Citation
Mile Hi JACL Bulletin, Volume 13, Number 5

Material Information

Title:
Mile Hi JACL Bulletin, Volume 13, Number 5
Series Title:
Mile Hi JACL Bulletin
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
25

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
Vol. X\ll No. 5
MARUYAMA
HONORED
AT BANQUET
Tamotsu Murayama spoke in
Japanese for little more
than an hour, recalling the
1930 Nat'l JACL convention
Seattle, Washington, and re-
calling that since we were
meeting at the Cathay Post
of the American Legion, how
efforts were made through
Takutaro Slocum and others
to gain citizenship for vet-
erans of Japanese ancestry
who served during World War
I. Murayama recalled that
the Issei vets of Los Ang-
eles took the name of Com-
odore Perry Post, and the
San Francisco group adopted
the name of Townsend Harris,
the first U.S. Minister to
Japan, Meeting at a vets'
post reminded him of the
many struggles 20 years ago,
he said,
Murayama also expressed
great satisfaction in speak-
ing before various groups in
the United States, before
Shriners, and other Cauca-
sian groups in Washington, D
C., New York, Seattle, Salt
Lake City, ana other places.
He emphasized that he was
not speaking to Japan Soc-
iety people, who were al-
ready impressed with the im-
portance of cultivating US-
Japan relations, but that he
was going out to meet and
speak to people who do not
know of Japan, and who have
expressed no particular in-
terest in things Japanese.
Murayama pointed out that
Japan is the 2nd customer of
the United States, a fact
not well known by Americans,
He pointed out that Hokkaido
farmers in Japan have been
forced to quit soya-bean
farming, because the U.S,
farmers in the Mid-West re-
gion of the Mississippi Val-
ley can export soya beans to
Japan cheaper than the Japan
ese farmers can grow soya
beans.
He also noted that the U,
S, will have a tremendous
problem of Japanese war bri-
des in the U.S., and their
half-Japanese offspring. Ma-
saoka has reported to him
that 26,000 Japanese war
brides are in the U.S,, and
£hat their problems will be-
come a problem for the Nisei
and certainly of the JACL,
Murayama explained briefly
about the background of the
war brides, in general, and
expressed the opinion that
5og were well adjusted, back
East,
Tomotsu Murayama was one
of the first leaders in the
National JACL movement in
the United States during the
late 1920's and early 30's.
He worked for Japanese ver-
nacular newspapers in San
Francisco, including the Ko-
kubei Mainichi of S.F. Af-
ter his return to Japan, and
at the present time he is
associated with the JAPAN
TIMES, and is an influential
leader in the English-speak-
ing community in Japan. He
has been prominent in the
Japan Boy Scout movement,
and has gone to the Phillip-
pines after the war in conn-
ection with the Boy Scout
movement in the Orient.
NISEI OF THE
BIENNIUM* AVMB
Dfcnvfcr. Colorado

