Citation
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 2, Number 2

Material Information

Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 2, Number 2
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
14

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text

|yts Included: Mr*
,j\ara, Thos. K* Abe,
Muranaka of Colorado
K, Takeuohl of Rocky
ro Tani of Rafu Shim-
* T. Kako, Sei Ozawa,
Z, Kanegaye, Harry
Hamano.
AC t ATlDM
forth of 1946
The memorable event for 1946
of the Denver JACL and for our
community was the National JACL
convention, held from Peb. 27th
to March 4th, and drew delegates
and boosters from as far as the
east and west coasts*
JANUARY
President Takashi Mayeda's
cabinet plunged into the prep-
arations for this event in Janu-
ary, after barely wiping the re-
mains of holiday ozoni off their
lips.
FEBRUARY
Cabinet officers took time in
February to become acquainted
with Jack Foster, editor of The
Rocky Mountain News, and Palmer
Hoyt, new publisher of The Den-
ver P03t The JACL participated
during Feb., in the panel dis-
cussions sponsored by the Insti-
tute of Social Work at the Phy-
llis Wheatley YWCA.
MARCH
Flocks of delegates and boos-
ters from Chicago, New York, San
(contd on page 3)
LOCAL JACL
COOPERATES IIM
LEGISLATIVE PROGRAM
The Denver JACL has undertak-
en to assist in the enactment of
three important legislative mea-
sures in the 36th General Assem-
bly of Colorado.
In cooperation with the Den-
ver Unity Council, a FEPC bill
and a bill to outlaw Restrictive
Covenants based on race, color
creed or ancestry has been in-
troduced*
Further, due to the ruling of
the Colorado Game and Fish Com-
mission to the effect that Issei
Japanese cannot be issued fish-
ing licenses, an amendment has
been introduced by Sen. Arthur
A* Brooks, to* provide for a res-
ident alien fishing license, at
a fee of $5.00, to permit Japan-
ese aliens the right to fish*
It Is expected that such a minor
change of the game and fish, law
will pass without difficulty.
DENVER JACLws
MEETWIffllBEIS
The Denver JACL cabinet offi-
cers met with influential Issei
on Jan. 24th, Friday evening, at
the Iohiyo Cafe to discuss plans
and objectives of the JACL* fin-
ancial drive.
Dr. K.K.Miyamoto, local Issei
pioneer and leader, acted as the
chairman for the meeting. Mr*
Keizaburo Koda, formerly a rice
grower in Sacramento, Calif, was
the host for the dinner.
(cont *d on page 3)
EMI KATAMt
HEADS DENVER
MEMBERSHIP DRIVE
Emi Katagiri, chairman of the
membership drive, announced that
the Denver JACL will try to keep
its record of'being the largest
JACL chapter in the U.S.
"With the active support and
cooperation of everyone," she
said, "We can do it.*"
During 1946, Denver JACL with
338 members topped Chicago JACL
by only "2. This year, it is an-
ticipated both Chicago and Los
Angeles will' give Denver tough
competition for top honors. The
goal set for the Denver JACL for
1947 is 400 members.
(cont'd on page 3)
TRI-STATE JACL CONFAB:
NATL OFFICERS TO ATTEND
The Tri-State JACL Regional Conference, planned for March 22-23,
to be held in Denver, Colo., will attract delegates from Cheyenne,
Wyoming; Scottsbluff, North Platte and Omaha, Nebraska; Port Lupton,
Greeley, Pueblo, Longmont, Rocky Ford, San Luis Valley, and outlying
ireas of Colorado, according to an announcement by Min Yasui, Tri-
State JACL Regional Representative.
The primary purpose of a regional conference would be to organize
the Nisei in the Tri-State area in order to act effectively to pro-
mote the interests of persons of Japanese ancestry. Moreover, sup-
port is essential to enact the legislative program of the Natl JACL-
ADC, which is now functioning in 'Washington, D.C,, and which will be
______ of inestimable value to our par-
-fen
uomnmmm
Under the rules of the Den-
ver JACL, non-citizens may be
admitted to honorary member-
ship in the Denver JACL.
