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Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 3, Number 6

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Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 3, Number 6
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
15

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Full Text
VOLUME III, NUMBER SIX
DENVER COLORADO
JUNE 1948
MISS DENVER JACL & ATTERDANTS-Rose Shlramizu, center, was crowned
queen on May 22nd at the Coronation Ball to represent Denver at the
national convention in Salt Lake City, Utah in September, The other
girls pictured are Chiz Okuno, Pearl Kuwabara, Dorothy Madokoro and
Aiko Fukayama.
MEMORIAL *
SERVICE *
The Denver Chapter held its
annual community-wide Memorial
Day Services at the Japanese
Hall on May 31. The program
wae planned by Shlg Imamura and
Matilde Taguchl.
The color guard of the Ameri-
can Legion Cathay Poet No. 185,
composed of Ed Chinn,Jimmy Naka-
gawa. Torn Aoyagi, and Sei Tana-
ka, posted the colors to open
the services. Tom Masamorl, ac-
companied by Peggy Yamato, led
in the singing of the national
anthem.
Rev. Y* Tamal of the Denver
Buddhist Church offered the open-
ing prayer. Sgt. Toru Aoyagi,
formerly of Hawaii and graduate
of the Fort Snelling MISLS
gave an address in Japanese on
behalf of the Nisei vets of
World War II. Major Isamu Oza-
moto, who served with distinc-
tion in the Medical Corps in
Europe during the past war, also
representing the Nisei veterans,
spoke in English. Dr.K.K. Mi-
yamoto, representing the Issei
of Denver, delivered a brief ad-
dress.
The California street Metho-
dist Church choir, led by Marjo-
rie Nakamura, sang the selection
"The American Prayer," The bene-
diction by Rev. George Uyemura
of CSMC concluded the program.
The Nisei Girl Scout Troop
No. 244 assisted in* ushering.
The girls who helped were Yoneko
Okuno, Keiko Matsuura, Carol Mi-
zoue, Eleanor Kusaka and Seiko
Kurokl. A good audience of many
Issei and Nisei packed the hall.
Min Yasul presided.
JACL NATIONAL
ELECTION
Masao Satow, National Execu-
tive Secretary of the JACL, an-
nounces that the election of Na-
tional officers will take place
in July by popular vote of the
entire membership.
All those who are official
JACL members of chapters in good
standing as of June 30, 1948,
shall be entitled to vote for
the 1948-1950 term.
Ballots will be sent to all
JACL members through the chapter
secretaries in July. Members
are to mark the ballots and re-
turn them to National Headquar-
ters,where they will be counted.
M/YAJJAtA APAOlim
Jfao V/c£ Pmy
Matilda Taguchl,3rd Vice Pre-
sident in charge of Publicity
and Public Relations, will leave
for Cincinnati, Ohio, In late
June, where her husband Dr.
James Taguchl will be resident
physician at the Cincinnati MedA
cal Center.
The cabinet approved the ap-
pointment of Ben Mlyahara to the
office of 3rd Vice President to
succeed Mrs. Taguchl.
Ben Mlyahara is a lab tech -
niclan at National Jewish Hospi-
tal. He was a reporter for the
Rocky Shimpo and was layout
bah for the Bulletin when it was
first organized.
GIRI5 URGED TO
ATTEND y CAMP
The JACL is cooperating with
the YWCA to encourage teen age
girls to attend the annual Y
Camp to be held at Lookout Mt.
The Nisei are playing a promi-
nent part in the camp program in
that Mrs. H. Kodani is camp
chairman and Rose Hanawa, Phi
Beta Kappa and Denver University
graduate, will be a counselor.
With such an outstanding Nisei
executive board for the Y camp
it is hoped that many Nisei
girls will attend. The camp
welcomes girls of any race
creed and nationality.
All JACL members with daugh-
ters aged 10 to 18 are urged to
send their children to tills in-
expensive, congenial and health-
ful camp.
There will be three separate
camp periods. The first will be
a one week period June 21 -28,
specially for girls from 15 to
18; however younger girls will
be welcomed in a unit of their
own during this period. Cost for
this period is |16.00. The
following two periods of 2 weeks
duration June 28 to July 12 and
July 12 to July 26 are for girls
from 10 to 18, and will cost
432.00.
