Citation
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 3, Number 10

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Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 3, Number 10
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
15

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
VOLUMNF. Ill, NUMBER TEN
DENVER COLORADO
October 1943
District Council Meeting
The Mountain Plains District Council which was organized on a tem-
porary basis at the National Convention is making tentative plans to
hold an organizational meeting in Denver, November 21-22 at the Tri-
State Buddhist Church*
This district, which includes Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska, New
Mexico and Texas, has three active chapters, Denver, Port Lupton and
Omaha. This meets the minimum requirement to form a district coun-
cil. Some localities in this area have formed JACL Committees as a
step toward petitioning the National Board for a Charter to form an
active chapter; other communities have Anti-Discrimination Commit-
DENVER'S ATTITUDE
TOWARD MINORITIES
The Opinion Research Center
of the University of Denver has
recently completed a survey on
the "Public Attitudes Toward
Minorities in Denver*" It is a
study concerning certain atti-
tudes of majorities toward mi-
norities in this city*
A part of the study which in-
cluded all the minorities was
Anti-Discrimination Legislation*
About three-fifths of the people
interviewed favored an anti-dis-
crimination law in regard to job
hiring* Every major group
interviewed contained more peo-
ple who favored such a law than
those who opposed it* The low-
est support for obvious reasons
oame from proprietors, managers
and executives. They were al-
most evenly divided on the issue*
A part of the study specific-
ally covered Jap&nese-Americans*
A majority of Denverites believe
that persons of Japanese descent
now in this country should be
granted citizenship* About 19$
qualified their answers in that
they were willing to give citi-
zenship status to Japanese resi-
dents who had met certain stand-
ards of eligibility and loyalty
tests*
"The results here show a
marked lowering of prejudice
against Japanese-Americans* Only
two years ago, a national sample
was opposed to granting citizen-
ship to Japanese-born residents
under any circumstances*
"Thus, the problem of the
Japanese-American, very serious
during the war, now seems to be
relatively minor in scope at
least in the Denver area* The
sizeable colony of Japanese-Amer-
icans which sprang up here dur-
ing the "relocation" hysteria
can feel that it has arrived at
community acceptance of its
basic American right*"
A hopeful note in the survey
showed that Denver people are
not indifferent about intergroup
relations In the community*
About two-thirds felt that steps
should be taken to help various
racial and religious groups im-
prove their relationships, but
they were vague as to what
should be done*
COLORADO
NISEI WAR DEAD
The Washington JAC1 ADC an-
nouned recently that an Army
Public Information Division re-
lease contained the names of ten
Nisei armed forces dead whose
remains were returned to the
United States from Europe*
Out of this number the next
of kin of two were listed from
Colorado* The names are Pvt*
George M* Futamata, next of kin
Mrs* Haru Futamata, Pueblo and
Pfc* John 7 Tanaka, next of kin
Mrs* Tsuyo Tanaka* 3635 Marion
Street, Denver* Pvt* Futamata
will be buried in Pueblo and Pfc
Tanaka will be buried in Arling-
ton Cemetary, Washington, D. C*
They were all members of the
famous 442nd Regimental Combat
Team*
The Denver Chapter will send
floral tributes to the services
of the two men*
MA^HADt
There will be a Masquerade
Dance Friday, October 29 on the
Fourth Floor of the YWCA sponsor-
ed by the local Chapter*
The Stardusters will furnish
the music* Prizes will be given
for the best costumes* Judges
are Rosa Mayeda, Mitsue Sugano
and Mitchie Terasaki.
Dance chairman is Haru Tanaka
with Mami and Emi Katagiri and
Helen Tanaka assisting with the
decorations, Dr* M. Uba and Dr*
T* Mayeda, tickets and Dorothy
Hayano, Rose Shiramizu and Tosh
Ando refreshments*
Patrons and patronesses are
Mr* & Mrs* George Miura, Mr* &
Mrs* George Ohashi and Dr* & Mrs*
Howard Suenaga*
/SANNUAL YPCC
IN DENVEJK
NOVEMBER 26-28
PEGGY YAHATO CNN,
The 15th animal Young Peo-
ple's Christian Conference will
be in Denver, November 26,27 and
28* This year's theme is "Build-
ing to Serve". Delegates are
expected from the tri-state area,
Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska*
The opening service with a
get-aquainted social following
will be at the Trinity Methodist
Church* The following morning
will find the delegates journey-
ing to the Red Rocks for a morn-
ing service with the Reverend J*
Russell Brown of the Shorter
Methodist Church as the speaker*
The workshops will be held at
Gamp Lookout* The evening ban-
quet will be at the Cosmopolitan
Hotel. Bishop Glen R. Phillips
of Colorado is the banquet speak-
er* A1 Tomlin's orchestra will
play for the dance*
The members of the 1948 cabi-
net are: Peggy Yamato, Presi-
dent; Sachi Maruyama, 1st Vice-
President; Albert Noda, 2nd Vice
President; Fred Minkuni, 3rd
Vice President; Dorothy Miyahara,
Secretary; Dr. Ben Matoba, Trea-
surer; Marjorie Nakamura, Histo-
ian and Tom Ida, Registrar* The
advisors are Dr. K. Sasaki, Joe
Ariki and Sachi Maruyama.
