Citation
A Revitalization plan for Bruce Randolph Avenue

Material Information

Title:
A Revitalization plan for Bruce Randolph Avenue
Creator:
Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
City and County of Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Bruce Randolph Avenue (Denver, Colo.)
City plannning
Urban renewal -- United States

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
A REVITALIZATION PLAN
FOR :


'I
TABLE OF CONTENTS
I. OVERVIEW
A. Neighborhood Planning ............................... 1
B. Use of the Plan ................................... 1
C. Planning Process .................................... 2
II. INTRODUCTION
A. Background ........................................ 3
3. ,Issues/Goals ....................................... 5
III. EXISTING CHARACTER
A. Character Description .....
B. Demographic Profiles ......
C. Community Facilities ......
IV. MAJOR ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
A. Environment ........................................ 11
B. Land Use and Zoning ................................ 13
C. Economic Development ............................... 26
D. Housing ............................................. 3 6
E. Traffic and Transportation ......................... 40
F. Urban Design ....................................... 45
<0 -4 CT\


BRUCE RANDOLPH AVENUE PLAN
Credits
Susan Ellerby, Denver Planning Office, Bruce Randolph
Avenue Task Force Chair
John Harris, Associate City Planner, Research Assistant
Maggie Sperling, Deputy Director of Planning and Development
in Charge of Neighborhood Planning
William Lamont, Jr., Director of Planning and Development
The Honorable Mayor Federico Pena
Bruce Randolph Avenue Task Force
Councilman Hiawatha Davis, Jr., Co-Chair
Ron Abo, Ron Abo Architects, P.C.
Ruth Bentley, Bruce Randolph Avenue Merchant's Association
Rick Borman, Bruce Randolph Avenue Merchant's Association
James Busby, Economic Development Agency
Tom Edmiston, Center for Community Development and Design
Delores Foster, Clayton Neighborhood Representative
Thom Foster, Bruce Randolph Avenue Merchant's Association
Pastor Hugh Harris, Epworth United Methodist Church
Ernest Hughes, Community Development Agency
Roger Johnson, Department of Public Works
Jeff Kenny, Ron Abo Architects, P.C.
John Lawrence, District 2 Police Station
Eloy Mares, Cole Neighborhood Representative
Getabecha McKonnen, Northeast Denver Housing Center
Ron & Bobbi Morrow, Cole Neighborhood Representatives
Herman Padilla, Bruce Randolph Avenue Merchant's Association
Rick Paige, Community Technical Skills Center
Asie Tatums, Cole Neighborhood Representatives
Jim Thornton, Developer/Landowner
Eugene Washington, Bruce Randolph Avenue Merchant's Association
other
Frank Murray Rocky Mountain News, Cover Photograph


VICINITY MAP


I.
OVERVIEW
A. Neighborhood Planning
Neighborhood and small area planning is a collaborative
process between the city, residents and property owners of a
particular area which actively solicits participation in the
formulation of a plan for a neighborhood. The process places
issues on the table, identifies goals, generates and tests
alternative ways to achieve the desired ends, and proposes a
plan for the area, which spells out policy changes and
investments which should be implemented to help realize that
future. It is a forum in which the various interest groups
within a neighborhood, who may have different goals, work out
their differences to arrive at a mutually satisfactory plan.
The private-public partnership is essential to the ultimata
success of the venture.
3. Use of the Plan
Once adopted, the neighborhood or small area plan is an
advisory document for directing and managing change. It
serves as an official guide for decisionmakers, including the
Denver Planning Office, the Mayor and City Council, various
city departments, and also guides public deliberations and
investments. It plays the same role for the private sector,
advising residents, businessmen and investors as to
expectations and direction for the neighborhood. The plan is
not an official zone map and, as a guide, does not imply any
implicit rights to a particular zone or to the land uses
permitted within. Zone changes, which are proposed in the
plan, must be initiated under a separate procedure established
under the City and County of Denver Municipal Code.
The plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban
design, circulation and services which encourage and
contribute to the economic, social and physical health, safety
and welfare of the people. The neighborhood or small area
plan addresses issues and opportunities at a scale which is
more refined and more responsive to needs than can be attained
under the broad outlines of the City's Comprehensive Plan; the
neighborhood plan serves as a component of that document.
1


<2. Planning Process
The Cole Neighborhood residents have been organized for
several years and asking for planning and economic development
assistance from the city. In recognition of the need to
provide more personalized neighborhood planning assistance,
Mayor Pena hired additional neighborhood planners and assigned
two to assist the Cole planning effort.
Planning meetings were held to discuss individual projects and
activities in the neighborhood as well as to work on proposed
development plans with developers. There were discussions
about broadening the level of involvement in terms of citizen
participation and there were discussions about what the area
of focus ought to be. At numerous meetings, residents and
merchants stated that the biggest concerns were related to
Bruce Randolph Avenue (B.R.A.), previously named 34th Avenue.
The Planning Office agreed with the community, to focus
efforts on improvement and revitalization of Bruce Randolph
Avenue.
To kick off revitalization efforts, Councilman Hiawatha
Davis, Jr., the Denver Planning Office, merchants and the
community worked together to change the name of East 34th
Avenue to Bruce Randolph Avenue. This was accomplished in
1986 in honor of Daddy Bruce. The name change brings positive
attention to the strip as a very special place. A Bruce
Randolph Avenue task force was then organized by the Planning
Office and Councilman Hiawatha Davis, Jr., with representation
from Cole and Clayton resident groups; merchants on Bruce
Randolph Avenue; landowners; the Northeast Denver Housing
Center; the Center for Community Development and Design; a
pastor from a local church on Bruce Randolph Avenue; a private
architect and five city agencies (Planning Office, Economic
Development Agency, Community Development Agency, Department
of Safety and the Department of Public Works). This task
force has been meeting since December 1985 with the single
goal of developing a workable plan to revitalize the strip.
All members of the committee have contributed verbally and in
writing to the issues and recommendations found in this draft
plan. Initial input was obtained from the larger neighborhood
at a special community meeting held in the Fall of 1985.
Early input was also obtained from merchants through a Cole
neighborhood merchant survey conducted in 1984. It is the
committee1s intention to go back and present this draft to the
larger community, the merchants organization and other city
agency personnel for additional input and fine tuning.
2


II. INTRODUCTION
A. Background
The revitalization of Bruce Randolph Avenue (B.R.A.) from
Downing Street to Colorado Boulevard is crucial to improving
the quality of life in both the Cole and Clayton
neighborhoods. B.R.A. is a key mixed use collector street
bisecting both of these communities. Residents, merchants,
landowners, area professionals, the City and the Council
representatives have come together to address the issues
facing Bruce Randolph Avenue and to prepare this plan for
action. This effort has come about in response to a push for
change by the community and merchants. The planning process
was designed to coordinate efforts through a broadly
representative committee and to build on recent momentum
stemming from new private investment visible on the strip.
This planning work builds on the following activities:
o The Bruce Randolph Avenue area is located in the heart of
inner city neighborhoods that are experiencing some
rejuvenation and improvement of the adjoining housing
stock.
o The Bruce Randolph Avenue area is in the city's
revitalization area (based on locational and socio-
economic factors) and thus it qualifies for special funds
and programs for housing and economic development funds.
A Fall 1985 Slum and Blight Study prepared by HOH
Associates, Inc., also found the area to be in need of
assistance. The findings identified Bruce Randolph
Avenue as a potential area for urban renewal funding
stating, "... it is clear that there is a presence of
substantial adverse conditions that affect the sound
growth of the community and the living environment of the
adj oining neighborhoods."
o In the late 1970s, the commercial shopping center at
34th and Downing received a Neighborhood Business
Revitalization (NBR) designation which led to its
revitalization. Public improvements including trees,
sidewalks and handicapped ramps, have just been
installed. This shopping area serves as the strip's
anchor on the west end.
o Commercial and residential investments are evident with
improvements to Daddy Bruce's existing business at 1629
East Bruce Randolph Avenue and his proposed new deli on
the comer of B.R.A. and Franklin Street. At that same
comer, the old Franklin Hotel has been newly renovated
.into apartments above the deli. Another vacant and
abandoned apartment building on the corner of Bruce
3


Randolph Avenue and Williams has been purchased and is
undergoing renovation for ten units. There is a third
residential building also proposed for renovation a block
north at 35th and Williams Street and a couple of single
family homes along the strip that are also participating
in rehabilitation programs.- These projects are
public/private ventures assisted by the City's Economic
Development and Community Development Agencies. The
southeast corner of Bruce Randolph Avenue and Franklin
Street has recently been purchased by the Northeast
Denver Housing Center. They are currently developing
strategies for commercial redevelopment of that block.
Finally, the owners of the Park Hill Golf Course property
are moving forward with development plans for their
property at 35th and Colorado Boulevard. They are
researching options for retail or mixed use development.
This project once off the ground would serve as an. anchor-
on the east end just off of the strip.
o There are several franchise businesses that are stable
and should participate in revitalization efforts. All
are in the study area.
o There are 3 city owned sites and a fourth owned by the
Denver Housing Authority in the study area. All are
vacant and provide an excellent opportunity for infill
housing development. Specifically, the sites are located
at Bruce Randolph Avenue and Marion both the south and
northeast sides, Lafayette and Bruce Randolph Avenue's
southwest comer (DHA) and Humboldt and Bruce Randolph
Avenue on the southwest corner.
o An entire block on Bruce Randolph Avenue between
Elizabeth and Clayton Streets on the north side is being
renovated by the Hope Center. The Hope Center will
provide preschool and daycare services for the retarded,
out of this facility. This large previously abandoned
structure was formally a supermarket. The Hope Center
recently was awarded $200,000 from the Mayor's Advisory-
Council to help offset the cost of renovation for the
facility. The funds will be used primarily for a play
ground, landscaping and beautification of the grounds.
o Cole Junior High School occupies an entire face block on
the south side of Bruce Randolph Avenue between Humboldt
and Franklin Streets. The committee will be working with
the Denver Public Schools to determine how they can
assist with beautification efforts of their property.
Additionally, it has been suggested that their grounds be
made more open to the community for parades and festivals
that can pull the entire community together.
4


o
Merchants applied for and- received close to $200,000 in
grant funds for beautification of 6 different nodes on
the strip along the public right of way. A $12,000 grant
was awarded to an apartment renovation project at Bruce
Randolph Avenue and Williams.
o A merchant's organization has been formed as a result of
a recent workshop held to expand communications with all
merchants on the strip. Merchants are working to secure
a paid staff person to implement the plan's
recommendations and to take it a step further in applying
for an expansion of the Neighborhood Business
Revitalization program east towards Colorado Boulevard
and.individual developers and landowners continue to work
on revitalization and development projects.
B. Issues/Goals
The critical issues brought out by all involved are centered
around two items: 1) the poor visual environment, ranging
from deteriorated properties and structures to the widely
known criminal activities and anti-social street behavior; and
2) the uncertain economic climate and the particular needs of
area business persons.
The primary goal is to clean up and beautify the strip so it
becomes more useful and inviting as a pedestrian avenue, and
to join the city, the community and the merchant's association
in a partnership to improve the economic climate of the area.
There are no grandiose schemes or surprises with this plan, it
is simply a statement of the problems and a call for action to
address these problems in a timely way. The plan must
increase public, private and political awareness about the
importance of providing assistance to the strip. It is also
intended to be the common framework for making future
decisions about economic stability, city services, public/
private development, urban design and beautification of Bruce
Randolph Avenue. Hopefully, improvement will take place
without the prescription approach and will instead be the
result of common goals spelled out in this plan.
5


III. CHARACTER SUMMARY AND DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE
A. Character Description
The Bruce Randolph Avenue study "area spans two neighborhoods,
Cole and Clayton. There is quite a bit of diversity along the
2 mile stretch. The study area- is anchored on the west by the
Downing shopping center and the east by the Colorado Boulevard
retail activity and the Parkhill Golf Course property
scheduled for retail/office development. It consists of a
series of nodes that differ dramatically in terms of the
overall feel, the mixture of land uses and existing zoning.
Properties vary in terms of their level of deterioration,
visual attractiveness, architectural styles, the level of
activity generated and type of activities both positive and
negative. The retail mix ranges from small mom and pop shops
that attract nearby residents who walk in, to major franchises
located at busy intersections (e.g., Colorado Boulevard) that
attract neighborhood and regional traffic. The housing stock
is also mixed with some multi-family structures but
predominantly single family houses. Houses tend to be in
better condition than many of the commercial properties, and
overall conditions generally improve when moving east on the
strip.
The perception or image of the area has two sides, internal
and an external to the neighborhood. The external image is
basically negative to passersby and neighborhood residents a
few blocks away who occasionally view it from a distance.
Many properties are felt to have become a "relocation" area
for illegal and anti social street activities that previously
flourished at "the Points". The anti social behavior affects
some pedestrians and inhibits them from walking about freely
and frightens them away from businesses. The negative image
is compounded by the feeling of hopelessness and the feeling
that there is a lack of support to address the issues. Many
also feel that: the area is neglected in terms of general code
enforcement and the efficiency and frequency of basic city
services such as street sweeping, trash pick up and the lack
of maintenance, clean up or landscaping of city properties and
rights of way. The external image is that this is an area
that is deteriorating physically and socially. Progress
exists but goes relatively unnoticed. There is little
knowledge about the individual or collective efforts to
revitalize the strip, but the problems are well known by
people in the larger community.
The internal image of the study area held by Bruce Randolph
Avenue residents, merchants, landowners and developers as well
as Bruce Randolph Avenue committee members, is more positive.
The problems are clear and the impacts have been felt, but the
possibilities for renewal are seen as good especially in light
6


of renewed interest on the part of property owners and the
city, and with the push from the community to take action.
Those on the strip know the area well and thus, recognize
positive changes occurring. They are hopeful but realistic
and most are willing to be active participants in the
revitalization movement. -
B. Demographic Profiles
COLE
The Cole Neighborhood is bounded by 40th Avenue on the north,
York Street on the east, Martin Luther King Boulevard on the
south, and Downing/Walnut Street on the west. It is
classified by the Denver Planning Office as a minor to
moderate redeveloping area.
Cole is a small neighborhood with 339 acres. It is
predominantly residential. The population according to Denver
Regional Council of Government's 1985 estimate was 4,970. The
1980 census showed the population at 4,928 as compared to
5,418 for 1970 and 7,259 for 1960. The most recent loss is
minimal and is similar to losses experienced by other
neighborhoods; it is reflective of a national trend to fewer
persons per household.
Ethnically, the area is mixed but is occupied primarily by
persons of Spanish origin and Blacks. The 1980 census shows
2,338 persons of Spanish origin (47.4%); 2,026 Black (41.1%);
511 White (10.4%); 31 Asian (.6%); and 22 Native Americans
(.5%) .
Young adults (25-34 years) form the largest age group with 841
persons. Persons 75 years and older make up the smallest age
group with 146. Other age groups are about equal with just
over 400 in each category (i.e., children and middle aged
persons).
This inner city neighborhood has a mix of owner and renter
occupied housing. The average age of the housing stock is
mixed but is generally 44 years or older for single family
homes and 35 years for multi-family structures. The area has
experienced some redevelopment or conversions of single family
units to multi-family structures. There have only been a few
new infill housing developments in recent years.
The median household income was $10,341 in 1970, but dropped
by $1,255 to $9,086 in 1980 (Census Bureau). The median
family income citywide in 1980 was $15,500. The unemployment
rate for the neighborhood in 1970 was 6.7% compared to 4.29%
citywide. For 1980, the neighborhood experienced a
significant increase to 13.3% unemployment as compared to
6.02% citywide. Cole's unemployment increased by 6.44% during
that ten year period. The 1980 adult median education level
was 11 years (11th grade) as compared to 10 years for 1970.
7


CLAYTON
The Clayton neighborhood is also a predominantly residential
neighborhood and it lies to the east of Cole. It is bounded
on the north by 40th Avenue, the-south by Martin Luther King
Boulevard, on the west by York Street and the east by Colorado
Boulevard. The neighborhood has experienced very little
redevelopment pressures compared to neighborhoods closer in
toward Downtown. The land uses are basically compatible with
the R-2 medium density zone district that covers much .of the
neighborhood.
Clayton is a small 350 acre neighborhood and according to the
Denver Regional Council of Government's 1985 estimate, it has
4,758 people. The 1980 census revealed the population as
4,622 as compared to 5,112 for 1970 and 5,172 for 1960.
Ethnically, the area was 79.1% Black in 1980. The 1980 census
also shows 515 persons of Spanish origin (11.1%); 351 White
(7.6%); 84 Asian (1.85%); and 18 Native Americans (9.4%).
Young adults (25-34 years) form the largest age group with 374
persons. Other age groupings are nearly equal in numbers,
with over 200 persons in each category. The median age for
the neighborhood is 23.7 years.
Income and employment data published by the U.S. Census shows
Clayton's median household income for 1970 was $12,985, and
like Cole, salaries dropped to $11,587 for 1980. The 1980
citywide income was $15,560. The percent of residents
unemployed in 1970 was 8.58% as compared to 8.36% in 1980.
The 1980 adult median education level was 12.1 years, close to
the 1980 citywide median education level which was 12.3%
years.
8


