Citation
Villa Park neighborhood plan, 1991

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Title:
Villa Park neighborhood plan, 1991
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Community planning
Neighborhood plans
City planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Villa Park

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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ILLA PARK
NEIGHBORHOOD
PLAN
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ADOPTED APRIL 29, 1991




VILLA PARK
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
CKNO
WLEDGEMENTS
AdoptedApril 29,1991
Mayor Federico Pena
City Council Ramona Martinez, Gtycouncilwoman, District 3
Marshall Vanderburg, Administrative Assistant, District 3
Villa Park Steering Committee
Jo Ann Philips Patricia Alvarado
Gilbert Barela, Jr. Sofie Gomez
Regina and Sergio Gonzales Cruc Rodriguez
Kathy Sandoval
Urban and Regional Planning Studio n
University of Colorado at Denver
Instructor Bernie Jones Linda Hamlin
Linda Madntyre Marianne LeClair
Kathy Loo Heidi Popkin
Ivan Soeria
City and County of Denver Departmental Staff
Frank Gray, Planning Director
Dennis Swain, Senior City Planner
Jerry Garcia, Program Manager
Harriet Hogue, Senior City Planner
Jerry McCowan, City Engineer
Julie Connor, Graphics
Dennis Royer, Director of Transportation Engineering
Terry Rosapep, Director of Transportation Planning
Neil Sperandeo, Long Range Planning Director of Parks and Recreation
Billie Bramhall, Deputy Director of Planning
Lupe Herrera, Associate City Planner
Steve Gordon, City Planner Specialist
Roger Johnson, City Engineer
Wayland Walker, Senior City Planner
Daniel Michael, Graphics
Readopted January 24,2000 as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive
Plan 2000
Mayor Wellington E.Webb
City Council Ramona Martinez, Councilwoman, District 3
John Soto, Jr., Special Advisor to Council President Ramona Martinez
Denver City Council
Dennis Gallagher, District 1
Ramona Martinez, District 3
Polly Flobeck, District 5
Bill Himmelman, District 7
Hiawatha Davis, Jr., District 8
Edward RThomas, District 10
Cathy Reynolds, Member-at-Large
Denver Planning Board
William H. Hornby, Chairman
Frederick Corn
Michael Dino
Rus Hackstaff III
Joyce Oberfeld
Robert Wright
Ted Hackworth, District 2
Joyce Foster, District 4
Susan Casey District 6
Kathleen Mackenzie, District 7
Deborah L. Ortega, District 9
Happy Haynes, District 11
Susan Barnes-Gelt, Member-at-Large
Jan Belle
Pat Cortez
Daniel Guimond
Mark Johnson
Terrance Ware


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
ABLE OF CONTENTS
Tide
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Vision for Villa Park.......................................
Summary of Neighborhood Goals...............................
Location....................................................
History.....................................................
Land Use Map..............................................
Use of this Plan............................................
Social Analysis.............................................
Neighborhood Goals, Strategies & Implementation Programs
Neighborhood Design Features................................
Land Use and Zoning.........................................
Land Use Map..............................................
Zoning Map................................................
Housing Characteristics.....................................
Business....................................................
Transportation..............................................
Traffic and Streets Map...................................
Environment.................................................
Elevation Map.............................................
Rood Hazard Map...........................................
Geologic Hazards Map......................................
Public Safety and Crime Prevention..........................
Community Facilities........................................
Page
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44


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
IV


INTRODUCTION


INTRODUCTION
IIhe vision for villa park
What will Villa Park look like in the future? If the goals, strategies, and implementation programs outlined
in this neighborhood plan are pursued and accomplished,Villa Park will be an attractive, economically
vital, and exciting, safe, stable, affordable, and inviting place to live and do business.
Villa Park will continue to be a neighborhood of mostly single-unit houses, with a few small apartment
buildings and apartment complexes interspersed with the houses. Rezoning from R-2 to R-l will relieve
large sections of the neighborhood from the pressures for redevelopment to higher density and will
assure that new housing will be single-unit, rather than higher density apartments. Both the houses and
apartments will be buffered from the traffic on the surrounding streets and will have safe and attractive
access to the trails, open spaces, and recreation facilities in Lakewood and Dry Gulches; to the
neighborhood-serving retail, conveniently located within the neighborhood and at its edge; and to the
light rail system which can make a trip Downtown, the new airport, the Denver Tech Center, or any of
the other major destinations in the Metropolitan Denver area fast and enjoyable.
Villa Park will have developed a strong image, focused on its unique access to Lakewood and Dry
Gulches, its well maintained and affordable housing, its mature landscaping, its wonderful topography and
views, its central location, and its culturally diverse population, welcoming everyone from young families
to the elderly.
2


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
SUMMARY OF NEIGHBORHOOD GOALS
> improve neighborhood arterials
> plant trees and improve tree maintenance
> establish a neighborhood image or identity
> sopport and enhance neighborhood commerical activity
> enhance the appearance and quality of neighborhood housing
> improve neighborhood environmental conditions
> improve neighborhood circulation for all modes of travel
> enhance neighborhood safety
> upgrade neighborhood infrastructure
> create neighborhood recreation opportunites
> develop lakewood gulch as a neighborhood asset
3


INTRODUCTION
Location
The neighborhood is situated on Denvers western border. Its edges are clearly defined: Lakewood / Dry
Gulch on the north, the 6th Avenue Freeway on the south, Federal Boulevard on the east, and Sheridan
Boulevard on the west.
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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
HISTORY
The Villa Park neighborhood got its start in 1871, when a mixture of Colorado and eastern developers
bought 1000 acres in what is now the Villa Park-Barnum area. According to the Rocky Mountain News of
August 24,1871, the group planned a subdivision, which would include artificial lakes in ravines on the
property, grand views, and streets with pedestrian walkways. Initial plans for the area also included a
hotel, landscaping by the man who designed Central Park in New York City, and a design consultation
group to review plans for the new housing.
Eight years later, in 1879, the still largely-undeveloped land was sold to Phineas Barnum, whose family
was extremely active in real estate development in Denver, and for whom the neighborhood immediately
south ofVilla Park is named Barnum is also credited with establishing Villa Park School in 1879.
By 1890, a hotel was still being mentioned for the area, but development plans were proceeding slowly.
In the 1900 Census, there were only 50 single-unit dwellings and 16 multi-unit dwellings in the area. As
current residents might expect, historic newspaper articles also indicate that the ditches and ravines in
the neighborhood have been an ongoing issue for Villa Park. An article from the March 10,1900, Denver
Times, for instance, noted that Villa Park needed sewers much more than a proposed high school for its
40 students.
From 1900 to 1939, slow but steady residential development occurred in Villa Park.An average of 14
dwelling units was added per year, with a total of 577 single and multi-unit dwellings added during this
time. Over 91.5% of these were single-unit dwellings. From the 1940s through the 1950s, the area was
largely built-out with single-unit dwellings. During the late 1950s, and into the 1960s and 1970s,
multi-unit construction predominated, particularly on sites at the western edge of Villa Park.
5


Historic Map
Western History Department, Denver Public Library
o
z


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
USE OF THIS PLAN
Following review by the Denver Planning Board and adoption by Denver City Council, the Villa Park
Neighborhood Plan will function as the official planning document for the neighborhood. As such, City
agencies, neighborhood organizations, and private developers will use it. It will provide guidance for
public improvements, programs, and private development.
Relationship to Other Plans
This and all other neighborhood plans are consistent with and supplemental to the Citys
Comprehensive Plan.The Comprehensive Plan presents a citywide perspective, while each
neighborhood plan provides more specific guidance both for the allocation of City resources and for the
location and design of private development.
The Planning Process
The Villa Park Neighborhood Plan began as a project for the Urban and Regional Planning Studio II at the
University of Colorado in Denver. The project was guided by Bernie Jones, Ph.D., an Associate Professor
in the Urban and Regional Planning program. A team of six graduate students prepared the first draft of
the plan. Working closely with Councilwoman Ramona Martinez, representatives from the Denver
Planning and Community Development Office, and a Steering Committee of neighborhood residents, the
student team held a series of work sessions and public review meetings and incorporated the comments
from those meetings into a draft plan.The draft plan was then turned over to representatives from the
Denver Planning and Community Development Office, who edited the plan and circulated it to other
City agencies for review. After the departmental comments were incorporated, the draft plan was
returned to the neighborhood for a final review and then was presented to the Denver Planning Board
for review. With a recommendation for approval from the Planning Board, the plan is currently
proceeding to City Council for review and adoption as an element of the Citys Comprehensive Plan.


INTRODUCTION
Race
Black
OCIAL ANALYSIS
1997 Births
Buck other
, Anglo
Hispanic
Age Distribution
Population
The population and demographics of Villa Park are continually changing. The population of the
neighborhood dropped from 7,419 in 1980 to 7,066 in 1990, a loss of 353 people, or 5% of the 1980
population. The demographics of Villa Park have also changed, with the principle shift being toward an
older and more Hispanic population. Between 1970 and 1980, for example, the number of residents who
were 65 years or older increased 38% and the number of households receiving Social Security benefits
rose 54%. Despite this shift, in 1985,Villa Park still had a smaller percentage of its population which was
older than 65 than did the City as a whole: 9.2% of the neighborhood versus 12.6% of the City residents
who were over 65. In 1990, Villa Park had a larger percentage of its population, which was younger, than
18 than did the City as a whole: 33% for the neighborhood versus 22% for the City. While 23% of the
Citys population was of Spanish origin in 1990, the figure for Villa Park was 64%, up from 50.5% in 1980.
The Villa Park work force suffered during the period from 1970 to 1980.The workers, who were
employed primarily in blue collar jobs, experienced a dramatic increase in unemployment, with the
number of unemployed residents 16 years and older increasing 48% in that 10 year period. During the
same period, the number of households receiving public assistance increased over 60%.
Household Income 1985
$74,500 plus
In 1985, the estimated median household income was lower in Villa Park than it was in the City as a
whole: $21,003 in Villa Park and $23,546 in the City. Villa Park also has shown a wide disparity between
the income levels of owner-occupied households and renter-occupied households. In 1980, the median
income of owner-occupied households was $17,941 and of renter-occupied households $9,944.
/Vole: The demographics presented in this section have been updated with the most current figures
available, in some cases 1990 Census data, in others 1985 estimates.
8


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
NEIGHBORHOOD
GOALS, STRATEGIES
It IMPLEMENTATION
PROGRAMS
Each of these goals has several strategies and suggestions for implementing those
strategies. It should be noted that the strategies and implementation steps detailed in this
section can be accomplished alone or in conjunction with one another. Names of contact
agencies referred to in the implementation statements are listed in the Appendix.
Note: The neighborhood goals are not listed by priority.


GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
h Low profile hoosiog
NEIGHBORHOOD DESIGN FEATORES
Villa Parks hilly topography provides panoramic views of downtown Denver and of the Rocky
Mountains, particularly from Lakewood / Dry Gulch, which divides the neighborhood diagonally.
Scale and Building Materials
Villa Park is a low profile neighborhood, laid out in a grid pattern. Most of the buildings are residential.
Although the dominant structure in the neighborhood is the G.A.O. Maes Apartment building, which is 12
stories tall, the majority of residences are single-unit, one-story brick houses. One, two, and three story
multi-unit dwellings are also present in the neighborhood, particularly in the western half. Most of the
residences are set back from the street on small lots with front and rear yards. Non-residential units
consist of single-story shops and numerous churches, which are scattered throughout the neighborhood.
Gateways and Edges
Although Villa Park has distinct borders, there are no gateways which clearly identify entry into the
neighborhood.There are, however, intersections, which could serve as gateways if they were improved
and clearly marked. These include both 8th and 10th Avenues at Federal Boulevard, on the eastern edge of
the neighborhood. On the western edge, 10th Avenue could serve as an identifiable gateway. Both Knox
Court and Perry Street are potential gateways, from the north at Lakewood / Dry Gulch, and from the
south at the 6th Avenue Freeway.
Activity Centers
Villa Park has no major center of activity, such as a centralized shopping area.The neighborhood,
however, does have minor activity centers, including the intersection of 10th and Knox Court, with the
convenience store and liquor store on two corners; Presentation Church; Cowell and Eagleton Elementary
Schools; and the intersection of 6th Avenue and Knox Court, where there are several stores.
10th & Federal
10


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Image
Villa Park does not project a strong image; few people outside the neighborhood know where Villa Park
is, let alone what the boundaries of the neighborhood are. Lack of major activity centers and of
identifiable gateways have contributed to this problem. While Lakewood / Dry Gulch provides an
opportunity for creating a strong image for Villa Park, it will not do so until it is more fully developed and
better maintained.
Aside from its lack of a clear public image, the biggest image problem facing Villa Park is the
deteriorating quality of maintenance of housing. There is a stark contrast between the owner-occupied
homes, most of which are well maintained, and the renter-occupied homes, many of which are poorly
maintained. A rising number of absentee-ownerships, HUD repossessions, and vacant homes are adding
to this image problem in Villa Park.
vision
> Build on the positive physical characteristics of the neighborhood.
> Create a more beautiful neighborhood in which to live and do business.
QOal UD-1: Improve neighborhood arterials.
strategy UD-la: Initiate business, streetscaping and business facade improvements along Federal
Boulevard.
implementation program UD-1a-1: Initiate a study of Federal Boulevard.
> Work with the Mayors Office of Economic Development, the Colorado Department of Highways,
the Transportation Division of the Denver Department of Public Works, and the Denver Planning
Office to initiate and implement market, business development, traffic, and urban design studies
of Federal Boulevard. The studies should evaluate how improvements to the businesses and the
traffic flow can be balanced with improvements to the way in which Federal Boulevard impacts
and serves both the adjoining neighborhoods and the City as a whole.To the extent possible,
address these issues in the Southwest Quadrant Transportation Study.
11


GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
implementation program UD-1a-2: seek funding for streetscaping and facade improvements and
maintenance.
> 6th & Perry
h Set annual priorities for streetscape and business facade improvement projects.
h Work with the City Council District office and the Denver Planning and Community
Development Office to identify funding programs currently available through the City or other
funding sources, the funding cycles for each of those programs, the criteria for qualifying for
those programs, and the criteria which will be used by the funding entity to evaluate whether or
not the project should be funded.
h Work with property owners to put together applications for funding programs, to develop
community support for those applications, to establish mechanisms which will assure long-term
maintenance of the improvements, to guarantee the participation of new retail or residential
uses, and to follow through the application, evaluation, funding, and construction process.
goal UD-2: Establish a neighborhood image or identity,
strategy UD-2a: Build neighborhood gateways
implementation program UD-2a-1: Select locations for gateways to the neighborhood.
> Possible locations for gateways to mark the entrance to Villa Park include 8th and Federal, 10th
and Federal, 10th and Sheridan, Fakewood / Dry Gulch (approximately 12th) and Sheridan, Knox
Court and 6th Avenue, Knox Court and the Gulch, Perry and 6th Avenue, or Perry and the Gulch.
implementation program UD-2a-2: Design gateways for each of the selected locations.
> For each of the selected locations, consider preliminary designs for a gateway.These might
include a sign, similar to the sign for Barnum at 6th and Knox; trees; or other landscaping.The
design should be preliminary; funding for final design work should be included in the request for
funding of the gateway.
12


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
implementation program UD-2a-3: seek funding to construct and maintain the gateways.
I Develop a program for maintaining the gateways once they have been constructed; consider
using neighborhood volunteers and holding fundraisers to help provide both a matching
contribution for the construction and an ongoing fund for maintenance. With the preliminary
design, an estimated construction cost, locally raised funds which can be used as a match for the
funds raised from outside the neighborhood, and a maintenance plan, approach alternative
funding sources with proposals for funding the remaining portion of the cost of construction of
the gateways.
13


GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
Rand use and zonins
Types of Land Use
There are six types of development in Villa Park, each of which is indicated on the land use map.
1 Single-unit detached housing dominates Villa Park.
2 Multiple-unit housing, including duplexes and low-to-medium density apartments are the second
most prominent land use.
3 Commercial uses, including retail and business services, border the neighborhood on Federal and
Sheridan Boulevards and are also found in small clusters within the neighborhood.
4 Public open space, including Lakewood and Dry Gulches, is concentrated on the north edge of
the neighborhood.
5 Semi-public uses include churches and schools.
6 Vacant land, including privately owned vacant lots, is the sixth, less predominant, land use.
14


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
LEOEND
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Land Use Map
15


GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
Zoning
The predominant zoning in Villa Park is residential, although there is also business zoning along the edges
of the neighborhood.The zoning categories listed below correspond to the zoning maps and describe
what types of development are allowed in each zone district.
R-l Single-unit Detached Dwellings, Low Density maximum density is 7.3 units per acre.
Foster family care, day care, home occupations, and room renting to one or two persons are
allowed after special permit approval.
R-2 Multi-unit Divellings, Low Density maximum density is 14.5 units per acre. Home
occupations are allowed as listed above after special approval.
R-2A Multi-unit Dwellings, Medium Density maximum density is 21.8 units per acre. Home
occupations are allowed only after special permit approval.
B-2 Neighborhood Business District regulations are designed to permit development of a
variety of locally-oriented retail uses, limited by standards designed to protect the adjacent
residential district.
R-4 General Business District provides commercial uses which include a wide variety of
consumer and business services and retail establishments that serve other business activities.
Limitations imposed in these areas are designed to protect integrity and character of adjacent
residential districts.
PUD Planned Unit Development a form of development characterized by unified site design (for
clustering buildings and providing common open space), density increases and a mixture of
building types and land uses. Permits planning of project and calculation of densities over an
entire development area, rather than on an individual lot.Allows both residential and commercial
uses if requested.
16


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
R-1 single family residence
R-2 multi-family residence
R-2A mutt Eternity residence
B-2 business
B-4 business
PUD planned unit development
sw i*sw
Zoning Map
17


GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
Land use in Villa Park generally conforms to the existing zoning. For example, the multiple-unit
dwellings along Lakewood / Dry Gulch are located in the R-2 zone district, and most of the businesses
are located along Federal and Sheridan Boulevards in the B-2 and B-4 zone districts.There are, however,
several small pockets of businesses located in R-l and R-2 zone districts.These are considered legally
non-conforming uses since they existed prior to the R-l and R-2 zoning and were, therefore,
grandfathered in as legal uses.
The primary inconsistency between the current zoning and the land uses in Villa Park is the
predominance of single-unit dwellings in the R-2 zone district. Because zoning should be consistent with
the existing and desired character of an area, most of the area in Villa Park which is zoned R-2 can be
considered over-zoned, even though single-unit dwellings are a use-by-right. R-l zoning would be more
consistent with the existing character in most of the neighborhood.
vision
> Compatibility of zoning to land use.
> Protection of residential character of the neighborhood.
> Compatibility between residential and business land use.
strategy IZ-1: Discourage higher density development.
implementation program IZ-la: Consider rezoning portions of the neighborhood.
) Zoning is intended to reflect both the current and the desired character of an area. However,
while most of the housing in Villa Park is single-unit, the zoning throughout much of the
neighborhood, R-2, allows and encourages the development of low density apartments.The
property owners in those areas, therefore, should consider rezoning to a lower density residential
zone, which would more accurately reflect the existing and desired character of the
neighborhood.
> Work with the Council office, the Planning and Community Development Office, and the Zoning
Administration to determine the best strategy for rezoning and the appropriate procedures.
18


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
strategy IZ-2: Discourage development that is incompatible with the scale and quality of the
neighborhood.
implementation program IZ-2a: Monitor requests for rezoning and for zoning variances.
I With a registered neighborhood organization, Villa Park will receive notification of any
applications for rezoning or zone variances. Using the neighborhood plan as the basis for
reviewing these applications, the neighborhood organization should establish a procedure and
assign responsibilities for commenting on these applications, sending written comments to the
appropriate agencies, and appearing at any applicable public hearings with the comments of the
association.
strategy IZ-3a: Remove housing from marginal areas.
implementation program IZ-3a-1: Rezone housing in marginal areas for commercial uses.
I As a way to help people sell houses which are in areas which no longer provide healthy
residential environments, such as along Sheridan and Federal Boulevards, encourage rezoning
that housing as a Planned Unit Development which would allow commercial or other more
intense, but residentially- compatible, uses while buffering the remaining adjoining residential
uses from potential negative impacts.
19


GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
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HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS
Housing in Villa Park is slightly older than the average for the City of Denver 46 years for single-unit
residences and 37 years for multiple-unit residences, compared to a Denver average of 39 years.The average size
of housing units in Villa Park is smaller than in the City as a whole 863 square feet for single-unit residences
and 720 square feet for multiple-unit residences, compared to a Denver average of 1024 square feet.
The percentage of owner-occupancy is comparable to the City average 46% of the housing units in Villa Park
are owner-occupied and 34% are renter-occupied, versus 48% and 52%, respectively, for Denver. During the later
part of Denvers economic recession of the 1980, Villa Park experienced an increasing number of vacant
residences.
Villa Park has few commercial or semi-public land uses, and no industrial uses. Retail activity is concentrated
along Federal Boulevard and Sheridan Boulevard, with a limited mixture of neighborhood-serving retail uses
located within the neighborhood. Semi-public uses such as schools and churches are scattered throughout the
neighborhood.
Using the land use map, some generalizations can be made about land use in Villa Park and the way differing
land uses interact. First, the boundary between private and publicly-owned land in Lakewood / Dry Gulch is
often unclear.This land ownership pattern blurs the lines of responsibility for maintenance since it is difficult to
determine at what point the public responsibility ends and the responsibility of private landowners begins.
Second, multiple-unit uses have changed the appearance, value, and composition of the western side of Villa
Park, particularly on the streets nearest Sheridan Boulevard.
Patterns of Residential Development and Condition
Residential development in the neighborhood has undergone periods of transition. The first area within Villa
Park to be developed was the eastern section; development there was primarily single-unit dwellings and few
lots were left vacant. Development in the western section of the neighborhood was slower and more scattered,
20


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
with many lots initially left undeveloped. As a result, as the demand for multiple-unit housing grew, the western
section of Villa Park experienced the development of apartments on many of its vacant lots. As Denvers
economy reeled from the oil boom and bust of the 1980s, the housing stock in Villa Park increasingly suffered
from deterioration and abandonment, with many homes reverting to bank, HUD, or VA ownership. Initial 1990
Census counts of vacant housing in Villa Park indicated there were 425 vacant housing units, accounting for
14.5% of the 2934 housing units in the neighborhood. Field checks confirmed the accuracy of that figure.As
the economy has begun to improve, so has the occupancy and the condition of housing in the neighborhood.
More recent field checks have shown a decrease in the number of vacant units.
vision
Mean Housing Sales Prices 19701998
) A strong and vital residential neighborhood.
> Increase the rate of home ownership.
> Sound management and a mix of income levels in rental single family homes and apartments.
) Renovate and maintain housing.
goal H-1: Enhance the appearance and quality of neighborhood housing,
strategy H-la: Focus on vacant and boarded-up structures.
implementation prograoi H-1a-1: Focus on existing owners.
I
>
>
>
Create and maintain a current list of deteriorated, vacant, or boarded-up structures in the
neighborhood.
Research the ownership of these properties through the Denver Assessors Office.
Write letters to the owners) of problem properties as a neighborhood organization requesting that
they repair their property and have it occupied. Provide information to them on available programs
for funding renovations. Follow-up on the initial contact with additional letters and telephone calls.
If the owner does not respond, work with the Council District office to identify and report City
codes violations.
21


GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
) Put a Hit List of problem properties in local newsletter as the Neighborhood Housing Service
does.This could include pictures of the properties with their addresses and the owners names.
implementation program H-1a-2: seek funding for renovating and occupying structures.
> Establish a new non-profit group, or work with an existing group, which will focus on improving
housing in the neighborhood.
) Work with the Council District office and the Denver Planning and Community Development
Office to identify funding programs currently available through the City or other funding
sources, the funding cycles for each of those programs, the criteria for qualifying for those
programs, and the criteria which will be used by the funding entity to evaluate whether or not
the project should be funded.
> Work with the non-profit housing group and property owners to put together applications for
funding programs, to develop community support for those applications, and to follow through
the application, evaluation, funding, and construction process.
strategy H-2a: Focus on poorly maintained and managed rental housing.
implementation program H-2a-1: Identify problem properties
> Create and maintain a current list of rental properties, which are poorly maintained, poorly
managed, or in violation of Denver building codes.
) Continue efforts, by following the process outlined in H-la-1, above.
implementation program H-2a-2: seek funding for renovating rental properties.
I Establish a new non-profit group, or work with an existing group, which will focus on improving
housing in the neighborhood.
) Work with the Council District office and the Denver Planning and Community Development Office to
identify funding programs currently available through the City or other funding sources, the funding
cycles for each of those programs, the criteria for qualifying for those programs, and the criteria which
will be used by the funding entity to evaluate whether or not the project should be funded.
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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I Work with the non-profit housing group and property owners to put together applications for funding
programs, to develop community support for those applications, and to follow through the application,
evaluation, funding, and construction process.
strategy H-3a: Encourage housing rehabilitation.
implementation program H-3a-1: seek funding for renovating housing.
I Establish a new non-profit group, or work with an existing group, which will focus on improving
housing in the neighborhood.
I Work with the Council District office and the Denver Planning and Community Development Office to
identify funding programs currently available through the City or other funding sources, the funding
cycles for each of those programs, the criteria for qualifying for those programs, and the criteria which
will be used by the funding entity to evaluate whether or not the project should be funded.
I Work with the non-profit housing group and property owners to put together applications for funding
programs, to develop community support for those applications, and to follow through the application,
evaluation, funding, and construction process.
strategy H-4a: Transfer ownership of substandard rental properties to home ownership,
implementation program H-4a-l: seek funding for home ownership programs.
I Establish a new non-profit group, or work with an existing group, which will focus on improving
housing in the neighborhood.
I Work with the Council District office and the Denver Planning and Community Development Office to
identify funding programs currently available through the City or other funding sources, the funding
cycles for each of those programs, the criteria for qualifying for those programs, and the criteria which
will be used by the funding entity to evaluate whether or not the project should be funded.
I Work with the non-profit housing group and property owners to put together applications for funding
programs, to develop community support for those applications, and to follow through the application,
evaluation, funding, and construction process.
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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
[Business
vision
> Support and enhance neighborhood commercial activities.
> Increase retail activity.
> Research the shopping desires and needs for new businesses.
> Institute a senior shopping service.
goal B-4: Support and enhance neighborhood commercial activities.
strategy B-4a: upgrade the visual appearance of 10th Avenue and Knox Court.
implementation program B-4a-1: Seek funding for streetscaping and facade improvements and
maintenance.
> Follow the recommendations outlined in UD la-2 on page 12.
strategy B-4b: Research the shopping desires and needs for new businesses,
implementation program B-4b-1: Conduct a neighborhood survey.
> Conduct a survey of neighborhood residents and businesses, asking residents their attitude
toward the businesses which are currently in the neighborhood, changes which they would like
to see to those businesses, and which additional businesses they would most like to see added to
the neighborhood.Ask business owners about their customers, other businesses which are in the
neighborhood and those, which they would like to see, added, and how they think their
businesses could be improved.
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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
implementation program B-4b-2: Form an association of business and property owners.
> Work with the business and property owners in and adjacent to the neighborhood to form one
or more business associations.At a minimum, form an association of businesses along Federal
Boulevard. As one of the first steps in the process of creating an association, talk to
representatives of similar business associations in the City. Once formed, the business association
can work to improve the business climate in the areas by solving common problems; attracting
new businesses; and jointly applying for available funding for business development, facade
renovation, and streetscaping.
strategy B-4c: Increase retail activity.
implementation program 4c-1: Develop and fund a business development program.
> Using the results of the neighborhood survey, work with the Council District and the Mayors
Office of Economic Development to establish a business development program and to identify
potential funding sources for implementing the program. Work with business and property
owners to apply for funds to implement the program.
strategy B-4d: Institute a senior shopping service.
implementation program B-4c-1: Use an existing service or create a new service.
> Work with current providers of senior shopping services to evaluate the need for expanded
service in Villa Park and potential mechanisms to provide the expansion. Current providers
include Senior Support Services, RTDs Senior Shopping Program, and RTDs Senior Ride
program. Local churches should be contacted for a source of volunteers for expanding existing
services or creating a new senior shopping service.
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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
If R A N S P 0 R T A T I 0 N
Description and Analysis
Streets are designated by the Denver Comprehensive Plan according to the following definitions:
> Local Streets: Serve the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties and of
carrying low volumes of traffic (less than 2,000 vehicles per day) with an origin or destination
within the neighborhood. Examples 7th Avenue and Tennyson Steet.
> Collector Streets: Distribute traffics between arterial and local streets within the community
and link residential areas, local and community shopping, and other major community activity
areas. Collector streets have average volumes of 5,000 to 12,000 vehicles per day. Examples of
collector streets are Perry Street and 10th Avenue.
) Arterial Street: Provide for through traffic on a continuous route.They serve as the primary link
between communities and major land use elements.The average traffic volumes typically range
from 10,000 to 50,000 vehicles per day. Examples of arterial streets are Federal Blvd. and
Sheridan Blvd.
The Department of Public Works classifies existing streets.The map shows the Villa Park neighborhood
with existing street classification and average daily traffic counts from 1988 and 1993.
Major Streets
The main streets, or arterials, in Villa Park Federal Boulevard, Sheridan Boulevard, and 6th Avenue
Freeway form three of the four neighborhood edges.
Tenth Avenue, which carries less traffic, runs east-west near the northern border of the neighborhood,
and is considered a collector for traffic from other, less traveled, streets.
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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
a
Traffic Count and Strnnt Classification Map
o aw K-y i/sss
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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
Perry and Knox Court, which run north-south, are also considered collectors and are the only streets
internal to the neighborhood which cross the 6th Avenue Freeway. The extension of Eighth Avenue from
Federal to Knox Court is a remnant of the street system which existed prior to the construction of the
6th Avenue Freeway.This street is currently considered a collector and has received City funding for
traffic and streetscaping improvements.
Traffic impacts from expanding 6th Avenue Freeway
There are long-range traffic plans, which consider the widening of 6th Avenue Freeway by two lanes on
each side and improving the frontage road. If these plans were approved and funded, they would require
the purchase and removal of a row of houses on either side of the freeway.This plan is not likely to
begin, however, for at least five years, because of delays in the Federal funding process and the lack of
State and Federal funds.The Southwest Quadrant Transportation Study is also addressing the potential
need for widening 6th Avenue.
Sidewalks and Bike Paths
While most streets in Villa Park have sidewalks, there are streets which do not have them on both sides,
and in some cases do not have sidewalks on either side of the street. Other streets have sidewalks which
are uneven and, therefore, hazardous.While bike paths run along sections of the gulches, they are not
continuous and are in some cases difficult to use because of poor maintenance, including low-hanging
branches and mud.
Public Transportation
Villa Park has a long history of access to public transportation.The street cars which served Denver from
the end of the 1800s until the 1950s serviced Villa Park, and many ofVilla Parks first homes were built
near these old routes. Currently, the Regional Transportation District (RTD) operates a number of bus
routes in and around the neighborhood, which follow the original street car routes.
RTD is not planning changes, which will affect the bus routes in and near Villa Park. However, if
constructed, the proposed rapid transit route servicing west Denver would go through Fakewood / Dry
Gulch, passing directly over the railroad tracks near Dry Gulch at 12th Street.With this proposed route,
one or more transit stations might be built near Villa Park. Prior to construction of a rapid transit system,
funding would have to be approved by voters in the affected municipalities.
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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
vision
> Safe and uncongested traffic flow within and through the neighborhood
> Landscaping and buffering that will protect adjacent residences along arterial streets.
> Reduced noise levels along 6th Avenue Freeway
> Convenient RTD bus transit service to all areas in the neighborhood.
strategy II: Provide noise barriers on the western portion of the 6th Avenue Freeway.
) Both the north and south sides of the 6th Avenue Freeway are considered Type 2 areas, meaning
that there were existing conditions exceeding 67 decibels. As a result, both sides of the freeway
are eligible for federal funds for noise barriers. However, because the freeway may be widened
and that widening might result in the removal of any noise barriers, which were installed prior
to the widening, federal funds cannot be used to construct them.
implementation program I1-a: Secure funding for noise barriers.
I
>
>
>
>
Address this issue through the Southwest Quadrant Transportation Study.
If it is consistent with the completed Southwest Quadrant Study, form a coalition with other
neighborhoods, which adjoin the 6th Avenue Freeway in order to work on acquiring noise
barriers and to participate in the design process for the anticipated expansion.
Work with the Colorado Department of Highways to determine the schedule for widening of
the 6th Avenue Freeway and the anticipated acquisitions, which would be required for that
widening.
Using the tentative schedule and the knowledge of anticipated acquisitions, determine the best
approach for the neighborhoods: whether to push for an accelerated construction schedule or
for construction of temporary noise barriers.
Work with City, State, and congressional representatives to lobby for the desired approach to
acquiring noise barriers.
29


GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
Strategy 12-b: Improve parking and traffic circulation around schools.
implementation program I2-b-1: Investigate the residential parking permit program.
) The Transportation Division of the Department of Public Works administers the residential
parking permit program.The program restricts parking to residents with permit stickers, with a
few parking spaces retained for guest parking. The neighborhood organization should investigate
the advantages of such a program around the neighborhood schools. As part of this effort, the
organization should work with the schools to find alternative parking for staff and visitors.
implementation program I2-b-2: Improve signage and lighting.
> Work with the Department of Public Works Transportation Engineering Section to identify
deficiencies and to request improved signage and lighting around neighborhood schools.Work
with the Parks Department to improve signage and trail lighting in Lakewood / Dry Gulch.
strategy I3-c: Improve traffic control.
implementation program 13-c-l: Work with the department of public works.
> Work with the Traffic Engineering Section of the Department of Public Works to identify and
request traffic control improvements, such as left turn arrows at both 10th and Sheridan and
10th and Federal.
strategy I4-d: Improve the extension of 8th Avenue to Knox Court.
implementation program I4-d-1: Work with the departments of public works and parks.
> Work with the Transportation Division of the Department of Public Works and the Parks
Department to improve both the efficiency and aesthetics of the extension of 8th Avenue to
Knox Court.The design should also improve the linkage of Barnum Park to the neighborhood,
including pedestrian linkages.
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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
strategy I4-e: Improve the service roads along 6th avenue.
implementation program 14-e-l: Lobby for resolution of the 6th avenue widening issue.
> As part of the Southwest Quadrant Study, seek a solution, either temporary or permanent, to the
deterioration of the service roads along 6th Avenue.
strategy I5-f: Monitor and participate in transportation plans.
implementation program T5-f-1: Assign transportation responsibilities.
) The neighborhood organization should assign individuals who will be responsible for attending
transportation meetings and monitoring transportation programs which might affect Villa Park, such as
the Southwest Quadrant Transportation Study, the potential widening of the 6th Avenue Freeway and
the potential construction of a light rail line along the gulch.Those individuals should report back to
the neighborhood organization and ask for direction and assistance from the larger organization.
implementation program I5-f-2: Encourage neighborhood participation in plans.
> Encourage neighborhood participation in planning for major transportation projects, such as
projects affecting 6th Avenue, Federal, Sheridan, or other projects, which could have a major
impact on the neighborhood and its residents.
goal I6-g: Enhance neighborhood circulation.
strategy I6-g: Improve the condition of bike routes and sidewalks and expand the system for both
circulation and recreation uses.
implemeotatioo program I6-g-1: Work with the parks department.
) The Parks Department has the responsibility for constructing and maintaining bicycle routes. Work with
the Trail Planner for the Parks Department and the State Bicycle Coordinator to seek improvements and
expansion to the existing system of bicycle routes, including connecting the Lakewood / Dry Gulch
trail to the Weir Gulch trail, providing curb cuts at Perry, and a pedestrian/bicycle-activated signal across
Sheridan. For sidewalks, see Implementation Program PS-9e-l.
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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
Environment
Although Villa Park is a relatively small neighborhood, it is an area of geographical contrast. Steep slopes
alternate with very flat areas, causing drainage problems for the neighborhood. Some property abutting
the two gulches lies in the designated flood plain areas and several old landfills lie underground one at
7th and Perry and a second at northeast corner of 6th and Sheridan.
Lakewood / Dry Gulch
Lakewood / Dry Gulch is the most prominent, contiguous parcel of open space in the neighborhood. It is
owned and managed by a combination of jurisdictions and agencies, including the Denver Parks and
Recreation Department, Public Service Company of Colorado, the Regional Transportation District (RTD),
and the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District. In addition to the open space and park improvements
mentioned above, the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District has plans to install 3-4 drop structures
in sections of Lakewood Gulch in the next few years.These structures are designed to prevent
downstream erosion, and will be constructed between Tennyson and Perry Streets.The District also has
funds to begin designing flood control improvements for an additional section of Lakewood Gulch. The
Parks and Recreation Department shares maintenance responsibilities for the area along the Gulch with
the Drainage District, with the Parks Department generally having responsibility for improving and
maintaining areas which abut the Gulch.
Vegetation
Native cottonwood and willow trees line the gulches in Villa Park, while the ground cover consists of both
native grasses and weeds. Along the streets, the dominant tree species in Villa Park are silver maples,
Chinese elms, and spruce.
Wildlife
Because of the natural state of the gulches, many species of wildlife continue to exist in Villa Park,
including squirrels, skunks, raccoons, muskrats, and cottontail rabbits.The greatest variety of wildlife in
32


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Villa Park, however, is provided by birds, including owls, ducks, and geese.
Pollution
Pollution problems in Villa Park are typical of many Denver neighborhoods.The brown cloud of dust
and automobile exhaust envelopes the neighborhood periodically, especially during the winter months.
Automobile traffic on 6th Avenue and Sheridan and Federal Boulevards exacerbates the air pollution
problem. Noise from the 6th Avenue Freeway is also a continuing problem, and litter and garbage are
eyesores and can create unpleasant odors.
Methane Gas
One of the biggest environmental problems in the neighborhood is the old covered landfill between 6th
and Sheridan and 8th and Wolff. As a known generator of methane gas, care should be taken when
excavating or rebuilding on or near this location.To enhance neighborhood safety, precautions issued by
the Denver Building Department should be adhered to at all times.
City programs should give priority to helping owners of housing on or adjacent to this landfill both
mitigate the dangers of methane gas and provide the frequent repairs to foundations, sidewalks, gutters,
and streets necessitated by the settling of the soil.
vision
I Improve neighborhood environmental conditions.
I Establish a neighorhood image of identity.
goal N-3: Establish a neighborhood image or identity.
strategy N-3a: strengthen the neighborhood organization.
implementation program N-3a-1: seek funding for the neighborhood association.
I Develop a program, which will provide funds for the operation of the neighborhood
organization.
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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
implementation program N-3a-2: Seek broad neighborhood participation in the association.
I Make a membership drive a primary focus of the neighborhood association in order to build its
strength and viability. Focus on developing active representation from each geographic,
economic, interest, and cultural sector of the neighborhood.
I Incorporate tenants into both the neighborhood organization and neighborhood activities.
I Take the neighborhood organization to the tenants.
I Periodically, hold neighborhood organization meetings in an apartment complex.
I Conduct one of the neighborhood events at an apartment complex.
I Deliver the neighborhood newsletter to the apartment complexes,
implementation program N-3a-3: Develop an annual work program for the association.
I Using the neighborhood plan as a base, develop an annual work program for the association,
determine priorities for each of the tasks, and assign responsibilities for accomplishing them.
Distribute the work program to the City Councilperson and to the Denver Planning and
Community Development Office.
strategy i-3b: Publish a neighborhood newsletter,
implementation program N-3b-1: Set parameters for the newsletter.
I Check with other neighborhood organizations, such as Southwest Improvement Council,
Neighborhood Housing Service, and Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods, regarding their
newsletters: what they hope to achieve with their newsletters, how they are written and laid out,
how often they are published, how they are distributed, how many copies are printed, how
much they cost, etc.Adapt the processes used by other organizations to the needs and
capabilities ofVilla Park.
implementatinn prugram N-3b-2: Publish and distribute the newsletter.
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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I Using these parameters, organize a process for producing and distributing the newsletter. Seek
donations and volunteers to help with production and distribution. Begin production and
distribution.
strategy N-3c: Sponsor an annual neighborhood event or festival.
implementation program N-3c-1: Set goals for the neighborhood event.
I Decide what should be accomplished by each neighborhood event: publicity, image building,
community building, fundraising, etc. Select an event, or multiple events, which will meet these
goals. Possible events might include a series of block parties as get acquainted opportunities; a
crafts fair with music, food, and entertainment; a neighborhood clean-up of the gulches; or a
celebration of neighborhood improvements.
implementatinn prngram N-3c-2: Organize the event.
I Establish a committee, which will organize the event(s), solicit volunteers and funding, and
oversee the event itself.
strategy N-3d: Adopt a neighborhood logo.
implementation program N-3d-1: Develop, adopt, and use a neighborhood logo.
I Seek volunteers who will donate several alternative designs for a neighborhood logo, select one
of these as the official neighborhood logo, and use the selected logo on all stationery for the
neighborhood association and on signage throughout the neighborhood.
strategy N-3f: Adopt a unified signage program.
implementatinn prngram N-3f-l: Use the neighborhood logo throughout the neighborhood.
I Put the neighborhood logo on signs erected in Villa Park, including those at the gateways and
announcing neighborhood events.
35


GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
goal N-6: Improve neighborhood environmental conditions,
strategy N-6a: ciean-up graffiti.
implementation program N-Ba-1: Work with Keep Denver Beautiful to develop an ongoing
neighborhood anti-graffiti campaign.
I Utilize the neighborhood association newsletter and the resources of Keep Denver Beautiful to
distribute information to all property owners and tenants on the importance of immediately
removing graffiti, available resources and techniques for removing graffiti, and programs for
preventing new graffiti.
strategy N-6b: ciean-up trash.
implementation program N-Bb-1: Publicize available trash pick-up and recycling programs.
I Utilize the neighborhood association newsletter to publicize and explain available trash pick-up
and recycling programs, including both the regular home trash collection program of the Denver
Department of Public Works and the monthly large item pick-up service. Explain the distinction
between home collection services, provided by the City, and commercial collection services,
provided by private contractors.
implementatinn program N-6b-2: Acquire roll-barrels for selected areas.
I Where appropriate, along those streets without alleys, acquire City-owned roll-barrels for trash
collection.
implementation program N-6b-3: Improve trash collection and eliminate dumping.
I Work with Keep Denver Beautiful to organize periodic neighborhood-wide trash collection
programs and to develop new strategies for eliminating the dumping of junk and trash along the
gulches.
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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
strategy N-Bc: Remove old, abandoned cars.
implementation program N-Bc-1: Use city police powers.
I Work with the City Council office, the Zoning Administration, and the Police Department to
have the Zoning Administration remove inoperable, dismantled, or wrecked vehicles from any
public or private property or to have vehicles impounded by the Police Department if they have
been abandoned for more than 72 hours and either create an obstruction to traffic or present a
public nuisance to health and safety.
strategy N-6d: Support the leash law.
implementation program N-Bd-1: Assist city agencies in the enforcement of city codes.
I The Manager of Health and Hospitals has the authority to impound any animal, which is loose or
does not have license tags. According to the Citys Animal Control Code, protection against dogs
is also regulated for persistent barking, damaging property, or vicious behavior. Contact the City
Council office for the proper procedure to follow for enforcing either of these authorities.
37


GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
38


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Flood Hazard Boundary Map
39
zz.imoiS


GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
old landfill
sw sw iflw 1
Geologic Hazards Map
40
mfBUEk


VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Public safety and crime prevention
Denver crime statistics place Villa Park 27th among the 68 neighborhoods in the City, with a rate of 89.8
crimes per 1000 residents.The highest-ranked neighborhood had a rate of 277.4 crimes per 1000
residents, and the lowest-ranked neighborhood had a rate of 20.9 crimes per 1000 residents.The largest
number of offenses committed in the Villa Park neighborhood were burglaries, with the highest crime
areas near Federal and Sheridan Boulevard.
1998 Crimes vs Person
vision
) Plant new trees and improve tree maintenance.
> Upgrade the neighborhood infrastructure.
) Enhance neighborhood safety.
goal PS-8: Enhance neighborhood safety and security,
strategy PS-8a: Expand the neighborhood watch program.
implementation program PS-8a-1: Encourage additional participation in neighborhood watch.
> Each block currently involved in the neighborhood watch program should encourage surrounding
blocks to join in order to increase the protection in the area.The neighborhood organization
should promote the program through its neighborhood newsletter and in its meetings.
Strategy PS-8b: Improve lighting.
implemeotatioo program PS-8b-1: Improve lighting in Martinez Park, around Lakewood / Dry
Gulch, and in other inadequately lighted areas.
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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
) Lighting in Martinez Park and along the bicycle trail is the responsibility of the ParksDepartment.
Working with the City Council office, the neighborhood organizations should send a written
request to the Manager of the Parks Department.Typically, interior park lighting must be funded as
a capital improvement item, a highly competitive and potentially lengthy process.
) Lighting along streets in the neighborhood is the responsibility of the Transportation Division of
the Department of Public Works. Every intersection is required to have a 30-foot high-pressure
sodium streetlight, but mid-block street or alley lights must be requested by 75 percent of the
residents in a block. A standard form and explanation of the procedure is included in the
Appendix. If a block is over 600 feet long, the Department will consider more than one mid-
block light. Once the Street Lighting Section receives the request, it is sent to the Public Service
Company for installation.There is no cost to residents for installation or maintenance.
> Because Lakewood / Dry Gulch is a 100-year flood plain, no lights would be allowed in the gulch
itself, but could be installed outside the flood plain boundaries.The master plan for
Lakewood/Dry Gulch shows lighting in the interior of the park and includes recommendations
for street lighting. Ownership of land within the gulch responsibility for lighting is shared by
several public entities: the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District, the Parks Department, and
Public Service Company. The neighborhood association should work with all three entities as
they plan improvements to the gulch.
strategy PS-8c: Enhance communication with the police.
implementation program PS-Sc-1: Include District One officers in neighborhood meetings.
) Invite District One police officers to regularly scheduled meetings, and provide regular
opportunities for police officers to address the neighborhood. Request that representatives of the
neighborhood organization be allowed to ride with police officers on a patrol shift to increase
their understanding of neighborhood police issues.
gnal PS-2: Plant new trees and improve tree maintenance,
strategy PS-2A: Start a tree planting program.
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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
implementation program PS-2A-1: seek funding for a tree planting program.
I Set annual priorities for tree planting projects.
I Check with the Denver Parks and Recreation Department, Denver Urban Forests,The Park People,
and all other potential sources for the availability of programs for acquiring trees, application
schedules for those programs, the criteria for qualifying for those programs, and the criteria which
will be used by the funding entity to evaluate whether or not the project should be funded.
I Work with property owners and tenants to put together applications for funding programs, to
develop community support for those applications, and to follow through the application,
evaluation, funding, and planting process.
strategy PS-2B: Maintain existing trees.
implementation program PS-2B-1: Educate people on tree maintenance.
I Ask the City Forester to help provide information on tree maintenance (e.g. when and
how to trim).
I Distribute the information provided by the City Forester throughout the neighborhood,
implementation program PS-2B-2: seek funding for tree maintenance.
I Because City funding for tree maintenance on private property and in the public right- of-way is
extremely limited, lobby to increase that funding.
I Seek alternative sources of funding for tree maintenance.
I Apply for any sources of funding which might be available to the neighborhood for tree
maintenance.
implementation program PS-2B-3: Support code enforcement for existing trees and other vegetation.
I If education efforts have failed, report trees in need of maintenance to the City Forester, who
can force property owners to trim their trees or to mow their weeds.
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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
L2 Hadley Library
L3 Westwood Library
S3 Presentation School
HI St. Anthony Hospital
D1 Police Department
FI Fire Station 20
Community facilities
Hospitals and Medical Facilities
Saint Anthonys Hospital, located at 4231 West 16th Avenue, is the nearest full-service hospital. The
Westside Health Center, a public health center that services the Villa Park neighborhood, is located at
1100 Federal Boulevard. Its services include an adult clinic, maternity and family planning, pediatrics, teen
clinic, social service aid, laboratory, X-rays, dental clinic, pharmacy, and food supplement programs.
Police and Fire Stations
The District 1 Police Station is located at 2195 Decatur Street. It serves Precincts, 133 and 134, both of which
are located in Villa Park.The fire station for the neighborhood is Station 20, located at 501 Knox Court.
Libraries
There are no public libraries in the neighborhood, although there are two branch libraries nearby. The
Hadley Branch at 1890 Grove and the Ross-Barnum Branch at 3570 West 1st Avenue are both within the
general area surrounding the neighborhood.
Parks
The City parks in the neighborhood are Martinez Park and Sanchez Park. Martinez Park is primarily open
space, with a few picnic tables, and Sanchez Park has a baseball diamond. Lakewood / Dry Gulch provides
a unique opportunity for the development of open space, trails, and parks.The General Obligation Bond
Issue passed by Denver voters in 1989 includes funds for developing a master plan for the improvement
of Lakewood / Dry Gulch as a public open space and park facility and for the first phase of construction
of the planned improvements.Additional funding will be needed for later phases of the planned
improvements.The concept for development of the gulches is that they will provide open space and
trails connecting into a larger metropolitan system, connecting into the Platte River Greenway and,
eventually, through Lakewood into the foothills.Additionally, at selected locations along the gulches, small
park and recreation sites will be developed.
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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Schools
There are three schools in Villa Park, two public elementary schools and one private school. Eagleton
Elementary, at 9th and Hooker, and Cowell Elementary, at 10th and Utica, are public schools. Presentation
School, at 7th and Julian, is a private, parochial school. These schools have all experienced growth in the
past few years because of the increasing number of families with young children in the neighborhood.
Senior Centers
The GAO has received a grant from the City to build a senior center adjacent to its Maes Apartment
building to help accommodate the needs of the rapidly increasing number of senior citizens living in the
Villa Park neighborhood.
'I
goal PS-S: Upgrade the neighborhood infrastructure.
strategy PS-Sa: upgrade street drainage.
implementation program PS-9a-1: identify and request necessary drainage improvements.
> The Wastewater Division of the Department of Public Works is responsible for identifying
drainage problems and for developing and implementing master plans for storm drainage
improvements throughout the City. The Parks Department is responsible for maintaining parks
only to the point where they abut designated flood channels.The Urban Drainage and Flood
Control District maintain the flood channel itself. The neighborhood organization should work
with the City Council office to identify drainage problems, contact the appropriate agency, and
seek funding for improvements.
Currently, between three and five million dollars in drainage improvements are planned for
Lakewood / Dry Gulch, including numerous major and minor projects. Initially, however,
improvements will be made only to the channel, costing approximately one million dollars.
Because of the topography ofVilla Park, many of its streets drain into Lakewood / Dry Gulch,
aggravating drainage and erosion problems. Give priority to rectifying these drainage problems,
including the 12th~and Knox Court drainage project.

r
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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
strategy PS-9b: Improve street pothole repair,
implementation program PS-9b-1: identify and report potholes.
I The Department of Public Works is responsible for repairing potholes. Residents may write
requests for repair to the Pothole Service of the Department of Public Works and fill-out a log
sheet which describes the location of potholes. Upon receipt of the log sheet, the District
Foreman will inspect the area and initiate pothole repairs.
strategy PS-9c: Establish a program of low-cost and no-cost alley improvements.
implementation program PS-9C-1: Initiate alley improvements.
I While numerous alleys in Villa Park need improvement, emphasis should initially be placed on
those unpaved and poorly paved alleys which drain into Lakewood / Dry Gulch, aggravating
drainage and erosion problems. Alleys should be improved with concrete paving. Alley paving
requires the formation of a local improvement district, which will provide a mechanism for
assessing property taxes to pay for the paving. Through the Board of Equalization, a property
owner may request a reduction in the assessment. The neighborhood organization should work
through the City Council office to identify alleys in need of repair and to initiate requests for
funding assistance.
strategy PS-9d: Provide uniform street, curb, and gutter improvements,
implementation program PS-9d-l: Initiate street, curb, and gutter improvements.
I The Transportation Division of the City Engineers Office is responsible for designing new
streets, curbs, and gutters and improvements to existing ones.The Street Maintenance
Division is responsible for maintaining streets, curbs, and gutters.The neighborhood
organization should work through the City Council District office to identify both locations
for streets, curbs, and gutters in need of repair and locations which currently do not have
these facilities but need them, and then to initiate work requests. Similar to alley paving
street, curb, and gutter improvements require the formation of an improvement district
through the Transportation Division. Streets currently requiring street, curb, and gutter
improvements include:
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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I 1200 block of Grove
I 12th Avenue between Lowell and Newton
I 1000 block of Winona Court
I 1200 block of Knox Court at Lakewood / Dry Gulch
strategy PS-9e: Provide uniform sidewalk improvements.
implementation program PS-9e-1: Initiate sidewalk improvements.
> While sidewalk construction, repair, and replacement is the responsibility of the adjoining
property owner, not the City, the Transportation Division of the City Engineers Office is
responsible for designing both new sidewalks and improvements to existing sidewalks.
Sidewalk improvements in a large area may be financed through the formation of an
improvement district. To be consistent with Citywide mobility plans and to provide
accessibility for the physically disabled, five-foot minimum width sidewalks must be provided
where they are non-existent and, where they are existing, are at a substandard width.
Intersection curb ramps should be included to provide improved accessibility for the elderly
and disabled populations.The neighborhood organization should work through the City
Council District office to identify sidewalks in need of repair and those areas, which have no
sidewalks, and to initiate work requests. Locations currently requiring new sidewalks
include:
I 600 block of Tennyson Perry
I 600,700, and 800 blocks of Perry Lowell
I 800,900, and 1000 blocks of Grove
I 800 block of Linley Court
I 900 and 1000 blocks of Irving
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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS
goal Gf-10: Create neighborhood recreation opportunities,
strategy CF-lOa: Use existing public facilities.
implementation program CF-10a-1: Initiate discussion of joint-use of existing facilities.
I While the two elementary schools and the churches in Villa Park offer some recreation
opportunities, these are limited and are not widely known.At a minimum, the neighborhood
organization should inventory existing recreation programs and publicize those through its
newsletter. Beyond that, the organization should initiate discussion with the schools and
churches regarding the potential expansion of the existing programs.
strategy CF-lOb: Utilize recreation centers in other neighborhoods.
implementation program GF-10b-l: Increase awareness of existing recreation facilities.
I Barnum Park has senior and child/adult activities, an outdoor pool, lighted tennis courts, and
playground and picnic facilities. Rude Park has softball fields, playground and picnic areas, and an
indoor pool. Mulroy Community center at 13th and King is also available for public use. Use the
neighborhood organization newsletter to help publicize these facilities, their locations, programs,
and hours.
implementation program CF-10B-2: Improve access to recreation facilities.
I While Barnum Park, Rude Park, and Mulroy Community Center all have RTD service, they would
benefit from improved pedestrian and bicycle access.Work with the State and the Parks
Department to provide better pedestrian and bicycle access.
goal CF-11: Develop Lakewood / Dry Gulch as a neighborhood asset.
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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
implementation program CMI-a: Participate in planning and maintaining Lakewood / Dry Gulch.
) The 1989 General Obligation Bond Issue includes funding for developing a master plan and for
the first phase of improvements to Lakewood / Dry Gulch and for related bicycle path
improvements.The neighborhood organization should take an active role in planning both these
and ongoing improvements to the gulch. Similarly, it should lobby for and participate in the
ongoing maintenance of the gulch as it is improved. Specific issues, which should be addressed,
include:
I Establishing a program to prevent dumping
I Establishing an ongoing clean-up program
I Upgrading lighting
I Creating more pedestrian gulch crossings
I Preventing erosion and mud problems.
I Acquiring additional funding.
I Providing for ongoing maintenance.
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Full Text