Conference committee chairmen
are: Ruby Kitsutaka, banquet;
Henry Kunugi, housing; Eddy Kawa-
kami, welcome; Tsune Kosuge,
transportation; Dr* Ben Matoba,
finance; Albert Noda, Publicity
and Grace and Setsuko Oka, con-
ference picture*
mmmcm
Evacuation Claims forms are
now available at the United
States District Attorney's of-
fice* The local JACL office
will distribute them as soon as
the Japanese transalatlon for the
form and the instructions are
received from Washington, D. C*
The expiration date for filing
of claims on this form is Jan* 2,
1950*
There are seventeen questions
which are worded quite simply*
The form also calls for a des-
cription of any documents which
a claimant may have to prove
ownership of the property in-
volved, its value and the extent
of damage or loss incurred* Such
documents need not be filed with
this claim*
Due to the simplicity of this
form, it is claimed that simple
claims can be filed by individu-
als themselves* For larger
claims it is advisable for a
claimant to obtain legal help*
The Denver JACL will offer
voluntary services to all claim-
ants who apply for assistance in
the way of furnishing forms, in-
formation, stenographic help and
interpreting. Many JACL members
and others have volunteered to
act as interpreters, clerks and
typists. Many more volunteers
are needed and anyone who is in-
terested in helping is urged to
contact the JACL office, CH 5990*
OUC Legislativerthw
The Denver JACL mailed more
than 500 legislative reports of
the Denver Unity Council to mem-
bers and interested people, ftie
reports showed the attitudes of
several candidates for office
on certain civil rights issues
affecting minorities in Denver.
The Denver Unity Council leg-
islative committee, headed by
Arthur A. Brooks, interviewed
legislative candidates and sum-
marized their answers. Mrs.
Meredith Selby, Executive Secre-
tary of the Dt)C, Bernard Valdez
of Community Services, Inc.,
Mide Emirich, Roy Takeno and
Min Yasui were other members of
the committee.
mm oimmi
Plans are underway by the lo-
cal chapter to hold a new Year's
Eve Ball on December 31 at a
time and plaoe to be announced
in the future. Dr. George Kubo
has been appointed the chairman
to find an appropriate place.
An Inaugural Dinner for the
newly elected .1949 JACL officers
to precede the dance is also be-
ing planned* Roy M* Takeno will
be in charge of the installation
ceremony*
tees to carry on this important
work*
The Issei are also planning
to meet at the same time accord-
ing to Mr* T. Kako and plan for
the coming ADC financial cam-
paign*
The purpose of a district
council is (1) to participate
and direct the National Program
any any other business referred
to it by the National Council in
its area, (2) to coordinate the
activities of the various chap-
ters within the area and with
the National Council*
There are several topics for
discussion which could be in-
cluded in the agenda besides the
adoption of a constitution and
the election of permanent offi-
cers* Some of these important
topics are evacuation claims,
formation of new JACL committees
and chapters, increasing chapter
memberships and the work of the
ADC and its financial drive*
Temporary officers for this
District Council are Bessie Ma-
tsuda, chairman; Pat Okura, Oma-
ha and Sam Okamoto, Fort Lupton,
Vice-Chairmen and Kami Katagiri,
Secretary*
The national officers who
have been asked to attend are
Hito Okada, National JACL Presi-
dent, and Kasao Satow, National
Executive Secretary, from Salt
Lake and Hike Masaoka, National
Legislative Director, from Wash-
ington, D. C.
