Citation
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 5, Number 3

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Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 5, Number 3
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
17

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
VOLUME V NUMBER III
DSENVER* COLORADO
JULY 1960
PRIZEWINNERS--Mike Tashiro broke out with a wide grin
when informed he was the champion pie eater at the JACL
picnic held at Dedisee Park, June 25. Susan Ohashi wears
the crown she was given as winner of the baby contest.
MERCHANTS AND CHAPTER CO-
SPONSOR POPUtAWTy CONTEST
TOP TEN WINNERS TO VIE FOR
MISS DENVER JACL TITLE ~
The current popularity poll now being staged to select
ten finalists for the final judging of Miss Denver JACL is
attracting much interest.
About thirty names were submitted to the nominations
committee. Nominations were closed July 24.
FISHING CONTFSF
OPEN TO PUBLIC
PICNIC AT DEDISSE DISTRICT CONVENTION
ENJOYE 0 BY 200 MEETS IN DENVER ON
LABOR DAY WEEKEND
A fishing derby is being
sponsored by the Denver
JACL under the direction of
John Noguchi.
More than 200 persons
attended the annual JACL
picnic held June 25 at Ded-
isse Park. Mami Katagiri
and George Masunaga were
co-chairmen.
Harry Shibao and Mrs.
Mae Murata won first prizes
in the mens and womens
fishing contest. Secon d
and third prizes in the
mens event were won res-
pectively by Bill Okubo and
Jess Masunaga.
Mike Tashiro, George Ma-
tsumonji and Kay Sakaguchi
were declared champion pie
eaters. The hole-in-one
golf contest was won by Dr.
George Kubo. Runners-up
were Dr. Tom Kobayashi and
George Shlyomura.
The first prize trophy
in the baby contest was a-
warded to Susan Ohashi.
Second prize went to Joan
Masunaga; third, Tarzan Ma-
tsumonji and fourth, Dennis
Yamaguchi.
A potluck supper was
served after the events.
Members who served on
the picnic committee were:
(Cont. page 3)
The Denver chapter will
again play host to the
Mountain plains District
convention to be held on
September 2, 3, and 4.
Pat Okura of Omaha, dis-
trict chairman, is calling
the convention together to
discuss matters confronting
the organization in prepa-
ration for the national
convention in Chicago.
Council officers and of-
ficial delegates from nine
chapters in the region as
well as numerous booster
delegates are expected to
attend.
The Denver chapter is
making arrangements for the
convention and is preparing
many diversions to make it
a worthwhile weekend for
the convention goers.
Tentatively an elaborate
dinner dance will open the
convention. Golf, fishing
and a picnic are Sunday
highlights. The climax to
the convention will be a
ball held on Labor Day at
the Cosmopolitan Hotel. It
will be sponsored jointly
with the baseball league.
Entrance
derby is 41
the public,
m ust pay
fees for the
and is open to
All entrants
their fees and
sign up before their fish
is caught. Any JACL offi-
cer will receive fees and
names of contestants.
Cash prizes will be a-
warded for the largest fish
based on, dressed weight.
Weighing-in station are at
Granada Fish Market and Ka-
tagiri s Grocery, Henderson.
The contest will close
at noon* Sept* 4* Those
competing in the contest to
date are s
(Cont. Page 3)
YIASUI NOMINATED
TOR PRESIDENCY
Minoru Yasui, local at-
torney and a vice-president
of the present chapter cab-
inet, was nominated for the
national JACL presidency
for the 1950-52 term. Ran-
dolph Sakada of Chicago was
also named for the presi-
dential office by the nat-
ional nominating committee.
Yasui has a long impres-
sive record as a JACL mem-
ber. He has also served as
a regional director of this
area.
Because some are with-
holding their votes in or-
der to boost a candidate
toward the contest end, the
committee warns that in or-
der to stay in the running
candidates must attain 5000
votes during specific per-
iods.
