Citation
Congress Park neighborhood plan, 1995

Material Information

Title:
Congress Park neighborhood plan, 1995
Creator:
Department of Public Works, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Congress Park (Denver, Colo.)
Neighborhood plans
Community planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Congress Park

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
L
J
ONGRESS PARK
NEIGHBRRHRRD PLAN
Adopted October 1995


TABLE OF CONTENTS
IIable of contents
Preface
Purpose of the Plan...................................................5
The Planning Process..................................................5
Plan Organization.....................................................8
Acknowledgements (General-see Appendix E for team members)............9
Introduction
Neighborhood Location and Description................................12
Vision Statement.....................................................12
Neighborhood History.................................................12
Demographic/Economic Profile.........................................15
Community Facilities and Services....................................21
Community Outreach
Overview.............................................................25
Goal.................................................................25
Action Recommendations...............................................25
Safety and Crime Prevention
Overview.............................................................29
Goal.................................................................29
Action Recommendations...............................................29
Land Use
Urban Design.........................................................33
Overview.......................................................33
Goals..........................................................33
Action Recommendations.........................................33
Zoning...............................................................37
Overview.......................................................37
Residential Land Uses..........................................37
Special Residential Land Uses..................................38
Commercial Land Uses...........................................38
Hospital Districts.............................................38
Vacant Land....................................................39
Parks and Open Space...........................................39
Schools........................................................39
2


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Goals.................................................................40
Action Reccommendations...............................................40
Traffic and Transportation
Overview..............................................................46
Mass Transit..........................................................46
Bike Routes...........................................................46
Issues................................................................47
Goals.................................................................48
Action Recommendations................................................48
Economic Development
Overview..............................................................57
Issues and Goals......................................................58
Action Recommendations................................................59
Appendices
Neighborhood Survey...................................................66
Aesthetic Guidelines..................................................71
Congress Park Neighbors, Inc..........................................75
Key Regulations of Zone Districts in Congress Park....................76
Acknowledgements......................................................77
Adoption Ordinance....................................................80
3




CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
IIhe purpose of ire plan
The plan serves as an official city guide to the physical development and improvement of the Congress
Park neighborhood. A city approved plan serves as a guide for making decisions about the
neighborhood. It is the responsibility of the neighborhood organization(s) and assigned city staff to
prioritize recommendations as time, energy and resources allow.The plan becomes an official
amendment to the Citys Comprehensive Plan. City departments use the plan to guide recommendations
and decisions based on consensus prioritization.
This plan is not an official zone map nor does it imply or deny any implicit rights to a particular zone.
Zone changes that may be proposed by property owners as part of any plan must be initiated under
separate procedures established by the City and County of Denver Municipal Code.
This plan is intended to promote patterns of desired neighborhood improvements, urban design,
housing, business types, traffic and public services which encourage and contribute to the economic,
social, and physical health, safety and welfare of the people who live and work in Congress Park.
R H E PLANNING PROCESS
The following diagram is an illustration of the plan process.As can be seen, the process is typically
initiated by changing conditions in and around the neighborhood.
In August 1992, Congress Park Neighbors, Inc. requested the assistance of the City in preparing a
neighborhood plan.The request came because of concerns that a number of neighborhood issues were
being addressed independently of each other.These included changes in the nature of the commercial
uses along 12th Avenue, re-use of Stevens School, a shelter for homeless women proposed in the
neighborhood, development pressures created by hospital expansion, and others.The Congress Park
Neighbors board of directors expressed concern that the many changes taking place concurrently
threatened the stability of the neighborhood and could undermine its future identity.The board asked for
help in addressing the interrelated nature of the issues and planning for positive change.
5


PREFACE
Grassroots efforts to organize the neighborhood on a block by block basis were launched by Congress
Park Neighbors in the Fall of 1992.A survey was distributed which asked neighbors to list the top three
things they valued about the neighborhood and the first issues they would like to see addressed. The
survey and its results can be found in Appendix A.
On January 12,1993, a community meeting was held at Teller Elementary School. Congress Park
Neighbors, Inc. leadership and Community Planning and Development Agency staff facilitated the
meeting. Although it was snowing heavily, over 200 neighbors attended. Issues of most concern were
identified and prioritized. A Steering Committee composed of representatives from Congress Park as well
as Capitol Hill United Neighbors, Inc., Denver East Central Civic Association, and Colfax at the Park was
formed. Six issues committees were also organized as follows:
p 1] Crime Prevention;
p 2] Traffic and Transportation;
p 3] Zoning and Development;
p 4) City Services;
p 5] Business and Economic Development; and
p 6] Community Outreach.
Over a period of 3-4 months, issues and concerns were divided into short-term and long-term goals. Short
term goals were identified as those requiring little or no monies from the City, and that could be resolved
in a relatively short period of time. These were also referred to as guerilla tactics. Long-term issues and
concerns were also addressed. Realistic goals and monies were identified for future implementation of
longer-term projects.
On April 21,1993, the Steering Committee met with the Planning Board to present mid-way
accomplishments and to receive feedback from the Board.The Steering Committee then set up a general
assembly with the neighborhood on May 4,1993 to receive feedback on draft ideas.A statement of
existing conditions, issues, and an action plan for each priority issue was developed. From this document,
the Steering Committee generated the narrative which, through many iterations over the course of the
next few months, became the draft Plan. In January 1994, the neighborhood reviewed the draft plan.


Conditions
CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING PROCESS


PREFACE
The Steering Committee met twice a month from February through May 1994 to review and edit the
neighborhood plan. Each chapter was reviewed for content and format. During the summer of 1994, the
Planning Office and other city personnel had the opportunity to review and comment. Comments were
brought back to the Steering Committee for discussion. By Fall 1994, Steering Committee revisions had
been completed and the plan draft was again routed to City Agencies for review, comment and editing.
Any changes to plan recommendations were taken back to the Steering Committee for further discussion
and resolution.
In early 1995, members of the Steering Committee, along with Planning Staff, met with various City agencies
to ensure that the vision and goals for the neighborhood, as defined by the Plan recommendations, would
not be lost in further revisions. By working towards consensus on the specific items contested, the plan
meets this goal. The final draft, completed in April 1995, and presented to the Planning Board and to the
community in May 1995, has had the benefit of countless hours of citizen involvement.
After adoption as an amendment to Denvers Comprehensive Plan, the Congress Park Neighborhood Plan
will not be published only to be shelved as a community planning exercise, ft will be implemented.This will
occur through the short and long-range actions of neighbors, businesses, and the City working jointly to
achieve the stated vision of the neighborhood.
The plan first contains descriptive information on the neighborhood its history, demographics, and
current facilities. Next, issues are discussed in an overview statement, followed by goals to be
achieved and then recommendations of actions to be taken to reach these goals.The action
recommendations are classified by subject category, e.g., Community Outreach Action
Recommendations = CO-1 through CO-10.The action recommendations have been divided into
short term and long term. Short term recommendations can be started immediately with little or no
money. Long term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding.
These action recommendations are accompanied by a vital component, the listing of implementing
groups. It will be these groups who will be the agents of attainment of the neighborhood vision.
ORGANIZATION
8


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
A historically large number of neighbors were involved in the creation of the Congress Park
Neighborhood Plan, as were a number of representatives of the City. Their work is gratefully
acknowledged. Their names appear in Appendix E.


INTRODUCTION
INTRODUCTION
10


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Colfax Ave.
6th Ave.
> Congress Park
n


INTRODUCTION
NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATION AND DESCRIPTION
The Congress Park neighborhood is bounded on the west by York Street, on the north by Colfax
Avenue, on the east by Colorado Boulevard and on the south by Sixth Avenue.
VISION STATEMENT
In a survey of residents and businesses of Congress Park conducted in the Fall of 1992, neighbors
reported that the following characteristics about the neighborhood were valued the most: 1) Location; 2)
Sense of Community; 3) Old Homes 4) Cultural and Economic Diversity; 5) Parks, Mature Trees, Green
Space. From this survey, the vision statement for Congress Park was developed as follows:
Congress Park is a traditional city neighborhood with a small town atmosphere. Here people of
diverse cultures, ages, colors and economic background share a sense of community, value older
homes and mature trees, and enjoy the convenience of city living amid the stability of a thriving
neighborhood.
NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY
Up through the Pikes Peak gold rush of the 1850s, the Congress Park area was Native American land. By
I860, however, the young City of Denver, only two miles to the west, had rapidly grown to a population of
5,000, with six men to every woman.
As the first stagecoaches were arriving in Denver in the late 1850s, William Larimer, one of the citys
founders, sited the park-like Mount Prospect Cemetery on a prominent hill to reinforce the image of
Denver as a refined city. The area the cemetery encompassed evolved over the next 100 years into
present-day Cheesman Park, the Morgan Addition, Denver Botanic Gardens, the Denver Water Board
Reservoirs, and Congress Park, for which the neighborhood is named.
12


HUNT ST.
CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
*-
C0
CO
<
_l o
o s
13th AVENUE
BOWLES AVENUE
8th AVENUE
Historic Map of the Vicinity of
The Denver Botanic Gardens
Drawn by Jullia Andrews-Jones
> Congress Park, Historic Map
13


INTRODUCTION
The coming of the railroad through Denver in 1870 paralleled another sudden surge in growth. Between
1880 and 1890 the citys population boomed from over 35,000 to nearly 107,000.Through the 1880s,
Denvers air was so polluted because of unpaved roads, coal and wood furnaces, smelting and other
industries that wealthy residents looked to the outskirts of Denver, such as Capitol Hill, for cleaner air and
reclaimed mountain views. With the expansion of public transit, including cable cars, to Colfax Avenue in
the late 1880s and early 1890s, the eastern reaches of Capitol Hill became more accessible to the middle
class. Because Colfax was the main route downtown, homes were first built along its corridor to the north
(now City Park South neighborhood) and to the south (now Congress Park neighborhood). Between 1887
and 1888, the neighborhood was completely platted into more than ten subdivisions of various sizes. On
March 11,1889, the area was incorporated into Denver as part of a larger annexation by the city.
> Street Railways, Denver Railway Co.
Many of the neighborhoods historic structures were built in the next decade. Examples are: Stevens
School (built as George W Clayton School in 1900), Fire Station #15 (circa 1903) at the southeast corner of
11th Avenue and Clayton Street (now a private residence) and the Capitol Heights Presbyterian Church,
built at the intersection of 11th Avenue and Fillmore Street in 1911. In 1917, old Gove Elementary, whose
site is now playing fields, tennis courts and a community garden, was one of the Citys first school
conversions from elementary to middle school. During World War I and into the 1920s, the park was the
home of the City Nursery and had the largest VICTORY Garden in the City. A portion of the park was
converted to playing fields during the 1930s through aWPA project which also built the terraced walls
and planted the trees. It was known as Victory Park up until its rededication as Congress Park in 1949. A
landmark to the neighborhood, the 1939 candy-striped smokestack at Signal Hill north of the park was a
primary structure at Denvers emergency alert system facilities which expanded in 1993 to become the
citys Combined Communication Center.
Congress Parks neighborhood commercial centers, always convenient to the neighborhood pedestrian,
have also evolved over the years not only in response to the growth of the neighborhood but also due to
the changes in modes of mass transportation. Horse-drawn streetcars carried downtown commuters along
both Colfax and 12th Avenues in the 1900s.Around street car stops such as 12th and Madison, merchants
small businesses flourished and these centers are still thriving, although the horses have been replaced
over time by trolleys (1920-30), then electric buses (1940s) and todays (starting in 1956) diesel buses.
Congress Parks continued prosperity as a residential neighborhood is tied directly to its ability to maintain
the very factors that created its stable history: a close-in neighborhood of quiet tree-lined streets, parks,
stable housing stock and pedestrian-oriented neighborhood shopping.
14


EMOGRAPHIC/ECONOMIC PROFILE
CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Population and Households
POPULATION*
14.000
12.000
10,000
8,000
6,000
4.000
2.000
0
12,752




Q Q



1960 1970 1980 1990 1996*:
Population figures represent total population for the area, which includes group
quarters (e.g....group homes, adult correctional facilities, communal living).
Source: U.S. Census
** Denver Regional Council of Governments
POPULATION IN GROUP QUARTERS
450
400
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
424-
---287----
wflUdg
1959 1969 1979 1989 1996*
HOUSEHOLDS
I960 1970 1990 1990
Average Household Size
2.64 2.35 1.98 1.89
Housiog Uoits
4,967 6,076 6,071 5,952
Households*
12,328 13,054 10,909 9,500
Household figures do not include group quarters. Based on the figures listed above, population in group quarters decreased between 1959-1979 and increased slightly in 1989.
The average household size has decreased, which is consistent with the downsizing
trend since 1989 for a majority of Denver's neighborhoods.
Source: U.S. Census
** Denver Regional Council of Governments
15


YORK ST.
INTRODUCTION
CENSUS TRACTS
COLFAX AVE.
RENTER/HOMEOWNER/ETHNIC BREAKDOWN BY CENSUS TRACT
The following tables contains information on both single detached housing units and multiple units
(apartments). The housing in Congress Park is stable based on the high levels of occupied units.
Homeowners Ethnic Breakdown by 1990 census Tracts
Census Tract 33 37.02 37.03
All housing units (total) 1,321 2,827 1,804
Occupied housing units 1,279 2,341 1,528
Owner occupied housing units 973 481 447
% of occupied units 96.8% 82.8% 84.7%
White 929 449 410
Black 4 6 7
Hispanic 30 14 21
American Indian, Eskimo/Aleut 2 1 2
Asian or Pacific Islander 8 11 7
16


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Renters Ethnic Breakdown by 1990 census Tracts
Census Tract 33 37.02 37.03
Renter-occupied units 306 1,860 1,081
White 274 1,436 741
Black 19 271 253
Hispanic 13 166 95
American Indian, Eskimo/Aleut. 2 31 12
Asian or Pacific Islander 3 37 30
Source: U. S. Census
In I960, the ratio of owner-occupied housing to renter-occupied housing was about equal. In 1970, the
ratio changed to 63.2% renter-occupied and 32.9% owner-occupied. 1990 statistics illustrate that the ratio
has stayed relatively stable with 55% renter-occupied and 32% owner-occupied. (Note: Does not equal
100%. Vacant units are not part of this percentage calculation).
Income
The Congress Park Neighborhood is made up of census tracts 37.02,37.03 and 33. Census tract 33 is
bounded by 10th Avenue on the North, Colorado Blvd. on the east, York Street on the West and 6th
Avenue on the south. Census tracts 37.02 and 37.03 are bounded by Colfax Avenue on the north, 10th
Avenue on the south, Colorado Blvd. on the east, and York Street on the west, these two census tracts are
divided by Steele Street. Income figures have been adjusted to the 1989 level.
The city of Denvers median household income for 1989 was $25,106.
Census tract areas 37.02 and 37.03 are slightly under Denvers median income, whereas, census tract 33
17


INTRODUCTION
HOUSEHOLD IHCOME BY CEHSUS TRACTS*
1969 1979
Figures adjusted to 1989 level
surpasses Denvers median income by 80%.The figures listed above show a decline in buying power between
1969 and 1989 for all three census tracts, although Census Tract 33 has maintained the most stability.
MEDIAN AGE
by Census Tracts
In 1989 the median age for census tract 33 was 37.7 years; census tract 37.02 was 33.8 years and census
tract 37.03 was 32.9 years. Census tract 37.03 has the youngest median age group.
18


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Employment In the Congress Park Neighborhood By Indostry by census Tract
1983 CENSUS TRACT 33 37.02 37.03
INDUSTRY # % # % # %
Agriculture 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Mining 7 1.6 0 0.0 0 0.0
Contract Construction 5 3.5 46 6.1 4 0.2
Manufacturing 0 0.0 8 1.1 7 0.3
Trans. & Pub. Util. 0 0.0 0 0.0 83 3.9
Wholesale Trade 0 0.0 0 0.0 16 0.7
Retail Trade 37 8.5 240 32.1 225 10.7
Fin., Ins. & Real Est. 5 1.21 8 2.4 40 1.9
Services 58 13.4 190 425.4 1,594 74.3
Government 56 12.9 24 3.2 40 1.9
Fed. Civilian 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
State 0 0.0 0 0.0 8 0.4
Local 56 12.9 24 3.2 32 1.5
Military 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
All Other* 256 59.0 221 29.5 135 6.3
TOTAL 434 100.0 748 100.0 2,144 100.0
* Includes self-employed, unpaid family, and domestic workers. Percentages may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
19


INTRODUCTION
Employment In the Congress Park Neighborhood By Industry by Census Tract
1988 CENSUS TRACT 33 37.02 37.03
INDUSTRY # % # % # %
Agriculture 0 0.0 5 0.6 0 0.0
Mining 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
Contract Construction 32 5.3 12 1.3 13 0.9
Manufacturing 7 1.2 57 6.4 23 1.5
Trans. & Pub. Util. 17 2.8 17 1.9 0 0.0
Wholesale Trade 0 0.0 16 1.8 13 0.9
Retail Trade 103 17.1 230 25.7 89 5.8
Fin., Ins. & Real Est. 35 5.8 63 7.0 74 4.9
Services 95 15.8 251 28.0 1,086 71.3
Government 48 8.0 26 2.9 94 6.2
Fed. Civilian 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
State 0 0.0 0 0.0 9 0.6
Local 48 8.0 26 2.9 85 5.6
Military 0 0.0 0 0.0 0 0.0
All Other* 266 44.1 218 24.4 132 8.7
TOTAL 603 100.0 895 100.0 1,524 100.0
* Includes self-employed, unpaid family, and domestic workers. Percentages may not sum to 100% due to rounding.
B-3 c Community Facilities.
20


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Community facilities and services
p Parks, Recreation, and Open Space
Congress Park is located at 8thAvenue and Josephine Street.The total acreage is 17.10 and the park
contains seven tennis courts, a swimming pool, ball fields, soccer fields, sheltered picnic area and a
newly constructed childrens playground. Immediately to the north are play fields located on top of
a Denver Water Department Reservoir. These fields are generally only available to organized sports
such as youth soccer.
The Botanic Gardens and Cheesman Park across York Street offer additional open space for the
neighborhood. Other parks outside of the neighborhood that are used by the residents are City Park,
Lindsley Park and Bromwell Park.
p Fire Protection
Fire Station No. 15 is located at 1375 Harrison Street.This new facility was constructed in 1987 and
replaced the old fire house at 1080 Clayton.
p Poblic Schools
Teller Elementary School at 1150 Garfield Street is the only remaining public school in the
neighborhood. The school was built in 1950 with a total land area of 2.58 acres.
Stevens Elementary School located at 1140 Columbine was closed in the fall of 1992. In 1993 Denver
Public Schools sold the property to a private developer for condominium housing.
Gove Middle School located at 1325 Colorado Boulevard just outside the neighborhoods boundaries was
opened in 1976.The old school building (on the west side of Colorado Blvd) was razed and tennis courts
built on the site.The original property is accessible to Gove Middle School by way of an overpass across
Colorado Boulevard. Denver Public Schools has considered the possibility of selling the old school site.
Bromwell Elementary School, Steck Elementary School, and East High School are also located outside of
the Congress Park neighborhood boundaries and have students who walk to the school from the
Congress Park Neighborhood.
21


