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Civic Center planning assessment

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Civic Center planning assessment
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Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
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English

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Civic Center (Denver, Colo.)
City planning
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Denver -- Civic Center

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT


TABLE OF
CONTENTS
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. Purpose and Need..........................................................1
II. Civic Center Plan Summaries..............................................5
Existing Plans and Studies....................................................6
Plans and Studies in Progress.................................................9
III. Land Use and Urban Design..............................................11
Existing Land Use............................................................12
Existing Zoning..............................................................14
Adjacent Zoning..............................................................15
Additional Regulations.......................................................16
Land Use Goals and Policies from Adopted Plans...............................20
IV. Urban Design and Architecture..........................................21
Existing Urban Form..........................................................22
Current and Proposed Development and Expansion Projects......................22
Design Guidelines............................................................23
Potential for Significant Change.............................................25
Urban Design and Architecture Goals and Policies from Adopted Plans.........25
Land Use and Urban Design Issues and Analysis................................27
V. Mobility and Parking...................................................31
Existing Streets and Classifications.........................................32
Existing Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes.......................................34
Existing Transit Routes......................................................37
Existing Parking Conditions..................................................38
Planned and Current Transportation Projects..................................41
Mobility Goals and Policies from Adopted Plans...............................42
Mobility and Parking Issues and Analysis.....................................43


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
VI. Parks and Parkways................................................46
Existing Parks and Parkways............................................47
Parks Goals and Policies from Adopted Plans...........................48
Parks and Parkways Issues and Analysis.................................49
VII. Quality of Life..................................................54
Existing Conditions....................................................55
Quality of Life Goals and Policies from Adopted Plans.................57
Quality of Life Issues and Analysis....................................58
VIII. Economic Activity...............................................64
Existing Economic Activity.............................................65
Economic Activity Issues and Analysis..................................70
IX. Government and Cultural Facilities..............................74
Existing Government and Cultural Facilities............................75
Projected Government and Cultural Facilities Needs.....................79
Planned or Proposed Government and Cultural Facilities Development....85
Facilities Goals and Policies from Adopted Plans.......................87
Government and Cultural Facilities Issues and Analysis.................89
X. Next Steps........................................................92
Track A: Civic Center Master Plan......................................93
Track B: Justice Center Design Development.............................95
Track C: No Action.....................................................97
Track D: Hybrid........................................................98
XI. Notes from Public Workshop........................................99
Land Use and Urban Design..............................................100
Mobility and Parking...................................................104
Quality of Life........................................................108
Economic Activity......................................................113
Government and Cultural Facilities.....................................116


TABLE OF CONTENTS
XII. Acknowledgements......................................................119
LIST OF MAPS AND CHARTS
Study Area Boundary Map........................................................3
Existing Land Use Pie Chart...................................................12
Existing Land Use Map.........................................................12
Civic Center Ownership Map....................................................13
Existing Zoning Map...........................................................14
Historic Districts and Structures Map.........................................17
Height Restrictions andView Plane Map.........................................18
Locations of Required Pedestrian Lights Map...................................24
Template for Required Pedestrian Lights and Street Trees......................24
Potential for Significant Change Map..........................................25
Street Classifications Map....................................................32
Existing Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes Map....................................34
Existing Transit Routes Map...................................................37
On-Street Parking Utilization Map.............................................39
Off-Street Parking Utilization Map............................................40
Parks and Parkways Map........................................................47
Neighborhood and Community Organizations Table................................55
Cultural, Institutional and Government facilities Table.......................56
Employment and Wage Estimates Table...........................................66
Visitor Estimates Table.......................................................68
Potential for Significant Change Map..........................................69
Employees Per Block Map.......................................................72
Existing City/Public Facilities Table.........................................77
Facilities Locations Map......................................................78
Facilities Ownership Map......................................................78
Facility Needs Table..........................................................83
IV




PURPOSE AND NEED
In 2002, the City and County of Denver purchased the Rocky Mountain News property as a potential site
for a new Denver Justice Center complex and, in 2003, completed a program for three facilities: the
proposed Justice Center, an associated parking structure, and a new Juvenile Courthouse. The purchase
and facility programming have raised questions about the impacts of current facilities; the potential for
other new or expanded governmental or cultural facilities; and the location, design, and the cumulative
impacts of existing and future governmental and cultural facilities in the Civic Center.
During discussions with City representatives regarding the proposed Justice Center and the associated
facilities, the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association requested that the City develop a Master Plan
that would address the Civic Center area and create a context and direction for discussions and plans for
the proposed Justice Center.They asked that the Master Plan place a particular emphasis on the location,
design, impacts, mitigation of the impacts, physical limits of government and cultural facilities, and the
integration of those facilities with the Golden Triangle and the adjoining neighborhoods.
The neighborhood association also requested that, if the Civic Center is chosen as the proposed site for a
new Justice Center, the master plan be completed prior to a City Council decision on forwarding to the
ballot the referendum on the funding for the proposed Justice Center. The completed plan could include
recommendations that would affect the final program, design, and budget for the Justice Center and other
future facilities. Having a completed plan would enable the Justice Center ballot measure to reflect the
resolution of issues raised in the planning process, rather than leaving those issues unanswered.
Because of the pressing need for new and expanded courtroom and jail facilities, it is possible that the
Administration and City Council could decide to include the funding referendum on either the November
2004 ballot or the May 2005 ballot. If it is decided to place the funding referendum on the ballot, and if
the City Administration decides to proceed with a Master Plan prior to the election, then the Master Plan
will need to be substantially complete eight months before the election. To meet either of these
deadlines, planning efforts need to be aggressive and immediate.
However, an aggressive planning schedule has been and will continue to be problematic:
) The Administration and ten of thirteen City Council members that were involved in earlier
discussions regarding the need for a new Justice Center and agreed to purchase the Rocky
Mountain News site left office in July 2003;
I The new Administration and ten new Council members have only been in office since July 2003;
2


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
h The Planning Services and Urban Design sections of Community Planning and Development are
undergoing drastic cuts in resources, consulting budgets, and professional staff;
h Other City agencies that also would be key participants in the planning process are making
similar budget and personnel cuts; and
h Other high priority projects need to be completed.
In recognition of these uncertainties, City staff agreed to engage in preliminary planning activities that
would result in an independent document and analysis that, if a decision is made to proceed with a
Master Plan, could also serve as the basis for an expanded planning effort.
The Civic Center Planning Assessment is the product of those preliminary planning activities. The
Assessment is intended to provide the Mayor and City Council with additional background for a decision
on the timing and process for proceeding with siting, funding, and designing a new Justice Center. It is
important to note that the Assessment is neither a master plan nor design development, but rather it is a
snapshot of the current condition and issues within a defined study area and the direction provided by
Left: Study Area Boundary
The Study Area focuses on Civic
Center Park and includes City, State,
and Federal facilities and the
immediately adjacent blocks.
3


PURPOSE AND NEED
existing plans and studies for addressing those conditions and issues.
The Assessment process focused on a public workshop held Saturday, August 9,2003, at the Webb
Municipal Building. Forty representatives of neighborhood, Downtown, and professional organizations;
government and cultural institutions; elected and appointed officials; and owners of property participated
in the workshop. City staff and the projects traffic consultant presented background information on the
history, land use, urban design, mobility, parking, parks, open space, economic activity, and government
and cultural facilities in the Study Area. The participants then broke into small groups where they
identified and verified the key issues for each of those topics, plus quality of life issues.
Using the results of the workshop, City staff developed four alternative approaches, or tracks, that future
planning efforts might follow and developed a general scope of work and a set of pros and consfor
each of the four tracks.The four approaches Civic Center Master Plan, Justice Center Design
Development, No Action, and Hybrid are described in the Next Steps section at the end of the
Assessment.
Future actions beyond the Planning Assessment are dependent on several key decisions from the City
Administration and overcoming several obstacles. Direction will be needed on:
I Whether to proceed with plans for a new Justice Center;
I The preferred site for a new facility;
I The timing of a potential bond issue that would fund the design and construction of the facility
and the associated improvements;
I Assignment of key City staff to the project;
I The priority of the project relative to the costs of funding, staffing, and time and potential
impacts on the initiation and completion of other projects; and
I The Next Steps for the process.
The obstacles that need to be overcome in order to proceed are the limited time, money, and staff
available for completing the project.


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
CIVIC CENTER PLAN
SUMMARIES
The study area has been included in a number of plans and studies in the
past 15 years. Specific goals and policies from these plans are inluded in the
applicable chapters of this assessment.
5


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT PLAN SUMMARIES
EXISTING PLANS AND STUDIES
Note: Plans are listed in reverse chronological order.
p Game Plan, 2003
The 50-year Master Plan for Parks and Recreation identifies guiding principles and values for the
management of Denver Parks. It includes goals for special events and investment in historic resources
and landscapes.
p Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transpnrtatinn Plan, 2002
Blueprint Denver is the citywide growth management plan that supplements the Citys comprehensive
plan. Blueprint Denver divides the city into Areas of Change, where growth and redevelopment should
be directed, and Areas of Stability, where the existing uses and urban form are appropriate and should be
protected. Downtown and Golden Triangle are both shown as Areas of Change on the Blueprint Plan
Map, reflecting goals for the area to increase in density and mix of uses. The Civic Center subarea is
shown as a Government and Cultural Campus, continuing the current uses and urban form.
p B-B-G Design Guidelines, 2002
The Golden Triangle, including the Study Area, is zoned B-8-G. These rules and regulations implement
the B-8-G zone district requirement for design review of all new construction and of significant
redevelopment projects. The design standards and guidelines focus on implementing the urban design
goals of the neighborhood plan, including pedestrian scale, comfort and connections; spatial definition
of street and open spaces; reinforcing the parkway character of Speer Boulevard and the civic
character of Civic Center; and architecture with human scale. They are consistent with the Civic
Center Design Guidelines.
p Bicycle Master Plan Update, 2001,2002
The Master Plan for bicycle mobility throughout the city.
p Denver Comprehensive Plan, 2000
Plan 2000 provides a vision for the city as a high quality place to live, work and play, with emphasis on
building on Denvers current assets and eliminating current deficits. The comprehensive plan includes a


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
vision, goals and recommendations for environmental sustainability, land use, mobility, legacies, housing,
economic development, neighborhoods, education, human services, arts and culture, and metropolitan
cooperation.
b Silver Triangle Urban Design Study, 1999
The urban design study was undertaken in response to the expansion of the Denver Convention Center
and includes eight land use alternatives and ten urban design principles related to uses, pedestrian
activity and comfort, landscape and streetscape character, historic preservation, transportation and
parking. It also was not adopted by the City, but provides valuable analysis and direction.
b Gnlden Triangle Neighborhood Plan, 1999
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan provides land use, urban design and transportation
recommendations for the growth and redevelopment of what it refers to as the Golden Triangle/Civic
Center Neighborhood (Colfax Avenue on the north, Broadway on the east and Speer Boulevard on the
southwest). The neighborhood vision includes developing the existing auto-oriented uses and parking
lots into a mixed-use neighborhood of residences, cultural and government facilities, arts-related
commercial uses, offices and retail. The design emphasis is on pedestrian facilities and linking to
downtown, with a scale lower than Downtown but greater than the adjacent Lincoln Park
neighborhood. The plan places special emphasis on building on the arts and cultural facilities provided
by the Denver Art Museum, Colorado History Museum, Denver Public Library and other cultural
institutions.
b Central Denver Transportation Study, 1999
The Transportation Study addresses streets south and east of Colfax and Broadway and recommends
solutions that strike a balance between traffic movement, mobility, and neighborhood and business
concerns.
b Central Dusiness District/D-5 Design Guidelines, 1995
Most of the Central Business District is zoned B-5. These rules and regulations implement the B-5 zone
district requirement for design review of all new construction and of significant redevelopment projects.
The design standards and guidelines focus on reinforcing and adding to the legacy of high quality design
in Downtown, creating an urban center that is comfortable, delightful, exciting and the regional center


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT PLAN SUMMARIES
for business and entertainment.
> Civic Center Cultural Complex Master Plan, 1992
Prepared by Venturi Scott Brown and Associates, the CCCC Plan is a district plan for the growth and
urban design of the major cultural facilities in the Civic Center: Denver Art Museum, Denver Public
Library and the Colorado Historical Society. Recommendations include shared programs and creations of
a common urban landscape centered on Civic Center Park. The plan focuses on adding new facilities and
specifically warns against fundamental alteration of the existing institutions. The Master Plan anticipates
the (now-built) Justice Center at 13th and Cherokee.
Silver Triangle Urban Uesign Study, 1999
This short urban design study was not officially adopted by the City, but it still provides valid urban
design analysis and guidance for the area north of Colfax Avenue, south of 16th Street and east of Speer
Boulevard. The recommendations include standards for street and pedestrian lighting and other
streetscape elements, views and gateways, and building massing and solar access to the street.
Civic Center Uesign Guidelines, 1999
These rules and regulations provide design standards and guidelines for the Civic Center Historic District
and design recommendations for the blocks adjacent to the historic district. The emphasis is on
compatibility of new structures in scale, massing, materials and form, but not in architectural style. The
Guidelines also include standards for streetscaping, including pedestrian lighting styles and locations.
Downtown Area Plan, 1986
The Downtown Area Plan was a visionary long-range plan for the health and vitality of the Central
Business District and its immediate surrounds. It includes framework principles for uses, urban form
and connections, as well as district goals for subareas within the planning area. The Civic Center
District, aka the Golden Triangle Neighborhood, is noted as Government on the Green and is
recommended as an urban centerpiece and reinforced as an anchor to Downtown. The Plan also
recommends that government facilities be concentrated in the Silver and Golden Triangles to avoid
impacts on adjacent neighborhoods. The recommendations for the Silver Triangle District (Sleeping
Giant) include development as an extension of the financial district with special attention to
connections and open space.
8


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
PLANS AND STUDIES IN PDOGDESS
Downtown Multi-Modal Access Plan [DMAPj
The Department of Public Works is heading a multi-agency and multi-jurisdictional review and plan for
getting people in, around and out of Downtown by automobile, bus and rail transit, circulator transit,
bicycle and walking. DMAP includes the study of the Central Connector transit line from the Broadway
light rail station to the Civic Center bus station, improvements to pedestrian, bicycle and transit facilities,
recommendations for alignment, technology and stops for new transit (including local buses, regional
buses, light rail, commuter rail, and bus rapid transit) with an emphasis on multi-modal stations at Union
Station, Market Street Station and Civic Center Station. Recommendations may also include changes to
the street system.
East Cnlfax Cnrridnr Plan
Community Planning and Development is the lead agency, partnering with Public Works, in developing
an Area of Change corridor plan for Colfax Avenue from Sherman Street to Colorado Boulevard. The plan
focuses on land use and design parameters that are expected to lead to zone district language and map
amendments. The vision and goals for the corridor include increased housing and mixed-use
development, with higher densities and intensities at strategically located transit nodes and activity
centers, as well as appropriate transitions to adjacent residential neighborhoods. The plan also addresses
enhanced bus transit.
Historic Landscape Assessment and Preservation Plan
The Denver Parks and Recreation Department is conducting a Civic Center Park Historic Landscape
Assessment and Preservation Master Plan to research the historic park and evaluate the impacts of
change on Civic Center Park. This study will provide the foundation needed to create a preservation
plan and identify strategies to preserve the park, prioritize needs, manage events more effectively, guide
future change, and use alternative funding sources to implement preservation projects. The plan will
also investigate options to strengthen the organizational capacity to develop partnerships and leverage
resources with other agencies and organizations.


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT PLAN SUMMARIES
West Colfax Corridor Plan
Community Planning and Development and Public Works are developing a corridor plan for West Colfax
from Speer Boulevard to Sheridan Boulevard. The plan focuses on defining an appropriate street cross
section, including access control and pedestrian amenities, as well as addressing redevelopment potential
along the proposed West Corridor Light Rail Line and thoughtful transitions to the adjacent residential
neighborhoods.
> Pedestrian Master Plan, 2003
A Master Plan for improving the citys pedestrian infrastructure and mobility.
10


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
LAND USE AND
UDDAN DESIGN
n


LAND USE AND URBAN DESIGN
Civic Cultural
12.GM
Above: Civic Center Master Plan Stedy
Area Cerrent Land Use [percent of
total parcel areal Pie chart
Bipht: Map of existing Land Use
EXISTING LAND USE
The land uses within the Civic Center study area are diverse and mixed. Denvers goal of introducing
significant housing to the Downtown area has not been achieved within the study area, although there
are several new high-density housing developments within a few blocks. Without significant housing, the
area lacks the mixed-use character that is desired. The land uses are primarily government, cultural and
other institutional uses, a few offices, limited retail and commercial businesses, and many surface parking
lots. There are a few industrial and automotive-related businesses. Parks and open space are limited to the
Civic Center Park, the Speer Boulevard Parkway and Triangles and Cherry Creek Trail, and the state-owned
Lincoln Park.
12


G
CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
City, State and Federal Governments own or control most of the land in the Study Area. There are also
private property owners with relatively large assemblages of property and those who own small
properties.
13


LAND USE AND
Right: Map nf Existing Zoning
URBAN DESIGN
EXISTING ZONING
For general information only. For official zoning interpretation, contact Denver Zoning Administration.
I B-8-G:
The B-8-G zone district was created in 1994 specifically for the Golden Triangle area. Currently, the
Golden Triangle is the only area of the city with B-8-G zoning. B-8-G is a high-density mixed-use
(residential, office and retail) zone district. It allows new construction at a base Floor Area Ratio (FAR) of
4:1 with density bonuses up to 6:1 for defined public benefits, including housing, ground-floor retail in
mixed-use developments, childcare facilities, public art, and rehabilitation of historic buildings. The FAR
can be increased to 7:1 through Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs) from historic structures or
through a more extensive design review process. Mandatory design review is required for a portion of
any new construction and significant redevelopment. Automobile-oriented uses such as drive-throughs
and gas stations are conditional. Commercial parking is not allowed. Parking requirements for residential
uses are reduced to one space per dwelling unit; parking requirements for other uses are the same as
14


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
other zone districts. New buildings are limited to a height of 175 feet above the centerline of Broadway
(plus or minus any difference in grade between the building site and Broadway). Setbacks of ten feet are
required along Speer Boulevard.
B-5:
The B-5 zone district was created for the Central Business District and was substantially revised in 1994.
Several overlay districts were established for the Central Business District at the time, but none were
applied to the blocks within the Civic Center study area. The B-5 district is the most intense, highest-
density zone district in Denver. Uses include office, residential and retail. There are no parking
requirements for any use in the zone district and commercial parking is not allowed. Parking must serve
a specific use by right in the B-5 district. The B-5 district has a base FAR of 10:1, which can be increased
to 17:1 with density premiums for defined public benefits such as residential uses, childcare facilities,
residential support facilities, pedestrian-active facilities, support for mass transit, underground parking,
public art and Transfer of Development Rights. In an area defined as the core of cores, the FAR may be
increased to 20:1. Design review of new construction is mandatory and there is no height limit. No
setbacks are required.
ADJACENT ZONING
B-4:
The B-4 zone district applies to commercial corridors throughout the city, including East Colfax Avenue.
This zone district allows a wide and occasionally incompatible mix of uses, including retail, office,
industrial and residential. FAR is limited to 2:1. Parking requirements for residential uses are reduced to
one space per dwelling unit. Other parking requirements are consistent with other zone districts. There
are no density bonuses or design review. There are no height limits or setback requirements.
BB-1:
This zoning overlay district was established in 1994 for use in conjunction with the R-4 zone in Capitol
Hill and Uptown. It provides incentives for housing development by decreasing the amount of required
parking for residential uses and limiting the FAR of non-residential uses. It also provides for mandatory
design review of new structures.
15


LAND USE AND
URBAN DESIGN
>R-4-X:
The R-4-X zone district was created in 1994 for the residential neighborhoods immediately adjacent to
Downtown. It allows a base FAR of 4:1, which can be increased to a maximum FAR of 5.5:1 through a
combination of incentives for providing affordable housing, and transferring development rights from
designated historic structures within the zone district. Commercial parking and parking for uses outside
the district are not allowed. Parking requirements are one space per dwelling unit. Parking requirements
for other uses are the same as other zone districts. Design review is mandatory. Allowed uses are
residential and office. Neighborhood-serving retail uses are conditional. There is no height limit. Setback
requirements are zero to ten fee from the front property line, five feet from the rear and five feet from
the side yard property line.
R-3:
This high-density residential zone is used throughout the city, especially in neighborhoods closer to
Downtown. The uses are limited to residential, with some exceptions for accessory uses for high-density
developments. R-3 allows an FAR up to 3:1. The parking requirement is one and one-half spaces per
dwelling unit. There is no design review and no height limit. Setback requirements are ten feet from the
front property line, five feet from the rear where an alley is present and five feet from the side yard
property line.
ADDITIONAL DEGDLATIONS
There are additional non-zoning regulations related to building and development. The local historic
district both limits demolition and requires design review of new construction. There are also two height
limitation ordinances. With the exception of Speer Boulevard, the western portion of the study area is
affected only by the mountain view preservation height limits. None of these regulations affect the
section of the Study Area south of 13 th Avenue.
Civic Center Historic Ristrict:
City Council designated the Civic Center Historic District in 1978 and expanded it to include the U.S.
Mint in 1982. All local historic districts have three purposes: to protect historic structures from
demolition, to guarantee that alterations to historic structures maintain the integrity of the historic
16


character, and to review new construction for compatibility with the district character. The Denver
Landmark Preservation Commission is charged with reviewing all applications for demolition and for
those alterations to building exteriors that requires a building permit. The Landmark Commission
adopted Design Standards and Guidelines for the Civic Center Historic District in 1996 to explain the
elements of historic character that must be reflected in new construction.
p Civic Center Design Guidelines:
The Landmark Preservation Commission adopted these rules and regulations in 1996 to provide design
standards and guidelines for the Civic Center Historic District and design recommendations for the
blocks adjacent to the historic district. The emphasis is compatibility of new structures in scale, massing,
materials and form, but not architectural style. The Guidelines also include standards for streetscaping,
including pedestrian lighting styles and locations.
pSpeer Boulevard Historic Parkway:
Both a designated landmark and a Parks Department designated parkway, the Speer Boulevard right of
NING ASSESSMENT
Left: Map of Historic Districts and
Structures
17


LAND USE AND
Right: Map of Civic Cennter Height
Restrictions and View Plane
URBAN DESIGN
way is subject to review by both the Landmark Preservation Commission and the Parks Department
administration. There are also deeper building setback requirements adjacent to the parkway (ten feet)
and bulk reduction standards for buildings taller than 100 feet.
h West 14th Avenue Parkway:
Fourteenth Avenue between Broadway and Bannock Streets is a Parks Department designated parkway,
with potential for special streetscape and building setback requirements.
h Civic Center Height Restrictions:
In 1973, City Council designated the land surrounding Civic Center Park as an area with special height
restrictions for new construction. Contained in Revised Municipal Code (RMC) Section 10-81 through
10-87, the Restrictions on Structures in the Civic Center Area describe a series of height limits stepping
back from the park. The height limits are designed to preserve the integrity of the Civic Center and to
protect the openness of the unique public space from the intensely developed surroundings; to protect
18


CIVIC CENTER PLAN NING ASSESSMENT
the stature of the public buildings as symbols of the city and the state as important points of orientation; to stabilize and enhance the aesthetic values of the surrounding areas; and to emphasize the national recognition of the governmental complex. p State Capitol View Preservation Ordinance: In 1971, City Council designated a view protection corridor from the vantage of the western steps of the Colorado State Capitol building. The protected view (RMC Section 10-56 and 10-61) was enacted to perpetuate a panoramic mountain view from the public vantage point; to strengthen and preserve the communitys unique environmental heritage as a city of the plains at the foot of the Rocky Mountains; to foster civic pride in the beauty of the city; and to stabilize and enhance the aesthetic and economic values of the surrounding areas. The view preservation ordinance limits building heights within a defined view plane. p Design Review Rules and Regulations: The B-8-G, B-5, R-4-X and OD-1 zone districts all have mandatory design review over new construction adjacent to streets, up to 80-feet tall. The procedures, standards and guidelines that govern the design review for each zone district are contained in rules and regulations adopted by the Denver Planning Board and the Director of Planning.
19


LAND USE AND URBAN DESIGN
Reinvestment and reuse nf histnric
structures adds tn the character nf
the area.
LAND USE GOALS AND POLICIES EDOM ADOPTED PLANS
h Silver Triangle is envisioned as the next expansion of the Financial District, with interim uses to
include office and services that expand on and reinforce the Convention Center, Performing Arts
Center and Government uses.
h Institutions such as the Denver Athletic Club, Emily Griffith Opportunity School and the Press
Club should be maintained in the Silver Triangle.
h Civic Center is one of the most memorable districts in Downtown because of the concentration
of public buildings surrounding Downtowns largest open space.
h As the center of government for both the City and the State, Civic Center provides a focus and
attraction of which all Colorado residents are proud.
h Concentrate new Civic Center state, city and private commercial development in the Silver and
Golden Triangles to avoid impacts on adjacent neighborhoods.
h Preserve and build on the Cultural and Civic character of the Golden Triangle neighborhood.
Encourage the development of uses related to the Civic Center Cultural Complex and its
components; build on the arts, culture and government presence in the area.
t The Civic Center subarea of the Golden Triangle neighborhood is envisioned as an integral part
of the Golden Triangle. New buildings continue the tradition of world class architecture around
the Civic Center. Artists studios, galleries, an art school and high tech businesses are attracted to
the subarea. Together the uses contribute to the Golden Triangles position as the center of art
and Western history in the Rocky Mountain region and the government center for Denver.
t Land uses should be complementary to the governmental and cultural uses in the Civic Center
subarea, including galleries, studios, restaurants, hotels and businesses that use the cultural
institutional collections.
t Encourage government-related growth in the 1300 block of Bannock.
t All parking should be accommodated in multi-level structures with pedestrian uses on the
ground floor.
t Civic Center subarea is a transition zone from the high density of Downtown to the lower
density of the neighborhood.
) Cultural and institutional growth should continue south of the Civic Center on Acoma Street.
20


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
URBAN DESIGN AND
ARGDITEGTURE
21


URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE
EXISTING URBAN FORM
1 ./ In spite of its location and good vehicular access, little development has taken place within the Silver Triangle. The district has an underutilized, low-density character, in stark contrast to the imposing Financial District across the 16th Street Mall. Acres of parking lots exist, portraying a barren image, although it is the most centrally located area of major developable land in Downtown.
. Jm ,*>. v- ..-/ip The civic institutions create a grand and distinctive city center. The Civic Center subarea of the Golden Triangle neighborhood is distinctive in the grand nature of the civic institutions surrounding the Civic Center Park. The park and the government architecture are both formal and classic in design. The large scale of the State Capitol, City and County Building, United States Mint, and the Central Library are mitigated by exquisite detailing, durable materials and human scaling elements. The new Wellington E.Webb Municipal Office Building continues the tradition of compatible yet contemporary architecture. The tower building of the Art Museum, Civic Center Bus Station and the Police Administration Building have been less successful in integrating pedestrian comfort and human scale into the building form and site design.
Outside the Civic Center proper, the City Beautiful principles begin to disintegrate. The abundant surface parking lots lend an air of abandonment and an atmosphere of discomfort. Buildings without adequate pedestrian amenities and ground-floor activity further undermine the sense of activity and safety. The blocks surrounding Civic Center have an inconsistent urban form, with individual buildings setting a high standard of interest and comfort, but lacking the critical mass of appropriate design and development to achieve the urban design goals of the area.
CURRENT AND PRUPUSED DEVELOPMENT AND EXPANSION PROJECTS
1 Convention Center Expansion (Adjacent to the Study Area) 1 Convention Center Hotel (Adjacent to the Study Area) ) Denver Art Museum Expansion 1 Denver Art Museum Co-Development (residential, retail, office) 1 Argyle Tower (residential) 1 Justice Center Complex (3 buildings) 1 Denver Newspaper Agency Headquarters
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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
DESIGN GUIDELINES
B-8-G Design Guidelines, 2002
These rules and regulations implement the B-8-G zone district requirement for design review of all new
construction and of significant redevelopment projects. The design standards and guidelines focus on
implementing the urban design goals of the neighborhood plan, including pedestrian scale, comfort and
connections; spatial definition of street and open spaces; reinforcing the parkway character of Speer
Boulevard and the civic character of Civic Center; and architecture with human scale. They are
consistent with the Civic Center Design Guidelines.
Civic Center Design Guidelines, 100G
These rules and regulations provide design standards and guidelines for the Civic Center Historic District
and design recommendations for the blocks adjacent to the historic district. The emphasis is on
compatibility of new structures in scale, massing, materials and form, but not in architectural style. The
Guidelines also include standards for streetscaping, including pedestrian lighting styles and locations.
Central Dusiness District/D-5 Design Guidelines, 1DD5
These rules and regulations implement the B-5 zone district requirement for design review of all new
construction and of significant redevelopment projects. The design standards and guidelines focus on
reinforcing and adding to the legacy of high quality design in Downtown, creating an urban center that
is comfortable, delightful, exciting and the regional center for business and entertainment.
Cnrridnr Guidelines, 2000
These review criteria apply to Speer Boulevard, Colfax, Broadway and Lincoln as designated Commercial
Corridors. Their use is intended to protect and enhance the traditional pedestrian-friendly character of
these corridors.
Civic Center Historic District
City Council designated the Civic Center Historic District in 1978 and expanded it to include the U.S.
Mint in 1982. All local historic districts have three purposes: to protect historic structures from
demolition, to guarantee that alterations to historic structures maintain the integrity of the historic
character, and to review new construction for compatibility with the district character. The Denver
23


URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE
Tree with grate
Pedestrian light
I | Tree with grass lawn
Above: Template for Reqeired
Pedestrian Liohts aed Street Trees
Landmark Preservation Commission is charged with reviewing all applications for demolition and for new
construction to building exteriors that requires a building permit. The Landmark Commission adopted
Design Standards and Guidelines for the Civic Center Historic District in 1996 to explain the elements of
historic character that must be reflected in new construction.
b Streetscape Design Manual, 1993
These guidelines provide basic direction for streetscape improvements in the public Right ofWay for
commercial and residential areas. Paving, street trees, pedestrian lighting and other street furnishing
items are addressed.
b Streetscape Inventory
Civic Center Master PLin
Required Pedestrian Li;jh|$
Above: Illustration nf Required Pedestrian linhts
24


