Citation
Mile Hi Bulletin, Volume 10, Number 4

Material Information

Title:
Mile Hi Bulletin, Volume 10, Number 4
Series Title:
Mile Hi Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
22

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
/V/CCMOLDS CONFERENCE
D//VE END DENCE .-EASTER
NICC delegates and advisors who remained for the Annual Ban-
quet held at Edelweis on Easter weekend First row (left to R)
K.Yamazaki, S. Nishimura, S. Terasaki, R. Matsunaga, M. Kizo-
ue, Dr. Levy, T. Yasui, M. Yasui, S. Matsumoto,H. Iwashiro.
Second row; N.Fukuda, H. Yamaguchi, Y. Hazue, S. Takeda, S.
Kuritani, K. Matsuura, J. Hanamura, C. Tomita, E. Kusaka, S.
Matsuda, A. Tambara, A. Yamada, M. Arita, S. Okada, D. Matsu-
da, D. Nikaido, K. Yamamoto,. M. Hamai, R. Yoshihara, H.. Hiro-
ee, A. Miyamoto* Dr. Howard Levy in the center foreground
was the guest speaker.
TEXES ROUGR-HAmERS Of
/SSE! DRAW /EE OE c/ACl
.VICE-
PRESIDENT,
MRS. BETTY HARUE SUZUKI
THIS IS THE THIRL OF
THE SERIES OF PERSONALTIES
IN THE 1955 JACL CABINET.
You wouldnt think so,
but Betty., is proud that she
is a native of Colorado,
Born in Pueblo back in the
good old days of 1919 as the
second and onlv daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Kanichi Kusaka,
she has been the ray of sun-
shine in the otherwise drab
life of another struggling
Japanese family.
Soon after, Betty had a
brother, Ben who with the
elder brother Paul completed
the rather small family cir-
cle.. The Kusakas left for
Palo Alto, Calif, when the
father became ill in 1922.
The younger Kusakas were
active in church and commu-
nity affairs in the San Ma-
teo, Palo Alto, Redwood City,
and other Bay areas and Bet-
ty attended San Mateo Jr.
College, up to the time of
their evacuation in 1942.
She also served as Vice-Pres.
of the JACL there.
Soon after the war, the
Kusakas settled in Henderson,
Colorado where they started
farming. Somewhere along the
line, between evacuation and
resettlement in Colorado, .
romance entered the lives of
Betty Kusaka and Henry Suzu-
ki. The lovy dovies got mar-
ried in Denver on that Memo-
rable day of April 22, 1942.
They now have two charming
boys. Stephen age 4, and
Ronnie age 3.
Our Betty is working her
hands and feet to the bones
in rounding up membership
for the JACL and shes real-
ly doing a bang up job with
the hardest office of the
cabinet.
Those who have contacts
with her, cannot deny that
Betty Suzuki has that quali-
ty of character which makes
one feel right at home with
her, Bettys wit and humor
is a well trade mark With
her. This writer wishes to
pass on a gag which might
illustrate her sense of
humor but lack of space and
not being an illustrator we
regret to miss out on a very
breezy Joke. So Sorry.
Surprise Lunch Auction
cooked up by our Chairman
Bill Mattocks has been
postponed until late sum-
mer. Details later.
red M&ruyama, president
of the Arkansas Valley JACL,
called attention to the
Mountain Plains JACL Office
that during March a certain
examiner from the District
Immigration and Naturaliza-
tion Service in El Paso, Tex*
as, created a very bad im-
pression upon the Issei ap-
plicants for citizenship,
witnesses, and interpreters*
President Maruyama of the
Arkansas Valley JACL Chapter
pointed out that members com-
plained that the examiner
was very insulting, incon-
siderate, and extremely rude.
The examiner exhibited a sus-
picious attitude towards the
interpreters and witnesses,
and members complained that
there was considerable dis-
respect indicated by the ex-
aminer*
Mr. Henry Hirose, JACL Re-
presentative for the Granada
Area, callod attention to
the Mountain Plains Office
of this matter, and an imr.e--
REDCRO# AIDERS
GO OVER THE TOP
The Kile-Hi JACL volun-
teers for the Red Cross
drive, co-captained by Irvin
Matsuda and Tak Terasaki,
reported C1397.50 for 107.5
of quota assigned by the Red
Cross headquarters for the
1955 campaign.
diate protest wa3 filed with
the District Office in El Pa-
so, Texas* The District Di-
rector in El Paso, Texas,
promptly responded with the
hope that the incident was a
result of a misunderstanding,
but assured the Mountain
Plains JACL Office that a
full investigation would be
made of the incident.
