Citation
Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District plan

Material Information

Title:
Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District plan
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Colorado Boulevard (Denver, Colo.)
City planning
Hospitals

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Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District
(CBHD)
Plan
This Plan envisions rhe Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District Studv Area
i i
as a healthy, safe, cohesive, and inviting neighborhood with healthcare
institutions, healthcare related uses, residential uses, and neighborhood-scale
retail uses that provide services for the residents, healthcare employees, and
visitors. Both rhe residents and the healthcare employees will see the
juxtaposition of residential and healthcare uses in the Study Area as an
advantage and reason for living and working in the neighborhood.
CBHD Plan Draft
October 1997


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FOREWORD
I. INTRODUCTION
A. The Organization of the Plan ...............
B. Purpose of the Plan.........................
\ C. The Planning Process & Vision for the Study Area ...
D. Goals of the Plan...........................
n. EXISTING CONDITIONS
A. Study Area Vicinity and Description ........
B. Existing Zoning.............................
C. Ownership ..................................
D. The Street System......................:......
E. Subarea Description and Key Issues..........
1. Subarea I
2. Subarea II
III. CBHD DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES
A. General Recommendations.....................
B. Height, Bulk, and Massing...................
C. Building Orientation and Placement..........
D. Circulation ................................
E. Parking Lots and Structures ................
F. Landscaping, Open Space and Pedestrian Circulation .
G. Architecture..................................
H .Signage......................................
ILighting.......................................
IV. SUBAREA I DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES
A. Context .....................................
B. Subarea Guidelines..........................
C. Building & Site Design .....................
D. Circulation....................,............
E. Parking Lots and Structures.................
F. Landscaping, Open Space and Pedestrian Circulation
G. Signage.....................................
H. Lighting....................................
V. SUBAREA II DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES
A. Context.....................................
B. Subarea Guidelines..........................
C. Building & Site Design......................
D. Circulation...................................
E. Parking Lots and Structures.................
F. Landscaping, Open Space and Pedestrian Circulation .
G. Signage.....................................
H. Lighting....................................
VI. IMPLEMENTATION ACTION PLAN
A. CBHD District...............................
B. Subarea I...................................
C. Subarea II..................................
APPENDICES & ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ...........................
CBHD Ptan Draft
October, 1997


FOREWORD
The Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District (CBHD) Plan provides a framework to balance the
delivery of quality medical care and instruction with the character and viability of adjacent
residential neighborhoods. The CBHD development guidelines provide quality urban design and
site planning solutions regardless of parcel ownership or tenancy. Ongoing communication and
cooperation among the members of the CBHD are key to the successful implementation of the
plan and goals to sustain a vital and diverse district. The contents of this plan are the result of
extensive discussion, intensive negotiation, and consensus building among the healthcare
institutions, neighborhood organizations, and the City of Denver over a number of years. These
efforts are gratefully acknowledged.
The CBHD Plan will be presented to the Denver Planning Board and City Council for
consideration of adoption as an amendment to the Denver Comprehensive Plan. As such, the
recommendations within this plan are consistent with and further the objectives of the Denver
Comprehensive Plan.
The CBHD acknowledges that the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, the University of Colorado
Health Sciences Center while fully participating members of the CBHD throughout this planning
process, cannot as divisions of the United States government and the state of Colorado, support
the passage of this plan before the City and County of Denver City Council. The
recommendations of these healthcare facilities have strengthened the document.
' 1 '-I'.-
The cornerstones of this plan are the continued communication and cooperation among the
members of the CBHD. This plan is prepared with full knowledge of the CBHD Planning
Committee that efforts are currently underway to relocate and/or reorganize healthcare facilities
or healthcare programs as opportunities arise. The members of the CBHD are committed to this
planning process because these guidelines and recommendations will lead to appropriate site
planning solutions.
The plan will address site specific issues, while also maintaining a unified vision for the
healthcare district. Development recommendations will respond affirmatively to the changing
face of the healthcare district. This will occur through coordination of the factors which
influence individual organization decisions on scale, massing, height, access, landscaping, street
furniture, and streetscaping. This vision will also address adverse traffic and transportation
issues.
Clearly delineated boundaries for the medical facilities will limit encroachment of non-residential
uses into the adjoining stable residential areas. This plan will identify the agreed boundaries for
the CBHD. It is also understood this will allow the participating healthcare institutions to
acquire appropriate H zoning with the support of the CBHD participating neighborhood and city
agencies. It should also be understood, any healthcare expansion beyond these boundaries may
CBHD Plan Draft '
October, 1997
1


be met with neighborhood association opposition.
Note: VAMC, and UCHSC believe that they are not subject to City and County of
Denver zoning. The neighborhoods and the City believe that these institutions and
healthcare facilities are subject to City and County of Denver Zoning.
This plan has been prepared within the context of the impending move of the University of
Colorado Health Sciences Center to the former Fitzsimmons Army Medical Base over the next
few years. It is the understanding of CBHD members that a master plan process for University
of Colorado properties remaining within the Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District boundaries
will begin in the near future. The CBHD must participate in the discussions of the UCHSC
master plan in order to continue the coordination of plan recommendation implementation
actions.
The Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District, with its combination of sound residential areas and
major healthcare educational campuses and facilities, provides a significant and vital component
to the economy of central Denver. The healthcare campuses and facilities deliver needed health
services to the neighborhood and region, and also provide employment and educational
opportunities. Neighborhood residents in the area are served by commercial convenience outlets
which might not locate in the vicinity except for the large employment and market base
generated by the healthcare facilities. Residential areas are aided in the maintenance of existing
stability through the residential occupancy of an educated and/or healthcare facility-employed
population. As neighbors, the healthcare facilities and residential neighborhoods have learned
to communicate with each other and to jointly address mutual concerns. At the same time that
the healthcare facilities benefit the neighborhoods! there are also an increasing number of issues
which affect the quality and characteristics of these neighborhoods. Increased traffic, and the
juxtaposition of hospital, offices, and parking lots to residential uses, combine to create a
tension in the fabric of the neighborhoods of the CBHD, which must be eased before the fabric
is tom. For these reasons, a plan has been prepared .in order to explicitly define the issues,
outline areas of common interest, and to create a framework upon which to build our existing
communication towards resolution of these concerns.
CBHD Plan Draft
October, J997


I. INTRODUCTION
A. Organization of the Plan
The CBHD Plan is organized into six major sections.
I. The Introduction describes the purpose for the CBHD Plan, the planning
process, the vision and goals for the district, and the intended use of the
plan.
II. The Existing Conditions section provides an assessment of the current land
uses, zoning and characteristics of the district. Emphasis is placed on the
existing street system, district subareas, and background information for
the application of the development guidelines.
III. The District Development Guidelines explicitly state the recommendations
which will guide public, private, healthcare and non-healthcare
redevelopment in the district. The CBHD guidelines promote a level of
quality, character, and identity that will knit together the diverse subareas
within the district. The guidelines are advisory, not mandatory. However,
they will be applied, along with the other plan recommendations, as
analysis tools in the review of proposed development plans.
IV. /V. Sections IV. and V. identify unique opportunities and recommendations
specific to Subarea I and Subarea II within the CBHD study area. These
sections acknowledge varying conditions and provide the opportunity to
create diverse and intriguing design solutions throughout the district.
Adherence to district-wide development parameters is achieved, yet
diverse needs and impacts are addressed.
VI. The Implementation Action Plan identifies tasks which must be
accomplished to make this plan a reality. This section describes the
relative priority of the projects, presents general time frames, and
identifies the parties which must be involved in order to implement the
recommendations. Identification of specific party involvement does not
necessarily construe funding responsibility for those particular projects.
Implementation actions are described first district-wide, then for each
subarea, with specific recommendations focused on the issues unique to
each sub area of the plan.
APPENDICES The Appendices include definitions, previous studies which have been
done for the area, and acknowledgment for the work done by many
individuals, institutions, and organizations in bringing this plan to fruition.
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
3


B. Purpose of the Plan
The CBHD is an area in transition. Each of the five major healthcare institutions in the district -
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, University Hospital, Veterans Affairs Medical
Center, Columbia-Rose Medical Center, and National Jewish Medical and Research Center, have
been experiencing substantial growth and changes in their programs. These factors have
mandated the expansion of the healthcare facilities and have resulted in new construction,
additional traffic, and the need for more parking facilities.
The encroachment of non-residential uses into the surrounding stable residential areas has raised
concern that boundaries may be necessary to secure the balance of uses within the district. The
CBHD Plan has been created to provide guidance for both private and public sector programs
and capital investments. Future development and renovation are integrated with an overall
vision for the character and quality of design throughout the district. Development guidelines
provide a framework for site specific review based on scale, massing, height,'_acaggsf'
landscaping, street furniture and stfeetscaping. Particular attention is focused on the adverse
environmental impacts created by traffic and related transportation issues. ....
Because the process for developing the CBHD Plan involved diverse input and negotiation, some
of the recommendations in the plan appear to conflict with one another. When conflicts do arise
among various recommendations, the final recommendation will be based upon the specifics of
the issue being addressed and the overall attainment of the plans goals and objectives.
I ,
C. The Process & Vision I
In response to the growing need for a coordinated strategy to address growth and potential
conflicts among healthcare institutions, residents, and other businesses in the area, the CBHD
was formed in 1991. An urban design planning process was initiated to :
1) accommodate the expansion of the healthcare institutions in a manner which enhances
both the institutions and the residential uses surrounding them, and,
2) to maintain and improve the residential quality of the surrounding area.
A committee was formed to represent the different interests in the neighborhood and to oversee
the planning process. The CBHD members have met on a regular basis since 1991, serving as
a clearinghouse for new development proposals and/or issues presented by representatives of the
neighborhood or the healthcare facilities. One item continued to command prominence in the
monthly discussions the issue of institution expansion and the subsequent impacts on adjacent
residential neighborhoods.~ffwas. determined following review of an jnitiaf sEtementbf issues
to be addressed in the CBHD Plan, that traffic and transportation issues would take a principal
role in the process.
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
4


To help fully understand the issues of traffic and parking, the healthcare institutions, with the
review assistance of the neighborhood associations, hired consultants, who performed a traffic
and parking study as background information for the district plan. Upon review of the
completed study, the planning team felt that the issues were of a magnitude to continue the
planning^ process and that the study projections could serve as background data for plan
recommendations.
Eight neighborhood organizations were responsible for representing the residents and institutions
in or adjacent to the CBHD: Bellevue-Hale Neighborhood Association, Capitol Hill United
Neighborhoods (CHUN), Congress Park Neighbors, Cranmer Park-Hilltop Civic Association,
Denver East Central Civic Association (DECCA), South City Park Neighborhood Association,
and Mayfair Neighbors. These organizations focused on protecting and enhancing areas within
or adjacent to the healthcare district as well as maintaining a close and harmonious relationship
with the healthcare institutions.
The CBHD purposes are as follows:
To prepare a CBHD Plan
To facilitate implementation of the plan and to monitor changes (if needed) to plan
recommendations
To serve as a point of contact between the healthcare facilities and neighborhood
associations for the dispersal of information
To attempt to obtain a consensus position of the neighborhoods and healthcare facilities
concerning issues of mutual interest.
The CBHD planning committee has, in addition to its regular meetings, held several public
forums to discuss this plan. It is anticipated this process will culminate in a presentation to the
Denver Planning Board with a request to accept this document as an official amendment to
Denvers Comprehensive Plan. Denver City Council will conclude the process with approval
of an ordinance adopting the CBHD plan as an amendment to Denvers Comprehensive Plan.
Vision for the CBHD Study Area
; The vision for the CBHD Study Area is a healthy, safe, cohesive, and inviting neighborhood
; with healthcare institutions, healthcare related uses, residential uses, and neighborhood-scale
/ retail uses that provide services for the residents, healthcare employees, patients and visitors.
The residents, the healthcare employees and the healthcare decision-makers see the juxtaposition
i of residential and healthcare uses in the study area as an advantage and reason for living and
working in the neighborhood.
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
5


The five major healthcare institutions within the district will function and be perceived as two
campus areasJntegrated with common visual images and shmed facilUies. The residential areas
of the Study Area will retain their existing character, and will be reinforced with compatible in-
fill housing and improvements to existing housing. A diversity of housing types and costs,
extensive landscaping, pedestrian linkages and upgraded retail uses will complement and
reinforce the eclectic and user-friendly character of the district.
It is envisioned automobile and service vehicle access to the CBHD will be focused on Colfax
Avenue, Colorado Boulevard, 8th and 9th Avenue (east of Colorado Boulevard), and Clermont
Street (north of 8th Avenue). An innovative signage program directing traffic to specific
healthcare institutions will be continued. Secondary access to Subarea I, via Hale Parkway is
acknowledged, but use of the Parkway is not encouraged in order to maintain the Parkway
capacity for neighborhood vehicular and pedestrian usage.
People will be encouraged to walk or use healthcare shuttles between points within the CBHD:
between the CBHD and the residential area; between the CBHD and the nearby resources such
as specialty shops and food services on Colorado Boulevard, 8th Avenue, and East Colfax
Avenue; and within the residential areas themselves by providing a hierarchy of safe and inviting
sidewalks.
The most intense and dense healthcare uses will be located in the center of Subarea I of the
CBHD, with uses and building scales transitioning downward from the center of the CBHD in
all directions.
D. Goals of the Plan
This plan provides an urban design framework and design guidelines for the redevelopment and
expansion of new and replacement uses within the CBHD. It also establishes a program for not
only improving the surrounding area, but also maintaining the stability of residential
neighborhoods.
The Plan is designed to meet eight primary goals:
1. Encourage and accommodate the healthcare institutions within the neighborhood in order
to promote job retention and creation, and to provide high quality healthcare for the
region.
2. Maintain and improve the livability of the surrounding area as an urban, mixed-use
neighborhood with a vital residential base and strong neighborhood-serving businesses.
3. Mitigate the off-site parking of vehicles and/or automobile traffic related to the mobility
of employees, patients, and visitors in the healthcare area of the CBHD through the
Colorado Boulevard Health Facilities Transportation Management Organization
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
6


(CBHFTMO) representing the five healthcare facilities within the district and with
neighborhood representation on the TMO Board. Support the TMO in its efforts to
implements cost effective transportation demand management (TDM) program including,
but not limited to education and outreach strategies, carpools, integrated shuttle program,
improved public transit and modified parking policies operations.
4. Improve the movement of traffic, in and out of the district, without heavy impact on
adjacent residences.
5. Improve the physical appearance of the CBHD.
6. Promote a cooperative environment for the healthcare institutions, the residents,
businesses, the neighborhood associations, and the City to work together to accomplish
the goals of the CBHD Plan;
7. Provide a framework for integration of healthcare institutions, the City, and
neighborhood development plans; and to
8. Identify the programs and processes necessary to accomplish the project goals.
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
7


H. EXISTING CONDITIONS
A. District Vicinity & Study Area Description
The Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District, with its combination of sound residential areas and
major healthcare educational campuses and facilities, provides a significant and vital component
to the economy of central Denver. The healthcare campuses and facilities deliver needed health
services to the neighborhood and region, arid also provide employment and educational
opportunities. Neighborhood residents in the area are served by commercial convenience outlets
which might not locate in the vicinity except for the large employment and market base
generated by the healthcare facilities. Residential areas are aided in the maintenance of existing
stability through the residential occupancy of an educated and/or healthcare facility-employed
population. As neighbors, the healthcare facilities and residential neighborhoods have learned
to communicate with each other and to jointly address mutual concerns. At the same time that
the healthcare facilities benefit the neighborhoods, there are also an increasing number of issues
which affect the quality and characteristics of these neighborhoods. Increased traffic, and the
juxtaposition of hospital, offices and parking lots to residential uses combine to create a tension
in the fabric of the neighborhoods of CBHD, which must be eased before the fabric is tom. For
these reasons, a plan has been prepared in order to explicitly define the issues, outline areas
of common interest and, to create a framework upon which to direct the existing communication
towards resolution of these concerns.
For purposes of this study, the Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District (CBHD) is defined as
the impact area shown on exhibit______. |
The CBHD is primarily located within census tract 43.01 (subarea I), which is designated for
statistical and planning purposes as the Hale neighborhood. This is a mixed-use, urban
neighborhood which extends from Colorado Boulevard to Holly Street, and from East 6th
Avenue Parkway on the south to East Colfax Avenue on the north. A portion of the CBHD
(sub-area II) is located in the Congress Park neighborhood whose boundaries are East Colfax
Avenue on the north, 6th Avenue on the south, Colorado Boulevard on the east, and York Street
on the west.
The CBHD is comprised of the following (listed in alphabetical order) healthcare facilities and
neighborhood associations:
Bellevue/Hale Neighborhood Association
Columbia-Rose Medical Center
Cranmer Park-Hilltop Civic Association
Mayfair Neighbors
South City Park Neighborhood Association
University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
University Hospital
Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods
Congress Park Neighbors
Denver East Central Civic Association
National Jewish Medical and Research
Center
Veterans Affairs Medical Center
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
8


