Citation
Mile Hi Bulletin, Volume 10, Number 3

Material Information

Title:
Mile Hi Bulletin, Volume 10, Number 3
Series Title:
Mile Hi Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
22

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
VICE-
PRESIDENT
THIS IS THE SECOND OP
THE SERIES OP PERSONALITIES
IN THE 1955 JACL CABINET.
*
IRVIN SEIJTJ MATSUDA
When Irvin Matsuda was
born to Mr, and Iclrs Umasa-
buro Matsuda of Watsonville
back in 1921)., they must have
called it quits, for they
now had seven children. Count
era yourself, First there
was Tom, then Ben, Toshi
(Fujikawa), Helen (Yuge),
Fred, Bessy (Shiyomura), and
then the lucky seventh,Ir-
vin,
Irvin probably can be re-
membered best as the lil
tyke who used to take apart
the cde family "grandfather *s
clock" and couldn*t put it
together again, but then
that1s how he got to working
on precision instruments of
which he is an expert today#
In his youth, he was an
athletic lad and took part
in many sports while at Wat-
sonville Union High School,
He then attended the Salinas
Jr, College,,from then eva-
cuation, ,, then came the War
,,,joined up in the service
did his share in Italy,
University of Bradley in
Peoria, 111, had him tinker-
ing with some more trinkets,
like gems, watches, silver
and goldsmithing, in other
words, he majored in horolo-
gy, Irvin then got himself
a job in Chicago where he
worked until 1954. Then he
decided that Denver was a
better place, and here he is
with* his sister at 1320 E,
20th Ave,
He is presently working
at the Rocky Mt, Arsenal in
the high precision instru-
ment laboratory, but the ex-
act nature of his work must
be top-drawer secret for he
never mentions much about it,
SKII AND FISHING
Besides being a hard work-
ing JACLer, he*s a member of
the Cathay Post Skii Club
with fishing thrown in dur-
ing the summer months.
And what does he do in
his spare time? Well, did
you ever visit Bessy*s home?
Have you ever seen so many
tropical fish? Well,,,who's
going to feed those cute fin-
ny things three times a day?
You guessed it,.
Incidentally, Irvin is
very, very eligible.and so.
NATL.JACL TRUST
FUND; T80,000
JACL' rational Headquarters
announced that $1,569,4.0 has
been received during the
past few months in voluntary
contributions to the Nation-
al JACL Endowment Fund,
This brings the National
; Endowment fund total to
$81,6.92.01, which $80,000 is
in trust. For the final
quarter of 19.54* $800,36 in
dividend was received from
the Endowment Trust, it was
reported by National Direc-
tor Masao W. Satow, making a
total of $3#366.93 which the
Endowment has earned for cur-
rent JACL operations since
it was established in the
latter part of 1952.
Headquarters acknowledged
the most recent of such con-
tributions, $50 from Mrs.
Tatsuyo Fuji! in memory of
her late husband, Mr. Sei
Fujii, newspaper publisher
of Los Angeles,
II MORE ISSEI
BECOME CITIZENS
Syril I, Shraiberg, chief
naturalization examiner for
the Denver I&NS office-, re-
leased the names of 11 Issei
who were sworn in as newly
naturalized citizens in the
U.S. District Court in Den-
ver before Judge Jean S.
Breitenstein on Friday, Feb.
11, as follows: Kazu Komuro,
Yaye Eguchi, Shigeji Arai,
Naru Arai, Frank Zenkichi
Miyazawa, Denji Eto, Yoshi-
taro I-Iatsuno, Mura Nakamura,
Kazu Yonehiro, Tsurukichi
Hanamura, and Kenichi Suzu-
ki, Rev. George Uyemura of
CSMC assisted the Court in
administering the Oath of
Allegiance in Japanese.
