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Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 6, Number 1

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Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 6, Number 1
Series Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
31

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
VOL. VI, No. 1.
DENVER. COLORADO
CITIZENSHIP CLASS
GRADUATION SET AT
TSBC, ON SEPT. 29
HARRY G. MATOBA, instructor of
Americanization classes for Japa-
nese Issei, and acting President
of the Japanese Assn of Colorado,
reported that graduation ceremo-
nies for a class of 35 was held
at Tri-State Buddhist Church, in
Denver, onTues., Sept. 29th.
JOHN T. CLINGAN, district di-
rector, with SYRIL I. SHRAIBERG
and ARNIE R. BAS.SART, naturaliza-
tion examiners, all of the U.S.
Immigration & Naturalization Ser-
vice, participated by presenting
certificates to the graduates.
YOZAN TSUBOKAWA, publisher of
Rocky Jiho, introduced the digni-
taries, and EIJ1R0 KAWAMURA for
the Japanese Assn., and MIN YASUI
for JACL, extended congratulatory
messages.
TERU MITOMA and SEN YAO, both
87, were the oldest graduates.
TETSUJI OIAKI responded on behalf
of the graduating class.
REGISTER TO VOTE !
DEADLINE: OCT. 14
IF you did not vote in general
elections in 1962, or IF you have
moved since Nov. 1962, you must
re-register as a voter in order
to vote on Nov. 3rd.
You must register at the of-
fice of the County Clerk, or at
the Election Commission, before
Oct. 14th, to be eligible to vote
in the 1964 elections.
Requirements for voting in Co-
lorado are: U.S. citizen, who is
21 years of age, and resident of
the State of Colorado for 1 year,
in the county for 90 days, and in
the precinct for 15 days.
Be sure you are REGISTERED and
remember to VOTE!!!! You owe it
to yourself and to our country,
to be a good citizen!
KANSA1 GLEE CLUB
CONCERT POSTPONED
REV. JON FUJ1TA reported that
the Kansai Gakuen chorale group,
which had been scheduled for sev-
eral performances during Oct., in
Colo., had to postpone their tour
to America until next spring.
The Japanese singing group had
entered competition for interna-
tional honors at the Lincoln Liv-
ing Arts Center in New York City,
but change of plans forced can-
cellation of their fall appear-
ances in the U.S.
SEPT.. 1964.
MILE-HI JACL ORIENTAL DINNER BENEFIT
AT TSBC, ALL DAY SAT., OCTOBER 10
BILL KUR0K1 was named Gen. Chrmn to heed the Mile-Hl JACL's annual
Oriental Dinner benefit, to be held et the Tri-State Buddhist Church,
1947 Lawrence St., in Denver, Colo., on Saturday, from 11:30 a.m. until
7:30 p.m., Oct. 10, 1964.
In addition to the Oriental food delicacies which
will be available all day long, there will be exhi-
bits of Japanese art and culture, as well ae a live
---------------------:---- program of en-
MIIKO TAKA, star of "Sayonara",
was Honorary Chrmn of the Fashion
Show, and guest of honor at the
Denver-Takayama Festival, during
August. (Unidentified woman in
background is a parade spectator)
JACL FALL MEETING
SET FOR OCT. 30
The annual fall meeting of the
Mile-Hi JACL will be held on Fri.
Oct. 30th. (Place not yet set.)
A pot-luck supper is planned,
with a Hallowe'en party for chil-
dren, and political information
discussions for adults.
Complete details will be pub-
lished in next month's Issue of
The Mtn-Plains A.J.A. News.
SAT., OCT. 10,1964
11:30 fl.m-7.30pm
(ALSO TAKE-OUTS)
TO-STATE BUDDHIST CHURCH
134-7 LBWRtnce St
DEDVER
-# ART EXHIBITS
* Cultural prmrbdi
* rums on JARon
* ticlets: adults \g> childbed ts
TSBC FOOD BAZAAR
SET FOR NOV. 7-8
The Tri-State Buddhist Church
will hold its 2-day Oriental Food
Bazaar and Carnival, at the TSBC,
on Sat. and Sun., Nov. 7-8, 1964.
General Co-Chrmn of the annuel
fund-raising event of the Church
will be LEE MURATA, Nisei Pres.,
and FRANK T. NAKATA, Issei Pres,
of the Tri-State Buddhist Church,
assisted by a large committee of
every affiliated organization of
the Church.
In addition to Oriental foods,
there will be booths for children
and adults, with many prizes, and
interesting items for sale. Also
there will be displays of Japa-
nese art and culture, as well as
programs, during the Bazaar.
BONSAI EXHIBIT
AT DENVER U.S.
BANK, OCT. 17-18
GEO. T. FUKUMA, Vice-President
of the Bonsai Club of Colorado,
announced that the annual display
of bonsai will be held at Denver-
U.S. Nat'l Bank in Denver, Colo.,
on Sat. and Sun., Oct. 17-18.
The impresalve exhibit, held
in the lobby of the Denver U.S.
Nat'l Bank, is free, snd open to
the public.
Interest in the dwarfed trees
and plants have been tremendous.
In past years, public atten-
dance at these displays have been
estimated in excess of 7,000 dur-
ing the two-day exhibit.
tertainaent at
8: 00 p.m. In
addition, there
will be color
movies on Japan
shown through-
out the after-
noon, supplied
by HARRY KATOBA,
BfLL KUftOKI
Japan Air Lines,
and the Japanese Consulate's of-
fice in San Francisco, Calif.
Chow mein, with su-no-mono and
chashu on the side, will be the
main dish. Sushi, manju and oth-
er delicacies will also be avail-
able as separate items.
Dinner tickets are available
from any board member of Mile-Hi
JACL, and are $1.50 for adults,
and only 75$ for children.
Voliateers Needed
Gen. Chrmn BILL KUR0KI issued
a call for volunteers to help at
the Mile-Hi JACL Oriental Dinner,
on Fri, and Sat., Oct. 9-10.
DICK YANASE will head up the
cooking crews, but will need out-
side assistance at members' homes
as well as for preparation of ve-
getables on Fri. evening at TSBC.
BEN KUMAGAI will handle the
rice-cooking chores, but s brew-
master for tea, kitchen crews and
food servers, hostesses, and many
more hands are urgently needed!
FRANK NAKAGAWA Is in charge of
clean-up, but assistance is need-
ed for setting up tables prior to
the dinner.
Anyone who would be willing to
assist, In any way, would be most
welcome! Please contact the JACL
office, 244-2239 or 722-9255, to
volunteer your assistance.'!.'
JAPANESE PRINTS
AT INT. HOUSE
An exhibition of modern Japa-
nese wood block prints will be
held at the International House,
1600 Logan St., in Denver, for a
week, Oct. 7-15.
There will be some 25 modern
prints displayed. The exhibit is
being prepared by HIDE0 YAJI and
DEANE KNOX of 802 Zenobia St.


PAGE 2.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
NATURALIZED
Japanese nationals naturalized
as U.S. citizens last month were:
TERUE COOK. .
KAZUMI DeMARS .
HIROKO EVANS. .
MIYAKO FITZGERALD
PEGGY R. MORIKAWA
YUKIKO PROPST .
NORIKO SPAULDING.
Colo. Spgs
Colo. Spgs
. Denver
Colo. Spgs
, Denver
Colo. Spgs
. Aurora
ARTIST MIKAMI
TO LEAD AUTUMN
TOUR TO JAPAN
TAKAHIKO MIKAMI, Japanese ar-
tist famous for his TV series on
brush painting, will lead a tour
to Japan this fall, leaving San
Francisco, via JAPAN AIR LINES,
on Oct. 20, 1964.
The 17-day tour of Japan which
will include e week in the Kyoto-
Nara-Osaka area, where the anci-
ent arts of Japan still flourish,
will cost $1,503.00 round-trip.
Details of the MIKAMI TOUR to
Japan this fall can be obtained
from MATOBA TRAVEL BUREAU in Den-
ver, or by writing to Japan Air
Lines, 240 Stockton Street, San
Francisco, Calif. 94108.
The 23 members of THE OHTANI GAKUEN CHORALE of Kyoto, Japan, con-
ducted by Prof. Tamotsu Kinoshita, presented a benefit performance,
which was well received by an over-flow crowd of more than 500 people
at the Tri-State Buddhist Church in Denver, Colo., on Aug. 25th.
'TRAVEL^
SERVICE BUREAU-
IZZJT 27 Zli+ST.
m*3~8d46
JAL CALENDARS
AVAILABLE NOW
JAPAN AIR LINES' beautiful and
highly popular calendar for 1965,
which features 12 full color re-
productions of famous Japanese
art treasures, are now available
to the public.
Because of heavy demand for
JAL calendars, they should be or-
dered well in advance. It takes
6-8 weeks to obtain delivery from
Japan.
Orders for calendars, at $1.50
each, may be made by requesting
order blanks from ROBERT McCABE,
Denver*s JAL sales manager, at
2044 Dahlia St., Denver, Colorado
(80207), or by writing directly
to JAL In San Francisco, Calif.
Be Tsukikos guest on
your flight to Japan
From the moment you board your OC-8 Jet Courier,
Tsukiko Yamazaki observes every detail of traditional Japanese courtesy
and hospitality. She pampers you with attentive service, offers you
delicacies of the East and Westmakes you feel you are already in Japan.
Your JAL flight, whether in the Economy or First Class cabin, will be
gracious and restful Yet JAL flights cost no more. JAL fares are the same
as all airlines. The real difference is in JALs superior service,
personal attention and convenient schedules.
Daily flights leave from Los Angeles or San Francisco. Visit family or
friends in Hawaii, at no extra fare, and continue on to Japan at
your convenience-any day of the week. Connections at
Tokyo for cities throughout Japan are excellent. See
your travel agent, and fly amid the calm beauty
of Japan at almost the speed of sound,
UAPAN
AIR
The group was en route home to
Japan, after having completed an
American toor, performing at such
places as the Hollywood Bowl in
Los Angeles, the Lincoln Perform-
ing Arts Center in New York City,
end other metropolitan areas in
the United States.
MCCABE PROMOTES
JAPAN OLYMPICS
ROBERT J. McCABE, Denver die-
trict sales manager for the Japan
Air Lines, boosted travel to Ja-
pan for the Olympics in October.
The 18th Olympiad will be held
in Tokyo, on Oct. 10-25, and will
attract tens of thousands of par-
ticipants and hundreds of thou-
sands of spectators.
McCABE assured, however, that
the hotel situation in Tokyo has
eased, and urged visitors to try
an experiment in Japanese living,
a night or more at a "ryokan", or
Japanese inn.
Moreover, shopping and adven-
tures in exotic eating in Tokyo
are unlimited, said McCABE.
Omwm
IN THE DENVER HILTON HOTEL
Court Place near 15th Street
AComa 2-3481
SEPT.. 1964.
GUIDE TO JAPAN
JAPAN AIR LINES has published
a new 'Businessmen's Guidebook to
Japan", explaining Japanese busi-
ness customs and etiquette, and
containing practical information,
such as dates of holidays and re-
gulations concerning importation
of merchandise samples.
All Japanese consulates in the
United States, and all American
consulates and U.S. banks repre-
sented in Japan, are listed.
The 50-page booklet is avail-
able free from the JAL offices at
240 Stockton St., San Francisco.
J. LEBRA STUDIES
JAPANESE HISTORY
JOYCE LEBRA, an assistant pro-
fessor of Oriental history at the
University of Colorado, spent her
summer vacation in
Japan, spending 3
months of inten-
sive study and re-
search on modern
Japanese political
history.
MISS LEBRA is a
member of the Japan Society of
Colorado, and advisor to the Ken-
kyu Club (an AJA organization de-
voted to study and appreciation
of Japanese culture), at the Uni-
versity of Colorado campus.
JAPAN SOCIETY
BILL H0S0KAWA, Chairman of the
Board of the Japan Society of Co-
lorado, convened the directors of
the Society on Sept. 9, to adopt
basic policies for the organiza-
tion. The Board voted to hold a
series of 3 quarterly meetings of
the Society for its membership,
instead of monthly meetings, as
heretofore.
PRES. TAD YAMAMOTO is planning
an interesting program on Japa-
nese history, at the Western Fed-
eral Savings Bldg., on Mon., Oct.
19th.
Anyone Interested in learning
more about Japan, and especially
members, are urged to attend the
fall meeting of the Society, on
Mon., Oct. 19th, at 8:00 p.m.
AKEBONO
RESTflURflI1T
.// ^ JAPANESE SAKE AWTi RPffD
JAPANESE SAKE AND BEER
CMIVEKO ftOKI (closed MONDAYS)
1953 IRUimeR ST.
CweRRv urns,
IZ36 zo Th ST.

