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Athmar Park neighborhood plan

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Title:
Athmar Park neighborhood plan
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Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Neighborhood plans
Community planning

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Full Text
Leona Deas
THMAR PARK
NEIGHRRRHROR
PERIMETER PEAR
SEPTEMBER 6 , 2000




ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
ACKNOWLEDGE
Mayor of Denver
Honorable Wellington E.Webb
Denver City Councilmembers for
Athmar Park Neighborhood
Councilwoman Ramona Martinez
Councilwoman Kathleen MacKenzie
Denver Planning Board
William H. Hornby, Chair
Jan Belle
Frederick Corn
Pat Cortez
Michael Dino
Daniel Guimond
Mark Johnson
Joyce Oberfeld
Bruce ODonnell
Terrance Ware
Dr. Robert Wright
Denver Community Planning and
Development Agency
Jennifer Moulton, Director
Ellen Ittelson, Manager Planning
Services
Dennis Swain, Senior City Planner
Steve Gordon, City Planner Specialist
Phil Plienis, Senior City Planner
Janell Flaig, Senior City Planner,
Plan Writer
Julie Connor, Graphics
Ken Barkema, Graphics
Jim Ottenstien, Graphics
John Koswan, Zoning Administration
MENTS
City of Denver Staff
Harriet R. Hogue, City Park Manager,
Former Manager of Neighborhood
Planning Section, CPDA
Robert Kochevar, Director of
Transportation Engineering,
Department of Public Works
Brian Mitchell, Traffic Operations
Engineer, Department of Public Works
Marilyn Miller, Director, Capital
Improvement Budget, Budget and
Management Office
Randy Moore, Senior Economic
Development Specialist, Mayors Office
of Economic Development and
International Trade
Pete Baertlein, Assistant Director of
Engineering, Department of Public
Works
John de Luca, Revenue Department,
Retired
Susan Fry, Parks Superintendent,
Department of Parks and Recreation
Mary Expinoza, Mayors Office of
Human Rights and Community
Relations
Bill Mitchell, Mayors Office of Human
Rights and Community Relations
Athmar Park Planning Group
Many thanks to all who attended
planning meetings, who assisted
with the survey of the commercial
areas, and participated in creating,
reading and editing this perimeter
plan. In particular the following
business owners, commercial
property owners and neighborhood
residents made special contribution
to the preparation of this plan.
Pete Aluise, James R. Anderson, the
late Steve Baca, Mike Billings, Steve
Buretz, Wendy Chao,Andrew Davis,
Alejandrina Duran, Cynthia Foster,
David Foster, Minh Ha, Bill Klevecka,
Jo Anne Phillips, Sandy Ruff, Karen
Ruff, Rick Taylor, Terri Seader, Hamid
Simantob, Chalmers Turner, Phyllis
Turner, Bob and Barb Wolf, and
Virginia Zick.
Present and former residents of the
Athmar Park Neighborhood
contributed to the compiling of the
historical information and map.
Information generated at a gathering
held by Carol Campbell resulted in
the historical location map as well
as a more complete history section.
Carol and Chloe Campbell,
Marguerite Christie, Leona Deas,
Wanda Gauthier, Dorothy Grant, Kim
and Amanda Gutierrez,
Marguerite(Babe) Hauser, Eileen
Holligan,Wayne Knox, Belva Ruff,
Bea Silva, and Olive Wise.
2


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction............................................................5
Mission statement..................................................6
Neighborhood Vision................................................6
Neighborhood and Small Area Planning...............................7
Use and Implementation of the Plan.................................8
Motivation........................................................10
Plans that Relate to the Athmar Park Neighborhood.................11
Overall Plan Goals and Recommendations.................................13
Location and History...................................................17
Neighborhood Conditions................................................23
Demographic Information...........................................24
Community Facilities..............................................27
Land Use and Zoning...............................................28
Commercial Areas.......................................................33
Sub-Areas.........................................................34
Transportation,Traffic and Parking................................40
Safety and Security...............................................43
Economic Situation................................................45
Urban Design and Streetscaping....................................49
3


TABLE OF CONTENTS
Action Agendas.........................................................53
Athmar Park Neighborhood..........................................54
Alameda Square....................................................60
West Alameda Avenue...............................................61
South Federal Boulevard...........................................62
West Mississippi Avenue...........................................63
Industrial Area...................................................64
Appendix...............................................................65
Methodology/Commercial Survey.....................................66
General Business Information......................................67
Specific Area Responses and Information/SWOT Chart................68
Demographic Tables................................................73
West Alameda Streetscape Guidelines and Template..................80


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
INTRODUCTION
5


INTRODUCTION
MISSION AND VISION
Mission Statement
The Mission of the Athmar Park Planning Group is to develop a plan to promote stability and growth in
Athmar Park. This plan will provide a guide for the Athmar Park neighborhood edges, advocate the
continued maintenance and improvement of community safety and services, and support preservation of
the neighborhood character and creation of a sense of place.
Neighborhood Vision
In the future,Athmar Park will evolve as a multi-ethnic, multi-cultural residential neighborhood
surrounded by a variety of successful local and regional businesses that provide employment and service
for residents and others. Individuals representing service, church, and neighborhood groups, and
businesses will continue to work together for a safe community; will preserve the neighborhood
character, and assure that Athmar Park is recognized as a valuable and important part of the City of
Denver.
Old Dillard House, also koowo as
the Alauieda Hotel, was located io
the 1 300 block of West Alameda


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
NEIGHBORHOOD AND SMALL AREA PLANNING
Neighborhood and small area planning is a professional commitment to build healthy and diverse
communities. Successful planning efforts must embrace physical, cultural, social and economic
conditions to positively impact quality for life and create a pleasing environment in which to live and
work. The neighborhood or small area plan is a guide to direct future public and private actions
concerning small area, short-range issues in the neighborhood and, when adopted, it becomes an official
supplement to the Citys Comprehensive Plan.
South Plalle River, 1921 11 n n d
Leona Deas


INTRODUCTION
USE AND IMPLEMENTATION OF TOE PLAN
The Athmar Park Neighborhood Perimeter Plan primarily addresses issues and concerns for commercial
and adjacent residential areas. It identifies issues, opportunities, and recommendations for Athmar Park
commercial areas specifically, for the residential neighborhood incidentally, and for the involvement of
neighborhood residents working cooperatively with area businesses.This plan advocates specific changes
in zone districts and/or land uses, and provides mechanisms for plan implementation when development
is subject to City review.
Successful implementation of this plan depends on the collaboration of all stakeholders to continue to
identify and discuss common and varying interests and concerns.The action recommendations contained
in the plan are supported by planning participants and considered mutually beneficial. Many of the action
recommendations will require the support, cooperation, and assistance of the Mayor, City Council, and
various City agencies and departments. Some of the action recommendations will require cooperation
among businesses and the support of the residential neighborhood to be implemented successfully.
Ideally, a strong business organization working with the neighborhood organization could be the catalyst
for long range plan implementation.
The Athmar Park Neighborhood Perimeter Plan is the result of a collaborative endeavor involving
residents, business owners, and city staff. Stakeholders participated in determining the specific plan goals,
objectives and action agendas.These are detailed to conditions, issues, needs, and concerns of the Athmar
Park neighborhood.
A study of the Athmar Park statistical neighborhood was initiated in April, 1996. Community Planning and
Development Agency (CPDA) staff researched and prepared land use and demographic information, and
the Graphics Section drew up the first Athmar Park neighborhood maps.The Athmar Park Planning Group
was organized and began meeting in September, 1996.This group was composed of neighborhood
residents, former residents, business owners, and CPDA staff. Although the residents of the neighborhood
provided core participation throughout the process, neighborhood business owners participated when
8


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
their specific subareas were discussed. From 1996 to the present, the Planning Group has not only
continued their work, but has also initiated implementation of some of the plan recommendations.
During the first phase in 1996 and 1997, the planning group identified issues and goals, analyzed
problems and opportunities, and conducted a survey of businesses on the edges of the residential
neighborhood. The planning group members continued to survey business throughout the planning
process, and to invite and encourage participation by businesses in the planning process.
In the second phase in 1997 and 1998, the Athmar Park Planning Group studied the identified issues and
problems and began to develop policy recommendations relating to zoning and land use; traffic and
parking; neighborhood image and cleanup; crime; underutilized, vacant, and deteriorated buildings; and
commercial revitalization. Commercial areas of the neighborhood were identified based on types of
businesses, related locations, and/or existing plans. Goals and action recommendations for commercial
development and stabilization were prepared for each subarea and with the involvement of business
people from those subareas.
During the third planning phase commenced in 1998, specific concepts and concerns for each sub-area
were refined, and representatives from city agencies were invited to assist the Planning Group to
develop realistic action recommendations. Focus groups were held for specific areas, including South
Federal Boulevard, and for issues, such as alternative youth activities.


INTRODUCTION
MOTIVATION
This will be the first neighborhood plan for Athmar Park. In Spring, 1996, Denver Social Services selected
another site for its future location.The decision of Denver Social Services to move from its Alameda
Square location generated great concern for the economic well being of the shopping center itself, and
for the overall neighborhood area. However, Athmar Park has not been identified as a neighborhood in
need of assistance. Housing is affordable, and residential areas are generally stable and safe.The stability of
the neighborhood depends on the economic health of surrounding commercial/industrial areas.
Along both W. Alameda Avenue and S. Federal Boulevard there has been, in the last two years, a shift away
from a variety of retail establishments, such as paint and hardware stores, printing shops, art and sport
stores.The amount of fast food establishments has remained much the same with a small increase in
the number of sit down restaurants.Although some used car lots have closed on the east end ofW.
Alameda Avenue; these have been replaced by dealerships on the west end and on South Federal
Boulevard. Additionally, there are properties that are minimally landscaped; buildings that have been
allowed to deteriorate; and more vacated buildings.These are indications that while the residential and
industrial areas appear to be fairly healthy, the commercial areas, particularly along W. Alameda Avenue and
S. Federal Boulevard are becoming at risk areas of the neighborhood.
10


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
PLANS THAT RELATE TO THE ATHMAR PARK
NEIGHR0RH000
The Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 is the foundation for the Athmar Park Neighborhood
Perimeter Plan and all official plans of the City. When adopted, this plan will become an amendment to
the Denver Comprehensive Plan.
There are two transportation study/plans and one Urban Renewal Area that relate to this neighborhood:
I federal Boulevard Corridor Plan (1995): Concerns related to businesses include the recognition of
unique characteristics along Federal Boulevard, promotion of safety and image enhancements
that will improve the corridor for pedestrian use and business access, including off street
parking, additional lighting, and landscaping.
I Southwest Quadrant Transportation Plan (1991): One of the goals and objectives is to Stimulate
quality economic development, with related objectives influenced/obtained through
transportation improvements.The related objectives include creation of jobs, expanding the tax
base, insuring development compatible with adjacent uses, and decreasing non-residential
redevelopment in residential areas.
i federal and Alameda Commercial Redevelopment Program (1995): The Westwood urban Renewal Area
resulted from a study of the Westwood commercial corridor and concern for existing businesses
and neighborhood stabilization. It includes revitalization strategies for invigorating the business
mix and attracting new businesses. It incorporates some of the concepts from the Federal
Boulevard Corridor Plan.
11


12


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
OVERALL PLAN
GOALS AND
REEIMMENDATIONS
13


OVERALL PLAN GOALS & RECOMMENDATIONS
The Athmar Park Planning Group developed goals and objectives following a neighborhood analysis.The
overall plan goals are to retain business viability and stability, and promote economic growth in the
neighborhood commercial corridors and the industrial area.
Goals
1 Promote neighborhood
stability, support
preservation of the
neighborhood character,
and create
a sense of place.
Strategies
\ Continue to maintain the integrity of the residentially zoned areas.
\ Identify areas along transit corridors that could be rezoned for mixed
use, transit supporting development.
\ Identify characteristics that make Athmar Park a unique neighborhood
and promote the neighborhood as a good place to live and work.
\ Encourage collaboration between neighborhood residents and
neighborhood businesses to promote the neighborhood as a
location/destination.
\ Develop identifying gateways, signage, landscaping, etc.that will
promote/identify Athmar Park.
\ Develop joint neighborhood projects with the neighborhood schools.
2 Encourage business
growth, revitalization,
and development in the
commercial areas
along the Athmar Park
neighborhood edges and
in the industrial area.
I Target new commercial retail to come to Athmar Park and identify
businesses that will add to the mix of retail establishments.
t Encourage businesses to remain in Athmar Park or to expand operations
in appropriately zoned areas.
I Encourage infill development and/or creative use of existing buildings
including mixed-use zoning on identified transit corridors.
I Encourage organization of business affiliations within commercial areas.
I Promote the commercial and industrial areas as good investment
opportunities.
14


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
Goals Strategies
3 Develop interaction and communication strategies between the businesses and residents. 1 Continue current interactions and develop better working relationships through increased interactions. 1 Identify neighborhood projects and issues of mutual concerns. 1 Establish a business component within the Athmar Park Neighborhood Association.
4 Improve interaction and communication between aU sectors of Athmar Park and governmental agencies. 1 Develop better working relationships with reviewing agencies in the City to influence land use and urban design decisions. 1 Increase opportunities for positive interactions and invite City agencies to make informational presentations at meetings.
5 Advocate continued maintenance and improvement of community safety and services. 1 Encourage more consistent response from governmental agencies regarding graffiti vandalism issues. 1 Identify issues and concerns of safety and security in the neighborhood.
6 Develop a realistic implementation strategy. 1 Identify and develop directory of possible resources. 1 Leverage (Community Development, Capital Improvement Project, DURA) funds l Meet and work with Councilmembers, CPDA, Parks, Planning, and Public Works to identify projects for inclusion in the Capital Improvements Budget. 1 Establish a Land Use Committee that will identify development and redevelopment activity not subject to City review; and advise property owners of area objectives.
15


16


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
LOCATION It
HISTORY
17


Leona Deas Leona Deas
LOCATION & HISTORY
Athmar Park has become a neighborhood located in the path and along the route to other locations. It is
situated west of the South Platte River, with the South Platte River as the east border, having W Alameda
Avenue on the north, S. Federal Boulevard on the west, and W Mississippi Avenue on the south.The
eastern portion of this neighborhood was the southern part of the Town ofValverde.
BothValverde Elementary Schools were built on the south side ofWest Alameda Avenue. The area west of
the river to S.Zuni Street and southerly to W Mississippi Avenue, was annexed into the City of Denver
when the Town ofValverde was annexed in 1902. Some western areas of the neighborhood were
identified as eastern areas ofWestwood at a time when South Federal Boulevard was only a local street.
With the exception of existing Valverde and the Mountain View Park subdivision, Athmar Park was farm
land or a rural subdivision of Arapahoe County.
Valverde Schnnl, June class nl 1918
Principal Charlotte Godsman and staff of Old
Valverde School, 1910: Mrs. Gay, Miss Cora
Dliss, Miss Griffith |mosic], Mrs. Qoayle,
Mrs. Godsman, Miss Pellinz, Miss Van
landenham. Godsman has an elementary school
at Florida and Sooth Tejnn named after her.
According to Valverde town records, what is now WAlameda Avenue between the South Platte River and
S.Tejon Street was the business district for the Town ofValverde. Alameda is a Spanish word meaning
Avenue lined with trees. In 1935 W.Alameda Avenue was extended from Denver into Jefferson County
intended to be a parkway connection to Red Rocks Park. Before that time, WAlameda Avenue ended
at the old Morrison Road.
In 1904, the area to the west of annexed Valverde was divided into the ownership of three owners as part
of the C. M. Stebbins Estate, as land owned by N. K. Huston, or as land owned by the State as school land.
The parcel of land owned by the State was bordered by WAlameda Avenue on the north, S.Tejon, S.
Pecos, and S. Lipan Streets on the east, by S. Zuni Street to the west, and W. Mississippi Avenue on the
south. In 1946, in the largest school land sale to that time, the land was auctioned, and purchased by
brothers Thomas and John R. McCusker, who were builders (Rocky Mountain News, May 4,1946).Their
subdivision was planned in four units or phases and named Athmar Park.
The area west to S. Zuni Street and south to W Mississippi Avenue, was annexed into the City of Denver as
part ofValverde in 1902, and later became part of the Athmar Park Neighborhood. Not all of the school
land was developed for housing. Goldrick Elementary School was built and named after O.J. Goldrick,
who is credited with Denvers first educational development. Goldrick established the private Union
school in 1859 to teach the small number of children in the early community.
By the year 1932, the Mountain View Park subdivision had been developed. Located west of S. Zuni Street,
it was annexed by Denver in 1943.This new subdivision numbering had started with 2000 at Alcott
18


Western History Department, Denver Public Library
ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
1 932 Daniel Smith Company Map,
Historic Maps showing Athmar Park as part
nt Denver and Arapahne Cnunlies
1904 City Tramway Company Map,
shnwing Athmar Park as part nt Valverde
19
Western History Department, Denver Public Library


Ruth Fabrizio Leona Deas
LOCATION & HISTORY
Street. Although this did not fit with existing numbers along W Alameda Avenue, the numbering was never
adjusted to follow sequentially from Denver to the east, with the result that street numbers between S.
Tejon Street and S. Federal Boulevard do not match. Undeveloped area to the south of this housing
development continued to be part of Arapahoe County. The Brooks Dairy Farm was to the west, and the
homestead farm house and some outbuildings were still located as recently as 1998 on the southwest
corner of the S. Federal Boulevard and W Kentucky Avenue.These buildings were demolished to
redevelop the property.
With few exceptions, residential areas of the Athmar Park neighborhood are bordered by and adjacent to
commercial/industrial development. Between 1956 and I960 land use on the neighborhood edges
changed from residential use to industrial, business, or increased business use. Some of the area to the
south and east of the W.AlamedaAvenue/S. Zuni Street intersection was set aside for a shopping center,
and became Alameda Square.The other shopping center Athmar Park Shopping Center broke ground in
1954 with Millers Super Market as its anchor store (Denver Post,April 12,1954).
On June 16,1965 the Worst Natural Disaster in Denvers History occurred. On that day the South Platte
River flooded parts of Southwest Denver, including areas west of the present course of the river in what
is now the Athmar Park neighborhood industrial areas and WAlameda Avenue commercial areas.Although
area homes and businesses were destroyed in the flood, the community pulled together under the
leadership ofValverde Presbyterian Church Minister Kent O. Mills.The Valverde Presbyterian Church, now
the Valverde Community Church, was organized in 1891. It had previously been located at the W Virginia
Avenue/S. Navajo Street intersection, but had moved to higher ground on S.Tejon Street in 1956, and was
out of the reach of the flood waters. Reverend Mills organized his congregation and opened the church
to provide a base for centralized flood relief and emergency assistance operations.
In 1998 some of the older residents gathered to remember the history of the neighborhood and to
identify the location of the landmarks and buildings they remember.These residents bought their first
houses in Athmar Park and lived through the flood of 1965.
The neighborhood was named after the residential subdivisions in the center, on what had been state
school land, but there is some mystery as to the source of the name Athmar. According to Ivan
Rosenberg, Publisher of the Herald Dispatch, Athmar is composed of the first letters of the first names of
Mrs. Perlmutter and Mrs. Burt, whose husbands purchased and built on the land north of West Mississippi
Avenue.
20


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
1948 City of Denver Planning Office,
shewing Atftmar Park develnpmenl
Historic Map
o
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21


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N O I 1 V 0 O 1


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
NEIGHBORHOOD
CONDITIONS
23


NEIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONS
DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE
Athmar Park neighborhood is divided into two census tracts. Census tract 13.01 includes areas west of
S.Tejon Street, from W Alameda Avenue to W. Mississippi Avenue. Census tract 13.02 includes the
industrial area and everything east of S.Tejon, from W.Alameda to W. Mississippi Avenue.According to
the 1990 U.S. Census, there were 6,856 people residing in the neighborhood, with an estimated
population increase to 6,988 people by 1993. While numbers of households have increased, the total
population only increased by one percent between 1990 and 1998, as estimated by Denver Regional
Council of Governments. Most of the population increase occurred in the 13.02 or east tract of Athmar
Park neighborhood.
Median age of the population of the neighborhood has remained fairly stable, and is consistent with
the Citys median age.The number of residents between the ages of 45 and 64 has decreased.The
number of retired people over age 65 in the neighborhood has increased, indicating that those who
moved here 20 to 30 years ago (or longer) may have chosen to remain in Athmar Park.
According to the U.S. 1990 Census,Athmar Parks total minority population is greater than for the City
of Denver overall. Many more Hispanic people have chosen to live in the neighborhood; although
Black, Asian, and American Indian populations have remained the same or have decreased in number.
The 2000 Census will most likely show the continuing population diversity in the neighborhood, but
with a substantial increase in the proportion of population and number of Hispanic people and a
decrease in the proportion and number of white and non-Hispanic people.
The U.S. Census in 1980 reported minority populations that did not include separate counts for Asians
other than Japanese and Vietnamese, or for Cubans, and Eskimos. According to the 1990 Census Data,
Athmar Parks resident population had increased in its diversity.
24