National Legislative Re-
presentative, Mike.K* Masao-
ica, indicated concern in re-
gard to such incidents* and
pledged to take the matter
up personally with the Com-
missioner of the I.N. & S,,
who indicated strong feeling
that all naturalization ex-
aminers should be courteous
to all applicants.
National JACL Headquar-
ters in San Francisco and
the National Organization re-
quested reports of such in-
cidents in order to facili-
tate and expedite the entire
naturalization program on be-
half of Issei applicants*
Min Yasui, Regional JACL
Representative for the Moun-
tain Plains Area, pointed
out that the local examiners,
Syril I* Shraiberg in Denver,
Colorado, and Dell Sullivan,
who conducts examinations in
outlying areas including
Western Nebraska and uspally
within the Stnte of Colorado,
have been extremely helpful
towards our Issei applicants.
INAGAKI TALKS
ON CLAIMS IN
DENVER VISIT
George Inagaki, national
president of the JACL, made
his first official visit
here, meeting with the local
JACL cabinet and various
community leaders.
Inagaki reported in re-
gard to the program develop-
ed by the JACL for the re-
maining H,700 larger evacua-
tion claiments who have a to-
tal of $ 60,000,000 claims
remaining. He explained
that the Hillings Amendment
and other remedial legisla-
tion in Congress is essen-
tial.
Toshio Ando, Harry G. Ua-
toba, and Min Ya6ui who have
handled the bulk of evacua-
tion claims in the Colorado
area reported that 310
claims have been compromis-
ed for a total of about $266,
000,000 of the original
amount of more than $670,000.
There are approximately 60
claims remaining in the Colo-
rado area with a total a-
mount of about $550,000,00.
President Inagaki indica-
ted that a special committee
has been set up nationally
in order to raise a campaign
fund of $10,000,00, together
with a pledge of 5# of the
amount received to the Na-
tional JACL Endowment Fund.
Mike U. idaeaoka in ffashing-
ton, D. C. has pledged to
perform lobbying work with-
out fee, and the national
JACL board is serving volun-
tarily to organize the Com-
mittee on Japanese American
Evacuation Ciaims. George
Ohashi of Denver was one of
the first to pledge $26.00
to the committee, and to
sign up &6 a member.
NICC SETS CABINET
The newly elected offi- .
cers of the NICC for the 19-
55 to 56 term are as follow:
President-Hank faUcaguchi A-M
V.P.------Stanley Gima,Mines
Rec Sect-Eleanor Kusaka, CU
Cor. Sect-Mari'-n Arita, CU
Treaa-Tak Horiuchi, AM
Aset. Trs-Robt. Hoshige, AM
Social Ch-7obt. Inal, CU
Paul Okada, CU
Publicity-John Nagata, CU
NEAR-CENTENARIAN DIES
Riichiro Nobe,perhaps the
oldest Japanese in southern
California died of prolonged
illness in Los Anreles at
the a*e of He was s form-
er Oaklander but prior to
death he operated a shoe
shoo in Los Aiv-eles.


fc With Oski Taniwaki
It was gratifying to hear
all kinds of comments on the
War Bride feature story of
the March edition of the BUL-
LETIN* The Colorado Times
and the-^Pacific Citizen re-
printed the story which gave
it a pretty good coverage*
The three war brides who
were interviewed in Denver
were up in arms when the BUI^
LETINs were delivered to
them gratis* Their husbands
dldn,t like the treatment
too well, the wives said.
But after talking with other
Nisei, the wives were final-
ly convinced that the arti-
cle intended to be sympathe-
tic* The BULLETIN was ex-
onerated, and your editor
was saved from a dishonora-
ble "hara-kiri".
jacl, the watchdog
OP THE SMUG JAPANESE?
