Citation
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 6, Number 3

Material Information

Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 6, Number 3
Series Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
31

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
VOL. VI, No. 3.______________
CATHAY SKI CLUB
CABINET MEETING
FRLNOV. 20
TOM UCHIDA, President of the
Cathay Ski Club, will convene the
first meeting of the 1964-65 ski
season, at the Cathay Post, on
Fri., Nov. 20th.
The matter of first priority
for the Club is the scheduling of
the annual pre-Christmas Dance,
probably to be held on Sat., Dec.
19th. Details as to place, price
and orchestra will be announced
later.
The Cathay Ski Club will also
schedule ski trips to Winter Park
and possibly to the new Vail Pass
ski area, as well as the tradi-
tional week-end at Aspen, Colo.
Anyone interested in joining
the ski fun for the forthcoming
winter season is urged to contact
PRES. TOM UCHIDA at 279-5976, or
any officer or member of the Ca-
thay Ski Club.
BENEFIT MOVIE
SAT., NOV. 21
GEORGE KURAMOTO heads the com-
mittee in charge of the benefit
movie, for the Denver School of
Judo, at TSBC, 1947 Lawrence St.,
on Sat., Nov. 21st.
Japanese movies will be shown
at 7:00 p.m., and all of the net
proceeds from the benefit will be
earmarked for the travel fund of
the Judo School.
Some funds will be expended to
partially subsidize sending three
teams of judoists to the 11th an-
nual Intermountain Judo Tourna-
ment to be held in Salt Lake City
over the Thanksgiving week-end.
DBAC BENEFIT
TURKEYS-HAMS
SUN., NOV. 22
KAY NITTA, Pres, of the Denver
Bussei Athletic Commission of the
Tri-State Buddhist Church, indi-
cated that the annual turkey and
ham benefit of DBAC would be held
at TSBC, 1947 Lawrence Street, in
Denver, Colo., on Nov. 22nd.
The benefit will commence at
7:30 p.m., Sunday evening, and is
scheduled to end at 10:00 p.m.
Advance sales of tickets will
allow 10 games for $1.00, while
admission at the door is priced
at 8 games for $1.00. Get your
tickets from any DBAC officer, or
member, early!!!
DENVER. COLORADO.
NOV., 1964.
3ISI ANNUAL Y.B.L CONFERENCE
IN DENVER, COLO., DEC. 18-19-20
HENRY T0B0, Pres, of the Tri-State YBL, announced that all plarts
have been completed for the 31st annual Young Buddhist League conven-
tion to be held in Brighton and Denver, Colo., Dec. 18-19-20, 1964.
TED TSUMURA and HENRY T0B0 will co-chair the
convention as General Coordinators, assisted by a
large committee (listed on Pg. 8). The high-light
of the convention will be the banquet at the Brown
- 1 Palace West on
Sun., Dec. 20,
commencing at
5:30 p.m. with
the Sayonara
Ball beginning
at 9:00 p.m.,
with the Play-
boys orchestra
playing.
PACIFIC CITIZEN
XMAS GREETINGS
Annual holiday greetings to
AJA friends all over the U.S. can
be placed in the Pacific Citizen
to reach more than 50,000 readers
over the holiday season.
JERRY K. AIKAWA
JERRY K. AIKAWA, M.D., of the
Univ. of Colo. Medical Center in
Denver, Colo., will be speaker on
radioisotopes at the Internation-
al Symposium in Prague, Czecho-
slovakia, on Nov. 26, 1964.
DR. AIKAWA is Assoc. Prof, of
medicine at the Colorado Medical
School, and director of the cen-
tral laboratory for Colorado Gen-
eral Hospital, in Denver, Colo.
TSBC JOINS
THANKSGIVING
Six churches of divergent re-
ligious faiths will join together
at the Tri-State Buddhist Church,
1947 Lawrence St., in Denver, to
celebrate Thanksgiving, on Thu.,
Nov. 26th.
Members of the Jewish Temple
Micjh, Unitarians, Universalists,
and Quakers will join Buddhists
in giving thanks at 10:00 a.m.,
at TSBC, Nov. 26th. Everyone is
welcome to attend.
One line greetings may be or-
dered at $2.00 per insertion, in
the Mile-Hi JACL section of the
Holiday Edition of P.C.
Space rates for larger greet-
ings or ad spaces are available
at $5.00 per column inch.
Detailed information, or or-
ders may be placed at the Denver
JACL office, by calling 244-2239
or 722-9255, or by writing to:
The Mile-Hi JACL, 1225-20th St.,
Denver, Colo., 80202.
M.Y.F. YOUTHS
TO SPOKANE,
NORTHWEST YPCC
Approximately 22 young people
and 6 adult chaperones from Simp-
son Methodist Church, in Denver,
will attend the Northwest Young
Peoples Christian Conference in
Spokane, Washington, over Thanks-
giving week-end.
Adult leaders will include the
REV. PAUL HAGIYA, MRS. GEO. GOTO,
LILLIAN TERASAKI, SUE HAMAMURA,
FLOYD BURROUGHS and KEN KURAMOTO.
The program HENRY TOSO
for the 3-day
conference of the Young Busseis
of this Tri-State region is as
follows:
FRI., Dec. 18th: .... Brighton
7:00 p.m........... Registration
8:00 p.m. Devotional Service
9:00 p.m. "Eggbeater" Social
SAT., Dec. 19th: TSBC, Denver
9:00 a.m. (All day) Registration
9:00 a.m............"Eye-Opener
10:30 a.m. General Sessions
1:30 p.m.........Bowl-Mor Lanes
6:30 p.m.........Buffet Supper
8:00 p.m.............Discussions
SUN., Dec. 20th: TSBC, Denver
10:00 a.m. Conference Service
11:00 a.m. Oratorical Contest
12:00 noon................Luncheon
5:30 p.m. Conference Banquet
8:30 p.m. Souvenir Picture
9:00 p.m.........Sayonara Ball
GEO. TERA0KA of Fowler, Calif,
will be the principal speaker and
PHILLIP MIYAZAWA will officiate
as toastmaster for the banquet.
Tickets are $6.50 for dinner and
dance, or $2.50 for dance only.
JAPAN FESTIVAL
BY KEN KYU CLUB
AT C.U. DEC. 6
Kenkyu Club of C.U. will hold
its 2nd annual Japan Festival at
the Student Union of the Univ. of
Colorado, in Boulder, Colo., on
Sun., Dec. 6th.
A free Japanese cultural pro-
gram will be held from 1:00 p.m.,
with BRENDA SEKIYA in charge, and
will include judo demonstrations,
tea ceremony, Japanese odori, art
displays and other aspects of Ja-
panese culture.
The traditional Japanese din-
ner will be served from 5:00 to
7:00 p.m., at $1.50 per person.

FRI-sat-sun
(SKHFHBH[S(gll
Dec. 18th Brighton Buddhist Church
Dec. 19th Tri-State Buddhist Church
Dec. 20th Tri-State Buddhist Church
Conference Banquet and Sayonara Ball
Brown Palace Hotel,
Denver, Colorado.
PEC IS 19 -20 1964-


PAGE 2.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
NOV.. 1964.
NATURALIZED JAPANESE IN COLORADO
In 1960, there were 6,846 persons of Japanese ancestry in Colorado
compared to 5,412 in 1950. The ten-year increase of 1,400 is due to
births of AJA children, and the influx of Japanese wives from Japan,
who now number about 500 in Colorado (about 40,000, nationally).
Knowledgeable community leaders advise there are about 1,400 Issei
in Colorado today, but unfortunately they are decreasing each year.
Since 1960, we have counted 134 __
deaths among Issei in the Denver
area alone. There are probably
about 700 Issei in Denver today.
IKEBANA TOUR
MAY 5, 1965
However, even in the twilight
years of their lives, we are ad-
vised that more than 750 Japanese
Issei have become naturalized ci-
tizens in Colorado, since 1952.
MATOBA HEADS
ISSEI SURVEY
HARRY G. MATOBA, Chrrnn for the
Issei survey in Denver, advised
that in consultation with the Ja-
panese Assn of Colorado, informal
interviews would be conducted.
SEISHIRO NAKAMURA, an old-time
pioneer in this area, has drawn
up a list of some 120 Issei who
are still living in this area and
who would be able to contribute
data concerning the Issei history
project for Colorado.
IKEBANA INTERNATIONAL is spon-
soring a 30-day tour to Japan,
with a 3-day Ikebana World Con-
vention in Tokyo, Japan.
The tour leaves San Francisco
via Japan Air Lines, May 5> 1965,
under the guidance of MRS. ELLEN
ALLEN of Washington, D.C., found-
er of Ikebana International.
The tour will include visits
to Nikko, Hakone, Kobe, Kyoto,
Takarazuka and Takamatsu, on a
study and cultural tour.

