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West Colfax neighborhood plan

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Title:
West Colfax neighborhood plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Colfax Avenue (Denver, Colo.)
Neighborhood plans
Community planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- West Colfax

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
WEST COLFAX
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
DENVER PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
MARCH 1987


CREDITS:
CITY TEAM
Betty Brooks, Senior City Planner-Author
Mark Leese, Urban Designer
Tony Chan, Graphic Artist
Mary Avgerinos, Research Assistant
Francis Burg, Typist
Margaret H. Sperling, Deputy Director of Neighborhood Planning.- -
William Lamont, Jr., Director of Planning and Community Development
The Honorable Federico Pena, MAYOR
CITY COUNCIL
Councilman M. L "Sam Sandos, District 3
Ramona Martinez, Council Aide, District 3
Councilman William "Bill" Scheitler, District 1
Shirley Shley, Council Aide, District 1
THE WEST COLFAX STEERING COMMITTEE:
Hector Benavidez, Greater Avondale Heights Improvement Association
Larry Morris, Greater Avondale Heights Improvement Association
Eddie Valdez, Greater Avondale Heights Improvement Association
Jacque Wailis, West Denver Concerned and Active Neighbors
Don Morales, West Denver Concerned and Active Neighbors
Ron Passarelli, West Colfax Improvement Association
Jerry Rosen, West Colfax Improvement Association
Irv Feldman, Sloans Lake Citizens
James P. Adams, Ph.D., Beth Israel Hospital
Harry Yaffe, Ph.D., Beth Israel Hospital
Barb Stuart, Saint Anthony's Hospital
Carole Steele, Saint Anthony's Hospital
Barbara Slawinski, Businesswoman/Property owner
Gertrude Hyman, Businesswoman/Property owner
Josh Mushell, Jewish Community Representative
Rabbi Lauer, Jewish Community Representative
Rabbi Lefkovitz, Jewish Community Representative
Margarita Aragon, Senior Citizen Representative
Kreg Snider, Public Housing Representative
William Ellis, Hebrew Education Alliance
Eddie Holtzman, Hebrew Education Alliance
Nettie Moore, Southwest Quadrant Representative
Kathleen Moore, Northeast Quadrant Representative


WEST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD
LOCATION MAP


WEST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Page
I. INTRODUCTION 1
NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING 1
USE OF THE PLAN 1
NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING PROCESS , 2
AN OVERVIEW 3
History 3
Demographic Profile 4
Neighborhood Vision 5
II. SUMMARY OF CONDITIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 5
A. INTRODUCTION 5
B. LAND USE AND ZONING 5
C. HOUSING 7
D. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 7
E TRAFFlCi TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING 9
F. CITY SERVICES/ENVIRONMENT 10
G. COMMUNITY FACILITIES 12
III. ACTION PLAN 13
III. GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE WEST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD 18
A. INTRODUCTION 18
B. LAND USE AND ZONING 18
C. HOUSING 19
D. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 21
E. TRAFFIC, TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING 24
F. COMMUNITY FACILITIES 29
G. CITY SERVICES/ENVIRONMENTAL 33
H. HISTORIC PRESERVATION 38
IV. SUBAREAS GOALS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 39
SUBAREA 1 WEST COLFAX CORRIDOR/FEDERAL-SHERIDAN 39
SUBAREA 2 NORTHWEST QUADRANT 42
SUBAREA 3 NORTHEAST QUADRANT 43
SUBAREA 4 SOUTHWEST QUADRANT 44
SUBAREAS SOUTHEAST QUADRANT 45
V. APPENDICES 47
DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE 47
AGE DISTRIBUTION, W. COLFAX AND DENVER, 1980 47


3
AN OVERVIEW
History
Originally, Colfax was known to residents of Denver in the early 20th century as "No Man's Land", and
"Jim Town." This area was sparsley settled but did contain several mansions of wealthy families as
well as scattered shacks of squatters.
A large wave of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe came into the area in the late 19th and early
20th centuries. Attracted by others with similar language, cultural and religious backgrounds, the
immigrants made No Mans Land" into Denver's version of a European Neighborhood.
As the neighborhood grew, problems created an interest in incorporation. Two factions appeared;
those who favored incorporation of the whole community under the name "Colfax* and those would
have the business section, a strip along Golden Avenue just west of the river, remain separate under
the name "Brooklyn." When Colfax did incorporate in 1891, Brooklyn seceded but then returned the
following year. This area nine and a half blocks in length and two and a half blocks in width, numbered
three hundred inhabitants. The town of Colfax was annexed to Denver in 1897. The name "Golden
Avenue" was officially changed to "West Colfax Avenue." This great cross town avenue was named
for Schuyler Colfax.
West Colfax Avenue was the main street of this small town. It was lined with two-story brick
commercial buildings, stores, saloons, a restaurant, a meeting hall and even a hotel. West Colfax had
a constant flow of hay wagons and peddlers, since all traffic enroute to Denver from the agricultural
communities of Golden and Morrison converged here.
In the 1920s two public schools, Colfax and Lake Junior High School, were opened in the area to meet
the challenges of a progressive neighborhood. The Depression years saw little or no development in
the West Colfax neighborhood. In the 1940s and mid 50's a housing boom occured, characteristic of
the "Filling In" era. Most vacant land west of Utica was purchased for home building. West Colfax
along with Bamum and Sloan Lake experienced this housing boom simultaneously.
The Mayoral Administration of the 1950s promoted civil bond issues that funded the construction of
public housing in and near West Colfax. The challenge and transition of West Colfax began and the
196Qs brought a wave of Hispanic immigration. The 1970s brought young Anglo families into the
neighborhood, and in the mid 70s the first wave of Indochinese families settled in the West Colfax
neighborhood. According to the 1980 U.S. Census, the area today is of varied ethnic make-up of
Anglo, Jewish, Black, Chicano, Native American, and Indo-Chinese.


5
Neighborhood Vision
Although West Coif ax derives its name from the commercial strip that bisects the area, one of the most
apparent characteristics of the neighborhood is the high proportion of residential land use as compared
to business and industrial uses.
The overall vision for the neighborhood Is to maintain the residential character of the area and
preserve and enhance the existing ethnic mix of people. Preservation of this unique character
can be achieved through various forms of housing, zoning and land use strategies.
To support the needs of West Colfax residents, it is envisioned that there be a strengthening
and increase of the economic viability along the West Colfax corridor. Therefore, selected
nodes have been targeted for revitalization along with Identifying various service needs. The
people In the community want to see the commercial corridor redevelop as a "little downtown"
of Denver.
II. SUMMARY OF CONDITIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
A. INTRODUCTION
West Colfax is classified as a "moderate-minor" redeveloping neighborhood according to the
Neighborhood Classification Report prepared by the Denver Planning Office, 1984. In
looking at the neighborhoods existing conditions and its potential future several issues were identified and
goals developed to attain a more stable environment.
The following is a summary of issues and recommendations. Specific subarea recommendations can be
found In Chapter four of this plan.
B. LAND USE AND ZONING
Existing Conditions
1. The continuing decline of the business district along West Colfax Avenue. Of special concern is
the limited number and variety of neighborhood shops and services. Although there appears to be
adequate commercial space available in existing structures to meet the retail demands of the
community there is a desire to encourage new commercial development if the business zone can
be expanded at selected points along the avenue.


7
C. HOUSING
Existing Conditions
1. A mixture of single and multi-family residential housing. Nearly 73% of the housing in West Colfax
is renter occupied with a significant percentage of such units located in the neighborhood's eastern
half.
2. A large concentration of public housing projects and government assisted private developments in
one area. Almost 96% of these projects and developments are concentrated east of Perry Street.
3. A high correlation between absentee landlords, rental properties, and deterioration. Although the
need for rehabilitation is high and there are several tracts of land available for infill housing, there
are currently tew signs of new housing construction and/or housing rehabilitation.
4. A significant increase in housing sale prices in census tract 7.01 (west of Perry Street) from
$56,600 to $72,100 between 1980 and 1981. It began to taper off in 1983. Sales prices in census
tract 7.02 (east of Perry Street) did not reveal such a drastic increase during 1981 but average
sales price in 1983 was still $65,300.
Recommendations
1. Create a non-profit housing corporation.
2. Encourage the development of affordable housing on vacant land that is in character with
surrounding residential.
3. Increase awareness about available housing programs, funds, and services.
4. Increase home ownership, home improvement programs, and other housing programs. Encourage
landlords to participate.
5. Protect and reinforce residential areas that abut commercial areas by encouraging property owners
to install landscaping and other forms of buffering.
6. Improve the conditions of absentee-owned housing through code enforcement.
D. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Two walking tours and a commercial survey were done of the West Colfax Avenue corridor and Avondale
Shopping Center. From these activities several issues came forth.


9
E. TRAFFIC, TRANSPORTATION, AND PARKING
Existing Conditions
Classifications of city street's established by the Department of Public Works include local, collector,
arterial or freeway.
West Colfax contains three of these four classifications.
1. The volume of traffic and speed hinders pedestrian safety and shopping. West Colfax Avenue
(I-70 business route) serves as the only arterial street running through the neighborhood and is the
main thoroughfare linking Downtown and the suburbs to the west.
2. The high speed of traffic and lack of police enforcement on West 17th Avenue present a problem.
Seventeenth Avenue, the busiest and major east-west collector street in the area, provides traffic
relief for West Colfax Avenue at peak travel hours.
3. The increase of recent traffic and excessive speed on Fourteenth Avenue is a concern for
pedestrian safety. This avenue is a collector street and is a highly travelled pedestrian corridor with
a strong residential character.
4. There is a limited number of north-south collector streets linking West Colfax to the southwest and
northwest neighborhoods besides Sheridan and Federal Boulevards. These two streets (Perry
Street and Lowell Boulevard) appear to function weil as classified.
5. Bus service in West Colfax appears to be adequate with the exception of the available buses along
Sheridan Boulevard. There are nine bus routes serving the West Colfax area. The need for
additional bus shelters and the desire to substitute a subsidized bus pass program to encourage
hospital employees of both Beth Isreai and Saint Anthony's hospitals to ride the bus are two issues
that have been expressed relative to R.T.D. This would serve to relieve the parking problems
around the hospitals.
6. Existing bike paths are adequate but future work needs to be done to identify the alignment of two
new bike paths in order to link the gulch and Paco Sanchez Park to Sloan Lake.
7. An external factor affecting the West Colfax neighborhood is related to the sports complex facilities
of Mile High Stadium and McNichols Sports arena. The area east of Saint Anthonys hospital and
north of West Colfax has experienced overflow parking impacts of fans using the Sports Complex
facility. This problem being one of the oldest continues to plague the area.
8. Additional parking issues have been focused around the hospital area and along the west Colfax
commercial corridor.


3. Littered and/or unmowed vacant lots.
4. Missing and deteriorated sidewalks throughout the neighborhood.
5. Corroded sidewalks, curbs, and gutters along the West Colfax corridor.
6. Inadequate street Sights, particularly along the Lakewood gulch and commercial districts.
7. Inefficient storm sewers that often back up and create large pools at intersections in the northwest
quadrant of the neighborhood...........-----------
8. Lack of maintenance of public right-of-ways.
Recommendations
1. Implement a systematic code enforcement program for ail of West Colfax.
2. Encourage the continuation of the "Super Can" program and other activities related to
neighborhood clean up.
3. Explore a different approach to snow removal to protect curbs and gutters from being damaged,
especially along West Colfax.
4. Repair the storm drainage system to improve water flow.
5. Encourage the continuation of the beautification of the Lakewood Dry Gulch and natural park
development.
6. Enforce "no dumping" laws along the Lakewood Dry Gulch.
7. Encourage the maintenance of public rights-of-way.
8. Urge continued funding for sidewalk replacement for the entire neighborhood.
9. Encourage continued promotion of neighborhood pride events such as the "Slogan Contest."


