Citation
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 2, Number 9

Material Information

Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 2, Number 9
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
14

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text

DENVER, COLORADO SEPTEMBER 1947
MIKE MASAOKA TOURS NATION
ADC DIRECTOR TO BE IN
DENVER SEPTEMBER 30
Mike Masaoka, national legislative director of JACL-ADC who is
now on national tour, is scheduled to be in Denver from September 50
to October 6.
LOCAL CHAPTER
AIDS ADC
In conjunction with its plans
to give the month of September
to assisting the Tri-State Of-
fice, the Denver chapter JACL is
soliciting funds for the Anti-
Discrimination Committee, it was
announced by the cabinet.
The committee in charge of
this project will solicit by
mail all the Japanese families
in Denver and the surro unding
areas which are not covered by
other chapters.
Plans are being made to dis-
tribute literature on the work
and progress of ADC together
with letters requesting funds in
hope that those who have not al-
ready contributed will support
the cause at this time. Spokes-
men for the committee have
emphasized the fact that while
large contributions are welcome,
no donation is too small. The
committee goal is to obtain
donations from every family in
the Denver area.
The committee plans to limit
its activities to solicitations
by mail} however, should the
returns from this method prove
unsatisfactory, teams will be
organized to conduct a house to
house canvass.
The Chicago chapter conduct-
ed a similar campaign and it is
believed that if every one in
this area will make some dona-
tion, this chapter will be able
to show results equal to those
of Chicago.
Members of the committee in-
clude Dorothy Madokoro, liichi
Ando, Atsu Ito, True Yasui, Emi
Katagiri and Chiye Horiuchi.
Chairman is Michi Kawai.
LARGE CROWD AT
VICTORY HOP
About 300 people attended the
Victory Hop at the Turnverein
Club on Labor Day to honor the
Denver Merchants, winners of the
NCNBL tournament.
During the intermission tro-
phies for outstanding perform-
ances were awarded to the first,
second, and third league champ-
ions, the tournament winner, and
outstanding individual players.
Tosh Nakamura was general
chairman of the dance sponsored
by the Busseis, and Sazy Iwa-
shita was in charge of the ar-
rangements
happy Logan's orchestra pro-
vided music for the dance.
NSW YORK TUPRMfiNTATIVE
VISITS DENVER*
Mr. Sam Ishikawa, field rep-
resentative of the American
Friends Service Committee and
regional representative -desig-
nate of the Eastern JACL-ADC
office visited Denver last week.
He toured the west coast in
behalf of the Japan Relief or-
ganization before coming here.
Mr. Ishikawa returned to
Philadelphia where he will ter-
minate his work with the AFSC.
He will then take charge of the
Eastern JACL- ADC office from
September 15.
HUMAN RIGHTS BILL
GIVEN SUPPORT
The Denver Chapter JACL is
cooperating with the Denver U-
nity Council in endorsing the
Bill of Human Rights, as pro-
posed for the City Charter re-
form. This document modeled af-
ter the Bill of Rights in the
Constitution of the United
States will guarantee that there
shall be no discrimination a-
gainst a man for reason of race
color, creed or national origin.
The proposed reform is being en-
dorsed by the various minority
groups in Denver, and it is
hoped that all the Nisei groups
will give it their support.
The Bill of Human Rights in
part"The Historical growth of
Denver owes much to the valuable
contributions of many races and
creeds. The magnificent sacri-
(continued page 2)
INSURANCE MEN IN
- CHICAGO -
A group of local insurance
salesmen are in Chicago to at-
tend the first post-war insur-
ance conference, from Sept. 18-
20.
Among those going to Chicago
are Mits Kaneko, S. Kameishi ,
Jinzo Noda, Shigeo Miyazawa, Ken
Sato, and Mr. and Mrs. H. Xodani.
MORIYAMAS TO VISIT
EUROPE
Toshiko Moriyama, nee Kako,
formerly of Denver, will accom-
pany her husband, Dr. Iwao Mori-
yama to Europe this fall.
Dr. Moriyama will be one of
the American health and sanita-
tion experts who will attend an
international conference in
Switzerland starting on Oct. 18.
At the close of the confer-
ence the Moriyamas will make an
extended tour of Europe,
The Tri-State Regional office
ED MATSUDA HEADS
RAFFLE COMMITTEE
Mr. Eddie Matsuda has been
appointed by the local chapter
cabinet to head a raffle ticket
sales committee in order to pro-
mote greater distribution of
tickets.
