order to qualify. Interest on the subsidized loan is paid for the student by the federal government as long as the student remains enrolled at least half-time and for a six-month grace period after dropping below half-time enrollment. The unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan program does not require the student to document financial need. Eligibility is calculated as the
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Four-Year Graduation Guarantee /25
cost of attendance minus other financial aid awarded. Interest is not paid by the federal government for the unsubsidized program, and the student may elect] to pay the interest currently or to allow the interest to be added tb the total loan amount. Interest rates for the Federal Stafford Loaij programs are variable, and are capped at 8.25 percent. Parents of dependent students are eligible to borrow under the Federal Parent I oan for Undergraduate Students program (PLUS). The PLUS program is unsubsidized, and interest payments become the responsibility of the borrower at the time of disbursement. The the PLUS program, and is capped at 9 percent. 'Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)— This is a need-based grant program for students who have not yet obtained a baccalaureate degree. Students must be eligible for a Federal Pell Grant tojbe considered for SEOG.
4. Federal Perkins Loan\—This need-based loan program, with an interest rate currently at 5 percent, is based at CU-Denver. No repayment of interes: or principal is due until six or nine months (time period differs c spending upon when student first received
interest rate varies on
3. Federal Supplementa
Perkins Loan) after tf 5. Federal College Work
1 e student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. \Study—Work-study is a need-based program that allows students fo work on a part-time basis on campus or off campus at nonprofit jagencies to help meet their educational costs.
The state of Colorado funds the following programs:
1. Colorado Student Grant—A need-based grant for resident undergraduate students, j
2. Colorado Leveragin^Educational Assistance Partnership Grant—
A need-based grant for resident undergraduates who have not yet obtained a bachelor’^ degree. This grant is funded 50 percent by the federal government and 50 percent by the state of Colorado.
3. Colorado Graduate tyrant—A need-based grant for resident graduate students.
4. Colorado Work-Study—A program similar to the College Work-Study program but limited to resident undergraduate students.
5. Governor's Opportunity Scholarship—A need-based grant program for first-time resident freshmen who have a zero family contribution or whose parents earn less than $26,700.
Four-Year Graduation Guarantee
The University of Colorado at Denver (CU-Denver) has adopted a set of guidelines to define the conditions under which an undergraduate student will be guaranteed to graduate in four years. More information is available through the undergraduate advising offices for each college and the major program cjffices. CU-Denver has four undergraduate colleges in which this guarantee applies: College of Arts & Media, Business School, College of Engineering, and College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
The University of Colorado at Denver guarantees that, if the lack of scheduling of essential courses is found to have prevented a student from completing all course wc rk necessary for a BA, BFA, or BS degree from the university by the end of the student’s eighth consecutive fall and spring semester, the colle ge/school shall provide tuition plus any course fees for all courses required for completion of the degree requirements. This applies only when needed courses are not offeredby the college/ school and does not apply to scheduling conflicts for individual students. Students must satisfy all tqe requirements described below to be eligible for this guarantee.
This guarantee applied to all students who enrolled for summer 2002 or after as first-semester, Ifull-time freshmen who do not have admission deficiencies, who do not] need remedial coursework, and who satisfy all the requirements described below. This guarantee does not include completion of all options within the major, a second major, a double degree, a minor, or a certificate program. The four (4)-year graduation guarantee does not apply to programs in which the degree has been
Scholarships
Following is a partial list of the major scholarships that are offered at CU-Denver. For a complete listing, go to www.cudenver.edu/admissions.
The following programs are funded by the General Assembly of the State of Colorado:
1. Regents Scholars awardxs offered to qualified new freshmen and transfer students by the Office of Admissions. New students will automatically be considered for this program.
2. Colorado Scholars awardxs for undergraduate resident students who have a minimum cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5 for a minimum of 12 CU credit hours. The deadline for applying is April 1. Contact the Office of Financial Aid for application procedures.
3. Deans Scholars awardxs awarded by undergraduate deans’ offices. Contact the appropriate dean’s office for more information.
The following programs are funded by CU-Denver:
1. Advantage Scholarship is for minority and/or first generation college students who meet the specified income guidelines. Contact the Scholarship/Resource Office at 303-556-3608.
2. Nelson/Running Wolf Scholarship funds are available for needy American Indian students. Contact the Office of American Indian Student Services, 303-556-2860, for more information.
3. Ahlin Fund assistance is available for mobility-impaired students. Contact Student Retention Services, 303-556-2324, for applications.
Other scholarship information is available from the Office of Financial Aid, the Auraria Library Scholarship InfoBank in the reference section, and the Scholarship/Resource Office at 303-556-3608.
Other Sources of Financial Aid. There are several other sources of financial aid for students. Employment opportunities are listed in the Student Employment Office and the Career Center. Graduate students should inquire about additional types of financial aid through their academic departments. Students should be aware that Emergency Student Loans are available through the Bursar’s Office. American Indian students should request information about Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scholarships from the Office of Financial Aid.
discontinued or is in process of being phased out. In these cases, every effort will be made to allow students to fulfill requirements by taking courses at other universities and colleges to facilitate timely completion of the degree.
Some CU-Denver study abroad programs may not provide a sufficient range of courses to allow students to meet the requirements and, thus, students who participate in study abroad programs during the fall or spring semesters may not be eligible for this guarantee. A student may be able to participate in a study abroad program during the summer semester and still meet all the requirements of this guarantee. It is essential that a student work closely with an advisor to determine if the student can participate in a study abroad program and still meet all the requirements of this guarantee.
Requirements
Students must satisfy all of the following requirements to be eligiblefor this guarantee.
1. Students must enroll in University of Colorado at Denver course-work as specified on the student plan of study for eight consecutive fall and spring semesters.
2. Students must complete all required coursework by the end of the eighth semester.
3. No fewer than 60 credit hours of applicable coursework must be completed successfully by the end of the second year (24 calendar
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


26 / Our University, Our Campus
months); 90 hours by the end of the third year (36 calendar months); and 120 hours by the end of the fourth year (48 calendar months). Students must successfully complete an average of 15 credit hours each semester.
4. Students must meet with their college advisor and their major advisor for academic advising during the first, third, fifth, and seventh semesters of study.
5. The major must be declared no later than the end of the first semester of study and students must not change their major or any options within the major.
6. A recommended plan of study toward the major must be agreed upon and signed by the student and advisor at the end of the first semester. Thereafter students must make satisfactory progress toward completing the major, as defined by each major, and the general education requirements. Courses with certain grades may not meet the satisfactory progress requirement of this guarantee.
A statement of what constitutes satisfactory progress and what grades are acceptable is available from the major or departmental office at the time the major is declared.
7. A minimum of 30 credit hours of college general education courses should be completed by the end of the second year, including core curriculum courses that also meet major requirements and foreign language proficiency.
8. All lower-division graduation requirements must be successfully completed by the 90 semester hour mark.
9. Students must remain in academic good standing according to their school/college academic policies.
10. Grades of C-, C, or C+, as defined by the college/school, must be earned in all coursework required for the major, and students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.0 in all major coursework attempted.
11. Students must register each semester within one week of the student’s specified eligibility to register.
12. Students must take courses that are specified in the student plan of study approved by their advisor.
13. Elective courses must be avoided if they conflict with required major or general education courses. Elective courses must not be given a higher priority than required courses.
14. Students planning to use courses from Metropolitan State College of Denver through the Common Pool of Courses (a) to satisfy general education requirements, must have prior permission from their college advising office; or (b) to satisfy major requirements, must have prior permission from their faculty advisor.
15. Students must meet all departmental, school or college and university policies regarding graduation requirements.
16. The college/school must be notified in writing of the students intent to graduate no later than the beginning of the seventh semester of study. A graduation application must be filed no later than the deadline for the appropriate graduation date. The student must complete a graduation checkout/senior audit with their advisor.
17. The student is responsible for and must keep documentation proving that these requirements were satisfied (e.g., records of advising meetings attended, advising records and instructions, etc.).
Registration
Students should review the sections of this catalog that describe in detail the academic programs available at CU-Denver,
New and transfer undeclared undergraduate students, as well as pre-business and pre-engineering students, should contact the Academic Advising Center at 303-352-3520 to arrange for an advising appointment prior to registration. Other freshmen and transfer students should contact their school or college to arrange for an advising appointment prior to registration.
A Web Schedule Planner is made available by the Registrar’s Office every semester prior to registration. CU-Denver students register for courses via SMART (Student Menu and Access to Records and Transactions). To log on, go to www.cudenver.edu, click on SMART, then click on the SMART logo. Specific instructions are included in the Web Schedule Planner. The Registrar’s Office will send an e-mail message to the e-mail address a student has on record with the university, inviting the student to register and including registration information and a registration time assignment. Registration is by time assignment only. Students may register on or after their assigned time.
Web Registration and Student Information
CU-Denver students can register and obtain information regarding their academic and financial records by accessing a secure site from the SMART link on the CU-Denver homepage. An assigned student I.D. and personal identification number (PIN) are required to access the registration or student record options.
Online registration allows the student to check the availability of specific courses prior to their registration time and to search for available courses by department, course level, or meeting time. If registration in a course is denied, the web registration system will specify the reason.
Student information available online currently includes e-mail and mailing address verification (or change), admission application status, financial aid information, schedule by semester, grades by semester, unofficial transcript, account balance, and degree audit (for some
programs). Online payment is now available. For security reasons, none of the student information screens will display a student’s name or student number.
The CU-Denver catalog and Schedule Planner, as well as additional information regarding programs, faculty, courses, and policies, are available at the CU-Denver home page: http://www.cudenver.edu.
Definition of Full-Time and Part-Time Status
Individual students receiving financial aid may be required to complete hours in addition to those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in the student’s financial aid award letter.
FALL AND SPRING
Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students:
Full-time 12 or more semester hours
Part-time 6 or more semester hours
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
5 or more hours
0 hours as candidate for degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
3 or more hours
SUMMER (10-WEEK TERM)
Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students:
Full-time 12 or more semester hours
Part-time 6 or more semester hours
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Registration / 27
Graduate degree students:
Full-time:
3 or more hours
0 hours as candidate fcjr degree
1 or more hours of thesis (not master’s reports or thesis preparation)
Half-time:
2 or more hours
3 or more hours of mixed-level classes
Notes
Enrollment verification including full-time/part-time attendance can be certified after the drop/add period.
Hours for calculating full-time/part-time attendance do not include interinstitutional hours, fior do they include hours on another CU campus, unless the student is enrolled through concurrent registration.
Students receiving veterans benefits should contact the Veterans Affairs coordinator for definition of full-time status for summer sessions.
Individual exceptions (to the minimum graduate courseload levels are considered for financial aid purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a written appeal with the OfFice of Financial Aid.
Add/Drop
Specific add/drop deadlines are announced in each semesters Web Schedule Planner.
1. Students may add cjourses to their original registration during the first 8 days (5 days elf classes in the summer) of full-term classes, provided there is space available.
2. Students may drop icourses without approvals during the first 12 days of the fall or spring semester (the first 8 days of the summer session). Tuition will not be charged. No record of the dropped course will appear on the student’s permanent record.
3. After the 12th day f>f a fall or spring semester (8th day of the summer session), the instructor’s signature is required for all drops. The instructor’s signature and dean’s signature are required for all adds. No tuition adjustment will be made.
4. After the 10th weelf of the fall and spring semesters (the 5 th week for summer session) ^//schedule adjustments require a petition and special approval from the dean’s office.
5. Dropping a//courses after the 12th day (8th in the summer) requires an official Withdrawal from the term. No tuition refunds are available.
Drop deadlines for module courses and intensive courses are published in the Web Schedule Planner tach term.
Administrative Drop
An administrative drtjp is implemented by university officials in the registrar’s office or the dean’s office. A student may be administratively dropped from one or more classes or withdrawn from all classes for any of the following reasons!
1. failure to meet certjain preconditions, including, but not limited to:
a. failure to pay tujtion and fees by designated deadlines
b. class cancellations
c. failure to meet course prerequisites
2. whenever the safetr of the student, faculty member, or other students in a course would be jeopardized
3. academic suspension, including, but not limited to, failure to attain or maintain a required grade point average (GPA)
4. disciplinary suspension for having been found to have violated the Student Code of Conduct
5. disruptive behavior determined by the chair and/or associate dean to be detrimental to the progress of the course and the education of other students
Auditing Courses
To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be registered for any other University of Colorado courses during the time they are auditing and are not eligible to audit courses if they are under suspension from the university or have outstanding financial obligations to the university. The Records Office does not keep any record of courses audited; therefore, credit for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those courses with laboratories or where special equipment is used), provided they have received permission from each instructor.
An auditor’s card is issued after classes begin. This card should be presented to the instructor. Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges, and are not eligible for other student services. For more information, contact the Bursar’s Office.
Senior citizens (aged 60 and over) may audit classes at no charge. Contact the Division of Enrollment and Student Affairs at 1250 14th Street, 303-556-8427.
Correspondence Study
Correspondence courses are offered by the CU-Boulder Division of Continuing Education. Applicability toward a degree program should be sought from the student’s degree advisor prior to registration.
Course Load/Restrictions
In most cases, students wishing to take more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer session) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. Consult the individual college or school for specific guidelines as to course load restrictions.
Credit by Examination
Degree students may take examinations for credit. To qualify for an examination, the student must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade point average of at least 2.0, and be currently registered. Contact the Records Office for instructions. A non-refundable fee is charged. Students should contact their degree advising office to determine whether the credit will apply to their degree.
No Credit
Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the consent of their instructor and the dean of their school or college. No grade or credit is awarded. The transcript reflects the name of the course taken and an N/Cnotation.
Pass/Fail Procedure
1. Students who wish to register for a course on a pass/fail basis (or to revert from pass/fail to graded status) may do so only during the drop/add period.
2. Up to 16 semester hours of coursework may be taken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor’s degree. Only 6hours of coursework may be taken pass/fail in any given semester. (Note: Individual schools and colleges may have additional restrictions as to pass/fail credits. See the accompanying chart for an overview.)
3. nstructors will not be informed of pass/fail registration. All students who register for a pass/fail appear on the regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in the Records Office, those registrations with a pass/fail designation are automatically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D- and above convert to grades of P. Courses
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


28 / Our University, Our Campus
taken pass/fail will be included in hours toward graduation.
Pass grades are not included in a student’s grade point average.
An Agrade in a course taken pass/fail will be included in the grade point average.
4. Pass/fail registration records are maintained by the Records Office.
5. Exceptions to the pass/fail regulations are permitted for specified courses offered by the School of Education, the Extended Studies Programs, and Study Abroad Programs.
6. Graduate degree students can exercise the A/Aoption for undergraduate courses only. A grade of Awill not be acceptable for graduate credit to satisfy any Graduate School requirement.
7. Students who register for a course on a pass/fail basis may not later (after the drop/add period) decide to receive a letter grade.
Note: many other institutions will not accept a Agrade for transfer credit.
PASS/FAIL OPTION RESTRICTIONS
Core Curriculum courses used to satisfy Intellectual Competencies cannot be taken on pass/fail basis.
College General Maximum
Business and Only non-business Only 6 semester
Administration electives may be hours may be
taken pass/fail. taken pass/fail.
Engineering and Required courses may A maximum of 16
Applied Science not be taken pass/fail. credit hours may
Upper division be taken pass/fail,
humanities and social including courses
sciences electives are taken in the honors
acceptable; otherwise, major department approval is required. program.
Liberal Arts and College requires a No more than 6 hours
Sciences minimum of 30 pass/fail any semester.
semester hours of A maximum of 16
courses with letter semester hours may
grades. Courses used to satisfy major, minor, or foreign language cannot be taken on a pass/fail basis. be taken pass/fail.
Short-Term Courses
Courses are also offered in five-week modules, in special weekend courses, and in seminars. Students should contact the college/school for information on short-term courses offered each semester.
Other Registrations
CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Degree-seeking students who wish to attend two University of Colorado campuses concurrently must obtain permission from their school or college on their home campus. A student in a degree program registered on the Denver campus may take up to two courses or 6 semester credit hours (whichever is greater) on another CU campus if:
1. the student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean or the Records Office
2. the course is a required course for the students degree (not an elective) and not offered at CU-Denver
3. the student obtains approval from the academic dean
4. there is space available at the other (host) campus
CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05
5. the student pays tuition at CU-Denver (home) campus at CU-Denver rates
6. the home campus school or college arranges for space in the host campus classes
7. the concurrent request is processed before the end of the drop/add period on both the host and home campuses
Students may not register for an independent study course through concurrent registration. Students may not take courses pass/fail or for n credit through concurrent registration.
To drop a concurrent course during the host campus drop/add period, arrange the drop at the home campus Records Office. To drop a concurrent course after the end of the host campus drop/add deadline, drop the course at the host campus Records Office.
INTER-INSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION
CU-Denver degree students may enroll in courses offered by the Community College of Denver and Red Rocks Community College. Students must be enrolled at CU-Denver for at least one course during the term to be eligible to register inter-institutionally. Registration is on a space available basis. Interinstitutional courses are evaluated for transfer credit and are not included in a CU-Denver student’s grade point average.
POOLED COURSES AT METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER
Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been pooled with similar courses at Metropolitan State College of Denver (MSCD). CU-Denver undergraduate students may register for any of the pooled courses listed in the CU-Denver Web Schedule Planner. Restrictions apply to the pooled courses:
1. CU-Denver graduate students are not eligible to register for MSCD pooled courses.
2. MSCD courses will not be included in the University of Colorado grade point average. MSCD courses will appear on the University o Colorado transcript and will count in the hours toward graduation
3. MSCD courses cannot be used to meet specific course requirement toward the major without prior written approval of the student’s dean
4. CU-Denver students who wish to take non-pooled MSCD classes must apply directly as a non-degree student to MSCD, and pay tuition and fees to MSCD. Non-pooled classes will not appear
on the University of Colorado transcript and will not be used in determining course loads for financial aid eligibility. Students may request an MSCD transcript to be sent to CU-Denver at the end of the term to determine if credit can be transferred.
5. MSCD common pool courses will not satisfy residence requirement at CU-Denver. The last 30 semester hours applied toward the baccalaureate degree must be taken in residence at CU-Denver.
6. CU-Denver students taking MSCD common pool courses are subject to the MSCD grading policy and student code of conduct.
Withdrawal from the University
To withdraw from the University of Colorado at Denver, students must drop all courses for the semester. During the first 12 days of the semester (8 days for the summer), students must use the Web Registration and Student Information System to drop courses. Courses dropped during this period are not recorded on the student’s permanen record.
After the 12th day of the semester (8th day in the summer), through tht 10th week (7th week for summer), students must submit a withdrawal form with the instructor’s approval. Courses dropped during this perioc will be recorded on the student’s permanent record with a grade of W.
Students seeking to withdraw after the 10th week (5th week for summer) must petition the associate dean of their school or college.
A student who stops attending classes without officially withdrawing from the university will receive grades of Afor all coursework during that term.
Deadlines for dropping module and intensive courses appear in the Web Schedule Planner.


Academic Policies and Regulations
Student Classification
Students are classified according to the number of semester hours passed: Freshman...............1..................................0-29 hours
Sophomore.........
Junior............
Senior............
All transfer students w
30-59 hours 60-89 hours
...90+ hours
11 be classified on the same basis according to
their hours of credit accented by the University of Colorado.
Grading System and Policies
The following grading system and policies have been standardized for all academic units of the university.
GRADE SYMBOLS
The instructor is responsible for whatever grade symbol (A, B, C, D, F, IF, IW, or IP) is to be assigned. Special symbols (NC, W, and ***) are indications of registration or grade status and are not assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail desigpations are not assigned by the instructor but are automatically convenjed by the grade application system, as explained under Pass/Fail Procedure.
Standard Grades Quality Points
A = superior!excellent 4.0
A(-) = 3.7
B(+) = 3.3
B = good/better t 'ban average 3.0
B(-) = 2.7
C(+)= 2.3
C — competent!average 2.0
C(-) = 1.7
D(+)= 1.3
D — minimum fussing 1.0
D(-) = 0.7
F = failing 0.0
Instructors may, at their discretion, use the PLUS/MINUS system, nut are not required to do so.
IF— incomplete— changed to an F if not completed within one year.
IW—incomplete—changed to a Wif not completed within one year.
IP— in progress—thesis at the graduate level only.
P/F—pass/fail—/■’grade is not included in the grade point average; :he /-’grade is included; tjp to 16 hours of pass/fail coursework may be :redited toward a bachelpr’s degree.
H/P/F— honors/pass/fail—intended for honors courses; credit hours ;ount toward the degree but are not included in the grade point average.
/VCindicates registration on a no-credit basis.
Vindicates withdrawal without credit.
*** indicates the final grade roster was not received by the time grades vere processed.
EXPLANATION OF /f AND /LV
An IF or IW'is an incomplete grade. Policies with respect to IF/IW grades are available in the individual college and school deans offices.
Jse of the IF or IW is at the option of the course instructor and/or the tcademic dean’s office. |
An IF or IW'is given only when students, for reasons beyond their xmtrol, have been unable to complete course requirements. A substantial imount of work must have been satisfactorily completed before approval or such a grade is given.
The instructor who a$signs an IF or /Upsets the conditions under vhich the coursework can be completed and the time limit for its ;ompletion. The student is expected to complete the requirements >y the established deadline and not retake the entire course.
Academic Policies and Regulations / 29
It is the instructor’s and/or the student’s decision whether a course should be retaken. If a course is retaken, it must be completed on the Denver campus or in CU-Denver Extended Studies classes. The student must re-register for the course and pay the appropriate tuition.
The final grade (earned by completing the course requirements or by retaking the course) does not result in deletion of the IF or IWfrom the transcript. A second entry is posted on the transcript to show the final grade for the course.
At the end of one year, /Land /Upgrades for courses that are not completed or repeated are changed to an For W, respectively.
Good Academic Standing
Good academic standing requires a minimum grade point average that is determined by the student’s school or college. Grades earned at another institution are not used in calculating the grade point average at the University of Colorado.
Degree students should consult the academic standards section of their school or college for degree program requirements.
Continuation as a non-degree student is contingent upon maintaining an overall grade point average of 2.0 upon completion of 12 or more semester hours.
Failure to maintain the required average will result in a non-degree student being suspended. The suspension is for an indefinite period of time and becomes part of the student’s permanent record at the university. While under suspension, enrollment at the university is restricted to summer terms or courses offered through Extended Studies.
Non-degree students are not placed on academic probation prior to being suspended.
GRADE POINT AVERAGE
The grade point average (GPA) is computed by multiplying the credit points per hour (for example, B = 3) by the number of hours for each course. Total the hours, total the credit points, and divide the total points by the total hours. Grades of P, NC, ***, W, IP IW and IF are not included in the grade point average. IFs that are not completed within one year are calculated as Ain the GPA.
If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining the grade point average. Grades received at another institution are not included in the University of Colorado GPA.
Undergraduate, graduate, and non-degree graduate GPAs are calculated separately. Enrollment in a second undergraduate or graduate program will not generate a second undergraduate or graduate GPA.
Students should refer to their academic dean’s office for individual grade point average calculations as they relate to academic progress and graduation from their college or school.
Grade Reports
Grade reports are normally available within two weeks after the end of the semester. Grade reports are available through the Web Registration and Student Information System. See the Web Schedule Planner for more information.
Mid-Term Grades
Instructors will assign mid-term grades for certain populations of students. Students in academic difficulty may be contacted and counseled about support services available to them. Note: academic support services are available to all students through the Center for Educational Opportunity Programs, NC 2012, 303-556-2065; the Student Advocacy Center, NC 2012, 303-556-2546; and the Center for Learning Assistance, NC 2006, 303-556-2802.
CU-Denver Catalog2004—05


UNIVERSITY OF COLORAD<
The faculty of the Colleges of Arts & Media, Business, Engineering and Liberal Arts establish curriculum to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual competencies Furthermore, the core curriculum promotes an awareness of cultural diversity. For details <
INTELLECTUAL COMPETENCIES
English Composition/ Oral Communication2 : Mathematics2 Natural & Physical Sciences
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 9 semester hours from the following courses: j 3 semester hours: 8 semester hours from the following courses:
ENGL 1020-3 Core Composition 1 and one of ENGL 2030-3 Core Composition II ENGL 3154-3 Technical Writing ENGL 3170-3 Business Writing and one of the following: CMMU 2050-3 Bus/Profess Speaking CMMU 2101-3 Present Speaking ENGL 2030-3 Core Composition II ENGL 2154-3 Intro Creative Writing ENGL 3001-3 Critical Writing ENGL 3084-3 Adv Composition CMMU 3120-3 Tech Comm ENGL 3154-3 Technical Writing ENGL 3170-3 Business Writing ENGL 4190-3 Rhetoric and Language PHIL 2441-3 Logic and Language j Any math course except ! MATH 3040 or a passing I mark on the Math 1 Proficiency exam ANTH 1303-4 Intro: Biological Anth BIOL 1550-4 Basic Biology I BIOL 1560-4 Basic Biology II CHEM 1474-4 Core Chemistry: Chemistry for the Consumer ENVS 1042-4 Intro to Environ Sci GEOL 1072-4 Phys Geology I GEOL 1082-4 Phys Geology II PHYS 1000-4 Intro to Physics PHYS 1052-4 Gen Astronomy I
COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA SAME AS CAMPUS CORE j SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE3
BUSINESS SCHOOL 9 semester hours, as follows: ENGL 1020-3 CoreComposition I CMMU 2050-3 Bus/Profess Spkng ENGL 3170-3 Business Writing | MATH 1070-3 SAME AS CAMPUS CORE
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 9 semester hours, as follows: ENGL 1020-3 Core Composition I CMMU 2101-3 Present Speaking and either ENGL 3154-3 Technical Writing or ENGL 2030-3 Core Composition 11 or CMMU3120-3 Technical Comm j Completed by fulfilling 1 major requirements Completed by fulfilling major requirements
1. For information about specific college cores, see the college advising office.
2. All courses must be completed with a grade of C(2.0) or higher to be counted as a core.
3. CLAS students are exempt from the Knowledge Area Courses in the CU-Denver Core Curriculum defined by their major.
4. An additional 3 credit hours is required in these areas, as defined by the CAM Distributed Core. Contact an advisor for details.
5. Cultural Diversity courses are restricted, requiring junior-level standing or the consent of the instructor prior to registration.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


4T DENVER CORE CURRICULUM
core curriculum for all undergraduate students. It is the objective of the CU-Denver core mathematics, reading, writing, oral communication, information literacy, and critical thinking, he core curriculum, students should contact their college advising office.
KNOWLEDGE AREAS
behavioral/Social Sciences Humanities Arts CULTURAL DIVERSITY
semester hours, as follow^: >ne behavioral science course: 6 semester hours from the following courses: 3 semester hours from the following courses: 3 semester hours from the following courses:
ANTH 2102-3 Culture & Human CHIN 1000-3 China: Central ARTS 1000-3 Arts in Our ANTH 3142-3 Cult Divers-Mod World
Experience States to Nation States Time ANTH 4200-3 Gender Cross-Cult Persp
CMMU 1011-3 Fund of Comm ENGL 1601-3 Telling Tales: FA 1001-3 Intro to Art CMMU 3271-3 Comm & Diversity
CMMU 1021-3 Fund/M^ss Comm Narrative Art in Lit and Film PM US 1001-3 Music ECON 3100-3 Econ ofRace & Gender
PSY 1000-3 Intro to Psyah 1 ENGL 2600-3 Great Works in Appreciation ENGL/ETST 3794-3 Ethnic Diversity
PSY 1005-3 Intro to Psyc|h II British & American Lit THTR 1001-3 Intro to in Amer Lit
>ne social science course: ECON 2012-3 Macroeconomics ECON 2022-3 Microeconomics ETST 2000-3 Intro - Ethnic Studies GEOG 1102-3 World Regional Geography GEOG 2202-3 Natural Hazards P SC 1001-3 Intro-Political Sci P SC 1101 -3 Amer Political Syst SOC 1001-3 Intro to Sociology SOC 2462-3 Intro-Social Psych lus one additional coursej tosen from either of the { >ove disciplines FR 1000-3 Intro to Cultures of French-Speaking World GER 1000-3 Germany & the Germans HIST 1381-3 Paths to Present I HIST 1382-3 Paths to the Present II PHIL 1012-3 Intro Philosophy PHIL 1020-3 Intro to Ethics & Society REST 2660-3. World Religions RUSS 1000-3 Russia & the Russians: Life/Culture/Art RUSS 2000-3 Masterpieces of Russian Culture Theatre ENGR 3400-3 Technology & Culture ETST 3704-3 Culture, Racism & Alien. FA 3110-3 Imaging and Identity HIST 3345-3 Immig/Ethn in Amer Hist MGMT 4100-3 Manag. Cultural Divers PHIL 3500-3 Ideology & Culture PMUS 3110-3 Social/Polit Implications of American Music PMUS 3111 -3 American Voice Revisit P SC 3034-3 Race/Gndr/Law/Pub Plcy P SC 3035-3 Pol Move: Race/Gender PSY 4485-3 Psych of Cultural Divers SOC 3020-3 Race/Ethnicity in U.S. THTR 3611-3 Drama of Diversity
AMEAS CAMPUS CORE 3 SAME AS CAMPUS CORE 3 SAME AS CAMPUS CORE
tudents must complete the allowing 3 courses: PSY 1000-3 Intro to Psvch I or PSY 1005-3 Intro to Psych II ECON 2012-3 Macroeconomics ECON 2022-3 Microeconomics SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE
semester hours from the lam pus Core behavioral | rience course list and semester hours from: i GON 2012-3 and ECdN 2022-3 or SC 1001-3 and P SC 1101 -3 or OC 1001-3 and SOC 2(162-3 6 semester hours from the same humanities discipline selected from: ENGL 1601-3 and ENGL 2600-3 or HIST 1381-3 and HIST 1382-3 or PHIL 1012-3 and PHIL 1020-3 SAME AS CAMPUS CORE 3 semester hours from the following list in the same discipline chosen to meet social science or humanities core curriculum requirement: ECON 3100-3 ENGL 3794-3 ENGR 3400-3 HIST 3345-3 PHIL 3500-3 P SC 3034-3 P SC 3035-3 SOC 3020-3
CU-Denver Catalog2004—05


32 / Our University, Our Campus
Originality of Work
In all academic areas it is imperative that work be original, or explicit acknowledgment be given for the use of other persons’ ideas or language. Students should consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measures ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the university.
Graduation
UNDERGRADUATES
Students should make an appointment with the advising office of their school or college to determine what requirements remain for graduation. Students intending to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their school or college during the first week of their graduation term. Students will not be officially certified to graduate until a final audit of the student’s record has been completed approximately six weeks after the end of the term. After students have been certified to graduate, they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
GRADUATES
Students must file an Application for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with the Graduate School Office on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term. Check with the Graduate School for more complete information. Students will not be officially certified to graduate until a final audit of the student’s record has been completed approximately six weeks after the end of the term. After students have been certified to graduate, they must reapply to return to CU-Denver.
COMMENCEMENT
In early March, informational brochures will be mailed to students eligible to participate in the May spring semester commencement. In early October, information regarding the December commencement will be mailed to students who graduated in summer term or expect to graduate in fall term. Information will be provided about ordering special display diplomas, fittings for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree recorded.
Official Transcripts
The official transcript includes the complete undergraduate and graduate academic record of courses taken at all campus locations or divisions of the University of Colorado. It contains the signature of the registrar and the official seal of the university.
Official transcripts are available approximately three weeks after final exams. A transcript on which a degree is to be recorded is available approximately eight weeks after final exams.
On the Denver campus, transcripts may be ordered through the Web Registration and Student Information System.
Requests should include the following:
1. student’s full name (include given or other name if applicable)
2. student number
3. birth date
4. the last term and campus the student attended
5. whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordered near the end of a term
6. whether the request should be held until a degree is recorded
7. agency, college, or individuals to whom transcripts are to be sent. (Complete mailing addresses should be included. Transcripts sent to students are labeled “issued to student.”)
8. student’s signature. (This is the student’s authorization to release the records.)
There is no charge for individual official transcripts. Transcripts are prepared only at the student’s request in writing, or through online
CU-Denver Catalog2004—05
student PIN authentication. A student with financial obligations to the university that are due and unpaid will not be granted a transcript. Official transcripts require five to seven working days.
Notification of Rights Under FERPA at University of Colorado at Denver
The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their educational records:
1. The right to inspect and review the student’s educational records within 45 days of the day that the university receives a request for access. Students should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official written requesi that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The university official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the university official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.
2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s educational records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the university to amend a record that they believ is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the university offici responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. If the university decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the university will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.
3. The right to consent to disclosure of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s educational records, excepi to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception that permits disclosure without consent is disclosu to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the university in an administrative supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (includii law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the university has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the boa of trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimai educational interest if the official needs to review an educational record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request, the university discloses educational records withou consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.
4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University of Colorado to comply with the requirements of FERPA.
Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20202-4605
The following items are designated “Directory Information,” and may be released at the discretion of the University of Colorado unless a student files a request to prevent their disclosure:
• name
• address
• e-mail address
• telephone number
• dates of attendance
• registration status


Academic Policies and Regulations / 33
• class
• major
• awards
• honors
• degrees conferred
• past and present participation in officially recognized sports and non-curricular activities
• Physical factors (height, weight) of athletes
Forms to prevent Disclosure of Directory Information can be ibtained at the Student Service Center in North Classroom 1003. Questions regarding student rights under FERPA should be directed o the Registrar’s Office, 3^)3-556-2389.
Academic Honor Code and Discipline Policies
iCADEMIC INTEGRITY
A university’s reputatioji is built on a standing tradition of excellence nd scholastic integrity. As members of the University of Colorado at Denver academic commupity, faculty and students accept the responsi->ility to maintain the highest standards of intellectual honesty and ethical onduct in completing all1 forms of academic work at the university.
ORMS OF ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
Students are expected to know, understand, and comply with the ethical tandards of the university. In addition, students have an obligation to nform the appropriate official of any acts of academic dishonesty by ither students of the university. Academic dishonesty is defined as a tudent’s use of unauthorised assistance with intent to deceive an nstructor or other such person who may be assigned to evaluate the tudent’s work in meeting course and degree requirements. Examples if academic dishonesty injclude, but are not limited to, the following:
i. Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the use of|another person’s distinctive ideas or words without acknowledgemerlt. The incorporation of another person’s work nto one’s own requires appropriate identification and acknowledgement, egardless of the means o ([appropriation. The following are considered o be forms of plagiarism When the source is not noted:
1. Word-for-word copying of another person’s ideas or words
2. The mosaic (the interspersing of one’s own words here and there while, in essence, copying another’s work)
3. The paraphrase (the rewriting of another’s work, yet still using their fundamental idea or theory)
4. Fabrication (inventing or counterfeiting sources)
5. Submission of another’s work as one’s own
6. Neglecting quotatioti marks on material that is otherwise acknowledged
Acknowledgement is pot necessary when the material used is ommon knowledge.
. Cheating
Cheating involves the possession, communication, or use of information, naterials, notes, study aicjs, or other devices not authorized by the nstructor in any academjc exercise, or communication with another erson during such an exercise. Examples of cheating are:
1. Copying from another’s paper or receiving unauthorized assistance from another during an academic exercise or in the submission of academic material
2. Using a calculator when its use has been disallowed
3. Collaborating with another student or students during an academic exercise without the consent of the instructor
(. Fabrication and Falsification
Fabrication involves inventing or counterfeiting information, i.e., creating results not obtained in a study or laboratory experiment. Falsification, on the other hand, involves the deliberate alteration or changing of results to suit one’s needs in an experiment or other academic exercise.
D. Multiple Submission
This is the submission of academic work for which academic credit has already been earned, when such submission is made without instructor authorization.
E. Misuse of Academic Materials
The misuse of academic materials includes, but is not limited to, the following:
1. Stealing or destroying library or reference materials or computer programs
2. Stealing or destroying another student’s notes or materials, or having such materials in one’s possession without the owner’s permission
3. Receiving assistance in locating or using sources of information in an assignment when such assistance has been forbidden by the instructor
4. Illegitimate possession, disposition, or use of examinations or answer keys to examinations
5. Unauthorized alteration, forgery, or falsification of academic records
6. Unauthorized sale or purchase of examinations, papers, or assignments
F. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty
Complicity involves knowingly contributing to another’s acts of academic dishonesty.
PROCEDURES IN CASES OF SUSPECTED ACADEMIC DISHONESTY
AH matters of academic policy, including academic dishonesty, are under the jurisdiction of each of the university’s schools and colleges pursuant to Article 1X2.B and Article VI.C of the Laws of the Regents. Accordingly, each school and college has established procedures for addressing matters of academic dishonesty and for determining the severity and consequences of each infraction. Students should contact their school or college for standards and/or procedures specific to their school or college. As a general rule, all school and college procedures contain the following requirements and provisions:
A. Faculty, staff members, or students may submit charges of academic dishonesty against students. A student who has evidence that another student is guilty of academic dishonesty should inform the instructor or the dean of the college of the charge in writing.
B. A faculty member who has evidence that a student is guilty of academic dishonesty should confront the student with the evidence. In cases of academic dishonesty, the faculty member has the authority to reprimand the student appropriately, which could include the issuance of a failing grade (F). If the faculty member elects to reprimand the student for academic dishonesty by issuing a failing grade, the faculty member shall submit a written report to the dean of the appropriate college within five (5) working days. The report shall include, but is not limited to, the time, place, nature of the offense(s), the name(s) of the accused, the name(s) of the accuser(s), and witnesses (if any). If the faculty member feels that her/his reprimand is an insufficient sanction for a particular case of academic dishonesty, the faculty member may recommend to the dean of the appropriate college that further action be taken.
C. In cases where the faculty member has recommended further action in a case of academic dishonesty, the dean or a designated committee shall schedule a disciplinary hearing as soon as possible. The student(s) accused of academic dishonesty shall be notified in
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


34 / Our University, Our Campus
writing of the specific charge(s). The student(s) also has (have) the right to have a representative present for advice, and to be present during the proceedings. The student(s) must notify the dean of the appropriate college five (5) working days before the hearing of the intent to have legal counsel present at the hearing.
D. The dean or the designated committee may take any of the following actions:
• Place the student(s) on disciplinary probation for a specified period of time
• Suspension of registration at CU-Denver, including Extended Studies, for a specified period of time
• Expulsion: No opportunity to return to the school or college in which the infraction occurred
• Take no further action against the accused student(s)
A record of the action taken shall be kept in the committee’s confidential file and a copy sent to the Registrar
E. In all cases, the student(s) shall be notified of the dean’s or committee’s decision within seven (7) working days.
F. If a student wishes to appeal a case, the student should request the procedures for doing so from his or her school or college.
G. Students who are taking courses at the University of Colorado at Denver, but are enrolled at one of the other educational institutions on the Auraria campus and are charged with academ dishonesty, are subject to the same procedures and sanctions outlined above.
SUMMARY
Questions regarding academic integrity should be directed to the dean’s office of the college or school in which the student is enrolled.
University Policies
Inclusiveness and Non-Discrimination
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to enhancing the inclusiveness of its work force and its student body. Inclusiveness among students, faculty, staff, and administrators is essential to educational excellence and to accomplishing CU-Denver’s urban mission. Inclusiveness among faculty, staff and administrators provides role models and mentors for students, who will become leaders in academe and in the larger society, and ensures that a broad array of experiences and world views informs and shapes teaching, research, service, and decision making at CU-Denver.
CU-Denver does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, creed, religion, sexual orientation, or veteran status in admission and access to, and treatment and employment in, its educational programs and activities. CU-Denver takes action to increase ethnic, cultural, and gender diversity, to employ qualified disabled individuals, and to provide equal opportunity to all students and employees. CU-Denver complies with all local, state, and federal laws and regulations related to education, employment, and contracting.
Program Access for Persons with Disabilities
The University of Colorado at Denver is committed to providing reasonable accommodation and access to programs and services to persons with disabilities. Students should contact the Disability Resources and Services Office, Arts Building 177; 303-556-3450, fax 303-556-2074, TTY 303-556-4766. Any other person requiring accommodation in order to access programs and services of the University of Colorado at Denver, should request accommodation from the individual or office responsible for providing the program or service. This request should be made in a timely fashion to allow adequate time to provide reasonable accommodation. The time frame for notification will vary according to the circumstances and the nature of the accommodation requested. For further information or for assistance, contact the ADA Coordinator, Lawrence Street Center, Suite 1400, 303-556-2550, fax 303-556-5855, TTY 303-556-6204, e-mail marylou.fenili@cudenver.edu.
University Policy on Sexual Harassment
The University of Colorado is committed to maintaining a positive learning, working and living environment. The University does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability, creed, religion, sexual orientation, or veteran status in admission and access to, and treatment and employment in, its educational programs
and activities. (Regent Law, Article 10, amended 11/8/2001). In purst of these goals, the University will not tolerate acts of sexual harassment related retaliation against or by any employee or student. This Policy ( provides a general definition of sexual harassment and related retaliatioi
(2) prohibits sexual harassment and related retaliation; and (3) sets out procedures to follow when a member of the University community believes a violation of the Policy has occurred. It is also a violation of tf Policy for anyone acting knowingly and recklessly either to make a fals complaint of sexual harassment or to provide false information regarding a complaint.
Robust discussion and debate are fundamental to the life of the University. Consequently, this policy shall be interpreted in a manner that is consistent with academic freedom as defined in Regent Law, Article 5 D, amended 10/10/02.
It is intended that individuals who violate this Policy be disciplined or subjected to corrective action, up to and including termination or expulsion.
DEFINITIONS
Appointing authority/disciplinary authority: An appointing authori is the individual with the authority or delegated authority to make ultimate personnel decisions concerning a particular employee. A disciplinary authority is the individual who has the authority or delegat authority to impose discipline upon a particular employee.
Complainant: A complainant is a person who is subject to alleged sexual harassment.
Respondent: A respondent is a person whose alleged conduct is the subject of a complaint.
Sexual harassment: Sexual harassment consists of interaction between individuals of the same or opposite sex that is characterized b; unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verb: or physical conduct of a sexual nature when: (1) submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment, living conditions and/or educational evaluation; (2) submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for tangible employment or educational decisions affecting such individual; or (3) such conduct has the purpose effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s work or academ performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive working or educational environment.
Hostile environment sexual harassment: (described in subpart
(3) above) is unwelcome sexual conduct that is sufficiently severe or pervasive that it alters the conditions of education or employment and creates an environment that a reasonable person would find intimidatit
CU-Denver Catalog2004- 05


University Policies / 35
lostile or offensive. The determination of whether an environment is hostile” must be based onj all of the circumstances. These circumstances ould include the frequency of the conduct, its severity, and whether it is hreatening or humiliating. Examples which may be Policy violations nclude the following: an instructor suggests that a higher grade might be ;iven to a student if the student submits to sexual advances; a supervisor mplicitly or explicitly threatens termination if a subordinate refuses the upervisor’s sexual advances; and a student repeatedly follows an instructor round campus and sendsIsexually explicit messages to the instructors oicemail or email.
Retaliatory acts: It is a yiolation of this policy to engage in retaliatory cts against any employee br student who reports an incident of alleged exual harassment, or any employee or student who testifies, assists or larticipates in a proceeding, investigation or hearing relating to such llegation of sexual harassment.
Students and employees who believe they have been retaliated gainst because of testifying, assisting or participating in a proceeding, nvestigation, or hearing relating to an allegation of sexual harassment, hould meet with and seek the advice of their campus sexual harassment ifficer, whose responsibilities include handling retaliation.
OLICIES AND PROCEDURES
. Obligation to Report
In order to take appropriate corrective action, the University must >e aware of sexual harassment or related retaliation. Therefore, anyone .'ho believes that s/he has experienced or witnessed sexual harassment r related retaliation should promptly report such behavior to a campus exual harassment officer (see campus Appendix discussed below) or ny supervisor (see section B below).
. Supervisor's Obligation to Report
Any supervisor who experiences, witnesses or receives a written or ral report or complaint df sexual harassment or related retaliation shall romptly report it to a campus sexual harassment officer. This section f the Policy does not obligate a supervisor who is required by the upervisor’s profession anji University responsibilities to keep certain ommunications confidential (e.g., a professional counselor or mbudsperson) to report confidential communications received rhile performing those Lfniversity responsibilities. Each campus shall ave an appendix to this policy designating the supervisory positions hat qualify under this exception.
. Investigation Process
1. Reports or complairjts under this Policy shall be addressed and resolved as promptly as practicable after the complaint or report is made. Ordinarily, investigations shall be concluded and reports submitted to the reviewing committee no later than 90 days following the receipt of a complaint. Ordinarily, the final report shall be sent to the Chancellor or President no later than 30 days after the committee’s receipt of the draft report of the investigation.
It is the responsibility of the sexual harassment officer(s) to determine le most appropriate means for addressing the report or complaint. )ptions include: (1) investigating the report or complaint in accordance nth paragraph C.3. beloW, (2) with the agreement of the parties, ttempting to resolve the report or complaint through a form of alternative ispute resolution (e.g., mediation), or (3) determining that the facts f the complaint or report, even if true, would not constitute a violation f this Policy. The campus sexual harassment officer(s) may designate nother individual (either from within the University, including an dministrator, or from odtside the University) to conduct or assist with ie investigation or to manage an alternative dispute resolution process. )utside investigators shall have training, qualifications and experience
as will, in the judgment of the sexual harassment officer, facilitate the investigation. Anyone designated to address an allegation must adhere to the requirements of this Policy and confer with the sexual harassment officer(s) about his or her progress. (See campus appendix for a list of resources for further assistance or additional information.)
2. All reports or complaints shall be made as promptly as feasible after the occurrence. (A delay in reporting may be reasonable under some circumstances, as determined on a case-by-case basis. An unreasonable delay in reporting, however, is an appropriate consideration in evaluating the merits of a complaint or report.)
3. If an investigation is conducted: The complainant and the respondent shall have the right to:
a. Receive written notice of the report or complaint, including a statement of the allegations, as soon after the commencement of the investigation as is practicable and to the extent permitted by law;
b. Present relevant information to the investigator(s); and
c. Receive, at the conclusion of the investigation and appropriate review, a copy of the investigator’s report, to the extent permitted by law.
4. The Chancellor, the respondent’s appointing authority and the respondent’s supervisor shall be notified that an investigation is taking place. The sexual harassment officer shall advise the respondent’s supervisor whether the respondent should be relieved of any supervisory or evaluative authority during the investigation and review. If the respondent’s supervisor declines to follow the recommendation of the sexual harassment officer, s/he shall send a letter explaining the decision to the Chancellor with a copy to the sexual harassment officer.
5. At the conclusion of an investigation, the investigator shall prepare a written report which shall include a statement of factual findings and a determination of whether this Policy has been violated.
The report shall be presented for review to the standing review committee designated by the Chancellor, or, in the case of System Administration, the President.
6. The standing review committee may consult with the investigator, consult with the parties, request that further investigation be done by the same or another investigator, or request that the investigation be conducted again by another investigator. The standing review committee may adopt the investigator’s report as its own or may prepare a separate report based on the findings of the investigation. The standing review committee may not, however, conduct its own investigation or hearing. Once the standing review committee has completed its review, the report(s) shall be sent to the campus sexual harassment officer(s), the complainant and the respondent, to the extent permitted by law. The report shall also be sent to the Chancellor, or, in the case of System Administration*, to the President. If a Chancellor is the respondent or complainant, the report shall be sent to the President. If the President or the Secretary of the Board of Regents is the respondent or complainant, the report shall be sent to the Board of Regents.
*For the purposes of this Policy, System Administration includes the Office of the Secretary of the Board of Regents and Internal Audit.
D. Reporting Process
1. a. If a Policy violation is found, the report(s) shall be sent to the disciplinary authority for the individual found to have violated the Policy, and the disciplinary authority must initiate a disciplinary process against that individual. The disciplinary authority shall have access to the records of the investigation.
If disciplinary action is not taken, the appointing authority and the Chancellor, or in the case of System Administration, the President shall be notified accordingly.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


36 / Our University, Our Campus
b. Following a finding of violation of the Policy, the disciplinary authority shall forward to the sexual harassment officer and to the Chancellor, or in the case of System Administration, the President, a statement of the action taken against an individual for violation of this Policy.
c. If a Policy violation is not found, the appointing authority and the Chancellor, or in the case of System Administration, the President, shall be notified accordingly.
2. The sexual harassment officer shall advise the complainant and respondent of the resolution of any investigation conducted under this Policy.
3. A copy of the investigators written report as approved by the standing review committee, shall be provided to: (1) the complainant;
(2) the respondent; and (3) the respondent’s appointing authority.
4. In all cases, the sexual harassment officer shall retain the investigator’s report, as approved by the standing review committee, for a minimum of three (3) years or for as long as any administrative or legal action arising out of the complaint is pending.
5. All records of sexual harassment reports and investigations shall be considered confidential and shall not be disclosed publicly except to the extent required by law.
6. Complaints Involving Two or More Campuses: When an alleged Policy violation involves more than one campus, the complaint shall be handled by the campus with disciplinary authority over the respondent. The campus responsible for the investigation may request the involvement or cooperation of any other affected campus and should advise appropriate officials of the affected campus of the progress and results of the investigation.
7. Complaints By and Against University Employees and Students Arising in an Affiliated Entity: University employees and students sometimes work or study at the worksite or program of another organization affiliated with the University. When a Policy violation is alleged by or against University employees or students in those circumstances, the complaint shall be handled as provided in the affiliation agreement between the University and the other entity. In the absence of an affiliation agreement or a provision addressing this issue, the University may, in its discretion, choose to 1) conduct its own investigation, 2) conduct a joint investigation with the affiliated entity, 3) defer to the findings of an investigation by
the affiliated entity where the University has reviewed the investigation process and is satisfied that it was fairly conducted, or 4) use the investigation and findings of the affiliated entity as a basis for further investigation.
E. No Limitations on Existing Authority
No provision of this Policy shall be construed as a limitation on the authority of a disciplinary authority under applicable policies and procedures to initiate disciplinary action. If an individual is disciplined for conduct that also violates this Policy, the conduct and the discipline imposed shall be reported to a campus sexual harassment officer. If an investigation is conducted under this Policy and no Policy violation is found, that fact does not prevent discipline of the respondent for inappropriate or unprofessional conduct under other applicable policies and procedures.
F. Information and Education
The President’s office shall provide an annual report documenting:
(1) the number of reports or complaints of Policy violations; (2) the categories (i.e., student, employee, or other) and sexes of the parties involved; (3) the number of Policy violations found; and (4) examples of sanctions imposed for Policy violations. Each campus shall broadly disseminate this Policy, distribute a list of resources available on the campus to respond to concerns of sexual harassment and related retaliation, maintain the campus appendix to the sexual harassment policy, and develop and present appropriate educational programs.
Each campus shall maintain information about these efforts, includinj a record of how the Policy is distributed and the names of individuals attending training programs.
G. Oversight Committee
There shall be an oversight committee consisting of campus and syste representatives appointed by the President. No one shall serve on this committee who has been involved with a sexual harassment case in any capacity during the previous two years. The oversight committee shall annually gather and review information regarding investigations conducted under this Policy and the ultimate actions taken as a result of such investigations. The oversight committee shall be responsible fc making confidential findings and recommendations to the University Counsel for the purpose of enabling the University Counsel to providi legal advice to the Board, the President, the campus Chancellors, and other University officials, as appropriate concerning the equitable, effective and lawful implementation of the policy.
H. Review of the University Policy
Pursuant to the University Policy on Sexual Harassment, effective July 1,1999, the Policy underwent review and revision in 2000-2003. In accordance with this Policy as reviewed and revised in 2003, the President shall periodically have this Policy reviewed.
RELATED POLICIES
Administrative Policy Statement, “University Policy on Amorous Relationships Involving Evaluative Authority,” provides that an amorous relationship between an employee and a student or between two employees constitutes a conflict of interest when one of the individuals has direct evaluative authority over the other and requires that the direct evaluative authority must be eliminated.
For related complaint, grievance or disciplinary processes, refer to Regent Policies under 5. Faculty, 5. H. Faculty Senate Grievance Proc< and 5.1. Faculty Dismissal for Cause Process (for faculty), State Personnel Board Rules (for classified employees), and campus student disciplinary policies and procedures (for students).
For further information, contact the Center for Human Resources, Lawrence Street Center 1450; 303-556-2868, TTY 303-556-6204, Fax 303-556-4472.
Drugs and Alcohol Policy
The University of Colorado at Denver recognizes the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol and is committed to providing a drug-free educational and drug-free workpla that supports the research, teaching, and service mission of the universi This Denver campus policy statement on drugs and alcohol is designe to address the university’s concerns about substance abuse and to ensu that the University of Colorado at Denver community complies with the Federal Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 (the “Drug-Free Workplace Act”) and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 (the “Drug-Free Schools Act”). These acts requ the university as a recipient of federal funds to take measures to comb, the abuse of drugs and alcohol. The continuation of federal financial support for our students as well as our academic programs and acaden support service programs is based upon compliance with these statute; and their regulations.
The University of Colorado at Denver Policy on Drugs and Alcoho prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possessit or use of any controlled substance (illicit drugs of any kind or amount and the abuse of alcohol by students and employees on university prope or as part of any of its activities. This prohibition covers any individua actions that are part of any university activities, including those occurri while on university property or in the conduct of university business away from the campus.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Code of Student Conduct / 37
It is a violation of university policy for any member of the faculty, taff, or student body to jebpardize the operation or interest of the Jniversity of Colorado at penver through the use of alcohol or Irugs. Those individuals found to be in violation are engaged in serious nisconduct and are subject to legal sanctions under local, state, or federal aw and are also subject to disciplinary action consistent with the Zode of Student Conduct, the Faculty Handbook, applicable rules >f the State Personnel Syst em, and the university’s Unclassified Staff dandbook. Sanctions thai will be imposed by the University of Zolorado at Denver for employees who are found to be in violation >f this policy may include requiring satisfactory participation in a ubstance abuse treatment, counseling, or education program as a :ondition of continued employment, suspension, or termination of employment, and referral for prosecution.
To acquaint members qf the CU-Denver community with applicable aws, the University Counjsel has prepared a description of local, state, tnd federal laws concerning drugs and alcohol. This information is ivailable for direct and imjmediate 24-hour per day access to all tudents, faculty, and staff on the CU-Denver web page at vww.cudenver. edu!Retourcet/Humanr Resources!Policies-Rules-nrocedures/Policies/Legal[Sanctions.htm
The web address for the Colorado Department of Human Services’ lirector of licensed treattrjents programs is 'ittp:llwww.cdhs.state.co.uslohrladadlTreatmentldirectory.asp
Health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of lcohol include, but are not limited to the following:
• Violence — Fights, vandalism, sexual assaults, homicide, and suicide are far more ljkely to occur when drinking is involved.
• Unprotected Sex — Individuals are less likely to use safer sex practices when drinkjng, which can result in unplanned pregnancy and infection with a iexually transmitted disease.
• Serious Injury — Mpre than 53 percent of all fatal automobile accidents in the U.S.(involve alcohol use.
• Death from Overdose
• Addiction — Although anyone can become addicted, those with a family history of alcohol or other drug addiction are at least four times more likely to (jlevelop alcoholism.
• Lowered Resistance to Disease/Illness — Increased risk of ulcers, heart disease, and cancers of the liver, mouth, throat and stomach.
• Fetal Alcohol Syndrome/Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAS/FAE) — Women who drink during pregnancy may give birth to infants with physical deformities,; brain damage, and/or mental retardation. If a woman is pregnant, frying to become pregnant, or suspects she is pregnant, she should abstain from alcohol and other drug use.
All university faculty ahd staff members, as well as any students mployed at the university, acknowledge that they will, as a condition of heir employment, abide by the terms of this University of Colorado at Denver policy. In addition, any employee who is convicted of a violation f any criminal drug law Recurring in the workplace must report that onviction to his or her immediate supervisor within five days. The Drug-Free Workplace Act makes a strict compliance with this policy tatement a condition of employment on all federal grants and contracts. Vithin ten days of learnir g of a drug conviction resulting from workplace ctivities of any individu; J engaged in work under grants or contracts unded by a federal agency, the University of Colorado at Denver is equired to notify the relevant funding agency that a violation of this 'olicy statement has occurred.
University employees ijnay contact the Center for Human Resources at 03-556-2868 (Lawrence Street Center, Suite 1450) for more information egarding resources, programs, and services available. CU-Denver students nay contact the Student and Community Counseling Center at 303-56-4372 (North Classroom 4036), or the Student Health Center at â– 03-556-2525 (Plaza Building 150), for confidential information and or referrals. Informatiorj may also be obtained by calling the U.S. Department of Health aid Human Services national drug and alcohol reatment referral service at 1-800-662-HELP.
This policy statement will be issued each year as part of the university’s continuing effort to increase awareness about the dangers of substance abuse. This policy is based on the belief that well-informed members of the university community will choose wellness over illness and effectiveness over impairment. We ask your support in this important campus effort.
Code of Student Conduct (Student Rights and Responsibilities and Procedures for Disciplinary Review and Action)
STANDARDS OF CONDUCT FOR WHICH ACTION MAY BE TAKEN IF A VIOLATION OCCURS
All persons on university property are required, for reasonable cause, to identify themselves when requested by university or Auraria Public Safety officials acting in the performance of their duties. Acting through its administrative officers, the university reserves the right to exclude those posing a danger to university personnel or property and those who interfere with its function as an educational institution.
All persons on CU-Denver/Auraria property who are not students or employees of the university are required to adhere to the Code of Conduct applicable to university students and to abide by university policies and campus regulations.
The behaviors outlined below will not be tolerated, because they threaten the safety of individuals and violate the basic purpose of the university and the personal rights and freedoms of its members.
1. Intentional obstruction, disruption, or interference with teaching, research, disciplinary proceedings, or other university activities, including its public service and administrative functions or activities on the CU-Denver/Auraria premises.
2. Willful obstruction or interference with the freedom of movement of students, school officials, employees, and invited guests to all facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus.
3. Physical abuse of any person on property owned or controlled by the CU-Denver/Auraria Higher Education Center or at functions sponsored or supervised by the university, or conduct that threatens or endangers the health or safety of any such person.
4. Verbal or physical harassment and/or hazing in all forms, which includes, but is not limited to, striking, laying hands upon, threatening with violence, or offering to do bodily harm to another person with intent to punish or injure; or other treatment of a tyrannical, abusive, shameful, insulting, or humiliating nature. (This includes, but is not limited to, demeaning behavior of an ethnic, sexist, or racist nature, unwanted sexual advances, or intimidations.)
5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU-Denver/Auraria facilities, defined as unauthorized entry or use of CU-Denver/Auraria property or facilities for illegal purposes or purposes detrimental to the university.
6. Forgery, fraud (to include computer fraud), falsification, alteration, or use of university documents, records, or instruments of identification with intent to gain any unentitled advantage.
7. Theft or damage to CU-Denver/Auraria property and the private property of students, university officials, employees, and invited guests when such property is located upon or within CU-Denver/ Auraria buildings or facilities. This includes the possession of known stolen property.
8. Possession of firearms, explosives, or other dangerous weapons or materials within or upon the grounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus. This policy shall not apply to any police officer or other peace officer while on duty authorized by the university, or others authorized in writing by the Chief of the Auraria Public Safety or designee. (A dangerous weapon is an instrument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons may include, but are not limited to, firearms, explosives, BB guns, slingshots, martial arts devices, brass knuckles, Bowie knives, daggers or similar knives, or switchblades. A harmless instrument designed to look like a firearm, explosive, or dangerous weapon which is used by a person to cause fear in or assault on
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


38 / Our University, Our Campus
STUDENT RIGHT TO KNOW AND DISCLOSURE INFORMATION
This report was prepared with information provided by the Auraria Higher Education Center (AHEC) Campus Police Department in compliance with the federal Student Right-to-Know and Campus Security Act. Campus Security can be reached at 303.556.3271.
AURARIA CAMPUS CLERY REPORT
Criminal Offenses On Campus Non-Campus Public Property
2000 2001 2002 200C 2001 2002 2000 2001 2002
Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Forcible Sex Offenses (including forcible rape) 3* 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Non-Forcible Sex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Robbery 0 2** 1 0 0 0 2 2 7
Aggravated Assault 3 1 3*** 0 1 0 5 2 2
Burglary 3 9 3 0 2 0 2 3 2
Motor Vehicle Theft 9 5 15 0 0 0 7 9 9
Arson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
* Forcible Rape — one attempt, two completed
** One offense, two victims (business and individual)
*** Two offenses, three victims
Hate Offenses On Campus Non-Campus Public Property
2000 2001 2002 200C 2001 2002 2000 2001 2002
Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
All Forcible Sex Offenses (inc. forcible rape) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Forcible Rape 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Arson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Negligent Manslaughter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Simple Assault 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Arrests On Campus Non-Campus Public Property
2000 2001 2002 200C 2001 2002 2000 2001 2002
Liquor Law Violations 2 1 0 2 0 0 27 16 0
Drug Law Violations 28 21 13 0 0 0 18 6 6
Illegal Weapons Possessions 5 1 2 0 0 0 7 0 2
PERSISTENCE AND COMPLETION DATA
Section 103 ofTitle 1 of Public Law 101-542 as amended by Public Law 102-26 (the Federal “Student Right-to-Know” Act) requires that institutions produce and make available to current and prospective students the completion rate of first-time, full-time, degree-seeking undergraduate students entering the institution. Six years after entering, 43.7 percent of the fall 1996 cohort graduated, another 26.4 percent transferred to other public higher education institutions in Colorado and 15.7 percent were still enrolled at CU-Denver for a total six-year combined persistence and completion rate of 85.8 percent.
CU-Denver’s one-year fall-to-fall retention rate is 65.9 percent for the fall 2002 cohort. That is, of the first-time, full-time, degreeseeking undergraduate students who entered CU-Denver in fall 2002, 65-9 percent were enrolled at CU-Denver in fall 2003.
RIOT LAW (STUDENT RIOT BILL)
Student enrollment-prohibition-public peace and order convictions: 1) No person who is convicted of a riot offense shall be enrolled in a state-supported institution of higher education for a period of twelve months following the date of conviction; 2) a student who is enrolled in a state-supported institution of higher education and who is convicted of a riot offense shall be immediately suspended from the institution upon the institution’s notification of such conviction for a period of twelve months following the date of
conviction, except that if a student has been suspended prior to the date of conviction by the state-supported institution of higher education for the same riot activity, the twelve month suspension shall run from the start of the suspension imposed by the institution; 3) nothing in this section shall be construed to prohibit a state-supported institution of higher education from implementing its own policies and procedures or disciplinary actions in addition to the suspension under (2) of this section, regarding students involved in riot.
SEX OFFENDER INFORMATION (CAMPUS SEX CRIMES PREVENTION AG)
Sex offenders are required to list the locations of all institutions of post-secondary education where he or she volunteers or is enrolled or employed. The Colorado Bureau of Investigation maintains a database identifying all such persons and makes it available to all law enforcement agencies in which jurisdiction the institution of postsecondary education is located. The campus community can obtain this information by contacting the Auraria Campus Police and Security at 303-5 56-3271.
VOTER REGISTRATION (NATIONAL VOTER REGISTRATION AG)
In compliance with the National Voter Registration Act, the State of Colorado Voter Registration Application Form and Information is available in the Office of the Registrar, 1250 14th Street, Lower Level Annex. The application form and information are also available at http://www.fec.gov/votregis/vr. htm.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Code of Student Conduct / 39
:xpl
another person is terms firearms, e:
9. Sale, distribution within or on the CU-Denver/Aura 10. Physical restrictio significant theft; possession of a su theft, or unauthor i: falsification, alterajti instruments of idi
expressly included within the meaning of the losive, or dangerous weapon.) use, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs g rounds, buildings, or any other facilities of the ria campus.
n, coercion, or harassment of any person; ale/manufacture of illegal drugs (includes fficient quantity with intent to sell); damage, zed possession of university property; or forgery, ion, or use of university documents, records, or entification to gain any unentitled advantage.
UNIVERSITY STANDARDS AND CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS
As a member of the University community, you are held accountable not only for upholding civil and criminal laws, but university standards as well. Enrollment does not confer either immunity or special consideration with reference tolcivil and criminal laws. Disciplinary action by the university will not pe subject to challenge or postponement on the grounds that criminal Charges involving the same incident have been dismissed, reduced, or ire pending in civil or criminal court. In addition, the university reserves (he right to pursue disciplinary action if a student violates a standard and withdraws from the university before administrative action is final.
USE OF UNIVERSITY/AURARIA PROPERTY OR FACILITIES
Nothing in this Code of Conduct shall be construed to prevent peaceful and orderly assembly for the voicing of concerns or grievances. The university is dedicated to the pursuit of knowledge through a free exchange of ideas, and tljis shall be a cardinal principle in the determination of whether or not a probosed use of university facilities is appropriate.
The Auraria Higher Education Center has established campus regulations and procedjrres governing the use of CU-Denver/Auraria grounds, buildings, and other facilities. Such regulations are designed to prevent interference [with university functions and activities. Except where otherwise specifically authorized, or when members of the public are invited, the use of C|U-Denver/Auraria facilities shall be limited to faculty, staff, and students of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus, and to organizations having chapters, local groups, or other recognized university-connected representation among faculty, staff, or students of the three academic institutions on the Auraria campus.
CLASSROOM CONDUCT
Students are expectec| to conduct themselves appropriately in classroom situations. If disruptivejbehavior occurs in a classroom, an instructor has the authority to ask the (disruptive student to leave the classroom. Should such disorderly or disruptive conduct persist, the instructor should report the matter to Au(aria Public Safety and/or the appropriate Dean’s office. The appropriate Dean or his/her representative may dismiss a student from a particular class for disruptive behavior, while the Student Discipline Committee (nay recommend to the Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs to withdraw, suspend, permanently expel, and/or permaner tly exclude the student from the campus.
Appeal questions conce rning disruptive behavior should be directed to the Academic Dean’s office when withdrawal from a class is involved, and to the Director of S tudent Life when suspension or expulsion from the university is involved.
NON-ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE POLICIES
Violations of Standards of Conduct should be reported to the Director of Student Lift during working hours. Auraria Public Safety should be contacted during non-duty hours.
If a violation occurs on campus and it is not in a specific building, Auraria Public Safety arjd/or the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
If emergency help is needed when on campus, contact Auraria Public Safety; for help off campus, contact the Denver Police.
Actions available to campus officials include, but are not limited to: asking those involved in inappropriate behavior to cease and desist; requesting offender(s) to leave the Auraria campus; denying or restricting use of facilities or services; calling Auraria Public Safety for assistance; billing offender(s) for any physical damages; pressing civil charges; and referring student(s) to the Director of Student Life.
STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
When one of the ten Standards of Conduct listed in this code is violated, the student may be referred to the Director of Student Life. Any person may refer a student or student group suspected of violating this code to the Director of Student Life. Persons making such referrals will be asked to provide information pertinent to the case. The Director of Student Life will make a determination as to the seriousness of the case. This will be done in most situations by asking the student(s) involved in the case to come in for an administrative interview to determine what actions, if any, will be taken by the university. Students will be notified in writing of the results of such administrative reviews.
The Director of Student Life has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no further action other than talking with the accused student(s).
3. Issue a university warning (a statement that a student’s behavior has been inappropriate, and any further violation of university rules will result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the university.
5. Refer cases to the Student Discipline Committee when the above sanctions are determined to be inadequate.
6. Take other actions, including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violator(s) provide(s) compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
STUDENT DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
Disciplinary proceedings shall be conducted as administrative proceedings and not ns judicial proceedings. The university is not a part of the judicial branch of state government. The university has authority to promulgate and enforce internal rules of behavior that shall be administered in a fair and impartial manner in harmony with its educational objectives and administrative nature. As part of the administrative nature of the committee’s proceedings, fundamental rules of fairness will be followed. Copies of these procedures are available in the Office of Student Life.
This committee, composed of students, faculty, and staff members, makes the decision whether students charged with violations of the student conduct code may continue to attend the University of Colorado at Denver.
The Student Discipline Committee has the authority to:
1. Dismiss the case.
2. Take no action other than talking with the accused student.
3. Issue a university warning (a statement that a student’s behavior
has been inappropriate, and further violation of university rules will
result in stronger disciplinary action).
4. Place the student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of which could result in suspension or expulsion from the university.
5. Recommend suspension of a student from the university for disciplinary reasons. This suspension may be for various lengths of time ranging from one semester to an indefinite period of time. After the period of disciplinary suspension has expired, a student may apply in writing to have the notation on the student’s record removed.
6. Recommend expulsion of a student from the university; notation on the student’s record will be kept permanently. When a student is suspended or expelled for disciplinary reasons, an additional sanction may include being excluded from the Auraria campus.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


40 / Our University, Our Campus
7. Take other actions, including but not limited to counseling, insuring the violator(s) provide(s) compensation for theft or damage, and/or placing stops on registration.
Student(s) must be notified in writing of the disciplinary action taken within five (5) days.
REVIEW PROCEDURES
A student may submit a request to review the recommendation of suspension or expulsion by the Student Discipline Committee within seven (7) working days to the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs. Except in cases involving the exercise of the power of summary suspension (see below), the sanctions of suspension or expulsion for disciplinary reasons shall be effective only after the administrative review by the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs has been exhausted or waived. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs decision shall be in writing to the student(s), with a copy to the Student Discipline Committee. Copies of review procedures may be obtained from the Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs.
SUMMARY SUSPENSION
Summary suspension is a suspension from the university which begins immediately upon notice from the appropriate university official without a formal hearing by the Student Discipline Committee. A hearing before the Student Discipline Committee is then scheduled as soon as possible (usually within seven calendar days) to determine the disposition of the case. Summary suspension may also include a physical exclusion from the campus if deemed necessary.
The Chancellor and / ora Vice Chancellor or Associate Vice Chancellor has (have) the authority to suspend summarily any student when in their opinion(s) such suspension is necessary to:
1. Maintain order on the campus.
2. Preserve the orderly functioning of the university.
3. Stop interference in any manner with the public or private rights of citizens on CU-Denver/Auraria-owned or -controlled property.
4. Stop actions that are threatening to the health or safety of any person.
5. Stop actions that are destroying or damaging property of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus, its students, faculty, staff, or guests.
PERMANENT RECORD NOTATIONS
While disciplinary proceedings are pending or contemplated, a temporary hold may be placed on the student’s academic record. It will not be released until all actions and appeal procedures have been completed or finalized by the university. Only in those cases where suspension, deferred suspension, or permanent expulsion results from disciplinary action will notations be placed on the academic record.
RELEASE OF DISCIPLINARY INFORMATION
Access to any student’s academic transcript or disciplinary file shall be governed by provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Only the student charged or those university officials who have a legitimate educational interest in disciplinary information may have access to the files. All other inquiries, including but not limited to employers, governmental agencies, news media, friends, or Denver Police, must have a written release from the student to gain access to university disciplinary files.
Every effort will be made by the university to respect the privacy of the student. However, where the identity of the student has been publicly disclosed in the news media, the university reserves the right to respond as it deems appropriate to describe fairly and accurately the disposition of disciplinary matters.
REFUND POLICY AFTER DISCIPLINARY ACTION
Submission of registration materials obligates the student to pay the assessed tuition and fees for that term. If a student is suspended or expelled from the university, the amount of tuition/fees which would
be refunded may be the same as when a student voluntarily withdraws from a term. See the Tuition and Fees section of this catalog or the Web Schedule Planner for more information.
The official withdrawal date applicable for tuition/fee refund purposes will be the date of the Student Discipline Committees decision.
TRI-INSTITUTIONAL VIOLATIONS
Procedures in deciding violations of the Code of Student Conduct involving students from other academic institutions on the Auraria campus have been developed by CU-Denver and the institution(s) involved. In such cases, the Director of Student Life should be contacted.
Ethical Use of Computing at CU-Denver
POLICY STATEMENT
CU-Denver honors the university-wide Information Technology Policies. Access to and use of CU-Denver’s computing resources is a privilege granted to members of the CU-Denver community for scholarly, research, academic, and administrative purposes. Computing resources are defined as facilities, equipment, systems, and personnel. Use of these resources includes World Wide Web pages, listservs, e-mail, application software, and any other electronic communication. Members of the CU-Denver community who use computing resources are expected to do so in an effective, efficient, appropriate, ethical, and legal manner.
Use of CU-Denver’s computing resources depends upon mutual respect and cooperation to ensure that all members of the CU-Denver community have equal access, privileges, privacy, and protection from interference and harassment.
CU-Denver computing resources shall be used in a manner consistent with the instructional, research, and administrative objectives of the academic community in general and with the purpose for which such use of resources and facilities is intended. All activities inconsistent with these objectives are considered to be inappropriate and may jeopardize continued use of CU-Denver’s computing resources.
CU-Denver computing resources are for the use of authorized
individuals only and for use only in a manner consistent with each individual’s authority. CU-Denver’s computing resources may not be used in any manner inconsistent with an individual’s authority, prohibited by licenses, contracts, university policies, or local, state, or federal law. No one may grant permission for inappropriate use of computing resources, nor does the ability to perform inappropriate actions constitute permission to do so.
USER AGREEMENT
Each user of CU-Denver computing resources is responsible for knowing and complying with all applicable laws, policies, and procedures. CU-Denver reserves the right to monitor, record, and store computing activities of anyone using computing resources. If such monitoring, recording, and storage reveals possible evidence of inappropriate, unethical, or illegal activity, computing system personnel may provide the evidence obtained from monitoring to appropriate university and civic authorities.
A. Each user agrees to make appropriate use of computing resources
including, but not limited to:
1. Respecting the intended purposes of computing resources, facilities, and equipment (for scholarly, research, academic, administrative and CU-Denver-sponsored community service purposes).
2. Respecting the stated purpose of computer accounts (for scholarly, research, academic, administrative, and CU-Denver-sponsored
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Ethical Use of Computing / 41
community servii e purposes) and to use computer accounts only for the specified purposes.
3. Respecting the di; ;nity and privacy of other users.
4. Respecting the integrity of the systems.
5. Respecting the resource controls of the systems and appropriately managing use of disk space.
6. Respecting the privileges associated with having network connectivity.
7. Respecting all copyright protections.
8. Following all Uni versify of Colorado and CU-Denver policies, and local, state, and federal laws related to computing.
B. Each user agrees to refrain from inappropriate uses of computing
resources, including, but not limited to:
1. Using any other individual’s computer account or password.
2. Inappropriate, urjethical, or illegal use of another individual’s computer.
3. Using computing resources, facilities, and equipment for personal commercial gain.
4. Intentionally seeking information on, obtaining copies of, modifying, or tar ipering with files, tapes, passwords, or any type of data belonging to other users unless specifically authorized to do so by those other users.
5. Using resources to develop or execute programs that could harass other users, infiltrate the systems, damage or alter the software components of tl e systems, or disrupt CU-Denver activities.
6. Violating any netjwork-related policy, whether set by the University of Colorado, CU-Denver, or a network governing body.
7. Altering or avoid ng accounting for the use of computing resources, facilities, and equipment.
8. Making excessive use of resources, controlled or otherwise.
; oneself or others through e-mail or other n inication.
Using, duplicating, or distributing licensed software and documentatio l without the express written permission of the original copyright owner.
11. Using unauthorized copies of licensed software.
12. Abusing, harai sing, intimidating, threatening, stalking, or discriminat ng against others through the use of computing resources.
13. Sending obscene, abusive, harassing, or threatening messages to any other ir dividual.
14. Engaging in vandalism or mischief that incapacitates,
9. Misrepresenting electronic comm'
10.
compromises.
E-Mail Policy
There is an expanding students, faculty, staff, at Denver (CU-Denvi r acceptance of electron^
means for commumc policy ensures that sta form of communicado
or destroys CU-Denver resources.
reliance on electronic communication among and administration at the University of Colorado ). Because of this increasing reliance on and c communication, e-mail is considered an official :s tion within CU-Denver. Implementation of this : f, faculty, and students have access to this critical
E-MAIL AS OFFICIAL COMMUNICATION
This e-mail policy app lies to all owners of CU-Denver e-mail accounts. The use of electronic mail is considered a privilege, not a right. The use of CU-Denver e-mail resources indicates an agreement to abide by the policies set forth.
• Official Communication: E-mail is an official means for communication within CU-Denver. Therefore, CU-Denver has the right to send communications to students/staff/faculty via e-mail and the right to expect that those communications will be received and read in a timely fashion.
• Privacy: CU-De|iver encourages the use of electronic mail and respects the privalcy of users. It does not routinely inspect, monitor,
or disclose electronic mail without the user’s consent. Nonetheless, subject to the requirements for authorization, notification, and other conditions specified in this policy, CU-Denver may deny access to its electronic mail services and may inspect, monitor, or disclose electronic mail (i) when required by and consistent with law; (ii) when there is substantiated reason to believe that violations of law or of campus policies have taken place; (iii) when there are time-dependent, critical operational needs of University business if it is determined that the information sought is not more readily available by other means or (iv) when there are compelling circumstances.
• Incidental Use: CU-Denver electronic mail services may be used for incidental personal purposes provided that such use does not:
(i) directly or indirectly interfere with the campus operation of computing facilities or electronic mail services; (ii) burden the campus with noticeable incremental cost; or (iii) interfere with the e-mail user’s employment or other obligations to the University. E-mail records arising from such personal use may, however, be subject to the presumption of a University E-mail Record. E-mail users should assess the implications of this presumption in their decision to use CU-Denver electronic mail services for personal purposes.
• General Precautions:
• Users are to take precautions to prevent the unauthorized use of e-mail account passwords. Passwords are not to be shared with others and their confidentiality is to be strictly maintained.
• No one is to use another individual’s account, unless shared rights have been designated at the server level.
• E-mail accounts are assigned a disk quota on the e-mail server that can only be increased based on valid business justification.
• When an individual’s affiliation with CU-Denver ends, the individual’s e-mail account will remain active no longer than 30 days beyond the date of termination.
ASSIGNMENT OF E-MAIL ADDRESSES
• Students: The e-mail address recorded in the Student Information System will be the official e-mail address of record for communication with students. Computing, Information, and Network Services (CINS) will initially assign all students a CU-Denver e-mail address and it will be recorded in the student information system. Students may use this address, or choose an e-mail address that they will update on the Student Information System to be the official e-mail address of university record to which the university will send e-mail communications. If a student chooses an e-mail address other than the assigned CU-Denver e-mail (i.e., @aol.com, @hotmail.com, or an address on a departmental server such as @ceo.cudenver.edu), or has e-mail in the CU-Denver assigned account electronically redirected to another e-mail address, they do so at their own risk. The university will not be responsible for the handling of e-mail
by outside vendors or by departmental servers, and using them does not absolve a student from the responsibilities associated with communication sent to his or her official e-mail address as recorded in the Student Information System.
• Faculty and Staff: E-mail services are extended for the sole use of CU-Denver faculty, staff, and other appropriately authorized users to accomplish tasks related to and consistent with the campus mission. All such users will be given a Microsoft Exchange e-mail account to be used as their official CU-Denver e-mail account. CINS will maintain no other e-mail servers for use by faculty and staff. Anyone electing to use a third-party account as their primary e-mail account may do so by forwarding all e-mail from the official Exchange account to the desired account. It is the responsibility of the user to perform the e-mail forwarding.
E-mail Address: The firstname. Listname@cudenver. edu tinming convention is the official university address. This address represents a permanent e-mail alias that directs e-mail to your official e-mail account.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


42 / Our University, Our Campus
EXPECTATIONS REGARDING STAFF/FACULTY USE OF E-MAIL
Students, staff, and faculty are expected to check their official e-mail address on a frequent and consistent basis in order to stay current with university communications. Students, staff and faculty have the responsibility to recognize that certain communications may be time-critical. “I didn’t check my e-mail,” error in forwarding mail, or e-mail returned to the university with “Mailbox Full” or “User Unknown” are not acceptable excuses for missing university communications sent via e-mail.
EDUCATIONAL USE OF E-MAIL
Faculty will determine how e-mail will be used in their classes.
If faculty have e-mail requirements and expectations, they should specify these requirements in the course syllabus. Faculty may make the assumption that students’ official e-mail addresses are being accessed, and faculty may use e-mail for their courses accordingly.
ACCESS TO/DISCLOSURE OF E-MAIL
Individuals needing to access the electronic mail communications of others, to use information gained from such access, and/or to disclose information from such access and who do not have the prior consent of the user must obtain approval in advance of such activity from the appropriate campus authority. To obtain approval, the requestor must fill out the form “Request to Access Electronic Communications of Others” and obtain the appropriate signatures.
Contents of electronic communications obtained after appropriate authorization may be disclosed without the permission of the employee. At the same time, CU-Denver will attempt to refrain from disclosure of particular messages if disclosure could create personal embarrassment, unless such disclosure is required to serve a business purpose or satisfy a legal obligation.
MICROSOFT EXCHANGE DISTRIBUTION LISTS
Exchange e-mail distribution lists should ONLY be used for electronic messages being sent to less than 100 people. Larger volumes of distribution should be handled through listservs or other e-mail tools.
BROADCAST E-MAIL
E-mail can be sent to the entire campus only by the Chancellor or designee. E-mail can be sent to an entire school or college only by approval of the Dean. This includes faculty and/or staff and/or student populations.
LISTSERVS
PostExpress: Staff and faculty are encouraged to subscribe to PostExpress, the official CU-Denver campus listserv. This list is moderated by the Office of Marketing Communications and is distributed twice a week. E-mail your message to postexpress@cudenver.edu for posting.
General Listservs: Computing, Information, and Network Services maintains a server for hosting listservs for the purpose of conducting university business. A listserv may be created upon request. Each listserv requires a designated ‘owner’ to perform the administrative duties of the list. Attachments are allowed.
Listservs may be setup for any number of recipients; however, they are strongly encouraged for e-mail being sent to more than 100 recipients.
MASS E-MAIL DISTRIBUTION (NON-LISTSERV)
Mass e-mail is defined as any non-listserv mailing intended for delivery to more than 100 recipients. It should be targeted to people who would reasonably expect to receive e-mail from you. CINS reserves the right to terminate a mass e-mail submission if policies are not followed or the e-mail has a negative impact on the campus computing network.
Academic Classroom Use: Faculty sending e-mail to more than 100
students are encouraged to do so via a listserv or through Blackboard.
If neither of these is an option, faculty sending e-mail to more than 100 students should do so before 7 a.m. and after 5 p.m. to reduce the burden on the network during business hours. Senders are encouraged to notify CINS in advance of sending this type of e-mail so that it is not mistaken for an attack on the network.
General Use: Mass e-mail being sent outside of an instructor/student relationship falls under this category. This e-mail MUST be approved by the appropriate Vice Chancellor. It cannot be larger than 50K in size. No attachments are allowed. These messages should be very brief. If the communication is larger than the 50K limit, the sender should place it on a web page and refer the reader to the web address within the message. The sender MUST notify CINS before sending this type of e-mail to coordinate an acceptable mailing time schedule that will have the least impact on the campus network and ensure that the mailing is not mistaken for a network attack.
ARCHIVING
CU-Denver does not maintain central or distributed electronic mail archives of all electronic mail sent or received. Electronic mail is normally backed up only to assure system integrity and reliability, not to provide for future retrieval, although back-ups may at times serve the latter purpose incidentally. Operators of CU-Denver electronic mail services are not required by this policy to retrieve e-mail from such back-up facilities upon the holder’s request, although on occasion they may do so as a courtesy.
SPECIAL ACCOUNTS
Students: Students may request administrative e-mail accounts for use within the scope of their CU-Denver employment. All students requesting such an account must obtain sponsorship from their full-time staff or faculty supervisor.
Groups: Group accounts may be created for the convenience of academic or administrative units. A full-time staff or faculty member must be designated as being responsible for the account and its use.
Guests: Guest accounts are available at the discretion of the Chancellor or designee.
Retirees: Retirees must submit a request for ongoing e-mail accounts upon their retirement from CU-Denver. Retirees will be prompted by e-mail for annual renewals.
Alumni: CU-Denver does not provide e-mail accounts for alumni.
MISUSE
CU-Denver e-mail services shall not be used for purposes that could reasonably be expected to cause, directly, or indirectly, strain on any computing facilities, or interference with others’ use of e-mail or e-mail systems, or interference with University business. Such uses include, but are not limited to, the use of e-mail services to:
• Send or forward chain letters.
• “Spam” (that is, to exploit listservs or similar systems for the widespread distribution of inappropriate mail).
• “Letter-bomb” (that is, to resend the same e-mail repeatedly to one or more recipients).
VIOLATIONS
Any violations of the policy should be referred to the appropriate university official. Sanctions for violation of this policy may include suspension or revocation of e-mail privileges, suspension or revocation of computing access privileges, and any other sanctions permitted under the University Guidelines. Violations of law may also be referred for criminal or civil prosecution.
Concerns about fiscal misconduct or criminal activity should not be investigated by unauthorized individuals or individual departments but should be referred to AHEC Police or Internal Audit stalf in accordance with the University Administrative Policy titled “Reporting Fiscal Misconduct.”
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Web Publishing Policies / 43
PROCEDURES
The Academic and Administrative Information Technology Committee will oversee and make recommendations for revision of this policy as needed. Changes will be authorized by the approval of the IT Policy Council (ITPC) and the Chancellor.
RESPONSIBLE ORGANIZATION
The ITPC is responsible for the maintenance and enforcement of this policy.
REFERENCE DOCUMENTS
• All use of e-mail, including use for sensitive or confidential information, will be consistent with the University Administrative Policy Statement on Use of Electronic E-mail. See http-Hwww. cusys. edu/-policies/GeneraUe-mail. html
• Confidentiality regarding student records is protected under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA).
All use of e-mail, including use for sensitive or confidential information, musj: be consistent with FERPA.
World Wide Web Policy
Access to the World Wide Web (WWW) and the ability to create web pages on CU-Der|ver computing systems are privileges provided to members of the CU|-Denver community. CU-Denver users must conduct their activities in a courteous and professional manner.
I. Servers
Computing, Information, and Network Services (CINS) supports and maintains designated WWW servers for general campus usage.
All web servers connected to the Internet through CU-Denver networking are to be registered with the CU-Denver Webmaster, webmaster@carbon.cudenver.edu. This includes all web servers located outside of the CINS department. The WWW Policy applies to all web servers using CU-Denver as the Internet Service Provider (ISP).
II. Individual WWW Pages
Appropriate use policies for CU-Denver computer accounts also apply to individual home pages. Individuals who create home pages are responsible for adhering to the following guidelines:
A. Individual home pages are encouraged for the following purposes:
1. Presenting personal non-commercial information (resumes, family, etc.).
2. Experimenting with available web technologies and authoring tools.
3. Publishing and disseminating academic work.
4. Linking to cultuijal, scientific, or historical sites.
5. Posting announcements, news bulletins, and other general information.
B. Individual home pages may not be put to inappropriate uses,
which include, but are not limited to:
1. Use of copyrighted materials in any form without the express written permission of the original copyright owner.
2. Personal, commercial uses that could result in a financial benefit for the page owner or his/her associates.
3. Use of audio, images (i.e., photographs, paintings, or derivatives thereof), videos, pr movies of individuals without their express written consent.
4. Use of any personal information that is not public record pertaining to other individuals without their express written permission.
5. Use of any imagds or data that are abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminatory.
6. Use of any images or data that violate other University of Colorado or CU-Denver pplicies (e.g., Sexual Harassment Policy) or local, state, or federal laws.
7. Creation of direct hypertext links to abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminatory material.
8. Use of materials whose nature or volume compromise the ability of the system to serve other users’ documents and web pages.
9. Any use that constitutes academic dishonesty.
10. Use of individual home pages to engage in illegal activity.
m. Departmental WWW Pages
Appropriate use policies for CU-Denver computer accounts also apply to departmental web pages. All departmental web pages are expected to adhere to the CU-Denver Authoring Standards.
A. Departmental pages are encouraged for the following purposes:
1. Disseminating general departmental information (goals, office hours, point of contact, etc.).
2. Highlighting departmental programs or activities.
3. Introducing faculty or staff and/or hyper-linking to their personal pages.
B. Departmental pages may not be put to inappropriate uses, which
include, but are not limited to:
1. Use of copyrighted materials in any form without the express written permission of the original copyright owner.
2. Personal, commercial uses which could result in a financial benefit for the page owner or his/her associates.
3. Use of audio, images (i.e., photographs, paintings, or derivatives thereof), videos, or movies of individuals without their express written consent.
4. Use of any personal information that is not public record pertaining to other individuals without their express written permission.
5. Use of any images or data that are abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminatory.
6. Use of any images or data that violate other University of Colorado or CU-Denver policies (e.g., Sexual Harassment Policy) or local, state, or federal laws.
7. Creation of direct hypertext links to abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminatory material.
8. Use of materials whose nature or volume compromise the ability of the system to serve other users’ documents and web pages.
9. Any use that constitutes academic dishonesty.
10. Use of departmental pages to engage in illegal activity.
WEB PUBLISHING POLICIES
This policy provides guidance on web publishing at CU-Denver.
It applies to all faculty, staff, students, and administrators, all users of CU-Denver web servers, and all contracts with external vendors to host or develop websites for CU Denver. CU-Denver reserves the right to change this policy at any time.
CU-Denver is accountable to the taxpayers of Colorado for proper use of its web pages, web page content presents an image of CU-Denver to the world. Therefore, official CU-Denver pages must undergo the same scrutiny and careful preparation given to any other form of official university publication.
1. Web publishing must be done on CU-Denver approved web servers.
CINS will maintain a list of those servers. Any web page utilizing the CU-Denver servers is subject to CU-Denver web policies.
2. Web publishing should be used exclusively for CU-Denver business.
CU-Denver’s web publishing resources shall be used in a manner
consistent with the instructional, research, creative activity, outreach, and administrative objectives of the CU-Denver community in general and with the purpose for which such use was intended. All activities inconsistent with these objectives are considered to be inappropriate and may jeopardize continued use of CU-Denver’s web publishing resources.
To be authorized to use CU-Denver’s web publishing resources, people must agree to the following:
2.1 CU-Denver web resources must be used for university purposes and be consistent with the goals and objectives
CU-Denver Catalog2004—05