INTRODUCTION
h Library
The closest libraries to the neighborhood are the Main Library at 1357 Broadway, Ross-Cherry Creek, a
branch library at 305 Milwaukee, and Park Hill Branch at Montview and Dexter Street.
Police
Congress Park is served by Police District Station #3 located at 1625 S. University Boulevard.The Congress
Park Neighborhood was ranked 30th of the 68 neighborhoods in the 1992 Neighborhood Crime
Rankings for total offenses by crime rate. In 1994, the ranking had improved to 41st of 72 neighborhoods,
illustrating how the Congress Park neighborhood is showing a major improvement in safety for its
residences and businesses.
hMedical Care
The National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine (National Jewish Center) is
located within the boundaries of Congress Park.The location is bordered by Colfax on the north,
Colorado Blvd. on the east, 14th Avenue on the south and Garfield on the west.
The University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, University Hospital, Rose Medical Center, and the
Veterans Administration Medical Center Denver are located in the Hale Neighborhood across Colorado
Blvd., primarily between 8th and 11th Avenues.
> Good Shepard Catholic Chorch
h Churches
Congress Park maintains its diversity in the provision of religious facilities. Examples include: Eastside
Christian Church at 131 Adams Street, Capitol Heights Presbyterian Church at 1100 Fillmore Street, the
Buddhist Temple at 12th and Clayton Street, Sixth Avenue United Church (UCC) at 3250 E. 6th Avenue
and Good Shepard Catholic Church at 2626 E. 7th Avenue Parkway.
h Trash Pickup
The City and County of Denver provides trash pick-up once a week for single family residences
thoughout the Congress Park Neighborhood.
h Alley and Street Cleaning
Between the months of April and November the city sweeps the streets once a month. Residents are
required to move their automobiles from the street in front of their residence or get ticketed. Due to the
22


CONGRESS PARK NE IGHBORHOOD PLAN
high volumes of traffic, Colorado Boulevard is swept at night, between midnight and 7 a.m. Alleys are swept during the summer between May and October, once a month. Animal Control The Zoning Department is responsible for enforcing the Citys ordinance for regulating the number of animals per household. Up to three dogs and five cats are permitted, but the number cannot exceed a total of five animals.The Office of Animal Control for the City and County of Denver located at 660 S. Jason Street is responsible for enforcing the leash law, which requires owners to leash their dog.Another vital ordinance to the neighborhood is one which requires animal owners walking their pets to remove animal wastes from others properties, at the time of deposit. Snow Removal Residents and property owners are responsible for removing snow from sidewalks adjacent to their property within 24 hours of each snow fall. During snow falls, the City plows and applies salt and sand to the following avenues and streets: 6th, 8th, 12th, 13th, 14th, Colfax,York, Josephine and Colorado Boulevard.
23


COMMUNITY OUTREACH
COMMUNITY OUTREACH
24


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
> Overview
Congress Park is a neighborhood within a city of nearly 500,000 people and a metropolitan area of over
2 million. Many of its residents leave the neighborhood daily for work, entertainment, shopping, and a
broad range of other activities.
The neighborhood also experiences the common phenomenon of changing population, where
individuals and families move often to follow jobs or to meet changing housing desires.
This transience, in both the daily mobility and the rapid turnover of the population, challenges the
neighborhoods ability to nurture a sense of community among its residents.
> Goal
To create and nurture a small town atmosphere in Congress Park and instill community pride in the
neighborhood; to educate and inform neighbors about issues of common concern.
o Action Recommendations
In order to accomplish this goal, the following action recommendations were developed. The
recommendations have been divided into short term and long term. Short term recommendations can
be started immediately with little or no money. Long term recommendations will take longer to
accomplish and will require funding.
CO-1 Establish a standing community outreach committee within the neighborhood organization to
collect and disseminate information in areas such as meeting information, city, business and
private sector plans, public and private schools and people with special needs and other issues
that impact the day to day lives in Congress Park.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
CO-2 Sponsor annual events (e.g. ice cream social, childrens art show, parade, cultural, sporting, other
excursions) that will involve a cross-section of the neighborhood.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
25


COMMUNITY OUTREACH
CD-7
CO-8
Compile a calendar of events relevant to the neighborhood for publication in the neighborhood
newsletter.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
Continue to produce and distribute a quarterly newsletter by and for all residents and
businesses.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
Contact new members of Congress Park Neighbors each month to encourage their participation
and increased activity in the neighborhood organization and its activities.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
Produce and distribute a neighborhood resource directory to all residents and businesses.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
Produce and distribute a Welcome Package for new residents moving into the neighborhood.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
Install and manage information kiosk and community information bulletin boards at high
pedestrian traffic areas.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
26


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
CO-9 Preserve and encourage gathering places, physical amenities and programs within the
neighborhood that foster neighborhood communication.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations,
Community Planning and Development Agency
Short Term
CO-ID Study the feasibility of developing a community center in the neighborhood.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations,
Community Planning and Development Agency
Long Term
27


SAFETY AND CRIME PREVENTION
SAFETY & GRIME PREVENTION
28


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
> Overview
In the 1992 survey*, crime prevention was identified as the number one priority of area residents.As in
most city neighborhoods, areas with higher population density have a higher incidence of crime.
Residents and businesses must, in some instances, contend with the impacts of such problems as: high
crime rate apartment buildings; prostitution; drug-related crimes; and gang presence and disturbances.
Burglary and auto-related crimes are the most frequently reported and this is the fastest increasing
reporting category, according to police department statistics.
Congress Park struggles with graffiti, insufficient mid-block street lighting, unreported crimes and a
general lack of awareness and, more importantly, a lack of interest/involvement by some property
owners and managers, most especially, absentee owners and managers.
*Survey results can be found in Appendix A.
> Goal
To reduce crime and make the neighborhood a safer place to live.
0 Action Recommendations
The action recommendations have been divided into short term and long term. Short term
recommendations can be started immediately with little or no money. Long term recommendations will
take longer to accomplish and will require funding.
Implementation efforts to achieve this purpose include, but are not limited to the following:
SCP-1 Encourage the city to implement stronger neighborhood -based policing, in which each officer
covers a smaller area, and gets more intimately involved with the areas problems.
Implementing groups: Denver Police Department
Short Term
SCP-2 Encourage the city to develop and implement more resources to help neighborhoods
fight crime.
Implementing groups: Denver Police Department
Short Term
29


SAFETY AND CRIME PREVENTION
SCP-3 Establish a volunteer committee to deal with crime and safety issues. Such a committee is
needed to keep residents informed about serious crime problems, and to perform many
constructive tasks.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
) Achieve 100% participation of all blocks in the Neighborhood Watch Program.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
P Hold regular open meetings to: 1) provide neighbors with a forum to bring forth problems and
discuss tactics, and 2) inform and educate residents on crime issues.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
P Network with city, police officials and other neighborhood groups to learn about current
resources available to residents, and to lobby the city for support deemed appropriate.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
P Identify and inventory the problem areas, such as apartment buildings with frequent reports of
crimes.Work with owners, managers, police and other city agencies to deal with such concerns.
Encourage 100% participation by all apartment managers in Police Department Management
Training Program
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
I Provide the neighborhood with current crime statistics.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations,
Denver Police Department
Short Term
30


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I Develop effective programs to prevent and to remove graffiti.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Long Term
I Develop effective communication with all businesses in Congress Park regarding crime and
safety issues.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations,
Neighborhood Business Organizations
Short Term
I Act as an advocate for Congress Park in dealing with the city on crime and safety issues.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
I Encourage the installation of mid-block street and alley lights
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations,
Department of Public Works
Short Term
31


LAND USE
LAND USE
32


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
URBAN DESIGN
> Overview
The Congress Park neighborhood is fully developed. As changes occur, it is important that these changes
remain consistent and complementary with the existing neighborhood character.
Congress Parks residential qualities and sense of community are expressed by the neighborhood street
image.The older homes, the diversity of housing stock and apartment types, the neighborhood
commercial services, mature street trees, sidewalks, and front porch detailing all contribute to the
communitys unique character and pedestrian friendly atmosphere that the residents value.
> Goals
0 Promote and enhance the existing neighborhood character and preserve the historic sense of
the community for future generations to enjoy.
> A Landscaped Median nn
Seventh Avenue Parkway
h Preserve and maintain a high standard for parks, open space, boulevards, parkways,
streetscaping, traffic circulation, special improvement and historic districts within its boundaries
as they pertain to the neighborhoods urban design.
h Preserve and enhance the pedestrian friendly atmosphere.
h Development should enhance the fabric of the neighborhood. Large scale development that
could harm the residential, historic character of the community shall be discouraged.
h Action Recommendations
The action recommendations that follow this section make reference to Aesthetic Guidelines.The
guidelines are provided as recommendations to property owners to serve as a tool in maintaining the
existing neighborhood character.They are not proposed as an overlay district, nor as a covenant, nor to
replace existing zoning laws. Recommendations have been divided into short term and long term. Short
term recommendations can be started immediately with little or no money. Long term recommendations
will take longer to accomplish and will require funding.
33


L A N
> Pedestrian-Friendly Streetscape Cnmplements
the Histnric Besidential Neighbnrhnnd
U S E
UD-1 Implement the Aesthetic Guidelines as outlined in Appendix B.The committee tasks shall include:
h Application of guidelines as building changes occur, through the variance, zone change, and
permitting processes.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
h Provide technical assistance upon request to property owners or developers during the design
phase of their projects (e.g. an aesthetics checklist of design considerations, a forum for feedback
early in the Planning process).
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
h Develop and apply a neighborhood process for continuous review of parks and open space,
boulevards and parkways, streetscaping, traffic circulation, special improvement and historic
districts within its boundaries (e.g. historic preservation, commercial districts, and hospital
districts) as they pertain to the neighborhoods urban design.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations,
Parks and Recreation Department,
Community Planning and Development Agency
Short Term
h All garage access and parking areas should be limited to alley access only. To preserve the
pedestrian friendly concept of the neighborhood the blocks should not be cut up with access
drives. All parking areas should be screened from street view with a combination of transparent
fencing and landscaping. Large pen parking areas should be discouraged and should be designed
to minimize the visual impact and to define the existing street lines as to not create a void in the
street imagery.
Implementing groups: Community Planning and Development Agency,
Department of Public Works, Traffic and Transportation Division
Short Term
34


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
UD-2 Create and reinforce buffers along the neighborhood borders and between res:
commercial areas. Specifically:
Community Planning and Development Agency,
Department of Public Works, Traffic and Transportation Division
Long Term
I Encourage landscaped visual buffers of parking areas within the neighborhood
Community Planning and Development Agency,
Department of Public Works, Traffic and Transportation Division
Long Term
I Support the creation of cul-de-sac parking on Colfax (see graphic).
Community Planning and Development Agency,
Department of Public Works, Traffic and Transportation Division
Long Term
IID-3 Special districtsdevelop designated areas within or adjacent to areas that need special
design consideration.
Community Planning and Development Agency, Neighborhood Organizations
Long Term
I 12th Avenue Business District: The enhancement of the street imagery and making this area a
pedestrian destination should be a high priority. Through specific street landscaping, furnishings,
lighting, and brick paved intersections, we can create two individual pockets of pedestrian
activity as well as cut down on 12th Avenue through traffic. Specific design guidelines should be
provided to create a high degree of visual interest, pleasing scale, and inviting spaces. Storefronts
and signs should be subordinate to and integrated with each building facade and choice of
materials and detailing should be compatible with the adjacent structures.
Community Planning and Development Agency,
Department of Public Works, Traffic and Transportation Division
Neighborhood Business Organizations, Neighborhood Organizations
Long Term
idential and
Colfax Ave.
35


LAND USE
> East Colfax Avenue
A Colfax Commercial District: The entire Colfax strip should be reviewed as a separate study to
ultimately provide design guidelines for this district. However, we must address the issue of
commercial/residential buffers.We fully endorse the concept of converting every other side street
into a cul-de-sac to the residential side and to additional parking to the commercial side, with
provisions to allow access to emergency vehicles. This transition should take place at he zone line
and should be heavily landscaped to provide a visual barrier to the commercial street beyond.
Zoning Administration,
Neighborhood Organizations
Long Term
A Colorado Boulevard Commercial District:The entire Colorado Boulevard area should be reviewed
as a separate study to ultimately provide design guidelines for this district. This study should not
only address the boulevard frontage and its mixture of higher density residential and commercial
but should also address the transition to the adjacent lower density residential area.
Zoning Administration,
Neighborhood Organizations
Long Term
A Hospital District: New structures should respect their old neighbors in terms of materials, scale,
proportions, and detailing. Care should be taken to create structures that are pedestrian friendly.
Through the use of landscaping, and attention to scale and structural detail at the pedestrian
level, there should be created a sense of comfort, to reduce the impact of the large scale of the
overall structure.
Zoning Administration,
Neighborhood Organizations
Long Term
UD-4 Remove all billboards and discourage any new billboard sites in the neighborhood (includes both
sides of Colfax Avenue).
Community Planning and Development Agency, Zoning Administration
Long Term
36


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Zoning
Overview
The neighborhood is predominantly residential with commercial uses along Colfax Avenue, Colorado
Boulevard, and two commercial nodes along 12th Avenue.The largest land use is residential.The second
largest land use is parks and open space (Congress Park and 7th Avenue Parkway), followed by
commercial land uses.
The zone districts specifically applicable to Congress Park are R-0, R-l, R-2, R-3, B-l, B-2, and B-A-3, H-l-A,
H-2,0-1, and P-1 and are shown on the attached map following this chapter.Their general purposes,
descriptions and key regulations are provided in Appendix E.
> Residential Land Uses
The Congress Park neighborhood has a total land area of 660 acres: 88% is zoned for residential (47% for
single-family, 41% for multi-family).
The R-0 zone south of 10th Avenue, which continues to Sixth Avenue, is a stable residential area.The
residents in 1968 initiated a rezoning which resulted in a change from R-l to the present zone.
The low density residential area zoned R-l, to the south of 11th Avenue, has a number of legal non-
conforming duplexes that were in existence prior to 1925 when zoning was instituted in the City.
The medium density residential area, zoned R-2, has developed almost identically to the R-l zone.The
number of single family units to multi-family units in the R-2 zone is 55% to 45%.Any action to decrease
density by changing the zone district to a lower density designation could lead to a number of non-
conforming uses.
The higher density residential area, zoned R-3, a high-rise apartment zone between 13th and Colfax Avenue, is
underdeveloped by definition. Single-family units and duplexes predominate here as well. In 1992, the City
and County of Denver instituted the H-l-A and H-2 Hospital District Zones, taking hospitals from the R-3
zone districts as a use by right. Due to the subsequent zone changes for National Jewish Center, the
percentage of multi-unit residential zoning in the neighborhood has been reduced by 13 acres or 3%.
In I960, the ratio of owner-occupied housing and renter-occupied housing was about equal. In 1970, the
37


LAND USE
JLl^c^UWUUUUUUUUUU
P Group Home Locatioos
ratio changed to 63.2% renter-occupied and 32.9% owner-occupied. 1990 statistics illustrate that the ratio has
stayed relatively stable with 55% renter-occupied and 32% owner-occupied. (Note: Does not equal 100% ,
vacant units are not part of this percentage calculation).
In short, Congress Park has developed a housing density mix that accommodates a variety of lifestyles and
displays a diverse urban landscape.
p Special Residential Land Uses
The neighborhood presently accommodates six group homes, one adult correctional facility and one
special care home within its boundaries.These facilities are presently located in the higher-density area,
or R-3 zone, of the neighborhood. A recent city ordinance now limits, in an area, the location of these
facilities, based on their proximity to each other.
p Commercial Land Uses
Commercial uses zoned B-4 are concentrated along the East Colfax Avenue corridor, along with two
areas of B-A-3 that have remained stable over the years.Two smaller nodes of commercial uses, zoned
B-l and B-2, are located at 12th Avenue and Clayton, and 12th Avenue and Madison. Colorado
Boulevard, 8th Avenue and 6th Avenue (zoned B-2), along with the two nodes mentioned above on
12th Avenue, have businesses which provide services to the surrounding neighborhood. Madison
Square (12th and Madison) has some vacancies and some businesses for the larger community (eye
bank, metal plating). For the purpose of this plan, both sides of East Colfax and 6th Avenues have been
included in the narrative.
p Hospital Uistricts
National Jewish Center occupies approximately two blocks in the northeast corner of the neighborhood.
A portion of the hospital campus is also located on the east side of Colorado Boulevard in the Hale
neighborhood.Although not in the Congress Park neighborhood, University Hospital and University of
Colorado Health Sciences Center (UCHSC) border on the east. UCHSC also utilizes one block in the
neighborhood zoned R-l/R-3 for a parking lot and offices.
38


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
> Vacant Land
There are approximately three acres of vacant land.The former Golden Ox restaurant, at one time a
prominent Colfax Avenue landmark for Denver residents, has been demolished. Between 14th and Colfax
on Steele Street in the R-3 zoned area are three to four parcels of land that are also vacant.
Parks and Open Space
Congress Park is located at 8thAvenue and Josephine Street.The total acreage is 17.10 and the area is
zoned 0-1. It contains tennis courts, a playground, an outdoor swimming pool area, playing fields,
picnic shelters, and a restroom. Additionally, there is the grassed-over area covering two of the Capitol
Heights reservoirs for use as playing fields for team sports.This area offers three more acres of active
recreational space.
Seventh Avenue Parkway provides additional green space and is frequently used for jogging and walking
by the residents of Congress Park.
Tennis courts, Gove Middle School playfields and a Community Garden located between 13th and 14th
Avenue on Harrison on DPS property (formerly the location of the school), also serve as open space for
the neighborhood.
The Denver Botanic Gardens at 10th Avenue and York Street and Cheesman Park directly east offer
additional recreational and other open space for the neighborhood. Other parks outside of the
neighborhood used by the residents are City Park (north of 17th Avenue, between Colorado Boulevard
and York Street), Lindsley Park (11th Avenue and Dahlia Street), and Bromwell Park (4th Avenue and
Josephine Street).
> Schools
Teller Elementary School at 1150 Garfield and Good Shepherd Catholic Elementary at 940 Fillmore and
Good Shepherd Catholic Middle School at 620 Elizabeth are located within the Congress Park
neighborhood boundaries.
39


LAND USE
> Goals
0 To maintain the existing integrity of the residential character of Congress Park.
A To oppose hospital expansion outside the areas currently zoned for hospital uses west of
Colorado Boulevard.
0 To maintain the small scale residential character of the 12th Avenue business areas and foster the
development of a Main Street type imagery.
A To preserve the existing parks and open space that are available to the neighborhood.
A To minimize the visual impact of commercial structures to their adjacent residential neighbors.
A Preserve the areas of historical significance through historic districts or historic landmark
designation.
A To maintain and enhance the viability of high density residential and commercial land uses on
Colorado Boulevard.
Action Recommendations
The action recommendations have been divided into short term and long term. Short term
recommendations can be started immediately with little or no money. Long term recommendations will
take longer to accomplish and will require funding.
ZG-1 Encourage the city-wide dispersal of group homes.
Implementing groups: Zoning Administration,
Denver Comprehensive Plan,
Community Planning and Development Agency
Short Term
40


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
ZG-2 Contain all hospital development and related uses to and within currently zoned hospital
districts only. Oppose additional hospital zoning and related uses including parking in adjacent
residential areas. Eliminate noncomforming hospital and parking uses.
Implementing groups: Hospitals,
Neighborhood Organizations,
Parking Management,
Community Planning and Development Agency
Short Term
ZG-3 Discourage any expansion or new construction of any non-park related facilities on existing
park land.
Implementing groups: Department of Parks and Recreation,
Neighborhood Organizations,
Parking Management,
Community Planning and Development Agency
Short Term
ZG-4 Preserve mountain view from Congress Park by moving the point of origin to the top of the
Congress Park reservoir.
Implementing groups: Community Planning and Development Agency
Short Term
ZG-5 Establish a standing neighborhood zoning committee to monitor, review and recommend use
permits within the neighborhood.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
41


LAND USE
> Zoning Map of Congross Park
42
Colorado Blvd.


