Citation
Site specific design driven by appropriate technology as an architectural directive for sensible living

Material Information

Title:
Site specific design driven by appropriate technology as an architectural directive for sensible living
Creator:
McWhorter, James Alessandro
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
60 leaves : illustrations ; 28 cm

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Architectural design ( lcsh )
Architecture -- Environmental factors ( lcsh )
Genre:
bibliography ( marcgt )
theses ( marcgt )
non-fiction ( marcgt )

Notes

Bibliography:
Includes bibliographical references (leaf 60).
General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
School of Architecture and Planning
Statement of Responsibility:
by James Alessandro McWhorter, III.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
41205883 ( OCLC )
ocm41205883
Classification:
LD1190.A72 1996 .M84 ( lcc )

Full Text
SITE SPECIFIC DESIGN DRIVEN BY APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY
AS AN ARCHITECTURAL DIRECTIVE FOR SENSIBLE LIVING


c 1996 by James Alessandro McWhorter, III
All rights reserved.


This thesis for the Master of Architecture
degree by
James Alessandro McWhorter, III
has been approved
&c SA, me.
Date


McWhorter, III, James Alessandro (Master of Architecture)
Thesis directed by Program Director, Peter Schneider
ABSTRACT
Architectural design methods are forever subjected to competition for the most
favorable acceptance. Site specific characteristics driven by systems integration
incorporating appropriate technology as a design method is supported here as a more
responsible method for not only the planet, but for the client and architect as well.
Architects are inherently leaders through the designing and testing of technology and so
therefore must be rational in decisions concerning the shelter of humanity in safety,
health, and purpose. Observations in the field of meteorology give credence and
scientific definition to the ancient practices of Feng Shui and other culturally significant
techniques dealing with the placement, orientation, and design of a structure.
Traditional methods, as these, are cloaked in mystery not only to protect a profession,
but because certain practices were scientifically unexplainable until now. The proposed
project ventures that basing architectural design on a unique micro-climate situation
sustains the case for the site specific approach to architectural design.
This abstract accurately represents the content of the ^andidajje ytl/e/s./l/recommend its
publication.
Signed __
Peter Schneider
1
IV


DEDICATION
I dedicate this thesis to the spirit of all architects pushing the boundaries of the
known world by redefining and implementing healthy and inspiring spaces for
humanity.


CONTENTS
Introduction
Chapter 1: Site Analysis
Physical Description
Plates
Climate
Soils Report
Conclusion
Chapter 2: Project Parameters
Spatial Requirements
Relationship Diagram
Program Analysis
Chapter 3: Regulations
Zoning Requirements
Building Codes
Chapter 4: Guidelines
Daylighting Chart
General Notes
Chapter 5: Design
Design Description
Plates
Appendix
Bibliography
Vll


TABLES
1. Plate #1: Site
2. Plate #2: Detail
3. Plate#3: Detail
4. Plate #4: Detail
5. Plate #5: Detail
6. Plate #6: Right for Life Facilities
7. Plate #7: Site Map
vm


INTRODUCTION
1


The following project encompasses, inherent within architecture, many more
issues than the purely functional approach of an engineering study. To support the
basic premise, testing the potential of viable dwelling in a location typically considered
impossible at best, this thesis contains several fictitious elements, such as the client,
etc., in accordance with traditional investigative methods of the architectural student.
The idea is to present a solution intended to push the physical limits and quality of
human habitation to new heights.
Earth shattering visions are not what is called for, but the logical and inspired
conclusions formulated from what is given and that what is perceived. The perceived
(felt) term is the element which sets architecture apart from engineering. This is the art
within architecture, not easily described and rarely truly on the mark, but the mark has
been witnessed. There are built works which raise the souls of man and stop time in a
rare and uncanny fashion. My aim is not to pursue the ethereal, but to identify the
essence of architecture which calls at every project... including this one. Not every
painting is considered a master work, but always a step on the way to one. Aesthetic
success carries the spirit of the purpose of the construction.
There exist built configurations which unlock certain corridors within the mind
of man to deposit him within a space before the unknown. This is what Worringer
describes as the abstract, a place where the mind of man can relax. An unusual part of
this scenario is that with the truly successful pieces, this quality endures and even
increases with visits.
2


I. Thesis Statement
This work is to show the potential of the advantages in materials and technology
to improve the quality of our environment and our minds. These advancements present
us with the opportunity to significantly enhance the performance of our built
environment without having to sacrifice either aesthetics, meaning, or uniqueness. An
analysis of different climatic solutions will examine this claim.
Of all natural forces, wind is the most enigmatic. It is invisible. The wind is
powerful enough to tear the largest living things on earth out by their roots, and yet
seep through a hairline crack. Although wind is elusive, difficult to define, fugitive, we
experience forced paths of travel for wind every day in the built world. As construction
continues and piles up on top of itself, the patterns to be analyzed will become much
more complex than the small straight, yet formidable, stretch for this project. Energy
generation of an unconsidered resource sets an example to reap benefits from what we
have set in motion to attempt maximization of the value of building roads, etc.
3


II. Purpose
A. In time, every square foot of this planet will be of great value.
Now is the time to work on solutions to maximize the potential benefits
to be derived from appropriate technology and design. Site is the key issue. If there is
no site there will be no architecture. Much ground can be covered through paper
architecture, but the absence of built form negates the classification of architecture.
Many design approaches revel in creating form within the context of the void, unrelated
to site. Drawings of proposed sculpture (for example) are still drawings. Drawings of
architecture are not architecture, but the tools with which to understand the built form of
architecture.
B. To derive benefit from a different approach to systems combining.
The Modernists worked on incorporating machine function with daily
living. I bring the Modernists into the discussion due to their profound insight into the
types of abstract spaces necessary to compliment the mind of man, the pure efficiency
demanded by man, and monuments erected as homes to reflect the will of mans
independence from natures whims. The pseudo-industrial systems front was
revolutionary, but a metamorphosed sophistication is necessary now to interact with the
minds and lives of the present.
C. To reconcile my studies stretched between Architecture and Sculpture.
Certainly, they seem to be the closest of kin, but their existences are of
inherently different natures. How the two interact and bring inspiration to the lives of
everyone, no matter their station. Both deal directly with form; sculpture reaches into
space, and architecture creates spaces. Observing that which occurs when these two
worlds collide is my life-quest.
4