C. Community Facilities
Overview
The richness and diversity of Bruce Randolph Avenue is evident
with the large number of community facilities located on this
short 2 mile stretch. There are 10 facilities, equating to
nearly one every other block. These facilities are well
supported by the neighborhood and they offer a variety of
services to meet special needs. The condition of many of the
facilities, however, is poor, either in terms of general
appearance, structural conditions or upkeep of the public
rights of way. Many will be targeted for improvement programs
as revitalization continues. These facilities include:
1. Mercy and Peace Pentecostal Church
Location: 3350 Lafayette Street
Built: 1888
2. Cole Middle School Playground
Location: Humboldt Street; Franklin Street along Bruce
Randolph Avenue
3. St. Paul Grand Lodge Scottish Rite No. 1 and Electra
Grand Chapter OES
Location: 1615 Bruce Randolph Avenue
Built: The building in which the organization is
quartered was built in 1890.
The secret fraternal religious non-profit charitable
organization was established in Denver, 1962. It is
connected with John G. Jones affiliate in Chicago.
4. Epworth United Methodist Church
Location: 3401 High Street
Built: 1936
5. Mt. Calvary Church of God in Christ
Location: 3354 High Street
Built: 1913
6. Denver Federation of Colored Women's Clubs
Location: 3401 Race Street
Built: 1916
The Denver Chapter is affiliated with the National
Headquarters located in Washington, D.C. The local group
engages in grass roots educational work for the benefit
of themselves and community besides contributing to some
social services. The National Association of Colored
Women's Clubs was organized in 1896 and is one of the
oldest women organizations in the United States. The
seven program objectives for the national association
include:
9


1. Promote education for women and girls.
2. Raise the standards of home.
3. Work for moral, economic, social and religious
welfare of women and children.
4. Protect equal rights of women and children.
5. To secure and use thei-r influence for enforcement of
civil and political rights for the group.
6. To obtain for colored women the opportunity of
reaching the highest standards in all fields of
human endeavor.
7. Promote interracial understanding so that justice
and goodwill may prevail among all people.
7. Mt. Sinai Baptist Church
Location: 3356 Clayton Street
Built: 1876
8. Central States Conference Corporation 7th Day Adventist
Church
Location: 3301-3385 Albion Street
Built: 1963
9. Park Hill Orthodox Presbyterian Church
Location: 4095 Bruce Randolph Avenue
Built: 1956
10. East Denver Temple Association
Location: 3400 Albion Street
Built: 1958
A temple hall owned by East Denver Lodge #160 AF & AM.
1 0


IV. MAJOR ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS
A. Environment
Overview
Environmental conditions along Brace Randolph Avenue (B.R.A.)
are mixed. The general feel or atmosphere of any area is
created by the people, the businesses, the street activity and
the cleanliness of properties. Community pride, private
management of properties and buildings along with adequate
code enforcement and city services are all important factors
in shaping an environment.
While there are some deteriorated residential properties along
the strip, residential uses tend to be in better condition
than commercial'properties. Generally speaking, the
environment on the east end of the strip towards Colorado
Boulevard is better than conditions west towards Downing.
There is a movement in the community now, to combat crime, to
push for revitalization of Bruce Randolph Avenue and to change
the negative image that has developed because of poor
environmental conditions. People want to see the physical and
visual environment of the area, addressing both real and
perceived problems.
Major Issues
1. Bruce Randolph Avenue has a poor image and has been
viewed as a rough and deteriorating neighborhood. The
recent revitalization and investment that has taken place
is overshadowed by the negative image.
2. The high crime rate in the Cole neighborhood (#23 of 63
citywide with 68 the best), coupled with some anti social
street behavior and illegal activities on the strip
contributes to the poor image, and keeps people from
using the positive businesses along the strip. This also
deters new investors from coming into the area. In a
1984 merchant's survey crime was identified as the
primary concern. Merchants who have been in the area for
10-16 years noted problems with burglaries, robberies,
shoplifting and vandalism. Other illegal or anti social
activities along the strip identified by the community
include loitering, gambling, fencing of goods,
prostitution, drug dealing, public drinking and
harassment. Many feel that if the police/community
relations were improved, the police could be more
effective. There are no effective community crime watch
mechanisms in place.


3. Some of the business are marginal and the houses
deteriorated. Vacant land and buildings that are-
neglected or abandoned are a blighting influence on the
strip. Internal structural conditions and maintenance of
buildings is not always safe, comfortable or inviting.
Storefronts and displays are not always attractive or
well kept. Many exteriors of older buildings have been
covered up with new surfaces, disguising the original
character of structures.
4. The strip is not as clean as it should be; trash and
litter are strewn across property; streets and alleys are
often dirty and need cleaning. Many feel that city codes
are not consistently enforced on property owners.
5. Improvements are needed with regard to streets, alleys,
sidewalks, curbs and gutters. Better maintenance is also
needed.
6. There is concern that deterioration breeds further
deterioration, thus impacting the physical and moral
character of the strip and increasing the lack of pride
and sense of hopelessness. Residents and merchants want
to stop negative trends and turn this area around to
"recapture" it as a safe neighborhood street.
Major Recommendations
1. Merchants and police need to work together cooperatively
to combat crime. Merchants need to create a crime watch
program and organize an operation/identification program
in the study area. Merchants and property owners should
post private property signs as part of the new trespass
ordinance permitting police to come on to private
property to enforce the sign. Merchants and property
owners need to work to secure better lighting; they need
to work with the police to secure a commitment for
increased scooter patrols and vice enforcement by
continually communicating concerns and reporting illegal
activities. Merchants need to obtain assistance from the
District Attorney in filing a public measure to close
down business with illegal activities that do not
cooperate. Merchants need to identify acceptable street
activity and discourage unacceptable street activity.
2. Landowners and business persons need to increase their
sense of responsibility and work on improving property
and building conditions. The city needs to provide
consistent, systematic and sensitive code enforcement and
institute necessary code revisions to strengthen, alter
or improve the delivery of services.
12


3. A streetscape beautification program should be initiated.
A study is needed of traffic patterns and ways to better
utilize Bruce Randolph Avenue, itself to improve the
appearance of the strip, and strengthen Bruce Randolph
Avenue as a pedestrian avenue.
4. Annual clean up weeks are needed to clean streets,
alleys, rights of way, vacant land and would serve to
pull the residents and merchants together.
5. The businessmen, the larger community, political leaders
and city officials should work on joint programs or
events that will lead to an improved environment and
image of the strip. Campaigns, parades and festivals can
boost neighborhood pride and attitudes, encourage self-
help and begin to change the mood of the neighborhood.
6. The business community should obtain positive press
coverage of events and should educate the press about the
revitalization movement.
7. A slogan contest for the strip or the merchant's
organization should be developed and marketed along with
a poster to increase awareness and boost pride.
3. The Bruce Randolph Avenue merchant's organization should
prepare a public relations and marketing plan for the
entire strip.
9. Efforts should be continued to build on neighborhood and
merchants pride efforts already started by increasing
involvement, awareness and self help in revitalizing the
strip.
B. Land Use and Zoning
Description
The mix of land uses along Bruce Randolph Avenue.from Downing
to Colorado Boulevard consists of linear stretches of
residential property broken up by 7 commercial nodes and an
occasional free standing retail shop or office. The frontage
parcels from Downtown to Colorado Boulevard make up 37 acres.
Residential use and public facilities equal 28 acres and the
community nodes together make up 9 acres. All commercial uses
are neighborhood serving except those at York and Colorado
Boulevard which have regional economic support due to high
visibility and heavy traffic volumes. The 7 nodes are ar
Downing, Franklin, Gilpin, York, Elizabeth, St. Paul, Colorado
Boulevard. Some are more active than others. The kinds of
businesses include liquor stores, service stations,
restaurants, barber/beauty shops, bar/lounges, grocery stores,
13


a drug store, a cleaners/laundromat, hardware store, and a
fish market. The residential uses are predominantly single
family with a few duplexes and low density multi family
structures.
The zoning along the strip includes B-4 (general business
district), B-2 (neighborhood serving retail), and a limited
amount of B-l (low scale professional office). The B-2 zone
district is the primary zone for commercial properties. There
are 2 Planned Unit Development zones (PUD), one for a grocery
store. The other is a vacant lot planned for commercial
development. Residential zoning includes R-4 (very high
density residential and/or office), R-3 (very high density
multi-family housing), R-2 (single-family and low density
multi-family). The R-4 and R-3 districts each cover one face
block on Bruce Randolph Avenue. The vacant R-4 parcels are
on the south side of Bruce Randolph Avenue between Marion and
Lafayette Streets. The R-3 site is on the south side of Bruce
Randolph Avenue between Monroe and Garfield. There are 4
single-family houses on the R-3 site in good condition and all
face Bruce Randolph Avenue.
The scale of commercial and residential structures along Bruce
Randolph Avenue is predominantly single story with several
older 2 story houses mixed in and a couple of older apartment
buildings. The tallest structure is the Old Franklin Hotel
which is 3 stories. The character and scale of development
along the strip is compatible with that of the adjacent
residential neighborhoods. The relationship between how the
land is used and how it is zoned, is not cohesive. While
legally permitted, single family uses are nearly all zoned R-2
for slightly higher densities, thus, allowing conversions to
multiple units. There are some single-family units zoned R-3
for high density apartments. There are a few duplexes zoned
for commercial development and there are commercial properties
zoned for residential use. Both the R-3 and R-4 zone
districts permit development to occur that would not be in
character with Bruce Randolph Avenue land uses nor would the
development be in character or scale with the adjacent
neighborhoods. While development of the vacant R-4 land is
desired, proposals must assure compatibility and sensitivity
to the character and scale of existing adjacent development.
For descriptive purposes and to get a better feel for land use
and zoning conditions, the strip has been divided below into
sections:
Downing-Marion
The small 2.5 acre shoppette located on Bruce Randolph Avenue
between Downing and Marion was designated a Neighborhood
Business Revitalization area (NBR) back in 1978 by the Mayor's
Advisory Council. The designation was made because of the


deterioration taking place and the need to retain neighborhood
serving retail uses in this low-moderate income area. This
program entitled the merchants and landowners.to receive
concentrated' matching funds and technical assistance from the
city to improve the economic development climate. The NBR
helped to bring in the current grocery chain and strengthen
other support retail services. ^Matching funds were used for
renovation of facades and for beautification. Public
improvements (i.e., sidewalks, trees) for the right-of-way
were also installed. Today, this is a thriving canter.
Businesses in and/or adjacent to the shoppette include a drug
store/liquor store, restaurant, grocery, meat market, auto
repair shop, a gas station, a health facility and a cleaners
and laundromat. The center benefits from the support of the
immediate residents as well as drawing on heavy traffic
volumes along Downing Street.
North of the canter on Marion, are 4 single-family structures
which face 3ruce Randolph Avenue. They are zoned R-2 for
single-family and duplexes. Both the northeast and southeast
comers of Bruce Randolph Avenue and Marion are vacant and
owned by the city. The northern parcel is zoned B-2 and the
southern one is zoned R-4 for office/residential at very high
densities. The following map depicts land use and zoning for
this area.
R-2
3 ^*9 *
3-2
Avg"
8-4
a-2
R-4
is
JSjio



DOWNING to
MARION street
15


Lafavette-Willjams
The land uses along this 4 block stretch of Bruce Randolph
Avenue are mixed but the area is predominantly commercial.
An exception is at the Lafayette intersection where there are
5 single-family houses, a church-and a vacant lot owned by the
Denver Housing Authority. The residential uses are properly
zoned. From Humboldt to Gilpin Street is the commercial strip
where Daddy Bruce's Barbeque is located (at Gilpin). Also in
the B-2 zoned area is Cole Jr. High, a lodge, a fourplex, the
Old Franklin Hotel (at Franklin Street), a vacant commercial
building, and a single-family house. Other retail uses
include a Phillips gas station, a thrift store, an auto
electric shop, Bait and Tackle shop, a record store, liquor
store and a bar. Daddy Bruce is planning to open a deli on
the ground floor of the Old Franklin Hotel which has recently
been renovated into apartments. Three frontage parcels from
Humboldt to Gilpin on the south side, are zoned R-2. Two are
vacant lots (one city-owned) and one is part of Cole Jr. High.
Three of the four comers on Williams Street are also zoned
for residential and include an apartment building, a duplex
and a single family house. The apartment building which has
been abandoned was recently purchased by a developer who is
renovating it into 10 apartments. The northeast corner is a
small grocery store zoned Planned Unit Development (PUD)
specifically for its use. The match between zoning and land
use here, is poor. There are a few single family houses and
apartments in the B-2 zone district and part of Cole Jr. High
is zoned 3-2 (see the following map).
Generally speaking, property conditions here need improvement.
There are some buildings in especially poor condition that
bring down the appearance of the rest. This area has received
a lot of positive publicity in recent years due to Daddy
Bruce. His community wide free dinners to feed the poor on
holidays has gained him national recognition. There is
concern that his efforts and the visibility and exposure he
has offered the strip has been offset by the poor condition of
other properties and because of visible crime and anti-social
street activity which all attract negative attention.


LAFAYETTE to WILLIAMS streets
R-2
SF
Vac.
R-A
k:
(-0
Ui
K
k
Uj
>~
<
i.
Pe*+£.eot*ol
. Chorch
R-2
r
i
-L.
<0
&v$
Cf& 3 TMtoff | g g i
S.P
I
R-2
i
k
Q
0
CO
I
r
, j

/1
8o 5.
' B*lUCE\P^r\HDOLPH
I
-------1 ----------
Oo/ P/3)\ rour.j
R-2
I
J
k
U)
T
I
I
R-2
Qjoc
^ _:£U
si. Po.,/
{jrcri? looDf
J c c 4 t > 5 h
XT Jc Mo. t *
OUD j _ ^ < | 5 3F6' '
FUAMcua/ .
AVE,
s c
3.F.
J I-
R 2
*
<
Hr
U_
i'-
0
Al./, i,i ** | /*?./< (.i v | k
*.v,~ C... i
B 2
r-
i
i
. j
v/ OC
s.r.
>
q.
j
O
avjF. e* 4
Lc-- f' "A/
S Ao
S.P
S.F. = Single Fnmlly
M.F. = Multi Fnmlly
VAC. = Vacant
BUS. = Business
17
1/V I L L i A /Vlvb


High Street-Gavlord
This area is predominantly single-family residential with one
duplex. There is one vacant lot which is being used as a
private garden at Gaylord. The only other land uses are
public facilities including two churches and the Denver
Federation of Colored Womens Clubs. Only 4 of the structures
face Bruce Randolph Avenue (at High street). The others (11
units) orient toward the side streets. All of this area is
zoned R-2 which typically permits single-family units and
duplexes-(see following map).
Property conditions range from good to excellent with
maintenance improving as you move eastward along Bruce
Randolph Avenue. Private yards tend to be attractively
landscaped and well maintained, as is much of the public right
of way.
18


UlQH
HIGH to GAYLORD streets
F 1-2
- T 1 ~ T
y*JltCD u : !
r hdpi? t C.MU_C_Vl 1 1 Mull S.F'srl Jf=te | 1 1 1 1 pt'UVP r^fDC IAT0M OP CoiP^J O wnMlM 3 Cli/65 s.* S F 5. * S P-
Bruce Rahdolph
Mv tAivMtY S- r S * SP. s .* S.F.
-C^U^CM Of* . Ui
COD *j CHP15T Vi
M
t*
R - 2
S. F. = Singl e Fanil ly
19
G AY LORD 3 T.