Units of 16 to 20 girls of
similar ages and interests will
live together with their counse-
lors. Hiking, horseback riding,
nature study,handcraft, singing,
dramatics, photography, sports,
games,dancing, working and play-
ing, eating and sleeping in a
gorgeous natural setting Is of-
fered the Nisei teenage girl.
All those interested In this
camp are urged to contact Tomi
Numoto at the YWCA. For those
who are unable to afford camp
fees, campershlps are available.
Oo /o tfue Ucamp
** this summer
Chapter senosjup
TO flOOD VICTIMS
The Memorial Day flood at
Vanport, Oregon, drove approxi-
mately 300 persons of Japanese
descent from their homes. Two
Issei are still listed among the
missing.
Practically all Inhabitants
of the city were able to flee
with only the clothes on their
backs.
The Portland JACL immediately
organized a relief program. More
than 45000 was raised and dis-
tributed among the unfortunate
victims of Japanese descent. The
Portland chapter contributed
$1000 to the American Red Cross.
An appeal has been made to
the National JACL for any relief
aid that might be obtained. The
local JACL has made a contribu-
tion of |50 through its social
service committee.
Any individuals who wish to
help in this relief program may
send their donations to the Port-
land JACL, 1204 S.W. Third Ave-
nue, Portland 4, Oregon.
COMMUNITY PICNIC
A gigantic community picnic
for all Japanese in Denver is to
be held Sunday, June 20, at Wil-
liams Park near Bergen. The e-
vent is sponsored by the Denver
Japanese Press Club, Toyo Bunka
Kyokal,and the Denver Engel Kyo-
kal. It will become an annual
community affair.
The general chairman Is Dr. K.
K. Miyamoto, assisted by Thomas
T. Abe of the Colorado Times and
H. Muranoka of the Rocky Shimpo.
There are several large com-
mittees aiding the executive com-
mittee. S. Koyama and E. Kawa-
mura are co-chairmen of the Fi-
nance Committe; prizes, A.F. Ta-
kamine; reception, Z. Kanegaye.
^Cont. P. 3* Uol. l)
QOSC SHIPAMI7U
CROWNED QUEEN
Rose Shlramizu, beautiful 19
year old Nisei stenographer for
Hilb Manufacturing Company, was
crowned Miss. Denver JACL at the
Coronation Dance, held at the
Rainbow Ballroom on May 22nd by
the local JACL.
About 250 people were present
at the dance to see Senator Ar-
thur Brooks crown Rose Shlramizu
Her beautiful court was composed
of Aiko Fukuyama, Dorothy Mado-
koro, Chiz Okuno and Pearl Ku-
wabara.
Oh* s and Ah' s accompanied the
entrance of cute Roddy Kodama as
crown bearer and Curtis Arlma
and Carl Yorimoto as the pages.
5 feet 2 inches Rose Shlrami-
zu weighs 104 and hails from Sa-
linas, California. She was gra-
duated from Manual High School
In 1947 and likes to horseback
ride, bowl. Ice skate, dance,
swim, sew, knit and loves to
bake.
A large booster delegate is
contemplating to accompany Rose
to the National JACL Convention
in Salt Lake City in September
with intentions of bringing her
home as the National JACL queen.
Joryo jewelers donated a gold
loving cup which was presented
Rose together with setose attrac-
tive luggage, while the runner
ups received double strand
pearls.
GENERAL MEET- 25
The Denver JACL will hold an
Important general meeting on
Friday nite, June 25th at 8:00
p.m. at the Nlhonjln Kai hall.
Activities for the last half of
the year will be mapped out at
this meeting.
All JACL members are urgent-
ly requested to attend this
meeting so that the cabinet
will be able to know what acti-
vities the general membershl p
would like to hold.
A social period will follow
the meeting and refreshments
will be served.
PRE-REGISTER EOR
m convention
Pre-registration for the Na-
tional Convention to be held in
Salt Lake City, September 4-9,
is being accepted by Denvers
Convention Committee. The fee
Is 415.00 and includes official
badges, tickets and program.
Pre-registration will elimin-
ate the tediousness of doing it
at convention. An Advance Regis-
tration Desk is being arranged
by Chiyo Arlta of Salt Lake, Na-
tional Registration Chairman.