Because of the transportation linkage between the CBHD and the surrounding neighborhood
areas and, because of the impact of the activity within the CBHD on the surrounding residential
and commercial uses, the study area also includes the influence area shown on exhibit______
This influence area includes the following neighborhoods: Hilltop, Mayfair, Park Hill, Colfax
at the Park, Congress Park, and South City Park.
Key Issues and Opportunities
The following issues and opportunities are to some degree common to all neighborhoods which
are immediately adjacent to large healthcare facilities.
1. Hospital development tends to expand outward from an historic core to become a campus
of very intense institutional uses surrounded by service and support uses, including
parking. These campuses can become massive in scale, with a tendency to create
"superblocks'' resulting from the closure of public alleys and streets.
2. Hospital campuses which become superblocks create an organized internal, physical
setting which can be designed to be visually appealing to its users through the use of
landscaping and other urban design features such as uniform street furniture and lighting.
Additionally, these settings aid the campuses in becoming easily identified as a whole
rather than as a collection of diverse facilities.
3. Maintaining the viability of healthy residential areas immediately adjacent to healthcare
facility development can, at times, be impeded by the closure of streets and alleys, as
superblock development often presents its "backdoor" to the neighborhood. Hospital
campuses which become superblocks* direct traffic onto the adjacent streets which are
still open. The adjacent streets, however, may not be designed or built to accommodate
the additional, unanticipated traffic.
4. Traffic circulation around hospitals must efficiently serve different users, each with
specific needs; patients, students, employees (including both medical and support staff),
service vehicles, emergency vehicles, visitors, and neighborhood traffic not related to the
hospitals. Visitors and patients are usually unfamiliar with hospital traffic patterns on
the first visit, but develop set patterns of access and egress. Additionally, visitors and
patients are often driving under stressful situations and unfamiliarity with traffic patterns
adds to the level of confusion on their first visit.
5. Autonomous hospital expansion and redevelopment tends to occur as programs evolve,
patient load increases, and funding becomes available. In the absence of long-range
planning arid inter-hospital coordination, circulation routes also evolve autonomously.
6: The very high number of automobile trips to, from, and through the CBHD create
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
9


severe parking problems that negatively impact the institutions and the surrounding
I neighborhoods.
7. The demand for parking increases with the facilitiesexpansion. The location of the
^ parking facilities which will meet the demand must be easily accessible.
8. Colfax Avenue and Colorado Boulevard are major arterials which serve the district.
While facilitating traffic flow, these two arterials also compound the confusion of
entering and leaving the district due to the heavy non-district traffic flow. East-bound
6th Avenue changes to a low volume parkway east of Colorado Boulevard, often leading
to vehicular traffic using local neighborhood streets to find its way to the CBHD.
Service vehicles now use residential streets and the streets that serve as boundaries
between the different residential sections of the neighborhood. Individually, these
vehicles generate more noise and pollution than the residential automobiles. Servicing
for hospitals occur at various hours of the day.
9. There are not many shared open spaces or other facilities, although there are shared
operational programs. (The Auraria Campus provides an example of separate institutions
with shared facilities and shared operational programs.)
10. The intersection of 9th Avenue and Colorado Boulevard has been recognized by the
general public as the primary entry into the CBHD. This has changed as each institution
has changed its parking and primary building entry points. Primary access points will
continue to change as needed.
B. Existing Zoning
The Study Area presents a patchwork of zoning districts, with a concentration of H-l and H-2
zones within the Healthcare District, surrounded by R-3, R-4, B-2, and B-4 zone districts.
Outside of the district, the area is surrounded by low density residential zoning, R-l and R-2.
C. Ownership
The largest ownership assemblages belong to the healthcare institutions, with many small
assemblages and individual parcels creating the ownership pattern in the rest of the Study Area.
D. The Street System
Streets are very important elements of each citys urban design. The character of Denver has
been established with a very clearly articulated grid street and block pattern, with detached
sidewalks, grass, and street trees.
Denvers street system includes every level of the urban street hierarchy, from local streets to
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
10


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major arterials serving the metro area. The streets play a significant function in the CBHD since
there are many different, and often conflicting groups that use the streets. These include
emergency vehicles, employees, residents, visitors, and patient traffic. The heavy daily levels
of background (pass-through) traffic also impacts; the District. The Transportation and Parking
Study, administered by the healthcare facilities at the request of the neighborhood
representatives, focused on identifying and addressing these issues.
One of the major challenges for this Plan is to improve the function of the street system without
sacrificing the essential role and character of the various streets and the uses adjacenf to them.
To accornplish this, it is important to examine both sides of each street when planning for new
development or redevelopment.
The following is a general description of the existing character for some of the streets most used
in the CBHD:
East Colfax Avenue: A major arterial which serves as a continuous connection from city
boundaries on the east to the same on the west. Major land uses are
typically retail strip developments. The primary entrance to Subarea II,
the National Jewish Medical and Research Center, is located on East
Colfax Avenue.
Colorado Boulevard: A major arterial bounded by a mixture of office, retail and healthcare
related uses, including some vacant, deteriorating, and under-utilized
properties and parcels, along with surface parking lots. Residential
character from 10th to 13th Avenues with a few clinical uses. Serves as
a primary access to Subarea I and II.
A collector and a City-designated parkway. One of Denvers few
diagonal streets, Hale Parkway extends from Colorado Boulevard to Grape
Street. The parkway is perceived as a buffer between the healthcare uses
on the south and the Bellevue-Hale residential neighborhood to the north.
Serves as a primary access to Subarea I.
An arterial bounded by a pedestrian-scale mixture of residential, office,
and retail uses on the south and the University of Colorado Health
Sciences Center on the north. Serves as a primary access to Subarea I.
A local street which has served as a point of entrance, or gateway to the
CBHD for both east (Dahlia) and west (Colorado Boulevard). Serves as
a primary access to Subarea I.
A local street. With the development of the UCHSC parking structure at
11th Avenue and Colorado Boulevard, and the proposed renovations to
Hale Parkway:
8th Avenue:
9th Avenue:
11th Avenue:
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
11


STREET classification
** Freeway
Arterial Street
Collector Street
Local Street
.fSth Street Mall
One-Way Street
- Beginning o< One-Way Street
- End of One-Way Street
~rr Stop Sign Control
(mat
"^l Hmh
CITY LIMITS
Z" *nv,r C'*V a County Limits
**. Encloves within Denver
INTERSECTION TRAFFIC SIGNALS
3 Vehicular Pre-Timed
D Vehieutor Semi Actuoted
* Vehieulor Pre-Timed plus added
Pedestrian Phase
v*h|fuiar Actuated with special
Pedestrian Phase
NON-INTERSECTION TRAFFIC SIGNAL
? Pedestrion Pre-Timed
- Pedestrian Actuated
5 Sb,, onl1 Gap Control Pre-Timed
t' Roilrooo Actuated
OTHER ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
1 Flashing Red Stop Sign
3 Flashing Yellow Warning Sign
traffic control and
STREET CLASSIFICATIO
... M'LES--------___
*LE rEET ~ - NO
TRAFFIC ENGINEERING OIVISIOK
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORl
j-|TY ana COUNTY Bt DENVER. COLORADO
3ASE MAP
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University Hospital, this street is expected to serve as a point of entry for
vehicular traffic. Serves as primary access for Subarea I.
A local street. Between Hale Parkway and 8th Avenue, this street serves
as a secondary access point for Subarea I.
A local street. No healthcare facilities are located east of this street
within the district. Serves as a primary access area for Subarea I.
A local street in Subarea II, this street will serve as the primary access
from East Colfax Avenue for Subarea II.
A local street in Subarea I, this street separates residential and healthcare
related (parking) land uses.
In summary, the streets utilized by patients, personnel and service delivery to the CBHD can
be classified into primary and secondary routes as follows:
Primary Routes:
Colorado Boulevard
9th AVENUE (east of Colorado Boulevard)
Colfax Avenue and Colorado Boulevard Intersection
(Primary for National Jewish Center, secondary and/or feeder for other health
care providers)
Secondary Routes:
6th Avenue eastbound to Colorado Boulevard
8th Avenue westbound to Colorado Boulevard
14th Ave. eastbound to Colorado Boulevard
Clermont Street between 8th Avenue and Hale Parkway
Hale Parkway between Dahlia Street and Colorado Boulevard
Feeders to secondary and primary streets:
11th Avenue (Dayton Street to Quebec Street)
Quebec Street (11th Avenue to 8th Avenue)
13th Avenue westbound to Colorado Boulevard
Traffic Route Issues
As the character descriptions of streets in the CBHD were generated by the committee members,
the next step in plan development involved resolution of the issues surrounding the following
topics:
Clermont Street:
Dahlia Street:
Jackson Street:
Harrison Street
CBHD Plan Draft
October. 1997
12


Closure of streets and alleys
Southbound movement on Clermont at 8th Avenue (the problem of traffic continuing
south on Clermont beyond 8th Avenue)
\ -
Heavy district-related secondary route use of Hale Parkway (maintaining the function and
status as a parkway)
Guide sign system to redirect traffic to primary access points
Use of Hale Parkway for delivery and service vehicles to the Veterans Affairs Medical
Center and to Columbia-Rose Medical Center (maintaining limited access to service areas
while retaining status as a Parkway).
Improved access from Colfax Avenue to National Jewish Center for Immunology and
Respiratory Medicine.
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
13


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HOSPITALS/HEALTHCARE INSTITUTIONS: SUBAREAS I and II.


E. Subarea Description and Key Issues
1. Subarea I
2. Subarea II
HOSPITALS/HEALTHCARE INSTITUTIONS: SUBAREAS I and II.
I. Subarea I is the location of most of the healthcare facilities and is zoned primarily H-l-
A and R-3, with large assemblages of property owned by the University of Colorado
Health Sciences Center, University Hospital, Columbia-Rose Medical Center, and
Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
II. Located on the southern side of the intersection of Colfax Avenue and Colorado
Boulevard, Subarea II is the site of National Jewish Medical and Research Center. The
parcels are zoned H-l-A with waivers and H-2.
SUBAREA I
This subarea is the largest of the two distinct subareas of the District and is bounded by
Colorado Boulevard on the west, Hale Parkway on the north, Dahlia Street on the East and 8th
Avenue on the south, which forms the hard edge boundary of this subarea. Within the
boundaries there are three subsections, I-A, I-B and11-C. There are two large and one small
sub-sections that are outside the boundary; these are subsections I-D, I-E and I-F, all of which
are described below and shown on exhibit(s) .'
I ;
SUBAREA I SUBSECTIONS
The Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District study area has several subsections which are
distinguished by a combination of land uses, zoning, ownership, and strong edges. Strong edges
may be defined as those boundaries (usually streets) commonly identified by the community as
the logical limits of the district. There may presently exist some non health-care use parcels
located to the interior of the edge streets, as well as some health care parcels located outside of
the boundaries, which may be viewed as intrusions into the surrounding neighborhoods. These
subsections are:
SUBSECTION I-A
This subsection is bounded by Colorado Boulevard and Ash Street on the west, 11th Avenue and
Hale Park way on the north, Dahlia and Clermont Street on the east, and 9th and 8th Avenues
on the south. The location of most of the healthcare facilities, this sub-section is zoned
primarily H-l and R-3; with large assemblages of property owned by the University of Colorado
Health Sciences Center, University Hospital, Columbia-Rose Medical Center, and the Veterans
Affairs Medical Center. The one exception is the property owned by The Colorado Hearing and
CBUD Plan Draft
October, 1997
14


Speech Center at the southwest comer of Hale Parkway and Bellaire, which is zoned B-l.
SUBSECTION I-B
This subsection is bounded by Colorado Boulevard on the west, Hale Parkway on the north, Ash
Street on the east and 11th Avenue on the south, and is within the hard edge boundary of
Subarea 1.
The University Hospital owns one small apartment property at 11th Avenue and Colorado
Boulevard. The remainder of the ownership is by condominium agreement or by various owners
and is all developed as mid-rise multi-unit residential. It is recommended that any future health
care expansion in this sub-area should be contiguous to existing Healthcare properties, and be
discussed with the neighbors and the Bellevue Hale Neighborhood Association.
SUBSECTION I-C
This subsection is bounded by Clermont Street on the west, 9th Avenue on the north, Dahlia
Street on the east and 8th Avenue on the south and is within the hard edge boundary of Subarea
I.
Columbia-Rose Medical Center owns: one property along 9th Avenue between Clermont and
Cherry Streets (PUD 359); the parking lot on the northeast corner of 8th Avenue and Clermont
Street (B-l) and property on the southwest comer of 9th Avenue and Dexter Street (H-2). The
majority of this subarea is, however, low-rise multi unit residential land and is currently zoned
R-3. The ownership is by various owners. Eveji though it is desirable for this subsection to
remain primarily residential, it is the primary area within Subarea 1 for any Columbia-Rose
expansion, and to a lesser extent, it may also be of interest to the Health Sciences Center or to
the Veterans Affairs Medical Center. At this time, Columbia- Rose has not shown any interest
in acquiring more property. It is recommended that any future heath care expansion in this sub-
section should be contiguous to existing healthcare properties and be discussed with the Bellevue-
Hale, the Cranmer Park-Hilltop, and the Mayfair neighborhood associations.
The following subsections are made up of properties that are owned by the healthcare
facilities and which lie outside the hard edge boundary. Each of these subsections are
encroachments into the residential neighborhood where it is located, and thus healthcare
facility development has met with varying degrees of support or opposition by area
residents. .. ..... __ ____________
SUBSECTION I-D
This subsection is bounded by Birch Street (north of 12th Avenue) and the alley between Birch
and Clermont Streets (between Hale Parkway and 12th Avenue) on the west, mid-block between
Birch and Clermont Streets on the north, Clermont Street on the east and Hale Parkway on the
south.
CBHD Plan Draft
October, ml
15


The Rose Foundation owns one property containing an office building and parking lot, between
Clermont Street and the alley to the east (zoned H-l-A). The University of Colorado Health
Sciences Center owns the properties to the north of 12th Avenue to mid block (the North
Pavilion, zoned R-5 & R-l), and a property on the northeast comer of Hale Parkway and
Clermont Street (the A.F. Williams Building, zoned R-3).
Even though it is desirable by the neighborhood for this area to be single or multi-unit
residential, at this time these properties are being used by Columbia-Rose and the Health
Sciences Center as satellite medical facilities with the acknowledgment of the Bellevue Hale
Neighborhood Association. Columbia- Rose may, in the future, purchase the office property
from the Rose Foundation for continued use as medical offices.
The Health Sciences Center and the neighborhood groups have an informal agreement that the
North Pavilion will retain its current R-5 zoning, and that the open space to the north of this
structure will remain and be well maintained. It is also understood that the current use and
facilities will not be expanded.
It is recommended that any future change in the use of these facilities should be reviewed with
the neighborhood. At this time, any increased use would likely be met with strong opposition
from the Bellevue Hale Neighborhood Association and the residents.
SUBSECTION I-E
This subsection is the Health Sciences Center owned property on the southeast comer of 9th
Avenue and Dahlia Street. At the present time, the building is being used as a day care center
and is zoned R-3. Even though it is desirable by the neighborhood for this area to be single or
multi-unit residential, at this time the property being used as satellite day-care center is a use
by right under current zoning. It is recommended that any future change in the use of this
facility should be discussed with the Bellevue-Hale and Mayfair Neighborhood Associations. At
this time, any increased use would likely be met with opposition from the Association.
SUBSECTION I-F
This subsection is west of Colorado Boulevard in the Congress Park Neighborhood and is
bounded by Harrison Street on the west, E. 10th Avenue on the north, Colorado Boulevard on
the east and E.9th Avenue on the south. This block is zoned R-3 from Colorado Boulevard west
to alley, and is zoned R-l from the alley west to Harrison Street. Also included in this
subsection is the property on the southwest comer of E. 10th Avenue and Harrison Street. This
parcel is zoned R-l. The Health Sciences Center owns these properties and at this time, these
properties are being used as satellite medical offices (in existing residential structures) and a
surface parking lot facility. It is recommended that any future change in the use of these
facilities should be reviewed with the Congress Park Neighborhood. At this time, any increased
healthcare use would likely be met with the strongest opposition by the Congress Park
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
16


Neighborhood Association.
The Congress Park Neighborhood Plan, which was adopted by the City Council and the Mayor
in October 1995 as an amendment to the Denver Comprehensive Plan, specifically objects to any
hospital use or zoning in the Congress Park neighborhood for this subsection. The University
of Colorado Health Sciences Center, as owner of the property, asserts that as an institution
established by the Colorado constitution, the University of Colorado is not bound by the zoning
requirements of local municipalities.
It is desirable for this area to be single or multi-unit residential or a use that is compatible with
the neighborhood and would serve as a buffer from the impacts of Colorado Boulevard traffic
impacts and the Healthcare District. It is hoped that the University of Colorado Health Sciences
Center and area residents and property owners will be able to resolve this issue.
ADDITIONAL PROPERTY
The Health Sciences Center is using, but does not now own, the property known as the Kohler
Building on the southeast corner of Ash Street and E. 8th Avenue. At the present time, the
building is being used as the Preventative Medicine and Biometrics Research Department.
Future purchase of this building by the Health Sciences Center is dependent on the
environmental testing results in the area. It is desirable for this area to be single or multi-unit
residential or a use that is compatible with the neighborhood or the B-l commercially zoned
adjacent parcels and serve as a buffer to Cranrher Park- Hilltop neighborhood residents from
E. 8th Avenue and the Healthcare District. It is Recommended that any future change in the use
of these facilities should be reviewed with the Cranmer Park-Hilltop Civic Association.
ADDITIONAL AREA DESCRIPTIONS and KEY ISSUES
COLORADO BOULEVARD MIXED-USE CORRIDOR:
The uses immediately adjacent to Colorado Boulevard are a mixture of office, retail, healthcare,
institutional, and multi-unit residential uses, zoned R-3, B-2, and H-l-A. This high intensity
development is very shallow on the west side of Colorado Boulevard, ending at the alley, 125
feet to the west, where the zoning is R-l and R-2 and land use shifts to primarily single detached
residential units.
8TH AVENUE CORRIDOR:
Forming the southern edge of the CBHD, 8th Avenue land uses (south side) are retail, service
and commercial between Colorado Boulevard and Clermont Street; zoned B-2, then R-3 multi-
unit zoning and land uses from this point eastward to Dahlia. As with the west side of the
Colorado Blvd. edge, the 8th Avenue higher intensity parcels have an approximate depth of 100
feet, then change to a low density residential area containing both single and multi-unit
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
17


