Citation
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 5, Number 10

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Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 5, Number 10
Series Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
31

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
VOL. V, No. 10.
DENVER. COLORADO
SUMMER. 1964
COLO. JAPAN SOCIETY
INITIATES FUND FOR
JAPANESE GARDENS
TAD T. YAMAMOTO, acting Pres,
of The Japan Society of Colorado,
announced that the Japan Society
will contribute $500.00 to estab-
lish a continuing fund to develop
an authentic Japanese garden at
the Denver Botanic Gardens.
Japan Society officials dis-
cussed the setting up of a trust
fund with LAWRENCE A. LONG, Pres,
of the Botanic Gardens, in order
to carry out the plans developed
by the late STANLEY K. YOSHIMURA.
Original discussions concern-
ing a Japanese garden were initi-
ated by the Japanese Association
of Colorado, in 1960.
Recently, Denver-Takayama com-
mittee thru MIRIAM HALEY as Chrmn
and MAY TORIZAWA as liaison, re-
vived interest in these proposals
and the installation of a stone
lantern from Takayama, Japan, on
Aug. 13th, will mark a new start
on this community project.
TANAHASHI EXHIBIT
AUG. 10-29, 1964
KAZUAKl TANAHASHI, famed Japa-
nese painter and artist, is stag-
ing a show of his art work for a
two-weeks exhibit at The Gallery,
314 Detroit St., in Cherry Creek
Center, Aug. 10-29, 1964.
TANAHASHI is director of The
International Sho-Do Art Associa-
tion, and author of many "haiku"
poems. This is his first trip to
the U.S., but has lectured in San
Francisco, Los Angeles, and Wash-
ington, D.C.
22 Y0UNGSTER8 FROM
JAPAN ARRIVING IN
DENVER ON AUG. 25
REV. N. TSUNODA announced that
a group of young people from Oh-
tani Gakuen in Kyoto, Japan will
be in Denver late this month.
A musical concert program is
being planned tentatively at East
High School auditorium on Aug. 25
with GEORGE UMETANI in charge.
HENRY Y. KASAI, of Salt Lake
City, Utah, was named at the 18th
Nat'l JACL Convention in Detroit,
during July, as "The Nisei of the
Biennium, 1962-1964".
KASAI, age 74, has a record of
half a century of community ser-
vice in the Utah-Idaho region.
DENVER-TAKAYAMA FESTIVAL SCHEDULES
TENTATIVELY SET, AUG. 10-15, 1964
MIRIAM HALEY, Chairman of Denver-Takayama Sister City Committee,
indicated all plans have been completed for the Denver-Takayama Fes-
tival to be held in Denver, during the week of Aug. 10 15, 1964.
Approximately 20 dancers, and other dignitaries, will
arrive in Denver from Takayama, Japan, on Mon., Aug. 10,
and will be welcomed by the Colorado Japanese Assn., at
- - an informal dinner,
JANET OKAMURA WINS
NAT'L ESSAY CONTEST
JANET OKAMURA, daughter of Mr.
& Mrs. Shiogo Okamura, 4972 Fill-
more St., Denver, Colo., won for
the second consecutive time, the
Nat'l JACL Essay Contest.
She will be a senior at Colo-
rado College in Colorado Springs,
this fall.
JANET won first at the Nat'l
JACL convention held in Seattle,
in 1962. This year, she was na-
tional winner at the JACL conven-
tion held in Detroit during July.
at the Women's Club.
MAYOR'S RECEPTION:
On Aug. 11, Tue.,
the group will tour HALEY
Estes Park, and that
evening, the Mayor's Reception is
scheduled at Brown Palace Hotel.
FASHION SHOW:
TSBC POT-LUCK:
On Aug. 12, Wed., the Takayama
delegation will be on KRMA-TV and
will be guests at Pinehurst Coun-
try Club for the fashion show, at
noon. In the evening, there will
be a pot-luck supper at TSBC.
DOWNTOWN PARADE:
NISEI SUPPER:
IDENVER-TAKAVATtlA FE1TIVAL
-r 964--
AUG. 10 WELCOME DintlER
AUG.II mRYOrtS RECEPTI0I1
AUG. 12, FASWIOn SHOW
AUG. 13 FESTIVAL PARADE
AUG. 14 FESTIVAL SHOW
RUG. 15 FAREWELL DintlER
1963 AJA GRADS
LIST ON PAGE 7
MTN-PLAINS AJA NEWS apologizes
for being late in publishing the
names of AJA graduates in the me-
tropolitan Denver area, on Pg 7.
Tho late, we extend congratu-
lations and best wishes to all!!!
(If we missed any grads, let us
know and will make corrections.)
JAPANESE MOVIES
T. HAYASHIDA of the TSBC Movie
Committee assured that Japanese
movies would be continued every
other Sun., at 7:00 p.m., at Tri-
State Buddhist Church, 1947 Law-
rence St., in Denver, Colo,
The next Japanese feature will
be on Sun., Aug. 16th, and every
two weeks thereafter until fur-
ther notice.
On Aug. 13, Thu., a big parade
with colorful floats from Japan
will end at City Hall, for an of-
ficial welcome at 11:30 a.m. The
Nisei-International House supper
will be at 7:00 p.m.
FESTIVAL SHOWS:
CHUCK-WAGON:
On Aug. 14, Fri., two Festival
shows will be held at Civic Cen-
ter at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. Chuck-
Wagon dinners will be served, at
$2.75 (5:00 p.m.), by families of
Denver Scouts who went to Japan,
in 1962, at 1370 Broadway.
SAYONARA BANQUET: DEPARTURE:
On Aug. 15, Sat., the Takayama
group will visit the US Air Force
Academy, and the Sayonara banquet
will be held at the Hilton Hotel,
in Denver, at 6:30 p.m.
The Takayama contingent will
depart for home on Sun., Aug. 16,
at 9:30 a.m., from Stapleton Air-
port after breakfast at 8:00 a.m.
in the Sky Chef Room.
RESERVATIONS: INFORMATION:
Anyone may attend any of these
events listed above, but reserva-
tions are required. Information
concerning coats of each event is
available at the Denver-Takayama
office, Suite 102 Sherman Plaza,
901 Sherman St. (Tel.: 244-6996)


PAGE 2.__________________________
JAPANESE NATURALIZED
Persons of Japanese ancestry
naturalized recently in Colorado
have included:
HOSHIKO CERKONEY. . . . Security
MIYOSHI DALLA .......... Durango
TSUYA DRISKILL............Denver
K1MIY0 GILL........Ft. Carson
KIJU HAYASHIDA............Blanca
KIKUTA JENSEN . . USAF Academy
TOSHIRO RICHARDS..........Denver
MIKIKO SMITH..............Aurora
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. MEWS
COLORADO SPRINGS
SISTER CITY CHRMN
WM. VANDELL, 2116 Lark Drive,
Colorado Springs, Colo. (80909),
reported that he has been Chair-
man of the Colorado Springs and
Fuji-Yoshida Sister City program,
during the past two years, since
Feb., 1962.
VANDELL is a retired U.S. Ar-
chitect, and was with the GHQ in
Tokyo during the Occupation. He
served 5 years with the U.S. Far
East Air Force HQ in Japan.
Anyone interested in contacts
with the City of Fuji-Yoshida, in
the Hakone region of Japan, may
contact Chrmn WILLIAM VANDELL for
detailed information.
SUMMER, 1964
TPflVFI /ja**- "'"7
serOice bureau-
1225* 27 ZUtST.
________mA3-8946
Above is part of the first contingent of 97 kimono-clad Japanese
girls, flown by jet directly to New York by JAPAN AIR LINES as a spe-
cial group. These girls are now
taurant at the World's Fair, in
New York this sunsner. The above
group arrived in April, but will
serving at the House of Japan res-
be replaced from time to time on
a rotating basis.
Be Tsukikos guest on
your flight to Japan
From the moment you board your DC-8 Jet Courier,
Tsukiko Yamasaki observes every detail of traditional Japanese courtesy
and hospitality. She pampers you with attentive service, offers you
delicacies of the East and Westmakes you feel you are already in japan.
Your JAl flight, whether in the Economy or First Class cabin, will be
gracious and restful. Yet JAl (lights cost no more. )Al fares are the same
as all airlines. The real difference is in JAl's superior service.
personal attention and convenient schedules.
