Citation
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 3, Number 5

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Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 3, Number 5
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
15

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Full Text
VOLUME ITI, NUMBER 5
DENVER COLORADO
MAY 1948
QUEEN FINALISTS


Photos by T. K. Shindo
QUEEN TO
BE CROWNED
AT
CORONATION
DANCE
The much, awaited an-
nouncement of the five
finalists for the MISS
DENVER JACL QUEEN CON-
TEST are as follows:
Aiko Fukuyama 9100
Dot Madokoro 9100
Rose Shiramizu 9100
Chiz Okuno 8600
Pearl Kuwabara 8400
The members of theJACL
are being sent ballots
to determine the final
queen. The community
at large will have a
chance to vote at the
inf orma1 Cor onat i on
Dance on May 22 at the
Rainbow Ballroom at
5th & Broadway.
Harry Logans orches-
Top row, left to right: Aiko Fukuyama, tra will play for the
Dorothy Madokoro, Rose Shiramizu. dance and tickets will
Bottom row: Chiz Okuno, Pearl Kuwabara. be $1*50 per person.
CHAPTER TO HOLD
MEMORIAL My SERVICE
The JACL is again planning a
Memorial Day Service for the com-
munity to honor the Nisei war
dead and veterans. It will be
Monday, May 31, 11:15 a.m., at
the Japanese Hall, 2109 Lawrence.
Many of our veterans will
participate in this annual com-
munity event. Shig Imamura and
Matilde Taguchi are in charge of
the arrangements.
Cathay Post #185 of the Amer-
ican Legion will form the Color
Guard. Tom Masamorl,accompanied
by Peggy Yamato, will open the
program with the National Anthem,
Reverend Yoshitaka Tamai of
the Denver Buddhist Church will
give the invocation and George
Uyemura of the California Street
Methodist Church will give the
benediction,
Toru Aoyagi, a former lan-
guage instructor at Fort Snell-
ing will speak in Japanese and
Dr. Isamu Ozamoto in English.
The Boy Scouts of Troop 38 will
usher.
The public is cordially in-
vited to the services.
LOCAL tltHBlKi
SUPPOtr/OOOCWB
In hopes that the finances of
the National JACL could be
spread in such a way so that the
burden would not rest on a few
loyal supporters, the One Thou-
sand $25.00 Club was organized.
"With 1,000 people donating
$25.00, $25,000.00 would be rea-
lized to carry on the national
and regional executive offices,
and the $25.00 would be a deduc-
tible item for income tax pur-
poses," so explained Mas Satow
National JACL Executive Secre-
tary at the May General Meeting
of the Denver Chapter JACL.
Eddie Matsuda was appointed
to head the Denver committee to
recruit $25.00 members and got
a fine start at the meeting with
jimmy Imatani, Mits Kaneko and
Harry Sakata handing him their
checks to add to Denvers first
$25.00 member, Mas Takata.
MAS SATOW SPEAKER
AT GENERAL MEETING
Reuort of the progress of the
National JACL political front
from the Washington office by
Masao Satow, National JACL sec-
retary, highlighted the dinner
and general meeting of the lo-
cal JACL, on May 3rd at the
Manchu Grill. More than 40
members attended the dinner held
in his honor and gave their
undivided attention to his in-
spiring and informative talk.
He reported that the Evac-
uation Claims Bill No. 3999 has
been passed by the House of Rep-
resentatives and had been pre-
pared for presentation to the
Senate committee. According to
Masao Satow, the Naturalization
Immigration Bill HR 5004, intro-
duced by Congressman Judd, has
also received favorable response
at the House Sub-committee hear-
ing. Further optimism for the
passage of the bill has been re-
flected by the recent report
that both the Los Angeles and
San Francisco B oard of Super-
visors have Just passed resolu-
tions supporting the bill. Chief
opposition to the bill comes
from various organizations of
the American Coalition and the
Native Sons of the Golden West.
