Citation
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 2, Number 8

Material Information

Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 2, Number 8
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
14

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
VOLUME II
NO* 8
DENVER, COLORADO
AUGUST 1947
COMMITTEES
ORGANIZE IN PUEBLO-
LA JARA
Two temporary JACL committees
were organized. last week-end,
In Pueblo and La Jara -Alamosa.
Immediate objective of theseoom-
mltteee, which will explore
later the possibilities of for-
mation of chapters, is to sup-
port the work of the JACL and
the ADC legislative work in Wash.
D.C., committee officials said.
The officers of the Pueblo
oommittee are Sanzo Shigeta ,
chairman; and Yose Fujita and Dr
Barry Takakl, committee members.
The issei and nisei held sep-
arate meetings at F. D. Muramoto
photo studio.
Roy Inouye was elected chair-
man of the La Jara-Alamosa com-
mittee. Members of the organ-
ization are: Siyoshi Eatsumoto,
vice-chairman; Tadashi Aigaki,
Roy Fujii and George Nishikawa,
committee members; and Mrs. Yo-
shiko. Inouye, secretary.
The issei in the two communi-
ties elected the following off-
icers for their Kika Kleei Dome!
branches: Committee members in
Pueblo are: F. Denklchl Muramotq
Yasoklohl Takakl and Yuzo Euzuma,
The La Jara-Alamosa oommittee
members are: Eichlgoro Ono,chain
man; Toyosuke Ogura and Hideiehl
Yoehida, committee members. The
issei and nisei meetings were
held Tuesday, July 22, in the
La Jara Buddhist church.
Traveling from Denver to at-
tend these meetings were Z.
Kanegaye, chairman of Elka Else!
Domel whloh works out of this
oity, and Roy M. Taken, Tri-
State JACL regional representa-
tive*
TWO NISEI ATTEND
USLE FELLOWSHIP
A cosmopolitan group of col-
lege students known as the Lisle
Fellowship is now encamped at
the YWCA camp on Mti Lookout.
There are 54 youths here repre-
senting 37 states and a number
of foreign countries. They are
of many faiths and nationalities.
Among their number are two Nisei,
Rose Hiraga of New York Citv and
Shirley Kajikawa of Peoria, Til.
E&eh week a deputation team
goes from the Lisle Fellowship
through the state to work with
various community groups and as-
sists them in their special
problems.
A few weeks ago a team of
four were In Denver to work on
the minority press organization.
The JACL office served as their
headquarters while they were in
town.
Nancy I to, shown above, was
grand prize winner at the picnic.
BOy SCOUTS AWARDED
CHARTER -
The recently formed Boy Scout
troop under the 0P'6nsorsbrp of
the California St* ffiE church has
been awarded a charter. The Cub
Pack troop number Is 138 and the
troop number is 38*
Sarge Terasaki Is in eharge
of the cubs, Tak Terasaki is in
charge of the Boy Scout, and Bob
Uyeda is the scoutmaster* Dr* T*
Kobayashi has been giving the
entrance physical examinations
for the cubs> and Dr* C* Fujisa-
ki has been examining the scouts*
The troop is hoping to secure
equipment such as tents, merit
badge, library and scout books*
The Denver Chapter JACL is con-
templating on presenting them
with a troop flag*
Nine of the group are now at
Scout Camp Tahosa near Ward,
Those attending are: William
Endo, Ernest Garcia, Bob Gonza-
les, Albert Eawamura, Ren Mlsuml
William Shimizu, Dick Dore, and
Richard Garcia*
For any boys interested in
Joining these troops, the meet-
ings are held for the Scouts on
Friday nite at 7:30 and 2:30 Sat.
urday for the Cubs*
PFC. yIINOKI MEMORIAL
SERVICE HELD AT
OROWAy
While the remains of the late
PFC Shojl Yunokl lie thousands
of miles away in an American
military cemeteiy In France more
than 250 of his friends, in-
cluding scores of his buddies,
honored him at a memorial ser-
vice on Aug. 7 in the Oidway,
Colorado, eemeteiy a few miles
outside the town.
The principal speaker was
Col. Louis V. Jones of the Colo-
rado Military District headquar-
ters in Denver* He was accom-
panied by Capt. Robert Brooks,
public relations officer of the
Colorado-wyoming Recruiting Dis-
trict.