Bessie Matsuda will announce
the committee chairmen In charge
of the program for the Council
Meeting. The Denver JACL as the
host chapter is busy making ar-
rangements to entertain the dele-
gates*
miHOAmmm.
srwMcnm
Roy M. Takeno, Regional Direc-
tor of the Mountain Plains Dis-
trict, attended a national staff
meeting in Los Angeles, Oct. 8-9.
The regional directors con-
ferred with Mike Masaoka and Ed
Ennis, special JACL counsel for
Evacuation Claims, to plan
JACL's proceedure in filing and
processing of claims. They will
help chapters in their districts
make plans to assist claimants*
Hito Okada, National JACL
President, emphasized that "JACL
feels a responsibility to the
people beyond the mere passage
of the Evacuation Claims Bill,
but we can only assist within
certain limitations of the law
itself as well as our own limita-
tions of personnel*
Members of the National Staff
attended the Pacific Southwest
District Council meeting after
wards


PAGE 2
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
October 1946
otnotua-mm
Published Monthly by the
Denver Chapter of the Japa-
nese American Citizens Lea-
gue* 1834 Curtis St., Denver*
Colorado* Telephone: CH 5990
Editors Chiye Horiuehi
Staffs Miohi Ando, Bill Ho-
sokawa, Mami Eatagiri, Geo.
Kubo, Dorothy Madokoro* Bess
Matsuda, Rosa Mayeda, and
Hiroshi Vada.
Photosi VILSHIRE STUDIO
V......... .. -J
Have you heard? Denver is to
be the host to a JACL District
Counoil meeting in November. Ve
are expecting delegates from Ft.
Lupton, Omaha and, I hope, a
great many from Denver; also,
delegates from thirteen JACL Com-
mittees in Wyoming, New Mexico,
Texas, Nebraska and Colorado.
For all Denverites, this Coun-
cil Meeting will he a wonderful
chance for education on JACL
policies.- For temporary JACL
Committees, we hope it will be
an inspiration to form chapters
immediately.
National President HITO OKADA
and National Executive Secretary
MASAO SATOV will be present. We
will be ar intimate details of
what goes on in Washington with
reference to matters which con-
cern us. We'll get an insight
to the organization, scope and
aims of the JACL.
I am especially eager to see
non-members attend the council
meeting. They will have an op-
portunity to grasp the great ser-
vice the JACL renders to the
Japanese community. They will
have an opportunity to see that
the NATIONAL JACL has high
ideals for the aims and soope of
individual chapters.
We know they will realize
that the organization, its pur-
poses and aims are well worth
supporting, and that they will
realize that the organization is
established for their benefit.
At times local chapter offi-
cers do not fulfill the scope of
activities in a manner that will
gain the support of individuals.
There are differences in opin-
ions* also, in the manner in
which to conduct the business of
the JACL to the satisfaction of
the people in the community.
We are well aware of this.
At times* we fail, but we try,
and the cabinet to follow shall
(Continued to Page 4, Col. 4)
AMERICAN
MOTOR SALES
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CARS '
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general
REPAtPJNG-
MupsonT Dealer
CH.2830 2358 WA.$r.
CRITIC'S
CORNER
by Bill Hotekauta.
NISEI: A CRITICAL APPRAISAL
by
JOE TANAKA
Winner of the National.
JACL Oratorical Contest
I was born and raised in St.
Louis, Missouri. But I am more
than a St. Louisan, because by
parentage I am a Nisei. I was
educated In schools with stu-
dents predominantly of German de-
scent. There were very few Jap-
nese in St. Louis. Before the
war there were probably 3 or 4
families. Consequently my think-
ing and my outlook is strictly
St. Louisan and if you are lis-
tening, you will hear me speak
like a Mid-westerner.
It was Pearl Harbor that
brought me face to face with one
fact.....that I was an American-
japanese, a member of a minority
group. It was the war that
brought me in contact with other
Niseis. Frankly, it was a new
experience. I was a stranger
among my own people. I looked
like them, but I did not think
or act like them. There was a
difference...what was it? I was
curious. I wanted to know. What
did I find?
Well, I have found the Nisei
to be sensitive..so much so that
they are over sensitive. The
Nisei will not speak out in a
meeting. This is true if there
is an outside speaker, and espe-
cially if the speaker is non-Jap-
nese. Getting the Nisei to take
part in the discussion is a pain-
ful process. .Trying to draw the
Nisei out..to pull out what goes
on inside the person is worse
than pulling teeth. Why? What
is behind this reticence? Per-
haps it is because most of you
come from Japanese communities,
from farms and from fishing vil-
lages. You have the same stoi-
cism, the same impassiveness as
any group which wrest their liv-
ing from the land or sea. The
midweatern farmer and the New
England fisherman have the same
outlook. Once their confidence
is won, they will open up, and
will bend over backwards in
their hospitality.
