Citation
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 2, Number 10

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Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 2, Number 10
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
14

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
flwOe/i
JACL,


VOLUME II, NO. 10
DENVER, COLORADO
OCTOBER 1947
THESE BILLS AFFECT EACH ONE OF
YOU ADC ASK PASSAGE OF
LEGISLATION
BILLS WHICH PASSED THE HOUSE AND WILL BE DISCUSSED AT THE NEXT
SESSION OF THE SENATE.
1.
2.
3.
NATURALIZATION FOR PARENTS OF WAR DEAD AND PURPLE HEART
VETERANS: This would he the first time since the pass-
age of the Oriental Exclusion Act of 1924 that persons
of Japanese ancestry are eligible for citizenship.
EVACUATION CLAIMS BILL: The Attorney General is au -
thorized to handle claims. Its passage would mean gov-
ernmental recognition of responsibility of losses sus-
tained in the evacuation.
STAY OF DEPORTATIONS: The Attorney General has dis-
cretionary powers to suspend and cancel the deporta-
tion of all aliens regardless of inadmissability under
certain conditions. This places persons of Japanese
origin on an equal basis with Europeans.
BILLS WHICH BECAME LAW.
1* FIRST DEFICIENCY APPROPRIATIONS: This bill awarded
some $30,000 to former residents of Poston and Manzanar
for losses sustained in the fires there.
2. ftMF.MDMFHT TO SOLDIERS BRIDES ACT: This permitted ad-
mlssion of soldier's brides on a non-quota basis re -
gardless of race.
Other ADC endorsed legislation include the FEPC, anti-
lynching laws, anti-poll tax laws, displaced persons
bills, legislation relating to housing and increased
benefits for veterans.
THESE LEGISLATIONS ARE IMPORTANT TO YOU AND YOU CAN OBTAIN
THEIR PASSAGE BY CONTRIBUTING TO THE ADC FINANCIAL DRIVE. NO
CONTRIBUTION IS TOO SMALL AND ALL ARE NEEDED. ADC IS YOUR
VOICE IN WASHINGTON. THE SUCCESS OR FAILURE OF ADC DEPENDS ON
iOU. SUPPORT THE ADC DRIVE NOWJ11 ____________________________
ISSE/NtSE/ HEAR
MASAOKA AT
MASS MEETING
Mike Masaoka, legislative di-
rector of the Anti-Discrimina-
tion Committee, gave a progress
report to a Joint meeting of the
Issei-Nlsei groups on Friday,
October 3 at the Japanese hall.
He pointed out that the ADC
has been able to introduce into
Congress over 200 bills directly
affecting persons of Japanese
ancestry. "It is significant,"he
said, "that four bills which
have the greatest effect upon us
passed the House without a sin-
gle objection."
These bills are:
1. Citizenship privileges for
parents of war dead and purple
heart veterans.
2. Evacuation claims bill.
3. Amendment to the soldier
brides act to remove racial res-
trictions.
4. A bill to prevent deporta-
tlon of certain Japanese na-
tionals and to give them the
same consideration granted to
Europeans
"The niseis have as much at
(continued on page 2)
''cji&ha-chapter
HOLDS INSTALLATION
Father Flanagan
of Boys Town is
pictured at the
installation ban-
quet of the O^aha
JACL chapter held
recently there.
From 1. to r.:
Mike Masaoka, Ma-
sako Nakadoi, Bob
Nakadoi, Lily Oku-
ra, secretary, Pat
Okura, president,
Mrs. Howard Drew,
Mr. Howard Drew, &
Rt. Rev. Msgr. E.
J. Flanagan.
GROUND BROKEN FOR
BUDDHIST CHURCH
The Denver Buddhist Church
recently held their ground break-
ing ceremonies at the site of
their new church building at
2019 Lawrence Street with the
Reverends Tamai and Tsunoda in
charge of the religious aspects
of the ceremony and Mr. S. Naka-
mura of Littleton, Mr. K. Hayeda
of Longmont spading the first
shovelful of ground.
The $87,000 modern structure
as planned by Architect Buell
and contracted by Hobbs Company
will be built in six months. It
will be a one story building
with a basement adequate for
banquets and the church proper,
classrooms, and minister1s quar-
ters to be on the main floor.
