Citation
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 6, Number 2

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Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 6, Number 2
Series Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
31

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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DENVER. COLORADO.
OCT., 1964.
MILE-HI JACL ANNUAL FALL MEETING,
HALLOWEEN PARTY,FRI., OCT. 30IH
The annual fall meeting of the Mile-Hi JACL will combine a family
pot-luck supper, children's Hallowe'en party, and a general business
meeting, in the upstairs dining room of Cathay Post, 2015 Market St.,
in Denver, Colo., on Fri., Oct. 30th.
The pot-luck supper will be at 6:30 p.ra., with
all JACLers urged to bring one dish to take care
of their own family. Anyone not contacted by the
------------------------ supper
FREE U.N. CONCERT
AUDITORIUM, NOV. I
"Salute to the United Nations"
concert will be held at the Audi-
torium Theatre, from 3:00 p.m.,
on Sun., Nov, 1st.
The Denver Symphony Orchestra,
USAF Chorale, CWC Concert Choir,
and the Loretto Heights College
Chorus, will participate.
com-
mittee please
come anyway,
without spe-
cial invita-
tion.
The chil-
dren's Hal-
lowe'en Party
will commence
at about 7:30 p.m., with cartoons
to be shown by TERNO ODOW, and to
be concluded about 8:30 p.m.
MAS SATOW
VOL, VI, No. 2.
TSBC FOOD BAZAAR
SET FOR NOV. 7-8
The annual Bazaar of the Tri-
State Buddhist Church, 1947 Law-
rence St., Denver, Colo., will be
held on Sat. and Sun., Nov. 7-8,
at the Church.
Hours will be from 2-7 p.m. on
Sat., Nov. 7th, and from 12 noon
until 6 p.m. on Sun., Nov. 8th.
More than 160 volunteers and
committee chairmen will assist in
the food service, which will in-
clude chow mein, shrimp, pastries
and salads. Adult portions are
$1.50 per plate.
In addition to Oriental foods,
there will be ikebana and bonsai,
as well as booths for games and
prizes during the two-day Bazzar.
Gen. Co-Chrmn are the two Pre-
sidents of TSBC, FRANK T. NAKATA
and LEE MURATA, with all church-
affiliated organizations assist-
ing in staging the Bazaar.
UNITED NATIONS
FETE* OCT, 24
GENEVIEVE FIORE, Exec. Secty
of the United Nations Association
for Colorado, at 1600 Logan St.,
Denver, noted that United Nations
Week was observed Oct. 18-24th.
"United Nations Week" in Den-
ver will be climaxed with a Fes-
tival Dance of some 20 costumed
dance groups performing music and
dances from some 30 countries, at
the Hellenic Center, 4610 E. Ala-
meda Avenue (at Dexter St.), from
7:30 p.m., on Sat., Oct. 24th.
"Japan Night" will be featured
at the International House, 1600
Logan St., from 5:30 p.m., @ 50$
for adults and 25$ for children,
on Fri., Oct. 23rd.
Thru out the week from Oct. 16
thru Oct. 24, Russia, the Muslim
countries, the American Indians,
Coanonvealths of the British Em-
pire, South American nations, Is-
rael, Germany, and countries of
southeast Asia, will present pro-
grams nightly at International
House, commencing from 5:30 p.m.
Gourmet dinners, prepared by
Chef Maurice, will be available
at $2.50 and up, at International
House, during the Festival. In-
formation or reservations can be
obtained by calling 266-3658.
In addition to programs, music
and dances, International foods,
and colorful demonstrations in
native costumes of a Pakistani
and Arabian wedding, bull fight
demonstration, and fashion shows,
there will be many displays.
JANET OKAMURA
JANET OKAMURA, daughter of Mr.
& Mrs. Shiogo Okamura, 4972 Fill-
more St., Denver, Colo., at pre-
sent a senior at Colorado College
in Colorado Springs, will be spe-
cially honored by Mile-Hi JACL at
its annual fall meeting at Cathay
Post lounge, on Fri., Oct. 30th.
VOTE INSTRUCTIONS
AT TSBC, OCT. 25
The Cathay Post #185, American
Legion, has arranged for a demon-
stration of a voting machine, at
the Tri-State Buddhist Church, on
Sunday afternoon, Oct. 25th.
BEN MURAKAMI, official of the
Denver election comnission, as-
sisted by TOM HIKIDA (both former
Conmanders of Cathay Post), will
explain mechanics of operating
the voting machine, and will sup-
ply complete sample ballots of
the Nov. 3rd election.
HARRY G. MATOBA of the Colo-
rado Japanese Assn, and citizen-
ship instructor, will assist in
interpreting for the Issei.
Admission is free, but tickets
must be obtained from AAUN-UNESCO
office, 1600 Logan St., Denver,
Colo., 80203. (Tel.: 534-5813)
FOUNDATION FOR DEAF EDUCATION
"MY FAIR LADY
BENEFIT SHOW AT
DENHAM, NOV. II
The Foundation for Deaf Educa-
tion is sponsoring the premiere
showing of My Fair Lady", at the
Denham Theatre, in Denver, Colo.,
on Wed., Nov. 11th.
Patrons are $25.00 per couple,
and Contributor's at $5.00 per
seat to provide training for spe-
cial teachers of deaf children.
Tickets may be obtained from
The Foundation for Deaf Education
at 2945 So. Gaylord St., Denver,
Colo. 80210. (Tel.: 255-1414)
NATIONAL JACL REPORT:
MASAO W. SATOW, National JACL
Director from San Francisco, will
report on national JACL programs
and on organizational matters.
SATOW will also confer on Sat.
(Oct. 31st) with officials of the
1965 Natl JACL Bowling Tourna-
ment to be held in Denver, Colo.,
on Mar. 8-13, 1965.
SPECIAL PRESENTATION:
A special presentation will be
made to JANET OKAMURA for winning
the Nat'l JACL Essay Contest, for
the 2nd consecutive time.
JANET OKAMURA won the National
Trophy in the JACL Essay Contest,
at the Seattle convention in 1962
end repeated in winning national
honors at the Detroit convention
in 1964.
POLITICAL INFORMATION:
In light of the general elec-
tions to be held on Nov. 3rd, a
panel of young people will pre-
sent views on candidates and is-
sues.
Tentatively, HOWARD KOSHI of
Colo. School of Mines, and RONALD
IN0UYE of C.U., will support the
candidacy of Goldwater. As of
press time, youths to speak for
the Johnson administration were
not definite.
1965 JACL BOARD NOMINATIONS:
HENRY SUZUKI, Nominations and
Election Chrmn for Mile-Hi JACL,
will submit a slate of nominees
for 7 new JACL Board members, and
one replacement for a vacancy, at
the general meeting. Any JACLer
may nominate candidates from the
floor, provided prior sssent has
been obtained from the nominee.


PAGE 2.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.JA. NEWS
OCT., 1964.
OUR APOLOGIESs
In the front page picture of
MIIKO TAKA in our Sept, issue, we
noted an "unidentified spectator
in the background.
We apologize for our dopiness:
The lady is THERESA McCABE, wife
of Robert J. McCabe, representa-
tive of The Japan Air Lines, in
Denver, Colorado.
SPECIAL AUTUMN
TOUR OF JAPAN
MATOBA TRAVEL BUREAU of Denver
is cooperating with JIO'S TRAVEL
SERVICE, of Berkeley, Calif., to
sponsor a 13-day tour of Japan,
scheduled for Nov. 2-14, 1964.
Highlights of the tour, to be
made by Japan Air Lines jet leav-
ing from San Francisco, will be
two full days in Tokyo, visits to
Nikko, Yokohama, Kamakura, Eno-
shima, Hakone Nat'l Park, Atami
spas, Ise shrine, Nara and Kyoto.
Travel in Japan will be train,
and accommodations at first class
hotels, or inns. The total cost
of the tour is $1,149.16. Call
MATOBA TRAVEL BUREAU, MA 3-8946,
for full information.
1964 OLYMPICS IN TOKYO, JAPAN
Above is Komazawa Sports Park in Tokyo, Japan, where many of the
1964 Tokyo Olympic Games were staged. The numbers indicate (1) gym-
for wrestling, (2) and (3) hockey fields, (4) football sta-
(5) parking area, (7) volley ball courts, and (8) the Olympic
and Esplanade. The above sports complex was only a
part of the multi-million r
nasrum
dium,
Memorial Tower
dollar
facilities constructed to stage
the 18th Olympiad, the first held
outside the Western world.
