Citation
Jefferson Park neighborhood plan

Material Information

Title:
Jefferson Park neighborhood plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Community planning
Neighborhood plans
City planning
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Jefferson Park

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
JEFFERSON PARK
NEIGHRORHDOD


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
City Council
Elbra Wedgeworth, Council President,
District 8
Rick Garcia, District 1
Jeanne Faatz, District 2
Rosemary E. Rodriguez, District 3
Peggy Lehmann, District 4
Marcia Johnson, District 5
Charlie Brown, District 6
Kathleen MacKenzie, District 7
Judy Montero, District 9
Jeanne Robb, District 10
Michael B. Hancock, District 11
Carol Boigon, At-Large
Doug Linkhart, At-Large
City and County of Denver
John H. Hickenlooper, Mayor
Peter Park, Manager of CPD
Tyler Gibbs, Director of Planning
Dennis Swain, Development Program
Manager
Devon Buckels, former Associate City
Planner, Plan co-author
Carla McConnell, former Urban
Design Architect, Plan co-author
Matt Seubert, former Senior City
Planner
Julie Connor, Graphic Designer
Jim Ottenstein, Graphic Designer
Daniel Michael III, Graphic Designer
Eric McClelland, GIS
Stakeholders
David Berton, co-chair
Rafael Espinoza, co chair
Lareen Castellano
Dale Chandler
Karen Harvey
Neil Macey
Joe Maestes
Jack Martinez
Lowell May
Dean von Holdt
Augustin Dionicio
Denise Perez
Planning Board
Barabara Kelley, Chair
Jan Marie Belle
Brad Buchanan
Frederick Corn, P.E.
Monica Guardiola, Esq.
Daniel R. Guimond,AICP
William H. (Bill) Hornby
Mason Lewis
Bruce ODonnell
Jeffery Walker


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Stable of contents
Executive Summary
Overview............................................................2
Introduction
Location Map........................................................6
Purpose of the Plan.................................................7
Relationship to Other Plans and Programs............................8
Planning Process...................................................14
Plan-Vision
Vision.............................................................16
Plan Neighborhood Framework
Introduction.......................................................20
Land Use/Urban Form/Zoning.........................................22
Housing............................................................29
Mobility...........................................................32
Community Facilities...............................................35
Plan Subareas
Introduction.......................................................38
Core Residential...................................................40
River Drive........................................................43
Park Face Blocks...................................................45
Neighborhood Commercial West 25th and Eliot......................48
Speer Boulevard....................................................52


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Plan Subareas continued
Federal Boulevard.................................................55
Diamond Hill......................................................58
Stadium Transition................................................62
Cultural/Educational Facility District............................65
Urban Design
Key Design Principles.............................................68
Implementation Plan
Summary...........................................................77
Action Plan
Introduction......................................................80
Action Plan Tables................................................82
IV




EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Overlooking Downtown and the Central Platte
valley, Jefferson Park sits in the path of
intense redevelopment.
OVERVIEW
Jefferson Park is one of the oldest and smallest neighborhoods in the City. It contains only 309 acres of
land and approximately 3,300 residents. The boundaries of the neighborhood are West 29th Avenue and
Speer Boulevard on the north, the South Platte River on the east, West 19th and 20th Avenues and
Interstate 25 on the south, and Federal Boulevard on the west. Most of the neighborhood is located on a
bluff west of 1-25 and the South Platte River, overlooking Downtown. The western section of the
neighborhood is primarily residential, while the eastern section contains a variety of institutional,
commercial, and industrial uses.
The neighborhood is diverse in land uses, the age of its structures, and the demographics of its residents.
Although its oldest houses and commercial structures date to the 1880s, approximately two-thirds of its
housing has been built since the 1940s. Until the recent surge in residential construction, the newest
structures in the neighborhood were commercial structures, an observation that reflects the changing
nature of Jefferson Park and the surrounding areas. Census information indicates that more than eighty
percent of the neighborhood residents are Latino, compared to approximately thirty percent for the City
as a whole, and more than fifty percent of the residents are foreign-born, compared to approximately
seventeen percent for the City. Only about twenty percent of the housing units are owner-occupied,
compared to about fifty percent of the total number of housing units for the City. Approximately thirty
five percent of the residents are classified as living in poverty, compared to approximately fourteen
percent for the City.
Despite having a large population of lower income residents, the neighborhood is experiencing a rapid
increase in the value of its housing and increasing pressures for redevelopment and construction of
higher density and more expensive housing. Overlooking Downtown and the Central Platte Valley,
adjacent to Lower Highland, and with generally high density zoning in place, Jefferson Park sits in the path
of the intense redevelopment that has occurred in those adjoining neighborhoods.This combination of
characteristics provides both a challenge and an opportunity for the neighborhood. Although the
2


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
neighborhood generally welcomes new residents and businesses, it desires to protect and enhance its
historic character and the diversity of its residents.
Blueprint Denver, An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, identifies both Areas of Change and
Areas of Stability in Jefferson Park. While the recommendations of this Plan are generally consistent with
and reinforce the concepts and recommendations of Blueprint Denver, there are four areas where this Plan
recommends changing the boundaries between the Areas of Change and Areas of Stability.
Key Issues
1. The existing zoning in Jefferson Park allows much more intense development than either the
existing or the desired intensity and character of housing and commercial development.
2. The existing zoning does not include any provisions for protecting and enhancing the character of
the neighborhood.
3. The views of Downtown from the west side of the Park are important to the neighborhood but are
not protected.
4. Denver does not currently have any zone districts that reflect the existing and desired intensity and
character of the neighborhood.
5. Mounting development pressures mandate that action must be taken quickly if the desired character
is to be achieved.
Key Recommendations
1. Use existing zoning overlay districts as an interim mechanism for helping to protect and enhance
the existing character of the neighborhood and to achieve the desired character and intensity of
new development.
2. Use the design principles in the Plan when developing new zone districts that reflect the existing
and desired character and intensity of the neighborhood.
3. Once new zone districts that reflect the desired character of the neighborhood have been prepared,
use them to replace the overlay districts.
4. Apply a view protection ordinance for the views from the west side of Jefferson Park to Downtown.
5. Encourage the use of mixed-use zone districts or other zone districts that include design principles
3


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
when rezoning sites that are currently zoned PRY
6. Amend the Blueprint Denver map to change two areas in the Core Residential Subarea from Area of
Change" to Area of Stability and one area in each of two subareas Diamond Hill and Stadium
Transition from Area of Stability to Area of Change.
While there are numerous other issues and recommendations in this plan, moving quickly to address
these issues and implement these recommendations will have the greatest impact on achieving the vision
for Jefferson Park.


INRODUCTION


INTRODUCTION
LOCATION MAP
KIPLING WADSWORTH PIERCE SHERIDAN LOWELL
GALAPAGO CLARKSON UNIVERSITY COLORADO HOLLY QUEBEC YOSEMITE HAVANA PEORIA POTOMAC CHAMBERS BUCKLEY TOWER


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
PURPOSE OF THE PLAN
This plan replaces the Jefferson Park Neighborhood Plan approved by City Council in 1976. A draft Plan
created in 1988 was never adopted and the 1976 Plan was not re-adopted as part of Comprehensive Plan
2000. Many of the issues relating to land use and zoning, housing, historic preservation and transportation
identified in the 1976 Plan are still relevant today. However, current market conditions and substantial
population and economic growth in the Denver metropolitan area have necessitated an evaluation of the
existing regulatory, economic, and programmatic elements guiding the future of the Jefferson Park
community.
The Plan establishes long-range goals and objectives for the development and stabilization of the
neighborhood. It provides a framework and establishes implementation strategies that will direct Jefferson
Park toward its vision as a community where people will live, work, play and celebrate the
neighborhoods cultural heritage.
The Plan provides a neighborhood and city-approved guide to the future development of the Jefferson
Park neighborhood. It is intended for use by Community Planning and Development, the Department of
Public Works, Department of Parks and Recreation, Police Department, other City agencies, Planning
Board, the Mayor, City Council, other public and quasi-public agencies, neighborhood associations, residents,
property owners, business people, and private organizations concerned with planning, development, and
neighborhood improvement.
The Plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban design, and circulation that contribute to
the economic, social, and physical health, safety, and welfare of the people who live and work in the
neighborhood.The Jefferson Park Neighborhood Plan addresses issues and opportunities at a scale
that is more refined and more responsive to specific needs than the Citys Comprehensive Plan,to which
it is a supplement.
The Plan is neither an official zone map, nor does it create or deny any rights. Zone changes must
be initiated under a separate procedure established under the Revised Municipal Code.


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PLANS
AND PROGRAMS
Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000
This and all other neighborhood plans are consistent with and supplemental to the Citys Comprehensive
Plan.The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 (Plan 2000) presents a citywide perspective, while each small
area plan provides more specific guidance both for the allocation of City resources and for the location
and design of private development.
All neighborhood and other small area plans are expected to be compatible with the citywide policies
contained in Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver:An Integrated Land Use and
Transportation Plan, which is also a supplement to the Comprehensive Plan. The Jefferson Park
Neighborhood Plan implements the following policies from these and other applicable plans:
Comprehensive Plan 2000 (2000)
Communication and Partnerships
i Neighborhood residents and organizations should be engaged in collaborative efforts to share
information, solve problems and plan for the future.
Land Use and Transportation
) High-density residential developments should be well served by public transportation and should be
in close proximity to employment centers, amenities and shopping facilities.
) Activity areas should provide housing as one of the mixture of uses so as to support non-residential
activities, minimize growth in auto use, and minimize negative impacts on air quality and energy use.
) Access to employment and activity centers should be improved in a manner consistent with
commitments to provide a full range of travel modes and to protect living quality and promote
8


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
good urban design.
) Land use patterns and zoning should support effective public rapid transit, an efficient roadway
system and alternative transportation modes.
) Applicants proposing zone change to more intense uses should substantially mitigate negative
impacts on existing uses.
) A mixture of uses that assure the availability of neighborhood services and amenities that reinforce
the role, identity and needs of the neighborhood should be encouraged.
Transit, Mobility and Parking
) Sidewalks and facilities for pedestrians are integral components of the transportation system. New
roads and transit facilities should be designed to include pedestrian facilities. When existing arterials
are reconstructed they should be furnished with sidewalks and pedestrian access to neighborhoods.
) The reuse of older structures and the revitalization and efficient development of commercial areas
should be encouraged by promoting the creation of parking districts that will provide pooled,
shared parking.
) Local streets not designated as collectors should serve neighborhood purposes and through traffic
must be diverted from these streets whenever possible.
Urban Design
) A well-designed urban environment, promoting the use of designs and materials that reflect the
communitys culture and materials should be developed and maintained.
) All projects should be built to the highest urban design standards. New facilities should make a
positive design contribution to the neighborhood and include facilities for bicycles, sidewalks, trees,
medians, lighting, and other high-quality physical design features.
) View corridors and solar access should be provided or preserved wherever feasible and appropriate.
Commerce and Industry
) Both large and small businesses that meet economic and community criteria should be sought,
retained and supported.
) Economic development programs should emphasize retention and expansion of existing businesses
as well as attractive new businesses.


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
) The revitalization of older neighborhood commercial centers that provide shopping within walking
distance to residences should be encouraged to assist the stabilization of older neighborhoods.
) Commercial development should be compatible in operation and design with the residential fabric
and character of the neighborhood.
) Off-street parking facilities should be landscaped, designed and located in a manner that minimizes
disruption and inconvenience to adjacent residential properties and streets.
) Deteriorated and declining business and shopping areas should be revitalized by rehabilitation or
replacement with appropriate uses.
) Adjacent residential areas should be protected from the negative activities of shopping areas by
adequate buffering and by ensuring that adequate off-street parking and circulation is provided.
) Strip commercial development in new areas should be discouraged and existing strip commercial
developments should be redeveloped, restructured and landscaped.
) Linear business areas in older neighborhoods should be compatible with other buildings in the area,
and should encorporate pedestrian orientation and buffering from adjacent residential uses.
Operations should avoid negative impacts on surrounding residential areas of lights, hours of
operation, noise, drive-in speakers, trash removal, deliveries, etc.
) Streetscaping and street amenities should be installed in revitalizing and new commercial areas.
Neighborhoods
) The existing stock of housing should be preserved and improved, especially encourage the
rehabilitation and re-occupancy of vacant buildings.
) Subsidized housing should be designed to be compatible with surrounding housing and the
character of the neighborhoods and should be located to promote economic and racial integration.
) The quality of the neighborhood should be preserved and improved. A focus of this effort should be
to preserve and improve the existing stock of housing, including the rehabilitation and re-occupancy
of vacant buildings.
) The character of stable residential neighborhoods should be preserved. Requests for rezonings on
the periphery of stable residential neighborhoods should be evaluated to ensure that long-term
stability is not threatened and the rezoning is compatible.
10


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Improvements in the condition of dwelling units and non-residential buildings should bring them
into conformance with code requirements to improve living conditions and remove blighting
influences from neighborhoods.
) Neighborhoods in which physical conditions are declining or inadequate should be stabilized and
upgraded. The strategies used should be those that minimize adverse impacts on the socioeconomic
composition of existing residents.
) Historic buildings and areas should be protected, and the destruction of any structures or
landscapes, which are part of the areas historic fabric, should be discouraged.
) Compatible residential development on vacant sites within developed residential areas should be
encouraged.
) Development should be compatible with and sensitive to the immediate environment of the site
and neighborhood in terms of architectural design, scale, bulk and building height, historic character,
orientation of the building on the lot, landscaping and visual integrity.
Blueprint Denver (2002)
Blueprint Denver:An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan is a citywide plan that outlines
Denvers growth management and development strategy. Blueprint Denver divides the city into Areas of
Change, where reinvestment and redevelopment is desirable, and Areas of Stability, where the existing land
use and character should be maintained and enhanced.
Jefferson Park has both Areas of Change and Areas of Stability. The Areas of Change include:
The northern edges of the neighborhood, generally including the blocks along Speer Boulevard and the area
between 1-25 and Clay Streets, north ofWest 23rd Avenue; the southern edge of the neighborhood, generally
between 1-25 and Eliot Streets, south ofWest 22nd Avenue.The neighborhood commercial area at West 25 th
Avenue and Eliot Street is identified as a neighborhood center anchoring the western edge Area of Change
from just south ofWest 24th Avenue to West 26thAvenue, between Federal Boulevard and Eliot Street.
These areas have great potential for reflecting the mixed-use nature of the historic land uses and offer
opportunities to build upon those uses while embracing opportunities for reinvestment and change.
This Plan recommends amending the Blueprint Denver Areas of Change Map to add two areas in the
neighborhood as the Areas of Change and to delete two other areas in the neighborhood from the Areas

Jefferson Park has both Areas of Change and
Areas of stability.
n


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
of Change. These proposed amendments are reflectd on the Area of Change Map included in this Plan.
Jefferson Park also contains several Areas of Stability that provide the characteristic urban fabric that
creates a strong sense of place.The Areas of Stability are:
The residential core of the neighborhood. This area generally includes the northwest end of the
neighborhood between West 29th and West 27th Avenues, between Federal and Decatur; the center of the
neighborhood between West 26th Avenue and West 23rd Avenue, between Eliot and Bryant Streets; and the
southwest end of the neighborhood between West 22nd and West 20th Avenues, between Federal Boulevard
and east of Eliot Street. Blueprint Denver also identifies River Drive as an Area of Stability.
Game Plan (2003)
The neighborhood is identified in this citywide parks and recreation plan, as an area posing a challenge
for safe access to parks, and is also identified as a neighborhood of greatest need for breathing space
associated with public schools. However, it is also identified as an area with walkable access to parks,
and receives the highest category ranking of acreage of parkland per capita, and exceeds the benchmark
standards for baseball fields. However, it is well below the benchmark for soccer fields and is identified as
falling below 75% of the national average for building square footage and lacking 1 to 3 core amenities in
the area of recreation facility need map. The plan also notes that both Speer and Federal Boulevard are
designated parkways, and also identifies 23rd Avenue and Water Street as proposedgreen streets.
Denver Bicycle Master Plan and Denver Bicycle
Master Plan Update (1993 and 2001)
The Citys Bicycle Master Plans identifies West 23rd Avenue / Water Street and Eliot Street / West 29th
Avenue as Grid Bike Routes; West 26th Avenue / North Zuni Street as a Neighborhood Bike Route; and
the Platte River Trail as an Off-street Bike Route.
Pedestrian Master Plan (2004)
The Plan identifies the following as part of the Citys pedestrian route network:
West 23rdAvenue,Water Street, West 29thAvenue, Speer and Federal Boulevards.
12


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Stadium Area Plan (2001)
The Stadium Districts Stadium Area Plan, adopted February 20,2001, provides suggestions for improving
the relationship between the stadium and the neighborhoods that surround it.This neighborhood plan
has been coordinated to be compatible with the Stadium Area Plan.
Stadium Area Economic Analysis (1999)
The Stadium Area Economic Analysis, prepared by the Leland Consulting Group, surveys the commercial
areas near the stadium and assesses their potential for growth.The Analysis points out the potential of
these commercial areas for capturing a greater share of local retail spending, and suggests a variety of
strategies to try and increase their market share.
Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan (1995)
The Citys Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan contains recommendations pertaining to the construction
and landscaping of a median in Federal Boulevard.The majority of this neighborhood plan is consistent
with the Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan. However, since the time of the adoption of the corridor plan,
the neighborhood has experienced some difficulties with access to businesses east of Federal Boulevard
at West 25th Avenue, and is recommending in this plan that the median be cut to allow access across
Federal Boulevard at West 25th Avenue.
The Platte River Valley (PRV) Subarea Zoning Standards
The PRV Zoning Standards identify the intended character and guidelines for the Diamond Hill subarea
located within Jefferson Park.
Focus Neighborhoods
This neighborhood planning process was complemented by another initiative involving Jefferson Park
called the Focus Neighborhoods Initiative. Jefferson Park was one of several neighborhoods included in
this initiative, which was designed to address short term needs (approximately five years) centered
primarily around safety, services, and neighborhood beautification. Many of the non-land use and
transportation needs of the Jefferson Park community were considered as part of the Focus
Neighborhoods program; this plan does not duplicate those efforts.
Neighborhood workshop
13


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
PLANNING PROCESS
The Jefferson Park Neighborhood Plan Steering Committee was composed of thirteen citizens who were
selected by the District City Council member to represent specific groups and entities that have interests
in Jefferson Park.The Stakeholder groups represented on the Committee include: residents, both
homeowners and tenants in rental properties; business owners; institutions; property owners; and
representatives from the registered neighborhood association. The Steering Committee joined with City
of Denvers Community Planning and Development Agency in an effort to garner neighborhood
participation in the planning process and to produce a draft plan. The Steering Committee began the
process in 2001 by identifying the most critical issues and developing a vision statement for the entire
neighborhood. The Steering Committee subsequently hosted six public meetings at key milestones in the
plan development process, and the Committee met over 28 times over a period of five years.Throughout
the planning process, hundreds of individuals participated in dozens of meetings.
Prior to adoption as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000, the draft neighborhood plan
was further reviewed by representatives of City agencies and in public hearings by both the Planning
Board and City Council. The Steering Committee will continue to advocate for the implementation of the
plan and to monitor progress toward that end.
14


VISION


VISION
Jefferson Park Promenade-helping achieue
the vision.
If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented, the following vision statement will be an
accurate description of Jefferson Park in the not-too-distant future.
Vision
Jefferson Park will be a neighborhood that encourages diversity and is proud of its strong sense of community.
Providing an inviting, safe, and comfortable urban environment for individuals and families from diverse cultural,
social and economic backgrounds will be a valued characteristic of Jefferson Park. The neighborhood will be a
vibrant and well-integrated blend of uses in a walkable environment.
The neighborhoods namesake park, Jefferson Park, one of the neighborhoods chief amenities will serve as a
neighborhood center, attracting people in the area to outdoor and social activities. The former streetcar stop
located at 25th Avenue and Eliot Street, which will be thriving with neighborhood retail and service businesses,
will serve the community as a second neighborhood center. The everyday needs of residents and workers in
Jefferson Park will be met by neighborhood commercial areas and institutions. The neighborhood will have a
strong economic base which allows individuals and businesses to achieve a better standard of living.
Jefferson Park will be a vital neighborhood, with a complementary mix of uses. This variety of uses will provide
benefits to the neighborhood and surrounding community by offering diverse employment and training
opportunities, strengthening the employment and retail bases. This mix of uses also will reinforce the
momentum of reinvestment in the neighborhood.
The neighborhood will contain a range of housing types, styles and price ranges, providing affordable
accommodations to diverse groups of current and future residents. This range of housing options will be
provided in a manner that is compatible with the desired character of the neighborhood. Educational and
childcare facilities will be easily and safely accessible to neighborhood children of all ages.
The Jefferson Park neighborhood will have a distinctive character, through which its many physical assets will be
celebrated and maximized, including:
I proximity and access to Downtown and the Platte Valley
I varied topography and views of Downtown
I existing historic buildings
I parks and open space
16


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
High quality new development will complement existing historical, architectural, geographical and cultural
elements, and reinvestment will occur in a managed fashion.The existing properties will be cared for and well
maintained by both public and private property owners.
Jefferson Park will include large public institutions such as Invesco Field at Mile High Stadium, Childrens
Museum, and Riverside Baptist Church. These institutions are well integrated into the community, and they will
provide benefits to their hosting neighborhoods, including employment opportunities.
The infrastructure, from Jefferson Parks characteristic alleys to water and sewer, will all be meeting the needs of
the community, and are well-maintained. The community of Jefferson Park will have open communications with
city agencies and surrounding neighborhoods, and the resulting ongoing dialogue will be beneficial for all. The
neighborhood will work to provide services and meet the needs of residents on an equal basis.
zocalo Condominiums on Jefferson Park
Neighbors will be invested in their community, and residents will enthusiastically participate in their
community. The participation of residents of diverse cultures will make Jefferson Park one of the strongest
neighborhoods in Denver.
Achieving The Vision
Plans are not regulatory tools. Plans provide a vision, which is a collective picture of a desired future and a
roadmap for achieving that vision. Plans are implemented incrementally with the vision and goals providing
common direction to a multitude of public and private undertakings. Part of the City process is to evaluate plan
objectives and neighborhood conditions to determine if regulatory modifications are needed in order to
facilitate the desired development.
Use of Plan Components
I It is expected that new development regulations will conform to plan goals and policies, as well as
citywide plans. Because of the intensity of the challenges facing Jefferson Park and because the Areas of
Change can anticipate significant redevelopment activity, it is recommended that regulatory tools
incorporate the design principles.The urban design principles reflect design goals that encourage
cohesiveness and compatibility with the existing and desired character of the neighborhood as well as
excellence in urban design.They are not intended to restrict innovation, imagination, or variety in design.
I Developers and designers are expected to meet with neighborhood associations and with immediate
neighbors to discuss their projects and to solicit input.
I Neighborhood groups are expected to give timely feedback based on adopted plans and to support
17


VISION
development proposals that meet neighborhood goals. Neighborhood input on new development is
expected to be consistent with plan goals and policies.
18


