Citation
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 2, Number 4

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Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 2, Number 4
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
14

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text

VOLUME II, NUMBER 4 DENVER, COLORADO APRIL, 1947
bsei Fishinq
limsesWcm
The Tri-state JACL office an-
nounces that the alien resident
fishing amendment to the Game &
Fish Laws of Colorado was passed
by both houseB of the Colorado
Legislature* providing that Jap-
anese Issei may now obtain fish-
ing licenses for $3,00.
Senator Arthur A. Brooks, Jr,
introduced the bill at the spe-
cial request of the Tri-State
Office, Officials of the State
Game and Fish Commission admit-
ted that their failure to intro-
duce the bill was an oversight
on their part.
Resident citizen licenses are
$2,00 this year; but the price
is going up to $3,00 next year.
Non-resident fishing licenses,
however, will be advanced to the
new $10,00 level immediately.
The fishing season opens May
25th in Colorado
w-smf/mm
mvemmsEs
A second $1,000 in donations
from the Tri-State JACL area has
been transmitted to Natl Head-
quarters, according to Roy Take-
no, Special Assistant to the Tri
State office. These contribu-
tions were solicited during the
month of March,
' Photo by Rossonian Studio
MIN YASUI, TRI-STATS JACL HBP,, REV. BURG CYNE, GEO, MASUNAGA, PRES,
Rev, V, Snerman Burgoyne, one of the recipients of the National
Thos, Jefferson Award for Democracy, and his wife visited Denver on
their way to New York, Rev, Burgoyne received the award for his
staunch defense of the Nisei in Hood River, Oregon, He protested
the erasing of the Nisei soldiers1 names from the honor roll by the
American Legion and it was principally through his efforts that
they were returned. Mien the Japanese returned to Hood River, Rev,
Burgoyne and his wife were among the first to welcome and help.
Past winners of this award include Eleanor Roosevelt, Ex-Gov. Ellis
Arnall of Georgia, and Utah*s Senator Elbert Thomas,
A dinner in their honor was held on Friday, April A at the Man-
chn Grill, Tosh Ando was in charge of arrangements and George Fu-
ruta was toastmaster. An evening meeting at Trinity ME Church fol-
lowed under the Joint sponsorship of the JACL and Denver Unity Cou-
ncil, George Masunaga, Chapter Pres, officiated, Mrs. Mary Jane
King offered a violin solo; Tom Masamori sang two selections, Eiko
Watanabe was the accompanist.
NICC MEETS
APRIL 19-20*
The annual Nisei Inter-Mount-
ain Collegiate Conference (NICC)
will meet at the Ebert School
Auditorium on April 19 and 20,
Registration is from 10x00 a.m.
to 1x20 p.m. It has been pro-
longed so that students with Sa-
turday a.m. classes may register.
This years conference will
feature the education aspects of
the Nisei as its theme. Dr. Ben
M# Cherrington, Director of the
Social Science Foundation and Mr
Bill Hosokawa, of the Denver
Post will be the speakers.
The conference will also fea-
ture a banquet on April 19th at
7:00 p.m, at the Edelweiss; Mr,
James Fresquea, Pres, of the
City Council will speak. Follow-
ing the banquet there will be a
dance, also at the Edelweiss,
featuring Harry Wilson* s band.
Ted Inouye, Pres, of NICC,
says, *1 would like to invite
any person, whether alumni, fu-
ture college students, or friend
to attend our conference,
"The NICC is extremely grate-
ful to many Japanese business
firms and individuals for their
kindest cooperation and help, I
wish to express our thanks to
all of you and to our worthy ad-
visors, Rev. Tsunoda, Rev. Sasa-
ki, Dr. Mayeda, George Masunaga,
and Minoru Yasui. We are also
indebted to the Tri-State JACL
for their fullest cooperation,"
Under the chairmanship of Mr.
Roy Inouye, of La Jara, the San
Luis Valley area contributed a
total of $400 to the JACL finan-
cial drive.
Altho $1500 in donations have
been solicited in the Denver ar-
ea, a goal of $5000 is sought.
To achieve this goal, two commi-
ttees are being set up: an Is-
sei committee headed by Messrs,
T. Kako, S. Nomura, and Dr. K.
K, Miyamoto; and a Nisei commit-
tee, headed by Dr. George J. Ku-
bo, and assisted by James Ima-
tani, George Masunaga, Roy Take-
no and Toshio Ando.
