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Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 6, Number 8

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Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 6, Number 8
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
18

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
..VOLUME VII NUMBER 8
DENVER* COLORADO
AUGUST* 1951
COMPROMISE BILL TO EXPEDITE
PAYMENT OF SMAUER CLAIMS
130 million dollars in
claims may be a reality for
Japanese evacuees from the
Vest Coast in 1942, by
terms of the Evacuation
Claims Compromise bill
signed by President Harry
S. Truman on August 17,
1951.
Instead of requiring
complicated and impossible
documentary proofs, the
amendment will permit the
Claims Division of the
Dept, of Justice to offer a
settlement in compromise up
to 75# of the compensable
items, or $2,500, whichever
amount is the smaller
amount. Emphasis and note
should be given to the
term "compensable item",
for by legal construction
that is construed to mean
only those items already
passed upon by the Dept, of
Justice*
It was further noted
that approximately 60# of
the 24,000 evacuation
claims could be possibly
settled under the compro-
mise amendment. All of the
larger claims will require
detailed investigation and
adjudication before recom-
mendation of payment could
be presented
for action.
to Congress
The Dept, of Justice in-
dicated that it would re-
quire some time before the
new procedures can be set
up, in order to speed up
and expedite the payment of
smaller claims under the
Claims Law.
4M2-RCT VWs
bivttw to Reunion
Clarence T. Taba, vice
president of the 442 Veter-
ans Club of Honolulu, T.H.,
extended a cordial invita-
tion to all 442nd Veterans,
particularly in the main-
land to attend the gigantic
reunion of the Combat Team
Honolulu in 1953.
Taba, visiting Denver
JACL officials, requested
that all 442nd veterans
write to the club head-
quarters at 993 Wiliwili
Street, Honolulu, T.H.
While in Denver, Hr. Ta-
ba endeavored to look up
Sad Kubota at CU, and Shig
Teraji in Denver, both of
whom served with him over-
seas*
YASUl. ANDO TO AID
STATE IN STUDY
OF DISCRIMINATION
Pres. Y* Terasaki of the
Denver JACL, and Reg* Repr*
Min Yasui of the Mtn-Plains
JACL Office, % attended the
special citizens committee
investigating discrimina-
tion against persons of mi-
nority groups during the
latter part of July, 1951,
at a luncheon meeting at
the Albany Hotel..
Toshio Ando and Min Ya-
sui were appointed to the
special investigative com-
mittees, dealing with the
legal aspects of discrimi-
nation in Colorado, as re-
presentatives from the
Nisei community.
community picnic
SCt FOR SEPTEMBER
Chiye Horiuchi, program
ohairman of the Denver JACL
announced that the communi-
ty picnic originally slated
for August 19 has been post
poned until September.
Local Japanese
In RKO Him
The Mtn-Plains JACL Of-
xice in cooperation with
the Denver JACL, assisted
the CSES in helping to lo-
cal 65 Japanese to act as
extras in the forthcoming
kKO film, which is being
taken at Colorado Springs,
Colorado on the Korean
story.
The request came through
Krederic Adams of the Colo-
. rado State Employment Ser-
vice, and case handling was
done hy Roy M. Taken o, now
an employee of the CSES. .
JACL undertook to assist
in the recruitment of Japa-
nese' in the Denver area as
a community service, since
RKO in paying good wages in
addition to providing trans-
portation and room and
board would be paying about
$8,000 to Oriental extras
in the two or three weeks
shooting period.
ANDO APPOINTED TO IMPOKJMT
CITY HOUSING COMMITTEE
Toshio Ando, prominent
Nisei attorney and active
JACLer in Denver, was ap-
pointed to the Sub-Commit-
tee on Substandardcy of the
Urban Redevelopment program
lor Denver, Colo. Ando's
appointment to this commit-
tee is of vital importance
to the Japanese community
in Denver, because this
sub-committee is setting up
criteria and standards to
rate dwellings in the so-
called slum areas of Denver
as a prerequisite to con-
demnation proceedings*
The multi-million dollar
slum clearance program for
Denver has been sharply
labor DayToumey
Attracts *2 Teams
Vying for the trophies
in the annual Labor Day
baseball tournament in Den-
ver will be twelve slugging
Nisei ball teams from Utah,
Wyoming, Nebraska and Colo-
rado.
