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Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 1, Number 8

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Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 1, Number 8
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
13

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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C ftrtdttruu & JUtott
VOLUME I NUMBER 8
DENVER, COLORADO
GEORGE MASUNAGA
NOMINATED FOR PRESIDENT
The Denver JACL nominating committee
met at a special session last week to
name candidates for 1947 officers. Af-
ter careful consider-
ation of potential
Nisei leaders In this
area, the committee
named George Masunaga
of Brighton, Colorado
as candidate for JACL
President. Masunaga
is a native-born Co-
loradoan, and is a
veteran of World War
11. He has been eery
active in Nisei af-
fairs ir. this area,
and is a graduate of
the University of Co-
lorado.
OBORGE MASUNAGA
Other candidates were named as fol-
lows:
1st Vice President (Program Chmn)
Toshio Ando
2nd Vice President (Membership)
(hlomdo Slate Confemnce
ho f urns Robert # Renni^
Attorney General Robert H. Kenny of
California was the featured speaker of
the Colorado State Unity Conference held
at the Albany Hotel on Nov. 30.
3rd.Vice President (Publicity)
Roy Takeno
Recording Secretary.
Bessie Uatsuda
Corresponding Secretary:
Bessie Onishi
Treasurer:
Dr. George J. Kubo
The Nominations Committee emphasizes
that these are official recommendations
and not election remits. If any mem-
ber desires to vote for individuals not
listed, "write-in" votes will be consi-
dered valid.___________________
MEMBERSHIPS INCREASED...
Membership fees of .the JACL for
1947 have been Increased, effective
as of Jan. 1, 1947.
Denver JACL Chapter yearly dues
are as follows:
$ 1.00 for membership
1.00 for The Bulletin
1.00 for Nat'l. H.Q.
i£> 3,66 total annual dues.
Married couples may become mem-
bers under a combined fee of $5.00.
The Pacific Citizen subscription
rate has been inoreased to $2.50 for
members and $3.50 for non-members
per year, after February 15, 1946.
WRSmtJWML MIL*
The DENVER JACL Christmas Inaugural
Ball will be held in the Silver Glade of
the Cosmopolitan Hotel, Dec. 26th, from
9:00 p.m. until 1:00 a.m. Happy Logans
orchestra has been obtained.
The high-light of the intermission
will be the shearing in of the new 1947
JACL officers for the Denver Chapter.
Min YasuL, Tri-State Regional Represen-
tative, will administer the oath of of-
fice to the newly elected cabinet.
The affair will be seml-formal.
Mits Xaneko has been appointed as the
general chairman for the dance. Dr. T.
Mayeda, JACL President, announced cne
other committee members as follows: Amy
Miura, tickets; Dr. George Kubo, posters
and ads; Bessie Matsuda, publicity; and
Bessie Onishi, invitations and arrange-
ments.
Atty-Gen. Kenny told of the methods
of combatting race hatreds in California
and particularly explained how public o-
pinlon was prepared for the return of
Japanese evacuees to the West Coast in
1945. He further added Ms opinion that
restrictive covenants prohibiting owner-
ship of land by persons other than the
Cauoasian race, and possibly the anti-
alien land laws in California might be
declared unconstitutional by the U.S.
Supreme Court in test cases.
All JACL members and friends are cor-
dially invited to- attend. Admission
will be $4.00 for couples, and $3.00 for
stags.
DUC SPONSORS LEGISLATION
The Denver Unity Council is plsnning
active sponsorship of four important le-
gislative bills, FEPC, antl-KKK, aboli-
tion of restrictive covenants, and com-
munity responsibility for riot demages.
The Denver JACL participated in this
statewide conference. Colorful posters
designed,by Saburo Tanl were donated to
the Denver Unity Council to advertise
this conference.
JACL la participating In the prepara-
tion of these bills, and further has ob-
tained resolutions by the DUC favoring
the immediate enactment of the JACL le-
gislative program by the U.S. Congress.