RADIO SERIES
FEATURE MINORITIES
Radio station KLZ is sponsor-
ing a series of programs each
Sunday evening at 10:15 p.m. en-
titled "Liberty Calling".
The programs feature speakers
from various minority groups to
discuss discrimination in employ-
ment, housing, and admittance to
public places
RADIO TORE AWARDED
AT CHAPTER PARTY
A Halloween party which will
feature a duplicate bridge tour-
nament, dancing, entertainment
and awarding of prizes has been
set for Friday, October 31, 8
p.m. in the basement of the YffC/V
according to George Masunaga,
president of the Denver chapter.
Those who have purchased raf-
fle tickets or plan to buy some
for the Ford drawing will be in-
terested to know that a small
radio will be raffled during the
course of the evening. The same
tickets will be used.
"If you have not yet bought
your raffle tickets, you may
purchase them at the door," an-
nounced Tosh Ando.
The duplicate bridge tourna-
ment will begin promptly at 8
p.m. Interested persons should
contact any of the following:
Taki Domoto, Jack Fuji, Shig I-
mamura or Sab Tani.
Musical selections will be
rendered by Dick Aoyagi and Mrs.
Shizuko Yoshimura.
DEFEATED BILL
SUPPORTED BY
IS GROUPS -
Although the "bill of human
rights" was not included in the
final draft of the new city
charter, it was given wide sup-
port by many local issei and
nisei organizations.
(continued on page 3)
FATHER FLANAGAN
MAIN SPEAKER AT
OMAHA INSTALLATION
The Rt. Rev. E. J. Flanagan,
founder of the famous Boys Town,
and Mike Masaoka shared speaking
honors at the installation ban-
quet of the Omaha JACL chapter.
Father Flanagan, recently re-
turned from a visit to Japan and
Korea, told of his experiences
in the Orient with special em-
phasis on the problems of Juven-
ile delinquency,
Masaoka also presented the
second annual Pvt. Ben Frank
Masaoka Memorial scholarship to
ex-GI Kazuo Oshlki, a student at
Drake U., Des Moines, Iowa.
The officers for the newly
established Omaha chapter who
were installed are K. Pat Okura,
president; Kazuo Ikebasu, first
vice-president; Joe Matsunaml,
second vice-president; Susan
Kumagai, recording secretary;
Lily Y. Okura, corresponding
secretary; and Frank Tanai,
treasurer.
LOCAL ADC COHMim
SETS $5000 COAL
A sum of $5000 was set as the
goal for the ADC fund raising
campaign, sponsored by the Den-
ver chapter, at the first com-
mittee meeting on October 10.
Spokesmen for the committee
stated that this sum could easi-
ly be realized if all the Nisei
in the Denver area contributed
$1.25 each. Most of the work s.o
far has been done by the Issei
and the Nisei for the most part
have not even been approached.
The committee plans to con-
duct an intensive campaign which
will reach its climax the first
part of November. It plans to
conduct an intensive campaign to
arouse the Nisei interest in the
vital work being done by the ADO
to establish an educational pro-
gram and to climax its activi-
ties by requesting some donation
from each person of Japanese an-
cestry in Denver.
To facilitate the work, this .
committee is enlisting the sup-
port of all the Nisei clubs and
organizations in the Denver area
and is planning its program to
work in close conjunction with
these groups.
"The importance of the suc-
cess of this campaign," said
Mr. Yasul, "iies In tha- ^*aet
that if the bills which are to
be presented to the second ses-
sion of the 80th Congress are
not passed, it means we will
have to start at the beginning
again with the 81st Congress....
These bills will not be passed
without adequate financial sup-
port."
Sub-committee chairmen have
been designated as follows: Pub-
licity, Bill Hosokawa; finance,
Mlts Kaneko; Clerical, Dorothy
Madokoro. General committee mem-
bers are: Shig Teraji, Carl A-
mano,Harry Yanarl,Atsu Ito, Chi-
ye Horluchl, Amy Miura, Haruko
Kobayashi, Clara Takahashi, Roy
Takeno, Min Yasui, Bessie Matsu-
da, George Ohashi, and George
Furuta. Chairman is Michi Kawal.
yPS TO TAKE
PLACE NOV. 28
The annual Young Peoples
Christian Conference will be
held November 28, 29 & 30, fea-
turing the theme, "Faith, Love,
and Hope."
