Citation
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 6, Number 5

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Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News, Volume 6, Number 5
Series Title:
Mountain Plains A.J.A. News
Publisher:
Japanese American Citizens League
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Location:
52
32

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Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Full Text
VOL, VI. No. .5
DENVER, COLORADO.
JAN.-FEB.. 1965,
SPEECH AUTHORITY
LECTURE, FEB. 12
DR. S. I. HAYAKAUA, Professor
of English at San Francisco State
College, was principal speaker at
the Rocky Mtn Speech and Communi-
cations conference, held at D.U.
Lav Center, on Fri., Feb. 12th.
DR. HAYAKAUA, a Canadian-born
Nisei, is regarded as one of the
foremost authorities in the field
of semantics in the U.S., and is
author of "Language in Action'*.
GENE AMOLE of Radio KDEN was
presented the Tau Kappa Alpha and
Delta Sigma Rho award for excel-
lence in the field of communica-
tions at the conference.
YOICHI SAJI, a graduate stu-
dent at Colorado College in Colo-
rado Springs, from Japan, was an
observer delegate to the confer-
ence in Denver, Colorado.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
JUDO TOURNAMENT
The 12th annual Rocky Mountain
Judo Tournament will be held at
the Denver School of Judo, Inc.,
2020 Arapahoe St., in Denver, on
March 13 14, 1965.
More than 15 judo clubs in the
Rocky Mountain region are expect-
ed to participate and compete in
this annual affair. Spectators
will be welcome to attend.
BOWLERS* AWARDS
DINNER-DANCE AT
HELLENIC CENTER
BODY UCH1DA, 1601 E. 86th PI.,
Denver, Colo., 80229, (288-6188),
is Gen. Chrmn for the Bowlers'
Awards Dinner-Dance of the Natl
JACL Bowling Tournament.
The dinner-dance will be held
at the Hellenic Community Center,
4610 E. Alameda Ave., in Denver,
Colo., on Sat., Mar. 13th.
Cocktails will be served from
7:00 p.m., at a very reasonable
cost per drink. Choice slices of
prime rib will be the entree for
dinner.. Please call in your re-
servations to D0DY UCHIDA as soon
as possible._______
FAT YAMAGUCHI
Above is PAT YAMAGUCHI, who is
part-time Executive Secretary of
the Mile-Hi JACL for 1965.
Her husband is RICH YAMAGUCHI,
a Board member and Secretary to
the JACL Board.
All local Mile-Hi JACL matters
should be referred to the Exec.
Secretary, (Mrs.) PAT YAMAGUCHI,
9654 W. 56th PI., Arvada, Colo.,
(80002), Tel.: 424-6326.
BRIGHTON J.A.A. SCHEDULED
CHOW MEIN DINNER. FEB. 28
HARRY FUKAYE, Pres, of the Brighton Japanese American Association,
and WES K0YAN0 were General Co-Chairmen of the annual Shrimp and Chow
Mein Dinner benefit of the Brighton JAA, held on Sun., Feb. 28th.
Ladies of the Brighton Nisei Women's Club were ii
charge of food preparation. All net proceeds of th<
benefit were ear-marked for Youth Activities and Ci-
vic Affairs, foi
SCHOLARSHIP
APPLICATIONS
BOB MARUYAMA, 2400 So. Newton
St., Denver, Colo. (80219), Tel.
934-1848, announced that applica-
tions for AJA scholarships in the
Rocky Mtn region were now avail-
able by contacting him.
In addition to the Nat'l JACL
scholarships ($2Q0-$300), there
are Cathay Post and Mile-Hi JACL
awards ($100-$250) available.
Awards are restricted to high
school graduating seniors who are
AJAs or members of families be-
longing to Cathay Post #185 or to
the Mile-Hi JACL of Denver, Colo.
wkmm. nurt. j#cl mwiwg
jfe
men
HELLEmc communiTv center
4CI0 E. flLAltlEDfl AVE.
13.1965
cocktails 7.00 pm
omnez 7:30 pw
ounce 1 poo coo nm
mike di salle's orchestra-
roce PRt two n
oinnerc. Dance 6.50
Dftnec oniy 3.00
the AJAs in th<
Brighton area.
Approximately
1,500 chow mein
and shrimp din-
ners were served
during the day.
HARRY
FUKAYE
It was anti-
cipated that al-
most $1,000 will
be realized as a net return, for
future community projects, as a
result of the splendid support by
the townspeople of Brighton.
With 75 members and their fa-
milies assisting, and 8 teams of
ticket sellers, some of the com-
mittee chairmen were:
Chairmen:
Tables & Chairs
Kitchen Crews.
Busboy Crews .
Dish Washers .
Dish Hauling .
P.A. System. .
. KENZO KAGIYAMA
CHARLES MIZUNAGA
. FRANK NAKAGAWA
. GEORGE OKUBO
. PAUL OKADA
. KEN MIZUNAGA
MTN-PLAINS JACL
MEETS, MAR. 13
LILY OKURA, Chrmn of the Mtn-
Plains JACL district council, an-
nounced that an interim council
session for the Mtn-Plains JACL
district would be held in Denver,
Colo., on Sat., Mar. 13, 1965.
The meeting will be held at a
luncheon scheduled at the Akebono
Restaurant, 1953 Larimer Street,
in Denver, Colo., at 12:00 noon,
Sat., Mar. 13th.
It was anticipated that repre-
sentatives from outlying chapters
would be in Denver for the Nat'l
JACL bowling tournament, so that
a district meeting could be sche-
duled with Di6t. Chrmn LILY OKURA
of 0mah8, and Nat'l JACL Director
MASAO SATOW of San Francisco.

ip
i


PAGE 2.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
________JAN-FBB.. 1965.
UAL SCHOLARSHIPS
FOR JAPAN TRAVEL
JAPAN AIR LINES announced that
almost 400 youths have applied to
The Experiment in International
Living for JAL grants of a summer
in Japan. 165 were to the west-
ern office in San Francisco, and
707. of these were from Nisei or
Sansei, indicating a change of
attitudes by AJAs in the U.S.
Formerly most AJA applications
to the Experiment in Internation-
al Living had been for Europe and
not Japan. Responses to the JAL
grants indicate a revival of in-
terest by AJAs in their Oriental
heritage.
HARRY G. MATOBA

. I'I
Last rites and final tribute to the late HARRY G. MATOBA of Den-
ver, Colo., were held at the Trinity Methodist Church, with Reverends
Jonathan Fujita and Paul Hagiya officiating, on Fri., Jan. 22, 1965.
HARRY G. MATOBA was born in Okayama, Japan, in 1897, and came to
the U.S. in 1914. After attending schools in Portland, Oregon, he
operated a grocery and produce market until evacuation in 1942, when
he and his family were sent to ----------------------------
the Minidoka WRA camp in Idaho.
This was usually the corner of
The Mtn-Plains AJA News reserved
for the late HARRY G. MATOBA.
In sad farewell, we print one
of the last pictures of him, at
his office, with HARU KOTO, his
secretary at right.
As a voluntary relocatee, he
worked for the Perry Canning Co.,
In Brigham City, Utah until 1947.
With the final illness of his
eldest son, Michiyasu Matoba, at
Fitzsimmons Army Hospital, after
military service in the Pacific,
the Matoba family moved to Den-
ver, Colo.
He was active in community af-
fairs, especially in connection
with citizenship classes, and was
an officer of the Japanese Assn
of Colo. HARRY G. MATOBA died on
Jan. 17, 1965.
Be Tsukikos guest on
your flight to Japan
From th moment you board your DC-8 jet Courier.
Ttukifco Yamazaki observes every detail of iraditional Japanese courtesy
and hospitality. She pampers you with attentive service, offers you
delicacies oi the East and Westmakes you feel you are already in japan,
tbur JAl flight, whether in the Economy or First CUSS cabin, will be
gracious and restful. Yet |Al flights cost no more. |Al fares are the same
as all airlines. The real difference is in |Al'$ superior service.
personal attention and convenient schedules.
Daily flights leave from los Angeles or San Francisco. Visit family o'
friends in Hawaii, at no extra fare, and continue on to Japan al
your convenienceany day of the week. Connections at
Tokyo for cities throughout Japan are excellent. See
your travel agent, and fly amid the calm beauty
Of japan at almost the speed of sound
UAPAN
AIR
0*< in tw Angeles. U* ff4ncK,$#uile,NcwYl, Chicago Other large
COLORADO ISSEI
STORY PROGRESS
The Mtn-Plains JACL office for
the Issei History project, 1225-
20th St., Denver, Colo., (80202),
reported that an Issei name list
for the Denver metropolitan area
has been compiled.
Although it is estimated that
in the Denver metropolitan area,
there are some 600-700 Issei re-
sidents, only 450 names have been
compiled. Anyone knowing of any
Issei names which might have been
missed, please report same to the
JACL office.
* *
SH1G WAKAMATSU of Chicago, who
is Chrmn of the Japanese History
Project, was a brief visitor in
Denver, Colo., on Jan. 15th, to
confer with BILL HOSOKAUA and MIN
YASUI on progress of Issei survey
questionnaires in this region.
JAPAN SOCIETY
ELECTION- DINNER
TAD YAMAMOTO, Pres, of Japan
Society of Colo., announced that
the annual meeting of the Society
would be held at the Fuji-En, at
6:30 p.m., Mon., March 22nd.
The Board of Directors, headed
by BILL HOSOKAWA as Chairman, au-
thorized a dinner meeting, to be
held in connection with election
of new officers, and 5 additional
board members for the Society.
MARY LAN1US, Assoc. Curator of
the Denver Oriental Art Museum,
was named Chrmn of the Nominating
committee. Any member or inter-
ested persons who wish to serve
on the Board of the Japan Society
of Colorado were urged to contact
MARY LANIUS, at 297-2620.
* *
The first quarterly meeting of
1965 for Japan Society was held
on Jan. 18th, at the Western Fed-
eral Savings Bldg., in Denver.
MME. YURI NODA, well-known ar-
tist of Denver, demonstrated her
sumi-e painting techniques. She
was assisted by YASUK0 FUJIMORI,
one of her students.
MME. NODA's sumi-e paintings
will be auctioned as a benefit at
the annual dinner meeting of the
Japan Society on March 22nd.
FAR EAST EXPERT
ARTHUR JOLLIFFE
ARTHUR JOLLIFFE of Jolliffes
Oriental in the Hilton Hotel was
recognized as one of the greatest
authorities on the Far East, in
this region.
JOLLIFFE served as a major, in
Army Intelligence in Japan, and
in post-war years was a buyer for
Army post exchanges, spending at
least $2-$3 million per month for
purchases in Japan.
He indicated that Tokyo was a
fabulous city, because it offers
more than any other city in the
world, but regretted it was be-
coming too Westernized. He noted
that old traditions and arts of
Japan are still preserved in such
cities as Kyoto, Nikko, Nara, and
many other places in Japan.
AKE BONO
JAPANESE SAKE AND BEER
FRED*a4 CHIVEKO ftOKl
1953 lARimeR st.
(CLOSED MONDAYS)
Tel. CW 4-7743
K£4'99&l
12,34 2.0th St.
jnponese cuinesE-nmERicnn food
jBpnnese S&KE nvAiugie-
TEL: ZtS-9530
Hours: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
(CLOSED ON TUESDAYS)


