Citation
Broadway corridor transportation and urban design study

Material Information

Title:
Broadway corridor transportation and urban design study
Creator:
BRW/URS Corp
Kimley Horn and Associates, Inc.
NWS Studios
Leland Consulting Group
Shiramizu Design
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Transportation planning
Urban design
Spatial Coverage:
Denver -- Broadway

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Broadway Corridor
Transportation
and Urban
Design Study
June 1999-July 2001

Revitalizing South Broadways Commercial Corridor


Broadway Corridor
Transportation
and Urban
Design Study
Presented
to the City & County of Denver
BRW/URS Corp
Kimley Horn and Associates, Inc
NWS Studios
Leland Consulting Group
Shiramizu Design


Broadway Corridor
Transportation
and Urban
Design Study
Contents
Introduction pg i
History and Context
Project History
Steering Committee
Public Meetings
Existing Conditions pg 5
Concurrent Projects
T RANSPORTATION
Land Use and Economic Development
Architecture and Historic Buildings
Issues and Objectives pg 13
Issues
Design Objectives
Recommendations pg 15
Overall Design Framework
Urban Design Zones
Implementation Plan pg 25
Implementation
Property Owner Organization
Market Study
Funding Sources
Afterword


Acknowledgements
Steering Committee Members
Marcus Aden, Aden Suede & Leather
Cleaning Co.
John Blessing, Business Owner
Mike Brooks
Dick Feather, West University
Community Association
Anthony Gengaro, Broadway
Partnership
A1 Helmstaedter, EMW Carpets &
Furniture
Gary Jackson, Gates Rubber Company
Richard Kolacny, Kolacny Music
John Ludwig, Birdsall & Company
Joe Onofho, Onofho Piano
Judy Pasquini, Pasquinis
Flank Saipe, Broadway Mini-Storage
Peter Schmidt, Aspen Antiques/
Antique Row Merchants
Association
Arthur Scibelli, City of Englewood
Lou Sigman, Gump Glass
Christopher Thomas, US Bank
Gerta Thompson, ARC
Steve Toltz, Dependable Cleaners
Jack Unruh, Overland Neighborhood
Association
Roxanne White, Urban Peak
Jim Zavist, RTD Board
Kenneth Debacker, Rebis Galleries
Sue Gustafson, Grandpa
Snazzys/Flossy McGrews
City and County of Denver
Wellington E. Webb, Mayor, City and
County of Denver
Council Members
Dennis Gallagher: District 1
T.J. Ted Flackworth: District 2
Ramona Martinez: District 3
Joyce Foster: District 4
Polly Flobeck: District 5
Charlie Brown: District 6
Kathleen MacKenzie: District 7
Elbra Wedgeworth: District 8
Deborah L. Ortega: District 9
Ed Thomas: District 10
Allegra Flappy Flaynes: District 11
Cathy Reynolds: Council-at-Large
Susan Barnes-Gelt: Council-at-Large
City Staff
Jennifer Moulton: Director,
Community Planning and
Development Agency (CPDA)
Ellen Ittelson: Planning Program
Manager
Janell Flaig: Senior Planner
Tom Best: Senior Planner
Tyler Gibbs: Director, Urban Design &
Graphics
Steve Turner: Urban Design
Carla McConnell: Urban Design
Dennis Royer: Public Works, Special
Projects
Robert Kochevar: Director,
Transportation Engineering/
Traffic Operations
Nelson Ho: Transportation
Engineering
Chad Salli: Transportation Engineering
Alana Smart: Council Staff
Amber L. Callender: Council Staff


Broadway Corridor
Transportation
and Urban
Design Study
June 1999-July 2001
Revitalizing South Broadways Commercial Corridor
For the past two decades, Denver has made significant strides toward
creating a livable, beautiful, functional city. The public and private sec-
tors together have accomplished this goal project by project, piece by
piece. The 16th Street Mall, the rebirth of Lower Downtown, the light
rail, the renaissance of Cherry Creek and the Platte River, Five Points
revival, Colfax on the Hill, Cherry Creek North_all over the City,
Introduction
there have been many many changes
that have put Denver at the top of lists
of America's most livable cities. The
Broadway Corridor Urban Design and
Transportation Project focuses on cre-
ating a vision for South Broadway's
revitalization so that it too can claim a
prominent place in the City.
Context and History
South Broadway was originally part of
the Town of South Denver, first incor-
porated in 1886. In 1894 it was
annexed to the City of Denver after a
lively debate largely centered on liquor
prohibition and Denver's need to
acquire water rights.
In 1913, the Ford Motor Company
built a factory just south of where 1-25
crosses Broadway today. By 1916, the
company was producing about 50
Model T cars daily. The rail line allowed
goods to be shipped in and out easily.
Thus began the tradition of industrial
uses along the west side of Broadway
from 1-25 south to Englewood. In
1947, the plant was sold to the Gates
Rubber Company and, though most of
its operations were shut down, Gates is
still there today with limited operations.
The company is possibly selling a large
portion of its land for redevelopment.
The Gates Rubber Company facilities
currently occupy approximately 70
acres adjacent to South Broadway just
south of the 1-25 viaduct.
Today, South Broadway is a major
traffic route connecting Downtown
Denver with Denver's southern neigh-
bors Englewood, Littleton, and
Elighlands Ranch. Buildings, business-
es, lots, and homes line the 18 blocks
from 1-25 to the Denver-Englewood
border at Yale Avenue. With its 30 -
40,000 vehicle trips per day, South
Broadway's image is basically that of a
major arterial roadway with businesses
alongside.
Except for Antique Row (a collection
of antique shops just south of 1-25)
most businesses along the corridor
south of Gates to the City border at
Yale attract customers to a single desti-
nation. Most customers leave the area
after completing their business. There is
little pedestrian activity or multiple des-
tination trips.
Antique Row, at the north end of this
stretch, is the only place along South
Broadway with pedestrian activity
where people go to several shops dur-
ing one visit. This area draws antique
shoppers locally, regionally, and nation-
ally. The Antique Row Merchants
Association promotes its businesses
collectively and sponsors special events.
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study i


The purpose of the project was to define the
present situation along the corridor and create a
vision for what it could be in the future.
Introduction
Many individual properties in
the area are well kept.
Some remnant homes exist, generally
small Denver bungalow style, built in
the first half of the twentieth century.
These are located mostly toward the
southern end of the corridor. Specialty
businesses, such as an upscale garden
and plant shop, piano and music stores,
and furniture stores are scattered along
the corridor. Restaurants, a bakery, con-
venience stores, auto sales, repair and
parts stores, repair shops, motels, a
large glass supply business and storage
facilities are also part of the mix of
uses. Over the years, many of these
shops and service places have devel-
oped a loyal clientele and have become
strong businesses.
To the first-time visitor, South
Broadway leaves a mixed impression.
Some properties are poorly kept, aban-
doned, or neglected. Broken sidewalks,
weeds, and peeling paint are not
uncommon. Clearly this is detrimental
to the overall image and to those who
have made significant investments in
their buildings and properties.
To the east of Broadway are lively
thriving neighborhoods, parks, and
schools, along with some service busi-
nesses and local shops. To the west of
Broadway, south of the industrial sec-
tor is the smaller Overland neighbor-
hood enclave bounded by Broadway
and Santa Fe. These neighborhoods
consider Broadway their back door,
rather than their neighborhood shop-
ping area, largely because there are few
neighborhood destinations along it.
2 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


S. Delaware St.
S. Cherokee St.
S. Ban nock St
S.Acoma St.
\
tb
>
<
56
0>
>
<
Santa Fe Dr.
S. Cherokee St,
S. Bannock St.
S. Broadway
1 Oi o aJ S. Lincoln St.
111 T5 ra S.Sherman St.
5 5
<
'o.
q.
'51
v>
s
1-25
Introduction This is a missed opportunity for
Broadway businesses. These neighbor-
hoods could serve as a customer base
the businesses along Broadway if the
corridor was redeveloped with that pur-
pose in mind and the street itself was
more inviting and pedestrian friendly.
Project History and Purpose
The South Broadway Corridor Urban
Design and Transportation Study was
initiated by the City in the spring of
1999. The project area includes eight-
Steering Committee members were appointed by
the City and represented interests along the length
of corridor and surrounding neighborhoods.
een blocks along South Broadway from
Interstate 25 south to the Denver-
Unique shops are found Englewood border at Yale Street.
along all of Broadway.
The recommendations of this study
are consistent with the Denver
Comprehensive Plan 2000. the
Overland Neighborhood Plan, and the
West Washington Park Neighborhood
Plan. They are also consistent with the
concepts being discussed in the plan-
ning processes that will lead to a
Denver Land Use and Transportation
Plan and an update to the Baker
Neighborhood Plan. Additional direc-
tion might be provided as further stud-
ies are completed for the potential
redevelopment of the Gates site and
for the Southeast Transit Corridor.
The purpose of the project was to
define the present situation along the
corridor and create a vision for what it
could be in the future. This effort
focused mainly on transportation issues
and urban design of the street and pub-
lic right-of-way: lights, trees, benches,
and other street furnishings. Historic
buildings were noted as a potential
resource in enhancing the corridor. A
second project component was eco-
nomic development and the evaluation
of land use, zoning, and business
potential.
The recommendations of this study
will be presented to the Planning Board
and the City Council for adoption as a
supplement to the Comprehensive
Plan.
Steering Committee
A Steering Committee made up of
property owners, neighborhood leaders,
and business owners met monthly to
craft the vision for the future. They
gave guidance to the consultant team
and helped shape a physical concept for
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study 3


Introduction
The public reached a
consensus that the cor-
ridor concept should be
brought forward to
implementation.
Local residents and business
owners attended three public
meetings.
the development of a street design to
be built over time.
Steering Committee members were
appointed by the City and represented
interests along the length of corridor
and surrounding neighborhoods.
Committee discussions were not only
about physical improvements, but also
the need to form a property and busi-
ness organization along the entire corri-
dor. The organization would not only
maintain street improvements, but also
possibly promote the area and be a
point of contact for the City. This
organization could be a Business
Improvement District (BID) or a
General Improvement District (GID).
The Committee understood the need to
act collectively to achieve greater bene-
fit for the whole corridor.
Public Meetings
During the seven months of this
project, there were two public meetings.
Subsequently, a third public meeting
was held to review an option to totally
reconstruct the street from building
front to building front.
The first meeting, attended by over
50 people, was a community discussion
about the project possibilities.
Participants reviewed some early proj-
ect ideas and discussed how South
Broadway might develop
over time.
The second public
meeting, held in late
October 1999, was a
review of street element
concepts, districts along
the eighteen-block corri-
dor, and organizational
ideas. Approximately 40
people attended the meeting to review
the design concepts. There was a slide
show presentation and discussion of
the ideas contained in this document.
Participants came from all along the
corridor and adjacent neighborhoods.
The public reached a consensus that
the corridor concept presented should
be brought forward to implementation.
There was also a discussion about the
need for a private-sector organization
to oversee the implementation, be a
point of contact for the City, and per-
haps promote and market the corridor.
At the final public meeting held in
January of 2001, an option was dis-
cussed to keep the same basic design,
but totally replace the sidewalk and
street sections from building front to
building front. The sidewalks and
streets would be constructed of con-
crete, be a significant improvement to
the existing condition, and tie into
improvements made by Englewood to
the south and Denver north of 1-25.
The City's Traffic Engineer suggested
that while this was a more expensive
project, it was a much better solution
with long-term application.
The pros and cons of this option
were thoroughly discussed including:
construction costs and schedules, possi-
ble disruption to businesses, a better
final product with consistent sidewalk
and roadway widths, a more lasting
design.
The meeting attendees (approximately
50 people) unanimously agreed that the
option to completely reconstruct the
streets and sidewalks was a better
option.
4 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


Broadway Corridor
Transportation
and Urban
Design Study
June 1999-July 2001
Revitalizing South Broadways Commercial Corridor
As with any urban design project, the South Broadway Corridor Project
was conducted as other related projects were going forward. These
include reconstruction of the 1-25 viaduct, extension of the light rail sys-
tem, and drainage and roadway improvements.
Existing Conditions
Concurrent Projects
As with any urban design project, the
South Broadway Corridor Project was
conducted as other related projects
were going forward.
Interstate 25 Viaduct
The largest concurrent project is the
reconstruction of the Interstate 25
viaduct over Broadway at the northern
end of the site. This project will
straighten the curve on the viaduct,
bring the highway to current safety
standards, and realign the on- and off-
ramps between 1-25, Broadway, and
Lincoln Street. Construction of this
improvement may not begin for several
years.
Light Rail
The light rail station at Broadway
connects to the Southwest corridor that
opened in July of 2000. A new station
at Santa Fe and Evans, four blocks
from the busiest intersection within this
study, Evans and South Broadway, is
likely to be a catalyst to redevelopment
of the area west of Broadway in the
Overland Park Neighborhood.
Additionally, a new Southeast corri-
dor will also be constructed and con-
nect to the Broadway Station. This
would open, at the earliest, in 2006.
These light rail extensions not only
provide better access to Broadway, but
also have implications for new develop-
ment associated with the transit sta-
tions.
Drainage and Roadway
Improvements
Roadway resurfacing and drainage
improvements are scheduled for the
area between Louisiana and Iowa
Streets. Denver's Wastewater
Management will perform drainage
improvements.
The exact construction timing is not
known because of the identification of
funding for these projects. Denver
Regional Council of Governments
(DRCOG), the agency that controls
State and Federal funding contribu-
tions, will review these projects along
with other regional projects and set pri-
orities for funding. Therefore, the
funding timing is not predictable.
The Evans-Broadway intersection,
one of the busiest in the area, is sched-
uled for major improvements involving
additional lanes and realignment of the
right-of-way. This intersection
improvement is not scheduled as a
near-term project, but was considered
in the development of the long-term
vision for the corridor.
Transportation
Roadway
South Broadway has a 100-foot right-
of-way, which consists of the public
property, including sidewalks and road-
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study 5