A varied program Is being
arranged by Salt Lake to in-
terest every delegate. There
will be golf, bowling and bridge
tournaments, picnics, tours and
roller skating. It is rumored
that Frank Hattorl, the last
national JACL Golf Champion,
will be on hand to defend his
crown.
An oratorical contest Is
planned with the national winner
to receive the Ben Masaoka Schol-
arship Award of 4200.00.


?A63 Z
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
JUNE 1948
Published monthly by the
Denver chapter of the Japa-
neee American Citizens Lea-
gue, 615 E & c Bldg., Den-
ver, Colo. Tel; CH 5990
Editor? Chiye Horluchl
Staff: Michi Ando, Rosa Hi-
gashi, Bill Hoaokawa, Shig
Imamura, Haml Kataglrl, Bess
Matsuda, George Kubo, George
Ohashl Margaret Shlbata,
and Hiroshi W&da.
Fotoa: WILSHIRE STUDIO ^
JACL HELPS NISEI
STRANDED IN
JAPAN
Roger Baldwin,dIrector of the
Aaerican Civil Liberties Union,
visited Japan and Korea last
year at the invitation of Gen-
eral MacArthur to survey civil
liberties in the occupied areas.
He also carried a mission frcm
the JACL to help the Nisei
stranded in Japan as a result of
the war.
With the help of a group of
Nisei and Caucasians, he formed
a local committee of the JACL,
Conferences were held with the
American Consul and the Japanese
Foreign Office regarding the ci-
tizenship status of the Nisei,
According to the estimates of
the United States Consul, there
are about 10,000 Nisei stranded
in Japan, About half have lost
their citizenship and can never
return, unless congress changes
the present laws. The tragic
thing is, that so many lost
their citizenship unintention-
ally.
There are four ways by which
an American can lose his citi-
zenships by serving in a foreign
array, voting in foreign elec-
tions, taking a Job open only to
nationals of a foreign country,
and becoming naturalized.
The Tokyo "Service Center is
the official headquarters of the
JACL in Japan, This center was
organized during the war to aid
Nisei escape the police and war
pressures? it now helps them get
back to the United States#
Most of the Nisei lost their
citizenship through naturaliza-
tion without their knowledge be-
cause in Japan mere registration
with a local official signed by
a personal seal makes one a na-
turalized citizen. The father
as head of the family had com-
plete authority to determine the
citizenship status of his child-
I
I
I
continued on page 3 column Jo
AMERICAN
MOTOR SALES
-INCORP-
Jfenny Zmac/a, amp.
Hudson? Dealer
CH2830 2358 MSH.Sr.
EDITORIAL
by Harry Sakata
JACLts greatest weakness, in
my opinion, lies in its member-
ship. At this writing the Den-
ver Chapter has only 196 members.
It should have at least 600. Of
the total, we are very proud to
have six non-Japanese members.
(Continued from Col. 2)
passed as 50,000. How much long-
er can we expect Mike to perform
miracles In Washington unless we
get him adequate support?
The strength of an organiza-
tion lies in its members# In
unity there Is strength, that Is
a universal law. It still a-
mazes me to knew that in the pre-
sent age, there is a national
organization of only 5000 being
heard, in Wadiington#
CRITIC'S
by 0 (I Hosofco**.
As far as memory goes, we've
had difficulty getting up of a
morning. That dislike for early
rising was thoroughly confirmed
during a period in the wholesale
produce markets when we had to
be at work by 3 a,a. a beastly
hour too late to stay up for and
too early to get up for.
During the previous conven-
tion year, this chapter was able
to boast the largest chapter in
the nation with slightly over
400 members.
Vhy has it slipped? This pro-
blem is not a local one. The
scale seems to be a national
trend, especially among the
large Japanese populace.
A charge has been made that
the JACL is falling. Yes, we
must face the facts. Why has it?
At the outbreak of the war
National JACL membership was
20,000, and during the war years
it dropped to an all time low of
2000, It's a miracle that it
survived. We must be grateful
to those unselfish leaders, who
had foresight and courage to
nurse the JACL through those
trying days.
It must put Mike Masaoka in a
very embarrassing spot when he
is asked by a congressman how
many members he represents.