Officer Del Sullivan in-
dicated that a group of a-
bout 8 Japanese in the Gra-
nada, Colo, area have sub-
mitted applications for cit-
izenship and that more were
expected,
MIKE'ON HAWTAMA
"The new Hatoyama govern-
ment is essentially friendly
to the United States, and
that people in the outlying
rural areas still show friend-
ship toward Americans", said
Mike Masaoka upon his return
from a one month*s visit to
Japan.
On the success of his mis-
sion this time, Masaoka had
only this to say: "The in-
formation that I have ga-
thered on this trip will be
very helpful in my future
activities.
Superlatives not wasted in
PRAISE -f JIGOKUMffll
SiMpU Dra^va Should
Appeal to Mass
Tak Terasaki, successful
benefit chairman of the show-
ing of "Rashomon" in 1952,
announced that the much-her-
alded "JIGOKUMON" (Gate of
Hell) is being brought to
the Esquire Theatre, 590
Downing St., with a premiere
showing on liar. 16.
"Jigokumon" was selected
as the best film of 1954 at
the Cannes International
Film Festival in France, and
New York critics have rated
"Jigokumon" as the world*s
best. The picture has been
nominated for the Academy
Award, and predictions are
that "Jigokumon" will sweep
highest honors, including
American competing films.
Filmed in Eastman color,
it is reported that Japanese
technicians after learning
Eastman processes went back
to Japan and did such an out-
standing job that Eastman ex-
perts were sent to Japan to
learn Japanese techniques.
The film relates to medie-
val Japan during the feudal
days of 1159 and tells of re-
tainer Morito*s loyalty to
Lord Kiyomori, who promises
to give Morito anything he
desires, Horito chooses lady
Kesa as his reward, and des-
pite learning that she is al-
ready the wife of Lord Wata-
ru, Morito persists in his
mad longing for lady Kesa,
The result is an emotional
maelstrom in the Oriental
manner to give intense ex-
pression to subjective drama.
The elegance of medieval Ja-
pan, the vivid color and lux-
uriant costuming, and the
magnificent photography of
"Jigokumon" gives the Nisei
something to be proud of as
a part of their racial heri-
tage.
BENEFIT: Japanese American Citizens League
Evenings at 5:30^7:309:30 p.m.
Matinee: Sat. at 3:30 p.m., Sun. at 1:303:30 p.m.
H- Y. FILM CRITICS AWARD!
"BEST FOREIGN FILM OF THE YEAR!
^Tsf^'Best picture of the year, bar none! t
EST. PRICE! .61. TAX .09. JACL .30
(TOTAL SI.OO)
UNUSUAL FILMS
s Cj u i \ e
6ih and Downing


EACH TICKET SOLD NETS
JACL 304 PRICE IS SAME
The Mile-ni JACL benefit
tickets for "Jigokumon" are
available at §1 each at the
JACL Office, T.K, Pharmacy,
and JACL cabinet officers,
and from local Japanese busi-
ness firms in Denver. These
tickets are good for any
showing between March l6-29
During the regular run of
the film, the regular admis-
sion price is $1,00, but
every JACL ticket sold will
allow 30/ benefit to the
Mile-Hi JACL.
It was noted that "Rasho-
mon", hailed as the world*s
best picture in 1952, was
attended by l,26l Japanese,
and it was hoped that the
1954 world*s best film "Jigo-
kumon would attract a simi-
lar enthusiastic response.
"Jigokumon" has been hail-
ed as an outstanding artis-
tic triumph in color. The
Eastman color process has
been brought to perfection
by Japanese technicians and
has been hailed by film cri-
tics as the world*s best.
EDITORS NOTE: THE
TROUT AND SALMON FISHING
SHORT ALONE IS RTH THE
ADMISSION. THEY CATCKEM.
4


PAGE TWO
THE MILE HI JACL BULLETIN
(JAPANESE WIVES OF NEGRO
LONELIEST BRIDES m
MARCH 1955
HUSBANDS
AMERICA
When an Itallan-Amerlcan
GI brings horn a wife from
Prance or Germany, no one
makes a big fuss, but when a
negro soldier marries a Jap-
anese girl, they are called
"war-brides", and a world of
trouble is just beginning.
