Citation
Golden Triangle neighborhood plan, 1998

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Title:
Golden Triangle neighborhood plan, 1998
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:

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Subjects / Keywords:
Neighborhood plans
Community planning
City planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Golden Triangle

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Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
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CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
MISSION STATEMENT 3
INTRODUCTION 4
Purpose of the Plan ......................4
Plan Components...........................4
Use of the Plan...........................5
Previous Plans ...........................5
EXISTING CONDITIONS 7
TIIE VISION 19
GOALS & PRINCIPLES 21
FRAMEWORK PLAN 23
SlIB-AREA PIANS 43
Lincoln- Broadway- Sub-area..............45
Civic Center Sub-area ...................61
Colfax Overlap...........................69
Speer Sub-area ..........................70
Aeoma Sub-area ..........................76
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 82
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 92
2


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
MISSION STATEMENT
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood will become an urban village:
) a mixed-use neighborhood with diverse uses and users
) a walkable community with lively public spaces
) an identifiable neighborhood with a strong sense of place
) a unique neighborhood in which to live, work and play
3


INTRODUCTION
Golden Triangle 1936
INTRODUCTION
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan represents the joint effort of the Golden Triangle
Neighborhood Association, the Denver Civic Center Cultural Complex and the City.
Purpose of the Plan
To establish long range goals and objectives for the development of the neighborhood
into an urban village, with a unique character.
To provide a framework and establish implementation strategies which will direct the
neighborhood towards its vision as a community where people live, work, play, and
celebrate Denvers cultural heritage.
Plan Components
Vision
The vision describes the Golden Triangle in the future, as an end result, with current
issues resolved, goals met and desires fulfilled.
Framework plan
The framework plan identifies improvements that are necessary to fulfill objectives of
the neighborhood. The framework plan presents the issues which are relevant to the
entire neighborhood and recommendations that tie the neighborhood together.
Sub-area plans
The plan establishes four sub-areas which have relatively distinct characteristics. It
acknowledges that the boundaries between the sub-areas are not sacrosanct and that
some characteristics overlap sub-area boundaries.The sub-area plans present issues and
recommendations which are supplemental to those presented in the framework plan.
Goals & Principles
Principles are the concepts that frame the plan recommendations to achieve the goals
of the neighborhood.


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Use of the Plan
The plan presents the best thinking of the city and the neighborhood and provides a
city-approved guide to the acceptable future development of the neighborhood. It is
intended for use by the Planning and Development Office, the Denver Planning Board,
the Mayor, City Council, other governmental agencies, residents, property owners,
business people and private organizations concerned with planning, development and
neighborhood improvement.The plan is neither an official zone map, nor does it
create or deny any rights. Zone changes that may be proposed as part of any
development must be initiated under a separate procedure established under the
Revised Municipal Code.
The plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban design, circulation and
services that contribute to the economic, social, and physical health, safety and welfare
of the people who live and work in the neighborhood.The neighborhood plan
addresses issues and opportunities at a scale that is more refined and more responsive
to specific needs than the Citys Comprehensive Plan.The neighborhood plan serves
as a component of that document.
Previous plans
This plan represents the urban design vision for the emerging Golden Triangle
Neighborhood. It updates and incorporates recommendations of earlier plans, which
are many, because of the proximity of the neighborhood to and impact on downtown.
Previously adopted planning documents that are relevant to the Golden Triangle
Neighborhood are:
) The Civic Center Area: Analysis & Development Policies, Denver Planning Office,
1978.
) The DowntownArea Plan,The Denver Partnership, Inc. and the Denver Planning
Office, 1986.
) The Comprehensive Plan, City and County of Denver, 1989.
) The Civic Center Cultural Complex Plan: Final Synthesis,Venturi, Scott, Brown
and Associates, March 31,1992.
5


INTRODUCTION
) The Capital Hill Cheesman Park Neighborhood Plan, Planning and Community
Development Office, City and County of Denver, June 1993.
) The 1996 Downtown Denver Agenda, Planning and Community Development
Office, City and County of Denver, 1996.
These plans have been reviewed and relevant material has been incorporated in the
development of this plan. This and all other neighborhood plans supplement the Citys
Comprehensive Plan.The Comprehensive Plan presents a citywide perspective, while
each neighborhood plan provides more specific guidance both for the allocation of
City resources and for the location and design of private development.


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Golden Triangle and adjacent neighborhoods.
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Location
No other area in the City is as strategically located to so many jobs and cultural and
civic institutions.The Golden Triangle neighborhood lies in the heart of the City. It
encompasses Civic Center Park, the State Capitol, state and local government offices,
the Denver Art Museum, the Denver Central Public Library and the Colorado
Historical Society. It lies south of the downtown core and central business district,
north of Denver Health Medical Center and Baker Neighborhood, west of Capitol
Hill and Cheesman Park residential areas, and east of Lincoln Park Neighborhood.
The Cherry Creek North retail district and the Cherry Creek Shopping Center are
easily accessible within minutes of the neighborhood and the Denver Country Club
Historic District with its luxury housing is just to the southeast.
The Golden Triangle is bounded by the major arteries of Lincoln-Broadway, Colfax
Avenue and Speer Boulevard, which not only carry large volumes of traffic around the
neighborhood, but help clearly define its boundaries.
Western Legacy
The Golden Triangle contains the legacy of Denvers pride and western history. Its
streets bear the names of Indian tribes and Mayor Speer, the namesake of Speer
Boulevard, was the founder of Denvers City Beautiful movement.The government
and cultural buildings surrounding the Civic Center are a microcosm of Denvers
history. Within the boundaries are samples of public and private architecture from
many eras.
Transition
The Golden Triangle has been in a state of transition for 40 years. It has been viewed
as the golden opportunity, blessed with an ideal location, economic base and
numerous public and natural amenities.To date its potential has been largely
underdeveloped. Its destiny in the past has been dependent on the will of others -
the City government, the Convention Center and land speculators. Its roads have
provided access to Downtown. Its uses dedicated to the automobile as a parking


EXISTING CONDITIONS
reservoir for Civic Center employees and visitors and automotive maintenance
facilities.There has been little or no sense of community.
Opportunities
Notwithstanding its location, the Golden Triangle is largely underdeveloped. With over
33% of the land vacant or in surface parking lots, and a large area significantly
underutilized, the Golden Triangle presents an opportunity to build a new community
and to create a strategically located urban village.
New Beginnings
1994 marked the beginning of a new era.The cultural institutions, the Denver Art
Museum, the Denver Central Library, and the Colorado Historical Society joined
forces to form an innovative partnership: the Civic Center Cultural Complex. This
was a milestone in public agency cooperation. A $60 million investment was made in
the construction of the new Central library and the renovations to the art museum.
This presence, and its influence on the Golden Triangle Neighborhood, cannot be
underestimated.
Through a private-public collaboration, new levels of creativity, opportunity and quality
of life can be realized.The Cultural Complex as the foremost education center and
resource of the West and as the world wide catalyst for associated activities, is the
keystone of the village.
Population
The Golden Triangle is comprised of census tract #20 and parts of tracts #27.01 and
#27.02.The 1990 resident population was 256. In 1995, the population rose to 703,
an increase of 175%.
Employment
The neighborhood supplies 12,012 jobs. Government employees make up the
majority of the labor force with 46% of the total number of jobs. Manufacturing
represents 25% of the work force. Employees in the service industry represent 13%
of the work force. Financial, insurance and real estate companies comprise 7% of the
8


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
POPULATION
Population increase in the Golden
Triangle from 1990 to 1995.
work force. Retail trade makes up 3% of the work force.Transportation,
communication and public utilities represent 3% of the labor force.
Land Use
The character of the Golden Triangle Neighborhood provides an interesting
juxtaposition of land uses. While automotive garages and surface parking lots are
located in the neighborhood, it also enjoys the presence of cultural, recreational,
commercial and residential entities.
Public, Institutional and Cultural Facilities
Contributing to the character of the neighborhood are the many public and cultural
facilities in the area.The foundation on which the neighborhood builds its communal
identity is established through the daily tasks of the facilities.The City and County
Building, the Police Building, the Permit Center and the Denver Health Medical Center,
augment the employment base in the neighborhood and affect the nature of
surrounding businesses. Likewise, the influence of great political and cultural
institutions, such as the Colorado State Capitol, the Denver Mint, the Denver Public
Library, the Denver Art Museum, the Evans Byers House, and the Colorado Historical
Society, creates an environment that attracts employees, residents and tourists alike.
The Acoma City Center at 11th and Acoma is a neighborhood center where artists
studios and live theater are located.The Center acts as the community gathering space,
providing both a physical and emotional center for the neighborhood.
P S. 1, and urban learning center and charter school, is currently located at 9th Avenue
and Bannock, but will relocate to the Rocky Mountain Banknote Building at 11th
Avenue and Speer in 1998. Its presence enhances the idea of a fully functioning Urban
Village by bringing a diversity of activities and ages to the neighborhood, and by its
ability to serve the resident population. It will encourage families to live in the
neighborhood and provide an active, vibrant life during the day and night, through its
involvement with the community.


EXISTING CONDITIONS
Natural Features, Parks and Open Space
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood enjoys the presence of parks and open space,
which provide opportunities for both active recreation and passive enjoyment. Cherry
Creek provides both water, green space, and a bike and walking path which connects
the neighborhood to the region through an extensive path system.The Speer
Boulevard parkway and triangle parks contribute to this green edge on the western
boundary, as do the Sunken Gardens and the pocket park at 7th and Speer.
Civic Center Park is the grand civic space that calls the Golden Triangle home. It is a
monumental space which houses elements of our cultural heritage, architectural
history and beautiful flower beds, and can be enjoyed in a quiet stroll. It is also the
venue for popular regional events, such as the Taste of Colorado, drawing thousands of
people state-wide.
The Arc is the newly created open space, an urban forecourt on 13th Avenue which
gives relief to the Denver Art Museum, the Colorado Historical Society, and the Denver
Public Library.The Arc also visually reduces the impact of the surface parking lot that
it borders. A sculpture plaza between the Denver Art Museum and the Denver Public
Library, the Acoma Plaza, draws visitors to the area, increasing the cultural connections
to the neighborhood.
Commercial: Retail
The Golden Triangle enjoys a growing community of diverse retail businesses.The
majority of the retail businesses are located long the Lincoln-Broadway corridor.
Restaurants, dance studios, television studios, sporting goods stores, home furnishing
stores, design studios, and art galleries, among other businesses, dot the streets of the
neighborhood. Long-time, local businesses, such as Rickenbaugh Cadillac/Volvo, Gart
Sports and Howard Lorton Galleries, sit next to new and restored buildings inhabited
by businesses that are new to the area, such as The Church, Ilios and Pony Expresso.
10


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
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Existing Land Use








Residential / Hotel
Office
Retail / Restaurant
Retail / Services
Communication / Utilities
Parking
Institutional
Vacant
Open Space, Parks
Light Industrial / Auto Uses
Retail / Residential
11


Total number of residential units in
the Golden Triangle.
EXISTING CONDITIONS
Commercial: Office
Both public and private entities utilize office space in the Golden Triangle. Branches of
the federal, state, and local government work along side large corporations, like Blue
Cross-Blue Shield, Security Life, the Rocky Mountain News and Rocky Mountain
Orthodontics, and small, locally owned businesses. Start-up businesses establish
themselves in small, incubator offices within the neighborhood, profiting from the
reasonable rents offered by the small space, and the proximity to downtown. Other
professionals, such as lawyers, locate their businesses in the area to take advantage of
close proximity to the Courts.
Since the neighborhood is adjacent to downtown, the office workers carry on their
daily tasks with easy access to the central business district. The high volume of
commuters affects the neighborhood by maintaining the demand for surface parking.
Commercial: Light Industrial/ Auto Related Uses
Light industrial and auto related businesses have had a long presence in the
neighborhood. Auto repair shops, car dealerships and manufacturing plants have
observed the evolution of the neighborhood and continue to affect its composition.
The existing auto-related and light industrial facilities act as an asset to the
neighborhood, providing necessary services in close proximity to residential and
employment centers. However, the addition of new facilities has been discouraged
through the change of zoning from B-8 to B-8-G.Auto related uses were made
conditional uses, allowed only through neighborhood notification and a public
process.
Utilities and Communications
Other businesses contributing to the diversity of the Golden Triangle include utility
and communication related uses.The training facility and offices of the Public Service
Company of Colorado are located within the neighborhood, as are three major
television stations: Channels 4,6 and 7. Private enterprises related to communication
technology can be found in the area as well.
12


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Residential
The number of residential units fell from 1,500 in I960 to 250 in 1990. Since then, the
development of lofts and town homes has accelerated and the additional number of
units completed or under construction is 239. In 1995, the Forum Building was
developed into a single room occupancy residence, adding 100 residential units.The
total number of units is currently 589. Of the units built before 1940, the majority are
rental properties.
Social Services
The Golden Triangle is home to a few social service agencies. Shalom Denver trains
and employs disabled adults.The Job Service Center finds employment opportunities
for needy individuals.The Forum Building is a multi-unit dwelling providing housing
for previously homeless adults. Low cost hotels, including the 11th Avenue Broadway
Hotel and the Coolidge Hotel, accept social service housing vouchers. David Clifton
Ministries serves meals to poor and homeless individuals. Denver Cares, an alcohol
rehabilitation center, and Western Clinical Health Services, a methadone clinic, serve
the needs of substance abusers.
Parking
Numerous surface parking lots exist in the neighborhood.Although parking is needed
in the area, the lots are void of character and deteriorate the pedestrian experience.
They do, however, provide great opportunities for development.
Zoning
The Golden Triangle was zoned B-8 until 1994 when its zoning was modified to B-8-G, a
zoning category created for the Golden Triangle and unique to the area. Certain
important changes in the zoning were made to enable the area to become a mixed use
neighborhood with a strong residential component and to encourage pedestrian
friendly design. Certain uses were eliminated as uses by right. These include automobile
uses, adult uses, package liquor stores, drive through uses and surface parking lots.These
uses were made conditional uses, subject to a neighborhood notification process, public
hearing and review by planning and zoning representatives.
13


EXISTING CONDITIONS
Floor Area Premiums
The desired character of the neighborhood is reflected in the density premiums
allowed by the new zoning. The basic density allowed, four times the lot area, may be
increased up to six times if certain uses are included. Premiums are given for providing
housing, childcare, residential support and cultural facilities located on the ground
floor of structures, and public art. A premium is also given for the rehabilitation of a
building designated for preservation.
Design Review
The new zoning establishes design guidelines and review for the design of street-
facing building facades.To promote pedestrian activity and a walkable environment,
design guidelines address human scale and detail of facade design, spatial definition of
the street space, the civic character of the Civic Center and the parkway character of
Speer Boulevard. Design Review is performed by members of the Planning Office and
the Planning Board Chair.
Building Height Controls
The B-8-G zone district sets the maximum height of structures at 175 feet as measured
from the elevation of Broadway. Upon the request of an applicant, a review committee
may increase heights up to 25 feet in order to compensate for unusual site conditions.
Additional height controls include the Civic Center Mountain View Preservation
Ordinance and the Civic Center Height Control Ordinance governing building heights
in the Civic Center area. The controls are established to preserve the integrity of the
Civic Center, to protect the openness of its unique public space and to preserve the
view of the mountains.
The Cheesman Park Botanic Gardens View Preservation Ordinance was established to
preserve panoramic views from the Botanic Gardens, through Cheesman Park west to
Broadway. Heights established by view preservation ordinances supersede those
established by the B-8-G zone district.
14


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
15


EXISTING CONDITIONS
Civic Center Landmark District
In addition to being in the B-8-G zone district, Civic Center is a Historic Landmark
District, with its own set of design guidelines.Any change to an existing structure or
construction of new structures must comply with the Civic Center Design Guidelines
and be reviewed by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.
Urban Form
The Golden Triangle is unique in that its boundaries are clearly defined by major
arterials while physical form within is loosely defined. With the presence of vacant
land in surface parking lots and under-developed property, there is great potential for
development and change. In addition there are several buildings of varying age and
architectural style which are strong assets of the neighborhood, contribute to its
unique character, and should be cherished and preserved. Many exist in and around
Civic Center on the northern edge, some along Broadway and Lincoln (such as Garts
Sports and the Jonas Building), along Speer (such as the Rocky Mountain Banknote
building) and others interspersed within the neighborhood (such as the Evans School
and the Acoma City Center).Together these physical characteristics provide great
opportunities to create an identity and a unique character within.
Vehicular Circulation
The Golden Triangle is influenced by the presence of major streets within its
boundaries. Four major arterials form its edges: Speer Boulevard, Colfax Avenue and the
Broadway/Lincoln one-way couplet. Four arterials; 13th/l4th and 6th/8th Avenues form
one-way couplets for east-west travel. Cherokee provides one-way access from the
south into downtown and Delaware one-way access from downtown. 11th Avenue is
the one continuous two-way street that connects the Lincoln Park neighborhood to
Capitol Hill.These high volume streets are connected by low volume interior streets
and form a strong framework around which the neighborhood will develop.
Civic Center landmark District Bnundary.
16


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Transit
The Civic Center RTD station at Broadway and Colfax is a major transit station where
regional buses connect with local buses and the 16th Street Mall Shuttle.
Pedestrian Circulation & Environment
High volume streets within and bordering the neighborhood are difficult to cross and
disrupt pedestrian circulation. Frequent curb cuts which bring cars across the
pedestrian space interrupt the continuity of the walking experience.
Because of the presence of high volume streets within and bordering the
neighborhood, pedestrian circulation is disrupted. Connections across these streets are
tenuous. Sidewalks are discontinuous, interrupted by frequent curb cuts.Though a
growing number of businesses and property owners maintain trees lawns throughout
the neighborhood, streetscaping is spotty; few trees or landscaped areas exist to shade
and beautify the sidewalks. Many buildings lack public ground floor uses to entice
pedestrians along the streets.
There are some exceptions, including the Speer/Broadway corner at Rickenbaugh
Cadillac/Volvo, Metro Lofts and Public Service Company on Acoma, the Civic Center
Parking lots at Acoma and 13th Avenue and the Acoma Streetscape project from
12th Avenue to 11th (and in phase 2 to 10th), one of the Citys Capitol
Improvement Projects.
Market Conditions
The Golden Triangle is currently experiencing a period of growth.Three new
residential projects are complete: Cadillac Lofts, Metropolitan Lofts and Balustrade.Two
are under construction: Grand Cherokee and Century Lofts. Several others are
proposed, including Trieste, Caravele, and Phase 2 of Bannock Center.
While some projects are strictly residential, others, like the Grand Cherokee Lofts,
are mixed-use projects, incorporating retail businesses into the ground floor of the
project. Bannock Center, a mixed-use project that will create residential, office and
retail space, has realized its first step:The Metropolitan Lofts at 9th and Acoma.The
current plan calls for an additional 750,000 square feet of office, 300,000 square
17


EXISTING CONDITIONS
feet of residential and 100,000 square feet of retail. Once the project is completed,
the neighborhood will enjoy an increase in residential population and the
employment base.
In addition to creating new structures, business owners and developers are renovating
old buildings, simultaneously preserving the architectural character and revitalizing the
neighborhood.The Cadillac Lofts is a renovation of an old Cadillac dealership.
Neosource, a neon lighting business, is a restored auto garage. Humphries Poli
Architects has renovated an auto-related business on Speer to house their offices, and
Pony Expresso has transformed a garage to a gourmet dessert and coffee spot.
The Golden Triangle Arts District, comprised of art galleries within the neighborhood,
acts as a support mechanism for the arts related retail businesses within the
neighborhood. The district hosts monthly First Friday Art Walks to call attention to the
galleries and to promote the neighborhood as an arts and cultural center.
In an effort to improve the neighborhood, property owners and business people are
working to create a Business Improvement District (BID). Owners of real property
would pay an assessment based on square foot of land in exchange for improved
maintenance, streetscape improvements, enhanced security, and marketing of the
neighborhood. The BID was approved by City Council in October 1997 and a board
was appointed. However the vote to approve the assessment did not pass, so there are
currently no funds to run the BID. The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Associations
Resource Committee will continue to work on the effort to obtain the funding
approval at a future election.
18


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
THE VISION
Development has been strong and vacant lots have disappeared. In their place are
uniquely designed mixed use projects which have brought residents and life to the
neighborhood.
Streets are lively with restaurants, bookstores, galleries and coffee spots enlivening the
ground floors.Above, the balconies hint at a robust housing market.
Residents and workers in the area stroll down treelined sidewalks, pausing at
intersections to admire the latest art installation.
Businesses that support the arts and literature of the American West have sprung up
south of the library, making the area the premier resource for Western culture.
Pedestrian plazas connect Civic Center Park to downtown and Acoma Center and
bring people in from all directions: the Cultural Complex is a key part of city life.
Broadway continues to be the grand commercial boulevard, a regional center with
diverse shopping opportunities, and a lively night presence.There are lots of people
walking down the well lit promenade, to take in some music or grab a late bite.
Broadway is lined with upper level office space that provides employment
opportunities for residents in the Golden Triangle and surrounding neighborhoods.
Destination retail businesses such as grocery, furniture and sports stores have located
in the GoldenTriangle.These stores serve the needs of the neighborhood as well as
the thousands of commuters who pass them everyday as they travel home from their
downtown jobs.
Speer is lush and colorful with enhanced green triangle parks, grand new buildings
and signature art work announcing the neighborhood.
The Golden Triangle will afford a high quality of life, on an intimate scale, for people
who reside, work, shop and play in this urban environment. Developing such a
community requires addressing the body, mind and soul of the neighborhood.
19


THE VISION
The ultimate test of any
plan or project is
whether it not only adds
a humanizing dimension
to the lives of
individuals, but improves
what the Greek called the
public happiness by
making the common
estate and the common
experience richer and
more meaningful for all.
The body is more easily defined. It deals with physical qualities, identifiable
boundaries, street layouts, land use, and the like.
The mind is represented by the intensity, vigor, and freedom of artistic and
intellectual expression.
The soul is the force that ties together the inhabitants with an emotional attachment
or pride in their place.
Including the mind and soul requires more than planning. Physical improvements or
promotion of cultural and civic values alone are insufficient. It involves a continuous
flexible and dynamic design process to keep the formation of the village on an up-to-
date level with the changing conditions.
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood is an old neighborhood which is beginning to
assert a strong community identity.The main task is to create an environment to
achieve human communications between its residents and the place to facilitate a
large variety of functions.
In building the community the intent is to embrace its many existing assets and
maximize their value.Through private and public collaboration, new levels of
creativity, opportunity and quality of life can be realized.
Stuart Udall
20


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Encourage a pedestrian-oriented environment
through ground floor public uses, generous
sidewalks, enhanced streetscaping and building
design with human-scale and detail.
GOALS & PRINCIPLES
GOAL ONE:
Create an Urban Village A Livable neighborhood
Principle: Encourage a mix of land uses, which includes housing, office, commercial,
destination and neighborhood-serving retail.
Principle: Provide diversity of housing stock to allow affordable products and a
diverse resident population.
Principle: Create an economically viable neighborhood by encouraging a mix of uses
to satisfy both the landowners investment needs and the needs of the public, the
office workers and the residents.
Principle: Promote employment and business opportunities for members of the
community by supporting the existing businesses and civic institutions within the
Golden Triangle.
Principle: Create a walkable neighborhood by providing active pedestrian-oriented
public uses on the ground floors of mixed-use projects, generous sidewalks, enhanced
streetscaping, and building design with human scale and detail.
GOAL TWO:
Build a Community
Principle: Create opportunities for residents to participate and be involved in the
community: In community events and community decisions.
Principle: Create opportunities for informal interaction and gathering through the
provision of public spaces and activity nodes.
21


GOALS & PRINCIPLES
GOAL THREE:
Preserve and build on the cultural and civic character
of the Neighborhood
Principle: Develop partnerships with public and private entities by balancing the
values and the interests of individuals, businesses, cultural institutions and government.
Principle: Encourage the development of uses related to the Civic Center Cultural
Complex and its components; build on the arts, culture and government presence in
the Village.
Principle: Create a unique character for the Golden Triangle through a commitment
to culture and the western legacy.
GOAL FOUR:
Create a Distinct Identity Through the Built
Environment
Principle: Create a sense of place by creating a special aesthetic feeling while in the
Village or moving through it.
Principle: Create a community identity and develop the Village into a distinctive
place through the overall composition of spaces, juxtaposition of buildings, unique
architectural character and details.
Principle: Create a unique identity through the integration of public art and design
elements in the public realm.
GOAL Five:
Preserve and enhance the environment and the natural
assets of the Golden Triangle
Principle: Protect the delicate balance of nature and man by promoting clean air
through the use of fewer automobiles, enhancing and increasing green space,
respecting mountain and city views and providing adequate light and air for all
neighbors.
22


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
FRAMEWORK PLAN
The framework plan looks at the neighborhood in the larger view and provides overall
concepts which will guide its development. It addresses core issues and provides a
core of recommendations for the entire neighborhood on which the sub-area
recommendations can build.
Land use
Issues
) Many buildings have been demolished. Surface parking lots and vacant land
remain.Though this creates development opportunities, it creates gaps in the
urban fabric, disperses activity and dilutes the identity of the neighborhood.
) As parking lots are developed into projects, the stock of needed parking will be
depleted.
) Surface parking as a use does not reinforce or contribute to the character of a
vital walkable urban neighborhood.
) The neighborhood does not want to become a monoculture, a neighborhood
made up solely of high-end condominiums with a homogenous population. It
wants to become a true neighborhood with a mix of uses, and a housing stock
with different kinds of people living there.
) The neighborhood is busy and active during the daytime office hours but
evening activity is limited; streets are dark and there are no eyes on the street.
) Parking requirements for retail have prevented some new projects from
including retail in their mix of uses. This defeats the goal of having active public
ground floor uses and pedestrian activity on the sidewalks.
) Management and containment of social services uses is currently a problem for
the neighborhood.
Recommendations
) Encourage the development of housing.
) Encourage the development of mixed-use projects throughout the
neighborhood.
) Provide neighborhood-serving businesses on the ground floor where possible.
23


FRAMEWORK PLAN
1 I OFFICE/RESIDENTIAL (High Density) RETAIL/COM M ERCIAL (Medium Density) ARTS RELATED MIXED USE (Medium Density)
^3 MIXED USE (Medium Density) INSTITUTIONAL PUBLIC OPEN SPACE
24


GOLDEN TRIANGLE N EIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Encourage restaurant and entertainment uses that contribute to the 24 hour activity of the neighborhood. ) Encourage density that would allow for diversity and affordability of housing stock. ) Eliminate surface parking lots. Develop structured parking to serve the neighborhood. Provide underground parking where feasible. ) Reduce parking requirements in mixed use projects; look at shared parking strategies. ) Clean-up and monitor existing social services in the neighborhood. ) Increase the intensity of commercial uses along Colfax on the northern edge of the neighborhood. ) Encourage the development of cultural, institutional and governmental uses, and uses that support them, on both sides and to the north of 13th Avenue. ) Increase the intensity of retail uses along Broadway. ) Develop office uses along Broadway as stand alone projects or in mixed-use projects with retail at the ground level. ) Develop office uses along the western edge of Lincoln and transition into a mix of office and residential uses along the eastern edge of the neighborhood. ) Encourage the development of higher density office and residential uses along Speer Boulevard on the western edge of the neighborhood. ) Decrease the intensity of commercial uses as one moves away from the edges into the neighborhood. ) Locate arts-related uses along Acoma in mixed-use projects. ) Locate neighborhood businesses at ground level in higher density mixed use development along Bannock.
25