44 / Our University, Our Campus
of CU-Denver. Using CU-Denver web resources, for example, in consulting for a business, running a business, or using an employees time to achieve a business’ objective is a misuse of state resources.
2.2 These web resources shall not be used for any illegal activity or any activity prohibited by university/ CU-Denver policy, rule or regulation.
2.3 Web publishing that interferes with the conduct of CU-Denver business is prohibited.
2.4 These web resources shall not be used to recognize corporate support, or include advertising, fund raising, or e-commerce without the prior approval of the Chancellor.
3. Hosting Affiliated Organizations and Acknowledging Partnerships
3.1 Hosting non-campus websites.
3.1.1 Personal websites may not host pages for organizations or for individuals other than the owner.
3.1.2 Official units of the campus may, with prior written approval from the Chancellor or designee, host websites for educational and nonprofit organizations affiliated with CU-Denver as long as the campus’s role and participation are acknowledged.
3.1.3 The above restrictions are limited to “hosting” websites and are not intended to prevent official units of the campus or personal websites from providing information on conferences, events, or activities of affiliated or unaffiliated organizations provided that information
is intended to advance the campus’s teaching, research and service mission.
3.2 Acknowledging Partnerships. Official CU-Denver websites may acknowledge business partnerships that assist CU-Denver in achieving its mission. Acknowledgement may include using a link to the corporate homepage. Advertisements for or endorsements of products and services are prohibited.
4. Political Activity
Using web resources for any partisan political activity, such as supporting a particular candidate for any elective office or a particular position on an issue before the voters of any jurisdiction, is strictly prohibited by Colorado law.
5. Privacy
CU-Denver websites may only collect personally identifiable information about visitors under the following circumstances: 1) a visitor chooses to make such information available to the website;
2) the website requires authorized and authenticated access. If a visitor provides any personal information to a website, CU-Denver will not sell that information to any commercial entities.
CU-Denver web servers may automatically recognize certain nonpersonal information, such as volume and timing of access, internet domain, and IP address from which the website was accessed.
Any information collected by a website must be handled in a manner permitted by law.
6. Copyright
Written permission must be obtained from the copyright holder and kept on file, whenever necessary, for the use of any and all copyrighted materials not belonging to the University of Colorado or to a faculty member utilizing his/her own material. Copyright permission may be necessary not only for text but in some instances also for photographs, graphics, audio, video, compiled statistics, graphs, or otherwise, as well as for mirrored websites. However, copyrighted materials that are in the public domain or that may be used within “fair use” guidelines may be displayed as permitted. Responsibility for obtaining permissions and maintaining appropriate documentation resides with the web page author. Appropriate copyright notices or ownership credits must be
prominently displayed. Access to copyrighted material must comply with the conditions granting usage or the license. Individuals with questions about the use of copyrighted material may contact the Office of University Counsel.
7. Use of University Name and Marks
The name “University of Colorado” or names for the CU System campuses, the commercial seal, wordmark, official CU logo (interlocking CU image), CU-Boulder athletic program symbol (buffalo) and other official and spirit marks (CUin the City) are among the words and symbols licensed by the University of Colorado. The CU Office of Licensing Programs promotes and protects the use of the university’s name and identifying marks. University marks are registered in the State of Colorado, at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and internationally. This ensures protection of the integrity of these marks. Commercial use is restricted, and requests to use these marks for any purpose must be made to the CU Office of Licensing Programs.
8. Personal Web Pages
Faculty, staff, and students may create and maintain a personal web page on the CU-Denver website. A personal web page is the responsibility of its author and CU-Denver accepts no responsibility for the content of personal web pages.
The following disclaimer must appear explicitly at the top of all pages on which a list of personal web pages appears:
The content of personal web pages is not in any way an officialpublication ofthe University of Colorado at Denver. Neither the contents ofthe personal web pages nor the linkedpages have been reviewed or endorsed by the University of Colorado at Denver. The statements and opinions included in personal web pages are those of the authors only. Any statements and opinions included in personal web pages are NOT those of the Board of Regents, the University of Colorado, the University of Colorado at Denver, or any department within the University of Colorado at Denver. The contents of personal web pages themselves, and/or of material accessed via links to other web pages, may contain material that some people may find offensive. If you believe that you might be offended by the contents of personal web pages, you should not access personal web pages.
9. Domain Name Usage
CU-Denver uses the domain of www.cudenver.edu. All official campus websites, including those of colleges, departments, divisions, or other fiscal or operating units of the campus, as well as faculty or staff performing CU-Denver functions, must use cudenver.edu. Exceptions may be granted by the Chancellor or designee.
For pages hosted on the official campus web server(s), a subdomain alias may be established via a request to CINS (i.e., admissions.cudenver.edu).
Alternate Hosting: Any official CU-Denver campus web pages served through a host other than the official campus web server(s)
(www.cudenver.edu) must be approved by the Chancellor or designee.
10. Document Retention
Document retention is governed by Colorado law and University of Colorado policy.
11. Accessibility
In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and University of Colorado nondiscrimination policies, all electronic publications must be made reasonably accessible to people with disabilities. CINS will maintain benchmarks for measuring accessibility.
12. Policy Compliance Interpretation of this Policy
Anyone who has a question about the interpretation of this policy, or whether some use of web publishing is permitted, should consult with the CU-Denver Webmaster.
Anyone who disagrees with the CU-Denver Webmaster’s interpretation of this policy or decision whether web publishing conforms to this policy may appeal in writing to the Chancellor or designee.
CU-Denver Catalog2004—05


Web Publishing Policies / 45
Responsibility for Compliance with this Policy
Supervisors are responsible for ensuring that web authors under their direction comply [with this policy. CU-Denver may employ technical means, or institute other reasonable procedures, to identify web publishing that fails to comply with this policy.
Reporting Non-Compliance
Allegations of non-compliance with this policy should be reported to the CU-Denver Webmaster.
Procedures for Handling Non-Compliance
CU-Denver reserve^ the right to remove from its servers or disconnect from its network any material or web pages that are potentially in violation of CU-Denver policies [or of applicable laws. The CU-Denver Webmaster is charged with responsibility for protecting both the system and users from abuses of these policies and laws. The Webmaster may communicate with offending parties, give instructions as to necessary steps to be taken to correct such violations, and specify a time frame in which the correction is to be made. CU-Deijiver may temporarily or permanently deactivate a web page, remove link| to specified material, close a user’s account, or take such other action as is appropriate under the circumstances.
Reference Documents
This policy document does not exhaust the requirements for web publishing at CU-Deriver. web publishing at CU-Denver must comply with all CU-System arid CU-Denver policies, and local, state, and federal laws. A list of reference documents includes the following:
University of Colorado Policies
• University of Colorado Administrative Policy Statement:
Providing and Usifig Information Technology, httpd/www.cusys.b^u/-policieslGenerallIT.html
• University of Colorado Administrative Policy Statement: Use of Electronic Mail, httpd/www. cusys. edul-policies/General/email, html
• University of Colorado Administrative Policy Statement:
University Policy bn Sexual Harassment,
http://www. cusys. Mud - policies/Personnel/sexharass. html
CU-Denver Policies
• CU-Denver Computing Policy, httpdlwww.cuden\er.edulcinslpolicylpolicy.html
• CU-Denver StylejGuide (underdevelopment)
• CU-Denver Website Management Policy and Procedures (under development)
• CU-Denver E-mail Policy (under development)
State of Colorado Laws
• Colorado Public (Open) Records, Title 24, Article 72,
Colorado Revisecj Statutes, Sections 112 et. seq., httpdlwww.archii\es.state.co.uslopenlOOopenrec.htm
• Colorado State Hjistory, Archives and Emblems, Title 24,
Article 80, Colorado Revised Statutes, Sections 101-111, http://www.archiUes.state.co.us/open/OOcsalaw.htm
• Colorado State Archives, Records Management Manual, General Retention Schedule for Community Colleges, State Colleges, and Universities, http.Hwww.archives.state.co.uslrmm_dirlsch8.htm
• Colorado State Archives, Records Management Manual,
Appendix C, Electronic Messaging Guidelines, httpd/www. archives.state, co. us/rmm_dir/appndx-c. htm
• Fair Campaign Practices Act, Title 1, Chapter 45, Colorado Revised Statutes, Sections 101118. and most specifically, 1-45-117, http:/164.78.178.12/cgi-dos/statdspp. exe?LNP&doc=1-45-101
Federal Laws
• Section 504, Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title 29, Chapter 16, United States Code, Section 794,
http:llwww. dol.gov/oasam/regs/statutes/sec504. htm
• Americans with Disabilities Act, Title 42, Chapter 126,
United States Codes, Sections 12101 et.seq., http://www.access\gpo.gov/uscode/title42/chapter 126_.html
• Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA),
Title 20, United States Code, Section 1232g,
httpd/www. cpsr. org/cpsr/privacy/law/education_records_privacy. txt
• FERPA Regulations, 34 Code of Federal Regulations 99, http://www.ed.gov/ojfices/OM/fpco/ferparegs.html
• Copyright Law, Title 17, United States Code, Sections 101 et.seq., httpd/www. copyright.gov/title 17/index, html
• Digital Millennium Copyright Act, Title 17,
United States Code, Section 101 et.seq.,
httpd/frwebgate. access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc. cgi?dbname= 105_cong_
public_lawsdrdocid=fpubl304.105;
summary: httpd/www. copyright.gov/legislation/dmca.pdf
• Electronics Communications Privacy Act, Title 18, Part 1,
Chapter 119, United States Code, Sections 2510 et. seq., http://www.access.gpo.gov/uscode/titlel8/parti_chapterl 19_.html
• Stored Wire and Electronic Communications and Transactional Records Access,
http://www.access.gpo.gov/uscode/titlel8lparti_chapterl21_.html
POLICY VIOLATIONS WWW Committee
The Chancellor shall appoint a WWW Committee to (1) manage the CU-Denver website, (2) set policies for and oversee the use of electronic communication at CU-Denver, and, (3) in conjunction with Computing, Information, and Network Services (C1NS), handle violations of CU-Denver Computing Policies.
Reporting
Any individuals who become aware of inappropriate, unethical, or illegal use of CU-Denver computing resources, inappropriate content of an individual home page, or any inappropriate electronic communication should notify the CU-Denver Webmaster, webmaster@carbon. cudenver. edu.
Child Pornography
Any material that appears to contain child pornography will be immediately referred to the Denver Police Department, and will also be subject to the procedures that follow.
Notification of Policy Violation
The CU-Denver Webmaster will notify the user who is alleged to have violated CU-Denver’s computing policies of the nature of the alleged violation and will provide the user with a copy of CU-Denver s Computing Policies.
Suspension of Privileges During Investigation
During the investigation of an alleged policy violation, a user’s computing and network access may be suspended. CU-Denver reserves the right to examine a user’s recorded and stored information in the course of investigating an alleged policy violation.
Procedures
1. The CU-Denver Webmaster will review the material alleged to be in violation of CU-Denver’s Computing Policies. If the CU-Denver Webmaster believes that the material violates the policies, the CU-Denver Webmaster will request that the user remove the offending material.
2. If the alleged violator fails or refuses to comply with the CU-Denver Webmaster’s request, the CU-Denver Webmaster may refer the matter to the CU-Denver WWW Committee for action.
3. If the alleged violator disagrees with the CU-Denver Webmaster, the user may file a written petition requesting that the WWW Committee review the case.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


46 / Our University, Our Campus
4. The Chair of the CU-Denver WWW Committee will appoint a three-person subcommittee of the WWW Committee to review the case. Two members of the subcommittee must be selected from the membership of the WWW Committee. The Chair may select the third member from the WWW Committee or from Faculty Assembly, Staff Council, or the Associated Students.
5. After consulting with the alleged violator and with the Webmaster, the subcommittee will determine (a) if a policy violation has occurred, and (b) if a policy violation has been found, what action should be taken to remedy the policy violation.
Consequences of Policy Violations
Violations of CU-Denver Computing Policies may result in disciplinary action, including, but not limited to, suspension of access to the WWW, suspension of e-mail privileges, suspension of computing privileges, suspension or expulsion from the university, suspension or termination of employment, imposition of fines, and referral for legal action.
The CU-Denver WWW Committee may recommend to the Director of Student Life that a student be suspended or expelled from the university, or to the appropriate appointing authority that an employee be suspended or terminated. The WWW Committee may impose all other sanctions specified above.
Computing, Information, and Network Services
Computing, Information, and Network Services (CINS) supports computer and network use for both the academic and administrative
communities at CU-Denver. All centralized administrative systems are developed, maintained, and processed by University Management Systems in Boulder, with output processing and user support provided by CINS in Denver.
The Denver campus maintains a communications network with more than 2,500 connections. This network provides access to all campus minicomputers and connection to the Auraria Library Online Information System, the World Wide Web, and the Internet. There are more than 2,500 personal computers located on the campus in 21 teaching laboratories, two public labs, individual laboratories, and in offices.
CINS maintains the campus World Wide Web, where information is kept for reference by students, faculty, staff, and others interested in CU-Denver.
The CINS Help Desk provides assistance to students, faculty, and staff The Help Desk technicians maintain personal computers and are available to assist with hardware and software planning and installation, acquisitions, Internet connectivity, troubleshooting, and general questions.
The CINS staff operates and maintains campus minicomputers, telecommunications equipment, and two of the CU-Denver computing laboratories. These laboratories provide students with access to Macintosh and Intel-based personal computers and software as well as access to the campus network and minicomputers.
The goal of CINS is to assist all members of the CU-Denver community in using computing as an effective tool in their work. For further information, call the CINS Help Desk at 303-556-6100.
Student Services, Support, and Organizations
STUDENT SERVICES Academic Advising Center
Office: North Classroom 1503
Phone: 303-352-3520
Web: http://thunderl. cudenver. edu/aac/
Director: Peggy Lore Advisors: Alan Christenson Nimol Hen Cheryl Kaas Kelli Stevens
Academic advising is the foundation of a successful college experience and an important component in both choosing a major and career planning. This office serves as the first point of contact for students who are pre-business, pre-engineering, or who have not declared a major in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences or the College of Arts & Media. In addition, the center provides general information and resource referral to all students.
New freshmen and transfer students will be assigned an advisor who will meet with them every semester to plan a schedule, discuss academic support services and assist with referrals to other on-campus resources. Frequent contact with an advisor is encouraged.
Career Center
Office: Tivoli Student Union, Suite 260 Telephone: 303-556-2250 Website: http://careers.cudenver.edu Director: Lissa Gallagher
The Career Center offers a full array of services that prepare students for career success. Students are encouraged to participate in career-
related programs and services as early as freshman year to begin planning their careers and gain the skills and experiences they need to be successful upon graduation.
CAREER PLANNING SERVICES
Career counselors can help you decide on a major; assess strengths, interests and values through career testing; research options; choose a career direction; and prepare for your job search.
INTERNSHIP AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM
Enrich your studies, gain hands-on experience in your field of study while earning academic credit and/or pay, and maximize your employment potential at graduation by participating in internships and cooperative education.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICES
Connect with employers through the Career Center’s employment programs and services:
• online job postings and resume referrals
• on-campus interviews
• career fairs
• networking events
Pre-Collegiate Programs
Programs offered by the Center for Pre-Collegiate Programs serve to motivate high school students to pursue post-secondary education and provide them the academic skills necessary to be successful in their college endeavors. The center is located in NC 2204,303-556-2322.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Support Organizations and Operations / 47
PRE-COLLEGIATE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
The Pre-Collegiate Development Program is a systemwide institutionally funded academic enhancement program for high school students. It is designed to motivate and prepare high school students who are first generation and from an underrepresented group in higher education to complete high school on a timely basis. The primary focus of the program is to prepare youth (grades 9-12) for professional careers of specific interest to them. The program includes academic advising (by parents and guidance counselors working together) regarding high school course selectior s that will best help students attain their desired career objectives. In addition, during the academic year, students will take part in relevant Saturday Academies in basic study skills, interpersonal skills development, and topics related to student preparation for the 21st century. Between their sophomore and junior years, students will participate in a twp-week session designed to enhance study and library research skills, and provide a thorough introduction to college placement exams and career fields. Between their junior and senior years, students will attend a five-week academically intense Summer Academic Program. Stjudents will experience university life on a firsthand basis and enhaneje their secondary school academics by taking courses designed to augment high school academic requirements (e.g., mathematics, sciences, writing, computer science, social sciences.) Students also enroll in a three-credit college course.
CU-DENVER SCHOLARS PROGRAM
This is an early college enrollment program for college-bound, high-achieving students, first generation and/or from an underrepresented group in higher education, who are enrolled in their senior year of high school. The program Enables students to begin their college studies by taking one course at OU-Denver during the fall term of their senior year in high school. The credit earned in the course can be applied toward a bachelors degree. Whjle enrolled in the program, students participate in monthly workshops designed to acclimate them to the university and prepare them for College study.
Center for Learning Assistance
The Center for Lea rning Assistance is designed to promote student success in the academic setting. Available to CU-Denver undergraduate and graduate students, services include English as a second language and study skills courses, tutoring, study strategies seminars, peer advocacy, a test file, consulting, and a minority resource library. First-generation college students may be eligible for intensive services through the Student Support Services and Ronald E. McNair federal grant programs within the center. The) center is located in NC 2006, 303-556-2802.
Tutoring. Free tutmjing is available in many subject areas (some limitations apply). Tutoring is held on weekdays and evenings. Scheduled tutoring is available Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., and Friday, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Open lab tutoring is available Monday through Thursday, 8 d.m.-7 p.m., and Friday, 8 a.m. -1 p.m.
Seminars. Study strategies seminars are provided on such topics as critical thinking, time/stress management, test anxiety/test taking, essay writing, study strategies, active reading, learning styles, and listening/note taking.
Consulting Academic, financial aid, and personal consulting are available. Peer advocacy is available to students eligible for the Student Support Services Program.
Library. The center) maintains a small periodical and book collection authored by, and/or about, minorities; these resources are available for student research and leisure.
Courses. Courses are offered in a small group format in the areas of college survival skills, introduction to word processing, English as a
second language, problem solving, and Excel. See course description section in this catalog for detailed information on courses.
ENGL 1006-3. Reading for Speakers of Other Languages.
ENGL 1007-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages I.
ENGL 1008-3. Composition for Speakers of Other Languages II.
ENGL 1009-3. Advanced ESL Writing Skills.
STSK 0705-1. Problem Solving.
STSK 0707-1. College Survival Skills.
STSK 0708-1. Introduction to Word Processing.
STSK 0800-1. Research Process for ESL Students.
STSK 0801-1. Communication Skills for ESL Students.
STSK 0802-1. Advanced Academic Reading Skills for ESL.
STSK 0803-1. Speech Presentation for ESL.
STSK 0804-1. Listening and Note-taking for ESL Students.
STSK 0806-1. Study Skills for ESL Students.
STSK 0810-1 to 3. Topics.
STSK 0811-1. Excel.
STSK 0820-1. Social Science Partnership for ESL.
SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS AND OPERATIONS American Indian Student Services
The American Indian Student Services program provides access and educational opportunities to American Indian students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. American Indian Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns of the American Indian community. The office is located in North Classroom 2013, 303-556-2860.
Asian American Student Services
Asian American Student Services provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, and student leadership development. Supportive services are tailored to meet the specific needs of students. Asian American Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus and community, providing current information on issues and concerns of Asian Americans. The office is located in North Classroom 2014, 303-556-2578.
Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD)
The Associated Students of the University of Colorado at Denver (ASCUD) serves as a voice for students and provides activities and services not normally offered to students under the formal university structure. ASCU-Denver assists students with information concerning student clubs and organizations, campus events, issues concerning student status, and other information of general interest to students. ASCU-Denver also provides students assistance with grievances and the opportunity to become more closely involved with the university community, through active participation in student government itself, or through service on university, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees. More information concerning services and activities can be obtained in the Student Government Offices, Tivoli Student Union, Room 301,303-556-2510.
Black Student Services
The Black Student Services program provides access, educational opportunities, and information to students of African descent through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


48 / Our University, Our Campus
academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. Black Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns affecting the community of Africans in America.The office is located in North Classroom 2010,303-556-2701.
Hispanic Student Services
The Hispanic Student Services program provides access and educational opportunities to Hispanic students through specialized recruitment and retention efforts. The program provides academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive services tailored to the specific needs of the students. Hispanic Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current information on issues and concerns of the Hispanic community. The office is located in North Classroom 2012,303-556-2777.
Clubs and Organizations
This is only a sampling of clubs recognized in the past and is not necessarily current.
ACM Computing Club American Institute of Architecture Students American Marketing Association American Planning Association American Society of Civil Engineers American Society of Landscape Architecture American Society of Mechanical Engineers Anthropology Club Art Club
Association of Black Students Auraria French Club
Auraria Transnational Student Association Beta Alpha Omega (Counseling/Education)
Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting Honor Society)
Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Honor Society)
Chi Epsilon
Chinese Student Association College Republicans
CSPA—Colorado Society for Personnel Administration CU Venture Network—Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs Equiponderance Pre-Law Club Etta Kappa Nu Feminist Alliance
Financial Management Association GSPA Association
Golden Key National Honor Society
HASO—Health Administration Student Organization
IBSA—International Business Student Association
Indian Student Organization
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
International Student Organization
Kappa Delta Pi
M.E.C.H.A.
Master of Social Sciences Club MBA/MS Association (Graduate Business)
Model United Nations Conference Organization The Robert E. Moore Collegiate Chapter of the American Marketing Association National Society of Black Engineers Native American Student Organization Phi Alpha Theta (History)
Phi Chi Theta (Business/Economics)
Philosophy Club Pi Tau Sigma Psi Chi (Psychology)
Russian Culture & Language Club
Sigma Iota Epsilon (Management Honor Society)
Sigma Tau Delta (English)
SAS—Society of Accounting Students Society of Women Engineers Student Association of Musicians Tau Beta Phi (Engineering)
Vietnamese Student Organization
CU-Denver Student and Community Counseling Center
The CU-Denver Student and Community Counseling Center provides services at no charge to students for personal, relationship and mental health concerns through individual, couples, family and group counseling, stress management, alcohol and drug prevention, and crisis intervention. If a client’s needs are such that they would benefit more from an alternative form of counseling or therapy, appropriate referrals will be made to community-based professionals.
Also, by request, staff provide consultation, lectures and workshops to student, faculty and staff groups, clubs, and classes on diversity, mental health topics, organizational and student development issues. The CU-Denver Student and Community Counseling Center is located in the North Classroom Building, Room 4036. Call 303-556-4372 or visit our website at www.cudenver.edu/resources/counselings-center/default.htm.
The Advocate
The purpose of the student newspaper, The Advocate, is to provide students with information about campus issues and events. The newspaper strives to include good investigative reporting, feature articles, and items of general interest to its campus readership. In addition, the newspaper is a tool to encourage and develop writers, journalists, artists, and other student members of its general management and production staff. The office is in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 345,303-556-2535.
Office of Disability Resources and Services
The Office of Disability Resources and Services (DRS) is committed to providing equal opportunities and fostering the personal growth and development of students with disabilities. The DRS staff strive to meet the needs of a large and diverse community of CU-Denver students with disabilities. We are available to provide assistance and to arrange for reasonable accommodations that will address specific educational needs. Accommodations may include, but are not limited to, the following:
• priority registration for classes
• assistance in identifying volunteer notetakers
• alternative testing for assessment tests and classroom examinations
• oral/sign language interpreters
• real-time captioning
• textbooks in alternate formats (audiotaped, Brailled, enlarged, scanned onto diskette)
For further information about our office, contact us at 303-556.3450 (voice), 303-556-4766, ore-mail to DisbilityResources@cudenver.edu. The office is located in the Arts Building, Room 177.
Emergency Student Loan Program
The Emergency Student Loan Program is designed to meet the emergency financial needs of students. The program provides interest-free, short-term loans for up to $400.
Applications for short-term loans will be accepted throughout the fall and spring semesters and summer session. Applicants are required to meet the minimum requirements listed below.
Students receiving financial aid are eligible if:
• financial aid or scholarship eligibility has been determined by the Office of Financial Aid
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Support Organizations and Operations / 49
• financial aid is vejrified by presenting recent copy of award letter, or letter from financial aid counselor
• amount of aid covers costs of tuition and loan
Students not receiving financial aid are eligible if:
• tuition balance i^ paid in full
• monthly income] is verified by presenting recent check stub or letter from emplojyer
• income indicate^ ability to repay loan within six weeks.
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans (GLBT) Student Services at Auraria
Gay, Lesbian, bisexual, Trans Student Services is open to all Auraria campus students as a rjesource for exploring sexual orientation issues. This program offers a [variety of support, education, and advocacy services for the entire campus community:
• support for those who may have questions about their own sexual orientation or that of a friend or family member
• advocacy for students experiencing discrimination or harassment based on a real or|perceived GLBT identity
• speakers for evenjts, workshops, and classes on various aspects of sexual orientation
• programs and workshops about working with the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and traps communities more effectively and combating misinformation, misconceptions, and homophobia
• resource library of 500 books and 90 videos (documentary and cinema) available] for research and leisure as well as a multitude of free literature regarding other organizations and services throughout Denver and Colorado that provide outreach, services, and advocacy
• programs such as Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trans Awareness Month and other forums providing information and dialogue about GLBT issues
The GLBT Student Services office is located in the Tivoli Student Union, room 311, and is staffed by a director with the support of student employees and volunteers. Input and involvement from the entire campus community are welcomed. For additional information, call 303-556-6333.
Ombuds Office
The Ombuds Office helps to enhance the clarity and dissemination of information, to simplify decision making and communication, to assist with the process of change and with adjustment to change, and to improve understanding among students, faculty, staff, and administrators.
The Ombuds Office provides information about programs, policies, services, and procedures affecting members of the university community; makes referrals to appropriate state, CU system, and CU-Denver resources; serves as consultant in the preparation and review of policies and procedures; and assists in the solution of problems and the resolution of disputes. Ombuds Office services do not replace or circumvent existing channels, but help them work more effectively.
Ombuds Office services are informal, impartial, confidential, and independent of administrative authorities. The issues and identities of persons who consult with the Ombuds Office are not divulged to anyone without express permission to do so, except to the extent required by law.
For further information or assistance, contact the Ombuds Office, 303-556-4493, e-mail: ombuds@carbon.cudenver.edu
Student Activities Office
The Office of Student Activities offers a comprehensive student activities program that helps bring about a positive college experience for each and every student. It is our goal to integrate what students learn from the full range of their experiences and to engage in active learning both inside and outside the classroom. We are committed to bringing
you new and exciting programs that actively involve student learning and leadership development.
The Office of Student Activities is located in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 303. Call 303-556-3399 or go to http://thunderl.cudenver.edu/ studentlife/activities. html.
Student Advocacy Center
The Student Advocacy Center provides support services to CU-Denver students, particularly during their first year on campus. Services are designed to help students make a smooth transition to life at CU-Denver and to succeed in their college studies. Professional staff and student peer advocates provide information about campus resources and assist students with class scheduling, academic policies and procedures, and problem solving. The center also houses an extensive scholarship library. The center is located in NC 2012, 303-556-2546.
Student Health Insurance Office
CU-Denver strongly encourages all students to have adequate health insurance coverage. This will help insure success in the academic community even in the event of an unexpected medical expense.
The Student Health Insurance Plan is designed to coordinate with the Health Center at Auraria to assure the availability of quality health care at the lowest possible cost.
The CU-Denver Student Health Insurance Office, administered through the Office of Student life, is pleased to offer you the benefits of a student health insurance plan underwritten by the MEGA Life and Health Insurance Company. This plan is designed to better suit the needs of CU-Denver students while maintaining reasonable student rates.
If you need more information or have questions, visit the Student Health Insurance Office in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 303, or call 303-556-6273.
Office of Student Life
The Office of Student Life is the advising, coordinating, resource, and general information center for student clubs and organizations, student government (ASCUD), student programs, and the academic honor societies. The office is responsible for the administration of the student fee budget and monitors all student fee expenditures to assure compliance with CU-Denver and state of Colorado regulations and procedures. The Director of Student Life represents the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs on selected CU-Denver, tri-institutional, and AHEC committees and maintains effective lines of communication with MSCD, CCD, and AHEC. The director administers the student conduct and discipline procedures as described in the Code of Student Conduct. The Office of Student Life is located in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 303,303-556-3399.
Office of Veterans Affairs
The Office of Veterans Affairs (OVA) is an initial contact point for eligible veterans and dependent students attending CU-Denver who wish to utilize Veterans Administration educational benefits. This office assists students with filling out VA paperwork and in solving problems associated with the receipt of VA-related educational benefits.
The OVA maintains proper certification for eligible students to ensure that each student meets Veterans Administration requirements for attendance, course load and content, and other regulations necessary to receive educational benefits payments.
In addition, the OVA provides VA Vocational Rehabilitation referrals, information on VA tutorial assistance, and VA work/study positions for qualified veterans. For further information, contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 303-556-2630, CU-Denver Bldg., Suite 107F.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


50 / Our University, Our Campus
CAMPUS SERVICE FACILITIES Auraria Child Care Center
The Auraria Child Care Center, 303-556-3188, serves the child care needs of Auraria’s students, staff, and faculty by providing high quality early childhood education and care programs. The Child Care Center is located on the southwest corner of the campus. Its programs are consistently recognized by the educational community for their high-quality early childhood care and education. Developmentally appropriate practices for young children guide the educational programs that are provided. Curriculum planning is flexible and based on children’s interests. Supervising teachers in the Child Care Center are all degreed teachers meeting the certification guidelines of the State of Colorado and of the National Academy of Early Childhood programs. Children aged 12 months to 5 years are served at the center. The center also has a fully accredited kindergarten program. Hours: M-F, 7 a.m.-6 p.m.
Auraria Event Center/Student Recreation Center
The Auraria Campus Event Center is a 2,800-seat facility for team and individual sport activities, academic programs, events and conferences. Funds from the Student Recreation Fee support the use by students of the many health and recreation facilities found within the building. Adjacent to the building are softball fields, tennis courts and a track.
Emmanuel Gallery
Located next to southwest corner of PE Bldg., 303-556-8337.
The Emmanuel Gallery hosts exhibits of students, faculty, and nationally known artists. Stop in for a relaxing break. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., M-F.
Health Center at Auraria
http://www. mscd. edu/student/resources/health/
All CU-Denver students are entided to medical services at the Health Center at Auraria, and student health insurance is NOT required to use this facility. The Health Center is approved to provide emergency care to persons covered by Medicare and/or Medicaid. Other medical conditions will be referred to approved Medicare/Medicaid providers. Physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, radiological technologists, and medical assistants staff the facility. Students will be asked to complete a sign-in sheet and show a current semester ID card each time they check in.
Services include treatment of illness and injuries, lab testing, medications, physicals, annual GYN exams, sexually transmitted disease information/ testing, birth control information/services, minor surgery, cholesterol screening, immunizations, HIV testing, blood pressure checks, casting, suturing, and x-ray. All services listed above are low cost. Payment is required at time of service, except for students who participate in the Student Health Insurance Program. Classes regarding health-related topics are taught each semester and are offered free to all students.
Walk-in services begin at 8 a.m., Monday—Friday. Access is on a first-come, first-served basis. Walk-in varies daily, contingent upon when all patient slots have been filled; thus, the daily closure time for walk-in care
is variable. Patients are encouraged to check in as early as possible. The Health Center at Auraria is located in the Plaza Building, room 150, on the lower level. Brochures with additional information are available at the health center. For further details and information regarding night students (Night Owl Advantage Program) and extended campus students (Satellite Advantage Program), call 303-556-2525.
Tivoli Student Union
9th and Auraria Parkway
Tivoli Administration, Room 325, 303-556-6330
The Tivoli Student Union, managed by Student Auxiliary Services, provides a wide variety of services for the Auraria community. The Student Union houses CU-Denver student government and student life offices, the University of Colorado Federal Credit Union, and the tri-institutional offices of Legal Services and the GLBT.
If you want a break or a quiet place to study, the Tivoli Student Union is just the place. With a pizza restaurant, a food court, coffeehouse and deli, and convenience store, you’ll find a place to suit your appetite, schedule, and budget. If you’d rather retreat than eat, you can watch TV in the Roger Braun Student Lounge, play a game of pool at Sigi’s Pool Hall & Arcade, meet a study group in the multicultural lounge or study in total silence in the Garage Quiet Study Lounge.
Additional student services at the Tivoli Student Union include the Auraria Campus Bookstore, the Club Hub, Click’s Copy Center, Conference Services, and the ID Program and Commuter Resource Center.
Visit the Tivoli Student Union website at www. Tivoli, orgfot more information.
Club Hub, Room 346,303-556-8094.
This uniquely designed club space on the third floor of the Tivoli features work space for over 60 clubs, mailboxes for campus clubs, a limited number of lockers, club bulletin boards, meeting rooms, and lounge area for larger group meetings. This office works closely with the Student Advisory Committee to the Auraria Board (SACAB), the Student Union Advisory Board (SUAB), and the Student Activities/
Life offices.
Auraria Campus Conference and Event Services, Room 325,303-556-2755.
Through the Conference Services office, meeting and conference space at the Tivoli Event Center, St. Francis and St. Cajetan’s can be reserved for non-academic purposes, including meetings, weddings, and receptions. Conference Services has five caterers to choose from for all off-campus catering needs.
ID Program/Commuter and Housing Services, Room 269,303-556-8385.
Auraria students come here to get their ID cards, which are necessary for parking in some campus lots and for checking out library books. Student IDs also serve as an RTD bus pass. The center provides an off-campus housing resources database, RTD bus maps, ride boards, and a microwave oven.
Sigi's Pool Holland Arcade, Room 145, 303-556-3645.
Sigi’s, named after Tivoli Brewery founder Moritz Sigi, houses 31 video game machines, and 7 billiard tables. Sigi’s is open to the entire Auraria campus population as well as the public. The student-friendly atmosphere encourages community socialization and relaxation.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


Campus Resources / 51
International Education Services
Office of International Education
Director: ChristopheL Johnson, 303-556-4925 Associate Director: Derrick Alex, 303-556-4930 International Student Advisors: Deborah Durkee, 303-556-4924 Laura Potter, 303-556-3489
Study Abroad Coordinator: Karen Goubleman, 303-556-3388 International Admissions Coordinator: Wei Kang, 303-556-2648 International Admissions Processing Manager: Joyce Espinosa,
303-556-6809
Office: CU-Denver Building, 1250 14th Street, Suite 130
Main Phone: 303-556-3489
Fax: 303-556-4562
E-mail: internationakg’cudenver.edu
Web: http://international. cudenver. edu
The University of (polorado at Denver, through the Office of International Education (OIE), provides a variety of international programs, educational opportunities, and services for international and domestic students, scholars, faculty, staff, and the greater Denver community. The goals of OIE are to raise international awareness on the CU-Denver campjus and, in particular, to provide an opportunity for all students to gairj the global competency needed in todays interdependent world.
OIE arranges student study abroad programs, expedites the exchange of students and faculty, hosts international visitors, promotes special relationships with foreign universities, and advises students and faculty on Fulbright and Natjonal Security Exchange Program (NSEP) and other scholarship opportunities. OIE also functions as a recruiting, retention, and advisory office for international students and coordinates many services for them before and after they have been accepted to CU-Denver, including;: new student orientation, visa and Immigration -vice (INS) advice, and help for those international istance with a variety of questions and potential the offering of a semester-long orientation course tion, OIE seeks to increase community awareness by periodically sponsoring lectures and programs
and Naturalization Se students who need as: difficulties, including (CLAS 1100). In add of international issues
that are open to the general public.
STUDY ABROAD
OIE assists studentjs wishing to make international study an integral part of their college experience. Study abroad programs vary in length from two weeks to onle academic year, and are also offered during the summer and winter breaks. Although many programs are for language study, a substantial number of programs are taught in English; thus, a foreign language is not always required for participation. These programs are available to studer ts in all disciplines, from architecture to business to liberal arts, in a var ety of countries worldwide. Students can pay
Campus Resources
CU-Denver tuition and study abroad on an exchange program for an academic semester or year. Either CU-Denver or transfer credit may be earned abroad, giving students the opportunity to fulfill degree requirements while experiencing a new culture.
Since tuition and program fees are generally affordable and financial aid is available and can be used for study abroad, it is a feasible option for almost every CU-Denver student. Information and advice on scholarships such as Fulbright and NSEP, as well as volunteer and work opportunities abroad are available.
New programs are continually developing, so call or check the OIE website to learn more about our programs. Logon to our website at http://international.cudenver.edu for further information.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADVISING AND SUPPORT SERVICES
Since the first few months in a new country and a new city can be particularly difficult for international students, OIE offers a number of special services in order to ease this transition, such as an orientation program for new international students, answers to visa questions, and help in finding housing. All international students meet with an international student advisor (ISA) in OIE upon arrival in Denver to have visas and other paperwork reviewed, in order to assist in personalized advising. OIE provides a friendly ear and a place to ask questions and express concerns about all kinds of issues, including U.S. social customs, as well as an avenue for communicating with other CU-Denver international student clubs and organizing social activities. For more information on immigration matters, advising, or services for international students and scholars, visit our website at international.cudenver.edu.
The Office of International Education also works with students who need additional English language preparation to connect them with appropriate resources and services on the Auraria Campus. For more information, contact an international student advisor at 303-556-3489.
GRADUATE STUDENT AND FACULTY FULBRIGHT INFORMATION
OIE maintains listings of opportunities and other information on various scholarships and fellowships for study and research abroad, including Fulbright graduate student and faculty visiting lectureships at foreign universities.
COMMUNITY OUTREACH SERVICES
During the year, OIE sponsors periodic guest lectures and special seminars focused on topics of current international interest. Most of these activities are open to the public as well as the CU-Denver community. OIE is also an active participant in a number of Denver community international programs and events.
For more information about these and other programs, contact the OIE office at 303-556-3489.
AURARIA LIBRARY
Dean/Director: David Gleim Office: Auraria Library, 1100 Lawrence Street Telephone: Administration: 303-556-2805 Information: 303-556-2740 Reference: 303-550-2585
FACULTY
Associate Professors: David Gleim, Ellen Greenblatt, Teri R. Switzer Assistant Professors: Anthony J. Dedrick, Robert L. Wick (Emeritus) Instructors: Orlando Archibeque, Eric Baker, Jeffrey Beall, Thomas J. Beck, Gayle Bradbeer, Meg Brown-Sica, Lorraine Evans, Rosemary Evens, Vera Gao, Cynthia Hashert, Florence Jones, Elaine Jurries, Susan Maret, Nikki McCaslin, Ellen Metter, Misha Sra, Marit S. Taylor, Linda D. Tietjen, Louise Treff-Gangler, Diane Turner,
Judith Valdez, Eveline Yang
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


52 / Our University, Our Campus
LIBRARY SERVICES
Access to information is essential to academic success. The Auraria Library, located at the center of the campus, provides a wide range of learning resources and services to support academic programs. The library is administered by the University of Colorado at Denver.
THE COLLECTION
The Auraria Library has a collection of approximately 600,000 volumes. In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection, the library also has over 3,200 journal and newspaper subscriptions, access to more than 5,000 electronic journals, and a film/videotape collection. The library is a selective depository for U.S. Government publications and a depository for Colorado State documents, with a collection of over 450,000 documents. The Auraria Library’s collection is supplemented by providing access to other libraries within the state and nationally through interlibrary loan services.
AURARIA LIBRARY ELECTRONIC RESOURCES
Auraria Library provides on- and off-campus access to a wide variety of electronic resources available through the Library’s home page: http-.Hlibrary.auraria. edu Available resources include:
Skyline: Auraria Library’s online catalog provides access to books, journal holdings, media, and government publications owned by the library. Reserve materials for courses are also listed.
Prospector Global Catalog: Auraria patrons can expand their searches for materials with Prospector, a catalog of sixteen Colorado libraries. Prospector has 13 million holdings including public and academic libraries. You may request items that are checked out or missing from Skyline and if the Prospector item you need is checked out, you may place a hold. Materials are requested online and delivered to Auraria Library Circulation within 2-4 days. Items are checked out for 3 weeks with one renewal. Try this popular service by clicking on the “Search Prospector” tab in a Skyline catalog search or directly at: www.prospector.coalliance.org.
Article databases: Over 300 databases provide access to full text articles and journal citations in a variety of fields. Available on-campus to all and off-campus to current students, faculty, and staff.
Reference resources: Dictionaries, encyclopedias, almanacs, and numerous other reference resources.
Web resources: Internet resources in all fields that have been selected and evaluated by librarians.
Auraria Library information: Instruction guides, subject guides, instructions for off-campus access, hours, policies, and other library information.
CIRCULATION SERVICES
Library materials are checked out from the Circulation Desk with a current Auraria ID or other valid identification. Undergraduate students may check out books for 28 days, and graduate students for 60 days.
An Auraria student can check out up to 75 items from the general collection. Items can be renewed three times if not requested by another borrower online using Sky line’s V iew Your Own Record, in person, or by phone, 303-556-2639. Other services include patron-placed holds in Skyline for checked-out items and e-mail circulation notices that allow for e-mail renewals. Fines are assessed when books are renewed or returned past their due date, and replacement charges will be assessed if items are 28 days overdue.
REFERENCE SERVICES
The Auraria Library Reference Department strives to provide excellent service in assisting students and faculty with their research needs. The Reference Desk is staffed during most hours the library is open, and has
librarians and staff trained in all subject areas in order to assist students with online and print sources of information. Contact the Reference Desk at 303-556-2585.
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS
Most U.S. and Colorado government publications are in a separate location in the library and are available all the hours the library is open. Specialized assistance is available during weekday hours and at the Reference Desk evenings and weekends. Call 303-556-8372 for information and hours.
INFORMATION DELIVERY/INTERLIBRARY LOAN
Auraria Library participates in a worldwide electronic borrowing and lending network with other libraries. This service enables all Auraria campus students, faculty, and staff to obtain materials not available at the Auraria Library. Requests from registered users can be initiated electronically through the Auraria Library’s Home Page using the WebZap service. This department also loans material to institutions throughout Colorado and around the world. Access to materials from other Colorado libraries is available via Prospector.
LIBRARY INSTRUCTION
The library is committed to providing information skills through its instruction program. The program is varied, ranging from basic, introductory-level material to advanced research methodology for graduate students. Information on other electronic resources is an important component of the library Instruction Program. For more information about the library’s instructional offerings, contact the Library Instruction office at 303-556-3683.
RESERVES
The Reserves Department (located in the northwest corner of the first floor) provides special short-term circulation of books, pamphlets, articles, and other materials needed for class instruction. Except for films and videos, all other types of media are housed in Reserves, along with CDs/records and appropriate players. Films and videos (including those on reserve) are located in the Video Collection, first floor, southeast corner.
The loan periods for “reserved” items are short, and overdue follow-up is prompt, so that the maximum number of students may have access to the materials. These materials include not only titles owned by the library, but also personal copies made available by the faculty. “Reserve” material may be checked out for two hours, one day or three days, with the exception of media items, which may be checked out for two weeks. The length of check-out is determined by the professor. Materials will be checked out with either a student I.D. or a Colorado driver’s license.
ARCHIVES AND SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
The Archives and Special Collections Department of the Auraria Library acts as the archival repository for materials produced by the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, Community College of Denver, and the Auraria Higher Education Center. These materials include documents such as college catalogs, student newspapers, budgets, and fact books. Manuscript collections at the Auraria Library focus on public policy issues and public affairs. Examples of manuscript holdings include the records from organizations such as the American Civil Liberties Union of Colorado, the National Municipal League, and the American Association of University Women of Colorado. The library’s special collections area contains books on many different subjects, including Colorado and Denver history, theses and dissertations from CU-Denver, science fiction, rhetoric, and juvenile literature. For information and hours, call 303-556-8373.
CU-Denver Catalog2004—05


Campus Resources / 53
COMPUTER COMMONS
are available for studer lab. The lab is also available whenever the
Word processing, s] treadsheet production, web browsing, and e-mail ts and faculty in the Library’s Computer Commons ipped with document scanners and printers. It is library is open.
SERVICES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES
The library is comn litted to making its resources and services available to all students. Librarr services to assist persons with disabilities include orientation to the physical layout of the library, retrieval of materials, and some assistance wjith use of the online public access catalog, periodicals, and indexes.
Adaptive computei) equipment and software have been installed in the reference area andjin the Combined Computer Access Center to assist a number of students with varying disabilities. This equipment connects to the online public access catalog, the Internet, and other electronic access systejns.
ADDITIONAL FACILITIES
Photocopiers, microform reader/printers, a copy center, pay phones, and study rooms are all available at the library.
FRIENDS OF AURARIA LIBRARY
The Friends of Aurhria Library is an association formed in 1976 to promote the development of Auraria Library as a center for learning, study, and research fo j the students and faculty of the University of Colorado at Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. The Friends of Auraria Library’s ongoing objectives are:
1. To promote awai eness of and good will toward Auraria Library on the campus, in the metropolitan area, and in the region; and
2. To increase library resources through contributions, solicitations, grants, bequests,|and gifts of books and other appropriate materials.
For more information about the Friends of Auraria Library, call 303-556-2805.
AURARIA MEDIA CENTER
1100 Lawrence Streep Room 015; 303-556-2426
The Auraria Media Center offers a full range of media services:
• distance learning technologies, including video conferencing, satellite teleconferencing, audio conferencing, video over IP, webcasts, and videotaping of course delivery
• circulation of a v fide range of audio, video, and data (AVD) presentation equ pment for one-time use
• long-term equip nent check-out
• special events
• production of ccjntent using various media, including digital tape, videotape, CD-ROM, and DVD-ROM. Specialized production servers such as animation and graphics
• equipment maintenance and repair
• equipment/systems consultation and installation
The Auraria Medial Center’s 34-channel closed-circuit campus cable system can be used in ;the classroom to broadcast channels such as CNN, MSNBC, History, Discovery, A&E, PBS, CSPAN, NASA and local television networks. Auraria Library’s extensive collection of videotapes and DVD-ROMs can also be distributed to any classroom on campus through the system.
The Auraria Media) Center staff are available to train faculty in the use of equipment in “imart” classrooms on campus and offer consulting services to faculty and other clients in such areas as media design and production, effective use of media types and effective use of distance learning technologies,! effective use of those technologies, and equipment selection to best meet instructional needs. A self-service Mac and PC lab
is available for faculty to access slide scanners, flatbed scanners, and film printers to transfer digital images to film.
AURARIA CAMPUS BOOKSTORE
Tivoli Student Union, 303-556-4286
Hours: M-Th, 8a.m.-6p.m.; F, 8a.m.-5p.m.; Sat, 10a.m.-3p.m. Please call for hours during vacation and interim periods.
The Auraria Campus Bookstore, a department of Student Auxiliary Services—your campus store—is located in the historic Tivoli Student Union. The bookstore provides textbooks for the Auraria schools, plus a complete general book department that is especially strong in technical and reference areas. Best sellers, new releases, and gift book selections change frequently, and are often accompanied by displays of special value books on many subjects.
Students need to bring course printouts to locate textbooks. Books are located by school; subjects are arranged alphabetically—departmental abbreviations, with course and section numbers—and prices are printed on the shelf tag below. Each title has the designation of Required, Preferred, Optional, or Available. You can also buy books online at www. aurariabooks. com.
The Auraria Campus Bookstore carries more used textbooks than any other book store in Colorado, but shop early as used books are the first to go. A full refund is given for new and used books accompanied by the receipt and returned within the first three weeks of class for regular semesters and during the first week of class for short terms.
Please read the refund policy attached to the receipt.
When a course ends, the textbook may still have value and may be bought back by the bookstore. The buy-back policy on used texts is to pay half of the new price on books that will be used again next semester on this campus. Other texts are purchased at lower percentages. The Auraria Campus Bookstore’s buy-back services are dedicated to its student customers. A validated Auraria student or campus ID is required to complete a buy-back transaction. Books are bought for this campus throughout the semester; however, buyers from national textbook companies are on hand at the end of each semester to purchase used books that may be required at other schools.
Campus Computers, 303-556-3726, offers the latest in hardware and software technology. An educational discount is offered to Auraria campus students; a current, validated Auraria ID must be presented at the time of purchase. A full line of computer reference books and accessories is also available, as well as calculators and other small electronics. Campus Computers’ hours are M-Th, 8a.m.-6p.m.;
F, 8a.m.-5p.m.; Sat, 10a.m.-3p.m. It is located on the second floor of the Auraria Campus Bookstore.
A current photo ID is required for purchases paid for by check. The bookstore also accepts MasterCard, VISA, and American Express.
Look for our website at: www.aurariabooks.com
The Auraria Campus Bookstore is owned by the State of Colorado and supports the Student Bond Fund.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
Campus Box 189, P.O. Box 173364
Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 Phone: 303-556-2549 Fax: 303-556-6545 E-mail: Carol.Heller@cudenver.edu
The CU-Denver Alumni Association provides programs and services of mutual benefit to graduates and the university. Founded in 1976, the association is governed by a board of alumni representing all schools and colleges on campus. Students automatically become CU-Denver Alumni Association members upon graduation and receive the CU on the Horizon newsletter, published twice a year. Alumni are invited to work on volunteer committees, which include recognizing 4.0
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


54 / Our University, Our Campus
students through the Academic Athlete program, providing financial assistance to undergraduate students through a scholarship fund, and bestowing Alumni Association awards to worthy community leaders and volunteers. The association also invites alumni back to campus to attend periodic reunions and activities that might interest them.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO FOUNDATION
Campus Box 174, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 Phone: 303-556-4301 Fax: 303-556-3958
E-mail: Betsy.Cheroutes@cufund.colorado.edu
Established in 1967, the University of Colorado Foundation is a privately governed nonprofit corporation whose mission is to support the University of Colorado. In 1981, the foundation established a Denver campus office to advance CU-Denver’s goal to become one of the nations premier urban institutions.
The CU Foundation raises and manages private funds that endow scholarships and professorships, enrich academic programs, purchase equipment, upgrade and construct facilities, and support projects to benefit students, faculty, and the community.
The university’s academic leadership establishes priorities for private support, and gifts are directed to the specific school, college, program, or purpose the donor designates. Professional fundraisers generate interest and enthusiasm for the university, recruit and organize volunteers, solicit gifts in collaboration with faculty and deans, and assist donors in gift planning.
CU-Denver Catalog2004-05


College of Architecture
Dean
Mark Gelernter
Associate Dean of Research
Michael Holleran
Contact
Office
CU-Denver Building, Third Floor
Main Telephone
303-556-3382
Fax
303-556-3687
Website
wu w. cudenver. edu/AandP
Faculty
Professors
Ern :sto Arias, Gene Bressler, Thoms s Clark, Mark Gelernter, Spenser Havlick, George Hoover, Joseph Juhasz, Yuk Lee, Dwayne Nuzum, Patricia O’Leary, John Prosser, Fahriye Sancar, Peter Schneider, Raymond Studer, Jr., Luis Summers, Willem van Vliet
Associate Professors
Lois Brink, Joan Draper, Phillip Gallegos, Julee Herdt, Michael Holleran, Lawrence Loftin III, Taisto Make!a, Raymond McCall, Jr., Hans Morger thaler, Bennett Neiman, Randall Ott, Ping Xu
Assistant Professors Barbara Ainbach, Robert Flanagan, Michael lughes, Michael Jenson, Ann Komara, Sohyun Park Lee, Brian Muller, Ekaterini Vlahos
Senior Instructors
Lori Cocke ham, John Frankhouser, Allen Ha low, Martha Hutchison, Anthony Mazzeo, E.J. Meade, E ic Morris, George Pond, Shayne Rymer, Rick Sommerfeld
If you’re interested in a career in architecture, urban and regional planning, landscape architecture, or urban design, you’ll want to get acquainted with the College of Architecture and Planning at CU-Denver. We offer the only undergraduate and graduate education in these fields in the state of Colorado. Students intending to enter the design and planning professions normally complete the college’s undergraduate degree as preparation for our graduate-level professional programs.
Our graduate programs are also available for those who already hold an undergraduate degree in an unrelated field. Our graduate programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban and regional planning, and urban design, and our graduate certificates in preservation and design build are taught on the CU-Denver campus, in the heart of a vital downtown. Our undergraduate programs are held in Boulder, an environment ideally suited to the needs of undergraduates (see the CU-Boulder catalog for details). We offer a multidisciplinary PhD in design and planning across the two campuses. With a diverse faculty committed to excellence in teaching, research, scholarship, andprofessional work, the college provides students with a broad range of learning opportunities.
Special Activities and Programs
The college provides a diverse range of opportunities that enrich and enhance the education of its students. Through activities and functions—including a lecture series, a visiting critic series, exhibits, publications, and active student organizations—the college encourages contact among students, faculty, and members of the design professions. Each summer, the college offers foreign study-travel programs, which in recent years have traveled to Prague, Rome, Turkey, China, Helsinki, and Spain. The college also offers a semester abroad program in Florence for its undergraduates each fall and spring. The college makes available a range of scholarships and fellowships, some of which are based on need, others on performance, and still others of which are specifically intended to provide enrichment opportunities. The college supports an active and focused internship program for its students, giving them access to elective internship opportunities in the Denver metropolitan area and beyond.
Finally, the college encourages students to take control of their own education and supports,
within its ability, any reasonable proposals from students that would enrich their own educational experiences.
College Facilities
The college’s administrative headquarters and graduate programs are located at 1250 14th Street in downtown Denver, on the northeastern edge of the Auraria campus. This favorable location gives easy access both to the extensive campus facilities and to the urban amenities of Denver’s lively lower downtown. Most of the major professional design offices in Denver, and many planning firms and agencies, are within easy reach of the college. These provide many opportunities for contact between students and practitioners. College facilities include studio spaces for students, lecture and seminar rooms, design jury spaces, exhibition spaces, and faculty offices. The college also provides a photographic darkroom and studio, a model and furniture-making woodshop, and an extensive computer lab whose focus is computer-aided design (CAD), computer 2-D and 3-D imaging, and analytic
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


56 / College of Architecture and Planning
tools for planning. Also located in the college is a Geographic Information System (GIS) computer lab, which is open to all students of the University of Colorado at Denver.
Scholarships/Financial Aid
Students in the college have access to a number of scholarships and other financial assistance funds. Some of these funds are provided by the institution itself, while others are provided by external sources like the American Institute of Architects Education Fund, the American Planning Association, the American Society of Landscape Architects, and the Rocky Mountain Masonry Institute. For further information on these scholarships and graduate tuition awards, contact the colleges student services officer at 303-556-3387 or request a list by e-mail at heather.zertuche@cudenver.edu. For information on federal and state financial aid, contact the Office of Financial Aid, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 125, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364, 303-556-2886.
ADMISSIONS General Requirements
Applicants to the College of Architecture and Planning are required to submit the following credentials:
• University of Colorado Application for Graduate Admission form
• Two official transcripts from each institution the applicant has attended. Transcripts must be mailed by the institution directly to the college. A certified literal English translation must also be submitted for documents that are not in English.
• Letters of recommendation. U.S. residents, three letters; international applicants, four letters.
• Statement of purpose. Applicants to all programs must submit a statement summarizing career objectives and reasons for pursuing the intended program of study. Applicants to the PhD program must also indicate a proposed area of specialization and, if possible, a potential faculty mentor.
• Supporting materials for architecture and landscape architecture: Applicants to the graduate architecture and landscape architecture programs are required to submit a portfolio (6-12 bound pages,
8.5 X 11 inches). Slides are not accepted. A portfolio is an orderly presentation of one’s work. This includes examples of creative and analytical work including, but not limited to, essays, papers, photographs, and photographic reproductions of artistic work such as sculptures, drawings, paintings, musical compositions, and other fine arts. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must be included for return of the portfolio. Applicants to architecture and landscape architecture are encouraged to submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores if their GPAs are below 3.0.
• Supporting materials for urban and regional planning: Applicants to the urban and regional planning program should submit, in an 8.5 X 11-inch bound document, their statement of purpose, a resume, and a copy of a student or professional paper or project. Applicants to the urban and regional planning program are encouraged to submit GRE (general) scores; those whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0 are required to submit GRE scores.
• Supporting materials for the PhD: Applicants to the PhD program must submit a sample of written work and any other evidence relevant to admission to the program, in accordance with submission guidelines that can be obtained from the college. Applicants to the PhD program are required to submit GRE scores.
• Application fee. Non refundable ($50, U.S. residents; $60, international applicants).
International Applicants
International applicants are required to submit the following documents in addition to the credentials listed under general requirements.
• TOEFL score. For the professional programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, and urban and regional planning, the College of Architecture and Planning requires a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 525 (paper based) or 197 (computer based) for students from non-English speaking countries. However, the college requires students with TOEFL scores between 525 and 550 (paper based) or 213 (computer based) to register for an English course when they arrive at the University of Colorado at Denver. Applicants to the PhD in Design and Planning must have achieved a TOEFL score of at least 575 (paper based) or 233 (computer based).
• Financial Resources Statement. International applicants must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds available. Financial documents must be less than one year old. To provide this evidence, each international applicant should follow these instructions:
a. If an applicant’s own money is to be used: In Part 2, Section 1 of the Financial Resources Statement, applicant’s bank must certify that the full amount of money is on deposit in his or her account to meet tuition and expenses.
b. If an applicant is sponsored by a family member or friend: The sponsor must agree to provide the money and sign the Financial Resources Statement in Part 2, Section 2. The sponsor’s bank must also certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of money the applicant will need for tuition and expenses.
c. If an applicant has been awarded a scholarship, Part 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must be completed.
Statements used for other institutions will not be accepted. Photocopied documents are not accepted unless signed by the originator; signatures must be original.
• copy of passport
Application Dates and Deadlines
Fall Semester
Allprofessionalprograms —March 15
PhD in Design and Planning—by March 1 to be considered for financial support
Spring Semester
All programs — October 1
(In architecture, urban design, and landscape architecture, students starting in the spring will only be able to select from a reduced set of courses, and will get on track starting the nextfall)
Applications received after these dates will be considered only if space is still available.
Confirmation Deposit
A non-refundabie confirmation deposit of $200 is required to secure an applicant’s place in the architecture and landscape architecture programs, and in the PhD program. The deposit is due at the time the applicant accepts the program’s offer of admission. The deposit will be applied to the first semester’s tuition when the student registers for classes.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
To request additional information, or to arrange a visit to the college, phone or e-mail:
Undergraduate Programs, 303-492-7711,
A8cP-Undergrad-info@carbonxudenver.edu
Graduate Professional Programs, 303-556-3382, A8cP-Grad-info@carbon.cudenver.edu
PhD Program, 303-492-7711, phddandp@spot.colorado.edu
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Architecture / 57
You may also write to:
Office of the Dean College of Architecture and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver, Campus Box 126, P.O. Box 173364, Denver, CO 80217-3364.
For periodical updates on all aspects of the college, see our website at http:IIutww. cudenver. edulAandPI.
ACADEMIC POLICIES Academic Standing
Students must maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in the graduate programs to remain in good standing and to graduate. If a student’s GPA falls below a 3.0, then he or she will be placed on academic probation beginning the following semester. If the GPA remains below a 3.0 after the probationary semester, then he or she may be dismissed from the college.
Appeals
Any student may appeal the grades he or she receives in a class. The student should first informally discuss the issue with the relevant faculty member and then with the department chair or program director. If the matter is not resolved this way, the student may initiate an appeal by writing to the faculty member outlining the reasons for the appeal. Copies are to be forwarded tq the department chair or program director and the dean. The faculty member must respond in writing to the student’s written appeal, with cjopies to the department chair or program director and the dean. An appeals committee consisting of three faculty members of the relevant acadenjiic program will review the written appeal. The chair of the appeals committee will convey its recommendation in writing to the student who has appealed, with copies to the instructor, the program chair or director, and (dean.
Attendance and Timeliness of Work
Students are expectjed to attend all meetings of classes. Excessive unexcused absences may result in a grade reduction at the discretion of the instructor. Absence from a class will be excused for verified medical reasons or for extreme personal emergencies. The student may be required to furnish evidence.
Students’ assignments are to be completed in a timely manner. Any assignment turned in late may have its grade reduced by an amount set at the discretion of th^ instructor. An assignment may be turned in late without penalty for verified medical reasons or for extreme personal emergencies. Students must have their instructor’s written permission to turn an assignment in late. Students with excused late work may turn in the assignment by the end of finals week without penalty. Otherwise, the grade “IF” or “Wl will be assigned at the discretion of the faculty.
Course Sequencing and Advancement
Programs in the co! lege are structured so that certain courses must be taken concurrently, others sequentially. Students will not be allowed to enroll in a course if its co-requisites or prerequisites have not been satisfied.
Originality of Work
Students must submit their own work. Where other sources are used in a student submission, they are to be clearly identified and referenced. The university considers plagiarism and similar acts of falsification to be a serious matter that may result in suspension or expulsion. Information on codes of conduct and grievance procedures are available from the University of Colorado at Denver’s Office of Enrollment and Student Affairs.
Retention of Student Work
The College of Architecture and Planning reserves the right to retain any student project submitted in fulfillment of class requirements for whatever period of time it deems necessary. This retained work is used to provide accrediting agencies with tangible evidence of performance, to serve as additional visual aid material in presentations to other students, and to contribute to possible educational exhibits requested by the university community and the general public.
PROGRAMS OF STUDY Architecture
Chair, Department of Architecture, Phillip Gallegos 303-556-3282 Assistant Chair, Undergraduate Architecture Pre-Professional
Program, Allen Harlow 303-492-7711
The architecture program’s mission is to lead in the discovery, communication, and application of knowledge in the discipline of architecture. The program aims to excel in the education of its students, in the research and creative endeavors of its faculty, and in service to the community. To respond to this mission, the program has developed a unique intellectual, educational, and architectural culture.
First of all, the program celebrates its place in a very special set of landscapes—urbanized Denver and the Front Range, and the spectacular natural landscape of the high plains and the Colorado Rockies. The architecture program therefore focuses not only on the design of buildings, but also on the interactions between buildings and their urban and natural settings.
Second, the program examines the interplay between architectural form and the complex cultural and technological context in which architects operate. As a result of these dominant concerns, the program has created an academic environment that is intellectually stimulating and educationally challenging, and that aims to educate students who will become leaders in the discipline and profession of architecture.
The Department of Architecture, along with the Department of Planning and Design, offers a Bachelor of Environmental Design (BEnvd) on the Boulder campus. The Department of Architecture also offers two graduate degrees on the Denver campus: the Master of Architecture (MArch) and the Master of Urban Design (MUD). The following statement from the National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is responsible for accrediting all architecture programs in the United States, should help a student choose the appropriate degree program:
“In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes two types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture and the Master of Architecture. A program may be granted a five-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on its degree of conformance with established educational standards.
“Master’s degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree, which when earned sequentially, comprise an accredited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree. The NAAB grants candidacy status to new programs that have developed viable plans for achieving initial accreditation. Candidacy status indicates that a program should be accredited within six years of achieving candidacy, if its plan is properly implemented.”
The pre-professional degree offered by the College of Architecture and Planning is the BEnvd. The professional degree offered by the college is the Master of Architecture (MArch), which is fully accredited by the NAAB.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 — 05


58 / College of Architecture and Planning
The Master of Architecture, the college’s accredited professional degree for students intending to seek licensure as architects, offers two distinct paths. One track, the MArch/4+2, is offered to students who have completed the college’s BEnvd or any other pre-professional design degree from any NAAB-accredited institution. A second track, the MArch/3.5, is available to students who have completed an unrelated undergraduate or graduate degree, or to students who hold professional architecture degrees from other countries, but who seek to obtain an NAAB-accredited architecture degree. Students holding professional architecture degrees from foreign institutions will be given advanced standing commensurate with their previous educational experiences.
“Master’s degree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree, which when earned sequentially, comprise an accredited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree. The NAAB grants candidacy status to new programs that have developed viable plans for achieving initial accreditation. Candidacy status indicates that a program should be accredited within six years of achieving candidacy, if its plan is properly implemented.”
THE MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE (MArch)
MArch/4+2
The MArch/4+2 is intended for students who have completed the college’s BEnvd or any other pre-professional architecture degree from any NAAB-accredited institution. This six-year plan of study, with completion of both the four-year undergraduate BEnvd offered on the Boulder campus and the accredited two-year MArch on the Denver campus of CU, has been fully endorsed by the NAAB.
Program Requirements
Students completing the college’s Bachelor of Environmental Design (BEnvd) on the Boulder campus—or completing a pre-professional degree from another NAAB-accredited institution—complete a minimum of four semesters of coursework (60 hours of credit) after entry into the MArch program. For further details on the BEnvd, and for descriptions of the pre-professional courses outlined below, see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog.
Students entering ENVD 3210 Arch Studio II must have the permission of the program chair.
Term by Term: Six-year MArch Curriculum Undergraduate Sequence
Four years at Boulder—30 credits per year (approx.), 120 total credits FIRST YEAR
Fall (15 credit hours)
ENVD 1004-6. ENVD 2003-3. UWRP 1150-3. Elective-3.
Intro to ENVD Ecology and Design Expository Writing Non-ENVD Elective
Spring (15 credit hours)
ENVD 2002-3. ENVD 2001-3. Social Science-3. Humanities-3. Elective-3.
ENVD Media
Intro to Social Factors in ENVD (see list of options)
(see list of options)
Non-ENVD Elective
YEAR TWO
Fall (16 credit hours)
ARCH 3114-3. ENVD 2110-6. MATH 1300-5. Elective-2.
History and Theories of Arch I Arch Studio I Calculus I
Non-ENVD Elective
Spring (14 credit hours)
ARCH 3214-3. ENVD 3001-3. PHYS 2010-5. Elective-3.
History and Theories of Arch II Environment and Behavior College Physics I ENVD Elective
YEAR THREE
Fall (15 credit hours)
AREN 4035-3. ENVD 3210-6. ENVD 3352-3. Elective-3.
Structures I Arch Studio II Arch Computer Media ENVD Elective (ending in ‘4’)
Spring (15 credit hours)
AREN 4045-3. Architectural Structures II
Elective-3. ENVD Elective (ending in ‘5’)
Electives-6. ENVD Electives
Elective-3. Non-ENVD Elective
YEAR FOUR
Fall (15 credit hours)
AREN 3050-3. ENVD 4310-6. ENVD 3115-3. Elective-3.
Environmental Systems I Arch Studio III
Building Materials and Systems ENVD Elective (ending in ‘2’)
Spring (15 credit hours)
ARCH 4314-3. AREN 3060-3. ENVD 4410-6. Elective-3.
Arch Theory
Environmental Systems II Arch. Studio IV ENVD Elective
Graduate Sequence
Two years at Denver—30 credits per year (approx.), 60 total credits FIFTH YEAR
Fall (15 credit hours)
ARCH 6150-4. Comprehensive Design Studio
ARCH 6151-2. Comprehensive Design Seminar
LA 6632-3. Site Planning
Electives-6.*
Spring (18 credit hours)
ARCH 5320-3. ARCH 6170-4. ARCH 6171-2. Electives-6.*
Build Construction and Methods
Advanced Design Studio
Advanced Design Seminar
(Take ARCH 6950-6. Thesis Preparation if
undertaking a thesis in the next semester.)
SIXTH YEAR
Fall (15 credit hours)
ARCH 5410-3. ARCH 6170-4. or
ARCH 6951 ARCH 6171-2.
Professional Practice Advanced Design Studio
Thesis (6)
Advanced Design Seminar or nothing if thesis taken
Electives-6.* (Take ARCH 6950-6. Thesis Preparation if
undertaking a thesis in the next semester.)
Spring (15 credit hours)
Electives-15*
* As of fall 1998, new students must take 9 credits each in cultural studies and professional studies, and 6 credits in technology studies (3 credits of which must emphasize the computer). The remaining 9 credits may be taken in any architecturally related electives on campus.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Post-Professional Programs / 59
MArch/3.5
The MArch/3.5 is intended for those students who have completed an unrelated undergnduate or graduate degree, or for students who hold professional architecture degrees from other countries. This three-and-one-half-year plan of study on the CU-Denver campus has been fully accredited by the NAAB.
Prerequisites
Students must complete the prerequisites of college-level trigonometry and physics before enrolling in ARCH 5310 Introduction to Building Technology. Since thjs class should be taken in the first semester in order to stay on track for graduation, students are strongly encouraged to complete the trigonometry and physics requirements before beginning the M.Arch. prograrrj.
ARCH 5000 Matfi and Physics for Architects is offered in the summer on a pass/fail basis. Tpis class meets the prerequisite requirements.
A Graphics Workshop is recommended for students who do not have a background in architectural drawing and model building. This class is offered each year before the beginning of the fall semester.
Students are also expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy, and should be familiar with PC or Apple operating systems.
Program Requirements
Students with a bachelors or master’s degree unrelated to architecture must complete a seven- or eight-semester sequence of coursework and accumulate a minimum of 114 semester hours of credit. Advanced standing will be giveii to students who have completed a non-NAAB-accredited professional architecture degree in another country, and who wish to obtain the NAAB-accredited degree from this college. These students will work with the chair of the department to develop an individualized plan of study commensurate with their previous degrees and experience, and skill have to complete at least 60 hours of credit in residence within the ((College of Architecture and Planning.
Course Sequence
The M.Arch. program is divided into five major components: design studies, 45 credit hours; cultural studies, 12 credit hours; technology studies, 18 credit hours; professional studies, 6 credit hours; and electives, 33 credit hours. A wide array of electives in these areas allows students to tailor their graduate studies to their own interests.
FIRST YEAR
Fall Semester (1$ credit hours)
ARCH 5110-6. ARCH 5111-3. ARCH 5210-3.! ARCH 5310-3.!
Design Studio I Design Seminar I Introduction to Architecture Introduction to Building Technology
Spring Semester
(18 credit hours)
ARCH 5120-4. ARCH 5121-2. ARCH 5220-3. ARCH 5320-3. LA 6632-3. Elective-3.*
Design Studio II Design Seminar II History of Architecture I Building Construction and Methods Site Planning
SECOND YEAR
Fall Semester (18 credit hours)
ARCH 5130-4. ARCH 5131-2. ARCH 5230-3. ARCH 5240-3. ARCH 5330-3. Elective-3.*
Design Studio III Design Seminar III History of Architecture II Human Factors in Design Environmental Control Systems I
Spring Semester (18 credit hours)
ARCH 5140-4. ARCH 5141-2. ARCH 5340-3. ARCH 5350-3. ARCH 5410-3. Elective-3.*
Design Studio IV Design Seminar IV Environmental Control Systems II Structures I Professional Practice
Summer Semester (12 credit hours)
ARCH 6150-4. Comprehensive Design Studio
ARCH 6151-2. Comprehensive Design Seminar
Electives-6.*
THIRD YEAR
Fall Semester (18 credit hours)
ARCH 5360-3. ARCH 6170-4. ARCH 6171-2. Electives-9.* or
ARCH 6950-6.
Structures II
Advanced Design Studio Advanced Design Seminar
Thesis Preparation and Electives-3.
Spring Semester (15 credit hours)
ARCH 6170-4. Advanced Design Studio
ARCH 6171-2. Advanced Design Seminar
Electives-9.*
or:
ARCH 6951-6. Thesis
Electives-9.*
* Students must take 9 elective credits in cultural studies, 9 elective credits in professional studies, 6 elective credits in technology studies (3 credits of which must emphasize the computer), and 9 elective credits in any architecturally related electives on campus.
POST-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS The Post-Professional Program
The Post-Professional Degree Program is a mid-career, post-professional intensive course for those individuals in the design fields who seek to expand their knowledge and to advance their professional careers. In this program, students have the opportunity to study recent developments in their design fields resulting from advances in information technology, new theories and methods, and emergent discoveries and associations. The program currently offers two primary areas of study, the Master of Architecture II and the Master of Urban Design degree programs. Each of these programs has a research orientation and agenda, and their general intent is to create an educational context within which the fundamental practices of architecture and urbanism can be examined, advanced, and extended. The programs have been designed to be both flexible and interdisciplinary so as to provide students with a broad range of options that can accommodate and respond to each students own interests and study agenda through coursework, independent study, or optional training.
Post-Professional Program: The Master of Architecture II
The Master of Architecture II is an advanced degree program that provides its students with a range of opportunities for exploring and extending their knowledge of the practice of architecture. Students applyingfor admission to the program must have been awarded a five-year or six-year first-professional degree in architecture. They may enter the Master of Architecture II program in any semester of the academic year.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


60 / College of Architecture and Planning
The Master of Architecture IIprogram does not offer an NAAB first-professional degree; it is an advanced studies program for those who already hold this first-professional degree.
Students in the program must complete 30 hours of credit in required, recommended, and elective coursework to qualify for the Master of Architecture II degree. To be eligible for graduation from the program, students must complete 12 credit hours of advanced design studio (ARCH 6150/6151 or UD 6600/6601) in the degree project sequence and 12 credit hours in required and/or focus-area coursework particular to their area of study. The remaining 6 credit hours are elective coursework. A typical sequence of coursework within a focus area leading to the award of the Master of Architecture II degree is as follows:
SEMESTER ONE
Design Studio: 6 credits
Focus-area required/recommended coursework: 6 credits Elective coursework: 3 credits
courses. Core themes, theories, precedents, technologies, and skills of the profession are developed in the lecture and seminar courses. Curriculum integration is achieved through deliberate internal coordination efforts and collaboration with other programs within the college as well as other CU-Denver colleges and schools. The curriculum provides opportunities that facilitate the offering and testing of new courses, which respond to timely interests of faculty and students.
Professional practitioners representing consulting firms and governmental agencies of regional, national, and international distinction share in and contribute to the life of the program. They teach courses, participate in reviews, host internships and office visits, give presentations, exhibit their works, and mentor with students and faculty.
Successful graduates pursue diverse practices in public and private arenas, and make positive differences in the quality of our environment.
MASTER OF LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE (MIA)
SEMESTER TWO
Design Studio: 6 credits
Focus-area required/recommended coursework: 6 credits Elective coursework: 3 credits
Dual Degree Option
Students may enroll in a dual degree program with Landscape Architecture (M.Arch. and M.L.A.).
Landscape Architecture
Chair, Department of Landscape Architecture, Gene Bressler 303-556-3382
The mission of the landscape architecture program is to explore design as the means to engage a range of evolving interactions between the ethics, places, and methods of landscape intervention and transformation. Our studies focus on compelling issues inherent to the urban, suburban, rural, and wilderness environments of the Rocky Mountain region. The insights and possibilities generated from these local studies provide an understanding of landscape design that is transferable at many scales and to other lands and cultures.
Specific objectives of the landscape architecture program are:
1. to develop excellence in the design process and design: exploring the strategies, methods, and skills to study, synthesize, experiment with, make, and evaluate design precedents, landscape design, and design processes
2. to learn and extend core themes of the profession that include landscape architectural theory and precedents, technologies and materials, natural and cultural systems, and communications and inquiry media: studying the means to inform and develop one’s ideas, to convey one’s values, and to criticize one’s work
3. to provide a working knowledge of the institutional framework within which the design process occurs: building a strong understanding of and the skills required in professional practice, including management, leadership, marketing, ethical conduct, and legal issues
4. to engage service in ways that apply and integrate coursework, research, and creative works to real world situations—participating with and involving others in opportunities to implement, enhance, demonstrate, communicate, and evaluate ideas and skills—and that provide measurable benefits.
We aim to link theory with practice, history with change, technology with invention, and designers with their constituents.
The curriculum prepares students for landscape architectural practice and research as presently known, and provides the setting to question, invent, test, and advance knowledge and capability of the profession.
It consists of sequential and integrated design studios, core lecture and seminar courses, and elective opportunities, including a professional internship. Students develop capabilities in design within studio
Prerequisites
Students are expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy. A graphics workshop is recommended for students who do not have a background in drawing and model building. The workshop is scheduled each year before the beginning of the fall semester.
Program Requirements
The landscape architecture program offers professional and advanced professional graduate degree curricula leading to the degree Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA). The first-professional degree program, requiring a six-semester sequence of coursework totaling 90 credit hours, is fully accredited by the Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board (LAAB) and recognized by the Council of Educators in Landscape Architecture (CELA). Students completing the college’s Bachelor of Environmental Design on the Boulder campus—or completing an undergraduate design degree at another institution—are given advanced standing in the three-year program and must complete at least 65 semester hours of credit. The advanced professional degree program, for qualified students having already earned a first professional degree in landscape architecture or related discipline, requires 48 credit hours. Advanced standing may be commensurate with prior academic accomplishment.
Course Sequence (90-credit MLA for students without a professional degree in landscape architecture or related profession.)
The curriculum consists of core and elective coursework. Core courses are grouped into six components: design studies, 36 credit hours; history and theory, 12 credit hours including 3 elective credit hours; landscape architectural technology, 14 credit hours including 3 elective credit hours; plants, 6 credit hours; and media, 4 credit hours; totaling 72 credit hours. The remaining semester credit hours are for additional elective courses.
Typical 90-credit-hour program of study in required courses for the first professional MLA degree
FIRST YEAR
Fall Semester—15 credit hours
LA 5500-6.
LA 5510-3. LA 5521-3. LA 5572-3.
Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio I
Graphic Media in Landscape Architecture History of Landscape Architecture Landscape Ecology
Spring Semester—15 credit hours
LA 5501-6.
LA 5521-3. LA 6631-3.
LA 6632-3.
Introduction to Landscape Architectural Design Studio II
History of Landscape Architecture Landscape Construction Materials & Methods Site Planning
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Landscape Architecture / 61
LA 6641-3. Elective-3.
SECOND YEAR
Fall Semester—15 credit hours
Landscape Architecture Computer Applications
Landform Manipulation
Landscape Architectural Design Studio III
Plants in Design
-15 credit hours
Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV Landscape Architecture Theory & Criticism
15 credit hours
Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio V
-15 credit hours
Professional Practice Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio VI Regionalism
LA 5332-3.
LA 6600-6.
LA 6670-3.
Elective-3.
Spring Semester4
LA 6601-6.
LA 6640-3.
Elective-6.
THIRD YEAR
Fall Semester-
LA 6700-6.
Electives-9.
Spring Semester -
ARCH 5410-3.
LA 6701-6.
LA 6721-3.
Electives-3.
Course Sequence (4$-hour MLA for students with a professional degree in landscape architecture or related disciplines)
This route require^ 48 credit hours and typically two years of fulltime study. The core curriculum consists of two groups: design, 30 credit hours; history and theory, 12 credit hours, for a total of 42 credit hours; plus 6 credit hours of electives. The program director will advise each student engaged in this program of study.
Concentration Areas
The curriculum de(ivers required courses that enable students to learn and develop core therjies of the profession inclusive of LAAB standards, with emphasis placed on studying the means to develop one’s ideas, to convey one’s values, arjd to criticize one’s work. In addition, the curriculum offers four concentration areas from which to choose elective courses offered by the program and other units within the college and university in order to explore advanced topics, challenge normative paradigms, and develop new knowledge and capabilities. Majors from other areas are invited to enroll in landscape architecture electives.
Areas of Concentration Urban Design
Advanced Landscape Architectural Technologies Landscape Planning' and Management History, Theory, and Criticism
These broadly defined areas of concentration reflect topics and issues related to the program’s location and context in Denver and its larger metropolitan and regional contexts. They also reflect faculty interests and resources available from within the college, university, and area. Students may pursue one or more concentrations within the required 24 elective hours, of which 18 are non-group related. Students are encouraged to consult with their assigned faculty advisor or other mentors as they make their decisions. (Note: 6 elective credit hours are to fulfill requirements in each of landscape architectural technologies and history and theory group.)
Urban Design
Denver, the surrounding metropolitan areas, and the newly emerging urban areas within the greater region provide limitless issues, topics, and situations fueling interests in urban design. The field of urban design is complex and crosses many disciplines, including architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, real estate development, law, engineering, and the social sciences. Students interested in this concentration are urged to seek and enroll in courses that provide:
• an analytical understanding of the urban/built environment
• the understanding and skills from which to develop, synthesize, create, and test responsive implementation strategies
Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to:
Urban Transportation Planning
Special Topics: Open Space in Urban Design
Landscape Architecture Internship
(requires pre-approval by advisor/director)
City and Region
Architecture of the City
The City as an Artifact
Special Topics in Urban Design
Urban Spatial Analysis
Urban Form Theory
Preservation Theory and Practice
History of American City Building
Urban Market Analysis
Urban Economic Development
Urban Housing
CE 5622-3.
LA 6686-3.
LA 6930-3.
SOC 4230-3.
UD 6620-3.
UD 6621-3.
UD 6686-3.
URP 5520-3.
URP 6633-3.
URP 6634-3.
URP 6635-3.
URP 6665-3.
URP 6670-3.
URP 6676-3.
Advanced Landscape Architectural Technologies
Many students will work within a variety of venues involving built works. Familiarity competence, and interest in learning, using, evaluating, and developing existing and new technologies are compelling. These technologies include computer applications, design-build/learn by building, materials, and construction processes. Students interested in expanding their knowledge, skills, and future applications of technologies are encouraged to seek and enroll in courses that provide them with:
• significant exposure and facility with applied technologies
• appreciation for the value, strengths, weaknesses, and potential of the technologies to develop, implement, and evaluate their design works
Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to:
ARCH 5310-3. Introduction to Building Technology ARCH 6390-3. Special Topics in Technology ARCH 6410-3. Computer Graphics
ARCH 6411 -3. Computer Applications in Practice LA 6641-3. Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture LA 6686-3. Special Topics: Advanced Landscape Architectural Technologies
LA 6686-3. Special Topics: Computer Applications (VARIES) LA 6930-3. Landscape Architecture Internship
URP 6612-3. GIS for Planners
Landscape Planning and Management
Landscape planning is an area in which landscape architects play an increasing and vital role, particularly in this region, resulting from pressures to develop non-urbanized or undeveloped lands and to develop and manage public lands. Study within this concentration area addresses development and advancing knowledge and capability of the profession in:
• ecological systems
• urban and regional growth
• land use
• real estate development and finance
• environmental impact assessment
• planning and development processes
CU-Denver Catalog2004 — 05