III. Goals
A. Support Site Specific work as a more responsible design tact.
The title of Architect speaks of a community leader; trusted with the
peoples future safety, health, and vision. If a more responsible way to approach
design is known, it must be implemented. Even by law, if necessary to complete these
functions of the title. Our laws will focus more on environmental awareness and
conservation in time, as they have been in other countries. If a primitive ignored the
orientation of the sun when siting his dwelling, then, his chances of surviving the
winter were undercut drastically. Why would an ancient do this anyway? Would an
ancient adolescent try to make a statement in this manner? I dont believe so, just as our
young radicals will drive in the proper lane of traffic to get to a destination. The point
here is to chastise the activities of the frivolous Peter Eisenman types whos
irresponsible style is aimed at distracting the inhabitants on living the fullest life
possible. Intellectual exercises are to be worked out within the cranial confines without
wasting precious resources for a teen prank. Just as in the Fine Arts works which
emanate depravity and hate, which are also convincingly emassioned are more to the
surface and easier to pull-out materially. I believe the same with architecture. The
quality we wish to improve in our lives is that of freedom and responsibility to show
the way for our children. These ideals may be made manifest and a part of our lives
through public awareness.
B. Combine theory education with sustainable ideas.
A theory-based education is not at odds with sustainable ideas, but is
not typically tied with it either. Learning to successfully manipulate form at a habitable
scale is a complete study. Sustainable characteristics are thought to be implemented to
design. Here, in this project, the both are to grow and promote each other with in, and
as, one design. Modernist theory has been inspirational in its fearless action to actually
live in their time, undaunted by the machine, knowing that one day it may meld with the
human.
C. Promote Site Specific design.
Many architectural designs are without context to the site and set in place
as a satellite lands on a planet. Site considerations are the largest set of clues available to
the architect. If a client has chosen a particular site, then it only seems to reason that the
site itself gas volumes to express beyond the grasp of articulation by the client. This is
the stumbling block of the modernists. The designs, in general, were united for the
revolutionary and mechanistic reasons mentioned before. Now, in times of incredible
specialization, the pure abstract spatial realms are still necessary to placate the human
mind, but contemporary technology demands a tighter contextuality between the
specialized machinery we employ and the ground we inhabit. Our resources are not
infinite and obviously increasingly expensive, hence the sustainable bent herein. One
such scenario is at the heart of this thesis and will be disclosed as you follow the
lines...
5


CHAPTER 1: SITE ANALYSIS
6


The site, located at just under nine thousand feet outside of Idaho Springs, CO,
is marked by the foundations of an old mining operation on a steep southerly slope.
The interstate (US 70) raises up to meet this historic spot in a typical fashion for
modem highways in difficult locations by resting on concrete piers which changes the
natural currents of air passage through the canyon to a new elevation (hence the term I-
70 corridor), which just happens to effect the specifics of the site to be examined.
Typical of Colorado, there is scarce and scrubby vegetation which has nearly no effect
on the wind patterns other than to cause unnoticeable turbulence.
Problems of the site deal with how to make the site habitable within the extreme
pressures of the micro-environment. Juxtaposition to the interstate is deemed unsuitable
due to aesthetics, noise, etc. Potential avalanche danger forces a structural pattern upon
the building, and the unstable, rocky soil is difficult to anchor a foundation.
These same problems produce the answers by looking at them in a different
light. There is plenty of micro-climactic activity to produce excessive energy needs. The
ability to live in the tail end of an avalanche zone, safely, and observe and analyze the
act which produces much of the rescue work for the client. The solar access here is
tremendous and open to many types of uses.
Micro-climate considerations are those concerning wind and temperature
patterns affecting a specific region. The main purpose is to explore the possibility of
creating our own energy, locally, which is more efficient and less toxic to the
environment. A challenge to relating site, client, historical context.
7


Plate #1: Site


Plate #2: Detail


Plate #3: Detail


Plate #4: Detail


Plate #5: Detail


Plate #6: Flight for Life Facilities


Plate #7: Site Map
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RSLAVVE HUMIDITY %
Comfort


WIND CHART
n
s
ANNUAL FREQUENCIES OF WINOS OF VARIOUS VELOCITIES
AT STAPLETON AIRPORT, OENVER COLORADO * l j
* legend
wind speed
4-12mph Ell
13-24mph c=n
>24mph *


CLIMATE
PRECIPITATION
The total annual precipitation is 18-59 inches.
Average precipitation per month, in inches:
January 1.70
February 1. 14
March 1.47
Apr i 1 1.36
May 1. 12
June .38
July 1.85
August/.i 2.43
September 1.59
October 1.94
November 1. 11
December 2.00
;V;/
* V
Y. V. '*/
Trie average number o-F days between killing -Frost
The months beginning and terminating the
VT; June to September. 7-0--
' . ; 7*-
Average Daily Temperature:
Mean
January 26.4
February 31.2
March 37. 3
April 44.9 v
May 53 3
June 61.2
July 63.0
August a O
September 58.5
October 49.0
November 37.1
December 27.7
Annual average temperature:
is 90 days
period ar
46.7


Month Percent of Poaalble Sunahtne Number of4 Clear Dav* Nuaber of4 Partly Cloudy Days Kuober of* Cloud* Dave Mean Sky Cover (Tench*)
January 72 10 10 11 5.5
February 71 a 9 11 5.8
March 70 a 10 15 6.0
April 66 7 10 15 6.1
Hay 65 6 12 15 6.2
June 71 9 15 8 5.0
July 71 9 16 6 5.0
Auguat 72 10 14 7 4.9
September 74 15 9 a 4.4
October 75 15 10 a 4 .4
Noveabcr 66 11 9 10 5.5
December 61 11 10 10 5.5
Total 70 115 1)2 118 5.5
Monthly total* arc rounded co Che nearest whole day.
SOURCE: U.S. Department of Cooaerc*. 1977.
\
1
ZfMfTM
SUNSHINE AND CLOUD DATA


