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Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 4, Number 1

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Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 4, Number 1
Series Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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VOL. IV. NO. 1
DENVER. COLORADO
SEPT.. 1962.
GOLFERS' INSTALLATION
DINNER*DANCE AT BROWN
PALACE WEST* OCT. 20
The Mile-Hi Golf Club's annual
Installation Dinner-Dance will be
held on Sat., Oct. 20th, at the
Brown Palace West.
TAR TKRASAKI, as social chair-
nan for the golfers, will offici-
ate as Master of Ceremonies.
The program will include pre-
sentation of awards by the Awards
Committee, consisting of DR. SETS
ITO, DR. TONY KAWANO, and RUPERT
ARAI, to winners of summer tour-
naments.
John DeFrange's 5-pc orchestra
has been obtained for the dance,
which will be from 10:00 p.m. un-
til 1:00 a.m. The public is in-
vited to the dance, and tickets
are $5.00 per couple.
CATHAY POST 186
BENEFIT* OCT. 27
COMMANDER AL M1YAGISHIMA of
Cethay Post #185 announced that
the annual fall benefit for the
Post would be held Sat., Oct. 27,
at 2015 Market Street.
The benefit is for the Post's
CoMunity and Child Welfare pro-
gram.
An RCA 21** color TV set is to
be given away as the grand prise,
with a VM Tape Recorder end Tran-
sistor Radio, as the consolation
prises.
Tickets may be obtained from
any Post member, or at various
business houses in Nlhonjln-machl
of Denver.
JANET OKAMURA, daughter of Mr. &
Mrs. Shiogo Okaamra of 4972 Fill-
more St., Denver 16, Colo., was
named National Winner of the JACL
Essay Contest during July, at the
Nat'l JACL Convention in Seattle,
Washington.
JANET OKAMURA is a sophomore
at Colorado College, in Colorado
Springs, majoring in English with
a minor in science. She is one
of the 1961 Mile-Hi Scholarship
winners.
BONSAI EXHIBIT AT
U.S. BANK*OCT. 6-7
GEO. Y. INAI, Pres, of Denver
Bonsai Club, announced that the
annual Bonsai exhibit at Denver-
11. S. Nat'l Bank, would be held on
Sat. and Sun., Oct. 6-7, 1962.
The exhibit will also feature
some ikebana displays, and will
be open to the public. Everyone
interested is most cordially in-
vited to attend.
MILE-HI JACL ORIENTAL DINNER
CULTURAL EXHIBIT. NOV. 10
PRES. MIKE TASHIR0 of Mile-Hi JACL announced that the annual JACL
Oriental food bazaar and cultural exhibits will be held on Sat., Nov.
10th. The locale of the dinner this year has not yet been confirmed.
As soon as the place is determined, public announcements will be
made. The general public is most cordially invited. Tickets will be
$1.50 for adults, and $1.00 for children. Special carry-out orders
INTERNATIONAL FETE
SEPT. 29- OCT. 7
International House, 1600 Lo-
gan St., in Denver, Is sponsoring
an "International Festival", from
Sept. 29th thru Oct. 7th.
lues., Oct. 2nd, has been de-
signated "Far East Day," and ex-
hibits and displays from Asia,
especially from Japan, will be
featured. The Festival is open
to the public and will be free.
K. PATRICK OKURA
NAT'L JACL PRES.
R. PATRICK OKURA of Omaha, Ne-
braska, was elected Nat'l Presi-
dent of the JACL for 1962-1964,
et the Nat'l JACL Convention in
Seattle, during July.
OKURA is Chief Probation Offi-
cer of Douglas County, Nebr., and
formerly served as chief psychol-
ogist at Boys' Town for 17 years.
He is a nationally known authori-
ty on problems of juvenile delin-
quency.
DBAC "TURKEY"
BENEFIT NOV. 18
HARRY NITTA, Pres, of the DBAC
announced that the annual Turkey
Benefit would be held on Sunday,
Nov. 18th, at TSBC.
Gen. Chrmn for this year's be-
nefit will be BILL CHIK0MA. The
benefit will be from 7:00 until
10:00 p.m.
will be available. A complete
Japanese dinner will be served at
the Oriental Food Bazaar.
This year, instead of the usu-
al chow mein on dried noodles, a
special treat with various Japa-
nese delicacies, as a "smorgas-
bord," is planned.
In addition to Oriental foods,
exhibits of bonsai, ikebana, and
other cultural displays will be
open to the public without charge
as well as free films on Japan.
As a special feature, Scouts
who went to Japan, will have spe-
cial exhibits of souvenirs, and
will be available for personal
reports of their experiences at
the 1st Aslan Jamboree in Japan.
Full details will be announced
as soon as plans are developed.
scholarshipTridge
BENEFIT* OCT. 6
BEN KUMAGAI and DR. MASA GIMA,
Co-Chrmn, announced that SAM MA-
TSUHOTO, ACBL Life Master, would
direct a benefit bridge tourna-
ment on Sat., Oct. 20th, at the
TSBC, for the Mile-Hi JACL.
Coat will be $1.25 per person,
and all net proceeds will go to
the Scholarship Fund. BUD UCHIDA
is also assisting in the Benefit.
Publicity and invitations to all
bridge playera will go out soon.
MTN-PLAINS AJA NEWS
PUBLICATION RESUMED
After two months' lay-off, we
again resume publication, for the
fourth year, of THS AJA NEWS, in
the hope of serving the Japanese
American public in the Rocky Mtn
region.
We know that THE ROCKY JIHO,
published by "Y0ZAN" TSUBOKAWA,
has been filling a timely need
for the English-readlng AJA, but
we feel that THE AJA NEWS has al-
so a legitimate function In this
region in reporting organization-
al and club matters, as well as
Intimate chit-chat.
So -- send us your news items,
and we shall endeavor to publi-
cize comnity activities. Our
monthly deadlines are the 10th of
eech month.