62 / College of Architecture and Planning
Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are
not limited to:
LA 6622-3. Visual Quality Analysis
LA 6641-3. Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture
LA 6930-3. Landscape Architecture Internship
URP 5530-3. Planning Law
URP 6612-3. GIS for Planners
URP 6640-3. Community Development Process
URP 6641-3. Social Planning
URP 6642-3. Neighborhood Planning
URP 6650-3. Environmental Planning II: Policy and Law
URP 6651-3. Environmental Impact Assessment
URP 6652-3. Growth Management
URP 6653-3. Natural Resource Management and Planning
URP 6660-3. Real Estate Development Process
URP 6661-3. Real Estate Development Finance
URP 6664-3. Fiscal Impact Analysis
URP 6671-3. Regional Economic Development
URP 6673-3. Transportation Planning I: Transport Network Analysis
History, Theory, and Criticism
Advanced study in history, theory, and criticism of design is fundamental to the landscape architect’s knowledge of the built environment, the intellectual forces that create it, and the theoretical construct of historic precedents in design influencing decisions.
Advancing knowledge and capability of the profession in this area of concentration is compelling and serves:
• to better inform designers eager to learn, generate, and develop ideas, and arrive at critical judgments about the worth of these ideas
• to enhance and inform one’s perspective in a context of economic boom where new development is flourishing
Courses available to landscape architecture students include, but are not limited to:
ARCH 5230-3. ARCH 6161-3. ARCH 6210-3. ARCH 6212-3. ARCH 6220-3. ARCH 6221-3. ARCH 6910-3. LA 6686-3.
LA 6686-3.
LA 6686-3.
LA 6686-3.
LA 6686-3.
LA 6686-3.
LA 6930-3.
History of Architecture II Precedents in Architecture History of American Architecture History of Modern Architecture History of Architectural Theory Post-Structuralist Architecture Teaching Assistantship
Special Topic: Architecture and the Landscape —
Exploration in Boundary
Special Topic: Contemporary Theories and
Criticism of Landscape Architecture
Special Topic: Landscape Architectural History
Special Topic: Modernism in Landscape Architecture
Special Topic: Open Space in Urban Design
Special Topic: Representations of Landscape
Architecture
Landscape Architecture Internship
Dual Degree Option
Students may enroll in a dual degree program with Architecture (MLA andMArch).
Urban and Regional Planning
Chair, Department of Planning and Design, Dwayne Nuzum 303-556-3382
Urban and regional planners in the United States and other countries seek to identify social needs and environmental capacities, anticipate change and its impact on communities, shape the pattern of human setdements, provide essential infrastructure, maintain viable economies, and achieve and preserve sustainable communities that are suitably fit to their natural surroundings. Study in planning considers how social
needs are legitimated, knowledge about communities and regions is compiled and analyzed, possible courses of action are evaluated, plans are formulated, implementation is transacted through the means of education, investment, negotiation and regulation, and how plans’ consequences are tracked over time.
These tasks require a high order of ability: to amass and manipulate information, to represent and model essential phenomena and processes, to simulate futures, and to judge outcomes having diverse dimensions. They also require the ability to portray and communicate key concepts, diagnoses, and actions, and to harness knowledge about all the key actors on the scene in order to understand their needs, motives, and possible responses to the public actions that plans provoke. Underlying these classes of abilities is a base of knowledge that easily overreaches the bounds of any one discipline.
Planners must understand theories regarding urban and regional process, concepts of presentation, communication and negotiation, technologies for the depiction and manipulation of spatial information, means by which to document, judge, and forecast change in urban systems, private economic motives and constraints, the behavioral inclinations of all the major classes of players on the urban scene, the mesh of laws that empower planning and govern private action, and the broader political economy of regional systems.
Needless to say, the education of planners can only begin in the university. It must be a life-long pursuit, and planning programs, including this one, are becoming increasingly supportive of the continuing education needs of professionals. It is the intellectual excitement of this ongoing pursuit of knowledge that draws many to the field.
The Department of Planning and Design, along with the Department of Architecture, offers a Bachelor of Environmental Design (BEnvd) degree on the Boulder campus. The Department of Planning and Design also offers the Master of Urban and Regional Planning (MURP) graduate degree on the Denver campus. The Master of Urban and Regional Planning is fully accredited by the national Planning Accreditation Board, and prepares students for professional careers in planning and for further study.
For further details on the BEnvd, see the University of Colorado at Boulder catalog. Additional details about the master’s program follow.
THE MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (MURP)
Prerequisites
Students are expected to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy, and should be familiar with PC or Apple operating systems.
A graphics workshop is recommended for students who do not have a background in drawing and model building. The workshop is scheduled each year before the beginning of the fall semester.
Program Requirements
The Master of Urban and Regional Planning is the college’s accredited degree for students intending to practice as planners. With no advanced standing, candidates for the MURP degree must complete a minimum of 51 credit hours of graduate work, including all core courses (27 credit hours), a concentration (15 credit hours minimum), and additional electives (9 credit hours). Entering students who have engaged in the study or practice of planning elsewhere may petition the faculty during their initial semester to determine whether any credit will be awarded or degree requirements relaxed as a result of these prior activities. A maximum of 27 credits of coursework can be applied for advanced standing.
Students who receive the college’s Bachelor of Environmental Design (BEnvd) degree on the Boulder campus and who have maintained a GPA of at least 3.0 will be admitted to the MURP with advanced standing. These students can earn the MURP degree after completing a minimum of 42 credit hours, which will include the core courses and an approved concentration. Students holding the college’s BEnvd degree who also completed the undergraduate planning option with a GPA of
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


PhD in Design and Planning / 63
at least 3.0 (and with Studio III) will, in addi Planning Studio I. Tf i completion of a minii of core courses and all above conditions for graduated from the o years. Those who gra< discretion of the head planning, in consultai i
Core Courses
URP 5501-3. Plai
URP 5510-3. Plju
URP 5511-3.
URP 5520-3.
URP 5530-3.
URP 6630-6.
URP 6631-6.
A thesis option URP 6951, Thesis) is e adva:
Plju
Ui
Pli
Plji
Pla
(Uil
in pursuing more fields. Thesis work will
grade of at least 3.0 in ENVD 4320, Planning ition, receive a waiver with credit for URP 6630, ese students will earn the MURP degree upon i|num of 36 credit hours, including 21 credit hours requirements for an approved concentration. The dvanced standing apply only to students who c liege’s undergraduate program within the last five r uated earlier may receive advanced standing at the of the graduate program in urban and regional ion with program faculty.
nning Issues and Processes nning Methods I nning Methods II i ban Spatial Analysis nning Law nning Studio I nning Studio II
P 6950, Thesis Research and Programming, and available primarily for students who are interested need academic training in planning or related substitute for Studio II.
Course Sequence
FIRST YEAR
Fall Semester (12 credit hours)
URP 5501-3. Planning Issues and Processes
URP 5510-3. Planning Methods I
URP 5530-3. Planning Law
Elective-3 credits.
Spring Semester (12 credit hours)
URP 5511-3. Planning Methods II
URP 5520-3. Urban Spatial Analysis
URP 6630-6. Planning Studio I
SECOND YEAR
Fall Semester (15 credit hours)
Concentration Courses—9 credits Electives-6 credits.
Spring Semester (12 credit hours)
URP6631-6. Planning Studio II
Concentration Courses—6 credits
Areas of Concentration
The concentration! and elective courses enable students to explore in depth an area of special interest. Students should, however, build on the expertise that they alre tdy possess. This can be done by either focusing on a related specialty, or by increased specialization in a previously acquired area of expertise. The urogram supports four official concentrations:
(1) physical planning, (2) environmental planning, (3) economic development planning, and (4) urban design. A set of foundation courses is identified in each concentration, plus additional supporting electives.
Physical Planning Concentration: Physical planning addresses the spatial arrangement o: the environment, from the scale of the project to the scale of the region, and its fitness for human activities. Physical planners establish the policy and regulatory context for design development, practicing as land use or comprehensive planners, or in specialties such as preservation, transportation or open space planning, real estate development, and urban design.
Environ men ta l Plan n i ng Concentration: All urban and regional planning actions imp; ct the environment in some manner, and environmental planne rs must manage these impacts, both pro-actively and re-actively. The er vironmental planning concentration introduces planners to the policy and legislative issues surrounding the environmental implications o: planning actions, as well as to methods for their assessment, control, ai id mitigation.
Economic Development Planning Concentration: Economic development aims to : mass within communities and regions the resources—jobs, capi :al, tax base—needed to sustain or improve the quality of life and insu e opportunities for all within the private economy, facilitated through appropriate public actions and services. Planners foster economic chanj ;e as diagnosticians, strategists, and promoters, gauge growth’s effect i l light of environmental capacities, manage its social benefits, mitigat: its negative consequences, and fashion its imprint on the physical landscipe of localities, regions, states, and nations. Students pursuing this concentration should seek as well to become conversant with the essentials of physical or environmental planning.
Urban Design Concentration: Planners are called upon with increasing frequency 11 organize spaces at a scale greater than that of a building site, but ess than that of an entire community. This concentration provides the essential abilities needed to contribute to the development of these intermediate-scale spaces. Among these are skills in spatial analyst;, design synthesis, real estate finance, and graphic expression. In additioiji to the four official concentrations, students have the choice of defi|ning their own concentration.
DUAL DEGREE OPTIONS
Students may also enroll in dual degree programs with public administration (MPA-MURP), law (JD), and business (MBA). In addition, dual degree options are also available combining the MURP with landscape architecture (MLA) and architecture (MArch).
Students may also take up to 6 credits of independent study, after first assembling a plan of study with one of the regular faculty. Up to 3 credits of internship may be applied to the 51-credit program.
PhD in Design and Planning
Program Director, Willem Van Vliet, 303-492-5015
The Department of Architecture, the Department of Planning and Design, and the Department of Landscape Architecture share the idea that the complex problems of the built environment are best addressed through collaboration among the various design and planning disciplines, and through developing bodies of knowledge about the built environment. To further these ends, the departments and program jointly offer the advanced research degree, the PhD in Design and Planning.
The college’s interdisciplinary doctoral program examines the complex factors that help shape the planned and constructed environment. The program offers three areas of specialization:
1. Land Use and Environmental Planning and Design
Work in this area focuses on purposeful intervention in the physical environment, including mechanisms and procedures such as land use controls, design review processes and standards, and environmental policies. It also deals with the planning and design of housing, neighborhoods, cities, regions, and the interrelationships among residential, economic, recreational, and transportation systems.
2. Design and Planning Processes and Practices
Work in this area focuses on the theory and methods of planning and design and the development of models and tools to understand and support decision processes and design practices. This area of specialization also includes the examination of practice-related issues such as the development of alternative and appropriate building technologies, energy-efficient designs, manufactured housing, and the design/build process.
3. History, Theory, and Criticism of the Environment
Work in this area involves critical analysis of architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, and planning, and of the theories,
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


64 / College of Architecture and Planning
processes, and policies that have regulated these fields. Whether focusing on contemporary or past environments, the aim is to understand and explain them in relation to individual and cultural values, and in their cultural and technological contexts.
Prerequisites
Applicants must hold at least a bachelors degree, although most will have also completed a master’s degree. Field specialization and background are open, and may include architecture, landscape architecture, architectural engineering, urban design, geography, urban economics, environmental law, urban sociology, real estate, management science, computer science, public administration, or environmental psychology. A successful applicant will have an undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.0 (out of a possible 4 points), and a graduate grade point average of 3.5 or better.
If students do not hold a professional or a pre-professional degree in a design or planning field, they will have to complete 12 hours of upper-level undergraduate coursework in the College of Architecture and Planning. They will have to obtain in each of these courses a grade of B or higher. These courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor, and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program.
A student must have completed 12 hours in an undergraduate program in one of the following prerequisites. The one that applies will depend upon the student’s intended area of specialization. In exceptional cases, a student may complete this requirement by taking additional undergraduate courses and gaining a grade of B or higher in each course. The courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor, and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program. They may count toward fulfilling the degree requirements.
• Social and Behavioral Sciences
• Environmental and Natural Sciences
• Engineering
• Humanities
A student must also have completed one of the following prerequisites. The one that applies will depend upon the student’s intended area of specialization. In exceptional cases, a student may complete this requirement by taking additional undergraduate courses and gaining a grade of B or higher in each of these courses. The courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student’s faculty advisor, and are to be completed within two years of admission to the program. They may count toward fulfilling the degree requirements.
• Statistics. Including probability theory, parametric and nonparametric methods, and acquaintance with basic multivariate techniques. A minimum of 3 hours.
• Mathematics. Including differential equations, finite mathematics, algor data structures, or other appropriate courses. A minimum of 3 hours.
• Language. Ability to read at least one foreign language relevant to the intended dissertation.
• Computer. Background in computer-aided design (CAD) or geographic information systems (GIS). A minimum of 3 hours.
The applicability of a student’s prior coursework will be decided by the graduate studies committee upon review of a student’s transcript and additional materials. If the student does not have the requisite educational background, grade point average, or GRE scores, the student may be admitted on a conditional or provisional basis, and additional coursework may be required in accordance with Graduate School rules.
Program Requirements
The PhD requires 76 credit hours. Up to 18 transfer credits may be approved for students admitted with a master’s degree. Students in the program will also have to meet the academic residency requirement, which requires six semesters of scholarly work beyond the attainment of an acceptable bachelor’s degree. Two semesters of residence credit
may be allowed for a master’s degree from another institution of approved standing. However, at least four semesters of resident credit, two of which must be consecutive in one academic year, must be earned for work taken at this university. Completion of the program therefore takes 3 or 4 years, depending on prior coursework.
The PhD program has five components: (1) Core Curriculum, (2) Research Specialization, (3) Minor Field of Study, (4) Electives, and (5) Dissertation. The Core of 10 hours consists of seminars and colloquia on the theories and research methods in the fields of design and planning. All students, no matter what their specialization, must take the core in the first two years of their residence. For the Research Specialization, each student must take at least 12 hours of coursework in one of the program’s three specialization areas; i.e., land use and environmental planning and design; design and planning processes and practices; and history, theory, and criticism of the built environment. One of the courses must be an advanced methods class. The Minor Field of Study provides students with a strong background that supports their chosen research emphasis. It requires completion of at least 12 hours of related coursework that provides in-depth knowledge in a relevant area.
Elective coursework consists of 12 hours of additional study in areas related to the dissertation topic. For the research specialization, the minor field of study, and the electives, students develop an individualized course of study to reflect their specific foci and career aspirations. The required coursework is determined jointly by the student, the faculty advisor, and committee members. The Dissertation requires 30 hours of coursework. Students are expected to define a research question in planning and design, to identify the research strategy to be used for answering this question, to conduct the research, and to write up the project in the form of a dissertation. A student is guided in this process by a dissertation advisor, and by the additional members who compose the student’s dissertation committee.
Students must register for a minimum of 5 dissertation credits each semester of their dissertation work. If unable to register for at least 5 credits, they must request a leave of absence from the PhD program until able to complete the minimum dissertation requirement. Students may take up to a year’s leave of absence before they are disenrolled from the program.
Evaluations and Examinations
Successful candidates for the PhD in Design and Planning pass four points of evaluation: (1) Preliminary Exam, (2) Comprehensive Exam, (3) Doctoral Dissertation, and (4) Final Exam. By the end of the first semester of residence, the student devises a degree plan, which is approved by the graduate studies committee. A Preliminary Exam then evaluates the student’s initial progress through the program. The Comprehensive Exam is an examination based on papers prepared by the candidate that survey the literature of the field and that set out a proposed dissertation. This exam takes place after two semesters of residency, and before the student becomes a candidate for the PhD degree.
After advancement to candidacy, the student prepares a Doctoral Dissertation, which offers original research in the student’s chosen field. When the college’s dissertation committee approves the final dissertation submission, it conducts a Final Exam based on the student’s research. This exam is open to the public.
Course Sequence
FIRST YEAR
Students develop their degree plan, take 5 semester hours of the required core curriculum, take additional courses in their specialty area, make up any prerequisite courses, and take the preliminary exam.
SECOND YEAR
Students take the remaining core courses, continue to take electives in their minor and specialty areas, begin literature surveys, and prepare for their comprehensive exam.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 — 05


Master of Ur ban Design / 65
THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR
Students complete their literature surveys, prepare a dissertation proposal, and take the comprehensive exam. After completion of the comprehensive exam, the rest of the third and fourth years is spent researching and writing the dissertation. Once the dissertation has been accepted, students take the final exam.
Master of Urban Design
Program Information, Dwayne Nuzum 303-556-3382
The Master of Urb^n Design is an interdisciplinary advanced degree program in which students articulate issues that integrate the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, transportation, real estate, and political affairs. The mission is to address the total realm of urbanization through research, collaboration and leadership development within the inclusive “public domain.” The program makes full use of its setting in the cor|e of downtown Denver, and explores the evolving environments of settlements, villages, towns, cities, metropolises, and megalopolises in Colorado as wide ranging planning laboratories for the studio-based projects cjr thesis studies. The urban design problem-solving opportunities are further enhanced by the extensive public-private connections the college has established throughout a rapidly growing state.
There are three general plans of study: 1) a 30-credit-hour program for students who have received a five- or six-year professional degree in architecture, landscape architecture, or planning (i.e. BArch, MArch, MLA, MURP); 2) for international students, a four-year accredited professional degree and other accepted qualifications would permit entry into a modified one-calendar-year long program that requires 39 credit hours for graduation; B) a 66-credit-hour program, including 6 hours of summer internship, is also available for students who hold a pre-professional (non-accredited design) degree; 4) for students from all other undergraduate degree programs, a customized three-year curriculum of 96 credit hours is required including an internship component of 6 credit hours during one summer. In all cases fall semester is the preferred entry time.
The emphases of the urban design degree focuses on three primary concerns that affect both horizontal and vertical developments in tactical and strategic timeframes:
I. history and theory of urbanization in the inclusive public domain
II. systems and processes used in the making of the urbanized public domain
III. designing the urbaji public domain
The ultimate goal of the program is to educate students to be effective in the public domain as problem originators, venture designers, idea linkers, and decision makers. These urban design degree graduates through creative problem solving, management, advocacy, and implementation can achieve! outstanding ends in the professional, public, and development process.
Course Sequence
(30 credit hours with professional degrees)
Semester One (15 credit hours)
I. History, Theory
URP 6633-3. I Urban Form Theory
II. Systems, Processes
URP6651-3 Environmental Impact Assessment
URP 6660-3 Real Estate Development Process
III. Design*
UD 6600-6 ! Transformation Decomposition Studio
(integrated team-taught course)
This course is being revised to be as follows:
Urbanization Transformation Studio—4 cr.
Urbanization Methodologies Seminar—2 cr.
Semester Two (15 credit hours)
I. History, Theory
Elective 3-6. History, Theory Selected List
II. Systems, Processes
UD 6686-3. ST: Urban Design Seminar
Elective-3. Systems, Processes Selected List
III. Design*
UD 6601 -6. Composition Studio
This course is being revised to be as follows:
Interdisciplinary Studio—6 cr.
*Summer Options
a) Complete thesis commitment begun in semester one with prior approval of subject and three-semester sequence of (1) thesis prep, (2) research and conceptual stages, (3) final documentation completion. This selected thesis sequence is an adjustment of the one-year or the last-year course progression. After the advisor and student have agreement on the thesis subject, the study sequence is then modified.
First semester (third or fifth semester):
Substitute thesis prep and an integrated thesis seminar course for the design course.
Second semester (fourth or sixth semester):
The studio content combines thesis research transitioning into concept-schematic design scenarios.
Summer semester is a combination of interrelated independent study and thesis studio conclusion courses.
Note: To pursue the thesis option, written and phone subject proposals must be completed with the advisor before enrollment.
b) Skip spring selected elective (6 hours) for overseas study (6 hours)
c) Summer internships and/or third studio
Course Sequence
(66 credit hours with only pre-professional degrees)
Semester One (15 credit hours)
I. History, Theory
URP 6633-3. Urban Form Theory
II. Systems, Processes
LA 6632-3. Site Planning
URP 6651 -3. Environmental Impact Assessment
III. Design
URP 6630-6. Planning Studio I
Semester Two (15 credit hours) I. History, Theory
ARCH 6220-3.
LA 6620-3.
II. Systems, Processes LA 5572-3.
III. Design URP 6631-3.
History of Architectural Theory LA Theory and Criticism
Landscape Ecology
Planning Studio II
Semester Three (summer 6credit hours)
II. Systems, Processes
UD 6840-6. Independent Study
(internship or overseas study for 6 hours)
Semester Four (15 credit hours)
I. History, Theory
URP 6670-3. Urban Economic Development
II. Systems Processes
UD 6686-3. ST: Urban Design Seminar
URP 6660-3. Real Estate Development
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


66 / College of Architecture and Planning
III. Design*
UD 6600-6. Transformation Decomposition Studio
(integrated team-taught course)
This course is being revised to be as follows:
Urbanization Transformation Studio—4 cr.
Urbanization Methodologies Seminar—2 cr.
Semester Five (15 credit hours)
I. History, Theory
Electives 3-6. History, Theory Selected List
II. Systems, Processes
Electives 3-6. Systems, Processes Selected List
III. Design*
UD 6601-6. Composition Studio
This course is being revised to be as follows:
Interdisciplinary Studio—6 cr.
* see one-year summer options above
Selected Electives
Recommended History, Theory (I)
ARCH 5220-3. History of Architecture I ARCH 5230-3. History of Architecture II ARCH 6220-3. History of Architectural Theory ENVD 4233-3. Environmental Aesthetics L A 5521-3. History of Landscape Architecture L A 6620-3. LA Theory and Criticism URP 6635-3. History of American City Building
System, Processes (II)
L A 5572-3. Landscape Ecology
L A 6632-3. Site Planning
URP 5530-3. Planning Law
URP 6661 -3. Real Estate Development and Finance
URP 6673-3. Transportation Planning I: Transport Network Analysis
URP 6686-3. ST: Design Review
Suggested
History, Theory (I)
ARCH 6161-3. Precedents in Architecture
LA 6686-3. Special Topics in LA
URP 6670-3. Urban Economic Development
System, Processes (II)
ARCH 5240-3. Human Factors in Design ARCH 6410-3. Computer Graphics
LA 6686-3. Special Topics in LA
URP 6612-3. Geographic Information Systems for Planners
URP 6664-3. Fiscal Impact Analysis
URP 6665-3. Urban Market Analysis
URP 6674-3. Transportation Planning II:
Urban Transportation Planning
Graduate Certificate in Historic Preservation
The College of Architecture and Planning together with the Department of History in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences offers a graduate certificate in Historic Preservation. The certificate can be earned as part of an MArch, MLA, MURP, or an MA in History. It requires a total of 18 credit hours.
Two preservation courses are required:
HIST 5232-3. Historic Preservation
URP 6634-3. Preservation Theory and Practice
These are core courses on preservation theory and practice from the architect and planner’s perspective of intervening through design and regulation and from the historian’s perspective of how the past might guide the future.
A thesis or studio (6 cr.) is required.
Students choose their remaining courses from a selection in the following categories:
• History of Architecture, Landscape Architecture, or Historic Places
(3 cr.)
• Preservation Methods (3 cr.), including Preservation Technology,
Documentation of Sites and Structures, Visual Research Methods,
and other subjects
Students are encouraged but not required to take an internship in preservation.
Preservation certificate students work out with their advisor a selection of courses appropriate to their needs and the requirements of their degree program. For more information, contact Professor Tom Noel in the history department (303-556-4830, tnoel@carhon.cudenver.edu) or Associate Professor Michael Holleran (303-556-3688, michael.holleran@cudenver.edu) in the College of Architecture and Planning.
Graduate Certificate in Design Build
The College of Architecture and Planning offers a graduate certificate in the emerging area of design build as an extension of the MArch program. It requires a total of 18 credit hours, some of which also count toward the MArch program, some of which do not. Coursework in this extension emphasizes the designer’s point of view.
Three courses totaling 12 credit hours can be applied to the MArch graduation requirements: ARCH 6370 Introduction to Design Build, ARCH 6373 Construction in Single Source Project Delivery, and ARCH 6170 Advanced Design Build Studio.
Two additional courses totaling 6 credit hours are required beyond the MArch program for the certificate: ARCH 6371 Maintaining Quality, Managing Risk and ARCH 6372 Architecture: Single Source Project Delivery.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


The Departments of Architecture and Landscape Architecture received full, six-year reaccreditation renewals in 2003.
focuses research in areas including "Children, Youth and Environment," capitalizing on the Learning Landscapes cooperative program with the Denver Public Schools.


'The Doctor Stories," wi by Prof. Kathryn Maes, based on books by Rich Selzer, MD. The produc of the play presented many opportunities for collaboration between â–  arts and the health scie
Opened in December 2003, the Digital Animation Center includes classroom, office, and studio space as well as a digital photography, video editing and postproduction laboratory.


College of Arts & Media
Interim Dean
Frank Jermance
Acting Associate Dean
Kathryn Maes
Advising Office
303-556-2279
Contact
Office
Arts Building 176
Phone
303-556-2279
Fax
303-556-2335
Website
'pjww.cudenver.edu/CAM
At the College of Arts & Media we believe that the arts are essential il for us to express ourselves, know ourselves, and understand the world around us. You’llfind a variety of students in our programs: Many are from the Denver area, while others come from around the country and around the world. Some are seeking their first degree, others a career change, many others personal growth and enrichment. Our programs emphasize artistic excellence, whether in visual art or multimedia studies, theatre, film, or music. We incorporate real-world knowledge in the classroom and provide that same experience for our students. Convocations with arts professionals, lectures and workshops by visiting artists, internships with start-up entertainment companies, and other challenging opportunities let students test out the theories while learning about and understanding the dynamics of their chosen profession.
We’ve also established cooperative relationships with civic groups, regional arts agencies, museums, galleries, performance venues, public schools and community colleges, professional societies, and the business community.
COLLEGE GOALS
1. The College of Arts & Media aims to instill, inspire, and model creativity founded upon the accumulated knowledge of human civilization.
2. The college serves as an intersection of art, technology, and commerce.
3. The college seeks to develop the artist committed to social responsibility and the citizen who will advocate for the role of the artist in society.
4. The college strives to become a center of cross-cultural exchange and understanding.
5. The college works to enrich the quality of life in the larger community, to foster community partnerships, and to encourage mentorship.
6. The college aims to integrate interdisciplinary modes of learning and creating.
7. The college adapts to meet future needs of diverse student constituencies.
PROGRAMS
Graduate
Master of Science in Recording Arts (MS)
Undergraduate
Students can earn baccalaureate degrees, including areas of emphasis listed below, in the following areas:
Bachelor of Arts in Fine Arts (BA)
Art History
Drawing
Painting
Photography
Sculpture
Bachelor of Arts in Theatre (BA)
Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA)
3D Graphics and Animation Drawing
Multimedia Studies Painting Photography Sculpture
Theatre, Film and Television
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


70 / College of Arts & Media
Bachelor of Science in Music (BS)
Music Industry Studies Music Management Music Performance RecordingArts
MINOR PROGRAMS
Most CU-Denver departments have developed minor programs. A minor is not required for graduation. Students interested in completing a minor should contact the individual departments regarding requirements. A minimum of 12 credit hours in residence is required for all minors.
DOUBLE MAJORS
Students may graduate with more than one major by completing all requirements for each major.
SECOND DEGREES
Students who have been awarded a bachelor’s degree may be granted a second bachelor’s degree provided that (a) all general requirements for that degree have been met; (b) the major for the second bachelor’s degree is different from the major for the first; and (c) the college and major department residence requirements ate satisfied. A second degree from the college requires a minimum of 30 additional semester hours of credit.
DOUBLE DEGREES
Students may earn two degrees in the College of Arts & Media (CAM) or from two different schools or colleges within the University of Colorado at Denver simultaneously by fulfilling all requirements for both degrees. Students must complete a minimum of 150 semester hours applied toward the two degrees.
Requirements for Admission
A student matriculating in the College of Arts and Media must be admitted at three levels: (1) as a student of the University of Colorado at Denver, (2) as a student in the College of Arts & Media, and (3) as a student within a College of Arts & Media department.
Admission to the College of Arts & Media is selective, based upon a variety of factors. Factors for consideration in the admission process may include:
• careful evaluation of secondary school records, which may include recommendations from guidance counselors, advisors, teachers and others
• scores on standardized tests
• creative review in the form of an audition, portfolio review or other Applicants should be able to indicate evidence of a level of character
and maturity essential in potential students who hope to benefit fully from the unique offering of the university and its urban environment.
Participation in meaningful school and community activities are also an indicator of potential success.
APPLYING TO THE COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA
• The student must indicate the degree program he/she is applying for.
• The application is based on two parts: academic and creative/artistic.
• Admissions evaluates the academic component.
• In addition, all undergraduate programs at CAM may require an incoming artistic/creative assessment, such as an audition, submission of a creative portfolio, a writing sample, or an entrance interview.
• Artistic/creative review is conducted by the appropriate department or program (see specific programs for details). Both the academic application and the artistic/creative review are evaluated as a whole to determine admission and must be completed before an admissions decision can be made.
Creative material should be mailed directly to the specific department or program. No admissions decision will be made until the candidate’s file is complete and the department has forwarded artistic/creative review results to the Office of Undergraduate Admissions.
Note: Please be aware that CU-Denver does not return creative materials and will not assume any liability or responsibility for original materials submitted by an applicant that are lost or damaged while in its possession. Candidates are urged to complete and file their applications as soon as possible, especially those who are seeking financial aid. Applicants will be notified promptly if additional information is required. No admission decision will be made without complete information.
Students with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the university provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., test scores, rank in high school class, grade point average) and provided they make up any deficiencies in the MAPS prior to graduation from the university. Two levels of deficiency will be recognized.
Note: Students who apply and/or are admitted after the published campus deadlines for priority admission should note that they may find that College of Arts & Media courses are not available and therefore these students may not be able to follow their curriculum as desired. Late-admit students should consult their faculty and/or CAM advisor to determine alternative curriculum plans.
NEW STUDENTS
For questions or details about the information on pages 66 through 69 of this catalog, contact the CAM Advising Office at 303-556-2279 or CAMadvising@cudenver.edu.
New Freshmen
• Contact the Academic Advising Center (AAC) at 303.352.3520
• AAC will provide an introduction to university policies and can explain core requirements and basic degree requirements.
• Attend an orientation session (required).
• Take the Accuplacer test (required).
• Transition to CAM advising during sophomore year.
New Transfers
1. Transfer is a two-step process.
a. The Office of Admissions will evaluate the student’s transfer transcript(s) and determine an initial set of courses to be transferred, based on established transfer tables. Admissions will mail a copy of this transfer evaluation to the student.
b. CAM advisors determine how these courses fit into the student’s degree plan, course by course. Students should contact a CAM advisor to complete this process.
2. Should there be any courses that are not initially accepted by the Office of Admissions, the student and the advisor can discuss the possibility of accepting further courses (i.e., courses in specific technical disciplines, such as photography or graphic design, will be accepted at the discretion of the specific school/college to which the student is applying). The advisor will then notify the Office of Admissions if the school/college has accepted any additional coursework and request that Admissions add these courses to the student’s transcript.
3. Contact CAM advisors at CAMadvising@cudenver.edu for the following:
a. evaluation of transfer credits
b. information about whether they are required to take the Accuplacer test
c. in-depth explanation of degree requirements and course sequencing
4. idave a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 (on a 4.0 scale) for all college coursework attempted.
5. For priority admission to CAM, students should have a minimum cumulative 2.5 GPA for all college coursework and 3.0 in specific program-related coursework.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Academic Policies / 71
If the cumulative G ’A is less than 2.5, the student can be admitted with at least a 2.0 C PA on the last 15 credit hours of applicable coursework, at least a 2.0 GPA in CAM-related courses, and at least a 2.0 overall GPA in courses applying to the degree.
6. Transfer applicants vho do not meet either of the priority admission standards are poole i and ranked on the basis of the GPA earned in the last 15 credit he urs. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available. F rr information about specific policies on transfer of credits, consult a CAM advisor.
INTRA-UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
Students who want to transfer to the College of Arts & Media from another college or school of the University of Colorado at Denver must formally apply to the College of Arts & Media.
Students will be co isidered for admission on either their overall GPA in applicable coursew ork from CU and all previous institutions or on their last 15 credit hoi trs. Applicants with less than a 2.0 GPA in related courses (from CU or ther institutions) and overall CU GPA of less than 2.0 will be denied admission even though they may meet other requirements for consideration.
TRANSFER OF MAJOR Wl
HIN THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND MEDIA
lents who wish to transfer from one department college must notify the CAM advising office by ission of the Change of Major form. Students will change of major has been approved or if there are ments (i.e., audition, etc.) that must be met prior
Undergraduate stu to another within the e-mail, phone or submi be contacted once the major-specific require to approval.
MUSIC AUDITION
All entering freshmen and transfer students applying for admission to music degree programs, with the exception of the Music Industry Studies program, must complete an audition. Call 303-556-2279 for information on scheduling an audition.
Academic Policies
Students are referre i to the General Information section of this catalog for a description of academic policies that apply to all undergraduate students at CU-Denv er. The policies that follow apply specifically to the College of Arts & Media (CAM).
ACADEMIC ADVISING
New freshmen will start at the Academic Advising Center (303-352-3520) for their initial advising. There the student will be introduced to the university and its policies, as well as the university core requirements. Basic degree requirements will be explained, although the student should consult the College o] Arts & Media advisor for specific questions.
Transfer students s lould contact the CAM advisors, who will assist with transfer evaluations and any other quetions.
The CAM advisor; assist in the transition from the advising center to the college. The CAIV advisors will assist with degree, major, and college requirements, and an r remaining requirements. The CAM advisor will assist with graduation check-out procedures and any CAM advising questions. For CAM ; dvising information or questions, contact the CAM advisors at 303 -556-2279.
Advising holds or SFOPs will be placed on CAM students’ registration periodically throughc ut the student’s academic career. Students will be notified in advance ofjthese STOPs, either by postcard or e-mail. Students must have an advising appointment with a CAM advisor to have the STOP lifted and be eligible to register. This is done to ensure that the student is fulfilling the proper requirements for the degree beforehelshe applies for graduatiori.
In addition to these advising holds, students will also be required to meet with a faculty member on a mentoring level to discuss internships,
career/employment possibilities, graduate school, or any other issues about his/her post-graduation career and chosen industry. The student will be notified in advance of this requirement, either by postcard or by e-mail.
ACADEMIC PROBATION AND SCHOLASTIC SUSPENSION
Good academic standing in the college requires a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on all University of Colorado coursework. Grades earned in another college or school within the University of Colorado system are used in determining the student’s scholastic standing and progress toward the degree. Grades earned outside the University of Colorado system are not used in calculating the grade point average at the University of Colorado.
Academic Probation
Students whose cumulative grade point average falls below a 2.0 at the end of an academic term will be placed on academic probation. Students are informed in writing of academic probation. Students on academic probation will be required to achieve a minimum 2.25 grade point average each semester until their cumulative grade point average is at least a 2.0, at which time students will be removed from probation.
There is no restriction on the length of time a student can remain on probation status; however, students must achieve a minimum 2.0 cumulative CU GPA to meet graduation requirements.
Academic Suspension
Students on academic probation who do not meet the 2.25 minimum required grade point average in the succeeding semester will be suspended from the college. Students are informed in writing of academic suspension.
A student’s suspension status is permanently indicated on the official University of Colorado transcript, and registration restrictions are imposed.
First Suspension
Students who first fail to meet the academic conditions of probation are placed on first suspension for one calendar year. Students on first suspension may only register for CU-Denver courses offered through the Extended Studies program.
A student under first suspension may be readmitted before the end of the normal suspension period only if the student has demonstrated academic improvement in one of the following ways:
1. raise the cumulative CU GPA to a minimum of 2.0;
2. achieve a minimum semester GPA of 2.5 with a minimum of 6 semester hours of University of Colorado coursework; or
3. attend another college/university and raise to a minimum 2.0 the combination of cumulative CU GPA and cumulative GPA from another institution. Students are removed from first suspension after one year upon written request to the CAM Academic Policies Committee.
Second Suspension
Students who fail to meet the conditions of continued probation for a second time or fail to meet the semester GPA requirements while on first suspension are placed on second suspension for an indefinite period of time.
Students on second suspension may be readmitted to the college only by petition to the CAM Academic Policies Committee. Students will not be considered for readmission unless they have demonstrated significant improvement in academic performance at the college/ university level.
CAM ACADEMIC POLICIES COMMITTEE
The CAM Academic Policies Committee is responsible for the administration and interpretation of the academic policies of the college as established by the faculty. Questions about interpretation of policies may be directed to the associate dean.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


72 / College of Arts & Media
INDEPENDENTSTUDY
The College of Arts & Media has very specific policies concerning eligibility and registration for Independent Studies. Students should consult the CAM advisor or their faculty advisor for specific eligibility criteria and registration procedures.
The amount of credit to be given for an independent study project shall be determined at the time of registration. A maximum of 12 credits in independent study may apply toward the bachelor s degree.
INTERNSHIPS/COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
Students seeking academic credit from employment experience should consult the Career Center section of this catalog.
Undergraduates must have attained junior standing and have a minimum 2.75 GPA. A maximum of three hours of internship credit per semester and nine hours overall is allowed.
INCOMPLETE GRADE POLICIES
The College of Arts & Media has very strict guidelines on granting incomplete grades. They include, but are not limited to the following:
1. Reason for Incomplete must be verified, compelling, and extraordinary circumstance beyond students control which made completion of the course impossible.
2. The majority of course requirements (75 percent) must have been completed with a passing grade to be eligible for Incomplete.
3. CAM Course Completion Agreement must be signed by both instructor and student, with final approval by associate dean.
4. All coursework must be completed within one calendar year of original course: NO EXCEPTIONS.
5. Students may not retroactively change letter grades to Incomplete.
GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
General Requirements
1. A minimum of 120 semester hours passed
2. A minimum 2.0 cumulative grade point average
3. A minimum of 45 semester hours of Upper-Division work for all BA and BFA degrees
4. A minimum of 30 semester hours with letter grades at CU-Denver
5. Fulfillment of all college and major requirements.
Core Curriculum
Depending on a student’s major, specific core courses may be required. Consult a CAM advisor for details.
I. INTELLECTUAL COMPETENCIES
Competency is satisfied by a letter grade of C(2.0) or higher.
A. English Composition/Oral Communication-9 credit hours
One course from each of the three sections below:
1. ENGL 1020-3.
2. ENGL 2030-3. ENGL 3154-3. ENGL 3170-3. CMMU/TC 3120-3.
3. CMMU 2050-3. CMMU 2101-3. ENGL 2030-3. ENGL 2154-3. ENGL 3084-3.
Core Composition I Core Composition II Technical Writing Business Writing Technical Communications Business and Professional Speaking Presentational Speaking Core Composition II Introduction to Creative Writing Advanced Composition
ENGL 3154-3. ENGL 3170-3. ENGL 4190-3. CMMU/TC 3120-3. PHIL 2441-3.
B. Mathematics-3 credit hours
Technical Writing Business Writing Special Topics: Rhetoric/Writing Technical Communications Logic & Language
Any CU-Denver mathematics course, with the exception of MATH 3040. Students who find math especially challenging may consider:
MATH 1010-3. Mathematics for the Liberal Arts
MATH 1350-3. Computers in the Arts and Sciences
C. Foreign Language-third semester proficiency, 0-13 credit hours
Students must demonstrate foreign language proficiency. This is accomplished through completion of second-semester-level course (1020 or equivalent) with a minimum grade of C(2.0), satisfactory proficiency testing, or completion of second-year (Level II) high school course with a minimum grade of C(2.0) or better. For additional information, see the Modern Languages section in this catalog. Students pursuing a BS in Music are not required to fulfill the foreign language proficiency.
The foreign language proficiency requirement is currently undergoing revisions within the college. Students should consult the CAM advisor for specific foreign language requirements related to their individual degree.
II. KNOWLEDGE AREAS
CU-Denver Knowledge Area core courses are identified in each Schedule Plannerby a “D” prefix in the course title.
Students may not use independent study, cooperative education, internships, CLEP, or courses in their major to satisfy Knowledge Area requirements.
A. Natural and Physical Sciences, Mathematics-11 credit hours
3 credit hours from a course in ANTH (approved), BIOL, CHEM, ENVS, GEOL, MATH or PHYS (intellectual competency course excluded). Consult the CAM advisor for questions and/or approved courses for this 3-credit requirement.
8 credit hours from the following laboratory core courses:
ANTH 1303-4. BIOL 1550-4. BIOL 1560-4. CHEM 147X-4. ENVS 1042-4. GEOL 1072-4. GEOL 1082-4. PHYS 1000-4. PHYS 1052-4.
Intro, to Biological Anthropology Basic Biology I Basic Biology II
Core Chemistry: (selected modules) Intro, to Environmental Sciences Physical Geology: Surface Processes Physical Geology: Internal Processes Introduction to Physics General Astronomy I
B. Behavioral and Social Sciences -12 credit hours
6 credit hours in behavioral sciences
6 credit hours in social sciences
9 of 12 credit hours must come from the following combined behavioral sciences and social sciences core courses (2 behavioral sciences/1 social science or 2 social sciences/1 behavioral science, all from the following lists):*
Behavioral Sciences
ANTH 2102-3. CMMU 1011-3. CMMU 1021-3. PSY 1000-3.
PSY 1005-3.
Culture and the Human Experience Fundamentals of Communication Fundamentals of Mass Communication Introduction to Psychology I Introduction to Psychology II
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Theatre, Film, and Video Production / 73
Social Sciences
ECON 2012-3. ECON 2022-3. GEOG 1102-3. GEOG 2202-3. PSC 1001-3.
PSC 1101-3. SOC 1001-3. SOC 2462-3.
Principles of Econ.: Macroeconomics Principles of Econ.: Microeconomics World Regional Geography Natural Hazards Introduction to Political Science: Quest for Freedom & Justice American Political System Introduction to Sociology Introduction to Social Psychology
C. Humanities—6 credit
Remaining 3 credit hours: Consult CAM advisor.
hours
6 credit hours from
the following
core courses:
CNST 1000-3. ENGL 1601-3.
ENGL 2600-3.
FR 1000-3.
GER 1000-3. HIST 1381-3. HIST 1382-3. PHIL 1012-3.
PHIL 1020-3.
RUSS 1000-3.
RUSS 2000-3.
China & the Chinese
Telling Tales: Narrative Art in Literature
and Film
Great Works in British and American Literature Intro: Cultures in the French Speaking World Germany and the Germans Paths to the Present I Getting Here: Paths to the Present II Introduction to Philosophy: Relationship of Individual to World Introduction to Ethics and Society: Person & Community Russia and Russians: Life, Culture and Arts
Masterpieces of Russian Culture
D. Arts—3 credit hours
3 credit hours from the student’s major. courses to fulfill
this
a course in any arts discipline other than Some Arts & Media degrees require specific requirement.
E. Multicultural Diversity-3 credit hours
3 credit hours from the following core courses:
ANTH 3142-3. ANTH 4200-3. CMMU 3271-3, ECON 3100-3. ENGL/ETST37 ENGR 3400-3. ETST 3704-3. FA 3110-3. HIST 3345-3.
94-3.
MGMT 4100-3 PHIL 3500-3. PHIL 3500-3. PMUS 3110-3.
P SC 3034-3.
P SC 3035-3. PSY 4485-3. SOC 3020-3. THTR 3611-3
Cultural Diversity in the Modern World Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective Communication and Diversity Economics of Race & Gender Ethnic Diversity in American Literature Technology and Culture Culture, Racism & Alienation Imaging and Identity Immigration & Ethnicity in American History Managing Cultural Diversity Ideology and Culture: Racism/Sexism Ideology & Culture: Racism & Sexism Social & Political Implications of American Music
Race, Gender, Law & Public Policy Political Movements: Race and Gender Psychology of Cultural Diversity Race and Ethnicity in U.S.
Drama of Diversity
Major Requirements
In addition to completing the college core requirements, students must declare a major by the time they have accumulated 60 credit hours, and fulfill all requirements of the major department. Departments require that all coursework in the major be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or above. A minimum of one-third of the required coursework in the major must be completed at CU-Denver.
The department is responsible for determining when a student has successfully completed the major requirements and for certifying the completion to the dean of the college.
Graduation Application
Students expecting to graduate are required to submit an application for graduation to the CAM advisor in Arts 176 by the following deadlines. Failure to submit the application on time will result in a significant delay in graduation.
Applications are due by 5 p.m. on the Drop/Add deadline of the semester in which the student is applying to graduate. The Drop/Add deadline is the twelfth working day of fall and spring semesters and the eighth working day of summer semester. Refer to the Academic Calendar in the front of this catalog or online on the Registrar’s home-page, www. cudenver. edu!registrar.
Students are required to meet with the CAM advisor the semester before they intend to graduate to ensure that all requirements are met.
Academic Honors
A student can be awarded honors based upon cumulative grade point average at the time of graduation. To be eligible for honors, a student must have completed a minimum of 45 semester hours at the University of Colorado (on any CU campus). A GPA of 3.65 will receive cum laude, 3.75 magna cum laude, and 3.85 and above summa cum laude honors designations on degrees.
Certificate Programs
Certificate programs are also available in the following areas: Computer Science Music Business
Contact the CAM Advising Office for specific course requirements.
DEAN'S LIST
Following each fall and spring semester, the college publishes a Dean’s List honoring students who demonstrate high scholastic achievement. To earn a place on the list, a student must achieve a 3.75 grade point average in all CU hours taken during the semester, with a minimum of 9 credit hours.
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE, FILM, AND VIDEO PRODUCTION
Chair: Kathryn Maes Office: Arts 176 Phone: 303-556-4652 Fax: 303-556-6504
Faculty
Professor: Mark Alan Heckler
Associate Professors: J. Brad Bowles, Laura Cuetara, Kathryn Maes Assistant Professors: Frederic Lahey, Craig Volk Instructors: Carol Bloom, Steve Lavezza, Janetta Pahel, Tom Sheridan, Nate Thompson
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


74 / College of Arts & Media
Students wishing to study theatre, film and television may choose a four-year curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre, Film and Television; a BFA in Performance, Production Development and Direction; Design; or a BFA in Film and Television with a concentration in Writing for Film and Television. In addition, students can choose to take their first two years of instruction at the Lowry campus of the Community College of Aurora (CCA). Students who choose this option can pursue the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree with tracks in Writing/Directing, Cinematography/Videography or Postproduction.
The Department of Theatre, Film and Video Production prepares students for careers in the theatre as well as in the filmmaking and video production industries within the context of a strategically designed liberal arts education. The department offers courses in the disciplines of theatre (THTR) and film and video (FILM) through an innovative curriculum built on a shared foundation of an integrative course sequence. Within the Studio Program, which presents academic programs centered on production practice, students learn in the context of practical experience and expand their professional horizons through laboratory courses, theatre production, film and video projects, and fieldwork in the Denver area and throughout Colorado. Transfer students and other students in theatre may also choose to seek a less specialized curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre.
Theatre students will prepare, perfect, and perform their work in the Kenneth Kendall King Academic and Performing Arts Center. This state-of-the-art facility houses a multipurpose 350-seat flexible-form courtyard theatre, scene shop, paint deck, and costume shop, as well as concert and recital halls. The King Center is one of the most accessible performance facilities in the world for students with disabilities. Theatre students also have the use of two production studios and a fully equipped CAD theatre design facility.
The facilities and equipment of the Colorado Film School, a unique agreement between the University of Colorado at Denver and the Community College of Aurora, will satisfy the needs of any aspiring film and video student. On the Auraria campus, students utilize single- and 3-chip video cameras and supporting lighting and recording equipment to capture video images. They cut their work in labs equipped with professional-quality hardware and software edit stations. The Auraria Media Center contains two broadcast quality studios and an extensive inventory of video, audio and replay equipment that students can use with appropriate training. The Auraria campus is home to an extensive DVD library as part of the University of Colorado collections. It is also the location of the Starz FilmCenter, a multi-screen cinema complex that is home to the Denver Film Society, the Starz Denver International Film Festival and the University of Colorado at Denver’s College of Arts & Media film education program for K-12 and college audiences. The Lowry campus of the Community College of Aurora is located 20 minutes from the Auraria Campus and offers classes for students from the Community College of Aurora or the University of Colorado at Denver in a 52,000-square-foot studio/classroom building. The building contains a high bay studio, several flexible studios, a sound recording booth, classrooms and supporting facilities. The equipment cage contains a large inventory of video, film and audio equipment available for student instruction and use. Students use one of several computer labs containing state-of-the-art editing stations and postproduction facilities. Fifty- and 600-seat theatres are available for showing professional and student work. Dormitory space is available for full-time film and video students taking classes at the Lowry campus.
The Studio Program: The Foundation Sequence
All entering theatre and film students beginning their studies at the University of Colorado at Denver are enrolled in an integrative course sequence designed to establish a collaborative educational context and create a foundation for advanced study informed by allied disciplines and an understanding of complementary areas of concentration. Topics are woven together in coursework that complements theory and practice and includes the strands of introduction to acting, directing, dramatic
and cinematic literature, camera equipment and techniques, production design, criticism and dramatic style. Using on-campus and Denver-area theatre productions, artist residencies, film screenings, lectures, concerts, exhibits and other cultural resources as an integral part of the curriculum, this sequence is a cross-disciplinary experience in the conception, collaborative creation, writing, analysis, performance, realization and capture of dramatic performance built on a broad understanding of varying techniques and modes of live and recorded drama. The courses of the shared curriculum includes Performance Visualization I and II, Writing the Short Script and Video Production/Postproduction I in the first year and concludes with Studio I: Content/Creation in the first semester of the second year of study, after which film and theatre students move into separate course sequences.
THEATRE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
All curricula in the College of Arts & Media’s Department of Theatre, Film and Video Production are undergoing review at the time of this catalog printing. All curricula are subject to change; use the following lists as general guidelines. Contact the CAM Advising Office at 303-556-2279 or CAMadvising@cudenver.edu for more information.
BFA Degrees in Performance, Production Development and Direction, Design
I. THEATRE: STUDIO AND ADVANCED STUDIO PROGRAM COURSES, BUILDING ON THE FOUNDATION SEQUENCE
A. The Studio Program: The Development Sequence
Studio II: Dynamics of Media and Style
Performance: Theory/History/Criticism I and II
These studio experiences (taken the second semester of the sophomore year and the first and second semesters of the junior year) create a continuing forum for advanced theatre students to investigate the creation of contemporary theatre experiences in context of models of production practice; dynamics of other media; performance conventions; dramatic writing; and the historical, theoretical, and critical development of theatre.
B. The Studio Program: The Capstone Experience
Internship
Senior Seminar and Project
These studio-based courses, taken in the senior year, provide applied experiences in theatre production and professional practice designed to develop areas of expertise and broaden the scope of experience as working artists in theatre. In addition, they provide a bridge between the academic theatre world and the professional theatre world.
II. CORE: BFA IN PERFORMANCE, PRODUCTION DEVELOPMENT AND DIRECTION,
AND DESIGN
FILM 1050. Production/Postproduction 1.......................4
THTR 1550. Scriptwriting I...................................3
THTR 1600. Performance Visualization I.......................6
THTR 1610. Performance Visualization II......................6
THTR 2600. Studio I: Dynamics of Content/Creation............3
THTR 2610. Studio II: Dynamics of Media/Style................3
THTR 3610. Performance: Theory/History/Criticism I...........3
THTR 3939. Internship........................................3
THTR 4610. Performance: Theory/History/Criticism II..........3
THTR 4999. Senior Seminar and Project........................6
Total Studio Program Hours..................................40
Total University and CAM Core Hours....................... 44
Total Required Hours........................................84
In addition to these 84 semester hour credits, 36 hours are taken in the area of emphasis (Performance, Production Development and Direction, or Design) to complete the 120 hours needed for graduation:
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Theatre, Film and Video Production / 75
A. BFA in Performance
THTR 2520. Voice and Movement 1...........................3
THTR 2521. Voice! and Movement II.........................3
THTR 2530. Acting: Character and Staging..................3
THTR 2531. MakdUp Workshop................................1
THTR 3530. Actinjg: Character and Text....................3
THTR 3540. Directing 1: Text and Analysis.................3
THTR 3570. Performing Arts Management.....................3
THTR 3820. Production Process.............................8
THTR 4530. Acting: Character and Media....................3
THTR Directing/Design/Production Elective.................3
CAM Core Performance Elective.............................. â–  3
Total Hours for Performance Emphasis.....................36
B. BFA in Produclion Development and Direction
THTR 2520. Voice and Movement 1..........................3
THTR 2530. Acting: Character and Staging.................3
THTR 3540. Directing 1: Text and Analysis................3
THTR 3730. Scene Design —or—
FILM 3207. Directing Workshop............................3
FILM 3400. Intro to Screenwriting
THTR 3570. Performing Arts Management...............
THTR 4550. Playwriting..............................
THTR 3820. Production Process.......................
THTR 4540. Directing II: Staging and Process........
THTR Design or pilm Elective........................
CAM Core Multimedia or Performance Art or Sculpture
Total Hours for Production Emphasis.................
C. BFA in Design
THTR 2700. Art for the Theatre......................
THTR 3540. Directing I: Text and Analysis...........
THTR 3570. Performing Arts Management...............
THTR 3730. Scen| Design.............................
THTR 3740. Costjime Design..........................
THTR 3750. Lighjing Design..........................
THTR 3760. Sounjd Design for Theatre................
THTR 3820. Production Process.......................
THTR 4540. Directing II: Staging and Process........
CAM Core Visual Arts Studio Class...................
Total Hours for Design Emphasis.....................
3
3
9
3
3
3
36
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.3
.9
.3
36
BA IN THEATRE
The Bachelor of Arts in Theatre is designed to train the diversified theatre artist-writer, director, performer, designer, teacher and to provide opportunities for a broad range of production process and performance experiences in courses), laboratory workshops, full productions, and field work in the Denver area. The goal of the theatre program is an understanding of the potential ofltheatre as an expressive medium in the context of its culture and as a col|aborative art form in relationship to literature, fine arts, and music. This course of study is recommended for transfer students and entering students who wish to use their theatre training in an applied context rather than as'preparation for a production-defined profession.
Core Classes BA in Theatre
THTR 1600. Performance Visualization I ................6
—and—
THTR 1610. Performance Visualization II ...............6
—or—
THTR 2600. Studio I: Dynamics of Content/Creation......3
—and—
THTR 2610. Studio II: Dynamics of Media/Style..........3
THTR 3610. Performance: Theory/History/Criticism I ...........3
THTR 3820. Production Process.................................4
THTR 4610. Performance: Theory/History/Criticism II...........3
THTR 4999. Senior Seminar and Project ........................6
Total Studio Program Hours ...............................22-28
Total University and CAM Core Hours..........................44
THTR Electives ...........................................20-26
CAM Arts Electives............................................3
Other Arts Electives..........................................9
General Electives.......................................... 16
Total Degree Hours..........................................120
FILM AND VIDEO PRODUCTION DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The Film and Video Production Program at the University of Colorado at Denver is for students seeking professional preparation for careers in film, video, and related industries. The program awards BFA degrees with emphases in film/video writing, producing and directing, film/video postproduction, or cinematography/videography, and provides advanced training for professionals already working in the film and video industries.
Upon completion of the BFA course of study, students will be prepared for employment in the television, industrial video, educational video, and feature film production industries, or for entry into graduate study programs. Each student may choose to focus on documentary or narrative styles while finding a balance of technical and creative concerns. Students graduate with several completed scripts and a professional-quality reel of work. Employment opportunities lie in writing, producing, directing, production management, production design, camera, lighting, audio for film and video, audio post for film and video, postproduction graphics and animation, editing, and multimedia production and integration, as well as a host of business management opportunities in the cable, network, and film industries. Because Denver is a center of the cable television industry, graduates have many employment options locally in addition to national and world markets.
Film/video students can study writing/directing in the BFA in Theatre, Film and Television Production on the Auraria campus, sharing a common set of foundation courses with the BFA in Theatre. This track is for students who are interested in gaining a broad understanding of the history, theoretical and conceptual bases and comparative study of dramatic performance modes in theatre, film and television while developing skills in writing, directing, acting, design and dramatic storytelling through instruction and practice. In this course of study, there is a strong emphasis on storytelling: conceiving, developing, portraying and capturing dramatic performance. Students in this track will take most classes in their freshman and sophomore years on the Auraria campus, then take Upper-Division FILM courses at the Colorado Film School at the Lowry campus of the Community College of Aurora.
Degree Requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre, Film and Television Production with Emphasis in Film/Video Writing & Directing, Performance Visualization Track
Total University and CAM Core Credit Hours...................47
BFA Theatre, Film and Television Core Classes
FILM 1050. Production/Postproduction 1.........................4
THTR 1550. Scriptwriting I.....................................3
THTR 1600. Performance Visualization I.........................6
THTR 1610. Performance Visualization II 6
THTR 2600. Studio I: Dynamics of Content/Creation............. , 3
Total Core Hours..............................................22
Emphasis Area Classes
FILM 2000. Film/Video Production II............................3
FILM 2060. Film and Video Lighting and Grip..................3
FILM 2090. Production Management Techniques....................3
FILM 2150. Film and Video Postproduction II..................2
FILM 2500. Introduction to Screenwriting for Film and Television 3 FILM 2640. Digital Editing..................................3
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


76 / College of Arts & Media
FILM 3207. Directing Workshop................................3
FILM 3222. The Film and Video Business......................3
FILM 3270. Film/Video Production III.........................3
FILM 3275. Film and Video Postproduction III................2
FILM 3939. Internship........................................2
FILM 4209. Advanced Production Management....................3
FILM 4270. Film and Video Production IV.....................3
FILM 4275. Film and Video Postproduction IV.................2
FILM 4400. Advanced Screenwriting............................3
FILM 4500. Writing for Episodic Television...................3
FILM 4840. Independent Study: Film (Reel Preparation).......1
ENGL 3070. History of Silent Film............................3
ENGL 3080. History of Sound Film............................. . 3
Total Emphasis Hours...................................... 51
Total Degree Hours.........................................120
Through the Colorado Film School, a unique agreement between the University of Colorado at Denver and the Community College of Aurora, students can choose to take their first two years of instruction at the Lowry campus of CCA. Students beginning their studies at CCA can pursue tracks in Writing/Directing, Cinematography/Videography or Postproduction. The initial two years of film/video technology (CCA, FVT) courses give students a fundamental understanding of technical, creative, and storytelling issues and exposure to disparate paths of study and future employment. The second two years of film and video (CU-Denver, FILM) provide students the opportunity to focus and hone their craft, find their own expressive voice, and graduate with a professional quality show reel of work, production credits, and/or completed screenplays, teleplays, and project proposals.
All students interested in applying for film and video major status must apply to the Colorado Film School program co-directors. Continued major status is subject to annual review. Visit our website at www.coloradofilmschool.net for more information.
Degree Requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts with Emphasis in Film/Video Writing ana Directing (2 + 2 Program with CCA)
Total University and CAM Core Credit Hours.................47
CCA Courses
FVT 105. Video Production I................................3
FVT 117. Understanding the Actors Process..................3
FVT 150. Development of Film Expression....................3
FVT 153. Intro, to Film Production.........................3
FVT 155. Writing the Short Script..........................3
FVT 160. Video Post Production 1...........................3
FVT 164. Digital Editing —or—
FVT 220. 16mm Production....................................3
FVT 200. Video Production II................................3
FVT 205. Camera Equipment and Techniques —or—
FVT 206. Film/Video Lighting & Grip........................3
FVT 209. Production Management Techniques..................3
FVT 250. Introduction to Screenwriting.....................3
FVT 265. DVD Authoring...................................... . 3
Total......................................................36
CU-Denver Courses
ENGL 3070. History of Silent Film..........................3
ENGL 3080. History of Sound Film............................3
FILM 3207. Acting/Directing Workshop........................3
FILM 3222. The Film and Video Business.....................3
FILM 3270. Film/Video Production III........................3
FILM 3275. Film/Video Post Production III...................2
FILM 3939. Film/Video Production Internship.................2
FILM 4209. Advanced Production Management....................3
FILM 4270. Film/Video Production IV..........................3
FILM 4280. Film/Video Post Production IV......................2
FILM 4400. Advanced Screenwriting for Feature Films..........3
FILM 4500. Writing for Episodic Television....................3
FILM 4840. Independent Study: Film (Reel Preparation).........1
FILM Electives............................................ â–  3
Total.......................................................J37
Total Degree Hours..........................................120
Degree Requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts with Emphasis in Film/Video Postproduction (2 + 2 Program with CCA)
Total University and CAM Core Credit Hours.................47
CCA Courses
FVT 105. Video Production I................................3
FVT 150. Development of Film Expression....................3
FVT 160. Video Post Production 1...........................3
FVT 164. Digital Editing...................................3
FVT 200. Video Production II...............................3
FVT 208. Sound for Film & Video............................3
FVT 215. Video Postproduction II............................3
FVT 264. Digital Effects....................................3
FVT 265. DVD Authoring......................................3
FVT 266. Flash or AVID Express.............................3
FVT 267. Dreamweaver —or—
FVT 268. Video Streaming....................................3
FVT 275. Introduction to Maya —or—
FVT 275. Photoshop for Editors............................... â–  3
Total......................................................36
CU-Denver Courses
ENGL 3070. History of Silent Film..........................3
ENGL 3080. History of Sound Film............................3
FILM 3111. Shooting Action..................................3
FILM 3222. The Film and Video Business......................3
FILM 3264. Advanced Digital FX..............................3
FILM 3270. Film/Video Production III........................2
FILM 3275. Film/Video Postproduction III....................3
FILM 3350. Editing Aesthetics...............................3
FILM 3939. Film/Video Production Internship.................2
FILM 4270. Film/Video Production IV.........................2
FILM 4280. Film/Video Postproduction IV.....................3
FILM 4840. Independent Study: Film (Reel Preparation).......1
FILM_______Electives.......................................... 6
Total.................................................... 37
Total Degree Hours........................................120
Degree Requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts with Emphasis in Cinematography/Videography (2 + 2 Program with CCA)
Total University and CAM Core Credit Hours.................47
CCA Courses
FVT 105. Video Production I................................3
FVT 117. Understanding the Actors Process..................3
FVT 150. Development of Film Expression....................3
FVT 153. Intro to Film Production..........................3
FVT 160. Video Post Production 1...........................3
FVT 164. Digital Editing
FVT 265. DVD Authoring.....................................3
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Music and Entertainment Industry Studies / 77
FVT 200. Video Production II................................3
FVT 205. Camera Fquipment & Techniques.....................3
FVT 206. Film/Video Lighting & Grip........................3
FVT 209. Production Management Techniques...................3
FVT 215. Video Po :t Production II..........................3
FVT 220. 16mm Pioduction....................................3
FVT 275. Photoshc p for Editors............................. . 3
Total..................................................... 36
CU-Denver Courses
ENGL 3070 History of Silent Film............................3
ENGL 3080 History of Sound Film.............................3
FILM 3111 Shootii ig Action.................................3
FILM 3222 The Fil n and Video Business......................3
FILM 3264 Advanc ed Digital Effects.........................3
FILM 3270 Film/Video Production III.........................3
FILM 3275 Film/Video Postproduction III.....................2
FILM 3300 Advanced Lighting for Film & Video................3
FILM 3939 Film/Video Production Internship..................2
FILM 4209 Advanced Production Management....................3
FILM 4270 Film/Video Production IV..........................3
FILM 4280 Film/Video Postproduction IV......................2
FILM 4840 Independent Study: Film (Reel Preparation.........1
FILM________ Electi'
Total.
Total Degree Hours
â–  â– 3 .37 120
Contact the Office of the Dean, College of Arts & Media, in AR 176 for CCA and FILM course descriptions that do not appear in this catalog.
DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC AND ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY STUDIES
Chair: Rich Sanders ! Office: AR 288
Phone: 303-556-2279 Fax: 303-556-2335
Faculty
Professors: Zoe Erism;
Associate Professors
Stan Soocher, Gregor Assistant Professors:
Sigmund Rothschild Professor Emeritus: Donna Bogard, Franz Roehmann
ian, Roy A. Pritts
Frank J. Jermance, Richard Sanders,
V Walker
William Clark, Judith Coe, John Kellogg,
The Department o! combines studies in ri music performance in place. Through partner: nonprofit organizatioi i: and nation in the pla music media.
The Department o offers courses in the dis< Music (PMUS). Stude Bachelor of Science in recording arts, music
Music
(Music and Entertainment Industry Studies :ording arts, multimedia, music business, and order to prepare students for the global market-ships with entrepreneurs, corporations, and s, we aspire to a leading position in the region ing and realization of current and future
1 Music and Entertainment Industry Studies iciplines of Music (MUS) and Performance nts interested in studying music will pursue the Music with areas of emphasis in performance, management, or music industry studies.
The music prograrri at the University of Colorado at Denver is intended for students seeking preparation for professional careers in music related to performance, recording, music business, and the entertainment industries. The four-year music program is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music.
The specialized curricula offered by the program lead graduates to local, regional, and national positions in audio research, record and production companies, arts administration, and audio engineering, as well as graduate studies at leading universities and conservatories.
In addition, many graduates establish careers as owners of booking agencies, publishing companies, management firms, and recording studios.
All music applicants, except those entering the Music Industry Studies program, must pass an entrance audition before being accepted to the program. Contact the department for information on the music audition.
Recording Arts: This area of study addresses contemporary technology in studio recording, sound reinforcement, and electronic music. It is intended to develop skills for creative musicians, producers, and technicians, using both analog and digital technology.
Music Management: This program prepares musicians for careers in such fields as artist management, music publishing, concert promotion, record production, and the development of skills relative to the rapidly expanding telecommunications industry.
Music Industry Studies: This program encompasses a broad liberal arts exposure to the language and practice of music, with specialized courses in the business and technological aspects of the music industry.
Performance Music
Students gain performance skills in classical, jazz, commercial, and experimental music styles. The program includes specialized courses in small performance ensembles, applied study, contemporary improvisation, and analysis, culminating in the presentation of a junior and senior recital. Students wishing to declare a major in the performance emphasis must audition for entry at the time of their sophomore proficiency exam.
ENSEMBLES
All music majors enrolled in an applied music course are required to register for an ensemble. Non-music majors are invited to audition for any of the CU-Denver music ensembles. Each ensemble carries 1 semester hour of credit.
APPLIED MUSIC
All applied music courses are restricted to music majors, and minors (only upon completion of the entrance audition) enrolled in a minimum of 7 other credit hours. Students may only be enrolled in one applied music course in any given semester. Non-music majors must register for applied music studies through Extended Studies.
All students taking an applied music course must also register for an ensemble and PMUS 1500: General Recital. Students in applied music courses are also required to perform in a performance jury at the end of each semester of applied study and to pass a sophomore proficiency examination at the end of their fourth semester of study.
All majors taking applied music must perform in a solo or solo with accompaniment capacity at least once a semester in a general recital. General recitals are scheduled throughout the semester.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR PERFORMANCE, RECORDING ARTS, AND MUSIC MANAGEMENT
Note: Degree requirements are under review and subject to change.
Required Courses in Music..........................Credit Hours
Applied Music................................................8
PMUS 2000 Ensembles .........................................6
PMUS 1500 General Recital (4 semesters) .....................0
PMUS 1100 Music Theory ......................................3
PMUS 1110 Ear Training/Sight Singing I ......................1
PMUS 1200 Music Theory II....................................3
PMUS 1210 EarTraining/Sight Singing II ......................1
PMUS 2100 Music Theory III...................................3
PMUS 2110 EarTraining/Sight Singing..........................1
CU-Denver Catalog2004 — 05


78 / College of Arts & Media
PMUS 2200 Contemporary Styles.................................3
PMUS 3830 Music History I ...................................3
PMUS 3831 Music History II ..................................3
Music History Elective .......................................3
PMUS 2470/MUS 3820 Music Applications on the Computer
or Digital Music Techniques ...............................3
MUS 2540 Audio Production I..................................3
MUS 2700 Music Business I....................................3
MUS 2710 Music Business II....................................3
PMUS Reading and Improv I or II .............................2
Keyboard, Voice, or Guitar Lab*..............................
Total Required Courses in Music .............................56
* All students (except piano majors) must pass the keyboard proficiency. Students must take 4 semesters of any combination of keyboard, voice, or guitar labs.
Emphasis in Performance............................Credit Hours
Applied Music ...............................................12
Ensembles ....................................................4
General Recital (4 semesters).................................0
Junior Recital (P-F) .........................................0
Senior Recital................................................0
Music Conducting & Rehearsal Techniques.......................2
PMUS 3939 Performance Practicum .............................^3
Total Credits in Area of Emphasis............................21
Emphasis in Recording Arts.........................Credit Hours
MUS 2560 Audio Production II..................................4
MUS 3540 Recording Studio Maint. & Calibration ..............3
MUS 4550 Audio Production III.................................4
MUS 4570 Audio Production IV..................................4
Music Electives...............................................5
Recording Electives ..........................................3
Junior Project................................................3
Senior Project ...............................................3
Total Credits in Area of Emphasis............................29
Emphasis in Music Management.......................Credit Hours
MGMT 1000 Intro to Business ..................................3
MUS 4720 Music Management.....................................3
MUS 4730 Music Production ....................................3
MUS 3730 Music Industry Financial Management .................3
MUS 4740 Music Business Analysis .............................3
MUS 2560 Audio Production II..................................4
MUS 4700 Senior Project.......................................3
Music Electives...............................................6
Total Credits in Area of Emphasis............................28
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR MUSIC INDUSTRY STUDIES
MUS 1010 Theory of Comm. Mus. I...............................3
MUS_______Theory of Comm. Mus. II.............................3
MUS_______F.T/SS Lab I & II ..................................2
MUS 2300 Songwriting I .......................................3
MUS 3310 Songwriting II —or—
Pop/Jazz Theory...............................................3
PMUS 3830 History of Music I .................................3
MUS_______Music History Elective..............................3
MUS 2470 Music on the PC......................................3
Music Performance Electives:
PMUS 1023/1093 Piano/Voice/GuitarLab..........................4
PMUS 15_____Applied Music.....................................2
PMUS 1310 Reading and Improv. I ..............................2
MUS_______Music Electives ....................................7
MUS 2700 Music Business I.....................................3
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05
MUS 2710 Music Business II......................................3
MUS 2540 Audio Production I.....................................3
MUS 2929/3939 Internship........................................3
MUS 4501 Music Industry Seminar —or—
MUS 4580 Audio Production Seminar .............................^3
Total MIS Core.................................................53
Music Business Focus Area
MUS 4720 Music Management.......................................3
MUS 4730 Music Production ......................................3
MUS 4740 Music Business Analysis ...............................3
MUS 3720 Law and Music Industry.................................3
MUS________Music Business Forum/Coloq..........................0
Music Business Electives........................................6
Total Focus Area...............................................18
Recording Arts Focus Area
MUS 4550 Audio Production III...................................4
MUS 4570 Audio Production IV....................................4
MUS 3540 Maint./Calib...........................................3
MUS 4580 Seminar ...............................................3
Elective........................................................4
Total Focus Area...............................................18
Master of Science in Recording Arts (MS)
The Master of Science in Recording Arts is designed to prepare students for careers in audio applications for the fields of mass communications, education, arts, and the entertainment industries. Of particular note is the rapidly growing need for faculty holding appropriate graduate degrees at institutions offering studies in Music Technology/Recording Arts. Candidates from undergraduate preparatory programs who have acquired technical, historical, and applications knowledge of music, music technology, recording arts, and technological applications will gravitate toward this proposed graduate program. The programs core courses advance students’ artistic, pedagogical, technical, and problemsolving abilities, while electives will allow them to develop additional skills and knowledge in related areas including film, broadcasting, education, business and the performing arts. Students may choose between a thesis (research) or portfolio option, either of which will provide evaluative measures required for completion of the degree.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR MASTER OF SCIENCE IN RECORDING ARTS
Students can earn a masters degree, either thesis or portfolio option,
with an emphasis in areas listed below:
Advanced Audio Production Audio Pedagogy Audio Forensics
Required Courses......................................Credit Hours
MUS 5000 Introduction to Graduate Study..........................3
MUS 5590 Graduate Audio Production...............................4
MUS 6510 Audio Studies Pedagogy..................................4
MUS 6580 Graduate Audio Seminar.................................^4
Total Credits in Required Courses ..............................15
Audio MSRA Electives
MUS 5500 Topics in Professional Audio............................3
MSRA Elective....................................................4
MSRA Elective....................................................4
MSRA Elective....................................................4
Total Credits...................................................15


Music and Entertainment Industry Studies / 79
Thesis/Portfolio
MUS 6950 Thesis in Professional Audio
MUS 6980 Professional Audio Portfolio.............................. _4
Total Credits........ .............................................34
Preparatory Undergraduate Courses
MUS 2470-3 MUS 2540-3 MUS 2560-4 MUS 3540-3
MUS 3820-3 MUS 4550-4 MUS 4570-4 MUS 4580-3 MUS 4505-4 MUS 4575-4 PHYS 3620-3
Music Applications on the Computer
Audio Production I
Audio Production II w/ Lab
Recording Studio Maintenance
and Calibration
Digital Music Techniques
Audio Production III w/ Lab
Audio Production IV w/ Lab
Audio Production Seminar
Audio Sweetening
Surround Sound
Physics of Sound and Music
Graduate Recording Arts Electives
MATH 5010-3 j MUS 5500-3 MUS 5505-4 MUS 5550-4 MUS 5570-4 MUS 5575-4 MUS 6580-3 MUS 5730-3 MUS 6510-4 MUS 6530-4 MUS 6550-4
History of Mathematics
Topics in Professional Audio
Graduate Audio Sweetening & Lab
Graduate Audio Production III & Lab
Gradate Audio Production IV & Lab
Graduate Surround Sound & Lab
Graduate Audio Seminar
Music Production
Audio Studies Pedagogy
Audio Forensics
Sound Design
Topics in Professional Audio
Audio Engineering] Society Seminars/Papers
National Association of Broadcasters Seminars/Papers
Location Recording
Sound Reinforcement
Trends in the Audii}) Industry
Others *
• Other electives are available in studies related to the Recording Arts from allied disciplines such as Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Physics, Film/Video Production, Multimedia.
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS
Graduate Admission Requirements
Admission to the MSRA program will be contingent upon evidence of an earned undergraduate bachelor’s degree, or its equivalent, with a minimum GPA of 3.0, completion of the general Graduate Records Exam (GRE), Test of pnglish as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) if required, and an MSRA entrance assessment that includes:
• an examination of the applicant’s knowledge of and laboratory experience with rfiusic recording/reinforcement techniques (equivalent to three years at the undergraduate level), musical acoustics/physics (equivalent to one semester at the undergraduate level), music on the computer (equivalent to two semesters at the undergraduate leyel with proficiency on both PC and Mac platforms), and studio calibration and maintenance (equivalent to one semester at the undergraduate level)
• a faculty review of the applicant’s music recording portfolio/essay Transfer Requirements
A maximum of 9 graduate credits may be transferred into the MSRA from another accredited graduate institution, subject to the review and
approval of the MSRA faculty. Only graduate courses with a grade of “B” or higher will be accepted for transfer, and only if those courses were taken within five calendar years of the applicant’s semester of admission into the MSRA program.
Provisional Student Requirements
Candidates for admission who do not meet entrance proficiency requirements in recording arts knowledge and experience may be admitted to the program as provisional students and be required to complete a sequence of undergraduate remedial courses to meet entrance proficiency standards.
International Students
All international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 500. International student applications must be received six months prior to the term for which the student is applying.
APPLICATION MATERIALS
1. Letter of Application
Students must submit a personal letter of application that provides a narrative description of their preparation for graduate-level studies, their career objectives, and their intention to matriculate. This letter should contain the following:
• complete name and contact information
• educational background
• career objective
• anticipated dates of attendance
• names and contact information of persons from whom you have requested letters of recommendation
2. Entrance Examinations
Graduate Records Exam (GRE), www.gre.com All applicants to the MSRA degree program must submit scores from the GRE tests. The General Test offered by Educational Testing Service will assist in evaluating applicants to the degree program on their verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing skills. This examination is offered around the world on a continuous schedule; it is not intended to exclude any applicant from the degree program, but rather to assist in academic advising.
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), www. toefl. org For students from countries where English is not the primary language, this examination is required to assure they will be able to make satisfactory progress in the program. All international students whose first language is not English are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 500/175 electronic. International student applications must be received six months prior to the term for which the student is applying.
3. Portfolios and Essay
All applicants will submit a portfolio of recordings that represent their best accomplishments in audio production. Acceptable submission format is a compact disk (CD) with an annotated index and a clear and accurate labeling of all materials. Presentation, breadth of experience, and technical and artistic quality will be evaluated. An essay that summarizes the educational and professional history of the applicant relative to a career in the audio/music industry must be submitted with the portfolio.
4. Transcripts
An official transcript of all studies from previous institutions must be sent to the College of Arts & Media Graduate Admissions Committee as well as the CU-Denver Admissions Office.
5. Letters of Recommendation
A minimum of two letters of recommendation from previous teachers, employers, or professional colleagues must be submitted with the application. Letters should attest to the applicant’s professional, personal, and academic potential for success in graduate-level studies.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 — 05


80 / College of Arts dr Media
DEPARTMENT OF VISUAL ARTS
Chair: Kent Homchick
Office: CU-Denver Building, 8th floor
Phone: 303-556-2279
Faculty
Professor: John Hull
Associate Professor: Kent Homchick
Assistant Professors: Joann Brennan, Mary Connelly, Brian DeLevie, Carol Golemboski, Quintin Gonzalez, Rian Kerrane, Moyo Okediji Professors Emeritus: Jerry Johnson, Charles Moone
The Department of Visual Arts offers professional instruction in six interrelated areas of study: art history, drawing/painting, photography, sculpture, multimedia studies, and an emphasis in 3D graphics and animation. The department provides an educational environment where artists and art historians of promise and motivation can explore the horizons of their own talents in the midst of intense critical dialogue. This dialogue is generated by their peers; by distinguished visiting artists, scholars, and critics; and by a faculty comprising artists and art historians of acknowledged accomplishment.
The primary educational experience for the student is centered on the knowledge and skills gained from rigorous and structured courses offered by the various areas of the visual arts department, as well as the rich academic offerings throughout the university. Each student is routinely exposed to many aesthetic or academic positions through encounters with faculty members and visitors. The visual arts departments efforts are devoted not only to the refinement of visual skills, but to the articulation and cultivation of the mind. Students must bring creative force and imagination to their own development, for these qualities cannot be taught-they can only be stimulated and appreciated.
Education in the visual arts encompasses a comprehensive knowledge of and direct experience with the various media of drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, multimedia, and other forms. Supporting this enterprise is the development of an understanding of art theory, a knowledge of the methods and materials of art making, and examination of the diverse approach to examining the art object in history. Central to the practice of art history are critical writing and analysis.
Upon completion of all required undergraduate credits specific to a student’s field of study in the visual arts, each student will undergo a portfolio review and assessment interview. At the conclusion of the review, the student will be advised of the practicality of pursuing the chosen area of concentration.
Graduating seniors receiving the BFA degree are required to have a thesis show during their last semester of study. These exhibitions are scheduled in the fall and spring terms only.
Fine Arts
BACHELOR OF ARTS (BA) IN THEATRE
THTR 1600. Performance Visualization I.....................6
—and—
THTR 1610. Performance Visualization II ...................6
—or—
THTR 2600. Studio I: Dynamics of Content/Creation..........3
—and—
THTR 2610. Studio II: Dynamics of Media/Style..............3
THTR 3610. Performance: Theory/History/Criticism I ........3
THTR 3820. Production Process..............................4
THTR 4610. Performance: Theory/History/Criticism II........3
THTR 4999. Senior Seminar and Project .....................6
Total Studio Program Hours ............................22-28
Total University and CAM Core Hours.......................44
THTR Electives ........................................20-26
CAM Arts Electives.........................................3
Other Arts Electives.......................................9
General Electives....................................... 16
Total Degree Hours.......................................120
BACHELOR OF ARTS (BA) IN FINE ARTS
Required Fine Arts Foundation Core Courses (for all BA majors pursuing studio concentrations)
FA 1100. Drawing Foundations................................
FA 1150. Introduction to Photography........................
FA 1400. Two-Dimensional Design.............................
FA 1500. Three-Dimensional Design...........................
FA 2200. Basic Painting.....................................
FA 2400. Multimedia Applications I..........................
—or—
FA 2420. Multimedia Applications II.........................
FA 2600. Art History Survey I...............................
FA 2610. Art History Survey II..............................
Total BA Fine Arts Foundation Core Hours....................1
Emphasis in Art History
FA 1100. Drawing Foundations................................
FA 1150. Introduction to Photography........................
FA 1400. Two-Dimensional Design.............................
FA 2420. Multimedia Applications II.........................
FA 2600. History of Art I...................................
FA2610. History of Art II...................................
FA 3600. Art History Survey: Non-Western Art................
FA 4790. Methods in Art History.............................
FA 4951. BA Thesis..........................................
Travel Study Abroad.........................................
Art Historical Surveys: Western Art (3 credits each; select one)
FA 4620. American Art
FA 4650. 19th Century Art
FA 4660. 20th Century Art
FA 4670. Greek and Roman Art
FA 4680. Art in the Middle Ages
FA 4690. Renaissance Art
FA 4710. Baroque & Rococo Art
FA 4990. Contemporary Art, 1945 to Present
Art Historical Surveys: Arts and Diversity (3 credits each; select one)
FA 4610. Pre-Columbian Art
FA 4720. Art of Native America
FA 4745. African Visual, Verbal & Musical Metaphors
FA 4780. Art of Islam
FA4785. Chicano/a Art
FA 4786. Art of Asia
FA 4787 Oceanic Art
Art Theory (3 credits each; select one)
FA 3110. Imaging & Identity FA 3120. Visual Cultural Studies FA 3130. Postmodern Art FA3140. Postcolonial Art & Theory FA 3150. Feminism & Art FA 3630. History of Photography FA 3632. Black Cinema FA 3640. Topics in Art History FA 3645. Aesthetics FA 3650. Art Criticism
Art dr Technology (3 credits each; select one)
FA 4350. Topics in Multimedia Technology FA 4625. Studio Creative Process
Art Marketing dr Display (3 credits each; select one)
FA 4525. Museum Studies
FA 4526. Appraisal & Auction Studies
FA 4527. The Business of Art
Total Semester Hours in Arts History Emphasis...............45
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05
Ioj OJOJ UJ LW OJ OJ OJ OJ


Visual Arts / 81
Emphasis in Photography
FA 2155. Introduction to Digital Photography................3
FA3155. Digital BookMaking/NarrativeStrategies..............3
FA 3160. Color & Lighting Dynamics............................3
FA 3165. Concepts Processes...................................3
FA 3630. History of photography...............................3
FA 4800. Art Seminar..........................................3
FA 4990. Contemporary Art History, 1945 to Present............3
Electives..........L........................................... . 6
Total Semester Hours m Photography Emphasis.................27
Emphasis in Sculpture
FA 2500. Sculpture IA.........................................3
FA 2510. Sculpture Ip.........................................3
FA 3500. Sculpture ijA........................................3
FA3510. Sculpture IIB.........................................3
FA 4990. Contemporary Art History, 1945 to Present..........3
Upper-Division Art History electives..........................3
Elective credits in Art| History or Studio..................... . 6
Total Semester Hours ip Sculpture Emphasis..................24
Emphasis in Drawing
FA 2000. Basic Life Drawing...................................3
FA 3000. Intermediate Drawing ................................3
FA 3020. Life Drawing ........................................3
FA 4000. Advanced Drawing.....................................3
Art Electives......|........................................... â–  6
Total Semester Hours in Drawing Emphasis....................18
Emphasis in Painting
FA 2210. Painting II .........................................3
FA 3200. Intermediate Painting................................3
FA 3210. Intermediate Painting................................3
FA 4200. Advanced Painting....................................3
Art Electives......|........................................... â–  6
Total Semester Hours in Painting Emphasis....................18
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS
Required Fine Arts Foundation Core Courses (for all BFA majors)
FA 1100. Drawing Foundations...................................3
FA 1400. Two-Dimeijisional Design..............................3
FA 1410. Color Theciry.........................................3
FA 1500. Three-Dim|ensional Design.............................3
FA 2010. Art Aesthetics & Artist’s Voice.......................3
FA 2600. Art History Survey I..................................3
FA 2610. Art History Survey II.................................. â–  3
Total Semester Hours ip BFA Fine Arts Foundation Core........21
Emphasis in Drawing
FA 2000. Basic Life Drawing....................
FA 3000. Intermediate Drawing..................
FA 3020. Intermediate Life Drawing.............
FA 4000. Advanced Drawing......................
FA 4020. Advanced Life Drawing.................
FA 4800. Art Semina r..........................
FA 4950. BFA Thesis............................
FA 4990. Contemporary Art History, 1945 to Present
Upper-Division Studio Art Electives............
Upper-Division Art History Electives...........
Fine Arts Electives . .........................
Fine Arts Topics Drawing Course................
Total Semester Hours in Drawing Emphasis.......
Emphasis in Painting FA 2200. Basic Painting.
. 3 . 3 .3 .3 .3 .3 . 1 . 3 18 .3 .6
52
3
FA 2210. Painting II..........................................3
FA 3200. Painting IILA........................................3
FA 3210. Painting IIIB........................................3
FA 4200. Painting IVA.........................................3
FA 4210. Painting IVB.........................................3
FA 4800. Art Seminar..........................................3
FA 4950. BFA Thesis...........................................1
FA 4990. Contemporary Art History, 1945 to Present...........3
Upper-Division Studio Art Electives..........................15
Upper-Division Art History Electives..........................3
Fine Art Electives............................................6
Fine Arts Topics Painting Course............................... â–  3
Total Semester Hours in Painting Emphasis....................52
Emphasis in Photography
FA 1150. Introduction to Photography.........................3
FA 2155. Introduction to Digital Photography.................3
FA 3155. Digital Book Making/Narrative Strategies............3
FA 3160. Color & Lighting Dynamics............................3
FA 3165. Concepts & Processes.................................3
FA 3630. History of Photography...............................3
FA 4195. Advanced Photography I: Creating a Personal Visual..3
FA 4196. Advanced Photography II: Portfolio Development......3
FA 4800. Art Seminar..........................................3
FA 4950. BFA Thesis...........................................1
FA 4990. Contemporary Art History, 1945 to Present...........3
Upper-Division Studio Art Electives..........................15
Fine Art Electives............................................. â–  6
Total Semester Hours in Photography Emphasis.................52
Emphasis in Sculpture
FA 2500. Sculpture LA.........................................3
FA 2510. Sculpture IB.........................................3
FA 3500. Sculpture IIA........................................3
FA 3510. Sculpture IIB........................................3
FA 3520. Contemporary Sculpture...............................3
FA 4500. Sculpture IILA.......................................3
FA 4510. Sculpture IIIB.......................................3
FA 4800. Art Seminar..........................................3
FA 4950. BFA Thesis...........................................1
FA 4990. Contemporary Art History, 1945 to Present...........3
Upper-Division Studio Art Electives..........................15
Upper-Division Art History Electives..........................3
Fine Art Electives............................................. â–  6
Total Semester Hours in Sculpture Emphasis...................52
Emphasis in Multimedia
FA 2400. Applications 1.......................................3
FA 2410. Methods & Conceptualization I.......................3
FA 2420. Applications II......................................3
FA 2430. Methods & Conceptualization II......................3
FA 3430. Digital Design.......................................3
FA 3435. Designing for Human Experience.......................3
FA 4632. History of New Media.................................3
FA 4800. Art Seminar..........................................3
FA 4940. Multimedia Thesis Preparation........................3
FA 4950. BFA Thesis...........................................1
FA 4990. Contemporary Art History, 1945 to Present...........3
Multimedia Internship or Independent Study....................3
Upper-Division Fine Arts Electives............................6
Multimedia Application Focus (3 credits each; select two)....6
FA 3440. Visible Stories FA 3445. Video Explorations FA 3448. Investigations of Interaction & New Media FA 3455. Issues of Interaction
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


82 / College of Arts & Media
FA 3460. Digital Visualization
FA 3465. Image Concept & Theory
FA 3470. 3D Time-Based Motion & Static Imagery
FA 3475. Advanced 3D Imagery & Media Integration
FA 4350. Topics in Multimedia (subject matter varies each semester)
Multimedia Topics (3 credits each; select two)................6
FA 4350. Topics in Multimedia (subject matter varies each semester)
FA 4420. Transgressive & Subversive Messages
FA 4425. Information & Interaction Multimedia Design
FA 4430. Design & Culture
FA 4435. Word as Image, Image as Word
FA 4440. Truth & Perception in Electronic Media
FA 4445. Interdisciplinary Explorations
FA 4450. Electronic Media Installation
Total Semester Hours in Multimedia Emphasis...................52
Emphasis in Multimedia 3D Graphics and Animation
FA 1420. Introduction to 3D Graphic Processes and Techniques .. .
FA 1425. Digital 3D Preproduction...........................
FA 3421. Digital 3D Surface Modeling........................
FA 3423. Digital Texture Mapping............................
FA 3425. 3D Digital Lighting................................
FA 3427. Digital 3D Organic Lighting........................
FA 3429. Digital Animation & Applied Effects I..............
FA 3431. Digital Animation & Applied Effects II.............
FA 3433. Digital Objects/Character Articulation.............
FA 3436. Digital Animation: Particles.......................
FA 3437. Digital Animation: Dynamics........................
FA 3439. Digital 3D Postproduction..........................
FA 4632. History of New Media...............................
FA 4800. Art Seminar........................................
FA 4950. BFA Thesis.........................................1
FA 4990. Contemporary Art History, 1945 to Present..........3
Fine Art Electives............................................. 6
Total Semester Hours in Multimedia 3D Graphics Emphasis.....52
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


The Business School
Dean
Sueann Ambron
Dean of Faculty and Executive Associate Dean
Jean-Claude Bosch
Associate Dean] for Academic Programs
JCenneth L. Bettenhausen
Contact
Office
CU-Denver Building 1250 14th Street, 2nd Floor
Phone
303-556-5802
Fax
303-556-5914
Website
Www. business, cudenver. edu
Admissions/Advising Undergraduate: 303-556-5800 Graduate: 303-556-5900
Located in the heart of the Rocky Mountain business community, the j Business School at the University of Colorado at Denver prepares students with the knowledge and skills necessary to become effective, responsible business professionals. We’re able to achieve a standard of excellence by bringing together nationally recognized faculty and highly motivated, mature students in an intellectually challenging academic environment. CU-Denver’s Business School is a “research institution.” Because ourfaculty are nationally recognizedfor their contributions to scholarly research as well as for their teaching skills, our students have the opportunity to be on the leading edge of business management theory and practice. Our class schedules and curriculum offerflexibility to meet your needs whether you plan to attendfull or part time, day or evening. Whether you’re an experienced working professional seeking an advanced degree orpreparingfor a new career in the business world, you’ll gain the knowledge and perspective necessary to succeed in today’s challenging business environment.
Faculty
Professors
Rlarcelle V. Arak (Finance) Heidi Boerstlejr (Health Administration) Jean-Claude Bosch (Finance) Peter G. Bryant (Management Science and Information Systems) Wayne F. Cascio (Management) .awrence F. Cunningham (Marketing and Transportation) E. Woodrow Eckard Jr. (Business Economics) C. Marlena Fiol (Management) Richaj'd W. Foster (Finance and Health Administration) James H. Gerlalch (Information Systems) Jahangir Karijni (Information Systems) Susan M. Keaveney (Marketing) Gary A. Kochenberger (i Operations Management) James R. Morris (Finance) Denn s F. Murray (Accounting) Bruce R. Neumann (Accounting and ) Health Administration) Edward J.