JAN-FBB., 1965.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 3.
Stage Band Will
Tour Far Fast
Denver Universitys Stage Band
was one of three college groups
from the u.S. to be selected by
the state Dept, for international
cultural presentation programs.
The DU jazz group with 19 mu-
sicians left in Jan., for a three
months tour of Japan, Korea, Oki-
nawa, Hong Kong, Viet Nam, Indo-
nesia, Australia, New Zealand and
the Fiji Islands.
Last year, the DU Band von the
1963 Notre Dame University Colle-
giate Jazz Festival, and was re-
cognized as the national college
champion band in the U.S.
D.U.'s Lamont School of Music
sent a 14-member choral group of
singers and Instrumentalists to
Europe last year under sponsor-
ship of USO and Nat'l Music Coun-
cil of the ILS._____
JAPANESE GARDEN
TOUR, APR, 29
SAMUAL NEWSON of Mill Valley,
Calif., (across the Golden Gate
Bridge from San Francisco), will
lead a tour to the Orient to vi-
sit outstanding gardens in Japan,
and witness unusual festivals in
Hong Kong and Bangkok.
The tour will depart from San
Francisco on Apr. 29th, via Japan
Air Lines, for 23 days.
NEWSON is a landscape archi-
tect, specializing in designing
Japanese gardens in northern Ca-
lifornia. He is author of "Japa-
nese Garden Construction", and of
"Bonsai Manual for Westerners".
Details of the tour may be ob-
tained from JAPAN AIR LINES of-
fice, 150 Powell St., San Fran-
cisco, Calif._____
JAPANESE VISITORS
TAKEO HIK1CHI, an English lan-
guage instructor in Japan, is an
observer at language classes in
the Westminster school district
for two weeks.
Above are officials from the City of Shizuoka, Japan, being wel-
comed in Omaha, Nebraska, as a part of the Omaha-Shizuoka Sister City
affiliation, on Jan. 11, 1965.
Seated at table, from left, are: FUMIO SUZUKI, managing director
of the Shizuoka Chamber of Commerce; in center is YUTAKA GOH, Presi-
dent of the Shizuoka City Assembly; and at right is KUNISODA TAKEUCHI
who is Chief of Planning for the '
Shizuoka Chamber of Commerce.
Standing are members of Omaha
JACL, who assisted in welcoming
the visitors, from left to right:
RICHARD TAKECHX, who served as an
interpreter; MAX MILLER, Chrran of
Omaha-Shizuoka Sister City Com-
mittee; EM NAKADOI, Pres, of the
Omaha JACL; BOB NAKADOI who offi-
ciated as Toastmaster; and NORI-
AKI OKADA, 1st Vice-Pres. of the
Omaha JACL who extended greetings
to the visitors. (Photo by 1SHII
Studios of Omaha, Nebraska.)
MADAM BUTTERFLY
TWO STORES TO SERVE YOU
GENE and KIMIKO SIDE of Madame
Butterfly Gift Shops, now at two
locations, are more conveniently
situated to serve you better.
Their main store is located at
4609 E. Colfax Ave., just off the
corner of Cherry St., on the main
east-west thoroughfare thru Den-
ver.
Their branch store, opened in
Nov., is located in the Boulevard
Shopping Center, at 1575 S. Colo-
rado Blvd., at E. Mexico Ave.
JAPANESE DRESS
DESIGNS IN U.S.
Japanese fashion designers are
invading the U.S. with unique and
exotic creations, blending a rich
cultural heritage of the Orient,
using hand-crafted brocades and
silks, into functional westerniz-
ed women's wear.
The latest to show her couture
fashions, in New York, is MADAME
HANAE MORI, one of Japan's lead-
ing designers.
* *
Colorado was privileged to see
modern Japanese fashions in 1964,
With visits of MME. TEL SATOW in
July and MME. CHIEKO KAKEHI dur-
ing Aug., in connection with the
Denver-Takayama Festival.
OMAHA NEWS
EM NAKADOI, Pres, of the Omaha
JACL, reported that the chapter
assisted in Omaha-Shizuoka Sister
City ceremonies, welcoming three
official visitors from Japan, on
Jan. 11th. (See picture at left)
The visiting delegation from
Shizuoka, Japan, was greeted by
Mayor Dworak of Omaha, Nebr., and
other city officials and digni-
taries.
Omaha'8 evening newspaper, The
World-Herald, sent a staff writer
to Shizuoka for a series of sto-
ries on the planned cultural ex-
change program.
AJAs in Omaha will be helpful
in promoting the sister city re-
lationships with Shizuoka, Japan,
especially in interpreting and in
assisting programs of cultural
exchange, stated Pres. Nakadoi.
People-to-People
The People-to-People corpora-
tion, parent organization of the
Denver-Brest and Denver-Takayama
sister-cities relationships, was
sponsor of a benefit concert of
Rodgers and Hanzmerstein hits by
the Denver Symphony Orchestra, on
Feb. 16, 1965.
Among AJAs actively associated
with the Denver-Takayama Sister
City program are: MAY TORIZAWA,
MRS. M. TSUNODA and TERRIE TAKA-
MINE, board members.
Japanese Books-Oriental Art Goods
3£obun-,Ska
OtNvtft, COIORAOO
Phone KEystone 4-4637
1234 23th Street
DENVER'S MOST COMPLETE
SELECTION OF QUALITY
JAPANESE MERCHANDISE
AT MODERATE PRICES
OUT-OF-TOWNERS: Write in for your free
MAIL ORDER CATALOG
REGULAR STORE HOURS:
MON. thru SAT. 9:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m
TUES. evenings open until 9:00 p.m
SUNDAYS ................ Closed
EUGENE SIDE and KIMIKO SIDE
Proprietors.
4609 E.COLFRX fiVE. FR7-I9*5
DEnVER 10, COLO.
FOR ft DELIGHTFUL VISIT
to Jflpfin comEto.
Udl EW
SUKIVflKI RESTAURflflT
330 uncoin st.
VISIT 0VR GIFT SHOP
IN THE SHERMAN PLAZA HOTEL
Tel.: 266-2170
* COCKTAILS S0c From 3 to A
DINNERS from 3.00 endup
Every TUE. & THU. at 9 PM
Authentic movies of Japan
shown in Cocktail Lounge.
T)ELIGHTFULLY DIFFERENT
JAPANESE FOOD"

hours:
Tue. thru Pri.
11:30 to 1:00 AM
SAT. 5:00 to 1:30 AM
SUN. 2:00 to 10:00 PM
CLOSED mOflDAYS