A new 1948 Ford Super DeLuxe
sedan is to be awarded to some
lucky person at the inaugural
ball this winter.
Those working with Mr. Matsu-
da are:
Jack Fujii, Lefty Kobayashi,
Yutaka Terasaki, George Muraka-
mi, Frank Ishikawa, Mas Takata,
Mits Kaneko, Hooch Okumura, Har-
ry Sakata, Jimmy Kanemoto, and
Yoshiko Ariki.
Up to the present time tic-
kets have been sold only to JACL
members. The committee announc-
es that the sale will be opened
to the public immediately. Tic-
kets may be had for $5 a book
(eleven tickets) or fifty cents
apiece.
The committee will meet this
month to complete plans.
CONTRIBUTION GIVEN
ARLINGTON GROUP
The local JACL Chapter made
a contribution recently to the
Arlington Committee, which was
organized by the Eastern Dist-
rict Council of the JACL for the
purpose of sponsoring projects
in connection with honoring the
return of the Nisei war dead for
reburial in Arlington National
Cemetery
This committee plans to con-
duct services when the first
bodies of Nisei soldiers arrive
at Arlington and to participate
in any activities that may be
held by the war department. They
also plan to hold special ser-
vices at Arlington for each Ni-
sei soldier at the time of re-
burial. Plans include placing a
wreath on the Tomb of the Un-
known Soldier, decorating the
graves of Nisei and taking pic-
tures to be sent to,the parents.
However, parents or relatives
desiring special wreaths may no-
tify the committee to that ef-
fect. The committee also hopes
to be able to obtain hotel re-
servations and perform other
services for any next of kin who
wish to make pilgrimages to
Arlington.
The national committee has
invited contributions not only
from all the chapters but from
any interested individuals who
wish to help carry out this
project.
To date there have been con-
tributions from seven chapters,
including Denver, and three in-
dividuals.
Correspondence and contribu-
tions may be sent to the JACL
Arlington National Cemetery com-
mittee, c/o Jack Hirose, 6626
Rhode Island Avenue, Riverdale,
Maryland.
is scheduling visits for Mr. Masa-
oka with Caucasian individuals
and groups, with officials and
members of the Denver JACL chap-
ter and the Issei supporting or-
ganization, the Kika Kisei Domei.
The Local Itinerary
His local itinerary is as
follows: Tuesday, September 30,
arrive at Stapleton airport from
Omaha;
Wednesday, October 1, confer
with ex-Governor Ralph Carr and
Senator Eugene D. Mllliken; at-
tend special Denver chapter eab-
- inet meeting;
Thursday, October 2, attend
Issei-Nisei meeting at the Jap-
anese hall.
Friday, October 3, attend
meeting of the policy board of
the Denver Unity Council in the
evening;
Invitations To Be Sent
Present plans call for issu-
ing invitations from the Tri-
State office to the JACL chapter
and committee officials, as well
as officials and members of the
Kika Kisei Dbraei in Colorado and
possibly Cheyenne.
Unscheduled to date, but pos-
sibly, is a talk by Mr. Masaoka.
from radio station KLZ. His
participation in other affairs
are being discussed subject to
his approval.
The JACL-ADC director will
leave by plane for Minneapolis
on October 6. He will wind up
his tour in Idaho Falls, Idaho,
on December 1 barring a sudden
change in the schedule necessi-
tated by developments in Wash-
ington, D. C,
NISEI FEDERAL EMPLOYEES
- STATUS UNCHANGED -
The JACL-ADC office in Wash-
ington has revealed that the
status of the Nisei Federal em-
ployees who were discharged
from their jobs has not changed
to date.
The ADC is protesting be-
cause the five Nisei in ques-
tion were discharged merely for
being "Japanese". William C.
Hull, of the Federal Civil Ser-
vice commission, explained to
JACL-ADC*s Washington office
that the Nisei were found dis-
loyal because they demonstrated
their loyalty to the Emperor of
Japan rather than to the govern
ment of the United States. How-
ever, ADC objects to the use of
ancestry or race as the sole
factor in determining loyalty
which is the way the State de-
partment's records read at the
present time.
The recent Gallup poll on the
question, whether government
worker subject to the new loy-
alty test should be dismissed
without a hearing, revealed
that an overwhelming majority
of American's expressed the be-
lief that individual employees
whose loyalty is questioned
should be given the opportunity
to present his case.