Educational Goals
CU-Denver’s Business School is committed to superb teaching, connecting theory to practice that focuses on:
• current and relevant knowledge and skills necessary for success in the highly competitive global business environment
• experience in cooperative and team-based work skills
• integrated professional and functional expertise
• sensitivity to cultural and ethnic diversity Our graduate programs serve both
traditional and non-traditional students who have extensive work experience. The MBA serves the needs of students who desire a general business education. The professionally oriented MS degrees serve the needs of students who desire greater specialization, particularly students who have already obtained an undergraduate business degree. Large numbers of our graduate students will be drawn from national and international locales.
Our undergraduate program, which serves both traditional and non-traditional students, leads to a baccalaureate degree in business with a substantial liberal arts component. The
program is closely linked, through articulation agreements, to lower-division programs offered by Colorado’s four-year and community colleges. The majority of undergraduates come from the Denver metropolitan area.
Key elements of our academic programs are the provision of top-quality career advising and placement services, as well as flexible schedules and programs to meet a wide range of student needs. We are committed to assisting our students’ efforts to pursue rewarding careers.
Faculty
Our nationally recognized faculty is vigorous and enthusiastic about its teaching and research. Faculty members hold degrees from the nation’s leading business schools, including Berkeley, Harvard, Stanford, University of Chicago, University of Pennsylvania, UCLA, and Yale. Many of them also bring years of valuable experience in private industry. Their interdisciplinary expertise, academic achievements, scholarly research, and business experience provide students with a dynamic learning environment.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


84 / The Business School
Associate Professors
Herman Aguinis (Management) Ajeyo Banerjee (Finance) Kenneth L. Bettenhausen (Management) Kang Rae Cho (Management and International Business) GaryJ. Colbert (Accounting) Edward J. Conry (Business Law and Ethics) Elizabeth S. Cooperman (Finance) David A. Forlani (Marketing) Blair D. Gifford (Management and Health Administration) Deborah L. Kellogg (Operations Management) Sarah Kovoor-Misra (Management) Michael Mannino (Information Systems) L. Ann Martin (Accounting) Madhavan Parthasarathy (Marketing) Manuel G. Serapio, Jr. (International Business and Management) Marlene A. Smith (Quantitative Methods)
Assistant Professors
James Diefendorff (Management) Dawn Gregg (Information Systems) Vicki R. Lane (Marketing) Robert Nieschweitz (Accounting) Ronald Rameriz (Information Systems) Michael Roberts (Accounting) Judy Scott (Information Systems) Steven Walczak (Information Systems) Zhiping Walter (Information Systems) Darryl J. Woolley (Accounting)
Senior Instructors
Elizabeth S. Conner (Accounting) Charles M. Franks (Quantitative Methods) Gary L. Giese (Business Law and Management) Michael D. Harper (Operations Management) Robert D. Hockenbury (Accounting) Barbara A. Pelter (Finance) Marianne Plunkert (Finance) Gary R. Schornack (Marketing) Eric J. Thompson (Information Systems) John Turner (Finance)
Instructors
Errol L. Biggs (Health Administration) Chen Ji (Finance) Jeffrey R. Nystrom (Management) Charles A. Rice (Management) Mary Lee Stansifer (Marketing)
Professors Emeritus
H. Michael Hayes (Marketing and Strategic Management) William D. Murray (Information Systems)
Scholarships and Financial Aid
Many programs for financial aid are administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Call 303-556-2886 for detailed information.
Thanks to the generous support of the Colorado business community and others, the Business School has a significant number of scholarships to offer its students. Scholarships are awarded on the basis of merit and/or financial need. The amount of the award and the number of awards available vary. Scholarship monies are typically used to support all or some of a student’s tuition and fees, although certain scholarships allow remaining scholarship funds to be spent at the student’s discretion.
Thirty different scholarships are available to eligible Business School students. Go to www.cudenver.edu/'business for more details.
Undergraduate scholarships include the Board of Advisors, the Business School Undergraduate Excellence, the Carolyn Lee Henderson, the Robert E. Moore Memorial, the Business School Sustaining Student, the Dean’s Community Scholarships, the Scholarship for International Study, and the Dean’s Scholarship for Continuing Undergraduate Business Students.
The MBA Excellence Award, the MBA Opportunity Scholarship and the MBA Faculty’s Scholarship are given to qualifying MBA students.
Accounting sc\\o\3.tsKi$s for both graduate and undergraduate accounting students include the Deloitte & Touche, and Accounting Program, as well as the Price Waterhouse Coopers Scholarship for undergraduate junior accounting majors only.
MS Finance scholarships are the MS Finance Fellows, open to graduate students in the finance program, and the Carolyn Lee Henderson Scholarship, designated for an undergraduate or graduate woman in the finance program.
MS Health Adminstration scholarships include the Abbott Fellows, AUPHA/McGaw, CU-Denver MS Health Administration, Eugenie D. Sontag, Leland R. Kaiser, Medical Group Management, and the MS Health Administration Alumni Scholarships.
MS Information Systems students may apply for the Dean’s Scholarship in Information Systems.
The MS International Business Merit Scholarship is open to students in the CU-Denver MS International Business program.
MS Management or Human Resources Management students may apply for the Excellence in Management Scholarship.
MS Marketing students may apply for the MS Marketing Sustaining Student,
MS in Marketing Fellows, and Robert E. Moore Memorial Scholarships (also open to undergraduate marketing students).
Finally, four scholarships are available to students who take courses in entrepreneurial studies at the Richard H. and Pamela S. Bard
Center for Entrepreneurship Development. These are the Coulter Foundation Scholarship in Entrepreneurial Studies and Business, and the Dean’s Pursuit of Excellence, Mehalchin, and Trueblood Scholarships.
Further information about these scholarships, including eligibility criteria and application forms, may be obtained by visiting the Business School website at www.cudenver.edu/business (click on scholarships) or by calling 303-556-5900.
Student Organizations
Opportunity for association with other Business School students in varied activities intended to stimulate professional interest and to give recognition to scholastic attainment is provided by the following student organizations: AABSA—African American Business Student Alliance
Beta Alpha Psi—national honorary scholastic fraternity in accounting
Beta Gamma Sigma—national honorary scholastic fraternity in business FMA—Financial Management Association, a national organization: www. cudenver. edulbusiness!fma HASO—Health Administration Student Organization
ISA—Information Systems Association MBA Student Organization (MBASO) — University of Colorado at Denver association of MBA students
Phi Chi Theta—national professional business and economics fraternity
SHRM—Society for Human Resources Management (student chapter) for students interested in human resources management, www. cudenver. edu/business
Study Abroad
Transfer credit from study abroad programs requires prior written approval from the undergraduate or graduate programs directors. Students must meet with a business staff advisor to determine course acceptability prior to the semester in which they intend to study abroad. Information on the various programs is available at the Office of International Education.
Institute for International Business
The Institute for International Business (IIB) was created in 1988 by the Board of Regents of the University of Colorado to serve as a center for the advanced study and teaching of international business. In 1993, the institute was designated a Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) by the U.S. Department of Education, one of only 25 such centers of excellence in the U.S. Through the CIBER and other funding sources, the institute strives to help the faculties of the Business School and other university
CU-Denver Catalog2004 — 05


Academic Policies / 85
departments in internationalizing curriculum, programs, certificates, or other student-oriented endeavors. The IIB works in other ways to support faculty in thejr teaching, research, and development activities. In addition, the institute designs and facilitates customized international programs and training for business, cooperates with other organizations to offer seminars and conferences, and publishes a quarterly newsletter to familiarize the Denver and regional communities with international business issues. Such initiatives help faculty, students, and the business community to acquire the skills and expertise needed to be successful in our increasingly global: economy. The institute also conducts and promotes research on the global economic aspects of competitiveness. Call 303-556-4738 for information.
Internships
The general requirements for internships are as follows:
• Undergraduate students must be admitted to the Business School, be in good standing with at least a 3.2 cumulative GPA, and have completed at least 15 hours of the business core at CU-Denver and senior standing.
• Graduate students jnust be admitted to the Business School, be in good standing with at least a 3.0 GPA, and have completed 15 semester hours of graduate work at CU-Denver.
Interested students Ishould contact the appropriate program director or the Career Center iwww.careers.cudenver.edu) for further details about the program.
GENERAL ACADEMIC POLICIES
Academic policies that apply to all CU-Denver students are described in the General Information section of this catalog. The policies outlined on the following page$ are relevant for both undergraduate and graduate students in the Business School. Individual policies appropriate only to undergraduate or graduate students are described under separate headings.
Each student is responsible for knowing and complying with the academic policies andj regulations established for the school. The school cannot assume responsibility for problems resulting from a student’s failure to follow the policies stated in this catalog. Similarly, students are responsible for all deadlines, rules, and regulations stated in the online schedule planner.
Academic Ethics
Students are expected to conduct themselves in accordance with the highest standards of honesty and integrity. Cheating, plagiarism, illegitimate possession and disposition of examinations, alteration, forgery, falsification of official records, and similar acts or any attempt to engage in such acts are grounds for suspension or expulsion from the university. In particular, students are advised that plagiarism consists of any act involving the qffering of the work of someone else as the student’s own. It is recommended that students consult with the instructors as to the proper preparation of reports, papers, etc., in order to avoid this and similar offenses. Also, actions that disrupt the administrative process, such as misrepresentat ion of credentials or academic status, other forms of deception, or verba abuse of university staff are grounds for suspension or probation. All reported acts of dishonesty must be referred to the Business School’s Internal Affairs Committee.
Admission to Business Classes
Enrollment in business classes is limited to students who have been admitted to business degree programs, and to other students as described in the separate undergraduate and graduate policy sections. The course registration criteria are designed to meet a number of objectives:
1. to assure access to business courses for students seeking a business degree
2. to serve students in pther colleges who have business-related education objectives or requirements
3. to serve non-degree students who have specific career or education goals
Refer to the online schedule planner each term for course availability and course prerequisites.
Attendance Regulations
Students are required to attend classes on a regular basis. Absences must be arranged with the instructor and must conform with university and instructor’s policies on attendance.
Prerequisites
Students are expected to know and fulfill all prerequisites when registering. See course listings for relevant prerequisites. The Business School reserves the right to administratively drop students who enroll without the correct prerequisites. Generally, students who are administratively dropped or withdrawn will not receive tuition refunds.
Course Numbering
The course numbering system used at the University of Colorado at Denver identifies the class standing required for enrollment. Students are expected to take 1000-level courses in their freshman year, 2000-level courses in their sophomore year, 3000-level courses in their junior year, and 4000-level courses in their senior year. Courses at the 5000 and 6000 level are restricted to master’s-level business students, and courses at the 7000 level are restricted to PhD students.
Adding Courses
Students may add courses to their original schedule through census date (first 12 days of the fall or spring semester, first 8 days of summer session). Instructor approval may be required to add a course after the first day of classes.
Dropping Courses
Students may drop a course through census date and it will not appear on the transcript. After census, a student who wishes to drop must obtain written approval from both the instructor and academic dean or designate. The course and a grade of lUwill appear on the transcript. In order to drop beyond the 10th week, it will also be necessary to document circumstances beyond a student’s control. Any student who is failing a class will not be allowed to drop, and an Twill be recorded on the transcript.
Withdrawal
See the General Information section of this catalog for university-wide withdrawal policies. Note that the Business School normally requires instructors’ signatures on withdrawal forms before the academic dean’s approval is granted.
Administrative Drop
The school reserves the right to administratively drop students who are incorrectly enrolled in business courses. Instructors also may recommend that students who fail to meet expected course attendance or course prerequisites be dropped from the course. Generally, students who are administratively dropped will not receive tuition refunds.
Note that students who never attend class are not automatically dropped from the course. The student is responsible for payment and for the grade in each course.
Appeal Procedure
Students should contact a staff advisor in the Business School’s programs office for appeal and petition procedures pertaining to rules and regulations of the school.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 — 05


86 / The Business School
General Grading Policies
Plus!Minus Grading. Faculty have the option to use plus/minus grading. Incomplete Grades. The only incomplete grade given in the school is IF. An //-grade is assigned only when documented circumstances clearly beyond the students control prevent completion of course requirements (exams, papers, etc.). Students must sign a contract outlining how they will make up the missing work with the instructor giving the IF. Students may not register for the course a second time. All //-grades must be made up within the contract period (which may not exceed one year), or the IF will automatically be changed to the grade of F.
Also, //"’grades must be completed and recorded at the Office of Admissions and Records no later than four weeks prior to graduation. The student is responsible for contacting the instructor concerning the removal of incomplete grades.
Grade Changes. Grades as reported by instructors are final. Grade changes will be considered only in cases of documented clerical errors or when a student is making up an incomplete grade (IF). All changes must be made within one year after the course has been taken, unless highly unusual circumstances can be documented and the change has been approved by the school. Normally, grade changes will not be considered under any circumstances after three years.
Pass-Fail or No Credit (Audit). With the exception of internships, the school does not permit election of pass-fail grading for any business course required for the degree.
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS
A carefully designed curriculum to prepare students for success in business administration is available for the student seeking either an undergraduate or graduate degree. The school offers courses leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration), Master of Business Administration (MBA), the Master of Science (MS), and Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degrees. The particular programs offered are as follows:
Areas of Emphasis (B.S. in Business Administration)
Accounting
Financial Management
Human Resources Management
Information Systems
International Business
Management
Marketing
Graduate Programs
Master of Business Administration (MBA)
Evening option
Health Administration option
11-month option (full time)
Master of Science in Accounting
Master of Science in Finance
Master of Science in Health Administration
Master of Science in Information Systems
Master of Science in International Business
Master of Science in Management and Organization
Master of Science in Marketing
It is possible to pursue two degrees simultaneously, such as an MBA and an MS, or two MS degrees, through our dual degree programs. In addition to the programs in the Business School itself, we partner with other University of Colorado departments to offer dual programs in MS Finance/Economics and the MBA in combination with graduate programs in nursing, architecture, urban planning, and the MD. We also have a joint MBA/MS in International Management degree through Thunderbird in Glendale, Arizona.
Executive Programs
Master of Business Administration (MBA) for Executives Master of Business Administration (MBA) in Health Administration
UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Associate Dean: Kenneth L. Bettenhausen Program Director: Clifford E. Young Director Advising & Admissions: Nancy A. Reed
The undergraduate curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree is intended to help the student achieve the following general objectives:
1. an understanding of the activities that constitute a business enterprise and the principles underlying administration of those activities
2. the ability to think logically and analytically about the kind of complex problems encountered by management
3. facility in the arts of communication
4. a comprehension of human relationships involved in an organization
5. awareness of the social and ethical responsibilities of those in administrative positions
6. skill in the art of learning that will help the student continue self-education after leaving the campus
Undergraduate Admissions
Telephone: 303-556-5800 Fax: 303-556-5904
ADMISSION OF FRESHMAN STUDENTS
Freshman applicants must have completed the college preparatory curriculum in high school, graduated in the top 25 percent of their high school class, and achieved a score of at least 26 on the ACT orllOOon the SAT. See the General Information section of this catalog for further information on freshman admission.
ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS
Applicants who have completed work at other collegiate institutions should review the information on transfer students in the General Information section of this catalog. In addition to university policies, the Business School evaluates coursework to determine its appropriateness for the degree of Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Students who have completed more than 24 semester hours of transferable course-work are evaluated for admission on the basis of their college grade point average (GPA) without regard to their high school performance.
To be fully considered for admission to the Business School, a transfer student must have a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale for all college coursework attempted. Transfer applicants seeking priority admission must have a minimum 3.0 GPA for all work applicable to the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree, and a 2.0 GPA in business courses. Students with less than an overall 3.0 GPA will be considered if they have a 2.6 in the last 24 semester hours of applicable coursework, a 2.0 GPA in business courses, and at least a 2.0 overall GPA in courses applying to the degree.
Transfer applicants who do not meet either of the priority admission standards are pooled and ranked on the basis of their GPA earned in the lastlA hours, if the GPA in the last 24 hours is at least 2.6. Pooled applicants are offered admission as space is available. For information about specific policies on transfer of credit, consult the undergraduate business program coordinator.
INTRA-UNIVERSITY TRANSFER
Students who want to transfer to the Business School from another college or school of the University of Colorado at Denver must formally apply to the Business School. Transfer deadlines are August 1
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Undergraduate Advising / 87
for fall semester, Dece
Tiber 1 for spring semester, and May 1 for the
summer session.
Students will be ev; business degree progr;: technical or vocational subjects. Students wb hours will be evaluate^ 24 transferable hours and college work.
Students will be co. in applicable coursewi their last 24 hours. A| courses (from CU or than 2.0 will be denial requirements for cons
Students will recei Business School if the 3.0 on their last 24 ho requirements for adm on the basis of their G hours is at least 2.6. Pi is available.
To apply for an inti Intra-University Tran: business program coorji: Office of Admissions forms are available at must include the stud with previous coursew submit a copy of their
FORMER STUDENTS
A CU student from has not registered for t is considered a former CU-Denver business d' to the school for up to they are in good stand Students who have no completed the equival institution of higher ed requirements applicabl
OLD WORK POLICY
For students newly business students read semesters, applicable business degree requir evaluated individually Students may be requi courses when past cou given for both courses old will not apply towa
SECOND UNDERGRADUA'
Students may apply graduate degree, provi
luated only on coursework that applies to the m. Generally, this will exclude coursework of a nature and courses in activity PE and remedial have completed at least 24 applicable semester on their college work; students with fewer than vill be evaluated on the basis of both high school
e priority consideration for admission to the r have an overall GPA of 3.0 or an overall GPA of ars. All other applicants meeting the minimum ssion as stated above will be pooled and ranked PA in the last 24 hours, if the GPA in the last 24 'ooled applicants will be offered admission as space
university transfer, students must submit an fer form and the CU-Denver transcripts to the inator. Transfer forms are available at CU-Denver the Business School office; transcript request the CU-Denver Records Office. The transcript it’s most recent semester at the university. Students ork from other institutions are also required to transfer credit evaluations (advanced standings).
another campus, or a CU-Denver student who tree consecutive semesters (summers included), student and must reapply for admission. Former egree students will be automatically readmitted three years from the semester they last attended if ng (not on probation or suspension) in the school, attended for more than three years, or who have nt of 12 or more semester hours at another ucation, must meet the admission and degree le at the time they reapply.
tdmitted to the Business School and former mitted to the school after an absence of three credits up to five years old will be counted toward :ments. Courses more than five years old will be for their current relevance to the degree program, red to update their knowledge by taking additional rses are outdated; in such cases, credit will be Generally, business courses more than 10 years rd degree credit.
EDEGREE
to the Business School to earn a second under-ded the first undergraduate degree is in a field other than business. Persons who have already earned an undergraduate degree in business maj not apply for a second undergraduate degree in are available through the Office of Admissions, cademic record that justifies consideration for a graduate program, tha)t student is encouraged to apply for one of the Business School’s master’s degree programs. Call 303-556-5900 for information or refer to the graduate business section of the catalog.
Students who are accepted for the second undergraduate degree will be required to pursue courses in the sequence normally required for a
business degree. For example, if a student registered for a second degree has not had the required mathematics or general education courses, these must be taken before the student will be eligible to register for business courses. Further, the basic business courses (core courses) must be taken before a student begins to pursue the major field.
MINOR IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Students in other undergraduate schools and colleges at CU-Denver wishing to take a minor in business administration must have a 2.0 GPA to enter as a business minor, and must have a 2.0 GPA overall, plus a 2.0 GPA in business courses at the time of graduation to receive a minor in business. Prerequisites to the business minor are ISMG 2000, MATH 1070 or a higher-level math course, QUAN 2010* or a statistics class approved by the Business School, and ECON 2022. Required courses for a business minor are MGMT 1000, ACCT 2200, BLAW 3000, MKTG 3000, FNCE 3100, and MGMT 3000. Twelve of these 18 hours must be taken while in residence at CU-Denver. If the student has already taken the equivalent of one or more of these courses, other higher-level business courses may be substituted with Business School approval. Up to 6 hours of the 18 required business courses may be taken at another institution. Transfer credit will be granted on the same basis that transfer credit is granted for courses taken by business majors.
*Note: Students enrolling for QUAN 2010 must have completed MATH 1070 and MATH 1080 or equivalent courses.
DOUBLE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Numerous career opportunities exist for persons trained in both a specialized field and management. For this reason, students may be interested in combined programs of study leading to completion of degree requirements concurrently in two fields. For additional information, contact an undergraduate business staff advisor at 303-556-5800.
Undergraduate Advising and Academic Planning
ADMISSIONS ADVISING
Persons not yet admitted to the Business School can receive advising on course selection, admission requirements, and other matters from an undergraduate staff advisor. To make an appointment, call 303-556-5800.
ADMITTED STUDENTS
Upon admission to the school, students execute a degree plan that identifies the courses required to graduate. This plan contains all the information needed to select courses and monitor progress toward completion of requirements for the Bachelor of Science (Business Administration). Business students are expected to assume responsibility for their own advising. This includes scheduling courses each term, being familiar with all the policies and procedures of the college, and otherwise managing their own academic careers. Staff advisors are available to answer questions about unusual situations.
Career advising is available from business faculty and from the CU-Denver Career Center, 303-556-2250.
Undergraduate Core Curriculum—
University of Colorado at Denver
The faculty of the Business School, College of Engineering and Applied Science, and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have established a core curriculum for undergraduate students. All undergraduate students who entered CU-Denver in fall 1990 or later are required to complete the undergraduate core curriculum independent of their college or major. Undergraduate students admitted prior to fall 1990 have a choice of either the new core curriculum or the requirements of their college in effect at the time of admission to the college.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


88 / The Business School
The undergraduate core curriculum for CU-Denver is outlined in the following table, and the CU-Denver core requirements for business students are specified in the section labeled Business Program Requirements.
The undergraduate core curriculum seeks to provide all baccalaureate students with basic intellectual competencies in mathematics and computation, writing, oral communication, information literacy, and critical thinking. It also requires all students to develop basic knowledge in the areas of natural and physical sciences, behavioral sciences, social sciences, humanities, and arts. Furthermore, the core curriculum promotes an awareness of cultural and racial diversity. The majority of the core curriculum is designed to be completed during a students freshman and sophomore years in order to provide the foundation for specific training in a students major discipline.
Graduation Requirements
The Bachelor of Science (Business Administration) degree requires the following:
Total Credits. A total of 120 semester hours.
A minimal level of proficiency must be demonstrated in one foreign language or in regional expertise. Students may satisfy the proficiency requirement by taking courses as described below.
Area of Emphasis or Non-Business Minor. Completion of at least 9—15 semester hours of approved courses in the area of emphasis or completion of at least 15 semester hours in an approved non-business minor. Students who select a non-business minor must complete an additional 3-hour business elective to earn the required number of hours in business.
Residence. At least 30 semester hours of business courses (including the business area of emphasis) must be completed after a student’s admission to the Business School. The 30 hours for residence must include BLAW 4120 and MGMT 4500, and 24 hours in other 4000-level business courses (including area of emphasis courses if an area is selected).
Grade Point Average Requirement. To graduate, a student must maintain a minimum cumulative scholastic grade point average of 2.0 for all courses attempted at the university acceptable toward the B.S. (Business Administration) degree, 2.0 for all business courses, and 2.0 for courses in the student’s area of emphasis or non-business minor.
Undergraduate Honors. Upon recommendation of the faculty, students who demonstrate superior scholarship are given special recognition at graduation. Students must achieve an overall University of Colorado grade point average of 3.3 and a grade point average of 3.5 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado to he consideredfor cum laude. Those who achieve an overall University of Colorado grade point average of 3.5 and a grade point average of 3.7 in all business courses taken at the University of Colorado will be considered for magna cum laude.
Those who achieve a 3.7 overall grade point average and a 3.85 GPA in all business courses will be considered for summa cum laude.
Filing for Graduation. A senior audit is completed on all students who have completed 90 or more semester hours. Students must file an Undergraduate Candidacy form and Diploma Card, and request a graduation evaluation prior to registering for their final semester. Failure to do so will delay graduation. Also, students desiring to change their area of emphasis after filing for graduation must have the change approved by the graduation supervisor prior to registering for their final semester. Changes after that time will delay graduation.
Business Program Requirements
Satisfaction of all the following:
Program Requirements................................Semester Hours
School proficiencies or other courses........................0—13
CU-Denver core.................................................41
Mathematics.....................................................6
Business core..................................................33
International studies...........................................3
Cornerstone courses ........................................6
Area of emphasis or non-business minor ....................... 24
Total Semester Hours Required...............................120
Detailed descriptions of degree course plans that satisfy program requirements follow:
I. BUSINESS SCHOOL REQUIRED SEMESTER HOURS PROFICIENCY: 0-13
The business student must demonstrate either proficiency in a foreign language or in regional expertise. The requirement can be met in the following ways:
A. Foreign Language
The language proficiency can be met by:
1. Completion of the third year of high school coursework in a single language. Students must complete three years of high school credit in one language. A C(2.0) or higher must be earned in the final semester of the third year high school course to show proficiency.
2. Completion of three semesters of college-level coursework in a single foreign language. The third semester course (college level) in one language requires a grade of Cor better to complete the proficiency. The Pass/Fail option cannot be used when completing the requirement at CU-Denver.
3. Examination. Students may show their level of proficiency by taking the placement proficiency exam given by the Language Laboratory in CN 220. The languages tested are French, German, and Spanish. For information about other languages, students should consult with their business advisor, 303-556-5800. The number of times the student may attempt the examination is once per semester.
B. Regional Expertise
The regional expertise option is available as an alternative to Foreign Language Proficiency. This requires the student to develop expertise about a region of the world other than North America. The student must complete a minimum of 9 credit hours of coursework from an approved list that relates to history, arts, culture, politics, or the economy of a single defined region of the world outside North America. Courses used in the expertise area must meet the Business School guidelines. These courses can be chosen from the list specified by the Business School. Students should contact their business advisor to outline their program, 303-556-5800.
Students who must meet all the proficiency requirements through coursework may find it necessary to complete more than 120 semester hours in order to earn the B.S. in Business Administration. The proficiency requirement must be completed during the first three terms in attendance at CU-Denver.
CU-Denver Undergraduate Core Curriculum for B.S. in Business
Specific requirements for the B.S. degree in business are i icluded in
the catalog text.
Knowledge Areas
a. Writing/Speech 9 hours
b. Mathematics 3 hours
c. Natural and Physical Sciences 8 hours
(Biology, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics)
d. Behavioral Sciences AND Social Sciences 9 hours
(Psychology and Economics)
e. Humanities (History, Literature, and Philosophy) 6 hours
f. Arts (Fine Arts, Music, and Theatre) 3 hours
g. Cultural Diversity 3 hours
Total Core 41 hours
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Undergraduate Graduation Requirements / 89
II. CU-DENVER BUSINESS CORE REQUIREMENTS: 41 SEMESTER HOURS
A. Writing/Speech—19 semester hours.
ENGL 1020. Core Composition I..........................3
ENGL3170. Business Writing ............................3
CMMU 2050. Business and Professional Speaking..........3
B. Mathematics—3 Semester hours.
MATH 1070. Algebra for Social Sciences and Business ...3
Note: The required]sequence MATH 1070 and MATH 1080
may be satisfied by ja 6-hour calculus sequence.
C. Natural and Physical Sciences—8 semester hours.
Two of the following courses (a sequence in the same discipline or courses in two different disciplines):
ANTH 1303. Intrb. to Biological Anthropology ................4
BIOL 1550. Basic Biology I ..................................4
BIOL 1560. Basic Biology II .................................4
CHEM 1470. Core Chemistry: Eat, Drink, Man, Woman............4
CHEM 1471. Core Chemistry: Risky Business....................4
ENVS 1042. Introj. to Environmental Sciences.................4
GEOI. 1072. Physical Geology I ..............................4
GEOL 1082. Physical Geology II...............................4
PHYS 1000. Intro to Physics..................................4
PHYS 1052. General Astronomy I...............................4
D. Behavioral Sciences and Social Sciences—9 semester hours.
PSY1000. Introduction to Psychology I........................3
or
PSY 1005. Introduction to Psychology II......................3
ECON 2012. Principles of Economics: Macroeconomics ..........3
ECON 2022. Principles of Economics: Microeconomics...........3
E. Humanities—6 selmester hours.
Two courses from the following:
ENGL 1601. Telling Tales: Narrative Art in Literature and Film.. 3 ENGL 2600. Grea,t Works in British and American Literature ... 3
GER 1000. Germany and the Germans ...........................3
HIST 1381. Paths [to the Present I ..........................3
HIST 1382. Getting Here: Paths to the Present II ............3
PHIL 1012. Introduction to Philosophy:
Relationship of Che Individual to the World ...............3
PHIL 1020. Introduction to Ethics and Society:
The Person and jhe Community...............................3
RUSS 1000. Russia and the Russians: Life, Culture, and Arts _3
RUSS 2000. Masterpieces of Russian Culture ..................3
F. Arts—3 semester hours.
One course from the following:
ARTS 1000. Arts in our Time..................................3
FA 1001. Introduction to Art.................................3
PMUS 1001. Musjc Appreciation ...............................3
THTR 1001. Introduction to Theatre...........................3
G. Cultural Diversity]—3 semester hours.
One course from the list specified for the CU-Denver Core Curriculum (see General Information section of this catalog).
III. BUSINESS SCHOOL SPECIFIC GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
A. MATH 1080. Polynomial Calculus.................................3
Note: The required sequence MATH 1070 and MATH 1080 may be satisfied by a 6-hour calculus sequence.
B. QUAN 2010. Business Statistics.............................3
C. OTHER. MATH 1070, ECON 2012, ECON 2022, PSY 1000, ENGL 3170 (or ENGL 2030), and CMMU 2050 may be taken as part of the CU-Derjver Core. The Business School strongly encourages students to take ENGL 2030 before completing ENGL 3170. However, if other cburses in their respective areas are taken to satisfy CU-Denver core requirements, then these required courses must still be completed to m«et graduation requirements.
IV. BUSINESS CORE: 33 SEMESTER HOURS
Students are required to complete the Business Core in the order listed below:
ACCT 2200. Financial Accounting and Financial Statement Analysis. 3
ACCT 2220. Managerial Accounting and Professional Issues ........3
ISMG 2000. Computer and Business Information Systems ............3
BLAW 3000. Legal, Ethical, and Social Environments of Business I 3
MGMT 3000. Managing Individuals and Teams .......................3
FNCE 3100. Principles of Finance I ..............................3
MKTG 3000. Principles of Marketing...............................3
OPMG 3000. Operations Management.................................3
FNCE 3200. Principles of Finance II .............................3
BLAW 4120. Legal and Ethical Environments of Business II ........3
MGMT 4500. Business Policy and Strategic Management .............3
V. INTERNATIONAL STUDIES: 3 SEMESTER HOURS
International Business—One course (3 semester hours) from the following list of courses:
ACCT 4800-3. Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations
FNCE 4370-3. International Financial Management
MGMT 4400-3. Introduction to International Business
MKTG 4200-3. International Marketing
MKTG 4580-3. International Transportation
VI. AREA OF EMPHASIS OR NON-BUSINESS MINOR: 18-24 SEMESTER HOURS
Students may choose a general business degree with a non-business minor, or a business degree with an area of emphasis in Accounting, Finance, Human Resources Management, Information Systems, International Business, Management, or Marketing.
A. General Business with Non-Business Minor: General business students must take an approved non-business minor of at least 24 semester hours. The courses must form an integrated sequence and be approved by the Business School. Up to 6 semester hours of the sequence may be in courses used to satisfy the general (CU-Denver core) requirements, but the number of “Other Courses” (see below) will be correspondingly increased to meet the 120-hour total requirement for the degree. Students selecting a non-business minor must complete an additional 3-hour upper-division business elective to earn the required number of hours in business. In addition, they must complete ISMG 3000, MGMT 4370, and MKTG 3050.
This credit appears under “Other Courses.” Students interested in completing a minor should contact the individual academic departments regarding requirements.
B. Areas of Emphasis: Areas of Emphasis must consist of at least 24 semester hours, including any business core courses.
VII. OTHER COURSES: 0-13 SEMESTER HOURS
Students may choose other courses freely, subject to the following general rules: (1) Only non-remedial (college-level, as determined by the Business School) courses will count toward the B.S. degree; (2) All students receiving the B.S. degree in business must take at least 48 semester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses). Students in general business will usually need to take at least one business course in the “other courses” category to meet this requirement;
(3) At most, 60 semester hours in business (excluding the economics core courses) may be counted toward the 120 credit hours required for the B.S. degree in business; (4) Students must complete 30 hours of actual business coursework, including the area of emphasis, after acceptance to the Business School; (5) At least 50 percent of the business credits applied to the degree must be taken at CU-Denver.
Guidelines for Elective Credits. Elective credits should be selected carefully because not all classes are acceptable. Generally, to be acceptable, electives must be taught by regular University of Colorado faculty, must
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


90 / The Business School
have a form of assessment such as a term paper and/or examinations, and must be regular classroom-type classes. Course coverage must be college level, not repetitious of other work applied toward the degree, must be academic as opposed to vocational or technical, and must be part of the regular university offerings.
Specifically, the school will accept:
a. A maximum of 6 hours of the theory of physical education, theory of recreation, and/or theory of dance, and
b. A maximum of 6 hours of approved independent study, internships, experimental studies, choir, band, and/or music lessons, art lessons, and
c. A maximum of 12 hours of advanced ROTC, providing the student is enrolled in the program and completes the total program.
The school will nor accept: activity physical education classes, recreation, workshops, orientations, dance, teaching methods, practicums, and courses reviewing basic skills in computers, English composition, mathematics, and chemistry.
Areas of Emphasis
See individual areas of emphasis in this section for specific courses required.
ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SELECTING COURSES Registration
Instruction for registering for courses is contained in another publication called the online schedule planner, which is available before each semester. That publication lists the times when registration occurs and the courses offered.
Maximum Units per Term
The normal scholastic load of an undergraduate business student is 15 semester hours, with a maximum of 18 hours allowed during the fall/spring semesters and 12 hours allowed during the summer session. Hours carried concurrently in the Division of Continuing Education, CU-Boulder, or CU-Denver Extended Studies Programs, whether in classes or through correspondence, are included in the student’s term load.
Repeating Courses
A failed course (grade of F) may be repeated; however, the Twill be included in the grade point average and will appear on the transcript.
A course in which a grade of D or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from the business program coordinator. Courses repeated without approval may not be used in the business grade point average calculation.
Courses from Other Institutions
Business students must have the written approval of the business program coordinator to register for courses (excluding MSCD pooled courses) offered by other institutions, including other CU campuses. Credit will not be given for courses taken without approval. Grades of C or better must be earned to receive business degree credit. Generally, only non-business electives or lower-division, non-business requirements are acceptable for transfer from other institutions once a student has been admitted to the Business School. Students who, after admission to the college, take more than 12 semester hours from another institution, must reapply for admission to the college as transfer students and must meet the current admission requirements.
Metropolitan State College of Denver Courses
Business students may select their non-business required and elective courses from those offered by MSCD. Grades of Cor better must be earned to receive business degree credit; however, the grade is not computed in the CU grade point average and is treated like other transfer credits. MSCD business courses may not be taken for CU-Denver business degree credit.
Graduate-Level Courses
With prior written approval of the business program coordinator, students may take a maximum of 6 semester hours of graduate-level non-business elective credits. Students must earn grades of B or better in graduate courses in order to apply the credits toward business degree requirements.
Pass/Fail
Only internships, independent studies, and non-business elective courses may be taken pass/fail. Required business and non-business courses (including the CU-Denver core) may not be taken pass/fail.
A maximum of 6 hours pass/fail credit may be applied toward the business degree. Courses taken in excess of the maximum will not be applied toward degree credit. Pass/fail determination must be made within the posted deadlines (at census dates) and may not be rescinded (unless approved by the Undergraduate Committee).
Correspondence Courses
Only 6 semester hours of credit taken through correspondence study (from regionally accredited institutions) will be applied toward the business degree. Business courses may not be taken by correspondence. All correspondence courses must be evaluated by the business program coordinator to determine their acceptability toward degree requirements and the program coordinator s written approval is required prior to the students registering for courses. Students may contact the Division of Continuing Education, CU-Boulder, for correspondence course offerings and registration procedures.
Independent Study
Junior or senior business students desiring to work beyond regular course coverage may take variable credit courses (1-3 semester hours) as non-business electives under the direction of an instructor who approves the project, but the student must have the appropriate approval before registering. A maximum of 3 semester hours of independent study coursework may be taken in any one semester; a maximum of 6 semester hours may be applied toward degree requirements.
An Independent Study Request Form must be signed by the student, instructor, area coordinator, and the associate dean for academic programs,
ACADEMIC POLICIES FOR SUSPENSION AND PROBATION
To be in good standing, students must maintain an overall CU grade-point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C=2.0) or better for all coursework attempted, and a 2.0 GPA or better for all business courses attempted. PE activity courses, remedial coursework, MSCD courses, and repeated courses noi approved by a business advisor are not included in this average.
When semester grades become available, students falling below the 2.1 GPA will be notified of 1) probationary status or 2) suspension. Student! are responsible for being aware of their academic status at all times; late grades and/or late grade notification does not waive this responsibility. School rules governing probation and suspension are as follows:
1. Any student whose overall GPA, or business course GPA, is less
than 2.0 will be placed on probation immediately. A student may
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Finance / 91
be removed from probation when the overall GPA and business GPA have been raided to 2.0.
2. A student may remain on probation as long as he/she maintains normal degree progress each semester as determined by the school and each term, while on probation, obtains an overall term GPA of 2.5, and term business course GPA of 2.5, with no grade below a C. Failure to meet probationary provisions will result in suspension. Probationary status may continue only until the student has completed a maximum of 12 Semester hours or four terms, whichever comes first; summer is considered a term. The student will be suspended
if the GPA deficiency is not cleared within this time.
3. Suspended students may not attend any campus of the University of Colorado or any division of the university (including Continuing Education or Extended Studies credit classes).
4. Students on suspension may petition for readmission to the school after waiting a minimum of one year from the term in which they were suspended. Generally, petitions are granted only in unusual circumstances. Anf suspended student readmitted to the school will be under contract and placed on a continued probation status until the GPA deficiency has been cleared. Such students will be automatically suspended if, at any time, their overall GPA or business GPA agaitjt falls below 2.0.
5. Students earning ajl failing grades for a semester will have a dean’s stop placed on their record and will not be permitted to register without a business advisor’s approval.
6. Combined degree students are required to maintain the same standards of performance as business School students in order to be continued in a combined program.
AREAS OF EMPHASIS
Each candidate for the B.S. (Business Administration) degree must complete the prescribed courses in an area of emphasis comprising a minimum of 15 semester hours taken at the University of Colorado at Denver. A 2.0 grade p|oint average is required for area courses. Typically, students select an area of emphasis after taking several of the core courses. They then complete the hours required for their selected area. All B.S. (Business Administration) students must declare a major area of emphasis by the time they have accumulated 60 credit hours. Information about jeach area of emphasis follows:
Accounting
Program Director: Bruce Neumann
Telephone: 303-556-5884
E-mail: Bruce.Neumann@cudenver.edu
Accounting course^ are offered in several fields of professional accountancy at the intermediate, advanced, and graduate levels. They provide preparation for practice in one or more of the following fields:
Auditing
Financial Accounti lg Financial Management Management Control Systems Managerial Accounting Tax Accounting Teaching and Research
In all of these fieldsja thorough knowledge of the social, legal, economic, and political environment is needed. A high degree of analytical ability and communication skill is indispensable.
Courses in English Composition, speech, ethics, and logic are desirable. Courses in statistics aqd information systems, beyond the required Business Core courses; are highly recommended.
Required Courses Semester Hours
ACCT 3054. Accounting Systems and Data Processing............3
ACCT 3220. Intermejdiate Financial Accounting I..............3
ACCT 3230. Intermediate Financial Accounting II ................3
ACCT 3320. Intermediate Cost Accounting.........................3
ACCT 4410. Income Tax Accounting................................3
ACCT 4620. Auditing.............................................3
ACCT free elective (4000 level).................................3
Students planning to pursue accounting as a career may take more than the above required hours. Many students complete a total of 30 hours of accounting, often taking two accounting courses each semester in their junior and senior years. Students should work closely with the accounting faculty and business advisors in planning their accounting programs.
The accounting program offers several 4000/6000-level courses. Students with credit for a 4000-level course cannot receive credit for the corresponding 6000-level course. Graduate students should take 6000-level courses.
Accounting students often specialize in a particular topical area of accounting. Examples of these specializations include:
FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
Recommended Electives
ACCT 4240-3. ACCT 4800-3.
Advanced Financial Accounting Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations
MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING
Recommended Electives ACCT 4330-3. ACCT 4800-3.
Managerial Accounting Problems and Cases Accounting for Government and Nonprofit Organizations
Graduate study in accounting is receiving increasing emphasis by professional organizations and employers. Students meeting admission requirements should consider continuing their education at the graduate level. Qualified undergraduates may petition for permission to take 1-2 graduate accounting courses as electives (e.g. ACCT 6800: Special Topics).
Finance
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816 E-mail: Clifford.Young@cudenver.edu
Since fall 2002, the principal area of study in finance is a Financial Management specialization. This specialization will provide students with skills they need in finance and accounting to succeed in jobs in finance and financial management, particularly in the corporate area. Increasingly, the business community has affirmed that students need skills in both the accounting and finance areas. The financial management specialty incorporates knowledge of financial accounting, cost and managerial analysis, corporate financial management, financial institutions and markets, investments, and accounting information systems and information technology. Job opportunities include accounting positions that are not CPA-track, finance/accounting positions with financial institutions and in the field of business finance. The specialization provides a solid accounting/finance background for other business positions as well.
Pre-requisites: ACCT 2200 and ACCT 2220 are prerequisites for the required accounting courses. In addition, FNCE 3100, FNCE 3200 (and their prerequisites) are prerequisites for the required finance courses.
Required Courses Accounting
ACCT 3054 Accounting Systems and Data Processing
ACCT 3220 Intermediate Financial Accounting I.....
ACCT 3320 Intermediate Cost Accounting............
FNCE 4350 Financial Markets and Institutions......
FNCE 4330 Investment and Portfolio Management FNCE 4500 Corporate Financial Decisions ..........
Semester Hours
.............3
.............3
.............3
.............3
.............3
.............3
CU-Denver Catalog2004 — 05


92 / The Business School
* Required International Course FNCE 4370 International Finance
Electives (1 accounting) ACCT4950 ACCT4950 ACCT 3230 ACCT4330 ACCT 4410
International Accounting Financial Statement Analysis Intermediate Financial Accounting II Managerial Accounting Problems & Cases Income Tax Accounting
* Students should note that all finance and accounting courses are not offered every semester. Students should take the ACCT 2200 and ACCT 2220 courses as soon as possible to avoid bottlenecks in their schedules, since these are prerequisites for all courses in the specialization.
Human Resources Management
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816 E-mail: Clifford.Young@cudenver.edu
Human resources management offers opportunities for students to develop professional competence in the areas of personnel administration and development. Students acquire an understanding of and skills in developing and implementing human resources systems, including recruitment, selection, evaluation, training, motivation, and compensation.
Required Foundation Courses. ISMG 3000, MKTG 3050, and MGMT4370.
Required Emphasis Courses. MGMT 3310 and 6 hours from the following: MGMT 4450, Human Resources Management: Compensation Administration; MGMT 4430, Training; MGMT 4420, Staffing; MGMT 4440, Performance Management.
Recommended Electives ECON 4610-3. Labor Economics MGMT 4950-3. Special Topics in Management PSY 3135-3. Organizational Psychology
Information Systems
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816 E-mail: Clifford.Young@cudenver.edu
The information systems area is designed for those who wish to prepare themselves for careers as professional data processing managers or as technical specialists in business and government. The student develops those technical skills and administrative insights required for analysis of information systems, the design and implementation of systems, and the management of data processing operations. The emphasis is on management information systems—systems for the collection, organization, access, and analysis of information for the planning and control of operations. Students should note that not all courses are offered each semester. ISMG 2200 is a required prerequisite for the information systems area and applies as a business elective.
The Information Systems program offers a new expanded emphasis at the undergraduate level. This specialization provides students with skills they need to enter the workforce in the area of information systems. The particular focus for these individuals is the area of application development. The market has indicated a particular need for students with bachelors degrees that can immediately enter the workforce in this area. CU-Denver is well-situated to provide this needed area through the program.
Required Foundation Courses. ISMG 3000
Required Emphasis Courses Semester Hours
ISMG 2200 Structured Programming with C .................3
ISMG3100 Information Technology Hardware and Software......3
ISMG 3200 Programming, Data, File, and Object Structures ..3
ISMG 4500 Physical Design and Implementation With DBMS — 3
ISMG 4600 Analysis and Logical Design ...................3
ISMG 4700 Networks and Telecommunication ................3
ISMG 4800 Physical Design and Implementation
with a Programming Environment........................3
ISMG 4900 Project Management and Practice ...............3
International Business
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816 E-mail: Clifford.Young@cudenver.edu
Increasingly, businesses are reorienting their thinking, planning, and operations to capitalize on opportunities that exist in the world marketplace. Every phase of business is affected by this reorientation. For individuals with the appropriate skills, training, and interest, international business provides excellent career opportunities.
The international business curriculum is designed to enhance and build on thorough training in basic business skills and to provide students with additional skills and knowledge appropriate to international business.
Required Foundation Courses. ISMG 3000, MKTG 3050, and MGMT 4370.
Required Emphasis Courses Semester Hours
FNCE 4370. International Financial Management......................3
MKTG 4200. International Marketing.................................3
MKTG 4580. International Transportation ...........................3
MGMT 4400. Introduction to International Business.................3
A second area of emphasis in business is highly recommended. In addition, serious consideration should be given to advanced study of a foreign language and to either a minor or a Certificate in International Affairs, offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Management
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816 E-mail: Clifford.Young@cudenver.edu
The management curriculum provides the foundation for careers in supervision and general management in a wide variety of organizations. It develops skills in management practice through an understanding of general management principles, individual and group behavior, organizational change and design, and human resources management.
Required Foundation Courses. ISMG 3000, MKTG 3050, and MGMT 4370.
Required Emphasis Courses Semester Hours
MGMT 3310. Introduction to Human Resources..................3
MGMT 4350. Conflict and Change in Organizations.............3
Management Elective.........................................3
(Choose one.) MGMT 4100, MGMT 4400, MGMT 4430, MGMT 4420, MGMT 4450, or MGMT 4950
Recommended Electives
MGMT 4400-3. Introduction to International Business MGMT 4410-3. Human Resources Management: Compensation Administration MGMT 4950-3. Special Topics in Management
Marketing
Program Director: Clifford E. Young Telephone: 303-556-5816 E-mail: Clifford.Young@cudenver.edu
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Graduate Business Programs / 93
Marketing is concerned with directing the activities of the organization toward the satisfactiojn of customer wants and needs. This involves understanding custodiers, identifying those wants and needs that the organization can best serve, guiding the development of specific products or services, planning and implementing ways to take products or services to the market, securing the customer’s order, and finally, monitoring customer response injorder to guide future activities.
In most organizations, marketing is a major functional area that provides a wide varietjy of career opportunities in such fields as personal selling and sales management, advertising and sales promotion, public relations, marketing research, physical distribution, product management, market management, marketing information systems, and retail management. Increasingly, career opportunities exist in service businesses and nonprofit organizations.
Required Foundation Courses. ISMG 3000, MKTG 3050, and MGMT4370.
Required Emphasis Courses Semester Hours
MKTG 3100. Marketing Research .................................3
MKTG required courses (*)......................................6
*Two courses from the following list:
MKTG 3200-3] Buyer Behavior
MKTG 4000-3J Advertising
MKTG 4100-3. Physical Distribution Management
MKTG 4200-3] International Marketing
MKTG 4500-3i Advertising Management and
Public Relations
MKTG 4580-3. International Transportation
MKTG 4600-3, Business Marketing
MKTG 4700-3. Personal Selling and Sales Management
In addition to the three required courses beyond the core, students may select marketing electives, business electives, and non-business electives that support their particular career orientations. The marketing faculty advisor can assist the student in choosing an appropriate set of electives to fit career cjbjectives.
GRADUATE BUSINESS PROGRAMS (MBA/MS/PhD)
Associate Dean: Kenneth L. Bettenhausen Director, Graduate Admissions and Advising: Linda J. Olson Telephone: 303-55615900 Fax: 303-556-5904
E-mail: grad.businessi@cudenver.edu or
Kenneth.Bettenhausen@cudenver.edu
The Business School offers programs leading to the Master of Business Administration (MBA), and the Master of Science (MS) in specific fields of business and health administration. In addition, the Master of Business Administration for Executives (Executive MBA) is offered as a multi-campus program of the Business School, and the Executive Program in (Health Administration (Executive MSHA)
> offered through the
Executive Programs division.
The MBA, the Executive MBA, and the MS degrees in business are accredited by AACSB International, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Tusiness. The MBA and MS in Health Administration are also accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACEHSA).
Requirements for Admission to the MBA and MS Programs
ADMISSIONS ADVISING
Persons contemplating graduate study are encouraged to learn about admission and program requirements by scheduling an appointment with a graduate advisojr or attending one of the regularly scheduled prospective student information meetings. Call 303-556-5900.
Admission to the graduate programs in business (MBA and MS) is granted only to students showing high promise of success in graduate business study. Admission is based on the following indicators of the candidates likelihood to succeed in the program:
ACADEMIC RECORD
The bachelors degree must be earned from a regionally accredited university. The total academic record is considered, including the grade point average, the course of study, and the quality of the program.
REQUIRED TESTING
The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is required for admission consideration for any applicant who does not have a postbaccalaureate degree. The GMAT test is administered several times each year at numerous centers throughout the world. For information and to make application for the test, write to: Graduate Management Admission Test, Educational Testing Service, CN 6103, Princeton,
NJ 08541; or phone 1-800-GMATNOW; or visit their website at www.mba.com. The code number for CU-Denver’s graduate business programs is 4819.
WORK EXPERIENCE
A record of appropriate employment at increasing levels of responsibility is considered a positive indicator of the likelihood of successful completion of graduate work.
BACKGROUND REQUIREMENTS
Students applying for graduate programs in business do not need to have taken their undergraduate degrees in business. The MBA program is specifically designed so that the required courses cover the material needed for completion of the degree. There are no prerequisites needed to start the MBA program. Applicants for the MS degree, however, may be required to take background or Common Body of Knowledge courses, depending on the individuals academic background. Students with non-business backgrounds have completed the program successfully. For more detailed information, phone a graduate academic advisor, 303-556-5900.
It is expected that students have an adequate level of personal computer proficiency in a word processing and spreadsheet software, as well as a good working knowledge of basic algebra and proper English.
THE ADMISSION PROCESS
Mailing address for applications:
Graduate Admissions The Business School University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 165, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80217-3364
Students seeking admission to the 11-Month MBA, MBA in Health Administration, Health Administration, or Executive Programs should consult with the relevant catalog sections for additional application criteria or requirements.
Domestic Application Requirements
1. Complete Parts I and II of the Application for Graduate Admission and the four essay questions.
2. Have required GMAT scores sent directly to the graduate business admissions office from the Educational Testing Service. The code for CU-Denver’s graduate business programs is 4819.
3. Have two official transcripts (not student copies) mailed directly from each school, college, and university ever attended past high school. Transcripts must be sent even if credit coursework completed was not part of a degree program or was taken after an undergraduate degree was earned.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


94 / The Business School
4. Enclose a check for $50 for the MBA or MS programs, or $80 for the dual MBA/MS or dual MS/MS, made payable to the University of Colorado. Personal interviews are not required, except for the 11-Month MBA and the MBA and MS in Health Administration.
Deadlines. To be considered for admission, applicants for graduate programs must submit all materials prior to the following dates:
April 1 for summer session admission;
June 1 for fall semester admission; and November 1 for spring semester admission.
The 11-Month MBA option only admits students each fall.
Early applications are encouraged because, if admitted, the student receives priority for registration time assignment. Applications received after published deadlines with complete supporting documentation, scores, fees, and transcripts will be considered, but do not receive priority handling.
International Students. Foreign applicants must fill out special forms, score at least 525 (paper based) or 197 (computer based) on the TOEFL exam, pay a $75 fee ($95 for dual MBA/MS), and meet significantly earlier deadlines—January 15 for summer session admission, March 15 for fall semester admission, and October 1 for spring semester admission.
Academic Policies for Graduate Students
ADVISING
As soon as possible after being admitted, students should schedule an appointment with a graduate advisor to discuss general degree requirements, plus determine if any background coursework may be required and/or what Common Body of Knowledge courses might be waived for the MS degree.
DEGREE PLAN
All students are encouraged to meet with a graduate advisor during their first semester to review their degree plan. Students are encouraged to meet with a graduate advisor throughout their program to ensure the correct sequencing of courses. Students must petition before receiving degree credit for any course changes.
COURSE LOAD
The normal course load for full-time graduate students is 9-15 semester hours. However, because many students also are pursuing a career, it is possible to attend classes on a part-time basis by enrolling for 3-6 semester hours. For financial aid purposes, 6 semester hours of graduate study is considered full time. Graduate courses are scheduled primarily in the evening in order to accommodate the working student.
TRANSFER OF CREDIT
Upon approval of the graduate committee, a maximum of 12 semester hours of graduate business coursework may be transferred to the MBA and 9 semester hours for the MS degrees (9 semester hours for each the MBA and MS degree if under a dual program) from another AACSB-accredited graduate school of business, if they have been completed within the last five years with a grade of at least B (not B-). No transfer courses will be accepted if they have been used to satisfy degree requirements of a previously awarded degree. Graduate business courses taken at other University of Colorado campuses are considered transfer hours and are included in the transfer limit. Transfer of quarter hours of graduate business credit may satisfy a course requirement, but may not satisfy the total number of hours requirement. One quarter hour equals .667 semester hours.
TIMELIMITS
Master’s students are required to complete all degree requirements within five years and one semester (seven years and one semester to earn dual MBA/MS or MS/MS degrees, or a PhD). Courses completed outside
of these time limits will not be accepted toward the degree without petition. Time-limit extensions are given only for external situations that restrict a student’s ability to complete the program in a timely manner.
FORMER STUDENTS
Any CU-Denver student who has not been enrolled for three consecutive semesters (summers included) is considered a former student, and must reapply for admission to the program by submitting Part I of the Application for Graduate Admission, in-state tuition form, along with the applicable fee. Readmitted students must conform to degree requirements in effect during the term in which they are readmitted.
If the new requirements differ significantly from the former degree plan, a petition may be submitted requesting exceptions.
GRADUATION
To file an Application for a Diploma, contact the graduate advising office at 303-536-5900. We encourage students to apply the semester prior to the semester of graduation to detect possible last-minute problems requiring petitions or course schedule changes.
GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIREMENTS
A minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 must be achieved and maintained for courses taken toward a graduate business degree.
All CU-Denver graduate courses completed to meet business degree requirements are computed in the graduate business grade point average. Transfer hours and grades from other institutions, including University of Colorado courses taken at the Boulder, Health Sciences and Colorado Springs campuses are not computed in the business GPA, although degree credit is awarded.
PROBATION AND SUSPENSION
If after completing 9 credit hours a student’s cumulative graduate business grade point average falls below 3.0, the student will be placed on academic probation and given three semesters (one calendar year) or 9 credit hours of graduate business coursework (whichever occurs first) in which to achieve the required 3.0 cumulative average. Failure to achieve the required GPA within the allotted time period will result in suspension for one year. Suspended students who showed improvement while on probation or students with unusual circumstances who are unable to meet the time limits will have 30 days from the date of suspension activation to petition for a prolonged probationary period. Suspended students may not attend any campus of the University of Colorado including Continuing Education/Extended Studies. Suspended students may seek to be readmitted after 12 months (three semesters) from the term in which the suspension occurred. A petition form plus a new Graduate Application Part I must be submitted along with the appropriate fee. Generally petitions of this nature prove successful only on rare occasions.
PASSING GRADES
Any grade below a C(2.0) is a failing grade for graduate students. Graduate students must repeat a required course for which they have received a grade below a C Both the original grade and the grade for the repeated course count in the computation of the business grade point average.
REPEATING GRADUATE BUSINESS COURSES
A failed course (any grade below a C) must be repeated if it is a required course. Both the original and the repeated grade will be included in the GPA and will appear on the transcript. A course in which a grade of C or better is obtained may not be repeated without written approval from the director of graduate programs. Graduate business courses repeated without approval may not be used in the graduate business GPA calculation.
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Master of Business Administration / 95
DROP/WITHDRAWAL
Classes dropped prior to census date will not appear on the transcript. Thereafter, to drop with a grade of W, a student must be earning a grade of Cor better; otherwise, an Twill appear on the transcript. Students will not be permitted jto drop a course or withdraw from all courses after the tenth week of the semester, unless circumstances outside the student’s control are documented. The petition to drop or withdraw must be approved by (he associate dean for academic programs and the course instructor(s). |
Registration for Graduate Business Courses
Students admitted to graduate degree programs have priority for graduate business coujrses. Non-degree students and graduate students from other University of Colorado schools or colleges may be permitted to attend on a space-available basis by meeting the qualifications and submitting a non-degree application form (available by calling 303-556-5900 or online at unvw.cudenver.edu/business.
Some graduate-level (6000-level) courses may be offered simultaneously with undergraduate 4000-level courses. However most 6000-level courses are reserved exclusively for graduate students.
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA)
Program Director: Sarah Kovoor-Misra Telephone: 303-556-5841 E-mail: sarah.kovoorf^cudenver.edu
The Master of Business Administration (MBA) program provides a general background jn management and administration. This background enables the stiident to have the breadth of exposure and depth of knowledge required for an advanced-level management career.
The program is devoted to developing the concepts, analytical tools, and communication s^dlls required for competent and responsible administration of an enterprise viewed in its entirety, within its social, political, and economic environment.
The MBA program! is available in different configurations:
Evening, 11-Month (full time), Health Administration, and the Executive MBA (see relevant section). All MBAs have the same curriculum requirements; they differ only in their focus, the flexibility of course scheduling, ynd the time required to complete the program. The 11-Month and Executive MBAs are lockstep programs (no open electives, no specialized tracks), where all the students complete all program requirement^ together. No course transfers, waivers, or substitutions are permjitted.
The Evening MBA allows the scheduling of classes with maximum flexibility so students Online courses add additional flexibility. Students may complete all degree requirements o lline, or combine online and campus courses to
broaden your choice o personal learning style
electives or to fit a business travel schedule or Choice of online electives is limited.
The 11-Month MBA is an accelerated full-time program. It enables students to focus their energies in a concentrated, total-immersion program of study and earn a nationally accredited, 48-credit-hour MBA in just under a year. All 11-Month MBA classes meet during the business day in the historic Masonic Temple Building on the 16th Street Mall in Denver, which houses (he innovative Richard H. and Pamela S. Bard Center for Entrepreneurship Development. For additional information, call 303-556-5911 or contact Program Director Ajeyo Banerjee at 303-556-5838.
11-Month MBA courses may be transferred to the Evening MBA arogram. Candidates for all MBA programs complete a total of 16 classes
(48 semester hours) comprised of 10 required courses (30 hours), one international business elective (3 hours), and 5 elective graduate business
courses (15 hours).
Core Requirements Semester Hours
BUSN 6520. Managing Individuals and Teams.....................3
BUSN 6530. Data Analysis for Managers.........................3
BUSN 6540. Legal and Ethical Environment of Business..........3
BUSN 6550. Analyzing and Interpreting Accounting Information . 3
BUSN 6560. Marketing Management...............................3
BUSN 6610. Information Technology Management..................3
BUSN 6620. Applied Economics for Managers.....................3
BUSN 6630. Management of Operations ..........................3
BUSN 6640. Financial Management...............................3
BUSN 6710. Strategic Management...............................3
Total Required Core Hours....................................30
Electives
International Business elective ..............................3
Free electives............................................. 15
Total Elective Hours........................................_2l
Total MBA Hours .............................................48
Notes and Restrictions
Core Substitution. Students with extensive and comparable course-work in a particular core subject area may petition to substitute a higher-level graduate core course on the basis of prior undergraduate or graduate coursework taken at a regionally accredited college or university for the corresponding core class. This does not waive the 48-hour requirement. If a core course is substituted, another graduate-level course in the same functional area must be used as a substitute so that the student completes a total of 48 semester hours.
International Elective. One 3-hour course must be completed from the following list:
ACCT 6370-3. International Accounting
ENTP 6826-3. International Entrepreneurship
FNCE 6370-3. International Financial Management
FNCE 6411-3. International Corporate Governance
HLTH 6070-3 International Health Policy and Management
INTB 6000-3. Introduction to International Business
INTB 6020-3. Cross-Cultural Management
INTB 6040-3. Managing People in Global Markets
INTB 6060-3. The Legal Aspects of International Business
INTB 6080-3. Global Competition
INTB 6200-3. International Business Policy
ISMG 6400-3 Global E-Business
MKTG 6020-3. International Marketing
MKTG 6080-3. Marketing in Emerging Markets
Or, with prior approval of the program director, a special topics graduate business course with an international emphasis may be substituted.
Electives. The MBA curriculum allows for 15 hours of elective credit, which can be chosen from graduate-level courses offered by the Business School, except BUSN courses numbered below 6800. A maximum of 3 semester hours of graduate-level coursework completed at CU-Denver outside the Business School may be applied to the MBA degree, but only with prior written approval of the MBA program director.
Note: Electives for the 11-Month MBA programs are pre-selected for all students.
MBA Specialized Tracks
Graduate students will have an opportunity to take specialized tracks within the MBA program by completing a pre-specified program of elective courses. The following 15 tracks are available:
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


96 / The Business School
Business-to-Business Marketing Business-to-Consumer Marketing Business Strategy Change Management Corporate Financial Management Decision Science
Enterprise Technology Management Entrepreneurship Financial Analyst Human Resources Management Information Systems International Business Investment Management Marketing
Services Management
For additional information about the MBA program, contact a graduate advisor at 303-556-5900.
Master of Business Administration-Health Administration
Program Director: Errol L. Biggs Telephone: 303-556-5845 E-mail: errol.biggs@cudenver.edu
ADMISSION PROCESS Requirements for Admission
Selection of students is a multi-step process. When making application to the program for the MBA-HA, candidates should send their applications to:
Graduate Admissions
Graduate School of BusinessAdministration University of Colorado at Denver Campus Box 165, P.O. Box 173364 Denver, CO 80127-3364
Application Requirements
1. Complete the Application for Graduate Admission, Parts 1 and II, and submit by published deadlines.
2. Send two (2) letters of recommendation from professional or academic acquaintances who are familiar with the applicant’s academic/professional competence.
3. Send required Graduate Management Admission Test scores directly to the graduate office from the Educational Testing Service. When registering for the GMAT, use code 4819. GRE test scores will also be considered.
4. Pay the $50 application fee.
5. Send two (2) official transcripts directly from each school, college, or university previously attended past high school. A minimum baccalaureate degree is required.
6. Include answers to the four essay questions.
7. Document any experience in the field of health services administration (preferred but not required).
8. Complete a personal interview with the program director.
Admission to the MBA-HA degree program is on a competitive
basis. Therefore, these admission criteria represent minimum entrance qualifications expected of all students.
For further information, brochures, and application materials, contact the Business School’s Graduate Program in Health Administration, University of Colorado at Denver, 303-556-5900.
HEALTH ADMINISTRATION SCHOLARSHIPS/LOANS
Financial assistance is available for qualified students. Students should apply directly to the University of Colorado at Denver Office of Financial Aid. Call 303-556-2886 for information and forms.
In addition, some funds are available only to students in the graduate program in health administration:
• U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Health Administration Traineeships
• Foster G. McGaw Scholarship
• CU-Denver MS and MBA Health Administration Scholarship
• Colorado Health Administration Alumni Association Scholarship
Enrollment in the program also makes students eligible to apply for some nationally competitive scholarships from professional organizations.
Call 303-556-5900 for applications or visit our website, wurw. cudenver. edu!business.
GRADUATE PROGRAM IN HEALTH ADMINISTRATION
The Graduate Program in Health Administration (F1A program) is consistently ranked as a top program in the United States and attracts students with a variety of backgrounds and experience levels, which further enriches the classroom experience. The HA program is accredited by the Accrediting Commission on Education for Health Services Administration (ACHESA). The program is the only such program in the Rocky Mountain region and was started in 1968. Full-time faculty with distinguished research records and a select group of practicing managers provide students with the latest thinking on the most important issues in international health.
The health administration program offers courses of study leading to the Master of Science in Health Administration/International Health Management and Policy Track; MS in Health Administration, Financia Management Track; MS in Health Administration; the Master of Business Administration in Health Administration; and the Executive Program in Health Administration. These courses of study can be pursued on a part-time or full-time basis.
DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
The curriculum of the graduate program in health administration is: synthesis of management concepts and techniques that are applicable to any economic organization, and tools that can be specifically applied to health services systems. The program emphasizes skills that strengthen basic analytic and decision-making processes used by top-level manager in selecting broad strategies and by junior managers in administering subunits in health care organizations.
Students enrolled in the Master of Business Administration-Health Administration must complete a minimum of 48 semester hours of graduate-level coursework to receive their degree. The curriculum is based on a series of structured learning sequences. Most of the courses are available in the evening to enable working students to pursue the degree on a part-time basis. The specific course requirements are as follows (recommended sequence):
YEAR ONE
BUSN 6520-3. BUSN 6530-3. BUSN 6550-3.
HLTH 6010-3. BUSN 6541-3. HLTH 6071-3 BUSN 6621-3. HLTH Elective
Managing Individuals and Teams Data Analysis for Managers Analyzing and Interpreting Accounting Information Health Care Systems
Legal and Ethical Environment of Business Intro to Health Information Technology Applied Economics for Managers
YEAR TWO
HLTH 6040-3. BUSN 6640-3. BUSN 6560-3.
BUSN 6630-3. BUSN 6711-3. HLTH 6911-3. HLTH____
Health Care Financial Management Financial Management Marketing Management International Elective (Health) Management of Operations Strategic Management Health Field Studies Health Elective
CU-Denver Catalog2004 - 05


Full Text

PAGE 2

1o; U18701 7539963 . ...... "'6 • . n.a.aoon See rhe F a l l web SMAR T pages August 23 Fir s r Da y o f C lasses Septem ber 6 Labo r Day H o liday (campu s closed) November 21-27 F all Break (no classes) Novem b er 25 Tha nks g i ving Ho liday (campus closed) Novem ber 26 ( campus o pen, n o classes) December 13-18 Fina l s Week December 18 E nd ofTerm December 18 Comm e ncem e nt Spring 2005 Registration See r h e S pring web SMAR T pages January 17 Marrin Lurh e r King Jr . H o l i day (campttS open, no classes) January 18 Fir s r Day o f lasses March 21-27 S prin g Brea k (campus open, no clasm) May 9-14 Finals Week May 14 E nd of Semest e r May 14 Comme ncem enr Summer 2005 Registration ee r h e Summe r Web SMART pages May30 M e m orial Day H oliday (campttS closed) May31 Fir s t Day o f Classes July 4 Ind e p e ndence Day Holiday (campus closed) August 6 E nd ofTe rm * T h e unive r s iry r eserves r h e rig hr r o a lt e r rhe Academic Cale nd a r a r a n y rime. Con s ult rhe web Schedule Planner f or a pplicatio n deadlin e d a res, dead lines f o r c h anging pr og r a ms, a nd r eg i s tr atio n d ares a nd procedures. Contents lifetime of learning .............................................................................................. 2 Degree Programs .............................................................................................. 3 Administration .................................................................................................... 4 Our University, Our Campus .................................................................................. 5 Undergraduate Admissions ......................... ................................................. 9 Graduate School ...................................................................................... 14 CU Online ............................. ..... .. .......................................................... 19 Professional and Continuing Education ..... ............. .................................. 19 Centers and Institutes .............................................................................. 20 Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid .............................................................. 21 Four-Year Graduation Guarantee ............................................................ 25 Registration .............................................................................................. 26 Academic Policies and Regulations ........................................................... . 29 University Policies ................................. . . . ......... ......... ............. . .... . .... ....... 34 Student S e r vices, Support, and Organizations ......................... ..... ............. .46 International Education Services ....... .......... .......... . ....................... , ...... . . . . 51 Campus Resources ...... . ................. . ........................................................... 51 College of Architecture and Planning .................................................................. 55 College of Arts & Media ..................................................................... . .............. 69 Business School .................................................................................................. 83 School of Education .......................................................................................... 1 05 College of Engineering and Applied Science ...................................................... 123 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences .................................................................. 145 Military Science ............ ............................................ ........................................ 211 Millennium College .......................................................................................... 215 Graduate School of Public Affairs ...................................................................... 217 Course Descriptions .......................................................................................... 225 Faculty ............................................................................................................ 383 Index .............................................................................................................. 394 Contact Information ......................................................................................... .399 Produced by the CU-Denver OHire of Marketing Communications, Marsholll. Collins, Oiredor. (over photos by Shock Photography and Larry George Photogrophy. (over design by Davis Creative Inc.

PAGE 3

AU N • CAMPUS BUILDING D OPEN PARKING D COVERID PARKING CAMPUS

PAGE 4

AMPUS Box 167 P.O.Box 173364 NVER. CQ 80217-3364 .• 2004 2005 CATALOG uco cnr 2004 TO 7005 IJCO CAT 07/n
PAGE 5

University of Colorado at Denver PEER AT LARiMER P.O. BOX 173364 DE VER, COLORADO 80217-3.364 Alternative format available upon request. Phone 303-556-4493 TIY 303-5 56-6204 Fax 303-556-5855 E-mail ombuds@carbon.cudenver.edu Although this catalog was prepared using the best information available at the time, all information (including the academic calendar, admission and graduation requirements, degree offerings and degree titles, course offerings and course descriptions, and statements of tuition and foes) is subject to change without notice or obligation. The university claims no responsibility for errors that may have occurred during the typesetting, printing, or production of this catalog. For cumnt calendars, tuition rates, requirements, deadlines, etc., students should reftr to the Web Schedule Planner for the semester in which they intend to enroll. The courses listed in this catalog are intended as a general indication of the University of Colorado at Denver curricula. Courses and programs are subject to modification at any time. Not all courses are offered every semester, and faculty teaching particular courses or programs may vary from time to time. The content of a course or prograrn may be altered to meet particu far class needs. Courses are listed by college or school. The University of Colorado at Denver is an affirmative action/ equal opportunity employer and educator committed to excellence through inclusiveness.

PAGE 6

Accreditation North Cenrral Association of Colleges and econdary chools 30 orrh LaSalle Srreer , S uire 2400 Chicago, I L 60602-2504 l-800-621-7 440 Fax: 312-263-7462 American Assembly of Collegiate School s of Business, Accrediting Commission on Education for Health ervices Administration, Colora d o State Board of Education, Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board, National Council for the Accreditation ofTeacher Education, National Architectural Accrediting Board, Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, National Associati o n of Schools of Music, Planning Accreditation Board, ational Association of Schools of Publi c Affairs and Adm inistration You con obtain information about our degrees by contacting us: Mailing Address Office of Admissions Univer s iry of Colorado at D enve r Campus Box 167 P.O. Box 173364 D e nver, Color ado 80217-3364 Location 1200 Latimer Street or 1250 14th Street Annex 303-556-2704 Web Address www.cudenver.edu A Lifetime of Learning P icture yourself at an urban university campus near the heart of downtown Denver, where history meets the future in your surroundings as welt as your studies. The city of Denver and its metropolitan region have become the center of communication and information technology in the Rocky Mountain Ulest. From telecommunications to biotechnology to website development, Denver companies incorporate the latest technologies and research, and look for employees who can fulfill their needs. Business studies, applied science, engineering, mathematics, information technology, technical communicationall have potential for lucrative employment. Yet there is also a need for professionals with knowledge ofpublic affairs, social sciences, humanities, and the arts-so essential to both high-tech companies and their employees. Burgeoning technology creates new demands for employees of the future in aft areas of human knowledge. The Unive r siry of Co l orado at Denve r i s dedica ted to preparing grad u ates w ho will b e well qualified to anai n p ositions i n s uch companies, as well as in th e professions that fos t er their development. The strength and prestige of the Universiry of Co l orado degree is known worldwide, and graduates from CU-Denver have becom e lead e r s in corp o rations, instit utions, governm e nts, a nd organizations. CU-D enve r's faculry excel i n c rafting th eir instruction aroun d issues of contemporar y life as well as the tradit ional disciplines. The y are alert to the c hallenges and o pp orrunities of the urban e n vi r o nment and respon sive to the needs of our s tudents a nd communiry . The combinati on of our talented faculry and highly motiv ated s tud e nts creates an exciting e du cational e nvironm e nt , combining realworld expe rienc e w ith acad e mic excelle nce. Our n onresidential campus features his t oric building s from Denv e r's pio neer beginnings , a l ong with "sm art " classroo m buildings incor p orat ing 2 1 s t-century multimedia. CU-De nver's diverse st ud e nt bod y enjoys ple nry of exciting , challenging, and enterraini11g opport unities for perso nal an d professional g rowth. There are more than 60 s tud e nt organizations, ranging from th e American Marketing Associ ation to th e ociery ofWomen Engineers. Students al o tak e part in classic film scree nings, th eatre and musical performar1ces, intramur a l s ports, and fascinating lectures b y nationally recognized speakers. Downtown Denv e r offers ample amenit ies for s tudent s to round out their classroom experi ences. Cultural op portunities a bound , with a nationally recognized p er forming arts center and museums on l y minutes away. Ciry, state, a nd federal governm e nt centers are just blocks from campus. Loc a t e d at the hub of Colora d o ' s professional sports industry, the campus is within walking distar1ce of the Peps i Cente r , the new Broncos sradi um , a nd Coors Field . CU-Denver i s easily accessible from any part of the m e t ropolitan Denver a rea, via expar1ded highways a nd a comprehen sive light rail and ciry bu s system. Enjo y your learning experienc e a t CU-Denver. We'll provide you with c hallenges and opportunities that will s hape your future and prepare you for a lif et ime of l earn ing. CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 7

DEGREE PROGRAJ I Undergraduate COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA Bachelor of Arts in Fine rts (BA) An Hi story Stu dio Arts Bachelor of Arts in The tre (BA) Acting/Direc t ing Design/Technical Integrate d S tu dies Bachelor of Fine Arts (. I" A) Drawing FilmNideo Produ cti n Multime di a Studies Painting Phorography Sc ulptur e Theatre , Film & Tele i s ion Bachelor of Science in usic (BS) Mus i c Indus try Srudi Music Managem ent Music Performan ce Music Technology BUSINESS SCHOOL Business Administratio Accounti n g Finance Information System s International Busin Management Marketi n g agement COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING APPLIED SCIENCE Civil Engineering (BS) I Computer Science and ngineering (BS) Electrical Engineering (BS) Mechanical Engineeri11 (BS) COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS NO SCIENCES Anthropology (BA) Biology (BS) Chemistry (BS) Communication (BA) Economics (BA) English (BA) Creat ive Writing Fil m Studies Literary Studies English Writing (BA) C r eative Writin g Film Studies General Writing French (BA) Geograpby (BA) Ea rth and E nvironmental Science History (BA) bulividzudly Structured Major (BA) lnrernarional Affairs Mathematics (BS) Actuarial Scie n ce Applied Math e m atics Computer Sc i e nce Math Education Probability and Statistics Pure Mathematics Philosophy (BA) Pbysics (BS) Applied Physics Medical Physics Pure Phys ics Political Science (BA) Public Polic y and Administratio n Psychology (BA, BS) Sociology (BA) Spanish (BA) Graduate COLLEGE OF ARCHITEGURE AND PLANNING Architecture (MArch) Design and Plamzing (PhD) Landscape Architecture (MLA) Urban mul Regional Planning (MURP) Urban Design (MUD) COLLEGE OF ARTS & MEDIA Recording Arts (MS ) BUSINESS SCHOOL Accounting (MS) Business Administration (MBA) Executive Program Finance (MS) Healtb Administration (MS) Executive Program biformation Systems (MS) International Business (MSIB) Mmzagement and Organization (MS ) Marketing (MS) SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Administrative Leadership and Policy Studies (MA, EdS) (Lice n sure-Type D /Sc hool Principal & Adminisrraror, K-12) Counseling Psychology and Comzselor Education (MA) (Licens ure-Publi c Schoo l Coun selor, E l ementary , Secondary, K-12) Curriculum and I11Struction (MA) (Endorsement-Bilin gual Educa tion , E l ementary, Secondary, K-12) (Endorsement-En glish as a Secon d Language , Elementary, Secondary, K-12) (E ndorsement-R eading Teacher, E l ementary, Seco nd ary, K-12) ( Licensure-El ementary Education, K-6) (Licensure-Second ary Education, 7-1 2) Early Childhood Education (MA) (Licensure-Early C hildh ood pecia l Ed u cation , Af,es 0-5) Educational Leadership mullnnovation (PhD) Educatio1ud Psychology (MA) Information and Learning Technologies (MA) (Licensure-School Library Media, E l ementary , Seco nd ary, K-12) School Psychology (EdS ) (Ed.S/Licens ure-School Psychologis t , K 12) Special Education (MA) (Licensure-Special Education, Af,es 5-21) COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIENCE Civil Engineering (MS, PhD) Computer Science (MS) Electrical Engineering (MS) Engineering (MEng) Mechanical Engineering (MS) COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES Anthropology (MA) Applied Mathematics (MS, PhD) Biology (MA) Chemistry (MS ) Communication (MA) Economics (MA) English (MA) Envir01zmental Sciences (MS) Health and Behavioral Scimce (PhD) History (MA) Humanities (MH ) bztegrated Scimce (MIS) Political Scimce (MA) Psychology (MA) Socilzl Scimce (MSS) Sociology (MA) Tee/mica! Commzmication (MS ) GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS Criminal justice (MCJ) Public Administration (MPA) Public Affairs (PhD) Executive Program JOINT DEGREE Computer Scimce and Infomzation Syste11zs (PhD through Business School and College of E ngineering and Applied Science) CU-Dmver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 8

The Universicy of Col orado seal , adopted in 1908, depicts a male Greek classica l fig ur e seare d again s t a pillar an d holding a scroll. A burning rorch fran1ed in l aurel is placed b eside him. The Gree k inscr ip tion m e ans " Let your light shine. " Acco rdin g to Denver desi g n er Henry Reed , the clas sical de s ign was used because Greek civilizatio n "st ands as the c rit er ion of cu ltu r e . " The laure l symboliz e s honor or s u ccess, the youth of the figure sugges t s the " mo rnin g o flife," a nd the s croll repre s ents wr itt en language . Welcome to the University of Colorado at Denver. We are one of the four campuses of the University of Colorado system, which prides itself on being a university without walls, one based on collaboration between campuses, disciplines, and departments, between faculty and students. Our outstanding academic programs, topranked faculty, and dedicated alumni have received national a nd internationa l recognition. We're happy youve decided to join us in our pursuit of excellence. We make the most of our prim e downtown Denver location by blending a cosmopol itan attitude with a dynamic Western setting. This urban perspective informs our curriculum and our identity. One stroll across our campus and you'll see how CU-Denver reflects the city we serve-both of us growing, diverse and energetic. We boast an enrollment that has increased to more than 12,200 students, but we serve nearly 24, 000 through a variety of regular, extended studies and non credit classes. We offer 80 degree programs including bachelor's, master's, doctoral and education specialist degrees-a ll with the distinction and prestige of the University of Colorado, and all designed to p rovide the foundation on which to build your future. CU-Denver's seven academic areas -Architecture and Planning , Arts and Media, Business, Education, Engineering and Applied Science, Liberal Arts, and Public Affairs -provide instruction and research programs that focus on the fundamental areas of know l edge, including interdisciplinary and professional study. We're committed to giving you the opportunities to gain the knowledge, training, skills and credentials that wi ll enhance your life. That's why we offer an enriched baccalaureate education and real-world research through graduate and professional work. O ur academi c programs focus on applications relevant to regional as well as national issues while providing a humanistic unders tanding of social needs and problems and encouraging cultural and technical exchange. We look forwar d to workin g with you as you join our community of scholars and dedicated staff We will challenge you just as you challenge us. I look forward to your time with us-and to your graduation. james H Shore Interim Chancellor, University of Colorado at Denver Chancellor, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center University-wide Office Elizabeth Hoffm; Presi d ent of the Univers i BA, Smith Coll1 MA, PhD, University ofPennsyLvan PhD, CaLifornia Institute ofTe chno/o. JackO. Bur. Vice President for Academic Affa. and Resea.n BA, MA, University of Massachuse CPA, MLE Certificate, Harvard Univem PhD, Indian a Univem Stephen T. Goldi1 V i ce President for Budget and F in an BA, Washington Coll1 MA, University of De Law' Charles V. Swe V i ce Presidenr and Uni versity Co un : BA, Duke Univers; ]D, University ofVirginia SchooL of Lt. CU-Denver Office James H. Sho Interim Chancel! BS, MD, Duke Univers; DanaGibsc Vice C h a n cellor for Administrati< and Finan BS, MBA, Texas \%man s Univers; PhD, University ofTexas a t ArLingt. Mark A. Heck! Vice C h ancellor for Academic aJ Student Affa. BA, ELizabethtown Coll1 MFA, CathoLic Univers; Rodney Andersc Inrerim Associa t e Vice Chanceil o r f Enro llm ent and Student Affa. Assistant V i ce C h a n cellor for Stu d e Adminisuarive Servic BA, University of Minnesota at Mankc. MPA, University of CoLorado at Dent LauraGoodw Interim Assoc i ate Vice Chancel! for Facu l ty Affa . BA, MA, University ofSant a CIA PhD, University of CoLora. Doroth y Le" Associate Vice Chancello r f Admini st r ation and Fina n BA, Hartwi c k CoL/1 Ed.M, EdD, Harvard Univers; FrankEd! Assistant Vice Chancellor for Compuri 1 Information and Network Ser v i c BS , MS , CoLorado State Univers; RobertTols11 Assi stant V i ce C han ceLlor for Aca d err Technology and Extended St udi BPh, Thomas jefferson CoLLege, Grand VaL, St ate Univers; MA, CathoLic University of Ameri DorothyYat Inr e rim Assistant Vice Chancel! for R esearc h and Administrati< BS, University of the Stat e of New Yo MBA , University ofWashingt ABD, Saint Louis Univers.