structures.
HALE PARKWAY CORRIDOR:
Hale Parkway was officially designated by the City as a parkway in 1956. This corridor could
be considered an edge but for the healthcare owned and operated facilities to the north on Birch
Street. The land uses on either side of the Hale corridor illustrate the sharp contrast between
the lower density single residential areas on the north and the multi-unit residential and
healthcare facilities on the south side.
CBHD Plan Draft
October. 1997
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in. CBHD DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES ENTIRE DISTRICT
The CBHD development guidelines shall be used by the CBHD to review proposed development
imprpvements and projects. The guidelines in this section focus on coordination and design
cohesiveness throughout the district, without dictating design uniformity1.- Specific solutions will
be evaluated on a case-by-case basis with regard to design ingenuity and overall compliance with
the goals of the CBHD Plan. Specific subarea opportunities and recommendations are included
in sections IV and V.
1. The recommended district boundaries for Subareas I and II healthcare expansion, as
generally defined by existing healthcare land uses and the H-1 and H-2 zone districts are
as follows: (The boundaries are shown on Exhibit___and___.)
Subarea I Boundaries:
NORTH: Hale Parkway with the exception of the area between Birch and Clermont
extending north to the mid-1200 block.
SOUTH: 8th Avenue
EAST: Dahlia Street
WEST: Colorado Boulevard
Subarea II Boundaries:
NORTH: Colfax Avenue
SOUTH: 14th Avenue, with the exception of the area between Harrison and Jackson
where the boundary extends south one quarter into the 1300 block.
EAST: Albion Street
WEST: Garfield Street
Wherever possible, in light of the existing zoning and the existing structures, locate and
design all public and private construction projects to improve the physical and functional
connections between healthcare institutions and the surrounding residential
neighborhoods.
Utilize quality architectural and site design standards to integrate institutional and
residential uses into a single, cohesive, mixed-use neighborhood.
a. Provide central district features and amenities upon which to focus new
development for all the healthcare institutions.
b. Coordinate public infrastructure and beautification projects district-wide to
enhance continuity and identity..
Minimize traffic, noise, lighting, shadowing, and other negative impacts on residential
areas within the District.
a. Define a clear transition between healthcare facilities and adjacent residential
properties. Treat the edges of the district in a manner which ensures the viability
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Odobtr, 19D7
19


and the scale of adjacent residential properties are acknowledged and considered
in CBHD construction (eg. scale in size, placement and treatment of structures
and parking),
b. Encourage delivery trucks and emergency vehicles to use arterial and collector
streets. Additionally, consider using physical traffic deterrents and other tools
which will discourage delivery and emergency vehicles from using residential
streets.
4. Encourage the design on both sides of the defined edge streets to be compatible in terms
of use, intensity and height.
5. Encourage common landscape design on both sides of the defined edge streets to help
buffer the residential uses from the institutional uses.
6. Restrict the creation of parking lots and parking structures which serve the healthcare
uses to areas within the boundaries of the CBHD. In collaboration with the CBHFTMO,
mitigate the creation of new parking iots and structures which serve the healthcare area
within the boundaries of the CBHD.
7. Encourage most healthcare related traffic to utilize Colorado Boulevard, Colfax Avenue,
Hale Parkway, 11th Avenue, 9th Avenue, 8th Avenue and Clermont Street.
8. Consider the use of entry features, gateway and use signage to direct traffic into and out
of the CBHD, to specific institutions, and onto certain streets, to avoid unnecessary
traffic circulating through the surrounding residential neighborhoods. Consider on-site
entry features at Colorado Boulevard and 9th Avenue, and Clermont Street and 9th
Avenue. Place signage in locations as agreed by the CBHD sign program review
process. This program might also include streetscaping and intersection improvements,
such as striping, special pavement, and pedestrian signalization.
9. Encourage access to parking structures and parking lots located either on arterial streets,
where permitted, or on those collector and local streets which are internal to the district.
Utilize traffic redirection structures (such as turn movement diverters) to direct or slow
automobile traffic and to facilitate pedestrian access.
10. Discourage traffic from crossing Hale Parkway and continuing north or crossing 8th
Avenue and continuing south, into the residential neighborhoods. On the residential side
of these streets, consider landscaping, residential entry monuments, and other methods
to reinforce the residential character of the neighborhood.
11. Discourage healthcare traffic from circulating through and parking in residential
neighborhoods. Support the CBHFTMOs transportation demand management (TDM)
program. Encourage each healthcare facility to provide free preferential car pool parking
CBIID Plan Draft
October, 1997
20


and support transit subsidies. Initiate a residential parking program which establishes
time limits for on-street parking in the neighborhood for non-residents. If the free night
parking program is not successful in limiting healthcare-related parking in the residential
neighborhoods, then consider expanding the scope of the residential parking program
(RPP) to include a night time parking restriction. In cooperation with the CBHD and the
CBHFTMO, monitor the effectiveness, management and control of the residential parking
program.
12. Discourage the use of Hale Parkway as a thoroughfare. Provide streetscaping on both
sides of the street to emphasize this streets residential character. Acknowledge that as
a designated Parkway, City regulations on the placement of buildings, signage and points
of access must be observed. Initiate the implementation of these regulations by exploring
the potential for phasing out or minimizing the use of existing curb cuts and driveways
and by reviewing the proposed placement of signs through the CBHD signage program
for proper placement. Consider adding additional stop signs.
13. Consider improving the safety and function of the intersection at 9th Avenue and
Clermont Street in order to better serve Columbia-Rose Medical Center and the Veterans
Affairs Medical Center.
14. As a last resort, when considering vacating streets in order to improve the utility of
individual parcels, review alternatives for encouraging the retention or enhancement of
both the functional and perceived permeability of the district for automobile and
pedestrian traffic. |
15. Maintain, enhance and expand the housing stock in the adjacent residential
neighborhoods.
16. Protect those structures which have historic character or significance.
17. As redevelopment within the district occurs along those streets which serve as district
boundaries, the scale and buffering of that development should respect the character of
the buildings across the street. ~
18. Encourage the retention and enhancement of the viable residential character of the areas
within and surrounding the CBHD. To achieve this, consider using tools such as
rezoning and the creation of overlay districts, which will provide design review of new
development and rehabilitation projects.
19. Encourage the residents, the neighborhood associations, the businesses, the healthcare
institutions,' the CBHFTMO, and the City to work together to create a safe mobile,
accessible, and inviting neighborhood. Use the CBHD to facilitate the coordination of
. these efforts.
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20. Efforts should be made to involve neighborhood residents and small business owners in
, extending the range of the districts scheme of street treatments and landscaping into the
surrounding areas of influence. This can proceed through both volunteer efforts (such
as the citys park flower beds) and through specific block development programs.
21. Any new development impacting the existing traffic capacity or patterns must assess the
impact and propose mitigating measures to handle the impact.
22. Public art should be used to create focal points and reinforce the pedestrian oriented
character of the district.
SUBAREA I DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES
A. Height, Bulk, and Massing
1. Protect the sunlight and privacy enjoyed by the lower-scaled properties north of both 11th
Avenue and Hale Parkway from the impact of development south of these streets.
Encourage the height, mass, form, length, and bulk of new development to be designed
to be compatible with surroundings uses and the districts established and historic
building styles. Encourage the use of the H-2 zone district bulk plane for all healthcare
buildings adjacent to Hale Parkway.
2. Within the CBHD, larger buildings should be concentrated in the center of large sites
gradually decreasing in mass and height towards the site boundaries.
3. Large, unarticulated facades are discouraged. Architectural details, windows and plane
projections or recesses should be used to reduce the scale of large continuous facades.
Typical institutional buildings, with no ground floor or pedestrian scale features, are
inappropriate.
B. Building Orientation and Placement
1. Building location and orientation should:
_ facilitate convenient access for occupants and visitors,
_ create visual interest and variety
_ accentuate views and the existing topography of the site,
_ minimize shading of streets and walkways and exposure to sources of noise and
lighting glare.
2. No development should place unscreened service areas, loading docks, mechanical
equipment locations, or unarticulated facades (blank walls), across from surrounding
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
22


residential uses. Ground floor facades that face public streets should have at a minimum
, arcades, windows, entry areas and landscaping to provide visual interest and enhance
campus edge activity.
3. ^ Service, mechanical, and storage areas should be internal to the site and visually
screened.
4. The front facade of buildings at the campus edge should orient towards the public right
of way and main entrances should wherever possible parallel the street which provides
primary access to the building.
5. Building entrances should be visible and accessible from the public right of way along
the buildings front facade.
6. New emergency access routes and servicing/loading docks should be placed away from
residential areas to preserve privacy, safety, and acceptable noise levels for adjacent
residential neighborhoods.
C. Circulation
1. Maintain the grid pattern of the Denver street layout to promote an easily recognizable
and understood circulation system in the district. Avoid the creation of large
impenetrable sites with massive institutional structures and no physical connection with
the surrounding neighborhood. When street closures occur in the district, provide
internal pedestrian mobility and access at similar, but not necessarily exact, intervals to
historic rights-of-way.
2. Maximize opportunities for shared parking and community amenities, such as outdoor
benches, news kiosks, and bike racks. Design lighting, signage, surfacing materials,
landscaping and drainage to encourage non-motorized circulation.
3. If a street closure occurs, the widening of adjacent streets to capture redirected traffic is
strongly discouraged.
4. Discourage new curb cuts along those streets which have adjacent residential uses in
order to minimize traffic volume and the number of potential conflicts with pedestrians.
5. Increase opportunities for public transit in order to improve access to commercial, public,
mixed use and multi-unit residential sites.
6. On-site pedestrian and bicycle amenities should be located to maximize intermodal
connections. Amenities could include: sidewalks, bicycle parking, benches and public
transit stops.
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
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7. Discourage healthcare traffic from circulating through and parking in residential
neighborhoods. Support a transportation management organization (TMO) which may
include, but not be limited to, carpooling information, bus services discount passes,
shuttles from outlying parking areas such as Stapleton, encouraging hospitals to provide
discounted carpool parking in their structures (possibly free at night), and initiating a
residential parking program which establishes time limits for on-street parking in the
neighborhood for non-residents. If this free night parking program is not successful in
limiting hospital-related parking in the residential neighborhoods, then consider
expanding the scope of the residential parking program to include a night time parking
restriction. Parking control must be enforced and management improved.
D. Parking Lots and Structures
1. Encourage the use of parking structures by hospitals and others located in the CBHD
to minimize the amount of land used for surface parking lots and the number of parking
structures. Such efforts will minimize the tendency of healthcare visitors and staff to
park in the surrounding residential neighborhoods.
2. Locate and design parking to minimize inconvenience and eliminate hazards to motorists,
pedestrians, and property.
3. Minimize the impact of large, uninterrupted surface parking lots by planting trees to
create a visual canopy. Appropriate landscape techniques should include planting islands
and defined landscaped pedestrian walkway^ that break up the impact of large parking
areas. Improvement and upgrading of existing surface parking lots with landscaping and
lighting is strongly encouraged.
4. Decrease the impact of surface parking along public right-of-ways and sidewalks through
the use of berms, hedges, shade trees or edge walls. Detached sidewalks and landscaped
tree lawns are highly encouraged. The use of chain link fences as enclosures for surface
parking lots is discouraged. If chain link fences are used, they should be buffered with
landscaping.
5. Encourage access to parking structures and parking lots to be located either on arterial
streets, where permitted, or on those collector and local streets which are internal to the
district.
6. Minimize long, uninterrupted walls of parking structures. Articulate the facades with
smaller scaled design materials and detailing similar to the primary buildings they serve.
7. For parking structures which are directly adjacent to high pedestrian activity streets,
integrate active uses or display areas along those walls which face these streets in order
to create visual interest and to heighten the role of the street in the hierarchy of district
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
24


functions. In considering alternative uses, each institution might first wish to consider
those activities which currently are located within their facilities but which could benefit
from a location along, a view of, and perhaps access to, a street with a high level of
landscaping and pedestrian activity. Amend the zoning language for accessory uses, 59-
^ 207(3), to help achieve this recommendation.
8. Limit the construction of parking lots and structures which serve healthcare facilities to
areas within the boundaries of the CBHD, unless in conjunction with the Transit
Management Organization planning.
9. Periodically explore the appropriateness of the Citys parking requirement for healthcare-
related facilities in light of the ongoing changes in the healthcare industry.
E. Landscaping, Open Space and Pedestrian Circulation
Landscaping should be used to integrate the site and architectural features of new development,
create visual continuity throughout the District, and enhance the pedestrian experience within
the CBHD. The density of landscaping need not be so dense as to completely cover or mask
buildings and sites, but should not be so sparse as to seem applied to building sites artificially.
All plant material should be healthy and well adapted to the Denver climate zone.
1. All new construction should provide landscape improvements in setback areas that are
not otherwise used for automobile parking. If the existing curb and gutter is in disrepair,
a new curb and gutter should be provided.
2. Landscaping should relate to building architecture, structural elements on the site and at
site perimeters provide continuity from one property to another regardless of land use.
3. The hierarchy of public streets should be conveyed through streetscape improvements that
reflect the significance of each sidewalk. For the highest priority pedestrian routes, the
following are recommended: a 15 wide landscaped tree-lawn, detached 8...sidewalk dong
.both sides, handicapped access'fampsT'Bencfiespii^ Plazas, pocket
parks, playgrounds, outdoor seating areas, bus stops and other active uses which
generate pedestrian activity are encouraged along these routes.
4. Building entrances should be landscaped and located near outdoor public spaces. Where
possible, landscape designs should be coordinated with the building design to strengthen
the visual connection between the building and site.
5. The selection of landscape trees and groundcover should be consistent with either the
CBHD plans or approved campus landscape plans. Specific campus landscape plans must
be based on quality principles of landscape design and must relate to the CBHD
landscape standards along campus boundaries. The intent is to create landscape
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1991
25


consistency without losing landscape diversity and campus distinction.
6. The provision, arrangement and maintenance of open space should be a primary
consideration in formulating an overall District Plan and in evaluating development and
site proposals.
7. Fragmentation of open space should be avoided; instead open space should be contiguous
and concentrated in areas that can be utilized for passive and active recreation and/or for
visual relief.
8. A clearly organized system of open spaces should be complemented by a pedestrian
network which flows both east/west and north/south to promote pedestrian permeability
throughout the district. Locate green space both inside and outside the boundaries of the
District and design common green space in a manner which will provide a safe
environment for patients, visitors, staff, and residents.
9. Provide clear landscaped pedestrian paths which connect the neighborhood residents,
hospital visitors and staff to those parks which are located in the interior of the district,
on the boundary of the district, or just outside the district boundaries.
10. New development should contribute to a network of well landscaped arid well lit
sidewalks that provide for safe and convenient pedestrian access to building entrances,
parking areas, and to public open space.
I .
11. Site or landscape features should be located ajt street comers and main entrances to create
focal points which provide color and character for pedestrians and motorists.
12. Street and open space furnishings should express local context in design and materials.
Products should be selected for durability and resistance to climactic elements.
Furnishings should be located in pedestrian areas adjacent to sidewalks, but should not
impede pedestrian movement.
13. Quality design, installation and maintenance of landscaping will be required. Each owner
or tenant shall be responsible for the maintenance and repair of all site landscaping.
Dead, damaged or dying plant materials shall be removed and replaced within sixty (60)
days.
14 All landscaped areas should be irrigated with an underground automated system designed
consistent with sound water conservation principles.
Sy 15. All plantings, particularly shrubs and groundcovers, shall be placed in groups with
similar water requirements to avoid excessive irrigation.
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
26