PAGE 2
THE DEBTOR JACL BULLETIN
SEPTEMBER 1947

The Anti-Discrimination Com-
mittee of the JACL needs your
help* This appeal is intended
for every Issei and Nisei to as-
sist the committee in the ful-
fillment of its policy*
You can do your part by con-
tributing monitarlly. Inciden-
tally, it has been suggested by
an enthusiastic member that the
Denver Chapter ask for a one
dollar donation from each odhiber
and from others who would be wil-
ling to contribute* Sounds good,
doesn't it?' We'll be around*
Another very good method of
contributing is by writing or
contacting your Senators and
Representatives concerning the
important bills before our Con-
gress. Reference should be made
especially to legislation amen-
ding our federal naturalization
laws so that the Issels may be-
come citizens on the same basis
as other aliens* Our Represen-
tatives should also be thanked
for their support of the fol-
lowing bills: HR 3149, naturali-
zation for parents of our sol-
dier dead and Purple Heart vet-
erans, HR3566,the Soldiers Bride
Amendments, HR 3555, equalizing
the deportation laws by removing
race factors, and H.R,3999, the
Evacuation Claims Bill* These
bills have not been presented to
the Senate.
It is suggested that meeting
irQm* congressmen while they are
at home this summer will be very
helpful. Your non Japanese
friends may be urged to contact
the congressmen, and may be
urged to support the ADC legis-
lation. This is very important,
especially if the individual is
a personal friend of the con-
gressman.
Congratulations to the East-
ern Division Council of the JACL
for the formation of the Arling-
ton Committee to sponsor pro-
jects in connection with the
honoring of the return of our
Nisei war dead.
Tentative plan have been made
for a Joint jssei-Nisei meeting
on October 3, at 8:00 pm at the
Japanese Hall with Mike,Masaoka
as guest speaker* Spread the
good work; everyone is welcome.
YASUtS RETURN FROM
VACATION*
Min Yasul, former Tri-State
representative, and Mrs* Yasui
recently returned from a five
week vacation during which they
made an estended tour of the
west coast*
Their leisurely motor tour
was made in counter clockwise
manner* Their first stop was in
Yellowstone National Park in
Idaho, then Seattle, Portland,
San Francisco, Los Angeles, and
thence through Arizona, New Mex-
ico, and back to Denver via
southern Colorado*
Min Yasui will resume his pri-
vate law practise here in Denver
and plans to do graduate work at
Denver University,_______
Studio
IPdtmtuJt Pfiotbcjteiphip,
FLORENCE 8L0q.
830-16*4. TA 3697

(continued from page 1)
fices of all ethnic and religi-
out groups are interwoven into
the very foundation of society.
The preservations of the rights
of all groups is a fundamental
factor in insuring the continual
growth of our city. To this end,
the following basic civil and
political rights are hereby es-
tablished for all inhabitants of
Denver regardless of race, creed,
color, or national origin.
Specifically it will guarantee
that there will be no discrimina-
tion in employment; outlaws re-
strictive housing, both as re-
gards sale and rent 'or lease of
property; provides that member-
ship in professional clubs shall
not be withheld for reasons of
race, color, creed or national
origin; guarantees to all the
right to Join trade unions, to
equal educational and vocational
training opportunities; makes
unlawful any propaganda which
stimulates racialdLscriminetionj
demands that there be no dis-
crimination in the granting of
municipal licenses, and outlaws
discriminatory practices in mu-
nicipal employment, and in any
firms under municipal contract.
TR! STATE
OFFICE REPORT
For the first time since the
establishment of the Tri-State
regional office in Denver, JACL
chapters and JACL ocmmittees,
and the Isseis Kika Kisei Domei
branch organization have been
in the process of being or-
ganized throughout the Colorado-
Wyooing-Nebraska area.
As of this moment, two chap-
ters are active in Denver and
Ft. Lupton* The new chapter in
Omaha will swear in its cabinet
officers on sept. 27. ADC Dir-
ector, Mike Masaoka, will In-
stall the cabinet members, head-
ed by President Pat Okura, an
administrative staff member of
the famous Boys Town established
by Father: Flanagan,
Kat Akagi is chairman of the
JACL committee, in Crowley, Colo-
rado, which is looking toward
the formation of its chapter
after the present melon-onion-
sugar beet harvest. Members of
the committed, in addition to
Vice-chairman, Sam Maruyama, are
Harry Shironaga, Kiyo Fujimoto,
George Ashida, Joe Uyeno, and
Raymond Nakamoto*
The Pueblo J.A.C.L* Committee
officers, headed by Chairman
Sanzo Shigeta are: Yase Fujita
and Dr. Harry Takaki.