Existing Conditions way from private property line on the
east to the private property line on the
west. The right-of-way includes a road-
way (approximately 70 feet) for all lanes
and parking, as well as two sidewalks
(approximately 15 feet) on either side.
The wide outside lane allows parallel
parking. While there is some variation,
these dimensions are generally stan-
dard.
At signalized intersections and select-
ed non-signalized intersections, there
are left turn lanes. Where there are no
left turn lanes, the outside lane at the
intersection is 28 feet wide.
There are 30,000 to 40,000 vehicles
traveling along South Broadway daily.
The lack of a comfortable pedestrian environment
means that most customers drive to a single
destination, and then leave.
South Broadway is a major arterial that
serves as a commute route from
Downtown Denver to the communities
of Englewood, Littleton, and
Highlands Ranch to the south. The
broad expanse of asphalt and the num-
ber of moving traffic lanes act as a sig-
nificant divider between the east and
west sides of the street. The busiest
intersections are at Mississippi and
South Broadway, with southbound cars
heading west to Santa Fe for the
evening commute home, and the inter-
section of Evans and South Broadway,
where two major arterials cross.
The Iowa/Broadway intersection is
noteworthy because neighbors to the
east report that it is their major access
point from Broadway into that neigh-
borhood. It is the only access to South
Santa Fe Drive and destinations west of
the South Platte River.
Pedestrian Activity
Pedestrians often find it difficult to
cross South Broadway because of a
lack of balance between pedestrian and
vehicular uses. While it is clear that the
street must serve its arterial function,
the street can better accommodate
pedestrians, transit riders, and bicyclists.
The lack of a comfortable pedestrian
environment discourages pedestrian
activity with the result that most cus-
tomers drive to a single business desti-
nation and then leave the area. This not
only is a loss for adjacent businesses,
but also deprives the area of an active
street life. The single destination pat-
tern is exacerbated by the lack of
mixed land uses that encourage pedes-
trian activity.
Parking
Parking for the businesses is some-
times incorporated onto the building
site. Public parking is provided along
each side of the street. Still, there is a
concern about parking near the
Antique Row area. Businesses are
looking for more parking nearby, and
the neighbors to the east are concerned
about overflow parking in their neigh-
borhoods.
Transit
South Broadway carries a number of
RTD bus routes: 0, 0 Limited, 11, 14,
19, and 21. The bus stops along the
corridor generally consist of simply a
6 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


Existing Conditions
The layering of shops,
apartments, and offices
is proving to be a suc-
cessful means of keep-
ing the evening streets
alive, with people at
hand to enjoy them.
-John Simonds
Some businesses are located in
older homes.
sign and a designated area along the
street. There are few bus shelters or
benches.
The light rail station at Evans and
Santa Fe, which opened in July 2000,
has become a destination for pedestri-
ans, bicyclists and those taking connect-
ing buses to the light rail station. The
station includes 99 parking spaces. The
station site is located in a mainly indus-
trial area with the Evans Avenue
viaduct just north of the platform.
Bicycles
South Broadway is a major arterial
and, while bicyclists use the roadway, it
is not a designated bicycle route. The
City of Denver bicycle route D18
crosses Broadway at Iowa and D20 at
Iliff. Route D9 runs parallel to
Broadway north/south along Logan to
Iowa and then continues on Sherman
to the Englewood limits.
The South Broadway corridor has
limited bicycle parking, mostly provided
by private properties. The light rail sta-
tions at Evans and Broadway provide
some bicycle parking. The City has a
bicycle parking program that pays for
the installation of bicycle racks and
could be employed on Broadway.
Land Use and Economic
Development
Land Use
The land uses along the entire corri-
dor are mainly business uses with some
office buildings. A few homes, espe-
cially to the south of Evans, still have
residential uses, although housing is a
very small component of the overall
corridor land use mix. There are also
two motels along the corridor.
The Gates Rubber Company site, at
the north end of the corridor, domi-
nates the land use between the 1-25
viaduct and Arizona Avenue. In early
2001, Gates was in the process of sell-
ing 49 acres on the west side of
Broadway for redevelopment as a
mixed use site. The specific develop-
ment plan is not complete as of this
writing.
Between Arizona and Iowa, for about
four to five blocks, there is a grouping
of shops collectively known as Antique
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study 7


Existing Conditions
The land along South
Broadway remains
largely in individual lots
or small parcels
(unassembled), making
redevelopment difficult.
Row. In this same area, there are desti-
nation businesses such as a glass retail-
er/fabricator and warehouse, a bank,
and an Italian restaurant.
To the south of Iowa, the businesses
are generally destination oriented.
These include music stores, furniture
stores, auto-related businesses, truck
rental, and a scattering of restaurants
and bars.
Most of the buildings that house
these businesses are one to three stories
tall with 96% of the properties built
before 1980. The majority of the older
structures are not historically signifi-
cant. The building areas are generally
of less square footage than allowed by
zoning and much of the land and
buildings are underutilized.
Ownership
Most of the buildings and properties
along the corridor are locally owned. In
fact, 92% are locally owned and anoth-
er 3% have owners in the Denver-
Metro area. There are no significant
assemblages of publicly-held land or
buildings. With only a few exceptions,
the land along South Broadway remains
largely in individual lots or small parcels
(unassembled), making redevelopment
difficult.
Zoning
The land along South Broadway is
zoned B-4 and allows business and
commercial uses. The uses range from
office to restaurant, to car lots, to light
industrial. The area to the north
Front Property Line Property Line
2:1 Floor Area Ratio
with a 4-Story Building
The Floor Area Ratio (EAR) determines the allowable
8 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


Existing Conditions
South Broadway
caters more to the
regional market than
the local market.
Antique Row draws
beyond the regional
market to the
national.
Antique Row draws customers
from across the country.
(where the Gates Rubber Company is
located) is zoned industrial, and that is
likely to change.
The blocks facing Broadway on either
side often contain housing on the half
block between the alley behind
Broadway and the adjacent streets of
Lincoln to the east and Acoma to the
west. The neighborhoods one-half
block away from South Broadway to
the east are zoned R-2, which allows
more than one residence on a zone lot.
The proximity to housing restricts the
building height and bulk that is allowed
and limits the amount of square feet
that can be built.
Housing
There are currently no significant
areas of housing along South
Broadway, although one block to either
side there are stable neighborhoods.
This is partly due to the nature of the
street as a major arterial. The consult-
ant team identified the lack of assem-
bled land and the current zoning as two
issues that discourage housing from
being built on Broadway.
The recent opening of the Evans
light rail station on the Southwest LRT
corridor may provide an opportunity
for multi-use projects near the intersec-
tion of Evans and Broadway. These
could include apartments and housing
along with retail and commercial uses.
A further market study will be needed
to determine the feasibility of such a
project. Elowever, from an urban
design point of view, a mixed-use
development with housing could greatly
contribute to improving the character
of that area.
Economic strengths and weaknesses
along the Corridor include:
Strengths
Most of the businesses are locally
owned which bodes well for future
financing programs supported by
those owners. Lack of absentee own-
ers also suggests that it might be easi-
er to form a property owner associa-
tion.
The surrounding neighborhoods are
stable and provide a strong customer
base for future neighborhood-based
businesses such as restaurants, drug
stores, and specialty shops.
Antique Row is a valuable anchor
within the corridor.
Traffic counts are high enough to
support local, regional, and national
chain operations.
There are a significant number of
underdeveloped properties where
redevelopment can occur.
Weaknesses
The physical environment is not con-
sistently pedestrian-friendly.
There is limited precedence for cre-
atively financed projects in the corri-
dor.
A single merchants or property own-
ers association for the corridor is
absent.
Elousing is limited along Broadway
and existing housing is low-density.
There are limited publicly held prop-
erties that could be used to leverage
investment.
With the exception of Antique Row,
there are few anchors within the cor-
ridor making it difficult to leverage
activity.
Limited neighborhood-serving retail,
such as drug stores, convenience
stores, restaurants, and coffee shops,
keeps the surrounding neighborhoods
from seeing Broadway as their shop-
ping district.
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study 9


Existing Conditions
Considering the
amount of land along
this corridor, there is
a clear loss of rev-
enue to the City
because of low vol-
ume business. This
indicates an opportu-
nity to make
improvements that
would change this
trend.
Seven percent of the property
in the corridor is located at the
Gates site.
Economic Corridor Characteristics
Seven percent of the property in the
corridor is located at the Gates site.
Currently, the portions of the property
west of Broadway are slated for rede-
velopment as a mixed-use area. This
redevelopment should have a strong
and positive influence on the areas to
the south and open up opportunities
for redevelopment that do not currently
exist.
A high percentage of owners have
small parcels and underutilized proper-
ties. This makes assemblage difficult
and thus development of a significant
project is impeded. Many of the prop-
erties are passed down to family mem-
bers, with the result that some owners
who are not necessarily interested in
change. However, some multi-genera-
tional ownerships work exceedingly well
maintaining long-term business estab-
lishments with a loyal clientele.
Property ownership is stable relative
to other Denver areas. During the
1990s, property ownership changes
ranged from one to three percent per
year. This means that significant rein-
vestment in the corridor has been mini-
mal. The fact that 96% of the build-
ings in the corridor were built before
1980 reiterates that fact.
Sales Tax Generation
One measure of the economic suc-
cess of businesses along Broadway is
the sales tax revenue. The City records
show a disappointing return for the
number of businesses and amount of
property and land along South
Broadway. In 1998, 71% of the busi-
nesses contributed under $1,000 to the
City's sales tax. Considering the
amount of land along this corridor,
there is a clear loss of revenue to the
City because of low volume business.
This indicates an opportunity to make
improvements that would change this
trend.
A reason for this low sales tax genera-
tion is that a number of conditions
exist that decrease business volumes.
Single destination trips, the inconsistent
character of the buildings and business-
es in terms of up-keep, the particular
mix of businesses that don't encourage
spontaneous spending, the lack of
neighborhood-oriented businesses, and
few eating and drinking establishments
are some of those reasons.
Market Draw
South Broadway caters more to the
regional market than the local market.
Antique Row draws beyond the region-
al market to the national. The missed
opportunity seems to be in the local
draw. South Broadway continues to be
the back door for surrounding neigh-
borhoods and thus loses the economic
benefit of its immediate location.
There are a number of specialty
shops, such as music stores, that are
single destination draws. Because there
is no supportive retail nearby (like an
ice cream or coffee shop) to capture
additional business, spillover sales are
limited and pedestrian activity is mini-
mal. This lack of mixed use reduces
business volumes along the corridor.
A good example of the importance
of diversifying the mix along South
Broadway can be seen in the renais-
sance that has taken place on South
Broadway north of 1-25. Over the past
15 to 20 years, this area has reinvented
itself as a neighborhood place and at
the same time maintains a strong
regional draw. Physical improvements,
a strong business organization, and new
strong businesses are part of the ingre-
dients of success.
io Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