All Issei are eligible for
honorary membership in the lo-
cal JACL chapter, and are urg-
ed to become supporters of the
national JACL legislative pro-
gram, which will directly be-
nefit them.
Honorary memberships will
be given to contributors of $3
or more per year, and all such
honorary members will receive
all JACL materials available.
INTER-RACIAL
HOUSING PLANNED
MRS.A. BROOK SAY5
Mrs. Arthur A. Brooks, Jr.,
wife of State Sen. Arthur Brooks
who has been very active in many
liberal movements in Denver, has
requested anyone interested in a
long-range home building program
to communicate with her. ^'
Mrs* Brooks contemplates tWe
planning of a new housing sub-
division in Denver, to be built
by private contractors, with the 0
ideal of an interracial and in-
tercultural community. All res-
trictions pased on race or reli-
gion would be prohibited. Inter-
group harmony and contacts would
be promoted!.
She believes that in our ex-
panding world of international
relations., it is essential to do
everything possible to promote a
better understanding of all the
peoples of the world; she is of
the opinion that we can start in
our own communities, and that in
this way we can do something ef-
fective towards world peace.
"Outstanding Nisei like Taki
Domoto, George Furuta, Dr. Kobayashi, Dr* T. Mayeda, or. Dr*
Howard Suenaga would make valu-
able contributions to such* a new
project," she said.
ent generation, the Issei
NATIONAL
OFFICERS
HITO OKADA
AND
MAS SATOW
TO
ATTEND
CONFERENCE
HITO OKADA
Natl President
MAS SATOW
Exec. Secty
Both Natl Pres. Hito Okada,
and Acting Executive Secty M&sao
Satow have assured the Tri-State
office that they will attend the
conference. They will bring ur-
gent messages for immediate sup-
port for the JACL.
NATL ML-ADC
legislation)
The Nat'l JACL has organized
the Anti-Discrimination Commit-
tee, Inc,, with headquarters in
Washington, DC, to push efforts
towards three major legislative
objectives:
(1) Immigration and Naturaliza-
tion amendments,
(2) Suspension of Deportation
for Japanese nationals,
(3) Evacuation Indemnification
Claims bills.
The proposed amendment to the
Immigration and Naturalization
laws would permit Japanese Issei
to become citizens, and further
would establish a quota for en-
try of Japanese nationals from
Japan.
The legal rights of Japanese
Issei have often been legally
denied on the grounds that they
were "ineligible to citizenship"
but the proposed amendment would
abolish the basis of such dis-
crimination. With it would fall
the anti-alien land laws on the
Pacific Coast states, and all
escheat cases.
Moreover, in. a nation which
was founded on the principles of
democracy, free and equal rights
should be extended to all people
of the world. The Japanese are
the only remaining large nation-
al group which cannot beoome US
citizens. On the grounds of e-
qualitarian concepts alone, the
(cont'd on page 3)
ID


PAGE 2
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
FEBRUARY, 1947
Our membership drive has be-
gun and the JACL again asks for
your support. You have respond-
ed marvellously in the past and
have helped overcome many obsta-
cles.
This year it is more import-
ant than ever that we continue
our unfinished business -- the
struggle for our rights: rights
for our parents and other Issei;
solving problems peculiar to us
as Isseis and Niseis.
These problems are being dis-
cussed both by state and nation-
al legislators. Basically, the
problems are worded to secure or
to preserve for us the fundamen-
tal rights involved in the Con-
stitution. So let us remember
the words of Sallust who once
said, "By union, the smallest
states thrive; by discord, the
greatest are destroyed."
In conclusion, I wish to men-
tion that many of our friends in
various organisations and state
legislatures are fighting dili-
gently to suppress those who are
attempting to defy the Constitu-
tion by claiming racial superio-
rity; deny employment because of
race, creed or color, etc.
The least we can do is sup-
port them by verbal encour-
agement, by getting your organ-
ization to pass and to support
resolutions; by contributions;
by writing state legislators in
support of the various bills
specifically H.R, 809 (Fair Em-
ployment Practice Bill), and the
bill outlawing restrictive cove-
nants (H.R. 517),
NOW WE'RE BRAlftlNlji
Sure, were bragging] We've
come a long way since our first
edition in April, 1946.
