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Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 3, Number 2

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Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 3, Number 2
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
15

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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VOLUME III, W3Siv XI
DENVER, COLORADO
FEBRUARY 1946
BRONZE PLAQUES AWARDED OUTSTANDING NISEI 8, Palmer Hoyt, editor and
publisher of the Denver Post, is pictured above congratulating Miss
Yoshiko Ariki, Toshio Ando and Dr. James Taguohi, recipients of out -
standing Nisei awards given by the Business and Professional Men's
Club at their annual inauguration banquet on Feb. 11 at the Albany
hotel. Photo by Wilshire
THREE OUTSTANDING NISEI HONORED
Pledging his entire energies towards the betterment of the commu-
nity, Dr. Y. Ito accepted the presidency of the Denver Business and
Professional Men's Club from 1947 First Vioe-President, Dr. Sam Oza-
moto, at their annual Dinner-dance on February llth in the Mural
Room of the Albany Hotel.
Honored guests included: Coun-
cilman James Fresques; Mr. and
Mrs. Cecil Scherer, president
of the Down Town Business teen's
Club; Senator and Mrs. Arthur
Brooks and the principle speaker
Mr. E. Palmer Hoyt accompanied
by Mrs. Hoyt.
For progress in their own
fields and for general contribu-
tion to the community, Dr. J.
fcaguchi and Mr, Tosh Ando were
nsmed the outstanding Niseis of
the year by Mr. Charles Iwashita
and his committee. Senator
Brooks awarded them with bronze
plaques in behalf of the orga-
nization.
Mr. Fresques presented Miss
Yoshiko Ariki with a bouquet of
roses as special recognition for
her contribution to the communi-
ty.
Dr. Taguchi, M.D. is 26 years
old, comes from Rocky ford, He
was graduated from the Univer-
sity of Colorado, and interned
at Colorado General Hospital.
Last year, at the Colorado State
Medical Association, he presen-
ted a paper on Right Heart Fail
ures. He is now connected with
National Jewish Hospital. He is
an active member of the Cosmopo-
litan Club and the JACL and re-
cently won acclaim for his res-
(continued on page 2)
are you A
REGISTERED VOTER
The local JACL Chapter will
campaign during the spring to
get every eligible Nisei voter
in Denver registered. This is
especially important because
1948 is an election year.
President George Ohashi re-
cently pointed out to Governor
Lee Knous the potential voting
power of the Nisei in Denver and
across the state. He says: "All
Nisei in Colorado should realize
the importance of their voting
power, and I urge all Nisei to
certainly register for voting.
We have a good administration in
the State House, and we, as Am-
erican citizens, should do our
part to support administrations
which are helpful to us.
Benny Murakami, a Hawaiian
Nisei Veteran of the 100th, is
employed with the City Election
Commission and has expressed his
willingness to help the Chapter
with this campaign.
Bessie Matsuda has been ap-
pointed to check registration
urocedures. Material on regis-
tration will be sent to all Ni-
sei during this campaign.
The Tri-State Office issued
this statement: "The strength
and influence of the Nisei vot-
ing power should not be underes-
timated. During the last gener-
al election, the historic Lari-
mer Street precinct at the Wind-
sor Hotel went Democratic for
the first time in its history.
Observers indicated that this
change was due to the strong
turn-out of Nisei voters in that
area. 1948 is an election year.
Remember, that the Nisei vote
will have a profound influence
in closely-contested elections.
Vie endorse the Denver Chapter* s
campaign to see that every eli-
gible Nisei voter in Denver is
registered before the spring
primaries."
mm umycouncil
LEGISLATIVE REPORT
The Legislative Committee of
the Denver Unity Council has
studied the bills now before
Congress in the Field of Race
Relations. Four of the six bills
endorsed by the Council affect
the Nisei.