The Oriental face or probably
a better word, mask, is an ex-
pressionless face. What goes on
behind that face is hard to tell,
Agreement or disagreement, good
cheer or grouchineas, hate, emo-
tional conflicts do not mirror
themselves in the Nisei face.
To outsiders...to Caucasians....
it is a silent, sullen, anti-so-
cial look. It is not inviting.
It is definitely not a warm wel-
come expression. This physical,
psychosomatic phenomenon is a
face molded by the years, by the
wind and rain and sun on the
farm, and on the sea. Vie need a
new look.
The non-participation in meet-
ings, in discussions, in conver-
sation can also be attributed to
fear...fear of being ostracized.
Because you come from neighbor-
hoods, communities, you know
each other. If I were to call
out a Nisei name from this plat-
form, many of you could give me
that person's family history....
hie background, his education,
his work, how much he is making,
and so forth. Consequently,
when he rises to talk, a low
murmuring, a twittering goes
through the group as if to say:
why should he say something, I
know him and I know his family.
And of course, the Nisei Is hesi-
tant to take part In a discus-
sion because he knows that there
will be group comment and group
criticism.
What can we do to overcome
these weaknesses? Certainly the
answer is not to forget your
background or to sever your re-
lationship with your community;
you can't eradicate from your
memory what you know about the
other person. What can you do?
You can Judge a person by his
ideas, by the courage of his con-
victions, and by the relevance
of his utterance. Commend him
for contributing to the discus-
sion. Disagree with his think-
ing....but dont condemn him be-
cause you know him. This is
true not only in your relation-
ship with Niseis but with all
persons.
It is also true that Niseis
do not like criticism. Yes, you
hate to be criticized. Your
feelings are easily hurt. You
won't criticize for fear of cri-
ticism. why is this so? I can
hazard a guess. Niseis are tal-
ented and ambitious and envious
of the places they have gained
in education, social and profes-
sional fields. You have been ac-
cepted and you have gained many
high places. Wonderful achieve-
ments for a few in this minority
group. Envious and fearful of
losing it...therefore, criticism
is not wanted. It points out
faults, failings, and weaknesses.
It is not wanted, because you do
not understand that criticism is
necessary for further growth and
progress. Criticism that is
tactfully given and gracefully
received is a step forward in
any human relations.
Because you Judge the person
and not his ideas, and your fear
of criticism for the third and
last of your characteristics.
Niseis avoid responsibilities.
Let George do it. I'm busy. I
haven't the time. You shirk du-
ties. Although you know the pro-
blems in your own organization,
in your own communities and ci-
ties, and you have a general
Idea as to the answers to some
of these problems. You don't do
anything about them. This is
undoubtedly based upon the pre-
vious weaknesses discussed. As
long as there is any racial or
religious discrimination in the
world, your fight is not finish-
ed.
Perhaps I have been overly
critical. If I have been it is
because I still have a certain
amount of identity with you.
Knowing the Nisei as to what
they can do as is evident by
their war record and by our post
war legislative record, I know
that no other group has the leadr
ershlp potentialities of the
Nisei. A few men have proven
their worth In scientific re-
search, in medicine and in agri-
cultural research. It is up to
(Continued on Page 3, Col. 2)
I "~m A
The keyhole-columnist who
signs her stuff "Peek-a-Boo" in
this publication thought it note-
worthy last month that "Chow
hounds Bill Hosokawa and Harry
Sakata certainly did their appe-
tites Justice at the Dillon Myer
dinner."
After having consumed food
more or less regularly for a
third of a century, we are
slightly astonished that the act
has been deemed worthy of coamait
in the public prints. Appetites,
we contend, were made to be sat-
isfied, and it's an unfortunate
man who cannot do the same.
There are, however, eome cir-
cumstances that need to be aired
in regard to the Dillon Myer din-
ner. They Are:
1. When a person puts out
§2.00 for a dinner, he certainly
can be excused for stowing away
his money's worth.
2. George Furuta's chefs
dished out such a feast, it
would have been rank insult to
them not to eat with gusto.