HEATING DEGREE DAYS, BASE 85* F COOLING DEGREE DAYS
250
200
TOTAL-625
0 65
200
400
00
-too
.1000
1088
BASE 65 F
NORMAL HEATING DEGREE DAYS
NORMAL COOLING DEGREE DAYS
SUN ANGLE 0->
OATA SOURCE: U.S. WEATHER BUREAU
1941-1970, OENVER
DEGREE DAY DATA


Mean Daily Solar Radiation
V
V 1,

: * ^ v
jj

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N i:

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a \\ ' ! : V.*: *. \ *: *0. : i '.U'
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1* I .iV;-: \ /.\m s !
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. a-


h * -
CONSERVATION MEASURES
-Proper site orientation
-Sun controls: balance need for winter gains with summer cooling
(with special attention to overheating problem in summer)
-insulated for maximum efficiency
-Optimum shapes: ratios for height, width and length based on hQ latitude
a. South receives twice as much irradiation in winter as in summer
b. East and Vest walls receive 2 l/2 times more irradiation in summer
than winter
c. optimum form for latitude is elongated along east-west axis
-Careful placement and-size of aperatures based on orintaion and function
-Strive to warm and cool room surfaces (radiant temperatures)
-Impact of ground refectance on building
-Impact landscaping
-Exterior color related to heating and cooling needs
-Use of berming_____ --------
-Use of thermal mass to control temperature swings
-Airlock entries
-Daylighting
-Control of interior air flows and infiltration
-Detailing
V


COLORADO SPRINGS / CO
SOLAR SAVINGS TABLE(7.) CF TABLE
LCR 200 100 67 50 40 33 25 20 ' 17 10 SOLAR SAVINGS
1000/LCR 5 10 15 20 25 30 40 50 60 too 107. 507. 807.
la r DG 9 17 24 30 36 41 51 58 63 74 1.2 1.5 4.1
30.8 DGNI 12 23 33 43 51 59 71 80 85 94 1 1.1 1.4
ELEV TWV 11 19 26 T'1' 38 43 52 59 65 81 1.1 1.5 n
ti/l fWNV e 16 29 34 39 47 55 61 77 1.2 1.6 2.1
HDDo5 WW n 21 29 36 43 48 58 65 71 86 1 1.4* 1.8
64 73 wwSS n 26 38 48 56 62 73 80 85 96 .9 1.1 1.4
TJAN WWN1 u '**7 i. / 39 49 57 64 74 82 87 96 .8 1. 1 1.4
23.6 SSA 13 21 27 33 38 42 50 56 61 77 1.1 1.6 o n 4m 4,
LCRM sse 16 25 38 44 48 56 63 .68 82 1 1.5 o
15 SSSE 1/ 29 38 46 52 57 66 73 <78 90 .9 1.2 1.6
DENVER LCR COLORADO SOLAR SAVINGS TABLE(V.) 200 100 67 50 40 33 25 20 17 10 CP TABLE SOLAR SAVINGS
lOw/LCR 5 10 . 15 20 25 30 40 50 60 100 107. 507. 807.
VAT DG 9 17 25 31 37 43 52 59 64 75 1.2 1.5 3.7
39.7 DGNI 13 24 34 43 52 60 72 80 85 94 1 1.1 1.4
ElEv TWV 11 19 27 33 39 44- 7-52- 60 66 81 1.1 1.5 n 4m
5331 TWNV 8 16 23 29 35 40 48 55 62 78 1.2 1.6 2.1
HDD65 WW 11 21 30 37 44 49 59 66 72 87 1 1.4 1.8
>16 WWSS 12 27 39 49 57 63 73 81 86 96 .8 1.1 1.4
..AN WWN I 11 27 40 50 58 65 75 82 87 96 .8 1. 1 1.4
29.9 SSA 13 21 27 33 38 42 50 56 62 76 1.1* 1.6 ^ o 4m 4m
LCRM . SSB 16 25 fa 'm'Jm 38 44 48 56 63 68 82 1 1.5 n 4m
16 SSSE 18 29 38 46 52 57 66 73 78 90 .9 1.2 1.7
grand JUNCTION / COLORADO SOLAR SAVINGS TABLEfc) LCR 200 100 .67 50 40 33 25 t20 17 10 CF TABLE SOLAR SAVINGS
1000/LCR 5 10 15 20 25 30 40 50 60 100 107. 507. 807.
LMT DG 9 17 23 29 35 39 47 54 58 69 1.2 1.7 0
39.1 DGNI 12 ">T 4.V 33 42 50 57 68 76 82 92 1 1.2 1.5
ELEV TWV 11 19 oc 31 37 41 49 56 62 77 1. 1 1.6 2.2
4S39 TWNV 8 15 > O'? 4mm. 28 33 37 45 52 58 73 1.2 1.7 2.3
riuuob WW il 20, 28 OJ 41 46 55 62 68 82 1.1 1.5 o a.
5605 WWSS 11 26 37 46 54 60 70 77 83 94 .9 1.2 1.5
TJAN WWN I 11 26 38 47 55 61 72 79 84 95 .9 1. 1 1.4
26.6 SSA 13 20 26 31 35 39 46 52 57 71 1.1 1.8 2.5
LCRM . SSB 16 24 30 36 41 45 52 58 63 77 1 . 1.6 o o b.
14 SSSE 17 27 36 42 48 53 61 68 73 85 .9 1.3 1.9


SOLAR DIAGRAMS
Winds .