As soon as final results of
the Tri-State financial drive
are available, the full list of
donors will be published in the
Denver JACL Bulletin and local
Japanese newspapers.
Easter morning the Burgoynes were taken to the Easter Sunrise
Service at Red Rocks, and they also attended the Calif, St. Metho-
dist Church and Trinity Church services. On their departure, Rev,
and Mrs. Burgoyne expressed their sincere thanks for their recept-
ion in Denver, They are due in New York, to receive his award at
the Waldorf Astoria on April 13th,
JACL BRIDGE
May Furuta and Jack Fuji won
first place in the second bridge
tournament of the year, sponsor-
ed by the JACL at the Manchu.
May Torizawa and Charles Iwa-
shita were a close second and
only one point behind in third
place were Etsu and Bee Uveda.
Min and True Yasui won(?) the
booby prize but are still going
to keep tryingi
wmmmm
ANNUAL MEETING-
The Denver Unity Council is
holding its annual meeting at
the Cosmopolitan Hotel Officer* s
Club at 12:15 p.m., Saturday,
April 19th, The feature speaker
will be Mr, Joseph D, Lohman,
Director for Race Relations of
the Julius Rosenwald Fund, His
subject is "Race Relations and
your City Government,"
He is the Exec, Secy, of the
Natl Committee on Segregation in
the Nations Capital; Moderator
of the Midwest Forum of the Air,
Consultant on Police Problems in
the Chicago Park District and
lecturer on criminology and race
relations at the U of Chicago,
Reservations for the luncheon
($1.28) may be made by calling
Keystone 8423*
A course entitled "Japanese-
American Contributions to Ameri-
can Culture," is being given at
the Denver University Civic Cen-
ter this spring quarter, with
Min Yasui, Tri-State JACL Repre-
sentative as the lecturer, Dr,
Prudence Bostwick supervising.
The course is given for credit,
under the Sociology School,
Mr, Yasui hopes to present
guest speakers during the course
including: Mr. Fred I, Kaihara,
Dr, N, Kunitomo, Mr, Ray Morio
Uyeshima, Mr, Sab Tani, Rev. E.
Sasaki, Rev. N, Tsunoda, Dr, X,
Ozamoto, Mr. James Curtis, Mr,
Bill Hosokawa, and Mr, Mike Mas-
aoka.
The elass is composed of seme
twenty-five students, most of
whem are sociology majors, with
several graduate students. Most
of the students are Caucasian,
but there are two Nisei and one
Negroe student,
A dinner and presentation of
cultural works of Japan is ten-
tatively being planned for some
time in the middle of May at the
Manchu, with rare art objects on
display through the courtesy of
Dr, K. K. Miyamoto and a perfor-
mance of "bon odori."
DENVER LEADS Hi
According to the April 1st,
1947 issue of the JACL member-
ship bulletin, the Denver Cha-
pter still ranks as the lead-
ing ohapter in the U.S.
1, Denver............ ,241
2, Salt Lake City.......227
3, Santa Clara......,...189
4, Chicago..............151
5, Los Angeles..........137
6, New York............134
7, San Diego............113
8, Oakland..............110
9, San Francisco.......,104
10, Idaho Falls...........99
ADMIRAL NIMITZ
CITES NISEI..............
Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nim-
itz, chief of naval operations,
reoently endorsed statehood for
Hawaii and praised eitizens of
Japanese ancestry for their loy-
alty and bravery during the war,
Nimitz testified before the
house public lands committee on
legislation to make Hawaii a
state. He said he could see "no
objection from a naval or mili-
tary standpoint."
"Before the war I had enter-
tained some doubt as to the loy-
alty of American citizens of Ja-
panese ancestry in the event of
war with Japan," Nimitz said. "I
no longer have that doubt. The
citizens of that island served
in the war with great distinct-
ion and that includes many Amer-
icans of Japanese ancestry,"


PAGE f>
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
APRIL. 1947
The first quarter of 1947 for
the Denver JACL has "been quite
successful*
The membership drive, headed
by Emi Katagiri, although not
quite fulfilling our quota of
400 members, nevertheless main-
tains for us the reputation of
being the largest chapter in the
United States*
Under the able direction of
Roy Takeno, special assistant to
the Tri-State office, the finan-
cial drive to assist the legis-
lative program of the ADC in
Washington, D.C. is well under
way*
The Denver JACL Bulletin, un-
der the new editorship of True
Yasui, has expanded into tabloid
siae, with four columns, and we
think it is the best chapter
bulletin in the country.