If enough individuals and or-
ganizations make their wishes
known to their Congress, especi-
ally in an election year, the
chances for passage of legisla-
tion is markedly increased. Per-
sonally written letters bear
much weight, so we list below
the bills and the persons to
whom letters should be written
urging passage of the bills.
DISPLACED PERSONS LEGISLATION
HR2910, S1563; FAIR EMPLOYMENT
PRACTICES LEGISLATION S984, and
HR2824> NATURALIZATION BILIS
S1655, HR4418, HR3555; DEPORTA-
TION BILL HR3566; EVACUATION
CLAIMS BILL HR39995
Write to:
Colorado Senators
Eugene Millikin (R)
Edwin C. Johnson (D)
Senate Office Building
Washington, D. C.
Denver Representative*
John A. Carroll
House Office Building
Washington, D. C.
JACL SUPPORTS CU
BUILDING FUND
The Denver JACL has subscrib-
ed to two Silver Shares at (230
each toward the Memorial Center
Building at the University of
Colorado at Boulder.
This Memorial Center is to
honor the service men from Colo-
rado who served in World War II.
There were more than 1800 Nisei
from this state who served in
the armed forces and 38 who gave
their lives.
The JACL has requested the
following names be inscribed on
the donors plaques, "The Nisei
Veterans of Colorado" and "The
Japanese American Citizens Lea-
gue ."
Harry Sakata, the Treasurer,
is chairman of the committee and
is assisted by George Masunaga
and George Ohashi.
Any veteran or interested
person wishing to subscribe to
this fund should mail their
checks to the JACL office, B & C
Building, Denver, Colorado.
TRI-STATE BUSSE/
CARNIVAL MAR 14
The Tri-State Young Buddhist
League is sponsoring their se-
cond Annual Bazaar and Carnival
at the Rollerdrome on Sunday,
March 14.
James Kanemoto of Longmont is
the General Chairman. The af-
fair is to he a huge one-day
event this year. Many new at-
tractions are being planned to
amuse the large crowd that Is
bound to attend.
GENERAL MEETING*
RECOGNITION DINNER
MARCH 19 YWCA
President George Ohashi an-
nounced that the first 1948 JACL
General Meeting will be held on
Friday evening, March 19, 6:30
p.m. at the Y.W.C.A,
Plans for the initial meeting
are not completed as yet, but it
will be a potluck dinner meeting
with Mas Nakayama and Bessie Ma-
tsuda in charge of the food.
Shig Imainura, program chair-
man, announces that this will be
an informal affair and urges all
former members and new members
and those who wish to join to
come to renew memberships or
ac quaintanc es.
Highlight of the evening is
to be the recognition of all
those who aided the 1947 JACL
program.
All those attending are asked
to bring a food contribufc ion to-
wards the dinner. Please con-
tact Masako Nakayama at 1920 La-
rimer or phone Main 7043*
JACL MEMBERSHIP
M.HANEKO, CNR.
February has been designated
Membership Month by the local
chapter. The drive is under the
direction of Mlts Kaneko, 2nd
Vice-President. Various teams
have been appointed to compete
with one another to see which
one will obtain the most member-
ships.
In 1946 the Denver Chapter
was the largest chapter in the
country with 388 paid up members
In the following year this chap-
ter led for the first six months
but finished the year with a-
bout 100 less members.
Mits Kaneko is out to beat
the 1947 figures and regain the
title of being the largest JACL
chapter.
Membership dues are:
Individual membership *3.50
includes:
National *1.00
Local 1*50
Bulletin 1.00
Couple Membership *3.00
ORIENTAL DINNER FOR
COSMOPOLITAN CLUB
The Denver Cosmopolitan Club
is holding its seventeenth An-
nual Dinner on Thursday evening,
February 26, at the Temple Emma-
nuel. Min Yasui is chairman of
the JACL Committee which is in
charge of serving the dinner to
about 300 guests.
The Oriental roast duck din-
ner will be prepared by Mrs. He-
len Uroezawa of the Manchu Grill.