TRAVEL
SERVICE BUREAU-
IXZ5*-27 ZIS+ST.
PH A 3-8946
To Japan, this was not just an
international sports event, but a
chance to prove to 30,000 tourist
visitors that Japan has now truly
joined the modern mainstream of
Western civilization.
Approximately 8,000 athletes
from 98 nations competed in 20
sports at the 1964 Tokyo Olympiad
during Oct. (Photo by J.A.L.)
Be Tsukikos guest on
your flight to Japan
From the moment you board your DC-6 )et Courier,
Tsukiko Yamazaki observes every detail of traditional Japanese courtesy
and hospitality. She pampers you with attentive service, offers you
delicacies of the East and Westmakes you feel you are already in Japan.
\bur |AL flight, whether in the Economy or First Class cabin, will be
gracious and restful. Yet JAI flights cost no more. JAL fares are the same
as all airlines. The real difference is in JAL's superior service,
personal attention and convenient schedules.
Daily flights leave from Los Angeles or San Francisco. Visit family or
friends in Hawaii, at no extra fare, and continue on to Japan at
your convenienceany day of the week. Connections at
Tokyo for cities throughout Japan are excellent. See
your travel agent, and fly amid the caim beauty
of Japan at almost the speed of sound.
JAPAN
JAPANESE PRINTS
AT I NT. HOUSE
The current exhibit of modern
Japanese wood block prints being
shown at International House, at
1600 Logan St., in Denver, Colo.,
will be continued until Nov. 1.
There are 25 prints, offering
a variety of moods, styles and
techniques. They are a part of
the collection of DEANE KNOX, an
art teacher in the Denver Public
Schools, who spent a year of stu-
dy in Japan.
HIDEO YAJI, a visitor from To-
kyo, Japan, assisted in the exhi-
bit. YAJI is connected with the
Datsun automobile agencies in the
United States.
Oriental
IN THE DENVER HILTON HOTEL
Court Ploce neor 15th Street
AComa 2-3481
FABRICS SENT
TO TAKAYAMA
Hand-printed fabrics, designed
by Denver high school students,
are being sent to foreign schools
in 12 different countries through
International Red Cross as a good
will gesture from Denver.
A special shipment will go to
the Mayor of Takayama, Japan, the
sister city of Denver, Colo., as
a part of the "People-to-People"
cultural exchange program.
JAPAN SOCIETY
The fall meeting of the Japan
Society of Colorado was held, at
Western Federal Savings Bldg., on
Mon., Oct. 19, with TAD YAMAMOTO
presiding.
BILL HOSOKAHA, Assoc. Editor
of The Denver Post, who spent two
months in the Orient this summer,
gave a talk on his observations
in the Far East.
The next meeting of the Japan
Society will be held on Monday,
Jan. 18, 1965.
JAPANESE PRINTS
AT DENVER MUSEUM
MARY LANIUS, Assoc. Curator
of Denver Oriental Art Museum,
displayed 49 Japanese wood block
prints, as a prelude to the in-
ternationally famous "7000 Years
of Iranian Art exhibit.
Included were ukiyo-e prints
by Utamaro, who specialized in
depicting lovely Japanese women;
and later Hokusai, followed by
Hiroshige, whose artistry in de-
lineating natural landscapes has
been described as "most poetic
evocation of nature that any art
has ever produced. ..."
MISS LANIUS indicated that if
pre-arrangements are made, these
prints, and other Japanese arti-
facts, with explanatory lectures
on Japanese art, could be exhi-
bited to special groups of AJAs.
It was noted that a display
of more than 50 modern Japanese
prints from Kyoto and Tokyo were
exhibited during May-June, 1963.
AKEBONO
JAPANESE SAKE AMD BEER
fRZDfiA CHlVeKO ftOKI
1953 LflIUmeR ST. TeL*
(CLOSED MONDAYS)
(TORY UHW6E, 9*6,
1136 10 Th ST.
unvER A.J.fi. mflnAGEmEnT
DENVER, COLORADO
TEL. 825-9530


OCT., 1964.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 3.
JAPANESE VISITORS
JAPANESE PIANIST:
TANIMICHI SUGITA is a member
of the music faculty at the univ.
of Colo., as a visiting lecturer
from Tokyo, Japan. He has a mas*
ters degree in piano from juil-
liard School of Music in New York
and served on the faculty at Rut-
gers Univ., before coming to C.U.
AMERICAN TOUR;
YURIKO OKUGAWA of Kyoto, Japan
was a recent visitor at the home
of Mr. & Mrs. Maurice Marshall of
Lakewood, Colo. she is the sis-
ter of OTO OKUGAWA, who graduated
from Jefferson High, in 1963, as
an exchange student from Japan.
NEW HOME:
DR. YASUHIKO TAKEDA, and fami-
ly, have moved into a new home at
427 Dexter Street, Denver, Colo.
Dr. Takeda is a physician from
Japan, serving at Colorado Gen-
eral Hospital, in Denver, Colo.
PHOTOGRAPHER LEAVES:
HIROMU OKADA, who served as a
photographic intern at The Denver
Post, and assisted The Rocky Jiho
with photos, has returned to Ja-
pan to take up his camera career
as his life's work.
RETURNED TO JAPAN;
DR. Y. TSUCHIYA, resident re-
search physician at the Childrens
Asthmatic Research Institute, in
Denver, Colo., has completed his
tour of duty, and has returned to
Japan with his wife and baby.
MADAME BUTTERFLY
ISSUES CATALOGUE
GENE and KIMIKO SIDE of Madame
Butterfly's Gift Shop, has issued
an attractive, new fall catalogue
of the many unique items in their
inventory at 4609 E. Colfax Ave.,
(East Colfax Ave., at Cherry St.)
in Denver, Colo.
Anyone wishing a copy of this
new gift brochure, preparatory to
early Christmas shopping, may ob-
tain one by calling or writing to
Madame Butterfly's, 277-1923, or
you are warmly invited to drop in
at any time to browse around.
THm MM4K4Ur
JAPAN
philharmonic
SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA
Above are some of the members of the Bonsai Club of Denver, Colo.,
and ladies who exhibited ikebana arrangements, at the 7th annual Bon-
sai and Ikebana Show, at the Denver-U.S. Nat'l Bank, on Oct. 17-18.
Ladies in kimono, seated in front row, who acted as hostesses and
were in charge of the ikebana display were: YURI NODA, TAKINO TAKA-
MATSU, MASANO NAKATSUKA and SHINKO IGUCHI. Others, and those stand-
ing, also assisted, and were mem-
bers of the Bonsai Club, includ-
ing KEN SUGIMOTO, from the Palo
Alto (Calif.) Bonsai Club.
POSITION WANTED:
JAPANESE HOUSEBOY
ICHIRO YAMAODA, an 18 year old
school boy from Kagoshima, Japan,
is seeking a non-paid position as
a houseboy, any-
where in Denver,
but preferably as
close as possible
to Manual High.
In enrolling in
high school, this
fall, YAMAODA was
found inadequate YAMAODA
in English, to keep up with his
studies in school. Consequently,
he is seeking a family where only
English is spoken to hasten his
understanding of the language.
He does not want any compensa-
tion, and is willing to do some
chores about the home, as long as
time is provided for him to study
to keep up with his classes.
Anyone knowing of any such op-
portunities for ICHIRO YAMAODA is
requested to contact MIN YASUI-
DENVER'S MOST COMPLETE
SELECTION OF QUALITY
JAPANESE MERCHANDISE
AT MODERATE PRICES
LARGE SELECTION OF ACCESSORIES
FOR JAPANESE KIMONO
REGULAR STORE HOURS:
MON. thru SAT. .9:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
TUES. evenings open until 9;00 p.m.
SUNDAYS ............... Closed
EUGENE SIDE and KIMIKO SIDE
Proprietors.
4609 E.COLFAX RVE. FR7-I9X5
DEAVGR 2,0, COLO.
SOCIOLOGIST TO
SPEAK* JAN. 16
CAREY McWILLIAMS, a well-known
sociologist from California, will
be speaker for Commentary Lecture
series, in the Auditorium, at 1st
and Grape St., in Denver, Colo,
on Sat., Jan. 16, 1965.
McWILLIAMS is author of "Pre-
judice: Japanese Americans, Sym-
bol of Racial Intolerance", in
1944. Also, he was outspoken in
defense of AJAs during the evacu-
ation period, 1942-44.
The lecture series are spon-
sored by the First Universalist
Church of Denver, Colo.