In activities, our chapter
has participated in the Tri-
State meeting, held a quarterly
meeting, co-sponsored a meeting
with the Denver Unity Council to
hear Rev. W. Sherman Burgoyne,
sent speakers to various meet-
ings, and in general, cooperated
with civic activities.
For the benefit of members,
the chapter has sponsored bridge
tournaments under Taki Domoto, a
nihon katsudo with Sab Tani and
Tosh Ando in charge, and held sn
Etna ter Bell with a big Ref fie
with Dr. Geo. J. Kubo and Tosh
Ando handling arrangements.
Unknown to most members, the
Denver cabinet meets every month
to plan activities. In these
meetings, all cabinet officers,
in particular Bessie Matsuda,
have been earnestly trying to
promote the interest of the Ni-
seis in Denver,
The foregoing is a review of
tiie 1st quarter activities of
the JACL. In the next few months
to come, we hope to present po-
litical information on the com-
ing city elections, and to spon-
sor a community-wide joint memo-
rial service on May 30th. Your
interest and support in our pro-
grams is earnestly requested.
ALICE KASAI
CONVENTION CO-CHAIRMAN
"SALT LAKE IN #8"
Your publication "bragging"
la certainly more than justi-
fied. Yes, the rest of us will
bow very humbly with high appra-
isal. It is oertainly a pleas-
ure to read such a "top-notch-
ing" chapter bulletin* and I
sincerely hope that other cap-
able chapters will follow suit.
By 1948* if sufficient pub-
lications are out to warrant
competition* we might be able to
hold a contest and have awards.
It will be something to strive
towards and look forward to for
the editors* don11 you think?
Utah is celebrating a Centen-
nial this year* so the oity has
been beautified* roads improved*
and provisions made to accommo-
date any number of people for
reoreations and sports. Next
year* our Tenth Biennial JACL
Convention can take overt
Hotel Utah has been scheduled
for headquarters from August 25
to 30th* 1948* which will be the
best time of the year to show

MFOTUKFORNKB vmmitm
MBIMU?
With so many familiar faces
now missing from' Denver scenes*
one oannot help but wonder if
Denver isn't becoming a dead-end
for Niseis. Businesses that ca-
tered exclusively to Japanese
trade have quietly folded up and
returned to Los Angeles.
And yet the Nisei businessmen
remaining in Denver tell us that
the end isn't yet in eight? it
seems to us that If we can build
our business on a broad enough
base with a sufficient hakujin
patronage* then certainly Denver
is still a City of Opportunity,
and there are unlimited possibi-
lities for the Nisei with fore-
sight and ambition.
rnmam
wmmmiL
It is indeed an encouraging
sign of strength of the local
chapter that the cabinet has of
its own initiative planned and
executed several events thus far
this year.
The Easter Ball and Raffle*
and the Nihon Katsudo* were put
on exclusively by the cabinet*
and both were successful. These
affairs were put over chiefly
thru the efforts of Toshio Ando*
assisted by the cabinet.
In participation in community
affairs* George Masunaga, local
prexy* has conscientiously ful-
filled his duties* as well ae in
doing a splendid job of provid-
ing leadership for the Nisei.
The 1947 Denver JACL Cabinet
is characterized chiefly by its
youth but therein lies its chief
strength* for they are enthusi-
astic and willing to undertake
onerous social functions for the
benefit of the chapter* or for
the benefit of the community.
Quite often* the JACL office
or the Denver JACL Bulletin re-
ceives anonymous letters. Many
times* the criticisms or sugges-
tions offered are quite excell-
ent. On the other hand* many of
the anonymous letters are abus-
ive and hardly in good taste.
All anonymous letters receiv-
ed by the JACL are immediately
consigned to the wastepaper bas-
ket. The failure of a signature
denies its validity.
If you have something to say*
by all means say it; if you have
criticisms to offer* write it.
But at least extend us the cour-
tesy of letting us know who you
are. Not that we would thereby
hate you or try "to get even*"
but it would give us an opportu-
nity to try to explain our posi-
tion and get on a better basis
of understanding with you.
We would like to emphasize in
order to make our position clear
that letters from the members or
critics are welcome. They give
us a guide as to membership re-
action. Moreover* such letters
are always promptly and courte-
ously answered and acknowledged.