TRAVEL
SERVICE BUREAU-
izzr-27 ZISfST.
niA3-894£
JAPAN WEEK
IN BOSTON
KYOTO, Japan, is the sister-
city of BOSTON, Mass., and the
World Affairs Council in Boston
celebrated a "Japan Week**, with
seminars, cultural events, artis-
tic exhibits, and meetings with
high-level Japanese officials.
Sen. Edward Kennedy hailed the
event as extremely gratifying for
Bostonians. Japan Air Lines was
a leading sponsor of the affair.
Be Tsukikos guest on
your flight to Japan
From ihe moment you board your DC-8 Jet Courier,
Tsukiko Yamazaki observes every detail of traditional lapanese courtesy
and hospitality. She pampers you with attentive service, offers you
delicacies of the East and Westmakes you feel you are already in Japan.
Vaur JAL flight, whether in the Economy or First Class cabin, will be
gracious and restful. Yet |Al flights cost no more. JAL fares are the same
as all airlines. The real difference is in |ALs superior service,
personal attention and convenient schedules.
Daily flights leave from Los Angeles or San Francisco. Visit family or
friends in Hawaii, at no extra fare, and continue on to lapan at
your convenienceany day of the week. Connections at
cities throughout japan are excellent. See
travel agent, and lly a mid the aim beauty
of lapan at almost the speed of sound.
UA PAM
AIR
LINES
JAL Hosless
Tsokiho Yanmaki
Call your
Travel A$nt
S.F. OSAKA
SISTER CITIES
OSAKA, Japan, is the sister-
city Of SAN FRANCISCO, California
and in observance of this affili-
ation, Miss Osaka, above, visited
San Francisco for a week, during
October, 1964.
SATOKO MATSUI, Miss Osaka for
1964, represented her heme city
as an official sister-city repre-
sentative to San Francisco, and
was feted at many receptions and
formal dinners during her visit.
(Photo by Japan Air Lines)
c= L. jr

IN THE DENVER HILTON HOTEL
Court Place near 15th Street
AComa 2-3481
LECTURE SERIES
ON ORIENTAL ART
MARY LANIUS, Associate Curator
for Oriental Art, reported a ser-
ies of lectures followed by gal-
lery tours are being held at the
Oriental Art Museum in Denver.
Art of the Near East, and Art
of India were covered during Oct.
Art of China commenced Nov. 10th.
The series include slide-lectures
at 4:00 p.m., on Tues., followed
by a gallery tour on the ensuing
Tues., also at 4:00 p.m.
Japanese and Far Eastern Art
will be discussed on Nov. 24th,
by DR. OTTO KARL BACH, with the
gallery tour on Dec. 1st.
Complete information on these
lecture series may be obtained by
calling MARY LANIUS at the Orien-
tal Art Museum, 297-2620.
Denver Art Museum
ART TREASURES
EXPERT PANEL
Specialists in specific fields
of art at the Denver Art Museum
constituted a panel of experts to
appraise the authenticity, and to
discuss heirlooms owned, or "bar-
gains" brought home from abroad,
by Denverites.
Critical judgments as to the
approximate age or period of its
artistic development were made by
the panelists. Analytical dis-
cussions of artifacts brought in
by the public were high-lights of
Denver Art Museum month.
ARTHUR JOLLIFFE of Jolliffes
Oriental, and MARY LANIUS of the
Art Museum staff, were the expert
panelists on oriental art, backed
by DR. OTTO KARL BACH who recent-
ly returned from extensive study
and travel in Japan.
A KEBONO
^LdClu^UCX RESTflURflriT
vV7 U JAPANRSR RAKK ANn
JAPANESE SAKE AND BEER
CHIVEICO ROKI
1953 Lft'RimeR ST.
(CLOSED MONDAYS)
Tt?L. CH 4-77-43
KE 4-9981
12,34, 2.0th St.
Japanese cmnesE-RmeRicnn food
jflPRnese S&KE BVAungLe-
TEL: &ZS-3S30

Hours: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
(CLOSED ON TUESDAYS)


nuuiriAIM-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
The Japan philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, above, with a youthful
group of some 85 Japanese musicians on their first U.S. tour, per-
formed at the Auditorium Theatre in Denver, Colo., under the baton of
AKEO WATANABE, on Wed., Nov. 11th.
Moderate reviews indicated that the group played with precision,
and were a well-drilled ensemble,
stiff and academic, so that the
which transforms organized sounds
into thrilling orchestral music.
The violin solo performance of
TOSHIYA ETO was noted as indicat-
ing remarkable skill, and whose
tone, clarity and intonation were
excellent.
ACLU WHITEHEAD
AWARD TO MENIN
but that the conducting was rather
performance lacked the vital spark
WYER AWARD TO
NELSON OF D.U.
DR. ALFRED G. NELSON, formerly
the Dean of the graduate school
at the University of Denver, will
receive the Wyer Award from the
Adult Education Council of Denver
at the Brown Palace Hotel, at a
noon luncheon, Mon., Nov. 23rd.
NOV.. 1964.___________________
JAPANESE VISITORS
JAPANESE ARTIST. .
TSUNEKQ GUENTHER, a candidate
for a masters degree at the Unlv.
of Denver, held an exhibit of oil
paintings in the Pioneer Room of
the DU student union during Nov.
MILITARY VISITOR. .
Visiting the USAF Academy last
week was Maj. Gen. SHINJI OTA of
Japan's self-defense force.
WRESTLERS COMING. .
9 The wrestling team of Japan's
National High Schools will tour
Colorado during Jan. 1965, under
the sponsorship of the Boulder
Amateur Wrestling Foundation.
JAPANESE BANKER
VISITING DENVER
RYOHEI ISHIKAWA, Pres, of the
Chubu Sogo Bank, in Tokyo, is a
brief two-week visitor in Denver,
to confer with officials of the
United Nations Ins. Co., at West
80th Ave. and Sheridan Blvd., in
Westminster, Colo.
ISHIKAWA is the son of multi-
millionaire Hiroauke Ishikawa of
Japan who owns controlling inter-
est in the Denver-baaed insurance
company. Young Ishikawa is the
1st Vice-Pres. of United Nations
Insurance Company.
He is a law graduate from the
Kelo University in Tokyo, and has
studied in Ohio in 1949, as well
as attended Harvard Law School in
Cambridge, Mass., for two years.
MADAM BUTTERFLY
BRANCH OPENING
GENE and KIMIKO SIDE of Madame
Butterfly's Gift Shop, announced
that their new branch store will
be opened at 1575 South Colorado
Blvd., during Thanksgiving week.
The new store is located in
the Boulevard Shopping Center, at
the Intersection of Colorado Blvd
and Valley Hvy, on the west side
of Colorado Blvd. There is plen-
ty of free parking available, and
access is readily provided at the
traffic light on E. Mexico Ave.
SAMUEL D. MENIN, a fighting,
liberal Denver attorney, will be
honored by presentation of the
Whitehead Memorial Award, by the
Colorado American Civil Liberties
Union, at the Pinehurst Country
Club, on Fri., Nov. 20th.
MENIN has defended the rights
of Spanish Americans in Colorado,
and has accepted unpopular cases
involving Communists. In fight-
ing for the rights of unpopular
minorities, he has helped to pre-
serve the constitutional rights
of all U.S. citizens.
AJAs were especially benefit-
ed by MENIN's activities, when he
assisted in suspension of depor-
tation of Japanese aliens during
1946-48, in Colorado, as a free
and voluntary legal service.
DR. NELSON is being honored
for his distinguished service in
the field of adult education. He
is now retired, and Dean Emeritus
of the Graduate College of D.U.
Older AJAs in this region will
recall that during the years of
the evacuation in 1942-1943, the
University of Denver was one of
the few schools in the U.S. which
would accept students of Japanese
American ancestry.
_______._________________PAGE 3.
WASHINGTON PARK
METHODIST FETES
FOREIGN STUDENTS
More than 280 foreign students
in the Denver area were invited
to the International Dinner of
Washington Park Methodist Church
on Nov. 15th.
The Church expressed its hope
of "promoting better world under-
standing and friendship** through
personal contacts.
(Editor's note: Change in atti-
tude of this church was noted, In
view of the resolution passed by
the Church, in 1953, against per-
sons of Japanese ancestry moving
into that neighborhood.)
JAPAN SOCIETY
TOUR OF JAPAN
JUDGE GEORGE G. PRIEST of the
Japan Society of Colorado report-
ed that the Japan-America Socie-
ties of the U.S. are sponsoring a
tour to Japan during Oct. 1965.
John D. Rockefeller, III, has
authorized Douglas W. Overton of
the New York Society (112 E. 64th
St.) to coordinate arrangements
for the tour.
Nana Gaddis Hall of Maryland,
who came to Denver for the inau-
gural meeting of the Colorado So-
ciety in 1963, will be director
of the Japan tour in 1965.
Japanese Books-Oriental Art Goods
3£obun-*Ska
OENVER. COlORADO
Phona KEystone 4-4637 '234 2h Street
DENVER'S MUST COMPLETE
SELECTION OP QUALITY
JAPANESE MERCHANDISE
AT MODERATE PRICES
LARGE SELECTION OF ACCESSORIES
FOR JAPANESE KIMONO
REGULAR STORE HOURS:
MON. thru SAT. 9:30 a.m. 6:00 p.m.
TUBS, evenings open until 9:00 p.m.
SUNDAYS ............... Closed
EUGENE SIDE and KIMIKO SIDE
Proprietors.
4609 E. COLFAX fiVE. FR 7-19X3
penveR to, COLO.
FOR ft DELIGHTFUL VISIT
to jppfln comE to.
uji ew
SUKIVflKI RESTflURAtlT
930 LinCOLrt ST.
IN THE SHERMAN PLAZA HOTEL
Tel.: 266-2170
VISIT OUR GIFT SHOP
COCKTAILS SOe From 3 t 6
DINNERS from 3.00 and up
Every TUE. & THU. at 9 PM
Authentic movies of Japan
shown in Cocktail Lounge.
"DELIGHTFULLY DIFFERENT
JAPANESE FOOD"
hours:
Tue. thru Fri.
11:30 to 1:00 AM
SAT. 5:00 to 1:30 AM
SUN. 2:00 to 10:00 PM
CLOSED mOHDAVS