Bessie Matsuda, Yukiye Tanaka,
Chiye Horiuchi, Mitsue Sugano,
Dorothy Madokoro, Yuriko Nogami,
Joyce Chiba, Joan Matsuda, and
Mesdames Ed Matsuda, Shig Ima-
mura, Carol Tanaka, Howard Doi
will help serve the dinner. W
Clay Marks, Harry Sakata, Tosh
Ando, Fits Kaneko, Hank Imada,
Frank Tamura, and Dr, James Ta-
guchi will assist the girls.


U9B 2
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
FEBRUARY 1948
A representative of the Red
Cross Is scheduled to speak at
the general meeting at which
time they will probably recruit
the general aid of the Japanese
community.
Inasmuch as the JACL's policy
is to aid in community affairs,
and we cannot do the work alone,
we trust that we can count on
each one to give the Red Cross
Drive the fullest possible sup-
port.
we received an invitation
from the Urban League to their
annual meeting on Feb. 26, 8:00
p. m. at the Unitarian Church at
1870 Broadway at which time Dr.
Iven D. Willis, vice president
of the International Harvester
Company is speaking. This will
be an open forum and promises to
be very interesting.
The JACL receives many such
invitations from other civic or-
ganizations. I am proud that
they think of us at all and in-
vite us, and I hope that we will
attend these meetings to warrant
continued invitations.
()REi7iNG%S ERQ#
NEW EtHTOR-
Greetings to you allll
The incoming editor is begin-
ning a new venturei "There is al-
ways a first time," they say.
Well, this is it. Fortunately,
I'll become oriented with the
wonderful cooperation of the old
staff. Im very grateful to
them for their willingness to
continue a rather thankless job.
Personal satisfaction is their
only gain.
I shall introduce to you,
dear reader, some new members on
the staff, Vuki Tanaka, a new-
comer to Denver Is the typist,
Dorothy Madokoro, affectionately
known as "Dodie" by her friends
will see that you receive the
Bulletin; and "Chuck" Shibata
will worry about the doings of
the Teen-Age set. Shig Imamura,
JACL 1st V-P, will see to'it
that we dont go into the red.
c/ry-i/m omen
YOUTHCOMC/L
Dorothy Miyahara, Peggy vama-
to, Henry Kunugl, and Bessie Ma-
tsuda represented the Japanese
when.Loulse Fvans, executive se-
cretary of the Denver Unity Coun-
cil gathered together young peo-
ple of various groups of Denver
to discuss the possibility and
or desirability of forming a
youth council in Denver.
Other groups represented were
the Jewish, Colored, Manual High
School, Loretto eights College,
Christian Endeavor and the v.
The groups felt a need for a
coordinating council of youth
from all districts, social clas-
ses, religions, and races to
meet on a cultural basis, where-
by meeting and playing with each
other, they would learn to live
and work with each other.
The consenses of opinion of
the group was that by appealing
to a city agency to sDonsor such
a council would meet with greet-
er success and they will meet
again to further study the pos-
sibility of such an organization.
"TO SECURE THESE
RIGHTS"
by
Rev. Tsutomu Fukuyama
Director of Brotherhood House
Heralded by the editor of a
well-known magazine as one of
"the most stirring documents
since the Bill of Rights" and
greeted with "something akin Id
resurrection-day fervor" by Ne-
groes is the report of the Presi-
dents Committee on Civil Rights.
v'hat the Columbus Conference of
Churches in 1946 told the
churches about segregation in
their own households the Presi-
dent's Committee has now told
the nation as a whole. The re-
port, "To Secure These Rights"
is a book of 178 pages. It is a
must for all people interested
in civil rights and the American
way of Life.
Central in our heritage is
"the importance of the individu-
al person", whose welfare is
"the final goal of group life".
The only aristocracy in the Am-
erican way of life is that of
"talent and achievement". The
worth of each citizen is measur-
ed not according to color, race
or creed, but his "personal char-
acter and...his social contribu-
tion."