York-Fillmore
The uses from York to Fillmore includes a fairly equal mix of
single family residential and retail, a couple of duplexes,
vacant land and public facilities. A major retail node exists
at York Street and Bruce Randolph Avenue. It appears quite
active and serves a number of shoppincr needs of nearby
residents. This node also flourishes from support of auto
passengers who stop on their way to other destinations. While
the visibility is good and the high volume of traffic brings
business, there are a couple of constraints. One is the
limited amount of parking available and the other is an
unacceptable amount of illegal activity. The retail uses
include a hardware store, cleaners, gas station, a bar, a
beauty shop, maintenance club, liquor store, office, drug
store and a restaurant (see following map).
A second smaller commercial stretch begins at Columbine Street
and runs along the north side of Bruce Randolph Avenue zo
Fillmore Street. Residential uses occupy the southern part of
the strip except for a real estate office on the southwest
comer of Fillmore and Bruce Randolph Avenue. The most
notable land use is a vacant abandoned grocery store that
occupies an entire block at Elizabeth and Bruce Randolph
Avenue. This was once a very busy center with a number of
retail outlets. When the grocery chain moved out, support
retail followed. Retail that remains adjacent to the old
store, includes a bait and tackle shop, a radio/tv repair
shop, a small grocery, a fish market and a couple of vacant
storefronts.
The match between zoning and land use is good except part of
one commercial development at York is zoned R-2 and part of a
retail use at Elizabeth is R-2, and a single family structure
on Fillmore is zoned B-l (see following map).
Property conditions vary. Residential properties are in good
condition with trees and landscaping evident. Retail uses
could be upgraded in terms of improved facades, store
displays, landscaping and street trees.
20


f UhK iu riLLi¥i r
SA I 3 ft j t'% V Uf 1 * 5/: V 5 * 3'* ^ yM/ *,W
W ?
| <0 1 1 Q
n j 2 3 4 M R- 2 i < 1 k )-
j 0 J
O Uj VI
$ p
f <
21 K
S.F. = Single Family
Vac. Vacant
F IULJUIO£P


Milwaukee-Colorado Boulevard
The primary land use here is single family residential, most
of which faces on to Bruce Randolph Avenue. There are also
about a half dozen duplexes or low density multi-units houses
and 2 retail nodes. One is a mini retail node at St. Paul
with a Texaco, liquor store, bait and tackle shop, barber
shop, office and a small grocery store. The second and most
prominent retail node on the strip, is at Colorado Boulevard.
This is a strong, active neighborhood and regional serving
business node that benefits from high traffic volumes, 2 bus
routes that intersect here and good visibility. There are a
few franchise businesses including McDonalds, Jack in the Box,
Texaco and Churches Chicken. Most of the businesses are well
kept but landscaping is minimal.
The Park Hill Golf Course property is one block north at 35th
and Colorado Boulevard. Part of this land is owned by the
Clayton Foundation and part is owned by an Alaskan Indian
group. They are currently looking at potential redevelopment
of the site to mixed use or a major retail center. Ideally,
redevelopment of this site would provide an activity node or
anchor retail project for the east end of Bruce Randolph
Avenue.
The zoning along this few block area,, is all for low density
residential use with the exception of the Colorado Boulevard
node (B-2) and one parcel for apartment type development (R-3)
from Monroe to Garfield on the south side of Bruce Randolph
Avenue. The golf course property is zoned 0-1. The zoning
and land use are compatible except for the R-3 which covers 4
single-family structures and permits high density residential
redevelopment to occur.
22


.yiiLin/AUKes
MILWAUKEE to MADISON STREETS
*
R-2 1 1 1 ] i
'1. TV J O k , j 7.- < r. ' k *o J 1 1 1 1 k 0 1
N VI 5 r ,5 ''f- j /, 0 >. £ *" S p. _l S J S F. 5 5 <-< i i
n - 2
F \ > 1 1
'0 1
3f j /=<-< e. 5 r
r
t
V;
f ^
;
i
>* tv V
......I 7
q
k
Bract Aawocph Avf
_ r-
- e /-* j r /=' ^ S.X y, 5 m^i-f V.. J i. -> f J >U, > f | i/f-c V 1 5 r. i 5 r S r
§ / / 0 i 1
r i *V 0 : H 2 1
Vj
n-2 k -
'h
S.F. = Single Family
!. Vac. = Vacant
. Bus. = Business
23 Apt. = Apartment
i
iVlAatso/v or.


ikU-SiU'.
MONROE to COLORADO BLVD
jt.a ' s a : -
R-2
Q
Q

misa&'iki
Ave.
; p\ :.a\ i i s.a :*
J p. 11 |0 J.^q l r-^ z?
; Z /U., ><*>
H3 : o 0 r.t
1 i i! 1 i '
j ;i , ; *
t| i !^i i i c R 2
i l
o
* i
*
X
#oH. UV
JmlM. C>
'3 O*
0
Q
\
*
O
-j
0
Vj
S.F. = Single Family
2A


Major Issues
1. The R3 and R-4 zoning permit much higher densities and
scales of development to occur than exist along the strip
or in adjacent neighborhoods. The R-4 land is vacant.
2. There are six commercial buildings or parking areas in
the R-2 zone district. Nearly all are viable uses that
serve the neighborhood. Three of these are located at
the St. Paul intersection. One is a busy Texaco station,
another is an office, and the third structure
accommodates a grocery store, a liquor store, bait and
tackle shop and a barber shop. All are in fair to good
condition. A fourth commercial structure at Milwaukee is
vacant and abandoned. It formerly housed a small ice
cream shop similar to a Dairy Queen. The other two are
commercial extensions into R-2 zones. One is the parking
area for a business on York Street's southeast corner.
The other is on Elizabeth and Bruce Randolph Avenue's
northwest comer where the building sets back into R-2
but the frontage and parking area are in the B-2 zone
district.
3. It is felt by many that existing zoning ordinances
governing land use and zoning and health and safety
regulations are not well followed by merchants, residents
and landowners, nor are the codes enforced properly by
appropriate city agencies. Examples include dirty
streets and alleys, improper use of dumpsters, inadequate
dumpster pick up, outdoor storage and visible illegal
activities.
Major Recommendations
1. Research the feasibility of changing the R-3 zone
district (Monroe-Garfield) to be more compatible with the
single-family uses on the block.
2. Determine the appropriate land use(s) for the city-owned
R-4 zoned parcel at Marion and the appropriate zone
district for desired development.
3. Determine the viability and future of all non-conforming
uses and bring into conformance (land uses not
appropriately zoned). Reduce conflicts between existing
non-conforming uses and neighboring land uses.
4. Encourage merchants, residents and landowners to take
better care of properties and follow the city codes and
ordinances governing the case and maintenance of their
property.
25


5.
Encourage city agencies involved in code enforcement
(Zoning, Building Department, Health and Hospitals,
Police) to crack down on code violators.
6. As redevelopment and new development takes place,
encourage design that is in character,with existing land
uses in terms of heights, scale, density and open space.
7. Encourage the development of additional neighborhood
serving convenience uses concentrated at existing
commercial nodes or on the Park Hill Golf Course site
when redeveloped. Continuous linear strip commercial
development should be discouraged.
8. Develop better transitions between commercial uses and
residential, in terms of design considerations,
landscaping, fences, etc.
9. Require developers to attractively landscape developments
including parking areas and rights of way.
C. Economic Development
Overview
The primary emphasis of this plan is to improve the economic
climate and livability of Bruce Randolph Avenue, with emphasis
on areas where deterioration has occurred. The goals are to
improve or replace marginal business activity; eliminate
illegal activities; discourage anti-social street activity;
improve the physical environment through clean up,
rehabilitation and beautification; attract new business and
residential development on the strip; increase the business
person's ability to survive and attract a stronger, more
diverse market.
While Bruce Randolph Avenue has a mixture of residential and
commercial uses, there is a strong commercial feel to the
Avenue. This is for a variety of reasons. First, Daddy
Bruce's establishment is well known as being on the strip;
there is a strong presence of active retail nodes; the
residential environment is interrupted with the dispersal of
these retail nodes over a 2 mile stretch. This commercial
"feel" is also due to the fact that Bruce Randolph Avenue is
not a quiet, local neighborhood street. It is a collector
street that is more heavily traveled and thus, lends itself to
some retail development. Finally, the business deterioration
draws attention to commercial nodes more than residential
uses. There is no uniform design along the strip outside of
the streetscape and sidewalk work being installed around the
Downing center.
26


Some renovation is visible. Some is planned both in terms of
rehabilitation and new infill development. Still other
business owners are gaining interest in rehabilitating their
properties. The Downing Center is complete and a number of
other businesses across from the center are planning
renovations and streetscaping. Other economic development
projects along Downing Street and Bruce Randolph Avenue
include La Hacienda Restaurant (complete), Hanks Conoco, Your
Valet Cleaners, Koin Kwick Laundry, Sandmac convenience store
and car wash, the old Franklin Hotel (complete) and Daddy
Bruce's Deli. La Hacienda, at 32nd and Downing has just
opened for business after major expansion and remodeling. It
has been in the community for over 45 years. It has been
redesigned with a southwest decor including bright colors,
plants and colorful tile work.
A number of businesses along Bruce Randolph Avenue are quite
stable in that they have been in business at their current
location for many years. Since many are small and have small
gross leasable areas, they require less capital and inventory
which provides them with the opportunity to be self employed
and be to entrepreneurs. The vacancy rate along the strip is
quite low because of the market for these smaller spaces.
As mentioned, there are a number of vacant lots on or adjacent
to Bruce Randolph Avenue that are prime for development. Most
are zoned for residential use but may make sense for mixed use
as well. Development of housing units on city owned vacant
sites on Bruce Randolph Avenue (i.e., Marion, Humboldt,
Lafayette) will provide more purchasing dollars to support
existing businesses and attract new retail development.
There are 9 acres of commercial zoning along Bruce Randolph
Avenue. The average age of commercial structures is 30 to 40
years with the newer, more modem structures concentrated at
major crossroads such as Colorado Boulevard and York Streets.
Studies indicate there is a market for convenience retail and
professional services in the area. Unfortunately, a lot of
patronage is lost because of crime, environmental conditions
and poor marketability of existing businesses and services.
Improvement of the business climate along Bruce Randolph
Avenue is key to turning the entire area around.
The following pictures are just a few examples of commercial
nodes and structures, vacant parcels, residential use and
abandoned structures.
27


DownW^
ijCHECKE^ *
DOWNING ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. DOWNING CTR.
N.E. MARION ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. CITY OWNED
VACANT LOT.
28
RETAIL NODE.


N.E. CORNER FRANKLIN ST £ BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE.
OLD FRANKLIN IIOTE(_. PROPOSED DELI.
GILPIN ST 6 BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE.
DADDY BRUCE'S RESTAURANT
29
P
S.E. CORNER FRANKLIN ST £ BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE.
VACANT. PROPOSED FOR REDEVELOPMENT.


YORK ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE.
ACTIVE RETAIL NOpE.
JOSEPHINE ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. N.E. CORNER.
TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL STYLE.
COLUMBINE ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. N.W. CORNER
COLUMBINE VACANT BUILDING.


ELIZABETH ST 6 BRUCE RANDLOPH AVE. HOPE CENTER
SCHOOL. 1
ST.PAUL S B BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. N.F. CORNER
MOM 6 PO ROCERY. '
ST. PAUL ST. B BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. N.W. CORNER
CAS STATION.
COLORADO BLVD. 6 BRUCE RANDLOPH AVE. N.W
CORNER. ACTIVE RETAIL NODE


Major Issues
1. Two merchant surveys conducted in 1984 and 1985 report
that the number one problem affecting businesses is
crime. Vandalism and burglaries are higher than in many
other parts of the city. The high crime rate keeps
people from using the businesses, and keeps investors
away. Many are concerned about the illegal business
activity on the strip that draws the rough crowd and
encourages loitering and anti-social street activity to
occur.
2. The appearance and environment of the strip as a whole is
not aesthetically pleasing. Many structures in
commercial nodes are not in good interior or exterior
condition. They lack paint and facade work; landscaping
is minimal at best, sidewalks, curbs and gutters need
repair or replacement? handicapped ramps are few; and
maintenance of many properties is inadequate or-non-
existent .
3. Major deterioration occurred with the grocery store
closing at Bruce Randolph Avenue and Elizabeth a few
years ago. That loss led to other business closings,
deterioration of property and structures and an increase
in graffiti. The Hope Center School has purchased the
building and received $200,000 from the Mayor's Advisory
Council for landscaping the grounds. While this will
address the issue of this building, there is still
concern about adjacent commercial uses and their needs.
4. Many businesses have high mark up on goods making them
unaffordable or encouraging shoppers to go out of the
neighborhood for similar goods and services. Many have
poor quality merchandise and minimal selection of goods
to serve basic needs.
5. Many business persons lack sufficient knowledge about
business management; many until very recently have not
been aware of services, funds and programs available from
the city agencies. Many lack necessary financing to
survive, expand or make any physical improvements without
assistance, and lending agencies are reluctant to
participate in this area.
6. High utility costs ara reportedly a burden on struggling
businesses and insurance rates are stated to be too high
possibly due to the crime rates.
7. The lack of sufficient parking at some nodes (i.e.,
Gilpin, Franklin, York) is thought to be hurting
businesses.
32


8. Landowners and tenant relations often need improving
i.e., governing fix up work and lease agreements.
9. There is some fear that as beautification and
redevelopment takes place, some long standing legitimate
businesses may be displaced.
10. There is concern that the unemployment rate in
neighborhoods adjacent to Bruce Randolph Avenue is higher
than the city's average.
11. Traffic is viewed both positively and negatively for the
betterment of businesses; some feel it is an opportunity
for drawing additional support; others feel the street is
a barrier.
Major Recommendations
1. Maintain the character of the strip as primarily
neighborhood serving. Build on the existing positive
qualities of each node in terms of services provided,
friendliness and physical character.
2. Encourage the development of a major retail anchor at
35th and Colorado Boulevard to enliven the strip, improve
the image of the area and to serve shopping needs (i.e.,
department store with support businesses).
3. Improve the maintenance of structures and property and
encourage regular clean up campaigns in the area.
Encourage merchants to work with the city to meet their
needs for business development or expansion and facade
work. Encourage individual business owners to
participate in low interest loan programs for interior
and exterior renovation/expansion programs offered by
the city. Channel public funds and resources onto the
strip while the momentum is high, the need is great and
there is strong community backing.
4. Encourage selective relocation or elimination of unwanted
businesses that do not complement the goals of the plan
i.e., especially blighted or illegal business that are
fronts for gambling or drug dealing. Provide the space
for new legitimate neighborhood serving retail uses.
5. Hire a project manager to work closely with merchants and
the city to coordinate revitalization efforts and to
expedite goals. Merchants and landowners should, through
their dues, help support the salary for this position.
This person would guide the merchant's association,
organize advertising, promotions and special events,
mobilize merchants to participate in revitalization
33


programs and help raise funds for the betterment of Bruce
Randolph Avenue. .The person should be skilled in small
business development and must be action oriented and be
accountable for producing results.
6. Work with the city's Economic Development Agency to find
new tenants for vacant stores. Encourage positive
business activity to come to Bruce Randolph Avenue and
help force out the negative influences. Establish a
leasing plan for new businesses to be brought in.
7. Conduct a city/merchant code enforcement "walk-through"
along the strip. Increase city officials awareness of
problems? obtain solutions and commitments; give property
owners 30 days maximum to meet the codes.
8. Explain city programs on an individual basis and through
educational workshops. Provide assistance and advice in
the areas of purchasing, merchandising, bookkeeping,
computerization of inventory, quality of goods and
services, pricing and other needs. Respect differences
in attitudes and management methods while also
recommending valuable alterations. Work with merchants
to increase pride in their stores, the strip and the
broader community. Work with those that are struggling,
to improve their ability to survive; capitalize on
traffic and visibility as well as Daddy Bruce's exposure.
9. Strengthen the relationship between the industrial sector
a few blocks north of the strip and the businesses along
Bruce Randolph Avenue. Obtain their patronage through
advertising and promotions and providing needed services.
10. Government buildings should be encouraged to locate on or
near the strip, to help stabilize the area and bring
people into the neighborhood to support the businesses.
11. Explore the possibility of establishing an business
"incubator" incubator on the strip for the same reasons
outlined above.
12. Encourage merchants to work closely with owners of major
business and anchors (i.e., Colorado Boulevard and York
Street) to draw them into the revitalization process as
well as to tap into their management expertise.
13. Improve aesthetics and visibility of signage. Encourage
uniform signage for the whole strip while allowing some
individuality and flexibility for each node.
14. Determine what steps can be taken to improve tenant -
property owner relations regarding fix up and lease
agreements.
34