Tickets and information may be
obtained from Commentary Lectures
at 4101 E. Hampden Ave., Denver,
Colo., 80222. (Tel.: 747-3832)
WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 11. B:30 P.M.
AUOITORIUM THEATRE
tuner MOM TOKYO FIRST TIMf IN THE WeSTtUN WOJUfi
The Philharmonic Symphony Or-
chestra of Japan will present a
concert, for one night only, at
the Auditorium Theatre in Denver,
Colorado, at 8:30 p.m., on Wed.,
Nov. 11th.
Admission prices range from
$2.00 in the upper balcony, and
$2.75 in the lower balcony, to
$3.50 for mezzanine seating, and
$4.00 for main floor seats.
Tickets for the concert are
available by writing or calling
ANDREWS-GARNER ATTRACTIONS, INC.,
630 East 6th Ave., Denver, Colo.,
80203. (Tel.i 744-3339)
A.D.L. TO HONOR
DR. OBERHOLTZER
The Mountain States regional
meeting of Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith will be held, at
Hilton Hotel, in Denver, Colo.,
on Sun., Nov. 15th.
The 'Torch of Liberty Awards
banquet, commencing at 7:00 p.m.,
honors DR. KENNETH OBERHOLTZER,
Supt. of Denver Public Schools.
Reservations for dinner will
be accepted at the A.D.L. office,
623 Empire Bldg., Denver, Colo.,
80202. (Tel.: 623-6209)
Japanese Books -Oriental Art Goods
<3£obun-$>ka
0ENVCR. C01 OftADO
Phone KEyslone 4-4S37
1234 2.1h street
FOR ft DELIGHTFUL VISIT
to jflPfin come to.
mi EM
SUKIVflKI RESTAURAflT
330 uncoin st.
VISIT OUR GIFT SHOP
IN THE SHERMAN PLAZA HOTEL
Tel.: 266-2170
COCKTAILS SOe From 3 to t
DINNERS ton 3.00 nd up
Every TUE. & THU. at 9 PM
Authentic movies of Japan
shown in Cocktail Lounge.
DELIGHTFULLY DIFFERENT
JAPANESE FOOD"
hours:
Tue. thru Fri.
11:30 to 1; 00 AM
SAT. 5:00 to 1:30 AM
SUN. 2:00 to 10:00 PM
CLOSED moriDAVS


PAGE 4.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
OCT.. 1964
MTN- PLAINS AJANEWS
Published monthly, except July
and August. Mailed by the 30th.
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
MINORU YASUI
1225 20th Street,
Denver, Colorado,
80202.
CH 4-2239 RA 2-9255
*******
BUD UCHIDA.............Heads
ROSA ODOW............ Artist
TOM MASAMORI. Photographer
TRUE YASUI. General Factotum
1C all citizens of Japanese
descent In Colorado were to vote
as a bloc-- which will never hap-
pen they wouldn't have the power
to elect a dog-catcher. There
just aren't enough votes.
But that doesn't mean they can
not be a potent influence as par-
ty workers, registering voters,
distributing what is laughingly
referred to as literature, and
otherwise making themselves use-
ful in the many thankless tasks
of a political campaign.
Which brings up the matter of
how Japanese Americans vote. No
comprehensive survey of their po-
litical loyalties has ever been
made, and lacking such a study,
it is impossible to say what per-
centage are Democrats or Republi-
cans. Chances are, however, that
they are divided in approximately
the same proportion as Americans
in general. In the last presi-
dential election, Americans were
split as close down the middle as
is possible 34,227,096 for Ken-
nedy and 34,108,546 for Nixon.
In Colorado, the Republicans
had quite an edge: 402,242 to
Nixon, and 330,629 for Kennedy.
Most Nisei reached voting age
during the Roosevelt years, the
time of the New Deal when the De-
mocrats were riding high. They
were among the under-privileged
poor and in a position to benefit
from New Deal measures and that's
where they placed their political
loyalties.
On the other hand many Nisei
were in the professions and oper-
ators of small businesses where
the traditions are strongly Re-
publican. In contrast to wage-
earners, they resented what they
considered federal intrusion into
their affairs, and so they voted
Republican, for candidates stand-
ing for decentralization of fed-
eral power.
The imnediate Issues have now
changed somewhat over the years,
but basic philosophical differ-
ences have changed little. That
really doesn't matter at this
time. What is important is that
all of us vote, whatever our po-
litical beliefs, on Nov. 3.
OUR POLITICAL RECOMMENDATION
We admit that the presidential election of 1964 makes us feel un-
comfortable -- We have supported every Republican presidential candi-
date ever since Wendell Willkie in 1940, including Thomas E. Dewey,
Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, and even Richard M. Nixon in 1960.
However, for the 1964 presidential election, we declare our sup-
port and endorsement, unenthusiastically, for the incumbent President
of the United States, LYNDON B. JOHNSON, the Democratic candidate,
because we are firmly convinced
that his Republican opponent, if
elected, would destroy many of
the social gains made by the com-
mon people of America.
We are disturbed by the cava-
lier attitudes of the Democrats
blithely disregarding basic and
sound principles of government,
and we are perturbed by the seem-
ing ineffectiveness of our for-
eign policies.
Nevertheless, we believe that
the announced policies of the Re-
publican candidate would be even
more disastrous for our nation.
Therefore, we recommend voting
for PRES. LYNDON B. JOHNSON for
re-election as President of the Above ard ROSE TANABE in back,
United States, on Nov. 3rd. ^ and FLOrenCE NAKATA, in center,
who organized the Brighton AJAs
in support of the Mile-Hi JACL's
Oriental dinner on Oct. 10th, at
the TSBC. In right foreground is
BUDDY UCHIDA, who was the chief
brewmaster for the gallons of hot
tea that was served all day long.
(Photo courtesy of ROY M. TAKEN0)
FOOD "BAZAAR
NETS $ 1,000
The highest-unpaid pot wallop-
er at Mile-Hi JACL's Food Bazaar
was BILL H0S0KAWA, above, who is
shown "pearl-diving" in the kit-
chen sink of the TSBC!!!
MILE-HI JACL
MEMBERSHIP DRIVE
DR. MASA GIMA of Denver, and
EIJI H0RIUCHI for Brighton, Co-
Chrmn of the 1964 Mile-Hi JACLs
membership drive, reported that
only 355 members were signed up
for this year.
The Brighton area came through
with 947., but 56 members were
lost in the Denver area. It was
hoped that the 1965 membership
drive would reach 500 as in past
years.
PRES. DAVID H. FURUKAWA of the
Mile-Hi JACL announced that the
1965 membership drive would com-
mence immediately, with dues at
$5.00 per person. Please contact
any JACL cabinet officer, or the
JACL office for 1965 cards.
DR. MIKE UBA, Treasurer of the
Mile-Hi JACL, reported that more
than 800 dinners were served at
the JACL Oriental Food Bazaar, on
Oct. 10, grossing more than $1500
and after payment of all expenses
a net of about $1,000.00 was re-
alized for the JACL treasury.
Special acknowledgments, for
contributions of materials used
for the benefit, were made to:
AMERICAN POTATO CO.........Rice
DENVER SCHOOL OF JUDO Rice
FORT PRODUCE COMPANY. Celery
FRESH VEG. PRODUCE. Vegetables
FUKUMA IMPORTS. Taped Music
IDEAL PHARMACY. Paper Goods
KOJIMAS GROCERY. Donation
MADAM BUTTERFLY'S..........Sales
SIMPSON METHODIST CHURCH. Sushi
TRI-STATE BUDDHIST CHURCH Sushi
Also, the assistance of many,
many people were gratefully ac-
knowledged by personal letters of
thanks sent individually to more
than 50 persons who assisted in
making the affair a success. The
assistance of FLORENCE NAKATA and
ROSE TANABE in the Brighton area,
and that of T0M1 MAYEDA and IRENE
GIMA in the Denver area, was es-
pecially noted.
ALL PHOTOS, unless otherwise
credited, in The Mtn-Plains AJA
News, taken by TOM T. MASAMORI,
2010 Lamar St., Denver 15, Colo.
Tel.: BE 7-3041

Thanks to the dedication and
the public-spirited cooperation
of many JACLers, and friends, the
Mile-Hi JACL was
successful in its
Oriental Dinner,
on Oct. 10th, at
the TSBC.
More than 50
volunteers gave
of their time and
efforts to help
the Mile-Hi JACL.
We are grate- FURUKAWA
ful, and express
our appreciation to everyone who
contributed to the success of our
annual chow mein dinner.