The American Coalition includes
such groups as the Daughters of
the American Revolution,Nation-
al Association of Manufacturers,
and the United States Chambe r
of Commerce.
Masao Satow also related his
witnessing the Supreme Court
hearing on the Takahashi Fishing
Case, which is a test of the
legality of denying fishing
licenses to aliens ineligible
for citizenship, but he stated
that the outcome, though op -
timistic,could not be definitely
predicted at the present time.
In his talk, Masao Satow
showered highest praise upon
Mike Masaoka and his staff In
Washington for their unrelent-
ing, tireless efforts in behalf
of the Nisei and Issei.
The Denver JACL went on re-
cord as giving its unanimous
vote of confidence and approval
at the National JACL political
program.
FREEDOM WEEK-
"I Am An American" Day began
the celebration of "Freedom
Week", May 15-23, as proclaimed
fey Mayor Quigg Newton.
George Masunaga was designa-
ted chairman of the JACL commit-
tee participating In this event.
"Freedom Week" was climaxed
by the two day visit of the
Freedom Train, May 22, 23 in
Denver, it contains the docu-
ments of America b freedom,
such as the original manuscript
of Jeffersons rough draft of
^the Declaration of Independence.
Most of these documents have
.. .never been taken from their
places of safe-keeping such as
the Library of Congress, the Na-
tional Archives, the State, War
Navy and Treasury Departments.
JACL President, Bessie Matsu-
da, urged every Issei and Nisei
to take advantage of a rare op-
portunity and visit the Freedom
Train.
Denver and Fort
Lupton PLAN
Joint Meeting
A delegation from the Denver
Chapter accompanied Mas Satow to
Ft. Lupton .on Sunday nite, May 2
to attend a general meeting, at
which time Sam Oksraoto, presi-
dent of the Ft. Lupton chapter
Invited the Denver Chapter to
meet with them in the near fu-
ture, just as soon as farm work
shapes up enough to permit the
undertaking.
Mr. Okamoto and his live wire
bunch who had just completed aid-
ing the Isseis to renew auto
licenses and registering for vo-
ting of nlsesi in the community
promised Denver chapter a royal
country style reception.
The delegation from Denver
included: Shig Imamura, Roy Ta -
keno, Frank Tamura, Dorothy Ma-
dokoro, Chiye Horiuchi, and Bes-
sie Matsuda.
Rupert Aral who did such a
fine job on the ticket sales
for the FashionShow is gathering
his committee together to take
over the ticket sales for the
dance.
Elaborate plans are being
made for the Coronation Ceremo-
nies. The Queen's court will
comprise of the following: the
runners up will be the ladies in
waiting! and so far Hiroshi Wada
and Ken Imamura will be the cour-
tiers, who will grace the
queens court: Master Roddy Ko-
dama will be the crown bearer :
and Master Curtis Arlma and Mas*
ter Carl Yorimoto will be the
pages.
Shig Imamura and his commit-
tee have been meeting twice week-
ly to formulate plans for the
Queen contest. Shig states, "The
Coronation Dance willbe one of
the major financial ventures put
on to swell Chapter funds. I
hope everyone will cooperate by
attending, and thus share in the
support of the Chapter in a pain*
less and thoroughly enjoyable
way."
Others who stressed their
willingness to support this pro-
gram were: Min Yasui, Tosh Ando
Saburo Tani, George Masunaga,
Shig Imamura, Mike Uba and Bes-
sie Matsuda.
CtMHtSHtP CAMP
Scholaash/p available
The national JACL has been
offered five scholarships to the
Encampment for Citizenship at
Fieldston School, New York, June
23-August 7. The value of this
six-week scholarship is$125*
Young people of every race
and religion are invited to this
encampment in interracial living
Persons between the ages ofl7
and 23 are eligible to apply.
The Denver Chapter has voted
$75.00 to help defray traveling
expenses for a local scholarship
recipient.
Maml Katagiri has been the
only person to apply from the
Denver area so far, according to
Mas Horiuchi, office secretary
of the national JACL in Salt
Lake.