Vigilance is the price of
democracy. .this has been
proven to a small extent in
the Texas case of naturaliza-
tion officials displaying
uncalled for disrespect to
those Issei taking examina-
tions .
We feel deeply for the un-
fortunate incident. Espe-
cially when it had to happen
as it did, on the threshold
of democracy.
But once again the JACL
comes to action. The organi-
zation^ existence is once
again justified. There is
"security through unity"
(JACL slogan), and we can be
assured that this kind of in-
cident, will not happen toof
often.
WHAT TO DO WITH
; LAST YEAR' S XMAS CARDS
Did you ever wonder what
good is a second hand Christ-
mas Cnrd? Most all homes
are littered with them right
after the new year. We put
them in a sack and throw it
away--whata shame, watta
shame*
A San Francisco Japanese
newspaper (Hokubei Mainichi)
advertised its readers to
send them all the unwanted
Christmas cards last January
and as the result of much
publicity, more than 1^0,000
multi-ooiored greeting cards
were collected. What did
they do with them?
A huge sack full was ship-
ped to Japan to be distribu-
ted to school children all
over the island empire. What
the school children did with
FLOWER SHOP
510-IS ST. CH43S46
PROBE OF TEXAS
OFFICERS UR6ED
Min Yasui, regional direc-
tor for the Mountain Plains
JACL, reported that a full-
fledged investigation of the
incident reported from the
Granada Area pertaining to
difficulties with a naturali-
zation examiner from EL Paso,
Texas, is being carried on
under orders by the District
Director, Marcus T. Neely,
with a speolal investigating
officer assigned from the
Denver office.
The National JACL has
been alerted to the problem
and contacts, have been made
on high national levels#
The special investigating
officer, assigned from the
Denver office under the di-
rection of John F. Hamaker,
officer in charge, will make
a personal visit to the Gra-
nada area to interview the
actual applicants, witnesses,
and interpreters in order to
ascertain the facts. Depend-
ing upon the facts found,
the Immigration and Naturali-
zation Service assured the
JACL that proper remedial
steps would be taken.
2? GRAND5 TOP
EVAC. CLAIMS
Joe Katayama of Brighton
now in the US Army, was the
only claimant in Colorado eo
far receiving an evacuation
claim in the $4,500 above
classification. He is to be
reimbursed for the amount of
$3,004.01.
' Tom and Sueko Kimura top
the listing with an award of
close to &5,000.
them is anybodys guess...
. And now coming back to
the question...what did YOU
do with all the Christmas
cards?
HARRY LEARNS TO BOV
IN JAPAN FASHION
Had a very educational
chat with Harry Sakata (JACL
prexy) who visited me recent-
ly, He talked profusely
about his Japan trip and the
first hand study of things
Japanese. "I have learned
to be really humble", said
Harry as he bowed with a
country gentleman gesture.
Harry promised me that he
will show his travelogue
slide some night after he
finishes with a long waiting
list of showings hes con-
tacted all among hakujin
groups.
He also promised the BUL-
LETIN a series of comments
which should be interesting
'in more than one way.
Your friendly
NEWYORK UFE INSURANCE
AGENT
SAM MATSUMOTO AT 8-3536
07U
HEROES FORM BACKGROUND
FOR MANY LEGENDS
By Dr. Howard Levy
As mentioned in my March f vicinity. He has killed'
article, the Sun Goddess Ama eight of the couple Ts child-
Terasu 0-Mikami was an off- ren during his annual excur-
snring of the deities Izana- sions, and is now feared
gi and Izanami. Her brother ready to devour their ninth
was the mischievous and hot an tempered Thunder God Susano ful maiden. The dragon is
0-Hikoto. Susans once an- described as having one body,
noyed his sister so much but eight heads and tails,
that she sulkily retired to His eyes are as red as the
a cave and refused to come winter cherry, while his
out, throwing Japan into com- belly is always bloody and
plete darkness. This is ob- inflamed in appearance. Su-
viously a mythological expla- sano* agrees to slay the dra-
nation of an early eclipse. gon, if in return he is giv-
Susano is described in one en the daughter. -Vhen the
Kojiki passage as a dragon grateful parents acquiesce,
killer li la Saint George of Susano sets forth on his
the West, but the Japanese task. He has constructed a
story hag an alcoholic fla- huge fence with eight doors
vor which is lacking in the and at each door he places a
Western version. tub of sake. The terrible
According to the legend, dragon, arrives, bends his
Susans 0-Mikoto finds an old eight heads into the sake
man and an old woman weeping tubs and falls into a drunk-
by the roadside. Near them n stupor. The wily Susano
stands their daughter, a then draws his sword and
beautiful maiden. When our outs off each and every one
Thunder God hero asks them of the dragon*s heads and
why they weep, the old man chops the dragon into tiny
replies that there is an nieces. (To be continued)
eight-forked serpent in the__________________
DA RUM A-SAN
The BULLETIN takes pleas-
ure in introducing DarumaSan
who will entertain us with
modern gags spiced with the
sages of the Orient.