Rocky Ford's committee is
headed by Co-Chairmen Yuji Hara-
da and George Ushiyama.
Roy Inouye is chairman of the
La Jara-Alamosa JACL Committee,
and Kiyoshl Katsumoto is vice-
chairman. Other members of the
committee are: Tadashi Aigaki,
Roy Fujll and George Nishikawa.
Mrs. Yoshiko Inouye is secretary.
In Cheyenne, Wyo., Frank Iku-
no is chairman, with Henry Omot,
Bill Matsuyama, Joe Okamoto and
Frank Ohashi as members of the
committee.
Twelve branches of the is-
sei's Kika Kisei Domei, affili-
ated with the Tri-State JACL-ADC
(continued page 3)
GEORGE'S MOTOR SERVICE
COrtyinallij PINfq and {jEORQE")
RECAPS
BATTERIES
TEXACO

CREASING
WASHING
TRUCK and AUTO REPAIRS
20*i*Lau>mci MA 9373
GUEST EDITOR -
WHATABOUT TO-
MORROW?"* MBERKA
Fate was not very benevolent
to us, young people from Europe;
born in the turmoil after the
first World War, brought up a-
midst devastation of the second
World War, we are standing on
the threshold of our lives with
a burning question on our lips:
Does there exist somewhere a
Miraslav Berks, the author of
this editorial, is a student
from Czechoslovakia studying in
Missouri. He was a recent Den-
ver visitor.
guiding light or a clear sign
that would show us the way out
of the seemingly hopeless dead-
lock, facing mankind today.
Most of us, who saw six years
of ruthless and demoralizing
war, are unable to answer this
question; we stand downhearted,
despondent, frustrated; our
ideas and thinking have become
bitter, pessimistic, cynical.
This moral scar, burnt upon our
hearts by the merciless fire of
total destruction, is one of
the wounds which heal very
slowly; damage to our souls Is
done much more easily than
physical damage.
But still we can't turn our'
back on this apparently dark
Sicture of the present world,
ne of the few privileges o f
us, young people, is the in-
domitable will to live-------and
for that right we are willing
to fight the fiercest battle of
our lives. We don't want to
create any artificial barriers
between ourselves and our
elders, who are now trying to
shape the destiny of the world;
but we shall not hesitate to
defy anybody who would try to
use and misuse us for his own
selfish purpose We have seen
enough destruction and death
during the comparatively short
period of our existence all
we are asking for now is a
possibility to co-operpte in
creating positive values and to
live peacefully on this earth
which we still believe could be
transformed through good will
and understanding into a world
free from want, free from fear
and free for democracy. Will
our modest wish be granted?
MONTHLY ADVERTISING RATES
Professional Listings. . $1.50
3/4 Business Ads. . 2.75
2 11 business Ads. . 5.00
2" Double-column Ads , 7.50
Basic Rate: $3.00 per column
Inch per month.
ACE-HI?, ja-
STUDIO
'-ARTISTRY IN ADVERTISING"
1330*20# St. KE4025
ojj {jfirer
Its a funny thing how you
it to depend on the same few
people to help you out all the
time.. Take this space,every,
month the Critic goes to work to
give us bis impression on things
in general. Its one of. those
things that happen so regularly
you dont even have to think
about it----and when Hosokawa
takes himself off on a vacation
you suddenly realize how much he
has been doing for you all this
time. Or, that gal, Bessie Mat-
suda, she goes off to New York
for a .. couple of weeks and you
hear people saying,"We can't do
anything about this or that till
Bessie comes back.!1 Yep, it's
always the same folks who do all
the work; and I reckon it's the
same ones who do all the com-
plainin' too.Too bad they can't
git together, if half the eneigy
spent on fussln' about things
was devoted to doin' somethin'
about them the folks who rim''em
wouldn't have to over-work the
same loyal crew all the time.
And maybe those who find things
to kick about would be able to
run things more like the way
they want 'em.
You take a look at the work
being done by the ADC, a couple
o' people like Mike Masaoka have
to handle all the work. The rest
of us sit back and dont pay much
attentionmaybe we kick through
with a dollar now and then after
someone has sent us 75£ worth of
requests for donations, but we
dont give them the backing we
should. You know, it must be
pretty discouragin' to work for
a bunch of people who dont enuff
even to keep up with what you're
tryin* to do.