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
Southwest Denver Income Comparisons
25


NEIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONS
Athmar Park is considered to be a stable neighborhood. Housing values have appreciated although not
as rapidly as for the city as a whole, and the housing stock has not substantially changed. Median
income levels have increased from 1990. Although the Athmar Park Neighborhood median household
income averages less than the City of Denver, in relation to surrounding neighborhoods it is
substantially higher. It is expected that with continued demand for single family houses in Denver,
housing sales volume will keep pace with previous years and housing values will continue to
appreciate in the Athmar Park neighborhood.
West view in Huston lake Park
26


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
COMMUNITY FACILITIES
Medical/Hospitals
No hospitals are located in southwest Denver, however there are many hospitals including Denver
Health Medical Center, St. Joseph, PorterCare, St.Anthony, and University Hospitals.There are also many
medical and alternative medicine clinics within two miles of the neighborhood.
Religious Facilities
Athmar Park maintains its diversity in the provision of religious facilities including St. Rose of Lima
Catholic Church at 1320 W Nevada Place. Rocky Mountain Church of God at 455 South Platte River
Drive. Iglesia Vida Abundante and New Life Fellowship (shared facilities) at 2707 W Mississippi Avenue,
Good Shaped Lutheran Church at 770 South Federal Boulevard, Denver Chinese Alliance Church at 700
South Federal Boulevard and the Valverde Community Church at 430 South Tejon Street.
Fire Protection
Fire protection is provided by Fire Station #23 located at 850 S. Federal Boulevard.
Gnldrick Elementary School
Library
The Athmar Park Branch of Denver Public Library is located at 1055 S.Tejon Street at W Mississippi Avenue.
Public Schools
The area is served by Valverde, Goldrick, and Monroe Elementary Schools, Rishel Middle School, and
Abraham Lincoln High School. There are also parochial and private schools in the neighborhood or
within two miles.
Off-Leash Dog Park
There is an offleash dog park located at Jason and South Platte River Drive behind the Denver Municipal
Animal Shelter.
27


NEIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONS
LAND USE AND ZONING
The Athmar Park statistical neighborhood contains 760.04 acres of land.Two-thirds of the total acreage is
zoned for residential use, over 180 acres is zoned for industrial use, and over 72 acres is zoned for
business uses.The R-l District contains two parks: Huston Lake Park, created from swamp land, and the
Clifford Aspgren Park, located on the industrial edge of the residential neighborhood.The only park zoned
as open space is Vanderbilt Lake Park. Habitat Park contains the Boy Scout Park, and is located in an
industrially zoned district, in an area designated as the South Platte River Greenway. Park and open space
area makes up over 40 acres of the neighborhood.
Land use is also controlled by two view planes that govern building heights.The Washington ParkView
plane extends to S. Lipan Street.The Ruby Hill ParkView plane cuts diagonally across W. Mississippi
Avenue east of S.Tejon Street to south of the Alameda Avenue/Federal Boulevard intersection.
Business and industrially zoned areas account for a little over one third of the total 760.04 acres of land in
Athmar Park.The commercial retail uses are located along the perimeter. Some grandfathered non-
conforming uses still exist in zoned R-l districts in the neighborhood interior.All industrially zoned areas
are located on the east side of the neighborhood, and adjacent to residentially zoned areas. Businesses
there include manufacturing companies, print shops, smaller service businesses, and construction related
industries.The City of Denver Parks Maintenance and General Services Departments also have space in
this area.
Most of the business areas are zoned B-4, General Business District, allowing as use by right all business
uses, including auto sales and repair and related uses.The B-4 zone district is intended to include a variety
of commercial uses, including retail that will serve other businesses. In Athmar Park B-4 Districts are
located along W. Alameda Avenue and S. Federal Boulevard.
28


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
The B-3 Shopping Center District is designed to provide retail and services for surrounding residential
communities.Two shopping centers are located in Athmar Park.Alameda Square is on the north side and
fronts on W Alameda Avenue.The Alameda Square Shopping Center has a fifty-percent vacancy rate
following the departure of Denver Social Services.The site is 19.51 total acres, most of which was
formerly occupied by Social Services.The center has continued to change ownership and is presently
owned separately by one individual and two distinct groups of owners.The building on the northwest
corner was formerly a restaurant, but has stood vacant for over a decade.
Land Use by Zone District
100%
80%
CD
ro
cc
+-
c
CD
W
CD
O.
+-
w
(T3
3
C
CD
U
60%
40%
20%
0% i B1 B2 B3 B4 BA1 BA3 io 11** 01 R1 * R2 * R2A R3X
13.02 4.32 0.00 11.40 3.36 0.00 0.00 41.30 138.87 6.65 176.87 21.21 0.00 1.63
13.01 0.31 4.53 31.95 12.96 2.56 1.11 0.00 0.00 0.00 271.04 28.14 1.83 0.00
Zone District Acres
29


NEIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONS
Other zoned B-3 Shopping Center Districts are The Athmar Park Shopping Center strip mall located along
\\T Mississippi Avenue and the strip mall at the S. Federal Boulevard/W. Mississippi Avenue intersection.
There are two small areas zoned B-2 Neighborhood Business Districts between W. Exposition and W
Kentucky Avenues.These districts are generally located in areas of high pedestrian traffic and relatively
low volume of vehicular traffic, and offer convenient access to adjacent neighborhoods. Along S. Federal
Boulevard these B-2 Districts support church, apartment, fast food, and convenience store uses.
Industrially zoned areas are situated on the east side of Athmar Park.The 1-0 is a Light Industrial and
Office District.The 1-1 is a General Industrial District. 1-0 Districts include uses that are generally
compatible with residential uses and the district serves as a buffer between residential areas and the
more intensive industrial uses of the 1-1 district.
Businesses in the industrial area have remained generally unchanged from the time of the 1965 flood that
covered this entire area. Companies requiring more space, mostly for parking, moving to other areas
outside of the neighborhood, and with some companies finding less expensive quarters elsewhere.The
lease rates for properties in the industrial area compare favorable with those of the better industrial
locations in Denver, however, there is added advantage in direct access to 1-25, and the 1-70 corridor,
South Santa Fe Drive, and rail lines.
30


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
Existing Zoning
31


32


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
COMMERCIAL AREAS
33


COMMERCIAL AREAS
An identification of existing zone districts and current land use suggested the identification of the
following subareas to simplify studying the commercial areas: Alameda Square,West AlamedaAvenue,
South Federal Boulevard, Athmar Park Shopping Center and along W Mississippi Avenue between S. Quivas
and S. Zuni S Streets, and Industrial/commercial area, including east of S. Lipan and S. Navajo Streets.
Commercial Subareas: Identification, Character, and Location
Location/
Sub Area Boundary Zoning Features/Landmarks Types of Businesses Open Space Characteristics
A. Alameda Square 2200 W.Alameda Avenue B-3. B-4 Shopping Center Shopping Center: Retail, new grocery store, restaurants None typical mall retail store fronts, some stores deep inside and hidden from view, back area not visible from W.Alameda Ave.
B. Alameda South Platte River to intersection at S.Federal Boulevard B-3, B-4. 1-0. PUD(l) No defining landmarks or boundaries, small businesses, large vacant area Small retail operations, some professional offices, car dealership/vehicle repair and related some vacant buildings, more auto related businesses replacing those that leave None mostly single level buildings having no street parking available, no unifying attribute, little landscaping, little difficult to see and/or access parking, fast moving traffic
C. Federal Boulevard South of intersection with W.Alameda Avenue south to W. Mississippi Avenue B-2, B-A-l, B-4. PUD(3), small R-l, B-A-3 Some S.Federal Boulevard Plan standards implemented, PUD Asian Center has a gateway, fast moving traffic, some residential uses and churches, some areas are busy, with crowded parking, and are fairly well defined Restaurants (Asian), some fast food, retail related to vehicle or home repair, a few professional offices, retail oriented, some service retail, travel, many businesses consider the area a regional center specifically for the Asian market Along Tennessee beneath power lines churches, some residential buildings (apts., single family), fire station, no defining architecture or landscaping devise, no vacant store fronts in Asian strip malls
D. Mississippi Business district along W. Mississippi Avenue, from S.Zuni to S. Quivas Street B-3. PUD(l), R-3, small R-l Definable area with a school and public library at west end, apartments at east end Shopping center, bakery, liquor stores, laundries, govt.offices, gas/convenience stores, restaurants, vacancy for larger store areas Landscaped areas create a sense of some open space most businesses are set back from street, and some have landscaping, lots of parking easy to see and access
E. Industrial Area and Lipan S.Lipan Street and areas east mostly zoned for industrial use, adjacent to residential 1-1, B-l, 1-2. 0- l(park). B-4. 1- 0. PUD (1) Vanderbilt Park located on east side, Aspgren Park on west side, some areas landscaped throughout area and to south of Mississippi Various industrial and warehousing uses, manufacturing, some retail or wholesale outlets, some govt.(Parks, Central Services) mostly construction/design related, some specialized Vanderbilt Park, Boy Scout training park Aspgren Park is located adjacent and to the west at W.Exposition Industrial warehousing and manufacturing buildings, some more recent cinderblock and stucco construction with leased office/warehousing /loading dock areas, many right of way areas are not delineated with curb and gutter
areas on the businesses, little long term vacancy treatments, along Lipan- mostly single
west level buildings landscaping in front
34


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
OFFICE
OFF1CE/RETAIL CENTER
RETAIL, NON-AUTO RELATED
RETAIL, AUTO RELATED
MANUFACTURINGAIVAREHOUSE
WHOLESALE
PUBLIC FACIUTIES/OFFICES
PARKS/OPEN SPACE
CONSTRUCTION & RELATED
| VACANT BUILDINGS/LAND
RESIDENTIAL (SINGLE FAMILY)
RESIDENTIAL (MULTI FAMILY)
[H RAILROADTRACKS
WATER
Alameda Square / West Alameda Avenue Commercial Area
35


COMMERCIAL AREAS
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RETAIL, AUTO RELATED
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PUBLIC FACIUTIES/OFFICES
PARKS/OPEN SPACE
CONSTRUCTION & RELATED
VACANT BUILDINGS/LAND
RESIDENTIAL (SINGLE FAMILY)
RESIDENTIAL (MULTI FAMILY)
[H RAILROADTRACKS
WATER
South Federal Boulevard Commercial Area
36


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
OFFICE
OFF1CE/RETAIL CENTER
RETAIL, NON-AUTO RELATED
RETAIL, AUTO RELATED
MANUFACTURINGAIVAREHOUSE
WHOLESALE
PUBLIC FACIUTIES/OFFICES
PARKS/OPEN SPACE
CONSTRUCTION & RELATED
| VACANT BUILDINGS/LAND
RESIDENTIAL (SINGLE FAMILY)
RESIDENTIAL (MULTI FAMILY)
[H RAILROADTRACKS
WATER
West Mississippi Avenue Commercial Area
37


COMMERCIAL AREAS
OFFICE
OFF1CE/RETAIL CENTER
RETAIL, NON-AUTO RELATED
§1 RETAIL, AUTO RELATED
MANUFACTURING/WAREHOUSE
WHOLESALE
PUBLIC FACIUTIES/OFFICES
PARKS/OPEN SPACE
CONSTRUCTION & RELATED
| VACANT BUILDINGS/LAND
RESIDENTIAL (SINGLE FAMILY)
RESIDENTIAL (MULTI FAMILY)
[H RAILROADTRACKS
Industrial Area
38


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
Commercial corridors form the boundaries of the Athmar Park Statistical Neighborhood. These corridors
serve and separate the Athmar Park residential neighborhoods from the residential areas ofValverde
across W Alameda Avenue and the community of Westwood across S. Federal Boulevard. Ruby Hill
residential areas to the south are adjacent to residential areas in Athmar Park. Businesses within the
commercial corridors contribute to the areas physical appearance and economic health. Businesses on
both sides of the commercial corridors, S. Federal Boulevard, W Mississippi Avenue, and WAlameda
Avenue, have been included in the study and were surveyed for planning purposes.
The Planning Group determined the following areas of focus:
I traffic, transportation, and parking
I safety and security
I economic situation and revitalization
I urban design and streetscaping
39


COMMERCIAL AREAS
Intersection of Alameda and Federal
before reconstrection
TRANSPORTATION, TRAFFIC AND PARKING
The City and County of Denver classifies its streets using criteria which includes function, access, street
and right-of-way width, traffic volume, and signalization. Denver Transportation Engineers have identified
three types of streets in the Athmar Park neighborhood: arterials, collectors, and local streets. Arterial
streets have the primary function of carrying through traffic, up to 50,000 vehicles per day, and also
provide access to adjacent property. Collector streets carry up to 15,000 vehicles per day and provide for
the distribution of traffic within neighborhoods and to adjacent properties. A local street is not normally a
through street, and its primary function is to provide access to adjacent property. Local streets carry low
volumes of traffic, or less than 5000 vehicles per day.
The Athmar Park neighborhood is bordered by arterial streets on the north, west and south: W Alameda
Avenue, S. Federal Boulevard, and W. Mississippi Avenue, respectively. WAlameda Avenue and S. Federal
Boulevard are State Routes or Highways.The State of Colorado does not have any plans to widen or to
reconstruct either of these streets and the City and County of Denver is responsible for their
maintenance and appearance.
W Alameda Avenue has three west bound lanes and two east bound lands between South Platte River
Drive and S. Federal Boulevard.Traffic on W. Alameda Avenue tends to use the center most lanes from S.
Tejon Street east to S. Lipan Street to avoid climbing and/or dropping off the humped intersection
pavement at the S. Raritan, S. Pecos, and S. Navajo Street intersections with W Alameda Avenue. Although
past efforts towards increasing capacity on this roadway have occurred, the asphalt mounding at
intersections, caused by repeated paving at intersections of local streets makes vehicular use of the
outside lanes very difficult.These intersections need to be rotomilled back from the intersections and
paved to the level ofWAlameda Avenue.There are future long range plans for widening this stretch of
road, and DRCOG has designatedWAlameda Avenue as eligible for reconstruction funding.
\\7 Mississippi Avenue has been paved in concrete for most of its distance on the south edge of the
neighborhood; however, the roadway from S. Zuni Street to S. Federal Boulevard needs some restoration.
40


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
Arterial Street
Collector Street
Local Street
Slop Sign Control
^ All-Way Stop
(S) Traffic Signal
Arterial street: primary function of carrying through traffic and
provides access to abutting property.
Collector Street: primary function of distributing traffic within Local Street: primary function of providing access to abutting
neighborhoods, carries through traffic and provides access to abutting property, property and does not normally carry through traffic.
Traffic Control Map
41


COMMERCIAL AREAS
North view along Sooth Federal
trom West Mississippi
Most adjacent development along W Mississippi Avenue from S. Zuni Street to S. Federal Boulevard is
residential. Commercial establishments, and the Denver Public Library at S.Tejon Street, have landscaped
parking areas. Between S. Raritan Street and S. Lipan Street, commercial and residential property owners
have not maintained or improved the public right-of-way. In the industrial area streetscaping and
improved pedestrian areas occur when property is redeveloped.
Five major collector streets run through the neighborhood: S.Tejon Street, S. Lipan Street, S.Jason Street
and part of S. Zuni Street, north to south, and W Exposition and W. Kentucky Avenues, east to west. S.Tejon
Street, S. Lipan Street, and W Exposition Avenue provide connections through the residential
neighborhood. S. Jason Street is located in the east industrial area and, with S. Huron Street, carries the
business through traffic. Many of the streets in the industrial area have been or are scheduled for asphalt
overlay within the next two years.
Some of the local streets on the neighborhoods west side, S. Eliot Street, S. Decatur Street, and S. Clay
Street, have cut-through commuter traffic, causing them to appear to be collector streets; particularly
when the S. Federal Boulevard/W. Alameda Avenue intersection backs up. This problem has been mitigated
somewhat following redesign and improvements at that intersection.
Speed limits vary from arterial to arterial and on collectors, and some streets require more speed limit
enforcement than do others.Along S. Federal Boulevard traffic may travel up to 40 mph, though rarely at
rush hour. On W. Alameda Avenue 35 mph is the limit. On W. Mississippi Avenue, speed limits are posted
and traffic may not exceed 30 mph, but often does west bound. In the industrial area, S. Lipan Street and
S.Jason Street speed limits are set at 25 mph and 30 mph, respectively. S. Federal Boulevard and W
Alameda Avenue are both state highways, and S. Federal Boulevard is a parkway. Generally, traffic tends to
be faster on W. Alameda Avenue as it connects with Morrison Road for destinations southwest.
The Regional Transportation District provides bus service around and through the neighborhood. Bus
service on W. Mississippi Avenue connects with Light Rail Transit. W Alameda Avenue is served by a
cross-town bus. Regional Transportation District also routes buses on W. Exposition Avenue.
42


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
SAFETY AND SECURITY
Most businesses surveyed indicated that the business area appearance is important, and they are
concerned about graffiti vandalism and its removal from the area; and to a lesser extent street lighting.
The Industrial area closes down after 6:00pm Monday through Friday, and is very quiet on weekends,
particularly in non-retail/wholesale areas.There is activity on weekends at and around businesses serving
the home improvement or auto repair customer, including lumber yards, tile and carpet outlets, paint and
hardware stores, and tire and auto parts stores. Commercial retail areas are active all week from open to
close of business.
Crime Statistics
In April 1998, Neighborhood Crime Rankings were issued and the Athmar Park Neighborhood was 9th
out of 72 up from a ranking of 25 in 1996. In general it would appear that crime is decreasing overall in
the neighborhood, although crime rates had increased since 1990 (88.0) to a statistical high in 1997
(120.6).A11 crime rates in Athmar Park increased after 1990 and reached a high mark in 1997, except for
burglary and larceny, which peaked in 1996, and crime rates have decreased significantly for burglary
(53-3-1996; 32.7-1998). Rates are generally consistent from 1996 to 1997 for murder and aggravated
assault with no reported increase in these categories.The All Other classification of crime includes
graffiti vandalism reported offenses.That rate nearly doubled within the last seven years, from 23.7 in
1990 to 45.2 in 1997, and is much higher than the citywide rate (33-1-Athmar Park; 30.0-Denver), which
has been much more consistent.
When compared to citywide rates in Denver, the neighborhood appears to be doing better as far as
larceny rates are concerned (18.1-Athmar Park; 27.8-Denver). For other crimes, except for murder, Athmar
Parks crime rate has been greater than overall percentages for the City of Denver, and while the Citys
total offenses begin to decrease after 1996,Athmar Park total offences do not show a decrease in total
offenses until 1998. Should 1998 total offense levels be maintained, the neighborhood will experience
less crime than before 1990 and considerably less crime than in the last half of the 1990s.
43


COMMERCIAL AREAS
1998 Crime Statistics
Crime Rates per 1000 people Athmar Park City of Denver
Total Offenses 86.3 82.3
Murder 0.1 0.1
Sexual Assault/Rape 0.6 1.4
Aggravated Assault 3.8 2.9
Robbery 1.7 2
Burglary 32.7 27.9
Larceny 18.1 27.8
Auto Theft 15.9 11.4
All other (includes Graffiti vandalism) 33.1 30
NOTE: Population for 1990 uses 1985 population figures. 1996 and 1997 use 1990population figures.
Burglary offenses per 1000 households.
Larceny includes both petty and grand larceny.
Sexual assault offenses per 1000females.
Source: Research and Development Bureau, Denver Police Dept.
In 1999, the DPD District 4 Statistical Unit reported that Athmar Park had the greatest decrease in
reported crime of any Denver neighborhood. With the establishment of the City of Denver Graffiti Task
force and subsequent implementation of the Public Works Graffiti Removal Program, it is expected that
the number of reported graffiti vandalism offenses will decrease.
44


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
ECONOMIC SITOATION AND
REVITALIZATION
Residents of Athmar Park, concerned about the economic health of the community, requested a study
of the commercial areas. Most businesses surveyed also expressed concern for economic
development. Businesses also felt there is need for additional business recruitment in the area. An
examination of the commercial areas was required in order to analyze the economic health and
situation of the neighborhood.
Businesses along Tennessee
in the Industrial Area
Information on commercial leasing rates provides an indication of the economic health of business
establishments in the Athmar Park neighborhood. In the industrially zoned areas, particularly for those
located in east Athmar Park, lease rates are generally above the average for Denver and there are few
vacancies overall. Some business owners are choosing to expand and redevelop their operations at the
present neighborhood location. Other businesses have done well in Athmar Park, but need more space in
which to expand. Industrial buildings are generally leased quickly due to nearby 1-25 and rail transit
corridors on the east side of the neighborhood.
There are more vacancies along the three commercial corridors. Along W. Alameda Avenue, the vacant
buildings tend to be reused by additional used vehicle dealerships.There are long standing vacant
shops on W. Mississippi Avenue, but property owners appear to be more willing to wait for tenants
who are willing to lease space, and to also pay for improvements to that space. Although there are
vacancies along S. Federal Boulevard, that location continues to generate interest and reinvestment
because leasing rates are generally lower than the Denver average. Investors appear to see this area as
a good place in which to start a new business, and the Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA)
actively promotes facade renovation through its urban renewal programs.There has been significant
progress in redevelopment of S. Federal Boulevard commercial sites with the continued efforts of
DURA in this area. That effort is expected to continue as the program becomes better known to
businesses in the area.
45


COMMERCIAL AREAS
Businesses along South Federal
Sales/Use Tax Revenue data was analyzed. This information would tend to indicate if, over time, businesses
in the area have become less viable.The information was used to help identify which parts of the
commercial sector have had the most significant and/or historical sales and use tax contribution. An
analysis of collected sales tax, by years, shows the steady, if not large contribution of Athmar Park
businesses to the general Denver economy.Total tax received indicates a steady increase reflecting a
steady increase in sales.
Sales/Use Tax Comparison: Athmar Park
1002 100c 1007
Industry Athmar Park % of Denver Total Athmar Park % of Denver Total Athmar Park % of Denver Total
Construction 552,745 1.78 450,560 1.74 433,046 1.57
Gen Mdse-Dept. Stores 30,745 0.23 12,960 0.09 33,087 0.23
Grocery/Deli 13,009 0.15 10,904 0.12 13,470 0.15
Auto-Dealers/Accs 193,648 0.42 276,535 0.53 344,187 0.96
Apparel 35,227 0.42 41,717 0.48 64,974 0.77
Furniture/Office Equip 220,725 0.65 273,054 0.68 398,747 0.86
Eating/Drinking 272,598 0.78 257,483 0.63 299,145 0.62
Misc. & Specialty 258,226 0.32 326,722 0.38 375,495 0.64
Totals 1,576,596 1,649,935 1,962,151
% of Denver Total Sales/Use 0.62 0.6 0.63
Source: Denver Treasury Division, City of Denver
While the contribution from the commercial corridors and the industrial area have remained fairly
constant, collections of sales and use taxes indicate there has been a shift in the sectors generating
the sales and use taxes. Less use tax was generated in 1997 for the construction sector than in
previous years.This decrease has been offset by increases in apparel, furniture and office
equipment, eating facilities and the miscellaneous and specialty sectors.The change in sectors
generating sales and use taxes to more service oriented businesses indicates a change in the type
of employment opportunities offered by business and industry in the neighborhood. However, the
46


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
shift in types of businesses does not suggest any change from regionally serving business to
primarily neighborhood serving businesses.

