Citation
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 5, Number 2

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Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 5, Number 2
Series Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
30

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
VOL. V. No. 2
DENVER. COLORADO
OCT. 1963.
MILE-HI JACL SLATES FALL MEETING
AND HALLOWEEN PARTY, ON NOV l
MICHI ANDO, (Tel.: AL 5-4213), was named General Chairman for the
Mile-Hi JACL*a annual fall meeting, which Is being planned as an ac-
tivity for the entire family and which will be concluded by 9:30 p.m.
in order to allow families with small children to return home at a
reasonable hour. The general fall meeting of Mile-Hi JACL will be
-------------------held at the TSBC, in Denver,
on
INTERNAL L DANCE
FESTIVAL,OCT. 24th
MRS. MUTSUYO TSUNODA will pre-
sent a group of Japanese dancers
at the 2nd annual International
Dance Festival to be held at the
Hilton Hotel, on Thu., Oct. 24.
Fri. evening, Nov. 1st.
The evening's
commence with a
at 6:30 p.m.
with the lo-
cal chapter
supplying the
cost of the
main dish.
activities will
pot-luck supper,
TSBC ANNUAL BAZAAR
AND FOOD BENEFIT,
SAT.-SUN, NOV. 9-10
JAMES KANEMOTO and HARRY NITTA
will head the annual two-day fes-
tival and bazaar of the Tri-State
Buddhist Church, at 1947 Lawrence
St., Denver, Colo., on Sat. and
Sun., Nov. 9 10.
DOROTHY FUJINO and M. WATADA
are in charge of the food booths,
on the lower level, which will be
given over to gsmes for children,
and a bazaar of Oriental goods.
Oriental foods, with a choice
of either a chow mein or chicken
teriyaki dinner, noodles or other
delicacies, will be available at
$1.00 per ticket.
On the main floor level, there
will be displays and exhibits of
Japanese arts and culture. Also,
there will be special programs on
stage, during both days. There
will be no admission charged for
any of the activities.
Everyone is most cordially in-
vited to attend the TSBC annual
Bazaar and Festival! Please call
MRS. N. TSUNODA, at 534-4984, for
detailed information.
SEN. PETER DOMINICK
IS PRINCIPAL SPEAKER
AT MTN-PLAINS CONF.
U.S. SENATOR PETER H. DOMINICK
(R) of Colorado has been confirm-
ed as the principal speaker for
the Mtn-Plains JACL district con-
vention to be held at the Cosmo-
politan Hotel, in Denver, Colo.,
on Sat., Nov. 30th.
SEN. DOMINICK indicated that
some conflict of schedules might
occur, requiring his presence in
Washington, D.C., for debate on
the Civil Rights bill (of which
he is one of the principal spon-
sors) and the major tax bill, as
well as possibility of conflict
with his tour of active duty, as
an USAF reserve officer.
However, SEN. DOMINICK assured
the Mtn-Plains JACL office, that
he would make every effort to be
In Denver, Colo, on Nov. 30th to
deliver the principal address, at
the convention banquet.
State Repr. SEIJI HORIUCHI, of
Adams County (Brighton, Colo.),
has been contacted to introduce
SEN. DOMINICK, who has been named
by Time Magazine as one of the
ten outstanding freshmen Senators
in the United States Senate.
JOHN NOGUCHI of Denver, Colo.,
will officiate as Gen. Chrmn of
the 8th biennial Mtn-Plains JACL
district convention, scheduled at
Cosmopolitan Hotel, Nov. 29-30.
NOGUCHI is active in JACL, ve-
terans, and bowling affairs, in
the Denver community.
MRS. Y. SAITA is Pres, of the
Iasei Women's Society for Chris-
tian Service, at Simpson Church.
Mesdames M. N0NAKA and T. OKA are
vice-presidents.
MRS. N. Y0RIT0M0, Chairman of
the Society's student activities,
and MRS. ESTHER FUJITA will as-
sist as hostesses.
The program will be from 7:00
p.m., until 10:00 p.m.
Some of the girls participat-
ing in the program are GE0RGIANNE
FUKUHARA, SHARON and JEAN DOIDA,
EILEEN FUJINO, DONNA JEAN KATO,
EVELYN UNO, MARCIA NITTA, CARO-
LYN OZAMOTO, and several others.
MARY LANIUS Y0ZAN TSUBOKAWA
JOHN SMAY REV. N. TSUNODA
MINORU YASUI
The Colorado Japan Society as-
sisted in the sponsorship of the
Japanese dance (odorl) recital of
MME. SENJO SEGAWA, winner of the
All-Japan Dance Concours Prize,
at TSBC, on Tues., Oct. 22nd.
Those who
plan to at-
tend, please
contact MRS.
MICHI ANDO at
AL 5-4213, in
the evenings,
since she is teaching at Harring-
ton School during days. All JACL
members in the Brighton area are
requested to contact FLORENCE NA-
KATA, 659-3726, or SUHI 1MATANI,
at AT 8-1613.
The schedule of events for the
Mile-Hi JACL annual fall meeting
are, as follows:
6:30 p.m.........POT-LUCK SUPPER
7:30 p.m. HALLOWE'EN PARTY
8:00 p.m. BUSINESS MEETING
9:00 p.m. INFORMAL CARD PARTY
Families were urged to bring
their children in costumes, since
prizes will be awarded for best
and funniest costumes. Games and
entertainment will be provided,
and movies will be shown for the
children.
MILE-HI JACL SEEKS
NOMINATIONS FOR
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
JEAN SATO, (Tel: AT 8-5751) is
Chairman for nominations of seven
new Board members of the Mile-Hi
JACL, for three-year terms, end-
ing Dec. 31, 1966.
Present incumbent Board mem-
bers, whose terms expire Dec. 31,
1963, are:
TOSHIO ANDO HARUK0 KOBAYASHI
ROY MAYEDA DR. T. MAYEDA
TOM NAKATA JOHN SAKAYAMA
JEAN SATO
Nominations may be submitted
to JEAN SATO directly, In writing
at 6790 N. Downing St., Denver 29
or at the general business meet-
ing of the Mile-Hi JACL, at TSBC,
on Fri., Nov. 1st.
can siMh
IT LUCK SUPPER
vik ^pusinESs mEETinc
iPKEn's UALiowe'en party
FRI. MOV, I
'TRI-STATE BUDDHIST CHURCH f30 PIB
ISSEI WOMEN'S CLUB
AT SIMPSON CHURCH
WELCOMES VISITORS
Issei ladies at Simpson Church
will welcome the more than fifty
Japanese students and doctors, in
the Denver metropolitan area, at
a dinner and entertainment, from
1-4 p.m., Sun., Nov. 3rd.
JAPAN SOCIETY
MEETS, OCT. 28
JUDGE GEO. G. PRIEST, Pres, of
The Japan Society of Colorado an-
nounced that the regular monthly
meeting of the Society would be
held at Cosmopolitan Hotel, 8:00
p.m., on Mon., Oct. 28th.