15. Determine the extent of problems with high utilities and
insurance rates and the relationship of these costs to
the negative perception of the area and/or crime rates.
16. Study existing parking to determine if there are
deficiencies or management problems.
17. Discourage any efforts to make Bruce Randolph Avenue a
continuous commercial strip. Focus efforts on the
improvement of existing businesses and nodes prior to
attracting new businesses or infill development. Tailor
programs to the needs of these businesses. Concentrate
on the qualities of each node and strengthen conditions
with available resources in a phased fashion. Marginal
cosmetic fix up work is not enough (i.e., at Colorado
Boulevard and York, improvements should capitalize on the
crossroads image, franchises, traffic and convenience.
At Gilpin, emphasize the specialty shops and Daddy
Bruce's restaurant. At Downing, emphasize the complete
neighborhood retail center).
18. Determine the status and future of existing non-
conforming business uses in residential zones; for those
that remain on the strip, encourage code enforcement,
clean up and beautification of property including the
rights-of-way. It may be desirable to relocate some of
them to the more active retail nodes.
19. Encourage merchants to hire local neighborhood residents
for jobs to help the unemployment situation. Analyze
employment needs and identify strategies, i.e., training,
job placement, expand existing businesses and
manufacturing companies at the neighborhood perimeter;
develop "export" businesses or service businesses with
high employment potential.
20. A specific trade area analysis may need to be completed
in order to further define the market area for Bruce
Randolph Avenue and to identify specific new businesses
that could be supported along the corridor'. Solicit the
Center for Community Development and Design to conduct
this study. Also conduct a participatory economic
analysis of Cole and Clayton households to determine
where the dollars flow.
35


D. Housing
Overview
Residential development along Bruce Randolph Avenue includes
single family houses, duplexes, court houses and low rise
apartments. The housing diversity is part of what adds to the
character of the strip. The density and scale of housing
development along the strip is compatible and blends in well
with housing in the larger area. It is one and two stories in
height. There are 76 single family structures, representing
10 acres of the 38 acres in the study area.(l) There are also
83 units in multi family structures, predominantly in
duplexes, triplexes and small court yard developments.
The average age of single family housing is 64 years which is
20 years older than the citywide average age of 44 years. The
housing includes a variety of architectural styles from
small brick bungalows to older two story Victorian homes.
Multi family structures average 60 years in age and include
older duplexes and more modem brick apartments and courts.
Owner occupancy of single family houses along the strip is
72%, which is quite high in comparison to the broader
neighborhood. Cole's 1985 homeownership figure was 44% and
Clayton's was 57%.
The average single family housing sales prices from 1982-1984
along Bruce Randolph Avenue increased from $48,000 to $52,000.
This increase is average in comparison to Clayton but slower
than increases in Cole.
The residential uses are, on the whole, in much better
physical and visual condition than the commercial properties.
There are, however, many that could use fix up, clean up and
landscape beautification. The vision is to achieve a diverse
multi use strip with compatible commercial and residential
uses that are secure and unblighted with a minimal amount of
displacement and with affordable housing.
(1) All data from Denver Planning Office Housing Detail
Report, 1986.
36


Manor Issues
1. As the strip is improved there is concern about the
impact on property values and the availability of
affordable housing.
2. The following specific sites along Bruce Randolph Avenue
from Downing to Colorado Boulevard have been identified
as problems either because of their condition or because
they are vacant lands that need to be cleaned up and
developed:
o N.E. comer of Marion and BRA 'vacant lot (city-
owned) .
o South side of BRA between Lafayette and Marion -
very large vacant lot (city-owned).
o S.E. corner of Lafayette and BRA narrow vacant
lot. (May be part of parcel that includes boarded-
up church next door on south side.)
o S.W. comer of Humboldt and BRA large vacant lot
(DHA owned).
o N.E. corner of Humboldt and BRA 1501, 05, 07, 09,
11, 15 BRA. Two story now house in disrepair,
o 1615 BRA 6 unit multi family house in disrepair,
o 1621-2.3 BRA duplex in disrepair,
o 1625 BRA single family house in disrepair,
o S.E. comer of Gilpin and BRA narrow vacant lot.
o N.W. comer of Williams and BRA boarded-up
apartment building (undergoing renovation).
o S.W. corner of High and BRA boarded-up houses,
o N.E. corner of Race and BRA narrow vacant lot.
o S.E. corner of Gaylord and BRA vacant lot.
o S.W. corner of Josephine and BRA vacant lot.
o N.E. corner of Clayton and BRA vacant lot.
o S.E. corner of Fillmore and BRA vacant lot.
o 2904 BRA single family house in disrepair,
o S.W. corner of Cook and BRA small boarded-up
church on large lot.
o North side of BRA between Clayton and Elizabeth -
vacant and boarded-up large grocery store (proposed
school).
3. Many feel housing deterioration continues to worsen as
the commercial areas deteriorate. Landowners are not
aware of rehabilitation or beautification programs
available through the city or nonprofit organizations.
4. Vacant and abandoned structures in the immediate vicinity
are a blighting influence on the area. Many residential
units above retail uses are not well kept or even
occupied.
37


5. Many feel that there are major problems procuring
construction and permanent financing in the Cole
neighborhood for multi family residential:
o Constraints facing housing development include land
costs, securing financing, market factors and
negative image of the strip.
o Some of the previous major lenders are no longer
doing the business (e.g., World Savings).
o The 312 HUD loan program is very conservative in its
approach to computing loan mortgage amounts.
o Most vacant and abandoned buildings require too much
renovation and the market street rents will not come
close to supporting the required permanent
mortgages.
o Redlining is reportedly taking place in the Cole
neighborhood.
6. There are specific risks and other problems with the
processing required under the CHFA bond money/FHA 221 DT
Program: (CHFA will only lend with FHA insurance); the
individual developer must spend money up front on a set
of detailed architectural drawings; these must be
approved by the Denver Building Department, Health and
Hospitals, FHA, CHFA's architectural representative, and
Wastewater Management. For example, upfront costs for
drawings and specifications can average $16,500 -
$17,000. This process takes four to six months.
Revision of the project to make it more economically
feasible and do only moderate rehab, requires that the
entire process start over again (more up front costs and
4-6 more months). There would be no guarantee a revised
version would be accepted.
In a nutshell, the developer takes great risk coming into
a distressed area, has to go through a time consuming
process, spend money and time, and gamble that FHA will
insure the project for a least 90% of the financing
required, to obtain CHFA assistance.
Major Recommendations
1. In order to attract developers who are willing to take
risks by investing ;in a deteriorated area, low and no
interest loans should be made available for for-profit
developers. This is crucial to the viability of the
first five or six major developments that come in and
take the first steps toward revitalizing an area such as
Bruce Randolph Avenue. Examples of needs include:
38


o
Grants or low interest loans for architectural
specifications and start up costs.
o Low interest loans for permanent financing for
projects so rents can cover debt service.
o Incentives to get 5 or 6 projects moving
simultaneously to continue momentum and attract
other investments into the area.
2. The city should solicit proposals to develop new infill
housing on the three city owned sites at Marion and
Lafayette. Test financial feasibility and work with the
community to establish parameters for development. Work
with DHA to develop their lot at Humboldt with affordable
housing. Include the community, merchants and citizens
in the review of concepts for development and design.
Establish a game plan for soliciting developers. Make
interim improvements on these sites (i.e., clean up
programs, interim parks or community gardens).
3. Infill housing should be diverse in terms of cost, styles
and scale of development. A percent of housing
development should be affordable to area residents but
should also include units that entice more middle income
families to move into the area.
4. Conserve, rehabilitate and protect the existing single
family and multi family housing stock.
5. When public funds are used, there should be a legal
stipulation that assures adequate property and building
maintenance.
6. Include representatives of private lending institutions
in the planning and implementation process to create
awareness about the area, Bruce Randolph Avenue goals and
to obtain assistance with implementation of specific
proj ects.
7. Maintain the current Bruce Randolph Avenue Committee or
create an official standing committee to carry out this
plan and complete objectives.
8. Continue the multi family housing rehabilitation program
along and adjacent to Bruce Randolph Avenue. Target
specific structures from the housing issues section and
work with the owners to get the buildings fixed up and
occupied.
9. Develop the parcel at Bruce Randolph Avenue and Franklin
.(southeast corner) into mixed use, retail on the ground
floor and residential upstairs or on the back side.
39


10.
Work with developers of other major neighborhood projects
proposed in the area that will have positive spin off
effects for the strip (i.e., Wyatt School, Hope Center,
RTD building).
11. Increase community awareness and involvement in such
programs as the Neighborhood Small Projects grants for
beautification and physical improvements in the public
right of way; crime watch programs; street and alley
maintenance; code enforcement, etc.
12. Work with the Denver Public Schools on physical
improvements and beautification of their property
including the right of way along Bruce Randolph Avenue.
13. Target outreach efforts for homeownership counselling,
single family rehabilitation, vacant and boarded up
building programs, etc.
14. Identify, acquire and develop other key parcels or
structures, on or adjacent to Bruce Randolph Avenue that
are holding down revitalization efforts. Test developer
interest prior to moving forward on acquisition.
15. Work with area nonprofits that might be interested in
purchase and fix up programs that will result in
affordable housing (i.e., Northeast Denver Housing,
Brothers Redevelopment, Inc., McCauley Housing
Foundation/Mercy Housing Corporation, Hope Communities,
etc.)
16. Study the possibility of converting some residential
structures into retail use when located at retail nodes
(i.e., Franklin, Gilpin block).
E. Traffic and Transportation
Overview
Traffic and transportation conditions along Bruce Randolph
Avenue affect the overall image of the strip, the visual
atmosphere and environment, as well as pedestrian
accessibility and safety. Since Bruce Randolph Avenue is the
spine of the revitalization area, how it is treated in
balancing local traffic, through-traffic and in terms of
aesthetics, is crucial to revitalization efforts. Much of the
avenue serves as a neighborhood commercial area for Cole and
Clayton communities and as a convenient uninterrupted east-
west traffic corridor that takes people to northeast Denver
and central downtown. Because of this, it receives a
tremendous amount of exposure. Therefore, street redesign and
40


beautification is an important component of this plan to
complement economic development and housing rehabilitation.
Bruce Randolph Avenue along with cross streets Franklin,
Williams and Steele Streets, is classified as a "collector"
street, one that collects the traffic from quieter "local"
streets and passes it on to busier "arterials" and freeways.
All of these streets are currently operating under average
levels for collector streets which is generally 5,000-10,000
vehicles per day. Additionally, where Bruce Randolph Avenue
intersects with arterial streets (Colorado Boulevard, York,
Marion, Downing), traffic counts are at collector street
volumes (4,550 7,250 vehicles per day). Arterials generally
carry 17,500 35,00 vehicles per day.
Trends show that traffic volumes have been decreasing on all
of these streets in recent years. While some consistent level
of traffic is good for business visibility and patronage, some
feel that too much traffic disturbs the visibility,
environment and convenience of using businesses. From 1S75 to
1981 traffic volumes decreased by 38% just east of Downing on
Bruce Randolph Avenue. East of Marion on Bruce Randolph
Avenue there was a 25% loss over that time period and a slight
7% loss east of York Street. The one increase noted was 8%
just west of Colorado Boulevard. The general feeling is that
the traffic volume loss is positive and continues to enhance
the pedestrian environment as long as there is a steady flow
of traffic on Bruce Randolph Avenue for business exposure.
Major Issues
1. The visual appearance of the street including curbs,
gutters, and rights of way, is unaesthetically pleasing
to passersby and pedestrians.
2. With traffic volumes down, the street width is more of a
visual and physical barrier than a convenience. The
width combined with traffic volumes, deters pedestrians
from using the strip or crossing. The street design is
not sensitive to pedestrian activity.
3. Excessive speeds are reportedly a major concern.
4. There are mixed feelings about bus service. The #38
local bus stops along Bruce Randolph Avenue twice per
hour at every three or four blocks. Connecting service
exist at Colorado Boulevard, York Street and Downing.
Some feel that while service is good at major
intersections, it is less efficient at other places along
Bruce Randolph Avenue. Many are concerned about the lack
of bus shelters.
41


Major Recommendations
1. Redesign the street to appeal visually to residents
living on the strip and to help improve the business
environment. Research the possibility of eliminating
laneage to install landscaped medians in residential
areas and increased landscaped frontages for commercial
areas. The existing laneage is not needed to carry
current or desired traffic volume (see following
drawings).
2. Paint attractive crosswalks at major intersections.
3. Work with the Police Department to increase monitoring of
speeding and enforce the existing limits.
4. Work with RTD to study additional issues and needs and
obtain funding approval for bus shelters.
5. Study the need for additional pedestrian signalization
and stop signs along Bruce Randolph Avenue.
6. Study ways to improve bicycle access to the strip and
bicycle safety in using Bruce Randolph Avenue.
42


Commercial Areas
C£NTEI? TURN LANE
police ROW OR TRttb

Mmtr~
vT
RecepTh,cu6 at interactions
ANQ Mif? P>LO£R IN COMMERCIAL AREAS
M3


Residential Areas
Tt?A6>U I?&£EPfACLE5
AT lNTER6££Tl<>i£>
44


F. Urban Design
Overviev
If an area looks and feels comfortable, it is generally the
result of good urban design. Clean streets, ample lighting,
safe sidewalks, patterned concrete, planter boxes, treelinea
avenues, and attractive storefronts, all contribute to the
environment of an area. These kinds of improvements are
necessary along Bruce Randolph Avenue in order to improve
existing businesses, attract new investment, and to draw local
and regional clientele.
The beautification effort has started. Some private
landowners such as Daddy Bruce have taken the initiative over
the years to take care of the appearance, and cleanliness of
their structures. A number of business persons and owners of
residential properties have followed suit in the last year.
Major development and design improvements are visible at the
Downing Center (including streetscaping); Franklin and Bruce
Randolph Avenue (Franklin Hotel and Daddy Bruce's Deli);
Humboldt and Bruce Randolph Avenue (apartment renovation);
Franklin and Bruce Randolph Avenue southside (proposed
redevelopment plan) and others.
On May 22, 1986, approximately 50 merchants representing 7
commercial nodes, and area residents came together to appeal
for commercial neighborhood small projects (CNSP) funds from
the Mayor's Advisory Council. The grant funds, totaling close
to 5200,000 were awarded for urban design improvements,
including trees, sod, irrigation, sidewalks, curbs, gutters
and handicapped ramps. On June 14, 1986, a $12,500 grant was
awarded to the owner renovating the Magnolia apartments at
Bruce Randolph Avenue and Williams Street for similar
improvements. This is a good start and will keep momentum
moving forward. There is, however, a long way to go in terms
of gaining the participation of additional business, public
and quasi public facilities and resident owners on the strip.
Improvements needed to complement these, include uniform
lighting, creative treatment to utility poles on the north
side of Bruce Randolph Avenue, trash receptacles at commercial
nodes, additional landscaping and tree planting, street
painting and redesign and most importantly, facade work to
improve the appearance of structures.
Major issues and recommendations are listed and depicted on
the following two sketches which represent only a sample of
the study area from Downing to Steele Streets.
45


Urban Design Issues
KJ1
2 .
3 .
ssues
There is no unifying element to
the strip in terms of design.
There are no unique or
architecturally significant
buildings. The strip lacks an
identity vith the exception of
the new name. Changes in land
use interrupt the strip, some
residential properties face
3ruca Randolph Avenue while
others face side streets,
lighting along the strip is
insufficient to assure safety or
provide a unifying theme;
signage along the strip is
outdated and is not uniform or
attractive, many signs are
inexpensive and sometimes hand
lettered or painted an old wood;
public service lines and wood
poles along the north side of
Bruce Randolph Avenue detract
from the appearance of the area
when driving or walking the
strip.
landscaping is not evident
except for a few trees mostly in
residential sections. They have
not been planted with any
consistency and do not provide a
unifying theme; rights of way
are generally not well
landscaped or well maintained.
Bruce Randolph Avenue itself is
not attractively designed in a
way that signifies arrival at a
special neighborhood "place.'
Some commercial and residential
structures are marginal or
blighted and detract from
improvements made by other
landowners.
There is no design coordination
of the various improvements
being made, both in terms of
landscaping and facade
renovations.
Vacant parcels look like missing
teeth on the strip and attract
litter and weeds.
46


Schematic Design
Major Recommendations
1. Develop urban design guidelines
db.au will precede decision
making by "landowners, merchants ,
residents and ode city and will
help achieve the overall design
"vision" for tbe scrip found on
the following pages.
2. Work with tbe public facilities
along 3RA to participate in
screetscape improvements to tbe
public right of way, as well as
needed improvements to private
property and grounds (i.e.,
churches, schools).
2. Continue to offer the CUSP and
US? and similar grant programs
to targeted business and
residential nodes along the
strip. Assure proper
maintenance of all improvements.
4. Work towards the eventual
installation of new, attractive,
functional and uniform lighting
along the strip.
5. Develop creative solutions to
deal with the utility poles
lining the northside of the
avenue (i.e., replace with
aluminum poles and lights,
create a colorful painting
scheme, etc.)
5. Install attractive trash
receptacles in every commercial
block.
7. Develop creative interim
solutions far vacant lands,
i.e., temporary open space,
gardens, parks.
3. Create a set of unique and
noticeable entry way signs for
installation at Downing Street,
Colorado Boulevard and York
Streets.
47