PAGE 9

Board of Regents Cindy Carlis l e Boulder term expires 2007 Pat Hayes Aurora term expires 2007 Susan Kirk Denver term expires 2004 T omasJ. Lucero, Jr. Johnstown term expires 2004 Jim Martin Boulder term expires 2004 Jerry G . Rutledge Colorado Springs term expires 2006 Paul Schauer Cenren n ial term expires 2007 Gail Schwartz Aspen term expires 2006 Peter Steinhauer Boulder term expires 2006 Staff Milagros Cortez Seer r ary of the Board of Regenr and rhe Univers iry BA, 5, State University o New York at Albany , Webster University Our University, Our Campus In 1876, the same year Colorado became the nation's 38th state, the University of Colorado was founded in Boulder. Opening its doors on September 5, 1877, the university began with 44 students, a president , and one instructor. Nearly a century later, in 1974, the University of Colorado had grown to four campuses in three Colorado citiesDenver, Colorado Springs, Health Sciences (Denver), and Boulder. With combined enrollments totaling more than 46,000 students, the University ofCo lorado ranks 12th amongpublic universities and colleges in overal l research expenditures and 6th among public universities in federally funded research. Awards for research within the university system total approximately $420 million, with funding provided by federal agencies, appropriations from the state of Colorado, and private foundations and donors. Each of rhe four camp uses of rhe Univers iry of Color ad o system has irs own chancellor and campus adminisrrarion. T h e chance llors, in turn, report to rhe presidenr of rhe CU System. The Board of Regenrs of the Universiry of Col orado a pproves rhe overall direction provided by rhe presidenr of rhe system. The system presidenr i s borh the c hief academic and chief adm ini st r ative officer of rhe universiry . The president has responsibi l iry for rhe administration of the e nrir e uni vers iry under rhe policie s described b y the Board of Regenrs or under law. The Un iver siry of Col orado at Boulder serves more than 26,000 srudents enrolled in undergraduate, grad uate , and professional programs. The Healrh Sciences Cenrer in Denver provides educat ion and training to medical, dental , nursing , pharmacy, and allied healrh personnel. The Universiry of Col ora do at Colorado Springs serves m ore rhan 6,60 0 swdents in rhe Pikes Peak region , offer ing undergraduate, gradua t e, and professional programs. CU-Denver's 12 ,200 students enroll in undergraduate and grad u ate stud ies, as well as innovative professional progr ams. C U 2010: A Vision for the Future Vision CU 20 I 0 i s a bold systemwide agen da inrended ro map th e fut ur e of the Universiry of Colorado for the next decade. CU 20 I 0 consists of five actions: creating a uni versiry wirhom walls, creating a culwre of excellence, increasing resource s and u s in g rhem wisely, s upporting diversiry, and int eg r ating our infrastructure. Creating a University Without WallsWe must focus on multidisciplinar y efforts that involve all four CU camp uses and serve as models for the universiry of rhe 21st Century. The universiry of rhe future must break down the walls that separate rhe di scip lines, colleges, and cam puses wirhin rhe system , the walls rhar separate swdenrs and researchers, campus and communiry. Creating a Culture of Excellence-Since it's impossible to be great at everyrhing all a t once, eac h campus is wo rking to targe t areas for national prominence. Boulder should be among rhe top 10 percent of public institutions wirho ut a medical schoo l in the AAU ran kings. Col ora do Springs s hould b e th e number one compre hen sive regional univer s iry in rhe United States with an enro llm enr of 10,000 to 12 ,000 srudenrs b y the year 2010 . CU Denver s hould be one of rhe rap 10 u rban research univer sities in rhe country . And the Health Sciences Center s hould be th e number one public health sci ences cenrer in the nation within 10 yea rs. Incr easi n g R es o urces and Using Them Wtsely-CU needs ro provide more scholarship money to attract Colorado's best and brightest s tud ents. We also n eed ro fund more endowed chairs and profes so rships, to build and retain our outs tanding faculry-our number one human r eso urce. We must also leverag e our expe rtise in technology to help fund CU-Denver Catalog 2 00 4-05

PAGE 10

6 / Our University, Our Campus VISION As the Denver campus of the University of Colorado system , CU-Den ver interprets its mission as advancing the creation, dissem ination , a nd application of knowledge in a culture of excellence. Irs boundaries are flexible and perme a ble , with knowledge flowing to and from the schools and colleges, the community, and the world. This view is global rather than local as CU-Denver seeks to l ink teaching, research , and service to the m ajor issues of the 21st Century. VALUES •:• mutual respect for all memb ers of the university community-students, faculty, and staff •:• excellence in all areas •:• collaboration among faculty, students, staff, and the community in the learning proces s •:• the power of community in teaching , l earning, and scho l arship •:• creativity, innovation, and flexibility •:• service to the public good •:• personal growth and profe ssional success •:• cultural diversity and enrichment GOALS •:• to build partnerships to strengthen core aca demic pro gra ms •:• to build and focus resources on academic goals •:• to foster academic innovations and excellence by defin ing a clear niche In additio n to these general goals, Vision CU 2010 i s a bold systemwide agenda intended to map rhe furure of the Un i versity of Colorado for the next decade: •:• crea ting a university without wal l s •:• creating a culture of excellence •:• increasi ng resources and using them wisely •:• s upporting diversity •:• integrating our infrastructure For details on Vision CU 2010, see pre vio u s page. state-ofthe-art technology for our st udents, faculty, and s taff . The university will refocus its fund-raising campaign to address these goals, and we'll co ntinu e to work in close partnership with the state of Colorado an d with our delegation in Washington to increase federal s upport. Supporting Diversity-B y the second quarter of the 21st Century, there will be no majority popul atio n in the United States. That's why it's so important for CU to educate all of the citizens of Colorado-and the world-who meet out qualification s for admission. Our programs should also reflect o ur global community in international progran1 offerings, such as expan ded opportunities for students, faculty, and staff exchanges and jointly sponsored degrees with uni versities around the world. Integrating Our Infrastructure-CU will work toward an integrated student information syste m , so our s tudent s can easily tr ansfer to or take courses on other campuses. An integrated s tudent services syste m will enhance our systemw ide technology and human r esources services. We will expand CU Online so students can take a much broader variety of courses and complete more requirements a nd degree programs on l ine. And we will benchmark CU's business pra ctices with the best models from the corporate world. Our plan i s ambitious-and for good reason. With the rapid pace of progress that defines our world, the year 2010 will be here sooner than we think. Now is the rime to envision our future and set out goals. The decade mead will be the most exciting one yet . CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 Organizational Abilities and Structures •:• organizational entrepreneurship •:• innovations in support oflearning •:• ability to create effective partnerships •:• ability to assess actions • : • streamlined processes and policies to reduce barriers •:• fair and equitable compensation system •:• forums to create extramural alliances across colleges, the community, and the world •:• an incubator to develop new interdisciplinary projects and programs THE UNIVERSITY OF COlORADO AT DENVER Situated near the heart of downtown Denver and looking west toward the majestic Rocky Mountains, the University of Colorado at Denver is the only public univer s ity in Colorado's capital city. It s proximity to the commercial and governmental hub of Denver enab les CU-Denver to offer its students the comb i ned excellence of its facu l ty and the opportunities afforded by this metropolitan environment. The University of Colorado a t Denver is committed to bec oming the nation ' s premier urban university. In urban environments, universities have a particular responsibility to adapt their traditional roles to the development , assessment, transmission, and pres ervatio n of knowledge to urban needs while maintaining the highest standards of education and scholarship. By drawing upon the riches of its traditional store of learning and disciplined thought , the university serves as Denver's intellectual center and as a community resource r eady to respond to urban challenges and opportunities facing its l ocal and global environment. CU-Denver offers 80 degree programs, from bachelor's to doctoral levels , as well as numerous profe ssional development programs through the indi v idual colleges and schools. Classes are held during weekday and evening hours , on weekends, and at off-campus sites.

PAGE 11

Histor y I n 1 912, th e U niver s i ty fCol o r ad o ' s D e parrrn e m of Corre s p o n d e nce and Ex t e n s i o n was esr a bl i s e d i n D e nver r o meet t h e need s of rh e ca pital c i ty ' s b ur geo nin g p opulari n . As rh e breadth o f co urse offe rings expand ed, so did th e de m an d for d eg e-g r an r i n g s t a tus. Fro m 1956 umil 1 976, t h e Den ver Exte n sio n Ce m e r p e r a r e d o u r of rhe f o rm e r D e nver Tr a m way Com pa n y Buildin g ar 1 4 a n d Arapahoe S tr eets. Thi s bui l d i n g h ad h o used rhe co r po r ate offic sand car ba rn s o f a huge s rr eerca r syst e m d i scominued in 1950. D e i g n a t e d a l a ndm ar k o n the a tiona! R eg i s t e r of H istoric Places in 1 994, th e T r amway Buildin g was l ate r r e n ova t e d imo a h o tel a n d restau r an t The D e nver Ext ensio n ente r was r ename d rhe U niver s i ty o f Col o r a do-Den ver Cemer 1 965 , a nd b y 1 969, 23 field s o f unde r g r ad uate s tud y a n d 11 of gradt r e study wer e o ffer e d . I n 1 972, rhe Col o r ad o Gen eral Asse m b l y appro p i a r e d s upp o rt ro build th e Aurar i a Campu s , CU-Denver ' s c ur rent sir e . h a t sa m e yea r th e D e n ver Cem e r was r e n ame d the Univer s i ty ofCol ora d a r Den ver. In 19 74 CU-Denver b ega n gran tin g d eg rees d e s i g n a t e as th e Unive r s i ty of Col o r ad o a r D e nver. Betwee n 1 9 7 3 and 197 , th e s t a r e bu i lt th e A u rar i a High e r Ed ucatio n Cem e r , s h are d y t h e Un iver s i ty o f Col ora d o at D e nver , Met r o p olita n Sta r e Colleg of D e nver , and rhe Community College of D enver. In 1 988 , CUDe ver m ove d imo ir s fir s t c u sto m mad e n ew home, th e 25 7 ,000-sq u a r foo t orth C lassro o m Building, l o cat e d berwee n S p eer B ou l eva rd nd 12th St reet , Larim e r an d Law r e nce Stree ts. H oover B erg Des o nd , a D e nver a r c hit ectu ral firm , desi g n e d this post-mod e rn , red bri c s tr u cture, featurin g a di s rin crive g lass bloc k atriu m an d l arge outdoor l ocks. Role ond Mission I n r h e Co l orado Rev ise Sta tures, rhe Univers i ty of Col o r ad o a r Denve r i s d efined as folio s: The Denver campus oft Univers ity of CoLorado shaLL be a comprehensive baccaLaureate LiberaL a sand s ciences imtitution with high admission standards. The Denver cam us shaLL provide seLected professionaL programs and such graduate program at the master's and doctoral Level as wiLL serve the needs of the Denver me opoLitan area, emphasizing those professionaL programs not offered by oth institutions of higher education. T h e fund ame ntal p u r p ses ofCU-D e nver a r e r o : 1 . P rovide students wir l earn in g o pp o rtunities tharwill e nh a nce rhe quality of r h e i r lives, r a r will make rh e m well-e du cat ed c itizens, r h a r will l ead to rewa r in g career s , an d rha r will p rov id e D e nver an d Col orado w i r h a wo r o rce able to compe r e i n r h e g l o bal eco n o my. 2. D evelop r esearc h , sc olars h i p , an d c r eative wo rk th a t will advance rh e base ofknowl e d g in our d isciplines an d tha r w ill co ntribut e to rhe v itali ty of ou r c ulr re and/or econo my. 3 . A ppl y r h e univer s i ty' s kill s a nd know l e dg e r o real pro b l em s i n th e D e nver m e tr o area. 4 . Build and m ain tain i n stitutio nal c ultur e of plurali ty , c olleg iality, integ r a t ion , and c u s r Administrative Structur T h e C h a ncellor ofCU e nver r e presem s rh e Denver campus and m anages cam pu s goal-se n g , p olicy d ev elopm ent, aca d e mi c affa irs, commu ni ty r elatio ns, a nd udger an d fin a n c i al m arre r s . T h e Vice C h a ncello r for Aca d e mi c d S tud ent Aff air s i s resp o n s ibl e f o r all aca d emic pro g r a m s , aca d e i c s up po rt progr a m s , s tudent enro llm ent services, th e G r aduate Sc h o l , an d s p o n so r e d p rog r ams . T h e V ice C h ancello r for a n d F in a n ce i s resp o n s ibl e f o r rh e cam pu s budget a n d th e o ces of fin ancia l and bu s iness serv i ces, hum an r eso u rces , p l a nnin an d in s tituti o nal r esearc h , compu tin g serv i ces, a nd voice comm i car i o ns. CU-D e nv e r Campus Information / 7 Academic Programs CU-Denver i s , above all , devo r e d to rhe needs o f th e r esident s of D e nver a nd th e r eg i o n . With th e n at i o nal r ecogn i t i on earned b y irs g r adu a t e faculty, it i s n o r s u r p rising th a r an increasi n g n umber of advanced s tud ents f r om across r h e n ario n and overseas ele c t to purs u e rh e ir s tudies h e re. CU-Denver compr i ses s even d i s tin c t academ i c un i r s : College of Arc hi tect ure and P l anning College of A rt s & Media T h e Bus iness Sc h oo l Sch oo l ofEdu cari on College of E n g ineer i n g and Ap pli e d Sci enc e College of L i b eral Arts a nd Sc i ences G r aduate Sc h oo l ofPu b l icAffa ir s T h e un derg r adu a t e Colleges o f Arcs & Media , E n g i neer i ng , Libe r a l Ar t s a nd Sc i e nces, and r he B us iness Sch oo l admi t f resh man and tra n sfe r s rud e m s an d offe r progr ams leadin g to the b acca l aureate degree in th e a rt s , sci e n ces , huma nities, bu s iness, a nd e n g i neer ing. A so l i d foun d atio n of acade m ic skills an d gen e ral e du catio n i s assure d th rough a compre h e n sive co r e c urriculu m . Sru d e m s may p u r sue gra du a t e ed u cation throu g h all of rhe cam p u s ' colleges an d schools . P re-p rofessional training in th e field s of educatio n , l aw , jo urn alis m , and rhe h ealt h career s a l so a r e avai.lable. CU-D e nver e mpl o y s m o r e tha n 460 regula r instru ccional faculty. T h e colleges a nd schoo l s sectio n s of rhis catalog p rovide a listi n g of bach elo r 's, mast e r ' s , a n d d ocroral d egree programs, p olic ies on r e quir emems f o r gra duacion , co urse req uir ements for various majors, course l oa d p olicies , co urse desc ripti o n s , and s imi l a r in for m acion . A r CU-Denver , faculty exp l o r e an d inco rp orate borh n ovel and tr ad itio nal m e th o d s ofin s rr ucrio n . Te l eco m m uni cat i o n s and or h er e l ec tr o ni c me di a are a n integ ral p ar r of t h e way CU-D enve r tran scen ds geog r a phi c s p ace, m aking i n s tru ctio n m o r e scimula rin g an d more w id e l y available , an d co n nec t i n g faculty, students , alum n i , a nd stare, r eg i o n al, n atio nal , and i m ernario nal lea d e rs. In kee pin g w ith CU's Visio n 2 010 , CU-Denve r has kep t pa c e with th e d emand for educatio n rh ar lead s to i m p rove d profes s i o nal opportuni ty in rh e n ew century . M a n y progra m s e m p hasize pract i cal , bus i ness-wo rld a pplicatio n s , a nd s p ec ific comp ur er-o r iemed aca d e mi c program s are o ff e r e d i n th e compute r scie n ce (en g in ee r i ng), app l i e d ma t hematics ( lib e ral ar r s an d sci e nces), and info rm ation syste m s ( busi ness ) prog r a m s . About Our Students CU-D e nver s tud e m s , borh u n d e r g r aduate an d g r ad u ate, ar e well g round e d in th e p rofess i o nal and acade mic disc ipli ne s , m aking the m id eal ca n d id a res for recru itment by e mpl oyers and advan ced degree p rog r a m s thr o u g h out th e n atio n . T h ey d evelop rhe lead ers hi p , c r it i cal thinking, e rhics, an d f uru re-orie m a r io n ro enab l e rh e m to become preem i n e m i n th e ir field s and ro p rov i de active lead e r s hi p for the r ev it alizatio n o f ciries everyw h e r e . T o in s till these values i n i r s s rud e ms, th e Univers i ty of Col ora d o a r D e nver excels in bu i ldin g i n struc ti o n a l exper i ences aro u n d p robl ems of come m porary urb a n life as well as t r ad iti onal d i sc iplines. Srudems a nd faculty are actively e n gage d in see kin g solutio n s , thr o u gh resea r ch a nd serv ice, to these probl e ms. The diver s i ty of o ur s ru de m bod y is a source of deep pride. Ethni c min ority students m ake up o ne-fif rh of th e s ru de m p o pul atio n . C lasses includ e tr a di t ional s rud e m s w h o h ave electe d to purs u e college d eg rees imm e di ately afr e r hig h sch oo l , t r a n s f e r stu dents , olde r s rud enrs w h o have del aye d college e n try, and p rofess i o n a l s w h o seek to s tr engt h en the ir base of s kill s o r bro ade n th e i r a ppreci atio n of r h e wo rld around rhem. W ith s rud e ms' ages r ang in g b etwee n 1 7 and 7 5 , r h e average unde r g r a du a t e s rud e nr age a r CU-Denver i s 25 , w h i l e o ur g r ad ua t e srude m s aver age 33. T h ey r epresem a dist i n ctive mix of ages a nd b ackgroun d s , co min g r o class in f ad e d jeans to co rp o r ate arri r e . Arou n d 80 p ercem o f ou r s rud e m s a r e e mpl oye d , an d 52 p e rcem arre nd p a rr -rime . Fortythree CU-Denver Catalog 2004-0 5

PAGE 12

8 / Our Urliversity, Our Campus percent are enrolled in graduate-level course . All rake advantage of rhe convenience of course offerings ar times that meer their schedules, enjoying an enviable student-to-faculry ratio of 14:1. Accreditation The University of Colorado ar Denver is insrirurionally accredited b y rhe North Central Association of Colleges and econdary Schools. This organization can be contacted ar: 30 . LaSalle Srreer, Suire 2400 Chicago, IL 60602-2504 Phone: 1-800 -621 744 0 E-mail: info @ ncacihe.org Website: www.ncacihe.org Many professional organizations have also granted accreditation to CU-Denver colleges and schools, including: • Accrediting Commission on Education for Healrh Services Admi nistration • American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business • American Chemical Society • Colorado Stare Board of Education • Council for Accreditation ofCoun eling and Relared Educational Programs • Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology • Landscape Architecture Accreditation Board • National Archirecrural Accrediting Board • National Association of Schools of Music • National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration • National ouncil for theAccredirarion ofTeacher Education • Narional Planning Accreditation Board Research and Other Creative Pursuits CU-Denver is strongly commirred to rhe pursuit of new knowledge rhrough rhe research and crearive efforts of its faculty. Such activities nor only advance knowledge and enhance the quality of life , bur also srrengrhen reaching by grounding instruction in scholarship and profes ional practice. In addition, rhese activities consrirure an important component ofCU-Denver's service to rhe community ar large. Therefore, externally funded projects are a major priority ar CU-Denver. Research projects, training and public service programs ar CU-Denver encompass borh traditional and nontraditional fields of study, focusing on issues important ar all levelscity, tare, national and international . The benefit to campus are substantial. Externally funded activities assisr in su raining scholarly discourse, enable faculty members to engage in the advancement of knowledge , provide the foundation for so lving pressing practical problems of viral concern ro society, and enhance the education of st udents. Many students, both at the undergraduate and graduate levels , actively participate in projects overseen b y faculry members at CU-Denver. Our faculty conduct borh basic and applied research and creative acriviries funded by local and stare governments, federal, private and international sponsors. Current externally funded research efforts address a variety of contemporary economic, politica l , educational, engineering, mathematica l , scientific and environmental needs. Examples of currently fw1ded projects include development of disaster management simulations, bilingual education reform , prevention of domestic violence , transportation improvement and development proj ects, geographical information systems, nanoscience srudies and cancer prevention in minority populations. CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 Financial support has been obtained for program and service d eve lopment in the areas of computational mathematics, early childhood an d special education, healrh administration, international affairs, intern ships and cooperative ed u car ion , and employment and training institutes. In addition, a great deal of research ar the university is conducted wirhour substantial external s upport. This research also yields imporranr insights rhar are conveyed ro a national a udi ence through faculty publi catio ns, presentations, exhibits, performances , and professional acriviries. Many members of the faculty are l eaders wirhin rhe national scholarly community. All rhese pursuits bring recognition ro rhe univ ersity, establish the credibility of irs faculry and enhance rhe value of rhe degree ir confers. AURARI A HIGHER EDUCATION CENTER The University of Colorado ar Denver i located on rhe Auraria Higher Education Center campus, a l so hom e to Metropolitan rare College of Denver and the Community College of Denver. The three insrirmion s share a libra ry (ope r ated by CU-Denver), administrative and das room building s equipped with c urrin g-edge technolo gies, and relared faciliries on rhe 127-acre Auraria campus. Certa in courses and programs are offered cooperatively by rhe Aura.ria educatio nal institutions. Because we s hare academic facilities, our srudenrs have the level of resour ces found ar much larger public universities. The campus library blends its book-filled shelves wirh computer laboratories rhar help s rudenr s link ro resources rhey need for success in rhe classroom. Professional child care and development centers provide high -quality, reasonabl y priced on-campus day care for students' preschool children. CU-Denver srudents may rake physical education courses as well as particip a te in numerou s recreation and intramural arhlerics programs a r Auraria's srare-of-rhe-arr firness facilities. The campus bookstore, located in the hisroricTivoli Student Union, is the large st in rhe Rocky Mountain region. Housed in a reno vated brewe ry originally builr in the 1860s, the Tivoli Srudent Union also provide s restaurants, student services and government offices , and man y comfortable areas for studying. In additio n to the Tivoli Student U nion , rhe Aura ria campus contains orl1er reminders of Denver's past-historic Ninrh Street Park , Sr. Cajetan's Church/Performing Arts Center , St . Elizabeth's Church, Emmanuel-Sherith Chapel/Synagogue/Art Gallery, and Golda Meir House. The hi sto ric i s complemented by rhe modern on rheAuraria campus. All classroom buildings are being upgraded to include Internet access, nerwork connections, aco u s tic and lighting enhanceme nts , and a full range of multimedia equipment ro facilirare high-tech studies. The innovativ e King Academic and Performing Arts Center features a 300sear courtyard rheatre , a five-story concert hall (550 sears), a recital hall (200 seats), and performance support space. The building also houses 29 classrooms and 7 enhanced classrooms and computer l abs.

PAGE 13

Undergraduate Admissions CU-Denver seeks to ide tify applicants who are likel y to compl ete an academic program of st dy . Admission deci s ions are based on many factors, the most importan being: 1 . level of previous acad mic performance 2 . evid ence of academic bility and accomplishment as indicated by scores on national apr tude tests 3. evidence of maturity, otivation, and potential for aca demic s u ccess CU-Denver may deny a mission to new applicants or readmission ro former students whose ere enti als indicate an inability ro assume obliga tion of performance and ehavior deemed essential by the university. After comp l eting the ap licarion process , official notification of one's admiss ion s status as an un ergraduate, graduate, or non-degree student is provided by the Office o Admissions. Lerrers from vario u s schools and colleges indicating ace prance into a particular program are pending , subject to official notificati n of ad mission to rhe institutio n by rhe Admissio n s Office. Students who are admit ed pending receipt of additional documenrs or with unofficial docume ts will be permirred one term to submit the documents. If temporarily aived official documents are nor received by the end of the initial ter of arrendance, registration for s ub sequent terms will be denied. If at 1y rime additional credentials are r eceived that affect the student's qu lifications, the university reserves the r ight to cha n ge the admission d cision. Applicants who have no decided upon a major field of study will be considered for admission t the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences as undetermined majors. Stu ents ad mined as undetermined major s should declare a major as q ickly as possible and no later than the e nd of their sop hom ore year. All questions and corres ondence regarding admission to CU-Denver and requests for applicario form s shou ld be directed ro: Office of Admissions University of Colorado t Denver Campus Box 16 7, P.O. ox 173364 Denver, CO 80217-33 4 303-556-2704 admissions@cudenver. ed Admission Deadlines T he uni versity may cha ge document/credential deadlines in accordance with enrollme r demands. For rhe best scholarship and registration time considera ons, applicants should apply and be ad mined as early as possible. For an pplicant to be considered for a specific term , all documents required for admission must be received in the Office of Adm i ssions by rhe deadlin for that term. Applicanrs who are unabl e to meet rhe d eadline may ele r to be considered for a later term. Transfer students are reminded rha they should allow sufficient rime to have transcripts sent from instit tions they have previously arrende d. Advanced planning and early applica ion are necessary for the timely admission of international srudents. lnt rnational srudenrs are advised that ir usually rakes 60 days for credentials o reach admissions in the Office oflnternational Education from internatio allocations. International transfer students should complete the Trans er Information Request form found in the application packet. Application Deadline for Priori Consideration Fall July 22 Spring December I Summer May3 Minimum Academic Pr parotion Standards (MAPS} Students entering the U iversity of Colorado who gradua t e d from high sc h ool in 1988 or late are required to meet the following Minimum Undergraduate Admissions / 9 Academic Preparation Standards: four years of Eng l i s h (w ith emphas i s on composition), three years of college preparatory mathematics (exclud ing business and consumer mathematics ), three years of natural sc i ence, rwo yea r s of social science (including one year of U .S. or wo rld his tor y), three years of a s ingle foreign language , and one year of the arts. Srudents with MAPS deficiencies may be admitted to the university provided they meet the other admission standards (e.g., res t scores, rank i n high school class , grade point average ) and provided they make up any deficiencies prior ro graduation from rhe university. Two l evels of defici e n cy will be recogni zed. l. One unit of deficien cy will be allowed, provided the st ud ent meers other a dmission standards and provided the srudenr makes up th e deficiency b e fore graduation from rhe university. Courses taken ro make up a defi c i e n cy will count coward graduation, provided the CU-Denver co llege accepts those course credits toward graduation. 2. A student h aving more than one unit of deficiency m ay be admitt e d , provided that the student meets other standards of rhe university . The student must make up additional deficienc ies before graduation. The student ma y satisfy the MAPS requirements by successful completion of: • courses taken at CU • cou rses taken at other insritll[ions of higher education • additional high school c redit s • credit-by-examination program s • other requirements as approved b y each CU-Denver co llege Admission Requirements for Freshmen Freshman admission standards define the level of s u ccess and achievement necessary to be admirt ed to the University of Colorado a nd includ e factors rhar predict academic success, such as scores on the ACT or SAT, high school coursework, and the grade point average. Both th e subjects rhe st ud en r has s tudied and how the studenr ha s performed will be factors that determine admission t o the university . ew freshmen ma y apply for admiss ion to the Colleges of Arts & Media, Engineering and Applied Sc i ence, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and rhe Bu s iness School. The applicant mus t be a high sc h ool graduate or have been awarded a High School Equivalency Certificate b y completing the General Educatio n Development (GED ) Test. Preference for admission i s given to applicants who rank in rhe top 30 percenr of their high school grad u ating class and present a composite score of21 or higher on th e Amer i can College Test (ACT) or a com bined score of950 or higher on rhe Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) . Business applicants will receive priority co nsideration if they graduated in the top 25 percent of their high schoo l class and achieved a compos ite score of at least 26 on the ACT or 1100 o n the SAT. Applicants who do nor meet the admission requirements for direct admission ro the Business Schoo l will be automati cal l y considered for admission as pre-business majors in the College of L ib eral Arts and Sciences . Engineerin g applicants will receive priority co nsideration if they graduated in the top 25 percent of their high scho o l class and achieved a composite sco r e of at l eas t 26 o n the ACT, with 28 on the mathematics section , or 1100 total on the SAT, with 600 on rhe mathematics section . Applicanrs who do not meet the admissions requirements for direct a dmis sion to the College of Engi n eering will be automatically considered for admission as a pre-engin ee ring major in th e College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. ew freshmen seeking admission to the C olleg e of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) and College of Arts & Media must meet college requiremenr s for MAPS insriruted by the University of Colorado. Applicants are required to satisfy 16 units of high schoo l -level courses CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 14

10 / Our University, Our Campus in Englis h , foreign language, mathema tics , sci e nces , hum anities, and social sci e nces. S rud enrs are eligibl e for admission ro rhe colleges w ith up ro rwo units of deficiency in a foreign lan g u age and no more than one additiona l d eficienc y in rhe remaining a reas. T h e colleges will all ow graduat ion credi t roward rhe ba c helor ' s degree for courses satisfying Min imum Academic Preparation Standards (MAP S ) d eficie ncie s onl y if rhese co urses are allowed for graduation c redir und e r c urr enr college poli cy . All music performance m ajors in rhe College of Arts & Media are e x pected ro h ave h a d previous experience in a n applie d music a r ea. Two y e a r s of prior pi ano trai ning are r ecom m e nd ed. An audition is required. Applicanrs m ay substi rur e r a p e r ecor dings (about 10 minutes in l ength) and a srare m enr of excelle nce from a qualifi e d teacher in l ieu of th e per sonal a uditi on. Inrerested s tud enrs s h o uld wr it e ro rhe College of Art s & Med i a , CU-Denver, for audition information a nd app lications. Applicants for all departmenrs w ho d o nor satisfy rhe requirement s for prior i ty consid e ration are reviewed on a n individu a l basis. COLLEGE O F ARTS & MEDIA Years English (literature , com po s ition , grammar ) , o ne year of speec h / d e b ate strong l y r ecomme nd e d ....................... .. ............. .4 Mathematics (excluding bu s iness a nd co n sumer math e m atics) ...... 3 Namral scie nc e ....................................................................................................................... 3 Social scie nce .......................................... ................ ............ .. ..... 2 Fore i g n l a n guage ( all unit s mu st b e in a sing l e l a nguage) ........... 2 Academic elective Total .......................................................................................................................................... 15 BUS! ESS SCHOOL Years E n glish (on e year of speec h / d e bat e and rwo years of compos ition are stro ngl y r ecommende d ) .................................... ......... ..4 Mathematics (including a t least rwo years of alge br a and one year of geometry) .................. ..4 Natural scie nce ( includes rwo years oflaboratory sci ence) ....................... ... 3 Social scie nce (i ncludin g hi s tory) .............................................................................. 2 Foreign language (all units mu st b e in a s in g l e language ) ............................ 3 Acade mi c e l ect ives ( additio nal co urses in English, .......... 1 foreig n lan g u age, mathematics, n a tural o r social sci e nce, not to include bu s ines s courses) Total.. ................................................ .............. ... 1 7 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND APPLIED SCIE CE English (literature , compos ition , grammar) , one yea r of speec h / d ebate Strongly recommended Mathematics di s tr ibu t ed as follow s : Years .............. .4 Algebra........................................... .................... .......... .......... . ...... 2 Geometr y .................................................................................................................... 1 Trigonometry and Analyrical Geo m etry .................... .... .......... .. ........ 1 Natural sci e n ces (to include I unit physics and .................................................. 3 1 unit chemistry; also ro include 2 unit s oflabor a tor y sc i ence) Foreign lan g uage ...... .. .................................................................. .. . ........... 2 Soc ial sci e nce ..................................................................................... .. .. ..... 2 E l ectives ................................................................ .. Total ............ .. . ........ . 16 COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES Years English (literature, com p os ition , g r ammar), .... . ........ .4 one year of s p eech/de bate st rongl y r ecomme nded Mathematics (excluding business and co n s umer mathem atics) ............ 3 Natural scie nc e ............................ .................................. ............................ .. ................... 3 Social science ......... .. ................................... 2 Foreign l a nguag e (all unit s mu s t b e in a s ingl e language ) ............................ 2 Academic e lective Total .. .. .............. 1 5 CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 HOW TO APPLY 1. Srudents should obtain an a pplication for undergradu a t e admis sion from a Co l orado high scho o l co un selor, from th e CU-Denver Office of Admissions, or a t www .cudenver.edu. 2. The a pplication mus t b e completed and sent to th e Office of Admissions with a $4 0 (subject ro c hange ) non-refund a bl e fee. For applicants who are g r anted a dmission but are unable ro e n roll for that t e rm , the $4 0 application fee will rem a in valid for 1 2 months , provid e d the Office of Admission s i s informed of the int ent ro enroll for a l ater term . 3. Srudents are r e quired ro h ave their hi gh sch oo l send an official transcript of their high school grades, inclu ding class r a nk , to the Offic e of Admiss i ons. Offi cial transcr ipt s a r e those sent by the issu in g in s titution directly to: Offi ce of Admissions , University of Colorado at D e nver , Campus Box 16 7, P.O. B ox 1 7 3364, Denver , co 80217-3364 Hand-carried or faxed copies are not official. 4. Srudents who did not graduate from high school a re requir ed ro hav e a copy of rheir GED t est scores and GED certificat e sent directly from the certifying agen cy to rhe CU-Denver Office of Admissio n s (see Admissions Requiremenr s for Non-Hig h School Graduates ) . 5. Srudents also are requ ir ed ro tak e e ith er rhe American College Tes t (ACT) or the Scholast icAptirudeTest ( SAT) and reque s t that test scores b e sent ro CU-Denver (ACT code 0533 or SAT code 48 7 5). High sc hool srudenrs ma y obtain ACT and SAT te s t dates and l ocations from rheir counselors. Students who rook one of rhese tes t s while in high sch ool may use rhe tes t sco res r e ported on rh e ir official high school tr anscrip t s as an official tes t scor e r e port. Applicants who rook one of these t ests and did not de s ign ate CO Den ver as the recipient of the scores must notify rhe testing agency t o send scores to CU-Denver. A Request for Additional Sco r e Report may be requested from any of the offices lis ted below. American College Testin g Program (ACT) P.O. Box 168 I owa City, Iowa 522 43 (319) 337-1270 The College Board (SAT) P.O. Box 620 1 Princeton, New Jer sey 085 4 1-6201 (609 ) 771-76 00 6. Inte rn a tional s tudents mus t submit proof of proficien cy in the English langu age (see Requirement s for Inte rn a tional Students) . APPLICANTS NOT GRANTED ADMISSION An applicant who is not granted adm ission as an e ntering freshman may wish ro consider transferring to rhe univer s ity after s u ccessful srudy elsewhere. The Office of Adm issi ons urges such stude nts to complete at least one full semester ( 12-15 credir hours) of collegel eve l coursework at a n orher college or un iversiry, giving s pecial a ttenti o n to courses that will pro v ide sound academic preparation for futur e transfer to CU D e nver. These co urse s s hould include an y Minimum Acad e mi c Preparation Standards ( MAPS ) not met in high sc hool (see rhe MAPS r eq uirements). Students who are not admissible will be e ncour age d to parti cipa t e in a Redirect Program that CU-Denver has est a bli s h e d with Colorado community colleges. All c r e dentials presented for admission b ecome the proper ty of the Univer s i ty of Col orado and must remain on file . Stttdents who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores or who fail to indicate all previottsly attended instittttions will be denied admission to, or will be dismrolled from, the ttniversity.

PAGE 15

New Student Orientatio A welcom e and p rog r a m open t o all n ew s tu d e nt s is held a t th e beginni ng oft e fall and sp ring seme sters. T h e progr a m provides a n int rod u ction t th e camp us, infor m ation abo ut s tudent services and student activ iti s avail able through CU-Denver, and serv ices provide d to al l students o n he Auraria Campus, includin g information on gett in g ID a n d parki ng. Transfe r and graduate st dents should co ntact their schoo l s an d colleges for additional info marion on aca d em i c advising , as well as special orientation sessio n s h at may be held for a particular pro g r am. New freshmen will recei e separate info rm a tion regarding p l acement testing, academic advising , nd specific or i e ntation sessio n s for students and parents. For more information , c 303-352-3520 or visit North Classroo m , Room 150 3 . Admission Requirement for Non-High School Graduates An indi vidual who has n t graduated but has passed the General Educat i o n Development ( ED) rest may be considered for a dmi ssion. The app l icat i on for underg a du ate admiss i o n must be acco mp an i e d b y a $40 non-refundable applE ' catio n fee and an official transcript s ho w in g comp l e t e d hig h school co u ses. An a ppli cant mus t a l so s ubmi t GED scores and scores from the er i can College Test (ACT) Program . T h e a dmissi on decision i based o n the s tudent ' s potential for acade mic success at CU-Denver. I Admission Requirement for Transfer Students Applicants are considere tran sfer stu d ents for adm ission purposes if iliey have compl eted colleg cou r sework sinc e g r aduat in g from hi g h school. Applicants are not ];n sidered tr a nsf e r s tud ents if ilie only co llege l evel classes they have take were b efo r e high schoo l g r adua tion . Any applicant not elig ib e to r eturn to all in s tituti ons previous l y atten d e d will b e r efused ad'!llissi on. To meet ili e minimum transfer admission s t andards at cu L l T D e nver, st ud e nt s m U S [ m eet one of the followi ng co n d i t i ons: I. have earned 12-29 c llegiate semes ter c r edi t hours an d have the following grade point average: a. 2.5 GPA (on a 4.0 s e) b. 2.0 GPA if transfe r in g from Col o rad o Sc h oo l of Mines , Col orado State Unive sity, Univers i ty of Col orado a t B o uld er , or University of Col ora at Col orado Springs 2. have earned 30 or m re collegi a t e seme s t er hours wiili a 2.0 GPA T r ansfe r st ud ents are g i v n priori ty co n sideration for ad mi ssion as follows: I. Business SchooL. To b e co n sidered for transfer a dmi ssion, s t u d ents must have completed t l east 24 semes t e r h o ur s that will a ppl y to th e b ac helor of scie n c (business admi ni stration) degree. Priority cons id erat i on for ad ission will be granted to tr ansfer a pplicants w iili a minimum c u l a tive overall GPA of3.0 for al l work a ppli cab l e to a BA in busin ss adm inistr at i on degree , inclu din g a mini mum 2.0 GPA in bus ness courses. St u d ents may also e admitte d if they have a 3.0 GPA in th e la s t 24 semester hours of a Licable coursework, a 2.0 GPA in b u siness courses, and a t least a 2. 0 overall cumulat ive GPA in cou rses app licable to a BA i n usiness a dmini s tr a t i on degree. Transfer applicants h o do not meet e iili e r of th e prio rity admission standards r e pooled and ranked on ili e basis of ili eir GPA earned in the I a t 24 semes ter hours. Pooled app l i cants are offered admission as ace is availab le, or are referred to th e College of Lib eral Ar sand Sci ences for admission cons ider atio n , w h e r e they will be a d ised as pre-business m ajors. Applicants with at Yeast a 2.6 GPA in ap pli cable cou r sewo rk in ilie last 24 semester h b ur s will be co n s i d e r e d as space is available. Students wiili less ili n a 2.6 GPA i n t h e last 24 seme s ter h ours of Undergraduate Admissions / 11 applicab l e co ur sework will be referred to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admiss i o n conside r atio n , where they will be adv i sed as pre-bu s iness majors. 2 . CoLlege of Engineering and Applied Science. Applicants to the College of Eng in eering shou ld have at least a 2.75 cu mul ative grade point average for all math and science cour sework arrempted, at least 24 hours of college cour sework including two semesters each of calc ulu s and calcul us-b ased physics . 3. CoLLege of LiberaL Arts and Sciences. Transfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 c umul ative college grade point aver age for all work attempted . Course work in progress cannot be used in calculati n g the cumul ative average. 4. CoLLege of Arts & Media . Tra n sfer applicants must have at least a 2.0 c umul a tive college gra d e point aver age for all work attempte d. Course work in p rog ress cannot be used in calcula tin g ilie cumu l ative aver age. Music m ajor applica nt s (except those enteri n g ilie Music Industry S tudies program) also must pass an autlition. Contact the Department of Music for autlition information, 303-556-2727 o r www . rodenver . edu/academicslcoLLeges/CAM. Important Note : Applicants who do not meet the above grade point average or credit hour requirement s wiLl be considered for admission, but on an individual basis. The primary fact ors used whe n cons id ering s tud ents i nd ividual l y are: • pr oba bility of s u ccess in th e academ i c progra m to which admissio n is desir ed • ilie quality of prior academ i c work • age , maturity, and noncollegiate achievements • time elapsed since last atte nd ance at previous colleges Transfer st ud ents wiili 60 c r etlits of earned college cretlit must select a major at th e time of application. " Undeclare d " is not a major. HOW TO APPLY I . The student s h ould obtain an appl i cation for underg r ad u ate adm issi o n from the CU-Denver Office of Ad missi ons o r the CU-Den ver we b site. 2. The applica tion form must b e completed and r etu rn ed wit h the r equ ir ed $4 0 (sub ject to c h a nge) non-refundable application fee. 3. The stude nt i s required to have two official transcripts sent to the Office of Admissions from each colleg i ate institution attended. Official uanscripts are those sent by the issui n g i nstitution directly to : Office of Admissio ns, University of Col orado at Denver , Campu s Box 1 67, P.O. Box 1 73364, Denver, CO 80217-3364 Hand-carried or faxed copies are not official. I f a student i s c urr e ntl y enrolle d a t a n other instit u tion , an official tr a n scri pt listi n g all courses except those taken in th e final term should b e sent. Another tr a n scrip t must be submitted after compl et i on of t h e final term. (Tr a n scr ipts from fore i g n institutions mus t be presented in th e original l a n g u age and accompa ni ed by a certified lit e ral English tr a n s l ation.) Applicants to the Colleges of Arts & Media and Lib eral Arts and Sciences who have fewer than 12 sem ester hours ( 1 8 quarter hours) of college work comp l eted must al.so s ubmi t a high school transcript and ACT or SAT te s t scores. Engineering and bu s iness applicants w ith fewer than 24 semester h o ur s also must s ubmit high school transcripts an d ACT/SAT scores. All c r ede nti a l s presented for admission become t h e prop e r ty of the University of Col orado and must r e m ain on file. Studmts w ho kno wingly falsifY transcripts or t e s t scores or who fail t o indicate all previo usly attmded institutions will b e dmied admiss io n to, o r w ill b e dis enro lle d fro m, the university. TRANSFER OF COLLEGE-LEVEL CREDIT Course wo rk taken a t any regi o n ally accredited instirution of hig h er education will b e considered for transfer to CU-Denver. Courses are CU-Denver Catalog 2004-0 5

PAGE 16

12 / Our University, Our Campus considered for transfer on th e basi s of havin g simil a r co nrenr ro thos e offered by CU-Denver. Statewide guaranteed transfer courses are a lways accepte d and apply ro core requiremenrs . Developmenta l , remed ial, vocat ional, tec hnical , relig ious, doctrinal , orienrarion, indep e nd e nr study, specia l ropics, an d cooperat ive e du cation co urses are nor acce pt e d . Only courses in which a grade of C-o r better was ear n ed are considered for transfer . Cour ses in which a grade of Pass { P)was earned are consi d ered for transfer only if a grade of Pass a r the sending institution is defined as a C-or berrer. Srudenrs w i s hing ro appeal tr ansfe r c r edi t d ecis i ons should co ntact th eir CU-Denver academic d e parrm e nr. After all official tran c ripr s have been r eceive d and rhe s tud ent is ad mined as a d egree st ud e nr , th e Office of Admissions will prepare a transfer credit report indicating w hi ch co urses have been accepte d i n tr ansfer by CU-Denver. A copy of thi s rep o rt i s mailed t o th e st ud ent as well as ro the student's acade mi c deparrm enr a r CU-Denver. Upon receipt of this transfer cred it r eporr, s tud en t s should co nr acr their academ i c d e p ar tment to meet with an a dvi so r , who will determin e how transferred c r ed it applies to s p ecific CU-Denver d egree r eq uir e ments. The Office of Admiss i o n s considers coursework for transfer regardless of the age of rhe academic cred it. Stare guarantee d gen eral educat i o n courses will b e accepted in transfer and applied to gra duati on requirements for a period of at least I 0 year s afre r course comp l e tion. Indi vidua l departments, h owever , may have s pecifi c guidelines a nd p olic ies a b out age of credit for co urses nor l i s r e d as "st are g uar anteed " a nd m ake t h e final decisio n about ap plication of credit tow ard a d eg ree pro g ram. Srudents are expected to have c urr ent working know l e dge of prereq u i s it e courses , regardless of when pre r equisite co urses were taken. The Business Schoo l generally limit s irs rran fer of bu s iness co urse credits ro those that are offered as l ower division co urses a r CU-Den ver . Srudenrs w h o have taken upp e r division business co ur ses from a n America n Assembly of Colleg iat e Schools ofBu ines (AACSB) acc redit ed college of business may request revi ew of these co urses for possib l e transfer by contacting CU-D e n ver's Business Sc hool ad v i sing office . All courses taken in the business a rea of emphasis mus t b e complet e d ar CU-Denver . The College of E n gineerin g a nd Applied Scie n ce, in gen eral, req u ires rhar engi n eeri n g cou rse transfer c redit mus t co m e from a n Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET)-accr e dired e n g i n eer i n g program to be acceptable for de g ree purposes. E n g i neering technol ogy courses are nor considere d equ i valent ro engineering courses. A maximum of 60 semester hours is acceptab l e in transfer ro CU-Denver from communi ty or junior colleges. Colorado Community College Transfer In compl iance with Colorado's Statewide Transfer Pol icy, s ruden r s may transfer c r edit f rom a Color ado community college on a co u r se-by course basis or by comp l e tin g an Associate of Arts (AA) or Associ are of Science (AS) d egree . St ud ents who complete a n ANAS d eg ree may b e g u aran t eed full tr ansfer of the assoc i ate de gree (60 c r e dits maximum) and comp l etion of a BNBS degree in th e College of Liberal Arts a nd Sciences or th e College of Arts & Me dia w ith 60 additi onal credits ar CU-Denver. This g u arantee d transfer program is r e ferr e d ro as rhe "60 plus 60 " transfer pr og r am. The 60 plu s 60 program ap plies only ro sr ud e nr s w ho beg an Colorado community college srudies i n fall2003 or l a t er and w ho meet the following requirements: • compl ete a n ANAS d egree, w hi ch includes 35 c r edits of srare-g u a ranr eed gen era l e ducation co urses • earn c r edit o nl y ar Colorado community colleges within rhe last 10 years • ea rn a grade of Cor berrer in each course • follow the CU-Denver transfer guide, whic h l i s t s r eq uir ed courses ro be taken as parr of the AN AS degree • declare a major in the College of Liberal Arts a nd Sciences or th e College of Arrs & Media (ch a nges of major a nd/or co mpl e tion of professional prerequ i s ites or minors are nor includ e d in thi s program ) I f sru d e nr s meet these c r i ter i a and their graduation evaluation s h ow s they need more th an 60 cre d i t s for a BA/BS degree, the y can file a n appeal. ee www.state.eo.us/cchelstuinfhtmlfor derails . CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 Statewide articula tion agreemenrs are in place gove rning rran fer of s tud ents from Colorado community colleges into programs in the B u s in e s Sc hoo l , th e College of E ngineering and Applie d S c i e n ce, and th e Elemenraty Education Teac h e r Lice n s ur e program. A Comprehemive Guide to Student Traniflrdocume nr conraining Col orado communi ty college advising plans and admiss ion information is avai l able from the CU-Denver Office of Admissions. In addition , a CU-Denver admissions representative can assist srudenrs w ith planning a rran fer program. R epresentatives regularly visit Colo rado community colleges. Cal l the CU-DenverTransfer Service Coordinator ar 303-556-4950 or tramjer@cudenver.edu for additional information. Advanced Placement Program T h e Advance d Placemenr (AP) Program of the College En trance Examination Board (CEEB) allows stud ents ro rake ad va nc ed work while in high schoo l and rhe n be exa min e d for cred it ar rhe college l evel. Srudenrs who rak e advanced placement courses and s ubsequ ently receive scores of 4 or 5 o n rhe CEEB Advanced Placement Examination are general l y g i ven college credit for l owerlevel courses in which they have demonstrated proficiency , and are granted advance d s tanding in rl10se areas. The College of Liberal Arts and ciences also grants AP credit for scores of3 plus a course gra d e of A-in the co rr esponding s ubj ect. For m ore inform at i on, contact your high schoo l co un selor or r h e Office of Admissions at U-Denv er. College-Level Examination Program In coming CU-De n ver students may earn university credit by examination in subject areas in which they have demonstrated college level proficiency. Interested students a r e e n couraged ro rake appropriate s ubj ect exami nation s pro vided in the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) of t h e College Entrance Exa minati o n Board resting service . Students w ho a r e int erested in how CLEP examina tion credit ap plies to the CU-Denver degree requirements should conracr their aca d emic advisor. International Baccalaureate Diploma Program The Inrernarional B accalau r eate Diploma Program (IB), available a t s elect hi g h schoo ls, i s a rigorous, pre-university course of s tud y empha s i zing liberal arts from an inrernational perspective . In accordance with HB 03-1108, the University of Col o r ado at Denver will g rant ar minimum 24 semester hours of credit for any studenr who has graduated from hi gh school having s u ccessfully com pl eted an Inte rn ationa l Baccalaur eate (IB) Diploma program. o ruition will be c h arged for awa rdi n g of thi academic c r e dit. To receive rhe maximum cred i t h ours, a s r u denr mus t have a score of a t l east 4 on each examinatio n a dm iniste r e d as p a rr of the l B diplom a pro g ram . If a score b elow 4 is earned on an exami n ation , credit awa rd e d may be reduced. Credit may b e gran red for ind ividuallB courses w h ere examinatio n s are completed w ith ar least a score of 4 for swdenrs w h o d o not complete an lB Diploma program . Srudents s h ould consult their academic advisors for information about apply in g IB credit r o their degree pro g r ams. Military Service and Schooling To have credit for educational experience evaluated, a ppli cants with military experience s h ould submit the following with their application: • Acopyof00Form 214 • DO Form 295, Application for the Eva l u atio n of Educational Expe r i e nc e Durin g Milit ary Servic e (USAF person nel may presenr rwo official transcripts from the Community College of the Air Force in lie u of DO Form 295) C r edit will be awa rd ed as recommended by the Commissi on on the Accreditation of Service Experiences of the American Coun cil on Education, ro the extenr that the credit is ap pli cable to the d egree the smdent i s seeki n g at CU-Denver. r edit for co urses comp l ete d through the U.S. Armed Force In s t itute will b e evaluated o n the same basi s as transfer c redit from co lle giate institutions.

PAGE 17

Reserve Officers' Training Cor s (ROT() Students e nroll e d in or Air Force ROTC pro g rams sho uld co n s ult w ith their college o schoo l r egarding the a ppli ca tion of ROTC co urse credit toward gra du tion r e quirement s . The College of Liberal Arts an d Sciences allows a aximum of6 semester hours of ROTC credit to be a ppli ed towar d b accala ureate degree r e quir e m e nts . The Business School stipulates h a t ROTC courses ma y be used for c r e dit only for n o n bu siness elect ve requirements and that no c redit ma y b e given for f reshman and so om o r e ROTC courses. Furthermore, a maximum of 1 2 semeste r ours may b e applied toward b acca l a ur eate d egree requir e m e nt s in bu ness, and then onl y if th e ROTC program is co mpleted . Intra-University Tronsf r CU-D e nver st ud ents m y c h a n ge co llege s or school s w ithin CU Denver pro vided the y are ccepted by th e college or sch oo l to which the y w i s h to transfer. CUenve r Intra-Univers i ty T r ansfe r forms may be obtained from the eco rd s Office . Deci s ion s on intra-university transfe r s a r e made b y the c ' !lege or sch oo l to w hi c h the student wishes to transfer. S tudent s in Extended St dies pro g ram s wishing to e nroll in regul ar CU-D e n ver courses or programs s hould contact th e Office of Admission s f or a degree ap Jlication. Readmission for Former Students CU-D enver st ud ents have not r eg i s t e r e d and atte nd e d classes at CU-Den ver for one yea r o l onger an d who have not att e nd e d a noth er institution since CU a r e co s id ered returning students and mu s t f o rmall y apply for readmissi on. An dditional ap plication fee i s r e quir e d only if you are changing f rom und r g r adu a r e to g radu ate or n o n-d eg ree to degree sta tus. Application forms e availa ble ar rhe Office of Adm ission s and at www. cudenver. edu. Students w h o have atte 1 d e d another college o r univer s ity s ince l ast a tt e nding rhe University o Colorado mus t a ppl y as transfer st ud e nts a nd m eet rhe transfer st ud nt de a dline s for r eceipt of documents. This requ ires payment of rhe $ (subje c t to c hange) n o n-r efun d a bl e applica tion fee and s ubmi ssion of o official tran sc ript s from all colleges and universitie s previousl y arte d e d . Transcripts must be sent directly from the issu in g institution to: Office of A dmi ssions Uni vers i ty of Col ora do Campus Bo x 1 67, P. 0. ox 1 73364 Denver,C080217 -33 4 Students w h o l ast atte n ed another CU campus mus t formall y appl y for readmiss i on. An applic tion fee i s n o r required unless yo u ar e goi n g from undergr ad u ate to gra uar e or from non-d eg ree to d eg ree s t a tus. Application forms are avai able from th e Office of Admissions and at www. cudenver. edu. Admission for Non-Deg ee Students P e r so n s who have reache the age of20 and who want to take un iversity co ur ses, but do not plan t work t owar d a U n iversity of Colorado de g r ee, may b e admitte d a non-d eg ree st ud ents pro v ided the y are eligib l e to r e turn ro all coli g i ate instituti o n s previou s l y atte nded. A 2 .0 cumulative grade point av rage f or all institution s a ttend e d i s r e quir ed robe a non-d egree stude n . Questions r ega rdin g admission as a non d egree student should be irecr e d ro the Office of Admiss ions. Each schoo l/ college limit s the 1umbe r of semester hours taken as a non degree student rhar may b . tr ansfe rr e d ro a d egree pro g ram . Students consi d ering c anging from nond eg ree t o degree sta tu s will need ro m eet the admiss io r eq uirem ents for d eg r ee-see kin g s tud ents. Course s rak en for cre di as a non-de gree student can be used for tr ansfe r to o th er institutio s or for professi onal de velopment. Undergraduate Admissions/ 1 3 Note: Inte rnational s tud ents a r e not admitted as nondegre e students . Students wirh a baccal a ur eate d eg ree who are nor accepted ro spec ific d eg ree programs ma y e nroll for coursewo r k as non-degree s tud ents . T h ey mus t co mpl ete a non d eg ree a ppl i cat ion for admiss i on. S tud ents in a non-d eg ree sta tu s who have a previou s degre e pay g r aduate tumo n r ates. To app l y for admission as a non-degre e student, obta i n a Non-Degree Student Applicatio n form from t h e Office of Ad missions . R eturn the co mpl eted app lication b y the dead lin e for th e t erm desired. A $25 (subj ect ro c h a nge) n o n-r efundab l e application fee is required . o additional c r e d e ntial s are required. Non-degree students are advised that registration for courses is on a space-available basis. Continu at ion as a n o n-deg ree s tud ent with no prior unde rgraduat e d eg ree i s co ntingent u pon maintaining an overall g r ad e point average of2.0 upon co mpl e tion of 12 o r mor e semester ho ur s . on-degree st ud ents may a pply f or admission roan undergr aduate d eg ree program b y following the i n str u ctions outlined on the applicat ion for d egree admissi on form . Admission for Students Seeking a Second Undergraduate Degree Students w ho alread y hold a bachelor ' s degree may apply for admission ro a program in w hi c h the y can earn a secon d unde r graduate degree. App l icants for a seco nd undergrad u ate degr ee mus t m eet CU-Denver adm issi o n s s tandard s . These students ma y apply ro the College of Arts & Media, College of E n g in eeri n g a nd Applied Scie n ce, or rhe College of Liberal Arts a nd Sc i ences. Persons w h o already hold an under gra du ate d eg ree in any disciplin e general l y ma y nor a ppl y for a seco nd und erg rad u ate degree in bu siness. Rather , rhey s hould app l y ro a graduate MBA or M .S. business program. Contact th e Graduate School of Business at 303-556-5900. Education is a graduate program.lnreresred stude nts sho uld contact the Schoo l of Ed u cation office for informatio n , 303-556-27 1 7. HOW TO APPlY 1. Obtain an application for undergraduate admission from rhe Office of Admissi ons or at www.cudenver.edu. 2. Compl ete th e a pplication a nd send i r ro the Office of Admissions w ith a $4 0 (subj ec t ro change) non-refundable a ppli cat ion fee. 3. Have rwo offic i a l tr anscrip t s sent to the Office of Admissions from each colleg i a t e insrirurion atte n ded. Official tran sc ript s are those sent by the issuin g in s titution directly ro: Office of Admissions Univers i ty of Colorado ar Denver Campu s Box 16 7, P.O. Box 1 73364 Denver , CO 8 0217-3364 Hand-carried or foxed copies are not official. Transcripts from the in sti tuti o n where rhe first undergraduate degree was earne d must have final grades posted for the semes t e r that the st udent graduated and have th e official n otation of the degree awarded. All c r edentials presenr ed for admi ssion b ecome the proper ty of the University of Colorado and m u s r r e m ain on file. Stud ents who do nor d eclare all previously attended institution s are su bject to disciplinary action andlor di s mi ssal. Students who knowingly falsify transcripts or test scores will be denied admission to, or will be dis enrolled from, the university. High School Concurrent Enrollment Hi g h sch oo l juniors and senio r s wirh demonstrated academic abilities may be admitte d ro CU-Denve r w irh special approva l for one term only. This approval m ay b e renewed . C r edit for courses taken may subse qu e ntl y be ap pli e d toward a university degree program. For more infor m at ion and ap pli cat ion instructions , contact the CU-Denver Office of Admissions , 3 0 3-556-2873. CUDenver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 18

14 / Our University, Our Campus Admission Requirements for International Students The Uni versity of Colorado at Denver encourages int ernational students to app l y for admiss i on to undergraduate an d graduate prog r ams. All internat i onal applicants mu st submit a formal a ppli cation and pay the non-refundable internat i onal application fee of$75 . Undergraduate. Adm i ssio n requirements for CU-Den ver ' s schoo l s and colleges vary, and international st ud ents seeki ng admi ssion mu s t meet the requir ements of the progran1 to which they are app lyin g . In addition , all international students whose first l anguage i s not English are required to have a minimum Test of E n glish as a Foreig n Language (TOEFL) score of525 (or 197 on the computer-based test) . Prospective students shoul d request an Int ernatio nal Student Applicat ion packer from th e Office oflnternational Education. Requirements for each CU-Denver college and school can be found in th i s catalog. For best processing , all information should be sent at leasr five months before the semester in which you w i sh to enroll. For undergrad uate applicat ion materials, have materials sent by the following dares: Interim Dean: Tom Clark Office: CU-Denver Building, 1250 1 4 th Street, Suire 320 Telephone: 303-556-368 7 For s pecific in formacio n and degree requirements for graduate s tudy, refer to the d e partment/program descriptions in rhe sc h ools and colleges sections of thi s ca t alog . Information About the Graduate School Quality graduate program s are sy nonymous wit h the University of Colorado. Professor s are actively invo l ved in r esea rch and creative activity and, as reachers and scho l ars, continue to stu d y and absorb new data , ideas , and techniq ues, eventually bringing these experie n ces to t h e classroo m . Graduate students at CU-Denver gain nor only from int eractions with the grad u ate faculty , but also from other students . CU-Denver's gra du a t e students bring practical ex p erience gained in th e D e nv er community to th e classroom, and they are read y to relate the realit ies of practice to th e models presented . The CU-Denver Gradua t e Schoo l includes the following co lleges and schoo ls: College of Architecture a nd Pla nning College of Arts & Media Business Sc h ool College of Engineering and Applied Science College of Liberal Arts and Sciences Schoo l of Ed ucat ion Grad uat e School of Pub lic Affairs Degrees Offered The following graduate prog r ams are authorize d for comp l etion through the Graduate Schoo l at CU-Denver: Master of Ar t s (MA) Anthropology Biology Communi cation Econo mics Englis h History Political Sci ence Psychology Sociology CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 Summer Fall Spring Preferred Janu ary 15 March 15 Aug u s t 15 F i nal May3 July22 D ecember 1 Graduate. Inte rn a tional stude nts who w ish to pursue graduate study a r CU-Denver mu s t h ave e arned an undergradu ate bachelor's de gree, or irs equivalent, a nd must fulfill all other requirements of the gradu a te program to w hi c h they are app l ying. In a ddition, all international s tud ents w h ose first lan g uage i s nor Englis h are required to h ave a minimum Test of E ngli s h as a Foreign La n g u age (TOEFL) score of 500 (or 1 73 on th e co mputer b ase d rest) befor e CU-Denv e r will process the application for admission. H oweve r , man y departments require a TOEFL sco r e hi g h er than 500 w h en g rantin g admission to a graduate pro g r am. Application s are available from the Office oflnte rn arional Education. These ap pli cat ions s hould be received six months prior to the t erm for w hich the sr uden r is applyi n g for priori ty co n sideration . Note: Except for summer sessions, international s tudents mu st be e nroll ed in a d eg r ee-see king pro gram. Master of Arts (MA Educa tion ) Administration , Supervision, and Curri c ulum Deve lopment Counseling Psychology and Counselor Edu catio n C urri c ulum and In s truction Early Childho o d E du ca tion Educational P syc hology Informatio n and Learn in g Technologies Special Education Master of Science (MS) Accounting Applied Mathe m atics Chemistry Civil Engineerin g Computer Science E l ectrical E ngineering E n viro nm enta l Sciences F in ance Info rm at ion Systems Management a nd Organization Mark eting Mechanical E ngineerin g R ecording Arts Technical Communica tion Master of Arc hit ect ure (MArc h ) Master oflnregrar e d Science (MIS) Mas t e r of Science International Bu s iness Master of Criminal Justice ( MCJ) Master of Enginee ring (MEng) Master of Science in Health Administration (MS) Executive Option Master of Humanities (M H ) Master of Landscape Arch it ecture (MLA) Master of Publ i c Admini s tration (MPA) Mast e r of Public Admin i s tration (MPA) Executive Option Master of Social Science (MSS) Master of Urban and R eg ional Planning (MURP)

PAGE 19

Master of Urban D esign ( UD) p ec ialist in Ed u cat i o n (E S ) Admini s tration , uperv s ion , C urri culum Development Schoo l P sycho l ogy Doctor of Phil osop h y (P h Appl i e d Mathematics Civil Engineering Computer Science and nforma tion Systems Design a nd Pl anning Educational Leadersh ip d Inn ovation Health and B e ha vio ral Public Administration Requirements for Admi sion Note th a t th e followi n g r e minimum requirements. Sc hool a nd co llege r egu l ations, if more trin gent, take precedenc e over the minimum g uidelines as se t forth b y t e Graduate School. REGUlAR DEGREE STUDENTS Qualified students are a mitre d to regular degre e status b y the a ppropriate depa rtm e nt. I addition to departmental approval , applicants for admission as r egular degree students must: 1. Present a combinatio of rhe following: a cu mul ative undergrad u ate grade point average ( PA ) of2.5 or better on a scale w h ere A i s equal to 4.0, standard d examinatio ns, prior professional exper i ence , portfolios or orher indi ca tors. 2. Meer the s p ecific requ remenrs as established b y the pro g ram faculty. Applicant who do not eet th e requirements for admission as a regular degree student rna be considered for admission r o a master's program as a pro vis ional d gree student upon the recommendation of the program faculty. Prog r ms may admit students under a provi s ional agreement s ubj ec t ro the fo l owing r e quirements: 1. The t e rm of the prov i ional p e riod s hal l not exceed two years. 2. T he stud ent must co piec e eac h semeste r ' s coursework with a GPA of 3.0 or hi g h er on all ork take n (w h e ther applied to th e mast er's degree o r not). 3. The pro v i s i o nal agree em should clearly state any additional program r equirement . Failure to m ee t the co n tion s of th e provisional agreement will be ca use for s u spens i on. APPLICATION PROCEDURES Gradua t e stude nts who xpect to study a t CU-Denver hould contact the Offi ce of Admi s ions concerning pro cedures for forw a rding co mpleted applications. Once a student has deci ed to apply for a graduate program, a compl e t ed application mu t be submirred befor e the dea dline date. Contact the s pe cific progr of study for deadline dates. An applicant for admiss n mus t prese nt: I. Parts I and II of the C D enver Graduate School Application form , includ ing the 11 irion Classificat ion form, which may be obtained from the dep rtmemal program coordinator. 2 . Two officia l rran sc rip for al l academ i c work in colleges and univer s ities co mpl e te to d a te . 3. Three l etter of refere ce. H ave nomina tors includ e appl icant's name and soc ial ec uri numbe r in th e ir letter of r efe rence. 4. A nonrefundable app " ca ti o n fee (c h ec k or money order) of$50 (internationa l s rud e nr pplication fee is $60). No application w ill be processed until t is fee is paid. 5. Any other m a t e rial r e uir ed s p ec ifical l y by th e program facu lty. T h i s ma y includ e scor s from the Graduate Record Examination Graduate School/ 1 5 (GRE) or other examination. C h eck w ith program coordinators in the d epartme nts for additiona l info rmati o n that m ay be required. When a prospective d eg r ee student a pplies for admiss ion, the c h a ir per so n or a student admissions committee of th e department will decide whether the a ppli cant s hall be admitte d and make cha r decision known to th e Office of Admissions. C h eck with the program to determine the dead lin e for submitting the appli cation a nd a ppli cation fee. Studems who wish to appl y for a graduate srude m award (e. g., fellow sh ip , sc h o lar s hip , assi s t ants hip ) s h o uld contact their d e p artment before th e a ppli ca tion d ea dlin e date for information, s in ce d ea dlines are u s ual l y earlier for aid req u ests . Readmis s ion/Changing P rograms Forme r and current students w h o wish to be readmitted o r c h a n ge from one d eg r ee pro g r a m to a noth e r must meet the r equirements of the n ew d eg r ee program a nd provide all it e m s required of students a ppl y in g to the Gradua t e School at CU-Den ver for the first time. T h ese applican ts, h oweve r , may petition the program to which they were initially admitt e d to sec ure a release of transcripts and letter s of recommendation supplie d at th e time of th e ir initial application. Transferring Students transfe rring from another CU campus to CU-D e nver must appl y and be acce pted to the new campu . Doctoral Application A student who has co mpl eted a m aster's program at CU-Denver must resubmit P arts I and II of the g r aduate application for acceptance into the doctoral pro g r am. Non-Degree Student s A tudenr who wishes to rake g r aduate cour ses, but i s not interested in earning a s p ec ific a dvanced degree , may appl y as a n o n -degree stude nt. Contact the Office of Admission s at 303-556-2704 for furth e r inform a tion. Non -degree studems will be allowed to r eg i s t e r onl y on th e campus to which th ey have b ee n admirred. on-degree st ud ents who later desire ro pursue a graduate degree program at this uni versity are encouraged to s ubmir d1e complete graduate applica tion a nd suppo rtin g credentials to their department as soo n as possible . Note th a t the grade point average (G PA) for courses taken as a nond egree student i s calc ulat ed separa t ely, and i s not incorporated in th e official graduate G PA. A d e p artment may recomm e nd the rr a n sfer of as m a n y as 9 c r edit hours toward th e require m ents of a mas t e r ' s d egree for courses t ake n e ith e r as a s tud ent a t another r ecognized grad u ate sc hool , as a non-degree stu d ent at th e U niver ity of Col ora d o, o r a combinati on. A g r a d e of Bo r b ette r must be earn ed. A I 0-yea r tim e limit i s in effect. International Applicants Pro spective inte rnati o nal sru dent s hould contact t h e Office of Inte rnati o nal Education for submission deadlines. The applica tion p ac ket should include: • $75 fee • TOEF L sco res • finan cial documentation • Graduate R eco rd Examina tion sco res • offic i a l E ngli s h tr ans l ation of all sc hool records • other documents as noted in the prev ious sec tion on a ppli catio n procedures Acceptable TOEFL Scores: T h e TOEFL is the Test of E n glis h as a Foreign Language. If a srude nr ' s native l a n g u age is not E ngli sh, o r the student has not atte nd ed a Britis h o r American univer s ity for ar l eas t one yea r and ac hi eve d satisfactory g r a d es, t h en he/she mus t take the TOEFL. CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 20

16/ Our University, Our Campus All programs within am and sci ences, ed u cation, a nd doctoral programs require a minimum score of500 for regular admiss i o n . b efore CO-D e nver will process the applicat ion for admission. H oweve r , man y deparrmems require a TOEFL score h ighe r th an 500 w h e n granrin g admi ssio n w a graduate program. The university provides an Imensive English Program for interna tional stud ems preparing to pass the TOEFL, through the American Language Cemer. See Specia l Programs and Facilities in the Ge n eral Information section for a compl ete description. G raduate Qualifying E xaminations At the option of any department , the Graduate R ecord Examinat i on (GRE) may be required of applicants for admission to the graduate pro gram or for assistantships prior w determining st ud em status. Students w h o are applyi n g for assis t antships for th e fall semes t e r should rake the GRE n o later than th e December restin g dare so rhar their scores will be availab l e to the selection com mittee. Six weeks should be allowed for GRE sco res to b e r eceived by the d epartme nt. Information regarding these examinations may b e obtained fro m rhe Assessment Center, 303-5 56-3677. Srudems may a l so contact rhe Educational Testing Service at 609-77 1 -7670, via the web at www.gre.org, or by wrir.ing to GRE-ETS, P.O. Box 6000 , Princeton , NJ 08541-6000. Other tests may be requi r ed by the sc ho o l or college. Students ente r ing profes i onal schoo l s and special programs may obtain information on the raduare Management AdmissionsTe r (GMAT), Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Doppler, and Law Schoo l Admissions Test (LSAT) from the college or school requiring the rest. New Student Orientation An oriemation program for n ew students is held at the beginn in g of the fal l a nd spring semesters, during the week prior to the first day of classes . The oriemarion program provides informa t ion to new students about activit ies and services availab l e at CO-Denver. Information on the registration process , parking , and secu ring ID cards i s also provided. Academic a dvisin g sess ion s a r e h eld b efo r e r egis trat i on for rhe rerm. Students s h o u l d contact their sch ools and colleges for additional infor mation on advising, as well as special oriemar ion sessions that may b e held for their programs . Registration On rhe r egular registration days of eac h semest e r , srudems w ho have been admitted to a grad u ate program a r e required to comp l ete ap propri ate registration procedures . Studems s h ould register for classes the semester they are accepted as graduate s tud ems. If unab l e to attend that semester , they mus t notify the Office of A dmi ssions a nd Records , in ad dition w th e d e p artment rhar has accepted th em. CHANGES IN REGISTRATION A student who wishes to drop a course should follow the standard drop/add procedure. After the 1Oth week of classes, graduate students may nor drop or add a course without preseming a l ette r to the dean of the appropriate school or college, staring the exce ptional c ir cumsta n ces rhar justify the c hange. This lerter , endorsed b y the instructor of rhe course, must accompany the properly sig n ed and co mpl e t ed drop/add form. WIT HDRAWAL Graduate stud ems who desire to withd r aw from rhe uni versity mu s t app l y to the d ea n of their school or co lleg e for perm ission to w ithdraw in good sta nding. A student who discontinues attendance in a course with out official withdrawal will be marked as havingfoiled the course. After the CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 I Oth week of the class, the student must have the associate dean's s ignatur e to drop a course. Tuition and Fees For information , see Tuition and Fees section of this ca talog . Financial Aid for Graduate Study COLORADO GRADUATE GRANT The olorado Graduate Grant i s admini ste r ed by the Office of Financial Aid. Competition for these funds i s based o n d emonstrated need and is ope n to grad u ate studems w ho are residems of th e stare of Col or ado. Applications a r e availa bl e from the Office of Financial Aid, 3 0 3-5 56-2886 . COLORADO GRADUATE MERIT AWARDS Col orado Graduate Fellows hip s are awarded primarily to emering a nd comin uin g r egu l ar d eg ree doctoral s tud ents . These are awarded to ente rin g stud e m s on the basis of academic promise an d to continuing s rud e m s on the basi s of acad emic success . Contact the department for inform atio n about thi s fellowship . GRADUATE STUDENT TEACHING APPOINTMENTS Many departments e mpl oy g r ad u ate st ud ents as part-time instructors or reaching assistants. The in structorshi p i s reser ved for those advanced graduate rudents already po ssess ing an appropriate master's degree who ma y b e ind epe ndentl y respon s ible for the conduct of a sect i on or co urse. Comacr the departmem for further information. RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS R esearch act i vit ie s pr ov id e opportunities for grad u ate students to obtain parr-rime work as research assis tants in m any d e p artments. Comact the department for further information . LOAN FUNDS Graduate students w i sh in g to apply for lon g-term loans a nd for part rime jobs through the college work-study pr ogram sho uld submit an a pp l ication for fin a n cial aid to the Office of Financial Aid b y March I. Short-term loa n assis t ance i s available to students w ho have completed one or more semester s in residence. Short-term l oans are design ed to s uppl ement inadeq u ate personal funds and to provide for emergencies. App l ication s h o uld be made directly to the Student ervice Center, CIOOI. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES The university m a intain s a n e mplo yment service to help students obtain part-time work, either through co n ventional empl oyment or through the college work-st ud y program. Students employe d by the uni versity are hir ed solely on the b asis of merit and fimess, a policy that avoids favor or discrimination because of race, color, cree d , sex, age, handicap, or nati onal origi n. St u dents are also r efe rr ed to prospective employer s in acco rd a nce with this policy. Requirements for Advanced Degrees QUALITY OF GRADUATE WORK A student i s expected to main rain at l east a n overal l 3.0 average in all wo rk attempte d while e nr olled in a gra duate pr ogram. For all g r adu a t e d egrees, a grade below C i s unsati sfac tory and will not be counted toward the minimum r e quirement s for these d egrees.

PAGE 21

CREDIT BY TRANSFER A limited amounr of hi h-qualiry residenr graduate work done in a recog n ized graduate scho I elsewhere with i n the rime allowed may be accepted, provided iris re ommended by the deparrmenr concerned and approved by rhe school or allege dean. The maximum amounr of work thar may be transferred to university is 9 semester hours or 30 percenr of the number of credits r qui red for the degree, whichever is higher for masrer's degrees, and 18 h urs for performance and PhD degrees. The c h ool or colleges all determine if graduate classes raken by an undergraduate can be uan ferred ro a grad u ate program. They shall also determine if courses taken in the University of Colorado system are con sidered re idenr or rransfe courses. Courses taken as pass/f: ' I or satisfacrory/unsarisfacrory will nor be transferred. In addition, a rade of B-or above musr be ear ned for a course robe rran ferred. C urses over I 0 years old will nor be transferred . USE OF ENGLISH A srudenr who is no rice bly delicienr in rhe use of standard English in all oral and written work 1 aynor obtain an advanced degree from the University of olorado. A ility rouse rhe language with precision and distinction should be culr] a red as an arrainmenr of major importance. The u niversity reserves he right ro rest English proficiency for nonnative speaker of Englis h o confirm and va l idate sufficiency for credit bearing cour ework and d gree programs. Each departmenr will j dge the qualifications of irs advanced studentS in the use of English. Rep rrs, examination , and speech will be consid ered in esrimaring rhe can idare ' s proficiency . GRADUATE APPEALS The G r a du ate Council h all review grievances relared to procedural issues thar can nor be reso l ed ar rhe school or college level. Appeals of grades or other academic i sues are conducted according ro the proce dures of the schools and c leges , with final resolution residing with the dean of rhe college/school. Moster's Degree A srudenr regularl y ro a graduate program and Iacer accepted as a candidate fo rhe masrer of arrs, masrer of cience, or other master ' s degrees will be rec mmended for rhe degree only after certain require m ents have been m r. The r e q u i rements scare below are minimum requirements ; addi t iona l co ndi tio n s may be s r by the individ ual programs. Students planning ro graduate should ascertain currenr deadl ines with their graduate progr . Ir i the graduate srudenr's and the depart menr's responsibility rose that all requiremenrs and deadlines are mer (i.l'., changing ofTW grad , notification of final examinations, ere.). DepartmentS or progra commirrees may have deadlines rhar musr be mer b y the graduate stu enrs in that departmenr or program. lr is rhe srudenr's r esponsibiliry ro certain and meer these requiremenrs. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS T h e mi nimum require enrs of graduate work for a master's degree may b e ful filled by com p ieing a minimum of30 semester credits, of which n o m ore than 9 rna be thesis or independenr srudy hours . A course m a r k below C s unsarisfacrory and will nor counr reward the mi n i m u m requireme n for a master's degree. A studenr on probation s nor eligible robe awarded a degree until he or she is removed from pro arion. Program requiremenrs may be more rringenr than these minimum requirement , in which cas program requiremenrs supercede rhe requiremenrs of rhe Grad u re chool. Graduatt' School/ 1 7 LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS andidares must have such knowledge of ancient and/or modern languages a eac h department require . ee specific departmenta l requiremenr . GRADUATE CREDIT Graduate credit i given for cour es thar are lisred at the 5000 level or above, and char are offered b y profe ssors who are m e mb e r of the gradu ate faculty. Cou r es at the 4000 level ma y be counted for graduate credit, bur a minimum of 1.8 semester hours musr be taken ar rhe 5000 level. o course below rhe 4000 level may be counted for graduate credit. Departmental approval musr be obtained for the courses raken by a s rudenr ro count reward the degree plan. rudenrs are advised thar nor all course lis red in thi s caralog are avail able ar any one rime. ome are given in alrernare years, a nd chis hould be con idered w h e n developing degree p l ans. ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY A studenr who wishes ro become a candidate for a ma ster's degree musr file a completed Application for Admission ro Candidacy in the Graduate School or in the student' s graduate program b y rhe ap propri ate deadline for graduating thar semester. The application musr be signed by the rudenr ' s advisor a nd the pro gram chair or direcror , certifYing char the s rudenr ' work i sari fac rory and char the program outlined in the application me ers the requirementS ser for the student. MASTER' S THESIS CREDIT Every grad u ate st udent working reward a maste r ' s degree who expects ro presenr a thesis i11 partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree musr register for thesis credit with a maximum of9 semeste r hours . The final grade will be wirhheld until the thesis i s completed. If rhe thesis is not completed ar the end of the term in which the srudenr is so registered , an In Progms (I P ) will be r eported. THESIS REQUIREMENTS A thesis ma y be of a research , exposirory , c ritical, or creative type. Every thesis pre enred in partial fulfillmenr of the requiremenr s for an advanced degree must: l. deal with a definite topic related ro rhe major field 2. be based upon independenr srudy and invesrigarion 3. represenr rhe eq u ivalenr of no more rhan 9 semester hours of work 4. receive rhe approval of rhe major deparrmenr 5. be essenrially complete ar the rime rhe comprehen ive final exa mi nation is given 6. comply in mechanical features with specificat ion s outlined in Dirt>ctiom for Prt>paring Masur's and Doctoral Theses, which is obtainab l e from the Graduate chool office, and have r eceived the sis format approval All these m u sr be approved a n d signed by rhe the i s advisor and ocher commirree members. Three co pie of rhe final the sis must be sub mitred to rhe Graduate School by the s pecified deadline. The thesis binding fee m u s r be paid b y check when the thesis is ubmirred to rhe Graduate chool. Approved rheses are kept on file in the Auraria Library a n d in the student's department. TIME LIMIT Master's degree srudenrs have seven yea r from the dare of the starr of co ursework ro complete all degree requir ements. CU-Denver Catalog 2004--05

PAGE 22

18 / Our University, Our Campus Doctor of Philosophy The do c tor of philo so ph y (PhD) d eg ree is the hig hest aca d em i c degree conferred b y the university. To s t a t e the req uir ements for rhe d eg ree in terms of cred it hour s would be misleading, b eca use rhe d eg ree i s nor con f e rr e d m erely upon th e sar i s factory co mpl e tion of a cou rse of study, however faithfully pur s ued. Students who rec eive rhi s d egree mu s r demon s trate that rhey are proficient in so m e broad s ubj ec t oflearning and th a t th ey can c riti cally eval u ate work in thi s field. Furthermore, they must have s h own the a bili ty r o work indep en d e ntl y in rhe ir c ho sen field and must have mad e a n original co ntr ibu tion of s i gn ific ance ro rhe advance m ent of know l e dge. The t ech nical requir ements s t a red b elow a r e minim a l r e quir ements for all can did ates for the degree; additi onal con dition s set b y the departments will be fou nd in th e announcements of separate d e p a rtm e nts. Any d e p ar tm ent may mak e a dditional r egulatio n s co n s i s tent w ith these general rules. Studies leading r o the PhD degree must b e c hosen so as to contribure r o s pe cial co mp e t ence and a hig h order of sch o l ars hip in a broad field of knowledge. A field of s tud y c h ose n by rh e s tud e m may be in o n e deparrmem o r ir ma y includ e rwo or mor e clo sely related d e p a rtm ents. The c rit e rion as to w h ar cons titute s a n accep table field of study s hal l be rhar rhe stu d ent's work mu s t cont ribut e roan organized program of study a nd r esea r ch w ithout regard t o rhe o r ganization of acade mi c dep art m ents within th e uni vers ity. MINIMUM COURSE/DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS A minimum of30 sem este r hours of g r adu a t e courses and 30 semest e r hours of dissert ation credit are requir e d f o r the PhD d eg ree. Course WOrk Requirement. A minimum of30 seme s t e r hours o f courses number ed 5000 or a bove is required for th e d egree, bur the number of hour s of formal co urses will o rdin arily exceed this minimum. Dissertation Hours Requirement. To co mplet e th e r e qui rements for the PhD, a student mus t comp l ete a total of a t least 30 h o ur s of doctoral di sse rt a tion c redit , wit h n o r more than 10 of these c r e dit hours taken during any s ingl e semes ter. A minimum of5 d isse rtati on h ours must be registered for eac h fall an d sp rin g sem este r following s u ccessful comp l etio n of the colloq uium or co mprehensive exa minat ion. Di sse rt atio n c r edit doe s nor a pp l y toward cl1e minimum 3 0 hours of r e quir e d co ur sewo rk s pecifi e d a bove. Course work a nd work o n th e di ssertat i on may pr oceed concu rr e ntl y throughout t h e doctoral pr og ram. RESIDENCE The student must be properly registered to earn residence credit. The min i m a l residence requirement s hall b e three semes t ers of scho l arly work. EXAMINATIONS Each PhD pro gram will r e quir e at l east comprehen s ive and fina l examinations. otice of all examinations mus t be fil e d with m e dean of the G r adu a t e Schoo l at l east rwo weeks prior ro administration. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION T h e stu d ent must pass a comprehe n s ive exam ination in the field of concentrat i o n and relate d fields. T hi s examinatio n may b e oral, w ritt e n , or both, a nd will test th e st ud ent's ma stery of a bro ad field of know l edge, nor m erely th e formal co ur sework co mpl eted. The examination s h all b e co ndu cted by an exa minin g board. T h e board s h all cons i s t of the a dvi sory committee a nd additi o n a l mem b e r s as n ecessary to total a minim um of four m embe r s of th e graduate facu lry, one of w hom i s omsi d e rhe prim ary d epartment. CUDenver Catawg 2004-05 CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DOGORAL CANDIDATES Following successful co mpl e tion of th e compre h ens ive examination , s tudent s must r eg i s t e r continuous ly. These s tud ems will r eg i s t er for an d be c har ged for a minimum of 5 hours of dissertation cred i t each fall and spri n g semes ter. A maximum of 10 hours of dissertation c r edit ma y be regis t ered for in a n y one semest e r . Cominuou s registration durin g the acad e mi c yea r will b e r e quir e d umil compl e tion of th e d i ssertation defense (excludin g summe r ). It i s expec t e d that the stu d ent and advisor will consult eam semester as ro the number of h ours for which the studem will r egis ter, cons i srem w ith the classification identified a b ove. DISSERTATION REQUIREMENTS A di ssertation based upon original investigation, show in g mature scho l arship , critical ju d gment , and familiarity with the too l s and methods of rese arch must b e written upon a s ubject approved by m e s tudem' s major dep artme m . To be acceptable, t hi s dissert ation s hou l d be a wort h w h i l e contribution to knowledge in the student's s p ecial field. In m echanical features, all di ssertatio n s must comply with the specifications as o utlin ed in th e Directions for Preparing Master's and Doctoral Theses, w hi c h ma y b e obtained from the Grad u a t e School office. T h e fina l draft mus t b e r eviewed and a pp roved for form at by the Graduate choo l prior ro final copies being made. Three formal l y approved and signed, typew r itten co pies of the dissert at i o n (includin g a b st r ac t ), plus on e additional co py of th e ride page and absuact mu s t be filed in the G raduat e Schoo l office. The thes i s binding fee and microfilm fee must b e p aid b y check when the di ssertation is submitted ro r he Gradua t e School office. T h e abstract, not to exceed 350 wor ds, will be publishe d in Dissertation Abstracts International. T h e d e termin acion of what constitu tes a n adequate abs tr act s hall rest w ith the m a jor department. All di ssertatio n s must be sig n ed by no fewer than four members who a r e r egularly engage d in gradua te instruction and are members of the gra du ate facu lry. All approved di sse rt at i ons a re kept o n fil e in the Aurar i a Library. One co p y i s deposited in th e reference section and the other in th e archives sec tion of me library . The third copy is sent ro the student's d epartmem. Whe n the dissertation i s submitte d ro the Graduate Sc h ool office, the candid a t e must s i g n a n agree m e m w ith University Mic r o film s lmerna tional to allow for publication in Dissertation Abstracts International a nd to grant University Microfilms lmerna tional the right to reproduce an d sell (a) cop ies of the manuscrip t in microform and/or (b) copies of the m a nuscript made from m i croform. The a uth or retains a il right s to publish an d/or sell the dissertation by any mean s at any time except by reproduction from negative microform. FINAL EXAMINATION/DEFENSE After the dissertation has been accepte d , a final exa min atio n of the dissert ation a nd related topics will be co nducted. This exa min ation will be wholly or partially oral, the oral portion being open to anyone. The exa min atio n will be co ndu c t e d b y a co mmittee cons i st ing of at l ea t four member s of t h e g r a du ate faculry, one of w h o m mus t be from outsid e th e s tud ent' department. Notice of all exami nati o n s mu st be fil e d w ith the dean of the G r aduate choo l a r least rwo weeks prior to administration. TIME LIMIT An eight-year maximum limit is in effec t for doctoral s tudies.