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
ZG-6 Initiate zoning amendments and policies to protect the single family residential character within
Congress Park. Specifically:
I Identify and extend R-2 zoning to those areas zoned R-3, but currently meeting R-2 criteria.
Zoning A dministration,
Community Planning and Development Agency,
Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
I Strongly oppose additional commercial and institutional zoning by other than the PUD process.
Zoning A dministration,
Community Planning and Development Agency,
Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
I Discourage zone changes that would result in higher residential densities by other than the
PUD process.
Zoning A dministration,
Community Planning and Development Agency,
Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
43


TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATION
TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATION
44


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
ARTERIAL
------- COLLECTOR
LOCAL
-------BIKE ROUTE
> Street Usage
45


TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATION
Overview
The Congress Park Neighborhood is a community that has several modes of transportation at its disposal.
The primary mode of transportation is the automobile.There are three designations used by the City in
classifying streets: arterial, collectors, and local streets.
0 Arterial streets have the function of permitting rapid and relatively unimpeded traffic movement
through the city and serving as a primary link between communities and major land use
elements. A number of major arterial are designed as state highways. Arterial typically carry up to
50,000 vehicles per day. Colorado Boulevard carries between 53,000 63,200 vehicles per day.
0 Collector streets have the function of collecting and distributing traffic having an origin or
destination between arterial and local streets within the community, and linking neighborhood
residential areas, shopping and service facilities, and employment areas. Collectors typically carry
up to 15,000 vehicles per day (i.e,..12thAvenue and 7thAvenue Parkway).
0 Local streets have the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties.They carry low
volumes of traffic (less than 5000 vehicles per day) with an origin or destination within the
neighborhood.
Mass Transit
Congress Park is served by several Regional Transportation District Routes. Routes (6) East 6th
Avenue/North Pecos, (10) East 10th Avenue runs along 12th Avenue, (15)(15 Ltd) East Colfax and East
Colfax limited, (24) University Crosstown and (40) Colorado Boulevard Crosstown.These routes provide
for adequate neighborhood geographic coverage based on walking distance to bus stops.
Bike Routes
Congress Park neighborhood is served by the city-wide bikeway system.The present bike routes
east/west are 7th Avenue Parkway and 12th Avenue; routes north/south are Steele/St. Paul Street from 7th
Avenue Parkway to City Park. Columbine Street and Elizabeth Street also connect 12th Avenue to City
Park and to downtown Denver (west along 16th Avenue).
46


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
> Issues
The Traffic and Transportation category was selected as focus issue #2 by the neighborhood survey
conducted at the beginning of the planning process.The neighborhood is experiencing increased traffic
through the neighborhood. Based on available traffic counts, the residential one-way arterial streets carry
in excess of 100,000 vehicles per day; maximum volumes are: 6thAvenue (21,400); 8th Avenue (16,300);
l4thAvenue (17,200); York Street (15,100): and Josephine Street (15,900).This has created a number of
issues, including:
) Motorists diverting from arterial streets via collector and local streets through the
neighborhood to get to their destinations across town.
) Off-street parking continues to be a major problem due to large volumes of traffic and
inadequate off-street parking at the hospitals, the Colfax and Colorado Boulevard corridor
businesses and the Botanic Gardens.
) Motorists, bus drivers and other commercial drivers do not comply with speed limits
) Properties and residences along arterial and collectors have experienced traffic related vibration
and noise problems as well as pollution due to street sanding/sweeping practices.
) There is not consideration apparent for the residents directly adjacent to the arterial when
scheduling repair, construction and maintenance operations in pre-dawn hours.
) The one-way streets function as a chute through the neighborhood, making 6th, 8th, 13th, 14th,
Josephine and York dangerous crossing for pedestrians and bicyclists.
I 13th and 14th Avenues have poor visibility for the motorist and need major aesthetic
improvement.
An imbalance exists between the need to maintain and improve the residential integrity of the one-way
streets versus the accommodation of an ever-increasing level of traffic.
47


TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATION
> Goals
A Mitigate impact to adjacent land uses and development from neighborhood traffic and reduce
through traffic.
A Reduce speeding traffic through the neighborhood to a level consistent with posted speed limits
and compatible with the neighborhoods land uses to preserve the residential quality of life.
A Provide an increase in alternative modes of transportation, other than the automobile, by
encouraging bus, bicycle and pedestrian travel.
A Discourage non-resident on street parking on local streets throughout the neighborhood,
especially near adjacent hospitals and Botanic Gardens.
A Protect and maintain the quality of life enjoyed by residents of Congress Park, especially those on
arterial and collector streets, by enforcing speed limits, improving road conditions, addressing
aesthetic issues and the appropriate timing of maintenance and repair operations.
> Action Recommendations
The action recommendations have been divided into short term and long term. Short term
recommendations can be started immediately with little or no money. Long term recommendations will
take longer to accomplish and will require funding.
TT-1 Enforce existing parking limits throughout the neighborhood. Work with Police and Parking
Management for better service.
Implementing groups: Parking Management,
Neighborhood Organizations,
Police Department
Short Term
48


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
TT-2 Enforce speed limits with particular emphasis on all one-way and collector streets.
Implementing groups: Police Department
Short Term
TT-3 Improve street surfaces and/or reconstruct streets to adequately support traffic weight and
volumes and enhance maintenance/sanding/sweeping practices.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works,
Street Maintenance and Traffic and Transportation Divisions
Long Term
TT-4 Enhance the use of alternative modes (walking, bicycling, and transit) through the following: the
improvement of landscaping along arterial/collector street rights-of-way, the installation of city
standard bicycle racks in neighborhood commercial areas, the construction of city standard
sidewalks along arterial/collector streets (with pedestrian ramps at intersections), the provision
of shelters, benches or hard surface waiting areas at bus stops.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Transportation Division
Long Term
TT-5 Evaluate existing traffic signage, signal timing and related traffic controls to discourage cut-
through traffic on local streets.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Transportation Division
Long Term
TT-B To enhance the residential and pedestrian environment, where appropriate consider physically
or visually narrowing local and collector streets, and install additional stop signs.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Transportation Division
Long Term
49


TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATION
TT-7 Stripe crosswalks at all 4-way stops within the neighborhood.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works,
Transportation Division and Street Maintenance Division
Long Term
TT-B In addition to the actions specified above, implement street-by-street recommendations as follows:
I Sixth Avenue Assess the adequacy of pedestrian crossing accommodations (safety and
convenience) throughout the corridor, with particular attention on activity around the school,
churches and neighborhood commercial areas located along the street. Evaluate the left turn
arrow from Sixth Avenue eastbound to Colorado Boulevard northbound to eliminate bottleneck,
consider a second left turn lane. Maintain as one-way.
I SeventhAvenue Install bike path signs. Construct gateway to Seventh Avenue westbound at
Colorado Boulevard. Investigate timing of light for Colorado Boulevard northbound turning to
Eighth Avenue westbound to discourage alternate turn patterns from Colorado Boulevard
northbound to SeventhAvenue westbound.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Transportation Division
Long Term
I Eight Avenue In order to enhance the residential character for adjacent homes, provide a
buffer from moving traffic lanes adjacent to Congress Park ballfields, and to shorten crossing
width for pedestrians, consider establishment of a full time parking lane along with two travel
lanes, similar to 13th Avenue. Construct sidewalk along Congress Park, adjacent to 8th Avenue.
Replace mid-block signal which has been removed between Colorado Boulevard and Steele
Street to provide more gaps for pedestrians. Implement more effective speed limit enforcement.
Streetscape public right-of-way. Maintain as one-way.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Transportation Division,
Police Department,
Community Planning and Development Agency
Long Term
50


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I Twelfth Avenue In order to improve safety and delineate pedestrian activity areas associated
with neighborhood business/shopping nodes, install Away stops and stripe crosswalks at
Twelfth and Madison, and Twelfth and Clayton. Add Away stop at Twelfth and Jackson adjacent
to Teller School at the striped crosswalk (see graphic). Reduce speed limit to 25 m.p.h. and
enforce. Improve street construction and maintenance to mitigate noise and vibration from
traffic.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Transportation Division,
Community Planning and Development Agency
Long Term
) Thirteenth Avenue End parking lanes farther back from intersections with local streets. Fix
curbs and gutters and install handicapped access ramps. Streetscape public right-of-way.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Transportation Division,
Planning and Development Office
Long Term
I Fourteenth Avenue Enforce speed limits. Streetscape public right-of-way.
Implementing groups: Police Department
Community Planning and Development Agency,
Long Term
51


TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATION
I Colfax Avenue Install street lamps, streetscape public right-of-way. Design and implement cul-de-
sac parking as illustrated in the economic development section. Explore the concept of a
designated area parking lot to cut down side-street parking and congestion.
Implementing groups: Community Planning and Development Agency
Department of Public Works, Transportation Division
Long Term
I Colorado Boulevard Establish liaison with hospitals to increase awareness of neighborhood
traffic and parking concerns, and encourage them to inform their employees and clientele and to
solicit cooperation.
Implementing groups: Hospital Representatives,
Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
I In order to enhance pedestrian safety and use, reconstruct sidewalks to minimum City
standards; improve cross-walk signage and markings, and maintain all improvements.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Transportation Division
Street Maintenance Division
Short Term
I Repair streets to reduce noise and vibration from traffic. Insure that arterial street repair and
maintenance occurs at an hour which accommodates the residents adjacent to the street
rather than accommodating traffic.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Street Maintenance Division
Short Term
52


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I Enforce speed limits. Study signal timing, lane channelization, and other traffic flow
modifications to discourage traffic short cuts through the neighborhood. Study traffic
movement on north/south arterial for smoothest flow alternatives.
Implementing groups: Police Department,
Department of Public Works, Transportation Division
Short Term
I Research, design and construct locations for bus pull-out pads to improve the flow of
through traffic on Colorado Blvd. (e.g.: between 13th and 14th Avenues- southbound;
between 9th and llthAvenues-northbound).
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Transportation Division,
Regional Transportation District
Long Term
l Josephine/York- Establish liaison with Botanic Gardens to increase awareness of neighborhood
traffic and parking concerns, and encourage them to inform their employees and clientele and
to solicit cooperation.
Implementing groups: Botanic Gardens Representatives,
Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
I Encourage pedestrian traffic through improvements to sidewalks, crosswalks and
maintenance of said improvements.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Transportation Division
Property/Business Owners
Long Term
53


TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATION
I Repair streets to reduce noise and vibration from traffic. Insure that arterial street repair and
maintenance occurs at an hour which accommodates the residents adjacent to the street
rather than accommodating traffic.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Street Maintenance Division
Short Term
I Enforce speed limits. Discourage cutting through the neighborhood. Study signal timing and
traffic flow modifications to help insure compliance with posted speed limits, improve
pedestrian safety and discourage short-cutting through the neighborhood. Study traffic
movement on north/south arterial for smoothest flow alternatives.
Implementing groups: Police Department,
Department of Public Works, Transportation Division
Short Term (enforcement)
Long Term
54


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
55


6th Ave.
Ul
o>
n
o
z
o
7 r
O
o
m
<
m
o
Q
N/vwauHataai


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
> Overview
Commercial uses comprise 2.7% of the area of Congress Park Neighborhood.This plan groups the
commercial areas into nodes and corridors for clarity of definition.Although not a part of Congress Park
Neighborhood, and not included in the 2.7% figure above, the north side of East Colfax Avenue between
York Street and Colorado Boulevard is included in its narrative and recommendations.
I Colfax Avenue Business Corridor (Sub-area 1)
Sub-area 1 is comprised of the East Colfax corridor from York Street to Colorado Boulevard.
Colfax Avenue is in many ways the Main Street of not only the neighborhood but also of
Denvers metropolitan region with more than 2 million people. Stretching from the foothills of
Golden to the high plains of Adams and Arapahoe County on the east, Colfax Avenue is the
longest commercial street in North America. It is also U.S. Route 40, which was the principle highway
link between Denver and Kansas City until the construction of Interstate Highway 70. From east to west,
Colfax Avenue functions as a type of linear mall for shopping and services.
Merchants and residents along the Colfax Corridor struggle with a negative image caused by the
generally-held, largely false perception that the area is one of prostitution and high crime. Denver,
Lakewood, and Aurora are continuing efforts to make Colfax a safe and attractive place through law
enforcement, streetscape beautification projects, economic development strategies, and a new Life
Begins on U.S. 40 promotional campaign.
The Avenue is lined with many established businesses and institutions such as Collins Bicycles,
Goodfriends Restaurant, Rosen-Novak Ford and National Jewish Center which serve people from the
entire Metropolitan area. Reasonable rental rates and land prices have also made this business district an
attractive location for new businesses.
I Colfax Avenue Greek Town (Sub-area la)
Located along both sides of Colfax between Elizabeth Street and St. Paul Street is an area identified by its
many Greek restaurants and bakeries. GreekTown recently received recognition by Denvers City
Council through a resolution acknowledging the naming of the area.
57


ro
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
I Colorado Boulevard Business Corridor (Sub-area 2)
This is a small business area along the west side of Colorado Boulevard between 7th Avenue and 9th
Avenue which serves not only the neighborhood but the Hospital District as well.This area is zoned for
business use B-2 and high density residential R-3 and abuts a lower density residential R-2 and R-l zone.
I 12th Avenue Shopping Nodes (Sub-area 3)
Two neighborhood shopping nodes located along 12th Avenuethe first between Clayton and Elizabeth
and the second between Monroe Street and Cook Streetare comprised of businesses which, generally,
serve the neighborhood. Established businesses such as 12th Avenue Ace Hardware and Pantry Thriftway
are in the first node while Capitol Heights Pharmacy and OK Antique Plating are examples of businesses
in the second node. 12th Avenue, unlike Colfax, is a local Collector street for mostly local traffic.
> Issues/Goals
The major goal of economic development is to sustain Congress Park Neighborhood by attracting,
stimulating and preserving small businesses to serve the neighborhood residents.The purpose of this
section is to ensure the stability of the businesses in the Shopping Nodes and to promote the health of
those enterprises along the Colfax and Colorado Boulevard Corridors.
At issue, specifically, is the aesthetic nature of the neighborhood which, if enhanced, will offer a
significant contribution to the welfare of commercial ventures which, in turn, help to maintain the
neighborhood. Congress Park Neighbors is concerned about the large number of vacant buildings and
vacant lots within business zones and the need to find suitable uses for those properties while preventing
further deterioration. In recognizing that problems, such as parking, can be fairly resolved only by strong,
cooperative organizations and, often, by financial assistance from government programs, Congress Park
Neighbors hopes to stimulate business organizations and to heighten awareness of economic programs
which might be available.
The following are goals for the business areas within Congress Park:
I Colfax Avenue Business Corridor (Sub-area 1)
To create a stable, safe, attractive, well-lit retail street with a mix of offices, neighborhood businesses, and
destination businesses that attract customers from out of the geographic area, with anchor tenants to
increase traffic for other businesses.
58


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
P Colfax Avenue Greek Town (Sub-area la)
To support the merchants in the development of Greek Town on Colfax Avenue between Elizabeth and
St. Paul Street in their aim to create a positive identity and attract people citywide to the area.
P Colorado Boulevard Business Corridor (Sub-area 2)
To encourage stable, attractive uses that serve the University Hospital community and the neighborhood
and do not detract from the residential character of the neighborhood.
P 12th Avenue Shopping Nodes (Sub-area 3)
To maintain the quiet, charming, low-traffic character of businesses, with an emphasis on services and
retail establishments that serve as amenities to Congress Park residents, such as drug stores, restaurants,
hardware stores, and laundries.
The action recommendations have been divided into short term and long term. Short term
recommendations can be started immediately with little or no money. Long term recommendations will
take longer to accomplish and will require funding.
ED-1 Economic Development
P Apply to become a Neighborhood Business Revitalization District (NBR) in order to participate
in Federal economic program granted through city government.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Business Associations,
Mayors Office of Economic Development
Long Term
P Inventory and evaluate vacant properties within the business corridors and nodes in order to
recruit business development.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Business Associations
Short Term
RECOMMENDATIONS
59


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
k Help the Colfax at the Park Association to become an Urban Enterprise Zone to take advantage
of various tax incentives offered by this state of Colorado /MOED program.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Business Associations,
Mayors Office of Economic Development
Long Term
k Develop vacant land in a way that is compatible with the character and density of the
surrounding businesses and neighborhoods.
Implementing groups: Property Owners,
Planning and Development Office
Long Term
ED-2 Market/ldentity
k Market Colfaxs identity as a positive shopping environment.
Implementing groups: Business Owners,
Neighborhood Business Associations
Long Term
k Encourage conversion of businesses that create a negative image, such as adult book stores and
can banks, to more appropriate uses.
Implementing groups: Business Owners,
Neighborhood Business Associations
Long Term
60


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
ED-3 Parking
h Study cul-de-sac parking for East Colfax businesses on alternating streets to accommodate
business parking requirements and to create a buffer between the neighborhoods and
businesses.
Implementing groups: Department of Public Works, Traffic and Transportation Division,
Business Associations,
Neighborhood Organizations,
Community Planning and Development Agency
Long Term
h Encourage shared parking with retail establishments.
Implementing groups: Business Associations,
Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
Colfax Ave.
ED-4 Aesthetics
h Support streetscaping, lighting, facade improvements, trees, flowers, and other aesthetic
enhancements for businesses.
Implementing groups: Business Associations,
Neighborhood Organizations,
Community Planning and Development Agency
Short Term
h Encourage removal of graffiti and trash by appropriate parties.
Implementing groups: Business Associations,
Neighborhood Organizations,
Department of Public Works, Keep Denver Beautiful Office
Short Term
61


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
h Eliminate billboards on Colfax Avenue.
Implementing groups: Zoning Administration
Long Term
ED-5 Health and Safety
h Secure additional police patrols of neighborhood business districts.
Implementing groups: Police Department
Long Term
h Aid in the formation of neighborhood/ business watch programs.
Implementing groups: Business Associations,
Police Department
Short Term
h Enforce code compliance by owners of vacant land and buildings.
Implementing groups: Neighborhood Inspection Services
Short Term
ED-6 Business Organizations
h Strengthen and stimulate membership in neighborhood business organizations such as Colfax at
the Park and the Twelfth Avenue Merchants Association. Foster cooperation between these
organizations, and with Congress Park Neighbors Inc.
Implementing groups: Business Associations,
Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
62