, "We don't like the word
'war-bride1 because it gives
you a cheap sounding word,
something like the GIs pieli
up in foreign countries for
the price of a few imported
chocolate and chewing gum",
said shapely Mrs. Takako Wi-
ley of Denyer (Kanai Apt.).
"Yes, we are very lonely,
no brothers, no sisters, no
parents, and above all, no
friends. We try very hard
to make friends among the
Nisei, but....", lamented
Teruko Hall, 2lk3 High St.,
who is expecting her third
child in the very near fu-
ture.
When most of the Japanese
war-brides arrived in Ameri-
ca, they naturally expected
to find and enjoy all the
marvels tl^eir husbands had
told them about, like gad-
gets, wide open spaces, fine
homes, new friends and in-
laws to replace those they
left in Japan.
It's true they have found
the gadgets to save time,
the spaces vast, but the in-
laws and friends have turned
out to be the most aloof peo-
ple they ever met. The new
wives have met only half-
hearted welcome from the in-
laws and been unable to make
EMIKO and J.LTJKE are typical
of more than 10,000 couples
estimated to be living in the
U.S. today.
510- IS ST. CH43S4*
matoba
, SERVICE BUREAU
baas sriMA
LONGING FOR HER NATIVE LAND? Teruko Miller sinks into a day
dream, recalling perhaps the family outing under the sakura
tree, or.is she asking: how .are my parents doing with the
farm? Her evening drags...especially when husband reads*
new friends.
As a result the-Japanese
war-brides have become the
loneliest brides in America.
As Japanese brides they
have not yet been freely ac-
cepted in negro communities,
and as the wives of negroes,
they are shunned in white
communities. They have even
found it difficult to remain
friends with other Nipponese
girls who married white sol-
diers and came here to live.
"It seems that the Japa-
nese girls who married white
soldiers got very high hat-
ted when they came to Ameri-
ca and drew a color line on
us and our husbands," say
many wives of negro soldiers.
Nor can they find easy re-
laxed friendship in the
Nisei circle. The Nisei
seem to prefer to identify
themselves with whites and
shy away from associations
with negroes.
These faots push the war-
brides to become the loneli-
est brides in America.
The result is that the
brides socialize in tiny
clusters with other girls
with Negro husbands, rarely
visit outside their own pin-
sized group, spend an enor-
mous amount of time either
with their husbands or alone
...most likely alone.
To relieve their lonesome-
Your friendly
NEW YORK LIFE INSURANCE
AGENT
SAM MATSUMOTO AT 8-2536
ness, the girls write many
letters home and few people,
outside their own families,
know what the girls really
think down deep inside of
them. The letters to Japan
are always written in Japa-
nese, the husbands cannot
read "nihongo"*
And what goes on in the
mind of the war-bride is a
baffling mystery to the ne-
gro husbands. ...the wives
keep it inside no matter
what...the husbands almost
beg that she throw it back
at them...but still it is
kept inside. It is a mystery
indeed to the highly emo-
tional negro people.
To most of the Japanese
brides, U.S. customs are as
bewildering as the fittings
on a new vacuum sweeper.
Often thebrf.de misinterprets
brisk, casual mannerisms for
discourtesy. She finds that
in Ameri.ca almost nobody
boWs (Japanese always do),
that few educated people
sport gold teeth (many Japa-
nese love them) and that
lots of people kiss each
other in public (in Japan
very few people ever kiss
anywhere).
To all this is added one
other barrier many negro
women accuse the Japanese
brides of "spoiling our men"
and are hostile to them. To
all the Japanese girls their
husbands are their masters
this is almost a command-
ment.
This idea simultaneously
embarrasses and pleases their
husbands. One negro husband
had this to say, "I like it
when my wife waits on me
hand and foot, gives me a
massage when I come home
from work, washes my back in
hot water and turns down the
bed so I can take a nap be-
fore supper".