Five additional directors are
nominated to the Board, and are:
MICHI ANDO


PAGE 2
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA NEWS
OCT., 1963
JAPANESE NATURALIZED
The U.S. I&NS reported that
three soldier wives at Colorado
Springs, Colo., were naturalized
as U.S. citizens as follows:
MITSUKO KNIGHT. .
CHIEK0 ELMS .
MITSUKO JENKINS .
Colo. Spgs
Colo. Spgs
Ft. Carson
MATOBA HEADS
"ISSEI STORY"
FUND CAMPAIGN
HARRY G. MATOBA, Mile-Hi JACL
chairman for the Xssei Story, an-
nounced that he would Initiate a
fund drive in the Denver area for
the Japanese History project.
Thus far, in Denver, only four
contributions have been received
for the Issei Story fund, as fol-
lows:
Family of MASUO YASUI $1,000.00
BESSIE SHIYOMURA........25.00
MASA KURODA, Iowa.......10.00
RONALD MORITA...........10.00
Chrmn MATOBA indicated that he
hoped that a goal of $2,500.00 in
the Denver area could be raised.
Opening scene of the Mimasu-Kai presentation, during Oct., with
MME. TAMIJI 0N0UYE, at extreme right, presenting an extendedkabuki
drams program at TSBC in Denver, Colo. More than 600 people, includ-
ing many Caucasians, Jammed the hall. In foreground is SUSIE ASAN0,
1 as featured dancer.
SERVICE bureau-
\VLS-Z1 ZlStST.
rrjA3-8946
japan air lines
1964 CALENDARS
A limited supply of beautiful
1964 calendars produced for JAPAN
AIR LINES is now available direct
from Japan, posted with commemo-
rative stamps, at $1.50 per copy.
Full-color reproductions of 13
superb art treasures of Japan il-
lustrate the JAL calendar. They
are most suitable as Christmas or
New Year's gifts to friends.
Advance orders may be placed
with: CHAS. E. TUTTLE CO., INC.,
Rutland, Vermont. About 4 weeRs
should be allowed for delivery of
calendars from Japan.
Be Tsukikos guest on
your flight to Japan
from the moment you board your OC-8 Jet Courier.
Tsukiko Yamazaki observes every detail of traditional lapanese courtesy
and hospitality. She pampers you with attentive service, offers you
delicacies of the East and West-makes you feel you are already in Japan.
Your JAI flight, whether in the Economy or First Class cabin, will be
gracious and restful. Yet |Al flights cost no more. JAL fares are ihe same
as all airlines. The real difference is in JAl's superior service,
personal attention and convenient schedules.
Oaily flights leave from los Angeles or San Francisco. Visit family or
friends in Hawaii, at no extra fare, and continue on to Japan at
your convenienceany day of the week. Connections at
Tokyo for cities throughout Japan are excellent. See
your travel agent, and lly amid the calm beauty
oI japan at almost the speed of sound.
UAPAN
AIR
JAL Hoiltss
Tsukiko Yimmki
Call y*ur
Travel Agent
JAPAN AIR LINES
2044 Dahlia Sc..
Braver 7, Cola.
DBxter 3-3941
Ladies in the background, with
samisen, are: Mesdames D. OKUN0,
T. TAKEUCHI, T. UYEBA, I. KUGE,
and M. INAMASU. (Foto by H. ODA)
"'*i ?**_
M1Y0K0 WATANABE, costumed for
the role of "Kumo no Taenia" (Rift
in the Clouds), in the Japanese
kabuki drama, presented at Univ.
of Denver theatre during Aug.
MISS UATANABE, a native of Los
Angeles, who studied kabuki drama
in Japan until the recent presen-
tation in New York City, trans-
lated the play into English, so
audiences in America could under-
stand the action. (Photograph by
KEN PURDIE, D.U. photographer.)
INTERNATIONAL FIESTA
HELD, OCT. 5 13
The International Fiesta held
at International House, 1600 Lo-
gan St., in Denver, from Oct. 5-
13, was an outstanding success.
AJAs participating in the "Ja-
pan Night" program, on Oct. 8th,
were:
TRUE S. YASUI .... Coordinator
MRS. N. TSUNODA .Japanese Odorl
ERLENE HIKIDA ....... Ikebana
(Arrangement by TAKINO TAKAMATSU)
REV. JON FUJITA......Exhibits
FUJI-EN.......Movies of Japan
(Courtesy of SUS MATSUM0T0)
MADAME BUTTERFLY'S. Sales Booth
(Courtesy of GENE SIDE; assist-
ed by JEAN SATO, JEAN MATSUDA,
JULIA KAMURA and RUTH KAWAMURA)
GENE SIDE, of Madame Butterfly
Gift Shop, donated $10.00 to the
Mile-Hi JACL as a token of appre-
ciation and support.
MME. TAMIJI ONOUYE
PRESENTS PROGRAM
MME. TAMIJI ONOUYE presented a
special Japanese odori program at
Englewood High School, in obser-
vance of United Nations' Day, on
Oct. 13th.
SUSIE ASANO was featured per-
former, dancing the title role of
"Urashima Taro".
A children's odori, "Ko-Uma no
Yukui", was presented by TSUYAKO
TSUTSUI and KIYOKO KODAMA.
The special Japanese program
was arranged by Mrs. lone Nelson,
who was a long-time resident of
Japan for many years, and who Is
now conducting Japanese language
classes at International House,
1600 Logan St., Denver, Colo.
ROCKY MTN NEWS
ROUND-THE-WORLD
VISIT IN JAPAN
Rocky Mountain News' "Round-
the-World" tour group visited in
Japan, during Sept., led by R0BT.
L. CHASE, associate editor of the
Rocky Mtn News.
The tour group flew to Japan
via JAPAN AIR LINES, and spent a
few days in Tokyo, then visited
the shrines in Nikko, the Great
Buddha at Kamakura, and the tem-
ples in Kyoto, before proceeding
westward to Hong Kong and India,
and thence to Athens, Greece, to
individually tour Europe, before
returning to the U.S.
ARE BONO
p uJCu^tUCL
JAPANESE SAKE AND BEER
FRED ittk CHIVEKO R0KI
1953 Lfi'RimeR ST.
(CLOSED MONDAYS)
TEL. CH 4-774*3
KG 4-99SI


MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA NEWS
PAGE 3.
OCT.. 1963.___________________
MAYOR MEETS WITH
RELIGIOUS LEADERS
MAYOR TOM CURRIGAN of Denver
convened a meeting of more then
20 leaders of various religious
faiths in the Denver area, in or-
der to stimulate moral leadership
towards the solutions of problems
of race relations in this area.
A broad statement of princi-
ples concurred in by the religi-
ous leaders of the conmunity is
expected at the next meeting, to
be held during November.
