Citation
Silver Triangle urban design study

Material Information

Title:
Silver Triangle urban design study
Creator:
Mid-Downtown Committee, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Community planning
Neighborhood plans
City planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Silver Triangle

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Silver Triangle
URBAN DESIGN STUDY
City of Denver
Mayors Sub-Committee
May 10, 1999


t
Mid-Downtown Committee
Clark Strickland, Chair
Susan Barnes-Gelt .
Barry Benware
John Caflin
Jerry Conover
Polly Flobeck
Jack Houser
Tracy Huggins
Bill Mosher
Brad Robinette
Ed Romero
Bob Webb
Bill Weak
Bob Wright
Bob Yeager
Hick LeMasters
Jerry Click:
ii
Acknowledgements
City Staff
Jennifer Moulton
Ellen Ittelson
Tyler Gibbs
Liz Orr
Terry Rosapep
Dennis Royer
Consultants
MNL Design
Leslie T. Bethel
Patric Dawe
Jim Leggitt
John Decker
Karen Archer
Szymanski-Ray
Arnold Ray


Table of Contents
Acknowledgements .........................................................ii
Introduction................................................................, ,1
Charge to Committee ......................................................... .1
The Silver Triangle .............................................................
Downtown Activities ............................................... ......2
Connections.................................................................... 3
14th Street ....................................................................3
15th Street ................................................................. 3
Speer Boulevard ......................... ..............................3
Street Grid ................................................................... ,4
Building Coverage ............................................................. .5
Parking........................................................................ 6
Historic Resources.......................................................... .7
Development Potential ......................................................... 8
Other Conditions in the Silver Triangle ....................................... .9
Vision Statement and Goals ..................................................... .10
Land Use Vision .......................................................... .10
Character Vision.......................................................... .11
Streetscape Environment .................................................. 12
Economic Vision............................................................. 13
Guiding Principles .......................................................... .14
Actions to Implement Principles ............................................14
Principle 1 Mix of Uses ........................................................15
Principle 2 14th Street....................................................... 16
Principle 3 15th Street...........................................1 ........ 17
Principle 4 Speer Boulevard................................................ .18
Principle 5 Pedestrian Friendly.............................................. .19
Principle 6 Designated Pedestrian Streets .................................... .20
Principle 7 Historic Buildings .............................................. .21
ill


Table of Contents
Principle 8 Vehicular Transportation....................................... .....22
Principle 9 Street Grid .........................................................23
Principle 10 Parking and Mobility................................................24
Appendix ............................................'.......... ................. .25
Urban Design Alternatives...................................................... .25
Alternative A In-Town Village .................................................26
Alternative B Mixed Use ......................................................26
Alternative C Hotel-Residential ........................................... .27
Alternative D Arc Park ........................................................27
Alternauve E Champa/13 Street Connections .....................................28
Alternative F Galleria Extension...............................................28
Alternative A Denver Place . ............................................29
Alternative A PLEX Connection..................................................29
IV


ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure 1: The Silver Triangle............................................ .1
Figure 2; Central Business District ...................................... 2
Figure 3: Historic 16th Street View.................................... .3
Figure 4; Street Grid ................................................. 4
Figure 5: Overhead View of Silver Triangle .............................. .5
Figure 6: Public Parking.................................................. 6
Figure 7: Historic 16th Street View..................................... 7
Figure 8: Development Potential ............................................8
Figure 9: Land Use Vision ........................................... 10
Figure 10; Urban Connections ............................................. .11
Figure 11; Potential Streetscape Environment .......................... .12
Figure 12: Business Activity Fill-In .................................. .13
Figure 13: New Silver Triangle Businesses ................................ 13
Figure 34; Principle 1 Mix of Uses..........................................15
Figure 15; Principle 2 14th Street ........................................ 16
Figure 16: Principle 3 15th Street.......................................... ,17
Figure 17: Principle 4 Speer Boulevard......................................18
Figure 18; Streetscape Framework ............... .19
Figure 19: Principle 5 Pedestrian Friendly ...............................19
Figure 20; Principle 6 Designated Pedestrian Streets .................... .20
Figure 21: Principle 7 Historic Buildings ............................. .21
Figure 22: Principle 8 Vehicular Transportation ............................22
Figure 23; Principle 9 Street Grid........................................ 23
Figure 24; Principle 10 Parking and Mobility................................ .24
Figure 25: Alternative A In-Town Village ............................... 26
Figure 26: Alternative B Mixed Use -................................ 26
Figure 27: Alternative C Hotel-Residential ............................ ,27
Figure 28: Alternative D Arc Park .................................... 27
Figure 29: Alternative E Champa/13 Street Connections ............. .....28
V


ILLUSTRATIONS
Figure 30; Alternative F Galleria Extension ....................................28
Figure 31: Alternative G Denver Place......................... t .29
Figure 32; Alternative FI PLEX Connection........................................ .29
VI


Introduction
THE SILVER TRIANGLE
The Silver Triangle area is the portion of Downtown
Denver bounded by Speer Boulevard, 16th Street,
Colfax Avenue and Lawrence Street, It is surrounded
by the rest of Downtown, Lower Downtown, the
Golden Triangle and Auraria. While these other areas
have developed their own identity, the SilverTriangle's
identity as part of Downtown has not been as clearly
defined. Ultimately, the Silver Triangle will become an
integral part of the Denver Downtown, and not a
separate, distinct district,
double the size of the present 300,000 sq, ft. complex.
The Convention Center Expansion Task Force was
appointed by the Mayor in January 1998 to assist die
City of Denver in making a recommendation about
the advisability of the expansion of the CCC.
Background
The City and Count)of Denver has been considering
expansion of the Colorado Convention Complex
(CCC), which consists of the Convention Center and
Currigan Hall, located in the Silver Triangle area of
Downtown Denver. The expansion would roughly
The Task Force divided itself into two Committees:
the first to explore the programming and planning of
the Convention Center expansion and the second to
explore its planning implications in the surrounding
Silver Triangle area. The second committee is the Mid-
Downtown Plan Committee, chaired by Clark
Strickland; it has developed the guiding principles and
actions described in this document, with the assistance
of RNL Design, urban designers and architects, and
Szymanski-Ray, economics consultants.
Charge to the Committee
The Committee was charged with developing urban
design concepts for the Silver Triangle that would
provide a vision for the development of this part of
Downtown and a fitting context for the expansion of
the Convention Center, The Committee asked the
consultants to evaluate the urban design, economic
and development potentials of the Silver Triangle. The
object of this work was not to produce a plan for the
SilverTriangle, but to develop a vision for the area, and
principles and actions to implement it.
Figure I: The Silver Triangle Area
1


DOWNTOWN ACTIVITIES
The map shows the Downtown attractions related
to the Convention Center and the Denver
Performing Arts Complex (PLEX). Areas of strong
visitor attraction such as the 16th St. Mall and
LoDo are shown to have numerous retail stores and
restaurants. These areas are particularly lively at
night and during special events. The Civic Center,
at the opposite end of 14th Street, is the other
concentration of cultural and civic facilities that
draws visitors. Other nearby destinations include
Pavilions, Larimer Square, hotels, government
offices, the Denver Athletic Club and the Auraria
Campus.
The Silver Triangle's primary attractions are the
Performing Arts Complex, and the Colorado
Convention Center, both of which have a national
and regional draw, with high peak visitor counts.
As the map shows, the Convention Center/PLEX
area has not generated significant restaurants,
hotels or other attractions that cater to these
visitors. This is largely due to the effect of the
superblock created by the Convention Center.
Most Downtown restaurants are located in Lower
Downtown, or along the axis of 16th/17th streets.
Hotels are located a minimum of 2-3 blocks away
from the Convention Center or the PLEX.
Some new hotel activity is currently being
generated on 14th, with the Teatro Hotel and the
proposed renovation of the Executive Tower Inn.
Aside from the Holiday Inn located at 15th Street
and Glenarm Place, these would be the closest
hotels to the Convention Center. Otherwise, it is a
2-3 block walk from the Convention Cenrer to any
restaurant, hotel or other attraction, past extensive
parking areas, with few pedestrian amenities along
the way.
2