FRAMEWORK PLAN
HIGH DENSITY
Institutional/Culture
(V) Speer Edge
Lincoln Edge


TRANSITION DENSITY
MEDIUM DENSITY
26


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Open Space
Issues
) Open space on the perimeter of the neighborhood provides places for people
to gather and provides a green amenity. However, there is no community open
space internal to the neighborhood.
) If families are going to be encouraged to live in the neighborhood, playgrounds
for their children must be provided.
) Open space on the edges, Cherry Creek bike path and Civic Center Park, is
difficult to get to.
) Civic Center Park is the neighborhood park that is used more for regional events
and less for localized activities.
Recommendations
) Provide community open space within the neighborhood; create informal
gathering places.
) Provide pocket parks.
) Provide a public playground.
) Work with St.Johns day care center and the Montessori School on a cooperative
plan for residents and their families to use their playgrounds after school hours.
) Provide linked open spaces on Acoma Street, from Civic Center south to 9th
Avenue to create a green spine in the center of the neighborhood.
) Reinforce the green edge along Cherry Creek and Speer Boulevard; enhance the
green triangle parks and their connection to the creek bed.
) Improve the use and presence of Civic Center Park by enhancing the
connections from the Golden Triangle and downtown.
) Encourage the use of Civic Center Park as a neighborhood park, programming it
with free daytime and evening events that attract surrounding residents, as well
as allowing it to be enjoyed in a passive way.
) Improve access to Sunken Gardens.
) Continue the Flowering of the Triangle, through the planting of flowers by the
residents, business and property owners.
27


FRAMEWORK PLAN
m: views
GATEWAYS
NODES
28


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Urban Form
Recommendations
) Encourage the preservation of buildings that contribute to the architectural
character of the neighborhood. Such buildings include:
I All buildings in the Civic Center Historic Landmark District.
I St. Marks Church
I Colorado Ballet
I Carts Sports
I The Jonas Building
| The Burke Hotel
| Rocky Mountain Bank Note Building
| The Evans School
| The Acoma City Center
I Victorian Houses on 13th Avenue and Delaware (Bail Bonds)
I Carpenter Gothic Houses at 12th and Delaware
I The Sandstone Building at 9th and Acoma
) Taller structures are encouraged in the Civic-Center subarea between Colfax and
13thAvenue. Heights must meet the existing view preservation ordinances.
) Taller structures are encouraged on Speer to reinforce the edge of the village.
) Taller structures are encouraged along Lincoln/Broadway to define the eastern
edge of the village, and to transition into the mid-rise structures on Sherman.
) Step buildings down from the edges toward the center of the village.
) Maintain the grid pattern of streets and alleys to reinforce the block pattern and
the existing urban structure.
29


FRAMEWORK PLAN
Views
Recommendations
) Maximize the opportunity for views to the west and back to the city center
along the edges.
) Maintain views within the village through the edges to the mountains to the
west and to the city to the north and east.
) Maintain the axial views within Civic Center Park.
) Maintain and frame the axial view from the south end of Acoma north to Acoma
Plaza into Civic Center, and from the north end of Acoma south to 8th Avenue.
Gateways
The Golden Triangle is a neighborhood that is clearly defined by its strong edges. As
development occurs, a sense of entry into the neighborhood should be clarified,
through the introduction of gateways. Gateways define a threshold one crosses as one
enters the neighborhood.They announce the neighborhood and can take many forms:
gateway monuments, public art, arches, landscaping, or architectural follies. In addition,
building form and design can take on special character at gateways to designate ones
arrival into the neighborhood.
Recommendations
) Strengthen the character of gateways into the neighborhood.
Nodes
Nodes are places in the neighborhood where people will gather and where activity is
focused and concentrated, be it a commercial area or a street corner or pocket park.
Currently Civic Center and the cultural institutions are nodes in the neighborhood. But
with development of the neighborhood, other nodes are envisioned in prime
locations.
Recommendations
) Strengthen the character of the node at 11th and Acoma Street.
) Strengthen the character of the node at Speer and 11th Avenue.
30


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Vehicular Circulation
Street Characteristics
Streets are classified by the number of cars that they carry on a daily basis and the
connections that they provide.
Arterials provide the most continuity, cross jurisdictions, and carry from 15000 -75000
cars per day. Several pairs of arterial streets in the Golden Triangle are one-way
couplets carrying traffic to, through and around the neighborhood: Broadway and
Lincoln Street, Speer Boulevard northbound and southbound, 13th and 14th Avenues,
and 6th and 8th Avenues. Colfax Avenue, which forms the northern boundary of the
neighborhood's also classified as an arterial carrying two-way traffic.
Collector Streets have limited continuity of about a mile in length.These streets collect
and distribute traffic to arterials, and carry up to 15000 cars a day. Bannock, Cherokee,
and Delaware Streets and 12th and 11th Avenues are classified as collectors.
Local Streets have little continuity and carry up to 1000 cars a day. Acoma, Elati, Fox,
Galapago and Inca Streets and 7th, 9th and 10th Avenues are the local streets of the
neighborhood.
Issues
) There is a perception that traffic enters the neighborhood and travels through
the neighborhood at high speed.This does not support the goal of a walkable
community.
) Internal streets are used as access to downtown.
) Bottlenecks occur at Colfax and Speer, Colfax and 15th Street and 11th and
Speer.
Recommendations
) Continue to balance the need to move cars with the ability of pedestrians to
walk comfortably and safely through the neighborhood.
) Conduct a complete traffic and speed study of the neighborhood.
) Reinforce a layered vehicular framework and hierarchy of streets; evaluate streets
in terms of what is good for the neighborhood and the pedestrian, not just for
what is good for cars.
31


FRAMEWORK PLAN
32


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Continue to focus regional vehicular traffic on the arterial edges, Colfax,
Broadway/Lincoln and Speer Boulevard; and the cross town connectors; 14th ,
13th, 8th and 6th Avenues.
) Maintain Bannock Street and 11th Avenue as main vehicular circulation spines
which bring traffic through and to the neighborhood.
) Maintain Acoma, Cherokee, Delaware, and 12th, 10th and 9th Avenues as the
internal neighborhood streets which carry local traffic.
) Study the conversion of Delaware and Cherokee from a one-way couplet into
two-way streets.
) Determine how the build-out of the neighborhood will impact its own streets as
well as the rest of the City.
) Introduce traffic calming measures to slow traffic to a more human pace on
Broadway, Colfax at Civic Center, 14th Avenue at Civic Center, Bannock,
Cherokee, and 11th Avenue. Use the following methods:
I Narrow the street.
I Bulb the corners.
) Improve the vehicular function at the following problem intersections:
I Colfax and 15th Street
I Colfax and Speer
| 11th Avenue and Speer
I 10th and Cherokee
33


FRAMEWORK PLAN
Bus Routes
Transit
Issues
) Colfax, Lincoln and Broadway carry major bus routes; links from the bus stops to
the neighborhood are unclear and weak.
) Bus shelters are not well taken care of and are unsafe places.
) Connections to the Civic Center RTD Terminal south to the neighborhood are
weak, unattractive and unsafe.
) The cultural assets and retail opportunities of the neighborhood are not used by
the large number of office and hospital workers at the southern end of the
neighborhood since they do not have quick and easy access to Civic Center and
downtown.
) Proximity to transit is not played up as an asset to living and working in the
neighborhood.
Recommendations
) Encourage the continued development of public transit in order to diminish the
use of the automobile.The impact of the development of Light Rail should be
considered in transportation recommendations.
) Create stronger and more pleasant pedestrian links to bus stops from Capitol
Hill and the Golden Triangle.
) Create safe, well-lit pedestrian connections from the Civic Center RTD terminal
to the cultural institutions and the retail/office corridor along Broadway and
Lincoln.
) Improve appearance and safety of bus shelters.
) Establish an internal public circulator to connect the employees at the southern
end of the Golden Triangle to the cultural institutions, the Broadway/Lincoln
corridor and downtown.
) Bring the cultural trolley into the neighborhood.
) Promote existing public transportation; market the concept of transit-oriented
development. Make RTD a partner with the neighborhood organization.
) Discontinue the staging of buses on Acoma and 12th Avenue.
34


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
VEHICULAR CIRCULATION
RECOMMENDATIONS
/\
N/
I
Convert to Two
Improve Vehicular Function
of Intersection
Slow Traffic
35


FRAMEWORK PLAN
36


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Pedestrian & Bicycle Circulation and Connections
Issues
) Pedestrians are uncomfortable crossing arterials and collectors because of the
speed and volume of cars. Specifically:
I Colfax and 14th Avenue Parkway into Civic Center from downtown and the
neighborhood.
I Speer Boulevard to the Cherry Creek bike path.
I Broadway from Capital Hill.
| 11th Avenue at Acoma.
) Frequent curb cuts which bring cars across the pedestrian space interrupt the
continuity of the walking experience.
) There are several intersections where vehicular and pedestrian conflicts occur:
| Bannock, 14th Street and Colfax
I 15th and Colfax
| 11th Avenue and Speer
) Bicycle routes from Capital Hill through the Golden Triangle are not well
connected to the Cherry Creek bike path.
Recommendations
) Make it easier for pedestrians to cross the street; slow cars down and make
drivers aware of pedestrian crossing zones:
I Shorten pedestrian crossing distances; bulb-out curb lines at intersections.
I Lengthen the pedestrian crossing time at stop lights.
I Study the need for four-way stop signs and pedestrian crossing signals;
provide where needed.
) Strengthen the pedestrian connections from the neighborhood into Civic Center
and to downtown, and from downtown to the cultural institutions and the
Golden Triangle.
I Facilitate the pedestrian crossing of l4thAvenue at Acoma Plaza. Study the
addition of a choker (narrowing) on the south side.
I Facilitate the crossing of 14th Avenue at Bannock into Civic Center; confusion
over vehicular turning movements make this a problem intersection.
37


FRAMEWORK PLAN
38


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I Facilitate the crossing of Colfax from Civic Center Park to downtown at the
Voorhies Memorial. Lengthen the median to provide a safe stopping place.
Create an enhanced landscaped plaza and bulb-out sidewalk at Cleveland and
15th Street to provide a safe, comfortable walk and interesting destination.
| Improve the crossing of Colfax at Broadway and at Colfax and 14th Street.
Study the timing of the lights to allow pedestrians more time to cross.
) Strengthen the connections from the neighborhood across Speer to the Cherry
Creek bike path and the Sunken Gardens Park.
) Strengthen the pedestrian connections to Capitol Hill on the east-west Avenues.
) Create a safer and more pleasant walking environment:
I Provide continuous sidewalks, minimize curb cuts.
I Use alleys for access where possible; widen alleys to 20 to allow for 2 way
traffic.
I Keep on-street parking.
| Improve streetscaping. (see Street Space & Public Realm)
) Strengthen the bicycle connections from bicycle routes on 12th Avenue and
Bannock across Speer to the Cherry Creek bike path.
Street Space & Public Realm
The public right-of way is comprised of the roadway, the sidewalk and amenity zone
and is legally defined by private property lines.This street space is an important
element of the public realm; it is public open space and the way the public
experiences the city and the neighborhood.
The definition and enclosure of this space by buildings is one of the elements that
contribute to the comfort and interest of the experience of walking and driving down
these streets.The character of these buildings, their transparency and detail are factors
that make this experience pleasant.
The streetscape, landscape and design elements in the amenity zone, also helps define
the character of the public realm, and is made up of sidewalks, paving, street trees,
treelawns, lighting and street furniture. When planted with trees and ground cover this
area provides continuous green and contributes to the livability of our city.
39


FRAMEWORK PLAN
40


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Issues
) Surface parking lots create gaps in the streetwall and leave the street space
undefined and uncomfortable for pedestrians.
) Streetscape improvements are intermittent; many blocks lack improvements
altogether.
I Tree lawn areas are paved in asphalt or filled with gravel.
I Street trees are sparse; some are poorly maintained and dying.
I Some sidewalks are in need of repair.
I Some streets are dark at night and not safe to walk along.
) The presence of payphones in the right-of-way attracts illegal activity.
Recommendations
) Spatially define the street spaces by building projects to the property line. Only
new buildings on Speer, 8th Avenue and Colfax should be set back to provide a
wider amenity zone.
) Include public uses (i.e. retail, office, galleries) at the ground floor of projects.
) Build screen walls and provide landscaping at the property line where surface
parking lots occur.
) For street-facing building facades provide human scale through change in plane,
contrast and intricacy in form, color, and materials, as required by the B-8-G
Design Guidelines.
) Encourage innovative signs and graphics that will aid in the creation of a unique
neighborhood.
) Intersections of streets provide special opportunities for corners of buildings. In
redeveloping property at street intersections, encourage special corner
treatment of buildings.
) Create a cohesive, identifiable neighborhood through streetscaping. Provide an
enhanced streetscape, generous sidewalk widths, street trees, treelawns,
landscaping and pedestrian lighting on all streets, (see Streetscape Plan)
) Write street development agreements for new projects that support this goal.
) Continue Flowering of the Triangle by encouraging the planting of flowers in
planters and window boxes.
41


FRAMEWORK PLAN
) Bring existing parking lots up to the minimum landscape standards. Develop a
mechanism to require landscaping on existing lots, such as an amortization
program, or upon sale or transfer of property.
) Eliminate pay phones from the public realm.
) Reinforce the maintenance requirements for existing streetscaping; emphasize
this requirement in new street development agreements.
42


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
43


S U B A R E A S
SUB-AREA INTRODUCTION
Four sub-areas have been identified in the Golden Triangle. Each has distinct
characteristics that sets them apart.They are:
) Lincoln-Broadway sub-area
) Civic Center sub-area
) Acoma sub-area
) Colfax sub-area
) Speer Boulevard sub-area
The following sections provides a detailed vision for the development of each
sub-area.
44


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
GENERAL NOTES
STREETSCAPING: INSTALL
STREETSCAPING THROUGHOUT
ENTIRE SUB-AREA. USE
HARDSCAPE ON BROADWAY AND
STREET TREES WITH
TREELAWNS ON LINCOLN. BURY
ALL UTILITY LINES. ALL
STREETSCAPING NEEDS TO BE
PROPERLY MAINTAINED.
RTD STOPS: UPGRADE ALL RTD
STOPS. DESIGN AND INSTALL
SPECIAL BUS SHELTERS.
MAINTAIN BUS STOPS.
PARKING LOTS: ALL EXISTING
PARKING LOTS SHOULD MEET
LANDSCAPING REQUIREMENTS
INCLUDING SCREEN WALLS
AND STREET TREES.
IMPROVE STREETSCAPE -
INSTALL STREET TREE AND
TREE LAWNS (SEE GENERAL
NOTES ON STREETSCAPING
IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN
FRIENDLINESS OF CHANCERY
OFFICE BUILDING
IMPROVE FACADE OF NEWS 4
GARAGE
RETAIN EXISTING HOUSING
REMOVE BILLBOARDS
REDEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITY
REHABILITATE SHERMAN
TOWER RETAIL BLOCK
CONSOLIDATE CURB CUTS
REDEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITY
GATEWAY OPPORTUNITY -
STRENGTHEN PEDESTRIAN
CONNECTIONS
LANDSCAPE PARKING LOT-
(SEE GENERAL NOTES)
INFILL OPPORTUNITY
REDEVELOP UNDESIRABLE
LAND USES
RESTORE FACADES
INSTALL CORNER ENTRANCE
REDEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITY
IMPROVE BUS SHELTERS
(SEE GENERAL NOTES ON BUS
STOPS)
LINCOLN-BROADWAY SUB-AREA
CREATE GATEWAY ENHANCE
PUBLIC ART IN PARK
- REEVALUATE THE DESIGN OF
PARK SEATING AND PICNIC
TABLES
REDEVELOP 7TH AVENUE AS A
PLAZA LEADING TO
ZECKENDORF PARK.
ADD STREET TREES IN PUBLIC
RIGHT-OF-WAY. PUBLIC ART
OPPORTUNITY AT BASE OF
BLUE CROSS BLANK WALL ON
8TH AVENUE AND PARKING
STRUCTURE VENTILATION
SHAFTS ARE POSSIBLE SITES
45


UNCOLN-BROADWAY SUB-AREA
The Lincoln-Broadway sub-area has many elements nf a traditinnal Main
Street. Fur many years, it has functinned as nne nf the primary
cnmmercial corridors in Denver.
LINCOLN-BROADWAY
SOB-AREA PLAN
Existing Conditions
The Lincoln-Broadway sub-area extends from the Lincoln-Sherman alley on the east
side to the Acoma-Broadway alley on the west side, bounded by Speer Boulevard on
the south and Colfax Boulevard on the north. Broadway and Lincoln have had a major
impact on the development of the area as the main arterials which carry the majority
of the traffic into and out of the Central Business District (CBD) each day. In addition,
the area is heavily impacted by the traffic on east-west one-way streets: 6th Avenue, 8th
Avenue, 13th Avenue and 14th Avenue, which provide strong vehicular connectors
between Capitol Hill and Lincoln Park through the Golden Triangle. While good for
providing auto access to the CBD, the traffic has a negative impact on the pedestrian
character of the area, and the ability of people to cross the streets.
The character of the sub-area is distinct from the rest of the neighborhood with the
dominance of commercial and retail uses. Broadway is the original commercial
corridor of Denver, containing remnants of a traditional walking main street with
limited retail and neighborhood services.There are a number of automobile-oriented
services, including Rickenbaugh Cadillac-Volvo, that remain from the days when this
area was a preeminent automobile sales area for Denver. Broadway is the home to
some large retail destinations. Gart Sports provides a major regional draw for outdoor
recreation enthusiasts throughout the metropolitan area, and Howard Lorton Furniture
Galleries has helped make the area a destination for purchasing home furnishings. All
three have had a long time presence in the area and will have an influence on the
development of the corridor.
Older commercial buildings are mixed with newer commercial structures, including
several large office buildings such as the Blue Cross Building, the Security Life building
and the Chancery Building. The Denver Civic Center Cultural Complex (CCCC) is the
cultural heart of the city and the sub-area.The CCCC, consisting of the Denver Art
Museum, Colorado Historical Society, the Denver Public Library, and Civic Center Park,
anchors the north end of the sub-area. Blue Cross, with 1200 employees anchors the
south end. These anchors are important gateways and create a sense of entry into the
46


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Pedestrian experience is enhanced alnng Broadway by streetscaping,
restnred facades, grnund-level retail and creative signs.
district. However, numerous vacant sites, buildings and underdeveloped blocks exist
between the two anchors, disrupting the continuity of retail and pedestrian activity.
Sales tax data indicate that 3,500 people are employed in the sub-area.There was $142
million in gross sales in the sub-area in 1996.
Development in the sub-area is subject to B-8-G Zoning and the restrictions of the
Cheesman Park Mountain View Ordinance.
Vision
The Lincoln Broadway sub-area area has undergone a transformation into a thriving
commercial district, with one of the major shopping streets in Denver within its
boundaries: Broadway. While significant structures have been preserved, underutilized
sites have been redeveloped with retail uses on the ground floor and a variety of uses,
including offices, on the upper floors. It is home to several furniture showrooms, high-
tech electronics dealers and a premier collection of outdoor recreation equipment
stores, capturing the bulk of the sporting goods market in the Denver Area.
The sub-area has attracted a number of small-scale retail establishments that provide
services for the thriving neighborhoods that surround the area. Residents from the
adjacent neighborhoods walk to new restaurants, coffee shops, grocery stores, and
other neighborhood services, as well as to long-established institutions like Watsons
Pharmacy.The Denver Buffalo Company is joined by several other restaurants that
serve both local residents as well as tourists from the downtown hotels. Surface
parking lots have been developed and parking needs are met by several strategically
placed parking structures with ground floor retail space.These new developments
contribute to the urban vitality of the area while producing a higher rate of return on
investment for property owners.
The streetwall on Broadway is continuous, with new buildings built to the street, and
glassy storefronts and outdoor cafes.The parking lots at the Civic Center have been
developed into structures that house institutional expansion, uses that support the
cultural institutions and structured parking.This project has helped connect the
Cultural Complex to points south, providing an interesting and continuous pedestrian
way down Broadway.
47


UNCOLN-BROADWAY SUB-AREA
Zeckendorf Park is at the gateway into the lincoln-Broadway Sub-Area
at 7th and Broadway and should be enhanced.
The pedestrian experience is enhanced by the addition of street trees, attractive street
furniture flower plantings. Lincoln and Broadway have been reconfigured with safer,
shorter pedestrian crossings. Security is improved by the presence of numerous
pedestrians, appropriate pedestrian lighting, and a continuous wall of retailers who
provide eyes on the street.The function of gateway to the downtown is reinforced
by the enhancement of the park and public art at the south end of the sub-area. Both
Lincoln and Broadway accommodate a significant amount of traffic. However, the
adverse effects of congestion and heavy traffic have been ameliorated by the
expansion of light rail to the South.
Lincoln-Broadway has a strong visible identity.To encourage the retention and
recruitment of quality tenants to the area and assure long-term economic health and
maintenance of Lincoln-Broadway as a vital business corridor, local property owners
have established a Lincoln-Broadway Corridor Management Office.This office, with a
full time staff person, is based on the successful National Trust for Historic
Preservation Main Street Program.
The renaissance of this area has helped to reknit the urban fabric of Denver. Capitol
Hill and the Golden Triangle are now connected through a relationship in which each
builds on the strengths of the other.
48


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Much of the land in the lincoln-Broadway sab-area is anderatilized.
This sitaation provides nameroas opportanities for redevelopment.
Retain existing basinesses
that contribate to the street
life of the sab-area.
Encoarage retail ases at
groand level of new
developments, sach as le
Central at 8th and Lincoln.
Land Use
Issue
Much of the land in the Lincoln-Broadway sub-area is vacant or underdeveloped.
Surface parking lots, neglected buildings, and poor maintenance of the pedestrian
amenity zone negatively impacts the visual quality of the sub-area. Higher density
development, which follows the traditional pattern of commercial on Broadway and
commercial with residential uses on Lincoln, is necessary to create the vitality of the
urban neighborhood envisioned for the Golden Triangle.
Recommendations
) Develop the sub-area with destination retail such as, furniture showrooms,
outdoor recreation equipment stores, computer and electronic stores, and
outdoor cafes to attract people from outside the adjacent neighborhoods.
) Encourage residential uses above first floor commercial development along
Lincoln.
) Encourage office uses in the sub-area.
) Encourage the retention of existing apartment buildings in the sub-area to
provide affordable housing.
) Encourage large scale destination uses such as antique stores and furniture
showrooms.
) Encourage uses that support the cultural activities and institutional uses and
locate them near the Civic Center.
) Build on the presence of art galleries, graphics, and map sales by encouraging
like uses to locate on the corridor.
) Encourage the development of businesses that will utilize the extensive Western
History holdings of the institutions located in the Golden Triangle.
) Denver Planning Office (DPO) and the Mayors Office of Economic Development
(MOED) should work with developers and neighborhood advocates to
encourage the redevelopment of parcels on Lincoln and Broadway.
49


UNCOLN-BROADWAY SUB-AREA
Issue
The ability to live, shop, work, and play in the same area is essential to achieve the
neighborhood objective of an urban village. With its location, sandwiched between
Capitol Hill and the Golden Triangle, the Lincoln-Broadway sub-area is the perfect
location for uses which serve residents needs.
Recommendations
) Provide retail businesses and services that support the needs of the residential
community, such as restaurants with outdoor seating, coffee shops, a grocery
store, dry cleaners and hair salons.
) Provide office space for residents of the surrounding neighborhoods.
) Ground floors should contain traditional uses such as shops and restaurants;
upper floors should contain offices and residential units when appropriate.
Issue
The Lincoln-Broadway sub-area is a regional transportation corridor serving
commuters to and from the downtown. There are few retail establishments taking
advantage of the huge regional market represented by the commuters passing through
the sub-area. Broadway provides an excellent opportunity to attract commuters
running personal errands on the way home from work.
Recommendations
) Encourage businesses which will attract commuters, as well as local residents.
Examples include grocery stores, florists, and hardware stores.
New construction should provide ground-floor
uses similar to development on south Broadway.
50


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
New parking structures shuuld be designed tu cumplement existing
architecture. Retail spaces shuuld be pruvided at gruund level.
Issue
Few businesses in the sub-area are open after 5 p.m., the lack of evening activities
contributes to the lack of urban vitality and feeling of safety.
Recommendations
I Provide ground floor uses which are active in the evenings such as restaurants,
outdoor cafes, bars, galleries, theaters and other entertainment facilities.
I Provide pedestrian lights.
| Encourage lighting of building facades and display windows.
Issue
A great number of people that work in the Golden Triangle area commute from
outside the area and have needs that could be met during the lunch hour or after
work.
Recommendations
I Locate additional child care centers in the sub-area. Provide 24 hour daycare for
workers who work the late shifts.
I Locate a fitness center in the sub-area that is available to all residents and office
workers in the adjacent neighborhoods.
Issue
The presence of pawnshops, liquor stores, and short-term housing is a detriment to the
development of the corridor and the feeling of pedestrian safety.
Recommendations
I Redevelop the properties where these uses occur.
I New uses of this type should be regulated through the conditional use process.
I Redevelop the 1100 block of Broadway; renovate and upgrade the existing hotel.
51


UNCOLN-BROADWAY SUB-AREA
Issue
The numerous surface parking lots in the sub-area provide a benefit to downtown
office workers and visitors while providing no benefit to the residents of the
neighborhood. The large number of government employees in the area contribute to
the demand for parking.
Recommendations
) Undertake a parking management study to study a combination of parking
decks, on-street parking, and a shared parking strategy to minimize the needs
for surface parking in the area.
) Redevelop surface parking lots with higher and better uses.
) Encourage underground parking where feasible due to the sloping grade; the
west sides of Lincoln and Broadway are advantageous for the construction of
underground parking.
) The City and the State should build a new parking structure to serve
government employees, as well as the needs of the retailers at the north end
of the Lincoln-Broadway sub-area. This facility should reinforce the
architectural character of the Civic Center Cultural Complex and provide
opportunities for retail, cultural and institutional support uses at the ground
level and the perimeter.
) Reevaluate current parking requirements for retail uses in mixed-use projects in
the B-8-G Zone District.
Vehicular Circulation & Transit
Issue
With 47,000 car trips per day, Lincoln and Broadway function as the primary
north/south access routes into and out of the downtown area. As the sub-area is
redeveloped, it will continue to serve this role. Lincoln Street is 56 feet wide with
four travel lanes (1 bus lane, 3 automobile lanes), and on-street parking and brings
people into the CBD in the mornings; Broadway is 72 feet wide with five travel
lanes (1 bus lane, 4 automobile lanes), and on-street parking. While the volume of
drive-by traffic is potentially an asset to sub-area businesses, the width of the
street, the volume and speed of traffic carried by both streets influence the kinds
52


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
of uses that are compatible for the area, and are not conducive to creating streets
that pedestrians feel comfortable walking along.
Recommendations
) Study options to slow traffic.
) Fund a study to reexamine the design of Broadway; evaluate the need for traffic
calming measures.
Issue
There have been discussions of providing High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes on
Broadway and Lincoln.
Recommendations
) Establish a neighborhood policy on HOV lanes.
Issue
In the lincoln-Broadway sub-area, much of the public realm is not maintained.
A comprehensive streetscaping program would improve the pedestrian experience.
Improve pedestrian experience by landscaping and screening surface parking.
Broadway and Lincoln are major transit routes which serve riders working and living
in the area. The one-way couplet contains bus lanes converging at the Civic Center
Station located at Broadway and 16th Street.The bus system brings in many people to
the Golden Triangle without increasing the need for parking. However, neighborhood
representatives have stated that RTD is not a good neighbor.The bus shelters are
unkempt and transit users create a litter problem.
Recommendations
k Improve the appearance and safety of bus stops with improved shelters, seating
and lighting. Use the shelters as an opportunity to establish an identity for
Broadway and Lincoln. Work with RTD to address the litter problem, RTD should
provide and maintain trash receptacles at bus stops in the Golden Triangle,
k Improve the pedestrian connections to the Civic Center RTD Station, encourage
RTD to improve the cleanliness and safety of the station,
y Design a special bus shelter for the sub-area.
y Locate bus stops at the major pedestrian east/west streets: 9th, 11th, 13th
Avenues.
53