Four basic rights essential to
the well-being of the individual
and progress of society were for-
mulated by the committee.
1. The Right to Safety and Se-
curity of the Person.
2. The Right of Citizenship
and Its Privileges.
3. The Right of Freedom of
Conscience and Expression.
4. The Right to Equality of
Opportunity.
There is a detailed presenta-
tion in the report of America's
failure in realizing these goals
Americans of Japanese extraction
and the barriers preventing
their parents from becoming na-
turalized citizens are treated.
However, the most depressing
factor in the American scene is
the color-caste system which re-
legates Negro-Americans to a se-
cond class citizenship. In this
so-called age of enlightenment
we would suppose that inequal-
(continued next column)
(continued from page 1)
Mr. Tosh Ando* 27 year old
lawyer, comes from Mills valley,
California. He attended Univer-
sity of California, Hastings
School of Law until the evacua-
tion, and was graduated from the
University of Denver Law School
in 1944; he entered the bar in
194b and was responsible for the
success of the JACL program in
1947.
Miss Yoshiko Ariki, beautician
is a native of Denver. She has
been superintendent of the Cali-
fornia Street Methodist Church
for three years and is a member
of the YWCA board.
BROTHERHOOD I
DENVER-Race Rela-
tion Sunday was
observed Febru*-
ary 8. A panel
discussion was
presented that
day at Zion Bap-
tist Church by
those pictured
here.
Left to right:
Minoru Yasui,rep-
resenting the
JACL; Rev. Euti-
mio Duran of- El
Salvador Baptist
Church; Mrs* E-
dith H. Elliott
of the Urban Lea-
gue, and Reverend
Clark Garman,for-
mer missionary to
janan-
- TSUTOMU FUKUYAMA ---
ities because of skin pigmenta-
tion would be abolished as re-
lics of a medieval past. Yet
prejudices are deep-rooted as
seen in one instance, opposition
of Southern Democrats to Presi-
dent Truman's civil rights pro-
gram.
The Government's responsibili-
ty is emphasized in this program
although it is not specifically
empowered by the Constitution to
enact civil rights legislation.
This is a real encouragement.
Since hithertofore the Federal
government has failed to protect
civil rights ana therefore has
indirectly sanctioned discrimina-
tion against minorities. A com-
prehensive program of action is
recommended with the declaration
that "the time for action is now?
The gap between ideals and prac-
tice is creating a kind of moral
dry rot which eats away at
the emotional and rational bases
of democratic beliefs."
This report is valuable in
Centering the nation's attention
on basic civil rights issues....
that have international implica-
tions. Our question is: "Do
we have the vision, the states-
manship and moral courage to put
these ideals into action?" Or
will these high-sounding phrases
go the way of other reports and
surveys and "gather dust in hid-
den-away library crannies?" as
is feared by the editor of
'Ebony', a Negro publication.
Coming closer home we Nisei
naturally want these basic
rights for ourselves. But do we
want them as much for Negroes,
Spanish-speaking and Jews? We
will not come of age until we do
want and work for these rights
for others as much as for our-
selves.
Published monthly by the
Denver chapter of the J^pa-
nese American Citizens Lea-
gue, 615 E & C Bldg,, Den-
ver, Colo. Tel: CH 5990
Editor; Chlye Horiuchi
Staff; Michi Ando, Rosa Hi-
gashi, Bill Hoso^awa, Shig
Imamura, Mami Katagiri, Bess
Matsuda, George Kubo, George
Ohashi,Yuki Tanaka, Margaret
Shibata, and Hiroshi Wada.
Fotos:
WILSHIRE STUDIO
CRITIC'S
CORNER
by 0dl Hosokoua.
What amazing news it must
have been for people overseas
who read that the southern wing
threatened to bolt the Democra-
tic party simply because Presi-
dent Truman had uttered a plea
for action on America's race
problem.
