Citation
Denver International Airport master plan, 2014

Material Information

Title:
Denver International Airport master plan, 2014
Creator:
Denver International Airport, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
City planning
Denver International Airport (Denver, Colo.)
Airports
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Denver International Airport

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Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
Planning the Future




Imagine a
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Table of Contents
1 - Imagine a Great Airport
2 - DIA Today
A What is a Master Plan?
6 Why Update the Master Plan?
8 Key Considerations
10 Timeline and Process
12 Airport Efficiency
1A Airport Activity Forecasts
18 Short-term Needs
18- Long-term Needs
20 Runways
22 Terminal and Concourse Alternatives
20 Terminal and Concourse Alternatives
2A Landside and Support Facilities Alternatives
26 Sustainable Development
28 Moving Forward
DIA was designed to be Denver's
port to the world.
As with many great public work projects, the
idea for Denver International Airport sprang from
need. In the early 1970s, farsighted community
leaders were already envisioning a larger
airport to accommodate Denver's burgeoning
growth. Stapleton Airport, which had opened
as Denver Municipal Airport in 1929, was virtually
landlocked and nearing its capacity, with noise
pollution and flight delays becoming increasingly
contentious issues.
The search for a new site began, culminating
in the acguisition of 53 sguare miles of farmland in
neighboring Adams County. Denver annexed most
of this property, an enormous political challenge
that reguired the astute guidance of business and
civic leaders, and, ultimately, approval by voters
from both counties. Building DIA was a seminal
event that raised Denver's collective consciousness
by showing how big dreams can be realized.
Stapleton International Airport
Denver International Airport / 1


[DjA Today
For four consecutive years (2005
to 2008) DIA has ranked as the top
airport for business travelers in
North America.
An airport is a reflection of a community and
its spirit. Denver International Airport has come
to symbolize many things about our region:
architectural ingenuity, technological innovation,
visionary planning and perhaps most important -
our community's belief in itself and confidence in
its future. Although metro Denver ranks as the
20th-largest metropolitan area in the US, DIA
served more than 51 million passengers in 2008,
ranking as the fifth-busiest airport in North
America and the 10th busiest in the world. Colorado
Department of Transportation estimated DIA's
annual economic impact to the state at more
than $22 billion dollars, while accounting for over
half of the state's total aviation jobs. DIA is truly
the most important economic engine in the state
of Colorado.
Encompassing 53 sguare miles of land, DIA is the
largest airport in North America and the second-
largest airport in the world. This large land area
is designed to limit the impacts of airport activity
on the airport's neighbors and provides room for
the airport to expand and grow. The enormous
potential of DIA to serve a prominent role in the
global aviation system is due primarily to the
airport's room to grow. DIA is part of a larger plan
for the landlocked city of Denver, opening the
path to markets around the world and providing a
stimulus for economic growth in the region. The
very foundation of Denver's role as a world-class
city is Denver International Airport.
2 / Master Plan
Denver International Airport / 3


What is a Master Plan?
DIAs Master Plan Update is funded
in part by a grant from the FAA, with
the remainder of the study funded
by Denver International Airport. No
taxpayer monies are involved to pay
for the master plan study.
A master plan is one of the most important
documents from an airport management and
operation perspective as it guides future growth
and development. An airport master plan provides
a road map for efficiently meeting aviation
demand through the foreseeable future while
preserving the flexibility necessary to respond
to changing industry conditions. DIA's current
master plan was developed in 1988 and provided
guidance for the airport through 50 million annual
passengers. With that threshold now reached,
DIA management is in the process of updating the
master plan. The new plan will provide development
guidelines through 2030.
The goal of a master plan is to build the overall
framework needed to guide future airport
development. The plan must also allow the airport
to keep pace with aviation growth cost effectively,
while also considering potential environmental and
socioeconomic impacts. Master plans also provide
the airport with the tools to react to uncertainties
by examining key trends in the aviation industry,
such as changing airline business models,
improvements in technology, and local/regional
economics that could affect airport activity.
4 / Master Plan
Denver International Airport / 5