BAGS 2
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
MAY 1948
m&mmitrfN'
Published monthly by the
Denver chapter of the Japa-
1neee American Citizens Lea*
gue, 615 E & C Bldg., Den-
ver, Colo. Tel: CH 5990
Editor: Chiye Horiuchi
Staff: Michi Ando, Rosa Hi-
gashi, Bill Hosok&wa, Shig
Imamura, Maml Katagirl, Bess
Matsuda, George Kubo, George
Ohashi Margaret Shibata,
and Hiroshi Wada.
Fotos:
WILSHIRE STUDIO

#/
The 10th Biennial JACL Conven-
tion is to be held in Salt Lake
City, September 4-8, The host
Chapter has been hard at work
since last fall making plans for
this big event.
One of the first events on
the Convention program which has
been announced is the Queen Con-
test. The Denver Chapter has
started the ball rolling to pick
its entrant for the national con-
test.
While the booster delegates
will be having fun, the official
delegates will have a lot of de-
cisions to make. The future pro-
gram of the JACL will have to be
more or less determined. If the
Judd Bill should become a law
and our parents are granted citi-
zenship, the problems and empha-
ses of the JACL will naturally
shift from the national scene to
more of a local or regional one.
This shift will mean that the
local chapters will have to find
or develop its most capable
leadership. Each chapter will
need the cooperation and support
of each Issei and Nisei. The
national and regional offices of
the JACL will have to be able to
meet this new need, of helping
to develop leadership.
Two outstanding speakers have
been announced for the Conven-
tion. They are Associate Su-
preme Court Justice Murphy and
Father Flannagan of Boys Town.
Already, several Denverites
have expressed a desire to at-
tend the Convention and the
local Chapter hopes to send a
large booster delegation.
Shig Imamura, 1st Vice-Presi-
dent, and George Furuta, one of
our faithful supporters, have
been appointed the Chapters
official delegates to the conven-
tion.
AMERICAN
MOTOR SALES
-INCORP"
JiGnr\/ Is77crc/ct' pmp.
r

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Auto ui
LOANS Wj PEPAJP/AEG-
Hudson? Dealer
CH.2830 2358 MSH.Sr.
I

cdHotiofTc
"SENSE AND NONSENSE OF THE LAW "
by SAM MENIN
What I shall say has no tan-
gible connection with the grave
perplexities that vex the world
today. I shall not call on you
to take any action.' I shall on-
ly burden my reader with some-
thing on the lighter side, a few
random observations on sense and
non-sense of the law, mostly
nonsense.
Because of our peculiar form
of government the American citi-
zen is thrice a citizen, being
subjected to Federal laws, State
laws, and City laws. If in ad-
dition he happens to be married,
there is still another authority
laying down more laws, however,
it is not my intention to delve
into that.
All told, our country has
some 5,000,000 laws and between
30,000 to 40,000 relate to the
behavior and deportment of human
beings.
During the early history of
our country when the Massachu-
setts Bay Colony exercised au-
thority in New England, a law
was enacted proving for a fine
for a young person found drink-
ing in public houses or disport-
ing himself in the streets or
fields after sundown on Saturday
and Sunday* The necessary im-
plications being that during the
days of the week one could dis-
port himself wherever he saw fit.
In the State of Ohio it is a
misdemeanor for a married man to
repeatedly call upon or keep
company with an "unmarried fe-
male of good character". Michi-
gan goes Ohio one better by pro-
viding that no person who had
led an unchaste life would be
permitted to marry.
In Maine one may be fined if
he has a complex for walking a-
round with his shoe strings un-
tied.
In the State of Kansas snake
eating was prohibited in public
in 1903 as was squirting tobacco
juice promiscuously and at will.
Georgia came up with a re-
markable piece of legislation
which provided that lifeguards
must wear a bathing suit of
"bright solid red" as well as a
leather harness around the neck
to which there shall be attached
a life line not less than 200
feet long and one-quarter inch
in diameter. Typical of Georgia
isnt it.