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
ED-7 Business/Resident Relations
0 Encourage neighbors to patronize Colfax Avenue, 12th Avenue and Colorado Boulevard
neighborhood businesses.
Implementing groups: Business Associations,
Business Owners,
Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
0 Preserve current zoning and development scale and require business development to remain
within these boundaries.
Implementing groups: Business Associations,
Business Owners,
Neighborhood Organizations,
Community Planning and Development Agency
Short Term
0 Closely monitor all liquor license applications and notify neighbors of hearings.
Implementing groups: Department of Excise and licenses,
Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
0 Support the current position of the Congress Park Neighbors, Inc. in opposing any new package
liquor store licenses and to evaluate all other liquor licenses on a case by case basis.
Implementing groups: Department of Excise and licenses,
Neighborhood Organizations
Short Term
63


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
I Work with city and state to establish more appropriate licensing procedures, such as liquor
licenses that are owner-specific and not attached to the property, regardless of ownership.
Implementing groups: Department of Excise and Licenses,
Neighborhood Organizations,
State Legislature
Long Term
64


APPENDICES


APPENDIK A: 1992 NEIGH90RH009 SURVEY
> The Three Things I Value Most About Our Neighborhood:
Answer:
Close to Downtown
Convenience to shopping/culture/dining
Location
Convenience to Cherry Creek
Conveniences
TOTAL
Neighbors
Sense of community
Friendliness
TOTAL
Old homes/architecture
Well maintained properties
TOTAL
Cultural, economic diversity
TOTAL
Parks/proximity to parks
Trees/mature landscaping
7th Avenue Parkway
Quiet and/or quieter than Capitol Hill
TOTAL
# of Responses Total # of Responses
23
17
15
6
5
66LOCATION
20
18
8
46SENSE OF COMMUNITY
33
13 46ARCHITECTURE
29 29CULTURE
27
20
11
13 71PARKS


c o NGRESS PARK NE IGHBORHOOD PLAN
Answer: # of Responses Total # of Responses
Neighborhood school 10
City living in residential neighborhood 8
Small businesses 7
Single family homes 6
Families 5
Feels safe/secure 5
Botanic Gardens 4
Real estate appreciation/ property values 4
Stability 3
Good Shepherd School 2
City services 2
Beauty 2
Sidewalks 2
Character 2
Integrity 2
Group homes 2
TOTAL 2VOTES EACH
Lighting 1
Parking off alleys 1
Grew up here 1
Recreation (parks?) 1
Areas of renewal 1
Scale 1
University Hospital 1
Senior Citizens 1
TOTAL 1VOTE EACH
67


A P E N DICES
h The Three Problems 1 Want Solved First In Oor Neighborhood Are:
Answer: # of Responses Total # of Responses
Crime 30
Break-ins/robberies 5
Gangs/loitering/graffiti/vandalism 24
Lack of police presence 12
Police visits to apartments 1
TOTAL 72CRIME
Traffic 23
Speeding 7
Cars/parking 6
One way streets 2
TOTAL 38TRAFFIC
Noise/ambulance 4
Hospital traffic 1
Med center parking 1
Hospital encroachment 7
TOTAL 13HOSPITAL
Poorly maintained property 11
Run-down rentals 3
Irresponsible landlords/tenants 4
Snow removal 2
Sidewalks need repair 1
Shrubs covering sidewalks 2
Shrubs/cars covering alley 1
Tree replacement 3
Litter 3
Too much new wiring in alleys 1
TOTAL 31AESTHETICS
68


Answer:
Trash in alleys
Lighting in retail/high crime areas
Alley recycling
Care of trees in right of way
Designated bike routes
Property tax increases
Keep streets fixed
Trash pick-up
Street cleaning restrictions
TOTAL
Down zone
Pop-tops
Encourage single family
Illegal multi-units
Historic pres./district
Reverse downzoning
Condos are increasing
Keep stability in R-3
Keep loud bars out
TOTAL
Liquor store relocation
12th Avenue vibrancy
Commercial interaction with residential
Preserve re: values through redevel.
Encourage growth and progress
TOTAL
# of Responses Total # of Responses
8
7
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
26CITY SERVICES
8
5
3
3
2
1
1
1
1
25CODE/ZONING
5
4
2
1
1
1312th AVE./BUSENESS


Answer:
Colfax
Group Homes
No shelter ever
Stevens vacancy/re-use
Dog problems (poop, barking, running loose)
Hatred increasing, Elitism,Dont exclude,
Diversity, Be organized without being
reactionary, response to homelessness
Quality of schools
Busing
Encourage young people/ families to move in
TOTAL
Neighborhood identity, sense of community,
manage change, need guidelines/plan
No problems
Transient residents
Joggers going wrong way on Parkway
Solicitations
Loss of community gardens at Botanic Gardens
Botanic Gardens
Invasion of privacy
Neighborhood committees
Do-gooders
People putting flyers on my door
# of Responses Total # of Responses
12
12
1
10
10
6 (one vote each)
5
2
3
10 FAMILIES/SCHOOLS
1 vote each
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Other Comments:
I Hold neighborhood meetings in the afternoons so senior citizens can attend.
I Give prizes for the most attractive alley/backyard.
I Set up a designated dog area in Congress park, except during soccer and baseball season.


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
APPENDIX B: AESTHETIC GUIDELINES
These guidelines are provided as recommendations to property owners to serve as a tool in maintaining
the existing neighborhood character. They are not proposed as an overlay district, nor as a covenant, nor
to replace existing zoning laws.
> Exterior Finishes
h Sense of Community
The materials of the individual structures create a unified element that provides a backdrop to the
neighborhood. Use of any new material should reflect the existing materials of brick, stucco, painted
wood, etc. and be represented in their historic context. Inappropriate materials such as natural wood,
metal, large glass areas, etc. should be discouraged,
h Architectural Integrity
The exterior materials should provide the unifying element in the design. From level to level and from
porches to fencing, the materials should blend to provide a level of continuity,
h Rental Maintenance
The neighborhood as a group should encourage landlords to maintain their properties consistent with
the exterior level of quality reflected in owner occupied structures.
> Renovations
0 Physical
Each property should be reviewed on a case by case basis for their impact on adjacent neighbors and
with regard to the overall street imagery.
0 Sense of Community
The design of the addition should reflect the imagery of the existing structure (front porches, strong
roof lines, dormers, etc). The addition should not turn its back to the street and should not be used as a
barrier to the street.
0 Architectural Integrity
All additions should be designed with the idea in mind that the integration between the new and old
should be natural, with a strong respect to the context of the existing design elements.
71


APPENDICES
I Landscaping
All fencing, street trees, and miscellaneous plantings should be reviewed in context with its street
imagery and not just as an individual project. All fencing fronting on the street shall be limited in height
(4-0 max.) and should have a feeling of transparency, so as to not be seen as a barrier.
I Lighting
All exterior lighting should be kept to a low level to enhance the structure of landscaping, but not to
impact adjacent neighbors.
> New Construction Single Family
0 Zoning/Physical
Each property should be reviewed on a case by case basis for its impact on adjacent neighbors and with
regard to the overall street imagery and in context with the existing scale of surrounding structures.
Over-building with respect to lot size should be discouraged.
0 Sense of Community
When providing a design concept for an infill lot there should be respect for the historic character of
the community, not from the standpoint of preservation, but from the aspect of compatibility.
0 Architectural Integrity
New structures should respect their old neighbors in terms of materials, scale, proportions, and detailing.
Care should be taken as to not have a hodge-podge of styles that will deteriorate the fabric of the
existing neighborhood.
0 Landscaping
All fencing, street trees, and miscellaneous plantings should be reviewed in context with its street
imagery and not just as an individual project. All fencing fronting on the street should be limited in
height (4-0 max.) and should have a feeling of transparency, so as to not be seen as a barrier.
0 Lighting
All exterior lighting should be kept to a low level to enhance the structure or landscaping, but not to
impact adjacent neighbors.
1 Parking
All garage access and parking areas should be limited to alley access only. To preserve the pedestrian
friendly concept of the neighborhood the blocks should not be cut up with vehicular driveways, nor
should the street imagery be cluttered with garage doors.
72


CONGRESS PARK NE IGHBORHOOD PLAN
New Construction Multifamily 0 Zoning/Physical Each property should be reviewed on a case by case basis for its impact on adjacent neighbors and with regard to the overall street imagery and in context with the existing scale of surrounding structures. Over-building with respect to lot size should be discouraged. 0 Sense of Community When providing a design concept for an infill lot there must be respect for the historic character of the community, not from the standpoint of preservation, but from the aspect of compatibility. 0 Architectural Integrity New structures should respect their old neighbors in terms of materials, scale, proportions, and detailing. Care should be taken to create structures that are pedestrian friendly. Through the use of landscaping, and attention to scale and detail at the pedestrian level there should be a sense of comfort, as to take away from the large scale of the overall structure. 0 Landscaping All fencing, street trees, and misc. plantings should be reviewed in context with its street imagery and not just as an individual project. 1 Lighting All exterior lighting should be kept to a low level to enhance the structure or landscaping, but not to impact adjacent neighbors. 1 Parking All garage access and parking areas should be limited to alley access. To preserve the pedestrian friendly concept of the neighborhood the blocks should not be cut up with vehicular driveways. All parking areas should be screened from street views with a combination of transparent fencing and landscaping. Large open parking areas should be discouraged and should be designed to minimize the visual impact to define the existing street lines so as not to create a void in the street imagery.
73


APPENDICES
> Street Imagery
I Traffic and Parking
All new improvements should encourage off street parking that should screen vehicles from the
street view.
I Parks and Recreation
The parks and tree lined streets are our most valuable asset and care should be taken to maintain and
build upon this imagery.
I Signage
No signs, billboards, or graphics should be displayed on any residential site, with the exception of the
occupants name and house number. Multifamily units and commercial sites may provide low-impact
signage that conforms with all local codes and is compatible with adjacent uses.
I Landscaping
The area between the street curb and front setback of the building provides that aesthetic continuity that
blends individual properties into a single street image. With that in mind, any evaluation of landscaping
improvements should be seen in the context of how it will effect the existing street imagery.
74


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Appendix c: congress park neighrors, inc.
Congress Park Neighbors, Inc. is a neighborhood association registered with the City of Denver as a
501 C (3) non-profit corporation. It was formed in 1978 to represent the neighborhood with the
following purposes:
I To coordinate and improve community and resident involvement, cooperation, pride and
awareness.
I To work for better cultural, recreational, educational, safety and civic programs.
I To disseminate information about issues which affect the community and its residents.
I To promote cooperation and coordination between the community, residents, public agencies,
private agencies and businesses.
The Board meets monthly. In 1994, there were 250 paid members. Standing committees are
Membership, Outreach, Crime Action, and Business Development. CPN also has strong liaisons with the
Colorado Boulevard Health Care District membership, the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center,
Denver Botanic Gardens, Denver Public Schools, the city of Denver and adjacent neighborhood
organizations. The organization publishes and distributes the quarterly Congress Park Newsletter.
CPN is a member of Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods (CHUN) and the Inter-Neighborhood
Cooperation (INC), and is eligible to send delegates to both these umbrella organizations.
75


APPENDICES
APPENDIX D: ZONING
k Key Regulations of Zone Districts in Congress Park
Zoning is the traditional legal tool of cities to regulate the use of all of the land within the jurisdiction
and control the impact that its use has on adjacent properties and the city as a whole. Denver has had
zoning regulations since 1926, after most of the Congress Park neighborhood was developed.
Zoning directly regulates the land uses allowed for properties, basic requirements for construction (e.g.
the minimum size allowed for a lot, setbacks from property lines to buildings, the height and bulk of
buildings, etc.), requirements for off-street parking, open space, and location and size of signs.
Since zoning regulations change from time to time, the latest information is always available from the
Zoning Administration.
0 R-0 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings, Low Density. Foster family care and day care allowed as home
occupations by permit. Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each dwelling unit. Maximum
Density = 7.3 dwelling units/acre.
0 R-l Single-Unit Detached Dwellings, Low Density. Same as R-0 except that home occupations and
room-renting to one or two persons are allowed upon application and issuance of a permit. Maximum
Density = 7.3 dwelling units/acre.
k R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings, Low Density. Typically duplexes and triplexes. Home occupations are
allowed by permit only. Minimum of 6,000 square feet required for each duplex structure with an
additional 3,000 square feet required for every unit over 2. Maximum Density = 14.5 housing units/acre.
k R-3 High-Density Apartment District. Building size is controlled by limited bulk standards, off-street
parking and open space requirements. Building floor area cannot exceed three times the site area. This
zone should not be used as a buffer zone. Maximum density is not specified and is determined by the
size of the individual units and the factors mentioned above.
k H-l, H-2 Hospital Zone Districts. Contact Zoning Administration for up-to-date information on
zoning ordinances.
76


CONGRESS PARK NE IGHBORHOOD PLAN
APPENDIX E: ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
1 Mayor of Denver Honorable Wellington E. Webb
) Denver Planning Board
Ruth Falkenberg, Chair Thomas Foster
Bernie Jones Jim Daniels
Peggy Montano Daniel R. Guimond
Marilyn Stokes Gilbert F. McNeish
Mary Beth Susman, Ph.D.
) Congress Park Neighborhood Plan Steering Committee
Mary Ferrell, Co-Chair John Yonushewski, Co-Chair
DeAnne Minner, President CPN Judith Spiegel
Margie Boshouwers Tom Johnson
Carol Johnson Frank Scalise
Kelly Tynan Paula Machlin
Tom ONeill Julie Bell
Brian Tooley Kathy Fay
Charlotte Redden Don and Terry McCullough
Eric Price
) Crime Prevention Committee
Richard Moody, Chair Dave Quinlivan
Kelly Bitner Monique Coustry
Gerry Armstrong DeVonna Johnson
Jean Griffin Claudia Goodman
Mary Zidanick Bruce and Fois Feinstein
Charlotte Bentley Kathi Anderson
77


APPENDICES
I Outreach and Community Pride Committee
Kathy Kurtz, Chair LuAnn Curtis
Michael Curtis Stephen Humphrey
Jennifer and Tracy Vermeyen ShirleeWreed
Terry McCullough Warren Banman
Jan Oen Buffy Naake
Peg Higgins Jay Nelsen
Eric Price ic and Transportation Committee
Joanne Malisani, Chair Kelly Tynan
Alin Rasmussen April Montgomery
Tom Eidsmoe Becky Gay
ig Committee
Bob Robertson Matthew Lancaster
Peggy Mahoney Edgar Neel
Kathy Fay Debbie Baldwin
John Yonushewski Steven Humphrey
Bryan Aumiller Linda Childs
Becky D. Laurilla Patrick K. Shannon
Tim and Judy Panther Susan Fisher
Ronda Ballard
78


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Economic Development Committee
Barbara Wright
Ron Kienzle
Cindy Chase
Cathy Kuykendall
Tito Collins
Bobby Lutrell
) Denver Community Planning and Development Agency
Jennifer T. Moulton, Director of Planning and Development
Harriet R. Hogue, Planning Manager, Neighborhood Planning
Lupe Herrera, Senior City Planner
Theresa Lucero, Senior City Planner
Kiersten Faulkner, Associate City Planner
Jim Ottenstein, Graphics
Julie Connor, Graphics
Ken Barkema, Graphics
Carl Haberman, Graphics
Daniel Michael, Graphics
Charlotte Redden
Alan Eisenberg
Jeffrey Joyce
Pete and Jim Dadiotis
Maureen Sherlock
79


OPTION ORDINANCE


CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
ORDINANCE NO. 806 SERIES OF 1095
For an ordinance approving a neighborhood plan for die Congress Park neighborhood,
which plan shall become a part of the Comprehensive Plan for the City and County of Denver
pursuant to die provisions of Section 41-18 (c) of the Revised Municipal Code and of
Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989.
> Whereas, pursuant to the provisions of Section 41-18 (c) of the Revised Municipal Code, and by
Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989, there has been approved a Comprehensive Plan for the City and
County of Denver; and
> Whereas, said section of the Revised Municipal Code provides for the amendment of said Plan; and
> Whereas, Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989, provides for the incorporation of Neighborhood Plans into
the Comprehensive Plan; and
> Whereas, as a proposed part of the Comprehensive Plan, the Planning Director has transmitted to the
Mayor and Council for acceptance a proposed neighborhood plan for the orderly and harmonious
development of the Congress Park neighborhood in the City and County of Denver; and
> Whereas, the Mayor has approved the same; and
> Whereas, the Planning Board has approved the same; and
> Whereas, the Neighborhood Plan was prepared with significant involvement of the residents and
representatives of the various interests of the Congress Park neighborhood and adjacent neighborhoods
and has been approved by the same; and
> Whereas, a member of City Council in whose council district the neighborhood plan is situated has
monitored the process whereby said plan was formulated.
81


INTRODUCTION
Now, Therefore, Be It Enacted By The City And County Of Denver:
> Section 1. That the proposed neighborhood plan for the harmonious development of the Congress Park
Neighborhood, consisting of a document entitled Congress Park Neighborhood Plan, filed with the City
Clerk, Ex-Officio Clerk of the City and County of Denver, on the 20th day of September, 1995, as City
Clerks filing No. 95-867, is hereby approved as part of the Comprehensive Plan, pursuant to Section
41-18 (c) of the Revised Municipal Code, Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989.
> Section 2. That the approval of the Congress Park Neighborhood Plan, and any subsequent amendment
thereto, is intended to establish the same, in conjunction with the Comprehensive Plan, as the official
guide for officials of the City and County of Denver and private citizens when making decisions affecting
the future character of the Congress Park neighborhood of the City and County of Denver; provided,
however, that such approval shall not preempt the decision making powers vested by law or the
administrative directive of the Mayor, the Council or any other official of the City and County of Denver
with respect to, but not limited to, a zoning map amendment, a zoning language amendment, a dedication
or vacation of a street, alley or other public way, a designation of a park, the issuance of a revocable
permit, a conveyance or the acquisition of real property by the City and County of Denver, of an
appropriation for or construction of a capital improvement; and provided, further, that it is expressly
understood that judgement must be exercised in the application of the Congress Park Neighborhood Plan
recommendations in the decision making process of the Mayor, Council and other officials of the City and
County of Denver.
Passed by the Council October 2, 1995
Deborah L. Ortega, President
Approved: Wellington E. Webb, Mayor, October 3, 1995
Attest: Elba Wedgeworth, Clerk and Recorder
Ex-Officio Clerk of the City and County of Denver
Published in the Daily Journal September 27, 1995 and October 6, 1995
82


Full Text

PAGE 1

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANAdopted October 1995 Adopted October 1995

PAGE 2

TABLE OF CONTENTSPrefacePurpose of the Plan. . . . . . . . . . . 5 The Planning Process. . . . . . . . . . 5 Plan Organization. . . . . . . . . . . 8 Acknowledgements (General see Appendix E for team members). . . 9IntroductionNeighborhood Location and Description. . . . . . . 12 Vision Statement. . . . . . . . . . . 12 Neighborhood History. . . . . . . . . . 12 Demographic/Economic Profile. . . . . . . . 15 Community Facilities and Services. . . . . . . . 21Community OutreachOverview. . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Goal. . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Action Recommendations. . . . . . . . . 25Safety and Crime PreventionOverview. . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Goal. . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Action Recommendations. . . . . . . . . 29Land UseUrban Design. . . . . . . . . . . 33 Overview. . . . . . . . . . . 33 Goals. . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Action Recommendations. . . . . . . . 33 Zoning. . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Overview. . . . . . . . . . . 37 Residential Land Uses. . . . . . . . . 37 Special Residential Land Uses. . . . . . . . 38 Commercial Land Uses. . . . . . . . . 38 Hospital Districts. . . . . . . . . . 38 Vacant Land. . . . . . . . . . . 39 Parks and Open Space. . . . . . . . . 39 Schools. . . . . . . . . . . 39 TABLE OF CONTENTS 2