CONNECTIONS
]4th Street
Historically, 14th Street has been the location of
civic uses such as the Denver Tramway Company
and telephone company. It has evolved into having
the potential to be a "main street", linking Lower
Downtown, the PLEX, the Convention Center and
other attractions with the Civic Center, A lower
building height limit on the southwest side of 14th
Street assures sunlight and preserves mountain
views.
15 th Street
The street is a heavily travelled automobile and bus
transit corridor serving as a paired one-way street
with both 14th and 17th Streets, which run the
opposite direction. It is also a cross-town connection
from Colfax Avenue to West 29th Avenue. Since it
is also a vehicular connection to the Central Platte
Valle} and Highlands, it has the character of a
movement corridor; but it lacks a pedestrian
orientation. It also has less historical identity as a
business or retail address, making it more difficult to
envision its future character.
Speer Boulevard
Speer Boulevard serves as a primary gateway to
Downtown, and a transition to the Auraria Campus.
Its orientation in a diagonal direction along Cherry
Creek is a distinct urban design feature. The Cherry
Figure 3: Historic /6th Street View
Creek Bikeway is an active recreational corridor
along Speer Boulevard and the Downtown edge of
Speer has considerable open space, such as the
sculpture park at the PLEX. This historic parkway
has a formal landscape design and a strong historical
.identity.
Transit & Pedestrian Connections
To be convenient for riders, public transit needs
frequent stops. Stops need to be integrated into the
streetscape improvements so that adequate amenities
for seating, lighting and trash containers are
provided.
The Silver Triangle lacks strong pedestrian
interconnections between the Convention Center,
the PLEX and other areas with visitor attractions,
such as the 16th Street Mall, LoDo and the. Civic
Center. As a result, there is little incentive to walk
along some of these streets because they lack a level
of activity that makes the pedestrian fed safe and
lack visual interest
3


STREET GRID
The map illustrates the extent and continuity of
the Downtown street grid. The grid has never been
interrupted for private purposes, but was broken
for the Convention Center and the PLEX. Multi-
block private projects such as the Tabor Center and
the Pavilions have been developed by bridging
streets, rather than closing them. Composed of
one-way streets, the grid has provided an easy-to-
use access pattern into and around Downtown.
Another feature of the street grid are the extensive
view from Downtown to the mountains along
many of the streets.
The expected growth of Downtown requires that
all street access be maintained. Any street closure
creates greater confusion, less access and
compounds congestion.
4


BUILDING COVERAGE
This view illustrates the building coverage in
Downtown, .compared to the open space, parking
lots and streets. The continuity of building
frontages can be dearly seen on many streets, such
as 16th Street. On the other hand, many building
frontages are missing on 15th and 16th Streets, in
the vicinity^ of the Convention Center. These gaps
in the pedestrian experience translate into streets
that are uninteresting to walk in the daytime and
dangerous-feeling at night..
Another point of interest shown in this view is the
large scale of the Convention Center, compared to
the smaller buildings on other blocks. Even the
PLEX is broken into block-size buildings by an
internal walkway system that follows the street
grid.
Figure 5: Overhead Vietv of Silver Triangle
5


PARKING
As new development takes place on surface parking
lots in LoDo, Downtown and the Golden Triangle,
the parking reservoir for the greater downtown area
is reduced. To meet growing parking demands,
private parking structures are being constructed,
such as the new structures on 16th Street and on
California. Attractions like the PLEX have
location-specific needs for additional parking at
event times, which sometimes overlap with all-day
patterns of commuters and business visitors to
Downtown.
Recently, several large parking lots have been built
in the Central Platte Valley for use by Sports
Complex, Coors Field and the Pepsi Center
visitors. These more remote parking areas could
potentially serve the downtown area. Transit
shuttle service would provide access to large
numbers of people from these lots to attractions in
the Silver Triangle,
6


HISTORIC RESOURCES
The rich history of the Silver Triangle creates a
unique opportunity to preserve historic structures
and integrate themes of the past into future
development and improvements. Curtis Street was
a brightly lit theatre district, and 14th Street was a
tree-lined residential street. Twelve buildings in the
Silver Triangle area, as well as Larimer Square are
designated landmarks. Fifteen additional buildings
in the Silver Triangle have been identified as
eligible to be landmarks, but have not yet been
designated. Curds, Champa, Stout, California,
Trcmont and Cleveland each have at least one
historic building, "survivors" that lend identity and
a sense ol place.
Figure 7: Historic 16th Street View
7


Figure 8: Development Potential
Although there is no height limit between 15th and 16th Streets, the model shows allowable bulk in the
mid downtown area. Base F.A.R. is 10-0 but with premiums, this can be increased to l7-0 F.A.R.
n WVFJ n PMFMT PriTFMTTA T
JL^fJZr V JUtJLKJA dt rJLJLhA V i JE V-A JL JLltA V x Jl/ajL*
The Silver Triangle is zoned B-5. This zoning was
revised in 1994 and Design Guidelines added to
create a more urbane, interesting and pedestrian-
friendly environment in Downtown, Many
sizeable, sites in the Silver Triangle await
development, and sufficient zoning density exists
to create substantial new building. In many cases,
the "missing teeth" of vacant lots along named
streets creates an insecure environment for
pedestrians.
Aside from the Convention Center and the PLEX,
the area has little positive image or identity and is
of mixed quality and intensity. A void of positive
activity exists around these two facilities.
The Silver Triangle does not provide enough
activity "not enough city". Restaurants, shops and
gathering places in the area, along with office,
residential and other attractions are needed to
create a viable area to visit and spend time.
As the 3D model illustrates, the continuity of large
tracts of undeveloped frontage creates a high
development potential, both in allowed height and
bulk, along the 14 th and 15 th Street corridors. The
only constraints to development are the limited
bulk planes that define the view corridor from the
Civic Center
As new development occurs in the Silver Triangle,
the ability to activate the streets wirh retail,
restaurants and shops increases. Examples are the
back of the Pavilions blocks on 15th Street, where
two sites have been left vacant for later
development, and the old Denver Post sited,
recently cleared for a new hotel project.
8


J
VISION STATEMENTS AND
GOALS
The Committee developed three vision statements
that are intended to provide the overall direction
for the Guiding Principles. These vision statements
are as follows:
LAND USE VISION
The Silver Triangle will become part of the core of
downtown by incorporating buildings of a
Downtown scale and intensity, including a mix of
civic/culturai, hotel, neighborhood support, office,
retail/restaurant, residential, open space and
parking uses. Ultimately, the name "Silver
Triangle" may lose its association with this area,
because it will have been absorbed into the greater
Downtown development pattern.
The land use diagram shows the structure of
Downtown as envisioned with the Silver Triangle
performing an essential role as part of the
Downtown pattern of land use, circulation and
pedestrian amenities.
Figure 9: Land Use Vision
9


p
CHARACTER VISION
Residents, local employees, customers, PLEX
patrons, conventioneers and visitors will enjoy a
dense urban area that is active, attractive, and safe
for pedestrians and efficient in moving people and
vehicles into and through Downtown Denver.
10