DECEMBER 15, 1946
nia w
STAFF REDUCED
The National JACL leaders conferencs
held in Salt Lake City during Nov. 23-24
made decisions which will greatly affect
the Denver JACL and the Tri-State office
org&nizati on.
Mike M. Masaoka was named executive
director of the Anti-Discrimination Com-
mittee, and will spend most of his time
and energies in 'Washington, D.C. to push
legislation affecting the welfare of the
Japanese in America, particularly the
naturalization and evacuation claims le-
gislation.
Mas Satow of the Mid-West and Eastern
JACL Regional Offices was transferred to
Salt Lake City as Acting Executive Sec-
retary of the JACL during Masaoka* s ab-
sence.
It was suggested that uln Yasui be
appointed to fill Mas Satow's vacancy
inChicago, leaving the Denver office as
a temporary office after June, 1947 with
only an office secretary in charge.
MAIL BALLOTS
Mail ballots for the 1947 election of
Denver JACL cabinet officers are being
mailed out to all registered members of
the Denver chapter on Dee. 16.
The Election Committee reminds mem-
bers that write-in names will be recog-
nized as valid, but emphasizes that the
deadline for voting is Dec. 23.
Remember*- -Hie3all //


PAGE 2
THE UBKTffi JAGL BULLET IB
DECEMBER 15. 1946
'9/umlkf,
PBEXY5 CORN


THIS IS MY FAREWELL MESSAGE. .
as the outgoing President of the
Denver JACL.
DURING THE YEAR 1946. .
the Denver JACL was able to accomp-
lish many worthwhile things. We would
like to think of the year just past as
the time when the Denver JACL was able
to do BIG things. Personally, I would
like to hope that our activities serve
only as an inspiration to accomplish far
bigger and better things- yet to come.
This, by far, is the pleasantest task
that we have undertaken in a long time.
We want to convey to tou, ou* readers
and friends, the season's joyous greet-
ings. With the holiday season approach-
ing, and with the festive feelings warm-
ing our hearts, we Just wanna say to you
all, "MERRY CHRISTMAS! MERRY CHRISTMAS!
KERRY CHRISTMAS!" and by all means, "A
HAPPY, HAPPY NEW YEAR!"
Admittedly, a tall, cool glass of ex-
cellent Scotch, a mellow pipe, and soft
comfortable slippers add to our feeling
of well-being and kindness and charity
towards our fellow-men.
"Peace on Earth, and Good Will toward
all Men." Yes, indeed, "God Bless You!"
A Word of Tha-nrs
"THE DENVER JAGL BULLETIN" made Its
first brave start in May, 1946. Since
that time, despite many vicissitudes,
we have been able to publish 8 monthly
issues which has meant a tremendous
amount of work for a handful of people
who loyally labored long and hard every
month to provide you with local news of
interest for your enjoyment.
But, now that the end of thd year ie
in sight, we want to express our fervent
thanks to our staff members who gave our
little paper the reputation of being the
"beat little JACL news bulletin in the
United States".
WE THANK:
KATHERINE KAWAMURA, who as the first
editor of the Bulletin set a high
standard and gave inspiration for
excellent journalism.
I HAVE DEEPLY APPRECIATED. .
the cooperation and the unselfish
support which the members and the cabi-
net officers have given to me during my
term in office as President of the "most
active and the largest JACL chapter in
the U.S."
TO EACH AND ALL OP YOU. .
members and officers of the Denver
JACL, I humbly express my sincere thanks
and heartfelt gratitude.
TO MY SUCCESSOR. .
the President-Elect Of the Denver
JACL for 1947, and to his cabinet, I do
wish you luck and suocess in your endea-
vors. We were able to do fairly well in
our efforts this year, but I hope that
you will be able to accomplish more and
bring greater glory to Denver!