As good a speaker as he is, I
bet he slurs 5.000, so it can be
(Continued Col, 3)
Nisei Elected To Dl
Uiotv Council Board
Roy M. Takeno, regional direc-
tor of the Tri-State JACL-ADC,
and Min Yasui, local Nisei Attor-
ney, were elected to the execu-
tive committee of the Denver U-
nity Council. Takeno was elect-
ed as member of the executive
committee, and Yasui was named
as 1st Vice President of the DUC,
The policy board considered
the advisability of recommending
a Nisei to the recently appoint-
ed Mayor's Commission on Human
Relations, but it was decided
that only if Japanese American
problems are ignored by the Com-
mission would representations be
made to the Mayor,
In regard to the Denver Tram-
way Co. proposed fare hike,the
executive secretary reported ihat
an open letter to idle Tramway
Co. and to the City Council of
Denver pointed out that although
members of minority groups con-
stituted the bulk of tram riders,
because of their lower economic
status, no equal employment op-
portunities were offered to mem-
bers of minority groups in pre-
ferred positions, particularly
with reference to Negroes, Span-
nish Americans, and Niseis. It
v/as recalled that DUG presenta-
tion of this matter at the time
of the renewal of the Public
Service Co. franchise resulted
in the hiring of members of mi-
nority groups in secretarial and
clerical positions. It was not-
ed that the Public Service Co.
now hires two Nisei girls in
clerical work, and one Chinese
Individually, our protest and
recommendation is worthless, but
did you ever stop to think what
a national body of 50,000 Ameri-
can citizens strong can do when
it speaks in concerteven the
most anti-legislator must listen.
Why has it been slipping? I
believe the answer, and to put
it in a simple way, is the sad
and known fact that most average
Nisei know very little of the
importance of JACL, if anything.
Many have wrong conceptions
others are skeptical and vague
and some even think it a crime
to Join# Many are prejudiced a-
gainst tne organization, for
slight reasons.
The whole answer, in a nut-
shell, is ignorance. JACL is in
competition with ignorance. To
overcome this, I believe, it
should have a national education-
al director and program, if it
is to progress to membership.
Even though the great majori-
ty of the nisei, who are the
principle beneficiaries of the
league's work refuse to join,the
organization goes on just the
same. There will always be some
parasitic Nisei, who benefit
from the program and activities
without contributing a single
thing.
Its membership fee is most
reasonable, costing less than a
penny a day, and even though one
can't actively engage in its ac-
tivities, every Nisei ought to
joinif for no other reason,
than to add prestige of the only
organization which steadfastly
and courageously battles for the
betterment of the Nisei and his
status in this country.
Join the JACL today! And why
not?
warn mtuse/m
ATF&UDOH TRAIN
Miss Maml Kataglrl, represent-
ing the Japanese American citi-
zens of Denver, spoke on Sunday,
May 25, during the ceremonies at
the Freedom Train in Denver,
Colorado. Other speakers In-
cluded Dr. Clarence F# Holmes,
active Negro leader, and Charles
Tafoya, representing the Spanish
Americans of this area.
Miss Kataglrl concluded her
stirring address, pledging lo-
yalty of Japanese Americans to
the heritage that is America,
and pleading for Americans by
all groups of citizens, with the
Japanese American Creed, Several
thousand people, gathered to
visit the freedom Train, heard
Miss Kataglrl*s speech. She was
accompanied to the speaker* s
plate form by Ruth Kawakami of
yuw 11P1C
ah w vAvrauw (gtf jt o ing
up of a summer morning isn* t
half bad. The air is crisp,
cool and envigoratlng, no matter
how hot the day before. As soon
as the sun Bets beyond the
Rockies the cooling off process
starts and It* s a pleasure to
feel the breeze sweeping down
off the canyons.
No, we still don't enjoy heal*
Ing the alarm go off, but It's
almost pleasant when compared to
the steaming, sweaty mornings
we've greeted with a bleary eye
In other parts of this fair land.
* *
Reports from Portland after
the v&nport disaster said flood-
ed-but Nisei rah into discrimi-
nation when they tramped the
streets looking for housing.
Several Nisei, these reports say,
identified themselves as flood
victims but were told frankly by
landlords that Orientals were
unwelooms.
The Portland JACL chapter has
been receiving a lot of praise
for the way It swung into motion
after the flood. Its assistance
to flood victims and the rapid
check it made of missing persons
no doubt averted unnecessary anx-
iety
Judging from food contribu-
tions, Vanport's Japanese flood
evacuees must be about as tired
of seeing shoyu as water. Two
eases of shoyu plus three odd
gallons of the soy sauce had
been received.
