Citation
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 3, Number 8

Material Information

Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 3, Number 8
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
15

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Notes

General Note:
Misprinted as Number 7

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
VOLUME III, NUMBER SEVEN
DENVER COLORADO
August 1948
Photo by "K" Yokouchi
ON THE SPEAKERS PLATFORMIn the
background Senator Ed C. Johnson,
Congressman John Carroll and
Tosh Nakamura*
BUDDHIST DIDKAKS
MIW CHURCH
The dedication of the Tri-
State Buddhist Church and the
Feast of the Obon were celebrat-
ed by hundreds of Buddhists of
Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska,
recently.
Dedication and Obon services
were held by Rev. Y, Tamal and
Rev. S, Tsunoda. The services
were open to the public and many
interested Caucasians were seen
in the audience.
In the evening following the
Obon service, the Obon Odorl was
performed in the street in front
of the new church. The dancers
were in colorful kimono and yuka-
ta with young and old, men and
women participating.
During the Intermission many
city and state dignataries were
introduced to the hundreds of
spectators and dancers by Tosh
Nakamura, president of the Tri-
State Young Buddhist League.
Among them Were Senator Ed.C,
Johnson and Congressman John
Carroll and representatives from
the local Fire and police Depart-
ment,
CARE PACKAGE
AVAILABLE HERE
Through an arrangement made
by CARE (Cooperative of American
Remittances in Europe), for ten
dollars a food package of twenty-
nine pounds will be delivered to
any individual or institution
you name in japan, Korea, or Oki-
nawa.
Delivery is prompt because
CARE has already shipped to Yo-
kohama, 16,000 packages. These
packages are retained in ware-
houses in key cities and upon
receipt of an order by CARE, the
orders are filled from the ware-
houses*
Delivery is guaranteed be-
cause the received must sign on
receipt of a package, and the
receipt is sent to the sender*
The $10.00 CARE package is
economical* CARE purchases food
products direct from the manu-
facturer in bulk purchases. CARE
is a non-profit organization. On
the basis of careful study, each
package contains the maximum
amount o.f calories, and each
package contains foodstuffs
suitable to its region.
The great advantage of CARE
is that it saves shopping, pack-
aging and mailing.
Many local stores are fea-
turing CARE packages. Order
blanks may be secured at Granada
Fish Market or at the JACL of-
fice where additional informa-
tion may be obtained*
LOCAL ISSEI TO
ATTEND CONVENTION
From the Denver Area, Mr. Z.
Kanegaye and Mr. T. Kako, chair-
man and vice chairman, respec-
tively of the Tri-State Kika
Klsel Domel will attend the Na-
tional JACL Convention in Salt
Lake City.
This will be the first all-
Issei national gathering held in
the country since the war. All
Isseis are urged to attend from
this area in order to make known
their wishes and suggestions so
that definite recommendations
could be made to the JACL-ADC in
their future work.
Roy M. Takeno, local Regional
Representative, indicated that
all Isseis interested and con-
cerned with the problems of the
Japanese in America were cordial-
ly invited to the 10th Biennial
National JACL Convention in Salt
Lake City.
A special meeting for the Is-
seis and members of the Kika Ki-
sei Dome! will be held on Sept.
9, in connection with the JACL-
ADC planning committee.
Important problems concern-
ing the iseei, with particular
reference to the naturalization
bill and the evacuation claims
law, will be discussed at that
meeting, Takeno stated.
ORATORICAL COHTBST
CANCtUED
The oratorical contest sched-
uled for August 27th, under the
chairmanship of Doug Taguchi was
cancelled, due to the lack of
contestants.
It is regretable that there
were no responses, for the win-
ner of the Denver Contest would
have been sent to Salt Lake City
with full expenses paid,- and
there, he would have the oppor-
tunity to vie for the $200.00
Ben Masaoka Scholarship.