POTENTIAL FOR SIGNIFICANT CHANGE
p Redevelopment Site Analysis
This illustration (above) graphically depicts that a significant percentage of the area within the Master
Plan study area has the potential for redevelopment. Areas included as having a potential for
redevelopment may currently serve as open space but enjoy no specific protection under current
ordinances or adopted plans.
ORRAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTORE GOALS AND POLICIES FROM ADOPTED PLANS
P The Silver Triangle should be the area for the next expansion of the Financial District. It should
develop densely with the highest scale buildings on 15th Street and a lower scale edge toward
Speer Boulevard.
25


URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE
Improving the connection streets in the Silver Triangle District will provide a desirable environment to which early development can attach. As development occurs, the attractive pathways will draw Downtowns pedestrians through the Silver Triangle to take advantage of the parks and Cherry Creek.
> A central square or other amenity is needed to provide a focal point for development and create a long-term identity for the Silver Triangle.
> 15th Street should be designed as a transit corridor with entrances to serve new development in the Silver Triangle.
> The theme of the Civic Center is set by Civic Center Park, a formal green space surrounded by the State Capitol, the Central Public Library, the Denver Art Museum, the City and County Building, and the Webb Municipal Building. The design is classical and grew out of the City Beautiful Movement of the early 1900s.
> Create a distinct identity through the built environment, with a sense of place and special aesthetic. The community identity and distinctive place is created through the overall composition of spaces, juxtaposition of buildings, unique architectural character and details.
> Unique identity is also accomplished through the integration of public art and design elements in the public realm.
> Taller structures, within the view preservation ordinances, are encouraged in the Civic Center subarea of the Golden Triangle, between Colfax and 13th Avenues.
> Taller structures are encouraged on Speer Boulevard and Lincoln/Broadway, with a step down in scale toward the center of the neighborhood.
> Maintain the grid pattern of streets and alleys to reinforce the block pattern and the existing urban structure.
> Maintain the axial views within Civic Center Park.
> Maintain and frame the axial view from the south end of Acoma Street north to Acoma Plaza into Civic Center and from the north end of Acoma south to Speer Boulevard.
> Strengthen the character of gateways and nodes, including the Civic Center and the cultural institutions.
26


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
LAND USE AND UDDAN DESIGN ISSUES AND ANALYSIS
General
Issues
Most of the study area has not reached its potential for mix of uses, density or desirable urban character
Appropriate locations for government and institutional expansion need to be determined. Proliferation
of surface parking lots undermines the long-term goals for the area and adds to the desolate feeling
outside the Civic Center core. Existing plans, studies and regulations are strong tools to guide future
development, but they may not provide adequate guidance to minimize abrupt changes between
neighborhoods.
Analysis
This area, in whole or in part, has been included in at least ten completed plans, studies and design
guidelines and in four studies currently underway.
hMixed-Use
Issues
The area currently lacks sufficient residential and retail uses to balance and support the government
institutions. Residential and retail facilities in addition to the civic and employment uses would increase
the sense of place, community and livability.
Analysis
All adopted plans and current zoning regulations allow, support and encourage mixed uses, especially
residential and ground floor retail. Zone districts also provide density bonuses as incentives for certain
public uses and design. Although inclusion of mixed uses in public facilities is hampered by security
concerns, some retail uses are possible. Private development of mixed use projects is driven by market
conditions. The regulatory system for mixed use projects is in place, ready for private development
activity when it becomes feasible.
Surface parking lots undermine the
long-term goals for a mixed-use
urban village.
27


URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE
Connections and Streetscape
Issues
Unsafe, unclear and unattractive pedestrian links between Downtown and Civic Center prevent full
utilization of the amenities and facilities. Poor wayfinding, lack of visibility, dangerous and unfriendly
pedestrian connections are barriers. Colfax Avenue is the most significant problem area.
Analysis
Denver Multi-modal Access Plan (DMAP) and the Pedestrian Master Plan are currently underway to
identify key projects and policies addressing overall citywide and Downtown connectivity. The 1998
Neighborhood Bond also includes improvements to Colfax Avenue/15th Street and l4thAvenue at Civic
Center. Private development is required to improve adjacent right of way, including streetscaping, and is
an incremental approach. No comprehensive approach to improvements is currently available.
p Parking
Issues
The availability and cost of parking for the area is a concern, especially as existing parking lots redevelop
into more active and appropriate uses. Surface parking as a stand-alone use does not reinforce or
contribute to the character of a vital, walkable, interesting urban neighborhood. The community and City
desire abundant, cheap and invisible parking, which is difficult to achieve.
Analysis
No comprehensive parking study or plan is currently available. DMAP will partially address the issue.
New development in the B-8-G zone district is required to provide parking for its needs. No parking is
required in the B-5 zone district. Displaced parking from new development on parking lots is not the
responsibility of the developer.
28


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
> Architecture
Issues
The existing architectural character places Denvers best and most important buildings in a weak
context. A streetscape and architectural palette that allows for innovative design within a consistent
framework needs to be implemented. The existing character of the Civic Center core is desirable and
should be expanded upon. Architectural and development standards need to address issues of
compatibility, appropriate density, height, and scale.
Analysis
Design review of all new development is a requirement of the B-5, B-8-G and Landmark District. Scaling
issues are partially addressed in these design review processes. Scale and height are also regulated by
the Civic Center Height Restriction and Mountain View Preservation ordinances. All public development
should be held to architectural standards that respect the existing architectural quality and materials of
Civic Center structures. There may be gaps or weaknesses in the other design guidelines that should
be addressed.
u Key Development Opportunities
Issues
Within the study area there are underdeveloped sites that could significantly impact the character of the
area, for good or for bad. These key development opportunities may include both public and private
facilities. Critical sites include locations immediately adjacent to Civic Center Park, between West 14th
and Colfax Avenues, bordering Colfax Avenue, and along Acoma and Bannock Streets. The appropriate
locations and limits of government and institutional expansion need to be determined.
An example of an inconsistent
streetscape treatment. On the right is a
detached sidewalk with trees and tree
lawn; on the left is pavement, illegal
parking, and no trees. The pedestrian
has chosen to walk in the street rather
than on the unappealing sidewalk.
Analysis
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan defines a Civic Center subarea. The Civic Center Cultural
Complex Master Plan also addresses cultural facility expansion. The Downtown Area Plan indicates
locations for government expansion. No single plan defines appropriate locations or limits of
government/institutional expansion. Partnerships or incentives for private development in key locations
have not been addressed.
29


URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE
p Development Barriers
Issues
The lack of significant private development activity in the area indicates there are barriers to projects.
These barriers may include:
P Market demand, which is impacted by the economy;
P Lack of development incentives;
P Profitability of surface parking is a disincentive for redevelopment, and
P The cost of land is increasing.
Analysis
There is no indication that significant regulatory barriers to redevelopment exist. Barriers are more
related to financing and market demand.
p Aesthetics/Livability
Issues
There are weaknesses in the relationship between the built environment and the overall quality of life.
Major park events both enhance the sense of community and create conflicts with adjacent businesses
and residents. Civic Center Park suffers from extremes of use: either too much or too little. Land use
decisions may not factor in safety and quality of life concerns.
Analysis
Current plans focus on physical development aspects of the area as well as goals for quality of life. Park
use issues should be included in the Civic Center Park master planning effort.
30


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
MOBILITY AND PARKING
31


MOBILITY AND PARKING
Bight: Map nf Street Classifications
EXISTING STREETS AND CLASSIFICATIONS
h Regional Access
Regional access to the Civic Center Planning Area is provided primarily by Interstate 25 (1-25). The
following roadways provide access from 1-25 into the study area: Broadway (south of the Civic Center
area), Colfax Avenue (west of the Civic Center area), and Speer Boulevard (west of the Civic Center area).
32


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
> Arterial streets
Arterial streets carry a majority of traffic traveling through the study area and are generally commercial
corridors. Arterial streets within the study area include: Speer Boulevard, Colfax Avenue, l4thAvenue,
13th Avenue,Welton Street,Tremont Place, Court Place, Broadway, Lincoln Street, and Grant Street. Speer
Boulevard is also classified as an Historic Parkway and 14th Avenue between Bannock and Broadway is a
Parkway.
> Collector Streets
Collector streets provide movement of traffic between arterials and neighborhoods. In the vicinity of the
proposed project, they include: 12th Avenue, Glenarm Place, Cleveland Place, Cheyenne Place, Cherokee
Street, and Bannock Street.
> Local Streets
Local streets are typically designed to provide access within residential areas and some limited access to
office and commercial uses. Within the study area the local streets are: Galapago Street, Fox Street, Elati
Street, Delaware Street, and Acoma Street.
33


MOBILITY AND PARKING
Right: Map of Existing Pedestrian and
Bicycle Routes
EXISTING PEDESTRIAN AND DICYCLE RODTES
Pedestrian Routes
Enhanced Bus Corridor
Neighborhood Bike Route
16 th Ave.
T3
2
ffl
Colfax Ave.
14th Ave.
13 th Ave.
h Bicycle Routes
The City and County of Denver has a system of bicycle routes throughout the City to serve the needs of
cyclists. The plan for bicycle facilities with the City is established and described within the 1993 Denver
Bicycle Master Plan and the Denver Bicycle Master Plan Update 2001. The Bicycle Master Plan
was intended to develop and implement a comprehensive bicycling program by developing a framework
for a physical bicycle system as well as education, promotion, enforcement, public policy, and information
distribution programs. Within the study area, the following bicycle facilities exist:
34


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
I Route D-10 This Grid Route is along 12th Avenue. It connects on the west with the City of
Lakewood (near the Lakewood/Dry Gulch) and runs primarily along 12th Avenue east to the
City of Aurora atYosemite Street. Within the project area it uses 11th and 12th Avenues,
connecting via Cherokee and Delaware Streets. Given the steep grade of 12thAvenue east of
Lincoln, a bicycle lane in the uphill, eastbound direction is desirable.
I Neighborhood Bike Routes There are two Neighborhood Bike Routes within the study area
on Cherokee and Bannock Streets that connect with the Cherry Creek Trail and intersect route
D-10. On Cherokee Street the route is from Colfax Avenue south to Speer Boulevard and the
Cherokee Street ramp leading to the Cherry Creek Trail. The Bannock Street route is between
Colfax Avenue and 1st Avenue, which accommodates Route D-14. These neighborhood routes
serve to connect with the off-street bikeway along the frontage of the Webb Municipal Building,
leading to the 16th Street Mall and the 16th Avenue bike lanes.
\ Cherry Creek Trail The Cherry Creek Trail is located within the Cherry Creek channel
between the north and southbound lanes of Speer Boulevard. There are existing trail access
ramps from Speer Boulevard to the trail at Colfax and 14th Avenues. The Bicycle Master Plan
cites the need for a future ramp connection at 12th Avenue to serve the Golden Triangle
neighborhood. A staircase connection to the trail exists at 11th Avenue. However, it is not
wheelchair accessible in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and does
not accommodate the needs of bicyclists and in-line skaters. This staircase is adjacent to Denver
Public School #1 at 11th and Delaware.
I City standard Inverted U type bicycle parking racks are currently in place at many of the
destinations in the project area including the City and County Building, the Webb Municipal
Building, the Central Branch of the Denver Library and the Denver Art Museum. However there
are numerous trip generators within the project area that do not have any city standard
Inverted U type bicycle parking racks.
The Bicycle Master Plan also identified Missing Links within the bicycle system. Within the study area
there are no missing links.
35


MOBILITY AND PARKING
> Pedestrian Facilities
Currently the City is preparing a City and County of Denver Pedestrian Master Plan, which is expected to
be adopted by City Council before the end of 2003. The Draft Pedestrian Master Plan (PMP) is
being developed as a recommendation of Blueprint Denver. The goal is to enhance the transportation
choices available to the public for mobility within Denver. As a part of this, a network of Pedestrian
Routes is being identified which link neighborhoods with such facilities as transit, parks, schools, and
commercial areas. These routes are coordinated with the Parks and Recreation Departments green
streets and will be a focus for providing mobility to pedestrians. The PMP also reinforces the need for
Enhanced Bus Corridors as defined by Blueprint Denver as corridors with high transit ridership
potential which should be targeted for higher frequency bus service, Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) and
priorities for Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) investments (including bus priority signalization).
High ridership on these corridors will translate into high pedestrian activity and the need for transit-
oriented pedestrian amenities along these corridors.
The Civic Center Planning Assessment study area has the following Pedestrian Routes and Enhanced
Bus Corridors:
I Pedestrian Routes: 12th Avenue, Speer Boulevard, and Acoma Street.
\ Enhanced Bus Corridors: Colfax Avenue and Speer Boulevard.
The PMP also identifies many pedestrian improvement projects across the city. The one project within
the study area is a linear project that has been identified along 13th Avenue. The plan identified this
section of 13th Avenue as having narrow sidewalks and recommends upgrades.
36


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
EXISTING TRANSIT ROUTES
Civic Center
Master Plan
RTD Transit
Routes
31,36L
l6thA e.
O 3 ffl

13th Ave.
a
u
o
0,6,10, 0L,
3L, 16L,46L
79L,83L
Left: Map nf Existing Transit Routes
Numerous Regional Transit District (RTD) bus routes serve the study area. Many regional routes operate
on the Broadway/Lincoln corridor. The following routes provide regional and local service within the
study area: 0, OL, 6,7,9,10,15,15L, 16, 48,50,52,3L, 29L, 36L, 46L, 79L, and the B-Line.
The RTD Civic Center Station is located within the study area and is one of the key stations that service
Downtown Denver. It is located at the southeastern end of the 16th Street Mall. RTD provides a free
Mall Shuttle service on 16th Street between Union Station and the Civic Center Station. The Civic Center
Station services approximately 24 bus lines and the Mall Shuttle. There is also Light Rail service just to
the west of the study area.
37


MOBILITY AND PARKING
EXISTING PARKING CONDITIONS
As part of the initial assessment, the existing parking conditions within the study area were analyzed. An
inventory of the existing parking supply was performed and the usage of publicly available parking
determined.
On- and Off- Street Parking Inventory
Parking Supply
The current supply of both on-street and off-street parking facilities was determined. This inventory does
not include private off-street parking for residents, customers, or employees. All on-street parking spaces
were accounted for. A number of these spaces are for special uses such as loading, fire department
vehicles, press parking, and other special users. Although these were inventoried, they are not included in
the supply of parking that is generally available to the public.
The inventory of on-street spaces was conducted in the field during July 2003. The results of this effort
indicate that there is a total supply of 444 publicly available on-street parking spaces. There are 123 other
spaces for loading and special users.
The off-street parking inventory was performed based upon City aerials from 2002. There are 2,635 off-
street spaces available to the public, which includes 973 spaces in the recently completed Arts Complex
Parking Structure located between 13th and 12th Avenues west of Broadway.
Parking Demand
The demand for parking fluctuates during the day. In general, the demand for parking within the study
area is highest during the weekday due to the high demand for employee and visitor parking for the
commercial, office and government/public related uses. However, there is a demand for parking within
the study area throughout the day. In an effort to perform an initial assessment, the demand for parking
during the peak weekday daytime period was determined. An on-street parking demand study was
performed from approximately 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM on a weekday during July 2003. The off-street
demand was determined from the aerial photos, which were taken on a weekday at midday.
38


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
On-Street Parking
Utilization
0-50% Utilization
51-75% Utilization
76-85% Utilization
86-100% Utilization
XX= Parking Demand
YY= Parking Supply
% = Percent Utilization
Colfax Ave.
Left: Map of On-Street Parking
Utilizatinn
Parking Utilization
The existing utilization of parking within the study area is represented by the percent occupancy. The
utilization was broken down into differing levels of demand, indicated by different-colored shading on
the figures. The demand for parking spaces, the amount of available parking, and the resulting utilization
is provided for each block within the study area. The on-street data represents the parking directly
adjacent to the block (not including loading and special users). As shown on each of the figures, the
highest demand for parking, 86 percent utilization or higher, is depicted with the darkest colored
pattern. In general the highest demand of on-street parking is adjacent to Civic Center Park. The highest
demand for off-street parking (as determined from the aerial photography) was south of Colfax Avenue
between Delaware and Bannock Streets. Near the Convention Center, the off-street demand was also
39


MOBILITY AND PARKING
Right: Map of Off-Street Parkieg
Utilizatioe
Off-Street Parking
Utilization:
Public Pay Lots
0-50% Utilization
51-75% Utilization
I 76-85% Utilization
86-100% Utilization
XX= Parking Demand
YY= Parking Supply
% = Percent Utilization
Colfax Ave.
high. It is worth noting that with its recent opening, the Cultural Center Parking Structure was observed
to have a typical weekday demand of approximately 25%. In conclusion, with very preliminary
observations of parking demand, the overall study area does not have demand for parking of greater than
85 percent, which is considered high utilization. However, further data collection regarding parking is
necessary to complete a thorough evaluation of existing parking utilization.
40


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
PLANNED AND CDDDENT TDANSPODTATION PDOJECTS
Public Works will be constructing a pedestrian-related 1998 Neighborhood Bond Initiative project within
the study area this fall. The work includes:
h Installation of a Pedestrian Signal on 14th Avenue on the south side of Civic Center Park and a
crosswalk constructed with special paving.
h Upgrades to the pedestrian crossing of Colfax Avenue/15th Street on the north side of Civic
Center Park.
1 7 r J-
A diagonal crosswalk of Colfax Avenue at 14th Street between the Webb Municipal Building and the City
and County Building was completed July 2003.
There are two studies currently being conducted which address transportation and mobility. The City is
completing a Pedestrian Master Plan. The plan addresses the needs of pedestrian mobility citywide.
A Downtown Multimodal Access Plan (DMAP) has just been initiated. The study will address access
for all modes of transportation for the Downtown area including the Civic Center and adjacent
neighborhoods. DMAP will examine regional vehicular and transit demands and connections within the
study area, connections from transit stations into Downtown, circulation of vehicles, transit, pedestrians
and bicycles within Downtown, connections to adjacent neighborhoods, and opportunities/solutions to
meet long range future transportation demands.
Recent crosswalk improvements at
Colfax, Bannock and 14th Street have
increased safety and convenience for
pedestrians.
A new ramp connection to the Cherry Creek Trail at 12th Avenue is recommended in the Denver
Bicycle Master Plan. Funds being actively sought to construct this improvement through the Denver
Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) Transportation Improvement Program (TIP).
41


MOBILITY AND PARKING
MOBILITY GOALS AND POLICIES IN ADOPTED PLANS
I Emphasis on pedestrian circulation within the Civic Center study area was mentioned in all
plans. Connections from Downtown into the Civic Center study area need to be enhanced.
I Acoma Street was mentioned as one of the key pedestrian corridors.
I Colfax Avenue presents a challenge for pedestrian mobility between Downtown and the Civic
Center study area. Key locations for pedestrian crossings should be identified and improved.
I Signal timing at intersections in the vicinity of the Civic Center should be examined to
determine if any additional time is available for pedestrians without significantly impacting
vehicular operations.
I Transit service should be enhanced. This could include shuttle service from Civic Center
to Downtown. An additional need is to improve the appearance and perceived safety of
bus shelters.
I A comprehensive traffic study is needed to determine the future transportation needs of the
area. The use of the streets for access into Downtown and for neighborhood traffic should be
recognized. The potential for impacts into adjacent neighborhoods should be addressed.
42


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
MOBILITY AND PARKING ISSUES AND ANALYSIS
h Traffic
Issues
Most of the study area has not reached full development. What transportation improvements will be
necessary to support full build-out within the Civic Center study area? The future transportation system
should support future development of the Civic Center area and maintain the local character of
neighborhood streets. How does this project relate to DMAP?
Analysis
A transportation and mobility study of the Civic Center is needed to: address future growth within the
study area, account for regional growth, strengthen transit use, and minimize impacts to adjacent
neighborhoods. This study should identify improvement measures to mitigate future impacts, to the
extent possible. This study must be coordinated with the DMAP effort and may not be possible to
complete without resolution of the issues that DMAP will address. The transportation and mobility study
should also consider the significance of the Civic Center area as a focal point in Denver. The study must
allow for innovative long-range solutions for the Civic Center.
1 1

* v 4
Pedestrian crossings at Colfax are
difficult because the street grid
changes.
A Pedestrian and Bicycle Mobility
Issues
The Civic Center study area is a focal point of pedestrian activity. The pedestrian corridor through
Civic Center Park, past the Denver Art Museum and the Library, and continuing south along Acoma
Street is a key link. This provides access from Downtown to cultural activity centers and adjacent
neighborhoods. Other connections are necessary however; the crossing of Colfax Avenue is difficult.
The transit activity on Broadway and Lincoln generates numerous pedestrians on these two roadways.
Connections from Civic Center to Lincoln and Broadway should be enhanced to support the use of
transit and pedestrian mobility.
43


MOBILITY AND PARKING
Analysis
The transportation and mobility study should examine solutions that further refine and implement the
recommendations of the Pedestrian Master Plan. The study should include other pedestrian
enhancements, such as those included in the Colfax Avenue Corridor Transportation
Improvements Analysis for the intersection of Colfax and Delaware.
I Transit
Issues
The study area has a number of local and regional bus routes; however, the need for a more additional
service should be explored. How a transit connection between the Light Rail Station at Broadway and
1-25 and Downtown impacts the study area should be determined.
Analysis
The DMAP study will address the transit connection between the Broadway Light Rail Station and
Downtown. Public Works and Community Planning and Development will need to consider the impacts
of this on the Civic Center study area. The need for a shuttle service between the Civic Center and
Downtown may be addressed in a number of ways: as part of DMAP, working directly with RTD, or it
could be included in the transportation and mobility study. In any of these, a high level of coordination
with DMAP and RTD is essential.
I Parking
Issues
The most recent parking study of the Civic Center area was performed in 1991. A major issue is, as the
surface parking lots within the study area develop, what happens to the parking demand for the lots that
remain? How will the newly opened Cultural Complex Parking Structure offset the need for future
additional public parking? It was recognized that many of the government related uses currently do not
provide parking for employees and visitors. As the area receives additional government uses, how will
the additional employee and visitor parking demand be addressed? As additional mixed-use projects are
developed on properties currently used for surface parking lots, how will the reduced public parking be
priced and what time limits will be appropriate? The supply of parking must also be sensitive to the
need to support the use of transit. If an abundant supply of inexpensive parking is available how does
this affect the use of transit?
44


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
Analysis
In order to address all of the parking issues, a comprehensive parking study of the Civic Center area
would need to be conducted.
> Other
Issues
Additional issues related to way-finding and special events were raised as a result of the assessment
workshop. An observation made by several groups was the need for way-finding for both the
Downtown and Civic Center areas. Special events at Civic Center Park typically require street closures
and detours.The need for a quick return of these streets to pre-event conditions was expressed.
Analysis
Downtown way-finding is a topic to be addressed within DMAP
Events that utilize Civic Center Park are carefully coordinated in terms of neighborhood traffic impacts,
street closures, detour signing, and public notification. These concerns will be provided to the Permit
Section of Denver Public Works for consideration in planning for future events. Special events held in
the Civic Center Park are important to maintaining the Citys tradition of civic celebration. The master
plan should address neighborhood concerns and develop strategies and solutions for maintaining a
balance between the tradition of civic celebration and minimizing impacts to adjacent neighborhoods.
45


PARKS AND PARKWAYS
PARKS AND PARKWAYS
46


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
Denver Parks and Recreation manages several park units in the study area:
I Civic Center Park
) Macintosh Park
I Fourteenth Avenue Parkway
Speer Boulevard Parkway is immediately adjacent to the study area.
Lincoln Park and the State Capitol grounds are owned and maintained by the State.
47


PARKS AND PARKWAYS
> Historic Resources
Outside (^Washington, D.C., Denvers Civic Center Park is one of the most complete and intact cultural
and government centers in the country. During the City Beautiful movement (1900 1910), many cities
succeeded in improving the urban landscape with parks, parkways, streets lined with shade trees, and
stately public buildings. However, few cities succeeded in implementing plans for the ultimate
expression of the City Beautiful movement: a downtown civic center. Denver triumphed over other
cities unrealized plans. Not only did Denver leaders realize a design, but also built this magnificent urban
center that continues to evolve within its traditional origins. Additional public institutions and
architectural excellence have gradually, over the past 80 years, reinforced and strengthened the character
of this cultural heart of the City. The Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places with
national level of significance.
PARKS AND PARKWAYS GOALS AND POLICIES FROM ADOPTED PLANS
I Redesign Bannock Street to create a strong connection from Colfax (Webb Municipal Office
Building) all the way south to Speer Boulevard. Reduce the width and treat Bannock differently
between the City and County Building and the Park.
I Bury either Colfax or l4thAvenue to create a seamless campus between the cultural institutions
on the south, the Park, and Downtown (16th Street Mall).
I Develop streetscape and land uses west and east of the Park along 14th and Colfax. As
connections to Speer Boulevard and the adjoining neighborhoods.
I Develop other festival sites (such as Auraria and an Auraria bridge to Downtown)
I Create a forum for collaboration among event organizers, the Parks Department, and residents to
improve the management of staging events in the Park.
I Investigate fee policies that put more money back into the park/area from large events
I Involve neighborhoods more (and give back to neighborhoods more) in events
I Develop appropriate guidelines for consistent management of event uses.
I Increase the level of casual activity and smaller programs in the Park to bring people into the
Park at all times, including weekdays
48


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
I Increase law enforcement
I Continue to enhance the Park conditions
I Dedicate Park-generated revenues to repair the Park
I Examine potential outside sources of funding. Civic Center is listed on the National Register of
Historic Places and is the only Denver park other than Red Rocks with a national level of
significance. This level of significance entitles the Park to Federal grant opportunities not
available to other parks that may be listed on the National register but have only State or local
significance.
I Develop new mechanisms for generating regular revenue dedicated to the Park to enhance the
success of its long-term preservation by strategically implementing Park restoration and
rehabilitation projects
I Reduce long-term maintenance needs through preventive maintenance measures and cost-
saving modifications
PARKS AND PARKWAYS ISSUES AND ANALYSIS
> General
Issues
The importance of Civic Center Park and the role it plays for the surrounding civic buildings cannot be
overestimated. However, urban pressures for parking and access; social problems such as graffiti, drug
dealing and homelessness; and larger, more frequent public events are contributing to the deterioration
of the park areas. Compounding these pressures, park budgets are shrinking. Routine maintenance
measures cannot keep up with the pace of deterioration, and costs have escalated out of reach for the
normal Denver Parks and Recreation maintenance budget. Today more than ever, creative solutions and
strategies are required to keep up with the escalating challenges to maintain Civic Center as a healthy,
vital historic icon in the heart of the civic district of the city and the state. However, no comprehensive
planning or long-term strategies have been developed to effectively deal with these most of these issues.
Little information currently exists to document the condition, integrity, significance or comprehensively
evaluate historic resources in Civic Center Park.
49


PARKS AND
PARKWAYS
Park planning needs tn build nn
histnric resnurces and design.
Analysis
The Parks and Recreation Department was recently awarded a grant from the Colorado Historical Fund to
assess the historic resources of Civic Center Park. The study will provide necessary baseline information
to develop design and management guidelines for appropriate development and future change in the
Park and more effectively preserve these significant resources.
b Connections and relationship between the Park and the rest of Downtown
Issues
Civic Center Park was historically planned as a strategic crossroads, serving as a link between the
commercial districts along 16th and 17th Streets and the State Capitol area. It continues to occupy a
critical location for Downtown bus, pedestrian and vehicular access. Furthermore, the primary pedestrian
link between major facilities such as Denver Public Library, the Denver Art Museum and the Downtown
area is along the edges of the Park or through the Park. However, the critical linkage along Bannock is
dominated by cars and parking. The central walkway through the Park does not meet the American
Disability Act requirements for an accessible route.
Analysis
Several plans broadly address goals for improving the connection between Civic Center Park and the
surrounding commercial district and civic places however no specific strategies exist to
comprehensively implement improvements and are dependent on incremental private development. To
strengthen the connection between the area and the neighborhoods, currently there is only limited
funding available for implementation. Site specific information and planning tools to guide transportation
and pedestrian oriented developments in the area are lacking.
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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
h Special Events
Issues
Public concerts by the Denver Municipal Band in 1920 began the parks enduring popularity as a forum
for free civic events. Civic Center Park is probably best known for the major events such as the Peoples
Fair, Taste of Colorado, Cinco de Mayo, and many others that are traditionally held annually in the Park.
While the Park continues in its role as premier civic space for civic events, the impact of these events on
the Park and the emerging Downtown neighborhoods is increasing. These events take their toll on the
Park structures, lawns and trees from soil compaction and vehicle damage. Damage fees do not always
keep pace with the level of impact in the Park nor are they effectively collected. The extent of street
closures, massive influx of visitors, and parking has impacts on the quality of life for the growing
population of Downtown residents.
Analysis
Large special event issues are typically dealt with piecemeal at periodic inter-agency meetings. However,
there are few guidelines or management strategies consistently applied to all events organizations to
address issues that affect the area around the park. No strategies or plans exist to address larger quality
of neighborhood life issues such as parking impacts. No economic or budget analysis has been
conducted to evaluate the fee structure for special events. Event programming is largely dependent on
and reactive to outside organization proposals.
Public celebrations have long been
part of the charm of Civic Center.
51


PARKS AND
PARKWAYS
Safety and Security
Issues
Social problems such as vagrancy, drug dealing and skateboarding, continue to dominate the social scene
in the Park, making it uninviting for appropriate Park use. Although the Park is full of people during
events and festivals, it is often devoid of activity during the week. While the Park is surrounded by an
increasing density of workers and residents, Civic Center Park often is avoided and has developed a
reputation as a dangerous locale, especially at night. Police patrols alone has not been an effective
deterent to eliminate or reduce illegal uses in the Park.
Analysis
Vagrancy is one of Civic Center
Parks most pressing issues.
There are no management strategies to address these issues. There are no programs to proactively
encourage regular park activities to attract broader public to use the park and promote a vital and healthy
park environment. No formal coordination among agencies exist to patrol or monitor the Park.
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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
> Maintenance
Issues
Inadequate funding is another issue that severely limits the ability of the Parks Department to keep up
with regular repairs, preventive maintenance, and appropriate cost-saving modifications. The Park is
funded through the Denver Parks and Recreation budget, which is shared by 301 other parks, parkways,
and recreation centers. These funds are so scarce there is currently a $100 million backlog of deferred
capital maintenance projects that only receives about $3-5 million a year to address. Furthermore, funds
collected from special event fees and other park-related revenues are deposited in the Citys general
funds and are not earmarked for specific use at Civic Center Park.
There are no dedicated funds to maintain the public art located in the Park: the Alan True murals, A. P
Proctor bronzes, and several smaller monuments and plaques have already suffered deterioration. Past
repairs have been made thanks to generous private donations, but generally this occurs only after the
pieces are in a crisis state of disrepair.
The Greek Theater during restoration
Day to day maintenance also suffers from the lack of sufficient staff to keep the Park in good condition.
Maintaining the areas around RTD bus stops is especially challenging. These areas are heavily used and
require much more intensive maintenance than can be provided by the available staff.
Analysis
No plans exist to address improving maintenance efficiencies or capturing alternative funding sources in
order to improve the level of maintenance.
53