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ADOPTED APRIL 29, 1991 VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANVILLA PARK NEIGHBOR H OOD PLAN

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANVILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ii Adopted April 29,1991 Mayor Federico Pena City Council Ramona Martinez,Citycouncilwoman,District 3 Marshall Vanderburg,Administrative Assistant,District 3Villa Park Steering CommitteeJo Ann PhillpsPatricia Alvarado Gilbert Barela,Jr.Sofie Gomez Regina and Sergio GonzalesCruc Rodriguez Kathy SandovalUrban and Regional Planning Studio II University of Colorado at DenverInstructor Bernie JonesLinda Hamlin Linda MacintyreMarianne LeClair Kathy LooHeidi Popkin IvanSoeriaCity and County of Denver Departmental StaffFrank Gray,Planning DirectorBillie Bramhall,Deputy Director of PlanningDennis Swain,Senior City PlannerLupe Herrera,Associate City PlannerJerry Garcia,Program ManagerSteve Gordon,City Planner SpecialistHarriet Hogue,Senior City PlannerRoger Johnson,City EngineerJerry McCowan,City EngineerWayland Walker,Senior City PlannerJulie Connor,GraphicsDaniel Michael,GraphicsDennis Royer,Director of Transportation EngineeringTerry Rosapep,Director of Transportation PlanningNeil Sperandeo,Long Range Planning Director of Parks and RecreationReadopted January 24,2000 as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 Mayor Wellington E.Webb City Council Ramona Martinez,Councilwoman,District 3 John Soto,Jr.,Special Advisor to Council President Ramona MartinezDenver City CouncilDennis Gallagher,District 1Ted Hackworth,District 2Ramona Martinez,District 3Joyce Foster,District 4Polly Flobeck,District 5Susan Casey,District 6Bill Himmelman,District 7Kathleen Mackenzie,District 7Hiawatha Davis,Jr.,District 8Deborah L.Ortega,District 9Edward P.Thomas,District 10Happy Haynes,District 11Cathy Reynolds,Member-at-LargeSusan Barnes-Gelt,Member-at-LargeDenver Planning BoardWilliam H.Hornby,ChairmanJan Belle Frederick CornPat Cortez Michael Dino Daniel Guimond Rus Hackstaff IIIMark Johnson Joyce Oberfeld Terrance Ware Robert Wright

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANTABLE OF CONTENTSTitlePageAcknowledgments IntroductionVision for Villa Park. . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Summary of Neighborhood Goals. . . . . . . . . 3 Location. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Land Use Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6Use of this Plan. . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Social Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . 8Neighborhood Goals, Strategies & Implementation ProgramsNeighborhood Design Features. . . . . . . . . 10 Land Use and Zoning. . . . . . . . . . . 14Land Use Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Zoning Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17Housing Characteristics. . . . . . . . . . . 20 Business. . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Transportation. . . . . . . . . . . . 26Traffic and Streets Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27Environment.. . . . . . . . . . . . . 32Elevation Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Flood Hazard Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Geologic Hazards Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 0Public Safety and Crime Prevention.. . . . . . . . 41 Community Facilities.. . . . . . . . . . . 44 iii

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN iv

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANINTRODUCTION 1

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INTRODUCTIONTHE VISION FOR VILLA PARKWhat will Villa Park look like in the future? If the goals,strategies,and implementation programs outlined in this neighborhood plan are pursued and accomplished,Villa Park will be an attractive,economically vital,and exciting,safe,stable,affordable,and inviting place to live and do business. Villa Park will continue to be a neighborhood of mostly single-unit houses,with a few small apartment buildings and apartment complexes interspersed with the houses.Rezoning from R-2 to R-1 will relieve large sections of the neighborhood from the pressures for redevelopment to higher density and will assure that new housing will be single-unit,rather than higher density apartments.Both the houses and apartments will be buffered from the traffic on the surrounding streets and will have safe and attractive access to the trails,open spaces,and recreation facilities in Lakewood and Dry Gulches;to the neighborhood-serving retail,conveniently located within the neighborhood and at its edge;and to the light rail system which can make a trip Downtown,the new airport,the Denver Tech Center,or any of the other major destinations in the Metropolitan Denver area fast and enjoyable. Villa Park will have developed a strong image,focused on its unique access to Lakewood and Dry Gulches,its well maintained and affordable housing,its mature landscaping,its wonderful topography and views,its central location,and its culturally diverse population,welcoming everyone from young families to the elderly. 2

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANSUMMARY OF NEIGHBORHOOD GOALSimprove neighborhood arterialsplant trees and improve tree maintenanceestablish a neighborhood image or identitysupport and enhance neighborhood commerical activityenhance the appearance and quality of neighborhood housingimprove neighborhood environmental conditionsimprove neighborhood circulation for all modes of travelenhance neighborhood safetyupgrade neighborhood infrastructurecreate neighborhood recreation opportunitesdevelop lakewood gulch as a neighborhood asset 3

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INTRODUCTIONLOCATIONThe neighborhood is situated on Denver's western border.Its edges are clearly defined:Lakewood / Dry Gulch on the north,the 6th Avenue Freeway on the south,Federal Boulevard on the east,and Sheridan Boulevard on the west. 4

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANHISTORYThe Villa Park neighborhood got its start in 1871,when a mixture of Colorado and eastern developers bought 1000 acres in what is now the Villa Park-Barnum area.According to the Rocky Mountain News of August 24,1871,the group planned a subdivision,which would include artificial lakes in ravines on the property,grand views,and streets with pedestrian walkways.Initial plans for the area also included a hotel,landscaping by the man who designed Central Park in New York City,and a design consultation group to review plans for the new housing. Eight years later,in 1879,the still largely-undeveloped land was sold to Phineas Barnum,whose family was extremely active in real estate development in Denver,and for whom the neighborhood immediately south of Villa Park is named Barnum is also credited with establishing Villa Park School in 1879. By 1890,a hotel was still being mentioned for the area,but development plans were proceeding slowly. In the 1900 Census,there were only 50 single-unit dwellings and 16 multi-unit dwellings in the area.As current residents might expect,historic newspaper articles also indicate that the ditches and ravines in the neighborhood have been an ongoing issue for Villa Park.An article from the March 10,1900,Denver Times,for instance,noted that Villa Park needed sewers much more than a proposed high school for its 40 students. From 1900 to 1939,slow but steady residential development occurred in Villa Park.An average of 14 dwelling units was added per year,with a total of 577 single and multi-unit dwellings added during this time.Over 91.5% of these were single-unit dwellings.From the 1940's through the 1950's,the area was largely built-out with single-unit dwellings.During the late 1950's,and into the 1960's and 1970's, multi-unit construction predominated,particularly on sites at the western edge of Villa Park. 5

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Historic MapINTRODUCTION 6WesternHistoryDepartment,DenverPublicLibrary

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANUSE OF THIS PLANFollowing review by the Denver Planning Board and adoption by Denver City Council,the Villa Park Neighborhood Plan will function as the official planning document for the neighborhood.As such,City agencies,neighborhood organizations,and private developers will use it.It will provide guidance for public improvements,programs,and private development.Relationship to Other PlansThis and all other neighborhood plans are consistent with and supplemental to the City's Comprehensive Plan.The Comprehensive Plan presents a citywide perspective,while each neighborhood plan provides more specific guidance both for the allocation of City resources and for the location and design of private development.The Planning ProcessThe Villa Park Neighborhood Plan began as a project for the Urban and Regional Planning Studio II at the University of Colorado in Denver.The project was guided by Bernie Jones,Ph.D.,an Associate Professor in the Urban and Regional Planning program.A team of six graduate students prepared the first draft of the plan.Working closely with Councilwoman Ramona Martinez,representatives from the Denver Planning and Community Development Office,and a Steering Committee of neighborhood residents,the student team held a series of work sessions and public review meetings and incorporated the comments from those meetings into a draft plan.The draft plan was then turned over to representatives from the Denver Planning and Community Development Office,who edited the plan and circulated it to other City agencies for review.After the departmental comments were incorporated,the draft plan was returned to the neighborhood for a final review and then was presented to the Denver Planning Board for review.With a recommendation for approval from the Planning Board,the plan is currently proceeding to City Council for review and adoption as an element of the City's Comprehensive Plan. 7

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INTRODUCTIONSOCIAL ANALYSISPopulationThe population and demographics of Villa Park are continually changing.The population of the neighborhood dropped from 7,419 in 1980 to 7,066 in 1990,a loss of 353 people,or 5% of the 1980 population.The demographics of Villa Park have also changed,with the principle shift being toward an older and more Hispanic population.Between 1970 and 1980,for example,the number of residents who were 65 years or older increased 38% and the number of households receiving Social Security benefits rose 54%.Despite this shift,in 1985,Villa Park still had a smaller percentage of its population which was older than 65 than did the City as a whole:9.2% of the neighborhood versus 12.6% of the City residents who were over 65.In 1990,Villa Park had a larger percentage of its population,which was younger,than 18 than did the City as a whole:33% for the neighborhood versus 22% for the City.While 23% of the City's population was of Spanish origin in 1990,the figure for Villa Park was 64%,up from 50.5% in 1980. The Villa Park work force suffered during the period from 1970 to 1980.The workers,who were employed primarily in blue collar jobs,experienced a dramatic increase in unemployment,with the number of unemployed residents 16 years and older increasing 48% in that 10 year period.During the same period,the number of households receiving public assistance increased over 60%. In 1985,the estimated median household income was lower in Villa Park than it was in the City as a whole:$21,003 in Villa Park and $23,546 in the City.Villa Park also has shown a wide disparity between the income levels of owner-occupied households and renter-occupied households.In 1980,the median income of owner-occupied households was $17,941 and of renter-occupied households $9,944.Note:The demographics presented in this section have been updated with the most current figures available,in some cases 1990 Census data,in others 1985 estimates. 8 Household Income 1985 Age Distribution Race "# $% &% 1990 US Census 1997 Births "# $% &%

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNEIGHBORHOOD GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMSEach of these goals has several strategies and suggestions for implementing those strategies. It should be noted that the strategies and implementation steps detailed in this section can be accomplished alone or in conjunction with one another. Names of contact agencies referred to in the implementation statements are listed in the Appendix. Note: The neighborhood goals are not listed by priority. 9

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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMSNEIGHBORHOOD DESIGN FEATURESVilla Park's hilly topography provides panoramic views of downtown Denver and of the Rocky Mountains,particularly from Lakewood / Dry Gulch,which divides the neighborhood diagonally.Scale and Building MaterialsVilla Park is a low profile neighborhood,laid out in a grid pattern.Most of the buildings are residential. Although the dominant structure in the neighborhood is the G.A.O.Maes Apartment building,which is 12 stories tall,the majority of residences are single-unit,one-story brick houses.One,two,and three story multi-unit dwellings are also present in the neighborhood,particularly in the western half.Most of the residences are set back from the street on small lots with front and rear yards.Non-residential units consist of single-story shops and numerous churches,which are scattered throughout the neighborhood.Gateways and EdgesAlthough Villa Park has distinct borders,there are no "gateways"which clearly identify entry into the neighborhood.There are,however,intersections,which could serve as gateways if they were improved and clearly marked.These include both 8th and 10th Avenues at Federal Boulevard,on the eastern edge of the neighborhood.On the western edge,10th Avenue could serve as an identifiable gateway.Both Knox Court and Perry Street are potential gateways,from the north at Lakewood / Dry Gulch,and from the south at the 6th Avenue Freeway.Activity CentersVilla Park has no major center of activity,such as a centralized shopping area.The neighborhood, however,does have minor activity centers,including the intersection of 10th and Knox Court,with the convenience store and liquor store on two corners;Presentation Church;Cowell and Eagleton Elementary Schools;and the intersection of 6th Avenue and Knox Court,where there are several stores. 10 Lakewood Gulch Low profile housing 10th & Federal

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANImageVilla Park does not project a strong image;few people outside the neighborhood know where Villa Park is,let alone what the boundaries of the neighborhood are.Lack of major activity centers and of identifiable gateways have contributed to this problem.While Lakewood / Dry Gulch provides an opportunity for creating a strong image for Villa Park,it will not do so until it is more fully developed and better maintained. Aside from its lack of a clear public image,the biggest image problem facing Villa Park is the deteriorating quality of maintenance of housing.There is a stark contrast between the owner-occupied homes,most of which are well maintained,and the renter-occupied homes,many of which are poorly maintained.A rising number of absentee-ownerships,HUD repossessions,and vacant homes are adding to this image problem in Villa Park.vision Build on the positive physical characteristics of the neighborhood. Create a more beautiful neighborhood in which to live and do business.goal UD-1: Improve neighborhood arterials.strategy UD-1a: Initiate business,streetscaping and business facade improvements along Federal Boulevard.implementation program UD-1a-1: Initiate a study of Federal Boulevard. Work with the Mayor's Office of Economic Development,the Colorado Department of Highways, the Transportation Division of the Denver Department of Public Works,and the Denver Planning Office to initiate and implement market,business development,traffic,and urban design studies of Federal Boulevard.The studies should evaluate how improvements to the businesses and the traffic flow can be balanced with improvements to the way in which Federal Boulevard impacts and serves both the adjoining neighborhoods and the City as a whole.To the extent possible, address these issues in the Southwest Quadrant Transportation Study. 11 8th & Federal