One lone response came In
from a sixteen year old high
school senior. But inasmuch as
the National Rules state that a
contestant must be a bonafide
JACL member, and as JACL member-
ships are open to all those over
eighteen, this candidate was not
eligible.
for"conference
The non-violent solution of
social problems will be the em-
phasis of the National Confer-
ence of the Fellowship of Recon-
ciliation (FOR), a world-wide
pacifist organization, to be
held at Association Camp, Estes
Park, Tuesday, August 31 through
Sunday, September 5*
Speakers will include George
Rouser, National Executive Sec-
retary of the Congress of Racial
Equality (CORE), who will lead a
daily seminar on "Pacifism and
Direct Action11. Carle Whitehead,
Denver civil rights attorney,
will lead a seminar on "Pacifism
and Civil Liberties". Mr* White-
head will be remembered for his
successful defense of the mixed
Negro and white groups who were
refused first-floor seating in
the Broadway and Denham theaters
a few years ago.
Other seminar leaders are
Dean Paul Roberts of St. John's
(Cont. Page 2, Col, 3)
GEO tlATSUMONJt
ElllS VACANCY
The appointment of George M&-
tsumonji to the vacancy of First
Vice Presidency of the Denver
JACL Chapter created by Shig
Imamura*s departure to California
was approved by the cabinet at
its August meeting.
The cabinet moved that a vote
of thanks be extended to Mr. Ima-
mura for his fine work in behalf
of the Chapter.
Mr* Matsumonji, a native of
Colorado, is an active member of
the Nisei Orchestra, the star-
dusters; he and his charming
wife, May, operate a trailer
camp near Ft* Logan; he is pre-
sently employed as a buyer for
Crews Produce Company* An accom-
plished sportsman, he keeps very
active the year around between
golfing and skiing*
Matsuo a amp Furuta
Official Delegates
At the August meeting of the
Denver JACL Cabinet, it was
voted that Bessie Matsuda be the
official delegate to the Tenth
Biennial Convention in Salt Lake
city to replace Shig Imamura,
who recently returned to Cali-
fornia
George Furuta is the other
official delegate, and it was
voted at the same time to for-
ward to each delegate and to
Rose Shiramlzu, queen finalist,
the sum of $50.00 each for their
expenses to Salt Lake. In order
to clarify the $50.00 expense,
the chapter figured the disburse-
ment as follows:
Registration $15.00
Hotel 5 days @
$4.00 per day 20.00
Transportation 10.00
Miscellaneous 5.00
$50.00
DENVER'S
QUEEN CANDIDATE
MISS ROSE NAMIYE SHIRAMIZU
She is 5 ft. 2 in. tall, 20
years old, and weighs 104 lbs.
Miss Shiramlzu is formerly from
Salinas, California. Things she
likes to do bowl, ice skate,
swim and dance.
GENERAL MEETING
OCTOBER 1-VWCA
At the August Cabinet meeting
of the Denver Chapter JACL it
was voted that a general meeting
be held on Friday, October 1, at
the Y.W.C.A.
The meeting will start with a
potluck supper at 6:30, which
will be arranged by Mrs* Mitchle
Terasaki and her committee. The
supper will be followed by a
general meeting at which time
Ben Miyahara and Tosh Ando will
present latest information on
the political situation*
Furthermore, arrangements are
now being made to have Represen-
tative John C&roll and Senator
Ed Johnson and other public offi-
cials attend this meeting-
The official delegates will
present a complete report on the
matters brought up at the Nation#
al Tenth Biennial JACL Conven-
tion in Salt Lake City.
The chapter is making arrange-
ments to secure the films that
will be taken at the Convention
to be shown, at this meeting.
This meeting will be a pop
off to the grand fall activities
the chapter has planned for the
fall and winter season and every
member is urgently requested to
attend*
CHAPTER PICNIC
Dr. Mike Uba announced at the
August Cabinet meeting that the
annual Chapter picnic will be
held on Sunday, September 19th
from 11:00 a.rn.
Dr. Uba and Frank Tamura, co-
chairmen, will announce complete
committee chairmen and the pic-
nic site within the next few d^s
in the local language newspapers.
CHAPTER WELL
REPRESENTED
The Denver Chapter is being
well represented at the Tenth
Biennial JACL National Conven-
tion. To date twenty-seven mem-
bers have pre-reglstered.