12
G. COMMUNITY FACILITIES
Existing Conditions
Community facilities such as parks, schools, day care centers, libraries, and senior citizen homes are
important to both the quality of life and the common identity of the neighborhood. Together and
individually they shape the feelings of the residents as well as perceptions of visitors and prospective
investors.
1. Limited open space within the neighborhood even though the area is bounded to the north and
south by two large parks: Sloan Lake, a city" park, and Paco Sanchez Park, a "neighborhood"
park. Both parks provide nearby open space, fine mountain views, and playground and picnic
areas.
2. The Lakewood Dry Gulch, although improved a great deal, continues to have problems with litter
as well as an undeveloped bike path. The gulch has been the site for dumping which has created
health and safety hazards.
3. Enrollment in the neighborhood public schools; Colfax Elementary, Cheltenham Elementary, and
Lake Middle School, has gone up and down but is not declining.
4. Insufficient number of day care centers and day care homes in the neighborhood to meet the
communitys needs resulting in long commuter trips tor parents taking their children to facilities far
from home. The ciosing of the Westridge Day Care and Julian Street Center has created a void in
child care services.
5. The lack of available transportation for the elderly. Although numerous facilities and programs are
present in the neighborhood to serve the needs of senior citizens, one problem for the elderly is the
availability of transportation for shopping, and medical needs. Additionally, there is a lack of
communication between the seniors, adults, and youth.
Recommendations
1. Encourage the completion of the Lakewood Dry Gulch natural park and bike path. Install
playground areas, where possible.
2. Urge the development of a vest pocket park on Stuart Street just south of West Colfax.
3. Support home ownership efforts and development of new multi-family housing to help stabilize
families in the area, and to strengthen the public schools.
4. Urge the development of new day care centers and provide support to expansion of existing
facilities.
5. Create senior citizen operated child care programs to help establish better communication among
seniors and adults.
8. Publicize senior citizen events and programs in local newspapers and media outlets.


14
7. Provide more housing opportunities. Planning, CDA, nbrhd.
8. Increase code enforcement of vacant and Zoning
abandoned houses.
9. Rename West ridge public housing project. D.H.A.
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
**1. Fund revitalization projects at priority nodes
(Lowell to Meade, Perry and Vrain)
2. Conduct joint business advertising and
promote positive public relations with the
banks.
**3. Create a Merchant's Association and/or
West Colfax Chamber of Commerce.
4. Encourage businesses to hire local
residents.
5. Support local merchants.
**6. Encourage new neighborhood.
7. Encourage facade renovation along the
Colfax corridor.
**8. Promote the development of a W. Colfax
Chamber of Commerce.
9. Explore ways to protect building facades
from adverse weather along W. Colfax.
10. Require landscaping on all new
developments.
11. Install streetscaping along W. Colfax and
discourage future R.O.W encroachment,
12. Fund a market study for the W. Colfax
business area.
State, EDA, private
Merchants, nbrhd., City
Merchants
Merchants, nbrhd.
Nbrhd.
EDA, merchants
EDA, Planning, merchants, nbrhd.
State, merchants
j
Public Works, Planning
Property owner
i
CDA, EDA, private
EDA, merchants
TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION
**1, Review traffic light timing and Meade Transportation Planning-DPW
Streets along W. Colfax.


16
18. Encourage parking lots to be compatible in design with surrounding residential areas. Planning, private
COMMUNITY FACILITIES/PARKS **1. Complete the Lakewood Gulch linear park and bike path. CDA, Parks & Rec.
**2. Develop a vest pocket park on Stuart Street (near W. Colfax Ave.) CDA, nbrhd.
3. Stabilize public school enrollment. 4. Expand day care center at Lowell Blvd. and W. 14th Ave. DPO, nbrhd. CDA, private
5. Involve senior citizens in day care. Social Services, senior homes
6. Publicize senior citizen programs and events. Community centers, senior homes, nbrhds, merchants
7, Create more grass land for football and baseball type of activities. Parks, Planning
HISTORIC PRESERVATION 1. Install historic signage at Stuart Street and W. Colfax Ave. DPW, Planning,nbrhd.
2. Evaluate SW quadrant of the neighborhood for historic designation. Landmark Commission, Planning, nbrhd.
3. Preserve historic structures including the Harvey Springer House at 16th & Yrain and the Dickerson Library at W. 17th & Hooker St. CDA, Planning, private
CITY SERVICES/ENVIRONMENTAL **1. Buffer the residental where commercial interfaces (especially W. Colfax Ave.) Private, EDA, CDA, Planning
**2. Install landscaping on St. Anthonys and Beth Israel Hospital parking lots. CDA, Hospitals
3, Install adequate landscaping on all new developments. Planning, developer


18
IV. GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE WEST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD
A. INTRODUCTION
The plan recommends policies for the entire neighborhood and also details specific recommendations by
subarea. The sub-areas were created for study purpose so that an indepth analysis could be done and
land use alternatives be tailored to each portion of the neighborhood. Sub-area goals and
recommendations can be found in chapter four of this plan-...
B. LAND USE AND ZONING
Existing conditions
The West Colfax neighborhood encompasses 421 acres. Although the West Colfax neighborhood
derives its name from the commercial strip that bisects the area, one of the most apparent
characteristics of the neighborhood is the high proportion of residential land use as compared to
business and industrial uses. Nearly 66% of the existing land use is residential, whereas the citys
average is 40%. Multi-family residences occupy almost one quarter of the total net land area.
Commercial uses are primarily located along both sides of the 1 1/2 mile commercial corridor of West
Colfax Avenue. Land used for industry, transportation, parking, open space, and vacant comprise a
normal portion of the net land use in the neighborhood. Two large private hospitals are also located
within the area.
In 1925 the City of Denver adopted its first set of zoning ordinances regulating the permitted land uses
and the density of development within specified zones. In anticipation of a rapid increase in population
the City in 1956 extensively revised its zoning laws, allowing for much higher residential densities in
those neighborhoods near the downtown area. However, the anticipated redevelopment and growth
never took place In the West Colfax neighborhood. Consequently, only 40% of land area that is zoned
R*2 is developed to the maximum permitted by the zone. Most of the blocks south of Colfax are zoned
R-2 but remain as single family dwelling units. The West Colfax commercial strip is zoned B-4 and
abuts residential districts on either side. It is a diversified retail business area characterized by
independent small businesses. With the exception of the R-3 zone district located in the northeast
quadrant of the neighborhood, there generally is a good correlation between zoning and existing land
use. (see existing zoning map on next page)
Recommendations
1. The plan recommends that the following areas be rezoned:
* The commercial zones at Vrain, Perry, and Lowell Boulevard to Meade nodes should be
expanded to encourage new neighborhood oriented services, (refer to subarea 1 for specifics,
see concepual analysis and proposed land use map on next pages)


CITY LIMITS
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19
* The area bounded by Irving to Grove Street between W. Colfax Avenue to W. 16th which is now
zoned R-3 should be rezoned to a density similar to the R-2-A. Any new development that may
require a slightly higher density than what is allowed in the R-2-A should be required to use the
P.U.D. process. All such zone changes need to be fully debated in City Council and would have
to have that body's approval before any map changes could be made.
* The area bounded by W. 16th and W. 17th Avenue between Irving and the alley between
Hooker and Irving which is now zoned R-3, should be rezoned to a density similar to the R-2-A.
* The area between W. Colfax Avenue and W. 16th Avenue along Sheridan Boulevard which is
......now zoned R-2 should be Tezoried for office usel
* Rezone the R-2 area between W. 16th and W, 17th Avenue, Irving Street to Hooker Street to
R-2-A or a similar zone district.
2. Infill housing developments that may require a slightly higher density than what is allowed in the
R-2 (primarily in the Lakewood Dry Gulch area) should be required to use the P.U.D. process.
These projects should be compatible in character and materials and provide appropriate buffering
to surrounding properties.
3. Commercial areas that abut residential uses should be encouraged to install landscaping and/or
other appropriate types of buffering.
4. Efforts should be supported to limit the number, size and height of existing and new billboards
primarily along the W. Colfax corridor.
5. Saint Anthonys hospital should be rezoned from R-3 to R-5 institutional zone district.
C. HOUSING
Existing Conditions
West Colfax is a neighborhood that has minor to moderate redevelopment potential according to the
July, 1984 Neighborhood Classification Report of the Denver Planning Office. The criteria used to
classify the neighborhoods included information on housing trends, compatibility between land use and
zoning, and a survey of general conditions.
According to the Denver Planning Office 1985 Housing Detail Report, West Colfax had 3,713 housing
units of which 1,141 were single family units, 2,311 mufti-family units, 236 public housing units, and 25
condominiums and mixed use residential. Of the total housing units in West Colfax, approximately
31% are single family and 62% are multi-family. Many of the single family and multi-family units
(duplexes) are relatively old dating back to the period-between 1900 -1939.
Owner occupancy, often a sign of neighborhood stability, is extremely low for the West Colfax
neighborhood at 25% compared to Denver's 48%. When comparing Denver's 74% single family owner


21
I
* Create more housing opportunities.
* Develop more senior citizen housing.
* Promote co-op housing.
3. Target local and state rehabilitation funding for West Colfax including the following:
* Colorado Housing Finance Authority funds.
* Community Development Block Grant funds.--------------- .................
* Skyline Housing funds.
4. Improve the condition of residential parking lots.
* Require parking lots to be landscaped.
* Encourage better maintenance.
5. Consider renaming the Westridge projects to reflect the rehabilitation of existing units and to
promote a better citywide image for public housing.
D. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Existing Conditions
Business development and redevelopment are needed in the neighborhood to upgrade deteriorated
retail areas, attract new businesses, increase employment opportunities, provide income for residents
and improve the quality of community life. West Coif axs retail businesses have declined due to
population loss and the relatively low level of expendable income In the area.
A commercial revitalization study conducted by the Denver Planning Office in January, 1985 revealed
that nearly one half of the businesses along the West Colfax corridor are automobile oriented.
Restaurants occupy 19% of the business strip with bar and liquor related establishments comprising
10%. The remainder of the businesses consist of 8% motel/hotel, and 21% general businesses,
(appliance repair, hair care, check cashing, etc.). See next page for business listing.
Approximately 44% of businesses have been at the same location for more than 10 years with the
oldest business being in operation for 60 years. Of the 121 workers employed at businesses
responding to the survey, 56% live in the neighborhood and/or surrounding area with the remainder
living in the suburbs. Almost half (45%) of the employees are in sales and services, 12% in
professional/management, and 16% in white and blue collar jobs.
To augment the revitalization study, representatives of the Steering Committee, Planning Office and
Council conducted two walking tours and a commercial conditions survey. The Committee concluded


23
A major problem relative to encouraging new development in West Colfax is the difficulty commercial
property owners have in convincing banks to finance projects in the neighborhood. The perception of
West Colfax from outside financial resources is that the neighborhood is declining and therefore to
invest in a project would be too risky. The assumption made by landowners who have attempted to
secure financing is that financial institutions have redlined the area.
There is a lack of cohesiveness among the businesses, little communication between merchants, and
lack of joint advertising. A merchants group did exist in the past but due to the lack of leadership and
organizational time it slowly came to an end. In 1984 with the assistance of the Steering Committee
the City brought together several of the merchants to^iscuss-the-potential for revitalizing West Colfax
and to re-establish the group. Currently there is a nucleus of merchants discussing that possibility.
The residents throughout the planning process identified a void in community oriented retail in the
neighborhood. A major problem resolved by the community was the replacement of the Safeway store
with a Super Foods store in the Avondale Shopping Center.
The physical appearance of the West Colfax Avenue in general is poor with an occasional exceptional
area where private development has occurred, where recent city public works projects have been
installed on Perry, Quitman, and Raleigh Street) and where State Highway West Colfax bridges have
been replaced. Sidewalks and curbs are in extremely poor condition due to the method of snow
removal, lack of maintenance and age. Additionally, the curb cuts that are no longer needed because
of a change in business to used car lots present safety hazards and prevent pedestrians from walking
freely along the sidewalks, this is especially true along the south end.
The last concern that hinders service access to the "strip is lack of adequate parking for shoppers.
On-street parking is available on the north side of the street only. Right-of-way encroachment by the
State eliminated parking on the south side.
Recommendations
1. Begin targeting funds for the redevelopment of the Loweii-Meade, Perry and Vrain Street nodes
(specific recommendations can be found in Subarea 1 of the Plan).
2. Make funds available for W. Colfax businesses.
3. Promote the development of a West Colfax Chamber of Commerce and/or merchants association
with 501 (c)(3) status.
4. Promote positive public relations with financial institutions to help with project financing.
5. Consolidate and publicize available city programs.
6. Upgrade the appearance of properties to attract new consumers.
7. Decrease crime and encourage neighborhoodwide clean up.