Daily flights leave from Los Angeles or San Francisco. Visit family or
friends in Hawaii, at no extra fare, and continue on to Japan at
your convenienceany day of the week. Connections at
Tokyo for Cities throughout Japan are excellent. See
your travel agent, and fly amid the calm beauty
of Japan at afmost the speed ot sound.
All of Che Japanese girls, who
will serve at the World's Fair as
representatives of Japan were se-
lected from among more than 2,000
applicants on the basis of charm,
education and food skills. All
were trained by the Japanese Ex-
hibitors' Assn. (Photo by JAL)
UAPAN

Ottlmni
IN THE DENVER HILTON HOTEL
Court Place near 15th Street
AComa 2-3481
MIKAM1 PROGRAM
HELD ON JULY 13
TAKAHIKO MIKAMI, famed sumi-e
painter and director of the Japa-
nese Art Center in San Francisco,
presented a special demonstration
program at Wyer Auditorium of the
Denver Public Library on July 13.
The unique program was arrang-
ed by Y0ZAN TSUB0KAWA of Denver,
and was sponsored by the Japanese
consul of San Francisco, and The
Japan Society of Colorado.
COLO. JAPAN SOCIETY
FRANK E. MCDONALD was elected
President of The Japan Society of
Colorado during March, 1964, and
the full slate of officers of the
Society were as follows:
PRESIDENT FRANK E. MCDONALD
1st V-Pres. TAD T. YAMAMOTO
2nd V-Pres. MRS. JAS. WOODRUFF
3rd V-Pres........REV. Y. TAMAI
Secretary............FUMI YABE
Treasurer BERNADINE HAWKINS
However, due to the absence of
Pres. McDonald, TAD YAMAMOTO has
been named Acting President for
the Japan Society of Colorado.
*****
Members of the Board of Direc-
tors and the expiration dates of
their terms in office are as fol-
lows:
Mar. 1965
WILLIAM K. H.OSOKAWA, Chairman
REV. JONATHAN FUJITA
ARTHUR A. JOLLIFFE
ELIZABETH ROSE
EDITH THROCKMORTON
HON. GEORGE G. PRIEST, ex officio
Mar. 1966
MARY LAN1US YOZAN TSUBOKAWA
JOHN SMAY REV. N. TSUNODA
MINORU YASUI
Mar. 1967
ZELLA FUGITA* HOMER HARTZLER
MIRIAM HALEY JAMES KARAKAWA
FRANK NAKAGAWA
*****
Except for co-sponsorship of a
formal "Sayonara Dinner" for the
Takayama delegation on Aug. 15th,
the Society will be inactive un-
til later this fall, when a full
program will be announced.
AKE BONO
RESTflURflirr
\Y/7 U JAPANESE SAKE AND BEER
FRED CHIVEKO A0KI
1953 LftHimeR ST.
(CLOSED MONDAYS)
TEL. CH *-77+3
K54-998!
12.36 2.0 Th ST.
wider a.J.a. mflnAGEmtnT

DMVER, COLORADO
TEL. 825*9530


SUMtCR. 1964
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
JAPANESE VISITORS
MAN-AGAINST-THB-SEA:
KENICHI HORIE, who sailed his
19-ft sloop across the Pacific to
San Francisco in 1962, visited in
June, promoting his book "Kodoku"
telling of his 94 days alone on
his 5,000 mile trip. His visit
was sponsored by Denver-Takayama
conaittee at International House,
TOKYO STUDENTS:
40 students from Sophia Univ.,
in Tokyo, were brief visitors in
June, on their summer study tour
of the U.S. 32 girls and 6 men,
sponsored by the Christian Family
Movement, were invited to homes
of members.
KUMAMOTO HIKER:
SEIXCHI TOKUYAMA of Kumamoto,
Japan, arrived in Denver in June,
on his walk to Washington, D.C.,
to lay 50,000 paper cranes, as a
symbol of peace, on the grave of
the late Pres. John F. Kennedy.
METROLOGY ENGINEER:
OHMI ENDOU, Chief of 2nd Sec-
tion of Nat'l Research Laboratory
of Metrology in Japan, was a del-
egate to the American Petroleum
Institute in Denver, during June.
JAPANESE CYCLIST*.
T0SHIAK3 KATAYAMA of Takamatsu
City, Japan, stopped on his cycl-
ing trip across the U.S., to pro-
mote the 1964 Olympics in Japan.
After a visit to St. Petersburg,
Fla., sister-city to Takamatsu,
he will go to Arlington Cemetery
to perform "Senhazuru" homage at
the grave of late Pres. Kennedy.
BONSAI EXPERT:
YUJI YOSHIMURA of Tokyo, one
of Japan's leading experts in the
art of Bonsai, spoke on Japanese
gardens, and demonstrated Bonsai,
at Phipps Auditorium during July.
His visit was sponsored by Denver
Botanic Gardens.
KYOTO NEWSPAPERMAN:
KAORU MURAKAMI, newspaperman
from Kyoto, attended the Interna-
tional Lions' Convention in Cana-
da, and stopped off in Denver, in
July. While here, Murakami and
his wife were entertained by Mr.
& Mrs. YOZAN TSUBOKAWA of Rocky
Jiho, at the Fuji-En.
Above is a fine example of Che type of Japanese garden being pro-
posed for Denver, Colorado, which is the only major city in the U.S.,
having a Japan Society, but without a public Japanese garden. As in
the garden above (in Shikoku, Japan), plans drawn by landscape archi-
tect STANLEY K. YOSHIMURA, it is
proposed that the Denver gardens
also feature peaceful ponds, and
swift-flowing streams with wispy
waterfalls, spanned by graceful
Japanese bridges. The background
will be formed by carefully hand-
created hills, and taller trees.
TANAHASHI TEACHES
JAPANESE CULTURE
RAZUAKI TANAHASHI, famed Japa-
nese calligraphist and artist, is
teaching classes in brush paint-
ing, Japanese art, Zen Buddhism,
and haiku poetry, at AMID School,
(744-6109), 1018 So. Gaylord St.,
Denver, until Aug. 31st.
He collaborated in authoring a
definitive book on Japanese sumi
painting with TAKAHIRO MIKAMI, of
San Francisco.
TANAHASHI is residing at Lido
Apartments, 790 Washington St.,
and can be reached at 825-3966,
for complete Information.
--------------_-----------PAGE 3.
MME. SATOW SHOWS
JAPANESE FASHIONS
MME. Y SATOW of Tokyo, Japan,
a Japanese dress designer and or-
ganizer of the Japanese Fashion
Women's Club, who was en route to
the World's Fair in New York, was
a week's visitor in Denver, dur-
ing July.
MME. SATOW staged a program at
International House, and at Wyer
Auditorium of the Denver Public
Library, showing both western and
traditional Japanese fashions.
While in Denver, she was guest
of Mr. & Mrs. Robt. Kark, 653 Co-
rona St. Mrs. Kark was a design
pupil and model of Mme Satow's,
while her husband was stationed
in Japan with the U.S. Navy.
CHILDREN'S CHOIR
EXPECTED IN OCT.
REV. JON FUJITA asked for com-
munity support in welcoming the
45-member Kansai Gakuen Glee Club
which plans to stop in Denver, on
Oct. 9 10.
The Glee Club is entered in an
international competition at the
Lincoln Arts Center in New York.
While in Denver, tentatively,
they will perform at the Colorado
Women's College, Univ. of Denver,
Univ. of Colorado at Boulder, and
possibly, U.S. Air Force Academy.
Japan Society may join as spon-
sors of the Denver visit.
HARUKO TAKESHIRO of Osaka, Ja-
pan receiving a formal resolution
enacted by the California Legis-
lature, welcoming 22 youngsters
from Japan on their goodwill tour
of the United States.
The Yodogawa Zenrinkan good-
will' mission is composed of young
people, ages 12-23, and promotes
international friendships. The
group expected to stop in Denver,
in Aug., before proceeding East.