PACE 2.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA NEWS
SEPT,. 1962
MILE- HI J ACL
SEEKING 1963-65
BOARD NOMINEES
PRES. MIKE TASHIRO of Mile-Hi
JACL announced Chat nominations
for seven new Board members are
now open.
JOHN SAKAYAMA, 1838 West 47th
Awe., GR 7-9686, la Chairman for
nominations. Candidates' names
should be submitted to SAKAYAMA
as soon as possible.
Retiring Board members are:
JAMES IMATANI ROBERT SAKATA
HENRY SUZUKI MIKE TASHIRO
TAK TERASAKI ROBERT UYEDA
AYAKO WADA
Newly-elected Board members of
the Mlle-Hi JACL will serve until
Dec. 31, 1965, Joining the hold-
over Board of 14 members, making
a total of 21 Board members.
Hold-over Board members, and
dates of expiration of the terms
of office, are as follows:
Terms expiring Pec. 31. 1963:
TOSHIO ANDO HARUK0 ROBAYASHI
ROY MAYEDA DR. T. MAYEDA
TOM NAKATA JOHN SAKAYAMA
AJA MEDICS AT
COLO. GENERAL
The University of Colorado Me-
dical School reported seven AJA
doctors on the teaching staff for
the 1962-63 school year.
DR. JERRY AIKAWA, an associate
professor in laboratory medicine
and clinical pathology, is rank-
ing Nisei faculty member.
Others are DR. T. K. KOBAYASHI
as instructor; DR. GEO. I. OGURA,
asst, professor, pathology; DR.
WM. TAKAHASHI and DR. KAYO SUNADA
as assistant professors; DR. IDA
NAKAMURA, instructor, pediatrics;
and DR. HERBERT MARUYAMA, assis-
tant in orthopedic surgery.
* *
Other AJA medics, in training,
include LT. GBORGE YAMASAKI, at
Fitzeimone General Hospital, and
DR. BEN MIYAHARA at Colorado Gen-
eral Hospital, in Denver.
UNITED NATIONS WEEK
IN DENVER* OCT.20-28
TAK TERASAKI, 3rd Vice-Pres.
and public relations chairman for
Mile-Hl JACL, reported that the
15th annual United Nations Week
would be celebrated in Denver, on
Oct. 20-28th.
JEAN SATO
Terms expiring Dec. 31, 1964:
DAVE FURUKAWA
BEN KUMAGAI
TOM MASAMORI
DR. MASA GIMA
BILL KUROKI
DR. MIKE UBA
MIN YASUI
NATIONAL JACL
PRIZE WINNERS
KEN UTSUHI of Oakland, Calif,
was the lucky winner of the Nat'l
JACL convention's grand prize, In
Seattle, Washington during July.
Eight other consolation prises
were awarded to lucky winners in
Seattle; Hayward, Calif.; Alexan-
dria, Va.; Redwood City, Calif,
and Murray, Utah.
00EH2ODD
csm
pern* r, colo.
*£4-6997
VZOp: OSfcl TfldlWRKl
Smiling celebrants at ^he Scouts "Welcome Home" party at the Fuji-En
on Sun., Sept. 16th. Above ere, from left to right: TOMMY T. FUJITA
with FRANK MCDONALD of D-C Truckers above and to the right; MRS. BOB
HEMPE, wife of the Deputy Scout Executive, in Japanese kimono; MIN
YASUI, Dlst. Chrmn, Mtn-Plalns JACL, which sponsored the AJA Scouts;
above and to right, BOB KNIGHT, Chief Scout for Denver contingent,
who represented the City of Denver at ceremonies in Takayama, Japan;
MRS. ELIZABETH ROSE, Chrmn of the Denver-Takayama Sister-City com-
mittee which sponsored the five non-Japanese Scouts; and MRS. FRANK
NAKAGAWA, wife of the Sr. contingent leader of the Denver delegation.
The above were a part of the 80
people Joining the "Welcome Home"
party for the Denver Scouts.
1963 JACL DUES
$ 5.00 PER MEMBER
DR. MASA GIMA and BOB SAKATA,
membership co-chairmen for Mile-
Hi JACL, announced that the 1963
dues for the local chapter will
be $5.00 per person.
A special $4.00 rate is allow-
ed for students and GIs on active
duty, but no reduced rates were
provided for couples, by Board
action in September.
Co-Chmrn GIMA and SAKATA an-
nounced the 1963 membership cam-
paign would get underway immedi-
ately in Oct., to try eo reach at
least 500 members by Dec. 31st.
WEST 80TH AVENUE at SHERIDAN BOULEVARD WESTMINSTER, COI0RADO.
P. 0. BOX 1501, DENVER 1, COLORADO.
HENRY IMADA, President.
Tel.: HA 9-3537
REV CLARK GARMAN
A special note on the passing
of REV. CLARK P. GARMAN of Denver
during Aug. is made here, because
he was truly a friend of all AJAs
and Japanese people, not only in
Colorado, but everywhere.
Following the outbreak of war,
REV. GARMAN came to Colorado, af-
ter having served many years as a
Congregatlonallst missionary in
Japan.
Soon after his arrival in Den-
ver, during 1944, there waa a vi-
cious anti-Japanese campaign in
Colorado. REV. GARMAN spearhead-
ed a courageous group (because it
was an act of courage to stand up
publicly for AJAs at that time)
of fair-minded Americans in Colo-
rado to beat back this virulent,
racist hate-campaign against us.
For this, and for his quali-
ties as a great human being, we
hold his memory dear.
Oct. 20 features the "Dance of
Nations" at the Hilton Hotel.
Oct. 21, Sunday, is Church Day
with pastors preaching on hope of
peace thru United Nations.
Oct. 22 will feature exhibits
at International House, with a
panel discussion by foreign con-
suls in Denver.