25
West Colfax neighborhood is bounded on the east and west by two major arterials, Federal
Boulevard and Sheridan Boulevard. All but seven of the streets between these arterials are local,
two-way streets. Perry Street is a collector street and bisects the neighborhood in an east/west
direction and provides access across Dry and Lakewood Quiches to U.S. 6, approximately five
blocks south of the neighborhood. West Colfax Avenue, once the primary east-west highway route
(U.S. 40) for Denver, is the only arterial street that runs through the neighborhood.
West 17th Avenue, the only other major east-west route in the neighborhood is the busiest collector
street in the area and provides traffic relief for Colfax Avenue at peak hours. Traffic volume have
increased 7% since 1971. The really significant increase in traffic volume came from the period
between 1960 and 1971 when volume on all arterials and some collector streets increased sharply.
West Colfax Avenue increased by 93%, Federal Boulevard by 21.6%, W. 17th Avenue by 95%, and
Sheridan Boulevard by 53%.
West 14th Avenue, also a collector street, is of concern to area residents as traffic volumes have
increased by 80% since 1971 and continues to increase. Excessive speed is a major problem due
to the lack of appropriate traffic control devices and police enforcement. This creates a major safety
hazard because the street is narrow, only thirty feet across, and many area residents utilize the
route for walking. New sidewalk' installation was done from Perry Street west to Sheridan
Boulevard.
I
Bus Routes and Shelters
There have been some changes in bus service since 1983 in West Colfax and nearby routes. With
the exception of poor service to Sheridan Boulevard, bus service appears to be meeting the needs
of residents on the westside.
Light rail plans for the neighborhood have basically been shelved" for the time being until the
results of a studyiby R.T.D. are complete. Currently R.T.D. is planning a bus transfer station to the
east of the W. Cotfax/Federal clover leaf. This plan will move forward once the State Highway
Department has finished its reconstruction of the Colfax viaduct connection. Additionally, R.T.D. is
negotiating the purchase of the railroad lines in the gulch which was abandoned Fall, 1986.
Service Changes for West Colfax and Nearby Routes since 1983
Route 1 4/1/83 Colfax viaduct reconstruction.
8/1/84 Return to Colfax Viaduct
9/3/85 Weekdays extended to Golden.
Route 10 4/1/83 Colfax Viaduct reconstruction
8/1/84 Return to Colfax Viaduct
Route 16 6/1/83 Downtown to Golden split off to Rte. 15
8/1/84 Reroute to Colfax Viaduct
9/1/85 Late evening service extended to Golden.


27
There are several streets that are widely used by pedestrians that need to be enhanced into a more
people oriented" place. These areas are W, 14th Avenue, West Colfax Avenue, W. 17th Avenue,
and Vrain Street. These corridors are people generators for a number of reasons that are related to
sidewalk width, treescape, shopping, open space linkages, etc.
Parking
Parking is a problem in particular areas of the neighborhood. Concerns over the lack of available
parking for the Colfax
corridor businesses, hospital users, and sports center complex users have been identified by
residents, hospital administrators and the City.
Parking at the Avondale Shopping Center on West Coif ax and Irving Street does adequately .
support the businesses. It is primarily the institutions and public facilities external to the
neighborhood that aggravate the parking problem in residential portions of the neighborhood.
Recommendations
Streets and Highways
West 17th Avenue:
1. Set actuated timing system to stow traffic and include peak hours.
2. Encourage more traffic control.
West Coifax Corridor
1. Review traffic light timing on Irving Street and Meade Street along West Colfax to allow more
time for pedestrian crossing.
2. Promote safety education programs, especially for West Coifax Avenue. -
3. Study the installation of pedestrian bulbouts at the corners to improve safety when crossing
West Coifax Avenue, Vrain, Perry Loweii.
4. Install street trees and detached brick in the median along W. Colfax between Federal Blvd. and
living Street.
5. Investigate the possibility of eliminating turning lanes at the designated intersections and replace
turning lanes with landscaped medians, i.e. Meade for Lowell.
6. Discourage future right-of-way encroachment along the corridor.
7. Review the potential for installing inset parking, where possible, to accommodate business.


29
3. Enforce 2 hour parking limits near Saint Anthony's and Beth Israel Hospitals.
4. Support the Preferential Parking Program of the City to help reduce the parking problem
associated with the use of the Sports Center Complex.
5. Investigate the possibility of constructing a structured parking facility along West Colfax to
support retail shopping.
6. Encourage the use of carriage lots for parking if they support a neighborhood serving business,
{exclude used car lots). Carriage lots,-when-convertedr^houid be landscaped.
7. Encourage new developments to be compatible to the surrounding residential areas in the
design of any parking lot or structure.
F. COMMUNITY FACILITIES
Parks, schools, day care centers, libraries, and senior citizen facilities support residential living in the
neighborhood. The existing neighborhood facilities were reviewed in terms of adequacy and
improvements needed. See map on next page.
Existing Conditions
Parks
There is limited public open space directly within the neighborhood although, the area is flanked on
either side by two large parks. Sloans Lake, Denver's second largest (290 acres) and the city's
seventh oldest park, borders the community along two thirds of its northern boundary (W. 17th
Avenue). The lake itself is five times larger than any other city park lake, and is the only one of
sufficient size for power boating. This distinction explains why most of its users are drawn from
almost all parts of metro Denver. Though this feature is a positive attribute the park still lacks grass
land for baseball and other similar sports. Sloans Lake is one of four parks designated for "city", as
opposed to "neighborhood" or "community" use.
Nonetheless the park provides nearby open space, a fine mountain view, and a playground/picnic
area for those residents north of Colfax and the numerous employees of the two hospitals.
Sanchez Park is located at the opposite end of the neighborhood, occupying 30.5 acres along
Lakewood Gulch from Knox Court to Federal Boulevard. Designated for neighborhood use, the park
is conveniently located across the street from three major public housing projects, which constitute
the largest concentration of high density residential development in the West Colfax area.
Sanchez Park's amenities include the gulch and rolling hills for recreational use, two baseball fields
and a bike path for active use.


31
To meet the growing need to provide classroom space for the students of Beth Jacob High, a new
facility was constructed in 1984-85. The new center houses all educational programs of the school
including offices and various laboratory needs.
Day Care Facilities
There are a lack of day care facilities in the neighborhood.
The Westridge Day Care Center, which serves the 200 units of public housing, was dosed for
numerous licensing violations involving txrth-bUTlding-maintenance-and operational problems. The
Julian Street Center was dosed due to an economic cost-effectiveness decision by the Mile High
Child Care Association, which has elected to rezone the building for office use. Although the
Association claims that it was able to transfer ail of those children whose parents wanted them to
remain in Mile High Centers to other locations, the lone remaining Center in the neighborhood is
operating at its legal capacity and has had to turn away business. Denver Opportunity, Inc. has
approached the city about refurbishing and reopening the Westridge Center, and anticipates that
their proposal will be accepted. Additionally, Warren Village II, a planned community for single
parents has a Day Care Center at 13th and Federal.
Senior Citizen Facilities
Numerous facilities and programs are present in the neighborhood to serve the needs of senior
citizens, with three worth special mention: two Volunteers of American (VOA) programs include
"Meal Site* operated at the Denver Housing Authoritys Muiroy Community Center, which serves the
senior citizens who live in the 50 apartment units; and the VOAs "Meals on Wheels* program,
which provides hot meals daily to most of the indigent population in the neighborhood.
The Metro Manor, located on Quitman Street and W. Colfax was a used car lot before 1972. It is
privately owned by the non-profit Colorado Association of Public Employees (CAPE). The ten story
structure Is filled to its 180-resident capacity, and has a slow turnover rate and subsequently a long
waiting list, even though residency is limited to retired state employees.
One problem for a small portion of the elderly population residing in the West Colfax neighborhood
is finding adequate transportation to the grocery store and to see their doctors. Additionally there is
a lack of an established communications network to get word to the elderly in a timely way.
Recommendations
Parks
1. Create more open space/gross land for football and baseball types of activities at Sloans Lake.
2. Continue maintenance of both Sloans Lake and Paco Sanchez parks.
3. Complete the linear park along the Lakewood gulch to include the following:


33
G. CITY SERVICES/ENV1R0NMENT
Existing Conditions
Code Enforcement
Image building, environmental cleanliness, and overall neighborhood pride are all derivatives of
adequate maintenance and improvements to the neighborhood. A revealing problem in the
neighborhood is the lack of code enforcement related to junked cars, weeds, trash, and
maintenance of sidewalks and public rightsrof-way. These conditions "are more severe in the
northeast quadrant of the neighborhood but the problem is found throughout the area.
The City's approach to snow removal has been of great concern to merchants and pedestrians who
shop along the West Colfax corridor. Currently the City has removed snow from the avenues by
pushing it off to the side of the street instead of toward the center. Curbs and sidewalks have been
destroyed along the length of the avenue and the corrosion of building facades has resulted.
Police Protection and Crime
The 198S Denver Police Departments Annual Report indicated a total of 173 crimes committed in
District One West Colfax neighborhood. This district encompasses eighteen precincts which are
bounded by 52nd Avenue on the north, 6th Avenue on the south, Broadway and i-25 on the east,
and Sheridan Boulevard on the west. West Colfax ranked seventeen out of sixty-eight
neighborhoods in 1983 in terms of total offenses with the offenses committed in 1983 (187) less
than in 1985 (173).
Violent crimes such as homicide, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault, account for 6% of total
offenses. Burglary (59%), and Larceny (37%), are the two most significant crime types in the area.
Environment
The majority of housing in the neighborhood is brick, pal.Tted brown or gray. The area west of Perry
Street to Sheridan Boulevard contains the only R-1 zoning in the entire neighborhood. In this ten
block, R-1 area across from Sloans Lake, newer and higher priced ranch homes line the streets.
This picture is quite a contrast to that of the housing stock east of Perry Street which includes, aged
and deteriorated duplexes located around the intersection of Irving and Conejos, or that of the
towering high rises of the publicly subsidized Avondale project that sit in the southeastern corner of
the neighborhood.
Many vacant lots exist in this eastern section that are either being temporarily used for parking by
adjacent households or havebeen left uncared for and are gathering weeds and litter.
Although West Colfax is primarily residential, the hospitals have established themselves in the
neighborhood and make their presence well known due to the size of their development.


35
Recommendations
Code Enforcement
1. Implement a systematic code enforcement program for the whole neighborhood. The
community should coordinate this effort with the Zoning Administration.
2. increase resources for code enforcement.
3. Continue super can program. .
4. Encourage maintenance of sidewalks and other public rights-of-way.
5. Support landlord "registered agent requirement" to enforce appropriate maintenance
responsibilities.
6. Encourage the city to develop a maintenance schedule for the cleaning of alleys, streets, and
carriage lots. This schedule can be shared among the various neighborhood associations.
7. Remove junked cars from W. 16th Avenue and Sheridan and 1200 Xavier.
8. Discuss a new approach towards snow removal with the City. It is preferred that snow be
pushed toward the center of the street rather than to the sides of the Avenue.
Police Protection and Crime
1. Encourage better police protection and crime prevention.
2. Encourage better police-community relations.
3. Initiate new Neighborhood Crime Watch programs.
4. Increase night time patrol, especially where the highest incidents are reported.
Environment
1. Prioritize and target streets and alleys to be paved based on needs and desires of residents.
Area residents who are not able to pay for assessment costs because they have low incomes
should be identified and offered assistance through CDA or council persons office.
2. Encourage sidewalk replacement at identified nodes along West Colfax, (Lowell-Meade, Perry,
and Vrain Street). Sidewalk, curb and gutters should be phased for the next 5 years and/or until
the total avenue is reconstructed. This same approach should be taken for other areas in the
neighborhood.