First carload to leave Denver
will compose of Dr. N. Kunltomo,
Betty Lou Kunltomo, and Helen
Komoto, who will take along Rose
Shiramlzu, leaving Friday Sept*
3rd at 5:00 a.m., so that Rose
can be in Salt Lake City that
evening to take part in a tele-
vision program with the other
queen finalists. Later she will
attend a tea where preliminary
judging will take place.
Rosa and Takaehi Mayeda will
leave on Friday and will be tak-
ing along Sam Kawanlshl.
Friday evening George Furuta
and George Masunaga will load
their cars with the following:
Haru Tanaka, Helen Tanaka, Mami
Kataglrl, Bessie Matsuda, Mitsue
Sugano, George Hagai, Harr'- Sa-
kata and Tosh Ando.
Early Labor Day morning, sev-
eral Denver golfers will embark
for salt lake City by car to
play in the National JACL golf
Tournament to be held on Sept.
7th and 8th at the Bonneville
Golf Course.
Those leaving on Labor Day
are: Hank Imada, N. Sugimoto,
Frank Torlzawa, Fred Aoki, Doug
Mizukaml, and Kody Kodama.
Many other young people are
making plans to attend over the
weekend*


MSB B
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
August 1948
Published monthly by the
Denver chapter of the Japa-
nese American Citizens Lea-
gue, 1934 Curtis Street Den-
ver, Colo. Tel: CH 5990
Editor: Chlye Horluchi
Staff: Michi Ando, Rosa Hi-
gashi, Bill Hosokawa, Shig
Imamura, Maml Kataglri, Bees
Matsuda, George Kubo, George
Ohaehi Margaret Shibata,
and Hiroshi Wada.
Fotos: WILSHXRE STUDIO J
^
Weve had an awful time get-
ting the BULLETIN out this month.
So many of our colu nists are on
vacation, so with a skeleton
crew of writers, who typed and
made up the paper, too, and our
usual generous friends, who pro-
vided us with pictures, we eked
out this issue,
George Kubo had to give up a
Sunday afternoon of golf to ink
in our heads.
Dorothy Madokoro, who is so
generous of her time and does
our typing for us, was busy mo-
ving into her new home.
Bill Hosokawa's column, the
backbone of this paper, will be
.missed this oionth, as will Rosa
Mayeda's snappy cartoons.
Mami Kataglri has been at the
Citizenship Training Encampment
in New York the past month, so
her articles have been. sorely
missed*
* *
Much enthusiasm and support
of the One Thousand $25*00 Club
seemed evident in Denver when
Mas Satow, National Executive
Secretary, was in Denver, which
pleased him very much.
With a national membership of
6000, you can well figure, that
the 50^ that goes to National
from each local membership
amounts to only $300 avail-
able for national activities.
The Thousand $25*00 Club is
the National JACL's solution to
the problem of direct financial
support from the Niseis, who in
turn are the direct benefactors.
If a thousand JACL members
throughout the nation would sub-
scribe to the Thousand $25*00
Club, $25,000*00 would be real-
ized to maintain National JACL
activities.
This would be done with the
minimum of drain on all those
interested in JACL.
At present there are only
(Next Column)
I
I
I
AMERICAN
MOTOR SALES
-INCORR-
Jffenr'y Jmac/ct, prp.
Hudson y Dealer
CH.2830 2358 WASH.ST.
EDITORIAL
Mike Masaoka made some very
interesting observations on his
recent trip to Denver,
One, which left a very strong
impression on me, was the remark
"The Issel are more interested
in the legislative program of
the JACL-ADC than the Nisei."
Unconsciously, I began to look
around the room and noticed that
the Issel far outnumbered the
Nisei present. The Issel in
this region, I am told, have
given more financially, too, tc
support this legislative program.
Granted, the Issel will re-
ceive more by the passage of all
this legislation, it does not
mean that the Nisei can afford
to be smug and stand aside.
It is our fight, too, to see
that our parents can become nat-
uralized citizens. Discrimina-
tion in this manner means dis-
crimination against us, too, A
good example is the escheat
cases against several Nisei pro-
perty owners in California, For-
tunately, because of a favorable
Supreme Court decision these
were dropped.