"To be free men means more
than a recognition of the debt
we owe the man we honor today,"
Col. Jones reminded his audience
who came from all sections of
the Arkansas Valley, from Pueblo
and even Blanca in San Luis
valley*
"It means," he said,"that we,
like him, recognize that eternal
peace is the ultimate goal of
all mankind, hut that peace at
the expense of freedom Is worse
than no peace at all."
Among those present at the
ceremony were Shoji'e parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Jirokl Yunoki, who
last saw their son in August of
1943, when he sailed for Italy
with the 442nd Regimental Combat
Team. He had volunteered for
service in June, 1943, and was
killed 1n action at Braveres,
Franoe, on October 28, 1944.
Participants in the service,
led by sam Waruyama, master of
ceremonies, were: Finjo Fujimoto
Nob Ashida, Tom Fujimoto, UJi
Harada, Bob Maruyama, Katashl
Akagi, and the Revs. Eizo Saka-
moto and H, Ralph Bixel*
The sneaker was secured for
the ocoaslon by the Tri-State
JACL Regional office in Denver.
Its representative, Roy. M. Tak-
eno, accompanied Col. Jones and
Capt. Brooks to Ordway.
CATHAY POST HAS
GOODWILL DINNER
Featuring the theme "Learning
to Live Together", Cathay Post
185 of the American Legion held
its annual anniversary and good-
will dinner on July 31.
A delicious Chinese dinner
was served the honored guests
who inoluded such notables as
Mayor Q,ulgg Newton; a represent-
ative of Gov. Lee Knous; Jack
Foster, editor of the Rocky
Mountain News; Hugh B. Terry,
Manager of K L Z; Thomas Abe of
the Colorado Times; George Masu-
naga, president of Denver Chap-
ter JACL; Tom Akron of KVOD, and
Rabbi Herbert A. Friedman of
Temple Emmanuel who delivered
the' principal address of the
evening.
The Rev. Louis J. Gorham of-
fered the invocation and Max
Greenwald, post commander, ex-
tended a welcome.
The new officers of the post
elected in June are; Max Green-
wald, post commander; Harry £>hi-
bao, senior vice-commander; Geo.
Lum, Junior vice- commander; iSd
Chin, adjutant; iienry Saiki, cha-
plain; Louis Jay,finance officer
Iris Y/atanabe, historian; Jimmie
ukida and Randolph Chan, sergeant
at arms.
MINORITY PRESS
HOLDS MEETING -
Several Interested persons
met on Friday, August 1 at the
DU School of Commerce to discuss
the possibility of the formation
of a press association of small
independent newspapers*
Those present were: Helen
Peterson, business manager of
Pan-American News; Jeanne Mar-
tin, Tom Mills, columnists for
the Colorado Criterion; Louis
Levin, CIO press representative;
John Glasse,- director of deputa-
tions for the Lisle Fellowship,
and Michi Ando, of the Bulletin.
It was suggested that a bzoad
membership be invited to Join
the group. This would Include
not only the minority press, but
also other small independent
and organizational publications.
John Glasse offered the aid
of a Lisle Fellowship team in
helping to organise an initial
meeting* The offer was accepted
and a team worked with the nu-
cleus committee from Tuesday to
Friday of this week. They called
on many editors and got their
reaction to the idea of a press
group*
The first meeting Is to be
called in the near future*
Buy RAFFLE
TICKETS NOW,
COMMITTEE UR&ES
According to the latest re-
port by the committee in charge
of the raffle, sponsored by the
Denver Chapter JACL, it has been
announced that there are only a
limited number of tickets for
sale. This gives JACL members a
better chance of winning the
1948 Ford than would be the case
if the sale of tickets were im-
mediately made open to the gen-
eral public*
The committee recommends that
because of the limited number of
tickets, each member make his
purchase as soon as possible so
that no one will be disappointed!.
This is the first time that a
car is being awarded by a local
Nisei organization:* The new Ford
Super De Luxe promises to be
drastically different from any-
thing on the market at the pre-
sent time*
Distribution of raffle tic-
kets will be made only to JACL
members until Oct* 15* In the
event that sufficient sales to
meet expenses are not made by
that date, tickets will be sold
publicly
Tickets may be obtained from
any of the following people:
George Masunaga, Eml Katagiri,
Bessie Matsuda, Harry Sakada, Dr.