Tourney Chairmen Shig
Teraji and Yosh Nakayama
reported that this years
closer competition assures
some fancy games.
Defending titleholders
are the Ogden, Utah, Niseis.
curtailed, due to building
restrictions imposed be-
cause of the Korean emer-
gency, but Wm. Henijs&er of
the City Planning -Office
indicated that the program
will move to point of actu-
al demolitions, before be-
ing suspended for the dura-
tion. It was estimated
that actual condemnations
may not take place until
iate in 1952, if the'Korean
crisis is resolved by that
time.
The importance of the
Urban Revelopraent program,
and its impact upon the
Japanese community in Den-
ver is underlined by the
lact that almost 75# of the
Japanese population in Den-
ver resides in the so-call-
ed "slum areas", where the
actual condemnation and de-
molition of buildings will
cake place when the program
is resumed.
80N OOOftl
HUGE SUCCESS
The annual obon festival
sponsored by the Tri State
Buddhist Church attracted a
crowd of 10,000 persons who
came to watch and admire
the colorful pageant.
This year the obon was .
observed on Sunday, August
12.


PAGE 2
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
AUGUST, 1951
IT MAPPENED IN DENVER/
"The Japanese hold the preponderance of voting
throughout all the (Hawaiian) islands, and' they are na-
turally very anxious to see statehood for the islands ac-
complished the contrary is the consensus of everybody
else that I came in contact with*
nThe Japanese are united to bring about their objec-
tive; are behind Wilfred Stukiyama for governor; Tom
Okino or Tommy Sakakihara for Senators, or other men who
are equally Japanese champions. .Such men would un-
doubtedly be elected by the Japanese vote. .It would
give Japanese positive domination politically over the
entire area, resulting in appointments being made favor-
able to Japanese interests to the detriment of all other
interests, American included. .n
Deep in the heart of every Japanese is an inherent
regard for the mother country. .Many (of the older Ja-
panese) forsook their status on the islands to serve in
Japanese Army. To my personal knowledge, many are back
in business again on the islands and still hold commis-
sions in the Japanese Aimy. ."
It is my firm belief irreparable damage to our Na-
tion could very logically result by. .Hav/aiian state-
hood.
NO I THOSE WORDS WERENT WRITTEN IN 1942 or during tlje
war years, when the height of emotional hatred towards
the Japanese was at its peak. Those words were written
on July 2, 1951.
Those words werent written by the race haters on the
West Coast, or the professional bigots who blight the
national scene with their fascistic and racist thinking..
Those were some of the words written by the DIRECTOR
OP THE PUBLIC RELATIONS DEPiUTOfiENT OF THE DENVER CHAMBER
OF COMMERCE! The writer is E. V/. Fishburn, 1190 So. Co-
rona St., Denver, Colo. The Denver Chamber of Commerce,
thru its Secty-Mgr, Geo. Collison has disavowed the
views expressed by Fishburn, and points out that the
Chamber of Commerce has gone on record as endorsing nd
favoring Hawaiian statehood.
The above words were Witten in a letter to Wayne N.
Aspihall, Congressman from Colorado, who fortunately,
possessed sufficient sense of fair play to refer the
matter to Delegate Joseph R. Farrington of Hawaii for
rebuttal and answer. Delegate Farrington completely ex-
plodes the biased views of Fishburn, and points to the
proud record of the Nisei GIs in both World War II and
in the fierce Korean action today.
AND SO ,V/KAT DO WE DO ABOUT OUR OWN HOME-GROWN BIGOTS?