QUALITY OF LIFE
QUALITY OF LIFE
54


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
EXISTING CONDITIONS
h Neighborhood and Community Organizations
Nine neighborhood and community organizations work to protect and enhance the quality of life within
the Civic Center Study Area, including Downtown and adjacent neighborhoods. These organizations are
listed in the following matrix, which identifies whether or not an organization is currently registered
with the City, the boundaries of that organization, and any committees that deal more specifically with
quality of life or issues particularly relevant to the Assessment.
Name Registered North Sooth East West Committees
Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Yes Colfax Avenue Speer Blvd. Lincoln Street Speer Blvd. 1 Urban Design 1 Good Neighbor 1 Justice Center 1 Transportation
Golden Triangle Arts District No
Downtown Denver Partnership/BID Yes 20th Street Colfax/Speer Grant St. Wewatta Street
Baker Historic Neighborhood Association Yes 6th Avenue Mississippi Avenue Lincoln Street S. Platte River 1 Zoning and Liquor License
Capitol Hill Onited Neighbors (CHUN) Yes 23rd Avenue 1st Avenue Colorado Blvd. Broadway 1 Zoning and Liquor License 1 Transportation
Neighbors United Con Poder Yes Colfax Avenue 6th Avenue Broadway 1-25
Inter-Neighborhood Cooperation (INC) Yes City Limits City Limits City Limits City Limits 1 Zoning
Downtown Denver Residents Association Yes I-25/23rd St. Speer Blvd. Broadway 1-25
La Alma/Lincoln Park Planning Group Yes Colfax Ave. 6th Avenue Speer Blvd. 1-25
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QUALITY OF LIFE
> Cultural, Institutional, and Governmental Facilities in the Study Area
The Civic Center Study Area is home to several of the premier cultural, institutional, and governmental
facilities in the Rocky Mountain region. These facilities attract a significant number of visitors to the Civic
Center and enhance the quality of life of the residents and employees within the Study Area, Downtown,
and the surrounding neighborhoods.These facilities include:
Name Address Type
Byers-Evans House 1310 Bannock Street Historic House Museum
Colorado History Museum 1300 Broadway State History Museum
Colorado State Capitol 200 East Colfax Avenue State Offices and Legislative Chambers
Denver Art Museum 2 East 14th Avenue Art Museum
Denver Central Public library 1357 Broadway Public Library, Western History Library, Government Documents, Geneological Research
Denver City and County Building 1437 Bannock Street City Offices, City Council Chambers, and Courts
Emily Griffith Opportunity School 1250 Welton Street Alternative High School and Adult Continuing Education
Firelighters Museum 1362 Tremont Street Firefighters History Museum
United States Mint 320 West Colfax Avenue Production Facility for U.S. Currency
56


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
QUALITY OF LIFE GOALS AND POLICIES FROM ADOPTED PLANS
I Neighborhood-serving uses, including uses such as restaurants, drug stores, and dry cleaners,
should be readily available to neighborhood residents, employees, and visitors.
I The neighborhood should be safe in both reality and perception.
I The neighborhood should be pedestrian-friendly, with priority given to the pedestrian and to
good pedestrian access to all areas of the neighborhood.
I Neighborhood residents, employees, and visitors should have ready access to transit, with good
connections to local and regional bus and light rail routes.A local connector, or shuttle service,
should be provided.
I The neighborhood should be perceived as having readily accessible green spaces, with inviting
linkages to every section of the neighborhood.
I Historic structures should be protected and used.
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QUALITY OF LIFE
QUALITY OF LIFE ISSUES ANU ANALYSIS
General
Issues
The study area is home to significant cultural and historic resources and neighborhood and government
services. Area residents feel threatened by the potential that new uses, such as the proposed new
detention facility and its related uses, might undermine the vision and investment in the area as a cultural
center and visitor attraction.
Analysis
The City has a huge financial stake in maintaining and enhancing the Civic Center as cultural center and
visitor attraction. In the last decade alone, over $300 Million of public money has been invested in the
area. This investment reflects the pride that the City takes in the Civic Center and the realization that the
cultural institutions and related facilities are important economic generators for the City and the
neighborhood. To help enhance the quality of the area and its institutions, the Civic Center Cultural
Complex Master Plan of 1992 set a framework for expansion and joint programming for the cultural
institutions. Similarly, the 1998 Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan reinforced the importance of related
cultural uses in a mixed-use environment. New government, court and detention facilities must be
evaluated for potential impacts, real or anticipated, that could devalue the investment in the area and for
ways in which they can enhance the quality of the area.
Architecture
Issues
Architecture in the study area is an uneasy mix of stately civic buildings, innovative contemporary design,
and mediocre architecture.
Analysis
The Design Standards and Guidelines for the Civic Center Historic District, B-5 and B-8-G Zone Districts,
and OD-1 Overlay Zone District address design issues and are intended to bring a more consistent quality
to all new construction in the area. Public buildings may need additional design criteria to ensure
continuation of the tradition of urban design excellence.
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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
Location and Access
Issues
The Civic Center study area is adjacent to Downtown and other dense, mixed-use neighborhoods, giving
it excellent proximity to cultural and government facilities, employment, shopping, parks, and open
space.These close-by uses and facilities provide potential amenities for visitors, employers, and residents.
However, there are physical and psychological barriers to full access to these amenities, primarily
because of poor pedestrian connections; a series of vacant, underutilized, and vandalized sites that divide
the more active uses; a concentration of panhandlers and homeless people; and a perception of unsafe
conditions.
Analysis
Social, psychological, and physical barriers between the study area and the surrounding amenities should
be addressed through further planning, programming, maintenance, and capital projects.The Downtown
Area Plan identifies key connections between Downtown, the Civic Center, and the other surrounding
neighborhoods. The Downtown Multi-modal Access Plan (DMAP) will provide further direction on
improving access.The Pedestrian Master Plan will provide guidance for improving pedestrian
connections.
Government and Neighborhood Services
Issues
While government services are concentrated in the study area, neighborhood services in the study area
are limited for visitors, employees, and visitors and often require a trip to the 16th Street Mall. Desired
services include drug stores, groceries, dry cleaning, shoe repair and other services that are often needed
on a regular basis. More neighborhood services are needed in or immediately adjacent to, convenient to,
and visible from Civic Center Park, particularly food services.
Analysis
The zoning to allow the desired mix of uses is in place. Private development of amenities and services is
dependant on market demand.
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QUALITY OF LIFE
p Events Issues Events in Civic Center Park trash the area for those who use it at other times. Analysis Denver Parks and Recreation has received a grant to conduct a parks plan for Civic Center Park, including events planning and mitigation of impacts. pCultural and Histuric Resuurces Issues The cultural facilities and resources, historic structures and landscape, and special events are uplifting to the spirit and help enrich the lives of visitors, employees, and residents. Notwithstanding the remaining historic structures, the area has lost a wealth of historic resources. Some of the remaining structures and landscape will likely to be threatened in the future. Analysis Civic Center Historic District protects the most significant historic buildings in the study area. The Civic Center Park Plan will inventory and recommend strategies for the protection and rehabilitation of historic resources and public art in the park. Other historic resources should be inventoried and considered for protection through local designation. pOpen and Green Spaces Issues While Civic Center Park, Lincoln Park, and Speer Boulevard provide large open spaces in close proximity to all parts of the study area, outside the immediate area of those spaces, there is no indication that they exist or how to get to them. Several of the sites that are perceived as open spaces, such as the areas on the south side of the Colorado History Museum or the areas around the new Cultural Complex Parking Structure provide open spaces, but are sites for future development. The area needs better connections to its green spaces and to feel like a neighborhood in a park. Analysis Improved streetscape and the siting and design of new buildings can help provide better visual and
60


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
physical connections to the existing parks and open spaces. The Denver Streetscape Design Manual and
the Design Standards and Guidelines in place for the study area provide guidance for improving the
streetscape and the siting of design of new buildings.
b Environs
Issues
Surface parking lots, sparse or nonexistent landscaping, and poorly maintained buildings characterize the
areas immediately surrounding the study area. All of the areas immediately surrounding the study area
need to be upgraded to the level and livability of the core of the Civic Center. At the same time, the
facilities in the Civic Center and the use of those facilities impact the adjoining areas both positively and
negatively.
Analysis
There is no indication that significant regulatory barriers to redevelopment exist. Barriers are more
related to financing and market demand. Increased code enforcement and amortization of non-
conforming uses could address some of the problem. The Civic Center Park Plan will include provisions
for events planning and impact mitigation.
bUrban Living
Issues
With the proximity of facilities and services, the area has the potential for providing an exciting and
fulfilling urban experience for visitors, employees, and residents. This potential is still largely untapped.
The cultural facilities in the study area successfully provide an environment that uplifts the spirit of
those individuals who can take advantage of their facilities and services.The entire area, however, is
missing an opportunity by not having the same effect.
Analysis
New development can be located and designed to help create an exciting and fulfilling urban
experience. All new development in the study area should take cues from the cultural facilities in the
area and provide high quality architecture, art, landscaping, and materials.The existing plans and
regulatory framework in the area call for the desired quality of redevelopment; barriers to additional
redevelopment are more closely related to financing and market demand.
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QUALITY OF LIFE
Parking Issues Employee parking is limited and expensive. Parking will become more limited and more expensive for employees and visitors as surface parking lots are redeveloped. Analysis No comprehensive parking study or plan is currently available. DMAP will partially address the issue. New development in the B-8-G zone district is required to provide parking for its needs. No parking is required in the B-5 zone district. Displaced parking from new development on parking lots is not the responsibility of the developer. Pedestrians Issues Pedestrians are subject to the impacts from the dominance of automobiles, high volume of traffic, congestion and noise. Distances can be long and unfriendly, disrupting the ease of pedestrian access. Analysis The Pedestrian Master Plan will help address pedestrian issues. DMAP will look at access issues. The Denver Streetscape Manual provides standards and guidelines for streetscape improvements.As additional redevelopment occurs, the pedestrian experience will improve. Transit Issues While both the bus system and light rail are readily accessible at the eastern and northern edges of the study area, transit connections to the edges are limited in the interior and limit the use of transit by visitors, area residents, and area employees. Distances between desired destinations are great enough that walking the area would benefit from some form of local shuttle service that would connect uses. Analysis DMAP will address transit issues related to getting in, around and out of Downtown. The Pedestrian Master Plan is looking at improving the pedestrian infrastructure and experience.
62


CIVIC CENTER PLAN NING ASSESSMENT
Safety Issues Both the reality and perception of safety are compromised by the intensity of the loitering and drug activity in and around both Civic Center and Lincoln Parks and the bus stops in each, both day and night. The reality and perception of anti-social activities in the park limits the use of the park by visitors, employees, and residents. Analysis The Civic Center Park Plan will provide baseline information for management guidelines for appropriate development and change in the park Trash and Litter Issues Trash and litter damage the beauty of the area. Analysis Code enforcement, parks maintenance should be increased. Neighbors can help be calling the Neighborhood Inspection Service hotline to report problems.The Civic Center Park Plan will provide baseline information for management guidelines for appropriate development and changes in the park
63


ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
64


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
EXISTING ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
The Civic Center Area has an important role with the City of Denver and for the entire State of Colorado.
Some key economic considerations for this area include:
P The study area is in the heart of governmental activity both for the State of Colorado and for the
City and County of Denver.
P The study area lies on the southern edge of the central business district.
P The study area marks the demarcation where high rise private offices transition to government
facilities and 3-4 story office and retail buildings, and eventually to high-rise housing.
P The area is on the northern edge of redevelopment occurring from Colfax south along
Broadway.
P This redevelopment is likely to foster more intense future residential and commercial
development within in this area.
P The majority of current activity in this area revolves around government
employment/interaction and tourism.
p Employment
Table 1 shows employment estimates by category for the study area. Within the study area, employment
is estimated at about 10,550 persons. This represents about 1% of the total employment within the
Denver Metro area, and about 9% of employment in the Downtown.
By category, about 52% of the 16,550 people are government employees, including municipal, State and
Federal employees. Another 26% are currently classified as media, which is primarily newspaper since
the staff for both the Denver Post and Rocky Mountain News are located in this area.
65


ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
Study Area Employment and Wage Estimates
Employment Category Number Percent
Government 5,500 52%
Media 2,750 26%
Museums 650 6%
Restaurant 400 4%
Professional 300 3%
Other 950 9%
Total Employment 10,550 100%
Total Wage Estimates: $190,000,000
p Government Impact
With the key City and State headquarters located in this area, these employers are not only the major
employers, but spend also significant sums on facilities. The major infrastructure investments by the City
during the past ten years are listed on the following page. These investments total approximately
$313 million. The State has also renovated facilities over the years and continues to explore reuse and
expansion options. Similarly the Federal government has spent substantial sums on renovations at the
US Mint and Post Office in recent years.
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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
b City Public Infrastructure Investment Past 10 Years
City Projects
b Denver Public Library, Central Branch
b Wellington E.Webb Municipal Office Building
b Denver Art Museum Expansion
b Cultural Center Parking Structure
b Remodel of Greek Theatre
b Total City Infrastructure Investment: $313 Million
b Tourism Draws, but Limited Services
Another interesting aspect of the area and perhaps one of the most untapped economic engines in the
area is the tourism component. Visitor estimates for this area are shown on the following page. The Art
Museum, Library, Colorado History Museum, State Capitol, City and County Building and Civic Center
Park all draw tourists, but the key attraction in the area was until recently the Denver Mint, which,
unfortunately, has been closed to the general public as of September 11,2001. Surprisingly, restaurants
account for only 4% of the employment in the area and there are no major hotels. Given the tourist
draws in this area, the portion of visitor service related employment could be higher. Only recently has
this sector begun to grow with new restaurants springing up as residential population increases.
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ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
Visitor Estimates:
Attraction________________
Denver Art Museum
Denver Public Library
Colorado History Museum
Attendance Per Year
383,949
1,152,973
269,861
Future Employment and Investments
The public and private investment in this area and redevelopment will continue to spur expanded
employment and population growth in the study area. Similar to growth that has occurred in LoDo, the
increased resident population in and around the study areas provides the opportunity for new services
and restaurants, which in turn encourages more residents in an upward spiral of economic growth and
investment.
Additionally, the public sector investment maintains the public aspect of the study area, attracts tourists
and increases employment in the area. Potential major future public and private investments are listed
on the following page.
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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
p Current and Prnpnsed Development and Expansinn Projects
P Denver Art Museum Expansion
P DAM Co-Development (residential, retail, office)
P Argyle Tower (residential)
P Justice Center Complex (3 buildings)
P Denver News Agency office
In addition to these specific projects, the majority of the Civic Center area is included in the State of
Colorados Enterprise Zone which offers a reduction on State income tax based on job creation, job
training, capital investment and other business activities.
69


ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
ECONOMIC ACTIVITY ISSOES AND ANALYSIS
General
Employment and economic activity in the area is poised for continued growth. While the potential exists
for expansion of government facilities in the study area, the residential growth to the south of the study
area continues to foster new and expanded service opportunities.
The areas unlikely to change shown on the Change Area Map are primarily government facilities and
while employment in the these areas may be cyclical, the primary employment increases for both
government and private sector activity are likely to occur in the areas subject to change. In the
northern portions of the study area, the Convention Center may stimulate some tourist and service
related growth and there is the potential for some expanded business activity. At the perimeter of
existing government facilities some expansion of government facilities is likely to occur. In the southern
portions of the study area, residential, tourist, art and service expansion would be expected.
Issues
Building on current activity and creating new activity are critical to support the tourist oriented and
potential art community growth.
Analysis
Pedestrian connections and other linkages are critical to tourist and art business growth. The southern
portions of the study area from 12th to 14th Avenues could capture this type of growth along with some
areas adjacent to the Convention Center. Linkages between the two are equally important.
Issues
As documented by the current landscape of activity and employment, future growth in this area should
revolve around government functions, tourist activity and potentially small/medium businesses.
Analysis
Local government is looking to expand in this area. Maintaining a pedestrian scale for government
facilities and pedestrian connections are important to the success of tourist related and service
businesses. As an example that should be emulated, the Webb Municipal Building and integrated annex
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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
made a successful transition from the CBD to the Civic Center, not only in terms of scale but in terms of
economic activity and diversity with the integrated retail vendors.
The growth of small and medium-sized businesses generally is generated by increases in the number of
residential units.Therefore, the anticipated increase in residential units in the Study Area should result in
additional small and medium business activity.
Issues
Major growth in new job creation (excluding the proposed Denver Newspaper Agency moving within
the area in the next few years) will be limited to government functions.
Analysis
Large, private sector businesses will grow in the Downtown core due to market trends, high vacancies,
and the availability of alternative transportation. They will also grow in outlining areas of the City,
including Stapleton, Lowry, Denver International Airport (DIA), Interstate 25 (1-25) corridor, etc.
Key Development Opportunities
Issues
The current surface parking lots in this area will be difficult to re-develop into other uses due to the
surplus of office space in the Downtown area, competition for residential development from other
areas of Downtown, City requirements for parking in new developments, and the profitability of
surface parking.
Analysis
No specific City program is established at this time to address surface parking lot redevelopment.
Issues
Within the study area there are underdeveloped sites that, if redeveloped, could significantly impact the
character of the area, for good or for bad. These key development opportunities may include both
public and private facilities. Critical sites include locations immediately adjacent to Civic Center Park,
between West 14th and Colfax Avenues, bordering Colfax, and along Acoma and Bannock Streets. The
appropriate locations and limits of government and institutional expansion need to be determined.
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ECONOMIC ACTIVITY
Bight: Map nf Employees per Block
20th Ave.
19th Ave.
18 th Ave.
17th Ave.
16 th Ave.
*4(h Ave.
c/3 13th Ave.
d
72
Pennsylvania St.


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
Analysis
The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan defines a Civic Center subarea. The Civic Center Cultural
Complex Master Plan also addresses cultural facility expansion. The Downtown Area Plan indicates
locations for government expansion. No single plan defines appropriate locations or limits of
government/institutional expansion. Partnerships or incentives for private development in key locations
have not been addressed.
p Development Barriers
Issues
The lack of significant private development activity in the area indicates there are barriers to projects.
These barriers may include:
P Market demand, which is impacted by the economy;
P Lack of development incentives;
P Profitability of surface parking is a disincentive for redevelopment, and
P The cost of land is increasing.
Analysis
There is no indication that significant regulatory barriers to redevelopment exist. Barriers are more
related to financing and market demand.
73


GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES
GOVERNMENT AND
CULTURAL FACILITIES
74


CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
EXISTING GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES
In the study area there are over four million gross square feet of space dispersed among 28 facilities that
house Federal, State, and City government and cultural uses. There are over 6,600 government and
cultural employees in these facilities. Many, if not all, the facilities involve heavy interaction with the
public. Although these facilities generally have, to varying degrees, met the needs of their users, several
facilities are: nearing the end of their useful-life-span; cannot feasibly or cost-effectively be expanded to
mitigate current overcrowded conditions; and/or lack the capacity to accommodate future growth.
The government facilities consist mostly of courts and court related use, administrative offices, legislature,
and safety uses. The cultural facilities include museums and the Central Denver Public Library.
Two current uses presently in the study area that have severe overcrowding issues along with facility
functionality problems are the courts in the City and County Building and detention and intake in the Pre
Arraignment Detention Facility (PADF). Identified below are some problems the City currently faces with
these two facilities:
9 Courts
0 County and District Courts are congested and below standards. Over 50 courts, which include
Probate, Civil, Juvenile, and Criminal, are located in the City and County Building that was
originally designed for eight courts when constructed in 1932.
0 Defendants, victims, jurors and families circulate together among 19 criminal courts.
0 The Grand Jury room is located in a basement space designed for storage that does not meet air
quality requirements.
0 The State could, at any time, mandate or force the City to meet current State standards by leasing
additional buildings or making major renovations.
The Denver Public Library Central
Branch had a majnr expansinn in
1995. Michael Graves was selected as
the architect fnllnwing a design
cnmpetitinn.
h The County Civil courts have a $3.25 million, five-year lease in the Adams Mark Hotel.
9 Renovation of the Permit Center for Juvenile Courts is costly (estimated at $9.0+ million) and
doesnt accommodate growth nor meet State Courtroom standards.
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GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES
I Inadequate space in Courtroom 191J, the County Juvenile Court, forces defendants and parents
to stand outside in the elements.
I There isnt any public parking associated with Courts.
> Detention
) City and County jails operate at 140% to 150% of capacity.
) In 2002 the Sheriff Department relinquished accreditation, the Citys only shield from a class-
action lawsuit and federal cap.
) Overcrowding strains Sheriffs ability to safely monitor and control inmates, putting both the
inmates and deputies at risk. Alternatives to jail cant keep pace with growth, requiring early
releases of inmates.
) The PADF rated capacity is 158. It consistently exceeds 250 arrestees on Fridays through
Mondays. The rated capacity at the County Jail is 1,350. The average daily count has been 1,928.
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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
EXISTING CITY/PUBLIC FACILITIES IN STUDY AREA
Item Facility Hame___________________________Address_______________Year Built Status_________Tatal Squ. Ft. # at Emplayees Primary Use
1 District One Fire House 745 W. Colfax Ave. 1975 City Owned 29,000 104 Fire Station, Offices
2 City & County Building 1437 Bannock St. 1932 City Owned 350,000 285 Mayors Office, Courts, Council
3 Wellington E. Webb Municipal Office Bldg. 201 W. Colfax Ave. 2002 City Owned 700,000 1,800 Offices
4 Art Museum 100 W. 14th Ave. 1950/71 City Owned 210,000 93 Museum
5 Central library 10W. 14th Ave. 1958/95 City Owned 540,000 320 Library
6 Permit Center 200 W. 14th Ave. 1987 City Owned 67,000 143 Backfill Offices
7 McNichols Civic Center Office Bldg. 144 W. Colfax Ave. 1904 City Owned 34,000 154 Offices
8 Pre-Arraignment Detenlion Facility (PADF) 1351 Cherokee St. 1975 City Owned 57,000 197 Detention/Intake
9 Police Administration Building 1331 Cherokee St. 1975 City Owned 172,000 551 Offices
10 Minoru Yasui Office Building 303 W. Colfax Ave. 1967/82 City Owned 146,000 398 Probation, Diversion, Offices
11 Tremont Office Building 1313 Tremont St. N/A Lease 25,000 105 Probation
12 Adams Mark Hotel 1515 Cleveland Pi. N/A Lease 27,000 35 Civil Courts
13 Gulf Western Building 110 16th St. N/A Lease 4,230 10 Traffic Courts
14 Cherokee Boiler Plant 1348 Cherokee St. 1928 City Owned 5,000 0 Maint./Storage
15 Cherokee Parking Garage 1338 Cherokee St. 1938 City Owned 13,500 0 Parking
16 Court Child Care Building 280 14th St. 1950 City Owned 9,150 25 Daycare/Offices
17 Cultural Center Parking Garage 1255 Broadway 2003 City Owned 324,000 5 Parking
18 Art Museum Admin. Building 414 14th St. 1923 Public Owned 42,000 110 Offices
19 Emily Griffith Opportunity School 1250 Welton St. 1944 Public Owned 227,000 600 School
20 Denver Public Schools 1338 Fox St. 1971 Public Owned 53,000 200 Office
21 Denver Firefighters Museum 1326 Tremont Pi. 1900 City Owned 12,000 25 Museum
22 State Capitol 200 E. Colfax Ave. 1903 State Owned 310,000 350 State Offices, Legislative Functions
23 RID Civic Center Station 1550 Broadway 1982 Public Owned 180,000 50 Transit Hub
24 Denver Mint 320 W. Colfax Ave. 1929 Federal Gov. 183,570 200 Industrial
25 Rocky Mountain News Site 400 W. Colfax Ave. 1952/72/85 City Owned 244,317 700 Offices, Industrial
26 Colorado History Museum 1300 Broadway 1976 State Owned 135,142 120 Museum
27 Colorado State Judicial Center 2 E. l4thAve. 1976 State Owned 87,490 60 Judicial
28 Post Office 1421 ElatiSt. 1970 Federal Gov. 24,000 50 Post Office, Distribution
Disclaimer: Square Footage and Employee numbers are approxima e. TOTALS: 4,211,399 6,670
Table 2 is a detailed list of the government and culture facilities in the study area. The map on the
following page indicates the location of the facilities in Table 2. By far the City and County of Denver
and the State of Colorado are the largest landowners in the area.
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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
PROJECTED GOVERNMENT AND COLTORAL FACILITIES NEEDS
Several master plans and facility studies that identify future needs have been completed for public
buildings in the study area. Some current and recently completed projects that are currently under
construction in the study area are a result of adopted master plans. The Wellington E.Webb Municipal
Office Building, the Denver Art Museum expansion, and the renovation of the Minoru Yasui Office
Building are all projects that were results of following master plans which guide public facility
investment.
There have been many plans over the years, with some plans building upon one another. Some plans
have changed direction over the years due to availability of land, changes in political agendas, and
budgets, but consistent through all plans is the driving force of population and employment. As
population and employment increase in Denver so does the need for governmental and cultural
facilities. It is important to note that while local government may decline in the short term due to the
current fiscally-constrained climate, over the long term, public employment will parallel population
growth.
Many facilities have outgrown their ability to accommodate growth, thus forcing the City to remodel
facilities or lease space. This is evident with the City and County Building, which was unable to
accommodate all of the necessary courtrooms. Thus, the City and County of Denver leased space in the
office tower of the Adams Mark Hotel for six courtrooms. The Office of Asset Management would like to
reduce lease expenses and return these courtrooms to the City and County Building. Current plans have
been created that accommodate this desire. This is a reasonable goal. For example, with the completion
of the Webb Municipal Building the City eliminated over 400,000 square feet of leased space scattered
around the City. While lease rates may vary over the short term, in the long term it will be more cost
effective for the City to own rather than lease space.
Many of the plans listed below relate to Safety, Courts and Government Services, which are significantly
present in the study area. While the new office building has accommodated government services
growth over the next twenty years, there will still be a need for growth in Safety and Courts to allow the
City to function efficiently and serve the public.
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GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES
The following are some of the City and County of Denver facility master plans and studies completed
over the last 16 years, which may influence the study area.
p 1986 Denver Facility Master Plan, Pnuw 9 Assnciates / Geisler Smith / Rnss Consulting
This plan suggested central administrative/justice facilities to house the activities involved in the
management of City affairs and the administration of justice. It advised that this type of facility requires a
central location because of the significant interrelationships between the occupying agencies and the
heavy volume of public business transacted. It observed that these facilities convey a sense of
community identity and image. The plan suggested developing a City and County Building Complex. It
noted that the City and County Building remains the key component, and recommended relocating the
Judicial functions into structures geographically related to the City and County and Public Safety
buildings. The plan also suggested construction of a new judicial facility. Two judicial facility options
were provided in the report: one site was located south of the Permit Center; the other located it north of
the City Jail.
p 1992 PADF Concept Design, Reilly Johnson Architecture
This concept design suggested a six-story addition to the north of the existing Pre-Arraignment Detention
Facility to increase the capacity of the facility to a 507-rated housing capacity.
p 1999 Draft Strategic Facility Master Plan, The SGS Group
This study (based on the 1986 Pouw Study) was not finalized and focused on eliminating leased space
and issues with existing City buildings. It explored the construction of a new office building and
renovating existing buildings. The Plan suggested the use of the Permit Center as a Court Annex to allow
lease space to return to City and County Building. It recommended renovating the City and County
Building to provide five new courts, which would meet year 2005 projections. It also stated that by year
2010 additional growth of courts would require the construction of a new court facility. To meet long-
term growth, the study projected the need for an additional 300,000 square feet. The Plan further
recommended developing new courts in conjunction with detention facilities when operational
improvements are exhausted and developing a dedicated Juvenile Court along with a Court Building
developed within the Civic Center.
Implementation of portions of this plan started in 1999. The first phase was to construct a new office
building to consolidate agencies and eliminate leased space. This phase was completed with the opening
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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
of the 700,000 square foot Wellington E.Webb Municipal Offie Building. The second phase identified
three buildings, which would receive substantial remodel to accommodate future growth. Due to fiscal
constraints only the Minoru Yasui building is being completely remodeled and the City and County
Building would receive a minor remodel only in vacated space. The Permit Center would not receive
any remodel. The decision not to renovate these two facilities may mean that the long-term needs of the
City may not be met at this time and future renovations would be needed.
p 2000 Denver Police Master Plan, Daniel C. Smith and Associates
The Police Master Plan calls for the decentralization of Investigations out of the existing Police
Administration Building. This would allow for other administrative functions to grow in the existing
building. Unfortunately even with decentralization the Police Department still needs additional space.
They will require approximately 28,000 square feet of additional administrative space within the next
twenty years. The plan also calls for a new District Six Police Station, a Special Function Facility, and an
Investigations Building, with all three totaling over 125,000 square feet. Although the facilities needs
were identified in the master plan, no specific sites have been identified for these functions.
p 2001 Denver Art Museum Master Plan, Klip Cullussy
This plan addresses the new wing of the Denver Art Museum, the Denver Art Museum Office Building,
the Cultural Center Parking Structure, and Co-Development. The plan calls for a 146,000 square foot
addition to the existing museum, a 42,000 square foot office building, over 13,000 square feet of
commercial/retail space, and over 166,000 square feet of residential. The plan also indicated a 967-space
parking garage, which was completed this year. Construction on the new wing just began and phase
one of the co-development (residential/commercial) is expected to begin in the summer of 2004.
p 2003 Fire Department Master Plan, Daniel C. Smith and Assnciates
This plan as it relates to the Civic Center calls for the Fire Department Headquarters presently located at
Fire House One to be relocated. No specific site has been targeted at this time for this use although it
should be located near the Manager of Safety and other government agencies. The plan also suggests
relocating the fire departments warehouse to the vacated area in Fire Station One, mainly due to its
central location. The fire station itself will remain in its current facility.
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> 2002-2003 Justice Center Planning, Reilly Johnson Architecture
This plan examined the City and County Buildings ability to meet long-term court needs. It determined
in order to meet the long-term needs of the Courts, City Council and the Mayors Office, criminal and
juvenile courts would need to be relocated to a new facility. This plan determined that Civil Courts in
leased space could return to the building and that it would be able to meet the twenty-year needs of the
civil courts remaining. With the acquisition of the Rocky Mountain News (RMN) site, this plan
developed concepts for a Justice Center. Twenty-year caseload projections forecasted the need for 29
adult criminal courtrooms and 12 juvenile courtrooms.
Using previous studies, it was determined that 1,500 pre-sentencing detention beds were necessary. This
estimate of new beds was also examined against the ability to close inefficient jail buildings at Smith
Road to allow for future expansion and to increase holding to a total of 2,700 beds. The plan indicated
the potential of developing three buildings on the RMN land that was acquired by the City in 2002. One
building would be an adult court and detention facility, the other would be a juvenile courthouse, and the
last building would house parking for all facilities and would provide over 20,000 square feet of
commercial/retail space. This plan recommends closing the existing PADF building and eliminating the
need to renovate the Permit Center, providing approximately 124,000 square feet for other government
needs in the area.
Table 3 is a detailed list of potential needs identified in the various plans for facilities that are located in
the study area. Items 1-20 are projected needs from master plans. Items 21-28 are possible back-fill uses
for the Rocky Mountain News site if a Justice Center is not developed on that site.
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FACILITY NEEDS (CITY & COUNTY OF DENVEO] IN TOE STUDY AOEA
Recommendation Existing Existing Prnjected Implementation
Item Heed_________________________facility Type Current tecatien Future location Based__________Status__________Sq. ft. Sq. ft.______________Plan
Projected Needs from Master Plans and Studies
1 Safety Detention Expansion, Justice Center Component Detention/ Intake PADF/Smith Rd. Rocky Mountain News Site Study City Owned 357,000 462,000 2004
2 Courts Criminal Courts Bldg., Justice Center Component Courts City & County Building Rocky Mountain News Site Master Plan City Owned N/A 241,000 2004
3 Courts -Juvinile Courts Bldg., Justice Center Component Courts City & County Building Gov. Complex Master Plan City Owned N/A 116,000 2004
4 Criminal Justice Center Parking, Garage Justice Center Component Parking/Office N/A Rocky Mountain News Site Study N/A N/A 160,000 2004
5 Safety District 6 Police Station Pobce Station Clarkson Within District Master Plan Lease 7,917 40,000 2005
6 Safety Fire Department Headquarters Office Fire Station #1 Gov. Complex Master Plan City Owned 15,000 25,000 2005
7 Safety Fire Department Warehouse Warehouse Center St. Fire Station #1 Master Plan City Owned 4,200 10,000 2005
8 Safety PAB Expansion Admin. Office PAB Gov. Complex Master Plan City Owned 172,000 28,000 2005-2015
9 Safety Property Storage Expansion Warehouse PAB Gov. Complex Master Plan City Owned N/A 10,000 2010
10 Safety Crime Lab Expansion Special PAB Gov. Complex Master Plan City Owned N/A 5,000 2010
11 Safety Police Special Function Facility Special Harvard Gulch/ Decatur/City Pk Gov. Complex Master Plan N/A N/A 80,000 2010
12 Safety Investigations Building Office 13th &Cheroket Gov. Complex Master Plan N/A N/A 5,000 2015
13 New Wing of Denver Art Museum Museum 14th Ave. South of Existing Plan N/A 210,000 146,000 2003
14 Expansion of Webb Building (2020) Office Colfax Ave. Gov. Complex Plan Lease/ Purchase N/A 35,000 N/A
15 Back-Dp 911 Call Center Office City & County Bldg. Qty & County Bldg. AMO City Owned 1,200 3,000 2004
16 Mayors Office Office of Emergency Management Office City & County Building City & County Building AMO City Owned 2,000 3,500 2005
17 County Courts Civil Division Relocation Courts Adams Mark Hotel City & County Building Master Plan Lease 27,000 30,000 2009
18 Courts Civil Court Expansion Courts City & County Building City & County Building Master Plan City Owned 25 existing civil courtrooms 32 courts projected 20 yr need 2009
19 Mayors Office Expansion Office City & County Bldg. Qty & County Bldg. Plan City Owned 5,000 3,000 2003
20 City Council Expansion Office City & County Bldg. Qty & County Bldg. Plan City Owned 8,500 2,800 2003
Sub-Total 1,447,300
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CULTURAL FACILITIES
CONTINUED: FACILITY NEEDS (CITY B COUNTY OF DENVER] IN THE STUDY AREA
Recommendation Existing Existing Prnjected Implementation
Item Heed__________________facility Type Current tecation Future tecatien Based_Status______Squ. ft. Squ. ft.________Date
Possible Backfill Uses Identified for RMN Site
21 General Services POB Shops Warehouse Brighton Blvd. RMN Backfill AMO Lease 18,000 12,000 N/A
22 Human Services Supplemental Foods Warehouse/ Retail Santa Fe RMN Backfill Master Plan Lease 45,000 70,000 N/A
23 Art Museum Warehouse Warehouse Brighton Blvd. RMN Backfill AMO Lease 8,000 8,000 N/A
24 Election Commission Warehouse Warehouse Gates RMN Backfill AMO Lease 40,000 45,000 N/A
25 Television Studios Special Stapleton RMN Backfill AMO Lease 13,000 15,000 N/A
26 Mayors Office Work Force Development Office Parkway Center RMN Backfill AMO Lease 10,000 15,000 N/A
27 Safety PADF Expansion Cityjail/Intake Grove St. Gov. Complex Study City Owned 57,000 87,000 N/A
28 Safety Civil Service Commission Office RMN Backfill AMO Lease 20,700 23,000 2005
Co-Development with City & County of Denver
29 DAM Co-Development Commercial/ New South of Master Plan N/A N/A 3,950 Retail 2004
at 12th Avenue Retail/ Residential Library 59,650 Res.
30 DAM Co-Development Commercial/ New South of Master Plan N/A N/A 10,660 Retail 2004
atAcoma Retail/ Residential Library 73,050 Res.
31 DAM Co-Development Commercial/ New South of Master Plan N/A N/A 42,000 Office 2007
at Broadway Retail/ Residential Library 120,000 Res.
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PLANNED OR PROPOSED GOVERNMENT AND COLTORAL FACILITIES DEVELOPMENT
Although the above master plans suggest several new facilities and renovation projects, only some of the
recommendations have been incorporated into an implementation plan. These facilities are as follows:
p Denver Art Museum [DAM]:
The expansion of the Denver Art Museum will be accomplished in four phases. The first phase,
completed in 2002, is a 967-space parking structure. The second phase, the addition of the Frederic C.
Hamilton Building, broke ground in 2003. A geometric explosion of glass and titanium designed by
Daniel Libeskind, the Hamilton Building will be an internationally significant work of architecture and a
signature landmark for the City of Denver. Silhouetted against the majestic Rocky Mountains, the
146,000-square-foot Hamilton Building will nearly double the size of the museum. It will house several
collections that have never been on permanent display.Three new state-of-the art special exhibition
galleries will allow the museum to bring unprecedented exhibitions to the region.
P DAM Co-Development:
The third and fourth phases of development have been designed to wrap the existing 967-space parking
structure with commercial and residential uses. The third phase will begin in the summer of 2004 and
will provide over 14,000 square feet of commercial/retail space and over 130,000 square feet of
residential. Phase four, slated to begin in the summer of 2007 would house 42,000 square feet of office
space and an additional 120,000 square feet of residential.
p Downtown Justice Center:
In an effort to eliminate overcrowding at the City and County Building and at the County Jail, return the
City and County Building to a civic use, allow for future growth at the City and County Building and at
the Smith Road site, and provide a centrally located facility that will maximize operational efficiencies,
the Rocky Mountain News (RMN) building has been proposed as the site for a new Justice Center. Prior
to construction, this proposal requires a citywide bond election, a rezoning, and design review. If
approved, this redevelopment would include relocating all criminal courts out of the City and County
Building into a new Criminal Courts Building containing 241,000 square feet. The RMN site is projected
to accommodate 32 criminal courtrooms, three more than the 20-year needs projection. In connection
with the criminal courtrooms, 462,000 square feet of detention facilities would also be constructed on
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the site. This would house 1,500 beds for pre-sentencing inmates and be the new intake building for the
Sheriffs office, thus allowing the closure of the current PADF at 14th and Cherokee completely and
closing inefficient housing units at Smith Road. The proposed Justice Center would accommodate
parking in three locations, on-site parking, underground private parking, and a parking structure for the
public south of 14th Avenue. The parking facility would also have 20,000 square feet of commercial
space. The final building in the Justice Center would be a juvenile courthouse of 116,000 square feet.
b City and County Building:
This building is presently planned for a minor remodel of the vacant space when agencies vacated to the
Webb Municipal Building. This remodel addresses deficiencies in present courtroom and office space
needs. Even with completion of this remodel, several courtrooms will still not meet courtroom standards.
Completion of the Justice Center would allow the City and County Building, without a major remodel, to
provide 34 quality courtrooms complying with court standards. The twenty-year projection for Civil
Courts is a total demand for 32 courtrooms, all of which could then be accommodated in the City and
County Building.
bPermit Center:
Present plans to remodel the building as a Juvenile Courthouse are on hold. Remodeling the Permit
Center would have met the present demand of nine courtrooms but would not have addressed the
twenty-year need of 12 courtrooms (growth of three additional). The Permit Center is currently being
used as offices for Probation staff and functions that vacated the Minoru Yasui Building while it is being
remodeled.
bState Facilities:
The State has not completed any expansion plans at present. They do have the desire to complete a
master plan for their facilities. State Historical Museum has conceptual plans for an expansion onto the
plaza at the south end of its current facility. The State owns several sites adjacent to Study Area that are
currently being used as surface parking lots and could be used for new facilities.
b Library:
No major renovations or expansions are planned in the near future for the Denver Central Library. There
is some internal expansion capabilities within the existing library and land south of the existing Library
that could be used for expansion.
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> Rocky Mountain News Site:
If the Rocky Mountain News site is not re-developed as a Justice Center, the Office of Asset Management
has identified several uses that can backfill the existing buildings. These backfill tenants are presently in
leased space and would benefit from the downtown location. These agencies include but are not limited
to Civil Service Commission, Art Museum Warehouse, Mayors Office of Work Force Development,
Supplemental Foods,Television Studios, Election Commission Warehouse, and Public Office Buildings Shops.
FACILITIES GOALS AND POLICIES FROM ADOPTED PLANS
Over sixteen years ago, the 1986 Denver Facility Master Plan recommended locating a new judicial
facility close to the heart of City government and the City Jail. Since then other studies have verified the
need and examined different options for creating additional courts and detention facilities. From these
studies a growing understanding has evolved about how these facilities function both alone and
together. Operational efficiencies are an essential consideration in building new facilities.
Current vision suggests combining pre-sentencing inmates with criminal courts achieve operational
efficiencies. Court efficiencies are also achieved by eliminating the scheduling delays stemming from
transport of inmates from the County Jail.
The Webb Municipal Building and its consolidation of government offices into one building has proven
very efficient. This facility is located in the heart of the Civic Center, close to mass transit, other
government offices, and is convenient for citizens. Co-location of services is often better for both City
workers and for the public.
With over 4,000,000 square feet of government and cultural facilities in the Civic Center area and
projected long-term population increasing, the need for expansion in the area over the long term should
be expected. Current plans have identified approximately 1.4 million square feet of new uses or
facilities required over the next twenty years, which is less that 1.5% growth per year.
When the Rocky Mountain News building came on the market, then-Mayor Wellington Webb directed
Asset Management to assess the sites potential for resolving jail overcrowding and court congestion and
overcrowding. Although the site is not large enough to house all detention activities as originally
proposed at the Sears site in 2001, it is well suited to combining all adult criminal courts with pre-trial
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detention and offers operating efficiencies and security benefits.
The City purchased the five acres, one block from City Hall, for $16 million with certificates of
participation funded through Sheriffs Regional Service Fund. The Rocky Mountain News will lease back
the facility until it moves to a new location for its operations.
A Justice Center combining 29 to 32 adult criminal courts, County and District, with booking, intake and
adult pre-trial inmates on the site of Rocky Mountain News building would relieve court and jail
congestion, enhance security and achieve operating efficiencies. Combining pre-sentencing inmates with
criminal courts eliminates security risks and court delays associated with busing 165 to 250 inmates from
County Jail to courts. Removing criminal courts and holding cells from the City and County Building
returns City Hall to a civic building. Relocating criminal courts from the City and County Building will
improve security for the remaining tenants and provide future growth for Mayor, City Council, and Civil
Division Courts. Once criminal courts move to the Justice Center, Civil Division courts can return to City
and County Building and the Adams Mark Hotel lease can be eliminated.
Converting the City Jail into public safety uses for Sheriffs and Police would increase the rated jail
capacity by nearly two-thirds from 1,508 to 2,470 without adding deputy sheriffs. This is accomplished
by closing old, staff-intensive buildings at the County Jail. The estimated 332 deputies needed for 1,500-
bed Justice Center would come from estimated 334 deputy sheriffs who staff closed PADF and County
Jail buildings replaced by the Justice Center.
Without an identified revenue stream the City and County of Denver would require a vote of the people
to construct a Downtown Justice Center. General Obligation Bonds would be necessary. In the event
voters do not approve funding the redevelopment of the site for a Justice Center, the City has activities in
leased space that could occupy the office building and its warehouses.
The Justice Center also provides opportunities for the City to meet the goals of other plans by providing
a surplus of space. The PADF and the Permit Center could readily be available to address other facility
master plan needs.
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GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES ISSUES AND ANALYSIS
p Existing Government Facilitaties Ability to Handle Future Growth
Issues
Several facilities are nearing the end of their useful life span, cannot feasibly or cost-effectively be
expanded to mitigate current overcrowded conditions, or lack the capacity to accommodate future
growth. Locations of future growth along with the cost of building in the Civic Center have proven to be
an increasing obstacle.
Analysis
Facility master plans with implementation strategies have recently proven very effective in identifying
needs as well as focus for future remodels, renovations, building acquisitions, and new facilities. These
plans have also helped identify locations for expansion and new facilities. Having a plan and a strategy
has proven helpful when land acquisition opportunities present themselves.The City has proven the
ability to provide the Civic Center with high quality architecture.
pGovernment Facility Related Development Opportunities and Integration
Issues
Government facilities in the study area provide opportunities to draw visitors to the area. Facilities such
as the Denver Art Museum and Library are anchors generating opportunities for retail in the area.
Measures to capitalize on these markets should be addressed.
It is important to explore the relationships between all government facilities and their ancillary activities.
Other examples include:
P The current expansion of the Art Museum provides yet another opportunity to revitalize the
study area;
P Government employees and visitors represent retail opportunities;
P Existing jail and bail bonds shops and proposed transition to a Justice Center facility with
integrated retail space for bail bonds;
P Visitors of the Capitol, Mint, Library and History Museum
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Analysis
Influencing traffic direction is important to capturing clients and customers and to eliminate confusion.
I Directional signage may play a key role in the ability to influence or capture potential markets
and direct traffic;
I The proposed transition to a Justice Center, a facility with integrated retail space for bail bonds
may also influence the opportunities;
A The architecture in the study area is an asset.
Master Planning nf Government Facilities
Issues
The government facilities in the area, like the neighborhood, change over time and the impact of growth
and change of these facilities must be considered in the plan. Government uses can also change over
time. Maintenance of these facilities plays an important role in the character of the neighborhood.
Analysis
The plan must acknowledge the long-term forecast for these facilities (20 years or more). The cumulative
impact may be more than one million square feet. Municipal, state and federal facilities are located in the
study area and may provided opportunities for cooperation on issues such as maintenance and
improvement districts. Interactions between government facilities and residences and businesses are
important considerations. The growth potentials must also consider parking as well. Potential exists for
public and private interaction in facilities in and around buildings. Consideration of the physical
locations of facilities within the study area should also be addressed in the plan.
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Justice Center Concerns
Issues
A number of concerns related to the Justice Center should be addressed in the plan including the scale
of the facility, the number of clients and customers including workers, jurors, inmates and visitors. There
are concerns that the Justice Center facility must be integrated into the area, not magnify the existing
challenges.
Analysis
The types of uses and facilities associated with the Justice Center should be delineated. The long-term
plan for the facility, including parking, should be addressed. There are concerns about safety and
whether perceived or real they should be addressed via the plan. Ancillary facilities such as the current
and future bail bonds vendors should be addressed. Opportunities to integrate the Justice Center and
the community should be explored.
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NEXT STEPS
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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT
The Planning Assessment can be used as the basis of future planning efforts and to help determine
which of four alternative tracks, or some variation of the tracks, best meets the needs of the City, the
neighborhood and the public at large. This chapter describes these four alternative approaches, a general
scope of work and the pros and cons of each track.
Whichever track is chosen, the timing for completion of the tasks will be determined by the deadline for
placing a bond issue on the ballot. The final product must be complete approximately six months prior
to Election Day in order to provide a document to City Council before it refers an issue to the ballot. For
example, if the Administration decides to pursue a general vote on the Justice Center bond in May 2005,
City Council needs to refer the measure in January 2005. If Council wants a complete Master Plan that is
available for a timely public review process prior to deciding whether to refer the measure to the ballot,
the Master Plan would need to be complete by November 2004.
TRACK A: CIVIC CENTER MASTER PLAN
> Overview
A Civic Center Master Plan is a small area plan that would be adopted as a supplement to the Denver
Comprehensive Plan 2000. The Master Plan would be directed at the contextual and future growth
issues identified in the Assessment, including a definition of boundaries and expectations for government
and institutional growth. The Master Plan would include a substantial Strategic Implementation chapter
that identifies projects and policies associated with transportation, parking, government-related
development, parks, and other issues set out in the Assessment.
> Tasks
1 Determine planning process, including planning team, public participation and resources.
2 Develop range of options to address issues identified in Assessment.
3 Review, refine and select alternatives, including a Parking Plan.
4 Develop comprehensive set of goals, objectives and recommendations.
5 Develop Strategic Implementation Plan to address issues, including policies, projects, funding
and timing.
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6 Adopt Master Plan as supplement to Comprehensive Plan
> Potential Cost
$150,000 to $250,000
> Staff
Community Planning and Development (6)
Public Works/Transportation (2)
Parks (2)
Asset Management (1)
Economic Development (1)
Parking and Transportation Consultant (1-2)
Time
Complete Draft plan: 8 months
Adopt plan: 4 months
Pros
Cons
Comprehensive approach to Civic Center issues
Identifies and recommends solutions for variety of issues
Identifies capital projects and potential funding sources
Responds to Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association request for a comprehensive plan
for the area
Plan is useful regardless of outcome of Justice Center location, design and mitigation
Neighborhood and public buy-in to plan recommendations
Plan provides information critical for planning the Justice Center
Does not address issues specific to Justice Center
May recommend City actions or projects that are costly
Requires intense City staffing and resources, thereby reducing their availability for other projects
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k Traffic studies may not be able to proceed until after the completion of the Downtown
Multimodal Access Plan (DMAP)
TRACK B: JUSTICE CENTER RESIGN BEVELOPMENT
> Overview
Many of the issues identified in the Assessment are related specifically to the Justice Center project
rather than to the Civic Center in general. These issues include the building design and operations, off-
site mitigation of traffic and parking, and the level to which an individual development should contribute
to overall Civic Center mitigation and improvements. All of these issues must be resolved prior to
constructing a Justice Center; they may or may not need to be resolved prior to a ballot measure. If they
are addressed prior to a vote, outstanding questions will be answered, giving the electorate a more
specific proposal on which to vote. If the ballot measure passes, the work will be well along and
construction can proceed more rapidly. If the ballot measure fails, the cost of the design work would
be lost.
> Tasks
1 Develop a process for selection of the Design Team, similar to the processes used for the Art
Museum expansion or the Webb Municipal Building, both competitive processes with an
emphasis on function and form.
2 Select the Design Team for Justice Center.
3 Complete Schematic Design for the Justice Center and the associated buildings (parking garage,
Juvenile Courthouse).
4 Identify off-site impacts and mitigation measures.
5 Complete agreements for off-site mitigation measures.
6 Complete, but do not submit, PUD application for site rezoning, including schematic design
> Cost
$3,000,000 to $5,000,000
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p Staff Asset Management Courts Department of Safety Community Planning and Development Public Works/Design and Construction Management and Transportation Engineering Selection Committee Design and Development Team p Time Design Competition and Selection: 6 months Schematic Design: 6 months PUD Application: 3 months (simultaneous with Development Agreements) Development Agreements: 3 months (simultaneous with PUD) PUD Review and Adoption: 6-9 months following passage of the bond issue p Pros P Addresses issues and answers questions related to Justice Center design P Provides accurate costs for construction and ballot measure P Review of Justice Center PUD can proceed immediately following voter approval. p Cons P Expensive, with no guarantee of reimbursement if voters deny funding P Does not address contextual or long-term issues related to Civic Center area P May have political backlash if voters find the project presumptuous
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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT NOVEMBER 5, 2003

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TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS I. Purpose and Need. . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. Civic Center Plan Summaries. . . . . . . . . 5 Existing Plans and Studies. . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Plans and Studies in Progress. . . . . . . . . . . 9 III. Land Use and Urban Design. . . . . . . . 11 Existing Land Use. . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Existing Zoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Adjacent Zoning. . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Additional Regulations. . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Land Use Goals and Policies from Adopted Plans. . . . . . . 20 IV. Urban Design and Architecture. . . . . . . . 21 Existing Urban Form. . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Current and Proposed Development and Expansion Projects. . . . . 22 Design Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Potential for Significant Change. . . . . . . . . . 25 Urban Design and Architecture Goals and Policies fromAdopted Plans. . . 25 Land Use and Urban Design Issues and Analysis. . . . . . . 27 V. Mobility and Parking. . . . . . . . . . 31 Existing Streets and Classifications. . . . . . . . . . 32 Existing Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes. . . . . . . . . 34 Existing Transit Routes. . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Existing Parking Conditions. . . . . . . . . . . 38 Planned and Current Transportation Projects. . . . . . . . 41 Mobility Goals and Policies fromAdopted Plans. . . . . . . 42 Mobility and Parking Issues and Analysis. . . . . . . . . 43 ii

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT VI. Parks and Parkways. . . . . . . . . . 46 Existing Parks and Parkways. . . . . . . . . . . 47 Parks Goals and Policies fromAdopted Plans. . . . . . . . 48 Parks and Parkways Issues and Analysis. . . . . . . . . 49 VII. Quality of Life. . . . . . . . . . . 54 Existing Conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Quality of Life Goals and Policies fromAdopted Plans. . . . . . 57 Quality of Life Issues and Analysis. . . . . . . . . . 58 VIII. Economic Activity. . . . . . . . . . 64 Existing Economic Activity. . . . . . . . . . . 65 Economic Activity Issues and Analysis. . . . . . . . . 70 IX. Government and Cultural Facilities. . . . . . . 74 Existing Government and Cultural Facilities. . . . . . . . 75 Projected Government and Cultural Facilities Needs. . . . . . 79 Planned or Proposed Government and Cultural Facilities Development. . . 85 Facilities Goals and Policies fromAdopted Plans. . . . . . . 87 Government and Cultural Facilities Issues and Analysis. . . . . . 89 X. Next Steps. . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Track A:Civic Center Master Plan. . . . . . . . . . 93 Track B:Justice Center Design Development. . . . . . . . 95 Track C:No Action. . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Track D:Hybrid. . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 XI. Notes from Public Workshop. . . . . . . . 99 Land Use and Urban Design. . . . . . . . . . . 100 Mobility and Parking. . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Quality of Life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Economic Activity. . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Government and Cultural Facilities. . . . . . . . . . 116 iii

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TABLE OF CONTENTS XII. Acknowledgements. . . . . . . . . . 119 LIST OF MAPS AND CHARTS Study Area Boundary Map. . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Existing Land Use Pie Chart. . . . . . . . . . . 12 Existing Land Use Map. . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Civic Center Ownership Map. . . . . . . . . . . 13 Existing Zoning Map. . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Historic Districts and Structures Map. . . . . . . . . 17 Height Restrictions and View Plane Map. . . . . . . . . 18 Locations of Required Pedestrian Lights Map. . . . . . . . 24 Template for Required Pedestrian Lights and Street Trees. . . . . . 24 Potential for Significant Change Map. . . . . . . . . 25 Street Classifications Map. . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Existing Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes Map. . . . . . . . 34 Existing Transit Routes Map. . . . . . . . . . . 37 On-Street Parking Utilization Map. . . . . . . . . . 39 Off-Street Parking Utilization Map. . . . . . . . . . 40 Parks and Parkways Map. . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Neighborhood and Community Organizations Table. . . . . . . 55 Cultural,Institutional and Government Facilities Table. . . . . . 56 Employment and Wage Estimates Table. . . . . . . . . 66 Visitor Estimates Table. . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Potential for Significant Change Map. . . . . . . . . 69 Employees Per Block Map. . . . . . . . . . . 72 Existing City/Public Facilities Table. . . . . . . . . . 77 Facilities Locations Map. . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Facilities Ownership Map. . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Facility Needs Table. . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 iv

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT 1 PURPOSE AND NEED

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PURPOSE AND NEED In 2002,the City and County of Denver purchased the Rocky Mountain News property as a potential site for a new Denver Justice Center complex and,in 2003,completed a program for three facilities:the proposed Justice Center,an associated parking structure,and a new Juvenile Courthouse.The purchase and facility programming have raised questions about the impacts of current facilities;the potential for other new or expanded governmental or cultural facilities;and the location,design,and the cumulative impacts of existing and future governmental and cultural facilities in the Civic Center. During discussions with City representatives regarding the proposed Justice Center and the associated facilities,the Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association requested that the City develop a Master Plan that would address the Civic Center area and create a context and direction for discussions and plans for the proposed Justice Center.They asked that the Master Plan place a particular emphasis on the location, design,impacts,mitigation of the impacts,physical limits of government and cultural facilities,and the integration of those facilities with the Golden Triangle and the adjoining neighborhoods. The neighborhood association also requested that,if the Civic Center is chosen as the proposed site for a new Justice Center,the master plan be completed prior to a City Council decision on forwarding to the ballot the referendum on the funding for the proposed Justice Center.The completed plan could include recommendations that would affect the final program,design,and budget for the Justice Center and other future facilities.Having a completed plan would enable the Justice Center ballot measure to reflect the resolution of issues raised in the planning process,rather than leaving those issues unanswered. Because of the pressing need for new and expanded courtroom and jail facilities,it is possible that the Administration and City Council could decide to include the funding referendum on either the November 2004 ballot or the May 2005 ballot.If it is decided to place the funding referendum on the ballot,and if the City Administration decides to proceed with a Master Plan prior to the election,then the Master Plan will need to be substantially complete eight months before the election.To meet either of these deadlines,planning efforts need to be aggressive and immediate. However,an aggressive planning schedule has been and will continue to be problematic: The Administration and ten of thirteen City Council members that were involved in earlier discussions regarding the need for a new Justice Center and agreed to purchase the Rocky Mountain News site left office in July 2003; The new Administration and ten new Council members have only been in office since July 2003; 2

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT The Planning Services and Urban Design sections of Community Planning and Development are undergoing drastic cuts in resources,consulting budgets,and professional staff; Other City agencies that also would be key participants in the planning process are making similar budget and personnel cuts;and Other high priority projects need to be completed. In recognition of these uncertainties,City staff agreed to engage in preliminary planning activities that would result in an independent document and analysis that,if a decision is made to proceed with a Master Plan,could also serve as the basis for an expanded planning effort. The Civic Center Planning Assessment is the product of those preliminary planning activities.The Assessment is intended to provide the Mayor and City Council with additional background for a decision on the timing and process for proceeding with siting,funding,and designing a new Justice Center.It is important to note that the Assessment is neither a master plan nor design development,but rather it is a snapshot of the current condition and issues within a defined study area and the direction provided by 3 Left: Study Area Boundary The Study Area focuses on Civic Center Park and includes City, State, and Federal facilities and the immediately adjacent blocks.

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PURPOSE AND NEED existing plans and studies for addressing those conditions and issues. The Assessment process focused on a public workshop held Saturday,August 9,2003,at the Webb Municipal Building.Forty representatives of neighborhood,Downtown,and professional organizations; government and cultural institutions;elected and appointed officials;and owners of property participated in the workshop.City staff and the project's traffic consultant presented background information on the history,land use,urban design,mobility,parking,parks,open space,economic activity,and government and cultural facilities in the Study Area.The participants then broke into small groups where they identified and verified the key issues for each of those topics,plus quality of life issues. Using the results of the workshop,City staff developed four alternative approaches,or tracks,that future planning efforts might follow and developed a general scope of work and a set of "pros and cons"for each of the four tracks.The four approaches Civic Center Master Plan,Justice Center Design Development,No Action,and Hybrid are described in the "Next Steps"section at the end of the Assessment. Future actions beyond the Planning Assessment are dependent on several key decisions from the City Administration and overcoming several obstacles.Direction will be needed on: Whether to proceed with plans for a new Justice Center; The preferred site for a new facility; The timing of a potential bond issue that would fund the design and construction of the facility and the associated improvements; Assignment of key City staff to the project; The priority of the project relative to the costs of funding,staffing,and time and potential impacts on the initiation and completion of other projects;and The Next Steps for the process. The obstacles that need to be overcome in order to proceed are the limited time,money,and staff available for completing the project. 4

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT 5 CIVIC CENTER PLAN SUMMARIES The study area has been included in a number of plans and studies in the past 15 years. Specific goals and policies from these plans are inluded in the applicable chapters of this assessment.