We have the BEST chapter bul-
letin in the United States.
THE STAfE OF COLORADO
EXECITTIVE CHAMBERS
DENVER
Our circulation exceeds 600*
Our columns are avidly followed
by all who want to know Denver
doings.
The costs of publication are
fuite high, however, and runs to
100.00 every month.
Moreover, about 200 man-hours
are spent every month to make-up
the paper.
But we think the cost and the
efforts are justified. What do
you think?

tnflSQO SATOIU
ACTINq NATL SECTT
Greetings to the Chapter unac
we consider a "pace setter" in
our National program'
Your efficient handling of
the Ninth Biennial National Con-
vention details is a bright page
in the history of our National
organization; your eye-catching
Bulletin is both a standard for
and the envy of other JACL Chap-
ters as it records from month to
month an impressive list of act-
ivities; and who can ignore your
standing as the Chapter with the
largest membership enrollment?
In the coming months we trust
that you will continue to stimu-
late other Chapters in showing
what is possible of achievement
and show how best to challenge
and channel the energy and en-
thusiasm of all the members.
I was happy to receive your
congratulations of November 6th,
and would have acknowledged same
before, but my office force has
been very limited.
I am deeply appreciative of
your cooperation, as I do not
underestimate the job before me,
and know that we will all have
to pull together to give Colora-
do the type of government to
which it is entitled.
Q*ncerely yours,
KNOUS
'or
lonal stand-
this year
i closen re-
L1 our chap-
to strength-
neir work;
ship in JACL
,-want to share more widely
tiw information vital to all of
us, invite more people to share
in all the considerations which
our over-all program involves,
and encourage an increasing mem-
bership participation in all our
program activities.
We look to Denver- to raaintsir
a high level of performance as
we face a most strategic year ir.
the history of persons of Japa-
nese ancestry; a year that will
not only require the utmost con-
sideration and tireless effort
of all of us, but will also mea-
sure the sincerity with which we
honored our Nisei combat veter-
ans in testimonial banquets all
over the country. Let us not be
found wanting.
Our former-Editor
c/o The Paonian
Paonia, Colorado
January 17, 1947
Hi, Everybody]
Working hard,on The Bulletin?
Surmized you might be batting
your brains out trying to make
deadlines -- so, I thought I'd
better pester you as much as I
can thru the courtesy of the
United States Postoffice Dept,
If I longed for strict surve-
illance of my doings when I was
in Denver, I certainly am not
finding it in Paonia at The Pao-
nian, My day is my own, usually
spent at soda fountains and just
browsing thru stores looking for
someone on whoa I might prey for
news. If I get tired of cover-
ing news, I wander into the of-
fices of Mary Jean Elder, only
attorney in Paonia and surround-
ing communities, and help her to
relax by playing from her large
treasury of' symphonies and opera
recordings. Or, I might drop in
for coffee and a chat at Jim's
(a favorite eating place of stu-
dents).
Once a week, I attend the
meetings of the Paonia Public
Library board, of which I am the
juvenile department advisor, and
purchase suitable books for pre-
school and teen-age kids. Then,
of course, there are numerous
weddings and whist parties (it
seems bridge isn't popular here)
to attend.
For such ah Isolated town, I
was surprised to find so many
college graduates -- many of the
grads are C.U. people] Bowling
at Grand Junction (76 miles from
here) is regarded as only a mere
trip'such as you take to a movie
downtown, and an overnight jaunt
to Salt Lake City or Los Angeles
is treated with calmness, but if
you say you are going to Denver
that's news]] it still aston-
ishes me. I tag along whenever
the town basketball team or high
school cagers go out-of-town but
no one gets excited except me.
Fires are another shock to me,
that makes no one else's blood
pressure rise. When I hear the
siren (that calls firemen and ci-
tizens alike to the fire) I drop
everything and dash. But, not so
these Paonians. They take their
GUpe (moderately). My first fire
was covered in a blizzard, but I
left the fire hot and black with
char and a lungful of smoke and
chlorine gas. My second fire was
covered at 9 p.m. on a Wednesday
night the first time the mer-
cury hit zero. You can imagine
my consternation when I arrived
at the fire, minus one sock, head
covering, mittens, and carrying
an ice-cold flashlight. More fun
than being saneJ]
Hearty eaters would find Pao-
nia an ideal place to live, espe-
cially if they have to eat out.