Oct. 23 is Service Club Day,
with U.N. programs.
Oct. 24 is U.N. Day, celebrat-
ing the 17th anniversary of the
founding the world organization.
A military parade will be featur-
ed in downtown Denver.
Oct. 25 features "Open House"
at Colorado Womens' College, with
attendants dressed in native cos-
ttsaes at display tables.
Oct. 26 is the International
Ice Skating Carnival at DU Arena,
with U.S. ice-skating champions.
Oct. 27 is International Day
program at the Colorado School of
Mines in Golden.
Oct. 28 is United Nations Con-
cert at the City Audi toritaa, with
the Denver Symphony Orchestra,
Air Force Academy Cadet Chorale,
and the CWC Chorus.
GEORGE FUJIMOTO
CAPITOL MORTUARY
1331 SHERMAN TA 5-0151
Personal Attention
to Every Detail


SEPT.. 1962
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA news
PAGE 3
25 AJA TEACHER8
IN DENVER SCHOOLS
According to best statistic*
available there are 25 AJAa among
the more than 3,800 teacher* in
the Denver Public School system,
for the 1962-63 school year.
Statistically, this is appro-
ximately 2/3 of 1% of all teach-
er* in Denver, and compared to
the approximate 1/2 of IX of the
AJA population of Denver, 1* ml-
nisculely better than could be
expected.
18 AJA* are elementary school
teachers, 6 are teacher* In Jr.
high schools, and there 1* only 1
AJA teaching at the high school
level, at Manual High School.
Ve are advised qualification*
for Denver public school teachers
are same for all grade levels,
except for high school, a course
specialty is required.
The 18 AJA teachers in elemen-
tary schools are placed in 14 of
the 89 grade schools in the city,
as follows:
Colwblan School. KIY0MI NISHI
4030 Federal Blvd.
Coliatbine School. ROSE TANAKA
2826 Columbine St.
Cowell School .... MARY ARXKX
4540 W. 10th Ave.
Crofton School. IRENE OSTJGA
2409 Arapahoe RUTH SAGARA
Ebert School........SOPHIA OKA
410 23rd St.
Gilpin School PHILLIP MIYAZAWA
720 30th St.
Harrington School MICHI ANDO
3230 E. 38th MADGE ICHIKAWA
Knapp School. LILY KATAOKA
500 So. Utica Y0SHINA0 OKA
Mitchell School BASON YANAGA
1335 E. 32nd Ave.
(Kiyoko Omoto, Clerk.)
Palmer School.........JOE ARIKI
995 Grape St.
Remington School. KATE NAKA0KA
4735 Pecos Street
Sabin School. MARJORIE KAWANO
3050 So. Vrain St.
Sherman School. DEANNA MATSUMOTO
208 Grant St.
Swansea School........A8AKD OKA
4630 Coliablne St.
Wyman School. DOROTHY PUNAKOSH1
1630 Williams St.
OMAHA NEWS
Led by FRANK NAKAGAWA as contingent leader and SAM SUEKAMA as as-
sistant leader, 15 Boy Scouts from the Denver area returned safely
home to Denver on Sun., Sept. 9th,
SUBURBAN TEACHERS
According to an informal, pre-
liminary survey, there appears to
be more than a dozen AJA school
teachers in the Denver suburban
araa.
In next months issue, we hope
to bring you a complete Hating
of all AJA teachers in the Denver
suburban area.
DENVER AJA TEACHERS, cont'd:
The 6 AJA Jr. Hi teachers, in
4 of the 16 Junior high schools,
are:
Cole Jr. High.........KATE ARIKI
3240 Hmboldt MARG MAISUNAGA
Horace Mann Jr MIKYO MATSUURA
4130 Navajo St.
Kepner Jr. High. BOB MARUYAMA
911 S. Hazel Ct.
Smiley Jr. High. MERLE IMAMOTO
2540 Holly St. ALICE OGURA
Thos. Jefferson Jr-Sr High
3950 So. Holly St.
(Pst Msnaoto, Clerk)
The only AJA high school tea-
cher la at Manual High, among the
eight high schools of Denver:
Manual Hi School. SAYAKO TAKATA
1700 E. 28th Ave.
Today's Prescriptions ToifBigjosl Health Value!
fig Same Pharmacy
i==l ZS2i E.34-TH AVE
PHONE OE3-305'
DENVER S, COLO.
Ben T. Kumagai
Sohmidt, Sharp, AtcCaLe & Co.
* IMCOftPOftATID
Member of
MIDWEST STOCK EXCHANGE
1717 Stout St.,
Denver 2, Colo.
ALpine 5-1411
ACorna 2-0716
after e two months* absence over-
sees. Above is BOB HEMPE, Deputy
Scout Executive, in center, con-
gratulating FRANK NAKAGAWA, at
right and SAM SUEKAMA on his left
upon the successful conclusion of
the 1962 Japan tour. All of the
returning Scouts from Denver are
pictured above. Possibilities of
sending a similar group to Japan
in 1964 are now being discussed.
(TOM T. MASAMORI PHOTO)
AYAKO SUMITOMO, sister of Mrs.
Klmiko Side, of Madame Butterfly
Gift Shop, at 4609 E. Colfax Ave.
is a visitor to Denver.
MISS SUMITOMO was formerly em-
ployed by a bank in Tokyo, Japan.
She is a trained Instructor in
the art of Ikebana, and la inter-
ested in the development of this
art form in America.
PRES. MIKE WATANABE of Omaha
JACL, with delegates EM and BOB
NAKADOI, and LILY and PAT OKURA,
reported on the Nat*l JACL Con-
vention In Seattle, during July.
The OMAHA JACL BULLETIN, with
KAZ IKEBASU, as editor, end staff
were honored as being one of the
outstanding Chapter bulletins in
the country.
YUKIO ANDO, Membership Chrmn,
reported an all-time high member-
ship for Omaha JACL with 137 mem-
bers for 1962.