Remember, nothing final or
conclusive was done; the presi-
dent merely suggested a course
of action to validate.some con-
stitutional guarantees which at
present are only hypocrisies in
many parts of the country.
And talking about hypocrisies
how earnest are we in regard to
racial equality? When we talk
about social and economic equal-
ity of opportunity for all,, are
we thinking only of the Nisei?
Or do we include Negroes,
Spanish Americans, Jews and
others?
Many Nisei in prewar days
were haruly in position to cry
discrimination. Their attitude
toward others, especially those
of Chinese ana Filipino origins
was shameful in many cases. The
Nisei were content in their self
contained communities, and only
the evacuation aroused them to
full realization of what preju-
dice could mean.
Some of the most disgraceful
acts of discrimination are prac-
ticed by the various minorities
against each other, or within
their own groups. The Nisei can
ill afford to be guilty of this
hypocrisy when they have made
such huge strides in removing
prejudice against themselves.
They owe it to themselves and
their friends to practice tol-
erance as well as to demand it.-
Seems to us, the diehard sou-
thern bigot is more to be admired
for his frankness than the pseu-
do-liberal who pays only lip
service to the cause of racial
equality.
MONTHLY ADVERTISING RATES
professional Listings. $1.50
3/4" Business Ads. ... 2.50
2 Business Ads. . 3.50
2 Double-column Ads. . 5.00
DENVER JAQ1 MEMBERSHIP
Memberships in the Denver
JACL are asfollows:
Individual membership. #3.00
Membership for oouplee . 6.00
Pacifio Citisen, member. 2,50
P.O., non-member , 3.30
Subscription to the Denver
JAOL Bulletin, only, until the
end of every year, to Deo. 31,
without membership, 18 $1.00
;xa1
[George's Motors

-SERVICE
slawtetvee fto 9373
1203 NINETEENTH
mm NOS 'JEWELRY
WfTCN REPAIRING
ST. DENVER. COLO.


FEBRUARY 1948
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
PAGE 3
*THE SAWdFRy
So, youve got a gripe or a
comment against the SMALL FRY!* I
Well, air it!! but first of all,
how about a glance behind the
scenes to see where the real fal-
lacy lies I
One of the biggest problems
of the SMALL FRY is that the
readers do not support the column
by sending in interesting news!!
How about it----drop us a line!!
The MICC Sweetheart Ball turn-
ed out to be quite a gala affair!
The "new look" simply looked ador*
able and glamourous on the lassies
who tried to be "sophisticated".
LOUISE NISHIKAWA and TED INOUYE
were the cutest couule there!!
Flash! FLOYD TANAKA was wear-
ing his "Hysteria" tie corsage
made by cute lil ROSE HANAWA.
Jeeper, wonder why SHIG MORI-
SHIGE wasnt wearing HIMI MAYE-
MURA'S corsage FIRST PRIZE WIN-
NER* cleverly made out of ribbon
and vegetables! Hmmmmmm,strange,
MAS AKIYAMA was proudly wearing
it!!!
Sorry, fellas, dream gal YUKI
SANADA is dated up for months to
come You might turn in your ap-
plication now for a date unseen
in the next century!
Can anyone tell us who that
fella is that MACHIKO TAKIGIKU
mentions in such a "drooly" tons?
The MANCHU-ETTES---basketball
squad-were feted at a chines
dinner given by their snonsor
the MANCHU GRILL. Those who at-
tended were: KAZ KANDA, coach,
GENII YAMAMOTO, STANLEY ICHIKAY/A,
RUTH KAWAKAMI, HIROKO ASANO, MEB
SHIBAO, JUNE KISHIYAMA, JANET SA-
3AHARA, HELEN TANAKA, ANN NAKATA,
KAZ TADA, DOROTHY MIYAHARA, YOUKO
YOSHIMURA, and KAMI KATAGIRI, Mis-
sing was MAS WAKAYAMA.