iavHO avios
i **0


tu/houa/sq ft
Sclar Solar Foiliten 0l act Normal Solar Htai Cain r*ctora. Sih/*N ft So) ar T imm r.M.
A.N. All. Atluch 1rradiatJen, Ituh/ ft K Nr f sr S 5W* V Mb' Nor.
si,%rER 3 4.2 117.3 21 10 21 20 6 1 1 1 1 2 7
A 14." 19N.4 154 47 142 131 n 12 12 17 17 39 6
Juna 21 7 26.0 19.7 215 37 172 207 1:2 21 20 70 20 9? 3
A 17.4 0.7 24* 29 136 215 152 79 76 26 76 153 4
9 44.(1 0.7 267 33 113 192 161 43 31 31 31 201 3
JO 39. * *5.A 272 35 67 145 14* 6 36 35 35 237 2
n *9.2 41.9 274 37 60 116 6 41 37 17 269 1
17 73.1 0.0 279 3* 1* 41 71 43 71 4] 3N 267 12
Naif D- iv Total*' 742 714 1019 S10 311 197 INI 1 NO 1121
wiK*rr* f 5.5 55.0 AN 2 7 67 *3 49 3 2 2 6 4
14.0 41.9 217 1 10 113 703' 131 12 9 1 39 3
tVc 21 JO 20.7 2.4 241 14 14 111 :i7 710 55 14 14 77 j
JJ 25.0 15.2 27 14 16 56 :w 74? 170 16 16 103 1
17 26. 0.0 7*4 17 17 ! 177 751 177 IN 17 iP 12
/ Saif Oi >v Total* 44 54 j 3*o 1 j *11 7"1 77 3 SO 49 2*2
*ttaJ aolat haai sain* for OS (1/N in.) *i*#t fla**.
!(* on rrrn<* rff Irrtancr of 0.20
\
t
NenrlntaA f rrr> ASH*A>
Milnrfho<>w *r Iuru41 1**2
40* NORTH LAX mmmm HEAT GAIN ON UNSHADED WINOOWS
-----HEAT GAIN WITH SHADES
tlllllllll HEAT BLOCKED
SOLAR HEAT GAIN FACTORS FOR 40 N LAT.


!
facaoe orientations INSOLATION ON WALL (Btu/dty)
b c 4 Totri
Q ft CiJ* c ~ 1 | OOUBLE 8 OOUBLE C 1Y 3 84 168 118 236 508 722 361 1016 508 1630 1160 2320 1630 3260 508 722 361 1016 508 2764 2668 3210 3780 4612
1 \ro & s / DOUBLE B OOUBLE C 123 b 87 174 123 246 828 1180 590 1656 828 1490 1060 2120 1490 2980 265 376 188 530 265 2406 2703 3072 3799 4319
1 4 V\ -4?* < A > /, ? < X 8 > \ / < A \e\ c A \s *\y double b Y OOUBLE C 127 90 180 127 254 1174 1670 835 2348 1174 1174 835 1670 1174 2348 127 180 90 254 127 2602 2775 2775 3903 3903
n !T.- OOUBLE C 265 188 376 265 530 1490 2120 1060 2980 1490 828 590 1180 828 1656 123 174 87 246 123 2406 3072 2703 4319 3799
UtlOlNa SIXKS: MLATlVf WALL AMO FLOOR AM (AX
A a r c
4mW
*'
t
I
Relative irradiation on buildings of different
shape and orientation ~ January 21, 40N latitude.
Listed, values represent the irradiation on walls
of a hypothetical building with w 1 square foot.
To get the daily irradiation on a building of
similar shape with w 100 square feet, multiply
these numbers by 100
i
i
INSOLATION ON WALLS I


GUIOaiMC MAPS FQ* PASSIVE SOLM OCSIOI
Cofttnrat1oii ttvell (CF)
load Collector Ratio (l01)
GUIDELINE VALUES
Lo Fuel Cost Hiqn Fuel Cost
CK LCK S4FC.) CF LCK 44F(t)
DENYER. COLORADO 1.27 jo b7 1.42 19 7o
lECHillT FALIQA. CF /
m
Nuaatr of Star (at
Moor ------------------
Area 1 2 7 4
1000 7.7
1400 4.$ 4.7
7000 S. 4 S. 4 4.7
SO00 4.9 4.7 4.9 S.l
tuuoo 4.7 4.0 4.0 4.2
20000 7.9 7.S 7.S 7.S
A
cr
**rt OF la a 9to**ir/ factor tint accounts
far l* relative itMNtiMt.if the Oullainy
ana A| la (At yruaa Hear area. SuyyaataO
valwaa af U arc five* % !*le 7.


INTERNAL ENVIRONMENT
WALL
EXTERNAL ENVIRONMENT
WINTER MCATIKKS
convcctco
4
4
WINTER INSOLATION
WINTER AIR TEMRCRATURi (STILL AIR)
winTCR winOS 1
a

1
Summer insolation £
Summer AiR TCMRCRATURCS (STILL AIR)
SUMMER BREEZE
SUMMER CONOlTlONINO
OEHUMlOlflfiO AIR
COOLEO air
ORCULATiO AIR
MOUStHOLO OOORS

VIEW (VISION OUT)
4
4
!>
il
l"l
ARTIFICIAL illumination
RROOUCTIVE SOUNO
inhabitants
waste WATER
-
SUMMER HUMlOlTY j
3
RREO*TATIOM (RAIN. SNOW ETC ) <
UNPLEASANT
OUST
RRIVACT (VISION IN)
winter Sunshine (visible wave Banoi
OatliGhT
SNOWCLARE
ARTIFICIAL ILLUMINATION ------
NOISE
VISITORS FRtCNOS
4' EMPLOYEES
v Customers
XtruOERS Thieves
vermin INSECTS ROLLENS m.CRChORGANiSuS
NUCV.EAR POLLUTION
ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS TO CONSIOER