Pennsylvania provided a pen-
alty for anyone caught singing
in the bathtub, while else where
it was made an offense for two
people to occupy a bathtub at
the same time. Thus making it
necessary for one seeking to
take a bath to ascertain if any-
one else in town was taking a
bath.
South Carolina was not going
to be outdone, and a bill was
introduced there forever abo-
JW
[GE0H6ES MOTOI
pp SERVICE*
^ImENCE /Us 9373
lishing hip pockets from trou-
sers of made inhabitants, they
being, by age old custom, the
hiding place for pints of gin.
In Maryland it is against the
law to throw bottles from the
window of railroad dining cars.
It appears, therefore, that as
far as pullman cars and coaches
were concerned, throwing bottles
was lawful.
In Louisiana members of po-
lice juries shall possess the
same qualifications as members
of the house of representatives
and also the following addition-
al qualification: "They shall
be able to read and write xxx."
Tennessee is the only state
where the owner of livestock is
prohibited from wandering around
at will for there the law says:
"It shall be unlawful for the
owner or keeper of horses,
mules, cattle, sheep, goats,
and hogs to run at large."
Hoi/ever, in Kansas we find
the most priceless gem of all a-
mong freak laws, for there the
law provides:
"When two trains approach
each other at a crossing,
they shall come to a full
stop, and neither shall
start until the other is
gone."
On June 20, 1906, the Con-
gress of the United States pass-
ed a law which prohibited the
offering for sale of sponges "in
any part or place in the United
States of a smaller size than
four inches in diameter" There
are, of course, lots of small
towns scattered throughout the
United States, but where, oh
where, is there a town smaller
than four inches in diameter.
Veil folks, remember, ignor-
ance of the law excuses no one.
CU BUILDING FUND
PLEDGES PAID
Harry Sakata, Treasurer, of
the Denver Chapter, reported
tha' two Buffalo shares at £100
each has been pledged to the
Colorado University Memorial
Building Fund, in order to per-
petuate the memories of the
Nisei GIs from Colorado.
The two shares will be in-
scribed in bronze as follows:
"Japanese American Citizens Lea-
gue" and"Nisei Veterans of Colo-
rado '*
President Robert L, Stearns
of Colorado University expressed
his appreciation to the local
chapter in behalf of the univer-
sity as follows; "I cannot let
this opportunity go by withou.t
expressing to your organization
our very groat appreciation for
this substantial help in our cam-
paign. The support and friend-
ship of our Japanese American
students, alumni and friends, is
something of which we are very
proud. I can assure you that
the Japanese American students
who come to the University in
the future years will have more
pleasant college experiences as
CRITIC'S
CORNER
by Bill Hosokawa.
Popular usage has given the-
word lobby an unpleasant conno-
tation. Lobby implies a pres-
sure group trying to get legis-
lative action on a bill of bene-
fit to special Interests, and
not always to the public advan-
tage.
There's the real estate lobby,
for instance. It allegedly is
spending money and influencing
legislators in an effort to de-
feat public housing bills which,
reportedly, would damage the in-
vestments of bigtime real estate
operators. There's the dairy
lobby that has been fighting the
bill to reduce the tax on oleo.
For an interesting story on
how a lobby operates, we refer
you to Drew Pearson's Washington
Merry-Go-Round column of May-10
as published in the Denver Post.
Pearson may not always be accur-
ate, but this particular column
makes sensational reading even
if it's given a 50 per cent dis-
count.
Pearson reports that Washing-
ton is swarming with more lobby-
ists now than during the war,
and that the oil industry's lob-
by is the biggest of them all.
The oil lobby, Pearson says, Is
trying to get congress to re-
verse a Supreme Court decision
(Just how isn't clear) and de-
cree that tidelands oil -- oil
found under the ocean off our
shores -- is the property of the
federal government.