Our special thanks go to the
Brighton ladies, and most especi-
ally to FLORENCE NAKATA and ROSE
TANABE, who coordinated the help
from the Brighton area.
Moreover, to the merchants and
friends who contributed materials
and donations for our annual din-
ner, we express our warm thanks.
Unfortunately, we cannot list
everyone who generously contri-
buted to the success of the din-
ner, but to everyone "Arigato"!!!
ANNUAL FALL MEETING:
As headlined on the front page
the annual fall meeting of Mile-
Hi JACL will be held in the up-
stairs dining room of Cathay Post
on Fri., Oct. 30th, from 6:30 pm.
MASAO W. SAT0W, our National
JACL Director, will be the prin-
cipal speaker, to report on the
National JACL and its programs.
And we hope, of special inter-
est will be the panel discussion
by young people on the forthcom-
ing presidential election. It
could get hot and heavy!
We plan to start with a pot-
luck supper, so pack a main dish
and bring the family -- salads,
drinks (coffee, tea or milk), and
dessert will be furnished. Bring
the children, too. A Hallowe'en
party is being planned for them.
There will be an interesting
program and an important business
meeting so please plan to attend.
SEE YOU AT CATHAY POST OCT. 30TH!
MTN-PLAIHS A.J.A. Mills
SUBSCRIPTION RAT1S:
Isgslsr: $3.00 for % yr ( 5 m.)
$5.00 for 1 yr (10 mo.)
Special Mile-Hi JACL members ONLY
$2.50 for % yr ( 5 me.)
$3.50 for 1 yr (10 mo.)


OCT., 1964.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGES.
(Mile-Hi JACL Prexy's Column, con-
fined from Page 4.)
NOMINATIONS FOR 1965:
Seven board members, who have
served for three years or more,
are retiring on Dec. 31st.
Retiring board members (alpha-
betic order) are: DAVE FURUKAWA,
DR. MASA GIMA, BEN KDKAGAI, BILL
KUROKI, TOM MASAMORI, DR. MIKE
DBA and MIN YASUI. Also, YASUKO
FUJIMORI has resigned as a board
member and replacement will have
to be elected in her place.
HENRY SUZUKI is the Chairman
of the Nominations and Election
committee, and you may submit any
nominations, which you desire, to
him at any time prior to the Oct.
30th meeting.
Or, please come to the meeting
on Oct. 30th, prepared to nomi-
nate active leaders for Mile-Hi
JACL. The only requirements for
nominations from the floor are
that you are a JACL member, and
that prior consent of the person
nominated be first obtained.
CHAIRMEN BEING SOUGHT:
To close out the year of 1964,
we need several dependable people
to assume the responsibility of a
chairman for:
Pacific Citizen holiday greet-
ings solicitations, during Nov.;
A couple of go-getting, active
JACLers, to head up the 1965 mem-
bership drive as of Nov. 1st;
An over-all chairman for the
annual New Years Eve festivities
to be held at Brown Palace West,
on Dec. 31st.
If you have any suggestions or
will be willing to volunteer for
any of the above, or any part of
the work, please let me know!!!
OPPORTUNITY TO SERVE:
There are many ways in which
you can serve the community; we
believe that JACL gives you ar*
opportunity to make significant
contributions to the community.
COME TO CATHAY POST ON OCT. 30TH1
CHINESE MUTUAL
SOCIETY FORMED
Although Chinese Americans in
Denver probably number less than
350 persons, a Chinese American
Mutual Society was recently or-
ganized with leading public offi-
cials and civic leaders partici-
pating.
DR. WM. YEN, of 1105 Krameria
St., is the founding president,
and other officers include: Lt.
Wendell Wong, Lt. Col. Robt. Fin-
ley, Anna D. McRae, Margie Chong,
Connie Wu Jee, George Fong, Edwin
Low, William Graf, Mary Huie, and
Ed Young.
Purpose of the Society is pro-
motion of the social welfare of
persons of Chinese American an-
cestry, better understanding of
Chinese customs and culture, to
cultivate and develop better lea-
dership in the community, and to
encourage education.
BRIGHTON
MIRKO MAYEDA of Brighton was
featured in The Denver Post maga-
zine section in August, as one of
the leading lady farmers in the
U.S. and ranked among the top six
farmers in Adams County.
By dint of accurate farm re-
cord keeping on diversified vege-
table crops, during the past six
years, MIEKO MAYEDA is able to
make her 60-acre farm operation a
profitable venture.
County Agent Al Lesser noted
that her efforts are a near per-
fect example of farming as a bu-
siness enterprise.
Husband ROY MAYEDA is a soil
scientist for American Fertilizer
Co., and a graduate chemist from
Colorado State University. The
Mayedas have one son, DON, who
is a junior at CSU in horticul-
ture.
Above is SUSAN TAWARA (native
of Peru) being congratulated by
JOHN T. CLINGAN, Director of the
Denver I&NS office, on her gradu-
ation from citizenship classes.
CATHAY POST
FREE TRANSPORTATION TO POLLS
ON ELECTION DAY. NOV. 3RD:
Cathay Post will provide free
transportation to anyone request-
ing assistance, to and from the
polls on election day, Nov. 3rd,
with JOHN NOGUCHI and YOSH ARAI
in charge of the conmittee.
Any Issei unable to get to the
polls on election day are especi-
ally invited to call Cathay Post,
KE 4-4008, and an auto will come
by to take them to the polls and
to return them home after voting.
1965 MEMBERSHIP DRIVE:
EDDIE OSUMI, 9300 Gaylord St.,
Thornton, Colo., is Chrmn of the
Cathay Post membership drive, as-
sisted by BEN MURAKAMI, Finance
Officer, and Adjutant JOE SAKAT0.
CLEAN-UP COMMITTEE:
The upstairs dining room and
meeting lounge was cleaned up by
a committee headed by Commander
TOSH OTA, and the work was done
by TOM HIKIDA, BEN MURAKAMI and
TOM MASAMORI.
FLOYD TANAKA HEADS
LONG-RANGE PLANS
FOR URBAN RENEWAL
NEW SCOUTMASTERS
YOSH ARAI has taken over the
Scoutmastership of Troop #38, at
Simpson Methodist Church, in Den-
ver, Colo. He was for many years
the Cubmaster of Peck #38* before
assuming responsibility as Scout-
master for the Boy Scout troop.
The new Cubmaster for Pack #38
at the church is GEO. JOE SAKAT0,
a World War II veteran, and win-
ner of the Distinguished Service
Cross, the 2nd highest military
decoration awarded by the U.S.
OMAHA NEWS
Mr. & Mrs. Gerhard Spies, who
were active supporters of Omaha
JACL during the past five years,
have moved to New York.
Weddings in Omaha, Nebr., this
year, included the marriages of
JANICE ISHII to WILLIAM PALMER,
and AKIYE WATANABE to EDWARD RE-
BARICH, all of Omaha.
FLOYD TANAKA, Asst. Executive
Director of the Denver Urban Re-
newal Authority, headed the long-
range planning for the community
renewal program for Denver.
And, births have included baby
boys to Mr. and Mrs. Gary Lewis
(the former CAROLYN KAYA), and to
Mr. and Mrs. Don Russell (former-
ly KAZUMI WATANABE), this summer.
Local cooperation to conserve
community resources in human val-
ues will involve city government,
Denver Public Schools, voluntary
organizations, as the Chamber of
Commerce, Metropolitan Council on
Community Services, and state and
federal agencies.
The 19 proposed projects would
constitute 3,295 acres, affecting
some 98,000 people -- about 107,
of the city area and 207, of the
city population.
Administrative costs are esti-
mated at $1.2 million, with $12.3
million for public improvements
which the city faces in any event
to maintain standards for sound
housing and future business de-
velopment for Denver.
Implementation of the Denver
Community Renewal Program may re-
quire more than 10 years, and is
certain to affect Nihonjin-machi
in downtown Denver as well as the
residential sections where many
AJAs are now living.
JEFFREY SHIMADA has enrolled
at Illinois Institute of Techno-
logy in Chicago, 111., this fall.
* *
Interviewers for the Japanese
History project in the Nebraska
region will be Omaha JACLers:
ROY HIRABAYASHI TAKE0 MISAKI
CECIL ISHII BOB NAKADOI
MARY MISAKI EM NAKADOI
LILY OKURA
* *
EM NAKADOI, Pres, of the Omaha
JACL, reported that the chapter
has remitted $50,00 to the cam-
paign to defeat Proposition #14
in California, which would repeal
the fair housing law of Calif.