OMfcTIffc >WHIM
Treasurer Sam Kumaoai
orNvtR JACL bulletin
Published monthly by the
Denver chapter of the Japanese
American Citizens League, 1917
Lawrence St., Denver, Colorado.
Telephone: Alpine 7227
Editor: George Uasunaga
Business Manager: Sam Kumagai
Staff: Bill Hosokawa, Fumi
Katagiri, Kami Katagiri, Dr.
George Kubo, Dorothy Uadokoro
Sue Uaruyama, Pearl Kuwabara,
Bessie Hatsuda, Rosa Mayeda, Ben
Miyahara, Sachi Shibata, Haru
Tanaka and kin 7asui.
|ljt Pray Ssj-
The news and information
is gathered, the layout is
m~.de, sent to the printers,
then mailed to its sub-
scribers.....who read it
in five minutes and toss it
aside..thats the life
of your Bulletin.
Sounds short and snappy
doesnt it? But if I could
tell you in this limited
space of the many sleepless
nights spent by the Editor
George Masunaga and his
faithful staff, the head-
aches, the limited budget
and financial worries, and
all on a voluntary basis
(worries included),It would
take this whole issue.
The Bulletin was started
in 1946 and under the ad-
vice of Min Yasui has con-
tinued ever since due to
the hard work of just such
groups as the present staff.
Its main purpose,of oourse,
is to keep members informed
of activities of the Local
JACL and its members. Tho
it is nothing more than a
bulletin the staff feels it
serves a very definite
function in keeping an
organization of this size
more closely integrated.
It was one of the first
publications of this kind
in the JACL and I am proud
to say is still considered
one of the best.
The man who controls the
purse-3trings of the Denver
JACL, the man who accounts
ior every penny coming into
and going out of our treas-
ury is our treasurer, Sam
Kumagai. An, accountant by
profession, Sam very capa-
bly fills this position.
Altho only a transplant-
ed Coloradoan, Sam is as
vociferous in his praises
of his adopted state as any
native. son. He came to
Denver from California at
government expense via Tule
Lake and Granada relocation
centers.
lie graduated
from CU with a
degree in busi-
ness administra-
tion and is now
associated with
i.lits Kaneko, lo-
cal accountant.
Fishing and
golf take up
most of his lei-
sure hours, but his favor-
ite pastime is dabbling in
the kitchen concocting var-
ious appetizing dishes.
Sam is married to the
former Alice Serizawa.
HAft*f
Cbmef*
j By Bill HOSOKAWA.
The more I see of this
business of fishing for
trout, the more respect I
have for the creatures and
fellows who can land them.
Nisei are supposed to be
good fishermen. They usu-
ally come back with nice
creels even when less
skilled devotees are
skunked. At least thats
their reputation.
But the trout on the
Yampa river and Elk creek
hadnt heard, because they
were as shy and coy as
could be. If they were
good sporting trout with
respect for reputations,
why they should have got
themselves hooked and jerk-
ed out of the water.
But they didnt. My
guide, mentor, instructor
and companion said the wa-
ter was too high. It was
also a low barometer day
which, for some reason,
causes trout to lose their
appetites.
So I didn't learn how to
land a fish. But at least
I did learn the technical
points of alibing. Thats
as essential to the sport
as rods and reels.
Veil, anyway, I had
plenty of exercise out in
the. open air. And thats
all that matters, isnt jtt?
Thats what youre Supposed
to say and think (even if
you. dont believe it) when
you crane home empty-handed*
Lisle Fellowship
Study Nisei fVobkm
Under the sponsorship of
Rev. K. Sasaki of the CSMD,
the deputation teams from
the Lisle Fellowship worked
at various places in the
Japanese community during
August, in order to gain a
better understanding of the
Japanese "problem" in Colo-
rado.
Min Yasui addressed the
Lisle Encampment atop Look-
out Mtn., to give the gen-
eral background of the Ni-
sei problems in America, on
August 2. The JACL office
assisted in preparation of
brochures for Lisle, with
Mrs. Lillian Terasaki pre-
paring mailings, and Mrs.