CHAPTER 2: PROJECT PARAMETERS
29


The profession of the client is that of a rescue helicopter pilot. The site is located
three miles from the Flight for Life landing pad. He is single and envisions this habitat
with the qualities of a docking base for vehicles as well as himself.
Due to the clients occupation, he understands the selection of equipment for the
job of search and rescue. Hence, the residence is to be based on a collection of selected
gear to perform particular functions. In essence, this is a kit-of-parts approach. The
components are to reflect efficiency as well as economy. Life supporting basics lead the
priority list of prefabricated choices to assemble the house from.
This is a project to incorporate many systems into one; therefore, enabling a
computer to function as the brain of the structure. To create a human-labor free
environment, save routine cleaning and diagnostics, which operates physically at all
times within the presence of the inhabitant. The psychological benefits of this type of
operation empower the inhabitant with the confidence and clarity of mind needed by
one who depends upon technology to save the lives of others while risking his own.
The intensity of this rescue profession requires effortless tranquillity while recharging
to amass the energy and nerves required to approach the next mission.
Spatial Needs:
1. Bedroom/Bath..................... 150 sq.ft.
2. Kitchen/Living .................. 500 sq.ft.
3. Study/Computer Room ............. 200 sq.ft.
4. Equipment Maintenance and Storage .... 750 sq.ft.
5. Mechanical Room ................. 100 sq.ft.
6. Guest Area/Bath ................. 200 sq.ft.
1900 sq.ft.
It is a sanctuary for meditation, to live within the confines of what kills many he
tries to rescue. This structure is the expression of his drive, ambition, and occupation
on this earth. What we do for a living individually is what defines our existence. This
man employs technology to accomplish his job. Some of the equipment and technology
are near fail-safe (as the strategies which safeguard structures from avalanche and hence
has become the main portion of his home), while some aspects are at the mercy of the
weather (such as a helicopter which is an unparalleled machine but still precarious in the
hands of unpredictable weather and landscapes of the hinterlands where the rescues
take place. A composite of the technological elements this man works with are to
assembled as a complete working and living structure. There is no question that the
more time spent with particular equipment, the more the operation becomes second
nature, giving more focus to the job at hand. Security in a home made of similar
technology gives not only more familiarity but more confidence in taking proper actions
in difficult situations. This is not a case of taking the job home with one, but the
practice of living within ones passion.
30


Worringer details the metabolic within architecture through the eye, and mainly
examples, of fine art works. Organic is considered one extreme of the scale comparing
square with circles. In this light, the Abstract, becomes the other extreme defining those
usually difficult and elusive boundaries defining the field of art.
The primary reason for the overall shape of the design is of the most critical part
of the machinery used in rescue. The weakest link in the technology is where the most
focus and attention must occur to make it better and to know the limitations of the
device. All fear must be squelched in using any gear. The basic configurations or
operations of this weak-link must be second nature, with the main concentration being
directed towards the particular, and always unique, operation of extraction. These
pieces are the wing- the shape which affords lift, necessary in saving lives; and the
wheel both elements are in direct contact with the force against that which we push
against. These are the crux points.
Responsibility to living in the reality of finite resources and the goal of releasing
ourselves from the noose of corporate propaganda. Smart homes and buildings do not
have to be the slaves of the power grid or cookie cut development. A major premise
set forth here is to, through appropriate technology and design, present a new model of
efficiency and grace and self-sufficiency to fit the needs of the client as well as the
building industry as a whole. Our government has become an unwieldy monster and
this has been reflected in the building industry. The approach here is to decentralize the
infantile building industry so that it may grow within its particular bioregion due to the
needs encountered. Appropriate technology changes from climate to climate. Within
each climate is a set of microclimates which must be recognized as potential sites in
which the structure may respond in healthy way with both client and environment. In
other words, the structure becomes the mediator between the two.
31


CHAPTER 3: REGULATIONS
32


This site has been designated as a Mining One district zone. Due to the on call
nature of the clients career, this high mobility location suits his needs quite well.
Following are zoning restrictions and building codes which regulate the area.
33


SECTION 18. M-l MINING ONE DISTRICT
A. PURPOSE
This district is established for the purpose of providing for mining, prospecting,
exploring, milling, processing and/or placering of mineral resources, and for residential
use all in a mutually compatible fashion.
B. PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
Except as otherwise herein provided, performance standards shall be the same
as for the MR-1 District.
1. HEIGHT. There shall be no height limitation for any use specifically
required for the mining, prospecting, exploring, milling, processing and/or placering of
mineral resources.
2. JUNK. Those materials which would be classified as junk in the Definitions
Section (Section32) but which are usable in the mining operation shall be allowed.
3. FENCES. All fences shall comply with the "Fencing/wildlife migration
performance standard of the MR-1 zoning district provided, however, that any fence
specifically required for safety or security purposes to prevent access to mine shafts,
adits, or equipment may exceed 42 inches in height. The area contained by any such
fence shall be no greater than necessary to provide for such safety and security.
C. PERMITTED PRINCIPAL USES
A parcel of land classified M-1 may be used, subject to other federal, state and
County laws, for the following purposes only, except as otherwise herein provided:
1. Any use or structure in compliance with County and State rules and
regulations which is specifically required for the mining, prospecting, exploring,
milling, processing and/or placering of mineral resources.
2. Any use permitted in the Mountain Residential One District, Subject to all
MR-1 District regulations.
3. Such other uses which may be permitted under Special Use Permit
procedures.
D. ACCESSORY USES AND BUILDINGS
Regulations for uses and buildings accessory to a residential use in the M-l
District shall be the same as those for the MR-1 district. In addition, a dwelling unit
and a dining facility for not more that five mine employees shall be allowed if no other
residential use exists on the property.
E. USES REQUIRING SPECIAL USE PERMITS
Pursuant to Section 27. Special Use Permits, land classified M-l may be
determined by the board of County Commissioners to be suitable for uses additional to
34


those enumerated above. Such uses requiring a Special Use Permit include but are not
limited to:
1. Uses which exceed the performance standards specified in Section 18.B.
provided, however, that no such use will mitigate the impact created by exceeding such
performance standards, or unless site conditions make such standards inappropriate or
unnecessary;
2. Temporary uses of land;
3. Combinations of uses listed within these M-l district regulations, not
otherwise allowed;
4. Church building;
5. Bed and breakfast lodging, provided that all uses are in compliance with
performance standards herein specified:
6. Non-public schools;
7. Governmental buildings;
8. Telephone exchange;
9. Electric substation;
10. Gas regulator station;
11. Water reservoirs;
12. Temporary placement of a mobile home, recreational vehicle, or trailer used
for a watchman or caretaker; and
13. Such other uses that are similar to the uses stated above.
35