ROUL ROBESON: AN
AMERICAN SPEAKS
Paul Robeson appeared at Bast
High School under the auspices
of the Rocky Mountain Council
for Social Action on Sunday aft-
ernoon* April 6th. The meeting
was held at 4s00 p.m. and about
3*000 people attended. Min Ya-
sui* Tri-State Representative*
attended. Maty Nisei students
from Manual High School* as well
as other minority groups* acted
as ushers.
Rabbi Bernard Baskin offici-
ated as Chairman. Reverend Gil-
more of the Methodist Conference
opened the meeting with an invo-
cation. Charles A. Graham* pre-
sident of the Rocky Mountain Co-
uncil gave greetings on behalf
of the sponsoring organization*
and Mr. John Pickett* Executive
Let's have more activities by
the chapter* so there will be a
greater membership participation
in JACL affairs.
you Salt Lake City, our cany one*
the Great Salt Lake, the fresh
mountain streams* the resorts*
parks* famous scenic spots,
our hospitality. To insure a
truly worthwhile trip for the
occasion* we have a $1,000 con-
tribution from the Interraountain
District Council to secure a na-
tionally known figure as main
speaker. A Children's Nursery
will be provided for vacationing
families.
The Chamber of Commerce Con-
vention Bureau is assisting and
advising us plan for a week's
activities you'll never forget.
If you have any suggestions they
will be more than welcome. Plan
now to attend! SALT LAKE IS THE
PLACE IN '48.
Secretary of NAACP, gave greet-
ings on behalf of the Negro peo-
ple.
Paul Robeson* before commenc-
ing his speech* sang a series of
about six songs which were* of
course, greeted with tremendous
enthusiasm. In speaking* Robe-
son said that he hae given up
the concert stage in order to
crusade for complete equality
for his people in the United
States.
He mentioned that in conduct-
ing a pell of many collegiate
audiences across the nation* in
the South and East the students
believed that the Negro could
never achieve equality; in the
Midwest and West the consensus
of opinion seemed to be that it
would take at least 500 years.
Robeson asked* with telling ef-
fect* "Do you expect me to tell
my son to tell his son* to tell
his son, for sixteen generations
to wait for complete equality?"
Robeson believes that now is the
time that the minority groups
and leaders of liberal thought
in America should attempt to
bring about a more rapid reali-
zation of the ideals of demo-
cracy .
DENVER JACL MEMBERSHIP
Individual membership. $3.00
Membership for couples . 5.00
Pacific Citizen, member. 2.50
P.C., non-member .... 3.50
Subs, to Denver JACL Bulletin,
only, is $1.00 per fiscal year
THE CRITIC'S CORNER.
There's always room for argu-
ment as to whether Seattle or
Denver is the more attractive
place to live. Seattle's abund-
ance of seafood and green vege-
tables helping to counterbalance
the persistent rain and mist.
Few Nisei* however* are so
secure economically that they
can choose their hemes on the
basis of attractiveness alone.
And so it was financial opportu-
nity* as well as nostalgia and a
good many other factors* whloh
helped draw some 4*000 Japanese-
Americans back to the Seattle a-
rea when the evacuation order
was rescinded.
Those who had the money to
invest in business* or who re-
sumed businesses which had been
leased out during the war* are
doing very well* thank you. This
goes for enterprises both in and
out of the Japanese community.
Small retail merchants* espe-
cially grocers* are spreading in
to almost every section of the
oity* reviving a pattern which
had been established prior to
1941* and doing good on 100 per
cent non-Japanese trade. Hotel
and apartment house operators*
florists* cleaners* and restau-
rateurs are also doing well* de-
pending largely on Caucasians.
But all this requires capital
and not all evacuees had money
to sink into business. How a-
bout the others?
Wages are good. But the best
jobs aren't always available. A
Nisei yielded to nostalgia and
gave up a job paying close to
$100 a week in New York; the
best he could do in Seattle was
stock boy. Another quit work as
a mechanic in a mountain state
and returned to Seattle with
high hopes. He's still looking
for a mechanic's job and his
hopes aren't as high.
Several vets went into a fur-
niture manufacturing plant under
the G.I. training bill* planning
to open a plant of their own e-
ventually. Now they're out of a
jobthe boss said business had
fallen offand they find a year
of experience pretty much wasted
since there doesn't seem to be
anything doing in the/industry.
It isn't all bad, however. A
Nisei printer* who was allowed
to join the typographical union
in the midwest* is now a member
of the local union and has a
good job with a daily newspaper.