AND SO, .
as my final word as the President
of the Denver JACL, I wish you all:
"A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR"
With the passing of the ten reloca-
tion centers, ten of America's most u-
nique publications were discontinued.
These were the relocation camp newspa-
pers which informed and entertained a
readership which was confined behind the
wire fences of the WRA camps.
In spite of the conditions which at-
tended their publication, these papers
were sprightly, lively and newsy. At
their best they combined good news cov-
erage and responsibility to their read-
ers with a lively initiative and good
humor. In addition, the Heart Mountain
Sentinel, to cite an example, carried on
a courageous editorial campaign against
the defeatist influences and negativism
within the relocation center and against
anti-democratic foroes on the outside.
The closing of the relocation camps
has meant the demise of these camp pap-
ers, like'Glia's News^Courier, the Mini-
doka Irrigator, Topaz Times, Granada
Pioneer, Denson Tribune, Rohwer Outpost,
Manzanar Free-Press, Poston Chronicle
and the Tulean Dispatch. The return of
approximately one-half of the evaouees
co the West Coast has been followed by
the reestablishment of the daily Rafu
Shlmpo In Los Angeles and by the Inaugu-
rtUou of two new daily papers serving
the Japanese Anerican group In San Fran-
cisco, the Nlchi-Bei Times and the Pro-
gressive News.
n HITO OKADA
J NATL JACL PRES'DENT
ej
"I wish to thank the Denver Bulletin
for this opportunity to send my Holiday
Greetings for a Merrier Christmas and a
Happier New Year to the members of the
Denver Chapter.
The highlight of the year was your
successful undertaking of the National
Convention. It was a convention long to
be remembered by all those who were for-
tunate to be in attendance.
In the coming year, I sincerely hope
that the Denver Chapter will continue
its leadership in the ambitious and ac-
celerated program confronting the na-
tional organization."
The need for information, most parti-
cularly that which concerns the Japanese
Americans, has been met by these papers
and other publications which have been
started in other resettlement areas. A
Nisei Weekender in New York and the Chi-
cago Nisei Courier are two examples of
the new community newspapers being pub-
lished by the Nisei. In addition to the
publications mentioned, a number of org-
anizational bulletins are published, a
great many bh JACL chapters, and these
help meet the need for news. (Probably
the liveliest example of these papers is
the Denver JACL Bulletin which combines
originality and wit with technical com-
petence. )
Newspapers like the Pacific Citizen,
with a general circulation scattered in
all of the forty-eight states and Hawaii
cannot meet the need for personalized,
community news which these new organiza-
tional bulletins can offer. Among these
papers are JACL bulletins in Chicago,
Cincinnati, Salt Lake City, Milwaukee,
New York City, Portland, Seattle and
other communities. In addition, there
are suoh established publications as the
Northwest Nisei News in Minneapolis, the
St. Louis Nisei, Perm-Notes in Philadel-
phia and bulletins in Cleveland, Detroit
and Des Moines. These papers, together
with newspapers of more general circula-
tion, help make Nisei one of the best-
informed groups in the nation-.
BEN MIYAHARA, make-up editor, who did
a splendid Job of professional com-
petence in setting up our paper in
distinctive style.
SABURO TANI, artist, who hand-printed
all the headlines, which gives our
publication its unique quality.
ROSA HIGASHI, who contributed all the
timely and entertaining cartoons
which have appeared.
HIKARU li'vASAKI of .YILSHIRE STUDIOS,
who generously supplied all the in-
teresting photos for our paper.
DR. T. luAYEDA, local JACL President,
who gave us his viewpoints in his
column, "From The Proxy's Corner".
BILL HOSOKAiVA, columnist extraordin-
ary, whose "The Critic's Corner" is
a special feature.
OUR COLUMNISTS, whose names we cannot
divulge, for their charming chit-
chat, which gave spice and verve to
our paper.
GUEST EDITORIAL WRITERS, who gave.us
important messages relating to our
welfare.