PAGE 3

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANGoals. . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Action Reccommendations. . . . . . . . . 40Traffic and TransportationOverview. . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Mass Transit. . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Bike Routes. . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Goals. . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Action Recommendations. . . . . . . . . 48Economic DevelopmentOverview. . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Issues and Goals. . . . . . . . . . . 58 Action Recommendations. . . . . . . . . 59AppendicesNeighborhood Survey. . . . . . . . . . 66 Aesthetic Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . 71 Congress Park Neighbors,Inc.. . . . . . . . . 75 Key Regulations of Zone Districts in Congress Park. . . . . 76 Acknowledgements. . . . . . . . . . 77 Adoption Ordinance. . . . . . . . . . 80 3

PAGE 4

PREFACEPREFACE 4

PAGE 5

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANTHE PURPOSE OF THE PLANThe plan serves as an official city guide to the physical development and improvement of the Congress Park neighborhood.A city approved plan serves as a guide for making decisions about the neighborhood.It is the responsibility of the neighborhood organization(s) and assigned city staff to prioritize recommendations as time,energy and resources allow.The plan becomes an official amendment to the City's Comprehensive Plan.City departments use the plan to guide recommendations and decisions based on consensus prioritization. This plan is not an official zone map nor does it imply or deny any implicit rights to a particular zone. Zone changes that may be proposed by property owners as part of any plan must be initiated under separate procedures established by the City and County of Denver Municipal Code. This plan is intended to promote patterns of desired neighborhood improvements,urban design, housing,business types,traffic and public services which encourage and contribute to the economic, social,and physical health,safety and welfare of the people who live and work in Congress Park.THE PLANNING PROCESSThe following diagram is an illustration of the plan process.As can be seen,the process is typically initiated by changing conditions in and around the neighborhood. In August 1992,Congress Park Neighbors,Inc.requested the assistance of the City in preparing a neighborhood plan.The request came because of concerns that a number of neighborhood issues were being addressed independently of each other.These included changes in the nature of the commercial uses along 12th Avenue,re-use of Stevens School,a shelter for homeless women proposed in the neighborhood,development pressures created by hospital expansion,and others.The Congress Park Neighbors board of directors expressed concern that the many changes taking place concurrently threatened the stability of the neighborhood and could undermine its future identity.The board asked for help in addressing the interrelated nature of the issues and planning for positive change. 5

PAGE 6

PREFACEGrassroots efforts to organize the neighborhood on a block by block basis were launched by Congress Park Neighbors in the Fall of 1992.A survey was distributed which asked neighbors to list the top three things they valued about the neighborhood and the first issues they would like to see addressed.The survey and its results can be found in Appendix A. On January 12,1993,a community meeting was held at Teller Elementary School.Congress Park Neighbors,Inc.leadership and Community Planning and Development Agency staff facilitated the meeting.Although it was snowing heavily,over 200 neighbors attended.Issues of most concern were identified and prioritized.A Steering Committee composed of representatives from Congress Park as well as Capitol Hill United Neighbors,Inc.,Denver East Central Civic Association,and Colfax at the Park was formed.Six issues committees were also organized as follows: 1) Crime Prevention; 2) Traffic and Transportation; 3) Zoning and Development; 4) City Services; 5) Business and Economic Development; and 6) Community Outreach. Over a period of 3-4 months,issues and concerns were divided into short-term and long-term goals.Short term goals were identified as those requiring little or no monies from the City,and that could be resolved in a relatively short period of time.These were also referred to as "guerilla tactics."Long-term issues and concerns were also addressed.Realistic goals and monies were identified for future implementation of longer-term projects. On April 21,1993,the Steering Committee met with the Planning Board to present mid-way accomplishments and to receive feedback from the Board.The Steering Committee then set up a general assembly with the neighborhood on May 4,1993 to receive feedback on draft ideas.A statement of existing conditions,issues,and an action plan for each priority issue was developed.From this document, the Steering Committee generated the narrative which,through many iterations over the course of the next few months,became the draft Plan.In January 1994,the neighborhood reviewed the draft plan. 6

PAGE 7

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 7 NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING PROCESSNeighborhood PlannerResearches Neighborhood Profile (Data) Neighborhood Meeting Describes Planning Process Existing Conditions Comprehensive Plan Develops Resource: Research Neighborhood Planning Team Resource: People Land Use Public Facilities Circulation Analysis/Plan Based Decision By: Neighborhood Residents and Businesses City Agencies Publish Acceptance City Council Mayor Transmitted Planning Board Planning Board Approval Revise if Necessary and Present Community Presents City Agency Review Requests Planning & Community Development Review Presentation Neighborhood Analysis/PlanChanging ConditionsDevelops Publicizes Other Issues Meets and Discusses

PAGE 8

PREFACEThe Steering Committee met twice a month from February through May 1994 to review and edit the neighborhood plan.Each chapter was reviewed for content and format.During the summer of 1994,the Planning Office and other city personnel had the opportunity to review and comment.Comments were brought back to the Steering Committee for discussion.By Fall 1994,Steering Committee revisions had been completed and the plan draft was again routed to City Agencies for review,comment and editing. Any changes to plan recommendations were taken back to the Steering Committee for further discussion and resolution. In early 1995,members of the Steering Committee,along with Planning Staff,met with various City agencies to ensure that the vision and goals for the neighborhood,as defined by the Plan recommendations,would not be lost in further revisions.By working towards consensus on the specific items contested,the plan meets this goal.The final draft,completed in April 1995,and presented to the Planning Board and to the community in May 1995,has had the benefit of countless hours of citizen involvement. After adoption as an amendment to Denver's Comprehensive Plan,the Congress Park Neighborhood Plan will not be published only to be shelved as a community planning exercise.It will be implemented.This will occur through the short and long-range actions of neighbors,businesses,and the City working jointly to achieve the stated vision of the neighborhood.PLAN ORGANIZATIONThe plan first contains descriptive information on the neighborhood its history,demographics,and current facilities.Next,issues are discussed in an overview statement,followed by goals to be achieved and then recommendations of actions to be taken to reach these goals.The action recommendations are classified by subject category,e.g.,Community Outreach Action Recommendations = CO-1 through CO-10.The action recommendations have been divided into short term and long term.Short term recommendations can be started immediately with little or no money.Long term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. These action recommendations are accompanied by a vital component,the listing of implementing groups.It will be these groups who will be the agents of attainment of the neighborhood vision. 8

PAGE 9

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 9 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSA historically large number of neighbors were involved in the creation of the Congress Park Neighborhood Plan,as were a number of representatives of the City.Their work is gratefully acknowledged.Their names appear in Appendix E.

PAGE 10

INTRODUCTION 10 INTRODUCTION

PAGE 11

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 11 Colfax Ave.13th Ave.14th Ave. 12th Ave. 11th Ave. 10th Ave. 9th Ave. 8th Ave. 7th Ave. Pkwy. 6th Ave.Congress ParkYork St. Josephine St. Columbine St. Elizabeth St. Clayton St. Detroit St. Fillmore St. Milwaukee St. St. Paul St. Steele St. Adams St. Cook St. Madison St. Monroe St. Garfield St., Jackson St. Harrison St. Colorado Blvd. Congress Park

PAGE 12

NEIGHBORHOOD LOCATION AND DESCRIPTIONThe Congress Park neighborhood is bounded on the west by York Street,on the north by Colfax Avenue,on the east by Colorado Boulevard and on the south by Sixth Avenue.VISION STATEMENTIn a survey of residents and businesses of Congress Park conducted in the Fall of 1992,neighbors reported that the following characteristics about the neighborhood were valued the most:1) Location;2) Sense of Community;3) Old Homes 4) Cultural and Economic Diversity;5) Parks,Mature Trees,Green Space.From this survey,the vision statement for Congress Park was developed as follows:"Congress Park is a traditional city neighborhood with a small town atmosphere. Here people of diverse cultures, ages, colors and economic background share a sense of community, value older homes and mature trees, and enjoy the convenience of city living amid the stability of a thriving neighborhood."NEIGHBORHOOD HISTORY Up through the Pikes Peak gold rush of the 1850's,the Congress Park area was Native American land.By 1860,however,the young City of Denver,only two miles to the west,had rapidly grown to a population of 5,000,with six men to every woman. As the first stagecoaches were arriving in Denver in the late 1850's,William Larimer,one of the city's founders,sited the park-like Mount Prospect Cemetery on a prominent hill to reinforce the image of Denver as a refined city.The area the cemetery encompassed evolved over the next 100 years into present-day Cheesman Park,the Morgan Addition,Denver Botanic Gardens,the Denver Water Board Reservoirs,and Congress Park,for which the neighborhood is named.INTRODUCTION 12 Congress Park Playground and Fields

PAGE 13

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 13 .Mount Prospect or City Cemetery 1858 1890 Congress Park 1902 1910 CHEESMAN PARK 19108 7 6O d d F e l l o w s G r a v e sS o c i e t y G r a v e sM a s o n i c G r a v e sChinese GravesHUNT ST.9th AVENUE 11th AVENUE 12th AVENUE 13th AVENUEHUMBOLDT ST FRANKLIN ST GILPIN ST. WILIAMS ST. HIGH ST. RACE ST. VINE ST. YORK ST. COLUMBINE ST. JOSEPHINE ST. GAYLORD ST.BOTANIC GARDENSCatholic Cemetery 1858 -1950 Samue B.Morgan SubdivisonHistoric Map of the Vicinity of The Denver Botanic GardensDrawn by Jullia Andrews-JonesBOWLES AVENUE 8th AVENUE Congress Park 1930CHILDRENS GARDEN BASIN #3 1956 BASIN #2 1906 BASIN #1 1899Hebrew Cemetery 1858 -1910 City Nursery DENVERWATR BOARDPARKINGl iREBUILT 1946Denver Union Water Co. EL CLAYTON ST. ELIZABETH ST.4 2 3 5 PotterÂ’s Field Congress Park, Historic Map

PAGE 14

INTRODUCTIONThe coming of the railroad through Denver in 1870 paralleled another sudden surge in growth.Between 1880 and 1890 the city's population boomed from over 35,000 to nearly 107,000.Through the 1880's, Denver's air was so polluted because of unpaved roads,coal and wood furnaces,smelting and other industries that wealthy residents looked to the outskirts of Denver,such as Capitol Hill,for cleaner air and reclaimed mountain views.With the expansion of public transit,including cable cars,to Colfax Avenue in the late 1880's and early 1890's,the eastern reaches of Capitol Hill became more accessible to the middle class.Because Colfax was the main route downtown,homes were first built along its corridor to the north (now City Park South neighborhood) and to the south (now Congress Park neighborhood).Between 1887 and 1888,the neighborhood was completely platted into more than ten subdivisions of various sizes.On March 11,1889,the area was incorporated into Denver as part of a larger annexation by the city. Many of the neighborhood's historic structures were built in the next decade.Examples are:Stevens School (built as George W.Clayton School in 1900),Fire Station #15 (circa 1903) at the southeast corner of 11th Avenue and Clayton Street (now a private residence) and the Capitol Heights Presbyterian Church, built at the intersection of 11th Avenue and Fillmore Street in 1911.In 1917,old Gove Elementary,whose site is now playing fields,tennis courts and a community garden,was one of the City's first school conversions from elementary to middle school.During World War I and into the 1920's,the park was the home of the City Nursery and had the largest VICTORY Garden in the City.A portion of the park was converted to playing fields during the 1930's through a WPA project which also built the terraced walls and planted the trees.It was known as Victory Park up until its rededication as Congress Park in 1949.A landmark to the neighborhood,the 1939 candy-striped smokestack at "Signal Hill"north of the park was a primary structure at Denver's emergency alert system facilities which expanded in 1993 to become the city's Combined Communication Center. Congress Park's neighborhood commercial centers,always convenient to the neighborhood pedestrian, have also evolved over the years not only in response to the growth of the neighborhood but also due to the changes in modes of mass transportation.Horse-drawn streetcars carried downtown commuters along both Colfax and 12th Avenues in the 1900's.Around street car stops such as 12th and Madison,merchants' small businesses flourished and these centers are still thriving,although the horses have been replaced over time by trolleys (1920-30),then electric buses (1940's) and today's (starting in 1956) diesel buses. Congress Park's continued prosperity as a residential neighborhood is tied directly to its ability to maintain the very factors that created its stable history:a close-in neighborhood of quiet tree-lined streets,parks, stable housing stock and pedestrian-oriented neighborhood shopping. 14 Street Railways, Denver Railway Co.

PAGE 15

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANDEMOGRAPHIC/ECONOMIC PROFILE Population and Households 15 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 12,752 13,341 11,003*Population figures represent total population for the area, which includes group quarters (e.g....group homes, adult correctional facilities, communal living). Source: U.S. Census ** Denver Regional Council of Governments1960 1970 1980 1990 1996** 9,636 9,663POPULATION* 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 1959196919791989 1996** 424 94 The average household size has decreased, which is consistent with the downsizingtrend since 1989 for a majority of Denver's neighborhoods. Source: U.S. Census ** Denver Regional Council of Governments 287 136 131POPULATION IN GROUP QUARTERS HOUSEHOLDS 1960197019801990 Average Household Size 2.642.351.981.89 Housing Units 4,9676,0766,0715,952 Households* 12,32813,05410,9099,500 Household figures do not include group quarters. Based on the figures listed above, population in group quarters decreased between 19591979 and increased slightly in 1989.

PAGE 16

INTRODUCTIONRENTER/HOMEOWNER/ETHNIC BREAKDOWN BY CENSUS TRACTThe following tables contains information on both single detached housing units and multiple units (apartments).The housing in Congress Park is stable based on the high levels of occupied units. Homeowner'sEthnic Breakdown by 1990 Census Tracts Census Tract 3337.0237.03 All housing units (total)1,3212,8271,804 Occupied housing units1,2792,3411,528 Owner occupied housing units973481447 % of occupied units96.8%82.8%84.7% White929449410 Black467 Hispanic301421 American Indian,Eskimo/Aleut212 Asian or Pacific Islander8117 16 COLFAX AVE.COLORADO BLVD.6TH AVE.YORK ST. 10TH AVE.STEELE ST.11TH AVE.DETROIT ST. 3337.02 37.03CENSUS TRACTS

PAGE 17

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Renter sEthnic Breakdown by 1990 Census Tracts Census Tract3337.0237.03 Renter-occupied units 3061,8601,081 White2741,436741 Black19271253 Hispanic1316695 American Indian,Eskimo/Aleut.23112 Asian or Pacific Islander33730 Source:U.S.Census In 1960,the ratio of owner-occupied housing to renter-occupied housing was about equal.In 1970,the ratio changed to 63.2% renter-occupied and 32.9% owner-occupied.1990 statistics illustrate that the ratio has stayed relatively stable with 55% renter-occupied and 32% owner-occupied.(Note:Does not equal 100%.Vacant units are not part of this percentage calculation).INCOMEThe Congress Park Neighborhood is made up of census tracts 37.02,37.03 and 33.Census tract 33 is bounded by 10th Avenue on the North,Colorado Blvd.on the east,York Street on the West and 6th Avenue on the south.Census tracts 37.02 and 37.03 are bounded by Colfax Avenue on the north,10th Avenue on the south,Colorado Blvd.on the east,and York Street on the west,these two census tracts are divided by Steele Street.Income figures have been adjusted to the 1989 level. The city of Denver's median household income for 1989 was $25,106. Census tract areas 37.02 and 37.03 are slightly under Denver's median income,whereas,census tract 33 17

PAGE 18

INTRODUCTIONsurpasses Denver's median income by 80%.The figures listed above show a decline in buying power between 1969 and 1989 for all three census tracts,although Census Tract 33 has maintained the most stability.MEDIAN AGEby Census Tracts In 1989 the median age for census tract 33 was 37.7 years;census tract 37.02 was 33.8 years and census tract 37.03 was 32.9 years.Census tract 37.03 has the youngest median age group. 18 0 10,000 20,000 40,000 30,000 50,000 60,000 48,115 32,180 29,770 38,581 20,852 21,683 45,054 20,637 22,8131969 C.T. 33 *Figures adjusted to 1989 level C.T. 37.02C.T. 37.03 19791989HOUSEHOLD INCOME BY CENSUS TRACTS*

PAGE 19

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 19 Employment In the Congress Park Neighborhood By Industry by Census Tract 1983 CENSUS TRACT3337.0237.03 INDUSTRY#%#%#% Agriculture00.000.000.0 Mining71.600.000.0 Contract Construction53.5466.140.2 Manufacturing00.081.170.3 Trans.& Pub.Util.00.000.0833.9 Wholesale Trade00.000.0160.7 Retail Trade378.524032.122510.7 Fin.,Ins.& Real Est.51.2182.4401.9 Services5813.4190425.41,59474.3 Government5612.9243.2401.9 Fed.Civilian00.000.000.0 State00.000.080.4 Local5612.9243.2321.5 Military00.000.000.0 All Other*25659.022129.51356.3TOTAL434100.0748100.02,144100.0* Includes self-employed,unpaid family,and domestic workers.Percentages may not sum to 100% due to rounding.