ALLEY PAVING INVENTORY Spring, 1984
* W. 17th, W. Annie, Sheridan and Zenobia
* W. 17th, W. Annie, Zenobia and Yates
* W. Annie, W, 10th, Sheridan and Zenobia
* W, Annie, W. 16th, Zenobia and Yates
* W. 16th, W. Colfax, Sheridan and Zenobia
* W, 16th, W. Colfax, Zenobia and Yates
* W, 16th, W. Colfax, Xavier and Woiff ...- -
W. 16th, W. Colfax, Woiff and Winona
W, 18th, W, 17th, Lowell and King
W. 18th, W. 17th, King and Julian
* W. 18th, W. 17th, Julian and Irving
* W. 19th, W. 18th, Irving and Hooker
* W. 19th, W. 18th, Hooker and Grove
* W. 18th, W. 17th, Irving and Hooker
* W. 18th, W. 17th, Hooker and Grove
* W. 17th, W. 16th, Lowell and King
W. 17th, W. 16th, King and Julian
W. 17th, W. 16th, Julian and Irving
W. 17th, W. 16th, Irving and Hooker
* W. 16th, W. Conejos, Lowell and King
* W. Colfax, W, 14th, Sheridan and Zenobia
* W. Colfax, W. 14th, Zenobia and Yates
* W. Colfax, W. 14th, Yates and Xavier
* W. Colfax, W. 14th, Winona and Vrairt (may be paved)
* W. 14th, W. 13th, Zenobia and Yates
* W. 14th, W. 13th, Yates and Xavier
* W. 14th, W. 13th, Xavier and Woiff
W. 14th, W. 13th, Utica and Tennyson
* W. 14th, W. 13th, Quitman and Perry
* W. 14th, W. 13th, Osceola and Newton
* W. 14th, W. 13th, Newton and Meade (1/2 alley)
* W. 14th, W. 13th, Meade and Lowell (1/2 alley)
* W. 14th, W. 13th, Lowell and King (1/2 alley)
* W. 14th, W. 13th, King and Knox (1/2 alley)
* W. 13th, approx. Gulch, Sheridan and Zenobia
* W, 13th, approx. Gulch, Zenobia and Yates
* W. 13th, approx. Gulch, Yates and Xavier
* W. 13th, Wells Place, Vrain and Utica
W. 13th, W. 12th, Tennyson and Stuart
W. 13th, W. 12th, Stuart and Raleigh
W. 13th, W. 12th, Raleigh and Quitman
* W. 13th, W, 12th, Meade and Lowell
TOTAL _______ 42 alleys
* High Priority


39
V. SUB-AREA GOALS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
Specific goals and recommendations were developed for the neighborhood to better define the problems
and needs. These subareas are described in depth as are goafs and objectives to be achieved for West
Colfax.
SUB-AREA 1
West Colfax Corridor/Federal-Sheridan Boulevard Commercial Districts *
Boundaries: Area Includes both sides of West Colfax Avenue from Federal Boulevard west to Sheridan
Boulevard, Avondale Shopping Center and the commercial areas along Federal and Sheridan Boulevard.
Character: Predominantly a retail and commercial area with very little residential scattered along the
Avenue. Used car lots dominate the retail and commercial uses. There are several vacant and boarded
up buildings. The residential structures that abut the Avenue are multi-family and senior citizen units
which are setback from the avenue with the exception of the duplexes on King Street. These are in
deteriorating condition.
The current zoning is primarily B-4 with R-2, R-3, B-2 and P-1 interspersed.
Goal: Revitalize West Colfax Avenue from Federal to Sheridan Boulevard and create a "Little Downtown"
atmosphere. Increase the economic vitality of the businesses along the avenue and upgrade the
appearance to attract new consumers. Improve the commercial building facades and limit used car lot
uses.
Overall Recommendations for the Avenue:
1. Emphasize both Federal and Sheridan Boulevard as east and west gateways into the
neighborhood by:
* installing signage to indicate entrance into the neighborhood.
* landscaping both medians and/or redesign existing medians at Federal and Sheridan
Boulevard.
* maintaining the clover leaf interchange at Federal Boulevard and W. Colfax.
2. Plant trees and install landscaping along the total avenue beginning at the 3 key commercial nodes
and fill in along the avenue, where possible.
3. Discourage any new automobile related uses and encourage the following neighborhood type
retail:
* clothing store
* post office


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CONCEPTUAL ILiUSTHATIVE SITE PLAN
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40
* hardware
* medical office
* mini-bank
* dry cleaners
* family restaurant
* bakery
4. Encourage multi-family residential development with appropriate setbacks on Wolff Street and
West Colfax and West Colfax between Irving and Hooker Street.
5. Encourage landscaping of the Universal Liquor Store and Raleigh Office Building parking lots.
6. Utilize funds from the Citys Economic Development Agency and other resources for commercial
revitalization projects identified in the plan. The following funds can be made available:
* Neighborhood Business Revitalization Loans
* Revolving Loans
* Community Development Block Grants
* Private funds
7. Encourage unified signage at Trevizos Restaurant and the Karate studio.
8. Encourage landscaping of the shoppetie on Sheridan Boulevard south of West Colfax Avenue.
9. Upgrade the area along Federal Boulevard south of W. 14th Avenue.
10. Encourage new residential on the southwest and northwest comers of the Avondale shopping
center lot. Construct a family restaurant and/or similar use if residential is not preferred by
developer.
Key Multl-Nodai Commercial Recommendations:
Begin redevelopment at the following key commercial nodes and implement the specific multi-nodal
recommendations.
A. Lowell to Meade node, (Includes area east of Lowell Boulevard to the alley on both sides of
the West Colfax Avenue): (see Lowell Intersection map on next page)
Character: Mixed use residential and retail area. Current zoning is B~4 along W. Colfax and R-2
to the north and south of the B-4.
Goal: Strengthen businesses and replace sidewalks, curbs and gutters. Create a unified
facade and signage theme and Install landscaping, where possible.


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CONCEPTUAL ILLUSTRATIVE SITE PLAN
LOWELL INTERSECTION
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41
Recommendations:
1. Support effort to rezone the R-2 area south of the Lake Steam Baths property on Lowell Blvd.
(including the church and south of the car wash) and the 1st set of duplexes on Lowell Blvd for
commercial use,
2. Encourage renovation of the duplexes between King and Lowell Boulevard (northside of the
street) for office use. Currently they are experiencing deterioration from commercial
encroachment.
3. Support any expansion effort of the Lake Steam Bath property.
4. Encourage sidewalk repair between Lowell Boulevard and Meade Street.
5. Encourage unified signage of the retail storefronts between Lowell Boulevard and Meade Street
on the northside.
6. Encourage landscaping and street furniture on the Wlnchells Donut Shop property.
7. Support effort to improve the condition of the Golden West Home.
improve management
upgrade building facade
redesign the frontage to include landscaping
B. Perry node, (Includes the properties that abut the Intersection): (see Perry Intersection map
on next page)
Character Predominantly retail area with an apartment on the northwest corner. Current zoning
is B-4.
Goal: Create a unified facade design and signage and soften the node to become more inviting for
pedestrian shopping.
Recommendations:
1. Encourage unified signage and facade renovation of the storefront shops on the northeast
comer.
2. Encourage treeplanting on the southeast comer {right-of-way on the westside). Work with the
Southland Corporation.
3. Improve maintenance of the landscaping on the northwest comer landscaping (Lake
Apartments)


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42
C. Vraln Node (Includes the four corners that abut the intersection); (see Vrain Intersection map
on next page)
Character: Commercial uses on all four corners include a hotel with adjacent parking, a used car
lot dealer, and a fast food franchise. Current zoning is B-4 and P-1.
Goal: Develop as a new neighborhood service area for support to hospitals and neighborhood
residents.
Recommendations:
1. Support the Four Winds' redevelopment project and effort development. Appropriate design,
setbacks, and building style should be negotiated with the community.
2. Encourage Wendys to maintain their landscaping. If needed, the City Forester can make
recommendations to improve the trees that appear to be dying.
3. Encourage the development of a neighborhood shoppette on the northeast comer of Vrain
Street that would replace the existing used car lot.
SUB-AREA 2
Northwest Quadrant
Boundaries: Sheridan Boulevard to Perry Street, W. 17th Avenue to W. Colfax, exciuding the commercial
area.
Character: Contains the only R-1 zoning in the entire area, approximately ten blocks. Predominantly
single family with newer and higher priced ranch homes throughout the area. Saint Anthonys Hospital (a
major institution and employer), an office support building, Colfax Elementary School, two high rise senior
citizen housing developments and three motels are also located in this portion of the neighborhood. The
current zoning is R-1, R-2, R-2-A, R-3, B-1 and B-4.
Goal: Preserve residential uses in the R-1, R-2, and R-2-A areas. Future commercial development
should be kept from encroaching into the residential with the exception of the area along Sheridan
Boulevard south of W. 16th Avenue. These residential structures should be converted for office use.
Recommendations:
1. Preserve and maintain existing residential character and provide housing rehabilitation as needed.
2. Encourage a lower density housing (4-6 stories) development on W. 16th Avenue and Wolff Street.
3. Support any re-zoning of R-2 south of W. 16th Avenue along Sheridan Boulevard for office use.


.lamdie*?* buttw
CONCEPTUAL ILLUSTRATIVE SITE PLAN


43
4. Maintain existing R-1 zoning. It vacant land is developed along Tennyson and W. 16th Avenue the
P.U.D, process is recommended.
5. Encourage Saint Anthony's hospital to be rezoned for institutional use (R-5).
6. Remove junked cars and maintain vacant lot on W, 16th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard.
SUBAREA 3
Northeast Quadrant
Boundaries: Federal Boulevard to Perry Street, W. I7th/I9th Avenue to West Colfax, excluding the
commercial area.
Character: Predominantly single family and low-moderate density residential with two public schools
(Lake Middle School, and Cheltenham Elementary), some quasi-public buildings, and a hospital (Beth
Israel). The housing in the R-2 and R-2-A area is in fair to good condition. There are scattered residential
units in poor condition but signs of housing rehabilitation are evident. The housing in the R-3 area
bounded by Irving, Grove, W. 16th Avenue and W. Colfax is deteriorating with a number of units in need of
moderate to major rehabilitation. Current zoning is R-2, R-2-A, R-3, R-3-X, B-A-1 and B-4.
Goal: Improve and stabilize the residential areas by preserving the existing housing stock and encourage
homeownership.
Recommendations:
1. Support effort to downzone the R-3 area to R-2-A and/or a comparable density to the surrounding
residential and encourage moderate density residential development.
2. Encourage moderate density residential development by supporting effort to rezone the area
bounded by W. 16th and W. 17th Avenue west of Hooker to Irving Strc et to R-2-A or similar density
zone district.
3. Rezone the R-2 area between W. 16th and W. 17th Avenues, Irving Street to Hooker Street to
R-2-A- or a similar zone district.
4. Improve housing condition of both single family and multi-family units. Target city, state and federal
rehabilitation resources to the whole area, especially the R-3 portion of the sub-area.
5. Create a better balance between owner occupied and rental homes.
6. Encourage the construction of a parking structure for Beth Israel Hospital that is design sensitive to
the surrounding residential.
7. Reopen the Mile Hi Child Care Center on W. Conejos and Julian Street.


45
SUB-AREA 5
Southeast Quadrant
Boundaries: Perry Street to Federal Boulevard, West Colfax to the Lakewood Gulch, excluding the
commercial area.
Character: Mixed single family, low-moderate density residential with high density publicly subsidized
housing developments in good condition. There are signs of housing deterioration through out the area.
Also there is a newiy constructed senior citizen housing site, a neighborhood park and scattered vacant
lots.
Goal: Improve and preserve the residential character of the area, encourage housing rehabilitation and
encourage new housing development on vacant land.
Recommendations:
1. Target local and state rehabilitation resources for the whole area.
2. Increase homeownershlp opportunities for renters.
3. Otter residential rehabilitation programs.
4. Maintain existing R-2 character.
5. Encourage housing infill on vacant land.
6. Maintain the Avondale apartments for low-moderate income individuals and families.
7. Encourage homeowners to purchase vacant land adjoining their property when infill development
Is not possible.
8. Enforce landlord/tenant agent requirement.
9. Continue maintenance and on-going improvements at the Denver Housing Authority (DHA) homes.
10. Initiate a name change for the Westridge housing projects to reflect current rehabilitation efforts
and to create a positive image.
11. Investigate the possibility of creating a local historic district along W. 14th Avenue between Newton
and Osceola Street.
12. Offer anti-crime awareness workshops when ever possible.
13. Increase communication with senior citizen groups by publicizing events and community activities
at senior housing sites, newspapers and other forms of information sharing ways.
14. Encourage joint tree trimming with City and residents and explore ways to offset costs.
15. Maintain W, 14th Avenue for residential use, office use should be discouraged.