That would have been impossible
before the war.
Meanwhile* the Lil* Tokyo pa-
ttern of social life has been
resumed with a vengeance. You'd
never think there had been an e-
vacuation.
MONTHLY ADVERTISING RATES
Professional Listings. $1.50
3/4" Business Ads. . 2.75
2 Business Ads. . 5.00
2" Double-column Ads . 7.50
Basic Rate: $3.00 per column
inch per month.
*
Published monthly by the
Denver chapter of the Japa-
nese American Citizens Lea-
gue, 615 E & C Bldg., Den-
ver*. Colo. Tel: CH 5990
Editor: True Yasui
Staff: Sab Tani, Bess Mats-
uda, Rosa Higashi, Bill Ho-
sokawa, Maud. Katagiri, Geo.
Masunaga, Min Yasui.
Fotos: WILSHIRE STUDIO
^ --J


APRIL, I'>47
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
PAGE 3
THE SMALL TRY
Coming all the way from K. C*
Dental College for Easter vaca-
tion were two handsome students*
JOHNNY CHIKUMA and RAYMOND ARAO.
Also frcm the wild mountain fas-
tness descended KATIE KAWAMURA.
Hope they enjoyed their short
holiday here*
It must run in the familyllil
Have you heard? LARRY FUKUHARA,
the TK Trojan basketball player
is cousin to the famous WAT LU-
SAKA, of the Univ. of Utah, who
played at the Madison Square Ga-
rdens in New York*
Congratulations to the Ray
Starlettesl They defeated the
Granada Sharks by one basket to
win their title for second place
in the MWAA Basketball League*
The Sharks really missed their
star, AXYCE KUMADA, who recently
returned to San Jose. They also
defeated the Manchu-ettes who
tied for second place. The win-
nahs ares GRACE TSUJISAKA, FLO-
RENCE MIYAHARA, MAR SHIMADA* YO-
SHIYB YAMAGA, FUZZY YASUDA, CHIZ
CSOJNO, YOSH MI20UE, RUBY NAKANO,
and the Coach is MOON KATAQKA*
Seems as if EMI KATAGIRI had
a real surprise birthday party,
with cake, flowers, presents --
and to top them all "Four Roses"
and a snake. HELEN TANAKA was
hostess and guests were: HARRY
KURACRI, FUMI KATAGIRI, JANET
SASAHARA, NOB TASH2RO, KAMI KA-
TAGIRI, EDDIE KURACHI, KENNY IM-
AMURA, GEKJI YAMAMOTO, and GQRO
SAKAGUCHI. Bridge was played
all evening*
The most attractive and uni-
que piece of art at the Buddhist
Hanamatsuri, to us* was the Bud-
dhist temple made out of oake by
YOUKO* S dad, MR. YOSHIMURA, of
the SKY Coffee Shop.
Admired in the Easter Parade
were charming and attractive T0-
SHIKO TANAKA, with a large white
straw hat, trimmed with black
laoe and flowers? and JOYCE CHI-
BA, with a large-brimmed white
leghorn*
Have you seen the brand new
limousine STANLEY ICHIKAWA has
bought? They say its a new Pon-
tiac, and green, too1.
Among those seen at the JACLs
Easter dance were: SAMMY TERA-
SAFI with HELEN TOMITA? HARRY
EASHIMOTO with EUGENIA HORITA
NOB tJCHIDA with HELEN NAKAMURA?
*HASH" TOGASHI with FERN STRO-
MEYER and EUNICE KUMAGAI with
soldier BILL OGASAWARA.
Have you noticed how ambit-
ious the Brighton SAD SACKS are?
Seems as if they are really tied
up with practicing their pley
for the forthcoming Buddhist Fe-
stival in Brighton.
Our best wishes to the newly
married pair, KAYO OTAGURA and
his wife, the former SETS MAEDA*
MAS SAT UW HI TO CKADA
nraiEMETM
An informal Tri-State area
meeting was held at the local
JACL office on March 22. Repre-
sentatives from out-of-town were
Rev. and Mrs. H. Kano, Mrs* Lily
Xkuta, Miss Rose Kubo, Mrs. Lois
Yam da and Masami Sakurada from
Nebraska? Miss Irene Kiyota and
Jack Tsuhara from Ft. Lupton?
and Miss Lena Konishi from Flat-
teville.