Generation of sales tax has increased for auto dealers, for those who sell automotive accessories, and
other related businesses. Sales taxes generated have doubled for the auto dealer sector since 1993,
accounting for almost 20% of the total sales/use taxes generated for the Athmar Park Neighborhood.
This percentage should increase as the number of used auto dealerships in the neighborhood
continues to increase.
ff
&

The grocery/deli and eating/drinking sectors combined account for about 15% of the total sales
taxes generated.There is no large food chain store within the neighborhood.The chain retail
businesses that exist in the neighborhood are limited to fast food, convenience stores, and those that
provide service and parts for vehicles.
Businesses on South Platte
in the Industrial Area
River Drive
Many businesses in the Athmar Park neighborhood see themselves as regional front range businesses.
According to the commercial survey, only the fast food, convenience stores, small food markets, bars,
and auto related businesses view their customer as generally local or from within the neighborhoods
adjacent to their location. For the other businesses, the Denver area, including Southwest Denver, is
where the customer is located; and two companies state they are not local concerns and have an
international customer base.
Businesses surveyed in Athmar Park indicate there is a variety of employment available, mostly in
entry level and service positions. Businesses employ all types of workers: office, skilled and unskilled
labor, professionally licensed/certified, managerial, and service workers. Most of the skilled labor is
employed in automotive/transportation and related work performing repairs.There are managerial
positions of various levels in businesses that are not owned by an individual or family.
By area, the manufacturing jobs are found generally in the Industrial area, with a few manufacturing
firms on S. Federal Boulevard and W. Alameda Avenue. Much of the wholesale type business is also
located in the Industrial area. Retail operations, although located in all areas, are more concentrated
along the W. Alameda Avenue, S. Federal Boulevard, and W. Mississippi Avenue corridors.
In the decade between the 1983 U.S. Census and the 1993 U.S. Census, the Athmar Park
neighborhood had a net loss of just 26 jobs. Industries that lost jobs in that decade were those in
the construction, wholesale trades, and the service sectors.The public utilities and transportation
47


COMMERCIAL AREAS
and manufacturing sectors gained jobs.The retail trade sector had mixed results: in the west census
tract there was a decrease in jobs, in the east, an increase.The remaining sectors did not experience
such fluctuation in employee positions. Smaller building contractors left the area, but some
manufacturing businesses expanded their operations. Overall, employment opportunities remained
steady during the past two decades.
The businesses surveyed do not always provide parking for their employees, and some do not have
specified parking for the customer. Businesses located in the shopping centers, the industrial area, and
some of the larger strip malls generally say they have enough parking.
48


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
URBAN DESIGN AND STREETSCAPING
FOR THE CORRIDORS
Many businesses along the corridors surrounding the Athmar Park Neighborhood claim not to
depend on walk in business. Pedestrian connections have not been important, and the sidewalks are
not attractive or have been perceived to be unsafe for pedestrians. Sidewalks along local streets and
the collectors, in comparison, are much safer and are more attractive within the residential
neighborhood.
A survey of businesses located in the Athmar Park Neighborhood indicated that the control of graffiti
vandalism is the most common and most stated concern. Corridor location appears to determine
other responses to the survey. Along S. Federal Boulevard priorities most often identified included
improving the appearance of commercial properties, promoting economic development, rebuilding
the street. Businesses located along W. Mississippi Avenue stated that promoting economic
development is most important with business recruitment and commercial area beautification as
secondary concerns. According to the survey, W. Alameda Avenue businesses first priority is for
commercial area beautification and streetscaping.Their second priority is for economic
development. Other concerns include business area appearance, sidewalk maintenance, and
residential area appearance.The businesses surveyed in the industrial area were most dissatisfied
with the control of graffiti vandalism and street maintenance. Of the possible projects their first
priority is for commercial area beautification and streetscaping; the second is a facelift of individual
commercial properties; and the third is the promotion of economic development.
Streetscaping projects require the establishment of a maintenance district and the participation of
businesses and property owners directly benefiting from the improvements. Prior to City of Denver
budgeting streetscaping funds, businesses and property owners will need to organize and form a
maintenance district. However, most business owners did not indicate that formation of either a
business association or a business improvement/maintenance district arrangement is a priority.
49


COMMERCIAL AREAS
South Federal Boulevard
This plan does not replace the Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan.The Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan
proposes that S. Federal Boulevard between W Alameda and W Mississippi Avenues be widened to six
lanes in both direction, with a raised median and limited left turn lanes.The road itself is rapidly
deteriorating with the steadily increasing traffic it carries. S. Federal Boulevard is State Highway 88, and is
designated by Denver as a parkway. Redeveloping businesses along the corridor are required to install
right of way improvements and to provide setbacks as specified by the Corridor Plan and parkway
requirements.
Parking along S. Federal Boulevard is extremely limited generally, and there will be little room remaining
for parking when the road is widened. Residents of both Westwood andAthmar Park neighborhoods are
concerned about the increased traffic that is generated when customers access side streets to find
additional parking in the residential area of the neighborhoods. Although the residents would like to have
business parking access limited, they would also be concerned if residential access from South Federal
Boulevard and side street residential parking were also limited.
Many Asian business owners have subdivided existing buildings, resulting in an increased demand for the
already limited and finite number of available spaces. In order to have enough parking, businesses may
have to purchase adjacent buildings, demolish them, and create parking lots. Other alternatives could
include working with developers to build and remodel office and retail space to suit available parking, or
vacating local streets, such as atW.Tennessee,W. Ohio,W. Center, andW.VirginiaAvenues, and using the
paved areas for business parking.
West Alameda Avenue
Customer parking is also a problem for businesses along WAlamedaAvenue. Commercial buildings were
constructed on short lots or have been expanded leaving little parking, except in the front setback areas.
Some businesses have located in houses, which were never intended to be commercial establishments,
and now impact the adjacent residential areas.The combination of setback and location on hillsides
facing the street requires creative use of space to accommodate customers and employees. Many
employees and customers must park on side streets. Parking for many businesses is in front and
accessible only by driving through the pedestrian area, which creates a safety issue for pedestrian traffic.
Design Guidelines for WAlamedaAvenue, developed by the Planning Group, follow the template used for
the reconstruction of the S. Federal Boulevard and WAlamedaAvenue intersection. Guidelines recognize
50


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
the need for a consistent appearance of well maintained buildings and enforced parking and landscaping
regulations. Businesses and new developments have not always followed signage, parking, and
landscaping requirements or have tended to provide very basic landscaping. Over time, this has resulted
in an unorganized and highly cluttered streetscape, and presents difficulty for potential customers to see
and to find businesses.
West Mississippi Avenue
The Athmar Park Shopping Center and the Texaco convenience store are well landscaped. When viewed
in connection with the Athmar Park Branch Library and Goldrick Elementary School, this area along W
Mississippi Avenue appears to be doing well.The road has also been improved. However, businesses to
the east and to the south across the street have not upgraded their building facades and some do not
have room for street trees.
Industrial East Area
The industrial area on the neighborhoods east side is neither dependent on nor connected to the
residential neighborhood.The businesses, many of which are manufacturing concerns, are regional
sources of goods and services. Some of the smaller businesses in this area are here because it is
appropriately zoned for their uses. In the industrial area, sidewalks appear to be almost incidental with
the existence of many, wide curb cuts, few street trees, and businesses that are interested primarily in the
transportation access afforded by geographic location.
51


52


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
ACTION AGENDA
53


ACTION AGENDA
Encourage and promote
business growth,
revitalization and development >
in the commercial areas
along the Athmar Park
neighborhood edges and *
in the industrial area.


Have Alameda Square, W Alameda and S. Federal Blvd designated as Neighborhood Revitalization Areas Small Business Services Council District Offices Community Planning and Development Agency
Encourage mixed-use development and identify appropriate areas along the transit corridors for mixed zoning Property Owners Businesses Community Planning and Development Agency
Develop a mechanism for conducting a periodic consumer survey Community Planning and Development Agency Neighborhood Groups
Develop a database of existing businesses that will identify: I At risk businesses 1 Business issues, concerns, needs and possible remedies 1 Businesses interested in a business association I Similar products and services 1 Businesses that may benefit from cooperative efforts Businesses Property Owners Community Planning and Development Agency Mayors Office of Economic Development and International Trade Small Business Administration
Study the possibility of developing marketing plan for commercial areas Businesses Small Business Services
Provide technical assistance and referral to business owners Mayors Office of Economic Development Small Business Administration
Review redevelopment in the context of the Denver Comprehensive Plan goals, rules and regulations adopted by the Denver Planning Board, and policies and standards developed by Development Review Committee membership departments and agencies Community Planning and Development Agency Public Works Wastewater Management other reviewing agencies
Identify realtors, bankers, etc., who will market the commercial and industrial areas for redevelopment and for appropriate neighborhood-serving retail Mayors Office of Economic Development and International Trade Small Business Services Denver Urban Renewal Authority Chamber of Commerce
54


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
I
>
>
I
I
I
Free advertising in APNA newsletter for new businesses Neighborhood Groups
Acknowledge businesses in the neighborhood area through the newsletter and articles in the Herald Dispatch Neighborhood Groups
Develop joint projects with businesses such as a weekend scavenger hunt to promote residential shopping of businesses located inAthmar Park Businesses Neighborhood Groups
Encourage neighborhood use of businesses, such as an APNA buyers card discount to promote repeat visits, and having business signs in languages commonly used by neighborhood residents such as Spanish, Chinese,Vietnamese and English Businesses Neighborhood Groups
Distribute newsletter to all new businesses Neighborhood Groups
Develop business directory Businesses Neighborhood Groups
2
Develop interaction
and communication
opportunities
within the neighborhood
between the businesses
and residents.
1205 West Alameda, 1954
55
Ruth Fabrizio


ACTION AGENDA
3
Improve interaction
and communication
between all sectors
of Athmar Park and
governmental agencies.
V Meet regularly with elected officials to inform them of
Athmar Park issues and concerns regarding land use,
zoning, and public welfare issues
V Develop Welcome to New Businesses Packet
Neighborhood Groups
Neighborhood Groups
56


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBO
Continue to work with Councilmembers, Public Works, and the Police to maintain public streets and alleys and resolve the graffiti vandalism problem through prevention and removal efforts Neighborhood Groups Public Works Council District Office Denver Police Department, District 4
Continue to meet with Denver Police Department personnel: District 4 Captain to request additional patrols, staffing, safety checks for businesses, and information on staffing policies, and Traffic Operations Supervisors for increased patrols of S. Federal Boulevard for cruising and traffic tie ups Council District Office Neighborhood Groups Denver Police Department, District 4 Denver Police Department Traffic Operations
Visit and survey those in neighborhood who have experienced graffiti vandalism and other crimes, and provide notification of available services Neighborhood Groups Denver Police Department, District 4
Organize a relations task force to perform community social outreach Neighborhood Groups Council District Office Mayors Office on Human Relations
RHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
4
Advocate continued
maintenance and improvement
of community safety
and services.
West view in Huston Lake Park
57


ACTION AGENDA
5
Implementation strategy.
Develop and maintain contacts with possible funding sources, particularly for seed money for streetscaping and corridor redevelopment projects Council District Office Community Planning and Development Agency Mayors Office of Economic Development and International Trade Public Works
Create a Plan Implementation Committee of interested residents and businesses to meet regularly as part of the Athmar Park Neighborhood Association Board Meetings Athmar Park Neighborhood Association Businesses
Create a calendar/listing of grants and schedules Neighborhood Groups
58


>
I
I
I
I
>
I
I
I
I
I
ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
Identify cultural concepts/traditions/heritage of neighborhood business and residential population, and apply for Neighborhood Cultures of Denver and other grants to fund culturally related projects such as festivals and cultural/social activities and programs to promote the neighborhood Neighborhood Groups Businesses Council District Office Parks and Recreation Neighborhood Cultures of Denver Mayors Office of Art, Culture, and Film
Identify and maintain the neighborhood commercial/residential edge and continue to monitor zoning change and variance requests to ensure continuity of existing R-l and R-2 zoning Neighborhood Groups Community Planning and Development Agency
Obtain approval to design and place neighborhood signs at neighborhood gateway areas, and work to provide appropriate plantings at signage locations Neighborhood Groups Public Works Urban Design/CPDA
Maintain existing residential R-l and R-2 zoning in the neighborhood except for sites that front on S. Federal Boulevard and W Alameda Avenue and which do not extend beyond mid block into residentially zoned area Neighborhood Groups Council District Office Community Planning and Development Agency
Continue to monitor zoning change, variance, street and alley vacation, and conditional use requests to ensure the continuity and character of the neighborhood in all zone districts Neighborhood Groups Council District Office Community Planning and Development Agency
Encourage businesses to continue to beautify frontage areas (e.g. use of street trees, flower boxes and planters, and street furniture) Businesses/ Property Owners Denver Urban Renewal Authority
Develop urban design concepts, including buffering strategies, for zoned industrial uses adjacent to residential areas Urban Design/CPDA
Determine locations of residential streets and alleys where additional lighting is needed, and work with residents and Public Service to add lighting Neighborhood Groups
Continue to work with Denver Public Schools to upgrade and maintain school grounds Neighborhood Groups Denver Public Schools
Attract additional APNA membership Athmar Park Neighborhood Association
Make a video of the neighborhood Athmar Park Neighborhood Association Office of Television and Internet Services
6
Promote oeighborhood
stability, sopport preservatioo
of the oeighborhood character,
aod create a seose of place.
59


ACTION
Alameda Square
Action Agenda
Sub Area
Alameda Square
Location
2200 WAlameda Avenue
Zoning
B-3.B4
Types of Businesses
Retail, former location of Social
Services Offices, many vacant
shops, new grocery store
Characteristics
Shopping Center with lots of
surface parking, little landscaping
Goals
Revitalization and/or
redevelopment of shopping center
and creative reuse of site
Encourage and support of existing
businesses growth, revitalization,
and development efforts
AGENDA
OBJECTIVES STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN IMPLEMENTOR
> Support and advocate mixed
use and total site
redevelopment involving
all owners
> Develop a streetscaping
concept to create a sense
of place for the shopping
center and to enhance the
WAlameda commercial
corridor
AS1 Continue to meet with current owners regarding the
development of an overall plan for the shopping
center site redevelopment
AS2 Study rezoning the area from B-3 to CMU 10 to
encourage mixed uses and the possibility of
redeveloping the back part of the site for market
rate and affordable housing and related uses
AS3 Encourage center owners and businesses to address
parking lot and entry landscaping in both the short
and long term
AS4 Explore the ways the City can assist in financing a
finalized development plan for the shopping center
AS5 Explore the development of an identifying
attribute/logo or defining element of the center
AS6 Develop design guidelines, options and alternatives
for building facades and landscaping in the center
and to relate to WAlameda Avenue
> Property Owners
> Business Owners
CPDA
> DURA
> Council District Office
MOED/IT
Continue to communicate
neighborhood interest in the
shopping center and owners
> Involve owners in
neighborhood related
activities when appropriate
AS7 Continue to encourage communication between
property owners
AS8 Plan mutually beneficial activities, including special
events, with business and shopping center owners
to promote businesses and the neighborhood
AS9 Continue and increase Mayors Office of Economic
Development and International Trade, Small Business
Services and DURA involvement and participation in
facade upgrade and business improvement programs
> Property Owners
> Businesses
MOED/IT
> Neighborhood Groups
> DURA
Abbreviations: MOED/IT Mayor's Office of Economic Development and International Trade; CPDA Community Planning and
Development Agency; DURA Denver Urban Renewal Authority; DPD Denver Police Department
60


A T H M A R PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETE R PLAN
West Alameda Avenue Action Agenda Location South Platte River west to the intersection at South Federal Boulevard OBJECTIVES STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN IMPLEMENTOR
) Encourage and promote business growth, revitalization, and development WAl Encourage development of office uses/buildings WA2 Work with businesses to organize and produce a marketing plan WA3 Contact realtors and bankers, and encourage increased investment along the corridor 1 Developers 1 Property Owners 1 Realtors MOED/IT 1 Area Bankers
Zoning B-3, B-4,I-0,PUD(1) Types of Businesses Small retail operations, second hand stores, some professional and non-profit offices, fast food and sit down restaurants, car dealership/vehicle repair and related Characteristics Mostly single level buildings having no street parking available, no unifying attribute, little ) Promote improvement the appearance of business properties to attract new consumers WA4 Organize a meeting of Alameda corridor businesses with Mayors Office of Economic Development and International Trade, Small Business Services WA5 Coordinate efforts with DURA to fund restoration of building facades, and interior renovation WA6 Continue to research and advocate for funding opportunities for corridor improvements 1 Businesses MOED/IT > DURA 1 Council District Offices CPDA
) Improve interaction and communication with businesses WA7 Develop a merchants association and/or Chamber of Commerce WA8 Support businesses in newsletter WA9 Encourage business employment of neighborhood residents Chamber of Commerce 1 Businesses 1 Property Owners 1 Neighborhood Groups
) Promote continued maintenance and improvement of corridor and street to enhance the area and to promote it as an attractive place to do business WA10 Explore with businesses the formation of Alameda Avenue improvement and maintenance districts WAllRottomill and reconstruct drainage at Navajo, Pecos, and Raritan intersections to improve capacity of street 1 Businesses 1 Property Owners 1 Public Works 1 Wastewater
landscaping Goals Promote the economic stability/redevelopment of commercial area ) Implement basic streetscaping concept utilized at Federal/Alameda intersection reconfiguration ) Develop additional streetscaping guidelines to create a sense of place for the commercial corridor WAD Explore the development of an identifying attribute/logo or defining element of corridor WAl 3 Request CIP funding to implement basic streetscaping concept WA14 Investigate limiting the number, size, height of existing/new billboards along the corridor WAl 5 Require landscaping for all new developments and redevelopment WA16 Develop streetscaping design guidelines, options and alternatives for landscaping along the corridor WA17 Request additional appropriate lighting WA18 Request undergrounding of utilities 1 Neighborhood Groups 1 Businesses 1 Zoning Administration 1 Council District Office CPDA 1 Neighborhood Group 1 Public Service Company
) Develop a plan for acquiring theValverde Community Building and rehabilitating it for office use and meeting space WA19 Research funding alternatives for acquisition of building WA20 Promote dialog with present owner 1 Neighborhood Groups 1 Colorado Historical Society > Denver Landmark Commission
) Encourage an increased Regional Transportation District presence along the corridor WA21 Advocate increased use of Regional Transportation District by commuter traffic WA22 Request establishment of a park and ride area at Alameda Square > Regional Transportation District > Neighborhood Groups > Businesses
61