Four actual bills affecting
Japanese and Japanese- Americans
were passed in the last CongresB.
"The Evacuation Claims Bill is
the only part of the Presidents
Civil Rights Report which has
been passed by Congress", de-
clared Masaoka. When one begins
to think of all the recommend-
ations included in the Presi-
dents Report, this triumph for
the JACL-ADC is even more signi-
ficant.
Now, that the Evacuation
Claims Bills is a reality, the
headaches beginthe filing and
processing of them. The Conven-
tion delegates will have to de-
termine the part the JACL will
take in this problem.
seven Thousand-$25.00 Club mem-
bers in Denver. They are: Mas
Takata, Hits Kaneko, Harry Saka-
ta, Jimmy Imatanl, Chili Fujisa-
kl, and George Masunaga. We are
very proud of these people, and
it is our hope that others in
Denver will join.
KATAGIRI RETURNS
FROM NEW YORK
"One of the most, worthwhile
experiences Ive ever had, re-
ported Mami Kataglri to Bessie
Matsuda, president Of the local
Chapter, in recounting her at-
tendance at the third annual
Citizenship Encampment at the
Fleldston School in Rlverdale,
New York.
Awarded a scholarship to the
encampment, June 28 to August 7,
Miss Kataglri's trip was sponsor-
ed by the Denver Chapter. Other
Nisei at the encampment were Sho
Maruyama, a student at Antioch
College and Helen Tashlro of Chi-
cago.
The lectures and discussions
were augmented by field trips.
Miss Kataglri and about 125
Miss Kataglri and about 125
other young people at the encamp-
ment thus visited United Nations
Headquarters at Lake Succese
where they heard a lecture given
by Dr. Huh shlh from China, a
member of the Secretariat.
They also attended a dinner
given by Mrs. Franklin D. Roose-
velt at her Hyde Park residence.
They looked in at one of the
hearings conducted in Washington,
D.C. by the House Un- American
Activities Committee, Miss Eli-
zabeth T* Bentley, star witness,
was giving her now-publicized
testimony in connection with the
Communist spy hunt.
(Cont. from Page 1)
Cathedral; Glenn Smiley, South-
west For Secretary; and A. J.
Muste, National Executive Secre-
tary of the F.O.R.
Another Interesting speaker
will be phllip Morrison, Profes-
sor of Physics, Cornell Univer*
slty and head of the mission
sent to study effects of the
atomic bombing of Hiroshima and
Nagasaki.
Elver A. Barker, Executive
Secretary of the Denver For has
extended a cordial invitation to
all interested persons to attend
all or any part of the Confer-
ence.
Book Review
AMERICANS
F ROM JAPAN
B/tAontt Sunn
reviewed by
SHYOKO HIRkGA
A warm, human story from the
time Marco Polo dictated his
travels in a Genoa Jail until
the evacuees returned to the
West Coast and fared problems is
the span of time covered in this
book*
The understanding author re-
lates the hardships the Issel
faced in integrating into commu-
nity life, the barriers erected
against the Japanese Americans
and how the Nisei proved their
Americanism in this stirring
drama of "Americans from Japan."
Many customs that we, as Ni-
sei, do not understand are ex-
plained by Mr. Smith. His heart-
warming story reminds us of our
Issel parents' contributions to
the land of their choice, Ameri-
ca. After reading this book,
one feels that he understands
his parents and the Issel, in
general, better.
We learn of great Issel men
besides Noguchi and Dr. Takamlne
who have been geniuses in their
respective fields. Prof. Ichi-
hashl of Stanford, Yasuo Matsul,
a New York architect and others,
with whom we have not been famil-
iar, have made great contribu-
tions to the country they had
loved and adopted.
The story of the 442nd combat
Team cannot be read and forgot-
ten. Even a race-baiter will be
emotionally stirred by the story
of the heroic exploits of the
Nisei soldiers.
The evacuation, and the prob-
lems faced by the evacuees in
concentration camps; the dilemma
to choose between renunciation
of one* s American citizenship
and separating from his family
is fully explained in the story
written by Tom Haratani.