Gads!! Is skiing ever popular!
seen flying down dem strange hills
were such enthusiastic ski-lovers,
as: KENNY IMAMURA, JIRO SHOJI,
NORMAN SHIBATA, HARRY KURACHI,
BEN KITASHIMA. EDDIE KURACHI, TOfi
HAMAI, "SUGAR"SUEHIRO, ALBERT NO-
DA, EMI and FUMI KATAGIRI, HELEN,
TANAKA, JOHN KURACHI, GEORGE HI-
GASHI, TOSH SHIBATA, BTMI UYEMURA,
JIM TOCHIHARA, the TAGUCHIS and
the MATSUMONJIS. Good enough to
join the Ski Patrol, yet??? How
about a demonstration, eh, kids?
STANLEY ICHIKAWA and HIDE NI-
TSU11A make a cute twosome.
Wonder what happened to our
Hawaiian boyALLEN YAMADAV Hi-
bernating from the cold weather
or is it that the beautiful ferns
are giving him a rest!!
Seems as if PAT INCUYE and RI-
CHARD KITASHIMA are really miss-
ing their buddy----GENE MATSUMOTO
who returned to Call!
Sweet JANET SASAHARA who left
for California gave a farewell
dinner for her friends at Bogglb.
Those who attended were: HELEN
TANAKA, MASAKO MURATA, EMI and
MAMI KATAGIRI, YASUKO TASHIRO,
HIROKO ASANO, and KABLE SHIBAO.
JtemqliL FLOWER SHOP
PGNVB& ECONOMICAL FlDfUSr
5H-IS*Stnet CM. 3546
STUOIO
^iAtinctidt ^fjotbej^ipfup'
FLORENCE BLOq.
830-18* St. TA 3697
INAUGURATION BALL ATTRACTS LARGS CROWDThe winter social season was
climaxed by the annual JACL semi-formal ball held, on January 23 in
the Silver Glade ballroom of the Cosmo hotel.
UPS RESUMES
DANCES AT Y
The Young Peoples Society of
the YWCA held their first dance
of the year in the Y Recreation
Room, Th ursday,February 12 with
George Davies orchestra fur-
nishing the music.
Besides dancing, many were
having a good time playing rummjj
bridge, checkers or just chewing
the rag.
A short informal business
meeting was held with Yoshlko
Arlkl, presiding. Miss Betty
Krumrael, the new program direc-
tor in charge of YPS was intro-
duced. The young people present
were asked if they wanted to
continue the dances and how of-
ten they should be held.
It was finally decided to
hold them twice a month. Volun-
teers were asked to serve on the
council to make arrangements for
these dances.
The Nisei who attend these
dances and have the fun should
take their turn helping, whether
its making general arrangements
or serving the punch, it was sug-
gested.
The JACL is cooperating with
the Y on this program by sending
four chaperons for each dance.
George Masunaga, JACL repre-
sentative of the YPS, announces
he would like to have more cou-
ples volunteer as chaperones.
coummssoc/AL
About fifty people enjoyed a
very well organized combination
of games planned by Amy Miura at
the Y on Feb. 14th, when the
Cornelians entertained their hus-
bands.
"I didnt realize folk dan-
cing was so much fun," commented
many as they sashayed and dosi-
dod.
Fumi Yabe and Matllde Taguchl
were in charge of refreshments.
N/CC'S SWEET-
HEART'S BALL
Hash Togashi and Emi Kfetagirl
reigned as King and Queen of
Hearts at the Sweethearts Ball
sponsored by the NICC at the
Conoco Auditorium, February 14.
Selection was based on penny
votes by those attending.
Mas Akiyama won the prize for
the most original corsage and
Chinii Maemura, its creator, was
presented with a sweetheart rose
corsage.