Registration will begin Fri-
day, November 28 at Trinity Me-
thodist Church.
On Saturday, the 29th, the
meetings will be held at Camp
Lookout followed by the confer-
ence banquet that evening at the
Albany Hotel. The main speaker
for the evening is the Reverend
George Berry of the Grand Avenue
Methodist Church.
A sunrise service at Red Rock
will be the opening program for
Sunday, the 30th followed by
morning services at the Califor-
nia Street Methodist Church.
Closing services will also be
held at the church.
Joe Arlki and Sachi Maruyama,
co-chairmen and their committee
have prepared for delegates an
inspiring, Jam packed program.
GIVE
COMMUNITY CHEST


PAGE Z
the Denver jaol bulletin
OCTOBER 1947

QEORQE MASUKlACjA
Hang on! Here we go again!
This column seems to "harp"
perpetually on the subject mat-
ter of your generous assistance,
monetary contribution* and co-
operation. Well, the control-
ling motive this time will be
the same, but I assure you this
will be the last timethe last
time for this month. My only
alibi is that this organization
is an eleemosynary organization
so..........
Give to the Community Chest
Member agencies of the Com-
munity Chest offer a variety of
services in the fields of health
welfare, and recreation* They
serve all people regardless of
race or creed, according to Hugh
B. Terry, campaign chairman. He
asserted that the camping pro-
grams, community centers such as
Grace, YWCA, etc., visiting nur-
ses, family welfare service,
childrens aid society and the
many other agencies are of as-
sistance to the American Japan-
ese. We niseis, as well as other
groups benefit directly from the
community chest agency services.
The Chest theme is "everybody
benefits, everybody gives". It
applies to all citizens of Den-
ver because even if everyone may
not benefit directly, all bene-
fit when the agencies do a good
Job of helping people; this In
turn makes Denveryour communi-
tya better place in which to
live.
the past, both the niseis
and the issois have supported
the Chest drives. Let's bolster
the drive this year with even
more enthusiasm and active coop-
eration. "The Chest needs more
volunteer workers," says Lilly
Mlta, secretary of the Chest.
This is an opportunity for nisei
to take part in a great communi-
ty endeavor.
The Ball is Rolling
Under the vary capable chair-
manship of Urs. Mike Kawai, the
Anti-Discrimination Committee of
the Denver Chapter has definite-
ly started "the ball a-rollln"!
Committee meetings have been
held, end the reactions have
been highly successful. The
different nisei organizations
and clubs have promised full
cooperation. The committee has
set $5000 as their goal. An
intensive educational program
has been tentatively planned
through the various newspapers,
magazines and posters.
It should be needless to give
the reason for the formation of
this committee. We reiterate
that the object of this commit-
tee is for the betterment of the
isseis and niseis in relation to
the community. The goal of the
committee affects or concerns
each and every one of you, here
and not In Europe or Asia. It
isn't similar to helping someone
or a group in some distant coun-
try. It is near to us; it is to
help us here at home. Conse-
quently your enthusiasm should
be greatly aroused and your co-
operation more full. This isn't
an erudite dictum but Just an
ordinary conclusion.
(Ed. Note: Gues.t editor Honda
is a columnist for the Rafu
Shimpo. He is also a philosophy
major at Loyola University.)
ALL MEN ARE EQUAL
bif Harry Honda
This will shock some of the
progressive and social-minded
Nisei that there is someone in
their crowd who equally stresses
the importance of the saying,
"All men are unequal."
So many already recognize the
validity of "all men are equal"
but miss the point that equality
has its root not in law or in
things but in man. Naturally,
these two Ideas refer to differ-
ent things and they do. Men are
equal in essence, unequal in ac-
cidents
Accidents of human nature are
the variety we find among men
todaythe different physique,
tastes, character, race, health
and the like.
Because men are equal by na-
ture and destiny and unequal in
talents, gifts and dispositions,
society should recognize the
equalities and inequalities of
man instead of clamoring for one
classless elass or an Aryan
level.
Society has been pictured as
a human body, which is composed
of many members unequal in func-
tion. So too is society made up
of different levels and classes.
Men and groups differ because of
their function in society, and
like the heart and lungs differ-
ent from one another, they must
function not for their own self-
ish interest, but for the good
of the whole body.