Vas talkin' to a fella Just
the other day who never even did
hear tell of the ADC, couldn't
see why he should be bothered
takin' an interest in it. Vhy,
this fella didn't even know of
the new Denver City Charter nri
what it might mean to him. Guess
he could have brought me up to
date on the life of Steve Canyon
tho'------as the fella says,*lt
takes all kinds." Reckon its a
good thing we've got some people
who are willin' to carry the
load for the rest of us.
DENVER JACL M&tBERSHIP
Memberships in the Denver
JACL are as follows:
Individual membership. $3.00
Membership for couples 5.00
Pacific Citizen, member. 2.50
P.C., non-member 3*50
Subscription to the Denver
JACL Bulletin, only, until the
end of every year, to Dec. 31,
without membership, Is $1.00

Published monthly by the
Denver chapter of the Japa-
nese American Citizens Lea-
rue, 615 E & C Bldg*, Den-
ver, Colo* Tel: CH 599C
Editor: Michi Ando
Staff: Rosa Higashi, Bill
Hosokawa, Mami Katagiri, Geo.
Kubo, Bess Matsuda, Geo. Ma-
sunaga, Hiroshi Wada, Mike
Kawai
Fotos: WILSHIRE STUDIO
^ ------------------------------>
FLOUJFfV SHOP
DENVER'S ECONOMICAL FWR/Sr
511 -15* Sired- C-H. 3546
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SCIENTIFIC WATCH REPAIRING


SEPTEMBER 1947
THE DENVER JAOL BULLET
PAGE 3
"THE SrtMUTRy
Coming to cool Colorado to
fish from Kansas City Is none
other than YANK HONDA, the for-
mer D.U. student, and his buddy,
RAYMOND ARAO.- They plan to go
back to continue their studies
at the Dental College this fall..
The Nu Chi Delta recentlyy
gave a graduation party honor-
ing the 3 DU graduates, PETE K3J-
S AKABE, A1K0 KUVABARA, and
RUTHIE KAVAKAMI at a dinner
party at Manchu Or111..Departing
from his college schoolmates Is
PETE KUSAKABE who has retunred
Seattle, his former home.
At the last NICC meeting,ROSE
HANAVA of DU was chosen the new
treasurer, replacing SAM USHIOQ
of CU who Is leaving for Ne-
braska.. SUE MARUYAMA replaced
IRIS WATANABE as representative
for Barnes. The new campus
visitation plan will be their
first activity for the fall
quarter.
Have you noticed the rooting
section that the Brighton Sad
Sax has at every baseball game,
especially the last Colorado
Times Tournament? The support
could be responsible fo* their
success in being the new Base-
ball ChampsJ! COULD BE!I
Seems as If PAT and ROGER
INOUYE really fall for the big
Buicks. They have a new 1946
Black Bulck and a 1947 Maroon
Bulck. Gals, don't yo all want
to go for a ride????
Some of the former CU frosh-
ies going back to study their
textbooks this coming week are
CAROLE MURATA RITZI YXNAGI,
HELEN MIKAWA, TOSH SAKAGUCHI,
DOUG TAGUCHI, HIDEKO NAKAYAMA
GEORGIANA HONDA, ROSIE MASUNAGA,
MAE EGUCHI, Let's not all turn
out to be Phi Beta Kappa, eh
kids?????
Eating an inch thick steak at
Flagstaff really made 19 DU stu-
dents mouth water!! Seems as if
they had all the trimmings, tool
The Chairmen for the successful
. event were: JANET SASAHARA, KAMI
KATAGIRI, TOM HAMI, and STANLEY
ICHIKAWA,
A dessert party was given in
honor of MASAEO SATO who is
leaving to Join her husband in
Japan. It was held at the home
of HELEN NAKAMURA.
ROSE TANABE of Los Angeles,
the former ROSE TANAKA is yisit-
,ing her parents in Henderson on
a vacation.
MACHIKO TAKIGIKU, '47 Manual
Hi graduate, is the young lady
behind the front desk at the
JACL office,
HELEN TANAKA and EMI KATAGI-
RI were seen dancing at Elitch's
when Gene Krupa was in town.
ttk; pharmacy
RENOVATED
The T. K. Pharmacy has just
been completely renovated and
modernized. The soda fountain
features a mirrored wall. Quick
lunches and breakfasts are now
served in addition to the usual
fountain service.
Many prizes were awarded the
week of September 12 in nightly
drawings.
The grand prize, a combina-
tion radio-phonograph was von by
Mineko Chado.