GLADYS HIRABAYASHI and MARY
MISAKI are in charge of the Omaha
JACL Bowling League.
OMAHA JACL reported that more
than $1,900 has been raised for
the laael History Project, with
MR. & MRS. PAT OKURA contributing
$1,000.00.
JAPAN SOCIETY
BEING FORMED
Initiated by ELIZABETH ROSE,
a Japan Society for Denver is now
being formed, with JUDGE GEO. C.
PRIEST, as temporary chairman.
Charter memberships for indi-
viduals are available at $25.00,
for firms at $150.00.
Full information is available
from MRS. ROSE, 430 Garfield St.,
Denver 4, Colo., Tel: DE 3-0605.
AJA8 invited to serve on the
organizing conlttee for the pro-
posed Japan Society Include:
REV. J. FUJITA
DR. MASA GIMA
BILL HOSOKAWA
HENRY SUZUKI
LARRY TAJIRI
OSKI TANIWAKI
TAK TERASAKI
T. TSUBOKAWA
REV. N. TSUNODA
MINORU YASUI
MANDARIN
CHOP SUEY CAFE
SUSHI DAILY Take-Out Orders
I22J-20TH. STREET CH4-9526
VISIT OUR
NEW STORE
(On East Colfax
at Cherry St.)
DENVERS MOST COMPLETE SELECTION
of Bonsai "hachi (planters)
and Ikebana vases.
WIDEST CHOICES OF HIGH QUALITY
Japanese import merchandise,
at reasonable prices.
EUGENE SIDE and KIHIKO SIDE
Proprietors.
4609 E.COLFAX AVE. FR7-I923
OEOVGR 2,0, COLO.


PACK 4.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA HEWS
SEPT., 1962.
MTN PLAINS AJA NEWS
Published once a month. Hailed
by the 20th of each month.
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
MINORU YASUI
1225 20th Street,
Denver 2, Colorado.
CH 4^2239 ra 2-9255
BUD UCHIDA..........Heads
ROSA ODOW ....... Artist
TOM MASAMORI. .Photographer
TRUE YASUI. .General Factotum
This last July, I had the pri-
vilege of being in Seattle for a
pert of the national JACL conven-
tion. Whether you like the JACL
or not, it la the only national
Nisei organization; it has accom-
plished near-miraculous things,
benefltting Isaei, Nisei and San-
sel too, and it has attracted the
support of top Nisei talent.
It was a great experience to
be on hand to see how the nation-'
al organization operates, and to
feel the pulse of the Nisei com-
munity. The pulsebeat is strong,
firm, and healthy.
For a long time the Issei, in
conon with all older generations
since the beginning of time, had
fairly substantial doubts about
the Nisei. The elders felt the
Nisei were frivolous, irrespons-
ible, lazy and a lot of other un-
complimentary things.
Z wish soma of the doubting
Takesalmons, who long since have
passed on to their rewards, could
have been in Seattle to suet the
Nisei, most of whom have become
responsible, thoughtful men and
women of ability and substance.
The Issei would have to admit
and probably would do so readily
that the Nisei ere a credit to
themselves.
Two years from now the nation-
al JACL convention will be held
in Detroit. Two years after that
in 1966, San Diego will host the
convention. The organization is
thinking beyond tomorrow.
The first and only time Denver
hosted a national JACL convention
was in 1946 when same vital goals
were established. Another con-
vention here is long overdue.
However, there was e notable lack
of conversation in the Denver de-
legation about taking on such a
responsibility.
The reason, of course, is that
in a coMsunity as small as Den-
ver's, the workload would have to
be borne by Just a few willing
horses, the old standbys who get
POLITICAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR NOV
The political pot will cosnence boiling furiously and hot, in the
next few weeks, until election time on Nov. 6th. In our October
issue of THE AJA NEWS, we'll stick our necks far, far out -- and make
our personal recommendations. But before announcing our personal
choices, we would like to call special attention to two AJAs who are
running for election, in widely
separated places,
support.
and urge your
SEIJI HORIUCHI of Brighton is
a Republican candidate for the
State Assembly, as representative
for Adams County. In a predomi-
nantly Democratic area, he needs
your support!
In Hawaii, U.S. Representative
DAN INOUYE is going for the U.S.
Senate, and is bueking a million-
aire. He needs funds. If you
can help, write MIKE M. MASAOKA,
919-18tb St., N.W., Washington 6,
D.C.
NATURALIZED
AJA CITIZENS
During Aug., nine Japanese in
Colorado were naturalized as U.S.
citizens, as follows:
KIMIKO HIGAKI
TOMIKO KOSTRIC
TAMIKO SUZUKI
MIYOKO STANLEY
MIYO LEWIS
HIDEK0 MILLER
MIYUKO 6ERGEL
TOMIKO JACKSON
KAZUKO RUIZ
Aurora
Aurora
Denver
Denver
Ft. Carson
Ft. Carson
Colo. Springs
Colo. Springs
Colo. Springs
JACL REPRESENTATIVES TO CITIZENSHIP DAY CEREMONIES
Mlle-Hl JACL was one of the civic organizations sponsoring the an-
nual Citizenship Day program held in the Greek Theatre of Civic Cen-
ter, In Denver, Colo., on Sun., Sept. 16th.
Above are TAK TERASAKI, 3rd Vice-Free, and public relations chair-
man for the Mile-Hl JACL, and SUMI
stuck with the chores on every
project. And what with time be-
ing such a scarce commodity, they
weren't sticking their necks out.
Some day, however, Denver is
going to have to volunteer. It
would be a good experience for
the conaunlty. It's something to
think about.
(Editor's note: The Mile-Hi JACL
Board la considering bidding for
the 1968 Nat'l JACL Convention to
be held in Denver. Colo.)
TAKENO, special representative for
JACL, official delegates to these
patriotic ceremonies, holding the
official program booklet.