SECTION 5. MR-1 MOUNTAIN RESIDENTIAL ONE DISTRICT
A. PURPOSE
This district is established for the purpose of providing for residential and other
appropriate uses in mountainous terrain.
B. PERFORMANCE STANDARDS
Unless approved by special use permit pursuant to Special Use Permit rules and
procedures adopted by the Board of County Commissioners, no use shall be made of
land classified MR-1 which exceeds the following performance standards:
1. ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
a. Non-commercial poultry houses, rabbit and chinchilla hutches are
allowed but shall contain not more than one hundred square feet of total ground floor
area.
b. Non-commercial stables are allowed to a maximum of four horses per
parcel; provided, however, that the total number of horses that may be kept is limited to
one animal for each twelve thousand square feet of lot area.
2. FENCING/WILDLIFE IMPACT MITIGATION
Any fence (including gates) over 500 feet in total perimeter length in
areas designated as High Impact Potential and any fence (including gates) over 1000
feet in total perimeter length in areas designated Moderate Impact Potential on the
Map of Significant Wildlife Habitat Areas (adopted by the Board of County
Commissioners and recorded in Book 456 at Pages 814, 815, and 816 of the records of
the County Clerk and Recorder) will have a maximum height of 42 inches and be of a
see-through design permitting wildlife to easily see what is on the other side, and to
allow for wildlife migration.
3. PARKING
Parking associated with on-site uses shall not overflow into public
rights-of-way.
4. HEIGHT
No building or structure shall exceed thirty-five feet in height.
5. JUNK
No owner, agent or occupant of any property shall be allowed to
accumulate junk within view from adjacent private property or public right-of-way.
6. AREA REGULATIONS
a. Area. For every dwelling or other main building erected or
structurally altered, there shall be provided a minimum lot area of not less than one
acre, or two acres for property proposed for platting. For property proposed for
platting, this area regulation is subject to factors unique to a site, which may demand
substantially larger areas per homesite. These factors include: wildfire hazard potential,
geologic hazard potential, wildlife habitats and corridors, ground water supply, soil
erosion potential, and sewage treatment system suitability.
36


b. Front Yard, t he minimum depth of front yard for aii structures shall
be thirty feet.
c. Side Yard. The minimum width of side yards for all structures snail
be thirty feet.
d. Rear Yard, l he minimum depth of rear yards for aii structures shaii
be twenty-five feet.
e. No wail, fence or other structure shaii be erected and no hedge,
shrub, tree or other growth shall be maintained on any property between any setback
'line and any public or private road or drive which would cause danger to traffic as
determined by the County Road and Bridge Supervisor.
C. PERMITTED PRINCIPAL USES
A parcel of land classified MR-1 may be used, subject to other federal,
state and County iaws, for the following purposes oniy, except as otherwise herein
provided:
1. One on-family dwelling which may include a day care home, and
infant and toddler home (excluding any specialized group facility); or
2. Public school; or
3. Public park or other non-commerciai public recreational use; and
4. Such other uses that are consistent with the intended permitted uses
stated above, subject to the approval of the Board of County Commissioners or its
designee.
D. ACCESSORY USES AND BUILDINGS
In conjunction with a use outlined above, a parcel of land classified
MR.-l may be used, subject to other federal, state, and County iaws, for the following:
1. Home Occupations in compliance with regulations herein adopted;
2. A guest house on the same iot with a on-family dwelling, provided
no kitchen facilities be installed therein, and subject to the approval of the Board of
Adjustment; on parcels four acres or larger in size, a guest house or caretaker's
residence not to exceed seven hundred fifty square feet in floor area shall be allowed
without Board of Adjustment approval;
3. Vehicle storage garage, bam and/or storage buildings;
4. Wind energy conversion systems (windmiiis used to generate
mechanical or electrical energy) included transmission and distribution lines; said
towers to be iocated at ieast a distance equai to the overaii height of the system


(including the maximum reach of any tower facility) from the nearest property
boundary;
5. One non-commercial, amateur service communications tower
included antenna shall be allowed on each parcel. Said tower shall be located at least a
distance equal to the overall height of the system (including the maximum reach of any
tower facility) from the nearest property boundary. Amateur Service shall be as
defined in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 47, Chapter 1 (Federal
Communications Commission), Subchapter A, Part 2;
6. Electric transmission and distribution lines;
7. Water storage tanks; and
8. Tennis courts and other private recreational uses.
E. USES REQUIRING SPECIAL USE PERMIT
Pursuant to Section 27; Special Use Permits, land classified MR-1
may be determined by the Board of County Commissioners to be suitable for uses
additional to those enumerated above. Such additional uses requiring a Special Use
Permit include but are not limited to:
1. Uses which exceed the performance standards specified in Section
5.B. provided, however, that no such use shall be approved unless activities or
methods are guaranteed which will mitigate the impact created by exceeding such
performance standards, or unless site conditions make such standards inappropriate or
unnecessary;
2. Temporary uses of land;
3. Combinations of uses of land;
4. Church building;
5. Day care center;
6. Bed and breakfast lodging, provided that all uses are in compliance
with performance standards herein specified;
7. Non-public schools;
8. Governmental buildings;
9. Telephone exchange;
10. Electric substation;
11. Gas regulator station;
38