M/SL S At BUM
IS AVAILABLE
The Military Intelligence
Service has published an Album
which pictorially describes the
great contribution the graduates
of MISLS, particularly the Jap-
anese Americans, have made to
further the cause of democracy.
However they do not have the ad-
dress of all. They are now seek-
ing the names and address of the
former graduates.
The MISLS feels sure that
their former graduates would all
be interested in getting a copy.
If any member is interested
in a copy, they may get one by
writing direct to the MISLS
Album Fund,Presidio of Monterey,
California, and enclose a money-
order or check for $3.50 made
payable to the MISLS Album Fund.
ypS DIRECTOR
TO WED
Mr, and Mrs. Henry Brauer of
Seattle have announced the en-
gagement of their daughter, Ar -
line, to Mr. Anton Broy of New
York City. The wedding will
take place in December in New
York.
Until her resignation in July
Miss Brauer was a member of the
professional staff of the Denver
YWCA, where her duties included
advisership of the Y.P.S.
When you approach the DR. Y.
I TO home, you can hear the pat-
ter of tiny feet. The stork was
by last month* PEGGY had a baby
boy. They call him PERCY.
wg

NAKAYAMA JEWELRY

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DIAMONDS -JEWELRY
WjkTCN REPAIRING
MINFTEENTM ST. DENVER, COLO.
BOOK REVIEW of
KINGSB100D ROYAL
KINGSBLOOD ROYAL, by Sinclair
Lewis is an angry and accurate
account of a problem that has
long needed just the sort of
treatment he has given it. It is
an effective work, as it was
chosen for distribution by the
Literary Guild it may make some
of that group think seriously
about race-relations and preju-
dice; and at times it Is also a
good story.
This story of the prejudice
indignities suffered by the Ne-
groes in the supposedly tolerant
North, deals with a young Min-
nesota banker who accidently
discovers that he is l/32nd part
Negro and with the effects of
that discovery on his life. Neil
Kingsblood at the beginning of
the book is a smug young man who
is proud of the fact that he is
a "one-hundred-percent normal ,
white, Protestant, middleclass
efficient, golf-loving, bound -
to-*succeed, wife pampering,
Scotch English Midwestern Ameri-
can." Upon discovery of his
racial background he decides to
learn all he can about the Ne-
groes and beginsto cultivate the
intellectuals of the Negro com-
munity in his home town. He
meets so many fine people whom
he likes better than many of his
Caucasian associates, and is so
enraged at the indignities these
people must suffer, that he
finally reveals his ancestry. As
a result he loses his position,
is ostracized by his Caucasian
friends, and eventually dragged
off to jail for the crime of
protecting his home from a mob
of angry neighbors.
(continued page 4)
NISEI DAU6G/ST
MARAUD ~
Howard Doi, local druggist,
returned from Los Angeles a few
weeks ago with his bride, the
former Florence Ono.
The marriage ceremony was per-
formed on August 27 at the Santa
Monica Presbyterian Church of-
ficiated by the Rev. Donald To -
riumi. Among those present at
the wedding ceremony were the
grooms father, who flew to Los
Angeles for the event, and Munch
Nakaoki, also of Denver.
(continued from page 1)
Regional Office, have been
established in various cities
and areas to support the forma-
tion of JACL chapters and com-
mittees and to conduct financial
campaigns for the JACL-ADC 's
legislative program in Washing-
ton, D.C.
With its headquarters in Den-
ver, these dome! branches, known
as shibus, have been established
in Fort Lupton, Crowley, Pueblo,
La Jara-Alamosa, Rocky Ford, Las
Animas, Brighton, Arvada, Gree-
ley, Riverdale-Welby and Long -
mont.
Contacts by the Denver head-
quarters of the dome! have been
established with Issei individ-
uals and groups in other cities,
including Cheyenne, Wyoming;
North Platte and Scottsbluff,
NebraskajBlanca, Grand Junction,
Sedgwick- Julesburg, Ault and
Boulder, Colorado, as well as
Webster,Texas, and Bartlesville,
Oklahoma. In all, the Nisei ,
and or, the Issei have been con-
tacted by the Tri- State office
and the Denver Dome! head-
quarters in twenty-three cities
and areas in Nebraska, Wyoming,
Colorado, Oklahoma and Texas.