AJAs who attended the Mayor's
meeting of Denver religious lead-
ers were REV. N. TSUNODA of Tri-
State Buddhist Church, and CANON
RUSSELL K. NAKATA, of St. John's
Episcopal Cathedral.
TERASAKI ON
CIVIL RIGHTS
TAK TERASAKI, Chrmn of Nat*I
JACL program committee, and long-
time civic leader in Denver, par-
ticipated in the Colorado State-
wide Conference on Minority Group
Problems, called by GOV. JOHN A.
LOVE of Colorado, this summer.
More than 40 representatives
of various groups, including Ne-
gro, Spanish, labor unions, and
agencies concerned with such pro-
blems, met with the Governor. As
official delegate, TAK TERASAKI
represented the JACL.
In addition to many discrimin-
atory practices complained of by
various groups, TERASAKI indicat-
ed JACL's concern about over-all
problems faced by minorities, and
specifically pointed out that Co-
lorado discriminates, by law, in
employment against non-citizens
by a quirk in the liquor lavs and
moreover, that many cemeteries in
Colorado have racially restrict-
ive prohibitions.
As a result of the state-wide
conference, GOV. LOVE of Colorado
Issued an Executive Order forbid-
ding discrimination on account of
race, color, creed or national
origin, in state employment or in
any state agencies of Colorado.
(See story in Col. 4, also)
Members of the Denver Bonsai Club, with Ikebana instructors at the
Denver-U.S. Nat'l Bank exhibit, on Oct. 12-13. An estimated 10,000
spectators viewed the bonsai and ikebana displays, during the two-day
show. The three gentlemen seated in the center are GEORGE Y. INAI,
Pres, of the Bonsai Club; GEORGE
T. FUKUMA, publicity chairman and
Vice-Pres.; and MOROKU SUYEHIR0.
(Photo by Hiromu Okada)
DENVER LIBRARY
WANTS JAPANESE
BOOKS SECTION
RICHARD BRUCE, special service
section of Denver Public Library,
requested printed materials and
books about Japan, either in Eng-
lish or in Japanese, to create a
Japanese section at the Library.
Anyone desiring to contribute
Japanese materials to the Denver
Public Library were urged to get
in touch with RICHARD BRUCE, at
266-0851, or bring books and any
printed materials about Japan to
the Main Library, 1357 Broadway,
Denver, Colorado.
COLORADO STATE
EXECUTIVE ORDERS
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY
GOV. JOHN A. LOVE'8 executive
order of July 16, 1963 noted that
the State of Colorado has a long
and proud history of concern and
legislation for equality of op-
portunity in employment, housing,
and public accommodations.
Consistent with such State po-
licy, GOV. LOVE ordered that, as
far as the executive branch of
the State government is concerned
there would be no discrimination,
because of race, color, creed, or
national origin, and specifically
with reference to:
Appointment, Assignment, and Pro-
motion of State personnel;
Public services, and use of State
facilities;
Public contracts involving public
works, or services supplied to
the State;
Employment Services, operated by
the State of Colorado;
Training for job opportunities,
including vocational guidance,
apprenticeship, and on-the-job
training programs;
State Licensing, and regulatory
agencies of the State; and
Cooperation with the State Anti-
Discrimination Commission.
Any person aggrieved, because
of discriminatory treatment, in
regard to any of the above, is
urged to contact the State Anti-
Discrimination Commission.
Above are MRS. J. HIRA0KA and'
MRS. H. TSUCHIYA, who assisted as
hostesses at International House,
for "Japan Night", during Oct.
Mesdames HIRAOKA and TSUCHIYA
are wives of Japanese doctors who
are taking advanced study and do-
ing advanced work at various hos-
pitals and medical facilities, in
Denver.
It was estimated, by REV. JON
FUJITA of Simpson ME Church, that
there are approximately 50 Japa-
nese doctors and wives, tempora-
rily in the Denver metropolitan
area, at the present time.
(Photo by TOM MASAMORI)
Japanese Books-Oriental Art Goods
3£obun-Ska
DENVER, COI0RAD0
Phone KEystone 4-4637
1234 20th Street
DENVER'S MOST COMPLETE
SELECTION OF QUALITY
JAPANESE MERCHANDISE
AT MODERATE PRICES
FREE GIFT WRAPPING, MAILING SERVICE
AVAILABLE AT NO EXTRA CHARGE.
MAIL ORDERS INVITED.
REGULAR STORE HOURS:
MON. thru SAT. 9:30 a.m. 6:00 p.a.
TUBS. EVENINGS..........until 9:00 p.m.
EUGENE SIDE and KIKIKO SIDE
Proprietors.
4609 E.C0LFRX fiVE- FR7-I9Z5
OeriVGR 2.0, COLO.
POR A
DELIGHTFUL VISIT TO JAPAN
GO TO
FUJI EM
SUKIYAKI
RESTAURANT
930 LINCOLN ST.
IN THE SHERMAN PLAZA HOTEL
Authentic Japanese Peed end Drinks Served et lew
tables "Japanese style" or et eenventienel
tebles end cheiri
AL. 5-43U
AL. 5*3530
COCKTAILS 50c From 3 to l
DINNERS from 3.00 and up
14
Oeen Dally 11:30 A.M. to 1 A.M.
Saturday 5 PM. to 1:30 AM.
_ Sunday 2 PM. to 10 PM.
Every Tuesday and Thursday at 9 p.m. authentic
movies of Japan shown in the Cocktail Lounge.
#1
*V>. I
vW\l
(Closed on Mondays)


PAGE 4
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA NEWS
OCT.. 1963.
MTN-PLAINS AJA NEWS
Published once a month. Mailed
by the 20th of each month.
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
MINORU YASUI
1225 - 20th Street,
Denver 2, Colorado.
CH 4-2239 RA 2-9255
* * * *
BUD UCHIDA. .
ROSA ODOW .
TOM MASAMORI. . .Photographer
TRUE YASUI. . .General Factotum
1963 AJA SCHOLARSHIPS AT MANUAL HIGH
In 1961, the Urban League of Denver made a study of scholarships
and awards granted at Manual High School, based upon the racial back-
grounds of the winners. The 1961 chart was as follows:
1961 MANUAL HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS:
% of Scholarships % of % of
Grads Total and Awards Awards Group
Negro.......................126
Anglo-White..................52 -
Spanish-American............48 -
Japanese American...........20 -
Totals: 246
52% 5 3 - 8 - 32% - 6.3%
21% 1 2 - 3 - 12% - 5.7%
19% 0 0 - 0 - 0% - 0.0%
8% 8 6 - 14 - 56% - 70.0%
25
Unfortunately, we do not have the records for 1962, but analysis
of scholarships and awards for 1963 discloses the following:
1963 MANUAL HIGH SCHOOL SENIORS:
% of Scholarships % of % of
Grads Total and Awards Awards Group
Last Saturday, a committee got
together to select, after the in-
evitable lunch, a handful of AJAs
to be recognized by the Mountain-
Plains JACL district council for
meritorious achievement. It was
quite a session.