Y. Ito, Jack Fuji, Tak Terasaki,.
Frank Torizawa, Toshio Ando, and
the Denver Chapter office, 615
E & C Building.
Tickets may be purchased in
books of 11 for the price of $5
or single tickets may be had at
fifty cents each*
Place your orders for tickets
now.
ARMY "RECRUITERS
THANK CHAPTER
M/Sgt. John Hanamura and Lt.
Y. Eono recently, sent to the &erv
ver Chanter JACL a letter, ack-
nowledging the help they re-
ceived in their recent army re-
cruiting drive.
The letter read in part,"Your
kindness, hospitality, and whole
hearted cooperation have made it
possible for us to perform our
recent recruiting assignment
satisfactorily and effectively.
We extend our sincere apprecia-
tion to you for your generov*
support.


PAGE 2
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
AUGUST 1947

In last month's issue the Rt.
Rev. Paul Roberts, Dean of Saint
Johns Episcopal Cathedral, Den-
ver, said, "Whenever I have the
chance to do so, I always recom-
mend two hooks to my friends.
They are both by the same author
D. Elton Trueblood. Professor of
Philosophy of Religion at Stan-
ford University. The first one
is The Predicament of Modern
Man, the other is 'Foundation
for Reconstruction'
A GUEST EDITOR
SPEAKS
The time in which we now find
ourselves is possibly the most
significant era in all of human
existence. Fvery word we say,
deed we do. and thought we pro-
ject will Dlay a large part in
determining whether mankind will
progress to a glorious future or
having created gargantua weapons
of death and destruction, use
them to eradicate himself from
off the face of the earth.
Yes, there Is hope, but only
as long as men will think and
act intelligently for themselves
Increasingly we must concern
ourselves with knowing current
issues and their iinnlications.
"No one," he continues,"needs
to be told that there is some-
thing wrong in the world, some-
thing so wrong that unless we
get it mended pretty quickly it
will be too late. Few of us need
to be told that that wrong is in
the area of human relations
That means the trouble is within
us".
My purpose of repetition was
to serve as an introduction to
emphasize the following para-
graph and its importance.
Recently in an eloquent ap-
peal to church people to give to
the world's starving he calls
attention to the dire circum-
stances of peoples throughout
the world and urges an immediate
response through the channels of
such relief efforts as have been
instigated or fomented in Ameri-
ca.
"Hunger! We have heard that
word a myriad of times, but do
we really know what it means. We
know it only as a momentary pang
between meals. But hunger in Eu-
rope and Asia means more than
that. It means gaunt bodies and
warped minds, children suffering
from malnutritionrickety limbs
and stunted bodies, babies with
tuberculosis and weak with ane-
mia, young mothers dying in
child-birth."
"Long queues stretch down the
streets of many*citieswaiting,
waiting, waiting. In some places
the lines have already disband-
ed. There is nothing remaining
to give to them. Fear of the fu-
ture stuns them into despair.
The bakeries are empty. The sup-
plies have run out. There is si-
lence and hopelessness."
"Hunger because it is a human
problem becomes a political
problem. It twists men's reason-
ing,drives them into the arms of
the demagogues, starts revolu-
tions .Hungry people welcome any-
body or any thing that promises
them food.If facism or communism
offers them food, they will em-
brace them. If democracy and
Christianity bring them food, we
may convince them of our sincer-
ity. World order and world peace
can be attained only if people
are fed."
"It may be hard for us to re-
alize with our plenty the extent
of our panic and despair that
surrounds us and yet to them the
dire need for food now means the
loss of morality and' spiritual-
ity .It has meant the loss of hu-
man dignity, of significance, of
^a*!&ong with the food they need
clothing, books, paper, Bibles,
etc.,everything that makes for a
healthy mind and spirit as well
MR. THOMAS MILLS
Columnist for Colorado Criterion
Taking a' quick glance at our
daily news we find...opposition
to cooperatives because of their
tax status...the indiscriminate
tagging of liberal individuals
and organizations as "Reds"...
the takeone-step-every--fifty-
years or educational approach to
human equality...indifference at
election time and at other times
of community importance. When
these happenings occur, clear
Indications of muddled misguided
thinking are seen.