A recent war-bride, Sayo-
ko, says, "I feel it is'my
duty to do my husband's bid-
ding and if this makes me
different from American wo-
men then I don't know what
to do about it because act-
ing this way makes him happy*
If he's happy then I am
Happy".
HOPES FOR THE FUTURE
All in all, the Japanese
brides of "kokujin" (the
Sino-form of the word, black-
people) face the future with
fairly strong hopes. They
feel that in the course of
time, they can surely narrow
the gap between them and ne-
gro housewives of their own
ages. Most of them are con-
scientiously studying En-
glish. ..the key to under-
Continued on next page
SAYQKO and BRUCE SMITH, like
other Negro-Japanese couples
are happy enough together but
have few friends outside of
their pin-point circle.
AL 5 ¥825 Z700WIMM >


MARCH 1955
VMR-BRIDES FORM CLUB
TO AID LONELY WIVES
PAGE THREE
# Another one 'of those "ha-
kujins" ,who,d rather hang
around with the Nisei crowd
than anywhere else is, hand-
some WAYNE HENDRIX of llp.2
3. 3^ Ave., whose mother is
searching in the cookbooks
for "chazuke-koko" recipe.
# Among those skiing with
the Cathay Ski Club at Aspen*
SUGAR SUY3HIR0, TOM HAMAI,
UNIS KAWAKAMI, FUZZY YASUDA
YOSTIIE MIZOUE, PEARL KUVABARA,
RUPERT ARAI, BARBARA TSURUDA,
SACHI, and ROY 3HIBATA.
# Bouquet of columbines to
CHUCKIS SHIBATA and BUD STARK
on their recent engagement.
DYANE KATSUDA recently pin-
ned to L30 GOTO, A Beta Theta
Pi at DU.
# Big dates for the Coxlegi-
ans: April 8 and 9 the 1TICC
cabinet is planning a confab
with mixers, picnic, banquet,
and dance.
Three lead-
ers of Colum-
bine Club v of
Denver formed
recently to
assist in any
way possible,
the more than
100 warbrides
who lead iso-
lated lives
among the
Negroes.
THREE OF THE TEN CHARTER MEMBERS of the Columbine Club, who
had much to say when interviewed by BULLETIN editor. They
are (left to right) Teruko Hall, Toe Okava, Takako Wiley.
Mrs. Wiley (spokesman) thinks that majority of the brides
are married for keeps, and all like to have Nisei friends.
# The newly formed Emanons,
boast a membership of about
50 with goal at more than a
hundred. They are planning
to use the Potenza Hall when
membership increases. At the
present the club is meeting
at SKY Cafe.
Or
(war bride story continued)
Lanky Lt. RONF/ HECK,
former leader of B3A troop
38, was voted cadet of the
month (Feb.) at Manual High.
0 The Three finalists for
the title of \}ueen for the
. Victory Hop at Manual High
are MAY TAKURA, TOSHI KUMA -
GAI, AND KICHI IWATA.
SUPRE/*\ACY OF MAN GAINED
IN FIRST NIPPON POETRY
Officers elected are;
ART ARITA...'.....President
MUTSU TAKATA......VP
JUNE MATSUURA... .1st VP
SAM I2IAI........2nd. VP
JOAN NISHIKOTO...Corresp.
EMI TAKESHITA....Recording
MIKE TODA.........Publicity
Board of trustees: Itsu
Yoshimura, Julia Komura, J.
Nagara, John Nakamura, Carol
Yano
By Dr. Howard Levy
Many people are unav/are
that Japan, before her ''samu-
rai period, enjoyed a high-
ly cultured civilization.