F. Architecture
The following architectural guidelines ensure quality building design, visual cohesiveness and
architectural compatibility within the CBHD. The use of thematic architectural design is
encouraged to create architecturally and visually unique groups of buildings. District continuity
shall be provided in terms of scale, height, bulk, proportions, detailing, use of exterior materials
and general architectural style.
1. Buildings facades should be attractive and compatible with the architectural style of the
Districts signature campus buildings. Historical precedents within the district should be
supported and reinforced through renovations and the use of compatible contemporary
design. New development should draw upon historical details and characteristics.
2. Facades should be articulated and designed at a human scale with entries, columns,
bearing walls, and other features which define the structural bays and/or modules of
functional space. The size, shape, and treatment of doors, windows, and other facade
elements should reduce the visual impact of large, overpowering, building facades.
3. Avoid large expanses of glazing through the use of mullion patterns, entry recesses, and
the use of individual windows rather than continuous undifferentiated ribbon windows or
large infill panels, etc.
4. Exterior building materials should be high quality, durable, aesthetically pleasing,
consistent with campus architecture, ancj sensitive to the character of surrounding
residential neighborhoods.
G. Signage
1. Provide consistent directional and identification signage throughout the district to limit
visual confusion and to promote a consistent district image. Conformance with the
appropriate H-zone regulations is required.
2. Pedestrian scale or monument style signs are preferred within the CBHD. Where
building signage is requested, the design and placement of signs on structures should be
consistent with the CBHD facility sign guidelines, as illustrated by exhibit_______.
3. Sign materials should be durable and compatible with the overall project design through
the use of common architectural features and by incorporating landscaping at the base of
monument signs.
4. Signs may be indirectly illuminated, but shall not be moving, flashing, blinking or
fluctuating. Ground mounted or back lit signs are preferred.
CBHD Plim Draft
October, 1997
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5. Appendix______includes an integrated and context specific sign program for the CBHD
District. Conformance with the CBHD sign parameters will be evaluated during site plan
review. Additionally, each healthcare institution should create its own integrated sign
program. Signage which is internal to an individual hospitals property and not visible
putside of the District or public right-of-way is allowed by ordinance, 59-537(b)(l).
The Design Engineering Division of the Denver Department of Public Works should
provide an acceptable design and process for placement of CBHD signage within the
public right-of-way. Signs should be placed at strategic locations to direct traffic at key
points onto preferred routes, away from residential areas.
H. Lighting
I. Consider a distinct lighting program for each health care campus to promote diversity
and variety within the district. Lighting programs should be distinct, but complimentary
working together to define a district identity. All campus lighting plans should address
standards for lighting color, height and placement as well as lighting integration with
streetscape, parking lots and service lighting requirements.
2. All lighting should be installed with consideration of the impact on the adjacent
residential neighborhood. Subtle, warm and downcast lighting is preferred to avoid high
contrast and unnecessary glare.
3. Streetscape and parking lot lighting along public rights-of-way shall be integrated with
streetscape standards for the CBHD.
4. Consider pedestrian lighting for all streets in or on the periphery of existing healthcare
campuses. Determine general standards for light fixtures and apply lighting in varying
patterns and frequency to emphasize the street hierarchy throughout the CBHD.
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October, 1997
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V. SUBAREA II DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES
Subarea II faces a tremendous opportunity to be enhanced as a vital mixed use neighborhood
with visual and design cohesiveness. To do so, visual identity must be strengthened, historical
qualities emphasized and pedestrian connections and amenities enforced. Discontinuities between
National Jewish Medical and Research Center and residential neighborhoods must be replaced
by permeable seams that visually integrate the district, yet accentuate the variety of uses which
makes Subarea II unique. The following guidelines serve as a supplement to the CBHD
guidelines, emphasizing opportunities specific to Subarea II.
A. Subarea II Context
Subarea II is located south of the intersection of Colfax Avenue and Colorado Boulevard, and
includes the National Jewish Medical and Research Center, and adjacent residential
neighborhoods. Future Subarea II improvements should emphasize the districts visual presence
at the intersection of Colfax and Colorado Boulevard, two major arterials with high levels of
local and regional traffic. CBHD coordination with ongoing redevelopment plans for East
Colfax Avenue will further strengthen the quality of this key intersection and enhance this
entrance to the CBHD.
National Jewish Center is the primary non-residential use in Subarea II and has brought stability,
jobs and revenue to the local neighborhood since 1899. This facility is a medical center with
a strong emphasis on medical research which limits the number of daily patient trips compared
with other general medical hospitals. The National Jewish Center facility is a compatible and
stable economic force in the neighborhood and provides an important buffer between residential
uses and the retail uses along Colfax Avenue and Colorado Boulevard.
B. Subarea II Guidelines
1. Achieve an equitable balance between the market demands of National Jewish Center (or
other private development) and the physical quality and sustainability of Subarea II.
Locate new development along Colfax or Colorado Blvd. to buffer heavy traffic and to
minimize impacts on the adjacent residential areas.
2. Maintain the National Jewish Center site as an open campus with limited vehicular
mobility, pedestrian oriented amenities, and connected areas of formal and informal Open
space. A traditional axial arrangement for landscape and building design should help to
strengthen the unique identity of the National Jewish campus, yet support the subarea
transition towards Colfax and Colorado Boulevard.
3. The edges surrounding the National Jewish Center campus shall be articulated as follows:
A more urban streetscape presence along Colfax Avenue that honors the scale and
CBHD Plan Dmfl
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continuity of existing retail development. Pedestrian scaled connections are highly
encouraged to ensure residents and employees will have clear and safe access to retail
along Colfax Avenue.
Along the southern and eastern boundaries of the campus, building design and scale shall
be compatible with surrounding residential uses. Edge landscaping, paving and street
edge lighting should be compatible with district-wide standards.
4. Most healthcare-related access should be directed to Colfax Avenue and Colorado
Boulevard.
C. Building & Site Design
1. The building architecture located on the National Jewish Center campus captures the
historical essence of the CBHD and should be maintained through renovation and the use
of compatible contemporary design. Architecture that directly mimics historical buildings
is discouraged. However, new development should draw upon historical details and
characteristics of existing buildings such as the historic Bnai Brith and the Nurses
Dormitory.
2. National Jewish Center development should concentrate larger, taller buildings in the
center or along major arterials of the campus, with height and mass gradually decreasing
towards the, residential edge.
3. The health center campus should be organized with more formal integrative space along
the campus boundary and informal, user specific open space in the site interior. Site
design within the campus shall be unique to National Jewish Center, enhancing the park-
like campus quality of this enclave of buildings.
4. No development should place unscreened service areas, loading docks, mechanical
equipment locations, or unarticulated facades (blank walls), across from surrounding
residential uses. Ground floor facades that face public streets should have at a minimum
arcades, windows, entry areas and landscaping to provide visual interest and enhance
campus edge activity. Service and storage areas shall be internal to the site and visually
screened.
5. Variations in roof lines should be used to reduce the scale of large buildings and to
ensure compatibility with adjoining neighborhoods.
D. Circulation
National Jewish Center functions as a buffer and transition between commercial areas along
Colfax Avenue and Colorado Boulevard and the Subarea II residential neighborhoods. As such.
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October, 1997
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30


considerable care should be taken to balance automobile circulation with pedestrian mobility.
1. Use the existing healthcare district TMO to create alternate transportation solutions which
mitigate the impacts of traffic within the district.
2. Improve automobile access off of major arterials by providing strong visible clues to
visitor parking and hospital entrances.
3. Clear traffic circulation is vital to both the National Jewish campus and the overall
quality of adjoining neighborhoods. Any proposed changes in street circulation must
consider impacts and opportunities to the National Jewish Center and the adjoining
neighborhoods, and include the neighbors in the definition of an appropriate design.
Changes in traffic circulation that force traffic into existing neighborhoods should be
avoided.
E. Parking lots and structures
1. Minimize conflicts between pedestrians and automobiles by limiting curb cuts for parking
lot access. Sidewalk, curb and landscape continuity are essential to the subareas
pedestrian oriented character.
i
2. Screen all parking lots from public right-of-ways with a landscaped buffer that contains
both shrubs and trees. '
3. Add landscaping to large open expansive parking areas to break the large expanse of
pavement, define pedestrian walkways and mitigate the visual impact. Consider
maintainability and operational clarity when placing this landscape.
4. Minimize the expansive nature of parking lots with landscaped parking islands.
5. Explore landscaping concepts that integrate parking lots into the campus layout. Utilize
landscaped corridors and paving to enhance the connection between parking and building
entrances.
F. Landscaping, Open Space and Pedestrian Circulation
1. The National Jewish campus should include both formal and informal landscaping that
frames pedestrian circulation and areas for outdoor activity.
2. Landscaping at the campus perimeter should respond to the City grid reflecting changes
in land use intensity, activity and scale. Landscaping along Colfax Avenue and Colorado
Boulevard should reflect the urban continuity characteristic of a major arterial, while the
landscaping along Garfield and 14th should more closely support the National Jewish
CBHD Plan Draft
October. 1997
31


Center campus as a part of a larger neighborhood.
3. Plant material and tree species shall be suited to the local climate. Diversification of tree
species is suggested to create variety in scale, texture and color. In addition, plant
diversification avoids the overuse of one species and may prevent exposure to disease.
4. Formal landscaping within the campus quadrangle should define pedestrian circulation
and access.
5. Landscaped plazas, where appropriate, should be combined with more historic and
informal tree groupings to create a variety of outdoor spaces and features.
G. Signage
1. All regulatory and directional signage in the public right-of-way shall be consistent with
the City of Denver sign code and the adopted CBHD sign guidelines.
2. The existing National Jewish Center sign standards should be maintained and enhanced
where necessary to coordinate sign style and location on campus. The campus sign
standards shall be sensitive and compatible with the character of the Districts sign
program.
3. The location of all signage must be coordinated with campus lighting and landscaping.
H. Lighting
I. Quality site and security lighting will be one of the most important elements affecting the
appearance and image of the National Jewish Center campus. The location and style of
lighting should be consistent and compatible with the architecture and the overall campus
design.
2. Site lighting shall be located to emphasize edges, entrances and site circulation.
Pedestrian safety and access depend upon lighting that is appropriately scaled and
located.
3. National Jewish Center lighting shall be designed to support a unique campus identity.
The intent is to create a space that is uniquely defined, but is still complementary with
Subarea II and the CBHD. This effect has been achieved in downtown Denver where
the Sixteenth St. Mall, the Civic Center and the Lower Downtown are distinct, but the
general layout and style of lighting ensure each area feels like Downtown.
4. ' If applicable, National Jewish Center shall incorporate Colfax Avenue lighting consistent
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
32


with the Colfax Avenue streetscaping program.
5. Lighting of large building surfaces should be avoided. Where appropriate, architectural
lighting may be included in the building design to emphasize specific design features, or
define a specific functional element such as building entrance, cornice, or street facade.
Such lighting should not create adverse glare, or visual intrusions upon neighborhoods.
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VI. IMPLEMENTATION ACTION PLAN
A. CBHD District Action Plan
Each of the implementation items reflects a recommendation from the guideline sections of this
plan. While the details of the projects are for the most part still to be determined by further
study and design work, this schedule is useful in terms of assigning priorities and a relative time
commitment to the projects, and identifying who is responsible for implementation.
Identification of specific party involvement does not necessarily construe funding responsibility
for those particular projects.
The District-wide recommendations which require implementation action, in addition to
development specific response, include the following:
1. Encourage the residents, the healthcare institutions, and the City to work together to
create a safe and inviting neighborhood. Support a District Planning Committee and
process which will facilitate the coordination of these efforts.
RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District Planning
Committee will take the responsibility of establishing a
development review process. The Planning Committee is
composed of representatives from each of the affected
neighborhood organizations and healthcare providers within
the district.
ACTION: The Planning Committee will establish goals and
procedures for itself, including goals, rules for the
appointment of members, the duration of membership,
operating procedures, and plan implementation.
TIME: The Planning Committee will continue on an on-going
basis.
ESTIMATED COSTS: Administrative costs are unknown at this time
2. Consider the use of entry features and signage to direct traffic into and out of the district,
to specific healthcare institutions, and onto primary access streets in order to avoid traffic
circulating through the surrounding residential neighborhoods.
RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, working with the
Department of Public Works Transportation and the
Planning and Development Office.
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October, 1997
34


ACTION:
\
TIME:
ESTIMATED COSTS: Design signage which will be less expensive than the Citys
current directional signage program. Entry features are
estimated to cost $75,000 per intersection.
3. Provide landscaping on both sides of the defined edge streets to help buffer the
, residential uses from healthcare facilities.
RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, working with the
Planning and Development Office.
ACTION: The Committee will seek funding for completing
streetscaping along the defined edge streets.
TIME: The completion of this project will follow the completion
of the signage program and will be coordinated with the
gateway program, with the exception that all new
development projects fronting on edge streets will be asked
to complete their portion of the entire project.
ESTIMATED COSTS: To be determined based on final approved designs.
4. Discourage healthcare traffic from circulating through and parking in residential
neighborhoods. Support a TMO which will include encouraging the hospitals to establish
employee carpools, bus pass discounts, shuttle services, free parking in structures at
night and enforcement of a residential parking program which establishes time limits for
on-street non-resident parking in the neighborhood. If this two-part program is not
successful in limiting hospital-related parking in the residential neighborhoods, then
consider expanding the scope of the residential parking program to include a night time
parking restriction. The TMO will become a member of CBHD.
RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, working with the
CBHFTMO Executive Director and the Parking
Management Office of the Department of Public Works -
Transportation.
ACTION: 1) Promote and work with the TMO. 2) If necessary,
1) Finalize the design and location of the signage and
gateways. 2) Develop maintenance commitments for the
signage and gateways. 3) Apply for City Capitol
Improvements Planning Program (CIPP) funding.
Ongoing for signage program.
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
35


initiate and promote a night time parking restriction.
TIME: Ongoing
ESTIMATED COSTS: Unknown
B. Subarea I Action Plan
1. Encourage the retention and enhancement of the residential character of the areas
surrounding the Healthcare District, including the subareas on the west side of Harrison
Boulevard, between 9th and 10th Avenues; from Colorado Boulevard to Dahlia; along
Hale Parkway; the R-3 zone district subareas south of 8th Avenue; between Clermont
and Dahlia Streets; and between Hale Parkway and 8th Avenue east of Dahlia Street.
To achieve this, consider using tools such as rezoning and the creation of Overlay
districts, which would provide design review of new development and rehabilitation
projects.
RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, with the assistance of the
Denver Planning Office.
ACTION: 1) Lay groundwork/build support with the healthcare
organizations, neighborhood organizations and their
constituents;
2) Enlist assistance and support from the City.
TIME: The CBHD Planning Committee will take this as an early
task. Several members of the neighborhood organizations
are already participating.
2. Discourage traffic from crossing 8th Avenue and continuing south into the residential
neighborhoods Use impediments to physically narrow the pavement width, while also
including landscaping, residential entry monuments, etc., to reinforce the residential
character of the area.
RESPONSIBLE PARTY:
ACTION:
' TIME:
CBHD Plan Draft
October, 1997
36
The CBHD Planning Committee, with the Department of
Public Works Transportation and the Planning and
Development Office.
1) Develop maintenance agreements. 2) Seek funding.
3) Finalize design
This project will run concurrently with it3, the landscaping


of the edge streets.
ESTIMATED COSTS: Unknown.
3. Consider improving the safety and function of the intersection at 9th Avenue and
Clermont Street in order to better serve Columbia-Rose, VAMC, University Hospital and
UCHSC. Review all proposals with consideration of traffic demands at other
intersections along 9th, focusing on 9th/Colorado Boulevard, the current entrance to the
Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District.
RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, working with individual
healthcare institutions and the Department of Public Works
- Transportation
ACTION: 1) Monitor traffic counts at the intersections of
Hale/Clermont, 9th/Clermont, and 9th/Colorado Blvd.
2) When traffic counts approach the level necessary to
warrant improvements to current traffic signals, initiate
discussions regarding the signals at these intersections and
along Hale Parkway and 8th Avenue.
TIME: Monitoring should begin immediately.
ESTIMATED COSTS: Depends on the solution. Traffic signals cost
approximately $75,000 per intersection.
C. Subarea II Action Plan
1. Encourage the retention and enhancement of the residential character of the areas
surrounding the Healthcare District, including the subareas west of Garfield Street; east
from Colorado Boulevard; north of Colfax Avenue; and south of 14th Avenue.
RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, with the assistance of the
Denver Planning Office.
ACTION: 1) Lay groundwork/build support with the healthcare
organizations, neighborhood organizations and their
constituents;
2) Enlist assistance and support from the City.
TIME: The CBHD Planning Committee will take this as an early
task. Several members of the neighborhood organizations
CBHD Plan Draft
October, W7
37


are already participating.
ESTIMATED COSTS:
2. Discourage traffic from crossing Garfield Street and 14th Avenue into the residential
^neighborhoods by reinforcing primary access off of Colfax Avenue. Where necessary
revise existing circulation patterns to more clearly define access and to improve
circulation. Use impediments to physically narrow the width of edge streets which are
likely to capture overflow traffic; include landscaping, residential entry monuments, etc.,
to reinforce the residential character of the area.
RESPONSIBLE PARTY: National Jewish Center and the CBHD Planning
Committee, with the Department of Public Works -
Transportation and the Planning & Development Office.
ACTION: 1) Develop maintenance agreements. 2) Seek funding.
3) Finalize design
TIME: This project will run concurrently with #6, the landscaping
of the edge streets.
ESTIMATED COSTS: Unknown.
3. As redevelopment occurs, identify a strategy to soften the campus boundaries with
facades and landscaping that closely relate to pedestrians and surrounding neighborhoods.
RESPONSIBLE PARTY: National Jewish Center and the CBHD Planning Committee
ACTION: 1) Review and utilize the CBHD and Subarea II guidelines
early in the conceptual development stage. 2) Develop a
campus master plan. 3) Encourage development projects
that integrate architectural, site and landscape design.
TIME: On going
ESTIMATED COSTS: Unknown.
4. Improve campus circulation and aesthetics by consolidating hospital service, delivery and
loading areas to minimize the amount of vehicular access.
RESPONSIBLE PARTY: National Jewish Center and the CBHD Planning
Committee.
C8IID Plan Draft
October. 1997
38


ACTION: 1) Integrate the design of service and similar functional
requirements with the overall campus master plan. 2)
Ensure each development project is coordinated with
existing service and delivery opportunities.
. \ ' 7 ' ' '
TIME: To be concurrent with #3.
ESTIMATED COSTS: Unknown.
5. Periodically review existing parking needs and provisions. Identify opportunities for time
sharing or lot reorganization which will improve parking capacity on campus.
RESPONSIBLE PARTY: National Jewish Center, CBHFTMO, and the CBHD
Planning Committee.
ACTION: National Jewish Center review and assessment of parking status, particularly with new facilities or changes in existing services.
TIME: On going
ESTIMATED COSTS: Unknown.
CBIID Plan Draft
October, 1997
39


VI.
APPENDICES
A. . General description of Zoning Districts within CBHD
B. Definitions of Denver Street Classifications
C. Transportation and Parking Study
D. Transportation Management Organization (TMO)
E. Notes on the Process for Street Vacation
(Example of typical insert)
1. If a developer wishes to vacate a public street or alley for the benefit of his development, he must make a
written request to the Manager of Public Works. The vacation process will be handled by the Right-of-Way
Engineer of the City Engineers Office. The developer will alto contact the City Planning Office and advise
the registered neighborhood organizations in the area of his inrent. Tire inrent of this advisement is to
secure a supporting consensus for the relocation project before a hearing is called for on the project. The
above organizations should be notified at least 60 days before a hearing is scheduled by the City Engineer.
Final approval decisions are made by City Council, should the Manager of Public Works pass forward a
recommendation that an ordinance on this matter he prepared.
2. Normally the developer is responsible for the costs of utility relocation for street improvements or
modifications caused by, or for the benefit of, the development project. Such responsibility applies to the
relocation of traffic control devices; gas, electrical, telephone, and water facilities; etc.
\ ,
3. The City makes an effort to defray some developer costs when the street improvements or modifications
result in improved traffic operation on the public street.
CBHD Finn Draft
October. 1997
40


CITY AND COUNTY OF DENVER
PLANNING OFFICE
A DIVISION OF THE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT OFFICE
200 West 14th Avenue, #203
Denver, Colorado 80204
Phone:(303)640-2736
Fax: (303) 572-4636
TTD: (303) 640-2549
Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District Plan
Amendment (February 12,1998)
On the advice of the Traffic Engineer, the following statements are hereby inserted in the Plan.
The CBHD planning team members have been briefed on this amendment. On February 11, 1998,
The CBHD gave APPROVAL for the changed language to be added to the document.
Page 21 Item 12. Replace
12. Discourage shortcutting traffic through the residential neighborhood. Modify existing
accesses and median breaks along Hale Parkway to direct traffic to the desired routes. Within the
neighborhoods, consider traffic management alternatives, i.e., bulb-outs, stop signs, etc., to
discourage usage.
Page 34 Item 2. Addition
With the completion of the signage installation, review effectiveness to allow for supplementary
entry features and signage to be located as necessary.
Page 36 Item 2. Addition
....to physically narrow the pavement width on cross streets, while...