Certainly, no one should go
through life carrying the bur-
dens of the world upon his
shoulders, but more than ever
before, each of us can and must
rise, prepared to cope with any
situation that arises. Are you
thinking for today?
too PEOPLE ENJOY
JACL P/CN/C
About 100 people gathered at
Stanley Lake on August 3 for the
JACL Community picnlo.
Fishing, swimming, cards,
races and various other activi-
ties were, enjoyed.
The following business houses
generously donated prizes for
the picnic:
JORYO JEWELERS, KUWABARA JEW-
ELERS, DENVER NOODLE, TOYO CO.,
FISH CAKE PRODUCTS, OSUMI JEWEL-
ERS, GEORGE MOTORS, JACKS BARBER
HENRY'S JEWELERS, UNIVERSAL FOOD
DIRECTORS, MIKAWAYA, HARRY HARD-
WARE, DOI PHARMACY. NAKAYAMAS
JEWELERS, PACIFIC MERCANTILE,
GRANADA FISH, £02IMA FISH, RAYS
MARKET, MODERN FOODS, D. OKUNO,
KAWAMATA SHOE SHOP, MANCHU'S and
T. K. PHARMACY,
as body.
^ttkGjiure&uf.
DIAMONDS -JEWELRY
. n/jam repairing
NINETEENTH ST. PENVER.C010.
continued from page four
slated to participate in the two
day affair at Denver. Crossing
bats with the seven NCBL teams
are Crowley (consisting of seve-
ral key players of last year's
tourney Ordway champs ), Rocky
Ford, Littleton, St. Mary's of
Nebraska and probably the soft-
ball king, Y Carpenters.
THE CRITICS CORNER.
hSMosoimJti
The nationwide interest ar-
oused by the Denver Post in the
New World's displaced persons
problemthe Japanese from Peru
being heid in a U. S. concentra-
tion campwas all the doing of
Vaughn ( Bonnie ) Mechau, now a
Post staffer and former reports
officer at the Heart Mountain
relocation center.
Elsewhere in the diamond dust
paths the Denver Merchants go
to Ogden to participate in the
Utah JAU tourney, while the oft-
trounced Manchu Grill have been
idle with a recess in the Metro
loop during the Denver Post's
tournament.
Along the golfing greens the
Mile High Golf Club's four week
72 hole tournament Is In pro'
gross and currently being paced
by Henry Imada who paired a neat
net 64-75 for an aggregate 139
score. Tagging closely behind
were a threesome consisting of C.
Arima, Ichlmaru and Bogle tour-
nament champion Jack Fuji,each
with a 143. Dan Yoshlmura held
fourth spot with 144, while John
Hanamura and Charles Iwashlta
with 145 followed to lead the
field of 21 performers.
The strong Victory Market
Bowling team with a 33-15 record
continued to occupy the top rung
in the Mixed Bowling League stan-
ding with Western Fountain five
games behind the leaders, re-
placing Kaneko Insurance for the
second position.
C/ry Charts* Elsct>on
It pleases us to note that
the recently elected representa-
tives to the city charter con-
vention come from many racial
backgrounds. We find among them
several good friends of the
nisei.
The chosen delegates were all
on the slate recommended by May-
or Quigg Newton. It seems that
the mayor is making efforts to
put capable individuals from
minority groups into responsible
positions in the city government
This is a healthy sign.
(HOSOKAWA)
portions. Then someone got the
idea of scooping out the meat
and freezing it in pellets to be
marketed as an off-season deli-
cacy. The Idea clicked. Nisei
girls are on the production line.
Denver Nisei fishermen are
more than somewhat relieved at
the departure of Henry Kubota
for his home in Seattle. Kubota,
an affluent hotel operator, has
the knack of pulling trout out
of rivers where no one else can,
and his limit catches of giant
rainbows during Ids Colorado va-
cation this summer have been the
envy and despair of local an-
glers.
Several of his prize fish
were on display at the Granada
counter.
MONTHLY ADVERTISING RATES
Professional Listings. . ^1.50
3/4 Business Ads. . . 2.75
2 business Ads. . . 5.00
2" Double-column Ads . . 7.50
Basic Rate: $3.00 per column inch per month.
Mechau read one of Larry Ta-
jiri's editorials in the Pacific
Citizen on. the plight of the
Peruvians and suggested a series
of stories to his editors. They
were enthusiastic and Bonnie was
authorized to fly to Crystal
City, Texas, to dig up as much
information as possible.