An informal dinner was held
at the Manchu Grill the same day
at which many prominent Issei
were also present. Hito Okada*
Natl. Pres, and Mas Sato, Acting
Exec. Secy, spoke at both the
meeting and the banquet. Fol
lowing the banquet several of
the delegates adjourned to the
home of Mr. & Mrs. Y. Terasaki
for the evening.
A general meeting was held on
Sunday, March 23, at the Calif.
St. Methodist Church. Geo* Mas-
unaga, local Pres, officiated*
Yoshiko Ariki presented a radio
skit and Hito Oka da and Mas Sa-
to* spoke* Refreshments were
prepared by Bessie Matsuda and
Ray Uyeshima spoke informally to
the group* That evening several
of the delegates were taken to
the home of Dr & Mrs. Y. Ito for
bridge.
fasten BalluMIe
The JACL Easter Ball, held at
the Cosmopolitan on Easter Eve-
ning together with the raffle of
a refrigerator and radio phono-
graph, was very successful. Over
350 people attended. Dr. George
Kubo and Howard Doi were co-
chairmen; Tosh Ando, tickets,?
and Pete Furuta was the Master
of Ceremonies.
The drawing was held at the
intermission. Mr. Tak Terasaki
won the refrigerator; Mr. Bennie
Bee of 1545 Bryant, won the ra-
dio phonograph. Others winning
prizes were Charles Iwaeihita,
Jim Imatani, Tak Komaru, Terry
Takamine, and Jerry Yasuda.
FLOWER SHOP
PENVER'S ECONOMICAL FLORISr
511 -Street C-H. 3546
^STUDIO
IPcAtuvduJt fiftotbifMpku,
FLORENCE BLOq.
830-18* St. TA3697
GEORGE'S MOTOR SERVICE
(Oriqinallij "PINf, and ^EOR^E")
RECAPS QREASING
BATTERIES ("VlT) WASHING

TRUCK and AUTO REPAIRS
204+Lawmci AHA 9373

DIAMONDS JEWELRY
HfrrCN REPAIRING
NINETEENTH ST. DENVER.COIO.
mmmmm
A very successful Japanese
movie performance was presented
at the Kiva theater on March 30
and 31st. The movie was spon-
sored by the Denver JACL, Toshio
Ando, General Chrnn., Sab Tani,
in charge of posters, and Roy
Takeno handling publicity. Pro-
ceeds were turned over to Natio-
nal Headquarters in Salt Lake
City to help finance its Anti-
Discrimination Committee work in
Washington, D. C.
George Masunaga, president of
the local chapter, wishes to ex-
press his gratitude, on behalf
of the chapter, to the Rooky Ci-
nema Co. of Denver and the Nich-
ibei Kinema Co. of Los Angeles
for arranging loan of the films.
Members of the NWAA acted as
ushers at the movies. Those who
assisted were: Hiroko Asano,
Joyce Chiba, Nancy Ito, Virginia
Ito, Emi Katagiri, Mami Katagiri
May Kurachi, Bessie Matsuda,
Bessie Onishi, Janet Sasahara,
Beth Sato, Helen Tanaka, Suml
Tashiro, Grace Tsujisaka, Yoshi
Yamaga, Fuzzy Yasuda, and Yoko
Yoshimura*
QUIfti NEWTON
A dinner for Quigg Newton,
young candidate for mayor of
Denver, was held at the Calif.
St. Methodist Church, April 10.
Approximately 90 guests attended
the dinner sponsored by the Cal.
St. Methodist Church.
The invocation was given by
Rev. Sasaki. George Furuta was
the toastmaster. Entertainment
was furnished by Helen Nakamura
with a violin solo, accompanied
by her sister, Marjery; a vocal
solo by Tom Masamori and group
singing led by Eiko Wat&nabe.
Rev. Sasaki concluded the dinner
with a benediction.
The Cornelians were in charge
of the Dinner Committee, Mrs. G.
Nakamura and Mrs# Arthur Yori-
moto, co-chairmen. Mrs. H&ruko
Kobayashi was in charge of the
table decorations and Miss Carol
Tanaka was Chairman of the Pro-
gram.
'Professional listinq-
ACC0UN1ANT- J
ROBERT MAS H0RIUCHI.
1238 20th Street.