PAGE 4
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. HEWS
JAM-FEB.. 1965
SIMPSON CHURCH
JAPAN TOUR SET
REV. PAUL HAGIYA of the Simp-
son Methodist Church reported the
tour to Japan, leaving Denver on
April 9, 1965 for two weeks, has
been definitely booked with Japan
Air Lines.
Altho some 32 persons had ori-
ginally indicated an interest in
joining the tour, as of date only
eight were definitely committed
for the trip, including:
REV. PAUL HAGIYA
Y0SH1E HAGIYA
JULIA KAMURA
CHARLOTTE MIYOSHI
YOSHIE MIZOUE
KEN NAMBA
JEAN SATO
FUMI YABE
Total cost of the tour is only
$1,112.00, which includes $875.00
for jet round-trip from Denver to
Japan, and $273.00 for the entire
two-weeks tour of Japan, includ-
ing hotels, meals, transportation
and sight-seeing.
Anyone interested in the two-
veeks tour to Japan in April is
urged to contact REV. HAGIYA, at
255-6817 or 333-2668.
SIMPSON CHURCH NEWS
DR. JERRY AIKAWA gave an in-
teresting talk to the Methodist
Men of Simpson Church on his trip
to Czechoslovakia, where he pre-
sented a paper on radio-isotopes.
GEO. GOTO, Pres, of Methodist
Men, presided over the anniver-
sary banquet of the organization
on Sat., Feb. 21. SAM 0VJADA was
in charge of arrangements.
Eight architectural firms have
been interviewed by the Building
Committee of Simpson Church, for
the new, proposed $250,000 church
building, and a decision will be
announced soon.
CATHAY POST NEWS
a Cathay Post's basketball team
is made up of 14 players in order
to keep up with the younger teams
in the League. The team roster
for Cathay Post include:
RUPERT ARA1
BEAVER ASANO
BOB IWATA
IRA IWATA
FRANK KAMIBAYASHI
JACK KUGE
GEORGE KUGA
FRED MIYAZAWA
PETE MENDA
MAS NONAKA
MEL SHIM0N0
CARL TERADA
MAS YOSHIMURA
REE YOSHIMURA
Basketball games are scheduled
at Manual Hi gym every Fri. night
commencing at 6:45 p.m. Turn out
to watch the oldsters play!
# Leaders in Cathay Post bowling
league are: JACK ISHIDA, MIN MA-
TSUNAGA, JACK KUGE and KEN KURA-
MOTO.
* In the mixed league at Trade
Winds Bowl, the team consisting
of JOHN NOGUCHI, JOE SAKATO, YUZO
HAYASHI, PERRY SATO and ELAINE
YOSHIDA are one place out of the
bottom Waesa aatta, NOGUCHI??
BEN MURAKAMI'S membership so-
licitation team won 1st place in
the 1965 membership campaign of
Cathay Post, but Comdr. TOSH OTA
reminded all un-renewed members
to pay up their 1965 dues!!!
AT THE END OF ANOTHER YEAR....
As a matter of curiosity, we reviewed events of 1964 as they re-
lated to the Japanese American community in this area, because it is
pleasant to reminisce about past events. And too, we thought it may
be helpful in scheduling community events this year with a minimum of
conflict of dates, to glance over the general pattern of activities.
We do not pretend to list every occurrence in the AJA community,
and we'll admit that we enumerated those which were of particular in-
terest or of concern to us personally.
Seasonally, bowling goes on all-year-round and basketball occupies
our younger AJAs until spring, when baseball and fishing takes over,
and older AJAs start swinging golf clubs in regular tournaments. In
winter, there is skiing and skating for both old and young.
Regular organized activities in the AJA community include weekly
church services. Almost every evening there is organized bowling at
various leagues, and regular classes at Denver School of Judo, Fort-
nightly, there are Japanese movies at TSBC. The Issel have their own
organized activities, with shigin, haiku poetry, ikebana, bonsai, and
many other cultural activities for the older Japanese.
At any rate, we list 1964 we hope you will some of the high-lights for the old year of find the listings of some interest:
Sponsors: 1964 Dates: Events:
Mile-Hi JACL Brighton J.A.A. Simpson Church Japan Society January Jan. 25 Jan. 25-26 Jan. 27 Alien Address Reports Inaugural Dinner-Dance Annual Bowling Tournament Nominations Meeting
Basketball League Denver Judo School I.C.S. Students Cathay Ski Club Denver Judo School February Feb. 9 Feb. 14 Feb. 14-15 Feb. 23 AJA Basketball starts Novice Tournament Sweetheart Ball Aspen Week-end Ski Trip Brown Belt Tournament
Denver Judo School Brighton J.A.A. Denver Judo School Simpson Church Mar. 7- 8 Mar. 15 Mar. 22 Mar. 29 Rocky Mtn Judo Tournament Chow Mein Dinner Benefit Chow Mein Dinner Benefit Easter Sunday Program
Assn for U.N. Tri-state Buddhists Basketball League Cathay Post #185 I.C.S. Students Apr. 4 Apr. 5 Apr. 17 Apr. 24 Apr. 24-25 Secty-Gen. U Thant Speech Hana Matauxi celebration Final Games and Awards Installation Dinner Annual Spring Conference
International House Simpson Church Bowling Leagues Tri-State Buddhists Baseball League Takayama Committee Cathay Post #185 Brighton Women's Club May 6- 7 May 9 May 16 May 17 May 17 May 22 May 30 May 30 Atomic Bomb Survivors Chow Mein Dinner Benefit Awards Dinner-Dance Fuji Matsuri celebration AJA Baseball Season starts Japanese Cooking School Memorial Day Service Installation Dinner
Tri-State Buddhists Mile-Hi JACL June 12-13 June 13 Mountain Retreat Graduates' Dinner
Tri-State Buddhists Japan Society July 12 July 13 O-Bon Festival T. Mikami Exhibit
Takayama Coumittee Aug. 10-15 Takayama Festival
Baseball League Simpson Church Mile-Hi JACL Japanese Assn Simpson Church Sep. 7 Sep. H-13 Sep. 20 Sep. 29 Sep. 30 Labor Day Tournament Mountain Retreat Citizenship Day Citizenship1Graduation $250,000.00 Bldg Fund
Mile-Hi JACL Bonsai Club Mile-Hi Golf Club Assn for U.N. Mile-Hi JACL Denver Bussei Oct. 10 Oct. 17-18 Oct. 24 Oct. 24-31 Oct. 30 Oct. 30 Chow Mein Dinner Benefit Bonsai & Ikebana Exhibit Awards Dinner-Dance United Nations Week Annual Fall Meeting Hallowe'en Party
Tri-State Buddhists Cathay Ski Club Denver Bussei Tri-State Buddhists Simpson Church Denver Judo School Bowling Leagues Nov. 7-8 Nov. 20 Nov. 22 Nov. 27 Nov. 27-29 Nov. 28 Nov. 27-28 Bazaar & Carnival Ski Season begins Turkey & Ham Benefit Thanksgiving Services Northwest Y.F.C.C. SLC Tournament Romni Tournament
Kenkyu Club, C.U. Tri-State Buddhists Mile-Hi JACL Cathay Post #185 Simpson Church Mile-Hi JACL Dec. 6 Dec. 18-20 Dec. 20 Dec. 20 Dec. 20 Dec. 31 Japan Festival Y.B.L. Conference Issel story briefing Christmas Party Christmas Services New Year's Eve Dinner-Dance
"HANA MATSURJ"
OATES SET IN
OUTLYING AREAS
Hana Metsuri (Flower Festival)
celebrations, commemorating the
birth of Buddha, will be held at
the various Buddhist churches of
this region as follows:
Mar. 14th...........Brighton
Mar. 14th.............Brighton
Mar. 28th..........Ft. Lupton
Mar. 28th.............Greeley
APRIL 4TH.........TSBC, DENVER
After local observances at the
various outlying churches, Budd-
hists will celebrate at a region-
wide ceremony at the Tri-State
Buddhist Oiurch, in Denver, Colo.
REV. N. TSUN0DA end the Priest
Emeritus of TSBC, REV. Y. TAMAI,
will conduct services in Denver,
on Sun., Apr. 4th.
Following the morning services
on Sun., Apr. 4, an entertainment
program will be held at TSBC, all
afternoon and evening in a non-
stop performance.
DENVER BUDDHIST
CHURCH ORGANIZED
EDWARD NAKAGAWA reported that
an independent, local Denver Bud-
dhist Church is being organized,
as an integral part of the Tri-
State Buddhist Church hierarchy.
Denver Buddhists have hereto-
fore used the facilities and per-
sonnel of the Tri-State Buddhist
Church, but have not functioned
as an organized and independent
church group.
Incorporation of a Denver Bud-
dhist Church is being proposed,
and by-laws are being drafted for
presentation to local Denver Bud-
dhist members.
TSBC NEWS BRIEFS
LEE MURAIA, Pres, of Tri-State
Buddhist Church, and JIM KANEM0T0
of the national Buddhist Planning
Commission, were recent delegates
to San Francisco, Calif.
The Japanese movie scheduled
for Sun., Mar. 7th, at TSBC, is
a benefit for the Welby Kyudo Kal
baseball association.
BOB HEMPE, Asst. Executive for
Boy Scouts in the Denver area of-
fice, noted that REV. H0GEN FUJI-
MOTO conducted Buddhist services
at the 6th Nat'l Scout Jamboree,
in Valley Forge, Pa., attended by
100 Bussel scouts and 1,000 non-
Buddhist scouts.
GOH LESSIONS
R. S. TANI announced that free
classes in beginning Goh is being
given at the Japanese Assn hall,
2019 Lawrence St., on Fri. even-
ings, from 6:00 p.m., for 2 hrs.
At the present time, about 10
persons, including non-Japanese,
are taking elementary lessons in
Goh. Anyone interested may drop
in at the Nihonjin-kai hall, on
Fri. evenings.