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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMSimplementation program UD-1a-2: Seek funding for streetscaping and facade improvements and maintenance. Set annual priorities for streetscape and business facade improvement projects. Work with the City Council District office and the Denver Planning and Community Development Office to identify funding programs currently available through the City or other funding sources,the funding cycles for each of those programs,the criteria for qualifying for those programs,and the criteria which will be used by the funding entity to evaluate whether or not the project should be funded. Work with property owners to put together applications for funding programs,to develop community support for those applications,to establish mechanisms which will assure long-term maintenance of the improvements,to guarantee the participation of new retail or residential uses,and to follow through the application,evaluation,funding,and construction process.goal UD-2: Establish a neighborhood image or identity.strategy UD-2a: Build neighborhood gatewaysimplementation program UD-2a-1: Select locations for gateways to the neighborhood. Possible locations for gateways to mark the entrance to Villa Park include 8th and Federal,10th and Federal,10th and Sheridan,Lakewood / Dry Gulch (approximately 12th) and Sheridan,Knox Court and 6th Avenue,Knox Court and the Gulch,Perry and 6th Avenue,or Perry and the Gulch.implementation program UD-2a-2: Design gateways for each of the selected locations. For each of the selected locations,consider preliminary designs for a gateway.These might include a sign,similar to the sign for Barnum at 6th and Knox;trees;or other landscaping.The design should be preliminary;funding for final design work should be included in the request for funding of the gateway. 12 6th & Perry

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANimplementation program UD-2a-3: Seek funding to construct and maintain the gateways. Develop a program for maintaining the gateways once they have been constructed;consider using neighborhood volunteers and holding fundraisers to help provide both a matching contribution for the construction and an ongoing fund for maintenance.With the preliminary design,an estimated construction cost,locally raised funds which can be used as a match for the funds raised from outside the neighborhood,and a maintenance plan,approach alternative funding sources with proposals for funding the remaining portion of the cost of construction of the gateways. 13

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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMSLAND USE AND ZONINGTypes of Land UseThere are six types of development in Villa Park,each of which is indicated on the land use map. 1 Single-unit detached housing dominates Villa Park. 2 Multiple-unit housing,including duplexes and low-to-medium density apartments are the second most prominent land use. 3Commercial uses,including retail and business services,border the neighborhood on Federal and Sheridan Boulevards and are also found in small clusters within the neighborhood. 4 Public open space,including Lakewood and Dry Gulches,is concentrated on the north edge of the neighborhood. 5Semi-public uses include churches and schools. 6Vacant land,including privately owned vacant lots,is the sixth,less predominant,land use. 14

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 15 Land Use Map

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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMSZoningThe predominant zoning in Villa Park is residential,although there is also business zoning along the edges of the neighborhood.The zoning categories listed below correspond to the zoning maps and describe what types of development are allowed in each zone district. R-1Single-unit Detached Dwellings, Low Density maximum density is 7.3 units per acre. Foster family care,day care,home occupations,and room renting to one or two persons are allowed after special permit approval. R-2Multi-unit Dwellings, Low Density maximum density is 14.5 units per acre.Home occupations are allowed as listed above after special approval. R-2AMulti-unit Dwellings, Medium Density maximum density is 21.8 units per acre.Home occupations are allowed only after special permit approval. B-2Neighborhood Business District regulations are designed to permit development of a variety of locally-oriented retail uses,limited by standards designed to protect the adjacent residential district. B-4General Business District provides commercial uses which include a wide variety of consumer and business services and retail establishments that serve other business activities. Limitations imposed in these areas are designed to protect integrity and character of adjacent residential districts. PUDPlanned Unit Development a form of development characterized by unified site design (for clustering buildings and providing common open space),density increases and a mixture of building types and land uses.Permits planning of project and calculation of densities over an entire development area,rather than on an individual lot.Allows both residential and commercial uses if requested. 16

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 17 Zoning Map

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Land use in Villa Park generally conforms to the existing zoning.For example,the multiple-unit dwellings along Lakewood / Dry Gulch are located in the R-2 zone district,and most of the businesses are located along Federal and Sheridan Boulevards in the B-2 and B-4 zone districts.There are,however, several small pockets of businesses located in R-1 and R-2 zone districts.These are considered legally non-conforming uses since they existed prior to the R-1 and R-2 zoning and were,therefore, "grandfathered"in as legal uses. The primary inconsistency between the current zoning and the land uses in Villa Park is the predominance of single-unit dwellings in the R-2 zone district.Because zoning should be consistent with the existing and desired character of an area,most of the area in Villa Park which is zoned R-2 can be considered over-zoned,even though single-unit dwellings are a use-by-right.R-1 zoning would be more consistent with the existing character in most of the neighborhood.vision Compatibility of zoning to land use. Protection of residential character of the neighborhood. Compatibility between residential and business land use.strategy LZ-1: Discourage higher density development.implementation program LZ-1a: Consider rezoning portions of the neighborhood. Zoning is intended to reflect both the current and the desired character of an area.However, while most of the housing in Villa Park is single-unit,the zoning throughout much of the neighborhood,R-2,allows and encourages the development of low density apartments.The property owners in those areas,therefore,should consider rezoning to a lower density residential zone,which would more accurately reflect the existing and desired character of the neighborhood. Work with the Council office,the Planning and Community Development Office,and the Zoning Administration to determine the best strategy for rezoning and the appropriate procedures. 18 GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANstrategy LZ-2: Discourage development that is incompatible with the scale and quality of the neighborhood.implementation program LZ-2a: Monitor requests for rezoning and for zoning variances. With a registered neighborhood organization,Villa Park will receive notification of any applications for rezoning or zone variances.Using the neighborhood plan as the basis for reviewing these applications,the neighborhood organization should establish a procedure and assign responsibilities for commenting on these applications,sending written comments to the appropriate agencies,and appearing at any applicable public hearings with the comments of the association.strategy LZ-3a: Remove housing from marginal areas.implementation program LZ-3a-1: Rezone housing in marginal areas for commercial uses. As a way to help people sell houses which are in areas which no longer provide healthy residential environments,such as along Sheridan and Federal Boulevards,encourage rezoning that housing as a Planned Unit Development which would allow commercial or other more intense,but residentiallycompatible,uses while buffering the remaining adjoining residential uses from potential negative impacts. 19

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HOUSING CHARACTERISTICSHousing in Villa Park is slightly older than the average for the City of Denver 46 years for single-unit residences and 37 years for multiple-unit residences,compared to a Denver average of 39 years.The average size of housing units in Villa Park is smaller than in the City as a whole 863 square feet for single-unit residences and 720 square feet for multiple-unit residences,compared to a Denver average of 1024 square feet. The percentage of owner-occupancy is comparable to the City average 46% of the housing units in Villa Park are owner-occupied and 54% are renter-occupied,versus 48% and 52%,respectively,for Denver.During the later part of Denver's economic recession of the 1980',Villa Park experienced an increasing number of vacant residences. Villa Park has few commercial or semi-public land uses,and no industrial uses.Retail activity is concentrated along Federal Boulevard and Sheridan Boulevard,with a limited mixture of neighborhood-serving retail uses located within the neighborhood.Semi-public uses such as schools and churches are scattered throughout the neighborhood. Using the land use map,some generalizations can be made about land use in Villa Park and the way differing land uses interact.First,the boundary between private and publicly-owned land in Lakewood / Dry Gulch is often unclear.This land ownership pattern blurs the lines of responsibility for maintenance since it is difficult to determine at what point the public responsibility ends and the responsibility of private landowners begins. Second,multiple-unit uses have changed the appearance,value,and composition of the western side of Villa Park,particularly on the streets nearest Sheridan Boulevard.Patterns of Residential Development and ConditionResidential development in the neighborhood has undergone periods of transition.The first area within Villa Park to be developed was the eastern section;development there was primarily single-unit dwellings and few lots were left vacant.Development in the western section of the neighborhood was slower and more scattered, 20 GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANwith many lots initially left undeveloped.As a result,as the demand for multiple-unit housing grew,the western section of Villa Park experienced the development of apartments on many of its vacant lots.As Denver's economy reeled from the oil boom and bust of the 1980's,the housing stock in Villa Park increasingly suffered from deterioration and abandonment,with many homes reverting to bank,HUD,or VA ownership.Initial 1990 Census counts of vacant housing in Villa Park indicated there were 425 vacant housing units,accounting for 14.5% of the 2934 housing units in the neighborhood.Field checks confirmed the accuracy of that figure.As the economy has begun to improve,so has the occupancy and the condition of housing in the neighborhood. More recent field checks have shown a decrease in the number of vacant units.vision A strong and vital residential neighborhood. Increase the rate of home ownership. Sound management and a mix of income levels in rental single family homes and apartments. Renovate and maintain housing.goal H-1: Enhance the appearance and quality of neighborhood housing.strategy H-1a: Focus on vacant and boarded-up structures.implementation program H-1a-1: Focus on existing owners. Create and maintain a current list of deteriorated,vacant,or boarded-up structures in the neighborhood. Research the ownership of these properties through the Denver Assessors Office. Write letters to the owner(s) of problem properties as a neighborhood organization requesting that they repair their property and have it occupied.Provide information to them on available programs for funding renovations.Follow-up on the initial contact with additional letters and telephone calls. If the owner does not respond,work with the Council District office to identify and report City codes violations. 21 Mean Housing Sales Prices 19701998

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Put a "Hit List"of problem properties in local newsletter as the Neighborhood Housing Service does.This could include pictures of the properties with their addresses and the owners'names.implementation program H-1a-2: Seek funding for renovating and occupying structures. Establish a new non-profit group,or work with an existing group,which will focus on improving housing in the neighborhood. Work with the Council District office and the Denver Planning and Community Development Office to identify funding programs currently available through the City or other funding sources,the funding cycles for each of those programs,the criteria for qualifying for those programs,and the criteria which will be used by the funding entity to evaluate whether or not the project should be funded. Work with the non-profit housing group and property owners to put together applications for funding programs,to develop community support for those applications,and to follow through the application,evaluation,funding,and construction process.strategy H-2a: Focus on poorly maintained and managed rental housing.implementation program H-2a-1: Identify problem properties. Create and maintain a current list of rental properties,which are poorly maintained,poorly managed,or in violation of Denver building codes. Continue efforts,by following the process outlined in H-1a-1,above.implementation program H-2a-2: Seek funding for renovating rental properties. Establish a new non-profit group,or work with an existing group,which will focus on improving housing in the neighborhood. Work with the Council District office and the Denver Planning and Community Development Office to identify funding programs currently available through the City or other funding sources,the funding cycles for each of those programs,the criteria for qualifying for those programs,and the criteria which will be used by the funding entity to evaluate whether or not the project should be funded. 22 GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Work with the non-profit housing group and property owners to put together applications for funding programs,to develop community support for those applications,and to follow through the application, evaluation,funding,and construction process.strategy H-3a: Encourage housing rehabilitation.implementation program H-3a-1: Seek funding for renovating housing. Establish a new non-profit group,or work with an existing group,which will focus on improving housing in the neighborhood. Work with the Council District office and the Denver Planning and Community Development Office to identify funding programs currently available through the City or other funding sources,the funding cycles for each of those programs,the criteria for qualifying for those programs,and the criteria which will be used by the funding entity to evaluate whether or not the project should be funded. Work with the non-profit housing group and property owners to put together applications for funding programs,to develop community support for those applications,and to follow through the application, evaluation,funding,and construction process.strategy H-4a: Transfer ownership of substandard rental properties to home ownership.implementation program H-4a-1: Seek funding for home ownership programs. Establish a new non-profit group,or work with an existing group,which will focus on improving housing in the neighborhood. Work with the Council District office and the Denver Planning and Community Development Office to identify funding programs currently available through the City or other funding sources,the funding cycles for each of those programs,the criteria for qualifying for those programs,and the criteria which will be used by the funding entity to evaluate whether or not the project should be funded. Work with the non-profit housing group and property owners to put together applications for funding programs,to develop community support for those applications,and to follow through the application, evaluation,funding,and construction process. 23

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BUSINESSvision Support and enhance neighborhood commercial activities. Increase retail activity. Research the shopping desires and needs for new businesses. Institute a senior shopping service.goal B-4: Support and enhance neighborhood commercial activities.strategy B-4a: Upgrade the visual appearance of 10th Avenue and Knox Court.implementation program B-4a-1: Seek funding for streetscaping and facade improvements and maintenance. Follow the recommendations outlined in UD 1a-2 on page 12.strategy B-4b: Research the shopping desires and needs for new businesses.implementation program B-4b-1: Conduct a neighborhood survey. Conduct a survey of neighborhood residents and businesses,asking residents their attitude toward the businesses which are currently in the neighborhood,changes which they would like to see to those businesses,and which additional businesses they would most like to see added to the neighborhood.Ask business owners about their customers,other businesses which are in the neighborhood and those,which they would like to see,added,and how they think their businesses could be improved. 24 GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS 10th & Knox