MTN.- PLAINS AJANEWS
Published monthly, except July
and August. Mailed by the 30th.
EDITOR AMD PUBLISHER
MINORU YASUI
1225 20th Street,
Denver, Colorado,
80202.
CH 4-2239 RA 2-9255
*******
BUD UCHIDA.............Heads
ROSA ODOW............ Artist
TOM MASAMOR1. ... Photographer
TRUE YASUI. General Factotum
The biggest bit of community
news in a long, long time is the
Simpson Methodist Church's pro-
posal to launch a quarter million
dollar building drive. Even in
this day of the inflated dollar
this is an impressive sum.
The plan is to build a physi-
cal plant of substantial propor-
tions just north of Denver proper
with an acre of recently donated
land as the project nucleus.
An investment of this size can
be justified only on the basis of
long-term service, and this is
precisely what the project's pro-
ponents say they have in mind.
If and when the congregation
should lose its identity as such
--and this is a possibility-- the
proposal is to serve the larger
community.
In this regard the church is
already an integrated one.
In other communities the trend
toward general community service
is already well established.
Not long ago the Seattle Times
published a series of photographs
showing children of various na-
tional and racial origins being
cared for at the day nursery at
the Buddhist Church of that city.
While $250,000 may appear to
be an enormous sum for Denver's
Japanese American community to
raise, in relation to today's in-
come it probably is not as large
as the sums the Issei have con-
tributed in times past for simi-
lar purposes.
The Tri-State Buddhist Church,
for example put together $136,000
more than a decade ago for the
original building on Lawrence St.
Today, according to the Rev.
Mr. Tamai, the building plus its
additions, its furnishings and
home for the ministers are valued
at close to $400,000.
ANTI-ALIENISM IN CALIFORNIA
California voters, by an overwhelming majority of more than 4 mil-
lion votes against about 2 million votes, approved a constitutional
prohibition against fair housing laws in the State of California.

Superficially, Prop. 14 on the California ballot appeared to be a
"Freedom of Choice proposal to allow real property owners to sell to
whomever they pleased. But in legal effect the constitutional amend-
ment in California now guarantees
the right to discriminate against
anyone in the sale or rental of
homes or land in California.
NATIONAL ESSAY
CONTEST WINNER
It means that, in California,
the sun-kist Sons and Daughters
of the Golden West (late-comers
to California) now have a consti-
tutional right to prohibit you or
me from living in California, or
in certain areas of California.
It also means that biased real
estate interests and racists of
every ilk are now encouraged to
attack legislation in other areas
where simple human rights of all
people had been protected by law.
Hopefully, a test case will be
initiated in California, and the
courts will strike down Prop. 14,
as contrary to the Constitution
of the United States.
NOMINATIONS FOR
1965 JACL BOARD
HENRY SUZUKI, Chairman of the
Nominations and Election commit-
tee for Mile-Hi JACL, reported
that the following nominations to
the 1965 JACL Board have been re-
ceived and approved:
HARRY HARADA
R0BT. H0RIUCHI
TAMI MASUNAGA
BOB MARUYAMA
ALBERT NAKATA
DOROTHY UCHIDA
RICH YAMAGUCHI
RICHARD YOSHIDA
Further nominations may be ac-
cepted, if postmarked before Nov.
30th, and accompanied by written
consent of the person nominated.
Ballots will be mailed to all
members of the Mile-Hi JACL on or
before Dec. 5th, to be returned
not later than Dec. 15th. Write-
in candidates will be accepted.
INTERVIEWERS FOR
JAPANESE HISTORY
PROJECT SOUGHT
In addition to the voluntary
free interview program of the Is-
sei History project, there is a
73-page questionnaire to be ad-
ministered by bi-lingual inter-
viewers in the Mtn-Plains region.
The work is part-time, and can
be fitted to suit the convenience
of the interviewer. Compensation
at the rate of $1.50 per hr. will
be paid for completed interviews.
Anyone interested, and quali-
fied, is requested to contact the
Mtn-Plains director, MIN YASUI,
1225-20th St., Denver, Colorado.
(Tel.: CH 4-2239 or RA 2-9255)
Above, JANET OKAMURA receiving
the Nat'l JACL Essay contest tro-
phy from Natl Director MAS SATOW
at the Mile-Hi JACL fall meeting,
at Cathay Post, on Oct. 30th.
JANET OKAMURA is the daughter
of Mr. & Mrs. Shiogo Okamura of
Denver, and is a senior at Colo-
rado College in Colorado Springs.
She is engaged to be married, af-
ter her graduation, to WM. SAKA-
HARA, now 2nd Lt. in the USAF,
JOIN JACL NOW!!!
1965 Mile-Hi JACL membership
cards are now available from any
Mile-Hi board member, or from the
JACL office, 1225-20th St., Den-
ver, Colo. 80202. (Tel. 244-2239
or 722-9255)
Dues for the Mile-Hi JACL for
1965 are $5.00 per person. All
members in good standing of the
Nat'l 1000 Club ($25.00 paid-up)
are automatically bona fide mem-
bers of the local Mile-Hi chap-
ter.
It was noted that the National
JACL Bowling Tournament would be
held in Denver, in March, 1965,
and that JACL membership is a re-
quisite for participation. Be-
cause of this requirement, it is
anticipated that the Mile-Hi JACL
membership for 1965 would reach
over 500 next year.
ALL PHOTOS, unless otherwise!
credited, in The Mtn-Plains AJA
News, taken by TOM T. MASAM0RI, I
2010 Lamar St., Denver 15, Colo.
Tel.: BE 7-3041
Our heartfelt thanks and ap-
preciation to all of you who gave
so generously of your time and
effort in making
our recent food
bazaar a great
success!
As a result
of your efforts
and the splendid
support of the
entire community
the Mile-Hi JACL
realized a net
profit of more FURUKAWA
than $1,000.00.
At a time when the treasury was
badly depleted, this was a much
needed boost to our finances and
to our morale!
POLITICAL DISCUSSIONS. .
I wish more of you could have
attended our fall general meeting
held in October. It was an ex-
tremely interesting evening fill-
ed with political discussion pro-
vided by three energetic and as-
tute Sansei college students.
JOYCE SAKAGUCHI backed Lyndon
Johnson, while HOWARD K0SHI and
RON INOUYE supported Goldvater in
opposition.
NAT'L ESSAY TROPHY. .
The meeting was an appropri-
ate occasion for presentation of
a beautiful trophy to JANET OKA-
MURA, who won the Nat'l JACL Es-
say contest for the second time
in a row, an unprecedented feat.
Congratulations, JANET!!!
NAT'L JACL REPORT. .
A fitting close for our gen-
eral meeting was provided by our
Nat'l JACL Director, MASA0 SATOW,
who gave the latest report on the
activities of the national organ-
ization, including a comprehen-
sive report on the vigorous cam-
paign against Proposition 14, by
JACLers in California.
NEW YEAR'S EVE FESTIVITIES. .
The last event on the 1964 ca-
lendar is the New Year's Eve Din-
ner and Dance, on Dec. 31st.
This year's gala affair will
be held in the luxurious Brown
Palace Hotel, with favors for all
and a good time awaiting you! We
hope to see you all there Let's
start planning on it.'!!
HTK-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
I Regular: $3.00 for % yr ( 5 mo.)
$5.00 for 1 yr (10 ao.)
Special Mile-Hi JACL members ONLY
$2.50 for \ yr ( 5 mo.)
$3.50 for 1 yr (10 mo.)


