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Louisiana-Pearl station area plan

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Louisiana-Pearl station area plan
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Community Planning and Development, City and County of Denver
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Denver, CO
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City and County of Denver
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English

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Transit oriented develop
Public transit

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
DENVER Community Planning & Development Department
THE MILE HIGH CITY i I I




Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Acknowledgements
Mayor John Hickenlooper
Denver City Council
Michael B. Hancock, Council President, District 11
Rick Garcia, District 1
Jeanne Faatz, District 2
Paul Lopez, District 3
Peggy Lehmann, District 4
Marcia Johnson, District 5
Charlie Brown, District 6
Chris Nevitt, District 7
Carla Madison, District 8
Judy Montero, District 9
Jeanne Robb, District 10
Carol Boigon, At-Large
Doug Linkhart, At-Large
Denver Planning Board
Laura Aldrete
Brad Buchanan
Fred Corn
Richard Delanoy
William Hornby
Barbara Kelley, Chair
Judith Martinez
Bruce O'Donnell
Karen Perez
Thomas Potter
Jeffrey Walker
Denver Community Planning and Development
Peter J. Park, AICP, Manager
Catherine Cox-Blair, AICP Principal City Planner, TOD Program Manager
Caryn M. Wenzara, AICP Senior City Planner, Project Manager
Chris Gleissner
Eric McClelland
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Denver Public Works
Brian Mitchell, PE, Director of Traffic Engineering
Amy Schiller, Senior City Planner
Robert Kochevar, Denver FasTracks Liaison
Office of Economic Development
Jacky Morales-Ferrand
Denver Parks and Recreation
Devon Buckels
Fred Hammer
Joe Kanata
Donna Krentz
Lisa Lapp
Jan Lapetino
Erin Manning
Edythe Mullins
David P. Reusch
Bill Ryan
Jim Schneck
Sherri Way
Shelly Watters
Louisiana-Pearl Station Working Group
Kathleen MacKenzie (Councilwoman District 7)
Ashley E. Arroyo
Nick Ault
Jimmy Balafas
Jim Carlson
Julie Conner
Michael Craig
John Dee
Roxanne Esquibel
Mathew Evans
Kathryn Fontaine
David Foster
Janis Frame
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction...................................................................1
Study Area.................................................................1
Southeast Light Rail Corridor .............................................2
FasTracks..................................................................2
Project Partners and Plan Process..........................................3
Purpose of the Plan........................................................4
Relationship to Other Plans and Studies....................................5
Existing Conditions...............
Station Area History..........
Demographic Characteristics
Existing Land Use.............
Zoning........................
Mobility......................
10
10
11
12
15
18
Plan Vision
25
Framework Plan..............................................................27
Introduction............................................................27
Land Use Concept........................................................27
Urban Design............................................................38
Mobility................................................................44
Parking.................................................................50
Implementation Strategy.....................................................52
Top Priority Action Items...............................................52
Additional Action Items.................................................55
Page iii


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
INTRODUCTION
STUDY AREA
The planning area boundary is the 0.25 mile radius
from the Louisiana-Pearl light rail station, located at
the intersection of Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel
Boulevard South. This radius is a five-minute walking
distance from the station and represents the area of
immediate influence. The northern boundary is
Mississippi Avenue and the southern boundary is
Florida Avenue. The eastern boundary is South Logan
Street and western boundary is South Corona Street.
While typical planning for a transit station area is a 0.5
mile radius, the Louisiana-Pearl station is strictly a walk-
up station that does not offer a park-n-ride. Therefore,
ridership generated by the station will be riders from
the neighborhood walking, biking, busing, or drop off.
As such, the area of influence is smaller and aligned
with the 0.25 mile (5-minute walk) radius.
The planning area resides in the charming
neighborhoods of Platt Park and West Washington
Park. Platt Park is south of 1-25 and West Washington
Park is north of 1-25. These stable neighborhoods offer
a variety of traditional housing stock, neighborhood
parks and schools. Reinvestment and changes in
existing business types are likely in response to the
success of the transit station and the desirability of the
neighborhoods.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
SOUTHEAST LIGHT RAIL CORRIDOR
The Louisiana-Pearl light rail station is on the Southeast Light Rail Corridor, which
opened November 2006. The transit extension was part of the Transportation
Expansion Project (T-REX). T-REX was a $1.67 billion venture that will transform
circulation patterns of Denver Metro commuters along Interstates 25 and 225. T-
REX added nineteen miles of light rail and improved seventeen miles of highway
through southeast Denver, Aurora, Greenwood Village, Centennial and Lone
Tree. The project is the result of a unique transit and highway collaboration
between the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), the Regional
Transportation District (RTD) and participating communities.
FASTRACKS
Also underway is FasTracks, RTD's comprehensive plan to build-out and operate a
regional rapid transit system by 2017. This system consists of commuter rail, light
rail, bus rapid transit, circulator bus service and park-n-ride facilities. FasTracks
cost is projected at $4.7 billion to be constructed over twelve years. A
combination of region-wide sales tax, federal funds, and local contributions will
fund the expansion. Once complete, the investment of FasTracks will augment
RTD's ability to provide enhanced public transit access to major destinations in
the region. FasTracks includes:
o 119 miles of new light rail and commuter rail
o 18 miles of bus rapid transit service
o 21,000 new parking spaces at rail and bus stations
o Expanded bus service
Louisiana-Pearl is the northernmost station of
the Southeast Light Rail Corridor. The transit
corridors extend north and south beyond the
boundary of fhis graphic.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
PROJECT PARTNERS AND PLAN PROCESS
Project Partners:
Business Owners
Property Owners
Residents
Platt Park People Association
Platt Park Residents Coalition
West University Community
Association
West Washington Park
Neighborhood Association
South Washington Park
Neighborhood Association
Regional Transportation District
The planning, design, construction and opening of the Southeast Light Rail
Corridor are a source of pride and excitement for neighborhoods and businesses
in Denver. Some elements are already in place, such as the station location and
the new plaza. Opportunities for changes to land use, design and mobility exist at
the Louisiana-Pearl light rail station. Over a course of approximately eighteen
months, volunteers from the community worked together to articulate these
opportunities, develop a vision and craft strategies to achieve the vision.
These volunteers formed a Working Group comprised of representatives from
businesses, developers and residents in the area. The planning area (within
Council District 7) included the Platt Park, West Washington Park and University
neighborhoods. In addition, the process involved collaboration between the City
and County of Denver's Community Planning and Development Department and
Public Works Department, with support from the Department of Parks and
Recreation and Office of Economic Development. Regular Working Group
meetings and public meetings shaped plan contents. Briefings and public
hearings with City Council, Denver Planning Board and interagency city staff were
also crucial to the process. The working group engaged in this process:
Task One: Identify and map existing conditions, current and future market
trends, key destinations, and activity nodes
Task Two: Determine strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats, and
develop a vision statement
Task Three: Conduct a parking study to evaluate parking for the station area
Task Four: Develop circulation improvement and parking management
strategies
Task Five: Develop land use and design recommendations
Task Six: Prepare implementation strategies for plan recommendations
Task Seven: Finalize draft plan
Task Eight: Adoption process
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
PURPOSE OF THE PLAN
Property owners, elected officials, neighborhood organizations and city
departments will use the Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan for many purposes over
its lifespan. The following is a description of the primary uses of the plan ranging
from big picture expectations to implementation.
Data Resource: The plan offers a collection of existing conditions data about
the planning area in an easy-to-reference document.
Reinvestment Guidance: Market conditions cannot be guaranteed and
changes in demographics cannot be accurately predicted. However, it is
clear that the addition of the light rail station generates reinvestment interest.
The plan established a vision that guides public and private decision-making
and investment over the coming years. It covers only the topics of land use,
urban design, parking and mobility. The plan offers guidance on reinvestment
for the near-term but adapts to changing markets and demographics.
Zoning Amendments: The plan does not convey or deny any zoning
entitlement but is an essential evaluation tool used in proposed zoning
changes. Furthermore, the plan does not change zoning code language, but
establishes goals and parameters for future zoning changes.
Capital Improvements: A plan can provide the justification or the prioritization
and allocation of funding from the city's capital improvement budget and
other sources.
Funding and Partnership Opportunities: Implementation of plans requires a
collaborative effort between neighborhoods, businesses, elected officials and
city departments. Plans typically require funding beyond the city's budget.
This plan identifies and supports these partnerships and resource leveraging
efforts.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PLANS AND STUDIES
Plan 2000 guides and shapes future
policies and planning efforts.
The Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan builds upon a solid foundation of existing
documents and guiding principles. This section provides a review of the
applicable content of adopted citywide plans. The Louisiana-Pearl Station Area
Plan provides specific recommendations for the planning area that, in case of
conflict, supersede general recommendations from existing plans.
Comprehensive Plan, 2000
The City Council adopted Denver Comprehensive Plan in 2000. Plan 2000 provides
the planning and policy framework for development of Denver. The key subjects
of Plan 2000 are land use, mobility, legacies and housing.
Land Use: Land use recommendations promote new investment that
accommodates new residents, improves economic vitality and enhances the
city's aesthetics and livability. In addition, Plan 2000 supports sustainable
development patterns by promoting walking, biking and transit use.
Mobility: Plan 2000 emphasizes planning for multiple modes of transportation -
walking, biking, transit and cars. Key concepts include expanding mobility
choices for commuters and regional cooperation in transit system planning.
Plan 2000 also promotes compact, mixed-use development in transit rich
places (like station areas).
Legacies: Ensuring that new buildings, infrastructure and open spaces create
attractive, beautiful places is the foundation of the legacies chapter. Historic
building preservation and respect for traditional patterns of development are
also key tenets of Plan 2000. To this end, Plan 2000 places a high value on
streets, trails, and parkways that link destinations within the community.
Housing: Plan 2000 recognizes that access to housing is a basic need for
Denver citizens. Thus, Plan 2000 emphasizes preservation and maintenance of
the existing housing stock and expanding housing options. Providing a variety
of unit types and costs, in addition to housing development in transit rich
places are fundamental tenets of Plan 2000.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation
Plan, 2002
Plan 2000 recommended that the city create a plan to integrate land use and
transportation planning. Blueprint Denver is an implementation plan that
recognizes this relationship and describes the building blocks and tools necessary
to achieve the vision outlined in Plan 2000.
Areas of Change and Stability; Blueprint Denver divides the city into Areas of
Change and Areas of Stability. Over time, all areas of the city will fluctuate
somewhat between change and stability. The goal for Areas of Stability is to
identify and maintain the character of an area while accommodating some
new development and redevelopment. The goal for Areas of Change is to
channel growth where it will be beneficial and can best improve access to
jobs, housing and services.
Transportation: The transportation component of Blueprint Denver provides
transportation building blocks and tools that promote multimodal and inter-
modal connections. Elements of connection include the street system, bus
transit system, bicycle system, and pedestrian system. These components
must work together to realize the guiding principles of Blueprint Denver.
Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan, 2006
The Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan prioritizes the city's
planning and implementation efforts related to the transit system and station area
development.
TOD Defined: The TOD Strategic Plan defines TOD as development near transit
that creates beautiful, vital, walkable neighborhoods; provides housing,
shopping, and transportation choices; generates lasting value, and provides
access to the region via transit.
TOD Typologies: The TOD Strategic Plan establishes TOD typologies for every
transit station in the city. Typologies establish a framework to distinguish the
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
The Bicycle Master Plan provides a
framework for an interconnected bicycle
system.
types of places linked by the transit system. The typologies frame expectations
about the land use mix and intensity of development at each of the stations.
The Louisiana-Pearl Station is an Urban Neighborhood Station. This implies a
predominant neighborhood character with supportive services.
Station Area Planning: While providing an important planning framework, the
TOD Strategic Plan calls for more detailed station area plans. Such plans offer
specific direction for appropriate development, needed infrastructure
investments and economic development strategies.
Bicycle Master Plan, 2002
In 2002 in response to Plan 2000, the Bicycle Master Plan (2002) provides a
framework for an interconnected bicycle system. The primary objective of the
Bicycle Master Plan is develop new neighborhood routes that create connections
between the existing bicycle route system and nearby facilities not currently on a
bicycle route. The plan also recommends improving access and signage around
light rail stations to make bicycling and transit work in a seamless manner. Finally,
the plan promotes education, enforcement and policy for the bicycle system.
Pedestrian Master Plan, 2004
The Pedestrian Master Plan serves as a framework for implementation of new city
policies that place an emphasis on pedestrian mobility in planning. Specifically,
the plan considers safety, accessibility, education, connectivity, streetscape, land
use, and public health as it relates to the creation of a citywide pedestrian
circulation system. Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver recommended preparation of
this plan. The plan establishes street classifications for the pedestrian network in
order to highlight routes that require greater emphasis on the pedestrian.
Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002
The Game Plan is a master plan for the city's park, open space and recreation
system. A primary principle is to create greener neighborhoods. Game Plan
establishes a tree canopy goal of 15-18% for the entire city. The plan also
establishes a parkland acreage target of 8-10 acres per 1,000 residents. Tools to
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
accomplish these goals include promoting green streets and parkways, which
indicate routes that require greater emphasis and additions to the landscape.
Strategic Transportation Plan, 2006
Denver Public Works drafted the Strategic Transportation Plan (STP). The STP is an
important implementation tool for Blueprint Denver and Plan 2000. The objective
of the STP is to determine transportation investments. The STP accomplishes: (1)
education concerning options for transportation alternatives; (2) consensus on
transportation strategies along transportation corridors through a collaborative
process; and (3) stakeholder support. The STP represents a new approach to
transportation planning in Denver. It forecasts person-trips to evaluate the
magnitude of transportation impacts caused by all travel types. This person-trip
data provides the ability to plan improvements for bikes, pedestrians, transit and
streets.
Storm Drainage Plan 2005 and Sanitary Sewer Plan 2006
The Storm Drainage Master Plan and the Sanitary Sewer Master Plan evaluates
adequacy of the existing systems assuming the future land uses identified in
Blueprint Denver. The Storm Drainage Master Plan determines the amount of
imperviousness resulting from future land development and the subsequent
runoff. The Sanitary Sewer Master Plan identifies needed sanitary sewer
improvements to respond to forecasted development.
Greenprint Denver
Greenprint Denver is the cities environmental action plan to ensure a positive
legacy for sustainability. The plan covers action items such as reducing
greenhouse emissions, increase city forest coverage, reduce waste, utilize
renewable energies, increase green built affordable housing, promote and
leverage mass transit, improve, protect and conserve water and promote green
industry economic development.
Page 8