47
VI. APPENDICES
Demographic Profile
(East of Perry), According to the most recent U.S. Census, in 1980 there were 9,707 person residing in
the area. Population has decreased 12.2% from 10,484 in 1970 reversing the trend of population
increases during 1960 and 1970.
Ethnically, West Colfax has maintained a mixed neighborhood composition. The non-white racial mix
includes Hispanic, Black, Native American, and Indo-Chinese populations. Hispanics comprise the largest
racial group in the neighborhood reflecting 48% of the total population.
Despite population losses the total number of households increased by 1% from 3,559 in 1970 to 3,709 in
1980. The female head of household was 12% higher than the citywide figure. Census tract 7.02 reflects
a 38% figure forfemale head of household that is 12% higher than the City norm of 19.6%.
In 1980 West Colfax had a high percent of children aged 0-19 years (31%). Also, the neighborhood had a
high percentage of elderly with 16% of its population at 65 years or older compared to the citywide elderly
figure of 12%. The two groups make up 47% of West Colfax's total population.
Age Distribution; West Colfax and Denver, 1980
Less than 5 years West Colfax 10%
5-9 years 8%
10-14 years 6%
15-19 years 7%
20-24 years 12%
25-34 years 18%
35-44 years 8%
45-54 years 7%
55-66 years 8%
65-74 years 9%
75 years and over 7%
Denver
7
6
6
7
11
22
10
4
10
7
5
Source U.S. Census of population, 1980


Full Text

PAGE 1

WEST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN DENVER PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MARCH 1987

PAGE 2

CREDITS: CITY TEAM Betty "B.J." Brooks, Senior City Planner-Author Mark Leese, Urban Designer Tony Chan, Graphic Artist Mary Avgerinos, Research Assistant Francis Burg, Typist Margaret H. Sperling, Deputy Director of Neighborhood Planning...... William Lamont, Jr., Director of Planning and Community Development The Honorable Federico Pena, M A Y 0 R CITY COUNCIL Councilman M. L. "Sam" Sandos, District 3 Ramona Martinez, Council Aide, District 3 Councilman William "Bill" Scheitler, District 1 Shirley Shley, Council Aide, District 1 THE WEST COLFAX STEERING COMMITTEE: Hector Benavidez, Greater Avondale Heights Improvement Association Larry Morris, Greater Avondale Heights Improvement Association Eddie Valdez, Greater Avondale Heights Improvement Association Jacque Wallis, West Denver Concerned and Active Neighbors Don Morales, West Denver Concerned and Active Neighbors Ron Passarelli, West Colfax Improvement Association Jerry Rosen, West Colfax Improvement Association lrv Feldman, Sloans Lake Citizens James P. Adams, Ph.D., Beth Israel Hospital Harry Yaffe, Ph.D., Beth Israel Hospital Barb Stuart, Saint Anthony's Hospital Carole Steele, Saint Anthony's Hospital Barbara Slawinski, Businesswoman/Property owner Gertrude Hyman, Businesswoman/Property owner Josh Mushell, Jewish Community Representative Rabbi Lauer, Jewish Community Representative Rabbi Lefkovitz, Jewish Community Representative Margarita Aragon, Senior Citizen Representative Kreg Snider, Public Housing Representative William Ellis, Hebrew Education Alliance Eddie Hottzman, Hebrew Education Alliance Nettie Moore, Southwest Quadrant Representative Kathleen Moore, Northeast Quadrant Representative

PAGE 3

BERMElEY SUNNYSIDE WEST HIGHt.AHO 1 I I I I I I _...., _____ .._ ____ ..,. __ 11tGHLANO I :t .. 01 : JEFFERSON ...J SLOAH lAKE I Ill ,_,_ :d 0 I> t a 17TH 0 COLFAX DRY GULCH GULCHI:,-
PAGE 4

WEST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Page I. INTRODUCTION 1 NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING 1 USE OF THE PLAN 1 NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING PROCESS 2 AN OVERVIEW 3 3 Demographic Profile 4 Neighborhood Vision 5 II. SUMMARY OF CONDITIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 5 A. INTRODUCTION 5 B. LAND USE AND ZONING 5 C. HOUSING 7 D. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 7 E. TRAFFIC, TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING 9 F. CITY SERVICES/ENVIRONMENT 10 G. COMMUNITY FACILITIES 12 Ill. ACTION PLAN 13 Ill. GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE WEST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD 18 A. INTRODUCTION 18 B. LAND USE AND ZONING 18 C. HOUSING 19 D. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 21 E. TRAFFIC, TRANSPORTATION AND PARKING 24 F. COMMUNITY FACILITIES 29 G. CITY SERVICES/ENVIRONMENTAL 33 H. HISTORIC PRESERVATION 38 IV. SUBAREAS GOALS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 39 SUBAREA 1 -WEST COLFAX CORRIDOR/FEDERAL-SHERIDAN 39 SUBAREA 2 NORTHWEST QUADRANT 42 SUBAREA 3 NORTHEAST QUADRANT 43 SUBAREA 4SOUTHWEST QUADRANT 44 SUBAREA 5 -SOUTHEAST QUADRANT 45 V. APPENDICES 47 DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE 47 AGE DISTRIBUTION, W. COLFAX AND DENVER, 1980 47

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3 AN OVERVIEW History Originally, Colfax was known to residents of Denver In the early 20th century as "No Man's Land", and "Jim Town." This area was sparsley settled but did contain several mansions of wealthy families as well as scattered shacks of squatters. A large wave of Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe came Into the area in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Attracted by others with similar language; cultural and religious backgrounds, the immigrants made "No Man's Land" into Denver's version of a European Neighborhood. As the neighborhood grew, problems created an Interest in incorporation. Two factions appeared: those who favored incorporation of the whole community under the name "Colfax" and those would have the business section, a strip along Golden Avenue just west of the river, remain separate under the name "Brooklyn." When Colfax did incorporate in 1891, Brooklyn seceded but then returned the following year. This area nine and a han blocks in length and two and a half blocks in width, numbered three hundred inhabitants. The town of Colfax was annexed to Denver in 1897. The name "Golden Avenue" was officially changed to "West Colfax Avenue." This great cross town avenue was named for Schuyler Con ax. West Conax Avenue was the main street of this small town. It was lined with two-story brick commercial buildings, stores, saloons, a restaurant, a meeting hall and even a hotel. West Colfax had a constant flow of hay wagons and peddlers, since all traffic enroute to Denver from the agricultural communnies of Golden and Morrison converged here. In the 1920's two public schools, Conax and Lake Junior High School, were opened in the area to meet the challenges of a progressive neighborhood. The Depression years saw IHtle or no development in the West Conax neighborhood. In the 1940's and mid 50's a housing boom occured, characteristic of the "Filling In" era. Most vacant land west of Utica was purchased for home building. West Colfax along wHh Barnum and Sloan Lake experienced this housing boom simultaneously. The Mayoral Administration of the 1950's promoted civil bond issues that funded the construction of public housing in and near West Colfax. The challenge and transHion of West Conax began and the 1960's brought a wave of Hispanic immigration. The 1970's brought young Anglo families into the neighborhood, and in the mid 70's the first wave of Indochinese families settled in the West Conax neighborhood. According to the 1980 U.S. Census, the area today is of varied ethnic make-up of Anglo, Jewish, Black, Chicano, Native American, and Indo-Chinese.

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5 Neighborhood VIsion AHhough West Colfax derives name from the commercial strip that bisects the area, one of the most apparent characteristics of the neighborhood is the high proportion of residential land use as compared to business and industrial uses. The overall vision for the neighborhood Is to malmaln the resldemlal character of the area and preserve and enhance the existing ethnic mix of people. Preservation of this unique character can be achieved through various forms of housing, zoning and land use strategies. To support the needs of WeSt cOifax residents, It is envisioned that there be a strengthening and Increase of the economic viability along the West Colfax corridor. Therefore, selected nodes have been targeted for revitalization along with ldemltylng various service needs. The people In the community wam to see the commercial corridor redevelop as a "little downtown" of Denver. II. SUMMARY OF CONDITIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS A; INTRODUCTION West Colfax is classified as a "moderate-minor" redeveloping neighborhood according to the Neighborhood Classification Report prepared by the Denver Planning Office, 1984. In looking at the neighborhood's existing and its potential future several issues were iden!Hied and goals developed to attain a more stable environment. The following is a summary of issues and recommendations. SpecHic subarea recommendations can be found in Chapter four of this plan. B. LAND USE AND ZONING Existing Conditions 1. The continuing decline of the business district along West CoHax Avenue. Of special concern is the limited number and variety of neighborhood shops and services. Although there appears to be adequate commercial space available in existing structures to meet the retail demands of the community there is a desire to encourage new commercial development if the business zone can be expanded at selected points along the avenue.

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7 C. HOUSING Existing Conditions 1. A mixture of single and multi-family residential housing. Nearly 73% of the housing in West CoHax is renter occupied with a significant percentage of such units located in the neighborhood's eastern haH. 2. A large concentration of public housing projects and government assisted private developments in one area. Almost 96% ofthese projects and "developments are concentrated east of Perry Street. 3. A high correlation between absentee landlords, rental properties, and deterioration. Although the need for rehabilitation is high and there are several tracts of land available for infill housing, there are currently few signs of new housing construction and/or housing rehabiiHation. 4. A significant increase in housing sale prices in census tract 7.01 (west of Perry Street) from $56,600 to $72,1 00 between 1980 and 1981. ij began to taper off in 1983. Sales prices in census tract 7.02 (east of Perry Street) did not reveal such a drastic increase during 1981 but average sales price in 1983 was still $65,300. Recommendations 1. Create a non-profit housing corporation. 2. Encourage the development of affordable housing on vacant land that is in character with surrounding residential. 3. Increase awareness about available housing programs, funds, and services. 4. Increase home ownership, home improvement programs, and other housing programs. Encourage landlords to participate. 5. Protect" and reinforce residential areas that abut commercial areas by encouraging property owners to install landscaping and other forms of buffering. 6. Improve the conditions of absentee-owned housing through code enforcement. D. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Two walking tours and a commercial survey were done of the West Avenue corridor and Avondale Shopping Center. From these activities several issues came forth.

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9 E. TRAFFIC, TRANSPORTATION, AND PARKING Existing Conditions Classifications of city street's established by the Department of Public Works include local, collector, arterial or freeway. West Colfax contains three of these four classifications. 1. The volume of traffic and speed hinders pedestrian-safety and shopping; West Colfax Avenue (1 business route) serves as the only arterial street running through the neighborhood and is the main thoroughfare linking Downtown and the suburbs to the west. 2. The high speed of traffic and lack of police enforcement on West 17th Avenue present a problem. Seventeenth Avenue, the busiest and major east-west collector street in the area, provides traffic relief for West CoHax Avenue at peak travel hours. 3. The increase of recent traffic and excessive speed on Fourteenth Avenue is a concern for pedestrian safety. This avenue is a collector street and is a highly travelled pedestrian corridor with a strong residential character. 4. There is a limited number of north-south collector streets linking West CoHax to the southwest and northwest neighborhoods besides Sheridan and Federal Boulevards. These two streets (Perry Street and Lowell Boulevard) appear to function well as classified. 5. Bus service in West CoHax appears to be adequate with the exception of the available buses along sheridan Boulevard. There are nine bus routes serving the West CoHax area. The need for additional bus shelters and the desire to substitute a subsidized bus pass program to encourage hospital employees of both Beth Isreal and Saint Anthony's hospitals to ride the bus are two issues that have been expressed relative to R.T.D. This would serve to relieve the parking problems around the hospitals. 6. Existing bike paths are adequate but future work needs to be done to identity the alignment of two new bike paths in order to link the gulch and Pace Sanchez Park to Sloan Lake. 7. An external factor affecting the West CoHax neighborhood is related to the sports complex facilities of Mile High Stadium and McNichols Sports arena. The area east of Saint Anthony's hospital and north of West Colfax has experienced overflow parking impacts of fans using the Sports Complex facility. This problem being one of the oldest continues to plague the area. 8. Additional parking issues have been focused around the hospital area and along the west CoHax commercial corridor.

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11 3. Littered and/or unmowed vacant lots. 4. Missing and deteriorated sidewalks throughout the neighborhood. 5. Corroded sidewalks, curbs, and gutters along the West CoHax corridor. 6. Inadequate street lights, particularly along the Lakewood gulch and commercial districts. 7. Inefficient storm sewers that often back up and create large pools at intersections in the northwest quadrant of the neighborhood. -8. Lack of maintenance of public right-of-ways. Recommendations 1. Implement a systematic code enforcement program for all of West Colfax. 2. Encourage the continuation of the "Super Can" program and other activfties related to neighborhood clean up. 3. Explore a different approach to snow removal to protect curbs and gutters from being damaged, especially along West CoHax. 4. Repair the storm drainage system to improve water flow. 5. Encourage the continuation of the beautification of the Lakewood Dry Gulch and natural park development. 6. Enforce "no dumping" laws along the Lakewood Dry Gulch. 7. Encourage the maintenance of public rights-of-way. 8. Urge continued funding for sidewalk replacement for the entire neighborhood. 9. Encourage continued promotion of neighborhood pride events such as the "Slogan Contest."