NOV.. 1964,
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PACE 5.
OMAHA JACL NEWS
Omaha JACL contributed a 2nd
$50.00 to the California campaign
against Prop. 14, in October.
The Sukiyaki Dinner project of
Omaha JACL continued with GLADYS
HIRABAYASHI, MARIE LINHART, and
MARY MISAKI, as Co-Chrmn. Some
60 guests at the Mariners' Club
were served as a chapter project.
College students in or from
the Omaha area included:
University of Omaha
DAVID KAWAMI JANE TAKECHI
DEN KUROISHI STEVE TAKECHI
MIKE WATANABE (Post-Grad.)
ROBERT ZAIMAN. Creighton Univ.
JEFF SHIMADA Illinois Institute
KAREN MISAKI Univ. of Calif.
RON MISAKI Sacramento College
And, also a number of students at
Creighton University from Hawaii.
RONALD INOUYE
Above is HOWARD KOSHI, fresh-
man at Colorado School of Mines,
in Golden, Colo., who teamed with
RON INOUYE to speak on behalf of
Sen. Barry Goldwater*s candidacy.
AJA STUDENTS
Students at C.U. in charge of
various phases of the 2nd annual
"Japan Festival", on Dec. 6th, at
the University of Colorado, are:
GENERAL CHAIRMAN.
Coordinator .
Tickets .........
Japanese Program.
Japanese Dinner .
Decorations .
Cultural Display.
Publicity .
. JAMES KATO
. DONNA UYEMURA
. MICKEY KOSHIO
. BRENDA SEKIYA
. DEN MQTOYOSHI
STEVE YASUZAWA
NANCY KUWABARA
JOLYN MATSUMOTO
All proceeds of the-Festival
are ear-marked for the Christian
Children's Fund, to help support
Japanese orphans.
Above is RONALD INOUYE of La
Jara, Colo., now a junior at the
University of Colorado, who team-
ed with HOWARD KOSHI (at left) to
support Sen. Barry M. Goldwater.
The duo spoke in opposition to
the views of JOYCE SAKAGUCHI (at
right), who supported the nation-
al Democratic ticket of LBJ-HHH.
RICH YAMAGUCHI, a graduate of
C.U., and now a science teacher
at Lakewood High School, acted as
moderator for the political dis-
cussion for Mile-Hi JACL.
DAVE FURUKAWA, who presided as
Chrran of the Mile-Hi JACL Board,
commended the young people for
their active and articulate In-
terest in national politics.
COLLEGE BRIEFS
COLORADO STATE COLLEGE:
DAVE KAWAKAMI was one of the
students from Colorado State Col-
lege who presented Hawaiian and
Tahitian songs and dances at the
"Travel to Polynesia" show of Pan
American Airways in Denver.
COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY:
JULIA MORITA, a coed at CSU,
is a delegate to the National 4-H
Congress, in Chicago, on Nov. 29-
Dec. 3rd.
LftKEUOOD
3- <174-5
VICK* ETHEL VhNASE
CAPITOL MORTUARY
1331 SHERMAN TA 5-0151
Personal Attention
to Every Detail
FT. LUPTON JACL
Prexy SAM FUNAKOSHI of the Ft.
Lupton chapter assigned the task
of revising the by-laws of the
Ft. Lupton JACL into a board sys-
tem to SAM KOSHIO, ALBERT WATADA
and FRANK YAMAGUCHI.
* The annual meeting of the Ft.
Lupton JACL is scheduled for Dec.
12th, at which time revisions of
by-laws, election of officers and
presentation of awards will con-
stitute the final business of the
Ft. Lupton JACL for 1964.
BRIGHTON
YOSHIKO QKAMOTO, Pres, of the
Brighton Nisei Women's Club, an-
nounced that the annual bazaar of
the Club would be held at Public
Service Bldg., in Brighton, Colo,
on Fri., Dec. 4, 1964.
LEE MURAXA of Ft. Lupton went
on a week's trip into Old Mexico,
during the end of October, to re-
turn some of his bracero laborers
to the Guadalajars area.
JOYCE SAKAGUCHt
Above, JOYCE SAKAGUCHI, junior
at University of Colorado, sup-
ported the Democratic administra-
tion of Pres. Lyndon B. Johnson,
in opposition to the candidacy of
Sen. Barry Goldwater. She oppos-
ed combined efforts of RON INOUYE
and HOWARD KOSHI to persuade lis-
teners that national policies of
the United States should be dras-
tically changed.
JOANNA SAKATA .< s Finance Chrmn
and advised that all proceeds 'of
the Bazaar will be devoted to the
Brighton Scholarship Fund.
Oriental food, including teri-
yaki chicken, sushi, and shrimp
tempura, will be under the chair-
manship of MARY CHIKUMA.
Japanese zabuton made of cloth
especially imported from Hawaii
will be under the joint chairman-
ship of FLORENCE NAKATA and HELEN
OKADA.
YOSHIKO SASAKI will handle the
kimono sales committee, while the
towels sales will be under joint
chairmanship of MIYEKO MAYEDA and
MARY MATSUNO.
Madame Butterfly's Gift Shop
of Denver will have a sales booth
under the supervision of EMI CHI-
KUMA and HARUKO SASA.
The Nisei Women's Club Bazaar
will open at 9:00 a.m., and will
be continued all day Fri., Dec. 4
in Brighton, Colo.
CUSTOM PHOTO FINISHING
7ii X7ttrsr.
Denver s, coio.
Telephone: CH 4-4073
MlKE TflSNlRO ,VtiOP. tel. 6S9-9984-
United Nations Insurance Company
WEST 80TH AVENUE at SHERIDAN BOULEVARD WESTMINSTER, COLORADO.
P. O. BOX 1501, DENVER 1, COLORADO.
HIROSUKE ISHIKAWA, President Tel.: HA 9-3537


