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Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 5, Number 9

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Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 5, Number 9
Series Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
31

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newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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VOL. V, Ho, 9._______________
MEMORIAL SERVICES
AT FAIRMOUNT, AT
12 NOON. MAY 30 TH
YOSHIAKI ARAI, who wss desig-
nated General Chairman of Cathay
Post's program for Memorial Day,
at the Nisei War Memorial monu-
ment, on May 30, 1964, regretted
the necessity of cancellation be-
cause of rain.
CHRMN ARAI noted that the ser-
vices had been planned to honor
the more than 80 Americans of Ja-
panese ancestry from this region
who gave their lives in the ser-
vice of the United States.
BRIGHTON WOMEN'S
ANNUAL INAUGURAL
MARY SH1BAO, retiring Pres, of
Brighton Nisei Women's Club, was
in charge of the annual meeting
of the Club, on May 30, 1964.
New officers of the Club were
installed as follows:
PRESIDENT. Y0SHIK0 0KAM0T0
Vice-Pres. SUMIKO MIZUNAGA
Rec. Secty FLORENCE UYEHARA
Corr. Secty.........KIM OKADA
Treasurer. SAKIYE HORIUCHI
Program Chrmn. ROSE FUJISAKI
Sunshine ......... DEKO SHIBAO
Publicity. CARRIE HORIUCHI
Wsys & Means JOANNA SAKATA
Social Co-Chrmn. JOSEPHINE FUKAYE
and DOLLY SATO
Refreshments MARY TOKUNAGA
and HAZEL TANI
Highlight of the evening was
presentation of the annual Nisei
Women's Club Scholarship Award of
$200.00 to JANE NAKATA, graduat-
ing from Brighton High School.
CONSUL-GENERAL
VISITS DENVER
HON. TSUT0KU WADA, Consul Gen-
eral of Japan, at San Francisco,
Calif., accompanied by his wife,
was a brief visitor to Denver, on
May 20-21-22, 1964.
The Consul General called upon
Gov. John A. Love of Colorado and
Mayor Tom Currigan of Denver, as
a matter of courtesy, during his
brief visit here.
A dinner and reception by the
Japanese Association of Colorado
was bald in his honor at Fuji-En,
on Thu., May 21at..
By coincidence,, since a recep-
tion was being held at Fuji-En,
for participants of the Japanese
cooking school, officials of the
Denver-Takayama Festival comalt-
tee were presented to the Consul
General, also on Thu. evening.
DENVER, COLORADO
MAY, 1964.
GRADUATES DINNER-DANCE SCHEDULED
AT ALBANY HOTEL, SAT., JUNE I3IH
MAE KUROK1, Chairman for the 1964 Graduates' Banquet, announced
that plans have been completed for a festive occasion to honor all
AJA graduates in the Denver metropolitan area (including Brighton,
and surrounding areas) at the Albany Hotel, in Den-
ver, Colo., at 6:30 p.m., Saturday, June 13, 1964.
DAVID H. FURUKAWA, Pres, of Mlle-Hi JACL, will
SYLVIA SAKAMOTO
SYLVIA SAKAMOTO, daughter of
Rev. and Mrs. Eizo Sakamoto, of
Rocky Ford, Colo., is Valedictor-
ian of her graduating class.
She was also designated as the
"Good Citizen of the Year", for
1964, by the D.A.R. She has won
the Masonic Scholarship Award, in
each year of her high school car-
reer with a cumulative 3.96 grade
point average for four years.
be toastmaster. JEAN SATO who has
ship programs for many years in the
SIMPSON CHURCH
BRIDGE BENEFIT
SAM MATSUMOTO, Director of the
Simpson Bridge Club, reported at-
tendance of about 30 enthusiasts
at the last duplicate tournament,
held at the Simpson Church, on
Sat., May 30th.
Winners of the N-S pairs were
WILLIE HASEGAWA and JUN KOMURA;
and winners of the E-W pairs were
TOSH UBA and BOBBY FUJIOKA. Next
session will be held June 27.
19
GRADUATES
SflT-JUnE 13-1964
ftLBftnV HOTEL-DEnVER.COLO-
g.30 pm-BflnQUET
ALL GRADUATES GUESTS
rdults s&e pea mre
STUOEnTS PER. PLATE
S*oo ptn* Dance
RLL STUDEIITS MV1TED GUESTS
I9G4- SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS TROGRAm
JAPANESE MOVIES
FOR SCHOLARSHIPS
Through the generosity and co-
operation of the Japanese movie
coomittee of Tri-State Buddhist
Church, approximately $200.00 net
was realized for the Mile-Hi JACL
scholarship fund for 1964.
Two Japanese films were shown
on Sun., May 24th, at the TSBC,
and all net proceeds were donated
to the Scholarship Fund.
Appreciation was expressed to
Chairman TAKESHI HAYASHIDA, and
to TAD YAMAMOTO and KAZ SAKAMOTO,
as members of the TSBC movie com-
mittee, and to the Tri-State Bud-
dhist Church as a whole
ANNUAL MEETING
OF COORDINATING
COUNCIL, MAY 26
BERNICE FRIEDER presided over
the annual meeting of the Coordi-
nating Council for Education and
Research in Human Relations, at
the American Legion hall on Tue.,
May 26th, in Denver, Colo.
Chief focus of the meeting was
directed towards the problems of
the Spanish American group, which
constitutes the largest minority
in Denver, and in Colorado.
ROBERT TAYLOR of the YMCA was
elected new Pres, of the CCERHR,
at the annual luncheon meeting.
headed scholar-
pest will reed
the honor roll
of 1964 gradu-
ates.
MAE KUROKI
HON. ROY R.
R0MER, a State
Senator of Den-
ver, will de-
liver the prin-
cipal addreae of the evening.
SEN. ROMER haa aerved on the Le-
gislative committee on Education
Beyond High School, In Colorado.
Cathay Post and Mile-Hi JACL
Scholarship Awards including the
HARRY H. SAKATA MEMORIAL AWARD
(for the 9th year), In aggregate
total of $1,000.00, will be pre-
sented during the evening.
REV. JONATHAN FUJITA of Simp-
son Methodist Church, and REV.
NOBORU TSUNODA of the Tri-State
Buddhist Church will also be on
the program.
CARD BENEFIT FOR
SCHOLARSHIPS AT
MAYEDA'S, JUNE 6
DR. BEN MIYAHARA reported that
the card party benefit for Mile-
Hi JACL's scholarship fund will
be held at the residence of DR.
AMD MRS. TAKASHI MAYEDA, 221 Hud-
son St., in Denver, at 7:30 p.m.,
Sat., June 6th.
Besides duplicate bridge, at
$1*50 per person, there will be
other card party games. Assist-
ing in arrangements will be BEN
KUMAGAI, BUD UCH1DA, BILL KUROKI,
SAM MATSUMOTO, and others.
RACE-RELIGION
CONFAB, MAY 27
MAYOR TOM CURRIGAN of Denver
greeted the first Conference on
Race and Religion to be held in
Denver, Colo., at Temple Emanuel,
on Wed., May 27th.
DR. EUGENE DAWSON, President
of Colorado Women's College, wss
the keynote speaker.
Among signers and participants
of 'The Statement of Conscience"
were CANON RUSSELL NAKATA of St.
John's Cathedral, and REV. NOBORU
TSUNODA of the TSBC.