PAGE 23

CU Online Offi ce : CU-D enve r Buil ing 800, 14th & Larimer f e l ephone: 303-556-65 5 E-mail: inquiry@cu o nli .edu Website : u CU Online is the v irtu campus of the U n iversity of Colorado ar D e nver , .vith a variety of collegiar a nd professional d evelopment programs Jffering more than 200 c urses via the Internet. CU Online offer core : urri culu m and elective c urse in a variety of di ciplines, all rh e sa me n i g h-quali ty co urses raugi throughout the University of Co l ora do syst em. As students rak e cours s with CU Online, rhey gain valuable skills for Jsing th e Int e rn et as a to l for learning , research, a nd communication , tak ing th e m far b eyond t e boundaries of the traditional educa tional T h ey have he opportuni ty ro participate in the n ew 5 lobal classroom , with a world of high e r educatio n ar th e ir fingertips. W e are well on o u r way r ac hieving the goal of providing s tudent s with the mo r comprehensive et of online courses, services and resources , : oupled with rhe be ron ne l ear ning experience of a n y insti tution of nigher education in the orld. Parti cipatio n in web-based l ea rnin g positio n s s tud ents to bec b me life lon g learners , a nd help s them ro d evelop inval uabl e to rak e advantage of g l obal learning o pportunities f o r th eir DELIVERY MEDIA tudents raking on lin courses thr ough CU Online e n joy a g reat er ;ched ulin g flexibility in a traditional classroom by logging into : lass a couple of rimes wee k a t the times of their c hoi ce. Ins tructor s de livering r co urses through CU Onlin e utilize c urringedge technology , such as ing audio, video, an d multimedia s lid e ; how s for presenting co ntent. A number of technologies allow i tud e nts to int eract with instrucror and their peers: threaded iiscussions in a bull etin type area, live discussions in an onl in e : lassro om, em ail, and te works p ace . PROGRAMS . . . . business, educa tion , . in lib e r a l arts an d sci e n ces, a rt s a nd m e dia , publi c affairs, a nd arc hit ectu r e a nd Professional and Continuing Education Continuin g your is key ro staying compe titive in roday's job marker , enhancing personal knowledge and skills, an d stay ing ahead of n ew developm rs in your field. T h e Divi s ion of Prof< ional a nd Continuing Education ar CUD enver offers compl ete programs, certificate/certification cour ses, profession a l de J elopmenr progra ms, precollegiare outreach programs, and per sonal nrichmenr courses aero the stare of Colorado. Cou rses are offered in a ariety offormars , including traditional oncampus, offcampus, on ine , hybrid , weekend, evening, s hort and condensed co urse s a nd 1an y others. R eg i s tration and ruiri n varies b y schoo l o r college. Contact the cor responding scho ol o college lis ted below ro learn about c urrent program a nd co urse offi rings, or contact the Academic Technology at 303-556-2040 or visit our we b site at Professional and Contin uin g Education/ 19 planning. Compl ete o nlin e degree programs , including a Bac hel o r of Arrs in sociology, an d m aster's degrees in bu s iness, e ngine eri ng (Geog raphi c Information Systems) a nd publi c a dministration , with m ore progr ams unde r d evelopment (ch ec k th e web s ire for I a res t developments). All of rhe courses may be a ppli ed ro a d eg ree progr am a t rhe University of Colorad o at D enve r or m ay be transf e rred ro a student's home instit ution , pending approval. FACULTY Online courses follow the arne faculty governance policies as the establis h ed on-campus courses. All CU Online facu l ty m e mber s are a pprov e d by the department and u s u ally r eac h on-ca mpu s courses as well. Many of rhe insrrucrors are experrs w ho a r e working in the field in w hi c h they reach an d bring vast knowledge and resources from their industr y ro rheir onlin e reaching. HYBRID COURSES rud ents raking online co urses thro u g h CU Online enjoy a greater scheduling flexibility, bur sometimes feel they need more of the structure d environment foun d i n a traditional classroom. This is why CU Online n ow offers a hybrid b etwee n these two learnin g env ironment s . A H y brid cou rse is one which u es t echnology delivered instruc tion (we b , cd-ro m , e t c.) as a s ub s rirure for a porrion of the ins tru ction that a st udent wo uld o th erwise receive in a campus classroom o r lab. H y brid co urses m eet a pproxim ately 50 percent of the normal classroom hours on campus where s tud ents do the r e maind e r of th e ir work o nline. SUPPLEMENTAL COURSES U D e n ver Online also supports faculty u s ing web-based coursew are ro a ugment their traditional classes. More and more faculty are u si ng instructional techno l ogy ro po r their sylla bus, l ect ur e notes, hold o nline quizze a nd practice exams, an d ro coordinate relevant r eso ur ces available o n rhe web, in rhe libraries and through other media. Contact CU Online ar 303-556-6505, v i sit our website at www.etto nline . e du, or send e-mai l ro inquiry@cuonline.edu. Academic Tec hnolo gy and Exten d ed Learning, 303-556-2 040 College of Architecture and Planning , 303-556-3382 College of Arrs & Media , 303-556-2279 Business chool (Professional Development Programs), 3 0 3-5 56-5826 c hool of Edu catio n , 303-556-6044 oll ege of Engineering and App lied cience (Co ntin u ing E ngineering Education), 303-556-49 0 7 ollege of Liberal Arts a nd Sc i e nce, 303-556-204 0 Gra du ate choo l of Publi c Affa irs, 303-556-5970 CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 24

20 / Our University, Our Campus Centers ond Institutes Many centers and institutes are housed at rh e University of Col orado at Denver. Each has a focus, whether advanc in g a specific academic area, serving as a pracricum for various curricu l ar pro grams, extending the university's reach into r h e community, or parrnering with orher organi zations , nonprofirs , and government agenc ies ro make our city and stare a berr e r place to live and learn. These centers and institutes are listed below by rhe college or aca demi c unit in which rhey a r e housed. College of Arts & Medio • Center for Am and Public Policy . . . ... 303-556-6588 Business School • Bard Center for Entrepreneurship Development .. 303-620-4050 • Center for Global Health ........................... 303-556-5866 • Center for Healrh Adm ini stration ............... . .. . 303-556-5845 • Center for Information Technology Inno vation ... 303-989-7575 • Institut e for International Business ...... 303-556-4738 School of Educotion enter for Collaborative Educational Leadership ... 303-556-6632 • Front Rang e Board of Cooperative . 303-556-6028 Ed u cational ervices (BOCES) College of Engineering ond Applied Science • Center for Geotechn ical Engineering Science ..... 303-556-2810 • FasrLab .......... . . .................................. .. 303-556-2372 • Transportation Research Center ............. . . .. .. . 303-556-2831 College of Liberal Arts ond Sciences • Center for Computational Marhematics ... 303-556-8460 • Center for Environme ntal Sciences... . .... 303-556-2963 • Center for Erhics a nd Community ..... 303-556-3223 • Center for Healrh and Behavioral Sciences . . .. 303-556-4300 • Center for Research on Economic and Social Policy .. 303-556-8540 Center for Computotionol Biology Director : Stephen Billups Phone: 303-556-8897 TUITION AND FEES All ruirion and fee charges are established b y the board of regents , rhe governing body of the University of Col orado, in accordance with legi slatio n enacted annual l y by rhe Colorado General Assembly . The regents reserve the right to c h ange ruirion a nd fee rates at any time. T h e following rates were for the 2003-2004 academic year, and are provided ro assist prospective st udents in anticipating costs. pecial tuition rates are available for non-degree grad u ate students rakin g undergraduate co urses only. Non-degree students who have previously earned a baccalaureate degree and are taking undergraduate courses only ma y be assessed CU-Denver CataLog 2004-05 The Center for Computational Biology (CCB) is a multi-campus center aimed ar catalyzing interdisciplinary research and developing e du cational programs in computational biology rhroughour rhe University of Color ado sysrem . The center brings rogerher faculty and students from a variety of fields, including marhemarics , com purer sci ence, and rhe biosciences, to engage in interdisciplinary research aimed ar advanci ng biological discovery through the development a nd application of computational tools and marhemarical models a nd techniques. The center l eads rhe development of new courses and educational program s for CU students . While coordinating degree programs ar all levels, rhe CB offers irs own Cerrificare in Computational B i ology aimed at retraining a Col orado workforce that will be able ro contribute to rhe economic growrh resu lt ing from new biotechnology companies. This includes a broad ba e of educational activities rhar form partner s hips w i th companies and labor atories, such as int ernships. All programs led by CCB initiative integrate education w irh research; students are introduced ro research as parr of rheir education. Groduote School of Public Affoirs enter for Affordable Housing and ................ 303-820-5650 Educatio n a l Poli cy • In st itute for Policy Research and Implementation 303-820-5650 • Center for Human In vest ment Polic y . . . ... 303-820-5631 • Center for rhe Improvement of Public Management.. . 303-820-5662 • Center for Publi c/Private Sector Coope r ation .. 303-820-5662 • CU/CU Health Ethics and Policy Con ortium ... 303-820-5650 • Center for Admini st ration . 303-820-5650 and Policy • Wells Fargo Public Policy Research Program . . 303-820-5628 • Wirrh Chair for Environment and Community . .. 303-820-5676 Development Policy Office of Acodemic ond Student Affoirs • Colorado Center for Communi ty Development .. 303-556-6650 • Fourrh World Center for rhe rud y of .. 303-556-2850 Indigenous Law and Politics • Internatio nal Training, Ed u cation, and Research Academy ( ITERA) • ario nal Veteran s Training Institute .. • Latino/ a Research and Policy Center. ...... 303-352-3700 303-352-3737 303-352-3700 undergraduate ruirion. Students must contact rhe Office of Records and Reg . istrarion ar 303-556-2389 ro request this special tuition rare. Rates are c ur rently being revised for r h e 2004-2005 aca d emic year. Please refer to the web ScheduLe Planner for rhe t e rm in which you register for current tuition and fees information. Poyment of Tuition ond Fees All tuition and fees (except the application fee) are assessed and payable when rhe st udent registers for the rerm, according ro guidelines in rhe current web Schedule Planner. Students may select one of the

PAGE 25

Tuition, Fees, and Financial Aid/ 21 payment plans c hat are a v!Ul ab l e a r CU-Denver . Specific informacion financial obligatio n s r o t h e univer s ity will n o t be permitted r o r egiste r )n the deferred pa yment lans is included in the U'leb Schedule P!dnn er for a n y subseq uent t erm, to be graduate d , to b e issued transcripts , or p ublished before each sen ester or summer sess ion. S tud ents w h o fail to be lis r ed among rhose r eceiving a degree or s pecial certificate . The ro pay tuition a nd fees in ull or make pa yment arra n gements by rhe onl y exceptio n to rh i s r egulation involves l oans and or h e r types of p ublished deadline s will e dropped from all classes . i nd ebtedness rhac a r e due after graduation. Per so nal checks are accepted Stud ents who r eg i ster in a non-degree srarus , and who larer a ppl y for any univer sity o bli gatio n . Any s tud ent who pays w irh a c h eck rhar is l!1d are admitted to a deg ee s tatus for rhar rerm , are responsible for n or acceptable to the bank will be assessed an additional service charge. r he difference in cui tion 1 erwee n the n on-degree program and their Stud ents ma y also pay tuition and fees by c redit card. 1pplicab l e degree prograr will b e billed accord in g ly. Students who register for courses are lia lefor payment of tuition and fees even if they Tuition Appeals :lrop our of sc hool. Refur d policies for students wh o withdraw from th e unive r sity are included in the Web Schedule P!dnner. A s rudent wit h For information contact rh e Office ofTuirion Appeals, 303-556-2324. CD-DENVER TUITION AND FEES FOR SPRING 2004 Tuition is based on student s t atus . Iris nor based o n the l evel of yo u r cou r ses . lr oes nor include tuition for Extended Studies courses (co ntact Exte nd ed Stud ies for further info rmation ) . UNDERGRADUATE TUITION RATES RESIDENT NON-RES ID ENT A!J. Freshmen & Sophomores ; Jun i ors & Seniors in A!.l. Freshmen & Sophomores; Juniors & Seniors in Credit Hours also Juni ors & Seniors in Arrs & Media , Business , also Juniors & Seniors in Arrs & Media, Business, Liberal Arrs Engineering a nd Non-Degree' Libe ral Arts Engineering a nd Non-Degree' 0-1 $ 161 $ 179 $ 880 $ 903 2 322 358 1 ,760 1,806 3 483 537 2,640 2,709 4 644 716 3,520 3,612 5 805 895 4,400 4.515 6 966 1 ,074 5,280 5,4 1 8 7 1,127 1 ,253 7,328 7,516 8 1,288 1 ,432 7,3 28 7, 516 9 I ,449 1,611 7,328 7, 516 10 1,471 1 ,624 7,328 7.516 II 1,493 1 ,637 7,328 7,5 1 6 12-15 1,514 1,650 7,328 7,516 each credit hour ove r 1 5 161 1 79 880 903 GRADUATE TUITI ON RATES RESIDENT Credit hours Liberal Arrs Architecture Education Arts & Media , Engi n eering, Business, and Sc i ences & Plan n ing and Public Affairs Non-Degree• 0-1 $ 231 $ 246 $ 255 $272 $ 288 2 462 492 510 544 576 3 693 738 765 816 864 4 924 984 1 , 020 1 , 088 1 , 152 5 1 ,155 1,230 1 , 275 1,360 1.440 6 1 ,3 86 1 .476 1,530 1 ,632 1 ,728 7 1,617 1,722 1 ,78 5 1,904 2,016 8 1,848 1 ,968 2,040 2,1 76 2,304 9-15 1,918 2,044 2,258 2,258 2,403 each credit hour over 1 5 231 246 255 272 288 NON-RESIDENT C redit hours Liberal Arrs Archirecrure & Planning, Arrs & Media, Busines, and Sciences Education, E n gineering, and Publi c Affairs Non-Degree 0-1 $ 961 $ 1 , 025 $ 1 , 043 2 1,922 2,050 2,086 3 2,883 3,075 3,129 4 3.844 4,100 4,172 5 4,805 5,1 25 5,215 6 5,766 6,150 6 ,258 7-15 8 ,021 8,537 8,698 each credit hour over 15 96 1 1,025 1 ,043 • Non-degree s rudenr s w o have previously earned a baccalaureate degree are classified as grad u ate sr udenr s a nd as esse d graduate ruirion regard less of the level of the course(es) rhey are t1ng. How ever, if sru d enrs are rakin g undergraduate courses 0 LY, the y may be assessed undergraduate ruirion. Srudenrs must conracr the Office of Records and R isrration ar 303-556-2389 ro request this specia l ruirion rare. The Board ofRegmts ofth F Univmity of Colorado rmrves the right to change Ntition and foes at any time. Please contact the Bursars Office, 303-556-2710, if you have questions regarding N•itio1 and/or foes. CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 26

22 / Our Unive r sity, Our Campus Required Fees Auraria Bond Fee ................. . ................ $58 As e ssed to retire th e construction bonds used for the Swdent Union, the Child Care Center, the Health , Ph ysica.l Education and Recreation (HPER) facilities , and Tivoli facility on the Auraria Campus . Fee was approved by student referendum and is required of all st ud ents at CU Denver, Metropolitan State College of Denver, and the Community College of Denver. Auraria Student RTD Bus Pass Fee .................................. $20 Students displa y ing a current swdent ID card and decal will be al.lowed to: ride free on all Denver Local bus and Light Rail serv i ce, ride free on all Denver Metro E x press or Regional Express Service, ride free on all other Regional Servic e , receive a $ 3. 00 credit on all kyRide routes. It is not valid for l ocal service in Boulder and Longmont or on special serv ices such as, but not limited to, BroncosRide, RockiesRide or Access-a-Ride. Candidate for Degree Fee Equal to one credit hour of r esident wition, i s required for all graduate swdents who are nor registered during the term that they are taking comprehensive examinations. Swdent must register as " candidate for degree " and pa y for one hour of corresponding resident tuition plus the SIS fee. Cu!rurai Events Fee .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. $4 Provides funding for CU-Denver's College of Ans and Media to allow for reduced admis s ion rates for CU-Denver students to attend theatrical and other cultural events. Information Technology Fee . . . . . . . . . ....... $5 per credit hour Provides funding for acquisition of computer s y stems to support student computing laboratories , including networks and networking infrastructure and facilities directl y accessible b y s tudents. (Maximum charge $75) International Student Fee ..... $ 100 Holders of non-immigrant visa staws are assessed the International Student Service s Fee to provide funds for immigration advising, cross cultural adjustment s upport, advocacy, programs and events offered through International Student and Scho l ar Services at the Office of Inrernational Education. It also funds operation and maintenance of systems to compl y with the Srudenr Exchange Visitor Information Systems (SEVIS). Matriculation Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ......................... $25 A one-time non-refundable fee required of all new st udent s ar the rime of their first registration. T hi s fee covers the costs of official transcripts. Student Activity Fee .. .. .. ....................... $11 Provides funding for swdent activities, student government, swd enr clubs and organizations and special events. Student Health Center Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... $24 Provides funding for an accessible outpatient , direct-care service rhar is devoted to meeting swdent health car e needs. Health education and counseling are available , as well as treatment and referral for medical problems. The Srudent Health Center is rri-instiwrional and is admin istered by Metropolitan State College of Denver. The payment of this fee does not cover the Health T nsurance Plan at CUDenver. Please call 303-556-62 7 3 to receive information on Student Health Insurance. Student Information System (SIS ) Fee . . . . ......................... $12 Provides funding for continu ed improvement of the computer system used in supporting such functions as admiss ion applicar ion processing , telephone and web registrarion and grade reporting , degree audit and graduation che c kout , a war ding of financ i a l a id, payment of tuition and fees and production of transcripts. Student Newspaper Fee . . . . . ... $4 Provides funding for the CU-Denver st udent n ewspaper, The Advocate. Student Recreation Fee ................................. $5 CU -Denver C atalog 2004-05 Provides funding for the recreational facilities and programs in the Health , Physical Education and R ecreation (HPER) Building , as well as the campus p l ay ing fields a nd club sport programs. Recreation is a ui-instiruriona l program admin i stered by Metropolitan Stare College of Denver. Student Services Fee . . . . . . . ......................... $36 Provides f unds for programs and events offered through the areer Center, Center for Educational Opporrunity Programs, Learning Assistance Center , Office of Legal Services, Office of Student Life, Swdent Advocacy Center, Office ofSwdent R etention, and CU-Denve Counseling Center. The Office of Legal Services is administered b y Metropolitan State College of Denver. Instructional and Course Fees Online Courses A $ 100 course fee is assessed for eac h online course taken. A $50 course fee i s assessed for eac h online lab taken. A $50 course fee is assessed for each hybrid course taken. College of Architecture and Planning All swdents registered for one or more Architecture and Planning course are required to pay a per credit hour instructional program fee for computer, rudio, and photography equipment and materials . Per c r edit hour . .. .................................... $33 Maximum .......................................................... $297 College of Arts & Media All students registered for one or more Arts and Media course are required to pay an ins tru ctiona l program fee for labor atories, tudios and technologies. CAM Majors .................. .. Non-CAM stude nts Business School ........... $200 ............. $5 7 All s tudents registered for one or more Business course are required to pay an instructional program fee for computer lab equipmenr , in tructional materia.ls , and technical assistance ............................... $51 School of Education All s tud ents registered for one or more Education cou rse are required to pa y an instructio nal program fee for technology support, test protocols, and assessment instruments... . .. .. .. . . .. .. .. . .. . $15 College of Engineering and Applied Science All st ud ents registered for one or more Engineering course are required ro pa y an insuucrional program fee for l abo rator y facility, equipment a nd technical assistance . . .. ...... . ......................... $50 College of Liberal Arts and Sciences All srudents registered for one or more Liberal Arts and Science course ar< required to pay a n instru ctio nal program fee for equipment, t echno logy , mat er i a l s , and technical support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..... $64 Residency Classification for Tuition Purposes Tuition classification is governed b y Colorado statutes that app l y to all state-funded insriwrion s in Col orado. Institutions are bound b y the provi s ion s of rhis stature and are not free to make exce ption s ro the rules set forth.

PAGE 27

Srudems are initiall y cl sified as in-scare or our-of-scare for ruirion urposes ar the rim e of ap lication. The classification i s based upon ,for mation furnished by h e s rud e nr a nd from och er releva m so urces. frer rhe srudenr's srarus i determined , ir remain s un changed in rhe >sence of sarisfacrory evi ence ro rhe comrary. Once a s rud e nr i s clas i ed as a non -residem for ruirion purposes , te rudent musr p eririon or a c h a n ge in classificatio n. Peririons musr sub mit:t e d NO LATE THAN THE FIRST OFFI CIAL DAY OF LA SES of the r erm for hic h th e s rudem wis hes robe clas sifie d as a : sident. Iris preferred th p e titions be r ece ived 30 days prior ro rhe of rhe term. La peririo n s will nor be considered umil the semest er. pecifi c inf< rmario n ma y be obtained from rhe Offic e The final decision r e ing ruirion srarus r esrs with rhe univers ity. regarding resid n ee ( ruirion ) s raru s sho uld b e referred onl y • the Tuitio n C lassi ficari n Officer. Opinions of other per so n s are )t official or binding up n rhe university . Additional information is rail a ble in the brochure 'lassification ofStudents for Tuition Purposes, hich may be obtain ed fr m the Admissi ons Offi ce . \SIC REQUIREMENTS The stat ur e provide s th tan inscare studem i s one who has be e n a gal domicili ary of Color o for o n e year or more immediatel y preceding 1 e beginning of th e term o r whic h rhein-stare classification is bein g •ughr. Persons over 23 y ars of age or who are emancipated esta bli s h 1eir own legal domicile. ho se who are under 23 years of age and 1emanc ip ared ass um e domicile of rheir p arent or court-appoime d gal guardian. An unem cipared minor's parent muse , therefore , have legal domi cile in Colora o for o n e year or more before the minor ma y :class ified as an in-sc are rudem for tuition purposes. ,TABLISHING DOMICILE Domicil e i s establishe d when one has a permanent pl ace of habitation Colorado and the inre cion of making Col orado one's true, fixed , and : rm ane m home and pia e of habitation. The tuition srarute place s the Jrden of est ablis hin g a o l o r ado domicil e on th e p e r so n seeki n g ro tablish the domicile . T que s tion of imem i s one of documentab l e cr and needs robe s how by s ub r anrial connections with the stare . fficienr ro evide n ce s u e imem. L egal domicile in Colorado for .irion purposes begin s e da y after connections with Colorado are a de ufficiem ro eviden e one's imenr. The mosr common ties with estate are ( I ) change o driver ' lice n e ro Color ado, (2) change of ttomobile regi s tration r Col orado, (3) Col orado voter r eg istration , ) perman e m employm tin Col orado, a nd most important, (5) t yme m of scare income axes as a r esident by o n e w h ose income is .fficienr robe taxed . Ca cion: pa y ment or filing of back taxes in n o ay serves ro esta bli s h l egjll domicile r e troactive ro the rime fil ed. In der ro qualifY for in-sra e ruirion for a given rerm , rhe 12-month a irin g per i od (w hi c h be ins when th e l egal domicile i s establis h e d ) ust be over b y the first ay of classes for the rerm in question. If one's waiti n g p e rio expires during the semeste r , in-s t ate tuition nnot be grame d umil rl e nexr sem ester. esident Tuition for Ac ive Duty Military Personnel The Colorado Legi sla reapproved residem ruition for active duty ilitary personnel on p e anent duty assignmem in Col orado an d for e ir dependents. EL!Gl LE STUDENTS MUST BE CERTIFIED <\CH TERM. Srudents brain a completed verification form from the tSe education officer, an submit the form with rheir milit ary ID ro e R ecords Office afrer t ey have r eg i ste r ed, bur b efore rhe end of rhe op/add period. Ar the r me th e ver i ficat ion form i s certified in the ecords Office, the scud r's bill will be adjusted ro refle c t the resident irion rare. S rud ents wh have been certifie d r emai n classified as non sidents for ruition purp ses and musr petition ro c h a n ge their srarus 1ce they establis h p e rm nenr rie s ro Colorado . FINANCIAL AID Dir e ctor: E lli e Mille r Office: NC 1030 Telephone : 303-556-2886 E -ma.il: finaid@carbon.cudenver.edu W e bsit e : http://www. cudenver. edulji naid Financial Aid / 23 The Offi ce of Financial A.id offers more chan $40 million in financial a id awards ro qualifie d rudenr s eac h yea r . If rh e sr ud e m's financi a l aid application materials a r e r eceived before th e Apri l I priority date , then th e student is co n s idered for a package of need-ba se d g ram, works rudy ( parr-tim e empl oyment) , and/or l o n gr e rm l oan funds. I f the fina n cial aid application materials are received after rh e April 1 priority dare, the n rhe st ud em is u s ually co n sidered only for a Federal Pel! Grant and for ourside stude m l oans (Fe d eral S t affor d L oan or Federal P a r ents Loan). Appli cants for Col orado Graduate Fellowships , Col o r a d o Dean s Scholars award, and Colorad o Regents Sc h o lar s award are s ubj ect ro diffe r e m dea dlines and a re r ev i ewe d b y other CU-Denver d e partm e m s ( the Graduate Sc ho o l , undergraduate d ea n s' offices, and the Office of Admissio ns, respectively ) . All ocher a ppli cants for financial a id a r e notifi e d of rheir award s tatu s in wr it i n g b y th e Offi ce of Financial A.id. Eligibility Eac h s rud e m musr qualifY for CU-Den ver financial aid as follows: l. B e a U.S. citizen or be adm irred ro t h e U.S . by the I NS on a permanem basi s . 2. B e classified as a degree-seeking sr ud ent b y the CU-D e nver Office of Admissions. Teacher certificatio n srudems are eligible ro a pply for financial aid and are co n side r e d unde r g r a du a t e s rud e m s acco rdin g ro federal g uidelines. 3. B e enrolled for a minimum number of c r edits as specified on rhe financial aid award lerrer and/or stude nr l oan plann i ng l errer. 4. Meer rh e minimum requiremems of Financial A.id Academic Standards. 5. App l y for financial aid b y s ubmirrin g all of rhe r eq uir e d d oc um e n tation. T h e n ee d analysis form is required for all programs except rhe Col orado Gradua t e Merit Award , Colorado Scho l ars award, Color a d o Dean s c holar s awar d , Color ado Regents Sc hol ars award, a nd rhe Eme r ge n cy rudent Loan Pr ogram . 6. Be classified as a res idem for tuition purposes for rhe following pr og rams: Color a do Studem G r a m , Color a d o Leveraging Ed u cat i onal Assiscance Program , Col o r ado Grad u ate Grant, Col o r a d o Worktudy, Colorado Regents Scho l ars award, Color a d o Deans Scholars awa rd , a nd Col ora d o Sc h o l ars award. 7. Nor b e in default o n a n y student l oa n or owe a r e fund o n any educatio nal gram. 8. B e r eg i ste r ed for th e drafr or be e nli s ted in rhe ar m ed for ces if required b y elective Servi ce . Application Each a pplicant musr c omplete the fin ancial aid a pplication material s for s ubmis s ion ro rhe Office o f F inancial A.id. Compl e te info r macion mus r b e available ro the office b e for e eligibili ty ca n b e determined. Limited Funds-The majority of gene ral financial aid funds are awarded o n a firs t-come , firsr-served basi s ro eligible students who documem s i gnificant financial n ee d an d who compl e t e th e ir a ppl i cat ion m aterials in the Office of Financial A.id by the April 1 priority dare . Application completio n i s defin e d as h aving all of rhe required do c um e m s a nd rhe resu l ts of rhe n ee d ana lysi s ( Free Application for Federal Srudem A.id) imo the Office of Financial A.id. Gen e ral financial aid is awarded ro needy s tud ems w h o meet the priority dare until all of the funds are co mmirr e d for th e yea r . If rh e file i s compl e t e d after April I , che n awards will pr obably be lim ired ro Feder a l P ell G r a m ( for needy undergraduate s rud ents only) and/o r outs ide st ud ent loan s (Fede ral r afford Loan or CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 28

24 / Our University, Our Campus Federal P are nts Loan). Appli cation for finan cial aid must b e made eac h year; ap pli cat i o n materials a r e availa ble in J a nu ary of ea ch year. Iris th e student's resp o n s ibil ity to be s ur e applicat ion m a t e rial s are compl ete. Please contact th e Office of Financial Ai d for applicatio n forms and complete derails. All financial aid policies and procedures a r e s ubj ect ro c h a n ge due to revis i ons i n federal and s t a r e l aws, r eg ul a tions, an d g uidelines. Qualification Financial Need -Most financial a id awards are b ase d o n rhe co n cept of financial n eed. Financ i a l need is calculate d as cos t of attendance (tuition, fees, books, living expenses) minu s fami l y contribution (stu dent/spouse contribution and parents ' co ntributi o n for d e p e nd ent st u d ents). The cosr of attendance i s rhe estimate d cost ro atte nd CU-D e nver, including tuition and fees, room a nd boa rd , b ooks and su pplies, transportatio n , and personal expenses. T h e Offi ce of F inan cia l Aid d e t e r mines s tandard budgets ba sed upon average tuiti o n and fees c harg e d a nd other budget items establis h ed by the Col orado Commis ion on Highe r Educat i o n . For 20 0 2-2003, the following monthly bud gets were u sed for room and board, tr ansportatio n , and personal exp enses: $530 for students living at home with parents; $ 1 ,057 for stud ents not living w ith parents. R esident tuition and fees for a full-time st udent were a pproxim a tel y $1,500 p e r semester, and non r esident t uition a nd fees we r e a ppro xi mately $6,800 per se mest er. T h ese a m ounts will probably increase b y approxi m ately 5 percent for the 2003-2004 schoo l year. Independent StudentThe federal government provides specific guidel in e rhar d efine a s elfsupporting s rudent for fina n cial aid pur poses. If a s tudent is classified as self-s upportin g, rhen the student's parental information is not conside r ed w h e n rhe calculatio n offamil y contrib ution is made. For 2003-2004, a self-support in g student is one w h o is 24 years old ( born b efore I I 1 /80) or one who m ee r s o n e of th e following conditions: 1. Graduate student 2. Married srudent 3. Student with legal d e p e nd ents oth e r than a spouse 4. Veteran of th e U .S. armed forces 5. O rph an or ward of th e court These cond i tions may be appealed ro the Office of Financial Aid if unusual c ir cumstances ex i st. Contact rhe office for ap peal gu idelines. If rhe s tud ent/spouse c ontributi on plu s rhe parents ' co ntributi o n i s equal ro or greater than th e cost of atten d a n ce, then rhe srudent will not qualifY for need-based financial aid. The co ntributi ons f r o m th e student/s p o u se and from rhe parents are c alcul ate d b y a s t andar dized formula that is r eq uir e d b y federal law. The formula considers inco me, savings and other assets, famil y s ize, number of children in postsecondary sc h ool , and other facrors. Students may appeal for special co n s id eration if they are experie n c in g unus ual circumstances. Financial aid i s intended ro supplement and not r e pla ce financia l contributions from the tudent and parents. Course Loadr-General financial aid undergraduate recipients usually mu s t enroll for a t least 12 credit s per semes t e r , and graduate st ud ents u s u ally mu s t enroll for a r l east 5 credits per sem ester. Federal Stafford Loan recipients must ca rr y a r l east a half -r im e credit l oad (6 h ours for undergraduates per emes r er and 3 hour s for graduates per semester). For deferment of student l oans, refer ro th e Schedule Planner eac h t e rm for s p ecific in forma tion. Higher or l ower minimums ma y b e required for ind ividual awa rd s (check awar d l etter and/or student l oan planning letter for the exac t nu mber of credi t s required) . Academic Progress-CU-Denver students must make aca demi c progress as defin ed b y the Offi ce of F inan cial Aid robe eligibl e and remain eligible for fina n c i a l a i d. rudents s hould review the Financial Aid Academic Standards policy , availab l e in the Office of Financial Aid . CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 Non-Degree Students-Non-d eg ree sru d ents are eligible robe considered on l y for the Advantage Scholarship Pro g ram. Refer ro separate brochu r e for applica tion procedures. Teacher certification s rud e n ts may apply for financial a id and a re conside r ed undergraduate students for financial aid purposes. Residency Status-A s tud ent is r equire d robe a resident of Colora d o for a full year befor e th e Offi ce of Admissions can co n side r classificar i o 1 as a resident for tuition purposes. on-resi dent srudents are encourage• ro obtain a dditional information from the Office of Admissions abou t appealing for resident sta rus. As a r esident, a student i s eligible for th e rar e of Color a do finan cial aid pro gran1s, and tuition is s i gnificanrly less than for non-resid ents. Refondr and Repayments-Any refund of tuition and fees re ulting from withdrawa l or reclassification of tuition status must be r erurned ro rhe r ecipient's finan cial aid awar d s before a n y payment is made ro th• s tud e nt. If a recipient of federal financial aid withdraws from all classe on o r b efore rhe 60 p ercent point in rime in the term , that student may b e r equire d ro rep ay a p o rtion of his/her financial aid. The federa l government has defin ed that th e rec ipient has only ear n e d a portion of th eir financial aid, and the earn e d aid is d i r ecrly proportional ro the p ercentage of rim e th e srudent atte nd ed classes up to and including the 60 percent point in time in the t er m . T h e r est of th e financial aid is d efine d as un ear ned financial aid and must b e returned ro the federal financial aid programs. Uneas n e d aid includes both th e an10unt allocated ro ruirion and fees and the amount allocated ro the student for other educa tional expenses. For a co mp l ete description of th ese r equirements, r e quest a copy of the Financial Aid R epayment Policy from th e Office of Financial Aid. Appealr-Students ma y appeal all decisions of the Office ofFinanci< Aid b y com pleting a R eq uest for Revi ew form a nd submitting it ro the office. Appeals are considered with i n th ree weeks a nd a written respons is mail ed to the student. R eapply Each YearFin ancial a id awards are nor a urom arically r e n ewe d eac h year. Students mus t reapp l y and meet priori ty dare s eac h year. Application m a t eria l s for rh e next summe r t e rm a r e avai l able b eginni ngJanuar y 1. Award S rudenr s are notifi e d in w ritin g of their financial aid eligibility a pproxim a t e l y 8-12 weeks afte r all application materials h ave been r ece ived in the Offic e of Financia l Aid . I f awa rd e d , a n award letter is m a i l ed ro the student; it includes th e ty pe s and a m ounrs of aid awarded a nd the minimum numbe r of credit hours required eac h term . A srude 1 l oan pl anni n g l e tter i s mailed ro th e srudenr after the ours ide srudenr l oan app l icar ion(s) h ave been pro cessed . Grants and loons T h e following aid p rograms are fund ed b y the federal governmenr: 1. Federal P e lt Grant-Eligibi li ty for the Federal P ell Grant is determined b efore any other aid is awa rd e d . Awards are defined by a stric t ne ed-based formula p rovide d by the federal government and awa rd amounts vary d e p e ndin g upon amount of fin ancial nee• and e nrollm ent s t a tu . Stud ents a r e eligible for Federal P ell G r ant co n side r at ion if they h ave nor received their first baccalaureate degree by June 1 of the award year. 2. Federal Stafford Loan-E ligibili ty for all oth er types of assi ranee s hould b e d etermined prior ro apply ing for ou r s id e student loans. The s ub s idized Federal Stafford Loa n program r e quires that stude n s h ow financial n eed in order ro qualifY. Interest on the subsidized loan is paid for the stu d ent b y the federal government as long as the st ud ent remain s e nrolled at l eas t h a lf-rim e and for a s ix-month grace period after dro pping bel ow h alfrim e enro llm e nt. The uns ub idized Federal tafford Loan program does nor require the student to do cu ment financial n eed. Elig ibili ty i s cal cu l ated as the

PAGE 29

cost of att endance m nu s oth er financial a id awarded. Interest i s not paid by the federal g vernment for the unsubsidized program, and the st udent may elec to pay the inte r est c urr ently or to allow the interest to be added t the total loan amount. Inte rest rates for th e Federa l rafford Lo programs are variab le, an d are cap p ed at 8.25 percent. Parents of d pendent st ud ents are eligible to borr ow under t h e Federal Parem Lo for Un d ergradua t e Srudents program ( PLUS). T h e PLUS pro gra m un s ub sidized , and inter est pa yments be co m e the r esponsibility of he b orrower at th e rime of disbursement. The int e r e r rare varies o n th e PLUS program, an d i s ca pped at 9 percent. 3. Federal Supplementa Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG)Thi s is a need-based rant program for students who have n or yet obtained a baccalaur are degree. ru d e nr s must be eligible for a Federal Pell Grant to be considered for SEOG. 4. Federal Perkins Loan T hi n eed-based l oan program, with an interest rare currenrl at 5 percent, is b ased at CU-Denver. o repayment ofinteres or principal i s du e until six or nine m o nth s (t im e per i od differs epending up o n w h en student first recei ved Perkin s Loan) afte r e s tud ent ceases to b e e nroll e d at least half rime. 5. Federal College Wtn Study-Work-st ud y is a need-based program that all ows students o work on a parr-rime basis o n campus or off camp u s ar nonprofit agencies ro help m ee r their educat ional costs. The stare of Colorado nds the follow in g programs: I . Cowrado Student G nt-A need-based grant for resident unde r graduate srudents. 2. Cowrado Leveragin Educational Assistance Partnership GrantA need-based grant r resident undergraduates who have n o r yet o bt ained a bachelo r ' d egree. T hi s gran t i s funded 50 perc ent by the federal governm nr and 50 percent by th e sta te of Col ora do. 3. Colorado Graduate rant-A need-based grant for resid ent gra du ate students . 4. Colorado Work-Stud -A program simi l ar to the College Work-Study program but limit e t o r esident undergraduate st ud ents. 5. Governor's Opportu ity Scholarship-A need-based gran t program for first-time resid e n freshmen who have a zero family co ntributi o n or whose parents e less than $26, 700. Four-Year Graduation Guarantee T h e University of Col rado at Denver (CU-D e n ver) ha s adopted a set of g uidelines to defin the conditions under which an undergraduate stu d ent will be g u aran t e d to grad u ate in four years. More inform atio n is available through the ndergraduare ad vising offices for each college and the major program ffices. CU-Denver has four unde rgradu a t e colleges i n which this g u ran tee applies: College of Arts & Media, Business School, Colleg of Enginee r ing, and College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. T h e Un i versity of Co rado at Denver g u aranrees that, if th e l ack of sch e dulin g of essent ial c ur ses i s found ro have pr evente d a s tud ent from comp l e tin g al l course w rk n ecessary for a BA, BFA, orBS degree from the univ e r s i ty b y the e n of th e student's e ighth co n secu tive fall and spring semester, the coll gel sch ool shal l pr ovide tuition plus any co u rse fees for all courses requi d for comp l et i o n of rhe degree requirements. This applies onrywhen e d ed courses are nor offiredby t h e college/ school and does nor appl to scheduling conAicrs for indivi dual students. Students must satirfj all t e requirements described below to be eligible for this guarantee. T hi s guarantee ap pli e to all students who e nr olle d for summer 2002 or afte r as first-semester, full-rime fresh m en w h o do nor have admission d efic i e n c ies, w h o do no n eed remedial cour ewo rk , and w h o satisfY all rhe r eq uir emenrs descri ed below. Thi s g u arantee does nor includ e comp l etion of all optio w ithin the major, a second major, a double degree, a minor, or a cer ificare program. The four (4) year g r ad u ation guaranree does nor app l to programs in which the degree has been Four-Year Graduation Guarantee/ 25 Scholarships Following i s a partial list of the major scholarships that are offered at CO D enver. For a complete l ist ing, go to www.ctul.enver.edu/admissions. The following programs are funded by the General Assembly of th e S r a r e of C olor ado: I . Regents Scholars award is offered to qualified n ew freshmen and transfer students by the Office of A dmi ssio n s . New stu d ents will auroma ricall y be considered for this program. 2. Colorado Scholars award i s for undergraduate resident students w h o have a minimum cumulative grade poim average of at least 3.5 for a min imum of 12 CU credit hours. The deadline for app l y in g i s April !. Contact the Office of Financ ial Aid for application procedures. 3. Deans Scholars award is awa rd ed by un dergrad u ate deans' offices. Contact the appropriate dean's office for more information. The following programs are funded by CO-Den ver: !. Advantage Scholarship is for minority and/or first generation college s tud ents who meet rhe specifie d income gu idelines. Contact the Sc h o l a r ship/Resource Office at 303-556-3608. 2. Nelson/Running WolfScholarship funds are available for needy American Indi an stu d ents . Con tact the Office of American Indi an Student Services, 303-556-2860, for more information. 3 . Ahlin Fund assi stance is avail ab l e for mobil ity-imp aired srudents . Contact Student Retention Services, 303-556-2324, for applications. Other sch o l a r s hip information i s available from the Office of Financ ial Aid, the A ur aria Library Scholarship Info Bank in the reference sectio n , and the Sch o l a r s hip /Reso urce Office at 3 0 3-556-3608. Other Sources of Financial Aid. T h ere are several other sources of financial aid for st ud ents. Empl oy m e m o pportunities are listed in the Student Empl oyment Office and the Career Center. Graduate students s h ould inqui r e about additional types of financial aid through their aca d em i c departmenrs. Students should be awa r e rhar Emergency Student Loans a r e available through the Bur ar's Office. American Indian s rud e nr s s h o uld request information abo m Bureau of Indian Affairs or tribal scho l arships from the Office of Financial Aid. di scontinue d or is in process of bein g phased o ur. In these cases, every effort will be made to allow students to fulfill requirements by raking courses at o ther uni versit ies a nd colleges to facilit a t e timely completion of the degree. Some CU-Den ver study ab r oa d programs may not provide a suffic ient range of courses to allow srudenrs to meet the requirement and, r hus, students who participate in study abroad programs during the fall or sp rin g semesters may nor be eligible for tb.is guarantee. A student may be ab l e to participate in a study a b road program during the sum m er semester a nd still m eet all the req uir ements of thi s g u a r a n tee. It is esse ntial that a stu dent work closely with an adv i sor to determine i f th e student can p articipate in a s tud y abroad program and still meet all the requirements of rhis guarantee. Requirements Students must satisfY all of the following requirements to be eligible for this guarantee. !. Srude nr s mus t enroll in U niver s i ty of Colorado at Denver co ursewo rk as specified on the srudenr plan of study f or eight consecutive fall and s prin g semesters . 2. Students mu st comp l e t e all r equired coursework b y the end of the eighth semester. 3. No fewer th an 60 credit h o ur s of applicab l e co ur sework musr be completed successfully by rhe end of the second year (24 calendar CU-Denver Catawg 2004-05

PAGE 30

26/ Our University, Our Campus months); 90 hours by the e nd of the third year (36 calendar months); and 120 hours by the end of the fourth year (48 calendar months). Students must succe sfully complete an aver age of 15 credit hours each semester . 4. Students must meet with their co lleg e advisor and their major advisor for acade mic advising during the first, third , fifth , a nd seventh semesters of study. 5. The major must be declared no lat e r man the end of rhe first semester of study and students must not change their major or any options within rhe major. 6. A recommended plan of study toward rhe major must be ag reed upon and signed by the s tudent and advisor a t th e en d of the first semester. Thereafter students must make sat i sfactory progress toward complet in g the major, as defined by eac h major, and the genera l e du cation requirements. Courses with certain grades may nor meet the satisfactory progress r equirement of this guarantee. A state m ent of what constitutes satisfactory progress and wha t grades are acceptable is avai l ab l e from rhe major or deparnnenral office at t h e rime rhe major is declared. 7. A minimum of30 credit hour s of college general ed u cation co u rses should be complete d by rhe end of the secon d year, including core curriculum courses that also meet major requirements and fore i gn language proficiency. 8. All lower-division graduation requirements mus t be s u ccessf ull y comple t ed b y rhe 90 semester hour mark. 9. Students mu st remain in academic good stan d i ng according to th e ir school/college academic policies. Students s hould review rhe sectio n s of this cata l og mar describe i n derail the academic programs available at CU-Denver. New a nd tran sfer undeclared unde rgraduate swdents, as well as pre-business and pre-engineering students, s h ould contact rhe Aca demi c Advising Cente r at 303-352-3520 to arrange for an advi sing appointment prior to registration. Orner freshmen and transfer students should contact their school or college to arra ng e for an advising appointment prior to registration. A web Schedule Planner i s made available b y rhe R eg i strar's Office every semester prior to registrat i on. U-Denver s t udents register for courses via SMART (Srudenr Menu and Access to Records and Transactions). To log on, go to www . cudenver.edu, click on SMART, men click on rhe SMART logo . Specific instructions are included in the web Schedule Planner. The Registrar ' s Office will send an e-mail message to rhe e-mail address a student has on record with the university , in viting the s rudent to register a nd including registration information and a r egis tr a tion rime assignmenr. Registration i.s b y t i me assignment only. Students may register on or after their assigne d rime. Web Registration and Student Information CU-Denver students can register and obtain information regar din g th eir academic and financial records by accessing a sec ur e site from the SMART link on rhe CU-Denve r h omepage. An assigned student I. D . and persona l identification numbe r (PI ) are required to access rh e r egistratio n or s tudent record options . Online registration allows the srudent to check the availability of specific co urses prior to th e ir registration rim e an d to searc h for avai l able courses by department, course l evel, or meeting time. If registration in a course is denied , rhe web registration system will s pecify rhe reason. Student information avai l ab l e online currently includes e-mail and mailin g address verification (or change), admission application status, finan cia l aid i nform ation, schedul e by semester , g r ade s b y semes ter , unofficial transcript, account balance, and degree a udit (for some CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 10. Grades ofC-, C, or C+, as defined by the college/ c hool , must be earned in all coursework required for the major , and students must have a cumulative GPA of2.0 in all major coursework attempted. 11. Students must register each semester within one week of the stu dent' s specified eligibility to register. 12. Students must rake co urses mar are specified in rhe st udent plan of study approved by their advisor. 13. Elective cou rses must be avoided if they conflict wirh requir ed major or general education courses. Elective courses must nor be given a higher priority than required courses. 14. Students planning to use courses from Metropolitan Stare College of Denver through the Common Pool of Courses (a) to satisfy general e du cat ion requirements , must have prior permission from their college advising office; or (b) to satisfy major requirements , must hav e prior perm i s ion from their faculty advisor. 15. Students must meet all departmental, school or college and university poli cies regarding graduatio n requirements. 16. The college/schoo l must be notified in writing of rhe srudent's intent to graduate no lat er man rhe beginning of me seventh semester of st udy. A grad u ation application must be filed no later th an rhe deadline for rhe appropriate graduation date. The student must comp l e t e a graduation checkout/senior audit wirh their advisor. 17. The srudent is responsible for and must keep documentation proving mat these r equ ir ements were satisfied (e.g., records of advising meerings attended, advising records and instructions, ere.). programs). Online payment is now avai l ab l e . For secur i ty reasons , none of the student information screens will display a student's name or s tu dent number . The CU-Denver catalog and Schedule Planner, as well as additional information regarding programs , faculty, courses, and policies , are avail able at rhe CU-Denver home page: http://www.cudenver.edu. Definition of Full-Time and Por t -Time Status In dividual st ud e nts receivin g financial aid may be required to comp l ete hours in addition ro those listed below. The exact requirements for financial aid will be listed in rhe student's financial aid award l etter. FALL AND SPRING Undergraduates and non-degree graduate students: Full-rim e 12 or more semeste r hours Parr-time 6 or more semester hours Graduate degree students: F ull-rime: 5 or more hours 0 hours as candidate for degree 1 or more hours of thesis (not master's reports or thesis preparation) Half-rime: 3 or more hours SUMMER ( 1 0-WEEK TERM) Undergraduates a nd non-d egree graduate students: Fullr ime 1 2 or more semes ter hours P a rr-tim e 6 or more semester hours

PAGE 31

Graduate d eg ree studen Full-rime: 3 or more hours 0 hours as candidat e f, r degree 1 or more h ours of the is (nor master's reports or thesis preparation) Half-rime: 2 or more hours 3 or more h ours of m' ed-level classes Notes Enrollment vecificatio including full-rime/pare-time attendance can be certified after the dro /add period. Hours for calculating ull-time/parc -time attendance do not include interinstitutional hours, or do the y include hours on another CU campus, unless the stude tis enrolled through concurrent regi s tration . Students receiving vee rans benefits should contact the Veterans Affairs coord i nator ford finit i o n offull-cime status for summer sessi ons. Individual exceptions o the minimum graduate courseload levels are co nsidered for financial id purposes by the Financial Aid Committee. Students must file a writ en appeal with the Office of Financial Aid. Add/Drop Specific add/drop dea ines are announced in each semester's web Schedule Planner. 1. Students may add urses to their original registration during the first 8 days (5 days f classes i n the su mmer ) of full-term clas es, provided there is sp ce available. 2. Students may drop ourses without approvals during th e first 12 days of the fall or sp ing semester (the first 8 days of the summer session). Tuition wi I nor be charged. o record of the dropped course will the student's permanent record. 3. Mter rhe 12th day fa fall or spring semester (8th day of rhe summer session), e instructor ' s signature is required for all drops. The instructor's sig ature and dean's s ignature are required for all adds. o tuition ad usrment will be made. 4. Mrer the lOth wee ofrhe fall and spri ng semes ters ( the 5th week for summe r session all schedule adjustments require a petition a nd s pecial approval fro the dean's office . 5. Dropping allcours after the 12th day (8t h in the summe r ) r equires an official ithdrawal from the term. No tuition refunds are avai lable . Drop deadlines form dule co urses and inrensive courses are published in the web Sc edule Planner each term. Administrative Drop An administ rative dr pis implemented by university officials in the registrar's office or the d an ' s office. A s tud ent ma y be ad ministrati vely dropped from one or m re classes or withdrawn from all classes for any of the following reasons I. failure ro m eet cer n preconditions, including, bur nor limited to: a. failure co pay tu cion and fees by designated deadlines b. class cancellaria s c. failure co meet urse prerequisites 2. whenever the safe of rhe stu d ent, faculty member , or other srudenrs in a cours1 would be jeopardized 3. academic s u spensifn, including, bur nor limited co, failure co attain or maintain required grade point average (GPA) 4 . discip lina r y suspe sion for having been found to have viola ted the Student Code f Conduct 5. disruptive b ehavio determined by th e c hair and/or associate dean co be detrimental r rhe progress of the course and the education of other students I Registration/ 27 Auditing Courses To qualify as an auditor for fall or spring semester, a student must be 21 years of age or older or approved by the Registrar. Auditors may not be regi stered for any ocher University of Colorado cour es during the rime they are auditing and are nor eligible co audit courses if they are und er suspension from th e university or have outstanding financial obligations to the univ ersity. The Records Office does nor keep any record of courses a udited ; therefore , cred it for these courses cannot be established. Auditors may attend as many courses as they wish (except those co urses with labor atories or where special equipment i s used), provided they have received permission from each instructor. An auditor's card is issued after classes begin. This card s h ould be presented co the instructor. Auditors, whether resident or nonresident, pay resident tuition for the audited courses during the fall or spring semester for class instruction and library privileges only. Auditors do not receive student parking privileges, and are nor eligible for other student services. For more information, contact the Bursar ' s Office. Senior cit izen s (age d 60 and over) may audit classes ar no c h arge. Contact the Division of Enrollment and Student Affairs at 1250 14th Street, 303-556-8427. Correspondence Study Correspondence courses are offered by the CU-Boulder Division of Continuing Education. Applicability coward a degree program should be sought from the student's degree advisor prior to registration. Course Load/Restrictions In most cases, students wishing co rake more than 18 semester hours (12 in the summer session) must have the overload approved by the dean of their college or school. Consult the individual college or school for specific guidelines as ro course load restrictions. Credit by Examination Degree srudenrs may rake examinat ion s for credir. To qualify for an examination, the s tud ent must be formally working toward a degree at CU-Denver, have a grade point average of at least 2 .0 , and be currently registered. Contac t the Record s Office for instructions. A non-refundable fee is c harg ed. Students should contact their degree advising office co determine whether the credit will app l y to their degree. No Credit Students may register for a course on a no-credit basis with the con sen r of their instructor and the dean of their school or college . o grade or cred it is awarded. The transcript reflects the name of the course taken and an N/Cnotation. Pass/Foil Procedure 1. Students who wish co register for a course on a pass/fail basis (or ro revere from pass/fail co graded status) may do so only during the drop/add period. 2 . Up co 16 semester hours of coursewock may be raken on a pass/fail basis and credited toward the bachelor ' s degree. Only 6 hours of coursework may be taken pass/foil in any given semester. (Note: Indi vidual schools a nd colleges may have additional restrictions as co pas s/fail credirs. See the accompanying chan for an overview . ) 3. nstru crors will nor be informed of pass/fail registration. All students who register for a pass/fail appear on rhe regular class roster, and a normal letter grade is assigned by the professor. When grades are received in rhe Records Office, chose registrations with a pass/fail designation are auromacically converted by the grade application system. Grades of D-and above convert co grades of P. Courses CU-Den ver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 32

28 / Our University, Our Campus taken pass/fail will be included in hours roward graduation. Pass grades are not incl u ded in a student's grade point average. An Fgrade in a co urse raken pass/fai l will be included in the grade point average. 4. Pass/fail registration records are maintained by rhe R eco rds Office. 5 . Exceptions ro the pass/fail regulations are permirred for specified courses offered by rhe School of Education , the Extended Studies Programs, and Study Abroad Programs. 6. Graduate degree students can exercise th e PIP oprion for unde r graduate courses only. A grad e o f Pwill not b e a cceptable f o r g r aduate credit t o satisfy any Graduate School requirement. 7. St ud ents who register for a course on a pass/fail basi s may nor l ater (after the drop/add period) decide ro r eceive a letter grade. Note: man y orher insrirurions will nor accept a Pgrade for tran sfer cred it . PASS/FAI L OPTIO N REST RICTIO NS Core Curriculum courses used ro satisfy lmeUecrual Cornper encies cann o t be t aken on pass/fail basis. CoUege Business a nd Administration Enginee rin g and Applied Science Liberal Arts and Sciences Short-Term Courses G e n e . ral Only non-business electives may be rak en pass/ fail. Required co urses may nor be raken pass/fail. Upper division hwnanities an d social sciences electives are acceptable; otherwise, major department approval is required. College requires a minimwn of30 semester hours of courses wirh lener grades. Courses u sed ro satisfy major, minor , or foreign language can nor be taken on a p ass/fai l basis. Maximum Only 6 semes t e r hours may be taken pass/fail. A maximum of 16 cred it hours ma y be raken pass/ fail, includin g courses taken in the hon ors program. No more rhan 6 hours pass/fail any semeste r . A maximum ofl6 semes t er hour s may be raken pass/fail. Cour es are also offered in five-week m o dules, in pecial weekend courses, a nd in seminars. Students sho uld co nta ct rhe co lleg e/sc h oo l for information on shorr-re rm courses offered each semester. Other Registrati o n s CONCURRENTENROLUMENT Degree-seelcing students who wish ro attend rwo U niv e r s iry of Col orado camp use conc u rrentl y must obtain permission from their school or college on their hom e campus. A s tudent in a degree program r egistered on the Denver campus may rake up ro rwo co urses or 6 semester credit hours (w hichever is greater) on another CU campus if: 1. the student obtains a Concurrent Registration form from the office of the academic dean or the Records Office 2. the course is a requi r ed course for the s rud enr's degree (nor an elective) and nor offe r e d ar CU-Denver 3. the student obtains approval from the academic dean 4 . there is s pace available ar the orhe r ( ho st) campus CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 5. the srude nr pays tuition ar CU-Denver ( h ome) campus ar CU-Denver rates 6. the home campus schoo l o r college a rr anges for space in the host campus clas es 7. the conc urrenr request is processed before the end of rhe drop/add period on both the host and hom e camp uses Students may not register for a n ind ependent stud y course thro ugh concurrent regi nation. Students ma y nor rake courses pas s/fai l or for n , credit through co n c urrent registration. To drop a co ncurrent course during the host campus drop/add period, arrange the drop ar the hom e campus Records Offi ce. To drop a co ncurrent co urse after the e nd of the host campus drop/add deadline , drop rhe course ar the hosr campus Records Office. INTER-INSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION CU-Denver deg ree students may enroll in courses offered by th e Communiry College of Denver and Red Rocks Communiry College. rud ents musr be enrolled ar CU-Denver for ar least one course during the rerm robe eligible ro register inter-insrirurionally. R eg i s tration is on a space availab l e basis. Interinstitutional courses are evaluated for transfer credit a nd are nor included in a CU-Denver student' s grade point average. POOLED COURSES AT METROPOLITAN STATE COLLEGE OF DENVER Certain courses in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences have been poo l ed with s imilar courses a r Metr opolitan Srare College of Denver (MSCD). CU-Den ver undergraduate students may register for any of rhe pooled cou rses lisred in rhe CU-Denver Wtob Schedule Planner. R estriC[ions ap p l y ro the poo l ed courses: I. CU-Denver graduate students are nor eligible ro register for MSCD pooled courses. 2 . MSCD co urses will nor be inclu ded in the Universiry of Colorado grade point average. MSCD courses will appear on the Universiry o Colorado transcript and will count in rhe hours roward g r aduatio n 3. MSCD co urses can nor be u sed ro meet specific co urse requirement t owar d tl1e major without pr i or written approval of th e rudent ' s dean 4. CU-Denver s tud ents who wish ro rak e non-pooled MSCD classes musr app l y dir ectly as a non-degree student ro MSCD, and pay ruirion and fees ro MSCD. Nonpooled classes will nor appear on rhe Univer siry of Colorado transcript and will nor be used in determining cours e loads for financial aid eligibiliry. Students may request an MSCD rran cr ipr robe senr ro CU-Denver ar the end of the rerm ro determine if c r edit can be rransferred . 5. MSCD common pool co urses will nor sat isfY residence requir e menl ar CU-Denver. The lasr 30 semester hours applied toward th e baccalaureate degree musr b e raken in residence ar CU-Denver. 6. CU-Denver students raking MSCD common pool courses are subjec t ro rhe MSCD gradi ng policy and s tudent code of conduct. Withdrawal from the University To withdraw from the Univers it y of Colorado ar Denver , students must drop all co ur ses for the semester. During the first 12 days of th e semes t er (8 days for the summer), students mu s r use th e Web Registration and Student Information System ro drop courses. Courses dropped during thi s period are nor recorded o n rhe student's permanen record. After me 12th dayofthesemesrer (8th day in the summer), through th( I Orh week (7 th week for summer), st ud ents must submit a withdrawal form with me insrru cror's approval. Courses dropped during rhis perioc will be recorded on the student's p ermanent record with a grade of W. Students seelcing ro withdraw after the I Oth week (5th week for summer) musr p eririon the associate dean of meir school or college. A student w ho srops a ttending classes without officially withdrawi n g from the universiry will receive g r ades ofF for all coursework during thar rerm. D eadJines for dropping modu l e and intens ive courses appear in the web Schedule Planner.

PAGE 33

Academic Policies and Regulations Student Classification Srudems are classified a cording to the number of semester ho urs passed: Freshman........................... .................... ........ ... ..... . .......................... 0-29 h ou r s Sophomore ........................... .30-59 hours Junior.. . .................................................................................. . . 60-89 ho urs Senior........... . ........... 90+ hours All transfer smdents w li be classified on the same basis according to their hours of credit by the University of Colorado. Grading System and licies The following gradin system and policies have been standardized for all acade mic un its of the GRADE SYMBOLS The instructor is resp sible for wharever grade symbol ( A, B , C. D , F. IF. Jw, or IP) is to be signed. Special symbols {NC. W, and** *) are indications of registratio or grade status and are nor assigned by the instructor. Pass/fail desig arions are not assigned by the instructor bur are automatical l y conver ed by the grade application system , as explained under Pass/Fai Procedure . Standard Grades A = superiorlexc !lent A { ) = B{+) = B = good/better an average B{-) = C ( + ) = C = competent/a erage C { ) = D { + ) = D = minimum p sing D { ) = F =foiling Quality Points 4 . 0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2.3 2.0 1 .7 1.3 1.0 0 .7 0.0 Instructors may , at th ir discretion , use the PLUS/Ml US sysrem , JUt are nor required to d so. IF-incomplete-ch ged to an F if nor comp l eted within one year. /W -incomplete-c anged to a Wif nor completed within one year. IPin progress-th is at the graduate level only. P/F-passlfoil-Pgr de is nor included in the grade point average; : he F grade is included; up to 16 hours of pass/fail coursework may be :red ired toward a degree. HIP/Fhonors/pass!. il-intended for honors courses; credit hours :ount towa r d the degree ut are not included in the grade point average. NCindicares registrar on on a no-credit basis. Windicares wirhdra I without credit. ***ind i cates t h e final rade roster was not received by the rime grades Nere processed. :XPLANATION OF I F AND I An IF or /Wi s an inc mp l ere grade. Policies wirh respect to /FIJW ;rades are available in th individual college and school dean's offices. Jse of the IF or /Wis at he option of the course instructor and/or the t cademic dean's office. An IF or /Wis given nly when students , for reasons beyond their : ontro l , have been unab to comp l ete course requirements. A s u bstant ial unount of work must h , e been satisfactorily completed before approval ur such a grade is given. The instr u ctor who a signs an IF or !Wsets the conditions under Nhich the coursework c n be completed and the rime limit for irs : omplerio n . T h e smden is expected to complete rhe requirements >y the established dead! e and nor retake the entire course. Academic Policies and Regulations / 29 It is the instructor ' s and/or the smdenr's decision whether a course should be retaken. If a course is retaken, it must be completed on the Den ver campus or in CU-Denver Extended Smdies classes. The student must re-register for the cour e and pay the appropriate mirion. T h e final grade (earned by completing the course requirements or by retaki n g the course) does nor result in deletion of the IF or !Wfrom the transcript. A second entry is posted on the transcript to show the final grade for the course. At the end of one year, IF and /W grades for course s thar are nor completed or repeated are changed to an For W, respectively. Good Academi c Standing Good academic standing require s a minimum grade point average that is determined by t h e smdent's school or college. Grades earned ar anoth er instirution are not used in calculating the grade point average at the University of Colorado. Degree smdenrs sho u ld consult the academic standards section of their school or college for degree program requirements . Continuation as a non-degree student is contingent upon maintaining an overall grade point average of2.0 upon completion of 12 or more semester hours . Fail ure to maintain the required average will result in a non-degree student being suspended. The susp e nsion is for an indefinite period of time and becomes part of the student ' s permanent record at the university. Whil e under suspension, enrollment: at the university is restricted to summer terms or courses offered through Extended Studies. Non-degree smdenrs are not p l aced on academic probation prior to being suspended. GRADE P OINT AVERAGE The grade point average (GPA) is computed by multiplying rhe credit poims per hour (for example , B = 3) by the number of hours for e a ch course. Total the hours, total the credit poims , and divide the total points by rhe total hours. Grades of P. NC. ***, W, IP. IW. and IF are nor included in the grade point average. !Fs that are nor completed within o n e year are calc u lated as Fin the GPA. If a course is repeated, all grades earned are used in determining rhe grade point average. Grades received at another instimrion are nor i ncluded in the Un i versity of Colorado GPA. Undergraduate , graduate , and non-degree graduate GPAs are calculated separately. Enrollment in a second undergraduate or graduate program will nor generate a second undergraduate or graduate GPA. Smdents should refer to their academic dean ' s office for individual grade point average calculations as they relate to academic progress and graduation from their college or school. Grode Reports Grade reportS are normally available within two weeks after the end of the semester. Grade reporrs are available through rhe Web Registration and Student Info r mation ysrem. See the web chedule Planner for more information. Mid-Term Grades Instructors will assign mid-term grades for certain populations of smdents. Students in academic difficulty may be contacted and counseled about support services ava i lab l e to them. Nore: academic support services are avai l able to all students through the Center for Educational Opportunity Programs , NC 2012, 303556-2065; the Student Advocacy Center, NC 2012, 303-556-2546; and rhe Center for Learning Assistance , C 2006,303-5562802. CU-Denv e r Cat alog 2004-05

PAGE 34

UNIVERSITY OF COLORADC The fac ul ty of the Colleges of Arts & Med ia, Bus i ness , Enginee ring and Lib eral Arts e s tablish curr iculum to pro v ide all baccal aurea t e s t udents with basic inte llectual compe tencies F urthermore, t h e core curric ulum p romotes an awar e ness of cultural d iver s ity . For detai l s ( INTEL LECTUAL COMPETENCIES English Composition/ Mathe matics2 Natural & Ph y sical Sciences O ral C o mmunicati o n2 COLLEGE O F LIBERAL 9 semester hours from the 3 semester hours: 8 semester hours from the ARTS AND SCI E NCES f ollowin g courses: following courses: ENGL 1020-3 Core Composition I Any math course except ANTH 1303-4 Inrro: B iological Ant h and o n e of MATH 3040 o r a passing BIOL 1550-4 Basic Bio logy I ENGL 2030-3 Core Composition II mark on the Math B IOL 15604 Basi c Bio logy II E GL 3154-3 Technical Writing Proficiency exam CHEM 1474-4 Cor e Chemisrry: ENGL 3170-3 B usiness Writing Chemisrry for the Consumer and one of the following: ENVS 1042-4 lnrro to Environ Sci CMMU 2050-3 Bus/Profess Speaking GEOL 1072-4 Phys Geology I CMMU 2101-3 Present Speaking GEOL 1 082-4 Phys Geology II ENGL 2030-3 Core Composition II PHYS 1000-4lnrro to Physics ENGL 2154-3 Intro Creative Writing PHYS 1052-4 Gen Asrronomy I ENGL 3001-3 Crit ical Wriring ENGL 3084-3 Adv Composition CMMU 3120-3 Tech Comm ENGL 3154-3 Technical Writing E GL 3170-3 Business Writing E GL 4190-3 Rheroric and Language PHIL 2441-3 Logic and Language : COLLEGE OF ARTS SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAME AS CAMPUS CORE3 &MEDIA i BUSINESS SCHOOL 9 semester hours, as I MATH 1070-3 SAME AS CAMPUS CORE follows: E GL I 020-3 Cor e Composition I CMMU 2050-3 Bus/Profess Spkng E GL 3170-3 Business Writing L COLLEG E O F ! 9 semester h ours, as omp leted b y fulfilling Comp l ete d b y f ulfillin g major ENGINEERING follows: major requirements requjrements E GL I 020-3 Cor e Composition I CMMU 2101-3 Present Speaking and either ENGL3154-3 Technical Writing or ENGL 2030-3 Core Composition li or CMMU 3 120-3 Technical Comm l 1. For information abo ur specific college cores, see the college advising office. 2. All courses musr be completed wirh a grade of C(2.0) o r higher robe counted as a core. 3. CLAS students are exempt from the Knowledge Area Courses in the CU-Denver Core Curriculum d efined by their major. 4. An addirional3 credit hours is required in these areas , as defined by rhe CAM Distr i buted Core. Contact an advisor for detai ls. 5. Cul tural Diversity courses are restri c ted, r equiring juniorlevel standing or the co n sent of the instructor prior to registra t ion. CU-Denver Catalog 2004-0 5

PAGE 35

\.T DENVE CORE CURRICULUM core c u rric ulu m fo all underg r adua t e students. It i s the objectiv e o f th e CU-D e nver core rlath e m a tics, read i n , w riting, o ral communica tion , info r m a tion lit e racy, and critical thinking . ne core c urri culum, tude nr s s hould contac t the i r c oll ege a dvisin g offi ce. OWLE DG E AREAS 3 ehav ioral/Social Scien es semester hours, as follow : > ne behavioral sci ence ANTH 21 02-3 Culture Human Experience CMMU 1011-3Fundof mm CMMU 1021-3 Fund/ Comm PSY 1000-3 lnr r o ro Psy hI PSY 1005-3 lnrro ro Psy h II > ne social scie nce course: ECO 2012-3 Macroec nomics ECO 2022-3 Microec nomics ETST 2000-3 lmro-E nic Studies GEOG 1102-3 World R gional Geography GEOG 2202-3 atural azards P SC 1001-3 lnrro-Polir cal Sci P SC 1101-3 Amer Polir cal Sysr SOC 1001-3 Inrro ro So iology SOC 2462-3 ln rro-Soci I Psych Ius one additional course 10sen from either of the Jove disciplines tudenrs must comp l ete e Jllowing 3 courses: Humanities 6 semester hours from the following courses: CHIN 1000-3 China: Cenrral Stares to Nation rates ENGL 1601-3TellingTales: arrative An in Lit and Film ENGL 2600-3 Grear Works in British & American Lit FR I 000-3 lnrro ro C u lrures of French-Speaking World GER 1000-3 Germany & the Germans HIST 1381-3 Parhs to Presem I HIST 1 382-3 Paths ro rhe Presenr II PHIL 1012-3 Imro Philosophy PHIL 1020-3Inrro to Ethics &Sociery RLST 2660 3. World Religio n s RUSS 1 0 00-3 Russia & t h e Russians: Life/Culture/An RUSS 2000-3 Masterpieces of Russian Culrure SAME AS CAMPUS CORE Arts 3 semester hours from the following courses: ARTS 1000-3 Arts in Our Time FA I 001 -3 l nrro roAn PMUS 1001-3 Music Apprec i ation THTR 1001-3 lnrroro Thearre CULTURAL DIVERSITY 3 semester hours from the following courses: ANTH 3142-3 Cult Divers-Mod World ANTH 42 0 0-3 Ge n der C ross-ulr Persp CMMU 3271 -3 Comm & D i versiry ECO 3100-3 Econ of Race & Gender E GLIETST 3794-3 Eth nic D i versiry in Amer Lit E GR 3400-3 Technology & Culture ETST 3 7 04-3 Culrure, Rac ism &Alien. FA 3110-3 I maging and Ide nr iry HIST 3345-3 Immig/Erhn in Amer His r MGMT 4100-3 Manag. Cultural Divers P H IL 3500-3 Ideo l ogy & Culmre PMUS 3110-3 Social! Po lit Implications of American Music PMUS 3 1 1 1 -3 Amer i can Voice Revisit P SC 3034-3 Race/Gndr/Law/Pub P lcy P SC 3035-3 Po l Move: R ace/Gender PSY 4485-3 P ych ofCul mral Divers OC 3020-3 Race/Erhnic iry in U .S. THTR 3611-3 Drama ofDiversiry SAME AS CAMPUS CORE SAMEASCAMPUSCORE SAMEASCAMPUSCORE semester hours from rh :amp us Core be h avioral :ience course list 6 semester hours from rhe SAME AS CAMPUS CORE 3 semester hours from the following list in t h e san1e discipline chosen ro meet social science or humanities co r e c u rric ulu m r eq u i r e m ent: same humanities discipline selected from: a n d ENGL 1 60 1 -3 and ENGL2600-3 or HIST 1381-3 and HIST 1382-3 or PHIL 1012-3 and PHIL I 020-3 ECO 3 1 00-3 E GL3794-3 E GR3400-3 HIST3345-3 PHIL3500-3 p sc 3034-3 p sc 3035-3 soc 3020-3 CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 36

32 / Our University, Our Campus Originality of Work In all academic areas it is imperative that work be original, or explicit acknow ledgment be give n for the use of other persons' ideas or language. Students hould consult with instructors to learn specific procedures appropriate for documenting the work of others in each given field. Breaches of academic honesty can result in disciplinary measure s ranging from lowering of a grade to permanent compulsory withdrawal from the university. Graduation UNDERGRADUATES Students should make an appointment w i th the advising office of their sc ho ol or college to det ermi n e what requirements remain for g rad uation. Srudenrs intend ing to graduate must file a Diploma Card with their schoo l or college during the first week of their graduation term. Students will not b e officially certified to graduate until a final aud it of the student's record has been compl eted approximately six weeks after the end of the term. After students have been certified to graduate, they must reapp l y to return to CU-Denver. GRADUATES Students must file an Application for Candidacy and a Diploma Card with the Graduate Schoo l Office on the Denver campus during the first week of their graduation term. Check with th e Graduate School for more complete information. Students will not be officially certified to graduate until a final aud it of the student's record has been completed approximately six weeks after the end of the term. After students have been certified to graduate, they must reapp l y to return to CU-Denver. COMMENCEMENT In early March, informational brochures will be mailed to students eligible to participate in the May spring seme ster commencement. In early October, information r egarding the D ecember commencement will be mailed to students who grad u ated in summer term or expect to graduate in fall term . Information will be pro vided about ordering spe cial display diplomas , firrings for caps and gowns, and obtaining diplomas and transcripts with the degree r eco rded. Official Transcripts The official transcript includes the complete undergraduate and graduate academic record of courses taken at all campus locations or divisions of the University of Colorado. It contains the signature of the registrar and the official seal of the university. Official transcripts are available approx imatel y three weeks after final exams. A transcript on which a degree i s to be recorded is available approximately eight weeks after final exams. On the Denver campus, transcripts m ay be ordered through the Web Registration and Student Information System. Requests should include the following: 1. student's full name (include given or other name if applicable) 2. studenr number 3. b irth d are 4. the last term and campus the student attended 5. whether the current semester grades are to be included when a transcript is ordere d n ear rhe end of a term 6 . whether the reques t should be held until a degree is recorded 7. agency, college, or individuals to whom transcripts a r e to be senr. (Compl ete mailing addresses sho uld be included. Transcripts senr to students are labe l ed " issued to srudenr.") 8. studenr's signatu re. (This is the student's authorization to release the records.) There is no charge for individual official tran scripts . Transcripts are prepared only at the student's request in writing, or through online CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 s tud enr PIN authentication. A student with finan cial obligations to th e university that are due and unpaid will not be gran r ed a transcript. Official transcripts require five to seven working days. Notification of Rights Under FERPA at University of Colorado at Denver The Family Edu cational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords s tud ents certai n right s with respect to their educational records: 1. The right to in spect and review the student's educational records within 45 days of the day that the university receives a request for access. rudenrs should submit to the registrar , dean , h ead of the academic department, or other approp riat e official written reques1 that identify the record(s) the y wish to inspect. The university official will mak e arrangements for access a nd notify the student of the rime and place where the records ma y be inspe c ted . If the records a r e not maintained by the university official to whom the request was s ub mitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addre sed. 2 . The right to requ est the amendmenr of the student's educationa l records that th e student believes are in acc urate or misleading. Studenrs ma y ask the university to amend a record that the y believ is inaccurate or misleading. They sho uld write the uni versity offici responsible for the record, clearly idenrify th e part of the record they wan t changed, and specify why it i s in acc urate or misle adi ng. If the university decides not to amend the record as r equested by the studenr, the university will notify the studenr of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the reques t for amendmenr. Additional information r egarding the hearing procedures wi ll be pro vided to the srude nr when notified of the right to a hearing. 3. The right to consent to di sclosure of personally identifiabl e information contained in the studenr ' s educational records, excep 1 to the ex t ent rhar FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One excep tion that permits disclo sure without co n senr is disclosu to schoo l officials with legitimate educational intere sts. A school official i s a per son em ployed b y the university in an adminiStrative supervisory, academic or research, or support s taff position (includi1 law enforce menr unit personnel and health s taff) ; a per so n or co mpan y with whom the univ ersity has contracted (suc h as a n attorney, auditor , or co llection agenr); a person servi ng on the boa of trustees; or a student serving on an official commirree, s uch as a disciplinary or grievance commirree, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A schoo l official has a legitima 1 educa tional inter est if the official needs to review an e ducational record in o rd er to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request, the university discloses educational records withou consent to officials of another school in which a srude nr seeks or inrends to enroll. 4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Deparrrnent of Educatio n co n cerning alleged failures by the University of Colorado to comply with the requir e ments ofFERPA. Family Policy Compliance Offi ce U.S. Department of Education 400 Mary l and Avenue , SW Washington, D.C. 20202-4605 The following item s are designated "Direc tory Information, " and ma y b e released at th e discretion of th e University of Col orado unl e s a student files a requ est to pr event their disclosure: • name • address • e-mail a ddres s • telephone number • dares of arrendance • registration s t atus

PAGE 37

• class • major • awards • honors • degrees conferred • past and present cipatio n in officially recognized sports and non-curricu l ar activi es • Physical factors (hei t , weight) of athletes Forms to prevent Di .scl ure of Directory Information can be •brained ar the rudent rvice Center in onh l assroom 1003 . regarding rud nr righrs under FERPA should be directed o rhe Registrar ' s Office, 3 3-556-2389. Honor Code nd Discipline Policies 1CADEMIC INTEGRilY A univer sity ' s repurario is built on a standing tradition of excel l ence .nd scholastic integrity. members of the University of Colorado a r )enver academic commurity, faculty and students accept rhe responsi ili ty ro main rain the hig esr standards of intellectual honesty and e thical :on duct in comp l eting aU forms of academic work at rhe university. 'ORMS OF ACADEMIC DISHONESlY rudents are expected r1know, understand, and comp l y with the ethical randards of the universi . In addition , students have an obligation to nform the appropriate o t cia l of any acts of academ i c dishonesty by •ther students of the uni rsity. Academic dishone ty is defined as a tudent' s u e of assi stance with intent to deceive an n srr ucmr or other such p r so n w h o may be assig ned to eval uat e the tudent's work in meetin cour e and degree requirements. Examp les ,f academic dishonesty i dude, bur are nor limited m, the following: ' Plagiarism Plagiarism is the use o another person ' s distinctive ideas or word vithout acknow l edgeme r. T h e incorporation of another person's work nm one ' s own r equires ap ropriare identification and acknowledgement , egardless of the means o appropriation. The following are considered o be forms of plagi arism hen the source is nor noted: 1. Word-for-word cop ing of another person's ideas or words 2. The mosaic (the int rspersi n g of one's own words here a nd there whi le, in essen e, copy ing another ' s work) 3. The paraphrase (the rewriting of another ' s work, yet still using their idea or theory) 4. Fabrication (inventi g or counterfeiting ources) 5. ubmi sion of ano er ' s work as one ' s own 6. eglecting quotatio marks on mare rial that is otherwise acknowle ged Acknowledgement is m necessary when rhe material used is ommon knowledge. . Cheating Cheating invo lves the p ssession , communication, or use ofinformation, nate rials, no res, study ai, , or o ther devices nor authorized by the nsrrucmr in any academ c exercise, or communication with another •erson during s uch an rcise. Examples of cheat ing are: I . Copying from ano er ' s paper or receiving unauthorized assistance from another durin an academic exercise or in the submission of academ i c material 2. Using a calculamr when its use has been di allowed 3. Collaborating with nother s tudent or students during an academic exercise w our the consent of the in str ucmr Academic Policies and Regulations/ 33 C. Fabrication and Falsification Fabrication involves inventing or counterfeiting information, i.e. , c reating results nor obtained in a study or l aboratory experiment. Falsification, on the other hand, involves the deliberate alteration or cha n ging of results w suit one ' s needs in an experiment or other acade mi c exerc ise. D . Multiple Submission This is the ubmi sion of academic work for which academic credit has already been earned, when such submission i s made without instructor authorization . E . Misuse of Academic Materials T h e misuse of academic materials includes, bur is nor lim ired ro, the following: 1. Stealing or destroying library or reference mare rials or computer programs 2. realing or destroying another student' s notes or materials, or having such materials in one ' s posse sion without rhe owner ' s permission 3. Receiving assistance in locating or u ing sour ces of information in an assignment when such assistance has been forbidden by the instrucmr 4. ILlegitimate possession disposition , or use of examinations or answer keys to examinations 5. Unauthorized alteration, forgery, or falsification of academic records 6 . Unauthorized sale or purchase of examinations , papers, or assignments F. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty Complicity involves knowingly contributing ro another ' s acts of academic di . shonesty . PROCEDURES IN CASES OF SUSPEGED ACADEMIC DISHONESlY All matters of academic policy, including academic dishone ty, are under the jurisdiction of each of the university' s schools and colleges pur uanr ro Article IX2.B and Article Vl . C of the Laws of the Regents. Accordingly, each school and college has established procedures for addressing matters of academic dishonesty and for determining rhe severity and consequences of each infraction. rudents should contacr their school or college for s tand ards and/or procedures specific w their sc hool or college. As a general rule , aU school and college procedures contain the following requirements and provisions: A. Faculty, staff members, or studenrs may submit charges of academic dishonesty against students. A student who has evidence that another student is guilty of academic dishonesty should inform the instrucmr or the dea.n of the college of the charge in writing. B. A faculty member who has evidence that a rudenr is guilty of academic dishonesty should confront the rudent with the evidence. In cases of academic dishonesty, the faculty member has rhe a uth ority ro reprimand the rudenr appropriately , which could include the issuance of a failing grade (F). If the faculty member elect ro reprimand the student for academic dishonesty by issuing a failing grade, the faculty member hall submit a written report m the dean of the appropriate college within five (5) working days. The report shall include, bur is nor limited m, the rime, place , nature of the offense(s), the name(s) of the accused , the name(s) of the accu er(s), and witnesses (if any) . If the faculty member feels that her/his reprimand is an insufficient sanction for a particular case of academic dishonesty, the faculty member may recommend to the dean of the appropriate college that further action be taken. C. In cases where the faculty member has recommended further act ion in a case of academic dishonesty, the dean or a designated committee shal l c h edule a disciplinary hearing as soon as possible. T h e srudenr(s) accused of academic di honesty shall be notified in CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 38