The cartoonist is Hiro
Yanagi of Ioka apts., former
S.F. youth and now with the
Post Office. Hiro, by the
way, holds many records as a
weight lifter. He is also
handsome and still single.
Here's good luck to the
creator and his Daruma-San.
BY YAWAGI

B/tiD6£mmes
True S. Yasui, chairman
of the Mile-Hi JACL Bridge
Club, reportedthat Leonard
Ring, 3b.8 South Oak Street,
Denver i<, Colorado, and
Betty Conradi, 6738 Montview
Blvd., were winners of the
first 19^ Ooen Pair Dupli-
cate Bridge Championship of
the Mile-Hi JACL Bridge Club
held on Saturday, April 16,
at the residence of Dr. and
Mrs. Thomas K. Kbbayashi*
Sam Matsumoto and Rosalie
Tokunaga placed second, fol-
lowed by Dick and Ethel Ya-
nase in third place.
REV.CITIZEN TAMAI
Among the recent Issei
earning their citizenship
papers were Rev. Y. Tamai of
the local Buddhist church.An
Italian warbride Bianca Kuga
wife of Harry Xuga also
passed the examination.
# Ted MarUyama, president
of the Arkansas Valley JACL,
was reported to be hospita-
lized at the St.Lukes Hospi-
tal in Denver. The extent
of his illness was not fully
knov^n, but it was reported
that he is suffering from
serious illness.
RELIABLE
PRESCRIPTIONS
AL 5 ¥825 2700wm


DI6 ME,HEP-HEP
Hey, hey, dig roe folks!
That Cattle-train that
icky Robert is riding around
is real gone*......must have
cost a pretty yummy.
But the hunk of hair he's
going around with, what a
drag, what a drag.
Just in case some parents
aren't hep to teenage slan-
guage. the SMALL FKY has
compiled a list of some of
the more standardised voca-
bulary to help daddy and mom
over the rough spots when
listening in on jive talks.
Here are some vocabulary:
AIR BAG...lungs
ATTTC
CATTLE*TR AIN. '..Cadillac
WAYS OUT...didn't mean
what you'just said.
WHAT A DRAG....boring.
YOU'R HEP.,,.real sharp.
REAL GONE...it's the best,
. CRACK-OUT...one who backs
out.
DIG ME...understand.
ICKY..,,not popular,
SEND ME...I'm interested,
GOES APE...crazy about
someone.
HUNK OF HAIR...a girl.
SQUARE,,.doesn't fit in.
NICC TO HONOR
GRADSAT DANCE
Hank Takaguchi of Colo-
rado A.I.t. College at Ft. Col-
lins, newly installed presi-
dent of the NICC, announced
that the Nisei students will
sponsor a Graduation Dance
on June 11, to honor all
Nisei graduating senors in
! the Mountain Plains area,
i The place and orchestra have
i not yet been decided uoon,
i but details will be pub-
; lished through this paper.
| Evelyn Suyehiro moved to
Brownsville, Texas in order
to accept a position with
Mercy Hospital there.
CAPSULES FROM
CSMC BULLETINS
SAICHI IRITA1II, father of
Rev, Frank, Dr. Roy, Willy,
Dan and Mrs. Don Kawano, pas-
sed away suddenly.
TO!.: TAK5TA and family
moved to their new home on
3659 Wyandott St., Ge. 3-
2Ql:-0.
VI and ROY NISHIMURA are
on a three week vacation to
Hawaii.