Negro.......................159 -
Spanish-American.............34 -
Anglo-White..................27 -
Japanese American............17 -
American Indian.............. 2 -
Totals: 239
66% 10 4 - 14 - 40% - 8.8%
14% 2 1 3 - 8% - 8.8%
11% 3 3 6 - 17% - 22.2%
7% 7 5 - 12 - 35% - 70.0%
0 0 - _0 35 - 0% - 0.0%
The difficulty was not to find
worthy individuals, but to select
for the honor a few who were more
worthy than others. That takes
a bit of doing.
Time was when it was a rela-
tively simple task to name AJAs
who were doing outstanding things
in their communities. They stood
out because there were so few of
them.
Today, there are a great many
AJAs, in every community, who are
truly outstanding.
They no longer stand out, in
the way they used to, because the
exceptional things they are doing
professionally and socially are
now considered routine.
We note that the percentage of Negroes at Manual High is increas-
ing, and that the numbers of students of other racial backgrounds are
decreasing. This trend gives ba-
sis to fears that Denver schools
will be segregated in fact, with
all the attendant ills.
One hopeful sign, altho it is
not necessarily a trend, is the
appearance of Spanish American
names on the honors lists.
Statistically, Japanese Ameri-
can students seem to be holding
up past traditions of scholarship
at Manual High School, but we of-
ten wonder whether in fact 70% of
our AJA graduates at Manual High
are truly among the intellectual
elite, if measured against commu-
nity-wide averages.
We hear about their achieve-
ments much less frequently, be-
cause their fine work is now tak-
en for granted, as if it were the
most ordinary thing in the world.
In a way, 1 suppose, this is
great, for this means the Ameri-
can of Japanese ancestry is be-
ing accepted completely as mem-
bers of their respective communi-
ties, and not being singled out
as different" people, requiring
special recognition.
This is what we seek when we
strive for total acceptance, and
obviously, we are achieving it.
I am not privileged to reveal
the names of those to be honored
by the Mountain-Plains District
Counc i1.
But, I am sure that when their
names are announced, and their
contributions to their communi-
ties made known, you'll share the
sense of pride which I felt in
helping to select them for our
own recognition.
The last figure showing that
there were two American Indians
among the graduates at Manual is
an interesting side-light. As we
understand, there are about as
many Indians in Denver as there
are Japanese Americans, and it
will be interesting to note the
future developments of this mi-
nority in Denver.
JACL ENDORSES
FAIR HOUSING
The Board of Mile-Hi JACL, by
official action, unanimously en-
dorsed a policy statement calling
for unrestricted housing in the
Denver metropolitan area, in con-
formity with the Fair Housing Law
of Colorado, enacted in 1959.
MARY McLUCAS, formerly a con-
sultant with the Colorado State
Anti-Discrimination Commission,
requested JACL's approval, in en-
dorsing Colorados Fair Housing
Law. She is now associated with
the Fair Housing Council of Colo-
rado (SK 6-4991).
Above, MINORU YASUI (left), as
Dist. Chrmn of Mtn-Plains JACL,
and GOV. JOHN A. LOVE (center),
listening to JAMES REYNOLDS, Di-
rector of the Anti-Discrimination
Commission of Colorado, at the
Governors reception, in obser-
vance of the 100th anniversary of
the Proclamation Emancipation.
BILL KUROKI, as President of
the Mile-Hi JACL, was scheduled
to attend, with TOM T. MASAMORI,
(who took the above picture), as
representatives of the JACL. Un-
fortunately, Mile-Hi JACL Presi-
dent KUROKI was unable to attend,
but was represented by YASUI.
Several hundred individuals,
including many public officials
and representatives of civic or-
ganizations, attended the cele-
bration at the Governors Mansion
in Denver, Colo., on Oct. 16th.
ALL PHOTOS, unless otherwise
credited, in The Mtn-Plains AJA
News, taken by TOM T. MASAMORI,
2010 Lamar St., Denver 15, Colo.
Tel.: BE 7-3041
We're going into the busiest
season of the year, with Thanks-
giving, Christmas,
Day holidays com-
ing up!
Your JACL chap-
ter is also shift-
ing into high gear
for its year-end
activities, too!
You are all in-
vited to partici-
pate in JACL af-
fairs, so we can
wind up the year
with a bang! We have an activi-
ty scheduled for each month, in
Oct., Nov., and Dec., and we do
most cordially invite you to at-
tend any or all of these affairs.
ANNUAL FALL MEETING:
As printed on the front page,
Mile-Hi JACL is holding its annu-
al fall meeting for all members,
families and friends, at TSBC, on
Pri., Nov. 1st.
After the pot-luck supper, the
children's Hallowe'en party will
be held, to entertain them while
adults meet for a brief business
session.
There will be a brief resume
of activities thus far this year,
and nominations will be accepted
for 7 new Board members.
Further details will be given
concerning the forthcoming Mtn-
Plains JACL district convention
on Nov. 29-30, and on the annual
New Year's Eve dinner-dance to be
held at the Brown Palace West, on
Dec. 31st.
There also will be the usual
organizational reports, i.e., by
BEN T. KUMAGAI, as chapter trea-
surer; by HARUKO K0BAYASHI, as
membership chairman; by TOSH ANDO
as chapter 1000 Club chairman;
and by JEAN SATO, as the Mile-Hi
Scholarships chairman.
and New Year's
BILL KUROKI
you are invited:::
Again, as chapter President,
I warmly invite you to attend the
local chapter's fall meeting. It
is being held for your benefit.
This is your opportunity to
hear what the Board has been do-
ing, and to participate in the
planning for future activities.
MTR-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Regular: $3.00 for \ yr ( 5 mo.)
$5.00 for 1 yr (10 mo.)
Special Mile-Hi JACL members ONLY
$2.50 for % yr ( 5 mo.)
$3.50 for 1 yr (10 mo.)


MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA NEWS
OCT., 1963.
PAGE 5.
With almost 2 months of class-
es behind us, school activities
arc now in full swing. .
Most schools have held their
elections, and here are some of
the results:
Our sincere congratulations to
JOLENE FUKUllARA, who was elected
as the 7th Grade Historian, and
to DAN TANAKA, an 8th Grade offi-
cer, both at Smiley Jr. High.
DICK OKIMOTO, a sophomore at
North High, was elected President
of his class. After serving as
an officer at Horace Mann Jr. Hi,
DICK has lots of experience, in
leadership, to do a great job.
Altho they just missed being
elected, congratulations are in
order for PHIL KARAKAWA and to
SHARON FUJISHIMA, both of whom
were in the final election cam-
paigns for class offices at East.
Over at Washington Hi, JOYCE
KOBAYASHI, besides being a good
skier, was elected as Vice-Pres.
of her sophomore class.
Speaking of skiing, GAIL TAKA-
MINE and LAURA MASUNACA (both of
East Hi), will be seen schussing
down the slopes this winter.