In left background are, from
the left, KAREN TAKENO, standing,
TRUE YASUI, seated In center, and
M1TCHIE TERASAKI, standing at the
right. (MASAMORI PHOTO)

ALL PHOTOGRAPHS IN THE AJA NEWS ARE TAKEN BY TOM T. MASAMORI, 2010 Lamar St., Denver 15, Colo. (BE 7-3041), UNLESS SPECIFICALLY CREDITED OTHERWISE.
Summer is now over, and the
activity-filled fall season is
upon us. Students are going back
to school; farmers
are busy with har-
vests; and city folk
are resuming autumn
activities.
Your Mile-Hi JACL
is planning a very
active fall season,
but, before mention-
ing future events,
we extend congratu-
lations to PAT OKURA
Nebr., as our Nat'l JACL Presi-
dent, and pledge our support to
his administration.
Omaha,
The Mtn-Plains JACL region is
proud to have one of our own as
National President of the JACL!
* *
PALL ORIENTAL DINNER:
The Mlle-Hl JACL is planning
to hold an Oriental dinner (not
chow mein!) on Sat., Nov. 10th.
Be sure to invite your hakujin
friends, because in addition to
Oriental foods, there will be va-
rious exhibits of Japanese art
and culture, as well as interest-
ing films on Japan.
As an added attraction, the 15
AJA Scouts who went to Japan will
report on their experiences at
the 1st Asian Jamboree, and their
travels in Japan. The Scouts and
leaders will report at 8:00 p.m.,
and display souvenirs from Japan.
Costs of tickets are $1.50 for
adults and $1.00 for children for
dinner. All of the exhibits and
displays are free.
* *
1963-65 BOARD NOMINATIONS;
Nominations are now open for
seven new Board members, to re-
place 1/3 of the JACL Board, who
retire as of Dec. 31, 1962.
My personal recommendation is
that English-speaking Issei, who
sre interested in community pro-
blems, and certainly more AJA wo-
olen who are civic-minded be added
to the Mile-Hi JACL Board.
Send your nominations to JOHN
SAKAYAMA, 1838 W. 47th Ave., Den-
ver 11, or call him at GR 7-9686;
we need and will greatly appreci-
ate your suggestions!
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Regular: $3,00 for 3$ yr ( 5 mo. )
$5.00 for 1 yr (10 mo. )
Special Mile-Hi JACL members ONLY
$2.50 for % yr ( 5 mo. )
$3.50 for 1 yr UP mo. )


SEPT.. 1962.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA HEWS
PAGE 5
Hi.' Summer is over already,
and everyone has Co reluctantly
relinquish summer fun to go back
to school. But, we'll have
memories of this summer to tide
us over until the next. .
For five days this July, young
people from 12 states met in Se-
attle, Washington, for the JACL
Youth Convention. They came from
as far as Washington, D.C., Chi-
cago, and even Los Angeles!
These teens and twenties, at
the Convention, came as delegates
from their Jr. JACL chapters, as
district oratorical contestants,
or just to tag along. They
were greeted by Seattle's Youth
group, housed at a dormitory at
Seattle University, and from that
Thurs., July 26, until next Tues.
July 31, it was go-go-go, and go
some more, from dawn to dawn!
Every minute of the Convention
was fun and filled with memorable
people, places and activities.
In the two Youth Assemblies,
such questions as a National JR.
JACL program, and extending ser-
vice to each chapter's community
were discussed.
MR. JERRY ENOMOTO, Chairman of
the JACL Youth Commission, pre-
sided over the meetings. He was
ready with answers to any ques-
tions and full of Jokes, too!
Jr. JACL presidents spent many
night-hours, typing up minutes of
meetings, and in planning and co-
ordinating programs to encourage
the forming of new Jr. JACL chap-
ters. They even banged on doors
to call meetings as early as 7:00
a.m. in the morning!
Activities like the two mixers
and the outing on Puget Sound, in
a ferry boat, especially rented
for the Youth group were all fun!
Coming back on the ferry, every-
one danced on the top deck, part-
ly to keep warm -- and caused the
adults to look on, across the wa-
ter, from their own ferry!
MRS. N0BUK0 SUZUKI, Seattle's
JACL Youth sponsor, invited every
one to her home, on the bay, to
swim and water ski, after the fi-
nal youth meeting. .
Inspiration was sparked in the
eloquently-expressed ideas of the
young speakers in the oratorical
contest, and in the dynamic words
of JACL's Washington representa-
tive, MIKE MASAOKA, at the Youth
Banquet, on how the JACL could
bridge from the past and build to
the future.
Warm pride of reflected glory
spread thru out the Colorado de-
legation when JANET OKAMURA was
named winner of the National JACL
Essay Contest!!!
Concurrently with the Conven-
tion, there was the fascinating
World's Fair, with its numerous
2815 DOWNING ST
DENVER 5, COLORADO
TEL
BILL KUROKI, MGR. 244-6068
FOR A
DELIGHTFUL VISIT TO JAPAN
GO TO
* fuji ea
S U K I Y A K I
RESTAURANT
930 LINCOLN ST.
IN THE SHERMAN PLAZA HOTEL
Authentic Japanese Food and Drinks Served at low
tables "Japanese style" or at conventional
tables and chairs
al. s-4316 COCKTAILS 50c From 3 to 6
AL. 5-3530 DINNERS from 3.00 and up
Open Dally 11:30 A.M. to 1 A.M.
Saturday 5 P.M. to 1:30 A.M.
_ Sunday 2 PM. to 10 P.M.
Every Tuesday and Thursday at 9 p.m. authentic
movies of Japan shown in the CocktaiJ Lounge.
(Closed on Mondays)
JOE MIYAMOTO, JR., was elected
as Head Boy at Shaw Heights Jr.
High School, in
Westminster for
the school year
of 1962-63.