PAGE 2
MOUNTAIN*PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
MAY. 1964.
JAPANESE NATURALIZED
Japanese nationals naturalized
as U.S. citizens during Che month
of April, 1964, included;
MISA CLEBURN........Aurora
CH1EK0 FRANSEN. Colo. Spga
OSKI SAKAE TANIWAKI Denver
HARRY MATOBA
TO REPRESENT
JAPANESE ASSN.
Due to the illness of ARTHUR
F. TAXAMINE, President, the Japa-
nese Association of Colorado will
be represented at the 1964 Gradu-
ates' Dinner, at the Albany Hotel
on June 13, by HARRY G. MATOBA as
Vice-President of the Assn.
Above, left, is KEN OTA, re-
presentative of Japan Air Lines,
who is a frequent visitor to Den-
ver, chatting with BISHOP E1ZAN
KISHIDA of the Gedatsu Church of
America, in San Francisco.
The Colorado Japanese Associa-
tion has indicated full coopera-
tion with the Coanunity Scholar-
ship program for 1964, and hope-
fully in future years.
KENICHI SUZUKI and FUMIO TANI
have represented the Japanese As-
sociation at planning meetings of
the coimBunlty representatives in
connection with the 1964 Scholar-
ship program.
. TRAVEL
SERVICE BUREAU*
7 ZIS+ST.
rrtA3-894fe
STUDENT SAJI
HEADS FOR U.S.
JIM KANEMOTO of Longmont, re-
ported that the financial drive
by Longmont citizens to sponsor
YOICHI SAJI, a graduate of Osaka
Univ. of Foreign Studies, has now
been successfully completed, with
$1,237.00 raised.
The fund will enable SAJI to
accept a scholarship to Colorado
College in Colorado Springs, this
fall, to complete graduate study
in international relations.
DR. HARRY HUNTINGTON, a retir-
ed Methodist minister in Longmont
spearheaded the successful drive.
Be Tsukikos guest on
your flight to Japan
(torn the moment you bterd your OC-8 Jet Courier,
Tiukiko Y.mazaki observes every detail of traditional lapanese courtesy
and hospitality. She pampers you with attentive service, offers you
delicacies of the East and Westmakes you feel you are already in Japan.
Your JAl flight, whether in the Economy or First Class cabin, will be
gracious and restlul. Yet JAL flights cost no more. JAL fares are the same
as all airlines. The real difference is in jAl's superior service.
personal attention and convenient schedules.
Oaily flights leave from Los Angeles or San Francisco. Visit family or
friends in Hawaii, at no extra fare, and continue on io Japan at
your convenienceany day of the week. Connections at
Tokyo for cities throughout lapan are excellent. See
your travel agent, and fly amid the ca/m beauty
of lapan at almost the speed of sound.
UAPAN
AIR
LINES
JAPANESE COOKING
SCHOOL AT HILTON
HOTEL, MAY 220 MAY TORIZAWA, one of the three
Co-Chrmn of the Japanese cooking
school at Hilton Hotel on May 22,
reported that more than 300 per-
sons attended the two-session be-
nefit for Denver-Takayama Festi-
val being planned in Denver, on
Aug. 10-15, 1964.
CHEF JOE ISHIZAKI, of Yamato's
Sukiyaki House in San Francisco,
presented an interesting program
of unique Japanese cuisine.
All net proceeds of the Japa-
nese cooking school will be used
towards expenses of return trans-
portation for the delegation of
some 20 dancers and dignitaries
from Tekeysme, Jepen, this fell.
Above is SUZUKI OHFU, from Ja-
pan, performing at the Shigin re-
cital at the Tri-State Buddhist
Church, during April. She is an
outstanding exponent of the Ohfu
School of Shigin. (Foto by ODA.)
Above is CHET JOB ISHIZAKI, of
Sen Francisco, demonstrating his
cooking techniques. ISHIZAKI is
s nationally known Japanese chef,
and has won many awards for his
unique skills in exotic Japanese
cookery. (Photo courtesy of JAL)
DENVER-TAKAYAMA
FESTIVAL CO-CHRMN
* WILLIAM K. HOSOKAWA and WALTER
F. HEL1MICH were named as General
Co-Chrmn of the Denver-Takayama
Festival, to be staged In Denver,
Colo., on Aug. 10-15, 1964.
HOSOKAWA is an Associate Edi-
tor of The Denver Post, and can
be reached by calling 297-1359.
He resides at 14855 Echo Drive,
in Golden, Colo.
HELUfICH is a retired contrac-
tor, residing at 5301 E. Quincy
Ave., Englewood, Colo. His tele-
phone number is 755-0733.
* *
RONALD MARTIN was elected as
President of the People-to-People
Corp. of Colorado, which is the
over-all governing body supervis-
ing the Denver-Takayama coonittee
in its plans for e fall Festival.
MRS. A. T. HALEY is the Chair-
man of the Denver-Takayama Sister
City coimnittee, which will have
direct charge of the Festival.
AKE BONO
^ RESTflURflnT ^
sX\£l ^ JAPANESE SAKE AND BEER
FRED CHIVEICO ROKI (closed Mondays)
1953 IftKimETR ST. TeUKe4-i9tu
(WERRy UHWGE,
. IZ.36 JLOTh ST.
W UER A.J.H.ltAnAGEmEnT
pgnviR, COLORADO TEL. 825-9530


