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Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 7, Number 10

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Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin, Volume 7, Number 10
Series Title:
Denver JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
19

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
VOLUME VII NUMBER 10
jfc
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
OCTOBER 1952
ENGLISH CLASSES OFFERED
FOR CITIZENSHIP APPLICANTS
Emily Griffith Opportu-
nity School, located at
13th and Welton Streets, is
currently offering classes
to advance persons who need
to read, write, and speak
the English language before
applying for United States
citizenship. The training
clan's is conducted by Mrs.
SECOND BRIDGE
TOURNEY TO BE
HELD NOVEMBER 14
All interested bridge
players are invited to the
second JACL-sponsored dup-
licate bridge .tournament, to
be held Friday, November
14th, promptly at 8 P.N, at
the home of the T.K. Kobay-
ashis, 455 Forest Street.
The first tournament
held October 8th, proved
highly successful, provid-
ing the participants with
competitive bridge in whioh
pairs were rated according
to the skill- with which
they played each hand.
Those attending were
Tosh Ando,* Taki Dometo,
Mami Katafeiri, Eddie Matsu-
da, Henry Matsumoto, Douglas
Toguchi, Dr. Mike Uba, True
Yasui, the Sam Katsumotos,
the Leonard Uchidas, the
Dick Yanases, and the T. K.
Kobayashis.
First place honors were
taken by Mike Uba and Henry
Matsumoto.
Margaret Booth.
There are also evening
class openings in courses
designed to benefit the
foreign born. Applications
are now being accepted dai-
ly in Room 255 at Opportu-
nity School.
JACL MEETING
OCTOBER 30 PLANS
POLITICS. BUSINESS,FUN
LARRY AND 6UY0 TAJIRI VISIT DWfR
"A decade of service."
"Such words inscribe the
badge of devotion and zeal
of Lawrence S. Tajiri and
his wife, Marion Guyo, who
now head for Mexico on a
well-earned vacation after
ten years of editing the
Pacific Citizen."
With these words does
the Pacific Citizen bade
au revoir to its former ed-
VOTE YOU i
PLEASE BUT VOIC f
GGNC&n blect/oa/s
//ovmsot
All JACL members and
.friends are invited to at-
tend the Family Potluck
supper meeting to be held
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 30th, at
the Y.W.C.A., 1545 Tremont
on the 4th floor, at. 6:30
P.M.
Bernice Ohashi,
of potluck, has
for supper dishes
to feed a large
JACLers. Mami
program chairman,,
special treat in
the kiddies.
in charge
arranged
suff icieat
number of
Katagiri,
has a
store for
itor and chief assistant.
Shown above are the Ta-
jiris relaxing, at the home
of. Bill and Alice Hosokava
on the first stop of their
well-deserved vacation.
They were also enter-
tained during their short
stay in Denver by the Hika-
ru Ivasakis and the Min Ya-
suis.
SPEAKERS CM5EH
Democratic headquarters
announces that Dr, George
T. Vardaman, professor of
speech at the University of
Denver, will speak on "Com-
munism, Crime, and Waste"
at the October 30 meeting
of the Denver JACL,
Mr, Jack Williams, can-
didate for the State Senate
will represent the Republi-
can party.
Both Speakers will be
limited to fifteen minutes
each aftqr which JACLers
will be gilven the opportu-
nity to question them in
regard to campaign issues.
The feature ol the even-
ing will be a discussion of
election issues by speakers
from both the Democratic
and Republican parties.
After a short business
meeting presided over by
President Roy Mayeda, a
movie will be shown by
George Masunaga, and Sam
Matsumoto will report on
the National Convention
held in June.
The Bulletin wishes to
emphasize the meeting will
be Thursday, October 30th,
and not Halloween as pre-
viously announced.
Bring your friends and
enjoy a full evening of fun.
Denver JACLs first meeting this
fall has been planned by It* en-
ergetic program nhaiman Hand Ka-
tagiri of Henderson, who is shown
above.


>AGE 8
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN OCTOBER 1952
(je Prtxy Sy-
The days are getting
shorter, the nights are
getting colder, and the old
fishing pole is getting a
little frayed around the
edges. It's the -time of
the year when we turn to
the Indoor instead of the
great outdoor. The time of
the year when the farmers
add up their year*s head-
aches and decide if ithas
been a good year or bad.