UtlbER ft.J.R. ITIfinAGEtnEnT
DENVER, COLORADO
TEL. 825-9530


MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PACE 3.
SEPT.. 1964.
JAPANESE VISITORS
LABOR LEADERS:
Three Japanese labor leaders
fro* Tokyo were recent visitors
in Denver, during Aug., and were
entertained by KA2UAKI TANAHASHI
and the Institute of Internation-
al Education.
The trio were: MASAYUKI MIYA-
ZAKI of the Steel Workers, SHO-
ICHI TAGS CHI of Chemical Workers,
and HIROSHI HEMOTO, research di-
rector of the Railway Workers.
POSTAL WORKERS:
FRANK and ACHES NAKAGAWA were
hosts to visiting Japanese postal
workers' union officials, during
Sept. The officials were: HISAO
AKACIRI, Pres., Chiba District HQ
Japan Postal Workers Union, AKIRA
YAMAMOTO and ASAO HISAKAWA.
MIHIWG EXPERTS:
Thirteen Japanese sluing ex-
ecutives were in the Denver area,
studying management practices in
sines of Colorado. They were ac-
companied by officials of the Ja-
pan Productivity Center, Washing-
ton, D.C., sponsors of the tour.
TOURIST PROMOTIONS:
JUKICHI MATSUHOTO, director of
Japan Nat'l Tourist Organization,
was a recent visitor to Denver to
promote tourist travel to the Far
East, and especially to Japan.
Above is MISS JUNKO KAWAI ot japan Air i.ines woo added tremendously
to the Denver-Takayasa Sister City Festival, held in Denver, Colorado
on Aug. 10-16, 1964. MISS KAWAI, in the picture above, is riding past
the Colorado State Capitol Building, as a part of the Denver-Takayama
parade which wound through downtown Denver for three hours.
SIMPSON CHURCH
TOUR TO JAPAN
IN APRIL. 1965
o REF. PAUL HAGIYA of the Simp-
son Methodist Church is scheduled
to lead a tour group to Japan, In
April, 1965.
Tentatively, those planning to
Join the Simpson tour group are:
MARY FUJI
YOSHIE HAGIYA
VIRGINIA ITO
JULIA KAMURA
VIC MIYAHARA
PAT MIYOSRI
CHARLOTTE MIYOSHI
YOSHIE MIZOUE
GARY NAKATA
KEN NAMBA
JEAN SATO
EVELYN SUYEHIRO
FUMI YABE
JACK YAMAMOTO
The tour group plans s brief
stop-over in San Francisco, and
in Honolulu, Hawaii. The trans-
pacific flight will be Japan Air
Lines' jetliner. Upon arrival in
Japan, there will be a 10-day es-
corted tour, following which the
group members may proceed on to
Hong Kong or spend time in Japan.
Additional tour members would
be welcomed to join the group.
Please contact REV. PAUL HAGIYA
for complete information.
* *
REV. JONATHAN FUJITA reported
that seven Isseis have signed up
for the round-the-world tour be-
ing sponsored by the Issei divi-
sion of Simpson Methodist Church,
in the spring of 1965.
He noted that construction in
Tokyo in preparation for the 1964
Olympic Games in October, are now
completed, with more than 10,000
hotel'rooms available, and with a
net work of new super-expressways
knifing across metropolitan areas
of Tokyo, and the new 120 mph ex-
press trains on the Tokaido Line
to the Osaka-Kobe area.
VISITING PHOTOGRAPHER:
HIROMU 0KADA of Tokyo, Japan,
baa been studying various aspects
of journalistic photography, with
fiapire Magazine section of Denver
Post, and has been assisting Edi-
tor YOZAN TSUBOKAWA of Rocky Jlho
In Denver, Colorado. He was also
the subject of a special feature
in The Denver Post, during July.
MISS KAWAI and members of the
Japan Air Lines regional staff in
San Francisco contributed materi-
als and support to the Festival.
MADAM BUTTERFLY
TO OPEN BRANCH
MADAME BUTTERFLY'S GIFT SHOP
will open a branch store at the
Boulevard Shopping Center, at the
northwestern corner of the inter-
section of Colorado Boulevard and
Valley Hwy, on about Nov. 1st.
GENE and KIMIK0 SIDE, owners
of Madame Butterfly's, indicated
that the new store will carry a
full line of Japanese and Orien-
tal art goods and curios, as well
as unique household items.
DENVER'S MDSE COMPLETE
SELECTION OF QUALITY
JAPANESE MERCHANDISE
AT MODERATE PRICES
TOP QUALITY "FUKUSUKE" TABI
Sizes: 5k 12
Available in Colors: White, Red, or Black
SUMMER STORE HOURS?
MON. thru FRI. 9:00 a.m. 9:00 p.m,
SATURDAYS........9:00 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
SUNDAYS ........ Closed
EUGENE SIDE and KXM1KD SIDE
Proprietors.
4609 E. COLFAX AVE. FR7-19X3
0ETWGR LO, COLO.
JAPAN AIR LINES
OFFICIALS VISIT
M. IHARA and TAKU RASUYA, of-
ficials of the San Francisco off-
ice of Japan Air Lines, were vi-
sitors in Denver during the Taka-
yama Festival, in August.
Both JAL officials commended
AJAs in Colorado and Utah in tak-
ing an active interest in matters
concerning Japan.
REV. FUJITA also indicated ad-
ditional tour members would be
most welcome to join the Isseis.
Japanese Books-Oriental Art Goods
3Co bun-iSka
DENVER. COLORADO
Phone KEystone 4-4637 1234 2h Street
FOR ft DELIGHTFUL VISIT
TO JflPfln COmE TO .
mi £N
SUKIVRKI HESTAURfiflT
330 L! n C 0 L n ST.
IN THE SHERMAN PlAlA HOTEL
VISIT OUR. GIFT SHOP
moors:
Tue, thru Fri.
11:30 to 1:00 AM
SAT. 5:00 to 1:30 AM
SUN. 2:00 to 10:00 PM
Tel.: 266-2170
COCKTAILS SOc From 3 tot
* DINNERS from 3.00 and up
Every TUE. & THU. at 9 PM
Authentic movies of Japan
shown in Cocktail Lounge.
"DELIGHTFULLY DIFFERENT
JAPANESE FOOD"
CLOSED TTlOnDAVS