MAY, 1964.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A, NEWS
PAGE 3
ATOMIC BOMB SURVIVORS
Four survivors of the atomic
bomb explosions at Hiroshima and
Nagasaki, Japan, a part of a team
of 30 Japanese good will ambassa-
dors, were brief visitors in Den-
ver, on May 6-7, 1964.
DR. KIICHI KIDO was a doctor,
and KENMITSU 1WANAGA was a news-
paperman in Nagasaki, at the time
of the atom bombing.
HIROSHI OUCHI is director of a
Buddhist kindergarten, and MISS
SHIZUE MATSUBARA is now a college
teacher, and both were in Hiro-
shima at the historic first atom
bombing of a city.
Interestingly, OUCHI was form-
erly a resident of Denver, since
his father was a Buddhist priest
in Colorado, prior to the present
REV. Y. TAMAI. A reception and
dinner were held by the Hiroshima
Kenjin-Kai and Buddhist groups,
in his honor.
SAN LUIS VALLEY
MAY MIZOKAMI, Corr. Secty for
the San Luis Valley JACL, report-
ed that three AJAs graduated from
San Luis valley high schools this
year.
SUMIKO SUE OGURA of Alamosa,
Colo., was winner of the San Luis
Valley JACL's $100.00 scholarship
award. She plans to attend Colo.
State Univ. in Ft. Collins, this
fall. Presentation was made by
Pres. KAY SHIOSHITA of San Luis
Valley JACL chapter.
Other AJA graduates in the San
Luis valley were JANE KAWANABE of
Sierra Grande High in Blanca, and
GAROLD UYEDA of Alamosa High.
OMAHA NEWS
YUKIO ANDO, Membership Chrmn,
reported that Omaha JACL now has
155 members for 1964 --- an all-
time high! Congratulations!!!
MRS. CECIL ISHII was named as
Issel Story Chrmn for Omaha JACL,
to be assisted by ROY HIRABAYASHI
as interpreter.
MRS. KANAMINE gave $20.00 to
the Omaha JACL Scholarship Fund,
in memory of her late husband.
BRIGHTON
JAPANESE GOVERNORS VISIT DENVER
Ten Governors from Japan, accompanied by their wives, and led by
GOV. MIURA of Miyagi-ken, were brief visitors in Denver, Colo., dur-
ing April, 1964. GOV. JOHN A. LOVE of Colorado arranged for a wel-
coming party at Stapleton Airport, and a brief motorcade through the
City of Denver, led by State Patrolman WILL KACOHARA. Above are seen
some of the Japanese Governors in
the sight-seeing bus during the
tour of Denver. FRANK TORIZAWA
acted as tour announcer for the
group. (Photo by HOWARD ODA.)
Among those who welcomed the
Japanese Governors were BILL and
ALICE HOSOKAWA, FRANK and MAY TO-
RIZAWA, YOZAN and SADAK0 TSUBOKA-
WA, YASUKO FUJIMORI, GLADYS TANI-
WAK1, YURI NODA, HARRY G. MATOBA,
SEISHIR0 NAKAMURA, MOROKU SUYEH1-
RO, FUMXO TANI, and MIN YASUI.
GOV. JOHN A. LOVE of Colorado
personally greeted each Japanese
Governor as they disembarked from
the plane at Stapleton Airport.
The Japanese Governors were en
route to Kansas City, Mo., where
they were to be guests of Gover-
nors of Kansas and Missouri.
GOV. LOVE indicated that he is
planning to go to the Governors
Conference in Japan next year, as
the conferences are held alter-
nately in the U.S. and Japan.
State Repr. SEIJI HORIUCHI, of
Brighton, announced at the Adams
County Republican convention that
he would not seek re-election be-
cause of private business.
* MIKE TASHIRO's farm was used
as an outstanding example of new-
est agricultural techniques, by
the Agricultural Committee of the
Brighton Chamber of Coonerce.
HENRY and JACK MORIMITSU were
members of the Brighton team that
came In 7th in the nine-state re-
ttonal VFW bowling tournament, at
the Trade Winds, in Denver.
* HARRY IDA paired with Hank Neb
of Ft. Lupton to take a lead in
the Colorado Mens Bowling Tour-
nament, In Boulder, with a 1219.
We are deeply sorry to hear of
the death of NORMAN YOROOJI, 19
year old son of Mr. A Mrs. Frank
Yokoojl, by drowning on May 13th,
while avimaing in North Sterling
Reservoir. Young Yokoojl was a
student at Northeastern Jr. Col-
lege, in Sterling, Colo.
MRS. JOHN A. LOVE presented to
each Japanese Governor a bouton-
niere, and a corsage to every Ja-
panese Governor's wife, as a ges-
ture of Colorado welcome.
The Japanese Governors were on
their way from a courtesy call to
the Governor of Idaho, in Boise,
and stopped only briefly for an
hour and a half between planes in
Denver, Colo.
Japanese Books-Oriental Art Goods
3£obun- DENVER, COl ORAOO
Phone KE,Slone 4-4637
1234 Z9lh Street
DENVERS MOST COMPLETE
SELECTION OF QUALITY
JAPANESE MERCHANDISE
AT MODERATE PRICES
TOP QUALITY FUKUSUKE TABI
Sizes:
Available in Colors:
5k 12
White, Red, or Black
REGULAR STORE HOURS;
MON. thru SAT. .9:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
TUBS. EVENINGS..........until 9:00 p.m.
EUGENE SIDE and KIMIKO SIDE
Proprietors.
4609 E. COLFAX fiVE. FR 7-192,3
OEnVGR 2.0, COLO.
FOR ft DELIGHTFUL VISIT
to jflPfln comE to .
USl EM
VflKI RESTfiURflllT
930 Lincom ST.
IN THE SHERMAN PLAZA HOTEL
Tel.: 266-2170
VISIT OUR GIFT SHOP
COCKTAILS SOe From 3 to A
DINNERS from 3.00 on* up
Every TUE. & THU. at 9 PM
Authentic movies of Japan
shown in Cocktail Lounge.
"DELIGHTFULLY DIFFERENT
JAPANESE FOOD"
hours:
Tue. thru Fri.
11: 30 to 1: 00 AM
SAT. 5: 00 to 1: 30 AM
SUN. 2:00 to 10: 00 PM
CLOSED monDAVS


PAGE 4
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
MAY, 1964
MTN-PLAINS AJA NEWS
Published once a month. Mailed
by the 20th of each month.
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
MINORU YASUI
1225 - 20th Street,
D'enver 2, Colorado.
CH 4-2239 RA 2-9255
* * VC *
BUD UCHIDA. .
ROSA 0D0W . Artist
TOM MASAMORI. . .Photographer
TRUE YASUI. . .General Factotum
Not long ago I had the oppor-
tunity of seeing and hearing a
group of young Greenland Eskimos
dance and sing.
They sang both contemporary
and traditional Eskimo songs and
did a beautiful Job of it, but
what struck me was the melodic
similarity between their ancient
tunes and that of old Japanese
folks songs.
Even more striking was the fa-
cial resemblance between these
Eskimos and Japanese types, lead-
ing one to suspect in an unscien-
tific way that there must be some
comnon genetic denominator in the
long, long ago.
The Eskimos weren't particu-
larly interested In talking with
me they spoke fluent English
as well as Danish and Eskimo dia-
lects -- but they were all atwit-
ter about a San Ildefonso Indian
in our party, a young man named
Joe Thundercloud. They thought
Joe was the most romantic figure
theyd ever seen. Joe, inciden-
tally, noticed a strong similar-
ity between the beat and rhyttia
of Eskimo dances and those of the
American Indians.
*****
You may have noticed some small
efforts at architectural face-
lifting on Larimer St., the lat-
est being FRED AOKI's one-man ur-
ban renewal project on the corner
of 20th Street. FRED says the
only way to improve the appear-
ance of the area is to spend some
money, which he is doing in hopes
of attracting tenants.
*****
BOB INAI, the footloose bache-
lor who is exploring modern Japan
on a figurative shoestring, has
been taking color photos which
are sent to a processor, and then
forwarded home to Denver.
The other day a new batch ar-
rived, and GEORGE KURAMOTO, who
was on the scene, predicted there
would be at least one picture of
a shapely young woman walking the
other way. There was, indeed!
1964 AJA SCHOLARSHIP FINALISTS NAMED
Nineteen outstanding students of Japanese ancestry of this region,
who are graduating from high school in June, 1964, have been selected
by the JACL and Cathay Post screening committee to be finalists for
1964 Scholarship Awards.
Their records are impressive; 3 are Valedictorians of their gra-
duating classes; one is Student Council President; 3 are senior class
presidents; 2 have been selected DAK "Good Citizens"; all have held
class offices and have been offi- ------------------------
cers and members of various clubs
and organizations; most are mem-
bers of Honor Society; the list
is almost endless in variety and
in honors and awards von.
These fine students, all now
designated as finalists for the
JACL and Cathay Post awards are:
"ICSr OF THE YEAR
AIGAKI, Dale. .
ETO, Shirley. .
FUJITA, Toosy .
HORII, Diana. .
IDA, Robert .
KANAI, Shirley.
KAWAKAMI, Carol
KAWANABE, Jane.
KIMURA, Tom .
KISHIYAMA, Sfairle
K0SH1, Howard .
KUSUMI, Henry .
NAKATA, Jane. .
SAKAMOTO, Sylvia
SATOW, Clayton.
SHIMADA, Jeffrey
SUYAMA, Robert.
TERASAKI, Alene
WADA, Healey. .
Thornton High
North High
. Manual High
Keenesburg, Colo.
Brighton High
Washington High
. West High
Blanca, Colo.
. Manual High
. East High
. East High
. Manual High
Brighton High
. Rocky Ford
Colo. Springs
Omaha, Nebr.
. West High
. East High
Jefferson High
Only five will be winners; we
regret that all of these students
cannot be winners. Their records
Justify recognition and honor.
HON. SEIJI HORIUCHI
NOMINATED FOR JACL
DAVE FURUKAWA, Proa, of Nile-
Hi JACL, presenting the "ICSer of
the Year" award to JOAN SAKYO, of
Locke, New York, at the ICS con-
ference held at Peaceful Valley
Lodge, on Apr. 23-24-25, 1964.
JOAN SAKYO is graduating from
Colorado State College, in June,
in elementary education. She is
planning to teach in California,
this fall.
DAVE FURUKAWA was the 1st win-
ner of "ICSer of the Year" award,
when it was originally establish-
ed In 1960.