JANIS SAKAYAMA, of North Hi,
will also be testing her agility
and ability at skiing. .
MIKE AR1KI, NORMAN YANASE, and
STEVE ANDO took a trip to Oregon
and the West Coast, this suimner,
to work in fruit harvests but,
the boys came home broke. .
NORMAN YANASE is now with the
U.S. Air Force, taking his basic
training at Lackland AFB, near
San Antonio, Texas.
LARRY ODA, who used to work at
Kistler's, is also now at Lack-
land Air Force Base for his basic
training. .
Down on the football gridiron,
HAROLD MUROYA at Mapleton High is
the teams quarterback, and going
great guns. .
In Denver's football campaign,
ALAN NITTA of Manual Hi may well
find himself face-to-face with
RON HIROKAWA of George Washington
Hi. Both are on the varsity
teams and are fighting hard for
their respective alma maters. .
but, to no avail ---- EAST HIGH is
leading the Denver league!JJ
At East High, the planning for
the Sophomore Party is in pro-
gress. The theme is "Route 66",
because we sophomores are gradu-
ating in 1966. With all these
clubs and activities going on,
school is no longer "all work and
no play". And speaking for
myself, I've been enjoying it!
TSBC SCOUTS
EDDIE ITO, the Scoutmaster for
Troop ->169, reported that a Court
of Honor was held at TSBC, during
Sept., for advancements in rank.
CHARLES OZAKI was advanced to
1st Class Scout, and TED TANI was
advanced to 2nd Class Scout.
HANK SHIBAO is the new Asst.
Scoutmaster, to help TAD YAMAMOTO
as the other Asst. Scoutmaster.
NEBO NAKAYAMA is Cubmastcr for
Cub Pack 5? 159, at TSBC.
Almost forgot to mention that
this past summer a hardy group of
youngsters climbed Pikes Peak by
way of Barr Trail. including
BOBBIE KAWANO, MELANIE TERASAKI,
JOYCE KOBAYASHI, with the three
YAS'JI sisters, IRIS, LAUREL, and
HOLLY. and their dog, MISSY.
MRS. M. TSUNODA reported that
a group of Japanese odori dancers
performed at East High School, in
connection with United Nations
week, on Oct. 24th.
CONNIE TAKANINE, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Tol Takamine, was a
soloist for the Denver Ballet, at
a performance at East High .
SAM SUTKAMA and GEO. TSUKAMOTO
are Advisors for Explorer Post
#169, at TSBC.
All Scouting units at the Tri-
State Buddhist Church in Denver
planned an active fall program of
camping and winter sports.
Tory's Pre$crlio$ Your Biggest Health Valve!
Sortie Pharmacy
r=- 2S\Zl e,34-TH AVE
PHONE DE 1-tZOS
DENVER 5, COLO.
GEORGE FUJIMOTO
CAPITOL MORTUARY
1331 SHERMAN TA 5-0151
Personal Attention
to Every Detail
ICS PLANNING
FALL ACTIVITIES
DAN MASAKI, a Hawaiian student
at CU, is acting President of the
Intermountain Collegiate Students
for the school year of 1963-64.
RICHARD IDA of Brighton, who was
elected Pres., did not enroll in
school at CU this fall.
MASAKI, as Vice-Pres., has as-
sumed the duties of the presiden-
cy, and convened the ICS cabinet
to plan an active fall and winter
program for AJA collegians.
YOUNG PEOPLE TO
NORTHWEST YPCC
Young people at Simpson Church
planned to attend the Northwest
Y.P.C.C., in Seattle, Wash., over
Thanksgiving holidays. A special
train leaves Denver at 8:00 a.m.,
Thu., Nov. 28th, and will return
to Denver at 3:30 p.m., on Tues.,
Dec, 3rd.
CALENDAR
Of Coming Events
Nov. 1: (Fri) MILE-HI JACL FALL MEET- ING, at TSBC, 6:30 p.m.
Nov. 2- Nov. 3: BCA PLANNING COMMISSION meeting, Hilton Hotel.
Nov. 3: (Sun) TESTIMONIAL DINNER, for REV. & MRS. N. TSUNODA.
Nov. 9- Nov. 10: (S-S) TSBC ANNUAL BAZAAR and FOOD BENEFIT. Displays and Programs, 2 days.
Nov. 22: (Fri) CATHAY POST BENEFIT for Child & Family Welfare.
Nov. 24: (Sun) DBAC TURKEY & HAM BENE- FIT, 7-10 p.m., TSBC.
Nov. 29- Nov. 30: (F-S) MTN-PLAINS JACL DIST. CONVENTION; Ft. Lupton and Denver, Colo.
Nov. 30- Dec. 1: (S-S) ROCKY MTN NISEI BOWLING ASSN BOWLING TOURNAMENT Celebrity Lanes, Denver j
YOUNG BUDDHISTS
CONFAB, DEC. 20-22
ALBERT NAKATA, Pres, of Tri-
State Young Buddhist League, an-
nounced that the annual conven-
tion for young Buddhists will be
held in Denver, Colo., on Dec. 20
thru Dec. 22.
VIRGINIA ITO and SACHI BOYER
are in charge of advance regis-
trations at $20.00 per person.
Altho the full cost is consi-
derably more, individual costs to
those joining the group will be
only $35.00 for the entire trip.
To help defray expenses, the
Issei WSCS are having sushi sales
on Oct. 29 and Nov. 24; the Cor-
nelians will have a tamale sale
on Nov. 10th.
The three-day convention will
be combined jointly for YBL mem-
bers and for the Junior YBA also.
CUSTOM PHOTO FINISHING
711 2.7tTST.
Derive* s, COLO.
Telephone: CH 4-4073
MIKE TflSN IH0 FflOP. TEL. 659-9984-
WEST 80TH AVENUE at SHERIDAN BOULEVARD WESTMINSTER, COLORADO.
P. 0. BOX 1501, DENVER 1, COLORADO.
HENRY IMADA, President. Tel.: HA 9-3537


PAGE 6.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA NEWS
MILE-HI GOLF CLUB AWARDS DINNER-DANCE
DR. JACK KIMURA was general chairman for the annual Mile-Hi Golf
Clubs annual awards and inaugural dinner-dance, assisted by DR. SETS
ITO who was in charge of the orchestra. The finale of the golf sea-
son for the Mile-Hi Golf Club was held at the Brown Palace West Hotel
on Sat., Oct. 19th.
DR. SUEO ITO officiated as the
Toastmaster for the affair. Club
secretary JIM HANAMURA, assisted
by the retiring Pres., RUPE ARAI,
awarded the trophies and prizes
won by various members during the
summer tournaments.
The new 1963-1964 officers of
the Mile-Hi Golf Club, headed by
TAK TERASAKI, as President, were
inaugurated into office.
CATHAY GOLFERS
The Cathay Golf Club recently
held its annual awards dinner and
inaugural at the Red Slipper Inn,
on Oct. 19th.