CUOteM
\ \ C23HMCROM-
\ \
PAPPY BRUCE1*
frankuu hotel-
COMMERCIAL a
\\
IWRU- dOWSfTRUCTlOU
I GILPIN
coring ,ual block
COLE JOKIIOPi HIGH SCHOOL
PLAYCEOOUP
REilPEKITlAL IUFILL
couemucnou
DOWNING STREET COMMERCIAL CENTER
AMP AVENUE ENTRANCE
M8


--\\
\
w
YOfifi STREET COmEPSOAL- >
CEMTER AK1P AVENUE. ENTRANCE.
conn ,,/v
x\
%>.
v
\
VOLUPIB
V\ AfTfERlAL >TREET
' Tf WCAL RP$\PeMTtAvL STREETSCAPIWC:
TREE UUEP MEDIAN
TRA6H RBCCnACUES
REFA1K $IPEV#*L*S M MECEfWRT
.RBfUACE WOOP UTlUTf ?OlBS WITH AIVniUUM
HAUC U&CU&OMOOD IPCM71TY BANNERS
on UTluTY PCL£5


HOPE CEMTER 6CHOOL
LAKIP6CAFE BCCC*
\
cbriMEKOAU
o\
'V
\
\
\
'i '
*> .
\
50
TffICAL COMMERCIAL 9TREET3CAP1UC
UMlfewntt Sfi^cEP TREES ow BOTH
Si PES OF STREET WTH F5MTB94EP
coMd^rrH
. REFAlR SJPE\*ALKS AS KJ&3£6A*tf
CM STREET 0WQKU3 WITH OFfPSIMtf
LEFT TURN LAKES
TK*SVI RECEPTACLE5
retiace wpop onurv fiples wrm ALUtTW*
Hauc neich&crhqpp ipewthy
FROM OT1UTY PEACES


Full Text

PAGE 1

A REVITALIZATION PLAN FOR:

PAGE 2

TABLE OF. CONTENTS I. OVERVIEW A. Neighborhood Planning ............................... l B. Use of the Plan ...................... ............... 1 c. Planning Process . . . . . . . . . 2 II. INTRODUCTION III. A. Background . . . . . . . . . . 3 B. Issues/Goals . . . . . . . . . . 5 EXISTING CHARACTER A. Character Description B. Demographic Profiles c. Community Facilities 6 7 9 IV. MAJOR ISSUES AND RECOMMENDATIONS A. Environment . . . . . . . . . . 11 B. Land Use and Zoning . . . . . . . . 13 C. Economic Development ............................... 26 D. Housing . . . . . . . . . . . 3 6 E. Traffic and Transportation ......................... 40 F. Urban Design ....................................... 45

PAGE 3

BRUCE RANDOLPH AVENU-E PLAN credits Susan Ellerby, Denver Planning Office, Bruce Randolph Avenue Task Force Chair John Harris, Associate City Planner, Research Assistant Maggie Sperling, Deputy Director of Planning and Development in Charge of Neighborhood Planning William Lamont, Jr., Director of Planning and Development The Honorable Mayor Federico Pena Bruce Randolph Avenue Task Force Councilman Hiawatha Davis, Jr., Co-Chair Ron Abo, Ron Abo Architects, P.C. Ruth Bentley, Bruce Randolph Avenue Merchant's Association Rick Borman, Bruce Randolph Avenue Merchant's Association James Busby, Economic Development Agency Tom Edmiston, Center for Community Development and Design Delores Foster, Clayton Neighborhood Representative Them Foster, Bruce Randolph Avenue Merchant's Association Pastor Hugh Harris, Epworth United Methodist Church Ernest Hughes, Community Development Agency Roger Johnson, Department of Public Works Jeff Kenny, Ron Abo Architects, P.C. John Lawrence, District 2 Police Station Eloy Mares, Cole Neighborhood Representative Getabecha McKonnen, Northeast Denver Housing Center Ron & Bobbi Morrow, Cole Neighborhood Representatives Herman Padilla, Bruce Randolph Avenue Merchant's Association Rick Paige, Community Technical Skills Center Asie Tatums, Cole Neighborhood Representatives Jim Thornton, Developer/Landowner Eugene Bruce Randolph Avenue Merchant's Association other Frank Murray -Rocky Mountain News, Cover Photograph

PAGE 4

' < ,., t I I .-..; -...; / ,_ .... ,-...... : .J..: .... VICINITY MAP / / BRUCE RANDOLPH 6 N

PAGE 5

I. OVERVIEW A. Neighborhood Planning Neighborhood and small area planning is a collaborative process between the city, residents and property owners of a particular area which actively solicits participation in the formulation of a plan for a neighborhood. The process places issues on the table, identifies goals, generates and tests alternative ways to achieve the desired ends, and proposes a plan for the area, which spells out policy changes and investments which should be implemented to help realize that future. It is a forum in which the various interest groups within a neighborhood, who may have different goals, work their differences to arrive at a mutually satisfactory plan. The private-public partnership is essential to the ultimate success of the venture. B. Use of the Plan Once adopted, the neighborhood or small area plan is an advisory document for directing and managing change. It serves as an official guide for decisionmakers, including the Denver Planning Office, the Mayor and City Council, various city departments, and also guides public deliberations and investments. It plays the same role for the private sector, advising residents, businessmen and investors as to expectations and direction for the neighborhood. The plan is not an official zone map and, as a guide, does not imply any implicit rights to a particular zone or to the land uses permitted within. Zone changes, which are proposed in the plan, must be initiated under a separate procedure established under the City and County of Denver Municipal Code. The plan is intended to promote patterns of land use, urban design, circulation and services which encourage and contribute to the economic, social and physical health, safety and welfare of the people. The neighborhood or small area plan addresses issues and opportunities at a scale which is more refined and more responsive to needs than can be attained under the broad outlines of the Citys Comprehensive Plan; the neighborhood plan serves as a component of that document.

PAGE 6

c. Planning Process The Cole Neighborhood residents have been organized for several years and asking for planning and economic development assistance from the city. In recognition of the need to provide more personalized neighborhood planning assistance, Mayor Pena hired additional neighborhood planners and assigned two to assist the Cole planning effort. Planning meetings were held to discuss individual projects and activities in the neighborhood as well as to work on proposed development plans with developers. There were discussions about broadening the level of involvement in terms of citizen participation and there were discussions about what the area of focus ought to be. At numerous meetings, residents and merchants stated the biggest concerns were related to Bruce Randolph Avenue (B.R.A.), previously named 34th Avenue. The Planning Office agreed with the community, to focus efforts on improvement and revitalization of Bruce Randolph Avenue. To kick off revitalization efforts, councilman Hiawatha Davis, Jr., the Denver Planning Office, merchants and the community worked together to change name of East 34th Avenue to Bruce Randolph Avenue. This was accomplished in 1986 in honor of Daddy Bruce. The name change brings positive attention to the strip as a very special place. A Bruce Randolph Avenue task force was then organized by the Planning Office and Councilman Hiawatha Davis, Jr., with representation from Cole and Clayton resident groups; merchants on Bruce Randolph Avenue; landowners; the Northeast Denver Housing Center; the Center for Community Development and Design; a pastor from a local church on Bruce Randolph Avenue; a private architect and five city agencies (Planning Office, Economic Development Agency, Community Development Agency, Department of Safety and the Department of Public Works) This task force has been meeting since December 1985 with the single goal of developing a workable plan to revitalize the strip. All members of the committee have contributed verbally and in writing to the issues and recommendations found in this draft plan. Initial input was obtained from the larger neighborhood at a special community meeting held in the Fall of 1985. Early input was also obtained from merchants through a Cole neighborhood merchant survey conducted in 1984. It is the committee's intention to go back and present this draft to the larger community, the merchants organization and other city agency personnel for additional input and fine tuning. 2

PAGE 7

II. INTRODUCTION A. Background The revitalization of Bruce Randolph Avenue (B.R.A.) from Downing Street to Colorado Boulevard is crucial to improving the quality of life in both the Cole and Clayton neighborhoods. B.R.A. is a key mixed use collector street bisecting both of communities. Residents, merchants, landowners, area professionals, the City and the Council representatives have come together to address the issues facing Bruce Randolph Avenue and to prepare this plan for action. This effort has come about in response to a push for change by the community and merchants. The planning process was designed to coordinate efforts through a broadly representative committee and to build on recent momentum stemming from new private investment visible on the strip. This planning work builds on the following activities: o The Bruce Randolph Avenue area is located in the heart of inner city neighborhoods that are experiencing some rejuvenation and improvement of the adjoining housing stock. o The Bruce Randolph Avenue area is in the city's revitalization area (based on locational and socioeconomic factors) and thus it qualifies for special funds and programs for housing and economic development funds. A Fall 1985 Slum and Blight Study prepared by HOH Associates, Inc., also found the area to be in need of assistance. The findings identified Bruce Randolph Avenue as a potential area for urban renewal funding stating, it is clear that there is a presence of substantial adverse conditions that affect the sound growth of the community and the living environment of the adjoining neighborhoods." o In the late 1970s, the commercial shopping center at 34th and Downing received a Neighborhood Business Revitalization (NBR) designation which led to its revitalization. Public improvements including trees, sidewalks and handicapped ramps, have just been installed. This shopping area serves as the strip's anchor on the west end. o Commercial and residential investments are evident with improvements to Daddy Bruce's existing business at 1629 East Bruce Randolph Avenue and his proposed new deli on the corner of B.R.A. and Franklin Street. At that same corner, the old Franklin Hotel has been newly renovated into apartments above the deli. Another vacant and abandoned apartment building on the corner of Bruce 3

PAGE 8

Randolph Avenue and Williams has been purchased and is undergoing renovation for ten units. There is a third residential building also proposed for renovation a block north at 35th and Williams Street and a couple of single family homes along the strip that are also participating in rehabilitation programsThese projects are public/private ventures assisted by the City's Economic Development and Community Development Agencies. The southeast corner of Bruce Randolph Avenue and Franklin street has recently been purchased by the Northeast Denver Housing Center. They are currently developing strategies for commercial redevelopment of that block. Finally, the owners of the Park Hill Golf Course property are moving forward with development plans for their property at 35th and Colorado Boulevard. They are researching options for retail or mixed use development. This project once off the ground would serve as an anchor on the east end just off of the strip. o There are several franchise businesses that are stable and should participate in revitalization efforts. All are in the study area. o There are 3 city owned sites and a fourth owned by the Denver Housing Authority in the study area. All are vacant and provide an excellent opportunity for infill housing development. Specifically, the sites are located at Bruce Randolph Avenue and Marion both the south and northeast sides, Lafayette and Bruce Randolph Avenue's southwest corner (DHA), and Humboldt and Bruce Randolph Avenue on the southwest corner. o An entire block on Bruce Randolph Avenue between Elizabeth and Clayton Streets on the north side is being renovated by the Hope Center. The Hope Center will provide preschool and daycare services for the retarded, out of this facility. This large previously abandoned structure was formally a supermarket. The Hope Center recently was awarded $200,000 from the Mayor's Advisory Council to help offset the cost of renovation for the facility. The funds will be used primarily for a play ground, landscaping and beautification of the grounds. o Cole Junior High School occupies an entire face block on the south side of Bruce Randolph Avenue between Humboldt and Franklin Streets. The committee will be working with the Denver Public Schools to determine how they can assist with beautification efforts of their property. Additionally, it has been suggested that their grounds be made more open to the community for parades and festivals that can pull the entire community together.

PAGE 9

o Merchants appliea for ana. receivea close to $200,000 in grant funas for beautification of 6 different nodes on the strip along the public right of way. A $12,000 grant was awarded to an apartment renovation project at Bruce Randolph Avenue and William:. o A merchant's organization has been formed as a result of a recent workshop held to expand communications with all merchants on the strip. Merchants are working to secure a paid staff person to implement the plan's recommendations and to take it a step further in applying for an expansion of the Neighborhood Business Revitalization program east towards Colorado Boulevard and.individual develooers and landowners continue to work on revitalization projects. B. Issues/Goals The critical issues brought out by all involved are centered around two items: 1) the poor visual environment, ranging from deteriorated properties and structures to the widely known criminal activities and anti-social street behavior; and 2) the uncertain economic climate and the particular needs of area business persons. The primary goal is to clean up and beautify the strip so it becomes more useful and inviting as a pedestrian avenue, and to join the city, the community and the merchant's association in a partnership to improve the economic climate of the area. There are no grandiose schemes or surprises with this plan, it is simply a statement of the problems and a call for action to address these problems in a timely way. The plan must increase public, private and political awareness about the importance of providing assistance to the strip. It is also intended to be the common framework for making future decisions about economic stability, city services, public/ private development, urban design and beautification of Bruce Randolph Avenue. Hopefully, improvement will take place without the prescription approach and will instead be the result of common goals spelled out in this plan. 5

PAGE 10

III. CHARACTER SUMMARY AND DtMOGEAPH!C PROFILE A. Character Description The Bruce Randolph Avenue spans two neighborhoods, Cole and Clayton. There is quite a bit of diversity along the 2 mile stretch. The study area is anchored on the west by the Downing shopping center and the east by the Colorado Boulevard retail activity and the Parkhill Golf Course property scheduled for retail/office development. It consists of a series of nodes that differ dramatically in terms of the overall feel, the mixture of land uses and existing zoning. Properties vary in terms of their level of deterioration, visual attractiveness, architectural styles, the level of activity generated and type of activities both positive and negative. The retail mix ranges from sEall mom and pop shops that attract nearby residents who walk in, to major franchises located at busy intersections (e.g., Colorado Boulevard) that attract neighborhood and regional traffic. The housing stock is also mixed with some multi-family structures but predominantly single family houses. Houses tend to be in better condition than many of the commercial properties, and overall conditions generally improve when moving east on the strip. The perception or image of the area has two sides, internal and an external to the neighborhood. The external image is basically negative to passersby and neighborhood residents a few blocks away who occasionally view it from a distance. Many properties are felt to have become a "relocation" area for illegal and anti social street activities that previously flourished at "t."le Points". The anti social behavior affects some pedestrians and inhibits them from walking about freely and frightens them away from businesses. The negative image is compounded by the feeling of hopelessness and the feeling that there is a lack of support to address the issues. Many also feel the area is neglected in terms of general code enforcement and the efficiency and frequency of basic city services such as street sweeping, trash pick up and the lack of maintenance, clean up or landscaping of city properties and rights of way. The external image is that this is an area that is deteriorating physically and socially. Progress exists but goes relatively unnoticed. There is little knowledge about the individual or collective efforts to revitalize the strip, but the problems are well known by people in the larger community. The internal image of the study area held by Bruce Randolph Avenue residents, merchants, landowners and developers as well as Bruce Randolph Avenue committee members, is more positive. The problems are clear and the impacts have been felt, but the possibilities for renewal are seen as good especially in light 6

PAGE 11

of renewed interest on the part of property owners and the city, and with the push from the community to take action. Those on the strip knew the area well and thus, recognize positive changes occurring. They are hopeful but realistic and most are willing to be active participants in the revitalization movement. B. Demographic Profiles The Cole Neighborhood is bounded by 40th Avenue on the north, York Street on the east, Martin Luther King Boulevard on the south, and Downing/Walnut street on the west. It is classified by the Denver Planning Office as a minor to moderate redeveloping area. Cole is a small neighborhood with 339 acres. It is predominantly residential. The population according to Denver Regional Council of Government's 1985 estimate was 4,970. The 1980 census showed the population at 4,928 as compared to 5,418 for 1970 and 7,259 for 1960. The most recent loss is minimal and is similar to losses experienced by other neighborhoods; it is reflective of a national trend to fewer persons per household. Ethnically, the area is mixed but is occupied primarily by persons of Spanish origin and Blacks. The 1980 census shows 2,338 persons of Spanish origin (47.4%); 2,026 Black (41.1%); 511 White (10.4%); 31 Asian (.6%); and 22 Native Americans ( 5%) Young adults (25-34 years) form the largest age group with 841 persons. Persons 75 years and older make up the smallest age group with 146. Other age groups are about equal with just over 400 in each category (i.e., children and middle aged persons). This inner city neighborhood has a mix of owner and renter occupied housing. The average age of the housing stock is mixed but is generally 44 years or older for single family homes and 35 years for multi-family structures. The area has experienced some redevelopment or conversions of single family units to multi-family structures. There have only been a few new infill housing developments in recent years. The median household income was $10,341 in 1970, but dropped by $1,255 to $9,086 in 1980 (Census Bureau). The median family income citywide in 1980 was $15,500. The unemployment rate for the neighborhood in 1970 was 6.7% compared to 4.29% citywide. For 1980, the neighborhood experienced a significant increase to 13.3% unemployment as compared to 6.02% citywide. Cole's unemployment increased by 6.44% during that ten year period. The 1980 adult median education level was 11 years (11th grade) as compared to 10 years for 1970. 7