Japanese Books-Oriental Art Goods
DENVER. COIORAOO
Phone KEystane 4-4637
1234 2C!U> Stcoet
DENVER'S MOST COMPLETE
SELECTION OF QUALITY
JAPANESE MERCHANDISE
AX MODERATE PRICES
TOP QUALITY "FUKUSUKE" TABI
Sizes: 5^ 12
Available in Colors: White, Red, or Black
SUMMER STORE HOURS:
MON. thru FRI. 9:00 a.m. 9:00 p.m.
SATURDAYS.........9:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
SUNDAYS ......... Closed
EUGENE SIDE and KIMIKD SIDE
Proprietors.
4609 t.COLFftX (WE. PR 7-197.5
DEnVER 2.0, COLO.
FOR fl DELIGHTFUL VISIT
to jflpfin comE to .
mi bn
S U Kl V A Kl V. ESTAURA nT
33 0 uncom st.
IN THE SHE9MAN PLAZA HOTEL
Tel.: 266-2170
VISIT OUR GIFT SHOP
COCKTAILS SOc Fran 3 to*
DINNERS from 3.00 ori up
Every TUE. & THU. at 9 PM
Authentic movies of Japan
shown in Cocktail Lounge.
"DELIGHTFULLY DIFFERENT
JAPANESE FOOD
HOURS:
Tue. thru Fri.
11:30 t 1:00 AM
SAT. 5:00 to 1:30 AM
SUN. 2:00 to 10:00 PM
CLOSED monHAVS


PAGE 4.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
SUMMER. 1964
MTN.- PLAINS AJA NEWS
Published once a month. Mailed
by the 20th of each month.
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
MINORU YASUI
1225 - 20th Street,
Denver 2, Colorado.
CH 4-2239 RA 2-9255
* * * *
BUD UCHIDA. .
ROSA 0D0W .
TOM MASAMORI. . .Photographer
TRUE YASUI. . .General Factotum
The turnout at the Albany Ho-
tel last June 13 for the dinner-
dance to honor high school and
college graduates vas the largest
in the history of the event, and
a rousing vote of support for
conmunity cooperation.
It's no secret that this well-
intended and nobly-conceived oc-
casion vas dying on the vine from
disinterest and factionalism.
What stirred folks to action
vas the reaction of a parent who
remarked: "This dinner for the
graduates is a great idea and my
youngster is graduating from high
school this year, but I can't go.
It's my bowling night."
Even though it vas late in the
game, various community groups
were invited to participate in
the dinner as co-sponsors. The
response vas heartening.
College students agreed to be
responsible for the dance. Simp-
son Methodist Church cancelled
plans for its own graduates din-
ner in favor of the coanunity
project.
The Brighton women's group had
already scheduled its own dinner,
but gave full support to the cen-
tral project.
On the night of the dinner it-
self, a contingent from the Tri-
State Buddhist Church left a re-
treat being held at Estes Park
and drove through a rainstorm to
attend the dinner. The Rev. No-
boru Tsunoda drove back to Estes
Park that very night after he had
offered the benediction.
Thanks to the cooperation of
all hands, the graduates were gi-
ven a meaningful sendoff before
a gathering of respectable prop-
ortions.
But more than that, this dem-
onstration of cooperation in a
worthwhile endeavor gives promise
of even greater cooperation on
other occasions where the entire
community interest Is involved.
"JAGL And CIVIL RIGHTS"
A year ago, on July 21, 1963, in Omaha, Nebraska, the special com-
mittee of the National JACL, on Civil Rights, led by the then Nat'l
President, K. PATRICK OKURA, met to consider JACL*s role in the civil
rights struggle that -was and is the No. 1 domestic problem facing our
country today.
National JACLs "Statement on Civil Rights" was forthright and un-
equivocal. We reaffirmed our historic and basic stand in support of
equal rights for all citizens, regardless of race, color, creed, re-
ligion or national origin, and JACL pledged its resources, both fin-
ancial and moral, in furtherance of those fundamental rights.
Now, the Civil Right6 Act of
1964 is law of the land. But,
we see race riots and violence in
New York City, in Rochester, in
Jersey City. where next? ? ?
In your town? or in mine?
It behooves us all, JACLers or
not, that we must be concerned in
our own communities everywhere to
see that "with justice and liber-
ty for all" is not an empty slo-
gan, but a living reality in our
community and national life.
JACL SCHOLARSHIP
AWARD WINNERS
Winner of the 9th Annual JAiCL-
HARRY H. SAKATA Memorial Award in
1964 vas WESLEY WADA of Jefferson
County High School. (Details on
next page, Col. 4.)
Other winners of Mile-Hi JACL
Scholarship awards, selected from
among 18 applicants, were:
HENRY KUSUMI...........$ 150.00
Henry vas Valedictorian of his
class at Manual High School, and
is planning to attend the Univer-
sity of Colorado, majoring in the
field of mathematics.
SHIRLEY KISHIYAMA. ... $ 100.00
Brilliant student at East High
who participated in many school
activities. She plans to attend
Knox College, and hopes to become
s biologist.
CAROL KAWAKAMI.........$ 100.00
Active student at West High,
who served in many class offices
and school clubs. She plans to
become a teacher, and hopes to go
to Colorado State College.
KAYO SUNADA,M.D.
SUNADA NOMINATED
BY JACL FOR ANNUAL
CITIZENSHIP AWARD
KAYO SUNADA, M.D., who is Che
Chief of Clinical Services at the
Colorado State Home and Training
School inWheat Ridge, Colo., was
nominated by the Mile-Hi JACL as
a candidate for the Citizenship
Day committee's annual "AMERICANS
BY CHOICE" award for 1964.
DR. SUNADA was born aboard a
ship, in mid-Pacific Ocean, while
his mother was returning from a
trip to Japan. He spent his boy-
hood in Green River, Wyo., and is
a graduate of the Univ. of Wyo.
Re earned his right to become
a citizen of the United States by
serving in the U.S. Army in Italy
during 1946-1947.
Following his graduation from
Jefferson Medical College in Phi-
ladelphia, DR. SUNADA served his
internship and was a resident in
pediatrics at the Salt Lake Coun-
ty Hospital.
Since this is summer vacation
time, we've begged off writing a
long column for JACUERs. Our
hope is that af-
ter a good, long
summer's rest, we
can start off tha
fall program with
zest and enthusi-
asm!
The immediate
project facing us
this fall will be
the annual Chow
Mein benefit, to
be held on Oct.
10th, at the Tri-State Buddhist
Church, in Denver, Colo. We are
scraping the bottom of the treas-
ury now, and need funds for our
winter program.
BOARD MEETING. SEPT. 9th:
To prepare for the big commu-
nity wide Oriental Dinner in Oct.
and to plan a political informa-
tion meeting on Oct. 31st, there
will be a JACL Board meeting, at
the Cathay Post upstairs lounge,
on Wed., Sept. 9th, at 8:00 p.m.
All Board members are asked to
attend, and all interested JACL
members are welcome too!.!
NATSUKO "NAICHI" MATSUNAM1 of
Omaha, Nebr., became MRS. DAVID
H. FURUKAWA of Denver, Colo., on
June 21, 1964.
FURUKAWA
1965 NAT'L JACL
BOWLERS AWARDS
DINNER-DANCE SET
DAVE FURUKAWA, Pres, of Mile-
Hi JACL, announced that the tra-
ditional Awards Dinner-Dance for
the 1965 Nat'l JACL Bowling Tour-
nament has been set at Hellenic
Orthodox Hall, 4610 East Alameda
Ave. (on Alameda at Cherry St.)
on Sat., March 13, 1965.
DOROTHY UCHIDA, AT 8-6188, has
been named Banquet Chairman, and
will head the Mile-Hi JACL com-
mittees which will make all ar-
rangements for the Dinner-Dance.
For two years, he was State
Epidemiologist for the U.S. Pub-
lic Health Service in Idaho. He
vas Chief Resident in Pediatrics
and Fellow in Bacteriology at the
University of Washington Hospital
in Seattle, Wash., before accept-
ing his present post in Colorado
in Oct. 1961.
In Nov., 1963, the Mtn-Plains
JACL District honored KAYO SUNADA
as one of the outstanding AJAs of
this region.
i ALL PHOTOS, unless otherwise
credited, in The Mtn-Plains AJA
News, taken by TOM T. MASAMORI,
2010 Lamar St., Denver 15, Colo.
Tel.: BE 7-3041
NiffCHI is a teacher at Molholm
School in Lakewood, Colo., and is
serving as Secretary of the Mile-
Hi JACL Board.