A special fund-raising drive
to aid in the defeat of the pro-
posed constitutional amendment in
California which would sanction
discrimination in housing against
all minority persons, is being
headed by DORIS MATSUNAMI, N0BUK0
SULLIVAN and K0K0 KUCIREK, for
the Omaha JACL.
A PART OF THE KITCHEN CREW, which cooked the chow mein for Mile-Hi
JACL's Oriental Dinner on Oct. 10. At extreme left is DR. MASA GIMA,
ladling out generous servings to ETHEL YANASE, next right. The on-
lookers are MIN YASUI and EIJI H0R1UCHI. Other chefs were TOM MASA-
MORI, TONY FUKEDA (a GI from Ft. Carson), and Head Chef DICK YANASE.


PAGE 6.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
OCT., 1964
MILE-HI GOLF CLUB AWARDS DINNER-DANCE
The Mile-Hi Golf Club held its annual Awards Dinner-Dance at the
Pinehurst Country Club, on Sat., Oct. 24, with YOSH NAKAYAMA, Social
Chrmn in charge. More than a hundred golfers, wives and friends at-
tended the affair. - --
Awarding of trophies was the
high-light of the evening, with
championship trophies going to:
72-Hole Tournament:
1st: SARGE TERASAKI. . 274
2nd: MAS YOSHIMURA ... 278
36-Hole Tournament:
"A" Flight: Tied for 1st
DICK YAMAMOTO
DR. TONY KAWANO
"B" Flight:
1. MAS YOSHIMURA
2. TAK TAKEMURA
Granada Fish Tournament:
1st: SAM TERADA
2nd: TOM MATSUMOTO
New officers, for 1964-65, of
the Mile-Hi Golf Club, were inau-
gurated as follows:
PRESIDENT...........SAM KUMAGAI
Vice-Pres..............KODY KODAMA
Secretary............ TERNO ODOW
Treasurer......................ROY TERADA
CUSTOM PHOTO FINISHING
7U zitfrsr.
Denver st to to.
Telephone; CH 4-4073
CATHAY SKI CLUB
The Cathay Ski Club held their
inaugural dinner at the Cspri, on
Sat., Oct. 24, with BARBARA HAMAI
as Past Pres., and BOB OTA, past
Vice-Pres., in charge.
The new cabinet for the 1964-
1964 skiing season are:
PRESIDENT.............TOM UCHIDA
Vice-Pres. ..... ROY SHIBATA
Rec. Secty .... YOSHIE MIZOUYE
Corr. Secty.........MIKO KAWANO
Treasurer. JACK YAMAMOTO
The Cathay Ski Club plans an
active ski season, with ski trips
to Winter Park and the annual ski
week-end at Aspens. Details will
be announced.
SATOW TO MEET
WITH NATIONAL
BOWLING HEADS
MASAO W. SATOW, Nat'l Director
of JACL, will confer with offici-
als of the 1965 Nat'l JACL Bowl-
ing Tournament to be held in Den-
ver, Colo., on Mar. 8-13, 1965.
Basic rules and policies gov-
erning the national bowling tour-
nament will be clarified at the
officials' meeting to be held on
Sat., Oct. 31st, in Denver, Colo.
MIKE TA$vJ mo ?0P. TEL. 6S9-098*
j
WEST 80TH AVENUE at SHERIDAN BOULEVARD WESTMINSTER, COLORADO.
P. 0. BOX 1501, DENVER 1, COLORADO.
HIROSUKE ISHIKAWA, President
Tel.: HA 9-3537
JUDO BENEFIT FOR TRAVEL FUND
H. T. ("HOCK) HALL, P. 0. Box 367, Arvada, Colo., is in charge of
the benefit for The Denver School of Judo scheduled on Nov. 22, 1964,
to create a travelling fund for judo students to go to regional and
national AAU-sanctioned judo tournaments as representatives of the
local judo school.
Prizes include a 1965 RCA 21" Color Television set with a base, a
1965 RCA 19" black-and-white portable TV set, and a 1965 RCA stereo
record player. Donations are 50c each, and tickets may be obtained
from any member or student of The
Denver School of Judo, Inc. The
drawings will be held at the Tri-
State Buddhist Church, 1947 Law-
rence St., in Denver, Colo., on
Sun., Nov. 22, 1964.
If any tickets or information
is desired, please contact "HOCK*'
HALL, P.O. Box 367, Arvada, Colo,
or The Denver School of Judo, at
2020 Arapahoe St., Denver, Colo.
DENVER SCHOOL OF JUDO, INC.
A six weeks beginner's course
in judo is being offered by The
Denver School of Judo, at $25.00
per person, for the first member
of a family, and $10.00 per per-
son for each additional member of
the same family.
There will be 18 hours of in-
structions, with two Vi hour les-
sons per week, on Tue. and Thu.
evenings, from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m.
The beginning course will con-
sist of instructions in the basic
principles of judo, falling and
throwing techniques, and history
of the sport, nomenclature, and
ethics to be taught by black belt
instructors. For complete infor-
mation call Denver School of Judo
at 222-5075 or 244-9630.
Above is Tokyo's Nihon Budokan
built within the Imperial Palace
grounds, where the XVIII Olympiad
judo matches were staged, during
Oct. (Photo by Japan Air Lines.)
JUDO KODOKAN
INVITATIONAL
The 2nd Annual Kodokan Invita-
tional Tour has been scheduled to
leave San Francisco via jet clip-
per on June 24, 1965, for 2 weeks
in Tokyo, Japan.
Daily training sessions will
be conducted at the Kodokan, un-
der expert masters, as KOTANI and
SHIRAI, 9th Dan; OTARI, SATO and
TANAKA, 8th Dan; DAIGO and OSAWA,
7th Dan; and other international
judo champions.
SPORTS BRIEFS
FOOTBALL PLAYERS. .
Week-ends will be spent visit-
ing tourist spots in Tokyo, Nikko
and Kamakura. Entire round-trip
costs, including 14 days at Ginza
Tokyu hotel, all instruction fees
and all travel, is only $750,00.
Complete details available at
Denver School of Judo, 2020 Ara-
pahoe St., Denver, Colo. S0205.
INTERNATIONA^
FINEST SPORTS EQUIPMENT
Happy Canyon Shopping Canter,
5042 E. Hampden Avenue,
Denver 22, Colorado.
ST0ME TANITA, Mgr. Tel. 756-9411
DUANE HASEGAWA is quarter-back
for the varsity football team at
East High.
GEO. KAWAMOTO is also an out-
standing player for East High's
sophomore football squad.
At Manual High School, there
are three AJA football stars on
the varsity squad, including DAVE
OKAZAKI, BRUCE KAMADA and RONALD
MATSUBA.
TENNIS PLAYERS. .
e Manual High School net stars,
DOUG TSUTSUI in the singles, and
MELVIN TAKAHASHI in the doubles,
will participate in the 1964 Den-
ver Prep League play-offs, as a
preliminary to Colo. State High
School championships in Boulder,
Colo., later this month.
GEORGE FUJIMOTO

CAPITOL MORTUARY
1331 SHERMAN TA 5-0151
Personal Attention
to Every Detail


OCT., 1964.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 7.
(**Editors Note: We bring you a
guest columnist this month, in
the hope that this corner will
bring more variety of teen-age
news monthly. If you wish to
be a contributor, please send
your picture and not more than
a page of double-spaced news.)
STUDENT OFFICERS. .
A number of Japanese American
students at various high schools
in this area have been elected to
a variety of offices in the stu-
dent government of their schools.
Some of them are:
NORTHWEST YPCC
AT SPOKANE, ON
NOV. 27- 29
The annual Pacific Northwest
Young Peoples Christian Confer-
ence will be held on Thanksgiving
week-end, in Spokane, Washington,
on Nov. 27-29, 1964.
The MYF of Simpson Methodist
Church is planning to attend as
a group delegation. Thus far,
those signed up
Lianne Aoyagi
Larry Goto
Noel Hagiya
JoAnn Masunaga
Laura Masunaga
Cathy
are:
Sharon Masunaga
Kris Matsumoto
Jovy Morishige
Rene Oya
Jan Sakayama
Shiramizu
However, in order to obtain a
special round-trip rate, a mini-
mum of 30 persons must be signed
up. Anyone interested in going
to Spokane to attend the North-
west YPCC are requested to call
SACHI BOYER, 477-5895.
(TEEN-TOPICS, contd:-
CHEERLEADERS. .
JOHN IMADA is President of the
Broomfield High all-school stu-
dent council.
ROGER GOTO is Head Boy at the
Adams City High School. He's al-
so a member of the varsity foot-
ball team for his school.