PAGE 12

CLAYTON The Clayton neighborhood is also a predominantly residential neighborhood and it lies to the east of Cole. It is bounded on the north by 40th Avenue, by Martin Luther King Boulevard, on the west by York Street and the east by Colorado Boulevard. The neighborhood has experienced very little redevelopment pressures compared to neighborhoods closer in toward Downtown. The land uses are basically compatible with the R-2 medium density zone district that covers much of the neighborhood. Clayton is a small 350 acre neighborhood and according to the Denver Regional Council of Government's 1985 estimate, it has 4,758 people. The 1980 census revealed the population as 4,622 as compared to 5,112 for 1970 and 5,172 for 1960. Ethnically, the area was 79.1% Black in 1980. The 1980 census also shows 515 persons of Spanish origin (11.1%): 351 White (7.6%); 84 Asian (1.85%); and 18 Native Americans (9.4%). Young adults (25-34 years) form the largest age group with 374 persons. Other age groupings are nearly equal in numbers, with over 200 persons in each category. The median age for the neighborhood is 28.7 years. Income and employment data published by the u.s. Census shows Clayton's median household income for 1970 was $12,985, and like Cole, salaries dropped to $11,587 for 1980. The 1980 citywide income was $15,560. The percent of residents unemployed in 1970 was 8.58% as compared to 8.36% in 1980. The 1980 adult median education level was 12.1 years, close to the 1980 citywide median education level which was 12.8% years. 8

PAGE 13

c. Community Facilities overview The richness and diversity of Bruce Randolph Avenue is evident with the large number of community facilities located on this short 2 mile stretch. There are 10 facilities, equating to nearly one every other block. These facilities are well supported by the neighborhood and they offer a variety of services to meet special needs. The condition of many of the facilities, however, is poor, either in terms of general appearance, structural conditions or upkeep of the public rights of way. Many will be targeted for improvement programs as revitalization continues. These facilities include: 1. Mercy and Peace Pentecostal Church Location: JJSO Lafayette street Built: 1888 2. Cole Middle School Playground Location: Humboldt Street; Franklin Street along Bruce Randolph Avenue 3. St. Paul Grand Lodge Scottish Rite No. 1 and Electra Grand Chapter OES Location: 1615 Bruce Randolph Avenue Built: The building in which the organization is quartered was built in 1890. The secret fraternal religious non-profit charitable organization was established in Denver, 1962. It is connected with John G. Jones affiliate in Chicago. 4. Epworth United Methodist Church Location: 3401 High Street Built: 1936 5. Mt. Calvary Church of God in Christ Location: 3354 High Street Built: 1913 6. Denver Federation of Colored Women's Clubs Location: 3401 Race street Built: 1916 The Denver Chapter is affiliated with the National Headquarters located in Washington, D.C. The local group engages in grass roots educational work for the benefit of themselves and community besides contributing to some social services. The National Association of Colored Women's Clubs was organized in 1896 and is one of the oldest women organizations in the United States. The seven program objectives for the national association include: 9

PAGE 14

1. Promote education for women and girls. 2. Raise the standards of home. 3. Work for moral, economic, social and religious welfare of women and children. 4. Protect equal rights of women and children. 5. To secure and use their influence for enforcement of civil and political rights for the group. 6. To obtain for colored women the opportunity of reaching the highest standards in all fields of human endeavor. 7. Promote interracial understanding so that justice and goodwill may prevail among all people. 7. Mt. Sinai Baptist Church Location: 3356 Clayton Street Built: 1876 8. Central States Conference Corporation 7th Day Adventist Church Location: 3301-3385 Albion Street Built: 1963 9. Park Hill Orthodox Presbyterian Church Location: 4095 Bruce Randolph Avenue Built: 1956 10. East Denver Temple Association Location: 3400 Albion Street Built: 1958 A temple hall owned by East Denver Lodge #160 AF & AM. 1 0

PAGE 15

IV. MAJOR ISSUES AND-RECOMMENDATIONS A. Environment overview Environmental conditions along Bruce Randolph Avenue (B.R.A.) are mixed. The general feel or atmosphere of any area is created by the people, the businesses, the street activity and the cleanliness of properties. Community pride, private management of properties and buildings along with adequate code enforcement and city services are all important factors in shaping an environment. While there are some deteriorated residential properties along the strip, residential uses tend to be in better condition than commercial 'properties. Generally speaking, the environment on the east end of the strip towards Colorado Boulevard is better than conditions west towards Downing. There is a movement in the community now, to combat crime, to push for revitalization of Bruce Randolph Avenue and to change the negative image that has developed because of poor environmental conditions. People want to see the physical and visual environment of the area, addressing both real and perceived problems. Major Issues 1. Bruce Randolph Avenue has a poor image and has been viewed as a rough and deteriorating neighborhood. recent revitalization and investment that has taken place is overshadowed by the negative image. 2. The high crime rate in the Cole neighborhood (#23 of 68 citywide with 68 the best), coupled with some anti social street behavior and illegal activities on the strip contributes to the poor image, and keeps people from using the positive businesses along the strip. This also deters new investors from coming into the area. In a 1984 merchant's survey crime was identified as the primary concern. Merchants who have been in the area for 10-16 years noted problems with burglaries, robberies, shoplifting and vandalism. Other illegal or anti social activities along the strip identified by the community include loitering, gambling, fencing of goods, prostitution, drug dealing, public drinking and harassment. Many feel that if the policejcommunity relations were improved, the police could be more effective. There are no effective community crime watch mechanisms in place. 1 1

PAGE 16

3. Some of the business are marginal and the houses deteriorated. Vacant land and buildings that are neglected or abandoned are a blighting influence on the strip. Internal structural conditions and maintenance of buildings is not always safe, comfortable or inviting. Storefronts and displays are not always attractive or well kept. Many exteriors of older buildings have been covered up with new surfaces, disguising the original character of structures. 4. The strip is not as clean as it should be; trash and litter are strewn across property; streets and alleys are often dirty and need cleaning. Many feel that City codes are not consistently enforced on property owners. 5. Improvements are needed with regard to streets, alleys, sidewalks, curbs and gutters. Better maintenance is also needed. 6. There is concern that deterioration breeds further deterioration, thus impacting the physical and moral character of the strip and increasing the lack of pride and sense of hopelessness. Residents and merchants want to stop negative trends and turn this area around to "recapture" it as a safe neighborhood street. Maior Recommendations 1. Merchants and police need to work together cooperatively to combat crime. Merchants need to create a crime watch program and organize an operation/identification program in the study area. Merchants and property owners should post private property signs as part of the new trespass ordinance permitting police to come on to to enforce the sign. Merchants and property owners need to work to secure better lighting; they need to work with the police to secure a commitment for increased scooter patrols and vice enforcement by continually communicating concerns and reporting illegal activities. Merchants need to obtain assistance from the District Attorney in filing a public measure to close down business with illegal activities that do not cooperate. Merchants need to identify acceptable street activity and discourage unacceptable street activity. 2. Landowners and business persons need to increase their sense of responsibility and work on improving property and building conditions. The city needs to provide consistent, systematic and sensitive code enforcement and institute necessary code revisions to strengthen, alter or improve the delivery of services. 12

PAGE 17

3. A streetscape beautification program should be initiated. A study is needed of traffic patterns and ways to better utilize Bruce Randolph Avenue, itself to improve the appearance of the strip, and strengthen Bruce Randolph Avenue as a pedestrian avenue. 4. Annual clean up weeks are needed to clean streets, alleys, rights of way, vacant land and would serve to pull the residents and merchants together. 5. The businessmen, the larger community, political leaders and city officials should work on joint programs or events that will lead to an improved environment and image of the strip. Campaigns, parades and festivals can boost neighborhood pride and attitudes, encourage selfhelp and begin to change the mood of the neighborhood. 6. The business collll!luni ty should obtain positive pres's coverage of events and should educate the press about the revitalization movement. 7. A slogan contest for the strip or the merchant's organization should be developed and marketed along with a poster to increase awareness and boost pride. 8. The Bruce Randolph Avenue merchant's organization should prepare a public relations and marketing plan for the entire strip. 9. Efforts should be continued to build on neighborhood and merchants pride efforts already started by increasing involvement, awareness and self help in revitalizing the strip. B. Land Use and Zoning Description The mix of land uses along Bruce Randolph Avenue.from Downing to Colorado Boulevard consists of linear stretches of residential property broken up by 7 commercial nodes and an occasional free standing retail shop or office. The frontage parcels from Downtown to Colorado Boulevard make up 37 acres. Residential use and public facilities equal 28 acres and the collll!lunity nodes together make up 9 acres. All commercial uses are neighborhood serving except those at York and Colorado Boulevard which have regional economic support due to high visibility and heavy traffic volumes. The 7 nodes are Downing, Franklin, Gilpin, York, Elizabeth, St. Paul, Colorado Boulevard. Some are more active than others. The kinds of businesses include liquor stores, service stations, restaurants, barberjbeauty shops, barjlounges, stores,

PAGE 18

a drug store, fish market. family with a structures. a cleaners/laundromat, hardware store, and a The residential uses are predominantly single few duplexes and low density multi family The zoning along the strip includes B-4 (general business district), B-2 (neighborhood serving retail), and a limited amount of B-1 (low scale professional office) The B-2 zone district is the primary zone for commercial properties. There are 2 Planned Unit Development zones (PUD) one for a grocery store. The other is a vacant lot planned for commercial development. Residential zoning includes R-4 (very high density residential and/or office), R-3 (very high density multi-family housing) R-2 (single-family and low density multi-family). The R-4 and R-3 districts each cover one face block on Bruce Randolph Avenue. The vacant R-4 parcels are on the south side of Bruce Randolph Avenue between Marion and Lafayette Streets. The R-3 site is on the south side of Bruce RandolDh Avenue between Monroe and Garfield. There are 4 single:family houses on the R-3 site in good condition and all face Bruce Randolph Avenue. The scale of commercial and residential structures along Bruce Randolph Avenue is predominantly single story with several older 2 story houses mixed in and a couple of older apartment buildings. The tallest structure is the Old Franklin Hotel which is 3 stories. The character and scale of development along the strip is compatible with that of the adjacent residential neighborhoods. The relationship between how the land is used and how it is zoned, is not cohesive. While legally permitted, single family uses are nearly all zoned R-2 for slightly higher densities, thus, allowing conversions to multiple units. There are some single-family units zoned R-3 for high density apartments. There are a few duplexes zoned for commercial development and there are commercial properties zoned for residential use. Both the R-3 and R-4 zone districts permit development to occur that would not be in character with Bruce Randolph Avenue land uses nor would the development be in character or scale with the adjacent neighborhoods. While development of the vacant R-4 land is desired, proposals must assure compatibility and sensitivity to the character and scale of existing adjacent development. For descriptive purposes and to get a better feel for land use and zoning conditions, the strip has been divided below into sections: Downing-Marion The small 2.5 acre shoppette located on Bruce Randolph Avenue between Downing and Marion was designated a Neighborhood Business Revitalization area (NBR) back in 1978 by the Mayor's Advisory Council. The designation was made because of the 1 4

PAGE 19

deterioration taking place and the need to retain neighborhood serving retail uses in this income area. This program entitled merchants and landowners to receive concentrated matching funds and technical assistance from the city to improve economic development The NBR helped to bring in current grocery chain and strengthen other =etail ser1ices. funds were used for =enovation of facades and for ?ublic (i.e., sidewalks, trees) for right-of-way were also installed. Today, this is a thriving center. Businesses in and/or adjacent to shoppette include a drug store/liquor store, grocerJ, meat market, auto repair shop, a gas station, a health facility and a cleaners and laundromat. The center benefits from the support of the immediate residents as well as drawing on heavy traffic volumes along Downing Street. of the on Marion, are 4 single-family which face Bruce Randolph Avenue. They are zoned R-2 for single-family and duplexes. Both the northeast and southeast corners of Bruce Randolph Avenue and Marion are vacant and owned by the city. The parcel is zoned B-2 and the southern one is zoned R-4 for office;residential at very high densities. The following map depicts land use and zoning for this area. / 2 -i .-, /! / I : I :: I II I: R-2 1 3-2 :: :J-j, _:: .._<. : 1: J' I :1 I 1 1 I _.f. -< ... -------.,. --'--.. / .. .. ,., .iw,-4/" 8-4 B-2 _:/'I :.:.:.-.1 -"./'T':o -.. .;.., --1 I I I I I I I" I" I I I L. I. ,::; 0:: I I I I I I I "' "{ R-4 .. ________ _, I ---....,, :,---' II 15 DOWNING to MARION streets

PAGE 20

Lafayette-Williams The land uses along this 4 block stretch of Bruce RandolPh Avenue are mixed but the area is predominantly commerciai. An exception is at the Lafayette intersection where there are 5 single-family houses, a a vacant lot owned by the Denver Housing Authority. The residential uses are properly zoned. From Humboldt to Gilpin Street is the commercial strip where Daddy Bruce's Barbeque is located (at Gilpin). Also in the B-2 zoned area is Cole Jr. High, a lodge, a fourplex, the Old Franklin Hotel (at Franklin Street), a vacant commercial building, and a single-family house. Other retail uses include a Phillips gas station, a thrift store, an auto electric shop, Bait and Tackle shop, a record store, J.iquor store and a bar. Daddy Bruce is planning to open a deli on the ground floor of the Old Franklin Hotel which has recently been renovated into apartments. Three frontage parcels from Humboldt to Gilpin on the south side, are zoned R-2. Two are vacant lots (one city-owned) and one is part of Cole Jr. High. Three of the four corners on Williams Street are also zoned for residential and include an apartment building, a duplex and a single family house. The apartment building which has been abandoned was recently purchased by a developer who is renovating it into 10 apartments. The northeast corner is a small grocery store zoned Planned Unit Development (PUD) specifically for its use. The match between zoning and land use here, is poor. There are a few single family houses and apartments in the B-2 zone district and part of Cole Jr. High is zoned B-2 (see the following map). Generally speaking, property conditions here need improvement. There are some buildings in especially poor condition that bring down the appearance of the rest. This area has received a lot of positive publicity in recent years due to Daddy Bruce. His community wide free dinners to feed the poor on holidays has gained him national recognition. There is concern that his efforts and the visibility and exposure he has offered the strip has been offset by the poor condition of other properties and because of visible crime and anti-social street activity which all attract negative attention. 16

PAGE 21

R-2 SF Vnc. R-1 ...: lf) L-s. LAF A VETTE to WILLIAMS streets r-------, I I R-2 R 21 r.--------J I I II 1----------------.,. j b .;.J }-Doc/, /11 ./, t,t I f>1,tJ; ,,, .J I r;----1111!1111'---u) :3 :-C.S f) I J I :., 8u$_ I V) .. :::, 'i1 I 8u5. t; lr "-'\ 1 u, .. C-" ,., "'c'-,,,,. l Jj I -n- .1 D I 13 !IF &. i I 'H; Tf.',<,... B -2 i I OL. -I B -2 l 'I ----' i I I Hl 11':LJ' J:eL I L ------------8R.UCEIR.tltY.DOLPH AVe., I ,R2 ,.,u, I I l'n -. C-ole M 7a/t?. .:..choo 5 j 1I h PI .7) .rour::) I: I s. F". R -2 L-----,-t I i < Q R-2 "'-Voc s.r. < Q S. F. Single Fnmily Nulti F;1mfly VAC. Vncm1t fillS. Business 17 S lo 1) f <:( .J .J -S:

PAGE 22

High Street-Gaylord This area is predominantly single-family residential with one duplex. There is one vacant lot which is being used as a private garden at Gaylord. The only other land uses are public facilities including two churches and the Denver Federation of Colored Womens Clubs. Only 4 of the structures face Bruce Randolph Avenue (at High street). The others (11 units) orient toward the side streets. All of this area is zoned R-2 which typically permits single-family units and duplexes. (see following map). Property conditions range from good to excellent with maintenance improving as you move eastward along Bruce Randolph Avenue. Private yards tend to be attractively landscaped and well maintained, as is much of the public right of way. 1 8

PAGE 23

'pwo.,nt Vo..J.-riWD c_ .. UQ..'-\l HIGH to GAYLORD streets l _c. ... u.:ct-t o,.. e,oo t-..1 C.HIII.IST ------------19 s. Av S.F. Single Family