Existing Conditions
The restored historic
buildings contribute to
the character of
Broadway, particularly at
Antique Row.
A sample inventory of historic buildings,
highlighting the blocks between
Mississippi Avenue and Iowa Avenue.
Additional buildings with historic charac-
ter are located along the entire South
Broadway Corridor.
To increase the South Broadway mar-
ket, the consultants believe that new
development and redevelopment must
take place. This will likely be led by the
private sector. However, the City could
support these efforts in terms of
rezoning for mixed-use commercial or
mixed-use housing projects and assist-
ing with public involvement.
Architecture and Historic
Buildings
Architecture
South Broadway's non-historic build-
ings have no cohesive architectural
style. The eclectic collection of build-
ings in some blocks is interesting and
contributes to the overall street charac-
ter. However, there are buildings and
properties that are neglected and have
Gates
Computer Guys
Mer Sadie's
B-D Company
Warner's Antiques
Raggedy Ann's
Somewhere In Time
AJAX Custom Plating
True Pump
Corky's Antiques
Finders Keepers
Oriental Rug Cer
Dolls Heirlooms Collectables
Furniture Depot
Karen's Annex
Buildings with
historic character
Mississippi Ave. (1100 S.)
Discount Vac & Sewing
Popular Cuture Vintage Modern
Popular Culture
Sunny China Cafe
Andy's Car Land
Arizona Ave. (1200 S.)
Antique Market
Antique Alcove
Antique Guild
Louisiana Ave. (1300 S.)
Pasquini's
The Groggy Lounge
(Vacant)
Antique Denver Broker
McDowel's Antiques
Azarl Rug Gallery Arkansas Ave. (MOOS.)
All Hours Clocks & Watches '
John Boulware Antiques
Amsterdam Antiques
Antique Broker
Cafe Cero
Manhattan West
Louie's Antiques
Lighting from Alden
Antique Clock Repair
Upland Interiors
Thrifty Stick
AB & P Liauors
Frontier Gallery
Antique Exchange
Florida Ave. (1500S.)
Birdsall & Co.
(Housing)
Herman's Hideaway
Foxy's Antiques
Packrat Antiques|owa Ave (] £00 S.)
been in poor repair for many years.
This is particularly true between Iowa
and Yale.
Denver's Commercial Corridor
Development Review Criteria apply to
the development of new buildings or
redevelopment of existing ones along
the Broadway Corridor. Specific design
guidelines tailored to the unique charac-
teristics of South Broadway may be
prepared in the future.
The City of Englewood has devel-
oped Review Criteria for their commer-
cial corridors. This process guides pri-
vate redevelopment in the areas of
building location, improvements to the
right-of-way, and siting effects on adja-
cent properties. Along with improve-
ments made through Englewoods low-
interest loan and business grant pro-
gram as well as its streetscape project,
the Broadway Corridor south of Yale
has made significant improvements.
Historic Buildings
The consultant team conducted an
informal survey to identify those
buildings that might be of historical
value either because they are historical-
ly significant or because they con-
tribute to the historic feel of a block.
Perhaps the greatest potential for his-
toric revitalization from both a preser-
vation and critical mass point of view
is the Gates Rubber Company proper-
ty between 1-25 and Arizona Avenue.
Most of the other historic buildings
in the corridor are located in the
northern end of the study area
between 1-25 and Iowa Avenue. Many
of these buildings are restored,
although some are neglected. The
restored historic buildings contribute
to the character of Broadway, particu-
larly at Antique Row. Some of historic
buildings are covered with siding or
otherwise disguised. Restoring them
could not only make them more indi-
vidually valuable, but also would con-
tribute to the quality of the street.
These building owners may be able to
take advantage of tax credits if they
redevelop their properties.
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study ii


12 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


Broadway Corridor
Transportation
and Urban
Design Study
- >
%
June 1999-July 2001
Revitalizing South Broadways Commercial Corridor
To achieve the vision for the South Broadway corridor, the consultant
team worked with the Steering Committee to determine the issues fac-
ing the Corridor and the objectives of the study.
Issues/Objectives
Issues
During the examination of the exist-
ing conditions along the Corridor, six
main issues emerged.
The street itself is problematic in that
it overwhelms the adjacent business-
es. This is in part due to the width of
the street, the traffic speed, and the
difficulty pedestrians have crossing.
Further, in most areas, the street is in
poor repair and often the sidewalks
are as well. This inconsistency con-
tributes to disruptive shifts in traffic
lanes and a general look of neglect.
While Broadway is not a designated
bicycle route, there are many destina-
tions that could be accessed by bicy-
cle. The lack of adequate and safe
bicycle parking is likely a hindrance
because Broadway is not bicycle
friendly.
The sidewalk is inconsistent in quality
and the lights, furnishings, trees, and
other elements are related to adjacent
businesses rather than the corridor.
There are no street elements that tie
the corridor together.
The corridor is overwhelmed with
private and public signs as well as bill-
boards. Many of the signs seem
designed to overpower other nearby
signs resulting in a visual clutter of
signs and billboards that compete for
attention. The signage is a major con-
tributor to visual disorganization
along the street.
The corridor is not the same along its
18-block length from 1-25 to Yale
Avenue. The sidewalk and its ele-
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study 13


Issues/Objectives ments appear random and there is lit-
tle to distinguish one area from
another. Thus, the roadway domi-
nates the adjacent land uses instead
of changing its character to reflect
land uses change.
The land along the corridor is vastly
underutilized. Despite some strong
The sidewalk and its elements appear random and
there is little to distinguish one area from another.
Thus, the roadway dominates the adjacent land uses
instead of changing its character to reflect land
uses change.
businesses and well-kept properties,
the overall impression is one of neg-
lect.
Design Objectives
To create a sense of order along the
South Broadway corridor and define a
vision for its future, the consultant
team developed the following objec-
tives.
Create a Kit of Parts for street ele-
ments (lights, benches, utilities, etc.) that
can be used in varying combinations to
create a consistent theme and distin-
guish different areas along the corridor.
Use the Kit of Parts to create an attrac-
tive, pedestrian friendly environment.
Address issues such as building disre-
pair and signage that clutter the corri-
dor.
Maintain or improve vehicle, pedestri-
an, transit, and bicycle access along the
corridor.
Identify market issues that impede busi-
ness development.
Identify historic buildings that con-
tribute to the character of South
Broadway and could qualify for special
tax credits if they were redeveloped.
Identify the steps necessary for imple-
mentation of this vision and potential
funding sources that could be used.
14 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


Broadway Corridor
Transportation
and Urban
Design Study
June 1999-July 2001
Revitalizing South Broadways Commercial Corridor
Based on the analysis of the issues and objectives, the Steering
Committee and the consultant team crafted a set of recommendations.
These recommendations are individual actions that collectively make the
vision a reality
Recommendations
The Kit of Parts can be used in
various combinations along the cor-
ridor. The colors, materials, and
costs are conceptual and will be
determined during the design devel-
opment phase.
Corridor Street
Reconstruction
Recommendations
As a result of discussions with the
City Engineer, the Steering Committee,
and among the public and property
owners at the final public meeting, the
following recommendations are made
for street reconstruction.
Along the entire 18 block corridor,
the streetscape Kit of Parts should be
installed according to the correct
zone: District, Destination, or
Crossroads as explained below. This
installation should be designed to
encourage pedestrian activity and
bicycle access.
Street sections should include dimen-
sions for a median to be initially built
only in areas defined as a District
(see page 16). Other street cross-sec-
tions will remain the same with a
painted median unless there is
enough pedestrian and multi-destina-
tion traffic to warrant construction of
a raised median.
Because there are varying widths of
sidewalks and street sections and their
general condition is poor, the street
and sidewalks should be replaced
building front to building front with
consistent dimensions and paving
Tree Guard Rail Destination Bench District Trash Kiosk Bollard
Ped L iaht Median Light
Intersection M:d Block
Standard Standard
Kit of Parts
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study 15


Recommendations material. On the advice of the City
engineer, the street and sidewalks
should be totally replaced with con-
crete with typical dimensions as
detailed on page 17.
Left-turn lanes should be installed at
every intersection along the corridor
to increase traffic flow, improve
access, and reduce the size of the
outside lanes. Some intersections
along the corridor have left-turn lanes
Much like the coordinated furnishings in a home or
office, the Kit of Parts contains coordinated indi-
vidual elements used along the sidewalk: benches,
trees, traffic signals, kiosks, fencing.
and some do not. Where there is no
left-turn lane, motorists who disre-
gard the No left turn sign block
traffic on the inside lane which occa-
sionally results in minor accidents.
Additionally, the no-left-turn areas
limit access to streets where people
want to go. The provision of left-
turn lanes at every intersection should
be part of the overall roadway design
that will standardize the lane widths,
sidewalk widths, and turning lanes for
the entire corridor.
Overall Design
Framework
Design Zones
The study area encompasses 18
blocks of Broadway from 1-25 to Yale
Avenue. The character of the Corridor
is not the same along its entire length.
The South Broadway corridor is divided
into design stones, areas with similar char-
acteristics and transportation junctions.
The differences are due to a change in
the types of shops and businesses.
Further, the intensity of vehicular traf-
fic at the Broadway-Evans intersection
makes that area function differently
than other sections.
The consultant team, working with
the Steering Committee, identified three
design zones.
The District: between Arizona and
Iowa Avenues, the only place in the
Corridor where there is currently sig-
nificant pedestrian activity.
The Crossroads: two blocks either
side of Evans and Broadway where
two major arterial streets cross, the
busiest intersection in the corridor.
The Destination areas: between Jewell
and Colorado Avenue and between
Iliff and Yale where most of the
businesses are single destinations.
The area directly south of Interstate
25 to Arizona is dominated by the
Gates Rubber Company facilities. The
more than 70-acre facility is mostly
vacant or underutilized. In 2001, Gates
sold its property west of Broadway. At
this writing, it is not yet clear what type
of redevelopment will go forward, the
timing, or to what extent the property
uses will change.
Because this area is such a large, inde-
pendent property and so little is known
about the owners plans, the consultant
team decided that it was premature to
develop any urban design recommenda-
tions along that stretch of Broadway.
The team did, however, recognize that
b?ESTlNlAT!e4t
AREA . }
District [
----/ 1
NORTH
A N a
I i 1
PBfSWl
16 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


lMTERSECTtONS. Pole Traffic. 5ivwl. Cros*u}lte*
l_e£|- Hard Tiirn £>3/6
5LOCK3:
^>1% T*es> £ Si* LiajaVs cm £3tJa felos-k Pace,
Tfo streetscape improvements ultimately should extend along the entire corridor.
Recommendations
Proposed traffic improvements
include left turn lanes at every
intersection, a median and on-street
parking spaces to maximize the
number of spaces per block.
area as a gateway to the rest of South
Broadway. When it is redeveloped, the
street should be designed to reflect its
gateway function using the same street
elements designated for the rest of the
corridor.
The Kit of Parts
One of the urban design problems
along the corridor is the lack of any
consistent treatment of the street fur-
nishings and utilities along the sidewalk.
There are few trees, most of the traffic
signals hang from span wires across the
intersections, and the overhead wires
and signs visually dominate the street.
There are some improved sidewalks,
trees, and other furnishings associated
with particular properties, but they are
isolated and do not have a significant
influence in the overall impression of
South Broadway.
The consultant team and the Steering
Committee created a Kit of Parts that
can be used in various combinations
along the entire length of the corridor.
Right-of-way
New median curb and gutter
New pavement markings
Tree with decorative grates and guards
Decorative light fixture and pole (sidewalk lighting)
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study 17


Recommendations
To unify the corridor
and make the sidewalks
more pedestrian friend-
ly, the consultant team
and the Steering
Committee recommend
a consistent pattern of
pedestrian lights, over-
head lights, and trees.
Much like the coordinated furnishings
in a home or office, the Kit of Parts
contains coordinated individual ele-
ments used along the sidewalk: bench-
es, bicycle racks, trees, traffic signals,
kiosks, and fencing. Traffic control
devices have been identified as part of
this kit.
These parts are then used in vary-
ing combinations along the entire
length of the corridor. The team used
them differently in each of the urban
design zones depending on the charac-
ter and function of the area. However,
because they are of the same style,
material, and color, the overall effect is
unifying.
A conceptual design for the Kit of
Parts has been proposed (see illustra-
tion on page 15) and will be developed
when the first project is initiated since
manufacturers specifications could
change. The Steering Committee
helped identify color, materials, and
design character types and the consult-
ant team developed conceptual level
cost estimates for budgeting purposes
only. The City will use these estimates
to help secure funding sources for
future implementation.
Lights and Trees
To unify the corridor and make the
sidewalks more pedestrian friendly, the
consultant team and the Steering
Committee recommend a consistent
pattern of pedestrian lights, overhead
lights, and trees. Because there was
concern among the business and prop-
erty owners that their frontages not be
blocked, the recommended pattern is
spaced to allow visibility.
Six trees and six lights alternate along
each block face at 50-foot intervals.
Additionally, at each corner there are
overhead lights, combined with traffic
signals at signalized intersections. If
overhead lights are required mid-block,
they should be placed geometrically
within this pattern. The luminaire on
all the lights is the same, although the
overhead lights may require a larger size
luminaire of the same style. The specif-
ic recommendation of light style is
noted for each urban design zone
below.
Part of the implementation of this
streetscape should include the burying
of utilities as part of the Citys continu-
ing program to replace overhead utili-
ties during reconstruction projects.
The trees, when planted, should be of
The District area with Kit
of Parts installed.
18 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


Recommendations
The main purpose of
these medians is to
make crossing the street
easier at the intersec-
tions. Pedestrians can
walk halfway across and
then have a place to
stand before proceeding
the rest of the way.
The Crossroads design,
with new lights, fences, bol-
lards, and trees.
a sufficient caliper to have a visual
impact and not be a target for vandals.
Tree guards and grates, as shown in the
Kit of Parts, should be installed to pro-
tect the trees. The Denver Streetscape
Design Manual should guide the selec-
tion, placement and installation of
trees. Additionally, there should be a
tree watering and maintenance program
in place prior to tree planting to ensure
their health. This may include an irri-
gation system.
Urban Design Zones
The District
This zone, between Arizona and Iowa
is dominated by antique shops and is
known locally as Antique Row.
Particularly on weekends, antique shop-
pers go from shop to shop within these
blocks. One of the problems identified
by the Steering Committee and the
public was the difficulty in walking
across Broadway and the lack of a
pedestrian friendly environment.
Within the District zone, elements
were chosen from the Kit of Parts that
create comfort for the pedestrians. The
double light, benches, trees, and fencing
help achieve this goal. Additionally, the
kiosk can provide a map of the area, a
place to post notices, and an informa-
tion center for the District.
The pedestrian light standard in the
District zone is the double luminaire.
This will provide more light at the
pedestrian level during the evening. It
will also distinguish this area from the
other zones because of the light level
and the visual impact of the double
light standard.
Because of the pedestrian traffic in
the District and the difficulty in cross-
ing Broadway, the consultant team and
the Steering Committee recommend
that low medians be placed in the cen-
ter of the street. These will follow the
existing double yellow lines in the
blocks where there are left turn lanes.
Medians will not be extensively land-
scaped because plantings in the medi-
ans sometimes further divide the sides
of the street, which is contrary to the
objective of unifying the opposite sides
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study 19