His brother, LARRY GOTO, was
elected sophomore class President
at Adams City High.
At East High School, in Den-
ver, SUSAN ANDO is representative
of the junior class, and GEORGE
KAWAMOTO is sophomore class re-
presentative on the student coun-
cil.
PHIL iCARAKAWA is treasurer of
the junior class at East High.
MARY JANE WAKABAYASHI is the
vice-president of the sophomore
class at George Washington High.
Over at North High, there are
three AJA student officers, in-
cluding DICKIE OK1MOTO who is the
President of the Junior Class.
His brother, GARRY OKIMOTO, is
President of the sophomore class,
and FRANCES TAKAMATSU is vice-
president of the sophomore class,
at North High.
EAGLE SCOUT. .
RONALD S. HORII of Brighton,
a member of Boy Scout Troop #109,
was among 82 Scouts who received
their Eagle Rank at East High, on
Oct. 19th.
CATHY SHIRAMIZU is one of the
cheerleaders at George Washington
High. They had a good homecoming
against East on Oct. 15th.
JANIS SAKAYAMA is a cheerlead-
er at North High, and North will
have their homecoming on Oct. 31,
against West High.
Manual High School has three
AJA cheerleaders, NE1K0 HIRAKAWA,
LINDA KINOSHITA and NAOMI TSUCHI-
MOTO.
East High pep club, The White
Jackets, include MELODY FUJIMORI,
ARLENE FUKUHARA and CHARLENE FU-
KUHARA, KRISTINE KUTSUMA, LAURA
MASUNAGA, and CHERYL OYE.
AJA STUDENTS
COLO. SCHOOL OF MINES:
According to information re-
ceived, there are three local AJA
students enrolled at the Colorado
School of Mines in Golden, Colo.,
this year. They are HOWARD KOSHI
(majoring in Chemistry), RONALD
UCHIDA of Wheatridge, and THOMAS
YANARI of Englewood.
REAL ESTATE. inSUR&ncr
mUTUAL Funps -
512.2. CHOSE 5T. N HA 2-15*11
Tel. 266-2170
DEnYER. |2,CO 10.
IWC. 3.0th St.
JAPnnesc cmnesE nmERicAn food
Jflpnnese SfcKE available.
Hours: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. __, a __ _
(CLOSED ON TUESDAYS) TcL. 8 2A-£?53U
The very charming DORIS NAKATA
of Brighton, Colo., daughter of
Mr. & Mrs. Frank T. Nakata, as-
sisted at the Mile-Hi JACL Food
Bazaar on Oct. 10th at TSBC. She
is a recent graduate of Central
Business College in Denver, Colo.
College Briefs
C.U. EXTENSION:
BOB FUJIOKA is continuing his
engineering studies at CU Exten-
sion, while his wife, the former
JANE SUEDA of Hawaii, is teaching
2nd grade at Secrist School, in
Arvada, Colo.
CALENDAR
Of Coming Events
Oct. 30: (Fri) MILE-HI JACL'S Annual Pot-Luck Supper, and General Fall Meeting, Cathay Post, 6:30 pm.
Oct. 30: (Fri) HALLOWE'EN PARTY, of TSBC's P-TA, at TSBC.
Nov. 3: ELECTION DAY VOTE!
Nov. 7- Nov. 8: (Sat- Sun) FOOD BAZAAR, of Tri- State Buddhist Church at 1947 Lawrence St., afternoons both days.
XMAS CONVOCATION
Senior MYF of Simpson Church
announced a Christmas Convocation
for 3 days in Colorado Springs,
on Dec. 28-31, 1964.
Registration is $16.50, which
will include: 3 nights hotel, one
meal, insurance, and registration
fees. Check with MARK HAGIYA, or
REV. PAUL HAGIYA, 333-2668, for
complete details.
Si PHOTOGRAPHS
1 3010 LAItlAA ST.
2 DEnvt* is, Colo.
-wow*-* BE 7* 3041
NEW CROP WILL BE AVAILABLE DURING EARLY OCTOBER
RICE
OVQI I GDI C QT
pacific mERCRmiLE company
194-4 IflBtmER ST.
TEL: KE 4-4031 DenVER, COLOR RDO


PAGE 8.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
OCT., 1964
SIMPSON CHURCH
BRIDGE CLUB
The Simpson Church Bridge Club
was featured by Len Smith's week-
ly column in The Denver Post dur-
ing Aug., 1964.
Columnist Smith noted that the
club was directed by an ACBL Life
Master, SAM MATSUMOTO, and that
most of the
players in
the bridge
club were
proteges of
MATSUMOTO.
Mention-
ed promi-
nently were
bridge fans
such as DR.
TAKASH1 MA-
YEDA, TOSH
ANDO, DICK
YANASE, DR.
AYAKO MAYE-
DA, DR. M.
UBA, BOBBY
FUJIOKA and
numerous others, including Sansel
bridge fans, who form the junior
group.
SAM MATSUMOTO
SAM MATSUMOTO is a native of
Dlnuba in central California, and
served in Military Intelligence
during the war. He is a graduate
of C.U., and is an insurance man
for the New York Life Ins. Co.
Officers of the Simpson Church
Bridge Club are:
President. ..... DR. MIKE UBA
Vice-Pres........YOSHIE HAGIYA
Secretary. CHARLOTTE MIYOSHI
Treasurer. ...... MARY FUJII
It was noted that proceeds in
the treasury of the church bridge
club went to help the Boy Scout
troop, and other youth activities
of the Church. The Bridge Club
meets once a month for a dupli-
cate bridge tournament, open to
all. Everyone is welcome!!!
SIMPSON DUPLICATE
SESSION# OCT. 31
DR. MIKE UBA, Pres, of Simpson
Church Duplicate Bridge Club, an-
nounced that the October session
of the duplicate bridge tourna-
ment would be held on Sat. even-
ing, commencing at 8:00 p.m., at
Simpson Church, on Oct. 31st.
Beginners as well as duplicate
experts are welcome. A special
section for tyros gives them an
opportunity to win.
The Senior MYF group will be
in charge of refreshments on Oct.
31st, as a "trick or treat" pro-
ject for Hallowe'en night. Every
bridge fan is invited to attend!
* *
Winners of the September tour-
nament of the Simpson Bridge Club
held on Sept. 25th were:
North-South Pairs:
1. WILL HASEGAWA and JUN KOMARU
2. DR. MIKE UBA and LILLIAN UBA
East-West Pairs:
1. YOSHI HAGIYA & ESTHER HASHIBA
2. ART YORIMQTO & KAMA YORIMOTO.
SIMPSON CHURCH BUILDING FUND
The Building Committee of the Simpson Methodist Church, in Denver,
Colo., convened during September, and announced a goal of $250,000.00
for a new church to be constructed at W. 60th Ave. and Sheridan Blvd.
The General Co-Chairmen for the Building Committee are M0R0KU SU-
YEHIR0, Y0SH ARAI and SAM MATSUMOTO. Chairmen of sub-committees,
who will coordinate the long-term
financial drive, are as follows:
Co-Chairmen of Sub-Committees:
ISSEI: NISEI:
Program:
FRANK UYENISHI JOE ARIKI
Resources:
TEIZ0 NON AKA JOE AKIYAMA
Visitations:
YUZ0 HONDA MEACH N0GAMI
Education:
Other sub-committee chairmen
and heads of church-affiliated
organizations, who will assist in
the drive are:
Public Relations. GEO. FUJIMOTO
Comm, on Education. RAY BOYER
Pres, of WSCS KIK0 AKIYAMA
Methodist Men Pres. GEORGE GOTO
Pres, of Senior MYF MARK HAGIYA
All Simpson Methodist Church
families will be contacted in the
near future to pledge support for
the proposed new Church.
SIMPSON CHURCH NEWS
SPEAKS IN CHICAGO. .
MAY KUMAGAI, R.N., is now em-
ployed at the Reading Hospital,
in Reading, Pennsylvania.
KENJI FUKUHARA, 3595 S. Wash-
ington St., Englewood, Colo., was
honored as a member of the Presi-
dent's Club for Nat'1 Life Ins.
Co. of Vermont. FUKUHARA wins a
trip to New York City for an edu-
cational conference on customer
service and sales, as a career
life underwriter.
SUE MAYEMURA was recently fea-
tured as the office manager for
Lehrer's Flowers, Inc. of Denver,
Colo.