All candidates with less
than 5000 votes will be au-
tomatically eliminated in
the first elimination on
July 30. And subsequently,
5000 added votes will be
necessary to compete thru
the next elimination on Au-
gust 11. The final elimi-
nation will be August 18.
Secure Votes at Stores
Voting can be done by
patronizing JaDanese mer-
chants and receiving from
them 10 votes for each dol-
lars purchase. Each stub
entitles the holder to a
chance for the 4200 cash
prize.
The final tabulation of
votes will be made in late
August. Girls receiving
ten highest votes and who
meet requirements set up by
the national queen commit-
tee will comprise the fin -
allsts for the selection of
Miss Denver JACL.
The girl receiving the
most votes will be consid-
ered the most popular girl
in Denver and an appropri-
ate trophy will be present-
ed her.
The ten finalists will
be judged by a committee on
the basis of beauty, charm
and intelligence. Their
decision will render the
winner the title Miss Den-
ver JACL.


PAGE TWO
THE DENVER JfCL BULLETIN
JULY 19fO
PrNVERjACL bulletin
Published monthly by
the Denver Chapter of the
Japanese American Citi-
zens League, 1834 Curtis
St,, Denver, Colorado.
Telephone Cherry 5990
Editor: Michi Ando
Bus.Mgr.: Kenny Imamura
Staff: Chiye Horiuchi,
Bill Hosokawa, Mami Kata-
glri, Ruth Kawakami,
George Kubo, Dorothy Ma-
dokoro, Bessie Matsuda,
George Masunaga, Rosa Ma-
yeda, Ed Nakagawa, Wally
Nakamura, Haru Tanaka and
Helen Tanaka.


JeZ3
Thirty local belles*
names have been submitted
at this writing as candi-
dates for the popularity
contest being sponsored by
the chapter and local mer-
chants. The top ten final-
ists polling the most votes
and who meet the require-
ments of the national JACL
queen contest will compete
in the selection of MISS
Denver JACL.
The Denver queen will
then vie in a district con-
test to select the repre-
sentative for the Mountain
Plains region. The lucky
winner will be awarded a
trip to the national con-
vention in Chicago to com-
pete with other regional
winners for the national
title.
Be sure to ask for your
votes when making purchases
at stores cooperating in
the contest.
-* *
Very shortly we'll be
mailing out ballots to all
local members to vote for
national officers. These
ballots (already self- ad-
dressed and stamped) must
be returned before August
1. we urge you to cast
your vote.
We are very proud that
Min Yasui has been named as
candidate for president.
(Editor's Note: Bob TTyeda, Scoutmaster of Troop 38, end
Donald Furuta, Scout, attended the recent Boy Scout Jam-
boree held at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. The following
is a fine account of their experiences written by Bob.)
I" BOY SCOUT JAMBOREE UN-
FORGETTABLE EXPERIENCE "
BOB UVEDA
On .Tune 30 47,000 Scouts listened solemnly as president
Truman delivered the opening address at the 1950 National
Jamboree of the Boy Scouts of America at Valley Forge.
This was the first encampment since Washington and his
tattered Continental Army endured a bitter winter over 170
year ago and went on to win their battle for liberty. The
site could not have been more inspiring, nor could the oc-
casion have been more momentous.
This was the setting for the opening of the Jamboree
the climax of the Scouting Crusade to "Strengthen the Arm
of Liberty" by citizenship training at home and world bro-
therhood abroad. Here was the bes t in Scouting by chosen
Scouts from every state and eighteen foreign countries.
'/hat's It like when 47,000 Scouts camp together for a
week? Imagine a city of the size of pueblo springing up
over a 44 hour period--a riot of activities, and all in
short pantsJ (Even the leadersmy wife screamed when I
tried them onJ) These awesome figures may help picture
the undertaking; over 20,000 colorful tents of every type
spread over 625 acres; two carloads of cereals, or pan-
cakes enough if stacked to reach twice the height of the
EJnpire State Building, at each breakfast; 35 miles of wetn-
ers at a meal; 80,000 gallons of milk; 100,000 pounds of
meat--all cooked by Scouts. *The Scouts were trained and
organized at Pre-Jamboree camps into patrols of eight.