PAGE 4.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
More chan 160 adulcs and children attended the 4th annual Retreat
for families of the Simpson Methodist Church, at the YMCA Camp of the
Rockies, near Estes Park, on Sept. 12-13, and included 29 Isseis who
joined the group on Sunday. Above is the adult group, with the mag-
nificent mountains in the background. All enjoyed the spiritual and
N1SHIMURA GIVES
LAND TO CHURCH
ROY and VIOLET NISHIMURA have
contributed one acre of land, at
W. 60th Ave. and Sheridan Blvd.,
as a future church site, in memo-
ry of the late MASAICHI OTSUKI.
MASAICHI OTSUKI was one of the
first Japanese Issei pioneers in
the Denver area, and was a char-
ter member of the old California
St. Methodist Church. During his
long and devoted church career,
he held many responsible offices,
including chairmanship of the Is-
sei Trustee and official Boards
of the Church.
SAN LUIS VALLEY
YOSHIKO INOUYE, assisting the
Japanese History project in the
San Luis Valley, reported there
were only 21 Issei individuals,
and about 50 Nisei families, now
left in the Valley, a decline of
some 507, during post-war years.
Working on the lettuce deal in
San Luis Valley, in Colo., from
Phoenix, Ariz., this summer, were
KEN YOSHIOKA and MAS TSUTSUMIDA.
OKURA'S FATHER
DIES IN L. A.
As it must come for all people
Death came for the father of K.
PATRICK OKURA in L.A. as an af-
termath of an accident.
The elder OKURA was 83 years
old, and had lived a long, rich
life, but nonetheless the passing
of a loved one is always sadden-
ing. We express our deepest sym-
pathies and condolences to the
OKURA family.
devotional inspiration derived
from the mountain setting of the
services. Next years Retreat
is scheduled for Sept. 11 12,
1965. (Photo by ED SHIMABUKURO)
OMAHA NEWS
STEVE TAKECHI was youth dele-
gate for Omaha to the Nat'l JACL
convention in Detroit, Mich.
YUKIO ANDO, Chran for Member-
ship of Omaha JACL, reported 161
JACLers in Omaha for an all-time
high record in 1964.
NEW CROP WILL BE AVAILABLE DURING EARLY OCTOBER
RICE
AVAILABLE AT
pacific mERCAnnle compAnv
194-4 LASimER ST.
TEL'. KE 4-4031 DenVER, COLOR RDO
CECIL ISHII was assigned Chnnn
and ROY HIRABAYASHI as interpret-
er for the Japanese History pro-
ject in the Omaha area.
GLADYS HIRABAYASHI was general
chairman for the Omaha JACL pic-
nic at the Orfutt AFB Lake during
July.
The MISAKI brothers held a re-
union in Denver, during Aug., af-
ter a 12-year interval. TAK is
a jeweler in Omaha, and came with
KAREN and DAVID by train; GEORGE
was a photographer in Japan, and
flew from Oakland with wife GRACE
and daughters, CLAIRE and JUDY;
ARTHUR is a commercial artist in
Chicago, and drove with daughters
STEPHANIE and EVELYN. They tour-
ed the Rocky Mtns and the USAF,
before returning to their respec-
tive homes.
PUOTOGRftPUS
ilHiS 51010 LflmnR. ST.
DEtlVtR IS, 00L0.
Be. 7-3041
Tom's Auto Suop
EXPERT PAINT & BODY WORK
1028 23rd Street,
Denver 5, Colorado.
TOM I0KA, Prop. Tel. 534-1908
___________________SEPT.* 1964.
WATADA JOINS
PEACE CORPS
BOB WATADA, graduate from C.U.
in political science, has applied
to the Peace Corps, for assign-
ment in South
America.
He was ac-
cepted tenta-
tively for a
training per-
iod of three
months at the
Univ. of Okla-
homa, prepara-
tory to being
assigned to a
cadre in Peru
if he success-
fully completes the rigorous pre-
liminary training in Oklahoma.
WATADA is the son of Mr. and
Mrs. Matajiro Watada of Ft. Lup-
ton, and has served as Pres, of
the Kenkyu Club at C.U., as well
as being active in the Intermoun-
tain Collegiate Students' organi-
zation. If successful in being
accepted by the Peace Corps, BOB
WATADA may well be the first AJA
to be serving in the Corps.
Our commendations and our best
wishes for luck and success go to
BOB WATADA of Ft. Lupton, Colo.
CATHAY POST
HAWAIIAN LAU LAU:
Cathay Post members and fami-
lies enjoyed a Hawaiian luau and
outing at the Monaco Beach Club,
in Applewood Mesa, during July.
TOM HIROMASA was in charge of the
summer affair.
NISEI VETS' REUNION;
JIM YAMANE was the only Cathay
Post representative to the 442nd
Infantry veterans reunion held in
Seattle, during the first part of
August.
PERSONAL TIP-BITS:
JIM YAMAMOTO and YOSH ARAI are
busy helping out with the Scout-
ing programs for youth.
JOHN NAKASHIMA won the "Lawn
of the Month" contest for July in
the northwest division, and was
awarded a GE portable TV set.
JOHN NOGUCHI underwent a suc-
cessful operation to restore his
hearing in one defective ear this
summer.
TOM MASAMORI and family went
on an extended vacation to the
West Coast, to visit his folks in
California, during August.
TOM HIKIDA, supervisor at the
Denver City Park Zoo, is respon-
sible for Che big cats, which are
his special charges.
REAL ESTATE. inSLIRAHCE
miTTUAL FUHDS -
SlZiCHftSe ST. HA 2-1911
Tel. 266-2170
Denver I2,colo,



MPWTAIH-PLAIMS A.J.A. NEWS

College Briefs
The two FUJI!A brother*, ICHI-
RO and TOM, spent two week* back
East this summer, with their pa-
rente, visiting the World's Fair
in Hew York, with brief visits to
Boston, Washington, D.C. Gettys-
burg, and stopping off In Chicago
and St. Louis, en rout* boas.
ICHIRO FIT JIT A baa transferred
fro* Adams State College, and is
now enrolled at C.0. in Boulder.
TOMKT T. FUJITA is a beginning
freshman at D.U., in pre-ned. He
was recently pledged to Theta Tau
honorary.
ROMMIE SAKAYAMA has been ad-
mitted to Southwestern College in
Winfield, Kansas, the alsui water
of Rev. Paul Hagiya of Denver.
After completing her freshman
year at box College in Illinois,
LYNN HORIUCHI, daughter of Mr. &
Mrs. Robert Horluchi of Denver,
has transferred to Colorado Col-
lege In Colorado Springs.
Meanwhile, her brother, BRUCE
HORIUCHI, has completed a year's
study at the Univ. of Vienna, in
Austria, and is finishing study
of French language at the Acade-
mia Francaise in Paris. He plans
to resiae his courses at the Uni-
versity of Washington in Set
varsity of Washington in Seattle,
after completion of his European
studies.
Word has been received from
ALENETERASAKI of Denver, a new
freshman at Reed College in Port-
land, Greg., that she is sdjust-
ing to the rigorous academic and
intellectual challenges of that
elite college.
AIRNE also notes that she has
mat at Reed, DAM UYEMURA, son of
Rev. and Mrs. George Uyemura, who
served at CSMC in Denver, Colo.,
for a number of years.
SUMMER GRADS
AJA grsdustes, at the conclu-
sion of sunmor sessions at vari-
ous colleges In Colorado, wort:
CBMTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE
MOTOR) ELSTON, Pt. Huachuca, Arls.
DORIS MAXATA, Ft. Lupton, Colo.
COLORADO STATE COLLEGE
MILDRED HIGASHI (MA). Hawaii
TED KOZEHARA (MA) .... Hawaii
DORIS MOJIRI (MA) .... Hawaii
HARRIET TAMAKA (BA) Hawaii
COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY
JUDITH K. KODA...........Hawaii
DANIEL SHIGKTA...........Hawaii
mitMtnSTTT OF COLORADO
KU(ZNE HORIUCHI.Brighton
HARUMASA TTO (Ph.D.) . . . .Japan
RONALD KAXAHARA.........Hawaii
EUGENE MIYAZAWA (MA) . . . Denver
COLIN MORINAfiA........Hawaii
ALAN TAKAKI...........Pueblo
UNIVERSITY OF DENVER
MARJORIE KAMAMO (MA). Denver
PHILLIP MIYAZAUA (MA) Denver
HASOH YAMAGA (MA) .... Denver
DENVER AJA SCHOOL TEACHERS
he beet as we ean.detprmlne, there are 26 AJA teachers in the Den-
ver Public School system, the seme number ea lest year. In addition,
thoro sro n eseistent principal, a coordinator, and 2 school secre-
taries, making a tetal of 30 AJAs employed by Denver school# for the
1964-65 school year.
There ere 10 AJA teachers at
the secondary school level In the
Denver schools, with 8 AJA teach-
ers and s coordinator at the Ju-
nior high level, end only 2 AJA
teachers in ssnior high schools.
Junior High Schools
There are about 2,500 AJAs in the City and County of Denver, with
its population of almost 500,000.
\ of 1% of the total population.
AJA teachers among the 4,080 in
the Denver school system consti-
tute .6 of IX* or approximately
proportionate to total numbera.
NO INCREASE;
Wo note that the number of AJA
teachers In the Denver schools is
static, while over-all, teachers
in the Denver school system hove
incvoasod from 3,800 to 4,080, or
a 7% increase.
According to our study, 3 AJA
tesehers have resigned, but 3 new
AJA teachere have joined Denver
schools, with the addition of a
coordinator, VIRGINIA MIYAMOTO,
at Horace Mann Jr. High School.
NEW TEACHERS:
The three new AJA teachers in
the Denver schools are:
JANE TAKESONO. Elyria School
MILTON SHIOTA. Gove Jr. High
DEXTER TAKE SUE Kepner Jr. High
TEACHERS LOST:
We have lost touch with three
AJA teachers at:
Beach Court. KATHERINE FUKDHARA
Columbine...........ROSE TANAKA
Wyman.........DOROTHY FUNAK0SH1
TRANSFERS;
Interestingly enough,*we could
find only three transfers among
the AJA school personnel indi-
cating that AJAs ere well adjust-
ed and accepted at their particu-
lar schools, or perhaps indicat-
ing that AJAs are not drivingly
ambitious for advancements. The
transfers were as follows:
JOE A&IKI, Assistant Principal at
Greenlee School to Asst. Prin-
cipal at Gilpin School;
KXYOEO 0M0T0, Secty at Mitchell
School to Secty at Remington
School;
FRANK OHO, teacher at Grant Jr.
High, to teacher at South High
School (science).
Japanese persons constitute about
There were 16 AJA teachers in
13 elementary schools, with one
Asst. Principal (JOE AR1KI), and
two school secretaries (PAT MARU-
KOTO st Elyria School, and KY0K0
OMOTO at Remington School). The
elementary achool teacher# are:
DENVER AJA TEACHERS:
Ash Grove...........HAS0N TANAGA
1700 So. Holly St.
Cowell..............MART ARIKI
4540 West 10th Ave.
Crofton.............RUTH KAWAMDRA
2409 Arapahoe . IRENE 0SUGA
Ebert...............SOPHIA OKA
410 23rd Street
Ellsworth .... BLAINE TSUMURA
27 So. Garfield St.
Elyria..............JANE TAKESONO
4725 High St. (Pat Karumoto,
Secretary)
Gilpin. JOE ARIKI, Asst. Prln.
720-30th St. PHILLIP MIYAZAWA
Harrington..........HICHI ANDO
3280 E. 28th MADGE ICHIKAWA
Johnson ............... ASAKO OKA
1850 So. Irving St.
Knapp...............LILT KATA0KA
500 So. Utica YOSHINAO OKA
Remington .... (Klyoko Omoto,
4735 Pecos St. Secretary)
Sabin............MARJORIE KAMAMO
3050 So. Train St.
Sherman .... DEANNA MATSUM0TO*
208 Grant Street
Wyatt ........... YOSHLE HAGIYA
3620 Franklin St.
(* We note that Deanna Matsumoto
is an AJA only by marriage.)
NURSES LICENSES
Colorado State Board of Nurs-
ing announced that only one AJA
has been licensed as a R.N., as a
result of the June examinations:
IRENE HASHIMOTO, 1465 Ivanhoe
St., Denvar, Colo., was licensed
as a Registered Nurse, as a re-
sult of the 1964 nurses' exams.
AJA ENGINEER
JACK HIROSHI TANIGAWA of 12337
W. Mississippi Ave., employed by
the City 6 County of Denver, was
certified as a registered profes-
sional engineer by the Colorado
State Board of Engineers, whleb
certified almost 300 engineers
during Sept., 1964.
e Colo. Board of Licensed Prac-
tical Nurses' examiners announced
that two AJAs, among 131 success-
ful applicants, were awarded li-
censes, as a result of the June
examinations:
KAREN ENOM0TO and LEA TSUDA,
both of Denver, Colo., were li-
censed as practical nurses.
IWt &0th St.
JAPAncsc cuinesE nniERicnn food
jAPonese SAKE available*
Hours: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. ,
(CLOSED ON TUESDAYS) T6L* ^
Cola Jr. High .... KATE ARIKI
3240 Humboldt MARG MAT SUN AG A
Gove Jr. High MILTON SHIOTA
1325 Colorado Blvd.
Horace Mann Jr. MIKYO MATSUURA
4130 Navajo VIRGINIA MIYAMOTO
(Coordinator)
Kepner Jr. High BOB MARUYAMA
911 So. Hazel DEXTER TAKESUE
Riehel Jr. High RICHARD JOKO
451 So. Tejon St.
Smiley Jr. High ALICE OGURA
2540 Holly St.
Senior High Schools
Manual High School. TED TSUMURA
1700 E. 28th Ave.
South High School FRANK 0N0
1700 E. Louisians
AJA TEACHERS
WIN MASTERS'
Many teachers, including AJAs,
utilize the summer for studying
for advanced degrees. Master's
degrees wore earned by three AJA
teachers, at DU, and were: MAR-
JORIE KAMAMO, PHILLIP T. MIYAZAWA
and HASON YAMAGA.
ROCKEFELLER GRANTS
OFFER SCHOLARSHIPS
MRS. TED CLARK of Metropolitan
Council for Community Services at
1375 Delaware St., Denver, Colo.,
advised that Rockefeller grants
are available to Negro and other
minority group students who have
need for financial assistance.
Scholarships are available to:
ANTIOCH (Ohio), CARL2T0M (Minn.),
GRINKELL (Iowa), 0BERLIN (Ohio),
OCCIDENTAL (Los Angeles, Calif.),
REED (Portland, Or.), and SWARTH-
M0RE (Pennsylvania) colleges.
All of the above schools are
snail, private colleges with lass
than 1400 students except Oberlin
College, which has 2300 students.
Applications may be made directly
to the specific college desired.
SA
1236 20th Street,
Denver, Colorado
O-BKNTO (Box Lunches)
and
SUSHI AVAILABLE ON WEEK-ENDS
MASATO M0RISHIGE
New chef from Fukuoka, Japan
Help Wanted
WAITRESSES Hears Open
YOUNG MAN AS KITCHEN HELPER
(Train in Japanese cooking)
T61 atr9s30