STREETSCAPE ENVIRONMENT
The diagram illustrates some of the potential
streetscape improvements that would help to make
the Silver Triangle an attractive, pedestrian-friendly
environment, and connect it into the Downtown
system. This is only one of many alternative
streetscape potentials for the Silver Triangle. Some
of its features may be:
A 14th Street promenade with street trees, special
paving and lighting, graphics, and development
focused on the street,
Streetscape Improvements with individual
identity on the named streets, to create pedestrian
connections between the PLEX and Convention
Center and other parts of Downtown.
Speer Walk a continuation of the open space in
front of the PLEX, for pedestrians and patrons of
the PLEX and Convention Center, respecting the
green edge of Speer Boulevard.
Event Center Park a plaza for special events and
gatherings in front of the expanded PLEX. This
would make the connection between the
Convention Center and the proposed hotel
across 14th Street.
Colfax Parkway Sculpture Parks The triangular
sites formed at Colfax Avenue become sites for
environmental sculpture and art, creating a
boulevard/parkway along Colfax.
Figure 11: Potential Streetscape Environment
11


ECONOMIC VISION
The Silver Triangle will "fill in" with additional
business and residential development that enhances
the baseline daily economic activity and supports
and captures the commercial value of the
Convention Center, PLEX and other visitor
facilities.
The objective is to change the supplement the
spikes of Convention Center and PLEX activity'
with stores, restaurants and other attractions that
can draw people into the area every day, creating a
constant healthy business environment.
Figure 13: New Silver Triangle Businesses
12


GUIDING PRINCIPLES
The Committee developed a series of principles
that are intended to guide further planning and
development in the Silver Triangle. These
principles address both public and private actions
in the area. The effect of these principles will be to
knit the Silver Triangle into Downtown, rather
than create a separate district. The principles also
address major improvements in the area, such as
the expansion of the Colorado Convention Center,
and describe how the area surrounding it can be
developed ro create an inviting, exciting addition
to Downtown Denver.
The guiding principles are summarized here and
are more full}'described and illustrated in the next
section.
The Guiding Principles
1. Create a diverse mix of complementary acrivities-civic/cultural, hotel, neighborhood
support, office, retail/resraurant, and residential uses.
2. Generate pedestrian interesr and activity on 14th Street.
3. Enhance the commercial viability' of 15th Street.
4. Respect the formal landscape edge of Speer Boulevard.
Open building facades
Provide development that is visually interactive and accessible
5. Reinforce a pedestrian-friendly environment and open space opportunities.
6. Enhance the designated pedestrian links between 14th and ItSth Streets (Glenarm,
California, Stout, Champa, Curtis and Arapahoe).
7. Support rehabilitation and reuse of remaining historic buildings.
8. Accommodate vehicular transportation (auto, bus, truck/service and light rail).
9. Respect the existing street grid.
10. Address Downtown parking concerns.
ACTIONS
Each of the guiding principles needs action steps to implement it. On the following pages some of rhe
implementing actions for each principle are described, with an illustration of the end result of the actions.
13


Principle 1
Mix of Uses
Create a diverse mix of complementary activities-
civic/cultural, hotel, neighborhood support, office,
retail/restaurant, and residential uses.
Add buildings and new uses to integrate the
Silver Triangle into the whole of Downtown,
Develop strategies to encourage small, street-
active uses to locate on the ground level of
buildings in the Silver Triangle and elsewhere in
Downtown.


Principle 2
14 th Street
Generate pedestrian interest and activity on 14th
Street.
* Use 14th Street as the pedestrian and bike link
between the Central Platte Valley and
Downtown extending from the new "Bronco
Bridge" touch down at the Pepsi Center to the
Civic Center.
* Create streetscape amenities that reinforce the
pedestrian and bikeway character and define the
"edge of the core of cores", a term used by the
City Planning office to define the most intense
and active part of downtown: between 14th and
18th Streets.
* Reconfigure Skyline Park to be a significant
Downtown open space and continue pedestrian
amenities to 14th Street.
Figure 15: 14th Street
15


Principle 3
15th Street
Enhance the commercial viability of 15th Street.
Encourage new development along 15th Street to
create a "downtown" character,
Improve bus stops to eliminate unkempt/uncared
for appearance.
Continue Downtown streetscape.
Maintain rhythm of streets and alleys.
Figure 16: 15th Street
16


Principle 4
Speer Boulevard
Respect the formal landscape edge of Speer
Boulevard.
* Address and reinforce Speer Boulevard's
attributes as Denvers premier landscape
boulevard.
* Provide active uses (such as the Sewell Ballroom)
along Speer Boulevard that take advantage of
views to and from the boulevard.
* Maintain landscaped open space edge.
Figure 17: Speer Boulevard
17


Principle 5
Pedestri an-Fri endJy
Reinforce a pedestrian-friendly environment and
open space opportunities.
* Create safe and attractive streets for pedestrians
on every numbered or named street, regardless of
its primary function, should be safe and
attractive for pedestrians.
* Consider alternatives for creation of open space,
either several smaller opportunity spaces, a
central square, or a "linear park", any of which
will lend identity.
* Enhance connections between adjacent amenities
and destinations.
* Encourage all linkages between buildings and
destinations to be at street level; discourage
pedestrian tunnels and bridges.
Figure 19: Pedestrian Friendly
18


Principle 6
Designated Pedestrian Streets
Enhance the designated pedestrian links between
14th and 16th Streets (Glenarm, California, Stout,
Champa, Curtis and Arapahoe),
* Enhance existing streetscape identity and
improvements on California, Curtis and
Arapahoe (Skyline Park).
* Design and install streetscape improvements on
Glenarm, Stout and Champa.
* Require building design that provides pedestrian
interest.
* Encourage buildings of a variety of types and
sizes to support a 24-hour community.
* Attract small uses appropriate to srorefront space,
* Provide primary building and business entries,
addressing the named streets.
* Recognize varied scale of historic building
patterns on named streets.
Figure 20; Designated Pedestrian Streets
19


Principle 7
Historic Buildings
Support rehabilitation and reuse of remaining
historic buildings.
Designate eligible buildings to provide
protection from demolition and incentives for
rehabilitation and reuse.
* Utilize remaining historic buildings to create
architectural identity for adjacent new
development.
* Consider using historic character of streets to
establish a new identity; for example, 14th Street
was once a tree-lined residential street, and Curtis
was a brightly-lit theatre district.
Denver Landmarks (Designated)
Larimer Square Historic District
Annex II, 414 14th Street
Auditorium Theatre, 920 14 th Street
Tramway Building, 1000 14th Street
Insurance Exchange Building, 910 15th Street
Denver Dry Building, 700 16th Street
Neusteter Building, 720 16th Street
Odd Fellows Hall, 1543 Champa
Curry-Chucov ich House, 1439 Court
Denver Athletic Club, 1325 Glenarm
Denver Press Club, 1330 Glenarm
Hover & Co. Building, 1348 Lawrence
Denver Fire Station #1, 1326 Tremont
Figure 21; Historic Buildings
Historic Buildings
(Eligible for Designation)
Telephone Building, 931 14th Street
Lewis & Sons, 800 I6rh Street
Symes Building, 820 16th Street
University Building, 910 16th Street
Colonial Hotel, 1506 California
McCiintock Building, 1245 Champa
Police fic Jail Building, 1245 Champa
Davis & Shaw, 1434 Champa
Annex I, 1445 Cleveland Place
Bauer Building, 1512 Curtis
Denver Motor Hotel, 1420 Stout
Rio Grande Building, 1531 Stout
Ady House, 1332 Tremont
Emily Griffith School, 1250 Weiron
Steel Building, 1555 Welron
20