In Paonia, cafes and restaurants
(of which-there are three].'), you
order and eat your fill. Then,
after getting your hat and coat,
you step up to the check stand to
give an accurate as possible des-
cription of what you ate. They
charge you only for what you say
you ate. And, usually, both Jim
and Lawrence .(owners of two mess
halls) stand over my table with a
coffee pot in one hand pouring in
teaspoonsful of coffee into my
cup to see that it's never empty.
Heaven? You bet]]
Rambled on and on meaningless-
ly -- until again.
Briefly,
Katie
P.S, The paper has improved vi-
sibly, and that I really and hon-
estly mean, I'm glad you're able
to get plenty of local news, be-
cause that, of course, is my meat
and drink. Seep me posted on all
JACL plans and doin's, pliz.
THE CRITICS CORNER.
kj$illIhsalmJa
"How," Joe Nisei was asked,
"is the state legislature doing
on thd three measures in which
the JACL is Interested?"
"Huh?" Joe replied in his
most polite manner. "I didn't
even know Colorado had a legis-
lature." And he went back to
addressing the cue ball.
"Well, there is a legislature
and it's in session. On top of
that it has three measures which
should interest every Nisei."
"Even me?" Joe asked. He put
down the cue and said, "Whatts
they going to do to us now?"
"For, not to, Joe.. They're
going to try and do something
for us."
"Jeez," Joe said. "Tell me
about it,"
"The JACL cooperated with the
Denver Unity Council in getting
measures introduced In the leg-
islature providing for a -state
FEPC."
"I know what-that is," Joe
said; "that's a fair employment
practices committee. That means
they can't discriminate against
me when I go look for a job."
"That's right. -And they also
are trying to outlaw restrictive
covenants. That would prevent
anyone from refusing to sell you
a house simply because you don't
happen to have a white skin."
"The third measure, pushed by
the JACL itself, is to provide
for the sale of fishing licenses
to Japanese aliens who are now
denied the right to go fishing
by a weird interpretation of the
laws."
"Jeez, that sounds o.k." Joe
said.
"Yes, even if it is doubtful
that some of the measures will
pass. They're pretty controver-
sial. But the big thing is that
we have enough friends here in
Colorado so that we can go to
the legislature asking for laws
like these."
"Jeez," said Joe, "I never
thought of it -that way. "
".Ve're pretty lucky, Joe." We
have come a long way since the
people of the state defeated the
anti-alien land law initiative
in the 1944 election. It put a
stop to a lot of similar fool-
ishness in other states and it
gave the racists something to
think about."
"Jeez," said Joe. "Jeez, may-
be I better read the papers and
find out what's going on,/ Jeez,
maybe I'll even join the JACL
and let those guys know I appre-
ciate ^hls kind of stuff. Jeez.*"
MONTHLY ADVERTISING RATES
Professional Listing^, $1.50
3/4" Business Ada, 2.75
2 Business Ads. 5.00
2" Double-column Ads .. 7,50-
Basic Rate: $3.00 per column
inch per month.
/'S&
x, .I.
c o
r Dimkk mdJBuMi&M
Published monthly by the Dsnver
chapter of the Japanese American
Cltlsens League, 615 £ ft C Building,
Denver, Colo. Telephone:. CH 59.90.
Editor: True Yaaul
Staff: Sab Tanl, Merljane Yokoe,
Roy Takeno, Roaa Higashi, Bill Hoso-
kava, Haul Kataglrl, George Manusage,
Min Yaaul.
^oto^^ourteaj^fJlILSHIRS^TBDIO^^^


FEBRUARY, 1947
THIS DENVER JACL BULLETIN
PAGE 3
~TOE SMUT Ry
We take a moment out from the
gay frivolous things of life to
express our sympathy to PRANK
TAZAWA who broke hie ankle while
skiing* It's so sad cuz the Sad
Sacks really miss him on the
basketball equadj
Our vote for the Personality
Olrl of the week goes to sweet
and harming TOSHIKO HORITA from
DU who assisted tremendously at
the NICC Winter Raphsody. You'se
la a good kid, Toshfko*
Seems as If the younger set
are really active and interested
in sklingJJ According to REV.