PAGE 20

INTRODUCTION Employment In the Congress Park Neighborhood By Industry by Census Tract 1988 CENSUS TRACT3337.0237.03 INDUSTRY#%#%#% Agriculture00.050.600.0 Mining00.000.000.0 Contract Construction325.3121.3130.9 Manufacturing71.2576.4231.5 Trans.& Pub.Util.172.8171.900.0 Wholesale Trade00.0161.8130.9 Retail Trade10317.123025.7895.8 Fin.,Ins.& Real Est.355.8637.0744.9 Services9515.825128.01,08671.3 Government488.0262.9946.2 Fed.Civilian00.000.000.0 State00.000.090.6 Local488.0262.9855.6 Military00.000.000.0 All Other*26644.121824.41328.7TOTAL603100.0895100.01,524100.0* Includes self-employed,unpaid family,and domestic workers.Percentages may not sum to 100% due to rounding. B-3 c Community Facilities. 20

PAGE 21

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANCOMMUNITY FACILITIES AND SERVICES Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Congress Park is located at 8th Avenue and Josephine Street.The total acreage is 17.10 and the park contains seven tennis courts,a swimming pool,ball fields,soccer fields,sheltered picnic area and a newly constructed children's playground.Immediately to the north are play fields located on top of a Denver Water Department Reservoir.These fields are generally only available to organized sports such as youth soccer. The Botanic Gardens and Cheesman Park across York Street offer additional open space for the neighborhood.Other parks outside of the neighborhood that are used by the residents are City Park, Lindsley Park and Bromwell Park. Fire Protection Fire Station No.15 is located at 1375 Harrison Street.This new facility was constructed in 1987 and replaced the old fire house at 1080 Clayton. Public Schools Teller Elementary School at 1150 Garfield Street is the only remaining public school in the neighborhood.The school was built in 1950 with a total land area of 2.58 acres. Stevens Elementary School located at 1140 Columbine was closed in the fall of 1992.In 1993 Denver Public Schools sold the property to a private developer for condominium housing. Gove Middle School located at 1325 Colorado Boulevard just outside the neighborhood's boundaries was opened in 1976.The old school building (on the west side of Colorado Blvd) was razed and tennis courts built on the site.The original property is accessible to Gove Middle School by way of an overpass across Colorado Boulevard.Denver Public Schools has considered the possibility of selling the old school site. Bromwell Elementary School,Steck Elementary School,and East High School are also located outside of the Congress Park neighborhood boundaries and have students who walk to the school from the Congress Park Neighborhood. 21 Fire Station No. 15 The Old Fire House

PAGE 22

INTRODUCTION Library The closest libraries to the neighborhood are the Main Library at 1357 Broadway,Ross-Cherry Creek,a branch library at 305 Milwaukee,and Park Hill Branch at Montview and Dexter Street. Police Congress Park is served by Police District Station #3 located at 1625 S.University Boulevard.The Congress Park Neighborhood was ranked 30th of the 68 neighborhoods in the 1992 Neighborhood Crime Rankings for total offenses by crime rate.In 1994,the ranking had improved to 41st of 72 neighborhoods, illustrating how the Congress Park neighborhood is showing a major improvement in safety for its residences and businesses. Medical Care The National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine (National Jewish Center) is located within the boundaries of Congress Park.The location is bordered by Colfax on the north, Colorado Blvd.on the east,14th Avenue on the south and Garfield on the west. The University of Colorado Health Sciences Center,University Hospital,Rose Medical Center,and the Veterans Administration Medical Center Denver are located in the Hale Neighborhood across Colorado Blvd.,primarily between 8th and 11th Avenues. Churches Congress Park maintains its diversity in the provision of religious facilities.Examples include:Eastside Christian Church at 131 Adams Street,Capitol Heights Presbyterian Church at 1100 Fillmore Street,the Buddhist Temple at 12th and Clayton Street,Sixth Avenue United Church (UCC) at 3250 E.6th Avenue and Good Shepard Catholic Church at 2626 E.7th Avenue Parkway. Trash Pickup The City and County of Denver provides trash pick-up once a week for single family residences thoughout the Congress Park Neighborhood. Alley and Street Cleaning Between the months of April and November the city sweeps the streets once a month.Residents are required to move their automobiles from the street in front of their residence or get ticketed.Due to the 22 Good Shepard Catholic Church

PAGE 23

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANhigh volumes of traffic,Colorado Boulevard is swept at night,between midnight and 7 a.m.Alleys are swept during the summer between May and October,once a month. Animal Control The Zoning Department is responsible for enforcing the City's ordinance for regulating the number of animals per household.Up to three dogs and five cats are permitted,but the number cannot exceed a total of five animals.The Office of Animal Control for the City and County of Denver located at 660 S. Jason Street is responsible for enforcing the leash law,which requires owners to leash their dog.Another vital ordinance to the neighborhood is one which requires animal owners walking their pets to remove animal wastes from other's properties,at the time of deposit. Snow Removal Residents and property owners are responsible for removing snow from sidewalks adjacent to their property within 24 hours of each snow fall.During snow falls,the City plows and applies salt and sand to the following avenues and streets:6th,8th,12th,13th,14th,Colfax,York,Josephine and Colorado Boulevard. 23

PAGE 24

COMMUNITY OUTREACH 24 COMMUNITY OUTREACH

PAGE 25

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 25 Overview Congress Park is a neighborhood within a city of nearly 500,000 people and a metropolitan area of over 2 million.Many of its residents leave the neighborhood daily for work,entertainment,shopping,and a broad range of other activities. The neighborhood also experiences the common phenomenon of changing population,where individuals and families move often to follow jobs or to meet changing housing desires. This transience,in both the daily mobility and the rapid turnover of the population,challenges the neighborhood's ability to nurture a sense of community among its residents. Goal To create and nurture a small town atmosphere in Congress Park and instill community pride in the neighborhood;to educate and inform neighbors about issues of common concern. Action Recommendations In order to accomplish this goal,the following action recommendations were developed.The recommendations have been divided into short term and long term.Short term recommendations can be started immediately with little or no money.Long term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. CO-1 Establish a standing community outreach committee within the neighborhood organization to collect and disseminate information in areas such as meeting information,city,business and private sector plans,public and private schools and people with special needs and other issues that impact the day to day lives in Congress Park. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term CO-2 Sponsor annual events (e.g.ice cream social,children's art show,parade,cultural,sporting,other excursions) that will involve a cross-section of the neighborhood. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term

PAGE 26

COMMUNITY OUTREACHCO-3 Compile a calendar of events relevant to the neighborhood for publication in the neighborhood newsletter. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term CO-4 Continue to produce and distribute a quarterly newsletter by and for all residents and businesses. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term CO-5 Contact new members of Congress Park Neighbors each month to encourage their participation and increased activity in the neighborhood organization and its activities. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term CO-6 Produce and distribute a neighborhood resource directory to all residents and businesses. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term CO-7 Produce and distribute a "Welcome Package"for new residents moving into the neighborhood. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term CO-8 Install and manage information kiosk and community information bulletin boards at high pedestrian traffic areas. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term 26 Community Bulletin Board on 12th Avenue

PAGE 27

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANCO-9 Preserve and encourage gathering places,physical amenities and programs within the neighborhood that foster neighborhood communication. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations, Community Planning and Development Agency Short Term CO-10 Study the feasibility of developing a community center in the neighborhood. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations, Community Planning and Development Agency Long Term 27

PAGE 28

SAFETY AND CRIME PREVENTIONSAFETY & CRIME PREVENTION 28

PAGE 29

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Overview In the 1992 survey*,crime prevention was identified as the number one priority of area residents.As in most city neighborhoods,areas with higher population density have a higher incidence of crime. Residents and businesses must,in some instances,contend with the impacts of such problems as:high crime rate apartment buildings;prostitution;drug-related crimes;and gang presence and disturbances. Burglary and auto-related crimes are the most frequently reported and this is the fastest increasing reporting category,according to police department statistics. Congress Park struggles with graffiti,insufficient mid-block street lighting,unreported crimes and a general lack of awareness and,more importantly,a lack of interest/involvement by some property owners and managers,most especially,absentee owners and managers. *Survey results can be found in Appendix A. Goal To reduce crime and make the neighborhood a safer place to live. Action Recommendations The action recommendations have been divided into short term and long term.Short term recommendations can be started immediately with little or no money.Long term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. Implementation efforts to achieve this purpose include,but are not limited to the following: SCP-1 Encourage the city to implement stronger neighborhood -based policing,in which each officer covers a smaller area,and gets more intimately involved with the area's problems. Implementing groups:Denver Police Department Short Term SCP-2 Encourage the city to develop and implement more resources to help neighborhoods fight crime. Implementing groups:Denver Police Department Short Term 29

PAGE 30

SAFETY AND CRIME PREVENTIONSCP-3 Establish a volunteer committee to deal with crime and safety issues.Such a committee is needed to keep residents informed about serious crime problems,and to perform many constructive tasks. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Achieve 100% participation of all blocks in the Neighborhood Watch Program. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Hold regular open meetings to:1) provide neighbors with a forum to bring forth problems and discuss tactics,and 2) inform and educate residents on crime issues. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Network with city,police officials and other neighborhood groups to learn about current resources available to residents,and to lobby the city for support deemed appropriate. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Identify and inventory the problem areas,such as apartment buildings with frequent reports of crimes.Work with owners,managers,police and other city agencies to deal with such concerns. Encourage 100% participation by all apartment managers in Police Department "Management Training Program" Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Provide the neighborhood with current crime statistics. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations, Denver Police Department Short Term 30

PAGE 31

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 31 Develop effective programs to prevent and to remove graffiti. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Long Term Develop effective communication with all businesses in Congress Park regarding crime and safety issues. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations, Neighborhood Business Organizations Short Term Act as an advocate for Congress Park in dealing with the city on crime and safety issues. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Encourage the installation of mid-block street and alley lights Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations, Department of Public Works Short Term

PAGE 32

LAND USELAND USE 32

PAGE 33

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANURBAN DESIGN Overview The Congress Park neighborhood is fully developed.As changes occur,it is important that these changes remain consistent and complementary with the existing neighborhood character. Congress Park's residential qualities and sense of community are expressed by the neighborhood street image.The older homes,the diversity of housing stock and apartment types,the neighborhood commercial services,mature street trees,sidewalks,and front porch detailing all contribute to the community's unique character and "pedestrian friendly"atmosphere that the residents value. Goals Promote and enhance the existing neighborhood character and preserve the historic sense of the community for future generations to enjoy. Preserve and maintain a high standard for parks,open space,boulevards,parkways, streetscaping,traffic circulation,special improvement and historic districts within its boundaries as they pertain to the neighborhood's urban design. Preserve and enhance the pedestrian friendly atmosphere. Development should enhance the fabric of the neighborhood.Large scale development that could harm the residential,historic character of the community shall be discouraged. Action Recommendations The action recommendations that follow this section make reference to "Aesthetic Guidelines".The guidelines are provided as recommendations to property owners to serve as a tool in maintaining the existing neighborhood character.They are not proposed as an overlay district,nor as a covenant,nor to replace existing zoning laws.Recommendations have been divided into short term and long term.Short term recommendations can be started immediately with little or no money.Long term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. 33 A Landscaped Median on Seventh Avenue Parkway

PAGE 34

LAND USEUD-1 Implement the "Aesthetic Guidelines"as outlined in Appendix B.The committee tasks shall include: Application of guidelines as building changes occur,through the variance,zone change,and permitting processes. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Provide technical assistance upon request to property owners or developers during the design phase of their projects (e.g.an aesthetics checklist of design considerations,a forum for feedback early in the Planning process). Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Develop and apply a neighborhood process for continuous review of parks and open space, boulevards and parkways,streetscaping,traffic circulation,special improvement and historic districts within its boundaries (e.g.historic preservation,commercial districts,and hospital districts) as they pertain to the neighborhood's urban design. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations, Parks and Recreation Department, Community Planning and Development Agency Short Term All garage access and parking areas should be limited to alley access only.To preserve the "pedestrian friendly"concept of the neighborhood the blocks should not be cut up with access drives.All parking areas should be screened from street view with a combination of transparent fencing and landscaping.Large pen parking areas should be discouraged and should be designed to minimize the visual impact and to define the existing street lines as to not create a void in the street imagery. Implementing groups:Community Planning and Development Agency, Department of Public Works,Traffic and Transportation Division Short Term 34 Pedestrian-Friendly Streetscape Complements the Historic Residential Neighborhood

PAGE 35

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANUD-2 Create and reinforce buffers along the neighborhood borders and between residential and commercial areas.Specifically: Community Planning and Development Agency, Department of Public Works,Traffic and Transportation Division Long Term Encourage landscaped visual buffers of parking areas within the neighborhood. Community Planning and Development Agency, Department of Public Works,Traffic and Transportation Division Long Term Support the creation of cul-de-sac parking on Colfax (see graphic). Community Planning and Development Agency, Department of Public Works,Traffic and Transportation Division Long Term UD-3 Special districtsdevelop designated areas within or adjacent to areas that need special design consideration. Community Planning and Development Agency,Neighborhood Organizations Long Term 12th Avenue Business District:The enhancement of the street imagery and making this area a pedestrian destination should be a high priority.Through specific street landscaping,furnishings, lighting,and brick paved intersections,we can create two individual pockets of pedestrian activity as well as cut down on 12th Avenue through traffic.Specific design guidelines should be provided to create a high degree of visual interest,pleasing scale,and inviting spaces.Storefronts and signs should be subordinate to and integrated with each building facade and choice of materials and detailing should be compatible with the adjacent structures. Community Planning and Development Agency, Department of Public Works,Traffic and Transportation Division Neighborhood Business Organizations,Neighborhood Organizations Long Term 35 Business Residential Residential BusinessColfax Ave.Removable Bollards

PAGE 36

LAND USE Colfax Commercial District:The entire Colfax "strip"should be reviewed as a separate study to ultimately provide design guidelines for this district.However,we must address the issue of commercial/residential buffers.We fully endorse the concept of converting every other side street into a cul-de-sac to the residential side and to additional parking to the commercial side,with provisions to allow access to emergency vehicles.This transition should take place at he zone line and should be heavily landscaped to provide a visual barrier to the commercial street beyond. Zoning Administration, Neighborhood Organizations Long Term Colorado Boulevard Commercial District:The entire Colorado Boulevard area should be reviewed as a separate study to ultimately provide design guidelines for this district.This study should not only address the boulevard frontage and its mixture of higher density residential and commercial but should also address the transition to the adjacent lower density residential area. Zoning Administration, Neighborhood Organizations Long Term Hospital District:New structures should respect their old neighbors in terms of materials,scale, proportions,and detailing.Care should be taken to create structures that are "pedestrian friendly.'' Through the use of landscaping,and attention to scale and structural detail at the pedestrian level,there should be created a sense of comfort,to reduce the impact of the large scale of the overall structure. Zoning Administration, Neighborhood Organizations Long Term UD-4 Remove all billboards and discourage any new billboard sites in the neighborhood (includes both sides of Colfax Avenue). Community Planning and Development Agency,Zoning Administration Long Term 36 East Colfax Avenue

PAGE 37

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANZONING Overview The neighborhood is predominantly residential with commercial uses along Colfax Avenue,Colorado Boulevard,and two commercial nodes along 12th Avenue.The largest land use is residential.The second largest land use is parks and open space (Congress Park and 7th Avenue Parkway),followed by commercial land uses. The zone districts specifically applicable to Congress Park are R-0,R-1,R-2,R-3,B-1,B-2,and B-A-3,H-1-A, H-2,O-1,and P-1 and are shown on the attached map following this chapter.Their general purposes, descriptions and key regulations are provided in Appendix E. Residential Land Uses The Congress Park neighborhood has a total land area of 660 acres:88% is zoned for residential (47% for single-family,41% for multi-family). The R-0 zone south of 10th Avenue,which continues to Sixth Avenue,is a stable residential area.The residents in 1968 initiated a rezoning which resulted in a change from R-1 to the present zone. The low density residential area zoned R-1,to the south of 11th Avenue,has a number of legal nonconforming duplexes that were in existence prior to 1925 when zoning was instituted in the City. The medium density residential area,zoned R-2,has developed almost identically to the R-1 zone.The number of single family units to multi-family units in the R-2 zone is 55% to 45%.Any action to decrease density by changing the zone district to a lower density designation could lead to a number of nonconforming uses. The higher density residential area,zoned R-3,a high-rise apartment zone between 13th and Colfax Avenue,is underdeveloped by definition.Single-family units and duplexes predominate here as well.In 1992,the City and County of Denver instituted the H-1-A and H-2 Hospital District Zones,taking hospitals from the R-3 zone districts as a use by right.Due to the subsequent zone changes for National Jewish Center,the percentage of multi-unit residential zoning in the neighborhood has been reduced by 13 acres or 3%. In 1960,the ratio of owner-occupied housing and renter-occupied housing was about equal.In 1970,the 37 Single-Family Residence Multi-Family Residence

PAGE 38

LAND USEratio changed to 63.2% renter-occupied and 32.9% owner-occupied.1990 statistics illustrate that the ratio has stayed relatively stable with 55% renter-occupied and 32% owner-occupied.(Note:Does not equal 100% vacant units are not part of this percentage calculation). In short,Congress Park has developed a housing density mix that accommodates a variety of lifestyles and displays a diverse urban landscape. Special Residential Land Uses The neighborhood presently accommodates six group homes,one adult correctional facility and one special care home within its boundaries.These facilities are presently located in the higher-density area, or R-3 zone,of the neighborhood.A recent city ordinance now limits,in an area,the location of these facilities,based on their proximity to each other. Commercial Land Uses Commercial uses zoned B-4 are concentrated along the East Colfax Avenue corridor,along with two areas of B-A-3 that have remained stable over the years.Two smaller nodes of commercial uses,zoned B-1 and B-2,are located at 12th Avenue and Clayton,and 12th Avenue and Madison.Colorado Boulevard,8th Avenue and 6th Avenue (zoned B-2),along with the two nodes mentioned above on 12th Avenue,have businesses which provide services to the surrounding neighborhood.Madison Square (12th and Madison) has some vacancies and some businesses for the larger community (eye bank,metal plating).For the purpose of this plan,both sides of East Colfax and 6th Avenues have been included in the narrative. Hospital Districts National Jewish Center occupies approximately two blocks in the northeast corner of the neighborhood. A portion of the hospital campus is also located on the east side of Colorado Boulevard in the Hale neighborhood.Although not in the Congress Park neighborhood,University Hospital and University of Colorado Health Sciences Center (UCHSC) border on the east.UCHSC also utilizes one block in the neighborhood zoned R-1/R-3 for a parking lot and offices. 38 Colfax Ave.13th Ave.14th Ave. 12th Ave. 11th Ave. 10th Ave. 9th Ave. 8th Ave. 7th Ave. Pkwy. 6th Ave.Congress ParkYork St. Josephine St. Columbine St. Elizabeth St. Clayton St. Detroit St. Fillmore St. Milwaukee St. St. Paul St. Steele St. Adams St. Cook St. Madison St. Monroe St. Garfield St., Jackson St. Harrison St. Colorado Blvd. Group Home Locations

PAGE 39

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Vacant Land There are approximately three acres of vacant land.The former Golden Ox restaurant,at one time a prominent Colfax Avenue landmark for Denver residents,has been demolished.Between 14th and Colfax on Steele Street in the R-3 zoned area are three to four parcels of land that are also vacant. Parks and Open Space Congress Park is located at 8th Avenue and Josephine Street.The total acreage is 17.10 and the area is zoned O-1.It contains tennis courts,a playground,an outdoor swimming pool area,playing fields, picnic shelters,and a restroom.Additionally,there is the grassed-over area covering two of the Capitol Heights reservoirs for use as playing fields for team sports.This area offers three more acres of active recreational space. Seventh Avenue Parkway provides additional green space and is frequently used for jogging and walking by the residents of Congress Park. Tennis courts,Gove Middle School playfields and a Community Garden located between 13th and 14th Avenue on Harrison on DPS property (formerly the location of the school),also serve as open space for the neighborhood. The Denver Botanic Gardens at 10th Avenue and York Street and Cheesman Park directly east offer additional recreational and other open space for the neighborhood.Other parks outside of the neighborhood used by the residents are City Park (north of 17th Avenue,between Colorado Boulevard and York Street),Lindsley Park (11th Avenue and Dahlia Street),and Bromwell Park (4th Avenue and Josephine Street). Schools Teller Elementary School at 1150 Garfield and Good Shepherd Catholic Elementary at 940 Fillmore and Good Shepherd Catholic Middle School at 620 Elizabeth are located within the Congress Park neighborhood boundaries. 39 Teller Elementary School

PAGE 40

LAND USE Goals To maintain the existing integrity of the residential character of Congress Park. To oppose hospital expansion outside the areas currently zoned for hospital uses west of Colorado Boulevard. To maintain the small scale residential character of the 12th Avenue business areas and foster the development of a "Main Street"type imagery. To preserve the existing parks and open space that are available to the neighborhood. To minimize the visual impact of commercial structures to their adjacent residential neighbors. Preserve the areas of historical significance through historic districts or historic landmark designation. To maintain and enhance the viability of high density residential and commercial land uses on Colorado Boulevard. Action Recommendations The action recommendations have been divided into short term and long term.Short term recommendations can be started immediately with little or no money.Long term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. ZG-1 Encourage the city-wide dispersal of group homes. Implementing groups:Zoning Administration, Denver Comprehensive Plan, Community Planning and Development Agency Short Term 40