The couple will be at home af-
ter a trip to Hawaii, returning
on Aug. 25th, at 2981 Niagara St.
(Tel. 333-7171), Denver, Colo.
MTH-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Regular: $3.00 for \ yr ( 5 mo.)
$5.00 for 1 yr (10 mo.)
Special Mile-Hi JACL members OWLT
$2.50 for % yr ( 5 mo.)
$3.50 for 1 yr (10 mo.)


SUMMER, 1964
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 5.
1964 AJA 6RADS
WIN SCHOLARSHIPS
Among the 86 AJA graduates in
the Denver metropolitan area, 20
AJA high school seniors won more
than 32 awards and scholarships,
some of which are listed below:
FUJITA, TOMMY .... MANUAL HICH
Univ. of Denver
HARA, ROGER WESTMINSTER HIGH
Univ. of Denver
IDA, ROBERT .... BRIGHTON HIGH
Community Foundation Award
JITSUDA, CAROL. WESTMINSTER HIGH
World Savings Assn Award
KAWAKAMI, CAROL .... WEST HIGH
Mile-Hi JACL Scholarship
KIMURA, TOM T. ... MANUAL HIGH
Univ. of Colorado
KISHIYAMA, SHIRLEY. EAST HIGH
Knox College Scholarship
Mile-Hi JACL Scholarship
KONDO, JEANETTE ADAMS CITY HIGH
Colorado State College
FINALIST FOR A.J.A. SCHOLARSHIPS in the Rocky Mtn and Denver metropolitan area, at the Cathay Post Din-
ing Room, during June, 1964, were seated from left to right: TOM KIMURA, West Hi; HELEN 0SMUNDS0N (judge),
American Legion; CAROL KAWAKAMI, West Hi; TOM FUJITA, Manual Hi; JOE ARIKI (judge) Asst. Principal, Green-
lee School; SHIRLEY KANAI, Geo. Washington Hi; SYLVIA SAKAMOTO, Rocky Ford, Colo.; SHIRLEY ETO, North Hi;
JANE KAWANABE, Blanca, Colo.; JANE NAKATA, Brighton Hi; and BERNICE- '
FRIEDER (judge), member of the State Board of Education for Colorado. JACL-SAKATA AWARD
SHIRLEY KISHIYAMA, East Hi; HENRY KUSUMI
Future Teachers' Award
KUSUMI, HENRY .... MANUAL HIGH
Teachers' Federation Award
Kiwanis Club Scholarship
Mile-Hi JACL Scholarship
Sertoma Service Award
Standing, from left are:
Manual Hi; WESLEY WADA, Jefferson Hi;
KOSHI, East Hi; DALE AIGAKI, Hut-
ton Hi; ROBERT IDA, Brighton Hi;
and CLAYTON SATOW, Colo. Springs,
Colo.
ROBERT SUYAMA, West Hi; HOWARD
SYLVIA SAKAMOTO
WINS TOP HONORS
Univ. of Denver
MIURA, KAREN...........EAST HIGH
Univ. of Pennsylvania
MURATA, JOYCE FT. LUPTON HIGH
Gates' Foundation Scholarship
Bausch & Lomb Science Award
Three finalists were unable to
attend: DIANA HORII of Keenes-
burg, who was ill; JEFF SHIMADA,
of Omaha, Nebr.; and ALENE TERA-
SAKI who was studying in Germany.
MUROYA, HAROLD. MAPLETON HIGH
Mapleton Education Assn.
NAKATA, JANE. BRIGHTON HIGH
Nisei Women's Club Scholarship
SATO, KEN...........SHERIDAN HIGH
C.S.C. Athletic Scholarship
SATOW, CLAYTON. CHEYENNE MIN HIGH
Broadmoor Rotary Scholarship
Cathay Post Memorial Award
SUYAMA, ROBERT..........west
SUYAMA, ROBERT..........WEST HIGH
Lions' Club Scholarship
Univ. of Colorado
TSUTSUI, GARY .... MANUAL HIGH
C.U. Joint Honor Scholarship
UCHIDA, RONALD. WHEATRIDGE HIGH
School of Mines Scholarship
WADA, WESLEY. JEFFERSON HIGH
Purdue University Scholarship
JACL-SAKATA Memorial Award
YAMAKISHI, SANDRA MANUAL HIGH
Univ. of Colorado
HAWAIIAN AJAS
GRADUATED PROM
COLO. COLLEGES
ADAMS STATE COLLEGE, Alamosa
MARIE SUEOKA MARJORIE TERAOKA
LINDA YASUDA
COLORADO STATE COLLEGE. Greeley
JOANN FUJIMOTO
LILY HAMAMURA
GORDON HARADA
RUBY HASEGAWA
JEANNE HIGASHI
RICHARD ITO (MA)
EILEEN IWANUMA
R. KANEKO (MA)
JOANN KONDO
BETTY 0KIM0T0
DONALD TANITOMI
HENRY TOMINAGA
LILLIAN YOSHIZAWA
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO. Boulder
SUSAN FUKUNAGA DANIEL MASAKI
BERT ITOGA TAKASHI SATO
KENNETH KAWABATA ROY WATANABE
KENNETH KAWAKAMI GEORGE YAMAKAWA
ROBERT YAMATO
1964 AJA COLLEGE GRADUATES
SYLVIA SAKAMOTO of Rocky Ford,
Colo., who won the Rocky Mtn Ni-
sei War Memorial Award, was also
a national winner of a Nat'l JACL
Supplemental Award for $200.00,
competing against top AJA scho-
lars in the United States.
1964 AJA HIGH
ADAMS CITY HIGH SCHOOL
JEANETTE Y. KONDO RICHARD SHIN
WESLEY SHIMODA RODNEY T. TAKEDA
MADELINE A. UNO
ALAMEDA HIGH SCHOOL
. GARY SHIRAMIZU
ARVADA WEST HIGH SCHOOL
LARRY AKIYAMA
ARVADA SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL
JUDY 0ZAKI SHARON SHIRANE
BOULDER HIGH SCHOOLS
DENNIS MURAHATA, Fairview High
LOUISE OGATA ESTHER SATO
BRIGHTON HIGH SCHOOL
ROBERT IDA BOB SAKAGUCHI
JO ANN MASUNAGA JUDY SASAKI
JANE NAKATA HARVEY TASHIRO
WESLEY WADA, son of Mr. & Mrs.
K. E. Wada, 2242 Lamar St., Edge-
water, Colo., was winner of the
Mile-Hi JACL HARRY SAKATA Memo-
rial Award for 1964.
WADA is a graduate of Jeffer-
son County High School, where he
ranked 4th in his class, with a
grade point of 3.759. He is in-
terested in science, and has won
many awards in rocketry. He is
planning to attend Purdue Univer-
sity this fall. He will major in
aerospace engineering at Purdue.
SCHOOL GRADS
LAFAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL
ANN YOSHIHARA
MANUAL HIGH SCHOOL
TOMMY FUJITA
PATRICIA GOW
JOYCE KASA
TOM T. KIMURA
SANDRA KINOSHITA
ARTHUR KURAMOTO
HENRY KUSUMI
DENNIS MATSUDA
ALAN NITTA
JERRY SAWAMURA
TOM TABUCHI
DONN TSUCHIMOTO
JUDY TSUCHIMOTO
GARY TSUTSUI
KENJI UMEMOTO
JUDY WILLIAMS
SANDRA YAMAKISHI
MAPLETON HIGH SCHOOL
HAROLD MUROYA
JOANN NAKATA
JUDY OSUMI
JUDY SATO
BRUCE UCHIDA
PATTY YANAGA
MERRITT HUTTON HIGH SCHOOL
DALE AIGAKI GEORGE YAMADA
AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo. Spgs.
THEODORE T. SAITO Calif.
WM. T. SAKAHARA .... Calif.