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD
FRAMEWORK
19


PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK
Introduction
The Framework looks at the neighborhood in the larger view and provides overall concepts that will
guide its development. It addresses core issues and provides basic recommendations for the entire
neighborhood. Many of the recommendations in this section are further defined in the subarea sections of
this plan, so the subarea sections should be referenced and implementation should be consistent with the
subarea goals.
Achieving The Vision
The adoption of this plan does not change the zoning. However, zoning is the primary land use regulatory
mechanism and, thus, an important tool for implementing small area plans.The land use-related elements
of a plans vision statement are easiest to achieve when zoning reinforces the vision through its provisions
for allowed uses and permitted structures. If a plan areas zone designations do not reinforce the plan
vision, changing the zoning to be compatible is the primary implementation mechanism. It is essential,
therefore, that rezoning applications be reviewed for their consistency with, and ability to help
implement, adopted plans.When these regulatory changes are not accomplished in a timely manner, it is
more difficult to achieve the vision.
The plan vision and goals must be a reference and a guide for any proposed rezoning within the
plan area.
20


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Urban Form
Zoning regulations alone do not necessarily achieve the desired urban form. Design review using adopted
standards and guidelines can be enabled through zoning (or Landmark designation). The design
principles provided in this plan may provide a basis for future design guidelines adopted as rules and
regulations or provide direction for future form-based zoning initiatives. The goals and strategies remain
advisory until adopted through a formal regulatory process. Individual property owners may also look to
the plan for guidance.
There are several factors in Jefferson Park that make the consideration of neighborhood form and design
in future regulations important. One of the factors justifying the extra attention is the areas location. Its
close proximity to Downtown and its prominent topography combine to make Jefferson Park, most
notably the edges, one of the most visible and therefore aesthetically important of Denvers
neighborhoods.These characteristics, along with the neighborhoods access to Speer Boulevard and 1-25,
make it particularly attractive for development, creating greater development pressures on the area than
other areas of the City.
Jefferson Park is one of the most visible of
Denver's neighborhoods.
Another reason for improved form-oriented regulations is the discrepancy between existing land use and
the vision for land use, and the existing zoning in the neighborhood. The neighborhood contains both
Areas of Change and Areas of Stability. The visions of Blueprint Denver for this area and the vision of this
neighborhood plan will be nearly impossible to achieve without significant efforts addressing the R-3
zoning. The section of Jefferson Park that is characterized as an Area of Stability will not remain as such
without these efforts. Similarly, the Areas of Change within Jefferson Park offer an exciting opportunity to
help achieve the vision of Blueprint Denver through development, but only if parameters are set in place
to help guide the development toward the scenarios in the vision, and to compensate for the mismatch
between the vision and the existing zoning.
21


PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK
/
v
r.
The neighborhood should be buffered from
the stadium and 1-25
LAND USE / URBAN FORM / ZONING
Strengths
\ Jefferson Park is a true mixed-use neighborhood, with a strong sense of community, provided in part
by long-term residents.
) Jefferson Parks namesake park is centrally located and easily accessible to all residents.
Issues
) Existing zoning does not match existing land use.
) The edges of the neighborhood are not clearly defined by a distinct transition in development form.
\ Existing carriage lots are underutilized.
) There is concern that view corridors to the Central Platte Valley and Downtown through the
neighborhood have been and will continue to be lost.
) There is a desire to strengthen the neighborhood with development that is consistent with the
existing development in scale and character.
\ Current zoning and available zone districts make it difficult to preserve the mix of single family and
multiple family housing.
) The neighborhood should be buffered from the stadium and 1-25.
) The intensity of the uses surrounding the neighborhood, such as Invesco Field at Mile High, which
contrast with the historic, small-scale residential core of the neighborhood, creates a difficult parking
situation.
) Viking Park is geographically part of the neighborhood but is not easily accessible.
22


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
JEFFERSON PARK
EAS OF STABILITY AND CHANGE
23


PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK
JEFFERSON PARK
EXISTING HEIGHT LIMITS
24


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Jefferson Park currently is used primarily for passive recreation and has been a gathering place for
illegal activities.
) Neighborhood alleys are poorly maintained, often unpaved and unlighted. These conditions are
causing traffic and safety concerns in the neighborhood.
Goals
) Maintain and enhance the character and identity of the historic Jefferson Park neighborhood.
) Bring zoning into closer conformance with the existing land use and the land use vision.
) Preserve views to Downtown, emphasizing the topography of the neighborhood.
) Create focal points within the neighborhood. The primary focal point is Jefferson Park, and a
secondary focal point is the neighborhood commercial area at West 25th and Eliot.
) Create a retail core for the neighborhood at West 25th and Eliot.
) Enhance residents ability to work, shop and recreate within the neighborhood.
) Facilitate a sense of community through quality design.
) Maintain connections, walkability and the fine grain of the historic Jefferson Park neighborhood, as
exhibited by the historic street pattern and alleys.
) Preserve and enhance a stable residential core.
) Accomodate new development in currently underutilized areas of the neighborhood.
) Balance neighborhood character preservation with the livability of the neighborhood and mobility
needs when reviewing parking requirements of new development.
View along west 23rd Avenue
Recommendations
) The neighborhood association, with the assistance from Denver Community Planning and
Development, should prepare an application for a map amendment that would add an OD-9 zone
overlay district to the R-3 zoned portions of the Core Residential Subarea and Park Face Block.
) Neighborhood issues, analysis, and urban design principles will be provided for use in the Citys
efforts to rewrite the zoning code and create new zone districts that reflect the existing and desired
conditions in Denvers inner-ring of neighborhoods.
25
.if


PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK
I
Accomodate new development in currently
underutilized areas of the neighborhood.
I
>
>
>
I
I
I
I
As new zone districts are created through the rewrite of the new zoning code, consider rezoning the
edges of the park to allow skightly greater height and density than R-2.
Once these new or amended zone districts are available, the new zoning districts should replace the
overlay districts.
When property owners in the PRV-zoned areas along the eastern edge of the neighborhood seek
amendments to begin the redevelopment process, these sites should be rezoned to one of the
mixed-use zoning districts.
Community Planning and Development will prepare a view preservation ordinance to protect the
views toward Downtown from the west side of Jefferson Park.
Preserve view corridors to the Central Platte Valley and Downtown along east-west streets.
New development along neighborhood edges should be distinctive and reflect the neighborhood
character. See character descriptions in the subareas of this plan.
Designate areas for greater height and density of development along Speer where it will create
strong neighborhood edges and buffer the core of the residential area.
Investigate the possibility of obtaining a grant for research regarding the potential historic
significance of several of the buildings in the neighborhood, including but not limited to: the
Deliverance Tabernacle on West 2 5th Avenue, the building on the southeast corner of West 25th and
Eliot, and the building on the southwest corner of West 25th and Eliot, and buildings on River Drive.
Encourage new development to maintain and extend the grid pattern of streets throughout the
neighborhood consistent with the subarea goals in this plan.
Develop the potential ofWest 25thAvenue as the principal neighborhood corridor anchored at one
end by the West 25th and Eliot neighborhood commercial area and at the other by redevelopment at
Diamond Hill.
Maximize the visibility and opportunities for increased use of carriage lots to increase their safety
and encourage community use.
Use pedestrian-friendly architectural and streetscape elements to help define neighborhood edges.
26


NEIGHBOR
) Maximize opportunities to create public social spaces. Possibilities include:
I Enliven pedestrian areas with streetscaping at West 25th and Eliot with the addition of wide
sidewalks, street trees, pedestrian lights and street furniture.
I Enhance public spaces and amenities in Jefferson Park.
I Consider the addition of a plaza area for gatherings in or adjacent to Jefferson Park, or within the
West 25th and Eliot commercial area.
) Encourage planting of street trees in the right-of-way to reinforce the traditional street patterns.
) Pave, light and maintain alleys for increased safety and improved appearance.
) Direct high-density development toward the neighborhoods perimeter, not its center.
) Any parking analysis being conducted for new development or redevelopment needs to carefully
weigh the tradeoff between neighborhood character and livability.
) Create gateway monuments or markers at the following locations:
I Speer Boulevard and Zuni
I 29th Avenue and Federal Boulevard
I 25th Avenue and Federal Boulevard
I Alcott and 23rd Avenue
O O D PLAN
Opportunities exist for redeuelopment that is
consistent with existing deuelopment in scale
and character.
27


PLAN
NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK
JEFFERSON PARK
Zoning
LEGEND
| R-2 Low Density Multi-Unit
| R-3 High Density Multi-Unit
| B-1 Office
^ B-2 Neighborhood Business
^ B-4 General Business
^ Planned Unit Development
^ P-1 Parking
| Platte River Valley
H Commercial Mixed Use
February 2001 N
nnji
O' 100' 250' -
28


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
HOUSING
Strengths
) Jefferson Park offers a wide variety of single and multi-family housing options for both renters and
homeowners across a broad price spectrum.
) Jefferson Park has strong areas of single-family residential housing which contribute substantially to
the character of the neighborhood.
) Jefferson Park values its historic buildings, many of which are single-family residences.
Jefferson Park has strong areas of single-
family housing.
Issues
) The primary housing concern centers on the possibility of losing a diversity of people in the
neighborhood. Market pressures for redevelopment could result in additional displacement of the
elderly and lower income residents, many of whom are long term residents.
) The diversity of housing options within Jefferson Park is threatened by development pressures.
) There are many poorly maintained properties in Jefferson Park.
) There is a lack of information among residents regarding tenants rights.
) Some poorly maintained properties provide affordable housing. However, if investments are made in
these properties it can lead to displacement, due to increased rent or sales prices. Code enforcement
can result in building closure.
) Rents are increasing faster than wages or income in Jefferson Park.
) Over time, given anticipated related increases in property values, some current residents may not be
able to afford to stay in the neighborhood due to increasing property taxes.
29


PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK
) There is a perceived threat to the neighborhoods single-family character and to the historic
buildings of Jefferson Park from encroaching development and from lack of maintenance.
) Existing vacant lots of less than 6,000 square feet are challenging to redevelop.
Goals
) Maintain a wide variety of well-maintained housing options including substantial numbers of
affordable units for sale or rent without compromising quality.
) Keep and upgrade as many of the existing single-family structures as possible, and in sections of the
neighborhood where conditions preclude retention of existing structures, encourage replacement
with town homes or other development in character with the neighborhood.
) Maintain the availability of multi-family affordable housing in the neighborhood.
Recommendations
Investigate the following options to address housing issues. Note that many of these options require a
citywide response.
) Multi-family rehabilitation with requirement that units stay affordable.
) Code enforcement in severe code violation situations.
) Partnership between the neighborhood and a non-profit to buy properties and enroll in low-interest
loan programs to maintain some of the multi-family housing as affordable.This could help offset
potential gentrification.
) Start a property manager/owner training program for Jefferson Park to address property
management problems.
) A new apartment inspection and licensing program.
) Encourage housing developers to take advantage of bond programs, tax credit programs, or other
incentives for the development of affordable housing units, such as the following (these incentives
are typically applied to projects over 100 units in size):
I Low-income housing tax credits through Colorado Housing Finance Authority (CHFA)
I Private Activity Bonds
30


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Investigate the possibility of the following to address displacement issues:
I Work with the City to take advantage of the Multi-Family Rental Program.
I If new development occurs in the neighborhood, encourage mixed income housing.
I Provide home ownership assistance to renters through educational efforts about programs for
down payment and closing cost assistance.
I Provide information to property owners about owner-occupied single-family rehabilitation
programs available through Denver Urban Renewal Authority to address property maintenance
issues.
I Make educational materials available regarding Tenants Rights with assistance from resources
such as ACORN and Legal Aid.
31


PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK
MOBILITY
Strengths
) Jefferson Park is well located for access into Downtown and onto 1-25.
) An opportunity exists to focus attention on the new pedestrian promenade, which has unusually
good views of Downtown/Central Platte Valley, linking Speer Boulevard pedestrian/bike paths to the
new pedestrian/bike path along the new 1-25 slip ramp.
Issues
) Extensive areas of surface parking are detrimental to the neighborhood.
) The stadium creates major traffic and parking impacts on the neighborhood.
) Access to neighborhood businesses on West 2 5th Avenue is difficult due to the median on Federal.
) Speer is not a pedestrian-friendly corridor.
) Traffic often moves too quickly along Eliot creating a dangerous pedestrian situation.
) Crossing West 26th Avenue is perceived by the neighborhood as dangerous for pedestrians due to
high traffic speeds and volume.
) The intersection of Speer Boulevard and West 29th Avenue is dangerous for pedestrians.
Improvements to this intersection are recommended in the Pedestrian Master Plan (Project #31).
) The intersection of West 23rd Avenue and Bryant is dangerous for pedestrians, and is frequently the
location of accidents involving parked cars. Improvements to this intersection are recommended in
the Pedestrian Master Plan (Project #38).
) Traffic often moves too quickly along eastboundWest 23rdAvenue.
) Transit service is inadequate or inconvenient in two areas:
32


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
I Along Federal Boulevard:Transfer is required at Colfax Avenue to travel north-south along
Federal Boulevard.
I Connections are lacking between Jefferson Park and popular local destinations such as
Downtown,Auraria, Mile High Stadium, Human Services on Federal, West Side Health Clinic, and
West 32nd Avenue retail.
Goals
) Alleviate impacts created by parking needs of stadium.
) Increase the neighborhoods pedestrian friendly environment.
) Improve mobility within the neighborhood.
) Improve access to the neighborhood from Federal Boulevard.
) Improve bicycle and pedestrian connections to the neighborhood.
) Improve transit service to better serve Jefferson Park residents.
When the bridge over 1-25 is rebuilt, provide
wide sidewalks, or a raised sidewalk, and a
wider bike lane.
Recommendations
) The neighborhood should work with the City to initiate a traffic study that will address several
specific areas of concern for pedestrian safety, including the streets immediately adacent to the Park
and the intersections along West 26th between Federal and Zuni.
) Explore the positives and negatives of opening the median on Federal Boulevard at West 25th
Avenue to allow access to the commercial area at West 25th and Eliot.
) Create pedestrian friendly improvements along Speer Boulevard between Zuni and Federal
Boulevard, including wider sidewalks and tree lawns and street trees. Improvements to this
intersection are recommended in the Pedestrian Master Plan (Projects #31 and #32).
) Enforce speed limits along West 23rd andWest 25thAvenues and Eliot Street for increased safety.
) Make improvements along West 23rd Avenue to ensure the safety and comfort of pedestrians and
bicyclists and to enhance livability along this important connection between northwest Denver and
Downtown.
) Create a clear, continuous and safe walkway and bicycle route between the Jefferson Park
neighborhood and the Platte Valley along West 23rd Avenue. Recent action that has been taken to
33


PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK
accomplish this includes striping the parking edge lines along West 23rd Avenue between Federal
Boulevard and 1-25. Long term, when the bridge over 1-25 is rebuilt, provide wider sidewalks, or a
raised sidewalk, and a wider bike lane.
) Continue to seek enhancements and better connections to the Jefferson Park Promenade.
) Work with the Regional Transportation District (RTD) to create a through service connecting north
and south Federal Boulevard.
) Work with RTD to investigate the possibility of improved bus service connecting Jefferson Park with
Downtown, Auraria, Invesco Field at Mile High Stadium, Human Services office on Federal Boulevard,
West Side Health Clinic, andWest 32ndAvenue.
) Improve the pedestrian crossing at West 29th Avenue and Speer Boulevard. Improvements to the
pedestrian crossing at West 29th and Speer Boulevard intersection are referenced in the Pedestrian
Master Plan (Project #31).
Achieving the Vision
The adoption of this plan does not provide funding for operational or capital projects. Capital projects,
such as street improvements or the construction of sidewalks, can be funded by the City through its capital
improvements program, by property owners through districts, or by private sources as development
occurs. In all cases, funding of projects is a process separate from plan adoption. Funding availability,
timing, and a fixed amount of street right-of-way are constraints to achieving the vision and goals.
34


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
COMMUNITY FACILITIES
Strengths
) The Jefferson Park neighborhood is well served by parks, including Gates-Crescent, Fishback Landing,
and Jefferson Parks within the neighborhood, as well as the immediately adjacent Viking Park. Jefferson
Park has five acres and contains a basketball court, a barbecue grill, a playground, a picnic shelter,
picnic tables and restrooms. Gates-Crescent Park has a bicycle/pedestrian connection to the South
Platte River Greenway, fishing, and a sand volleyball court. Fishback Landing has natural vegetation and
a connection to the Greenway. Viking Park contains a flower garden and picnic tables.
) The neighborhood is home to two successful child care and youth facilities: Head Start at West 28th
Avenue and Clay Street, and Family Star Early Head Start Child Development Center at West 22nd
Avenue and Federal Boulevard.
) Several churches are located within or adjacent to the neighborhood, offering a variety of worship
opportunities.
) Though the Jefferson Park neighborhood doesnt have its own neighborhood branch library, the
neighborhood is adequately served by the Woodbury Branch Library at Federal Boulevard and West
32nd Avenue.
Issues
) The vacant field adjacent to the Career Education Center (CEC), a Denver Public School facility,
located at West 26th Avenue and Eliot Street, is underutilized.
) The lack of a neighborhood elementary school within the boundaries of Jefferson Park requires
Jefferson Parks elementary school-age children to cross Speer Boulevard to attend Valdez
Elementary school located at 2475 West 29th Avenue.
) Pedestrian connections to and from Jefferson Park are difficult because of traffic volumes and speed.
35


PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK
Riverside Baptist Church has a strong
presence in the neighborhood.
) Pedestrian connections to and from the nearby recreation centers (Rude Recreation Center located
at 2855 West Holden Place in Sun Valley and Ashland Recreation Center, located at 2950 Fife Court in
Highland) are difficult. The Stadium and its adjacent parking, and West Colfax Avenue are barriers to
the Rude Recreation Center, and Speer Boulevard is a barrier to the Ashland Recreation Center.
) Despite the presence of several large educational and cultural institutions in the neighborhood,
there is a need for expanded opportunities for job training and community activities.
Goals
) Increase the availability of the CEC field for use by Jefferson Park residents.
) Improve pedestrian safety at intersections used by school children to and from school.
) Improve pedestrian safety and connections to the Ashland and Rude Recreation Centers.
) Expand opportunities of Jefferson Park residents for job training and community activities.
Recommendations
) Work with Denver Public Schools to facilitate the shared use (by the neighborhood residents and
the CEC patrons) of the CEC field at West 26th Avenue and Eliot Street.
) Improve bicycle / pedestrian connections between Jefferson Park and nearby Ashland recreation
center. Coordinate with the Department of Public Works to investigate intersection safety
improvements for the intersection of Speer Boulevard and Zuni Street to facilitate access to the
Ashland Recreation Center north of Speer Boulevard.
) Work with Denver Public Schools and Riverside Baptist Church to investigate ways to increase
opportunities for job training and community activities for Jefferson Park residents.
36


PLAN SUBAREAS


PLAN SUBAREAS
INTRODUCTION
The plan identifies nine sub-areas with relatively distinct characteristics. It acknowledges that boundaries
between the sub-areas are not absolute and that characteristics overlap sub-area boundaries.The sub-area
plans present issues and goals that are supplemental to those presented in the Framework Plan.
38


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
JEFFERSON PARK
SUBAREAS
39


PLAN SUBAREAS
2800 block Decatur
CORE RESIDENTIAL SURAREA
If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented, the following vision statement will be an
accurate description of the Core Residential Subarea.
Architectural diuersity
Vision
The vision for the Core Residential Subarea includes a large, well maintained, residential area that will
provide a wide variety of housing types for both owners and renters. Renovation and new development
will reflect the existing architectural character of this traditional Denver neighborhood. New development
of either single-family or multiple units will be 2-3 stories tall. Garages will be accessed from alleys where
possible, keeping the fronts of homes inviting and safe for pedestrians and neighborhood activities.
Carriage lots, a unique asset for Jefferson Park, will have developed in a variety of ways including
community gardens, pocket parks, and some paved courts for games, and will be well used by all residents.
Current Conditions
The heart of the Jefferson Park neighborhood is residential, divided into 3 major districts, providing a
variety of housing types including single-family, duplex, row houses and apartments.The current zoning is
R-2 (medium density residential) and R-3 (high-density residential).The R-3 zoning allows significant
increases in the intensity and types of development within the neighborhood. However, Blueprint
Denver, describes most of this section of Jefferson Park as an Area of Stability.
Strengths
0 Existing diversity in architectural style, scale and size of buildings, building materials, and natural
topography of area.
0 Active recreational use of space in front of homes (public right-of-way & front setback) that
contributes to a strong sense of community.
40


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Opportunity exists under current zoning, as well as under recommendations contained in this plan,
for increased density that can further enhance the variety of housing options available in the
residential sub-area.
Issues
\ There are no mechanisms in place for either discouraging demolition of significant structures or for
guiding redevelopment to be consistent and complementary with the neighborhood character.
\ Many existing multi-family buildings do not work well for families with children due to enclosed
corridors and a corresponding lack of street orientation (porches, front yards), lack of maintenance,
and no open space or play area.
) There is concern about new development not reflecting the architectural scale and character of the
existing neighborhood.
) Existing zoning is incompatible with existing low to moderate density land uses.
\ The unlimited height allowed in the R-3 zone is incompatible with the existing moderate density
residential character.
\ Pedestrian safety is a concern throughout residential areas.
) Some of the alleys are neither paved nor maintained.
Carriage lots are a potential asset
Goals
) Maintain and enhance the single-family character and use of the historic Jefferson Park
neighborhood core.
) Preserve and enhance the traditional neighborhood pattern of streets, alleys and carriage lots.
) Enhance livability of the neighborhood and each new development.
) Preserve the pedestrian orientation and scale of the neighborhood core.
) Preserve and enhance the livability and traditional pattern of the residential core through designs
that place eyes on the street, increasing safety and security in the public realm.
) Encourage redevelopment that provides a variety of housing options.
Recommendations
\ Encourage new infill construction and renovations to existing structures that are complementary
and compatible with the residential character and enhance the feeling of community existing in the
neighborhood.
) Support efforts to change the R-3 Zoning. Possible options include:
I Create a new zone district that provides the scale and density for new development to be
41


PLAN SUBAREAS
DPS Career Education Center
I
>
>
I
I
I
I
compatible with the character of the neighborhood.
I Rezoning to R-2.This would be an appropriate tool for the 2000 block of Federal, for example,
which is zoned PRY
I Overlay District 9 designation.This would limit height to 35, which is consistent with the
recommendations for these subareas.
I Other recommendations developed from the citywide R-3/R-4 study currently underway.
Maintain and improve existing residential uses and all historic and architecturally significant
structures.
Sensitively, but systematically enforce the environmental code.
Reinvestment is encouraged in the residential area.
Any changes to the streetscape and buildings through redevelopment will further create a
pedestrian-friendly environment that reinforces the neighborhood character.
Develop carriage lots to be attractive, safe areas that are an asset for the neighborhood.
Encourage designs and uses that place eyes on the street increasing safety and security in the
public realm. Front porches, front windows, front yards, and visibility to carriage lots and alleys are
examples.
Establish the residential core subarea as a priority area for alley paving projects.
42