* *
F. A. Matsuyama, the Denver
physical culture expert, has
been quoted in print as saying
yawara is superior to judo.
S. Takahashl, who has been
teaching judo at Denver universi-
ty, Lowry Field, Fitzsimona Gen-
eral hospital and elsewhere,
contends he studied yawara and
then dropped it because judo was
better.
Both these strongmen are well
into middle age but have kept
themselves in shape. Takahashl
says he thinks he*s even better
at. Judo than when he was younger
simply because he*e learned bet-
ter Judgment and more trloks.
It's be a match well worth
seeing if some promoter could
persuade these two exponents of
self defense to tangle on the
mat for a local charity.
[George's Motoi
_ £ERYiC£

(/wvwuoWUj STUDIO aKrrfl p/amonds -jewelry
ARTISTRY IN ADVERTI5IN^" gfjgip^/7\k^ wfTC* tetoW**
1330*20$ St. KE4025 1203 NINETEENTH ST. DENVER. COLO.


JUNE 1946
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
PAGE 3
tfflALlffiYM
Seen Dunking the fem1s heads
at a Steak Fry at Eldorado
Springs was KENNY IKAMURAt Just
because he wab on the champion
AAU Swimming Team, hes trying
to show offll
Ve take a moment out of the
frivolous things in life to ex-
press our sympathy to DOROTHY
MIYAHARA anti NAOMI INAI, who
were injured while riding horses.
Wonder why SUE HARUYAMA is
humming "Oh Johnny, Oh Johnny
heaven's above". Could it be
that a certain party came into
existence.
Less pigeon talk from the
"Kanaka" boys in Denver, since
Dick Aoyagi, Wally and Charlie
Nakamura left for Hawaii for a
vacation.
Seen working at Scratchy1s
fresh vegetable stand is beauti-
ful KIKU TAJIRIthe Manual Prom
Queen. They say she really
draws the business.
Have ya heard JIRO SHOJI sing?
Better stick to the piano, butchj
A surprise bridal shower was
given in honor of AIKO KUWABARA
at the home of Mrs* Yuri Tajima.
Other Nu Chi Delta members that
attended were; SUE HARUYAKA,
DOROTHY MIYAHARA, NAOMI INAI,
RUTH KAWAKAMI, MAKI KATAGIRI,
MARY HIRA1-U, MASA KURODA, PEARL
KUWABARA.
IKUYO MATSUMOTO and JACK HATA,
KIYO ABE and KAZ KAKDA, and SHIZU-
KO USHIJIMA and HENRY INOUYE are
now one.
Church MusicaLe
The California Street Method-
ist Church Choir is presenting
a musicale at the church June 18.
The purpose is to raise a fund,
to send young people to the
Northern California Young Peo-
ples Christian Conference to be
Held at Lake Tahoe and other sum-
mer conferences.
The program will include a
variety of sacred, secular and
popular songs. Soloists are Tom
Masamori and Albert Makata. The
male quartet is composed of Bill
Oba, Ben Matoba, Tom Masamori,
and Joe Ariki.
The choir is directed by
Marjorie Nakamura and the accom-
panist is Peggy Yamato* Members
of the choir are; Alice Amano,
Carol Tanaka, Mary 0,}i, Sachi
Kitsutaka, Taiko Furukawa, Betty
Yajnato, Suzanne Inai, Fuzzy Ya-
euda, Unis Kawakami, Helen Naka-
mura, Yasuko Furukawa,. Kenj i To-
yama, Willie Mikuni, Tom Masamo-
ri, Joe Ariki, Ben Matoba, Bill
Oba, Fred Mikuni, Tsune Kosuge
and Paul Hoshiko.
(Cont. from P. 1, Col. 3)
The program will be in charge
of jiro Tani; transportation,
George Kuramoto; first aid, Dr.
N. Kunitomo; Grounds, 1. Morleht-
tan and the Nisei Boy Scouts,
and the Emergency Committee,
Tosh Ando and Min Yasul.