One of the problems identified by the Steering
Committee and the public was the difficulty in
crossing Broadway and the lack of a pedestrian
friendly environment.
Recommendations
The Kit of Parts in the
Destination Area.
of the street. Therefore, the medians
will be raised six to eight inches, per-
haps with some decorative surface
treatment or low plantings as deter-
mined during final design.
The main purpose of these medians
is to make crossing the street easier at
the intersections. Pedestrians can walk
halfway across and then have a place to
stand before proceeding the rest of the
way. Details for median placement and
dimensions are included in the drawing
on page 17.
Where the median is widest, about 15
feet back from the intersection, it will
have a double light and a tall median
standard containing a logo, art piece, or
banner. This will distinguish the
District and help to bring the two sides
of the street together. The exact
design of the upper portion of this fix-
ture will be determined during design
development prior to producing con-
struction documents.
The Crossroads
This zone is now and will continue to
be a high volume area for vehicular
traffic. Additionally, the light rail sta-
tion at Evans and Santa Fe will increase
bus traffic. The City has plans to
widen this intersection to accommodate
traffic flow, although the implementa-
tion of this project is likely long-term.
The consultant team and Steering
Committee recommend that this zone
20 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


Some sidewalks have landscaping.
The Destination Areas
need to be woven into
the overall design of the
corridor.
Recommendations
Vehicles dominate the landscape.
also be designed to accommodate tran-
sit riders, and pedestrians comfortably.
Transit shelters, bright lights, benches,
and trees from the Kit of Parts should
be placed along the sidewalk to accom-
plish this objective. Additionally,
pedestrian crosswalks should be well
maintained and marked, and the traffic
signals should accommodate easy
pedestrian movement.
This zone needs to be well lit because
of the heavy traffic, transit uses, and
pedestrians. The consultant team and
Steering Committee recommend using
two to four luminaires at each corner
of Broadway and Evans. Additionally,
only overhead lights will be used in the
Crossroads zone, spaced six per block-
face to continue the tree and light pat-
tern. The intent is to create a consis-
tent ambient light with a brighter level
than other zones, but not so bright that
it is glaring.
In this zone, many of the businesses
are set back with parking in front
between the building and the sidewalk
at the front of the lot. Combined with
the high traffic volumes at Evans and
Broadway, this arrangement contributes
to the feeling of vehicular domination
of the environment. To address this,
the fence from the Kit of Parts should
be used at the edge of the sidewalk in
front of the parking lots to help main-
tain the building line at the sidewalk
and to separate the sidewalk from the
parking lot.
The design of this intersection is
complicated by the need to increase its
capacity. At the time of this writing
the City has plans to increase the capac-
ity of the Evans/Broadway intersec-
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study 21


Recommendations
Bus shelters provide
comfort for the transit
riders. They also, if
carefully designed, pro-
vide a sense of identity
to the corridor.
tion. Currently there is no funding or
timeline associated with that plan.
When there is funding, the design will
inevitably be further developed. That
design should incorporate the Kit of
Parts and, if possible, add a median of
an adequate size as a pedestrian refuge
to encourage walk-on traffic at the light
rail station at Evans. Similarly, traffic
signals should be timed, to the degree
possible, to aid both pedestrians and
bicyclists crossing this intersection.
The Destination Areas
These zones are on either side of the
Crossroads and are characterized by the
destination businesses that line this
portion of Broadway. Customers
patronizing these businesses tend to go
to one destination and then leave the
area. Therefore, convenient access to
those businesses is critical.
The Destination Areas need to be
woven into the overall design of the
corridor. These areas are perhaps in
the most need of a consistent design
because the land uses are so inconsis-
tent. As with all portions along this
corridor, the consultant team and the
Steering Committee recommend a con-
tinuation of the light and tree pattern.
The pedestrian light will have a single
luminaire and the tree and light pattern
will be the same as the other urban
design zones. Overhead lights will be
placed at each comer of the intersec-
tion, combined with traffic signals
where appropriate. They may be added
mid-block into the pattern of lights and
trees as needed.
In this area, the medians are not
raised, but rather painted on the street
to keep the lanes consistent throughout
the corridor. If these areas change
land uses and become more like the
District zone, the median could be
added in the same manner as in the
District.
Bus Shelters
Bus shelters provide comfort for the
transit riders. They also, if carefully
designed, provide a sense of identity to
the corridor. Nearby communities,
including Englewood, Thornton and
Glendale, have worked with a supplier
who provides shelters in exchange for
advertising revenue.
At this writing, the City and County
of Denver is exploring this bus shel-
22 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


Since signage is an important part of any business, property owners and busi-
nesses should work closely with the City to determine the best course of action.
Recommendations
The lack of consistency in signage
gives Broadway a disorganized look.
ter/ advertising program to determine if
it can be used on Denvers public rights
of way. If they determine that it can,
Broadway is an excellent candidate for a
pilot project.
Signage
Through its Zoning Code, the City
has limited the number and location of
billboards. No additional billboards
should be permitted on Broadway.
All public signage (such as parking
signs) should be part of the design
package of the streetscape and coordi-
nated with the Department of Public
Works.
Private signage should be addressed
by a property owner organization (there
is not one in place at this writing). It
(the owners organization) should work
with the City to develop a signage pro-
gram that integrates the private signs
into the overall street design and pro-
gram to improve the look of the corri-
dor. For example, signage should prob-
ably fit within the architecture of the
building. Perhaps vertical signs, which
are more pedestrian oriented, could be
used. Neon is another option that
might fit well with the eclectic nature of
the buildings. Some of these ideas will
likely mean changes or additions to the
current City sign code. Since signage is
an important part of any business,
property owners and businesses should
work closely with the City to determine
the best course of action.
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study 23


24 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


Broadway Corridor
Transportation
and Urban
Design Study
June 1999-July 2001
Revitalizing South Broadways Commercial Corridor
The vision created as part of this study will be implemented over many
years. Hundreds of projects and people will need to make it happen.
There will also be opportunities and issues that we cannot now antici-
pate. This implementation plan is a flexible guide to realizing the vision
for South Broadway.
Implementation Plan
Implementation
The purpose of this Study is to create
a vision for what Broadway could
become based on its character and use.
Currently, there are no City funds ear-
marked for implementation. However,
the Steering Committee will work with
the City to identify a pilot project for
this corridor.
This document will be presented for
Planning Board approval and then as an
ordinance to City Council with a
request to make it an amendment to
the Comprehensive Plan. At that point,
the urban design elements and the Kit
of Parts will become part of the guide-
lines as street improvements are made
over time. For example, if traffic sig-
nals are replaced, they will be designed
not only according to the requirements
of the Transportation Department, but
also in accordance with the design con-
cept shown in the Kit of Parts.
Similarly, bicycle racks and bus shelters
could be added prior to the larger
implementation project because they
can be moved during construction and
replaced within the new streetscape.
Property Owner
Organization
In areas where the City constructs
street improvements, it requires that the
property owners maintain the
streetscape elements: lights, trees,
benches, and other furnishings. This is
part of the Citys effort to stretch the
limited resources they have for these
kinds of projects. The Steering
Committee and the public who attend-
ed the public meetings expressed inter-
est in exploring the formation of a
business organization along the entire
corridor that could represent the ideas
of this study and work with the City to
implement the concept plan.
The organization will, at a minimum,
take the responsibility of maintaining
the installed streetscape improvements,
but may also be interested in promo-
tion, event planning, or other business
development activities. The Steering
Committee and other interested parties
will pursue creating an organization.
Market Study
The consultant team and the Steering
Committee recommend working with
the City to develop a market study.
The study would focus on analyzing
market forces, understanding the exist-
ing mix of uses and identifying retail
gaps, looking for potential redevelop-
ment sites, and defining methods for
stimulating private redevelopment. The
potential for mixed-use developments
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study 25


Renovated historic buildings contribute to the character of South Broadway.
Implementation Plan
Vision without action is
a daydream; action
without vision is a
nightmare.
-Japanese proverb
that include some housing will also be
explored.
Because of the underutilization of
land along this corridor, stimulating
redevelopment is beneficial not only to
private property owners, but also the
City. Sales tax revenues along this cor-
ridor are low and redevelopment could
help stimulate more revenues.
The market study should conclude
with a roundtable discussion that
includes developers, property owners,
and lenders to identify potential rede-
velopment sites and initiate a project.
Private sector redevelopment is critical
to the improvement of the corridor.
Recommended
Implementation Timing
The following is a suggested
timetable and identification of respon-
sibilities for implementing the concepts
outlined in this report. The formation
of a property owner organization to
work with the City on implementation
and maintenance is critical to the imple-
mentation of this plan.
Short-term: one to five years
The Steering Committee and the City
work together to conduct a Market
Study and initiate private property
redevelopment.
The Steering Committee initiates the
effort to form an organization and
defines its powers, level of taxing,
and duties.
The Steering Committee works with
the City to identify a pilot project
(that leverages private investment),
funding source for that project, and
an implementation strategy. This
effort includes:
design development;
preliminary engineering; and
refinement of constructions costs.
Private property owners evaluate their
properties for potential improve-
ments and implement upgrades con-
sistent with the desire to improve the
appearance of the overall corridor.
The City uses the Kit of Parts and
urban design concepts when it imple-
ments street improvements or
replaces traffic signals along
Broadway and its adjacent areas.
Private property redevelopment con-
tinues and keys in on taking advan-
tage of the new light-rail station at
Santa Fe and Evans.
The Gates redevelopment, the 1-25
viaduct reconstruction project, and
the Southeast Corridor
Transportation Project uses the Kit
of Parts elements along the
Broadway Corridor and adjacent
areas.
Mid-term: three to seven years
The City continues to use the design
concepts and Kit of Parts in all
improvements to the street.
The private property organization
conducts an evaluation of the urban
design initiatives to date and makes a
five-year plan for continued imple-
mentation.
The Broadway/I-25 viaduct is recon-
structed and should be designed as an
attractive entry to the South
Broadway Corridor.
Long-term: beyond seven years
The Evans and Broadway intersection
26 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


Implementation Plan
Private sector
redevelopment is critical
to the improvement of
the corridor.
The City and property owners should
identify specific opportunities to fund.
is rebuilt.
Street improvements continue as a
combination of City projects and pri-
vate property initiatives.
The organization continues to main-
tain the streetscape and be the point
for contact with the City on issues
related to the South Broadway
Corridor.
Funding Sources
As with all urban design projects, this
one is likely to be implemented over
time from a variety of funding sources.
The City should work with the property
owners to identify specific opportuni-
ties for applying for funds. The follow-
ing is a list of potential funding sources
for consideration.
When there is reconstruction of the
street for any reason (such as to
replace water or wastewater lines) it
should be reconstructed according to
the urban design concept developed
in this plan and the future design
development, preliminary engineering
and pilot project. This approach
maximizes the resources available.
TEA 21 (Transportation Equity Act
for the 21st Century): The City
applies for this federal source of
money through the Denver Regional
Council of Governments (DRCOG).
Funds are specifically targeted to
projects with a multi-modal trans-
portation emphasis. The pedestrian-
ization of the District and the provi-
sion of shelters and benches for tran-
sit riders could qualify for this fund.
Community Development Block
Grants (CDBG): Although this fund-
ing is limited with many more
requests than can be met, this could
be a potential fund for street
improvements. The key is to identify
a project and get in line for funding,
which may not be immediate. The
City should work with the Steering
Committee or its organization to ini-
tiate this effort.
Capital Improvements Program
(CIP): Every year the City identifies a
set of capital improvements to be
made over the next five years and sets
aside resources to implement those
improvements. With this concept
plan in place, the private-sector
organization and the City should
work together to identify a pilot proj-
ect and implement it.
MOEDIT (Mayors Office of
Economic Development and
International Trade): This group may
be helpful, especially with the Market
Study. Possibly they could identify
funding sources for specific projects.
Denver Urban Renewal Authority
(DURA): During the proposed mar-
ket study, DURA should be involved
Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study 27