Salt Lake City, Utah,
Aug 26. The "Nisei of the
Biennium" award, highest
honor that can be bestowed
by the Japanese-American
Citizen League, was present-
ed to Bill Hosokawa, assist-
ant managing editor of The
Denver Post.
The presentation was made
at a banquet closing the
league's 15th biennial con-
vention.
The award was made for
achievement and leadership
by a Japanese American dur-
ing the past two years.
Twenty-four Nisei from all
sections of the country had
COMTmutB..
been nominated.
Hosokawa, 43, was born in
Seattle, Wash, and was grad-
uated from the University of
Washington.
He joined The Post in
1946 and in 1950 covered the
fighting in Korea as The
Denver Post's first war cor-
respondent. He was editor
of Empire magazine from 1950
to 1956 when he was made ex-
ecutive news editor* He be-
came assistant managing ed-
itor late last year.
Hosokawa, his wife Alice,
and their four children live
at ^060 Cherry st.
Previously "Nisei of the
Biennium" included Minoru
Yasui, Denver attorney; and
Hershey Miyaraura of Gallup,
N.M., who won the Congress-
ional Medal of Honor during
the Korean war.
Principal speaker at the
banquet, George C. Doub, U,
S. assistant attorney gen-
eral, said he believes the
United States was wrong in
excluding the Nisei from
the Pacific Coast during
World 'War II.
He said history will
record the action, which
forced relocation of
110,442 persons of Japanese
ancestry, as "tragic failure
of principle" and a viola
tion of "tie most fundament -
al standards and traditions
of 'individual dignity and
personal freedom for which
our country stands."
Doub told the concluding
JACL banquet the Justice De-
partment has and is acting
to make amends and that "the
conscience and maturity of
America will never permit
its repetition for any min-
ority group of our gre-
at country."
COM IMG EVEMT
During the Thanksgiving
weekend the Mountain Plains
District and the local chap-
ters are planning a district
meeting and a bowling tourn-
ament.
The National Director.
Mas Satow, will be present
and we hope to have Shig
Wakaraatsu, the National Pres
ident.
Further information per-
taining the meeting and
tournament will be announced
bn a later date.
_________September. '958
HOLIDAY ISSUE
The Pacific Citizen is
honoring the Mountain-Plains
in the 1958 Holiday Issue.
Basically, we would like to
know what the Japanese Amer-
ican in our community would
like to have said about him
and the community. The pic-
tures will enhance the story
of course.
In this connection, the
ads and one-line name greet-
ings ($2) solicited for this
Holiday Issue will be incor-
porated into this section*
So lets go all out for
this.
What the Holiday Issue
would more or less like to
have is the story of old-
time Denverites, how they
first settled, etc.
A committee will be soli-
citing Holiday Issue ads and
name insertions. Each fami-
ly can write of their pa-
rents adventure here if they
wish. The Holiday Issue of
the P.C. will act as a
directory and your name will
enable friends to find your
new address. This is mater-
ially a human interest fea-
ture.
HEW YEAR
PLANS
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Suzu-
ki with great efforts were
able to get auditions of two
fine orchestras. One audi-
tion was at the Fraternity
House freshman rush party in
Golden and the other was at
the Cherry Hills Country
Club. They have secured us
a contract with the Cherry
Hills Country Club band for
New Year's Eve at the Cosmo-
politan Hotel. We know this
band is the best we have
heard in Denver so buy your
tickets early..And I mean
early, man!.

Bill Hosokawa, assistant
managing editor of the Den-
ver Post, is on a five week
assignment evaluating reper-
cussions of the latest Que-
moy outbreak.



Page 2.
EDITORIAL M?KAWA
The autumnal equinox has
once again passed us by, and
though we feel quite healthy
a little wiser, but certain-
ly not wealthier, we can
pause to reflect upon the
twilight' of another year
and count ,the creaking of a
few more bones.
This has been an outstand
ing year for the Mile-Hi
JACL chapter. At the 15th
Biennial JACL Conference
held at Salt Lake City,
Denver members achieved nat-
ional recognition. Betty
Suzuki was presented a sap-
phire pin for 10 years of
outstanding service, Guyo
Tajiri was presented a sc-
roll in anpreciation of her
brilliance in penning the
words to the National JACL
anthem, and hill Hosokawa
won the coveted "Nisei of
the Biennium" award.
Yes, its been a great
year for the chapter, the
officers, and a few of the
members, but what have the
rest of us accomplished?
Well weve grown a year
older, joined a few more
clubs entertained a few more
times. Weve enjoyed the
status quo of an orderly
peaceful life and calmly
overlooked such news-shat-
tering events as the segre-
gatiqn .crigXl in Little Rock
qrVinols. the transient, labor
problem in our communities,
and even the growing Negro
problem in our midst.
Segregation is an ugly
word. We nisei, having been
actively confronted with its
full implications during the
war years, can appreciate
fully the growing acceptance
of our people in our various
communities. But what of
the other minority races?
Aliho.ugh.verY few. if any
of us actively participate
in the perpetration of rac-
ial barriers passive accep-
tance can be just as deadly
to our way of life. So the
next time one of your neigh-
bors makes a disparaging re-
mark about the other racial
minorities, enlighten them.
Remember, they used to say
the same things about you.
b'i SMA HATASAKft
Greetings to all after a
brief summer respite. Once
again the beautiful Colo-
rado fall season comes down
upon us leaving us with
memories of all the things
we did last summer, or did-
n't do as we had hoped, and
plans for exciting things
to do during tne winter
months
This will be the year
when football fans hope Colo
rado will finally upset mi-
ghty Oklahoma. The farmers
will be completing their
harvests hopefully planning
for next year while wonder-
ing who the next world cham-
pions of baseball will be.
The Yankees again!
, 1958 JACL Bulletin
Proud parents once again
send their beaming clean
faced offsprings off to sch-
ool. For each person from
kindergarten to college, a
whole new adventure unfolds
while giving Mother a rest
after those tiring, but won-
derful, summer vacation mon-
ths. with more and more Ni-
sei and Sansei attending
college every year, we hope
more and more will success-
fully graduate and take his
place in society. As for
the younger set, parents
will have to sharpen up so
they can answer intelligent-
ly all the questions the
younger ones will bring
home.
But who can answer some
of the whoppers they bring
home, huh? Then many of the
green college freshmen will
be away from home for the
first time and new problems
arise. It feels so good to
become free and independent
for a couple of weeks, then
a seige of homesickness
falls and makes you want to
pack up and go home. But
everything seems to come out
okay after that trying fresh
man year.
Dear Editor:
I have noticed that the
"green-thumbs" of you and
your staff have turned to a
" greenish-yellow as you
anticipated in your March,
issue. For an inexperienced
staff, as you said, you have
done a marvelous job of news*
writing. Congratulations!
Sincerely yours,
J.T.
Dear J.T.:
The staff and I
thank you for your comp-
;liments and will strive
ito satisfy............ED..
NICC SPONSORS
W-ACQUAINTEff
DANCE
The NICC would like to
see high schoolers and col-
legiates make their fall de-
but at the "get-together"
dance on October 11th at the
Buddhist Church from 8 pm to
12 midnight.
Dave Furukawa, chairman,
noted that the dance will be
a sports affair for which a
nominal fee of will be
charged and the public is
cordially invited.
GOLF CLUB
MILE HIGH
AWARDS FOR 1958
Get Together Tournament
"A" Flight 1st: T. Mayeda
2nd: G. Fujisaki