The very worthwhile virtues
the Nisei have learned from the
Japanese Alien parents are
(Cont. Page 3, Col. 1)
DENVER JACL MEMBERSHIP
Memberships In the Denver
JACL are as follows:
Individual membership. $3.50
Membership for couples . 5.00
Pacific Citizen, member. 2.50
P.C., non-member .... 3.50
Subscription to the Denver
JACL Bulletin, only, until the
end of every year, to Dec. 31,
without membership, is $1.00
MONTHLY ADVERTISING RATES
Professional Listings . . $1.50
3/4" Business Ads. . . 2.50
2 Business Ads. . 3.50
2 Double-column Ads. . 5.00


DIAMONDS JEWELRY
MfrrCH REPAWN*
NINETEENTH ST. DENVER.COW.


August 1946
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
PAGE 3
Note that GEORGE MASUNAGA la
again squiring about luscious
DOTY MADOKORO. Incidentally,
MAS pulled la the other nlte
from flehlng with Tory wet pants
"1 fell in*, he claims.
rAUL USHIYAUA, the guy what
dances like what all we women
want our guys should dance like
is batching up with KEN IMAMURA,
another dream bait.
Noted RUPE ARAI and GKNJI YA-
MAMOTO having a high time at the
Bussei Victory Hop* RUTS'S state
of Melancholia stems from one
mighty cute gal leaving for Ja-
pan, we'll betcha.
Noted SMI KATAGIRI sporting a
black eye--what did the other
party look like, SMI?
Down Central City way to see
"The Play's the Thing* and do-
nate to the hamlet*e slots were:
EMI KATAGIRI-JOHNNY CHIKUMA, HE-
LEN TANAKA-HARRY KURACHI, PRANK
TARAWA- YAS SAKAGUCHI, and STU
TASHIRO-BES MATSUDA.
Since GOON SAKAGUCHI*s got
his new convertible, he's been
too busy to notice poor lil us*
uns, but atill we wait and hope
that one fine day he'll bust
down and take us for a spin.
Saw comely KIYO OKAMOTO of
Chicago being met by KOD? and
RODDY KODAMA at the airport* In-
cidentally TERRY KODAMA came
back with enthusiastic reports
from California, after a month's
stay. Ve hope we don't lose the
KODAMAS to California.
CHIYO SATO, popular local gal
flew to her home in Sacramento
for a reunion with her family*
SHO and MAS SATO, her brother *n
sister-in-law, had flown in from
Japan. MAS, See MASAKO JUKAXAMA
flew right into Denver to visit
her family* Her charming sister
AIKO left for Japan in the mean-
time to take on Civil Service
duties.
We've seen lovely ROSE SHIRA-
MlZU's picture inidiich she wears
a bathing suit. When it oomes
to whistles* she'll take second
place to none. We're rooting
for you to capture the JACL
crown, ROSS!
Ran into IRIS WATANABE, r*.
cently, looking her lovely self*
She's been getting ribbed to
death over the naming of the YA-
SUI baby, IRIS AYAMB, which is
her name also*
if you ever run into HARRY
SHIBAO, ask him to tell you that
fantastic tale he weaves about
the big trout that got away. The
way he puts it, you can almost
believe the guy.
JEAN FUJIMOTO underwent an
appendectomy at Mercy Hospital
on August 25*
An the August 16th edition of
LIRE appear shots taken at Red
Rocks by HICKY IWASAKI, BULLETIN
staff photographer, and JOHN
FLOREA. Incidentally, saw HICKY
sporting around a new red Ford
sddanette, and he's still got
his Buick, too, gals.
MITSUE SUGANO, operating
nurse and instructor at St .Lukes
Hospital is spending a month
with her parentb in Rock Springs*
Heard tell that the Century
Music Company is looking for a
reliable nisei girl; last month
LIPS was searching for a nisei
steno to take over a desk at
Echo Lake, where they are writ-
ing up a story on cosmic rays*
ROY SHIBATA, IRVIN HATSUDA,
and MAS SHIODA, IRV's school-
mate from Hawaii motored to Cal-
ifornia to vacation.