PAGE 6.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
SEPT., 1964.
MTN.- PLAINS AJA NEWS
Published once a month. Mailed
by the 20th of each month.
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
MINORU VASUI
1225 20th Street,
Denver 2, Colorado.
CH 4-2239 RA 2-9255
*******
BUD UCHIDA.............Heads
ROSA ODOW............Artist
TOM MASAMORI. .Photographer
TRUE YASUI. .General Factotum
Poker, war and service on vo-
lunteer committees reveal a per-
son's character as nothing else
will. Few of us have served in a
war, only some of us play poker,
but nearly all have taken part in
committee work.
This last was particularly
true this past summer when the
town was jumping with activity.
"Volunteers" were being pressed
into service by the platoon.
Some of them deserved medals
for the work they put into commu-
nity causes. Some deserved to be
court-martialed for their fail-
ures, and of course there were
the usdal draft dodgers.
But even more interesting than
the amount of work that was, or
was not done, was the way that
the various individuals reacted
to the pressure of their duties.
Some demonstrated heroic and
selfless devotion and leadership,
just as in war. Others became
confused and petty tyrants.
Some demonstrated that they
could handle the trying details
as well as direct the broad pic-
ture, and others proved to be the
worst kind of prima donnas who
had to be patted on the head and
praised for every small perfor-
mance to keep them happy.
There is the makings of a fas-
cinating novel in the reactions
of this conaunity's many indivi-
duals to the pressures of commu-
nity service.
Such a story of human strengths
and weaknesses, told in the vivid
language of drama, would be near-
ly unbelievable. Unfortunately
no record was kept, and the bit-
ternesses of the summer past will
die in uncertain memory just as
will the triumphs.
But now we know the individu-
als, just as though their charac-
ters were analyzed on a punch
card and run through a computer.
COMMISSION ON COMMUNITY RELATIONS
During the past 15 years, since 1949, we, personally as an indivi-
dual and through the JACL, have been associated with the Commission
on Community Relations, in Denver, Colo.

Thru the years, we have noted the increase in the Spanish American
population in Denver from about 40,000 to 65,000; an Increase in the
Negro population from about 18,000 to 32,000; and, in recent years,
the establishment of an American Indian community of about 2,500, as
a result of the resettlement pro- "
gram of the Bureau of Indian Af-
fairs. (Reminiscent of the WRA?) FLOYD ITO
The AJA population in Denver
has dropped from a war-time high
of about 8,000 to today's 2,500.
Not only has the population of
minority group people increased
in Denver, but so have their pro-
blems. The above figures would
indicate that l/5th of Denver's
half-million population still has
a special interest in defending
equal rights of all persons.
In this endeavor, the Denver
Commission on Community Relations
can and must play a significant
role for the good of all of us.
1965 JACL BOARD
NOMINEES SOUGHT
HENRY SUZUKI, Chairman of the
Nominations and Election commit-
tee for Mile-Hi JACL, requested
suggestions for 7 new Board mem-
bers for three-year terms on the
local JACL board.
Retiring Board members, whose
terms expire on Dec. 31, 1964,
are as follows;
DAVE FURUKAWA
BEN KUMAGA1
TOM MASAMORI
DR. NASA G1MA
BILL KUROKI
DR. MIKE UBA
MIN YASUI
FLOYD ITO, 3444 Race St., Den-
ver, Colo., became the first AJA
in the U.S. to be commissioned in
the Coast and Geodetic Survey of
Che U.S. Dept, of Commerce.
ITO was commissioned a 2nd Lt.
in the U.S. Army, but later com-
missioned as an Ensign in the CGS
by U.S. Postmaster Geo. Cavender
of Denver, Colo.
He is a graduate of the School
of Mines in geophysical engineer-
ing. He will train at Norfolk,
Virginia for 12 weeks, and there-
after will be assigned to a ship
for coastal and geodetic surveys.
Carry-over Board members, and
the respective dates of expira-
tion of their terms are;
Terms expiring Dec. 31, 1965
NATCHI FURUKAWA ROY NAGAI
HARRY G. MAT0BA DR. DICK M0MII
DR. BOB MAYEDA TERRIE TAKAMINE
DON TANABE
CITIZENSHIP DAY
CEREMONIES HELD
DAVID FURUKAWA, Pres, of the
Mile-Hi JACL, represented local
JACLers at Citizenship Day cere-
monies at East High School audi-
torium, on Sun., Apr. 20th.
Terms expiring Dec, 31, 1966
YASUK0 FUJIMORI EIJI HORIUCHI
YVONNE KUMAGAI DR. BEN MIYAHARA
FRANK NAKAGAWA GLADYS TANIWAKI
HENRY TOBO
Any nominations or suggestions
should be submitted to Chairman
HENRY SUZUKI, 429-7325.
POLITICAL NOTE:
The national presidential cam-
paign ie getting hotter and more
bitter as weeks go by. .
For the record, we acknowledge
that we are a registered Republi-
can as to political affiliation.
In our October issue, we shall
publish our political recomnenda-
tions for the Nov. 3rd election.
Mile-Hi JACL has participated
in these impressive services for
the past 12 years, since Japanese
Issei were granted the privilege
of naturalization, as U.S. citi-
zens, under the Walter-McCarran
Act of 1952.
This year, Mile-Hi JACL nomi-
nated KAYO SUNADA, M.D., Chief of
Clinical Services, Stwt
This year, Mile-Hi JACL nomi-
nated KAYO SUNADA, M.D., Chief of
Clinical Services, State Home and
Training School, at Ridge, Colo.,
as a candidate for the "Americans
by Choice" award.
! 1
I ALL PHOTOS, unless otherwise
credited, in The Mtn-Plains AJA
News, taken by TOM T. MASAMORI,
2010 Lamar St., Denver 15, Colo. ,
________Tel.: BE 7-3041___________j
After an exciting and bliss-
ful summer, it has been difficult
for me to get back into the swing
of JACL activi-
ties for the fall
season.
The JACL Board
has planned three
major events, for
the three months
remaining in this
calendar year.
We hope that _____
Mile-Hi JACL can FURUKAWA
end the year in
a blaze of success! This will,
however, depend upon you as JACL
members and upon support from the
Japanese American public.
CHOW MEIN DINNER: .
On Oct. 10th, Sat., at TSBC,
the Mile-Hi JACL will sponsor its
annual Oriental food bazaar, with
chow mein, chashyu, sunomono, su-
shi and manju from 11:30 a.m. un-
til 7:30 p.m.
Cultural displays and a con-
tinuous showing of travel films
on Japan are being planned during
the afternoon, with an entertain-
ment program at 8:00 p.m.
And, you can get a full dinner
at $1.50 for adults and only 75c
for children! PLAN TO ATTEND!!!
Don't forget: Sat., Oct. 10th
all afternoon until 7:30 p.m.
FALL MEETING. .
In keeping with tradition, the
Mile-Hi JACL will hold its fall
meeting on Oct. 30th.
Information concerning candi-
dates for election will be pre-
sented by a panel discussion, and
whether you're a DEM or a GOP, we
urge you to attend!
A Hallowe'en party is being
arranged for the children, so be
sure to plan to bring the whole
family.
NEW YEAR'S EVE. .
The main ballroom of the Brown
Palace West has been reserved for
the annual New Year's Eve Ball on
Dec. 31, 1964.
Mark your calendars now, and
plan to join us at the Brown Pa-
lace on New Year's Eve. .
MIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
SUBSCRIPTION RATES;
Regular: $3.00 for % yr ( 5 mo.)
$5.00 for 1 yr (10 mo.)
Special Mile-Hi JACL members ONLY
$2.50 for \ yr ( 5 me.)
$3.50 for 1 yr (10 mo.)