Why Update the Master Plan?
DIA's original master plan, which was completed
in the late 1980s when airport construction
initially started, projected that the newly built
facility could support approximately 50 million
annual passengers. In 2007, the airport handled
49-9 million passengers, and, in 2008, annual
passenger traffic topped 51 million. Even as we
face a downturn in the economy and passenger
traffic there is a great need to plan for
DIA's future.
Aviation has changed tremendously over the
past 20 years when DIA's current master plan was
developed. These changes include increased
security measures and processes, an evolution in
airline check-in procedures, baggage screening
technology and regulations, evolution of airline
fleets, and changes in airline and aviation industry
economics. These changes have resulted in
different and typically more intensive demands on
airport facilities. The Federal Aviation Administration
recommends that airports review and update
their master plan every five to 10 years or as
necessary to ensure future planning accounts
for these changes. DIA's master plan study will
consider these factors in order to develop an
expansion plan that meets projected demand,
both in magnitude and characteristics, while
providing flexibility for the airport to respond to
future changes.
Additionally, DIA was originally designed to
handle a significantly higher number of connecting
passengers than current levels. The proportional
increase in originating and terminating passengers
has imposed more demand on airport facilities
than would have the same increase in the
number of connecting passengers, since ''local"
passengers use roadways, parking facilities,
airline ticketing and baggage facilities, security
checkpoints, and other facilities that connecting
passengers do not.
6 / Master Plan
Denver International Airport / 7


Key Considerations
There are numerous elements
that must be balanced to develop
a master plan that will meet the
dynamic needs of DIA's varied
stakeholders.
Key considerations for developing DIAs
master plan:
- Ensure safety and security
- Keep costs practical and affordable
- Maintain consistency with DIA's vision,
mission and goals
- Maintain consistent and coordinated
development that matches city and
regional development plans
Minimize impact to current operations
Optimize operational efficiencies and flexibility
Emphasize customer service and satisfaction
Allow airport to respond to the changing
needs of the dynamic aviation industry
Continue to support DIA's role as the key
economic engine for the region and the state
Meet sustainability and environmental
reguirements and continue DIA's leadership
in environmental stewardship
Reserve and maintain land uses on-airport
to permit logical, phased development that
is both flexible and responsive
Allow the airport and its terminal to remain
architecturally iconic
Allow for enhancement of nonairline revenue
8 / Master Plan
Denver International Airport / 9


Timeline and Process
The development of an airport master plan
generally takes three years from start to finish.
At the end of the process, the FAA will grant
approval, allowing the airport to move forward with
development plans. As demonstrated here, public
input begins early on and continues throughout
the process. Denver Mayor Hickenlooper also
convened a Master Plan Advisory Committee which
includes representatives from all stakeholder
groups including government, businesses, airlines,
and community organizations.
Master Plan Process
STEP 1
STEP 4
Initial Technical
Evaluation of Needs
- Inventory
- Forecasts
- Analysis
- Coordination with FAA
Preliminary
Recommendations
- Best options to meet our
future needs
STEP 2
Detailed Technical Analyses
Identify Needs
Stakeholder Meetings
& Input
fc-------------------------J
c.
We Are Here
STEP 3
Alternative Solutions
- What are the options to
meet our future needs?


I
STEP 5
Final Stakeholder
Meetings
STEP 6
FAA Approval of Airport
Layout Plan (ALP)
- EIS Scoping
Concept Evaluation and
Recommendation Process
Step 3 of the master plan process includes concept
evaluation and recommendation. The process is
depicted graphically below.
TERMINAL
AIRFIELD
AAi*iSi LANDSIDE
SUPPORT
Alternative
Concepts
Screened
Concepts
INTEGRATION


::
Integrated
Concepts
SCREENING


EVALUATION
Shortlist Integrated
Concepts
#
Preferred
Alternative
Preparation of Airport Layout Plan
Stakeholder input begins in step 2 and
continues through step 5.
10 / Master Plan
Denver InternationalAirport / 11


Airport Efficiency
DIA is one of the most efficient
airports in the world due to the
vision of the airport's original
planners.
Situated on 53 square miles of land, DIA currently
has one terminal building, three concourses and
six runways. DIA planners designed enough room
between concourses to allow two wide-body
aircraft to push back from opposite concourses
while two more aircraft taxi between them.
The pinwheel layout of the airport's six runways
and wide spacing between runways add to the
airport's efficiency. Three aircraft can typically
land simultaneously at DIA, even in adverse
weather conditions.
Passenger movement also follows a simple
flow-through principle. While DIA may seem
intimidating to infrequent travelers, everything is
arranged in a logical, consistent pattern from
parking to ticket counter to train to concourse.
These elements have led to DIA's ranking as one
of the least-delayed airports in the US good
news for both airlines and passengers.
12 / Master Plan
Denver InternationalAirport / 13