And the parents, urged on
by the ehildren must start
thinking of spooks, goblins
and Santa Claus. In short,
fall is here and winter is
just around the comer.
The local chapter has
been rather dormant during
the past few months during
the sumrae",partly thru your
prexy ha.lag been so busy
tending old mother earth.
But with the advent of old
Jack Frost and old Man Win-
ter setting in, we*11 start
our calendar going again.
We hope that all of you
have had an enjoyable sum-
mer and are ready to give
some vigorous support to
your chapter.
We'll start the ball
rolling with a Political
Rally and Pot-Luck Supper
on the 30th of October,plus
a short business meeting.
And speaking of political
rallies,we should all adopt,
that slogan, "I'll meet you'
at the polls." It's a duty
of every eligible voter to
vote.
See you on the 30th.
Come and hear both sides of
the issues in an election
that promises to be one of
the bitterest and most in-
teresting in many a year.
In the foreword to the
JACL broohure "for Better
Americans in ^ Greater Am-
erica" Monroe E. Deutsch,
provost emeritus of the U-
niverslty of California
Suotes Wendell Wilkie thus:
The best answer to Caabtu-
nlsm is a living, vibrant,
fearless demooraoy-eoonomi^
sooial and political* All
we need to do is to stand
up and perform according to
our professed ideals. Then
those ideals will be safe."
When Eisenhower' was nom-
inated by the Republicans,
there- were two dominant
theories as to who would be
the Democratic candidate.
Since the candidaoy was ap-
parently an open question,
the activities of the Demo-
cratic Convention were most
interesting to observe from
my standpoint as a student
observer.
Just to what extent the
final decisions came from
the delegates themselves,
or to what degree they were
influenced by pressure from
so-called maohines cannot
be ascertained, but 1 think
the consensus.of opinion a-
mong most Democrats was
that Stevenson was nominat-
But now as the election
draws near, there comes to
mind another major factor
in any presidential camp-
aign: the party. In a
close oampaign such as this.
one, the voter must ohoose
not only between the candi-
dates, but he must remember
what each stands for, the
platform he is running on.
Adequate and skillful orga-
nization from the national
to the precinct level will
determine to a large degree
the final outcome.
It has been most encour-
aging to me upon my return
to Wellesley to see how
Students for Stevenson
groups have cooperated with
Young Democrats organiza-
Maureen kuk/ano reports on the democratic
CONVENTION AND THE PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN
*aureen Kxnrano, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Knwana^of 1623
Gilpin Street, is a senior majoring in political science atTfelles-
ley. A very attractive Sansei, Maureen was an honor student at East
High. In line with her major, she served a political science intern-
ship earlier this summer in Washington, D.C., and then attended the
Democratic Convention in Chicago in July. The Bulletin believed a
report of her experiences would be timely in view of the impending
elections. The JACL is politically non-partisan. __________________
ed on an honest draft.
There are those who cri-
ticize the convention sys-
tem, but it is in such a
convention system as we
have in the' United States
that a relatively open;
place is 'provided for a
trial of strength and a re-
sulting balance of forces
which brings forth the most
de.sirable candidate and a
party platform to guide fu-
ture aotion.
Although the Democratic
Convention was like all the
"big shows" rolled- into
one-^Grand Central Station,
football rallies in the Ivy
League, World's Fair, cir-
cuses, etc., still the more
serious side of the Conven-
tion is what I will always
remember. One could sense
history in the making be-
hind all the noise and con-
fusion. And when Stevenson
made his acceptance speech,
I could not help that lump
in my throat as I felt a
wave of thankfulness that
such an outstanding man was
to run for thb. presidency
of the United States.
tions and with local and
national Volunteers for
Stevenson groups. To a po-
litical science major, this
kind of grass roots activi-
ty is most heartening. It
impresses upon me the res-
ponsibility each of us have
in a democracy. If we
would have democracy work,
if we would have the best
qualified men in high pla-
ces, it is our responsibil-
ity to do everything we can
from the grass roots on up
to see that such men are
elected to office.
I like to remember, that
"bad officials are elected
by those who don't vote,"
and .if we would not have
bad officials in office, we
must not only vote for our
candidates, but we must
work devotedly to see that
they get elected. Some day
I hope to see politics made
completely honorable and
worthwhile and the politi-
cian a respected career man.
We who are young today can
help to make that possible
tomorrow by our Intelligent
participation in politics
now.