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Zoning Code Update
Denver citizens called for reform of the City's Zoning Code in the 1989
Comprehensive Plan and again in the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000.
Blueprint Denver provided the vision and initial strategy to begin this effort. The
Zoning Code Update process is making steady progress in the effort to bring
Denver's current regulations into closer alignment with desired development
patterns. Key issues identified include recognition that in some instances current
regulations do not advance the proactive implementation of Blueprint Denver
and other adopted plans; current procedures are numerous, complicated and
often inconsistent; and the size and complexity of the current regulations make
them difficult to use, comply with, understand, and enforce. The results of this
effort will include better tools than currently available for implementation.
Platt Park Neighborhood Assessment 2003
The Platt Park Assessment documents conditions as of 2003 of the Platt Park
statistical neighborhood. Demographic findings indicate the neighborhood
continues to stabilize and improve in desirability and quality. The assessment
supports a focus on reinvestment areas such as the station area, Antique Row,
South Broadway and Old South Pearl Street. The assessment supports preserving
existing residential structures in stable areas and improving access to the transit
station, parks, business districts and other destinations. Economic analysis shows
strong economics health for the neighborhood.
West Washington Park Neighborhood Plan 1991
In collaboration with the city, the West Washington Park neighborhood prepared
a neighborhood plan. The plan promotes patterns of land use, urban design,
circulation and services that contribute to the economic, social, and physical
health, safety and welfare of the people living and working in the neighborhood.
The vision is to preserve and enhance the positive qualities of the neighborhood.
This includes a diversity of people, historic buildings, mature landscape, human-
scale land use, urban character, convenient transportation access and the high
level of energy and interaction among residents and business people.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
EXISTING CONDITIONS
STATION AREA HISTORY
Settlement of the Platt Park and West Washington Park neighborhoods in the late
1800s has an interesting history. This history plays a strong role in its current
characteristics. This area incorporated in 1886 as the Town of South Denver. The
City of Denver annexed the area in 1894.
In 1893, Denver Tramway Company installed the first cable car service along
Broadway. The company later extended its service to Alameda Avenue and
South Pearl Street. During the 1950s, rubber wheeled trolley coaches replaced
electric trolley cars. The transit and pedestrian linkages created by these
streetcar systems shaped land use patterns still evident today.
Trolley car on South Pearl Street circa 1910.
(Denver Public Library, Western History Cotlmction)
One of the greatest influences in the area was the Gates Rubber Company
located at South Broadway and Mississippi Avenue. In 1911, Charles Gates, Sr.
purchased the Colorado Tire and Leather Company. Over time, the Gates
Rubber Company became a successful regional and international company.
Many employees lived in the nearby Platt Park and West Washington Park
neighborhoods. After almost a century of operation, Gates ceased activity and
sold the site.
The original street car and cable car lines
play a role in the development pattern of
the Platt Park and West Washington Park
neighborhood.
One final influencing factor in the transportation history of the Louisiana-Pearl
Station area was the construction and completion of the Valley Highway, now
known as Interstate 25. Construction of the Valley Highway started in 1948 and
completed in 1958. The Valley Highway became a physical barrier between the
Platt Park and Washington Park neighborhoods.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS
Planning Area Age
Distribution
32
% Less than Age 18
% between Age 18-39
% between Age 40-64
a % Age 65 and greater
The table below provides a summary of the demographics of the Louisiana-Pearl
Station planning area in comparison to the demographics of the city. This data is
derived from the 2000 U.S. Census counts and includes the census block groups
mostly contained within a 0.25 mile radius of the station. The employment data is
from the Denver Regional Council of Government's 2000 traffic analysis zone (TAZ)
data.
2000 Demographic Data
Category Planning Area City of Denver
Population 4,477 people 554,636 people
Housing 2,423 units 251,435 units
Persons per Household l .95 people 2.3 people
% of Housing Ownership 59.2% 49.9%
Median Income $70,158 $39,500
Average Age 36.2 years 33.1 years
Employment 2,592 workers 301,434 workers
Sources: 2000 U.S. Census Tract 002902 Block Groups 2 and 3 and Census Tract 003001
Block Groups I and 2; employment data provided by DRCOG
The high median income and housing ownership in comparison to the city as a
whole reflect the planning area's stable neighborhood character. They also are
indicators that residents in the planning area have less diverse characteristics than
the city as a whole. The slightly higher median age and smaller household size
reveal a variety of household types in the planning area, including small families,
singles, couples without children, empty nesters and retired residents. Like many
Denver neighborhoods, the areas' household composition may evolve over time.
Page 11