This basis for social rela-
tion is the solution to our
problems of liberty and equality.
Because we are all organic, only
a part of human society, we must
not function apart from one an-
other for our selfish interests.
The basis of division in society
under such an arrangement is not
a privilege which comes from
power, wealth or blood, but
rather a division based on the
service to the common good. As
the heart has a special function
in the body and the lungs anoth-
er function, likewise have the
professional group, the business
group, the labor group, etc.,
for promoting common good.
(continued from page 1)
stake in obtaining naturaliza-
tion rights for their parents as
do the isseis," Masaoka stated.
"As long as the stigma of racial
undesirability exists, we are
only second class citizens. The
present bill is a start toward
the removal of these racial res-
trictions."
Masaoka gave a history of the
bills, showing how much work and
effort it takes to get them in-
troduced into Congress, and how
much preparation goes into each
one.
Reports from the Kika Kisel
Domel, the issel group working
for ADC were given by Messrs.
Kanegaye, Kako and Miyamoto.
Mr. Masaoka left Immediately
by plane for Minneapolis where
he was scheduled to speak. He
will continue his tour of the
nation until Congress convenes
in January.
PICTURED BELOW ARE DICK AOYAGI &
MRS. SHIZUKO YOSHIMURA.
mMONDS JEWELRY
w-\ MtfTCH REPAIRING
S>3 NINETEENTH ST. DENVER.COLO.
Foto by Wilshire.
DENVBR NEWCOMBR
UH£ MU&C
"What Is it that makes me so
very sleepy all the time?" quer-
ied Dick Aoyagi, newcomer to
Denver from Hilo, Hawaii.
Dick is a first year vocal
student at the Lamont School of
Music. In three years he hopes
to have a Bachelor of Music de-
gree. "Then I want to go back
to Hawaii to teach," he said.
Before coming here he taught
Japanese singing at the YMCA in
Honolulu. During the war he
served two years as a technical
sergeant.
Asked why he chose to come
to Denver, be smilingly replied
"My piano teacher sold me on the
place. She said there wasn't a
better school in the country.
And I don't think she's wrong."
CITY CHARTER HAS HO
HUMAN RIGHTS Bill
The much publicized "Bill of
Human Rights" was not incorpo-
rated into the new city charter
and we cannot help but feel that
through our own indifference, we
lost our chance to outlaw dis-
criminatory practices in Denver.
At least the preamble to the
Charter contains a statement
that all persons "shall enjoy
equal rights and opportunity for
education, etc." This is en-
couraging, but the fact remains
that the preamble is not binding
legally.
DENVER JAOL 1GB4BER3HIP
Memberships in the Denver
JACL are as follows:
Individual membership. $3.00
Membership for couples 5.00
Pacific Oitisen, member. 2.50
P.C., non-member .... 3.50
Subscription to the Denver
JAOL Bulletin, only, until the
end of orrery year, to Dec. 31,
without membership, la $1.00
MONTHLY ADVERTISING RATES
Professional Listings. $1.50
3/4" Business Ads. 2.75
2 business Ads. 5,00
2" Double-coluijm Ads . 7.50
Basic Rate: §3.00 per column
inch per month.
CRITIC'S
CORNER
by Sill Hosokatrfo.
"Take your coat off, stink-
er," we said, "we are going to
the mat."
Joe Nisei stopped midway In
the process of chalking his cue,
lifted one eyebrow. said in
his eloquent fashions "What
for?"
"Where were you," we began,
"when Mike Masaoka was giving a
report on his activities in
Washington?"
"Oh him," said Joe, obviously
relieved. "Well, was I the only
guy that was not there?"
"You, and about 150 others,"
we said.
Hmmm," said Joe, which is a
sign that he is working hard at
the unaccustomed chore of think-
ing. "Well, who was there?"
"A few Nisei, mostly Issel."
"Emma," Joe continued. "Ghana*
"We," we added, "kick about
the Issel. They are old fash-
ioned. They are a bunch of
stupes because they haven't
learned to speak English after
40 years. But more of them were
there, trying to find out what
was going on, then there were
Nisei."
"Yeah," said Joe.
"Yeah. A nd Masaoka gave a
report every Nisei should have
heard. It makes a fellow feel
good that his organization can
go right into the halls of con-
gress and be heard, and have his
plea acted on even when congress
was worrying about a lot more
Important things like taxes and
rent control and the high cost
of living and the T&ft-Hartley
law."