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT PLAN SUMMARIES 6 EXISTING PLANS AND STUDIES Note: Plans are listed in reverse chronological order. Game Plan, 2003 The 50-year Master Plan for Parks and Recreation identifies guiding principles and values for the management of Denver Parks.It includes goals for special events and investment in historic resources and landscapes. Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, 2002 Blueprint Denver is the citywide growth management plan that supplements the City s comprehensive plan.Blueprint Denver divides the city into Areas of Change,where growth and redevelopment should be directed,and Areas of Stability,where the existing uses and urban form are appropriate and should be protected.Downtown and Golden Triangle are both shown as Areas of Change on the Blueprint Plan Map,reflecting goals for the area to increase in density and mix of uses.The Civic Center subarea is shown as a Government and Cultural Campus,continuing the current uses and urban form. B-8-G Design Guidelines, 2002 The Golden Triangle,including the Study Area,is zoned B-8-G.These rules and regulations implement the B-8-G zone district requirement for design review of all new construction and of significant redevelopment projects.The design standards and guidelines focus on implementing the urban design goals of the neighborhood plan,including pedestrian scale,comfort and connections;spatial definition of street and open spaces;reinforcing the parkway character of Speer Boulevard and the civic character of Civic Center;and architecture with human scale.They are consistent with the Civic Center Design Guidelines. Bicycle Master Plan Update, 2001, 2002 The Master Plan for bicycle mobility throughout the city. Denver Comprehensive Plan, 2000 Plan 2000 provides a vision for the city as a high quality place to live,work and play,with emphasis on building on Denver s current assets and eliminating current deficits.The comprehensive plan includes a

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT vision,goals and recommendations for environmental sustainability,land use,mobility,legacies,housing, economic development,neighborhoods,education,human services,arts and culture,and metropolitan cooperation. Silver Triangle Urban Design Study, 1999 The urban design study was undertaken in response to the expansion of the Denver Convention Center and includes eight land use alternatives and ten urban design principles related to uses,pedestrian activity and comfort,landscape and streetscape character,historic preservation,transportation and parking.It also was not adopted by the City,but provides valuable analysis and direction. Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan, 1998 The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan provides land use,urban design and transportation recommendations for the growth and redevelopment of what it refers to as the Golden Triangle/Civic Center Neighborhood (Colfax Avenue on the north,Broadway on the east and Speer Boulevard on the southwest).The neighborhood vision includes developing the existing auto-oriented uses and parking lots into a mixed-use neighborhood of residences,cultural and government facilities,arts-related commercial uses,offices and retail.The design emphasis is on pedestrian facilities and linking to downtown,with a scale lower than Downtown but greater than the adjacent Lincoln Park neighborhood.The plan places special emphasis on building on the arts and cultural facilities provided by the Denver Art Museum,Colorado History Museum,Denver Public Library and other cultural institutions. Central Denver Transportation Study, 1998 The Transportation Study addresses streets south and east of Colfax and Broadway and recommends solutions that strike a balance between traffic movement,mobility,and neighborhood and business concerns. Central Business District/B-5 Design Guidelines, 1995 Most of the Central Business District is zoned B-5.These rules and regulations implement the B-5 zone district requirement for design review of all new construction and of significant redevelopment projects. The design standards and guidelines focus on reinforcing and adding to the legacy of high quality design in Downtown,creating an urban center that is comfortable,delightful,exciting and the regional center 7

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT PLAN SUMMARIES for business and entertainment. Civic Center Cultural Complex Master Plan, 1992 Prepared by Venturi Scott Brown and Associates,the CCCC Plan is a district plan for the growth and urban design of the major cultural facilities in the Civic Center:Denver Art Museum,Denver Public Library and the Colorado Historical Society.Recommendations include shared programs and creations of a common urban landscape centered on Civic Center Park.The plan focuses on adding new facilities and specifically warns against fundamental alteration of the existing institutions.The Master Plan anticipates the (now-built) Justice Center at 13th and Cherokee. Silver Triangle Urban Design Study, 1990 This short urban design study was not officially adopted by the City,but it still provides valid urban design analysis and guidance for the area north of Colfax Avenue,south of 16th Street and east of Speer Boulevard.The recommendations include standards for street and pedestrian lighting and other streetscape elements,views and gateways,and building massing and solar access to the street. Civic Center Design Guidelines, 1996 These rules and regulations provide design standards and guidelines for the Civic Center Historic District and design recommendations for the blocks adjacent to the historic district.The emphasis is on compatibility of new structures in scale,massing,materials and form,but not in architectural style.The Guidelines also include standards for streetscaping,including pedestrian lighting styles and locations. Downtown Area Plan, 1986 The Downtown Area Plan was a visionary long-range plan for the health and vitality of the Central Business District and its immediate surrounds.It includes framework principles for uses,urban form and connections,as well as district goals for subareas within the planning area.The Civic Center District,aka the Golden Triangle Neighborhood,is noted as Government on the Green and is recommended as an urban centerpiece and reinforced as an anchor to Downtown.The Plan also recommends that government facilities be concentrated in the Silver and Golden Triangles to avoid impacts on adjacent neighborhoods.The recommendations for the Silver Triangle District ( Sleeping Giant ) include development as an extension of the financial district with special attention to connections and open space. 8

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT PLANS AND STUDIES IN PROGRESS Downtown Multi-Modal Access Plan (DMAP) The Department of Public Works is heading a multi-agency and multi-jurisdictional review and plan for getting people in,around and out of Downtown by automobile,bus and rail transit,circulator transit, bicycle and walking.DMAP includes the study of the Central Connector transit line from the Broadway light rail station to the Civic Center bus station,improvements to pedestrian,bicycle and transit facilities, recommendations for alignment,technology and stops for new transit (including local buses,regional buses,light rail,commuter rail,and bus rapid transit) with an emphasis on multi-modal stations at Union Station,Market Street Station and Civic Center Station.Recommendations may also include changes to the street system. East Colfax Corridor Plan Community Planning and Development is the lead agency,partnering with Public Works,in developing an Area of Change corridor plan for Colfax Avenue from Sherman Street to Colorado Boulevard.The plan focuses on land use and design parameters that are expected to lead to zone district language and map amendments.The vision and goals for the corridor include increased housing and mixed-use development,with higher densities and intensities at strategically located transit nodes and activity centers,as well as appropriate transitions to adjacent residential neighborhoods.The plan also addresses enhanced bus transit. Historic Landscape Assessment and Preservation Plan The Denver Parks and Recreation Departmentis conducting a Civic Center Park Historic Landscape Assessment and Preservation Master Plan toresearchthehistoric parkand evaluate the impacts of change on Civic Center Park.This study will provide the foundation needed to create a preservation planand identify strategies to preserve the park,prioritize needs,manage events more effectively,guide future change,anduse alternative funding sources to implement preservation projects.The plan will alsoinvestigateoptions to strengthen the organizational capacity to develop partnerships and leverage resources with other agencies and organizations. 9

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT PLAN SUMMARIES West Colfax Corridor Plan Community Planning and Development and Public Works are developing a corridor plan for West Colfax from Speer Boulevard to Sheridan Boulevard.The plan focuses on defining an appropriate street cross section,including access control and pedestrian amenities,as well as addressing redevelopment potential along the proposed West Corridor Light Rail Line and thoughtful transitions to the adjacent residential neighborhoods. Pedestrian Master Plan, 2003 A Master Plan for improving the city s pedestrian infrastructure and mobility. 10

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT 11 LAND USE AND URBAN DESIGN

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LAND USE AND URBAN DESIGN EXISTING LAND USE The land uses within the Civic Center study area are diverse and mixed.Denver s goal of introducing significant housing to the Downtown area has not been achieved within the study area,although there are several new high-density housing developments within a few blocks.Without significant housing,the area lacks the mixed-use character that is desired.The land uses are primarily government,cultural and other institutional uses,a few offices,limited retail and commercial businesses,and many surface parking lots.There are a few industrial and automotive-related businesses.Parks and open space are limited to the Civic Center Park,the Speer Boulevard Parkway and Triangles and Cherry Creek Trail,and the state-owned Lincoln Park. 12 Above: Civic Center Master Plan Study Area Current Land Use (percent of total parcel area) pie chart Right: Map of existing Land Use Parking Garage 2.84% School 2.52% Residential 1.96% RTD 1.58% DAC 1.19% Vacant Land 0.15% Surface Parking Lot 17.52% Open Space 14.77% City Government 13.03% Civic Cultural 12.08% Office / Mixed-Use 10.40% State Government 7.38% Industrial 7.11% Federal Government 4.41% Retail / Restaurant 3.06%

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT City,State and Federal Governments own or control most of the land in the Study Area.There are also private property owners with relatively large assemblages of property and those who own small properties. 13 Left: Civic Center Ownership Map

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LAND USE AND URBAN DESIGN EXISTING ZONING For general information only.For official zoning interpretation,contact Denver Zoning Administration. B-8-G: The B-8-G zone district was created in 1994 specifically for the Golden Triangle area.Currently,the Golden Triangle is the only area of the city with B-8-G zoning.B-8-G is a high-density mixed-use (residential,office and retail) zone district.It allows new construction at a base Floor Area Ratio (FAR) of 4:1 with density bonuses up to 6:1 for defined public benefits,including housing,ground-floor retail in mixed-use developments,childcare facilities,public art,and rehabilitation of historic buildings.The FAR can be increased to 7:1 through Transfer of Development Rights (TDRs) from historic structures or through a more extensive design review process.Mandatory design review is required for a portion of any new construction and significant redevelopment.Automobile-oriented uses such as drive-throughs and gas stations are conditional.Commercial parking is not allowed.Parking requirements for residential uses are reduced to one space per dwelling unit;parking requirements for other uses are the same as 14 Right: Map of Existing Zoning

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT other zone districts.New buildings are limited to a height of 175 feet above the centerline of Broadway (plus or minus any difference in grade between the building site and Broadway).Setbacks of ten feet are required along Speer Boulevard. B-5: The B-5 zone district was created for the Central Business District and was substantially revised in 1994. Several overlay districts were established for the Central Business District at the time,but none were applied to the blocks within the Civic Center study area.The B-5 district is the most intense,highestdensity zone district in Denver.Uses include office,residential and retail.There are no parking requirements for any use in the zone district and commercial parking is not allowed.Parking must serve a specific use by right in the B-5 district.The B-5 district has a base FAR of 10:1,which can be increased to 17:1 with density premiums for defined public benefits such as residential uses,childcare facilities, residential support facilities,pedestrian-active facilities,support for mass transit,underground parking, public art and Transfer of Development Rights.In an area defined as the core of cores, the FAR may be increased to 20:1.Design review of new construction is mandatory and there is no height limit.No setbacks are required. ADJACENT ZONING B-4: The B-4 zone district applies to commercial corridors throughout the city,including East Colfax Avenue. This zone district allows a wide and occasionally incompatible mix of uses,including retail,office, industrial and residential.FAR is limited to 2:1.Parking requirements for residential uses are reduced to one space per dwelling unit.Other parking requirements are consistent with other zone districts.There are no density bonuses or design review.There are no height limits or setback requirements. OD-1: This zoning overlay district was established in 1994 for use in conjunction with the R-4 zone in Capitol Hill and Uptown.It provides incentives for housing development by decreasing the amount of required parking for residential uses and limiting the FAR of non-residential uses.It also provides for mandatory design review of new structures. 15

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LAND USE AND URBAN DESIGN R-4-X: The R-4-X zone district was created in 1994 for the residential neighborhoods immediately adjacent to Downtown.It allows a base FAR of 4:1,which can be increased to a maximum FAR of 5.5:1 through a combination of incentives for providing affordable housing,and transferring development rights from designated historic structures within the zone district.Commercial parking and parking for uses outside the district are not allowed.Parking requirements are one space per dwelling unit.Parking requirements for other uses are the same as other zone districts.Design review is mandatory.Allowed uses are residential and office.Neighborhood-serving retail uses are conditional.There is no height limit.Setback requirements are zero to ten fee from the front property line,five feet from the rear and five feet from the side yard property line. R-3: This high-density residential zone is used throughout the city,especially in neighborhoods closer to Downtown.The uses are limited to residential,with some exceptions for accessory uses for high-density developments.R-3 allows an FAR up to 3:1.The parking requirement is one and one-half spaces per dwelling unit.There is no design review and no height limit.Setback requirements are ten feet from the front property line,five feet from the rear where an alley is present and five feet from the side yard property line. ADDITIONAL REGULATIONS There are additional non-zoning regulations related to building and development.The local historic district both limits demolition and requires design review of new construction.There are also two height limitation ordinances.With the exception of Speer Boulevard,the western portion of the study area is affected only by the mountain view preservation height limits.None of these regulations affect the section of the Study Area south of 13th Avenue. Civic Center Historic District: City Council designated the Civic Center Historic District in 1978 and expanded it to include the U.S. Mint in 1982.All local historic districts have three purposes:to protect historic structures from demolition,to guarantee that alterations to historic structures maintain the integrity of the historic 16

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT character,and to review new construction for compatibility with the district character.The Denver Landmark Preservation Commission is charged with reviewing all applications for demolition and for those alterations to building exteriors that requires a building permit.The Landmark Commission adopted Design Standards and Guidelines for the Civic Center Historic District in 1996 to explain the elements of historic character that must be reflected in new construction. Civic Center Design Guidelines: The Landmark Preservation Commission adopted these rules and regulations in 1996 to provide design standards and guidelines for the Civic Center Historic District and design recommendations for the blocks adjacent to the historic district.The emphasis is compatibility of new structures in scale,massing, materials and form,but not architectural style.The Guidelines also include standards for streetscaping, including pedestrian lighting styles and locations. Speer Boulevard Historic Parkway: Both a designated landmark and a Parks Department designated parkway,the Speer Boulevard right of 17 Left: Map of Historic Districts and Structures

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LAND USE AND URBAN DESIGN way is subject to review by both the Landmark Preservation Commission and the Parks Department administration.There are also deeper building setback requirements adjacent to the parkway (ten feet) and bulk reduction standards for buildings taller than 100 feet. West 14th Avenue Parkway: Fourteenth Avenue between Broadway and Bannock Streets is a Parks Department designated parkway, with potential for special streetscape and building setback requirements. Civic Center Height Restrictions: In 1973,City Council designated the land surrounding Civic Center Park as an area with special height restrictions for new construction.Contained in Revised Municipal Code (RMC) Section 10-81 through 10-87,the Restrictions on Structures in the Civic Center Area describe a series of height limits stepping back from the park.The height limits are designed to preserve the integrity of the Civic Center and to protect the openness of the unique public space from the intensely developed surroundings;to protect 18 Right: Map of Civic Cennter Height Restrictions and View Plane

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT the stature of the public buildings as symbols of the city and the state as important points of orientation; to stabilize and enhance the aesthetic values of the surrounding areas;and to emphasize the national recognition of the governmental complex. State Capitol View Preservation Ordinance: In 1971,City Council designated a view protection corridor from the vantage of the western steps of the Colorado State Capitol building.The protected view (RMC Section 10-56 and 10-61) was enacted to perpetuate a panoramic mountain view from the public vantage point;to strengthen and preserve the community s unique environmental heritage as a city of the plains at the foot of the Rocky Mountains;to foster civic pride in the beauty of the city;and to stabilize and enhance the aesthetic and economic values of the surrounding areas.The view preservation ordinance limits building heights within a defined view plane. Design Review Rules and Regulations: The B-8-G,B-5,R-4-X and OD-1 zone districts all have mandatory design review over new construction adjacent to streets,up to 80-feet tall.The procedures,standards and guidelines that govern the design review for each zone district are contained in rules and regulations adopted by the Denver Planning Board and the Director of Planning. 19

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LAND USE AND URBAN DESIGN LAND USE GOALS AND POLICIES FROM ADOPTED PLANS Silver Triangle is envisioned as the next expansion of the Financial District,with interim uses to include office and services that expand on and reinforce the Convention Center,Performing Arts Center and Government uses. Institutions such as the Denver Athletic Club,Emily Griffith Opportunity School and the Press Club should be maintained in the Silver Triangle. Civic Center is one of the most memorable districts in Downtown because of the concentration of public buildings surrounding Downtown s largest open space. As the center of government for both the City and the State,Civic Center provides a focus and attraction of which all Colorado residents are proud. Concentrate new Civic Center state,city and private commercial development in the Silver and Golden Triangles to avoid impacts on adjacent neighborhoods. Preserve and build on the Cultural and Civic character of the Golden Triangle neighborhood. Encourage the development of uses related to the Civic Center Cultural Complex and its components;build on the arts,culture and government presence in the area. The Civic Center subarea of the Golden Triangle neighborhood is envisioned as an integral part of the Golden Triangle.New buildings continue the tradition of world class architecture around the Civic Center.Artists studios,galleries,an art school and high tech businesses are attracted to the subarea.Together the uses contribute to the Golden Triangle s position as the center of art and Western history in the Rocky Mountain region and the government center for Denver. Land uses should be complementary to the governmental and cultural uses in the Civic Center subarea,including galleries,studios,restaurants,hotels and businesses that use the cultural institutional collections. Encourage government-related growth in the 1300 block of Bannock. All parking should be accommodated in multi-level structures with pedestrian uses on the ground floor. Civic Center subarea is a transition zone from the high density of Downtown to the lower density of the neighborhood. Cultural and institutional growth should continue south of the Civic Center on Acoma Street. 20 Reinvestment and reuse of historic structures adds to the character of the area.

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT 21 URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE

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URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE EXISTING URBAN FORM In spite of its location and good vehicular access,little development has taken place within the Silver Triangle.The district has an underutilized,low-density character,in stark contrast to the imposing Financial District across the 16th Street Mall.Acres of parking lots exist,portraying a barren image, although it is the most centrally located area of major developable land in Downtown. The Civic Center subarea of the Golden Triangle neighborhood is distinctive in the grand nature of the civic institutions surrounding the Civic Center Park.The park and the government architecture are both formal and classic in design.The large scale of the State Capitol,City and County Building,United States Mint,and the Central Library are mitigated by exquisite detailing,durable materials and human scaling elements.The new Wellington E.Webb Municipal Office Building continues the tradition of compatible yet contemporary architecture.The tower building of the Art Museum,Civic Center Bus Station and the Police Administration Building have been less successful in integrating pedestrian comfort and human scale into the building form and site design. Outside the Civic Center proper,the City Beautiful principles begin to disintegrate.The abundant surface parking lots lend an air of abandonment and an atmosphere of discomfort.Buildings without adequate pedestrian amenities and ground-floor activity further undermine the sense of activity and safety.The blocks surrounding Civic Center have an inconsistent urban form,with individual buildings setting a high standard of interest and comfort,but lacking the critical mass of appropriate design and development to achieve the urban design goals of the area. CURRENT AND PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT AND EXPANSION PROJECTS Convention Center Expansion (Adjacent to the Study Area) Convention Center Hotel (Adjacent to the Study Area) Denver Art Museum Expansion Denver Art Museum Co-Development (residential,retail,office) Argyle Tower (residential) Justice Center Complex (3 buildings) Denver Newspaper Agency Headquarters 22 The civic institutions create a grand and distinctive city center.

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT DESIGN GUIDELINES B-8-G Design Guidelines, 2002 These rules and regulations implement the B-8-G zone district requirement for design review of all new construction and of significant redevelopment projects.The design standards and guidelines focus on implementing the urban design goals of the neighborhood plan,including pedestrian scale,comfort and connections;spatial definition of street and open spaces;reinforcing the parkway character of Speer Boulevard and the civic character of Civic Center;and architecture with human scale.They are consistent with the Civic Center Design Guidelines. Civic Center Design Guidelines, 1996 These rules and regulations provide design standards and guidelines for the Civic Center Historic District and design recommendations for the blocks adjacent to the historic district.The emphasis is on compatibility of new structures in scale,massing,materials and form,but not in architectural style.The Guidelines also include standards for streetscaping,including pedestrian lighting styles and locations. Central Business District/B-5 Design Guidelines, 1995 These rules and regulations implement the B-5 zone district requirement for design review of all new construction and of significant redevelopment projects.The design standards and guidelines focus on reinforcing and adding to the legacy of high quality design in Downtown,creating an urban center that is comfortable,delightful,exciting and the regional center for business and entertainment. Corridor Guidelines, 2000 These review criteria apply to Speer Boulevard,Colfax,Broadway and Lincoln as designated Commercial Corridors.Their use is intended to protect and enhance the traditional pedestrian-friendly character of these corridors. Civic Center Historic District City Council designated the Civic Center Historic District in 1978 and expanded it to include the U.S. Mint in 1982.All local historic districts have three purposes:to protect historic structures from demolition,to guarantee that alterations to historic structures maintain the integrity of the historic character,and to review new construction for compatibility with the district character.The Denver 23 Denver Art Museum Expansion

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URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE Landmark Preservation Commission is charged with reviewing all applications for demolition and for new construction to building exteriors that requires a building permit.The Landmark Commission adopted Design Standards and Guidelines for the Civic Center Historic District in 1996 to explain the elements of historic character that must be reflected in new construction. Streetscape Design Manual, 1993 These guidelines provide basic direction for streetscape improvements in the public Right of Way for commercial and residential areas.Paving,street trees,pedestrian lighting and other street furnishing items are addressed. Streetscape Inventory 24 Tree with grate Pedestrian light Tree with grass lawnBroadway80' 40' 40' 40' 40' 80' Lincoln40'40'40' Above: Template for Required Pedestrian Lights and Street Trees Above: Illustration of Required Pedestrian Lights

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT POTENTIAL FOR SIGNIFICANT CHANGE Redevelopment Site Analysis This illustration (above) graphically depicts that a significant percentage of the area within the Master Plan study area has the potential for redevelopment.Areas included as having a potential for redevelopment may currently serve as open space but enjoy no specific protection under current ordinances or adopted plans. URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE GOALS AND POLICIES FROM ADOPTED PLANS The Silver Triangle should be the area for the next expansion of the Financial District.It should develop densely with the highest scale buildings on 15th Street and a lower scale edge toward Speer Boulevard. 25 Left: Map of Potential for Significant Change

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URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE Improving the connection streets in the Silver Triangle District will provide a desirable environment to which early development can attach.As development occurs,the attractive pathways will draw Downtown s pedestrians through the Silver Triangle to take advantage of the parks and Cherry Creek. A central square or other amenity is needed to provide a focal point for development and create a long-term identity for the Silver Triangle. 15th Street should be designed as a transit corridor with entrances to serve new development in the Silver Triangle. The theme of the Civic Center is set by Civic Center Park,a formal green space surrounded by the State Capitol,the Central Public Library,the Denver Art Museum,the City and County Building,and the Webb Municipal Building.The design is classical and grew out of the City Beautiful Movement of the early 1900s. Create a distinct identity through the built environment,with a sense of place and special aesthetic.The community identity and distinctive place is created through the overall composition of spaces,juxtaposition of buildings,unique architectural character and details. Unique identity is also accomplished through the integration of public art and design elements in the public realm. Taller structures,within the view preservation ordinances,are encouraged in the Civic Center subarea of the Golden Triangle,between Colfax and 13th Avenues. Taller structures are encouraged on Speer Boulevard and Lincoln/Broadway,with a step down in scale toward the center of the neighborhood. Maintain the grid pattern of streets and alleys to reinforce the block pattern and the existing urban structure. Maintain the axial views within Civic Center Park. Maintain and frame the axial view from the south end of Acoma Street north to Acoma Plaza into Civic Center and from the north end of Acoma south to Speer Boulevard. Strengthen the character of gateways and nodes,including the Civic Center and the cultural institutions. 26

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT LAND USE AND URBAN DESIGN ISSUES AND ANALYSIS General Issues Most of the study area has not reached its potential for mix of uses,density or desirable urban character. Appropriate locations for government and institutional expansion need to be determined.Proliferation of surface parking lots undermines the long-term goals for the area and adds to the desolate feeling outside the Civic Center core.Existing plans,studies and regulations are strong tools to guide future development,but they may not provide adequate guidance to minimize abrupt changes between neighborhoods. Analysis This area,in whole or in part,has been included in at least ten completed plans,studies and design guidelines and in four studies currently underway. Mixed-Use Issues The area currently lacks sufficient residential and retail uses to balance and support the government institutions.Residential and retail facilities in addition to the civic and employment uses would increase the sense of place,community and livability. Analysis All adopted plans and current zoning regulations allow,support and encourage mixed uses,especially residential and ground floor retail.Zone districts also provide density bonuses as incentives for certain public uses and design.Although inclusion of mixed uses in public facilities is hampered by security concerns,some retail uses are possible.Private development of mixed use projects is driven by market conditions.The regulatory system for mixed use projects is in place,ready for private development activity when it becomes feasible. 27 Surface parking lots undermine the long-term goals for a mixed-use urban village.

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URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE Connections and Streetscape Issues Unsafe,unclear and unattractive pedestrian links between Downtown and Civic Center prevent full utilization of the amenities and facilities.Poor wayfinding,lack of visibility,dangerous and unfriendly pedestrian connections are barriers.Colfax Avenue is the most significant problem area. Analysis Denver Multi-modal Access Plan (DMAP) and the Pedestrian Master Plan are currently underway to identify key projects and policies addressing overall citywide and Downtown connectivity.The 1998 Neighborhood Bond also includes improvements to Colfax Avenue/15th Street and 14th Avenue at Civic Center.Private development is required to improve adjacent right of way,including streetscaping,and is an incremental approach.No comprehensive approach to improvements is currently available. Parking Issues The availability and cost of parking for the area is a concern,especially as existing parking lots redevelop into more active and appropriate uses.Surface parking as a stand-alone use does not reinforce or contribute to the character of a vital,walkable,interesting urban neighborhood.The community and City desire abundant,cheap and invisible parking,which is difficult to achieve. Analysis No comprehensive parking study or plan is currently available.DMAP will partially address the issue. New development in the B-8-G zone district is required to provide parking for its needs.No parking is required in the B-5 zone district.Displaced parking from new development on parking lots is not the responsibility of the developer. 28

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Architecture Issues The existing architectural character places Denver s best and most important buildings in a weak context.A streetscape and architectural palette that allows for innovative design within a consistent framework needs to be implemented.The existing character of the Civic Center core is desirable and should be expanded upon.Architectural and development standards need to address issues of compatibility,appropriate density,height,and scale. Analysis Design review of all new development is a requirement of the B-5,B-8-G and Landmark District.Scaling issues are partially addressed in these design review processes.Scale and height are also regulated by the Civic Center Height Restriction and Mountain View Preservation ordinances.All public development should be held to architectural standards that respect the existing architectural quality and materials of Civic Center structures.There may be gaps or weaknesses in the other design guidelines that should be addressed. Key Development Opportunities Issues Within the study area there are underdeveloped sites that could significantly impact the character of the area,for good or for bad.These key development opportunities may include both public and private facilities.Critical sites include locations immediately adjacent to Civic Center Park,between West 14th and Colfax Avenues,bordering Colfax Avenue,and along Acoma and Bannock Streets.The appropriate locations and limits of government and institutional expansion need to be determined. Analysis The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan defines a Civic Center subarea.The Civic Center Cultural Complex Master Plan also addresses cultural facility expansion.The Downtown Area Plan indicates locations for government expansion.No single plan defines appropriate locations or limits of government/institutional expansion.Partnerships or incentives for private development in key locations have not been addressed. 29 An example of an inconsistent streetscape treatment. On the right is a detached sidewalk with trees and tree lawn; on the left is pavement, illegal parking, and no trees. The pedestrian has chosen to walk in the street rather than on the unappealing sidewalk.