Committees for the dance were
MamI Katagiri, general chairman;
decorations, Doug Taguchi and
Dorothy Miyahara; refreshments,
Sue Maruyama and Yoshlko Mameda;
finance, Bill Kinoshlta, Roy Ka-
to, Shig Hayashl and Rose Hanawa
MCL mAsufi£RiR£po*r
Harry Sakata, who succeeds
Dr. George Kubo as treasurer,
received the.following financial
report. The JACL treasury has
to date $2,048.00. The BULLETIN
has a balance of $194.49 to
start the year.
The large amount in the trea-
sury is due to the efforts of
the 1947 cabinet which work ed
unceasingly to raise funds for
the chapter.
From their recent financial
venture, total ticket sales e-
mounted to $2,857 with disburse-
ments of $1,739, leaving a net
profit of $1,117.81.
Mr. George Furuta, father of
Stanley Furuta, who was the win-
ner of the 1948 DeLuxe Ford Se-
dan, donated $500.00, increasing
the net receipts to $1,617.81
The 1947 cabinet turned over
this amount to the new cabinet
to launch the activities for the
year and will be a part of the
general fund to promote and ad-
vance the welfare of the Japa-
nese in this area.
NAKAYAMA JEWELRY
%-Hi-
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1920 merit MA 7043
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a a
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PAGE 4
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
FEBRUARY 1948
i
SUE MAYEDA recently enter-
tained guests at dinner in honor
of LILY MITA, Denver Social A-
gency worker, who left for civil
service work in Japan.
In the juke box biz, when a
new model phonograph la ready
to come out, the factory con-
ducts classes for distributor s
to acquaint them with the im-
provements. The key man for a
distributor is sent and FREDDY
YOSHIOKA has so been honored by
Jones Diet. Co., and will be in
Chicago this month at the See-
burg factory.
All those lovely gals had the
governors secretary ROSCOE
PILE in one big quandry at the
Inaugural Balleveryone looked
so lovely. CHIMI MAYEMURA In
lovely pinkish blue tiered net
had the sweetest gown. HARUKO
KOBAYASHI had the very latest
look in aqua bengaline with a
single diagonal strap and the
very new padded hips.
Sophisticated TERRY KODAMA
was a page out of Harper's In
her ankle length black gown and
her striking hairdo. MARY SUE -
(continued next column)
PEEK-A-B&&
NOTES
..W
(PEEK-A-BOO)
NAGA looked so regal In a richly
embroidered off the shoulder
gown.
It was swell to see BEA MAYE-
DA in a quaint hooped skirt laf-
fing at the hula dancer in brown
slack length socks, unshaven un-
derarms, grass skirt, and mop
tressed hairdo. B ILL HOSOKAWA
and TOL TAKAMINE seemed to be
enjoying it, too. Incidentally
TOL and MARY have a new addition
to their home; tis another girl.
Noticed EDDY YAMATO executing
a light fantastic with the BP's;
with his graceful dips, glides,
and twists--why the man's bet-
ter'n AstalreJJJ
At the Blzpro affair, BEA TA-
KATA looked very chic in a black
dinner gown. In contrast equally
chic in a svelte white dinner
gown was MAY TORIZAWA; these two
were accented by sweet HELEN U-
MEZAWA In a black lace topped
gown. MAY FURUTA glowed in a
black haltered top velvet gown
with white camellias accenting
her dark complexion.
BETTY KUNITOMO was very smart
in a salmon colored gown, and
MITCHIE TERASAKI appeared in a
bold "murasakl" print with very
chic lines.
BEAUTIFULLY GOWNED LADIES ATTEND INAUGURAL BALL--The ladies shown a-
bove smiled prettily when the photographer asked them to pose with
the Governor's secretary, Roscoe Pile, and Mr. George Ohashi, chapter
president. The ladies are Mrs. Howard Suenaga, Mrs. George Furuta
Mrs, Ed Matsuda, and Mrs, Clarence Arima, PhQtQ by Wilshire<
GRPfJPDP fish awTPoulPui Tfikh
1919 Lawrence St KEqstooe 5985
/flancku
GRILL CHOP SUEV
jutdywJr ^tdejidA^
1956 Larimer St. TAbor 9576,^
o
p bv
After six weeks of battle in
the local DNBL basketball arena,
the Marusho Mika, in spite of
the gallery and locker-room gos-
sip that one or more of their
four contending rivals would
knock them off, securely remain
perched atop their regal maple-
wood throne.