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12 G. COMMUNITY FACILITIES Existing Conditions Communfiy facilities such as parks, schools, day care centers, libraries, and senior cfiizen homes are important to both the quality of lrre and the common identfiy of the neighborhood. Together and individually they shape the feelings of the residents as wall as perceptions of visttors and prospective investors. 1. Umited open space wtthin the neighborhood though the area is bounded to the north and south by two large parks: Sloan Lake, a "city" park, and Paco Sanchez Park, a "neighborhood" park. Both parks provide nearby open space, fine mountain views, and playground and picnic areas. 2. The Lakewood Dry Gulch, although improved a great deal, continues to have problems wtth litter as well as an undeveloped bike path. The gulch has been the sfie for dumping which has created health and safety hazards. 3. Enrollment in the neighborhood public schools; Colfax Elementary, Cheltenham Elementary, and Lake Middle School, has gone up and down but is not declining. 4. Insufficient number of day care centers and day care homes in the neighborhood to meet the communfiy's needs resulting in long commuter trips for parents taking their children to facilities far from home. The closing of the Westridge Day Care and Julian Street Center has created a void in child care services. 5. The lack of available transportation for the elderly. Although numerous facilfiies and programs are present in the neighborhood to serve the needs of senior cttizens, one problem for the elderly is the availabiiHy of transportation tor shopping, and medical needs. Addfiionally, there is a lack of communication between the seniors, adults, and youth. Recommendations 1. Encourage the completion of the Lakewood Dry Gulch natural park and bike path. Install playground areas, where possible. 2. Urge the development of a vest pocket park on Stuart Street just south of West CoHax. 3. Support home ownership efforts and development of new multi-family housing to help stabilize families in the area, and to strengthen the public schools. 4. Urge the development of new day care centers and provide support to expansion of existing facilfiies. 5. Create senior citizen operated child care programs to help establish better communication among seniors and adults. 6. Publicize senior cttizen events and programs in local newspapers and media outlets.

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14 7. Provide more housing opportunities. 8. Increase code enforcement of vacant and abandoned houses. 9. Rename Westridge public housing project. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Fund revitalization projects at priorfty nodes (Lowell to Meade, Perry and Vrain) 2. Conduct joint business advertising and promote positive public relations with the banks .. 3. Create a Merchant's Association and/or West Colfax Chamber of Commerce. 4. Encourage businesses to hire local residents. 5. Support local merchants. .. 6. Encourage new neighborhood. 7. Encourage facade renovation along the CoHax corridor. a. Promote the development of a W. CoHax Chamber of Commerce. 9. Explore ways to protect building facades from adverse weather along W. CoHax. 10. Require landscaping on all new developments. 11. Install streetscaping along W. Colfax and discourage future R.O. W encroachment. 12. Fund a market study for the W. CoHax business area. TRAFFIC AND TRANSPORTATION t. Review traffic light timing and Meade Streets along W. CoHax. Planning, CDA, nbrhd. Zoning D.H.A. State, EDA, private Merchants, nbrhd.,. City Merchants Merchants, nbrhd. Nbrhd. EDA, merchants EDA, Planning, merchants, nbrhd. State, merchants Public Works, Planning Property owner CDA, EDA, private EDA, merchants Transportation Planning-DPW

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16 18. Encourage parking lots to be compatible in design with surrounding residential areas. COMMUNITY FACILITIES/PARKS Complete the Lakewood Gulch linear park and bike path. -z. Develop a vest pocket park on Stuart Street (near W. Coffax Ave.) 3. Stabilize public school enrollment. 4. Expand day care center at Lowell Blvd. and W.14thAve. 5. Involve senior cttizens in day care. 6. Publicize senior cttizen programs and events. 7. Create more grass land for football and baseball type of activtties. HISTORIC PRESERVATION -1. Install historic signage at Stuart Street and W. Colfax Ave. 2. Evaluate SW quadrant of the neighborhood for historic designation. 3. Preserve historic structures including the Harvey Springer House at 16th & Vrain and the Dickerson Library at W. 17th & Hooker St. CITY SERVICES/ENVIRONMENTAL -1. Buffer the residental where commercial interfaces (especially w. Coffax Ave.) z. Install landscaping on St. Anthony's and Beth Israel Hospital parking lots. 3, Install adequate landscaping on all new developments. Planning, private CDA, Parks & Rec. CDA, nbrhd. DPO, nbrhd. CDA, private Social Services, senior homes Community centers, senior homes, nbrhds, merchants Parks, Planning DPW, Planning,nbrhd. Landmark Commission, Planning, nbrhd. CDA, Planning, private Private, EDA, CDA, Planning CDA, Hospttals Planning, developer

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18 IV. GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR THE WEST COLFAX NEIGHBORHOOD A. INTRODUCTION The plan recommends policies for the entire neighborhood and also details specific recommendations by subarea. The sub-areas were created for study purpose so that an indepth analysis could be done and land use attematives be tailored to each portion of the neighborhood. Sub-area goals and recommendations can be found in chapter .tour of this plan. ______ B. LAND USE AND ZONING Existing conditions The West Colfax neighborhood encompasses 421 acres. Although the West CoHax neighborhood derives its name from the commercial strip that bisects the area, one of the most apparent characteristics of the neighborhood is the high proportion of residential land use as compared to business and industrial uses. Near1y 66"/o of the existing land use is residential, whereas the city's average is 40"/o. Mutti-family residences occupy almost one quarter of the total net land area. Commercial-uses are primarily located along both sides of the 1 1/2 mile commercial corridor of West CoHax Avenue. Land used for industry, transportation, parking, open space, and vacant comprise a normal portion of the net land use in the neighborhood. Two large private hospitals are also located wtthin the area. In 1925 the City of Denver adopted tts first set of zoning ordinances regulating the permitted land uses and the denstty of development wtthin specified zones. In anticipation of a rapid increase in population the City in 1956 extensively revised tts zoning laws, allowing for much higher residential denstties in those neighborhoods near the downtown area. However, the anticipated redevelopment and growth never took place in the West Colfax neighborhood. Consequently, only 40"/o of land area that is zoned R-2 is developed to the maximum permitted by the zone. Most of the blocks south of ColfaX are zoned R-2 but remain as single family dwelling unfts. The West CoHax commercial strip is zoned B-4 and abuts residential districts on etther side. It is a diversified retail business area characterized by independent small businesses. With the exception of the R-3 zone district located in the northeast quadrant of the neighborhood, there generally is a good correlation between zoning and existing land use. (see existing zoning map on next page) Recommendations 1. The plan recommends that the following areas be rezoned: The commercial zones at Vrain, Perry, and Lowell Boulevard to Meade nodes should be expanded to encourage new neighborhood oriented services. (refer to subarea 1 for specifics, see concepual analysis and proposed land use map on next pages)

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19 The area bounded by Irving to Grove Street between W. Colfax Avenue to W. 16th which is now zoned R-3 should be rezoned to a denstty similar to the R-2-A. Any new development that may require a slightly higher densfiy than what is allowed in the R-2-A should be required to use the P. U. D. process. All such zone changes need to be fully debated in Ctty Council and would have to have that body's approval before any map changes could be made. The area bounded by W. 16th and W. 17th Avenue between Irving and the alley between Hooker and Irving which is now zoned R-3, should be rezoned to a densfiy similar to the R-2-A. The area between W. Colfax Avenue and W. 16th Avenue along Sheridan Boulevard which is now zoned R-2 should tie rezoned lo-r'office'use:. .. Rezone the R-2 area between W. 16th and W. 17th Avenue, Irving Street to Hooker Street to R-2-A or a similar zone district. 2. lnfill housing developments that may require a slightly higher denstty than what is allowed in the R-2 (primarily in the Lakewood Dry Gulch area) should be required to use the P.U.D. process. These projects should be compatible in character and materials and provide appropriate buffering to surrounding properties. 3. Commercial areas that abut residential uses should be encouraged to install landscaping and/or other appropriate types ot buffering. 4. Efforts should be supported to limfi the number, size and height ot existing and new billboards primarily along the W. CoHax corridor. 5. Saint Anthony's hospfial should be rezoned from R-3 to R-5 instfiutional zone district. C. HOUSING Existing Conditions West Colfax is a neighborhood that has minor to moderate redevelopment potential according to the July, 1984 Neighborhood ClassHication Report of the Denver Planning Office. The crtteria used to classHy the neighborhoods included information on housing trends, compatibiltty between land use and zoning, and a survey ot general conditions. According to the Denver Planning Office 1985 Housing Detail Report, West CoHax had 3, 713 housing units of which 1,141 were single family units, 2,311 muiti-tamily units, 236 public housing units, and 25 condominiums and mixed use residential. Of the total housing units in West CoHax, approximately 31% are single family and 62% are multi-family. Many of the single family and multi-family units (duplexes) are relatively old dating back to the period between 19001939. Owner occupancy, often a sign of neighborhood stability, is extremely low tor the West Colfax neighborhood at 25% compared to Denver's 48%. When comparing Denver's 74% single family owner

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Create more housing opportunities. Develop more senior citizen housing. Promote co-op housing. 3. Target local and state rehabilitation funding for West including the following: Colorado Housing Finance Authority funds. Communtty Development Block Grant funds,----......... Skyline Housing funds. 4. Improve the condttion of residential parking lots. Require parking lots to be landscaped. Encourage better maintenance. 21 5. Consider renaming the Westridge projects to reflect the rehabilttation of existing untts and to promote a better cttywide image for public housing. D. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Existing Conditions Business development and redevelopment are needed in the neighborhood to upgrade deteriorated retail areas, attract new businesses, increase employment opportunities, provide income for residents and improve the quality of community tHe. West retail businesses have declined due to population loss and the relatively low level of expendable income in the area. A commercial revttalization study conducted by the Denver Planning Office in January, 1985 revealed that nearly one haH of the businesses along the West corridor are automobile oriented. Restaurants occupy 19% of the business strip with bar and liquor related establishments comprising 10%. The remainder of the businesses consist of 8% moteVhotel, and 21% general businesses, (appliance repair, hair care, check cashing, etc.). See next page for business listing. Approximately 44% of businesses have been at the same location for more than 1 0 years wtth the oldest business being in operation for 60 years. Of the 121 workers employed at businesses responding to the survey, 56% live in the neighborhood and/or surrounding area wtth the remainder living in the suburbs. Almost haH (45%) of the employees are in sales and services, 12% in professionaVmanagement, and 16% in white and blue collar jobs. To augment the revitalization study, representatives of the Steering Commtttee, Planning Office and Council conducted two walking tours and a commercial condttions survey. The Committee concluded

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23 A major problem relative to encouraging new development in West Conax is the difficulty commercial property owners have in convincing banks to finance projects in the neighborhood. The perception of West Colfax from outside financial resources is that the neighborhood is declining and therefore to invest in a project would be too risky. The assumption made by landowners who have attempted to secure financing is that financial institutions have redlined the area. There is a lack of cohesiveness among the businesses, little communication between merchants, and lack of joint advertising. A merchant's group did exist in the past but due to the lack of leadership and organizational time it slowly came to an end. In 1984 with the assistance of the Steering Committee the City brought together several oHhe merchants to i:liscussthepotential for revitalizing West Colfax and to re-establish the group. Currently there is a nucleus of merchants discussing that possibility. The residents throughout the planning process identified a void in community oriented retail in the neighborhood. A major problem resolved by the ccmmuntty was the replacement of the Safeway store with a Super Foods store in the Avondale Shopping Center. The physical appearance of the West con ax Avenue in general is poor with an occasional exceptional area where private development has occurred, where recent ctty public works projects have been installed on Perry, Quitman, and Raleigh Street) and where State Highway West Conax bridges have been replaced. Sidewalks and curbs are in extremely poor condition due to the method of snow removal, lack of maintenance and age. Additionally, the curb cuts that are no longer needed because of a change in business to used car lots present safety hazards and prevent pedestrians from walking freely along the sidewalks, this is especially true along the south end. The last concern that hinders service access to the "strip" is lack of adequate parking for shoppers. On-street parking is available on the north side of the street only. Right-of-way encroachment by the State eliminated parking on the south side. Recommendations 1. Begin targeting funds for the redevelopment of the Lowell-Meade, Perry and Vrain Street nodes (specific recommendations can be found in Subarea 1 of the Plan). 2. Make funds available for W. Colfax businesses. 3. Promote the development of a West Conax Chamber of Commerce and/or merchants association wtth 501 (c)(3) status. 4. Promote positive public relations with financial institutions to help with project financing. 5. Consolidate and publicize available city programs. 6. Upgrade the appearance of properties to attract new consumers. 7. Decrease crime and encourage neighborhoodwide clean up.