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URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE Development Barriers Issues The lack of significant private development activity in the area indicates there are barriers to projects. These barriers may include: Market demand,which is impacted by the economy; Lack of development incentives; Profitability of surface parking is a disincentive for redevelopment,and The cost of land is increasing. Analysis There is no indication that significant regulatory barriers to redevelopment exist.Barriers are more related to financing and market demand. Aesthetics/Livability Issues There are weaknesses in the relationship between the built environment and the overall quality of life. Major park events both enhance the sense of community and create conflicts with adjacent businesses and residents.Civic Center Park suffers from extremes of use:either too much or too little.Land use decisions may not factor in safety and quality of life concerns. Analysis Current plans focus on physical development aspects of the area as well as goals for quality of life.Park use issues should be included in the Civic Center Park master planning effort. 30

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT 31 MOBILITY AND PARKING

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MOBILITY AND PARKING EXISTING STREETS AND CLASSIFICATIONS Regional Access Regional access to the Civic Center Planning Area is provided primarily by Interstate 25 (I-25).The following roadways provide access from I-25 into the study area:Broadway (south of the Civic Center area),Colfax Avenue (west of the Civic Center area),and Speer Boulevard (west of the Civic Center area). 32 Right: Map of Street Classifications Welton St.California St.Glenarm Pl.Court Pl.16th Ave. 13th Ave. 12th Ave. 14th Ave.Cleveland Pl.Cherokee St. Delawar e St. Elati St. Santa Fe Dr. Inca St. Fox St. Galapago St. Banno ck St. Acoma St. Lincoln St. Sherman St. Grant St.14th St.Bike Path13th St.15th St. 16th St. MallColfax Ave.Broadway14th Ave.Speer Blvd. Speer Blvd.Tremont Pl. Street Classification Arterial Collector Local Street Parkway

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Arterial streets Arterial streets carry a majority of traffic traveling through the study area and are generally commercial corridors.Arterial streets within the study area include:Speer Boulevard,Colfax Avenue,14th Avenue, 13th Avenue,Welton Street,Tremont Place,Court Place,Broadway,Lincoln Street,and Grant Street.Speer Boulevard is also classified as an Historic Parkway and 14th Avenue between Bannock and Broadway is a Parkway. Collector Streets Collector streets provide movement of traffic between arterials and neighborhoods.In the vicinity of the proposed project,they include:12th Avenue,Glenarm Place,Cleveland Place,Cheyenne Place,Cherokee Street,and Bannock Street. Local Streets Local streets are typically designed to provide access within residential areas and some limited access to office and commercial uses.Within the study area the local streets are:Galapago Street,Fox Street,Elati Street,Delaware Street,and Acoma Street. 33

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MOBILITY AND PARKING EXISTING PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE ROUTES Bicycle Routes The City and County of Denver has a system of bicycle routes throughout the City to serve the needs of cyclists.The plan for bicycle facilities with the City is established and described within the 1993 Denver Bicycle Master Plan and the Denver Bicycle Master Plan Update 2001 .The Bicycle Master Plan was intended to develop and implement a comprehensive bicycling program by developing a framework for a physical bicycle system as well as education,promotion,enforcement,public policy,and information distribution programs. Within the study area,the following bicycle facilities exist: 34 Right: Map of Existing Pedestrian and Bicycle Routes W el ton St.California St.Glenarm Pl.Court Pl.16th Ave. 13th Ave. 14th Ave.Clevel and Pl.Cherokee St. Delawar e St. Elati St. Santa Fe Dr. Inca St. Fox St. Galapago St. Banno ck St. Acoma St. Lincoln St. Sherman St. Grant St.14th St.Bike Path13th St.15th St. 16th St. MallColfax Ave.Broadway14th Ave.Speer Blvd. Speer Blvd.Tremont Pl. Pedestrian Routes Enhanced Bus Corridor Cherry Creek Trail Neighborhood Bike Route Grid Bike Route

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Route D-10 This Grid Route is along 12th Avenue.It connects on the west with the City of Lakewood (near the Lakewood/Dry Gulch) and runs primarily along 12th Avenue east to the City of Aurora at Yosemite Street.Within the project area it uses 11th and 12th Avenues, connecting via Cherokee and Delaware Streets.Given the steep grade of 12th Avenue east of Lincoln,a bicycle lane in the uphill,eastbound direction is desirable. Neighborhood Bike Routes There are two Neighborhood Bike Routes within the study area on Cherokee and Bannock Streets that connect with the Cherry Creek Trail and intersect route D-10.On Cherokee Street the route is from Colfax Avenue south to Speer Boulevard and the Cherokee Street ramp leading to the Cherry Creek Trail.The Bannock Street route is between Colfax Avenue and 1st Avenue,which accommodates Route D-14.These neighborhood routes serve to connect with the off-street bikeway along the frontage of the Webb Municipal Building, leading to the 16th Street Mall and the 16th Avenue bike lanes. Cherry Creek Trail The Cherry Creek Trail is located within the Cherry Creek channel between the north and southbound lanes of Speer Boulevard.There are existing trail access ramps from Speer Boulevard to the trail at Colfax and 14th Avenues.The Bicycle Master Plan cites the need for a future ramp connection at 12th Avenue to serve the Golden Triangle neighborhood.A staircase connection to the trail exists at 11th Avenue.However,it is not wheelchair accessible in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and does not accommodate the needs of bicyclists and in-line skaters.This staircase is adjacent to Denver Public School #1 at 11th and Delaware. City standard Inverted U type bicycle parking racks are currently in place at many of the destinations in the project area including the City and County Building,the Webb Municipal Building,the Central Branch of the Denver Library and the Denver Art Museum.However there are numerous trip generators within the project area that do not have any city standard Inverted U type bicycle parking racks. The Bicycle Master Plan also identified Missing Links within the bicycle system.Within the study area there are no missing links. 35

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MOBILITY AND PARKING Pedestrian Facilities Currently the City is preparing a City and County of Denver Pedestrian Master Plan,which is expected to be adopted by City Council before the end of 2003. The Draft Pedestrian Master Plan (PMP) is being developed as a recommendation of Blueprint Denver .The goal is to enhance the transportation choices available to the public for mobility within Denver.As a part of this,a network of Pedestrian Routes is being identified which link neighborhoods with such facilities as transit,parks,schools,and commercial areas.These routes are coordinated with the Parks and Recreation Department s green streets and will be a focus for providing mobility to pedestrians.The PMP also reinforces the need for Enhanced Bus Corridors as defined by Blueprint Denver as corridors with high transit ridership potential which should be targeted for higher frequency bus service,Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) and priorities for Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) investments (including bus priority signalization). High ridership on these corridors will translate into high pedestrian activity and the need for transitoriented pedestrian amenities along these corridors. The Civic Center Planning Assessment study area has the following Pedestrian Routes and Enhanced Bus Corridors: Pedestrian Routes: 12th Avenue,Speer Boulevard,and Acoma Street. Enhanced Bus Corridors: Colfax Avenue and Speer Boulevard. The PMP also identifies many pedestrian improvement projects across the city.The one project within the study area is a linear project that has been identified along 13th Avenue.The plan identified this section of 13th Avenue as having narrow sidewalks and recommends upgrades. 36

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT EXISTING TRANSIT ROUTES Numerous Regional Transit District (RTD) bus routes serve the study area.Many regional routes operate on the Broadway/Lincoln corridor.The following routes provide regional and local service within the study area:0,0L,6,7,9,10,15,15L,16,48,50,52,3L,29L,36L,46L,79L,and the B-Line. The RTD Civic Center Station is located within the study area and is one of the key stations that service Downtown Denver.It is located at the southeastern end of the 16th Street Mall.RTD provides a free Mall Shuttle service on 16th Street between Union Station and the Civic Center Station.The Civic Center Station services approximately 24 bus lines and the Mall Shuttle.There is also Light Rail service just to the west of the study area. 37 Left: Map of Existing Transit Routes Civic Center Master Plan RTD Transit Routes 0, 6, 10, 0L, 3L, 16L, 46L 79L, 83L 0, 6, 10, 0L, 3L, 16L, 46L 79L, 83L 7, 16, 16L, 29L, 30, 30L, 31, 36L 9, 50, 52 8, 9, 50 8, 9, 50 9, 50, 52 8, 9, 50, 52 16, 16L, 29L, 36L, 48 10, 28, 32, 44 8, 16, 83L Welton St.California St.Glenarm Pl.Court Pl.16th Ave. 13th Ave. 14th Ave.Cleveland Pl.Cherokee St. Delaware St. Elati St. Santa Fe Dr. Inca St. Fox St. Galapago St. Bannock St. Acoma St. Lincoln St. Sherman St. Grant St.14th St.Bike Path13th St.15th St. 16th St. MallColfax Ave.Broadway14th Ave.Speer Blvd. Speer Blvd.Tremont Pl.

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MOBILITY AND PARKING EXISTING PARKING CONDITIONS As part of the initial assessment,the existing parking conditions within the study area were analyzed.An inventory of the existing parking supply was performed and the usage of publicly available parking determined. Onand OffStreet Parking Inventory Parking Supply The current supply of both on-street and off-street parking facilities was determined.This inventory does not include private off-street parking for residents,customers,or employees.All on-street parking spaces were accounted for.A number of these spaces are for special uses such as loading,fire department vehicles,press parking,and other special users.Although these were inventoried,they are not included in the supply of parking that is generally available to the public. The inventory of on-street spaces was conducted in the field during July 2003.The results of this effort indicate that there is a total supply of 444 publicly available on-street parking spaces.There are 123 other spaces for loading and special users. The off-street parking inventory was performed based upon City aerials from 2002.There are 2,635 offstreet spaces available to the public,which includes 973 spaces in the recently completed Arts Complex Parking Structure located between 13th and 12th Avenues west of Broadway. Parking Demand The demand for parking fluctuates during the day.In general,the demand for parking within the study area is highest during the weekday due to the high demand for employee and visitor parking for the commercial,office and government/public related uses.However,there is a demand for parking within the study area throughout the day.In an effort to perform an initial assessment,the demand for parking during the peak weekday daytime period was determined.An on-street parking demand study was performed from approximately 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM on a weekday during July 2003.The off-street demand was determined from the aerial photos,which were taken on a weekday at midday. 38

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Parking Utilization The existing utilization of parking within the study area is represented by the percent occupancy.The utilization was broken down into differing levels of demand,indicated by different-colored shading on the figures.The demand for parking spaces,the amount of available parking,and the resulting utilization is provided for each block within the study area.The on-street data represents the parking directly adjacent to the block (not including loading and special users).As shown on each of the figures,the highest demand for parking,86 percent utilization or higher,is depicted with the darkest colored pattern.In general the highest demand of on-street parking is adjacent to Civic Center Park.The highest demand for off-street parking (as determined from the aerial photography) was south of Colfax Avenue between Delaware and Bannock Streets.Near the Convention Center,the off-street demand was also 39 Left: Map of On-Street Parking Utilization On-Street Parking Utilization15 18 83% XX= Parking Demand YY= Parking Supply % = Percent Utilization 4 7 57% 0-50% Utilization 51-75% Utilization 76-85% Utilization 86-100% Utilization 6 7 86% 25 37 68% 24 26 92% 10 12 83% 16 32 50% 18 23 78% 14 26 54% 9 14 64% 11 11 100% 16 31 52% 5 21 24% 16 24 67% 10 17 59% N/A N/A 48 65 74% 27 32 84% 10 21 48% 17 33 52% 9 13 69% 10 11 91% 13 14 93% 14 22 64% 13 35 37% 14 37 38% 34 44 77% 5 16 31% 14 15 93% Welton St.California St.Glenarm Pl.Court Pl.16th Ave. 13th Ave. 14th Ave.Cleveland Pl.Cherokee St. Delaware St. Elati St. Santa Fe Dr Inca St. Fox St. Galapago St. Bannock St. Acoma St. Lincoln St. Sherman St. Grant St.14th St.Bike Path13th St.15th St. 16th St. MallColfax Ave.Broadway14th Ave.Speer Blvd. Speer Blvd.Tremont Pl.

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MOBILITY AND PARKING high.It is worth noting that with its recent opening,the Cultural Center Parking Structure was observed to have a typical weekday demand of approximately 25%.In conclusion,with very preliminary observations of parking demand,the overall study area does not have demand for parking of greater than 85 percent,which is considered high utilization.However,further data collection regarding parking is necessary to complete a thorough evaluation of existing parking utilization. 40 Right: Map of Off-Street Parking Utilization Off-Street Parking Utilization: Public Pay Lots182 244 74% 23 28 82% 55 75 73% 55 77 71% XX= Parking Demand YY= Parking Supply % = Percent Utilization 34 53 64% 62 65 95% 0-50% Utilization 51-75% Utilization 76-85% Utilization 86-100% Utilization 176 213 83% 59 115 51% 139 174 95% 50 78 64% 61 68 90% 61 71 86% 73 100 73% 37 40 93% 29 36 81%21 31 68% 68 77 88% 28 64 44% 225 972 23% 47 54 87% Welton St.California St.Glenarm Pl.Court Pl.16th Ave. 13th Ave. 14th Ave.Cleveland Pl.Cherokee St. Delaware St. Elati St. Santa Fe Dr Inca St. Fox St. Galapago St. Bannock St. Acoma St. Lincoln St. Sherman St. Grant St.14th St.13th St.15th St. 16th St. MallColfax Ave.Broadway14th Ave.Speer Blvd. Speer Blvd.Tremont Pl.

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT PLANNED AND CURRENT TRANSPORTATION PROJECTS Public Works will be constructing a pedestrian-related 1998 Neighborhood Bond Initiative project within the study area this fall.The work includes: Installation of a Pedestrian Signal on 14th Avenue on the south side of Civic Center Park and a crosswalk constructed with special paving. Upgrades to the pedestrian crossing of Colfax Avenue/15th Street on the north side of Civic Center Park. A diagonal crosswalk of Colfax Avenue at 14th Street between the Webb Municipal Building and the City and County Building was completed July 2003. There are two studies currently being conducted which address transportation and mobility.The City is completing a Pedestrian Master Plan .The plan addresses the needs of pedestrian mobility citywide. A Downtown Multimodal Access Plan (DMAP) has just been initiated.The study will address access for all modes of transportation for the Downtown area including the Civic Center and adjacent neighborhoods.DMAP will examine regional vehicular and transit demands and connections within the study area,connections from transit stations into Downtown,circulation of vehicles,transit,pedestrians and bicycles within Downtown,connections to adjacent neighborhoods,and opportunities/solutions to meet long range future transportation demands. A new ramp connection to the Cherry Creek Trail at 12th Avenue is recommended in the Denver Bicycle Master Plan .Funds being actively sought to construct this improvement through the Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). 41 Recent crosswalk improvements at Colfax, Bannock and 14th Street have increased safety and convenience for pedestrians.

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MOBILITY AND PARKING MOBILITY GOALS AND POLICIES IN ADOPTED PLANS Emphasis on pedestrian circulation within the Civic Center study area was mentioned in all plans.Connections from Downtown into the Civic Center study area need to be enhanced. Acoma Street was mentioned as one of the key pedestrian corridors. Colfax Avenue presents a challenge for pedestrian mobility between Downtown and the Civic Center study area.Key locations for pedestrian crossings should be identified and improved. Signal timing at intersections in the vicinity of the Civic Center should be examined to determine if any additional time is available for pedestrians without significantly impacting vehicular operations. Transit service should be enhanced.This could include shuttle service from Civic Center to Downtown.An additional need is to improve the appearance and perceived safety of bus shelters. A comprehensive traffic study is needed to determine the future transportation needs of the area.The use of the streets for access into Downtown and for neighborhood traffic should be recognized.The potential for impacts into adjacent neighborhoods should be addressed. 42

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT MOBILITY AND PARKING ISSUES AND ANALYSIS Traffic Issues Most of the study area has not reached full development.What transportation improvements will be necessary to support full build-out within the Civic Center study area? The future transportation system should support future development of the Civic Center area and maintain the local character of neighborhood streets.How does this project relate to DMAP? Analysis A transportation and mobility study of the Civic Center is needed to:address future growth within the study area,account for regional growth,strengthen transit use,and minimize impacts to adjacent neighborhoods.This study should identify improvement measures to mitigate future impacts,to the extent possible.This study must be coordinated with the DMAP effort and may not be possible to complete without resolution of the issues that DMAP will address.The transportation and mobility study should also consider the significance of the Civic Center area as a focal point in Denver.The study must allow for innovative long-range solutions for the Civic Center. Pedestrian and Bicycle Mobility Issues The Civic Center study area is a focal point of pedestrian activity.The pedestrian corridor through Civic Center Park,past the Denver Art Museum and the Library,and continuing south along Acoma Street is a key link.This provides access from Downtown to cultural activity centers and adjacent neighborhoods.Other connections are necessary however;the crossing of Colfax Avenue is difficult. The transit activity on Broadway and Lincoln generates numerous pedestrians on these two roadways. Connections from Civic Center to Lincoln and Broadway should be enhanced to support the use of transit and pedestrian mobility. 43 Pedestrian crossings at Colfax are difficult because the street grid changes.

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MOBILITY AND PARKING Analysis The transportation and mobility study should examine solutions that further refine and implement the recommendations of the Pedestrian Master Plan .The study should include other pedestrian enhancements,such as those included in the Colfax Avenue Corridor Transportation Improvements Analysi s for the intersection of Colfax and Delaware. Transit Issues The study area has a number of local and regional bus routes;however,the need for a more additional service should be explored.How a transit connection between the Light Rail Station at Broadway and I-25 and Downtown impacts the study area should be determined. Analysis The DMAP study will address the transit connection between the Broadway Light Rail Station and Downtown.Public Works and Community Planning and Development will need to consider the impacts of this on the Civic Center study area.The need for a shuttle service between the Civic Center and Downtown may be addressed in a number of ways:as part of DMAP,working directly with RTD,or it could be included in the transportation and mobility study.In any of these,a high level of coordination with DMAP and RTD is essential. Parking Issues The most recent parking study of the Civic Center area was performed in 1991.A major issue is,as the surface parking lots within the study area develop,what happens to the parking demand for the lots that remain? How will the newly opened Cultural Complex Parking Structure offset the need for future additional public parking? It was recognized that many of the government related uses currently do not provide parking for employees and visitors.As the area receives additional government uses,how will the additional employee and visitor parking demand be addressed? As additional mixed-use projects are developed on properties currently used for surface parking lots,how will the reduced public parking be priced and what time limits will be appropriate? The supply of parking must also be sensitive to the need to support the use of transit.If an abundant supply of inexpensive parking is available how does this affect the use of transit? 44

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Analysis In order to address all of the parking issues,a comprehensive parking study of the Civic Center area would need to be conducted. Other Issues Additional issues related to way-finding and special events were raised as a result of the assessment workshop.An observation made by several groups was the need for way-finding for both the Downtown and Civic Center areas.Special events at Civic Center Park typically require street closures and detours.The need for a quick return of these streets to pre-event conditions was expressed. Analysis Downtown way-finding is a topic to be addressed within DMAP. Events that utilize Civic Center Park are carefully coordinated in terms of neighborhood traffic impacts, street closures,detour signing,and public notification.These concerns will be provided to the Permit Section of Denver Public Works for consideration in planning for future events.Special events held in the Civic Center Park are important to maintaining the City s tradition of civic celebration.The master plan should address neighborhood concerns and develop strategies and solutions for maintaining a balance between the tradition of civic celebration and minimizing impacts to adjacent neighborhoods. 45

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PARKS AND PARKWAYS 46 PARKS AND PARKWAYS

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT EXISTING PARKS AND PARKWAYS Denver Parks and Recreation manages several park units in the study area: Civic Center Park MacIntosh Park Fourteenth Avenue Parkway Speer Boulevard Parkway is immediately adjacent to the study area. Lincoln Park and the State Capitol grounds are owned and maintained by the State. 47 Bicycle police patrol Civic Center Park. Left: Map of Parks and Parkways

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PARKS AND PARKWAYS Historic Resources Outside of Washington,D.C.,Denver s Civic Center Park is one of the most complete and intact cultural and government centers in the country.During the City Beautiful movement (1900 1910),many cities succeeded in improving the urban landscape with parks,parkways,streets lined with shade trees,and stately public buildings.However,few cities succeeded in implementing plans for the ultimate expression of the City Beautiful movement:a downtown civic center.Denver triumphed over other cities unrealized plans.Not only did Denver leaders realize a design,but also built this magnificent urban center that continues to evolve within its traditional origins.Additional public institutions and architectural excellence have gradually,over the past 80 years,reinforced and strengthened the character of this cultural heart of the City.The Park is listed on the National Register of Historic Places with national level of significance. PARKS AND PARKWAYS GOALS AND POLICIES FROM ADOPTED PLANS Redesign Bannock Street to create a strong connection from Colfax (Webb Municipal Office Building) all the way south to Speer Boulevard.Reduce the width and treat Bannock differently between the City and County Building and the Park. Bury either Colfax or 14th Avenue to create a seamless campus between the cultural institutions on the south,the Park,and Downtown (16th Street Mall). Develop streetscape and land uses west and east of the Park along 14th and Colfax.As connections to Speer Boulevard and the adjoining neighborhoods. Develop other festival sites (such as Auraria and an Auraria bridge to Downtown) Create a forum for collaboration among event organizers,the Parks Department,and residents to improve the management of staging events in the Park. Investigate fee policies that put more money back into the park/area from large events Involve neighborhoods more (and give back to neighborhoods more) in events Develop appropriate guidelines for consistent management of event uses. Increase the level of casual activity and smaller programs in the Park to bring people into the Park at all times,including weekdays 48

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Increase law enforcement Continue to enhance the Park conditions Dedicate Park-generated revenues to repair the Park Examine potential outside sources of funding.Civic Center is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is the only Denver park other than Red Rocks with a national level of significance.This level of significance entitles the Park to Federal grant opportunities not available to other parks that may be listed on the National register but have only State or local significance. Develop new mechanisms for generating regular revenue dedicated to the Park to enhance the success of its long-term preservation by strategically implementing Park restoration and rehabilitation projects Reduce long-term maintenance needs through preventive maintenance measures and costsaving modifications PARKS AND PARKWAYS ISSUES AND ANALYSIS General Issues The importance of Civic Center Park and the role it plays for the surrounding civic buildings cannot be overestimated.However,urban pressures for parking and access;social problems such as graffiti,drug dealing and homelessness;and larger,more frequent public events are contributing to the deterioration of the park areas.Compounding these pressures,park budgets are shrinking.Routine maintenance measures cannot keep up with the pace of deterioration,and costs have escalated out of reach for the normal Denver Parks and Recreation maintenance budget.Today more than ever,creative solutions and strategies are required to keep up with the escalating challenges to maintain Civic Center as a healthy, vital historic icon in the heart of the civic district of the city and the state.However,no comprehensive planning or long-term strategies have been developed to effectively deal with these most of these issues. Little information currently exists to document the condition,integrity,significance or comprehensively evaluate historic resources in Civic Center Park. 49

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PARKS AND PARKWAYS Analysis The Parks and Recreation Department was recently awarded a grant from the Colorado Historical Fund to assess the historic resources of Civic Center Park.The study will provide necessary baseline information to develop design and management guidelines for appropriate development and future change in the Park and more effectively preserve these significant resources. Connections and relationship between the Park and the rest of Downtown Issues Civic Center Park was historically planned as a strategic crossroads,serving as a link between the commercial districts along 16th and 17th Streets and the State Capitol area.It continues to occupy a critical location for Downtown bus,pedestrian and vehicular access.Furthermore,the primary pedestrian link between major facilities such as Denver Public Library,the Denver Art Museum and the Downtown area is along the edges of the Park or through the Park.However,the critical linkage along Bannock is dominated by cars and parking.The central walkway through the Park does not meet the American Disability Act requirements for an accessible route. Analysis Several plans broadly address goals for improving the connection between Civic Center Park and the surrounding commercial district and civic places however no specific strategies exist to comprehensively implement improvements and are dependent on incremental private development.To strengthen the connection between the area and the neighborhoods,currently there is only limited funding available for implementation.Site specific information and planning tools to guide transportation and pedestrian oriented developments in the area are lacking. 50 Park planning needs to build on historic resources and design.

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Special Events Issues Public concerts by the Denver Municipal Band in 1920 began the park s enduring popularity as a forum for free civic events.Civic Center Park is probably best known for the major events such as the Peoples Fair,Taste of Colorado,Cinco de Mayo,and many others that are traditionally held annually in the Park. While the Park continues in its role as premier civic space for civic events,the impact of these events on the Park and the emerging Downtown neighborhoods is increasing.These events take their toll on the Park structures,lawns and trees from soil compaction and vehicle damage.Damage fees do not always keep pace with the level of impact in the Park nor are they effectively collected.The extent of street closures,massive influx of visitors,and parking has impacts on the quality of life for the growing population of Downtown residents. Analysis Large special event issues are typically dealt with piecemeal at periodic inter-agency meetings.However, there are few guidelines or management strategies consistently applied to all events organizations to address issues that affect the area around the park.No strategies or plans exist to address larger quality of neighborhood life issues such as parking impacts.No economic or budget analysis has been conducted to evaluate the fee structure for special events.Event programming is largely dependent on and reactive to outside organization proposals. 51 Public celebrations have long been part of the charm of Civic Center.

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PARKS AND PARKWAYS Safety and Security Issues Social problems such as vagrancy,drug dealing and skateboarding,continue to dominate the social scene in the Park,making it uninviting for appropriate Park use.Although the Park is full of people during events and festivals,it is often devoid of activity during the week.While the Park is surrounded by an increasing density of workers and residents,Civic Center Park often is avoided and has developed a reputation as a dangerous locale,especially at night.Police patrols alone has not been an effective deterent to eliminate or reduce illegal uses in the Park. Analysis There are no management strategies to address these issues.There are no programs to proactively encourage regular park activities to attract broader public to use the park and promote a vital and healthy park environment.No formal coordination among agencies exist to patrol or monitor the Park. 52 Vagrancy is one of Civic Center Park's most pressing issues.

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Maintenance Issues Inadequate funding is another issue that severely limits the ability of the Parks Department to keep up with regular repairs,preventive maintenance,and appropriate cost-saving modifications.The Park is funded through the Denver Parks and Recreation budget,which is shared by 301 other parks,parkways, and recreation centers.These funds are so scarce there is currently a $100 million backlog of deferred capital maintenance projects that only receives about $3-5 million a year to address.Furthermore,funds collected from special event fees and other park-related revenues are deposited in the City s general funds and are not earmarked for specific use at Civic Center Park. There are no dedicated funds to maintain the public art located in the Park:the Alan True murals,A.P. Proctor bronzes,and several smaller monuments and plaques have already suffered deterioration.Past repairs have been made thanks to generous private donations,but generally this occurs only after the pieces are in a crisis state of disrepair. Day to day maintenance also suffers from the lack of sufficient staff to keep the Park in good condition. Maintaining the areas around RTD bus stops is especially challenging.These areas are heavily used and require much more intensive maintenance than can be provided by the available staff. Analysis No plans exist to address improving maintenance efficiencies or capturing alternative funding sources in order to improve the level of maintenance. 53 The Greek Theater during restoration

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QUALITY OF LIFE 54 QUALITY OF LIFE

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT EXISTING CONDITIONS Neighborhood and Community Organizations Nine neighborhood and community organizations work to protect and enhance the quality of life within the Civic Center Study Area,including Downtown and adjacent neighborhoods.These organizations are listed in the following matrix,which identifies whether or not an organization is currently registered with the City,the boundaries of that organization,and any committees that deal more specifically with quality of life or issues particularly relevant to the Assessment. 55 Registered Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes YesNorthColfax Avenue 20th Street 6th Avenue 23rd Avenue Colfax Avenue City Limits I-25/23rd St. Colfax Ave.SouthSpeer Blvd. Colfax/Speer Mississippi Avenue 1st Avenue 6th Avenue City Limits Speer Blvd. 6th AvenueEastLincoln Street Grant St. Lincoln Street Colorado Blvd. Broadway City Limits Broadway Speer Blvd. West Speer Blvd. Wewatta Street S. Platte River Broadway I-25 City Limits I-25 I-25 Committees Urban Design Good Neighbor Justice Center Transportation Zoning and Liquor License Zoning and Liquor License Transportation Zoning Name Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association Golden Triangle Arts District Downtown Denver Partnership/BID Baker Historic Neighborhood Association Capitol Hill United Neighbors (CHUN) Neighbors United Con Poder Inter-Neighborhood Cooperation (INC) Downtown Denver ResidentsÂ’ Association La Alma/Lincoln Park Planning Group

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QUALITY OF LIFE Cultural, Institutional, and Governmental Facilities in the Study Area The Civic Center Study Area is home to several of the premier cultural,institutional,and governmental facilities in the Rocky Mountain region.These facilities attract a significant number of visitors to the Civic Center and enhance the quality of life of the residents and employees within the Study Area,Downtown, and the surrounding neighborhoods.These facilities include: 56 Address1310 Bannock Street 1300 Broadway 200 East Colfax Avenue 2 East 14th Avenue 1357 Broadway 1437 Bannock Street 1250 Welton Street 1362 Tremont Street 320 West Colfax Avenue Type Historic House Museum State History Museum State Offices and Legislative Chambers Art Museum Public Library, Western History Library, Government Documents, Geneological Research City Offices, City Council Chambers, and Courts Alternative High School and Adult Continuing Education Firefighters Â’ History Museum Production Facility for U.S. Currency Name Byers-Evans House Colorado History Museum Colorado State Capitol Denver Art Museum Denver Central Public Library Denver City and County Building Emily Griffith Opportunity School Firefighters Â’ Museum United States Mint

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT QUALITY OF LIFE GOALS AND POLICIES FROM ADOPTED PLANS Neighborhood-serving uses,including uses such as restaurants,drug stores,and dry cleaners, should be readily available to neighborhood residents,employees,and visitors. The neighborhood should be safe in both reality and perception. The neighborhood should be pedestrian-friendly,with priority given to the pedestrian and to good pedestrian access to all areas of the neighborhood. Neighborhood residents,employees,and visitors should have ready access to transit,with good connections to local and regional bus and light rail routes.A local connector,or shuttle service, should be provided. The neighborhood should be perceived as having readily accessible green spaces,with inviting linkages to every section of the neighborhood. Historic structures should be protected and used. 57

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QUALITY OF LIFE QUALITY OF LIFE ISSUES AND ANALYSIS General Issues The study area is home to significant cultural and historic resources and neighborhood and government services.Area residents feel threatened by the potential that new uses,such as the proposed new detention facility and its related uses,might undermine the vision and investment in the area as a cultural center and visitor attraction. Analysis The City has a huge financial stake in maintaining and enhancing the Civic Center as cultural center and visitor attraction.In the last decade alone,over $300 Million of public money has been invested in the area.This investment reflects the pride that the City takes in the Civic Center and the realization that the cultural institutions and related facilities are important economic generators for the City and the neighborhood.To help enhance the quality of the area and its institutions,the Civic Center Cultural Complex Master Plan of 1992 set a framework for expansion and joint programming for the cultural institutions.Similarly,the 1998 Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan reinforced the importance of related cultural uses in a mixed-use environment.New government,court and detention facilities must be evaluated for potential impacts,real or anticipated,that could devalue the investment in the area and for ways in which they can enhance the quality of the area. Architecture Issues Architecture in the study area is an uneasy mix of stately civic buildings,innovative contemporary design, and mediocre architecture. Analysis The Design Standards and Guidelines for the Civic Center Historic District,B-5 and B-8-G Zone Districts, and OD-1 Overlay Zone District address design issues and are intended to bring a more consistent quality to all new construction in the area.Public buildings may need additional design criteria to ensure continuation of the tradition of urban design excellence. 58

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Location and Access Issues The Civic Center study area is adjacent to Downtown and other dense,mixed-use neighborhoods,giving it excellent proximity to cultural and government facilities,employment,shopping,parks,and open space.These close-by uses and facilities provide potential amenities for visitors,employers,and residents. However,there are physical and psychological barriers to full access to these amenities,primarily because of poor pedestrian connections;a series of vacant,underutilized,and vandalized sites that divide the more active uses;a concentration of panhandlers and homeless people;and a perception of unsafe conditions. Analysis Social,psychological,and physical barriers between the study area and the surrounding amenities should be addressed through further planning,programming,maintenance,and capital projects.The Downtown Area Plan identifies key connections between Downtown,the Civic Center,and the other surrounding neighborhoods.The Downtown Multi-modal Access Plan (DMAP) will provide further direction on improving access.The Pedestrian Master Plan will provide guidance for improving pedestrian connections. Government and Neighborhood Services Issues While government services are concentrated in the study area,neighborhood services in the study area are limited for visitors,employees,and visitors and often require a trip to the 16th Street Mall.Desired services include drug stores,groceries,dry cleaning,shoe repair and other services that are often needed on a regular basis.More neighborhood services are needed in or immediately adjacent to,convenient to, and visible from Civic Center Park,particularly food services. Analysis The zoning to allow the desired mix of uses is in place.Private development of amenities and services is dependant on market demand. 59

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QUALITY OF LIFE Events Issues Events in Civic Center Park trash the area for those who use it at other times. Analysis Denver Parks and Recreation has received a grant to conduct a parks plan for Civic Center Park,including events planning and mitigation of impacts. Cultural and Historic Resources Issues The cultural facilities and resources,historic structures and landscape,and special events are uplifting to the spirit and help enrich the lives of visitors,employees,and residents.Notwithstanding the remaining historic structures,the area has lost a wealth of historic resources.Some of the remaining structures and landscape will likely to be threatened in the future. Analysis Civic Center Historic District protects the most significant historic buildings in the study area.The Civic Center Park Plan will inventory and recommend strategies for the protection and rehabilitation of historic resources and public art in the park.Other historic resources should be inventoried and considered for protection through local designation. Open and Green Spaces Issues While Civic Center Park,Lincoln Park,and Speer Boulevard provide large open spaces in close proximity to all parts of the study area,outside the immediate area of those spaces,there is no indication that they exist or how to get to them.Several of the sites that are perceived as open spaces,such as the areas on the south side of the Colorado History Museum or the areas around the new Cultural Complex Parking Structure provide open spaces,but are sites for future development.The area needs better connections to its green spaces and to feel like a neighborhood in a park. Analysis Improved streetscape and the siting and design of new buildings can help provide better visual and 60