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
RIVER DRIVE SURAR
If the goals and recommendations of this plan are
accurate description of the River Drive Subarea.
Vision
E A
implemented, the following vision statement will be an
River Drive residential
Typical window proportions
The vision for the River Drive Subarea includes its enhancement as an important and unique part of the
residential core of Jefferson Park. It will continue to have a unique physical character due to the curving
street layout, topography and architecture. Property owners will respect and value this uniqueness and
will have taken steps to preserve its character, carefully renovating and enlarging their homes in ways that
enhance the historic character of this small area. New development on vacant sites will have occurred in
a manner that respects the historic character of the neighborhood.
Current Conditions
River Drive and West 23rd Avenue have a concentration of homes identified in the 1976 neighborhood
plan as having potential for a Denver Landmark District. Research would have to be undertaken to
determine if the area meets two of the three categories (history, architecture, geography) required for
Denver Landmark Districts. A visual inspection reveals an area that is unique within Jefferson Park and one
where any redevelopment should be carefully designed to enhance this unique setting. The current R-3
zoning provides no protection for the existing character and allows development of greater density. If we
are to achieve the vision of Blueprint Denver, which identifies this as an Area of Stability, we need to
identify a regulatory mechanism that will allow this area to remain a stable residential area.
Strengths
) This is a residential area with an unusual mix of architectural styles that may have potential as a
Denver Landmark District.
43


PLAN SUBAREAS
) Unique topography and curvilinear street layout
Issues
) The R-3 zone allows development that could be very different in scale and character than the
existing residential development.
) On-street parking is very limited. Residents compete with restaurant patrons for space.
Goals
) Preserve and strengthen the predominantly historic residential character of this area and ease
potential development pressures.
Recommendations
) Support efforts to change the R-3 Zoning. Possible options include:
I Rezoning to R-2. Consideration of the appropriateness of the R-2 should consider whether the
uses, minimum lot size, front and side yard setback, and bulk plane standards in the R-2 may be
more restrictive than the existing conditions in the neighborhood and may result in creating non-
conforming structures and uses.
I Overlay District 9 designation.This would limit height to 35, which is consistent with the
recommendations for these subareas.
I Other recommendations developed from the citywide R-3/R-4 study currently underway.
I Investigate potential as Denver Landmark District.
) Maintain single-family character. New infill should be compatible with the historic buildings.
) Enforce the maintenance of vacant land and public rights-of-way.
) Encourage designers of new development to use massing, materials, and detailing that reflect and
enhance this unique sub area.
) All new/redevelopment projects must comply with standard zoning parking regulations.
) View corridor to Downtown from River Drive should be provided and preserved through any
redevelopment of the Baby Does restaurant site.
) New development should take advantage of the opportunity for walkout lower (basement) level
created by slope of the land.
) Any new development increasing density from the existing single-family level should be directed to
West 23rdAvenue.
44


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
PARK FACE BLOCKS SUBAREA
If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented, the following vision statement will be an
accurate description of the Park Face Block Sub-area.
Vision
The vision for the Park Face Blocks Subarea includes the Park functioning as the cultural heart of the
neighborhood.The streets surrounding the Park will be lined with a variety of town homes,
condominiums, apartments and single-family homes all sharing views into a beautiful urban oasis. The
Park will serve as a true community gathering spot, hosting family picnics, casual games and occasional
concerts or performances.The Park perimeter will be defined by development that is of a greater density
than the core residential subarea with buildings of up to 45 high on the blocks facing the north, south
and west sides of the park, and up to 35 height on the blocks facing the east side of the park.The former
police station site will have been redeveloped into affordable housing and a small police substation.
Current Conditions
) This sub area consists of the sides of the blocks facing Jefferson Park. Development around the Park
is primarily residential. The Park and the land around it slope dramatically down from the west and
north to the south and east. The west side of the Park provides significant views of Downtown.
New residential development is either recently completed or underway on the north and south
edges of the Park.
Parkside residential
Strengths
) The sub area benefits from direct/easy physical access and views of a large beautiful
neighborhood park.
) Many locations have views of the Downtown Denver skyline.
45


PLAN SUBAREAS
View from Jefferson Park
) These face blocks have historically been predominantly residential, which is consistent with the
neighborhoods desired future use in the sub area.
Issues
f The height of new development around the Park, has the potential for blocking views to Downtown
Denver.
) Building heights on the south side of the Park are limited by current zoning,
f There is a perceived lack of pedestrian safety for travel to and from the Park. Cars are perceived as
speeding along West 23rd Avenue and pedestrians must cross at unprotected intersections.
Goals
Potential Redevelopment site
J Improve pedestrian safety, particularly for children, traveling to and from the Park.
J Preserve the view of Downtown Denver from the west side of Jefferson Park.
J Increase activity in the Park.
J Increase safety and reduce illegal activity in the Park.
J Maintain and support continued residential uses around the Park.
Recommendations
% Investigate a zoning change to a zone district or a combination of zone district and overlay district,
which allows development of the park perimeter that is of a greater density than the core
residential subarea with buildings of up to 45 height on the blocks facing the north, south and west
sides of the park, and up to 35 height on the block facing the east side of the park.
% Pursue a view plane preservation ordinance preserving the view of Downtown Denver from the
west side of Jefferson Park.
% Enforce speed limits on streets surrounding the park.
46


NEIGHBOR!- O O D PLAN
) Work with Public Works Transportation to address a variety of traffic issues and perceived pedestrian safety problems.This effort should consider the possibility of traffic calming measures to slow auto traffic and facilitate pedestrian comfort on the streets around the Park. ) Improve Park safety by increasing activity in the park and providing an opportunity for additional housing facing the park.
47


PLAN SUBAREAS
west 25th & Eliot
NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL SOBAREA
WEST 2 5 T H 0 ELIOT
If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented, the following vision statement will be an
accurate description of the Neighborhood Commercial Subarea.
Deliverance Tabernacle on Eliot Street
Vision
The vision for the neighborhood commercial subarea includes older buildings that will have been
carefully restored and vacant lots developed in a manner that reinforces the historic character of this
small neighborhood commercial district.Apartments on upper levels will provide reasonably priced
housing close to jobs. Improvements will have been made for pedestrian safety at West 25th and Eliot. A
carriage lot will now provides off street parking for businesses and a community center on West 25th will
provide a neighborhood gathering spot.Jefferson Park residents will come to this area for everyday
shopping and people from outside the neighborhood will know they can find unique restaurants and
goods not available elsewhere in the City.
Current Conditions
This subarea currently includes commercial space which is both pedestrian and auto oriented. The
Safeway draws business from both Jefferson Park and the larger northwest Denver neighborhood, but is
disconnected from the rest of the commercial area. The commercial area along West 25th is scaled to
appeal to neighborhood pedestrian use.The commercial properties in this area have not been developed
to their full potential.
Strengths
) Location: Adjacency to Federal Boulevard enables customers from outside the neighborhood to
reach businesses without bringing additional traffic into neighborhood streets and it is a short walk
48


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
for most Jefferson Park residents
) Architectural character: the existing buildings along West 25th are examples of older commercial
buildings that have large expanses of shop windows at street level and interesting architectural
detail.
) This is an ideal location for a mix of first floor retail with upper levels of residential reinforcing this
as a center of community activity.
) Existing residential buildings have potential for commercial uses
) Potential location for special community celebrations.
Issues
) Vehicular access to this area is currently limited by the continuous median on Federal.
) Structures and streetscape are in need of renovation and maintenance.
) Pedestrian safety is a concern along both West 25th and Eliot.
) Neighborhood services are lacking.
Goals
) Strengthen the neighborhood retail center to support the neighborhood as a self-contained
community with a healthy activity center.
) Maintain the historic character of the neighborhood center, which was an early Denver trolley stop.
) Encourage redevelopment of vacant and underutilized properties.
) Strengthen the identity of the neighborhood through the retail district.
) Encourage additional development to provide the critical mass required for a sustainable
retail center.
) Improve and maintain visual and pedestrian connections between the Safeway retail area and the
West 25th and Eliot retail area.
) Encourage pedestrian connections to adjoining neighborhoods and all sections of the Jefferson Park
neighborhood.
) Minimize impacts of new development, redevelopment, and new uses on the residential core of the
neighborhood.
Recommendations
) Encourage new construction to be mixed use with residential and retail.
) Maintain the historic commercial buildings at West 25thAvenue and Eliot Street.
49


PLAN SUBAREAS
) Investigate the possibility of obtaining a grant for research regarding the potential historic
significance of several of the buildings in this subarea, including: the Deliverance Tabernacle on West
25th, the building on the southeast corner ofWest 25th and Eliot, and the building on the southwest
corner ofWest 25th and Eliot.
) Investigate the availability of funding, including City participation, for the purchase of properties in
this subarea and subsequent assistance in attracting developer interest for the areas successful
redevelopment.
) Given the unique opportunity for parking in the middle of the block between West 25th and West
26th Avenues, we recommend that the neighborhood work with the property owners to explore
the possibility of using the carriage lot and parking lot for parking for commercial uses in this block.
) Encourage shared parking agreements between property owners.
) Explore the positive and negative aspects of opening Federal Boulevard at 25th Avenue to allow
improved vehicular access to this neighborhood commercial district and to allow access for
emergency vehicles.
) Develop business areas in a manner that encourages small independent businesses and pedestrian
and transit friendliness, reinforces the character of the area and buffers adjacent residential uses.
) Create a walkable neighborhood by providing active pedestrian-oriented uses on the ground floors
of commercial, residential and mixed-use projects, generous sidewalks, enhanced streetscaping, and
building design with human scale and detail.
) Improve pedestrian safety at West 25th and Eliot.
) As renovations or redevelopment projects are proposed ensure that site design makes access to
retail centers safe, convenient and inviting for pedestrians and bicyclists as well as vehicles.
) Establish the adaptability and potential for long-term vitality of the neighborhood by ensuring that
retail center sites are developed in a manner allowing evolution to more intense and dense uses
over time. For example, floor heights should accommodate conversion to commercial uses, and site
plans should reflect adequate flexibility for more intense uses in the future.
) New buildings in this area should be compatible in scale and character with existing buildings.
) On street parking and bus stops are expected to be retained in this area.
) Allow either residential or commercial use in existing residential properties.
) Commercial uses in existing residential buildings should retain the character of a residential
structure.
) Encourage pedestrian-scale, mixed-use development between Federal and Eliot, north of the alley
between West 25th andWest 26thAvenues.
50


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Encourage building owners to pursue a marketing study to determine business uses that would be
feasible in this location.
) In the short-term, encourage the establishment of an association of business and property owners to
work together to improve the area.
) Long-term, encourage the establishment of a Special District for the installation and maintenance of
streetscape improvements, particularly along West 25th Avenue, and for marketing businesses.
) Investigate the possibilities for a zoning change in this subarea to a zone district which includes uses
allowed in B-2 zoning, but which also guides the form of new neighborhood commercial
construction, and allows buildings of up to four stories tall.
) Investigate the possibility of expanding the business zoning to include the southeast corner ofWest
26th Avenue and Eliot Street as a beneficial extension of the commercial core. Investigate reducing
parking requirements in order to facilitate business location in this area.
) Seek funding to improve and strengthen existing businesses.
) Encourage neighborhood reinvestment by existing business owners.
) Enhance the visual appearance and image of local businesses by encouraging facade and
streetscaping improvements, where possible.
51


PLAN
North High School and Viking Park provide a
gateway for Speer Boulevard.
This section of Speer does not live up to its
potential.
SUBAREAS
SPEER BOULEVARD SUBAREA
If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented, the following vision statement will be an
accurate description of the Speer Boulevard Subarea.
Vision
The vision for the Speer Boulevard Subarea includes a strong north border for Jefferson Park.
Redevelopment will have remedied the dangerous pedestrian conditions and those edges will have
continuous lengths of detached sidewalks with trees, sometimes in tree lawns, sometimes in grates,
shielding pedestrians from traffic. Most of the redevelopment along the south edge of Speer will have
been for office and residential, often combined in the same project. Buildings generally will be four to six
stories and provide further buffering for the lower scaled residential area to the south. Parking will have
been accommodated within the buildings or is well screened with landscaping and decorative walls.
Pedestrian crossings at West 29th and Zuni will have been improved to ease movement between the
Jefferson Park and Highland neighborhoods.
Current Conditions
Speer Boulevard carries a high volume of traffic moving between northwest Denver and Downtown. Over
the years it has been widened, leaving little room for pedestrians due to the lack of a parkway setback.
Crossing Speer is dangerous for both pedestrians and vehicles.Viking Park and the Speer bridge frame
either end of the boulevard through Jefferson Park, but the development between is inconsistent and
does not take full advantage of the benefits of this significant street.
Strengths
) Speer Boulevard is part of Denvers historic parkway system.
) Speer Boulevard forms a strong north border for Jefferson Park.
52


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Easy access to 1-25 and Downtown is possible from Speer Boulevard.
) As a neighborhood edge, higher density development is appropriate in this subarea.
) Dramatic views of Downtown exist along Speer Boulevard.
Issues
) This section of Speer Boulevard does not have a parkway setback.
) Most development along Speer detracts from the boulevard character and does not take advantage
of the topography and views.
) Speer Boulevard is a difficult pedestrian environment with narrow sidewalks, heavy traffic and no
safe pedestrian crossings to the Highlands neighborhood.
) The Speer and West 29th intersection is extremely difficult for pedestrians to cross.
) The Eliot and West 29th intersection is preceived as unsafe for pedestrians and vehicles.
Speer Boulevard is a difficult pedestrian
environment.
Goals
t Improve safety of Speer Boulevard for both pedestrians and vehicular traffic,
t Improve safety at the following intersections: Speer Boulevard and West 29th Avenue, Speer
Boulevard and Zuni, and Eliot and West 29th Avenue,
t Strengthen neighborhood identity from Speer Boulevard so it is apparent where the Jefferson Park
neighborhood is as one travels along Speer,
t Maintain and enhance the official boulevard design character of Speer Boulevard.
Recommendations
% Enhance the pedestrian environment along Speer through wider or detached sidewalks and the
addition of street trees in tree lawns or in paved amenity zones with trees in grates. In some cases,
this may require that the City work with the property owners to acquire additional right-of-way.
% Buffer the interior of the neighborhood with higher density development along Speer Boulevard to
protect the interior residential area, as well as to strengthen the neighborhood edge.
% Create a gateway monument/marker at Speer and Zuni.
% Establish a Parkway setback along Speer sufficient for a detached sidewalk, tree lawn and/or amenity
zone.This may be a long-term project that requires the dedication of additional right-of-way as
opportunities arise.
% Review, update, and consider adoption the 1992 Speer Corridor Design Guidelines.
53


PLAN SUBAREAS
I
>
Encourage new development and redevelopment along Speer that adds to the historic boulevard
character and that takes advantage of the topography and views.
Work with the Public Works Department to study ways to improve the pedestrian and vehicular
safety of the following intersections:
I Speer Boulevard and West 29th Avenue
Eliot Street and West 29th Avenue
I Speer Boulevard and Zuni
54


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
FEDERAL BOULEVARD SUBAREA
If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented, the following vision statement will be an
accurate description of the Federal Boulevard Subarea.
Federal Boulevard is a designated City Parkway.
Vision
The vision for the Federal Boulevard Subarea includes Federal Boulevard, north ofWest 20th Avenue, as
having reclaimed its past as a tree shaded street lined with well kept homes and small apartment
buildings. Many of the magnificent historic homes will have been preserved and are well maintained.
Small concentrations of neighborhood serving retail, such as those found at West 25th and Federal, will
both enhance the pedestrian character of the neighborhood and benefit from being easily accessible from
Federal Boulevard.This will be a lower density area with building heights generally one to three stories.
Current Conditions
Despite the high volume of traffic, the character of Federal Boulevard north ofWest 20th is largely
residential with some smaller scale neighborhood commercial uses.The Federal Boulevard medians, which
were recently added, have helped to enhance pedestrian street-crossing safety and have helped protect
local streets from cut-through traffic.
Strengths
I Federal is a major arterial.The number of people traveling along Federal Boulevard is an opportunity
for Jefferson Park businesses.
I Federal Boulevard links ethnically diverse neighborhoods and the businesses along Federal represent
and serve these diverse populations.
I Areas of single-family housing line Federal Boulevard in this area, enhancing the character of the
street and providing additional housing options.
55


PLAN
Residentaii character on Federal Boulevard
is unstable.
well-maintained tree lawns can enhance the
residentaii character of Federal Boulevard.
SUBAREAS
F Historic character of the neighborhood is reflected in many of the single-family residential buildings
and the commercial buildings at West 25th Avenue and Eliot.
Issues
F Despite the Federal Boulevard median, pedestrian crossings at West 23rd, 26th & 29th Avenues are
perceived as dangerous due to high volume of traffic and high traffic speeds.
F Federal Boulevard suffers from a high volume of traffic and from previous street widenings, which
have changed the character of the boulevard by reducing tree lawns, sidewalk setbacks, and the
depth of front lawns.
F Vehicular access to neighborhood commercial along West 25thAvenue is difficult due to the Federal
Boulevard median.This barrier reduces cut through traffic from Federal Boulevard, but it also limits
customer access to businesses in the commercial area.
F Residential character of Federal is unstable.
F Fandscape treatment along Federal is inconsistent. North of West 20th Avenue the character of a
tree-lined residential boulevard is still evident but needs to be enhanced through maintenance of
tree lawns and replanting of street trees.
F Fighting along Federal Boulevard may be inadequate for pedestrians.
F There is not a cohesive development character along Federal Boulevard.
Goals
F Provide optimum access to businesses at West 25thAvenue and Eliot Street.
F Enhance the landscape treatment along Federal Boulevard to reflect the residential character of
northwest Denver.
F Enhance the comfort and safety of the pedestrian environment and facilitate pedestrian connections
across the boulevard.
F Increase neighborhood identity.
F Encourage preservation and adaptive reuse of buildings.
F Maintain the commercial/residential balance in use and zoning.
F Reconcile discrepancy between zoning and existing development in the southwest corner of
this subarea.
56


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Recommendations
\ Redevelopment along Federal should respect and enhance the residential character by installing and
maintaining tree lawns, street trees, and detached sidewalks.
) Surface parking should be oriented to the sides and rear of the property and should be screened
using walls, landscaping, and fencing.
) New development, including moderate density development, is expected to strengthen and enhance
the existing residential character and scale along Federal Boulevard.
) Tree lawns and street tree plantings should be maintained and parking areas screened using walls,
landscaping and fencing.
% Improve lighting conditions for pedestrian safety where necessary.
% Encourage home office as an adaptive reuse of buildings.
) Maximize opportunities for neighborhood identification through development of entry markers at
West 20th, 25th and 29th Avenues.
% Alley access should be used whenever possible to avoid new curb cuts.
) Discourage the expansion of commercial zoning along Federal Boulevard.
% Redevelopment along Federal should maintain traditional building lines with well-screened parking
to the sides and behind buildings.
) Investigate the use of a zone district that will accommodate the R-2 uses and that contains a similar
height restriction (35), for the area currently zoned PRV in the southern section of the block
between West 20th and West 21st Avenues on Federal.
57


PLAN SUBAREAS
Diamond Hill enjoys a preeminent location.
DIAMOND HILL SDHAHEA
If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented, the following vision statement will be an
accurate description of the Diamond Hill Subarea.
Vision
The vision for the Diamond Hill Subarea includes its redevelopment as a lively mixed-use district within
Jefferson Park. A new hotel, offices and higher density residential buildings, remodeled buildings, and
small-scale retail and restaurant uses will provide amenities and employment for neighborhood residents.
The traditional street grid will have been extended into this area, breaking down the super blocks into
pedestrian friendly, tree lined streets.This district will continue to enjoy easy access from 1-25 and Speer
Boulevard and will be within walking and biking distance of Highland, Commons and Downtown. Heights
and density will be greater towards West 27thAvenue andAlcott, dropping down to three stories (35) to
more closely match the single-family residential scale of development along Bryant St. and West 23rd in
order to transition to the predominantly residential area of the neighborhood. Buildings of three to four
stories will have been built along the north side ofWest 23rd Avenue.The interior of the subarea will
accommodate buildings up to 140 in height.
Current Conditions
This subarea enjoys a prominent location with clear views to Downtown and the Platte River Valley to the
southeast.Access into this area is very good. Diamond Hill provides opportunities for higher density and
mixed-use developments.Treatment of the edges varies considerably from higher more intense uses on
the north side to single-family residential uses on the west side. Predominant uses are an office complex, a
large church, and large expanses of surface parking.
58


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Strengths
) Higher density is appropriate in this area with a transition to lower density and scale at interior
neighborhood edges.
) The subarea has excellent views toward Downtown.
) Access to 1-25 and Downtown Denver is excellent.
) The new pedestrian Promenade above 1-25 provides an opportunity to further take advantage of the
views from Jefferson Park and to enhance the neighborhood connections.
Issues
) The current land uses and expanses of surface parking separate this area from the majority of the
Jefferson Park neighborhood.
) There is a potential conflict in scale and uses between redevelopment of Diamond Hill and
redevelopment of residential areas to the west.
) Parking, unless appropriately located, designed and regulated, can create negative visual impacts on
the rest of the neighborhood.
) This area has developed as a series of super blocks with a scale very different from the residential
core of Jefferson Park, immediately to the west.
Goals
) Integrate the subarea into the larger neighborhood.
) Connect and integrate the subarea with the Diamond Hill Promenade (the pedestrian walkway
along the eastern edge of the subarea between Speer and West 23rd Avenue).
) Activate the Diamond Hill Promenade by encouraging adjacent uses that are open to the walkway.
) Strengthen West 25thAvenue as a principal neighborhood pedestrian corridor.
) Preserve and enhance view corridors.
) Preserve and enhance pedestrian and bicycle access throughout the subarea.
) Maximize the topography and views of Downtown Denver.
) Encourage new development that is compatible with and complementary to the character of the
remainder of the neighborhood.
) Provide a transition of uses and development intensity in redevelopment along the edge bordering
the residential area to the west and the River Drive Subarea to the south.
59


PLAN SUBAREAS
Site of slip ramp and promenade
) Enhance the urban character of the interior of this subarea.
Recommendations
) Future redevelopment should occur in a manner that respects the transition to the low density
residential scale of the neighborhood directly west of Diamond Hill.
) Development of future parking should be done so as to minimize traffic and visual impacts on the
neighborhood.
) Create a pedestrian and vehicular access and circulation system that is similar to the traditional
street and alley grid system.
) Encourage development of street level uses that are pedestrian oriented, neighborhood serving and
can help integrate this site into the larger neighborhood as well as with the Promenade.
) Encourage a design that strengthens West 25th Avenue as a principal neighborhood pedestrian
corridor.
) Encourage a design that facilitates pedestrian mobility to and from the Diamond Hill Promenade,
and which activates the promenade through outdoor seating or other integrating features.
) Preserve informal view corridors and pedestrian corridors from the interior of the neighborhood to
the east down the extension ofWest 24th, 25th, 26th and 27th Avenues east of Bryant.
) Investigate the use of a zone district and/or overlay district that accomplishes the following:
I A 15' setback along the east side of Bryant.
I 0' 10' set-backs for the interior streets.
I Hotel, office, higher density residential, small-scale retail and restaurant uses.
I Building heights up to 140' in the interior of the subarea.
I Building heights of up to three stories (35') on the north side ofWest 23rd Avenue.
I Building heights up to three stories (35') along Bryant Street and West 23rdAvenue.
I A bulk plane similar to the PRV zone district bulk plane.
) Taller buildings should be located in the interior of the subarea, transitioning down to the residential
area to the west.
) Create a transition from this subarea into the Core Residential and River Drive subareas and enhance
the urban character of the interior.
) Strengthen West 25thAvenue as a pedestrian corridor through landscaping and pedestrian
improvements.
60