SEPT. 1964.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 7.
MELODY FUJIMORI of East High,
daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Kenzo Fu-
jimori, was one of the 130 Colo**
redo semi-finalists in the Nat'l
Merit Scholarship competition.
MELODY vas among 7 students at
East High scoring high enough to
place among the 60 top scholars
of the Denver area. She ia the
only AJA semi-finalist in the
State of Colorado.
Nationally, there will probab-
ly be about 14,000 semi-finalists
of whom about 10% will win Nat'l
Merit Scholarships to colleges,
next year. As far as we know,
there are about 30 AJA? (mostly
in Calif.) who have advanced to
the semi-finals.
Congratulations, MELODY, and
much success in the competitions!
* *
* IRENE TAKEMURA was one of 36
delegates from Colo.-Wyo. to the
Nat'l Classical League convention
at the Univ. Of Illinois, which
was attended by more than 2,000
students of Latin, this suaaer.
DUANE HASEGAWA of East High in
Denver is one of the knight com-
manders in the Order of Crusades,
composed of top echelon students
in high school who are outstand-
ing in scholarship and athletics,
and are church-goers. The Cru-
saders are members of a national
honorary leadership fraternity.
* *
JR. BRIDGE FANS;
Among the many bridge fans in
the younger set are included such
sharks as HOWARD K0SH1, who took
part in the Teen-Age Bridge Tour-
nament; EDDIE MAYEDA, who did his
bridge playing at the University
of Oregon; KRIS MATSUMOTO, whose
father-tutor is an ACBL Life Mas-
ter; and even brother STEVE ANDO,
who will now be doing his bridge
playing at the Univ. of Colorado.
BOBBY KAWANO is also a hot bridge
fan now, taking lessons and par-
ticipating in duplicate tourna-
ments at the Cherry Creek center.
BALLET DANCER
CONNIE TAKAMINE, daughter of
Mr. A Mrs. Tol Takamine, has been
appearing in several ballet pro-
ductions this Sumer, including
The Denver Post Opera, "My Fair
Lady" at Cheeaman Park in July;
the Evans School benefit of "La
Tllle Mai Gardes" during August;
and the Metropolitan Denver Civic
Ballet program at Loretto Collage
featuring Marcos Parades of the
Ballet Classlco de Mexico.
Above is group of almost 70 youngsters who participated in the an-
nual Family Retreat of the Simpson Methodist Church, at Estes Park,
on Sept. 11-12-13, 1964. In addition to the spiritual and devotional
services conducted in connection with the Retreat, there were many
wholesome recreational facilities 1 --------------------------
available for the youngsters, in-
cluding: roller skating, bowling,
hiking, and fishing. Accomoda-
tions for families were excellent
at the YMCA Camp of the Rockies.
(Photo by EDWIN K. SHIMABUKURO)
Little NANCY WADA, top center,
is part of Western Cowgirls dance
ensemble presented by the Ginther
Dance Studio. (Denver Post photo)
* TIA KAWAKAM1, daughter of Mr.
& Mrs. Ed Kawakami, 4916 E. Iowa
Ave,, vas awarded first prise for
her garden in the advanced divi-
sion for summer garden projects,
at Denver Botanic Gardens. She
is a student at Merrill Jr. High.
STANLEY KOSHI HAS
FOREI&N PEN-PALS
TEEN-TOPICS, cont'd:
JANICE SAKAYAMA of North High
is one of the cheerleaders of the
Vikings Pep Club.
TED NAKAGAWA Is a member of
the tennis squad at Abraham Lin-
coln High, and helped down North
High last week.
RICHARD SHIN of Comerce City
was one of the Scouts participat-
ing In the dedication of peace-
ful Valley Boy Scout Ranch, near
Elbert, Colo.
ALAN J. DOHAN, one of the Boy
Scouts who went to the 1st Asian
Jamboree in 1962, has returned to
Japan for 2\ years. DOMAN will
be doing missionary work for his
LDS (Mormon) Church in Japan.
a TERUTAKE KATO is an exchange
student from Japan, enrolled at
Abraham Lincoln High for the new
1964-65 school year.
YURIKO OKUGAWA of Kyoto, Japan
was a recent visitor to the home
of Mr. 6c Mrs. Maurice Marshall of
Lakewood, Colo. She la the sis-
ter of 0T0 OKUGAWA, who graduated
from Lakewood High in 1963. She
planned a 4 months' bus trip of
the U.S. following her graduation
from junior college, and plans to
return to Japan to become an air-
line hostess.
M.Y.F. YOUTHS
TO CHUGWATER
REV. PAUL HAGIYA was Director
of the Methodist 7th grade camp,
at Chugwater, Wyo., during Aug.
GENE TAKAMINE served as the Asst.
Counselor.
STANLEY KOSHI, a Soph, at East
Hi, is hollering for help in res-
ponding to a surplusage of for-
eign pen pals.
He has some 20 letters from a
variety of students in foreign
countries, who want to correspond
to an American student.
Youngsters from the Simpson
Methodist Church were:
CHRIS ANDO
JAN HAGIYA
MARGIE HASEGAWA
DAVID MURAKAMI
VICKI NAKAMURA
MARILYN SHINTO
ALLYN SUNATA
PAUL YAKACUCH1
ALAN YAMAMOTO
Anyone Interested can write to
STANLEY KOSHI, 2008 Vine Street,
Denver, Colo., (80205), or please
call 333-5382.
JIM SHINTO and JOE ARIK1 pro-
vided transportation. En route
home, MR. A MRS. HARRY SHIBA of
Cheyenne, Wyo., extended hospi-
tality of luch to the group.
CALENDAR Of Coming Events
Oct. 10: (Sat) MILE-HI JACL ORIENTAL DINNER BENEFIT, TSBC; 11:30 am. to 7:30 pm.
Oct. 17- Oct. 18: (S-S) DENVER BONSAI CLUB's Exhibit, at Denver-US National Bank, Lobby.
Oct. 19: (Mon) JAPAN SOCIETY General Meeting, Western Fed. Savings Bldg., 8 p.m.
Oct. 24: (Sat) MILE-HI GOLF CLUB'S Awards Dinner-Dance, at the Pinehurst Club
Oct. 25: (Sun) SIMPSON CHURCH ISSEI Dinner for Japanese doctors and students.
I.C.S. ACTIVITIES
KENNETH M. TAGAWA, Chairman of
the coordinating council of the
Intenaountain Collegiate Students
of the Rocky Mtn region, indicat-
ed that social activities of the
ICS would be curtailed this year.
TAGAWA pointed out that inter-
est in the ICS has diminished in
recent years, and there vas some
question whether the organization
should be continued.
For 1964-65, Chrsm TAGAWA in-
dicated that the annual confer-
ence would be held in the spring,
during about April, and that the
ICS would cooperate in the JACL's
dinner dance for June graduates.
The annual Sweetheart Ball, in
Feb., would be discontinued and
the fall get-together social and
vinter ski trip would not be held
this year.
It vas hoped that ICS could be
s coordinating body to maintain
contact with other AJA groups on
various college campuses In Colo-
rado.
Any constructive suggestions
or offer of assistance would be
appreciated by KENNETH M. TAGAWA,
Chairman of ICS, 15 Baker Hall,
University of Colorado, Boulder,
Colorado.
TENNIS PLAYER
Unseeded SUSAN ANDO of Denver,
Colo., made a strong bid in the
Intenaountain Sectional Jr. Ten-
nis Championships at the Univ. of
Utah, in Salt Lake City, during
August.
In the 16 year old girls' sin-
gles bracket, SUSAN defeated 3rd-
ranking Jeannie Wilhelm to reach
the quarter-finals, but was elim-
inated by Susan Ollinger of Salt
Lake City,
However,.In the doubles for 16
year old girls, SUSAN ANDO teamed
With MAR1CAYE CHRISTENSON (a 5th
seeded rank), of Grand Junction,
Colo., to sweep the 16 year old
girls' championship.
* *
SUSAN ANDO didn't mention It,
but she reached the quarterfinals
in the 18-year old girls doubles
championships In the Colo. Junior
Tennis meet, also this suimer.