Full Text

PAGE 1

. .. Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District (CBHD) Plan This Plan envisions rhe Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District Studv Area I I \ as a healthy, safe, cohesive, and invit{ng neighborhood with healthcare institutions, lzealthcare related uses, residential uses, and neighborhood-scale retail uses that provide services for the residents, healthcare employees, and visitors. Both the residents and the healthcare employees will see the juxtaposition of residential and healrhcare uses in the Study Area as an advanrage and reason for living and working in the neighborhood CDilD Pf111a /Jrnfl Odobar. I 997 ,_

PAGE 3

FOREWORD I. ,INTRODUCTION A. The Organization of the Plan ............................................ ........................................... B. Purpose of the Plan .............................................................................................. \ C. The Planning Process & Vision for the Study Area .......................... D. Goals of the Plan ........................................................................... .-; ......................... II. EXISTING CONDITIONS A. Study Area Vicinity and Description .......................... : .............................................. B. Existing Zoning ...................................................................................................... C. Ownership ....................................................................................................... ; ..... D. The Street System ..................................................... E. Subarea Description and Key Issues ......................................................................... 1. Subarea I 2. Subarea II III. CBHD DISTRICT DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES A. General Recommendations ...................................................................................... B. Height, Bulk, and Massing ............................................................................................ C. Building Orientation and Placement ........................... ........................................... .. D. Circulation ........................................................ .............................................. E. Parking Lots and Structures .... ; ................................................................................... .. F. Landscaping, Open Space and Pedestrian Circulation .............................................. G. Architecture .......................................................................................................... .. H.Signage. ............................................................ ,.., ...................................................... !Lighting ..................................................................................................................... IV. SUBAREA I DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES A. Context ............................................................................................................... B. Subarea Guidelines ................................................................................... ................. C. Building & Site Design ........................................................................................... .. D. Circulation ............................... ......................................... : ........................ E. Parking Lots and Structures ............................................................................ F. Landscaping, Open Space and Pedt!..'ltrian Circulation ................................... .. G. Signage ...................................................................... H. Lighting ..................................................................... V. SUBAREA II DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES A. Context ................................... ; ....................................................................... B. Subarea Guidelines ................................ ; ............................................................ C. Building & Site Design ............................................................................................ D. Circulation .............................................................................................................. E. Parking Lots and Structures .................................................................................... .. F. Landscaping, Open Space and Pedestrian Circulation .............................................. G. Signage ............................................................................................................... H. Lighting ..................................................................................................... VI. IMPLEMENTATION ACTION PLAN A. CBHD District .................................... ............................................... ; .. B. Subarea I ........................... ,. ..................................................................... C. Subarea II ......................................................... ............................................. APPENDICES & ACKNOWLEDGMENTS ........................................................ .. CBIID Ptan Draft 1997 2

PAGE 4

FOREWORD The Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District (CBHD) Plan provides a framework to balance the delivery of quality medical care and instruction with the character and viability of adjacent residential neighborhoods. The CBHD development guidelines provide quality urban design and site planning solutions regardless of parcel ownership or tenancy. Ongoing communication and cooperation among the members of the CBHD are key to the successful implementation of the plan and goals to sustain a vital and diverse district. The contents of this plan are the result of extensive discussion, intensive negotiation, and consensus building among the healthcare institutions, neighborhood organizations, and the City of Denver over a number of years. These efforts are gratefully acknowledged. The CBHD Plan will be presented to the Denver Planning Board and City Council for consideration of adoption as an amendment to the Denver Comprehensive Plan. As such, the recommendations within this plan are consistent with and further the objectives of the Denver Comprehensive Plan. The CBHD acknowledges that the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center while fully participating members of the CBHD throughout this planning process, cannot as divisions of the United States government and the state of Colorado, support the passage of this plan before the City and County of Denver City Council. The recommendations of these healthcare facilities have strengthened the document. The cornerstones of this plan are the continued and cooperation among the members of the CBHD. This plan is prepared with full knowledge of .the CBHD Planning Committee that efforts are currently underway to relocate and/or reorganize healthcare facilities or healthcare programs as opportunities arise. The members of the CBHD are committed to this planning process because guidelines and recommendations will lead to appropriate site planning solutions. The plan will address site specific issues, while also maintammg a unified viston for the healthcare district. Development recommendations will respond affirmatively to the changing face of the healthcare district. This will occur through coordination of the factors which influence individual organization decisions on scale, massing, height, access, landscaping, street furniture, and streetscaping. This vision will also address adverse traffic and transportation issues. Clearly delineated boundaries for the medical facilities will limit encroachment of non-residential uses into the adjoining stable residential areas. This plan will identify the agreed boundaries for the CBHD. It :-is also understood this will allow the participating healthcare institutions to acquire appropriate H zoning with the support of the CBHD participating neighborhood and city agencies. It should also be understood, any healthcare expansion beyond these boundaries may CBHD Plan Drttfl October, 1997 1 I!

PAGE 5

be met with neighborhood association opposition. Note: V AMC, and UCHSC believe that they are not subject to City and County of Denver zoning. The neighborhoods and the City believe that these institutions and healthcare facilities are subject to City and County of Denver Zoning. This plan has been prepared within the context of the impending move of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center to the former Fitzsimmons Army Medical Base over the next few years. It is the understanding of CBHD members that a master plan process for University of Colorado properties remaining within the Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District boundaries will begin in the near future. The CBHD must participate in the discussions of the UCHSC master plan in order to continue the coordination of plan recommendation implementation actions. The Colorado Boulevard Healthcare. District, with its combination of sound residential areas and major healthcare educational campuses and facilities, provides a significant and vital component to the economy of central Denver. The healthcare campuses and facilities deliver health services to the neighborhood and region, and also provide employment and educational opportunities. Neighborhood residents in the area are served by commercial convenience outlets which might not locate in the vicinity except for the large employment and market base generated by the healthcare facilities. Residential areas are aided in the maintenance of existing stability through. the residential occupancy of an educated and/or healthcare facility-employed population. As the healthcare facilities and residential neighborhoods have learned to communicate with each other an9 to jointly ad1fress mutual concerns. At the same time that the healthcare facilities benefit the neighborhoods there are also an increasing number of issues which affect the quality and characteristics of these neighborhoods. Increased traffic, and the juxtaposition of hospital, offices, and parking lots to residential uses, combine to create a tension in the fabric of the neighborhoods of the CBHD, which must be eased before the fabric is torn. For these reasons, a plan has been prepared .in order to explicitly define the issues, outline areas of common interest, and to create a framework upon which to build our existing communication towards resolution of these concerns CHilD Ptan Draft Odobtr, 1997 2

PAGE 6

I. INTRODUCTION A. Organization of the Plan The Plan is organized into six major sections. I. II. III. IV./V. VI. APPENDICES CBHD Plan Dmfl Odober, 1997 The Introduction describes the purpose for the CBHD Plan, the planning process, the vision and goals for the district, and the intended use of the plan. The Existing Conditions section provides an assessment of the current land uses, zoning and characteristics of the district. Emphasis is placed on the existing street system, district subareas, and background information for the application of the development guidelines. The District Development Guidelines explicitly state the recommendations which will guide public, private, healthcare and non-healthcare redevelopment in the district. The CBHD guidelines promote a level of quality, character, and identity that will knit together the diverse subareas within the district. The guidelines are advisory, not mandatory. However, they will be applied, .along with the qther plan recommendations, as analysis tools in the review of proposed development plans. Sections IV. and V. identify unique opportunities and recommendations specific to Subarea I and Subarea II within the CBHD study area. These sections acknowledge varying conditions and provide the opportunity to create diverse and intriguing design solutions throughout the district. Adherence to district-wide development parameters is achieved, yet diverse needs and impacts are addressed. The Implementation Action Plan identifies tasks which must be accomplished to make this plan a reality. This section describes the relative priority of the projects, presents general time frames, and identifies the parties which must be involved in order to implement the recommendations. Identification of specific party involvement does not necessarily construe funding responsibility for those particular projects. Implementation actions are described first district-wide, then for each subarea, with specific recommendations focused on the issues unique to each sub area of the plan. The Appendices include definitions, previous studies which have been done for the area, and acknowledgment for the work done by many individuals, institutions, and organizations in bringing this plan to fruition 3

PAGE 7

B. Purpose of the Plan The CBHD is an area in transition. Each of the five major healthcare institutions in the districtUniversity of Colorado Health Sciences Center, University Hospital, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Columbia-Rose Medical Center, and National Jewish Medical and Research Center, have been experiencing substantial growth and changes in their programs. These factors have mandated the expansion of the healthcare facilities and have resulted in new construction, additional traffic, and the need for more parking facilities. The encroachment of non-residential uses into the surrounding stable residential areas has raised concern that boundaries may be necessary to secure the balance of uses within the district. The CBHD Plan has been created to provide guidance for both private and public sector programs and capital investments. Future development and renovation are integrated with an overall vision for the character and quality of design throughout the district. Development guidelines provide a framework for site speci fie review basf!c:l .. 911 __ ____ ___ landscaping, street furniture-and streetscaping. the adverse .. environmental impacts created by traffic and related transportation issues. .--------. '"---Because the process for developing the CBHD Plan involved diverse input and negotiation, some of the recommendations in the plan appear to conflict with one another. When conflicts do arise among various recommendations, the final recommendation will be based upon the specifics of the issue being addressed and the overall attainment of the plan's goals and objectives C. The Process & Vision In response to the growing need for a coordinated strategy to address growth and potential conflicts among healthcare institutions, residents, and other businesses in the area, the CBHD was formed in 1991. An urban design planning process was initiated to : 1) accommodate the expansion of the healthcare institutions in a manner which enhances both the institutions and the residential uses surrounding them, and; 2) to maintain and improve the residential quality of the surrounding area. A committee was formed to represent the different interests in the neighborhood and to oversee the planning process. The CBHD members have met on a regular basis since. 1991, serving as a clearinghouse for new development proposals and/or issues presented by representatives of the neighborhood or the healthcare facilities. One:item continued to command prominence in the monthly discussions the issue of institution expansion and the subsequent impacts on adjacent residential following reviewofan inltiarstateirienfof1ssues' the CBHD Plan, that traffic and transportation issues would take a principal role in the process CBHD Plan Draft Odl!lm, 1997 4

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To help fully understand the issues of traffic and parking, the healthcare institutions, with the review assistance of the neighborhood associations, hired consultants, who performed a traffic and parking study as background information for the district plan. Upon review of the completed study, the planning team felt that the issues were of a magnitude to continue the planning\ process and that the study projections could serve as background data for plan recommendations. Eight neighborhood organizations were responsible for representing the residents and institutions in or a,djacent to the CBHD: Bellevue-Hale Neighborhood Association, Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods (CHUN), Congress Park Neighbors, Cranmer Park-Hilltop Civic Association, Denver East Central Civic Association (DECCA), South City Park Neighborhood Association, and Mayfair Neighbors. These organizations focused on protecting and enhancing areas within or adjacent to the healthcare district as well as maintaining a close and harmonious relationship with the healthcare institutions. The CBHD purposes are as follows: To prepare a CBHD Plan To facilitate implementation of the plan and to monitor changes (if needed) to plan recommendations To serve as a point of contact between the healthcare facilities and neighborhood associations for the dispersal of information To attempt to obtain a consensus position of the neighborhoods and healthcare facilities concerning issues of mutual interest. The CBHD planning committee has, in addition to its regular meetings, held several public forums to discuss this plan. It is anticipated this process will culminate in a presentation to the Denver Planning Board with a request to accept this document as an official amendment to Denver's Comprehensive Plan. Denver City Council will conclude the process with approval of an ordinance adopting the CBHD plan as an amendment to Denver's Comprehensive Plan. Vision for the CBHD Study Area / ... ( 1 The vision for the CBHD Study Area is a healthy, safe, cohesive, and inviting neighborhood with healthcare institutions, healthcare related uses, residential uses, and neighborhood-scale retail uses that provide services for the residents, healthcare employees, patients and visitors. The residents, the health care emplo'yees and the health care decision-makers see the juxtaposition of residential and healthcare uses in the study area as an advantage and reason for living and working in the neighborhood. LCBHD Plan.Dmjl October, 1997 5

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The five major healthcare institutions within the district will function and be perceived as two campus areas The residential areas of the Study.Areawill retain their existing character, and will be reinforced with compatible-in fill housing and improvements to existing housing. A diversity of housing types and costs, extedsive landscaping, pedestrian linkages and upgraded retail uses will complement and reinforce the eclectic and user-friendly character of the district. It is envisioned automobile and service vehicle access to the' CBHD will be focused on Colfax Avenue, Colorado Boulevard, 8th and 9th Avenue (east of Colorado Boulevard), and Clermont Street (north of 8th A venue). An innovative signage program directing traffic to specific healthcare institutions will be continued. Secondary access to Subarea I, via Hale Parkway is acknowledged, but use of the Parkway is not encouraged in order to maintain the Parkway capacity for neighborhood vehicular and pedestrian usage. I People will be encouraged to walk or .hetw.eetqlQin.t.s within the....Qll!Di. between the CBHD and the residential area: between the CBHD and the nearby resources such as specialty shops and food services on Colorado Boulevard, 8th A venue, and East Colfax A venue; and within the residential areas themselves by providing a hierarchy of safe and inviting sidewalks. The most intense and dense healthcare uses will be located in the center of Subarea I of the CBHD, with uses and building scales transitioning downward from the center of the CBHD in all directions. D. Goals of the Plan This plan provides an urban design framework and design guidelines for the redevelopment and expansion of new and replacement uses within the CBHD. It also establishes a program for not. only improving the surrounding area, but also maintaining the stability of residential neighborhoods. The Plan is designed to meet eight primary goals: 1. Encourage and accommodate the healthcare institutions within the neighborhood in order to promote job retention and creation, and to provide high quality healthcare for the region. 2. Maintain and improve the livability of the surrounding area as an urban, mixed-use neighborhood with a vital residential base and strong neighborhood-serving businesses. 3. Mitigate-the off-site parking of vehicles and/or automobile traffic related to the mobility of employees, patients, and visitors in the healthcare area of the CBHD through the Colorado Boulevard Health Facilities Transportation Management Organization CBHD Plan Drnjl Odober, 1997 6

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(CBHFTMO) representing the five healthcare facilities within the district and with neighborhood representation on the TMO Board. Support the TMO in iils efforts to implement a cost effective transportation demand management (TDM) program including, but not limited to education and outreach strategies, carpools, integrated shuttle program, improved public transit and modified parking policies operations. 4. Improve the movement of traffic, in and out of the district, without heavy impact on adjacent residences. 5. Improve the physical appearance of the CBHD. 6. Promote a cooperative environment for the healthcare institutions, the residents, businesses, the neighborhood associations, and the City to work together to accomplish the goals of the CBHD Plan; 7. Provide a framework for integration of healthcare institutions, the City, and neighborhood development plans: and to 8. Identify the programs and processes necessary to accomplish the project goals. CBHD Pfan Draft Or:tober, 1997 7 \.

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IT. EXISTING CONDITIONS A. District Vicinity & Study Area Description The Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District, with its combination of sound residential areas and major healthcare educational campuses and facilities, provides a significant and vital component to the economy of central Denver. The healthcare campuses and facilities deliver needed health services to the. neighborhood and region, arid also provide employment and educational opportunities. Neighborhood residents in the area are served by commercial convenience outlets which might not locate in the vicinity except for the large employment and market base generated by the healthcare facilities. Residential areas are aided in the maintenance of existing stability through the residential occupancy of an educated and/or healthcare facility-employed population. As' neighbors, the healthcare facilities and residential neighborhoods have learned to communicate with each other and to jointly address mutual concerns. At the same time that the healthcare facilities benefit the neighborhoods, there are also an increasing number of issues which affect the quality and characteristics of these neighborhoods. Increased traffic, and the juxtaposition of hospital, offices and parking lots to residential uses combine to create a tension in the fabric of the neighborhoods of CBHD, which must be eased before the fabric is torn. For these reasons, a plan has been prepared in order to explicitly define the issues, outline areas of common interest and, to create a framework upon which to direct the existing towards resolution of these concerns For purposes of'this study, the Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District (CBHD) is defined as the impact area shown on exhibit __ \ The CBHD is primarily located within census tract 43.01 (subarea I), which is designated for statistical and planning purposes as the Hale neighborhood. This is a mixed-use, urban neighborhood which extends from Colorado Boulevard to Holly Street, and from East 6th, Avenue Parkway on the south to East Colfax Avenue on the north. A portion of the CBHD (sub-area II) is located in the Congress Park neighborhood whose boundaries are East Colfax Avenue on the north, 6th Avenue on the south, Colorado Boulevard on the east, and York Street on the west. The CBHD is comprised of the following (listed in alphabetical order) healthcare facilities and neighborhood associations: Bellevue/Hale Neighborhood Association Columbia-Rose Medical Center Cranmer Park-Hilltop Civic Association Mayfair Neighbors South City Park Neighborhood Association University of Colorado Health Sciences Center University Hospital CBIID Plan Dmft Oelober, 1997 Capitol Hill United Neighborhoods Congress Park Neighbors Denver East Central Civic Association National Jewish Medical and Research Center Veterans Affairs Medical Center 8