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I Work with developers, the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Urban
Design Committee and the Planning Office to locate new buildings at the
property line along Broadway and to locate parking to the north, the south or
behind them.
I o not allow new curb cuts along Broadway.
I Establish a Lincoln-Broadway Marketing/Redevelopment Office to provide
business recruitment, develop a unified marketing strategy, coordinate
maintenance streetscape and to promote the area through special events.This
organization should be under the umbrella of the Golden Triangle
Neighborhood Association.
I Identify funding sources for sub-area management and capital improvements.
Possibilities include a Tax Increment Funding District (TIF, MOED, and the
State Historic Preservation Fund.
I Study the establishment of a low-interest loan fund for facade improvements
and redevelopment of the sub-area.
Speer
) Create a Speer sub-area committee to:
I Implement the recommendations of the sub-area plan.
I Work with the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Transportation and
Urban Design Committees and the Denver Transportation to improve the
pedestrian connections from the neighborhood to the access points along
the Cherry Creek bike path across Speer Boulevard.
I Evaluate the feasibility of building a pedestrian bridge across Cherry Creek
on the existing bridge abutments to connect the neighborhood to the
Sunken Gardens.
| Continue the flower planting program in the Speer triangle parks.
| Work in conjunction with Parks and Recreation to plant and maintain the
green edge along Cherry Creek and the bike path.
I Evaluate, complete and implement the Speer Boulevard streetscape
guidelines.
89


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
Acoma
) Create anAcoma sub-area committee to:
I Implement the recommendations of the sub-area plan.
I Work with the cultural and civic institutions and the Golden Triangle
NeighborhoodAssociationArts and Culture Committee to encourage arts-
related uses to locate in the sub-area. Explore the use of tax incentives.
I Develop special streetscape elements for the sub-area.
I Develop a strategy for incorporating art into the public realm within the sub-
area.
| Enhance the visual connection down Acoma to downtown.
| Enhance the visual connection downAcoma to 8th Avenue.
I Create the Village Center at 11th and Acoma.
| Make the reuse and rehabilitation of the Evans School a high priority for the
neighborhood
90


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
91


ACKNOWLEGEMENTS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS GOLDEN TRIANGLE
N E1 G H 0 0 R H 0 0 0
Wellington E.Webb PLANNING COMMITTEE
Mayor
Council Members Rick Ashton, Denver Public Library
Dennis Gallagher Bruce Berger, Bruce Berger Realty
District 1 Bill Cook, Howard Lorton Galleries
T.J.Ted Hackworth Dick Eber,Alan Eber Company
District 2 Margerie Hicks, Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association
Ramona martinez Dennis Humphries, Humphries Poli Architects
District 3 Mark Johnson, Civitas
Joyce Foster Tom Klein, Design Workshop
District 4 Sarah Meskin, Barker Rinker Seacat Architects
Polly Flobeck Jim Morobitto, Security Life
District 5 Andrew Moss, Semple Brown Roberts
Susan Casey Joe Magee, Channel Six
District 6 Buck Oakes, Oakes Management Services
William Bill Himmelmann Valery Ohman, Golden Triangle neighborhood Association
District 7 Linda Reilly, PS1 Charter School
Hiawatha Davis Jr. Kent Rickenbaugh, Rickenbaugh Cadillac/Volvo
District 8 Ron Scholar, Scholar Buchanan Yonushewski Architects
Deborah L. Ortega Brent Snyder, TenRep Ltp.
District 9 Bill Wenk, Wenk Associates
Ed Thomas Mickey Zeppelin, Zeppelin & Co., Chairman
District 10 City and County of Denver
Allegra Happy Haynes Jennifer Moulton, Director of Planning
District 11 Madie Martin, Urban Design Planning
Cathy Reynolds Kristen Cypher, Planning Intern
Council-at-Large Ed Ellerbrock, Public Works
Susan Barnes-Gelt Jacy Montoya, Planning Intern
Council-at-Large Steve Turner, Urban Design Planning
92


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
ORDINANCE NO.
460
BY AUTHORITY
COUNCIL BILL NO.

SERIES OF 1998
COMMITTEE OF REFERENCE:
jiWto us-
FOR AN ORDINANCE APPROVING A NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN FOR THE
GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD, WHICH PLAN SHALL BECOME A PART
OF THE COMPREHENSIVE PLAN FOR THE CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER
PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 41-18(c) OF THE REVISED
MUNICIPAL CODE AND OF ORDINANCE NO. 617, SERIES OF 1989.
Section 1. That the proposed neighborhood plan for the harmonious development of
the Golden Triangle neighborhood, consisting of a document entitled Golden Triangle
Neighborhood Plan, filed with the City Clerk, Ex-Officio Clerk of the City and County of Denver,
on the 23rd day of June, 1998, as City Clerk's filing No. 98-556, is hereby approved as part of the
Comprehensive Plan, pursuant to Section 41-18(c) of the Revised Municipal Code, and Ordinance
No. 617, Series of 1989.
Section 2. That the approval of The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan, and of any
subsequent amendment thereto, is intended to establish the same, in conjunction with the
Comprehensive Plan, as the official guide for officials of the City and County of Denver and private
citizens when making decisions affecting the future character of the Golden Triangle
WHEREAS, pursuant to the provisions of Section 41-18(c) of the Revised Municipal Code,
and by Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989, there has been approved a Comprehensive Plan for
the City and County of Denver; and
WHEREAS, said Section of the Revised Municipal Code provides for the amendment of
said Plan; and
WHEREAS, Ordinance No. 617, Series of 1989, provides for the incorporation of
"Neighborhood Plans" into the Comprehensive Plan; and
WHEREAS, as a proposed part of the Comprehensive Plan, the Planning Director has
transmitted to the Mayor and Council for acceptance a proposed neighborhood plan for the orderly
and harmonious development of the Golden Triangle neighborhood in the City and County of
Denver; and
WHEREAS, the Mayor has approved the same; and
WHEREAS, the Planning Board has approved the same; and
WHEREAS, the Neighborhood Plan was prepared with significant involvement of the
residents and representatives of the various interests of the Golden Triangle neighborhood and
adjacent neighborhoods and has been approved by the same; and
WHEREAS, a member of City Council in whose council district the neighborhood plan is
situated has monitored the process whereby said plan was formulated.
NOW, THEREFORE,
BE IT ENACTED BY THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER:
neighborhood of the City and County of Denver; provided, however, that such approval shall not
preempt the decision making powers vested by law or the administrative directive in the Mayor,
the Council or any other official of the City and County of Denver with respect to, but not limited
to, a zoning map amendment, a zoning language amendment, a dedication or vacation of a street,
alley or other public way, a designation of a park, the issuance of a revocable permit, a
conveyance or the acquisition of real property by the City and County of Denver, of an
appropriation for or construction of a capital improvement; and provided, further, that it is expressly
understood that judgment must be exercised in the application of The Golden Triangle
Neighborhood Plan recommendations in the decision making processes of the Mayor, Council and
other officials of the City and County of Denver.
PASSED BY THE COUNCIL___________________
ll

APPROVED:
ATTE


1jJLas\
RESIDENT

_ PRESIDE!*
.-MAYOR. 7W 7
1998
1998
- CLERK AND RECORDER,
EX-OFFICIO CLERK OF THE
CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER
93


UNCOLN-BROADWAY SUB-AREA
Streetscaping in the sub-area will create a
more pleasant pedestrian environment.
Future developments should
avoid continuous blank walls.
Increasing the transparency of
structures at the sidewalk edge
provides a more vibrant
pedestrian experience.
) Improve the pedestrian connections to bus stops, with improved streetscape,
street furniture and lighting along Broadway, Lincoln and the cross streets.
) Encourage the establishment of an RTD Rider incentive program for employees
in the sub-area. Special emphasis should be given to large employers such as
Blue Cross Blue Shield, Security Life, and State and City employees.
Pedestrian / Bicycle Circulation
Issue
At present, Lincoln-Broadway are difficult to cross and function as an obstacle for the
east-west bound pedestrians and bicyclists to overcome.This condition inhibits the
development of pedestrian and bicyclist connections between the Golden Triangle and
Capitol Hill.
Recommendations
) Study shortening the crossing distance by bulbing out the sidewalks at the
corners in the east west direction.
) Improve pedestrian/bicycle access from Capitol Hill to Cherry Creek bicycle
path.
) Provide continuous streetscaping on the east/west blocks of 9th, 11th, and 13th
Avenues to foster pedestrian connections between the Golden Triangle and
Capitol Hill.
) Establish dedicated bike lanes from Capitol Hill to the Golden Triangle.
) Install bike racks in the sub-area
) Enhance tree lawns on Lincoln and hardscape on Broadway.
) Encourage the placement of flowers on Lincoln and Broadway.
Issue
People do not walk along Broadway or Lincoln because the walk is not an interesting
one.There are blank walls, vacant buildings, and surface parking which break the
continuity of the walk, creating pedestrian discomfort. The storefronts that are
interesting to look into are scarce and scattered.
54


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
SCHEME A
Illustrates the position of street trees and pedestrian lights in the Lincoln-
Broadway sub-area. Broadway is bulbed out at the intersections to shorten
the distance for pedestrian crossing. Street trees occur only at the
pedestrian crossings on Broadway.
SCHEME B
Illustrates similar conditions to Scheme A. The primary variation is that street
trees are continued down the full length of Broadway.
PEDESTRIAN LIGHT
PROPOSAL FOR STREETSCAPING II TREE WITHIN GRASS LAWN
IN THE LINCOLN-BROADWAY SUB-AREA
55


UNCOLN-BROADWAY SUB-AREA
Recommendations
) Encourage ground floor uses that serve the public and neighborhood needs.
) Open up storefronts in existing buildings with large display windows; make the
lower floor of buildings more transparent.
) Orient the main entrance of new construction to front onto Lincoln or
Broadway.
) Encourage human scale architectural detailing and interest in new building
design particularly in the lower 80.
) Encourage infill development that builds projects to the property line to provide
continuity of building facades at the sidewalk edge.
) Provide screen walls and landscaping at the perimeters of all existing and future
surface parking lots.
Urban Form
This sub-area provides an excellent opportunity to reknit the urban fabric of Denver
and provide urban amenities for residents of both the Golden Triangle and Capitol Hill.
Urban design issues, such as mass, scale, texture, openings to the street, pedestrian
relationships, and land use should be fully considered in the design of new structures.
Issue
Lincoln-Broadway acts as a very strong edge to the Golden Triangle Neighborhood.
While this is helpful in defining the boundaries and making it a distinct area, it acts as
a barrier to the neighborhood to the east: Capitol Hill.
Recommendations
) Reinforce the east/west axis at 9th, 11th, and 13th Avenues; designate these as
linkages between the neighborhoods with appropriate streetscaping and
gateway designs to reinforce the sense of entry into the Golden Triangle; create
gateways where these streets intersect Lincoln.
) Encourage new developments to accentuate the street corners.
) Develop mid-rise structures, 4-8 stories, on the west and east side of Lincoln, to
transition into high-rise residential structures on Sherman.
56


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Utilize innovative signs and street furniture within the sub-area.
Issue
There is an opportunity to create gateways at the intersection of 13th and Lincoln-
Broadway, and at Speer and Lincoln-Broadway.
Recommendations
) Develop new construction at the north and south ends of the corridor to
reinforce their significance and position as gateways to the downtown.Taller
structures in these areas should transition down to lower structures in the
center of the sub-area.
) Improve the park amenity on 7th Avenue.This could be the site of a piece of art
reinforcing the imagery of this area as a gateway to the downtown.
) Work with Blue Cross to improve the pedestrian friendliness of their building.
One possibility is to install public art on the corner parking structure ventilation
towers.
Issue
The visual image of Lincoln-Broadway has deteriorated.The buildings, sidewalks, and
tree lawns need to be improved and maintained.
Recommendations
) Establish a visible identity for the sub-area through improved streetscaping,
street furniture, lighting, banners, awnings, and signage.
) Evaluate the appropriateness of street trees for the sub-area; consider the need
for storefront visibility for retailers in the sub-area.The analysis should look at
other options for improving the streetscape and at the feasibility of maintenance
agreements for the sub-area streetscaping.
) Reevaluate the sign code for B-8-G to allow creative and eye-catching signs. Look
at the appropriateness of using neon and projecting signs in the sub-area.
) Develop a program to encourage the maintenance of buildings in the sub-area.
) Work with US WEST and Public Service to relocate utilities underground.
) Remove billboards.
57


UNCOLN-BROADWAY SUB-AREA
Remove non-historic facades and rehabilitate significant structures.
Issue
The sub-area contains structures that contribute to the historical significance of the
Golden Triangle; however, no effort has been made to capitalize on the historic
character of this area. Some of the most significant buildings are neglected, vacant, or
hidden behind non-historic metal facades.
Recommendations
) Encourage building owners and tenants to remove non-historic facades and
rehabilitate contributing structures.
) Explore the possibility of grants for a facade rehabilitation program from the
State Historic Preservation Fund.
) Explore the possibility of landmarking historic structures in the Lincoln-
Broadway sub-area. Possible candidates include; the Colorado Ballet Building,
Gart Sports, and the Jonas Building.
Issue
New construction too often does not respect the character of its neighbors. Many of
the existing buildings in the Lincoln-Broadway sub-area offer clues to the pattern for
new development.
Recommendations
) Encourage new construction to follow the traditional facade proportions and
patterns found on Broadway between 10th and 12th Avenue. Incorporate the
traditional size, rhythm, and configuration of large first floor display windows
and upper story windows of existing commercial buildings into new
construction.
) New construction which is taller than existing buildings should appear similar
to traditional commercial construction in mass, scale, and height in cornice lines
or setbacks found in the sub-area.
) Orient the main entrances of new construction to front onto Lincoln or Broadway.
58


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
New infill developments should respect the scale of existing
structures.
Issue
Much of the sub-area is under-developed. The numerous vacant parcels result in a
discontinuous streetwall.The street wall is particularly well established along
Broadway.
Recommendations
) Encourage the development of a continuous streetwall, especially along
Broadway.Align the facades of new buildings with the established streetwall
pattern.
) Discourage new curb cuts on Broadway. Service and parking access should be
through the widened alleys whenever possible.
Issue
Surface parking lots disrupt the continuity of the street wall along Broadway.
Recommendations
) Discourage the location of surface parking lots along Broadway; only access to
parking should be provided.
) Parking should be provided in structures and underground when possible.
) If surface parking is used, it should be located away from the street edge, to the
north or south of the new building, in order to minimize the visual impact.
) Build screen walls and provide landscaping at the property lines of vacant lots
and parking lots.
) Place service equipment and trash containers in the alleys.
Issue
Alleys are primarily used for garbage collection. The limited use of alleys creates a
hardship for some sub-area tenants.
Recommendations
) Alleys should be used to service businesses and provide access to parking
within projects.
) City policy on limited use of alleys should be reevaluated.
) Encourage city and property owners to maintain alleys.
59


UNCOLN-BROADWAY SUB-AREA
) WidenAUeys to 20 to allow them to be used for access to projects and to
provide room for two-way traffic; property owners across the alleys should share
the responsibility.
Economic Development
Issue
The Lincoln-Broadway sub-area presents an excellent opportunity for economic
redevelopment. Workers and residents in the Golden Triangle and Capitol Hill provide
a strong market for services. However, to optimize the potential of the sub-area, an
organization with a professional staff person should be established to facilitate
redevelopment activities in the sub-area.
Recommendations
) Undertake an economic analysis to look at market directions and economic
viability of redeveloping the sub-area.
) Encourage the development of new retail and commercial
activities as well as services for workers and residents.
) Establish a Lincoln-Broadway Marketing/Redevelopment Office to provide
business recruitment, to develop a unified marketing strategy, to coordinate
maintenance and to promote the area through special events.This organization
should be under the umbrella of the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association.
) Identify funding sources for sub-area management and capital improvements.
Possibilities include an urban renewal district with tax increment financing,
MOED and the State Historic Preservation Fund.
) Study the establishment of a low-interest loan fund for facade improvements in
the sub-area.
60


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
IMPROVE SIDEWALKS
VISUALLY LINK COLORADO
HISTORICAL SOCIETY TO CIVIC
CENTER CULTURAL COMPLEX
THROUGH STREETSCAPING
REDEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITY CULTURAL
AND INSTITUTIONAL
EXPANSION WITH
STRUCTURED PARKING
CITY GOVERNMENT EXPANSION
OPPORTUNITY
RESTORE PROVIDE PUBLIC
ACCESS
IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN
CROSSING AT COLFAX-
INSTALL PUBLIC ART TO
VISUALLY LINK DOWNTOWN TO
CIVIC CENTER
COMPLETE THE ARC-
INSTALL OUTDOOR ART
IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN
CROSSING
CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREA PLAN


CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREA
The Civic Center Cultural Cumplex is the gateway tu Duwntuwn frum the
Gulden Triangle.
CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREA PLAN
Existing Conditions
The Civic Center sub-area is made up of governmental, cultural, institutional, and
private-sector components.The core of the sub-area is formed by Civic Center Park,
the State and City government buildings, the Denver Public Library, the Denver Art
Museum, and the Colorado Historical Society the Civic Center Cultural Complex
(CCCC). Collectively these structures represent some of the finest architecture in the
state. Other prominent occupants of the sub-area include the Colorado Judicial
Building, Colorado Ballet Studios, the United States Mint and Security Life Center.
The surrounding blocks contain a mixture of uses. For example, the 1300 block of
Bannock contains the City of Denver Permit Center, a 100 unit single room occupancy
multi-unit residence, an art gallery, a restaurant, offices and several parking lots. Other
blocks in the sub-area contain diverse uses such as bail bond businesses and other
institutional support uses.
The CCCC was subject of a 1992 urban design plan by Venturi, Scott Brown and
Associates.This plan represented a commitment to develop a strategy that would allow
the Civic Center cultural institutions to share programs and create a common urban
landscape.The Master Plan that evolved has brought the three institutions into a new
and dynamic working relationship.The recommendations of this plan should be
followed as the Golden Triangle is developed. At present, the area provides parking for
the Civic Center institutions. In 1996 the City invested $1.6 million to rebuild the
parking lots.The improvements were funded by a bond issue.Any redevelopment of
the site would need to take into account the provision of parking and the repayment
of bonds. While the extensive streetscaping has improved the site, the surface parking
lots are not conducive to the desired urban characteristics envisioned for the Golden
Triangle, and should be developed.
In 1997, the Denver Art Museum completed major improvements to their facilities.An
enhanced entry, with outdoor cafe seating, and the addition of the DeSuvero sculpture
has made Acoma Plaza an active space and a visual focal point.
62


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Much of the Civic Center seb-area consists of sorface parking lots.
While this is detrimental to the viseal quality of the seb-area,
it provides opportenities for redevelopment.
Vision
The Civic Center sub-area has become an integral part of the Golden Triangle. The
institutions in the sub-area draw a large number of people who patronize the adjacent
art galleries, shops, and restaurants. New construction in the Golden Triangle supports
the missions of the cultural institutions in the sub-area. The new buildings continue the
tradition of world class architecture around the Civic Center.Artist studios, galleries, an
art school, and high tech businesses such as multi-media studios, which use the
collections and resources of the cultural institutions, have been attracted to the sub-
area.Together, these uses contribute to the Golden Triangles position as the center of
art and Western history in the Rocky Mountain region and the government center for
Denver.
Pedestrian connections between the Civic Center and downtown have been
strengthened by enhanced streetscaping. New public open space has been included in
the expansion of City government offices at the 1300 block of Bannock Street. Parking
for employees and visitors to the government agencies and cultural institutions is
provided in a structure located on the City owned land south of the Library and Art
Museum.
Civic Center Park is the neighborhood park for the Golden Triangle. Residents use the
park for picnics, sun-bathing, or just to fly a kite. Numerous concerts are held in the
amphitheater. Free events attract both residents of the Golden Triangle and other city
residents who wander over to explore the neighborhood after the event.
There is a synergy between the neighborhood and the institutions that contributes to
the vitality of both.
63


CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREA
Land Use
Issue
The cultural and governmental uses in the sub-area contribute to the vitality of the
Golden Triangle. However, much of the current land use such as surface parking lots,
bail bond offices, and automotive repair businesses do not support the objectives of
the CCCC nor the Golden Triangle.
Recommendations
) Land use should be complementary to the governmental and cultural uses in the
sub-area. Examples include: art galleries, studios, restaurants, hotels, and
businesses that use the cultural institutional collections.
) Development in the CCCC sub-area should reinforce the City Beautiful concept
of civic, cultural and institutional organizations in a campus setting.
) Allow high-density residential as part of mixed-use developments.
) Encourage government-related growth in the 1300 block of Bannock. Preserve
the Cherokee Power Plant and the native American Art Center.
) Develop the CCCC parking lots with uses that support the functions of the
adjacent cultural institutions.
) All parking in the sub-area should be accommodated in multi-level structures
with pedestrian uses on the ground floor.
) Complete the CCCC Arc on 13th Avenue. Expand the park to Bannock.
) Encourage the use of Civic Center Park as a neighborhood park. Program it with
free lunchtime and evening events, as well as enhancing it to be enjoyed in a
passive way.
) Improve the safety of the Civic Center Park.
) Encourage police to drive through the neighborhood as they travel to and from
the Police Headquarters.
) Encourage the Bail Bonds Businesses to work to together to improve the
exterior appearance of their buildings.
) Encourage the use of Acoma Plaza as an active gathering place.
) Work with the State of Colorado in understanding their future plans and the
impact on the neighborhood.
64


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
New development should continue the streetwall and respect the
characteristics of the architecture surrounding the Civic Center.
Vehicular Circulation and Transit
Issue
The sub-area is served by wide one-way sheet which are difficult for pedestrians to
cross.This condition results in a lack of pedestrian friendly connections between the
Civic Center, the Golden Triangle and Downtown.
Recommendations
) Reevaluate the configuration of the 14th Avenue segment by the Denver Art
Museum eliminating on-street parking and bulbing the curb.
) Reevaluate the traffic configuration at the intersection of Colfax and 15th Street
on the north side of the Civic Center.
Issue
There are many people working at the southern end of the Golden Triangle at Denver
Health and Blue Cross who do not take advantage of the Civic Center and downtown
at the lunch hour.
Recommendations
) Work with RTD to develop a circulator bus connecting the Civic Center to other
points in and adjacent to the Golden Triangle such as Denver Health Medical
Center.
Issue
The sub-area is served by a large number of bus routes.The bus stops are not
maintained and are potentially unsafe. The standard bus-shelter design is not
appropriate for use in the sub-area.
Recommendations
) Improve the appearance and safety of RTD bus stops.
) Work with RTD to improve the pedestrian connections to the Civic Center RTD
Station as well as the cleanliness and safety of the station.
) Install new bus shelters. Utilize a non-standard design for the sub-area that plays
on the neo-classical character of the buildings.
65


CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREA
'i
1
Sketch of enhanced intersection of 15th and Colfax on north side of
Civic Center Park.
Pedestrian Environment and Circulation
Issue
The Civic Center Cultural Complex is the cultural heart of the city. Improvements have
been made around the Civic Center parking lots, but much of the remaining area has
sidewalks in poor condition and minimal streetscape improvements.
Recommendations
) Continue streetscape, tree placement and pedestrian light pattern, established at
the Civic Center parking lots, south on Broadway, along 12th, 13th, 14th and
Colfax Avenues to create a visual cohesiveness in the sub-area and to create a
more pleasant pedestrian environment.
) Clean up and monitor the bus stops and shelters at the Civic Center, which are
currently loitering spots for the homeless.
) Rebuild deteriorated sidewalks and curbs at Civic Center Park between Colfax
and 14th Avenue.
Issue
A lack of pedestrian friendly connections degrades the pedestrian experience and
discourages visitors from exploring the Golden Triangle.
Recommendations
) Improve the pedestrian connections at Acoma Plaza and across 14th Avenue.
) Improve the pedestrian route along Broadway from the Transit Center to the
sub-area.
) Redesign the pedestrian crossing at the intersection of Colfax and 15th Street on
the north side of Civic Center.
) Use streetscaping on 13th Avenue to reinforce the connection between the Art
Museum, Main Library, and the Colorado Historical Society.
Cultural and institutiunal
growth shuuld be encuuraged
un the land suuth uf the Civic
Center Cultural Complex.
66


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Both the major aod minor axis are importaat arbaa desiga elements within the Civic Center.
Fatare development in the sab-area shoald extend the axis into the Golden Triangle.
The minor axis of the Civic Center New development in the seb-area shoald
sab-area is a strong viseal element provide opportenities for peblic art.
linking the Golden Triangle to Downtown.
Urban Form
Issue
The sub-area is a transition zone from the high density of downtown to the lower
density of the Golden Triangle. However, sufficient density must be maintained to
achieve the urban village concept of the GoldenTriangle.The marginal development of
the surrounding blocks provides an opportunity to increase the density to an
appropriate level.
Recommendations
k Encourage cultural and institutional growth south of the Civic Center
betweenl2th and 13th Avenues downAcoma Street.
k Encourage government growth in the 1300 block of Bannock. Preserve the
historic structures in this block.
Issue
Civic Center Park and the surrounding institutions have established a precedent for
very high caliber architecture and streetscaping in the sub-area. As new development is
initiated the established caliber of design and construction should be maintained.
Recommendations
k New construction should continue the tradition of world class architecture
found in the civic center.
k Work with the State government to ensure that future their future growth is
supportive of objectives of this plan.
k New construction south of the Library and Art Museum should reinforce the
design of the new Arc..
k Public art and flower beds should be located in the Arc park
k New buildings should respect the scale and height of the Library and Art
Museum.
k Preserve views to and from Civic Center Park
k Use public art at 15th and Colfax to extend the north-south axis of the Civic
Center into the downtown. Use public art downAcoma to connect the Golden
Triangle to the Civic Center.
67


CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREA
) New development in the sub-area should provide significant opportunities for
outdoor art.
) Plant flowers throughout the Civic Center sub-area.
Issue
Surface parking lots are incompatible with the desired development density.
Recommendations
) Minimize surface parking in the sub-area. Utilize building edges and landscaped
lawns to create a Civic Center campus.
Issue
The junction of Acoma, the Avenue of the Arts, and 13th Avenue is an important civic
place: it signals the entry into Acoma Plaza which is the threshold of the Civic Center.
The greenArc of civic open space, located on the south side of 13thAvenue connects
the institutions to the Golden Triangle.
Recommendations
) Enhance the civic character of the space with additional activities and public
amenities.
) Incorporate public art.
68


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
COLFAX OVERLAP AREA
Existing Conditions
Colfax Avenue is the primary entrance to the Civic Center from Speer Boulevard.The
marginal land use west of Elati Street does not provide an appropriate gateway into
the sub-area. The lack of streetscaping negatively impacts the pedestrian experience.
Connections to downtown and the Convention Center are inhibited by the heavy
volume of traffic.
Issue
Much of the land along Colfax is underdeveloped.
Recommendations
) Encourage the redevelopment of Colfax with high density uses that support the
neighborhood and surrounding area and the Convention Center. Examples are
hotels and restaurants.
Issue
The pedestrian realm along Colfax is unimproved and the pedestrian connections
across Colfax to other parts of downtown are weak.
Recommendations
) Future construction should set back a minimum of 10 to provide room for
streetscaping and wider sidewalks.
) Discontinue surface parking.
) Install streetscaping.
) Study ways to improve the pedestrian connections across Colfax.
69