NEIGHBOR!- O O D PLAN
) Stair step buildings in this subarea to maximize topography and views and to provide an appealing aesthetic as a gateway to the neighborhood. ) Consider vacating Byron Place ifWest 25th Avenue was extended east to Zuni, or West 24thAvenue was extended east toAlcott.
61


PLAN SUBAREAS
invesco Field at Mile High
STADIUM TRANSITION SUBAREA
If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented, the following vision statement will be an
accurate description of the Stadium Transition Subarea.
Vision
The vision for the Stadium Transition Subarea includes the north side of West 20th Avenue between Eliot
and Clay Streets being now lined with many types of residential and live-work units. The area between
Clay and 1-25 contains a mix of office, multi-family housing, light commercial, and live-work units. Greater
height and density in the Front View Crescent area takes advantage of the lower elevation without
obscuring views from Jefferson Park. Along West 21st, low rise apartments, condominiums and town
homes have been developed which serve as a transition between the mixed uses to the south and east,
and strong residential areas to the north. North of Frontview Crescent, if a change of use occurs, higher
density residential, office, and restaurant uses would be encouraged (provided that restaurant use is
limited to those the primary business of which is food and does not include activities that are disruptive
to the residential character of the neighborhood.). South of West 20th Avenue, along Federal Boulevard,
uses that share parking with the stadium, such as office or stadium-serving retail uses, are encouraged.The
street grid has been maintained, and new development is designed to reflect the historic presence of
alleys. People living in this part of the neighborhood appreciate the easy walk north to Jefferson Park or
south to events in the stadium. A short distance to the east is the new north/south bike and pedestrian
path. This path connects the neighborhood into downtown across Speer Boulevard or to light rail stations
in the Central Platte Valley.
Current Conditions
West 20th Avenue serves as the boundary between Jefferson Park and stadium uses to the south. Farge
vacant parcels in this transition area offer development opportunities.
62


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Strengths
) Large parcels of vacant land offer opportunities for development that can be beneficial to the
Jefferson Park neighborhood.
) This area is easily accessed from Federal Boulevard on the west and the new West 23rdAvenue slip
ramp on the east.
) A number of potentially historically significant homes line the west side of Clay Street, between West
21st and West 22ndAvenues.
Issues
) Traffic generated by the stadium and related uses in this subarea have created problems for the
residential core of Jefferson Park for many years.
) Stadium uses have dominated this area leaving few opportunities for community related activities.
) Higher densities and greater heights may be appropriate in this area due to topography and
underdevelopment of area.
Goals
) Provide buffer and transition between stadium and the residential area to the north.
) Reconcile discrepancy between zoning and existing development character in the northwest corner
of this subarea.
) Maintain the area south of West 22nd on the west side of Clay as an Area of Stability within the Area
of Change described in Blueprint Denver.
Recommendations
) New development should transition from higher density at West 20th to lower density north of
West 21st.
) Access to parking for new development should be designed to minimize traffic impacts on
residential subareas.
) New development in this area should serve as a buffer and create a compatible edge for the
residential areas north ofWest 21st Avenue.
) The edges of this subarea should be designed in such a way as to provide good transitions to
residential areas to the north and buffer the impacts of sports crowds to the south.
The stadium creates traffic and parking
impacts in the neighborhood.
63


Full Text
PLAN SUBAREAS
) In the northwest comer of this subarea, north of West 20th Avenue and west of Eliot, investigate the
use of a zone district other than PRV that will accommodate low-density residential, live/work, and
small office.
) Encourage shared parking uses that could use the stadium parking areas on days when the stadium
is not in use.
) Maintain and enhance the historic single-family character of the west side of Clay between West 21st
and 22nd Avenues.
64


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
CULTURAL/EDUCATIONAL FACILITY
DISTRICT SURAREA
If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented, the following vision statement will be an
accurate description of the Cultural/Educational Facility District Subarea.
Vision
The vision for the Cultural/Educational Facility District Subarea includes the facilities in the subarea being
enjoyed by Denver residents and visitors as a regional destination for cultural, recreational and educational
activities.
Current Conditions
This subarea is currently home to the Downtown Aquarium (formerly Ocean Journey Aquarium), the
Childrens Museum, Fishback & Gates Crescent Parks, and the George Schmidt House (listed on the
National Register). Zoning is PRV and Commercial Mixed-Use; redevelopment in this area will necessitate
rezoning.
Landrys Ocean Journey at Fishback Park
A picnic at Fishback Park
Strengths
0 The Platte River, adjacent bike/pedestrian paths, parks, family-oriented facilities, and proximity to
Downtown are this areas strengths.
0 High density residential may be appropriate in this area.
Issues
\ Pedestrian access from west of 1-25 and from Downtown is difficult.
0 There are no easy pedestrian connections to the C-Fine Fight Rail Stations across the river.
0 There is only limited access to the Platte River bike/pedestrian path.
0 Appearance of the 1-25 edge of this subarea could be improved.
65


PLAN SUBAREAS
Goals
Denver Childrens Museum
) Enhance the existing cultural, recreational and educational uses in this subarea.
) Improve pedestrian access to this subarea.
) Improve pedestrian connections between this subarea and the surrounding neighborhoods, bicycle
and pedestrian paths, and transit facilities.
) Improve the appearance of the 1-25 edge of this subarea.
Recommendations
) Create a clear, continuous and safe walkway and bicycle route between the Jefferson Park
neighborhood and the Platte Valley along West 23rdAvenue. Action recently taken to help
accomplish this includes striping the parking edge lines along West 23rd Avenue between Federal
Boulevard and 1-25 (completed Fall 2003). Long term, when the bridge over 1-25 is rebuilt, provide
wider sidewalks or a raised sidewalk, and a wider bike lane.
) Improve connections to the Platte River bike path system.
) Improve trail identification and way finding.
) Establish a neighborhood gateway feature at West 23rd and 1-25.
) North ofWater Street, encourage office, residential or public institutional uses.
) South ofWater Street, encourage public cultural and educational uses.
) A pedestrian bridge over 1-25 should be considered between Frontview Crescent and the South
Platte River to connect the Jefferson Park neighborhood with the nearby park area.
\ Maintain current height restriction of 80 in area covered by PUD #412.
) Work with the Department of Public Works to explore the need for a pedestrian signalization or
crosswalks as the new traffic signal is installed at West 23rd and Alcott.
) Improve the appearance of the 1-25 edge through the use of fences, walls, and/or landscaping.
) Make improvements along West 23rd Avenue to ensure safety and comfort of pedestrians and
bicyclists and to enhance livability along this important connection corridor between northwest
Denver and Downtown.
66


NEIGHBOR!- O O D PLAN
Implementation actions include three general categories: ) Regulatory actions (e.g. zoning, design review, landmark district, view protection) ) Public investment (e.g. transportation, parks, facilities, utilities) ) Partnerships between the public and private sectors (e.g. residents, businesses, neighborhood associations, special districts). Regulation is a powerful but not entirely sufficient tool for bringing about the vision of the neighborhood plan. While creating the regulatory framework of zoning and design standards, the public sector also must create a climate that attracts private investment. The neighborhood residents, businesses and others must also do their parts to implement the neighborhood plan.
67


URBAN DESIGN
URBAN DESIGN
68


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
KEY DESIGN PRINCIPLES
) Residential units should provide direct access from public rights-of-way.
) Redevelopment and new development should include active street-level uses on the public streets
or pedestrian corridors.
) Redevelopment and new development should include materials that reinforce a contextual level of
architectural scaling and detailing and reflect the materials and details used in the neighborhood,
such as the use of similar detail elements present in standard brick, modular stone, cast stone
accents, concrete masonry, and traditional cementitious stucco.
Streetscape
Intent I Streetscape design principles will help:
) Create a more pedestrian oriented neighborhood with subareas that share common urban design
elements.
) Maintain the unique historic character of this pedestrian-oriented neighborhood.
) Create a safer pedestrian environment through minimization of vehicular impacts.
) Reinforce the lively community interactions that occur on the street side of properties in this
traditional neighborhood.
) Provide a consistent right-of-way treatment that reinforces the residential character of Federal north
of West 20th while allowing for variations for commercial development.
Principles
) Except where otherwise noted, new development should include tree lawns with street trees that
match the widths of existing adjacent tree lawns. In many cases, tree lawns are wider on the east-
west streets than on the north-south streets.
) In the commercial subareas, including Speer Boulevard, Federal Boulevard and the Neighborhood
Commercial subareas. Tree lawns should be 8wide, with detached sidewalks that are a minimum of
5 wide. In some cases, it may be appropriate to replace the tree lawn with a paved amenity zone
and trees in grates.
69


URBAN DESIGN
Front yard fences should be transparent
) All new and redevelopment residential projects in the commercial subareas should provide
detached sidewalks, tree lawns, and street trees.
) Existing stone walks and curbs should be preserved and maintained, where possible.
) Front yard fences (where used) should provide transparency through the use of pickets or the
spacing of infill materials.
) New development should reflect the rhythm established by narrow lots and small houses.
) The existing street layout should be preserved.
) Development that is adjacent to the Promenade should provide pedestrian and bicycle links to
this path.
Site
Intent I Site design principles should:
) Improve the pedestrian experience by reinforcing the pedestrian orientation and scale of the
neighborhood and its subareas through minimization of vehicular impacts.
) Integrate the subareas into the street and alley grid of the larger neighborhood.
) Integrate the individual subareas into the context of the adjacent subareas.
Principles
) Existing alleys, wherever possible, should be used for vehicular access to the site.
) Garages and parking stalls should be oriented to alleys.
) On corner lots where alley access is not feasible, garages and parking stalls should be oriented to
side streets.
) Where alley access is not feasible, curb cuts should be minimized to avoid disruption of the
pedestrian environment.
) If alley access is not possible, the maximum width of residential garage doors facing the street
should be lOO".
) Where they are necessary, the width of new curb cuts should be minimized.
70


NEIGHBOR
) No parking and/or drive aisles that are parallel to the street should be placed between buildings and
the public street.
) Parking lots should be physically removed or visually screened from the street. When possible,
parking should be located in the interior of building sites.
) Structured parking is expected to have active ground floor uses.
) Direct pedestrian access should be provided from new development to the public sidewalk.
) Development should be oriented to the public right-of-way to enhance the pedestrian character of
the development and the neighborhood.
) Large-scale redevelopment should provide site access through the extension of the traditional street
and alley grid system.
) Large-scale redevelopment projects should incorporate amenities such as art, water features, pocket
parks, and public gathering places accessible from the right-of-way.
Building Orientation
Intent I Building orientation design principles should:
) Reinforce pedestrian activity and circulation along neighborhood streets and reflect the historic
character of the neighborhood and its subareas by continuing the tradition of entries, porches, and
informal gathering spaces facing the public right-of-way.
) Improve the pedestrian environment along Speer Boulevard and reinforce the importance of Speer
as an historic parkway.
) Reinforce the residential character of Federal Boulevard north of West 20th, create a more inviting
pedestrian environment along Federal, and enhance the corridors traditional street-oriented
development patterns.
) Reinforce the pedestrian and urban character of the Neighborhood Commercial, Diamond Hill,
Stadium Transition, and Cultural / Educational Facility District subareas by placing primary structures
in a manner that provides a consistent street edge, by promoting active uses on the ground floor of
all structures, and by minimizing the presence of utility functions.
O O D PLAN
Single garage door appropriate
Double garage door inappropriate
71


URBAN DESIGN
) Loading, storage, HVAC, garbage dumpsters, and other service functions should be located away from
pedestrian routes and access points. Service functions should be screened from view by walls,
fences, and/or landscaping. Delivery and other service operations should be located so as to
minimize the disturbance of adjoining residences and properties.
Principles
) The primary front doors or entryways of all ground floor residences, including those in multi-story
buildings, should be oriented toward and accessible from the public street, with pedestrian access to
the public sidewalk.
) Ground floor units should be developed with individual front porches or patios to encourage
activity and interaction.
) Each ground floor unit in a multi-story building should have a street-facing entrance.
) Orientation of the narrow end of a single residence, or of a residential unit in a multi-story building,
should be toward the public street to reflect the scale of existing small lot residential development.
) Along Speer and Federal Boulevards, new buildings should continue the linear quality of the streets
by aligning and orienting their primary facade to the Boulevard. Buildings presenting rear or side
facades to the Boulevards are undesirable.
) In the Diamond Hill subarea, building walls should be located at the property line adjacent to the
public street in order to create a consistent "street wall".
) Parking structures should receive architectural treatments on all street-facing elevations and should
incorporate pedestrian-oriented uses, such as retail, office, studios, or residential units, on the ground
floor.
) Lighting and mechanical systems associated with parking facilities should be screened and muted
with screening elements that are architecturally compatible with the primary structures.
Massing and Scale
Intent I Massing and scale design principles should modulate the form of new developments in order to:
) Reinforce the scale of the existing development and subarea character and enhance the pedestrian
environment.
) Mitigate abrupt changes in the scale of buildings and between subareas.
72


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
) Provide a buffer between Speer Boulevard and the Core Residential Subarea.
) Allow higher densities along Speer and reinforce the importance of Speer as a parkway and a
neighborhood border.
Principles
) Visual interest and human scale should be provided through the use of prominent windows and
entries at the street-facing facades and through architectural variation, including form, materials,
detail, and color.
) On multi-storied structures, building bases should be defined and articulated using techniques such
as a change in brick course, materials, color, or detailing on the building.
) In the residential subareas, building heights should be a maximum of three stories at the front or
street entrance. Additional stories should be stepped back from the front.
) In the Park Face Blocks Subarea, buildings heights should be no higher than 45 on the blocks facing
the north, south, and west sides of the park, and should be no higher than 35 on the block facing
the east side of the park.
) Along Speer Boulevard, buildings should be no higher than 6 stories.
) Along Federal Boulevard, new development should be of a similar height to that allowed under the
current R-2 zoning: 35.
Appropriate roof pitch and orientation
) In the Diamond Hill subarea, new development should be no more than 140 in the interior of the
subarea; 35, or 3 stories, on the north side of West 23rd and along Bryant.
Roof Pitches
Intent I The roof pitch of new development and redevelopment should reflect and reinforce the
existing architectural character of this traditional Denver neighborhood and its subareas.
Principles
) On single-family houses, dominant ridgelines should be perpendicular to the public street.
) Steep roof pitches (8:12) are generally appropriate over the primary occupiable space. Shallower
pitches may be used over porches, dormers, and secondary spaces.
73


URBAN DESIGN
) Flat rooflines are generally acceptable provided that they include prominent and/or decorative
parapets.
Materials
Intent I Design principles are intended to:
) Insure the use of high quality materials appropriate to the urban environment.
) Insure that materials reflect the variety, durability, and character of materials typically used in the
neighborhood and its residential and commercial architecture.
Principles
) In the residential subareas, careful combinations of materials should be used in order to reinforce
architectural scaling and detailing and to reflect the materials and details used in the neighborhood
and its subareas, such as brick and horizontal wood siding.
) Durable, solid materials should be used for ground floors of new construction. Such materials
include brick, masonry, cementitious stucco, cast in place concrete, tile, glass block systems, and
similar durable materials properly finished and detailed. Artificial stucco systems, if used, are
acceptable only on levels above the ground floor.
) Carefully detailed combinations of materials should be used to reinforce the architectural scaling.
) New construction should relate to existing buildings through the use of similar detail elements
present in standard brick, modular stone, cast stone accents, concrete masonry, and detailed stucco.
Detailing
Intent I Detailing design strategies that provide qualities of scale can help:
) New development relate to existing construction through use of similar scale and pattern in
architectural elements.
) New development along Speer Boulevard reinforce the importance of Speer and enhance the
pedestrian experience along it.
) New development along Federal Boulevard reinforce the importance of the Boulevards historically
residential character north ofWest 20th.
74


N E I G H B O R H
Principles
) Buildings should provide a richness of scale through a change in plane, contrast and intricacy in
form, color, and materials.
) Repeating patterns of color, texture, or material, or a change in plane should be used as integral parts
of the building construction, rather than superficially applied.
) Buildings should include human-scaled building elements and architectural variation, including form,
detail, materials, and colors to provide visual interest.
) All building facades that are visibile from the public streets should be finished to a similar level of
detailing.
) Windows should differentiate upper and lower floors through fenestration pattern, size, and
detailing.
) Window proportions should reflect the vertical orientation of windows in existing neighborhood
houses.
) Windows, other than storefront systems, should be recessed from the main facade.
) Expanses of glazing should be subdivided by systems of framing and mullions to reinforce
architectural scaling.
) Prominent windows and operable doors should be integrated into facades facing Speer Boulevard.
O O D PLAN
inappropriate window orientation
75


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
76


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
SUMMARY
Implementation of the recommendations in this plan will occur through a series of private, public-private,
and public actions.The scale of many implementation actions will be small. Many will not be subject to
public debate or review, while others will be extensively reviewed and intensely debated.
Implementation by the private sector may be accomplished through new construction or major
renovations. If they are located and designed consistent with the recommendations in the Plan, each new
house, office building, business, sidewalk, park facility and tree will help achieve the vision for Jefferson
Park. Most of the implementation strategies rely on partnerships between public agencies and the private
sector, including developers, property owners and residents, and neighborhood associations. It will take the
combined efforts of all to realize the goals of the Plan.
Public implementation actions will be both initiated by the City and reactive to opportunities or proposals
as they arise. Directed public actions may include a change in operations, such as maintenance programs;
the planning and construction of public infrastructure, funded through the Citys capital improvements
program or general fund; or adoption of regulatory changes, such as zoning language and map
amendments. Implementation may include the review of private uses and construction for consistency
with the Plan. Review processes vary depending on the type and location of construction and uses being
reviewed. Review may be limited to City agency and utility review for projects proposed under existing
regulations. It may also include review by neighborhood associations, adjacent property owners, the
Denver Planning Board and Denver City Council for zoning changes or map amendments.
The Jefferson Park Neighborhood Plan identifies the top administrative and capital improvement project
priorities.This list includes both specific projects that were identified in the planning process and general
awareness of opportunities that may develop later.
77


IMPLEMENTATION PLAN
Implementation actions include three general categories:
) Regulatory actions (e.g. zoning/design review, landmark district, view protection)
) Public investment (e.g. transportation, parks, facilities, utilities)
) Partnership between the public and private sectors (e.g. residents, businesses, neighborhood
associations, special districts)
Regulation is a powerful but not entirely sufficient tool for bringing about the vision of the neighborhood
plan. While creating the regulatory framework of zoning and design standards, the public sector also must
create a climate that attracts private investment.The neighborhood residents, businesses and others must
also do their parts to implement the neighborhood plan.
78


ACTION PLAN


ACTION PLAN
Rntroduction
The table on the following two pages provides a summary of the key recommended actions and
implementation strategies of this Plan. The top row of the table identifies the categories of information
that is provided in the columns and the next seven rows describe specific Actions and Strategies.
Columns:
The headings in the top row of the table identify the seven categories of information provided in the
columns below, including Priority, Type of Action, Action, Time Frame, Strategies, Section of Plan, and
Page Number.
1. Priority
The first column provides the relative Priorities of the four recommended Actions.
2. Type of Action
Three Types of Actions that were identified in Blueprint Denver were also identified in this planning
process:
a. Regulatory Actions The Citys land use regulatory tools address the dimensions of a
development; i.e. size, density, setbacks, and height. Regulatory tools can allow or limit land uses and
can guide the basic design of a structure and its site.
b. Public Investments The City invests in physical improvements such as streets, alleys, bicycle
paths, sidewalks, utilities, parks, community and recreation centers.
c. Public / Private Partnerships Partnerships can be created between public agencies and private
interests by lending money, using redevelopment agency powers, and sharing responsibility for
building and maintaining public amenities.
As evidenced in the second column, all four key recommended actions in this Plan are Regulatory
Actions.
80


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
3. Action
The third column identifies the four key recommended Actions.
4. Time Frame
The fourth column notes the relative Time Frames for completing the proposed Actions: Short Term,
Short-to-Medium Term, and Ongoing.
5. Strategies
The Strategies column identifies key steps to implementing the Action.
6. Section of Plan
The sixth column references the section(s) in which the Action or Strategy is proposed.
7. Page Number
The last column identifies the page(s) on which the Action or Strategy is proposed.
Rows:
The information provided in the rows describes the Actions and Strategies.
81


ACTION PLAN
Jefferson Park Action Plan
PRIORITY TYPE OF ACTION ACTION TIME FRAME STRATEGIES SECTION OF PLAN PAGE NUMRER
1 Regulatory Change the existing zoning to help protect and enhance the character of the neighborhood and to help achieve the desired character and intensity of new development.
Regulatory Short-Term Use existing overlay 1. Executive Summary 3
districts as an interim 2. Land Use/Urban Form/Zoning 25
measure. The neighborhood 3. Core Residential Subarea 42
association, with assistance 4. River Drive Subarea 44
from CPD, should prepare an application for R-3/OD-9. 5. Park Face Blocks Subarea 46
Regulatory Short-to- Use the design principles 1. Executive Summary 3
Medium-Term in the Plan when developing new zone districts that reflect the existing and desired character and intensity of Jefferson Park and similar neighborhoods. 2. Land Use/Urban Form/Zoning 25
Regulatory Short-to- Once new zone districts 1. Executive Summary 3
Medium-Term that reflect the desired 2. Land Use/Urban Form/Zoning 26
character of the neighborhood
have been prepared, use them
to replace the overlay districts.
82


NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN
Jefferson Park Action Plan
PRIORITY TYPE OF ACTION ACTION TIME FRAME STRATEGIES SECTION OF PLAN PAGE NUMRER
2 Regulatory Protect the views from the west side of Jefferson Park. Short-Term CPD, working with the neighborhood organization, should prepare an application for a view protection ordinance. 1. Executive Summary 2. Land Use/IIrban Form/Zoning 3. Park Face Blocks Subarea 3 26 46
3 Regulatory Incorporate the design principles as applications are made to rezone the areas that are currently zoned PRV Ongoing Encourage the use of mixed-use zone districts or other zone districts that include design principles when rezoning sites that are currently zoned PRY 1. Executive Summary 2. Land Use/IIrban Form/Zoning 3 26
Regulatory Assure consistency among this and other adopted plans. Short-Term Amend the Blueprint Denver Areas of Change map to 1. Executive Summary 2. Plan Subareas map 2 23,39
change two areas in the Core
Residential Subarea from Areas
of Change to Areas of Stability
and one area in each of two
Subareas Diamond Hill and
Stadium Transition from Areas
of Stability to Areas of Change.
83



PAGE 1

NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN JEFFERSON PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN JULY 2005

