Citation
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 6, Number 7

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Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 6, Number 7
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
18

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
VOLUME VII NUMBER 7
DENVER, COLORADO
JULY, 1951
/?ev. Yam ad a Speaks
At Denver Meezin&s
Sponsored by the Denver
JACL and arranged by Chiye
Horiuchi, program chairman
and 1st vice president of
the local chapter, two
public meetings were held
tor the Rev* Masao Yamada
of Hilo, Hawaii on his vi-
sit to Denver on June 27th
and 28th*
Rev* Yamada was the
first Nisgi commissioned as
a chaplain in the U. S*
Army, and attained the rank
of Captain. He acted as
the Chaplain for the famed
442nd Combat Team, in all
of its bloody campaigns in
Italy and Prance* Yamada
won the Purple Heart with
oak leaf cluster, and the
Legion of Merit award while
serving the men of the
<*42nd
a dinner for Rev. and Mrs.
M. Yamada at the Cathay
.post, followed by a oublic
meeting at the Tri-State
Buddhist Church. Rev. Ya-
mada spoke of the tremend-
ous gains that the JACL had
made and achieved for Nisei
in America, and reminded
veterans -that the fight is
not yet over; that because
of their war records they
could make immeasurably
valuable contributions to
the cause of all Nisei* Ya-
mada dramatically recounted
xhe heroic exploits of the
*42nd, and called for a coi>
tinuation of that spirit in
the continuing battle for
Americanism* He emphasized
that a nation-wide organi-
zation of Nisei, the JACL,
is essential for the securi-
ty and future of the Nisei
in America*
Yamada spoke to the Is-
sei on June 27, at the
CSMD, recounting his per-
sonal first-hand observa-
tions of the Nisei in ac-
tion* He was able to tell
Gold Star parents of the
actual situations in which
their sons were killed* He
emphasized that the Nisei
61*8 sacrificed and fought
i or democracy, but that the
fight for equality for the
parents of these same Nisei
01*8 is not yet over. The
meeting was chaired by R.S.
Tani, who conducted the
meeting in Japanese*
On Thursday night, head-
ed by Y* Terasaki, presi-
dent, the Denver JACL gave
Scouts Bssin
Bkper Drive
With the help of Scout
Dad Art Yorimoto, the Boy
Scout Troop #38 has start-
ed their periodical pick-
up of old newspapers and
magazines.
Scoutmaster Bob Uyeda
announced that anyone hav-
ing a garage full of news-
papers or a basement full
of magazines may call TK
Pharmacy, AL 4825, and the
scouts will be over to
haul than away*
EXTRAS WANTED
OPrra movie roles
TO LOCAL JARANESE
i-ji excellent opportunity
for Japanese families to get
some fun acting in a movie
and some good income be-
sides, was revealed this
week. The roles, which of-
fer no glamour parts, will
be playing extras as peas-
ants in rice paddies and
war refugees trekking down
dusty roads*
RKO Pictures, which is
filming a movie obopt the
Community Picnic
Set Tor August
a late August pionio is
being planned by the Denver
JACL, it was revealed by
Chiye Horiuchi, program
chairman of the local'chap-
ter.
Preparing for this annu-
al community affair are the
following committee members
Sue Liaruyama, Dodie iaadoko-
ro. Rui Taniguchi, True Ya-
sui and Dr. George Kubo.
A variety of games for
the children as well as ad-
equate diversions for the
adults will be provided, it
was assured*
JACL Assists
Lisle Fellowship
The JACL has assisted
the Lisle Fellowship, which
has its basic philosophy
that people of varied back-
grounds and races can live
and work together in peace
and harmony to solve the
problems of community liv-
ing*
A special brochure ap-
pealing for financial as-
sistance was prepared by
JACL members, including Ro-
sa Mayeda who sketched cle-
ver cartoons, Lillian Tera-
saki who did the mimeo-
graphing work, and True Ya-
sui who did the 500 piece
mailing*
The Colorado unit of
Lisle atop Lookout Mtn com-
mences July 27th for six
weeks* Deputation teams
consisting of college stu-
dents of all races and na-
tionalities, including for-
eign exchange students,
will visit the Japanese
community in Denver, as
well as Denver Social agen-
cies*
Korean .ar near Colorado
Springs, issued an urgent
call for 65 Orientals to
act as extras in the pic-
ture and requested the JACL
office to assist in filling
this order* In the event
that sufficient extras can-
not be obtained in Colorado
the extras will be imported
from California.