Implementation Plan to identify potential initiatives that
could be used to stimulate private
development and implementation of
streetscape elements in conjunction
with private property efforts.
The Steering Committee or organiza-
tion should work closely with their
City Council representative to identify
potential funding sources or matching
funding sources that could be made
available through the general fund or
other source within the City.
Afterword
The South Broadway Corridor
includes many strong businesses along
it. It also contains much underutilized
property. The vision outlined in this
document, demonstrates a simple,
straightforward, urban design concept
intended to be implemented over time
as resources allow.
The obvious benefit of implementing
this concept is a more attractive street.
Denverites are proud of their City and
South Broadway needs to be improved
to become competitive with other areas
South Broadway should be an integral part of its
surrounding neighborhoods and not a division.
that have revitalized.
Beyond this, however, there are many
other benefits. South Broadway should
be an integral part of its surrounding
neighborhoods and not a division.
Business profits and tax revenues both
suffer because of South Broadways
lack of neighborhood inclusion.
Individual businesses probably per-
form below their potential because of
the overall character of South
Broadway. It is not an inviting and
comfortable place to be and therefore
is not realizing its potential market
share. The propensity of customers to
go to a single destination and leave
means that adjacent businesses dont
benefit from their proximity to each
other.
Because of its location near two light
rail stations, there are opportunities to
implement transit-oriented develop-
ment that is both profitable and helps
increase transit ridership. This is an
opportunity to make the most of our
community investment in light rail.
The consultant team was very
impressed with the Steering Committee
and the public interest and input into
this project. The talent to carry this
plan forward and work with the City on
implementation is there. If private
property owners collectively move for-
ward with property improvements and
creating an organization, they stand to
greatly benefit. The success in achiev-
ing this vision rests largely with those
who own property and businesses
along South Broadway.
Perhaps the most important key to
implementing this vision is the private-
sector leadership necessary to make it
happen. The Steering Committee has
been diligent in its effort to create this
plan. The public was supportive of
these concepts. Now is the time for
the private leadership to emerge and
carry these ideas forward. It will
require tenacity, patience, and dedica-
tion. As has been seen with similar
efforts around the City, it can be done.
28 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study


Full Text

PAGE 1

South Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study June 1999-July 2001 REVITALIZINGSOUTHBROADWAYÂ’SCOMMERCIALCORRIDOR

PAGE 2

I

PAGE 4

BRW/URS CORPKIMLEYHORNANDASSOCIATES, INCNWS STUDIOSLELANDCONSULTINGGROUPSHIRAMIZUDESIGNPresented to the City & County of Denver Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study

PAGE 6

I IN T R O D U C T I O N P G1 1HISTORYANDCONTEXTPROJECTHISTORYSTEERINGCOMMITTEEPUBLICMEETINGSE EX I S T I N GC CO N D I T I O N S P G5 5CONCURRENTPROJECTSTRANSPORTATIONLANDUSEANDECONOMICDEVELOPMENTARCHITECTUREANDHISTORICBUILDINGSI IS S U E S A N DO OB J E C T I V E S P G1 1 3 3ISSUESDESIGNOBJECTIVESR RE C O M M E N D A T I O N S P G1 1 5 5OVERALLDESIGNFRAMEWORKURBANDESIGNZONESI IM P L E M E N T A T I O NP PL A N P G2 2 5 5IMPLEMENTATIONPROPERTYOWNERORGANIZATIONMARKETSTUDYFUNDINGSOURCESAFTERWORDContents Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study

PAGE 7

ST E E R I N GCO M M I T T E EME M B E R SMarcus Aden,Aden Suede &Leather Cleaning Co. John Blessing,Business Owner Mike Brooks Dick Feather,West University Community Association Anthony Gengaro,Broadway Partnership Al Helmstaedter,EMWCarpets & Furniture Gary Jackson,Gates Rubber Company Richard Kolacny,Kolacny Music John Ludwig,Birdsall &Company Joe Onofrio,Onofrio Piano Judy Pasquini,Pasquini’s Hank Saipe,Broadway Mini-Storage Peter Schmidt,Aspen Antiques/ Antique Row Merchants Association Arthur Scibelli,City ofEnglewood Lou Sigman,Gump Glass Christopher Thomas,USBank Gerta Thompson,ARC Steve Toltz,Dependable Cleaners Jack Unruh,Overland Neighborhood Association Roxanne White,Urban Peak Jim Zavist,RTDBoard Kenneth Debacker,Rebis Galleries Sue Gustafson,Grandpa Snazzy’s/Flossy McGrew’s CI T Y A N DCO U N T Y O FDE N V E RWellington E.Webb,Mayor,City and County ofDenver CO U N C I LME M B E R SDennis Gallagher:District 1 T.J.“Ted”Hackworth:District 2 Ramona Martinez:District 3 Joyce Foster:District 4Acknowledgements Polly Flobeck:District 5 Charlie Brown:District 6 Kathleen MacKenzie:District 7 Elbra Wedgeworth:District 8 Deborah L.Ortega:District 9 Ed Thomas:District 10 Allegra “Happy”Haynes:District 11 Cathy Reynolds:Council-at-Large Susan Barnes-Gelt:Council-at-Large CI T YST A F FJennifer Moulton:Director, Community Planning and Development Agency (CPDA) Ellen Ittelson:Planning Program Manager Janell Flaig:Senior Planner Tom Best:Senior Planner Tyler Gibbs:Director,Urban Design & Graphics Steve Turner:Urban Design Carla McConnell:Urban Design Dennis Royer:Public Works,Special Projects Robert Kochevar:Director, Transportation Engineering/ Traffic Operations Nelson Ho:Transportation Engineering Chad Salli:Transportation Engineering Alana Smart:Council Staff Amber L.Callender:Council Staff VI

PAGE 8

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY1 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study June 1999-July 2001 REVITALIZINGSOUTHBROADWAYÂ’SCOMMERCIALCORRIDORthere have been many many changes that have put Denver at the top oflists ofAmerica's most livable cities.The Broadway Corridor Urban Design and Transportation Project focuses on creating a vision for South Broadway's revitalization so that it too can claim a prominent place in the City.C CO N T E X T A N DH HI S T O R YSouth Broadway was originally part of the Town ofSouth Denver,first incorporated in 1886.In 1894 it was annexed to the City ofDenver after a lively debate largely centered on liquor prohibition and Denver's need to acquire water rights. In 1913,the Ford Motor Company built a factory just south ofwhere I-25 crosses Broadway today.By 1916,the company was producing about 50 Model T cars daily.The rail line allowed goods to be shipped in and out easily. Thus began the tradition ofindustrial uses along the west side ofBroadway from I-25 south to Englewood.In 1947,the plant was sold to the Gates Rubber Company and,though most of its operations were shut down,Gates is still there today with limited operations. The company is possibly selling a large portion ofits land for redevelopment. The Gates Rubber Company facilities currently occupy approximately 70 acres adjacent to South Broadway just south ofthe I-25 viaduct. Today,South Broadway is a major traffic route connecting Downtown Denver with Denver's southern neighbors Englewood,Littleton,and Highlands Ranch.Buildings,businesses,lots,and homes line the 18 blocks from I-25 to the Denver-Englewood border at Yale Avenue.With its 30 40,000 vehicle trips per day,South Broadway's image is basically that ofa major arterial roadway with businesses alongside. Except for Antique Row (a collection ofantique shops just south ofI-25) most businesses along the corridor south ofGates to the City border at Yale attract customers to a single destination.Most customers leave the area after completing their business.There is little pedestrian activity or multiple destination trips. Antique Row,at the north end ofthis stretch,is the only place along South Broadway with pedestrian activity where people go to several shops during one visit.This area draws antique shoppers locally,regionally,and nationally.The Antique Row Merchants Association promotes its businesses collectively and sponsors special events. Introduction For the past two decades,Denver has made significant strides toward creating a livable,beautiful,functional city.The public and private sectors together have accomplished this goal project by project,piece by piece.The 16th Street Mall,the rebirth ofLower Downtown,the light rail,the renaissance ofCherry Creek and the Platte River,Five Points revival,Colfax on the Hill,Cherry Creek NorthÂ….all over the City,

PAGE 9

2BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY Introduction The purpose ofthe project was to define the present situation along the corridor and create a vision for what it could be in the future. Many individual properties in the area are well kept. Some remnant homes exist,generally small Denver bungalow style,built in the first halfofthe twentieth century. These are located mostly toward the southern end ofthe corridor.Specialty businesses,such as an upscale garden and plant shop,piano and music stores, and furniture stores are scattered along the corridor.Restaurants,a bakery,convenience stores,auto sales,repair and parts stores,repair shops,motels,a large glass supply business and storage facilities are also part ofthe mix of uses.Over the years,many ofthese shops and service places have developed a loyal clientele and have become strong businesses. To the first-time visitor,South Broadway leaves a mixed impression. Some properties are poorly kept,abandoned,or neglected.Broken sidewalks, weeds,and peeling paint are not uncommon.Clearly this is detrimental to the overall image and to those who have made significant investments in their buildings and properties. To the east ofBroadway are lively thriving neighborhoods,parks,and schools,along with some service businesses and local shops.To the west of Broadway,south ofthe industrial sector is the smaller Overland neighborhood enclave bounded by Broadway and Santa Fe.These neighborhoods consider Broadway their back door, rather than their neighborhood shopping area,largely because there are few neighborhood destinations along it.

PAGE 10

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY3 This is a missed opportunity for Broadway businesses.These neighborhoods could serve as a customer base the businesses along Broadway ifthe corridor was redeveloped with that purpose in mind and the street itselfwas more inviting and pedestrian friendly.P PR O J E C TH HI S T O R Y A N DP PU R P O S EThe South Broadway Corridor Urban Design and Transportation Study was initiated by the City in the spring of 1999.The project area includes eighteen blocks along South Broadway from Interstate 25 south to the DenverEnglewood border at Yale Street. The recommendations ofthis study are consistent with the Den v er Compr ehensi v e Plan 2000 ,the Ov er land Neighborhood Plan ,and the W est W ashington P ar k Neighborhood Plan .They are also consistent with the concepts being discussed in the planning processes that will lead to a Den v er Land Use and T r anspor ta tion Plan and an update to the Bak er Neighborhood Plan .Additional direction might be provided as further studies are completed for the potential redevelopment ofthe Gates site and for the Southeast Transit Corridor. The purpose ofthe project was to define the present situation along the corridor and create a vision for what it could be in the future.This effort focused mainly on transportation issues and urban design ofthe street and public right-of-way:lights,trees,benches, and other street furnishings.Historic buildings were noted as a potential resource in enhancing the corridor.A second project component was economic development and the evaluation ofland use,zoning,and business potential. The recommendations ofthis study will be presented to the Planning Board and the City Council for adoption as a supplement to the Comprehensive Plan.S ST E E R I N GC CO M M I T T E EA Steering Committee made up of property owners,neighborhood leaders, and business owners met monthly to craft the vision for the future.They gave guidance to the consultant team and helped shape a physical concept for Introduction Steering Committee members were appointed by the City and represented interests along the length ofcorridor and surrounding neighborhoods. Unique shops are found along all ofBroadway.

PAGE 11

4BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY the development ofa street design to be built over time. Steering Committee members were appointed by the City and represented interests along the length ofcorridor and surrounding neighborhoods. Committee discussions were not only about physical improvements,but also the need to form a property and business organization along the entire corridor.The organization would not only maintain street improvements,but also possibly promote the area and be a point ofcontact for the City.This organization could be a Business Improvement District (BID) or a General Improvement District (GID). The Committee understood the need to act collectively to achieve greater benefit for the whole corridor.P PU B L I CM ME E T I N G SDuring the seven months ofthis project,there were two public meetings. Subsequently,a third public meeting was held to review an option to totally reconstruct the street from building front to building front. The first meeting,attended by over 50 people,was a community discussion about the project possibilities. Participants reviewed some early project ideas and discussed how South Broadway might develop over time. The second public meeting,held in late October 1999,was a review ofstreet element concepts,districts along the eighteen-block corridor,and organizational ideas.Approximately 40 people attended the meeting to review the design concepts.There was a slide show presentation and discussion of the ideas contained in this document. Participants came from all along the corridor and adjacent neighborhoods. The public reached a consensus that the corridor concept presented should be brought forward to implementation. There was also a discussion about the need for a private-sector organization to oversee the implementation,be a point ofcontact for the City,and perhaps promote and market the corridor. At the final public meeting held in January of2001,an option was discussed to keep the same basic design, but totally replace the sidewalk and street sections from building front to building front.The sidewalks and streets would be constructed ofconcrete,be a significant improvement to the existing condition,and tie into improvements made by Englewood to the south and Denver north ofI-25. The City's Traffic Engineer suggested that while this was a more expensive project,it was a much better solution with long-term application. The pros and cons ofthis option were thoroughly discussed including: construction costs and schedules,possible disruption to businesses,a better final product with consistent sidewalk and roadway widths,a more lasting design. The meeting attendees (approximately 50 people) unanimously agreed that the option to completely reconstruct the streets and sidewalks was a better option. Introduction The public reached a consensus that the corridor concept should be brought forward to implementation. Local residents and business owners attended three public meetings.