34 I Our University, Our Campus writ in g of che specific c h arge(s) . T h e s rud e m(s) also has ( have) che right to have a represemarive presem for advice, and to b e presem durin g che procee dings. The srudem(s) must notifY the dean of che appropriate college five (5) wo rkin g days befo r e the hear i n g of the imem to have l egal counsel presem at che h earing. D. The dean or che design ated committee may r ake a n y of rh e following actio ns: Place the s rudem(s ) on disciplinar y probation for a s pe cified period of rime Suspensio n of regi st r at ion at CU-Denver, including Extended rudies , for a specifie d period of rime Expulsion: No opporruniry to return to the sc h oo l or college in w h i ch che infr act ion occ u rre d Take no furth e r action agai n s t th e acc used s rud e m(s) A r eco rd of che action tak en s hall be k ept in the commirree's confidenrial file a nd a cop y sem ro rhe R eg i srra r Inclusiveness and Non-Discrimination The U niver siry of Co l or ado at D e nver i s committed ro e nhan c ing the inclu s iveness of irs wo rk f orce a nd ir s s tud ent b o dy. Inclu s iveness amo n g srudents , facu lry, staff, an d admirusrraro r s i s essential ro e ducati o nal excel l ence and to acco mpli s hin g CU-D e nver ' s urban mission. Inclu s iveness among faculry, s t aff, and ad mini st r ato r s provide s ro l e mode l s and mentors for s rudents, w h o will b ecome lead e r s in aca d e m e a nd i n rhe l a r ger soc iery , and ensures thar a bro ad a.rray of ex peri e n ces a nd wo rld v i ews informs and shapes reac hing, researc h , ser v ice , a nd deci s ion m aki ng at CU-D e nver. CU-De n ver doe s no r di scr imin a t e o n che basi s of race , color , national or i gin, sex , age , dis a b iliry , creed , religion , sex u a l orie marion , or vete r a n starus in admission an d access to, a nd tr earmem an d e mplo y mem in , irs ed u ca tion a l programs a nd activities. CU-D enver rake s ac t i o n to inc rease ethnic, c u l tural , and ge nd e r di versiry, to e mpl oy qualified di sabled indivi duals, and ro prov id e equa l oppo rruniry to all s rud e nr s and emplo yees. CU-Denver complies w ith all l ocal , stare, and f e deral l aws a nd regulations r elated to education , e mp l oyment , and contracti ng. Program Access for Persons with Disabilities The Univers iry of Color ad o at Denver i s committed to pro vid in g r easo n able accommoda tion and access ro pro gra m s and erv i ces ro p e r sons w i th di sab ilities. Srud e m s s h o u l d co m ac r the D isabiliry R eso urce and Services Office, Arts Building 1 77; 303-5563 4 50 , fax 303-556-2074 , TTY 303-556-4766. Any other p erso n requirin g acco mmod atio n in order ro access prog r a m s and ser v ice of che Unive r s iry of Colorado a t D enver, s h ouJd r equest acco mmodation from che indi vidual or o ffic e responsib l e for p rovi ding che program or serv ice. This request s hould b e m ad e in a timel y fash ion to allow adequa t e rime to provide r easonable accommodation . The rim e frame for notification will vary according to the c ir cumstances and che narure of th e accommodat i o n req uest ed. For furche r inform a tion o r for assi sta n ce, contact the ADA Coordinator , Lawre nce Str eet Cente r , S uir e 1 4 00 , 303-556-2550, fax 3035565855, TTY 303-556 -6 204 , e-mail marylou.fenili@cudenver. edu. University Policy on Sexual Harassment The Universiry of Col orado is committ e d to m a imaining a positive l ear ning , working and livin g environme nt. The Universiry does n or discriminate on che basis of r ace, co l o r , national or i gin, sex, age, di sa biliry , creed, r elig i on , sexual o riem ation, or veteran srarus in admiss ion and access ro , and rrearmem and employment in, it e ducational pro grams CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 E. In all cases, che srude m(s) s hall be not i fied of che d ean ' s or commirree ' s d ecisio n withi n seve n (7) working days. F. If a s rud e m w i s hes to appea l a case , che s tud ent s h o uld requ est the procedures for doing so from his or h er school or college. G. Srudenrs w h o a r e raking co ur ses at t h e Uruversiry of Col orado at Denver, but are e nroll e d a t one of che otber educational institu tion s on the Aurar i a campus an d are c harg e d with acade m dishonesry, a r e su bject to the same procedure s and sanctio n s outl in e d a b ove. SUMMARY Questio ns r ega rdin g aca d e m i c inr egriry s hould b e dire cted roche dean ' s office of th e college or sch ool in w hi c h th e student is e nroll ed. a nd ac tivities. ( R egem Law, Article 10, ame nd ed 11/8/2001). In pursL of these goals , che U n iversiry will n or tolerate acts of sex ual h arassment • r e l ated retalia t ion again s t or by a n y employee or s rud e nr. This Policy(' pr ov ide s a gen eral d efinition of sexual h a rassm e m and rela t e d reraliario 1 (2) prohibits sexual h a rassm ent and related retaliation; and (3) sets o ut p rocedures ro follo w whe n a m e mb er of the Universiry communiry believes a v iolation of the Policy has occ urred . It i s also a vio l at ion of rr Policy for an y one acting knowing l y a nd recklessl y eith er to make a fals complaint o f sex ual harassment or ro provide false inform a tion regard in g a co mpl a int . R obust discu ssion and debate are fundamental ro the lif e of th e Universiry. Consequ ently, this poli cy shal l be int e rpr eted in a manner chat i s co n s i s t ent with aca d e mic free d o m as defin e d in R egent Law, Articl e 5 D , ame nd ed I 0/10/02. I ris imended char indi v iduals who violate chis Policy be disciplined or s ubje c ted t o corrective act i o n , up ro and includin g t e rminati o n or expulsion. DEFINITIONS Appointing a u chori ry/ disciplinary authority: An appoiming auchori i s th e indi v idual w ith th e a urhoriry or del ega ted aurhoriry ro make ultim a t e p erso nnel d ecisio n s co ncernin g a particular empl oyee. A disciplin ary auchoriry i s tbe indi vidual w ho has the a urh oriry or del ega r a u rhoriry to impose disciplin e upon a particular e mployee. Complainant : A compl ainant i s a p erso n w ho i s su b ject ro alleg e d sex ual harassm e nt. R espon d ent: A respondent i s a per son whose all ege d conduct i s the s ubj ect of a co mplaint. Sexual harassment : Sex u a l harassmem co n sists of interaction b etwee n individual s of the sa m e o r opposite sex that is c h aracterized un welco m e sexual ad vances, requests for sex ual favors , and other or physical co nduct of a sexual natur e when: (1) submission to such co ndu ct i s made eith er ex pli c itly or impli c itl y a term or co nditi o n of an individ ual ' s emplo yment, living co ndition s and/or educational eval u a tion; (2) s ubm ission to or r e j ect i o n of such co ndu ct by an i ndi v idual i s used a s che basi s for tangibl e e mployrn e nr or e du catio nal deci s i ons affec tin g s u c h indi v idual ; o r (3) s uch conduct has th e purpose effect of unreasonabl y inter f e ring wich an individual ' s work o r academ p erformance or cre a tin g a n intimidating, ho s tile , or offens ive working or ed u catio nal e n vironment. Hostile env ironment sex ual h arassment: ( described in s ubpart (3) a bove) i s un welcome sex ual conduct char is s ufficientl y eve r e o r p ervasive char it alt ers che co ndition s of ed ucation or employment and c r eates an e n v ironment that a reasonable person wou.ld find inrimidarir

PAGE 39

10srile or offensive. The d termination of whether an environment i ' ho sr.ile" must be based o all of the circumstances. These circumstances :ould include the frequen of the conduct, irs severity, and whether it is hreatening o r hu miliatin . Examp les which may be Policy vio lations nclude rhe following: ani suuctor suggesr.s that a higher grade might be ;iven to a student if the sr dent submits to sexual advances; a supervisor mplicirl y or explicitly thr a tens termination if a subordinate refuses the upervisor's sexual advanc ; and a student repeatedly follows an instructor . round campus and sends exual l y explicit mes sages to the instructor's oicemail or email. R e t aliatory acts: It is a iolation of this poli cy ro engage in retaliatory . crs against any employee r student who reporr.s an incident of alleged exual harassment, or any mployee or student who te stifies, assis t s or >arricipares in a proceedi g, investigation or hearing relating to such !legation of sexual harass em. Srudenr.s and employee who believe they have been retaliated .gainsr because of resrifyi g, assisting or paniciparing in a proceeding, nvesrigarion, or hearing r Ia ring to an allegation of sexual harass ment, hould meet w i th and see the advice of their campus sexual harassment ,fficer, whose responsibil' ies includ e handling retaliation. 'OLICIES AND PROCEDURES . . Obligation to Report In order to rake iare co rrective action, the University must •e aware of sex ual harass em or related retaliation. Therefore, anyone ;ho believes that s/he has experienced or witnessed sexual harassment • r related retaliation shou d promptly report s uch behavior ro a campus exual harassment officer see campus Appendix discussed below ) or n y supervisor (see sectio B below). . Supervisor' s Obligation to eport Any supervisor who ex eriences, witnesses or receives a written or raJ report or complaint f sexual haras sment or related retaliation shall •rompdy report it to a ca pus sexual harassment officer. This section f the Policy does nor obi gate a s upervi so r who is required by the upervisor's profession an University r espo n s ibilities to keep certain ommunicarions confide rial (e. g., a professional counselor or mbudsperso n) to report confidential communications received r hile performing those niversity responsibilities . Each campus shall ave an appendix to this ' olicy designating the supervisory po s itions qualify under this ex eprion. .Investigation Process 1. Reports or complai rs under this Policy shall be addressed and resolved as prompt! as practicable after the complaint or report i s made . Ordinarily, i vestigarions s hall be concluded and reporrs submitted to the revi wing committee no later than 90 days following the receipt of a com lainr. Ordinarily, the final report shall be sent ro the hancell r or President no later than 30 day s after the committee's receipt f the draft report of the investigation. It is the responsibility f the sexual harassment officer(s) ro determine 1e most appropriate me s for addressing the report or complainr. )ptions include : ( l) inv tigaring the report or complaint in accordance r ith paragraph C.3. belo , (2) with the agreement of the parries, rrempting to resolve the port or complaint through a form of alternative ispute resolution (e.g., ediarion), or (3) determining that d1e fact s f the complaint or repo t, even if true, would nor constitute a violation f this Policy. The camp s sex ual harassment officer(s) may designate nother individual (eithef from w i thin rhe University, including an dminisrr ato r , or from outside the University) to conduct or assis t with 1e investigation or tom 1 age an alternative dispute re so lution process. )urs ide investigators sh I have training, qualifications and experience University Policies/ 35 as will, in the judgment of the sexual harassment officer, facilitate the investigation. Anyone designated to address an allegation must adhere ro the requ irements of this Policy and confer with the sexual harassment officer(s) about his or h er progress. (See campus appe ndix for a list of resources for further assistance or additional information.) 2. All reporrs or co mplaint s shall be m a de as promptly as feasible after the occurrence. (A delay in reporting may be reasonable under some circumstances, as determined on a case-by-case basis. An unreason able delay in reporting , however , is an appropriate co n sideration in evaluating the merits of a complaint or r e port. ) 3. If an investigation is conducted: The complainant and d1e respondent shall have the right ro: a. R eceive written notice of the report or complaint , including a statement of the allegations, as soo n after the commencement of the investigation as is practicable and ro the extent permitted by law ; b. Present relevant information to rhe invesrigaror(s); and c. Receive, a t d1e conclus ion of the inv estigat ion and appropriate review , a copy of the investigator's report , ro the extent permitted by law. 4 . The Chancellor, the respondent's appointing authority and the respondent's supervisor shall be notified that an investigation i s raking place. The sexual harassment officer shall advise the respondent's supervisor whether the respondent should be relieved of any supervisory or evaluative authority during the in vestigation and review. If the respondent's supervisor declines ro follow the recommend at ion of the sexua l harassment officer , s/ h e s hall send a letter explaining the decision to the Chancellor with a copy ro the sexual harassment officer. 5. At the conclusion of an investigation, the investigator shall prepare a written report which shall include a statement of factual findings and a determination of whether this Policy has been violated. The report shall be presented for review to the standing review committee designated by the Chancellor, or, in rhe case of System Administration, the Presidenr. 6. The s tanding review committee may consult with the investigator, consult with the parries, request that further investigation be done b y rhe same or anod1er investigator, or r eq ue st that the inve s tig a tion be conducted again by another investigator. The standing review committee may adopt the investigator's report as its own or may prepare a separate report based on the findings of the investigation. The standing review committee ma y nor, however, conduct ir.s own investigation or hearing. Once the s tand i n g review committee has completed ir.s review , the reporr(s) shall be sent to the campus sexual harassment officer(s), the complainant and the respondent, to the extent permitted by law. The report shall also be sent to the Chancellor , or, in the case of System Administration*, to rh e Presidenr. If a Chancellor i s th e respondent or co mplain ant, the report shall be sent to the Presidenr. If the President or the Secretary of the Board ofRegenr.s is the respondent or complainant, rh e report shal l be sent to the Board of Regents . * For the purposes of this Policy , System Administration includes the Office of the Secretary of the Board of Regents and Internal Audir. D . Repor t i n g Process 1. a. If a Policy violation is found, the reporr(s) shall be sent to the disciplinary auth ority for the individual found to h ave violated the Policy , and the disciplinary auth ority must initiate a disciplinary process against that individual. The disciplinar y authority shall have access to the records of the investigation. If disciplinary act i on is nor taken, the appointing authority and the Chancellor , or in rhe case of System Administration, the President shall be notified accordingly. CU-Denver Catawg 2004-05

PAGE 40

36/ Our University, Our Campw b. Following a finding of violation of the Policy, the disciplinary aurhoriry shall forward ro the sexual harassment officer and to rhe Chancellor, or in th e case of System Administration, the President , a statement of the actio n taken against an indi vidual for violation of this Policy. c. If a Policy v iolation is not found, the appoi nting a uthoriry and the Chancellor, or in the case of System Administration, the Pres ident , s hall be notified according ly. 2. The sexual harassment officer shal l advise the comp l ainant and respondent of the resolution of any inv estigatio n conduc t e d under this Policy. 3. A copy of the invest i gator ' s written report as app r oved by the stand ing review committee, shall be provided to: (1) the com plainant ; (2) the respondent; and (3) the respondent's appointing authoriry. 4. In aU cases, the sexual harassment officer shall retain the investigator's report , as approved by the standing review committee, for a minimum of three (3) years or for as long as any administrative or l egal act ion arising om of the co mpl aint is pending. 5. All records of sex ua l h arassment reports and investigations s hall be considered confidential and shall not be di sclosed publicly except to rhe extent required by law. 6. Complaints Invo lvin g Two or More Campuses: When an alleged Policy violation involve more than one campus, the complaint shall be handled by the campus with disciplinary authoriry over the respondent. T he campus responsible for th e investigatio n may request the involvement or cooperation of any other affected campus and sho uld advise app ropri a te officials of the affected campus of rhe progress and resu lt s of th e investigation. 7. Complaints By and Against Univers iry Employees and Students Arising in an Affiliated Entiry: Universiry employees and students so m e times work or study at the works it e or program of another organization affiliated with the Universiry. When a Policy vio l ation is alleged by or aga in st Universiry emp l oyees or stud ents in those circumstances, the complaint shal l be handl ed as pro vided in the affiliation agreement berween the Uni versiry and the other entiry. In the a bsenc e of an affiliation agreement or a provision addressing this issue , the Unive r s it y may, in it s dis cretion, choose to 1) co ndu c t its own investigation, 2) conduct a joint inve s tigation with the affiliated entiry, 3) defer to the findings of an investigation b y the affiliated emiry where the Unive r siry has reviewed the investigation process and is satisfied that it was fairly conducted, or 4) use rhe investigation and findi ngs of the affiliated entiry as a basis for further investigation . E . No Limitations on Existing Authority No provision of this Poli cy shall be construed as a limit at ion o n the aurhoriry of a disciplinary authoriry unde r applicable policies and procedures to initiate disciplina ry action. If an individual i s disciplined for conduct that also vio l ates thi s Policy , the conduct and the discipline imposed s hall be reported to a campus sexual harassment officer. If an in vest igation is conducted under this Policy and no Policy violation is fou nd , that fact does not prevent discip l in e of the respondent for in ap propriate or unprofessional co nduct under other applicable policies and procedures . F. Information and Education The Presid ent' s office s hall provide an annual report documenting: (1) the number of repor t s or complaints of Poli cy v i o l atio ns; (2) the catego rie s (i.e., student, employee, or other) and sexes of the parties involved ; (3) the number of Policy violations found; a nd (4) examples of sanctions impos ed for Policy violations. Each campus s hall broadly disseminate this Policy, distribute a list of resources available on the campus to respond to co n cerns of sexual h arassment and related rerali a rion, maintain the campus appendix to the sex u a . l h arassment policy, and develop and pres ent appropriate educatio nal programs. CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 Each campus s hall maintain information abom these efforts , includin1 a record of how the Policy is disrributed and the names of individuals at t ending training programs. G . O versight Committee There s hall be an overs ight committee consisti n g of campu and sym representatives appointed by the President . o one s hall serve on this committee who has been invo l ved with a sexual harassment case in any capaciry durin g the previous rwo years. The overs ight committee shall annually gather and review in formation regarding investigations conducted under this Policy and the ultimate actions taken as a result of s uch investigations. The overs ight committee shall be responsible fc m aking confi d e ntial findings and recommendations to the Universiry Counsel for the pu rpose of e nabling the U ni versiry Counsel to providc l egal advice to th e Board , the Pre s ident , the campus Chancellors, and other Unive r sity officials , as appropriate concerning the equitable, effective and lawful implementation of the policy. H. Review of the University Policy Pursuant to rhe Universiry Policy on exual Harassment, effective Jul y 1 , 1999, rhe Policy underwent review and revision in 2000-2003. ln accordance with this Policy as reviewed and revised in 2003, the President shal l p eriodically have this Policy reviewed. RELATED POLICIES Administrative Policy Sta t e m ent, "Universiry Policy on Amorous R e lationship s Invol ving Evaluative Authoriry, " provides that an amorous relationship between an employee and a student or between two employees constitutes a co nfli ct of interest when one of the individual s has dire ct evalua tiv e a uth oriry ove r the oth e r and requires that the direct evaluative amhoriry must be eliminated. For related complaint , grievance or disciplinary processes , refer to R egent Policies under 5. Faculry, 5. H. Faculry Senate Grievance Procc and 5. I. Faculry Dismissal for Cause Process (for faculry ), Stare Personnel Board Rules (for classified employees), and campus student disciplin ary po l icie s and procedures (for students). For further information , co nt act the Center for Human Resources , Lawrence treer Center 1450; 303-556-2868, TTY 303-556-6204, Fax 303-556-4472. Drugs and Alcohol Policy T h e Univers iry of Colorado at Denver recognizes the health risks associated wit h the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol and is committed to providin g a drug -free educat ional and dru g -free workp l a that supports the research , teaching, and service mission of the universi This Denver campus policy sta t ement on drugs and alcohol is designe to address the univ ersiry's co n ce rn s about s ub stance abu e and to ens u that the Universiry of Colorado at Denver communiry complies with the Federal Drug-Free Workp l ace Act of 1988 (the " Drug-Free Workplace Act") and rhe Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 198 9 (the " Drug-Free choo l s Act "). These acts requ the universiry as a recipient of federal funds to rake measures to com b : rhe abuse of d rugs and alcohol. The contin uation of federal financial support for our st ud ents as well as our academic programs and acaderr support service pr ograms is based upon compl iance with these statute and their regulations. The Univers iry of Col orado a t Denver Policy on Drugs and Alcoho prohibits the u . nlawful manufacture, disuibution, dispensation , possessi< or use of any controlled substa nce (ill i cit drugs of any kind or amount and the abuse of alcohol by students and employees on universiry prope or as parr of any of irs activities. This prohibition covers any individua actions that are part of any universiry activities, including those occur r i whi l e on universiry properry o r in rh e conduct of universiry business away from the campus.

PAGE 41

It is a violation of unive icy policy for any member of th e faculry, , raff, or rudenr bod y ro je pardize the operation or interest of the J niversiry of Colorado at enver through the u e of alcohol or !rugs. Those individual s und to b e in v iol atio n a r e engaged in se rious niscondu ct and are s ubje to legal sanctions under l ocal, state, or fed eral aw and are also subject ro isciplinary action co n s istent with th e ::ode of rudenr onduc the Faculty Handbook, a pplicable rules >f the State Per so nnel ys m, and the university's Unclassified Staff -Iandbook. ancr i ons rha will be imp osed by the Univer icy of :::olorado at Denver fore ployees who are found robe in vio l ation >f this policy may include req uirin g satisfacrory participation i n a ubstance abuse treatmen , counseling, or education progran1 as a : ondition of continued e plo y menr , uspen s ion , or termination of : mployment , a nd referral or prosecution. To acquainr member s the U-Denver community with applicable aws, the Un i vers i ty Colli el has prepared a description oflocal, s t a te , LJ1d federal l aws concerni g drugs and alco h ol. Thi s information is tvailable for dir ect a nd i ediate 24-hour per d ay access to all wdents, faculty, and st on the CU-Denver web page at vww.cudenver.edu/Resou ces/Human+Resources/Poli cies-RulesDrocedu res/ Policies/ Legal Sanctions . htm The web addre s forth Col orado Departmenr of Human ervices' lir ector oflicensed treat ems programs is 1ttp:llwww.cdhs.state.co. lohrladad/Treatmmtldirectory.asp Health risks as ociated ith the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of Jcohol include, bu t are n t limited to the following: • Violence-Fight , andal i sm, sexual assaults, homicide, and suicide are far more I kely to occur whe n drinking is in vo lved. • Unprotected ex-ndividuals are les likely to use safer sex practices w h en drink ng , whic h can result in unpl an n ed pregnancy and infection with a exual l y tran smitted di sease. • Serious Injury-M r e than 53 percenr of all fatal auromobile accident in the U .. invo lve alcohol use. • Death from Overdo e • Addiction-Altho gh anyone can become addicted, those with a family hisrory of al ohol o r other drug addict i o n are at l east four rimes mo r e likel y to evelop alcoholism. • Lowered R esistance o Di ease/ lllness-Increased risk of ulcers, heart disea e, and cers of the liver , mouth, throat and sromam. • Feral Alcohol yndr me/Feral Alcohol Effects (FA /FAE)Women who drink uring pregnan cy may give birth to infants with physical deformities brain damage , and/or m e ntal retardation. If a wo m a n is pregnant, rying to b ecome pregnant, or sus p ects s he i s pregnant, she s houl abstain from alcohol and oth er drug use. AU univer s ity faculty a d staff members, as well a a n y st ud ents mployed at the univ ers i , acknow l edge that they will, as a condi tion of heir employme nt , abide y the terms of thi University of Colo rado a t )enver policy. In additio , any employee who is convicted of a vio lation ,f any criminal drug law ccurri n g in the workp l ace must report that onviction to hi s or her i mediate s u pervisor within five days. The )rug-Free Workplace A makes a suict compliance with thi policy tatemenr a co ndiri on of mploymenr on all federal g rant s an d co nrr acrs . l(lithi n ten days oflearni g of a drug conviction resulting from workplace ctiviries of any individu I engaged in wo rk under grams or co nrra c t s unded b y a federa l agen y, t h e University of o l o r a d o at D e n ver i s equired to notifY the r e i vanr funding agency that a vio l ation of this •olicy state m ent has occ rr ed. University employees ay contact the Center for Human Resources a t 03-556-2868 (Lawre nc treet Center, Suite 1 450) for more information ega rdin g resources , prog ms, and services available. CU-Denver st ud e nts nay contact the Student and Community Counseling Center at 30356-4372 ( orth Clas r m 4036), or the Student Health Cente r a t -556-2525 (Plaza Bu !ding 150) , for co n fidenrial information and or referral . lnformatio ma y al o be obtained by callin g the U.S. )eparrmenr of H ealth a d Human Services national drug and a l co hol reatment referral servic ar 1-800-662HELP. Code oJStudem Conduct/ 37 T hi s policy sta t e m ent will be issued eac h year as parr of th e univer icy's co nrinuin g efforr to in c r ease awa r e ness about the dangers of substance a buse. This policy is based on the belief that well-informed m em bers of the univer s i ty community will choose well ness over illn es and effeniveness over impairme nt. We ask yo ur support in thi important campus effort. Code of Student Conduct (Student Rights and Responsibilities and Procedures for Disciplinary Review and Action) STANDARDS OF CONDUIT FOR WHICH AGION MAY BE TAKEN IF A VIOLATION OCCURS All p erso n s on universi ty pro p e rry a r e requir ed, for r easo nable cause, ro identifY them s elves w h e n requested b y uni versity o r Auraria Public afery officials acti ng in the performance of their duties. Acting t hr o ugh its admini trative officers, th e univer icy reserves th e right ro exclude those posing a danger to univer sity personnel o r property and th ose w ho int e rfere with it s function as a n educa tional inst itution. All per ons on CU-Denver/Auraria prope r ty who are not students or e mplo yees of the univ e r s ity a r e required to adhere ro t he Cod e of onduct applicable to uni versity students a nd to abi d e b y univer icy p olicies and campus r egulatio ns. The b e h avio r s outlined below will not b e tolerated , b eca u se the y threaten the safery of individuals and vio lat e the basic purpose of the university an d the p e r so nal rights an d freedoms of its memb ers. I . lnte nrion a l obstruction, di ruption , or interference with r eaching, r esea r ch, di ciplin ary proceeding , or other university activit ies, including it s publi c se rvi ce and administrative functions or activities on the CU-Denver/A uraria pr emises. 2. Willful ob miCtion or interfe r e n ce with th e freedom of mo vement of s tud ents, smool officials, empl oyees, a nd invited g u ests to all facilities of the CU-Denver/ Auraria campus. 3. Ph ysical abuse of any per so n on pro perry owned or conrroUed b y th e U-D enve r/Auraria Hi g h e r Education Cenrer o r a t fun ctions spo n sored or superv i sed b y th e university , or conduct th a t threatens or e nd ange r s th e health or safety of any s u ch p e r so n. 4. Verbal or physical har assme nt an d/or hazin g in all forms, which includes, bur is not limit e d ro, s triking , laying h ands upo n , threateni n g wi th viole nc e, or offering to do bodily harm to another per on with intent to punis h or i n j ure; o r other treatm ent of a ty r a nnical , abusive, s hameful , insu lt ing , or humili a ting n a ture . (Thi includes , but is not limited to, d emeaning behavior of an et hnic, sexist, or racist n ature, unwante d sexual a dvan ces, or inrimidati o n s.) 5. Prohibited entry to or use of CU-Denver/ Aura ria facilities, defined as un a uthorized entry or u se ofCU-Denver/Auraria prop e r ty or facilities for illegal purpo es o r purpo es d etrimental to t h e university . 6. Forgery, fraud ( to includ e computer fraud ), falsification , alteration, or u e of universi ty documenrs , records, or instrumenrs of i d entifi catio n with inrenr ro gain any un e ntitl ed advanrage. 7. Theft o r dam age t o CU-Denver/Auraria property and the pri vate pro p erry of students , uni versity o fficial , employees, and invited guest whe n s u ch pro perry i s loca r e d upon or within CU-Denver/ Auraria buildings or facilities. This includes the possession of known srolen pro perry . 8. Possession of firearms , explo sives, or other dan ge rou s w eapons or materials within or upon the gro unds , buildings, or any other facilities of the CU-Denver/Auraria campus. This poli cy s hall not app l y to any police officer or o th e r pea ce office r w hil e on dury a urhori zed by the university , or other s authorized i n writing by th e Chief of the Auraria Public afery or designee . (A dangerous weapon is an in strument that is designed to or likely to produce bodily harm. Weapons m ay include, but are not limit e d to , firearms , explosives, BB guns, s lingshots, martial art devices , brass knu c kles, Bowi e knives, dagg e r s or s imilar knive o r switchb lades. A harmless instrument design e d to l ook lik e a fire ar m , exp losive, or d a n gerous weapo n which i s u se d b y a person to cause fear in or assault on CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 42

38 I Our University, Our Campus S TUDENT RIGHT TO KNOW AND DISCLOSURE INFORMATION This reporr was prepared w ith informatio n provided b y rhe Aura ria High er Ed u catio n Center (AH EC) Campus Police Department in compliance with rhe federa l Student Right-to-Know and Campus Semrity Act. Campus Securiry can be reached ar 303.556.3271. AURARIA CAMPUS CLERY REPORT Criminal Offenses On Campu s Non-Campus Public Property 2000 200 1 2002 2 000 2001 2002 2000 2001 2002 Murder/ on-Negligent Mans l aughter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Forcible Sex Offenses (inclu ding forcible rape) 3 * I 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 Non-Forcible ex Offenses 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 I 0 Robber y 0 2** 1 0 0 0 2 2 7 Aggravated Assa ult 3 1 3*** 0 1 0 5 2 2 Burgl ary 3 9 3 0 2 0 2 3 2 Motor Vehicle T h efr 9 5 15 0 0 0 7 9 9 Arson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Negligent Mans lau ghter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 *Forcible Rape-one attempt , two c ompleted ** One offense, two victims (business and individual) ***Two offenses, three victims Hate Offen ses On Campus Non-Campus Public Property 2000 200 1 2002 2 000 200 1 2002 2000 2001 2002 Murder/Non-Negligent Mans l a u ghter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Aggravated Assault 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 All Forcible Sex Offenses (inc. for c ibl e rape) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Forc ibl e R ape 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Arson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Negligent Mans l a u ghter 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Simp l e Assau lt 0 0 0 I 0 0 0 0 0 Arrests On Campus Non-Campus Public Property 2000 Liquor Law Vio l ations 2 Drug Law Violations 28 Illegal Weapons Possessions 5 PERSISTENCE AND COMPLETION DATA Section 103 ofTide 1 of Public Law 101 -542 as a men ded by Public Law 10 2-26 (rhe Federal "St ud ent Right-to-Know " Ac t ) requires thar institution s produce an d make avai l a bl e ro current and pro s pecti ve st udents rhe com pletion rare of first-r ime, full-rime, degree-seekin g undergradu a te s tud ents entering rh e in s tituti on. Six yea r s afrer entering, 43.7 percent of rh e fall1996 co h o rr graduated, anorher 26.4 percent tran sfer red ro o rh er public higher education in s titutions in Col ora do a nd 15.7 p ercent were s r ill enrolled at CU Denver for a rota! six-year co mbined per sistence and comp l etio n rare of85. 8 percent. CU-Denver' s one-year fall-to-fal l r e tention rare i s 65.9 percent for rhe faU 2002 co hort. That is, of the firs t-time , full rime, degree seeki ng unde rgr ad u a t e students who entered CU-Denver in fall 2002, 65.9 perc ent we r e enrolied ar CU-Denver in fall 2003. RIOT LAW (STUDENT RIOT BILl) St udent enrollmentp rohibit i onpubli c peace and o rder co n v i ctions: 1 ) No person who is co n victed of a riot offense s hall be e nroll e d in a srare-s upp orred institutio n of higher education for a period of twelve mo nrh s following t h e d ate of co n victio n ; 2) a s tud ent who i s e nroll ed in a s ta te-supported in s t itution of higher education and who is convicte d of a riot offense s hall be immediately suspended fro m rhe institution up o n rhe in s titution's notification of s u c h co n v iction for a per iod of twelve months following rhe dare of CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 20 01 1 21 1 2002 2 000 2001 2 00 2 2 000 2 001 2002 0 2 0 0 2 7 16 0 13 0 0 0 18 6 6 2 0 0 0 7 0 2 conviction, except rh at i f a s tud ent has been sus p e nd ed prior to rhe dare of convictio n by rhe state-supported in st itution of higher education for rhe same riot acriviry, rhe twelve monrh sus p e n s ion s hall run from rh e s t arr of the s usp ension imposed b y rhe institution; 3) nothing in rhi s sec tion s hall be constr u e d to prohibit a stare-supported in s titu tion of higher educatio n from implement in g irs own policies and procedures or di scip lin ary ac tion s in addition ro rh e u s pen s ion under (2) of rhis section, regarding st ud e nts involved in rior. SEX OFFENDER INFORMATION (CAMPUS SEX CRIMES PREVENTION AG) Sex offende r s are required to list the loc atio ns of all institutions of p ost-secondary education w h ere h e or she volunteers or is enrolled o r employed. T h e Col orado Bur eau oflnvesrigarion mainrains a d atabase ident ifying all suc h persons and makes ir avai lable to all law enforcemen t agencie s in whi c h j uri sdiction rh e in stitution of po st seco nd ary educa tion i s located. The campus community can obtain rhis information b y contacting rh e Auraria Campus Polic e and Sec u riry ar 3 0 3-556-3271. VOTER REGISTRATION (NATIONAL VOTER REGISTRATION AGl In comp liance w irh the National Voter R eg i s tration Acr, rhe Stare of Col orado Voter R egistra tion Application Form an d In formation i s available i n the Office of rhe R egistrar , 1250 1 4rh Street, Lower Level Annex. The a ppli catio n form and info rm ation are also available ar http://www . ftc .gov/vonegislvr.htm.

PAGE 43

another person is xpressly included within the meaning of the terms firearms, e l osive , or dangerous weapon . ) 9. a l e , distributio , use, possession, or manufacture of illegal drugs w ithin or on the rounds , buildings, or any other facil ities of the CU-Denver/ Aur ria campus. I 0. Physical resrricti n , coercion, or harassment of any person; s i g nificant theft; s e/manu fact ur e of illegal drugs ( includes possession of a s u teient quantirywith intent to sell); d amage, theft , or unautho zed possession of universiry pro perry; or forgery , fa l sification , a lt e r rion, or use of universiry documents, records, or instruments of id rificarion to gain any unentitled advantage . UNIVERSITY STANDARDS NO CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS As a member of rhe mi versiry communiry, you are held accountable not only for upholdin civil and criminal laws, but universiry standards as well. Enrollment do not confer e ith er immuniry o r special conside r ation with reference to civil a nd cr iminal l aws. Disciplinary ac tion by the uni versiry will not e subject to c h alle n ge or postponement on the grounds that criminal harges involv in g the same incident have been dismissed , reduced , o r e pending in civil o r criminal co u rt. In a dditi on, the univer siry reserves e right to pursue di sciplinary actio n if a studen t viol ates a standard and ithdraws from tl1e universiry befo r e admi ni suative action is final. USE OF UNIVERSITY/AU Nothing in this Co of Conduct shal l be construed to prevent peaceful a nd orderly as e mbl y for the voi c ing of conce rn s or grievances. The universiry is dedic r ed to the pursuit of knowledge throu gh a free excllange of ideas , and is shall be a cardi nal principle in the determination of w h ether or nor apr osed use of universiry facilities i s a ppropri ate . The Auraria Higher ducar ion Center has establ i she d campus regulations and proced res governing the use ofCU-Den ver/Au r ar i a grounds, buildings , an other facilities. S uch regulations a r e designed to prevent interfere n ce ith uni versiry f u n c tion s and activ it ies. Except whe r e otherwise speci all y authorized, or when members of th e public are invited , the use of U-Denver/Auraria facilities shall be limited to faculry, staff, and stu d e t s of the CU-Denv e r/Aur aria can 1pus, a nd to o r ganizations havin c h apters, l ocal groups , or other r ecogn i zed universiry-connected r presentation among faculry, staff, or students of the three academic i srirutions on the Auraria campus . CLASSROOM CON DUG Students are expecte to conduct themselves app ropriately in classroom situations. If disruptive b ehavior occurs in a classroom, an in s tructor has the a uth oriry to ask the 'sruprive student to leave the classroom. Should suc h disorderly or disr rive conduct persist, the instructor s hould report th e matter to Au aria Public Safery and/or th e a ppropri ate Dean ' s office. T h e appropria t e ean or his/her r epresentative may dismiss a student from a particul class for disruptive behavior, w hil e the Student Discipline Committee ay recommend to the Vice C h a n cello r for Aca d e mi c and Student a ir s to withdraw, s u s p end, permanently expel, and/or permane dy exclude the student from t h e campus. Appeal questions conce ning disruptive behavior should be directed to tl1e Academic Dean's office when w ithdrawal from a class i s invol ved, an d to the Director of S udent Life whe n s uspen sion or expulsion from rhe uni ver iry is invo lve V i o l ations ofSranda s of Conduct s h o uld be reported to the Director of Student Lifc during worki n g h ours. A ur aria Public Safery s hou l d b e contacted du in g non-dury hours. If a violation occurs n campus and it is not in a specific building , Auraria Public Safery a J d/or the Director of Student Life should be contac t ed. If emergency help is eeded when o n campus , contact Au r aria Public afery; for help off cam us, contact the D enve r Police. Code of Student Conduct/ 39 Actions available to campus officials include , but are not limited to: asking those involved in inappropriate behavior to cease and desist; r eq u esting offe nd er(s) to leave the Auraria camp us; denying or restricting u se of fac iliti es or services; cal lin g Auraria Public Safery for assistance; billing offender( ) for any physical damages ; pressing civil charges; and referring sru den r(s) to the Director of rudent Life. STUDENT LIFE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES When o n e of rhe ren Standards of Conduct lis red in this code is violated , rhe student may be referred to rhe Director of Srudent Life. Any person may refer a student or student gro up suspected of vio l ating this code to the Director of Student Life. Persons making such referrals will be asked to p rovide information pertinent to the case. The Director of Student Life will make a determination as to the seriousness of tl1e case. This will be done in most situations by asking the srudent(s) involved in the case to come in for an administrative interview to determ in e what actions, if a ny, will be taken by th e universiry. Stu d ents will be notified in writing of the results of such admin istrative reviews. The Di r ector of Student Life has rhe aurhoriry ro: I. Dismiss th e case. 2. Take n o further action other man talking witl1 the accused srudent(s). 3. I ssue a universiry warn in g (a statement that a srudent ' s behavior has been inappropriate, and any further vio l ation of universiry rules will result in st r onger disciplinary action). 4 . Place t h e student on disciplinary probation, a violation of the terms of w h ich could result in suspension or expulsion from the universiry. 5. Refer cases to the Student Discipline Committee when the above sanct i ons are determined to be inadequate. 6. Take oth er actions, includ in g bur not limited to counseling, in s urin g th e v i o l aror(s) provide(s) compen sat i on for theft or damage, an d/or placing stops on registration. STUDENT DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Disciplinary proceedings shall be conducted as administr ative proceedings and nor as judicial proceedings. The universiry is not a parr of rhe judicial branch of stare government. T h e uni versiry has aurhoriry to promulgate and enforce internal rule of behavior that s hall be ad mini stered in a fair and impartial manner in harmony with irs educat ional objectives and administrative n ature. As parr of the administrative n ature of the commirree's proceed ings, fundamental rules of fairness will be followed . Copies of these procedures are available in the Office of Student Life. This committee, compose d of student , facu lry, and staff members , makes the decision whether students charged with violations of the student cond uct code may continu e to attend the Universiry of Color ado at D e nver. The Stu d ent Discipline Committ ee has the autl10riry ro: I . Dismiss the case . 2. Take no action other than talking with the accused student. 3. Issue a uni vers iry warning (a statement that a student's behavior has been inappropriate , and further violation of universiry rules will result in st r o n ger disciplinary action). 4. Place th e student on disc i p lina r y probation, a viol ation of d1e terms of which cou ld result in suspension or expulsion from the universiry. 5. Recommend suspension of a student from the universiry for discip linary reasons . Thi s s u spension may be for various lengths of rime ranging from one semester to an indefinite period of rime. After the period of disciplinary suspension has expired , a student may apply in writing to have the notation on me student' s record r emoved. 6 . Recommend expulsion of a student from r h e universiry; notation o n me student' s record will be kept permanently. When a st udent is s u spe nd e d o r expelled for disciplinary reasons, an additio nal sanction ma y include being excluded from the Auraria campus. CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 44

40 / Our University, Our Campus 7. Take other actions, including bur nor limited to counseling , insuring th e violaror(s) provide(s ) compensation for theft or damage . an d/or p l aci n g stop on registration. Student(s) m u st be notified i n writing of the d i c i p l inar y action tak e n within five (5) days. REVIEW PROCEDURES A student may submit a request to review the recommendation of s u spensio n or expulsion by th e S tu dent D iscipl i n e Com m i t tee within seven (7) wo rkin g days to the Assoc i ate Vice C h ancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs. Except in cases involving the exercise of the power of summary suspension (see below ), the sanctions of suspension or expulsion for discip l inary r easo n s s hall be effective only after the administrative review b y the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and rudentAffairs has been exhausted or waived. T h e Associate V ice Chancellor for E n rollment a n d St u dent Affairs decisi o n s hall be in writing to the s rudent (s), with a copy to the tudent Discip l ine Committee. Copies of revi ew pro ce dures ma y be obtained from the Offi ce of the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment and Student Affairs. SUMMARY SUSPENSION Summary suspension is a suspe n sion from the univer s ity which begin s immediately upon not i ce from the appropriate un iversity official without a formal hearing b y the Srudent Discipline Committee. A hearing b efore the Student Discipline Committee is then sch e duled as soo n as p ossible ( usua l l y w i thin seve n cale n da r days) to dete rmin e the di s po s it i o n of th e case. Summary s uspensio n ma y also include a p hysical exclusion from the campus if deem e d n ecessary. The Chancel l o r and/or a Vice Chancellor or Associate Vice Chancellor has ( have) the a u thority to s u s p en d summaril y any st udent when in t h e ir opinion(s) such s u s pen s ion is n ecessar y to: 1. Maintain order on the campus. 2. Preserve the orderl y fu n ct ioning of the unive r sity. 3. top interference in any manne r with the pub lic or private rights of citizens o n CU-Denver/Auraria-owned or -controll e d prop erty. 4. Stop acti o n s that are th rea t e n i n g to th e h ealth or safety of any p e r o n . 5. Stop actio n s that are dest r oy i ng or damaging p r op e rty of th e CU-Denver/Auraria campus, it s s tudenrs, faculty, staff, or g uests. PERMANENT RECORD NOTATIONS While disc i p l i nary proceedings are pending or contemplated, a temporary h o l d m ay be p l aced on the s tud ent's aca d emic record . It will not b e release d unci! all actions and appeal procedures have been comp l eted or finalized b y the university. Only in those cases where s uspension , defe rred suspens ion, or permanent expulsion results from disciplinary action will n o t ations be p l ace d on t h e aca d em i c reco rd . RELEASE OF DISCIPLINA R Y INFORMATION Ac cess to a n y student' s academ i c transcript or d isci p l inary file shall b e governe d by provi s ions of the Family Educationa l Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Onl y the student charged or those university officials who h ave a legit i m a t e educatio nal inte r est i n d i sciplinary information may have access to th e files. All oth e r i n quir ies, i ncludi n g but not limited to employers, governmental agencies, news m e dia , friends, or Denver Police, must have a written release from the student to gain acces to u niv e rsity d isci p l inary files. Every effo rt will be made b y th e w1iversity to respect the privacy of the student. Howev e r , where the i dentity of the s tud ent has been publicl y disclosed in t h e n ews media, the u niversity reserves t h e r i ghr to res po n d as ir deems appropriate to descr i be fairly and accura t e l y th e dispo irian of disciplinary matters. CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 REFUND POLICY AFTER DISCIPLINARY AaiO N ubmission of registration m aterials obligates the student to p ay the assessed tuition a nd fees for that t er m . If a student is s u s pended or expell e d from t h e uni vers ity, th e amount of tuition/fees w hich would b e refw1ded may be the same as when a student voluntarily withdraws from a term. See the Tuition and Fees sect ion of this catalog or th e WCb Schedule Planner for more informacion. T h e official withdrawal date applicab l e for tuiti on/fee refund purp oses will be t h e dat e of th e Student Disciplin e Committee's decision. TRI-INSTITUTIONAL VIOLATION S Proce dure s in decidin g vio lation s of the Code of Student Conduct invo l v i ng s tud ents from oth er academic institutions on the Aura ria campu s have been develop ed b y CU-Den ver a nd the institution(s) invo lved. In s u ch cases, the Director of tudent Life sho uld b e contacted. Ethical Use of Computing of CU-Denver POLICY STATEMENT CU-Denver h o nor s the university-wide Information Technology Policie s . Access to and use ofCU-Denver's computing resources i s a privilege granted to members of th e U-Den ver community for scllo l ar ly, research, academic, a nd adm ini strative purposes. Computing r esources are defi n e d as facilities, equipment, syste ms, and personnel. Use of these reso urces includes World Wide Web pages, lis t servs, e-mail , application softwa re, and any othe r electronic communi cation. Members of the CU-D e nver communi ty who use computi ng r esources are exp ected tO do so i n a n effective, effi i ent, appropriate, ethical, and l egal manner. Use ofCU-Denver's computing r esources d e p e nd s up o n mutua l r e peer and cooperation to ensure that all members of the CU-Denve r community have e qual acces • privileges, privacy, and prot ect ion from interfe r ence and harassm ent. CU-Denver comp utin g resource s hall b e used in a manner consistent w ith t h e in s tru c tional , research, a nd ad mini s trative objectives of the academic community in general and w ith t h e purpose for which such use of r esources a nd facilities is int ended. All activ ities inconsistent with the e objectives are considere d to be inap propri ate and may jeopardize conrin ued use ofCU-Denver's compu ting resources. CU-Denver comp utin g resources are for th e use of au thorized indiv i dual s only and for use only in a manner consistent with eac h ind i vidual's authority. CU-Den ver's computin g r esource may not be use d in any manner in consistent wit h an individual's a uthority , prohibit e d b y licen es, contrac t s, university policies, or local, state , or federal law . o one may grant permission for inappropriate use of com pu ti n g resour ces, nor does th e a bility to p e rform inappropriat e actions co nstitut e permission to do so. U S E R AGREEMENT Each u se r ofCU-Denver com putin g resources is responsible for knowing and complying with all ap pli cable laws, policies, and pro cedures. CU-Denver reserves the right to moniror, record, and store computing acriviries of a nyone using co mputin g r esources. If suc h monitoring, recording , and storage reveals possible evid ence of inappropriate , un e thi cal, or illegal activity, computing syst em p ersonne l may provide t h e evi dence obtained from monitoring to appropriate university and civ i c a u thorities. A. Each user agrees to m ake a ppropri ate use of computing reso ur ces incl u ding, but not limit ed to: I. R especting the intended purpo es of computing resources, facilities, and equipment (for scholarly, research, academic, adm ini strative and CU-Denver-sponsored community service purposes). 2. Respecting th e stared purpose of compute r accounts (for scholarly. r esearch, academic, adminis tr ative, and CU-Denver-s pon sored

PAGE 45

community servi e purposes) and to use com purer accounts only for the specified rposes. 3. Respecting rhe di niry and privacy of other users. 4. R especting the in egriry of the systems. 5. Respecting there ource controls of the systems and appropr i a tel y m anaging use of i sk space. 6. R especting the pri ileges associated with having nerwork con n ectivity. 7. R especting all co yrighr protections. 8 . Following all Un i ers iry of Colorado and CU-Denver policies , and local , stare, d federal l aws related to computing . B. Each u ser agrees to efrain from inappropriate uses of compming resources, includin , bm not limited ro: 1. Using any other i dividual ' s computer account or password. 2. Inappropriate , u ethical, or illega l use of another individual ' s computer. 3. Using compurin resources , facilities, and equipment for personal commercial gain. 4. Inte ntionally see n g informatio n on, obtaining copies of, modifYing , or ra pering with files, r apes, passwords, or any rype of data belongin to other users unless specifically authorized to do so by those ot er users. 5. Using resources t develop or exec me programs that could harass other users, infilr ate the systems, damage or alter the sofrware components of rl e systems , or disrupt CU-Denver act ivities. 6. Violating any ne ork-related policy, whether set by rhe University of Colorado, CU Denver, or a nerwork governing body. 7. Altering or avoid ng accounting for the use of computing resources , faciliti s , and equipment. 8 . Making excess i v use of resources , controlled or otherwise. 9. Misrepresenring n e elf or others through e-mai l o r other electroni c comm nication . 10. Using, duplic ring , or distributing licensed sofrwa r e and documentatio without rhe express wrirren permission of the original co yrighr owner. I 1. Using unauth rized copies oflicensed software. 12. Abusing , hara sing , intimidating, threatening, talking, or discriminar n g against others through the use of compming re urces. 13. Sending obsc e, abusive, harassing, or threatening messages to any other i dividual. 1 4. Engaging in v ndalism or mischief that incapacitates, compromises, or destroys CU-Denver resources. E-Mail Policy There is an expand in reliance on electronic communication among students , faculry , staff and administration at the Univer iry of Colorado at Denver (CU-Denv r). Because of this increasing reliance on and accep tan ce of electro c communication, e-mail is considered an official means for communic tion within CU-Denver. Implementation of this po l icy ensures that sra , faculry, and st ud e nts h ave access to this critical form of communicati n. This e-mail policy ap lies to all owners ofCU-Denver e-mai l accounts . The use of electronic ail is considered a privilege, nor a right. The use ofCU-Denver e-mai l esources indicates an agreement ro abide by the policies ser forth. • O fficial Comm nication: E-mai l is an official means for commu nication within U-Denver. Therefore, CU-Denver has rhe right to send commun cations to srudents/staff/faculry via e-mail and the right to expect rh r those communi cations will be received and read in a timely fa hio . • P r i vacy: U-De ver enco ur ages the use of electronic mail and r espects the priv y of users. It does not routinely inspect, monitor, EthicaL Use of Computing / 41 or disclose electronic mail wirhour th e user ' s consenr. Nonetheless, subject ro the requirements for authorization, notification, and other co ndition s specified in this policy, CU-Denver may deny access to its electronic mai l services and may inspect , monitor, or disclose electronic mail (i) when required b y and consistent with law; (ii ) when there is substantiated reason to believe that violations of law or of campus policies have taken place; (iii) when there are time-dependent, crit i cal operational need s of University business if it i s determined r h ar the informat ion sought i s no t more readily avai l able by o t her means or ( iv) w h en there are compelling circumstances. • Incid ental Use: CU-Denver electronic mail services may be used for incidental personal purposes provided that such use doe s nor: (i) directly or indirectly interfere with the campus operation of computing facilities or electronic mail services; (ii) burden the camp u s with noti cea ble i n cre m e ntal cost; or ( iii ) interfere w i th rhe e-mai l u ser ' s employment or other obligatio n s to the University. Emai l records arising from s uc h per onal use may, however , be s ubject to the presumption of a University E-mail Record. E-mail u ers sho uld assess the implicat i ons of this pres u mption in their decision to use CU-Denver electronic mail serv ices for personal purposes. • Gen e ral P reca uti o ns: • Users are to take precaution s to prevent the un a uthorized u se of e-mai l account pas swo rds. Passwo rds are not to be shared w irh others and their confidentiality is to be strictly maintained. o one i s to use another individual ' s account, unless shared rights have been designated at the serve r l evel. • E-mail accounts are assigned a disk quota on the e-mail serve r that can only be increased based on val id business justificat i on. • When an individual's affi l iation with CU-D enver ends, t he individual' s e-mail acco unt will rema in active no longer t h an 30 days be yon d the date of terminatio n . ASSIGNMENT OF E -MAIL ADDRESSES • Students : The e-mail address recorded in th e Student Information System will be the offic ial e-mail address of record for communication with s tudents. Compu t ing, I n formation, and erwork Services (CIN ) will initiall y ass i gn all students a CU-Denver e-mai l address and it will be recorded in the smdent information system. Smdenrs may use this address, or choose a n e-ma i l address that they will update on th e Student Information System robe the official e-mai l address of university record ro which the u n i versity will send e-mail communica tion s . If a student chooses an e-mail address other t h an the assigned CU-Denver e-mail (i.e., @aol.com, @ h otmail.co m , or an address on a departmental server suc h as @ceo.c udenver.edu ), o r has e-mail in the CU-Denver assig ned account electronically redirected to another e-mail addre s, they do so at their own risk. The univ ersity will nor b e responsible for the handling of e-mail b y outside vendors or by departmental servers, and using r h em doe s not absolve a s tude n t from the respo n s i bilitie s associate d with communication sent ro his or her officia l e-m ail address as recorde d in the St udent Informat i on y tern. • Fac ulty an d S t aff: E-mail services are extended for the sole use of CU-Denver faculry, staff, and other appropriately a uthorized users to accomp lish tasks related ro and consistent with the campus mission. All suc h users will be given a Microsoft Exchange e-mail account to be used as their officia l CU-Den ver em ail acco u nr. CINS will maintain no other email servers for u se b y facu lry and staff. Anyone electing to use a third-parry account as their primar y e-mai l account may do so b y forwarding aU e-mail from the official Exc h a nge account to the desired acco unr. lr is rhe responsibility of the u er to perform the e-mail forwarding. E-mail Address : The firstname.lastname@cudenver. edu naming convention i s rhe official un i vers i ty address. Thi s address represe nts a permanent e-mail alias that directs e-mail ro your official e-mai l acco u nr. CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 46

42 / Our University, Our Campus EXPEGATIONS REGARDING STAFF/FACULTY USE OF E-MAIL Stud ems, staff, and faculty are expected ro check their official e-mai l address on a frequent and consisrenr basis in order to stay currenr with university communications . Srudenrs, staff and faculty have the responsibility to recognize that certain communications may be time critical. " ! didn ' t check m y email ," error in forwarding mail, or e-mail returned to rhe university with " Mailbox Full " or " User Unknown " are nor acceptable excuses for missing university communications sent via e-mail. EDUCATIONAL USE OF E-MAIL Faculty will determine how e-mail will be used in their classes. If faculty h a ve e-mail requiremenrs and expectations, they should specifY these requirements in the course syllabus. Faculty may make the assumption that srudenrs ' official e-mail addresses are being accessed, and faculty may use e-mail for their co urses accordingly. ACCESS TO/DISCLOSURE OF E -MAIL Individuals needing to access the electronic mail communications of others, rouse information gained from such access , and/or to disclose information from such access and who do not have the prior consent of the user must obtain approval in advance of such activity from rhe appropriate camp u s authority. To obtain approval, the requesror must fill out the form "Request roAccess Elecrronic Communications of Others " and obtain rhe appropriate signatures. Conrenrs of electronic communications obtained after appropriate authorization may be disclosed without the permission of rhe employee. Ar rhe same rime, CU-Denver will arrempr ro refrain from disclosure of parti cular messages if disclosure co uld create personal embarrassment, unless such disclosure is required to serve a business purpose or satisfY a legal oblig a tion . MICROSOFT EXCHANGE DISTRIBUTION LISTS Exchange e-mai l distribution lists should ONLY be used for elecrronk messages being sent to less than 100 people. Larger volumes of distribution should be handled through l isrservs or other e-mail too ls. BROADCAST E-MAIL E-mail can be sent to the entire campus only by the C hanc ellor or designee . E-mail can be sent to an entire school or college on l y by a ppr oval of the Dean. This includes faculty and/or staff and/or srudenr popul ations. LISTSERVS PostExpress: Staff and faculty are encouraged ro subscribe ro PostE x press, the official CU-De nver campus usrserv. This list is moderated by the Office of Marketing Communications and is distributed twice a week. E-mail yo ur message ro postexpress@cudenver.edu for posting. General Listservs: Computing , Information, and Nerwork Services m aintains a server for hosting lisrservs for rhe purpose of conducting univ ersity business. A listserv may be created upon request. Each lisrserv requires a designated 'owner' ro perform the administrative duties of rhe list. Arrachments are allowed. Lisrservs may be setup for any number of recipients; however , they are s tron gly enco urag ed for e-mail being sent to more than 100 recipients. MASS E-MAIL DISTRIBUTION (NON-LISTSERV) Mass e-mail is defined as any non lisrserv mailing intended for delivery to more than 100 recipients. Ir shou ld be targeted ro people who would reasonabl y expect ro receive e-mail from you. CINS reserves the righ r ro terminate a mass e-mail submission if policies are nor followed or the e-mail has a negative imp act on rhe camp u s computing nerwork . Academic C l assroom Use: Faculty sending e-mail to more than 100 CU-Den ver Catalog 2004-05 students are encouraged ro do so via a lisrserv or through Blackboard. If neither of these is an option , faculty sendi ng e-mail ro more rhan 100 srudenrs sho uld do so before 7 a.m. and after 5 p.m. ro reduce rhe burden on rhe nerwork during business hours. Senders are e ncour aged ro notifY CINS in advance of sending this type of e-mail so that iris nor mistaken for an arrack on rhe nerwork. General Use: Mass e-mail being senr ours ide of an insrrucror/srudenr relationship falls under chis category. This e-mail MU T be approved by the appropriate Vice Chancellor. lr cannot b e larger than 50K in size. No attac h ments are allowed. These messages should be very brief If the communication is larg er than the 50K limit , the ender s hould place iron a web page and refer rhe reader ro the web addres s within the message. The sender MUST notifY CI S before sending this type of e-mail ro coordinate an acceptable mailing time schedule that will have the least imp act on the campus nerwork and ensure that the mailing is nor m i s tak en for a nerwork arrack. ARCHIVING CU-Denver does nor mainrain central or distribut e d electronic mail archives of all elecuonic mail sent or received. Electronic mail is normall y backed up on l y to assure system integrity and reliability, nor ro provide for furure retrieval, although back-ups may at rimes serve the larr er purpose incidentally. Operators ofCU-Denver electronic mai l services are nor required by this policy ro retrieve e-mail from such back-up facilities upon rhe holder ' s request , although on occasion they may do so as a courtesy . SPECIAL ACCOUNTS Students: Students may request administrative e-mail accounts for use within the scope of their CU-Denver empl oyment. All students requesting such an account must obtain sponsorship from their full-cime staff or faculty supervisor. Groups : Group accounts may be created for the convenience of academic or administrative units. A full-time staff or faculty member must be designated as being responsible for the account and its use. Guests: Guest accounts are avail ab l e at the discretion of the C hancellor or designee. R e tir ees: Retirees must submit a request for ongoing e-mail accounts upon their retirement from CU-Denver. Retirees will be prompted by e-mai l for annual renewals. Alurnni: CU-Denver does nor provide e-mail accounts for alumni. MISUSE CU-D enver e-mail services shal l not be used for purposes that could reasonab l y be expected ro cause, directly , or indirectly , strain on any computing facilities, or inrerference with others ' use of e-mail or e-mail systems, or interference with University business. Such uses include , bur are nor limited to, the use of e-mail services ro: • Send or forward chain letters. • " Spam" (rhar is, ro exploit lis rservs or s imilar systems for the widespread distribution of inappropriate mail ). • "Letter-bomb " (that is, to r esend the same e-mail repeatedly to one or more recipients). VIOLATIONS Any vio l ations of the poli cy s hould be referred ro the appropriate university official . Sanctions for violation of rhis policy may includ e suspe n s ion or revocation of e-mail privileges , s u spension or revocation of computing access privileges , and any other san ctions permitted under the University Guidelines. Violations oflaw may also be referred for criminal or civil prosecution. Concerns about fiscal misconduct or criminal activity sho uld nor be investigated by unauthorized individuals or individual depart m ents bur s hould b e r eferred ro AHEC Police or Internal Audit staff in acco rdance with the University Adminisrrative Policy titled "Repo rtin g Fiscal Misconduct. "

PAGE 47

PROCEDURES The Academic an d dministrarive Informati on Techno l ogy Committee will overse and make recommendations for revi s i on of this policy as needed. hanges will be authorized by the approval of the IT Policy Council ITPC) and rhe Chancellor. RESPONSIBLE ORGANIZA ON The ITPC is respon ible for the maintenance and enforcement of rhis po licy. REFERENCE DOCUMENTS • All use of e-mail, ncluding use for sensitive or confidential information , will e consisrenrwith the Universiry Administrative Policy Statement n Use of Electronic E-mail. ee http://www. cusys. e u / policies/GeneraUe-mail.html • Confidentialiry r garding student records i s prorecred under rhe Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA). All use of e-mail, eluding use for sensitive or confidential information , mus be consistent with FERPA. World Wide Web Po icy Access to the World Wide Web (WWW) and rhe abiliry to create web pages on CU-De ver computing systems are privileges provided to members of the C Denver communiry. CU-Denver users musr conduct their acrivirie in a courteous and professional manner. I. Servers Computing, and Network Services (CINS) supports and maintain s designa ed WWW servers for general campus u sage. All web servers conne ed to rhe Internet through CU-Denver networking are robe r gisrered with the CU-Denver Webmasrer, webmaster@carbon.cu enver.edu. This includes all web servers located outside of the CINS d parrment. The WWW Policy applies to all web serv ers using CUDen eras the I nrerner Service Provider (ISP). II. Individual Pages Appropriate use p licie s for CU-Denver computer accounts also apply to individual ho e pages . Indiv i duals who create home pages are responsible for to the foLlowing guidelines: A. Individual home papes are encouraged for the following purposes : 1. Presenting perso al non-commercial information (resumes, family , ere.). 2. Experimenting ith availab l e web technologies an d authoring tools. 3. Publishing and c!fsseminaring academic work. 4. Linking to cultu1al, scientific, or historical sires. 5. Posting announlmenrs, news bulletins , and other general informa on. B. Individual home p ges may nor be pur to inappropriate uses, wh i c h include, bur re nor limited to: I . Use of copyright d materials in any form without rhe express written permissi n of the original copyright owner . 2. Personal , comm9rcial uses that couJd result in a financial benefit for the owner or his/her associates. 3. Use of audio, im ges (i.e., photographs, paintings , or derivatives thereof), videos, r movies of ind i viduals wirhour their express written consent. 4. Use of any information that i s nor public record pertaining ro other individJals without their express written permission. 5. Use of any imag or data rhar are abusive, obscene, harassing , threatening, or 'sc riminarory. 6. Use of any imag or data that v iol ate other Universiry of Colorado or CU-Denver p l icies (e.g., Sex ual Harassment Policy) o r local , s rare, or federal! ws. Web Publishing Policies/ 43 7 . Creation of direct h y pertext links to abusive, obscene, harassing, threatening, or discriminator y material. 8. Use of mare rials whose n ature or volume compromise rhe abiliry of the system to serve other user s' documen rs and web pages. 9. Any use rhar constitutes aca demic dishonesry . 10. Use of individual home pages to engage in illegal acr iviry . ill. Departmental WWW Pages Appropriate use policies for CU-Denver computer accounts also appl y to departmental web pages . All deparrmenral web pages a r e ex peered to ad h ere to the CU-Denver Authoring Standards . A. Deparrmenral pages are encouraged for the following purposes: 1. Disseminating general departmental information (goals, office hours, point of contact, ere.) . 2. Highlighting departmenral programs or activities. 3. Introducing faculry or staff and/or hyperlinkin g ro their personal pages. B. Departmental pages may nor be pur to inappropriate uses , which include, bur are nor limited to: 1. Use of copyrighted materials in any form without the express writte n permission of the original copyright owner. 2. Personal , commercial use s which could result in a financial benefit for the page owner or his/her associates. 3. Use of a udi o, images (i.e., photographs, paintings, or derivatives thereof), videos , or movies of individuals without th e ir express wr itt en consent. 4. Use of any personal information that is nor public record pertaining to other individuals wirhour their express written p er mission. 5. Use of any images or data that are abusive, obscene , harassing , threatening, or discriminatory. 6. Use of a n y images or data rhar vio l ate other Univer siry of Colorad o or CU-Denver policies (e.g. , Sexual Harass ment Policy) or local, stare, or federal laws. 7 . Creation of direct h y pertext links to abus ive, obscene, harassing , threatening , or discriminatory material . 8. Use of materials whose nature or volume compromise rhe abiliry of the system to serve other u sers' documents and web pages. 9. Any use th at constitutes academic dishonesry. 10. Use of departmental pages ro engage in illegal acriviry. WEB PUBLISHING POLICIES This policy provides guidance on web publishing ar CU-Denver. lr applies to all faculry , staff, srudenrs , a nd admi ni strators, all users of CU-Denver web servers, and all co nrr acrs with external vendors to ho st or develop websires for CU Denver. CU-Denver reserves the right to change this policy ar any rime . CU-Denver is accountable to rhe taxpa yers of Colorado for proper use of irs web pages. web page content presents an im age of CU-Denver to the world. Therefore, official CU-Denver pages musr undergo th e same sc rutin y a nd careful preparation given to any other form of official uni versiry publication. 1 . Web publishing must be done on CU-Denver ap pro ved web servers. CINS wi.ll maintain a lisr of tho se servers. Any web page utilizing rhe CU-Den ver servers is subject to CU-Denver web policies . 2. Web publi shing should b e u se d excl u sively for CU-Den ver business. CU-Denver's web publishing resources shal l be used in a manner co n sistent w ith the instructional, research, creative acr i v iry, outreac h, and administ r ative objectives of t h e CU-Denver communiry in genera l and with the purpose for which such use was intended. All activ ities inconsistent wirh these objectives are considered to be inappropriate and may jeopardize continued use ofCU-Denver's web publi s hing resources. To be au thori zed to use CU-Denver's web publishing resources, people must agree ro the following: 2.1 CU-Den ver web r esources must be used for universiry purposes and be cons istent with the goals and objectives CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 48

44 / Our University, Our Campus of CU-Denver. Using CU-Denver web resources , for examp le, in co n s ultin g for a bu siness, runnin g a business, or u sing an e mployee's tim e to achi eve a bu s in ess' objective i s a mis use of s t are r esources. 2.2 These web re ources shall nor b e used for any illegal activity or any activity prohibited by uni versity/ CU-Denver policy , rul e or regulation. 2.3 Web publishing that interferes with the conduct of CU-Denver business is prohibited. 2.4 These web re o ur ces s hal l nor b e used ro r ecognize co rp orate support, or includ e advert i s ing , fund raising, ore-commerce without the prior approval of the Chancellor. 3 . Hosting Affuiared Organizations and Acknowledging Partnerships 3.1 Hosting non-campus websires. 3.1.1 P e r sonal we b s ires may nor ho st p ages for organizations or for individuals other than rhe ow ner. 3.1.2 Official units of rhe cam pu s may , wit h prior written approval from the Chancellor or designee , hosr webs ires for educational and nonprofit organizat i ons affiliated with CU-Denver as long as the can1pus's role and participation are acknow l e dg ed. 3.1.3 The above restrictions are limit ed ro " ho s ting" websi res and are nor intended to pr event official units of the campus or personal websires from provi din g information o n conferences, events, or activities of affiliated or u n affiliated organizations provided that information is intended ro adva nce the campus's reaching, research a nd service mission. 3.2 Acknowledging Partn e r s hips. Official CU-D enver websires may acknow l edge business partnerships rhar assist CO Denver in ach ievin g irs mission. Ack nowl edgement may include using a link ro the corporate h omepage. Advertisements for or endo r sements of products and services are prohibited. 4. Po l itical Activity Using web resources for any partisan political activ ity , s u c h as supporting a particular candidate for any elective office or a particular position on an issue before the voters of any jurisdictio n , is strictly prohibit e d by Col orado law. 5. Privacy CU-Denver webs ires may on l y collect p e r so n ally ide ntifi ab l e inform atio n about v i sirors under rhe following circums tances: I ) a visitor chooses ro m ake suc h info rmati o n available ro th e we b s ite; 2) the website requires authorized and a uth enticated access. If a visiror provides a n y per so nal information ro a website, CU-Denver will nor sell rhar information ro a n y comm erc ial entities. CU-Denver web servers may a utomatically recognize certain non per sonal information, such as volume and timin g of access, int ernet domain, and IP address fro m which the website was accesse d. An y information collected b y a websit e musr be h a ndl ed in a marm er permirred b y law. 6 . Copyright Written permission must be ob t ained from the copyr ight holder an d kept on file, whe n ever necessary , for the use of any a nd all copyrighted mat er ials not belonging ro the University of Color ado or to a faculty memb er utilizing his/ h er ow n m aterial. Copyr i ght permission may b e ne cessary nor onl y for rexr bur in some instance s also for photographs , g r aphics, a udio , video, compi l ed statistics, graphs, or otherw i se, as well as for mirrored websites. However , copyrighted materials that are in the publi c domain o r th a r may be used within " fair u se" g uidelines may be di splayed as permitted. Responsibility for obtai nin g permissions and maint aining appropriate documentation resides with rhe web p age author. Approp riat e copyright n o rices or ow n ers hip credits mu st be CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 prominentl y displayed . Access ro copyrig hted mat erial must comply wit h tl1e conditions granting u sage or the lic e nse . Individual s with questions about the use of copyrighted material ma y contact rhe Office ofUniversity Counsel. 7. Use of University Name and Marks T h e nam e " University of Colorado" or name s for the CU System campuses, the co mmercial seal, wordmark, official CU logo ( interlocking CU ima ge), CU-Bou ld er athletic program symbol (buffalo) and other official a nd sp irit marks ( CU in the City) are among the words and sym bo l s licensed by the Un i versity of Colorado. The CU Office of Licensing Programs promotes and protects the use of rhe university' s name a nd identifying marks. University marks a r e registered in th e Stare of Colorado, at the U.S. Parent and Trademark Office, and internat i onally. This ensures protection of the integri ty of tl1ese m arks. Commercial use is restricted, and requests to us e these marks for any purpose must be made to the U Office of Licensing Programs. 8. Personal Web Pages Facu lty, staff , and students may create and maintain a personal web page on the CU-Denver website. A personal web page is th e respons ib ility of irs author and CU-Denver accepts no responsibility for the content of personal web pages. The following disclaimer musr a ppe a r explic itl y ar the top of all pages on which a lis r of personal web pages appears: The content ofpersonal web pages is not in any way an official publication of the University of Colorado at Denver. Neither the contents of the personal web pages nor the linked pages have been reviewed or endorsed by the University ofCowrado at Denver. The statements and opinions included in personal web pages are those of the authors only. Any statements and opinions included in personal web pages are NOT those of the Board of Regents, the University of Colorado, the University ofColomdo at Denver, or any department within the University of Colorado at Denver. The contents of personal web pages themselves, and/or of material accessed via links to other web pages, may contain material that some people may find offensive. Ifyou believe that you might be offended by the contents of personal web pages, you should not access personal web pages. 9 . Domain Name Usage CU-Denver uses rhe domain of www .cudenver.edu. All official campus webs ires, including those of colleges, departm ents, divisions , or other fiscal or operating unir s of rhe camp u s, as well as facu lty or staff performing CU-Denver funcrions, must use cudenver . edu. Exceptions may be granted by the Chancellor or designee. For page s hosted on the official campus web server(s) , a subdomain alias ma y b e establishe d via a request to CINS (i.e., admissions.cudenver.edu). Alternate Hosting: Any official CU-Denver campus web pages serve d through a hosr other than rhe official campus web server(s) (www.cudenver.edu) must be approved by the Chancellor or de s ignee. 10. Document Retention Document retention i s governed b y Colorado law and University of Colorado policy. 11. Accessibility In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Amer i cans with Disabilities Act, and University of Colorado non discrimination policies, all electronic publications must be made reasonabl y accessible to peopl e with disabilities. CI Swill maintain benchmarks for measuring accessibility . 12 . Policy Compliance Interpretation of this Poli cy Anyone who has a question abour the interpretation of rhis policy, or whether so m e use of web publi s hing is permirred, s hould consult with the U-Denver Web master. Anyone who di agrees with the CU-Denver Web master's inte rpr etation of this poli cy or decision whethe r web publishing conforms ro tl1is policy may a ppeal in writi n g ro r h e Chancellor or designee.

PAGE 49

R esponsi bili ty for Co pliance wi th thi s Poli cy Supervi or are resp nsible for ensur in g that web author under their direction comply ith this policy . CU-Denver may empl oy technical means , or in iture other reasonable procedures, ro identify web publishing that fa I to comply with this policy. R eporting on-Com lia n ce Allegation of nonmpliance with this policy should be reponed ro the CU-Denver We Proc edures for Han
PAGE 50

46/ Our University. Our Campus 4. The Chair of the CU-Denver WWW ommirree will appoinr a rhree-person subcommittee of rhe WWW Committee ro review th e case . Two m e mb e r s of rhe s ub committee musr be selec t e d from th e membership of rhe WWW Commirree. The hair may select the rhird member from the WWW Committee or from Facu l ty Assemb ly, raffCouncil , or rhe Associa t ed rudenrs. 5. After cons ultin g wirh rhe alleged violator and with the Web mas t er, the subcommittee will determine (a) if a policy vio l ation has occurred, and (b) if a policy violat i on has been found , whar actio n should be taken ro remedy rhe policy vio l ation. Consequences of Policy Violations Violations ofCU-Denver Computing Policies may result in disciplinary action, including , bur nor limited ro, suspension of access ro rhe WWW, suspension of e-mail privileges , suspension of computing privileges, s usp e n sion or expu l s ion from rhe uni versity , s u spension or termination of employment, imp ositio n of fines, and referral for l ega l action. The U-De n ver WWW Committee may recommend ro rh e Director of tudenr Life rhar a s rud enr be suspended o r expelled from rhe university, or ro the appropriate appointing authority that an e mpl oyee be suspended or terminated . The WWW ommirree may impose all other sanctions specified above . Computing, Information, and Network Services Computing, Information, and etwork ervices (Cl S) supports computer and network use for borh rhe academic and administrative STUDENT SERVICES Academic Advising Center Office: North lassroom 1503 Phone: 303-352-3520 Web: http:!! thunder 1. cudenver. edulaacl Dire ctor: Peggy Lore Advi sors: Alan C hri stenson imol H en h e r y l Kaas Kelli Stevens Academic adv i sing is rhe foundation of a successful college experience a nd an important componenr in both choosing a major and career plann ing. This office serves as the first poinr of contact for students who are pre-business, pre-engineering , or who have n o r declared a major in rhe College of Liberal Arts and cie n ces or rhe College of Arts & Media.ln a ddition, the cenrer provides general information and r esource referral ro all students. ew freshmen a nd rransfer srudenrs will be as igned an advisor w ho will meer wir h them every semes t er to plan a schedule, discuss acade mi c support services and assist wirh r eferrals ro orher o n -campus r esou rces. Frequent co nr acr wirh an adviso r is enco ur aged. Career Center Office: Tivoli Srudenr Union, uire 260 Telephone: 303-556-2250 Website: http://careers.cudenver.edu Direct or: Lissa Gallagher The Career Cenr e r offers a full array of services thar prepare st ud ents for career uccess. Students are e n couraged to participate in careerCU-Dwver Catalog 2004--05 com munities at CU-Denv e r . All centralized administrative systems are developed, maintained, an d pro cesse d by University Management Syste m s in Bould e r , with output pro cess ing a nd user support pro vided by C INS in D enver. T h e D e nver cam pus mainrain s a co mmunication s network with more than 2,500 co nn ec tions. This network provide s access ro all campus mini co mputer s and connection ro rhe Aurari a Library Online Informacion ysre m , the World Wide Web, and rhe lnrerner. There are more rhan 2,50 0 per so nal computers located on rhe campus in 21 r eachi ng l a boratories, two public labs, individual laboratories , and in offices. C!N m aintai n s rhe campus World Wide Web, where information is kept for reference b y students, faculty, staff, a nd orhers inte r ested i n CU-Denver. T h e ClN Help Desk pr ovide assistance to students, faculty, and s t aff. T h e H elp D esk techni c ian s m aintai n per so nal computer s and are avail ab l e ro assi s r with hardwar e and software planning and install atio n , acqui s itions, Internet conne c tivity, troubleshooting , and general qu estions. T h e C INS staff operates a nd maintains campus mini computers, releco mmuni carions eq uipm ent, and rwo of rhe CU-Denver computing l a b ora tories. T hese l a boratories pro vide students wirh access to Macintosh and Jnrel-based p e r so n a l compute r s a nd softwa re as w ell as access to th e camp u s network and mini computers. The goal of CINS is ro assi s t all member s of rhe CU-Denver community in u s ing computing as an effective roo ! in rheir work. For further infor mation, call rhe Cl SHelp D esk at 303-556-6100. related pro grams an d services as early as freshm an year r o begin plannin g their ca r eers and gain rhe skills a nd experie nces rhe y n eed to be successful upon graduation. CAREER PLANNING SERVICES Career counselors can help you decide on a m ajor; assess srrengrhs, inreresrs a nd values through caree r resting; r esearc h options; c hoose a caree r dir ec tion ; and pr e par e for your job search . INTERNSHIP AND COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM Enrich your s tudies , gain hands -o n experience in your field of s tud y w hil e earnin g aca d e mic credit and/or pay, and maximize your employ ment potential ar g r aduat ion by participating in internships and cooper ative e du cation. EMPLOYMENT SERVICES Connect wirh employe r s thro ugh the Career Center's em plo ymenr programs and serv ices : • onlin e jo b postings and resume referral s • on-campus interviews • car eer fairs • n e tworkin g eve nr s Pre-Collegiate Programs Programs offere d b y rhe Cente r for Pre-Collegiate Programs serve ro morivare high sc hool studenrs ro purs u e post-second ary e ducation and provide rhe m rhe academic skills ne cessary to be s u ccess ful in rh eir co llege e nd eavo rs. The cenrer i s l ocated in NC 2204,303-556-2322.