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT physical connections to the existing parks and open spaces.The Denver Streetscape Design Manual and the Design Standards and Guidelines in place for the study area provide guidance for improving the streetscape and the siting of design of new buildings. Environs Issues Surface parking lots,sparse or nonexistent landscaping,and poorly maintained buildings characterize the areas immediately surrounding the study area.All of the areas immediately surrounding the study area need to be upgraded to the level and livability of the core of the Civic Center.At the same time,the facilities in the Civic Center and the use of those facilities impact the adjoining areas both positively and negatively. Analysis There is no indication that significant regulatory barriers to redevelopment exist.Barriers are more related to financing and market demand.Increased code enforcement and amortization of nonconforming uses could address some of the problem.The Civic Center Park Plan will include provisions for events planning and impact mitigation. Urban Living Issues With the proximity of facilities and services,the area has the potential for providing an exciting and fulfilling urban experience for visitors,employees,and residents.This potential is still largely untapped. The cultural facilities in the study area successfully provide an environment that uplifts the spirit of those individuals who can take advantage of their facilities and services.The entire area,however,is missing an opportunity by not having the same effect. Analysis New development can be located and designed to help create an exciting and fulfilling urban experience.All new development in the study area should take cues from the cultural facilities in the area and provide high quality architecture,art,landscaping,and materials.The existing plans and regulatory framework in the area call for the desired quality of redevelopment;barriers to additional redevelopment are more closely related to financing and market demand. 61

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QUALITY OF LIFE Parking Issues Employee parking is limited and expensive.Parking will become more limited and more expensive for employees and visitors as surface parking lots are redeveloped. Analysis No comprehensive parking study or plan is currently available.DMAP will partially address the issue. New development in the B-8-G zone district is required to provide parking for its needs.No parking is required in the B-5 zone district.Displaced parking from new development on parking lots is not the responsibility of the developer. Pedestrians Issues Pedestrians are subject to the impacts from the dominance of automobiles,high volume of traffic, congestion and noise.Distances can be long and unfriendly,disrupting the ease of pedestrian access. Analysis The Pedestrian Master Plan will help address pedestrian issues.DMAP will look at access issues.The Denver Streetscape Manual provides standards and guidelines for streetscape improvements.As additional redevelopment occurs,the pedestrian experience will improve. Transit Issues While both the bus system and light rail are readily accessible at the eastern and northern edges of the study area,transit connections to the edges are limited in the interior and limit the use of transit by visitors,area residents,and area employees.Distances between desired destinations are great enough that walking the area would benefit from some form of local shuttle service that would connect uses. Analysis DMAP will address transit issues related to getting in,around and out of Downtown.The Pedestrian Master Plan is looking at improving the pedestrian infrastructure and experience. 62

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Safety Issues Both the reality and perception of safety are compromised by the intensity of the loitering and drug activity in and around both Civic Center and Lincoln Parks and the bus stops in each,both day and night.The reality and perception of anti-social activities in the park limits the use of the park by visitors, employees,and residents. Analysis The Civic Center Park Plan will provide baseline information for management guidelines for appropriate development and change in the park Trash and Litter Issues Trash and litter damage the beauty of the area. Analysis Code enforcement,parks maintenance should be increased.Neighbors can help be calling the Neighborhood Inspection Service hotline to report problems.The Civic Center Park Plan will provide baseline information for management guidelines for appropriate development and changes in the park 63

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ECONOMIC ACTIVITY 64 ECONOMIC ACTIVITY

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT EXISTING ECONOMIC ACTIVITY The Civic Center Area has an important role with the City of Denver and for the entire State of Colorado. Some key economic considerations for this area include: The study area is in the heart of governmental activity both for the State of Colorado and for the City and County of Denver. The study area lies on the southern edge of the central business district. The study area marks the demarcation where high rise private offices transition to government facilities and 3-4 story office and retail buildings,and eventually to high-rise housing. The area is on the northern edge of redevelopment occurring from Colfax south along Broadway. This redevelopment is likely to foster more intense future residential and commercial development within in this area. The majority of current activity in this area revolves around government employment/interaction and tourism. Employment Table 1 shows employment estimates by category for the study area.Within the study area,employment is estimated at about 10,550 persons.This represents about 1% of the total employment within the Denver Metro area,and about 9% of employment in the Downtown. By category,about 52% of the 16,550 people are government employees,including municipal,State and Federal employees.Another 26% are currently classified as media,which is primarily newspaper since the staff for both the Denver Post and Rocky Mountain News are located in this area. 65

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ECONOMIC ACTIVITY Study Area Employment and Wage Estimates Government Impact With the key City and State headquarters located in this area,these employers are not only the major employers,but spend also significant sums on facilities.The major infrastructure investments by the City during the past ten years are listed on the following page.These investments total approximately $313 million.The State has also renov ated facilities over the years and continues to explore reuse and expansion options.Similarly the Federal government has spent substantial sums on renovations at the US Mint and Post Office in recent years. 66 Number 5,500 2,750 650 400 300 950 10,550 $190,000,000 Percent 52% 26% 6% 4% 3% 9% 100% Employment Category Government Media Museums Restaurant Professional Other Total Employment Total Wage Estimates:

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT City Public Infrastructure Investment Past 10 Years City Projects Denver Public Library,Central Branch Wellington E.Webb Municipal Office Building Denver Art Museum Expansion Cultural Center Parking Structure Remodel of Greek Theatre Total City Infrastructure Investment: $313 Million Tourism Draws, but Limited Services Another interesting aspect of the area and perhaps one of the most untapped economic engines in the area is the tourism component.Visitor estimates for this area are shown on the following page.The Art Museum,Library,Colorado History Museum,State Capitol,City and County Building and Civic Center Park all draw tourists,but the key attraction in the area was until recently the Denver Mint,which, unfortunately,has been closed to the general public as of September 11,2001.Surprisingly,restaurants account for only 4% of the employment in the area and there are no major hotels.Given the tourist draws in this area,the portion of visitor service related employment could be higher.Only recently has this sector begun to grow with new restaurants springing up as residential population increases. 67

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ECONOMIC ACTIVITY Visitor Estimates: Future Employment and Investments The public and private investment in this area and redevelopment will continue to spur expanded employment and population growth in the study area.Similar to growth that has occurred in LoDo,the increased resident population in and around the study areas provides the opportunity for new services and restaurants,which in turn encourages more residents in an upward spiral of economic growth and investment. Additionally,the public sector investment maintains the public aspect of the study area,attracts tourists and increases employment in the area.Potential major future public and private investments are listed on the following page. 68 Attendance Per Year 383,949 1,152,973 269,861 Attraction Denver Art Museum Denver Public Library Colorado History Museum

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Current and Proposed Development and Expansion Projects Denver Art Museum Expansion DAM Co-Development (residential,retail,office) Argyle Tower (residential) Justice Center Complex (3 buildings) Denver News Agency office In addition to these specific projects,the majority of the Civic Center area is included in the State of Colorado s Enterprise Zone which offers a reduction on State income tax based on job creation,job training,capital investment and other business activities. 69 Left: Map of Potential for Significant Change

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ECONOMIC ACTIVITY ECONOMIC ACTIVITY ISSUES AND ANALYSIS General Employment and economic activity in the area is poised for continued growth.While the potential exists for expansion of government facilities in the study area,the residential growth to the south of the study area continues to foster new and expanded service opportunities. The areas unlikely to change shown on the Change Area Map are primarily government facilities and while employment in the these areas may be cyclical,the primary employment increases for both government and private sector activity are likely to occur in the areas subject to change. In the northern portions of the study area,the Convention Center may stimulate some tourist and service related growth and there is the potential for some expanded business activity.At the perimeter of existing government facilities some expansion of government facilities is likely to occur.In the southern portions of the study area,residential,tourist,art and service expansion would be expected. Issues Building on current activity and creating new activity are critical to support the tourist oriented and potential art community growth. Analysis Pedestrian connections and other linkages are critical to tourist and art business growth.The southern portions of the study area from 12th to 14th Avenues could capture this type of growth along with some areas adjacent to the Convention Center.Linkages between the two are equally important. Issues As documented by the current landscape of activity and employment,future growth in this area should revolve around government functions,tourist activity and potentially small/medium businesses. Analysis Local government is looking to expand in this area.Maintaining a pedestrian scale for government facilities and pedestrian connections are important to the success of tourist related and service businesses.As an example that should be emulated,the Webb Municipal Building and integrated annex 70

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT made a successful transition from the CBD to the Civic Center,not only in terms of scale but in terms of economic activity and diversity with the integrated retail vendors. The growth of small and medium-sized businesses generally is generated by increases in the number of residential units.Therefore,the anticipated increase in residential units in the Study Area should result in additional small and medium business activity. Issues Major growth in new job creation (excluding the proposed Denver Newspaper Agency moving within the area in the next few years) will be limited to government functions. Analysis Large,private sector businesses will grow in the Downtown core due to market trends,high vacancies, and the availability of alternative transportation.They will also grow in outlining areas of the City, including Stapleton,Lowry,Denver International Airport (DIA),Interstate 25 (I-25) corridor,etc. Key Development Opportunities Issues The current surface parking lots in this area will be difficult to re-develop into other uses due to the surplus of office space in the Downtown area,competition for residential development from other areas of Downtown,City requirements for parking in new developments,and the profitability of surface parking. Analysis No specific City program is established at this time to address surface parking lot redevelopment. Issues Within the study area there are underdeveloped sites that,if redeveloped,could significantly impact the character of the area,for good or for bad.These key development opportunities may include both public and private facilities.Critical sites include locations immediately adjacent to Civic Center Park, between West 14th and Colfax Avenues,bordering Colfax,and along Acoma and Bannock Streets.The appropriate locations and limits of government and institutional expansion need to be determined. 71

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ECONOMIC ACTIVITY 72 16th St. MallColfax Ave.Broadway14th Ave.Speer Blvd.Speer Blvd.SpeerBlvd.Blake St.Wynkoop St. Wazee St.Market St. Walnut St.Larimer St.Lawrence St.Arapahoe St.Curtis St.Champa St. Stout St.California St.Welton St.Glenarm Pl. Glenarm Pl.Court Pl.20th Ave. 19th Ave. 18th Ave. 17th Ave. 16th Ave. 13th Ave. 14th Ave.Cleveland Pl.Cherokee St. Delaware St. Elati St. Santa Fe Dr. Inca St. Kalamath St. Fox St. Galapago St. Bannock St. Acoma St. Lincoln St. Sherman St. Grant St. Logan St. Pennsylvania St. Pearl St. Washington St.14th St.Bike Path13th St.CherryCreek15th St. 20th St. 21st St. 22nd St. Park Ave. 24th St. h St.19th St. 18th St. 17th St.Tremont Pl. Employees Per Block 1,500+ 500-1,499 250-499 100-249 1-99 none Right: Map of Employees per Block

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT 73 Analysis The Golden Triangle Neighborhood Plan defines a Civic Center subarea.The Civic Center Cultural Complex Master Plan also addresses cultural facility expansion.The Downtown Area Plan indicates locations for government expansion.No single plan defines appropriate locations or limits of government/institutional expansion.Partnerships or incentives for private development in key locations have not been addressed. Development Barriers Issues The lack of significant private development activity in the area indicates there are barriers to projects. These barriers may include: Market demand,which is impacted by the economy; Lack of development incentives; Profitability of surface parking is a disincentive for redevelopment,and The cost of land is increasing. Analysis There is no indication that significant regulatory barriers to redevelopment exist.Barriers are more related to financing and market demand.

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GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES 74 GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES

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EXISTING GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES In the study area there are over four million gross square feet of space dispersed among 28 facilities that house Federal,State,and City government and cultural uses.There are over 6,600 government and cultural employees in these facilities.Many,if not all,the facilities involve heavy interaction with the public.Although these facilities generally have,to varying degrees,met the needs of their users,several facilities are:nearing the end of their useful-life-span;cannot feasibly or cost-effectively be expanded to mitigate current overcrowded conditions;and/or lack the capacity to accommodate future growth. The government facilities consist mostly of courts and court related use,administrative offices,legislature, and safety uses.The cultural facilities include museums and the Central Denver Public Library. Two current uses presently in the study area that have severe overcrowding issues along with facility functionality problems are the courts in the City and County Building and detention and intake in the Pre Arraignment Detention Facility (PADF).Identified below are some problems the City currently faces with these two facilities: Courts County and District Courts are congested and below standards.Over 50 courts,which include Probate,Civil,Juvenile,and Criminal,are located in the City and County Building that was originally designed for eight courts when constructed in 1932. Defendants,victims,jurors and families circulate together among 19 criminal courts. The Grand Jury room is located in a basement space designed for storage that does not meet air quality requirements. The State could,at any time,mandate or force the City to meet current State standards by leasing additional buildings or making major renovations. The County Civil courts have a $3.25 million,five-year lease in the Adams Mark Hotel. Renovation of the Permit Center for Juvenile Courts is costly (estimated at $9.0+ million) and doesn t accommodate growth nor meet State Courtroom standards. CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT 75 The Denver Public Library Central Branch had a major expansion in 1995. Michael Graves was selected as the architect following a design competition.

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GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES Inadequate space in Courtroom 191J,the County Juvenile Court,forces defendants and parents to stand outside in the elements. There isn t any public parking associated with Courts. Detention City and County jails operate at 140% to 150% of capacity. In 2002 the Sheriff Department relinquished accreditation,the City s only shield from a classaction lawsuit and federal cap. Overcrowding strains Sheriffs ability to safely monitor and control inmates,putting both the inmates and deputies at risk.Alternatives to jail can t keep pace with growth,requiring early releases of inmates. The PADF rated capacity is 158.It consistently exceeds 250 arrestees on Fridays through Mondays.The rated capacity at the County Jail is 1,350.The average daily count has been 1,928. 76

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT EXISTING CITY/PUBLIC FACILITIES IN STUDY AREA Table 2 is a detailed list of the government and culture facilities in the study area.The map on the following page indicates the location of the facilities in Table 2.By far the City and County of Denver and the State of Colorado are the largest landowners in the area. 77 Address 745 W. Colfax Ave. 1437 Bannock St. 201 W. Colfax Ave. 100 W. 14th Ave. 10 W. 14th Ave. 200 W. 14th Ave. 144 W. Colfax Ave. 1351 Cherokee St. 1331 Cherokee St. 303 W. Colfax Ave. 1313 Tremont St. 1515 Cleveland Pl. 110 16th St. 1348 Cherokee St. 1338 Cherokee St. 280 14th St. 1255 Broadway 414 14th St. 1250 Welton St. 1338 Fox St. 1326 Tremont Pl. 200 E. Colfax Ave. 1550 Broadway 320 W. Colfax Ave. 400 W. Colfax Ave. 1300 Broadway 2 E. 14th Ave. 1421 Elati St. Status City Owned City Owned City Owned City Owned City Owned City Owned City Owned City Owned City Owned City Owned Lease Lease Lease City Owned City Owned City Owned City Owned Public Owned Public Owned Public Owned City Owned State Owned Public Owned Federal Gov. City Owned State Owned State Owned Federal Gov. TOTALS: Primary Use Fire Station, OfficesMayor Â’ s Office, Courts, CouncilOffices Museum Library Backfill Offices Offices Detention/Intake OfficesProbation, Diversion, OfficesProbation Civil Courts Traffic Courts Maint./Storage Parking Daycare/Offices Parking Offices School Office MuseumState Offices, Legislative FunctionsTransit Hub Industrial Offices, Industrial Museum Judicial Post Office, Distribution Total Squ. Ft. 29,000 350,000 700,000 210,000 540,000 67,000 34,000 57,000 172,000 146,000 25,000 27,000 4,230 5,000 13,500 9,150 324,000 42,000 227,000 53,000 12,000 310,000 180,000 183,570 244,317 135,142 87,490 24,000 4,211,399 # of Employees 104 285 1,800 93 320 143 154 197 551 398 105 35 10 0 0 25 5 110 600 200 25 350 50 200 700 120 60 50 6,670 Year Built 1975 1932 2002 1950/71 1958/95 1987 1904 1975 1975 1967/82 N/A N/A N/A 1928 1938 1950 2003 1923 1944 1971 1900 1903 1982 1929 1952/72/85 1976 1976 1970 Facility Name District One Fire House City & County Building Wellington E. Webb Municipal Office Bldg. Art Museum Central Library Permit Center McNichols Civic Center Office Bldg. Pre-Arraignment Detention Facility (PADF) Police Administration Building Minoru Yasui Office Building Tremont Office Building Adams Mark Hotel Gulf Western Building Cherokee Boiler Plant Cherokee Parking Garage Court Child Care Building Cultural Center Parking Garage Art Museum Admin. Building Emily Griffith Opportunity School Denver Public Schools Denver Firefighters Â’ Museum State Capitol RTD Civic Center Station Denver Mint Rocky Mountain News Site Colorado History Museum Colorado State Judicial Center Post Office Disclaimer: Square Footage and Employee numbers are approximate. Item 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28

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GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES 78 Right: Map of Facilities Locations (numbers correspond to Table 2) Right: Map of Facilities Ownership

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT PROJECTED GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES NEEDS Several master plans and facility studies that identify future needs have been completed for public buildings in the study area.Some current and recently completed projects that are currently under construction in the study area are a result of adopted master plans.The Wellington E.Webb Municipal Office Building,the Denver Art Museum expansion,and the renovation of the Minoru Yasui Office Building are all projects that were results of following master plans which guide public facility investment. There have been many plans over the years,with some plans building upon one another.Some plans have changed direction over the years due to availability of land,changes in political agendas,and budgets,but consistent through all plans is the driving force of population and employment.As population and employment increase in Denver so does the need for governmental and cultural facilities.It is important to note that while local government may decline in the short term due to the current fiscally-constrained climate,over the long term,public employment will parallel population growth. Many facilities have outgrown their ability to accommodate growth,thus forcing the City to remodel facilities or lease space.This is evident with the City and County Building,which was unable to accommodate all of the necessary courtrooms.Thus,the City and County of Denver leased space in the office tower of the Adams Mark Hotel for six courtrooms.The Office of Asset Management would like to reduce lease expenses and return these courtrooms to the City and County Building.Current plans have been created that accommodate this desire.This is a reasonable goal.For example,with the completion of the Webb Municipal Building the City eliminated over 400,000 square feet of leased space scattered around the City.While lease rates may vary over the short term,in the long term it will be more cost effective for the City to own rather than lease space. Many of the plans listed below relate to Safety,Courts and Government Services,which are significantly present in the study area.While the new office building has accommodated government services growth over the next twenty years,there will still be a need for growth in Safety and Courts to allow the City to function efficiently and serve the public. 79

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GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES The following are some of the City and County of Denver facility master plans and studies completed over the last 16 years,which may influence the study area. 1986 Denver Facility Master Plan, Pouw & Associates / Geisler Smith / Ross Consulting This plan suggested central administrative/justice facilities to house the activities involved in the management of City affairs and the administration of justice.It advised that this type of facility requires a central location because of the significant interrelationships between the occupying agencies and the heavy volume of public business transacted.It observed that these facilities convey a sense of community identity and image.The plan suggested developing a City and County Building Complex.It noted that the City and County Building remains the key component,and recommended relocating the Judicial functions into structures geographically related to the City and County and Public Safety buildings.The plan also suggested construction of a new judicial facility.Two judicial facility options were provided in the report:one site was located south of the Permit Center;the other located it north of the City Jail. 1992 PADF Concept Design, Reilly Johnson Architecture This concept design suggested a six-story addition to the north of the existing Pre-Arraignment Detention Facility to increase the capacity of the facility to a 507-rated housing capacity. 1999 Draft Strategic Facility Master Plan, The SGS Group This study (based on the 1986 Pouw Study) was not finalized and focused on eliminating leased space and issues with existing City buildings.It explored the construction of a new office building and renovating existing buildings.The Plan suggested the use of the Permit Center as a Court Annex to allow lease space to return to City and County Building.It recommended renovating the City and County Building to provide five new courts,which would meet year 2005 projections.It also stated that by year 2010 additional growth of courts would require the construction of a new court facility.To meet longterm growth,the study projected the need for an additional 300,000 square feet.The Plan further recommended developing new courts in conjunction with detention facilities when operational improvements are exhausted and developing a dedicated Juvenile Court along with a Court Building developed within the Civic Center. Implementation of portions of this plan started in 1999.The first phase was to construct a new office building to consolidate agencies and eliminate leased space.This phase was completed with the opening 80

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT of the 700,000 square foot Wellington E.Webb Municipal Offie Building.The second phase identified three buildings,which would receive substantial remodel to accommodate future growth.Due to fiscal constraints only the Minoru Yasui building is being completely remodeled and the City and County Building would receive a minor remodel only in vacated space.The Permit Center would not receive any remodel.The decision not to renovate these two facilities may mean that the long-term needs of the City may not be met at this time and future renovations would be needed. 2000 Denver Police Master Plan, Daniel C. Smith and Associates The Police Master Plan calls for the decentralization of Investigations out of the existing Police Administration Building.This would allow for other administrative functions to grow in the existing building.Unfortunately even with decentralization the Police Department still needs additional space. They will require approximately 28,000 square feet of additional administrative space within the next twenty years.The plan also calls for a new District Six Police Station,a Special Function Facility,and an Investigations Building,with all three totaling over 125,000 square feet.Although the facilities needs were identified in the master plan,no specific sites have been identified for these functions. 2001 Denver Art Museum Master Plan, Klip Collussy This plan addresses the new wing of the Denver Art Museum,the Denver Art Museum Office Building, the Cultural Center Parking Structure,and Co-Development.The plan calls for a 146,000 square foot addition to the existing museum,a 42,000 square foot office building,over 13,000 square feet of commercial/retail space,and over 166,000 square feet of residential.The plan also indicated a 967-space parking garage,which was completed this year.Construction on the new wing just began and phase one of the co-development (residential/commercial) is expected to begin in the summer of 2004. 2003 Fire Department Master Plan, Daniel C. Smith and Associates This plan as it relates to the Civic Center calls for the Fire Department Headquarters presently located at Fire House One to be relocated.No specific site has been targeted at this time for this use although it should be located near the Manager of Safety and other government agencies.The plan also suggests relocating the fire departments warehouse to the vacated area in Fire Station One,mainly due to its central location.The fire station itself will remain in its current facility. 81

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GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES 2002-2003 Justice Center Planning, Reilly Johnson Architecture This plan examined the City and County Building s ability to meet long-term court needs.It determined in order to meet the long-term needs of the Courts,City Council and the Mayor s Office,criminal and juvenile courts would need to be relocated to a new facility.This plan determined that Civil Courts in leased space could return to the building and that it would be able to meet the twenty-year needs of the civil courts remaining.With the acquisition of the Rocky Mountain News (RMN) site,this plan developed concepts for a Justice Center.Twenty-year caseload projections forecasted the need for 29 adult criminal courtrooms and 12 juvenile courtrooms. Using previous studies,it was determined that 1,500 pre-sentencing detention beds were necessary.This estimate of new beds was also examined against the ability to close inefficient jail buildings at Smith Road to allow for future expansion and to increase holding to a total of 2,700 beds.The plan indicated the potential of developing three buildings on the RMN land that was acquired by the City in 2002.One building would be an adult court and detention facility,the other would be a juvenile courthouse,and the last building would house parking for all facilities and would provide over 20,000 square feet of commercial/retail space.This plan recommends closing the existing PADF building and eliminating the need to renovate the Permit Center,providing approximately 124,000 square feet for other government needs in the area. Table 3 is a detailed list of potential needs identified in the various plans for facilities that are located in the study area.Items 1-20 are projected needs from master plans.Items 21-28 are possible back-fill uses for the Rocky Mountain News site if a Justice Center is not developed on that site. 82

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT FACILITY NEEDS (CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER) IN THE STUDY AREA 83 Need Safety Detention Expansion, Justice Center Component Courts Criminal Courts Bldg., Justice Center Component Courts Juvinile Courts Bldg., Justice Center ComponentCriminal Justice Center Parking, Garage Justice Center ComponentSafety District 6 Police Station Safety Fire Department Headquarters Safety Fire Department Warehouse Safety PAB Expansion Admin. Safety Property Storage Expansion Safety Crime Lab Expansion Safety Police Special Function Facility Safety Investigations Building New Wing of Denver Art Museum Expansion of Webb Building (2020) Back-Up 911 Call Center Mayor Â’ s Office Office of Emergency Management County Courts Civil Division Relocation Courts Civil Court Expansion Mayor Â’ s Office Expansion City Council Expansion Sub-Total Facility Type Detention/ Intake Courts CourtsParking/OfficePolice StationOffice Warehouse Office Warehouse Special Special Office Museum Office Office Office Courts Courts Office OfficeCurrent LocationPADF/Smith Rd. City & County Building City & County Building N/A Clarkson Fire Station #1 Center St. PAB PAB PAB Harvard Gulch/ Decatur/City Pk.13th & Cherokee14th Ave. Colfax Ave.City & County Bldg.City & County Building Adams Mark Hotel City & County BuildingCity & County Bldg. City & County Bldg.Future LocationRocky Mountain News Site Rocky Mountain News Site Gov. Complex Rocky Mountain News Site Within District Gov. Complex Fire Station #1 Gov. Complex Gov. Complex Gov. Complex Gov. Complex Gov. Complex South of Existing Gov. ComplexCity & County Bldg.City & County Building City & County Building City & County BuildingCity & County Bldg. City & County Bldg.BasedStudy Master Plan Master Plan Study Master Plan Master Plan Master Plan Master Plan Master Plan Master Plan Master Plan Master Plan Plan Plan AMO AMO Master Plan Master Plan Plan PlanRecommendationStatus City Owned City Owned City Owned N/A Lease City Owned City Owned City Owned City Owned City Owned N/A N/A N/A Lease/ Purchase City Owned City Owned Lease City Owned City Owned City Owned Existing Sq. Ft. 357,000 N/A N/A N/A 7,917 15,000 4,200 172,000 N/A N/A N/A N/A 210,000 N/A 1,200 2,000 27,000 25 existingcivil courtrooms5,000 8,500 Existing Sq. Ft. 462,000 241,000 116,000 160,000 40,000 25,000 10,000 28,000 10,000 5,000 80,000 5,000 146,000 35,000 3,000 3,500 30,000 32 courtsprojected 20 yr need3,000 2,800 1,447,300 Projected Plan 2004 2004 2004 2004 2005 2005 2005 2005-2015 2010 2010 2010 2015 2003 N/A 2004 2005 2009 2009 2003 2003 Implementation Item 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Projected Needs from Master Plans and Studies

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GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES CONTINUED: FACILITY NEEDS (CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER) IN THE STUDY AREA 84 Facility Type Warehouse Warehouse/ Retail Warehouse Warehouse Special OfficeCity Jail/IntakeOffice Commercial/ Retail/ Residential Commercial/ Retail/ Residential Commercial/ Retail/ ResidentialCurrent LocationBrighton Blvd. Santa Fe Brighton Blvd. Gates Stapleton Parkway Center Grove St. New New NewFuture LocationRMN Backfill RMN Backfill RMN Backfill RMN Backfill RMN Backfill RMN Backfill Gov. Complex RMN Backfill South of Library South of Library South of LibraryBasedAMO Master Plan AMO AMO AMO AMO Study AMO Master Plan Master Plan Master PlanRecommendationStatus Lease Lease Lease Lease Lease Lease City Owned Lease N/A N/A N/A Existing Squ. Ft. 18,000 45,000 8,000 40,000 13,000 10,000 57,000 20,700 N/A N/A N/A Existing Squ. Ft. 12,000 70,000 8,000 45,000 15,000 15,000 87,000 23,000 3,950 Retail 59,650 Res. 10,660 Retail 73,050 Res. 42,000 Office 120,000 Res. Projected Date N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 2005 2004 2004 2007 Implementation Item 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Possible Backfill Uses Identified for RMN Site Need General Services POB Shops Human Services Supplemental Foods Art Museum Warehouse Election Commission Warehouse Television Studios Mayor Â’ s Office Work Force Development Safety PADF Expansion Safety Civil Service Commission Co-Development with City & County of Denver DAM Co-Development at 12th Avenue DAM Co-Development at Acoma DAM Co-Development at Broadway

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT PLANNED OR PROPOSED GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES DEVELOPMENT Although the above master plans suggest several new facilities and renovation projects,only some of the recommendations have been incorporated into an implementation plan.These facilities are as follows: Denver Art Museum (DAM): The expansion of the Denver Art Museum will be accomplished in four phases.The first phase, completed in 2002,is a 967-space parking structure.The second phase,the addition of the Frederic C. Hamilton Building,broke ground in 2003.A geometric explosion of glass and titanium designed by Daniel Libeskind,the Hamilton Building will be an internationally significant work of architecture and a signature landmark for the City of Denver.Silhouetted against the majestic Rocky Mountains,the 146,000-square-foot Hamilton Building will nearly double the size of the museum.It will house several collections that have never been on permanent display.Three new state-of-the art special exhibition galleries will allow the museum to bring unprecedented exhibitions to the region. DAM Co-Development: The third and fourth phases of development have been designed to wrap the existing 967-space parking structure with commercial and residential uses.The third phase will begin in the summer of 2004 and will provide over 14,000 square feet of commercial/retail space and over 130,000 square feet of residential.Phase four,slated to begin in the summer of 2007 would house 42,000 square feet of office space and an additional 120,000 square feet of residential. Downtown Justice Center: In an effort to eliminate overcrowding at the City and County Building and at the County Jail,return the City and County Building to a civic use,allow for future growth at the City and County Building and at the Smith Road site,and provide a centrally located facility that will maximize operational efficiencies, the Rocky Mountain News (RMN) building has been proposed as the site for a new Justice Center.Prior to construction,this proposal requires a citywide bond election,a rezoning,and design review.If approved,this redevelopment would include relocating all criminal courts out of the City and County Building into a new Criminal Courts Building containing 241,000 square feet.The RMN site is projected to accommodate 32 criminal courtrooms,three more than the 20-year needs projection.In connection with the criminal courtrooms,462,000 square feet of detention facilities would also be constructed on 85