MONTHLY ADVERTISING RATES
Professional Listings $1.50
3/4" Business Ads. ... 2.50
2 Business Ads. ... 3*50
2 Double-column Ads. . 5.00
NAKAYAMA JEWELRY
* -^i-CloAkpuieb^ *
1920 JLflpimerSf. MA7043
flm.WO/MJL USTINf -
* DENTISTS
T. ITO, DDS ...... 8680
830 18th Street
Y. ITO, DDS...........KB 1077
830 18th Street
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS .TA 6961
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
K. K. MIYAMOTO, DDS *TA 4307
1952 Larimer Street
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS .TA 7498
200 Interstate Trust Bldg.
JLAWYFF^S -
TOSHIO ANDO
615 E. & C. Bldg....CH 7987
Branch Office:
1232 20th Street .AL 3500
MINORU YASUI.........CH 798V
615 E. & C Bldg.
INSURANCE
SHIG IMAMURA.............GL 3133
1238 20th Street
JOHNNY INOUYE............CH 7614
MITSUO KANEKO............GR 5000
1232 20th Street .AL 3500
HENRY KIMURA.............AL 9900
1232 20th Street .AL 3500
THE QUEEN AND HER ESCORT-The cameraman caught the smiling face of
Oueen Rose Shlramizu as she was led to the platform to be introduced
at the Coronation dance. Her escort is George Inai. Some of those
seen in the background are Helen Nakaehima, Louise Nagata, Ritzl Ya-
nagi, Hide Noda, Harry Nakagawa, Amy Salto & Mr. A Mrs. Jun Oya.
JINZO NODA...............
2829 Champa.............MA 8595
KENNETH T. SATO .... .MA 1644
1238 20th Street
Mrs. E. Troelsch, head of
Colorado Women's College home
eoonomlcs department, was the
guest speaker at the June meet-
ing of the Nisei Mother's Club.
She disoussed food values and
menu planning.
The new executive committee
elected to serve from July in-
dues Sum! Imatani, Michl Tera-
saki, Jean Fujimoto, Helen Yama-
moto, jean Jitsuda and Teuyako
Takata.
Flans are now being made for
a family picnic and a tea to
honor new members during the
summer months.
Cne/im mm*
To honor Mrs. Bernice Ohashi,
grand award winner of the hair
styling contest of the Associ-
ated Beauticians Convention held
in Denver recently, the Corne-
lians held a dinner at Woodlavn
on Wednesday, June 9.
New offloers introduced were
Mrs. May Furuta, president; Mrs.
Frances Salto, vice president;
Mrs. Rose Fujlsakl, secretary ;
and Mrs. Yosh Miyawaki, treasur-
er. About 28 members and guests
attended.
The Cornelians will have its
next regular meeting in Septem-
ber.
DENVER JACL MEMBERSHIP
Memberships In the Denver
JACL are as follows:
Individual membership, $3.50
Membership for couples . 5.00
Pacific Citizen, member. 2.50
P.C., non-member .... 3.50
Subscription to the Denver
JACL Bulletin, only, until the
end of every year, to Dec. 31,
without membership, is $1.00
(Cont. from P. 2, Col. l)
ren up to 30 years of age. Ap-
plications for food and Jobs in
wartime Japan carried with them
a declaration of Japanese citi-
zenship. Hundreds of American
born boys and girls have protest-
ed what their fathers have done.
The JACL Chapter in Tokyo has
been advised to have these
stranded Nisei bring suits in
the Japanese courts to annul the
acts of their fathers. Where the
courts act favorably, the United
States will recognize citizen-
ship and they can come home.
OPTOMETRIST'
GEORGE J. KUBO, O.D. .CH 7813
1240 20th Street
BEN T. MATOBA......KE 1941
436 26th Street
P-HYSICIAN and SURGEONS
CHARLES FUJISAKI, MD. ,GR 8822
3301 Zuni Street
The JACL-ADC has enlisted the
servioes of A. L. Wirin of L os
Angeles to help the strandees in
Japan.
According to the Pacific Citi-
zen Mr. Wirin has filed a number
of court cases In Los Angelss on
behalf of American bom persons
who lost their citizenship.
The recently organized young
adult group at the Denver Bud-
dhist Church is called Sangha.
They are planning a steak fry to
climax their membership drive.
Outdoor movies will be shown by
Tom Yabu.
Members of the cabinet for
the coming year are: President*
Sto Tani, 1st V.P., Harry Yanari,
2nd V.P,, Mrs. Tosh Nakamura,
3rd V.P,, Sam Yoshikawa, 4th V.P.