Tenting and cooking under the patrol system were so effi-
cient that the General Staff of the Army paid a visit for
study.
A full schedule of events followed the organizations of
the sections. The'highlights of the week were the pro-
grams held in a 12 acre arena with a stage two blocks long.
The opening ceremonies included, in addition to the Presi-
dent's talk, words of welcome by Gov. Duff; a pageant,--
"The Valley Forge Story"; convocation, stressing religious
freedom; songfest led by Lanny Ross; Sunday services for
the different faiths; Fourth of July presentation of Amer-
ican history; Eisenhower's talk; Region VIII campfire (a
group of states including Colorado); and the inspiring
closing ceremony: a bridge built on the stage for the
pageant "Bridge of Friendship Over the world." A spontan-
eous roar of cheers greeted the announcement of the reorg-
anization of the Boy Scouts of Japan.
Daytime activities included tours of the well-preserved
andreconstructed grounds of Valley Forge and visits to
other sections. The foreign section was perhaps the most
popular--Lithuanian refugee Scouts, native Filipino huts,
kilted Nova Scotia Scouts, a thriving "gringo" trade at
the Mexican area, Hawaiians in their colorful shirts, the
lone Scout from Belgium. There were about 25 of Japanese
ancestry in the Hawaiian contingent; two from Lki one from
Frisco, Laredo, Texas, Leonia, N.J., and Donald Furuta of
our own Troop 38, who was an excellent representative.
Popular with all Scouts were the trading posts with
their television sets and snack bars. Coke consumption:
10,000 cases the first day--over a million bottles through
the Fourthl
* #
Georgians Honda who is
attending the annual Encamp-
ment for Citizenship at Riv*
erdale, N. v. on a scholar-
ship writes: "This summer
camp is an experience I am
thankful to be having for
the program is smooth and
superb. We have education-
al lectures and workshops
and discussions daily for
six hours--one city tour a
week, movies, town meetings
--very full schedule."
As educational and exciting was the trip itself--the
contingent traveling by special trains to Chicago, Dear-
born Village, Niagara, New York City, Baltimore, Annapolis,
Washington, D.C. and St. Louis.
Additional passengers on the return trip Included a
baby raccoon, a five-foot snake with nine eggs, countless
horned toads, a turtle and a deodorized skunk (wonder what
mom said?).
It was a great experience and thrill to be at Valley
Forge. Forty-seven thousand Scouts will forever have en-
shrined in their hearts wonderful memories of exciting and
inspirational moments, and will take back to their troops,
the Scouting values they acquired to "Strengthen the Arm
of Liberty."
CRITICS CORNER
PUL HO&OKAWA
I see by the papers that
Denver's own Min Yasui has
been nominated for the na-
tional JACL presidency.
The organization can look
far and never find a person
more enthusiastic, more
zealous about good causes.
He well could be a worthy
successor to such outstand-
ing Nisei as Hlto Okada,
Saburo Kido, Jim Sakamoto,
Walt Tsukamoto, Doc Yatabe
who headed the JACL through
its critical years.
Now that Yasxii has been
recognized nationally by
nomination, it behooves all
Denverites to push his can-
didacy. H is election will
be an honor to the city and
the region. His candidacy
should be the focus for re-
vitalizing the local chap-
ter, and reawakening inter-
est in its activities.
Nothing would embarrass
Candidate vasui so much in
the national view as a
lackadaisical, phlegmatic
home chapter. Once Denver
was one of the JACL'S most
active groups. But it has,
through many reasons, slip-
ped from that pinnacle.
Perh*p* that decline was
inevitable. The Nisei popi>
1 ation has dwindled. So
have the problems that made
the JACL such a necessary
organization. There was
little around which the
members could rally--except
such superficial functions
as dances and picnics.