0 TED NONAKA received his
discharge from the Army.
OACL MEMBERSHIP
DRIVE NEAR< MIRPNT
With the JACL membership
goal set at a very optimis-
tic high of l,OCO, Betty Su-
zuki, chairman of the signup
committee reported that with
only 55C more, the goal will
be reached.
Hard hitting Harry Saka-
ta coining up from a belated
start signed up 65 members
to become second highest
signerupper next to Bette
Suzuki who signed up 119*
SEEKS U.S.STAY
Senators Eugene D. Milli-
kin and Gordon Allott, Sen-
ators from Colorado, report-
ed that on March 28, the U.S,
Senate passed the bill S-89I
on behalf of Chokichi Iraha,
granting him the right of
permanent residence in the
United States.
The special bill will now
be referred to the House for
final action. Congressman
Byron G, Rogers of Colorado
has evidenced an interest in
Iraha*s case and has pledged
to exert every possible ef-
fort to pass the bill during
this session of Congress.
OrientalGrdnToOpen
A completely redecorated
Japanese eatery and "sake
house" will soon open at
1926 Larimer Street, in the
center of Lil Kobe according
to owner, George Fukuma. The
new hotspot will cater pri-
marily to the Japanese taste
and will be christened Orien-
tal Garden.
Ben Furuta, nisei cuisine
plenipotentiary will probab-
ly have a hand in the manage-
ment of the kitchen.
Ethel Yanase was honored
at a surprise baby shower
given by Hana Takamine and
Jean Fujimoto on March 23 at
the home of Mr. & Mrs. Ter-
ri Takamine. Among those
present were: Michi Terasa-
ki, Kana Yorimoto, Masaka Fu-
ruta, Bernice Ohashi, True
Yasui, Ruby Uyemura, Amy
Miura, Mary Kuritani, and
Toshi Tanaka.
4 Frank and Ruth Kamibaya-
shi became proud parents of
a baby girl. The baby was
named' Sandra Kav, born March
10th.
4 The BULLETIN and the JACL
in general would like to pre-
sent a wooden OSCAR to JO-
ANNA TOKUNAOA for her untir-
inr effort in helping the
JACL and the BULLETIN in hun-
dreds of behind the scene ac-
tivities,
JOANNA is that unassuming
charming girl who answers
the telephone with a very
sweet voice when you call up
: IN YAST'I' s law offiwe at
1225 21th St. Try it some
.time--the number is AI5.7027
ywA/AMB/r-mm
JSOMfM/rj
wmmm/tTME
can't tell you how it
started, but there's a Capi-
tal Recording of Rovers-Ray
Dobaxd (Hollywood) entitled:
Ichi-Bon Tami Dachi". (Ed-
itor's note). We played it,
it's supposed to be "Ichi-
Ban Tomo Dachi," or No. 1
Friend. Then there's the re-
cording of "Gomen-Nasai" and
have you heard "Yamaguchi Ma-
ma"? But the most appetiz-
ing is entitled: "Chow-Mien".
It won't be long now before
they'll be dancing to hot
syncopation called "Yaki-Su-
ki".
cCumac
C-U. stoanctsTffattfi
General Chairman Leonard
Nevis of Honolulu, Hawaii,
has announced that "lu&u
time" has rolled around once
more for the University of
Colorado students and is
scheduled to be held on May
ill-, from 6:00 P.M. to mid-
night in the Glenn Miller
Ballroom at the University
of Colorado student union.
The "luau" is being co-spon-
sored by the Hawaiian Clubs
of the University of Colora-
do and the University of Den-
ver.
The luau", an authentic
Hawaiian feast, has become a
tradition at the University
of Colorado, and in previous
years has been considered
one of the outstanding events.
Students of Hawaii have trans-
planted a little bit of the
glamour of the Islands amidst
the snow-^^oed peaks of the
Rockies.
NISEI EDITOR OUlTS
Frank Tamura, editor of
the Colorado Times English
section for the past eight
years since 191^7. submitted
his resignation Friday, April
22.
4 Funeral services for Mrs.
Kuni Minami 71, wife of Yae-
raon Minami one of the most
widely known pioneer farmers
of central Cal. was held on
March 12.
PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY THE
MILE HI CHAPTER OF THE JA-
PANESE AMERICAN CITIZENS
LGE. 1225 20th. St. DENVER1
COLORADO. ^
Editors OSKI S. TANIVAKI
Bus. Mgr. Sam Matsuaoto
STAFF: Rev. Geo Uyemura
Dr. Howard Levy,Toshi Tan-
aka, Kana Yorimoto, Fumi
Yabe, Chiye Horiuchi, Ruby.
Sakayama, Marie Kisoae
Carol Yano, Amy Miura, Min
Yasui, Bessie Shiyomura,
Hiro Yanagi Rosalie Toku-
naga.
PROFESSIONAL
LISTINGS
ACCOUNTANT
GEORGE MITSUO KAKKKO
280lS. Colfax DlT8-l66
DENTISTS
JOhfr 'SHim-iA, DPS
US Air Force v
MILTON HAYAKO,-DPS
2103 "Larimer MA 3-$400
MICHAEL T, HORI, DPS
1211 E. 18th Ave CH~4-1617
ITO DENTAL GROUP
830 l8th St KE 4-8680
T. Ito, DDS
Y. Ito, DDS
Sueo Ito, DDS
Sets Ito, DDS
TONY KAWANO, DDS
1404 S.-16th Ave KE 4-3084
ROBERT MAYEDA, DDS
300 Interstate Trust Bldg.,
TA 5-6961
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS
US Army
K. K. MIYAMOTO, DDS
1952 Larimer TA 5-4307
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS
200 Interstate Trust Bldg.
TA 5-7598
INSURANCE AGENTS
HENRY K. IbiADA
4588 Lowell Blvd GR 7-8413
SAM Y, MATSUMOTO
Henderson, Colo. AT 8-2536
JINZO NODA
3211 Clayton FR 7-1065
ATTORNEYS
TOSH ANDO
1942 Larimer AC 2-5315
iMINORU YASUI
.1225 20th St AL 5-7227
OPTOMETRISTS
BEN MATOBA, OP
1927 Larimer KE 4-1941
ialSAO MATOBA, OD
Ft. Lupton UL 7-655CL physicians CHARLES FUJISAKI. MD
40 N. Main Brighton 418
T. K. KOBAYASHI, MD
1227 27th St KE 4-4590
RICHARD MOMII, MD
1227 27th St KE 4-3104
ISAMU OZAMOTO. MD
301 Interstate HOWARD SUENAGA Trust Bldg. TA 5-1596 MD
830 18th St AC 2-1314
GEORGE TAKENO. MD
830 16th St TA 5-0783
MAH1TC UBA, DO
.1230 21st St MA 3-3743
PATRONIZE the firms which
make the BULLETIN possible


SStSELau* **-*&*&.
The MileHi^ Red Cross team, cp&Wtfpraira
by .XrvlTrMafs'ada and Tak Te-
rasaki, was cited for cam-
paign headquarters in its
final report dated April 4,
1955, and was given an
"Award of Merit" for out-
standing service.to the 1955
Red Cross campaign.
Those assisting the JACL
teams were Sam Matsumoto,
Willie Mikuni, Sarge Terasa-
ki, Joanna Tokunaga, and co-
captains Tak Terasaki and
Irvin Matsuda.
'home again;
AVAILABLE. FOR *322
"HOHE AGAIN", a poignant
story of a Japanese American
family who underwent the
heartaches of avacuation and
returned "home again" to Cal-
ifornia, is available at the
jacl office, laas-aoth st.
The regular publisher*sprice
is $4.00, but can be ob-
tained through the JACL for
?3.00.
James Edmiston, the au-
thor, is a writer for televi-
sion and motion pictures. He
served with the San Jose fiRA
office in 1942 and has years
of close association with
the Japanese Americans.
\>.6oku'NEMIvso
Tak Terasaki. general
chairman for the "Jigolcumon"
benefit held at the Esquire
Theatre during the latter
part of March, reported that
a net figure of $269.50 has
been added to the Mile-Hi
JACL treasury, and that 905
tickets were sold through
the whole-hearted coopera-
tion of various JACL workers.
Rev. Geo. Uyeraura is wearing a special smile in the fore-
ground of this picture. The others must find themselves
scattered about the front of the CSMC at the close of the
Easter services. (Poto by Tom Masamori).