COLORADO STATE COLIEGE, Greeley
JANICE E. AOYAGI. Denver
JOYCE M. FUJIMOTO Alaska
JOAN SAKYO...........New York
BRUCE TASHIRO .... Greeley
DENNIS YAMAMOTO .... Denver
SHIRLEY YAMAZAKI.........Iowa
COLORADO STATE UNIV., Ft. Collins
ROBERT KONISHI (DVM) Ft.Uipton
GARY KINOSHITA. Sedgwick
TERRY KISHIYAMA .... Denver
KENNETH TAKEDA (MA) Rocky Ford
CHRISTINE YORIMQTO (BS) Denver
DENVER UNIVERSITY. Denver
ALBERT GOTO ............ Denver
REGIS COLLEGE. Denver
RONALD YAMAMOTO, Denver
JERRY MOTOOKA (B.S.). Okla.
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO. Boulder
CHIZUKO DUNCANSON Rifle
JUDY SAITO FUKUHARA Denver
IRENE HASHIMOTO .... Denver
EUGENE HORIUCHI Brighton
PAUL HORIUCHI .... Brighton
DYKE KANAI (M.A.) Denver
MAY KUMAGAI.............Denver
FREDERICK MORIMOTO. .Bristol
JOHN NAGATA.............Denver
YOJI NAKASHIMA..........Calif.
PHILIP OGATA............Denver
MILTON SHIOYA ......... Denver
ALAN TAKAKI ........... Pueblo
SUE YAMAMOTO TAKAKI Derby
KENNETH TERADA..........Denver
ROBERT WATADA .Ft. Lupton
GEORGE YAMAKAWA .... Denver
MITSU YOSHIDA ......... Denver
CHERRY CREEK HIGH SCHOOL
KATHY UKITA
CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN HIGH SCHOOL
CLAYTON SATOW, Colorado Springs
EAST HIGH SCHOOL
STEVEN ANDO JOANNE MAYEDA
EUGENE KAMBARA DOREEN MOR1SHIGE
SHIRLEY KISHIYAMA KAREN MIURA
HOWARD KOSHI RICHARD NAKAMURA
JOYCE MASUNAGA GENE TAKAMINE
ALENE TERASAKI
ENGLEWOOD HIGH SCHOOL
CLARE TAKAHASHI THOMAS YANARI
GEORGE WASHINGTON HIGH SCHOOL
SHARON KANAI
JEFFERSON COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL
ANN AOYAGI NANCY AOYAGI
WESLEY WADA
NORTH HIGH SCHOOL
RONALD ABO CAROL NISHIMOTO
SHIRLEY ETO CHRISTINE SAGARA
ROSE ANN NAKAMURA GAYLE YAMAUCHI
BARBARA SUGIHARA
IVER C. RANUM HIGH SCHOOL
BOB FUSHIMI PAUL~PUCKETT
SHERIDAN HIGH SCHOOL
CAROL M. SATO KEN SATO
SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL
RICHARD SUENAGA
WEST HIGH SCHOOL
SUSAN HAMAMURA ROBERT SUYAMA
CAROL KAWAKAMI TOM TAMAKI
WESTMINSTER HIGH SCHOOL
ROGER HARA CAROL JITSUDA
WHEAT RIDGE HIGH SCHOOL
RONALD UCHIDA


PAGE 6.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
SIX AJA BASEBALL TEAMS PREPARING
FOR LABOR DAY TOURNAMENT, SEPT. 7
EUGENE TOCH1HARA, President of the Northern Colorado Nisei Base-
ball League, reported that six AJA baseball teams are ready to go for
the Labor Day week-end tournament. The Pee-Wee League will also be
in action Aug. 29-30. 1 ____
Complete information concern-
ing the baseball tournaments may
be obtained from WILLIE CHIKUMA,
3157 Gaylord St. (534-7765), for
the Pee Wees, and GENE TOCHIHARA,
2655 Champa St. (255-5223).
Preliminary rounds of tourna-
ment play will be held on Sunday,
Sept. 6th, with championship and
consolation finals on Labor Day,
Mon., Sept. 7th.
Teams and managers who will be
participating in the tournament
are as follows:
TEAMS: MANAGERS:
BRIGHTON.............JIM IMATANI
BUSSEIS..........GEO. TSUKAMOTO
FT. LUPTON. Player-Mgr AL APO
GREELEY ......... GERALD MIYOSHI
MILE-HI MERCHANTS ... LEE IWATA
WELBY................HARRY ARIKI
CUSTOM PHOTO FINISHING
7M-X7tfcrsr.
Denve* s, coio.
Telephone: CB 4-4073
KUNITAKE KICKING
HOME WINNERS AT
CENTENNIAL TRACK
jockey JON KUNITAKE of Hawaii
is pictured with IVAN THOMAS, Mgr
of Centennial Turf Club, above.
This is Kunitake's 2nd season at
Centennial, and he has been boot-
ing home several winners, includ-
ing the winning horse in the 15th
Annual Newcomers Race in July.
(Photo by H. ODA)
mike Tflsumo,Prop. tel. es9-9984
United Minns Insurance Company
WEST 80TH AVENUE at SHERIDAN BOULEVARD
WESTMINSTER, COLORADO.
P. 0. BOX 1501, DENVER l, COLORADO.
HIROSUKE ISHIKAWA, President
Tel.: HA 9-3537
SUMMER. 1964
CHICAGO JUDOISTS INVADE COLORADO
51 judoists, fans and parents came from Chicago, 111., to invade
Colorado at the Junior Olympic Tournament held in Colorado Springs on
July 25th. The Denver School of Judo hosted a practice session for
the 23 participants from the Uptown Judo Club of Chicago, led by TOM
Above is a scene at the Judo
Kodokan, in Tokyo, Japan, where
DR. Y. ITO of Denver, Colo., went
for intensive advanced training,
during July.
Judo is now a recognized in-
ternational sport, and will be a
part of the 1964 Olympic Games.
(Photo by J.A.L.)
AJA BOWLERS tN
10 GRAND TOURNEY
DARLENE HANES, a 133 bowler,
who wee "Most Improved Bowler" in
Denver Nisei Bowling League, held
a tenuous lead in the Ten-Grand
Bowling Tournament in the women's
division of more than 600 compe-
titors. HARU FURUKAWA will also
probably end up in the money.
In the men's division of the
10 Grand Tourney, TOK MUKAIKUBO,
TERRY FUNAYAMA, and JIM SHIMIZU
are participating, but consider-
ably off the leaders' pace.
* *
SUE KOJIMA is the youth bowl-
ing director at Dahlia Lanes, and
is assisting the News-AMF Youth
Bowling Tournament.
WATANABE as chief instructor, on
Fri,, July 24th, in Denver, Colo.
In the Jr. tournament, for 16-
year olds and under, Chicago Judo
won 5 first places, while Denver
School of Judo could win only 3
blue ribbon firsts.
1966 NATL JAGL
BOWLING TOURNEY
The Board of the 1965 National
JACL Bowling Tournament in Denver
has organized working committees
to finalize plans during the sum-
mer for the national Nisei bowl-
ing classic next year.
The 19th annual National JACL
xegfest will be held at Celebrity
Lanes, in Denver, Colo., during
the week of March 8-13, 1965.
JOHN SAKAYAMA will be Tourna-
ment Director. He indicated, un-
officially, that Japan may possi-
bly send two bowling teams to the
Nat'l JACL tourney in 1965.
Moreover, SAKAYAMA indicated
that SHO TORIGOE of Hawaii pro-
mised to send a shipment of fresh
pineapples for tournament parti-
cipants.
INTERNATIONAL
FINEST SPORTS EQUIPMENT
Happy Canyon Shopping Center,
5042 E. Hampden Avenue,
Denver 22, Colorado.
STOME TANKA, Mgr. Tel. 756-9411
ABOVE are 1964-65 officers of
the Simpson Methodist Church Mix-
ed Bowling League.
Seated from left to right are:
CHARLOTTE MIYOSHI, 3rd Vice-Pres.
WILLIE HIROKAUA, League President
JANET NAKATA, 1st Vice-President
Standing, from left to right:
MEACH N0GAM1, League Secretary,
ROY NISHIMURA, 2nd Vice-President
EDWIN SHIMABURKD, Treasurer.
(Foto, courtesy of Ed Shimabukuro)
CAPITOL MORTUARY
1331 SHERMAN TA 5-0151
Personal Attention
to Every Detail


SUMMER. 1964
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J. A. NEWS
PAGE 7.
We're In the midst of sunnier,
but, only too soon, SCHOOL will
be starting again in September.