GEORGE FUKUMA MARY TAKAMINE
Materials:
SOJIRO YORITOMQ MARY FUJII
Hostesses:
SAI KOSUGE
NOYE KAWAKAMI
SACHI BOYER
KANA YORIMOTO
Advance Pledges:
MOROKU SUYEHIRO TOL TAKAMINE
* *
REV. JON FUJITA of Simpson Me-
thodist Church in Denver was the
principal guest speaker for the
Chicago Japanese churches evange-
lical meeting held in Chicago, on
Oct. 15-18, 1964.
TAMALE SALE. NOV. 8TH:
The Cornelian Ladies will hold
a tamale sale on Sun., Nov. 8th,
to help raise funds for the Spo-
kane trip for the MYF and Young
Adults of Simpson Church.
REV. RUSSELL K. NAKATA, Canon
at St. John's Episcopal Church in
Denver, Colo., was one of three
clergymen of different faiths who
were quoted in support of United
Nations, this past week.
DR. KIMISHIGE ISH1ZAKA, one of
Japan's best known authorities on
iranunology, is a research scien-
tist at the Children's Asthmatic
Research Institute and Hospital,
in Denver, Colo.
REV. DAISUKE KITAGAWA, of New
York City, executive secretary of
the domestic mission of the Nat'l
Council of Protestant Episcopal
Church, was one of the principal
speakers, at the American Indian
conference, held at Estes Park,
earlier this summer.
Recent visitors to Denver in-
cluded: SHOJI HATT0RI, Pres, of
Toyota Motors of Los Angeles, to
visit sales agencies in this re-
gion; MISS CHIKAKO OKAZAKI, for-
reign exchange student from Japan.
NEW ADDRESSES
More new addresses of AJAs, in
the Denver metropolitan area, in-
clude the following:
of the Simpson Methodist Church
examining tentative plans for the new building to
at W. 60th Ave. and Sheridan Blvd., in Denver, Colo.
Above are the General Co-Chairmen
Building Committee
be constructed
At left is MOROKU SUYEHIRO, Issei
Chnnn, YOSH ARAI in center, and
SAM MATSUMOTO at right. Present
plans call for an intensive fin-
ancial drive through Nov. 29th to
obtain pledges for the next three
years to raise $250,000.00, from
church families and friends.
(Photo by EDWIN K. SHIMABUKURO,)
BRIDGE WINNERS
SUE AKIYAMA teamed with Mrs.
P. Robinson, both of Denver, to
win the Women's Pairs, topping a
field of 62 teams, at the South-
ern Colorado Sectional ACBL tour-
nament in Colorado Springs, dur-
ing Sept.
KEN YABE, an ACBL Life Master,
teamed with E. B. Heber, also of
Denver, to win over a field of 28
pairs in taking the Men's Pairs
title, at that sectional bridge
tournament In Colorado Springs.
CORNELIAN TEA
HELD, OCT. 18
The annual tea of Cornelians
of Simpson Church was held at the
home of MARY TAKAMINE on Oct. 18.
Officers of The Cornelians for
the forthcoming year of 1964-1965
are as follows:
PRESIDENT...........SUE ONO
Vice-Pres. SADAKO HASEGAWA
Secretary......CHIYE HORIUCHI
Treasurer.......BETTY SUZUKI
BOBBY K. and JANE FUJIOKA, 2712
Federal Blvd., Denver 80211.
ROBERT and TSUNEKO FURUIYE, 3194
West 36th Ave., Denver 80211.
BEN and MIY0K0 GOTO, 4650 Sauls-
bury Street, Wheatridge.
JOHN and TAMI MASUNAGA, 1922 So.
Magnolia St., Denver 80222.
LOREN and TSURUKO M1YAGI, 2195 S.
Logan St., Denver 80210.
DENNIS and MARGARET NAKATA, 4031
Zuni St., Denver 80221.
HARRY and ROSE SHIBA0, 5810 No.
Ogden St., Denver 80216.
TED and ELAINE TSUMURA, 601 York
Street, Denver 80206.
SHIG and MASAKO WATANABE, 2303
Bellaire St., Denver 80207.
i=? Ki usd van a
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OCT.. 1964.______________________
1964-66 SENIOR
MYF OFFICIALS
Officers of the Senior MYF 8t
Simpson Methodist Church were in-
stalled for 1964-65 as follows:
PRESIDENT. ..... MARK HAGIYA
Vice-Pres. CATHY SHIRAMIZU
Secretary. RHONDA NISHIMOTO
Treasurer. LAURA HASHIMOTO
Chairmen for various committee
responsibilities were assigned as
follows:
Comn. on Christian Faith:
JOVY MORISHIGE
Comm, on Christian Witness:
DIANE OKITA
Comm, on Christian Outreach:
LAURA MASUNAGA
Comm, on Christian Citizenship:
JOHN HASEGAWA
Comm, on Christian Fellowship:
ROGER GOTO and SUSAN ANDO
AWARD WINNER
MRS. TRUE BROADWATER (nee True
Hoshiko) earned a nomination for
a Government Employees' Incentive
Award for her suggestions to eli-
minate wasteful procedures in a
computer routine at the Air Force
Finance Center in Denver, Colo.
She is a digital computer sys-
tems operator at the Air Reserve
Records Center in Denver, and is
a resident at 7020 Knox Court, in
Westminster, Colo. She is a na-
tive of Greeley, Colo.
WEDDINGS
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
BIRTHS
HIR0SE, Dr. Hideo . a a GIRL
410 Garfield St., Denver
KITASHIMA, Cecil S. a BOY
4900 W. 30th Ave. , Denver
MIZUSHIMA, Dr. M. . * o a GIRL
523 Theresa Dr., Boulder
M0RITA, Dr. Michio. i i a BOY
1551 Madison St., Denver
NAKATA,. Masashi . a a BOY
2780 Skyline Dr., Denver
YAMAKAWA, George M. t a a BOY
2881 Garfield St. , Denver
A l *
Above are the TAK TERASAKI fa-
mily at the Mile-Hi JACL Food Ba-
zaar, on Oct. 10th at the TSBC.
At left is MELANIE TERASAKI, and
TAK TERASAKI, standing, while at
the crowded table in foreground
is MITCHIE TERASAKI.
GAIL CHIKUMA, daughter of Sam
and Jo Chikuma of Brighton, was
married to GEORGE TAGAWA, son of
Mr. & Mrs. Frank Tagawa, 6640 N.
Downing St., of Welby, Colo., on
Oct. 18th, at the Tri-State Bud-
dhist Church, in Denver, Colo.
(Photo by EDWIN K. SHIMABUKURO.)
GOLDEN WEDDING
MR. AND MRS. RIKICHI HARA, of
2441 W. 55th Ave., Denver, Colo.,
celebrated their 50th Golden Wed-
ding Anniversary, early this sum-
mer, in Denver, Colo.
MR. AND MRS. SHOICHI H. HARA,
of Scottsbluff, Nebr., also cele-
brated their 50th Golden Wedding
Anniversary recently in Nebraska.
__________________PAGE 9.
[ OBITUARIES
FRED TOKUHICHI TANAKA of 2553 Ca-
lifornia St., Denver, Colorado.
SAN LUIS VALLEY
We were grieved to learn that
FRANK EIICHI YOSHIDA of Alamosa,
Colo., a long-time resident and
pioneer in the San Luis Valley in
southern Colorado, passed away
during early October.
FRANK E. YOSHIDA was born in
Hiroshima in 1890, and immigrated
to the U.S. in the early 1900's.
He came to Colorado about 1925,
from Stockton, Calif., to join a
group of Issei farmers who were
opening up vegetable farming in
the San Luis Valley of Colorado.
Surviving are ISAYO YOSHIDA,
his widow, and 12 adult children:
Kimiye Miyake, Alamosa; Kisayo
Kawanabe, Ft. Garland; Clarence
Yoshida, Alamosa; Edith Nishikawa
of L.A.; Grace Mizokami, Blanca;
Lucy Mori, Atwood; Dorothy Nitta,
Denver; Bessie Konishi, Alamosa;
Margery Yoshida, Alamosa; Shirley
Horiuchi, Japan; Gary Yoshida, at
Ft. Carson; and Judy Yamakishi,
Denver.
2815 DOWNING ST
DENVER 5, COLORADO
TEL
BILL KUROKI, MGR. 244-6068
KATAOKA-UYEDA:
LILY KATA0KA of Denver, daugh-
ter of Mr. & Mrs. Yoshio Kataoka,
will be married to FRANK UYEDA,
also of Denver, son of Mr. & Mrs.
Tamaki Uyeda, on Dec. 2, 1964.