PAGE 41

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANZG-2 Contain all hospital development and related uses to and within currently zoned hospital districts only.Oppose additional hospital zoning and related uses including parking in adjacent residential areas.Eliminate noncomforming hospital and parking uses. Implementing groups:Hospitals, Neighborhood Organizations, Parking Management, Community Planning and Development Agency Short Term ZG-3 Discourage any expansion or new construction of any non-park related facilities on existing park land. Implementing groups:Department of Parks and Recreation, Neighborhood Organizations, Parking Management, Community Planning and Development Agency Short Term ZG-4 Preserve mountain view from Congress Park by moving the point of origin to the top of the Congress Park reservoir. Implementing groups:Community Planning and Development Agency Short Term ZG-5 Establish a standing neighborhood zoning committee to monitor,review and recommend use permits within the neighborhood. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Organizations Short Term 41

PAGE 42

LAND USE 42 B-1B-2R-2 R-3 R-3 R-3H-1-A* wrs B-4 B-4 B-4B-4R-2 R-1 R-0 R-0 R-0 0-1H-2* P-1 B-A-3 B-2B-A-3H-2/ wrs*R-1B-4 wvr. PUD 425 Colfax Ave.13th Ave.14th Ave. 12th Ave. 11th Ave. 10th Ave. 9th Ave. 8th Ave. 7th Ave. Pkwy. 6th Ave. Congress Park York St. Josephine St. Columbine St. Elizabeth St. Clayton St. Detroit St. Fillmore St. Milwaukee St. St. Paul St. Steele St. Adams St. Cook St. Madison St. Monroe St. Garfield St., Jackson St. Harrison St. Colorado Blvd. Zoning Map of Congress Park

PAGE 43

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 43 ZG-6 Initiate zoning amendments and policies to protect the single family residential character within Congress Park.Specifically: Identify and extend R-2 zoning to those areas zoned R-3,but currently meeting R-2 criteria. Zoning Administration, Community Planning and Development Agency, Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Strongly oppose additional commercial and institutional zoning by other than the PUD process. Zoning Administration, Community Planning and Development Agency, Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Discourage zone changes that would result in higher residential densities by other than the PUD process. Zoning Administration, Community Planning and Development Agency, Neighborhood Organizations Short Term

PAGE 44

TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATIONTRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATION 44

PAGE 45

Street Usage CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 45 Colfax Ave.13th Ave.14th Ave. 12th Ave.11th Ave.10th Ave. 9th Ave.8th Ave. 7th Ave. Pkwy. 6th Ave. Congress Park Colorado Blvd. York St. Josephine St. Columbine St. Elizabeth St. Clayton St. Detroit St. Fillmore St. Milwaukee St. St. Paul St. Steele St. Adams St. Cook St. Madison St. Monroe St. Garfield St. Jackson St. Harrison St.ARTERIAL COLLECTOR LOCAL BIKE ROUTE

PAGE 46

TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATION Overview The Congress Park Neighborhood is a community that has several modes of transportation at its disposal. The primary mode of transportation is the automobile.There are three designations used by the City in classifying streets:arterial,collectors,and local streets. Arterial streets have the function of permitting rapid and relatively unimpeded traffic movement through the city and serving as a primary link between communities and major land use elements.A number of major arterial are designed as state highways.Arterial typically carry up to 50,000 vehicles per day.Colorado Boulevard carries between 53,000 63,200 vehicles per day. Collector streets have the function of collecting and distributing traffic having an origin or destination between arterial and local streets within the community,and linking neighborhood residential areas,shopping and service facilities,and employment areas.Collectors typically carry up to 15,000 vehicles per day (i.e...12th Avenue and 7th Avenue Parkway). Local streets have the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties.They carry low volumes of traffic (less than 5000 vehicles per day) with an origin or destination within the neighborhood. Mass Transit Congress Park is served by several Regional Transportation District Routes.Routes (6) East 6th Avenue/North Pecos,(10) East 10th Avenue runs along 12th Avenue,(15)(15 Ltd) East Colfax and East Colfax limited,(24) University Crosstown and (40) Colorado Boulevard Crosstown.These routes provide for adequate neighborhood geographic coverage based on walking distance to bus stops. Bike Routes Congress Park neighborhood is served by the city-wide bikeway system.The present bike routes east/west are 7th Avenue Parkway and 12th Avenue;routes north/south are Steele/St.Paul Street from 7th Avenue Parkway to City Park.Columbine Street and Elizabeth Street also connect 12th Avenue to City Park and to downtown Denver (west along 16th Avenue). 46

PAGE 47

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Issues The Traffic and Transportation category was selected as focus issue #2 by the neighborhood survey conducted at the beginning of the planning process.The neighborhood is experiencing increased traffic through the neighborhood.Based on available traffic counts,the residential one-way arterial streets carry in excess of 100,000 vehicles per day;maximum volumes are:6th Avenue (21,400);8th Avenue (16,300); 14th Avenue (17,200);York Street (15,100):and Josephine Street (15,900).This has created a number of issues,including: Motorists diverting from arterial streets via collector and local streets through the neighborhood to get to their destinations across town. Off-street parking continues to be a major problem due to large volumes of traffic and inadequate off-street parking at the hospitals,the Colfax and Colorado Boulevard corridor businesses and the Botanic Gardens. Motorists,bus drivers and other commercial drivers do not comply with speed limits Properties and residences along arterial and collectors have experienced traffic related vibration and noise problems as well as pollution due to street sanding/sweeping practices. There is not consideration apparent for the residents directly adjacent to the arterial when scheduling repair,construction and maintenance operations in pre-dawn hours. The one-way streets function as a chute through the neighborhood,making 6th,8th,13th,14th, Josephine and York dangerous crossing for pedestrians and bicyclists. 13th and 14th Avenues have poor visibility for the motorist and need major aesthetic improvement. An imbalance exists between the need to maintain and improve the residential integrity of the one-way streets versus the accommodation of an ever-increasing level of traffic. 47

PAGE 48

TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATION Goals Mitigate impact to adjacent land uses and development from neighborhood traffic and reduce through traffic. Reduce speeding traffic through the neighborhood to a level consistent with posted speed limits and compatible with the neighborhood's land uses to preserve the residential quality of life. Provide an increase in alternative modes of transportation,other than the automobile,by encouraging bus,bicycle and pedestrian travel. Discourage non-resident on street parking on local streets throughout the neighborhood, especially near adjacent hospitals and Botanic Gardens. Protect and maintain the quality of life enjoyed by residents of Congress Park,especially those on arterial and collector streets,by enforcing speed limits,improving road conditions,addressing aesthetic issues and the appropriate timing of maintenance and repair operations. Action Recommendations The action recommendations have been divided into short term and long term.Short term recommendations can be started immediately with little or no money.Long term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. TT-1 Enforce existing parking limits throughout the neighborhood.Work with Police and Parking Management for better service. Implementing groups:Parking Management, Neighborhood Organizations, Police Department Short Term 48

PAGE 49

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANTT-2 Enforce speed limits with particular emphasis on all one-way and collector streets. Implementing groups:Police Department Short Term TT-3 Improve street surfaces and/or reconstruct streets to adequately support traffic weight and volumes and enhance maintenance/sanding/sweeping practices. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works, Street Maintenance and Traffic and Transportation Divisions Long Term TT-4 Enhance the use of alternative modes (walking,bicycling,and transit) through the following:the improvement of landscaping along arterial/collector street rights-of-way,the installation of city standard bicycle racks in neighborhood commercial areas,the construction of city standard sidewalks along arterial/collector streets (with pedestrian ramps at intersections),the provision of shelters,benches or hard surface waiting areas at bus stops. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Transportation Division Long Term TT-5 Evaluate existing traffic signage,signal timing and related traffic controls to discourage cutthrough traffic on local streets. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Transportation Division Long Term TT-6 To enhance the residential and pedestrian environment,where appropriate consider physically or visually narrowing local and collector streets,and install additional stop signs. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Transportation Division Long Term 49

PAGE 50

TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATIONTT-7 Stripe crosswalks at all 4-way stops within the neighborhood. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works, Transportation Division and Street Maintenance Division Long Term TT-8 In addition to the actions specified above,implement street-by-street recommendations as follows: Sixth Avenue Assess the adequacy of pedestrian crossing accommodations (safety and convenience) throughout the corridor,with particular attention on activity around the school, churches and neighborhood commercial areas located along the street.Evaluate the left turn arrow from Sixth Avenue eastbound to Colorado Boulevard northbound to eliminate bottleneck, consider a second left turn lane.Maintain as one-way. Seventh Avenue Install bike path signs.Construct gateway to Seventh Avenue westbound at Colorado Boulevard.Investigate timing of light for Colorado Boulevard northbound turning to Eighth Avenue westbound to discourage alternate turn patterns from Colorado Boulevard northbound to Seventh Avenue westbound. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Transportation Division Long Term Eight Avenue In order to enhance the residential character for adjacent homes,provide a "buffer"from moving traffic lanes adjacent to Congress Park ballfields,and to shorten crossing width for pedestrians,consider establishment of a full time parking lane along with two travel lanes,similar to 13th Avenue.Construct sidewalk along Congress Park,adjacent to 8th Avenue. Replace mid-block signal which has been removed between Colorado Boulevard and Steele Street to provide more gaps for pedestrians.Implement more effective speed limit enforcement. Streetscape public right-of-way.Maintain as one-way. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Transportation Division, Police Department, Community Planning and Development Agency Long Term 50

PAGE 51

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Twelfth Avenue In order to improve safety and delineate pedestrian activity areas associated with neighborhood business/shopping nodes,install 4-way stops and stripe crosswalks at Twelfth and Madison,and Twelfth and Clayton.Add 4-way stop at Twelfth and Jackson adjacent to Teller School at the striped crosswalk (see graphic).Reduce speed limit to 25 m.p.h.and enforce.Improve street construction and maintenance to mitigate noise and vibration from traffic. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Transportation Division, Community Planning and Development Agency Long Term Thirteenth Avenue End parking lanes farther back from intersections with local streets.Fix curbs and gutters and install handicapped access ramps.Streetscape public right-of-way. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Transportation Division, Planning and Development Office Long Term Fourteenth Avenue Enforce speed limits.Streetscape public right-of-way. Implementing groups:Police Department Community Planning and Development Agency, Long Term 51 Twelfth AvenueMadison Street Clayton StreetBrick/Concrete pavers

PAGE 52

TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATION Colfax Avenue Install street lamps,streetscape public right-of-way.Design and implement cul-desac parking as illustrated in the economic development section.Explore the concept of a designated area parking lot to cut down side-street parking and congestion. Implementing groups:Community Planning and Development Agency, Department of Public Works,Transportation Division Long Term Colorado Boulevard Establish liaison with hospitals to increase awareness of neighborhood traffic and parking concerns,and encourage them to inform their employees and clientele and to solicit cooperation. Implementing groups:Hospital Representatives, Neighborhood Organizations Short Term In order to enhance pedestrian safety and use,reconstruct sidewalks to minimum City standards;improve cross-walk signage and markings,and maintain all improvements. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Transportation Division Street Maintenance Division Short Term Repair streets to reduce noise and vibration from traffic.Insure that arterial street repair and maintenance occurs at an hour which accommodates the residents adjacent to the street rather than accommodating traffic. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Street Maintenance Division Short Term 52

PAGE 53

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Enforce speed limits.Study signal timing,lane channelization,and other traffic flow modifications to discourage traffic short cuts through the neighborhood.Study traffic movement on north/south arterial for smoothest flow alternatives. Implementing groups:Police Department, Department of Public Works,Transportation Division Short Term Research,design and construct locations for bus "pull-out"pads to improve the flow of through traffic on Colorado Blvd.(e.g.:between 13th and 14th Avenuessouthbound; between 9th and 11th Avenues-northbound). Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Transportation Division, Regional Transportation District Long Term Josephine/YorkEstablish liaison with Botanic Gardens to increase awareness of neighborhood traffic and parking concerns,and encourage them to inform their employees and clientele and to solicit cooperation. Implementing groups:Botanic Gardens Representatives, Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Encourage pedestrian traffic through improvements to sidewalks,crosswalks and maintenance of said improvements. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Transportation Division Property/Business Owners Long Term 53

PAGE 54

TRAFFIC & TRANSPORTATION Repair streets to reduce noise and vibration from traffic.Insure that arterial street repair and maintenance occurs at an hour which accommodates the residents adjacent to the street rather than accommodating traffic. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Street Maintenance Division Short Term Enforce speed limits.Discourage cutting through the neighborhood.Study signal timing and traffic flow modifications to help insure compliance with posted speed limits,improve pedestrian safety and discourage short-cutting through the neighborhood.Study traffic movement on north/south arterial for smoothest flow alternatives. Implementing groups:Police Department, Department of Public Works,Transportation Division Short Term (enforcement) Long Term 54

PAGE 55

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 55

PAGE 56

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 56 Colfax Ave.13th Ave.14th Ave. 12th Ave. 11th Ave. 10th Ave. 9th Ave. 8th Ave. 7th Ave. Pkwy. 6th Ave. Congress Park York St. Josephine St. Columbine St. Elizabeth St. Clayton St. Detroit St. Fillmore St. Milwaukee St. St. Paul St. Steele St. Adams St. Cook St. Madison St. Monroe St. Garfield St., Jackson St. Harrison St. Colorado Blvd. Sub-area 1a “GREEK TOWN” Sub-area 1Sub-area 3 Sub-area 2 Sub-Areas

PAGE 57

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Overview Commercial uses comprise 2.7% of the area of Congress Park Neighborhood.This plan groups the commercial areas into nodes and corridors for clarity of definition.Although not a part of Congress Park Neighborhood,and not included in the 2.7% figure above,the north side of East Colfax Avenue between York Street and Colorado Boulevard is included in its narrative and recommendations. Colfax Avenue Business Corridor (Sub-area 1) Sub-area 1 is comprised of the East Colfax corridor from York Street to Colorado Boulevard. Colfax Avenue is in many ways the "Main Street"of not only the neighborhood but also of Denver's metropolitan region with more than 2 million people.Stretching from the foothills of Golden to the high plains of Adams and Arapahoe County on the east,Colfax Avenue is the longest commercial street in North America.It is also U.S.Route 40,which was the principle highway link between Denver and Kansas City until the construction of Interstate Highway 70.From east to west, Colfax Avenue functions as a type of linear mall for shopping and services. Merchants and residents along the Colfax Corridor struggle with a negative image caused by the generally-held,largely false perception that the area is one of prostitution and high crime.Denver, Lakewood,and Aurora are continuing efforts to make Colfax a safe and attractive place through law enforcement,streetscape "beautification"projects,economic development strategies,and a new "Life Begins on U.S.40"promotional campaign. The Avenue is lined with many established businesses and institutions such as Collins Bicycles, Goodfriends Restaurant,Rosen-Novak Ford and National Jewish Center which serve people from the entire Metropolitan area.Reasonable rental rates and land prices have also made this business district an attractive location for new businesses. Colfax Avenue "Greek Town" (Sub-area 1a)Located along both sides of Colfax between Elizabeth Street and St.Paul Street is an area identified by its many Greek restaurants and bakeries."Greek Town"recently received recognition by Denver's City Council through a resolution acknowledging the naming of the area. 57

PAGE 58

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENTColorado Boulevard Business Corridor (Sub-area 2) This is a small business area along the west side of Colorado Boulevard between 7th Avenue and 9th Avenue which serves not only the neighborhood but the Hospital District as well.This area is zoned for business use B-2 and high density residential R-3 and abuts a lower density residential R-2 and R-1 zone. 12th Avenue Shopping Nodes (Sub-area 3) Two neighborhood shopping nodes located along 12th Avenuethe first between Clayton and Elizabeth and the second between Monroe Street and Cook Streetare comprised of businesses which,generally, serve the neighborhood.Established businesses such as 12th Avenue Ace Hardware and Pantry Thriftway are in the first node while Capitol Heights Pharmacy and OK Antique Plating are examples of businesses in the second node.12th Avenue,unlike Colfax,is a local "Collector"street for mostly local traffic. Issues/Goals The major goal of economic development is to sustain Congress Park Neighborhood by attracting, stimulating and preserving small businesses to serve the neighborhood residents.The purpose of this section is to ensure the stability of the businesses in the Shopping Nodes and to promote the health of those enterprises along the Colfax and Colorado Boulevard Corridors. At issue,specifically,is the aesthetic nature of the neighborhood which,if enhanced,will offer a significant contribution to the welfare of commercial ventures which,in turn,help to maintain the neighborhood.Congress Park Neighbors is concerned about the large number of vacant buildings and vacant lots within business zones and the need to find suitable uses for those properties while preventing further deterioration.In recognizing that problems,such as parking,can be fairly resolved only by strong, cooperative organizations and,often,by financial assistance from government programs,Congress Park Neighbors hopes to stimulate business organizations and to heighten awareness of economic programs which might be available. The following are goals for the business areas within Congress Park: Colfax Avenue Business Corridor (Sub-area 1) To create a stable,safe,attractive,well-lit retail street with a mix of offices,neighborhood businesses,and destination businesses that attract customers from out of the geographic area,with anchor tenants to increase traffic for other businesses. 58 12th Avenue Shopping Node

PAGE 59

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 59 Colfax Avenue "Greek Town" (Sub-area 1a)To support the merchants in the development of "Greek Town"on Colfax Avenue between Elizabeth and St.Paul Street in their aim to create a positive identity and attract people citywide to the area. Colorado Boulevard Business Corridor (Sub-area 2) To encourage stable,attractive uses that serve the University Hospital community and the neighborhood and do not detract from the residential character of the neighborhood. 12th Avenue Shopping Nodes (Sub-area 3) To maintain the quiet,charming,low-traffic character of businesses,with an emphasis on services and retail establishments that serve as amenities to Congress Park residents,such as drug stores,restaurants, hardware stores,and laundries.ACTION RECOMMENDATIONSThe action recommendations have been divided into short term and long term.Short term recommendations can be started immediately with little or no money.Long term recommendations will take longer to accomplish and will require funding. ED-1 Economic Development Apply to become a Neighborhood Business Revitalization District (NBR) in order to participate in Federal economic program granted through city government. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Business Associations, Mayor's Office of Economic Development Long Term Inventory and evaluate vacant properties within the business corridors and nodes in order to recruit business development. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Business Associations Short Term

PAGE 60

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Help the Colfax at the Park Association to become an Urban Enterprise Zone to take advantage of various tax incentives offered by this state of Colorado /MOED program. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Business Associations, Mayor's Office of Economic Development Long Term Develop vacant land in a way that is compatible with the character and density of the surrounding businesses and neighborhoods. Implementing groups:Property Owners, Planning and Development Office Long Term ED-2Market/Identity Market Colfax's identity as a positive shopping environment. Implementing groups:Business Owners, Neighborhood Business Associations Long Term Encourage conversion of businesses that create a negative image,such as adult book stores and can banks,to more appropriate uses. Implementing groups:Business Owners, Neighborhood Business Associations Long Term 60