JAN-FKB.. 1965.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PACES.
TRI-STATE BUDDHIST CHURCH OFFICERS
MASS INSTALLATION OF 1965 OFFICERS OF TRI-STATE BUDDHIST CHURCH at
the 31st annual Young Buddhist League Conference, during the banquet
program at the Brown Palace Hotel in Denver, Colo., during Dec. 1964.
REV. YOSHITAKA TAMAI, priest
emeritus of TSBC, officiated in
the administration of the oath of
office to the incoming officials
of the Church, (above pictured en
masse, including Issei and Nisei)
as follows:
PRESIDENT.........LEE T. MURATA
Vice-Presidents:
Issei.........FRANK T. NAKATA
Nisei.........KENZO FUJIMORI
Program Co-Chrmn:
Issei.........GEORGE SHIMODA
Nisei...........FRANK HIRAOKA
1965 Officers of TSBC, contd:
Finance Co-Chrmn:
Issei...............M. WATADA
Nisei................SAM DOIDA
Auditors:
Issei................k. KIMURA
Nisei...............SAM KATO
Publicity Co-Chrmn:
Issei.............FUMIO TANI
Nisei............TAD YAMAMOTO
Movies Co-Chrmn:
Issei...........T. HAYASHIDA
Nisei...........KAZ SAKAMOTO
Membership Co-Chrmn: Altar Maint. KENICHI SUZUKI
Issei.............T. DOIZAKI
Nisei.............HARRY NITTA Religious Educ. FLOYD KOSHIO
Treasurers: Planning Comm. JIM KANEMOTO
issei...............T. MAYEDA
Nisei...............KAY NITTA Business Mgr..........ED NAKAGAWA
Rec. Secretaries: Hall Schedules. FUMIO TANI
Issei. ..... FRED S. UYEDA
Nisei...........GEORGE UMETANI Banquet Arr. SHIGEO YANARU
Corr. Secretaries: Maintenance ......... SAM SUEKAMA
Issei...........TERUJI OKAZAKI
Issei.........HARRY KAJIWARA Sound System. HARRY KAJIWARA
Nisei..............GEO. UMETANI
Nisei...............BEN HARA Bldg. Custodian DEN HIRAIWA
ABOVE are winners of trophies in the YBLC bowling held during the
Bussei convention in Denver, Colo. From left to right: RALPH SUGI-
MOTO, for men's high series; LILLIAN MIYAZAWA, for women's high game;
AL NAKATA, for men's high game; and CARRIE ANN SAKAMOTO, for women's
high series. Chairman for the YBLC bowling, which was held at Bowl-
Mor Lanes on Sat., Dec. 19th, was BILL WATADA of Ft. Lupton, Colo.
OUTSTANDING BUSSEI AWARDS for 1964 were made at the 31st annual
convention of the Tri-State Young Buddhist League, in Denver, Colo.,
on Dec. 18-19-20, 1964. Awardees, holding plaques, are from left to
right: LARRY KISHIYAMA of Denver;
Ina Koshio accepting for daughter
JANICE KOSHIO of Ft. Lupton; IRIS
NAKATA of Brighton; MICHI YOSHIDA
of Denver; and TONY FUKUEDA, from
Hawaii, stationed at Ft. Carson,
who has served faithfully in YBL
activities in Denver, Colo.
1965 OFFICERS OF
TRI-STATE Y. EL.
New 1965 officers of the Tri-
State Young Buddhist League were
installed into office at the 31st
annual YBLC, during Dec. 1964.
BYRON YOSHIDA, 3300 Columbine
St., Denver, Colo., was elected
Pres, of YBL for 1965. He suc-
ceeds HENRY TOBO, the immediate
past and retiring Pres.
The entire cabinet of the YBL
was sworn into office by REV. N.
TSUNODA, and are as follows:
PRESIDENT.
1st V. Pres
2nd V. Pres
Rec. Secty
Corr. Secty
Treasurer.
Asst. Treas
. BYRON YOSHIDA
. LOUIS YOSHIDA
. RALPH MURA
SHARON MORIMOTO
JANE KAWANABE
. DUANE HASEGAWA
JANICE KOSHIO
Committee Chairmen:
Research Chrrnn. .
Literary Chrmn. .
Publicity Chrmn .
Social Chrmn. .
Men's Ath. Chrmn.
Girls' Ath. Chrmn
. JUDY SASAKI
MELODY FUJIMORI
. TONY FUKUEDA
LARRY KISHIYAMA
. WILLIAM TANI
. IRIS NAKATA
EDWARD T. NAKAGAWA of Denver,
Colo., at right, receiving scroll
of special appreciation from the
Young Buddhist League of the Tri-
State region, for outstanding and
long-continued assistance to the
Bussei youth group. RICH YOSHIDA
at left is making the presenta-

ORATORICAL CONTEST WINNERS, including all participants, at the YBL
convention banquet at the Brown Palace Hotel, on Sun., Dec. 20, 1964.
Winners were: CHRIS NAKAYAMA (2nd from left) in the Junior Division,
and RALPH MURA (in center, with large trophy) in the Senior Division.
Chairman for the Oratorical Contest was IRIS NAKATA of Brighton, Colo.
From left to right: DON YAMAMOTO, Winner of Jr. Div. CHRIS NAKAYAMA.
FRANCES TAKAMATSU, BRUCE SUZUKI, RONALD OMOTO, Winner of the Sr. Div.
RALPH MURA. JANICE KOSHIO, DONNA KATO, MARILYN KUSUMI, NAOMI SUGIURA,
PATTY SHIBAO and CHARLES OZAKI. (All YBL photos by Tom T. Masamori.)


PAGE 6.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A, NEWS
JAN-FEB.. 1965
MTN,- PLAINS AJANEWS
Published monthly, except July
and August. Mailed by the 30th.
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER
MINORU YASUI
1225 20th Street,
Denver, Colorado,
80202.
CH 4-2239 RA 2-9255
*******
BUD UCHXDA.............Heads
ROSA ODdW............ Artist
TOM MASAMORI. Photographer
TRUE YASUI. General Factotum
A generation has grown up since
a military marionette, frightened
nearly out of his britches of be-
ing caught in a West Coast Pearl
Harbor, ordered his preserve eva-
cuated of all Japanese Americans.
The record of that evacuation and
its consequences are all but un-
known to a substantial number of
Americans including the offspring
of the evacuees themselves.
Thus, it was most appropriate
that CBS' Twentieth Century pro-
gram, sponsored by the Prudential
Insurance people, chose to tell
that story one recent Sunday.
I hope you saw it. It would
have started the adrenalin flow-
ing all over again.
Overall, the program was well
done, with Mike Masaoka, Mine 0-
kubo the artist, and Senator Dan
Inouye providing much of the nar-
ration.
Still, the task of telling the
evacuation story adequately in a
30-minute program was almost as
impossible as telling the story
of World War II, its causes, its
action and its aftermath, in an
hour-long presentation.
As it turned out, the evacua-
tion story was so stark, so di-
rect, so devoid of trimming as to
be almost unbelievable. Could
this sort of thing have happened
in America the Beautiful?
It not only could, but did.
The program alluded to but did
not pinpoint a matter of vital
importance to all Americans. The
evacuation decision, imprisoning
American citizens without either
trial or accusation, was made ar-
bitrarily by a military officer.
And civilian concernor hysteria
as the case may be--was such that
the military order was never suc-
cessfully challenged. In fact,
it was given the endorsement of
the United States Supreme Court.
The court'8 decision provides a
precedent that could be used for
a new evacuation in an unforsee-
able circumstance.
WE CONTINUE THE STRUGGLE......................
At one point, early this year, we were seriously considering the
discontinuance of this monthly bulletin, because of the tremendous
amount of work involved (80-100 man-hours per month), and because we
were most eminently successful in showing a financial deficit every
month. Truly, a non-profit endeavor!
However, we are persuaded that perhaps this JACL-oriented publica-
tion can serve a useful purpose in this community, in being primarily
a pictorial, and as a resume of past events We cannot hope to be
current in coverage of the "news" '
and we can't meet deadlines. Elll HOHlUCMi
So we continue the struggle
to publish the rest of this year;
we bring you a combined Jan.-Feb.
issue, with pictures and reports'
of events of the past 90 days.
1964 SCHOLARSHIP
PROGRAM FOR JACL
INVOLVED $2^00.09
According to figures released
by DR. MIKE UBA, 1964 Treasurer
of the Mile-Hi JACL, $2,400.00
was involved in the 1964 scholar-
ship program.
Cathay Post contributed $450
in outright grants to students,
and Mile-Hi JACL awarded $600 in
scholarship grants, part of which
was given in the name of the late
HARRY H. SAKATA (dec. 1954).
EIJI HORIUCHI, who relinquish-
ed his position as 2nd Vice-Pres.
(memberships) to become Treasurer
for Mile-Hi JACL, was toastmaster
of the Dec. recognitions banquet.
Above are members of the 1965 :
cers, at the dinner held in their
Denver, Colo., on Dec. 31, 1964.
Mtn-Plains JACL, administered the
left, are:
HARRY HARADA, Chrmn for the 1965
New Year's Eve Dance;
>oard of Mile-Hi JACL, and new offi-
honor at the Brown Palace Hotel, in
HENRY SUZUKI, three-term officer of
oath of office. Standing, from the
RICHARD YAMAGUCHI, Secty of Board
and coordinator for the Exec.
Secy, PAT YAMAGUCHI.
Greetings to all of you from
the JACL Board of Governors for
1965!!! We are getting off to a
somewhat belated
start, but we're
off and winging
now!
Our scholar-
ship program is
moving into high
gear, with BOB
MARUYAMA at the
helm, assisted
by representa-
tives of coDsnu-
nity organiza-
tions which are
pledging utmost
cooperation in the 1965 scholar-
ship program for the Denver me-
tropolitan area and the Rocky
Mtn. region.
We are looking forward to a
prestigious and meaningful tri-
bute to our June 1965 graduates
at a dinner-dance scheduled for
Sat., June 12, 1965.
PAST ACCOMPLISHMENTS. .
Altho* we have a full year of
activities planned, it is well to
look back at past accomplishments
of the JACL, locally and nation-
ally.
Today, 20 years after V-J Day,
we are prone to be complacent and
take for granted Issei citizen-
ship, immigration from Japan, the
fair housing law in Colorado, job
opportunities, and even granting
of fishing licenses to Issei in
Colorado. JACL had a great
deal to do with the gaining of
these rights.
PENDING PROJECTS. .
The most significant national
JACL project is the Issei History
now being compiled jointly by the
JACL-UCLA staff in Los Angeles,
California.
We shall sorely miss the pre-
sence of HARRY G. MATOBA, who was
the local Issei story committee
chairman.
TANABE
ROBT. HORIUCHI, Chnan for public
relations for 1965;
DON TANABE, new 1965 President of
Mile-Hi JACL (carry-over Board
member from 1963);
ROBT. MARUYAMA, Scholarship Chrmn
for community-wide program;
EIJI HORIUCHI, Treasurer for 1965
(carry-over from 1964 Board);
DOROTHY UCHIDA, Chrmn for Nat'l
JACL bowling awards dinner, on
March 13, 1965;
YVONNE KUMAGAI, Vice-Pres. for
memberships, Denver area (also
carry-over from 1964 Board);
RICH YOSHIDA, Chrmn for the 1965
Hew Year's Eve Dinner;
ALBERT NAKATA, 2nd Vice-Pres. for
memberships, Brighton area.
(Only 1965 Board member not pic-
tured above was TAMI MASUNAGA,
who was unable to attend.)
Together with the 1965 Board,
the 14 carry-over members of the
1963-1964 Boards will constitute
the Board of Governors for JACL.
ALL PHOTOS, unless otherwise
credited, in the Mtn-Plains AJA
News, taken by TOM T. MASAMORI,
2010 Lamar St., Denver 15, Colo.
Tel.: BE 7-3041
Locally, the biggest and most
gratifying project is the cornu-
nity wide Scholarship Program for
high school graduates. Backed by
Cathay Post and supported by all
organizations in the AJA communi-
ty, we hope to make 1965 the best
and biggest ever!
MTN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
Regular: $3.00 for fe yr (5 mo.)
$5.00 for 1 yr (10 mo.)
Special Mile-Hi JACL members ONLY
$2.50 for % yr (5 mo.)
$3.50 for 1 yr (10 mo.)
Nj