ACTION AGENDA
South federal Boulevard Action Agenda OBJECTIVES STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN IMPLEMENTOR
Location South of intersection with Alameda south to Mississippi Avenue Zoning B-2, B-A-l, B-4, PUD(3), small R-l Types of Businesses Ethnic restaurants, some "fast food", retail related to vehicle or home repair, bridal,Asian owned professional offices and small retail operations, junk yard Characteristics Churches, some residential buildings (apts., single family), fire station, no defining architecture or landscaping devise, the dedicated street right-of-way is 100 feet, except for the half block south of Tennessee that has 80 feet of dedicated right-of-way > Encourage and support business growth, revitalization, and development SFl Support the implementation of the existing South Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan through requests for Capital Improvement Projects and Transportation Improvement Project funding through Denver Regional Council of Governments SF2 Perform a parking study SF3 Encourage, and assist as requested, the organization of business association > Transportation Engineering > CDOT > Transportation Planning CPDA > Businesses > Council District Office > Neighborhood Groups
> Promote improvement in appearance of business properties to attract new consumers SF4 support, and promote as requested, the implementation of the DURA facade improvement program SF5 provide information on Denver Digs Trees to businesses as appropriate SF6 continue efforts to assist in maintaining appearance of the corridor through graffiti removal and general clean-up participation SF7 identify appropriate site for future customer parking areas > DURA, Council District Office > Neighborhood Groups > Public Works, Neighborhood Groups, Council District Office, Police Dept. District 4 > Transportation Planning, CPDA
Goals Promote the economic stability of South Federal Boulevard
Abbreviations: MOED/IT Mayor's Office of Economic Development and International Trade; CPDA Community Planning and Development Agency; DURA Denver Urban Renewal Authority; DPD Denver Police Department
62


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
West Mississippi Avenue
Action Agenda
Location
Mississippi Business district along
W Mississippi from Zuni to Quivas
Zoning
B-3, PUD(l), R-3, small R-l
Types of Businesses
Shopping center, bakery, liquor
stores, small retail operations,
laundries, govt, offices,
gas/convenience stores,
restaurants, auto repair and related
Characteristics
Surrounded by a residential
neighborhood, most businesses are
set back from street, and some
have landscaping, lots of parking
readily apparent
Goals
Promote the economic stability of
the West Mississippi Avenue
Commercial Section
OBJECTIVES STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN
Streetscaping
Promote the development
and use of streetscaping to
create a sense of place for
the commercial section of
West Mississippi Avenue
Commercial aspect
1 Encourage and promote
business growth,
revitalization, and
development
1 Encourage neighborhood
support of local merchants
1 Require all season
landscaping buffering and
solid fences where
residential and commercial
areas interface
Maintenance/security
1 Promote continued
maintenance and
improvement of corridor to
enhance the area and to
promote it as an attractive
place to do business
1 Improve safety and security
along the corridor
WM1 Extend the existing landscaping treatment of Athmar
Park Shopping Center to businesses east along
Mississippi and across Mississippi
WM2 Explore establishing a local improvement district to
pursue additional options, alternatives, and locations
for landscaping and buffering
WM3 Develop an identifying attribute/logo or defining
element for this commercial area
WM4 Require landscaping for all redevelopment and
change of use
WM5 Maintain existing detached sidewalks and tree lawn
template and require detached sidewalks for all new
and redeveloped areas on the W. Mississippi Avenue
corridor
WM6 Encourage leasing and reuse or redevelopment of
vacant spaces for neighborhood serving businesses
WM7 Encourage businesses to organize and conduct
joint advertising projects to promote this
commercial area
WM8 Assist businesses to utilize the APNA newsletter
for business promotion to neighborhood residents
WM9 Require implementation of landscaping and
fencing requirements at parking redevelopment
or change of use
WM10 Explore the possibility of establishing a maintenance
district to support additional streetscaping
WM11 Encourage and work with existing businesses to
identify and address maintenance issues in and
around parking areas, including the graffiti and
trash problem in the alleyways and parking lots
WM12 Advocate the sensitive enforcement of code
requirements
WM13 Work with Traffic Engineering to regulate traffic
signals at intersections to accommodate various
pedestrian speeds
WM14 Promote traffic/bike/pedestrian safety programs
for branch library users and Goldrick
Elementary students
IMPLEMENTOR
1 Property Owners,
Businesses
1 Public Works
1 Urban Design-CPDA
1 Property Owners
1 Realtors
1 Businesses
MOED/IT
CPDA
1 Businesses
1 Property Owners
1 Public Works
CPDA
> Zoning Administration
1 Neighborhood Inspection
Services
1 Transportation
Engineering
> DPD District 4
1 Denver Public Schools
1 Neighborhood Groups
63


ACTION AGENDA
Industrial Area Action Agenda OBJECTIVES STRATEGIC ACTION PLAN IMPLEMENTOR
Location
S. Lipan Street east to South Platte River, between Alameda and Mississippi, mostly zoned for industrial use Zoning I-l, B-l, 1-2,0-1 (park), B-4 Lipan: 1-0,PUD(1) Types of Businesses Various industrial uses, warehousing, manufacturing, some retail and/or wholesale outlets, some govt. (Parks, Central Services.) Lipan: mostly construction/design related, some are specialized businesses, some auto repair and auto parts related businesses Characteristics Industrial warehousing and manufacturing buildings, some more recent cinderblock and stucco construction with leased > Encourage and support business growth, revitalization, and development > Require all season buffering and fences where residential and commercial areas interface IAl Encourage businesses to hire local residents IA2 Continue to research and advocate for funding opportunities for area improvements IA3 Encourage similar or complementary businesses to develop marketing/interaction strategies where possible IA4 Continue to monitor conditional uses IA5 Explore the formation of improvement and maintenance districts, or other business related organizations. > Businesses CPDA > Council District Office MOED/IT
> Promote continued maintenance and improvement of corridor to enhance the area and to promote it as an attractive place to do business > Improve safety and security for businesses in the area IA6 Identify streets and public right of way areas in need of street repair, curb and gutter work, and establish appropriate pedestrian access according to Denver standards IA7 Encourage existing businesses to landscape parking and entrance areas and require landscaping of all new developments IA8 Support enforcement of zoning requirements for industrial areas regarding parking requirements, lighting and signage, and conditional uses IA9 Encourage area businesses to request police review and analysis of business security > Public Works > Business Owners > Property Owners > Council District Office CPDA > Zoning Administration > Neighborhood Inspection Services > DPD District 4
office/warehousing /loading dock areas, many right of way areas are not delineated with curb and gutter treatments; Lipan: has mostly single level buildings with some landscaping in front > Promote recognition of past events IA10 Identify areas impacted by the 1965 flood and mark the height of floodwaters on lampposts and utility poles > Neighborhood Group > Public Works > Public Service > Council District Office
Goals Promote the economic stability and encourage continued business growth. Recognize the historical location of the area. Abbreviations: MOED/IT Mayor's Office of Economic Development and International Trade; CPDA Community Development Agency; DURA Denver Urban Renewal Authority; DPD Denver Police Department Planning and
64


APPENDIX


APPENDIX
METHODOLOGY AND SORVEY
Methodology
Athmar Park is divided into two census tracts: 13.01, west of SouthTejon Street, and 13.02, east of South
Tejon Street. Information obtained from the 1990 Census and DRCOG estimates on housing,
employment, household income, and population numbers, income, race and national origin, was analyzed
to develop a demographic profile of the neighborhood.
Land use, zoning, and property data was obtained from the Denver Community Planning and
Development Agencys Land Use and Zoning Files and from the Assessors Office. This information was
used to determine the acreage amount and type of land uses in Athmar Park. Land uses and changes in
business activities were researched and tracked through field survey work and with the Assessors Office
information. Information concerning property ownership, location of residence of property owners,
valuation of parcels, and square-footage and acreage of businesses was obtained from the City Assessors
Office. Business owners and managers were contacted and requested to participate and contribute
information on their business operation.
Commercial Survey
A survey of the businesses provided information concerning customer base, marketing efforts, employees,
parking, and other aspects of doing business in Athmar Park.The business survey information has been
tabulated in different ways.The second section requested information on public facilities and services,
and the third section asked survey participants to rank a list of possible neighborhood projects.A section
of the survey requested information on the business itself. Other sections requested responses on City
Services and Facilities and Possible Projects for their immediate area.
66


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
GENERAL BUSINESS INFORMATION
I Requested information included type of operation and customer. Findings: most businesses are
area wide and regional, do not consider their businesses to be local, with wholesale operations
generally in Industrial areas, retail along commercial corridors,
I Hours of operation and business traffic information. Findings: Retail oriented establishments and
restaurants were open longer hours, but usually opened later in the day and are open more
days/week; Industrial and wholesales operations usually followed M-F workweeks with earlier
hours beginning at 7AM, some Saturday hours.There was no strong indication of heavy or low
business traffic except at holidays for retail businesses, and no change for industrial or wholesale
operations.
I Parking provided for customers and employees. Findings: if there was available land around the
business, then employees had parking furnished to them, regardless of the customer needs.
Businesses along S. Federal Boulevard were least likely to provide adequate parking for both
customers and employees. Businesses in the Industrial area and along W Mississippi Avenue
generally had enough parking available for all.
) Crime information. Findings: commonly businesses assisted by the Athmar Park Neighborhood
Association said graffiti vandalism is cleaned up; industrial areas were not happy with efforts to
remedy graffiti vandalism. Police response for the residential area appears to be more timely
than for the industrial area.
I Type of employees. Findings: All levels of employment in most sectors of employment are found
in the Athmar Park statistical neighborhood. Generally there is more service employment along
the commercial corridors and more manufacturing and clerical in the industrial area.
67


APPENDIX
SPECIFIC AREA RESP0NSES / INF0RMATI 0N
South Federal Boulevard
I Service and Facilities. Respondents satisfied with availability of eating places, fire protection, and trash collection.
Respondents dissatisfied with graffiti vandalism protection.
I Possible Project Priorities. Respondents first priority is promotion of economic development, second is area beautification.
68


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
West Alameda Avenue
I Service and Facilities .Respondents satisfied with fire protection, trash collection, police protection, availability of eating places.Respondents dissatisfied
with graffiti vandalism protection, business area appearance and sidewalk maintenance.
I Possible Project Priorities .Respondents first priority is commercial area beautification, second is facelift of commercial properties.
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied No response
\ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ % \ \ \ V \
\ \ \ \ % % % \ V V % \ %
V V %
\ \
X
* %
X.
Services and Facilities
69


APPENDIX
West Mississippi Avenue
I Service and Facilities.Respondents satisfied with water and sewer maintenance, traffic control, street signs, storm drainage, fire protection, and most
everything that was queried.Respondents were more neutral than dissatisfied with availability of financial services, street cleaning, and local workforce.
) Possible Project Priorities.Respondents first priority is promotion of economic development.
18
16
14
12
10
8
6
4
2
0
Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied No response
I
I
I
\ \ \ \ \ \ \ \ % % \ \ V \
X. %, % X. X ^ \ % \ ^
Jk S4>, %>* 'o/s 4.
% x
% ^ X +

* %
X
% % 0/ X ^
x
Services and Facilities
70


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
Industrial Area
I Service and Facilities .Respondents satisfied with fire and police protection, trash collection (usually private contractor), street signs, and curb and
gutters. Respondents dissatisfied with graffiti vandalism protection and availability of eating places.
I Possible Project Priorities .Respondents first priority is promotion of economic development, second is commercial area beautification.
25 n
20
15
10
5
0
\ v \ \ \ \ \ \ % % % \ v \
^. ^/x % % %/ %>, %
'4, 4
X. %> 4;. X
w
% ^ X +
X
%
to 'O/
%

%
Services and Facilities
71


A P P E N D 1 X
SWOT CHART: Athmar Park Neighborhood Assessment The Athmar park Planning Group developed goals and objectives following a SWOT analysis of the neighborhood. Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats were listed. The following are those areas that relate to the economic condition of the Athmar Park commercial edges.
Strengths Weaknesses
P Diverse population/culture P educational level of population
P Educational level of population P students perceived to be out of control
P Involved APNA group P signs of urban blight apparent
P Income levels comparatively good P unappealing look of some commercial
P Good transportation areas/establishments
P mix of uses for the neighborhood P lack of professional services
P affordable housing P lack of office space
P good quality stock of housing P good city services, e.g. police, etc. P close to downtown P street maintenance needed throughout the neighborhood on local and collector streets
P not enough activity for young people P too much gang activity and graffiti vandalism P need more parking in commercial areas l perception that neighborhood has too low a capacity to support the larger stores l rents in Alameda Square are too high l non-pedestrian scale in Alameda Square
P light rail is coming P accessible arterials-Alameda, Mississippi, S. Federal P high traffic volume-potential customer base P most of the neighborhood is above the flood plain
l police response time to commercial areas is too high

Opportunities Threats
P increased professional presence in area P businesses lured away from area
P attract new retail business in Alameda Square P perceptions of location and crime
P business improvements in types, building P lack of neighborhood interactions
facades, and landscaping P neighborhood/business interactions P formation of business association P general apathy
72


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
DEMOGRAPHIC TABLES
Census Tract Population/Household Estimates for Athmar Park Statistical Neighborhood
Census Tracts Total 1990 Population 1990 Households Total 1993 Population 1993 Households Annual % Change
13.01 3,772 1,487 3,819 1,521 0.41
13.02 3,084 1,177 3,169 1,222 0.91
Athmar Park 6,856 2,664 6,988 2,743 1.31
Source: U.S. 1990 Census;DRCOG
General Characteristics of People
City of Denver Total Population
1980 1000
All Persons 13.01 13.02 13.01 13.02
Under 5 years 268 275 320 261 34,764
5 to 9 years 232 260 264 237 29,550
10 to 14 years 218 247 212 202 24,514
15 to 19 years 290 263 231 193 25,707
20 to 24 years 387 394 267 183 34,224
25 to 34 years 694 605 662 526 95,951
35 to 44 years 354 341 556 427 77,358
45 to 54 years 356 313 325 264 42,554
55 to 64 years 532 428 307 285 38,183
65 to 74 years 383 216 376 355 35,734
75 and over 188 90 252 151 29,071
Median Age 32.4 29.1 33.8 33.7 33.8
Source: U.S. 1980 &1990 Census
73


APPENDIX
Race and National Origin -1990
City of Denver Population % Athmar Park Population % Athmar Park % of Totals
White and Non-Hispanic 288,515 61.6 3,537 51.58 12.29
Hispanic 107,382 22.9 2,981 43.4 2.776
Black 60,046 12.8 82 1.19 0.136
Asian 10,652 2.27 206 3 1.93
American Indian 5,289 1.13 81 1.18 1.53
Source: U.S. Census; Denver Community Planning and Development Agency
Race and National Origin, Athmar Park 1980
1980
13.01 13.02
White 3,108 2,673
Black 24 18
American Indian 21 37
Japanese 13 3
Vietnamese 53 12
Other Asian 13 2
Mexican 750 716
Puerto Rican 17 10
Other Spanish 419 411
Source: U.S. Census; Denver Community Planning and Development Agency
74


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
Race and National Origin, Athmar Park 1990
1990
13.01 13.02
White 2,837 2,429
Black 58 24
American Indian 55 26
Eskimo 0 2
Chinese 11 0
Filipino 0 10
Japanese 17 0
Korean 5 1
Vietnamese 118 29
Cambodian 6 0
Laotian 0 5
Other Asian/Pacific Islander 0 4
Mexican 1231 879
Puerto Rican 5 3
Cuban 2 0
Other Hispanic 379 482
Source: U.S. 1980 & 1990 Census
Median Household Income, Athmar Park
Statistical Neighborhood 1990
Athmar Park $21,721 26,726
Ruby Hill $20,332 3,287
Valverde $18,764
Westwood $15,938- 17,636
City of Denver $25,106
Source: U.S. 1990 Census
75


APPENDIX
Zoning By Acres, Athmar Park
Census Tracts Total Acres by
13.01 13.02 Zone District
0.31 4.32 B1 4.63
4.53 0 B2 4.53
31.95 11.4 B3 43.35
12.96 3.36 B4 16.32
2.56 BA1 2.56
1.11 BA3 1.11
53.42 19.08 Total Commercial 72.5
41.3 10 41.3
138.87 11 180.17
6.65 01 6.65
271.04 176.87 R1 447.91
28.14 21.21 R2 49.35
1.83 0 R2A 1.83
0 0 R3 0
1.63 R3X 1.63
0 R4 0
0 R5 0
PUD
354.43 405.61 Totals 760.04
*Open space/park acres may be included in these totals.
PUD Zone Districts not included in calculations.
Source: Community Planning and Development Agency
76


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
Employment Comparisons
1983 Employment
Denver Region------- --------Census Tracts for Athmar Park---
-------13.01--------- ---------------13.02
Industry Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent
Mining 25,300 2.7 0 0.0 0 0.0
Contract Construction 50,700 5.3 19 1.5 833 29.2
Manufacturing 123,500 13.0 8 0.6 235 8.2
Transp. & Pub. Util. 61,100 6.4 0 0.0 0 0.0
Wholesale Trade 59,300 6.2 58 4.7 852 29.8
Retail Trade 149,300 15.7 386 31.2 150 5.3
Fin., Ins., R.E. 62,600 6.6 11 0.9 4 0.1
Services 192,200 20.2 457 36.6 531 18.6
Government 134,500 14.1 174 14.1 201 7.0
Federal Civilian 32,700 3.4 0 0.0 0 0.0
State 31,700 3.3 0 0.0 11 0.4
Local 70,100 7.4 174 14.1 190 6.7
Non-Agr.Total 858,500 90.1 1,113 90.0 2,806 98.2
Agriculture 6,300 .07 0 0.0 0 0.0
Military 10,400 1.1 0 0.0 0 0.0
All Other 77,700 8.2 124 10.0 51 1.8
Total Employment 952,900 100.0 1,237 100.0 2,857 100.00
Source: U.S. 1983 Census; Denver Community Planning and Development Agency
77


APPENDIX
1993 Employment
Industry
Number Percent 12 A1 1 2 fV7
Number Percent Number Percent
Mining 6,823 1.6 0 0.0 11 .03
Contract Construction 11,483 2.7 59 6.1 328 10.0
Manufacturing 33,528 8.0 14 1.5 825 25.3
Transp. & Pub. Util. 43,184 10.3 0 0.0 135 4.1
Wholesale Trade 32,535 7.8 92 9.6 648 19.8
Retail Trade 49,830 11.9 202 21.0 458 14.0
Fin.,Ins.,R.E. 32,645 7.8 106 11.0 11 0.3
Services 122,030 29.1 128 13.3 471 14.4
Government 62,151 14.8 187 19.5 218 6.7
Non-Agr.Total 394,209 93.99 788 82.0 3,105 95.1
Agriculture 1,179 0.3 5 .05 22 .07
Military 3,573 0.9 0 0.0 0 0.0
AllOther 20,371 4.9 168 17.5 138 4.2
Total Employment 419,332 100.00 961 100.00 3,265 100.00
Source: U.S. 1993 Census; Denver Community Planning and Development Agency
78


ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
Crime Statistics
Denver Police Department, District 4, District 4, Precinct 413
Crime Rates per 1000 persons 1990 1996 1997 1998
Population 7636 6858 6858 6858
Households 3076 2664 2664 2664
Total Offenses 88.0 117.7 120.6 86.3
Murder 0.0 0.1 .03 0.1
Sexual Assault/Rape 1.6 0.6 2.9 0.6
Aggravated.Assault 3.1 4.5 4.8 3.8
Robbery 2.8 2.6 4.4 1.7
Burglary 46.5 53.3 46.5 32.7
Larceny 21.6 27.9 24.1 18.1
Auto Theft 16.5 19.7 21.6 15.9
All other (includes graffiti vandalism) 23.7 41.0 45.2 33.1
City of Denver, Citywide
Crime Rates per 1000 persons 1996 1997 1998
Total Offenses 105.2 96.4 82.3
Murder 0.1 0.2 0.1
Sexual Assault/Rape 1.5 1.5 1.4
Aggravated.Assault 4.0 3.4 2.9
Robbery 2.7 2.5 2
Burglary 36.7 30.6 27.9
Larceny 36.7 31.6 27.8
Auto Theft 11.5 12.3 11.4
All other (includes graffiti vandalism) 32.0 30.8 30
Population for 1990 uses 1985 population figures;1996 and 1991 use 1990population figures; burglary offenses per 1000 households; larceny includes both petty and grand larceny; sexual assault offenses per 1000females. Source: Research and Development Bureau, Denver Police Dept.
79