LETTERS .
TO THE
EDITOR
3
Dear Editor,
When you live in a remote
outlying district such as I
do, its nice to have some
news via the JACL Bulletin.
As you probably have guessed
I am not much of a let-
ter and by way of the
paper I know what's new.
What happened to "Bri-
ghton Party Line"? I've
more or less lost track of
the people and the doings.
I'd like to compliment-
you on your editorials, they
always seem to bring out
points that we take for gr-
anted. But when they're
down on black and white, it
makes one think and realize
how lucky you are.
4
5
Unsigned
Dear Unsigned:
"B" Flight
1st: R. Aral
2nd: Sets Ito
36 Hole Tournament
(Combined Flights)
1st: G. Nagai
2nd: Sets Ito
3rd: J. Ito
4th: G. Fujimoto
Low Aggregate Tournament
(Combined Flights)
1st: C. FujisafcL-R. Terada
2nd: G. Nagai-S. Terasaki
3rd: G. Fujimoto-D. Yamamoto
72 Hole Match Play
"A" Flight 1st: Sam Kumagai
Runnerup: G. Fujimoto
Semi-finalists: T. Odow
G, Komaru
"B" Flight 1st: Roy Terada
Runnerup: G. Fujimoto
Semi-finalists: D. Yamamoto
S. Terada
72 Hole Tournament (medal)
(Combined Flights) 1st: G. Nagai
2nd: T. Kawano
3rd: C. Yamaguchi
4th-10th: Miyamoto, Fujisaki
Saito. Arai, Sakamoti
Suyehiro, Fujimoto &
R. Terada
Low Gross: T. Odow
Perpetual Trophy: G. Nagai
We have combined the
Brighton Party Line with
the Chatter Matter,
" Dear Yakamashi ", (or
"Dear Haruko)" and Vital
Statistics.
It is a great satis-
faction to know that you,
being one of our readers
of the Bulletin, took
you? valuable time to
write us..............ED.
6. 36 Hole Tournament
(Combined Flights) 1st: G. Nagai
2nd: S. Kumagai
3rd: C. Fujisaki
D. Yamamoto
4th: T. Kawano
S. Teraji
5th: T. Mayeda
7. Frank Dalpes Tournament to be played October 5, 1958,