But now Yasui's candida-
cy is something that all
members can support. Let's
do it.
-CALENDAR-
Coming Events
Sunday, July 30Tea at
the T. K. Kobayashi resi-
dence for queen candidates.
Fashion show. Date to
be announced later.
Fishing derby closes on
September 1.
District Council Conven-
tion, Sept. 2, 3, 4. Dance
to be heid Labor Day, Sil-
ver Glade room.
DENVER JACL MEMBERSHIP
Single Membership $2.00
Couple Membership $3.50
P.C. (Member) $3.00
P.C. (Non-Member) $3.50
Subs, to Denver JACL Bul-
letin only, is $1.00 for
balance of the year.


JULY 1950
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
PAGE THREE
Vacationing here In the
Mile-Hi City are:Dr. At Mrs.
SAM SATO of West Virginia;
Mr. and Mrs. HASH TOGASKI
from Chicago, Illinois; the
OJIS, RUBY and MARY from
Sacramento, Calif...MARY is
now engaged to JAMES UNO;
IRV MATSUDA from Chicago;
and JENNIE ITO came from
San Francisco.
RUBY KITSUTAKA just re-
turned from a vacation to
the Windy City. She was
visiting her one and only,
EDWIN HAGIHARA.
Have you ever tasted IRV
MATSUDA1S delicious steaks?
voure missing something if
you havent)! He gave a
steak fry and those lucky
ones who attended included:
JENNIE ITO, DODIE MADOKORO,
HELEN TANAKA, HARRY KURACHI,
DR. & EMI CHIKUMA, GEORGE
MASUNAGA, ROY & SACHI SH1--
BATA, SUE MARUYAMA, TERRY
HARADA At JIRO SHOJI, DON &
ROSE TANABE.
AGNES KITSUTAKA is now
wearing a sparkler on her
third finger, left hand.
The lucky man is PAUL NAKA-
JTMA.
HELEN MIKAWA, a recent
CTJ grad is now working as a
Med. Tech at St.Lukes Hos-
pital Lab. RUTHIE KAWAKAMI
is also working there but
will transfer to Fitzsimmon
Gen. Hosp. on August 1,
JAMES OSUGA who recently
sang at the CSMC has both
good looks and good voice.
FLORENCE ENDO said 'I Do'
recently to HASON YANAGA.
SUE MAYEDA, CHIYE HORIU-
CHI, MAMI KATAGIRI and BES
MATSUDA did a little angl-
ing at parvin Lake. Results
were MAMI caught 3 trout
and CHIVE caught......up on
her sleepiJJ
ATST.J ITO, SACHI SHIBATA,
CHIVE HORITTCHI, MAMI KATA-
GIRI, ROSE TANABE, BESSIE
MATSUDA, HELEN UMEZAWA, RO-
SA MAVEDA and SUKI MATSUMO-
TO have formed the Divoters
Women's Golf Club. They
are improving, but still
hit in the "50s", that is
.....nine holes'. ATSU made
a birdie last week on the
5th hole at City Park. A
tournament is being talked
up soon to be arranged by
HELEN UMEZAWA, president.
'oAA&lr Fton si
D£NV£R5ECONOMICAL FLORIST
FREE DELIVERY
5// !5ST CH.3&4G
JACL PICNIC SCENES
AW ft'WAN ST RELAXIN
(Fishing Derby)
Fred voshioka, John No-
guchi, Tosh Ando, Min Ya-
sui, George Furuta, Norma n
Takakl, Ed Chinn, Bill Naka-
gawa, Bill Chinn, Doc Maye-
da, Yosh Iwahashi, Jim Oki-
da, John Okizaki, E. Hori-
uchi.
George Masunaga, Bessie
Matsuda, J. Kanegaye, Jim
Hamai, George Ohashi, N.