Thirty women from 18
years and up, 15 children
of either sex between the
ages of 5 to 12' years, and
20 older men over the age
of 50 years are being
sought.
Women will receive ^8
per day; children are paid
sj>6 per day; and the men
will get tflO per day. Some
few lines of speaking parts
are offered, and any extra
with a speaking line will
receive ^55 for any speak-
ing part*
RKO will pay all trans-
portation, meals and hous-
ing. The filming will take
place about August 6, 1951,
and will continue over a
period of 2 or 3 weeks. It
was suggested that ^orae
families fitting the above
age brackets could take ad-
vantage of the job offer as
a vacation with excellent
pay.
Any person or family in-
terested should immediately
contact Min Yasui at the
JaCL office, 1917 Lawrence
St*, Denver 2, Colorado,or
call AL 7227 or AL 4149 for
further details and defi-
nate commitments*
Kuutabata Wins
Radio Prga
Kenichi Kuwabara, active
member of the Denver JACL,
was recently awarded $25
and a years subscription
to Colliers magazine by a
national radio program*
He submitted a question
used on the Reporters
Round-up, a Mutual network
show emanating from Wash-
ington DC last week.
The question directed
at Senator Flanders (Rep.£
Vermont), guest on the
program, was: What effect
will the truce in Korea
have on the bipartisan po-
licy of the United States?


PAGE 2
THE DLNVER JACL .BULLETIN
JULY, 1951
DENVER JACLBUUETIM
Published monthly by the
Denver chapter of the Japanese
American Citizens League, 1917
Lawrence St., Denver, Colorado,
Telephones Alpine 7227
Editor: George Llasunaga
Business Manager: Sam Kumagai
Staff: Bill Hosokawa, Fumi
Katagiri, Mami Katagiri, Dr,
George Kubo, Dorothy Madokoro
Sue Maruyama, Pearl Kuwabara,
Bessie Matsuda, Rosa Mayeda, Ben
Miyahara, Sachi Shibata, Haru
Tanaka and Min Yasui,
(j£ Pray Sy-
Yutaka Terapaki.
One of the most gratify-
ing things that I have "dis-
covered" has been t£e- un-
selfish desire of our mem-
bers to cooperate and to
help. I might say that I
have been continuously sur-
prised and overwhelmed with
the response. Each time we
have a job to do and I have
contacted members, the
answer has always been a
complete willingness to
help in some way.
The answer, of course in
my analysis, is that each
of you as members realize
the importance of the organ
ization; realize that every
other member is contribut-
ing freely of his time be-
cause he too believes it
best for all of us, and
realizes above all that an
organization of this sort
is the only answer to some
of the problems confronting
tf !!
Join the JACL
^TEXACO*
GEORGE'S MOTOR
20thST LAWRENCE
____MAIN 9373
GUEST EDITORIAL
Makujin JACLer Speaks
on,, c.
On request, here is word
from a hakujiri JACL member.
I was early introducted to
the organization, at Santa
Barbara, not long after
Pearl Harbor. The Issei
leadership was soon removed
to Missoula, and elsewhere,
and responsibilities fell
to the Nisei, both in
the churches and in the
JACL. It was at a JACL
meeting that for the first
time in my life I partici-
pated in the "Salute to the
American Flag."
At first., the JACL atti-
tude wa's, "They can11 push
us around; we are American
citizens." To dne just out
of Japan, it was surprising
how American these Nisei
were.- fyiite a different
type from the Japanese, if
of the same race.