JOE, Jr., is
the son of Mr.
& Mrs. Joe Mi-
yamoto, of 3400
West 80th Ave.
in Westminster,
Colorado, and is a nephew of Geo.
Shiyomura of Denver, Colorado.
exhibits of scientific and cul-
tural advances in our 21st Cen-
tury, and in startling contrast,
we viewed Seattle's beautiful Bon
Odori festivities, bringing to us
a toueh of old culture. We felt
these two events were especially
significant for young persons of
Japanese American background.
By Tues. morning, everyone was
leaving for home. We were all a
tired bunch of young people, but
we regretted the Convention was
over.
Everyone was taking home some
new dance steps, latest Western
fads, slang, friendships and may-
be even a new outlook on how to
bridge from the past and build to
the future, with our heritage as
Americans of Japanese ancestry.
Si PHOTOGRAPH s
1 2.0 i 0 LfUTIRE, ST.
£ DEtlVt* IS, COLO.
-mm*-'** BE. 7- 3041
CALENDAR
Of Coming Events
Oct. 2: (Tue) "FAR EAST DAY" featur- ing Japan, at Inter- national House, 1600 Logan St., Denver.
Oct. 6: (Sat) JACL BRIDGE BENEFIT, for Scholarship Fund, at the TSBC, Denver.
Oct. 6- Oct. 7: (Sat) (Sun) DENVER BONSAI CLUB EX- HIBITS, at the Denver- U.S. Nat'l Bank, lobby entrance, on Broadway.
Oct. 13: (Sat) CATHAY POST GOLF CLUB, Awarda Dinner, at Red Slipper Restaurant.
Oct. 20: (Sat) MILE HI GOLF CLUB, Awards Dinner-Dance at the Brown Palace West.
Oct. 20- Oct. 28: UNITED NATIONS WEEK: (See complete schedule on Pg. 2, Col. 4.)
Oct. 27: (Sat) CATHAY POST's BENEFIT for Youth and Communi- ty Welfare, at Post HQ 2015 Market St.
Nov. 10: (Sat) MILE-HI JACL ORIENTAL DINNER BENEFIT, (Place to be announced.)
Nov. 18: (Sim) DBAC "TURKEY" BENEFIT, at TSBC (from 7 p.m.)
Dec. 1* Dec. 2: TSBC COMMUNITY BAZAAR AND EXHIBITS, at TSBC
PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS LISTINGS
ADVeXT/S/MO lAwms
J. HOWARD McCarthy. 725 St. Paul TOSHIO ANDO
Brown & Bigelow AL 5-2075 1942 Larimer St. AC 2-5315
PGMTiSTS MINORU YASUI I225-20th St. CH 4-2239
JOHN CHIKUMA, DDS Brighton OPTOMCTPiSTS
75 So. 4th Street 659-1825 MAS KAMDA, O.D.
MASA GIMA, DDS 1515 W. 48th Ave. GE 3-4221
1404 E. 18th Ave. AL 5-6822 BEN MATOBA, O.D.
MICHAEL T. HORI, DDS 1959 Larimer St. KE 4-1941
4101 E. Weeley Ave. SK 6-0924 MISAO MATOBA, O.D. Ft. Lupton
T. ITO, DDS Burt Building 0L 7-6550
830 18th Street KE 4-8680
2838 Federal Blvd. GL 5-0741
Y. ITO, DDS PHYSiCiMS
SUE0 ITO, DDS S. ITO, DDS CHARLES FUJISAKI, M.D. Brighton
1477 Pennsylvania CH 4-6589 40 No. Main St. 659-0783
K0JI KANAI, DDS Wheatrldge T.K. KOBAYASRI, M.D.
4310 Harlan St. HA 2-5817 DICK D. M0MII, M.D. ALBERT NODA, M.D.
TONY KAWANO, DDS 1227-27th St. KE 4-3104
1750 Humboldt St. KE 4-3084 SUSNAGA, HOWARD, M.D.
ROBERT MAYEDA, DDS 830 18th St. AC 2-1314
Interstate Trust Bldg TA 5-6961 M. GEO. TAKENO, M.D.
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS Medical Arts Bldg.
Interstate Trust Bldg. TA 5-6961 1955 Pennsylvania St. TA 5-0783
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS AYAKO WADA, M.D.
Interstate Truat Bldg. TA 5-7498 810 23rd St. TA 5-2565
KEN UYEHARA, DDS Brighton MAHITO UBA, D.O.
40 No. Main Street 659-3062 1230 21st St. MA 3-3743


PAfa 6.
mountain-plains aja news
SEPT,, 1962
NEW BOARD OF
JUDO OFFICERS
Hew officials for The Denver
School of Judo, Inc., were elect-
ed recently, as follows:
PRESIDENT..........DR, $060 ITO
Vice-Pres. TOORU TAKAMATSU
Secty-Treas. GEORGE KURAMOTO
Vice-Trees .... WILSON SH0M0T0
Directors:
JAMES FOKUHARA TOM MASAMORI
KEN FUSHIMI FRED OKIMOTO
DR. TOSH HO ROGER STEVENS
DR. TAKESHI HO, who served as
President of the Denver Judo Dojo
and as 1st president for the new
Denver School of Judo, Inc., has
retired as president.
* *
GEO. KURAMOTO advised that the
next judo tournament at the Den-
ver School of Judo, 2020 Arapahoe
St., would probably be held dur-
ing November.
The Judo Board Is tentatively
planning to bid for the American
judo elimination tournament in
1964 to determine finalists for
the Olympics in Japan.
* SERVICE BUREAU*
1X25" 27 Xl*tST.
H1A 3-8946
SUSAN ANDO, daughter of Mr. &
Mrs. Toah Ando, recently competed
In the Wightman tennis tournmaent
in Provo, Utah. She teamed with
Agnes Sliversteln to win the In-
termountain tennis doubles title.