ACOMA SUB-AREA
NOTES:
PROVIDE PUBLIC ART ON ALL
STREET CORNERS.
PUT PROJECT ENTRIES ONTO
ACOMA.
DISCOURAGE NEW CURB
CUTS.
PROVIDE ENHANCED
STREETSCAPING.
UNDERGROUND ALL
OVERHEAD UTILITIES
BULB OUT CORNERS AT 12TH
AVE. TO SHORTEN CROSSING
REMOVE BILLBOARD
LANDSCAPE AND SCREEN
PARKING LOTS (SHORTTERM)
REDEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITY
RESTORE EXISTING
STRUCTURE
BULB OUT CORNERS AT 11TH
AVE. TO SHORTEN CROSSING
ENHANCE PAVING AT ACOMA
CITY CENTER
LANDSCAPE AND SCREEN
PARKING LOT
CONSOLIDATE CURB CUTS
REDEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITY INCORPORATE
COMMUNITY OPEN SPACE INTO
DESIGN
SCREEN AND LANDSCAPE ALL
PARKING LOTS (SHORT TERM)
PROVIDE PUBLIC ART AT ALL
STREET CORNERS ON ACOMA.
REDEVELOP BLOCKS WITH
MIXED USES THAT SUPPORT
CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS AND
THE THEME OF ACOMA AS THE
AVENUE OF THE ARTS. NEW
CONSTRUCTION SHOULD
RESPECT THE DESIGN OF THE
NEW LIBRARY AND THE
DENVER ART MUSEUM.
ACOMA SUB-AREA PLAN
RESTORE ART-DECO OFFICES
AT 1045 ACOMA
ENCOURAGE THE PLACEMENT
OF ENTRANCES ON ACOMA
FOR ALL NEW CONSTRUCTION.
CONTINUE STREETSCAPING
SOUTH OF 11TH AVENUE.
REDEVELOP AS A VILLAGE
CENTER FOR THE GOLDEN
TRIANGLE WITH COMMUNITY
OPEN SPACE. POSSIBLE USES
INCLUDE A SCHOOL FOR THE
ARTS, ARTIST STUDIOS AND
RESIDENTIAL LOFTS.
RETAIN DANCE STUDIO
USES. RELOCATE IN THE
NEIGHBORHOOD
ENCOURAGE THE RETENTION OF
THE SANDSTONE STRUCTURE -
INCORPORATE INTO NEW
DEVELOPMENT.
REDEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITY
ENCOURAGE NEW USES IN
EXISTING BUILDINGS. RELOCATE
THE DANCE STUDIOS CURRENTLY IN
THE BANNOCK CENTER.
70


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Acoraa The Avenue of the Arts connects the Golden Triangle to
Civic Center and Downtown.
ACOMA SUB-AREA PLAN
Existing Conditions
The Acoma sub-area is comprised of the face blocks ofAcoma Street fromAcoma Plaza
on the north to 8th Avenue on the south. Acoma provides a strong visual axis from the
neighborhood north to the Cultural Complex. Looking up Acoma, the vista is framed
by the new Denver Public Library and the Denver Art Museum. Acoma terminates at
13thAvenue in a plaza formed by these cultural institutions.The vista extends through
Civic Center Park and visually connects the Golden Triangle with downtown. Because
of this prominent connection, the sub-area is designated as The Avenue of the Arts for
the Golden Triangle.
The Acoma sub-area is characterized by parking lots and low rise buildings.There are
some significant structures, including the Evans School at the corner of 11th Avenue,
the Acoma Center at 1080 Acoma, the sandstone duplex at 907 Acoma, and the newly
constructed Metropolitan Lofts.Typical land use in the area includes auto-related
businesses, small industrial uses, and professional offices.The Denver Municipal Credit
Union has constructed a new building and a drive-in facility. There is a daycare center
on the southeast corner of 10th and Acoma.
New development along Acoma
shonld reflect the pedestrian-
friendly atmosphere of an
orban neighborhood.
Acoma Street is a two-way street with stop signs at each intersection. It has a 70 foot
right-of-way, composed of a 36 foot street and a 17 foot amenity zone on each side.
There are two travel lanes and on-street parking on both sides. Pedestrian lights and
street trees were installed north of 11th Avenue as part of a city financed streetscaping
program. Most vehicular traffic is generated by the parking lots in the sub-area.
Pedestrian activity is beginning to increase due to improved streetscape and new
development, but much of the sub-area is still undeveloped.
Vision
New development along Acoma has strengthened its role as the Avenue of the Arts.
Artists have located their studios in the area.The Acoma Center presents performing
and visual arts programs that draw people from all over the metropolitan area. Vacant
lots have been developed into mixed use projects with art studios, art galleries and
71


ACOMA SUB-AREA
The Acoma Center provides a home for civic fonctions in the
Golden Triangle.
cafes on the ground floor and residential units above. Surface level parking lots have
been redeveloped into mixed use projects.
The improved pedestrian environment links the Civic Center to the neighborhood and
invites people to explore the Golden Triangle.The intersection of 11th and Acoma has
become the Village Center, with community open spaces, street art, and outdoor
seating at the Evans School. The intersection of Acoma and 9th Avenue provides a
pocket park and outdoor art in conjunction with the closing of Acoma, should it occur.
Acoma has become the Avenue of the Arts in function as well as name.
Land Use
Issue
The current development along the Avenue of the Arts offers little attraction for
pedestrians. A large portion of the sub-area is used as parking lots for the Civic Center
Cultural Complex and the downtown.This use conflicts with the desired urban
density and the art theme for the sub-area.
Recommendations
) Encourage redevelopment with mixed-use projects. New projects should
support the theme of Avenue of the Arts by providing space for art related
activities.
) Explore the use of tax or zoning incentives to encourage art related uses in new
developments in the sub-area.
) Encourage cultural and institutional growth along Acoma.
Issue
Much of the area is underdeveloped with incompatible uses. Automotive repair and
plumbing shops are not complementary to the arts theme of Acoma Street.
Recommendations
) Discourage new auto repair uses. Encourage arts related uses to locate in mixed-
use projects on Acoma.
72


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
The Evans School is visually an important anchor in the Acoraa sub-area
and the neighborhood. It should be redeveloped with uses which
support the concept of a village center.

Issue
The Evans School, which is the most significant building in the neighborhood, is
vacant and surrounded by parking.
Recommendations
) Restore and reuse the Evans School. It is an important anchor for the Golden
Triangle Neighborhood. Encourage uses that support the arts and the
community at large.
) Encourage the provision of open space around Evans School for public use,
include public art.
) Develop the blocks along 11th Avenue and Acoma as the village Center.
Vehicular Circulation and Transit
Issue
Automotive congestion is negligible due to the underdeveloped character of the sub-
area. Most of the traffic is the result of people driving to and from the numerous
surface parking lots adjacent to Acoma.The exceptions are 8th and 13th Avenues
which carry large volumes of traffic as one-way arterials and the two-way traffic of
11th Avenue.
Recommendations
) Study the need for stop signs and other traffic calming devices at key
intersections.
Pedestrian Environment and Circulation
Issue
The pedestrian environment has been improved by a streetscaping program from the
Civic Center Cultural Complex to 11th Avenue.An enhanced pedestrian crossing plaza
was constructed at 13th Avenue as part of the Central Library expansion.
Current condition of Evans
School.
The sandstone duplex on Acoma
gives character and adds
texture to the sub-area.
73


ACOMA SUB-AREA
The enhanced streetscape alnng Acnma has greatly imprnved the
pedestrian friendliness nf the area. The streetscaping shnuld be
cnntinued dnwn the length nf the Avenue nf the Arts.
Recommendations
) Continue the enhanced streetscape of tree lawns and pedestrian lights south to
9th Avenue.
) Continue double treelawns were possible downAcoma.
) Develop special street furniture standards for Acoma. Encourage the planting of
flowers along Acoma.
) Enhance the pedestrian environment by providing community open spaces and
public art at the Evans School and Bannock Center along Acoma Street.
Urban Form
Issue
Acoma is the major visual connection between the Golden Triangle and the CCCC.The
lack of a continuous street wall resulting from the parking lots and underdeveloped
blocks does not reinforce this connection.
Recommendations
) Encourage the development of a continuous street wall that reinforces the
visual and physical connections between the Golden Triangle and the CCCC.
New construction should be built to the edge of the public right of way.
) Encourage the development of Acoma as a major connector by creating a
pattern of public open spaces with public art.
) Provide venues along the Avenue of the Arts to showcase the visual and
performing arts.
) Incorporate art on buildings, sidewalks, and street corners along Acoma,
especially at the Evans School.
) Parking lots should not front onto Acoma. Provide landscaping and screening
along the edges of existing lots.
) Maintain an unobstructed visual axis downAcoma from 8th Avenue to Civic
Center Park and from Civic Center Park to 8th Avenue.
74


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Visual and preforming artists should be encouraged to locate along
the Avenue of the Arts.
Issue
The historic structures onAcoma add texture to the built environment in the sub-area.
Recommendations
) A combination of historic structures and high quality new construction should
be used to develop a complex texture for the Avenue of the Arts.
Issue
There is very little development or street activity contributing to the bustling public
realm envisioned by the Golden Triangle Neighborhood.
Recommendations
) New construction should incorporate first floor public activities and be as
transparent as possible.
Issue
The Denver Municipal Credit Union has built its new banking facility on the southwest
corner. The Acoma Center across the street in the renovated Swedish church acts as a
community center, live stage and movie theater. Both of these have begun to establish
the public character of this intersection.
Recommendations
) Create a Village Center at 11th Avenue and Acoma.
) Encourage the further development of this intersection into a node of activity
by redeveloping the Evans School.
) Encourage the inclusion of public uses in the buildings on the northeast corner.
) Improve the intersection with bulb-outs across 11th Avenue to provide shorter
pedestrian crossings.
75


SPEER BOULEVARD SUB-AREA
ENLARGE SPEER TRIANGLE
INSTALL PUBLIC ART
REDEVELOP PARKING LOT
WITH MID-RISE BUILDING -
SHOULD MIMIC SCALE OF
PARKWAY CENTER. SET BACK
ALL NEW CONSTRUCTION A
MINIMUM OF 10 FEET WITH
DETACHED SIDEWALKS AND
TREE LAWNS
ENLARGE SPEER TRIANGLE-
INSTALL PUBLIC ART
REDEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITY
INFILL OPPORTUNITY
SCREEN PARKING LOT
GATEWAY OPPORTUNITY-
INCORPORATE PUBLIC ART
ELIMINATE ON-STREET
PARKING ADD TREE LAWN
AND STREETSCAPING
RELOCATE PS-1
ENLARGE SPEER TRIANGLE
INSTALL PUBLIC ART
PLANT TREES IN EXISTING
TREE LAWN
IMPROVE TRAFFIC SIGNAL TO
MINIMIZE CONGESTION
CLOSE ALLEY-
REDEVELOPMENT
OPPORTUNITY
PRESERVE EXISTING
CARPENTER GOTHIC HOUSES
REUSE EXISTING BUILDINGS
ENLARGE SPEER TRIANGLE -
INCORPORATE PUBLIC ART.
GATEWAY OPPORTUNITY -
INCORPORATE PUBLIC ART
ELIMINATE DRIVE-THROUGH
LANE
DEVELOP TRAFFIC CALMING
CONFIGURATION FOR
CHEROKEE STREET INSTALL
PUBLIC ART
PLANT TREES IN EXISTING
TREE LAWN
RECONSTRUCT PEDESTRIAN
BRIDGE
SPEER BOULEVARD SUB-AREA PLAN
76


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Speer Boulevard and the Cherry
spaces for the Golden Triangle,
amenity and the Golden Triangle
Creek Path form one of the major open
Connections between this recreational
should be strengthened.
SPEER BOULEVARD
SUB-AREA PLAN
Existing Conditions
The Speer Boulevard sub-area is located on the western edge of the Golden Triangle. It
extends from the center line of Cherry Creek to one block east of Speer, and from
Colfax on the north to Logan on the south. Speer Boulevard, which is a designated
Historic Landmark District and historic parkway, is a major traffic artery used by
47,000 cars per day. In addition to the landscaped automotive boulevard, there is a
bike and hiking path along Cherry Creek. The bike path is one of the major open
space amenities in the City and is a significant asset for the Golden Triangle. In spite of
the presence of five ramps providing access to the creek, poor pedestrian connections
across Speer make access from the Golden Triangle to this important amenity very
difficult.Triangle shaped pieces of land, which are part of the Historic Landmark
Parkway, are formed at the intersection of Speer Boulevard with the north-south streets
and the east-west avenues.
Land use in the sub-area is a mixture of single story commercial properties such as
Rickenbaugh Cadillac-Volvo with some mid-rise offices and surface parking lots. Many
of the blocks in the sub-area are underdeveloped.There are some buildings of
historical interest, notably the Rocky Mountain Bank Note Company and the 1100
block of storefronts; however, they are vacant and not maintained at this time.
In spite of the marginal land use and heavy traffic volume in the sub-area, a stroll down
Speer Boulevard along Cherry Creek is one of Denvers most pleasant urban
experiences. It is critical that the connection to this resource be maximized as the
Golden Triangle develops.
Vision
The Speer sub-area is a major public amenity of the Golden Triangle.The sub-area has
been redeveloped and now consists of several mid-rise office and residential
structures.Along with Racines, there are other restaurants with outdoor seating areas
that serve residents of the Golden Triangle and provide a stopping point for the
77


SPEER BOULEVARD SUB-AREA
r-* f
Existing conditions at Delaware Street and Speer Boolevard. The historic
Rocky Moentain Banknote Beilding is located on the right.
Speer Triangles shoeld be enlarged to serve as traffic calming devices into
the Golden Triangle. Green spaces provide opportenities for peblic art. The
Rocky Moentain Banknote Beilding will hoese the PS1 Charter School.
passing in-line skaters and bicyclists.The alley in the 1100 block has been closed and a
signature building has been built on the northside at the 11th Avenue gateway.
The creek bed has been adopted by the neighborhood and has been enhanced with
additional planting and public amenities.
Pedestrian connections to the Golden Triangle have been improved by the installation
of mid-block pedestrian cross-lights and a foot bridge across the creek leading to
Sunken Garden Park. Existing bridges at 11th, 13th, 14th and Colfax have been
enhanced with pedestrian lights. Cross walks have been enhanced by changes in
paving and pedestrian activated crossing lights.
The Speer green triangles have been enhanced and now serve as gateways into the
Golden Triangle. Several of the islands have been expanded and connected with the
adjacent property, although the original historic configuration is clearly visible.The
islands contain public art placed by the City, the Denver Art Museum, and private
collectors.The island at Cherokee Street has been modified to serve as a traffic calming
device for cars traveling north from Speer Boulevard into the Golden Triangle.
Through careful redevelopment the Speer sub-area has become the playground of the
Golden Triangle. It provides both recreational opportunities and a green respite from
the more intense urban environment of the Golden Triangle.
Land Use
Issue
Speer Boulevard no longer supports the street front commercial uses it once did. As a
result many blocks consist of vacant buildings or marginal uses that do not contribute
to the vitality of the neighborhood. One entire block is surface parking and other
blocks have single story buildings surrounded by large parking lots.
Recommendations
k Redevelop marginal blocks in the sub-area. Appropriate uses include mid-rise
residential complexes and offices.
k Public ground floor activities, such as restaurants, are encouraged. Ground floors
78


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Gateways into
the Golden Triangle can be created
by enhancin
the
green islands alon
eer Goulevard.
must be transparent (visually open to pedestrians) pursuant to the guidelines,
regardless of use.
) Parking should not front onto Speer.AU parking should be located away from
Speer, accessed by alleys or name streets.
) Locate Public School 1 (PS-1) on the intersection of Speer and Delaware.
Enhance green triangle to support this use.
) Allow the closure of alleys that intersect Speer, where consolidation of property
would encourage development.
Vehicular Circulation and Transit
Issue
Speer Boulevard is a major traffic artery and serves as the southwestern gateway to the
Golden Triangle. As cars travel north on Speer, they enter the Golden Triangle at high
speeds on Cherokee. This is a potentially dangerous situation and does not allow for
any sense of arrival into the Golden Triangle.
Recommendations
) Use Speer green triangles to serve as traffic calming devices as well as gateways
into the Golden Triangle. Consider closing or necking down the islands at
Cherokee, Delaware, Elati, Fox, and Galapago Streets.
Issue
The green triangles are part of the Historic Landmark District and any alteration to the
existing configuration must respect the historic character of the parkway.
Recommendations
) Expand or connect Speer green islands with the adjacent blocks. Differentiate
between the historic green and new paving.
) Place sculptures or gateway structures on the green islands to create entrances
into the Golden Triangles at Zeckendorf Park at 7th, 9th, 11th, 13th, and Colfax
Avenue.
79


SPEER BOULEVARD SUB-AREA
Pedestrian and bicyclist access tn the Cherry Creek Path is hindered
by Speer Bnulevard.
Pedestrian Environment and Circulation
Issue
Speer Boulevard and the Cherry Creek bike path are two of the major civic amenities
of Denver. In spite of its proximity, pedestrians perceive that it is difficult to cross
Speer and to access the bike path from the Golden Triangle.The width of the road, the
volume of cars, and speed of traffic on Speer Boulevard create a barrier that hinders
pedestrian access.The lack of pedestrian connection also inhibits residents of the
Golden Triangle from walking to Sunken Garden Park or King Soopers located on the
west side of Speer Boulevard.
Recommendations
) Provide clearly delineated pedestrian crossing zones at 10th and 12th Avenues.
) Provide a foot bridge across Cherry Creek to access Sunken Gardens.This bridge
should be located at the site of the historic abutments leading to Sunken Garden
Park.
Issue
The sidewalks along both sides of the north bound lane of Speer do not provide a
comfortable walking zone. Narrow attached sidewalks, high speed traffic and buildings
with narrow setbacks are obstacles to improving the pedestrian experience.
Recommendations
) Require detached sidewalks with tree lawns for all new construction.
) Setback all new construction on Speer Boulevard pursuant to guidelines.
) Widen sidewalk and move curb out where possible.
80


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Future developments alung Speer Boulevard should mimic Park Geeter
West ie scale. New parkieg lots adjaceet to Speer Boulevard eot
allowed ueder curreet zoeieg.
Urban Form
Issue
Speer Boulevard is one of the premier legacies of the City Beautiful movement in Denver.
The sub-area contains a mixture of uses from mid-rise office, drive-in coffee shops, and
parking lots.There is no continuous edge to reinforce the linear quality of the parkway, nor
is there any consistent treatment of the landscape on property adjacent to the parkway
Recommendations
) Encourage mid-rise construction in the sub-area. Match the scale of Parkway
Center that encloses and reinforces the linearity of the parkway to create an
outdoor room.
) New construction should establish a consistent street frontage onto Speer.
) Lawns fronting Speer Boulevard should be consistent with the characteristics of
the Parkway.The phrase a continuous carpet has been used to describe this
character.This implies a continuity of the ground plane with no abrupt
transitions or berms.Trees, grass lawns, and foundation planting are the
recommended landscape treatment.
) Provide gateways denoting the entrance into the Golden Triangle from Speer
Boulevard at Bannock and 11th Avenue, Colfax and 14th Avenue.
) Provide entrances from Speer Boulevard into new buildings.
Issue
Some of the service alleys intersect Speer in a way that results in small parcels of land
that are too small to develop.
Recommendations
) Close alleys where appropriate to assemble small parcels and encourage redevelopment.
Issue
The green triangles are an underdeveloped greenspace amenity.
Recommendations
) Connect green triangle parks to adjacent property to provide an enhanced
linked open space system.
81


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
The implementation plan consists of specific actions that can be taken to implement
the recommendations contained in the framework and sub-area plans.This is not an
exhaustive list, but suggests some steps for the realization of the vision for the Golden
Triangle Plan.
Make people aware of the neighborhood plan, its recommendations and its
purpose as a road map for the development of the village.
) Planning Office and the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association will make
copies of the plan available to the neighborhood.The Golden Triangle
Neighborhood Association to notify the neighborhood via the newsletter of the
availability of the plan.
) Planning Office to distribute final plan internally to other city departments.
) Planning Office and Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association will make the
plan available to potential developers and others as requested.
) Put Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association plan on the internet as that
capability is developed.
) Involve PS-1 in the creation of a Golden Triangle web page which would include
the principles of the plan.
Use the recommendations of the neighborhood plan in the review of all
projects
) Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Board of directors to be
knowledgeable of the plan and to use it in the evaluation of proposals and board
actions.
) Planning Office to request that all proposals and projects be submitted to the
Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association as information items for the Board.
82


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
The following action items are based on the committee structure of the
Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association and listed under the committee
which would carry them out
) Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Board to define a sub-committee
structure and create a framework for the committees to collaborate on
recommendations and implementation of the plan.
Marketing
) Market the Golden Triangle as an urban village: a walkable community with
lively public places, a mixed-use neighborhood with diverse uses and users, a
unique neighborhood where people live work and play, an identifiable
neighborhood with a strong sense of place.
) Encourage the development of housing
I Identify and market developable property and buildings which could be
converted to housing.
I Work with the Denver Partnership to promote and identify housing
opportunities in the neighborhood.
I Work with CDA, CHFA and other housing agencies to identify funding
sources for affordable housing.
) Encourage the development of mixed-use projects
I Identify opportunities for neighborhood serving retail in the ground floor of
mixed use projects.
) Identify opportunities for entertainment uses and destination retail.
) Encourage the location of arts-related uses in the neighborhood. Identify
opportunities.
) Develop a marketing strategy once opportunities have been identified.
) Develop a database of properties, listing vacant property, empty buildings,
developable land, and space for lease.
) Market the existing businesses: create a map and a flier to promote the
neighborhood.
) Work with the Downtown Partnership to market the Golden Triangle along with
downtown, recognizing the Golden Triangle as an extension of the core and the
importance of Civic Center as the connection between them.
83


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
Urban Design
) The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Urban Design Committee will
reinforce the urban design recommendations of the plan.
) Develop strategies to encourage creative architecture, design diversity and
quality in the village.
) City and Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Urban Design Committee to
develop concepts for the urban design elements for the village with an emphasis
on walkability and the placement of public art.
\ Work with building owners to landmark historically significant and contributing
structures.
\ Create and refine the Village Center at 11th and Acoma.
) Work with the owners of the Evans School to designate and rehabilitate the
building.
Street Space and the Public Realm
) Enhance the pedestrian connections and walkability of the village through
improved streetscape, lighting, special street furniture and public art.
) Create a streetscape master plan for the neighborhood which will include
recommendations for street trees, pedestrian lighting, paving, tree lawns,
landscaping and street furniture.
) Create a cookbook of recommended landscaping methods and materials.
) Establish a tree-planting program for the neighborhood.
) Expand the flower planting program in the neighborhood.
) Work with the Denver Art Museum, the Colorado Historical Society and private
collectors to develop a strategy for the incorporation of public art into the public realm.
) Work with developers to incorporate public art into private development projects.
) Enforce the maintenance requirements for existing and future streetscape
improvements.
) Revise the sign code to allow projecting, three-dimensional and creative signs in
the B-8-G zone district.
) Work with the utility companies to remove poles and underground utilities in
the whole village. Begin with Acoma and 11th Avenue.
) Work with the zoning department to remove all billboards
84


GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Parking
) Conduct a parking management study to look at how the existing and future
parking needs of the people who work, shop, visit and park in the neighborhood
can be met.
\ Create a parking strategy for the neighborhood to reduce the amount of land
used for parking and reduce the overall number of parking spaces required.
| Develop a parking master plan and parking management strategy. Provide an
ongoing evaluation of the parking strategy and revise as necessary.
\ Zoning to revise the existing parking requirements to allow reduced parking for
office and retail in mixed use projects. Consider shared parking as one means of
achieving this.
) Initiate a dialogue with the City and State to address the parking needs of their
employees.
) Encourage parking in structures with ground floor public uses.
| Enforce the parking lot landscaping standards.
) Develop a strategy to bring existing surface parking lots into conformance with
the landscaping standards; create a funding source to provide low interest loans
to allow owners to amortize the expense.
Transportation
) Conduct a traffic and speed study for the neighborhood which will accomplish
the following:
I Evaluate the current street capacities.
I Estimate the future build out of the neighborhood to evaluate future traffic
demands.
| Determine methods to focus regional traffic on the arterial edges.
I Study the need to maintain Delaware and Cherokee as a one-way couplet and
the conversion into two-way streets.
| Recommend appropriate methods to slow cars on Acoma, Cherokee,
Delaware, and 11th, 12th, 10th and 9th Avenues to retain them as local
streets.
| Determine additional locations for traffic calming; evaluate and recommend
appropriate methods.
85


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
) Include Transportation and Urban Design Committees of the Golden Triangle
Neighborhood Association in the review of any proposed alley or street
vacations for impact on the neighborhood.
) Work with the Denver Transportation to develop a policy and master plan for
alley access to new projects in order to prohibit new curb cuts on streets.
) Fund a study to reexamine the design of Broadway. Discuss the proposal for
HOV lanes.
) Enhance the walkability and pedestrian connections throughout the village.
) Conduct a pedestrian circulation study in order to accomplish safer and easier
pedestrian connections across major streets:
I Study connections to adjacent neighborhoods including downtown, Capital
Hill and Lincoln.
| Determine where stop signs and pedestrian crossing signals are needed.
| Determine where curbs can be bulbed-out to shorten the crossing distance.
I Identify intersections where conflicts with vehicles occur; recommend
solutions.
| Recommend additional methods to identify and alert vehicles to pedestrian
crossing zones.
) Implement the actions of the pedestrian study.
) Implement the actions of the bicycle plan.
Transit
Make RTD a partner with the neighborhood organization. Work with them to:
) Discontinue the staging of buses in the neighborhood
) Establish an RTD Rider incentive program for employees in the neighborhood.
) Improve the appearance, lighting and safety of bus shelters.
) Create a special shelter for Broadway and Lincoln from Colfax to Speer.
) Bring the Cultural Connection Trolley into the neighborhood.
) Discuss future public transportation plans that would impact the neighborhood.
86


GOLDEN TRIANGLE N EIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Sub-areas ) Create a committee of business and land owners for each sub-area to address the needs and issues for their sub-area and to help implement the recommendations. ) Include sub-area representatives on the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association board. ) Create a mechanism for the sub-area committees to share information with each other and to collaborate on ideas. Colfax ) Create a Colfax sub-area committee to implement the recommendations of the sub-area plan, including the creation of a gateway at Speer Boulevard and encouraging of uses which support the Convention Center. Cultural Complex ) Reconvene the Civic Center Cultural Complex Task Force as the sub-area committee to: I Implement the recommendations of the sub-area plan. I Develop a marketing strategy for encouraging cultural, institutional and arts- related uses to locate in the sub-area. | Market the presence of the Western History holdings of the cultural institutions. I Work with Denver Transportation, the Denver Partnership and the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Transportation Committee to improve pedestrian connections from the Golden Triangle to Civic Center to downtown. I Work with Golden Triangle NeighborhoodAssociationArts and Cultural Committee, the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Urban Design Committee and Denver Planning to develop special streetscape elements for the sub-area. I Develop a strategy to purchase the property to complete the Arc Park along 13 th Avenue.
87