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Because of the transportation linkage between the CBHD and the surrounding neighborhood areas and, because of the impact of the activity within the CBHD on the surrounding residential and commercial uses, the study area also includes the influence area shown on exhibit __ This inQuence area includes the following neighborhoods: Hilltop, Mayfair, Park Hill, Colfax at the Park, Congress Park, and South City Park. Key Issues and Opportunities The following issues and opportunities are to some degree common to all neighborhoods which are immediately adjacent to large healthcare facilities. 1. Hospital development tends to expand outward from an historic core to become a campus of very intense institutional uses surrounded by service and support uses, including parking. These campuses can become massive in scale, with a tendency to create "superblocks" resulting from the closure of public alleys and streets. 2. Hospital campuses which become superblocks create an organized internal, physical setting which can be designed to be visually appealing to its users through the use of landscaping and other urban design such as uniform street furniture and lighting. Additionally, these settings aid the campuses in becor:ning easily identified as a whole rather than as a collection of diverse facilities. 3. Maintaining the viability of healthy residential areas immediately adjacent to healthcare facility development can, at times, be impeded by the closure of streets and alleys, as superblock development often presents its "backdoor" to the neighborhood. Hospital campuses which become direct traffic onto the adjacent streets which are still open. The adjacent streets, however, may not be designed or built to accommodate the additional, unanticipated traffic. 4. Traffic circulation around hospitals must efficiently serve different users, each with specific needs; patients, students, employees (including both medical and support staft), service vehicles, emergency vehicles, visitors, ana neighborhood traffic not related to the hospitals. Visitors and patients are usually unfamiliar with hospital traffic patterns on the first visit, but develop set patterns of access and egress. Additionally, visitors and patients are often driving under stressful situations and unfamiliarity with traffic patterns adds to the level of confusion on their first visit. 5. Autonomous hospital expansion and redevelopment tends to occur as programs evolve, patient load increases, and. funding becomes available. In the absence of long-range planning arid inter-hospital coordination, circulation routes also evolve autonomously. 6:. The very high number of automobile trips to, from, and through the CBHD create CBHD Pfn11 Draft 1997 9

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severe parking problems that negatively impact the institutions and the surrounding neighborhoods. 7. The demand for parking increases with the facilities' expansion. The location of the \ parking facilities which will meet the demand must be easily accessible. Colfax Avenue and Colorado Boulevard are major arterials which serve the district. While facilitating traffic flow, these two arterials also compound the confusion of entering and leaving the district due to the heavy non-district traffic flow. East,bound 6th A venue changes to a low volume parkway east of Colorado Boulevard, often leading to vehicular traffic using local neighborhood streets to find its way to the CBHD. Service vehicles now use residential streets and the streets that serve as boundaries between the different residential sections of the neighborhood. Individually, these vehicles generate more noise and pollution than the residential automobiles. Servicing for hospitals occur at various hours of the day. 9. There are not many shared open spaces or other facilities, althpugh there are shared operational programs. (The Auraria Campus provides an example of separate institutions with shared facilities and shared operational programs.) 10. The intersection of 9th Avenue and Colorado Boulevard has been recognized by the general public as the primary entry into the CBHD. This has changed as each institution has changed its parking and primary building entry points. Primary access points will continue to change as needed. B. Existing Zoning The Study Area presents a patchwork of zoning districts, with a concentration of H-1 and H-2 zones within the Healthcare District, surrounded by R-3, R-4, B-2, and B-4 zone districts .. Outside of the district, the area is surrounded by low density residential zoning, R-1 and R-2. C. Ownership The largest ownership assemblages belong to the healthcare institutions, with many small assemblages and individual parcels creating the ownership pattern in the rest of the Study Area. D. The Street System Streets are very important elements of each city's urban design. The character of Denver has been established. with a very clearly articulated grid street and block pattern, with detached sidewalks, grass; and street trees. -----... -............. Denver's street system includes every level of the urban street hierarchy, from local streets to CDHD Ptan Draft Oc1obrr, 1997 10

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\

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major arterials serving the metro area. The streets play a significant function in the CBHD since there are many different, and often conflicting groups that use the streets. These include emergency vehicles, employees, residents, visitors, and patient traffic. The heavy daily levels of _(pass-through) traffic also t.he District. The Transportation Parking Study, adm1mstered by the healthcare facl11t1es at the request of the representatives, focused on identifying and addressing these issues. of the major challenge for this Plan is of ... and the uses l'o accom1ilish this, it is important to examine both sides of each street when planning for new development or redevelopment. The fqllowing is a general description of the existing character for some of the streets most used in the CBHD: East Colfax Avenue: A major arterial which serves as a continuous connection from city boundaries on the east to the same on the west. Major land uses are typically retail strip developments. The primary entrance to Subarea II, the National Jewish Medical and Research Center, is located on East Colfax A venue Colorado Boulevard: A major arterial bounded by a mixture of office, and healthcare related uses, including some vacant, deteriorating, and under-utilized properties and parcels, along with surface parking lots. Residential character from lOth to 13th Avenues with a few clinical uses. Serves as a primary access to Subarea I and II. Hale Parkway: 8th Avenue: 9th Avenue: 11th A venue: CBIID Plan Draft Odober, 1997 A collector and a City-designated parkway. One of Denver's few diagonal streets, Hale Parkway extends from Colorado Boulevard to Grape Street. The parkway is perceived as a buffer between the healthcare uses on the south and the Bellevue-Hale residential neighborhood to the north. Serves as a primary access to Subarea I. An arterial bounded .by a pedestrian-scale mixture of residential, office, and retail uses on the south and the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center on the north. Serves as a primary access to Subarea I. A local street which has s_erved as a point of entrance, or gateway. to the CBHD for both east (Dahlia) and west (Colorado Boulevard). Serves as a primary access to Subarea I. A local street. With the development of the UCHSC parking structure at 1 lth Avenue and Colorado Boulevard, and the proposed renovations to 1l

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m-o ::. t ._ I .. = ... ... r-r-rr-'; hl = .... STREET CLASSIFICATION :=-Freeway Arterial Streit <:ollactor Strnt t..ocol Street 16th Street Mall -One-Way Street Beqlnninq of One -way Strut Eftd of On1Way Street Stop Sign Control ----. CITY LIMITS : : :a : .... Cl ... !.i. I --Denver City a County Limits : : IZ 1..1 Enclaves w1thin Denver ... ... .. .. .-.... 2 ....... 2 .. INTERSECTION TRAf'f'IC SIGNALS .D Vehicular Pre Timed 1l Vehicular Semi Actucnecl __ I i L ,. I JR I _..-7 .. ) ... 1 \. S !: plus added I I ll Vehicular Actuated with spectal Pedestrian Phon hiON-INTERSECTION TRAFFIC SIGNALS 1 a VI t Pedes man Pre-Tim eel ill 8 SIT '1: Pedestrian Actuated .. ....,.-I 1-I 1 Speeo and Gap Control Pre-Timecl & .'! Railroao Actuateo Vf : I OTHER ELE:CTRICAL. EQUIPMENT a:: I tl HI &VI J 11. 1....... 1"'1".---4---.1 r Flashing Red Stoo Siqn '"' \ :!l Floshmq Yellow Worninq Siqn Q .... L ..... &VI-- f ...... il TRAFFIC CONTROL AND U( :IJ. I .. .. 5 ..!L. TJ' ..... -.. TREET CLASSIFICATIOf a NOI ; __ I ,,= t fJ ===-= 7.; ''" '"' m ... l 2 7 TRAFFIC ENGINEERING DIVISION -I I I I "'1 -; -.,. ;. "i\ -DEPARTMENT OF PUI!SWC WORt o-, :ITY ana COUNTY ot OENVER: COLORADO ,.WT It .. .:" .,. ,..., "' .. ... r-6ASE MAP I ___ ........... I 2 ) ...,.. Il--l. I ... ..

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University Hospital, this street is expected to serve as a point of entry for vehicular traffic. .serves as primary access for Subarea I. Clermont Street: A local street. Between Hale Parkway and 8th Avenue, this street serves as a secondary access point for Subarea I. Dahlia Street: A local street. No healthcare facilities are located east of this street within the district. Serves as a primary access area for Subarea I. Jackson Street: A local street in Subarea II, this street will serve as the primary access from East Colfax A venue for Subarea II. Harrison Street A local street in Subarea I, this street separates residential 'and healthcare related (parking) land uses. In summary, the streets utilized by patients, personnel and service delivery to the CBHD can be classified into primary and secondary routes as follows: Primary Routes: Colorado Boul(f'vard 9th A VENUE (east of Colorado Boulevard) Colfax Avenue and Colorado Boulevard Intersection (Primary for National Jewish secondary and/or feeder for other health care providers) Secondary Routes: 6th A venue eastbound to Colorado Boulevard 8th A venue westb<;mnd to Colorado Boulevard 14th Ave. eastbound to Colorado Boulevard Clermont Street between 8th Avenue and Hale Parkway Hale Parkway between Dahlia Street and Colorado Boulevard Feeders to secondary and primary streets: 11th Avenue (Dayton Street to Quebec Street) Quebec Street (11th Avenue to 8th Avenue) 13th A venue westbound to Colorado Boulevard Traffic Route Issues As the character descriptions of streets in the CBHD were generated by the committee members, the next step in plan development involved resolution of the issues surrounding the following topics: CBIJD Plan Draft Odober. 1997 12

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Closure of streets and alleys Southbound movement on Clermont at 8th Avenue (the problem of traffic continuing south on Clermont beyond 8th Avenue) \ Heavy district-related secondary route use of Hale Parkway (maintaining the function and status as a parkway) Guide sign system to redirect traffic to primary access points Use of Hale Parkway for delivery and service vehicles to the Veterans Affairs Medical Center and to Columbia-Rose Medical Center (maintaining limited access to service areas while retaining status as a Parkway). Improved access from Colfax Avenue to National Jewish Center for Immunology and Respiratory Medicine. CBHD 1'1n11 Draft Odober, 1997 13

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... HOSPIT .ALSIHEAL THCARE INSTITUfiONS: SUBAREAS I and IT.

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E. Subarea Description and Key Issues 1. Subarea I 2. Subarea II HOSPITALS/HEALffiCARE INSTITUTIONS: SUBAREAS I and TI. I. Subarea I is the location of most of the healthcare facilities and is zoned primarily H-1A and R-3, with large assemblages of ,property owned by the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, University Hospital, Columbia-Rose Medical Center, and Veterans Affairs Medical Center. II. Located Of1 the southern side of the intersection of Colfax A venue and Colorado Boulevard, Subarea II is the site of National Jewish Medical and Research Center. The parcels are zoned H -1A with waivers and H2. SUBAREA I This subarea is the largest of the two distinct subareas of the District and is bounded by Colorado Boulevard on the west, Hale Parkway on the north, Dahlia Street on the East and 8th A venue on the south, which forms the hard edge boundary of this subarea. Within the boundaries there are three subsections, 1-A, I-B and 1-C. There are two large and one small sub-sections that are outside the .boundary; these are subsections I-D, 1-E and I-F, all of which are described below and shown on exhibit(s) .. -I SUBAREA I SUBSECTIONS The Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District study area has several subsections which are distinguished by a combination of land uses, zoning, ownership, and strong edges. Strong edges may be defined as those boundaries (usually streets) commonly identified by the community as the logical limits of the district. There may presently exist some non health-care use parcels located to the interior of the edge streets. as well as some health care parcels located outside of the boundaries, which may be viewed as intrusions into lhe surrounding neighborhoods. These subsections are: SUBSECTION I-A This subsection is bounded by Colorado and Ash Street on the west, 11th A venue and Hale Park way on the north, Dahlia and Clermont Street on the east, and 9th and 8th Avenues on the south. The location of most of the healthcare facilities, this sub-section is zoned primarily H-1 and R-3; with large assemblages of property owned by the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, University Hospital, Columbia-Rose Medical Center, and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The one exception is the property owned by The Colorado Hearing and CDIID /'fan Draft Oclo/Jer, 1997 14

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Speech Center at the southwest corner of Hale Parkway and Bellaire, which is zoned B-1. SUBSECTION 1-B This subsection is bounded by Colorado Boulevard on the west, Hale Parkway on the north, Ash Street on the east and 11th Avenue on the south, and is within the hard edge boundary of Subarea 1. The University Hospital owns one small apartment property at 11th Avenue and Colorado Boulevard. The remainder of the ownership is by condominium agreement or by various owners and is all developed as mid-rise multi-unit residential. It is recommended that any future health care expansion i,n this sub-area should be contiguous to existing Healthcare properties, and be discussed with the neighbors and the Bellevue Hale Neighborhood Association. SUBSECTION 1-C This subsection is bounded by Clermont Street on the west, 9th Avenue on the north, Dahlia Street on the east and 8th Avenue on the south and is within the hard edge boundary of Subarea I. Columbia-Rose Medical Center owns: one property along 9th Avenue between. Clermont and Cherry Streets (PUD 359); the parking lot on the northeast corner of 8th Avenue and Clermont Street (B-1) and property on the southwest corner of 9th Avenue and Dexter Street (H-2). The majority of this subarea is, however, low-rise multi unit residential land and is currently zoned R-3. The ownership is by various owners. though it is desirable for this subsection to remain primarily residential, it is the primary area within Subarea 1 for any Columbia-Rose expansion, and to a lesser extent, it may also be of interest to the Health Sciences Center or to the Veterans Affairs Medical Center. At this time, ColumbiaRose has not shown any interest in acquiring more property; It is recommended that any future heath care expansion in this sub section should be contiguous to existing healthcare properties and be discussed with the Bellevue Hale, the Cranmer Park-Hilltop, and the Mayfair neighborhood associations. The following subsections are made up of propert.ies that are owned by the healthcare facilities and which lie outside the hard edge boundary. Each of these subsections are encroach i11!o lhe residential neighborhood where it is.iocaie-(f, .. and has met with varying degrees of support or opposition by area .. -.. ... ,, .. SUBSECTION 1-D This subsection is bounded by Birch Street (north of 12th Avenue) and the alley betweenBirch and Clermont Streets (between Hale Parkway and 12th Avenue) on the west, mid-block between Birch and Clermont Streets on the north, Clermont Street on the east and Hale Parkway on the soutfi CBHD Ptm /)raft October, 1997 15

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The Rose Foundation owns one property containing an office building and parking lot, between Clermont Street and the alley to the east (zoned H-1-A). The University of Colorado Health Sciences Center owns the properties to the north of 12th Avenue to mid block (the North Pavilion, zoned R-5 & R-1), and a property on the northeast corner of Hale Parkway and Street (the A.F. Williams Building, zoned R-3). Even though it is desirable by the neighborhood for this area to be single or multi-unit residential, at this time these properties are being used by and the Health Sciences Center as satellite medical facilities with the acknowledgment of the Bellevue Hale Neighborhood Association. ColumbiaRose may, in the future, purchase the office property from the Rose Foundation for continued use as medical offices. The Health Sciences Center and the neighborhood groups have an informal agreement that the North Pavilion will retain its current R-5 zoning, and that the open space to the north of this structure will remain and be well maintained. It is also understood that the current use and facilities will not be expanded. It is recommended that any future change in the use of these facilities should be reviewed with the neighborhood. At this time, any increased use would likely be met with strong opposition from the Bellevue Hale Neighborhood Association and the residents. SUBSECTION 1-E This subsection is the Health Sciences Center owned property on the southeast corner of 9th Avenue and Dahlia Street. At the present time, the building is being used as a day care center and is zoned R-3. Even though it is desirable by the neighborhood fot this area to be single or multi-unit" residential, at this time the property being used as satellite day-care center is a use by right under current zoning. It is recommended that any future change in the use of this facility should be discussed with the BellevueHale and Mayfair Neighborhood Associations. At this time, any increased use would likely be met with opposition from the Association. SUBSECTION 1-F This subsection is west of Colorado Boulevard in the Congress Park Neighborhood and is bounded by Harrison Street on the west, E. lOth Avenue on the north, Colorado Boulevard on the east and E.9th Avenue on the south. This block is zoned R-3 from Colorado Boulevard west to alley, and is zoned R-1 from the alley west to Harrison Street. Also included in this subsection is the property on the southwest of E. lOth Avenue and Harrison Street. This parcel is zoned R-1. The Health Sciences Center owns these properties and at this time, these properties are being used as satellite medical offices (in existing residential structures) and a surface parkinglot facility. It is recommended that any future change in the use of these facilities should be reviewed with the Congress Park Neighborhood. At this time, any increased healthcare use would likely be met with the strongest opposition by the Congress Park CBHD l'lm Draft October, 1997 16

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Neighborhood Association. The Congress Park Neighborhood Plan, which was adopted by the City Council and the Mayor in October 1995 as an amendment to the Denver Comprehensive Plan, specifically objects to any hospital use or zoning in the Congress .Park neighborhood for this subsection. The University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, as owner of the property, asserts that as an institution established by the Colorado constitution, the University of Colorado is not bound by the zoning requirements of local municipalities. It is desirable for this area to be single or multi-unit residential or a use that is compatible with the neighborhood and would serve as a buffer from the impacts of Colorado Boulevard traffic impacts and Healthcare District. It is hoped that the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and area residents and property owners will be able to resolve this issue. ADDITIONAL PROPERTY The Health Sciences Center is using, but does not now own, the property known as the Kohler Building on the southeast corner of Ash Street and E. 8th A venue. At the present time, the building is being used as the Preventative Medicine and Biometrics Research Department. Future purchase of this building by the Health Sciences Center is dependent on the environmental testing results in the area. It is desirable for this area to be single or multi-unit residential or a use that is compatible with the neighborhood or the B-1 commercially zoned adjacent parcels' and serve as a buffer to Cranmer ParkHilltop neighborhood residents from E. 8th Avenue and the Healthcare District. It is that any future change in the use of these facilities should be reviewed with the Cranmer Park-Hilltop Civic Association. ADDITIONAL AREA DESCRIPTIONS and KEY ISSUES COLORADO BOULEY ARD MIXED-USE CORRIDOR: The uses immediately adjacent to Colorado Boulevard are a mixture of office, retail, healthcare, institutional, and multi-unit residential uses, zoned R-31 B-2, and H-1-A. This high intensity development is very shallow on the west side of Colorado Boulevard, ending at the alley, 125 feet to the west, where the zoning is R-1 and R-2 and land use shifts to primarily single detached residential units. 8TH A VENUE CORRIDOR: Forming the southern edge of the 8th Avenue land uses (south side) are retail, service and commercial between Colorado Boulevard and Clermont Street; zoned B-2, then R-3 multi: unit zoning and .. land uses from this point eastward to Dahlia. As with the west side of the Colorado Blvd. edge, the 8th Avenue higher intensity parcels have an approximate depth of 100 feet; then change to a low density residential area containing both single and multi-unit CBHD /'fan Dmjl Odober, 1997 17