More than a thousand years
ago, the art of composing
poetry .was widely practiced
by both sexes' of the upper
class
Early specimens of Japa-
nese poetry are found in the
Kojiki and Nihonpri, ancient
works of histor^ and legend
compiled in the Eighth Cen-
tury. According to both
works, when heaven and earth
were separated, the lighter,
male element went up to hea-
ven, while the heavier, fe-
male elemont settled in the
form of earth. Two impor-
tant deities were subsequent-
ly born,- called Izanagi,
"The Male Who Invites, and
Izanami, "The Female Who In-
vites".
Their meeting had a bear-
ing not only on poetry, but.
on the legendary origin of
the Japanese people as well.
After a whirlwind courtship,
the deities joined in matri-
mony. Izanami, when her
time came, did not merely
give birth to children, as
might an ordinary mortal,
but instead produced islands,
seas, rivers, and trees. Af-
ter producing the islands of
Japan, Izanami gave birth to
her first offspring, the Sun
Goddess Ama Terasu 0-I.Iikami,
.Then Izanagi and Izanami
first met, they stood on the
"Floating Bridge of Heaven"
and thrust a jewelled spear
into the ocean belov/. The
congealed mud that was raised
went to form the first is-
land. They set up a pillar
on the island, and walked a-
round it. When, they met,
Izanami uttered the first
words of Japanese poetry,
saying:
"What joy beyond compare,
To see a man so fairI"
These words displeased
Izanagi, who informed his
bride-to-be that man should
speak first. They, there-
fore, circled the pillar a-
gain, and this time Izanagi
spoke first, saying:
"What joy beyond compare,
To see a maid so fairj"
These words became the
earliest ever recorded in
Japanese poetry. (To be con-
tinued) .
standing and sufficient hap-"
piness.
The loneliest brides in
America, humbly appeal to
the Nisei as their guiding
brothers and sisters, they
want us to be tolerant, they
want to be taught, and above
all they want to be friends.
The end-By O.S.T.
1,073 OAfAWESE.
BORN 1954 IN LA-
The Los Angeles Japanese
population for 19*>i|. was giv-
en as 2£,£02, according to
figures from the Health
Board, More amazing was the
birth statistics which gave
Japanese birth at 1,073 for
the same year.
# MR. AND MRS. KASAICHI HA-
MA I of 3511 Milwaukee St.,
parents of JUNE and I.IICHI,
celebrated their Silver anni-
versary on Feb. 19 by invit-
ing their Sacramento friends.
#MISAE UNO made the trip all
the way from Rogen, Colo, on
Mar. 19, to take in the 'ji-
gokumon". Thanks to you the
JACL made 30^ more.

PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE
MILE HI CHAPTER OF THE JA-
PANESE AMERICAN CITIZENS
LGE, 1225 20th. St. DENVER
COLORADO.
Editor: OSKI S. TAMIWAKI
Bus. Mgr. Sam Matsumoto
STAFF: Rev. Geo. Uyeraura
Dr. Howard Ley, Toshi Tan-
aka, Kana Yorimoto, Fumi
Yabe, Chiye Horiuchi, Ruby
Sakayama, Marie Mizoue,
Carol Yano, Amy Miura, Min
Yasui, Bessy Shiyomura Hi-
ro Yanagi,Rosalie Tokunaga.