The first half of 1964 is ra-
pidly slipping by, and we seem to
be unable to accomplish all that
we should, before
going into summer
vacations.
Our membership
is down from the
normal 500 or so,
and our treasury
is beginning to
scrape bottom.
We have tried
to plan construc-
tive programs and
to carry out worthwhile activi-
ties of interest for all of our
membership, but somehow, we seem
to fail to ignite a spark of en-
thusiasm for JACL in this area.
RENEW JACL MEMBERSHIPS!!!
Regretfully, we note that our
1964 membership is less than 300,
as of date.
At one time, Mile-Hi of Colo-
rado was "Miles Ahead!!!" and led
the nation. .
If you have not renewed your
JACL membership yet, please send
in $5.00 to the JACL office, at
1225-20th St., Denver, Colo.
NATIONAL JACL CONVENTION. .
As of date, it does not seem
that Mile-Hi JACL will be repre-
sented at the National JACL Con-
vention In Detroit, Mich., during
July 1-4, 1964.
FURUKAWA
"NISEI OF BIENNIUM"
HON. SEIJI HORIUCHI, of Brigh-
ton, Colo., hailed as the first
person of Japanese ancestry to be
elected to a State Legislature in
the United States, aside from Ha-
waii where AJAs constitute 40% of
the population, was nominated by
Mile-Hi JACL es a candidate for
"Nisei of the Biennium" honors.
HORIUCHI has a distinguished
record of service with the Junior
Chamber of Commerce, serving as a
local unit President In Brighton,
then State President of the JC's
of Colorado, and finally a Nat'l
Vice-President of the U.S. Junior
Chamber of Commerce. He was win-
ner of the Distinguished Service
Award of the Jaycees, in 1954.
V06UE ART THEATRE
MOVIE BENEFIT
The Japanese movie benefit, at
The Vogue Art Theatre, during the
week of Apr. 23-29, 1964, raised
a net of $113.00 for the Mile-Hi
JACL Scholarship Fund.
LARRY TAJIRI, Drama Editor of
Denver Post, arranged the movie
benefit at the Vogue Art Theatre
for the Mile-Hi JACL.
SUYAMA NOMINATED
FOR NATIONAL JACL
SCHOLARSHIP AWARD
ROBERT SUYAMA was nominated by
Mile-Hi JACL for one of the Nat'l
JACL Scholarship Awards, and his
records were forwarded to Nat'l
JACL H.Q., in San Francisco, for
consideration.
SUYAMA is graduating from West
High School in Denver, Colo., and
ranks 8th in his senior class of
387, with a GPA of 3.69.
He is senior class president,
and has been outstanding in ROTC.
He is a Lt. Col. of the 4th Bat-
talion, and has won the Masonic
Officers' Achievement Award, ROTC
Reserve Officers Assn Award, the
Chicago Tribune Gold Award, Den-
ver Post Cadet Citizenship Award,
and twice the Superior Junior Ca-
det Award in 1962 and in 1963.
ALL PHOTOS, unless otherwise
credited, in The Mtn-Plains AJA
News, taken by TOM T. MASAM0R1,
2010 Lamar St., Denver 15, Colo.
Tel.: BE 7-3041
The chapter partially subsi-
dizes attendance at the National
JACL Convention, with an alloca-
tion of $75.00.
If any Mile-Hi JACL member is
interested in going to Detroit as
a delegate for our chapter please
contact me as soon as possible.
GRADUATES' DINNER-DANCE. .
The one bright spot in Mile-Hi
JACL activities is the finalizing
of the program for the Graduates*
Dinner-Dance at the Albany Hotel,
on Sat., June 13th.
PLAN NOW TO ATTEND!! Your
presence will honor our AJA gra-
duates of 1964!
Tickets are $5.00 per plate.
Call MAE KUROKI, at 355-3461, for
reservations, right away!!!
MTN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
SUBSCRIPTION RATER;
Regular: $3.00 for % yr ( 5 mo.)
$5.00 for 1 yr (10 mo.)
Special Mile-Hi JACL members ONLY
$2.50 for % yr ( 5 mo.)
$3.50 for 1 yr (10 mo.)


MAY,1964.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 5.
All of the talk now-a-days la
about graduation and scholarships
for our graduating seniors. Some
top awards already won by AJAs in
the Denver area include:
TOMMY FUJXTA Manual High
University of Denver Scholarship
TOM T. KIMURA. Manual High
$500.00 Denver Civitan Club Award
$300.00 C.U. Scholarship and Loan
SHIRLEY KISHIYAMA. East High
4-yr $1300 annual renewable scho-
larship to Knox College, Illinois
HENRY KUSUMI Manual High
$300.00 Kiwanis Key Club Award
HAROLD MUROYA. Mapleton High
$250.00 Mapleton Education Assn.
No doubt there will be many, many
more before all of the results in
the Denver area are announced be-
cause the Sansei are compiling a
good record in high schools!
HENRY KUSUMI is Valedictorian
at Manual High School, and was a
winner of the Denver Federation
of Teachers 7th annual Scholastic
Achievements Award honor, at the
Hilton Hotel, on Apr. 30th.
e NORMA MURATA, a 9th grader at
North Jr. Hi in Brighton, reigned
as the May Day Queen. She is the
daughter of the OSCAR MURATAs.
0 IRIS NAKATA of Ft. Lupton was
named delegate to Colorado Girls'
State to be held at the Colorado
Women's College campus in Denver,
this sunmter.
AJAs are scarce in the south-
ern part of town, but our YASUI
cousins in Washington Park area
are getting prominent too. .
0 Cousin IRIS YASUI was chosen a
"Pom-Pom" Girl at South High, and
was one of three junior girls so
selected,
And, cousin LAUREL YASUI was
elected President of Big Sisters
at Byers Junior High.
ROTC AWARDS:
Among the more than 100 medals
and awards presented at the bri-
gade review, at Washington Park,
in Denver, on May 22nd, were the
following:
Selected as outstanding ROTC
cadets of their respective high
schools, and winning The Denver
Post's Cadet Citizenship Awards,
for character, military achieve-
ments, and leadership abilities,
were:
TOM KIMURA of Manual High, a
Cadet Lt. Col. of the 5th Bat-
talion at Manual High School;
ROBERT SUYAMA of West, also a
Cadet Lt. Col. of the 4th Bat-
talion at West High School.
Other winners at the brigade re-
view included:
# Cadet Major GARY TSUTSUI, of
Manual High School.
Winning Superior Jr. Cadet rib-
bons and certificates were:
LAURENCE KISHIYAMA, at Manual;
RONALD IWAGOSHI, at East High.
The Distinguished Cadet Medal was
presented to:
+ RONALD IWAGOSHI, of East High.
The Reserve Officers' Association
Medal was won by:
RANDOLPH KITANO of North High.
The Chicago Tribune Medals were
won by.
GARY TSUTSUI, of Manual High;
STEVE SUZUKI of East High, who
also won Individual Drill Trophy
for first year cadets.
Up at Boulder, Colo., at the Uni-
versity of Colorado, winner of a
Chicago Tribune Gold Medal was:
DOUGLAS M. HASHII of 2750 Cur-
tis St., Denver, Colorado.
Tom's Auto Shop
EXPERT PAINT & BODY WORK
1028 23rd Street,
Denver 5, Colorado.
TOM IOKA, Prop. Tel. 534-1908
GEORGE FUJIMOTO
CAPITOL MORTUARY
1331 SHERMAN TA 5-0151
Personal Attention
to Every Detail
JOYCE MURATA, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Lee Murata of Ft. Lup-
ton, Colo., was named winner of a
4-year Gates Scholarship, to at-
tend any college of her choice.
JOYCE planned to enroll at the
Colorado State University, at Ft.
Collins, this fall, where she la
planning to major in biology.
NATIONAL JACL
SCHOLARSHIPS
Competing for Nat'l JACL Scho-
larships, ranging from $200-$300,
will be at least 3 AJA students
from the Mtn-Plains JACL region:
Arkansas Valley JACL nominated
SYLVIA SAKAMOTO of Rocky Ford, as
top scholar and Valedictorian of
her graduating class.
Mile-Hi JACL proudly nominated
ROBERT SUYAMA of West High School
in Denver, Colo., as its candi-
date for national honors. (Last
year, JAMES SUEKAMA of West High
was a Nat'l JACL Scholarship win-
ner of a $200.00 grant.)
Omaha JACL advanced the candi-
dacy of JEFFREY SHIMADA, an out-
standing student leader at Ben-
son High School, in Omaha, Nebr.
CALENDAR
Of Coming Events
June 6: (Sat) SCHOLARSHIP CARD PARTY, Residence of DR. & MRS. T. MAYEDA, 221 Hudson, 7:30 p.m.; Mile-Hi JACL
June 12- June 14: (F-S) Y.B.L. MOUNTAIN RETREAT Estes Park conference camp; Henry Tobo, Pres.
June 13: (Sat) GRADUATES' DINNER-DANCE at Albany Hotel; Dinner at 6:30 p.m.; Dance at 9:00 p.m. until midnite
June 27: (Sat) SIMPSON BRIDGE CLUBS monthly duplicate tour- nament, from 8:00 p.m.
July 1- July 4: NAT'L JACL CONVENTION at Sheraton Cadillac, in Detroit, Michigan.
Y.B.L. MOUNTAIN
RETREAT, JUNE 13
HENRY TOBO, Pres, of the Tri-
State Young Buddhists League, an-
nounced that the three-day Moun-
tain Retreat of the Y.B.L. will
be held at Estes Park conference
camp, on June 12-13-14, 1964.
In order to cooperate in the
honoring of AJA graduates of this
area, REV. N. TSUN0DA and other
YBL officials will return to Den-
ver on Sat. night, June 13th, to
participate in the community Gra-
duates' Dinner-Dance, and bring
all YBL high school graduates in-
to Denver with them.
PHOTOGRAPH 5
2010 LAItlAR ST.
DEnvtft 15, Colo.
ke7*304t
MIKE TflSU WO 'PtfOP. TEL. 6S9-9984-
WEST 80TH AVENUE at SHERIDAN BOULEVARD WESTMINSTER, COLORADO.
P. 0. BOX 1501, DENVER 1, COLORADO.
HENRY IMADA, President. Tel.* HA 9-3537