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structures. HALE PARKWAY CORRIDOR: Hale was officially designated by the City as a parkway in 1956. This corridor could be considered an edge but for the healthcare owned and operated facilities to the north on Birch Street. The land uses on either side of the Hale corridor illustrate the sharp contrast between the lower density single residential areas on the north and the residential and healthcare facilities on the south side. CBHD Plan Draft Odober, 1997 18

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Ill. CBHD DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES -ENTIRE DISTRICT The CBHD development guidelines shall be used by the CBHD to review proposed development impr9vements and projects. The guidelines. in this section focus on cohesiveness throughout the district, without dictating design uniforru.llY' Specific solutions will ---.. ..... ... ... .. be evaluated on a case-by-case basis with regard to design ingenuity and overall compliance with the goals of the CBHD Plan. Specific subarea opportunities.and recommendations are included in sections IV and V. 1. The recommended district boundaries for Subareas I and II healthcare expansion, as generally defined by existing healthcare land uses and the H-1 and H-2 zone districts are as follows: (The boundaries are shown on Exhibit and _.) 2. 3. Subarea I Boundaries: NORTH: Hale Parkway with the exception of thearea between Birch and Clermont extending north to the mid-1200 block. SOUTH: 8th Avenue EAST: Dahlia Street WEST: Colorado Boulevard Subarea TI Boundaries: NORTH: Colfax Avenue SOUTH: 14th Avenue, with the exception of the area between Harrison and Jackson EAST: WEST: where the boundary extends south one quarter into the 1300 block .. Albion Street Garfield Street Wherever possible, in light of the existing zoning and the existing structures, locate and design all public and private construction projects to improve the physical and functional connections between healthcare institutions and the surrounding residential neighborhoods. Utilize quality architectural and site design standards to integrate institutional and residential uses into a single, cohesive, mixed-use neighborhood. a. Provide central district features and amenities upon which to focus new development for all the healthcare institutions. b. Coordinate public infrastructure and beautification projects district-wide to enhance continuity and identity .. Minimize traffic, noise, lighting, shadowing, an'd other negative impacts on residential areas within the District. a. Define a clear transition between healthcare facilities and adjacent residential properties. Treat the edges of the district in a manner which ensures the viability CBitn l'lnn Draft Odobu, 1997 19

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b. and the scale of adjacent residential properties are acknowledged and considered in CBHD construction (eg. scale in size, placement and treatment of structures and parking). Encourage delixery trucks and emergency vehicles to use arterial and collector streets. Additionally, consider using physical traffic deterrents and other tools which will discourage delivery and emergency vehicles from using residential streets. 4. Encourage the design on both sides of the defined edge streets to be compatible in terms of use, intensity, and height. 5. Encourage common landscape design on both sides of the defined edge streets to help buffer the reside!ltial uses from the institutional uses. 6. Restrict the creation of parking lots and parking structures which serve the healthcare uses to areas within the boundaries of the CBHD. In collaboration with the CBHFTMO, mitigate the creation of new parking lots and structures which serve the healthcare area within the boundaries of the CBHD. 7. 8. Encourage most healthcare related traffic to utilize Colorado Boulevard, Colfax Avenue, Hale Parkway, 11th Avenue, 9th Avenue, Avenue and Clermont Street. Consider the use of_ entry features. __ to direct traffic into and out of the CBHD, to specffic.Tn.stihitioris, and onto certain streets, to avoid unnecessary traffic circulating through the surrounding neighborhoods. Consider on-site entry features at Colorado Boulevard and 9th Avenue, and Clermont Street and 9th A venue. Place signage in locations as agreed by the CBHD sign program review process. This program might also include streetscaping and intersection improvements, such as striping, special pavement, and pedestrian signalization. 9. Encourage access to parking structures and parking lots located either on arterial streets, where permitted, or on those collector and local streets which are internal to the district. Utilize traffic redirection structures (such as turn movement diverters) to direct or slow automobile traffic and to facilitate pedestrian access. 10. Discourage traffic from crossing Hale Parkway and continuing north or crossing 8th Avenue and continuing south, into the residential neighborhoods. On the residential side of these streets, consider landscaping, residential entry monuments, and other methods to reinforce the residential .character of .the neighborhood. 11. Discourage healthcare traffic from circulating through and parking in residential neighborhoods. Support the CBHFTMO's transportation demand management (TDM) program. Encourage each healthcare facility to provide free preferential car pool parking CBltn 1't1111 Draft Oclobrr, 1997 20

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12. 13. 14 and support transit subsidies. Initiate a residential parking program which establishes time limits for on-street parking in the neighborhood for non-residents. If the free night parking program is not successful in limiting healthcare-related parking in the residential neighborhoods, then consider expanding the scope of the residential parking program (RPP) to include a night time parking restriction. In cooperation with the CBHD and the CBHFTMO, monitor the effectiveness, management and control of the residential parking program. Discourage the use of Hale Parkway as a thoroughfare. Provide streetscaping on both sides of the street to emphasize this street's residential character. Acknowledge that as a designated Parkway, City regulations on the placement of buildings, signage and points of access must be observed. Initiate the implementation of these regulations by exploring the potential for phasing out or minimizing the use of existing curb cuts and driveways and by reviewing the proposed placement of signs through the CBHD si'gnage program for proper placement. Consider adding additional stop signs. Consider improving the safety and function of the intersection at 9th A venue and Clermont Street in order to better serve Columbia-Rose Medical Center and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center. As a last resort, when considering vacating streets in order to improve the utility of individual parcels, review alternatives for encouraging the retention or enhancement of both the functional and perceived permeability of the district for automobile and pedestrian traffic. \ 15. Maintain, enhance and expand the housing stock in the adjacent residential neighborhoods. 16. Protect those structures which have historic character or significance. 17. As redevelopment within the district occurs along those streets which serve as district boundaries, the scale and buffering of that development should respect the character of the buildings across the street. 18. Encourage the retention and enhancement of the viable residential character of the areas within and surrounding the CBHD. To achieve this, consider using tools such as rezoning and the creation of overlay districts; which will provide design review of new development and rehabilitation projects. 19. Encourage the residents, the neighborhood associations, the businesses, the healthcare institutions; the CBHFTMO, and the City to work together to create a safe mobile, accessible, and inviting neighborhood. Use the CBHD to facilitate the coordination of these efforts CBHD Pttut Dmft Odober, 1997 21

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20. Efforts should be made to involve neighborhood residents and small business owners in extending the range of the district's scheme of street treatments and landscaping into the surrounding areas of influence. This can proceed through both volunteer efforts (such as the city's park flower beds) and through specific block development programs. \ 21. Any new development impacting the existing traffic capacity or patterns must assess the impact and propose mitigating measures to handle the hnpact. 22. Public art should be used to create focal points and reinforce the pedestrian oriented character of the district. SUBAREA I DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES A. Height, Bulk, and Massing 1. Protect the sunlight and privacy enjoyed by the lower-scaled properties north of both 11th Avenue and Hale Parkway from the impact of development south of these streets. Encourage the height, mass, form, length, and bulk of new development to be designed to be compatible with surroundings uses and the district's established and historic building styles. Encourage the use of the H-2 zone district bulk plane for all healthcare buildings to Hale Parkway. 2. Within the CBHD, larger buildings should be concentrated in the center of large sites gradually decreasing in inass and height towards the site boundaries. 3. Large, unarticulated facades are discouraged. Architectural details, windows and plane projections or recesses should be used to reduce the scale of large continuous facades. Typical institutional buildings, with no ground floor or pedestrian scale features, are inappropriate. B. Building Orientation and Placement 1. Building location and orientation should: facilitate convenient access for occupants and visitors, create visual interest and variety accentuate views and the existing topography of the site, minimize shading of streets and walkways and exposure to sources of noise and lighting glare. 2. No development should place unscreened service areas, loading docks, mechanical equipment locations, or unarticulated facades (blank walls), across from surrounding CBHD Pfllll Drnfl October, 1997 22

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residential uses. Ground floor facades that face public streets should have at a minimum arcades, windows, entry areas and landscaping to provide visual interest and enhance campus edge activity. 3. \ Service, mechanical, and storage areas should be internal to the site and ':'isually screened .. 4. The front facade of buildings at the campus edge should orient towards the public right of way and main entrances should wherever possible parallel the street which provides primary access to the building. 5. Building entrances should be visible and accessible from the public right of way along the building's front facade. 6. New emergency access routes and servicing/loading docks should be placed away from residential areas to preserve privacy, safety, and acceptable noise levels for adjacent residential neighborhoods. C. Circulation 1. Mai]!.tf.lin the of the Denver street layout to promote an easily recognizable and understood circuiation system in the district. Avoid tl:le creation of large impenetrable sites with massive institutional structures and no physical connection with the surrounding neighborhood. When street closures occur in the district, provide internal pedestrian mobility and access at similar, but not necessarily exact, intervals to historic rights-of-way. 2. Maximize opportunities for shared parking and community amenities, such as outdoor benches, news kiosks, and bike racks. Design lighting, signage, surfacing materials, landscaping and drainage to encourage non-motorized circulation. 3. If a street closure occurs, the widening of adjacent streets to capture redirected traffic is strongly discouraged. 4. Discourage new curb cuts along those streets which have adjacent residential uses in order to minimize traffic volume and the number of potential contlicts with pedestrians. 5. Increase opportunities for public transit il) order to improve access to commercial, public, mixed use and multi-unit residential sites. 6. On-site pedestrian and bicycle amenities should be located to maximize intermodal connections. Amenities could include: sidewalks, bicycle parking, benches and public transit stops CBHD Plan Draft October, 19 97 23

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7. Discourage healthcare traffic from circulating through and parking in residential neighborhoods. Support a transportation management organization (TMO) which may include, but not be limited to, carpooling information, bus services discount passes, shuttles from outlying parking areas such as Stapleton, encouraging hospitals to provide discounted carpool parking in their structures (possibly free at night), and initiating a residential parking program which establishes time limits for on-street parking in the neighborhood for non-residents. If this free night parking program is not successful in limiting hospital-related parking in the residential neighborhoods, then consider expanding the scope 'of the residential parking program to include a night time parking restriction. Parking control must be enforced and management improved. D. Parking Lots and Structures 1. Encourage the use of parking structures by hospitals and others located in the CBHD to minimize the amount of land used for surface parking lots and the number of parking structures. Such efforts will minimize the tendency of healthcare visitors and staff to park in the surrounding residential neighborhoods. 2. Locate and design parking to minimize inconvenience and eliminate hazards to motorists, pedestrians, and property. 3. Minimize the impact of large, uninterrupted surface parking lots by planting trees to create a visual canopy. Appropriate landscape techniques should include planting islands and defined landscaped pedestrian that break up the impact of large parking areas. Improvement and upgrading of existing surface parking lots with landscaping and lighting is strongly encouraged. 4. Decrease the impact pf surface parking along public right-of-ways and sidewalks through the use of berms, hedges, shade trees or edge walls. Detached sidewalks and landscaped tree lawns are highly encouraged. The use of chain link fences as enclosures for surface parking lots is discouraged. If chain link fences are used, they should be buffered with landscaping. 5. Encourage access to parking structures and parking lots to be located either on arterial streets, where permitted, or on those collector and local streets which are internal to the district. 6. Minimize long, uninterrupted walls of _parking structures. Articulate the facades with smaller scaled design materials and detailing similar to the primary buildings they serve. 7. For parking structures which are directly adjacent to high pedestrian activity streets, integrate active uses or display areas along those walls which face these streets in order to create visual interest and to heighten the role of the street in the hierarchy of district CBHD 1'1111 Dmft Oclober, 1997 24 .I

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\ functions. In considering alternative uses, each institution might first wish to consider those activities which currently are located within their facilities but which could benefit from a location along, a view of, and perhaps access to, a street with a high level of landscaping and pedestrian activity. Amend the zoning language for accessory uses, 59207(3), to help achieve this recommendation. 8. Limit the construction of parking lots and structures which serve healthcare facilities to areas within the boundaries of the CBHD, unless in conjunction with the Transit Management Organization planning. 9. Periodically explore the appropriateness of the City's parking requirement for healthcare related facilities in light of the ongoing changes in the healthcare industry. E. Open Space and Pedestrian Circulation Landscaping should be used to integrate the site and architectural features of new development, create visual continuity throughout the District, and enhance the pedestrian experience within the CBHD. The density of landscaping need not be so dense as to completely cover or mask buildings and sites, but should not be so sparse as to seem applied to building sites artificially. All plant material should be healthy and well adapted to the Denver climate zone 1. 2. All new construction should provide landscape improvements in setback areas that are not otherwise used for automobile parking. If the existing curb and gutter is in disrepair, a new curb and gutter should be provided. Landscaping should relate to building architecture, structural elements on the site and at site perimeters provide continuity from one property to another regardless of land use. 3. ..... The hierarchy of public streets should be conveyed through streetscape improvements that \ reflect the significance of each sidewalk. For the highest priority pedestrian routes, the / following are recommended: a 15' wide landscaped tree-lawn, detached 4. 5. __ botlL accessr'3:ifipS,. Plazas, pocket parks, playgrounds, 'otltdoorseailng areas,bus uses which generate pedestrian activity are encouraged along these routes. Building entrances should be landscaped and located near outd2_or public Where possible, landscape designs should be coordinated with the building design to strengthen the visual connection between the build_ing and site. The selection of landscape trees and groundcover should be consistent with either the CBHD plans or approved campus landscape plans. Specific campus landscape plans must be based on quality principles of landscape design and must relate to the CBHD landscape standards along campus boundaries. The intent is to create landscape CBHD Plan Draft Odober, 1997 25

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consistency without losing landscape diversity and campus distinction. 6. The provision, arrangement and maintenance of open space should be a primary consideration in formulating an overall District Plan and in evaluating development and site proposals. 7. Fragmentation of open space should be avoided; instead open space should be contiguous and concentrated in areas that can be utilized for passive and active recreation and/or for visual relief. 8. A clearly organized system of open spaces should be complemented by a pedestrian network which flows both east/west and north/south to promote pedestrian permeability the district. Locate green space both inside and outside the boundaries of the District and design common green space in a manner which will pn::>Vide a safe environment for patients, visitors, staff, and residents. 9. Provide clear landscaped pedestrian paths which connect the neighborhood residents, hospital visitors and staff to those parks which are located in the interior of the district, on the boundary of the district, or just outside the district boundaries. 10. New development should contribute to a network of well landscaped and. well lit sidewalks that provide for safe and convenient pedestrian access to building entrances, parking and to public open space. 11. Site or landscape features should be located street comers and main entrances to create focal points which provide color and character for -pedestrians and motorists. 12. Street and open space furnishings should express local context in design and materials. Products should be selected for durability and resistance to climactic elements. Furnishings should be located in pedestrian areas adjacent to sidewalks, but should not impede pedestrian movement. 13. Quality design, installation and maintenance of landscaping will be required. Each owner or tenant shall be responsible for the maintenance and repair of all site landscaping. Dead, damaged or dying plant materials shali be removed and replaced within sixty (60) days. 14 All landscaped areas should be irrigated with an underground automated system designed consistent with sound water conservation principles. All plantings, particularly shrubs and groundcovers, shall be placed in groups with similar water requirements to avoid excessive irrigation. CBHD 1'1n11 Draft Odober, 1997 26 ..

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F. Architecture The following architectural guidelines ensure quality building design, visual cohesiveness and architectural compatibility within the CBHD. The use of thematic architectural design is encouraged to create architecturally and visually unique groups of buildings. District continuity shall be provided in terms of scale, height, bulk, proportions, detailing, use of exterior materials and general architectural style. 1. Buildings facades should be attractive and compatible with the architectural style of the District's signature campus buildings. Historical precedents within the district should be supported and reinforced through renovations and the use of compatible contemporary design. New development should draw upon historical details and characteristics. 2. Facades should be articulated and designed at a human scale with entries, columns, bearing walls, and other features which define the structural bays and/or modules of functional space ... The size, shape, and treatment of doors, windows, and other facade elements should reduce the visual impact oflarge, overpowering, building 3. 4. Avoid large expanses of glazing through the use of mullion patterns, entry recesses, and the use of individual windows rather than continuous undifferentiated ribbon windows or large infill panels, etc Exterior building materials should be high quality, durable, aesthetically pleasing, consistent with campus architecture, an9 sensitive to the character of surrounding residential neighborhoods. G. Signage 1. Provide consistent directional and identification signage throughout the district to limit visual confusion and to promote a consistent district image. Conformance with the appropriate H-zone regulations is required. 2. Pedestrian scale or monument style signs are preferred within the CBHD. Where building signage is requested, the design and placement of signs on structures should be consistent with the CBHD facility sign guidelines, as illustrated by exhibit __ 3. Sign materials should be durable and compatible with the overall project design through the use of common architectural features. and by incorporating landscaping at the base of monument signs. 4. Signs may be indirectly illuminated, but shall not be moving, flashing, blinking or fluctuating. Ground mounted or back lit signs are preferred CBIID !'r1111 Draft Odober, 1997 27

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5. Appendix includes an integrated and context specific sign program for the CBHD District. Conformance with the CBHD sign parameters will be evaluated during site plan review. Additionally, each healthcare institution should create its own integrated sign program. Signage which is internal to an individual hospital's property and not visible of the District or public right-of-way is allowed by ordinance, 59-537(b)(l) .. The Design Engineering Division of the Denver Department of Public Works should provide an acceptable design and process for placement of CBHD signage within the public right-of-way. Signs should be placed at strategic locations to direct traffic at key points onto preferred routes, away from residential areas. H. Lighting 1. Consider a distinct lighting program for each health care camplisto promote diversity and variety within the district. Lighting programs should be distinct, but complimentary working together to detine a district identity. All campus lighting plans should address standards for lighting color, height and placement as well as lighting integration with streetscape, parking lots and service lighting requirements. 2. All lighting should be installed with consideration of the impact on the adjacent residential neighborhood. Subtle, warm and downcast lighting is preferred to avoid high contrast and unnecessary glare. 3. Streetscape and parking lot lighting along public rights-of-way shall be integrated with streetscape standards for the CBHD. 4. Consider pedestrian lighting for all streets in or on the periphery of existing healthcare campuses. Determine general standards for light tixtures and apply lighting in varying patterns and frequency to emphasize the street hierarchy throughout the CBHD. CBHD Plan Draft Odobrr, 1997 28