THE TYPISTS, who every month pains-
takingly and meticulously typed the
many dummy sheets and final proofs.
#e do not recall all who helped us
but they include: -MAY SATO, BESSIE
ONISHI, BESSIE MATSUDA, YAYE SAKA-
GUCHI, and many other people.
AND, finally, but certainly not least
in Importance, are people suoh as
MBRIJANE YOKOE, TRUE SH1BATA YASUI,
ROY TAKENO, and others who have in
anonymous ways contributed to the
outstanding success of our paper.
It is perhaps odd that a newspaper of
this kind should close the year with a
word of thanks to its own staff members.
However, since all the people above
did a remarkably fine Job, without any
compensation, and on many occasions kept
working until the wee hours of the morn-
ing to meet deadlines, in order to pro-
duce a worthwhile paper, it is fitting
that we publicly say "THANKS A MILLION!"
r *Vliv)i/i -s
Published monthly by the Denver
chapter of the Japanese American
Citizens League, 615 E & C Building,
Denver, Colo. Telephone: CH 59,90.
Editor: Bill Hosokawa
Staff: Ben Miyahara, Sab Tani,
Dr. T. Mayeda, Merijane Yokoe, Maml
Kataglri, Rosa Higashi, True Shlbta
Yasul, and Min Yasul.
Poto^^ourtes^^fJ*IkSHIREJ5TUDJ0^^^p
^U6$T EDITORIAJ-
TARRY TAJ I Rl
EDITOR "PACIFIC CITIZEN
It
NISEI NEWS PAPERS
a


DECEMBER 19. 1946
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
PAGE 3
TKE OHM'S CORNER.
___________It/WllbsoImJa.
Long ago, mien quantity was highly
Important, Pepsi became our favorite co-
la drink. A nickel would buy a king-
size bottle, containing enough to quenoh
our youthful thirst. It was important
not to have to spend another nickel to
complete the job.
We have remained loyal to Pepal Cola
through the years, but our loyalty has
not been without effort.
We have had to put up with the scoff-
ing of our more aristocratic friends who
sang the praise of another, more widely
know and advertised-brand. They con-
tended its flavor was superior, and per-
haps with reason.
We have had to listen, often with
grimaces, to an inane radio ditty which
goes like this: "Pepsi-Cola hits the
spot, twelve ounce bottle that's a lot,"
and fading out into "Nickel, nickel,
nickel, nickel" accompanied by the sound
of gurgling.
And sometimes there would be foisted
on us a dizzy pseudo-comic strip about a
couple of cops who would get the energy
to rescue a fair damsel in distress aft-
er a few snifters of Pepsi. That would-
n't have been so bad If those characters
weren't always crowding some legitimate
comics out of our Sunday morning reading
fare.
But we could always swallow these af-
fronts to our sensibilities by recalling
that a single bottle of the stuff,
spiked with a few Ice cubes, would fill
two glasses. And at the prevailing rate
of six bottles for a quarter, that was
not bad.
But this week the Pepsi people dealt
out the cruelest blow of all. This is
how it happened. Airily we wandered
down to the grocery store with six emp-
ties, In a paper sack (they won't sell
you full bottles unless you bring in
empties, and we often wonder what a fel-
low does If he hasn't got them.)
We picked out six bottles, carried
them over to the counter and plunked
down a quarter, plus a penny for the
state.
"Sorry, Bub," said the man, "I've got
to have 11 cents more. They're six
cents straight nowsix times six Is 36,
plus a penny tax."
Oh well. We won't have to listen to
that crazy radio jingle any more.
Df. TAKENO commences
PRACTICE IN DENVER
Dr. George Takeno, Nisei physician
surgeon, is now associated with Dr. Ho-
ward Suenaga at 830 18th Street, Den-
ver, Colorado in the practice of medi-
cine. Dr. Takeno becomes the fifth Ni-
sei N.D. practicing In Denver, Colorado.