Cbner*
By BILL mosokawa I
Do you remember Mike
Emizawa. He's the Japanese
boy who was given a home,
and a chance to acquire an
American education, by John
Souder of Montrose, Colo.
Perhaps to commemorate the
first anniversary of his
arrival in the United
States, Mike wrote me re-
cently.
Mike says he's getting
along just fine. He's hap-
pier. than he ever thought
he could be, Mike is a.
sophomore at Montrose Union
high this year. His Eng-
lish is improving rapidly,
and he's just as popular as
he ever was.
Some months ago John
Souder bought Mike a tenor
sax. Mike is. repaying
Souder little by little.
Meanwhile he's had lessons,
and now he's good enough to
play in the school band.
Mike, doesn't need to
work, but he takes over as
bellhop at the -Souders*
Belvedere hotel every day
after school. He gets paid
the going wage, plus tips.
This enables Mike to keep
in spending money,and some-
times he can send presents
to his parents and younger
brothers and sisters in
Tokyo.
Mike manages to keep so
busy, he writes, that he
never has a chance to be-
come homesick. He's deeply
grateful for the opportun-
ity of studying in America.
He's anxious to make good.
He's determined to show the
Souders that their act of
kindness, generosity and
brotherhood was a noble in-
vestment.
Just thought I'd bring
you up to date on the. heart-
warming story of Mike Emi-
zawa, because he's a boy
who'll be heard from some
day.
Published monthly by the
Denver chapter of the Japanese
American Citizens League, 1917
lawrence St., Denver 2, Colo.
Telephone Al. 7227.
Editor: Haruko Kobayashi
Dus. Mgr.: Robert Horiuchi
Staff: June Aochi, Bill Ho-
sokaara, Maud Katagiri, Hay Kit?'
gawa, George Kubo, Mary KuriU
ni, Dorothy liadokoro, Sue Uanw
yama, George llasunaga, Rosa Ma-
yeda, Amy Miura, Ben Hiyahara,
Bessie Shlyannra, Earn Tanaka,
Kichi Teraji, Ida Xaaui.


OCTOBER 1952
THE DKfoVKR JaCL BULLETIN
I'aUL 3
We had a charming visiter,
YASUKO OTA of Seattle enjoy-
ing her brief, stay in Denver
while enroute home from an
extended vacation in New
York and Chioago.
We* re all glad to see
SUGAR SUYEHIRO back in Den-
ver and for good
seems Chicago didn*t quite
appeal to him.
Speaking of familiar
faces, HIRO ASANQ is back
to make her permanent home
in Denver after spending
the past few years in Los
It was our pleasant ex-
perience the other day to
accompany Min Yasui to
Fitzsimons Army Hospital to
visit wax brides who al-
though they speak hardly
any English proudly bear
such names as Smith,'Moore,
eto.
Although busier than the
proverbial bee with- his ma-
Fhotographed above are Japanese war brides who are patients in
Ward E-l at Fitzsimons. Top row left to right* Mrs. Maynard
Smith, Mrs. Teas! Hard/* Mrs. Mitsue Hansen. Lower row left, Mrs.
Fujiye Moore and right, Mrs. lillian Kumata.
Angeles. Nice to see you
back, HIRO12
We*re told that MARGE
NISHIKAWA from Alamosa is
back in Denver and bunking
with ESTHER FUJI.
Our own NANCY SOGI,popu-
lar Nisei soprano is cer-
tainly in demand. -She was
the featured entertainer at
a weekly Arthur Murray dence
class party.
Dropped in at the CPA
firm of CONNOR DAVIS &
MILES and who should we see
seated behind the reception
\esk, none other than JUNE
DCHIl
Ping Pong seems to be
the exciting game at the
DR. CHIKDMA'S just ask
DODIE MADOKORO what hajpened
in the doubles?
Lucky owner of a brand
new Buick Riviera is Tosh
Tashiro of Brighton. It*s
the prettiest thing.
Seen at the Continental
Room dining on a beautiful
filet were Mami Katagiri
and Tommy Hamai. No new
romance budding here. Tom-
my was paying off a golf
bet.
Handsome groom Kenny
Imamura.
Lovely bride Mae Egu-
chi.
Location CSMC
Date November 8, 1952.
Twas a third daughter
for the Bill Satos Trudy
Miyoko.