"That there Taft-Hartley law
..." Joe broke in.
"Now hold it. Don't go chang-
ing the subject. Where were you
when you should have been lis-
tening to Masaoka?"
"Well," said Joe. "I started
to go there. In fact, I got
within a block of the hall."
"And then you heard the bil-
liard balls clicking?"
"No sir," Joe said emphati-
cally. "I did not. I remember-
ed something else."
"Yeah?"
"Yeah, I remembered my fav-
orite radio program was on the
air. So of course I had to turn
around and go home."
Joe carefully chalked his cue
again and hoisted himself on the
edge of the table to get into
position to drop the three ball
into the side pocket.
"Yeah," he said. "Every Fri-
day night they have that program
on KLZ at eight o'clock. It's
called:'It Pays to Be Ignorant'.

Published monthly by the
Denver chapter of the Japa-
nese American Citizens Lea-
gue, 615 E & C Bldg., Den-
ver, Colo. Tel: CH 5990
Editor: Michi Ando
Staff: Rosa Higashi, Bill
Hosokawa, Mami Kataglri, Geo.
Kubo, Bess Matsuda, Geo* l£a-
sunaga, Hiroshi Wada, Hue
Kawai
Fotos: WILSHIRE STUDIO
CUdotted ChnoiatZ;
.bliss Saulws Bun+i. (Ltiasc
mauiaua iu/edtfltoa
1990 LARIMER, ST. J DCNVER


OCTOBER 1947
page 3
TE SMALL fRy
The Nisei students of D.U.
presented their first fall ffget
acquainted social at the YWCA
in honor of the new students* A
large committee consisted of:
STANLEY ICHIKAWA, M.C., EDWIN
HAGIHARA, DOROTHY MIYAHARA, ROSE
HANAWA. ALBERT NODA, ROTH KAWA-
KAMI, CHESTER OJI, BIAIII KATAGIRI
and TON HAUAI.
We take a moment out of the
frivolous things of life to ex-
press our sympathies to the pals
of MASAKO SATO-who will miss her
sweet and charming personality
in addition to all her contribu-
tion toward the different orga-
nization in which she partici-
pated* She has left for Japan
to join her husband.
Seems as if the Brighton Sad
Sacks were really congratulated
at a successful party held in
their honor for being the new
Colorado Times1 baseball champsl
Could their popularity be the
result of their jovial attitude.
Seen on the D. U. Campus is a
handsome B.M.O.C. (big men on
Campus) by the name of STANLEY
ICHIKAWA!! He looks mighty
sharp wearing the gold and crim-
son Phi Eps sweater!!
Wondering why KAZ KANDA is
paying his JACL Ford raffle tic-
ket on down paymentsone cents
per day -could it be that poker
is that interesting???
The community is probably
wondering what happened to the
three popular musketeers: Well,
its quite a sadistic story.
SETS ITO is studying at Kansas
City Dental Colleee: KENNY IMA-
MURA is studying accounting at
D. U.; and GENJI YAMAMOTO is ac-
tually working for his uncle.
It's good to see HIROKO ASANO
back from California where she
has been vacationing. She is
the new Nu Chi Delta prexy.
Nu Chi's installation and
initiation is to be held for the
new members and officer on Octo-
ber 17th.
At the monthly NICC meeting
It was decided that a "get ac-
quainted" social will be held on
November 8th for all University
students in the Intermountain
circuit. Tentative arrangements
are being made by the cabinet.
All representatives are request-
ed to get in touch with elth er
HELEN NAKAMURA, corresponding
secretary or MAUI KATAGIRI,
president for further details*
Congratulations to LEFTY K0-
BAYASHI for organizing a nisei
band. Here's success from us
all.
Newest addition to the YOSH
NAKAYAMA twosome is their honey
colored cocker.
man ftcftpHAMiaisr
druJ/2z£:
22+LARIMER TA9207
eti)ilSkW
^STUDIO
UfotmcDt ^Pftotcxf/uipkiy
FLORENCE BLOq.
8JO-18* St. TA 3697
THE DENVER JAOX BULLETIN
SPECIAL GUESTS
ATTEND ADC
D/NNEfi.