The local "L" soon found
that there was little they
could do. They looked to
the head officers, up state*
and great was their disap-
pointment when they learned
that despite the efforts of
these officers, evacuation
would be necessary. "Sun-
kist hysteria" and the "get
them out" group were having
results. The attorney
General.had said that the
Constitution would not per-
mit the removal of a part
of the citizenry and not
the rest. But the Presi-
dent* as Comander in Chief
of the armed forces issued
a directive, and authorized
area Army authorities to
make decisions. I never
took any stock in the criti-
cism that the JACL leader-
ship "give in" and too easi-
ly "agreed to evacuation."
The activities of the
JACL in the Centers is
little known to me, though
it was in a waiting room at
Amache that I first met Ma-
Wilson Leading
JACL Tiiotft Derby
Leading the Denver JACL
Trout Derby with a husky 2
lb, 12 oz. (dressed) rainbow
is L. C. Wilson, announced
Mike Kitano, chairman of the
fishing contest.
Inn
-
sao Sato. Later, I met
other JACL leaders in Re*
settlement work. We and
the Fishers were permitted
to entertain the Mike Masa-
okas and the Larry Taj iris
in Denver, after Joe Grant
Masaoka came to activate
the Denver Association,
The campaign to defeat
the proposed Amendment to
deny alien land ownership
necessitated hakujin promo-
tion and finance. Although
the JACL was working* it
was necessary that the Colo-
rado Committee for Fair
Play do that job.
It was at the Denver Na-
tional League meeting that
I first saw in action Sabu-
ro Kido* Dr. Sakada, Min
Yasui, those previously
mentioned and others. It
was an impressive and in-
spiring sight which gave
one confidence in the organ*
ization*s future.
The superb work of Paci-
fic Citizen, the coopera-
tion with the ACLU in oppos-
ing in the courts discrimi-
natory laws and practices,
the broadening of Nisei in-
terests to include other
minorities* and the spark-
ing of the ADC program have
made the organization one
to be conjured with.
One suggestion. the
JACL in Colorado might well
secure the cooperation of
the Unity Council and
others in working to secure
legislation to include the
Issei in the Old Age Pen-
sion system.
Cbmer*
MOSOKAWA.
This being Colorado*s
5th anniversary of state-
hood, and Aug. 1 being the
oirthday* I*ve got an idea.
How about a historical re-
search project to be xack-
led by all of Colorados
JACL chapters, dealing with
the part played by Japanese
pioneers in the
early development,
state* s
Seems to me that such
research could produce a
fascinating end historical-
ly valuable story. And
surely the JACL chapters*
with all their many con-
positions to undertake, such
a job.
For myself* I*d like to
read an authoritative his-
tory about the role of Jap-
anese immigrants in early
day mining, when Colorado
was booming rich. I*d like
to find out about the rail*
roads they helped lay, and
about the land they helped
clear in places like the
upper and lower Platte val-
leys, the Arkansas Valley*
the San Luis valley. What
part did they have in the
Oak Creek coal fields* in
the Walsenburg mines and
the early development of
the Colorado Fuel and Iron
Corp* at Pueblo?
Some research on these
subjects* before the last
of the pioneers slip away*
would be a valuable addi-
tion to the store of state
history. And when the com-
plete story is compiled and
told* it would add immense-
ly to the prestige of Jap-
anese Americans.
It wouldn* t be much of a
problem to get the story
published. I happen to know
a magazine editor.
Know yquil chaptcr.
RlCOAOMt Set'r Sue
Charming Sue Maruyama is
our efficient recording
secretary.
Sue is another native
Coloradoan having been born
in Swink. She attended
school thete and graduated
from Crowley High School.
In Denver she attended
Barnes School of Commerce
and now is employed as a
private secretary at George
Prior Company.
She excells in golf,
swimming and skiing. Danc-
ing is one of her favorite
pastimes.
Attractive Sue was the
regional representative in
the national JACL Q,ueen
Contest in 1950.