PAGE 6.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
NOV., 1964.
COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN NAMED FOR
1965 JACL BOWLING TOURNAMENT
JOHN SAKAYAMA, General Chairman for the 1965 National JACL Bowling
Tournament to beheld at the Celebrity Lanes, in Denver, Colorado, on
March 8-13, 1965, announced that officials and committee chairmen for
the 19th annual national Japanese
THANKSGIVING BOWLING TOURNAMENT
The traditional Thanksgiving week-end bowling tournament of the
Rocky Mountain Nisei Bowling Assn
Center, in Denver, Colo,, on Sat.
General Co-Chrmn for the tour-
nament are TAK YAMASAKI for the
mens division, and JEAN SATO for
the women's division. Other of-
ficials are as follows:
Registration. SADAMI KURODA
Entries ......... IWAO NISHIKAWA
and MARY MASUNAGA
Scorekeepers. WILLIE HIROKAWA
and KIYOSHI NAKATA
Ragtime Doubles PETE MENDA
and KOJI KANAI
Tabulations ......... TOM HIKIDA
Singles and doubles will com-
mence at 12:30 a.m. Sat., Nov. 28
(just half-hour past midnight, on
Fri.), with a 4:30 p.m. squad on
Sat. afternoon, and two squads on
Sun. afternoon, 1 & 3 p.m.
Team events will be rolled on
Sat. evening, commencing at 7:00
p.m. and winding up Sun. morning.
will be held
and Sun., Nov.
at Celebrity Sports
28-29, 1964.
WOMEN'S BOWLING
HITS NAKAGAWA, in Nisei Mixers
at Trade Winds Bowl, slammed home
a big 268-652; at one point, she
had 8 strikes going in a row.
MATS ITO, in Columbine tourna-
ment tours, has a hi game of 263.
TAY KONDO scored a 223 in the
Ladies Major at Rec Bowling, and
MARTHA YAGO had a 233 in the Ni-
sei Womens League at Celebrity.
JANE RADA has a 235 at Bowl-ero
Queens.
JOHN SAKAYAMA, above, is again
Gen. Chrmn for the National JACL
Bowling Tournament to be held in
Denver, Colo.
In 1960, he was the Gen. Chrmn
of the 14th Annual National JACL
Bowling Tournament, held during
March of that year.

DENVER JUDOISTS TO SALT LAKE CITY
Three mens teams, and a women's demonstration team, from Denver
School of Judo will invade Salt Lake City, Utah, for the invitational
judo tournament to be held on Nov. 28, 1964. The Denver contingent
will leave via "City of St. Louis" domeliner on Fri., Nov. 27th, and
return to Denver on Sun., Nov. 29th at 7:55 p.m., at the Denver union
railroad station. Team nembers
going to Salt Lake City for the
llch annual Intermountain Tourna-
ment are as follows:
mo ARAPAHOE ST.
DEnVER, COLORADO
RC. 2*5075
ttK
SIX WEEKS BEGINNERS' COURSE IN JUDO
Fon MEN & WOMEN- BOYS a GIRLS
6 WEEKS TUESDAYS 6 THURSDAYS
7:30 p.m. to 9: 00 p.m.
(18 HOURS TWO Ik HOUR LESSONS PER WEEK)
Senior Team
Captain..........ROGER STEVENS
LEROY ABE WILBUR VAUGHN
SHUNY SUGIURA FRED YAMASHITA
Alternates:
MARK YAMASAKI PERRY YAMASHITA
Intermediate Team
Captain............DICK 0KIM0T0
WAYNE FUSHIMI PHIL JORDAN
STEVE NAKAMURA HAROLD TANI
Alternate............BRAD END0
American bowling classic
as follows:
will be
GENERAL CHAIRMAN
Men's Division.
Women's Division
Treasurer .
Secretary .
JOHN SAKAYAMA
. TOM SHIBA0
. JEAN SATO
IWAO NISHIKAWA
RUBY MIYAZAWA
Committee chairmen
appointed as follows:
have been
Booklet................SAM INAI
Registration. SADAMI KURODA
Transportation.........TOM I0KA
Housing............BILL CHIKUMA
Scheduling.........TAK YAMASAKI
Finance ........... JOHN NOGUCHI
Tabulations ......... TOM HIKIDA
Trophies...........SHUN NAKAYAMA
Publicity .... DR. BOB MAYEDA
Mixer............DR. TAK MAYEDA
Special Events. GENE IKEYA
Scorekeepers. WILLIE HIROKAWA
and KIYOSHI NAKATA
Rag-Time.............PETE MENDA
and KOJI KANAI
More than 600 nationally known
AJA bowlers are expected to par-
ticipate, including delegations
from Hawaii and the West Coast,
as well as Chicago and Midwest,
and possibly two teams from Japan
as special sports goodwill ambas-
sadors to the U.S.A.
SPORTS BRIEFS
BRUCE KAMADA, center for Man-
ual Hi, and DAVE OKAZAKI, a back
also for Manual, placed honorable
mention on Rocky Mtn New's All-
City football squad.
* KEN MIZUSHIMA, Grand Junction,
a guard, was the only AJA to be
listed as honorable mention on
the Denver Post's 1964 All-League
football selections for Colorado.
TED KUSUN0 of Poudre High, in
Ft. Collins, and KENJI KAWAKAMI
of Platteville, are among foot-
ball stars in the prep leagues.
BEGINNERS' COURSE- $25 22.
The Beginners' Course in Judo is an orientation program to intro-
duce fundamentals in the sport of Judo. Basic principles, correct
methods of falling, some aspects of self-defense, and training in
basic throwing and grappling techniques, as well as the history,
ethics and nomenclature will be taught by well-qualified and com-
petent black belt judo instructors in this beginning course.
(SPECIAL FAMILY RATES)
FOR SPORT-FUn-HEflLTH LEARn JUDO
For details (no obligation imposed), clip and send to:
DENVER SCHOOL OF JUDO, INC.
2020 ARAPAHOE STREET DENVER S. COLORADO
TELEPHONES: 222*S07S 244-9630
Please send me complete information on BEGINNERS' COURSE IN JUDO.
NAME:____________________________________________ Sex: Male f~J
' Female /w7
ADDRESS:
Phone
ZIP #
AGE: __________ HEIGHT: WEIGHT:
Junior Team
Captain...........MIKE FUKUHARA
JAMES HALL GLENN NITTA
EARL FUKUHARA KEN SUGIURA
Alternate.........MIKE FERNANDES
DENVER SCHOOL OF JUDO, INC.
2020 ARAPAHOE ST. DENVER, COLORADO
PHONE 244*9909
-TRAVELING FUND-
Receipts From Drawing To Be Used
For Judo Students Travel Expenses
To National and Regional JudoTournaments
1965 RCA 1965 RCA 194$ RCA
21" 19"
COLOR TELEVISION 8 & W PORTA81E PORTABLE STEREO
WITH BASE TELEVISION RECORD PLAYER
TICKETS 50 EACH
DRAWING WILL BE HELD AT
TRI-STATE BUDDHIST CHURCH
1947 LAWRENCE STREET
SUNDAY 8:30 P.M.
DOUGLAS TSUTSUI and MELVIN TA-
KAHASHI were regulars on Manual's
tennis team this season.
The first Karate Tournament to
be held in the Rocky Mtn region
was staged at the Denver School
of Judo, on Sun., Oct. 18th.
Sponsored by the Colo. Karate
Assn, four teams were entered by
the American Judo Club, the Den-
ver AMID (Advanced Methods in De-
fense), Dun Jang Soo Do and the
U.S. Air Force Academy.
INTERNATIONAL
FINEST SPORTS
Happy Canyon Shopping Center,
5042 E. Hampden Avenue,
Denver 22, Colorado.
STOME TANITA, Mgr. Tel. 756-9411
NOVEMBER 22, 1964