APPENDIX
ALAMEDA AVENUE COMMERCIAL AREA
STREETSCAPING GUIDELINES
General Concepts
The unifying character of W.Alameda Avenue is a consistent appearance of enforced landscaping and
parking regulations, well maintained buildings, parking areas, and public areas, where safety is encouraged
through minimizing the number of access/egress points along the street (resulting in fewer curb cuts),
control of visual clutter (resulting from too many and varied signs), and prohibiting parking on front
lawn areas.W.Alameda Avenue between S.Pecos and S.Raritan Streets is the original town center of the
Town ofValverde and the location of the historic meeting hall, now privately owned.The detached walks
and existing street trees should be maintained and additional trees planted as needed.
To promote a unifying character along WAlameda Avenue and to create an attractive place in which to do
business, the following steps should be taken:
I Continue to orient buildings to face street with primary entrances on the street side
I Eliminate billboards or work with businesses that rely on this source of income to work for more
residentially favorable content
I Enforce signage guidelines
I Enforce landscaping standards for parking areas and used car lots
I Encourage selective and sensitive code enforcement, particularly for temporary signs
I Inform property owners of their responsibility to maintain area(s) in front and to the sides of
their businesses, including the maintenance of plantings between the sidewalk and the street
) Minimize the number of curb cuts
) Enforce parking requirements
I Encourage the use of the sidewalk/streetscaping pattern used at the reconstructed
Alameda/S.Federal Boulevard intersection however where there is an existing tree lawn and
planting area adjacent to the sidewalk or street, those tree lawn areas should be maintained
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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN
I Promote the planting of street trees according to the Tree Planting Layout along the corridor,
from South Federal Boulevard east to Lipan Street
I Enhance pedestrian areas, such as transit stops, with street furniture as appropriate to the space
and use, and with appropriate landscape planting(s)
I Develop intensive landscaping only at gateway areas or where there is adequate space to
accommodate plantings
Notes
Scored concrete is continuous without trees; sidewalk scoring is incidental to sidewalk construction.
Tree species and planting method to be approved by the City Forester; at least 3 inch caliper.
Tree grates to be:
1. Neenab Foundry, Inc.Model R-8713 180 square with style U frame; no paint or primer
2. Urban Accessories Model Kiva with standard frame
3. Deeter Foundry, Inc.Model B7512
Tree grates to be installed in accordance with manufacturers recommendations.
West Alameda template
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Full Text

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SEPTEMBER 6, 2000 ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORH OOD PERIMETER PLANRuthFabrizio LeonaDeas

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTSMayor of DenverHonorable Wellington E.WebbDenver City Councilmembers for Athmar Park NeighborhoodCouncilwoman Ramona Martinez Councilwoman Kathleen MacKenzieDenver Planning BoardWilliam H.Hornby,ChairJan Belle Frederick Corn Pat Cortez Michael Dino Daniel Guimond Mark Johnson Joyce Oberfeld Bruce ODonnell Terrance Ware Dr.Robert WrightDenver Community Planning and Development AgencyJennifer Moulton,DirectorEllen Ittelson,Manager Planning ServicesDennis Swain,Senior City PlannerSteve Gordon,City Planner SpecialistPhil Plienis,Senior City PlannerJanell Flaig,Senior City Planner, Plan WriterJulie Connor,GraphicsKen Barkema,GraphicsJim Ottenstien,GraphicsJohn Koswan,Zoning AdministrationCity of Denver StaffHarriet R.Hogue,City Park Manager, Former Manager of Neighborhood Planning Section, CPDARobert Kochevar,Director of Transportation Engineering, Department of Public WorksBrian Mitchell,Traffic Operations Engineer, Department of Public WorksMarilyn Miller,Director, Capital Improvement Budget, Budget and Management OfficeRandy Moore,Senior Economic Development Specialist, Mayors Office of Economic Development and International TradePete Baertlein,Assistant Director of Engineering, Department of Public WorksJohn de Luca,Revenue Department, RetiredSusan Fry,Parks Superintendent, Department of Parks and RecreationMary Expinoza,Mayors Office of Human Rights and Community RelationsBill Mitchell,Mayors Office of Human Rights and Community RelationsAthmar Park Planning GroupMany thanks to all who attended planning meetings,who assisted with the survey of the commercial areas,and participated in creating, reading and editing this perimeter plan.In particular the following business owners,commercial property owners and neighborhood residents made special contribution to the preparation of this plan. Pete Aluise,James R.Anderson,the late Steve Baca,Mike Billings,Steve Buretz,Wendy Chao,Andrew Davis, Alejandrina Duran,Cynthia Foster, David Foster,Minh Ha,Bill Klevecka, Jo Anne Phillips,Sandy Ruff,Karen Ruff,Rick Taylor,Terri Seader,Hamid Simantob,Chalmers Turner,Phyllis Turner,Bob and Barb Wolf,and Virginia Zick. Present and former residents of the Athmar Park Neighborhood contributed to the compiling of the historical information and map. Information generated at a gathering held by Carol Campbell resulted in the historical location map as well as a more complete history section. Carol and Chloe Campbell, Marguerite Christie,Leona Deas, Wanda Gauthier,Dorothy Grant,Kim and Amanda Gutierrez, Marguerite(Babe) Hauser,Eileen Holligan,Wayne Knox,Belva Ruff, Bea Silva,and Olive Wise.ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 2

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANTABLE OF CONTENTSIntroduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Mission statement. . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Neighborhood Vision. . . . . . . . . . . 6 Neighborhood and Small Area Planning. . . . . . . . 7 Use and Implementation of the Plan. . . . . . . . 8 Motivation. . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Plans that Relate to the Athmar Park Neighborhood. . . . . 11Overall Plan Goals and Recommendations. . . . . . 13 Location and History. . . . . . . . . . . 17 Neighborhood Conditions. . . . . . . . . . 23Demographic Information. . . . . . . . . . 24 Community Facilities. . . . . . . . . . . 27 Land Use and Zoning. . . . . . . . . . . 28Commercial Areas. . . . . . . . . . . 33Sub-Areas. . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Transportation,Traffic and Parking. . . . . . . . . 40 Safety and Security. . . . . . . . . . . 43 Economic Situation. . . . . . . . . . . 45 Urban Design and Streetscaping. . . . . . . . . 49 3

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TABLE OF CONTENTSAction Agendas. . . . . . . . . . . . 53Athmar Park Neighborhood. . . . . . . . . . 54 Alameda Square. . . . . . . . . . . . 60 West Alameda Avenue. . . . . . . . . . . 61 South Federal Boulevard. . . . . . . . . . 62 West Mississippi Avenue. . . . . . . . . . 63 Industrial Area. . . . . . . . . . . . 64Appendix. . . . . . . . . . . . . 65Methodology/Commercial Survey. . . . . . . . . 66 General Business Information. . . . . . . . . 67 Specific Area Responses and Information/SWOT Chart. . . . . 68 Demographic Tables. . . . . . . . . . . 73 West Alameda Streetscape Guidelines and Template. . . . . 80 4

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANINTRODUCTION 5

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INTRODUCTIONMISSION AND VISIONMission StatementThe Mission of the Athmar Park Planning Group is to develop a plan to promote stability and growth in Athmar Park.This plan will provide a guide for the Athmar Park neighborhood edges,advocate the continued maintenance and improvement of community safety and services,and support preservation of the neighborhood character and creation of a sense of place.Neighborhood VisionIn the future,Athmar Park will evolve as a multi-ethnic,multi-cultural residential neighborhood surrounded by a variety of successful local and regional businesses that provide employment and service for residents and others.Individuals representing service,church,and neighborhood groups,and businesses will continue to work together for a safe community;will preserve the neighborhood character,and assure that Athmar Park is recognized as a valuable and important part of the City of Denver. 6 Old Dillard House, also known as the Alameda Hotel, was located in the 1300 block of West Alameda

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANNEIGHBORHOOD AND SMALL AREA PLANNINGNeighborhood and small area planning is a professional commitment to build healthy and diverse communities.Successful planning efforts must embrace physical,cultural,social and economic conditions to positively impact quality for life and create a pleasing environment in which to live and work.The neighborhood or small area plan is a guide to direct future public and private actions concerning small area,short-range issues in the neighborhood and,when adopted,it becomes an official supplement to the Citys Comprehensive Plan. 7 South Platte River, 1921 flood LeonaDeas

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INTRODUCTIONUSE AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PLANThe Athmar Park Neighborhood Perimeter Plan primarily addresses issues and concerns for commercial and adjacent residential areas.It identifies issues,opportunities,and recommendations for Athmar Park commercial areas specifically,for the residential neighborhood incidentally,and for the involvement of neighborhood residents working cooperatively with area businesses.This plan advocates specific changes in zone districts and/or land uses,and provides mechanisms for plan implementation when development is subject to City review. Successful implementation of this plan depends on the collaboration of all stakeholders to continue to identify and discuss common and varying interests and concerns.The action recommendations contained in the plan are supported by planning participants and considered mutually beneficial.Many of the action recommendations will require the support,cooperation,and assistance of the Mayor,City Council,and various City agencies and departments.Some of the action recommendations will require cooperation among businesses and the support of the residential neighborhood to be implemented successfully. Ideally,a strong business organization working with the neighborhood organization could be the catalyst for long range plan implementation. The Athmar Park Neighborhood Perimeter Plan is the result of a collaborative endeavor involving residents,business owners,and city staff.Stakeholders participated in determining the specific plan goals, objectives and action agendas.These are detailed to conditions,issues,needs,and concerns of the Athmar Park neighborhood. A study of the Athmar Park statistical neighborhood was initiated in April,1996.Community Planning and Development Agency (CPDA) staff researched and prepared land use and demographic information,and the Graphics Section drew up the first Athmar Park neighborhood maps.The Athmar Park Planning Group was organized and began meeting in September,1996.This group was composed of neighborhood residents,former residents,business owners,and CPDA staff.Although the residents of the neighborhood provided core participation throughout the process,neighborhood business owners participated when 8

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANtheir specific subareas were discussed.From 1996 to the present,the Planning Group has not only continued their work,but has also initiated implementation of some of the plan recommendations. During the first phase in 1996 and 1997,the planning group identified issues and goals,analyzed problems and opportunities,and conducted a survey of businesses on the edges of the residential neighborhood.The planning group members continued to survey business throughout the planning process,and to invite and encourage participation by businesses in the planning process. In the second phase in 1997 and 1998,the Athmar Park Planning Group studied the identified issues and problems and began to develop policy recommendations relating to zoning and land use;traffic and parking;neighborhood image and cleanup;crime;underutilized,vacant,and deteriorated buildings;and commercial revitalization.Commercial areas of the neighborhood were identified based on types of businesses,related locations,and/or existing plans.Goals and action recommendations for commercial development and stabilization were prepared for each subarea and with the involvement of business people from those subareas. During the third planning phase commenced in 1998,specific concepts and concerns for each sub-area were refined,and representatives from city agencies were invited to assist the Planning Group to develop realistic action recommendations.Focus groups were held for specific areas,including South Federal Boulevard,and for issues,such as alternative youth activities. 9 Northeast view from Aspgren Park

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INTRODUCTIONMOTIVATIONThis will be the first neighborhood plan for Athmar Park.In Spring,1996,Denver Social Services selected another site for its future location.The decision of Denver Social Services to move from its Alameda Square location generated great concern for the economic well being of the shopping center itself,and for the overall neighborhood area.However,Athmar Park has not been identified as a neighborhood in need of assistance.Housing is affordable,and residential areas are generally stable and safe.The stability of the neighborhood depends on the economic health of surrounding commercial/industrial areas. Along both W.Alameda Avenue and S.Federal Boulevard there has been,in the last two years,a shift away from a variety of retail establishments,such as paint and hardware stores,printing shops,art and sport stores.The amount of fast food establishments has remained much the same with a small increase in the number of sit down restaurants.Although some used car lots have closed on the east end of W. Alameda Avenue;these have been replaced by dealerships on the west end and on South Federal Boulevard.Additionally,there are properties that are minimally landscaped;buildings that have been allowed to deteriorate;and more vacated buildings.These are indications that while the residential and industrial areas appear to be fairly healthy,the commercial areas,particularly along W.Alameda Avenue and S.Federal Boulevard are becoming at risk areas of the neighborhood. 10

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANPLANS THAT RELATE TO THE ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOODThe Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000is the foundation for the Athmar Park Neighborhood Perimeter Plan and all official plans of the City.When adopted,this plan will become an amendment to the Denver Comprehensive Plan. There are two transportation study/plans and one Urban Renewal Area that relate to this neighborhood: Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan(1995):Concerns related to businesses include the recognition of unique characteristics along Federal Boulevard,promotion of safety and image enhancements that will improve the corridor for pedestrian use and business access,including off street parking,additional lighting,and landscaping. Southwest Quadrant Transportation Plan(1991):One of the goals and objectives is to Stimulate quality economic development,with related objectives influenced/obtained through transportation improvements.The related objectives include creation of jobs,expanding the tax base,insuring development compatible with adjacent uses,and decreasing non-residential redevelopment in residential areas. Federal and Alameda Commercial Redevelopment Program(1995):The Westwood Urban Renewal Area resulted from a study of the Westwood commercial corridor and concern for existing businesses and neighborhood stabilization.It includes revitalization strategies for invigorating the business mix and attracting new businesses.It incorporates some of the concepts from the Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan. 11

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANOVERALL PLAN GOALS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 13

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The Athmar Park Planning Group developed goals and objectives following a neighborhood analysis.The overall plan goals are to retain business viability and stability,and promote economic growth in the neighborhood commercial corridors and the industrial area.Goals Strategies 1Promote neighborhood stability, support preservation of the neighborhood character, and create a sense of place. 2Encourage business growth, revitalization, and development in the commercial areas along the Athmar Park neighborhood edges and in the industrial area. Target new commercial retail to come to Athmar Park and identify businesses that will add to the mixof retail establishments. Encourage businesses to remain in Athmar Park or to expand operations in appropriately zoned areas. Encourage infill development and/or creative use of existing buildings including mixed-use zoning on identified transit corridors. Encourage organization of business affiliations within commercial areas. Promote the commercial and industrial areas as good investment opportunities. Continue to maintain the integrity of the residentially zoned areas. Identify areas along transit corridors that could be rezoned for mixed use,transit supporting development. Identify characteristics that make Athmar Park a unique neighborhood and promote the neighborhood as a good place to live and work. Encourage collaboration between neighborhood residents and neighborhood businesses to promote the neighborhood as a location/destination. Develop identifying gateways,signage,landscaping,etc.that will promote/identify Athmar Park. Develop joint neighborhood projects with the neighborhood schools. 14 OVERALL PLAN GOALS & RECOMMENDATIONS

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANGoals Strategies 3Develop interaction and communication strategies between the businesses and residents. 4Improve interaction and communication between all sectors of Athmar Park and governmental agencies. 5Advocate continued maintenance and improvement of community safety and services. 6Develop a realistic implementation strategy. Identify and develop directory of possible resources. Leverage (Community Development,Capital Improvement Project, DURA) funds Meet and work with Councilmembers,CPDA,Parks,Planning,and Public Works to identify projects for inclusion in the Capital Improvements Budget. Establish a Land Use Committee that will identify development and redevelopment activity not subject to City review;and advise property owners of area objectives. Encourage more consistent response from governmental agencies regarding graffiti vandalism issues. Identify issues and concerns of safety and security in the neighborhood. Develop better working relationships with reviewing agencies in the City to influence land use and urban design decisions. Increase opportunities for positive interactions and invite City agencies to make informational presentations at meetings. Continue current interactions and develop better working relationships through increased interactions. Identify neighborhood projects and issues of mutual concerns. Establish a business component within the Athmar Park Neighborhood Association. 15

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANLOCATION & HISTORY 17

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LOCATION & HISTORYAthmar Park has become a neighborhood located in the path and along the route to other locations.It is situated west of the South Platte River,with the South Platte River as the east border,having W.Alameda Avenue on the north,S.Federal Boulevard on the west,and W.Mississippi Avenue on the south.The eastern portion of this neighborhood was the southern part of the Town of Valverde. Both Valverde Elementary Schools were built on the south side of West Alameda Avenue.The area west of the river to S.Zuni Street and southerly to W.Mississippi Avenue,was annexed into the City of Denver when the Town of Valverde was annexed in 1902.Some western areas of the neighborhood were identified as eastern areas of Westwood at a time when South Federal Boulevard was only a local street. With the exception of existing Valverde and the Mountain View Park subdivision,Athmar Park was farm land or a rural subdivision of Arapahoe County. According to Valverde town records,what is now W.Alameda Avenue between the South Platte River and S.Tejon Street was the business district for the Town of Valverde.Alameda is a Spanish word meaning Avenue lined with trees.In 1935 W.Alameda Avenue was extended from Denver into Jefferson County intended to be a parkway connection to Red Rocks Park.Before that time,W.Alameda Avenue ended at the old Morrison Road. In 1904,the area to the west of annexed Valverde was divided into the ownership of three owners as part of the C.M.Stebbins Estate,as land owned by N.K.Huston,or as land owned by the State as school land. The parcel of land owned by the State was bordered by W.Alameda Avenue on the north,S.Tejon,S. Pecos,and S.Lipan Streets on the east,by S.Zuni Street to the west,and W.Mississippi Avenue on the south.In 1946,in the largest school land sale to that time,the land was auctioned,and purchased by brothers Thomas and John R.McCusker,who were builders (Rocky Mountain News,May 4,1946).Their subdivision was planned in four units or phases and named Athmar Park. The area west to S.Zuni Street and south to W.Mississippi Avenue,was annexed into the City of Denver as part of Valverde in 1902,and later became part of the Athmar Park Neighborhood.Not all of the school land was developed for housing.Goldrick Elementary School was built and named after O.J.Goldrick, who is credited with Denvers first educational development.Goldrick established the private Union school in 1859 to teach the small number of children in the early community. By the year 1932,the Mountain View Park subdivision had been developed.Located west of S.Zuni Street, it was annexed by Denver in 1943.This new subdivision numbering had started with 2000 at Alcott 18 Valverde School, June class of 1918 Principal Charlotte Godsman and staff of Old Valverde School, 1918: Mrs. Gay, Miss Cora Bliss, Miss Griffith (music), Mrs. Quayle, Mrs. Godsman, Miss Pellinz, Miss Van Landenham. Godsman has an elementary school at Florida and South Tejon named after her. LeonaDeas LeonaDeas

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN 19 Historic Maps 1904 City Tramway Company Map, showing Athmar Park as part of Valverde 1932 Daniel Smith Company Map, showing Athmar Park as part of Denver and Arapahoe CountiesWesternHistoryDepartment,DenverPublicLibraryWesternHistoryDepartment,DenverPublicLibrary

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LOCATION & HISTORYStreet.Although this did not fit with existing numbers along W.Alameda Avenue,the numbering was never adjusted to follow sequentially from Denver to the east,with the result that street numbers between S. Tejon Street and S.Federal Boulevard do not match.Undeveloped area to the south of this housing development continued to be part of Arapahoe County.The Brooks Dairy Farm was to the west,and the homestead farm house and some out-buildings were still located as recently as 1998 on the southwest corner of the S.Federal Boulevard and W.Kentucky Avenue.These buildings were demolished to redevelop the property. With few exceptions,residential areas of the Athmar Park neighborhood are bordered by and adjacent to commercial/industrial development.Between 1956 and 1960 land use on the neighborhood edges changed from residential use to industrial,business,or increased business use.Some of the area to the south and east of the W.Alameda Avenue/S.Zuni Street intersection was set aside for a shopping center, and became Alameda Square.The other shopping centerAthmar Park Shopping Center broke ground in 1954 with Millers Super Market as its anchor store (Denver Post,April 12,1954). On June 16,1965 the Worst Natural Disaster in Denvers Historyoccurred.On that day the South Platte River flooded parts of Southwest Denver,including areas west of the present course of the river in what is now the Athmar Park neighborhood industrial areas and W.Alameda Avenue commercial areas.Although area homes and businesses were destroyed in the flood,the community pulled together under the leadership of Valverde Presbyterian Church Minister Kent O.Mills.The Valverde Presbyterian Church,now the Valverde Community Church,was organized in 1891.It had previously been located at the W.Virginia Avenue/S.Navajo Street intersection,but had moved to higher ground on S.Tejon Street in 1956,and was out of the reach of the flood waters.Reverend Mills organized his congregation and opened the church to provide a base for centralized flood relief and emergency assistance operations. In 1998 some of the older residents gathered to remember the history of the neighborhood and to identify the location of the landmarks and buildings they remember.These residents bought their first houses in Athmar Park and lived through the flood of 1965. The neighborhood was named after the residential subdivisions in the center,on what had been state school land,but there is some mystery as to the source of the name Athmar.According to Ivan Rosenberg,Publisher of the Herald Dispatch,Athmaris composed of the first letters of the first names of Mrs.Perlmutter and Mrs.Burt,whose husbands purchased and built on the land north of West Mississippi Avenue. 20 1400 block of West Nevada, 1921 flood Flood damage, 1965 LeonaDeas RuthFabrizio

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN 21 Historic Map 1948 City of Denver Planning Office, showing Athmar Park developmentWesternHistoryDepartment,DenverPublicLibrary

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LOCATION & HISTORY 22Historic Sites

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANNEIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONS 23