Airport Activity Forecasts
DIA's annual airport activity is
estimated to grow by 20- to
25-percent by the 2015/2020
time period.
One of the first steps in the master plan process
is to develop forecasts of aircraft and passenger
activity. To allow the airport to adapt to future
changes, several alternate scenarios for future
growth at the airport have been examined.
Base
Forecast: Growth rates reviewed in comparison
to FAA's Terminal Area Forecast:
84-percent growth in passengers
and 77-percent growth in operations
Scenario 1: Fligh growth rate (compared to
the baseline): 108-percent growth
in passengers; 98-percent growth
in operations
Scenario 2: Decrease in hubbing/connecting
activity: 64-percent growth in
passengers; 60-percent growth
in operations
Scenario 3: An evolution to a larger aircraft
fleet: 84-percent growth in
passengers; 64-percent growth
in operations
Scenario 4: Fligher international growth as
Denver grows into an international
gateway: 103-percent growth in
passengers; 90-percent growth
in operations
Based on these forecasts, DIA's annual airport
activity is estimated to grow by 20- to 25-percent
by the 2015/2020 time period, and by 70- to
100-percent by the 2030/2035 timeframe. This
generally translates into a 60- to 90-percent
increase in overall facility needs at DIA.
14 / Master Plan
Denver InternationalAirport / 15


Short-term Needs
As part of the master plan, DIA has identified
short-term needs (2015/2020 timeframe).
These include:
- One additional runway (7 total runways)
- Concourse expansion 20-plus new gates
(total) on any or all Concourses (A, B, or C)
- Additional international passenger processing
and gates
- Capacity expansion of the airport people mover
- Baggage system improvements
- Expansion of passenger security screening
- FasTracks rail station
- On-airport hotel
- Parking and rental car expansions
Long-term Needs
In addition to meeting the short-term needs of
airport activity, DIA is taking a longer term view
of the airport to plan for activity through the
2030/2035 timeframe. Like visionary planners
of the past, we want to prepare the airport for
future generations and leave a legacy that can
support growth and expanded economic activity.
- Additional runways (9 or 10 total)
- 100-plus additional gates
- Concourse D (2020/2025)
- Concourse E (2030/2035)
- Significant international passenger
processing expansion
- Expansion of passenger security screening
- Taxiway improvements
- More aircraft deicing positions
- Potential for doubling of rental car space
- Fourth lane on Pena Boulevard
- Public and employee parking expansion
(near doubling)
16 / Master Plan


Runways
DIAs runway configuration is
the envy of the airport industry.
The airfield design which includes no
intersecting runways allows for smooth and
efficient flow, which reduces delays. As the map
here shows, future runways follow the same
pinwheel pattern, allowing DIAto maintain one
of the most efficient airfields in the world.
To accommodate the forecast growth in air
service, a seventh runway will be needed by the
2015/2020 timeframe. DIA has not yet decided
which runway will be built next. We will consider
several issues before selecting the seventh
runway, including:
- Optimization of existing runways and taxiways
- Weather conditions specifically the coordination
of deice pads and snow-removal operations
- Minimization of taxi times and flight times
- Accommodation of new/emerging aircraft types
- FAA Control Tower needs for line-of-sight
16R
16L
N
w-
12,000'
3,658m

17L
12,000'
3,658m
35R
26
18
36
18 / Master Plan
Denver InternationalAirport / 19


Terminal and Concourse Alternatives
Existing Template Expansion Concept
When DIA was first designed, the original long-
term concept was for terminal expansion to the
south and concourse expansion to the north.
This concept remains one of the alternatives for
future development. The concept components
and related issues follow.
- Telescoping of current concourses to the
east and west
- Concourses D and E built to the north
- Second terminal building to the south of
current Jeppesen Terminal
- Concerns about capacity and funding of the
people-mover and baggage systems
- People-mover remains the must-ride system
to all concourses other than Concourse A
CURRENT TERMINAL
CURRENT CONCOURSES I
FUTURE TERMINAL/CONCOURSE EXPANSION I
D
20 / Master Plan
Denver InternationalAirport / 21
lln111