Rob and Grace Brannon
are now at home at 1150 So.
Gilpin.
L
ny activities Min has un-
dertaken to teach these
girls English once weekly
in preparation for the time
when they may take out cit-
izenship papers.
Young and attractive,
the Japanese girls we met
were lonesome -for GI hus-
bands who are scattered
from Camp Carson to Heidel-
...berg, Germany. In some
oases too these convales-
cing patients at Fitzsimons
spoke longingly of small
children waiting for them.
Petite Mrs. Tomiko Har-
dy, for instance, is from
Yokohama. She will be sep-
arated from her husband who
is stationed in Heidelberg
and her four year old boy
for another year.
Mrs. Fujiye Moore, also
of Yokohama, whose husband
Sgt. John Moore is station-
ed in Ft. Leavenworth, Kan-
sas,- chattered animatedly
about her five year old
daughter and three year old
son. B
Mi's. Maynard Hmith is a
diligent student whose hus-
band is. stationed in Virgi-
nia. She is from Hokkaido.
Mrs. Milsue Hansen is
fortunate in that her hus-
band is stationed at Camp
Carson and is able to visit
her regularly.
Only Nisei in the group
is Mrs. Lillian Kumata,
formerly of Sacramento by
way of Iowa. Her First
Lieutenant Nisei husband is
teaching psychological war-
fare at Ft. Bragg, No.Caro-
lina. She has two daugh-
ters, four and two.
We were not able to see
Kazue Gleeson nor Kiyoko
Wilson, war brides who have
been in this country less
than a year.
The amorous swain was soon
subdued .
With neatness and precision
She used the wrestling
holds she learned
From watching television.
Closer to the truth than
he meant to be was *the
school boy who wrote on an
examination, paper: "The
Armistice was signed on the
11th of November, 1918, and
sinoe then once in every
year there has been two mi-
nutes of peace."
ACCOUNTING INSURANCE
GEORGE. MITSUO KANEKO
1232 20th St. Alpine 3500
DENTISTS
Brighton 560
MAin 9U00
MAin 9U00
Keystone 8680
JOHN CHIKUMA, DDS
U0 N. Main
F. E. .HAXANO, DDS
2103 Larimer St.
MILTON HAIANO, DDS
2103 Larimer St.
IT0 DENTAL GROUP
830 18th St.
T. IT0, DDS
Y. IT0, DDS
S. IT0, DDS
TONY KAWAN0, DDS .
UiOU E. 18th Ave. Keystone 308k
ROBERT MAYEDA, DDS
301 Interstate Trust TAbor 696l
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS
301 Interstate Trust TAbor 6961
K. K. MIYAMOTO, DDS
1952 Larimer St.
TAbor 1*307
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS
200 Interstate Trust TAbor 7598
INSURANCE
HENRY K. IMADA
4*588 Lowell Blvd. GRand 81*13
SAM Y. VATStJliOTO
Henderson, Colo. H&zeltine 771-R
JINZO NODA
3211 Clayton St. FRemont 1065
LAWyER.S
AComa 531?
A&dne 7227
OPTOMETRISTS
AComa 5315
TOSHIO ANDO
391*2 Tarijner St.
MINORU YASUI
1917 Lawrence St.
GEORGE KUBO, OD
391*2 Larimer St.
BEN MATOBA, OD
1927 Larimer St. Keystone 191*1
PHYSICIANS -
Surgeons
CHARLES FOJISAKI, HD
1*0 N. thin Brighton 1*18
T. K. KOBAYASHI, MD 1227 27th St. Keystone U590
ISAMU 0ZAM0T0, MD 301 Interstate Trust TAbor 1596
> HOWARD SUE5JAGA, MD 830 18th St. AComa H3j*
GEORQE TAKENO, MD 830 18th St. TAbor 0783
MAHITO UBA, DO 1230 21st St. MAin 37U3


'AGE 4
THE DENVER JACL BULLETIN
OCTOBER 1952 ,
Swimming every Friday
nisht t the 20th Street
Recreation Center, you*11
f ind L1AHTKA & T/u) TARDA,
TERU OKUNO, SHIG & H3MI
ivIORISHIGE TOMMY HAAMURA,
TOM INOUYEtJUN Sc TOoKX OYA,
JACK K^NEGATE, RUPERT ARAI,
' CHARLIE Sc CHIORIE Y.MAGUCHI,
TERRY, KODY & RODDY KODAMA,
TERRY & SUE wulTSUHOTO.