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
I Work with the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association to establish a
policy regarding the use of the Civic Center park for regional events and its
role as a neighborhood park.
I Build a parking structure, as part of a mixed use project, to accommodate the
parking currently on surface lots.
I Develop a special bus shelter for the sub-area.
Lincoln-Broadway
) Create a Lincoln-Broadway sub-area committee to:
I Implement the recommendations of the sub-area plan.
| Market the corridor for destination retail, restaurants, entertainment uses,
office and commercial development, as well as uses that serve the needs of
the residents of both Capital Hill and the Golden Triangle.
I Work with building and business owners, Golden Triangle Neighborhood
Association Urban Design Committee and the Planning Office to improve
existing building facades. Encourage the lighting of facades and display
windows to activate the street at night.
I Explore grants for facade rehabilitation programs through the State Historic
Preservation Office.
I Work with the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Urban Design
Committee and the Planning Office to encourage the major portion of
building to be built to the property line, and to follow traditional facade
proportions.
I Require specially designed screen walls at the perimeter of parking lots on
Broadway.
I Work with Blue Cross to add pedestrian interest to the walls around the base
of their building and improve their streestscape.
I Work with Parks & Recreation to improve the park amenity at 7th Avenue.
I Work with the Transportation Department to evaluate the redesign of
Broadway.
I Create a streetscape master plan to establish a unique identity for the
sub-area.
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1 GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLANGOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBOR H OOD PLANJUNE 7, 1998

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CONTENTS 2 TABLE OF CONTENTSMISSION STATEMENT . . . . .3 INTRODUCTION . . . . .4Purpose of the Plan . . . . .4 Plan Components . . . . .4 Use of the Plan . . . . .5 Previous Plans . . . . .5EXISTING CONDITIONS . . . .7 THE VISION . . . . . .19 GOALS & PRINCIPLES . . . .21 FRAMEWORK PLAN . . . . .23 SUB-AREA PLANS . . . . .43LincolnBroadwaySub-area . . . .45 Civic Center Sub-area . . . .61 Colfax Overlap . . . . .69 Speer Sub-area . . . . .70 Acoma Sub-area . . . . .76IMPLEMENTATION PLAN . . . .82 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS . . . .92

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MISSION STATEMENTThe Golden Triangle Neighborhood will become an urban village:a mixed-use neighborhood with diverse uses and usersa walkable community with lively public spacesan identifiable neighborhood with a strong sense of placea unique neighborhood in which to live,work and play GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 3

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INTRODUCTIONThe Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan represents the joint effort of the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association,the Denver Civic Center Cultural Complex and the City.Purpose of the PlanTo establish long range goals and objectives for the development of the neighborhood into an urban village,with a unique character. To provide a framework and establish implementation strategies which will direct the neighborhood towards its vision as a community where people live,work,play,and celebrate Denver's cultural heritage.Plan ComponentsVisionThe vision describes the Golden Triangle in the future,as an end result,with current issues resolved,goals met and desires fulfilled.Framework planThe framework plan identifies improvements that are necessary to fulfill objectives of the neighborhood.The framework plan presents the issues which are relevant to the entire neighborhood and recommendations that tie the neighborhood together.Sub-area plansThe plan establishes four sub-areas which have relatively distinct characteristics.It acknowledges that the boundaries between the sub-areas are not sacrosanct and that some characteristics overlap sub-area boundaries.The sub-area plans present issues and recommendations which are supplemental to those presented in the framework plan.Goals & PrinciplesPrinciples are the concepts that frame the plan recommendations to achieve the goals of the neighborhood. INTRODUCTION 4 Golden Triangle 1936

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Use of the PlanThe plan presents the best thinking of the city and the neighborhood and provides a city-approved guide to the acceptable future development of the neighborhood.It is intended for use by the Planning and Development Office,the Denver Planning Board, the Mayor,City Council,other governmental agencies,residents,property owners, business people and private organizations concerned with planning,development and neighborhood improvement.The plan is neither an official zone map,nor does it create or deny any rights.Zone changes that may be proposed as part of any development must be initiated under a separate procedure established under the Revised Municipal Code. The plan is intended to promote patterns of land use,urban design,circulation and services that contribute to the economic,social,and physical health,safety and welfare of the people who live and work in the neighborhood.The neighborhood plan addresses issues and opportunities at a scale that is more refined and more responsive to specific needs than the City's Comprehensive Plan.The neighborhood plan serves as a component of that document.Previous plansThis plan represents the urban design vision for the emerging Golden Triangle Neighborhood.It updates and incorporates recommendations of earlier plans,which are many,because of the proximity of the neighborhood to and impact on downtown. Previously adopted planning documents that are relevant to the Golden Triangle Neighborhood are:The Civic Center Area:Analysis & Development Policies,Denver Planning Office, 1978.The Downtown Area Plan,The Denver Partnership,Inc.and the Denver Planning Office,1986.The Comprehensive Plan,City and County of Denver,1989.The Civic Center Cultural Complex Plan:Final Synthesis,Venturi,Scott,Brown and Associates,March 31,1992. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 5

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The Capital Hill Cheesman Park Neighborhood Plan,Planning and Community Development Office,City and County of Denver,June 1993.The 1996 Downtown Denver Agenda,Planning and Community Development Office,City and County of Denver,1996. These plans have been reviewed and relevant material has been incorporated in the development of this plan.This and all other neighborhood plans supplement the City's Comprehensive Plan.The Comprehensive Plan presents a citywide perspective,while each neighborhood plan provides more specific guidance both for the allocation of City resources and for the location and design of private development. INTRODUCTION 6

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EXISTING CONDITIONSLocation No other area in the City is as strategically located to so many jobs and cultural and civic institutions.The Golden Triangle neighborhood lies in the heart of the City.It encompasses Civic Center Park,the State Capitol,state and local government offices, the Denver Art Museum,the Denver Central Public Library and the Colorado Historical Society.It lies south of the downtown core and central business district, north of Denver Health Medical Center and Baker Neighborhood,west of Capitol Hill and Cheesman Park residential areas,and east of Lincoln Park Neighborhood. The Cherry Creek North retail district and the Cherry Creek Shopping Center are easily accessible within minutes of the neighborhood and the Denver Country Club Historic District with its luxury housing is just to the southeast. The Golden Triangle is bounded by the major arteries of Lincoln-Broadway,Colfax Avenue and Speer Boulevard,which not only carry large volumes of traffic around the neighborhood,but help clearly define its boundaries.Western LegacyThe Golden Triangle contains the legacy of Denver's pride and western history.Its streets bear the names of Indian tribes and Mayor Speer,the namesake of Speer Boulevard,was the founder of Denver's "City Beautiful"movement.The government and cultural buildings surrounding the Civic Center are a microcosm of Denver's history.Within the boundaries are samples of public and private architecture from many eras.TransitionThe Golden Triangle has been in a state of transition for 40 years.It has been viewed as the "golden opportunity",blessed with an ideal location,economic base and numerous public and natural amenities.To date its potential has been largely underdeveloped.Its destiny in the past has been dependent on the will of others the City government,the Convention Center and land speculators.Its roads have provided access to Downtown.Its uses dedicated to the automobile as a parking GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 7 Golden Triangle and adjacent neighborhoods. AU R AR I ALO W E R D O W N T O W N D O W N T O W NN O R T H C API T O LH I LL C API T O LH I LL G O LD E N T R I AN G LE LI N C O LN PAR K

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reservoir for Civic Center employees and visitors and automotive maintenance facilities.There has been little or no sense of community.OpportunitiesNotwithstanding its location,the Golden Triangle is largely underdeveloped.With over 33% of the land vacant or in surface parking lots,and a large area significantly underutilized,the Golden Triangle presents an opportunity to build a new community and to create a strategically located urban village.New Beginnings1994 marked the beginning of a new era.The cultural institutions,the Denver Art Museum,the Denver Central Library,and the Colorado Historical Society joined forces to form an innovative partnership:the Civic Center Cultural Complex.This was a milestone in public agency cooperation.A $60 million investment was made in the construction of the new Central library and the renovations to the art museum. This presence,and its influence on the Golden Triangle Neighborhood,cannot be underestimated. Through a private-public collaboration,new levels of creativity,opportunity and quality of life can be realized.The Cultural Complex as the foremost education center and resource of the West and as the world wide catalyst for associated activities,is the keystone of the village.Population The Golden Triangle is comprised of census tract #20 and parts of tracts #27.01 and #27.02.The 1990 resident population was 256.In 1995,the population rose to 703, an increase of 175%.Employment The neighborhood supplies 12,012 jobs.Government employees make up the majority of the labor force with 46% of the total number of jobs.Manufacturing represents 25% of the work force.Employees in the service industry represent 13% of the work force.Financial,insurance and real estate companies comprise 7% of the EXISTING CONDITIONS 8 Aerial photograph of Golden Triangle

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work force.Retail trade makes up 3% of the work force.Transportation, communication and public utilities represent 3% of the labor force.Land UseThe character of the Golden Triangle Neighborhood provides an interesting juxtaposition of land uses.While automotive garages and surface parking lots are located in the neighborhood,it also enjoys the presence of cultural,recreational, commercial and residential entities.Public, Institutional and Cultural FacilitiesContributing to the character of the neighborhood are the many public and cultural facilities in the area.The foundation on which the neighborhood builds its communal identity is established through the daily tasks of the facilities.The City and County Building,the Police Building,the Permit Center and the Denver Health Medical Center, augment the employment base in the neighborhood and affect the nature of surrounding businesses.Likewise,the influence of great political and cultural institutions,such as the Colorado State Capitol,the Denver Mint,the Denver Public Library,the Denver Art Museum,the Evans Byers House,and the Colorado Historical Society,creates an environment that attracts employees,residents and tourists alike. The Acoma City Center at 11th and Acoma is a neighborhood center where artist's studios and live theater are located.The Center acts as the community gathering space, providing both a physical and emotional center for the neighborhood. P.S.1,and urban learning center and charter school,is currently located at 9th Avenue and Bannock,but will relocate to the Rocky Mountain Banknote Building at 11th Avenue and Speer in 1998.It's presence enhances the idea of a fully functioning Urban Village by bringing a diversity of activities and ages to the neighborhood,and by its ability to serve the resident population.It will encourage families to live in the neighborhood and provide an active,vibrant life during the day and night,through it's involvement with the community. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 9 Other Utilities Manufacturing Financial Service Industry Retail GovernmentEMPLOYMENT Breakdown of employment categories by percentage. 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 19901995POPULATION Population increase in the Golden Triangle from 1990 to 1995. 46% 25% 13% 7% 3% 3% 3% Other Utilities Manufacturing Financial Service Industry Retail Government EMPLOYMENT POPULATION

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Natural Features, Parks and Open SpaceThe Golden Triangle Neighborhood enjoys the presence of parks and open space, which provide opportunities for both active recreation and passive enjoyment.Cherry Creek provides both water,green space,and a bike and walking path which connects the neighborhood to the region through an extensive path system.The Speer Boulevard parkway and triangle parks contribute to this green edge on the western boundary,as do the Sunken Gardens and the pocket park at 7th and Speer. Civic Center Park is the grand civic space that calls the Golden Triangle home.It is a monumental space which houses elements of our cultural heritage,architectural history and beautiful flower beds,and can be enjoyed in a quiet stroll.It is also the venue for popular regional events,such as the Taste of Colorado,drawing thousands of people state-wide. The "Arc"is the newly created open space,an urban forecourt on 13th Avenue which gives relief to the Denver Art Museum,the Colorado Historical Society,and the Denver Public Library.The "Arc"also visually reduces the impact of the surface parking lot that it borders.A sculpture plaza between the Denver Art Museum and the Denver Public Library,the Acoma Plaza,draws visitors to the area,increasing the cultural connections to the neighborhood.Commercial: RetailThe Golden Triangle enjoys a growing community of diverse retail businesses.The majority of the retail businesses are located long the Lincoln-Broadway corridor. Restaurants,dance studios,television studios,sporting goods stores,home furnishing stores,design studios,and art galleries,among other businesses,dot the streets of the neighborhood.Long-time,local businesses,such as Rickenbaugh Cadillac/Volvo,Gart Sports and Howard Lorton Galleries,sit next to new and restored buildings inhabited by businesses that are new to the area,such as The Church,Ilios and Pony Expresso. EXISTING CONDITIONS 10

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GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 11 Colfax AveSpeer Blvd. 14th AVE.13th AVE. 12th AVE. 11th AVE.10th AVE. 9th AVE.8th AVE. BroadwayAcoma St.Bannock St.Cherokee St. Delaware St.Lincoln St.Elati St.Fox St.Galapago St. Lincoln St.Sherman St. 6TH AVE.15th St. 14th St.Glenarm St. Tremont Pl. Court Pl. Cleveland Pl. Existing Land Use Residential / Hotel Office Retail / Restaurant Retail / Services Communication / Utilities Parking Institutional Vacant Open Space, Parks Light Industrial / Auto Uses Retail / Residential

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Commercial: OfficeBoth public and private entities utilize office space in the Golden Triangle.Branches of the federal,state,and local government work along side large corporations,like Blue Cross-Blue Shield,Security Life,the Rocky Mountain News and Rocky Mountain Orthodontics,and small,locally owned businesses.Start-up businesses establish themselves in small,"incubator"offices within the neighborhood,profiting from the reasonable rents offered by the small space,and the proximity to downtown.Other professionals,such as lawyers,locate their businesses in the area to take advantage of close proximity to the Courts. Since the neighborhood is adjacent to downtown,the office workers carry on their daily tasks with easy access to the central business district.The high volume of commuters affects the neighborhood by maintaining the demand for surface parking.Commercial: Light Industrial/ Auto Related UsesLight industrial and auto related businesses have had a long presence in the neighborhood.Auto repair shops,car dealerships and manufacturing plants have observed the evolution of the neighborhood and continue to affect its composition. The existing auto-related and light industrial facilities act as an asset to the neighborhood,providing necessary services in close proximity to residential and employment centers.However,the addition of new facilities has been discouraged through the change of zoning from B-8 to B-8-G.Auto related uses were made conditional uses,allowed only through neighborhood notification and a public process.Utilities and CommunicationsOther businesses contributing to the diversity of the Golden Triangle include utility and communication related uses.The training facility and offices of the Public Service Company of Colorado are located within the neighborhood,as are three major television stations:Channels 4,6 and 7.Private enterprises related to communication technology can be found in the area as well. EXISTING CONDITIONS 12 0.0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 1960 19901997RESIDENTIAL UNITS Total number of residential units in the Golden Triangle.

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ResidentialThe number of residential units fell from 1,500 in 1960 to 250 in 1990.Since then,the development of lofts and town homes has accelerated and the additional number of units completed or under construction is 239.In 1995,the Forum Building was developed into a single room occupancy residence,adding 100 residential units.The total number of units is currently 589.Of the units built before 1940,the majority are rental properties.Social ServicesThe Golden Triangle is home to a few social service agencies.Shalom Denver trains and employs disabled adults.The Job Service Center finds employment opportunities for needy individuals.The Forum Building is a multi-unit dwelling providing housing for previously homeless adults.Low cost hotels,including the 11th Avenue Broadway Hotel and the Coolidge Hotel,accept social service housing vouchers.David Clifton Ministries serves meals to poor and homeless individuals.Denver Cares,an alcohol rehabilitation center,and Western Clinical Health Services,a methadone clinic,serve the needs of substance abusers.ParkingNumerous surface parking lots exist in the neighborhood.Although parking is needed in the area,the lots are void of character and deteriorate the pedestrian experience. They do,however,provide great opportunities for development.ZoningThe Golden Triangle was zoned B-8 until 1994 when it's zoning was modified to B-8-G,a zoning category created for the Golden Triangle and unique to the area.Certain important changes in the zoning were made to enable the area to become a mixed use neighborhood with a strong residential component and to encourage pedestrian friendly design.Certain uses were eliminated as uses by right.These include automobile uses,adult uses,package liquor stores,drive through uses and surface parking lots.These uses were made conditional uses,subject to a neighborhood notification process,public hearing and review by planning and zoning representatives. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 13 ZONINGMAP B-8-G boundary and adjacent districts.

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Floor Area PremiumsThe desired character of the neighborhood is reflected in the density premiums allowed by the new zoning.The basic density allowed,four times the lot area,may be increased up to six times if certain uses are included.Premiums are given for providing housing,childcare,residential support and cultural facilities located on the ground floor of structures,and public art.A premium is also given for the rehabilitation of a building designated for preservation.Design ReviewThe new zoning establishes design guidelines and review for the design of streetfacing building facades.To promote pedestrian activity and a walkable environment, design guidelines address human scale and detail of facade design,spatial definition of the street space,the civic character of the Civic Center and the parkway character of Speer Boulevard.Design Review is performed by members of the Planning Office and the Planning Board Chair.Building Height ControlsThe B-8-G zone district sets the maximum height of structures at 175 feet as measured from the elevation of Broadway.Upon the request of an applicant,a review committee may increase heights up to 25 feet in order to compensate for unusual site conditions. Additional height controls include the Civic Center Mountain View Preservation Ordinance and the Civic Center Height Control Ordinance governing building heights in the Civic Center area.The controls are established to preserve the integrity of the Civic Center,to protect the openness of its unique public space and to preserve the view of the mountains. The Cheesman Park Botanic Gardens View Preservation Ordinance was established to preserve panoramic views from the Botanic Gardens,through Cheesman Park west to Broadway.Heights established by view preservation ordinances supersede those established by the B-8-G zone district. EXISTING CONDITIONS 14

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GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 15 C o l f a x A v eS p e e r B l v d A c o m a S t E l a t i S t .F o x S t 15 t h St. 1 4 th S t .G l e n a r m S t T r e m o n t P l C o u r t P l C l e v e l a n d P l 5 th A v e Opportunities and Constraints Redevelopment Opportunity Rehabilitation Opportunity Character Defining Buildings (to remain) Buildings Likely to Remain6th Ave. 6th Ave. 7th Ave. 8th Ave. 9th Ave. 10th Ave. 11th Ave. 12th Ave. 13th Ave. 14th Ave.

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Civic Center Landmark DistrictIn addition to being in the B-8-G zone district,Civic Center is a Historic Landmark District,with its own set of design guidelines.Any change to an existing structure or construction of new structures must comply with the Civic Center Design Guidelines and be reviewed by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.Urban FormThe Golden Triangle is unique in that its boundaries are clearly defined by major arterials while physical form within is loosely defined.With the presence of vacant land in surface parking lots and under-developed property,there is great potential for development and change.In addition there are several buildings of varying age and architectural style which are strong assets of the neighborhood,contribute to its unique character,and should be cherished and preserved.Many exist in and around Civic Center on the northern edge,some along Broadway and Lincoln (such as Gart's Sports and the Jonas Building),along Speer (such as the Rocky Mountain Banknote building) and others interspersed within the neighborhood (such as the Evans School and the Acoma City Center).Together these physical characteristics provide great opportunities to create an identity and a unique character within.Vehicular CirculationThe Golden Triangle is influenced by the presence of major streets within its boundaries.Four major arterials form its edges:Speer Boulevard,Colfax Avenue and the Broadway/Lincoln one-way couplet.Four arterials;13th/14th and 6th/8th Avenues form one-way couplets for east-west travel.Cherokee provides one-way access from the south into downtown and Delaware one-way access from downtown.11th Avenue is the one continuous two-way street that connects the Lincoln Park neighborhood to Capitol Hill.These high volume streets are connected by low volume interior streets and form a strong framework around which the neighborhood will develop. EXISTING CONDITIONS 16 C olfax Ave 14th AVE.13th AVE.BroadwayAcoma St.Bannock St.Cherokee St. Delaware St.Lincoln St.Elati St. Lincoln St.Sherman St.15th St. 14th St.Glenarm St. Tremont Pl. Court Pl. Cleveland Pl. Civic Center Landmark District Boundary.

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TransitThe Civic Center RTD station at Broadway and Colfax is a major transit station where regional buses connect with local buses and the 16th Street Mall Shuttle.Pedestrian Circulation & EnvironmentHigh volume streets within and bordering the neighborhood are difficult to cross and disrupt pedestrian circulation.Frequent curb cuts which bring cars across the pedestrian space interrupt the continuity of the walking experience. Because of the presence of high volume streets within and bordering the neighborhood,pedestrian circulation is disrupted.Connections across these streets are tenuous.Sidewalks are discontinuous,interrupted by frequent curb cuts.Though a growing number of businesses and property owners maintain trees lawns throughout the neighborhood,streetscaping is spotty;few trees or landscaped areas exist to shade and beautify the sidewalks.Many buildings lack public ground floor uses to entice pedestrians along the streets. There are some exceptions,including the Speer/Broadway corner at Rickenbaugh Cadillac/Volvo,Metro Lofts and Public Service Company on Acoma,the Civic Center Parking lots at Acoma and 13th Avenue and the Acoma Streetscape project from 12th Avenue to 11th (and in phase 2 to 10th),one of the City's Capitol Improvement Projects.Market ConditionsThe Golden Triangle is currently experiencing a period of growth.Three new residential projects are complete:Cadillac Lofts,Metropolitan Lofts and Balustrade.Two are under construction:Grand Cherokee and Century Lofts.Several others are proposed,including Trieste,Caravele,and Phase 2 of Bannock Center. While some projects are strictly residential,others,like the Grand Cherokee Lofts, are mixed-use projects,incorporating retail businesses into the ground floor of the project.Bannock Center,a mixed-use project that will create residential,office and retail space,has realized its first step:The Metropolitan Lofts at 9th and Acoma.The current plan calls for an additional 750,000 square feet of office,300,000 square GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 17

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feet of residential and 100,000 square feet of retail.Once the project is completed, the neighborhood will enjoy an increase in residential population and the employment base. In addition to creating new structures,business owners and developers are renovating old buildings,simultaneously preserving the architectural character and revitalizing the neighborhood.The Cadillac Lofts is a renovation of an old Cadillac dealership. Neosource,a neon lighting business,is a restored auto garage.Humphries Poli Architects has renovated an auto-related business on Speer to house their offices,and Pony Expresso has transformed a garage to a gourmet dessert and coffee spot. The Golden Triangle Arts District,comprised of art galleries within the neighborhood, acts as a support mechanism for the arts related retail businesses within the neighborhood.The district hosts monthly First Friday Art Walks to call attention to the galleries and to promote the neighborhood as an arts and cultural center. In an effort to improve the neighborhood,property owners and business people are working to create a Business Improvement District (BID).Owners of real property would pay an assessment based on square foot of land in exchange for improved maintenance,streetscape improvements,enhanced security,and marketing of the neighborhood.The BID was approved by City Council in October 1997 and a board was appointed.However the vote to approve the assessment did not pass,so there are currently no funds to run the BID.The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association's Resource Committee will continue to work on the effort to obtain the funding approval at a future election. EXISTING CONDITIONS 18

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THE VISIONDevelopment has been strong and vacant lots have disappeared.In their place are uniquely designed mixed use projects which have brought residents and life to the neighborhood. Streets are lively with restaurants,bookstores,galleries and coffee spots enlivening the ground floors.Above,the balconies hint at a robust housing market. Residents and workers in the area stroll down treelined sidewalks,pausing at intersections to admire the latest art installation. Businesses that support the arts and literature of the American West have sprung up south of the library,making the area the premier resource for Western culture. Pedestrian plazas connect Civic Center Park to downtown and Acoma Center and bring people in from all directions:the Cultural Complex is a key part of city life. Broadway continues to be the grand commercial boulevard,a regional center with diverse shopping opportunities,and a lively night presence.There are lots of people walking down the well lit promenade,to take in some music or grab a late bite. Broadway is lined with upper level office space that provides employment opportunities for residents in the Golden Triangle and surrounding neighborhoods. Destination retail businesses such as grocery,furniture and sports stores have located in the Golden Triangle.These stores serve the needs of the neighborhood as well as the thousands of commuters who pass them everyday as they travel home from their downtown jobs. Speer is lush and colorful with enhanced green triangle parks,grand new buildings and signature art work announcing the neighborhood. The Golden Triangle will afford a high quality of life,on an intimate scale,for people who reside,work,shop and play in this urban environment.Developing such a community requires addressing the "body,mind and soul"of the neighborhood. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 19

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The "body"is more easily defined.It deals with physical qualities,identifiable boundaries,street layouts,land use,and the like. The "mind"is represented by the intensity,vigor,and freedom of artistic and intellectual expression. The "soul"is the force that ties together the inhabitants with an emotional attachment or pride in their place. Including the "mind and soul"requires more than planning.Physical improvements or promotion of cultural and civic values alone are insufficient.It involves a continuous flexible and dynamic design process to keep the formation of the village on an up-todate level with the changing conditions. The Golden Triangle Neighborhood is an old neighborhood which is beginning to assert a strong community identity.The main task is to create an environment to achieve human communications between its residents and the place to facilitate a large variety of functions. In building the community the intent is to embrace its many existing assets and maximize their value.Through private and public collaboration,new levels of creativity,opportunity and quality of life can be realized. THE VISION 20 "The ultimate test of any plan or project is whether it not only adds a humanizing dimension to the lives of individuals, but improves what the Greek called the public happiness by making the common estate and the common experience richer and more meaningful for all." Stuart Udall

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GOALS & PRINCIPLESGOAL ONE: Create an Urban Village A Livable neighborhoodPrinciple:Encourage a mix of land uses,which includes housing,office,commercial, destination and neighborhood-serving retail.Principle:Provide diversity of housing stock to allow affordable products and a diverse resident population.Principle:Create an economically viable neighborhood by encouraging a mix of uses to satisfy both the landowners'investment needs and the needs of the public,the office workers and the residents.Principle:Promote employment and business opportunities for members of the community by supporting the existing businesses and civic institutions within the Golden Triangle.Principle:Create a walkable neighborhood by providing active pedestrian-oriented public uses on the ground floors of mixed-use projects,generous sidewalks,enhanced streetscaping,and building design with human scale and detail.GOAL TWO: Build a CommunityPrinciple:Create opportunities for residents to participate and be involved in the community:In community events and community decisions.Principle:Create opportunities for informal interaction and gathering through the provision of public spaces and activity nodes. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 21 Encourage a pedestrian-oriented environment through ground floor public uses, generous sidewalks, enhanced streetscaping and building design with human-scale and detail.