The expose of how the United
States is acting as jailor for
another nation two years after
VJ-day, and long aft?r we have
released every German prisoner
of war, followed.
Success deserves credit and
Wes Oyama achieved a measure of
it when he was named the only
Nisei in the first contingent of
American traders to be permitted
into Japan. Five other Nisei, ac-
cording to press reports, will
be included in subsequent con-
tingents.
Oyama founded the Modern Food
Products firm in Denver during
the war from humble beginnings,
and he has been the guiding
force behind its spectacular
climb to prominence. There was
opportunity in Denver for Nisei
businessmen during the war, and
Oyama was one who made the most
of it.
Nisei girls, our informants
tell us, have been providing
some of the labor in a new in-
dustry down at Rocky Fordquick
freezing of the famed Colorado
canteloupes.
A big seed firm used to waste
the best melons by taking only
the seeds and dumping the edible
(continued col. 3)
DENVER JACL MEMBERSHIP
Memberships in the Denver
JACL are as follows:
Individual membership. $3.00
Membership for couples 5.00
Pacifio Citizen, member. 2.50
P.C., non-member 3.50 I
Subscription to the Denver
JACL Bulletin, only, until the
end of every year, to Deo. 31,
without membership, is #1.00
.i- J
>
Published monthly by the
Denver chapter of the Japa-
nese American Citizens Lea-
gue, 615 E & C Bldg., Den-
ver, Colo. Tel: CH 5990
Editor: Michi Ando
Staff: Rosa Higashi, Bill
Hosokawa, Mami Katagiri, Geo.
Kubo, Bess Matsuda, Geo. Ma-
sunaga, Hiroshi Wada.
Fotos: WILSHIRE STUDIO
l----- J
&64 £qi)lot SchrtLfft'i ftrcchf's
ikauiaua yuBJtbhm
1930 LQR1M6R tl.J DfNVf n/uj:


AUGUST 1947
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
PAGE 3
*TE SMAIlTRy
Have you seen the NWAA play
softball In the State girl*a
tourney? You eho* didn't miae
nuoh the first nltebut tremen-
dous Improvement was shown the
next day despite the loss of
NANCY TTO. The laesiee defeated
Fort Oolline 11 to 10 in a 9 in-
ning game, and later that even-
ing played another game only to
be defeated 15-10 against Pueblo.
Do yo blame em??????
Have you noticed the change
in the atmosphere lately? Could
it be that cute lil Katie Kawa-
mura and handsome Joe Arlkl blew
into town?
Seems as If Denver Is quite a
popular place these days!! From
L. A. halls TOYE A IEEE KTTAJBIA.
"RABBIT" H1GUCHI, A the ISHEA-
WAS. Ah yes, cute 111 ROGER
INOUYE Is Just back from the
army, gals!!!
EUGENIA HORITA and HARRY
HASHIMOTO are now one!!
Did yo' all notloe the cooky
dusters that are being raised
In this community? Heres a
hint-romeos"A wolf who longs
to roam and prowl should shave
before he starts to howl!!
Have you heard the latest
broadcast from the BRIGHTON SAD
SAX? They claim-"A kiss with-
out a mustache Is like a soup
without salt!!"

THE SMALL FRYS
MOST SPECTACULAR REVELATION
NOTICE!! KENNY TMAMURA
DIVED WITH HIS BOOTS ON
I
AMERICAN
MOTOR SALES
-INCORR-
Irrjac/a, pn#>.
NEW-*
C/SEO
CARS
Auro
LOANS
Booy-*-
RENOER
GERsQ/R
General
Repairing-
Hudson? Dealer
CH.2830 2358 MM
^ilslyfy
I
STUDIO
FLORENCE BLDCjr.
830-18* TA 3697
CANDIDS tf PICNIC--------
MORE GAMS
GEORGE'S MOTOR SERVICE
(Oriqinallcj "PIN^ and (jEORQE")
RECAPS /rfficcK fiBFflsiNfi
BATTERIES! UlT) WASHING
&
TRUCK and AUTO REPAIRS
20*>+lau>mci M A 9373
ACE-HI
-ut7

STUDIO
'ARTISTRY IN ADVERTISING"
1330*20# St. KE4025
fflOFESSIOML USTINGr
ACCOUNTANT* J
ROBERT MAS HORIUCHI .2 9166
1228 20th Street
DENTISTS '
T. ITO, .................8680
820 18th Street
Y. ITO, DDS..............EB 1077
820 18th Street
TAKA3HI MAYEDA, DBS .S* 6961
301 Interstate Trust Bldg*
K. K. MIYAMOTO, DDS .TA 4307
1962 Larimer Street
GENTA NAKAMURA, DBS .TA 7498
£00 Interstate Trust Bldg.