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANimplementation program B-4b-2: Form an association of business and property owners. Work with the business and property owners in and adjacent to the neighborhood to form one or more business associations.At a minimum,form an association of businesses along Federal Boulevard.As one of the first steps in the process of creating an association,talk to representatives of similar business associations in the City.Once formed,the business association can work to improve the business climate in the areas by solving common problems;attracting new businesses;and jointly applying for available funding for business development,facade renovation,and streetscaping.strategyB-4c: Increase retail activity.implementation program 4c-1: Develop and fund a business development program. Using the results of the neighborhood survey,work with the Council District and the Mayor's Office of Economic Development to establish a business development program and to identify potential funding sources for implementing the program.Work with business and property owners to apply for funds to implement the program.strategy B-4d: Institute a senior shopping service.implementation program B-4c-1: Use an existing service or create a new service. Work with current providers of senior shopping services to evaluate the need for expanded service in Villa Park and potential mechanisms to provide the expansion.Current providers include Senior Support Services,RTD's Senior Shopping Program,and RTD's Senior Ride program.Local churches should be contacted for a source of volunteers for expanding existing services or creating a new senior shopping service. 25

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TRANSPORTATIONDescription and AnalysisStreets are designated by the Denver Comprehensive Plan according to the following definitions: Local Streets:Serve the function of providing direct access to adjacent properties and of carrying low volumes of traffic (less than 2,000 vehicles per day) with an origin or destination within the neighborhood.Examples 7th Avenue and Tennyson Steet. Collector Streets:Distribute traffics between arterial and local streets within the community and link residential areas,local and community shopping,and other major community activity areas.Collector streets have average volumes of 5,000 to 12,000 vehicles per day.Examples of collector streets are Perry Street and 10th Avenue. Arterial Street:Provide for through traffic on a continuous route.They serve as the primary link between communities and major land use elements.The average traffic volumes typically range from 10,000 to 50,000 vehicles per day.Examples of arterial streets are Federal Blvd.and Sheridan Blvd. The Department of Public Works classifies existing streets.The map shows the Villa Park neighborhood with existing street classification and average daily traffic counts from 1988 and 1993.Major StreetsThe main streets,or "arterials,"in Villa Park Federal Boulevard,Sheridan Boulevard,and 6th Avenue Freeway form three of the four neighborhood edges. Tenth Avenue,which carries less traffic,runs east-west near the northern border of the neighborhood, and is considered a "collector"for traffic from other,less traveled,streets. 26 GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 27 Traffic Count and Street Classification Map

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Perry and Knox Court,which run north-south,are also considered "collectors"and are the only streets internal to the neighborhood which cross the 6th Avenue Freeway.The extension of Eighth Avenue from Federal to Knox Court is a remnant of the street system which existed prior to the construction of the 6th Avenue Freeway.This street is currently considered a "collector"and has received City funding for traffic and streetscaping improvements.Traffic impacts from expanding 6th Avenue FreewayThere are long-range traffic plans,which consider the widening of 6th Avenue Freeway by two lanes on each side and improving the frontage road.If these plans were approved and funded,they would require the purchase and removal of a row of houses on either side of the freeway.This plan is not likely to begin,however,for at least five years,because of delays in the Federal funding process and the lack of State and Federal funds.The Southwest Quadrant Transportation Study is also addressing the potential need for widening 6th Avenue.Sidewalks and Bike PathsWhile most streets in Villa Park have sidewalks,there are streets which do not have them on both sides, and in some cases do not have sidewalks on either side of the street.Other streets have sidewalks which are uneven and,therefore,hazardous.While bike paths run along sections of the gulches,they are not continuous and are in some cases difficult to use because of poor maintenance,including low-hanging branches and mud.Public TransportationVilla Park has a long history of access to public transportation.The street cars which served Denver from the end of the 1800's until the 1950's serviced Villa Park,and many of Villa Park's first homes were built near these old routes.Currently,the Regional Transportation District (RTD) operates a number of bus routes in and around the neighborhood,which follow the original street car routes. RTD is not planning changes,which will affect the bus routes in and near Villa Park.However,if constructed,the proposed rapid transit route servicing west Denver would go through Lakewood / Dry Gulch,passing directly over the railroad tracks near Dry Gulch at 12th Street.With this proposed route, one or more transit stations might be built near Villa Park.Prior to construction of a rapid transit system, funding would have to be approved by voters in the affected municipalities. 28 GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANvision Safe and uncongested traffic flow within and through the neighborhood Landscaping and buffering that will protect adjacent residences along arterial streets. Reduced noise levels along 6th Avenue Freeway Convenient RTD bus transit service to all areas in the neighborhood.strategy T1: Provide noise barriers on the western portion of the 6th Avenue Freeway. Both the north and south sides of the 6th Avenue Freeway are considered Type 2 areas,meaning that there were "existing conditions exceeding 67 decibels."As a result,both sides of the freeway are eligible for federal funds for noise barriers.However,because the freeway may be widened and that widening might result in the removal of any noise barriers,which were installed prior to the widening,federal funds cannot be used to construct them.implementation program T1-a: Secure funding for noise barriers. Address this issue through the Southwest Quadrant Transportation Study. If it is consistent with the completed Southwest Quadrant Study,form a coalition with other neighborhoods,which adjoin the 6th Avenue Freeway in order to work on acquiring noise barriers and to participate in the design process for the anticipated expansion. Work with the Colorado Department of Highways to determine the schedule for widening of the 6th Avenue Freeway and the anticipated acquisitions,which would be required for that widening. Using the tentative schedule and the knowledge of anticipated acquisitions,determine the best approach for the neighborhoods:whether to push for an accelerated construction schedule or for construction of temporary noise barriers. Work with City,State,and congressional representatives to lobby for the desired approach to acquiring noise barriers. 29

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strategy T2-b: Improve parking and traffic circulation around schools.implementation program T2-b-1: Investigate the residential parking permit program. The Transportation Division of the Department of Public Works administers the residential parking permit program.The program restricts parking to residents with permit stickers,with a few parking spaces retained for guest parking.The neighborhood organization should investigate the advantages of such a program around the neighborhood schools.As part of this effort,the organization should work with the schools to find alternative parking for staff and visitors.implementation program T2-b-2: Improve signage and lighting. Work with the Department of Public Works Transportation Engineering Section to identify deficiencies and to request improved signage and lighting around neighborhood schools.Work with the Parks Department to improve signage and trail lighting in Lakewood / Dry Gulch.strategy T3-c: Improve traffic control.implementation program T3-c-1: Work with the department of public works. Work with the Traffic Engineering Section of the Department of Public Works to identify and request traffic control improvements,such as left turn arrows at both 10th and Sheridan and 10th and Federal.strategy T4-d: Improve the extension of 8th Avenue to Knox Court.implementation program T4-d-1: Work with the departments of public works and parks. Work with the Transportation Division of the Department of Public Works and the Parks Department to improve both the efficiency and aesthetics of the extension of 8th Avenue to Knox Court.The design should also improve the linkage of Barnum Park to the neighborhood, including pedestrian linkages. 30 GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANstrategy T4-e: Improve the service roads along 6th avenue.implementation program T4-e-1: Lobby for resolution of the 6th avenue widening issue. As part of the Southwest Quadrant Study,seek a solution,either temporary or permanent,to the deterioration of the service roads along 6th Avenue.strategy T5-f: Monitor and participate in transportation plans.implementation program T5-f-1: Assign transportation responsibilities. The neighborhood organization should assign individuals who will be responsible for attending transportation meetings and monitoring transportation programs which might affect Villa Park,such as the Southwest Quadrant Transportation Study,the potential widening of the 6th Avenue Freeway and the potential construction of a light rail line along the gulch.Those individuals should report back to the neighborhood organization and ask for direction and assistance from the larger organization.implementation program T5-f-2: Encourage neighborhood participation in plans. Encourage neighborhood participation in planning for major transportation projects,such as projects affecting 6th Avenue,Federal,Sheridan,or other projects,which could have a major impact on the neighborhood and its residents.goal T6-g: Enhance neighborhood circulation.strategy T6-g: Improve the condition of bike routes and sidewalks and expand the system for both circulation and recreation uses.implementation program T6-g-1: Work with the parks department. The Parks Department has the responsibility for constructing and maintaining bicycle routes.Work with the Trail Planner for the Parks Department and the State Bicycle Coordinator to seek improvements and expansion to the existing system of bicycle routes,including connecting the Lakewood / Dry Gulch trail to the Weir Gulch trail,providing curb cuts at Perry,and a pedestrian/bicycle-activated signal across Sheridan.For sidewalks,see Implementation Program PS-9e-1. 31

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ENVIRONMENTAlthough Villa Park is a relatively small neighborhood,it is an area of geographical contrast.Steep slopes alternate with very flat areas,causing drainage problems for the neighborhood.Some property abutting the two gulches lies in the designated flood plain areas and several old landfills lie underground one at 7th and Perry and a second at northeast corner of 6th and Sheridan.Lakewood / Dry GulchLakewood / Dry Gulch is the most prominent,contiguous parcel of open space in the neighborhood.It is owned and managed by a combination of jurisdictions and agencies,including the Denver Parks and Recreation Department,Public Service Company of Colorado,the Regional Transportation District (RTD), and the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District.In addition to the open space and park improvements mentioned above,the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District has plans to install 3-4 "drop structures" in sections of Lakewood Gulch in the next few years.These structures are designed to prevent downstream erosion,and will be constructed between Tennyson and Perry Streets.The District also has funds to begin designing flood control improvements for an additional section of Lakewood Gulch.The Parks and Recreation Department shares maintenance responsibilities for the area along the Gulch with the Drainage District,with the Parks Department generally having responsibility for improving and maintaining areas which abut the Gulch.VegetationNative cottonwood and willow trees line the gulches in Villa Park,while the ground cover consists of both native grasses and weeds.Along the streets,the dominant tree species in Villa Park are silver maples, Chinese elms,and spruce.WildlifeBecause of the "natural"state of the gulches,many species of wildlife continue to exist in Villa Park, including squirrels,skunks,raccoons,muskrats,and cottontail rabbits.The greatest variety of wildlife in 32 GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANVilla Park,however,is provided by birds,including owls,ducks,and geese.PollutionPollution problems in Villa Park are typical of many Denver neighborhoods.The "brown cloud"of dust and automobile exhaust envelopes the neighborhood periodically,especially during the winter months. Automobile traffic on 6th Avenue and Sheridan and Federal Boulevards exacerbates the air pollution problem.Noise from the 6th Avenue Freeway is also a continuing problem,and litter and garbage are eyesores and can create unpleasant odors.Methane GasOne of the biggest environmental problems in the neighborhood is the old covered landfill between 6th and Sheridan and 8th and Wolff.As a known generator of methane gas,care should be taken when excavating or rebuilding on or near this location.To enhance neighborhood safety,precautions issued by the Denver Building Department should be adhered to at all times. City programs should give priority to helping owners of housing on or adjacent to this landfill both mitigate the dangers of methane gas and provide the frequent repairs to foundations,sidewalks,gutters, and streets necessitated by the settling of the soil.vision Improve neighborhood environmental conditions. Establish a neighorhood image of identity.goal N-3: Establish a neighborhood image or identity.strategy N-3a: Strengthen the neighborhood organization.implementation program N-3a-1: Seek funding for the neighborhood association. Develop a program,which will provide funds for the operation of the neighborhood organization. 33

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implementation program N-3a-2: Seek broad neighborhood participation in the association. Make a membership drive a primary focus of the neighborhood association in order to build its strength and viability.Focus on developing active representation from each geographic, economic,interest,and cultural sector of the neighborhood. Incorporate tenants into both the neighborhood organization and neighborhood activities. Take the neighborhood organization to the tenants. Periodically,hold neighborhood organization meetings in an apartment complex. Conduct one of the neighborhood events at an apartment complex. Deliver the neighborhood newsletter to the apartment complexes.implementation program N-3a-3: Develop an annual work program for the association. Using the neighborhood plan as a base,develop an annual work program for the association, determine priorities for each of the tasks,and assign responsibilities for accomplishing them. Distribute the work program to the City Councilperson and to the Denver Planning and Community Development Office.strategy N-3b: Publish a neighborhood newsletter.implementation program N-3b-1: Set parameters for the newsletter. Check with other neighborhood organizations,such as Southwest Improvement Council, Neighborhood Housing Service,and Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods,regarding their newsletters:what they hope to achieve with their newsletters,how they are written and laid out, how often they are published,how they are distributed,how many copies are printed,how much they cost,etc.Adapt the processes used by other organizations to the needs and capabilities of Villa Park.implementation program N-3b-2: Publish and distribute the newsletter. 34 GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Using these parameters,organize a process for producing and distributing the newsletter.Seek donations and volunteers to help with production and distribution.Begin production and distribution.strategy N-3c: Sponsor an annual neighborhood event or festival.implementation program N-3c-1: Set goals for the neighborhood event. Decide what should be accomplished by each neighborhood event:publicity,image building, community building,fundraising,etc.Select an event,or multiple events,which will meet these goals.Possible events might include a series of block parties as "get acquainted"opportunities;a crafts fair with music,food,and entertainment;a neighborhood clean-up of the gulches;or a celebration of neighborhood improvements.implementation program N-3c-2: Organize the event. Establish a committee,which will organize the event(s),solicit volunteers and funding,and oversee the event itself.strategy N-3d: Adopt a neighborhood logo.implementation program N-3d-1: Develop,adopt,and use a neighborhood logo. Seek volunteers who will donate several alternative designs for a neighborhood logo,select one of these as the official neighborhood logo,and use the selected logo on all stationery for the neighborhood association and on signage throughout the neighborhood.strategy N-3f: Adopt a unified signage program.implementation program N-3f-1: Use the neighborhood logo throughout the neighborhood. Put the neighborhood logo on signs erected in Villa Park,including those at the gateways and announcing neighborhood events. 35