PAGE 12

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY5 Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study June 1999-July 2001 REVITALIZINGSOUTHBROADWAYÂ’SCOMMERCIALCORRIDOR C CO N C U R R E N TP PR O J E C T SAs with any urban design project,the South Broadway Corridor Project was conducted as other related projects were going forward. IN T E R S T A T E2 5 VI A D U C TThe largest concurrent project is the reconstruction ofthe Interstate 25 viaduct over Broadway at the northern end ofthe site.This project will straighten the curve on the viaduct, bring the highway to current safety standards,and realign the onand offramps between I-25,Broadway,and Lincoln Street.Construction ofthis improvement may not begin for several years. LI G H TRA I LThe light rail station at Broadway connects to the Southwest corridor that opened in July of2000.A new station at Santa Fe and Evans,four blocks from the busiest intersection within this study,Evans and South Broadway,is likely to be a catalyst to redevelopment ofthe area west ofBroadway in the Overland Park Neighborhood. Additionally,a new Southeast corridor will also be constructed and connect to the Broadway Station.This would open,at the earliest,in 2006. These light rail extensions not only provide better access to Broadway,but also have implications for new development associated with the transit stations. DR A I N A G E A N DRO A D W A YIM P R O V E M E N T SRoadway resurfacing and drainage improvements are scheduled for the area between Louisiana and Iowa Streets.Denver's Wastewater Management will perform drainage improvements. The exact construction timing is not known because ofthe identification of funding for these projects.Denver Regional Council ofGovernments (DRCOG),the agency that controls State and Federal funding contributions,will review these projects along with other regional projects and set priorities for funding.Therefore,the funding timing is not predictable. The Evans-Broadway intersection, one ofthe busiest in the area,is scheduled for major improvements involving additional lanes and realignment ofthe right-of-way.This intersection improvement is not scheduled as a near-term project,but was considered in the development ofthe long-term vision for the corridor.T TR A N S P O R T A T I O NRO A D W A YSouth Broadway has a 100-foot rightof-way,which consists ofthe public property,including sidewalks and roadExisting Conditions As with any urban design project,the South Broadway Corridor Project was conducted as other related projects were going forward.These include reconstruction ofthe I-25 viaduct,extension ofthe light rail system,and drainage and roadway improvements.

PAGE 13

6BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY way from private property line on the east to the private property line on the west.The right-of-way includes a roadway (approximately 70 feet) for all lanes and parking,as well as two sidewalks (approximately 15 feet) on either side. The wide outside lane allows parallel parking.While there is some variation, these dimensions are generally standard. At signalized intersections and selected non-signalized intersections,there are left turn lanes.Where there are no left turn lanes,the outside lane at the intersection is 28 feet wide. There are 30,000 to 40,000 vehicles traveling along South Broadway daily. South Broadway is a major arterial that serves as a commute route from Downtown Denver to the communities ofEnglewood,Littleton,and Highlands Ranch to the south.The broad expanse ofasphalt and the number ofmoving traffic lanes act as a significant divider between the east and west sides ofthe street.The busiest intersections are at Mississippi and South Broadway,with southbound cars heading west to Santa Fe for the evening commute home,and the intersection ofEvans and South Broadway, where two major arterials cross. The Iowa/Broadway intersection is noteworthy because neighbors to the east report that it is their major access point from Broadway into that neighborhood.It is the only access to South Santa Fe Drive and destinations west of the South Platte River. PE D E S T R I A NAC T I V I T YPedestrians often find it difficult to cross South Broadway because ofa lack ofbalance between pedestrian and vehicular uses.While it is clear that the street must serve its arterial function, the street can better accommodate pedestrians,transit riders,and bicyclists. The lack ofa comfortable pedestrian environment discourages pedestrian activity with the result that most customers drive to a single business destination and then leave the area.This not only is a loss for adjacent businesses, but also deprives the area ofan active street life.The single destination pattern is exacerbated by the lack of mixed land uses that encourage pedestrian activity. PA R K I N GParking for the businesses is sometimes incorporated onto the building site.Public parking is provided along each side ofthe street.Still,there is a concern about parking near the Antique Row area.Businesses are looking for more parking nearby,and the neighbors to the east are concerned about overflow parking in their neighborhoods. TR A N S I TSouth Broadway carries a number of RTD bus routes:0,0 Limited,11,14, 19,and 21.The bus stops along the corridor generally consist ofsimply a Existing Conditions The lack ofa comfortable pedestrian environment means that most customers drive to a single destination,and then leave.

PAGE 14

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY7 sign and a designated area along the street.There are few bus shelters or benches. The light rail station at Evans and Santa Fe,which opened in July 2000, has become a destination for pedestrians,bicyclists and those taking connecting buses to the light rail station.The station includes 99 parking spaces.The station site is located in a mainly industrial area with the Evans Avenue viaduct just north ofthe platform. BI C Y C L E SSouth Broadway is a major arterial and,while bicyclists use the roadway,it is not a designated bicycle route.The City ofDenver bicycle route D18 crosses Broadway at Iowa and D20 at Iliff.Route D9 runs parallel to Broadway north/south along Logan to Iowa and then continues on Sherman to the Englewood limits. The South Broadway corridor has limited bicycle parking,mostly provided by private properties.The light rail stations at Evans and Broadway provide some bicycle parking.The City has a bicycle parking program that pays for the installation ofbicycle racks and could be employed on Broadway.L LA N DU US E A N DE EC O N O M I CD DE V E L O P M E N TLA N DUS EThe land uses along the entire corridor are mainly business uses with some office buildings.A few homes,especially to the south ofEvans,still have residential uses,although housing is a very small component ofthe overall corridor land use mix.There are also two motels along the corridor. The Gates Rubber Company site,at the north end ofthe corridor,dominates the land use between the I-25 viaduct and Arizona Avenue.In early 2001,Gates was in the process ofselling 49 acres on the west side of Broadway for redevelopment as a mixed use site.The specific development plan is not complete as ofthis writing. Between Arizona and Iowa,for about four to five blocks,there is a grouping ofshops collectively known as Antique Existing Conditions The layering ofshops, apartments,and offices is proving to be a successful means ofkeeping the evening streets alive,with people at hand to enjoy them.-John Simonds Some businesses are located in older homes.

PAGE 15

8BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY Row.In this same area,there are destination businesses such as a glass retailer/fabricator and warehouse,a bank, and an Italian restaurant. To the south ofIowa,the businesses are generally destination oriented. These include music stores,furniture stores,auto-related businesses,truck rental,and a scattering ofrestaurants and bars. Most ofthe buildings that house these businesses are one to three stories tall with 96% ofthe properties built before 1980.The majority ofthe older structures are not historically significant.The building areas are generally ofless square footage than allowed by zoning and much ofthe land and buildings are underutilized. OW N E R S H I PMost ofthe buildings and properties along the corridor are locally owned.In fact,92% are locally owned and another 3% have owners in the DenverMetro area.There are no significant assemblages ofpublicly-held land or buildings.With only a few exceptions, the land along South Broadway remains largely in individual lots or small parcels (unassembled),making redevelopment difficult. ZO N I N GThe land along South Broadway is zoned B-4 and allows business and commercial uses.The uses range from office to restaurant,to car lots,to light industrial.The area to the north Existing ConditionsThe land along South Broadway remains largely in individual lots or small parcels (unassembled),making redevelopment difficult. Rear Property Line Front Property Line Street Residential Property Alley 1st Story 2nd Story 3rd Story 4th Story 2:1 Floor Area Ratio with a 4-Story Building 45 Rear Property Line Front Property Line 10 feet Street 135 feet 125 feetResidential Property Alley 25 feet Buildable Area Potential Building Area within Bulk Plane Bulk plane requirements create an envelope within which the building should fit. The Floor Area Ratio (FAR) determines the allowable square footage in a building based on the lot size. In a B-4 zone, a 2:1 FAR is allowed.

PAGE 16

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY9 (where the Gates Rubber Company is located) is zoned industrial,and that is likely to change. The blocks facing Broadway on either side often contain housing on the half block between the alley behind Broadway and the adjacent streets of Lincoln to the east and Acoma to the west.The neighborhoods one-half block away from South Broadway to the east are zoned R-2,which allows more than one residence on a zone lot. The proximity to housing restricts the building height and bulk that is allowed and limits the amount ofsquare feet that can be built. HO U S I N GThere are currently no significant areas ofhousing along South Broadway,although one block to either side there are stable neighborhoods. This is partly due to the nature ofthe street as a major arterial.The consultant team identified the lack ofassembled land and the current zoning as two issues that discourage housing from being built on Broadway. The recent opening ofthe Evans light rail station on the Southwest LRT corridor may provide an opportunity for multi-use projects near the intersection ofEvans and Broadway.These could include apartments and housing along with retail and commercial uses. A further market study will be needed to determine the feasibility ofsuch a project.However,from an urban design point ofview,a mixed-use development with housing could greatly contribute to improving the character ofthat area. Economic strengths and weaknesses along the Corridor include: ST R E N G T H SMost ofthe businesses are locally owned which bodes well for future financing programs supported by those owners.Lack ofabsentee owners also suggests that it might be easier to form a property owner association. The surrounding neighborhoods are stable and provide a strong customer base for future neighborhood-based businesses such as restaurants,drug stores,and specialty shops. Antique Row is a valuable anchor within the corridor. Traffic counts are high enough to support local,regional,and national chain operations. There are a significant number of underdeveloped properties where redevelopment can occur. WE A K N E S S E SThe physical environment is not consistently pedestrian-friendly. There is limited precedence for creatively financed projects in the corridor. A single merchants or property owners association for the corridor is absent. Housing is limited along Broadway and existing housing is low-density. There are limited publicly held properties that could be used to leverage investment. With the exception ofAntique Row, there are few anchors within the corridor making it difficult to leverage activity. Limited neighborhood-serving retail, such as drug stores,convenience stores,restaurants,and coffee shops, keeps the surrounding neighborhoods from seeing Broadway as their shopping district. Existing Conditions South Broadway caters more to the regional market than the local market. Antique Row draws beyond the regional market to the national. Antique Row draws customers from across the country.

PAGE 17

10BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY EC O N O M I CCO R R I D O RCH A R A C T E R I S T I C SSeven percent ofthe property in the corridor is located at the Gates site. Currently,the portions ofthe property west ofBroadway are slated for redevelopment as a mixed-use area.This redevelopment should have a strong and positive influence on the areas to the south and open up opportunities for redevelopment that do not currently exist. A high percentage ofowners have small parcels and underutilized properties.This makes assemblage difficult and thus development ofa significant project is impeded.Many ofthe properties are passed down to family members,with the result that some owners who are not necessarily interested in change.However,some multi-generational ownerships work exceedingly well maintaining long-term business establishments with a loyal clientele. Property ownership is stable relative to other Denver areas.During the 1990s,property ownership changes ranged from one to three percent per year.This means that significant reinvestment in the corridor has been minimal.The fact that 96% ofthe buildings in the corridor were built before 1980 reiterates that fact. SA L E STA XGE N E R A T I O NOne measure ofthe economic success ofbusinesses along Broadway is the sales tax revenue.The City records show a disappointing return for the number ofbusinesses and amount of property and land along South Broadway.In 1998,71% ofthe businesses contributed under $1,000 to the City's sales tax.Considering the amount ofland along this corridor, there is a clear loss ofrevenue to the City because oflow volume business. This indicates an opportunity to make improvements that would change this trend. A reason for this low sales tax generation is that a number ofconditions exist that decrease business volumes. Single destination trips,the inconsistent character ofthe buildings and businesses in terms ofup-keep,the particular mix ofbusinesses that don't encourage spontaneous spending,the lack of neighborhood-oriented businesses,and few eating and drinking establishments are some ofthose reasons. MA R K E TDR A WSouth Broadway caters more to the regional market than the local market. Antique Row draws beyond the regional market to the national.The missed opportunity seems to be in the local draw.South Broadway continues to be the back door for surrounding neighborhoods and thus loses the economic benefit ofits immediate location. There are a number ofspecialty shops,such as music stores,that are single destination draws.Because there is no supportive retail nearby (like an ice cream or coffee shop) to capture additional business,spillover sales are limited and pedestrian activity is minimal.This lack ofmixed use reduces business volumes along the corridor. A good example ofthe importance ofdiversifying the mix along South Broadway can be seen in the renaissance that has taken place on South Broadway north ofI-25.Over the past 15 to 20 years,this area has reinvented itselfas a neighborhood place and at the same time maintains a strong regional draw.Physical improvements, a strong business organization,and new strong businesses are part ofthe ingredients ofsuccess. Existing Conditions Considering the amount ofland along this corridor,there is a clear loss ofrevenue to the City because oflow volume business.This indicates an opportunity to make improvements that would change this trend. Seven percent ofthe property in the corridor is located at the Gates site.