CATHAY POST PLANS
NISEI WAR MEMORIAL
JOHN NOGUCHI and TOSH ARAI of
Cathay Post #185, American Legion
have been designated Co-Chairman
of a project to create e $10,000
memorial for the Nisei war dead
In the Rocky Mountain region.
Altho no definite proposals
have been finalised, e suitable
monument at Falrmount Cemetery
has been suggested.
calm beauty awaits
you in Japan and, even as
you fly there, aboard the
magnificent DC-8
Jet Couriers of
UARAN
AIR
LINES
From Sn Francisco or los Angeles,
vie Hawaii. to Japan end the Orient
Call your TRAVEL AGENT,
or
JAPAN AIR LINES
2390 Glencoe St., Denver 7, Colo. DExter 3-3941
LABOR DAY BASEBALL TOURNAMENT
Led by MAX HIRAI, pitcher, named "Moat Valuable Player, the Ogden
team von the annual Labor Day baseball tournament in Denver, by beat-
ing the strong Denver Merchants #1 team by a score of 9-8.
HENRY TOBO, catcher for the Merchants, won "The Most Outstanding
Player" award, while 16-year old TOM KIMURA, pitcher for the Busaela,
was designated as "Most Promising
Player".
The tournament was directed by
LEE IWATA, as President of the
League, and was assisted by HARRY
ARIKI, GEORGE GOTO, BILL CHIKUMA,
AL NAKAXA and TAD YAMAMOTO.
COLORADO NISEI CLASSIC CHAMPIONS:
1961-62 Bowling League champions
were LEFTIES' team, from left to
right: TOOTSIE TSUTSUI, SHIG HA-
YASHI, WILLIE HASEGAWA (Captain),
and CHAZ KOMARU.
MILE-HI GOLF
CLUB RESULTS
JIM HANAMURA, of the Mlle-Hi
Golf Club, reported the following
results of sumer golf plsy this
year:
Apr.: 36-Hole Tournament:
Winner:
Runner-up:
CHAS. YAMAGUCH1
SAM TERADA
June: Match-Play Tournament:
"A" Plight DR. SUBO ITO
"B" Plight DR. JACK KIMURA
July: Granada Tournament:
Winner: JOHN MASUNAGA
Jul-Aug: 72-Hole Tournament:
Winner: DAN LOSSASO
Runner-up: GEORGE HAGAI
Third Place: DR. SETS HO
Low Gross: TERNO ODOW
( Due to printers' error, the a-
bove picture was omitted in our
laet issue, and we now reproduce
seme with our apologies.)
MADAM ROttERPlVi
4609 E. Colfax Ave., PR 7-1923
Denver 20, Colorado
Sep.: 54-Hole Tournament:
Tied: DR. JACK KIMURA
end DAN LOSSASO
Sep.: "Turkey" Tournament:
"A" Flight SHUG MADOKORO 69
JOHN CHIKUMA 69
JIM HANAMURA 69
"B" Plight:- SY SAITO 67
BEANS YAMAMOTO 68
ROY TERADA 69
DICK YAMAMOTO and DAN LOSAS-
SO both shot a hole-in-one at
Meadow Hills this earner.

HIT A DEI
Z 3 0/0 C H A m P ft
4-4778
nsencv for riissell stover crhdv
SIOE OP SRICHTOn)
rgJjgMW
CORO $ftKAOUCHI, JUgr. TEL. (,S9-9984-


SEPT.. 1962
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA NEWS
PAGE 7
JOYCE SAWAMURA was wed, during
July, to FRANK FUKAZAWA, at the
Tri-State Buddhist Church In Den-
ver, Colo.
Above, from left to right, are
REV. N. TSUNODA who officiated at
the marriage rites, FRANK FUKAZA-
WA signing the marriage register,
the new MRS. FRANK FUKAZAWA, with
PEGGY MATSUMOTO as Maid of Honor,
and KEN K1TASHIMA as the Best Man
for the groom.
The newly-weds are at home at
1711 Gilpin St., in Denver, Colo.
(Photo by HOWARD ODA.)
UYEDA SHIOZAKI
AMY UYEDA of Denver, Colo, be-
came the bride of AKIRA SHIOZAKI
of St. Paul, Minn., during July,
at ceremonies held at the Simpson
M.E. Church In Denver, Colo.
The newly-weds have made their
home in San Jose, Calif-
(Photo by TOM T. MASAMORI. )
SUMMER WEDDINGS
GAIL HANAMURA FRANK TAMARIBUCHI
(Denver) (Denver)
JANE IMADA JAMES KISHIYAMA
(Thornton) (Denver)
MARGARET JENKINS SAMUEL MORIKAWA
(Ohio) (Denver)
YOSHIYE JINGUCHI BRIGHT HOSHIKO
(Tacoma) (Denver)
BESSIE KAMURA RICHARD JOKO
(Denver) (Denver)
AMY SASAKI.........DON TOKUNAGA
(Brighton) (Brighton)
SACHIKO TAKAGI YOSHIHARU ETO
(Japan) (Denver)
FRANCIS TSUKAMOTO SAM FUNAROSHI
(Hawaii) (Ft. Lupton)
TANI SATO
HAKUMI LOIS TANI, daughter of
Mr. & Mrs. Sto Tanl of 3651 Osage
St., Denver, Colo., became the
bride of MAMORU SATO of Thornton,
Colo., on Aug. 26, 1962, at cere-
monies held at the TSBC.
The groom, MAMORU SATO, is a
senior at the University of Colo-
rado, majoring in commercial art.
He is the son of Tetsuro Sato, of
Thornton, formerly of Holly.
(Photo by HOWARD ODA.)