To press this campaign, Pear-
son continues, the oil lobby
operates like a well-organized
army functioning "through a .
front-line commander, shock
troops, deputy commanders, plus
financial backers and camp
followers."
A setup like this requires
plenty of moola, probably run-
ning into millions.
Obviously, when that much
money is being spent in an ef-
fort to Influence congress, the
return to the oil companies on
that investment is going to
amount to considerable.
Well, what's all this have to
do with you and me and the price
of groceries? Just that we're
supporting a lobby, too, the
JACL-ADC lobby that is trying to
get congress to act on several
bills affecting the welfare of
Japanese-AmericanB most directly.
But, by no stretch of any-
body's imagination can It be con-
tended that the Interests of a
special group are being further-
ed at the expense of the general
public. The measures which the
JACL-ADC are pushing benefit
Japanese-Amerlcans, yes, but
they also set aright inconsis-
tencies and injustices on the
national scene. The JACL-ADC,
then, is a good lobby and don't
let anyone tell you different.
What were getting around to,
after all these words, is that,
lobbying can be legitimate and
even necessary; that it is a
skilled profession and that it
takes plenty of money. The JACL-
ADC is operating on a measly few
the result of your generosity." (cont. Page 3, Col. 2) i|§PW iQi&timebvu.
(rfdl/QruMtoNj STUDIO PTMONDS -JEWELRY
ARTISTRY IN ADVERTISING RfTCH REPAWN*
1330*20^51 KE4025 1203 NINETEENTH ST. DENVER. COLO.


MAY 194*
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
PAGE 3
MALLffl
Have you all seen our romeo
ICJRT IKaMJRA and his cowboy
boots??? Y/heres the horse, BUM?
Did she run away when you net it
half way???
Aint life grand?? especially
when you dont have to wait in
line to get a hair cut!! Those
fellas living in heaven with a
styled "booch" hair cut are such
well-known characters as: ROY
SHI3ATA, JIRO SHOJI, JIM TOCKI-
KARA, DICK AOY AG I and TOM SIIIBAO
By the way-they say GEORGE MASU-
NAGA is operating a barber shop
at his home without a license!!!
Can you imagine???
Listen to JIRO SHOJI jabber
sometimes! He sez that listen-
ing to Russ Morgans "bed-room"
voice sure makes his tummy tick-
le!! Wonder how he danced at
the DUs Senior Prom!!
At a bridal shower given for
MASAKO MURATA, many artists were
revealed in a game of drawing!!!
Jeepersl! cute MEB SHIBA.0 took
firat honors by drawing a horse
that looked like a pig!!
The local Star-Dusters are
performing at Oak Creeks Senior
Prom! Wheres Oak Creek??? Ask
ROY SHIBATA who came from dem*
dere hills!!!!
Congrats to our glamorous and
beautiful KIKU TAJIRI who was
chosen Queen of Senior Prom at
Manual High School!!
Some of the cute twosome who
attended the Nu Chi Delta serai-
formal were* SUE MARUYAMA, JOHN
TODOROKI: HELEN NAKAMURA-, JOE
MARUYAMA: SETS OKA, DICK UNO?
MARY HIRAMI KEN KUWABARA: and
PEARL KUWABARA and PETE MIYAHARA.
The famous tune at the Thurs-
day YPS Social is "Arthur Murray
teaches dancing in a hurry" Jeez,
some people sure can use some
dancing lessons!! No lie!!
The DU "Upper" Campus gave a
May Day weiner bake* The "lower"
campus certainly enjoyed it!!!
Heard that KNOBBY KAWANO and
CHET OJI are now working till
late at night!! Could work be
THAT serious to miss all the so-
cial life!
PEARL KUWABARA and GEORGE MA-
SUNAGA made a nice duo at the
D.U. Senior Prom. Cutest couple
was ROY SHIBATA and SACHI MARU-
YAMA. Seen performing the Samba
were DICK AOYAGI and- MAMI KATA-
GIRI.