Dr. Takeno is the younger brother of
Roy Takeno, former English editor of the
Rocky Shimpo who Is at present a report-
er -for the Denver Post.
YBL CONFERENCE
SLATED FOR DEC.27.28.29
The thirteenth annual Young Buddhist
League Conference will convene under the
direction of Ployd Koshio, president of
the conference in Denver on Dec. 27, 28,
29, it was revealed by the Bussei Head-
quarters this week.
The Reverend Kumata of the Buddhist
Churches of America at San Francisco and
the Reverend Wahlberg, formerly of the
Grace Community Church of Denver will
deliver the keynote addresses in the
afternoon.
A memorial service honoring those who
died during the past year will be held
at Denver Buddhist Church Sunday morn-
ing beginning at 10:00 O'clock. The
newly elected officers of the Tri-State
YBL will be installed following this
service.
The conference banquet will be held
in the Silver Glade Room of the Cosmo-
politan Hotel from 4:30 o'clock. Dr.
Takashi Mayeda will be Toastmaster. The
Sayonara Ball will follow at 9:00 o'-
clock with Happy Logan and his orchestra
providing the music.
KITAGAWA GOES TO N.Y.
MASA KITAGAWA, talented Nisei Pianist
recently left Boulder for New York City
where she' is to continue her studies at
the famed Jullllard School of Music.
The former music student at the Uni-
versity of Colorado was considered one
of the most promising students to enroll
at the school. She is the daughter of
Dr. Kav Kitagawa of San Francisco.
13& Y. P. C.C. HELD IN
DENVER NOV30-DEC 1
The 13th Annual YPCu was held in Den-
ver on Nov. 30 Dec. 1, under the able
chairmanship of Aiko Fukuyama.
Approximately 250 young people from
all parts of Colorado and Nebraska were
in attendance. The high point of the
confab was the banquet and ball in the
Cathedral Room of the Albany, at which
many JACLers were patrons and patroness-
es. Dean Paul Roberts was featured as
principal speaker for the banquet.
Joe Arlki was elected chairman for
next year's conference, and Rev. K. Sa-
saki continues as advisor.
"THE SMALL TRy
HE WHO KNOWS ONLY HIS OWN GENERATION
REMAINS ALWAYS A CHILD
With many activities and socials m.
planned, the DU Coed's Club are now or-
ganized under a new nameNU CHI DELTA
which simply stands for Nisei Coeds of
Denver. New Pins are being ordered un-
der the co-chairmanship of HIROKO ASANO
and JANET SASARARA. Mrs. K. SASAKI is
advisor, and the cabinet consists of the
following: President KAMI KATAGIRI;
Vice President RUTH IE KA'-VAKAKIj Secre-
tary KASAKO SATO; Treasurer ROSE HA-
NA'*YA; Social Welfare NAOMI INAI; pub-
licity TETSUKO TODA.
KATIE KAiAMURA writes the Brotherhood
gang once in a wnile to tell them she's
having quite a time especially with the
horseslI Here's hoping she doesn't meet
the horses "half way" when she goes rid-
ing.
Say nowit isn't spring but we sure
hear birds singing for RUTHIE KAJVAKAMI
and STANLEY ICHIKAWA as they stroll the
walks at the DU campus. It seems as if
they can't concentrate at all on subject
like Bio-chemistry or zoology but such
interesting ones such as Marriage and
the Family. flow about that? Any reme-
dies, folks?
Just heard from the Manchu-ettes bas-
ketball squad that if you want a cut-
rate price on your bansuia splits at the
DOI Pharmacy, bring your own bananas!!
The DU students must give one point-
credit to their rivals the Boulderites
(CU) for being dismissed earlier this
quarter. Thanks to JOHN L. But the DU
students dont seem to mind at all wear-
ing their fur mittens and heavy overcoat
to classes to get better educated. If
you see any of the DU or CU kids wearing
bags under their eyes just tap them
on the back and say, "How were the fi-
nals? Easy, no?" They sure will give
you a dirty look, but will certainly a-
gree with a slight grin!!