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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMSgoal N-6: Improve neighborhood environmental conditions.strategy N-6a: Clean-up graffiti.implementation program N-6a-1: Work with "Keep Denver Beautiful"to develop an ongoing neighborhood anti-graffiti campaign. Utilize the neighborhood association newsletter and the resources of "Keep Denver Beautiful"to distribute information to all property owners and tenants on the importance of immediately removing graffiti,available resources and techniques for removing graffiti,and programs for preventing new graffiti.strategy N-6b: Clean-up trash.implementation program N-6b-1: Publicize available trash pick-up and recycling programs. Utilize the neighborhood association newsletter to publicize and explain available trash pick-up and recycling programs,including both the regular home trash collection program of the Denver Department of Public Works and the monthly "large item"pick-up service.Explain the distinction between home collection services,provided by the City,and commercial collection services, provided by private contractors.implementation program N-6b-2: Acquire "roll-barrels"for selected areas. Where appropriate,along those streets without alleys,acquire City-owned "roll-barrels"for trash collection.implementation program N-6b-3: Improve trash collection and eliminate dumping. Work with "Keep Denver Beautiful"to organize periodic neighborhood-wide trash collection programs and to develop new strategies for eliminating the dumping of junk and trash along the gulches. 36

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANstrategy N-6c: Remove old,abandoned cars.implementation program N-6c-1: Use city "police powers." Work with the City Council office,the Zoning Administration,and the Police Department to have the Zoning Administration remove inoperable,dismantled,or wrecked vehicles from any public or private property or to have vehicles impounded by the Police Department if they have been abandoned for more than 72 hours and either create an obstruction to traffic or present a public nuisance to health and safety.strategy N-6d: Support the leash law.implementation program N-6d-1: Assist city agencies in the enforcement of city codes. The Manager of Health and Hospitals has the authority to impound any animal,which is loose or does not have license tags.According to the City's Animal Control Code,protection against dogs is also regulated for persistent barking,damaging property,or vicious behavior.Contact the City Council office for the proper procedure to follow for enforcing either of these authorities. 37

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38GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMSElevation Map

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 39 Flood Hazard Boundary Map

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40GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMSGeologic Hazards Map

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANPUBLIC SAFETY AND CRIME PREVENTIONDenver crime statistics place Villa Park 27th among the 68 neighborhoods in the City,with a rate of 89.8 crimes per 1000 residents.The highest-ranked neighborhood had a rate of 277.4 crimes per 1000 residents,and the lowest-ranked neighborhood had a rate of 20.9 crimes per 1000 residents.The largest number of offenses committed in the Villa Park neighborhood were burglaries,with the highest crime areas near Federal and Sheridan Boulevard.vision Plant new trees and improve tree maintenance. Upgrade the neighborhood infrastructure. Enhance neighborhood safety.goal PS-8: Enhance neighborhood safety and security.strategy PS-8a: Expand the neighborhood watch program.implementation program PS-8a-1: Encourage additional participation in neighborhood watch. Each block currently involved in the neighborhood watch program should encourage surrounding blocks to join in order to increase the protection in the area.The neighborhood organization should promote the program through its neighborhood newsletter and in its meetings.strategy PS-8b: Improve lighting.implementation program PS-8b-1: Improve lighting in Martinez Park,around Lakewood / Dry Gulch,and in other inadequately lighted areas. 41 1998 Crimes vs Person

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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMS Lighting in Martinez Park and along the bicycle trail is the responsibility of the ParksDepartment. Working with the City Council office,the neighborhood organizations should send a written request to the Manager of the Parks Department.Typically,interior park lighting must be funded as a capital improvement item,a highly competitive and potentially lengthy process. Lighting along streets in the neighborhood is the responsibility of the Transportation Division of the Department of Public Works.Every intersection is required to have a 30-foot high-pressure sodium streetlight,but mid-block street or alley lights must be requested by 75 percent of the residents in a block.A standard form and explanation of the procedure is included in the Appendix.If a block is over 600 feet long,the Department will consider more than one midblock light.Once the Street Lighting Section receives the request,it is sent to the Public Service Company for installation.There is no cost to residents for installation or maintenance. Because Lakewood / Dry Gulch is a 100-year flood plain,no lights would be allowed in the gulch itself,but could be installed outside the flood plain boundaries.The master plan for Lakewood/Dry Gulch shows lighting in the interior of the park and includes recommendations for street lighting.Ownership of land within the gulch responsibility for lighting is shared by several public entities:the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District,the Parks Department,and Public Service Company.The neighborhood association should work with all three entities as they plan improvements to the gulch.strategy PS-8c: Enhance communication with the police.implementation program PS-8c-1: Include District One officers in neighborhood meetings. Invite District One police officers to regularly scheduled meetings,and provide regular opportunities for police officers to address the neighborhood.Request that representatives of the neighborhood organization be allowed to ride with police officers on a patrol shift to increase their understanding of neighborhood police issues.goal PS-2: Plant new trees and improve tree maintenance.strategy PS-2A: Start a tree planting program. 42

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANimplementation program PS-2A-1: Seek funding for a tree planting program. Set annual priorities for tree planting projects. Check with the Denver Parks and Recreation Department,Denver Urban Forests,The Park People, and all other potential sources for the availability of programs for acquiring trees,application schedules for those programs,the criteria for qualifying for those programs,and the criteria which will be used by the funding entity to evaluate whether or not the project should be funded. Work with property owners and tenants to put together applications for funding programs,to develop community support for those applications,and to follow through the application, evaluation,funding,and planting process.strategy PS-2B: Maintain existing trees.implementation program PS-2B-1: Educate people on tree maintenance. Ask the City Forester to help provide information on tree maintenance (e.g.when and how to trim). Distribute the information provided by the City Forester throughout the neighborhood.implementation program PS-2B-2: Seek funding for tree maintenance. Because City funding for tree maintenance on private property and in the public rightof-way is extremely limited,lobby to increase that funding. Seek alternative sources of funding for tree maintenance. Apply for any sources of funding which might be available to the neighborhood for tree maintenance.implementation program PS-2B-3: Support code enforcement for existing trees and other vegetation. If education efforts have failed,report trees in need of maintenance to the City Forester,who can force property owners to trim their trees or to mow their weeds. 43

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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMSCOMMUNITY FACILITIESHospitals and Medical FacilitiesSaint Anthony's Hospital,located at 4231 West 16th Avenue,is the nearest full-service hospital.The Westside Health Center,a public health center that services the Villa Park neighborhood,is located at 1100 Federal Boulevard.Its services include an adult clinic,maternity and family planning,pediatrics,teen clinic,social service aid,laboratory,X-rays,dental clinic,pharmacy,and food supplement programs.Police and Fire StationsThe District 1 Police Station is located at 2195 Decatur Street.It serves Precincts,133 and 134,both of which are located in Villa Park.The fire station for the neighborhood is Station 20,located at 501 Knox Court.LibrariesThere are no public libraries in the neighborhood,although there are two branch libraries nearby.The Hadley Branch at 1890 Grove and the Ross-Barnum Branch at 3570 West 1st Avenue are both within the general area surrounding the neighborhood.ParksThe City parks in the neighborhood are Martinez Park and Sanchez Park.Martinez Park is primarily open space,with a few picnic tables,and Sanchez Park has a baseball diamond.Lakewood / Dry Gulch provides a unique opportunity for the development of open space,trails,and parks.The General Obligation Bond Issue passed by Denver voters in 1989 includes funds for developing a master plan for the improvement of Lakewood / Dry Gulch as a public open space and park facility and for the first phase of construction of the planned improvements.Additional funding will be needed for later phases of the planned improvements.The concept for development of the gulches is that they will provide open space and trails connecting into a larger metropolitan system,connecting into the Platte River Greenway and, eventually,through Lakewood into the foothills.Additionally,at selected locations along the gulches,small park and recreation sites will be developed. 44 P1Marinez Park P2Sanchez Park L2Hadley Library L3Westwood Library S1Cowell Elementary S2Eagleton Elementary S3Presentation School H1St. Anthony Hospital H2Westside Health Clinic D1Police Department F1Fire Station 20

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANSchoolsThere are three schools in Villa Park,two public elementary schools and one private school.Eagleton Elementary,at 9th and Hooker,and Cowell Elementary,at 10th and Utica,are public schools.Presentation School,at 7th and Julian,is a private,parochial school.These schools have all experienced growth in the past few years because of the increasing number of families with young children in the neighborhood.Senior CentersThe GAO has received a grant from the City to build a senior center adjacent to its Maes Apartment building to help accommodate the needs of the rapidly increasing number of senior citizens living in the Villa Park neighborhood.goal PS-9: Upgrade the neighborhood infrastructure.strategy PS-9a: Upgrade street drainage.implementation program PS-9a-1: Identify and request necessary drainage improvements. The Wastewater Division of the Department of Public Works is responsible for identifying drainage problems and for developing and implementing master plans for storm drainage improvements throughout the City.The Parks Department is responsible for maintaining parks only to the point where they abut designated flood channels.The Urban Drainage and Flood Control District maintain the flood channel itself.The neighborhood organization should work with the City Council office to identify drainage problems,contact the appropriate agency,and seek funding for improvements. Currently,between three and five million dollars in drainage improvements are planned for Lakewood / Dry Gulch,including numerous major and minor projects.Initially,however, improvements will be made only to the channel,costing approximately one million dollars. Because of the topography of Villa Park,many of its streets drain into Lakewood / Dry Gulch, aggravating drainage and erosion problems.Give priority to rectifying these drainage problems, including the 12thand Knox Court drainage project. 45

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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMSstrategy PS-9b: Improve street pothole repair.implementation program PS-9b-1: Identify and report potholes. The Department of Public Works is responsible for repairing potholes.Residents may write requests for repair to the Pothole Service of the Department of Public Works and fill-out a log sheet which describes the location of potholes.Upon receipt of the log sheet,the District Foreman will inspect the area and initiate pothole repairs.strategy PS-9c: Establish a program of low-cost and no-cost alley improvements.implementation program PS-9c-1: Initiate alley improvements. While numerous alleys in Villa Park need improvement,emphasis should initially be placed on those unpaved and poorly paved alleys which drain into Lakewood / Dry Gulch,aggravating drainage and erosion problems.Alleys should be improved with concrete paving.Alley paving requires the formation of a local improvement district,which will provide a mechanism for assessing property taxes to pay for the paving.Through the Board of Equalization,a property owner may request a reduction in the assessment.The neighborhood organization should work through the City Council office to identify alleys in need of repair and to initiate requests for funding assistance.strategy PS-9d: Provide uniform street,curb,and gutter improvements.implementation program PS-9d-1: Initiate street,curb,and gutter improvements. The Transportation Division of the City Engineer's Office is responsible for designing new streets,curbs,and gutters and improvements to existing ones.The Street Maintenance Division is responsible for maintaining streets,curbs,and gutters.The neighborhood organization should work through the City Council District office to identify both locations for streets,curbs,and gutters in need of repair and locations which currently do not have these facilities but need them,and then to initiate work requests.Similar to alley paving street,curb,and gutter improvements require the formation of an improvement district through the Transportation Division.Streets currently requiring street,curb,and gutter improvements include: 46

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 1200 block of Grove 12th Avenue between Lowell and Newton 1000 block of Winona Court 1200 block of Knox Court at Lakewood / Dry Gulchstrategy PS-9e: Provide uniform sidewalk improvements.implementation program PS-9e-1: Initiate sidewalk improvements. While sidewalk construction,repair,and replacement is the responsibility of the adjoining property owner,not the City,the Transportation Division of the City Engineer's Office is responsible for designing both new sidewalks and improvements to existing sidewalks. Sidewalk improvements in a large area may be financed through the formation of an improvement district.To be consistent with Citywide mobility plans and to provide accessibility for the physically disabled,five-foot minimum width sidewalks must be provided where they are non-existent and,where they are existing,are at a substandard width. Intersection curb ramps should be included to provide improved accessibility for the elderly and disabled populations.The neighborhood organization should work through the City Council District office to identify sidewalks in need of repair and those areas,which have no sidewalks,and to initiate work requests.Locations currently requiring new sidewalks include: 600 block of Tennyson Perry 600,700,and 800 blocks of Perry Lowell 800,900,and 1000 blocks of Grove 800 block of Linley Court 900 and 1000 blocks of Irving 47

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GOALS, STRATEGIES & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMSgoal CF-10: Create neighborhood recreation opportunities.strategy CF-10a: Use existing public facilities.implementation program CF-10a-1: Initiate discussion of joint-use of existing facilities. While the two elementary schools and the churches in Villa Park offer some recreation opportunities,these are limited and are not widely known.At a minimum,the neighborhood organization should inventory existing recreation programs and publicize those through its newsletter.Beyond that,the organization should initiate discussion with the schools and churches regarding the potential expansion of the existing programs.strategy CF-10b: Utilize recreation centers in other neighborhoods.implementation program CF-10b-1: Increase awareness of existing recreation facilities. Barnum Park has senior and child/adult activities,an outdoor pool,lighted tennis courts,and playground and picnic facilities.Rude Park has softball fields,playground and picnic areas,and an indoor pool.Mulroy Community center at 13th and King is also available for public use.Use the neighborhood organization newsletter to help publicize these facilities,their locations,programs, and hours.implementation program CF-10B-2: Improve access to recreation facilities. While Barnum Park,Rude Park,and Mulroy Community Center all have RTD service,they would benefit from improved pedestrian and bicycle access.Work with the State and the Parks Department to provide better pedestrian and bicycle access.goal CF-11: Develop Lakewood / Dry Gulch as a neighborhood asset. 48

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VILLA PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLANimplementation program CF-11-a: Participate in planning and maintaining Lakewood / Dry Gulch. The 1989 General Obligation Bond Issue includes funding for developing a master plan and for the first phase of improvements to Lakewood / Dry Gulch and for related bicycle path improvements.The neighborhood organization should take an active role in planning both these and ongoing improvements to the gulch.Similarly,it should lobby for and participate in the ongoing maintenance of the gulch as it is improved.Specific issues,which should be addressed, include: Establishing a program to prevent dumping Establishing an ongoing clean-up program Upgrading lighting Creating more pedestrian gulch crossings Preventing erosion and mud problems. Acquiring additional funding. Providing for ongoing maintenance. 49