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GOAL THREE: Preserve and build on the cultural and civic character of the NeighborhoodPrinciple:Develop partnerships with public and private entities by balancing the values and the interests of individuals,businesses,cultural institutions and government.Principle:Encourage the development of uses related to the Civic Center Cultural Complex and its components;build on the arts,culture and government presence in the Village.Principle:Create a unique character for the Golden Triangle through a commitment to culture and the western legacy.GOAL FOUR: Create a Distinct Identity Through the Built EnvironmentPrinciple:Create a sense of place by creating a special aesthetic feeling while in the Village or moving through it.Principle:Create a community identity and develop the Village into a distinctive place through the overall composition of spaces,juxtaposition of buildings,unique architectural character and details.Principle:Create a unique identity through the integration of public art and design elements in the public realm.GOAL Five: Preserve and enhance the environment and the natural assets of the Golden TrianglePrinciple:Protect the delicate balance of nature and man by promoting clean air through the use of fewer automobiles,enhancing and increasing green space, respecting mountain and city views and providing adequate light and air for all neighbors. GOALS & PRINCIPLES 22

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FRAMEWORK PLANThe framework plan looks at the neighborhood in the larger view and provides overall concepts which will guide its development.It addresses core issues and provides a core of recommendations for the entire neighborhood on which the sub-area recommendations can build.Land useIssuesMany buildings have been demolished.Surface parking lots and vacant land remain.Though this creates development opportunities,it creates gaps in the urban fabric,disperses activity and dilutes the identity of the neighborhood.As parking lots are developed into projects,the stock of needed parking will be depleted.Surface parking as a use does not reinforce or contribute to the character of a vital walkable urban neighborhood.The neighborhood does not want to become a monoculture,a neighborhood made up solely of high-end condominiums with a homogenous population.It wants to become a true neighborhood with a mix of uses,and a housing stock with different kinds of people living there.The neighborhood is busy and active during the daytime office hours but evening activity is limited;streets are dark and there are no "eyes"on the street.Parking requirements for retail have prevented some new projects from including retail in their mix of uses.This defeats the goal of having active public ground floor uses and pedestrian activity on the sidewalks.Management and containment of social services uses is currently a problem for the neighborhood.RecommendationsEncourage the development of housing.Encourage the development of mixed-use projects throughout the neighborhood.Provide neighborhood-serving businesses on the ground floor where possible. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 23

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FRAMEWORK PLAN 24 Galapago Fox Elati Delaware Cherokee Bannock Broadway Lincoln Sherman Grant Logan14th 13th Colfax 12th 11th 10th 9th 8th 7th 6th OFFICE/RESIDENTIAL (High Density) CONCEPTUALLAND USE PLAN MIXED USE (Medium Density) RETAIL/COMMERCIAL (Medium Density) INSTITUTIONAL ARTS RELATED MIXED USE (Medium Density) PUBLIC OPEN SPACE

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Encourage restaurant and entertainment uses that contribute to the 24 hour activity of the neighborhood.Encourage density that would allow for diversity and affordability of housing stock.Eliminate surface parking lots.Develop structured parking to serve the neighborhood.Provide underground parking where feasible.Reduce parking requirements in mixed use projects;look at shared parking strategies.Clean-up and monitor existing social services in the neighborhood.Increase the intensity of commercial uses along Colfax on the northern edge of the neighborhood.Encourage the development of cultural,institutional and governmental uses,and uses that support them,on both sides and to the north of 13th Avenue.Increase the intensity of retail uses along Broadway.Develop office uses along Broadway as stand alone projects or in mixed-use projects with retail at the ground level.Develop office uses along the western edge of Lincoln and transition into a mix of office and residential uses along the eastern edge of the neighborhood.Encourage the development of higher density office and residential uses along Speer Boulevard on the western edge of the neighborhood.Decrease the intensity of commercial uses as one moves away from the edges into the neighborhood.Locate arts-related uses along Acoma in mixed-use projects.Locate neighborhood businesses at ground level in higher density mixed use development along Bannock. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 25

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FRAMEWORK PLAN 26 HIGH DENSITY Institutional/Culture Speer Edge Lincoln Edge 1 2 3 TRANSITION DENSITY MEDIUM DENSITY Galapago Fox Elati Delaware Cherokee Bannock Broadway Lincoln Sherman Grant Logan14th 13th Colfax 12th 11th 10th 9th 8th 7th 6th 1 2 3 URBAN FORM

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Open SpaceIssuesOpen space on the perimeter of the neighborhood provides places for people to gather and provides a green amenity.However,there is no community open space internal to the neighborhood.If families are going to be encouraged to live in the neighborhood,playgrounds for their children must be provided.Open space on the edges,Cherry Creek bike path and Civic Center Park,is difficult to get to.Civic Center Park is the neighborhood park that is used more for regional events and less for localized activities.RecommendationsProvide community open space within the neighborhood;create informal gathering places.Provide pocket parks.Provide a public playground.Work with St.John's day care center and the Montessori School on a cooperative plan for residents and their families to use their playgrounds after school hours.Provide linked open spaces on Acoma Street,from Civic Center south to 9th Avenue to create a green spine in the center of the neighborhood.Reinforce the green edge along Cherry Creek and Speer Boulevard;enhance the green triangle parks and their connection to the creek bed.Improve the use and presence of Civic Center Park by enhancing the connections from the Golden Triangle and downtown.Encourage the use of Civic Center Park as a neighborhood park,programming it with free daytime and evening events that attract surrounding residents,as well as allowing it to be enjoyed in a passive way.Improve access to Sunken Gardens.Continue the "Flowering of the Triangle,"through the planting of flowers by the residents,business and property owners. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 27

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FRAMEWORK PLAN 28 Galapago Fox Elati Delaware Cherokee Bannock Broadway Lincoln Sherman Grant Logan14th 13th Colfax 12th 11th 10th 9th 8th 7th 6th VIEWS GATEWAYS NODES VIEWS AND GATEWAYS

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Urban FormRecommendationsEncourage the preservation of buildings that contribute to the architectural character of the neighborhood.Such buildings include:All buildings in the Civic Center Historic Landmark District.St.Marks ChurchColorado BalletGarts SportsThe Jonas BuildingThe Burke HotelRocky Mountain Bank Note BuildingThe Evans SchoolThe Acoma City CenterVictorian Houses on 13th Avenue and Delaware (Bail Bonds)Carpenter Gothic Houses at 12th and DelawareThe Sandstone Building at 9th and AcomaTaller structures are encouraged in the Civic-Center subarea between Colfax and 13th Avenue.Heights must meet the existing view preservation ordinances.Taller structures are encouraged on Speer to reinforce the edge of the village.Taller structures are encouraged along Lincoln/Broadway to define the eastern edge of the village,and to transition into the mid-rise structures on Sherman.Step buildings down from the edges toward the center of the village.Maintain the grid pattern of streets and alleys to reinforce the block pattern and the existing urban structure. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 29

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ViewsRecommendationsMaximize the opportunity for views to the west and back to the city center along the edges.Maintain views within the village through the edges to the mountains to the west and to the city to the north and east.Maintain the axial views within Civic Center Park.Maintain and frame the axial view from the south end of Acoma north to Acoma Plaza into Civic Center,and from the north end of Acoma south to 8th Avenue.GatewaysThe Golden Triangle is a neighborhood that is clearly defined by its strong edges.As development occurs,a sense of entry into the neighborhood should be clarified, through the introduction of gateways.Gateways define a threshold one crosses as one enters the neighborhood.They announce the neighborhood and can take many forms: gateway monuments,public art,arches,landscaping,or architectural follies.In addition, building form and design can take on special character at gateways to designate one's arrival into the neighborhood.RecommendationsStrengthen the character of gateways into the neighborhood.NodesNodes are places in the neighborhood where people will gather and where activity is focused and concentrated,be it a commercial area or a street corner or pocket park. Currently Civic Center and the cultural institutions are nodes in the neighborhood.But with development of the neighborhood,other nodes are envisioned in prime locations.RecommendationsStrengthen the character of the node at 11th and Acoma Street.Strengthen the character of the node at Speer and 11th Avenue. 30FRAMEWORK PLAN

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Vehicular CirculationStreet CharacteristicsStreets are classified by the number of cars that they carry on a daily basis and the connections that they provide. Arterials provide the most continuity,cross jurisdictions,and carry from 15000 -75000 cars per day.Several pairs of arterial streets in the Golden Triangle are one-way couplets carrying traffic to,through and around the neighborhood:Broadway and Lincoln Street,Speer Boulevard northbound and southbound,13th and 14th Avenues, and 6th and 8th Avenues.Colfax Avenue,which forms the northern boundary of the neighborhood,is also classified as an arterial carrying two-way traffic. Collector Streets have limited continuity of about a mile in length.These streets collect and distribute traffic to arterials,and carry up to 15000 cars a day.Bannock,Cherokee, and Delaware Streets and 12th and 11th Avenues are classified as collectors. Local Streets have little continuity and carry up to 1000 cars a day.Acoma,Elati,Fox, Galapago and Inca Streets and 7th,9th and 10th Avenues are the local streets of the neighborhood.IssuesThere is a perception that traffic enters the neighborhood and travels through the neighborhood at high speed.This does not support the goal of a walkable community.Internal streets are used as access to downtown.Bottlenecks occur at Colfax and Speer,Colfax and 15th Street and 11th and Speer.RecommendationsContinue to balance the need to move cars with the ability of pedestrians to walk comfortably and safely through the neighborhood.Conduct a complete traffic and speed study of the neighborhood.Reinforce a layered vehicular framework and hierarchy of streets;evaluate streets in terms of what is good for the neighborhood and the pedestrian,not just for what is good for cars. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 31

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32FRAMEWORK PLAN 14th AVE.13th AVE. 12th AVE. 11th AVE.10th AVE. 9th AVE.8th AVE. Bannock St.Cherokee St. Delaware St.Lincoln St.Elati St.Fox St.Galapago St. Lincoln St. 6TH AVE. STREET CLASSIFICATION TRAFFIC VOLUMES PER DAY X 1000 Arterial Collector Local 21.821.3 21.517.021.4 5.9 10.8 2.8 15.7 25.1 15.8 17.4 21.526.1 20.825.4 8.2 1.8 Colfax 14th 13th 12th 11th 10th 9th 8th 6th 7thBroadway Lincoln Bannock Cherokee Delaware Elati Fox Galapago

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Continue to focus regional vehicular traffic on the arterial edges,Colfax, Broadway/Lincoln and Speer Boulevard;and the cross town connectors ;14th 13th,8th and 6th Avenues.Maintain Bannock Street and 11th Avenue as main vehicular circulation spines which bring traffic through and to the neighborhood.Maintain Acoma,Cherokee,Delaware,and 12th,10th and 9th Avenues as the internal neighborhood streets which carry local traffic.Study the conversion of Delaware and Cherokee from a one-way couplet into two-way streets.Determine how the build-out of the neighborhood will impact its own streets as well as the rest of the City.Introduce traffic calming measures to slow traffic to a more human pace on Broadway,Colfax at Civic Center,14th Avenue at Civic Center,Bannock, Cherokee,and 11th Avenue.Use the following methods:Narrow the street.Bulb the corners.Improve the vehicular function at the following problem intersections:Colfax and 15th StreetColfax and Speer11th Avenue and Speer10th and Cherokee GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 33

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TransitIssuesColfax,Lincoln and Broadway carry major bus routes;links from the bus stops to the neighborhood are unclear and weak.Bus shelters are not well taken care of and are unsafe places.Connections to the Civic Center RTD Terminal south to the neighborhood are weak,unattractive and unsafe.The cultural assets and retail opportunities of the neighborhood are not used by the large number of office and hospital workers at the southern end of the neighborhood since they do not have quick and easy access to Civic Center and downtown.Proximity to transit is not played up as an asset to living and working in the neighborhood.RecommendationsEncourage the continued development of public transit in order to diminish the use of the automobile.The impact of the development of Light Rail should be considered in transportation recommendations.Create stronger and more pleasant pedestrian links to bus stops from Capitol Hill and the Golden Triangle.Create safe,well-lit pedestrian connections from the Civic Center RTD terminal to the cultural institutions and the retail/office corridor along Broadway and Lincoln.Improve appearance and safety of bus shelters.Establish an internal public circulator to connect the employees at the southern end of the Golden Triangle to the cultural institutions,the Broadway/Lincoln corridor and downtown.Bring the cultural trolley into the neighborhood.Promote existing public transportation;market the concept of transit-oriented development.Make RTD a partner with the neighborhood organization.Discontinue the staging of buses on Acoma and 12th Avenue. 34FRAMEWORK PLAN 15 2 10 6 6 23 50 5 5 Major Local and Express Routes Bus Routes 6

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GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 35 Convert to Two-Way Improve Vehicular Function of Intersection Slow Traffic Colfax AveSpeer Blvd. 14th AVE.13th AVE. 12th AVE.10th AVE. 9th AVE.8th AVE. BroadwayAcoma St.Delaware St.Lincoln St.Elati St.Fox St.Galapago St. Lincoln St.Sherman St. 6TH AVE.15th St. 14th St.Glenarm St. Tremont Pl. Court Pl. Cleveland Pl. VEHICULAR CIRCULATION RECOMMENDATIONS

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36FRAMEWORK PLAN Improve Pedestrian Crossing to Eliminate Vehicular Conflict Access Points to Creek Path (Ramps and Stairs) Enhance Pedestrian Access Colfax AveSpeer Blvd. 14th AVE.13th AVE. 12th AVE. 11th AVE.10th AVE. 9th AVE.8th AVE. BroadwayAcoma St.Bannock St.Cherokee St. Delaware St.Lincoln St.Elati St.Fox St.Galapago St. Lincoln St.Sherman St. 6TH AVE.15th St. 14th St.Glenarm St. Tremont Pl. Court Pl. Cleveland Pl. Improve Pedestrian Crossing to Eliminate Vehicular Conflict Access Points to Creek Path (Ramps and Stairs) Enhance Pedestrian Access PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION RECOMMENDATIONS

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Pedestrian & Bicycle Circulation and ConnectionsIssuesPedestrians are uncomfortable crossing arterials and collectors because of the speed and volume of cars.Specifically:Colfax and 14th Avenue Parkway into Civic Center from downtown and the neighborhood.Speer Boulevard to the Cherry Creek bike path.Broadway from Capital Hill.11th Avenue at Acoma.Frequent curb cuts which bring cars across the pedestrian space interrupt the continuity of the walking experience.There are several intersections where vehicular and pedestrian conflicts occur:Bannock,14th Street and Colfax15th and Colfax11th Avenue and SpeerBicycle routes from Capital Hill through the Golden Triangle are not well connected to the Cherry Creek bike path. RecommendationsMake it easier for pedestrians to cross the street;slow cars down and make drivers aware of pedestrian crossing zones:Shorten pedestrian crossing distances;bulb-out curb lines at intersections.Lengthen the pedestrian crossing time at stop lights.Study the need for four-way stop signs and pedestrian crossing signals; provide where needed.Strengthen the pedestrian connections from the neighborhood into Civic Center and to downtown,and from downtown to the cultural institutions and the Golden Triangle.Facilitate the pedestrian crossing of 14th Avenue at Acoma Plaza.Study the addition of a choker (narrowing) on the south side.Facilitate the crossing of 14th Avenue at Bannock into Civic Center;confusion over vehicular turning movements make this a problem intersection. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 37

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38FRAMEWORK PLAN Colfax Ave 14th AVE.13th AVE. 12th AVE. 11th AVE.10th AVE. 9th AVE.8th AVE. BroadwayAcoma St.Bannock St.Cherokee St. Delaware St.Lincoln St.Elati St.Fox St.Galapago St. Lincoln St.Sherman St. 6TH AVE.15th St. 14th St.Glenarm St. Tremont Pl. Court Pl. Cleveland Pl. Improved Access Improved Bike Lane Existing Bike Lanes BIKE MAP

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Facilitate the crossing of Colfax from Civic Center Park to downtown at the Voorhies Memorial.Lengthen the median to provide a safe stopping place. Create an enhanced landscaped plaza and bulb-out sidewalk at Cleveland and 15th Street to provide a safe,comfortable walk and interesting destination.Improve the crossing of Colfax at Broadway and at Colfax and 14th Street. Study the timing of the lights to allow pedestrians more time to cross.Strengthen the connections from the neighborhood across Speer to the Cherry Creek bike path and the Sunken Gardens Park.Strengthen the pedestrian connections to Capitol Hill on the east-west Avenues.Create a safer and more pleasant walking environment:Provide continuous sidewalks,minimize curb cuts.Use alleys for access where possible;widen alleys to 20'to allow for 2 way traffic.Keep on-street parking.Improve streetscaping.(see Street Space & Public Realm)Strengthen the bicycle connections from bicycle routes on 12th Avenue and Bannock across Speer to the Cherry Creek bike path.Street Space & Public RealmThe public right-of way is comprised of the roadway,the sidewalk and amenity zone and is legally defined by private property lines.This street space is an important element of the public realm;it is public open space and the way the public experiences the city and the neighborhood. The definition and enclosure of this space by buildings is one of the elements that contribute to the comfort and interest of the experience of walking and driving down these streets.The character of these buildings,their transparency and detail are factors that make this experience pleasant. The streetscape,landscape and design elements in the amenity zone,also helps define the character of the public realm,and is made up of sidewalks,paving,street trees, treelawns,lighting and street furniture.When planted with trees and ground cover this area provides continuous green and contributes to the livability of our city. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 39

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40FRAMEWORK PLAN Colfax AveSpeer Blvd. 14th AVE.13th AVE. 12th AVE. 11th AVE.10th AVE. 9th AVE.8th AVE. BroadwayAcoma St.Bannock St.Cherokee St. Delaware St.Lincoln St.Elati St.Fox St.Galapago St. Lincoln St.Sherman St. 6TH AVE.15th St. 14th St.Glenarm St. Tremont Pl. Court Pl. Cleveland Pl. Street Trees in Grates Bulb Out/Widen Sidewalk Special Street Furniture and Pedestrian Lighting Note: Provide Street Trees in Lawns Unless Otherwise Noted. Provide Pedestrian Lights Throughout. STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS

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IssuesSurface parking lots create gaps in the streetwall and leave the street space undefined and uncomfortable for pedestrians.Streetscape improvements are intermittent;many blocks lack improvements altogether.Tree lawn areas are paved in asphalt or filled with gravel.Street trees are sparse;some are poorly maintained and dying.Some sidewalks are in need of repair.Some streets are dark at night and not safe to walk along.The presence of payphones in the right-of-way attracts illegal activity.RecommendationsSpatially define the street spaces by building projects to the property line.Only new buildings on Speer,8th Avenue and Colfax should be set back to provide a wider amenity zone.Include public uses (i.e.retail,office,galleries) at the ground floor of projects.Build screen walls and provide landscaping at the property line where surface parking lots occur.For street-facing building facades provide human scale through change in plane, contrast and intricacy in form,color,and materials,as required by the B-8-G Design Guidelines.Encourage innovative signs and graphics that will aid in the creation of a unique neighborhood.Intersections of streets provide special opportunities for corners of buildings.In redeveloping property at street intersections,encourage special corner treatment of buildings.Create a cohesive,identifiable neighborhood through streetscaping.Provide an enhanced streetscape,generous sidewalk widths,street trees,treelawns, landscaping and pedestrian lighting on all streets.(see Streetscape Plan)Write street development agreements for new projects that support this goal.Continue "Flowering of the Triangle"by encouraging the planting of flowers in planters and window boxes. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 41

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Bring existing parking lots up to the minimum landscape standards.Develop a mechanism to require landscaping on existing lots,such as an amortization program,or upon sale or transfer of property.Eliminate pay phones from the public realm.Reinforce the maintenance requirements for existing streetscaping;emphasize this requirement in new street development agreements. 42FRAMEWORK PLAN

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GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 43 Colfax AveSpeer Blvd. 14th AVE.13th AVE. 12th AVE.10th AVE. 9th AVE.8th AVE. BroadwayAcoma St.Lincoln St.Galapago St. Lincoln St.Sherman St. 6TH AVE.15th St. 14th St.Glenarm St. Tremont Pl. Court Pl. Cleveland Pl. CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREA LINCOLN/BROADWAY SUB-AREA SPEER SUB-AREA ACOMASUB-AREA CIVIC CENTER/ACOMA OVERLAPPING AREA AREAADDRESSED IN FRAMEWORK CIVIC CENTER/SPEER OVERLAPPING AREA COLFAX OVERLAPPING AREA GOLDEN TRIANGLE SUB-AREAS

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SUB-AREA INTRODUCTIONFour sub-areas have been identified in the Golden Triangle.Each has distinct characteristics that sets them apart.They are:Lincoln-Broadway sub-areaCivic Center sub-areaAcoma sub-areaColfax sub-areaSpeer Boulevard sub-area The following sections provides a detailed vision for the development of each sub-area. 44SUB-AREAS

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GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 45 Galapago Fox Elati Delaware Cherokee Bannock Broadway Lincoln Sherman Grant Logan14th 13th Colfax 12th 11th 10th 9th 8th 7th 6th INFILLOPPORTUNITY REDEVELOPUNDESIRABLE LAND USES RESTORE FACADES INSTALLCORNER ENTRANCE REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY IMPROVE BUS SHELTERS (SEE GENERALNOTES ON BUS STOPS) REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY SCREEN PARKING LOT(SEE GENERALNOTES) RESTORE FACADE AND RECRUITNEW TENANTS FOR VACANTBUILDINGS IMPROVE FACADE OF GART SPORTS PARKING STRUCTURE CREATE GATEWAYENHANCE PUBLIC ARTIN PARK REEVALUATE THE DESIGN OF PARK SEATING AND PICNIC TABLES REDEVELOP7TH AVENUE AS A PLAZALEADING TO ZECKENDORF PARK. ADD STREETTREES IN PUBLIC RIGHT-OF-WAY. PUBLIC ART OPPORTUNITYATBASE OF BLUE CROSS BLANK WALLON 8TH AVENUE AND PARKING STRUCTURE VENTILATION SHAFTS ARE POSSIBLE SITES IMPROVE STREETSCAPE INSTALLSTREETTREE AND TREE LAWNS (SEE GENERAL NOTES ON STREETSCAPING IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLINESS OF CHANCERY OFFICE BUILDING IMPROVE FACADE OF NEWS 4 GARAGE RETAIN EXISTING HOUSING REMOVE BILLBOARDS REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY REHABILITATE SHERMAN TOWER RETAILBLOCK CONSOLIDATE CURB CUTS REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY GATEWAYOPPORTUNITYSTRENGTHEN PEDESTRIAN CONNECTIONS LANDSCAPE PARKING LOT(SEE GENERALNOTES)GENERALNOTESSTREETSCAPING : INSTALL STREETSCAPING THROUGHOUT ENTIRE SUB-AREA. USE HARDSCAPE ON BROADWAYAND STREETTREES WITH TREELAWNS ON LINCOLN. BURY ALLUTILITYLINES. ALL STREETSCAPING NEEDS TO BE PROPERLYMAINTAINED. P ARKING LOTS: ALLEXISTING PARKING LOTS SHOULD MEET LANDSCAPING REQUIREMENTS INCLUDING SCREEN WALLS AND STREETTREES. R TD ST OPS: UPGRADE ALLRTD STOPS. DESIGN AND INSTALL SPECIALBUS SHELTERS. MAINTAIN BUS STOPS. LINCOLNBROADWAYSUB-AREA

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LINCOLN-BROADWAY SUB-AREA PLANExisting ConditionsThe Lincoln-Broadway sub-area extends from the Lincoln-Sherman alley on the east side to the Acoma-Broadway alley on the west side,bounded by Speer Boulevard on the south and Colfax Boulevard on the north.Broadway and Lincoln have had a major impact on the development of the area as the main arterials which carry the majority of the traffic into and out of the Central Business District (CBD) each day.In addition, the area is heavily impacted by the traffic on east-west one-way streets:6th Avenue,8th Avenue,13th Avenue and 14th Avenue,which provide strong vehicular connectors between Capitol Hill and Lincoln Park through the Golden Triangle.While good for providing auto access to the CBD,the traffic has a negative impact on the pedestrian character of the area,and the ability of people to cross the streets. The character of the sub-area is distinct from the rest of the neighborhood with the dominance of commercial and retail uses.Broadway is the original commercial corridor of Denver,containing remnants of a traditional "walking"main street with limited retail and neighborhood services.There are a number of automobile-oriented services,including Rickenbaugh Cadillac-Volvo,that remain from the days when this area was a preeminent automobile sales area for Denver.Broadway is the home to some large retail destinations.Gart Sports provides a major regional draw for outdoor recreation enthusiasts throughout the metropolitan area,and Howard Lorton Furniture Galleries has helped make the area a destination for purchasing home furnishings.All three have had a long time presence in the area and will have an influence on the development of the corridor. Older commercial buildings are mixed with newer commercial structures,including several large office buildings such as the Blue Cross Building,the Security Life building and the Chancery Building.The Denver Civic Center Cultural Complex (CCCC) is the cultural heart of the city and the sub-area.The CCCC,consisting of the Denver Art Museum,Colorado Historical Society,the Denver Public Library,and Civic Center Park, anchors the north end of the sub-area.Blue Cross,with 1200 employees anchors the south end.These anchors are important gateways and create a sense of entry into the 46LINCOLNBROADWAY SUB-AREA The Lincoln-Broadway sub-area has many elements of a traditional Main Street. For many years, it has functioned as one of the primary commercial corridors in Denver.

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district.However,numerous vacant sites,buildings and underdeveloped blocks exist between the two anchors,disrupting the continuity of retail and pedestrian activity. Sales tax data indicate that 3,500 people are employed in the sub-area.There was $142 million in gross sales in the sub-area in 1996. Development in the sub-area is subject to B-8-G Zoning and the restrictions of the Cheesman Park Mountain View Ordinance.VisionThe Lincoln Broadway sub-area area has undergone a transformation into a thriving commercial district,with one of the major shopping streets in Denver within its boundaries:Broadway.While significant structures have been preserved,underutilized sites have been redeveloped with retail uses on the ground floor and a variety of uses, including offices,on the upper floors.It is home to several furniture showrooms,hightech electronics dealers and a premier collection of outdoor recreation equipment stores,capturing the bulk of the sporting goods market in the Denver Area. The sub-area has attracted a number of small-scale retail establishments that provide services for the thriving neighborhoods that surround the area.Residents from the adjacent neighborhoods walk to new restaurants,coffee shops,grocery stores,and other neighborhood services,as well as to long-established institutions like Watson's Pharmacy.The Denver Buffalo Company is joined by several other restaurants that serve both local residents as well as tourists from the downtown hotels.Surface parking lots have been developed and parking needs are met by several strategically placed parking structures with ground floor retail space.These new developments contribute to the urban vitality of the area while producing a higher rate of return on investment for property owners. The streetwall on Broadway is continuous,with new buildings built to the street,and glassy storefronts and outdoor cafes.The parking lots at the Civic Center have been developed into structures that house institutional expansion,uses that support the cultural institutions and structured parking.This project has helped connect the Cultural Complex to points south,providing an interesting and continuous pedestrian way down Broadway. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 47 Pedestrian experience is enhanced along Broadway by streetscaping, restored facades, ground-level retail and creative signs.

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The pedestrian experience is enhanced by the addition of street trees,attractive street furniture flower plantings.Lincoln and Broadway have been reconfigured with safer, shorter pedestrian crossings.Security is improved by the presence of numerous pedestrians,appropriate pedestrian lighting,and a continuous wall of retailers who provide "eyes"on the street.The function of "gateway to the downtown"is reinforced by the enhancement of the park and public art at the south end of the sub-area.Both Lincoln and Broadway accommodate a significant amount of traffic.However,the adverse effects of congestion and heavy traffic have been ameliorated by the expansion of light rail to the South. Lincoln-Broadway has a strong visible identity.To encourage the retention and recruitment of quality tenants to the area and assure long-term economic health and maintenance of Lincoln-Broadway as a vital business corridor,local property owners have established a Lincoln-Broadway Corridor Management Office.This office,with a full time staff person,is based on the successful National Trust for Historic Preservation Main Street Program. The renaissance of this area has helped to reknit the urban fabric of Denver.Capitol Hill and the Golden Triangle are now connected through a relationship in which each builds on the strengths of the other. 48LINCOLNBROADWAY SUB-AREA Zeckendorf Park is at the gateway into the Lincoln-Broadway Sub-Area at 7th and Broadway and should be enhanced.

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Land UseIssueMuch of the land in the Lincoln-Broadway sub-area is vacant or underdeveloped. Surface parking lots,neglected buildings,and poor maintenance of the pedestrian amenity zone negatively impacts the visual quality of the sub-area.Higher density development,which follows the traditional pattern of commercial on Broadway and commercial with residential uses on Lincoln,is necessary to create the vitality of the urban neighborhood envisioned for the Golden Triangle.RecommendationsDevelop the sub-area with destination retail such as,furniture showrooms, outdoor recreation equipment stores,computer and electronic stores,and outdoor cafes to attract people from outside the adjacent neighborhoods.Encourage residential uses above first floor commercial development along Lincoln.Encourage office uses in the sub-area.Encourage the retention of existing apartment buildings in the sub-area to provide affordable housing.Encourage large scale destination uses such as antique stores and furniture showrooms.Encourage uses that support the cultural activities and institutional uses and locate them near the Civic Center.Build on the presence of art galleries,graphics,and map sales by encouraging like uses to locate on the corridor.Encourage the development of businesses that will utilize the extensive Western History holdings of the institutions located in the Golden Triangle.Denver Planning Office (DPO) and the Mayors Office of Economic Development (MOED) should work with developers and neighborhood advocates to encourage the redevelopment of parcels on Lincoln and Broadway. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 49 Much of the land in the Lincoln-Broadway sub-area is underutilized. This situation provides numerous opportunities for redevelopment. Retain existing businesses that contribute to the street life of the sub-area. Encourage retail uses at ground level of new developments, such as Le Central at 8th and Lincoln.