Principle 8
Vehicular Transportation
Accommodate vehicular transportation (auto, bus,
truck/service and light rail).
* Locate curb cuts to facilitate transit stop function
for riders and vehicles.
* Provide transit access to all locations of
downtown-without one street or area having the
bulk of benefits and burdens.
* Take advantage of the Light Rail service going
through the Colorado Convention Center and its
close proximity to PLEX. Light Rail can help
convention goers get out and about quickly.
* Light Rail service stops at the periphery should
coordinate with service such as cross-town buses.
* Shuttles and circulators may be provided, for
example to peripheral parking.
* Transit facilities should reflect good streetscape
design and site planning, with high levels of
amenit}r and maintenance.


Principle 9
Street Grid
Respect the scale and mobility provided by the
existing street grid.
Maintain vistas along streets toward mountains.
Discourage closing of any street without
thorough analysis of the costs and benefits.
Figure 23: Street Grid
22


*
f
Principle 10
Parking and Mobility
Address Downtown parking concerns.
* Conduct a mobility study for the Central Denver
area (Downtown, Lower Downtown, Golden
Triangle, Arapahoe Triangle and Central Platte
Valley) that includes parking resources and
connections to employment and entertainment
destinations, pedestrian and bicycle connections,
and convenient use of transit, as well as vehicular
access into, out of, and through the area.
* Consider all parking resources as having the
potential to be shared by two or more uses.
* Manage available parking and locate new parking
to meet nearby demands. No one district of
Downtown should be a parking reservoir for the
rest of Downtown.
* Create transit links between Downtown and
complementary destinations such as DIA,
Cherry Creek and Denver Tech Center.
* Locate parking garages mid-block along named
streets.
* Incorporate space for retail at the ground floor of
all parking garages.
* Provide consistent signage for public parking.
Figure 24: Parking and Mobility
23



24
APPENDIX-URBAN DESIGN
The alternative sketch concepts on the following
pages for the Silver Triangle were developed during
an On-site Workshop held at RNL's offices, with
the Mid-Downtown Planning Committee. Each of
these illustrates themes or ideas. Some of these are
similar in their approach, but represent different
applications to the Silver Triangle. These were
presented to the Committee at the On-site
Workshop.
The best big ideas were selected from the
alternatives and incorporated into the principles
described earlier.



'' m im$
-INFILL mtDBHWL
gWU SHALE 6U5CM
W**5?WSW

RE! rTtR#:L Ci.&Tfl^T
Figure 25: In-toum Village
:2- ' -J*
4,1 iJF r,
J ;V:f _
:nb rl! h -1 1 4.T
!D '~ TTF u,i T
' SIS 10 B*S
ENTERTAINfisw aCNE
,*C0HI*ieTfOrt OF
Cwi CfeKTSfc
r j t *5if sme

'4, R "'fi, '
seymiT.
Figure 26: Mixed Use
Alternative A "In-town Village"
The ideas in this alternative are the idea of infill
residential development strongly reinforcing the
concept of a Downtown residential neighborhood in
the Silver Triangle. Many opportunities exist
between 14ch and 16th Streets for new residential
development, possibly mixed with commercial, retail
and office, Toward the Civic Center, this concept
envisions a small scale residential neighborhood on
both sides of I4rh Street, consisting of smaller
developments that add up to an in-town village.
This alternative also envisions an "art park" along
Colfax Avenue, where the triangles created by the
street intersections at Colfax are developed as
sculpture gardens. The Speer Boulevard edge of the
Convention Center expansion is cut back at Champa
and Stout Streets to create a more continuous public
open space along Speer.
Alternative B "Mixed Use "
This concept focuses around four different
development districts; AMid-town residential
district similar to Alternative A; B-Entertainment
zone, linking Pavilions with the Convention Center;
C-Museum/Civic zone, which is fills out the
remaining sites of the Civic Center with public uses;
D-a small scale residential neighborhood similar to
Alternative A; and E-a 14th Street streetscape, which
centers on a central park and open space across 14th
from the expanded Convention Center, This
alternative also proposes cutting back the
Convention Center expansion from Speer
Boulevard, keeping a significant public open space
on that side. The Art Park along Colfax is also a part
of this alternative.
25


ft
4 *
**. ~L\T.....".:.- "-----------------
P--'.' 6/6 ICm5
- - -7~' cmmzahi fows

Figure 27: Hotel-Residential
m iomr
ft* mm mz
coMEcr pm 70 ccc
x-._
Figure 28: Arc Park
Alternative C "Hotel-Residential"
This concept has some similarities to Alternative B,
but differs in the suggestion of a hotel/residential
district between the Convention Center and the
Civic Center. There is a similar Entertainment
Zone, a Midtown Residential Zone and an
Office/Hotel zone adjacent to the Civic Center,
finishing off that side of the public park with major
development facing the Civic Center. Public open
space in this concept includes a plaza on the 14th
Street side of the Convention Center, a Speer
Boulevard open space formed by cutting back the
Convention Center, and the An Park along Colfax
Avenue. .
Alternative D "Arc Park "
This concept centers around a parkway, coming
north from the Golden Triangle, that describes a
great arc through the Silver Triangle, forming a
large plaza directly in from of the expanded
Convention Center. At Colfax Avenue, residential
development is created on either side of the
parkway as it goes north from Colfax. A pedestrian
bridge connects the PLEX to the expanded
Convention Center.
26





E
CONNECTS O*- ST.
n ccc
MAjCR OfBH 5P/*ee
W FRONT r/-a.ikiFy-pc<4&
Figure 29: Champa/13th Street Connections
m IDEAS
>
T
Figure 30: Galleria Extensions
27
Alternative E "Champa/13th
Street Connections "
This alternative is similar t-o Alternative F in the
suggestion ol an extension of the Galleria along
13th Avenue through the Convention Center and
beyond, into the proposed "Tremont Square"
residential neighborhood, which is similar to the
some of the other alternatives. Retail and
residential space wrap the Convention Center
expansion along Champa Street, where it fronts on
the light rail system, with a station at 13th. A
pedestrian plaza and open space is developed along
14th Street, with hotels across 14th from the
Convention Center.
Alternative F "Galleria Extension "
The major idea in this alternative is the extension
of the Galleria walkway along the 13th Street right-
of-way. This extension has a major focal point on
Champa Street, where it crosses the light rail
system. Mixed uses front onto Champa Street,
wrapping the Convention Center on that side. A
Speer Green is envisioned along Speer Boulevard, a
significant open space that creates a gateway into
Downtown. A Formal semi-circular green spans
rhree blocks on the 14th Street side ol the
Convention Center, providing both an open space
a men in' to the Convention Center, and a pleasant
connection to l-6th Street. A lower density
residential area called "Tremont Square" is
proposed between the Convention Center and
Court Street,



Figure 31: Denver Place
Figure 32: PLEX Connections
28
Alternative G "Denver Place "
This alternative focuses on a major plaza (Denver
Place) in front of the Convention Center entrance
on 14th Street. Development on the three 14th
Street blocks facing the Convention Center is
coordinated so that the buildings form the open
space, a circular form that also includes the front of
the Convention Cenrer. "Pocket blocks" of mixed
residential and commercial development form an
urban neighborhood between the Convention
Center and Civic Center. This is the "Tremont
Place of other alternatives such as F. In this
alternative, the light rail line remains where it is.
Another building infills the site next to the Terra
Center, and civic buildings fill out the Civic Center
spaces on Cleveland.
Alternative H "PLEX Connection "
This is an alternative that focuses on the
Convention Center. The PLEX is connected to the
Convention Center over Champa Street, with the
light rail station on 13th Street, connected to both
these facilities. Commercial and residential
development wraps the Convention Center along
Champa Street. A civic plaza similar to "Denver
Place" in Alternative G is proposed on 14th Street.
This open space and adjacent development shapes
pedestrian connections to 16th Street, die
Pavilions, etc.