Mrs. Sam Yoshikawa, Rec Sec.
Mary Miyazawa, Cor. Sec., Tetsu-
ko Toda, Treasurer, Harry Koto-
yama, and Auditor, Frank Takaha-
shi.
cMaMAfkk FLOWER SHOP
DENVER'S ecoNOMiCAC FlQRtSr

THOS. K. KOBAYASHI, MD. ,KE 4590
1227 27th Street
ISAMU 0ZAM0T0, MD .TA 1596
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
HOWARD SUENAGA, MD. .TA 2642
830 18th Street
M. GEORGE TAKENO, MD. .TA 0783
830 18th Street
Mr UBA, D.O.
1230 21st Street *MA 3743
aTUDIO
IPlituidult ^otbcj/iophy
FLORENCE BLOQ.
830-184 Si TA 3697


Charming SUMI TAKH3T0 has don-
ned a nurse's uniform. She's
taking pulses in the office of
DR. GEORGE TAKENO, her "brother-
in-law.
Seen Saturday night dancing
at Lakeside recently were HELEN
and JOHNNY NAKASHIMA, another
cute twosome was PEARL KUWABARA
and TOM KURATANI.
The other night we strolled
into the now-being-redecorated,
Cathay Post, and learned to our
great dismay that the Teddy Ted-
dy handsome BILL CHIN was marry-
ing EvELYN LOWE of Pasadena in
that city, so we strolled to the
"bar to drown our sorrows and ran
into the American Potato bowlers
JOHNNY OKIZAKI and JIMMY HANAMU-
RA celebrating a Tictory with
JIMMY NAKAGAWA and SEI TANAKA.
ED CHIN lamenting his bache-
lorhood offered himself matrimo-
nially aTailable for $10,000.00.
Applicants please send in appli-
cations to the post in care of
ED. Only those with cash need
apply.
GOON SAKAGUCHI, HARRY SHIBA0,
NORMAN SHIBATA and LOUIE JAY at-
tended the American Legion De-
partmental ConTention in Durango.
BEA MAYEDA was in North
Platte, Nebraska for a three
weeks Tacation. HELEN UKEZAWA
flew to Los Angeles.
DR. WATARU SUTOV, pediatri-
cian from Los Angeles, is here
in town studying child research
at Colorado General. He leaTes
in the near future for Japan to
work among the atom bomb Tictims.
The stork left a baby boy in
the homes of BILL HOSOKAV/A and
HIKE KITANO.
KAZ SAKAMOTO tells us he has
a "full time" job now. Hell be
behind the fish counter at Gra-
nada Pish.
AMY MIURA and HARUKO KOBAYA-
SHI were having great fun at
Elitch's one night last week co-
llecting coupons at the various
concessions. They came out with
two water pitchers.
The lure of Californy is
still great. Those heading west
to make their homes are the
CHARLES IVASUITAS, SHIKPEI MIYA-
KES-, CHARLES SUYEISHIS and H. H.
KODAN1S,
Twosomes seen at the Corona-
tion Dance were, MOLLIE SHIRAI-
SHI and HENRY KUNUGI, who were
one of the first couples to ar-
rive? PETE MIYAHARA with the
very poised PEARL KUWABARA? HAR-
RY SAKATA looked so proud of
FLORENCE YAMADA? GENJI YAMAMOTO
was cutting up with TERRY KARADA.
RUPERT ARAI and AIKO FUKAYAMA
were the cutest couple, while
MABEL SHIBAO was with GOON SAKA-
GUCHI, and very much in demand
by the Brighton stags, JIMMY TO-
CHIHARA-, STU and NOBEL TASHIRO
EMI KATAGIRI was with swelli-
gent dancer PAUL USHIYAMA. FRANK
TAMURA was with charming YUKI
TANAKA? and GLADYS and OSKI TA-
NIWAKI made a welcomed appear-
ance at the dance.
MRS. GEORGE KUBO was honored
at a stork shower on June 29
given by CHIYO SATO and MRS.
TOSH ANDO at the latter's home.