NOV.. 1964.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 7
jAnis
SflKflVflmfl
(**Editor's Note; We bring you a
guest columnist this month, in
the hope that this corner will
bring more variety of teen-age
news monthly. If you wish to
be a contributor, please send
your picture and not more than
a page of double-spaced news.)
Congratulations are in order
for EILEEN YANASE, who was elect-
ed Secty of the Senior Methodist
Youth Fellowship sub-district, in
Denver. She is a member of the
Simpson Methodist Church.
DALE YANARI, popular editor of
photography for North Hi's annual
board, has been pledged to Tau
Sigma fraternity, whose members
are chosen for outstanding lead-
ership and academic ability.
# At Horace Mann Jr. Hi school,
ELYN OKUMURA and DEBBIE SAGARA
are members of the Girls' Guid-
ance Group. Outstanding 8th and
9th grade girls make up this se-
lect group to help counsel girls
of the school.
* Among members of the Valkyries
(North High Pep Club) are EILEEN
FUJINO, LINDA ITO, RHONDA NISH1-
MOTO, MAUREEN TANOUYE, DEBBIE YA-
SHIRO and JANIS SAKAYAMA.
At North High, DICKIE OKIMOTO,
GARY OKIMOTO and JANIS SAKAYAMA
are members of the Presidents'
Round Table, an organization of
all presidents of various clubs
and groups at the school.
Little KAREN NOGAMI was pic-
tured in the Rocky Mountain News
last week as a Blue Bird of the
Camp Fire Girls, in promoting the
annual candy sales for the camp-
ing program of that organization.
She is the daughter of Mr. & Mrs.
Meach Nogami, 4695 Alcott St., in
Denver, Colorado.
# WARREN YAMADA and his sister,
ADRIENNE YAMADA, children of Mr.
& Mrs. Geo. Yaraada of 680 Dahlia
St., helped promote children's
recordings available at the main
public library in Denver.
Children in the Hallowe'en Parade, at the Mile-Hi JACL meeting on
Oct. 30th at the Cathay Post, from left: JILL SHIYOMURA, DICK YANASE,
EMILY YANASE, JOHNNY MASAMORI with DANNY MASAMORI, BYRON MAYEDA, DEAN
TERASAKI (under robot space uni-
form), KAREN MAYEDA and PAM ANDO.
DANNY MASAMORI was judged the
cutest, KAREN MAYEDA the pretti-
est, and DEAN TERASAKI the most
original, by a panel of judges
headed by HENRY TOBO, board mem-
ber of Mile-Hi JACL.
The children's Hallowe-en par-
ty was headed by NATCHI FURUKAWA,
assisted by SARA TERASAKI, BESSIE
SHIYOMURA, ETHEL YANASE, and LILY
MASAMORI. TERNO ODOW showed car-
toons for the children.
CALENDAR
Of c oming Events
Nov. 24: (Tue) "ART OF JAPAN" series at Denver Art Museum.
Nov. 27: (Thu) THANKSGIVING SERVICES, 10:00 a.m., at TSBC.
Nov. 27- Nov. 29: (F-S-S) NORTHWEST YPCC, Spo- kane, Wn.; delegation from Simpson ME Church
Nov. 28: (Sat) JUDO TOURNAMENT, Salt Lake City; teams from Denver School of Judo
Dec. 6: (Sun) "JAPAN FESTIVAL", C.U. Student Union Bldg, in Boulder; Kenkyu Club.
Dec. 18- Dec. 20: (F-S-S) 31st Annual YBLC, in Brighton and Denver; Banquet, Brown Palace.
Dec. 20: (Sun) XMAS PARTY, families of Cathay Post #185.
Dec. 31: (Thu) NEW YEAR'S EVE BALL, Brown Palace Hotel, by Mile-Hi JACL, sponsors
Above, SKUNY SUGIURA as a very
willing and laughing target at
the TSBC Bazaar, held on Nov. 7-
8, 1964. At right is CARRIE ANN
SAKAMOTO, who was in charge of
the sponge-throwing booth. (TSBC
Bazaar photo by HOWARD N. ODA.)
AJA STUDENT
GLENN MAD0K0R0, junior at Ra-
num Hi, Westminster, was selected
to attend the State Senate Youth
Conference at CSU, in Nov., where
he was elected as one of six fi-
nalists, two of whom will be sent
to Washington, D.C., in 1965, to
watch the U.S. Senate in action.
GLENN is Pres, of the Junior
Class, and also Pres, of Inter-
national Relations Club, at Ranum
High. He is the son of Lt. Col.
(Ret.) and Mrs. Shug Madokoro of
8794 Pecos Street, Westminster,
Colo. 80030.
Universal SfuJios
1526 ROADWAY
DOWNTOWN
EDWin K.SUimABUKURG
PHOTOGRAPHS
zoto Lflnrn st.
PEnvtu is. colo.
BE 7- 3041
NEW 1964 CROP NOW AVAILABLE AT PACIFIC MERCANTILE CO.
AC 2-32S2
TA 5-1-4S6
DENVER 2. COLO.
RICE
flVfll LQRI P DT
PACIFIC ITlERCflnTILE COITlPPnM
194-t LARimER ST.
TEL: KE 4-4051 DEflVER, COLORADO


PAGE 8.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. MEWS
MOV.. 1964
Above Is a scene in the kitchen ot the Tri-State Buddhist Church,
during the TSBC Bazaar, held on Nov. 7-8, 1964. At extreme left is
GRACE MOTOYAMA, with KAY NITTA, working at the sink. At the extreme
right is MAY DOIDA, and one of the two men at the stove in the back-
ground, with their backs to the camera, is HARRY NITTA (probably, at
left). The lady at the sink. in_center, is RUTH KAMIBAYASHI, and the
SIMPSON CHURCH
BUILDING DINNER
The Simpson Methodist Church
held a congregational dinner at
The Lotus Room, on Sun., Nov. IS,
to explain details concerning the
proposal to build a new $250,000
church at V. 60th Ave. and Sheri-
dan Blvd., just north of Denver.
Details concerning a sanctuary
to seat 300, with 14 classrooms
for Sunday School, a small Issei
chapel for 100, two pastors' stu-
dies and offices, a combination
fellowship hall and gym, and a
large kitchen, were explained.
simpsonT church news
ALL-CHURCH TALENT SHOW
e The Simpson Church sponsored
an all-Church Talent Show, at the
Columbine School auditorium, on
Fri., Nov. 13th.
MINISTER TO BOULDER
REV. JON FUJITA of the Simpson
Methodist Church in Denver, goes
to Boulder, Colo., every week to
minister to the group of Japanese
students, professors, and others,
at the University of Colorado.
BRIDGE WINNERS:
Winners of the Oct. 31st ses-
sion of the Simpson Bridge Club's
duplicate tournament were:
1st: SUE AKIYAMA and TRUE YASUI
2nd: RUBY ARAI and SAM MATSUM0T0
Tie for 3rd: ART & KANA YORIMOTO
FUMI ARAI and CATHY KAWAKAMI
CATHAY POST NEWS
1965 MEMBERSHIP DRIVE. .
EDDIE OSUMI, Membership Chrmn,
reported that three team captains
have been appointed for the 1965
Cathay Post membership drive.
Membership captains are: SHIG
MOR1SR1GE, FRANK KAMIBAYASHI, and
BEN MURAKAMI. Members are urged
to renew their 1965 memberships!
CATHAY POST BOWLERS. .
JOHN NAKASHIMA rolled a string
of 600 series, with 644, 602 and
610 recently. JOHN NOGUCHI had a
224 game, and TOM HIK1DA rolled a
624 handicap series in the Cathay
league at Bowl-Mor Lanes.
lady hurrying from the kitchen,
in center background is MRS. S.
YASHIRO, who was assisting at the
udon booth. We cannot identify
the other three figures, who are
almost completely hidden at left.
(Photos by HOWARD 0DA)
Above are Issei ladies at the
"sushi" table. At left is MRS.
CHIYO MAYEDA waiting upon a cus-
tomer, while in center is MRS. C.
MARUTANI with a plate of sushi,
and at extreme right is MRS. ROSE
SHINK0 IGUCHI.
In addition to chow mein, the
TSBC Bazaar had aenju, teriyaki,
sushi, udon, pastries and other
delicacies available.
REALTY FOR SALE
724 734 28th St.,
Denver, Colorado
INCOME PROPERTY, 6 complete self-
contained units rented at $75.00,
each, per month; grosses $450.00,
monthly. Annual net will exceed
$2,000.00 per year, plus annual
reserves for depreciation.
WILL SACRIFICE FOR $15,000 CASH
Purchased 10 yrs ago for $20,000;
$5,000 in renovations made within
past 5 years, including complete
electrical work and new roofing.
Old, but solid, masonry building.
Please call 244-2239 or 722-9255,
for complete information.
MULTIPLE LINE INSURANCE
no
INSURANCE OF ALL TYPES
QUALITY- SERVICE
TELEPHONE 429-6303
3699 West 73rd Avenue
Westminster, Colorado
JAMES RUGA
Residence Phone:
824-0575
THE ST. RAUL
INSURANCE COMPANIfS