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NEIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONSDEMOGRAPHIC PROFILEAthmar Park neighborhood is divided into two census tracts.Census tract 13.01 includes areas west of S.Tejon Street,from W.Alameda Avenue to W.Mississippi Avenue.Census tract 13.02 includes the industrial area and everything east of S.Tejon,from W.Alameda to W.Mississippi Avenue.According to the 1990 U.S.Census,there were 6,856 people residing in the neighborhood,with an estimated population increase to 6,988 people by 1993.While numbers of households have increased,the total population only increased by one percent between 1990 and 1998,as estimated by Denver Regional Council of Governments.Most of the population increase occurred in the 13.02 or east tract of Athmar Park neighborhood. Median age of the population of the neighborhood has remained fairly stable,and is consistent with the Citys median age.The number of residents between the ages of 45 and 64 has decreased.The number of retired people over age 65 in the neighborhood has increased,indicating that those who moved here 20 to 30 years ago (or longer) may have chosen to remain in Athmar Park. According to the U.S.1990 Census,Athmar Parks total minority population is greater than for the City of Denver overall.Many more Hispanic people have chosen to live in the neighborhood;although Black,Asian,and American Indian populations have remained the same or have decreased in number. The 2000 Census will most likely show the continuing population diversity in the neighborhood,but with a substantial increase in the proportion of population and number of Hispanic people and a decrease in the proportion and number of white and non-Hispanic people. The U.S.Census in 1980 reported minority populations that did not include separate counts for Asians other than Japanese and Vietnamese,or for Cubans,and Eskimos.According to the 1990 Census Data, Athmar Parks resident population had increased in its diversity. 24

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN 25 Southwest Denver Income Comparisons

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NEIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONSAthmar Park is considered to be a stable neighborhood.Housing values have appreciated although not as rapidly as for the city as a whole,and the housing stock has not substantially changed.Median income levels have increased from 1990.Although the Athmar Park Neighborhood median household income averages less than the City of Denver,in relation to surrounding neighborhoods it is substantially higher.It is expected that with continued demand for single family houses in Denver, housing sales volume will keep pace with previous years and housing values will continue to appreciate in the Athmar Park neighborhood. 26 West view in Huston Lake Park

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANCOMMUNITY FACILITIESMedical/HospitalsNo hospitals are located in southwest Denver,however there are many hospitals including Denver Health Medical Center,St.Joseph,PorterCare,St.Anthony,and University Hospitals.There are also many medical and alternative medicine clinics within two miles of the neighborhood.Religious FacilitiesAthmar Park maintains its diversity in the provision of religious facilities including St.Rose of Lima Catholic Church at 1320 W.Nevada Place.Rocky Mountain Church of God at 455 South Platte River Drive.Iglesia Vida Abundante and New Life Fellowship (shared facilities) at 2707 W.Mississippi Avenue, Good Shaped Lutheran Church at 770 South Federal Boulevard,Denver Chinese Alliance Church at 700 South Federal Boulevard ,and the Valverde Community Church at 430 South Tejon Street.Fire ProtectionFire protection is provided by Fire Station #23 located at 850 S.Federal Boulevard.LibraryThe Athmar Park Branch of Denver Public Library is located at 1055 S.Tejon Street at W.Mississippi Avenue.Public SchoolsThe area is served by Valverde,Goldrick,and Monroe Elementary Schools,Rishel Middle School,and Abraham Lincoln High School.There are also parochial and private schools in the neighborhood or within two miles.Off-Leash Dog ParkThere is an off-leash dog park located at Jason and South Platte River Drive behind the Denver Municipal Animal Shelter. 27 Denver Public Library, Athmar Park Branch Goldrick Elementary School Rishel Middle School

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NEIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONSLAND USE AND ZONING The Athmar Park statistical neighborhood contains 760.04 acres of land.Two-thirds of the total acreage is zoned for residential use,over 180 acres is zoned for industrial use,and over 72 acres is zoned for business uses.The R-1 District contains two parks:Huston Lake Park,created from swamp land,and the Clifford Aspgren Park,located on the industrial edge of the residential neighborhood.The only park zoned as open space is Vanderbilt Lake Park.Habitat Park contains the Boy Scout Park,and is located in an industrially zoned district,in an area designated as the South Platte River Greenway.Park and open space area makes up over 40 acres of the neighborhood. Land use is also controlled by two view planes that govern building heights.The Washington Park View plane extends to S.Lipan Street.The Ruby Hill Park View plane cuts diagonally across W.Mississippi Avenue east of S.Tejon Street to south of the Alameda Avenue/Federal Boulevard intersection. Business and industrially zoned areas account for a little over one third of the total 760.04 acres of land in Athmar Park.The commercial retail uses are located along the perimeter.Some grandfatherednonconforming uses still exist in zoned R-1 districts in the neighborhood interior.All industrially zoned areas are located on the east side of the neighborhood,and adjacent to residentially zoned areas.Businesses there include manufacturing companies,print shops,smaller service businesses,and construction related industries.The City of Denver Parks Maintenance and General Services Departments also have space in this area. Most of the business areas are zoned B-4,General Business District,allowing as use by right all business uses,including auto sales and repair and related uses.The B-4 zone district is intended to include a variety of commercial uses,including retail that will serve other businesses.In Athmar Park B-4 Districts are located along W.Alameda Avenue and S.Federal Boulevard. 28 Intersection of Alameda and Federal

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANThe B-3 Shopping Center District is designed to provide retail and services for surrounding residential communities.Two shopping centers are located in Athmar Park.Alameda Square is on the north side and fronts on W.Alameda Avenue.The Alameda Square Shopping Center has a fifty-percent vacancy rate following the departure of Denver Social Services.The site is 19.51 total acres,most of which was formerly occupied by Social Services.The center has continued to change ownership and is presently owned separately by one individual and two distinct groups of owners.The building on the northwest corner was formerly a restaurant,but has stood vacant for over a decade. Land Use by Zone District 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%Zone District AcresCensus Tract Percentage 13.02 4.320.0011.403.360.000.0041.30138.876.65176.8721.210.001.63 13.01 0.314.5331.9512.962.561.110.000.000.00271.0428.141.830.00B1B2B3B4BA1BA3I0 I1**O1R1 *R2 *R2AR3X 29 Valverde Community Church

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Other zoned B-3 Shopping Center Districts are The Athmar Park Shopping Center strip mall located along W.Mississippi Avenue and the strip mall at the S.Federal Boulevard/W.Mississippi Avenue intersection. There are two small areas zoned B-2 Neighborhood Business Districts between W.Exposition and W. Kentucky Avenues.These districts are generally located in areas of high pedestrian traffic and relatively low volume of vehicular traffic,and offer convenient access to adjacent neighborhoods.Along S.Federal Boulevard these B-2 Districts support church,apartment,fast food,and convenience store uses. Industrially zoned areas are situated on the east side of Athmar Park.The I-0 is a Light Industrial and Office District.The I-1 is a General Industrial District.I-0 Districts include uses that are generally compatible with residential uses and the district serves as a buffer between residential areas and the more intensive industrial uses of the I-1 district. Businesses in the industrial area have remained generally unchanged from the time of the 1965 flood that covered this entire area.Companies requiring more space,mostly for parking,moving to other areas outside of the neighborhood,and with some companies finding less expensive quarters elsewhere.The lease rates for properties in the industrial area compare favorable with those of the better industrial locations in Denver,however,there is added advantage in direct access to I-25,and the I-70 corridor, South Santa Fe Drive,and rail lines. 30 South view along South Federal NEIGHBORHOOD CONDITIONS

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN 31 Existing Zoning

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANCOMMERCIAL AREAS 33

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An identification of existing zone districts and current land use suggested the identification of the following subareas to simplify studying the commercial areas:Alameda Square,West Alameda Avenue, South Federal Boulevard,Athmar Park Shopping Center and along W.Mississippi Avenue between S.Quivas and S.Zuni S Streets,and Industrial/commercial area,including east of S.Lipan and S.Navajo Streets. Commercial Subareas: Identification, Character, and Location Sub Area Location/ Boundary Zoning Features/Landmarks Types of Businesses Open Space Characteristics A. Alameda Square 2200 W.Alameda Avenue B-3, B-4 Shopping Center Shopping Center: Retail, new grocery store, restaurants None typical mall retail store fronts, some stores deep inside and hidden from view, back area not visible from W.Alameda Ave. B. Alameda South Platte River to intersection at S.Federal BoulevardB-3, B-4, I-0, PUD(1)No defining landmarks or boundaries, small businesses, large vacant areaSmall retail operations, some professional offices, car dealership/vehicle repair and related some vacant buildings, more auto related businesses replacing those that leave Nonemostly single level buildings having no street parking available, no unifying attribute, little landscaping, little difficult to see and/or access parking, fast moving traffic C. Federal Boulevard South of intersection with W.Alameda Avenue south to W.Mississippi Avenue B-2, B-A-1, B-4, PUD(3), small R-1, B-A-3 Some S.Federal Boulevard Plan standards implemented, PUD Asian Center has a gateway, fast moving traffic, some residential uses and churches, some areas are busy, with crowded parking, and are fairly well defined Restaurants (Asian), some fast food retail related to vehicle or home repair, a few professional offices, retail oriented, some service retail, travel, many businesses consider the area a regional center specifically for the Asian market Along Tennessee beneath power lines churches, some residential buildings (apts., single family), fire station, no defining architecture or landscaping devise, no vacant store fronts in Asian strip malls D. MississippiBusiness district along W.Mississippi Avenue, from S.Zuni to S.Quivas Street B-3, PUD(1), R-3, small R-1Definable area with a school and public library at west end, apartments at east endShopping center, bakery, liquor stores, laundries, govt.offices, gas/convenience stores, restaurants, vacancy for larger store areasLandscaped areas create a sense of some open spacemost businesses are set back from street, and some have landscaping, lots of parking easy to see and access E. Industrial Area and Lipan S.Lipan Street and areas east mostly zoned for industrial use, adjacent to residential areas on the west I-1, B-1, I-2, 0-1(park), B-4, 1-0, PUD (1) Vanderbilt Park located on east side, Aspgren Park on west side, some areas landscaped throughout area and to south of Mississippi Various industrial and warehousing uses, manufacturing, some retail or wholesale outlets, some govt.(Parks, Central Services) mostly construction/design related, some specialized businesses, little long term vacancy Vanderbilt Park, Boy Scout training park Aspgren Park is located adjacent and to the west at W.Exposition Industrial warehousing and manufacturing buildings, some more recent cinderblock and stucco construction with leased office/warehousing /loading dock areas, many right of way areas are not delineated with curb and gutter treatments, along Lipanmostly single level buildings landscaping in front 34COMMERCIAL AREAS

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN 35 Alameda Square / West Alameda Avenue Commercial Area

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36South Federal Boulevard Commercial AreaCOMMERCIAL AREAS

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN 37 West Mississippi Avenue Commercial Area

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38Industrial AreaCOMMERCIAL AREAS

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANCommercial corridors form the boundaries of the Athmar Park Statistical Neighborhood.These corridors serve and separate the Athmar Park residential neighborhoods from the residential areas of Valverde across W.Alameda Avenue and the community of Westwood across S.Federal Boulevard.Ruby Hill residential areas to the south are adjacent to residential areas in Athmar Park.Businesses within the commercial corridors contribute to the areas physical appearance and economic health.Businesses on both sides of the commercial corridors,S.Federal Boulevard,W.Mississippi Avenue,and W.Alameda Avenue,have been included in the study and were surveyed for planning purposes. The Planning Group determined the following areas of focus: traffic,transportation,and parking safety and security economic situation and revitalization urban design and streetscaping 39

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TRANSPORTATION, TRAFFIC AND PARKINGThe City and County of Denver classifies its streets using criteria which includes function,access,street and right-of-way width,traffic volume,and signalization.Denver Transportation Engineers have identified three types of streets in the Athmar Park neighborhood:arterials,collectors,and local streets.Arterial streets have the primary function of carrying through traffic,up to 50,000 vehicles per day,and also provide access to adjacent property.Collector streets carry up to 15,000 vehicles per day and provide for the distribution of traffic within neighborhoods and to adjacent properties.A local street is not normally a through street,and its primary function is to provide access to adjacent property.Local streets carry low volumes of traffic,or less than 5000 vehicles per day. The Athmar Park neighborhood is bordered by arterial streets on the north,west and south:W.Alameda Avenue,S.Federal Boulevard,and W.Mississippi Avenue,respectively.W.Alameda Avenue and S.Federal Boulevard are State Routes or Highways.The State of Colorado does not have any plans to widen or to reconstruct either of these streets and the City and County of Denver is responsible for their maintenance and appearance. W.Alameda Avenue has three west bound lanes and two east bound lands between South Platte River Drive and S.Federal Boulevard.Traffic on W.Alameda Avenue tends to use the center most lanes from S. Tejon Street east to S.Lipan Street to avoid climbing and/or dropping off the humped intersection pavement at the S.Raritan,S.Pecos,and S.Navajo Street intersections with W.Alameda Avenue.Although past efforts towards increasing capacity on this roadway have occurred,the asphalt mounding at intersections,caused by repeated paving at intersections of local streets makes vehicular use of the outside lanes very difficult.These intersections need to be rotomilled back from the intersections and paved to the level of W.Alameda Avenue.There are future long range plans for widening this stretch of road,and DRCOG has designated W.Alameda Avenue as eligible for reconstruction funding. W.Mississippi Avenue has been paved in concrete for most of its distance on the south edge of the neighborhood;however,the roadway from S.Zuni Street to S.Federal Boulevard needs some restoration. 40 COMMERCIAL AREASIntersection of Alameda and Federal before reconstruction

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN 41 Traffic Control Map Arterial street: primary function of carrying through traffic and provides access to abutting property. Collector Street: primary function of distributing traffic within neighborhoods, carries through traffic and provides access to abutting property. Local Street: primary function of providing access to abutting property and does not normally carry through traffic.

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COMMERCIAL AREASMost adjacent development along W.Mississippi Avenue from S.Zuni Street to S.Federal Boulevard is residential.Commercial establishments,and the Denver Public Library at S.Tejon Street,have landscaped parking areas.Between S.Raritan Street and S.Lipan Street,commercial and residential property owners have not maintained or improved the public right-of-way.In the industrial area streetscaping and improved pedestrian areas occur when property is redeveloped. Five major collector streets run through the neighborhood:S.Tejon Street,S.Lipan Street,S.Jason Street and part of S.Zuni Street,north to south,and W.Exposition and W.Kentucky Avenues,east to west.S.Tejon Street,S.Lipan Street,and W.Exposition Avenue provide connections through the residential neighborhood.S.Jason Street is located in the east industrial area and,with S.Huron Street,carries the business through traffic.Many of the streets in the industrial area have been or are scheduled for asphalt overlay within the next two years. Some of the local streets on the neighborhood s west side,S.Eliot Street,S.Decatur Street,and S.Clay Street,have cut-through commuter traffic,causing them to appear to be collector streets;particularly when the S.Federal Boulevard/W.Alameda Avenue intersection backs up.This problem has been mitigated somewhat following redesign and improvements at that intersection. Speed limits vary from arterial to arterial and on collectors,and some streets require more speed limit enforcement than do others.Along S.Federal Boulevard traffic may travel up to 40 mph,though rarely at rush hour.On W.Alameda Avenue 35 mph is the limit.On W.Mississippi Avenue,speed limits are posted and traffic may not exceed 30 mph,but often does west bound.In the industrial area,S.Lipan Street and S.Jason Street speed limits are set at 25 mph and 30 mph,respectively.S.Federal Boulevard and W. Alameda Avenue are both state highways,and S.Federal Boulevard is a parkway.Generally,traffic tends to be faster on W.Alameda Avenue as it connects with Morrison Road for destinations southwest. The Regional Transportation District provides bus service around and through the neighborhood.Bus service on W.Mississippi Avenue connects with Light Rail Transit.W.Alameda Avenue is served by a cross-town bus.Regional Transportation District also routes buses on W.Exposition Avenue. 42 North view along South Federal from West Mississippi

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANSAFETY AND SECURITYMost businesses surveyed indicated that the business area appearance is important,and they are concerned about graffiti vandalism and its removal from the area;and to a lesser extent street lighting. The Industrial area closes down after 6:00pm Monday through Friday,and is very quiet on weekends, particularly in non-retail/wholesale areas.There is activity on weekends at and around businesses serving the home improvement or auto repair customer,including lumber yards,tile and carpet outlets,paint and hardware stores,and tire and auto parts stores.Commercial retail areas are active all week from open to close of business.Crime StatisticsIn April 1998,Neighborhood Crime Rankings were issued and the Athmar Park Neighborhood was 9th out of 72 up from a ranking of 25 in 1996.In general it would appear that crime is decreasing overall in the neighborhood,although crime rates had increased since 1990 (88.0) to a statistical high in 1997 (120.6).All crime rates in Athmar Park increased after 1990 and reached a high mark in 1997,except for burglary and larceny,which peaked in 1996,and crime rates have decreased significantly for burglary (53.3-1996;32.7-1998).Rates are generally consistent from 1996 to 1997 for murder and aggravated assault with no reported increase in these categories.The All Other classification of crime includes graffiti vandalism reported offenses.That rate nearly doubled within the last seven years,from 23.7 in 1990 to 45.2 in 1997,and is much higher than the citywide rate (33.1-Athmar Park;30.0-Denver),which has been much more consistent. When compared to citywide rates in Denver,the neighborhood appears to be doing better as far as larceny rates are concerned (18.1-Athmar Park;27.8-Denver).For other crimes,except for murder,Athmar Park s crime rate has been greater than overall percentages for the City of Denver,and while the City s total offenses begin to decrease after 1996,Athmar Park total offences do not show a decrease in total offenses until 1998.Should 1998 total offense levels be maintained,the neighborhood will experience less crime than before 1990 and considerably less crime than in the last half of the 1990 s. 43

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1998 Crime Statistics Crime Rates per 1000 people Athmar Park City of Denver Total Offenses 86.3 82.3 Murder 0.1 0.1 Sexual Assault/Rape 0.6 1.4 Aggravated Assault 3.8 2.9 Robbery 1.7 2 Burglary 32.7 27.9 Larceny 18.1 27.8 Auto Theft 15.9 11.4 All other (includes Graffiti vandalism)33.1 30NOTE: Population for 1990 uses 1985 population figures. 1996 and 1997 use 1990 population figures. Burglary offenses per 1000 households. Larceny includes both petty and grand larceny. Sexual assault offenses per 1000 females. Source: Research and Development Bureau, Denver Police Dept.In 1999,the DPD District 4 Statistical Unit reported that Athmar Park had the greatest decrease in reported crime of any Denver neighborhood.With the establishment of the City of Denver Graffiti Task force and subsequent implementation of the Public Works Graffiti Removal Program,it is expected that the number of reported graffiti vandalism offenses will decrease. 44 COMMERCIAL AREAS

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANECONOMIC SITUATION AND REVITALIZATIONResidents of Athmar Park,concerned about the economic health of the community,requested a study of the commercial areas.Most businesses surveyed also expressed concern for economic development.Businesses also felt there is need for additional business recruitment in the area.An examination of the commercial areas was required in order to analyze the economic health and situation of the neighborhood. Information on commercial leasing rates provides an indication of the economic health of business establishments in the Athmar Park neighborhood.In the industrially zoned areas,particularly for those located in east Athmar Park,lease rates are generally above the average for Denver and there are few vacancies overall.Some business owners are choosing to expand and redevelop their operations at the present neighborhood location.Other businesses have done well in Athmar Park,but need more space in which to expand.Industrial buildings are generally leased quickly due to nearby I-25 and rail transit corridors on the east side of the neighborhood. There are more vacancies along the three commercial corridors.Along W.Alameda Avenue,the vacant buildings tend to be reused by additional used vehicle dealerships.There are long standing vacant shops on W.Mississippi Avenue,but property owners appear to be more willing to wait for tenants who are willing to lease space,and to also pay for improvements to that space.Although there are vacancies along S.Federal Boulevard,that location continues to generate interest and reinvestment because leasing rates are generally lower than the Denver average.Investors appear to see this area as a good place in which to start a new business,and the Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA) actively promotes faade renovation through its urban renewal programs.There has been significant progress in redevelopment of S.Federal Boulevard commercial sites with the continued efforts of DURA in this area.That effort is expected to continue as the program becomes better known to businesses in the area. 45 Businesses along Tennessee in the Industrial Area