PAGE 2

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS City Council Elbra Wedgeworth,Council President, District 8 Rick Garcia,District 1 Jeanne Faatz,District 2 Rosemary E.Rodriguez,District 3 Peggy Lehmann,District 4 Marcia Johnson,District 5 Charlie Brown,District 6 Kathleen MacKenzie,District 7 Judy Montero,District 9 Jeanne Robb,District 10 Michael B.Hancock,District 11 Carol Boigon,At-Large Doug Linkhart,At-Large Planning Board Barabara Kelley,Chair Jan Marie Belle Brad Buchanan Frederick Corn,P.E. Monica Guardiola,Esq. Daniel R.Guimond,AICP William H.(Bill) Hornby Mason Lewis Bruce O'Donnell Jeffery Walker City and County of Denver John H.Hickenlooper,Mayor Peter Park,Manager of CPD Tyler Gibbs,Director of Planning Dennis Swain,Development Program Manager Devon Buckels,former Associate City Planner,Plan co-author Carla McConnell,former Urban Design Architect,Plan co-author Matt Seubert,former Senior City Planner Julie Connor,Graphic Designer Jim Ottenstein,Graphic Designer Daniel Michael III,Graphic Designer Eric McClelland,GIS Stakeholders David Berton,co-chair Rafael Espinoza,co chair Lareen Castellano Dale Chandler Karen Harvey Neil Macey Joe Maestes Jack Martinez Lowell May Dean von Holdt Augustin Dionicio Denise Perez ii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

PAGE 3

iii NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary Overview. . . . . . . 2 Introduction Location Map. . . . . . . 6 Purpose of the Plan. . . . . . 7 Relationship to Other Plans and Programs. . . . 8 Planning Process. . . . . . 14 Plan Vision Vision. . . . . . . 16 Plan Neighborhood Framework Introduction. . . . . . . 20 Land Use/Urban Form/Zoning. . . . . 22 Housing. . . . . . . 29 Mobility. . . . . . . 32 Community Facilities. . . . . . 35 Plan Subareas Introduction. . . . . . . 38 Core Residential. . . . . . 40 River Drive. . . . . . . 43 Park Face Blocks. . . . . . 45 Neighborhood Commercial West 25th and Eliot. . . 48 Speer Boulevard. . . . . . 52

PAGE 4

iv TABLE OF CONTENTS Plan Subareascontinued Federal Boulevard. . . . . . 55 Diamond Hill. . . . . . . 58 Stadium Transition. . . . . . 62 Cultural/Educational Facility District. . . . 65 Urban Design Key Design Principles. . . . . . 68 Implementation Plan Summary. . . . . . . 77 ActionPlan Introduction. . . . . . . 80 Action Plan Tables. . . . . . 82

PAGE 5

1 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

PAGE 6

2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY OVERVIEW Jefferson Park is one of the oldest and smallest neighborhoods in the City.It contains only 309 acres of land and approximately 3,300 residents.The boundaries of the neighborhood are West 29th Avenue and Speer Boulevard on the north,the South Platte River on the east,West 19th and 20th Avenues and Interstate 25 on the south,and Federal Boulevard on the west.Most of the neighborhood is located on a bluff west of I-25 and the South Platte River,overlooking Downtown.The western section of the neighborhood is primarily residential,while the eastern section contains a variety of institutional, commercial,and industrial uses. The neighborhood is diverse in land uses,the age of its structures,and the demographics of its residents. Although its oldest houses and commercial structures date to the 1880 s,approximately two-thirds of its housing has been built since the 1940 s.Until the recent surge in residential construction,the newest structures in the neighborhood were commercial structures,an observation that reflects the changing nature of Jefferson Park and the surrounding areas.Census information indicates that more than eighty percent of the neighborhood residents are Latino,compared to approximately thirty percent for the City as a whole,and more than fifty percent of the residents are foreign-born,compared to approximately seventeen percent for the City.Only about twenty percent of the housing units are owner-occupied, compared to about fifty percent of the total number of housing units for the City.Approximately thirty five percent of the residents are classified as living in poverty,compared to approximately fourteen percent for the City. Despite having a large population of lower income residents,the neighborhood is experiencing a rapid increase in the value of its housing and increasing pressures for redevelopment and construction of higher density and more expensive housing.Overlooking Downtown and the Central Platte Valley, adjacent to Lower Highland,and with generally high density zoning in place,Jefferson Park sits in the path of the intense redevelopment that has occurred in those adjoining neighborhoods.This combination of characteristics provides both a challenge and an opportunity for the neighborhood.Although the

PAGE 7

3 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN neighborhood generally welcomes new residents and businesses,it desires to protect and enhance its historic character and the diversity of its residents. Blueprint Denver,An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, identifies both Areas of Change and Areas of Stability in Jefferson Park.While the recommendations of this Plan are generally consistent with and reinforce the concepts and recommendations of Blueprint Denver,there are four areas where this Plan recommends changing the boundaries between the Areas of Change and Areas of Stability. Key Issues1. The existing zoning in Jefferson Park allows much more intense development than either the existing or the desired intensity and character of housing and commercial development. 2. The existing zoning does not include any provisions for protecting and enhancing the character of the neighborhood. 3. The views of Downtown from the west side of the Park are important to the neighborhood but are not protected. 4. Denver does not currently have any zone districts that reflect the existing and desired intensity and character of the neighborhood. 5. Mounting development pressures mandate that action must be taken quickly if the desired character is to be achieved. Key Recommendations1. Use existing zoning overlay districts as an interim mechanism for helping to protect and enhance the existing character of the neighborhood and to achieve the desired character and intensity of new development. 2. Use the design principles in the Plan when developing new zone districts that reflect the existing and desired character and intensity of the neighborhood. 3. Once new zone districts that reflect the desired character of the neighborhood have been prepared, use them to replace the overlay districts. 4. Apply a view protection ordinance for the views from the west side of Jefferson Park to Downtown. 5. Encourage the use of mixed-use zone districts or other zone districts that include design principles

PAGE 8

4 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY when rezoning sites that are currently zoned PRV. 6. Amend the Blueprint Denver map to change two areas in the Core Residential Subarea from Area of Change" to Area of Stability and one area in each of two subareas Diamond Hill and Stadium Transition from Area of Stability to Area of Change While there are numerous other issues and recommendations in this plan,moving quickly to address these issues and implement these recommendations will have the greatest impact on achieving the vision for Jefferson Park.

PAGE 9

5 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN INRODUCTION

PAGE 10

6 INTRODUCTION LOCATION MAP 64TH AVE 56TH AVE 48TH AVE 38TH AVE 26TH AVE COLFAX 6TH AVE ALAMEDA MISSISSIPPI JEWELL YALE HAMPDEN QUINCY BELLEVIEW BOWLES KIPLINGWADSWORTH CARR PIERCE SHERIDAN LOWELLFEDERALZUNI GALAPAGOBROADWAYCLARKSONUNIVERSITYCOLORADOHOLLYMONACOQUEBECYOSEMITEHAVANAPEORIAPOTOMACCHAMBERSBUCKLEY TOWER HIMALAYA REGIS BERKELEY WEST HIGHLAND SLOAN LAKE WEST COLFAX VILLA PARKBARNUMWESTBARNUMWESTWOOD MAR LEE HARVEY PARK HARVEY PARK SOUTH BEAR VALLEY FORT LOGAN MARSTON CHAFFEE PK SUNNYSIDE HIGHLANDJEFFERSON PARKSUN V A L L E Y VALVERDE ATHMAR PARK RUBY HILL COLLEGE V I E WS O U T H P L A T T EGLOBEVILLE FIVE POINTS LINCOLN PARK BAKER O V E R L A N D PLATTE PARK ROSEDALE U N I V E R S I T Y WELLSHIRE UNIVERSITY PARK WEST WASH PARK WASH PARK SPEER CAPITOL HILL N CAPITOL HILL ELYRIA SWANSEA COLE CLAYTONWHITTIERSKYLAND CITY PARK WEST CHEESMAN PARKCOUNTRYCLUB BELCARO CORYMERRIL CHERRY CREEK CONGRESS PARK CITY PARK NORTHEAST PARK HILL NORTH PARK HILL SOUTH PARK HILL HALEMONTCLAIR HILLTOPWASHINGTONVIRGINIA VALE VIRGINIA VILLAGE GOLDSMITH U N I V E R S I T YHILLS SOUTH MOOR P A R K HAMPDEN SOUTH HAMPDEN KENNEDY I N D I A N CREEK WINDSOR LOWRY EAST COLFAX STAPLETON MONTBELLO GATEWAY TO DIA GREEN VALLEY RANCH UNION STATION AURARIA CBD CIVIC E N T E R

PAGE 11

7 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PURPOSE OF THE PLAN This plan replaces the Jefferson Park Neighborhood Plan approved by City Council in 1976.A draft Plan created in 1988 was never adopted and the 1976 Plan was not re-adopted as part of Comprehensive Plan 2000.Many of the issues relating to land use and zoning,housing,historic preservation and transportation identified in the 1976 Plan are still relevant today.However,current market conditions and substantial population and economic growth in the Denver metropolitan area have necessitated an evaluation of the existing regulatory,economic,and programmatic elements guiding the future of the Jefferson Park community. The Plan establishes long-range goals and objectives for the development and stabilization of the neighborhood.It provides a framework and establishes implementation strategies that will direct Jefferson Park toward its vision as a community where people will live,work,play and celebrate the neighborhood s cultural heritage. The Plan provides a neighborhood and city-approved guide to the future development of the Jefferson Park neighborhood.It is intended for use by Community Planning and Development,the Department of Public Works,Department of Parks and Recreation,Police Department,other City agencies,PlanningBoard,the Mayor,City Council,other public and quasi-public agencies,neighborhood associations,residents,property owners,business people,and private organizations concerned with planning,development,and neighborhood improvement. The Plan is intended to promote patterns of land use,urban design,and circulation that contribute to the economic,social,and physical health,safety,and welfare of the people who live and work in the neighborhood.The Jefferson Park Neighborhood Plan addresses issues and opportunities at a scale that is more refined and more responsive to specific needs than the City s Comprehensive Plan,to which it is a supplement. The Plan is neither an official zone map, nor does it create or deny any rights. Zone changes must be initiated under a separate procedure established under the Revised Municipal Code.

PAGE 12

8 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PLANS AND PROGRAMS Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 This and all other neighborhood plans are consistent with and supplemental to the City s Comprehensive Plan.The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 (Plan 2000) presents a citywide perspective,while each small area plan provides more specific guidance both for the allocation of City resources and for the location and design of private development. All neighborhood and other small area plans are expected to be compatible with the citywide policies contained in Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver:An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan,which is also a supplement to the Comprehensive Plan.The Jefferson Park Neighborhood Plan implements the following policies from these and other applicable plans: Comprehensive Plan 2000 (2000) Communication and Partnerships Neighborhood residents and organizations should be engaged in collaborative efforts to share information,solve problems and plan for the future. Land Use and Transportation High-density residential developments should be well served by public transportation and should be in close proximity to employment centers,amenities and shopping facilities. Activity areas should provide housing as one of the mixture of uses so as to support non-residential activities,minimize growth in auto use,and minimize negative impacts on air quality and energy use. Access to employment and activity centers should be improved in a manner consistent with commitments to provide a full range of travel modes and to protect living quality and promote

PAGE 13

9 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN good urban design. Land use patterns and zoning should support effective public rapid transit,an efficient roadway system and alternative transportation modes. Applicants proposing zone change to more intense uses should substantially mitigate negative impacts on existing uses. A mixture of uses that assure the availability of neighborhood services and amenities that reinforce the role,identity and needs of the neighborhood should be encouraged. Transit, Mobility and Parking Sidewalks and facilities for pedestrians are integral components of the transportation system.New roads and transit facilities should be designed to include pedestrian facilities.When existing arterials are reconstructed they should be furnished with sidewalks and pedestrian access to neighborhoods. The reuse of older structures and the revitalization and efficient development of commercial areas should be encouraged by promoting the creation of parking districts that will provide pooled, shared parking. Local streets not designated as collectors should serve neighborhood purposes and through traffic must be diverted from these streets whenever possible. Urban Design A well-designed urban environment,promoting the use of designs and materials that reflect the community s culture and materials should be developed and maintained. All projects should be built to the highest urban design standards.New facilities should make a positive design contribution to the neighborhood and include facilities for bicycles,sidewalks,trees, medians,lighting,and other high-quality physical design features. View corridors and solar access should be provided or preserved wherever feasible and appropriate. Commerce and Industry Both large and small businesses that meet economic and community criteria should be sought, retained and supported. Economic development programs should emphasize retention and expansion of existing businesses as well as attractive new businesses.

PAGE 14

10 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The revitalization of older neighborhood commercial centers that provide shopping within walking distance to residences should be encouraged to assist the stabilization of older neighborhoods. Commercial development should be compatible in operation and design with the residential fabric and character of the neighborhood. Off-street parking facilities should be landscaped,designed and located in a manner that minimizes disruption and inconvenience to adjacent residential properties and streets. Deteriorated and declining business and shopping areas should be revitalized by rehabilitation or replacement with appropriate uses. Adjacent residential areas should be protected from the negative activities of shopping areas by adequate buffering and by ensuring that adequate off-street parking and circulation is provided. Strip commercial development in new areas should be discouraged and existing strip commercial developments should be redeveloped,restructured and landscaped. Linear business areas in older neighborhoods should be compatible with other buildings in the area, and should encorporate pedestrian orientation and buffering from adjacent residential uses. Operations should avoid negative impacts on surrounding residential areas of lights,hours of operation,noise,drive-in speakers,trash removal,deliveries,etc. Streetscaping and street amenities should be installed in revitalizing and new commercial areas. Neighborhoods The existing stock of housing should be preserved and improved,especially encourage the rehabilitation and re-occupancy of vacant buildings. Subsidized housing should be designed to be compatible with surrounding housing and the character of the neighborhoods and should be located to promote economic and racial integration. The quality of the neighborhood should be preserved and improved.A focus of this effort should be to preserve and improve the existing stock of housing,including the rehabilitation and re-occupancy of vacant buildings. The character of stable residential neighborhoods should be preserved.Requests for rezonings on the periphery of stable residential neighborhoods should be evaluated to ensure that long-term stability is not threatened and the rezoning is compatible.

PAGE 15

11 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Improvements in the condition of dwelling units and non-residential buildings should bring them into conformance with code requirements to improve living conditions and remove blighting influences from neighborhoods. Neighborhoods in which physical conditions are declining or inadequate should be stabilized and upgraded.The strategies used should be those that minimize adverse impacts on the socioeconomic composition of existing residents. Historic buildings and areas should be protected,and the destruction of any structures or landscapes,which are part of the area s historic fabric,should be discouraged. Compatible residential development on vacant sites within developed residential areas should be encouraged. Development should be compatible with and sensitive to the immediate environment of the site and neighborhood in terms of architectural design,scale,bulk and building height,historic character, orientation of the building on the lot,landscaping and visual integrity. Blueprint Denver (2002) Blueprint Denver:An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan is a citywide plan that outlines Denver s growth management and development strategy.Blueprint Denver divides the city into Areas of Change,where reinvestment and redevelopment is desirable,and Areas of Stability,where the existing land use and character should be maintained and enhanced. Jefferson Park has both Areas of Change and Areas of Stability.The Areas of Change include:The northern edges of the neighborhood,generally including the blocks along Speer Boulevard and the area between I-25 and Clay Streets,north of West 23rd Avenue;the southern edge of the neighborhood,generally between I-25 and Eliot Streets,south of West 22nd Avenue.The neighborhood commercial area at West 25th Avenue and Eliot Street is identified as a neighborhood center anchoring the western edge Area of Change from just south of West 24th Avenue to West 26th Avenue,between Federal Boulevard and Eliot Street. These areas have great potential for reflecting the mixed-use nature of the historic land uses and offer opportunities to build upon those uses while embracing opportunities for reinvestment and change.This Plan recommends amending the Blueprint Denver Areas of Change Map to add two areas in the neighborhood as the Areas of Change and to delete two other areas in the neighborhood from the Areas

PAGE 16

12 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY of Change.These proposed amendments are reflectd on the Area of Change Map included in this Plan. Jefferson Park also contains several Areas of Stability that provide the characteristic urban fabric that creates a strong sense of place.The Areas of Stability are:The residential core of the neighborhood.This area generally includes the northwest end of the neighborhood between West 29th and West 27th Avenues,between Federal and Decatur;the center of the neighborhood between West 26th Avenue and West 23rd Avenue,between Eliot and Bryant Streets;and the southwest end of the neighborhood between West 22nd and West 20th Avenues,between Federal Boulevard and east of Eliot Street.Blueprint Denver also identifies River Drive as an Area of Stability. Game Plan (2003) The neighborhood is identified in this citywide parks and recreation plan,as an area posing a challenge for safe access to parks,and is also identified as a neighborhood of greatest need for breathing space associated with public schools.However,it is also identified as an area with walkable access to parks and receives the highest category ranking of acreage of parkland per capita,and exceeds the benchmark standards for baseball fields.However,it is well below the benchmark for soccer fields and is identified as falling below 75% of the national average for building square footage and lacking 1 to 3 core amenities in the area of recreation facility need map.The plan also notes that both Speer and Federal Boulevard are designated parkways,and also identifies 23rd Avenue and Water Street as proposed green streets Denver Bicycle Master Plan and Denver Bicycle Master Plan Update (1993 and 2001) The City s Bicycle Master Plans identifies West 23rd Avenue / Water Street and Eliot Street / West29th Avenue as Grid Bike Routes ;West26th Avenue / North Zuni Street as a Neighborhood Bike Route ;and the Platte River Trail as an Off-street Bike Route Pedestrian Master Plan (2004) The Plan identifies the following as part of the City s pedestrian route network :West23rd Avenue,Water Street,West29th Avenue,Speer and Federal Boulevards.

PAGE 17

13 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Stadium Area Plan (2001) The Stadium District s Stadium Area Plan ,adopted February 20,2001,provides suggestions for improving the relationship between the stadium and the neighborhoods that surround it.This neighborhood plan has been coordinated to be compatible with the Stadium Area Plan. Stadium Area Economic Analysis (1999) The Stadium Area Economic Analysis ,prepared by the Leland Consulting Group,surveys the commercial areas near the stadium and assesses their potential for growth.The Analysis points out the potential of these commercial areas for capturing a greater share of local retail spending,and suggests a variety of strategies to try and increase their market share. Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan (1995) The City s Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan contains recommendations pertaining to the construction and landscaping of a median in Federal Boulevard.The majority of this neighborhood plan is consistent with the Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan.However,since the time of the adoption of the corridor plan, the neighborhood has experienced some difficulties with access to businesses east of Federal Boulevard at West25th Avenue,and is recommending in this plan that the median be cut to allow access across Federal Boulevard at West25th Avenue. The Platte River Valley (PRV) Subarea Zoning Standards The PRV Zoning Standards identify the intended character and guidelines for the Diamond Hill subarea located within Jefferson Park. Focus Neighborhoods This neighborhood planning process was complemented by another initiative involving Jefferson Park called the Focus Neighborhoods Initiative .Jefferson Park was one of several neighborhoods included in this initiative,which was designed to address short term needs (approximately five years) centered primarily around safety,services,and neighborhood beautification.Many of the non-land use and transportation needs of the Jefferson Park community were considered as part of the Focus Neighborhoods program;this plan does not duplicate those efforts.

PAGE 18

14 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PLANNING PROCESS The Jefferson Park Neighborhood Plan Steering Committee was composed of thirteen citizens who were selected by the District City Council member to represent specific groups and entities that have interests in Jefferson Park.The Stakeholder groups represented on the Committee include:residents,both homeowners and tenants in rental properties;business owners;institutions;property owners;and representatives from the registered neighborhood association.The Steering Committee joined with City of Denver s Community Planning and Development Agency in an effort to garner neighborhood participation in the planning process and to produce a draft plan.The Steering Committee began the process in 2001 by identifying the most critical issues and developing a vision statement for the entire neighborhood.The Steering Committee subsequently hosted six public meetings at key milestones in the plan development process,and the Committee met over 28 times over a period of five years.Throughout the planning process,hundreds of individuals participated in dozens of meetings. Prior to adoption as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 ,the draft neighborhood plan was further reviewed by representatives of City agencies and in public hearings by both the Planning Board and City Council.The Steering Committee will continue to advocate for the implementation of the plan and to monitor progress toward that end.

PAGE 19

15 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN VISION

PAGE 20

16 VISION If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented,the following vision statement will be an accurate description of Jefferson Park in the not-too-distant future. Vision Jefferson Park will be a neighborhood that encourages diversity and is proud of its strong sense of community. Providing an inviting,safe,and comfortable urban environment for individuals and families from diverse cultural, social and economic backgrounds will be a valued characteristic of Jefferson Park.The neighborhood will be a vibrant and well-integrated blend of uses in a walkable environment. The neighborhood s namesake park,Jefferson Park,one of the neighborhood s chief amenities will serve as a neighborhood center,attracting people in the area to outdoor and social activities.The former streetcar stop located at 25th Avenue and Eliot Street,which will be thriving with neighborhood retail and service businesses, will serve the community as a second neighborhood center.The everyday needs of residents and workers in Jefferson Park will be met by neighborhood commercial areas and institutions.The neighborhood will have a strong economic base which allows individuals and businesses to achieve a better standard of living. Jefferson Park will be a vital neighborhood,with a complementary mix of uses.This variety of uses will provide benefits to the neighborhood and surrounding community by offering diverse employment and training opportunities,strengthening the employment and retail bases.This mix of uses also will reinforce the momentum of reinvestment in the neighborhood. The neighborhood will contain a range of housing types,styles and price ranges,providing affordable accommodations to diverse groups of current and future residents.This range of housing options will be provided in a manner that is compatible with the desired character of the neighborhood.Educational and childcare facilities will be easily and safely accessible to neighborhood children of all ages. The Jefferson Park neighborhood will have a distinctive character,through which its many physical assets will be celebrated and maximized,including: proximity and access to Downtown and the Platte Valley varied topography and views of Downtown existing historic buildings parks and open space !"

PAGE 21

17 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN High quality new development will complement existing historical,architectural,geographical and cultural elements,and reinvestment will occur in a managed fashion.The existing properties will be cared for and well maintained by both public and private property owners. Jefferson Park will include large public institutions such as Invesco Field at Mile High Stadium,Children s Museum,and Riverside Baptist Church.These institutions are well integrated into the community,and they will provide benefits to their hosting neighborhoods,including employment opportunities. The infrastructure,from Jefferson Park s characteristic alleys to water and sewer,will all be meeting the needs of the community,and are well-maintained.The community of Jefferson Park will have open communications with city agencies and surrounding neighborhoods,and the resulting ongoing dialogue will be beneficial for all.The neighborhood will work to provide services and meet the needs of residents on an equal basis. Neighbors will be invested in their community,and residents will enthusiastically participate in their community.The participation of residents of diverse cultures will make Jefferson Park one of the strongest neighborhoods in Denver. Achieving The Vision Plans are not regulatory tools.Plans provide a vision,which is a collective picture of a desired future and a roadmap for achieving that vision.Plans are implemented incrementally with the vision and goals providing common direction to a multitude of public and private undertakings.Part of the City process is to evaluate plan objectives and neighborhood conditions to determine if regulatory modifications are needed in order to facilitate the desired development. Use of Plan Components It is expected that new development regulations will conform to plan goals and policies,as well as citywide plans.Because of the intensity of the challenges facing Jefferson Park and because the Areas of Change can anticipate significant redevelopment activity,it is recommended that regulatory tools incorporate the design principles.The urban design principles reflect design goals that encourage cohesiveness and compatibility with the existing and desired character of the neighborhood as well as excellence in urban design.They are not intended to restrict innovation,imagination,or variety in design. Developers and designers are expected to meet with neighborhood associations and with immediate neighbors to discuss their projects and to solicit input. Neighborhood groups are expected to give timely feedback based on adopted plans and to support #"$

PAGE 22

18 VISION development proposals that meet neighborhood goals.Neighborhood input on new development is expected to be consistent with plan goals and policies.