The ability
to take neat
and accurate
notes coupled
with a pleas-
ant personali-
ty certainly
adds to the
efficacy and
smooth opera-
tion of cabi-
net activities.


JULY, 1951
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
PAGE 3
CongratulationsU!l It's
a boy for SUMI and GEORGE
KAGOHARA* They*ve named
him BOB ALLEN* SUMI is the
former SUMI TASUIRO of
Brighton*
NAOMI repeated the vows
very sweetly to DR* AKIRA
TAJIRI. SUZANNE INAI was
her fiiaters maid-of-honor*
Doing the honors for AKIRA
was his brother TANEY*
Ushers were BOB and SAM
INAI and TSUNEO OZAWA*
Fords are sho getting
popular nowadays* SAM and
MARY MOMII are bragging
about their new Victoria,
also sporting a gorgeous
two-tone Victoria are HELEN
and HARRY KURACEI (the new-
ly weds)
Heard KATIE KAWAMURA,
former JACL Bulletin Editor,
rode all the way from Delta
to Gunnison with DOC and
Evil CHIKUMA. Accompanying
them was dodie madokoro,
who now claims that peach
color complexion**
A recent announcement of
the marriage of DENNIS TOKU-
NAGA and HELEN KATAYAMA was
a very pleasant surprise to
their many friends, both
are native Brightonians*
From White Sands, New
Mexico TOMMY HAMal was a
recent visitor to Denver,
guest of EDDIE KAWAKAMI.
The women golfers prac-
ticing every Saturday are:
ROSA MAYEDA, SACHI SHIBATA
and sister SUE MARUYAEA.
Heard that they are getting
mighty goodlllilncidentally
FRANCES HASEGAV/A has been
seen practicing at the
driving range, she can hit
a mighty long ball*
YOSHI and KAZ YAMAGA
gave fancy dinner for
their brothers LUCKY and
KENNY who were recent
graduates from college*
Seme of the guests were:
SHIZ and DANNY YOoilBaURA,
MARY and SAM ARIKI, Miil.ll
KATaGIRI, Mas YOSHIMURA and
NELSON HiiDA*
A cute foursome that are
mighty good are YAS AOChl*
RUPERT ARAI, JACK KANAGAYE
and WALT MORIYA* Isntt it
a rough game fellows?????
Have you ever seen STAN
ICHIKAWA fish????
for suckers*, that is*
JANE OKADA, SUMI and
KATHERINE TOCHIHARA and
MAMX KATAGIRI were among
the enthusiastic audience
at the Sigmund Romberg con-
cert at Red Ro'cks Park*
Action Demanded On
Immigration, Naturalization
Mike Masaoka, national
legislative director of the
JACL Anti discrimination
committee, oalled upon gov-
ernment and congressional
officials for early action
on legislation for equality
in naturalization and immi-
New home owners1 are MAS
and YOSH NAKAYAMA.
gration tot persons of Jap-
anese ancestry. Noting that
a peace conference to con-
sider a treaty with Japan
has been called for Sept-
ember 4th in San Francisco
Masaoka observed that pass-
age of such legislation be-
fore the signing of a peace
treaty with Japan would
have a most salutary effect;
The JACK HATA* S are ex-
pecting their first baby in
early fall*
Two pert Chicago misses
ROSE ARIKA and MI YE INOKU-
CHI found the cool, clean
air of Colorado exhilarat-
ing and were reluctant to
leave for the heat and
grime of the Windy City*
Brightening up Denver
with their sparkling charm
were KAY and ANNABEL UYEDA
from San Frspicisco* They
were guests of sister Lt*
FLO UYEDA at Fitzsimons
Gere ral Hospital*
Good-looking Lt* TOM
KUKAGAI from Fort Keade,
1-Id., spent most of his
short leave in Denver dat-
ing pretty ALICE MUCAVA
Kudos to BOB UYEDA and
SAM TERASAKI for their un-
selfish and somewhat unap-
preciated contributions to
the boy scout program of
this dommunity.