Photo by T. K. Shlndo
FIRST WEDDING IN THE NEW TRI-STATE BUDDHIST CHURCHMiss Klsao Kama-
da became the lovely bride of George s. Yamaguchi at a colorful Bud-
dhist marriage ceremony with Rev. N. Tsunoda officiating. Maid of
honor was Miss Torie Yamaguchi, sister of the groom, and Miss Youko
Yoshimura was the bridesmaid. The best man was Yosh Nakayama and
Frank Kamibayashi was the usher.
NICC ANNOUNCES
SEMI-FORMAL
Douglas Taguchi, president of
the NiBei Intermountain Collegi-
ate Conference, has announced
that the fall semi-formal dance
of the NICC will be held on
October 6, Saturday night, in
the Lincoln Room of the Shirley
Savoy Hotel* Don Tucker and his
orchestra have been secured to
provide the music.
The NICC Cabinet decided that
in view of summer vacations with
so many students away from this
area, that it would be wisest to
postpone their fall dance.
DENVER GOLFERS TO
PLAY AT SALT LAKE
Doug Mizukami, Denver's low-
est handicap man will be one of
the eight Denverites attending
the JACL Convention in Salt Lake
City to compete in the National
JACL Golf Tournament.
The tournament will be played
off on the 7th and 8th of Septem-
ber at the Bonneville Course, a
par 72, nine hole link*
The Denver players and their
handicaps are as follows*
Fort Logan loses
popular NISEI
George and Susan Sunada re-
cently broke house at Ft. Logan
where they have been very active
in community affairs*
George and Susan edited the
VILLAGE CRIER, the Ft* Logan pap
per, and George served as adju-
tant of the Ft* Logan V.F.W.
Sheila and Cheryl, their twin
daughters, and Susan are at pre-
sent visiting in Rook Springs
with George's parents.
... r . 7. a*
Siieilia and Cheryl
Birthday Party
Doug Mizukami............10
Takashi Mayeda .13
Fred Aoki *15
Hank Imada...............15
N* Sugimoto ..... .17
Frank Torizawa...........17
George Furuta. ... .19
Kody Kodama ..... .19
(Cont. from Page 3)
"most noticeable was a sense of
duty (over 10,000 volunteers;
33,000 in the armed forces alto-
gether), gratitude (a favor must
never he forgotten and continual-
ly repaid), integrity (if I felt
one percent different I don't
want to say yet"), and loyalty
to the family and to the nation
in particular according to Mr.
Smith.
Whether one is studying the
history of the Japanese-Ameri-
cans or learning their character
and problems they face, this
book covers everything more com-
pletely and is more factual than
anything I have ever read.
ACE -HI?.
STUDIO
'-ARTISTRY IN ADVERTISING
1330-20* St KE4025
Stevie Ando, son of Mr* and
Mrs* Tosh Ando, celebrated his
second birthday with a picnic
party on Sunday, August 8, at
City Park*
The table centerpiece featur-
ed a Jolly clown swinging on a
trapeze* At each plate there
were balloons and clown lolli-
pops*
Stevie's guests and their
parents who attended were Mr*
Mrs* James Imatani and Carol,
Raymond and Eddie; Mr* and Mrs.
Y. Terasaki and Alene; Mr.and
Mrs* George Fujimoto and Delight,
Dr. and Mrs. Howard Suenaga and
Howie and Dickie; Mr. and Mrs.
George Ohashi and Susan; Mrs. Y.
Ito and Kiku; Mrs. Roy Take-
no and Karen; Mr. Jack Fuji and
Sharon; Mrs. Hank Kimura and
Carolyn) Mrs. Bea Mayeda and
Tommy and Eddie; Mrs. George Ma-
tsuraonji and Vicky and Iynn ;
Johnny Kobayashi; Diana and Den-
nis Wanifuchi, and Carrie Ann
Sakamoto.