Terminal and Concourse Alternatives
East/West Terminal and Concourse Concept
In this concept, a strong central terminal is
created for both DIA's passengers and tenants.
- Includes two new concourses oriented
north-south one west and a second one
east of the current Jeppesen Terminal
- Defers the need for Concourses D and E
beyond 2030/2035
- Alleviates the need for an expensive expansion
of the people-mover system and new, bigger
tunnels for the planning period
CURRENTTERMINAL
CURRENT CONCOURSES
FUTURE TERMINAL/CONCOURSE EXPANSION
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South Terminal Concept
This concept provides for a new terminal
complex in the existing cargo area south of the
current Jeppesen Terminal.
- A new terminal complex could be uniguely
branded as an international or a low-cost
terminal
- Reguires the relocation of most of DIA's
support facilities south of the terminal and
will reguire a people-mover system to
connect passengers, employees and visitors
to the existing terminal/concourse complex
CURRENTTERMINAL
CURRENT CONCOURSES
FUTURE TERMINAL/CONCOURSE EXPANSION
22 / Master Plan
Denver InternationalAirport / 23


andside and Support Facilities Alternatives
In addition to runways and
terminal/concourse facilities,
the master plan will include a
review of landside and support
facilities. As the airport grows,
one of the areas of focus needs
to be how to best accommodate
demands for these facilities.
The review includes:
- Parking (both public and
employee)
- Rental car facilities
- A potential Ground
Transportation Center (GTC)
- Cargo facilities
- General aviation operations
- Firefighting operations
- Airline and airport
maintenance facilities
- The fuel farm
Landside Alternatives
26R
These are all critical elements
for DIA's long-term success,
and various alternatives are
under review.
Support Facilities
Alternatives
CURRENT RUNWAYS
FUTURE RUNWAYS
EXISTING SUPPORT FACILITIES
FUTURE SUPPORT FACILITIES:
ALTERNATIVE 1
ALTERNATIVE 2
ALTERNATIVE 3
ALTERNATIVE U
16C
16L
12,000'
3,658m

17C 17L
TERMINAL
26 R
24 / Master Plan
Denver InternationalAirport / 25


.Sustainable Development
DIA is one of the greenest
airports in the world.
Colorado is perhaps most well-known for its
natural beauty and recreation, and leaders from
both the public and private sectors are proactive in
protecting the environment for future generations.
Denver International Airport has also established
itself as a leader in environmental stewardship.
In January 2009, DIA hosted the first meeting of
the Global Reporting Initiative for international
airports. This group which includes world-class
airports such as Munich and Frankfurt will
develop environmental guidelines specific to
airports. DIA was the first US airport asked
to join this prestigious group.
The following are DIA's key environmental
achievements:
- First international airport in the US to
develop and implement a facility-wide
Environmental Management System
certified to ISO 14001 (2004)
- First airport in the US to be accepted into
the US Environmental Protection Agency's
National Environmental Performance
Track Program (2006)
- Received FAA Environmental Stewardship
Award (2007)
Ongoing environmental initiatives include recycling,
the use of alternative fuels, management of
the deicing process, and wildlife and wetlands
management. In August 2008, DIA installed a
two-megawatt solar facility on its land. This facility
will generate more than three million kilowatt
hours of electricity annually and reduce carbon
emissions by five million pounds per year. DIA's
master plan process and future growth will
incorporate sustainable principles every step of
the way.
26 / Master Plan


Moving Forward
At full build out, DIA will
have over 300 gates and can
accommodate over 100 million
annual passengers.
Imagine an airport twice the size of the present
one. As one of the largest economic engines for
the region and the state, DIA's growth will continue
to propel the Denver metropolitan area as one of
the most successful and desirable in the country
in the coming decades.
Size is one of the most significant competitive
advantages in the global aviation industry. DIA is
the envy of airports around the world because of
the room to grow to accommodate the dynamic
needs of airlines, passengers and stakeholders.
The challenge facing current planners is to
ensure that this tremendous asset is preserved.
This can be achieved through communication,
cooperation and coordination with stakeholder
groups, including governments, businesses,
airlines and community organizations. Ultimately
the entire region and state will benefit from the
continued growth of DIA.
Fortunately, Denver International Airport is
poised to embrace the future. Avisionary master
plan coupled with experienced, professional
management and staff and supportive community
leaders and stakeholders will ensure DIA's
place as the jewel in the crown of world-class
airports for decades to come. For updates
regarding DIA's Master Plan, please visit
www.flydenver.com/masterplan.
Comments can be submitted in writing to
masterplan@flydenver.com.
Flight Times from DIA
Note: Times are approximate
28 / Master Plan
Denver InternationalAirport / 29


DENVER INTERNATIONAL
AI R.PORT
www.flydenver.com


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