PAGE 8.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
SEPT,. 1964
BASEBALL TOURNAMENT RESULTS
LABOR DAY BASEBALL TOURNAMENT
A victory-minded Welby team, managed by HARRY ARIKI, von the 1964
Labor Day baseball tournament of the Northern Colorado Nisei Baseball
League, in Denver, Colo., by finally downing a strong Brighton nine,
which was managed by JIM IMATANI, -
and which had jumped into a 9 4
lead in the fourth inning. Welby
came thru to win the Championship
trophy.
OGDEN 20
BUSSEI 5
BRIGHTON 16
GREELEY 2
MILE-HI 20
MAPLETON 19
WELBY 4
FT. LUPTON 2
OGDEN 7
BRIGHTON 9
BRIGHTON 12
WELBY
MILE-HI 0 CHAMPIONS
WELBY 10
WELBY 14
Ft. Lupton came thru with the
consolation title, smashing the
Greeley team by a score of 21-7.
Eight teams, including the an-
nual invaders from Ogden, Utah,
participated in the Tournament.
The Simpson Church was unable to
field a team for the tourney.
GENE TOCHIHARA was President
of the NCNBL for the 1964 season.
Team representatives and managers
for the teams were:
Brighton. ...... PAUL OKADA,
JIM IMATANI, Mgr.
Busseis...............KAY NITTA,
GEO. TSUKAMOTO, Mgr.
Ft. Lupton. GORDON KOSHIO,
RICHARD URANO;
AL APO, Mgr.
Greeley ......... GERRY MIYOSHI.
Mile-Hi Merchants LEE MURATA.
Simpson* Church. MARK HAGIYA,
ED KAWANO, Mgr.
Welby.................JOE SATO,
DAVE TAGAWA;
HARRY ARIKI, Mgr.
DENNIS YAMAMOTO, pitcher for
Welby, won "The Most Outstanding
Player" award, while TOM YOKOOJ1
of Pt. Lupton received "The Most
Promising Player" award.
DENVER GIRLS DEFEAT SAN LUIS VALLEY
The girls judo team from The Denver School of Judo accepted an
invitation to attend the "housewarming" of the San Luis Valley Judo
Club, in Alamosa, Colorado, and to participate in a team match with
members of the San Luis Valley women's and girls' judo class, on Sat.
Aug. 22nd. Sanctioned by the board of the Denver Judo School, seven
feminine judoists from Denver,
accompanied by TOORU TAKAMATSU,
and his family, coaches and pa-
rents, Invaded San Luis Valley.
Members of the Denver girls'
judo team, which won the "shlal"
at Alamosa, scoring 5-1-1, were:
MARILYN ANDERSON (white belt, de-
feated by higher ranking brown
belt for only Denver loss)
JOANN and LINDA CVLTANOVICH (both
won), ANITA CVITANOVICH (draw),
JEANIE HALL (won), and IRIS YASUI
and LAUREL YASUI (both won).
Adult judo leaders accompany-
ing the girls' team included the
Denver School of Judo director,
TOORU TAKAMATSU, with two black
belt judo coaches, LEROY ABE and
JAMES SAKABE. Parents making the
trip to Alamosa were "HOCK" HALL,
JOE CVITANOVICH and MIN YASUls.
LAUREL YASUI demonstrating the
ukl-otoshi throwing technique, at
the San Luis Valley Judo Club's
'housewarming' activities In Ala-
mosa, Colo., on Aug. 22nd. The
"victim" in the demonstration be-
ing thrown is JEAN1E HALL.
The Denver girls were treated
to an evening swimming party and
hamburger feed by WHITFORD MYERS,
while Denver adults were enter-
tained by the HARRY SUMIDA's at a
steak fry at their home.
LABOR DAY TOURNAMENT,
Sept. 6-7, 1964.
Above is chart showing elimi-
nation of teams in the NCNBL La-
bor Day baseball tournament.
As indicated, Welby squeaked
by a strong Ft. Lupton team, and
swamped the Mile-Hi Merchants to
face the strong Brighton team in
the finals, but win they did, end
are 1964 NCNBL Champions!
1964 NCNBL PEE WEE LEAGUE:
The Greeley Pee Wee team took
the League Championship, with the
Buesel Blues in 2nd place, and
Ft. Lupton in 3rd place.
The Pee Wee All-Stars managed
to defeat Greeley by a score of//
18-10 in their August tournament.
In the Pee Wee baseball league
series, MARK MIYOSHI of Greeley
was named "Outstanding Pitcher",
and MEGG TOKUNAGA also of Greeley
was accorded "Moat Valuable Play-
er" honors.
WESLEY OKAMOTO of the Ft. Lup-
ton juniors earned "The Most Pro-
mising Player" award.
BILL CHIKUMA directed the Pee
Wee league for the Northern Colo-
rado Nisei Baseball League, and
noted that many potential talents
are being developed among the Ju-
niors as future baseball stars.
Judo officials participating in the housewarming for the San Luis
Valley Judo Club, at the Colorado National Guard Armory, in Alamosa,
Colo., were, above; TOORU TAKAMATSU (6th dan), 2nd Nat'l Vice-Pres,
of the Black Belt Judo Federation of America, who conferred 2nd de-
gree Black Belt honors to EDWIN 1MADA, of Adams State College (at ex-
treme right), the head instructor of the San Luis Valley club.
Standing in between are M/Sgt JAMES SAKABE, 3rd degree Black Belt,
and LEROY ABE, 2nd degree Black Belt, who was Rocky Mtn 1964 over-all
AAU judo champion. SAKABE and ABE assisted in instruction of some 50
judo students and members of the San Luis Valley Judo Club.
Above are the women's and girls' class of the San Luis Valley Judo
Club, and the visiting women's team from the Denver School of Judo:
Standing in back row, left to rieht are: EDWIN IKADA, instructor of
San Luis Valley Judo Club, DIANE ALLEN (SLV), JOANN and LINDA CVITA-
NOVICH (DSJ), SARA LUCERO (SLV), MARILYN ANDERSON (DSJ), and TOORU
TAKAMATSU, head Instruct of The Denver School of Judo, Inc.
Middle row, left to right are: LAUREL YASUI, JEAM HALL, IRIS YASUI,
(all DSJ), and TERRY MAIMBERG and SUSIE MOENY of the SLV Judo Club.
Bottom row, front, are: TONI BOWERS and CARA COUTURE (SLV), ANITA
CVITANOVICH (DSJ), MICHELE MYERS and NANCY NORTON (SLV). (Photos by
Whitford Myers of Alamosa, $olq., for the San Luis Valley Judo Club.)


SEPT., 1964.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 9,
PROMOTIONS IN RANK DENVER SCHOOL JUDO DENVER WOMEN'S
AT SCHOOL OF JUDO
Promotions in rank, awarded by
The Denver School of Judo, Inc.,
on Fri., Sept. 25th, included no
black belt awards or advancements
but totalled 75 in lesser ranks.
SENIOR MENS DIVISION:
Ni-kvu
ELDON ANDERSON JOEL BRIDGEMAN
PHILIP J. JORDAN
San-kyu
ALFRED BECKER GEORGE KODAMA
DONALD R. KAHL
Yon-kyu
KARL F. WEIFFENBACH
INTERMEDIATE DIVISION:
Ikkyu
BRADBURN ENDO RICHARD TABUCHI
Ml-kvu
GEORGE HAMMOND GARY OKIMOTO
ERIC K. MATOBA GEORGE PIERCE
San-kvu
ROBT. BULLOCK CHRIS LINDENBERGER
MICHAEL MASAM0R1
Yon-kyu
ERIC MATOBA DWIGHT D. KISHIYAMA
MATTHEW ASAI LARRY S, KISHIYAMA
LARRY ENOMOTO JACK M. NOVOTNY
GIRNN FUSHIMI RODNEY B. SATO
KEITH M. HAMMOND PAUL STEVENS
th
THEODORE T. TANI
JTOI^sJ^S|_jmSION:
Ikkyu
MALCOLM CAMPBELL JAMES K. HALL
EARL FUKUHARA GLENN K. NITTA
JEFFREY A. SMITH
Ni-kyu
MIKE FERMANIS PAT HAMMOND
THOMAS GOMEZ STAN NAKAYAMA
STEVEN N. TSUTSUMI
PATRICK ARIKI
DAVID FURUKAWA
JERRY GOMEZ
WILLIS HERBERT
San-kyu
DOUGLAS JORDAN
JOSEPH TAKAMATSU
DAVID WOOIMAN
ROBERT J. ZARATE
Yon-kyu
JOHN J. ASAI
DAVID BULLOCK
LEO HEBERT
MARK C. LOUFBK
ALAN MIYAGISHIMA
BOBBY NAKAOKA
STANLEY RADACH
EDDIE STONE
JOHN TODOROK1
S. WEIFFENBACH
Go-kyu
ANTHONY ASAI
DANIEL HEBERT
DANIEL MATSUNO
WALTER SHAFFER