Rosa Mayeda executing cle-
ver cartoons to illustrate
the pamphlets.


AUGUST* 1951
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
PAGE 3
Visiting TERRY and HANNA'
TAKAMINE is curvaceous NO-
BIE SAITO of Los Angeles.
She seems very interested
in golf and has invested in
some new clubs 11
Have you seen the
latest?????? SAM TERASAKI
TAEBO YAMASAKI and TERRY
TAKAMUDS have been follow-
ing the latest trend of
Hair styling. Can't tell
if its the Navajo or the
Apache cut. Cut it any
shorter and it will be the
"Last of the Mohicans."
Our best wishes for a
speedy recovery to LT.
FLORENCE UYEDA who recently
underwent surgery at the
Fitzsimmons Army Hospital.
A farewell dance at the
Tri-State Buddhist Church
was given in honor of LUCKY
YAKAGA who joined the ranks
of a G.I. KAZ YAKAGA and
STANLEY NXSHIKOTO was the
cutest couple there. Others
attending were* HAS Y0SHX--
MURA* YOSHIE YAKAGA* SHOJI
A.IMURA, JEAN MIYAGISHIMA,
DORIS ITO* JUNE MATSUURA*
KASU HAMASU and others.
Chaperones were: REVEREND
and MRS. TSUNODA, and MR.
and MRS. DAN YOSHIKURA.
They had a spectacular cake
designed in the shape of a
ilag in red, white and blue
colors..
A baby shower was held
at the YAKADA'S residence
ior MRS. JACK SUZUKI.
Hostesses were: Mesdames
MILLIE KIYOTAKS, FLORENCE
LEE* SHIZ YOSHIKURA and
PEARL KUWABARA. Others
attending were: Mesdames
MARY TAVARA-, BETTY YANARI,
SUE SHIRANS SHIZUKO YAKADA
and DORIS YAMADA.
Infancipating are: the
KODY KODAKAS SARGE TERASA-
KI S* H.ARRY ARIKIS* PERRY
MORIS, NOB TASHIROS, DON
TANABES* DOUG MIZUKAKIS,
GEORGE YAKAGUCHIS GEORGE
h.1 SHINUKAS YOSH ARAIS *
CHARLIE YAKAGUCHIS and
the STANLEY LEES.......Must
be cheaper by thedozen1111,
DOROTHY and TOH SAVADA
from way down south Alaba-
ma, were recent vacationers
here in the Kile High City
visiting DOROTHY'S folks---
the KANEGAYES
The Ling's Kotor Company
softball Team was feted to
a steak dinner by their
sponsor at Joe's Awful Cof-
xee. Incidentally they won
the Good Sportsmanship tro-
phy in the Brighton League.
CdUSADE Pba FftEEOOM
The Crusade for Freedom,
already slugging it out
with Russian Communism in
Europe, this year will ex-
pand it operations to the
Orient, it was announced
recently by General Lucius
D. Clay, national chairman
of the Crusade.
Radio Free Asia will go
into operation, if the goal
of the 1951 Crusade for
Freedom campaign is realiz-
ed, General Clay said. A
year ago, 16 million Ameri-
cans joined the Crusade and
gave §1,330,000 which made
possible erection of two
Radio Free Europe trans-
mitters in Europe to fight
Communism in that part of
the world.
This year, a national
goal has been set at
§3,500,000. If this objec-
tive is reached, money will
be available to inaugurate
Radio Free Asia, a hard-
slugging station which will
ins of the fish he couldve
caught is Dr. Mac Suzuki of
the US Atomic Energy Com-
mission who visited friends
in Denver recently.
third baseman on the Ling's
Softball Team, who recent-
ly broke his ankle during a
game. A nice crowd turned
uut and wss claimed a huge
success.