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COMMERCIAL AREASSales/Use Tax Revenue data was analyzed.This information would tend to indicate if,over time,businesses in the area have become less viable.The information was used to help identify which parts of the commercial sector have had the most significant and/or historical sales and use tax contribution.An analysis of collected sales tax,by years,shows the steady,if not large contribution of Athmar Park businesses to the general Denver economy.Total tax received indicates a steady increase reflecting a steady increase in sales.Sales/Use Tax Comparison: Athmar Park 1993 1995 1997 Athmar Park% of Athmar Park% of Athmar Park% of Industry Denver Total Denver Total Denver Total Construction552,7451.78450,5601.74433,0461.57 Gen Mdse-Dept.Stores30,7450.2312,9600.0933,0870.23 Grocery/Deli13,0090.1510,9040.1213,4700.15 Auto-Dealers/Accs193,6480.42276,5350.53344,1870.96 Apparel35,2270.4241,7170.4864,9740.77 Furniture/Office Equip220,7250.65273,0540.68398,7470.86 Eating/Drinking272,5980.78257,4830.63299,1450.62 Misc.& Specialty258,2260.32326,7220.38375,4950.64 Totals 1,576,596 1,649,935 1,962,151 % of Denver Total Sales/Use0.62 0.6 0.63Source: Denver Treasury Division,City of DenverWhile the contribution from the commercial corridors and the industrial area have remained fairly constant,collections of sales and use taxes indicate there has been a shift in the sectors generating the sales and use taxes.Less use tax was generated in 1997 for the construction sector than in previous years.This decrease has been offset by increases in apparel,furniture and office equipment,eating facilities and the miscellaneous and specialty sectors.The change in sectors generating sales and use taxes to more service oriented businesses indicates a change in the type of employment opportunities offered by business and industry in the neighborhood.However,the 46 Businesses along South Federal

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANshift in types of businesses does not suggest any change from regionally serving business to primarily neighborhood serving businesses. Generation of sales tax has increased for auto dealers,for those who sell automotive accessories,and other related businesses.Sales taxes generated have doubled for the auto dealer sector since 1993, accounting for almost 20% of the total sales/use taxes generated for the Athmar Park Neighborhood. This percentage should increase as the number of used auto dealerships in the neighborhood continues to increase. The grocery/deli and eating/drinking sectors combined account for about 15% of the total sales taxes generated.There is no large food chain store within the neighborhood.The chain retail businesses that exist in the neighborhood are limited to fast food,convenience stores,and those that provide service and parts for vehicles. Many businesses in the Athmar Park neighborhood see themselves as regional front range businesses. According to the commercial survey,only the fast food,convenience stores,small food markets,bars, and auto related businesses view their customer as generally local or from within the neighborhoods adjacent to their location.For the other businesses,the Denver area,including Southwest Denver,is where the customer is located;and two companies state they are not local concerns and have an international customer base. Businesses surveyed in Athmar Park indicate there is a variety of employment available,mostly in entry level and service positions.Businesses employ all types of workers:office,skilled and unskilled labor,professionally licensed/certified,managerial,and service workers.Most of the skilled labor is employed in automotive/transportation and related work performing repairs.There are managerial positions of various levels in businesses that are not owned by an individual or family. By area,the manufacturing jobs are found generally in the Industrial area,with a few manufacturing firms on S.Federal Boulevard and W.Alameda Avenue.Much of the wholesale type business is also located in the Industrial area.Retail operations,although located in all areas,are more concentrated along the W.Alameda Avenue,S.Federal Boulevard,and W.Mississippi Avenue corridors. In the decade between the 1983 U.S.Census and the 1993 U.S.Census,the Athmar Park neighborhood had a net loss of just 26 jobs.Industries that lost jobs in that decade were those in the construction,wholesale trades,and the service sectors.The public utilities and transportation 47 Businesses on South Platte River Drive in the Industrial Area

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and manufacturing sectors gained jobs.The retail trade sector had mixed results:in the west census tract there was a decrease in jobs,in the east,an increase.The remaining sectors did not experience such fluctuation in employee positions.Smaller building contractors left the area,but some manufacturing businesses expanded their operations.Overall,employment opportunities remained steady during the past two decades. The businesses surveyed do not always provide parking for their employees,and some do not have specified parking for the customer.Businesses located in the shopping centers,the industrial area,and some of the larger strip malls generally say they have enough parking. 48 COMMERCIAL AREAS Businesses along West Mississippi

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANURBAN DESIGN AND STREETSCAPING FOR THE CORRIDORSMany businesses along the corridors surrounding the Athmar Park Neighborhood claim not to depend on walk in business.Pedestrian connections have not been important,and the sidewalks are not attractive or have been perceived to be unsafe for pedestrians.Sidewalks along local streets and the collectors,in comparison,are much safer and are more attractive within the residential neighborhood. A survey of businesses located in the Athmar Park Neighborhood indicated that the control of graffiti vandalism is the most common and most stated concern.Corridor location appears to determine other responses to the survey.Along S.Federal Boulevard priorities most often identified included improving the appearance of commercial properties,promoting economic development,rebuilding the street.Businesses located along W.Mississippi Avenue stated that promoting economic development is most important with business recruitment and commercial area beautification as secondary concerns.According to the survey,W.Alameda Avenue businesses first priority is for commercial area beautification and streetscaping.Their second priority is for economic development.Other concerns include business area appearance,sidewalk maintenance,and residential area appearance.The businesses surveyed in the industrial area were most dissatisfied with the control of graffiti vandalism and street maintenance.Of the possible projects their first priority is for commercial area beautification and streetscaping;the second is a facelift of individual commercial properties;and the third is the promotion of economic development. Streetscaping projects require the establishment of a maintenance district and the participation of businesses and property owners directly benefiting from the improvements.Prior to City of Denver budgeting streetscaping funds,businesses and property owners will need to organize and form a maintenance district.However,most business owners did not indicate that formation of either a business association or a business improvement/maintenance district arrangement is a priority. 49 East view along West Alameda

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South Federal BoulevardThis plan does not replace the Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan.The Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan proposes that S.Federal Boulevard between W.Alameda and W.Mississippi Avenues be widened to six lanes in both direction,with a raised median and limited left turn lanes.The road itself is rapidly deteriorating with the steadily increasing traffic it carries.S.Federal Boulevard is State Highway 88,and is designated by Denver as a parkway.Redeveloping businesses along the corridor are required to install right of way improvements and to provide setbacks as specified by the Corridor Plan and parkway requirements. Parking along S.Federal Boulevard is extremely limited generally,and there will be little room remaining for parking when the road is widened.Residents of both Westwood and Athmar Park neighborhoods are concerned about the increased traffic that is generated when customers access side streets to find additional parking in the residential area of the neighborhoods.Although the residents would like to have business parking access limited,they would also be concerned if residential access from South Federal Boulevard and side street residential parking were also limited. Many Asian business owners have subdivided existing buildings,resulting in an increased demand for the already limited and finite number of available spaces.In order to have enough parking,businesses may have to purchase adjacent buildings,demolish them,and create parking lots.Other alternatives could include working with developers to build and remodel office and retail space to suit available parking,or vacating local streets,such as at W.Tennessee,W.Ohio,W.Center,and W.Virginia Avenues,and using the paved areas for business parking.West Alameda AvenueCustomer parking is also a problem for businesses along W.Alameda Avenue.Commercial buildings were constructed on short lots or have been expanded leaving little parking,except in the front setback areas. Some businesses have located in houses,which were never intended to be commercial establishments, and now impact the adjacent residential areas.The combination of setback and location on hillsides facing the street requires creative use of space to accommodate customers and employees.Many employees and customers must park on side streets.Parking for many businesses is in front and accessible only by driving through the pedestrian area,which creates a safety issue for pedestrian traffic. Design Guidelines for W.Alameda Avenue,developed by the Planning Group,follow the template used for the reconstruction of the S.Federal Boulevard and W.Alameda Avenue intersection.Guidelines recognize 50 COMMERCIAL AREAS East view along West Mississippi

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANthe need for a consistent appearance of well maintained buildings and enforced parking and landscaping regulations.Businesses and new developments have not always followed signage,parking,and landscaping requirements or have tended to provide very basic landscaping.Over time,this has resulted in an unorganized and highly cluttered streetscape,and presents difficulty for potential customers to see and to find businesses.West Mississippi AvenueThe Athmar Park Shopping Center and the Texaco convenience store are well landscaped.When viewed in connection with the Athmar Park Branch Library and Goldrick Elementary School,this area along W. Mississippi Avenue appears to be doing well.The road has also been improved.However,businesses to the east and to the south across the street have not upgraded their building facades and some do not have room for street trees.Industrial East AreaThe industrial area on the neighborhood s east side is neither dependent on nor connected to the residential neighborhood.The businesses,many of which are manufacturing concerns,are regional sources of goods and services.Some of the smaller businesses in this area are here because it is appropriately zoned for their uses.In the industrial area,sidewalks appear to be almost incidental with the existence of many,wide curb cuts,few street trees,and businesses that are interested primarily in the transportation access afforded by geographic location. 51 Athmar Park Shopping Center

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANACTION AGENDA 53

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Have Alameda Square,W.Alameda and S.Federal Blvd Small Business Servicesdesignated as Neighborhood Revitalization Areas Council District Offices Community Planning and Development Agency Encourage mixed-use development and identify appropriateProperty Ownersareas along the transit corridors for mixed zoningBusinesses Community Planning and Development Agency Develop a mechanism for conducting a periodic consumer Community Planning and Development AgencysurveyNeighborhood Groups Develop a database of existing businesses that will identify:Businesses At risk businessesProperty Owners Business issues,concerns,needs and possible remediesCommunity Planning and Development Agency Businesses interested in a business associationMayor s Office of Economic Development Similar products and servicesand International Trade Businesses that may benefit from cooperative effortsSmall Business Administration Study the possibility of developing marketing plan Businessesfor commercial areasSmall Business Services Provide technical assistance and referral to business ownersMayor s Office of Economic Development Small Business Administration Review redevelopment in the context of the Denver ComprehensiveCommunity Planning and Development AgencyPlan goals,rules and regulations adopted by the Denver PlanningPublic WorksBoard,and policies and standards developed by Development Wastewater ManagementReview Committee membership departments and agencies other reviewing agencies Identify realtors,bankers,etc.,who will market the commercial Mayor s Office of Economic Developmentand industrial areas for redevelopment and for appropriate and International Tradeneighborhood-serving retailSmall Business Services Denver Urban Renewal Authority Chamber of Commerce 54 ACTION AGENDA 1 Encourage and promote business growth, revitalization and development in the commercial areas along the Athmar Park neighborhood edges and in the industrial area. Businesses along Lipan in the Industrial Area

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN Free advertising in APNA newsletter for new businessesNeighborhood Groups Acknowledge businesses in the neighborhood area through Neighborhood Groupsthe newsletter and articles in the Herald Dispatch Develop joint projects with businesses such as Businessesa weekend scavenger hunt to promote residential Neighborhood Groupsshopping of businesses located in Athmar Park Encourage neighborhood use of businesses,such as an APNA Businessesbuyers card discount to promote repeat visits,and having businessNeighborhood Groupssigns in languages commonly used by neighborhood residents such as Spanish,Chinese,Vietnamese and English Distribute newsletter to all new businessesNeighborhood Groups Develop business directoryBusinesses Neighborhood Groups 55 2 Develop interaction and communication opportunities within the neighborhood between the businesses and residents. 1205 West Alameda, 1954 RuthFabrizio

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ACTION AGENDA Meet regularly with elected officials to inform them of Neighborhood GroupsAthmar Park issues and concerns regarding land use, zoning,and public welfare issues Develop Welcome to New Businesses PacketNeighborhood Groups 56 3 Improve interaction and communication between all sectors of Athmar Park and governmental agencies. Valverde Elementary School

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN Continue to work with Councilmembers,Public Works,and the Neighborhood GroupsPolice to maintain public streets and alleys and resolve the graffiti Public Worksvandalism problem through prevention and removal effortsCouncil District Office Denver Police Department,District 4 Continue to meet with Denver Police Department personnel:Council District OfficeDistrict 4 Captain to request additional patrols,staffing,safety Neighborhood Groupschecks for businesses,and information on staffing policies,and Denver Police Department,District 4Traffic Operations Supervisors for increased patrols of S.Federal Denver Police Department Traffic OperationsBoulevard for cruising and traffic tie ups Visit and survey those in neighborhood who have experienced Neighborhood Groupsgraffiti vandalism and other crimes,and provide Denver Police Department,District 4notification of available services Organize a relations task force to perform community Neighborhood Groupssocial outreachCouncil District Office Mayors Office on Human Relations 57 4 Advocate continued maintenance and improvement of community safety and services. West view in Huston Lake Park

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Develop and maintain contacts with possible funding sources,Council District Officeparticularly for seed money for streetscaping and corridor Community Planning and Development Agencyredevelopment projectsMayor s Office of Economic Development and International Trade Public Works Create a Plan Implementation Committee of interested residentsAthmar Park Neighborhood Associationand businesses to meet regularly as part of the Athmar Park BusinessesNeighborhood Association Board Meetings Create a calendar/listing of grants and schedulesNeighborhood Groups 58 ACTION AGENDA 5 Implementation strategy.An example of the Industrial edge adjacent to existing residential development

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN Identify cultural concepts/traditions/heritage of neighborhood Neighborhood Groupsbusiness and residential population,and apply for Neighborhood BusinessesCultures of Denver and other grants to fund culturally relatedCouncil District Officeprojects such as festivals and cultural/social activities and Parks and Recreationprograms to promote the neighborhood Neighborhood Cultures of Denver Mayors Office of Art,Culture,and Film Identify and maintain the neighborhood commercial/residential Neighborhood Groupsedge and continue to monitor zoning change and variance Community Planning and Development Agencyrequests to ensure continuity of existing R-1 and R-2 zoning Obtain approval to design and place neighborhood signs at Neighborhood Groupsneighborhood gateway areas,and work to provide appropriate Public Worksplantings at signage locationsUrban Design/CPDA Maintain existing residential R-1 and R-2 zoning in the neighborhoodNeighborhood Groupsexcept for sites that front on S.Federal Boulevard and W.AlamedaCouncil District OfficeAvenue and which do not extend beyond mid block into Community Planning and Development Agencyresidentially zoned area Continue to monitor zoning change,variance,street and alley Neighborhood Groupsvacation,and conditional use requests to ensure the continuity andCouncil District Officecharacter of the neighborhood in all zone districtsCommunity Planning and Development Agency Encourage businesses to continue to beautify frontage areas (e.g.useBusinesses/ Property Ownersof street trees,flower boxes and planters,and street furniture)Denver Urban Renewal Authority Develop urban design concepts,including buffering strategies,for Urban Design/CPDAzoned industrial uses adjacent to residential areas Determine locations of residential streets and alleys where Neighborhood Groupsadditional lighting is needed,and work with residents and Public Service to add lighting Continue to work with Denver Public Schools to upgrade and Neighborhood Groupsmaintain school groundsDenver Public Schools Attract additional APNA membershipAthmar Park Neighborhood Association Make a video of the neighborhoodAthmar Park Neighborhood Association Office of Television and Internet Services 59 6 Promote neighborhood stability, support preservation of the neighborhood character, and create a sense of place. Old Valverde Elementary School, early 1900s

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Alameda Square Action AgendaSub AreaAlameda SquareLocation2200 W.Alameda Avenue ZoningB-3,B-4Types of BusinessesRetail,former location of Social Services Offices,many vacant shops,new grocery storeCharacteristicsShopping Center with lots of surface parking,little landscapingGoalsRevitalization and/or redevelopment of shopping center and creative reuse of site Encourage and support of existing businesses growth,revitalization, and development efforts ACTION AGENDA 60 Support and advocate mixed use and total site redevelopment involving all ownersDevelop a streetscaping concept to create a sense of place for the shopping center and to enhance the W.Alameda commercial corridor Continue to communicate neighborhood interest in the shopping center and ownersInvolve owners in neighborhood related activities when appropriate Property OwnersBusiness OwnersCPDADURACouncil District OfficeMOED/IT Property OwnersBusinessesMOED/ITNeighborhood GroupsDURA AS1Continue to meet with current owners regarding the development of an overall plan for the shopping center site redevelopmentAS2Study rezoning the area from B-3 to CMU 10 to encourage mixed uses and the possibility of redeveloping the back part of the site for market rate and affordable housing and related usesAS3Encourage center owners and businesses to address parking lot and entry landscaping in both the short and long termAS4Explore the ways the City can assist in financing a finalized development plan for the shopping centerAS5Explore the development of an identifying attribute/logo or defining element of the centerAS6Develop design guidelines,options and alternatives for building facades and landscaping in the center and to relate to W.Alameda Avenue AS7Continue to encourage communication between property ownersAS8Plan mutually beneficial activities,including special events,with business and shopping center owners to promote businesses and the neighborhoodAS9Continue and increase Mayor s Office of Economic Development and International Trade,Small Business Services and DURA involvement and participation in fa ade upgrade and business improvement programsOBJECTIVES STRATEGICACTIONPLAN IMPLEMENTOR Abbreviations: MOED/IT Mayors Office of Economic Development and International Trade; CPDA Community Planning and Development Agency; DURA Denver Urban Renewal Authority; DPD Denver Police Department

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN 61 West Alameda Avenue Action AgendaLocationSouth Platte River west to the intersection at South Federal Boulevard ZoningB-3,B-4,I-0,PUD(1)Types of BusinessesSmall retail operations,second hand stores,some professional and non-profit offices,fast food and sit down restaurants,car dealership/vehicle repair and relatedCharacteristicsMostly single level buildings having no street parking available, no unifying attribute,little landscapingGoalsPromote the economic stability/redevelopment of commercial area Encourage and promote business growth,revitalization, and development Promote improvement the appearance of business properties to attract new consumers Improve interaction and communication with businesses Promote continued maintenance and improvement of corridor and street to enhance the area and to promote it as an attractive place to do business Implement basic streetscaping concept utilized at Federal/Alameda intersection reconfiguration Develop additional streetscaping guidelines to create a sense of place for the commercial corridor Develop a plan for acquiring the Valverde Community Building and rehabilitating it for office use and meeting space Encourage an increased Regional Transportation District presence along the corridor DevelopersProperty OwnersRealtorsMOED/ITArea Bankers BusinessesMOED/IT DURACouncil District OfficesCPDA Chamber of CommerceBusinessesProperty OwnersNeighborhood Groups BusinessesProperty OwnersPublic WorksWastewater Neighborhood GroupsBusinessesZoning AdministrationCouncil District OfficeCPDANeighborhood GroupPublic Service Company Neighborhood GroupsColorado Historical SocietyDenver Landmark Commission Regional Transportation DistrictNeighborhood GroupsBusinesses WA1Encourage development of office uses/buildingsWA2Work with businesses to organize and produce a marketing planWA3Contact realtors and bankers,and encourage increased investment along the corridor WA4Organize a meeting of Alameda corridor businesses with Mayor s Office of Economic Development and International Trade,Small Business ServicesWA5Coordinate efforts with DURA to fund restoration of building facades,and interior renovationWA6Continue to research and advocate for funding opportunities for corridor improvements WA7Develop a merchants association and/or Chamber of CommerceWA8Support businesses in newsletterWA9Encourage business employment of neighborhood residents WA10Explore with businesses the formation of Alameda Avenue improvement and maintenance districtsWA11Rottomill and reconstruct drainage at Navajo, Pecos,and Raritan intersections to improve capacity of street WA12Explore the development of an identifying attribute/logo or defining element of corridorWA13Request CIP funding to implement basic streetscaping conceptWA14Investigate limiting the number,size,height of existing/new billboards along the corridorWA15Require landscaping for all new developments and redevelopmentWA16Develop streetscaping design guidelines,options and alternatives for landscaping along the corridorWA17Request additional appropriate lighting WA18Request undergrounding of utilities WA19Research funding alternatives for acquisition of buildingWA20Promote dialog with present owner WA21Advocate increased use of Regional Transportation District by commuter trafficWA22Request establishment of a park and ride area at Alameda SquareOBJECTIVES STRATEGICACTIONPLAN IMPLEMENTOR

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South Federal Boulevard Action AgendaLocationSouth of intersection with Alameda south to Mississippi AvenueZoningB-2, B-A-1,B-4,PUD(3),small R-1Types of BusinessesEthnic restaurants,some "fast food",retail related to vehicle or home repair,bridal,Asian owned professional offices and small retail operations,junk yardCharacterisitcsChurches,some residential buildings (apts.,single family),fire station,no defining architecture or landscaping devise,the dedicated street right-of-way is 100 feet, except for the half block south of Tennessee that has 80 feet of dedicated right-of-wayGoalsPromote the economic stability of South Federal Boulevard ACTION AGENDA 62 Encourage and support business growth, revitalization,and development Promote improvement in appearance of business properties to attract new consumers Transportation EngineeringCDOTTransportation PlanningCPDABusinessesCouncil District OfficeNeighborhood Groups DURA,Council District OfficeNeighborhood GroupsPublic Works, Neighborhood Groups, Council District Office, Police Dept.District 4Transportation Planning, CPDA SF1Support the implementation of the existing South Federal Boulevard Corridor Plan through requests for Capital Improvement Projects and Transportation Improvement Project funding through Denver Regional Council of GovernmentsSF2Perform a parking studySF3Encourage,and assist as requested,the organization of business association SF4support,and promote as requested,the implementation of the DURA fa ade improvement program SF5provide information on Denver Digs Trees to businesses as appropriateSF6continue efforts to assist in maintaining appearance of the corridor through graffiti removal and general clean-up participationSF7identify appropriate site for future customer parking areasOBJECTIVES STRATEGICACTIONPLAN IMPLEMENTOR Abbreviations: MOED/IT Mayors Office of Economic Development and International Trade; CPDA Community Planning and Development Agency; DURA Denver Urban Renewal Authority; DPD Denver Police Department