JAN-FEB.. 1965,
MOUNTAIN"PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 7,
JACL PROPOSES
1964 PROGRAM
DON TANABE, President of Mile-
Hi JACL, announced the tentative
1965 annual program of the local
JACL as follows:
JAN. Alien Address Reports
FEB. Scholarship Benefit
MAR. JACL Bowling Tournament
APR......... Students' Conference
MAY.........Memorial Day Services
JUNE .... Grads Dinner-Dance
JULY............Community Picnic
AUG...................(Vacation)
SEP.............Citizenship Day
Oct. Oriental Food Benefit
NOV. Nominations, Election
DEC. New Year's Eve Program
It was emphasized that the an-
nual program first listed above
was tentative only, and that spe-
cific announcements would be made
thru The Mtn-Plains AJA News, and
by special mail notices to mem-
bers of Mile-Hi JACL.
Chairman for various JACL ac-
tivities for the year have been
appointed, as follows:
Scholarship Chrmn. BOB MARUYAMA
Public Relations BOB HORIUCHI
1000 Club Chrmn. GEO. MASUNAGA
Issel Story Chrmn. JOHN HORIE
Pacific Citizen. MIKO KAWANO
Year-End Benefit BEN KUMAGAI
New Year's Dinner. RICH Y0SH1DA
New Year's Dance HARRY HARADA
Any volunteers to assist any
of the above would be appreciated
by your Mile-Hi JACL chapter.
At right is DAVID H. FURUKAWA,
the retiring 1964 President of
Mile-Hi JACL, receiving congratu-
lations from MIN YASUI who pre-
sented the pearl-studded JACL pin
to FURUKAWA for his services to
the community and to the JACL.
Scene at inaugural banquet of
Mile-Hi JACL on Dec. 31st, at the
Brown Palace. in foreground are
ROBLEY BRANNON and GRACE BRANNON.
DENVER COMMUNITY SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM
Again, this year, the Mile-Hi JACL in cooperation with Cathay Post
and other community organizations la taking the initiative to sponsor
a scholarship program to honor all AJA graduates in the Denver metro-
politan area,
on Sat., June
with a dinner-dance
12, 1965.
BOB MARUYAMA, a Mile-Hi JACL
board member and teacher at Kuns-
miller Jr. Hi, is Chairman of the
coordinated community effort.
TOSH OTA, Commander of Cathay
Post, assured the renewed cooper-
ation of AJA Legionnaires to the
scholarship program for the en-
tire Mtn-Plains region.
HARRY FUKAYE, Pres, of Brigh-
ton JAA, pledged continued sup-
port of his organization, as has
been done during the past 10 yrs.
KEN FUJIMORI and TED TSUMURA
represented the Denver Buddhists,
and assured assistance by Busseis
of this area.
Simpson Methodist Church rep-
resentatives, JULIA KAMURA and
***

A smiling GRACE NOGUCHI won
the door prize at the New Year's
Eve dance -- a big, stuffed puppy
dog almost as big as she! In the
background is BEN KUMAGAI.
MILE-HI BOARD
MEETS, MAR. 4
DON TANABE, 1965 Pres, of the
Mile-Hi JACL, announced that the
regular Board Meeting for March
would be held at the Cathay Post,
at 8:00 p.ra., Thur., Mar. 4th.
Board meetings of the Mile-Hi
JACL are open, and all JACLers or
interested persons are cordially
invited to attend. Regular meet-
ings of the Board are on the 1st
Thursday night of each month.
§ #
At the New Year's Eve Dance,
from left are TOMI MAYEDA, HELENE
IOKA, CH1YO HORIUCHI, and a new
Board member, ROBERT HORIUCHI.
CHARLOTTE SHIMIZU, were assigned
responsibility for the graduates
banquet, scheduled for June 12.
Other community organizations
are invited to join in the 1965
scholarship program. Please con-
tact either Chrmn BOB MARUYAMA or
the Exec. Secty PAT YAMAGUCHI.
BELLE OF NEW
YEAR'S EVE
In keeping with past tradition
of Mile-Hi JACL New Years Eve,
a bouquet of roses was presented
to the "Belle of the Ball, who
was CHRISTINE Y0RIM0T0 for 1964.
At present working in Calif., she
is the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Art
Yorimoto of Denver, Colorado.
Making the presentation is BEN
KUMAGAI, a retiring Board member,
who officiated as Master of Cere-
monies, during the intermission
program of the dance.
MICHI ANDO and TOSH ANDO also
at the inaugural dinner of Mile-
Hi JACL on Dec. 31st.
Also seen at the Mile-Hi JACL
New Years Eve Dance at the Brown
Palace, at left is ROSE FUJISAKI,
with MITCHIE TERASAKI.
JACL SILVER PIN
AWARDS FOR 1964
Retiring Pres. DAVID FURUKAWA
presenting the Silver JACL pin to
BETTY SUZUKI, for her outstanding
services to the Mile-Hi JACL.
Also honored, although unable
to be present, was BILL KUR0KI,
for his long and faithful service
to the local JACL.
CHIYO HORIUCHI, at left, with
ALBERT NAKATA, a new Board member
of the Mile-Hi JACL for 1965.
GRACE NOGUCHI and JOHN NOGUCHI
at Mile-Hi JACL's inaugural din-
ner at the Brown Palace Hotel.
ROSE TANABE, wife of the new
Pres, of Mile-Hi JACL, with DR.
CHAS. FUJISAKI of Brighton, at
the New Year's Eve Dance.


PACK 8,
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
JAN-PEB.. 1965
SIMPSON CHURCH BOWLING TOURNEY
Some 400 bowlers from western Nebraska, and from outlying areas of
Colorado, Including Rocky Ford, Pueblo, Colorado Springs, Ft. Lupton,
Brighton, Greeley, and Longmont, competed with Denver Nisei bowlers
at the Simpson Methodist Church's
invitational bowling tournament
on Jan. 29-30-31, 1965.
Winners in the various tourna-
ment events were:
WOMEN'S SINGLES:
1st: LILLIAN TERASAKI. ... 677
2nd: MAE SHIMIZU ;
3rd: MARGE MORISHIGE . ... 650
WOMEN'S TEAM:
1st: LOTUS ROOM 2901
2nd: ACME RADIATOR . 2897
3rd: SIMPSON TEAM #3 . 2864
Women s team champions were: SUE
AK1YAMA, MARY IDA, MARY MASUNAGA,
HIMI MORISHIGE and KAY SANCHEZ.
Croton bowling supply
6760 W. 38TH AVE.
WHEAT RIDGE. COLORADO
80033
BEN YANAGA, Prop. Tel: 422-3738
WOMEN'S DOUBLES:
1st: MARY MASUNAGA and
LIL TERASAKI . 1189
2nd: ELAINE MATSUDA and
MARY MORISHIGE . 1187
3rd: SUE MAYEMURA and
MARTHA YAGO . . . 1180
WOMEN'S ALL-EVENTS:
1st: VIRGINIA DUJMOVIC . 1953
2nd: MAE SHIMIZU...........1799
3rd: HIMI MORISHIGE. . 1794
VIRGINIA DUJMOVIC is a bowler
from Pueblo, Colo. MAE SHIMIZU
and HIMI MORISHIGE are members of
the Simpson Bowling League.
102,0 ARAPAHOE ST. 9
OEAVER, COLORADO
AC. 25075
SIX WEEKS BEGINNERS* COURSE IN JUDO
For: MEN & WOMEN,- BOYS ft GIRLS
6 WEEKS TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS
7:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
(18 HOURS TWO Ik HOUR IESSONS PER WEEK)
BEGINNERS COURSE- $25SS.
The Beginners' Course in Judo is an orientation program to intro-
duce fundamentals in the sport of Judo. Basic principles, correct
methods of falling, some aspects of self-defense, and training in
basic throwing and grappling techniques, as well as the history,
ethics and nomenclature will be taught by well-qualified and com-
petent black belt judo instructors in this beginning course.
(SPECIAL FAMILY RATES)
FOR SPORT-FUn-HEflLTH-LEfiRn JUDO
For details (no obligation imposed), clip end send to:
DENVER SCHOOL OF JUDO, INC.
2020 ARAPAHOE STREET DENVER 6. COLORADO
TELEPHONES: 222.B07S 244-9630
Please send me complete Information on BEGINNERS' COURSE IN JUDO.
NAME:______________________________________________Sex: Male £7
Female 7/
ADDRESS:
Phone
ZIP #
AGE: __________ HEIGHT: _____________ WEIGHT:
DENVER SCHOOL OF JUDO SCHEDULE
TOORU TAKAMATSU, national board member of the Judo Black Belt Fed-
eration of the U.S.A., and director of The Denver School of Judo, an-
nounced the schedule of tournaments sanctioned by the Rocky MCn AAU,
and activities of the local Denver judo school during the forthcoming
spring months of 1965 as follows:
Above are WILLIAM HIROKAWA who
directed the Men's Division, and
JANET YOSHIDA who directed the
Women's Division of the Simpson
Church bowling tournament in Jan.
(Photo by: Edwin K. Shimabukuro)
MEN'S TEAM:
1st: F & B AUTO SERVICE. . 3151
2nd: ARKANSAS VALLEY JACL. 2992
3rd: GENE TAGAWA's TEAM. . 2979
Men's team champions were: YOSH
AKIYAMA, DR. KOJI KAUAI, GEORGE
0M0T0, BEN KARA and TOM HIRAOKA.
MEN'S SINGLES:
ist: JOHN TSUNEMORI (Neb.). 701
2nd: BOB HOSHIJIMA 684
3rd: JOHN PERKO 677
4th: DAVE FURUKAWA 674
5th: HARRY FURUKAWA .... 667
MEN'S D0UB1ES:
1st: TATEYAMA and UYEDA . 1269
2nd: SAMESHIMA and OGATA. . 1252
3rd: KISHIYAMA and KIMURA . 1248
MEN'S ALL-EVENTS:
1st: JOHN TSUNEMORI . 1925
2nd: EDWARD SHIMODA . 1920
3rd: EVERRETT SHIGETA . 1895
TSUNEMORI is from Scottsbluff,
Neb. , SHIMODA lives in Englewood,
and SHIGETA is from Pueblo, Colo.