JUDO PROMOTIONS
At the promotion ceremonies of
The Denver Judo School, on Fri.,
Sept. 25, sixteen members of the
women's and girls judo class re-
ceived promotions as follows:
WOMENS DIVISION:
SENIOR SECTION
San-kyu
JO LINDENBERGER HIROKO TSUBOKAWA
SALLY LINDENBERGER
Yon-kyu
CONNIE HUMBLE MARGARET SMITH
INTERMEDIATE SECTION
San-kyu
MARILYN ANDERSON JEAN N. HALL
JOANN CVITANOVICH IRIS A. YASUI
LINDA CVITANOVICH LAUREL YASUI
JUNIOR SECTION
San-kyu
NAOMI M. HISAMOTO
Yon-kyu
ANITA CVITANOVICH
KAROL J. NAKAMURA
JAN SMITH
KIM SMITH
HON. SHINICHIRO IWAMOTO, Mayor of Takayama, Japan, at left, with
YACHIRO TARADA, Pres, of the Takayama Chamber of Commerce, met with
TOORU TAKAMATSU of the Denver School of Judo, and a newspaperman from
the Yomiuri Shimbun of Tokyo, Japan, to examine the local judo dojo.
Members of the Denver School of ------------------------------------
Judo served Rocky Ford melons to "Qgg** HANES WINS
the visitors as a special treat.
(Photo by TOM T. MASAMORI.)
MILE-HI GOLFERS
Mile-Hi Golf Club has set its
annual Awards and Inaugural Din-
ner-Dance at the Pinehurst Coun-
try Club, for Sat., Oct, 24th.
New officers for the coming
year are as follows:
PRESIDENT..........SAM KUMAGAI
Vice-Pres..........KODY KODAMA
Secretary...........TERNO ODOW
Treasurer............ROY TERADA
10 GRAND TOURNEY
DARLENE HANES, winner of the
10-Grand Bowling Tournament, was
"Most Improved Bowler" of the Ni-
sei Women's Bowling league, for
1963-64, with a 133 average.
She is the daughter of James
M. Tochihara, 2655 Champa Street,
Denver, Colorado.
SIMPSON CHURCH
BOWLINO LEAGUE
The Simpson Methodist Church's
mixed bowling league commenced
their 1964-65 season at Celebrity
Lanes in Aug., with 20 teams, ac-
cording to WILLIE HIROKAWA, Pres.
CUSTOM PHOTO FINISHING
711 Z1VKT $r.
Denver s, colo.
Telephone: CH 4-4073
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Happy Canyon Shopping Canter,
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Denver 22, Colorado.
STOKE TANITA, Mgr. Tel. 756-9411
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Personal Attention
to Every Detail
United Nations Insurance Company
VEST BOTH AVENUE at SHERIDAN BOULEVARD
WESTMINSTER, COLORADO.
P. 0. BOX 1501, DENVER 1, COLORADO.
HIROSUKE ISHIKAWA, President
Tel.: HA 9-3537


PAGE 10.
Sane forty-odd members of the Denver School of Judo, Inc., participated in the Denver-Takayama Festival
Parade, on Aug. 13, 1964. Above is scene of the famous "yatai" being pulled by some of the members of the
Denver School of Judo, preceded by others carrying a "mikoshi". At extreme left is a member of the Taka-
yama delegation, while in right foreground is DR. YOSHIO ITO, leading
the Denver Judo School contingent. (Takayama photos by TOM MASAM0R1.)
DENVER-TAKAYAMA SISTER CITIES FESTIVAL
The Denver-Takayama Sister Cities Festival, August 10-15, 1964, as
conceived and staged by MIRIAM HALEY, Chairman of the Denver-Takayama
conmittee, in Denver, Colorado, was a tremendous success.
MAYOR SHINICHIRO IWAMOTO led a 23-man delegation from Takayama, Ja-
pan to Denver, Colo., and the group was received in a whirlwind round
of activities, with breakfasts, luncheons, banquets, tours, parades,
welcomes, and a hundred other programs following one after the other
in exciting succession.
WILLIAM K. HOSOKAWA and WALTER F. HELLMICH served as Co-Chairmen of
the Festival. BILL HOSOKAWA is Associate Editor of The Denver Post as
well as Chairman of the Board of The Japan Society of Colorado.
MAY TGRIZAWA served a9 liaison for festival activities and possibly
more than any other single individual assured the success of the week-
long People-to-Peopie project in Denver, Colorado.
The Japanese Association of Colorado Initiated the welcoming cere-
monies for the Takayama visitors, at the Women's Club building, with a
Japanese banquet catered by Fuji-En, on Mon., Aug. 10th.
The Tri-State Buddhist Church was outstanding in its contributions
to the parade and festival programs, with probably more than 200 mem-
bers participating in various phases of the activities. TSBC's prise-
winning float was supervised by JAMES KANEMOTO of Longmont, Colo., and
scores of Bussei workers headed by SAM SUEKAMA, assisted in putting in
many hundreds of hours on the project.
Above are some of the members of the Japanese Association of Colo-
rado, participating in the welcoming ceremonies at Civic Center. Left
to right, front row, are: KENICHI SUZUKI, MOROKU SUYEHIRO, SEISHIRO
NAKAMURA and HARRY G. MATOBA, Vice-Pres. of the Colo. Japanese Assn.
NEW ADDRESSES
AJAs in the Denver metropoli-
tan area move around quite a bit,
as per following listinge:
DR. and MRS. MASA GIMA, 1357 So.
Jackson Street, Denver 80210.
BOB and JANET HOSHIJIMA, 1827 Ir-
ving Street, Denver 80204.
BILL and MAE KUROKI, 1392 S. Dud-
ley Street, Denver 80229.
CHAS. and EMIKO MOON (Nakasugi),
913 Humboldt St., Denver 80206
DR. and MRS. ALBERT Y. NODA, 4735
Montview Blvd., Denver 80207.
MR. and MRS. ROBERT NOGUCHI, 8260
Louise Drive, Denver 80221.
SEPT.. 1964
TAK and MITCHIE TERASAKI were
feted on their 25tb wedding anni-
versary on Sept. 13th at the home
of DR. and MRS. TONY KAWAN0. Ce-
lebrants included the JAMES LMA-
TANls, R0BLEY BRANNONs, DON TA-
NABEs and the MIN YASUIs.
TAK TERASAKI is now managing
the Republic Rexall drug store,
at 299 So. Sheridan Blvd, after
leaving T. K. Pharmacy, where he
had worked for almost 25 years.
His new telephone is 233-6527.
MARY TAKETA has opened her new
Bellva Beauty Salon at a new lo-
cation in the Auditorium Hotel,
722-l4th St., in Denver, Colo.
LARRY MATSUURA, a psychologist
at Veterans Hospital, has moved
to Ft. Collins, to work for his
Ph.D. degree in psychology.
JUN 0YA, accompanied by TOSHI,
his wife, were visitors to Japan
and Hong Kong, this sun&ner.
LT. FRANK NAKAMURA reported he
will be transferred from Biloxi,
Miss., to the Barksdale A.F.B. in
Louisiana, during September.
FRANK TAKESHITA, 3655 Glencoe
St., won the "Lawn of the Month"
contest sponsored by Denver Post
and Western Federal Savings Assn,
receiving a GE portable TV set as
1st prize.
During July, he won the "Gar-
den of the Month" contest, spon-
sored by Rocky Mtn News, Empire
Savings, and Ortho-Gro Co.
DENVER VISITORS
DR. and MRS. KATSUMX UBA, and
their three children, were summer
visitors to Denver, visiting with
his brothers, DR. MAHIT0 UBA and
TOSH UBA, and their mother, MRS.
MISAO UBA.
"KATS" UBA attained the high
rank of Life Master in the ACBL,
at the summer nationals in L.A.,
where he resides and practices as
s dentist.
MR. & MRS. ROBERT KUWAHARA of
Larchmont, N.Y., were brief visi-
tors in Denver, recently.
ROBT. KUWAHARA is an animation
artist for CBS, and was formerly
an employee of Walt Disney.
JULIA KUWAHARA is a daughter
of the Late.DR. P. M. SUSKI, who
lived in Denver, after being eva-
cuated to Heart Mtn WRA, during
the war.
The KUWAHARAs visited with the
Pagano sisters, Mary and Teresa,
and with the Bill Hosokawas, dur-
ing their stay in Denver. Mary
Pagano was a teacher at Heart Mtn
and Bill Hosokawa was editor of
The Heart Mtn Sentinel during the
evacuation.


MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 11.
SEPT,, 1964.
TOWN TALK, cont'd:
EDWARD and SUMI HAYNES (former
Sumi Fujita) are now residing at
5629 Edinburg Drive, in El Paso,
Texas.
A reception was held recently
for BOB and JANE FUJIOKA who were
wed in Hawaii on Aug. 23rd. BOB
goea back to engineering studies
at C.U. Extension, while the new
MRS. JANE FUJIOKA is a 2nd grade
teacher at Secrist School, in Ar-
vada, Colo.
SUE AKIYAMA and ZEKE TOLENTINO
were winners of the Sat. morning
side session at the Denver sunner
sectional bridge tournament, held
at the Denver Hilton Hotel during
the week-end of Aug. 21-22-23, in
which more than 1900 entries were
participating._______
BIRTHS
FUKINO, Henry M........a BOY
3233 Steele St., Denver
FUKUHARA, Harold S. .a GIRL
5139 Meade St., Denver
KIMURA, Manabu.........a BOY
3238 St. Paul St., Denver
KITSUTAKA, Justin S. . . . a GIRL
2254 Locust St., Denver
MUROYA, Tom T..........a BOY
6881 York St., Denver
SAGARA, Carl K.........a GIRL
3050 S. Hobart Way, Denver
YAMAKAWA, George.......a BOY
3035 Ash Street, Denver
YAMASHITA, Henry N. ... a BOY
3330 E. 32nd Ave., Denver
WEDDINGS
MARY MOTOYAMA, Denver, Colo.,
and VERLE MAXWELL, also Denver.
RONALD H. NAGATA of Littleton,
Colo., and IRENE M0RITA of Olaa,
Hawaii.
YOSHIKO NUMATO, of Cheyenne,
Wyo., and GEORGE CARDON of Lara-
mie, Wyo.
A.J.A. ARCHITECT
IN COLO. SPRINGS
CLIFFORD S. NAKATA, member of
the American Institute of Archi-
tects, is a partner in the firm
of HIGGINBOTHAM, NAKATA & MUIR at
206 E. Pikes Peak Ave., in Colo-
rado Springs, Colo. (633-4382)
NAKATA is a native of Calif.,
and worked in California for sev-
eral years, prior to his coming
to Colorado
ENGAGEMENTS
ARLENE SATOW, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Norman Satow of Colorado
Springs, was engaged to ROGER L.
JACKS of Golden, Colo. Both are
students at CSC in Greeley, and
plan to wed next June, after gra-
duation.
* GENE TAGAWA of Denver will wed
GEORGIA SHIMAZU, of Los Angeles,
next March. Gene is a senior in
accounting at Denver Univ., and
his fiancee is a senior at Calif.
State College in L.A.
EMI Y0K0GAWA of San Francisco,
Calif., wed GEORGE SUYEH1R0 of
Denver, Colo., at the Simpson Me-
thodist Church, on Aug. 30th.
George Suyehiro is a former
Denverite, now employed as an ac-
countant for Lockheed Aircraft in
Sunnyvale, Calif. The new Mrs.
Geo. Suyehiro is a public health
nurse in S.F.
(Both wedding photos above are by
EDWIN K. SHIMABUKUR0 of Denver.)
HAMILTON FUNDS, INC
77*7 GRANT
Denver Colorado
Bo*. Priori* £25.7077 RCS. PrONC 433.1222
REPRESENTED BY
HOLLY A. MCOOVERN
Unit Mgr.
ia gib