GEORGE HAGAI, our No. 1
jo-zu-na" hurler is the
talk of the town*.I He cer-
tainly throws a mean and
fast ball for the Granaua
Sharks......and can hit the
ball as well too l; i 1
Recently engaged........
Our congratulations to SETS
KARUYAMA and TOM HADA,
beam the truth into Commu-
nist target areas of the
Far East.
In addition to Radio
Free Asia, a well-rounded
program of psychological
warfare will be launched in
the Orient. Picture books,
handbills, other printed
matter will be prepared for
distribution to the masses
in the Far East. These
will tell the truth about
Communism and America's de-
termination that freedom
shall prevail around the
world.
Through Radio Free
Europe and soon Radio
Free Asia the truth is
reaching people who have
been denied that priceless
commodity by their Red
masters. Seeds of disunity
are being sowed among the
Communists themselves. Re-
ligion is being kept alive
within the Iron Curtain
countries. Folk songs and
traditions, also banned by
the Russian tyrants, are
being kept alive. Undis-
torted news is being sent
to people who are denied
the free exchange of news
in their own land.
The dynamic spirit of
millions of Americans is
being felt abroad. Hope
for liberation and restora-
tion of their right to re-
sist and work for the day
of liberation is being nur-
tured.
The battle line is
clear. It is a fight of
Truth and Freedom against
lies and tyranny which the
Crusade for Freedom is
carrying to the enemy.
Crusade for Freedom
headquarters in Denver are
located in Room 305, Denver
Post Building.
TtexacoT
GEORGES MOTOR
20ST. LAWRENCE
MAIN 9373.
MIKAWAYA
iq30 uuuMaa Ta Ml
matAE!
I SERVICE BUREAU I
\xxs st. ma
Welcome to
% AUB
, ________
dint danct
SEVEN SEAS
CU/S/NC BY HOUSE OF MANCH'
I23e 2Q4h ST:
DENTISTS
JOHN CHIKUMA, DDS
40 N. Main BRIGHTON 560
F.E. HAYANO, DDS MA 9400
2103 Larimer Street
MILTON HAYANO, DDS MA 9400
2103 Larimer Street
T. ITO, DDS KE 8680
830 18th Street
Y. ITO, DDS KE 1077
830 18th Street
T. KAWANO, DDS KE 3084
1404 E. 18th Avenue
ROBERT KAYEDA, DDS TA 6961
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS TA 6961
301 Interstate Trust Bldg.
K.K. MIYAMOTO, DDS TA 4307
1952 Lariner Street
IGEKTA NAKAMURA, DDS TA'' 7598
.200 Interstate Trust Bldg.
INSURANCE
JlNZO NODA FR 1065
3211 Clayton Street
LAWYERS
T-OSHIO ANDO ... AC 5315
1942 Larimer Street
MINORU YASUI AL 7227
1917 Lawrence Street
OPTOMETRISTS
GEORGS KUBO, OD AC 5315
1942 Larimer Street
BEN MATOBA, OD-'. KE 1941
1927 Larimer ^Street
PHYSICIANS smm
CHARLES FUJISAKI, MD
40 N. Main BRIGHTON 418
T.K. KOBAYASHI, MD KE 4590
1227 27th Street
ISAMU 0ZAM0T0, MD TA 1596
30l Interstate Trust Bldg.
HOWARD SUBNAGA, MD AC 1314
830 18th Street
GEORGE TAKENO, MD TA 0783
830 18th Street
MAHITO UBA, DO MA 3743
1230 21st Street
Accounting-
tNSURANCS-
MITSUO KANEKO AL 3500
1932 20th Street
A benefit game was held
for TOM SHI3A0 the star


PAGE 4
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
AUGUST 1951
Ptaka-bee?
'GUT2> T^IGUCiilo very
cfarming mother, who is the
houjemother at North Gate
Dormitory, a Japanese wo-
mens Dorm, on the Berkeley
U. C. campus, was a recent
Denver visitor* Her fluen-
cy in English makes her a
brilliant conversationalist.