PAGE 51

PRE-COLLEGIATE D EVELO MEN T PROGRAM The Preolleg i are evelopment Program is a systemwide institu tionally fund ed e nh a n cement program for hig h sc hool tudents. l r is des i gne to morivare a nd prepare high sc h oo l stud e nt s who are fir r generario and from a n und e rr e pr esented g r o up in high er education ro com pier high schoo l o n a rimely basis. T h e primary focus of the program is to pr pare youth (g r a des 9-1 2) for professional careers of spec ific interest ro em . The program includes acade mi c advisi n g (by parents and guid ce counselor working together) r ega rding hi gh sch oo l co u r e selecrio s that will best help studen t s attain th e ir desir e d career objective . In a clition , during t h e academic year, st ud e nts will rake parr in releva r Saturday Academies in basic study skills, interpersonal skills dcv l opment , and topics related to student preparation for the 21 sr century. B tween rheir sophomore and junior years, stu d ents will participate in a tw -week session d esigned to enhance sru d y and libr ary r e earch kills, nd provide a thorough introduction to college p l acement exams an d reer fields. Between rheir junior and seni o r years, students will art nd a five-week aca d em i cal l y inte n se ummer Academic Program. S dents will experience univer ity lif e on a first hand basis and en han e their secondary school academics by r aking cou r ses designed to au menr high schoo l academic requirements (e.g., mathematics, sci n ces , writi ng, com purer cience, social sciences . ) rud ents also enroll in a three-credit college co ur e. CU-DENVER SCHOLARS P OGRAM This is an early coli ge enrollment program for college-bound , high achievi n g students, fir r generation and/or from an underrepresented gro up in higher educa i o n , who are e nroll ed in their sen ior yea r of high sc hool. The program n ab les student to b egin their college s tudie s by raking one course a t U-Denver during the f all term of rheir senior yea r in high school. The c r dir earned in the co ur e can be a ppli e d toward a bachelor ' s degree. Wh l e enrolled in rhe program , students participate in monthly workshop designed ro acclimate them ro rhe university and prepare them for ollege study . Center for leornin Assistance The Center for Lea ningAssistance is designed to promote student succes in the acade c sening. Avail able ro CU-Denver undergraduate and graduate students services include Eng l ish as a second l anguage and study skills courses, r oring, srudy strategies seminar , p ee r a d vocacy, a rest file, co n su lt ing, nd a minority r eso ur ce lib rary. First-generation college student may e eligible for inte n s ive serv i ces throu g h rhe Student upporr erv ces and Ronald E. Me air federal g rant programs wi thin the center. T h cente r is located in C 2006, 303-556-2802. Tutoring. Free ruto ing is available in many subject areas ( orne limitations apply). T u oring is held on weekdays and evenings. Sc h e dul ed turoring is " ! able Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m.-7 p.m., a nd Friday, 8 a.m . ! .m . Open lab tutoring i availab l e Monday through Thursday, 8 .m.-7 p.m., and Friday, 8 a . m. 1 p.m. Seminars. Srudy sr r r egie semi n ars are provided on s u c h topics as c riti ca l thinking, rim srress management, t esr anxiety/rest raking, essay w riting, srudy sr aregies, acrive r ead ing , learning sty les, and lisrening/nore raking . Consulting. Acade i c, financial aid, and personal co n s u l ring are ava ilable. P eer advoca y i s avai l ab l e ro stude nts elig ibl e for the tudent Support Service Pro ram. Library. The cenre maintain a smal l periodical and book collection authored by, and/or a our, minorities; these resource are avai l able for srudent research and I isure. Courses. ourses a r l offe r ed in a s mal l g r oup format in th e a r eas of co lle ge s ur vival skills, ntroducrio n ro word pro cessi ng, English as a Support Organizations and Operations/ 47 second language, problem so lving, and Excel. ee cour e de criprion section in this catalog for derailed information on course . ENGL 100 6-3. Reading for peakers of Other Languages. ENGL 100 7-3. Composition for peakers ofOrher Lang u ages[. ENGL 1008-3. Composition for peakers of Other Lang u ages II. ENGL 1009-3. Advanced E L Writing Skills. T K 0 7 05-1. Problem olving. STSK 0707-1. College urvival kills. ST K 0708-1. Introduction ro Word Processing. T K 08001 . R esea r c h Proces for ESL Students. T K 0801-1. Communi cation kills for E L rudents. T K 0802-1. Advanced Academic Reading kill for ESL. STSK 0803-1. peech Presentation for ESL. ST K 0804-1. Listening and Note-raking for ESL rudents. T K 0806-1. Srudy Skills forE L rudents. TSK0810-I to3.Topics. STS K 08 1 1 -1. Excel. STSK 0820-1. Social Science Partner h i p for ESL. SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS AND OPERATIONS American Indian Student Services The American Indi an Student erv i ces program provides access and educationa l opportunities to American Indian students through specialized recruitment and r etention efforts. The program prov ides academic ad v i ing, scho l ars hip information , cultural programs , advocacy, student organization sponsorship , and other supportive services t ailored ro th e specific n ee d s of the students. America n Indi a n Student Services a l so ser ves as a resource to th e campus, providing c urr e nt information on issues a nd conce rn s of th e American Indi a n community . T h e office is located in orth Classroom 2013,303-556-2860. Asian American Student Services Asian American tudenr Services provide academic advising , sc hol ar hip inform at ion , c ultur a l programs, a d vocacy, a nd student l ea d ers hip d eve lopment. upporrive services are r ailored to meet rhe specific needs of students. Asi an American tudent ervices also serves as a resource ro the campus and community, prov iding c urrent information on issues and co n cerns of Asian American . The office i s l ocate d in Nord1 C l assroom 20 1 4, 303-556-2578. Associated Students of the University of Colorado ot Denver (ASCUD) The Associated rudents of the Univer ity of Colorado ar Denver (A CUD) serves as a voice for students and provide s activities and services nor normally offere d to stud ents under the formal univers i ty s tru cture . ASCU-Denver ass i s t s students w irh information co ncernin g sr ud en r clubs and organ i zat i o ns, campus events, issues concern ing st udent stat us, and other information of ge n era l inrere t r o stu d ents. ASCU-Den ver also provides students a si ranee wit h grieva n ces a nd the opportunity to become m o r e closely involved with the university community, thro u g h active p articipatio n i n student government itself, or throug h ervice on university, tri -instir utional, and AH EC commit tees. More i nformation co n ce rnin g ervices a nd act ivities can be obtaine d in the rudent Government Offices , Tivoli rudent Union, Room 301, 303-556-2510. Block Student Services The Black tudent Services program provides access, educat ion a l opportunities, and information ro stu d ents of African d escent t h rough spec i alized r ecr uitm ent and retention efforrs. The program provides CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 52

48 / Our University, Our Campus academic advising, scholarship information, cultural programs, advocacy, student organization sponsorship, and other supportive service tailored to the specific needs of the s tudents. Black Student Services also serves as a resource to the campus, providing current informatio n on issue s and concerns affecting the communi ty of Africans in America.The office is l ocated in onh Classroom 20 I 0 , 303-556-270 l. Hispanic Student Services The Hi s panic S tud ent Services program provides access and educa tional opportunities to Hi spanic students through s peci alized r ecr uitment and retenrion efforrs. The program provides academic advising , schola r s hip informacion, cu ltural programs, advocacy, s tudenr organization sponso r ship, and other s upportiv e services tailored to the specific needs of the students. Hispanic Student Services also serves as a resource co the camp us, providin g current information on issues and concerns of the Hispanic community. The office is located in orth Classroom 2012, 303-556-2777. Clubs and O rganizations This is only a sampling of clubs recognized in the past and i s not nec essarily c urrent. ACM Computin g Club American Institut e of Architectu r e Srudents American Marketing Association American Planning Associatio n American Society of Civil E n gineers American Soc i ety of Landscape Architecture American Society of Mechanical Engineers Anthropology C lub Art Club Association of B l ack Srudents Aurari a French Club Auraria Transnational Student Association Beta Alpha Omega (Co unseling/Education) Beta Alpha Psi (Accounting Honor Society ) Beta Gamma Sigma (Business Honor Society) ChiEpsiwn Chinese tudent Association College Republicans CSPA-Colorado ociety for Personnel Administration CU Venture Network-Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs Equiponderance Pre-Law C lub Etta Kappa Nu Feminist Alliance Financial Managemenr Association GSPA Association Golden Key National Honor Society HASOHealth Administratio n Srudent Organization IBSA-International Business Student Assoc i atio n Indian Student Organization Institute of E l ectrical and E l ec tronics Engineers International S tudent Organization Kappa Delta Pi M.E.C.H.A. Master of Social Sciences C lub MBNMS Association (G raduate Business ) Model United Nations Conference Organization The Robert E. Moore Collegiate Chapter of the American Marketing Association ational Society of Black Enginee r s Native American Studenr Organization Phi Alpha Theta (Hiscory) Phi Chi Theta ( Busines s/Eco nomics ) Philo sophy Club Pi Tau Sigma Psi Chi (Psyc ho l ogy) CU-Denver Catawg 2004-05 Russian Culture & Language Cl ub Sigma Iota Epsiwn (Management Honor Society ) Sigma Tau Delta (English) SAS-Society of Accounting Students Society ofWomen Engineers Student Associatio n of Musicians TatJ Beta Phi (Engine e ring) Vietnamese S tud ent Organization CU-Denver Student and Community Counseling Center The CU-Denver Student an d Community Counseling Center p ro vides services at no charge to st ud ents for personal, relations hip and mental h ealth concerns through individual, coup les, family a nd group counsel ing, stress management, alcohol and drug prevention, and crisis intervention. If a client's needs are such rhat they would benefit more from a n alternative form of cou n seling or therapy , appropriate referrals will be m ade to communi ty-based professionals . A l so, by request, staff provide consultatio n , l ectures an d wo rksh ops to srudent, faculty and staff groups , clubs, and classes on diversity, mental health topics , organizational and student developmenr issues. The CU Denver Student and Community Counseling Center is located in the orth C l assroom Building, Room 4036. Call303-556-4372 or visit our website at www.cudenver.edu/resources/counseling+centerldefoult.htm. The Advocate T h e purpose of th e srudenr n ewspaper, The Advocate, is to provid e stu d e nr s with information about cam pu s issues a nd events. The newspa per s trive s co include good inve s tigativ e report i ng, feature articles, and items of general inrerest to it s campus readership. In addition , th e new s paper i s a tool ro e ncourage and d ev elop wri ters, journalists, a rti sts, and other st udent members of its general management and production staff. The office is in the Tivoli Student Union, Room 345, 303-556-2535. Office of Disability Resources and Services The Office of Disability Resource and Services ( DRS) is committed co providing equal opporrunities and fostering the personal growth and development of students with disabilities. T h e DRS staff strive co meet the needs of a large and div erse community ofCU-Denver students with disabilities . We are availab l e to provide assistance and co arrange for reasonable accommodations that will address specific educatio nal needs . Accommodations may include, but are not limited to, the following: • priority registration for classes • assi s t ance in identifYing volunteer notetakers • a ltern ative testing for assessment tests and classroom exam in ations • oral/sign language interpreters • real-time captio ning • textbooks in a lternate formats (audi otaped, Br ailled, e nlarg ed, sca nn ed onto diskette ) For furth er information about our office, co ntact u s at 303-556.3450 (voice), 303-556-4766, or e-mail to DisbilityResources@cudenver.edu. The office is l ocate d in th e Arts Build ing, Room 177. Emergency Student loan Program The Emergency Student Loan Program is d esigned to meet the emergency financial needs of students. The program provides int erest free, s hort -term loans for up co $400. Applications for short-term loans will be accepted throughout the fall and s prin g semeste r s and summer session. Applicants are required to meet th e minimum requirements listed below. S tud ents receiving financial aid are eligible if: • financial aid or schol arship eligibility has been determined b y the Office of Financial Aid

PAGE 53

• finan cial aid i s v ified b y presenting recent co p y o f award letter, or lerter from fin ncial aid counselo r • amount of aid c ers costs of tuition a nd lo a n S tud entS not rec eiv ' g financial aid are eligibl e if: • tu i tion balanc e i paid in fuLl • monthl y in co m e is verifie d by presenting r ecent check s tub or lett er from e mpl er • income indicat abiliry to r epay l oan w ithin s i x weeks. Goy, lesbian, Trans (GlBT) Student Services at Aurario Gay , Lesbian , Bisexfal, Tran s Student Services is o p e n to all Auraria camp u s students as a so urce for exp l oring sexual orie ntation issues. This pr ogram offe r s a ariery of support, education, an d a d vocacy services for the e ntire am pus communiry : • support for rhos who m ay have questions about t h eir own sexual orientation or th t of a friend or famil y m ember • ad vocacy for s tu ems ex p e rien c ing discriminati o n or harassment b ase d on a real o perceived GLBT identiry • speaker for eve1 t s , workshops , and classes o n var iou s aspect s of sexual orientatio • pro g r ams and w rk s h ops about working with the gay, l esbian, bisexual, a nd tra s communities m ore effectively a nd combating mi s inform atio n , isco n ceptio ns, a nd homophobi a • r eso urce librar y f 500 books and 90 videos (documentary and cinema ) avai l a bl for resea r c h and l eisu r e as well as a multitud e offree lit e r a ture egarding o ther organizations and serv i ces thr o u ghout Den er and Colo r ado th a t provide o utre ac h , services, and advocacy • pro g ram s s uch and other forum GLBT issue s The GLBT Stu den Gay, Lesbian, Bisex ual , Tr a n s Awareness Month pro v idin g information and dialogu e about Services office i s located in th e T ivoli Student is s taffed b y a director with the support of s tudent empl oyees and volun ers . Input and involvement from th e entire campus communiry a e wel co med. For additional information , call 303-556-6333. Ombuds Office T h e Om buds Offi e help s to e nhance the clariry an d di sseminatio n of inform ation , to s i plif y deci s ion making and communica tion , to assist w ith th e proces of change and with adjustment to c hange, and to impr ove understan di among s tudents , faculry, staff, an d admi ni strators. T h e Ombuds Offi e pro vides information about programs , poli cies, services, and pro ce d es affe c ting members of the univer s iry co m muniry; make s r eferrals to app opriate s t a te, CU system , and CU-Denver resources; serves as co s ultant in the prepar atio n and review of poli cies and proc edures ; and sisrs in the so lution of problems and the r eso lution of di sputes. Om buds ffice serv ices do not r ep l ace or c ir cumvent existing c hannels, but help t h m work more effectivel y . Om buds Office se ices are informa l , impartial , co nfidential , and independent of admi i s trativ e a uthorities. The issues a nd identitie s of per so n s who co n s u t with th e Om buds Office are not divulged to anyon e without expr s permi ssio n to do so , except to t h e extent required b y law. For further inform cion o r assistance , contact th e Om buds Office, 303-556-4493 , em : ombuds@carbon.cudenver.edu Student Activities ffice The Offic e o f Stu I nt Activities offers a comprehensive student activ i ties program rh t help s bring about a positive college experience for each and every s r dent. It is o u r goal to int egrate w h at s tudent s l ear n from th e full rang e o their ex peri e n ces a nd to eng age in active l ear ning both inside a nd o ur s i e the clas sroo m . We are committed to bringin g Support Organizations and Operations/ 49 you n ew and exc itin g programs th at active l y involve student l ear nin g and lead e r s hip development. The Office of Student Act i v ities i s locate d in th e T ivol i Stude nt Un i o n , Room 3 03. Call303-556-339 9 or go to http:!l th under l.cudenver.edul studentlife!activities. html. Student Advocacy Center The Studem Advocacy Cem er provides s upport service s to CU-D e nver studems, parti cu l arly during th e ir first year on campus . Services a r e de s i gned to h e l p s tudentS mak e a s mooth transiti o n to life at CU-D e n ver and to s ucceed in their college stu dies. Pr ofess i onal s t aff and s tudent peer advoca tes pro vide information about camp u s resour ces a nd assist s tudentS with class sched uling, academic policies and procedures, and problem so lving. T h e cente r also houses an ex t en s ive scholarship library. The cenr e r i s l ocated in C 2012,303-556-2546. Student Health Insurance Office CU-Denver strongly encourages all students to have adequate health insurance coverage. This will help insure success in the academic communiry eve n in th e evem of a n unexpected medical expe nse. The Student H ealth Insur ance Pla n i s desi gned to coordi n ate w ith rhe Health Center a t Aurar i a to assure the availa b iliry of qualiry health care at the lowe s t possible cost. The CU-D e n ver Student Health In surance Office , admin i ste r ed through th e Office of Student life, is pleased to offe r you the benefits of a student health insurance plan underwritten by rhe MEGA Life and Health In s urance Compan y . This plan is designed t o better sui t th e needs of CU-Denver students w hil e maint aining reason a ble st udent rate s . If yo u n eed m ore information or have questio ns, v isit the Student Health Insuranc e Office in th e Tivoli St ud ent U ni on, Room 303, or call 303-5 56-6273. Office of Student life T he Offi ce of Student Life i s th e advisi ng , coo rdin ati ng, resource, a nd gen eral inform a tion center for s tudent clubs and organizations, s tudent government (A CUD), s tud ent pr og r ams, and the academic h o nor soc i eties. The office i s respon s ibl e for the admini stration of the st udent fee budget a nd monitors all s tud ent fee expe nditures to assure compliance with CU-D e nver and sta r e of Colorado regu l at ion s and procedures. The Director of tudent Life rep resents the Assoc i ate Vice Chance llor for Enro llm ent a nd S tudent Affa ir s on selec ted CU-Denver, rri-ins titution a l , and AHEC committees and m aintains effec tiv e lines of com munic atio n with MSCD, CD, and AHEC. T h e director admini sters the st udent co ndu c t a nd di sc ipline procedures as described in rhe Code of Student Conduct. The Office of Student Life is located in rhe Tivoli Student U nion , Room 303, 303-556-3399. Office of Veterans Affairs The Office ofVeterans Affa ir s (OVA) is a n ini tial contact point for eligible veteran s and dependent students atte nding CU-Denver w h o wish to utiliz e Veterans Administration educational benefits. T hi s office assi s t s students with filling our VA p aperwo rk and in so l ving prob l e m s associated with th e receipt ofVA-related e du cational benefits. The OVA maintain s proper certification for eligibl e students to e n s ure that eac h s tud ent me e r s Veterans Admin i s tr at i on require m ents for a tt e ndan ce, co urse lo ad and conten t , and other r egu l ations necessar y t o receive e du cational b e n efits payments . In addition , the OVA pr ovide VA Vocatio nal Reh a bilitation r eferrals, info rm a tion o n VA tutorial assi s t ance, and VA work/stud y po s ition s for qualifi e d veterans. For further info rmation , contact the Office of Vetera n s Aff a ir s at 3 0 3 -556-26 3 0 , CU-Denv e r Bldg., Suite l07F. CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 54

50/ Our University, Our Campus CAMPUS SERVICE FACILITIES Auroria Child Core Center The Auraria hi l d Care Center, 303-556-31 88, e rves the child care n eed of Auraria's students, staff , and faculty by providing high quality ear l y c hildh oo d educatio n and ca r e pr ograms. The C hild Care Center is l ocated on the ourhwe t corne r of the campus. It programs are consistently recognized by the ed u catio nal community for their high quality early chil dho od care and educat ion . Developmentally appropriate p r actices for young c hildr en g uid e the ed u cational programs that are pro v id ed. urriculum planning is flexible and based o n c hild ren ' s inter e ts. upervising teachers in the Child Care Center are all degreed tea c h ers meeting the certification guidelines of the tate of Colorado and of the ar ional Academy of Early Childhood programs. Children aged 1 2 month ro 5 years are served at the center. The center also has a full y acc r ed it e d lcindergarren program. H ou rs: M-F, 7 a .m.-6 p . m. Auraria Event Center/Student Recreation Center The Auraria am pus Event Center is a 2 , 800-seat facility for team and individual sport activities, academic programs, events and conferences. Funds from the tudent Recreation Fee support the use by students of th e many health and recreation facilities found within rhe building. Adjacent ro the buildin g are softbal l fields renni courrs and a track. Emmanuel Gallery Locat e d next to southwest co rner ofPE Bld g., 303-556-8337. T h e Emmanuel Gallery ho sts exhibits of s tud ents, fac ulty , and n at i onall y known artists. Stop i n for a relaxing br eak. Gal l ery hours are II a.m. to 5 p.m., M-F. Health Center at Auroria http://www. mscd. edulstudentlresourceslhealth! Nl CU-Denver students are emided to medical serv i ces at the Health Center ar Aurar ia, and student health insurance is NOT required w u e this facility. The H ealth Center is approved to provide emergency care ro person s cove r e d b y Medicare and/or Medicaid . Other medical conditions will be r eferre d to approved Medicare/Medicaid providers. Physicians, physi cian assi r ant , nurse practitioners, radiological technologists, and m edical as istants staff the facility . tudents will be asked w complete a sig n -in sheet and s ho w a current semest e r ID card each rime they check in. ervices include treatment of illness and injuries , lab testing, medication , ph y i cals, an nu a l YN exams, sexuall y transmitted disease information/ resting, birth co ntrol information/services, minor surgery, cholesterol screening, immunizations, HIV resting, blood pressure c h ecks , casting, s u t u ring , and x-ray. All services liste d above are low cost. Payment is req u ired at rime of ser vice, except for student who participate in the S tudent H eal t h Ins ur ance Program. Classes r egarding h eal th -related t opics are taught each semes t e r and a r e offered free to all stud ents. Walk-in ervi ces b eg in at 8 a.m., Monday-Friday. Access is on a first come, first-served ba is. Walk-in varies daily, co ntingent up on when all patient slots have b een fille d ; thus, rhe daily closure time for walk-in care CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 is variable. Patients are encouraged to check in as early as possible. The Health Center at Auraria is located in the Plaza Building, room 150, on the lower level. Brochures with additional information are available ar rhe health center. For further derails and information regarding night students (Night Owl Advantage Program) and extended camp u s students (Sate llit e Advantage Program), call303556-2525. Tivoli Student Union 9d1 and Auraria Parkway Tivoli Administration , Room 325 ,303-556-6330 The Tivoli Student Union, managed by Student Auxiliary Services , provides a wide variety of services for the Auraria community. The Student Union houses CU-Denver student government and rudent life offices, the University of Colorado Federal Credit Union, and the rri-institutional offices ofLegal Services and the GLBT. If you want a break or a quiet place to rudy, the Tivoli Student Union is just the place. With a pizza restaurant , a food court, coffeeho u se and deli, and convenience store , you'll find a place to uit your appetite, s c hedule, and budget. If you ' d rather retre a t d1an eat, you can watch TV in the Roger Braun Student Lounge , play a game of pool at igi's Pool Hall & Arcade, meet a study group in the multicultural lounge or study in total silence in the Garage Quiet rudy Lounge. Additional student services at the Tivoli rudenr Union include the Aura ria Campus Bookstore , the Club Hub, lick ' s Copy Center, onference Services , and the I D Program and Commuter Re o ur ce Center. Visit d1e Tivoli Student Union website at www . Tivoli. orgfor more information . Club Hub, Room 346,303-556-8094. This uniqu ely designed club space on the third floor of d1e Tivoli fea ture wo rk space for ove r 60 clubs, mailboxes for campus clu bs, a limited number oflockers, club bulletin boards, meeting rooms, and lounge area for larger group meetings. This office works close l y with the tudenr Advisory Committee to the Auraria Board (SACAB) , rhe rudenr Union Advisory Board (SUAB ) , and the rudenr Activities/ Life offices. Aumria Campus Conference and Event Si!rvices, Room 325 , 303-556-2755. Thr ough the Conference Services office, meeting and conference space at the Tivoli Event Center, r. Francis and t. ajeran's ca n be reserved for non-academic purposes, including meeting , weddings , and receptions. Conference Se r vices has five caterers ro choo e from for all off-campus catering needs . ID Program/Commuter and Housing Services, Room 269, 303-556-8385. Aura ria students come h ere ro get their lD cards, which are necessary for par Icin g in some camp u s lOts and for checlcing out library books. rudent IDs also serve as an RTD bus pass. The center provides an off camp u s h ousing resources database, RTD bus maps , ride boards , and a microwave oven. igi's Pool Hall and Arcade, Room 1 45, 303-556-3645. igi's , nam ed after T i voli Brewery founder Moritz Sigi, houses 3 1 video game machines, and 7 billiard tables. i g i's i s open to d1e e ntir e Aura ria campus population as well as the public. The studentfriendly a tmosphere encourages community socializat ion and relaxation.

PAGE 55

International Education Services Office of lnternotio ol Education Director: Chrisrophe Johnson, 303-556-4925 Associate Director: errick Alex, 303-556-4930 International Stude t Advisors: Deborah Durkee, 303-556-4924 Laura Porter, 303-5 5 -3489 Study Abroad Coor inator : Karen Goubleman, 303-556-3388 International Admis ions Coordinator: Wei Kang, 303-556-2648 International Admi ions Processing Manager: Joyce Espinosa, 303-5 56-6809 Office: CU-Denver uilding, 1250 14th Srreer, Suite 130 Main Phone: 303-55 -3489 Fax: 303-556-4562 E-mail: international cudenver.edu Web: http://internatio al.cudenver.edu The University of olorado ar Denver, through the Office of International Educari n (OlE), provides a variety of international programs, education opportunities, and services for international a nd dom estic student , scholars, faculty, sraff, and rhe greater Denver community. The goa l of OlE are to raise international awareness on rhe CU-Denver cam us and, in particular, to provide an opportunity for all srudenrs ro gai rhe global competency needed in roday's interdependent worl . OlE arranges stud nt study abroad programs , expedites rhe exchange of students and facul , hosts international visitors, promotes special relationships with for ign uni versities, and advises students and faculty on Fulbright and Nar onal Security Exch ange Program (NSEP) and other scholarship opPfrrunities . OlE also functions as a recruiting, retention , and adv i so y office for international students and coordinates many services for and afrer they have been accepted to CU-Denver , includin :new student or i entation, visa and Immigration and Narur . alization Se ice (INS) advice, and help for those internation a l st udent s who need as isran ce wirh a variety of questions and potential difficulties, includin the offering of a semester-long orientat ion course (CLAS 11 00). In add cion, OlE seeks ro increase community awareness of int ernational issue by periodically sponsoring lectures and programs char are open to the g neral public. STUDY ABROAD OlE assists stud en w i shing ro make international st ud y an integral parr of their college e perience. Study abroad programs vary in length from rwo weeks roo academic year, and are also offered during the summer and winter b eaks. Although many programs are for language s tudy, a substantial n ber of programs are taught in English; rhus, a foreign language is no always required for participation. These programs are available ro stude ts in all disciplines, from arch it ect ure ro business ro liberal arrs, in a var ety of countries worldwide. Students can pay Campus Rcmurccs AURARIA LIBRARY Dean/Director: Dav d Gleim Office: Auraria Libra , 1100 Lawrence Srreer Telephone: Admin is arion: 303-556-2805 Information: 30356-2 74 0 Ref erence: 303-55 -2585 Campus Resources/ 51 CU-Denver tuition and srudy abroad on an exchange program for an academic semester or year. Either CU-Denver or transfer credit may be earned abroad, giving students rhe opportunity to fulfill degree requirements while experiencing a new culture . Since tuition and program fees are general l y affordable and financial aid is available and can be used for srudy abroa d , it i s a feasible opti on for almost every CU-Denver student. Information and advice on scholarships such as Fulbright and SEP, as well as volunteer and work opportunities abroad are available. ew programs are continually developing, so call or check the OlE website ro l earn more about our programs . Logon to our webs ite a t http:llinternational.cudenver.edtt for further information. INTERNATIONAl STUDENT ADVISING AND SUPPORT SERVICES Since rhe first few months in a new country and a new city can be particularly difficult for international students, OlE offers a number of special services in order toea e rhis transition, such as an orientatio n program for n ew international students, answers ro visa questions, and help in finding housing. All i nternational st udent s meet wirh a n int erna tional student advisor (ISA) in OTE upon arrival in Denver to have visas and other paperwork reviewed , in order ro assist in personalized advising. OlE provides a friendly ear and a place to ask questions and express concerns about all kinds of issues , including U.S. social customs, as well as an avenue for communicat in g wirh other CU-Denver international student clubs and organizing social activities. For more informatio n o n immigration matters, advising, or services for int ernationa l st ud ents and scho lars, visit our website ar international.cudenver.edu. The Office oflnternational Education also works wirh students who need additional English language preparation ro connect rhem wirh appropriate resources and services on rhe Aura ria Campus. For more information, contact an international student ad visor at 303-556-3489. GRADUATE STUDENT AND FACUlTY FUlBRIGHT INFORMATION OlE maintains listings of opportunities and other information on var i ous scholarships and fellowships for study and re earch abroad, including Fulbright graduate srudenr and facu l ty visiting lectureships ar foreign uni versities. COMMUNITY OUTREACH SERVICES During the year, OlE sponsors periodic g u est l ectures and spec ial seminars focused on topics of current international interest. Mosr of these acriviries are open ro rhe public as well as rhe CU-Denver community. OlE is also an active participant in a number of Denver communi ty international programs and events. For more i nformation about these and other programs, co ntact the OlE office at 303-556-3489. FACUlTY Associate Professors: David Gleim, Ellen Greenblatt , Teri R. Switzer Assistant Professors : Anthony J. Dedrick , Robert L. Wick (Emeritus) Instructors: Orlando Archibeque , Eric Baker, Jeffrey Beall, Thomas J. Beck , Gayle Bradbeer, Meg Brown-Sica , Lorraine Evans, Rosemary Everts, Vera Gao , Cynthia Hash err, Florence Jones, Elaine Jurries, Susan Maret, Nikki McCas lin, Ellen Metter, Misha Sra , MarieS. Taylor, Linda D. Tietjen, Louise Treff-Ga n g ler, Diane Turne r , Judith Valdez, Eveline Yang CU-Dmver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 56

52/ Our University, Our Campus LIBRARY SERVICES Access ro information is essen rial to academic success. The Auraria Library, located at the cente r of the campus, provides a wide range of l earning resources and services ro support academic programs. The libr ary is administered b y the University of Colorado at Denver . THE COLLEOION The Auraria Library has a collecrion of approximately 600 , 000 volumes. In addition to a strong, up-to-date book collection, the library also has over 3,200 journal and newspaper sub criptions, access ro more than 5,000 electronic journals, and a film/videotape collection. The library is a elective depository for U .S. Government publications and a depository for Colorado Stare documents , with a collection of over 450,000 documents. The Auraria Library's collection is supplemented by providing access to other libr aries within the srate and nationally throu gh interlibrary loan services. AURAR lA LIBRARY ELEGRONIC RESOURCES Auraria Library provides on-and off-campus access to a wide variety of electronic re ources available through the Library's home page : http://library.auraria.edl4 Available re ources include: Skylin e : Aura ria Library's online catalog provides access to books , journal holdings , media , and government publications owned by the library. Reserve materials for courses are also liste d . Pros p ecto r Global Catalog: Auraria patrons can expand rheir searches for materials with Prospector, a catalog of sixteen Colorado libr aries. Prospector has 1 3 million holding s including public and academic libr ar ies. You may request items that are c h ecked out or missing from Skyline and if the Prospector item you need is checked our, you may place a hold. Materials are requested online and delivered to Auraria Library Circulation within 2-4 days . Items are checked om for 3 weeks with one renewal. Try this popular service by clicking on the "Search Prospector " tab in a kylinecaralog search o r directl y at: www.prospector.coalliance.org. Articl e databases: Over 300 databases provide acces to full text articles and journal citations in a variety of field . Available on-campus to all and off-campus to current srudents, faculty, and staff. Refer e n ce resources: Dictionaries , encyclopedias, almanacs, and numerous other reference resources. W e b resources: Internet resources in all fields that have been selected and evaluated by libr arians. Auraria Library information: lnmuction guides, s ubj ect guides, instructions for off-campus access, hours, policies , a nd other Library information. CIRCUlATION SERVICES Library material are checked om from the Circulario n Desk with a c u rrent Auraria TD or other va lid identification . Undergraduate students may check out books for 28 days, and graduate swdents for 60 days. An Auraria student can check out up to 75 items from the general collection. It ems can be renewed three times if not requested by another borrower online using Skyline's View Your Own Record , in person, or by phone, 303-556-2639. Other services include patron-placed holds in Skyline for checked-out items a nd e-mail circulation notices that all ow for e-mai l renewal.s. Fines are assessed when books are rene wed or returned past their due date, and replacement charges will be assessed if items are 28 days overdue. REFERENCE SERVICES The Auraria Library Reference Department strives to provide exceUent service in a sisring students and faculty with their researc h n eeds. The Reference Desk i s s taff ed during mo r hours the library is open , and has CU-Denver Catawg 2004-05 librarians and staff trained in all subject areas in order to assis t swdenrs with online and print sources of information. Contact the Reference Desk at 303-556-2585. GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS Most U.S. and Colorado government publications are in a separate location in the library and are available all the hours the library is open . pecialized assistance is available during weekday hours and at th e Reference Desk even ing s and weekends . Cal1303-556-8372 for informa tion and hours. INFORMATION DELIVERY/INTERLIBRARY LOAN Auraria Library participates in a worldwide electronic borrowing and lending nerwork with other librarie . This service enables all Auraria campus students, faculty, and taff to obtain materials not available at th e A u raria Library. Requ ests from registered user s can be ini t i ated electronically through the Auraria Library's Home Page u sing the WebZap service. This department also loans mat erial to institutions throughout Colorado and around the world. Access to mater ial s from other olorado libraries is available via Prospector. LIBRARY INSTRUOION The libr ary is committed to providing information skills through irs instruction program. The program i s varied, ranging from basic , introductory-level material ro advanced research methodology for graduate students. Information on other electron .ic resources is an important component of the librar y Instruction Program. For more information about the library's in structional offerings, contact the Library ln strucrion office ar 303-556-3683. RESERVES TheRe erves Deparrment (locared in the nonhwesr corner of the first floor) provides special short-term circulation of books , pamphlet , articles, and od1er materials needed for class instruction. Except for films and videos, all other types of media are housed in Reserves , along w i th COs/r ecords and appropriare players. Films and videos (inclu ding those on reserve) are located in the Video Collection, first floor, outheast corner. The loan periods for " reserved " items are short, and overdue follow-up is prompt, so that the maximum number of st ud enrs may have access to the materials. T hese materials include nor only tides owned b y the library, bur al o personal copies made availab l e b y rhe faculty. " R eserve " material may be ci1ecked our for rwo hours, one day or three days, with the exception of media item , which may be c h ecked our for rwo weeks. The length of check-out is determined by the professor. Materials will be checked out with either a swdent I. D . or a olorado driver's license. ARCHIVES AND SPECIAL COLLEGIONS The Archives and Special Collections Deparrmenr of the A u raria Library acts as the archival repository for materials produced by the University of Colorado at Denver , Metropo litan tate CoUege of Denver , Community College of Denver, and the Auraria Hig h er Education enter. These materials include documents such as college catalogs, student newspapers, budgets, and fact books. Manuscript collectio n s ar theAuraria Library focus on public policy issues a n d public affairs. Examples of manuscript holdings includ e the r ecords from organizations such as the American Civil Liberties Unio n of Colorado, the ational Muni c ipal League, and the American Association of University Women of Colorado. The library's special collections area co ntains books on many different subjects, including Colorado and Denver hi story, theses a nd dissertations from CU-Denver, scie nce fictio n , rhetoric , and juvenile literature. For inform ation and hours , call 3 0 3-556-8373.

PAGE 57

COMPUTER COMMONS Word proces ing, s readsheer production, web brows i ng, and e-mail are available for srude ts and faculty in the Library' ompmer Commons lab. The lab is also eq ipped with document canner and p r inters. Iris available whenever rh library is open. The library i com irred to making its resource and ervices available to all students. Libra services ro assist persons with disabilit i es include orientation to the ph icallayour of the library, retrieval of materials, and some as i ranee w rh use of the online public acce s catalog, periodicals, and inde s. Adaptive compute equipment and software have been installed in rhe reference area and in rhe Combined Computer Access enter ro as isr a number of sru ents with varying disabilities. This equipment connects to the on lin public access catalog, the I nternet , and other ADDITIONAL FACILITIES Photocopier , mic form reader/prinrers, a copy center, pay phones , and study rooms are a I available at the library. ria Library is an as ociarion formed in 1976 to promote rhe develop enr of Auraria Library as a center for learning, rudy, and re earch fo the student and faculty of the University of Colorado at Denver, erropolitan rare College of Denver, and the ommunity ollege f Denver. The Friends of Aura ria Library's ongo i ng objectives ar : I. To promote awa eness of and good will toward Auraria Library on rhe campu , in e metropolitan area, and in rhe region; and 2. To increase lib re ource through contributions, olicirarions, grants, bequest , and gifts of books and other appropriate materials. For more in format on about the Friends of Auraria Library, call 303-556-2805. Room 0 15; 303-556-2426 enter offers a full range of media services: • di ranee learn in techno l ogies, including video co n ferencing, satellite releconfl rencing, audio conferencing , video over IP, we beast , and vi eo taping of course delivery • circulation of a\ ide range of audio, video, and data (AVO) presentation equ pment for one-rime use • long-term equip ent check-out • special events production of c ntent using variou media, including digital tape, videotape, 0-OM, and DVD-ROM. pecialized production server such as a imarion and graphics • equipment mai renance and repair • equipment/sysr s consultation and installation The Auraria Medi Center's 34-channel closed-circuit campus cable system can be u ed in the classroom to broadcast channels such as C M B , Hi rory , 0 covery, A&E, PBS, CSPAN , A A and local te l ev i sion networks. uraria Library's extensive collection of videotapes and DVD-R Ms c:t also be distributed to any cia sroom on campus through the system. The Auraria Medi1Center staff are available to train faculty in the use of equipment in" mart" classrooms on c:tmpu and offer consulting services ro fa ulty an other clients in such areas as media design and production , effective se of media rypes and effective u e of diS[ance learning technologies effective use of rho e rechnologie , and equipment selection to be r meet instructional needs. A self-service Mac and PC lab Campus Resources I 53 is available for faculty to access I ide canner , Aatbed canners, and film printers to uan fer digital images ro film. AURARIA CAMPUS BOOKSTORE T ivoli Student Union, 303-556-4286 Hours: M-Th, 8a.m.-6p.m.; F , 8a.m.-5 p.m.; at , !Oa.m.-3 p.m. Please call for hour during vacation and interim periods. The Auraria am pus Bookstore, a department of rudent Auxi l iary ervice -your campus store-is located in t h e h istoric Tivoli Srude n t Union . The bookstore provide textbooks for the Auraria schools , plu a complete general book department that i especially trong in technic:tl and reference areas. Best sellers , new release , and gift book selections change frequently , and are often accompanied by displa y s of special value books on many subject . rudents need to bring course printouts to locate textbooks. Books are located by schoo l ; subjects are arranged alphaberically-deparrmenral abbreviat i ons, with course and section numbers-and prices are prinred on rhe shelf rag below. Each ririe has the designation of Required, Priferred, Optional , or Available. You can also buy books online at www.aumriabooks .com. The Auraria am pus Bookstore carries more used textbooks than any other book store in Colorado, bur hop early as u ed books are the first ro go. A full refund is given for new and used books accompanied by the receipt and returned within the first rhru weeks of cia for regular semester and during the first week of class for shorr terms. Please read the r efund policy attached to the r ece ip t . When a cour e ends, the textbook may sri II have value and may be bought back by the bookstore. The buy back po l icy on used texts is ro pay h a l f of rhe n ew price o n books that will be u sed again next se mest er on this campus. Other texts are purchased at l ower percentages. The Auraria Campu Bookstore ' s buy-back ervices are dedicated to irs rudent customers. A validated Auraria rudent or campus LD i required to complete a buy-back uan action. Books are bought for rhis c:tmpus throughout the erne rer; however, buyer from national textbook companies are on hand at the end of each emesrer ro purchase used books char may be required at or her schools . Campus Computers, 303-556-3726, offers rhe latest in hardware and software technology. An educational di count is offered ro Auraria campus students; a current, validated Aura ria LD must be presented at the time of purchase. A full line of computer reference books and accessories i also available, as well as calculators and other mall electronics. am pus Computers' hours are M-Th, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; F,8a.m.-5p.m.; ar,!Oa.m.-3p.m.lri locaredonrhe econdAoor of rhe Aura ria Campus Bookstore . A current photo 10 is required for purchases paid for by check. The bookstore also accepts Master ard , V1 A , and American Express. Look for our website ar: www.aurariabooks.com The Aura ria Campm Bookstore is owned by the Stau of Colorado and supports the Student Bond Fund. ALUMNI ASSOCIATION Campus Box 189 , P.O. Box 173364 Denver, Colorado 80217-3364 Phone: 303-556-2549 Fax: 303-556-6545 E-mail: aroi.Heller@cudenver.edu The U-Denver Alumni Association provides program and services of mutual benefit ro graduates and the university. Founded in 19 7 6, rheas ociarion is governed by a board of alumni representing all school and colleges on campus. Srudents automarimlly become CU-Denver Alumni As ociarion members upon graduation and receive the CU on the Horizon newsletter, publi hed twice a year. Alumni are invited to work on volunteer commi ttees , whi h include recognizing 4.0 CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 58

54 I Our University, Our Campus studenrs through th e Aca demic Athlete program, pro v iding financial assistance to undergraduate stu d ents through a scholarship fund , an d be stowi n g Alu mni Associat ion awar d s to wor th y comm unity l eaders a nd volunteers. T he associatio n also invites alum ni back to campus to a tt e nd periodic r e uni ons an d activities that might i nt eres t them . UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO FOUNDATION Campus Box 1 74, P.O. Box 1 73364 D enver, Color a do 80217-3364 Pho ne : 303 556-4301 Fax: 303-556-3958 E-mail: Betsy.Cheroutes@cufund.colorado.edu CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 Estab l ish e d in 1967, the University of Col o r a d o Foundat ion i s a privately governed nonprofit cor porati o n w hose mi ssion is to s upport the University of Colorado. In 1 981, the foundation establis hed a Denver campus office to a d vance CU-Denver's goal to beco m e one of the nat ion' s premier urban in s tituti o n s . The CU Foundat i on raises and man ages priv a t e f und s that endow scho larship s and professor s hips, e nr ich academic pro grams, purcha se e quip m ent , up g r a de and construct facilities, and support projects to benefit s tu d e nts , facu lty, and th e community. The u niver s ity's aca demic leader s hip estab l i s hes priorities for p rivate support, and g ift s are direct e d to th e specific scho o l , college, progr am , or purpose th e donor designates. Professional fund raiser s gene r ate interest and enthusiasm for th e univer s ity, recruit and organize volu nte ers, solicit gifts in co llabor a tion w ith facu l ty and deans, and assi s t donors in gift p l anning .

PAGE 59

Dean Mark Gel e rnr er Ass dat e Dean of R esearc h Michael Holler a n Contact Office CU-Den er Building, T hird Flo o r Main Te lephone 3 0 3-55 6-338 2 Fax 303-5 56-368 7 We bsite w w.cudenver.edu/AandP Faculty Professors Ern sro Arias, Gene Bressler , T hom s Clark, Mark Gelernrer , Spenser avlick, George Hoover , J ose ph Juh asz, Yuk Lee , Dwayne uzum , P atr i cia O 'L eary, Joh Prosser , Fahriye San car, P erer Sc hn e i er, Raymond Sruder, Jr. , Luis Su 1mers, Willem van Vliet Associate Professors Loi s Brink , Joan Draper , Phil ip Gallegos, Julee Herdt, Mich ael Holle a n , Lawrence Loftin III , Taisro Make a , R ay m o nd McCall, Jr., Hans Morge thaler , Bennett Neiman , R a nd all Orr, Ping Xu Assistant Professors B arbara b ac h , R obe rr Flanagan , Michae l ugh es, Michael J enson, Ann K mara , Sohyun Park Lee, Brian uller, Ekarerini Vlahos Senior Instructors Lori Cocke ham , John F r ankhouser , Nlen H a low , Martha Hutchison, Anrh n y Mazzeo, E.]. Meade, E ic Morris, George Pond , Shayne y m e r , Rick Sommerfeld College of Architecture and Planning Ifyou're interested in a career in architecture, urban and regional planning, landscape architecture, or urban design, you'll want to get acquainted with the College of Architecture and Planning at CU-Denver. We offer the only undergraduate and graduate education in these fields in the state of Colorado. Students intending to enter the design and planning professions normally complete the college's undergraduate degree as preparation for our graduate-level professional programs. Our graduate programs are also available for those who already hold an undergraduate degree in an unrelated field. Our graduate programs in architecture, landscape architecture, urban and regional planning, and urban design, and our graduate certificates in preservation and design build are taught on the C UDenve r campus, in the heart of a vital downtown . Our undergraduate programs are held in Boulder, an env ironment ideally suited to the needs of undergraduates {see the CU Boulder catalog for details). We offer a multidisciplinary PhD in design and planning across the two campuses. With a diverse faculty committed to excellence in teaching, research, scholarship, and professional work, the college provides students with a broad range of l earning opportunities. Special Activities and Programs The provides a diverse r a ng e of opportunities cha r enrich a nd e nh a n ce the ed u cation of it s students. Through activities and functions-including a l ecrure series, a visiti n g critic series, exh ibit s, publications, and ac tive stud ent organ izatio ns-th e college e n co urages conracr among students, faculry, a nd members of the de s ign profession . Eac h summer, the college offers for eig n s rudy-travel pro g r ams, which in recenr years have travel ed ro Prague, Rome, Turkey, C hina, Hel s inki , a nd Spa in. The college also offers a semest e r a bro ad program in F lor e nce for irs under g radu a tes eac h fall an d sp ring. The college makes available a r a nge of scho lar s hip s and fellowships, som e of whic h are based o n need , others on p er form a nce, a nd still o thers of which are s pecificall y int e nd ed ro provide e nri c hm e nr opportunities. T h e college s upport s a n active and f oc used inrernship program for irs st ud ents, giv ing them access ro elective inrern s hip opporruniries in rhe D e nv e r m e tropolitan area and b eyo nd. F inally, the co lleg e e ncourages s tud ents r o rake co ntrol of their own education and su pports , w ithin its abiliry, any r easonab l e proposals from s rud enrs that wo uld enri ch th e ir own educational experie nces. College Facilities The college's adm ini strat ive headquarters and g radu ate prog ram s are l oca t ed a t 1250 14th Street in do w nrown D e nver , on rhe northeast e rn e dg e of t h e Auraria campus. T h i s favorab l e l ocatio n gives easy access both ro t h e ext e n s ive campus facilities and t o th e urban amenities of Denver's lively l ower downtown. Most of the major professional design offices in D e nver, a nd many planning firms and agencies, a r e within easy r eac h of the co llege. These pro vide many opportunities for co nracr b etwee n s rud e nrs a nd pr actit i o n ers . Colleg e facilities include s rudi o s p aces for st ud ents, lecrure a nd sem in ar rooms, design jury spaces , exhibition spaces, a nd faculry offices. The colleg e also pr ovides a phoro gra phi c darkroom and s tudi o, a m o del and furniture-maki n g woodshop , a nd an ext e n sive compute r l a b w hose focus i s compute r -a id e d design (CAD), computer 2-D and 3-D imaging, an d a nal y tic CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 60

56 I College of Architecture and Planning tools for planning. Also located in the college is a Geographic In formation System (GIS) com purer l ab, which is open ro all students of the University of Colorado a r Denver. Scholarships/Financial Aid Students in the college have access to a number of scholar ships an d other financial assi stance funds. Some of these funds are provided by the institution itself, while others are provided b y exte rnal sources like the American Institute of Architects Education Fund, th e American Planning Association, the American Society of Landscape Architects, and the Rocky Mountain Masonry Instirute. For further inform atio n on these scholars hip s and graduate tuition awards, co ntact the college's student services officer at 303-556-3387 or request a l ist b y e-mail at heather.zertuche@cudenver.edu. For information on federal and s t ate financial aid , contact the Office of Financial Aid, University of Colorado at Denver , Campus Box 125 , P.O. Box 1 73 364, Denver, CO 8021 7-3364, 303-556-2886. ADMISSIONS General Requirements Applicants to th e College of Architecture and Planning are required to submit rhe following credent i a ls: • University of Color ado App lication for Graduate Admission form • Two official transcripts from each institution the app l icant has attended. Transcripts must be mailed by the institution directly to the college. A certified literal English translation must also be submitted for documents that are nor in English. • Letters of recommendation . U.S. residents , three letters; international applicants, four l etters. • Statement of purpose. Appl icant s to all programs must submit a statement summarizing career objectives and reasons for pursuing the intended program of st ud y . Applicants to the PhD pro gram must also indicate a propose d area of specialization and, if possible, a potential faculty mentor. • Supporting materials for archi t ecture and landscape architecture: Applicants to rhe graduate arc hit ecture and landscape architecture programs are required to subm it a portfolio (6-12 bound pages, 8.5 X 11 in c h es). Slides are nor accepted. A portfolio i s an orderly presentation of one's work. This include s examples of creative and analytical work including, but not limit ed to, essays, papers, photo graphs, and photographic reproductions of artistic work such as sculptures, drawings, paintings , musical composit ions, and other fine arts. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must be includ ed for remrn of the portfolio. Applicants to architecture and landscape architecture are encouraged to submit Graduate Record Exam (GRE) scores if their GPAs are below 3.0 . • Supporting materials for urban and regional planning: Applicants to the urban and r egional planning program shou ld submit, in an 8.5 X !l-inch bound document, their statement of purpose, a resume , an d a copy of a student or professional paper or project. App l icants to the urb an and regional planning program are encouraged to submit GRE (general) scores; those whose undergraduate GPA is below 3.0 are r equired to submit GRE scores. • Supporting material s for the PhD: Applicants to the PhD program must submit a sample of written work and any other evidence relevant to admissio n to the program, in accordance with submission guideli nes that can be obtained from the college. Applicants to th e PhD program are required ro s ubmir GRE scores. • Application fee. Non refundable ($50, U.S . residents; $60, international applic a nts). CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 International Applicants International applicants are required to submit the following docu m ents in addition to th e credentials lis ted under general requirements. • TOEFL score. For the professional programs in architecture, l and scape architecture, urban design , and urban and regional planning , the College of Architecture and Planning requires a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of525 (paper based) or 197 (compurer based) for st ud ents from nonEnglish speaking co untries . However , the co llege requires students with TOEFL scores between 525 and 550 (paper based ) or 213 (computer based) to register for a n English course when they arrive at the University of Col orado a t Denver. Applicants to the PhD in Design and Planning must have achieved a TOEFL score of at l east 575 (paper based) or 233 (comp uter based). • Financial Resources Statement. International applicants mu st prov i de evidence that they have sufficient funds available. Financial documents must b e less than one year old. To pro vide this evidence, eac h int ernational applicant shou l d follow these instructions: a. If an applicant ' s own money is to be used: In Part 2, Section I of the Financial Resources Statement, app l icant's bank m u st certify that the full amount of money i s on deposit in his or her account to meet tuition and expenses. b. If an applicant i s spo n so red b y a family memb er or friend: The sponsor must agree to provide the money and s i gn the Financial Resources Sta tement in Parr 2, Section 2 . The sponsor's bank must also certify that the sponsor has on deposit the amount of mon ey the applicant will need for tuition and expenses. c. If an applicant has been awarded a sc ho l arship , Parr 2, Section 3 of the Financial Resources Statement must b e compl ete d . Statements used for other institutions wil l not be accepted . Photocopied documents are not accepted unless signed by the originator ; sig natures must be original. • copy of passport Application Dates and Deadlines Fall Semester All professional programs-March 15 PhD in Design and Planningby March 1 to be considered for financial support Spring Semester Ali programs-October 1 (In architecture, urban design, and landscape architecture, students starting in the spring will only be able to select from a reduced set of courses, and will get on track starting the next fall) App l ications received after these dates will b e considered on l y i f space is still available . Confirmation Deposit A non-r efundable co nfirm atio n d eposit of$200 is required to secure an app licant's place in the a rchitectur e and landscap e architecmre programs, and in th e PhD program. The d eposit is due at the time the applicant accepts the program's offer of admission. The d eposit will be applied to the first semeste r's tuition when th e student reg i s ter s for classes . ADDITIONAL INFORMATION To request additio nal information, or to arrange a visit to the college, phone or e-mail: Undergraduate Programs , 303-492-7711, A&P-Undergrad-info@carbon . c udenver.edu Graduate Professional Programs, 303-556-3382, A&P-Grad-info @ carbon.cudenver.edu PhD Program , 303-492-7711, phddandp@spot.colorado.edu

PAGE 61

You may also wr it e ro: Office of the Dean College of Architecture and Planning, U niver s iry of Colorado ar Denve , Campus Box 126 , P.O. Box 173364 , D enver, CO 802 1 7-3364. For periodical upd res on all aspec t s of rh e college, see our we b s ire ar http://www.cudenver. u/AandPI ACADEMIC POUCI 5 Amdemic Standin Students must mai rain a minimum overal l GPA of3.0 in th e graduate progran1s to remain i good standing and to graduate. If a student's GPA fall s below a 3.0, rhe h e or s h e will be pl aced on acade mi c probation beginning the follow i g semester. If the GPA remains below a 3.0 after the probationary semesre , then he or she ma y be dismissed from the college. Appeals fu1y student may a peal the grades h e or she receives in a class . The st ud e nt s h o uld first i formall y discuss rhe issu e with the r elevant faculry m e mb er and th e n w i the deparrmenr chair o r program dir ector. If the matter is nor reso l ved this way, the student may initi ate an appeal by writing to the outlin ing rhe r easo n s for th e a ppeal. Copies a r e ro be forwarded t th e deparrmenr c hair or program dir ector and rhe dean. The faculry m e b er must respo nd in writing to th e student's w ritt e n appeal, with pies ro the department chair or program director an d the dean. All ap p a l s committee consisting of three faculry members of rh e relevant acade ic program will review the w ritt e n appeal . T h e c hair of the appeals co mirree will co nvey irs recommendation in writi n g to th e student who h appealed, with copies to the instructor , the program c hair or dire cto r , a nd Students are expec ed to arrend all m eetings of classes. Excessive unexcu sed absences ay result in a gra d e reduction ar th e discr etion of th e in str u ctor. Abse n e from a class will be excused for verifie d medical reasons or for exrrem p ersonal emergenc ies. The s rudenr may b e r eq uir ed to furnish ev dence. Srudenrs ' assign m e rs are robe co mpl eted in a timely manner. Ally assignmenr turned in are may have irs grade reduced by an amounr ser at the discretion of rh instructor. All assi gnment may b e turn ed in late without penalry for v rified medical reasons or for ext r e m e p erso nal e m erge n cies. Student must have their in st ruct or's wri tt e n permission to turn a n assignment i l ate. Students wirh exc u sed l ate wor k may turn in the assignment b y th end of finals week without penalry. Otherwise , the g r ad e " IF " or " W ' will be assig n ed a r the discretion of the faculry . Course Sequencing and Advancement Programs in the co lege are stru ctu red so thar certai n courses must be tak e n concurrently, o hers seq uentially. Students will not be allowed to en roll in a course if irs o-requisires or pr e requisites have not been satisfie d . Originality of Wor St ud ents must s ub ir the ir own wo rk. Where other so ur ces are used in a stu dent submiss i n, rhey are to be clear l y id entifie d and r efe r ence d . The universiry consi d r s plagiarism and simi l ar acts of falsification robe a serious matte rhat ma y result in suspension or expulsion. Information on code of conduct an d grievance procedures are availab l e from the Universiry o Col orado ar Denver's Office of Enro llment and Srudent Affairs. Architecture / 57 Retention of Student Work The College of Architectu r e and Planning reserves the right to r etai n any student project submitted in fulfil lment of class requirements for whatever period of rime ir deems necessar y . Thi s r e tained work i s u sed to provide accrediting agenc ies wirh tangible evide nce of performance , to serve as additional visual aid material in presentations to other students, and to co ntribute ro possib l e ed u cational exhib it s requested by rhe universiry communiry and rhe general public. PROGRAMS OF STUDY Architecture Chair, Department of Architecture, Phillip Gal l egos 303-556-3282 Assistant C hair, Undergraduate Architecture Pre Professional Pr o gram, Allen Harlow 303-492-7711 The arc hit ecture program's mission is to lead in rhe discovery, communicatio n , and application of knowledge in rhe discipline of architec ture . The progran1 aims ro exce l in the educat i on of its srudenrs, in the research and creative endeavors of its faculry, an d in service to rhe com muniry. To respond ro this mission, rhe program ha s developed a uniqu e intellectual, educational, and architectural cu ltur e . First of all, the program celebrates its place in a very special set of landscapes-urbanized Denver and the Front Range , and the spec tacular natural l andscape of the high plain s and the Colorado Rockies. The architecture program therefore focu es not onl y on rh e des i gn of buildings, bur also on the interactions between building s and t h e ir urban a nd natural serrings. Secon d , the program exam ines the interplay between architect ur a l form and rhe complex cult ural and technological context in wh i c h architects operate. As a result of these dominant concerns, the program has c reat ed an academic environment that i s intell ectually sti mulating and ed u cational l y challenging, and that ain1S to ed u cate st udents who will become l eade r s in the discipline and profession of architecture. The Department of Arch it ect ure, along wir h rhe Department of Planning a nd Design , offers a Bachelor of Env ironmen tal Des i gn ( BEnvd) on the Boulder camp us. The Department of Architecture also offers two g r aduate degrees on the Denver camp us: the Master of Architect ur e (MArch) and the Master ofUrban D esig n (MUD). The following statement from the Nati onal Arch i tect ural Accrediti n g Board (NAAB), w hi ch is r espons ibl e for accrediting all architecture programs in the Unit ed Stares, should help a student choose the ap propriate degree program: " In the Unit ed Stares, most stare registration boards require a degree from an accredi t ed professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The arional Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is th e so l e agency authorized to accredi t U.S. professional de gree programs in a r chirecrure, recognize s two rypes of degrees: the Bach e l or of Architecture and rhe Master of Arch it ecrure. A program may be g rant ed a five-year, clu ee-year, or two-year term of acc r edi t ation, depending on irs degree of conformance with established ed u cationa l standar ds. "Mas ter's de gree programs may consist of a pre-professional undergraduate d egree and a profess ional graduate degree , which when earned sequentially, comprise an accredited professional education. However , the pre-professional degree is nor, by irself, recognized as an acc r edited degree. T h e NAAB grams candidacy status to new programs that have developed v i able plan s for achievin g initial accreditation. Candidacy status indicates that a program s hould be accred it ed within six years of achieving can d idacy, if its plan is properl y imp l emented." The pre-profes s ional degree offered by the College of Architect ur e and Pl a nning is the BEnvd. The professional d egree offered by the college is the Master of Arch i tecture (MArc h), which is fully accredited bytheNAAB. CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 62

58/ College of Architecture and Planning The Master of Architecture, th e college ' s accredite d professional d egree for st ud ents intending to seek licensure as arc hit ects, offers two di stinct paths. One track, the MArch/4+2 , is offered to students who h ave completed the college's BEnvd or any other pre-professional design d egree from any NAAB-accredited institution. A second track, the MArch/3.5, is available to students who have comp l e t ed an unrelated undergraduate or graduate degree, or to students who h old professiona l a r c hit ecture degrees from other co untries, but who seek to obtain an NAAB-accred ited architect ure degree. Students holding professional architecture degrees from foreign institutions will be given advanced s t anding comme n surate with their previous educatio n a l experiences . "Master ' s degree programs may co n sist of a pre-professional under graduate deg ree and a professio nal grad u ate degree, whic h when earne d sequentially, comprise an acc r edited professional education. However, the pre-professional degree i s n or, by itself, recognized as an accredi t e d d egree. The NAAB grants candidacy status to new programs that have d eveloped v i ab l e plans for achieving initial accreditat ion. Candidacy s t atus indicates that a program s h ould be accredited w ithin six years of achieving candidacy , if irs plan is properly implemented. " THE MASTER OF ARCHITEGURE (MArch) MArch/4+ 2 The MArc h /4+2 is intended for students who have comp l eted the college ' s BEnvd or any other pre-professional architec tur e degree from any NMB-accredited institution. This six-year plan of s tud y , with completion of both the four-year undergraduate BEnvd offered on the Bould er camp u s and rhe accredited two-year MArch o n the Denver campus ofCU, has been fully endo r sed by the NAAB. Program Requirements Students comp l eting the college' s Bachelor of Environ m ental Des i gn ( B E n vd ) on the Boulder campus-or comp l eting a pre-professional d egree from anot h er NAAB-accredired institution-complete a minimu m of four semes t ers of coursewo rk (60 hours of credit) after entry into th e MArch program. For further details on the BEnvd, an d f or descriptions of th e pre-professional courses ou tlin ed below , see the University of Col orado at Boulder catalog. Stud ents entering ENVD 3210 Arch Studio II m u st have the permission of the program chair. Term b y Term: Six-year MArch Curriculum Undergraduate Sequence Four years at Boulder-30 credits per year (approx.), 1 20 total cred it s FIRST YEAR Fall (15 credit hours) ENVD 1004-6. ENVD 2003-3. UWRP 1150-3. Elective-3 . I nrr o to ENVD Eco l ogy and Design Expos i tory Wr it ing Non-ENVD E l ective Spring (15 credit ho1m) ENVD 2002-3. ENVD Media ENVD 200 1 -3. Intro to Social Factors in ENVD Social Science-3. (see list of opti ons) Humanities-3. (see list of options) Elecrive-3. Non-ENVD E l ective YEAR TWO Fall (16 credit hours) ARCH3114-3. ENVD 2110-6. MATH 1 3 00 -5 . Elective-2. History and T h eories of Arc h I Arch Studio I Calculus I Non-ENVD E l ect ive CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 Spring (14 credit hours) ARCH 3214-3. History and T heories of Arch II ENVD 3001-3. E n vironment a nd Behavior PHYS 2010-5. College Physics I E l ecrive-3. ENVD Elective YEAR THREE Fall (15 credit hours) AREN 4035-3 . ENVD 3210-6. ENVD 3352-3. E l ective-3. Structures I Arch Studio II Arch Comput er Media ENVD E l ective (endi ng in '4') Spring (15 credit hours) AREN 4045-3. Architectural Str u c tures II E l ective-3. ENVD E l ective (en din g in ' 5 ' ) E l ecrives-6. ENVD E l ectives E l ecrive-3. Non-ENVD E l ective YEAR FOUR Fall (15 credit hours) AREN 3050-3 . ENVD 43 1 0-6. ENVD 3115-3. E l ective-3. Env i ronmental Systems I Arc h Studio III Building Materials and Systems ENVD E l ective (endin g in ' 2') Spring (15 credit hours) ARCH 4314-3 . Arc h T h eory AREN 3060-3. Environmental Systems II ENVD 441 0-6. Arch. Studio IV E l ecrive-3. ENVD E l ect ive Graduate Sequence Two years at Denver-30 credits per year (approx.), 60 total credits FIFTH YEAR Fall (15 credit hours) ARCH 6150-4. ARCH 6151-2. LA6632-3. E l ecrives-6. * Comprehensive Design Studio Compr e h ensive Desi gn Semina r Sire Planning Spring (18 credit hours) ARCH 5320-3. Build Constr u c tion and Metho d s ARCH 6170-4. Adva n ced Design Studio ARCH 6171-2. Advanced Design Seminar E l ectives-6. * (Take ARCH 6950-6 . Thesis Preparation if undertaking a thesis in the next sem ester . ) SIXT H YEAR Fall (15 credit hours) ARCH 5410-3. ARCH 6170-4. or ARCH6951 ARCH 6171-2 . E l ectives-6. * Professional Practice Advanced Design St udi o Thesis (6) Advanced Design Seminar or n o thin g if thesis taken (Take ARCH 695 0 -6. Thesis Pr e par ation if undertaking a the s i s in the next sem ester. ) Spring (15 credit hours) E l ectives-15 * *As of fall1998, n ew stude nts must take 9 credits each in cultural srudies and professional st udies, an d 6 c r edits in technology studies (3 credits of whic h must emphasize th e compute r ) . The remaining 9 c r edits may be taken in any architecturally related e l ectives o n campus.

PAGE 63

MArch/3.5 The MArch/3.5 is intended for those students who have completed an unrelated undergr duare or graduate degree , or for st udent s who hold profe ssional arc irecture degrees from other countries. This three and-one-half-year pi of study on the CU-Denver campus has been fully accredited b y rh NAAB. Prerequisites Students must co plere the prerequisites of college-level trigonometry and ph ysics before e rolling in ARCH 5310 Introduction to Building Technology. Since th s class should be taken in the first semester in order to stay on track for g duation , s tudents are strongly encouraged to complete the rrigono erry and physics requirements before beginning the M . Arch. progr . ARCH 5000 Ma and Physics for ArchitectS is offered in the summer on a pass/fail basis. T is class meers the prerequisite requirements. A Graphics Works op is recommended for students who do nor have a background in arc h rectural drawing and model building . This class is offered each year bef< re the beginning of the fall semester. StudentS are also e peered to have achieved a basic level of computer literacy, and s hould 'f familiar with PC or Apple operating systems. Program RequiremJnts Students with a ba helor's or master's degree unrelated to architecture must complete a severor eight-semester sequence of coursework and accumulate a minim tim of 114 semester hours of credit. Advanced standing will be giveEo students who have completed a nonAAB ac.credired profession degree in another country, and who w 1sh to obram theN -accredited degree from this college. These students will work w h the c hair of the department to develop an individualized plano study commens ur ate with their previous degrees and experience, and ill have to comp l ete at least 60 hours of credit in residence within the ollege of Architecture and Planning. Course Sequence The M.Arch. prog am is divided into five major components : design stud ies, 45 credit ho rs; cultural stud i es, 1 2 credit hours; technology studies, 18 credit hou s; professional studies, 6 credit hours; and electives, 33 credit hours . A wi e array of electives in these areas allows students to tailor their gradua e studies to their own interests. FIRST YEAR Fall Semester (1 credit hours) ARCH 5110-6. ARCH 5111-3. ARCH 5210-3. ARCH 5310-3. Design Studio I Design Seminar I Introduction to Architect ur e Introduction to Building Techno l ogy Spring Semester 18 credit hours) ARCH 5120-4. ARCH 5121-2. ARCH 5220-3. ARCH 5320-3. LA6632-3. Elecrive-3.* SECOND YEAR Design Studio II Design Seminar II History of Architecture I Building Construction and Methods Site Planning Fall Semester (1 credit hours) ARCH 5130-4. ARCH 5131-2. ARCH 5230-3. ARCH 5240-3. ARCH 5330-3. Elecrive-3.* Design St udio III Design Seminar III History of Architecture II Human Factors in Design Environmental Control System s I Post-Professional Programs/ 59 Spring Semester (18 credit hours) ARCH 5140-4. ARCH 5141-2. ARCH 5340-3. ARCH 5350-3. ARCH 5410-3. Elecrive-3.* Design Studio IV Design Seminar IV Environmental Control Systems II Structures I Profes s ional Pract ice Summer Semester (12 credit hours) ARCH 6150-4. ARCH 6151-2. Elect ives-G.* THIRD YEAR Comprehensive Design Studio Comprehensive Design Seminar Fall Semester (18 credit hours) ARCH 5360-3. ARCH 6170-4. ARCH6171-2. Elecr i ves-9 . * or Structures II Advanced Design Studio Advanced Design Seminar ARCH 6950-6 . Thesis Preparation and Electives-3. Spring Semester (15 credit hours) ARCH 6170-4 . ARCH617 1-2. Elect i ves-9. * or: ARCH 6951-6. Elect i ves-9. * Advanced Design Studio Advanced Design Seminar Thesis *S tudents must take 9 elective creditS in cultural studies, 9 elective credi t s in professional studies, 6 elective creditS in technology studies (3 credits of which must emphasize the computer), and 9 elective credits in any architecturally related electives on campus. POST-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS The Post-Professional Program The Post-Professional Degree Program is a mid-career, post-professional intensive co urse for those individuals in the design fields who seek to expand their knowledge and to advance their professional careers. In this program , students have the opponuniry to s tudy recent developments in their design fields resulting from advances in information techno logy, new theories and methods , and emergent discoveries and associations. The program currently offers rwo primary areas of study, the Master of Architecture II and the Master ofUrban Design degree programs. Each of these programs has a research orientation and agenda, and their general intent is to create an educational context with in which the fundamental practices of architecture and urbanism can be examined, advanced, and extended. The programs have been designed to be both Aexible and interdisciplinary so as to provide students with a broad range of options that can accommodate and respond to each student's own interests and study agenda through coursework, independent study, or optional training. Post-Professional Program: The Master of Architecture II The Master of Architectu r e II is an advanced degree program that provides irs students with a range of opportunities for exploring and extending their knowledge of the practice of architecture. Students applyingfor admission to the program must have been awarded a five-year or six-year first-professional degree in architecture. They may enter the Master of Architecture II program in any semester of the academic year. CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 64

60 / College of Architecture and Planning The Master of Architecture II program does not offe r an NAAB first-professional degree; it is an advanced studies progra m for those who already hold this first-professional degree. Students in the program mus t complete 30 hours of c r edit in required , recommended, and elective co ur sework to qualify for the Master of Architecture II degree. To be e ligibl e for gra duation from the pro gram, s tud ents mu st co mplete 12 credit hour s of advanced design studio (ARC H 6150/6151 or UD 6600/6601) in the degree project sequ ence an d 12 c r e d it hours in r e quired and/or focus-area coursewo rk p a rti cular to th e ir area of study. The r e mainin g 6 cre dit hours are elec tive cour sework. A ty pical seq uence of coursework with in a focu s area l eading to the award of the Master of Architecture II degree i s as f o llows : SEMESTER ONE D esig n Stud io: 6 c r e dits Foc u s-area required/r ecommended coursework: 6 cred its Elective co ur sework: 3 cred it s SEMESTER TWO Design S tudio: 6 credits Focus-area required/recommended co ur sework: 6 credits Elective co ur sework: 3 c r edits Dual Degree Option Students ma y enroll in a dual degree pro g ram w ith Landscape Archit ecture (M .Ar c h . an d M.L.A.). Landscape Architectur e Chair, Department of Landscape Architecture, Gene Bressl er 303-556-3382 The mission of th e landscape a rchitectur e pro gram is to expl ore desi g n as the m eans to engage a rang e of evo l v in g interactions between th e e thics, places, a nd methods oflandscape int erve ntion and transfor mation. Our s tudies f ocus on compelli n g issues inh erent to th e urban , suburban , rural, and wilderness environments of the Rocky Mountain regi o n . The in s ight s and possib ilities generated from these local s tudies pro v id e an understanding oflandscape de s i g n rhar i s tran s f e rable a t man y scales a nd ro other l ands and c ultures. S p ecific objectives of rhe land sca p e architecture program are : 1. t o develop excellence in the de s ign pro cess a nd design: ex plorin g th e strategies , m ethods, and s kill s ro s tudy, sy nthesize, exp eriment w ith , make, and evaluate de s ign preced ents , l an d sca p e de s i g n , and d esign processes 2. ro l earn and ex t e nd co r e themes of the profession that includ e land scape arc hite c tural th eory and preced e nts , technologies and m a terials , n atural a nd c ultural syst e ms, and communi cations and inqui ry media : st ud y ing the mean s to inform and de velo p one ' s idea s , ro convey one's values , and to criticize o ne's work 3. ro provide a wo rkin g knowledge of the in sti turi o nal framework w ithin which the design process occurs: buildin g a stro n g under s tanding of and rhe s kill s required in professional practice, includin g man agement, l eadership , mark eting , e thical conduc t , and l egal issues 4. ro engage ser v ice in ways tha t apply and inr egra r e coursework, r esearch, and creative works ro real wo rld s ituations-parti c ipating with and invo l ving o th e r s in opportunities to imple m enr, enhance, d emo n strate, communicate, and evaluate ideas and skills-and that provide measu rabl e benefits. We aim ro link theory w ith pr ac tice , history w ith c han ge, technology with invenrion, a nd designers with th eir co n st itu ents. The curr i culum prepares st udenrs for l a nd sca p e a r chitectural prac tice and research as pre sently known , and pro v ides rhe setting ro que stio n , in vent , rest , and ad vance knowledge and cap a bili ty of rhe professio n . It consists of seq u ential a nd integrat e d desi g n s tudios, core lecture a nd semin ar courses, and elect iv e opportunities, including a professional inr ernship. St ud e nts develop capabilitie s in desi g n within s tudi o CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 co urses. Core themes , th eories, precedenrs , techn o lo gies , and skills of th e profes sio n are developed in rhe l ecture a nd sem i n ar co urses. C urricu l um integr a t i on is achieved through deliberate interna l coord ination efforts and collaboration w ith other program s wi thin th e college as well as other CU-Den ver colleges and schoo ls. The curr i c ulum provides opportunities that facilit a t e rl1e offe ring and resting of n ew co urses, which res pond ro timel y interests of faculty and students. Profes s ional practitioner s representing co n sul ring firms and govern m enta l age ncie s of r eg ional , national , an d internation al distinction s har e in and co ntribute to th e lif e of rhe program. They reach courses , participate in reviews, ho s t int e rnships and office v i s its, give present ations, ex hibit their works, and m e ntor w ith s tudents and faculty. Successful gr aduates pur s u e di verse prac tice s in publi c and priv a t e are nas, and make positive diff e rences in the quality of o ur e nvironment. MASTER OF lANDSCAPE ARCHITEGURE (MlA) Prerequisites Students a r e expe c ted to have ac hi eve d a ba s i c le vel of compute r l iteracy . A graphics workshop i s recommended for stud ents who do not have a ba ckground in drawing and model building . T h e wo rkshop is scheduled each year b efor e th e b eg inning of th e fall semester. Program Requirements T h e l andscape a rchitectur e program offers profession a l and advanced professional graduate degre e curricula leading to the d egree Mas t e r of Landscape Archirecrure (MLA). The first-professional degree progr am, requi rin g a six-se me s ter sequ e nce of coursework totaling 9 0 c r edit hours, i s full y acc redited b y th e Landscape Ar chitecture Acc r editation Board (LAAB) and recognized b y th e Council ofE du cato r s in Landscape Ar c hitectur e (CELA) . Students comp leting the college ' s Bachelor of E n v ironm e ntal Design on rhe Bould e r campus-or compl e tin g an undergraduate de sig n d egree a t a n o th e r institution-are give n ad va nced s tanding in th e three-y ear program a nd mu s t comp l ete a t l east 65 sem ester hours of credit. The advanced professi onal degree pro g ram , for qualifi e d s tudents h aving already earned a firs t profession al degre e in l andscape a r c hitecture o r related disciplin e, requires 48 credit hours. Advanced stan ding m ay b e commensurate w ith pri o r academic accompl i shmenr . Course Sequence (90 -credit MLA for stud e nts withour a professi onal degree in lands ca p e architecture o r relate d profession. ) The curri c ulum consists of core and elective coursework. Cor e co urses are gro up e d into six co mpon ents: d esign s tudies, 36 credit hours; history and theory , 12 credit hours including 3 elective credit hours; l andscape a r c hitectural technology, 1 4 c r e dit hours including 3 elective credit hours; p lants, 6 credit hours ; and media, 4 credit hours; tota ling 72 c r edit hours . The remaining semester c r edit hours are for additional e l ec tive co urses. Typical90-credit-hour program of study in required courses for the first professional MLA degree F IRST YEAR Fall SemesterI 5 credit hours LA 5500-6. LA5510-3. LA5521-3 . LA 5572-3. Introdu ct ion to Landscape Architectural Design S tudio I G raphic Media in Land scape Arc hit ecture His tory of Landscape Architecture Landscape Eco logy Spring Semester1 5 credit hours LA5501-6 . LA5521-3 . LA 6631-3. LA6632-3 . Introduction to Landscape Arc hit ect ural Design Studio II Hi s tory of Landscape Architecture Landscape Con s truction Materials &Methods Site Planning

PAGE 65

LA6641-3. Elecrive-3. SECOND YEAR Landscape Architecture Computer Applications Fall Semester-5 credit hours LA5332-3. LA6600-6. LA6670-3. Elecrive-3. Spring Semester LA6601-6. LA 6640-3. Elecrive-6. THIRD YEAR Landform Manipulation Landscape Architectural Design Studio III Plants in Design 15 credit hours Landscape Architectural Design Studio IV Landscape Architecture Theory & Criticism Fall Semester5 credit hours LA67 00-6. E l ectives-9. Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio V Spring Semester ARCH 5410-3. LA 6 7 01-6. 15 credit hours Professional Practice LA 6721-3. E l ecri ves-3. Advanced Landscape Architectural Design Studio VI Regionalism Course Sequence (4 -hour MLA for st udent s with a professional degre e in landscape a chirecrure or related disciplines) This route require 48 credit hours and typically rwo years of fullrime study. The core urriculum consists of rwo groups: design, 30 cred it hours; history nd theory , 12 credit hours, for a total of42 credit hours; plus 6 credit h ur s of electives . The program director will advise each s tudent engaged in this program of study. Concentrotion Areas The curriculum de ivers required courses that enab l e students to learn and develop core the es of the profession inclusive of LAAB standards, with emphasis placed on studying the means to develop one's ideas, to convey one's values, d to criticize one's work. In addition, the curriculum offers fou r conce nrra on areas from wh i ch to choose elective courses offered b y the progr and other units within the college and university in order to explore ad anced topics, chal l enge normative paradigms , and develop new kno ledge and capabilities. Majors from other areas are invited to enroll i landscape archi t ecture electives. Areas of Concen ation Urban Design Advanced Landsca e Architectural Technologies Landscape Pumnin and Management History, Theory, an Criticism These broadl y defi ed areas of concentration reflect topics and issues related ro the progran 's location and context in Denver and irs larger metropolitan and reg anal contexts. They also reflect facu lty interest s a nd r esources availabl from w ithin the college, university, and area. Students may pursue ne or more conce ntr at i ons within the required 24 elective hours , of\ hich 18 are non-group related . Students are encouraged to co nsul with th eir assigned faculty advisor or other mentor s as they make their decisions. (Note: 6 elective credit hours are to fulfill requirement in each oflandscape architectural technologies and history and theor group.) Landscape Architecture / 61 Urban Design Denver, the surrounding metropolitan areas, and the newly emerging urban areas within the greater region provide limitless issues , top i cs, and situations fueling interests in urban design. The field of urban de s i g n is comp lex and crosses many di scip lines, including architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning , real estate development, law, engineering, and the social sciences. Srudenrs interested in this concentration a r e urged to seek and enroll in courses that provide: • an analytical understanding of the urban/built environment • the und erstand ing and skills from which to develop , synthesize, create, and rest responsive implement a tion strategies Courses available to landscape architecture students include , bur are nor limited ro: CE 5622-3. LA6686-3. LA 6930-3 . SOC4230-3. UD 6620-3. UD 6621-3. UD 6686-3. URP 5520-3. URP6633-3. URP6634-3. URP6635-3. URP6665-3. URP6670-3. URP6676-3. Urban Transportation Planning Special Topics: Open Space in Urban Design Landscape Architecture Internship (requires pre approval by advisor/director) City and Region Architecture of the Ciry The City as an Artifact Special Topics in Urban Design Urban Spatial Analysis Urban Form Theory Preservation Theory and Practice History of American City Building Urban Marker Analysis Urban Economic Development Urban Housing Advanced Landscape Architectural Technologies Many st ud ents will work within a variety of venue s invol ving built works. Familiarity, competence, and interest in learning, using, evaluating, and developing existing and new technologies are compelling. These technologie s include computer applications, design-build/learn by building, materials , and construction processes. Studenrs interested in expanding their knowledge, skills, and future app l ications of technologies are enco ura ged to seek and enroll in courses that provide them with: • significant exposure and facility with appl ied technologie s appreciation for the value, strengths, weaknesses, and potential of the technologies to develop, impl ement, and evaluate their design works Courses available to landscape architecture students include , bur are nor limited to: ARCH 5310-3. ARCH 6390-3. ARCH 6410-3. ARCH6411-3. LA6641-3. LA6686-3. LA6686-3. LA6930-3. URP 6612-3. Introduction to Building Technology Special Topics i n Techno l ogy Computer Graphics Computer Applications in Practice Computer Applications in Land cape Architecture Special Topics: Advanced Landscape Architec tural Tech nologies pecial Topics: Computer Applications (VARIES) LandscapeArchirecnue Internship GIS for Planners Landscape Pklnning and Management Landscape planning is an area in which landscape architects play an increasing and viral role , particularly in this region , resulting from pressures to develop non-urbanized or undeveloped lands and to develop and m a n age public l ands. Study within thi s concentratio n area addresses development and advancing knowledge and capability of the profes s ion in: • ecological systems • urban a nd regional growth • land use • real estate development and finance • enviro nm e ntal impact assessment • planning a nd development processes CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 66

62 / College of Architecture and Planning Courses available to landscape architecture students include , but are not limited to: LA6621-3. LA664 1-3. LA6930-3. URP 5530-3. URP6612-3. URP 6640-3. URP6641-3. URP 6642-3. URP 6650-3. URP665l-3. URP6651-3. URP 6653-3. URP6660-3. URP 6661-3. URP6664-3. URP 66 7 1-3. URP6673-3 . Visual Quality Analysis Computer Applications in Landscape Architecture Landscape Architecture Internship Planning Law GIS for Planners Community Development Process Social Planning Neighborhood Planning Environmental Planning II: Policy and Law Environmental Impact Assessment Growth Management Natural Resource Management and Planning Real Estate Development Process Real Estate Development Finance Fisca l Impact Analysis Regional Economic Development Transportation Planning I: Transport Nerwork Analysis History, Theory, and Criticism Advanced stu d y in hi story, theory, and criticism of design is funda mental to the land scape architect's knowledge of the built environment, rhe intellectual forces rh a r create ir, and the theoretical construct of historic precedents in design influencing decisions. Advancing knowledge and capability of the profession in this area of concentration is compelling and serves: • ro berrer inform de sig ners eager to learn , generate, and develop ideas, and arrive ar critical judgments about the worth of these ideas • to enhance and inform one's perspective in a context of economic boom where n ew development is flourishing Courses availabl e to landscape architecture students include , but are nor limited to: ARCH 5230-3. ARCH 6161-3. ARCH 6110-3. ARCH 6111-3. ARCH 6210-3. ARCH 6211-3. ARCH 6910-3. LA6686-3. LA6686-3. LA6686-3. LA6686-3 . LA6686-3. LA6686-3. History of Architecture II Precedents in Architecture History of American Architecture History of Modern Architecture History of Architectural Theory Pos t-Structuralist Architecture Teaching Assi stantship Special Topic: Architecture and rhe LandscapeExploration in Boundary Special Topic: Contemporary Theories and Criticism of Landscape Architecture Special Topic: Landscape Architectural History Special Topic: Modernism in Landscape Architecture Special Topic: Open Space in Urban Design Special Topic: Representations of Landscape Architecture LA 6930-3. Landscape Architecture Internship Dual Degree Option Students may enroll in a dual degree program with Architecture ( MLA and MArch). Urban and Regional Planning Chair, Department of Planning and Design, Dwayne Nuzum 303-556-3382 Urban and regional p l anners in the United States and other countries seek to identify social needs and environmental capac i ties, anticipate c h ange and its impact on communities, s h ape the pattern of human serrlements , provide essential infrastructure, maintain viable eco nomies , and achieve and pre serve sustai n able communities rhar are s uit ably fit to rheir natural surroundings. Stud y in planning considers how social CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05 needs are legitimated , knowledge about communities and regions is compi l ed and analyzed, possible courses of action are evaluate d , plans are formulated, implementation is transacted through the means of educatio n , investment, negotiation and regulation , and how plans ' conseq u ences are tracked over rime. These tasks requi r e a high order of ability: to amass and manipulate information, to represent and model essential phenomena an d processes , to simulate futures, and to judge outcomes having diverse dimensions. They also require the ability to porrra y and communicate key concepts, diagnoses, and actions, and to harness knowledge about all rhe key actors on the scene in order ro understand rheir needs , motives, and possible res ponse s to rhe public actions that plans provoke. U nd erlying these classes of abil ities is a base of knowledge rhar easily overreaches the bounds of any one discipline. Planners must understand theor ies regarding urban and regional process, concepts of presentation , communication and negotiation , tech n ologies for the depicti o n and manipulat i on of spatial informacion , means b y which to document , judge , and forecast change in urb an systems, priv ate econo mic motives and cons traints, rhe behavioral inclinations of all the major classes of players on rhe urban sce ne, the mesh oflaws that empower planning and govern private actio n , and the broader political economy of regional systems. Needless ro say, the education of planners can only begin in the university. Ir must be a Life-long pursuit, and planning programs, includi n g this one, are becoming increasingly s upp ortive of r h e continu ing edu cation needs of professionals. It is the intellectual excit ement of this ongoing pursuit of knowledge that draws man y to the field. The Department of Planning and Design, along with the Department of Architecture, offers a Bachelor of Environmental Design ( BEnvd) degree on rhe Boulder campus. The Department of Planning and Design also offers the Master of Urban and Regional Planning ( MURP) graduate degree on the Denver campus. The Maste r of Urban and Regional Planning is fully accredited by the narional Planning Accredi tation Board , and prepares students for professional careers in planni n g and for further study. For further detai l s on the BEnvd , see rhe University of Col orado at Boulder catalog. Additional derails about the m aster's program follow. THE MASTER OF URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (MURP) Prerequisites Students are expec ted to have achieved a basic l evel of com puter literacy, and should be familiar with PC or Apple operating systems. A g raphics workshop is r ecommended for stude nt s who do nor have a background in drawing and model building. The workshop is sched uled each year before the beginning of the fall semester. Program Requirements T h e Master of Urban and Regional Planning is the college's accredited degree for students intending ro practice as planners. With no advanced standi ng , candidates for the MURP degree must complete a minimum of 51 c r edit hours of graduate work, including all core courses (27 credit hours), a concentration (15 credit hours minimum) , and additional electives (9 credit hours). Entering students who have engage d in the study or practice of planning elsewhere ma y pecirion the faculty during their initial semester to determine whether any credit will be awarded or degree requirements relaxed as a result of these prior activities. A maximum of 27 credits of coursework can be applied for a dvan ced stand ing. St ud ents who receive the college's Bachelor of Environmental Design (BE nvd) degree on the Boulder cam pus and w h o h ave maintained a GPA of at least 3.0 will be admitted to the MURP with advanced stand ing . These students can ear n the MURP degree after co m pleting a minimum of 42 credi t hours, which will includ e rhe core courses and an approve d concentra tion . Students holding the college's BEnvd degree who also completed the und ergrad u ate planning option with a GPA of

PAGE 67

at l east 3.0 (and wit h grade of at l east 3.0 in ENVD 4320, Planning Studio Ill) will, in ad irion, receive a wai ver with credit for URP 6630, Planning Studio l . Tl ese studenrs will earn the MURP degree upon completion of a mini urn of36 cre dit hour s , including 2 1 credit h ours of co r e courses a nd a! requirements for a n approved co n centration. The above cond iti ons for dvanced standing apply only to st ud ents who grad u ated from the c liege's undergraduate program w ithin the l ast five years. T h ose who gra uared earlier may r eceive advanced standing at the discretion of the head of the graduate program in urban and regional planning, in consulra ion with program faculty . (ore Courses URP 5501-3. nning Issues and Processes URP 5510-3. ning Methods I URP 5511-3. PI nn ing Methods II URP 5520-3. U ban Spatial Analysis URP 5530-3. PI nnin g Law URP 6630-6. PI ning Stud i o I URP 6631-6. PI ning Studio II A thesis option (U 6950, Thes i s Research and Programming, and URP 6951 , Thesis) is vailab l e primarily for srudenrs who are interested in pursuing more adv n eed academic tr aining in planning or related fields. T h esis work w i I subst itut e for Studio II. Areas of Concentratio n The concentrat ion and e l ective courses enab l e students to explore in d e pth an area of spec i l interest. Students should , however, build on the exp e rtise that they air 1 d y possess. This can be done by either focusing on a related specialty, or y increased specialization in a previously acquired a rea of expert ise. The rogram suppor t s four official concentrations: (1) physical planning, (2) environme ntal planning, (3) economic development planning , an (4) urban design. A set of foundation courses i s identified in each con entrar ion, plus additional supporting electives. Physical Plannin Concentratiom Physical planning addresses the spatial arrangement o the environment, from the scale of the project to the scale of the regi n, and irs fitness for human activ ities. Physical planners establish the olicy and regulatory context for design develop ment, practicing as l d use or comprehensive planners, or in specialties such as preservation , ansportation o r open space planning , real estate development, and ur an design. Enviromnental P. nning Concentration: All urban and regional planning actions imp ct the environment in some manner , and environmental plann rs must manage these im pacts, both pro-actively a nd r e-actively. Thee vironmenral planning concenrrarion introduces planners to the pol i cy nd legislative i ssues surrounding the environ m enta l impli cations o planning actio ns, as well as to methods for their assessmenr, contro l , a d mitigation . Economic Devel o ment Planning C o ncentration: Economic development aims to mass within communities and regions t h e resources-jobs, capi a!, tax base-needed to sustain or improve rhe quality oflife and insu e opportunities for all within the private economy, facilit ated through ap ropriate public actio n s and services. Planners foster eco n omic cha n e as diagnosticians, strategists , an d promoters, gauge growth ' s effec t i light of enviro nm ental capacities, manage irs social benefits , mirigar its negarive consequences , and fashion its imprinr o n th e physicallandsc pe of l ocalities, regions, stares, and n ations. St ud ents pursuing thi concenrration should seek as well to become co n versant with thee enr ials of physical or environmental planning. Urban Design Co centration : Planners are cal l ed upon with increasing frequency t organize spaces at a scale greater than that of a building site , but ess than that of an entire community. This concentrat i on provid rhe essential abilities needed to contribute to the development of se inrermediare-scale spaces. Among these are skills in spatial analys if, design synrhesis, real estate finance, and graphic exp r ession. In addirio to the four official concentrations , students have the choice of de in g their own concentration. PhD in Design and P&.nning / 63 Course Sequence FIRST YEAR FaLL Semester (12 credit hours) URP 5501-3. URP 5510-3. URP 5530-3. E l ect i ve-3 credits . Planning Issues and Pro cesses Pla nning Methods I Planning Law Spring Semester (12 credit hours) URP 5511-3. Planning Methods II URP 5520-3. Ur b an Spa rial Analysis URP 6630-6. Plannin g Studio I SECOND YEAR Fall Semester (15 credit hours) Concenrrarion Courses-9 credits Elecr i ves-6 credits . Spring Semester (12 credit hours) URP 6631-6. Planning Studio II Conce nrr at i on Courses-6 c r e dits DUAL DEGREE OPTIONS Students may also enroll in dual d egree programs w ith publ i c administra tion (MPA-MU RP ), l aw U D), an d bu s i ness (MBA). I n addition, dua l degree options are also availab l e co mbinin g the MURP with l andscape arc hit ecmre (MLA) and arc hit ecmre (MArc h ). Studenrs may also rake up to 6 c r edits of independent smdy, after fir st assembling a plan of st ud y with o n e of the regular faculty. Up to 3 credits ofinr erns h ip may be applied to the 51-c r edit program. PhD i n Design and Planning Program Direc t or, Will em Van Vliet , 303-492-50 15 The Department of Architecture, the Departmenr of Planning and Design, and the Department of Landscape Architecture share the i dea that the complex problems of th e built environment are best addres s ed through co llabor arion among the var iou s design a nd planning discip l ines, and through developing bodies of knowledge abo ur the built e n v ironment. To further these ends, the departments and program jointl y offe r th e advanced research degree, the PhD in Design and Planning. T h e college's int e rdisciplin ary d octoral program examines the co mplex factors that help s hap e th e planned a nd co n s tructed e n v ironment. T h e program offe r s three areas of spec iali zation: 1. Land Use and Environmental Planning and D es ign Work in thi s a rea focuses on purposeful int e r vention in the phys i ca l environme nt, including mechanisms an d proced ures s uch as land use controls, de s i gn review processes a nd standards, and e n v ironmental policies. It a l so d eals with the planning a nd des i g n of h o usin g, ne i g h borhoods, c ities, regions, and the int errelat ionship s among residential, economic, recreational , an d tr a n sportatio n system s . 2. Design and Planning Processes and Practices Work in this area focuses on the theory a nd m ethods of planning and design and the development of models an d tools to unders tand and support decision processes and design practices. This area of specializat ion also includes rhe examination of practice-related issues such as the developmenr of alternative and appro pri a t e building technologies , e n ergy-effic i enr designs, manufactured h o using, and the design/build process. 3. History, T h eory, and Criticism o f the Environment Work in thi s area involves critical analysis of a rchit ect ure, urba n design , l a nd sca p e arc hitecture, a nd planning, and of the theories, CU-Denver Catalog 2004-05

PAGE 68

64 / College of Architecture and Nmning proc esses, and policies that have regulated these fields. Whether focusing on contemporary or past environments, the aim is to understand and explajn them in relation ro individual and cu lrural values, and in their cultural and technological contexts . Prerequisites Applicants must hold at least a bachelor's degree , although most will have also com pleted a master ' s degree. Field specialization and background are open, and may include archirecrure, landscape architecture, architectural engineering , urban design, geography, urban economics, environmental law, urban sociology, real estate, management science, computer scie n ce, public administration, or environmental ps yc hology . A successful applicant will have an undergraduate grade point average of at least 3.0 (ou t of a possib l e 4 points), and a grad uat e grade point average of3.5 or better. If srudents do not hold a professional or a pre -pro fessional degree in a desi gn or planning field, rhey will have to complere12 hours of upper level undergraduate coursework in the College of Architecture and Planning. They will have to obtain in each of rhese courses a grade of B or rugher. These courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student' s faculty advisor, and are co be completed within rwo years of admiss ion to the program . . A studen t must have completed 12 hour s in an undergraduate program 111 one of the following prerequis i tes. The one that applies will depend upon the student' s intended area of specialization. In exceptional cases, a s tudent may complete this requirement by taking adrucional under graduate courses and gruning a grade of B or higher in each course. The courses are robe chosen from a selected list in consultation with the facu lty advisor , and are to be completed wit hin rwo years of admiSSIOn ro the pro gram. They ma y count coward fulfilling the degree reqUirements. • Social and B e havioral Sciences • Environmental and Natural Sciences • Engineering • Humanities A student must also have completed one of the follow in g prerequisites. The one that applies will depend upon the student' s intended area of specialization. In exceptional cases, a student ma y complete this require ment by raking additional undergraduate courses and gaining a grade of B or hjgher in each of these courses. The courses are to be chosen from a selected list in consultation with the student's faculty advisor, and are ro be completed wi rrun rwo years of admission co rhe program. They may count toward fulfilling the degree requirements. • Statistics. lnclurung probability theory, parametric a nd non parametric methods, a nd acquruntan