Full Text

PAGE 1

SILVER TRIANGLE City of Denver Mayor's Sub-Committee May 10, 1999 URBAN DESIGN STUDY

PAGE 2

Mid-Downtown Committee Clark Strickland, Chair Susan Barnes-Celt Barry Benware john Cajlin jerry Conover Polly Flobeck jack Houser Tracy Huggins Bill Mosher Brad Robinette Ed Romero Bob \Vebb Bill Wenk Bob \Vright Bob Yeager '-'rick LeMasters jerry Glick ii City Staff Jennifer Moulton Ellen lttelson Tyler Gibbs Liz Orr Terry Rosapep Dermis Ro_yer Consultants RNLDesign Leslie T. Bethel Patrie Dawe jim Leggitt john Decker Karen Archer Sz:yn1a11ski-Ray Arnold Ray

PAGE 3

TABLE OF CONTENTS Acknowledgements ............................................... ii Introduction .................................................... 1 Charge to Committee ............................................. 1 The Silver Triangle ......... , ........ .... .... ......... 1 Downtown Activities .............................................. 2 Connections .................................................... 3 14th Street ..................................................... 3 15th Street ..................................................... 3 Speer Boulevard ................................................. 3 Street Grid .................................................... .4 Building Coverage .. ..... .................. , .. , ... 5 Parking .............................. ......................... 6 Historic Resources ..... .............................. ........... 7 Development Potential ............................................ 8 Other Conditions in the Silver Triangle ................................ 9 Vision Statement and Goals ........................................ 1 0 Land Use Vision ................ , .......................... 1 0 Character Vision ................................................ 11 Streetscape Environment .......................................... 12 Economic Vision ................................................ 13 Guiding Principles .............................................. .14 Actions to Implement Principles ..................................... 14 Princi pie 1 Mix of Uses .......................................... 15 Principle 2 14th Street ........................................... 16 !'rinciple 3 15th Street ................................. ; ......... 17 Princi pie 4 Speer Boulevard ....................................... 18 Principle 5 Pedestrian Friendly ..................................... 19 Princi pie 6 Designated Pedestrian Streets ............................. 20 Principle 7 Historic Buildings ..................................... 21 iii

PAGE 4

TABLE OF CONTENTS Principle 8 Vehicular Transportation ................................. 22 Principle 9 Street Grid ........................................... 23 Principle 10 Par!Gng and Mobility ................................... 24 Appendix ..................................................... 25 Urban Design Alternatives ......................................... 25 Alternative A "InTown Village" .................................... 26 Alternative B "Mixed Use" ........................................ 26 Alternative C "Hotel-Residential" ................................... 27 Alternative D "Arc Park" .......................................... 27 Alternative E "Champa/13 Street Connections" ......................... 28 Alternative F "Galleria Extension" .................. : ................ 28 Alternative A "Denver Place" ......................... : ............ 29 Alternative A "PLEX Connection" ................................... 29 iv

PAGE 5

ILLUSTRATIONS Figure 1: The Silver Triangle ....................................... 1 Figure 2: Central Business District .................................. 2 Figure 3: Historic 16th Street View .................................. 3 Figure 4: Street Grid ............................................ .4 Figure 5: Overhead View of Silver Triangle ............................ 5 Figure 6: Public Parking .......................................... 6 Figure 7: Historic 16th Street View .................................. 7 Figure 8: Development Potential .................................... 8 Figure 9: Land Use Vision ....................................... 1 0 Figure 10: Urban Connections ..................................... 11 Figure II: Potential Streetscape Environment .......................... 12 Figure 12: Business Activity Fill-In .................................. 13 Figure 13: New Silver Triangle Businesses ............................. 13 Figure 14: Principle 1 Mix of Uses .................................. 15 Figure 15; Principle 2 14th Street ................................... 16 Figure 16: Principle 3 15th Street ................................... 17 Figure 17: Principle 4 Speer Boulevard ............................... 18 Figure 18: Streetscape Framework ................................... 19 Figure 19: Principle 5 "Pedestrian Friendly'' ........................... 19 Figure 20: Principle 6 Designated Pedestrian Streets ..................... 20 Figure 21: Principle 7 Historic Buildings ............................. 21 Figure 22: Principle 8 Vehicular Transportation ......................... 22 Figure 23: Principle 9 Street Grid ................................... 23 Figure 24: Principle 10 Parking and Mobility .......................... 24 Figure 25: Alternative A "InTown Village" ............................ 26 Figure 26: Alternative B "Mixed Use" ................................ 26 Figure 27: Alternative C "Hotel-Residential" .......................... 27 Figure 28: Alternative D "Arc Park" ................................. 27 Figure 29: Alternative E "Champa/ 13 Street Connections" ................ 28 v

PAGE 6

ILLUSTRATIONS Figure 30: Alternative F "Galleria Extension" .......................... 28 Figure 31: Alternative G "Denver Place" .............................. 29 Figure 32: Alternative H "PLEX Connection" .......................... 29 vi

PAGE 7

THE SILVER TRIANGLE The Silver Triangle area is rhe portion of Downtown Denver bounded by Speer Boulevard, 16th Streer, Colfax Avenue and Lawrence Street. h is surrounded by the rest of Downtown, Lower Downtown, the Golden Triangle and Aura ria. While these other areas have devdoped their own identity; the Silver Triangle's identity as part of Downtown has nor been as clearly defined. Ultimately, the Silver Triangle will become an Figure I: The Silver Triangle Area integral parr of the Denver Downtown, and nor a separate, distinct district. double the size of me present 300,000 sq. ft. complex. The Convention Center Expansion Task Force was appointed by the Mayor in January 1998 to assist the City of Denver in making a recommendation about the advisability of the expansion of rhe CCC. Introduction Background The City and CounryofDenver has been considering expansion of the Colorado Convention Complex (CCC), which consists of the Convention Center and Currigan Hall, located in the Silver Triangle area of Downtown Denver. The expansion would roughly The Task Force divided itself into two Comminees: the first ro explore the programming and planning of the Convention Cenrer expansion and the second to explore its planning implications in the surrounding Silver Triangle area. The second conunittee is the MidDowntown Plan Committee, chaired by Clark Strickland; it has developed the guiding principles and actions described in this document, with the assistance of RNL Design, urban designers and architects, and Szymanslci-Ray, economics consultants. Charge to the Committee The Committee was charged with developing urban design concepts for the Silver Triangle that would provide a vision for the development of this part of Downtown and a fitting context for the expansion of the Convention Center. The Comminee asked the consultants to evaluate the urban design, economic and development potentials of the Silver Triangle. The object of rhis work was nor to produce a plan for the Silver Triangle, bur to develop a vision for the area) and principles and actions ro implement it.