Speaking of school, here are few
tidbits left over since June. .
Late news from West High in-
dicates that SHUNY SUGIURA, fre-
quently a straight "A" student,
was inducted as a member of the
National Honor Society.
Congrats, too, tc ALLAN NITTA
of Manual High. He received a
federal grant of $700.00, to at-
tend C.U. this fall. He was al-
so awarded "The Most Valuable
Varsity Football Player" plaque.
And, our warm congratulations
to ROGER GOTO, who will be Head
Boy at Adams City High School,
this fall.
AJA STUDENTS
COLLEGE-BOUND
AJA graduates from high school
in June are already making plans
for college this fall. Among the
college-bound AJAs are:
STEPHEN ANDO......Colo. Univ.
TOMMY FUJITA. Denver Univ.
RODGER HARA .... Denver Univ.
CAROL KAWAKAMI. .Colo.St. College
TOM T, KIMURA .... Colo. Univ.
SHIRLEY KISHIYAMA Knox College
JEANETTE K0ND0. .Colo. St. College
KAREN MIURA.......Penn. Univ.
ALLAN NITTA.......Colo. Univ.
KENNETH SATO. .Colo.St. College
CLAYTON SATOW M.I.T. (Mass.)
ROBERT SUYAMA .... Colo. Univ.
ALENE TERASAKI. Reed College
GARY TSUTSUI......Colo. Univ.
BRUCE UCHIDA. N.E. Jr. College
RONALD UCHIDA School of Mines
SUSAN UJIFUSA Wellesley College
WESLEY WADA .... Purdue Univ.
SANDRA YAMAK1SH1. Colo. Univ.
SIMPSON CHURCH
Simpson Methodist Church will
hold its annual Retreat, at Estes
Park, on Sept. 12-13, 1964.
Church leaders hoped to have
200 people at their fall Retreat.
For those pre-registering during
August, a special rate of $15.00
per family, for 4 meals and over-
night accommodations, will be al-
lowed as special inducement.
JANIS SAKAYAMA at North High
was elected as one of the cheer-
leaders, and she'll be in action
this fall at football games.
For full details, call Simpson
Methodist Church at 255-6817, or
REV. PAUL HAGXYA at 333-2668.
* *
Among the 50,000 Boy Scouts
at the Nat'l Scout Jamboree, at
Valley Forge, this summer, were:
ROGER SUEKAMA, of TSBC Post #169
of Denver; and CLIFF NISHIMURA,
of Englewood, Colo., who was an
Asst. Patrol Leader.
LYNDA FUJ1M0T0 was elected as
President of the Intermediate MYF
at Simpson Methodist Church.
STEVEN SUZUKI, 13-year old son
of Henry and Betty Suzuki, is a
member of "The Dreamers", an in-
strumental ensemble, which per-
formed in Showagon try-outs re-
cently at Berkley Park.
GARY OKIZAKI is playing at the
Terrace Club (S.W. Denver), with
"The Aristocrats". He's a senior
at Abraham Lincoln Hi, this fall.
(Editor's Note: Contributions on
Teen-Agers will be printed; send
name, address and school picture.)
REAL ESTATE inSURftnCf
minuAL funp$
5IZ2-CHASE ST. HA Z-15~ll
Tel. 266-2170
DEOVeR. 12,C0LQ.
REV. PAUL HAGIYA will lead a
10-day guided tour to Japan, dur-
ing April, 1965, with stop-overs
in San Francisco and Hawaii. The
trip is being arranged by KEN OTA
of Japan Air Lines, and after the
tour, members will be free to vi-
sit as they wish.
To date, approximately 15 mem-
bers of Simpson Church are plann-
ing to go on the tour, but addi-
tional individuals will be wel-
comed to join the group.
Tom's Auto Shop
EXPERT PAINT & BODY WORK
1028 23rd Street,
Denver 5, Colorado.
TOM 10KA, Prop. Tel. 534-1908
iaomciirflflC]
Above are members of the Paci-
fic Japanese Provisional Confer-
ence of the Methodist Church, in
San Francisco, prior to their fi-
nal session.
From left to right are: REV.
TARO GOTO, PJPC superintendent,
who served in Denver during the
war years; REV. LESTER SUZUKI of
Sacramento; REV. JOHN C. K0N0 of
Seattle; REV. PAUL HAGIYA of Den-
ver; and REV. LLOYD WAKE of San
Francisco.
The 75-year old Pacific Japa-
nese Provisional Conference con-
vened for the last time in May,
1964, and formally dissolved as a
segregated ethnic church group.
The 31 churches with Japanese
ancestry congregations in the six
far western states voted to merge
in the regular conferences of the
Methodist Church.
However, a Pacific Methodist
Fellowship was created, as a fra-
ternal extension of present Japa-
nese heritage congregations to
continue AJA relationships.
Of CALENDAR Coming Events
Aug. 10- DENVER-TAKAYAMA SISTER
Aug. 16: CITY FESTIVAL, Denver, Colo. (See listing of daily events, Page 8.)
Aug. 10- K. TANAHASHI EXHIBITS,
Aug. 29: The Galleries, 314 De- troit St. (DU 8-1498)
Aug. 16: JAPANESE MOVIES, from
(Sur ) 7:00 p.ra. at the TSBC.
Aug. 25- OHTANI GAKUEN GROUP,
Aug. 26: from Kyoto, Japan. *** [Watch for announcement)
Aug. 29- PEE-WEE BASEBALL TOUR-
Aug. 30: NAMENT, Denver, Colo.
Sep. 6- NCNBL LABOR DAY BASE-
Sep. 7: BALL TOURNAMENT. (See Pg. 6 for information)
Sep. 12- SIMPSON CHURCH RETREAT
Sep. 13: at Estes Park, Colo.
Sep. 20: CITIZENSHIP DAY CERE-
(Sun) MONIES, East Hi School
Bi PHOTOGRAPHS
I ZOIO LAItlAR ST.
i DEtIVfcR IS. COLO.
*,<** BE 7-3041
RICE
available at
pacific mERcanTiLE compflnv
194*6 LAWimCR ST.
TEf. KE 4 6031 DEnVER, COLOR P DO


PAGE 8.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
Above are ALICE and WILLIAM K.
HOSOKAWA of Denver, Colo., prior
to departure for the Far East via
Japan Air Lines jet courier, from
San Francisco, on June 15, 1964.
HOSOKAWA is Associate Editor
of The Denver Post, and will be
on a six weeks tour, visiting in
Japan, Formosa, Hong Kong, Malay-
sia, Indonesia and Thailand.
He planned to visit New Delhi,
India, where he hoped to inter-
view Lai Bahadur Shastri, the new
prime minister, before returning
to Denver, Colo., during the ear-
ly part of August. (Photo by JAL)
* *
ALICE HOSOKAWA was designated
Chrmn of the "Sayonara Banquet"
for the Takayama delegation, to
be held at the Hilton Hotel, on
Sat., Aug. 15th.
Banquet tickets are $7.50 per
person, with the cocktail hour at
6:30 p.m., and dinner to be serv-
ed at 7:30 p.m., Saturday night.
Omental Fantasies in foxstofons
CHIEKO KAKEHI of Tokyo, Japan, an internationally famous fashion
designer, is a Colorado girl who made good in the field of world fa-
shions She returns to Denver to stage an exclusive premiere showing
of originals at the Pinehurst Country Club, on Wed., Aug. 12, 1964.
She was born in Colorado, and is the older sister of ROSE TANABE
and HELEN KURACHI, both of Brighton, Colo. CHIEKO KAKEHI graduated
from East High School in Denver,
and trained in New York City, be-
fore going to Japan. She now de-
signs for Matsuya Dept. Score in
Tokyo, and shows her fashions in
Paris, France.
ROSE FUJISAKI of Brighton is
one of the Co-Chrmn for the lun-
cheon fashion show, and tickets
may be obtained at $5.00 each.
AUA PERSONALITIES
COMING TO DENVER
FOR TAKAYAMA FETE
MIIKO TAKA, beautiful star of
"Sayonara**, will model the tradi-
tional ceremonial Japanese wedd-
ing costume, as well as partici-
pate in the fashion show.