PAGE 24

York-Fillmore The uses from York to Fillmore includes a fairly equal mix of single family residential and retail, a couple of duplexes, vacant land and public facilities. A major retail node exists at York Street and Bruce Randolph Avenue. It appears quite active and serves a number of shoppincr needs of nearby residents. This node also flourishes tram support of auto passengers who stop on their way to destinations. While the visibility is good and the high volume of traffic brings business, there are a couple of constraints. One is the limited amount of parking available and the other is an unacceptable amount of illegal activity. The retail uses include a hardware store, cleaners, gas station, a bar, a beauty shop, maintenance club, liquor store, office, drug store and a restaurant (see following map). A second smaller commercial stretch begins at Columbine Street and runs along the north side of Bruce Randolph Avenue Fillmore Street. Residential uses occupy the southern part of the strip except for a real estate office on the southwest corner of Fillmore and Bruce Randolph Avenue. The most notable land use is a vacant abandoned grocery store that occupies an entire block at Elizabeth and Bruce Randolph Avenue. This was once a very busy center with a number of retail outlets. When the grocery chain moved out, support retail followed. Retail that remains adjacent to the old store, includes a bait and tackle shop, a radiojtv repair shop, a small grocery, a fish market and a couple of vacant storefronts. The match between zoning and land use is good except part of one commercial development at York is zoned R-2 and of a retail use at is R-2, and a single family on Fillmore is zoned B-1 (see following map). Property conditions vary. Residential properties are in good condition with trees and landscaping evident. Retail uses could be upgraded in terms of improved facades, store displays, landscaping and street trees. 20

PAGE 25

I' r UHI\ tu riLL8VIVtta..::. ----------------, R-2 t'; I d---1 /1,.,, c .. ,/.-r-... -------.---------1 V,.,(.,... 01) s'r:""!-----L --_;jl-I i I PUD J" I .&,.,t I 4 B-2 __ ______!__ __ ..J_ I --------I I -I ... t Q. .. ., I 0 -, L------dllt'c.l -A''=---------------'--------4 B .... 1 I ,.,,,,,. ll,f.T s I! : '1\' I ... I. : '""'-' v,,,, y I --iQ "n2 t 'l .J 0 \_) :. o, u. '.'.' I _: II_ ::: [--;-, 11,,., I-"' I 1,...-J,.,,:.J 'll I ; I () <{ A2 j h )-l -LL-----.1 ..J lu I \.) S.F. Single Family Vac. Vacant L F I;

PAGE 26

Milwaukee-Colorado Boulevard The primary land use here is single family residential, most of which faces on to Bruce Randolph Avenue. There are also about a half dozen duplexes or low density multi-units houses and 2 retail nodes. One is a mini retail node at St. Paul with a Texaco, liquor store, bait and tackle shop, barber shop, office and a small grocery store. The second and most prominent retail node on the strip, is at Colorado Boulevard. This is a strong, active neighborhood and regional serving business node that benefits from high traffic volumes, 2 bus routes that intersect here and good visibility. There are a few franchise businesses including McDonalds, Jack in the Box, Texaco and Churches Chicken. Most of the businesses are well kept but landscaping is minimal. The Park Hill Golf Course property is one block north at 35th and Colorado Boulevard. Part of this land is owned by the Clayton Foundation and part is owned by an Alaskan Indian group. They are currently looking at potential redevelopment of the site to mixed use or a major retail center. Ideally, redevelopment of this site would provide an activity node or anchor retail project for the east end of Bruce Randolph Avenue. The zoning along this few block area,. is all for density residential use with the exception of the Colorado Boulevard node (B-2) and one parcel for apartment type development (R-3) from Monroe to Garfield on the south side of Bruce Randolph Avenue. The golf course property is zoned 0-1. The zoning and land use are compatible except for the R-3 which covers 4 single-family structures and permits high density residential redevelopment to occur. 22

PAGE 27

.r. rr-,,,r.(" rc-.1 : p.,. I I L __ r. .. J .o 5 c.vtr... j I MILWAUKEE to MADISON STREETS R-2 ,v .. Jl.-4. L.c _: j ,. -_-" ,_ {, -J. r. C. .c E; BrucE I(JftvoaL PI( R-2 r I. I I : .s. AvX' S nlvrl t. c, .... / ---2) r I I 5 -7' .s r;._c:: -: _J. __ L_ fl! I t ,,; .J ... l 'I',.. I r ''; I ... 5P 1Jf, 1 ; ric. c. ..! t :: J., I --I --Q \) I..J S.F. Vnc. Bus. i\pt. R-2 sr __ l_:.__ J Single Fnmlly V<1Cillll Business i\pnrtmC'Ill .J F. t tH, ,I 'v I >,,,,_ LJ.,., J

PAGE 28

I :;.I" I [-----,.; of) d .J;: ;: S t:'' 'Fi' t Jj,.. I .J : I i --------MONROE to COLORADO BLVD R-2: I u I 1--------I l-----_j -----"'"'"'-"' U) I I s.: : t ... 2.4 ,;. "l ;,......., Q,,.,,.;/ I < '--' w.,.-," : J'-"'-,.. C)/-------I ': I I I J I : [ ______ 0 Q .! -e.'"''""" r-f.-f,., .;# ...... .. .., .... S.F. Single Family

PAGE 29

Major Issues l. The R-3 and R-4 zoning permit much higher densities and scales of development to occur than exist along the strip or in adjacent neighborhoods. The R-4 land is vacant. 2. There are six commercial buildings or parking areas in the R-2 zone district. Nearly all are viable uses that serve the neighborhood. Three of these are located at the st. Paul intersection. One is a busy Texaco station, another is an office, and the third structure accommodates a grocery store, a liquor store, bait and tackle shop and a barber shop. All are in fair to good condition. A fourth commercial structure at Milwaukee is vacant and abandoned. It formerly housed a small ice cream shop similar to a Dairy Queen. The other two are commercial extensions into R-2 zones. one is the parking area for a business on York Street's southeast corner. The other is on Elizabeth and Bruce Randolph Avenue's northwest corner where the building sets back into R-2 but the frontage and parking area are in the B-2 zone district. 3. It is felt by many that existing zoning ordinances governing land use and zoning and health and safety regulations are not well followed by merchants, residents and landowners, nor are the codes enforced properly by appropriate city agencies. Examples include dirty streets and alleys, improper use of dumpsters, inadequate dumpster pick up, outdoor storage and visible illegal activities. Major Recommendations l. Research the of changing the R-3 zone district (Monroe-Garfield) to be more compatible with the single-family uses on the block. 2. Determine the appropriate land use(s) for the city-owned R-4 zoned parcel at Marion and the appropriate zone district for desired development. 3. Determine the viability and future of all non-conforming uses and bring into conformance (land uses not appropriately zoned) Reduce conflicts between existing non-conforming uses and neighboring land uses. 4. Encourage merchants, residents and landowners to take better care of properties and follow the city codes and ordinances governing the case and maintenance of their property. 25

PAGE 30

5. Encourage city agencies involved in code enforcement (Zoning, Building Department, Health and Hospitals, Police) to crack down on code violators. 6. As redevelopment and new development takes place, encourage design that is in character.with existing land uses in terms of heights, scale, density and open space. 7. Encourage the development of additional neighborhood serving convenience uses concentrated at existing commercial nodes or on the Park Hill Golf Course site when redeveloped. Continuous linear strip commercial development should be discouraged. 8. Develop better transitions between commercial uses and residential, in terms of design considerations, landscaping, fences, etc. 9. Require developers to attractively landscape developments including parking areas and rights of way. c. Economic Development Overview The primary emphasis of this plan is to improve the economic and livability of Bruce Randolph Avenue, with emphasis on areas where deterioration has occurred. The goals are to improve or replace marginal business activity; eliminate illegal activities; discourage anti-social street activity; improve the physical environment through clean up, rehabilitation and beautification; attract new business and residential development on the strip; increase the business persons ability to survive and attract a stronger, more diverse market. While Bruce Randolph Avenue has a mixture of residential and commercial uses, there is a strong commercial feel to the Avenue. This is for a variety of reasons. First, Daddy Bruces establishment is well known as being on the strip; there is a strong presence of active retail nodes; the residential environment is int.errupted with the dispersal of these retail nodes over a 2 mile stretch. This commercial 11feel" is also due to the fact that Bruce Randolph Avenue is not a quiet, local neighborhood street. It is a collector street that is more heavily traveled and thus, lends itself to some retail development. Finally, the business deterioration draws attention to commercial nodes more than residential uses. There is no uniform design along the strip outside of the streetscape and sidewalk work being installed around the Downing center. 26

PAGE 31

Some renovation is visible. Some is planned both in terms of rehabilitation and new infill development. Still other business owners are gaining interest in rehabilitating their properties. The Downing Center is complete and a number of other businesses across from the center are planning renovations and streetscaping. Other economic development projects along Downing Street and Bruce Randolph Avenue include La Hacienda Restaurant (complete), Hanks Conoco, Your Valet Cleaners, Koin Kwick Laundry, Sandmac convenience store and car wash, the old Franklin Hotel (complete) and Daddy Bruce's Deli. La Hacienda, at 32nd and Downing has just opened for business after major expansion and remodeling. It has been in the community for over 45 years. It has been redesigned with a southwest decor including bright colors, plants and colorful tile work. A number of businesses along Bruce Randolph Avenue are quite stable in that they have been in business at their current location for many years. Since many are small and have small gross leasable areas, they require less capital and inventory which provides them with the opportunity to be self employed and be to entrepreneurs. The vacancy rate along the strip is quite low because of the market for these smaller spaces. As mentioned, there are a number of vacant lots on or adjacent to Bruce Randolph Avenue that are prime for development. Most are zoned for residential use but may make sense for mixed use as well. Development of housing units on city owned vacant sites on Bruce Randolph Avenue (i.e., Marion, Humboldt, Lafayette) will provide more purchasing dollars to support existing businesses and attract new retail development. There are 9 acres of commercial zoning along Bruce Randolph Avenue. The average age of commercial structures is 30 to 40 years with the newer, more modern structures concentrated at major crossroads such as Colorado Boulevard and York Streets. Studies indicate there is a market for convenience retail and professional services in the area. Unfortunately, a lot of patronage is lost because of crime, environmental conditions and poor marketability of existing businesses and services. Improvement of the business climate along Bruce Randolph Avenue is key to turning the entire area around. The following pictures are just a few examples of commercial nodes and structures, vacant parcels, residential use and abandoned structures. 27

PAGE 32

DOWNING ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. lJOWNING CTR. 4 N.E. MARION ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. CITY OWNED VACANT LOT. 28 LAFAYETTE ST & BRUCE RANlJOLPH AVE. LOOKnJG N.W. CITY OWNElJ VACANT PARCEL. 'L-1'[ \ .. .. RETAIL NOIJE. =--, ----..... ---

PAGE 33

N.E. CORNER FRANKLIN ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH A OLD FRANK Ll N PROPOSED DELl. 1 GILPIN ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. DADDY BRUCE'S RESTAURANT S.E. CORNER FRANKLIN ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. VACANT. PROPOSED FOR REDEVELOPMENT. WILLIAMS ST. & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. APARTMENT 29 RENOVATION.

PAGE 34

YORK ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH ACTIVE RETAIL NOI!JE. COLUMBINE ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. VACANT 'NDERGOI NG RENOVATION. I r r JOSEPHINE ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. N.E. CORNER. TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL STYLE I\. .. .. COLUMBINE ST & BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. N.W. CORNER COLUMBINE VACANT BUILDING.

PAGE 35

. t-: ELIZABETJI ST c BRUCE RANDLOPif AVE. SCIIOOL. I JIOPE CENTER ''Y:--.. ';f, ST.P/\UL ST t; HIJCE ,R/\NIJOLPII 1\VF. N.E. CORNER M()M r. PO IHHTRY. ij1 31 r I I ST. PAUL ST. t; BRUCE RANDOLPH AVE. N.W. CORNER GAS STATION. ORAIJO 11LVU. c BRUCE RANIJLOPII AVE. N.W. ACTIVE HET AIL NODE

PAGE 36

Major Issues 1. Two merchant surveys conducted in 1984 and 1985 report that the number one prob.-Lem affecting businesses is crime. Vandalism and h:..:.rgla;t:ies are higher than in many other parts of the city. The high crime rate keeps people from using the businesses, and keeps investors away. Many are concerned about the illegal business activity on the strip that draws the rough crowd and encourages loitering and anti-social street activity to occur. 2. The appearance and environment of the strip as a whole is not aesthetically pleasing. Many structures in commercial nodes are not in good interior or exterior condition. They lack paint and facade work; landscaping is minimal at best, sidewalks, curbs and gutters need repair or replacement; handicapped ramps are few; and maintenance of many properties is inadequate ornonexistent. 3. Major deterioration occurred with the grocery store closing at Bruce Randolph Avenue and Elizabeth a few years ago. That loss led to other business closings, deterioration of property and structures and an increase in graffiti. The Hope Center School has purchased the building and received $200,000 from the Mayor's Advisory Council for landscaping the grounds. While this will address the issue of this building, there is still concern about adjacent commercial uses and their needs. 4. Many businesses have high mark up on goods making them unaffordable or encouraging shoppers to go out of the neighborhood for similar goods and services. Many have poor quality merchandise and minimal selection of goods to serve basic needs. 5. Many business persons lack sufficient knowledge about business management; many until very recently have not been aware of services, funds and programs available from the city agencies. Many lack necessary financing to survive, expand or make any physical improvements without assistance, and lending agencies are reluctant to participate in this area. 6. High utility costs are reportedly a burden on struggling businesses and insurance rates are stated to be too high possibly due to the crime rates. 7. The lack of sufficient parking at some nodes (i.e., Gilpin, Franklin, York) is thought to be hurting businesses. 32

PAGE 37

8. Landowners and tenant relations often need improving i.e., governing fix up work and lease agreements. 9. There is some fear that as beautification and redevelopment takes place, some long standing legitimate businesses may be displaced. 10. There is concern that the unemployment rate in neighborhoods adjacent to Bruce Randolph Avenue is higher than the city's average. 11. Traffic is viewed both positively and negatively for the betterment of businesses; some feel it is an opportunity for drawing additional support; others feel the street is a barrier. Major Recommendations 1. Maintain the character of the strip as primarily neighborhood serving. Build on the existing positive qualities of each node in terms of services provided, friendliness and physical character. 2. Encourage the development of a major retail anchor at 35th and Colorado Boulevard to enliven the strip, improve the image of the area and to serve shopping needs (i.e., department store with support businesses). 3. Improve the maintenance of structures and property and encourage regular clean up campaigns in the area. Encourage merchants to work with the city to meet their needs for business development or expansion and facade work. Encourage individual business owners to participate in low interest loan programs for interior and exterior renovation/expansion programs offered by the city. Channel public funds and resources onto the strip while the momentum is high, the need is great and there is strong community backing. 4. Encourage selective relocation or elimination of unwanted businesses that do not complement the goals of the plan i.e., especially blighted or illegal business that are fronts for gambling or drug dealing. Provide the space for new legitimate neighborhood serving retail uses. 5. Hire a project manager to work closely with merchants and the city to coordinate revitalization efforts and to expedite goals. Merchants and landowners should, through their dues, help support the salary for this position. This person would guide the merchant's association, organize advertising, promotions and special events, mobilize merchants to participate in revitalization 33

PAGE 38

programs and help raise funds for the betterment of Bruce Randolph Avenue. The person should be skilled in small business development and must be action oriented and be accountable for producing results. 6. Work with the city's Development Agency to find new tenants for vacant stores. Encourage positive business activity to come to Bruce Randolph Avenue and help force out the negative influences. Establish a leasing plan for new businesses to be brought in. 7. Conduct a city/merchant code enforcement 11walk-through11 along the strip. Increase city officials awareness of problems; obtain solutions and commitments; give property owners 30 days maximum to meet the codes. 8 Explain city programs on an individual basis and through educational workshops. Provide assistance and advice in the areas of purchasing, merchandising, bookkeeping, computerization of inventory, quality of goods and services, pricing and other needs. Respect differences in attitudes and management methods while also recommending valuable alterations. Work with merchants to increase pride in their stores, the strip and the broader community. Work with those that are struggling, to improve their ability to survive; capitalize on traffic and visibility as well as Daddy Bruce's exposure. 9. Strengthen the relationship between the industrial sector a few blocks north of the strip and the businesses along Bruce Randolph Avenue. Obtain their patronage through advertising and promotions and providing needed services. 10. Government buildings should be encouraged to locate on or near the strip, to help stabilize the area and bring people into the neighborhood to support the businesses. 11. Explore the possibility of establishing an business "incubator11 incubator on the strip for the same reasons outlined above. 12. Encourage merchants to work closely with owners of major business and anchors (i.e., Colorado Boulevard and York Street) to draw them into the revitalization process as well as to tap into their management expertise. 13. Improve aesthetics and visibility of signage. Encourage uniform signage for the whole strip while allowing some individuality and flexibility for each node. 14. Determine what steps can be taken to improve tenant -property owner relations regarding fix up and lease agreements. 34