PAGE 6.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
MAY 196/.
FINAL BASKETBALL SEASON RESULTS
ROCKY MTN AAU JUDO CHAMPIONSHIPS
Denver School of Judo continued to dominate the judo scene in the
Rocky Mountain region, winning all but four places of a possible 18
in the AAU Open Judo Championships on Apr. 12, 1964. (See picture at
right. )
In the Rocky Mountain AAU 5-Men Judo Team competitions on Apr. 26,
1964, teams from the Denver School of Judo swept the meet, yielding
only third place in the Intermediate Division and third place in the
Senior Division. Denver School
of Judo swept the Junior Division
clean with wins for 1st, 2nd, and
3rd places.
Eight judo clubs competed in
the team matches, on April 26th,
and were as follows:
FLOYD ITO, retiring Pres. , of the Denver Nisei Basketball League,
tabulated the final results of the basketball season for the seven
team:, of the League, as follows:
GAMES GAMES POINTS POINTS
RANK: NAMES OF TEAMS WON LOST: PERCENT FOR: AGAINST
1. SAKURA-EN RESTAURANT 11 1 .917 626 307
2. FUJI-EN RESTAURANT 11 1 .917 548 316
3. SIMPSON CHURCH 7 5 .583 385 418
4. PLAYBOYS 6 6 .500 420 479
5. BUSSEI TEAM #1 4 8 .333 390 475
6. GEORGE'S CONOCO 3 9 .250 381 418
7. BUSSEI TEAM #2 0 12 .000 211 648
Retiring Pres. FLOYD ITO noted
that the season ended in tie for
the Championship between SAKURA-
EN and FUJI-EN, but on the basis
of points scored, the statistical
edge was given to SAKURA-EN.
Amid of Denver
Craig Judo Club
CSU Judo Club
CU Judo Club
Denver School
Imperial Judo
Lowry A.F.B.
USAF Academy
Team match results, Apr. 26th,
were as follows:
JUNIOR DIVISION (12 and under):
1964 ALL-STARS
In our April issue, we errone-
ously listed KEN TAGAWA, of the
Sakura-En team, as one of the All
Star selections, in the place of
TOM KIMURA of Bussei #1 team. We
apologize for our error, and re-
list the All-Star selections, as
follows:
RONNIE FOX.
TOM KIMURA.
REGGIE LEE.
KEN NAMBA .
WALT SAGARA
RON YAMAMOTO
. Simpson
Bussei #1
. Fuji-En
Sakura-En
Sakura-En
. Fuji-En
1st Denver School of Judo A
2nd Denver School of Judo
3rd Denver School of Judo CM
INTERMEDIATE DIVISION (13-16 yrs)
1st Denver School of Judo "A"
2nd Denver School of Judo TJ"
3rd Amid of Denver, Team "A"
SENIOR DIVISION (17 and older)
1st : Denver School of Judo "A"
2nd: Denver School of Judo
3rd: Univ. of Colo. Judo Club.
Captains for the "A" teams for
the Denver School of Judo were as
follows:
ERIC MATOBA...........Juniors
SHUNY SUGIURA. Intermediates
ROGER STEVENS.........Seniors
(Members making up the A" teams
listed in Col. 3, of this psge.)
ABOVE are the 1964 Rocky Mountain AAU Open Judo Champions, as of
Apr. 12, 1964. Standing at left *re GEORGE KURAMOTO and FRED OKIMOTO
while in center, dressed in mufti, is JAMES SAKABE; at extreme right
is TOORU TAKAMATSU, who served as Tournament Director.
Champions are kneeling in front row, and are, from left to right
135 lb. GEORGE TAGAWA; 150 lb. JOSEPH MILEY; 165 lb. FRED YAMASHITA;
180 lb. KUNI SHIBA; 200 lb. ROGER
STEVENS; and unlimited,LEROY ABE.
In second row, kneeling, are
the runners-up: 135 lb. MARK YA-
MASAKI; 150 lb. TOM TABUCHI; 165
lb. WAYNE FUSHIMI; 180 lb. BERND
BUSCH; 200 lb. JACK OLIVER; and
unlimited JOHN STOCKWELL.
In third row, standing, in 3rd
place are: 135 lb. SHUNY SUGIURA;
150 lb. DICK OKIMOTO; 165 lb. LOU
HANAVAN; 180 lb. KENNY KIN0SHITA;
200 lb. TED MATSUO; and unlimited
BERKELEY PENS.
Except for the Junior Olympic
tournament in Colorado Springs on
June 21st, the tournament season
Because of a tie in the voting
instead of five, a total of six
players were awarded All-Star de-
signation for the 1964 season.
LEAGUE OFFICERS
New officers of the Denver Ni-
sei Basketball League, to carry
on basketball competition, next
year, are:
President.........KEN TAGAWA
Vice-Pres.........KEN NAMBA
Treasurer.......KEN OKAZAKI
The next Nisei Basketball sea-
son will resume during Feb. 1965,
at Manual High School gymnasium.
LEADING SCORERS
High scorers in the Denver Ni-
sei basketball league are tabu-
lated below by FLOYD ITO. Rank-
ings reflect the number of games
played by each person listed be-
low:
LEROY ABE, at right, over-all
champion of the Rocky Mountain
AAU Open Judo Tournament, held in
Apr., 1964, receiving trophy from
TOORU TAKAMATSU, at left, Tourna-
ment Director for Denver School
of Judo, in Denver, Colorado.
ABOVE Is an action shot of the
dazzling judo throw being execut-
ed by TOMMY TABUCHI, in the 150
lb. weight class. (All judo pic-
tures taken by HOWARD N. ODA.)
DENVER SCHOOL OF JUDO
On May 10th, the Denver School
of Judo journeyed to Ft. Collins
to participate in a competition
with the Colo. State Univ. Judo
Club, and to stage demonstrations
of judo techniques.
On May 30th the Denver School
of Judo leaves for an invitation-
al tournament with the Craig Judo
Club, in Craig, Colo. Approxi-
mately 50 judoists and fans will
be making the 2-day trip.
completed for the summer. PLAYERS: TEAM PTS AVG.
JUDO CHAMPIONS KEN NAMBA Sakura-En 188 15.7
TOM KIMURA Bussei #1 146 12.2
Members of the judo champion- FLOYD ITO Fuji-En 126 12.6
ship "A teams for Denver School REGGIE LEE Fuji-En 117 10.6
of Judo, which made a clean sweep RONNIE FOX Simpson 100 8.3
of the Rocky Mtn AAU 5-Men Judo RON YAMAMOTO Fuji-En 97 9.7
Team Championships, Apr. 25, were DAVE TAGAWA Playboys 90 9.0
as follows: WALT SAGARA Sakura-En 86 7.2
TED MATSUO Sakura-En 79 7.2
JUNIORS "AT TEAM: WM KAWAMURA Sakura-En 77 7.0
ERIC MATOBA . . Captain GENE TOCHIHARA Conoco 72 6.0
LARRY UMETANI Conoco 69 6.3
MAC CAMPBELL MIKE FUKUHARA RICHARD J0K0 Simpson 68 7.6
LEROY ENOMOTO KEN SUGIURA KEN TAGAWA Sakura-En 67 6.1
STEVE ANDO Bussei #1 66 5.5
SHUNY SUGIURA
WAYNE FUSHIMI
DICKIE OKIMOTO
. Captain
MARK YAMASAKI
PERRY YAMASHITA
SENIORS "A" TEAM:
ROGER STEVENS Captain
LEROY ABE
JACK OLIVER
BERKELEY PENS
KUNI SHIBA
CUSTOM PHOTO FINISHING
711 ZVfclT.
Denver s, coio.
Telephone: CH 4-4073