DENTISTS
T. ITO, ^DS .
830 18th Street
PE 9166
MA 1644
.KE 8680
Y. ITO, DDS............KE 1077
830 18th Street
TAKASHI EAYEDA, DDS .TA 6961
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
K. II. MIYAMOTO, DDS .TA 4037
L952 Larimer Street
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS .TA 7490
200 Interstate Trust Bldg.
JLiWYFRS -
TOSHIO ANDO
615 E. & 0. Bldg.
Branch Office:
1232 20th Street
. .OH 7987
. .AL 3500
,CH 7987
MINORU YASUI,
615 E. Sc 0. BLdg.
INSURANCE
MITSUO KAIJEKO........5000
1232 20th Street .AL 5bOU
KENNETH T. SATO.......^ *644
1238 20th Street
OPTOMETRIST-
GEORGE J. KUBO. O.D. .OH 7813
1234 20th Street
PHYSICIAN and 5UR0N$
CHARLES FUJ1SAKI, MD GL 3638
3301 Zuni Street
THOS. E. KOBAYASHI, MD KE 4690
1229 21st Street
ISAMU OZAMOTO, MD. TA 1596
301 Interstate Trust Bldg*
HOWARD SUENAGA, MD TA 2642
830 18th Street
M. GEORGE TAKENO, MD TA 2642
830 18th Street
XciiwsmmE
The engagement of Miss Arlie
Sugioka to the Rev. Robert V.
Gildner was announced recently
at a tea held at the home of Mr.
and Mrs* George Hanasono.
Miss Sugioka is on the cleri-
cal staff at Grace Community Ch-
urch. Rev. Gildner, a recent
graduate of the Iliff School of
Theology, is at present pastor
of the youthful but progressive
Barnum Methodist Church.
jtamtjZ Jtu/tLKY
'Quality jewelry
scientific Watch repairing
20ft'*. LarinKtr A-L. 2977
APPY:
B&tij&LRakejcL PRODUCTS
HALL BAKIN* COMPANY...
600 W. I2.AVE. DENVER.
Miss Setsuko Mayena of Grand
Junction was married in a lovely
ceremony to Mr. Kiyoshi Kayo Ot-
aguro in the chapel of the Cali-
fornia Street Methodist Church
on Sunday, March 16, at 8:00 pm.
ACE-HI
-uC?

STUDIO
'-ARTISTRY IN ADVERTISING"
1330-20$St. KE4025

ft*.*.
DAY
way 5*
MOTHERS DAY
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Wikmm fwdjflurp
1930 LARIMER Sf. DENVERPJufit TA 2623


PAGE 4
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
APRIL, 1947
#



NOTES: mBr_ ~
....a* PEEK-A-B$$>
The Conference delegates were
shown real Denver hospitality by
the TAK TERASAXI* S one night and
ATSU and DOC ITO'S the next.
2ND LIEUT. YOSH HAKAGARA, A-
lameda, Calif, stopped in Denver
to renew a ship board acquaint-
ance with GEORGE KASUNAGA he
got in some skiing while here.
One of the loveliest brides
of the year was TET* S NARAHARA*S
SUSAN TORRY, who sings and acts
and works for Parkway Community
Center in Chicago's Harlem--,they
are going to Chicago to live.
Susan'8 sister and ^parents came
in from New York for the event*
KEN OSAJIMA & BILL OHAHA staged
a stag party for TETS the night
before the event.
MESBAMBS ED MATSUDA and B*
UMEZAWA hostessed a group of
young matrons bidding adieu to
MERIJANE YQKCE with a lil dinner
at Boggio's.
Kioto by Wilbhire
THE DENVER MARUSHO MIKS Baok row, left to right* Isa Tsutsui,
Tootsie Tsutsui, lack Ito, Pete Tsutsui, Kayo Senzaki & Ken Komaru
Front row, left to right* Taka Komaru, Yas Aoichi, Lander Ito,
Shun Nakayama, and Tets Narahara.
BXffiL!L...efifv
'Twas brillig and elithy toves
Did gyre and gimble in the wabe;
All mimsy were the borogroves,
And the mcme rathe outgrabe.
Yeah, Sprig habe sprug, and
most people have colds, or have
caught the tail end of the flu
epidemio that came late this
year.
But fishermen are still era*
2&\ TAKI DOMOTO JR., "THE MAYOR"
GEORGE FUHUTA, and GARD YQKCE
took off on April let Into the
snow-covered wilds of groaning
for a fishing trip* They were
looking for a 4th at bridge, in
the event they got stuck; and
sure enuf, when they returned,
they told of having to dig Geo's
Packard out of the snowdriftslll
Likewise, with DR* T* HAYEDA and
MXTS KANEKO trying their luok in
Wyoming. Even with "DOC'S" new
Super Buick, they had troubles
buoking snow and no fishll
Those NICC GALS did a swell
Job ushering and taking tickets
at the Japanese movies sponsored
by your JACL'.'*'.