Incidentally, were wondering why the
Brighton veterans are calling themselves
the "SAD SACKS"I! Could it be that they
really are that sad?
We're wondering why every time George
Masunaga makes a telephone call he say's
"Is this the Morgue?" or when he answers
a call says "which ccrpse do you want to
speak to?" Is it that hes really in-
terested in the embalming hnslne**?
SCENE OF THE 13 N
YOUNO PEOPLES CHRISTIAN CONFERENCE-


PAGE 4
THE- DELIVER JACL 3SZXB&IU
rtimpBPB is. 1946
"^kbjk-a-bSS
YPCC BANQUET According to tne story
Dean Roberts told KIN YASUI won't be
going where we're going, 'cause he's a
lawyer Disappointed not to have heard
the yanato sisters PEG and M.J. in a pi-
ano duet. Heard in the audience "TOM
MASAMORI has -the sweetest unspoilt voice
I've heard". Cause for all the giggling
at EMI KATAGIKI'S table was over a small
lipstick Eml insisted on carrying around
with her, ALICE KUMADA looking sweet 'n
nice all dressed up,
TAKI DOMOTO will be spending Xmas and
New Year in San Francisco, Bridge play-
ers are already lamenting as Taki is
known as the "Master" of the g^rae.
Note to GEORGE MIURA don't say we
didn't tell you -- if you want your car
in running condition, don't let AMY get
any more cold shots, 'Tis reported she
leaves the car motor running while she
enjoys a sewing session 'til all hours.
It's amazing what one little needle can
do even to our Amy, P.S. Amy -bet you
thought you'd never see this in print.
Not following the trend to the west
coast, YOSH ARIKI will be heading east.
CLARENCE and TOYO ARIMA will be tak-
ing a jaunt to Chioago before Xmas. Rea-
sons business and pleasure.
A farewell bridge party was given for
YURI KAMAYATSU, who is returning to Tur-
lock, Calif., by GRACE NODA. With four
tables it was quite a session gab and
bridge. Top honors going to MICHI ANDO,
MITSU MATSUDA, MASAKO MIYAKE and MAY
FURUTA. Boobies going to RUTH KODANI,
KERIJANE YOKOE, MAY TORIZAWA and BESSIE
MATSUDA. Others present were ETSU UYEDA,
HELEN UiwEZAWA, HARUKO KOBAYASHI, M/.SAKO
TAKAYOSHI, KAMA YORIMOTO AND AMY MIORA.
The GEORGE KANEGAIs have named, their
daughter ELAINE TOY.
A combined baseball victory and fare-
well dinner was given SETSUMI KAYEDA by
Ray's Starlettes. Being a star player -
the girls will be missing her. Only men
present were MOON KATAOKA, TAR TSUTSUI
(oh, so nice in Uncle Sam's uniform) and
CLEM OYAMA. TAKI held the table in awe
with her constant chatter. It was nice
to see RITZ YANAGI in from Boulder.
ANN SO is quite thrilled to receive
from her husband ED a coat from Chicago.
Just a tip to other travelling husbands.
TO INQUISITIVE HISA TAKEUCHI, the
cute girl at MANCHU, is none other than
HELEN UMEZAWA and MAY FURUTA'S sister.
JONAH SHIRAKA'sVA is quite smitten now-
adays. Handkerchiefs are in order when
he appears.
CHARLIE IWASKITA going around with a
smile since HELEN MIYAHAKA has returned
to the office.
"Where's LUCY TAGUCHI?" is the famil-
iar question around town. For your in-
formation she's still here; it's just
that we don't see her as often.
When it comes to earrings HATSUKO NA-
KATSUKA has the best selections in town.
SHIG and KICHI TERAJI will be proud
parents next June. We hope Michi likes
Denver as Denver is quite fond of her.