3* The guest of honor was
unaccustomed to the dishes ser-
ved, and it was only common
courtesy to set to with vigor,
thus assuring him of the.pala-
tability of the victuals,
4. We were hungry.
5. We were in peril of be-
ing shamed by a young lady to
our immediate left, namely Bes-
sie Matsuda. She had stated
in a loud voice that she didn't
expect to eat much inasmuchas
she grabbed a sizeable bite at
home before coming to the din-
ner. Yet she demonstrated an
astonishing capacity for viands,
ad we would have been less
than gallant if we had left her
to complete her meal alone.
We trust that our fellow
celebrity of the banquet table,
Mr. Sakata, concurs.
In the last issue the first
sentence in the second paragraph
of this column should have been:
"The President turned on his
NOT lnconsIderable charm for Den-
verites and took ample advantage
of the prestige of his office."
Our apologies to Bill. -- Ed.
DENVER JACL MEMBERSHIP
Memberships in the Denver
JACL are as follows;
Individual membership. $3.50
Membership for couples . 5.00
Pacific Citizen, member. 2.50
P.C., non-member .... 3.50
Subscription to the Denver
JACL Bulletin, only, until the
end of every year, to Dec. 31,
without membership, is $1.00
MONTHLY ADVERTISING RATES
Professional Listings $1.50
3/4" Business Ads. ... 2*50
2 Business Ads. . 3.50
2 Double-column Ads. . 5*00
DIAMONDS 'JEWELRY
WATCH REPAIRING
03 NINETEENTH ST. DENVER. CPU).


October 1946
THE DENVER JACL BUILETIN
PAGE 3
Heard tell "Cow-Cow" means
eating time with the Hawaiians
attending DU.CHARLIE and
WALLY NAKAMURA sure can please
your appetite with ALLEN YAMADA
and cute TED MIYAHARA feudin n
fussin' in' 111 about washin and wip-
Cute twosomes at the NICC
semi-formal were: JOHN TODOROKI
and FRANCES HASEGAWA? DOUG TA-
GUCHI and PEARL KUWABARA? HASH
TOGASHI and YOSHIKO MAMEDA?
KENNY IMAMURA and HELEN TANAKA?
PAUL USHIYAMA and SUE MARUYAMA;
RICKY SHINDO and RUTH HIYAHA;
HIROSHI WADA and KIKU TAJIRI?
FRANK SEITARA and SALLY FURUSHIRO;
missing and "was missed was our
romeo, "HASUNAGA" .
Wondering where HARRY SAKATA
puts his terrrrrrific apetite?
Heard tell he won both the *oie
and the donut eating contest,
too*.'ll Congratulations, HARRY.'.
Similarities are somethin'
aren't they? At the YPS Des-
sert Party" JIRO SHOJI and cute
lil JOHNNY KURACHI looked like
mad foaming dogs" with the de-
licious meringue from the choco-
late pie all oyer their faces'.
That's life'.'.'.
Have yo all met our "depend-
able" WES KOYANO? They sez he* s
right on the ball about time ,
gals, and collecting tickets for
the YPS. Let's give him a handl
Could it be that he's cookin
with shoyu and a wee bit of dat
stuff called "Aji-no-moto"????
At the Nu Chi Delta installa-
tion NAOMI INAI was installed
prexv for the year 48-49 replac-
ing DOROTHY MIYAHARA. Her cabi-
net includes* MARY HIRAMI-Vice-
President, CHIYOKO MARUYAMA-Re-
cording Secretary, MARY JANE YA-
MATO-Corresponding Secretary, MA*
SA KURODA-Treasurer and PEARL KU-
WABARA-Historian.
IMPROVING ON THE DICTIONARY
AN'GEL In Heaven, nobody in
particular.
BANQUET A 50# dinner served
in sufficient number
to enable a caterer to
charge $2 for it.
BIG'A-MIST Person who took
one too many.
EIGHT-BAIL An object that is
seldom behind you.
IN'TU-I'TION Suspicion in
skirts.
VOMAN A person who can hurry
through a drugstore
aisle 18 inches wide
without brushing
against the piled up
tinware and then drive
home and still knock
off one of the doors
of a 12-foot garage.
HKT /BA RECORD
CONCERT A SUCCESS
A series of free monthly re-
cord concerts are being held at
the Tri-State Buddhist Church
under the sponsorship of the Den-
ver YBA with Ed Nakagawa as the
chairman. These concerts are
the outgrowth of an increasing
Interest in the community.