Talk about beginner's luckll
YOSH NAKAYAMA shot a 55 in nine
holes at Case on his first time
out golfing'.
SUE HAYEDA has made a flying
trip baok to California for a
vacation. JACK NQDA is back a-
gain from California for about
two weeks.
There's a new gal in town
purty, toolll She's the former
VAC, IRIS WATANAEB.
In the Easter ParadeIt was
swell to see TERRY KODAMA, the
GEORGE KURAMOTO'S, LILLIAN TERA-
SAKI, FRANCES SAITO, RUI & GUTS
TANIGUCHI, the TOL TAKAMINE'S,
the BEE UYEDA'S, THE Y. ITO'S
THE GEORGE FUROTA'S, FUMI YABB,
ITSUKO HTRUTA, whose bonnet was
lovely, among others watching
their respective offspring per-
form at the childrens program
Easter Sunday at the Calif. St.
M.E. Church.
Among those seen at the JACL
Easter Ball were DR. "CEILI" FU-
JISAKI, CHIYO SATO, GARD Y0-
KQE (how we miss his MERIJANS'S
energy and beaming smile*.), and
DR. GEORGE KUBO and his lovely
wife.
DENVER BOWLERS
DO WELL IN SU
Several Denver Niseis attend-
ed the bowling tournament spon-
sored by the National JACL in
Salt Lake City, Utah on Harch 29
and 30. The meet was held at
the Temple Bowling Alley, popu-
lar rendezvous of Nisei bowlers
in Salt Lake City.
Denverites made a good show-
ing. The women's team, composed
of Elko Vatanabe, Masako Kojima,
Amy Konishi, Lillian Goto and
Rosa Higashi, came out first of
all the womens' teams, with a
score of 2267. The team of Siko
Vatanabe and Rosa Higashi copped
the first prize in the Womens1
Doubles with a score of 1030;
and Rosa walked away with the
top woman's score in all events
with a total score of 1465.
The team of Sam Kawanishi and
Fred Hasegawa placed second in
the Hen* 8 Doubles, with a score
of 1089* Sam Kawanishi finished
fifth in the Men* s Singh s With
a score of 567. In the Mixed
Doubles, Biko Vatanabe and Hooch
Okumura placed second with 1058;
and Sam Kawanishi and Rosa Higa-
shi placed fourth with 998.
GRflDQDQ mrn/'Pm
'VteimAurfms trifoamis
1919 Lawrence St KEiptoiK 5989
fflCiiuJut
GRILL CHOP SlIEV L
1l)l0i£tj I956 Larimer ft TAbor 9576,
mum Mm
The Marusho Mike went to Salt
Lake City to participate in the
tournament sponsored by National
JACL at the Pioneer Gymnasium on
Mar oh 26, 27, and 28.
The T. K. Pharmacy team won
the first half of the Denver
League games, and the Marusho
Miks the seoond half. In the
match to determine the champ,
the Hike came out on top.
About eighteen teams attended
the conference from Utah, Idaho,
and Seattle. Although the Maru-
sho Miks did not plaoe in the
conference, they were awarded a
sportsmanship trophy.
NAKAYAMA JEWELRY
MRS. ROBERT ADELL of the Natl
Jewish Hospital at 3800 S. Col-
fax reports that RUBY. OEXTBO, of
La Craoenta, California is a pa-
tient at BJH and would appreci-
ate visitors.
And, ah hal A cute addition
to the office personnel frequen-
ting the S&C Bldg, is BETTY TSU-
DA, employed at Silers. When she
dropped in at the JACL offices,
we put her to work, helping to
send out 1,000 notices for the
Rev. Surgoyne meetingU
BILL H06CKAWA and HIKARU IWA-
SAKI were recent air-visitors to
Seattle, Vh* Both were on busi-
ness. We hope that BILL will be
able to get a feature story out
of his trip to the Northwest, as
we liked his full-page feature
in the Sunday magazine seotion
of the POST* on March 16th*
vrT
1920 iacimerSf. MA 7043
<2
vfidcall EA$fOII8andclianjci}
5800 EAST COLFAX DENVER,
ffimt
TA. 0332
TA. 9277
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615 E & C Building
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