SASAKI, they are all out for fun
at Berthoud Pass, with GEORGE
MASUNAGA, ROY SHIBATA, and IRV.
MATSUDA, the expert skiers vol-
unteering to teach the new tech-
niques. More power to them!
Question of the week is: Is
beauty really skin deep? If you
really want to know, just ask
the members of the Nu Chi Delta,
tiie Nisei DU Coed*s club who had
the beauty counselor demonstrate
on each individual* JANET SASA-
HARA was the chairman while ROSE
HANAWA and RUTH SERA were host-
esses*
Congrats to JOE*S JEWELER'S
for taking the 1st round champ-
ionship in the NWAA basketball
league. They beat RAY'S GROCERY
21-11* Proud players are NANCY
ITO, SUUI TASHIRO, EMI KATAGXRX,
VIRGB ITO, BETH SATO, OHXUX and
HIMI MAYEMURA, FUMI KATAGIHI, &
CHIYE INADOMI. Coaches are HI-
TOSHI TASHIRO and EDDIE KURACHI,
with the Brighton Sad Sacks as
"rooting section*"
The college group, the NICC,
is planning for the annual con-
ference under the chairmanship
of TED INOUYE, proxy* Seems as
if the JACL office will be the
popular place again this yearl
Led by MASAKO SATO, the Nu
Chi Delta are sponsoring a skate
feat and hop at the Rollerdrome,
on Washington's birthday. Mem-
bers are energetically selling
tickets to all fun-lovers.
SUNDflU FEB.75
TURMVERE.IN
9/w not +
fnmigjiaa
ROTHE Ki-SH RDWlUt
'tdilshw
alllOlO
^iitinsstult PfiotoqAOpkip,
FLORENCE BLDQ.
830-18* St. TA 3697
Mr* and Mrs. Masao Shintani, wed
in Honolulu, TH, Dec*. 31, 1946$
Mrs* Shintani is the former Miss
Haru Teuiaka of Denver*
ISSEIMEETING, ConM
JACL officials present were:
Min -Yasui, Tri-State Regional
Representative, Toshlo Ando, 1st
Vice Pres, in charge of activi-
ties, Dr. George J* Rubo, Trea-
surer and. chairman of financial
drive, Bessie Onlshi, secretary,
and Saburo Tani.
Issel guests included: Mr*
Fred I. Kaihara, Thos. K. Abe,
and Haruo Muranaka of Colorado
Times; Mr. K. Takeuchi of Rocky
Shimpo; Jiro Tani of Rafu Shim-
po; Messrs* T* Kako, Sel Ozawa,
Tw Takaaine, Z. Kanegaye, Harry
Osumi and Y* Hamano*
MTL LEGISLATION, Cant'd
amendment is.in order. To deny
the right to naturalization to
Japanese alone would be failure
to recognize human equality and
the dignity of our fellow man.
mmmip drive, o>m
At the last cabinet meeting,
held Feb. 4 at the Manchu Grill,
active workers for the member-
ship drive were appointed, in-
cluding: Saburo Tani, Merijane
Yokoe, Elko Watanabe, Tosh Ando,
Jim Imatani, Mits Kaneko, Harry
Sakata, Tak Terasakl, Harry Ida,
Johnny Rurachi, Aiko Fukuyama,
and all officers of the cabinet.
To date more than 100 members
have renewed their memberships
with Denver JACL. At present,
Tosh Ando leads with 28 members
solicited*
GEORqrs MOTOR SERVICE
(Oriqinallij "PIN^ and $E0R<*E)
RECAPS /TCXtofrs ^RFflSINfl
BATTERIES ( H W\ WASHING
&
TRUCK and AUTO REftlRS
20** lawKnee M A 9373
EVENTS Of 1946, ConHd ^EEST/OmL^WN^
Francisco, Salt Lake City, and
all parts of the country poured
into Denver, taxing the facili-
ties of the JACL office to the
limit during the convention.