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GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES the site.This would house 1,500 beds for pre-sentencing inmates and be the new intake building for the Sheriffs office,thus allowing the closure of the current PADF at 14th and Cherokee completely and closing inefficient housing units at Smith Road.The proposed Justice Center would accommodate parking in three locations,on-site parking,underground private parking,and a parking structure for the public south of 14th Avenue.The parking facility would also have 20,000 square feet of commercial space.The final building in the Justice Center would be a juvenile courthouse of 116,000 square feet. City and County Building: This building is presently planned for a minor remodel of the vacant space when agencies vacated to the Webb Municipal Building.This remodel addresses deficiencies in present courtroom and office space needs.Even with completion of this remodel,several courtrooms will still not meet courtroom standards. Completion of the Justice Center would allow the City and County Building,without a major remodel,to provide 34 quality courtrooms complying with court standards.The twenty-year projection for Civil Courts is a total demand for 32 courtrooms,all of which could then be accommodated in the City and County Building. Permit Center: Present plans to remodel the building as a Juvenile Courthouse are on hold.Remodeling the Permit Center would have met the present demand of nine courtrooms but would not have addressed the twenty-year need of 12 courtrooms (growth of three additional).The Permit Center is currently being used as offices for Probation staff and functions that vacated the Minoru Yasui Building while it is being remodeled. State Facilities: The State has not completed any expansion plans at present.They do have the desire to complete a master plan for their facilities.State Historical Museum has conceptual plans for an expansion onto the plaza at the south end of its current facility.The State owns several sites adjacent to Study Area that are currently being used as surface parking lots and could be used for new facilities. Library: No major renovations or expansions are planned in the near future for the Denver Central Library.There is some internal expansion capabilities within the existing library and land south of the existing Library that could be used for expansion. 86

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Rocky Mountain News Site: If the Rocky Mountain News site is not re-developed as a Justice Center,the Office of Asset Management has identified several uses that can backfill the existing buildings.These backfill tenants are presently in leased space and would benefit from the downtown location.These agencies include but are not limited to Civil Service Commission,Art Museum Warehouse,Mayor s Office of Work Force Development, Supplemental Foods,Television Studios,Election Commission Warehouse,and Public Office Buildings Shops. FACILITIES GOALS AND POLICIES FROM ADOPTED PLANS Over sixteen years ago,the 1986 Denver Facility Master Plan recommended locating a new judicial facility close to the heart of City government and the City Jail.Since then other studies have verified the need and examined different options for creating additional courts and detention facilities.From these studies a growing understanding has evolved about how these facilities function both alone and together.Operational efficiencies are an essential consideration in building new facilities. Current vision suggests combining pre-sentencing inmates with criminal courts achieve operational efficiencies.Court efficiencies are also achieved by eliminating the scheduling delays stemming from transport of inmates from the County Jail. The Webb Municipal Building and its consolidation of government offices into one building has proven very efficient.This facility is located in the heart of the Civic Center,close to mass transit,other government offices,and is convenient for citizens.Co-location of services is often better for both City workers and for the public. With over 4,000,000 square feet of government and cultural facilities in the Civic Center area and projected long-term population increasing,the need for expansion in the area over the long term should be expected.Current plans have identified approximately 1.4 million square feet of new uses or facilities required over the next twenty years,which is less that 1.5% growth per year. When the Rocky Mountain News building came on the market,then-Mayor Wellington Webb directed Asset Management to assess the site s potential for resolving jail overcrowding and court congestion and overcrowding.Although the site is not large enough to house all detention activities as originally proposed at the Sears site in 2001,it is well suited to combining all adult criminal courts with pre-trial 87

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GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES detention and offers operating efficiencies and security benefits. The City purchased the five acres,one block from City Hall,for $16 million with certificates of participation funded through Sheriff s Regional Service Fund.The Rocky Mountain News will lease back the facility until it moves to a new location for its operations. A Justice Center combining 29 to 32 adult criminal courts,County and District,with booking,intake and adult pre-trial inmates on the site of Rocky Mountain News building would relieve court and jail congestion,enhance security and achieve operating efficiencies.Combining pre-sentencing inmates with criminal courts eliminates security risks and court delays associated with busing 165 to 250 inmates from County Jail to courts.Removing criminal courts and holding cells from the City and County Building returns City Hall to a civic building.Relocating criminal courts from the City and County Building will improve security for the remaining tenants and provide future growth for Mayor,City Council,and Civil Division Courts.Once criminal courts move to the Justice Center,Civil Division courts can return to City and County Building and the Adams Mark Hotel lease can be eliminated. Converting the City Jail into public safety uses for Sheriffs and Police would increase the rated jail capacity by nearly two-thirds from 1,508 to 2,470 without adding deputy sheriffs.This is accomplished by closing old,staff-intensive buildings at the County Jail.The estimated 332 deputies needed for 1,500bed Justice Center would come from estimated 334 deputy sheriffs who staff closed PADF and County Jail buildings replaced by the Justice Center. Without an identified revenue stream the City and County of Denver would require a vote of the people to construct a Downtown Justice Center.General Obligation Bonds would be necessary.In the event voters do not approve funding the redevelopment of the site for a Justice Center,the City has activities in leased space that could occupy the office building and its warehouses. The Justice Center also provides opportunities for the City to meet the goals of other plans by providing a surplus of space.The PADF and the Permit Center could readily be available to address other facility master plan needs. 88

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES ISSUES AND ANALYSIS Existing Government Facilitaties Ability to Handle Future Growth Issues Several facilities are nearing the end of their useful life span,cannot feasibly or cost-effectively be expanded to mitigate current overcrowded conditions,or lack the capacity to accommodate future growth.Locations of future growth along with the cost of building in the Civic Center have proven to be an increasing obstacle. Analysis Facility master plans with implementation strategies have recently proven very effective in identifying needs as well as focus for future remodels,renovations,building acquisitions,and new facilities.These plans have also helped identify locations for expansion and new facilities.Having a plan and a strategy has proven helpful when land acquisition opportunities present themselves.The City has proven the ability to provide the Civic Center with high quality architecture. Government Facility Related Development Opportunities and Integration Issues Government facilities in the study area provide opportunities to draw visitors to the area.Facilities such as the Denver Art Museum and Library are anchors generating opportunities for retail in the area. Measures to capitalize on these markets should be addressed. It is important to explore the relationships between all government facilities and their ancillary activities. Other examples include: The current expansion of the Art Museum provides yet another opportunity to revitalize the study area; Government employees and visitors represent retail opportunities; Existing jail and bail bonds shops and proposed transition to a Justice Center facility with integrated retail space for bail bonds; Visitors of the Capitol,Mint,Library and History Museum 89

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GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES Analysis Influencing traffic direction is important to capturing clients and customers and to eliminate confusion. Directional signage may play a key role in the ability to influence or capture potential markets and direct traffic; The proposed transition to a Justice Center,a facility with integrated retail space for bail bonds may also influence the opportunities; The architecture in the study area is an asset. Master Planning of Government Facilities Issues The government facilities in the area,like the neighborhood,change over time and the impact of growth and change of these facilities must be considered in the plan.Government uses can also change over time.Maintenance of these facilities plays an important role in the character of the neighborhood. Analysis The plan must acknowledge the long-term forecast for these facilities (20 years or more).The cumulative impact may be more than one million square feet.Municipal,state and federal facilities are located in the study area and may provided opportunities for cooperation on issues such as maintenance and improvement districts.Interactions between government facilities and residences and businesses are important considerations.The growth potentials must also consider parking as well.Potential exists for public and private interaction in facilities in and around buildings.Consideration of the physical locations of facilities within the study area should also be addressed in the plan. 90

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Justice Center Concerns Issues A number of concerns related to the Justice Center should be addressed in the plan including the scale of the facility,the number of clients and customers including workers,jurors,inmates and visitors.There are concerns that the Justice Center facility must be integrated into the area,not magnify the existing challenges. Analysis The types of uses and facilities associated with the Justice Center should be delineated.The long-term plan for the facility,including parking,should be addressed.There are concerns about safety and whether perceived or real they should be addressed via the plan.Ancillary facilities such as the current and future bail bonds vendors should be addressed.Opportunities to integrate the Justice Center and the community should be explored. 91

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NEXT STEPS 92 NEXT STEPS

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT The Planning Assessment can be used as the basis of future planning efforts and to help determine which of four alternative tracks,or some variation of the tracks,best meets the needs of the City,the neighborhood and the public at large.This chapter describes these four alternative approaches,a general scope of work and the pros and cons of each track. Whichever track is chosen,the timing for completion of the tasks will be determined by the deadline for placing a bond issue on the ballot.The final product must be complete approximately six months prior to Election Day in order to provide a document to City Council before it refers an issue to the ballot.For example,if the Administration decides to pursue a general vote on the Justice Center bond in May 2005, City Council needs to refer the measure in January 2005.If Council wants a complete Master Plan that is available for a timely public review process prior to deciding whether to refer the measure to the ballot, the Master Plan would need to be complete by November 2004. TRACK A: CIVIC CENTER MASTER PLAN Overview A Civic Center Master Plan is a small area plan that would be adopted as a supplement to the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000.The Master Plan would be directed at the contextual and future growth issues identified in the Assessment,including a definition of boundaries and expectations for government and institutional growth.The Master Plan would include a substantial Strategic Implementation chapter that identifies projects and policies associated with transportation,parking,government-related development,parks,and other issues set out in the Assessment. Tasks 1 Determine planning process,including planning team,public participation and resources. 2 Develop range of options to address issues identified in Assessment. 3 Review,refine and select alternatives,including a Parking Plan. 4 Develop comprehensive set of goals,objectives and recommendations. 5 Develop Strategic Implementation Plan to address issues,including policies,projects,funding and timing. 93

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NEXT STEPS 6 Adopt Master Plan as supplement to Comprehensive Plan Potential Cost $150,000 to $250,000 Staff Community Planning and Development (6) Public Works/Transportation (2) Parks (2) Asset Management (1) Economic Development (1) Parking and Transportation Consultant (1-2) Time Complete Draft plan:8 months Adopt plan:4 months Pros Comprehensive approach to Civic Center issues Identifies and recommends solutions for variety of issues Identifies capital projects and potential funding sources Responds to Golden Triangle Neighborhood Association request for a comprehensive plan for the area Plan is useful regardless of outcome of Justice Center location,design and mitigation Neighborhood and public buy-in to plan recommendations Plan provides information critical for planning the Justice Center Cons Does not address issues specific to Justice Center May recommend City actions or projects that are costly Requires intense City staffing and resources,thereby reducing their availability for other projects 94

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Traffic studies may not be able to proceed until after the completion of the Downtown Multimodal Access Plan (DMAP) TRACK B: JUSTICE CENTER DESIGN DEVELOPMENT Overview Many of the issues identified in the Assessment are related specifically to the Justice Center project rather than to the Civic Center in general.These issues include the building design and operations,offsite mitigation of traffic and parking,and the level to which an individual development should contribute to overall Civic Center mitigation and improvements.All of these issues must be resolved prior to constructing a Justice Center;they may or may not need to be resolved prior to a ballot measure.If they are addressed prior to a vote,outstanding questions will be answered,giving the electorate a more specific proposal on which to vote.If the ballot measure passes,the work will be well along and construction can proceed more rapidly.If the ballot measure fails,the cost of the design work would be lost. Tasks 1 Develop a process for selection of the Design Team,similar to the processes used for the Art Museum expansion or the Webb Municipal Building,both competitive processes with an emphasis on function and form. 2 Select the Design Team for Justice Center. 3 Complete Schematic Design for the Justice Center and the associated buildings (parking garage, Juvenile Courthouse). 4 Identify off-site impacts and mitigation measures. 5 Complete agreements for off-site mitigation measures. 6 Complete,but do not submit,PUD application for site rezoning,including schematic design Cost $3,000,000 to $5,000,000 95

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NEXT STEPS Staff Asset Management Courts Department of Safety Community Planning and Development Public Works/Design and Construction Management and Transportation Engineering Selection Committee Design and Development Team Time Design Competition and Selection:6 months Schematic Design:6 months PUD Application:3 months (simultaneous with Development Agreements) Development Agreements:3 months (simultaneous with PUD) PUD Review and Adoption:6 9 months following passage of the bond issue Pros Addresses issues and answers questions related to Justice Center design Provides accurate costs for construction and ballot measure Review of Justice Center PUD can proceed immediately following voter approval. Cons Expensive,with no guarantee of reimbursement if voters deny funding Does not address contextual or long-term issues related to Civic Center area May have political backlash if voters find the project presumptuous 96

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT TRACK C: NO ACTION Overview The Civic Center Planning Assessment is designed to be a stand-alone document.The Administration may opt to forgo both a full Master Plan and design work for the Justice Center. Tasks 1 Complete and distribute Civic Center Planning Assessment 2 Continue and complete Programming Assessment for Justice Center Costs Copying and distribution:$100 $300 Staffing Asset Management Community Planning and Development Time Complete documents:1 month Pros The Civic Center Planning Assessment provides a comprehensive list of existing conditions, plans,and community concerns. Inexpensive Fast Little staffing requirement Cons Does not address Civic Center issues Does not address Justice Center issues Does not satisfy neighborhood request for plan 97

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NEXT STEPS TRACK D: HYBRID Overview A Civic Center Master Plan and a Justice Center Schematic Design could be done in parallel,each process informing the other.This is the most comprehensive approach to planning and would result in the most complete resolution of the issues. Pros Addresses both contextual and Justice Center-specific issues. Highest degree of certainty of both on-site and off-site projects. Cons Very expensive Extremely staff intensive 98

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT 99 NOTES FROM PUBLIC WORKSHOP The Planning Assessment Team held a public workshop on August 9, 2003 to identify issues in the study area related to Land Use, Urban Design, Transportation, Parking, Parks and Open Space, Quality of Life, Economic Development and Public Facilities. About 50 members of the public, property owners, neighborhood activists and representatives of interest groups participated in the workshop. The following section contains the notes from the breakout sessions on each of the topics.

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NOTES FROM BREAKOUT SESSIONS LAND USE & URBAN DESIGN General U.D.issue best and most important buildings in Denver,in a weak context Guide development consistent with existing neighborhood plans,guidelines,etc. Integration of design plans to minimize abrupt changes between neighborhoods look at a group not independently Role of private property owner in improving and maintaining the public Rights-of-Way Mix of uses desirable Attract residents and pedestrians Focus redevelopment on un-used areas,Colfax structures for example MIXED USE Need more residential (incentives) Residential will attract retail Retail will improve Quality of Life administrative desert monuments don t produce livability No person s land 24-hour activity needed 24/7 DPL New use should add a mix of residential/retail Captive population and amenities for mixed us is a plus Existing buildings and existing businesses need to be considered Compatible uses Pay attention to civic and neighborhood uses and needs Expensive propertyredevelopment should be highest and best use Affordable housing should be included After hour uses/amenities 100

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT CONNECTIONS Need north-south pedestrian mall Colfax barrier/difficult pedestrian connects pedestrian/shuttle development Uniformity & signage to direct people around area to destinations way-finding tools Promote connections east,southeast,and south of the district. Need to figure out how to bridge busy streets that are like a river you can t cross Colfax and Broadway should have boulevard feel should be great streets to walk Would there be a benefit to closing Bannock Street and preserve for the shuttle Encourage safe connections 14th St.needs upgrade as a pedestrian connection Improving quality of key connections Broadway,Lincoln,Cleveland,Acoma Cherry Creek extend government complex to the River it s an asset Strengthen design of pedestrian walkways and connectivity Visual cues to destinations PARKING Parking/lacks discourage people from becoming [incomplete] What happens to displaced surface parking? Inconsistent parking good in south not near government area ARCHITECTURE Private development needs to reflect high standards of existing public development Existing buildings and existing businesses need to be considered Aesthetic coherence (especially historic) Pedestrian friendly/human scale Protect character neighborhood and monumentality of Civic Center Civic Center character carried over to other part of district 101

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NOTES FROM BREAKOUT SESSIONS Study appropriate levels of density,height and scale. Compatibility with existing buildings should be taken into account not to mimic styles so much as quality Preserve,as well as new things Better lighting Define Civic Center elements in more detail Define the character,elements,edges Incorporate landscape into design and redevelopment Design standards that take into account such elements as set backs.,entrances and quality of materials are important Enhance design review for public and private buildings D.N.A.redevelopment coordination and planning KEY DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES Area:14th Ave. Colfax corridor Welton:major entry to CBD Define priority for redevelopment Detailed planning for Broadway,Colfax,Lincoln,Acoma,Bannock to enhance unique characteristics Block 244 opportunity Connect park to 16th Street Important anchors to CC Civic Center Plaza property opportunity 102

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT DEVELOPMENT BARRIERS Regulations that affect re-development of surface parking Incentives to overcome redevelopment barriers Potential for condemnation private property Economic development is a challenge,particularly now Involve State of Colorado shared facilities? AESTHETICS/LIVABILITY Quality of streetscape along Colfax Design of safety-mandated areas Value of events parades,People s Fair Conflict with other neighborhoods No current economic benefit to business Some negative impact to neighborhoods related to events More active park spaces Land use decisions must factor in safety concerns,e.g.,Justice Center Maintenance of historic buildings private and public More business to encourage street activity Concern that guidelines would homogenize the area 103

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NOTES FROM BREAKOUT SESSIONS MOBILITY AND PARKING TRAFFIC Colfax at 14th (important link) to Convention Center Plan ahead for traffic and parking to Denver Art Museum expansion,especially from downtown hotels Need a longer term plan to address traffic at intersections surrounding Civic Center Have a vision in place with ideas and all possibilities Underpasses? Light rail? Taxi cabs stands New facilities (like underground parking at Boston Commons,for example) With development will come increased need for parking and traffic Change roadway classification Cleveland Place entry to park Expand study area to include historic district/Broadway and Lincoln to Speer Integrate mobility and parking components with DMAP Surrounding neighborhoods should be integrally involved with DMAP PEDESTRIAN AND BICYCLE Needs to be pedestrian-friendly Colfax barrier (also other major streets) Pedestrian signal enhancements (disability needs) Grid shift at Colfax confuses Increase in bike/pedestrian use from more residential development in Golden Triangle Colfax & 14th need pedestrian improvements 104

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Pedestrian crossing confusing for pedestrians Vehicles favored Way-finding would be helpful 14th & Bannock Bike friendly (Mayor s Bike Advisory Commission should address this) Connections between east and west and north and south needed Need to address what happens when commuters get out of the car or bus: How do they get around? How you get across the grid and Colfax is critical Need to make it easier not to drive Need to address Lincoln-Broadway corridor and connections to light rail and central corridor Connections between transportation modes are needed Pedestrian improvements:14th Street Colfax as a pedestrian connection improve Need better pedestrian mobility and connections,particularly across busy streets Crossing Broadway Signal going in:Acoma & 14th TRANSIT Central Connector extension through project site How to distribute that traffic Express v.local stops Extend mall shuttle Tied in rapid service to 16th Street mall Downtown transit circulator A Civic Center circulator? (like downtown Los Angeles) 105

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NOTES FROM BREAKOUT SESSIONS Mode of transit in Lincoln and Broadway has to be integrated Implications of other transit changes could impact study area Shuttle Civic Center connection PARKING Need to solve problems of plentiful,inconspicuous,inexpensive parking (no in or under a building,post 9/11) Redevelopment displaces existing cheaper surface parking How to maintain/replace existing surface parking If business activity goes up,will need to mitigate the impact on parking Parking needs to serve range of needs: Two-hour parking discourages longer stays Parking lots promote all day parking or by the month Jurors who are compelled to come downtown need parking Parking issues Costs? Structure needs? North of Colfax? Convention Center needs? Who should build? Public building parking at WWOB needs to be open to public it affects adjacent properties Adjacent property needs must be considered (e.g.,office vacancy rates) Parking as an opportunity serve visitors,money-maker 106

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT OTHER More city services by internet would reduce people who need to come to City Hall Promote use of mopeds and alternatives to the car Way-finder signage to destinations Getting from downtown to Golden Triangle is difficult no visual cues Homeland safety urban design Events block streets meters etc.over longer return streets to normal quickly Better interaction via internet to conduct business 107

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NOTES FROM BREAKOUT SESSIONS QUALITY OF LIFE SPECIAL EVENTS Events trash the area for those who use it at other times Mix of uses is structured ,including huge events/need a broader variety of uses would bring more people More local/smaller events Encouraging smaller events TRAFFIC AND PARKING Dominance of autos & busy crowding streets Distances for pedestrians are long and unfriendly Pedestrian access should be easy Shuttle/public transit in area to connect with light rail and regional bus Employee parking availability and cost Larger parking issues regarding redevelopment of existing surface parking Pedestrian connections access Shared parking could be used if the uses were more varied public access to the area parking for those who drive better access for pedestrians/Colfax crossing Tough to walk around angles from change in grid poses psychological barrier or perception of accessibility problems Pedestrians connections important Should explore whether parking meters discourage evening visitors Extend 16th Street mall shuttle to connect pedestrians downtown with the Civic Center amenities 108

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Need connections to the common man: Shuffle board in the Civic Center Park reflects this notion (someone suggested crochet) Use spaces for downtown residents and employees Civic Center Station s location on the hill poses a challenge to connecting it with surrounding area Turned grid is daunting to the unfamiliar and an impediment to pedestrians SAFETY AND SECURITY Personal safety (vagrants) day & night Vagrancy visual barrier perception Safety and feeling of safety Safety park/sidewalk quality/intersections safety day & night Low-level crimes and vagrancy that plagues the area creates of perception of danger Elimination of panhandling and vagrancy PARKS AND OPEN SPACE Retain open space and green space Active uses/food/carts in the park green needs to stay beautiful uses need to reinforce one another (Bryant Park) Civic Center is the heart of Denver Need more activity in the Park Civic Center Park needs to be a park a place to gather/attracts downtown workers and residents and visitors Park is formal/it is tough to have an informal use A real park for recreation 109

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NOTES FROM BREAKOUT SESSIONS LAND USE AND URBAN DESIGN Shuttle,pedestrian-oriented development,retail Places to eat / relax around (and within) park,convenience Reuse of buildings Multi-use buildings v.boring single-use buildings Close proximity of government services (convenience of centralization) Maintain availability of services Retail opportunities through redevelopment Government facilities the location and programming (?) design is an opportunity to affect the area bring additional uses/more activities Reuse of Carnegie/re-design Ambience-pedestrian quality/trees/green/maintenance of buildings Fun-outdoor/people watching/fun ready (?) Small business-not chains/well designed main street streetscape/LoDo,Cherry Creek,32nd & Lowell,Old South Gaylord Convenience grocery store Maintenance of historic ambience to maintain the unique quality/character Human contact small stores/pedestrian Smaller is better Diversity of uses,people and services Use our models 32nd/Lowell,Gaylord St. don t want a government ghetto at night user-friendly facilities don t get lost in buildings/welcome visibility of Civic Center from mall lighting 110

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT beautiful buildings should be obviously public buildings active ground floor uses Need to support businesses that generate night time activity Public and private entities needs to pay attention to streetscape Extend feel of the park into the district Consistent lighting is needed Need to address redevelopment of the Byers School it should be included in Civic Center Master Plan boundaries Variety of support businesses to the main institutions such as restaurants and retail desirable Development encouraged to human scale Landscaping and trees important Interaction between facilities and the residential uses Carnegie Library should be a public/active use Carnegie should be restored Broadway/Lincoln/Colfax as commercial corridors/not happen unless there are viable businesses MAINTENANCE Adjoining neighborhoods in need of upgrades Trash/litter damages beauty Impact of CC on surrounding neighborhoods Need to keep clean,trash picked up NON-TANGIBLE QUALITIES Area needs to be uplifting to spirit Great close-in bullseye location Urban living possible promote energy untapped resource 111

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NOTES FROM BREAKOUT SESSIONS Aesthetic goal of historic/cultural elements QOL Key Items: + Beauty,energy,neighborhoods,convenience Cars,parking,pedestrian access,safety,neighborhoods,vagrancy Tourist/worker/resident-friendly Intellectual center/richness need more public art mix of services for employees and visitors:food,bathrooms,water noise Colfax/needs to feel better The district has a special character/identity which should be preserved and enhanced Making the area a place with edges,places to go/a dignity to public facilities/extending the area into the adjacent areas/live/work/play= community There are multiple audiences to address:tourists,residents,employees and commuters Walkability/safe/clear,interesting paths/places that are easily crossable and facilitate sociability City needs to be more pro-business 112

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT ECONOMIC ACTIVITY ARTS Arts district creation / Acoma Avenue of Arts bring it about Some cities have tax incentives for an arts district Leverage / Promote DAC more within area and State RESIDENTAL City role in driving/supporting residential in down economy Residential development drives all other activity;i.e.retail,vagrancy,etc. Affordable housing is needed More housing would help 24 hour activity ALLOW RETAIL AND VENDING Would assist 24 hour activity PARKING Rules time limits Encourage/discourage visitors Hassle factor Parking at public buildings Way-finding to parking and for pedestrians Insufficient parking perception Private / Public Partnership? Meter issue 113

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NOTES FROM BREAKOUT SESSIONS SAFETY Lack of personal safety/security discourages activity Need to replace criminal activities with other uses BETTER COORDINATION: BUSINESS & CITY Sensitive design reuse of buildings and new buildings Single use buildings v.mixed use Explore economic activity in the park that will attract more people Lots of suggestions for better pedestrian access and connections Connectivity to surrounding neighborhoods is import to promote use of attractions in the Civic Center area. Include area in downtown circulator BUSINESS ACTIVITY Economics of surface parking v.conversion Encourage small business-loss of small business could impact character Attract workers back to enjoy area Study activities complementary to cultural facilities retail Need to diversity small businesses such as restaurants and retail TOURISM Need to bring back visitors to the Denver Mint Economic activity should build on cultural facilities Tourists no tours at Mint;accommodations/visitor info,maps Promotional structure to draw tourist/visitor/business Spill over from events to neighborhood to do business 114

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT OTHER Try and attract private investment Kiosks in Civic Center Reuse of Auditor s building Too little non-event activity Broadway as a commercial street RTD circulating bus or system to connect Triangle to CBD Panhandling:no-panhandling zone Leverage Auraria Broadway/Lincoln link to highest CBD job/office density Places to interact urban streets Maintain scale Trans not let big developers over power smaller owners/residents Incorporate neighborhood with government needs Emphasize as a center 115

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NOTES FROM BREAKOUT SESSIONS GOVERNMENT AND CULTURAL FACILITIES GENERAL Get a jump on the potential attraction of the DAM Addition Potential for condemnation Parking to handle demand of significant facilities How to keep state facility here consolidations possible Way to work with state and city to work together parking,etc. Mix of uses residential in particular is key to 24-hour activity.Residential promotes ownership. RG:private/public art uses DF:public interaction with facilities Links to CCC physical and marketing EXISTING GOVERNMENT FACILITATES ABILITY TO HANDLE FUTURE GROWTH 303 W.Colfax Permit Center S.G.Handout list of needs Recent additions to public facilities Some uses now in leased space Need to have permanent locations for these Civic Center Park is an underutilized facility Businesses/intersection with government uses Parking to handle demand of significant facilities Impact of DAM expansion 116

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT GOVERNMENT FACILITY RELATED DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES AND INTEGRATION Safety,justice,parking needs total 1.2M sf Issue of type of government/cultural facilities (courts/jails) What is the interaction between primary government activities and ancillary (bail bonds) issues Architecture and uses intersect good buildings/bad uses? DAM as anchor market the rest of the area at the same time How to keep state facility here consolidations possible Government,cultural and private facilities need to work together to insure maintenance of the area,perhaps in the form of a Business Improvement District. Include state government facilities east of Broadway within the boundaries with of the Civic Center Master Plan City buy-in to clean up area? Fine line where government is & where isn t Maintaining mix of uses in district Mix of uses within buildings (single-use has limited times of use) Increase/link government/cultural facilities with additional services Multi-use or more to do Multi-facility Fine line where government is & where isn t MASTER PLANNING OF GOVERNMENT FACILITIES This study should determine impact of 1 million SF on Civic Center and surrounding neighborhoods Should look at all government needs over next 20 years Expensive to build in the Civic Center area but development needs to incorporate pedestrians ratio of City employees is this the place to accommodate that growth? 117

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NOTES FROM BREAKOUT SESSIONS What is the most efficient arrangement for the public employees Long-term uses of Civic Center Design of public buildings Use of those buildings Quality architecture design guidelines Plan all aspects of uses of government buildings City concept of where government buildings should go? As growth occurs,needs for space (public) grows Need directional signage to promote accessibility City buy-in to clean up area? Way to work with state and city to work together parking,etc. Public access towards Broadway;towards Speer,Colfax main corridor Partnering in public facilities with private needs JUSTICE CENTER CONCERNS Statistical safety vs.perception of safety? (subliminal/or not/messages) Justice center (close to 1 mil.SF) new building rehab of others/parking to accommodate needs Justice Center needs to fit in,not magnify problems in the area Uncertainty about with Justice Center will enhance security or create safety problems How does Justice Center affect jurors? What is going to happen to bail bonds houses Parking uses in government buildings Open WWOB to public Coordinating public/private uses 118

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT 119 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Core Team Civic Center Assessment Asset Management Stephen Graziano,Co-Chair, Community Planning and Development Kiersten Faulkner Carla McConnell Eric McClelland Jim Ottenstein Lynn Sargent Dennis Swain,Co-Chair Wayland Walker Mayor's Office of Economic Development and International Trade Nathan Oatman Parks and Recreation Susan Baird Helen Kuykendall Public Works Traffic Engineering Services David Weaver Ruth Rollins Coordinating Committee Derek Brown,Asset Management Steve Comito,Department of Safety CL Harmer,Department of Safety Marilyn Miller,Budget and Management Office Mark Najarian,Public Works Infrastructure Planning and Programming Judge Raymond Satter,County Court Justice Center Task Force Judge Jeffrey Bayless Judge Karen Ashby Matt McConville Miles Flesche Judge Raymond Satter Michelle Stevenson Mickey Zeppelin Dennis Humphries Marcus Squarrell Janis Frame Paul Grattet Carol Minor Chuck Lepley Norm Brisson Chief Fred Oliva Chief Bill Lovingier Chief Steve Comito Dan Barbee Derek Brown CL Harmer Marilyn Miller Tracy Howard 120

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CIVIC CENTER PLANNING ASSESSMENT Workshop Participants Adrian Brown Becky Rafkelson Ben Kelly Billie Bramhall Brad Buchanan Buzz Geller Cassie Robinson Chris Bendon Dave Walstrom David Foster Dick Farley Donna Barr Ed Shackelford Ellen Ittelson Fred Oliva Gayle Williams George Gonzales Georgianna Contiguglia Gheda Gayou Gil Berkovich Granville Lee Ira Selkowitz James Cowperthwaite Jeffrey Pitchford Jim Zavist John Desmond Lloyd Wilkinson Michael Henry Michael Hicks Michael Langley Mike Berry Nell Swiers Nora Kimball Rick Ashton Robin Riddel Lima Ron Garrison Sharon Elfenbein Steve Newman Terr Skinner Tina Bishop Willie Favors 121