The new cabinet for the 1963-
1964 year are as follows:
RUPERT ARAI, above, retiring
PRESIDENT...........TAK YAMASAKI Pres, of Mile-Hi Golf Club, was
Vice-pres. CASEY HAYASHIDA assisted by DR, JACK KIMURA, Vice
Secty-Treas.........RICHARD JOKO Pres.; JIM HANAMURA, Secretary;
Handicaps...........GENE TAGAWA and SAM KUMAGAI, Treasurer.
DAVE FURUKAWA, the out-going
Pres., was toastmaster for the
banquet. GARY NAKATA was banquet
chairman, and GEO. YAMAKAWA act-
ed as Awards Chrmn.
Awards were presented to Match
Play champion TAK YAMASAKI, and
runner-up GEO. YAMAKAWA. Winner
of the Dalpes Trophy was RICHARD
JOKO.
KAMLOOPS CLUB
New officers of the Kamloops
Fishing Club, as reported by the
retiring President, KEN FUSHIMI,
are as follows:
PRESIDENT.............GEORGE OYE
Secretary.........MARTHA FUSHIMI
Treasurer. .... WILSON ENOMOTO
Altho the regular season has
ended, ardent golf enthusiasts
Indicated that they would contin-
ue play during Colorado's balmy
Indian summer, probably up until
New Year's Day!
INTERNATIONAL
FINEST SPORTS EQUIPMENT
Happy Canyon Shopping Canter,
5042 B. Hampden Avenue,
Denver 22, Colorado.
STOME TANITA, Mgr. Tel. 756-9411
Up until the very last day of
the deadline on weigh-ins, WILSON
ENOMOTO was leading in the Colo-
rado trout division with a 3 lb.,
11 oz. rainbow from Lake John.
However, HARRY KOJIMA came in on
the last day with a 4 lb. 4J* oz.
German brown to capture the Colo-
rado title. RICHARD OTA kept the
out-of-state prize with a 6# 5 oz
rainbow from Montana.
LAKEWOOD
Bt5-*745
DICK* ETHEL VANASE


23 0,
AGEncy FOR RUSSELL STOV
E 4-477%
c a n d H
OCT.. 1963.
MTN-PLAINS BOWLING TOURNAMENT
SET FOR THANKSGIVING WEEK-END
SAM INAI and BEN YANAGA have been named as Co-Chairmen of the 2nd
annual Rocky Mountain Nisei Bowling Association tournament to be held
at the Celebrity Sports Center, 888 So. Colorado Blvd., in Denver, on
Nov. 30 Dec. 1, 1963. --
Four events have been schedul-
ed, including team, doubles, sin-
gles, and ragtime doubles for men
and mixed couples.
Handicap is based upon 2/3rds
of 200.
Entry deadline is Nov. 15th.
Entries must be mailed to:
DENVER SCHOOL OF JUDO, INC.
The Board of Directors of The
Denver School of Judo announced
increases in tuition for instruc-
tion in judo, effective Oct. 1.
All yudansha, including volun-
teer instructors, will now be re-
quired to pay $5.00 monthly.
MEN:
IWAO NISHIKAWA,
3271 Poplar St.
Denver 7, Colo.
ZIP Code: 80207
WOMEN:
JEAN MATSUDA,
2371 Tremont PI.
Denver 5, Colo.
ZIP Code: 80205
Men and boys caking judo will
pay $10.00 monthly, and women and
girls, $7.00 monthly, for the 1st
member of the family. $4.00 will
be charged for each additional
family member.
Committee chairmen who will be
in charge of the Tournament are:
Finances: .
Women's Div.:
Rag-time: .
Schedules:. .
(Women's).
Trophies: .
Scorekeepers:
Tabulations: .
Publicity:. .
. IWAO NISHIKAWA
and SUE MAYEMURA
. SADAMI KURODA
. BOB OTA and
MIN KISHIYAMA
. PETE MENDA and
DR. KOJI KANAI
JEAN MATSUDA and
ELAINE MATSUDA
EUGENE IKEYA and
CHARLENE IKEYA
. JOHN SAKAYAMA
and JOHN NOGUCHI
. GEO. MUKAIKUBO
and YUJI FURUTA
. HARRY HASHIMOTO
A tremendous turn-out of more
than 500 individual bowlers, and
possibly 70 teams, including 50
men's teams and 20 women's teams,
are anticipated for the regional
bowling keg classic, according to
DR. BOB MAYEDA, Chairman of the
Rocky Mtn Nisei Bowling Assn.
CATHAY SKI CLUB
Initiation fees of $15.00 will
remain unchanged.
DBAC FISH DERBY
DINNER, NOV. 17
HENRY TAGAWA is Chairman for
the annual Buddhist fishing derby
dinner, to be held at the TSBC,
on Sun., Nov. 17th.
The final deadline for entries
is Oct. 31st. All trout must be
registered with FRANK H1RA0KA, as
welgh-master at the G & F Market,
2844 Champa St., in Denver.
FRANK TAKAHASH1 is in charge
of trophies, which include the
CAROLYN TAKAHASHI Perpetual Tro-
phy, and the Tsukamoto-Yamamoto
perpetual trophies.
Other prizes will be awarded
for 1st, 2nd and 3rd places in
four categories: for men, women,
juniors (10-15) and small fry un-
der 10 years of age.
BOB INAI, Pres, of the Cathay
Ski Club, announced that JIM KUGA
will be Gen. Chrmn of the annual
Inaugural Dinner-Dance of Cathay
Ski Club, at the Golden Steer, in
Wheatridge, on Sat., Nov. 2nd,
HATTIE AR1TA will be in charge
of the dinner, assisted by GEORGE
TSUKAM0T0, who will handle door
prizes. EDDIE ITO 1$ membership
chairman, and ST0 TANI is publi-
city chairman.
New cabinet officers for the
Cathay Ski Club, for the 1963-64
season, will be:
PRESIDENT.........BARBARA HAMAI
Vice-Pres...............BOB OTA
Corr. Secty.......SUSAN TURNER
Rec. Secty .... DOROTHY GORAI
Treasurer.........JUNICHI K0MUR0
Altho the dinner is for mem-
bers and guests only, the dance
is open to the public, at $1.00
Per person. Dancing will com-
mence at 9:30 p.m.
Further information may be ob-
tained from BOB INAI, at Pacific
Mercantile Co., KE 4-6031.
REAL ESTATE inSUKAnCE
~ mirruAL fluids.
5IZ2.CHft$e ST. HA 2-1511
AL 5-6316
DEnVER. I2.C0LO.
DBAC "TURKEY"
BENEFIT NOV.
The annual turkey and ham be-
nefit of the Denver Buddhist Ath-
letic Commission will be held, at
the TSBC, from 7-10 p.m. on Sun.,
Nov. 24th.