MAY, 1966.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 7
ANNUAL BOWLING AWARDS PRESENTED
More chan 200 bovlers, sponsors and guests, of Che Colorado Nisei
Men's Classics, Che CelebriCy Nisei Men's League, and Che Denver Ni-
sei Women's League, gathered at Che Tiffin Inn, in Denver, on Sat.,
May 16, for a wind-up of the sea-
son, and presentations of awards
end trophies.
ABOVE is PAUL LEGG, Manager of
Celebrity Lanes, presenting award
to SHUN NAKAYAMA for his scratch
high series of 709.
BEN YANAGA officiated as the
Master of Ceremonies. The retir-
ing Presidents of each League, as
their last official action, came
forward to make the presentations
and were: SADAMI KURODA of the
Women's League; SHUN NAKAYAMA of
the Celebrity Nisei League; and
SAM INA1 (re-elected) of Colorado
Nisei Men's Classics.
MENS CLASSICS
ELITE FLOWERS' team, captained
by HOOTCH OKUMURA, with team mem-
bers YOSH FURUIYE, GEORGE OTSUKI,
and NORM GOTO won the Nisei Clas-
sic championship, among 12 teams.
TOM HIRAOKA, of Lotus Room, had a
703 high series in the Classics.
KEN MATSUDA
New officers of the Colorado
Nisei Men's Classics are:
KEN MATSUDA and GEO. MCDONALD, PRESIDENT................SAM INA1
who won the Western U.S. Doubles Vice-Pres..............GEORGE GOTO
with a blazing 2565 6-game series secretary...........NISH NISHIKAWA
placed 8th in Nat'l Doubles Fi- Treasurer...............KIYO YOKQOJI
nala in St. Louis, Mo., May 23rd. Sgt-at-Arms.............ART AR1TA
The championship GART BROTHERS' SPORTS SHOP team, winner# of the
Celebrity Nisei Bowling League, was captained by GEORGE NAGAI, at the
extreme left. Other members of the team from left are TAK YAMASAKI,
CELEBRITY LEAGUE
New officers of the Celebrity
Nisei League are as follows:
PRESIDENT..........BEEP NORRISH
Vice-Pres...........TOM HIKIDA
Secretary.......NISH NISHIKAWA
Treasurer............BOB NOGUCHI
Sgt-at-Arms.........BUD STARK
Publicity...........JOHN NOGUCHI
REftL ESTATE. inSURAnCf
minuAL runps -
512.2- CHASE ST. HA 2-1511
Tel. 266-2170
D COVER. 12,COLO.
BEAVER ASANO, and in center hold-
ing the team trophy, is M0RT GART
one of the sponsors, with DAVID
FURUKAWA and KEN NAMBA, at right.
The lady at the table is ANNE
BAIRD, Exec. Secty of WBIC, with
her husband. (Bowling pictures
on this page by TOM T. MASAMOR1.)
INTERNATIONAL
FINEST SPORTS EQUIPMENT
Happy Canyon Shopping Center,
5042 E. Hampden Avenue,
Denver 22, Colorado.
ST0ME TANITA, Mgr. Tel. 756-9411

Z 30/
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cnTaoc]
Russell stov
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R c n d y
BELLEVIEW BOWL TEAM, champions of the Nisei Women's Bowling League
for the 1963-1964 season, which just ended, are pictured above. The
team members are, from left to right: TAKI HAYASHIDA, DOROTHY FUJINO,
HELEN GOTO, and SACHI NAGATA. Runners-up for team championships were
NISEI WOMEN'S
HITS NAKAGAWA won high series
with a 701, and holds high aver-
age with 170, and was 2nd in high
scratch game with a 223.
JEAN SATO won a trophy for the
high scratch game with 233, and
DEE HANES was moat improved bowl-
er with improvement of 14 pins.
New officers for Denver Nisei
Women's Bowling League are:
PRESIDENT..........JEAN MATSUDA
Vice-Pres........DOROTHY FUJINO
Secretary........MARY MASUNAGA
Treasurer............MARGE OTA
Representative SADAMI KURODA
The Tolve Liquours team, followed
by Lehrer's Flowers in 3rd place,
and Lotus Room in 4th place.
Other teams in Women's League,
and order of finish were Pioneer
Office Supply, Pioneer Food Mar-
ket, Strike & Spare Shop, and the
Boys' Store.
LAKEU00P
V\C<* ETHEL VftWASC
RICE
AVfll LQ Rl F QT
pacific mERCAnmE comPArw
194-4 LfiRimeR ST.
TEL: KE 4-4031 DEPVER, COLOR RDO