PAGE 61

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANED-3 Parking Study cul-de-sac parking for East Colfax businesses on alternating streets to accommodate business parking requirements and to create a buffer between the neighborhoods and businesses. Implementing groups:Department of Public Works,Traffic and Transportation Division, Business Associations, Neighborhood Organizations, Community Planning and Development Agency Long Term Encourage shared parking with retail establishments. Implementing groups:Business Associations, Neighborhood Organizations Short Term ED-4 Aesthetics Support streetscaping,lighting,facade improvements,trees,flowers,and other aesthetic enhancements for businesses. Implementing groups:Business Associations, Neighborhood Organizations, Community Planning and Development Agency Short Term Encourage removal of graffiti and trash by appropriate parties. Implementing groups:Business Associations, Neighborhood Organizations, Department of Public Works,Keep Denver Beautiful Office Short Term 61 Business Residential Residential BusinessColfax Ave.Removable Bollards

PAGE 62

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Eliminate billboards on Colfax Avenue. Implementing groups:Zoning Administration Long Term ED-5Health and Safety Secure additional police patrols of neighborhood business districts. Implementing groups:Police Department Long Term Aid in the formation of neighborhood/ business "watch"programs. Implementing groups:Business Associations, Police Department Short Term Enforce code compliance by owners of vacant land and buildings. Implementing groups:Neighborhood Inspection Services Short Term ED-6Business Organizations Strengthen and stimulate membership in neighborhood business organizations such as Colfax at the Park and the Twelfth Avenue Merchants Association.Foster cooperation between these organizations,and with Congress Park Neighbors Inc. Implementing groups:Business Associations, Neighborhood Organizations Short Term 62

PAGE 63

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANED-7 Business/Resident Relations Encourage neighbors to patronize Colfax Avenue,12th Avenue and Colorado Boulevard neighborhood businesses. Implementing groups:Business Associations, Business Owners, Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Preserve current zoning and development scale and require business development to remain within these boundaries. Implementing groups:Business Associations, Business Owners, Neighborhood Organizations, Community Planning and Development Agency Short Term Closely monitor all liquor license applications and notify neighbors of hearings. Implementing groups:Department of Excise and Licenses, Neighborhood Organizations Short Term Support the current position of the Congress Park Neighbors,Inc.in opposing any new package liquor store licenses and to evaluate all other liquor licenses on a case by case basis. Implementing groups:Department of Excise and Licenses, Neighborhood Organizations Short Term 63

PAGE 64

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Work with city and state to establish more appropriate licensing procedures,such as liquor licenses that are owner-specific and not attached to the property,regardless of ownership. Implementing groups:Department of Excise and Licenses, Neighborhood Organizations, State Legislature Long Term 64

PAGE 65

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANAPPENDICES 65

PAGE 66

APPENDIX A: 1992 NEIGHBORHOOD SURVEY The Three Things I Value Most About Our Neighborhood: Answer:# of ResponsesTotal # of Responses Close to Downtown23 Convenience to shopping/culture/dining17 Location 15 Convenience to Cherry Creek6 Conveniences 5 TOTAL 66LOCATION Neighbors20 Sense of community18 Friendliness8 TOTAL46SENSE OF COMMUNITY Old homes/architecture33 Well maintained properties13 TOTAL46ARCHITECTURE Cultural,economic diversity29 TOTAL 29CULTURE Parks/proximity to parks27 Trees/mature landscaping20 7th Avenue Parkway 11 Quiet and/or quieter than Capitol Hill13 TOTAL 71PARKSAPPENDICES 66

PAGE 67

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANAnswer:# of ResponsesTotal # of Responses Neighborhood school10 City living in residential neighborhood8 Small businesses7 Single family homes6 Families5 Feels safe/secure5 Botanic Gardens4 Real estate appreciation/ property values4 Stability3 Good Shepherd School2 City services2 Beauty2 Sidewalks2 Character2 Integrity2 Group homes2 TOTAL 2VOTES EACH Lighting1 Parking off alleys1 Grew up here1 Recreation (parks?)1 Areas of renewal1 Scale1 University Hospital1 Senior Citizens1 TOTAL 1VOTE EACH 67

PAGE 68

APPENDICES The Three Problems I Want Solved First In Our Neighborhood Are: Answer:# of ResponsesTotal # of Responses Crime30 Break-ins/robberies5 Gangs/loitering/graffiti/vandalism24 Lack of police presence12 Police visits to apartments1 TOTAL 72CRIME Traffic23 Speeding7 Cars/parking6 One way streets2 TOTAL 38TRAFFIC Noise/ambulance4 Hospital traffic1 Med center parking1 Hospital encroachment7 TOTAL 13HOSPITAL Poorly maintained property11 Run-down rentals3 Irresponsible landlords/tenants 4 Snow removal2 Sidewalks need repair1 Shrubs covering sidewalks2 Shrubs/cars covering alley1 Tree replacement3 Litter3 Too much new wiring in alleys1 TOTAL 31AESTHETICS 68

PAGE 69

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANAnswer:# of ResponsesTotal # of Responses Trash in alleys8 Lighting in retail/high crime areas7 Alley recycling3 Care of trees in right of way2 Designated bike routes2 Property tax increases1 Keep streets fixed1 Trash pick-up1 Street cleaning restrictions1 TOTAL26CITY SERVICES Down zone8 Pop-tops5 Encourage single family3 Illegal multi-units3 Historic pres./district2 Reverse downzoning1 Condos are increasing1 Keep stability in R-31 Keep loud bars out1 TOTAL25CODE/ZONING Liquor store relocation5 12th Avenue vibrancy4 Commercial interaction with residential2 Preserve re:values through redevel.1 Encourage growth and progress1 TOTAL1312th AVE./BUSINESS 69

PAGE 70

APPENDICESAnswer:# of ResponsesTotal # of Responses Colfax12 Group Homes12 No shelter ever1 Stevens vacancy/re-use10 Dog problems (poop,barking,running loose)10 Hatred increasing,Elitism,Don't exclude, Diversity,Be organized without being reactionary,response to homelessness6 (one vote each) Quality of schools5 Busing2 Encourage young people/ families to move in3 TOTAL10 FAMILIES/SCHOOLS Neighborhood identity,sense of community, manage change,need guidelines/plan1 vote each No problems3 Transient residents2 Joggers going wrong way on Parkway1 Solicitations1 Loss of community gardens at Botanic Gardens1 Botanic Gardens1 Invasion of privacy1 Neighborhood committees1 Do-gooders1 People putting flyers on my door1 Other Comments: Hold neighborhood meetings in the afternoons so senior citizens can attend. Give prizes for the most attractive alley/backyard. Set up a designated dog area in Congress park,except during soccer and baseball season. 70

PAGE 71

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANAPPENDIX B: AESTHETIC GUIDELINESThese guidelines are provided as recommendations to property owners to serve as a tool in maintaining the existing neighborhood character.They are not proposed as an overlay district,nor as a covenant,nor to replace existing zoning laws. Exterior Finishes Sense of Community The materials of the individual structures create a unified element that provides a backdrop to the neighborhood.Use of any new material should reflect the existing materials of brick,stucco,painted wood,etc.and be represented in their historic context.Inappropriate materials such as natural wood, metal,large glass areas,etc.should be discouraged. Architectural Integrity The exterior materials should provide the unifying element in the design.From level to level and from porches to fencing,the materials should blend to provide a level of continuity. Rental MaintenanceThe neighborhood as a group should encourage landlords to maintain their properties consistent with the exterior level of quality reflected in owner occupied structures. Renovations PhysicalEach property should be reviewed on a case by case basis for their impact on adjacent neighbors and with regard to the overall street imagery. Sense of Community The design of the addition should reflect the imagery of the existing structure (front porches,strong roof lines,dormers,etc).The addition should not turn its back to the street and should not be used as a barrier to the street. Architectural Integrity All additions should be designed with the idea in mind that the integration between the new and old should be natural,with a strong respect to the context of the existing design elements. 71

PAGE 72

APPENDICESLandscaping All fencing,street trees,and miscellaneous plantings should be reviewed in context with its street imagery and not just as an individual project.All fencing fronting on the street shall be limited in height (4'-0"max.) and should have a feeling of "transparency,"so as to not be seen as a barrier. Lighting All exterior lighting should be kept to a low level to enhance the structure of landscaping,but not to impact adjacent neighbors. New Construction Single Family Zoning/PhysicalEach property should be reviewed on a case by case basis for its impact on adjacent neighbors and with regard to the overall street imagery and in context with the existing scale of surrounding structures. Over-building with respect to lot size should be discouraged. Sense of Community When providing a design concept for an "infill"lot there should be respect for the historic character of the community,not from the standpoint of preservation,but from the aspect of compatibility. Architectural Integrity New structures should respect their old neighbors in terms of materials,scale,proportions,and detailing. Care should be taken as to not have a "hodge-podge"of styles that will deteriorate the fabric of the existing neighborhood. Landscaping All fencing,street trees,and miscellaneous plantings should be reviewed in context with its street imagery and not just as an individual project.All fencing fronting on the street should be limited in height (4'-0"max.) and should have a feeling of "transparency,"so as to not be seen as a barrier. Lighting All exterior lighting should be kept to a low level to enhance the structure or landscaping,but not to impact adjacent neighbors. Parking All garage access and parking areas should be limited to alley access only.To preserve the pedestrian friendly concept of the neighborhood the blocks should not be cut up with vehicular driveways,nor should the street imagery be cluttered with garage doors. 72

PAGE 73

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN New Construction Multifamily Zoning/PhysicalEach property should be reviewed on a case by case basis for its impact on adjacent neighbors and with regard to the overall street imagery and in context with the existing scale of surrounding structures. Over-building with respect to lot size should be discouraged. Sense of Community When providing a design concept for an "infill"lot there must be respect for the historic character of the community,not from the standpoint of preservation,but from the aspect of compatibility. Architectural Integrity New structures should respect their old neighbors in terms of materials,scale,proportions,and detailing. Care should be taken to create structures that are "pedestrian friendly."Through the use of landscaping, and attention to scale and detail at the pedestrian level there should be a sense of comfort,as to take away from the large scale of the overall structure. Landscaping All fencing,street trees,and misc.plantings should be reviewed in context with its street imagery and not just as an individual project. Lighting All exterior lighting should be kept to a low level to enhance the structure or landscaping,but not to impact adjacent neighbors. Parking All garage access and parking areas should be limited to alley access.To preserve the "pedestrian friendly"concept of the neighborhood the blocks should not be cut up with vehicular driveways.All parking areas should be screened from street views with a combination of transparent fencing and landscaping.Large open parking areas should be discouraged and should be designed to minimize the visual impact to define the existing street lines so as not to create a "void"in the street imagery. 73

PAGE 74

APPENDICES Street Imagery Traffic and Parking All new improvements should encourage off street parking that should screen vehicles from the street view. Parks and Recreation The parks and tree lined streets are our most valuable asset and care should be taken to maintain and build upon this imagery. Signage No signs,billboards,or graphics should be displayed on any residential site,with the exception of the occupants'name and house number.Multifamily units and commercial sites may provide "low-impact" signage that conforms with all local codes and is compatible with adjacent uses. Landscaping The area between the street curb and front setback of the building provides that aesthetic continuity that blends individual properties into a single street image.With that in mind,any evaluation of landscaping improvements should be seen in the context of how it will effect the existing street imagery. 74

PAGE 75

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANAPPENDIX C: CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORS, INC.Congress Park Neighbors,Inc.is a neighborhood association registered with the City of Denver as a 501 C (3) non-profit corporation.It was formed in 1978 to represent the neighborhood with the following purposes: To coordinate and improve community and resident involvement,cooperation,pride and awareness. To work for better cultural,recreational,educational,safety and civic programs. To disseminate information about issues which affect the community and its residents. To promote cooperation and coordination between the community,residents,public agencies, private agencies and businesses. The Board meets monthly.In 1994,there were 250 paid members.Standing committees are Membership,Outreach,Crime Action,and Business Development.CPN also has strong liaisons with the Colorado Boulevard Health Care District membership,the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver Botanic Gardens,Denver Public Schools,the city of Denver and adjacent neighborhood organizations.The organization publishes and distributes the quarterly "Congress Park Newsletter." CPN is a member of Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods (CHUN) and the Inter-Neighborhood Cooperation (INC),and is eligible to send delegates to both these umbrella organizations. 75

PAGE 76

APPENDICESAPPENDIX D: ZONING Key Regulations of Zone Districts in Congress Park Zoning is the traditional legal tool of cities to regulate the use of all of the land within the jurisdiction and control the impact that its use has on adjacent properties and the city as a whole.Denver has had zoning regulations since 1926,after most of the Congress Park neighborhood was developed. Zoning directly regulates the land uses allowed for properties,basic requirements for construction (e.g. the minimum size allowed for a lot,setbacks from property lines to buildings,the height and bulk of buildings,etc.),requirements for off-street parking,open space,and location and size of signs. Since zoning regulations change from time to time,the latest information is always available from the Zoning Administration. R-0 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings,Low Density.Foster family care and day care allowed as home occupations by permit.Minimum of 6,000 square feet of land required for each dwelling unit.Maximum Density = 7.3 dwelling units/acre. R-1 Single-Unit Detached Dwellings,Low Density.Same as R-0 except that home occupations and room-renting to one or two persons are allowed upon application and issuance of a permit.Maximum Density = 7.3 dwelling units/acre. R-2 Multi-Unit Dwellings,Low Density.Typically duplexes and triplexes.Home occupations are allowed by permit only.Minimum of 6,000 square feet required for each duplex structure with an additional 3,000 square feet required for every unit over 2.Maximum Density = 14.5 housing units/acre. R-3 High-Density Apartment District.Building size is controlled by limited bulk standards,off-street parking and open space requirements.Building floor area cannot exceed three times the site area.This zone should not be used as a buffer zone.Maximum density is not specified and is determined by the size of the individual units and the factors mentioned above. H-1, H-2 Hospital Zone Districts.Contact Zoning Administration for up-to-date information on zoning ordinances. 76

PAGE 77

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANAPPENDIX E: ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Mayor of Denver Honorable Wellington E.Webb Denver Planning Board Ruth Falkenberg,ChairThomas Foster Bernie JonesJim Daniels Peggy MontanoDaniel R.Guimond Marilyn StokesGilbert F.McNeish Mary Beth Susman,Ph.D. Congress Park Neighborhood Plan Steering Committee Mary Ferrell,Co-ChairJohn Yonushewski,Co-Chair DeAnne Minner,President CPNJudith Spiegel Margie BoshouwersTom Johnson Carol JohnsonFrank Scalise Kelly TynanPaula Machlin Tom O'NeillJulie Bell Brian TooleyKathy Fay Charlotte ReddenDon and Terry McCullough Eric Price Crime Prevention Committee Richard Moody,ChairDave Quinlivan Kelly BitnerMonique Coustry Gerry ArmstrongDeVonna Johnson Jean GriffinClaudia Goodman Mary ZidanickBruce and Lois Feinstein Charlotte BentleyKathi Anderson 77

PAGE 78

APPENDICES Outreach and Community Pride Committee Kathy Kurtz,ChairLuAnn Curtis Michael CurtisStephen Humphrey Jennifer and Tracy VermeyenShirlee Wreed Terry McCulloughWarren Banman Jan OenBuffy Naake Peg HigginsJay Nelsen Eric Price Traffic and Transportation Committee Joanne Malisani,ChairKelly Tynan Alin RasmussenApril Montgomery Tom EidsmoeBecky Gay Zoning Committee Bob RobertsonMatthew Lancaster Peggy MahoneyEdgar Neel Kathy FayDebbie Baldwin John YonushewskiSteven Humphrey Bryan AumillerLinda Childs Becky D.LaurillaPatrick K.Shannon Tim and Judy PantherSusan Fisher Ronda Ballard 78

PAGE 79

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Economic Development Committee Barbara WrightCharlotte Redden Ron KienzleAlan Eisenberg Cindy ChaseJeffrey Joyce Cathy KuykendallPete and Jim Dadiotis Tito CollinsMaureen Sherlock Bobby Lutrell Denver Community Planning and Development Agency Jennifer T.Moulton,Director of Planning and Development Harriet R.Hogue,Planning Manager,Neighborhood Planning Lupe Herrera,Senior City Planner Theresa Lucero,Senior City Planner Kiersten Faulkner,Associate City Planner Jim Ottenstein,Graphics Julie Connor,Graphics Ken Barkema,Graphics Carl Haberman,Graphics Daniel Michael,Graphics 79

PAGE 80

APPENDICESADOPTION ORDINANCE 80

PAGE 81

CONGRESS PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANORDINANCE NO. 806 SERIES OF 1995For an ordinance approving a neighborhood plan for the Congress Park neighborhood, which plan shall become a part of the Comprehensive Plan for the City and County of Denver pursuant to the provisions of Section 41-18 (c) of the Revised Municipal Code and of Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989. Whereas, pursuant to the provisions of Section 41-18 (c) of the Revised Municipal Code,and by Ordinance No.617,Series of 1989,there has been approved a Comprehensive Plan for the City and County of Denver;and Whereas, said section of the Revised Municipal Code provides for the amendment of said Plan;and Whereas, Ordinance No.617,Series of 1989,provides for the incorporation of "Neighborhood Plans"into the Comprehensive Plan;and Whereas, as a proposed part of the Comprehensive Plan,the Planning Director has transmitted to the Mayor and Council for acceptance a proposed neighborhood plan for the orderly and harmonious development of the Congress Park neighborhood in the City and County of Denver;and Whereas, the Mayor has approved the same;and Whereas, the Planning Board has approved the same;and Whereas, the Neighborhood Plan was prepared with significant involvement of the residents and representatives of the various interests of the Congress Park neighborhood and adjacent neighborhoods and has been approved by the same;and Whereas, a member of City Council in whose council district the neighborhood plan is situated has monitored the process whereby said plan was formulated. 81

PAGE 82

INTRODUCTIONNow, Therefore, Be It Enacted By The City And County Of Denver: Section 1. That the proposed neighborhood plan for the harmonious development of the Congress Park Neighborhood,consisting of a document entitled "Congress Park Neighborhood Plan",filed with the City Clerk,Ex-Officio Clerk of the City and County of Denver,on the 20th day of September,1995,as City Clerk's filing No.95-867,is hereby approved as part of the Comprehensive Plan,pursuant to Section 41-18 (c) of the Revised Municipal Code,Ordinance No.617,Series of 1989. Section 2. That the approval of the Congress Park Neighborhood Plan,and any subsequent amendment thereto,is intended to establish the same,in conjunction with the Comprehensive Plan,as the official guide for officials of the City and County of Denver and private citizens when making decisions affecting the future character of the Congress Park neighborhood of the City and County of Denver;provided, however,that such approval shall not preempt the decision making powers vested by law or the administrative directive of the Mayor,the Council or any other official of the City and County of Denver with respect to,but not limited to,a zoning map amendment,a zoning language amendment,a dedication or vacation of a street,alley or other public way,a designation of a park,the issuance of a revocable permit,a conveyance or the acquisition of real property by the City and County of Denver,of an appropriation for or construction of a capital improvement;and provided,further,that it is expressly understood that judgement must be exercised in the application of the Congress Park Neighborhood Plan recommendations in the decision making process of the Mayor,Council and other officials of the City and County of Denver.Passed by the Council October 2, 1995 Deborah L. Ortega, President Approved: Wellington E. Webb, Mayor, October 3, 1995 Attest: Elba Wedgeworth, Clerk and Recorder Ex-Officio Clerk of the City and County of Denver Published in the Daily Journal September 27, 1995 and October 6, 1995 82