Guests included,JEAN FUJIMOTO,
LILLIAN TERASAKIi FLORA FUJIKAWA,
BESSIE KATSUDA-, MITCHIE TERASAFIj
SUMI IMATANI > BEA MAYEDA j ROSE
FUJI SAKI *, ATSU I TO* KAY IMAMURAj
HISAKO KIMURAj SUE SHIC-EOj CLAPA
TAKAHASHI, TSURU HIRAMI -9 SALLY
SAKAMOTO and JANE KUTSUKA.
Infanticipating; the TERRY
TAKAMINES, KAZ SAKAMOTOS*, TOSHIO
ANDOS, KEN OSAJDiAS, JACK FUJIS
and GEORGE HADAS.
GR0DPDP fiihand'Pwi
1919 Lawrence. 5t. KEqs+one 598?
fflanchu &
GRILL CHOP SUEV 7
1956 Larimer ft TAbor 9576
Smilino-
Pages
AND
Bored Ceow
Bearer
Left to right-
Page Curtis Arima, 9
year old son of Mr.and
Mrs. Clarence Arima;
Crown Bearer Roddy Ko-
dama, 6 year old son
of Hr. & Mrs. Kody Ko-
dama; and Page Carl
Yorimoto, 9 year old
son of Mr. and Mrs.
Arthur Yorimoto are
seen in the costumes
they appeared in at
the Coronation Dance.
by Hiroshi Wada
After five v/eeks of play in
the current NCNBL baseball lea-
gue the hard-hitting Denver Bus-
seis and the Littleton AC club
are leading in the American and
National circuits respectively.
Since dropping their opener,
a 15 inning 10-9 to Brighton,
the local Busseis displaying
power at the plate simultaneous-
ly with the superb mound perform-
ance of Southpaw Hideo Hirose
are currently riding on the
crest of a four-game winning
streak. Vielders of the thunder-
ing Templar bats are George Yama-
guchi, Frank Kamibayashi, Mas
Yoshimura and Tom Tsunoda. To
date Tosh Nakamura1 s high-riding
crew have beaten Ft. Lupton 9-3,
Greeley 15-1, Ault 20-10 and the
Denver Merchants 15-7 to take
command of the American loop pen-
nant fight at this point.
The ever-dangerous Merchants,
troubled with their limited
pitching staff, are cornered in
second place and by no means can
be counted out of the running.
(Continued next column)
Scrambled in a four-way tie are
Brighton, Ft. Lupton, Greeleyand
Ault, all capable of upsetting
the present pattern.
In the National League a dog-
fight is brewing between the lea-
gue leading and undefeated Lit-
tleton Ac and the high-scoring
Denver Nisei AC. Littleton is
pacing the race with consecutive
wins over DNAC (ll-lu), Ft. Mor-
gan (7-6), Greeley (17-15) and
Brighton mainly on the great
chucking of Nob Ito.
Since their opening loss to
the league leaders the Denver
Nisei AC, scoring 96 runs for an
unheard of record, have walloped
Platteville, Longmont, Brighton,
and Ft. Morgan. The aforemen-
tioned two clubs will eross bats
on Aug. 22 which may turn out to
be the championship battle.
Grouped accordingly behind
the leaders are Platteville, Ft.
Morgan, Longmont, Greeley and
Brighton.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Von Lost
BUSSEIS 4 1
MERCHANTS. 3 2
BRIGHTON 2 3
FT. LUPTON 2 3
GREELEY 2 3
AULT 2 3
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Von Lost
LITTLETON AC 4 0
DENVER NISEI AC 4 1
PLATTE VLuLE 2
FI. riUKixAN 2 3
LONGMONT 1 3
GKKEufii 1 3
J3KJ.GHTON X 3
MILE* HI
GOLF TOURNAMENT
M. Matsumoto and Dr. T. Maye-
da are tied for the first half
of the tournament for the
Charles Iwashita trophy of the
Mile-High Golf Club played at
the Vellshire course. Ihe sec-
ond round will be at the Case
Golf Course.
The following are the scores*
Gross Handicap Net
Matsumoto 82 11 71
Mayeda 84 13 71
Iwashita 82 10 72
Fujisaki 91 19 72
Nakayama 91 19 72
Fujimoto 94 21 73
RELIABLE.
ffiont
TA. 0332
TA. 92*7
PRESCRIPTIONS
2700 Larimer $t.
Return postage guaranteed
THE DENVER BULLETIN
The Denveir Chapter JACL
615 E & C Building
Denver 2, Colorado
seo. 562, P. L. & R.