EXISTING LAND USE
In the Fall of 2006, the city conducted an inventory of existing land uses for the
planning area. The Existing Land Use Map is on page 15. There are six land use
categories, described below. The predominant land use for the entire planning
area is single family residential. Generally, West Washington Park has more single-
family residential dwellings and less commercial and office uses in comparison to
Platt Park. Platt Park contains greater diversity of housing types and non-
residential uses. Since the initiation of the planning process, the neighborhoods
(Platt Park in particular) have seen reinvestment activity for businesses and
housing. There is a new mixed use project across from the station with 29
condominium units and ground floor retail.
Single Family: Single family residential areas contain neighborhood design
qualities typical of Denver neighborhoods such as detached sidewalks, street
trees, uniform setbacks, front porches/entries, and detached garages accessed
by an alley. Single family residential is the predominant land use in both Platt
Park and West Washington Park. In recent years, many homeowners have
reinvested in their homes through renovations, additions, or tearing down the
existing structure and building a new home (e.g. scrape-offs). This reinvestment
is an indicator that both neighborhoods are becoming increasingly desirable.
Two Family: The Existing Land Use Map identifies the location of all two family, or
attached duplex structures. Two family structures exist in scattered locations
throughout the planning area and the two neighborhoods. As indicated on the
map, the majority of the two-family units are in Platt Park. Areas zoned R-2 have
seen an increase in new construction of duplexes, again due to the desirability of
the neighborhoods.
Multiple Family: This category includes residential structures with three or more
units in a building. These uses are very limited and only found in Platt Park within
the planning area. Most are located near commercial areas and on major
Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Single family homes are the
predominant land use in West
Washington Park and Platt Park.
This commercial building is a good
local example of a mixed-use building
right near the station. It has ground
floor commercial and upper level
residential.
Page 12


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
There are numerous businesses serving
the station area located along South
Pearl Street and Louisiana Avenue.
This new multiple family project at
Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel
Boulevard South has ground floor retail.
streets. Due to minimum lot area requirements and limited land assembly
opportunities, multiple family use is not common. A new multiple family project is
located at the corner of Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel Boulevard South. While it
is primarily multiple family, there is small scale ground floor retail.
Institutional: Institutional uses include a church and school that are located on
the edge of the planning area.
Office: Office uses are along Buchtel Boulevard North and South. While minimal,
office uses in these neighborhoods provide opportunities for residents to live near
work and to enjoy nearby professional services.
Commercial: Commercial uses include businesses such as retail, services,
restaurants and repair. Some buildings containing commercial uses have
residential units on upper floors. Most commercial uses are concentrated in Platt
Park along Buchtel Boulevard South, South Pearl Street and Louisiana Avenue.
The eclectic mix of restaurants and retail shops in Platt Park is an important part of
the neighborhood character and attracts customers from all over the metro area.
In West Washington Park, commercial uses in the planning area are south of East
Mississippi Avenue, west of South Washington Street.
Vacant: There is only one site labeled as vacant because it has no existing use or
structure. There is one vacant site in the station area with in-fill development
potential. It is on South Pearl Street, north of Louisiana and is approximately 10,000
square feet in area.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
0.25 0.125 0 -0.125 0.25 Miles
I---------------------------------------'-------------------------------------1----------------------------------------1------------------------------------1
Louisiana Pearl
Station
Existing Land Use
Land Use
Single Family
Two Family
Multi Family
Institutional
Office
Commercial
Vacant
* %
KJ
1/4 Mile Radius
of Louisiana Station
Map Date: 8/28/07
Page 14


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
In R-2 zoned areas, most homes are
single family (above) but there are some
duplex units (below). These photographs
are of Platt Park.
ZONING
The following is a summary of the existing zoning districts represented in the station
area. The Zoning Map, found on page 18, shows the zoning within the study area.
R-1 Single Unit Detached Dwellings. This residential zone district is a low density
residential district that accommodates single family homes and certain limited
ancillary uses. While many lots do not meet the minimum lot size, the current
required minimum lot size is 6,000 square feet, which translates to a gross density
of 7.3 dwelling units per acre. As shown on the Zoning Map, the majority of the R-
1 zoning is in West Washington Park with a few blocks zoned R-1 within Platt Park.
R-2 Duplex/Multi-Unit Dwellings. This district typically includes a mix of single
family, duplexes and multiple family structures. The size of the parcel, parking and
other development regulations dictate the number of allowable units. The
minimum lot size is 6,000 square feet for each duplex structure with an additional
3,000 square feet required for each additional unit. This yields a maximum density
of approximately 14.5 units per acre. The majority of the R-2 zoning is in Platt Park
with a few blocks within West Washington Park. Both neighborhoods have R-2
zoning where duplexes and multiple unit dwellings are currently allowable.
However, the current land use pattern in R-2 areas is predominantly single family.
B-1 Limited Office. This district allows office uses such as dental clinics, medical
care and professional services. There is a low volume of direct daily customer
contact with these permitted office uses. This district is characteristically small in
area and ideally situated between more intense business areas and residential
areas. The district regulations establish standards comparable to those of the low
density residential districts. Bulk standards and open space requirements control
building height. Building floor area cannot exceed the site area. B-1 zoning is on
both sides of 1-25 within the planning area.
B-2 Neighborhood Business. This district provides for the retailing of commodities
classed as convenience goods and the furnishing of certain personal services.


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
The district intends to satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal needs of
the residents of surrounding residential neighborhoods. This district is
characteristically small in size and located on collector streets. Residential uses
typically surround these areas, offering a convenient walking distance. The district
regulations establish standards comparable to those of low density residential
districts, resulting in similar as-built building heights. Building floor area cannot
exceed the site area. B-2 zoning is on both sides of 1-25 in the planning area.
B-4 General Business. This district provides for appropriate commercial uses
adjacent to arterial streets. Allowed uses include a wide variety of consumer and
business services and retail establishments. The regulations generally allow a
moderate intensity of use and concentration. The maximum floor area ratio of 2
to 1 controls the size of buildings. Building height limitations apply only when there
is an abutment to a protected residential zone district or view plane restrictions
exist. B-4 zoning is only in Platt Park.
P-1 Off-Street Parking. The P-1 district allows only parking lots and structures with
bulk and setback regulations applying to structures. This zone allows business
parking without the expansion of the business zone. There are requirements for
visual screening when adjacent to residential uses. P-1 zoning is only in Platt Park.
R-MU-30 Residential Mixed-Use. There is one site within the planning area zoned
R-MU-30. It is at the intersection of South Emerson and South Buchtel Blvd, in Platt
Park. This is a primarily residential district that allows supportive commercial uses
such as consumer retail, service uses and small scale office. Maximum heights,
setbacks, parking and open space requirements determine building size. This
zoning change occurred during the planning process. It is one example of how
the transit investment resulted in immediate reinvestment interest in the station
area.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
0.25 Miles
1
Louisiana Pearl
Station
Zoning
Zone District
| R-1
| R-2
| B-1
| B-2
] B-4
| R-MU-20
| R-MU-30
| T-MU-30
P-1
I
%
J1/4 Mile Radius
of Louisiana Station
MaD Date: 5/3/07
Page 1 7


MOBILITY
Within the station area, there are many circulation choices. The following is an
overview of these opportunities. Refer to the Existing Mobility Map and Street
Classification Map on pages 23 and 24.
Light Rail Transit
The Louisiana-Pearl Station is a neighborhood serving station on the Southeast
Light Rail line. The 2006 Southeast Corridor Service Plan, prepared by RTD,
projects that by 2010 weekday activity on the Southeast Light Rail Corridor will
reach 43,300 riders. Of that total, 1,500 riders (3.4%) are projected to use the
Louisiana-Pearl Station.
The station includes a below grade platform that is 370 feet long and 30 feet
wide. Elevators and stairs access the platform at the intersection of Buchtel
Boulevard South and Louisiana Avenue. The northbound and southbound light
rail tracks run between the station platforms. There is a plaza area for public
gathering and is an amenity for the neighborhood.
To support the walk-up nature of the station, the Louisiana Avenue/l-25 overpass
includes pullouts for bus and passenger use, new pedestrian lighting, sidewalks,
bike lockers and bike racks. The streets at the station have new pedestrian
crossing striping and intersection signalization. These improvements enhance the
station's pedestrian and bike access.
Bus Routes
Three bus routes serve the station area. Bus Route # 12 runs along South Downing
Street, Louisiana Avenue, and South Pearl Street. Route #12 is a heavily used
route for Platt Park and West Washington Park residents because of its direct
connection to downtown. Bus Route #11 runs along Louisiana Avenue. Bus Route
#79 runs along Buchtel Boulevard North and South Logan Street with a loop by
Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
The station platform is below grade and
offers a canopy and seating for transit
Three bus routes serve the Louisiana-
Pearl light rail station. Improvements
and new facilities at the bridge over
1-25 were part of T-REX.
Page 18