Money must eome easy in
Chicago, *cuz we saw SUGAR
SUYEIIIRO sporting around in
a new Ford* He returned ra-
ther hastily to the Windy
City after spending a few
days back home in Denver*
FUMI KATAGIRI, YAYE SA-
KAGUCHI and her sister TOSH
are now sharing an apart-
ment in San Francisco, Cal-
ifornia*
SETS and TORIE ITO and
their new daughter are now
making their home in Denver*
Congratulations to FRED
and PEGGY (nee YAMATO) MI-
KUHI on the arrival of a
son, they^e named him
i^
MIKAWAm
430 LMUMM. TA Ibll
S3S*
He declared that the
elimination of racial dis-
crimination against the Jap-
anese in our federal nat-
ional and immigration laws
would go far to demonstrate
the sincere desires of the
Congress for permanent
friendship with* Japan*
Since the passage 6J- the
Japanese Exclusion Act in
1924, the.Japanese people
have resented the implied
inferiority levied against
them ih the statute, the
legislative director ex-
plained* In fact, many His-
torians have suggested that
this discriminatory measure
contributed materially to
World War II."
If. in welcoming Japan
back into the family of na-
tions, the United States
can also announce that it
has repealed the Japanese
Exclusion Act of 1924 and
extented naturalization
privileges to its immigrants
already in this country,the
freedom-seeking peoples of
the world, particularly in
Asia, will be more likely
to accept American leader-
ship as truly democratic,"
Masaoka said*
"In the future,as in the
past, it will be difficult
for America to reconcile her
racially-dis oriminatory-to-
the Orient laws with her
professions goodwill* By the simple ex-
pedient of removing the rao-
ial barriers in naturaliza-
tion and immigration lavra,
however, the United States
can. dramatically illustrate
a changed policy ct equality
to all nations and to all
peoples," The ADC official
suggested*
rnSSSES
service bureau
%%%S ST. KA SSHfc
MM RELIABLE
PRESCRIPTIONS
AL ¥82*
2700LAfflMfR
DENTISTS
JOHN CHIKUMA, DDS
40 N. Main BRIGHTON 560
F.E. HAYANO, DDS MA 9400
2103 Larimer 3treet
MILTON HAYANO, DDS MA 9400
2103 Larimer Street
T. ITO, DDS ... KE 8680
830 18th Street
Y. ITO, DDS KE,1077
830 18th Street*
T. KAV/ANO, DDS KE 3064
1404 E* 18th Avenue
ROBERT MAYEDA, DDS TA 6961
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS TA 6961
301 Interstate Trust Bldg*
K.K. MIYAMOTO, DDS TA 4307
1952 Lari iter Street
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS TA 7598
200 Interstate Trust Bldg.
/HSURANCE
JINZO NODA FR 1065
3211 Clayton Street
LAWYERS
TOSHIO ANDO ... AC 5315
1942 Larimer Street
MINORU-YASUI AL 722*7
1917 Lawrence Street
OPTOMETRISTS
GEORGE KUBO, OD aC 5315
, 1942 Larimer Street
BEN MATOBA, OD- KE 1941
1927 Larimer Street
pmicmssmm
CHARIES FUJISAKI, MD
40 N* Main BRIGHTON 418
T.K. KOBAYASHI, MD KE 4590
1227 27th Street
ISAMU 0ZAM0T0, MD TA 1596
301 Interstate Trust Bldg*
HOWARD SUENAGA, MD AC 1314
830 18th Street
GEORGE TAKENO, MD TA 0783
830 18th Street
MAHITO UBA, DO MA 3743
1230 21st Street
flCCQUNTMO-
tmURANCS.
MITSUO EANEKO AL 3500
1232 20th Street


PAGE 4
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
JULY 1951
P&ka-bee?
TOM Sc NELLIE YANG and
their two children are back
in good old Denver after
trying to live in Califor-
nia. Illness on the part
of the children forced them
to return to Colorado.