PAGE 23

19 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PLANNEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK

PAGE 24

20 PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK INTRODUCTION The Framework looks at the neighborhood in the larger view and provides overall concepts that will guide its development.It addresses core issues and provides basic recommendations for the entire neighborhood.Many of the recommendations in this section are further defined in the subarea sections of this plan,so the subarea sections should be referenced and implementation should be consistent with the subarea goals. Achieving The Vision The adoption of this plan does not change the zoning.However,zoning is the primary land use regulatory mechanism and,thus,an important tool for implementing small area plans.The land use-related elements of a plan s vision statement are easiest to achieve when zoning reinforces the vision through its provisions for allowed uses and permitted structures.If a plan area s zone designations do not reinforce the plan vision,changing the zoning to be compatible is the primary implementation mechanism.It is essential, therefore,that rezoning applications be reviewed for their consistency with,and ability to help implement,adopted plans.When these regulatory changes are not accomplished in a timely manner,it is more difficult to achieve the vision. The plan vision and goals must be a reference and a guide for any proposed rezoning within the plan area.

PAGE 25

21 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Urban Form Zoning regulations alone do not necessarily achieve the desired urban form.Design review using adopted standards and guidelines can be enabled through zoning (or Landmark designation).The design principles provided in this plan may provide a basis for future design guidelines adopted as rules and regulations or provide direction for future form-based zoning initiatives.The goals and strategies remain advisory until adopted through a formal regulatory process.Individual property owners may also look to the plan for guidance. There are several factors in Jefferson Park that make the consideration of neighborhood form and design in future regulations important.One of the factors justifying the extra attention is the area s location.Its close proximity to Downtown and its prominent topography combine to make Jefferson Park,most notably the edges,one of the most visible and therefore aesthetically important of Denver s neighborhoods.These characteristics,along with the neighborhood s access to Speer Boulevard and I-25, make it particularly attractive for development,creating greater development pressures on the area than other areas of the City. Another reason for improved form-oriented regulations is the discrepancy between existing land use and the vision for land use,and the existing zoning in the neighborhood.The neighborhood contains both Areas of Change and Areas of Stability.The visions of Blueprint Denver for this area and the vision of this neighborhood plan will be nearly impossible to achieve without significant efforts addressing the R-3 zoning.The section of Jefferson Park that is characterized as an Area of Stability will not remain as such without these efforts.Similarly,the Areas of Change within Jefferson Park offer an exciting opportunity to help achieve the vision of Blueprint Denver through development,but only if parameters are set in place to help guide the development toward the scenarios in the vision,and to compensate for the mismatch between the vision and the existing zoning. %

PAGE 26

22 PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK LAND USE / URBAN FORM / ZONING Strengths Jefferson Park is a true mixed-use neighborhood,with a strong sense of community,provided in part by long-term residents. Jefferson Park s namesake park is centrally located and easily accessible to all residents. Issues Existing zoning does not match existing land use. The edges of the neighborhood are not clearly defined by a distinct transition in development form. Existing carriage lots are underutilized. There is concern that view corridors to the Central Platte Valley and Downtown through the neighborhood have been and will continue to be lost. There is a desire to strengthen the neighborhood with development that is consistent with the existing development in scale and character. Current zoning and available zone districts make it difficult to preserve the mix of single family and multiple family housing. The neighborhood should be buffered from the stadium and I-25. The intensity of the uses surrounding the neighborhood,such as Invesco Field at Mile High,which contrast with the historic,small-scale residential core of the neighborhood,creates a difficult parking situation. Viking Park is geographically part of the neighborhood but is not easily accessible. &$$ $'()*

PAGE 27

23 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN AREAS OF STABILITY AND CHANGE SPEER 25TH & ELIOT CORE RESIDENTIAL DIAMOND HILL FEDERAL BLVD. PARK FACE BLOCKS RIVER DRIVE STADIUM TRANSITION CULTURAL/EDUCATIONAL FACILITY DISTRICT AREAS OF CHANGE NORTH HIGH SCHOOL VIKING PARK 29TH AVE. 28TH AVE. 27TH AVE. 26TH AVE. 25TH AVE. 24TH AVE. 23RD AVE. JEFFERSON PARKALCOTT ST.SO UTH P LA TTE RIVERBRYANT ST. CLAY ST. DECATUR ST. ELIOT ST. FEDERAL BLVD.22ND AVE.F R O N T V IE W C R E S C E N TRIVER D R.21ST AVE. 20TH AVE. 19TH AVE. 18TH AVE. 17TH AVE. FOOTBALL STADIUM BYRON PL.SPEER BLVD.W A TER S T.E litch Cir.7 TH ST.IN TE R ST A TE 25ZUNI ST. 500' 250' 100' 0' NJEFFERSON PARK

PAGE 28

24 PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK 25' 30' 35' 45' 80' 140' 140' base up to 250' w/OK from Planning Board (white) no limit Height Limits EXISTING HEIGHT LIMITS NORTH HIGH SCHOOL VIKING PARK 29TH AVE. 28TH AVE. 27TH AVE. 26TH AVE. 25TH AVE. 24TH AVE. 23RD AVE. JEFFERSON PARKALCOTT ST.SOU TH PL ATT E RIVERBRYANT ST. CLAY ST. DECATUR ST. ELIOT ST. FEDERAL BLVD.22ND AVE.F R O NT V IE W CR E SC ENTRI V E R DR .21ST AVE. 20TH AVE. 19TH AVE. 18TH AVE. 17TH AVE. FOOTBALL STADIUM BYRON PL.S PEE R BLVD.WATE R S T.E lit ch C ir.7TH ST.IN T ER ST ATE 2 5ZUNI ST. 500' 250' 100' 0' NJEFFERSON PARK B-2PUD #486R-MU-20R-3 R-3 R-3 R-3R-2 R-2 R-2 R-2P-1 B-2B-2 B-2 B-1PUD #45PUD #306PUD #536R-3 B-1 B-1PRV PRVPUD #437R-3 B-4 B-4PUDB-2 R-3 B-2PRV PRV CMU-30 wvrs PRV B-4 ZONINGPRV PRV R-3C-MU-10/* C-MU-10/* C-MU-10/*January 2002

PAGE 29

25 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Jefferson Park currently is used primarily for passive recreation and has been a gathering place for illegal activities. Neighborhood alleys are poorly maintained,often unpaved and unlighted.These conditions are causing traffic and safety concerns in the neighborhood. Goals Maintain and enhance the character and identity of the historic Jefferson Park neighborhood. Bring zoning into closer conformance with the existing land use and the land use vision. Preserve views to Downtown,emphasizing the topography of the neighborhood. Create focal points within the neighborhood.The primary focal point is Jefferson Park,and a secondary focal point is the neighborhood commercial area at West 25th and Eliot. Create a retail core for the neighborhood at West25th and Eliot. Enhance residents ability to work,shop and recreate within the neighborhood. Facilitate a sense of community through quality design. Maintain connections,walkability and the fine grain of the historic Jefferson Park neighborhood,as exhibited by the historic street pattern and alleys. Preserve and enhance a stable residential core. Accomodate new development in currently underutilized areas of the neighborhood. Balance neighborhood character preservation with the livability of the neighborhood and mobility needs when reviewing parking requirements of new development. Recommendations The neighborhood association,with the assistance from Denver Community Planning and Development,should prepare an application for a map amendment that would add an OD-9 zone overlay district to the R-3 zoned portions of the Core Residential Subarea and Park Face Block. Neighborhood issues,analysis,and urban design principles will be provided for use in the City s efforts to rewrite the zoning code and create new zone districts that reflect the existing and desired conditions in Denver s inner-ring of neighborhoods. +),$

PAGE 30

26 PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK """$ $$As new zone districts are created through the rewrite of the new zoning code,consider rezoning the edges of the park to allow skightly greater height and density than R-2. Once these new or amended zone districts are available,the new zoning districts should replace the overlay districts. When property owners in the PRV-zoned areas along the eastern edge of the neighborhood seek amendments to begin the redevelopment process,these sites should be rezoned to one of the mixed-use zoning districts. Community Planning and Development will prepare a view preservation ordinance to protect the views toward Downtown from the west side of Jefferson Park. Preserve view corridors to the Central Platte Valley and Downtown along east-west streets. New development along neighborhood edges should be distinctive and reflect the neighborhood character.See character descriptions in the subareas of this plan. Designate areas for greater height and density of development along Speer where it will create strong neighborhood edges and buffer the core of the residential area. Investigate the possibility of obtaining a grant for research regarding the potential historic significance of several of the buildings in the neighborhood,including but not limited to:the Deliverance Tabernacle on West 25th Avenue,the building on the southeast corner of West 25th and Eliot,and the building on the southwest corner of West 25th and Eliot,and buildings on River Drive. Encourage new development to maintain and extend the grid pattern of streets throughout the neighborhood consistent with the subarea goals in this plan. Develop the potential of West 25th Avenue as the principal neighborhood corridor anchored at one end by the West 25th and Eliot neighborhood commercial area and at the other by redevelopment at Diamond Hill. Maximize the visibility and opportunities for increased use of carriage lots to increase their safety and encourage community use. Use pedestrian-friendly architectural and streetscape elements to help define neighborhood edges.

PAGE 31

27 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Maximize opportunities to create public social spaces.Possibilities include: Enliven pedestrian areas with streetscaping at West 25th and Eliot with the addition of wide sidewalks,street trees,pedestrian lights and street furniture. Enhance public spaces and amenities in Jefferson Park. Consider the addition of a plaza area for gatherings in or adjacent to Jefferson Park,or within the West 25th and Eliot commercial area. Encourage planting of street trees in the right-of-way to reinforce the traditional street patterns. Pave,light and maintain alleys for increased safety and improved appearance. Direct high-density development toward the neighborhood s perimeter,not its center. Any parking analysis being conducted for new development or redevelopment needs to carefully weigh the tradeoff between neighborhood character and livability. Create gateway monuments or markers at the following locations: Speer Boulevard and Zuni 29th Avenue and Federal Boulevard 25th Avenue and Federal Boulevard Alcott and 23rd Avenue $. "." ""

PAGE 32

28 PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK NORTH HIGH SCHOOL VIKING PARK 29TH AVE. 28TH AVE. 27TH AVE. 26TH AVE. 25TH AVE. 24TH AVE. 23RD AVE. JEFFERSON PARKALCOTT ST.SO UTH PLA TTE R I VERBRYANT ST. CLAY ST. DECATUR ST. ELIOT ST. FEDERAL BLVD.22ND AVE.F R O N T VI EW C R E S C EN TR IVER DR.21ST AVE. 20TH AVE. 19TH AVE. 18TH AVE. 17TH AVE. FOOTBALL STADIUM BYRON PL.SPEE R BL VD.W A T ER ST .Elitch C ir.7TH ST.IN T ER ST ATE 2 5ZUNI ST. 500' 250' 100' 0' NJEFFERSON PARK B-2PUD #486 R-MU-20R-3 R-3 R-3/wvrs R-3R-2 R-2P-1 B-2B-2B-1PUD #45PUD #306PUD #536R-3 B-1PRV PRVR-3 B-4 B-4B-2 B-2PRV PRVCMU-30 wvrsPRVB-4PRVPRV C-MU 10/wvrs C-MU 10 C-MU 10/wvrs C-MU 10 LEGEND R-2 Low Density Multi-Unit R-3 High Density Multi-Unit B-1 Office B-2 Neighborhood Business B-4 General Business Planned Unit Development P-1 Parking Platte River Valley Commercial Mixed UseZoningFebruary 2001

PAGE 33

29 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN HOUSING Strengths Jefferson Park offers a wide variety of single and multi-family housing options for both renters and homeowners across a broad price spectrum. Jefferson Park has strong areas of single-family residential housing which contribute substantially to the character of the neighborhood. Jefferson Park values its historic buildings,many of which are single-family residences. Issues The primary housing concern centers on the possibility of losing a diversity of people in the neighborhood.Market pressures for redevelopment could result in additional displacement of the elderly and lower income residents,many of whom are long term residents. The diversity of housing options within Jefferson Park is threatened by development pressures. There are many poorly maintained properties in Jefferson Park. There is a lack of information among residents regarding tenants rights. Some poorly maintained properties provide affordable housing.However,if investments are made in these properties it can lead to displacement,due to increased rent or sales prices.Code enforcement can result in building closure. Rents are increasing faster than wages or income in Jefferson Park. Over time,given anticipated related increases in property values,some current residents may not be able to afford to stay in the neighborhood due to increasing property taxes. ( $

PAGE 34

30 PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK There is a perceived threat to the neighborhood s single-family character and to the historic buildings of Jefferson Park from encroaching development and from lack of maintenance. Existing vacant lots of less than 6,000 square feet are challenging to redevelop. Goals Maintain a wide variety of well-maintained housing options including substantial numbers of affordable units for sale or rent without compromising quality. Keep and upgrade as many of the existing single-family structures as possible,and in sections of the neighborhood where conditions preclude retention of existing structures,encourage replacement with town homes or other development in character with the neighborhood. Maintain the availability of multi-family affordable housing in the neighborhood. Recommendations Investigate the following options to address housing issues.Note that many of these options require a citywide response. Multi-family rehabilitation with requirement that units stay affordable. Code enforcement in severe code violation situations. Partnership between the neighborhood and a non-profit to buy properties and enroll in low-interest loan programs to maintain some of the multi-family housing as affordable.This could help offset potential gentrification. Start a property manager/owner training program for Jefferson Park to address property management problems. A new apartment inspection and licensing program. Encourage housing developers to take advantage of bond programs,tax credit programs,or other incentives for the development of affordable housing units,such as the following (these incentives are typically applied to projects over 100 units in size): Low-income housing tax credits through Colorado Housing Finance Authority (CHFA) Private Activity Bonds

PAGE 35

31 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Investigate the possibility of the following to address displacement issues: Work with the City to take advantage of the Multi-Family Rental Program. If new development occurs in the neighborhood,encourage mixed income housing. Provide home ownership assistance to renters through educational efforts about programs for down payment and closing cost assistance. Provide information to property owners about owner-occupied single-family rehabilitation programs available through Denver Urban Renewal Authority to address property maintenance issues. Make educational materials available regarding Tenants Rights with assistance from resources such as ACORN and Legal Aid.

PAGE 36

32 PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK MOBILITY Strengths Jefferson Park is well located for access into Downtown and onto I-25. An opportunity exists to focus attention on the new pedestrian promenade, which has unusually good views of Downtown/Central Platte Valley,linking Speer Boulevard pedestrian/bike paths to the new pedestrian/bike path along the new I-25 slip ramp. Issues Extensive areas of surface parking are detrimental to the neighborhood. The stadium creates major traffic and parking impacts on the neighborhood. Access to neighborhood businesses on West 25th Avenue is difficult due to the median on Federal. Speer is not a pedestrian-friendly corridor. Traffic often moves too quickly along Eliot creating a dangerous pedestrian situation. CrossingWest 26th Avenue is perceived by the neighborhood as dangerous for pedestrians due to high traffic speeds and volume. The intersection of Speer Boulevard and West 29th Avenue is dangerous for pedestrians. Improvements to this intersection are recommended in the Pedestrian Master Plan (Project #31). The intersection of West 23rd Avenue and Bryant is dangerous for pedestrians,and is frequently the location of accidents involving parked cars.Improvements to this intersection are recommended in the Pedestrian Master Plan (Project #38). Traffic often moves too quickly along eastbound West 23rd Avenue. Transit service is inadequate or inconvenient in two areas:

PAGE 37

33 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Along Federal Boulevard:Transfer is required at Colfax Avenue to travel north-south along Federal Boulevard. Connections are lacking between Jefferson Park and popular local destinations such as Downtown,Auraria,Mile High Stadium,Human Services on Federal,West Side Health Clinic,and West 32nd Avenue retail. Goals Alleviate impacts created by parking needs of stadium. Increase the neighborhood s pedestrian friendly environment. Improve mobility within the neighborhood. Improve access to the neighborhood from Federal Boulevard. Improve bicycle and pedestrian connections to the neighborhood. Improve transit service to better serve Jefferson Park residents. Recommendations The neighborhood should work with the City to initiate a traffic study that will address several specific areas of concern for pedestrian safety,including the streets immediately adacent to the Park and the intersections along West 26th between Federal and Zuni. Explore the positives and negatives of opening the median on Federal Boulevard at West 25th Avenue to allow access to the commercial area at West 25th and Eliot. Create pedestrian friendly improvements along Speer Boulevard between Zuni and Federal Boulevard,including wider sidewalks and tree lawns and street trees.Improvements to this intersection are recommended in the Pedestrian Master Plan (Projects #31 and #32). Enforce speed limits along West 23rd and West 25th Avenues and Eliot Street for increased safety. Make improvements along West 23rd Avenue to ensure the safety and comfort of pedestrians and bicyclists and to enhance livability along this important connection between northwest Denver and Downtown. Create a clear,continuous and safe walkway and bicycle route between the Jefferson Park neighborhood and the Platte Valley along West 23rd Avenue.Recent action that has been taken to +'()*$

PAGE 38

34 PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK accomplish this includes striping the parking edge lines along West 23rd Avenue between Federal Boulevard and I-25.Long term,when the bridge over I-25 is rebuilt,provide wider sidewalks,or a raised sidewalk,and a wider bike lane. Continue to seek enhancements and better connections to the Jefferson Park Promenade. Work with the Regional Transportation District (RTD) to create a through service connecting north and south Federal Boulevard. Work with RTD to investigate the possibility of improved bus service connecting Jefferson Park with Downtown,Auraria,Invesco Field at Mile High Stadium,Human Services office on Federal Boulevard, West Side Health Clinic,and West 32nd Avenue. Improve the pedestrian crossing at West 29th Avenue and Speer Boulevard.Improvements to the pedestrian crossing at West 29th and Speer Boulevard intersection are referenced in the Pedestrian Master Plan (Project #31). Achieving the Vision The adoption of this plan does not provide funding for operational or capital projects.Capital projects, such as street improvements or the construction of sidewalks,can be funded by the City through its capital improvements program,by property owners through districts,or by private sources as development occurs.In all cases,funding of projects is a process separate from plan adoption.Funding availability, timing,and a fixed amount of street right-of-way are constraints to achieving the vision and goals.

PAGE 39

35 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN COMMUNITY FACILITIES Strengths The Jefferson Park neighborhood is well served by parks,including Gates-Crescent,Fishback Landing, and Jefferson Parks within the neighborhood,as well as the immediately adjacent Viking Park.Jefferson Park has five acres and contains a basketball court,a barbecue grill,a playground,a picnic shelter, picnic tables and restrooms.Gates-Crescent Park has a bicycle/pedestrian connection to the South Platte River Greenway,fishing,and a sand volleyball court.Fishback Landing has natural vegetation and a connection to the Greenway.Viking Park contains a flower garden and picnic tables. The neighborhood is home to two successful child care and youth facilities:Head Start at West 28th Avenue and Clay Street,and Family Star Early Head Start Child Development Center at West 22nd Avenue and Federal Boulevard. Several churches are located within or adjacent to the neighborhood,offering a variety of worship opportunities. Though the Jefferson Park neighborhood doesn t have its own neighborhood branch library,the neighborhood is adequately served by the Woodbury Branch Library at Federal Boulevard and West 32nd Avenue. Issues The vacant field adjacent to the Career Education Center (CEC),a Denver Public School facility, located at West 26th Avenue and Eliot Street,is underutilized. The lack of a neighborhood elementary school within the boundaries of Jefferson Park requires Jefferson Park s elementary school-age children to cross Speer Boulevard to attend Valdez Elementary school located at 2475 West 29th Avenue. Pedestrian connections to and from Jefferson Park are difficult because of traffic volumes and speed.

PAGE 40

36 PLAN NEIGHBORHOOD FRAMEWORK Pedestrian connections to and from the nearby recreation centers (Rude Recreation Center located at 2855 West Holden Place in Sun Valley and Ashland Recreation Center,located at 2950 Fife Court in Highland) are difficult.The Stadium and its adjacent parking,and West Colfax Avenue are barriers to the Rude Recreation Center,and Speer Boulevard is a barrier to the Ashland Recreation Center. Despite the presence of several large educational and cultural institutions in the neighborhood, there is a need for expanded opportunities for job training and community activities. Goals Increase the availability of the CEC field for use by Jefferson Park residents. Improve pedestrian safety at intersections used by school children to and from school. Improve pedestrian safety and connections to the Ashland and Rude Recreation Centers. Expand opportunities of Jefferson Park residents for job training and community activities. Recommendations Work with Denver Public Schools to facilitate the shared use (by the neighborhood residents and the CEC patrons) of the CEC field at West 26th Avenue and Eliot Street. Improve bicycle / pedestrian connections between Jefferson Park and nearby Ashland recreation center.Coordinate with the Department of Public Works to investigate intersection safety improvements for the intersection of Speer Boulevard and Zuni Street to facilitate access to the Ashland Recreation Center north of Speer Boulevard. Work with Denver Public Schools and Riverside Baptist Church to investigate ways to increase opportunities for job training and community activities for Jefferson Park residents. /0$"

PAGE 41

37 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PLAN SUBAREAS

PAGE 42

38 PLAN SUBAREAS INTRODUCTION The plan identifies nine sub-areas with relatively distinct characteristics.It acknowledges that boundaries between the sub-areas are not absolute and that characteristics overlap sub-area boundaries.The sub-area plans present issues and goals that are supplemental to those presented in the Framework Plan.