A play-by-play description of
the progress of ADC sponsored
legislation was given by Mike
Masaoka at a dinner sponsored
by the Denver chapter on Oct, 1.
President George Masun&ga
presided at the meeting, which
was held at the Navarre Cafe.
Special guests included State
Senator & Mrs. Arthur A. Brooks,
State Democratic Committee Chair-
man ft Mrs. Gene Cervl, Charles
Graham of the Denver Unity Coun-
cil and Executive Secretary Mil-
ler Barbour of the Urban League.
DR. CROFTS SCHEDULER
TO SPEAK
Professor Alfred Crofts, pro-
fessor of history at Denver Uni-
versity has been obtained as a
speaker for the November meeting
of the Cornelians to be held on
November 12, 8:00 p.m. at the
California Street Methodist
Church.
Professor Crofts was born and
reared in China; during the war,
he served in Navy Intelligence;
be has been the president of the
Korean National University, and
recently had charge of setting
up universities In Japan under
General MacArthur.
ROCKY SHIMPO EDITOR
ON RADIO
James Omura, editor of the
Rocky Shimpo was featured on
Station KLZ Sunday evening, Oct.
12th on the program, "Liberty
Calling."
He emphasized that the main
problems of the some 3000 people
of Japanese ancestry in Denver
dealt with housing and employ -
ment.
HAmmmEnctnm
ftms&itmm
According to a recent city
wide poll made for the Denver
Post, 68 per cent of all adult
Denver residents questioned said
they were in favor of keeping
some racial or religious groups
out of certain residence areas.
Twenty nine per cent favored
letting all groups live wherever
they liked. Six per cent didn't
know.
The question put to these
people was: "Do you think that
people of all racial and reli-
gious groups should be able to
live anywhere they like in the
city, or do you think that some
racial or religious groups
should be kept out of certain
areas?
Negroes, Orientals, Spanish-
Amerleans and Mexicans, and Jews
were groups considered in the
poll. The only case In which a
majority of Denver people favor-
ed non-segregation is in the
case of Jews.
"The majority of Japanese
live in substandard homes," he
explained, due to restrictive
housing practices,
Mr. Omura pointed out that
the employment problem was not
one of lack of jobs but lack of
the right kind of Jobs which
forced college graduates into
manual labor.
AMERICAN
MOTOR SALES
-INCORP-
Jfenr'j/ Zmac/ct,
MEW + \
OSBO
CAALS
Aura
LOANS
H
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D
£
' Qooy v-
FBArOBR,
&BAR/A
SBNBRAL
Abpa/r/mg-
Hudson y Dealer
CH. 2830 2358 MSH.ST.
NAKAYAMA JEWELRY
£)(pe4(Wlc^MpoJ/L^
# rjfl-
X
1920 .Unmet* 5L MA704?
At first 29 per cent of the
people asked said they thought
all groups should live where
they liked, but this figure fell
to 17 per cent when asked about
each group.
(continued from page l)
Those who endorsed the bill
for their group are: Rev. N.
Tsunoda, Buddhist church; Rev.K.
Sasaki, California Street Meth-
odist church; Mrs. May Furuta,
Cornelians; Chiye Horluchl ,
Young Adults; Lily Kitsutaka,
Youth Fellowship; Rev. George U-
yemura, asst, pastor of Calif.
St. Methodist Church; Alice
Amano, church's official board;
Yoshiko Ariki, church school;
Machlko Taklglku, Tri-State JACL
regional office.
Others are Toshio Ando, Denver
JACL; Roy M. Takeno, JACL-ADC
Tri-State regional representa-
tive; George Kubo, Nisei Busi-
ness and Professional Men's clut;
Harry Yanari, Tri-State Young
Buddhist League; Fred Kalh&ra,
publisher of the Colorado Times
and S. Toda, publisher of the
Rocky Shimpo.
The bill, had it been includ-
ed, would have illegalized dis-
criminatory practices with res-
pect to Jobs, wages, housing and
purchase of homes, registration
in schools and colleges, issu-
ance of city licenses, member-
ship in occupational organiza-
tions and accommodations in ho-
tels# restaurants, theaters and
other places to which the public
customarily is admitted.
The measures were sponsored
by the Denver Unity Council.