BIRTHS
HADA, Ted M a BOY
2120 Niagara St-, Denver KAWAMURA, Albert a BOY
7714 Navajo St., Denver KIYOTAKE, Fred a BOY
5025 Adams St., Denver MATOBA, Isao a BOY
1525 S. Clay St., Denver MATSUURA, Larry a GIRL
2660 Fairfax St., Denver OKITA, Todd a BOY
2921 William St., Denver TANIWAKI, Michio a BOY
813 32nd St., Denver UBA, Toshlo a BOY
826 S. Owens Ct., Denver
YABE, Norman a GIRL
45 Cook St., Denver
f OBITUARIES
MR. AND MRS. HIROKICHI FUNAKOSHI
(auto accident in July, 1962)
survived by sons: Sam in Ft.
Lupton, Fred in L.A., and Ken
in Denver, and four daughters
Mrs. Geo. Masunaga, Mrs. John
Kiyota, Mrs. Any Urano, and
Mrs. Robt. Noda.
TSURUKICHI HANAMURA, 2526 West
39th Ave., Denver; husband of
Taka Hanamura, and father of
James Hanamura, both of Den-
ver, Colo.
DENTA ITO, 3400 Columbine St.,
Denver; husband of Yosoe Ito;
father of Seda Suzuki, Sacra-
mento; Virginia and Lander of
Denver; Jack of St. Paul; and
t, Nancy of South Gate, Calif.
YAMAGUCHI KOBAYASHI
JOANNE YAMAGUCHI of Fort Lup-
ton, Colo., became the bride of
THOMAS KENJI KOBAYASHI of Denver,
Colo., during June, in ceremonies
held in Platteville, Colo.
KENJI KOBAYASHI is a medical
student, at the University of Co-
lorado Medical School, in Denver.
The couple ere now residing in
Denver, Colo.
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DENVER 2. COLO.
KE. 4- 6031


PAfig 8,
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA NEWS
SEPT., 1962.
1964 JAPAN TOUR
BEING PROJECTED
WiCh the success of the Denver
Scout contingent to Jepan during
July-Aug., 1962, a group of spon-
soring individuals are now tenta-
tively planning a Youth Program
to send young people to Japan in
1964.
Altbo no definite plans have
been crystalized, there is some
thinking in terms of sending high
school students, either boys or
girls, between the ages of 14-18,
on such a projected tour of Japan
two years from now, in 1964.
It was noted that the Olympics
would be held in Oct., and hence
would not be a consideration for
this proposed project.
A "WELCOME HOME" party for the 15 Boy Scouts and 2 adult leaders,
from the Denver area, who went to the 1st Asian Jamboree In Japan,
was held on Sun., Sept. 16th, at the Fuji-En.
Above, seated at lower center,
is FRANK NAKAGAWA, adult leader
for the Denver contingent, and at
extreme left Is SAM SUEKAMA, as-
sistant contingent leader.
Scouts standing, at rear, are
from left to right: GENE KAMBARA,
GENE TAKAMINE, GEORGE PRIEST, TOM
FUJITA, ALAN DOMAN, DON TAKEMURA,
HOWARD K0SHX, STEVE ANDO, JAMES
SUEKAMA, RON YAMAMOTO, RUSS TSU-
KAMOTO, DUSTY OSBORN, with HAR-
VEY NAKAGAWA and LYNN SCHWABAUER
seated at extreme right.
510 IStW ST
DEnveR. a,coto.
HAR.RV WA0RR.I CH4-3S46
Guests at the heed table, from
left to right are WALTER KRSTICH,
Deputy Mayor of Denver; ELIZABETH
H. ROSE, Chairman of the Denver-
Takaysma Sister-City committee^
FRANK MCDONALD of D-C Truckers,
who flew the Scouts from Denver
to San Francisco and return; MRS.
ROBERT HEMPS; BOB KNIGHT, Chief
Scout of the Denver contingent;
MRS. WALTER KRSTICH; and ROBERT
HEMPE, Deputy Scout Executive for
the Denver Area Council. MR. A.
F. TAKAMINE is seated at lower
right foreground.
All of the Scout parents, and
families, as well as friends and
sponsors, totalling 80 persons,
attended the festive welcoming
party at the Fuji-En.
(Re-prints of the original photo
above can be ordered from TOM T.
MASAMORI, 2010 Lamar St., Denver
15, Colo. Tel: BE 7-3041)
COLLEGIANS FLAN
FALL ACTIVITIES
HENRY TOBO, President of the
Intermountain Collegiate Students
announced that the ICS plans to
hold either an informal dance, or
a picnic, during October, as a
"Get-Acquainted function for all
AJA collegians in this region.
As soon as full details have
been decided, further announce-
ments and publicity will be re-
leased thru the I.C.S. fell pub-
lication by KEN TERADA.
JACL NEW YEAR'S
EVE DANCE SET
TOM I. MASAMORI, Ch.inaan of
the New Year's Eve Dance for the
Mlle-Hl JACL, announced that JAY
WIEDER'S 7-pc orchestra will play
from 9:00 p.m. until 1:00 a.m. In
the main ballroom of Brown Palace
West, on Dec. 31, 1962.
Plenty of noisemakers and fa-
vors will be furnished by the lo-
cal JACL. Details will be pub-
lished as soon as available.
SAM Y. MATSUMOTO
NEW YORK LIFE INS. CO.
RT. I, BOX I96A
HENDERSON, COLO. AT.8-2536
jRPnnESG CHinCSE AltlERlCAn FOOD
jBPnnese SAKE HVAiinsie.
T6 L' &2S-9530
SPECIALIZING IN ORIENTAL FOODS AND GOODS
194G LARimER ST. KE 4-&03I
Exclusive distributors of Ssn Francisco's
',HOWJi^jOHMAYtJQAS^
GENUINE Chinese Roast Duck, with mouth-watering flavor!21
Orders taken now. .... Arrives on Thursdays
dining Room
KE4-40O8
7ZXL z
2015 mflRKET ST.
Return Postage Guaranteed:
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Denver 2, Colorado
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