4%ofes$/oml nmf
DENTISTS *
T. 110, DDS..............KB 0680
800 18th Street
Y, ITO, DOS..............KB 1077
830 18th Street
TAKA3HI UAYBJU, DDS .TA 6961
301 Interstate Trust Bldg*
K. K* MIYAMOTO, DDS .TA 4307
1962 Larimer Street
OBNTA NAKAMURA, DDS .TA 7496
200 Interstate Trust Bldg*
TAWYF^S '
T03HX0 ANDO
616 E* & 0, Bldg*
Branoh Offloe:
1232 20th Street
MINORU YASUI. .
616 S* & C* Bldg*
. *CH 7987
. .AL 3600
. .OH 7987
INSURANCE
3HIG ..............GL 3133
1238 20th Street #MA 1644
JOHNNY INOUYE......CH 7614
IHTSUO KANEKO.....*GR 5000
1232 20th Street AL 3500
HENRY JOTURA. *AL 9900
1232 20th Street A£ 3500
JTNZO NOM .**
2829 Champa *KA 8695
KENNETH T. SATO *M& 1644
1238 20til Street
OPTOMETRIST'
George j. kobo, o.d. .ch 7013
1234 20th Street
PHY5ICIAN.p5UR6fONS
CHARLES PUJISAZI, MD. *GL 3638
3301 Zuni Street
TH0S* K. KOBAYASHI+ MD* .KB 4690
1229 21st Street
ISAMU 0ZAM0T0, MD .TA 1696
301 Interstate Trust Bldg*
HOWARD 3UENAGA, -MD. .TA 2642
830 16th Street
M* OECRGE TAKLNO, MD. *TA 0783
630 18th Street
EVENTS
1. General Meeting October 3
2. JACL Halloween Dance (De-
tails to be announced later)
3. Y.P.C.C, November 28 -30
nisei pHAftnAair,
DOI /R-scnptions
DRUG /Vitumns* Drills
FOUNTAIN Ssftvce.
22+LARIMER TA9207
Ituss Sadovs Bunlfc. Chase
^* 3recl^'s_________________
.. .1 kauiaua {luedfhm
1930 LARIMER ST.DENVER /Pkoni^ TA/262


PAGE 4
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
SEPTEMBER 1947
NOTES:
....W peek-a-b>$>
HENRY TAKAHASHI has been go-
ing around for the past several
weeks with a very sore jaw.
Three teeth knocked loose and
one broken. Seems HANK ran into
a fence while playing softball
at Overland Park, one night.
Irony of it all is that it was
not during the game but during
practice period before the game*
Says HANK, "I'll never play ball
again", but his wife seems to
think differently. Says she ,
"see you next season, old boy."
Mr. and Mrs. PETER FURUTA
with their two children left
for a months vacation in Calif-
ornia.
One section of the spectators
bleachers at the final game on
Labor Day really had some good
rootersj girls, at that. Fine,
because that's what really makes
a team play harder. There was
one young lady who was really
rooting or should I say....curs-
ing U
The JAMES IMATANI'S are very
proud parents for the third time.
Another son has been added to tiie
family. Named EDWARD.
The cutest young adult in pig
tails I have ever seen is NICHI
ANDO. Have any of you ever not-
iced? She looks like a young
High School student. Wish we
could all produce effects like
that, MICHI
Bowling is still a year round
favorite. Even the young mothers
had a try at it a fortnight or
so ago. Ify, myf what form, what
grace..........what scoresl MAY
MATSUMONJI scored the high e st
with 156 and the lowest? I dare
not say.
Among the expecting group are
FRANK and CAROLYN TAKAHASHI.
Prices in California certain-
ly are high, especially when
dinner for two costs fifteen dd.-
lars. Ask MITS KANEKO,he knows.
Dr. MAHITO UBA has recently
come to Denver from Kansas. He
is house physician at St. Phil-
lip's Hospital.
BESSIE MATSUDA was one sur-
prised gal, Just before leaving
for her N.Y, vacation. A group
of her girl friends gifted her
with a beautiful piece of lug-
gage.
HANK KIMURA and wife enjoyed
their two weeks visit at San
Francisco, as did GEO. KUBO and
wife.

Speaking of baseball, that
little RUPERT ARAI certainly
can hit those balls and did you
ever see a player run so fast?
Rev. N. TSUNODA recently spent
two months at his church head-
quarters in California. He re-
turned to Denver this week to re-
sume his duties here.
Stork item..the GEORGE UYE-
MURAS were blessed with a baby.
Having fun at the recent
circus were Mr. and Mrs. DICK
YANASE. Seems they enjoyed it
more than their two children.