Last Friday night at Manual
High, the Blue and Gold soundly
trounced the challenging TK Tro-
jans 43-32 to break into the 3/4
turn with a greatly weakened Joe
Jewelers as their only obstacle
facing them towards a clear-cut
homestretch.
To make matters more compli-
cated but smooth sailing for the
championship bound Mlk, the
Arikl gang eked out Rupe Aral's
horde 39 37, with the latter
group dumping Tosh Nakamura's
YBA in an overtime 59-57 thril-
ler game of the season.
The strongest links In the a-
foreraentioned quartet are the
Sparklers, paced by Barney Yasu-
da, Harry Shlramlzu and Co., and
the Bussels, featuring diminu-
tive Lucky vamaga and Tats Iwa-
hashi. Both clubs are virtually
assured of second place, barring
further upsets.
Previously the Miks on suc-
cessive weeks froze the Bussele
32-19, romped over the Cards 43-
28, Johnny Downs 59-20 and the
Brighton YBA 37-15 before man-
handling a tough Manchu Grill 32
to 24. To date only Joe Arikl's
crew has held the high scoring
Marusho machine to an 8 point
margin*
While the Miks current cruise
has been somewhat calm, the "Big
Four" members who had anticipa-
ted serene hopes were enveloped
in the midst of a civil war. The
chain in this battle, "beat thy
neighbor", found the Jewelers
edging out TK 46-43, and Manchu
45-42 only to lose 48-42 to the
Templars who also hold a 41-38
overtime decision over the Cafe
club.
TWO DEN VSR Af/S£/
ON YWCA BOARD
Miss Yoshiko Ariki was elec-
ted to the Board of Directors of
the Young Women's Christian As-
sociation at its Annual Meeting,
January 29. She is a very ac-
tive Y worker, being a member of
the Northwest Business Girls
Area Council and the National
Business and Professional Girls
Council of the YWCA.
Mrs. Hideo Kodani was elected
assistant recording secretary of
the Board at their first meeting
on February 10.
JOIN THE JACL
The battle for the cellar
spot found the winless Johnny
Downs hugging the doormat as the
Cards downed them 27-18 on top
of their 32-26 opening loss to
Brighton. The Redbirds remain
one notch above the Farmers by
virtue of their 33-32 decision.
In the Class "B" circuit, a
hustling bunch of Bussei Juniors
copped the -junior division gon-
falon with a 3-1 season standing.
Members of the championship club
who edged out the pre-season fa-
vorites, the 01 Market and Bri-
ghton YMA teams, are the stellar
Min Hlga end Jun Hamal, tall Art
Arite, guards Harry Ito, Mickey
Takeshita and Willie Hiraga.
Finishing in a triple tie for
second place were the Inmates,
with the Longmont representative
in the cellar.
With the conclusion of the
regular league play In both the
"A" and "B" divisions, the DNBL
will hold a tournament for the
league members, with awards to
the finalists and consolation
winners. Further details of the
forthcoming tourney will be re-
leased by Tosh Nakamura and hie
committee.
Elsewhere in the hardwood
circle, the invading TK Pharmacy
returned triumphantly from their
Rocky Ford Jaunt with the CYC
tournament championship. The
Denverites trounced Las Animas
42-27 in the first round, edged
out Crowley 38-36 in a semi-
final overtime and polished off
Rocky Ford 33-28 for the trophy.
RELIABLE.
ffiont

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THE DENVER BULLETIN
The Denver Chapter JACL
615 E & C Building
Denver 2, Colorado
2700 Larimer 5f.
Sec. 562, L. & R.