FINEST SPORTS EQUIPMENT
Happy Canyon Shopping Canter,
5042 E. Hampden Avenue,
Denver 22, Colorado.
S19ME TANITA, Mgr. Tal. 756*9411
Mar. 5- Nat'l High School Tourna-
Mar. 7: ment at San Jose, Calif.
Mar. 13- 12th Annual Invitational
Mar. 14: Rocky Mountain Tourney.
Mar. 28: Rocky Mountain A.A.U.
(Sun) Open Championships.
Apr. 11: Denver School of Judo
(Sun) Chow Mein Dinner Benefit
Apr. 23- Nat'l AAU Judo Champion-
Apr. 25: ships, San Jose, Calif.
May 2nd: Brown Belt Tournament,
(Sun) Colo. Springs, Colo.
May 16: 5-Men Team Championship
(Sun) C.U., Boulder, Colo.
June 6: Jr. Olympic Judo Tour-
(Sun) nament at Casper, Wyo.
NAT'L BOWLING AT
CELEBRITY LANES
FROM MAR. 6-13
JOHN SAKAYAMA, director of the
19th annual National JACL Bowling
Tournament, to be held In Denver,
Colo., Mar. 8-13, 1965, announced
104 teams were entered in the an-
nual Nisei keg classic.
Out-of-state teams include: 3
from Hawaii, 5 from Chicago, 25
from California, 9 from Utah, and
one each from Washington, Wyoming
and Nebraska.
Top-ranked men's team will be
Sacramento with a 986, followed
by Denver'8 Japan Food Corp. with
982, anchored by KEN MATSUDA.
AJAs COMPETE IN
WRESTLING MEET
The SATO brothers of Sheridan
High School received considerable
publicity for their feats in the
State Wrestling Championships.
DON SATO won the 112# crown,
while his brother ALLEN SATO was
the 103# winner in Division II.
The older brother, KEN SATO,
now a freshman at CSC, was 138#
Div. I. champion last year.
JIM TAGAWA was Dist. 2 champ
in the 120 lb. class for Mapleton
High in Div. I.
KEN MIZUSHIMA of Grand Junc-
tion was 138 lb. champ of Dist. 8
in Div. I, but was eliminated in
the state finals.


JAN-FBB.. 1965,
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE 9.
77
KAREN
TAZAWA
(Editor's Note: KAREN TAZAWA who
brings you this month's "Teen-
Topics" is a sophomore at Brigh-
ton High. She is the daughter
of Harry and Rose Tasawa of Hen-
derson, Colo. She was Head Girl
at South Jr. High, last year.)
it is it it
Cheering the boys on to vic-
tory are Varsity cheerleaders at
Brighton Hi school, JAYN MATSUNO
and FAYE TOKUNAGA.
e Pulling for the Junior Varsity
team are: PATTI FUJISAKI, SHARON
MASUNAGA and KAREN TAZAWA.
Drill team members at Brighton
Hi are NORMA MURATA, SHERI OKUBO,
LYNN OKADA and JOAN MIZUNAGA.
* Basketball players at South Jr
High are JOHN HORIUCHI (7th grade
team) and CHAS. TANABE (8th grade
team).
DENVER TEEN-TOPICS
STANLEY KOSHI was a member of
Denver's Jr. Police Band, which
went to Washington, D.C., for the
inaugural of Pres. Lyndon Johnson
on Jan. 20, 1965. STANLEY KOSHI
is a clarinet player in the Band.
Out at Brighton High School, a
student council officer and rep*
resentatives for 1964-65 include
the following AJAs:
Treasurer...........KAREN TAZAWA
Senior Repr. EDDIE IMATANI
Soph Repr....................EDDIE MIZUNAGA
Soph Repr...................SHARON MASUNAGA
At the junior high schools in
Brighton, AJAs are also prominent
as student council officers. At
South Junior High, in Brighton,
we have:
Head Girl...........PHYLLIS SASA
Secretary....................PAUL HORIUCHI
Treasurer...........KATHY TAZAWA
* COLLEEN ITO Is school treasur-
er at North Junior High, while
CRAIG FUJISAKI is home room pre-
sident, and a regular on the 7th
grade basketball team.
* EDDIE IMATANI is a regular on
the Varsity basketball team, at
Brighton High. He has been high-
point man for Brighton in several
crucial games.
RON H0R1I is also a regular on
the Brighton varsity basketball
team.
* DENNIS DOI ranks high as one
of the junior varsity players at
Brighton Hi, while KENNY IMATANI
and TONY YAMADA are on the soph-
omore squad.
# At Abraham Lincoln High School
DENNIS S. YAMAGUCHI, son of Mr. &
Mrs. Jinx Yamaguchi, was on the
January honor roll with better
than a 3.5 average. He is also
active with the Highlander Boys.
SHUNY SUGIURA at West High was
one of 7 students with straight A
average in Jan. Other AJAs on the
honor roll at West were: GLORIA
KAGAWA and KIM TAMAKI.
LEE MINAGA of Manual High was
a participant in the Inner Parish
meeting on global understanding
and prosperity, after attending a
"War on Poverty" seminar sponsor-
ed by the Amerigan Friends, dur-
ing November, 1964.
HOWARD TSUCHIYA of 771 Ltpan
St. won a Bronze Medal and a cash
award from the Big Brothers orga-
nization for outstanding citizen-
ship and for achievements in self
improvement during Feb. The Big
Brothers Inc. serves boys without
fathers.
CUSTOM PHOTO FINISHING
711-
Derive* st colo.
Telephone: CH 4-4073
OUTk SIOE OF gglCMTOn)
rron.c

W
MIKE TASKIflO,-PROP.
TEL. 6S9-9984-
ID R RKET
the FinEST in Fins nno fehtuers
KE 4'5985 1913 LftWfcEnCC ST.
LAUREL YA8UI
Pardon a proud papa's pride --
but above is LAUREL YASU1, who is
Head Girl at Byers Junior High,
in Denver, Colo. LAUREL was the
Pres, of Big Sisters (girls' ser-
vice organization) last semester
at Byers, and served as Pres, of
the Student Council at Washington
Park School during her last year
there.
Now younger sister HOLLY YASUI
is following her foot steps, and
was elected Pres, of the Student
Council at Washington Park School
for her final semester there.
Big sister IRIS YASUI led the
way by serving as Pres, of Junior
Honor Society at Byers, and is
now a Pon Pon girl at South High
in her junior year.
CALENDAR Of Coming Events
Fridays: BASKETBALL, weekly at Manual High gymnasium.
Mar. 8- 19TH ANNUAL NAT'L JACL
Mar. 13: BOWLING TOURNAMENT at The Celebrity Lanes;
Mar. 13: AWARDS DINNER at the
(Sat.) Hellenic Comm. Center.
Mar. 14: HANA MATSURI at Brigh-
(Sun.) ton Buddhist Church.
Mar. 13- 12TH ANNUAL ROCKY MTN.
Mar. 14: JUDO TOURNAMENT at the
(SiS) Denver School of Judo.
Mar. 21: JUDO BENEFIT CAR WASH,
(Sun.) George's Motor (9-3pm)
Mar. 22: ELECTION DINNER of the
(Mon.) JAPAN SOCIETY, Fuji-En
Mar. 27: DUPLICATE BRIDGE at
(Sat.) Simpson M. E. Church.
Mar. 28: HANA MATSURI Services,
(Sun.) Ft. Lupton and Greeley
iNfe PHOTOGRAPH 5
ImuI 2010 5T*
imKh DEttVfcH 15. COLO.
fee 7-304!
12th ANNUAL INVITATIONAL
JUDO
tsuhnmat
Saturday march 13
Stutdiuj MARCH 14 jtm, 1 rm
at DENVER SCHOOL OF JUDO
2020 ARAPAHOE ST. DENVER, COLORADO


PAGE 10.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
JAN-FEB., 1965
BRIGHTON
BOB SAKATA was a member of the
12-man Colorado delegation which
met with U.S. Dept, of Labor of*
vicials in Memphis, Tenn., on the
bracero problem. As Labor Chrmn
of the Colo. Sugar Beet Growers'
Assn, he has been travelling ex*
tenslvely on this matter.
TAGUS MURATA and JESS MASUNAGA
have proposed sponsorship by the
Brighton JAA of a Junior Girls'
bowling league, as an organiza-
tional activity.
DON TANABE, 1965 Pres, of the
Mile-Hi JACL, and prominent lead-
er in the Brighton area, indicat-
ed that he may be leaving for an
extended stay in Texas during the
month of April, and would be gone
until later this summer.
JAMES IMATANI of the Henderson
Pickle Co., was featured in the
Empire Magazine section of Denver
Post, for his extensive farming
operations in Mexico, as an out-
standing example of U.S.-Mexican
cooperation.
BRIGHTON WOMEN'S CLUB
HAZEL TANI and MARY TOKUNAGA
were Co-Chairman of the annual
dinner for the Adams County Soil
Conservation district meeting, at
Brighton South Junior High School
during Che Ag Institute in Feb.
TEL.
244-6068
j| ?/-j
HSBBJ