PAGE 43

39 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN SUBAREAS SPEER 25TH & ELIOT CORE RESIDENTIAL DIAMOND HILL FEDERAL BLVD. PARK FACE BLOCKS RIVER DRIVE STADIUM TRANSITION CULTURAL/EDUCATIONAL FACILITY DISTRICT NORTH HIGH SCHOOL VIKING PARK 29TH AVE. 28TH AVE. 27TH AVE. 26TH AVE. 25TH AVE. 24TH AVE. 23RD AVE. JEFFERSON PARKALCOTT ST.SOUTH PLA TTE RIVERBRYANT ST. CLAY ST. DECATUR ST. ELIOT ST. FEDERAL BLVD.22ND AVE.FRONT VIEW CRESCENTRIVER DR.21ST AVE. 20TH AVE. 19TH AVE. 18TH AVE. 17TH AVE. FOOTBALL STADIUM BYRON PL.SPEER BLVD.W ATER ST.E litch Cir.7TH ST.IN TERSTA TE 25ZUNI ST. 500' 250' 100' 0' NJEFFERSON PARK

PAGE 44

40 PLAN SUBAREAS CORE RESIDENTIAL SUBAREA If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented,the following vision statement will be an accurate description of the Core Residential Subarea. Vision The vision for the Core Residential Subarea includes a large,well maintained,residential area that will provide a wide variety of housing types for both owners and renters.Renovation and new development will reflect the existing architectural character of this traditional Denver neighborhood.New development of either single-family or multiple units will be 2-3 stories tall.Garages will be accessed from alleys where possible,keeping the fronts of homes inviting and safe for pedestrians and neighborhood activities. Carriage lots,a unique asset for Jefferson Park,will have developed in a variety of ways including community gardens,pocket parks,and some paved courts for games,and will be well used by all residents. Current Conditions The heart of the Jefferson Park neighborhood is residential,divided into 3 major districts,providing a variety of housing types including single-family,duplex,row houses and apartments.The current zoning is R-2 (medium density residential) and R-3 (high-density residential).The R-3 zoning allows significant increases in the intensity and types of development within the neighborhood.However, Blueprint Denver ,describes most of this section of Jefferson Park as an Area of Stability. Strengths Existing diversity in architectural style,scale and size of buildings,building materials,and natural topography of area. Active recreational use of space in front of homes (public right-of-way & front setback) that contributes to a strong sense of community. )122""$ ""$

PAGE 45

41 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Opportunity exists under current zoning,as well as under recommendations contained in this plan, for increased density that can further enhance the variety of housing options available in the residential sub-area. Issues There are no mechanisms in place for either discouraging demolition of significant structures or for guiding redevelopment to be consistent and complementary with the neighborhood character. Many existing multi-family buildings do not work well for families with children due to enclosed corridors and a corresponding lack of street orientation (porches,front yards),lack of maintenance, and no open space or play area. There is concern about new development not reflecting the architectural scale and character of the existing neighborhood. Existing zoning is incompatible with existing low to moderate density land uses. The unlimited height allowed in the R-3 zone is incompatible with the existing moderate density residential character. Pedestrian safety is a concern throughout residential areas. Some of the alleys are neither paved nor maintained. Goals Maintain and enhance the single-family character and use of the historic Jefferson Park neighborhood core. Preserve and enhance the traditional neighborhood pattern of streets,alleys and carriage lots. Enhance livability of the neighborhood and each new development. Preserve the pedestrian orientation and scale of the neighborhood core. Preserve and enhance the livability and traditional pattern of the residential core through designs that place eyes on the street ,increasing safety and security in the public realm. Encourage redevelopment that provides a variety of housing options. Recommendations Encourage new infill construction and renovations to existing structures that are complementary and compatible with the residential character and enhance the feeling of community existing in the neighborhood. Support efforts to change the R-3 Zoning.Possible options include: Create a new zone district that provides the scale and density for new development to be

PAGE 46

42 PLAN SUBAREAS compatible with the character of the neighborhood. Rezoning to R-2.This would be an appropriate tool for the 2000 block of Federal,for example, which is zoned PRV. Overlay District 9 designation.This would limit height to 35 ,which is consistent with the recommendations for these subareas. Other recommendations developed from the citywide R-3/R-4 study currently underway. Maintain and improve existing residential uses and all historic and architecturally significant structures. Sensitively,but systematically enforce the environmental code. Reinvestment is encouraged in the residential area. Any changes to the streetscape and buildings through redevelopment will further create a pedestrian-friendly environment that reinforces the neighborhood character. Develop carriage lots to be attractive,safe areas that are an asset for the neighborhood. Encourage designs and uses that place eyes on the street increasing safety and security in the public realm.Front porches,front windows,front yards,and visibility to carriage lots and alleys are examples. Establish the residential core subarea as a priority area for alley paving projects. 3$"

PAGE 47

43 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN RIVER DRIVE SUBAREA If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented,the following vision statement will be an accurate description of the River Drive Subarea. Vision The vision for the River Drive Subarea includes its enhancement as an important and unique part of the residential core of Jefferson Park.It will continue to have a unique physical character due to the curving street layout,topography and architecture.Property owners will respect and value this uniqueness and will have taken steps to preserve its character,carefully renovating and enlarging their homes in ways that enhance the historic character of this small area.New development on vacant sites will have occurred in a manner that respects the historic character of the neighborhood. Current Conditions River Drive and West 23rd Avenue have a concentration of homes identified in the 1976 neighborhood plan as having potential for a Denver Landmark District.Research would have to be undertaken to determine if the area meets two of the three categories (history,architecture,geography) required for Denver Landmark Districts.A visual inspection reveals an area that is unique within Jefferson Park and one where any redevelopment should be carefully designed to enhance this unique setting.The current R-3 zoning provides no protection for the existing character and allows development of greater density.If we are to achieve the vision of Blueprint Denver,which identifies this as an Area of Stability,we need to identify a regulatory mechanism that will allow this area to remain a stable residential area. Strengths This is a residential area with an unusual mix of architectural styles that may have potential as a Denver Landmark District. / &"

PAGE 48

44 PLAN SUBAREAS Unique topography and curvilinear street layout Issues The R-3 zone allows development that could be very different in scale and character than the existing residential development. On-street parking is very limited.Residents compete with restaurant patrons for space. Goals Preserve and strengthen the predominantly historic residential character of this area and ease potential development pressures. Recommendations Support efforts to change the R-3 Zoning.Possible options include: Rezoning to R-2.Consideration of the appropriateness of the R-2 should consider whether the uses,minimum lot size,front and side yard setback,and bulk plane standards in the R-2 may be more restrictive than the existing conditions in the neighborhood and may result in creating nonconforming structures and uses. Overlay District 9 designation.This would limit height to 35 ,which is consistent with the recommendations for these subareas. Other recommendations developed from the citywide R-3/R-4 study currently underway. Investigate potential as Denver Landmark District. Maintain single-family character.New infill should be compatible with the historic buildings. Enforce the maintenance of vacant land and public rights-of-way. Encourage designers of new development to use massing,materials,and detailing that reflect and enhance this unique sub area. All new/redevelopment projects must comply with standard zoning parking regulations. View corridor to Downtown from River Drive should be provided and preserved through any redevelopment of the Baby Doe s restaurant site. New development should take advantage of the opportunity for walkout lower (basement) level created by slope of the land. Any new development increasing density from the existing single-family level should be directed to West 23rd Avenue.

PAGE 49

45 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN PARK FACE BLOCKS SUBAREA If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented,the following vision statement will be an accurate description of the Park Face Block Sub-area. Vision The vision for the Park Face Blocks Subarea includes the Park functioning as the cultural heart of the neighborhood.The streets surrounding the Park will be lined with a variety of town homes, condominiums,apartments and single-family homes all sharing views into a beautiful urban oasis.The Park will serve as a true community gathering spot,hosting family picnics,casual games and occasional concerts or performances.The Park perimeter will be defined by development that is of a greater density than the core residential subarea with buildings of up to 45 high on the blocks facing the north,south and west sides of the park,and up to 35 height on the blocks facing the east side of the park.The former police station site will have been redeveloped into affordable housing and a small police substation. Current Conditions This sub area consists of the sides of the blocks facing Jefferson Park.Development around the Park is primarily residential.The Park and the land around it slope dramatically down from the west and north to the south and east.The west side of the Park provides significant views of Downtown. New residential development is either recently completed or underway on the north and south edges of the Park. Strengths The sub area benefits from direct/easy physical access and views of a large beautiful neighborhood park. Many locations have views of the Downtown Denver skyline.

PAGE 50

46 PLAN SUBAREAS These face blocks have historically been predominantly residential,which is consistent with the neighborhood s desired future use in the sub area. Issues The height of new development around the Park,has the potential for blocking views to Downtown Denver. Building heights on the south side of the Park are limited by current zoning. There is a perceived lack of pedestrian safety for travel to and from the Park.Cars are perceived as speeding along West 23rd Avenue and pedestrians must cross at unprotected intersections. Goals Improve pedestrian safety,particularly for children,traveling to and from the Park. Preserve the view of Downtown Denver from the west side of Jefferson Park. Increase activity in the Park. Increase safety and reduce illegal activity in the Park. Maintain and support continued residential uses around the Park. Recommendations Investigate a zoning change to a zone district or a combination of zone district and overlay district, which allows development of the park perimeter that is of a greater density than the core residential subarea with buildings of up to 45 height on the blocks facing the north,south and west sides of the park,and up to 35 height on the block facing the east side of the park. Pursue a view plane preservation ordinance preserving the view of Downtown Denver from the west side of Jefferson Park. Enforce speed limits on streets surrounding the park. /

PAGE 51

47 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Work with Public Works Transportation to address a variety of traffic issues and perceived pedestrian safety problems.This effort should consider the possibility of traffic calming measures to slow auto traffic and facilitate pedestrian comfort on the streets around the Park. Improve Park safety by increasing activity in the park and providing an opportunity for additional housing facing the park.

PAGE 52

48 PLAN SUBAREAS NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL SUBAREA WEST 25TH & ELIOT If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented,the following vision statement will be an accurate description of the Neighborhood Commercial Subarea. Vision The vision for the neighborhood commercial subarea includes older buildings that will have been carefully restored and vacant lots developed in a manner that reinforces the historic character of this small neighborhood commercial district.Apartments on upper levels will provide reasonably priced housing close to jobs.Improvements will have been made for pedestrian safety at West 25th and Eliot.A carriage lot will now provides off street parking for businesses and a community center on West 25th will provide a neighborhood gathering spot.Jefferson Park residents will come to this area for everyday shopping and people from outside the neighborhood will know they can find unique restaurants and goods not available elsewhere in the City. Current Conditions This subarea currently includes commercial space which is both pedestrian and auto oriented.The Safeway draws business from both Jefferson Park and the larger northwest Denver neighborhood,but is disconnected from the rest of the commercial area.The commercial area along West 25th is scaled to appeal to neighborhood pedestrian use.The commercial properties in this area have not been developed to their full potential. Strengths Location:Adjacency to Federal Boulevard enables customers from outside the neighborhood to reach businesses without bringing additional traffic into neighborhood streets and it is a short walk +)*43 "&"3

PAGE 53

49 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN for most Jefferson Park residents Architectural character:the existing buildings along West 25th are examples of older commercial buildings that have large expanses of shop windows at street level and interesting architectural detail. This is an ideal location for a mix of first floor retail with upper levels of residential reinforcing this as a center of community activity. Existing residential buildings have potential for commercial uses Potential location for special community celebrations. Issues Vehicular access to this area is currently limited by the continuous median on Federal. Structures and streetscape are in need of renovation and maintenance. Pedestrian safety is a concern along both West 25th and Eliot. Neighborhood services are lacking. Goals Strengthen the neighborhood retail center to support the neighborhood as a self-contained community with a healthy activity center. Maintain the historic character of the neighborhood center,which was an early Denver trolley stop. Encourage redevelopment of vacant and underutilized properties. Strengthen the identity of the neighborhood through the retail district. Encourage additional development to provide the critical mass required for a sustainable retail center. Improve and maintain visual and pedestrian connections between the Safeway retail area and the West 25th and Eliot retail area. Encourage pedestrian connections to adjoining neighborhoods and all sections of the Jefferson Park neighborhood. Minimize impacts of new development,redevelopment,and new uses on the residential core of the neighborhood. Recommendations Encourage new construction to be mixed use with residential and retail. Maintain the historic commercial buildings at West 25th Avenue and Eliot Street.

PAGE 54

50 PLAN SUBAREAS Investigate the possibility of obtaining a grant for research regarding the potential historic significance of several of the buildings in this subarea,including:the Deliverance Tabernacle on West 25th,the building on the southeast corner of West 25th and Eliot,and the building on the southwest corner of West 25th and Eliot. Investigate the availability of funding,including City participation,for the purchase of properties in this subarea and subsequent assistance in attracting developer interest for the area s successful redevelopment. Given the unique opportunity for parking in the middle of the block between West 25th and West 26th Avenues,we recommend that the neighborhood work with the property owners to explore the possibility of using the carriage lot and parking lot for parking for commercial uses in this block. Encourage shared parking agreements between property owners. Explore the positive and negative aspects of opening Federal Boulevard at 25th Avenue to allow improved vehicular access to this neighborhood commercial district and to allow access for emergency vehicles. Develop business areas in a manner that encourages small independent businesses and pedestrian and transit friendliness,reinforces the character of the area and buffers adjacent residential uses. Create a walkable neighborhood by providing active pedestrian-oriented uses on the ground floors of commercial,residential and mixed use projects,generous sidewalks,enhanced streetscaping,and building design with human scale and detail. Improve pedestrian safety at West 25th and Eliot. As renovations or redevelopment projects are proposed ensure that site design makes access to retail centers safe,convenient and inviting for pedestrians and bicyclists as well as vehicles. Establish the adaptability and potential for long-term vitality of the neighborhood by ensuring that retail center sites are developed in a manner allowing evolution to more intense and dense uses over time.For example,floor heights should accommodate conversion to commercial uses,and site plans should reflect adequate flexibility for more intense uses in the future. New buildings in this area should be compatible in scale and character with existing buildings. On street parking and bus stops are expected to be retained in this area. Allow either residential or commercial use in existing residential properties. Commercial uses in existing residential buildings should retain the character of a residential structure. Encourage pedestrian-scale,mixed-use development between Federal and Eliot,north of the alley between West 25th and West 26th Avenues.

PAGE 55

51 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Encourage building owners to pursue a marketing study to determine business uses that would be feasible in this location. In the short-term,encourage the establishment of an association of business and property owners to work together to improve the area. Long-term,encourage the establishment of a Special District for the installation and maintenance of streetscape improvements,particularly along West 25th Avenue,and for marketing businesses. Investigate the possibilities for a zoning change in this subarea to a zone district which includes uses allowed in B-2 zoning,but which also guides the form of new neighborhood commercial construction,and allows buildings of up to four stories tall. Investigate the possibility of expanding the business zoning to include the southeast corner of West 26th Avenue and Eliot Street as a beneficial extension of the commercial core.Investigate reducing parking requirements in order to facilitate business location in this area. Seek funding to improve and strengthen existing businesses. Encourage neighborhood reinvestment by existing business owners. Enhance the visual appearance and image of local businesses by encouraging fa  ade and streetscaping improvements,where possible.

PAGE 56

52 PLAN SUBAREAS 5" 0$ &"$ SPEER BOULEVARD SUBAREA If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented,the following vision statement will be an accurate description of the Speer Boulevard Subarea. Vision The vision for the Speer Boulevard Subarea includes a strong north border for Jefferson Park. Redevelopment will have remedied the dangerous pedestrian conditions and those edges will have continuous lengths of detached sidewalks with trees,sometimes in tree lawns,sometimes in grates, shielding pedestrians from traffic.Most of the redevelopment along the south edge of Speer will have been for office and residential,often combined in the same project.Buildings generally will be four to six stories and provide further buffering for the lower scaled residential area to the south.Parking will have been accommodated within the buildings or is well screened with landscaping and decorative walls. Pedestrian crossings at West 29th and Zuni will have been improved to ease movement between the Jefferson Park and Highland neighborhoods. Current Conditions Speer Boulevard carries a high volume of traffic moving between northwest Denver and Downtown.Over the years it has been widened,leaving little room for pedestrians due to the lack of a parkway setback. Crossing Speer is dangerous for both pedestrians and vehicles.Viking Park and the Speer bridge frame either end of the boulevard through Jefferson Park,but the development between is inconsistent and does not take full advantage of the benefits of this significant street. Strengths Speer Boulevard is part of Denver s historic parkway system. Speer Boulevard forms a strong north border for Jefferson Park.

PAGE 57

53 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 0$"$ Easy access to I-25 and Downtown is possible from Speer Boulevard. As a neighborhood edge,higher density development is appropriate in this subarea. Dramatic views of Downtown exist along Speer Boulevard. Issues This section of Speer Boulevard does not have a parkway setback. Most development along Speer detracts from the boulevard character and does not take advantage of the topography and views. Speer Boulevard is a difficult pedestrian environment with narrow sidewalks,heavy traffic and no safe pedestrian crossings to the Highlands neighborhood. The Speer and West 29th intersection is extremely difficult for pedestrians to cross. The Eliot and West 29th intersection is preceived as unsafe for pedestrians and vehicles. Goals Improve safety of Speer Boulevard for both pedestrians and vehicular traffic. Improve safety at the following intersections:Speer Boulevard and West 29th Avenue,Speer Boulevard and Zuni,and Eliot and West 29th Avenue. Strengthen neighborhood identity from Speer Boulevard so it is apparent where the Jefferson Park neighborhood is as one travels along Speer. Maintain and enhance the official boulevard design character of Speer Boulevard. Recommendations Enhance the pedestrian environment along Speer through wider or detached sidewalks and the addition of street trees in tree lawns or in paved amenity zones with trees in grates.In some cases, this may require that the City work with the property owners to acquire additional right-of-way. Buffer the interior of the neighborhood with higher density development along Speer Boulevard to protect the interior residential area,as well as to strengthen the neighborhood edge. Create a gateway monument/marker at Speer and Zuni. Establish a Parkway setback along Speer sufficient for a detached sidewalk,tree lawn and/or amenity zone.This may be a long-term project that requires the dedication of additional right-of-way as opportunities arise. Review,update,and consider adoption the 1992 Speer Corridor Design Guidelines.

PAGE 58

54 PLAN SUBAREAS Encourage new development and redevelopment along Speer that adds to the historic boulevard character and that takes advantage of the topography and views. Work with the Public Works Department to study ways to improve the pedestrian and vehicular safety of the following intersections: Speer Boulevard and West 29th Avenue Eliot Street and West 29th Avenue Speer Boulevard and Zuni

PAGE 59

55 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 60$ FEDERAL BOULEVARD SUBAREA If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented,the following vision statement will be an accurate description of the Federal Boulevard Subarea. Vision The vision for the Federal Boulevard Subarea includes Federal Boulevard,north of West 20th Avenue,as having reclaimed its past as a tree shaded street lined with well kept homes and small apartment buildings.Many of the magnificent historic homes will have been preserved and are well maintained. Small concentrations of neighborhood serving retail,such as those found at West 25th and Federal,will both enhance the pedestrian character of the neighborhood and benefit from being easily accessible from Federal Boulevard.This will be a lower density area with building heights generally one to three stories. Current Conditions Despite the high volume of traffic,the character of Federal Boulevard north of West 20th is largely residential with some smaller scale neighborhood commercial uses.The Federal Boulevard medians,which were recently added,have helped to enhance pedestrian street-crossing safety and have helped protect local streets from cut-through traffic. Strengths Federal is a major arterial.The number of people traveling along Federal Boulevard is an opportunity for Jefferson Park businesses. Federal Boulevard links ethnically diverse neighborhoods and the businesses along Federal represent and serve these diverse populations. Areas of single-family housing line Federal Boulevard in this area,enhancing the character of the street and providing additional housing options.

PAGE 60

56 PLAN SUBAREAS /""60$ $ +("" ""60$ Historic character of the neighborhood is reflected in many of the single-family residential buildings and the commercial buildings at West 25th Avenue and Eliot. Issues Despite the Federal Boulevard median,pedestrian crossings at West 23rd,26th & 29th Avenues are perceived as dangerous due to high volume of traffic and high traffic speeds. Federal Boulevard suffers from a high volume of traffic and from previous street widenings,which have changed the character of the boulevard by reducing tree lawns,sidewalk setbacks,and the depth of front lawns. Vehicular access to neighborhood commercial along West 25th Avenue is difficult due to the Federal Boulevard median.This barrier reduces cut through traffic from Federal Boulevard,but it also limits customer access to businesses in the commercial area. Residential character of Federal is unstable. Landscape treatment along Federal is inconsistent.North of West 20th Avenue the character of a tree-lined residential boulevard is still evident but needs to be enhanced through maintenance of tree lawns and replanting of street trees. Lighting along Federal Boulevard may be inadequate for pedestrians. There is not a cohesive development character along Federal Boulevard. Goals Provide optimum access to businesses at West 25th Avenue and Eliot Street. Enhance the landscape treatment along Federal Boulevard to reflect the residential character of northwest Denver. Enhance the comfort and safety of the pedestrian environment and facilitate pedestrian connections across the boulevard. Increase neighborhood identity. Encourage preservation and adaptive reuse of buildings. Maintain the commercial/residential balance in use and zoning. Reconcile discrepancy between zoning and existing development in the southwest corner of this subarea.

PAGE 61

57 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 7""" """ Recommendations Redevelopment along Federal should respect and enhance the residential character by installing and maintaining tree lawns,street trees,and detached sidewalks. Surface parking should be oriented to the sides and rear of the property and should be screened using walls,landscaping,and fencing. New development,including moderate density development,is expected to strengthen and enhance the existing residential character and scale along Federal Boulevard. Tree lawns and street tree plantings should be maintained and parking areas screened using walls, landscaping and fencing. Improve lighting conditions for pedestrian safety where necessary. Encourage home office as an adaptive reuse of buildings. Maximize opportunities for neighborhood identification through development of entry markers at West 20th,25th and 29th Avenues. Alley access should be used whenever possible to avoid new curb cuts. Discourage the expansion of commercial zoning along Federal Boulevard. Redevelopment along Federal should maintain traditional building lines with well-screened parking to the sides and behind buildings. Investigate the use of a zone district that will accommodate the R-2 uses and that contains a similar height restriction (35 ),for the area currently zoned PRV in the southern section of the block between West 20th and West 21st Avenues on Federal.

PAGE 62

58 PLAN SUBAREAS 5" DIAMOND HILL SUBAREA If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented,the following vision statement will be an accurate description of the Diamond Hill Subarea. Vision The vision for the Diamond Hill Subarea includes its redevelopment as a lively mixed-use district within Jefferson Park.A new hotel,offices and higher density residential buildings,remodeled buildings,and small-scale retail and restaurant uses will provide amenities and employment for neighborhood residents. The traditional street grid will have been extended into this area,breaking down the super blocks into pedestrian friendly,tree lined streets.This district will continue to enjoy easy access from I-25 and Speer Boulevard and will be within walking and biking distance of Highland,Commons and Downtown.Heights and density will be greater towards West 27th Avenue and Alcott,dropping down to three stories (35 ) to more closely match the single-family residential scale of development along Bryant St.and West 23rd in order to transition to the predominantly residential area of the neighborhood.Buildings of three to four stories will have been built along the north side of West 23rd Avenue.The interior of the subarea will accommodate buildings up to 140 in height. Current Conditions This subarea enjoys a prominent location with clear views to Downtown and the Platte River Valley to the southeast.Access into this area is very good.Diamond Hill provides opportunities for higher density and mixed-use developments.Treatment of the edges varies considerably from higher more intense uses on the north side to single-family residential uses on the west side.Predominant uses are an office complex,a large church,and large expanses of surface parking.

PAGE 63

59 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Strengths Higher density is appropriate in this area with a transition to lower density and scale at interior neighborhood edges. The subarea has excellent views toward Downtown. Access to I-25 and Downtown Denver is excellent. The new pedestrian Promenade above I-25 provides an opportunity to further take advantage of the views from Jefferson Park and to enhance the neighborhood connections. Issues The current land uses and expanses of surface parking separate this area from the majority of the Jefferson Park neighborhood. There is a potential conflict in scale and uses between redevelopment of Diamond Hill and redevelopment of residential areas to the west. Parking,unless appropriately located,designed and regulated,can create negative visual impacts on the rest of the neighborhood. This area has developed as a series of super blocks with a scale very different from the residential core of Jefferson Park,immediately to the west. Goals Integrate the subarea into the larger neighborhood. Connect and integrate the subarea with the Diamond Hill Promenade (the pedestrian walkway along the eastern edge of the subarea between Speer and West 23rd Avenue). Activate the Diamond Hill Promenade by encouraging adjacent uses that are open to the walkway. Strengthen West 25th Avenue as a principal neighborhood pedestrian corridor. Preserve and enhance view corridors. Preserve and enhance pedestrian and bicycle access throughout the subarea. Maximize the topography and views of Downtown Denver. Encourage new development that is compatible with and complementary to the character of the remainder of the neighborhood. Provide a transition of uses and development intensity in redevelopment along the edge bordering the residential area to the west and the River Drive Subarea to the south.