12. Water reservoirs;
13. Uses which are accessory to or incidental to permitted principal uses
on adjacent parcels; and
14. Such other uses
that are similar to the uses stated above.
39


BUILDING CODES
Refer to UBC 1991.
40


CHAPTER 4: GUIDELINES
41


Site specific design lends itself to creating community by grounding the design
formulation on characteristics of a site instead of the whims of a designer or the
untrained judgements of the client. If neighboring structures are built from the same
original premise; inherently, a community starts to develop regardless of style,
materials, and expression. Basing design on site makes for a better integrated building
to the ground.
This thesis of grounding design on the site is an ancient and basic first step
rooted in survival. Our resources are finite and sustainable techniques are coming to the
forefront in the world of architectural design. At some point we will have no choice, as
the ancients.
Certainly, with stratospheric real estate on the horizon (demonstrated by the
plans to release 250 40-ton wireless communications platforms 100,000 above the
earth held in place by helium-filled dirigibles,GPS, and footballfield-sized solar panels
powering zero-pollution ion engines by Sky Station International, Inc.), certainly
there is no place on the face of the planet that is uninhabitable by man. Pressurized,
prefab, tropospheric village of tomorrow.
42


CHAPTER 5: DESIGN
43


Project Directives
Systems Integration
Home off-grid by utilizing micro-climate elements
-Wind + Wind well pump
-Solar + Parabolic dish solar reflector cooker []
-Water by snow collection
Insulated by berm
Insulated by snow collection
Developed Lifestyles
-Environment enhances how one visualizes himself.
- Ones work is ones identity. Architecture must support this.
The way to investigate the future is to use the tools of the future. The number of
potential scenarios that are able to be investigated through use of the computer is mind-
bending. Architectural spaces are now simulated well enough to free the mind into
delving to a more distinct level of critique and refinement.
The residence is a pole structure of 40 foot penta-treated utility poles to elevate
the building planes above the highly unstable sand and gravel soil content.
Furthermore, the existing foundations of concrete are used as a tethering base of
supporting cables and platform for the steel bridge/framework for the energy producing
wind tunnel (mimicking the power towers around the site). The cost, placement, and
implementation of concrete foundations is not only very expensive for this site, but
structurally suspect and dangerous due to the inherent fluidity of the site, however, in
this case, the existing concrete foundations are used not to support habitable space, but
to act as primarily an aesthetic integration of the site, and secondarily, a secondary
anchor to this site. The conclusion of using the structure in this manner derives from
investigation of the estimated movement of the structure over time, the analysis of
coherency and strength as well as measures to seal it from the elements. The utility
poles echo the lodgepole pines which grow in this region which act as the first wave of
natural soil stabilization. The horizontal orientation of the steel structure describes an
aesthetic break, or visual resting place in the line of power lines strung across the
landscape. This steel structure supports locally generated and used power by the
harnessing of wind in contrast to the miles of power lines transporting declining energy
from a remote site.
The concept of the wheel powers the design in context, operation (wind
generator), the circular pattern the helicopter rotors make, the close attention to the
seasons due to the natural conditions the client must work in, and the spiritual values
described by the wheel according to local native American lore.
The design practice of overlaying significant elements and characteristics of site
history, client, and possibly any other type of pertinent or relevant image is used in this
project. The thematic glue in this plan is the relevance of the overlaid technology on the
wheel, turbine, prop of the helicopter.
44


Empirical means and conservative adjustments shall guide many decisions
throughout this project so as not to compromise the exploration into the potential of
harvesting untapped resources. Another factor in dealing with the wind is to bring it
within the residence to perform other tasks than merely pushing a turbine without the
main power source being directly involved with the household. Valves may be open
and closed admitting and denying wind access depending on its need. The supply will
most always be present due to both the canyon and the constant stream of motorists.
Systems management. Key factors driving this project are functional, so there
exists the opportunity for a more relaxed and less conjured design initiative. There are
modem micro-climates to investigate which are site specific issues to initially influence
the initial direction of design, these concerns necessitate the use of the already-
mentioned systems. Typically, wind is inconsistent due to the turbulence in the air and
thought unrewarding of potential use in energy production beyond pumping a little
water. This site has an unobstructed plane channeling the wind with the walls of the
canyon directly to the turbine on the site. Since wind is influenced by the relative
locations and orientations of objects in the landscape, wind tunnel tested forms will
predominate the primary designs.
Architecture is originally of experimentation. With its success, this type of
construction is to soon be the standard. With the design of raised platforms, comes the
inherent factor of a modified micro-climate. This is the crux of the biscuit, for, a new,
clean resource is available for power creation. Enough power that a margin could be
sold to the power company (in some places this is a legal responsibility). Units could
be produced in-mass to be anchored in many configurations depending on the site.
The goals of the project were met and new questions have been raised as is
typical with this type of research. The results exhibit specifically how multiple systems
complement each other to reach new heights of efficiency and space organization. The
Modernist criticisms I put forth earlier, are to be shone by example with the details of
this project. These plans show an adhesion to the five principles to be followed
according to Le Corbusier, but only by coincidence. Or is it coincidence? With my
study of copious quantities of Modem work, still, I feel free of their orbits. My instinct
looks for an inherent aesthetic bond between the spirit of the movement and the
archetypal figures which emerge from under their pencils. Finally, a reason to
investigate the paranormal.
45