APRIL
Three April events are note-
worthy: the American Fellowship
panel discussion; the Nisei In-
teroollegiate Conference, and
the initial edition of the JACL
Bulletin, edited by Katherine T.
Kawamura.
HAY
The first JACL "outing" held
in May, so labeled euphemistic-
ally, adjourned to Dr. Mayeda's
home in deference to the raging
snowstorm outside. The testimo-
nial banquet honoring Ralph L.
Carr, ex-govemor, was held at
the Tiffin, with Yutaka Terasakl
as toastmaster* The Memorial
Day services for the Nihon-jin
community was held in the city
auditorium annex, with the Bud-
dhists and Christian churches
cooperating under the chairman-
ship of George Masunaga*
JUNE
Altho we didn't know it, in
June, the future governor-to-be
of our state, W. Lee Knous, was
an honored guest at the Urban
League Meeting at Morey Junior
High School. The JACL was in-
vited and was represented at the
meeting. The Veterans Testimon-
ial Banquet, eo-sponsored by the
Buddhist and Christian churches,
and the JACL, was the outstand-
ing social event for the month.
More than 375 guests attended to
honor our Nisei veterans of Co-
lorado. Ruby Yoshino's concert
in the Phipps Auditorium was the
musical event of the month, with
Yoshiko Ariki heading the commi-
ttee.
The foregoing is a resume of
activities of the Denver JACL in
the first half of 1946, The sec-
ond instalment of "The EVENTS OF
1946," SECOND-HALF, WILL BE CON-
TINUED IN OUR NEXT ISSUE.
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1952 Larimer Street
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200 Interstate Trust Bldg.
* LAWYERS
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1229 21st Street
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3301 Zuni Street
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830 I8th Street

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PAGE 4
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
FEBRUARY, 1947

NOTES:
.....^PEEK-A-B$>$>
AGNES MAKIYAMA, nee MIYAKAWA,
was the honored guest at a re-
cent gathering at the GEORGE FU-
RUTAS, We believe she is one of
the first civilians to reach our
shores from Japan.
AGNES is a well-known artist
to music lovers, having studied
in Paris and making her debut in
that metropolitan city.
Sixteen years ago, she left
these shores for a concert tour
of Japan, and was there till now.
ohe has the daintiest feet of
anyone we know; 2% is her shoe
size/ We were instantly charmed
by her graciousness. Talent on
talent, she accompanied herself
on the piano. PETE FURUTA join-
ed her in several numbers,
She is now in Charleston vis-
iting her brother and will con-
tinue on to N ew York to visit.
Speaking of the FURUTAS, Geo,
recently bought MAY a cake mix-
er we're wondering if he got
it to make her task easier, or -
is it a hint for more cakes???
We're waiting for that piece of
cake, MAY/
HELEN MIYAHARA will be missed
by our sport world as she has
retired from our active circle
in favor of JOHNNY NA&ASHIMA.
Her sisters DOROTHY and FLORENCE
.will carry on.
For my money, the top bachel-
ors' group in town consists of:
SHUN NAKAYAMA, TAK HAMANO, FLOYD
TANAKA, YUKIO YOKOE, Sc YAS AOCHI.
Wish we could be their one and
only girl friend 'cause they
seem to be having fun all of the
NAKAYAMA JEWELRY
* -j/i-doAi%
I920lgrimer5t. MA 7045
. SCENE FROM SKIING PARTY AT BERTHOUD PASS, SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 1947
TOP ROW: LEFT TO RIGHT REV. K. SASAKI, ROY SHIBATA, DOROTHY MADO-
KORO, GEORGE MASUNAGA, TAK TERASAKI, KEN IMAMURA, TRUE YASUI. EMI
KATAGIRI AND IRV MATSUDA, IN THE FRONT.