ACE-HI/, .>5*
STUDIO
ARTISTRY IN ADVERTISING
BJ0-20#St KE4025
'PROFmOtML USVNFj
DENTISTS
f. ITO, ..................KB 8680
880 18th Street
Y. ITO, DD3..............SB H>77
880 18th Street
, .TA 6861
st Bldg*
TAEA3HI MAYBDA,
801 Interstate
K. £ MIYAMOTO, DDS *TA 4307
1962 Larimer Street
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS .TA 7498
200 Interstate Trust Bldg.
LAWYERS
TOSHIO ANDO
616 E. ft 0, Bldg,
firenoh Office:
1282 20th -Street
.CH 7987
.AX 8500
MINORU YASUI. .
616 8. ft ft. Bldg.
,CS 7987
INSURANCE
SHIG TifAMTTPA..............GL 3188
1238 20th Street .HA 164ft
JOHNNY INOUYE .
MXT&UO KANEKO ...
1232 20th Street
HENRY KXKUHA ...
1232 20th Street
. .CH 761ft
. .GR 5000
. .AX 3500
. .AX 9900
. AL 3500
,J£A 8695
JIfiZO NODA ....
2829 Champa ,
KENNETH T. SATO...........MA 1644
1238 20th Street
OPTOMETRIST-
GEORGE J. KUBO. O.D.
1234 20th Street
.CH 7813
TWSICIANwiDSUfWNS
CHARLES 7UJISAKI HD.
3301 2uni Street
GL 3536
TBOS. K. KOBAYASHI* HD. .KB 4590
1229 2let Street
ISAMU 0ZAM0T0, MD .TA 1596
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
HOWARD 3U2NAGA, MD. .TA 2642
830 18th Street
M. GEORGE TAKDNO, MD. .TA 0783
830 18th Street
COMING EVENTS
1. Halloween Party-, October 31
2. General Chapter Meeting,
November 7 to nominate 1948
officers.
GE0RQF5 MOTOR SERVICE
(Oriqinallij PH*, and QEORQE")
RECAPS
BATTERIES
^EASING
WASHlNq-
TRUCK and AUTO REftIM
2*+lJtwmci MA9373
c/faMAfhk FLOWER SHOP
JMM0T3 ECONOMICAL FLOWSr
5ll-|g*Stre*f C-H. 354£
'quality jewelry
SCI ENTIFIC WATCH REPAIRINQ-
20jt*_Larimgr A-L. 2077


PAGE 4
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
OCTOBER 1947

I>EEK-A-B$>$>
CHARLES IWASHITA was seen
squiring three pretty girls,
CLEO HIRAI, MAGGIE HATADA, and
CHERRY SHIMAMURA from Chicago
who are enroute to California
for their vacation* SHIMPEI MI-
YAKE and GEORGE FURUTA were in-
terested on-lookers*
CHILI FUJISAKI, the golfer,
shoots an 85 most generally,
when hes out by himself till he
plays for more than a score then
hes way up in the 100s.
YOSH ARIKI is in Chicago ta-
king part in the Midwest JACL
Work Shop as a representative of
the Denver Chapter*
MRS. HIDEO KODANI and son
JOHN were recent visitors in
Chicago*
Is that YURIKO NOGAMIS fa-
milar and very much welcomed
map we see in town now??
I bet DOUG TAGUCHI slays em
out D. U* way*
The N* Y* representative of
the Denver JACL has certainly
been doing well selling raffle
tickets for us Good work,
SMILEY*
That big hole theyre excava-
ting next to Granada Fish Market
is the beginning of the Denver
Buddhist Church* More power to
them!J
Most of the women in Denver
are pretty conservative judging
from the length of the skirts
seen at the Cornelian Tea* MRS*
TERRY DODAMA looked lovely in a
green suit. HANNAH TAKAMINE was
very chic in blackher hat was
the new close fitting type, also
MARY SUENAGA in black and FRAN-
NIE SAITO in a plaid suit were
smart*
PETE FURUTA lost no time get-
ting in his last chance fishing
for no sooner than he had got
back from his vacation, he and
brother GEORGE were up Gunnison
way landing 16 to 20 inchers*
MR. and MRS. JOE GRANT MASA-
OKA are still beaming over the
newest addition to their family,
ALAN KEITH.
SARGE TERASAKI and JIMMY IMA-
TANI polished off their guns and
were one of the first out for
the big game stuff.