ABOVE are 1965 officers of The Japanese American Assn of Brighton,
Colorado, at the inaugural dinner held at the Officers' Club of the
Rocky Mtn Arsenal, on Jan. 16, 1965. (Photo by ALBERT Y. NAKATA.)
Seated, from left are: ROY MAYEDA, Property Chrmn; KEN MIZUNAGA,
Recording Secty; 1965 PRESIDENT HARRY FUKAYE; BOB SAKATA, Treasurer;
and TAGUS MURATA, Vice-Pres.
Standing, from left to right,
are: WES KOYANO, Finance Chrmn;
TOM SHIBAO, Program Chrmn; PAUL
OKADA, Publicity; OSCAR MURATA,
Memberships; JAY FUKAYE, Corres.
Secty; NOB ITO, Sports; and MIKE
TASHIRO, Civic Chrmn.
2615 DOWNING ST
DENVER 5, COLORADO
BILL KUftOKI, MGR.
SAN LUIS VALLEY
ROY INOUYE, a Farm Bureau of*
ficial, indicated that farmers in
the San Luis Valley are consider*
ing hog-raising as a major farm
activity, since much of the pork
consumed in Colorado now comes
from other states. A $350,000.00
"kill-and-chill" facility is be-
ing planned in the La Jara area.
INOUYE was the Master of Cere-
monies for the Lincoln Day pro*,
gram held in Conejos County. He
is county chairman for the Repub-
licans in that county.
ARKANSAS VALLEY
JOE UYEN0 of La Junta, Colo.,
was installed as the 196S Pres,
of the Arkansas Valley JACL, to-
gether with his cabinet. Offici-
ating at the installation was re-
tiring Pres., MIKE FUJIM0T0.
EMORY NAMURA is administrator
of the Bent County Hospital, in
Las Animas, Colo. He is a native
of Sacramento, but was evacuated
to the Granada WRA camp in Amache
during World War II, in 1942. He
served in the Army Medical Corps.

23
AlfaQUl
AGency for Russell stov
4-477%
cnn oy
Above, KAY SH10SHITA, at left,
retiring Pres, of San Luis Valley
JACL, congratulating DEN ONO of
LaJara, Colo., the new 1965 Pres.
In center is Judge Henry Blick-
hahn, speaker of the evening, who
swore in the new officers. (Foto
by The Alamosa Courier.)
The installation dinner-dance
was held at the Mt. Blanca Inn,
in Fort Garland, Colo., on Sat.,
Jan. 16, 1965.
mtrnsm
BiVt
United illations Insurance Company
WEST 80TH AVENUE at SHERIDAN BOULEVARD
WESTMINSTER, COLORADO.
P. 0. BOX 1501, DENVER 1, COLORADO.
H1R0SUKE ISHIKAHA, President
Tel.: HA 9-3537
Unirersol SinJlos
1526 BROADWAY
DOWNTOWN
EDWinK.SmmA&UKUBQ
ac 2-3aea
TA e-1A
Denver 2. Couo.
KATE ARIKI, a teacher at Cole
Jr. High, in Denver, is a sponsor
at her school for the 1965 spell-
ing bee to be held on May 8, for
the Colorado-Wyoming region.
DR. JOHN K. MATSUSHIMA of CSU
headed the Fed Beef competition
at the Nat'1 Western Stock Show,
as superintendent. The Fed Beef
competition measured the red beef
available for butchers' cuts, and
for retail consumption.
Winsome ANN HIROKAWA of Rocky
Ford, Colo., is one of the beau-
tiful young ladies from Patricia
Stevens career school at the an-
nual Sports Show at the Coliseum.
She was named Queen of Archery.
LT. BEN FURUTA, Jr., now with
the USAF, was engaged to a girl
in Tokyo, Japan, and planned to
be married on Apr. 11, 1965.
DEMYEJL-VISITORS
Visitors to the Denver scene,
during last month, have included:
DR. HARRY KITANO of UCLA, who
is conducting an intensive study
of juvenile delinquency among the
Sansel in Los Angeles.
DR. RONALD OZAKI of the Univ.
of Nebraska, who attended the na-
tional conference on Social Work
Education, in Denver, Colo.
DR. H. JAMES HARA, instructor
in Ear-Nose-Throat at Loma Linda
medical school near Los Angeles,
who visited DR. GEO. TAKENO here.
AJA BRIDGE FANS
SUE AKIYAMA, probably Denver's
most avid AJA bridge fan, was ac-
claimed for brilliant bidding at
the winter sectionals during Jan.
She has also been winning consis-
tently with ZEKE TOLENTINO as her
partner in local games.
* *
SAM MATSUMOTO, director of the
Simpson Church bridge club, re-
ported that ETHEL and DICK YANASE
were the winners North-South, and
TOSH UBA and WALT SAGARA were the
East-West winners, on Feb. 27th.
The next duplicate session of the
Simpson bridge club will be held
on Sat., Mar. 27th, at 8:00 p.m.
CAPITOL MORTUARY
1331 SHERMAN TA 5-0151
Personal Attention
to Every Detail


JAH-FEB.. 1965.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.A. NEWS
PAGE II.
ENGAGEMENTS
KAY LORRAINE KOSHIO, daughter
of Mr. & Mrs. Sam Koshlo of Fort
Lupton, engaged to DONALD SEEGER,
also of Ft. Lupton, Colorado.
CHARLOTTE SHIMIZU, daughter of
Mr. & Mrs. Tad Shimizu of Denver,
engaged to Airman 1/c DAN 0HASH1,
of Lowry AFB, son of Mr. & Mrs.
Roy Ohashl of Seattle, Wash.
MARIE TAKAO, daughter of Mr. H.
Takao of Denver, Colo., engaged to
JOHN WANG of Los Angeles, Calif.,
a graduate student at UCLA.
YOKO YOKOYAMA of Japan, was en-
gaged to GEORGE NAGAI, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Tatsuma Nagai of Denver.
WEDDINGS
SUSAN INAGAKI DENNIS MORISHIGE:
Susan Inagaki, daughter of Mr.
Kay Inagaki, was wed on Jan.
17, at the Tri-State Buddhist
Church, to Dennis Morishige of
Denver, Colo.
DOREEN MORISHIGE DANIELPREHN:
Doreen Morishige, daughter of
the Preston Morishiges of Den-
ver, was married in January to
Daniel Prehn of Wheatridge.
IRENE NARATA LEO UCHIYAMA:
Irene Nakata, daughter of Mr.
& Mrs. Frank Nakata of Brigh-
ton, was married to Leo Uchi-
yama, on Jan. 23, in San Jose,
California.
PATRICIA SAY THOMAS T. MAYEDA:
Patricia Say from Pittsburgh,
Pa., was married to Thomas T.
Mayeda of Denver, during Dec.
Both are students at the Univ.
of Colo., at Boulder, Colo.
BIRTHS
LARRY TAJIRI, nationally-known
drama editor of The Denver Post,
passed away on Feb. 12, 1965, at
the age of 50, in Denver, Colo.
TAJIRI was born in Los Angeles
on May 7, 1914. His first news-
paper job was with the Kashu Mai-
nichi in L.A,, and he later was
with the Nichi-Bei in San Fran-
cisco before accepting a position
in the New York offices of Asahi
Shimbun of Japan.
In 1941, he moved to Salt Lake
City, Utah, and became editor of
The Pacific Citizen. During his
10 years with P.C., his was the
crusading spirit of Nat*l JACL.
In 1954, he joined The Denver
Post and in 1956 became the drama
editor. As such, he won national
acclaim and respect for his abi-
lities and tremendous knowledge
in the entertainment field.
LARRY TAJIRI not only reflect-
ed favorable credit upon all AJAs
but was a positive force in im-
proving the world of entertain-
ment for all of us. His passing
will be long and sadly mourned by
the entire Denver metropolitan
community.
HORIUCHI, Kenzo..............a BOY
Brighton, Colorado
MASAMORI, Tom T..............a GIRL
2010 Lamar St., Denver
SHIBATA, Jim.................a BOY
6122 Uno St., Arvada
SHIOSHITA, Teddy.............a BOY
2545 Saulsbury St., Lakewood
SONODA, Mel N................a BOY
170 So. Jackson, Denver
HAMILTON FUNDS, INC
777 OflANT
Denver 3. Colorado
BUS. Phone 628-7077 Res. RhONB 433.1222
REPRESENTED BY
MOLLY A. MCOOVERN
Unit Mgr.
MEMOIR PACIFIC C O AIT ITOCK IICHAHCI
FJJI HORIUCHI
REGISTERED REPRESENTATIVE
stocks MUTUAL FUNDS bonds
WE9UM£filCA SECURITIES,me.
444 SHERMAN ST.
DCNVGft, COLO. 60203
OFF.! 744*Stftf
RES S SSS-1742
Metropolitan National Bank
L_________DENVERy COLORADO
A BANK FOR ALL OF THE PEOPLE!!!
DENVER, COLORADO 80205 PHONE 825-6176
OBITUARIES
SAM S. HATASAKA of 3447 Garfield
St., Denver. Father of Edith
Uyeno of Lovington, N.M.; Henry
Nabeshima of San Jose, Calif.;
Nori Tsutsui of Denver, Colo.
Brother of Frank Hatasaka, Den-
ver; and Keizo Hatasaka, Japan.
Also, six grandchildren.
HARRY G. MATOBA of 162 So. Stuart
St., Denver. Husb. of Matsuno;
father of Frank T., Isao, and
Mrs. Yoshie Hamamura of Denver,
and Mrs. Teruko Hara of Warsaw,
Ind.; also 13 grandchildren.
DOUGLAS D. MUROYA, 6871 York St.,
Denver. Son of Mr. & Mrs. Tom
Muroya; brother of Greg; grand-
son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Mizunaga
and Mr. T. Tokunaga.
GEO. T. NAGAMOTO, 4115 Brentwood
St., Denver. Husb. of Shizuye;
Father of Kazumi Nagamoto, Los
Angeles, Calif.; Martha Tanda,
Wheatridge, Colo; Tom Nagamoto,
Boulder, Colo; and June Furuta,
Taneko Matoba, and Mary Komaru,
all of Denver, Colo. Also sur-
vived by 13 grandchildren.
TOSHIO SHIGETOMI, 2226 Lawrence
St., Denver. Husb. of Tsutano;
Father of Mrs. Akira Agawa of
Denver, and Seichi Shigetoml of
Monterey Park, Calif. Also 12
grandchildren.
TSUKI SHINTO, 3521 Josephine St.,
Denver. Mother of Kazuo S. and
Jim Shinto of Denver; Mrs. Fumi
Masunaga of Los Angeles, Calif.
Also 8 grandchildren.
JACK K. SUNAHARA, Sr., 716 25th
St., Denver. Husb. of Mary T.;
Father of Jack K., Jr., Marian
Worsham and Lynn Sunahara, all
of Denver.
LARRY S. TAJIRI, 7870 Grove St.,
Westminster. Husb. of Marian;
son of Mrs. Fuyo Tajiri, Minne-
apolis, Minn. Brother of Vin-
cent and Thomas Tajiri of Chi-
cago, 111.; Mrs. Yoshi Roberts
of Berkeley, Calif.; Shinkichi
Tajiri of Baarlo, Holland; and
Maj. James Tajiri of Tokyo.
SEIZ0 TAKAHASHI, c/o Great North-
ern Hotel, 1612 Larimer Street,
Denver, Colo. (Former judo ex-
pert and instructor; bachelor.)
TOM S. NAKANO, 2535 Gaylord St.,
Denver. Husb. of Jeanne; Father
of Tommy Jr., Johnny, Susan and
Naomi Nakano, all of Denver.
KAZUO G. OKAZAKI, 934 21st St.,
Denver. Brother of Harry Oka-
zaki, Palo Alto, Calif.; and of
Harold Okazaki, Cotati, Calif.
REAL ESTATE. inSURfWCF
mUTUAL runes -
5IZZ-CHRSE ST. Hfl 2-1911
Tel. 266-2170
penyep. iz.coLo.
PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS LISTINGS
PMTtSTS
CLIFFORD S. NAKATA Colo. Spgs
JOHN CHIKUMA, DDS Brighton 206 E. Pikes Peak Ave . 633-4382
75 So. 4th Street 659-1825 UM&tf
MASA GIMA, DDS Denver T0SHI0 ANDO 1942 Larimer St. Denver 222-5315
1404 E. 18th Ave. 255-6822
MINORU YASUI Denver
MICHAEL T. H0RI, DDS Denver 1225 20th St. 244-2239
4101 E. Wesley Ave. 756-0924
T. IT0, DDS opTOMmisrs
Denver Denver
830 18th Street 534-8680 BEN MATOBA, O.D.
2838 Federal Blvd. 455-0741 1959 Larimer St. 534-1941
Y. IT0, DDS SUEO ITO, DDS MISAO MATOBA, O.D. Ft. Lupton
Denver 244-6589 Burt Building 857-6550
SETS ITO, DDS
1477 Pennsylvania PHYSidMS
KOJ1 KANAI, DDS Wheatridge CHAS. FUJISAKI, M.D. Brighton
4310 Harlan St. 422-5817 40 No. Main St. 659-0783
TONY KAWAN0, DDS Denver T. K. KOBAYASHI, M.D. Denver
1750 Humboldt St. 534-3084 DICK D. MOMII, M.D. ALBERT N0DA, M.D. 534-3104
ROBERT MAYEDA, DDS Denver 1227 27th Street
Interstate Trust Bldg 825-6961 HOWARD SUENAGA, M.D. Denver
TAKASHI MAYEDA, DDS Denver 830 18th Street 222-1314
Interstate Trust Bldg 825-6961 M. GEO. TAKENO, M.D. Denver
GENTA NAKAMURA, DDS Denver Medical Arts Big., 825-0783
Interstate Trust Bldg 825-7498 1955 Pennsylvania St.
KEN UYEHARA, DDS Brighton AYAKO WADA, M.D. Denver
40 No. Main Street 659-3062 810 23rd Street 825-2565
JACK YAMAMOTO, DDS Lakewood MAHITO UBA, D.O. Denver
1005 W. 17th Place 238-3331 1230 21st Street 625-3743
2031 STOUT STREET