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
the station. These route changes provide better service to the transit station for
the neighborhood.
Pedestrian Access
There are sidewalks along every street within the planning area. Bridge
improvements, made as part of T-REX, include wide sidewalks and pedestrian
lighting on all the bridges over 1-25 along South Logan Street, South Washington
Street, Louisiana Avenue, and South Emerson Street. The Louisiana-Pearl Station
plaza creates a wonderful place for neighborhood gathering near the station. In
addition, there are striped and signalized crosswalks with accessible ramps. The
grid street pattern coupled with the complete sidewalk system provides
pedestrian access throughout the planning area.
The new plaza at the station creates a
welcoming pedestrian environment.
Bike Routes
There are three bike routes within or near the planning area. Bike route D-9 runs
along South Logan Street, D-18 runs along Iowa Avenue then links up to Buchtel
Boulevard South at South Franklin Street, and D-l 1 runs along Franklin and feeds
into Washington Park. The primary streets in the planning area are wide enough
to accommodate on-street bicycles. Plowever, there is no designated on-street
bike route running by the transit station.
Street Classification and Typologies
Street classifications and typologies identify the function and character of streets.
First, the conventional street functional classification encompasses a street's
design and travel characteristics. This classification forms a hierarchy of streets
ranging from those for travel mobility (arterials) to those for access to property
(local streets). Second, Blueprint Denver defines streets by relating them to the
adjacent land use and their function for pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit.
Beyond these main methods, the Pedestrian Master Plan and the Parks and
Recreation Game Plan also assign typologies to streets. The following is a list of
the key streets in the planning area and their overlapping classifications:
Page 19


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Interstate-25. 1-25 is a federal highway that runs north/south through the state.
Blueprint Denver designates 1-25 as an Arterial. The highway carries local,
statewide and regional traffic at high volumes. T-REX included a number of
highway improvements between Broadway and south of the city boundary.
Improvements assist in lessoning congestion on the highway and at
interchanges. Convenient access to 1-25 is an asset to the neighborhoods,
providing a direct link to the region. Within the planning area, access ramps to
1-25 are at South Washington Street along Buchtel Boulevard North and South.
South Logan Street. This street classification is Arterial and provides access to
destinations outside of the neighborhood. Blueprint Denver identifies this
street as a Residential Arterial and emphasizes neighborhood character. The
Pedestrian Master Plan and Parks and Recreation Game Plan designate South
Logan Street as a Green Street, reinforcing its role in neighborhood character
and identifying a need for landscape and pedestrian enhancements.
Louisiana Avenue. Its street classification is Collector and links local traffic to
arterials. Blueprint Denver identifies this street as a Residential Collector, which
indicates it will handle more traffic than a local street, but there is an important
emphasis on neighborhood character. The Pedestrian Master Plan and Parks
and Recreation Game Plan designate Louisiana Avenue as a Green Street
further reinforcing the street's role in establishing the neighborhood character
and its need for landscape and pedestrian enhancements.
Buchtel Boulevard South. Buchtel Boulevard South is a Collector and
designated in Blueprint Denver as a Mixed-Use Collector, in terms of land use.
The Mixed-Use typology emphasizes a variety of travel choices supported by a
healthy mix of land uses. Buchtel Boulevard South is a Green Street and is a
designated Parkway between South Clarkson Street and South Colorado
Boulevard. These designations entail special attention to landscaping, green
space and land uses that will activate the street in Platt Park. Additionally,
Buchtel Boulevard South connects the Louisiana-Pearl Station area
Louisiana Avenue is a Residential
Collector and a Green Street and plays
an important role in defining the
neighborhood character.
Page 20


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
neighborhoods, University Station and Colorado Station. Unfortunately, the
addition of travel lanes and limited right-of-way diminished much of the
established greenspace along the corridor within the planning area. It is not
until east of the planning area that Buchtel Boulevard South evolves into a
dynamic arrangement of multi-modal circulation and parkway design. This
plan explores opportunities for reversing this condition.
Buchtel Boulevard North. Buchtel Boulevard North is a Collector and has no
other designation in the Pedestrian Master Plan or Parks and Recreation Game
Plan. The street extends from South Logan to South Downing, thereby
collecting traffic only from the West Washington Park neighborhood.
While the street is a Mixed-Use Collector in Blueprint Denver, the true
characteristics of this street are more consistent with a Residential Collector.
Buchtel Boulevard North is characterized by primarily single family residential
uses with only a few incidences of neighborhood scale retail and office. These
land uses generate low volumes of traffic and minimal on-site activity
compatible with the neighborhood. One cannot travel the roadway and gain
access further east or west of the neighborhood.
South Washington Street and South Emerson Street. Presently, both streets are
Collectors and assigned the Residential Collector typology in Blueprint Denver
north of 1-25. West Washington Park is pursuing the feasibility of converting of
these streets from one-way to two-way. South of 1-25 they are local streets.
The streets do not have a designation from the Pedestrian Master Plan or Parks
and Recreation Game Plan.
South Pearl Street and all others. All other streets function as local streets
providing immediate access to private property. They support the street
hierarchy by evenly dispersing local traffic within the neighborhood.
Page 21


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Si H i H-H" Light Rail
Louisiana Pearl
Station
Existing Mobility
3 Bus Routes
Bike Routes
1/4 Mile Radius
of Louisiana Station
Map Date: 5/3/07
Page 22


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Louisiana Pearl
Station
Existing
Street
Classification
1/2 Mile Radius
of Louisiana Station
Street Class
ARTERIAL
---COLLECTOR
---- LOCAL
Map Date: 5/3/07
Page 23


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Parking
Access to the Louisiana-Pearl station is by walking, biking,
passenger drop-off or bus. As such, there are no, and should be
no, dedicated parking facilities for transit users. Some of the
businesses in the area provide their own on-site parking. On-street
parking accommodates the remainder of the parking demand in
the planning area. A capacity assessment of on-street parking
supply within a quarter-mile walking distance of the station was
completed. The study was on a typical day for a few hours in the
morning and a few hours in the evening. The study suggests that in
the morning hours, there was a relatively stable supply of available
on-street parking spaces. In the evening, there is more competition
for parking spaces between residents and businesses.
While this snap shot data was informative, there was substantially
more interest and discussion about future parking supply impacts
upon station opening. In response, the City and County of Denver
Public Works Department implemented a Parking Management
Plan. The plan addresses potential neighborhood impacts from
transit-related parking demand. The full impact of the new
restrictions will require evaluation over time. The accompanying
image illustrates existing parking restrictions.
Louisiana-Pearl Station
Parking Restrictions
Legend
---- 1 hour parking
----- 2 hour parking
Passenger loading only
No Parking
Va Mile Planning Area
Page 24


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
PLAN VISION
The Louisiana-Pearl Station is a walk-up light rail transit station with easy
pedestrian access and designated passenger drop-off and pick-up areas. It is
embedded in a stable neighborhood that offers primarily single family housing.
Consistent with the principles of the Urban Neighborhood TOD Typology, near the
platform there is a vibrant mix of additional housing options, shopping, dining,
employment and public gathering areas.
Station Platform Area: The immediate station platform area is inviting and
comfortable. The transit plaza draws riders to the station while providing a
neighborhood gathering space made attractive with landscaping, art and
appropriate lighting.
The vision for the station area includes an
active business district that serves the
neighborhood.
Access: Multiple transportation choices will continue, providing access and
opportunities for travel by foot, bicycle, light rail, bus or car. There is special
emphasis and enhancement to pedestrian-friendly and convenient access to
the light rail station. Parking supplies balance business and resident needs.
Mobility: Sidewalks provide easy access to and from the station by foot. Bike
routes offer safe routes to the station and bicycle facilities provide convenient
storage. Streetscape improvements create a pleasant environment.
Reinvestment: Mixed uses and buildings respect the scale and character of the
neighborhood with the greatest concentration of reinvestment occurring at
Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel Boulevard South. Development provides
pedestrian friendly, ground-floor uses offering goods and services to residents,
workers, transit riders and visitors. There are new and diverse housing
opportunities and employment for residents to live close to work, services and
transit.
Page 25


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Design: Building design is contextual and respects the character of the
surrounding older, established neighborhoods in building orientation, massing,
scale and quality of materials. Dominant front entries promote pedestrian
access and connections at the street. There is an increase in sustainable
design practices in accordance with Greenprint Denver.
Housing: The stable, neighborhoods of Platt Park and West Washington Park will
maintain their predominantly single family housing, tree-lined streets, sidewalks,
and front yards and engaged entries. Housing reinvestment will maintain the
unique neighborhood character, the long-standing tradition of high quality
construction and materials and support goals of environmentally responsible
design.
Page 26


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Continued reinvestment in the existing
housing stock is necessary to maintain
the neighborhood character illustrated in
this picture of West Washington Park..
FRAMEWORK PLAN
INTRODUCTION
The Framework Plan seeks to carry forward the vision for the station area. It
accomplishes this by articulating detailed goals and recommendations. There
are four main subject areas for these ideas. The Land Use Concept guides land
use and development intensity. Urban Design directs the main elements of
building form, orientation, and character. Mobility addresses further
improvements to multi-modal access within the station area. Finally, Parking
provides techniques for handling parking demands in the neighborhoods.
LAND USE CONCEPT
The land use concept articulates the geographic land use pattern envisioned for
the planning area. Different land use categories distinguish land within the
planning area that requires different recommendations and strategies. Also
included is a discussion of the primary issues and opportunities for the land use
concept. Finally, there are goals and recommendations that guide decision-
making as it relates to land use in the station area.
Committed and Reinvestment Areas of Stability
The entire planning area is an Area of Stability, per Blueprint Denver. The goal for
Areas of Stability is to identify and maintain character of an area while
accommodating some change. Blueprint Denver further explains that Areas of
Stability belong predominantly to one of the following two categories:
Committed Areas and Reinvestment Areas. This station area plan delineates
committed areas and reinvestment areas (see accompanying graphic). While
both areas have specific entitlements based on zoning, the plan establishes these
Page 27