PAGE 8

DOWNTOWN ACTIVITIES The map shows the Downtown auracrions related to rhe Convention Center and the Denver Performing Arrs Complex (PLEX). Areas of strong visitor attraction such as the 16th Sr. Mall and LoDo are shown ro have numerous retail stores and restaurants. These areas are panicularly lively at night and during special events. The Civic Center, at rhe opposire end of 14th Srreer, is rhe other concentrarion of cultural and civic facilities rhar draws visitors. Other nearby destinations include Pavilions, Larimer Square, hotels, government offices, rhe Denver Arhleric Club and rhe Auraria Campus. The Silver Triangle's primary anracrions are the Performing Arts Complex, and rhe Colorado Convention Center, both of which have a national and regional draw, with high peak visitor counrs. As the map shows, the Convenrion Cenrer/PLEX area has nor generated significant restaurants, hotels -or orher attractions that cater to these visitors. This is largely due to the effect of the superblOck created by the Convenrion Center. Mosr Downmwn restaurants are located in Lower Downtown, or along the axis of 16th/17th streets. Hotels are located a minimum of 2-3 blocks away from the Convention Cenrer or rhe PLEX. ... Restaurn'IU.S Retail llotels Cultural Op"'n Space Cnlflradu Connnlion CenleF Figure 2: Central Business District Some new hotel acnv1ry IS currently being generated on 14th, with the Teatro Hotel and rhe proposed renovation of the Execmive Tower Inn. Aside from the Holiday Inn located at 15th Street and Glenarm Place, these would be the closest hotels ro rhe Convention Center. Otherwise, it is a 2-3 block walk from the Convention Center to any 2 _;; I fol ; "--. ,.:C' s...-...a-, ..... ........ ......... RNL restaurant, hotel or other attraction, past extensive parking areas, with few pedestrian amenities along rhe

PAGE 9

CONNECTIONS 14th Street Historically, 14th Street has been the location of civic uses such as rhe Denver Tramway Company and telephone company. It has evolved into having the potential to be a "main street", linking Lower Downtown, the PLEX, the Convention Center and other attractions with the Civic Cenrer. A lower building height limit on the southwest side of 14th Srreer assures sunlight and preserves mountain v1ews. 15th Street The street is a heavily travelled automobile and bus transit corridor serving as a paired one-way street with both 14th and 17th Srreers, which run the opposite direction. Iris also a cross-town connection from Colfax Avenue to West 29th Avenue. Since it is also a vehicular connection to rhe Central Platte Valley and Highlands, it has the character of a movement corridor; bur ir lacks a pedestrian orientation. It also has less historicaJ idenrity as a business or retail address, making it more difficult to enviSion irs future character. Speer Boulevard Speer Boulevard serves as a primary gateway to Downtown, and a transition to the Auraria Campus. Irs orientation in a diagonal direction along Cherry Creek is a distinct urban design feature. The Cherry Figure 3: Historic 16th Street View Creek Bikeway is an active recreational corridor along Speer Boulevard and the Downtown edge of Speer has considerable open space, such as the scu1prure park at the PLEX. This historic parkway has a formal landscape design and a strong historical identity. Transit & Pedestrian Connections To be convenient for riders, public transit needs frequent stops. Stops need to be integrated inro rhe srreerscape improvements so that adequate amenities 3 for searing, lighting and trash conra1ners are provided. The Silver Triangle lacks strong pedestrian inrerconnecrions between the Convention Center, the PLEX and Other areas with visimr artracrions, such as rhe 16rh Street Mall, LoDo and rhe. Civic Center. As a result, there is little incenrive to walk aJong some of rhese sneers because rhey lack a level of activity that makes the pedestrian feel safe and lack visuaJ interest

PAGE 10

STREET GRID The map illusrrates the extent and cominuiry of the Downtown street grid. The grid has never been interrupted for private purposes, but was broken for the Convention Center and the PLEX. Multiblock private projects such as the Tabor Center and the Pavilions have been developed by bridging streets, rather than closing them. Composed of one-way srreers, the grid has provided an easy-touse access panern into and around Downtown. Another feature of the street grid are the extensive view from Downtown to the mountains along many of the streets. The expected growth of Downrown requ1res rhat all srreer access be maintained. Any srreet closure creates greater confusion, less access and compounds congestion. .. ,_ -'-;-L T_ ;...::::_,_, IMh S!r!i-.1 =:' -S'i Figure 4: Street Grid 4 i L. t ---,,_ II t!---I :=-;;__ I' I

PAGE 11

BUILDING COVERAGE This view illustrates the building coverage in Downtown, _compared to the open space, parking lots and streets. The continuity of building frontages can be clearly seen on many streets, such as 16th Street. On rhe other hand, many building frontages are missing on 15th and 16th Streets, in the vicinity of the Convention Center. These gaps in the pedestrian experience translate into streets that are uninteresting to walk in the daytime and da'ngerous-feeli ng
PAGE 12

PARKING As new developmenr rakes place on surface parking lots in LoDo, Dowmown and rhe Golden Triangle, rhe parking reservoir for the greater downtown area is reduced. To meet growing parking demands, private parking structures are being constructed, such as the new structures on 16rh Street and on California. Anracrions like the PLEX have location-specific needs for additional parking at event rimes, which sometimes overlap with all-clay panerns of commuters and business visitors to Downtown. Recently, severaJ large parking Iars have been buiJr in the Central Plane Valley for use by Spons Complex, Coors Field and rhe Pepsi Center visitors. These more remore parking areas could potentially serve the downtown area. Transit shuttle service would provide access to large numbers of people from rhese lors ro anracrions in the Silver Triangle. Figure 6: Public Parking 6

PAGE 13

HISTORIC RESOURCES The rich hisrory of the Silver Triangle creates a unique opportunity to preserve hiswric structures and inregrare themes of the past inw future developmenr and improvements. Curris Street was a brightly lit theatre district, and 14th Street was a lined residential street. Twelve buildings in the Silver Triangle area, as well as Larimer Square are designated landmarks. Fifteen additional buildings in the Silver Triangle have been identified as eligible to be landmarks, but have not yet been designated. Curris, Champa, Stout, California, Tremont and Cleveland each have ar least one hisroric building, "survivors" rhat lend identity and a sense of place. Figure 7: Historic I 6th Street Vlew 7

PAGE 14

DEVELOPMENTPOTENTML The Silver Triangle is zoned B-5. This zoning was revised in 1994 and Design Guidelines added to create a more urbane, interesting and pedesrrianfriendly environment in Downwwn. Many sizeable; sires in the Silver Triangle await development, and sufficient zoning density exists to create substantial new building. In many cases, the "missing teeth" of vacant lots along named streets creates an insecure environment for pedestrians. Aside from the Convenrion Center and the PLEX, the area has little posidve image or identity and is of mixed quality and intensity. A void of positive aCliviry exists around these rwo facilities. The Silver Triangle does nor provide enough activity"nor enough ciry". Resrauranrs, shops and gathering places in the area, along with office, residential and other attractions are needed to create a viable area ro visit and spend rime. .& the 3D model illustrates, the continuity of large tracts of undeveloped frontage creates a high development potential, both in allowed heighr and bulk, along the 14rh and 15rh Street corridors. The only constraints w developmenr are the limited bulk planes that define rhe view corridor from the Civic Center Figure 8: Development Potential Although there is no height limit between 15th and 16th Streets, the model shows allowable bulk in the mid downtown area. Base F.A.R. is 10'-0" but u.1ith premiums, this can be increased to 17'-0" F.A.R. As new development occurs in the Silver Triangle, the ability ro activate rhe srreers wirh retail, restaurants and shops increases. Examples are the back of rhe Pavilions blocks on 15th Street, where 8 rwo sites have been left vacant for later developmeJH, and rhe old Denver Post sit_ed, recently cleared for a new hotel projecr.