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25 West Colfax neighborhood is bounded on the east and west by two major arterials, Federal Boulevard and Sheridan Boulevard. All but seven of the streets between these arterials are local, two-way streets. Perry Street is a collector street and bisects the neighborhood in an easUwest direction and provides access across Dry and Lakewood Gulches to U.S. 6, approximately five blocks south of the neighborhood. West Cottax Avenue, once the primary east-west highway route (U.S. 40) for Denver, is the only arterial street that runs through the neighborhood. West 17th Avenue, the only other major east-west route in the neighborhood is the busiest collector street in the area and provides traffic relief for Colfax Avenue at peak hours. Traffic volume have increased 7% since 1971. The really significant increase in traffic volume came from the period between 1960 and 1971 when volume on all arterials and some collector streets increased sharply. West Cottax Avenue increased by 93%, Federal Boulevard by 21 .6%, W. 17th Avenue by 95%, and Sheridan Boulevard by 53%. West 14th Avenue, also a collector street, is of concern to area residents as traffic volumes have increased by 80% since 1971 and continues to increase. Excessive speed is a major problem due to the lack of traffic control devices and police entorcement. This creates a major safety hazard because the street is narrow, only thirty feet across, and many area residents utilize the route for walking. New sidewalkinstallation was done from Perry Street west to Sheridan Boulevard. Bus Routes and Shelters There have been some changes in bus service since 1983 in West CoHax and nearby routes. With the exception of poor service to Sheridan Boulevard, bus service appears to be meeting the needs of residents on the westside. Light rail plans f0r the neighborhood have basically been "shelved" for the time being until the results of a study1by R.T.D. are complete. Currently R.T.D. is planning a bus transfer station to the east of the W. C'oHax/Federal clover leaf. This plan will move forward once the State Highway Department has finished ijs reconstruction of the CoHax viaduct connection. Addijionally, R.T.D. is negotiating the purchase of the railroad lines in the gulch which was abandoned Fall, 1986. Service Changes ;for West CoHax and Nearby Routes since 1983 Route 1 Route 10 Route 16 4/1/83 8/1/84 9/3185 4/1/83 8/1/84 6/1/83 811/84 9/1/85 CoHax viaduct reconstruction. Return to Colfax Viaduct Weekdays extended to Golden. CoHax Viaduct reconstruction Return to Colfax Viaduct Downtown to Golden splij off toRte. 15 Reroute to CoHax Viaduct Late evening service extended to Golden._

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27 There are several streets that are widely used by pedestrians that need to be enhanced into a more "people oriented" place. These areas are W. 14th Avenue, West Colfax Avenue, W. 17th Avenue, and Vrain Street. These corridors are people generators for a number of reasons that are related to sidewalk width, treescape, shopping, open space linkages, etc. Parking Parking is a problem in particular areas of the neighborhood. Concerns over the lack of available parking for the Colfax corridor businesses, hospttal users, and sports center complex users have been identified by residents, hospttal administrators and the Ctty. Parking at the Avondale Shopping Center on West Cottax and Irving Street does adequately support the businesses. It is primarily the institutions and public facilities external to the neighborhood that aggravate the parking problem in residential portions of the neighborhood. Recommendations Streets and Highways West 17th Avenue: 1. Set actuated timing system to slow traffic and include peak hours. 2. Encourage more traffic control. West Colfax Corridor: 1. Review traffic light timing on Irving Street and Meade Street along West Colfax to allow more time for pedestrian crossing. 2. Promote safety education programs, especially for West CoHax Avenue .. 3. Study the installation of pedestrian bulbouts at the corners to improve safety when crossing West CoHax Avenue, Vrain, Perry Lowell. 4. Install street trees and detached brick in the median along W. CoHax between Federal Blvd. and Irving Street 5. Investigate the possibility of eliminating turning lanes at the designated intersections and replace turning lanes with landscaped medians, i.e. Meade for Lowell. 6. Discourage future right-of-way encroachment along the corridor. 7. Review the potential for installing inset parking, where possible, to accommodate business.

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29 3. Enforce 2 hour parking limits near Saint Anthony's and Beth Israel Hospitals. 4. Support the Preferential Parking Program of the City to help reduce the parking problem associated with the use of the Sports Center Complex. 5. Investigate the possibility of constructing a structured parking facility along West Colfax to support retail shopping. 6. Encourage the use of carriage lots for parking a they support a neighborhood serving business, (exclude used car lots). Carriage lots;-when-converted;--should be landscaped. 7. Encourage new developments to be compatible to the surrounding residential areas in the design of any parking lot or structure. F. COMMUNITY FACILITIES Parks, schools, day care centers, libraries, and senior citizen facilities support residential living in the neighborhood. The existing neighborhood facilities were reviewed in terms of adequacy and improvements needed. See map on next page. Existing Conditions Parks There is limited public open space directly within the neighborhood although, the area is flanked on either side by two large parks. Sloans Lake, Denver's second largest (290 acres) and the city's seventh oldest park, borders the community along two thirds of its northern boundary (W. 17th Avenue). The Jake itseH is five times larger than any other city park Jake, and is the only one of sufficient size for power boating. This distinction explains why most of its users are drawn from almost all parts of metro Denver. Though this feature is a positive attribute the park still lacks grass land for baseball and other similar sports. Sloans Lake is one of four parks designated for "city", as opposed to "neighborhood" or "community" use. Nonetheless the park provides nearby open space, a fine mountain view, and a playground/picnic area for those residents north of CoHax and the numerous employees of the two hospitals. Sanchez Park is located at the opposite end of the neighborhood, occupying 30.5 acres along Lakewood Gulch from Knox Court to Federal Boulevard. Designated tor neighborhood use, the park is conveniently located across the street from three major public housing projects, which constitute the largest concentration of high density residential development in the West CoHax area. Sanchez Park's amenities include the gulch and rolling hills for recreational use, two baseball fields and a bike path tor active use.

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31 To meet the growing need to provide classroom space for the students of Beth Jacob High, a new facility was constructed in 1984-85. The new center houses all educational programs of the school including offices and various laboratory needs. Day Care Facilities There are a lack of day care facilities in the neighborhood. The Westridge Day Care Center, which serves the 200 units of public housing, was closed for numerous licensing violations involvingtlottriJI.lilding-maintenance -and operational problems. The Julian Street Center was closed due to an economic cost-effectiveness decision by the Mile High Child Care Association, which has elected to rezone the building for office use. Although the Association claims that it was able to transfer all of those children whose parents wanted them to remain in Mile High Centers to other locations, the lone remaining Center in the neighborhood is operating at its legal capacity and has had to tum away business. Denver Opportunity, Inc. has approached the city about refurbishing and reopening the Westridge Center, and anticipates that their proposal will be accepted. Additionally, Warren Village II, a planned community for single parents has a Day Care Center at 13th and Federal. Senior Citizen Facilities Numerous facilities and programs are present in the neighborhood to serve the needs of senior citizens, with three worth special mention: two Volunteers of American (VOA) programs include "Meal Site" operated at the Denver Housing Authority's Mulroy Community Center, which serves the senior citizens who live in the 50 apartment units; and the VOA's "Meats on Wheels" program, which provides hot meals daily to most of the indigent population in the neighborhood. The Metro Manor, located on Quitman Street and W. CoHax was a used car lot before 1972. It is privately owned by the non-profit Colorado Association of Public Employees (CAPE). The ten story structure is filled to its 180-resident capacity, and has a stow turnover rate and subsequently a long waiting list, even though residency is limited to retired state employees. One problem tor a small portion of the elderly population residing in the West CoHax neighborhood is finding adequate transportation to the grocery store and to see their doctors. Additionally there is a lack of an established communications network to get word to the elderly in a timely way. Recommendations Parks 1. Create more open space/gross land tor football and baseball types of activities at Sloans Lake. 2. Continue maintenance of both Sloans Lake and Paco Sanchez parks. 3. Complete the linear park along the Lakewood gulch to include the following:

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G. CITY SERVICES/ENVIRONMENT Existing Conditions Code Enforcement 33 Image building, environmental cleanliness, and overall neighborhood pride are all derivatives of adequate maintenance and improvements to the neighborhood. A revealing problem in the neighborhood is the lack of code enforcement related to junked cars, weeds, trash, and maintenance of sidewalks and public rights'Of-way. These condftions-are more severe in the northeast quadrant of the neighborhood but the problem is found throughout the area. The City's approach to snow removal has been of great concern to merchants and pedestrians who shop along the West Colfax corridor. Currently the Cny has removed snow from the avenues by pushing ft off to the side ot the street instead of toward the center. Curbs and sidewalks have been destroyed along the length of the avenue and the corrosion of building facades has resulted. Police Protection and Crime The 1985 Denver Police Departments Annual Report indicated a total of 173 crimes committed in District One -West Colfax neighborhood. This district encompasses eighteen precincts which are bounded by 52nd Avenue on the north, 6th Avenue on the south, Broadway and 1-25 on the east, and Sheridan Boulevard on the west. West Colfax ranked seventeen out of sixt)-eight neighborhoods in 1983 in terms of total offenses wnh the offenses committed in 1983 (187) less than in 1985 (173). Violent crimes such as homicide, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault, account for 6% of total offenses. Burglary (59%), and Larceny (37%), are the two most signtlicant crime types in the area. Environment The majority ot housing in the neighborhood is brick, pa:.lted brown or gray. The area west of Perry Street to Sheridan Boulevard contains the only R-1 zoning in the entire neighborhood. In this ten block, R-1 area across from Sloan's Lake, newer and higher priced ranch homes line the streets. This picture is qufte a contrast to that of the housing stock east of Perry Street which includes, aged and deteriorated duplexes located around the intersection of Irving and Conejos, or that of the towering high rises of the publicly subsidized Avondale project that sn in the southeastern corner of the neighborhood. Many vacant lots exist in this eastern section that are either being temporarily used for parking by adjacent households or havebeen left uncared for and are gathering weeds and litter. Atthough West Colfax is primarily residential, the hospnals have established themselves in the neighborhood and make their presence well known due to the size of their development.

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Recommendations Code Enforcement 35 1. Implement a systematic code enforcement program for the whole neighborhood. The communijy should coordinate this effon with the Zoning Administration. 2. Increase resources tor code enforcement. 3. Continue super can program. 4. Encourage maintenance of sidewalks and other public rights-ot-way. 5. Support landlord "registered agent requirement" to enforce appropriate maintenance responsibiltties. 6. Encourage the city to develop a maintenance schedule for the cleaning of alleys, streets, and carriage lots. This schedule can be shared among the various neighborhood associations. 7. Remove junked cars from W. 16th Avenue and Sheridan and 1200 Xavier. 8. a new approach towards snow removal wijh the Cijy. It is preferred that snow be pushed toward the center of thestreet rather than to the sides of the Avenue. Police Protection and Crime 1. Encourage better police protection and crime prevention. 2. Encourage better police-<:emmunity relations. 3. lnijiate new Neighborhood Crime Watch programs. 4. Increase night time patrol, especially where the highest incidents are reported. Environment 1. Priorijize and target streets and alleys to be paved based on needs and desires of residents. Area residents who are not able to pay for assessment costs because they have low incomes should be identHied and offered assistance through CDA or council persons office. 2. Encourage sidewalk replacement at identified nodes along West CoHax, (Lowell-Meade, Perry, and Vrain Street). Sidewalk, curb and gutters should be phased for the next 5 years and/or until the total avenue is reconstructed. This same approach should be taken for other areas in the neighborhood.