SETS KOBAYASHI and SHIG HARA-
DA were recently married in L.A.
His parents honored them at a
beautiful reception in Rocky
Ford.
JOYCE HONDA placed third in
the recent Spelling Bee.
Congratulations!1!
The Younger Set Golfers seen
divoting the golf courses:
GEORGB BAKAYAMA, TOMMY HAMAI,
SUGAR SUYEHIRO ? EDDIE KURACHI,
' ALBERT NODA, STANLEY ICHIKAWA,
MAMI KATAGIRI-, BESSIE MATSUDA
and CHIYE HORIUCHI.
Look Out !!! Mile Hi Golfers,
theres competition in the mak-
ing...........
Cute MASAKO MURATA and SHE IDO
MAMEDA took their vows at Rocky
Ford....Lots of Happiness to you
both....

NEW OFFICERS
OF A//CC
The new officers for the 4th
Annual Nisei Intermountain Col-
legiate Conference were select-
ed by popular poll by the Nisei
students:
Pres.....Douglas Taguchi, C.U.
V.Pres..Robert Okamoto, Wyo.U,
Rec.Sec .. .Ruby Kitsutaka, C .U.
Corr.Sec...Carole Murata, C.U.
Treas.......Hash Togashi, C.U.
The retiring officers for 3rd
Annual NICC, who have conscien-
tiously given their services are:
Pres........Mami Katagiri, D.U.
V.Pres.........Pat Hirami, C.U.
Reo .Sec. .Yoshiko Mameda,Barnes
Corr.Sec..Helen Nakamura, D.U.
Treas.........Rose Hanawa, D.U.
Retiring Advisors:
Mr. Toshio Ando
Dr. Yoshio Ito
Mr. George Masunaga
Mr. Roy Takeno
Miss Iris Watanabe
Mr. Harry Yanari
A meeting will be held Friday
May 21 at the local JACL Office
to make tentative activity plans
for the coming year. Douglas
will be chairman.
(cont. Page 2, Col. 4)
thousand bucks; the fellows run-
ning the show have unlimited en-
thusiasm but are amateurs com-
pared to the #50,OOO-a-year hot-
shots that run the bigtime lob-
bies.
That the JACL-ADC has gotten
as far as It has under these con-
ditions is one of the miracles
of this age. The only explana-
tion is that the objectives are
Just, the men behind the move-
ment are well-fortlfled with
faith in Justice and zeal In
their cause. The combination
has been amazingly successful.
NAKAYAMA JEWELRY
* -Jli-chM.^uieSfup *
1920 JUrimerSi MA 704?
cldilshjw
STUDIO
IPtftmtidt *?fl0fo(jMphlpr
FLORENCE 0LDQ.
830-18* *t. TA 3697
BODY OF DENVER GI
BEING RETURNED
According to latest reports
the remains of Silver Star win-
ner, Sgt. Abe Fuji, brother of
Jack Fuji, and husband of Thelraa
Noguchi Fuji, who was fatallv
wounded in France is being sent
back to the states for final bu-
rial in this country.
Mrs. Fuji, who has recently
moved to San Francisco is re-
questing the body returned there
for burial and the Tri State
JACL office and the Social Ser-
vice Committee is making arran-
gements to have the remains sent
there inasmuch as the original
request was to have the remains
sent to Denver.
10OU. MEMBERS ON
NATIONAL COMMITTEES
Several active Denver chapter
members are serving on national
JACL Committees which will meet
at the 10th Biennial Convention
in Salt Lake City, September 4-8.
Min Yasui is Vice-Chairman of
the National Planning Committee
and a member of the Legislative
Committee.
Others on the various commit-
tees are Pacific Citizen, Mrs.
Tosh Ando and Bessie Matsuda;
Resolutions, Dr. Yosh Ito? Cre-
dentials, Howard Doi? Constitu-
tion, Mrs. Charles Ivashita and
Mrs. T. K. Kobavashi;Program and
Activities, Mrs. George Furuta?
and Nominations, Saburo Tani.