PAGE 15

VISION STATEMENTS AND GOALS The Commirree developed three vision sraremenrs that are inrended to provide the overall direction for rhe Guiding Principles. These v!sion statements are as follows: LAND USE VISION The Silver Triangle will become parr of the core of downrown by incorporating buildings of a Downtown scale and intensity, including a mix of civic/culturaJ, hotel, neighborhood support, office, retail/restaurant, residential, open space and parking uses. Ultimately, rhe name "Silver Triangle" may lose irs association with this area, because ir will have been absorbed inro the greater Downtown development pattern. The land use diagram shows the structure of Downtown as envisioned with the Silver Triangle performing an essenrial role as parr of the Downtown pattern of land use, circulation and pedestrian amenities. Figure 9: Land Ue Vision 9

PAGE 16

CHARACTER VISION Residents, local employees, cusromers, PLEX patrons, conventioneers and visirors will enjoy a dense urban area that is active, attractive, and safe for pedestrians and efficient in moving people and vehicles into and through Dowmown Denver. Figure I 0: Urban Connections 10

PAGE 17

STREETSCAPE ENVIRONMENT The diagram illustrates some of the potential streetscape improvements that would help to make the Silver Triangle an attractive, pedestrian-friendly environment, and connect ir into the Downtown system. This is only one of many alternative streetscape potentials for rhe Silver Triangle. Some of irs features may be: A 14th Street promenade with street trees, special paving and lighting, graphics, and development focused on the street. Srreetscape 1 mprovements with individual identity on rhe named streets, to create pedestrian connections berween the PLEX and Convention Center and other parts of Downtown. Speer \Valka continuation of rhe open space in front of rhe PLEX, for pedestrians and patrons of rhe PLEX and Convention Cenrer, respecting rhe green edge of Speer Boulevard. Evenr Cemer Parka plaza for special evems and gatherings in front of the expanded PLEX. This would make the connection between the Convention Center and the proposed hotel across 14th Street. Colfax Parkway Sculpture Parks -The criangular sites formed at Colfax Avenue become sites for environmental sculpture and art, creating a boulevard/parkway along Colfax. Figure 11: Potential Streets cape Environment II

PAGE 18

ECONOMIC VISION The Silver Triangle will "fill in" with additional business and residenrial developmenr that enhances rhe baseline daily economic acriviry and supports and caprures rhe commercial value of rhe Convention Center, PLEX and other visitor facilities. The objective is to change rhe supplemem the "spikes" of Convenrion Center and PLEX activity with stores, restaurants and other attractions that can draw people into the area every day, creating a constant healthy business environment. Peak eoonomi(; -----stimulated by Convention Center and PLEX events center Today'slow level or economic activity Proposed: Add economic actlv// Vis10n: Add i'lusmess that economic: evf'ryi:IRy Figure 12: Business Activity Fill-In Figure 13: New Silver Triangle Businesses 12

PAGE 19

. GUIDING PRINCIPLES The Committee developed a series of principles that are intended to guide furrher planning and development in rhe Silver Trian-gle. These principles address both public and private actions in the area. The effect of these principles will be ro knit the Silver Triangle into Downwwn, rather than create a separate disrricr. The principles also address major improvements in the area, such as the expansion of rhe Colorado Convenrion Center, and describe how rhe area surrounding it can be developed ro create an inviting, exciting addition ro Downrown Denver. The guiding principles are summarized here and are more fully described and illustrated in the nexr section. The Guiding Principles I. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. ACTIONS Create a diverse mix of complementary acriviries-civic/cultural, hotel, neighborhood support, office, retail/restaurant, and residential uses. Generate pedestrian interest and activity on 14rh Street. Enhance the commercial viability of 15th Street. Respect the formal landscape edge of Speer Boulevard. Open building facades Provide developmfnr that is visuaJiy interactive and accessible Reinforce a pedestrian-friendly environment and open space opportunities. Enhance the designated pedestrian links between 14th and 16th St-reets (Glenarm, California} Srout1 Champa1 Curtis and Arapahoe). Support rehabilitation and reuse of remaining hisroric buildings. Accommodate vehicular transportation (aura, bus, truck/service
PAGE 20

Principle 1 Mix of Uses Creare a diverse mix of complementary activities civic/cuhural, hote.l, neighborhood support, office, retail!resrauram, and residenrial uses. Add buildings and new uses ro inregrare the Silver Triangle in ro rhe whole of Downtown. Develop strategies to encourage small, street active uses to locate on rhe ground level of buildings in the Silver Triangle and elsewhere in Downtown. Figure I 4: Mix of Uses 14

PAGE 21

Principle 2 14th Street Generate pedestrian interest and activity on 14th Street. Use 1 4rh Street as the pedestrian and bike link berween the Central Platte Valley and Downtown extending from the new "Bronco Bridge" much down at the Pepsi Center to the Civic Cenrer. Create srreetscape amenities that reinforce the pedestrian and bikeway character and define rhe "edge of the core of cores", a term used by the Ciry Planning office to define the most intense and active parr of downtown: between 14th and 18th Srreers. Reconfigure Skyline Park to be a significant Downtown open space and conrinue pedestrian amenities to 14th Streer. Figure 15: 14th Street 15

PAGE 22

Principle 3 15th Street Enhance the commercial viability of 15th Srreer. Encourage new development along 15th Street co create a "downtown" character. Improve bus stops ro eliminate unkempt/uncared for appearance. Continue Downtown streetscape. Maintain rhythm of streets and alleys. Figure 16 15th Street 16

PAGE 23

Principle 4 Speer Boulevard Respect the formal landscape edge of Speer Boulevard. Address and reinforce Speer Boulevard1s attributes as Denver's premier landscape boulevard. Provide active uses (such as the Sewell Ballroom) along Speer Boulevard rhat take advanrage of views w and from the bOulevard. Maintain landscaped open space edge. Figure 17: Speer Boulevard 17

PAGE 24

Principle 5 PedestrianFriendly Reinforce a pedestrian-friendly environment and open space opportunities. Create safe and auractive streets for pedestrians on every numbered or named street, regardless of its primary function, should be safe and attractive for pedestrians. Consider alterncirives for creation of open space, either severaJ smaller opportunity spaces, a central square, or a "linear park", any of which will lend identity. Enhance connections between adjacent amenities and destinations. Encourage a11 linkages between buildings and destinations to be at srreer level; discourage pedestrian tunnels and bridges 1. "".>C'>,.'\"'. Figure 18: Streetscape Framework Figure 19: Pedestrian Friend(y 18

PAGE 25

Principle 6 Designated Pedestrian Streets Enhance the designated pedestrian links between 14th and 16th Streets (Glenarm, California, Stout, Champa, Curris and Arapahoe). Enhance existing srreetscape identity and improvements on California, Curtis and Arapahoe (Skyline Park). Design and insraJI streetscape improvements on Glenarm, Srour and Champa. Require building design rhat provides pedestrian interest. Encourage buildings of a variety of types and sizes ro supporr a 24-hour communi[)'. Arrracr small uses appropriate to srorefront space. Provide primary building and business entries, addressing the named streets. Recognize varied scale of historic building patterns on named streets. Figure 20: Designated Pedestrian Streets 19