RALPH YAttAOATA OUT cutie pie will
be spending holidays with his family in
Chicago.
Wedding bells we hear will be chiming
for JUNIOR SAGARA very, very soon.
We thank all of you for all informa-
tion but as you know we ean't print it
all censors. Here's wishing all of you
a Kerry Xmas and a Happy New Year.
~ l&iL. ~
KEGLER'S KORNER
fy THE ALLEY CAT
Denver Nisei bowling enthusiasts are
going all out for the weekly games held
at Recreation Bowling on Wednesday eves.
Six teams are in hot competition for top
honors and it's still anybody's game as
the league is completing Round 1 with 2
more rounds to go.
Leading contender so far is the newly
formed Kaneko Insurance with three wins
ahead of 2nd place, Ota Grocery.
Oxy Goto who retired for awhile has
made quite a comeback, building up a 188
average.. The combination of Hooch Oku-
mura and Frank Ota (Ota Grocery's main-
stays) can be a menace when they "click'.'
The "dark horse" favorite is Wilshire
Studio, with the steady, cool bowling of
Nick Yoneda (possessor of the highest
average-190) and Shun Nakayama whose ab-
sence caused some losses for the team.
Another threat is the reorganized R
Another treat is the reorganized Ra-
dio Maintenance -foursome with Fred Hase-
gawa showing good bowling form. Jim Na-
kagawa started pf with a bang in the
last league but has failed to click as
yet in the current one.
Elko Watanabe (ah yes-a fern bowler!)
is providing a lot of help with her 150
average. Ken Sato's "Lefty" Kobayashi
is another bowler to watch. Unfortu-
nately, Victory Market has gotten off to
a slow start but if George Matsumonji &
Tad Nomura should roll a "hot streak",
Victory can cause an upset for any team.
A Li We
3ULL...eh'n
btf -tiit Bu/fehfleei*
.......... Come, my friends,
Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
Evidently, with this thought in mind,
many temporary Denver evacuee residents
are slowly returning to greener pastures
on the West Coast.
According to the latest, Chaz Kamaya-
tsu and family, Including his wife, Yuki
and daughter Aiko, are soon leaving Den-
ver for "sunny Californy".
Danar Abe and family have already re-
turned to the Coast. And, every day, we
too often hear of other families who are
going back.
Amy Watanabe was Joined in marriage
to Henry Harada of Rocky Ford on Dec. 8.
Yoshiko Ariki' was maid of honor and Teru
Harada was bridesmaid. George Sakai was
best man and Joe Ariki was usher.
Mr. and Mrs. C. Knnugl, recently mar-
ried couple, donated to the Denver JACL
in commemoration of their marriage. The
newly-weds are now residing at 2234 Emer-
son Street, In Denver.
The Tak Terasaki's were proud parents
of a 6 lb 10 oz baby girl, born Nov. 18.
The baby was named Aline Kiku Tomoye.
Lander Ito has joined the new list of
benedicts. He wed Tomiko Kikuchi on Dec.
7th.
A friendly, and familiar face will be
missed at the JACL offices. TOSH YATSU-
SHIRO has completed his relocation study
in Denver and returned to Washington DC.
His address is? 3801 J St. NE, in Wash-
ington,' DC.
MICC DANCE SCHEDULED
FOR JAN. 18 AT ALBANY
A colorful sports dance befitting the
season'd beauty is the NICC sponsored
"Winter Rhapsody" which is scheduled for
Jan. 18 in the Cathederal Room of the
Albany Hotel.
In the bandstand will be Jade Litvak
and his orchestra who is being intro-
duced to the Nisei crowd for the first
time.
Bids are available for $2.00 (couple)
and $1.50 (stag).
Return Postage uuarartteeo
THE DENVER BULLETIN
The Denver Chapter JACL
615E & C Building
Denver 2, Colorado
.Sec* 562, P. L. & R.