TAD YAMAMOTO
Residence Phone:
466-4590
Western Life Insurance Company
365 WASHINGTON STREET
P.O BOX 76, ST, PAUL 2, MINNESOTA
GEORGE FUJIMOTO, special pub-
lic relations director of Capitol
Mortuary in Denver for the Japa-
nese American community, recently
joined Public Surplus Furniture
Co., as a part-owner. The store
is located at 1560 Platte St., in
Denver, Colo.
JERRY UCHIYAMA is back from
Hampton, Va., where he was work-
ing on special assignment for the
Martin Co.
DR. SHUNZ0 SAKAMAKI of Hawaii,
dean of summer sessions at the
Univ. of Hawaii, was a delegate
to the annual convention of Nat'l
Assn of Summer Deans, which was
held in Denver during Nov.
State Patrolman WILL KAG0HARA,
official personal driver for Gov.
John A. Love of Colorado, remind-
ed motorists to be on the alert
for children, in observance of
Youth Protection Week.
Gibraltar Savings & Loan Assn,
1905 E. Colfax Ave., in Denver,
Colo., was robbed of some $629.00
by two gunmen on Nov. 3rd. Many
AJAs, including K0DY K0DAMA, who
is Chrmn of the Board, have fin-
ancial interests in the Assn.
EIJ1 H0RIUCHI recently spent a
week in the Midwest. He took ad-
vanced training in mutual funds,
in Chicago, and also visited his
brother in Iowa, before returning
to Colorado.
TRI-STATE Y.B.L.
Chrmn of various committees of
the Young Buddhist League conven-
tion for 1964 are as follows;
Invitations. . . . JANICE K0SHIO
Registration .... GAYLE TAGAWA
Booklets ........ LOUIS Y0SH1DA
Publicity.........TONY FUKUEDA
Hostesses..........SHIRLEY ET0
Eggbeater Mixer. Brighton YBA
Eye-Opener Brighton Jr. YBA
General Session. HENRY T0B0
Elections....................AL NAKATA
Bowling................BILL WAX ADA
Buffet Dinner. . . . DORIS NAKATA
Ice-Breaker. CAROLE UYEKURA
Oratorical......IRIS NAKATA
Art Contest. SHARON MORIM0TO
Bussei Award..........KEN TANI
Jsmn.'i&mtgh
2815 DOWNING ST
DENVER 5, COLORADO
TEL.
BILL KUROKl, MGR. 244*6068
a?? ca Mir/an a
23 Of
flcency for.
C H A m P A ST.
RUSS 6 LL STOV
* 4-4778
R c n o cf
GREENSBORO. NORTH CAROLINA


MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
NOV.. 1964.
PACE_9.
(TOWN TALK, contd:)
CAPT. DON FURUTA of the USAF
is now stationed in Alabama. He
and his family are now residing
at 489 E. Lanier Ct., Montgomery,
Alabama.
The BILL KUROKIs were feted at
a surprise housewarming hosted by
SETS SUMIKAWA and BEA IWASAKI, at
their new home, 1392 South Dudley
Street. A dozen couples attended
to shake-down the new house.
BRYAN YAMAUCHI has completed
his Marine Corps training, and is
planning to re-enroll at C.U. for
the January semester. He will be
a junior at C.U.
HARRY MATOBA was a recent vi-
sitor to San Francisco and Hawaii
as travel representative for Ja-
pan Air Lines. While in S.F., he
met with TAKU KASUYA of JAL.
KEIZO OSUGA is still unconsci-
ous and in critical condition, at
Mercy Hospital, as a result of a
bad automobile accident two weeks
ago. One of his sons, HIDEO, has
flown from Japan, to be with his
father; his brother, REV. YASU-
HARU OSUCA from Long Beach, who
was minister at Portland, Oreg.,
before his retirement, is also in
Denver at his bedside.
DR. WILLIAM TAKAHASHI of Boul-
der, Colo., is co-director of the
Boulder county commission to de-
velop programs for mentally re-
tarded children.
DR. BOB MAYEDA of Denver, and
Prof. ADELINE KANO of CSU, in Ft.
Collins, were among Citizens for
LBJ-HHH in the recent campaign.
DEAF FOUNDATION
AJAs contributing to the Rocky
Mountain premiere showing of "My
Fair Lady" at the Denham Theatre,
as a benefit for the Foundation
for Deaf Education, included:
MR. & MRS. TOSHIO ANDO
MR. & MRS. J. ANDO (S.F.)
DR. & MRS. TONY KAWANO
DR. & MRS. T. K. KOBAYASHI
MR. & MRS. BEN MURAKAMI
MR. & MRS. MINORU YASUI
The net proceeds of the bene-
fit, amounting to some $2,000.00,
are used as scholarships for spe-
cial training of teachers of deaf
children in the Denver schools.
NEW ADDRESSES
More new addresses for AJAs in
the Denver metropolitan area, re-
cently, include:
TOMMY and MICHI H0SHIK0, 1227 Ra-
leigh St., Denver 80204.
GEORGE E. and RUTH KAWAMURA, 3451
Cook St., Denver 80205.
ROY and VI NISHIMURA, 7580 Kline
Drive, Arvada, Colo. 80002.
BEANS and RUTH YAMAMOTO, 1922 So.
Magnolia St., Denver 80222.
Above, the Sat. kitchen crew
for the TSBC Bazaar, were, from
left to right: ART YOSHIMURA,
FRANK FUJINO, GEO. UMETANI (lad-
ling out chow mein), FRANK TAKA-
HASHI, and MRS. NATSUKO HIRAKAWA.
(Photo by Tom T. Masamori)
BRIDGE WINNERS
Len Smith noted in his bridge
column in The Denver Post, during
October, that DELORES 0ZAKI of
Littleton, Colo., was 1st in the
Salt Lake charity game, with DON
0AKIE (Aoki of San Francisco), as
her partner.
SUE AKIYAMA of Denver teamed
with Zeke Tolentino (formerly of
Denver) to score 4th in her sec-
tion, in the open pairs, to win
red points, and was runner-up in
the consolation rounds.
HAMILTON FUNDS, INC
77? GRANT
Oenvir 3, COLORAQO
BU. PHONE 23.7077 Res. Phone 4Sa.122a
REPRESENTED BY
MOLLY A. MtOOVEfiN
Unit Mgr.
MEMBER PACIFIC COAlT STOCK EXCHANGE
EIJI HOR1UCHI
REGISTERED REPRESENTATIVE
stocks MUTUAL FUNDS bonds
WESMMSStCA SECURITIES,me.
444 fHERMAN ST.
0INV6R, COLO. soaoa
OFF.: 744-
RES.: 659-1742
p
Li LJ\A q j6 p/MMiftiC&m--
2700 LfiRI m E R ST.
R L 5-4S£5
HARUMI EMIZAWA
We cheerfully admit we're in
favor of good-looking people, as
per example above. "MIMI" is the
wife of MIKE EMIZAWA, assistant
maitre d* at the Outrigger Room
of the Cosmopolitan Hotel.
BIRTHS
GIMA, Dr. Masa........a GIRL
1357 S. Jackson St., Denver
MORI, Masahiro........a BOY
1235 Garfield St., Denver
SATO, Masaru..........a GIRL
1910 Athena St., Boulder
WATANABE, Alan........a BOY
1455 Zenobia St., Denver
Fobituaries
MATASAKU MURA1, 6701 E. 60th PI.,
Denver, Colo. Father of Betty
Fujiki of Commerce City, Colo.;
also 4 grandchildren.
JEANETTE NOGAMI, 4695 Alcott St.,
Denver, Colo. Daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Meach Nogami; sister
of Robt. and Karen; granddaugh-
ter of Mrs. Kuni Kitsutaka and
Mr. I. Tanaka, all of Denver.
MAUDI M. TANAKA of Morrill, Nebr.
Wife of Charles Tanaka; mother
of Donald, Richard, Beverly and
Dale Tanaka. Daughter of Seizo
Otsuki of Morrill, Nebr.
WEDDINGS
In October, HIDEKI IWAKABE and
REGINA ANDREWS, both of Denver,
Col-o., were married.
F On Nov. 29th, MARJORIE YOSHIDA
of Alamosa, Colo., will be wed to
TOM NAKATA of Ft. Lupton, Colo.,
at the Tri-State Buddhist Church,
at 3:00 p.m., in Denver, Colo.
On Dec. 2nd, LILY KATA0KA will
become the bride of FRANK UYEDA,
both of Denver, Colo.
FRANK NOBUYE TSUSHIMA, 2418 Stout
St., Denver, Colo. Husband of
Ichitni Tsushima; father of Mrs.
Junko Kimura; also 3 grandchil-
dren, all of Denver, Colo.
Real estate in sura nee
miiTUAi funps
5IZ2.CHAS6 5.T- HA 2-151/
Tel. 266-2170
oenyeR. i2,coto.
PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS LISTINGS
P CHTIS7S JOHN CHIKUMA, DDS 75 So. 4th Street MASA GIMA, DDS 1404 E. 18th Ave. Brighton 659-1825 Denver 255-6822 AKcmttr CLIFFORD S. NAKATA 206 E. Pikes Peak Ave iawycki TOSHIO ANDO 1942 Larimer St. Colo. Spgs 633-4382 Denver 222-5315
MICHAEL T. H0RI, DDS 4101 E. Wesley Ave. Denver 756-0924 MINORU YASUI 1225 20th St. Denver 244-2239
T. ITO, DDS 830 18th Street 2838 Federal Blvd. Denver 534-8680 455-0741 OPTOMtmSTS BEN MATOBA, O.D. Denver 1959 Larimer St. 534-1941
Y. ITO, DDS SUEO ITO, DDS SETS ITO, DDS 1477 Pennsylvania Denver 244-6589 MISAO MATOBA, O.D. Ft. Lupton Burt Building 857-6550 PHYSICIANS
KOJ1 KANAI, DDS 4310 Harlan St. Wheatridge 422-5817 CHAS. FUJISAKI, M.D. 40 No. Main St. Brighton 659-0783
TONY KAWANO, DDS 1750 Humboldt St. ROBERT MAYEDA, DDS Interstate Trust Bldg. Denver 534-3084 Denver 825-6961 T. K. KOBAYASHI, M.D. DICK D. MOMII, M.D. ALBERT NODA, M.D. 1227 27th Street Denver 534-3104
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS Interstate Trust Bldg. Denver 825-6961 HOWARD SUENAGA, M.D. 830 18th Street Denver 222-1314
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS Interstate Trust Bldg. Denver 825-7498 M. GEO. TAKENO, M.D. Medical Arts Big., 1955 Pennsylvania St. Denver 825-0783
KEN UYEHARA, DDS 40 No. Main Street Brighton 659-3062 AYAKO WADA, M.D. 810 23rd Street Denver 825-2565
JACK YAMAMOTO, DDS 1005 W. 17th Place Lakewood 238-3331 MAHIT0 UBA, D.0. 1230 21st Street Denver 625-3743