PAGE 26

Principle 7 Historic Buildings Supporr rehabilitation and reuse of remam10g hisroric buildings. Designate eligible buildings w provide protection from demolition and incentives for rehabilitation and reuse. Utilize remaining historic buildings to create architectural identity for adjacent new development. Consider using historic Character of streets to establish a new identity; for example, 14rh Street was once a tree-lined residential street, and Curris was a brighdy-lir theatre district. Denver Landmarks (Designated) Larimer Square Hiswric District Annex II, 414 14th Street Auditorium Theatre, 920 14th Street Tramway Building, 1000 14th Street Insurance Exchange Building, 910 15th Street Denver Dry Building, 700 I 6th Street Neusreter Building, 720 I 6th Street Odd Fellows Hall, 1543 Champa Curry-Chucovich House, 1439 Courr Denver Athletic Club, 1325 Glenarm Denver Press Club, 1330 Glenarm Hover & Co. Building, 1348 Lawrence Denver Fire Station #1, 1326 Tremont Figure 21: Historic Buildings Historic Buildings (Eligible for Designation) Telephone Building, 931 14th Street Lewis & Sons, 800 16th Street Symes Building, 820 16th Street University Building, 910 16th Street Colonial Hotel, 1506 California McClintock Building, 1245 Champa 20 Police & Jail Building, 1245 Champa Davis & Shaw, 1434 Champa Annex I, 1445 Cleveland Place Bauer Building, 1512 Curris Denver Motor Hotel, 1420 Stout Rio Grande Building, 153 I Stout Ady House, 1332 Tremont Emily Griffith School, 1250 Welton Steel Building, 1555 Welton

PAGE 27

Principle 8 Vehicular Transportation Accommodate vehicular transportation (auto, bus, truck/service and light rail). Locate curb curs to facilitate transit stop function for riders and vehicles. Provide transit access to all locations of downtown-without one street or area having the bulk of benefits and burdens. Take advantage of the Light Rail service going through the Colorado Convention Center and its close proximity co PLEX. Light Rail can help convention goers get our and about Light Rail service stops at rhe periphery should coordinate with service such as cross-rown buses. Shurrles and circulators may be provided, for example ro peripheral parking. Transit facilities should reflect good streerscape design and site planning, with high levels of amenity and maintenance. Figure 22: Vehirolar Transportation 21

PAGE 28

Principle 9 Street Grid Respect the scale and mobility provided by tbe existing street grid. Mainrain vistas along streets roward mountains. Discourage closing of any street without thorough analysis of the costs and benefits. Figure 23: Street Grid 22

PAGE 29

Principle 10 Parking and Mobility Address Downtown parking concerns. Conduct a mobility study for the Central Denver area (Downtown, Lower Downtown, Golden Triangle, Arapahoe Triangle and Cenrra1 Plarre Valley) that includes parking resources and connections to employment and entertainment destinations, pedestrian and bicycle connections, and convenient use of rransir, as well as vehicular access inro, out of, and through the area. Consider all parking resources as having rhe potential to be shared by rwo or more uses. Manage available parking and locate new parking to meet nearby demands. No one district of Downtown should be a parking reservoir for the rest of Downtown. Create transit links between Downtown and complementary destinations such as DIA, Cherry Creek and Denver Tech Center. Locate parking garages mid-block along named streets. Incorporate space for retail at the ground floor of all parking garages. Provide consistent sign age for public parking. Figure 24: Parking and Mobility 23

PAGE 30

24 APPENDIX--URBAN DESIGN ALTERNATIVES The alternative sketch concepts on the following pages for the Silver Triangle were developed during an On-site Workshop held at RNL's offices, with the Mid-Dowmown Planning Commitree. Each of rhese illustrates themes or ideas. Some of these are similar in rheir approach, but represent different applic:uions w the Silver Triangle. These were presented to the Committee at rhe On-site Workshop. The best "big ideas" were selected from the alternatives and incorporated into the principles described earlier.

PAGE 31

.. '-., ; .. AINlOWN VI.J.A.6-E Figure 25: In-town Vilhge :;:j .i '=r -, ./, Figure 26: Mixed Use eJG.iOEfiS INFILL Re51D&ITII\L S,..,U !4ALf BIG IDS'\S 20;e r:1' CE./{1EFi-sl:4e 25 Altemative A '1n-town Village" The ideas in this alrernarive are the idea of inflll residenrial development strongly reinforcing the concept of a Downrown residential neighborhood in rhe Silver Triangle. Many opportunities exist berween 14th and 16th Streets for new residential development, possibly mixed with commercial, retail and office. Toward the Civic Center, this concept envisions a small scale residential neighborhood on both sides of 14rh Street, consisting of smaller developments that add up to an in-town viHage. This alternative also envisions an "arr park" arong Colfax Avenue, where the triangles created by rhe street intersections at Colfax are -developed as sculpture gardens. The Speer Boulevard edge of rhe Convention Center expansion is cut back at Champa and Stout Streets ro create a more continuous public open space along Speer. Altemative B "Mixed Use This concept focuses around four different development districts: A--Mid-town residential district similar to Alternative A; B-Emenainment zone, linking Pavilions with the Convention Center; C-Museum/Civic zone, which is fi-lls our the remaining sites of the Civic Center with public uses; D-a small scale residential neighborl10od similar ro Alternative A; and E-a 14th Street streetscape, which centers on a central park and open space across 14th from the expanded Convention Center. This alternative also proposes cut-ting back the Conventi-on Center expansion from Speer Boulevard, keeping a significant open space on that side. The Art Park along Colfax is also a parr of this alternative.

PAGE 32

... .. .. ::=. .,;;.::; ,.: '"'"""" --Figure 27: Hotel-Residential Figure 28: Arc Park BIG 106'15 fi!CIJ5 ..... STREET f\F
PAGE 33

' E Figure 29: Champa! 13th Street Connectiom ) Figure 30: Galleria Extensions 816 !D""t::f\5 : IY ST. "1'0 CCC. oPEH IN FRONT or= 27 Altemative E "Champal13th Street Connections" This alrernative is similar r-o Alternative F in the suggestion of an extension of rhe Galleria along 13th Avenue through rhe Convention Center and beyond, inro the proposed "Tremont Square" residential neighborhood, which is similar to the some of d1e other alternatives. Retail and residential space wrap the Convention Center expansion along Champa Street, where it fronts on rhe light rail system, with a station at 13th. A pedestrian plazaand open space is developed along 14th Street, with hotels across 14th from the Convention Center. Alternative F "Galleria Extension" The major idea in this alrerna.rive is the extension of the Galleria walkway along the 13rh Sneer rightof-way. This extension has a major focal point on Champa Street, where ir crosses the lighr rail system. Mixed uses front onm Champa Street, wrapping rhe Convention Center on rhar side. A Speer Green is envisioned along Speer Boulevard, a signiflcanr open space that creates a gateway inro Downrown. A Formal semi-circular green sp.ans rhree blocks on rhe 14th Street side of the Convention Center, providing both an open space amenity to the Convenrion Center, and a pleasant conneoion to l-6rh SrreeL A lov.er densif)' residential area called "Tremonr Square" is proposed between rhe Convention Center and Cou rr Streer.

PAGE 34

\ ..> I .. Figure 31: Denver Place BIG -No t:>