MURATA-TANI:
GLENICE MURATA of Ft. Lupton,
daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Lee Murata,
will be married to HIROSHI TANI
of Denver, son of Mr. & Mrs. Sto
Tani, on Dec. 22, 1964.
YOSHIDA-NAKATA:
MARGERY YOSHIDA of Alamosa,
daughter of Mrs. I. Yoshida, will
be married to TOM NAKATA of Ft.
Lupton, on Nov. 29, 1964.
TAK and MITCHIE TERASAKI were
in San Francisco for a week, dur-
ing early October, where TAK at-
tended the Natl Retail Druggists
Assn convention, at which Hubert
Humphrey, a former pharmacist and
now Democratic vice-presidential
candidate, was principal speaker.
HAMILTON FUNDS, INC
777 Grant
DCNveft 3. Colorado
SU. PHONC *28-7077 RE5, a,.one 4*3-1222
REPRESENTED BY
MOLLY A. MCGOVERN
Unit Mgr.
PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS LISTINGS
PBHTtSTS Brighton 4 XCH3TMCT CLIFFORD S. NAKATA 206 E. Pikes Peak Ave Colo. Spgs 633-4382
JOHN CHIKUMA, DDS
75 So. 4th Street 659-1825 IAWYCHS
T0SHI0 ANDO
MASA GIMA, DDS 1404 E. 18th Ave. Denver 255-6822 1942 Larimer St. 222-5315
MINORU YASUI DPmrpr
MICHAEL T. HORI, DDS Denver 1225 20th St. 244-2239
4101 E. Wesley Ave. 756-0924
T. IT0, DDS Denver OPTOMCTMSTS
830 18th Street 534-8680 BEN MAT0BA, O.D. Denver
2838 Federal Blvd. 455-0741 1959 Larimer St. 534-1941
Y. ITO, DDS SUE0 ITO, DDS MISA0 MAT0BA, O.D. Ft. Lupton
Denver Burt Building 857-6550
SETS ITO, DDS
1477 Pennsylvania 244-6589 PHYSICIANS
K0JI KANAI, DDS Wheatridge CHAS. FUJISAKI, M.D. Brighton
4310 Harlan St. 422-5817 40 No. Main St. 659-0783
TONY KAWANO, DDS Denver T. K. KOBAYASHI, M.D. Denver
1750 Humboldt St. 534-3084 DICK D. M0MII, M.D. ALBERT NODA, M.D. 534-3104
ROBERT MAYEDA, DDS Denver 1227 27th Street
Interstate Trust Bldg. 825-6961 HOWARD SUENAGA, M.D. Denver
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS Denver 830 18th Street 222-1314
Interstate Trust Bldg. GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS 825-6961 M. GEO. TAKENO, M.D. Denver
Denver Medical Arts Big., 825-0783
Interstate Trust Bldg. 825-7498 1955 Pennsylvania St.
KEN UYEHARA, DDS Brighton AYAKO WADA, M.D. Denver
40 No. Main Street 659-3062 810 23rd Street 825-2565
JACK YAMAMOTO, DDS Lakewood MAHITO UBA, D.O. Denver
1005 W. 17th Place 238-3331 1230 21st Street 625-3743


PAGE 10*
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
TOUR OF CONSULAR
RESIDENCES. IN
DENVER, OCT. 31
AAUN-UNESCO has arranged for a
tour of the official residences
of foreign consulates in Denver,
from 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., on
Sat., Oct. 31st.
Admission will be reservations
only, at $5.00 per card, and must
be obtained from the AAUN-UNESCO,
1600 Logan St., Denver, Colo., on
or before Oct. 25th.
Official residences which will
be open for the tour, and where
gourmet delicacies of their res-
pective countries will be served,
are:
FRANCE: Hon. Victor Gares, Con-
sul General, and Dean of
Denver consular corps,
738 Pearl Street.
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC: Dr. Rene Ro-
driguez, Honorary Consul
General, 700 E. 9th Ave.
GREAT BRITAIN: Hon. Laurence P.
L'Estrange, Consul, 5201
East 6th Avenue.
GERMANY: Hon. Karl Brueselbach,
Honorary Consul, 100 So.
Ash Street.
FINLAND: Hon. Randall A. Forse-
lius, Hon. Vice-Consul,
2515 East 7th Avenue.
Other nations represented in
the Denver consular corps, which
total 14 consular representatives
in Denver, are:
Belgium, Canada, Costa Rica
Italy, Luxemburg, Mexico
Netherlands, Nicaragua, Panama
SCENE at Mile-Hi JACL's Chow Mein dinner held on Oct. 10th, at the
Tri-State Buddhist Church. At first table, from left, HELEN FUKAYE,
daughter ELEANOR, and HARRY FUKAYE. At extreme right, LAUREL YASUI
and IRIS YASUI seated opposite to
each other, with CHRIS H0S0KAWA
standing. At next table, ETHEL
YANASE standing, with DICK YANASE
seated in front of her. Japanese
sumi paintings, exhibited by YURI
NODA's class, can be seen hung on
back wall.
FLOWERS
SIQ IS1V ST.
DEnVFR. z, coio.
WARP.V VAIIARJ CH 4-3S46
QUAKER'S ANNUAL
MEETING OCT. 24
The American Friends Service
Committee will hold their annual
meeting at 2727 Columbine St., in
Denver, on Sat., Oct. 24th.
The 60-minute film, "MANHATTAN
BATTLEGROUND", depicting the work
of the AFSC in Harlem of New York
City, will be shown at 2:00 p.m.
A panel discussion, including
MILDRED BIDDICK, Director of the
School-Community Relations office
of Denver Public Schools, will be
held from 3:30 p.m.
Dinner @ $1.25, from 6:30 p.m.
will feature JAMES GALVIN, M.D.,
Chrmn of Denver's War on Poverty.
Reservations may be placed with
AFSC, Rm 303, 1375 Delaware St.,
BUDDHIST P-T-A
HALLOWE'EN PARTY
AT TSBC* OCT. 30
HENRY NAKATA, President of the
Tri-State Buddhist Church's P-TA,
announced that the annual Hallow-
e'en Party for children will be
held at the TSBC on Fri., at 8:00
p.m., Oct. 30th.
PRES. NAKATA noted that this
year, instead of the usual movies
and cartoons for the children on-
ly, there will be games and Hal-
lowe'en treats, as well as a cos-
tume contest. Approximately 200
children and parents are expected
to attend.
_____________________OCT.. 1964.
31 ST ANNUAL YBL
CONFERENCE SET
FOR DEC. ISM9-Z0
HENRY TOBO, Pres, of the Tri-
State Young Buddhist League, will
head the 31st annual YBL Confer-
ence to be held at Brown palace
West Hotel, in Denver, Colo., on
Dec. 18-19-20, 1964.
GEORGE TERAOKA, an outstanding
Bussei lay leader, from Fowler,
Calif., will be principal speak-
er at the convention banquet, on
Sun., Dec. 20th.
CATHAY DINING
ROOM RE-OPENS
The Cathay Post Dining Room,
2015 Market St., Denver, Colo.,
has re-opened for business, after
extensive re-modelling.
Two new expert Chinese chefs,
KEN CHAN from Michigan, and IITH
JONG, who specialized in Oriental
dishes at the Outrigger Room, are
in charge of the Cathay kitchen.
AL MIYAGISH1MA, Mgr., reported
the dining room will be closed on
Mondays. Dining hours will be:
Weekdays 11:00 a.m. 10:00 p.m.
Fridays 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.
Saturdays 4:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.
Sundays 3:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.
SAM Y. MATSUMOTO
NEW YORK LIFE INS. CO.
RT. I, BOX I96A
HENDERSON, COLO. AT8-2536
Denver, Colo. B02U4.
i3 lTnN\p w R m r c v
W 0 ii $ jj>
A
2700 LORI mHR ST.
AL5-4BZ5
New CHinn Cafe
732. £. C OIFAX AVE.
TEL. 53*-0 FAmous for CHinese Dishes
visit "Hts. Diutqrni Djmcu

d i n i n g
Room
6.
SPECIALIZING IN ORIENTAL FOODS AND GOODS
194G LARim ETL ST. KE 4-G031
SPECIAL MANJU SHIPPED FROM WEST COAST
$1.89 box of 15 $2.39 box of 20
Store Hours:
(Rice: New crop in October)
Open daily
Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, & Sat. 8:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.
Special Sunday hours. .... 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.
2015 mfiPKET ST.
K E 4 -4 008
Return Postage Guaranteed:
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Denver 2, Colorado
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