FLOWER-SHOP
mm's ECONOMICAL FLOR/Sr
'Z>i£as&btf
511 -15* Sinet CH. 3546
[George's Motor]
AJW 9373
'PROFESSIONAL LISTING^
DENTISTS
T. ITO, DDS .KE 8680
830 18th Street
Y. ITO, DDS 1077
830 18th Street
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS . .TA 6961
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
K. K. MIYAMOTO, DDS . % .TA 4307
1952 Larimer Street
GENT A NAKAMURA, DDS . .TA 7498
200 Interstate Trust Bldg.
JLAWYFRS 0
TOSHIO ANDO
615 E. & C Bldg.. Branch Office: .CH 7987
1232 20th Street . .AL 3500
MINORU YASUI 7987
1917 Lawrence Street
INSURANCE
SHIG IMAMURA 3133
1238 20tii Street
JOHNNY INOUYE .... 7614
MITSUO KANEKO .... 5000
1232 20th Street . e .AL 3500
HENRY KIMURA .... 9900
1232 20th Street . .AL 3500
JINZO NODA
2829 Champa .... 8595
KENNETH T. SATO . e .MA 1644
1238 20th Street
- OPTOMETRIST*
GEORGE J. KUBO, O.D.. .CH 7813
1240 20th Street
BEN T. MATOBA . * .KE 1941
2212 Larimer Street
PHYSICIAN and .SURGEONS *
CHARLES FUJISAKI, MD. .GR 8822
3301 Zuni Street
THOS. K. KOBAYASHI, MD. .KE 4590
1227 27th Street
ISAMU OZAMOTO, MD .TA 1596
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
HOWARD SUENAGA, MD. .TA 2642
830 18th Street
M. GEORGE TAKENO, MD. .TA 0783
830 18th Street
K, UBA, D.O.
1230 21st Street* .MA 3743
'idilshfy
STUDIO
FLORENCE BLDQ.
830-18* St. TA 3697
NAKAYAMA JEWELRY
^ sf"*
1920 l^pimersf. MA 7043


PAGE 4
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
August 1948
NOTES:
......fyP
The long-legged bird who
brings babies, left a lot of lil
boys this last month. Mr. and
Mr8. RUB OKAMURA welcomed a son
and promptly named him BRIG LEX*
PETER and MARY UM3KUBQ, the
former was a Denverite, now of
San Francisco, were blessed with
a son on August 10* The little
fellow is called peter Yoshio.
SAT and TUN I YAMAMOTO had a
second son on August 9 and his
name is Arthur*
T's reported the T. K. KO-
BAYASHI'S have purchased a love-
ly home in East Denver and will
be moving from their Downing
street address shortly.
mlN and TRU3 YASUI, with
their infant daughter, IRIS AYE-
ME plan a trip to Oregon.
B3E UY2DA took a quick busi-
ness trip to Chicago before
leaving for the coast. BEE plans
to move his family to the Bay
area next month*
SHIG and KAY IMAMURA will be
missed by their many Denver
friends since they have moved
to Los Angeles. Among those who
hosted farewell dinners for them
were GEORGE and MAY MATSUMONJI,
TOSH and MICHI ANDO, and GEORGE
and MURIEL KUBQ together with
GEORGE AND JEAN FUJIMOTO.
When the Denver Invitational
open was held, many Nisei busi-
nessman were noticeably missing
from fheir desks* Among the
tournament followers who watched
BEN HOGAN win top honors were:
MIKE KITANO, HANK KIMURA,and K.
YOKOUCHI.
DOC and ROSA MAYBDA took a
trip to California for a couple
weeks*
The sound of the calliope has
an attraction for many. When
the singling Bros, circus came
to town, we saw among others
witnessing the acts under the
big top, MAS and YOSH NAKAYAMA,
REA KAIHAKA, TURJ.3 YAMAGUCHI,
and SETS ITo.
SARGE and
have moved
LILLIAN T3RASAKI
to the house of the
senior T3RASAKIrs
AKIKu SHIBATA's passion is
horses. But so far, in her
short stay in Denver, she hasn't
met anyone who loves horseback
riding as much as she does.
SPORT ROUNDUP
NATIONAL LEAGUE
The sparkling Denver Busseis
added their 1948 baseball gem to'
their "diamond** crown, symbolic
of NCNBL supremacy, with an im-
pressive 9-1 season record as
the champions steam-rolled in on
the back stretch. With Prank
Kamibayashi, their hard-hitting
shortstop who won the batting
title with a sensational .540
average, and southpaw Hideo Hiro-
se who tossed for 8 perfect wins
pacing the pack, the Templars
smashed Greeley 18-5, Ault 12-8
and their arch rivals, the Mer-
chants, 5-1 to clinch the pen-
nant.