'MR. MOTO 'finBETS
SURPRISE FOE
Mr, Ho to, the popular Ja-
panese matman can take care
of himself in the arena with
any legitimate opponent, but
when a young lady enters the
show,,..well, anything can
happen.
An enraged 20 year old
lady (?) lunged from her
ringside seat and scratched-
Mr. Moto with a broken piece
of mirror, at one of the
matches recently in Washing-
ton. Hr. Moto was treated
for deep cuts about the leg
and Miss Clements was booked
for assault with a deadly
weapon.
Five young hoods netted
$240 when they held up Fred
Katagiri, owner of a service
station five miles south of
Brighton on April 2 at 7 p.o.
One of the thugs displayed a
gun, and tore off the tele-
phone from the wall when
they left, according to the
undersheriff Virgil Barstow.
jUDY T. TAKAHASHI of Los
Angeles announced her caning
wedding with TOM SAKURAI of
this city. The services are
to be held at the Senshin
Buddhist Church on May 15.
GRANADA !Uk^Pou£VW
MARKET ^
Jons wJje&Zfekd
Kg HWI 1919 LAMhUMCE ST.
ww rorf
DINING ROOM
Serving only -the -Tirwct in Chinese osine
4015 wVRKtT ST. KVYSTOAI6 HF
OTSUKAS ATTEND
ROTARY CONFAB
Mr. & Mrs. Kiyoshi
of Sedgwick, Colorado,
Otsuka
both
members of the Mile-Hi JACL
of Denver were official de-
legates to the Rotary In-
ternational Convention held
in Colorado Springs on Arpil
17-18-19, for District 168,
which comprises of northern
Colorado, Wyoming, and west-
ern Nebraska. K Otsuka has
been recognized as an out-
standing leader in north-
eastern Colorado, and has
had several feature articles
written concerning his farm-
ing and leadership activi-
ties in the Sedgwick area.
PIONEER DIES
Tommy Matsuda of Chicago
joined Bessy Shiyomura and
Irvin Matsuda in Denver and
drove to Watsonville, Calif,
to attend the funeraiservice
of their father which was on
April 16.
The late Umesaburo Matsu-
da was one of the most suc-
cessful pioneers in the in-
surance field, associated
with the N.Y. Life Ins. Co.
He was better known in
his recent years as the or-
ganizer of the Seicho-no-Iye
groups thruout U.S* andCana-
da. The BULLETIN extends its
deepest sympathy.
Return postage guaranteed
THE IvjILE HI JACL BULLETIN
1225 Twentieth Street
Denver 2, Colorado.
I was out- of hi<-h
school back in 1939 when I
was first signed up with the
TasMnrrton Townshin JACL
Chapter. It made me feel
then as if I was joining an
old people's group. In fact,
I didnt even know what the
letters JACL meant. Anyway
I was curious and went to my
first meeting. It was a so-
cial meeting, and I not Imow-
inp, how to dance, didnt en-
joy myself at all.
As time went on, I no-
ticed the local JACL talking
many important part in the
community, and its leaders
were the type of people every-
one was proud of.
The following year I arm-
ed myself with an axitograph
book and tagged along to at-
tend the National JACL Con-
vention in Portland, Oregon.
More than anything els% this
convent! on caivineed me, the
importance of the JACL,...,.
even if I did miss the Sayo-
nara Ball. It also con-
vinced me that I should learn
how to dance. Thats how
your new president got start-
ed in the JACL.
Perhaps you may say yo^
dont care Mto play bridge,
bowl, or maybe dont hang,
around Japs too much,,...
Youll find that the JACL is
a pretty good outfit to be-
long- to. If you dont like
the way your Chapter oper-
ates, why not come to the
meetings and let us know,
Yfed be glad to get acquaint-
ed with you and talk things
over.
Remember your Chapter is
as strong as its members I
MAYOR ASKS JACL
I-iayor ':tuigg Newton of Den-
ver invited the JACL to par-
ticipate in the 1955 Inven-
tory of Human Relations for
the City and County of Den-
ver.
BODYSHOP
I3QS OfrDtN
Sec. 34.66, P.
Permit No.
L & R,
8091-8.