PAGE 10
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
MILE-HI JACL SETS
NEW YEAR'S EVE AT
BROWN PALACE WEST
Mile-Hi JACL will hold its an-
nual New Year's Eve celebration
in the main ballroom of the Brown
Palace West, on Thursday night,
Dec. 31, 1964.
Plans are being made to hold
an inaugural dinner preceding the
New Years Eve ball, to install
eight new board members and offi-
cers of the Mile-Hi JACL for the
forthcoming year of 1965.
The dinner will probably com-
mence at 7:30 p.m., with the ball
from 10:00 p.m. until 2:00 a.m.
Plenty of noisemakers and favors
will be supplied by the JACL.
The Board of Mile-Hi JACL in-
dicated that specially reduced
admission would be allowed stu-
dents and younger couples. De-
tails as to tickets will be an-
nounced later.
XMAS CONVOCATION
COLORADO SPRINGS
DEC. 28-29-30
The Methodist Youth Fellowship
of Simpson Church in Denver will
participate in a 3-day Christmas
convocation in Colorado Springs,
on Dec. 28-29-30, 1964.
Cost of the convocation will
be $16.50, which will include 3
nights hotel lodging, one banquet
and registration fees.__Transpor-
tation, and other meals and inci-
dental expenses must be furnished
by each registrant.
5 10 \S1V VT.
DEfWE'p. Z, COLO.
HGR.P.V L/AnftZI CH4-3S46
Above, hostesses for the Tri^State Buddhist Church's annual Bazaar
and Oriental Food Benefit, held on Sat. and Sun., Nov. 7-8, receiving
instructions from REV. YOSHITAKA TAMAI, in front of the newly dedi-
cated altar of the Tri-State Buddhist Church.
Facing the REV. TAMAI, from left to right are: LILY KUGE, JUDY
TAKAHASHI, KAREN TAKAMATSU and FLORENCE YONEKIRO. These young la-
dies assisted in explaining to the many hundreds of visitors concern-
ing the various religious symbol-
ism inherent in the Buddhist al-
tar. Although yet incomplete,
the TSBC altar has been valued at
more than $40,000.00.
NOV.. 1964.
CATHAY POST # 185
XMAS PARTY
SUN., OEC. 20
COMMANDER TOSH OTA will be in
charge of the annual Christmas
party for families of Cathay Post
on Sun., Dec. 20th.
As traditionally customary, an
appearance of Santa Claus is pro-
mised for the children, with lots
of gifts. In addition to an en-
tertainment program for the chil-
dren, there will be a pot-luck
supper for the entire family.
CATHAY DINING
ROOM LUNCHES
AL MIYAGISHIMA, manager of The
Cathay Post Dining Room, reminded
members, friends and patrons that
businessmens lunches are served
daily, except Mondays and week-
ends (Sat. & Sun.), at The Cathay
Post, 2015 Market St., in Denver.
With plenty of free parking in
the lot immediately adjoining the
Post, the dining room is readily
accessible from any part of town,
by auto, or even by #5 bus.
Lunches are reasonable, with
generous portions, and are deli-
cious; service is fast, and cour-
teous, so you can get back to the
afternoon work in a mellow mood.
SAM Y. MATSUMOTO
NEW YORK LIFE INS. CO.
RT. I, BOX I96A
HENDERSON, COLO AT8-2536
HENRY NAKATA, Pres, of the PTA
of the Tri-State Buddhist Church,
coordinated the efforts of more
than 150 persons who assisted in
the TSBC Food Benefit. (Photo by
TOM T. MASAM0RI, 2010 Lamar St.)
cmmy lounge,
IZ36 ZOTh ST. 0
UtlbER ft.J.fi. ITIAnAGEmEnT
DENVER, COLORADO
TEL. 825-9S30
New Cwnn Cape
73Z E. COLFAX AVE.
TEL. 53*1--0M1
FAMOUS FOR CHINESE DISHES
visit "Ha V/uujtx4 Pjim.'1
SPECIALIZING IN ORIENTAL FOODS AND GOODS
I 94G LftRimER ST. KE 4-G03I
SPECIAL MANJU SHIPPED FROM WEST COAST
$1.89 box of 15 $2.39 box of 20
Store Hours:
Open daily;
d i ning Room
S£AAK*tG ifit.fJnM-f' fyr
& (MwaCuUUi,
2015 mORKET ST. (CLOSED MONDAYS) K E 4 4008
Mon, Tue, wed, Thu, Fri, & Sat. 8:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.
Special Sunday hours. .... 10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.
Return Postage Guaranteed:
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA NEWS,
1225 20th Street,
Denver 2, Colorado
(RETURN REQUESTED)
BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
DENVER, COLO.
Permit #1033.