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
two different areas in order to direct the most significant change, if it occurs, to
the established development pattern to reinvestment areas.
Committed Areas. Committed areas are stable and benefit from reinvestment in
the housing stock and some new housing development. Committed areas
coincide with residential zone districts (R-l and R-2). The established land use and
building pattern of this area is important to maintain. As indicated on the existing
land use map, homes are predominantly single family in Platt Park and West
Washington Park.
Homes have prominent front porches, entries and high quality construction. The
public realm is comfortable and walkable with narrow streets, on-street parking,
alleys, rear access detached garages, sidewalks, tree lawns and street trees. The
neighborhoods also include wonderful amenities including parks, churches,
schools, bus routes and now light rail access. Collectively, these details create
two desirable neighborhoods and an important component in Denver's success.
Like many Denver neighborhoods, current regulations for these areas need
improved alignment with the existing and desired development pattern. The R-
1 areas found in Platt Park and West Washington Park are compatible and protect
single family use. However, bulk and massing requirements for R-l and R-2 do not
foster predictable development with simple, easy-to-understand regulations. In
addition, the development capacity of the R-2 (two-family versus multiple family)
may be too intense in some areas of the planning area in comparison to the
existing and desired development pattern. For example, West Washington Park
seeks to preserve the predominant single family housing stock in R-l areas and
continue the pattern of predominantly single family homes with some duplexes in
R-2 areas of their neighborhood.
Better tools that speak to these elements will maintain this character and
improvements to the existing housing stock can continue in a manner that
protects the investment of homeowners and the neighborhood character.
Committed Area
f ^4 1/4 Mile Radius
^ ^9 of Louisiana Station
Page 28


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Reinvestment Areas. Reinvestment areas have a character that is desirable to
maintain but may benefit from a greater level of reinvestment than committed
areas. Reinvestment areas were determined based on the existing business
zoning and the additional capacity for development in those areas. In addition,
these sites have good access to collector and arterial routes and the station area.
In the coming years, these areas should support limited and targeted investment.
The new mixed-use building at the corner of Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel
Boulevard South is an example of how reinvestment areas have begun to
experience redevelopment. Challenges to reinvestment include the transition
between committed areas, adequate neighborhood services and
redevelopment of underutilized sites.
The successful Old South Pearl Business District along S. Pearl Street (in the
southwest edge of the planning area) is a reinvestment area because it will
continue to evolve and improve. Since the majority of this business district is
located outside of the station area, this plan does not address specific strategies
for this area. This business association should continue to work with the
neighborhood to balance opportunities for reinvestments and compatibility with
adjoining residential uses.
New housing such as these fownhouses
found in Stapleton is an ideal transition
between the Urban Neighborhood Station
area and the neighborhoods.
The Reinvestment Areas Land Use Concept creates two sub-areas for business
properties closest to the station. These sub-areas provide specific direction on the
land use and character for the reinvestment areas.
Urban Neighborhood Station. The Urban Neighborhood Station area
includes the business district immediately adjacent to the station. The main
frontage streets include South Pearl Street, Louisiana Avenue, South
Washington Street, and Buchtel Boulevard South. The Urban Neighborhood
Station is currently zoned B-4 and offers a mix of commercial businesses. A
new mixed-use development has ground floor retail and upper story
residential units. Over the long term, redevelopment can occur that will
add housing and businesses in close proximity to the station. This is where a
greater level of intensity should occur compared to the Transition area.
Page 29


Development must promote active ground floor uses and a pedestrian-
friendly environment. It must also respect the scale, context and unique
character of the area through techniques such as lower building heights
adjoining residential districts.
Urban Neighborhood Station Transition. The Urban Neighborhood Station
Transition area, the majority of which is in Platt Park, is along Buchtel
Boulevard North and South. These boundaries generally coincide with
existing business zoning. This area is within a few blocks of the station and
includes established businesses. The street grid and residential parcels
separate most sites from each other. There is a more consistent business
corridor along Buchtel Boulevard South compared to along Buchtel
Boulevard North. Over the long term, reinvestment may occur adding
additional housing and neighborhood serving retail, service and office uses.
Nevertheless, it must be at a scale that is compatible with the adjoining
committed areas. Development must respect the boundaries of this area.
Treatment of the edges must be sensitive to adjoining residential areas,
particularly when adjoining properties are single family homes.
Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
The Urban Neighborhood Station area
has the greatest potential for
redevelopment. This is a photograph of
an example of the type of building
appropriate in this area.
Page 30


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Louisiana Pearl
Station
Reinvestment Area
Land Use Concept
Land Use
Urban Neighborhood
Station Transition
Urban Neighborhood
Station
? 1/4 Mile Radius
of Louisiana Station
Map Date; 8/3/07
Page 31


Land Use Primary Issues and Opportunities
This plan addresses goals, recommendations and implementation strategies for
the reinvestment areas. In order to develop these, it is important to understand
the primary issues and opportunities of this area. A summary is below:
Established Businesses. The reinvestment area offers a number of extremely
successful businesses that include a mix of office, art/design studios, charming
shops, popular restaurants and a grocery store. Most are owned/operated by
local merchants. These established businesses and their local roots are
paramount to the continued success and quality of the neighborhood.
Many of the merchants belong to the Old South Pearl Street Association (OSPSA).
OSPSA is a merchants' association that is involved in business revitalization and
marketing efforts such as special events, lighting and landscaping. The
organization is an excellent model and resource.
Value-Added Development and Reinvestment Potential. Opportunities to
increase the activity and add value to the transit system investment are
important. Reinvestment can provide additional services conveniently located
for the neighborhood. Reinvestment can also provide an opportunity for residents
to live near the station and reduce household transportation expenditures. In
addition, increased convenience allows more time devoted to family and friends
rather than commuting. For example, riders can stop for coffee, pick up dry-
cleaning or meet for dinner near the station. Finally, employers and retail benefit
from enhanced foot traffic, exposure and access.
Louisiana-Pearl Station Typology. In accordance with the Transit Oriented
Development Strategic Plan, the Louisiana-Pearl Station typology is Urban
Neighborhood. As an Urban Neighborhood station, access is primarily by
pedestrians living and working in the adjoining neighborhoods, or by passenger
Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Sites closest to the station, like these on S.
Pearl Street, present the greatest
opportunities for value-added
reinvestment.
Page 32


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
drop-off from the bus or autos. A mix of housing and neighborhood serving retail
and offices characterize development in Urban Neighborhood station area.
Market Trends. As part of the citywide transit planning efforts, there exists a Transit
Oriented Development Economic Analysis and Market Study. This analysis covers
national, regional and transit station market trends. While the study did not
specifically analyze the Louisiana-Pearl Station, many of the national and regional
trends are helpful indicators that reinforce assumptions about reinvestment
potential in the Urban Neighborhood Station area. These are relevant findings:
There is particular interest in office along the Southeast light rail corridor as
indicated by positive absorption trends, declining vacancy rates, increasing
rental rates and employer interest in locating near transit.
Demographic and economic forces in the Denver region are fueling interest in
living near transit as evidenced by growth of households more likely to live
near transit (e.g. empty-nesters, young professionals and working families) and
rising energy costs.
Household growth subsequently fuels retail growth as demonstrated by positive
absorption rates and increased rents.
There is an increased market interest in sites with smaller markets, access and
visibility, connectivity to residential areas, access to regional attractions and
existing retail clusters.
Housing supply at station. The reinvestment area currently provides a limited
supply of residential units. Housing is an integral part of the mix of uses in a station
area and more residences are important in strategic locations that respect the
neighborhood character and quality of life. Residents and the activity that results
from healthy neighborhoods provide eyes on the street that increase natural
surveillance and the sense of safety. Therefore, additional opportunities for
housing in the reinvestment area (the Urban Neighborhood Station area in
particular) are important.
Page 33


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Station Area Zoning and Development Predictability. As depicted on the zoning
map on page 20, most Urban Neighborhood Station properties are zoned B-4.
The B-4 zoning possesses many well-documented shortcomings. These problems
do not support the vision of Blueprint Denver (and this Plan) to create pedestrian-
friendly uses and site design that is compatible with transit-oriented development.
Some of the shortcomings of B-4 zoning include:
Many non-residential land uses (commercial and industrial) are allowable
without prevention or minimization of external effects to adjoining residential
properties.
B-4 does not allow residential uses appropriate near a transit station such as
live/work units and artist studios.
There is no incentive to mix land uses.
Development standards in the B-4 zone fall short of furthering pedestrian-
friendly uses and site design. Specifically, there is no build-to line, which
means that buildings may be set back from the street and not oriented to
pedestrians.
Parking is permitted between structures and the sidewalk.
B-4 permits private parking lots, contrary to the goals of the walk-up station.
There are no open space requirements for residential land uses.
There is no maximum height for the district. However, in this location the
Washington Park view plane and the bulk plane along R-l and R-2 zoned sites
create height limitations. All of these factors vary based on size, location and
proposed land use, thereby creating a very unpredictable situation and in
many cases underutilized sites.
This lack of predictability increases risk for developers and uncertainty for
nearby residents.
The current urban form with many open
spaces along the street front is a result of
the inconsistency of B-4 zoning.
Zoning Mixture of Urban Neighborhood Station Transition. The Urban
Neighborhood Station Transition area includes a zoning mix of B-l, B-2, B-4, P-1
and R-MU-30 (with waivers). The B-l and B-2 districts are valuable to the
neighborhoods and the B-4 zoning district is far more problematic. However,
Page 34