* LAWYERS -
TOSHIO ANDO
616 E. & 0. Bldg. * . .CH 7987
Branch Office:
1232 20th-Street . . ,AL 3600
MINORU YASUI. . . ,CH 7987
616 E. & 0. Bldg.
INSUIWCT
SHIG IMAMURA. . , .GL 3138
1238 20th Street - . ,MA 1644
JOHNNY INOUYE , . .CH 7614
MITSUO KANEKO . . ,GR 5000
1232 20th Street . .AL 3500
HENRY KIICURA
1232 20th Street . .AX 3600
JINZO NODA ....
2829 Champa . . ,MA 8595
KENNETH T. SATO . . .KA 1644
1238 20th Street
OPTOMETRIST'
George j, kubo, o.d. .oh 7813
1234 20th Street
PHYSICIAN and SURGEONS
CHARLES FUJISAKI, MD. .GL 3638
3301 Zuni Street
THOS. K. KOBAYASHI* MD. .KB 4690
1229 21st Street
ISAMU 0ZAM0T0, MD .TA 1696
30.1 Interstate Trust Bldg.
HOWARD 3UENAGA, MD. .TA 2642
830 18th 3treet
M. GEORGE lATJJIJO, MD. .TA 0783
830 18th Street
NISEI RE&.PHAftn-'tosr.
Uf^Uo /wws-pftt^
fountain Swvie&
22*LARIMER TA9207
cMWrtflL FLOWER SHOP
DENVER'S ECONOMICAL FLORIST"
=S£*ee 'DlEas&M/
511-15* Street C-H. 3546
JEWELRY
'Quality jewelry
SCIENTIFIC WATCH REPAIR-INCr
2Q&* Larinw A-L. 2977


PAGE 4
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
AUGUST- 1947
1PHEK-A-B&&
KODY KODAMA, JIM OZAWA, and
UIT6 KANEKO are on a business
trip In California.
JOHNNY INOUYE came back with
the 'biggest limit of trout yet
from Colorado River. FRED and
GEORGE INOUYE and GEORGE TAKAO
went also, but let s not talk
about that.
The GEORGE MIURAS and the
TOIf KOBAYASHIS and family are
vacationing in Yellowstone.
JERRY KATAYAMA from Salt Lake
City buzzed into town and had a
chance reunion with GENJI YAMA*
MOTO, whom he had last seen in
Korea.
Bathing fashions-EDDY YAMATO
in his striking striped bathing
trunks was the best dressed na-
tator at the recent JACL picnic
St Stanley Lake. RAY UYESHIMA
looked enviously from shore as
EDDY floated about leisurely on
his back.
PETER TJMEKUBO, former DU stu-
dent, now third year dental ma-
jor at Washington U in St. Louis
married MARY OSHIUA of St. Louis
at Pine ME church in S.F. with
former Denver pastor Rev. J. FU-
JIMORI officiating.
Frequent swimmers at Berkeley
Lake are: JIRO SHIOJI, ROY SHI-
BATA, NOBIE KAJANO, KEN I MAMUKA,
GENJI YAMAMOTO, MIT SUE SUGANO,
and MIKE KAWAI.
Were so sorry MARY MASUNAGA
skinned her elbow so badly in
the races at the picnic~we still
think she should have gotten the
radio for trying.
CHARLES 3UYEI3HI is in the
hospitalquick recovery, Chas.
Expecting extra passengers to
join them in the family car are:
the SHIMP3I MIYAKE'S, GUTZ TANI-
GUCHIS, and the JAMES IMATANI'S.
TED & DOROTHY CHIBA and their
daughter,JOYCE, MRS. G. NAKAMURA
and her daughters, MARJORIE and
HELEN, and PEGGY YAMATO were re-
cent vacationers in California.
The SHIG IUAMUaA'S are now in
California as are the GEORGE JTU-
IIMOTOS. and so is TAKI POMOTQ.