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ALLEY PAVING INVENTORY Spring, 1984 W. 17th, W. Annie, Sheridan and Zenobia W. 17th, W. Annie, Zenobia and Yates W. Annie, W. 16th, Sheridan and Zenobia W. Annie, W. 16th, Zenobia and Yates W. 16th, W. CoHax, Sheridan and Zenobia W. 16th, W. Colfax, Zenobia and Yates W. 16th, W. CoHax, Xavier and Wolff W. 16th, W. Colfax, Wolff and Winona W. 18th, W. 17th, Lowell and King W. 18th, W. 17th, King and Julian W. 18th, W. 17th, Julian and Irving W. 19th, W. 18th, Irving and Hooker W. 19th, W. 18th, Hooker and Grove W. 18th, W. 17th, Irving and Hooker W. 18th, W. 17th, Hooker and Grove W. 17th, W. 16th, Lowell and King W. 17th, W. 16th, King and Julian W. 17th, W. 16th, Julian and Irving W. 17th, W. 16th, Irving and Hooker W. 16th, W. Conejos, Lowell and King W. Colfax, W, 14th, Sheridan and Zenobia W. Colfax, W. 14th, Zenobia and Yates W. CoHax, W. 14th, Yates and Xavier W. Colfax, W. 14th, Winona and Vrain (may be paved) W. 14th, W. 13th, Zenobia and Yates W. 14th, W. 13th, Yates and Xavier W. 14th, W. 13th, Xavier and Wolff W. 14th, W. 13th, Utica and Tennyson W. 14th, W. 13th, and Perry W. 14th, W. 13th, Osceola and Newton W. 14th, W. 13th, Newton and Meade (112 alley) W. 14th, W. 13th, Meade and Lowell (1/2 alley) W. 14th, W. 13th, Lowell and King (1/2 alley) W. 14th, W. 13th, King and Knox (112 alley) W. 13th, approx. Gulch, Sheridan and Zenobia W. 13th, approx. Gulch, Zenobi.a and Yates W. 13th, approx. Gulch, Yates and Xavier W. 13th, Wells Place, Vrain and Utica W. 13th, W. 12th, Tennyson and Stuart W. 13th, W. 12th, Stuart and Raleigh W. 13th, W. 12th, Raleigh and Quitman W. 13th, W. 12th, Meade and Lowell TOTAL 42 a!levs High Priortty 37

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39 V. SUB-AREA GOALS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Specific goals and recommendations were developed for the neighborhood to better define the problems and needs. These subareas are described in depth as are goals and objectives to be achieved for West Colfax. SUB-AREA 1 West Colfax Corridor/Federal-Sheridan Boulevard Commercial Districts Boundaries: Area includes both sides of West Colfax Avenue from Federal Boulevard west to Sheridan Boulevard, Avondale Shopping Center and the commercial areas along Federal and Sheridan Boulevard. Character: Predominantly a retail and commercial area with very little residential scattered along the Avenue. Used car lots dominate the retail and commercial uses. There are several vacant and boarded up buildings. The residential structures that abut the Avenue are multi-family and senior citizen units which are setback from the avenue with the exception of the duplexes on King Street. These are in deteriorating condition. The current zoning is primarily B-4 with R-2, R-3, B-2 and P-1 interspersed. Goal: Revitalize West Coilax Avenue from Federal to Sheridan Boulevard and create a "Little Downtown" atmosphere. Increase the economic vitality of the businesses along the avenue and upgrade the appearance to attract new consumers. Improve the commercial building facades and limit used car lot uses. Overall Recommendations for the Avenue: 1. Emphasize both Federal and Sheridan Boulevard as east and west gateways into the neighborhood by: installing signage to indicate entrance into the neighborhood. landscaping both medians and/or redesign existing medians at Federal and Sheridan Boulevard. maintaining the clover leaf interchange at Federal Boulevard and W. Coilax. 2. Planttrees and install landscaping along the total avenue beginning at the 3 key commercial nodes and fill in along the avenue, where possible. 3. Discourage any new automobile related uses and encourage the following neighborhood type retail: clothing store post office

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40 hardware medical office mini-bank dry cleaners family restaurant bakery 4. Encourage multi-family residential development wijh appropriate setbacks on Wolff Street and West Colfax and West Cotlax between Irving and Hooker Street. 5. Encourage landscaping of the Universal Uquor Store and Raleigh Office Building parking lots. 6. Utilize funds from the Cijy's Economic Development Agency and other resources for commercial revitalization projects identffied in the plan. The following funds can be made available: Neighborhood Business Revijalization Loans Revolving Loans Communijy Development Block Grants Private funds 7. Encourage unffied signage at Trevizo's Restaurant and the Karate studio. 8. Encourage landscaping of the shoppette on Sheridan Boulevard south of West Colfax Avenue. 9. Upgrade the area along Federal Boulevard south of W. 14th Avenue. 1 0. Encourage new residential on the southwest and northwest comers of the Avondale shopping center lot. Construct a family restaurant and/or similar use ff residential is not preferred by developer. Key Multi-Nodal Commercial Recommendations: Begin redevelopment at the following key commercial nodes and implement the specffic multi-nodal recommendations. A. Lowell to Meade node, (Includes area east of Lowell Boulevard to the alley on both sides of the West Colfax Avenue): (see Lowell Intersection map on next page) Character: Mixed use residential and retail area. Current zoning is B-4 along W. Colfax and R-2 to the north and south of the B-4. Goal: Strengthen businesses and replace sidewalks, curbs and gutters. Create a unified facade and slgnage theme and Install landscaping, where possible.

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I laodaape bur l W. Collu Ave. 1--70 Bulllnlo .. Route rl ..... -. ..._ Into OM. ill::-:: / ..... _. ..... r CONCI!PTUAL ILLUSTRA TIVI! SITI! PLAN note; eldowalke, llt.lfbe and liltltlor should bo evaluated and rocooalruclod whore needed llfld mode COf'IUououa (1(1 colfax lrom ailerlde.o lo lederel. LOWELL INTERSECTION rM-----Jlnl

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41 Recommendations: 1. Support effort to rezone the R-2 area south of the Lake Steam Baths property on Lowell Blvd. (including the church and south of the car wash) and the 1st set of duplexes on Lowell Blvd for commercial use. 2. Encourage renovation of the duplexes between King and Lowell Boulevard (northside of the street) for office use. Currently they are experiencing deterioration from commercial encroachment.. 3. Support any expansion effort of the Lake Steam Bath property. 4. Encourage sidewalk repair between Lowell Boulevard and Meade Street. 5. Encourage unrried signage of the retail storefronts between Lowell Boulevard and Meade Street on the northside. 6. Encourage landscaping and street fumfture on the Winchells Donut Shop property. 7. Support effort to improve the condftion of the Golden West Home. improve management upgrade building facade redesign the frontage to include landscaping B. Perry node, (Includes the propentes that abut the Intersection): (see Perry Intersection map on next page) Character: Predominantly retail area wfth an apartment on the northwest corner. Current zoning is 8-4. Goal: Create a unrried facade design and signage and soften the node to become more inviting for pedestrian shopping. Recommendations: 1. Encourage unrried signage and facade renovation of the storefront shops on the northeast comer. 2. Encourage treeplanting on the southeast comer (right-of-way on the westside). Work with the Southland Corporation. 3. Improve maintenance of the landscaping on the northwest comer landscaping (Lake Apartments)

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42 C. Vrain Node (Includes the four corners that abut the Intersection): (see Vrain Intersection map on next page) Character: Commercial uses on all four corners include a hotel wnh adjacent parking, a used car lot dealer, and a fast food lranchise. Current zoning is B-4 and P-1. Goal: Develop as a new neighborhood service area for support to hospitals and neighborhood residents. Recommendations: 1. Support the Four Winds' redevelopment project and effort development. Appropriate design, setbacks, and building style should be negotiated wtlh the communny. 2. Encourage Wendy's to maintain their landscaping. If needed, the City Forester can make recommendations to improve the trees that appear to be dying. 3. Encourage the development of a neighborhood shoppette on the northeast comer of Vrain Street that would replace the existing used car lot. SUB-AREA 2 Northwest Quadrant Boundaries: Sheridan Boulevard to Peny Street. W. 17th Avenue to W. excluding.the commercial area. Character: Contains the only R-1 zoning in the entire area, approximately ten blocks. Predominantly single family wtlh newer and higher priced ranch homes throughout the area. Saint Anthony's Hospital (a major institution and employer), an office support building, Elementary School, two high lise senior cttiZen housing developments and three motels are also located in this portion of the neighborhood. The current zoning is R-1, R-2, R-2-A, R-3, B-1 and B-4. Goat: Preserve residential uses in the R-1, R-2, and R-2-A areas. Future commercial development should be kept from encroaching into the residential wtlh the exception of the area along Sheridan Boulevard south of W. 16th Avenue. These residential structures should be converted for office use. Recommendations: 1. Preserve and maintain existing residential character and provide housing rehabilttation as needed. 2. Encourage a lower densny housing (4-6 stories) development on W. 16th Avenue and Wolff Street. 3. Support any re-zoning of R-2 south of W. 16th Avenue along Sheridan Boulevard for office use.

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43 4. Maintain existing R-1 zoning. If vacant land is developed along Tennyson and W. 16th Avenue the P.U.D. process is recommended. 5. Encourage Saint Anthony's hospttal to be rezoned for instttutional use (R-5). 6. Remove junked cars and maintain vacant lot on W. 16th Avenue and Sheridan Boulevard. SUBAREA3 Northeast Quadrant Boundaries: Federal Boulevard to Perry Street, W. 17th/19th Avenue to West Colfax, excluding the commercial area Character: Predominantly single family and low-moderate denstty residential wtth two public schools (Lake Middle School, and Cheltenham Elementary), some quasi-public buildings, and a hosprtal (Beth Israel). The housing in the R-2 and R-2-A area is in fair to good condttion. There are scattered residential untts in poor condttion but signs of housing rehabilitation are evident. The housing in the R-3 area bounded by Irving, Grove, W. 16th Avenue and W. CoHax is deteriorating wtth a number of untts in need of moderate to major rehabilttation. Current zoning is R-2, R-2-A, R-3, R-3-X, B-A-1 and B-4. Goal: Improve and stabilize the residential areas by preserving the existing housing stock and encourage homeownership. Recommendations: 1. Support effort to downzone the R-3 area to R-2-A and/or a comparable denstty to the surrounding residential and encourage moderate denstty residential development. 2. Encourage moderate denstty residential development by supporting effort to rezone the area bounded by W. 16th and W. 17th Avenue west of Hooker to Irving Sir( et to R-2-A or similar densrty zone district. 3. Rezone the R-2 area between W. 16th and W. 17th Avenues, Irving Street to Hooker Street to R-2-A-or a similar zone district. 4. Improve housing condition of both single family and multi-family unrts. Target crty, state and federal rehabilitation resources to the whole area, especially the R-3 portion of the sub-area. 5. Create a better balance between owner occupied and rental homes. 6. Encourage the construction of a parking structure for Beth Israel Hospttal that is design sensitive to the surrounding residential. 7. Reopen the Mile Hi Child Care Center on W. Conejos and Julian Street.

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SUB-AREAS Southeast Quadrant 45 Boundaries: Perry Street to Federal Boulevard, West CoHax to the Lakewood Gulch, excluding the commercial area. Character: Mixed single family, low-moderate density residential wfth high density publicly subsidized housing developments in good condttion. There are signs of housing deterioration through out the area. Also there is a newly constructed senior citizen housing site, a neighborhood park and scattered vacant lots. Goal: Improve and preserve the residential character of the area, encourage housing rehabilftation and encourage new housing development on vacant land. Recommendations: 1. Target local and state rehabilitation resources for the whole area. 2. Increase homeownership opportunities for renters. 3. Offer residential rehabilitation programs. 4. Maintain existing R-2 character. 5. Encourage housing infill on vacant land. 6. Maintain the Avondale apartments for low-moderate income individuals and families. 7. Encourage homeowners to purchase vacant land adjoining their property when infill development is not possible. 8. Enforce landlord/tenant agent requirement. 9. Continue maintenance and on-going improvements at the Denver Housing Authority (DHA) homes. 1 o. lnftiate a name change for the Westridge housing projects to reflect current rehabilftation efforts and to create a positive image. 11. Investigate the possibility of creating a local historic district along W. 14th Avenue between Newton and Osceola Street. 12. Offer anti-crime awareness workshops when ever possible. 13. Increase communication wfth senior citizen groups by publiciZing events and communfty activities at senior housing sHes, newspapers and other forms of information sharing ways. 14. Encourage joint tree trimming with City and residents and explore ways to offset costs. 15. Maintain W. 14th Avenue for residential use, office use should be discouraged.

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47 VI. APPENDICES Demographic Profile (East of Perry). According to the most recent U.S. Census, in 1980 there were 9,707 person residing in the area. Population has decreased 12.2% from 1 0,484 in 1970 reversing the trend of population increases during 1960 and 1970. Ethnically, West Colfax has maintained a mixed neighborhood composition. The non-white racial mix includes Hispanic, Black, Native American, and Indo-Chinese populations. Hispanics comprise the largest racial group in the neighborhood reflecting 48% of the total population. Despite population losses the total number of households increased by 1 o/o from 3,559 in 1970 to 3, 709 in 1980. The female head of household was 12% higher than the citywide figure. Census tract 7.02 reflects a 38% figure tor female head of household that is 12% higher than the City norm of 19.6%. In 1980 West Colfax had a high percent of children aged 0-19 years (31%). Also, the neighborhood had a high percentage of elderly with 16% of its population at 65 years or older compared to the citywide elderly figure of 12%. The two groups make up 47% of West CoHax's total population. Age Distribution! West Colfax and Denver, 1980 Less than 5 years 5-9 years 10 years 15 years 20 years 25-34 years 35-44 years 45-54 years 55-66 years 65-74 years 75 years and over West Colfax 10% 8% 6"/o 7% 12% 18% 8% 7% 8% 9% 7% Source U.S. Census of population, 1980 Denver 7 6 6 7 11 22 10 4 10 7 5