DENVER JACL MEMBERSHIP
Memberships in the Denver
JACL are as follows:
Individual membership. $3.50
Membership for couples . 5.00
Pacific Citizen, member. 2.50
P.C., non-member 3.50
Subscription to the Denver
JACL Bulletin, only, until the end of every year, to Dec. 31,
without membership, is . $1.00
'Professional usmsj-
DENTISTS
T. ITO, DDS .
830 18th Street
,KE 8680
Y. ITO, DDS...............KE 1077
830 18th Street
TAKA.SHI MAYEDA, DDS .TA 6961
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
K. K. MIYAMOTO, DDS .TA 4307
1952 Larimer Street
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS .TA 7498
200 Interstate Trust Bldg.
' LAWYERS
TOSHIO ANDO
615 E. & C. Bldg..
Branch Office:
1232 20th Street
,CH 7987
AL 3500
MINORU YASUI. .
615 E. & C. Bldg.
.CH 7987
INSURANCE
SHIG .....................GL 3133
1238 20th Street
JOHNNY INOUYE.............CH 7614
MITSUO .................... 5000
1232 20th Street .AL 3500
HENRY KIMURA..............AL 9900
1232 20th Street .AL 3500
JINZO NODA .
2829 Champa
.MA 8595
KENNETH T. SATO...MA 1644
1238 20th Street
- OPTOMETRIST'
GEORGE J. KUBO, O.D..
1234 20th Street
BEN T. MATOBA .
436 26th Street
.CH 7813
.KE 1941
PHYSICIAN aw SURfjTONS
CHARLES FUJISAKI, MD. .GR 8822
3301 Zuni Street
THOS. K. KOBAYASHI, MD. .KE 4590
1229 21st Street
ISAMU OZAMOTO, HD ?A 1596
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
HOWARD SUENAGA, MD. .TA 2642
830 18th Street
M. GEORGE TAKENO, MD. .TA 0783
830 18th Street
M. UBA, OD...............MA 3743
FLOWFR SHOF
DENVER'S ECONOMICAL FLORIST"
511^1 Street
L.ahkoafr-'ftsT.
or{
JACL DENVER CHAPTER
615 S.&C. Building
17th & Curtis Streets
Denver, Colorado
MEMBERSHIP FORM
Name
Street
City
Phone
Individual membership.......#3.50
Couple membership........... 5.00
includes:
National dues.......#1.00
Chapter dues...... 1.50
Chapter Bulletin.. 1*00
Paoifio Citizen (member)...$250
Pacific Citizen (non-member) 3*60
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PAGE 4
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
MAY 1948
NOTES:
...../fa PEEK A-B$4t>
ETSU UYEDA was really cute
singing to her own accompaniment
at a recent Cornelian meeting.
She was able to get in a little
practice, until the bridge nla-
yers requested her to cease.
PAULINE KURACHI is in town
to receive her Master's in nur-
sing from Colorado General.
While here she's a guest of the
Y. TERASAKI'S. She certainly
looked smart at the Fashion Show.
Opera goers opening nite at
the Met were CHIVE HORIUCHI, the
GEORGE OHASHIS, Y. TERASAKI'S.
Fashion show goers had loads
of fun after the show trving on
clothes modeled bv the Q.ueen
Candidates. Noticed some hus-
bands being led bv the nose to
get a closer gander at the duds.
Did you notice MICHI MORI-
SHIGE dashing out of the Y in
her nurse's uniform after having
modeled in the fashion show?????
One wouldn't mind getting laid
up with all that pulchritude ho-
vering about one, does one?
BES MATSUDA1s big sister and
brother in law JOHNNY and TOSH
FUJIKAWA will be in town to
check on the runt from Chicago
in Kid-Mav.
HISAKO KIMURA is visiting her
sister in San Francisco. HUBBY
HANK looks mightv lonelv these
davs
Noticed a lot of the Niseis
turned out to see Tallulah Bank-
head in Private Lives.