Hoshijima, Dick Motoyoshi,
George Matsumonji, Doc Ko-
bayashi, Doc Suenaga, John
Miura, T. Katagiri, Harry
Shibao, Sammy Terasaki.
Mike Tashiro, Jess Masu-
naga, George Fujimoto, Ta-
gus Murata, Kay Sakaguchi,
John Shimizu, Bill Okubo,
Sam Naka, Kaz Sakamoto, Ma-
sato Suyama.
(Picnid Story Cont.)
food, True Yasui, Mi chi An-
do; fishing, Mike Tashiro,
Frank Nakagawa, Jess Masu-
naga; baby contest, Dorothy
Madokoro, Helen Tanaka, Sue
Maruyama, Emi Chikuma; golf,
Dr, George Kubo, Mike Kita-
no.
Pie eating contest, Geo.
Masunaga, Ed Nakagawa, Min
Yasui; childrens races,
Sachi Shibata, Betty Kane-
gaye; adult races, Mary Fu-
Jimoto, Helen Okada; prizes,
Frank Torizawa, Ed Matsuda ;
transportation, Kenny Ima-
mura, John Noguchi.
* TEXACO*
GEORGES MOTOR
20ST. LAW PENCE
MAIN 9373
mm mw reliable
lm ppescBptk
PRESCRIPTIONS
TA.0332 TA.9227 2700LAmR
DIAMONDS JEWEL#.)
EXPERT WATCH REPAIRING
1203-ID Sr. DENVER. COLO.
fmmmumw
DENTISTS
JOHN CHIKUMA, DDS
40 N. Main BRIGHTON 560;
F.E. HAYAN0-, DDS MA 9400
2103 Larimer Street
MILTON HAYANO, DDS MA 9400|
2103 Larimer Street
T. ITO, DDS KE 8680
830 18th Street
Y. ITO, DDS KE 1077
830 18th Street
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS TA 6961
301 Interstate Trust Bldg*
K.K. MIYAMOTO, DDS TA 4307
1952 Larin^r Street
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS TA 7598
200 Interstate Trust Bldg.
INSURANCES
MITSUO KANEKO AL 3500,
1232 20th Street
JINZO NODA FR 1065
3211 Clayton Street
LAWYERS
TOSHIO ANDO ... AC 5315
1942 Larimer Street
OTORU YASUI AL 7227
1917 Lawrence Street
OPTOMETRISTS
GEORGE KUBO, OD AC 5315
1942 Larimer Street
BEN MATOBA, OD KE 1941
1927 Larimer Street
physicians smm\
CHARLES FUJISAKI, MD
40 H. Main BRIGHTON 418
.K. KOBAYASHI, MD KE 4590
1227 27th Street
ISAMU OZAMOTO, MD TA 1596
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
HOWARD SUENAGA, MD AC 1314,
830 18th Street
GEORGE TAKENO, MD TA 0783|
830 18th Street
MAHITO UBA, DO MA 3743|
1230 21st Street


EDDY KATSUDA will be
eating pork chops and ham-
burger patties, the only cu-
linary accomplishments of
15 year old daughter, DIANE
for a whole month while
wife, wiwqtte is in Califor-
nia. While there, MIT SUE
will be seeing her daughter
JOAN, who is being missed
by Denvers younger set.
CAROL TANAKA flew to LA
in early July for a three
day visit with a sis ter
from Hawaii, whom she had
not seen for 21 years.
DOROTHY and TED CHIBA
are motoring to California.
,!eens they miss their daugh-
ter J0VCE. Why, they miss
her almost as much as
JOYCES best pal FUZZY YA-
SUDA does.
H ART.T TANAKA, X-ray tech-
nician at St. Josephs hos-
pital, will be vacationing
in California. Shell be
leaving just as soon as she
gets the candidates tea un-
der way.
Big fish are being cau^t
left and right. SALLY SUYA-
MA tells us her husband MA-
SATO got some big uns in
Wyoming a couple weeks ago.