The recordings are classical
and semi-classical* Some are
the new Long-Playing Microgroove
records and all are reproduced
over the new churchs fine sound
system.
The program for the first
concert was well received. These
affairs are open to the public
and future dates will be publish-
ed in the local papers. Refresh-
ments are served at a social
hour following the program.
_ WV Oct. zm.
(ftiJCfr +TH PLOOft
Am. 5&P veuTk&eti
BROTHERHOOD HOUSE
BEGINS FAU PROGRAM
The Brotherhood House has
started their fall Sunday even-
ing fellowship gatherings with
the Reverend C. Perrigo speak-
ing on the topic "Who Is To
Blame for My Religion."
This is the beginning of a
series of discussions on compara-
tive religions by competent
speakers.
Everyone is welcome to attend
any of these meetings which are
held every Sunday evening, 7:30
p.m. at the Brotherhood House,
1220 Corona Street.
i/APONESC
C00KIN6 Cl/US
A Japanese cooking class has
bef underway at the California
Street Methodist Church with Mra
Jinzo Noda as the instructor.
The lessons include the proper
Japanese table etiquette and
serving of the food as well*
Those enrolled in the class
are* Mesdames Howard Doi, Mar-
garet Sakaniva, Haruko Kitano,
Jane Hada, Jean Hashimoto, Komi
Hashimoto, Ruby Sakayama, Shig
Vatanabe, May Nakata, Kaz Kanda,
K. Sasaki and Hirotsu; Misses
Ruby Kitsutaka, Peggy Yamato,
Mary Jane Yamato, Alice Nakagawa,
Chimi Mayemura, Tazawa and Take-
mot o.
Anyone interested in the next
series may contact Mrs. Sasaki
at HA 3719 *
yPS SPONSOR?
MAKING CtflSS
Under the sponsorship of the
YPS another series of dancing
classes will begin at the YWCA
Thursday evenings beginning No-
vember 4.
Two one-hour classes will be
held on Thursdays for eight
weeks. The instructor will
again be Mr. Lefty Blanchard who
taught the class last winter.
The 8-9 p.m. class will be
Fox-Trots and Waltzes and the 9-
10 p.m. class will concentrates
the Tango, Samba and Rhumba. The
fee for the entire series for
one class is $1.75 or §3*25 for
both classes.
A new cabinet has been elec-
ted by the YPS Council at a re-
cent meeting. The members of
this new cabinet ares Rose Hana-
va-President; Wes Koyazaa-2nd V.
President; Dr. Ben Matoba-3rd V.
President; Yoshiko Mameda-Secre-
tary and John Todoroki-Treasur-
er.
The following committee chair-
men were appointed* Games--Aliee
Kodani and Yuki Tanaka, Records-
Mami Katagiri, Refreshments*
Frank Amano and George Hirayama
and Gate--Tei Shioshita.
CORNELIANS TO
HOLD benefit
The Cornelians are planning
to hold a card party Saturday*
November 13, 8*30 p.m. at the
Japanese Hall on Lawrence be-
tween 21st and 22nd.
(Continued from Page 2, Col. 3)
you and I to gain that leader-
ship in human relatione and to
become the leaders of tomorrow
in community, national, and in-
ternational affairs.
*ST. LOUIS NISEI Sept., 1948
NOTE* Joe Tanaka is a native
Missourian and a relative new-
comer to the JACL. He is very
active In the St. Louis Chapter.
He ie a Washington University
graduate and heads a St. Louis
engineering firm, Designers and
Builders.
ACE-HI?
0
STUDIO
^ARTISTRY IN ADVERTISING
1330-20# St. KE 4025
The purpose is to raise funds
to help furnish the newly reno-
vated terrace rooms of the Cali-
fornia Street Methodist Church.
Amy Miura and Fumi Yabe are co-
chairmen for this affair.
Various games will be offered
such as bridge, mah Jong and
rummy. There will be door prizes
and refreshments will be served
by the club members.
Tickets are on sale at $1.00
per person and May Furuta is the
ticket chairman.
Everyone is cordially invited.
JtOMAfk FLOUJER SHOP
Pm£R$£CONOMtCAC fLCRtfr
5ll-l5*SJreet OH. 3546

[George's Motoi
SERVICE.