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN 63 West Mississippi Avenue Action AgendaLocationMississippi Business district along W.Mississippi from Zuni to QuivasZoningB-3,PUD(1),R-3,small R-1Types of BusinessesShopping center,bakery,liquor stores,small retail operations, laundries,govt.offices, gas/convenience stores, restaurants,auto repair and relatedCharacteristicsSurrounded by a residential neighborhood,most businesses are set back from street,and some have landscaping,lots of parking readily apparentGoalsPromote the economic stability of the West Mississippi Avenue Commercial Section StreetscapingPromote the development and use of streetscaping to create a sense of place for the commercial section of West Mississippi Avenue Commercial aspectEncourage and promote business growth, revitalization,and developmentEncourage neighborhood support of local merchants Require all season landscaping buffering and solid fences where residential and commercial areas interface Maintenance/securityPromote continued maintenance and improvement of corridor to enhance the area and to promote it as an attractive place to do businessImprove safety and security along the corridor Property Owners, BusinessesPublic WorksUrban Design-CPDA Property OwnersRealtorsBusinessesMOED/ITCPDA BusinessesProperty OwnersPublic WorksCPDAZoning AdministrationNeighborhood Inspection ServicesTransportation EngineeringDPD District 4Denver Public SchoolsNeighborhood Groups WM1Extend the existing landscaping treatment of Athmar Park Shopping Center to businesses east along Mississippi and across MississippiWM2Explore establishing a local improvement district to pursue additional options,alternatives,and locations for landscaping and bufferingWM3Develop an identifying attribute/logo or defining element for this commercial areaWM4Require landscaping for all redevelopment and change of useWM5Maintain existing detached sidewalks and tree lawn template and require detached sidewalks for all new and redeveloped areas on the W.Mississippi Avenue corridor WM6Encourage leasing and reuse or redevelopment of vacant spaces for neighborhood serving businessesWM7Encourage businesses to organize and conduct joint advertising projects to promote this commercial areaWM8Assist businesses to utilize the APNA newsletter for business promotion to neighborhood residentsWM9Require implementation of landscaping and fencing requirements at parking redevelopment or change of use WM10Explore the possibility of establishing a maintenance district to support additional streetscapingWM11Encourage and work with existing businesses to identify and address maintenance issues in and around parking areas,including the graffiti and trash problem in the alleyways and parking lotsWM12Advocate the sensitive enforcement of code requirementsWM13Work with Traffic Engineering to regulate traffic signals at intersections to accommodate various pedestrian speedsWM14Promote traffic/bike/pedestrian safety programs for branch library users and Goldrick Elementary studentsOBJECTIVES STRATEGICACTIONPLAN IMPLEMENTOR

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Industrial Area Action AgendaLocationS.Lipan Street east to South Platte River,between Alameda and Mississippi,mostly zoned for industrial useZoningI-1,B-1,I-2,0-1(park),B-4 Lipan:1-0,PUD(1)Types of BusinessesVarious industrial uses, warehousing,manufacturing,some retail and/or wholesale outlets, some govt.(Parks,Central Services.) Lipan:mostly construction/design related,some are specialized businesses,some auto repair and auto parts related businessesCharacteristicsIndustrial warehousing and manufacturing buildings,some more recent cinderblock and stucco construction with leased office/warehousing /loading dock areas,many right of way areas are not delineated with curb and gutter treatments;Lipan:has mostly single level buildings with some landscaping in frontGoalsPromote the economic stability and encourage continued business growth. Recognize the historical location of the area. ACTION AGENDA 64 Encourage and support business growth, revitalization,and developmentRequire all season buffering and fences where residential and commercial areas interface Promote continued maintenance and improvement of corridor to enhance the area and to promote it as an attractive place to do businessImprove safety and security for businesses in the area Promote recognition of past events BusinessesCPDACouncil District OfficeMOED/IT Public WorksBusiness OwnersProperty OwnersCouncil District OfficeCPDAZoning AdministrationNeighborhood Inspection ServicesDPD District 4 Neighborhood GroupPublic WorksPublic ServiceCouncil District Office IA1Encourage businesses to hire local residentsIA2Continue to research and advocate for funding opportunities for area improvementsIA3Encourage similar or complementary businesses to develop marketing/interaction strategies where possibleIA4Continue to monitor conditional usesIA5Explore the formation of improvement and maintenance districts,or other business related organizations. IA6Identify streets and public right of way areas in need of street repair,curb and gutter work,and establish appropriate pedestrian access according to Denver standardsIA7Encourage existing businesses to landscape parking and entrance areas and require landscaping of all new developmentsIA8Support enforcement of zoning requirements for industrial areas regarding parking requirements, lighting and signage,and conditional usesIA9Encourage area businesses to request police review and analysis of business security IA10Identify areas impacted by the 1965 flood and mark the height of floodwaters on lampposts and utility polesOBJECTIVES STRATEGICACTIONPLAN IMPLEMENTOR Abbreviations: MOED/IT Mayors Office of Economic Development and International Trade; CPDA Community Planning and Development Agency; DURA Denver Urban Renewal Authority; DPD Denver Police Department

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANAPPENDIX 65

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APPENDIXMETHODOLOGY AND SURVEYMethodologyAthmar Park is divided into two census tracts:13.01,west of South Tejon Street,and 13.02,east of South Tejon Street.Information obtained from the 1990 Census and DRCOG estimates on housing, employment,household income,and population numbers,income,race and national origin,was analyzed to develop a demographic profile of the neighborhood. Land use,zoning,and property data was obtained from the Denver Community Planning and Development Agency s Land Use and Zoning Files and from the Assessor s Office.This information was used to determine the acreage amount and type of land uses in Athmar Park.Land uses and changes in business activities were researched and tracked through field survey work and with the Assessor s Office information.Information concerning property ownership,location of residence of property owners, valuation of parcels,and square-footage and acreage of businesses was obtained from the City Assessor s Office.Business owners and managers were contacted and requested to participate and contribute information on their business operation.Commercial SurveyA survey of the businesses provided information concerning customer base,marketing efforts,employees, parking,and other aspects of doing business in Athmar Park.The business survey information has been tabulated in different ways.The second section requested information on public facilities and services, and the third section asked survey participants to rank a list of possible neighborhood projects.A section of the survey requested information on the business itself.Other sections requested responses on City Services and Facilities and Possible Projects for their immediate area. 66

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANGENERAL BUSINESS INFORMATION Requested information included type of operation and customer.Findings:most businesses are area wide and regional,do not consider their businesses to be local ,with wholesale operations generally in Industrial areas,retail along commercial corridors, Hours of operation and business traffic information.Findings:Retail oriented establishments and restaurants were open longer hours,but usually opened later in the day and are open more days/week;Industrial and wholesales operations usually followed M-F workweeks with earlier hours beginning at 7AM,some Saturday hours.There was no strong indication of heavy or low business traffic except at holidays for retail businesses,and no change for industrial or wholesale operations. Parking provided for customers and employees.Findings:if there was available land around the business,then employees had parking furnished to them,regardless of the customer needs. Businesses along S.Federal Boulevard were least likely to provide adequate parking for both customers and employees.Businesses in the Industrial area and along W.Mississippi Avenue generally had enough parking available for all. Crime information.Findings:commonly businesses assisted by the Athmar Park Neighborhood Association said graffiti vandalism is cleaned up;industrial areas were not happy with efforts to remedy graffiti vandalism.Police response for the residential area appears to be more timely than for the industrial area. Type of employees.Findings:All levels of employment in most sectors of employment are found in the Athmar Park statistical neighborhood.Generally there is more service employment along the commercial corridors and more manufacturing and clerical in the industrial area. 67

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APPENDIXSPECIFIC AREA RESPONSES/INFORMATIONSouth Federal Boulevard Service and Facilities.Respondents satisfied with availability of eating places,fire protection,and trash collection. Respondents dissatisfied with graffiti vandalism protection. Possible Project Priorities.Respondents first priority is promotion of economic development,second is area beautification. 0 5 10 15 20 25 Services and Facilities Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied No responseBusiness Area Appearance Residential Area Appearance Street Maintenance Street Cleaning Sidewalk Maintenance Curb and Gutter Street Lights Storm Drainage Water/Sewer Maintenance Traffic Control Police Protection Fire Protection Trash Collection Street Signs Graffiti Vandalism Protection Local Workforce Availability Local Workforce Skill Level Availability of Eating Places Availability of Financial Services 68

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANWest Alameda Avenue Service and Facilities.Respondents satisfied with fire protection,trash collection,police protection,availability of eating places.Respondents dissatisfied with graffiti vandalism protection,business area appearance and sidewalk maintenance. Possible Project Priorities.Respondents first priority is commercial area beautification,second is facelift of commercial properties. Services and FacilitiesBusiness Area Appearance Residential Area Appearance Street Maintenance Street Cleaning Sidewalk Maintenance Curb and Gutter Street Lights Storm Drainage Water/Sewer Maintenance Traffic Control Police Protection Fire Protection Trash Collection Street Signs Graffiti Vandalism Protection Local Workforce Availability Local Workforce Skill Level Availability of Eating Places Availability of Financial Services 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied No response 69

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APPENDIXWest Mississippi Avenue Service and Facilities.Respondents satisfied with water and sewer maintenance,traffic control,street signs,storm drainage,fire protection,and most everything that was queried.Respondents were more neutral than dissatisfied with availability of financial services,street cleaning,and local workforce. Possible Project Priorities.Respondents first priority is promotion of economic development. Services and FacilitiesBusiness Area Appearance Residential Area Appearance Street Maintenance Street Cleaning Sidewalk Maintenance Curb and Gutter Street Lights Storm Drainage Water/Sewer Maintenance Traffic Control Police Protection Fire Protection Trash Collection Street Signs Graffiti Vandalism Protection Local Workforce Availability Local Workforce Skill Level Availability of Eating Places Availability of Financial Services 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied No response 70

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANIndustrial Area Service and Facilities.Respondents satisfied with fire and police protection,trash collection (usually private contractor),street signs,and curb and gutters.Respondents dissatisfied with graffiti vandalism protection and availability of eating places. Possible Project Priorities.Respondents first priority is promotion of economic development,second is commercial area beautification. Services and FacilitiesBusiness Area Appearance Residential Area Appearance Street Maintenance Street Cleaning Sidewalk Maintenance Curb and Gutter Street Lights Storm Drainage Water/Sewer Maintenance Traffic Control Police Protection Fire Protection Trash Collection Street Signs Graffiti Vandalism Protection Local Workforce Availability Local Workforce Skill Level Availability of Eating Places Availability of Financial Services 0 5 10 15 20 25 Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied No response 71

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APPENDIXSWOT CHART: Athmar Park Neighborhood AssessmentThe Athmar park Planning Group developed goals and objectives following a SWOT analysis of the neighborhood.Strengths,weaknesses,opportunities and threats were listed.The following are those areas that relate to the economic condition of the Athmar Park commercial edges. Strengths Diverse population/culture Educational level of population Involved APNA group Income levels comparatively good Good transportation mix of uses for the neighborhood affordable housing good quality stock of housing good city services,e.g.police,etc. close to downtown light rail is coming accessible arterials-Alameda,Mississippi,S. Federal high traffic volume-potential customer base most of the neighborhood is above the flood plain Opportunities increased professional presence in area attract new retail business in Alameda Square business improvements in types,building facades,and landscaping neighborhood/business interactions formation of business association(s) Weaknesses educational level of population students perceived to be out of control signs of urban blight apparent unappealing look of some commercial areas/establishments lack of professional services lack of office space street maintenance needed throughout the neighborhood on local and collector streets not enough activity for young people too much gang activity and graffiti vandalism need more parking in commercial areas perception that neighborhood has too low a capacity to support the larger stores rents in Alameda Square are too high non-pedestrian scale in Alameda Square police response time to commercial areas is too high Threats businesses lured away from area perceptions of location and crime lack of neighborhood interactions general apathy 72

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANDEMOGRAPHIC TABLESCensus Tract Population/Household Estimates for Athmar Park Statistical Neighborhood Census Total 1990 1990 Total 1993 1993 Annual % Tracts PopulationHouseholdsPopulationHouseholdsChange 13.01 3,7721,4873,8191,5210.41 13.02 3,0841,1773,1691,2220.91 Athmar Park6,8562,6646,9882,7431.31Source:U.S.1990 Census;DRCOGGeneral Characteristics of People Census Tracts for Athmar Park City of Denver 1980 1990 Total All Persons 13.01 13.02 13.01 13.02 Population Under 5 years268 275 320 26134,764 5 to 9 years232 260 264 23729,550 10 to 14 years218 247 212 20224,514 15 to 19 years290 263 231 19325,707 20 to 24 years387 394 267 18334,224 25 to 34 years694 605 662 52695,951 35 to 44 years354 341 556 42777,358 45 to 54 years356 313 325 26442,554 55 to 64 years532 428 307 28538,183 65 to 74 years383 216 376 35535,734 75 and over188 90 252 15129,071 Median Age32.4 29.1 33.8 33.7 33.8Source:U.S.1980 &1990 Census 73

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APPENDIXRace and National Origin 1990 City of Denver Athmar Park Athmar Park Population % Population % % of TotalsWhite and Non-Hispanic288,51561.63,53751.5812.29 Hispanic107,38222.92,98143.42.776 Black 60,04612.8 82 1.190.136 Asian 10,6522.27 206 3 1.93 American Indian5,2891.13 81 1.18 1.53Source:U.S.Census;Denver Community Planning and Development AgencyRace and National Origin, Athmar Park 1980 1980 13.01 13.02 White 3,108 2,673 Black 24 18 American Indian 21 37 Japanese 13 3 Vietnamese 53 12 Other Asian 13 2 Mexican 750 716 Puerto Rican 17 10 Other Spanish 419 411Source: U.S. Census; Denver Community Planning and Development Agency 74

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANRace and National Origin, Athmar Park 1990 1990 13.01 13.02 White 2,837 2,429 Black 58 24 American Indian 55 26 Eskimo 0 2 Chinese 11 0 Filipino 0 10 Japanese 17 0 Korean 5 1 Vietnamese 118 29 Cambodian 6 0 Laotian 0 5 Other Asian/Pacific Islander0 4 Mexican 1231 879 Puerto Rican 5 3 Cuban 2 0 Other Hispanic 379 482Source:U.S.1980 & 1990 CensusMedian Household Income, Athmar Park Statistical Neighborhood 1990 Athmar Park $21,721 26,726 Ruby Hill $20,332 3,287 Valverde $18,764 Westwood $15,93817,636 City of Denver $25,106Source:U.S.1990 Census 75

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APPENDIXZoning By Acres, Athmar Park Census Tracts Total Acres by 13.01 13.02 Zone District 0.314.32B1 4.63 4.53 0B2 4.53 31.9511.4B3 43.35 12.963.36B4 16.32 2.56 BA1 2.56 1.11 BA3 1.11 53.4219.08Total Commercial72.5 41.3IO 41.3 138.87I1 180.17 6.65O1 6.65 271.04176.87R1 447.91 28.1421.21R2 49.35 1.83 0R2A 1.83 00R 30 1.63R3X 1.63 0R4 0 0R5 0 PUD 354.43405.61Totals 760.04*Open space/park acres may be included in these totals. PUD Zone Districts not included in calculations. Source: Community Planning and Development Agency 76

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANEmployment Comparisons1983 Employment Denver Region Census Tracts for Athmar Park 13.01 13.02 Industry NumberPercentNumberPercentNumberPercent Mining25,3002.700.000.0 Contract Construction50,7005.3191.583329.2 Manufacturing123,50013.080.62358.2 Transp.& Pub.Util.61,1006.400.000.0 Wholesale Trade59,3006.2584.785229.8 Retail Trade149,30015.738631.21505.3 Fin.,Ins.,R.E.62,6006.6110.940.1 Services192,20020.245736.653118.6 Government134,50014.117414.12017.0 Federal Civilian32,7003.400.000.0 State31,7003.300.0110.4 Local70,1007.417414.11906.7 Non-Agr.Total858,50090.11,11390.02,80698.2 Agriculture6,300.0700.000.0 Military10,4001.100.000.0 All Other77,7008.212410.0511.8 Total Employment952,900100.01,237100.02,857100.00Source:U.S.1983 Census;Denver Community Planning and Development Agency 77

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APPENDIX1993 Employment Denver Region Census Tracts for Athmar Park 13.01 13.02 Industry NumberPercentNumberPercentNumberPercent Mining6,8231.600.011.03 Contract Construction11,4832.7596.132810.0 Manufacturing33,5288.0141.582525.3 Transp.& Pub.Util.43,18410.300.01354.1 Wholesale Trade32,5357.8929.664819.8 Retail Trade49,83011.920221.045814.0 Fin.,Ins.,R.E.32,6457.810611.0110.3 Services122,03029.112813.347114.4 Government62,15114.818719.52186.7 Non-Agr.Total394,20993.9978882.03,10595.1 Agriculture1,1790.35.0522.07 Military3,5730.900.000.0 All Other20,3714.916817.51384.2 Total Employment419,332100.00961100.003,265100.00Source:U.S.1993 Census;Denver Community Planning and Development Agency 78

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLANCrime StatisticsDenver Police Department, District 4, District 4, Precinct 413 Crime Rates per 1000 persons 1990 1996 1997 1998 Population 7636 6858 6858 6858 Households 3076 2664 2664 2664 Total Offenses 88.0 117.7 120.6 86.3 Murder 0.0 0.1 .03 0.1 Sexual Assault/Rape 1.6 0.6 2.9 0.6 Aggravated.Assault 3.1 4.5 4.8 3.8 Robbery 2.8 2.6 4.4 1.7 Burglary 46.5 53.3 46.5 32.7 Larceny 21.6 27.9 24.1 18.1 Auto Theft 16.5 19.7 21.6 15.9 All other (includes graffiti vandalism)23.7 41.0 45.2 33.1City of Denver, Citywide Crime Rates per 1000 persons 1996 1997 1998 Total Offenses 105.2 96.4 82.3 Murder 0.1 0.2 0.1 Sexual Assault/Rape 1.5 1.5 1.4 Aggravated.Assault 4.0 3.4 2.9 Robbery 2.7 2.5 2 Burglary 36.7 30.6 27.9 Larceny 36.7 31.6 27.8 Auto Theft 11.5 12.3 11.4 All other (includes graffiti vandalism)32.0 30.8 30Population for 1990 uses 1985 population figures;1996 and 1997 use 1990 population figures; burglary offenses per 1000 households; larceny includes both petty and grand larceny; sexual assault offenses per 1000 females. Source:Research and Development Bureau, Denver Police D ept. 79

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APPENDIXALAMEDA AVENUE COMMERCIAL AREA STREETSCAPING GUIDELINESGeneral ConceptsThe unifying character of W.Alameda Avenue is a consistent appearance of enforced landscaping and parking regulations,well maintained buildings,parking areas,and public areas,where safety is encouraged through minimizing the number of access/egress points along the street (resulting in fewer curb cuts), control of visual clutter (resulting from too many and varied signs),and prohibiting parking on front lawn areas.W.Alameda Avenue between S.Pecos and S.Raritan Streets is the original town center of the Town of Valverde and the location of the historic meeting hall,now privately owned.The detached walks and existing street trees should be maintained and additional trees planted as needed. To promote a unifying character along W.Alameda Avenue and to create an attractive place in which to do business,the following steps should be taken: Continue to orient buildings to face street with primary entrances on the street side Eliminate billboards or work with businesses that rely on this source of income to work for more residentially favorable content Enforce signage guidelines Enforce landscaping standards for parking areas and used car lots Encourage selective and sensitive code enforcement,particularly for temporary signs Inform property owners of their responsibility to maintain area(s) in front and to the sides of their businesses,including the maintenance of plantings between the sidewalk and the street Minimize the number of curb cuts Enforce parking requirements Encourage the use of the sidewalk/streetscaping pattern used at the reconstructed Alameda/S.Federal Boulevard intersection however where there is an existing tree lawn and planting area adjacent to the sidewalk or street,those tree lawn areas should be maintained 80

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ATHMAR PARK NEIGHBORHOOD PERIMETER PLAN Promote the planting of street trees according to the Tree Planting Layout along the corridor, from South Federal Boulevard east to Lipan Street Enhance pedestrian areas,such as transit stops,with street furniture as appropriate to the space and use,and with appropriate landscape planting(s) Develop intensive landscaping only at gateway areas or where there is adequate space to accommodate plantingsNotesScored concrete is continuous without trees;sidewalk scoring is incidental to sidewalk construction. Tree species and planting method to be approved by the City Forester;at least 3 inch caliper. Tree grates to be: 1.Neenab Foundry,Inc.Model R-8713 180 square with style U frame;no paint or primer 2.Urban Accessories Model Kiva with standard frame 3.Deeter Foundry,Inc.Model B7512 Tree grates to be installed in accordance with manufacturer s recommendations. West Alameda template 81