Its a treat to run into
her kind of Issei.
fhe oBIG TjSkAJI B, that
is BKIG, MICH, end baby CA-
RY i.otored to Utah, MICiiS
hc.ie state for their vaca-
tion. They dint stay long
however, you know whyole
o.'IG and his golf*
PEARL KUV/A3ARA has taken
a job as steno with an en-
gineering firm on 17th &
Stout. Shed make a char-
ming asset to any film.
FRANCES HaBLGAWA hopped
a streamliner for LA and is
vacationing with her broth-
ers family there*
One of the cutest inci-
dents occurred at STEVIE
ANDOS sixth birthday party
at City Park* Mother MICHI
used a pirates theme and
amidst a swashbuckling
sword fight, lil Pirate
JOHNNY K03AYASIH stopped to
blow lil sister JOYCES
nose and clean up a very
sticky food besmudged face*
JOE MIYAMOTO is driving
a stock car which he rigged
up himself out at the Engle-
wood tracks. Hes been hav-
ing mighty fine results.
HANNAH & TERRY TAIL-MINE,
GEORGE & JEAN EUJBCOTO were
seen one nite dancing at
Elitchs. GEORGE AVAIL-
ABLE MASUNAGA was also
there danoing with a charm-
ing newcomer.
HOWARD HARUOS arrival
via Storkways, Ltd. at the
HARRY SAKATA household had
PAPA HARRY virtually, shout-
nasao Sato*>
To Confer With
Local JACL'ers
Hasao V. Satow, execu-
tive director of the Natl
JACL, will be a brief visi-
tor to Denver on Sept. 4th
and 5th, on his return from
the Midwest District Coun-
cil meeting in Detroit.
While in Denver, Satow
indicated that he would be
available for conferences
with JACLers* He can be
reached at AL 7227, during
his stay here*
He planned to confer in
regard to the 1952 Natl
JACL Bowling Tournament to
be held in Denver with the
officials of the Denver Ni-
sei Bowling League, includ-
ing Chrmn John Noguchi, and
Dr. Takashi Mayeda*
He will also contact Tak
Terasaki, president of the
Denver JACL, to congratu-
late the local chapter for
its fine achievements in
1951.
He also planned to con-
fer with Bill Hosokawa of
the Denver Post, in regard
to the public relations as-
pects of the Natl JACL.
lag from the house tops and
busting out all over with
pride.
Scene on Larimer St:
A drunk weaving up to his
car and attempting to get
his door open, was approach-
ed* by a cop.
The cop said,you arent
going to drive in that con-
dition, are you?
The dtfunk replied, "Why
not, Im too drunk to walk."
The Bowling group is be-
ginning to formulate plans
for the annual JACL Bowling
tournament to be sponsored
by the Denver group in
March.
REUME 7>vy WdW
k PRESCRIPTIONS
AL. ¥82ir Z700LADMR
nesting after a full meal during an outing to Dedisgee
Fark are left to right: Purni Yabe, Sue Uaeda, Bessie Shi-
yoraura, Jean^u^inw^o^^hi^^iaoriandDclight Pujimoto.
JAPANESE STUDENTS HOSOKN^TD(W0l
WISH TO VISIT HOMES JAPAN PEACE TRUCTY
Thirty-one Japanese for-
eign students at DU, under-
going the State Department
orientation and preparatory
program would like to visit
Nisei homes in Denver.
Bill Koso.cawa, proiainent
Nisei journalist, and ac-
tive Denver JACLer, will be
flying to San Francisco on
3opt. 3 to cover the Japan-
ese peace treaty for the
Denver Post.
Information can be ob-'
tained from the Rev. Tom Hosokawa is rated as one
Fukuyama at Brotherhood top Lisei journalists
House, AL 8771. the USA.
Return postage guaranteed Sec. 34.66, P. L. & R.
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN, Permit No. 2091-B.
The Denver Chapter JACL,
1917 Lawrence Street,
Denver 2, Colorado.