2OjUm$!£0cr M4 $3731
'PffiESSIOML USTlNtj-
- -DENTISTS *
T. ITO, DDS 830 18th street
Y. ITO, DDS 8.30 18th Street
TAXASHI MAYEDA, DDS . . .TA 6961
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
K. X. MIYAMOTO, DDS .TA 4307
1952 Larimer Street
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS .TA 7498
200 Interstate Trust Bldg.
-
TOSHIO ANDO
1232 20th Street .AL 3500
MINORU YASUI
1917 Lawrence Street .CH 7987
* OPTOMETRIST*
GEORGE J. KUBO, O.D. -CH 7813
1240 20th Street
INSURANCE *
JOHNNY ..................CH 7614
1232 20th Street .AL 3500
MITSUO KANEKO............GR 5000
1232 20th Street . . .AL 3500
HENRY KIMURA.............AL 9900
1232 20th Street . . .AL 3500
JINZO NODA ..............
2829 Champa..............MA 8595
PHYSICIAN and SURGEONS
CHARLES FUJISAKI, MD. .GR 8822
3301 Zuni Street
THOS. K. KOBAYASHI, MD. .KE 4590
1227 27th Street
ISAMU OZAMOTO, MD .TA 1596
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
HOWARD SUENAGA, MD. .TA 2642
830 18th Street
M. GEORGE TAKENO, MD. .TA 0783
830 18th Street
M, UBA, D. 0.
1230 21st street .MA 3743
ctiilshw
Studio
'Etyototj/iaphip,
FLORENCE 8LD4.
830-16* TA 3697
NAKAYAMA JEWELRY
* -4li- OlcM. fauelfaf, *
1920 lfipitnerSf. AHA 704?


PAGE 4
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
October 1948
NOTES: ~,
Ve took a peek into the grand
program for the JACL'S TALENT
EXTRAVAGANZA. You can't imagine
WHO ALL you will eee aa male
floradoras, black faces, glamor-
ous Nisei chorines, precision
dancers and artists'.II
Last month we said the cutest
couple at the JACL picnic was
the JUNE AOCHI-GEORGE INAI duo;
OOPS!l We're sorry, we mistook-
t'waa the JUNE AOCHI-GEORGE NA-
AI duo.
De-lovely LOTTIE LEE HARTNETT
led the fashion parade at the
Cornelian tea. Welcomed new
faces were: HARU TAMURA'S, MASA-
KO FURUTA'S. FUDGE NAKAOKAS,
YURI SANDA S and ASTER OYE'S,
and the two MASAKO'S NAKAYAMA
and TAKAYOSHI.
Seen sporting a new Buick
convertible are the CHINN BOYS.
ED'S recent bid for a gal thru
this column still holds, gals,
and the line forms in back of us.
The very eligible GENJI YAMA-
MOTO is back in town after a
Mid-west vacation. He seemed
very impressed with Chicago's
queen, JULIA YOSHIOKA. Give us
a break, GENJI, we'd like to im-
press you, too.
Some day the stork may pay a
visit and leave a little souve-
nir, Just a cute little what-is-
it for former DENVERITES, the
SHIMPEI MIYAKES; also the TOSH
ANDO'S, BEN FURUTA'S and the
OSKI TANIWAKIS.
MIN YASUI had a birthday par-
ty the other nite, he should
live so long
MAY and GEORGE MATSUMONJI
Just motored back from a vaca-
tion. Points visited were Phoe-
nix, El Paso and Juarez, Mexico,
GEORGE is complaining about hav-
ing to shell out for some Chanel
#5.
(Continued from Page 2, Col.l)
try. we certainly welcome some
active participation for the ful-
fillment of our activities in a
way that will be acceptable to
the whole community.
So, I urge you to encourage
your friends, prospective mem-
bers, and above all, YOURSELF,
to attend. I know that none of
us have time but let's make
time for the District Council
Meeting.
VIVC A WOMB
FEUQWSMP WEFK
MOV 14-21
Mrs. Bartlett Heard will be
guest speaker at the dinner 6:15
p.m., Tuesday, November 16, by
which the Denver YW is celebrat-
ing WORLD FELLOWSHIP WEEK, No -
vember 14-21. During this week
all the YWCA'S and YMCA'S in the
world are joined in a week of
prayer and fellowship "that all
may be one."
Mrs. Heard is vice president
of the National Board of the
Yound Women's Christian Associa-
tions of the United States and
was a Y delegate to the World's
Council meeting in Hangchow ,
China. Her talk will be a first
hand message about the YWCA'S of
the world.