Mile. H i JACl
Sep+'lft'be.r, 1958
Pa
ge
.ii J
LAO-KISH l YAH A
IHADA- SASAKI
NAQAHOTO FURUTA
VITAL
STATISTICS
* Miss Evelyn Ota and Kei-
shi Hayashida were married
on August 31st.
* Miss Carole Tanaka and
Tetsuo Misumi of Japan, were
married in Denver on August
12.
Misumi is a graduate of
Doshisha University in Kyoto
Japan, and is an agent for a
cotton importing firm.
Mr. and Mrs. Misumi are
living in San Francisco at
the present,
* Timo Yoshiraura and Jo
Akiyoshi, an exchange stu-
dent from Japan majoring in
nursing, were recently uni-
ted in marriage. Best
Wishes!
* June Iwahiro and Pete
Menda have recently announ-
ced their engagement and
plan to tie the knot some-
time in December,
* Mr. & Mrs. George Yoshi-
da of Denver, announce the-
engagement ana forthcoming
marriage of their daughter,-
Miss Sum! Yoshida to Sam
Tanaka.
* Born to Mrs. and Mrs
George Fukui, nee Helen Kato
of 7110 York St, a boy.
* Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Kagiyama, nee Violet
Tani of 2330 W 37th Ave, a
girl.
* Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Taro Yoshihashl of 1790 Yo-
semite, a girl.
* Born to Dr. and Mrs. Ben
Matoba (nee Miyori Kuroda)
of 2234 Emerson St, on Sept.
15, a boy.
* Born to Mr. and Mrs. Mi-
noru Yoshiraura, of 2335
Champa St, a boy.
* Born to Mr. and Mrs. Moss
M. Kishiyaraa of 1394* Meade
St, a boy,
* Born to Mr. and Mrs.
George Omoto (nee Kiyoko Ka-
to) of 3048 Clayton St, a
girl.
* Born to Mrs. and Mrs.
Shozo Watanabe of 450 Clark-
son St, a girl.
* Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Frank G, Horino of 5250 W 53
Ave, Arvada, a girl.
* Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Sugihara (nee Elaine
Yoshida) of 34-24 Monroe, a
girl, on Sept. 23.
* Born to Mr. and Mrs. Herb
Onodera (nee Miya Kitashiraa)
of 3520 Jackson St, a boy.
* Born to Mr. and Mrs.
Jim Tochihara (nee Iyako Ta-
shiro), a boy.
* Mr. and Mrs. Yosh Aki-
yama (nee Sumi Tawara) is
expecting sometime in the
latter part of March. Hope
it's a boy!
* JAA Bowling began its
season last Wednesday, Oct.
8.
* Dr. and Mrs, Kurachi have
recently moved to Brighton
where he is presently prac-
ticing,
* (Skook) Kurachi, CSU fac-
ulty member, moved to Fort
Collins.
SUSHI
WORmAKl $ A&F-SUSWI
TO 60 SATURDAY* SUVI&AY
free delivery w\IVm city
SOnSTeATE
1123-20* ST KE4-9602
OHASHI
RETURNS FROM
CONVENTION
Mr. and Mrs. George Cha-
shi recently returned from
Salt Lake City where they
attended the Hair Dressers
Convention of Sept. 14 and
15, Ohashi served as one of
the judges at the convention
Mrs. Ohashi, prominent in
her own right had been in
Hollywood learning various
makeup techniques and hair
styles at various schools,
such as Max Factors, etc.
She flew to Salt Lake City
to join her husband at the
convention.
FUjmOTO OKADA FUNAKOSHV- MASUNAGA
>0 CHAMPA ST.
KE.4-4778 DEnVER 2. COLO.
ARGE* TERASAKI, MGR.
W06 65WUAA


Mile-Hi JACL Bulletin \^58
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Pag Ar
NEW JACL
HEADQUARTERS
The National JACL moved
to new quarters at 1634- Post
Street.
Masao Satow and his
staff moved last Tuesday to
the new quarters. The JACL
is occupying the entire se-
cond floor of the newly con-
structed building between
Buchanan and Laguna St.
For the past five years
the National JACL has been
occupying the rooms at the
old building free, but the
new quarters will cost $2000
per year for rent.
The San Francisco JACL
had been considering plans
to erect a more modern
building, but the chapter's
building committee revealed
earlier this year that no im
mediate action was contempl-
ated.
TALENTS SOUGHT
for m SHOW
The Tri-State YBL will
sponsor a Talent Show on
Sunday, November 2, at the
Tri-State Buddhist Church,
from 8:00 p.m. At present
they are seeking talented
personalities and hope to
present a variety of out-
standing acts.
Anyone interested in
participating in the show is
asked to call or otherwise
contact Harry Matsushima in
Platteville. Sam Tochihara
in Brighton, or Yo Tani-
guchi in Denver, FL 5-9171.
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