PAGE 18

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY11 Existing Conditions The restored historic buildings contribute to the character of Broadway,particularly at Antique Row. A sample inventory ofhistoric buildings, highlighting the blocks between Mississippi Avenue and Iowa Avenue. Additional buildings with historic character are located along the entire South Broadway Corridor. To increase the South Broadway market,the consultants believe that new development and redevelopment must take place.This will likely be led by the private sector.However,the City could support these efforts in terms of rezoning for mixed-use commercial or mixed-use housing projects and assisting with public involvement.A AR C H I T E C T U R E A N DH HI S T O R I CB BU I L D I N G SAR C H I T E C T U R ESouth Broadway's non-historic buildings have no cohesive architectural style.The eclectic collection ofbuildings in some blocks is interesting and contributes to the overall street character.However,there are buildings and properties that are neglected and have been in poor repair for many years. This is particularly true between Iowa and Yale. Denver's Commercial Corridor Development Review Criteria apply to the development ofnew buildings or redevelopment ofexisting ones along the Broadway Corridor.Specific design guidelines tailored to the unique characteristics ofSouth Broadway may be prepared in the future. The City ofEnglewood has developed Review Criteria for their commercial corridors.This process guides private redevelopment in the areas of building location,improvements to the right-of-way,and siting effects on adjacent properties.Along with improvements made through EnglewoodÂ’s lowinterest loan and business grant program as well as its streetscape project, the Broadway Corridor south ofYale has made significant improvements. HI S T O R I CBU I L D I N G SThe consultant team conducted an informal survey to identify those buildings that might be ofhistorical value either because they are historically significant or because they contribute to the historic feel ofa block. Perhaps the greatest potential for historic revitalization from both a preservation and critical mass point ofview is the Gates Rubber Company property between I-25 and Arizona Avenue. Most ofthe other historic buildings in the corridor are located in the northern end ofthe study area between I-25 and Iowa Avenue.Many ofthese buildings are restored, although some are neglected.The restored historic buildings contribute to the character ofBroadway,particularly at Antique Row.Some ofhistoric buildings are covered with siding or otherwise disguised.Restoring them could not only make them more individually valuable,but also would contribute to the quality ofthe street. These building owners may be able to take advantage oftax credits ifthey redevelop their properties. Buildings with historic character

PAGE 19

12BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY

PAGE 20

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY13 I IS S U E SDuring the examination ofthe existing conditions along the Corridor,six main issues emerged. •The street itselfis problematic in that it overwhelms the adjacent businesses.This is in part due to the width of the street,the traffic speed,and the difficulty pedestrians have crossing. Further,in most areas,the street is in poor repair and often the sidewalks are as well.This inconsistency contributes to disruptive shifts in traffic lanes and a general look ofneglect. •While Broadway is not a designated bicycle route,there are many destinations that could be accessed by bicycle.The lack ofadequate and safe bicycle parking is likely a hindrance because Broadway is not “bicycle friendly.” •The sidewalk is inconsistent in quality and the lights,furnishings,trees,and other elements are related to adjacent businesses rather than the corridor. There are no street elements that tie the corridor together. •The corridor is overwhelmed with private and public signs as well as billboards.Many ofthe signs seem designed to overpower other nearby signs resulting in a visual clutter of signs and billboards that compete for attention.The signage is a major contributor to visual disorganization along the street. •The corridor is not the same along its 18-block length from I-25 to Yale Avenue.The sidewalk and its eleBroadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study June 1999-July 2001 REVITALIZINGSOUTHBROADWAY’SCOMMERCIALCORRIDOR To achieve the vision for the South Broadway corridor,the consultant team worked with the Steering Committee to determine the issues facing the Corridor and the objectives ofthe study. Issues/Objectives The wide street is in poor repair. The visual clutter and lack ofcharacter overwhelm adjacent businesses.

PAGE 21

14BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY ments appear random and there is little to distinguish one area from another.Thus,the roadway dominates the adjacent land uses instead ofchanging its character to reflect land uses change. •The land along the corridor is vastly underutilized.Despite some strong businesses and well-kept properties, the overall impression is one ofneglect.D DE S I G NO OB J E C T I V E STo create a sense oforder along the South Broadway corridor and define a vision for its future,the consultant team developed the following objectives. •Create a Kit ofParts for street elements (lights,benches,utilities,etc.) that can be used in varying combinations to create a consistent theme and distinguish different areas along the corridor. •Use the Kit ofParts to create an attractive,pedestrian friendly environment. •Address issues such as building disrepair and signage that clutter the corridor. •Maintain or improve vehicle,pedestrian,transit,and bicycle access along the corridor. •Identify market issues that impede business development. •Identify historic buildings that contribute to the character ofSouth Broadway and could qualify for special tax credits ifthey were redeveloped. •Identify the steps necessary for implementation ofthis vision and potential funding sources that could be used. The sidewalk and its elements appear random and there is little to distinguish one area from another. Thus,the roadway dominates the adjacent land uses instead ofchanging its character to reflect land uses change. Issues/Objectives Poor sidewalks and overwhelming signs create an overall impression ofneglect and clutter.

PAGE 22

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY15 C CO R R I D O RS ST R E E TR RE C O N S T R U C T I O NR RE C O M M E N D A T I O N SAs a result ofdiscussions with the City Engineer,the Steering Committee, and among the public and property owners at the final public meeting,the following recommendations are made for street reconstruction. •Along the entire 18 block corridor, the streetscape Kit ofParts should be installed according to the correct zone:District,Destination,or Crossroads as explained below.This installation should be designed to encourage pedestrian activity and bicycle access. •Street sections should include dimensions for a median to be initially built only in areas defined as a “District” (see page 16).Other street cross-sections will remain the same with a painted median unless there is enough pedestrian and multi-destination traffic to warrant construction of a raised median. •Because there are varying widths of sidewalks and street sections and their general condition is poor,the street and sidewalks should be replaced building front to building front with consistent dimensions and paving Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study June 1999-July 2001 Based on the analysis ofthe issues and objectives,the Steering Committee and the consultant team crafted a set ofrecommendations. These recommendations are individual actions that collectively make the vision a reality. Recommendations REVITALIZINGSOUTHBROADWAY’SCOMMERCIALCORRIDOR The Kit ofParts can be used in various combinations along the corridor. The colors, materials, and costs are conceptual and will be determined during the design development phase.K i t o f P a r t s

PAGE 23

16BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY material.On the advice ofthe City engineer,the street and sidewalks should be totally replaced with concrete with typical dimensions as detailed on page 17. •Left-turn lanes should be installed at every intersection along the corridor to increase traffic flow,improve access,and reduce the size ofthe outside lanes.Some intersections along the corridor have left-turn lanes and some do not.Where there is no left-turn lane,motorists who disregard the “No left turn”sign block traffic on the inside lane which occasionally results in minor accidents. Additionally,the no-left-turn areas limit access to streets where people want to go.The provision ofleftturn lanes at every intersection should be part ofthe overall roadway design that will standardize the lane widths, sidewalk widths,and turning lanes for the entire corridor.O OV E R A L LD DE S I G NF FR A M E W O R KDE S I G NZO N E SThe study area encompasses 18 blocks ofBroadway from I-25 to Yale Avenue.The character ofthe Corridor is not the same along its entire length. The differences are due to a change in the types ofshops and businesses. Further,the intensity ofvehicular traffic at the Broadway-Evans intersection makes that area function differently than other sections. The consultant team,working with the Steering Committee,identified three design zones. •The District:between Arizona and Iowa Avenues,the only place in the Corridor where there is currently significant pedestrian activity. •The Crossroads:two blocks either side ofEvans and Broadway where two major arterial streets cross,the busiest intersection in the corridor. •The Destination areas:between Jewell and Colorado Avenue and between Iliffand Yale where most ofthe businesses are single destinations. The area directly south ofInterstate 25 to Arizona is dominated by the Gates Rubber Company facilities.The more than 70-acre facility is mostly vacant or underutilized.In 2001,Gates sold its property west ofBroadway.At this writing,it is not yet clear what type ofredevelopment will go forward,the timing,or to what extent the property uses will change. Because this area is such a large,independent property and so little is known about the owner’s plans,the consultant team decided that it was premature to develop any urban design recommendations along that stretch ofBroadway. The team did,however,recognize that Recommendations Much like the coordinated furnishings in a home or office,the Kit ofParts contains coordinated individual elements used along the sidewalk:benches, trees,traffic signals,kiosks,fencing. The South Broadway corridor is divided into design zones, areas with similar characteristics and transportation functions.

PAGE 24

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY17 area as a gateway to the rest ofSouth Broadway.When it is redeveloped,the street should be designed to reflect its gateway function using the same street elements designated for the rest ofthe corridor. TH EKI T O FPA R T SOne ofthe urban design problems along the corridor is the lack ofany consistent treatment ofthe street furnishings and utilities along the sidewalk. There are few trees,most ofthe traffic signals hang from span wires across the intersections,and the overhead wires and signs visually dominate the street. There are some improved sidewalks, trees,and other furnishings associated with particular properties,but they are isolated and do not have a significant influence in the overall impression of South Broadway. The consultant team and the Steering Committee created a Kit ofParts that can be used in various combinations along the entire length ofthe corridor. Recommendations Legend Right-of-way New median curb and gutter New pavement markings Tree with decorative grates and guards Decorative light fixture and pole (sidewalk lighting) Sample minor intersection (unsignalized) Sample major intersection (signalized) Sample Roadway Segment7'11'11'14'11'11'7' 4'10' 7'11'11'14'11'11'7' 4' 10' Proposed traffic improvements include left turn lanes at every intersection, a median and on-street parking spaces to maximize the number ofspaces per block. The streetscape improvements ultimately should extend along the entire corridor.

PAGE 25

18BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY Much like the coordinated furnishings in a home or office,the Kit ofParts contains coordinated individual elements used along the sidewalk:benches,bicycle racks,trees,traffic signals, kiosks,and fencing.Traffic control devices have been identified as part of this kit. These “parts”are then used in varying combinations along the entire length ofthe corridor.The team used them differently in each ofthe urban design zones depending on the character and function ofthe area.However, because they are ofthe same style, material,and color,the overall effect is unifying. A conceptual design for the Kit of Parts has been proposed (see illustration on page 15) and will be developed when the first project is initiated since manufacturers specifications could change.The Steering Committee helped identify color,materials,and design character types and the consultant team developed conceptual level cost estimates for budgeting purposes only.The City will use these estimates to help secure funding sources for future implementation. LI G H T S A N DTR E E STo unify the corridor and make the sidewalks more pedestrian friendly,the consultant team and the Steering Committee recommend a consistent pattern ofpedestrian lights,overhead lights,and trees.Because there was concern among the business and property owners that their frontages not be blocked,the recommended pattern is spaced to allow visibility. Six trees and six lights alternate along each block face at 50-foot intervals. Additionally,at each corner there are overhead lights,combined with traffic signals at signalized intersections.If overhead lights are required mid-block, they should be placed geometrically within this pattern.The luminaire on all the lights is the same,although the overhead lights may require a larger size luminaire ofthe same style.The specific recommendation oflight style is noted for each urban design zone below. Part ofthe implementation ofthis streetscape should include the burying ofutilities as part ofthe City’s continuing program to replace overhead utilities during reconstruction projects. The trees,when planted,should be of Recommendations To unify the corridor and make the sidewalks more pedestrian friendly,the consultant team and the Steering Committee recommend a consistent pattern of pedestrian lights,overhead lights,and trees.The District area with Kit ofParts installed.

PAGE 26

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY19 The main purpose of these medians is to make crossing the street easier at the intersections.Pedestrians can walk halfway across and then have a place to stand before proceeding the rest ofthe way. a sufficient caliper to have a visual impact and not be a target for vandals. Tree guards and grates,as shown in the Kit ofParts,should be installed to protect the trees.The Denver Streetscape Design Manual should guide the selection,placement and installation of trees.Additionally,there should be a tree watering and maintenance program in place prior to tree planting to ensure their health.This may include an irrigation system.U UR B A ND DE S I G NZ ZO N E STH EDI S T R I C TThis zone,between Arizona and Iowa is dominated by antique shops and is known locally as Antique Row. Particularly on weekends,antique shoppers go from shop to shop within these blocks.One ofthe problems identified by the Steering Committee and the public was the difficulty in walking across Broadway and the lack ofa pedestrian friendly environment. Within the District zone,elements were chosen from the Kit ofParts that create comfort for the pedestrians.The double light,benches,trees,and fencing help achieve this goal.Additionally,the kiosk can provide a map ofthe area,a place to post notices,and an information center for the District. The pedestrian light standard in the District zone is the double luminaire. This will provide more light at the pedestrian level during the evening.It will also distinguish this area from the other zones because ofthe light level and the visual impact ofthe double light standard. Because ofthe pedestrian traffic in the District and the difficulty in crossing Broadway,the consultant team and the Steering Committee recommend that low medians be placed in the center ofthe street.These will follow the existing double yellow lines in the blocks where there are left turn lanes. Medians will not be extensively landscaped because plantings in the medians sometimes further divide the sides ofthe street,which is contrary to the objective ofunifying the opposite sides Recommendations The Crossroads design, with new lights, fences, bollards, and trees.