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IssueThe ability to live,shop,work,and play in the same area is essential to achieve the neighborhood objective of an urban village.With its location,sandwiched between Capitol Hill and the Golden Triangle,the Lincoln-Broadway sub-area is the perfect location for uses which serve residents'needs.RecommendationsProvide retail businesses and services that support the needs of the residential community,such as restaurants with outdoor seating,coffee shops,a grocery store,dry cleaners and hair salons.Provide office space for residents of the surrounding neighborhoods.Ground floors should contain traditional uses such as shops and restaurants; upper floors should contain offices and residential units when appropriate.IssueThe Lincoln-Broadway sub-area is a regional transportation corridor serving commuters to and from the downtown.There are few retail establishments taking advantage of the huge regional market represented by the commuters passing through the sub-area.Broadway provides an excellent opportunity to attract commuters running personal errands on the way home from work.RecommendationsEncourage businesses which will attract commuters,as well as local residents. Examples include grocery stores,florists,and hardware stores. 50LINCOLNBROADWAY SUB-AREA New construction should provide ground-floor uses similar to development on south Broadway.

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IssueFew businesses in the sub-area are open after 5 p.m.,the lack of evening activities contributes to the lack of urban vitality and feeling of safety.RecommendationsProvide ground floor uses which are active in the evenings such as restaurants, outdoor cafes,bars,galleries,theaters and other entertainment facilities.Provide pedestrian lights.Encourage lighting of building facades and display windows.IssueA great number of people that work in the Golden Triangle area commute from outside the area and have needs that could be met during the lunch hour or after work.RecommendationsLocate additional child care centers in the sub-area.Provide 24 hour daycare for workers who work the late shifts.Locate a fitness center in the sub-area that is available to all residents and office workers in the adjacent neighborhoods.IssueThe presence of pawnshops,liquor stores,and short-term housing is a detriment to the development of the corridor and the feeling of pedestrian safety.RecommendationsRedevelop the properties where these uses occur.New uses of this type should be regulated through the conditional use process.Redevelop the 1100 block of Broadway;renovate and upgrade the existing hotel. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 51 New parking structures should be designed to complement existing architecture. Retail spaces should be provided at ground level.

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IssueThe numerous surface parking lots in the sub-area provide a benefit to downtown office workers and visitors while providing no benefit to the residents of the neighborhood.The large number of government employees in the area contribute to the demand for parking.RecommendationsUndertake a parking management study to study a combination of parking decks,on-street parking,and a "shared"parking strategy to minimize the needs for surface parking in the area.Redevelop surface parking lots with higher and better uses.Encourage underground parking where feasible due to the sloping grade;the west sides of Lincoln and Broadway are advantageous for the construction of underground parking.The City and the State should build a new parking structure to serve government employees,as well as the needs of the retailers at the north end of the Lincoln-Broadway sub-area.This facility should reinforce the architectural character of the Civic Center Cultural Complex and provide opportunities for retail,cultural and institutional support uses at the ground level and the perimeter.Reevaluate current parking requirements for retail uses in mixed-use projects in the B-8-G Zone District.Vehicular Circulation & TransitIssueWith 47,000 car trips per day,Lincoln and Broadway function as the primary north/south access routes into and out of the downtown area.As the sub-area is redeveloped,it will continue to serve this role.Lincoln Street is 56 feet wide with four travel lanes (1 bus lane,3 automobile lanes),and on-street parking and brings people into the CBD in the mornings;Broadway is 72 feet wide with five travel lanes (1 bus lane,4 automobile lanes),and on-street parking.While the volume of drive-by traffic is potentially an asset to sub-area businesses,the width of the street,the volume and speed of traffic carried by both streets influence the kinds 52LINCOLNBROADWAY SUB-AREA

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of uses that are compatible for the area,and are not conducive to creating streets that pedestrians feel comfortable walking along.RecommendationsStudy options to slow traffic.Fund a study to reexamine the design of Broadway;evaluate the need for traffic calming measures.IssueThere have been discussions of providing High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes on Broadway and Lincoln.RecommendationsEstablish a neighborhood policy on HOV lanes.IssueBroadway and Lincoln are major transit routes which serve riders working and living in the area.The one-way couplet contains bus lanes converging at the Civic Center Station located at Broadway and 16th Street.The bus system brings in many people to the Golden Triangle without increasing the need for parking.However,neighborhood representatives have stated that RTD is not "a good neighbor."The bus shelters are unkempt and transit users create a litter problem.RecommendationsImprove the appearance and safety of bus stops with improved shelters,seating and lighting.Use the shelters as an opportunity to establish an identity for Broadway and Lincoln.Work with RTD to address the litter problem,RTD should provide and maintain trash receptacles at bus stops in the Golden Triangle.Improve the pedestrian connections to the Civic Center RTD Station,encourage RTD to improve the cleanliness and safety of the station.Design a special bus shelter for the sub-area.Locate bus stops at the major pedestrian east/west streets:9th,11th,13th Avenues. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 53 In the Lincoln-Broadway sub-area, much of the public realm is not maintained. A comprehensive streetscaping program would improve the pedestrian experience. Improve pedestrian experience by landscaping and screening surface parking.

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Improve the pedestrian connections to bus stops,with improved streetscape, street furniture and lighting along Broadway,Lincoln and the cross streets.Encourage the establishment of an RTD Rider incentive program for employees in the sub-area.Special emphasis should be given to large employers such as Blue Cross Blue Shield,Security Life,and State and City employees.Pedestrian / Bicycle CirculationIssueAt present,Lincoln-Broadway are difficult to cross and function as an obstacle for the east-west bound pedestrians and bicyclists to overcome.This condition inhibits the development of pedestrian and bicyclist connections between the Golden Triangle and Capitol Hill.RecommendationsStudy shortening the crossing distance by bulbing out the sidewalks at the corners in the east west direction.Improve pedestrian/bicycle access from Capitol Hill to Cherry Creek bicycle path.Provide continuous streetscaping on the east/west blocks of 9th,11th,and 13th Avenues to foster pedestrian connections between the Golden Triangle and Capitol Hill.Establish dedicated bike lanes from Capitol Hill to the Golden Triangle.Install bike racks in the sub-areaEnhance tree lawns on Lincoln and hardscape on Broadway.Encourage the placement of flowers on Lincoln and Broadway.IssuePeople do not walk along Broadway or Lincoln because the walk is not an interesting one.There are blank walls,vacant buildings,and surface parking which break the continuity of the walk,creating pedestrian discomfort.The storefronts that are interesting to look into are scarce and scattered. 54LINCOLNBROADWAY SUB-AREA Future developments should avoid continuous blank walls. Increasing the transparency of structures at the sidewalk edge provides a more vibrant pedestrian experience. Streetscaping in the sub-area will create a more pleasant pedestrian environment.

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GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 55 40' 40' 80' 40'40'40'B R O AD W AYLI N C O LN 40'40'40' 40' 40' 80' B R O AD W AYLI N C O LNSCHEME BIllustrates similar conditions to Scheme A. The primary variation is that street trees are continued down the full length of Broadway.SCHEME AIllustrates the position of street trees and pedestrian lights in the LincolnBroadway sub-area. Broadway is bulbed out at the intersections to shorten the distance for pedestrian crossing. Street trees occur only at the pedestrian crossings on Broadway. TREE WITH GRATE PEDESTRIAN LIGHT 40' 40' 80' TREE WITHIN GRASS LAWN PROPOSALFOR STREETSCAPING IN THE LINCOLNBROADWAYSUB-AREA

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RecommendationsEncourage ground floor uses that serve the public and neighborhood needs.Open up storefronts in existing buildings with large display windows;make the lower floor of buildings more transparent.Orient the main entrance of new construction to front onto Lincoln or Broadway.Encourage human scale architectural detailing and interest in new building design particularly in the lower 80'.Encourage infill development that builds projects to the property line to provide continuity of building facades at the sidewalk edge.Provide screen walls and landscaping at the perimeters of all existing and future surface parking lots.Urban FormThis sub-area provides an excellent opportunity to reknit the urban fabric of Denver and provide urban amenities for residents of both the Golden Triangle and Capitol Hill. Urban design issues,such as mass,scale,texture,openings to the street,pedestrian relationships,and land use should be fully considered in the design of new structures.IssueLincoln-Broadway acts as a very strong edge to the Golden Triangle Neighborhood. While this is helpful in defining the boundaries and making it a distinct area,it acts as a barrier to the neighborhood to the east:Capitol Hill.RecommendationsReinforce the east/west axis at 9th,11th,and 13th Avenues;designate these as linkages between the neighborhoods with appropriate streetscaping and gateway designs to reinforce the sense of entry into the Golden Triangle;create gateways where these streets intersect Lincoln.Encourage new developments to accentuate the street corners.Develop mid-rise structures,4-8 stories,on the west and east side of Lincoln,to transition into high-rise residential structures on Sherman. 56LINCOLNBROADWAY SUB-AREA Surface parking should be screened to lessen its visual impact.

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IssueThere is an opportunity to create gateways at the intersection of 13th and LincolnBroadway,and at Speer and Lincoln-Broadway.RecommendationsDevelop new construction at the north and south ends of the corridor to reinforce their significance and position as gateways to the downtown.Taller structures in these areas should transition down to lower structures in the center of the sub-area.Improve the park amenity on 7th Avenue.This could be the site of a piece of art reinforcing the imagery of this area as a "gateway"to the downtown.Work with Blue Cross to improve the "pedestrian friendliness"of their building. One possibility is to install public art on the corner parking structure ventilation towers.IssueThe visual image of Lincoln-Broadway has deteriorated.The buildings,sidewalks,and tree lawns need to be improved and maintained.RecommendationsEstablish a visible identity for the sub-area through improved streetscaping, street furniture,lighting,banners,awnings,and signage.Evaluate the appropriateness of street trees for the sub-area;consider the need for storefront visibility for retailers in the sub-area.The analysis should look at other options for improving the streetscape and at the feasibility of maintenance agreements for the sub-area streetscaping.Reevaluate the sign code for B-8-G to allow creative and eye-catching signs.Look at the appropriateness of using neon and projecting signs in the sub-area.Develop a program to encourage the maintenance of buildings in the sub-area.Work with US WEST and Public Service to relocate utilities underground.Remove billboards. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 57 Utilize innovative signs and street furniture within the sub-area.

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IssueThe sub-area contains structures that contribute to the historical significance of the Golden Triangle;however,no effort has been made to capitalize on the historic character of this area.Some of the most significant buildings are neglected,vacant,or hidden behind non-historic metal facades.RecommendationsEncourage building owners and tenants to remove non-historic facades and rehabilitate contributing structures.Explore the possibility of grants for a facade rehabilitation program from the State Historic Preservation Fund.Explore the possibility of landmarking historic structures in the LincolnBroadway sub-area.Possible candidates include;the Colorado Ballet Building, Gart Sports,and the Jonas Building.IssueNew construction too often does not respect the character of its neighbors.Many of the existing buildings in the Lincoln-Broadway sub-area offer clues to the pattern for new development.RecommendationsEncourage new construction to follow the traditional facade proportions and patterns found on Broadway between 10th and 12th Avenue.Incorporate the traditional size,rhythm,and configuration of large first floor display windows and upper story windows of existing commercial buildings into new construction.New construction which is taller than existing buildings should appear similar to traditional commercial construction in mass,scale,and height in cornice lines or setbacks found in the sub-area.Orient the main entrances of new construction to front onto Lincoln or Broadway. 58LINCOLNBROADWAY SUB-AREA Remove non-historic facades and rehabilitate significant structures.

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IssueMuch of the sub-area is under-developed.The numerous vacant parcels result in a discontinuous streetwall.The street wall is particularly well established along Broadway.RecommendationsEncourage the development of a continuous streetwall,especially along Broadway.Align the facades of new buildings with the established streetwall pattern.Discourage new curb cuts on Broadway.Service and parking access should be through the widened alleys whenever possible.IssueSurface parking lots disrupt the continuity of the street wall along Broadway.RecommendationsDiscourage the location of surface parking lots along Broadway;only access to parking should be provided.Parking should be provided in structures and underground when possible.If surface parking is used,it should be located away from the street edge,to the north or south of the new building,in order to minimize the visual impact.Build screen walls and provide landscaping at the property lines of vacant lots and parking lots.Place service equipment and trash containers in the alleys.IssueAlleys are primarily used for garbage collection.The limited use of alleys creates a hardship for some sub-area tenants.RecommendationsAlleys should be used to service businesses and provide access to parking within projects.City policy on limited use of alleys should be reevaluated.Encourage city and property owners to maintain alleys. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 59 New infill developments should respect the scale of existing structures.

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Widen Alleys to 20'to allow them to be used for access to projects and to provide room for two-way traffic;property owners across the alleys should share the responsibility.Economic DevelopmentIssueThe Lincoln-Broadway sub-area presents an excellent opportunity for economic redevelopment.Workers and residents in the Golden Triangle and Capitol Hill provide a strong market for services.However,to optimize the potential of the sub-area,an organization with a professional staff person should be established to facilitate redevelopment activities in the sub-area.RecommendationsUndertake an economic analysis to look at market directions and economic viability of redeveloping the sub-area.Encourage the development of new retail and commercial activities as well as services for workers and residents.Establish a Lincoln-Broadway Marketing/Redevelopment Office to provide business recruitment,to develop a unified marketing strategy,to coordinate maintenance and to promote the area through special events.This organization should be under the umbrella of the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association.Identify funding sources for sub-area management and capital improvements. Possibilities include an urban renewal district with tax increment financing, MOED and the State Historic Preservation Fund.Study the establishment of a low-interest loan fund for facade improvements in the sub-area. 60LINCOLNBROADWAY SUB-AREA

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GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 61 Galapago Fox Elati Delaware Cherokee Bannock Broadway Lincoln Sherman Grant Logan14th 13th Colfax 12th 11th 10th 9th 8th 7th 6th IMPROVE SIDEWALKS VISUALLYLINK COLORADO HISTORICALSOCIETYTO CIVIC CENTER CULTURALCOMPLEX THROUGH STREETSCAPING REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITYCULTURAL AND INSTITUTIONAL EXPANSION WITH STRUCTURED PARKING COMPLETE THE “ARC”INSTALLOUTDOOR ART IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING CITYGOVERNMENTEXPANSION OPPORTUNITY RESTORE PROVIDE PUBLIC ACCESS IMPROVE PEDESTRIAN CROSSING ATCOLFAX INSTALLPUBLIC ARTTO VISUALLYLINK DOWNTOWN TO CIVIC CENTER CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREAPLAN

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CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREA PLANExisting ConditionsThe Civic Center sub-area is made up of governmental,cultural,institutional,and private-sector components.The core of the sub-area is formed by Civic Center Park, the State and City government buildings,the Denver Public Library,the Denver Art Museum,and the Colorado Historical Society the Civic Center Cultural Complex (CCCC).Collectively these structures represent some of the finest architecture in the state.Other prominent occupants of the sub-area include the Colorado Judicial Building,Colorado Ballet Studios,the United States Mint and Security Life Center. The surrounding blocks contain a mixture of uses.For example,the 1300 block of Bannock contains the City of Denver Permit Center,a 100 unit single room occupancy multi-unit residence,an art gallery,a restaurant,offices and several parking lots.Other blocks in the sub-area contain diverse uses such as bail bond businesses and other institutional support uses. The CCCC was subject of a 1992 urban design plan by Venturi,Scott Brown and Associates.This plan represented a commitment to develop a strategy that would allow the Civic Center cultural institutions to share programs and create a common urban landscape.The Master Plan that evolved has brought the three institutions into a new and dynamic working relationship.The recommendations of this plan should be followed as the Golden Triangle is developed.At present,the area provides parking for the Civic Center institutions.In 1996 the City invested $1.6 million to rebuild the parking lots.The improvements were funded by a bond issue.Any redevelopment of the site would need to take into account the provision of parking and the repayment of bonds.While the extensive streetscaping has improved the site,the surface parking lots are not conducive to the desired urban characteristics envisioned for the Golden Triangle,and should be developed. In 1997,the Denver Art Museum completed major improvements to their facilities.An enhanced entry,with outdoor cafe seating,and the addition of the DeSuvero sculpture has made Acoma Plaza an active space and a visual focal point. 62CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREA The Civic Center Cultural Complex is the gateway to Downtown from the Golden Triangle.

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VisionThe Civic Center sub-area has become an integral part of the Golden Triangle.The institutions in the sub-area draw a large number of people who patronize the adjacent art galleries,shops,and restaurants.New construction in the Golden Triangle supports the missions of the cultural institutions in the sub-area.The new buildings continue the tradition of world class architecture around the Civic Center.Artist studios,galleries,an art school,and high tech businesses such as multi-media studios,which use the collections and resources of the cultural institutions,have been attracted to the subarea.Together,these uses contribute to the Golden Triangle's position as the center of art and Western history in the Rocky Mountain region and the government center for Denver. Pedestrian connections between the Civic Center and downtown have been strengthened by enhanced streetscaping.New public open space has been included in the expansion of City government offices at the 1300 block of Bannock Street.Parking for employees and visitors to the government agencies and cultural institutions is provided in a structure located on the City owned land south of the Library and Art Museum. Civic Center Park is the "neighborhood park"for the Golden Triangle.Residents use the park for picnics,sun-bathing,or just to fly a kite.Numerous concerts are held in the amphitheater.Free events attract both residents of the Golden Triangle and other city residents who wander over to explore the neighborhood after the event. There is a synergy between the neighborhood and the institutions that contributes to the vitality of both. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 63 Much of the Civic Center sub-area consists of surface parking lots. While this is detrimental to the visual quality of the sub-area, it provides opportunities for redevelopment.

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Land UseIssueThe cultural and governmental uses in the sub-area contribute to the vitality of the Golden Triangle.However,much of the current land use such as surface parking lots, bail bond offices,and automotive repair businesses do not support the objectives of the CCCC nor the Golden Triangle.RecommendationsLand use should be complementary to the governmental and cultural uses in the sub-area.Examples include:art galleries,studios,restaurants,hotels,and businesses that use the cultural institutional collections.Development in the CCCC sub-area should reinforce the "City Beautiful"concept of civic,cultural and institutional organizations in a "campus"setting.Allow high-density residential as part of mixed-use developments.Encourage government-related growth in the 1300 block of Bannock.Preserve the Cherokee Power Plant and the native American Art Center.Develop the CCCC parking lots with uses that support the functions of the adjacent cultural institutions.All parking in the sub-area should be accommodated in multi-level structures with pedestrian uses on the ground floor.Complete the CCCC "Arc"on 13th Avenue.Expand the park to Bannock.Encourage the use of Civic Center Park as a neighborhood park.Program it with free lunchtime and evening events,as well as enhancing it to be enjoyed in a passive way.Improve the safety of the Civic Center Park.Encourage police to drive through the neighborhood as they travel to and from the Police Headquarters.Encourage the Bail Bonds Businesses to work to together to improve the exterior appearance of their buildings.Encourage the use of Acoma Plaza as an active gathering place.Work with the State of Colorado in understanding their future plans and the impact on the neighborhood. 64CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREA

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Vehicular Circulation and TransitIssueThe sub-area is served by wide one-way street which are difficult for pedestrians to cross.This condition results in a lack of pedestrian friendly connections between the Civic Center,the Golden Triangle and Downtown.RecommendationsReevaluate the configuration of the 14th Avenue segment by the Denver Art Museum eliminating on-street parking and bulbing the curb.Reevaluate the traffic configuration at the intersection of Colfax and 15th Street on the north side of the Civic Center.IssueThere are many people working at the southern end of the Golden Triangle at Denver Health and Blue Cross who do not take advantage of the Civic Center and downtown at the lunch hour.RecommendationsWork with RTD to develop a circulator bus connecting the Civic Center to other points in and adjacent to the Golden Triangle such as Denver Health Medical Center.IssueThe sub-area is served by a large number of bus routes.The bus stops are not maintained and are potentially unsafe.The standard bus-shelter design is not appropriate for use in the sub-area.RecommendationsImprove the appearance and safety of RTD bus stops.Work with RTD to improve the pedestrian connections to the Civic Center RTD Station as well as the cleanliness and safety of the station.Install new bus shelters.Utilize a non-standard design for the sub-area that plays on the neo-classical character of the buildings. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 65 New development should continue the streetwall and respect the characteristics of the architecture surrounding the Civic Center.

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Pedestrian Environment and CirculationIssueThe Civic Center Cultural Complex is the cultural heart of the city.Improvements have been made around the Civic Center parking lots,but much of the remaining area has sidewalks in poor condition and minimal streetscape improvements.RecommendationsContinue streetscape,tree placement and pedestrian light pattern,established at the Civic Center parking lots,south on Broadway,along 12th,13th,14th and Colfax Avenues to create a visual cohesiveness in the sub-area and to create a more pleasant pedestrian environment.Clean up and monitor the bus stops and shelters at the Civic Center,which are currently loitering spots for the homeless.Rebuild deteriorated sidewalks and curbs at Civic Center Park between Colfax and 14th Avenue.IssueA lack of pedestrian friendly connections degrades the pedestrian experience and discourages visitors from exploring the Golden Triangle.RecommendationsImprove the pedestrian connections at Acoma Plaza and across 14th Avenue.Improve the pedestrian route along Broadway from the Transit Center to the sub-area.Redesign the pedestrian crossing at the intersection of Colfax and 15th Street on the north side of Civic Center.Use streetscaping on 13th Avenue to reinforce the connection between the Art Museum,Main Library,and the Colorado Historical Society. 66CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREA Cultural and institutional growth should be encouraged on the land south of the Civic Center Cultural Complex. Sketch of enhanced intersection of 15th and Colfax on north side of Civic Center Park.

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Urban FormIssueThe sub-area is a transition zone from the high density of downtown to the lower density of the Golden Triangle.However,sufficient density must be maintained to achieve the urban village concept of the Golden Triangle.The marginal development of the surrounding blocks provides an opportunity to increase the density to an appropriate level.RecommendationsEncourage cultural and institutional growth south of the Civic Center between12th and 13th Avenues down Acoma Street.Encourage government growth in the 1300 block of Bannock.Preserve the historic structures in this block.IssueCivic Center Park and the surrounding institutions have established a precedent for very high caliber architecture and streetscaping in the sub-area.As new development is initiated the established caliber of design and construction should be maintained.RecommendationsNew construction should continue the tradition of world class architecture found in the civic center.Work with the State government to ensure that future their future growth is supportive of objectives of this plan.New construction south of the Library and Art Museum should reinforce the design of the new "Arc.".Public art and flower beds should be located in the "Arc"parkNew buildings should respect the scale and height of the Library and Art Museum.Preserve views to and from Civic Center ParkUse public art at 15th and Colfax to extend the north-south axis of the Civic Center into the downtown.Use public art down Acoma to connect the Golden Triangle to the Civic Center. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 67 Both the major and minor axis are important urban design elements within the Civic Center. Future development in the sub-area should extend the axis into the Golden Triangle. The minor axis of the Civic Center sub-area is a strong visual element linking the Golden Triangle to Downtown. New development in the sub-area should provide opportunities for public art.

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New development in the sub-area should provide significant opportunities for outdoor art.Plant flowers throughout the Civic Center sub-area.IssueSurface parking lots are incompatible with the desired development density.RecommendationsMinimize surface parking in the sub-area.Utilize building edges and landscaped lawns to create a Civic Center "campus."IssueThe junction of Acoma,the Avenue of the Arts,and 13th Avenue is an important civic place:it signals the entry into Acoma Plaza which is the threshold of the Civic Center. The green Arc of civic open space,located on the south side of 13th Avenue connects the institutions to the Golden Triangle.RecommendationsEnhance the civic character of the space with additional activities and public amenities.Incorporate public art. 68CIVIC CENTER SUB-AREA

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COLFAX OVERLAP AREAExisting ConditionsColfax Avenue is the primary entrance to the Civic Center from Speer Boulevard.The marginal land use west of Elati Street does not provide an appropriate gateway into the sub-area.The lack of streetscaping negatively impacts the pedestrian experience. Connections to downtown and the Convention Center are inhibited by the heavy volume of traffic.IssueMuch of the land along Colfax is underdeveloped.RecommendationsEncourage the redevelopment of Colfax with high density uses that support the neighborhood and surrounding area and the Convention Center.Examples are hotels and restaurants.IssueThe pedestrian "realm"along Colfax is unimproved and the pedestrian connections across Colfax to other parts of downtown are weak.RecommendationsFuture construction should set back a minimum of 10'to provide room for streetscaping and wider sidewalks.Discontinue surface parking.Install streetscaping.Study ways to improve the pedestrian connections across Colfax. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 69

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70ACOMA SUB-AREA UNDERGROUND ALL OVERHEAD UTILITIES BULB OUTCORNERS AT12TH AVE. TO SHORTEN CROSSING REMOVE BILLBOARD LANDSCAPE AND SCREEN PARKING LOTS (SHORTTERM) REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY RESTORE EXISTING STRUCTURE BULB OUTCORNERS AT11TH AVE. TO SHORTEN CROSSING ENHANCE PAVING ATACOMA CITYCENTER LANDSCAPE AND SCREEN PARKING LOT CONSOLIDATE CURB CUTS REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITYINCORPORATE COMMUNITYOPEN SPACE INTO DESIGNGalapago Fox Elati Delaware Cherokee Bannock Broadway Lincoln Sherman Grant Logan14th 13th Colfax 12th 11th 10th 9th 8th 7th 6th RETAIN DANCE STUDIO USES. RELOCATE IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD ENCOURAGE THE RETENTION OF THE SANDSTONE STRUCTURE INCORPORATE INTO NEW DEVELOPMENT. REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY ENCOURAGE NEW USES IN EXISTING BUILDINGS. RELOCATE THE DANCE STUDIOS CURRENTLYIN THE BANNOCK CENTER. RESTORE ART-DECO OFFICES AT1045 ACOMA ENCOURAGE THE PLACEMENT OF ENTRANCES ON ACOMA FOR ALLNEW CONSTRUCTION. CONTINUE STREETSCAPING SOUTH OF 11TH AVENUE. REDEVELOPAS A“VILLAGE CENTER” FOR THE GOLDEN TRIANGLE WITH COMMUNITY OPEN SPACE. POSSIBLE USES INCLUDE ASCHOOLFOR THE ARTS, ARTISTSTUDIOS AND RESIDENTIALLOFTS. SCREEN AND LANDSCAPE ALL PARKING LOTS (SHORTTERM) PROVIDE PUBLIC ARTATALL STREETCORNERS ON ACOMA. REDEVELOPBLOCKS WITH MIXED USES THATSUPPORT CULTURALINSTITUTIONS AND THE THEME OF ACOMAAS THE “AVENUE OF THE ARTS.” NEW CONSTRUCTION SHOULD RESPECTTHE DESIGN OF THE NEW LIBRARYAND THE DENVER ARTMUSEUM. NOTES: PROVIDE PUBLIC ARTON ALL STREETCORNERS. PUTPROJECTENTRIES ONTO ACOMA. DISCOURAGE NEW CURB CUTS. PROVIDE ENHANCED STREETSCAPING.ACOMASUB-AREAPLAN

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ACOMA SUB-AREA PLANExisting ConditionsThe Acoma sub-area is comprised of the face blocks of Acoma Street from Acoma Plaza on the north to 8th Avenue on the south.Acoma provides a strong visual axis from the neighborhood north to the Cultural Complex.Looking up Acoma,the vista is framed by the new Denver Public Library and the Denver Art Museum.Acoma terminates at 13th Avenue in a plaza formed by these cultural institutions.The vista extends through Civic Center Park and visually connects the Golden Triangle with downtown.Because of this prominent connection,the sub-area is designated as "The Avenue of the Arts"for the Golden Triangle. The Acoma sub-area is characterized by parking lots and low rise buildings.There are some significant structures,including the Evans School at the corner of 11th Avenue, the Acoma Center at 1080 Acoma,the sandstone duplex at 907 Acoma,and the newly constructed Metropolitan Lofts.Typical land use in the area includes auto-related businesses,small industrial uses,and professional offices.The Denver Municipal Credit Union has constructed a new building and a drive-in facility.There is a daycare center on the southeast corner of 10th and Acoma. Acoma Street is a two-way street with stop signs at each intersection.It has a 70 foot right-of-way,composed of a 36 foot street and a 17 foot amenity zone on each side. There are two travel lanes and on-street parking on both sides.Pedestrian lights and street trees were installed north of 11th Avenue as part of a city financed streetscaping program.Most vehicular traffic is generated by the parking lots in the sub-area. Pedestrian activity is beginning to increase due to improved streetscape and new development,but much of the sub-area is still undeveloped.VisionNew development along Acoma has strengthened its role as the Avenue of the Arts. Artists have located their studios in the area.The Acoma Center presents performing and visual arts programs that draw people from all over the metropolitan area.Vacant lots have been developed into mixed use projects with art studios,art galleries and GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 71 Acoma "The Avenue of the Arts" connects the Golden Triangle to Civic Center and Downtown. New development along Acoma should reflect the pedestrianfriendly atmosphere of an urban neighborhood.