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
collectively this mixture does not support a land use and development pattern
that coincides with the vision of the Urban Neighborhood Station Transition area.
Examples of impacts from the current zoning mixture include:
Varying or lacking building height requirements.
Inconsistent setbacks resulting in inconsistent building and parking placement.
Varying floor-area-ratio requirements.
Some allowable uses are not appropriate adjoining residential.
With the exception of B-l, it lacks predictability and creates uncertainty for the
neighborhoods and diminishes its role as a transition area.
With the exception of B-l, a lack of appropriate tools to transition between
these districts and adjoining residential districts.
Land use goals promote neighborhood
scale, pedestrian-oriented uses near the
station such as this neighborhood business
district in Uptown Denver
Gates Redevelopment. Redevelopment of the Gates factory is a significant
opportunity for the Broadway Station area. This development can serve as a
receiving area for more intense development and will assist in alleviating
development pressure at the Louisiana-Pearl Station. This will help ensure that
reinvestment at Louisiana-Pearl will continue to respect the committed areas of
Platt Park and West Washington Park.
Land Use Goals
Goal 1: Focus Reinvestment at the Transit Station
Encourage pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use development closest to the station
area to create a defined neighborhood center and opportunities to live, work,
and play near the station.
Goal 2: Station Area Transition
Maintain a buffer of smaller scale, neighborhood serving land uses between the
station and stable neighborhoods.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Goal 3: Neighborhood Character Stability
Respect the stable single family neighborhood fabric and pattern of
development in terms of density, quality, scale, landscape, open space and
safety for residents.
Land Use Recommendations
Recommendation 1: Urban Neighborhood Station. Provide active, pedestrian-
oriented uses on the ground floor of buildings in the Urban Neighborhood
Station area that compliment existing neighborhood businesses. These uses
could include small grocers, pharmacies, dry cleaners, florists, bookstores, gift
shops, professional studios, service and repair, restaurants, banks, and
childcare facilities. Vertical mixed use is encouraged that includes office and
residential uses. Private surface parking is not a land use that supports the
vision for the Urban Neighborhood Station area.
Recommendation 2: Urban Neighborhood Station Transition. Improve the
predictably of the land use mixture and scale in the Urban Neighborhood
Station Transition area. Appropriate vertical and horizontal land use mixtures
include residential, office, medical uses, and neighborhood serving retail and
services. Desired intensities, but not necessarily land uses, are most compatible
with the existing B-l and B-2 zoning categories to create a necessary land use
transition to single family and other residential uses in Platt Park and West
Washington Park. Private surface parking is not a land use that supports the
vision for the Urban Neighborhood Station Transition area.
Special consideration should be given to sites that abut single family residential
uses in terms of appropriate use, intensity and design. For example, this is
particularly important along Buchtel Boulevard North where Transition sites
adjoin residential zoning on multiple sides. Another example is in Platt Park at
Arizona Avenue and S. Clarkson Street. It is ideal to create one zoning district
____________- -______i. _______ ___
Land Use Recommendations:
Active, pedestrian uses near the station
Transition area between the station and
residential areas
Neighborhood serving employment and
services
Diverse housing options near the station
Page 36


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Committed areas require better tools to
protect the predominant single family
housing stock in Platt Park and West
Washington Park
for the Urban Neighborhood Station Transition. However, special
circumstances (such as variations between areas north and south of 1-25) will
likely warrant multiple techniques.
Recommendation 3: Committed Areas. Create predictable, easy-to-
understand regulations aligned with the current neighborhood development
pattern. Areas zoned R-l offer a solid foundation to protect the single family
housing pattern and needs to remain. However, both residential districts need
improvement to align with the desired density, building types, proportion,
coverage, form and size of the neighborhoods.
Recommendation 4: Employment and Services. Provide employment and
service opportunities within the Urban Neighborhood Station and Urban
Neighborhood Station Transition areas with convenient access for residents
and transit riders.
Recommendation 5: Compact, Diverse Housing Opportunities. Provide some
new housing opportunities (e.g. townhouses, lofts live/work units) at an
appropriate intensity. Locate in suitable areas of the Urban Neighborhood
Station and Urban Neighborhood Station Transition.
Page 37


URBAN DESIGN
Urban Design Primary Issues and Opportunities
Placemaking. While land use mixture is an important foundation to any
neighborhood and station area, the experience is what truly defines its success
and quality. Placemaking is what compels people to drive less often, walk more,
and interact with their neighborhood. In order to succeed, a neighborhood and
station area needs to be safe, stimulating and attractive. Additionally, it must
offer opportunities for gathering and be easily accessible.
Currently, some sites in the station area have varying locations of buildings,
landscaping and parking. This condition creates an inconsistent street presence
and dominance of off-street parking. The eclectic mix of design styles and
heights contributes to the area's charm. In some instances, it does not support
the placemaking of the station area.
Design & Development Standards. Existing zoning for reinvestment areas do not
provide sufficient design and development standards. Additionally, it does not
encourage mixed-use development or enhancements to the pedestrian
experience. Parking is often between buildings and streets, and excessive curb
cuts interrupt the pedestrian realm.
Streetscape. Streets provide the best opportunity for the neighborhood to create
significant places for people to move and interact. It is even more important in
this small neighborhood station setting. T-REX included excellent improvements
immediately near the station with a new plaza area, pedestrian crossings, wider
sidewalks and decorative street lighting. Unfortunately, the adjacent business
areas lack streetscape improvements to carry this new aesthetic into the
neighborhood.
Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Placemaking is important at the station
to create an experience such as this
plaza in Portland, Oregon
The current streetscape along S. Pearl
Street lacks character and appeal.
Page 38


Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
A complete streetscape environment consisting of curb lawns, street trees, wide
sidewalks, pedestrian lighting, and other amenities have a number of benefits.
Creates a desirable experience that entices pedestrians to stroll along the
street, walk further distances without driving and interact with their
neighborhood
Increases business revenue through longer customer visits
Promotes a feeling of safety and comfort for residents and visitors.
Reduces traffic speeds because it alerts the driver of an active pedestrian
area and triggers the need to drive cautiously.
Building Mass and Scale. As change occurs to the physical environment of the
station area, it will take adjustment because it will look and feel different from the
current mass and scale. In addition, many developers will want to maximize
density and mass at the station area. Many techniques break-up or minimize the
mass and scale of larger structures so they blend into the neighborhood and add
value to the neighborhood and station area. These techniques not only benefit
the neighborhood but also provide long-term benefits to the developer because
these details become key selling points for a project.
Urban Design Goals
Goal 1: Pedestrian Scale
Establish distinct design areas that create timeless and beautiful places for the
neighborhood at a human scale that encourages comfort, pedestrian activity
and a sense of place.
Goal 2: Design Quality
Ensure that building and site design reflect the scale, active environment and
construction quality of the established neighborhood.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Urban Design Recommendations
Recommendation 1: Specific Design Recommendations for Urban
Neighborhood Station and Urban Neighborhood Station Transition Areas.
Support different urban design characteristics for the two reinvestment sub-
areas of Urban Neighborhood Station and Urban Neighborhood Station
Transition as it relates to development pattern, building height, building scale,
street character and off-street parking.
Urban Neighborhood Station Urban Neighborhood Station Transition
Development Pattern Variable, compact, dense highest intensity focused around the station platform Variable, less compact than the Urban Neighborhood Station
Building Height Buildings 1-5 stories; use stepbacks to properly transition building heights adjoining residential districts. Bulk plane and Washington Park Viewplane requirements apply. Buildings 1-3 stories; compatible with B- 1 /B-2 zoning, respectively. Bulk plane and Washington Park Viewplane requirements apply.
Building Scale 70-100% lot coverage 30-80% lot coverage, compatible with B-l/B-2 zoning, respectively
Features Functional courtyards, porches, stoops, balconies, sidewalk cafes Functional front yards, courtyards, porches, stoops, balconies
Street Character Wide (16 feet) attached sidewalks with street trees in grates and pedestrian amenities such as lighting, benches, outdoor eating places and seating, trash cans, and bike racks. Existing constraints, such as existing buildings or lack of ROW, may warrant a narrower 13 ft width. Street trees, curb lawns (8 feet), detached sidewalks (5 feet) In cases where businesses face the neighborhood, some building setback from the sidewalk is appropriate to create greater separation.
Off-Street Parking In garages, below grade, or parking spaces accessed from alleys In garages, below grade or parking spaces accessed from alleys. Above ground parking for the buildings north of 1-25 should be sited along Buchtel Boulevard North.
This view exemplifies many of fhe
Urban Design Goals by creafing a
vibranf and appropriafely-scaled
environmenf for fhe sfafion area.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Create human-scale buildings and
avoid monolithic lines through:
Massing
Scale
Spacing
Variation in materials and details
Upper story step backs
Active ground floor uses
Prominent front entries
Recommendation 2: General Design Recommendations for Urban
Neighborhood Station and Urban Neighborhood Station Transition Areas.
Create a built environment that offers a consistent design theme relating to
massing and form, pedestrian scale, landscape and open space, parking,
signs, lighting and sustainability.
a. Massing and Form:
(1) Arrange residential, employment, retail, service and open space uses to
be convenient to and compatible with each other and to minimize
impact on surrounding residential areas.
(2) Provide architecturally finished and detailed elevations to create
interesting traditionally-informed buildings, visually minimize the mass of a
building and avoid monolithic lines.
(3) Provide a primary building entrance facing or clearly visible from the
public sidewalk. Secondary entrances are possible from parking areas or
side streets. The main focal streets in the Urban Neighborhood Station
areas are Louisiana Avenue and South Pearl Street with Buchtel Boulevard
South and South Washington Street as secondary streets.
(4) Relate the perceived form, quantity or aggregate volumes of new
construction to the form of traditional development patterns.
b. Pedestrian Scale: Promote pedestrian activity and a neighborhood of inviting
experiences that is respectful of the surrounding residential areas:
(1) Orient buildings to form a consistent street wall; orient structures on corner
lots to hold the corner.
(2) Establish appropriate standards for the street edge created by residential
structures.
(3) Relate the intervals, rhythm and order of new construction to traditional
development patterns.
(4) Step-back upper stories of taller buildings to preserve pedestrian scale.
The step-back will also create a transition into the neighborhood.
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(5) Provide pedestrian active uses on the first floor, directly accessible from
public space.
(6) Use higher proportions of first floor fenestration (transparency) permit
views of interior activities.
(7) Promote use of design features such as functional stoops, patios, porches
and balconies on the street facing facades of residential buildings to
promote informal opportunities for community interaction.
c. Landscape and Open Space: Incorporate landscaping and small open
spaces to add depth and soften the hard edges of a building. Shared
outdoor spaces may include active sidewalk cafes or passive seating areas.
Link these spaces directly to the streets and the streetscape. These
improvements will contribute to increasing tree canopy and open space goals
of the Game Plan and Greenprint Denver.
d. Parking:
(1) Provide screening when abutting the street or residential zone district
through landscaping and/or a decorative wall or fence.
(2) Provide parking that is designed to minimize the impact on the pedestrian
realm and residential areas.
(3) Locate parking at the rear of the site, or below grade, away from the street
and residential areas, and utilizing the alley for access and circulation.
(4) Promote opportunities to increase on-street parking supply to alleviate
impacts on the neighborhood. Techniques to consider include driveway
closures and angled parking.
e. Signs: Ensure that signs enhance the character of the neighborhood through:
(1) Appropriate scale, color, material and lighting levels.
(2) Creativity such as two and three dimension forms and iconographic
representation.
Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Orient entrances at the street, use durable
materials and incorporate landscaping to
soften hard edges. This is an example of
great neighborhood streetscape in Platt
Park.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
The leaves and pedestrian plaza at the
station are an excellent foundation for
open space at the Louisiana-Pearl station
(3) Use of high quality, durable materials.
(4) Limiting off-premise, outdoor advertising to the below-grade platform
area.
(5) Kiosks and other signage (other than wayfinding) should be limited to the
Urban Neighborhood Station area and should not be near residential^
zoned properties.
f. Lighting: Use lighting that is compatible with adjoining residential and fully
shielded. Limit building lighting to only decorative styles and strictly limit sign
illumination when facing residential districts.
g. Sustainability: In accordance with Greenprint Denver, encourage use of
green building practices and LEED certification.
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MOBILITY
Mobility Primary Issues and Opportunities
Complete Streets. T-REX improvements within the station area included
installation of the Southeast Light Rail Corridor and improvements to 1-25 and the
overpasses. Station specific improvements included construction of vehicle and
bus pullouts, bike racks and lockers, wider sidewalks on the bridges and new
crosswalk striping. These projects contribute to a multi-modal, or complete
street network for the neighborhood in accordance with Plan 2000, Blueprint
Denver and Greenprint Denver. The Mobility section of the plan seeks to address
challenges, opportunities and improvements to mobility choice.
Pedestrian Environment. Existing conditions listed below do not create a desirable
pedestrian experience. As a result, people might be more inclined to drive to
destinations within the station area instead of walking.
Underutilized properties create gaps and inconsistencies along the street front.
Limited pedestrian amenities degrade the feeling of comfort.
Limited active businesses inhibit opportunities for outdoor gathering, seating,
window shopping, etc.
Multiple curb cuts and lack of access control increase points of contact
between vehicles and pedestrians and increase potential for conflicts.
Some intersection corners do not accommodate ADA accessibility or strollers.
Bike Facilities. The streets within the station area provide adequate width for
mixed vehicle and bike traffic. The Bicycle Master Plan specifically calls for direct
bike route connections to all transit stations. However, there is currently no route
planned along Louisiana Avenue to connect bicyclists between the existing
system and the station.
Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Complete streets allow bikes, people
and cars to co-exist, like this example in
Washington Park
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
There is bike storage immediately near the station platform to serve transit riders.
However, there is a future demand for additional bicycle facilities within the
Urban Neighborhood Station to serve employees and visitors. Without these bike
facilities bicyclists will be less inclined to choose this mode of transportation.
Buchtel Boulevard North. As noted in the Existing Conditions section of this report,
the residential character of Buchtel Boulevard North is not consistent with the
Blueprint Denver designation of Mixed-Use Collector. This designation implies
greater development potential than is possible or consistent with the land use
recommendations of this plan.
The current Louisiana Avenue and South
Pearl Street intersection is not pedestrian-
friendly.
Louisiana Avenue Intersection at South Pearl Street: The Reinvestment Area Land
Use Concept contemplates the four corners of Louisiana Avenue and South Pearl
Street to become a pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use area for the neighborhood.
To accomplish this, pedestrians must be able to access buildings and uses on
either side of the street easily and safely. The intersection is stop sign controlled
for South Pearl Street so traffic does not stop on Louisiana Ave at this intersection.
Louisiana Avenue is a busy street, which often results in long waits before traffic
clears for pedestrian crossing. Since there is no stop sign or traffic signal for
Louisiana Avenue, there is no painted crosswalk for pedestrians. If a marked
crosswalk were in place, it could enhance awareness of pedestrians crossing in
this area. In addition, the curb-to-curb crossing distance on Louisiana Avenue is
wider than desirable and does not contribute to slower traffic speeds. These
existing conditions combine to create a non-friendly pedestrian environment for
the Urban Neighborhood Station area.
Louisiana Avenue Intersection at Buchtel Boulevard South. This is a signalized
intersection re-aligned as part of T-REX. The angle of Buchtel Boulevard South
creates a non-typical intersection alignment and merging of multiple lanes
including a highway exit ramp. Drivers and pedestrians have to be very alert in
order to avoid conflicts. Public Works recently completed additional corrective
action to provide a painted crosswalk and curb ramp for pedestrian crossing on
the west leg of the intersection. This provides an additional pedestrian crossing
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
opportunity. Because of the angle, vehicles turning left onto Louisiana Avenue
from Buchtel Boulevard South do not have ideal site distance for pedestrians and
it is difficult for pedestrians to recognize if vehicles are turning left (onto Louisiana
Avenue) or continuing straight (on Buchtel Boulevard South). This condition
increases potential for pedestrian/vehicle conflicts and impedes the pedestrian
friendliness of this crucial intersection at the station.
Buchtel Boulevard South. Within the planning area, the current character of
Buchtel Boulevard South is not compatible with its Parkway and Green Street
designations. It lacks consistent landscaping and green space. In addition, a few
of the blocks have attached five-foot wide sidewalks. Its location along a busy
three-lane road, which induces higher traffic speeds, is not a pleasant experience
for pedestrians.
Mobility Goals
Goal 1: Transportation Choice
Expand transportation choices and routes in the planning area.
Goal 2: Bike and Pedestrian Friendly Station Area
Create a bike and pedestrian friendly station area that supports the walk-up
typology and provides a focal point for the neighborhood.
Goal 3: Safety and Convenience
Improve the safety and convenience of facilities for non-motorized travel and
wayfinding throughout the station area
Mobility Recommendations
The following recommendations are important in realizing the Mobility Goals.
Recommendations can be more specific than the land use and urban design
because market and demographics conditions do not influence the details. In
Key Mobility Recommendations:
Make Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel
Boulevard South complete streets
Improve vehicle operations and