PAGE 27

20BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY Recommendations ofthe street.Therefore,the medians will be raised six to eight inches,perhaps with some decorative surface treatment or low plantings as determined during final design. The main purpose ofthese medians is to make crossing the street easier at the intersections.Pedestrians can walk halfway across and then have a place to stand before proceeding the rest ofthe way.Details for median placement and dimensions are included in the drawing on page 17. Where the median is widest,about 15 feet back from the intersection,it will have a double light and a tall median standard containing a logo,art piece,or banner.This will distinguish the District and help to bring the two sides ofthe street together.The exact design ofthe upper portion ofthis fixture will be determined during design development prior to producing construction documents. TH ECR O S S R O A D SThis zone is now and will continue to be a high volume area for vehicular traffic.Additionally,the light rail station at Evans and Santa Fe will increase bus traffic.The City has plans to widen this intersection to accommodate traffic flow,although the implementation ofthis project is likely long-term. The consultant team and Steering Committee recommend that this zone One ofthe problems identified by the Steering Committee and the public was the difficulty in crossing Broadway and the lack ofa pedestrian friendly environment. The Kit ofParts in the Destination Area.

PAGE 28

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY21 also be designed to accommodate transit riders,and pedestrians comfortably. Transit shelters,bright lights,benches, and trees from the Kit ofParts should be placed along the sidewalk to accomplish this objective.Additionally, pedestrian crosswalks should be well maintained and marked,and the traffic signals should accommodate easy pedestrian movement. This zone needs to be well lit because ofthe heavy traffic,transit uses,and pedestrians.The consultant team and Steering Committee recommend using two to four luminaires at each corner ofBroadway and Evans.Additionally, only overhead lights will be used in the Crossroads zone,spaced six per blockface to continue the tree and light pattern.The intent is to create a consistent ambient light with a brighter level than other zones,but not so bright that it is glaring. In this zone,many ofthe businesses are set back with parking in front between the building and the sidewalk at the front ofthe lot.Combined with the high traffic volumes at Evans and Broadway,this arrangement contributes to the feeling ofvehicular domination ofthe environment.To address this, the fence from the Kit ofParts should be used at the edge ofthe sidewalk in front ofthe parking lots to help maintain the building line at the sidewalk and to separate the sidewalk from the parking lot. The design ofthis intersection is complicated by the need to increase its capacity.At the time ofthis writing, the City has plans to increase the capacity ofthe Evans/Broadway intersecThe Destination Areas need to be woven into the overall design ofthe corridor. Recommendations Some sidewalks have landscaping. Vehicles dominate the landscape.

PAGE 29

22BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY tion.Currently there is no funding or timeline associated with that plan. When there is funding,the design will inevitably be further developed.That design should incorporate the Kit of Parts and,ifpossible,add a median of an adequate size as a pedestrian refuge to encourage walk-on traffic at the light rail station at Evans.Similarly,traffic signals should be timed,to the degree possible,to aid both pedestrians and bicyclists crossing this intersection. TH EDE S T I N A T I O NAR E A SThese zones are on either side ofthe Crossroads and are characterized by the destination businesses that line this portion ofBroadway.Customers patronizing these businesses tend to go to one destination and then leave the area.Therefore,convenient access to those businesses is critical. The Destination Areas need to be woven into the overall design ofthe corridor.These areas are perhaps in the most need ofa consistent design because the land uses are so inconsistent.As with all portions along this corridor,the consultant team and the Steering Committee recommend a continuation ofthe light and tree pattern. The pedestrian light will have a single luminaire and the tree and light pattern will be the same as the other urban design zones.Overhead lights will be placed at each corner ofthe intersection,combined with traffic signals where appropriate.They may be added mid-block into the pattern oflights and trees as needed. In this area,the medians are not raised,but rather painted on the street to keep the lanes consistent throughout the corridor.Ifthese areas change land uses and become more like the District zone,the median could be added in the same manner as in the District. BU SSH E L T E R SBus shelters provide comfort for the transit riders.They also,ifcarefully designed,provide a sense ofidentity to the corridor.Nearby communities, including Englewood,Thornton and Glendale,have worked with a supplier who provides shelters in exchange for advertising revenue. At this writing,the City and County ofDenver is exploring this bus shelRecommendations Bus shelters provide comfort for the transit riders and a sense of identity to the corridor. Bus shelters provide comfort for the transit riders.They also,if carefully designed,provide a sense ofidentity to the corridor.

PAGE 30

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY23 ter/advertising program to determine if it can be used on DenverÂ’s public rights ofway.Ifthey determine that it can, Broadway is an excellent candidate for a pilot project. SI G N A G EThrough its Zoning Code,the City has limited the number and location of billboards.No additional billboards should be permitted on Broadway. All public signage (such as parking signs) should be part ofthe design package ofthe streetscape and coordinated with the Department ofPublic Works. Private signage should be addressed by a property owner organization (there is not one in place at this writing).It (the owners organization) should work with the City to develop a signage program that integrates the private signs into the overall street design and program to improve the look ofthe corridor.For example,signage should probably fit within the architecture ofthe building.Perhaps vertical signs,which are more pedestrian oriented,could be used.Neon is another option that might fit well with the eclectic nature of the buildings.Some ofthese ideas will likely mean changes or additions to the current City sign code.Since signage is an important part ofany business, property owners and businesses should work closely with the City to determine the best course ofaction. Recommendations Since signage is an important part ofany business,property owners and businesses should work closely with the City to determine the best course ofaction. The lack ofconsistency in signage gives Broadway a disorganized look.

PAGE 31

24BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY

PAGE 32

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY25 I IM P L E M E N T A T I O NThe purpose ofthis Study is to create a vision for what Broadway could become based on its character and use. Currently,there are no City funds earmarked for implementation.However, the Steering Committee will work with the City to identify a pilot project for this corridor. This document will be presented for Planning Board approval and then as an ordinance to City Council with a request to make it an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan.At that point, the urban design elements and the Kit ofParts will become part ofthe guidelines as street improvements are made over time.For example,iftraffic signals are replaced,they will be designed not only according to the requirements ofthe Transportation Department,but also in accordance with the design concept shown in the Kit ofParts. Similarly,bicycle racks and bus shelters could be added prior to the larger implementation project because they can be moved during construction and replaced within the new streetscape.P PR O P E R T YO OW N E RO OR G A N I Z A T I O NIn areas where the City constructs street improvements,it requires that the property owners maintain the streetscape elements:lights,trees, benches,and other furnishings.This is part ofthe CityÂ’s effort to stretch the limited resources they have for these kinds ofprojects.The Steering Committee and the public who attended the public meetings expressed interest in exploring the formation ofa business organization along the entire corridor that could represent the ideas ofthis study and work with the City to implement the concept plan. The organization will,at a minimum, take the responsibility ofmaintaining the installed streetscape improvements, but may also be interested in promotion,event planning,or other business development activities.The Steering Committee and other interested parties will pursue creating an organization.M MA R K E TS ST U D YThe consultant team and the Steering Committee recommend working with the City to develop a market study. The study would focus on analyzing market forces,understanding the existing mix ofuses and identifying retail gaps,looking for potential redevelopment sites,and defining methods for stimulating private redevelopment.The potential for mixed-use developments Broadway Corridor Transportation and Urban Design Study June 1999-July 2001 REVITALIZINGSOUTHBROADWAYÂ’SCOMMERCIALCORRIDOR The vision created as part ofthis study will be implemented over many years.Hundreds ofprojects and people will need to make it happen. There will also be opportunities and issues that we cannot now anticipate.This implementation plan is a flexible guide to realizing the vision for South Broadway. Implementation Plan

PAGE 33

26BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY that include some housing will also be explored. Because ofthe underutilization of land along this corridor,stimulating redevelopment is beneficial not only to private property owners,but also the City.Sales tax revenues along this corridor are low and redevelopment could help stimulate more revenues. The market study should conclude with a roundtable discussion that includes developers,property owners, and lenders to identify potential redevelopment sites and initiate a project. Private sector redevelopment is critical to the improvement ofthe corridor.R RE C O M M E N D E DI IM P L E M E N T A T I O NT TI M I N GThe following is a suggested timetable and identification ofresponsibilities for implementing the concepts outlined in this report.The formation ofa property owner organization to work with the City on implementation and maintenance is critical to the implementation ofthis plan. Short-term:one to five years •The Steering Committee and the City work together to conduct a Market Study and initiate private property redevelopment. •The Steering Committee initiates the effort to form an organization and defines its powers,level oftaxing, and duties. •The Steering Committee works with the City to identify a pilot project (that leverages private investment), funding source for that project,and an implementation strategy.This effort includes: •design development; •preliminary engineering;and •refinement ofconstructions costs. •Private property owners evaluate their properties for potential improvements and implement upgrades consistent with the desire to improve the appearance ofthe overall corridor. •The City uses the Kit ofParts and urban design concepts when it implements street improvements or replaces traffic signals along Broadway and its adjacent areas. •Private property redevelopment continues and keys in on taking advantage ofthe new light-rail station at Santa Fe and Evans. •The Gates redevelopment,the I-25 viaduct reconstruction project,and the Southeast Corridor Transportation Project uses the Kit ofParts elements along the Broadway Corridor and adjacent areas. Mid-term:three to seven years •The City continues to use the design concepts and Kit ofParts in all improvements to the street. •The private property organization conducts an evaluation ofthe urban design initiatives to date and makes a five-year plan for continued implementation. •The Broadway/I-25 viaduct is reconstructed and should be designed as an attractive entry to the South Broadway Corridor. Long-term:beyond seven years •The Evans and Broadway intersection Implementation Plan Vision without action is a daydream;action without vision is a nightmare.-Japanese proverb Renovated historic buildings contribute to the character ofSouth Broadway.

PAGE 34

BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY27 is rebuilt. •Street improvements continue as a combination ofCity projects and private property initiatives. •The organization continues to maintain the streetscape and be the point for contact with the City on issues related to the South Broadway Corridor.F FU N D I N GS SO U R C E SAs with all urban design projects,this one is likely to be implemented over time from a variety offunding sources. The City should work with the property owners to identify specific opportunities for applying for funds.The following is a list ofpotential funding sources for consideration. •When there is reconstruction ofthe street for any reason (such as to replace water or wastewater lines) it should be reconstructed according to the urban design concept developed in this plan and the future design development,preliminary engineering and pilot project.This approach maximizes the resources available. •TEA 21 (Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century):The City applies for this federal source of money through the Denver Regional Council ofGovernments (DRCOG). Funds are specifically targeted to projects with a multi-modal transportation emphasis.The pedestrianization ofthe District and the provision ofshelters and benches for transit riders could qualify for this fund. •Community Development Block Grants (CDBG):Although this funding is limited with many more requests than can be met,this could be a potential fund for street improvements.The key is to identify a project and get in line for funding, which may not be immediate.The City should work with the Steering Committee or its organization to initiate this effort. •Capital Improvements Program (CIP):Every year the City identifies a set ofcapital improvements to be made over the next five years and sets aside resources to implement those improvements.With this concept plan in place,the private-sector organization and the City should work together to identify a pilot project and implement it. •MOEDIT (Mayor’s Office of Economic Development and International Trade):This group may be helpful,especially with the Market Study.Possibly they could identify funding sources for specific projects. •Denver Urban Renewal Authority (DURA):During the proposed market study,DURA should be involved Implementation Plan Private sector redevelopment is critical to the improvement of the corridor. The City and property owners should identify specific opportunities to fund.

PAGE 35

28BROADWAYCORRIDORTRANSPORTATIONANDURBANDESIGNSTUDY to identify potential initiatives that could be used to stimulate private development and implementation of streetscape elements in conjunction with private property efforts. •The Steering Committee or organization should work closely with their City Council representative to identify potential funding sources or matching funding sources that could be made available through the general fund or other source within the City.A AF T E R W O R DThe South Broadway Corridor includes many strong businesses along it.It also contains much underutilized property.The vision outlined in this document,demonstrates a simple, straightforward,urban design concept intended to be implemented over time as resources allow. The obvious benefit ofimplementing this concept is a more attractive street. Denverites are proud oftheir City and South Broadway needs to be improved to become competitive with other areas that have revitalized. Beyond this,however,there are many other benefits.South Broadway should be an integral part ofits surrounding neighborhoods and not a division. Business profits and tax revenues both suffer because ofSouth Broadway’s lack ofneighborhood inclusion. Individual businesses probably perform below their potential because of the overall character ofSouth Broadway.It is not an inviting and comfortable place to be and therefore is not realizing its potential market share.The propensity ofcustomers to go to a single destination and leave means that adjacent businesses don’t benefit from their proximity to each other. Because ofits location near two light rail stations,there are opportunities to implement transit-oriented development that is both profitable and helps increase transit ridership.This is an opportunity to make the most ofour community investment in light rail. The consultant team was very impressed with the Steering Committee and the public interest and input into this project.The talent to carry this plan forward and work with the City on implementation is there.Ifprivate property owners collectively move forward with property improvements and creating an organization,they stand to greatly benefit.The success in achieving this vision rests largely with those who own property and businesses along South Broadway. Perhaps the most important key to implementing this vision is the privatesector leadership necessary to make it happen.The Steering Committee has been diligent in its effort to create this plan.The public was supportive of these concepts.Now is the time for the private leadership to emerge and carry these ideas forward.It will require tenacity,patience,and dedication.As has been seen with similar efforts around the City,it can be done. Implementation Plan South Broadway should be an integral part ofits surrounding neighborhoods and not a division.