pROFESSIONAL
Pl RECTORY
ACCOUNTANT
GEORGE MITSUO KANEKC
2801 E. Colfax SiTs-1666'
dentists
JOHN1 0K1KUMA. DPS
US Air l^orce
MILTON HAYAKO, DPS
2103 Larimer MA 3-9400
MICHAEL T, HORI, DPS '
1211 E. 18th Ave ClT4-1617
ITO DENTAL GROUP
830 18th St KE 4-8580
T. Ito, DDS
Y. Ito, DDS
Sueo Ito, DDS
Sets Ito, DDS
TONY KAWAftC, DDS
1404 E. ICth Ave ICC 4-3084
ROBERT 1AYEDA, DDS
500 Interstate TAiLASKI iviAYEDA, Trust Bldg. TA 5-6961 DDS
US army
K. K. MIYAMOTO, DDS
1952 Larimer KT 5-4307
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS
TA 5-7598
INSURANCE A66NTS
HENRY K. I LADA
4588 Lowell Blvd GR 7-8413
SAW Y. MATSUMOTO
Henderson, Colo. AT 8-2536
JIHZO NODA
3211 Clayton FR 7-1065
ATTORNEYS
TOSH ANDO
1942 Larimer AC 2-5315
MINORU YASUI
1225 20th St
AL 5-7227
OPTOMETRISTS
BEN MATOBA, OP
1927 Larimer KE 4-1941
i.:ISA0 MATOBA, OP
Ft. Lupton UL 7-6550
PHYSICIANS
40 ft. Main Brighton 418
T. K. ICO BA YA SHI, MD
1227 27th St KE 4-4590
RICKARD MOMII, Md
\22i 27til St KE 4-3104
ISAMU 0ZAM0T0. MD
301 Interstate HOWARD SUENAGA Trust Bldg, TA 5-1596 r MD
830 18th St ' AC 2-1314
GEORGE TAKENO. MD
830 18th St
TA 5-0783
MAH1T0 DBA, DO
l-236~~2lstSt MA 3-3743

IT IS ALWAYS A GOOD
POLICY TO PATRONIZE
BULLETIN ADVERTISERS


LITTLE WOMAN YOU
HAVE A BUSY DAY
It*3 hard to believe how
a dimunitive girl like Amy
Fukuhara can carry two wig-
gling, twisting babies in
her arms, but thats what
she's doing now*,,twice bles-
sed with the birth of £
pound 2 oz. twin girls on
February 21, at the. Mercy
Hospital,
The identical twins were
named Christine Harue, and
Cynthia Tazuko. Asked how
she tells them apart, Amy-
said, "You tickle their feet,
and the first one that says
stop it*, is Christine.
Amy*s husband, Larry, had
this to say, "At least they
come in handy with the in-
come tax deadline getting
closer",
''OUR MARRY'OPERATED
Harry Sakata, who was e-
lected president of the Mile
Hi JACL while vacationing in
Japan, has finally returned
to this city* Unfortunately
upon his arrival to the
States, he was stricken with
appendicitis in LA on Feb 28
Due to complications, Sa-
kata was unable to tetum to
Denver until Mar* 13. He
is now out of danger and he
promised great things for a
great year for the JACL*
DR.MIYAMOTO HURT
Dr* K.K. Miyamoto, pioneer
leader of Denver was slightly
injured last weekend while he
was motoring to Cheyenne Vyo*
\h en his car overturned sev-
eral times* The doctor was
injured about the head and a.
very bad hand Injury was sus-
tained*
It doesn't do you any
good to read this article...
it is merely put in here to
fill this, much space.
(Mi
MILE HI JACL BULLETIN
EMI CHIKUMA, nee Katagiri,
was seen in Denver, which
means she's back from Texas
where she was keeping her
hubby (Dr. JOHN M.) company
while in the service. Hope
to see you folks around.
DR. TOM and HARUKO KOBAYA-
SHI are scheduled to leave
on a two week vaoation dur-
ing the latter part of the
month. They plan deep sea
fishing in old Mexico under
the balmy techila sun before
returning home. We're all
waiting to hear about the
one that got away, Doc.
J FLO UYEDA, former Army
nurse and now a med* student
at BU planned to fly to S.F.
Calif, to visit her folks
during the spring vacation.
FLO. expects to enroll at CU
Med. School next fall.
MRS. M. NASASUGI, 724 24
St. left for S.F. Cal wher
she will embark for a trip
to Japan*
CEO. FUJIMOTO, 2511 Race.
St. recently flew to LA Cal.
to meet his mother-in-law a
MRS MORI, who returned from
Japan. Mrs. Mori went to see
PERKY MORI who had a baby
last year there.