CARL IWASHITA of San Francis-
co is here visiting his brother,
CHARLES.
Noticed that TRUE YASUI is
getting real domestic. she
carries a great big box around
as she follows MIN around to the
various meetings he must attend
and pulls, out crocheting-----
baby things???Nopillow cases
SUEO SERIZAWA, prominent Los
Angeles artist, brother in law
of Denverite, HARU TANAKA, and
former Denver resident is now
having a one man show in Los
Angeles.
DR. and MRS. SAM SATO is va-
cationing in Henderson from West
Virginia.^
Photo by T. Shindo
SPORT ROUNDUP
Baseball enthusiasm attained
a new high in as much as the
number of participating teams
this season as thirteen clubs
began swinging away on the May
Ifith ouenlng date in the NCNBL
circuit*
The league, under the cap-
able supervision of Tosh Naka-
mura, Beans Yamamoto, Shig Tera-
ji and Yosh Nakavama, split the
teams into two groups. One di-
vision, called the American lea-
gue, consists of the six out-
standing nines as displayed in
last season's competition, while
the untried, newly formed teams
along with last year's NCNBL
weak sisters are grouped in the
National division.
Three of last year's various
championship clubs head the
American division. First of all
comes the 1947 HJNEL pennant
winning Denver Busseis. Featur-
ing one of the best keystone
combination in Frank Kamibayashi
and George Yamaguchi, the heavy
hitting of Mas Yoshimura and
Tats Iwahashi, Lucky Yamaga' s
alertness backed up with such
veterans as Tom Tsunoda and Doc
Mayeda, the local YBA promises
to repeat their performances.
Tosh Nakamura, tho lacking
pitching wealth, has depth in
Hideo Hirose, A1 Mivagishima,
Miekev Takeshita, Tad Marumoto,
Peanuts Takata and Jim Saito.
Another championship caliber
club is the Denver Merchants,
Labor Day tournament victors.
Shig Teraji can field an All
Star combination with the Kawano
brothers, Rupe Arai George
Nagai, Lefty Noda, Lander Ito
and veteran Harry Ariki whose
changeable battery versatility
will greatly aid the one*man
pitching duties of Tom Tsukiji.
Rated as one of the toughest
outfit in the circuit is the
1 9 4 7 Times tourney winning
Brighton club. Manager Goon
Sakaguchi has one of the loop's
niftiest chucker in Harrv
Shibata who shares mound work
with speedball Tam Shibao.
Hardhitting Hank Doi, George and
Hank Shibao with Bill Chikuma
backbone the Farmers.
Rounding out this fast field
are the Ault Merchants, Greeley
YBA and Ft. Lupton, strong rural
teams. Ault's star performers
are the Kinoshita and Tokunaga
brothers, pitcher Harold Tateya-
ma and outfielder Fred Mikumi*
Greeley boasts of hurlers Jack
Murta and Bill Osaki, the long
hitting Ken Osaki and Isao Mizu-
no. Two of baseball's well-
known veterans, Beans Yamamoto
and Sam Okamoto, are the guiding
stars of a young Ft. Lupton club
featuring two very promising
rookies in Frank Sugihara and
Jack Tani
Since the members of the
National league are comparative-
ly new, not much can be said
about the teams in detail at
this time. But the baseball
prophets state that the recently
formed Denver Nisei AC will be
the team to watch. Fort Morgan
and the Littleton backers vouch
the same for their respective
clubs. Fig Ishiguro of.Greeley,
George Tanaka of Longmont and
Sam Chikuma and Charlie Hizunaga
of Brighton are expo* imenting
with rookie material. Last
year's NCNBL cellar dwelling
Flatteville nine are hoping to
erase their previous poor mark*
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THE DENVER BULLETIN
The Denver Chapter JACL
615 E & 0 Building
Denver 2, Colorado
2700 Larimer $t.
Sec. 562, P. L. St R.