PAGE 8.
I.C.S. ELECTS
1964-65 COUNCIL
KEN TAGAWA (CU) of Denver was
named Chairman of Che coordinat-
ing council of the InCennounCaln
Collegiate Students at their 19th
annual conference held at Peace-
ful Valley Lodge, on Apr. 24-25-
26, 1964.
Members and representatives on
the coordinating council, in ad-
dition to Chrmn KEN TAGAWA are;
CAROLE UYEMURA. ... CSC
RONALD MURATA CSU
LINDA NAKAMURA. ... CSU
DONNA UYEMURA .... CU
JANET IDA.............CU
The ICS will assist the Mile-
Hi JACL in sponsoring the Gradu-
ates' Dinner-Dance on June 13th,
at Albany Hotel, in Denver, Colo.
In cooperation with the Mile-
Hi JACL, the I.C.S. cordially in-
vite all high school seniors, and
all AJA collegians, to attend the
Graduates' Dance as guests of the
Mile-Hi JACL and the I.C.S.
DANNY MASAKI, Pres, of Inter-
mountaln Collegiate Students, ad-
dressing the ICS conference dur-
ing April. He is graduating from
CU as an electrical engineer, and
is from Hawaii.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS_A.J,A. NEWS
ABOVE Is part of the head table at the I.C.S. conference banquet,
at Peaceful Valley Lodge, during April, with BOB WATADA, C.U., toast-
master, standing, in center. Approximately 50 students from univer-
sities and colleges in Colorado attended the 19th student conference.
Others, from left, include MIN
YASUI, advisor to ICS since 1946;
JACK MAYEDA, Nat'l JACL Adminis-
trative Asst, from San Francisco;
and, at right, DAVID H. FURUKAWA,
President of Mile-Hi JACL. (All
I.C.S. photos by TOM T. MASAMORI)
FALL PROGRAM
BEING PLANNED
KEN TAGAWA, new Chrmn of ICS,
indicated that fall programs for
AJA collegians will be formulated
during the summer this year.
I.C.S. SPONSORS
GRADUATES' DANCE
KEN TAGAWA, Chrmn of ICS, an-
nounced that all AJA high school
students and AJA collegians will
be guests, without charge, at the
Graduates' Dance at Albany Hotel,
on Sat., June 13th.
TAGAWA reported that CU's "The
Jaguars", specializing in popular
music for young people, will play
for the Graduates' Dance.
______________________MAY, 1964.
AJA COLLEGIONS
PHILIP H. OGATA of Denver, was
initiated Into Phi Beta Kappa, at
C.U., on May 24, 1964.
EVERETT WATADA, of Ft. Upton,
earned a diploma in agriculture
from Northeastern Junior College,
in Sterling, Colo.
DICK SATO of Denver, Colorado,
and TIM HIRABAYASHI of Bethesda,
Mr., were winners of the Tipton
& Associates' Engineering Awards,
at C.U.
All AJAs, who plan to attend
college this fall, are urged to
contact KEN TAGAWA, 728-28th St.,
Denver, Colorado. 80205.
Students (non-graduates), who
wish to attend the dinner also at
6:30 p.m., may make reservations
at $3.50 per plate. ALL GRADUAT-
ING AJAs ARE INVITED AS GUESTS.
JACK M. MAYEDA, Administrative
Assistant at National JACL H.Q.,
in San Francisco, Calif., was the
principal speaker at the 19th an-
nual ICS conference in Colorado.
nua
an-
BANQUET SCENE at Peaceful Valley Lodge, on Apr. 25th, of the Intermountain Collegiate Students' 19th .
f d e!rence Approximately 50 collegians from various campuses in Colorado gathered for a week-end of
n an re axat on, as well as for serious consideration of contemporary problems facing the youth of today


ENGINEER. .
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 9.
HAY. 1964.
NANCY NITTA, Pres, of the P-TA
at Columbine School, attended the
3-day state convention of PTA, at
the CSU campus, in Ft. Collins,
during April.
* FLORENCE OZAXI, and daughter
DEBORAH, were participants in the
St. John's Lutheran Church pro-
cessional depicting overseas mis-
sions of the Church.
TEEN-AGERS:
* GENE TAKAMINE of East High won
6th place in the Colorado State
high school gymnastics champion-
ships, in all-around events.
* TOM T. KIMURA, of Manual High,
was given honorable mention, as a
pitcher on Denver Post's Baseball
All-Star selections for 1964.
GARY OKIZAKI, teen-age son of
John and June Okizakl, is drummer
for the ever-increasingly popular
"ARISTOCRATS" combo, which is now
playing at the Teen-Age Club, at
1028 So. Gaylord St., and has al-
so performed at Elitch Gardens.
VACATION-BOUND:
The TERNO ODOW's, family and
all, are planning a camping trip
to Yellowstone Nat'l Park, during
June.
SICK-CALL:
TODD OKITA recently underwent
an emergency appendectomy, but is
now recovering satisfactorily at
home.
YURI SANDA is still suffering
from a whiplash Injury, as a re-
sult of an accident about a month
ago. but at least is out of a
neck harness now. .
* CARL AMANO is slowly recuper-
ating from his ski accident, but
is still on crutches. Ue hear he
will be back to work soon.
* We're glad to learn that MIKO
KAWANO will be home soon, after a
prolonged stay at Mercy Hospital.
Y0SHI0 NAGO, 1118 Marion St.,
Denver, Colo., was certified as a
professional engineer by Colorado
State Board of Registrations, on
May 13, 1964.
ARCHITECT. .
CLIFFORD NAKATA, formerly from
Klngsburg, Calif., is now a prac-
ticing architect with the firm of
Higginbotham & Miur, 206 E. Pikes
Peak Ave., in Colorado Springs.
He worked on plans for the Japan
Trade Center in S.F., before com-
ing to Colorado.
MOVES GARAGE. .
GEORGE HADA, who operated the
Hada Automotive, for many years
at 20th & Broadway, has moved to
2301 Lawrence St., in Denver.
Above delegation called upon
Mayor Thomas G. Currigan's office
during April, in connection with
the proposed Denver-Takayama Fes-
tival to be held in Denver during
Aug. 10-16, 1964.
RY0HEI ISHIKAWA of Japan (2nd
from right) conveyed a personal
letter from the Mayor of Takayama
to the Mayor of Denver, being re-
ceived by BILLY McNICHOLS (at ex-
treme right) as deputy mayor, in
the absence of Mayor Currigan.
Others, above, from left are:
REV. N0B0RU TSUN0DA of the TSBC;
T. TSUB0KAWA of Rocky Jiho; MAX
SPEARS, V.Pres. of United Nations
Ins. Co.; and TAD YAMAMOTO of the
B. J. Leonard Investment Co.
HAMILTON FUNDS, INC
777 GRANT
DENVCA 9. CQI.ORAOO
Bus P-OMS B2S 7077 Res P>.NE 433-1222
REPRESENTED BY
MOLLY A. MCOOVERM
Unit Mgr.