(It was rumored that TAK TERA-
SAKI would portray the groom, in
traditional Japanese costume, if
true, this we've got to see!!!)
JUNK0 KAWAI of Los Angeles, as
hostess for Japan Air Lines, will
also model some of ftne. Kakehi's
creations, including daytime cos-
tumes, cocktail and evening gowns
of hand-woven brocade and hand-
screened silks and laces.
I .^ TAKAYAMA FESTIVAL
Aug. 10: (Mon) JAPANESE ASS'N DINNER, at Fuji-En, 6:30 p.m.
Aug. 11: (Tue) MAYORS RECEPTION, at The Brown Palace West, 6:30 p.m., $7.00 plate
Aug. 12: (Wed) ORIENTAL FASHION SHOW, Pinehurst Country Club at 12:30 p.m.; $5.00.
Aug. 12: (Wed) TSBC POT-LUCK SUPPER, for Takayama visitors.
Aug. 13: (Thu) DOWN-TOWN PARADE, led by JCs and Cathay Post Welcome at 11:30 a.m.
Aug. 13: (Thu) NISEI SUPPER, at TSBC, Chairman Mary Takamine
Aug. 14: (Fri) FESTIVAL SHOWS, 2:30 & 7:30 pm, Civic Center.
Aug. 14: (Fri) BOY SCOUTS CHUCKWAGON, 5:00 pm, 1370 Broadway
Aug. 15: (Sat) "SAYONARA BANQUET", at Hilton Hotel, 6:30 pro.
Aug. 16: (Sun) DEPARTURE from Staple- ton Airport, 9:30 a.m.,
KODY K0DAMA, Chairman of the Board of Director# of The Gibraltar Savings and Loan Aaan., handing a check
for $500.00 to MIRIAM HALEY, Chairman of the Denver-Takayama Sister City Committee, in connection with the
drive to raise $10,000.00 for the Denver-Takayama Festival, in Denver, Colo., on Aug. 10 16, 1964. Look-
ing on, standing are VIRGINIA KILE, manager, and TONY GARNIERE, vice-president, repectively of Gibraltar.
Congrats to FRANK IAKESHITA,
3655 Glencoe St., for winning the
July "Garden of the Month" con-
test. He wins a Polaroid instant
color camera, and Ortho-Gro lawn
food as prizes.
Our wannest congratulations to
RON YAMAMOTO for graduating cum
laude from Regis College in June.
He'll attend C.U. Medical School,
this fall.
DR. WILLIAM TAKAHASHI is Chrmn
of the Boulder Medical Society's
Scholarship Fund to provide $200
annually for the next five years
for nursing scholarships.
JULIA KAMURA is historian of
the Denver Ass'n of Educational
Secretaries. She is employed in
the personnel division of Denver
Public Schools.
OSKI and GLADYS TANIWAKI are
operating Gretchen Donut Shop, at
3919 East 8th Ave., just before
Colo. Blvd. on East 8th.
The former YAYE SAKAGUCHI, now
MRS. JAMES OHASHI, of Hawaii, and
her children were sunmer visitors
to Denver, for the big reunion of
the KATSUBEI SAKAGUCHI clan, in
Brighton, Colo. Members of the
family came from both the Pacific
and Atlantic coast for the family
get-together. --------------------
ENGAGEMENTS
JANET 0KAMURA of Denver is en-
gaged to 2nd Lt. UM. SAKAHARA of
Calif., a June graduate from the
U.S. Air Force Academy.
BOB FUJIOKA will be married in
Hawaii on Aug. 23rd to JANE SUEDA
of Honolulu. The couple will re-
turn to Denver, so BOB can con-
tinue his engineering studies and
JANE will teach school in Arvada.
GEO. "SUGAR SUYEHIR0 will wed
EMI YOKOGAWA of San Francisco, on
Aug. 30th at Simpson Church. EMI
is a nurse, and SUGAR is an ac-
countant at Lockheed Aircraft, in
Sunnyvale, Calif.
1236 20th Street,
Denver, Colorado
0-BENT0 (Box Lunches)
and
SUSHI AVAILABLE ON WEEK-ENDS
MASATO M0RISHIGE
New chef from Fukuoka, Japan
Kelp WiiiM
WAITRESSES Hours Open
YOUNG MAN AS KITCHEN HELPER
(Train in Japanese cooking)
T6L: air-SS30


SUMMER, 1964
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS
r OBITUARIES
TAK1 KINOSH1TA, 3546 Shoshone St.
Denver. Mother of Toshi Uchida
of Golden; Fumi Arai, Kay Kino-
shita of Denver; and Shoji Ki-
noshlta of Albuquerque, N.M.
HENRY X. MATSUMOTO of Brighton.
Father of Jess, Lakewood; Tom,
Washington; Henry, Japan; Aya-
ko, Peggy, Shari, Brighton; and
Mary Yokooji, Ft. Lupton. Bro-
ther of Jim, Calif, and Sam,
Derby, Colo.
TATSUNO OKA, 6801 E. 8th Avenue,
Denver. Mother of Toyoko Goto,
Calif.; Kendo, Yoshinao, Sophie
and Grace Latham, Denver; and
Setsuko, Calif.
HARRY Y. S0N0DA, 2449 Champa St.,
Denver. Step-father of Midori
Onaga, Hawaii, and Rosa Odow,
Denver.
ARTHUR F. TAKAMINE, 3001 Ivanhoe
St., Denver. Father of Haruko
Agatsuma, Fumiko, Tol, Terry,
Denver; and Richie, Greeley.
STANLEY K. YOSHIMURA, 1641 W 82nd
PI., Denver. Husband of Fude.
Father of Youko Yamasaki, Itsu
Arita, Mabel Googins, Minoru,
Toshiaki, Michio, Masashi, Den-
ver; Reiko Shibata, Calif.; Roy
Yuichi, San Jo$e; Yoshito Otera
of Calif.
MR. & IAS. KENJ1 FUKUHARA (the
new Mrs. Fukuhara is the former
JUDY SAITO) at the wedding recep-
tion held at the Lotus Room, in
Denver, Colo., during June, 1964.
The couple were married May 15th,
just prior to Judys graduation
from the University of Colorado.
(Photo by H. ODA)
WEDDINGS
CAROL IMATANI was married to
JERRY KISHIYAMA of the U.S. Army,
at the Congregational Church, in
Henderson, Colo., on June 14th.
# IRENE NAGASAWA of Sacramento,
became the bride of DAVID OSUGA,
on July 5th in Sacramento, Calif.
The reception was held at the New
China Cafe, in Denver, Colo.
# JANET YANAGA and BOB HOSHIJIMA
were married on June 14, at Simp-
son Church, in Denver, Colo.
MICHIKO KURAMOffO, daughter of
Mr. & Mrs. George Kuramoto, be-
came the bride of TOM HOSHIKO of
Denver, on June 26th, at Simpson
Church. (Foto by Ed Shimabukuro)
HAMILTON FUNDS, INC
77? GRANT
OENVCA 3. COLORADO
Bus. PmOHI 82S-70V7 Res PkOnc 433-1222
REPRESENTED BY
MOLLY A. MCOOVERN
Unit Mgr.
MW
mflRKET
est in Fins nno fertuers
KE4--59S5 1919 L&WftEnCE ST.
SAKURA-EN
I- £0Th ST.
Jftpfincse*CHinese*omERicfln food
Japanese SAKE fiv/uiftRLE*
Houre: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. -rej ojX-QS^O
(CLOSED ON TUESDAYS) 16t *
A.J.A. NEWS
HAZEL TOMIKO WATADA, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Watada, of
Ft. Lupton, Colo., was married to
ROBERT M. TAKEDA, of Rocky Ford,
Colo., on June 13th, at TSBC, in
Denver, Colo. Both were students
at Colo. State Univ., where ROBT.
M. TAKEDA earned his M.A. degree.
(Photo by H. ODA)
PAGE 9.