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cafes on the ground floor and residential units above.Surface level parking lots have been redeveloped into mixed use projects. The improved pedestrian environment links the Civic Center to the neighborhood and invites people to explore the Golden Triangle.The intersection of 11th and Acoma has become the Village Center,with community open spaces,street art,and outdoor seating at the Evans School.The intersection of Acoma and 9th Avenue provides a pocket park and outdoor art in conjunction with the closing of Acoma,should it occur. Acoma has become the "Avenue of the Arts"in function as well as name.Land UseIssueThe current development along the "Avenue of the Arts"offers little attraction for pedestrians.A large portion of the sub-area is used as parking lots for the Civic Center Cultural Complex and the downtown.This use conflicts with the desired urban density and the art theme for the sub-area.RecommendationsEncourage redevelopment with mixed-use projects.New projects should support the theme of "Avenue of the Arts"by providing space for art related activities.Explore the use of tax or zoning incentives to encourage art related uses in new developments in the sub-area.Encourage cultural and institutional growth along Acoma.IssueMuch of the area is underdeveloped with incompatible uses.Automotive repair and plumbing shops are not complementary to the "arts"theme of Acoma Street.RecommendationsDiscourage new auto repair uses.Encourage arts related uses to locate in mixeduse projects on Acoma. 72ACOMA SUB-AREA The Acoma Center provides a home for civic functions in the Golden Triangle.

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IssueThe Evans School,which is the most significant building in the neighborhood,is vacant and surrounded by parking.RecommendationsRestore and reuse the Evans School.It is an important anchor for the Golden Triangle Neighborhood.Encourage uses that support the arts and the community at large.Encourage the provision of open space around Evans School for public use, include public art.Develop the blocks along 11th Avenue and Acoma as the village Center.Vehicular Circulation and TransitIssueAutomotive congestion is negligible due to the underdeveloped character of the subarea.Most of the traffic is the result of people driving to and from the numerous surface parking lots adjacent to Acoma.The exceptions are 8th and 13th Avenues which carry large volumes of traffic as one-way arterials and the two-way traffic of 11th Avenue.RecommendationsStudy the need for stop signs and other traffic calming devices at key intersections.Pedestrian Environment and CirculationIssueThe pedestrian environment has been improved by a streetscaping program from the Civic Center Cultural Complex to 11th Avenue.An enhanced pedestrian crossing plaza was constructed at 13th Avenue as part of the Central Library expansion. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 73 The Evans School is visually an important anchor in the Acoma sub-area and the neighborhood. It should be redeveloped with uses which support the concept of a village center. Current condition of Evans School. The sandstone duplex on Acoma gives character and adds texture to the sub-area.

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RecommendationsContinue the enhanced streetscape of tree lawns and pedestrian lights south to 9th Avenue.Continue double treelawns were possible down Acoma.Develop special street furniture standards for Acoma.Encourage the planting of flowers along Acoma.Enhance the pedestrian environment by providing community open spaces and public art at the Evans School and Bannock Center along Acoma Street.Urban FormIssueAcoma is the major visual connection between the Golden Triangle and the CCCC.The lack of a continuous street "wall"resulting from the parking lots and underdeveloped blocks does not reinforce this connection.RecommendationsEncourage the development of a continuous street "wall"that reinforces the visual and physical connections between the Golden Triangle and the CCCC. New construction should be built to the edge of the public right of way.Encourage the development of Acoma as a major connector by creating a pattern of public open spaces with public art.Provide venues along the "Avenue of the Arts"to showcase the visual and performing arts.Incorporate art on buildings,sidewalks,and street corners along Acoma, especially at the Evans School.Parking lots should not front onto Acoma.Provide landscaping and screening along the edges of existing lots.Maintain an unobstructed visual axis down Acoma from 8th Avenue to Civic Center Park and from Civic Center Park to 8th Avenue. 74ACOMA SUB-AREA The enhanced streetscape along Acoma has greatly improved the pedestrian friendliness of the area. The streetscaping should be continued down the length of the "Avenue of the Arts."

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IssueThe historic structures on Acoma add texture to the built environment in the sub-area.RecommendationsA combination of historic structures and high quality new construction should be used to develop a complex "texture"for the Avenue of the Arts.IssueThere is very little development or street activity contributing to the bustling public "realm"envisioned by the Golden Triangle Neighborhood.RecommendationsNew construction should incorporate first floor public activities and be as transparent as possible.IssueThe Denver Municipal Credit Union has built its new banking facility on the southwest corner.The Acoma Center across the street in the renovated Swedish church acts as a community center,live stage and movie theater.Both of these have begun to establish the public character of this intersection.RecommendationsCreate a Village Center at 11th Avenue and Acoma.Encourage the further development of this intersection into a node of activity by redeveloping the Evans School.Encourage the inclusion of public uses in the buildings on the northeast corner.Improve the intersection with bulb-outs across 11th Avenue to provide shorter pedestrian crossings. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 75 Visual and preforming artists should be encouraged to locate along the "Avenue of the Arts."

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76SPEER BOULEVARD SUB-AREA Galapago Fox Elati Delaware Cherokee Bannock Broadway Lincoln Sherman Grant Logan14th 13th Colfax 12th 11th 10th 9th 8th 7th 6th GENERALNOTESIMPROVE PEDESTRIAN ACCESS ACROSS SPEER TO ALLRAMPS AND STAIRS ON THE CHERRYCREEK BIKE TRAIL. GATEWAYOPPORTUNITYINCORPORATE PUBLIC ART ELIMINATE DRIVE-THROUGH LANE DEVELOPTRAFFIC CALMING CONFIGURATION FOR CHEROKEE STREETINSTALL PUBLIC ART PLANTTREES IN EXISTING TREE LAWN RECONSTRUCTPEDESTRIAN BRIDGE ELIMINATE ON-STREET PARKING ADD TREE LAWN AND STREETSCAPING RELOCATE PS-1 ENLARGE SPEER TRIANGLE INSTALLPUBLIC ART PLANTTREES IN EXISTING TREELAWN IMPROVE TRAFFIC SIGNALTO MINIMIZE CONGESTION CLOSE ALLEYREDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY PRESERVE EXISTING CARPENTER GOTHIC HOUSES REUSE EXISTING BUILDINGS ENLARGE SPEER TRIANGLE INCORPORATE PUBLIC ART. ENLARGE SPEER TRIANGLE INSTALLPUBLIC ART REDEVELOPPARKING LOT WITH MID-RISE BUILDING SHOULD MIMIC SCALE OF PARKWAYCENTER. SETBACK ALLNEW CONSTRUCTION A MINIMUM OF 10 FEETWITH DETACHED SIDEWALKS AND TREE LAWNS ENLARGE SPEER TRIANGLE INSTALLPUBLIC ART REDEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITY INFILLOPPORTUNITY SCREEN PARKING LOT GATEWAYOPPORTUNITYINCORPORATE PUBLIC ART SPEER BOULEVARD SUB-AREAPLAN

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SPEER BOULEVARD SUB-AREA PLANExisting ConditionsThe Speer Boulevard sub-area is located on the western edge of the Golden Triangle.It extends from the center line of Cherry Creek to one block east of Speer,and from Colfax on the north to Logan on the south.Speer Boulevard,which is a designated Historic Landmark District and historic parkway,is a major traffic artery used by 47,000 cars per day.In addition to the landscaped automotive boulevard,there is a bike and hiking path along Cherry Creek.The bike path is one of the major open space amenities in the City and is a significant asset for the Golden Triangle.In spite of the presence of five ramps providing access to the creek,poor pedestrian connections across Speer make access from the Golden Triangle to this important amenity very difficult.Triangle shaped pieces of land,which are part of the Historic Landmark Parkway,are formed at the intersection of Speer Boulevard with the north-south streets and the east-west avenues. Land use in the sub-area is a mixture of single story commercial properties such as Rickenbaugh Cadillac-Volvo with some mid-rise offices and surface parking lots.Many of the blocks in the sub-area are underdeveloped.There are some buildings of historical interest,notably the Rocky Mountain Bank Note Company and the 1100 block of storefronts;however,they are vacant and not maintained at this time. In spite of the marginal land use and heavy traffic volume in the sub-area,a stroll down Speer Boulevard along Cherry Creek is one of Denver's most pleasant urban experiences.It is critical that the connection to this resource be maximized as the Golden Triangle develops.VisionThe Speer sub-area is a major public amenity of the Golden Triangle.The sub-area has been redeveloped and now consists of several mid-rise office and residential structures.Along with Racines,there are other restaurants with outdoor seating areas that serve residents of the Golden Triangle and provide a stopping point for the GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 77 Speer Boulevard and the Cherry Creek Path form one of the major open spaces for the Golden Triangle. Connections between this recreational amenity and the Golden Triangle should be strengthened.

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passing in-line skaters and bicyclists.The alley in the 1100 block has been closed and a signature building has been built on the northside at the 11th Avenue gateway. The creek bed has been "adopted"by the neighborhood and has been enhanced with additional planting and public amenities. Pedestrian connections to the Golden Triangle have been improved by the installation of mid-block pedestrian cross-lights and a foot bridge across the creek leading to Sunken Garden Park.Existing bridges at 11th,13th,14th and Colfax have been enhanced with pedestrian lights.Cross walks have been enhanced by changes in paving and pedestrian activated crossing lights. The Speer green triangles have been enhanced and now serve as gateways into the Golden Triangle.Several of the islands have been expanded and connected with the adjacent property,although the original historic configuration is clearly visible.The islands contain public art placed by the City,the Denver Art Museum,and private collectors.The island at Cherokee Street has been modified to serve as a traffic calming device for cars traveling north from Speer Boulevard into the Golden Triangle. Through careful redevelopment the Speer sub-area has become the "playground"of the Golden Triangle.It provides both recreational opportunities and a green respite from the more intense urban environment of the Golden Triangle.Land UseIssueSpeer Boulevard no longer supports the street front commercial uses it once did.As a result many blocks consist of vacant buildings or marginal uses that do not contribute to the vitality of the neighborhood.One entire block is surface parking and other blocks have single story buildings surrounded by large parking lots.RecommendationsRedevelop marginal blocks in the sub-area.Appropriate uses include mid-rise residential complexes and offices.Public ground floor activities,such as restaurants,are encouraged.Ground floors 78SPEER BOULEVARD SUB-AREA Speer Triangles should be enlarged to serve as traffic calming devices into the Golden Triangle. Green spaces provide opportunities for public art. The Rocky Mountain Banknote Building will house the PS1 Charter School. Existing conditions at Delaware Street and Speer Boulevard. The historic Rocky Mountain Backnote Building is located on the right.

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must be transparent (visually open to pedestrians) pursuant to the guidelines, regardless of use.Parking should not front onto Speer.All parking should be located away from Speer,accessed by alleys or name streets.Locate Public School 1 (PS-1) on the intersection of Speer and Delaware. Enhance green triangle to support this use.Allow the closure of alleys that intersect Speer,where consolidation of property would encourage development.Vehicular Circulation and TransitIssueSpeer Boulevard is a major traffic artery and serves as the southwestern gateway to the Golden Triangle.As cars travel north on Speer,they enter the Golden Triangle at high speeds on Cherokee.This is a potentially dangerous situation and does not allow for any sense of arrival into the Golden Triangle.RecommendationsUse Speer green triangles to serve as traffic calming devices as well as gateways into the Golden Triangle.Consider closing or necking down the islands at Cherokee,Delaware,Elati,Fox,and Galapago Streets.IssueThe green triangles are part of the Historic Landmark District and any alteration to the existing configuration must respect the historic character of the parkway.RecommendationsExpand or connect Speer green islands with the adjacent blocks.Differentiate between the historic green and new paving.Place sculptures or gateway structures on the green islands to create entrances into the Golden Triangles at Zeckendorf Park at 7th,9th,11th,13th,and Colfax Avenue. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 79 Gateways into the Golden Triangle can be created by enhancing the green islands along Speer Boulevard.

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Pedestrian Environment and CirculationIssueSpeer Boulevard and the Cherry Creek bike path are two of the major civic amenities of Denver.In spite of its proximity,pedestrians perceive that it is difficult to cross Speer and to access the bike path from the Golden Triangle.The width of the road,the volume of cars,and speed of traffic on Speer Boulevard create a barrier that hinders pedestrian access.The lack of pedestrian connection also inhibits residents of the Golden Triangle from walking to Sunken Garden Park or King Soopers located on the west side of Speer Boulevard.RecommendationsProvide clearly delineated pedestrian crossing zones at 10th and 12th Avenues.Provide a foot bridge across Cherry Creek to access Sunken Gardens.This bridge should be located at the site of the historic abutments leading to Sunken Garden Park.IssueThe sidewalks along both sides of the north bound lane of Speer do not provide a comfortable walking zone.Narrow attached sidewalks,high speed traffic and buildings with narrow setbacks are obstacles to improving the pedestrian experience.RecommendationsRequire detached sidewalks with tree lawns for all new construction.Setback all new construction on Speer Boulevard pursuant to guidelines.Widen sidewalk and move curb out where possible. 80SPEER BOULEVARD SUB-AREA Pedestrian and bicyclist access to the Cherry Creek Path is hindered by Speer Boulevard.

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Urban FormIssueSpeer Boulevard is one of the premier legacies of the City Beautiful movement in Denver. The sub-area contains a mixture of uses from mid-rise office,drive-in coffee shops,and parking lots.There is no continuous edge to reinforce the linear quality of the parkway,nor is there any consistent treatment of the landscape on property adjacent to the parkway.RecommendationsEncourage mid-rise construction in the sub-area.Match the scale of Parkway Center that encloses and reinforces the linearity of the parkway to create an outdoor "room".New construction should establish a consistent street frontage onto Speer.Lawns fronting Speer Boulevard should be consistent with the characteristics of the Parkway.The phrase "a continuous carpet"has been used to describe this character.This implies a continuity of the ground plane with no abrupt transitions or berms.Trees,grass lawns,and foundation planting are the recommended landscape treatment.Provide gateways denoting the entrance into the Golden Triangle from Speer Boulevard at Bannock and 11th Avenue,Colfax and 14th Avenue.Provide entrances from Speer Boulevard into new buildings.IssueSome of the service alleys intersect Speer in a way that results in small parcels of land that are too small to develop.RecommendationsClose alleys where appropriate to assemble small parcels and encourage redevelopment.IssueThe green triangles are an underdeveloped greenspace amenity.RecommendationsConnect green triangle parks to adjacent property to provide an enhanced linked open space system. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 81 Future developments along Speer Boulevard should mimic Park Center West in scale. New parking lots adjacent to Speer Boulevard not allowed under current zoning.

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IMPLEMENTATION PLANThe implementation plan consists of specific actions that can be taken to implement the recommendations contained in the framework and sub-area plans.This is not an exhaustive list,but suggests some steps for the realization of the vision for the Golden Triangle Plan.Make people aware of the neighborhood plan, its recommendations and its purpose as a road map for the development of the village.Planning Office and the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association will make copies of the plan available to the neighborhood.The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association to notify the neighborhood via the newsletter of the availability of the plan.Planning Office to distribute final plan internally to other city departments.Planning Office and Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association will make the plan available to potential developers and others as requested.Put Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association plan on the internet as that capability is developed.Involve PS-1 in the creation of a Golden Triangle web page which would include the principles of the plan.Use the recommendations of the neighborhood plan in the review of all projectsGolden Triangle Neighborhood Association Board of directors to be knowledgeable of the plan and to use it in the evaluation of proposals and board actions.Planning Office to request that all proposals and projects be submitted to the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association as information items for the Board. 82IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

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The following action items are based on the committee structure of the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association and listed under the committee which would carry them out.Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Board to define a sub-committee structure and create a framework for the committees to collaborate on recommendations and implementation of the plan.MarketingMarket the Golden Triangle as an urban village:a walkable community with lively public places,a mixed-use neighborhood with diverse uses and users,a unique neighborhood where people live work and play,an identifiable neighborhood with a strong sense of place.Encourage the development of housingIdentify and market developable property and buildings which could be converted to housing.Work with the Denver Partnership to promote and identify housing opportunities in the neighborhood.Work with CDA,CHFA and other housing agencies to identify funding sources for affordable housing.Encourage the development of mixed-use projectsIdentify opportunities for neighborhood serving retail in the ground floor of mixed use projects.Identify opportunities for entertainment uses and destination retail.Encourage the location of arts-related uses in the neighborhood.Identify opportunities.Develop a marketing strategy once opportunities have been identified.Develop a database of properties,listing vacant property,empty buildings, developable land,and space for lease.Market the existing businesses:create a map and a flier to promote the neighborhood.Work with the Downtown Partnership to market the Golden Triangle along with downtown,recognizing the Golden Triangle as an extension of the core and the importance of Civic Center as the connection between them. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 83

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Urban DesignThe Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Urban Design Committee will reinforce the urban design recommendations of the plan.Develop strategies to encourage creative architecture,design diversity and quality in the village.City and Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Urban Design Committee to develop concepts for the urban design elements for the village with an emphasis on walkability and the placement of public art.Work with building owners to landmark historically significant and contributing structures.Create and refine the Village Center at 11th and Acoma.Work with the owners of the Evans School to designate and rehabilitate the building.Street Space and the Public RealmEnhance the pedestrian connections and walkability of the village through improved streetscape,lighting,special street furniture and public art.Create a streetscape master plan for the neighborhood which will include recommendations for street trees,pedestrian lighting,paving,tree lawns, landscaping and street furniture.Create a cookbook of recommended landscaping methods and materials.Establish a tree-planting program for the neighborhood.Expand the flower planting program in the neighborhood.Work with the Denver Art Museum,the Colorado Historical Society and private collectors to develop a strategy for the incorporation of public art into the public realm.Work with developers to incorporate public art into private development projects.Enforce the maintenance requirements for existing and future streetscape improvements.Revise the sign code to allow projecting,three-dimensional and creative signs in the B-8-G zone district.Work with the utility companies to remove poles and underground utilities in the whole village.Begin with Acoma and 11th Avenue.Work with the zoning department to remove all billboards 84IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

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ParkingConduct a parking management study to look at how the existing and future parking needs of the people who work,shop,visit and park in the neighborhood can be met.Create a parking strategy for the neighborhood to reduce the amount of land used for parking and reduce the overall number of parking spaces required.Develop a parking master plan and parking management strategy.Provide an ongoing evaluation of the parking strategy and revise as necessary.Zoning to revise the existing parking requirements to allow reduced parking for office and retail in mixed use projects.Consider shared parking as one means of achieving this.Initiate a dialogue with the City and State to address the parking needs of their employees.Encourage parking in structures with ground floor public uses.Enforce the parking lot landscaping standards.Develop a strategy to bring existing surface parking lots into conformance with the landscaping standards;create a funding source to provide low interest loans to allow owners to amortize the expense.TransportationConduct a traffic and speed study for the neighborhood which will accomplish the following:Evaluate the current street capacities.Estimate the future build out of the neighborhood to evaluate future traffic demands.Determine methods to focus regional traffic on the arterial edges.Study the need to maintain Delaware and Cherokee as a one-way couplet and the conversion into two-way streets.Recommend appropriate methods to slow cars on Acoma,Cherokee, Delaware,and 11th,12th,10th and 9th Avenues to retain them as local streets.Determine additional locations for traffic calming;evaluate and recommend appropriate methods. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 85

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Include Transportation and Urban Design Committees of the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association in the review of any proposed alley or street vacations for impact on the neighborhood.Work with the Denver Transportation to develop a policy and master plan for alley access to new projects in order to prohibit new curb cuts on streets.Fund a study to reexamine the design of Broadway.Discuss the proposal for HOV lanes.Enhance the walkability and pedestrian connections throughout the village.Conduct a pedestrian circulation study in order to accomplish safer and easier pedestrian connections across major streets:Study connections to adjacent neighborhoods including downtown,Capital Hill and Lincoln.Determine where stop signs and pedestrian crossing signals are needed.Determine where curbs can be bulbed-out to shorten the crossing distance.Identify intersections where conflicts with vehicles occur;recommend solutions.Recommend additional methods to identify and alert vehicles to pedestrian crossing zones.Implement the actions of the pedestrian study.Implement the actions of the bicycle plan.TransitMake RTD a partner with the neighborhood organization.Work with them to:Discontinue the staging of buses in the neighborhoodEstablish an RTD Rider incentive program for employees in the neighborhood.Improve the appearance,lighting and safety of bus shelters.Create a special shelter for Broadway and Lincoln from Colfax to Speer.Bring the Cultural Connection Trolley into the neighborhood.Discuss future public transportation plans that would impact the neighborhood. 86IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

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Sub-areasCreate a committee of business and land owners for each sub-area to address the needs and issues for their sub-area and to help implement the recommendations.Include sub-area representatives on the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association board.Create a mechanism for the sub-area committees to share information with each other and to collaborate on ideas.ColfaxCreate a Colfax sub-area committee to implement the recommendations of the sub-area plan,including the creation of a gateway at Speer Boulevard and encouraging of uses which support the Convention Center.Cultural ComplexReconvene the Civic Center Cultural Complex Task Force as the sub-area committee to:Implement the recommendations of the sub-area plan.Develop a marketing strategy for encouraging cultural,institutional and artsrelated uses to locate in the sub-area.Market the presence of the Western History holdings of the cultural institutions.Work with Denver Transportation,the Denver Partnership and the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Transportation Committee to improve pedestrian connections from the Golden Triangle to Civic Center to downtown.Work with Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Arts and Cultural Committee,the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Urban Design Committee and Denver Planning to develop special streetscape elements for the sub-area.Develop a strategy to purchase the property to complete the Arc Park along 13th Avenue. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 87

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Work with the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association to establish a policy regarding the use of the Civic Center park for regional events and its role as a neighborhood park.Build a parking structure,as part of a mixed use project,to accommodate the parking currently on surface lots.Develop a special bus shelter for the sub-area.LincolnBroadwayCreate a Lincoln-Broadway sub-area committee to:Implement the recommendations of the sub-area plan.Market the corridor for destination retail,restaurants,entertainment uses, office and commercial development,as well as uses that serve the needs of the residents of both Capital Hill and the Golden Triangle.Work with building and business owners,Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Urban Design Committee and the Planning Office to improve existing building facades.Encourage the lighting of facades and display windows to activate the street at night.Explore grants for facade rehabilitation programs through the State Historic Preservation Office.Work with the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Urban Design Committee and the Planning Office to encourage the major portion of building to be built to the property line,and to follow traditional facade proportions.Require specially designed screen walls at the perimeter of parking lots on Broadway.Work with Blue Cross to add pedestrian interest to the walls around the base of their building and improve their streestscape.Work with Parks & Recreation to improve the park amenity at 7th Avenue.Work with the Transportation Department to evaluate the redesign of Broadway.Create a streetscape master plan to establish a unique identity for the sub-area. 88IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

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Work with developers,the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Urban Design Committee and the Planning Office to locate new buildings at the property line along Broadway and to locate parking to the north,the south or behind them.o not allow new curb cuts along Broadway.Establish a Lincoln-Broadway Marketing/Redevelopment Office to provide business recruitment,develop a unified marketing strategy,coordinate maintenance streetscape and to promote the area through special events.This organization should be under the umbrella of the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association.Identify funding sources for sub-area management and capital improvements. Possibilities include a Tax Increment Funding District (TIF,MOED,and the State Historic Preservation Fund.Study the establishment of a low-interest loan fund for facade improvements and redevelopment of the sub-area.SpeerCreate a Speer sub-area committee to:Implement the recommendations of the sub-area plan.Work with the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Transportation and Urban Design Committees and the Denver Transportation to improve the pedestrian connections from the neighborhood to the access points along the Cherry Creek bike path across Speer Boulevard.Evaluate the feasibility of building a pedestrian bridge across Cherry Creek on the existing bridge abutments to connect the neighborhood to the Sunken Gardens.Continue the flower planting program in the Speer triangle parks.Work in conjunction with Parks and Recreation to plant and maintain the green edge along Cherry Creek and the bike path.Evaluate,complete and implement the Speer Boulevard streetscape guidelines. GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 89

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AcomaCreate an Acoma sub-area committee to:Implement the recommendations of the sub-area plan.Work with the cultural and civic institutions and the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Arts and Culture Committee to encourage artsrelated uses to locate in the sub-area.Explore the use of tax incentives.Develop special streetscape elements for the sub-area.Develop a strategy for incorporating art into the public realm within the subarea.Enhance the visual connection down Acoma to downtown.Enhance the visual connection down Acoma to 8th Avenue.Create the Village Center at 11th and Acoma.Make the reuse and rehabilitation of the Evans School a high priority for the neighborhood 90IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

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GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 91

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GOLDENTRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNINGCOMMITTEERick Ashton,Denver Public Library Bruce Berger,Bruce Berger Realty Bill Cook,Howard Lorton Galleries Dick Eber,Alan Eber Company Margerie Hicks,Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Dennis Humphries,Humphries Poli Architects Mark Johnson,Civitas Tom Klein,Design Workshop Sarah Meskin,Barker Rinker Seacat Architects Jim Morobitto,Security Life Andrew Moss,Semple Brown Roberts Joe Magee,Channel Six Buck Oakes,Oakes Management Services Valery Ohman,Golden Triangle neighborhood Association Linda Reilly,PS1 Charter School Kent Rickenbaugh,Rickenbaugh Cadillac/Volvo Ron Scholar,Scholar Buchanan Yonushewski Architects Brent Snyder,TenRep Ltp. Bill Wenk,Wenk Associates Mickey Zeppelin,Zeppelin & Co.,Chairman City and County of Denver Jennifer Moulton,Director of Planning Madie Martin,Urban Design Planning Kristen Cypher,Planning Intern Ed Ellerbrock,Public Works Jacy Montoya,Planning Intern Steve Turner,Urban Design Planning ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSWellington E.Webb Mayor Council Members Dennis Gallagher District 1 T.J."Ted"Hackworth District 2 Ramona martinez District 3 Joyce Foster District 4 Polly Flobeck District 5 Susan Casey District 6 William "Bill"Himmelmann District 7 Hiawatha Davis,Jr. District 8 Deborah L.Ortega District 9 Ed Thomas District 10 Allegra "Happy"Haynes District 11 Cathy Reynolds Council-at-Large Susan Barnes-Gelt Council-at-Large 92ACKNOWLEGEMENTS

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GOLDEN TRIANGLE NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 93