The very disappointing Denver
Merchants, including a forfeit-
ure to Ault, had to be contended
as runner-ups with an unimpres-
sive 6-4 record, a step ahead of
Brighton. Ft* Lupton downed
Greeley 12-8 to remain one notch
above the cellar-locked Greeley
and Ault clubs.
in the National loop Ft. Mor-
gan continued to play havoc with
the league leaders as the Nukaya
paced gang knocked out the DNAC
Club from the number one posi-
tion with a 12-3 viotory. This
upset, although not too surpris-
ing, elevated Littleton on top
again after an absence of two
weeks, since their loss to Ft*
Morgan on July 11th, Littleton
has downed Greeley 19-8, Bright-
on 19-5 and defeated Flatbevllle.
DNAC meanwhile bounced back with
a smashing 24-15 triumph over
Greeley, with the present out-
look pointing to the Aug. 22 conr
test against Littleton as a de-
ciding pennant factor.
Along the softball trails
Beans Yamamoto produced his se-
cond Nisei softball champions in
as many years as the Beans Sport
Shop won the Triple A Crown in
the Welton Bark League. Last
year his Y Carpenters grabbed
the North Denver aA Softball pen*
nant at the Erie Park*
in hanging up the very out-
standing record of 11 wins
against a lone setback the fast-
playing Nisei team attracted pop-
ular support from the Welton
park fans whevever they played.
Diminutive George Nagai, versa-
tile athlete de-luse, was Beans
Yamamoto's winning answer as he
was credited with 6 victories,
his only defeat coming at the
hands of the runner-up Brooks
GRflnflDQ liAh and'PoulPui Tfikh
1919 Lawrence $t. KEqstone 598? .
Jflcntchu a
GRILL CHOP SUEV
^Lfouh
1956 Larimer ft TAbor 957$ A
Sportwear in a close 2-0 game.
George Goto hung up 4 wins while*
the slow-ball tossing George
Inai earned one.
in the hitting department sen-
sational Rupe Aral, speedy short-
stop, received the Beans Sport
Shop leading hitter trophy with
.367 average, while Frank Kami-
bayashi received honors as the
king of the extra base blows*
Nagai, N. Nicholychick, Beans
Yamamoto and Yosh Kawano in that
order followed in the 300 or
over batting list.
Second half results found the
Niseis wallopping Police 10-0,
Kilroy 7-0, Griffith Motors 13-3
Brooks 16-5 and narrow squeaks
over Macs (9-7) and Diamond Cafe
(9-8).
While the softball teams are
preparing to enter the city-wide
tournament commencing August 18,
the Nisei hardball clubs locally
and from Nebraska and Wyoming
are smoothing their wrinkles in
preparation for the third annual
Labor Day tournament held in Den-
ver.
LITTLETON AC WON 9 LOST 1
DENVER NISEI AC 9 2
FT. MORGAN 7 3
LONGMONT 4 7
BRIGHTON 3 6
PLATTEVILLS 2 7
GREELEY AC 1 9
FINAL AMERICAN LEAGUE STANDINGS
DENVER BUSSEIS WON 9 LOST 1
DENVER MERCHANTS 6 4
BRIGHTON 5 5
FT. LUPTON 4 6
GREELEY BUSSEIS 3 7
\ULT MERCHANTS X 7
JIM HANAMUKA
t£IL?P ^LL 2!B WH0SE R0STER R^BS-TO- Ida, Sill 3*to, Nob
"S4 2; Toy? Nobuto, TO Ka-yiwara, Billy Hotoyams, Howard Moto-
>ama. Tosh Hiisa, Frank Hi5a and Tete Ida.
RELIABLE.
Wont
TA. 0332
TA. 92*7
PRESCRIPTIONS
2700 Larimer ft.
Return postage guaranteed
THE DENVER BULLETIN
The Denver Chapter JACL
615 E & C Building
Denver 2, Colorado
sec. 562,
I C. 1
, s.; U*? 9