HARU TANAKA, has taken a
job as Ex-Hay technician at
Et. Logans Vet Hospital.
She has taken an apartment
in Englewood.
The BOB NAKADuIS of Oma-
ha are spending a week in
town renewing JACI acquaint-
ances, while getting in
some fishing. if BOBs
luck is anything like no
good fishermen, TOSH ANDO.
GEORGE MASUNAGA, MIN YASUI
or MIKE KITANO, he aint
gonna do so hot*
Talking about fishing,
dont see how lil DOC ITO
does it. In Bear Creek,
where no others can catch
em, he tosses in his line,
jerks, and comes out with
fish. '.'/a watched him, and
came to the only possible
deduction, those particular
fish wanted to commit sui-
cide.
DuUG MIZUKAMI is back in
town getting in his licks
fishing and golfing, after
a winter back last ssxing
chickens. The MIZUKAMIS
just got back from a three
weeks vacation in Califor-
nia. Theyre expecting
their 1st child very soon.
HELEN YUG2 flew in from
California to attend her
sister, BESSIE DAT3UDA S
GEORGE & AMY MIURA just
got back from a 3 weeks
motor trip to California.
They looked up a whole lot
of former Denverites and
got in a lot of sight see-
ing besides.
LAYE UY&DA of San Er an-
cisco was a guest of the
CSKY TAHIIAKIs. Ches a
sister of LT. ELOR3NCE UY3-
DA at Eitzsimmons. Heard
tell 331T MIYAHARA and GEO.
kASUNAGA t_ook KAY3 and JEAN
EUJIMCTO in a poker game*
SUE MA3DA can always be
found at the Red Rocks con-
certs, top'first row, under
the one and only tree.
The ART YGRILIOTGS are
spending a week in Gunnison
fishins and vacationing.
iCSN YAB3 snatched first
price at one session of the
Rocky iit. American Contract
Bridge League's tournament,
which was held in Denver
last month. JOB SANO of
Boulder was another prize
winner*
Relatives and guests on
vacation take advantage of
many a denver households
hospitality, dome Denver-
ites, who have opened wid$
their doors are the GUTZ
TAiiiGUCHl3 -who entertained
relatives from Chicago, the
KEN YABES entertained rela-
tives from Detroit.
THELMA N0GU3HI kORIKA.YA
is visiting the JOHN NOGU-
CHIS. DR, Sc MRS, H0M3R
YASUI of Poughkeepsee, N.Y*
stopped en route to Port-
land at their many rela-
tives, such as the TOSH AN-
DOS, MIN YASUI *3, & KEN
YABT3.
marriage to GEORGE SHIYOMU-
RA.
GHO & ;iAS SATO of Boston
BRED & EL YOSIIIOKA have visited with the PERRY_ MO-
welcomed a new addition, JO HI'S, who are expecting a
ANN, into their midst last *aby in September. HARUKO
month. 7/ith JOY Sc DALE, TAMURAo sister and husband
they make quite a family. were in town also.
Within the candle-lit
chapel of the California
Street Methodist Church in
a quiet, late afternoon
formal wedding, Miss Bessie
Matsuda and Mr* George Shi-
yomura were uhited in holy
matrimony. The Reverend K.
Sasaki and the Reverend
George Uyemura officiated
at the ceremony.
were the brides sisters,
Mrs* John Fujikawa of Chi-
cago and Mrs* George Yuge
of Delhi, Calif*
The grooms best man was
Carl Saito, while his at-
tendants included Jim Shi-
yomura, George Masunaga and
Joey Sumida.- John Fujikawa
and George Fujiraoto were
the ushers*
Miss Sue kaeda was maid A reception followed in
of honor and attendants the church terrace.
Return postage guaranteed Sec. 3-4.66, P. L. & R.
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN, Permit No. 2091-B.
The Denver Chapter JACL,
1917 Lawrence Street,
Denver 2, Colorado.