BIRTHS
GERALD ISHIMOTO. . GIRL
2833 W. Park PI., Denver
T0KIR0 MUKAIKUBO . a GIRL
701j 27th St. , Denver
TOSHIO OKUNO . BOY
1625 S. Yukon Ct. , Denver
JOE M. ONODERA . . a GIRL
1635 S. Josephine , Denver
RONALD S. TAKAHASHI a BOY
1621% Fairfax St. , Denver
JACK H. TANIGAWA . a GIRL
12337 W. Mississippi Ave.
JOHN Y. TOD0R0KI . . a BOY
2330 Paris St., Aurora
SHOZO watanabe . BOY
3340 W, Iowa Ave. , Denver
JAKE YAG0 GIRL
2826 Curtis St., Denver
WILLIAM K. YAMADA. ... a BOY
2895 Holly St., Denver
ROTC OFFICERS AT critoshi yoshida .... a girl
^ Wr rlwEnw Ml 800 Delta St., Adams County
G.U. COMMISSIONED
Two Hawaiian AJAs at the Univ.
of Colorado were commissioned as
2nd Lieutenants at special cere-
monies during June.
BERT K. ITOGA of Honolulu was
commissioned 2nd Lt. in the USAF,
and TAKASHI SATO of Hilo was.com-
missioned 2nd Lt. in the US Army.
1
2815 DOWNING ST
DENVER 5, COLORADO
BILL KUROKI, MGR.
TEL.
244-6068
PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS LISTINGS
ARCHITECT
WHT9SU CLIFFORD S. NAKATA Colo. Spgs 206 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 633-4382
JOHN CHIKUMA, DDS Brighton la wrens
75 So. 4th St. 659-1825 TOSHIO ANDO 1942 Larimer St. AC 2-5315
MASA GIMA, DDS
1404 E. 18th Ave. AL 5-6822 MINORU YASUI 1225 20th St. CH 4-2239
MICHAEL T. HORI, DDS
4101 E. Wesley Ave. SK 6-0924 opTOMemsrs MAS KANDA, O.D.
T. ITO, DDS 830 18th Street KE 4-8680 1515 W. 48th Ave. GE 3-4221
2838 Federal Blvd. GL 5-0741 BEN MATOBA, O.D. 1959 Larimer St. KE 4-1941
Y. ITO, DDS
SUEO ITO, DDS MISAO MATOBA, O.D. Ft. Lupton
SETS ITO, DDS 1477 Pennsylvania CH 4-6589 Burt Building PHrSICIAUS UL 7-6550
KOJI KANAI, DDS Wheatridge CHAS. FUJISAKI, M.D. Brighton
4310 Harlan St. TONY KAWAN0, DDS HA 2-5817 40 No. Main St. T. K. KOBAYASHI, M.D. 659-0783
1750 Humboldt St. KE 4-3084 DICK D. M0MII, M.D. ALBERT NODA, M.D. KE 4-3104
ROBERT MAYEDA, DDS Interstate Trust Bldg TA 5-6961 1227 27th Street HOWARD SUENAGA, M.D.
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS Interstate Trust Bldg GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS TA 5-6961 830 18th Street M. GEO. TAKENO, M.D. Medical Arts Bldg., AC 2-1314
Interstate Trust Bldg TA 5-7498 1955 Pennsylvania St. TA 5-0783
KEN UYEHARA, DDS Brighton AYAK0 WADA, M.D.
40 No. Main Street 659-3062 810 23rd Street TA 5-2565
JACK YAMAMOTO, DDS Lakewood MAHITO UBA, D.O.
10005 W. 17th Place 238-3331 1230 21st Street MA 3-3743


PAGE 10.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
NISEI WAR MEMORIAL
SCHOLARSHIP AWARD
* SYLVIA SAKAMOTO, daughter of
the Rev. and Mrs. Eizo Sakamoto,
Rocky Ford, Colo., vas named win-
ner of the first Rocky Mtn Nisei
War Memorial Award for $250.00,
presented by Cathay Post #185, in
Denver, Colo., on June 13, 1964.
SYLVIA vas the valedictorian
of her graduating class, with a
four-year grade average of 3.96.
She hopes to become a biologist
in research, and plans to attend
Phillips University, in Oklahoma,
this fall.
* *
CLAYTON SAI0W of Cheyenne Mtn
High School in Colorado Springs,
Colo., was winner of the Cathay
Post #185 scholarship of $200.00,
for 1964.
CLAYTON is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Norman Satow of the Broad-
moor Hotel in Colorado Springs.
He plans to become an aeronauti-
cal engineer, and will enroll at
Massachusetts Institute of Tech-
nology in Boston, this fall.
SUMMER. 1964
CITIZENSHIP DAY
CEREMONIES SET
FOR SEPT. 20 TM
Citizenship Day ceremonies for
1964 will be held at the East Hi
auditorium at 2:00 p.m., on Sun.,
Sept. 20, 1964, in Denver, Colo.
Mile-Hi JACL has participated
annually in these patriotic ser-
vices for 12 yeers, since 1952,
and urges all AJAs to attend.
JEANIE HALL of the Girls' judo class at the Denver School of Judo
showing good form in throwing Instructor JACK OLIVER, in preparation
and training for the national women's tournament to be held in Mason
City, Iowa on Sept. 11-12-13, 1964.
Denver School of Judo for classes
on Wed. evenings and Sat. after-
noons. Call 244-9909, for com-
plete information.)
JACK OLIVER took charge of the
women's judo classes, during 3-
weeks absence of DR. Y0SHI0 IT0,
who went to the Judo Kodokan, in
Tokyo, Japan, for advanced trains
ing in July. DR. ITO, 3rd degree
Black Belt, ia back in Denver and
has resumed judo instruction.
JACL FOOD BAZAAR
SCHEDULED OCT. 10
BILL KUR0KI, Chrmn for Mile-Hi
JACLs annual Oriental Dinner, is
asking for volunteers and sugges-
tions, for the affair to be held
at the Tri-State Buddhist Church,
in Denver, on Oct. 10, 1964.
The 1963 JACL Oriental Dinner,
chaired by MAY T0RIZAWA, featured
teriyeki; the 1962 dinner, pre-
pared by Chefs JOHN NOGUCHI and
MIN YASUI, was sukiyaki. Any new
suggestions for 1964???
(Ladies may enroll in classes at
DENVER COMMUNITY
PICNIC CANCELLED
Officials of the Japanese Assn
of Colorado cancelled the annual
community picnic, in Denver, for
1964, because of participation in
the Denver-Takayama Festival.
A total of $2,500 vas raised,
with $1,000 as a direct contribu-
tion to the Denver-Takayama Fes-
tival committee. The balance is
ear-marked for entertainment of
the Takayama guests and for other
expenses of the Festival.
CATHAY POST NEWS
BOYS' STATE DELEGATES:
DENNIS IOKA and BRUCE KAMADA
were selected by Cathay Post, as
delegates from Manual High School
to attend Colorado Boys' State at
the CU campus, in Boulder, Colo.,
during June.
LEGION CONVENTION:
Delegates to the State Conven-
tion of American Legion, from the
Cathay Post included TOM COOLIDGE
as Chrmn of the Cathay delegates.
Other Cathay Post Legionnaires
were: AL MIYAGISHIMA, TOM HIKIDA,
MIN MAISUNAGA, SHIG M0RISHIGE and
JUN 0YA as delegates. Commander
TOSH OTA and Adjutant JOE SAKAT0
were designated as alternates.
CATHAY POST HEADS
TAKAYAMA PARADE
JIM KDGA and TOM HIKIDA were
Co-Chrnm and representatives of
Cathay Post #185 in co-sponsoring
with the Denver Junior Chamber of
Commerce the Denver-Takayama Fes-
tival parade, scheduled for Thu.,
Aug. 13th.
TOSH OTA, Commander, will lead
Cathay Post Legionnaires in their
participation in the downtown pa-
rade, down 16th St. to Arapahoe
St., and back on 15th St., to the
City Hall in Civic Center.
SAM Y. MATSUMOTO
NEW YORK LIFE INS. CO.
RT. f, BOX I96A
HENDERSON, COLO AT8-2536
Mew CHinfi Cafe
732, E. COLFAX A VC.
TEL. S3+-0* FAMOUS F0A CHIIIESE RlFHCS
visit "ifa VmC'
specializing in oriental foods and goods
I94G LARirriER ST. KE4-G03I
SPECIAL MANJU SHIPPED FROM WEST COAST
$1.85 box of 15 $2.35 box of 21
Store Hours: Open daily;
Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, & Sat. . 8:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.
Special Sunday hours. .... 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.

d i ning Room
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