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V. SUBAREA II DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES Subarea II faces a tremendous opportunity to be enhanced as a vital mixed use neighborhood witQ. visual and design cohesiveness. To do so, visual identity must be strengthened, historical quaiities emphasized and pedestrian connections and amenities enforced. Discontinuities between National Jewish Medical and Research Center and residential neighborhoods must be replaced by permeable seams that visually integrate the district, yet accentuate the variety of uses which mruces Subarea II unique. The following guidelines serve as a supplement to the CBHD guidelines, emphasizing opportunities specific to Subarea II. A. Subarea IT Context Subarea II is located south of the intersection of Colfax A venue and Colorado Boulevard, and includes the National Jewish Medical and Research Center, and adjacent residential neighborhoods. Future Subarea II improvements should emphasize the district's visual presence at the intersection of Colfax and Colorado Boulevard, two major arterials with high levels of local and regional traffic. CBHD coordination with ongoing redevelopment plans for East Colfax A venue will further strengthen the quality of this key intersection and enhance this entrance to the CBHD. National Jewish Center is the primary non-residential use in Subarea II and has brought stability, jobs and revenue to the local neighborhood since 1899. This facility is a medical center with a strong emphasis on medical research which limits the number of daily pati.ent trips compared with other general medical hospitals. The National Jewish Center facility is a compatible and stable economic force in the neighborhood and provides an important bufferbetween residential uses and the retail uses along Colfax Avenue and Colorado Boulevard. B. Subarea II Guidelines 1. 2. 3 Achieve an equitable balance between the market demands of National Jewish Center (or other private development) and the physical quality and sustainability of Subarea II. Locate new development along Colfax or Colorado Blvd. to buffer heavy traffic and to minimize impacts on the adjacent residential areas. Maintain the National Jewish Center site as an with limited vehicular mobility, pedestrian oriented amenities, and connected areas of formal and informal open space. A traditional axial arrangement for landscape and building design should help to strengthen the unique identity of the National Jewish campus, yet support the subarea transition towards Colfax and Colorado Boulevard. The edges surrounding the National Jewish Center campus shall be articulated as follows: A more urban streetscape presence along Colfax Avenue that honors the scale and CBHD Plan Dmjl October, 1991 29

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continuity of existing retail development. Pedestrian scaled connections are highly encouraged to ensure residents and employees will have clear and safe access to retail along Colfax A venue. Along the southern and eastern boundaries of the campus, building design and scale shall be compatible with surrounding residential uses. Edge landscaping, paving and street edge lighting should be compatible with district-wide standards. 4. Most healthcare-related access should be directed to Colfax Avenue and Colorado Boulevard. C. Building & Site Design 1. The building architecture located on the National Jewish Center campus captures the historical essence of the CBHD and should be maintained through renovation and the use of compatible contemporary design. Architecture that directly mimics historical buildings is discouraged. However, new development should draw upon historical and characteristics of existing buildings such as the historic B'nai B'rith and the Nurses Dormitory. 2. National Jewish Center development should concentrate larger, taller buildings in the center or along major arterials of the campus,' with height and mass gradually decreasing towards the. residential, 3. The health center campus should be organizJd with more formal integrative space along the campus boundary and informal, user specific open space in the site interior. Site design within, the campus shall be unique to National Jewish Center, enhancing the park like campus quality of this enclave of buildings. 4. No development should place unscreened service areas, loading docks, mechanical equipment locations, or unarticulated facades (blank walls), across from surrounding residential uses. Ground floor facades that face public streets should have at a minimum arcades, windows, entry areas and landscaping to provide visual interest and enhance campus edge activity. Service and storage areas shall be internal to the site and visually screened. 5. Variations in roof lines should be used to reduce the scale of large buildings and to erisure compatibility with adjoining neighborhoods. D. Circulation National Jewish Center functions as a buffer and transition between commercial areas along Colfax Avenue and Colorado Boulevard and the Subarea II residential neighborhoods. As such, CBHD Ptnn Draft Odaber, 1997 30

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considerable care should be taken to balance automobile circulation with pedestrian mobility. 1. Use the existing health care district TMO to create alternate transportation solutions which mitigate the impacts of traffic within the district. 2. Improve automobile access off of major arterials by providing strong visible clues to visitor parking and hospital entrances. 3. Clear traffic circulation is vital to both the National Jewish campus and the overall quality of adjoining neighborhoods. Any proposed changes in street circulation must consider impacts and opportunities to the National Jewish Center and the adjoining neighborhoods, and include the neighbors in the definition of an appropriate design. Changes in traffic circulation that force traffic into existing neighborhoods should be avoided. E. Parking lots and structures 1. Minimize conflicts between pedestrians and automobiles by .. for parking lot access. Sidewalk, curb and landscape continuity are essential to the subarea's pedestrian oriented character. 2. 3. Screen all parking Jots from public right-of-ways with a landscaped buffer that contains both shrubs and trees. Add landscaping to large open expansivJ parking areas to break the large expanse of pavement, define pedestrian walkways and mitigate the visual impact. Consider maintainability and operational clarity when placing this landscape. 4. Minimize the expansive nature of parking lots with landscaped parking islands. 5. Explore landscaping concepts that integrate parking lots into the campus layout. Utilize landscaped corridors and paving to enhance the c<:mnection between parking and building entrances. F. Landscaping, Open Space and Pedestrian Circulation 1. The National Jewish campus should include both formal and informal landscaping that frames pedestrian circulation and areas for outdoor activity. 2. Landscaping at the campus perimeter should respond to the City grid reflecting changes in land use lntensity, activity and scale. Landscaping along Colfax Avenue and Colorado Boulevard should reflect the urban continuity characteristic of a major arterial, while the landscaping along Garfield and 14th should more closely support the National Jewish CBHD Plan Draft Odober. 1!197 31

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Center campus as a part of a larger neighborhood. 3. Plant material and tree species shall be suited to the local climate. Diversification of tree species is suggested to create variety in scale, texture and color. In addition, plant diversification avoids the overuse of one species and may prevent exposure to 4. Formal landscaping within the campus quadrangle should define pedestrian circulation and access. 5. Landscaped plazas, where appropriate, should be combined with more historic and informal tree groupings to create a variety of outdoor spaces and features. G. 1. All regulatory and directional signage in the public right-of-way shall be consistent with the City of Denver sign code and the adopted CBHD sign guidelines. 2. 3. The existing National Jewish Center sign standards should be maintained and enhanced where necessary to coordinate sign style and location on campus. The campus sign standards shall be sensitive and compatible with the character of the District's sign program. The location of all signage must be coordinated with campus lighting and landscaping. H. Lighting 1. Quality site and security lighting w111 be one of the most important elements affecting the appearance and image of the National Jewish Center campus. The location and style of lighting should be consistent and compatible with the architecture and the overall campus design. 2. Site lighting shall be located to emphasize edges, entrances and site circulation. Pedestrian safety and access depend upon lighting that is appropriately scaled and located. 3. National Jewish Center lighting shall be designed to support a unique campus identity. 4." The intent is to create a space that is uniquely defined, but is still complementary with Subarea II and the CBHD. This effect has been achieved in downtown Denver where the Sixteenth St. Mall, the -Civic Center and the Lower Downtown are distinct, but the generaltayout and style of lighting ensure each area feels like Downtown. If applicable, National Jewish Center shall incorporate Colfax Avenue lighting consistent CBIID Pfan Draft Oclober, 1991 32

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with the Colfax A venue streetscaping program. 5. Lighting of large building surfaces should be avoided. Where appropriate, architectural lighting may be included in the building design to emphasize specific design features, or define a specific functional element such as building entrance, cornice, or street facade. Such lighting should not create adverse glare, or visual intrusions upon neighborhoods CBHD Ptan Draft Odober, 1997 33

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VI. IMPLEMENTATION ACTION PLAN A. CBHD District Action Plan Each of the implementation items reflects a recommendation from the guideline sections of this plan. While the details of the projects are for the most part still to be determined by further study and design work, this schedule is useful in terms of assigning priorities and a relative time commitment to the projects, and identifying who is responsible for implementation. Identification of specific party involvement does not necessarily construe funding responsibility for those particular projects. The District-wide recommendations which require implementation action, m addition to development specific response, include the following: 1. Encourage the residents, the healthcare institutions, and the City to work together to create a safe and inviting neighborhood. Support a District Planning Committee and process which will facilitate the coordination of these efforts. RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District Planning Committee will take the responsibility of establishing a development review process. The Planning Committee is composed of representatives from each of the affected neighborhood organizations and healthcare providers within ACTION: TIME: ESTIMATED COSTS: the district. The Planning Committee will establish goals and procedures for itself, including goals, rules for the appointment of members, the duration of membership, operating procedures, and plan implementation. The Planning Committee will continue on an on-going basis. Administrative costs are unknown at this time 2. Consider the use of entry features and signage to direct traffic into and out of the district, to specific healthcare institutions, and onto primary access streets in order to avoid traffic circulating through the surrounding residential neighborhoods. RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, worl9ng with the Department of Public Works Transportation and the Planning and Development Office. CHilD Pla11 Drtr.ft October, 1997 34

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. ACTION: \ TIME: ESTIMATED COSTS: 1) Finalize the design and location of the signage and gateways. 2) Develop maintenance commitments for the signage and gateways. 3) Apply for City Capitol Improvements Planning Program (CIPP) funding. Ongoing for signage program. Design signage which will be less expensive than the City's current directional signage program. Entry features are estimated to cost $75,000 per intersection. 3. Provide landscaping on both sides of the defined edge streets to heip buffer the residential uses from healthcare facilities. RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, working with the Planning and Development Office. ACTION: The Committee will seek funding for completing streetscaping along the defined edge streets. TIME: ESTIMATED COSTS: The completion of this project will follow the completion of the signage program and will be coordinated with the gateway program, with the exception that all new development projects fronting on edge streets will be asked to complete their portion of the entire project. To be determined based on final approved designs. 4. Discourage healthcare traffic from circulating through and parking in residential neighborhoods. Support a TMO which will include encouraging the hospitals to establish employee carpools, bus pass discounts, shuttle services, free parking in structures at night and enforcement of a residential parking pz:ogram which establishes time limits for on-street non-resident parking in the neighborhood. If this two-part program is not successful in limiting hospital-related parking in the residential neighborhoods, then consider expanding the scope of the residential parking program to include a night time parking restriction. The TMO will become a member of CBHD. RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, working with the CBHFTMO Executive Director and the Parking Management Office of the Department of Public Works Transportation. ACTION: CBHD Plan Draft October, 1997 1) Promote and work with the TMO. 2) If necessary, 35

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initiate and promote a night time parking restriction. TIME: Ongoing ESTIMATED COSTS: Unknown B. Subarea I Action Plan 1. Encourage the retention and enhancement of the residential character of the areas surrounding the Healthcare District, including the subareas on the west side of Harrison Boulevard, between 9th and lOth Avenues; from Colorado Boulevard to Dahlia; along Hale Parkway; the R-3 zone district subareas south of 8th Avenue; between Clermont and Dahlia.Streets; and between Hale Parkway and 8th Avenue east of Dahlia Street. To achieve this, consider using tools such as rezoning and the creation of Overlay districts, which would provide design review of new development and rehabilitation projects. RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, with the assistance of the Denver Planning Office. ACTION: TIME: 1) Lay groundwork/build support with the healthcare organizations, neighborhood organizations and their I constituents; 2) Enlist assisdmce and support from the City. The CBHD Planning Committee will take this as an early task. Several members of the neighborhood organizations are already participating. 2. Discourage traffic from crossing 8th Avenue and continuing south into the residential neighborhoods Use impediments to physically narrow the pavement width, while also including landscaping, residential entry monum-ents, etc., to reinforce the residential character of the area. RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, with the Department of Public Works Transportation and the Planning and Office. ACTION: 1) Develop maintenance agreements. 2) Seek funding. 3) Finalize design TIME: CBHD l'tan Drojl ()dobtr, 1997 This project will run concurrently with #3, the landscaping 36 1,

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; of the edge streets. ESTIMATED COSTS: Unknown. 3. Consider improving the safety and function of the intersection at 9th Avenue and Clermont Street in order to better serve Columbia-Rose, VAMC, University Hospital and UCHSC. Review all proposals with consideration of traffic demands at other intersections along '9th, focusing on 9th/Colorado Boulevard, the current entrance to the Colorado Boulevard Healthcare District. RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, working with individual healthcare institutions and the Department of Public Works ACTION: TIME: ESTIMATED COSTS: C. Subarea II Action Phm Transportation 1) _Monitor traffic counts at the intersections of Hale/Clermont, 9th/Clermont, and 9th/Colorado Blvd. 2) When traffic counts approach the level necessary to warrant improvements to current traffic signals, initiate discussions regarding the signals at .these intersections and along Hale Parkway and 8th Avenue Monitoring should begin immediately. Depends oj the solution. Traffic signals cost approximately $75,000 per intersection. 1. Encourage the retention and enhancement of the residential character of the areas surrounding the Healthcare District, including the subareas west of Garfield Street; east from Colorado Boulevard; north ofColfax Avenue; and south of 14th Avenue. RESPONSIBLE PARTY: The CBHD Planning Committee, with the assistance of the Denver Planning Office. ACTION: 1) Lay groundwork/build support with the healthcare organizations, neighborhood organizations and their constituents; TIME: CBIID Plan Draft October, 199 7 2) Enlist assistance and support from the City. The CBHD Planning Committee will take this as an early task. Several members of the neighborhood organizations 37

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are already participating .. ESTIMATED COSTS: 2. Discourage traffic from crossing Garfield Street and 14th Avenue into the residential \neighborhoods by reinforcing primary access off of Colfax A venue. Where necessary revise existing circulation patterns to more clearly define access and to improve circulation. Use impediments to physically narrow the width of edge streets. which are likely to capture overflow traffic; include landscaping, residential entry monuments, etc., to reinforce the residential character of the area. RESPONSIBLE PARTY: National Jewish Center and the CBHD Planning Committee, with the Department of Public Works Transportation and the Planning & Development Office. ACTION: 1) Develop maintenance agreements. 2) Seek funding. 3) Finalize design TIME: This project will run concurrently with #6, the landscaping of the edge streets. ESTIMATED COSTS: Unknown. 3. As redevelopment occurs, identify a strategy to soften the campus boundaries with facades and landscaping that closely relate to pedestrians and surrounding neighborhoods. RESPONSIBLE PARTY: National Jewish Center and the CBHD Planning Committee ACTION: 1) Review and utilize the CBHD and Subarea II guidelines early in the conceptual development stage. 2) Develop a campus master plan. 3) Encourage development projects that integrate architectural, site and landscape design. TIME: On going ESTIMATED COSTS: Unknown. 4. Improve campus circulation and by consolidating hospital service, delivery and loading areas to minimize the amount of vehicular access. RESPONSIBLE PARTY: National Jewish Center and the CBHD Planning Committee. CBIID Plan Dmjl Oclobn, 1997 38

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ACTION: \ TIME: ESTIMATED COSTS: 1) Integrate the design of service and similar functional requirements with the overall campus master plan. 2) Ensure each development project is coordinated with existing service and delivery opportunities. To be concurrent with #3. Unknown. 5. Periodically review existing parking needs and provisions. Identify opportunities for time sharing or lot reorganization which will improve parking capacity on campus. RESPONSIBLE PARTY: National Jewish Center, CBHFTMO, and the CBHD Planning Committee. ACTION: National Jewish Center review and assessment ofparking status, particularly with new facilities or changes in existing services. TIME: ESTIMATED COSTS: CBIID Plan Draft October, 1997 On going Unknown. 39

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VI. APPENDICES A.. General description of Zoning Districts within CBHD B. Definitions of Denver Street Classifications C. Transportation and Parking Study D. Transportation Management Organization (TMO) E. Notes on the Process for Street Vacation (Example of typical insert) 1. If a developer wishes to vacate a public street or alley for the benefit of his development, he must make a written request to the Manager of Public Workr. The vacation process will be handled by the Right-of-Way Engineer of the City Engineer's Office. The developer will al.w comact the City Planning Office and advise the registered neighborhood organizations in the area of his imem. 111e imellt of this advisf!metJl is to secure a supporting for the relocation project before a hearing is called for 011 the project. The above organizations should be notified at least 60 days before a hearing is scheduled by the City' Engineer. Final approval decisions are made by City Council, shoukl the Manager of Public Workr pass forward a 2. recommerldation that an ordinance o11 this be prepared. Normally the developer is re.vponsible for the costs pf utility relocaTion for streeT improvements or modifications by, or fin the benefit of, the development project. Such responlibility applies 10 the relocation of TrffiC COIIIro[ l/evices; gas, elecTrical, telephone, and Water facilities, etc. I 3. The City makes an effort to defray some developer co\1ts whet/ the streeT improvemems or modifications result in improved traffic operation on the public street. CBIID Plan Draft Odober. 1997 40

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. CITY AND COUNIY OF DENVER PLANNING OFFICE A DMSION OF TiiE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT OFFICE 200 West 14th Avenue, #203 Denver, Colorado .80204 Phone: (303) 640-2736 Fax: (303) 572-4636 ITO: (303) 646-2549 Colorado Boulevard Health care District Plan Amendment (February 12, 1998) On the advice of the Traffic Engineer, the following statements are hereby inserted in the Plan; The ,CBHD planning team members have been. briefed on this amendment. On February 11, 1998, The CBHD gave APPROVAL for the changed language to be added to the document. Page 21 Item 12. Replace 12. Discourage shortcutting traffic through the residential neighborhood. Modify existing accesses and median breaks along Hale Parkway to direct traffic to the desired routes. 'Within the neighborhoods, consider traffic management alternatives, i.e., bulb-outs, stop signs, etc., to discourage usage. Page 34 Item 2. Addition wlth the completion of the signage installation, review effectiveness to allow for supplementary entry features and signage to be located as necessary. Page 36 Item 2. Addition .... to physically narrow the pavement width on cross streets. while ...