PAGE 64

60 PLAN SUBAREAS Enhance the urban character of the interior of this subarea. Recommendations Future redevelopment should occur in a manner that respects the transition to the low density residential scale of the neighborhood directly west of Diamond Hill. Development of future parking should be done so as to minimize traffic and visual impacts on the neighborhood. Create a pedestrian and vehicular access and circulation system that is similar to the traditional street and alley grid system. Encourage development of street level uses that are pedestrian oriented,neighborhood serving and can help integrate this site into the larger neighborhood as well as with the Promenade. Encourage a design that strengthens West 25th Avenue as a principal neighborhood pedestrian corridor. Encourage a design that facilitates pedestrian mobility to and from the Diamond Hill Promenade, and which activates the promenade through outdoor seating or other integrating features. Preserve informal view corridors and pedestrian corridors from the interior of the neighborhood to the east down the extension of West 24th,25th,26th and 27th Avenues east of Bryant. Investigate the use of a zone district and/or overlay district that accomplishes the following: A 15' setback along the east side of Bryant. 0' 10' set-backs for the interior streets. Hotel,office,higher density residential,small-scale retail and restaurant uses. Building heights up to 140' in the interior of the subarea. Building heights of up to three stories (35') on the north side of West 23rd Avenue. Building heights up to three stories (35') along Bryant Street and West 23rd Avenue. A bulk plane similar to the PRV zone district bulk plane. Taller buildings should be located in the interior of the subarea,transitioning down to the residential area to the west. Create a transition from this subarea into the Core Residential and River Drive subareas and enhance the urban character of the interior. Strengthen West 25th Avenue as a pedestrian corridor through landscaping and pedestrian improvements.

PAGE 65

61 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Stair step buildings in this subarea to maximize topography and views and to provide an appealing aesthetic as a gateway to the neighborhood. Consider vacating Byron Place if West 25th Avenue was extended east to Zuni,or West 24th Avenue was extended east to Alcott.

PAGE 66

62 PLAN SUBAREAS STADIUM TRANSITION SUBAREA If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented,the following vision statement will be an accurate description of the Stadium Transition Subarea. Vision The vision for the Stadium Transition Subarea includes the north side of West 20th Avenue between Eliot and Clay Streets being now lined with many types of residential and live-work units.The area between Clay and I-25 contains a mix of office,multi-family housing,light commercial,and live-work units.Greater height and density in the Front View Crescent area takes advantage of the lower elevation without obscuring views from Jefferson Park.Along West 21st,low rise apartments,condominiums and town homes have been developed which serve as a transition between the mixed uses to the south and east, and strong residential areas to the north.North of Frontview Crescent,if a change of use occurs,higher density residential,office,and restaurant uses would be encouraged (provided that restaurant use is limited to those the primary business of which is food and does not include activities that are disruptive to the residential character of the neighborhood.).South ofWest 20th Avenue,along Federal Boulevard, uses that share parking with the stadium,such as office or stadium-serving retail uses,are encouraged.The street grid has been maintained,and new development is designed to reflect the historic presence of alleys.People living in this part of the neighborhood appreciate the easy walk north to Jefferson Park or south to events in the stadium.A short distance to the east is the new north/south bike and pedestrian path.This path connects the neighborhood into downtown across Speer Boulevard or to light rail stations in the Central Platte Valley. Current Conditions West 20th Avenue serves as the boundary between Jefferson Park and stadium uses to the south.Large vacant parcels in this transition area offer development opportunities. '"695

PAGE 67

63 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN &$"" Strengths Large parcels of vacant land offer opportunities for development that can be beneficial to the Jefferson Park neighborhood. This area is easily accessed from Federal Boulevard on the west and the new West 23rd Avenue slip ramp on the east. A number of potentially historically significant homes line the west side of Clay Street,between West 21st and West 22nd Avenues. Issues Traffic generated by the stadium and related uses in this subarea have created problems for the residential core of Jefferson Park for many years. Stadium uses have dominated this area leaving few opportunities for community related activities. Higher densities and greater heights may be appropriate in this area due to topography and underdevelopment of area. Goals Provide buffer and transition between stadium and the residential area to the north. Reconcile discrepancy between zoning and existing development character in the northwest corner of this subarea. Maintain the area south of West 22nd on the west side of Clay as an Area of Stability within the Area of Change described in Blueprint Denver. Recommendations New development should transition from higher density at West 20th to lower density north of West 21st. Access to parking for new development should be designed to minimize traffic impacts on residential subareas. New development in this area should serve as a buffer and create a compatible edge for the residential areas north of West 21st Avenue. The edges of this subarea should be designed in such a way as to provide good transitions to residential areas to the north and buffer the impacts of sports crowds to the south.

PAGE 68

64 PLAN SUBAREAS In the northwest corner of this subarea,north of West 20th Avenue and west of Eliot,investigate the use of a zone district other than PRV that will accommodate low-density residential,live/work,and small office. Encourage shared parking uses that could use the stadium parking areas on days when the stadium is not in use. Maintain and enhance the historic single-family character of the west side of Clay between West 21st and 22nd Avenues.

PAGE 69

65 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN :%"$6" ""6" CULTURAL/EDUCATIONAL FACILITY DISTRICT SUBAREA If the goals and recommendations of this plan are implemented,the following vision statement will be an accurate description of the Cultural/Educational Facility District Subarea. Vision The vision for the Cultural/Educational Facility District Subarea includes the facilities in the subarea being enjoyed by Denver residents and visitors as a regional destination for cultural,recreational and educational activities. Current Conditions This subarea is currently home to the Downtown Aquarium (formerly Ocean Journey Aquarium),the Children s Museum,Fishback & Gate s Crescent Parks,and the George Schmidt House (listed on the National Register).Zoning is PRV and Commercial Mixed-Use;redevelopment in this area will necessitate rezoning. Strengths The Platte River,adjacent bike/pedestrian paths,parks,family-oriented facilities,and proximity to Downtown are this area s strengths. High density residential may be appropriate in this area. Issues Pedestrian access from west of I-25 and from Downtown is difficult. There are no easy pedestrian connections to the C-Line Light Rail Stations across the river. There is only limited access to the Platte River bike/pedestrian path. Appearance of the I-25 edge of this subarea could be improved.

PAGE 70

66 PLAN SUBAREAS Goals Enhance the existing cultural,recreational and educational uses in this subarea. Improve pedestrian access to this subarea. Improve pedestrian connections between this subarea and the surrounding neighborhoods,bicycle and pedestrian paths,and transit facilities. Improve the appearance of the I-25 edge of this subarea. Recommendations Create a clear,continuous and safe walkway and bicycle route between the Jefferson Park neighborhood and the Platte Valley along West 23rd Avenue.Action recently taken to help accomplish this includes striping the parking edge lines along West 23rd Avenue between Federal Boulevard and I-25 (completed Fall 2003).Long term,when the bridge over I-25 is rebuilt,provide wider sidewalks or a raised sidewalk,and a wider bike lane. Improve connections to the Platte River bike path system. Improve trail identification and way finding. Establish a neighborhood gateway feature at West 23rd and I-25. North of Water Street,encourage office,residential or public institutional uses. South of Water Street,encourage public cultural and educational uses. A pedestrian bridge over I-25 should be considered between Frontview Crescent and the South Platte River to connect the Jefferson Park neighborhood with the nearby park area. Maintain current height restriction of 80 in area covered by PUD #412. Work with the Department of Public Works to explore the need for a pedestrian signalization or crosswalks as the new traffic signal is installed at West 23rd and Alcott. Improve the appearance of the I-25 edge through the use of fences,walls,and/or landscaping. Make improvements along West 23rd Avenue to ensure safety and comfort of pedestrians and bicyclists and to enhance livability along this important connection corridor between northwest Denver and Downtown. %9$$ 6".63"; "$

PAGE 71

67 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Implementation actions include three general categories: Regulatory actions (e.g.zoning,design review,landmark district,view protection) Public investment (e.g.transportation,parks,facilities,utilities) Partnerships between the public and private sectors (e.g.residents,businesses,neighborhood associations,special districts). Regulation is a powerful but not entirely sufficient tool for bringing about the vision of the neighborhood plan.While creating the regulatory framework of zoning and design standards,the public sector also must create a climate that attracts private investment.The neighborhood residents,businesses and others must also do their parts to implement the neighborhood plan.

PAGE 72

URBAN DESIGN 68 URBAN DESIGN

PAGE 73

69 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN KEY DESIGN PRINCIPLES Residential units should provide direct access from public rights-of-way. Redevelopment and new development should include active street-level uses on the public streets or pedestrian corridors. Redevelopment and new development should include materials that reinforce a contextual level of architectural scaling and detailing and reflect the materials and details used in the neighborhood, such as the use of similar detail elements present in standard brick,modular stone,cast stone accents,concrete masonry,and traditional cementitious stucco. StreetscapeIntent Streetscape design principles will help: Create a more pedestrian oriented neighborhood with subareas that share common urban design elements. Maintain the unique historic character of this pedestrian-oriented neighborhood. Create a safer pedestrian environment through minimization of vehicular impacts. Reinforce the lively community interactions that occur on the street side of properties in this traditional neighborhood. Provide a consistent right-of-way treatment that reinforces the residential character of Federal north of West 20th while allowing for variations for commercial development. Principles Except where otherwise noted,new development should include tree lawns with street trees that match the widths of existing adjacent tree lawns.In many cases,tree lawns are wider on the eastwest streets than on the north-south streets. In the commercial subareas,including Speer Boulevard,Federal Boulevard and the Neighborhood Commercial subareas.Tree lawns should be 8 wide,with detached sidewalks that are a minimum of 5 wide.In some cases,it may be appropriate to replace the tree lawn with a paved amenity zone and trees in grates.

PAGE 74

All new and redevelopment residential projects in the commercial subareas should provide detached sidewalks,tree lawns,and street trees. Existing stone walks and curbs should be preserved and maintained,where possible. Front yard fences (where used) should provide transparency through the use of pickets or the spacing of infill materials. New development should reflect the rhythm established by narrow lots and small houses. The existing street layout should be preserved. Development that is adjacent to the Promenade should provide pedestrian and bicycle links to this path. SiteIntent Site design principles should: Improve the pedestrian experience by reinforcing the pedestrian orientation and scale of the neighborhood and its subareas through minimization of vehicular impacts. Integrate the subareas into the street and alley grid of the larger neighborhood. Integrate the individual subareas into the context of the adjacent subareas. Principles Existing alleys,wherever possible,should be used for vehicular access to the site. Garages and parking stalls should be oriented to alleys. On corner lots where alley access is not feasible,garages and parking stalls should be oriented to side streets. Where alley access is not feasible,curb cuts should be minimized to avoid disruption of the pedestrian environment. If alley access is not possible,the maximum width of residential garage doors facing the street should be 10'0". Where they are necessary,the width of new curb cuts should be minimized. 70 URBAN DESIGN

PAGE 75

71 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN No parking and/or drive aisles that are parallel to the street should be placed between buildings and the public street. Parking lots should be physically removed or visually screened from the street.When possible, parking should be located in the interior of building sites. Structured parking is expected to have active ground floor uses. Direct pedestrian access should be provided from new development to the public sidewalk. Development should be oriented to the public right-of-way to enhance the pedestrian character of the development and the neighborhood. Large-scale redevelopment should provide site access through the extension of the traditional street and alley grid system. Large-scale redevelopment projects should incorporate amenities such as art,water features,pocket parks,and public gathering places accessible from the right-of-way. Building OrientationIntent Building orientation design principles should: Reinforce pedestrian activity and circulation along neighborhood streets and reflect the historic character of the neighborhood and its subareas by continuing the tradition of entries,porches,and informal gathering spaces facing the public right-of-way. Improve the pedestrian environment along Speer Boulevard and reinforce the importance of Speer as an historic parkway. Reinforce the residential character of Federal Boulevard north of West 20th,create a more inviting pedestrian environment along Federal,and enhance the corridor s traditional street-oriented development patterns. Reinforce the pedestrian and urban character of the Neighborhood Commercial,Diamond Hill, Stadium Transition,and Cultural / Educational Facility District subareas by placing primary structures in a manner that provides a consistent street edge,by promoting active uses on the ground floor of all structures,and by minimizing the presence of utility functions.

PAGE 76

72 URBAN DESIGN Loading,storage,HVAC,garbage dumpsters,and other service functions should be located away from pedestrian routes and access points.Service functions should be screened from view by walls, fences,and/or landscaping.Delivery and other service operations should be located so as to minimize the disturbance of adjoining residences and properties. Principles The primary front doors or entryways of all ground floor residences,including those in multi-story buildings,should be oriented toward and accessible from the public street,with pedestrian access to the public sidewalk. Ground floor units should be developed with individual front porches or patios to encourage activity and interaction. Each ground floor unit in a multi-story building should have a street-facing entrance. Orientation of the narrow end of a single residence,or of a residential unit in a multi-story building, should be toward the public street to reflect the scale of existing small lot residential development. Along Speer and Federal Boulevards,new buildings should continue the linear quality of the streets by aligning and orienting their primary fa  ade to the Boulevard.Buildings presenting rear or side facades to the Boulevards are undesirable. In the Diamond Hill subarea,building walls should be located at the property line adjacent to the public street in order to create a consistent "street wall". Parking structures should receive architectural treatments on all street-facing elevations and should incorporate pedestrian-oriented uses,such as retail,office,studios,or residential units,on the ground floor. Lighting and mechanical systems associated with parking facilities should be screened and muted with screening elements that are architecturally compatible with the primary structures. Massing and ScaleIntent Massing and scale design principles should modulate the form of new developments in order to: Reinforce the scale of the existing development and subarea character and enhance the pedestrian environment. Mitigate abrupt changes in the scale of buildings and between subareas.

PAGE 77

73 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Provide a buffer between Speer Boulevard and the Core Residential Subarea. Allow higher densities along Speer and reinforce the importance of Speer as a parkway and a neighborhood border. Principles Visual interest and human scale should be provided through the use of prominent windows and entries at the street-facing facades and through architectural variation,including form,materials, detail,and color. On multi-storied structures,building bases should be defined and articulated using techniques such as a change in brick course,materials,color,or detailing on the building. In the residential subareas,building heights should be a maximum of three stories at the front or street entrance.Additional stories should be stepped back from the front. In the Park Face Blocks Subarea,buildings heights should be no higher than 45 on the blocks facing the north,south,and west sides of the park,and should be no higher than 35 on the block facing the east side of the park. Along Speer Boulevard,buildings should be no higher than 6 stories. Along Federal Boulevard,new development should be of a similar height to that allowed under the current R-2 zoning:35 In the Diamond Hill subarea,new development should be no more than 140 in the interior of the subarea;35 ,or 3 stories,on the north side of West 23rd and along Bryant. Roof PitchesIntent The roof pitch of new development and redevelopment should reflect and reinforce the existing architectural character of this traditional Denver neighborhood and its subareas. Principles On single-family houses,dominant ridgelines should be perpendicular to the public street. Steep roof pitches (8:12) are generally appropriate over the primary occupiable space.Shallower pitches may be used over porches,dormers,and secondary spaces.

PAGE 78

Flat rooflines are generally acceptable provided that they include prominent and/or decorative parapets. MaterialsIntent Design principles are intended to: Insure the use of high quality materials appropriate to the urban environment. Insure that materials reflect the variety,durability,and character of materials typically used in the neighborhood and its residential and commercial architecture. Principles In the residential subareas,careful combinations of materials should be used in order to reinforce architectural scaling and detailing and to reflect the materials and details used in the neighborhood and its subareas,such as brick and horizontal wood siding. Durable,solid materials should be used for ground floors of new construction.Such materials include brick,masonry,cementitious stucco,cast in place concrete,tile,glass block systems,and similar durable materials properly finished and detailed.Artificial stucco systems,if used,are acceptable only on levels above the ground floor. Carefully detailed combinations of materials should be used to reinforce the architectural scaling. New construction should relate to existing buildings through the use of similar detail elements present in standard brick,modular stone,cast stone accents,concrete masonry,and detailed stucco. DetailingIntent Detailing design strategies that provide qualities of scale can help: New development relate to existing construction through use of similar scale and pattern in architectural elements. New development along Speer Boulevard reinforce the importance of Speer and enhance the pedestrian experience along it. New development along Federal Boulevard reinforce the importance of the Boulevard s historically residential character north of West 20th. 74 URBAN DESIGN

PAGE 79

75 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN Principles Buildings should provide a richness of scale through a change in plane,contrast and intricacy in form,color,and materials. Repeating patterns of color,texture,or material,or a change in plane should be used as integral parts of the building construction,rather than superficially applied. Buildings should include human-scaled building elements and architectural variation,including form, detail,materials,and colors to provide visual interest. All building facades that are visibile from the public streets should be finished to a similar level of detailing. Windows should differentiate upper and lower floors through fenestration pattern,size,and detailing. Window proportions should reflect the vertical orientation of windows in existing neighborhood houses. Windows,other than storefront systems,should be recessed from the main fa  ade. Expanses of glazing should be subdivided by systems of framing and mullions to reinforce architectural scaling. Prominent windows and operable doors should be integrated into facades facing Speer Boulevard.

PAGE 80

IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 76 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

PAGE 81

77 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN SUMMARY Implementation of the recommendations in this plan will occur through a series of private,public-private, and public actions.The scale of many implementation actions will be small.Many will not be subject to public debate or review,while others will be extensively reviewed and intensely debated. Implementation by the private sector may be accomplished through new construction or major renovations.If they are located and designed consistent with the recommendations in the Plan,each new house,office building,business,sidewalk,park facility and tree will help achieve the vision for Jefferson Park.Most of the implementation strategies rely on partnerships between public agencies and the private sector,including developers,property owners and residents,and neighborhood associations.It will take the combined efforts of all to realize the goals of the Plan. Public implementation actions will be both initiated by the City and reactive to opportunities or proposals as they arise.Directed public actions may include a change in operations,such as maintenance programs; the planning and construction of public infrastructure,funded through the City s capital improvements program or general fund;or adoption of regulatory changes,such as zoning language and map amendments.Implementation may include the review of private uses and construction for consistency with the Plan.Review processes vary depending on the type and location of construction and uses being reviewed.Review may be limited to City agency and utility review for projects proposed under existing regulations.It may also include review by neighborhood associations,adjacent property owners,the Denver Planning Board and Denver City Council for zoning changes or map amendments. The Jefferson Park Neighborhood Plan identifies the top administrative and capital improvement project priorities.This list includes both specific projects that were identified in the planning process and general awareness of opportunities that may develop later.

PAGE 82

78 IMPLEMENTATION PLAN Implementation actions include three general categories: Regulatory actions (e.g.zoning/design review,landmark district,view protection) Public investment (e.g.transportation,parks,facilities,utilities) Partnership between the public and private sectors (e.g.residents,businesses,neighborhood associations,special districts) Regulation is a powerful but not entirely sufficient tool for bringing about the vision of the neighborhood plan.While creating the regulatory framework of zoning and design standards,the public sector also must create a climate that attracts private investment.The neighborhood residents,businesses and others must also do their parts to implement the neighborhood plan.

PAGE 83

79 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN ACTION PLAN

PAGE 84

80 ACTION PLAN INTRODUCTION The table on the following two pages provides a summary of the key recommended actions and implementation strategies of this Plan.The top row of the table identifies the categories of information that is provided in the columns and the next seven rows describe specific Actions and Strategies. Columns: The headings in the top row of the table identify the seven categories of information provided in the columns below,including Priority, Type of Action, Action, Time Frame, Strategies, Section of Plan, and Page Number 1.Priority The first column provides the relative Priorities of the four recommended Actions. 2.Type of Action Three Types of Actions that were identified in Blueprint Denver were also identified in this planning process: a.Regulatory Actions The City s land use regulatory tools address the dimensions of a development;i.e.size,density,setbacks,and height.Regulatory tools can allow or limit land uses and can guide the basic design of a structure and its site. b. Public Investments The City invests in physical improvements such as streets,alleys,bicycle paths,sidewalks,utilities,parks,community and recreation centers. c. Public / Private Partnerships Partnerships can be created between public agencies and private interests by lending money,using redevelopment agency powers,and sharing responsibility for building and maintaining public amenities. As evidenced in the second column,all four key recommended actions in this Plan are Regulatory Actions

PAGE 85

81 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN 3.Action The third column identifies the four key recommended Actions. 4.Time Frame The fourth column notes the relative Time Frames for completing the proposed Actions: Short Term Short-to-Medium Term ,and Ongoing 5.Strategies The Strategies column identifies key steps to implementing the Action. 6.Section of Plan The sixth column references the section(s) in which the Action or Strategy is proposed. 7.Page Number The last column identifies the page(s) on which the Action or Strategy is proposed. Rows: The information provided in the rows describes the Actions and Strategies.

PAGE 86

82 ACTION PLAN Jefferson Park Action Plan PRIORITYTYPE OF ACTIONACTIONTIME FRAMESTRATEGIESSECTION OF PLANPAGE NUMBER 1RegulatoryChange the existing zoning to help protect and enhance the character of the neighborhood and to help achieve the desired character and intensity of new development. RegulatoryShort-TermUse existing overlay 1.Executive Summary3 districts as an interim 2. Land Use/Urban Form/Zoning25 measure.The neighborhood3.Core Residential Subarea42 association,with assistance 4.River Drive Subarea44 from CPD,should prepare5.Park Face Blocks Subarea46 an application for R-3/OD-9. RegulatoryShort-toUse the design principles 1.Executive Summary3 Medium-Termin the Plan when 2. Land Use/Urban Form/Zoning25 developing new zone districts that reflect the existing and desired character and intensity of Jefferson Park and similar neighborhoods. RegulatoryShort-toOnce new zone districts 1.Executive Summary3 Medium-Termthat reflect the desired 2. Land Use/Urban Form/Zoning26 character of the neighborhood have been prepared,use them to replace the overlay districts.

PAGE 87

Jefferson Park Action Plan PRIORITYTYPE OF ACTIONACTIONTIME FRAMESTRATEGIESSECTION OF PLANPAGE NUMBER 2RegulatoryProtect the views from the Short-TermCPD,working with the 1.Executive Summary3 west side of Jefferson Park.neighborhood organization,2.Land Use/Urban Form/Zoning26 should prepare an 3.Park Face Blocks Subarea46 application for a view protection ordinance. 3RegulatoryIncorporate the design OngoingEncourage the use of 1.Executive Summary3 principles as applications aremixed-use zone districts or 2.Land Use/Urban Form/Zoning26 made to rezone the areas that other zone districts that are currently zoned PRV include design principles when rezoning sites that are currently zoned PRV. RegulatoryAssure consistency among thisShort-TermAmend the Blueprint Denver 1.Executive Summary2 and other adopted plans.Areas of Change map to 2.Plan Subareas map23,39 change two areas in the Core Residential Subarea from Areas of Change to Areas of Stability and one area in each of two Subareas Diamond Hill and Stadium Transition from Areas of Stability to Areas of Change. 83 NEIGHBORHOOD PLAN