Citation
Novel method of bioremediation and characterization of bacterial communities on arsenic-impacted museum collections

Material Information

Title:
Novel method of bioremediation and characterization of bacterial communities on arsenic-impacted museum collections
Creator:
Subotic, Sladjana ( Author, primary )
Roane, T. M. ( Faculty mentor )
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

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Novel method of bioremediation and characterization of bacterial communities on arsenicimpacted museum collections By: Sladjana Subotic PI: Timberley Roane

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Background ‡ To preserve museum collections, pesticides such as naphthalene, carbon tetrachloride and metalbased chemicals were applied ‡ Pesticides used to prevent biodeterioration by insects and rodents ‡ Among metal-based chemicals is arsenic in the form of sodium arsenite (NaAsO 2 ) a known carcinogen ‡ Objects were dipped/sprayed with arsenic solutions or sprinkled with sodium arsenite powder

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Background To preserve museum collections, pesticides such as naphthalene, carbon tetrachloride and metal-based chemicals were applied Pesticides used to prevent biodeterioration by insects and rodents Among metal-based chemicals is arsenic in the form of sodium arsenite (NaAsO2) a known carcinogen Objects were dipped/sprayed with arsenic solutions or sprinkled with sodium arsenite powder

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Background ‡ Presence of arsenic can be seen on many collections ‡ 80% of national history collections in United States and Canada affected by arsenic ‡ Widespread, nondiscriminate use of chemicals has led to a large-scale public health issue Figure 1. Arsenic powder dispersed between a headdress. (Odegaard 2005)

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7KH problem of pesticide contamination is that no one ever thought these objects would be leaving WKHQDWLRQVPXVHXPVDQGFXUDWRUV GLGQWZDQWWKHPGHVWUR\HGE\LQVHFWV Nancy Odegaard, Conservator, Head of Preservation, Arizona State Museum

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Background ‡ A wide variety of collections including anthropological and cultural have been impacted by application of metal-based pesticides ‡ 1990 Congress passed Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) requires return of cultural items to lineal descendants and affiliated tribes ‡ Items include human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony ‡ Artifacts cannot be safely used by tribal owners if they are deemed toxic due to presence of metal (i.e. sodium arsenite )

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Figure 2. Native American artifacts found in the museum.

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Due to presence of arsenic, collections have been protected from deterioration but how has this influenced the bacterial communities? Figure 3. Items sampled at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. Figure 4. Bacterial cell and colony morphology.

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Arsenic at DMNS Collection Item Spot 1 Spot 2 Spot 3 Hooded merganser (PB 1119) >2,000 ppb >2,000 ppb >2,000 ppb Buffle head duck (PB3085) 60 ppb 40 ppb 50 ppb Duck (PB 3088) 20 ppb 40 ppb 20 ppb Red Eagle (Z 10569) 150 ppb 125 ppb 150 ppb Gull (Z 21281) 875 ppb 1,000 ppb 875 ppb Gull (Z 22178) 1,000 ppb >2,000 ppb 1,000 ppb Red fox (PB 4275) BDL BDL BDL Coyote hide (PB 5753) BDL BDL BDL Raccoon (DZTM 3101) BDL BDL BDL Beaver (DZTM 3463) BDL BDL BDL Deer (ZM 2401) 100 ppb 100 ppb 100 ppb Howler Monkey (ZM 2479) 50 ppb 50 ppb 80 ppb Table 1. Arsenic concentrations detected across collections and material types at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. BDL = below detectable limit

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Zoology Collection Hide Arsenic Detected No Arsenic Detected

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Zoology feather No arsenic detected Zoology feather Arsenic Detected Education feather Arsenic Detected

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Remediation Series of REDOX and methylation steps. Figure 5. Rhodopseudomonas palustris an organism capable of arsenic volatilization.

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Remediation ‡ 14 days of incubation on a rotary shaker (150 RPM) at 25 P C shows 50-70% removal of arsenic in broth experiments Figure 6. Arsenic removal by R. palustris

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Figure 7. Presence of arsenic marked by tags on museum collections and items marked for repatriation.

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Acknowledgements ‡ NCPTT National Park Service, Grant #P13A900081 ‡ Rich Busch, & Jeff Stephenson, Denver Museum of Nature and Science ‡ Katrina Diener, Genomics Microarray Core, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus ‡ Adrienne Narrowe, Dr. Chris Miller & Joshua Sackett, Data analysis help ‡ Jeffery Boon, Shared Analytical Services Laboratory, CU Denver

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Background Presence of arsenic can be seen on many collections 80% of national history collections in United States and Canada affected by arsenic Widespread, non-discriminate use of chemicals has led to a large-scale public health issue Figure 1. Arsenic powder dispersed between a headdress. (Odegaard 2005)

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Background A wide variety of collections including anthropological and cultural have been impacted by application of metal-based pesticides 1990 Congress passed Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) requires return of cultural items to lineal descendants and affiliated tribes Items include human remains, funerary objects, sacred objects, and objects of cultural patrimony Artifacts cannot be safely used by tribal owners if they are deemed toxic due to presence of metal (i.e. sodium arsenite )

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Arsenic at DMNS Arsenic concentrations detected across collections and material types at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science. BDL = below detectable limit

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Remediation Figure 5. an organism capable of arsenic volatilization.

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Remediation 14 days of incubation on a rotary shaker (150 RPM) at 25C shows 50-70% removal of arsenic in broth experiments Figure 6. Arsenic removal by

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Acknowledgements NCPTT National Park Service, Grant #P13A900081 Rich Busch, & Jeff Stephenson, Denver Museum of Nature and Science Katrina Diener, Genomics Microarray Core, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus Adrienne Narrowe, Dr. Chris Miller & Joshua Sackett, Data analysis help Jeffery Boon, Shared Analytical Services Laboratory, CU Denver