The committee, in charge, in-
cludes:
WILLIE CHIKUMA
FRANK FUJINO
BEN HARA
HARRY NITTA
KAY NITTA
HUGH N1SH1M0TO
GEORGE 0M0T0
KA2 SAKAMOTO
GEO. TSUKAMOTO
TAD YAMAMOTO
and many others.
Door prizes are being donated
by THE GART BROS. SPORTING GOODS
and DAVE COOK SPORTING GOODS CO.,
and will be given away to lucky
persons attending the benfit.
Tickets for the turkey and ham
benefit may be purchased in ad-
vance at 10 for $1.00, or on Sun.
Nov. 24th, at 8 for $1.00, at the
door.


OCT.. 1963.
mountain-plains aja news
PAGE 7^
ENGAGEMENTS
SUMI FUJITA, daughter of Rev.
and Mrs. Jonathan Fujita, of Den-
ver, Colo., was engaged to EDWARD
HAYNES of El Paso, Texas. A De-
cember wedding is being planned.
MITCH and REIKO HAMAI, now of
San Leandro, Calif., became pa-
rents of a baby boy on Oct. 14th.
Mrs. Haraai is the former Reiko
Yoshihara of Denver.
JANET YANAGA, daughter of Mr.
& Mrs. Tom Yanaga, 7190 No. Wash-
ington St., was engaged to BOBBIE
HOSHIJIMA, of 3822 Franklin St.,
both of Denver, Colo.
The BUD UCHIDA's became grand-
parents recently, with the birth
of a grandson, JEFFREY ALLAN, in
October.
WEDDING
KIMIKO TSUKAHARA, 4526 Champa
St., Denver, was married to K00ZU
XSABE, 912 24th St., of Denver,
BUD UCHIDA, steel detailer and
engineering draftsman, is working
for Schmidt Bros., 1342-12th St.,
in Denver. (255-5123)
MAE KUROKI recently went to
hospital for minor surgery. Hus-
band BILL was batching for a few
days, while the children were out
on the Inouye farm, with the old
folks.
ALICE HOSOKAWA is now visiting
in Japan, for probably about four
weeks. .
LT. BEN FURUTA, Jr., was re-
cently transferred to Japan with
the USAF, after having served for
a year and a half in Guam, flying
weather reconnaissance.
The Cherry Lounge, Inc., will
be taking over the Acapulco Bar,
20th & Larimer St., in Denver, in
an effort to restore the Japanese
business center in the tradition
of George Furuta's Manchu Grill
and Club Seven Seas of the past.
Incorporators are: JOHN YAMA-
SAKI, EIJIRO KAWAMURA, OSKI TANI-
WAKI, and TOSH ANDO. They plann-
ed to continue the operation of
Sakura-En, at 1236-20th St., with
MINORU NODA continuing as chef.
HERBERT WONG, owner of the New
China Cafe, 732 East Colfax Ave,,
in Denver, Colo., has a new Can-
tonese chef who can prepare, with
a day's notice, a super de luxe
Kwok Kwong dinner that is simply
out of this world! For a party
of six or more, the cost is only
$3.50 per person, with an exotic
taste treat with each bite! Just
call 534-0897, and order the spe-
cial dinner for the next evening.
Colo.
MICHI KAGIYAMA, of Henderson,
Colo., was wed to RICHARD YOSHIDA
of Denver, Colo., on Sept. 29th,
at Tri-State Buddhist Church.
The bride's parents are Mr. &
Mrs. Susumu Kagiyama of Henderson
and the groom's father is Keiichi
Yoshida of Denver, Colo. (Photo
by EDWIN SHIMABUKURO.)
2815 DOWNING ST
DENVER 5, COLORADO
TEL
BILL KUROKI, MGR. 244-6068
New Cmnn Cafe
73Z E. COLFAX AVE.
TEL. 53T-0897
Fflmous foe CHinese jmswes
VISIT V/UUjtTu! DjS4Cu

m fi RKET

ie TinEST in Fins nno feathers
KE 4-J9E3 |9|9 LAWREHCE ST.
JEANETTE KAWAMURA, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Fred N. Kawamura, of
2556 Arapahoe St., Denver, Colo.,
was married to GEORGE TOMOMITSU,
formerly from Hawaii, at Simpson
Church, on Sun., Oct. 20th.
Maid-of-honor was JUNE MATSUDA
and junior bridesmaid was CYNTHIA
MASAMORI. Flower girl was SANDRA
FUKUMA.
Best man was PAUL FUKUMA, and
the groomsman was ARTHUR KAWAMURA
with little JOHN MASAMORI as ring
bearer.
The newly-weds are honeymoon-
ing in Hawaii, and visiting with
the groom's parents, Mr. and Mrs.
Harry S. Tomomitsu, of Honolulu.
(Photo by TOM T. MASAMORI.)
BIRTHS
KAWANO, Eddie......... GIRL
945 Washington St., Denver
SHINTO, Jim a GIRL
8031 Ogden St., Denver
TAMARIBUCHI, Frank. . a GIRL
1585 Moline St., Aurora
UCHIDA, Steve a BOY
10749 Carroll Ln, Northgl enn
YAMAGUCHI, Nobie a BOY
4044 Umatilla St., Denver
OBITUARIES
REIJI K0DAMA, 1906 W. 33rd Ave.,
Denver, Colo. Father of Kody
Y. Kodama and Joan Harue Miya-
moto, of Denver; grandfather of
Roderick M. Kodama of Los Ange-
les, Calif., and Joy F. Kodama,
of Denver, Colo.
GEORGE YOSHIMURA, 4940 Alcott St,
Denver, Colo. Father of Kimiko
Nakamura, Aiko Armijo, Yukiko
Chavez, Richard Yoshimura, and
Jerry Yoshimura, all of Denver,
Colo.; and Ralph Yoshimura, of
San Pedro, Calif.
photographs
ImI 2010 ST.
JHKf DEnvtft 15, Colo.