The GEORGE FURUTA'S, who were
vacationing in California have
decided not to come back to Den-
verwe*ll miss May and George.
THE DAY'S CATCH

THE EDITOR RELAXES
GREAT EXPECTATIONS
Min Yasui honored
AT DINNER
On July 17th, Min Yaeui* the
retiring Tr1 -8tate representa-
tive was guest of honor at a
dinner at Woodlawn given by the
past and present cabinet members
of the Denver JACL. Wise Yoshl-
ko Arikl was general chairman of
the dinner.
A pen and pencil set was giv-
en to Mr. Yasul by the past and
present cabinet. Mr. Ror Takeno
presented him with a watch from
the national office.
Those attending the dinner
were: Baburn Tani, Mlts Kaneko,
Dr. A Mrs. T. Mayeda, Taki Domo-
to. Jr., Dr. a Mrs. T. K. Koba-
yashi, Emi Katagirl, Mr. A Mrs.
M. Yasul, Yoshiko Arlki, Dorothy
Madokoro, Roy Takeno, George
Masunaga, Rose Kokubu, Dr. C.
Fujisakl, Mr. a Mrs. Y. Terasa-
ki, Dr. a Mrs. Y, Tto, Toshio
Ando, Bessie Matsuda, and Dr. A
Mrs. G Kubo.
Rev. Uyemura leaves
FOR FRESNO
The California Street Commu-
nity Church is holding a supper
meeting on Sunday, August 24, at
6 p.m. to bid farewell to Rev.
and Mrs. Uemura and to welcome
Rev. and Mrs. K. Sasaki.
The Uemura family is sche-
duled to leave shortly for Fres-
no, California, where Rev. Uemu-
ra has been assigned to the Me-
thodist Church pastorate.
Rev. Sasaki has been pastor
of the local Nisei church, but
henceforth he will preach to the
Issei congregation.
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1919 Lawrence 5t. KEqs+one 598?
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GRILL CHOP SUEV 1
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DU students make.
flitnon+y survey
Mrs. Masako Sato is one of
sixty Denver University sociolo-
gy students making a study of
discriminatory practices against
minorities.
These students have been as-
signed to Mayor Quigg Newtons
survey on human relations.
Eleven students are working
with Father Newell on Orientals.
Mrs. Sato has been assigned to
study Japanese Americans.
Facts about minority discri-
minations in employment, hous-
ing, recreation, health, and
education are being sought.
This information will be turned
over to the human relations
committee which will be perma-
nently formed about November.
"Among the Japanese American
element I have not found as much
prejudice directed against them
as I had expected," commented
Mrs. Sato.
Occupying the limelight for
the month in the eyes of the
local Nisei sports realm are the
Y Carpenters championship soft-
ball club which batted their op
ponents with a convincing 8 won-
2 loss record and a clear-cut
title in the North Denver Soft-
ball loop. In subduing their
foes Beans Yamamotos gang made
116 runs and allowed only 62 In
ten games played.
The Carpenters Big Guns"
who played an important role to
bring home the softball flag are
Tad Marumoto, leading Nisei bat-
ter with a .471 average, Rupe
Aral, speedy shortstop(.423 ave-
rage;, the fence-busting perfor-
mances of Lander I to and Win-
bourne Enoraoto, and the pitching
staff of Lefty Noda, Beans and
Sat Yamamoto.
Currently the Carpenters are
competing in the City-wide Soft-
ball tourney, and on Aug 12 at
Lincoln Park belted Supreme Coal
Overland Parks Class AA repre-
sentatives, 7-2 in their opener.
In the NCBL circuit Tosh Naka-
muras youthful Busseis with an
envious 11. won-1 loss slate con-
tinued their winning spree and
held a slim lead over the con-
tending Ault nine with the local
Merchants trailing in third.This
Sunday(Aug. 17) the Busseis en-
tertain Ault at the East Hi
ground with the league champion-
ship at stake. An Ault victory
would necessitate a playoff and
a possibility to nab the title.
On Aug. 31 and Sept. 1st the
local Busseis will act as hosts
during the second annual Labor
Day tournament with twelve teams
(continued on page two)
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THE DENVER BULLETIN
The Denver Chapter JACL
615 E & C Building
Denver 2, Colorado
Sec. 562, P, l. & r.