They were displayed in his
shop for all to see.
Its good to know TONY &
W7K0 KA'VAMO with infant son
BOBBY are settling down in
Denver.
IT$u fttrttta is in town
with her two boys visiting
friends and relatives. Hus-
band PETE was left at home.
TOMMY KUMAGAI, stationed
at Ft. Meade, Maryland was
home on furlough visiting
his family. TOMMY and his
beautiful new red Ford con-
vertible was much in evi-
dence in and about popular
nisei rendezvous with BEN
MIYAHARA. But where wuz
the gals, BEN?
JAMES OTA, new JACL mem-
ber from Hawaii who is ma-
triculating at DU is our
choice of a most coopera-
tive member. New in town
and eager to make friends,
give him a buzz at the Ya-
maga apts.
The winners of the fish-
ing contest at the picnic
refused to have their "big"
fish pictured, but they
were willing to pose. In
the snap are HARRY SHIBAO,
BILL OKUBC, JESS MASUNAGA,
and MRS. MAE MURATA.
The MIKE KITANOS wel-
comed a third son recently.
Hes called DAVID. The
stork left BILL and ALICE
HOSORA'VA a baby girl. The
MIN YASUIS expect an addi-
tion in the fall.
SUE MAVEDA entertained a
group of friends at a lunch-
eon to honor FLORA FUJIKAWA.
GRANADA
MARKET *
KC.SOT3 1919 LM/REMCE ST.
"Iflanchiu
GRIU CHOPSUEy f
-h/Tmyou. can
1956 Larimer StTa 9576
The fight for the American league title is a nip-and-
tuck affair with the Denv er Merchants and Ault in the
thick of it. Both teams have lost only one contest to
date, and it is rather difficult to tell which team will
hold the Drivers seat when the season closes. Besides,
second division teams are sure to cause some major upsets
before the campaign ends.
Tn the National league Longmont looks like a good bet
to come out in front, but dont count the tough Platte-
ville nine out. The Denver Rockets have been plenty tough
and ditto for the young Bussei. Look for these two teams
to make a better showing next year.
The colorful Denver Nisei club won their first game of
the season by trouncing Midwest Trade School in a highly
propitious manner. They collected a total of 18 solid
base-knocks and played fine all-around ball much to the
satisfaction of our rabid ball followers. The local club
will be journeying to California sometimes next month for
a series of games against Vest coast teams.
Art Arita, who formerly played every position for the
Denver Russel has been elevated to the Denver Nisei nine.
The husky young Manual Hi grad is one of the finest back-
stoppers in this area and his presence in the Nisei line-
up should bolster the team considerably.
Nancy Ito is probably the finest wahine Nisei softball-
er in Denver. The likeable lassie plays shortstop for a
local club in the City Park league, and is thrilling the
huge throngs with her long distance hitting and fine all-
around play.
The NWAA Gibos and Joes Jewelry are entered in the in-
termediate division of the gals city softball league. Both
teams have lost most of their games, but they are improv-
ing with every game and thats what counts.
Mitzi Osumi is an up-and-coming player who should go
far. She toes the rubber for the NWAA nine and has pitch-
ed some fine games to date. Sacbi Yoshimura ie doing a
fine job for the Jewelry team. Her scintillating flinging
has been the main factor in the teams fine showing.
Rupe Aral is a veritable whirlwind whenever he sets
foot on the diamond. He can hit, he can run, and he can
field with the best of them. A very modest fella, he is a
big favorite with the fans at 23rd & v/elton.
The CSMC nine has come up with a formidable outfit in
the city sponsored church league. .Timmy Okazaki sparkles
with his fine mound work, while Tsune Kosuge and Jun Hamai
plays sensationally at short and left field, respectively.
Return postage guaranteed See* 562, P, L. & R,
THE DENVER BULIETIN
The Denver Chapter JACL
1834 Curtis Street
Denver 2, Colorado