be 7* 304i
PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS LISTINGS
whyists
JOHN CHIKUMA, DDS 75 So. 4th St. Brighton 659-1825
MASA GIMA, DDS 1404 E. 18th Ave. AL 5-6822
MICHAEL T. HORI, DDS 4101 E. Wesley Ave. SK 6-0924
T. ITO, DDS 830 18th Street 2838 Federal Blvd. KE 4-8680 GL 5-0741
Y. ITO, DDS SUEO ITO, DDS SETS ITO, DDS 1477 Pennsylvania CH 4-6589
KOJI KANAI, DDS 4310 Harlan St. Wheatridge HA 2-5817
TONY KAWANO, DDS 1750 Humboldt St. KE 4-3084
ROBERT MAYEDA, DDS Interstate Trust Bldg. TA 5-6961
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS Interstate Trust Bldg. TA 5-6961
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS Interstate Trust Bldg. TA 5-7498
KEN UYEHARA, DDS 40 No. Main Street Brighton 659-3062
JACK YAMAMOTO, DDS 10005 W. 17th Place Lakewood 238-3331
APvenrtswo
J. HOWARD McCarthy, 725 St. Paul
Brown & Bigelow AL 5-2075
LAWYttS T0SHI0 ANDO 1942 Larimer St. AC 2-5315
MINORU YASUI 1225 20th St. CH 4-2239
OPTOMETRISTS
MAS KANDA, O.D. 1515 W. 48th Ave. GE 3-4221
BEN MAT0BA, O.D. 1959 Larimer St. KE 4-1941
MISAO MATOBA, O.D. Ft. Lupton
Burt Building UL 7-6550
PHYSICIANS CHAS. FUJISAKI, M.D. Brighton
40 No. Main St. 659-0783
T. K. KOBAYASHI, M.D. DICK D. MOMII, M.D. ALBERT NODA, M.D. 1227 27th Street KE 4-3014
HOWARD SUENAGA, M.D. 830 18th Street AC 2-1314
M. GEO. TAKENO, M.D, Medical Arts Bldg., 1955 Pennsylvania St. TA 5-0783
AYAK0 WADA, M.D. 810 23rd Street TA 5-2565
MAHITO UBA, D.0. 1230 21st Street MA 3-3743


PAGE 8.
MOPWTAIH-PLAIMS AJA REVS
OCT., 1963.
TESTIMONIAL FOR
THE TSUNODAs AT
TSBC, ON NOV. 3
REV. NOBORU TSUNODA and MRS.
MUTSUYO TSUNODA, who have served
the Tri-State Buddhist Church for
20 years, will be honored at tes-
timonial services and an appreci-
ation dinner on Sun.. Nov. 3rd.
Colncidently, the two Buddhist
religious leaders of this region
will be celebrating their 25th
Silver wedding anniversary.
BOA PLANNING GROUP
MEETS, NOV 2-3
JAMES KANEMOTO, member of the
Planning Commission of the Bud-
dhist Churches of America, advis-
ed that Buddhist leaders from all
parts of the U.S. will be conven-
ing in Denver, at the Hilton, on
Nov. 2-3, 1963.
The top level of Buddhist lea-
dership in America, meeting for
the 2-day planning session, are:
BISHOP SHINSHO HANAYAMA, of S.F.
REV. TAKASHI TSUJ1, of HQ, S.F.
REV. KAKUMIN FUJINAGA, of S.F.
REV. EJITSU HOJO, of San Jose,
REV. CYODO KONO of Chicago, 111.
REV. NOBORU TSUNODA, of Denver,
NOBY YAMAKOSHI, Chrmn, Chicago
DR. KIKUO TAIRA, Fresno, Calif.
DR. BEN CHIKARAISHI, of Chicago
NOBORU HANYU, of San Francisco
GEORGE ISERI, of Ontario, Oreg.
NOBORU ISHITANI, of Los Angeles
TAD TOMITA, of Seattle, Wash.,
JAMES KANEMOTO, Longmont, Colo.
MITS NAKASHIMA, Oakland, Calif.
CARL SATO, of Mesa, Arizona, and
possibly others.
In recognition of more than 50 years of outstanding Christian ser-
vice, commemorating the 85th anniversary of The Christian Mission for
Japanese in America, six prominent leaders in church work were honor-
ed at Simpson Church, during Sept. At left is REV. JONATHAN FUJITA,
and at extreme right is GEO. T. FUKUMA. Honorees included, standing,
--------------------------------- from left, Y. NAKAYAMA of Denver;
FATHER HIRAM H. KANO, now of Ft.
Collins (formerly of Scottsbluff)
MRS. T. HANAMURA of Denver; MR.
K. KUROKAWA of Ft. Lupton. Seat-
ed are MRS. TADOME OTSUKI of Ar-
vada, and MR. T. OHTA of Denver.
(Photo by Hiromu Okada)
LOWERS
510 \StW ST.
DEnveR. Z} COLO.
HftRfcV Qaoau ch 4-WG
JACL RECOGNITIONS
COMMITTEE CONVENED
The Recognitions Conraittee for
Mtn-Plains JACL district, headed
by BILL HOSOKAWA, as Chrmn, met
on Sat., Oct. 19, to make preli-
minary selections of outstanding
persons of Japanese ancestry in
the Mtn-Plains region to be hon-
ored at the district convention
banquet, on Nov. 30th.
In addition to individual's in
the metropolitan Denver area, the
committee noted that nominations
were expected from Arkansas Val-
ley, Ft. Lupton, Omahf, and San
Luis Valley JACL chapters.
Members serving on the region-
al Recognitions Committee are:
BILL HOSOKAWA, Chrmn; BOB MARU-
YAMA, SUM1 TAKENO, TAK TERASAKI;
and from Ft. Lupton, FRANK YOKO-
0J1, ALBERT WATADA and SAM FUNA-
KOSHI.
Decisions of the district Re-
cognitions Committee will be an-
nounced at the District JACL Con-
vention, at Cosmopolitan Hotel.
KENKYU CLUB-ICS
PLAN JAPAN FIESTA
AT C.U., DEC. 8th
ROBERT WATADA, Pres, of Kenkyu
Club at Colorado University, an-
nounced that a Japanese Festival
will be held in the Glen Miller
ballroom of the CU Student Union,
in Boulder, Colo., on Dec. 8th.
JANET IDA is general chairman
for the affair which will feature
exhibits and demonstrations, from
2:00 to 4:00 p.m., Including ike-
bana, cha-no-yu, judo demonstra-
tions, bonsai, and other cultural
aspects of Japanese life.
CAROL IMATANI is Chairman of
the Japanese-style dinner, which
will be served from 6:00 p.m., at
the CU Student Union.
An entertainment program will
be staged from 8:00 p.m. Final
details, as to programs and costs
will be announced later.
CATHAY FAMILY FUN
NIGHT, NOV. 22nd
YOSH ARAI and JIM KUGA are Co-
Chairmen of the Cathay Posts an-
nual benefit for Child and Family
Welfare, to be held on Fri., Nov.
22nd.
Prizes will include: 21 RCA
Color TV; Tape Recorder, Typewri-
ter, or Movie Camera; and Tran-
sistor Radio.
JAPANESE MOVIE
TOSHIRO MIFUNE, Japanese actor
who won the Best Actor award from
the Venice Film Festival for his
role in "YOJIMBO", opens at The
Vogue Theatre, 1465 S. Pearl St.,
Denver, on Thu., Oct. 31st.
SAM Y. MATSUMOTO
NEW YORK LIFE INS. CO.
RT. I, BOX I96A
HENDERSON, COLQ AT8-2536

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(CLOSED ON TUESDAYS) TEL! &ZS-9S3Q
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I 94G LARimER ST. KE 4-G03I
JUST ARRIVED*
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Store Hours:
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Special hours, on FRIDAYS.
on SUNDAYS.
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10:00 a.m.- 3:00 p.m.
d i n i ng Room
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