Other program features will
include the Style Show of the
Nations which has become a year-
ly feature of our World-Fellow-
ship Week and two dance and musi-
cal numbers which are a preview
of Fiesta.
Reservations may be made by
calling TA 7141.
ORIENTAL MT EXHIBIT
AT CHAPPEL HOUSE
An exhibition of Oriental art
is currently showing at Chappell
House, lJOO Logan, a branch of
the Denver Art Museum, until No-
vember 50.
It is composed of some of the
outstanding Oriental art trea-
sures in the United States. The
exhibit is drawn from some 2000
items the museum has acquired in
the past two years through gifts,
longtime loans and purchases.
Great bronze figures from India,
Chinese silk paintings, fragile
porcelains, beautiful brocades,
wood carvings and Persian minia-
tures are on display.
Many of these art treasures
are being shown for the first
time. A lack of display space
makes it necessary to keep about
90 percent of the permanent col-
lection in storage.
The exhibition is open to the
public during regular museum
hours. On Sunday afternoon the
hours are 2-5 p.m.
GRflPQDfl
1919 Lawrence St KBifsione 998J #
/flancku
GRILL CHOP SUCV
you can
1956 Larimer ft TAfeor 9576 ^
SPORT ROUNDUP
Tne Denver JACL bowling team
defeated Mandarin Cafe 3 to 1 to
gain the leadership in the Sun-
day Men's Winter League by the
score of 2766-2710. Lefty Koba-
yashi's terrific score of 594-12
-606, Johnny Noguchi's, 513-60-
573 and Nobe Ishizawa's very
steady bowling a 543 scratch
kept the JACL team in the win-
ning streak.
John Okizaki was the outstand-
ing bowler for the losers with a
563-54-617. Incidently, he bowl-
ed the high game of the week
with a 254-18-272.
American Motors pulled a sur-
prise upeet over the favored
Cathay Post #1, 3 to 1, by a
score of 2588 2443. George
Shinn was high with 477-96-543
for the American Motors, while
George Otsukl was high with a
507-12-519 for the Post.
Denargo Box Company white-
washed T.Y. Market, 4-- 0, by
the score of 2632 2507. John
Sakayama was high with a 509-42-
551 and Moon Kataoka was high
for the losers with a steady 535
scratch.
Cathay Post #2 split even
with Izuo Studio, 2-2, even
though Post #2 won the series,
2624 2469. Tom Shibao was
high with a neat 553-54-607, for
the losers Ken Toyama was high,
460-66-526.
Lupton Lanes defeated Beans
Sport Shop, 3 to 1 with a score
of 2703 2540. Kaz Hayashi
was high with a 523-60-583 for
the out-of-towners, while Jim
Ota rolled a 508-60-583 for the
local team.
TEAM STANDINGS
Team Won Lost
Denver JACL 13 3
Cathay Post #1 12 4
Denargo Box Co. 12 4
T. Y. Market 8 8
Mandarin Cafe 774 8£
Cathay Post #2 li 8£
American Motors 7 9
Lupton Lanes 5 11
Izuo Studios 5 11
Beans Sport Shop 2 14
TOP MEN'S AVERAGES
Player
Nobe Ishizawa
Moon Kataoka
Lefty Kobayashi
Hoooh Okumura
George otsuki
Hank Ichikawa
Oxy Goto
Total High High
Games Pins Average Score Game
12 2196 I83 585 215
12 2190 182 570 203
12 2149 179 594 213
12 2097 174 540 216
12 2056 171 542 200
12 2054 171 549 205
12 2048 170 536 191
DNAC TURKEY HOP
A Thanksgiving Eve "Turkey
Hop" at the stork Club, 4300
Pecos St., is being planned by
the Denver Nisei Athletic Club,
Walt Moriya and Nebo Nakayama,
recently electasi Social Chairmen
are heading the^Committee arrang-
ing the affair. Tickets will
soon be on sale. N.
Other officers elected are:
President Harry Ariki, Vice-
President Yas Aochl, Secretary-
Treasurer Roy Terada and Ath-
letic Chairmen Genji Yamamoto
and Kayo Ctaguro.
FRANK TORIZAWA
T.K.
ffiont
TA. 0332
TA. 92*7
PRESCRIPTIONS
2700 Larimer if.
Return postage guaranteed
THE DENVER BULLETIN
Sec* 662, P. L. & R.
The Denver Chapter JACL
1834 Curtis Street
Denver 2, Colorado
/ye.

/ 3- £Lo
-£ 0 /o/s &