12,34. 2.0th St.
JAPAnCSC CHIflESE CWIERlCfln FOOD
JBPHnese ShKE available-
Hours: 11.a.m. to 9 p.m. *TP I fl2C-Qt^fl (CLOSED ON TUESDAYS) ICL. &9 3U
e ABOVE before the shrine of the
Tri-State Buddhist Church in Den-
ver, are, on left side: REV. Y.
TAMAI and REV. N. TSUN0DA; and on
right side, HIR0SUKE ISHIKAWA and
his son, RYOHEI ISHIKAWA.
H, ISHIKAWA is a prominent in-
dustrialist and philanthropist in
Japan, and recently was named as
Chairman of the Board of United
Nations Ins. Co. of Denver, Colo.
He is donor and creator of Ryozen
Kannon Memorial in Kyoto, Japan,
dedicated in memory of war dead
of World War 11 in the Pacific.
WEDDINGS
LYNN TAKAHASHI, of 10840 Mil-
dred Drive, Denver 34, Colo., and
DAVID L. BENJAMIN, of 10681 Blue
Jay Lane, Adams County, were re-
cently wed.
JUDY SA1T0 and KENJI FUKUHARA
were married by Judge Philip Gil-
liam, on May 13, 1964, in Denver,
Colo. The new Mrs. Judy Fukuhara
is a graduating senior at C.U.
EMIKO NAKASUGI, niece of Mr. &
Mrs. M. Nakasugl, to CHARLES MOON
on Sun., May 31st, at the Denver
South 7th Day Adventist Church.
BIRTHS
RAY T. ETO...............a BOY
2807 Champa St., Denver
TED K. 0GASAWARA.........a BOY
722 26th St., Denver
MIKE M. SAKURAI..........a GIRL
3562 S. Marlon, Englewood
CHAS. T. SUZUKI..........a GIRL
4148 Fillmore St., Denver
FLOYD H. TANAKA..........a BOY
3320 Albion St., Denver
OBITUARIES
ZENJIR0 NISHIMURA, of 2461 Champa
St., Denver, Colo. Husband of
Yesa Nishimura. Father of Geo.
Nishimura, Englewood, Colo, and
John Nishimura, Gardena, Calif.
Daughters, Toshiye Kanamine of
Inglewood, Calif., and Misuye
Mayawaki, Garden Grove, Calif.
14 grandchildren, and 7 great-
grandchildren.
HATSUYO OGATA, of 2434 Bryant St,
Denver, Colo. Mother of Morio
Ogata and Mrs. Mae Kawaji, both
of Denver; 4 grandchildren.
2815 DOWNING ST
DENVER 5, COLORADO
TEL.
BILL KUROKI, MGR. 244-6066
PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS LISTINGS
AWmtStM*
mr/m J. HOWARD McCarthy, 725 St. Paul Brown 6 Bigelow AL 5-2075
JOHN CHIKUMA, DDS Brighton Mwrat
75 So. 4th St. 659-1825 TOSHIO ANDO 1942 Larimer St. AC 2-5315
MASA GIMA, DDS
1404 E. 18th Ave. AL 5-6822 MINORU YASUI 1225 20th St. CH 4-2239
MICHAEL T. HORI, DDS
4101 E. Wesley Ave. SK 6-0924 opTommisrs MAS KANDA, O.D.
T. ITO, DDS ISIS W. 48th Ave. GE 3-4221
830 18th Street KE 4-8680
2838 Federal Blvd. GL 5-0741 BEN MAT0BA, O.D. 1959 Larimer St. KE 4-1941
Y. ITO, DDS
SUEO ITO, DDS MISA0 MATOBA, O.D. Ft. Lupton
SETS ITO, DDS Burt Building UL 7-6550
1477 Pennsylvania CH 4-6589 PHYSiCIAMS
ROJI KANAI, DDS Wheatrldge CHAS. FUJISAKI, M.D. Brighton
4310 Harlan St. HA 2-5817 40 No. Main St. 659-0783
TONY KAWANO, DDS T. K. KOBAYASHI, M.D.
1750 Hunboldt St. KE 4-3084 DICK D. M0MII, M.D. ALBERT NODA, M.D.
ROBERT MAYEDA, DDS 1227 27th Street 4-3104
Interstate Trust Bldg. TA 5-6961 HOWARD SUENAGA, M.D.
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS 830 18th Street AC 2-1314
Interstate Trust Bldg. TA 5-6961 M. GB0. TAKEN0, M.D.
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS Medical Arts Bldg.,
Interstate Trust Bldg. TA 5-7498 1955 Pennsylvania St. TA 5-0783
KEN UYEHARA, DDS Brighton AYAKO WADA, M.D.
40 No. Main Street 659-3062 810 23rd Street TA 5-2565
JACK YAMAMOTO, DDS Lakewood MAHITO UBA, D.0.
10005 W. 17th Place 238-3331 1230 21st Street MA 3-3743


IXk IP.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
MAY. 1964,
NEW OFFICIALS OF CATHAY POST #185 being sworn into office, by MIN
YASUI at extrene right. Cathay Post officers from left to right are:
BEN MURAKAMI, Finance Officer; JOE SAKATO, Adjutant; ED CROWELL, Sgt-
at-Arna; EDDIE OSUKI, Jr. Vice-Commander; JUN OYA, Sr. Vice-Commander
and TOSH OTA, the nev 1964-1965
CATHAY POST
MONTE CARLO
BEN YANAGA and MIN MATSUNAGA
were Co-Chairmen of Cathay Post's
"Monte Carlo" fun nights, on May
22-23, at the Cathay Post.
Funds realized from the affair
were ear-narked for the Scholar-
ship awards (with an annual grant
of $200.00), for the Boys' State
program, to send delegates to the
Legion convention, and for other
general welfare purposes of the
Post.
Cathay Post members expressed
thanks to the community for their
support of comnunity projects.
Commander. Post Historian TOM T.
MASAMORI took the above picture.
The first function of the new
cabinet of Cathay Post #185 will
be participation in the Memorial
Day parade in downtown Denver and
the memorial service at Fairmount
Cemetery at 12: 00 noon, May 30th.
Covunity support and attendance
were requested for these events.
CATHAY POST
SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
Cathay Post #185 will award a
total of $450.00 in scholarship
grants, at the Albany Hotel, in
Denver, on June 13, 1964.
$250.00 will be awarded as the
Nisei War Memorial, in memory of
AJAs who died during World War II
and during the Korean conflict.
$200.00 will be presented as a
Cathay Post #195 Scholarship, and
is a local contribution by Cathay
Post legionnaires.

'LOWERS
sio vn
deavep. z, coio.
L/ftnAR.1 CH4-3S4G
SPOnSORED
I no OUR WAR DEAD
FfllRmoUfTT CEItlETERV
ITIAV 30,1964^
ftTHflv tosi*I8S amcRicAn legioh
Above, AL MIYAGISHDtA present-
ing engraved Plaques of Apprecia-
tion from the Cathay Post #185 to
JOHN T. NOGUCHI, in center, and
to Y0SHIAKI ARAI, at right,
their leadership and devotion
Co-Chairmen of the 1963 Nisei War
Memorial drive.
for
as
CONTRIBUTION FROM
GIBRALTAR SAVINGS
TOM T. MASAMORI, Chrmn of the
Nisei War Memorial scholarship,
reported Chat Gibraltar Savings &
Loan Assn has donated $50.00 to
the 1964 Scholarship. The 1964
award will be $250.00 this year.
SAMUEL KUMAGAI, one of the of-
ficers of Gibraltar Savings and
Loan Assn, was helpful in arrang-
ing the grant.
Memorial Day services for the Japanese American community in the
metropolitan Denver area was washed out because of rain, on May 30th.
Ceremonies had been scheduled at the Nisei War Memorial monument, at
Fairmount cemetery by Cathay Post #185, American Legion, in memory of
AJA war dead of World War II and
of the Korean conflict, but had
to be cancelled because of rain.
SAM Y. MATSUMOTO
NEW YORK LIFE INS. CO.
RT. 1. BOX I96A
HENDERSON, COLO AT.8-2536
Y0SH ARAI had been designated
Gen. Chrmn, and the Cathay Post
Legionnaires were to have assem-
bled under the direction of TOSH
OTA, Comnander. MRS. SAKIN0 SHI-
BATA of Denver was to have repre-
sented the Gold Star families of
this region.
NEwCmnn Cafe
732 E. COLFAX AV6.
TEL. 53+-0t FAMOUS FOR CHMESE 1MSMES
VISIT "Hit. V/UUjtHl DjMC''
M ARiTIRCY
2700 LARIIT1ER ST.
A L 5- 482,5
SPECIALIZING IN ORIENTAL FOODS AND GOODS
I94G LARimER ST. KE 4-G03I
SPECIAL MANJU SHIPPED FROM WEST COAST
$1.85 box of 15 $2.35 box of 21
Store Hours: Open daily;
Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, & Sat. . 8:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.
Special Sunday hours. .... 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.
v dining Room
SJuUpta U? A
201 5 m A RKET ST. KE4-4008
Return Postage Guaranteed:
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA NEWS,
1225 20th Street,
Denver 2, Colorado
(RETURN REQUESTED)
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U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
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Permit #1033.