PAGE 12.
JUDO SCHOOL
CAR WASH ON
FEB, 21 a 28
Students of the Denver School
of Judo sponsored a car wash, on
Feb. 21 and 28, at George's Motor
Service, 20th & Lawrence St., in
Denver, Colo.
The Feb. 21st date was snowed
out, and is now re-scheduled from
9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at $1.00
per car, on Sun., Mar. 21st.
All proceeds of the car wash
goes into the Judo School travel
fund to send teams to out-of-town
tournaments, including the Nat'l
High School tourney in San Jose,
in March, and the Nat'l Womens
judo meet in Ames, Iowa, in May.
SPRING CONFERENCE
OF STUDENTS SLATED
APR. 30, MAY 1-2
KEN TAGAWA, Chairman of Inter-
mountain Collegiate Students, an-
nounced that the 20th annual con-
ference of AJA students in the
Rocky Mtn region would be held on
Apr. 30, May 1 & 2, 1965.
JANET IDA of CU and ROM MURATA
of CSU are in charge of planning
and scheduling of the conference.
The locale probably will be at
Peaceful Valley Lodge again this
year.
In cooperation with the Mile-
Hi JACL, an exchange of student
delegates with the Hi-Co confer-
ence in'Los Angeles is being pro-
posed. (The Hi-Co group in L.A.
is composed of AJA students at-
tending high schools and colleges
in southern California.
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS A.J.
tS-TK ST.
Denver 2,0010.
wmm
Jf-] TO
Thru courtesy of LARRY GOOD-
ENOUGH of the Vogue Art Theatre,
the Japanese prize-winning film,
"Woman in the Dunes" will be pre-
sented as a benefit for the scho-
larship fund of Mile-Hi JACL.
Above are members of the Japanese All-Star high school wrestling
team that Invaded Colorado during Jan., 1965, and in 12 matches were
undefeated, but tied by the Grand Junction team which won the 1965
Colorado state championship for --------------------------------------
high school wrestlers.
The Japanese visitors drew re-
cord crowds, and it was estimated
that 26,000 fans saw them in ac-
tion. A Colorado All-Star team
will return the visit in Japan,
this summer. (Foto by TSUB0KAWA)
HERBERT WONG OF
NEW CHINA CELE-
BRATES NEW YEAR
HERBERT WONG of New China Cafe
celebrated the Chinese New Year,
with a sumptions banquet for 350
guests and friends, at his res-
taurant, 726-732 E. Colfax Ave.,
in Denver, on Feb. 2nd.
The de luxe banquet menu, in-
cluding shark fin soup, crystal
shrimp, boneless chicken stuffed
with water chestnuts and bamboo
shoots, sauteed button mushrooms
with crab, Peking duckling with
plum sauce, and other delicious,
mouth-watering dishes are avail-
able upon 24-hours' notice. Just
call HERB WONG at 534-0897.
According to Chinese calendars
this is "The Year of the Snake",
and is supposed to be lucky for
women. By Chinese calculations,
this is year 4663.
WYOMING
CtfERRy iDMit, fa.
1X36 2.0Th ST.
uiid&r a.j.r.mflnAGEmEirr
SERVER, COLORADO TEL. 825*9530
wmwm MBimiTiiE
Specializing in oriental poops and goods
1946 LARimER. ST. KE 4- 6031
Store Hours:
FRESH MANJU FROM WEST COAST AVAILABLE EACH WEEK
------- Open dally;
Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, & Sat. 8:00 a.m. 7:00 p.m.
Special Sunday hours..............10:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.
MARY UJIFUSA of Worland, Wyo.,
during Dec. 1964, called atten-
tion of Mtn-Plains JACL to the
anti-miscegenation law of Wyoming
which had been enacted in 1913,
barring marriages between "white
persons and Negroes, aulattoes,
Mongolians and Malays".
Authorized by LILY OKURA, as
Dist. Chrmn of Mtn-Plains JACL,
and backed by the Nat'l JACL, the
Denver JACL office assisted in
coordinating the drive to repeal
Wyoming's anti-miscegenation law.
TOSH SUYEMATSU, an AJA attor-
ney in Cheyenne, Wyo., was help-
ful in the successful effort to
eliminate this law, and reported
that Gov. Clifford Hansen signed
the repeal on Jan. 27, 1965.
Exact dates have not yet been
determined, but will be sometime
during the mid-part or the latter
part of March.
Watch for announcements and
notices. Admissions will be the
regular door price of $1.50, but
if tickets are purchased thru the
JACL, 50$ of each ticket will go
towards the Scholarship Fund.
FOR SALE
Newly-refurbished pool parlor,
new rugs, re-conditioned tables,
snack bar, all equipment. Gross
$1600.00 mo. Sacrifice equity of
$15,000 for only $2,000 cash; as-
sume payments. Can net $300-$500
monthly for good operator. Con-
tact The AJA News, 244-2239, or
722-9255, for further details.
SAM Y. MATSUMOTO
NEW YORK LIFE INS. CO.
RT. I. BOX I96A
HENDERSON, COLO AT8-2536
New Chuih Cafe
732 E. COLFAX AVE.
TtL. 53+-07
Famous for cninese Diehls
VISIT Vj*h,u
d i nine Room
(Uu4i4*Jt/
20I5IT1 ft RKET ST. (closed Mondays) KE4-40O8
Return Postage Guaranteed:
MOUNTAIN-PLAINS AJA NEWS,
1225 20th Street,
Denver 2, Colorado
(RETURN REQUESTED)
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U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
DENVER, COLO.
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