m 0 RKET
e f\nest in Fins nno feathers
KE 4-5983 1919 LAWREHCC ST.
DOROTHY TOBO became the bride
of DOUGLAS UYEMURA, both of Den-
ver, at the TSBC, on Aug. 30th.
Dorothy Tobo is the daughter
of Mrs. Fujiye Tobo, 2611 Stout
St., in Denver. She was majoring
in mathematics at C.U., prepara-
tory for secondary education.
Douglas Uyemura, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Joe Uyemura, is a den-
tal student at Northwestern Uni-
versity in Chicago, 111., where
the newly-weds will make their
temporary home until graduation.
T OBITUARIES
FRED M. KAWAKAMI, 8980 West 64th
Ave., Arvada. Husband of Aki;
father of Mark and Christine;
son of Noye Kawakami, Denver.
Brother of Kay and Chas. Kawa-
kami, Denver; Grace Ito, Great
Falls, Mont.; Ruth Shinto, Den-
ver; Unis Kinoshita, Albuquer-
que, N.M.
TAKEJIRO KUBO, 343 3rd St., Ft.
Lupton, Colo. Husband of Seki
Kubo, Ft. Lupton, Colo.
NASE MAEDA, of Greeley, Colorado.
Mother of Sue Maeda, Denver.
MIYO SERA, 3540 St. Paul Street,
Denver. Wife of Taichi; mother
of Jim T. and John T. Nakamura,
Denver, Colo.
TSUNESABURO UYEDA, 1944 Larimer
St., Denver. Father of Ann An-
derson; grandfather of July An-
derson, Denver, Colo.
MEREDEE ANN YAMABAYASHI, 1380 Ma-
con St., Aurora. Daughter of
Capt. & Mrs. Gilbert Y. Yamaba-
yashi. Granddaughter of Helen
Maklshima, Aurora, and of Mr. &
Mrs. M. Yamabayashi, Hawaii.
2815 DOWNING ST
DENVER 5, COLORADO
TEL
BILL KUROKI, MGR. 244-6068
PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS LISTINGS
ARCHIUCT
dentists CLIFFORD S. NAKATA Colo. Spgs 206 E. Pikes Peak Ave. 633-4382
JOHN CHIKUMA, DDS Brighton lawyers
75 So. 4th St. 659-1825 T0SHI0 ANDO 1942 Larimer St. *AC 2-5315
MASA GIMA, DDS
1404 E. 18th Ave. AL 5-6822 MINORU YASUI 1225 20th St. CH 4-2239
MICHAEL T. HORI. DDS
4101 E. Wesley Ave. SK 6-0924 OPTOMETRISTS MAS KANDA, O.D.
T. ITO, DDS 1515 W. 48th Ave. GE 3-4221
830 18th Street KE 4-8680
2838 Federal Blvd. GL 5-0741 BEN MAT0BA, O.D. 1959 Larimer St. KE 4-1941
Y. ITO, DDS
SUEO ITO, DDS MISA0 MATOBA, O.D. Ft. Lupton
SETS ITO, DDS Burt Building UL 7-6550
1477 Pennsylvania CH 4-6589 PHYSICIANS
K0J1 KANAI, DDS Wheatridge CHAS. FUJISAKI, M.D. Brighton
4310 Harlan St. HA 2-58X7 40 No. Main St. 659-0783
TONY KAWANO, DDS T. K. KOBAYASHI, M.D.
1750 Humboldt St. KE 4-3084 DICK D. MOMII, M.D. ALBERT NODA, M.D.
ROBERT MAYEDA, DDS 1227 27th Street KE 4-3104
Interstate Trust Bldg. TA 5-6961 HOWARD SUENAGA, M.D.
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS 830 18th Street AC 2-1314
Interstate Trust Bldg. TA 5-6961 M. GEO. TAKEN0, M.D.
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS Medical Arts Bldg.,
Interstate Trust Bldg. TA 5-7498 1955 Pennsylvamia St. TA 5-0783
KEN UYEHARA, DDS Brighton AYAK0 WADA, M.D.
40 No. Main Street 659-3062 810 23rd Street TA 5-2565
JACK YAMAMOTO, DDS Lakewood NAHIT0 UBA, D.O.
10005 W. 17th Place 238-3331 1230 21st Street MA 3-3743


PAGE 12.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A, NEWS
SEPT.. 1964.
REMINISCENCES OF
ISSEI WANTED FOR
HISTORY PROJECT
Human interest stories of old
Issei, who came into the Colorado
country around the early part of
this century, is being sought by
the Japanese History project.
Names and addresses, with the
approximate age and date of arri-
val in Colorado, are especially
desired.
Anyone having any information
concerning such Issei pioneers to
Colorado is urged to contact the
JACL office, 1225-20th St., Den-
ver, Colo., 80202, or call CH 4-
2239 or RA 2-9255.
ISSEI DINNER FOR
VISITING JAPANESE
REV. JON FUJITA of the Simpson
Methodist Church, reported that
the Issei division of the Church
will host an annual welcome din-
ner for all doctors, students and
visitors from Japan, now tempora-
rily residing in the Denver area.
All are most cordially invited
to attend the welcome dinner, set
for Sun., Oct. 25th.
According to the REV. FUJITA,
there are approximately: 50 doc-
tors, 30 students, 100 recently
arrived Japanese wives, and inde-
terminate number of visitors from
Japan in this area.
If you know of any lonely vi-
sitor from Japan, who wishes to
exchange experiences with recent
arrivals, please have them con-
tact REV. FUJITA at 399-2036.
MIMI EMIZAWA instructing DAVE FURUKAWA, Pres, of Mile-Hi JACL, in
the proper use of chop sticks, preparatory to the JACL BENEFIT DINNER
to be held at the Tri-State Buddhist Church, in Denver, Colorado, on
Sat., Oct. 10th, from 11:30 a.m. until 7:30 p.m.
5 10 \StK ST,
DEnvep. z} coio.
l)Anftiu ch
JAPANESE GARDEN
PROJECT PENDING
MAY TORIZAWA, liaison for the"
Japanese community in Denver dur-
ing the recent Takayama Festival,
indicated concern about progress
of proposals for a Japanese gar-
den in Denver, Colorado.
In 1960, the Japanese Assn in-
itiated the project tentatively,
with preliminary landscape plans
and Japanese garden drawings made
by the late STANLEY K. Y0SHIMURA.
Further progress was stymied by
a lack of a sustained program to
assure financing to completion.
The Japan Society of Colorado,
in July, 1964, indicated support
in the sum of $500.00, but no de-
finite arrangements have been fi-
nalized to complete the project.
DORIS NAKATA, at right, pour-
ing tea, and NATCHI FURUKAWA, in
right background, are typical of
the young ladies who will be as-
sisting at the food bazaar. Cul-
tural displays and movies of Ja-
pan will be shown all afternoon.
Tickets are $1.50 for adults,
and 75$ for children, for a com-
plete dinner, and are available
from any JACLer, or thru the JACL
office, 244-2239 or 722-9255.
UYEDA CO-DEAN AT
INTERFAITH MEET
ROBERT Y. UYEDA was one of the
six co-deans serving at the major
interfaith retreat of the United
Church Men in the Denver metropo-
litan area at Camp La Foret, near
Colorado Springs, on Sept. 26-27.
Among the six co-deans were
such prominent community leaders
as SHELDON STEINHAUSER as direct-
or of the Anti-Defamation League,
TED YODER of the Natl Conference
of Christians and Jews, and other
distinguished public figures.
UYEDA was member of the Exec.
Board of United Church Men, and
Vice-Chrmn of Coordinating Coun-
cil on Human Relations. He is a
member of the Auditor's staff for
the City and County of Denver.
HORIUCHI SERVES
HUMAN RELATIONS
EIJI HORIUCHI, representative
for West America Securities Inc.,
was designated official delegate
of Mile-Hi JACL to the Coordinat-
ing Council on Human Relations.
As a JACL delegate, HORIUCHI
attended the report meeting of
the Coordinating Council convened
by MAYOR TOM CURRIGAN, on Wed.,
Sept. 30th at the Heart 0 Denver
Motel.
SAM Y. MATSUMOTO
NEW YORK LIFE INS. CO.
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FAMOUS FOR CHItlESe DKHtS
visit "4bfu V/uu^nU VmC
SPECIALIZING IN ORIENTAL FOODS AND GOODS
I94G LARimER ST. K E 4-G03I
SPECIAL MANJU SHIPPED FROM WEST COAST
$1.89 box of 15 $2.39 box of 20
Store Hours:
(Rice: New crop in October)
Open dally;
Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, & Sat. 8:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.
Special Sunday hours..............10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.

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2015 mflRKET ST. KE4-4008
Return Postage Guaranteed:
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA NEWS,
1225 20th Street,
Denver 2, Colorado
(RETURN REQUESTED)
BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
DENVER, COLO.
Permit #1033.