YEIZI KAGOEARA, funeral
services were held at the
local Buddhist church March
10.
.STUDIES BOWLANE
On his way home from the
recent bowling tournament in
Long Beach, Ed. Matsuue was
a guest of Dr.Bob Mayeda and
Tom I oka. Ed, who manages
one of the more popular lane
in Honolulu, scent much time
here studying the automatic
pin ball setup system at the
E!1 s lane.
'/ew extra copies of Bulletir
available at JACL office.
GRANADA 1uksPou£m
MARKET
jfc?,
ft&S 1919 LAIVttEMCE ST.
DINING noon
serving only the -Pmeet m Chinese cuisine
2015 market st.
KVfsTOAie tft MZ+j
'6L 772KM, ?7lasrtS
HITT RUN GIRL,fc
"He was a mean man..."
cried lil Wilma Tamaki, 6,
who was run down by a hit-
run driver, on her way to
Ebert School, Monday morning,
March 7 at the corner of*
19th and Champa Sts.
Witness reported the num-
ber of the hit-run car but
it checked to a vacant lot,
according to Jim Tamaki, fa-
ther of the child and opera-
tor of the Jefferson Hotel,
1^29 Champa,
Treated for injuries this
month list: DON FURUTA for
a leg operation from a foot-
ball mishap,BOB FUJIOKA,
injured while skiing.
MR. and MRS. KUMAGAI, par-
ents of the well known
Nisei pair, SAM and TOSHI,
were feted by the members of
the Seicho-no-Iye and Shiro-
Hato clubs on March 13, at
the home of Mrs, M. Ioka,
The venerable couple were
scheduled to leave on a Ja-
pan tour on or about March
19.
Among the proud owners of
shining new cars are KEN
YABE, who thinks-the Chevy
station wagon is JTJST THE
THING for chasing those elu-
sive "rainbowa1/ all over the
continental divide,..,as for
LARRY TAJIRI, he's sticking
to Fords, but we hear that
the Mrs. is having a terri-
fic time learning the conven-
tional shift,
SESSUE AMD SHIRLEY
FILM CO-STARS
Sessue Hayakawa, once a
popular star in Hollywood,
is co-starring with Shirley
Yamaguohi and Robert Ryan in
the 20th Century Fox movie,
"IJeuse of Bamboo", which be-
gan shooting scenes near Mt*
Fuji*
PRIDE FROM JAPAN
Since Tom Baglyama brought
back such an ideal wife from
Japan last January to his
home in Bight on, other young
men of this region are plan-
ning for a mad rush for "im-
ported brides", according to
the vernacular Denver press#
The Nisei girls, no doubt,
aren't going to like this
turn of events.
0 Dr, I. Ozamoto, well known
Nisei physician of this city,
will soon be entertaining
friends at his new home at
1625 Yates. Revs. Y. Tamal
and N. Tsunoda will be the
Doc's across the street
neighbors,
HONEST,THIS JS.
N OT AN OLD GAG l
MEMO TO ALL JACL MEM-
BERS: If you do not re-
ceive your monthly BULLE-
TIN, please notify our of-
fice at 1225 20th St. giv-
ing us your name and cor-
rect address.
This may sound like the
old gag: "If you do not
receive this letter please
let us know by return mail*
or "Your money will gladly
be refunded if this para-
chute fails to open"*
All aside from joking,
we are earnestly trying to
check and double check our
files so that all those
entitled to the BULLETIN
sh all not be left out*
0 SAM KISHIYAMA, ex-pres,
of the NICC and CU grad in
pharmacy was assigned to Ja-
pan by the US Army. Sam K*
was serving at S.F. before
his appointment to Japan.
ijT&i OGDEN
BODY SHOP
130* OftDEM ikt IfthM
Return postage guaranteed
THE MILE HI JACL BULLETIN
1225 Twentieth Street
Denver 2, Colorado.
Sec. 34.66, P. L. & R.
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