Z
5
CL,


SOUTH ELEVATION


EAST ELEVATION
NORTH ELEVATION






APPENDIXES
51


1. ROOF
CATCHMENT
400 sq.
OVERFLOW


'CLEAN WATER" CATCH SYSTEM;
& ALL VALVE 1 SWTS Off TANK FROM SYSTEM
r ii, t i: n i so me$h ..protects- pump'
ni x HOSt REQUIRED FOR VSR AT (ON OF PUMP
12 VOLT DC PUMP PUSHES WATER INTOPRESSWf TANK
BALL VALVE 2 ISOLATES PUMPFROMPRESSURE:
TANK *TT- SPECIAL,"T~ to ACCOMODATE GUAGE AND HOSE BIB
BAIL VALVE S '-SHUTS OFF PR£S$Ufif.TANK FROM SYSTEM
PRESSURE TANK PRESSURIZES SYSTEM
BALL VALVE 4 OLAT£5: FITERS 2 & 3 FROM PRESSURE
FILTER 2 50Q MESH STEP'S UP 10 1000 MESH FILTER :
FILTER $ 1000 MESH STEP'S UP TO 5 MCRON FILTER '
GOOD ENOUGH FOR ALL BUT DRINK WO WATER
PRESSURE RETURN LINE b PROVIDES PRESSURE FOR CLEATS OUT Of FILTER 1
BALL VALVE 5 ACTIVATES PRESSURE RETURN LINE
typical, filter blowout
with garden hose to
TAKE WATER iT
PRESSURE RE TURN L WE

! j BALL VALVE 4 J &&&*: v hq* BB
GUAGE
to ft
t
FILTER I
FILTER 2

BALI VALVE 5 *
) 2 VOLT DC
PUMP
/
WATER
TO FIXTURES
- ALL VALVE 2
TANK "T"
PRESSURE TANK l B ALL VALVES

\
V



BALL VALVE
FILTER t


'DIRTY WATER" CATCH SYSTEM
BAIL VALVE 1 SHUTS OFF TANK FROM SYSTEM =
FII TER 1 50 MESH PROTECTS PUMP
FLEX HOSE RfQU RED FOR VBRAT ION OF PUMP I
12 VOLT DC PUMP PUSHES WATER INTO PRESSURE TANK
BALI VALVE 2 ISOLATES PUMP FROM PRESSURE
TANK *T SPECIAL T" TO ACCOMODATE GUAGE AMO HOSE B
BALL VALVE 3 ~ SWTS OFF PRESSURE TANK FROM SYSTEM
PRESSURE TANK PRESSURIZES SYSTEM
BALI VALVE 4 ISOLATES FILTERS 2 & 3 FROM PRESSURE
Fll. TER 2-500 MESH STEPS UP TO 1000 MESH F ILTER
FILTER 3 1000 MESH STEPS UP TO 5 MICRON FILTER
000 ENOUGH FOR ALL BUT DRINK IN0 WATER
PRESSURE RETURN LINE PROVIDES PRESSURE FOR CLEAN OUT OF FILTER I
BALI. VALVE 5 ACTIVATES PRESSURE RETURN LINE
BALL V ALVE 6 ISOLATES FOCR 4 & DRINKING FILTER FROM PRESSURE:
FILTER 4 5 MICRON TO PROTECT DRINKING FILTER
DRINKING FILTER FILTERS OUT BACTERIA FOR DRMKMG ALMOST ANY WATER

tank;
"FILTER
DRINKING F ITER
DRINKING
WATER
WATER
TO FIXTURES
PRESSURE TANK
*- BALL VALVE 2
tank "T~
BALL VALVE $
BALL VALVE 1
FILTER I


$. mm
Â¥
.. ...
!§^§t...

1 r
vm-fr t IfiVV* him ter

Schematic of a typical sobr imulkskm
(Ijjfhi I!fiw3|


yi
if?';
Solar Panel Alignment for the Northern Hemisphere
(Direction is reversed for Southern Hemisphere!
A rough estimate would add 15* so your latitude for winter
and subtract 55* tWm your latitude for summer

V*U
x -vO** crafts
lHV*. T£*.
vA*CS li^UK
V>4.£7 *S?fc
ccntscls. n
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Recommended Battery Enclosure


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SQUARE D LOAD CENTER


BIBLIOGRAPHY
59


Alexander, C. ; A Pattern Language, Oxtord (1977) NY
Barrett, J.K., and Pearl, R.H., 1978: An appraisal of Colorados geothermal
resources. Colorado Geological Survey Bulletin 39, 224 pp.
Brown, Robert D. ; Microclimatic Landscape Design John Wiley & Sons,Inc.
(1995) NY
Coe, B.A., 1978: Geothermal energy development in Colorado: processes,
promises, and problems. Colorado Geological Survey Information Series 9, 48 pp.
Fuller, R. Buckminster; Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth, Dutton (1978) NY
Grose, L.T. ,1974: Summary of geology of Colorado related to geo-thermal energy
potential, in Proceedings of a symposium on geothermal energy and Colorado.
Colorado Geological Survey Bulletin 35 pp. 11 -29
Harbison, Robert ; The Built, the Unbuilt and the Unbuildable. MIT (1991)
Cambridge, MA
Hejduk, John ; Mask of Medusa. Rizzoli (1985) NY
Keller, G.V., 1974: Geophysics of Colorado and geothermal energy, in
Proceedings of a symposium on geothermal energy and Colorado. Colorado
Geological Survey Bulletin 35. pp.31-43
Kloos, Maarten ; Architecture Now. Architecture & Nature Press (1991)
Amsterdam
Marlin. William: Nature Near: Late Essays Of Richard Neutra. Capra Press (1989)
Santa Barbara, CA
Nesbitt, Lois E. ; Brodsky & Utkin. Princeton Architectual Press (1991) NY
Oke, Tim; Boundrv Laver Climates UBC (1995) Vancouver.BC
Pawley, Martin; Future Systems Phaidon (1993) London
Pearl, R.H., 1979: Colorados hydrothermal resources base an assessment.
Colorado Geological Survey Resources Series 6. 144 pp.
Snyder, Gary ; The Real Work. Penguin (1969) NY
Soleri, Paolo ; Technology and Cosmogenesis. Harper & Row (1973) NY
T omkins, Calvin ; Off The Wall. Doubleday (1980) NY
U.S. Geological Survey and Colorado Geological Survey, 1977: Energy resources
K)39f ^olorado' ^-S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Map I-
Wilhelm ; Abstraction and Empathy. International Universities Press
60