ELLIb Si FUSAYE RECK Yfel-
corned a new addition to
their family on August 24th.
A baby boy named ROBIN
joined their midst.
KEBQ 4c uin NuKAYAMA re-
moving to their new home in
Littleton, come November.
Commander .SAM MOMII of
the Cathay Post and alot of
other foimer GI,s are wax-
ing a little enthusiasm over
the coming 442nd reunion in
Honolulu, come end of July,
1953. GEORGE KOBAYASHI, TAK
YOSHIOKA, PLASH FUJIKI &
johnny nishikawa of Honolulu
came barnstorming thru Den-
ver to promote the big do-
ings. They tell us that the
round trip expenses from
San Francisco, Los Angeles
or Seattle will be less than
$5005l The Cathay Post
wined and dined the boys
here,and, in exchange, were
shown movies1 of the 442nd
Combat Team and a United
Airlines movie of the isles.
Beating the
experts" at du-
plicate bridge
at the JACI
sponsored tour-
ney October 8th
brought pleased
smiles to the
faces of first
place winners
Dr, Mike Uba and
partner Henry
L'atsumoto of
Pueblo *
Kami Katagiii
and Tosh Ando
were low men on
the totem cole."
G.E. ULTRAVI90H TVSET (0 BE GIVEN AT BENEFIT
cently had another baby boy.
MICHI Si TOSH i-HDQ welcomed
another girl and the DOUG
MIZiUHAHIs are certainly
Pouring tea for Hannah Tak ami-
ne at the annual Cornelian Fel-
lowship Tea held October 12th at
the home of Dr, and Mrs. K.T. Sa-
sano is President Kana Yorimoto.
Wives attended the an-
nual golfer's club dinner
held at Patsy's Inn, The
members viewed movies shot
by MAMI KATAGIRI and CHILI
FUJI3AKI. Making a rare
appearance were: FRANCES
SAITO, MITbU MILUKaMI, RObE
FUJISAKI, HARU MIYAMOTO,
SACHI SHIBATA, MARY KOMAKU,
SHILURO YOSHBtfURA, KIYO HA-
NAMURA, MITbU MATbUDA, TER-
RY KODAMA, MAS NAKaYAMA,
MJCHI TERAJI and JEAN FUJI-
MOTO.
HOHIHATIOMSCOMNITTEE
TO MEET IN NOVEMBER
President Roy Mayeda an-
nounces that selection of a
nominations Committee to
consider and 1 select nomi-
nees for the 1953 Denver
JACL cabinet has been cam-
proud of their little
daughter.
NORMAN GOTO will be a
bachelor for awhile since
bom Matsumoto, Denver ,
JACL finance chairman, has
made arrangements for elab-
orate prizes to be given a-
way during the New Year's
Eve Dance and Benefit at
the Albany Hotel.
Grand prize .will be a
19^3 General Electric
Ultravision television set,
obtained through the court-
esy of Tak Terasaki at T.K.
Pharmacy.
Other prizes to be given
away will be a wrist watch,
camera, and electric house-
hold, appliances.
1IH MM RELIABLE
#nevwMC0 Wj
I 1% (/ PRESCRIPTIONS
AL. ¥82f 2700L/mR
Return postage guaranteed Sec. 3U.66, P. L. & R.
THE DENVER JACL BULIETIN Permit No. 20?L-B. .
Denver Chapter JACL
1917 Lawrence Street
Denver 2, Colorado
ML&A. and her daughter NORMa pleted,
JEAN took off for Monterey,
California for a month1 s va-
cation. chairman:
Tosh Ando will serve
others on
as
the
sister,
husband
MURIEL KUBO'S
MARGARET, and her
FRANK TSUJI were recent
visitors, and a lucky few
were able to see GUYA &
LARRY TAJIRI as they were
enroute for a month's vaca-
tion in Mexico.
HELEN & JR. GOTO will be
-*i?rwB£7r
committee are Sue Maruyama,
George Masunaga, Dr. Taka-
shi Mayeda, Carol. Tanaka,
and Tak Terasaki.
Committee meetings will
be held during November.and
it is expected that ballots
will, be sent to the members
by mail shortly after the
first of December.
PMKCLEANERS
2219 E 21.. ME FL(,7ZI
service bmw
It KAWHk

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