Foto by Xilshire.
MRS. MAY FURUTA IS SHOWN ABOVE
SERVING TEA TO MRS. ETSU UYEDA
CORNEAUAN TEA,
FEATURES FLORAL
ARRANGEMENT
Under the chairmanship of
Mrs* T* K* Kobayashi, the Corne-
lians had their Annual Fellow-
ship Tea to which the ladies of
Denver were invited on October
12 at the Methodist Church.
Mesdames J. Misuml and George
ttLura were in charge of refresh-
ments with Mesdames Genta Naka-
mura and George Furuta pouring.
A delightful program was pre-
sented featuring vocal selec-
tions by Miss Florence Yamada ad
Dick Aoyagi accompanied by Mrs.
Yoshimura. Miss Cynthia Yamada
rendered piano selections, after
which Miss Lottie Lee Hartnett
demonstrated the creation of a
bridesmaids bouquet*
Dr Kobayashi speaks
to Nisei Moms
Dr* T. K. Kobayashi addressed
members of the Nisei Mothers
Club on Thursday, October 9 on
maladjustments In children and
how to cope with such problems.
After his lecture a period
was devoted to questions and an-
swers*
Atsu Ito and Lily Arikl were
hostesses for the evening*
GIRL SCOUT TROOP
ORGANIZED
Under the leadership of Mrs*
K*T Sasano assisted by Hisses
Sachi Maruyama and Yuri Kando, a
girl scout troop is now being
organized* Mrs* Amy Miura and
Miss Chlye Horiuchi are also as-
sisting in the organization*
All girls aged nine to twelve
are welcomed to join this group
which meets on Friday nights at
7:00 oclock at the California
Street Methodist Church.
rsona. Cities
Rev. N* Tsunoda will be in
Chicago for three weeks taking
over the pulpit of the Midwest
Buddhist Church in the absence
of Rev* G* Kono, who will be in
California*
Florence Yamada, a Denver
University dietetic major is the
newest Denver singing discovery.
She has a very charming me-
thod of rendition and her voice
and personality promises to be a
credit to Denver.

Foto by Wilshire
Bowling
The weekly mixed bowling four-
some league came to a close re-
cently, Victory Market was the
leading contender for the title*
Tough opposition was set up by
Western Fountain who followed a
close second, and Kaneko Insur-
ance trailed In third*
Moon Kataoka and Shun Nakaya-
ma were responsible for Victory
Market remaining on top of the
list throughout the whole league.
Supporting them were Helen Muro-
saki and George Matsumonji,
Westerns mainstays were Oxy
and Lillian Goto, Fred Hasegawa,
and Kyo Otagura*
The Kaneko Insurance team was
handicapped with too many losses
In the beginning of the league
to catch up In the final round
although it proved to be a
threat for second place*
Fourth, fifth, and sixth
places went respectively to Sad
Sacks who miraculously pulled
out of cellar position,Nisei
Grill and Team No* 3*
Western is credited with hav-
ing the highest team series of
2250 and the highest team game
of 821.
Fred Hasegawa had the highest
single game in the mens divi-
sion having hit a 256 while Moon
Kataoka is credited with having
high single series of 641* He
also had the high average of 163
for men.
In the womens division the
highest single series was a 523
by Jane Hada and the highest
single game honors went to Helen
Murosaki for a 213 game. Rosa
Higashi had womens high average
of 152.
The next mixed foursome lea-
gue is expected to start the
latter part of October with many
new entries. These games will
be bowled at Ten Pin Alleys*
On October 12 a free stake
tournament was held at Recrea-
tion bowling alley with about 40
bowlers present.
Sam Kawanlshi came through
to take first place honors with
572 series while Moon Kataoka
took second place with 561, and
Oxy Goto came in third.with 557,
Tats Mamiya had high game of
211* Mary Aigakl took first
place In the womens division
with a 490 while Rosa Higashi
was second with 477 and Lillian
Goto third with 454*
AN INTERESTED AUDIENCE LISTENS
TO MUSIC AT CORNELIAN TEA.
GRPI1PDP -fUh a*u£PoulPiq Tf/kt:
1919 Lawrence St KEqstone 598?
ft/cmhu
GRILL* CHOP 5UEV
1956 Larimer $1 TAbor 957$. J
£


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