(continued from page 3)
Although it is doubtful that
any man who felt as Neil Kings-
blood did before his discovery
would take the trouble to in-
vestigate the circumstances ofa
race of which so distant an an-
cestor was a representative,
this is probably the best ap-
proach to the problem as it en-
ables the author to take a smug
prejudiced young man and almost
over night subject him to the
same circumstances that his own
prejudice has helped to maintain.
As a study of the problems
faced by a minority group,KINGS-
BLOOD ROYAL is well worth read-
ing, it might be well for us to
acquaint ourselves with the pro-
blems of another group who
struggle for the same ideals as
we do. KINGSBLOOD ROYAL, be-
cause it does offer an intel-
ligent study on race-relations
in a palatable and interesting
form, should be a must on read-
ing lists.
NCNBL
CHAMPIONS
Pictured at left is
the Denver Merchant team
which won the Labor Day
baseball tournament.
The game was played at
23rd and Welton park be-
fore a large crowd of
spectators.
The players are left
to right,
' 1st row: M. Okamoto,
G. Nagai, T. Takahashi,
Y* Nakayama, "Butch", Y.
Otv V Efl Kawano.
2nd row: H, Tsuchiya-
ma, N. Mori, N. Kawano,
S. Morishige, S. Ito, R.
Aral, T, Tsukiji,
3rd row: D. Uno, H.
Nakagawa, B, Ichikawa, B.
Otsuki, S. Teraji, H, No-
da, H. Takahashi, H. Arl-
ki.
-SPOUTS ROUND UP
With the conclusion of the
regular baseball season in late
August twelve Nisei ball clubs,
including the southern Colorado
representative Crowley nine and
the St. Mary's team from Ne-
braska, gathered at Denver for
the two-day one-game elimination
tournament.
After some ten eliminating
games were played the two sur-
viving clubs, namely the Denver
BusseisNCBL loop titlistsand
the Denver Merchants, met at the
23rd and Welton Park before a
capacity crowd of over a thou-
sand spectators broiling under a
hot Labor Day afternoon which
saw the Merchants humbling their
city rivals 17-14.
Displaying power at the plate
and loaded with pitching talent
Shig Teraji's boys blasted their
way thru the opposition with a
23-12 opener against Littleton,
walloped Ft. Lupton 21-2, buried
Ault 24-8 in the semi-finals to
spike home plate 85 times in
their four tournament games for
a 21 run average per game.
The lower-bracketed Busseis
gained their rights to partici-
pate in the finals by downing Ft
Morgan 11-6, Greeley 17-6 and
squeezed by Beans Miyamoto and
the Manchus 5-4 with youthful
Hideo Hirose starring on the
mound.
Two weeks after the Labor Day
tourney eight clubs participated
in the Colorado Times event with
an unheralded Brighton team
playing inspired ball to edge
out Crowley 4-2 in the finals.
The Times tournament champions
bowled over a heavily favored
Manchu Grill outfit 9-7 in the
semi-finals while Crowley bat-
tled Littleton for 11 long in-
nings to nab a 7-6 decision.
Falling out of line in the open-
ers were Ault, Ft. Morgan, Gree-
ley and Blanca.
Denver's softball representa-
tive, the Y Carpenters, after
winning the North Denver soft-
ball title entered the city wide
sponsored tournament and follow-
ing their first two impressive
triumphs over Supreme Coal and
the Glenarm Y teams bowed out
with successive losses to Mile
Hi and Supreme Coal in their
second engagement.
In the Metro loop a revamped
Manchu nine, strengthened by the
addition of several key players
from the championship Merchant
squad, trounced the Metro mer-
chants 16-9 on Sept. 7th for
their opener in second half play.
Along the Nisei golf greens
veter&n Dan Yoshimura captured
the beautiful Dr. Ito trophy
with a nine stroke victory over
Clarence Arima in an 18 hole
play-off. Both golfers had e-
merged tied with a 284 score for
the regulation 72 hole tourna-
ment.
GRflDRDQ ?tihaHdl^oulPu^lfjkh
'fi0ediff7u/S __
1919 Lawrence St KEqs+one 598? .
Jflattcku
GRILL CHOP SUEV
juidt/ouh
1956 Larimer TAbor 9576
RELIABLE.
TA. 0332
TA. 9277
PRESCRIPTIONS
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THE DKNVliK BULLETIN
The Denver Chanter JACL
615 E & : Building
Denver 2, Colorado
Lee. 562, P. L. & K.