PAGE 39

15. Determine the extent of problems with high utilities and insurance rates and the relationship of these costs to the negative perception of the area andjor crime rates. 16. Study existing parking to determine if there are deficiencies or management problems. ,.-17. Discourage any efforts to make Bruce Randolph Avenue a continuous commercial strip. Focus efforts on the improvement of existing businesses and nodes prior to attracting new businesses or infill development. Tailor programs to the needs of these businesses. Concentrate on the qualities of each node and strengthen conditions with available resources in a phased fashion. Marginal cosmetic fix up work is not enough (i.e., at Colorado Boulevard and York, improvements should capitalize on the crossroads image, franchises, traffic and convenience. At Gilpin, emphasize the specialty shops and Daddy Bruce's restaurant. At Downing, emphasize the complete neighborhood retail center) 18. Determine the status and future of existing nonconforming business uses in residential zones; for those that remain on the strip, encourage code enforcement, clean up and beautification of property including the rights-of-way. It may be desirable to relocate some of them to the more active retail nodes. 19. Encourage merchants to hire local neighborhood residents for jobs to help the unemployment situation. Analyze employment needs and identify strategies, i.e., training, job placement, expand existing businesses and manufacturing companies at the neighborhood perimeter; develop "export" businesses or service businesses with high employment potential. 20. A specific trade area analysis may need to be completed in order to further define the market area for Bruce Randolph Avenue and to identify specific new businesses that could be supported along the corridor. Solicit the Center for Community Development and Design to conduct this study. Also conduct a participatory economic analysis of Cole and Clayton households to determine where the dollars flow. 35

PAGE 40

D. Housing overview Residential development along Bruce Randolph Avenue includes single family houses, duplexes, houses and low rise apartments. The housing diversity is part of what adds to the character of the strip. The density and scale of housing development along the strip is compatible and blends in well with housing in the larger area. It is one and two stories in height. There are 76 single family structures, representing 10 acres of the 3,8 acres in the study area. ( 1) There are also 83 units in multi family structures, predominantly in duplexes, triplexes and small court yard developments. The average age of single family housing is 64 years wtc .::h 20 years older than the citywide average age of 44 years. housing includes a variety of architectural styles -from small brick bungalows to older two story Victorian homes. Multi family structures average 60 years in age and include older duplexes and more modern brick apartments and courts. Owner occupancy of single family houses along the strip is 72%, which is quite high in comparison to the broader neighborhood. Cole's 1985 homeownership figure was 44% and Clayton's was 57%. is The The average single family housing sales prices from 1982-1984 along Bruce Randolph Avenue increased from $48,000 to $52,000. This increase is average in comparison to Clayton but slower than increases in Cole. The residential uses are, on the whole, in much better physical and visual condition than the commercial properties. There are, however, many that could use fix up, clean up and landscape beautification. The vision is to achieve a diverse multi use strip with compatible commercial and residential uses that are secure and unblighted with a minimal amount of displacement and affordable housing. (1) All data from Denver Planning Office Housing Detail Report, 1986. 36

PAGE 41

-Major Issues 1. As the strip is improved there is concern about the impact on property values and the availability of affordable housing. 2. The following specific sites along Bruce Randolph Avenue from Downing to Colorado Boulevard have been identified as problems either because of their condition or because they are vacant lands that need to be cleaned up and developed: 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N.E. corner of Marion and BRA -vacant lot (cityowned). South side of BRA between Lafayette and Marion -very large vacant lot (city-owned). S.E. corner of Lafayette and BRA -narrow vacant lot. (May be part of parcel that includes boardedup church next door on south side.) s.w. corner of Humboldt and BRA -large vacant lot ( DHA owned) N.E. corner of Humboldt and BRA1501, 05, 07, 09, 11, 15 BRA. Two story now house in disrepair. 1615 BRA -6 unit multi family house in disrepair. 1621-2.3 BRA -duplex in disrepair. 1625 BRA -single family house in disrepair. S.E. corner of Gilpin and BRA -narrow vacant lot. N.W. corner of Williams and BRA -boarded-up apartment building (undergoing renovation) s.w. corner of High and BRA -boarded-up houses. N.E. corner of Race and BRA -narrow vacant lot. S.E. corner of Gaylord and BRA -vacant lot. s.w. corner of Josephine and BRA -vacant lot. N.E. corner of Clayton and BRA -vacant lot. S.E. corner of Fillmore and BRA -vacant lot. 2904 BRA -single family house in disrepair. s.w. corner of Cook and BRA -small boarded-up church on large lot. North side of BRA between Clayton and Elizabeth -vacant and boarded-up large grocery store (proposed school) 3. Many feel housing deterioration continues to worsen as the commercial areas deteriorate. Landowners are not aware of rehabilitation or beautification programs available through the city or nonprofit organizations. 4. Vacant and abandoned structures in the immediate vicinity are a blighting influence on the area. Many residential units above retail uses are not well kept or even occupied. 37

PAGE 42

5. Many feel that there are major problems procuring construction and permanent financing in the Cole neighborhood for multi family residential: o constraints facing housing development include land costs, securing market factors and negative image of the strip. o Some of the previous major lenders are no longer doing the business (e.g., World savings). o The 312 HUD loan program is very conservative in its approach to computing loan mortgage amounts. 0 Most vacant and abandoned buildings require too much renovation and the market street rents will not come close to supporting the required permanent mortgages. o Redlining is reportedly taking place in the Cole neighborhood. 6. There are specific risks and other problems with the processing required under the CHFA bond moneyjFHA 221 DT Program: (CHFA will only lend with FHA insurance); the individual developer must spend money up front on a set of detailed architectural drawings; these must be approved by the Denver Building Department, Health and Hospitals, FHA, CHFA's architectural representative, and Wastewater Management. For example, upfront costs for drawings and specifications can average $16,500 $17,000. This process takes four to six months. Revision of the project to make it more economically feasible and do only moderate rehab, requires that the entire process start over again (more up front costs and 4-6 more months). There would be no guarantee a revised version would be accepted. In a nutshell, the developer takes great risk coming into a distressed area, has to go through a time consuming process, spend money and time, and gamble that FHA will insure the project for a least 90% of the financing required, to obtain CHFA assistance. Major Recommendations 1. In order to attract developers who are willing to take risks by investing 'in a deteriorated area, low and no interest loans should be made available for for-profit developers. This is crucial to the viability of the first five or six major developments that come in and take the first steps toward revitalizing an area such as Bruce Randolph Avenue. Examples of needs include: 38

PAGE 43

2 o Grants or low interest loans for architectural specifications and start up costs. o Low interest loans for permanent financing for projects so rents can cover debt service. o Incentives to get 5 or 6 projects moving simultaneously to continue momentum and attract other investments into the area. The city should solicit proposals to develop new infill housing on the three city owned sites at Marion and Lafayette. Test financial feasibility and work with the community to establish parameters for development. Work with DHA to develop their lot at Humboldt with affordable housing. Include the community, merchants and citizens in the review of concepts for development and design. Establish a game plan for soliciting developers. Make interim improvements on these sites {i.e., clean up programs, interim parks or gardens). 3. Infill housing should be diverse in terms of cost, styles and scale of development. A percent of housing development should be affordable to area residents but should also include units that entice more middle income families to move into the area. 4. Conserve, rehabilitate and protect the existing single family and multi family housing stock. 5. When public funds are used, there should be a legal stipulation that assures adequate property and building maintenance. 6. Include representatives of private lending institutions in the planning and implementation process to create awareness about the area, Bruce Randolph Avenue goals and to obtain assistance with implementation of specific projects. 7. Maintain the current Bruce Randolph Avenue Committee or create an official standing committee to carry out this plan and complete objectives. 8. Continue the multi family housing rehabilitation program along and adjacent to Bruce Randolph Avenue. Target specific structures from the housing issues section and work with the owners to get the buildings fixed up and occupied. 9. Develop the parcel at Bruce Randolph Avenue and Franklin (southeast corner) into mixed use, retail on the ground floor and residential upstairs or on the back side. 39

PAGE 44

10. Work with developers of other major neighborhood projects proposed in the area that will have positive spin off effects for the strip (i.e., Wyatt School, Hope Center, RTD building) 11. Increase community awarenes's and involvement in such programs as the Neighborhood Small Projects grants for beautification and physical improvements in the public right of way; crime watch programs; street and alley maintenance; code enforcement, etc. 12. Work with the Denver Public Schools on physical improvements and beautification of their property including the right of way along Bruce Randolph Avenue. 13. Target outreach efforts for homeownership counselling, single family rehabilitation, vacant and boarded up building programs, etc. 14. Identify, acquire and develop other key parcels or structures, on or adjacent to Bruce Randolph Avenue that are holding down revitalization efforts. Test developer interest prior to moving forward on acquisition. 15. Work with area nonprofits that might be interested in purchase and fix up programs that will result in affordable housing (i.e., Northeast Denver Housing, Brothers Redevelopment, Inc., McCauley Housing Foundation/Mercy Housing Corporation, Hope Communities, etc.) 16. Study the possibility of converting some residential structures into retail use when located at retail nodes (i.e., Franklin, Gilpin block}. E. Traffic and Transportation Overview Traffic and transportation conditions along Bruce Randolph Avenue affect the overall image of the strip, the visual atmosphere and environment, as well as pedestrian accessibility and safety. Since Bruce Randolph Avenue is the spine of the revitalization area, how it is treated in balancing local traffic, through-traffic and in terms of aesthetics, is crucial to revitalization efforts. Much of the avenue serves as a neighborhood commercial area for Cole and Clayton communities and as a convenient uninterrupted eastwest traffic corridor that takes people to northeast Denver and central downtown. Because of this, it receives a tremendous amount of exposure. Therefore, street redesign and 40

PAGE 45

beautification is an important component of this plan to complement economic development and housing rehabilitation. Bruce Randolph Avenue along with cross streets Franklin, Williams and Steele Streets, is classified as a "collector" street, one that collects the traffic from quieter "local" streets and passes it on to busier "arterials" and freeways. All of these streets are currently operating under average levels for collector streets which is generally 5,000-10,000 vehicles per day. Additionally, where Bruce Randolph Avenue intersects with arterial streets (Colorado Boulevard, York, Marion, Downing) traffic counts are at collector street volumes (4,550-7,250 vehicles per day). Arterials generally carry 17,500-35,00 vehicles per day. Trends show that traffic volumes have been decreasing on all of these streets in recent years. While some consistent of traffic is good for business visibility and patronage, some feel that too much traffic disturbs the visibility, environment and convenience of using businesses. From 1975 to 1981 traffic volumes decreased by 38% just east of Downing on Bruce Randolph Avenue. East of Marion on Bruce Randolph Avenue there was a 25% loss over that time period and a slight 7% loss east of York Street. The one increase noted was 8% just west of Colorado Boulevard. The general feeling is that the traffic volume loss is positive and continues to enhance the pedestrian environment as long as there is a steady flow of traffic on Bruce Randolph Avenue for business exposure. Majo::Issues 2. 3. 4. The visual appearance of the street including curbs, gutters, and rights of way, is unaesthetically pleasing passersby and pedestrians. With traffic volumes down, the street width is more of a visual and physical barrier than a convenience. The width combined with traffic volumes, deters pedestrians from using the strip or crossing. The street design is not sensitive to pedestrian activity. Excessive speeds are reportedly a major concern. There are mixed feelings about bus service. The #38 local bus stops along Bruce Randolph Avenue twice per hour at every three or four blocks. Connecting service exist at Colorado Boulevard, York Street and Downing. Some feel that while service is good at major intersections, it is less efficient at other places along Bruce Randolph Avenue. Many are concerned about the lack of bus shelters. 41

PAGE 46

Maior Recommendations 1. Redesign the street to appeal visually to residents living on the strip and to help improve the business environment. Research the possibility of eliminating laneage to install landscaped medians in residential areas and increased landscaped frontages for commercial areas. The existing laneage is not needed to carry current or desired traffic volume (see following drawings). 2. Paint attractive crosswalks at major intersections. 3. Work with the Police Department to increase monitoring of speeding and enforce the existing limits. 4. Work with RTD to study additional issues and needs and obtain funding approval for bus shelters. 5. Study the need for additional pedestrian signalization and stop signs along Bruce Randolph Avenue. 6. study ways to improve bicycle access to the strip and bicycle safety in using Bruce Randolph Avenue. 42

PAGE 47

Commercial Areas CNffr( lur
PAGE 48

Residential Areas I I I I l -----: I i 44 I ,...., I/ I l/ \ "'fK'A-sU AI

PAGE 49

F. Urban Design Overview If an area looks and feels it is generally the result of good urban design. Clean streets, ample lighting, safe sidewalks, patterned concrete, planter boxes, treelined avenues, and attractive storefronts, all contribute to the environment of an area. These kinds of improvements are necessary along Bruce Randolph Avenue in order to improve existing businesses, attract new investment, and to draw local and regional clientele. The beautification effort has started. Some private landowners such as Daddy Bruce have taken the initiative over the years to take care of the appearance, and cleanliness of their structures. A number of business persons and owners of residential properties have followed suit in the last year. Major development and design improvements are visible at the Downing center (including streetscaping); Franklin and Bruce Randolph Avenue (Franklin Hotel and Daddy Bruce's Deli); Humboldt and Bruce Randolph Avenue (apartment renovation); Franklin and Bruce Randolph Avenue southside (proposed redevelopment plan) and others. On May 22, 1986, approximately 50 merchants representing 7 commercial nodes, and area residents came together to appeal for commercial neighborhood small projects (CNSP) funds from the Mayor's Advisory Council. The grant funds, totaling close to $200,000 were awarded for urban design improvements, including trees, sod, irrigation, sidewalks, curbs, gutters and handicapped ramps. on June 14, 1986, a $12,500 grant was awarded to the owner renovating the Magnolia apartments at Bruce Randolph Avenue and Williams Street for similar improvements. This is a good start and will keep momentum moving forward. There is, however, a long way to go in terms of gaining the participation of additional business, public and quasi public facilities and resident owners on the strip. Improvements needed to complement these, uniform lighting, creative treatment to utility poles on the north side of Bruce Randolph Avenue, trash receptacles at commercial nodes, additional landscaping and tree planting, street painting and redesign and most importantly, facade work to improve the appearance of structures. Major issues and recommendations are listed and depicted on the following two sketches which represent only a sample of the study area from Downing to Steele Streets. 45

PAGE 50

Urban Design Issues :-ia"'o::-:ssues 2. 5. 6. :here :s no of design. :nere are no unique or :he :acks an identi ..,..i th ':..'le of new. name. Changes. in land use ehe some face 3ruce Randolph Avenue ..,.nile face side along ':..'le is assure safety or ;rovide a unifying theme; siqnage along is and is or many signs are inexpensive and hand lettered or Painted on old wood; public service lines and wood poles along nor--A side of Randolph Avenue from appearance of the area ..,.hen driving or ..,..alking Landscaping is except for a few trees mostly in residential They nave not been with any and do not provide a unifying eheme; of way are generally not well landscaped or ..,.ell maintained. 3ruce Randolph Avenue itself is designed in a ..,..ay signifies arrival a special neighborhood "?lace." Some commercial and residential are marginal or bligntad and !rom improvements made by other landowners. :here is no design coordination of various improvements being made, both in terms of landscaping and facade renovations. parcels look like missing on the and and weeds. "'=== -.......... JkW -= ; 0'1d ==a:rQ ----. ==---== ----

PAGE 51

Schematic Design Develop urban wil: precede making by landowners, and and help achieve overall "vision" !or 1:-.'le found on following pages. 2. Work with the public along BRA to in public right of way, as wall as needed improveJnents pri va and grounds (i.e., churches, schools). :onti.."lue to of::e:-':..'le CHSP and NSP and programs to business and :-esidential nodes along the strip. Assure proper maintenance of all 4 Work towards eventual installation of new, funct:.onal and uniform along the strip. 5. Develop creative solutions to deal with the poles lining the nor--hside ot the avenue (i.e., replace with aluminum poles and lights. a color!ul paint:.ng scheJne, etc. ) 5. :nstall re trash every commerc:.al block. Develop solutions tor vacant i.e., temporary open space, gardens, parks. 8. Create a set ot unique and noticeable way signs for installation at Downing Colorado Boulevard and York Streets. 47 :===--= -r;E'(-Comm..c:ran. =SI ; iliiiCcrrmr-.r:---.;:::.. ----r:-J il = -== __ _:_.: ill -----!IP. --=--1! --= I ____ :rrt{ ., 1

PAGE 52

( // / / __ //-\, \ ',' -._ _____.-\. ,-----/' \ \ -, DADOY \\ \ -..

PAGE 54

' \ \ I \. _.,.. ( ,...._ I /// \\ /. \ \ // \ \ / \ \ I \\. \ \ \ \ \ \ 50 .. "\.\, \ \ \ \ ', \,