Twenty-four hopeful skiers left the Calif. St. ME Church on Feb. 8
for Berthoud Pass under the able patronage of Rev. Sasaki and Tak Te-
rasaki. Perfect skiing weathercrisp and clear. The beginners va-
liantly attempted kick turns, herringbones, and 'stems," resulting in
wildly waving skis and limbs, but much fun/ A special orchid, with a
huge flourish to one, Emi Katigiri, for her amazing fortitude, or to
put it less elegantly, "more guts than sense." The party left Berth-
oud at 5:30 and all 24 encamped upon the Terasaki home, where grac-
ious Mi chi Terasaki had piping hot spaghetti and crisp salad ready
for the ravenous mob. Everyone unanimously agreed it had been a won-
derful experience -7 even if some of us did more "sits-marklng" than
skiing/ ________ __________
?££/<-A-Boo con+'d
time and without a girl in
sight, too,'
It's a son at the TAPPY NAKA-
OKAS. While daughter REBECCA
made an entrance at the HENRY
TAKAHASHI home. The month of
March will bring additions to
the household of TETS MAMIYA and
ED YAMATO.
The McDowell Music Guild, or-
ganized by SHIZU YOSHIMURA, met
at the home of JOAN MATSUDA. The
officers of the organization are
- President FLORENCE YAMADA, Se-
cretary CHIYEKO ABE, Treas. AIKO
KDWABARA. Plans have been made
by this organization to have a
musicale on March 14th tickets
will be sold for the event.
Other members of the organi-
zation are MAY OTAGIRI, TETSUKO
TODA, PEARL KUWABARA, DORIS YA-
MADA, MIKIE HAMADA, IKUYO MATSU-
MOTO. Bet ED MATSUDA had more
fun thsn the girls entertaining
them/ The evening was topped
off with a jam session.
ART, MARY and PATTY MITANI
believe in making their home in
San Fernando Valley.
It's nice to see the familiar
face of TART DOMOTO around town
again after a five-week trip to
the coast. Also returned to our
fold are KODIE & TERUHA KODAHA.
'Tis said that KODIE will again
operate the Johnny Downs outfit.
GEORGE NAKATSUKA and CLEM 0-
YAMA are on an extended trip to
tile west coast.
BOB YAMAMOTO has left our icy
weather for the balmy breezes of
Hawaii wife HARUYB will be
joining him 'fore long. MARY
SUENAGA'S ermine is sure gorge-
ous a Xmas gift from HOWARD.
BUHLS* ...eriiv
"Men of the tattered battalion,
which fights till it dies.
Dazed with the dust of battle,
and tiie din and the cries,
The men with broken heads, and
blood running into their eyes?
"AMERICANS The Story of the
442nd Combat Team" is just off
tile press. We saw a copy, and
are deeply impressed.
We wonder how many people do
realize really what the Nisei
soldier, including the MXSLS men
in the Pacific, sacrificed for
us during the war.
Genial PING ODA, former part-
ner of Ping & Geos automotive
service, has returned to Cal. He
was a generous supporter of JACL
and he will be missed. But, we
wish GEORGE KURAM0T0 continued
success in the business.
We hear rumors that HERIJANE
YOKOE, the 111 gal.with a big
heart, may be leaving us soon;
we understand the YOKOE'S won't
be leaving until GARD gets in a
little trout fishing this year.
The GEORGE FURUTA building on
the corner of 20th and Larimer
St ha3 a distinct Nihonjin-machi
flavor, with the MANCHU GRILL,
HENRY'S JEWELRY, BOB HQRIUCHI &
KEN SATO insurance, SAIKI TAILOR
SHOP, DR. GEORGE KUBO'S optomet-
ry, TOSH ANDO, MITS KANEKO and
HANK KXMURA's combination law
office, insurance and accounting
service, and KURODA'S WHITE SWAN
laundry. That's 10 business en-
terprises in one building.

w . 'W' *'O
Just call EAsfOII8andcl|cmjei}
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GRflnPDfl ^idhand^aui
% Tmdurflus
1919 Lawrence St. KEqs+one 598?
/flmcku
GRILL -CHOP SUEV
1l)lteft£l I956 Lttrifper ft TAbor 9576 ^
RELIABLE.
fKcnt
TA.0332
TA. 9277
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THE DENVER BULLETIN
The Denver Chapter JACL
615 E & C Building
Denver 2, Colorado
Sec, 562, P. L. Sc R.