pedestrian-friendliness at Louisiana
Avenue and Buchtel Boulevard
Provide enhanced pedestrian crossings
at Louisiana Avenue and South Pearl
Street
Install wide sidewalks in the Urban
Neighborhood Station area to support
the higher volumes of pedestrian traffic
Install pedestrian amenities along the
streetscape such as benches and
wayfinding signs
Incorporate additional bike storage
facilities
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
addition, as City and County of Denver right-of-way, the land is publicly
controlled and there is little reliance on private entities.
Within the planning area, replicate the
beauty and greenspace of Buchtel
Boulevard South east of South Downing
Street.
Recommendation 1: Louisiana Avenue Pedestrian Improvements. Consistent
with the Green Street designation, explore opportunities and resources to
provide enhanced pedestrian crossings on Louisiana Avenue. Public Works
recently added a striped crosswalk for pedestrians on the west leg of the
intersection with Buchtel Boulevard South. This increases opportunities for
pedestrians to cross Louisiana Avenue safely.
As a focal point for the Urban Neighborhood Station area, the intersection of
Louisiana Avenue and South Pearl Street needs additional attention to
improve pedestrian comfort, slow traffic speeds and contribute to
placemaking. Public Works has agreed to evaluate whether volumes and
operations warrant a traffic signal at this intersection. Suggested crosswalk
improvements include colored concrete or striping and bump-outs at the curb
ramps to decrease crossing distance. Other Green Street enhancements for
Louisiana Avenue include street trees and a modest landscape median.
Recommendation 2: Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel Boulevard South. As
described in Issues and Opportunities, Buchtel Boulevard South intersects with
Louisiana Avenue at an unusual angle and there are converging lanes and
exit ramps. Vehicles on Buchtel Boulevard South turning east onto Louisiana
Avenue travel at higher speeds and have limited visibility for pedestrians.
Public Works has agreed to conduct further analysis of signal operations and
other elements at this intersection in an attempt to improve pedestrian safety
on this east leg of the intersection.
Recommendation 3: The Greening of Buchtel Boulevard South. As noted in
Issues and Opportunities, T-REX degraded the greenspace along Buchtel
Boulevard South in Platt Park. As a Green Street, we must seek opportunities
to replace that character and replicate, to the extent possible, the beauty
found east of South Downing Street. This will take collaboration from different
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
entities. In the end, we can create a truly picturesque boulevard that links the
Louisiana -Pearl, University and Colorado stations and offers an invaluable
amenity for the adjoining neighborhoods.
a. As new development occurs on the south side of the street, replace existing
attached sidewalks with a curb lawn, street trees and five-foot wide
sidewalk. Planned and almost complete projects will create this condition
on the blocks between Louisiana Avenue and South Clarkson Street and
between South Emerson Street and South Ogden Street. The remaining
gaps are between South Clarkson Street and South Emerson Street and
between South Ogden Street and South Downing Street.
b. Evaluate the need for three travel lanes on Buchtel Boulevard South
between Louisiana Avenue and South Emerson Street. Reducing the travel
lanes could result in lower travel speeds on Buchtel Boulevard South, south
of Louisiana. In addition, the shorter crossing distance and slower traffic
speeds could enhance pedestrian comfort crossing the street or walking
along the street. It may also be possible to use this excess right-of-way for
additional greenspace.
Recommendation 4: Buchtel Boulevard North Street Typology. As part of the
update to Blueprint Denver, pursue changing the street typology from Mixed-
Use Collector to Residential Collector.
Recommendation 5: Bike Improvement. Providing options for travel is
important especially for a neighborhood walk-up transit station. People are
more inclined to use other modes, such as bikes, if it is convenient. The
following recommendations improve the environment for bicycles and can
increase use in the neighborhood and for access to the station.
a. Explore the potential to designate a bike route along Louisiana Avenue to
create an east-west link to the existing north/south bikes routes D-l 1 (runs
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
through Washington Park to Franklin) and D-9 (runs along Logan). A
neighborhood connector route improves east/west bike route connectivity
in the area and offers a direct bike route to the station. Route designation
options include a sign, or if there is adequate street width, a striped bike
lane on both sides of the street.
b. Explore opportunities and resources to install additional city standard
inverted U type bike racks within the Urban Neighborhood Station area.
Recommendation 6: Bus Improvements. Monitor bus route changes to ensure
they continue to service the neighborhoods and their regular travel patterns.
Recommendation 7: Pedestrian Improvements. As part of site redevelopment
or other capital investment projects, implement simple improvements that will
improve the pedestrian experience:
a. Install wider, attached sidewalks (16 feet wide) with street trees in grates in
the Urban Neighborhood Station area and other areas of high pedestrian
traffic. This may require dedication of additional right-of-way. If there are
constraints such as existing buildings, a minimum width of 13 feet may be
acceptable.
b. Maintain detached 5-foot sidewalks with an 8-foot tree lawn in the Urban
Neighborhood Station Transition area. This cross section is also appropriate
in other areas with lower levels of pedestrian activity.
c. Seek opportunities and resources to install benches, trash receptacles and
other pedestrian amenities along sidewalks near the station, bus stops and
other public gathering areas. Barrier free improvements (e.g. curb ramps)
are also essential.
d. Reduce and/or seek to eliminate driveways accessing the street through
mandated access from the alleys as redevelopment occurs.
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e. Seek opportunities and resources to install and maintain tasteful, low-
impact wayfinding signage that will direct people exiting the station to key
destinations. These destinations could include Washington Park, businesses
north of the station at South Pearl Street and Mississippi Avenue, businesses
immediately west of the station at South Pearl Street and Louisiana Avenue
and businesses south of the station at South Pearl Street and Iowa Avenue.
PARKING
Primary Issues and Opportunities
Parking Supply. While the current on-street parking supply and demand is
balanced, new development and reinvestment could create spillover into the
neighborhoods. While this cannot be completely avoided, opportunities to
increase parking supply particularly on-street are important to reduce this impact.
However, it is crucial to ensure that new parking supply does not impede the
pedestrian-friendly environment.
Parking Demand. The light rail station is conveniently located close to Downtown
and the Denver Tech Center (DTC). This creates opportunities for residents in the
neighborhood to use vehicles less. This shift in driving behavior reduces parking
demand. The close proximity of the light rail station to neighborhood business
districts creates opportunities for visitors and employers to travel by light rail as
opposed to driving their cars, also reducing parking demand.
Shared Parking. The businesses in the station area are primarily part of the Old
South Pearl Merchants Association. This is a great resource to address parking
issues collectively and capitalize on the amazing resource of the light rail station.
Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
On-sfreef parking is a valuable resource
in the neighborhood but demand should
decrease as transportation choices
increase.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Shared parking can accommodate
parking demand and blend in with
the street environment.
Parking Goals
Goal 1: Support Short Term Parking Demand
Ensure that parking demand in the short term does not affect the quality and
character of the neighborhoods and business districts.
Goal 2: Reduce Long Term Parking Demand
Strive to change long term parking behaviors and reduce parking demand within
the station area and Old South Pearl commercial district through capitalizing on
the transit system and other transportation choices such as bike and pedestrian.
Goal 3: Parking Design
Allow strategic additions to the parking supply in a manner that does not disrupt
or diminish the placemaking and pedestrian character and respect the walk-up
nature of the station.
Parking Recommendations
Recommendation 1: Monitor Parking Restrictions. Monitor parking restrictions
and patterns within the station area for an acceptable period. Consider the
relationship between existing restricted areas, businesses, transit and
neighborhood. This will assist in understanding ridership counts and assess
whether additional or less parking restrictions are necessary to implement.
Maintain consistent and frequent contact with the business association and
registered neighborhood associations on findings and recommendations.
Recommendation 2: Parking Supply and Design. Explore creative ways to
offer an appropriate level of parking supply. Examples include shared parking
opportunities for businesses and expanding the on-street parking supply
through techniques such as elimination of curb cuts. Design new off-street
parking in a manner that does not dominate the streetscape.
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY
As described in the beginning of this document, the purpose of the plan is to set
forth a vision for the planning area. Further, it sets the foundation and support for
implementation strategies such as changes to zoning, investment in infrastructure
and seeking funding sources. Like any plan, additional work needs to occur in
order to realize goals and recommendations. This implementation section
outlines the proceeding steps to achieve the recommendations of this plan.
Many of the implementation strategies implement more than one
recommendation of the plan, so the description lists all the applicable
recommendations. The list of strategies provides the top priority action items first,
followed by the remaining strategies.
TOP PRIORITY ACTON ITEMS (YEAR 1)
Strategy Description Responsibility
Implementation Focus Groups Convene focus groups of residents, property owners, business owners and other partners to pursue top priority action items. PW, CPD Potential Partners RNOs, property owners, businesses
Zoning for Urban Neighborhood Station Plan Recommendations: Land Use Recommendations #1, #4 & #5 Urban Design Recommendations #1 & #2 (a-e) Mobility Recommendation #7(a) Parking Recommendation #2 Urban Neighborhood Station needs an active mixture of business and residential uses that creates a pedestrian oriented, vibrant station area. Building heights should range from 1 to 5 stories with a height transition from residential districts to respect neighborhood character. The current B-4 zoning does not guarantee this desired vision. Form-based zoning will support this vision because it will require design elements such as buildings and entrances at the street, minimum transparency and building heights. Explore application of Main Street Zoning or a new form-based district to existing B-4 properties. Pursue this zoning map update in a comprehensive manner that considers potential for property owners, impacts to adjoining properties and plan goals and recommendations. Community Planning and Development (CPD), Planning Board (PB),City Council (CC) Potential Partners Property owners, registered neighborhood organizations (RNOs)
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Strategy Description Responsibility
Zoning for Committed Areas Plan Recommendations: Land Use Recommendations #3 Areas already zoned R-l have a strong foundation to protect the single family character of the neighborhoods. The district needs improvement in terms of its bulk and building type requirements to ensure reinvestment in the housing stock respect the current character. Both R-l and R-2 areas have less predictability in terms of use, density and building type. Establish improved zoning tools as part of the Zoning Code update to support the existing character. CPD, PB, CC Potential Partners Property owners, RNOs
As a walk-up light rail station, this planning process revealed the need for improvements to station accessibility and the pedestrian environment. Public Works has agreed to pursue a number of implementation tasks and seek funding sources in order to create a safer more pedestrian friendly station area.
Public Works Plan Recommendations: Mobility Recommendations #1, #2, #3(b) Evaluate whether volumes and operations warrant a traffic signal at the Louisiana Avenue and South Pearl Street this intersection and consider other techniques to improve pedestrian friendliness such as bulb-outs. Conduct further analysis of signal operations and other components at the Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel Boulevard South intersection in an attempt to improve pedestrian safety at the intersection. As new development occurs on the south side of the street, require replacement of existing attached sidewalks with a detached 5-foot sidewalk and tree lawn along Buchtel Boulevard South. Evaluate the need for three travel lanes on Buchtel Boulevard South between Louisiana Avenue and South Emerson Street. This could create additional land area for the green street environment. PW, CPD Potential Partners RNOs, property owners, business owners
Bike Route on Louisiana Avenue Plan Recommendations: Mobility Recommendation #5 (a-b) Update the Bicycle Master Plan to include a bike route (or neighborhood connector) along Louisiana Avenue. Once the plan is updated, allocate funding for necessary signage, bike racks and possible route striping PW,CPD
Urban Design Plan Recommendations: Urban Design Recommendation #2(f-j) Many of the Urban Design recommendations may translate to the new zoning districts for the Urban Neighborhood Station and perhaps portions of the Urban Neighborhood Station Transition areas. There are general strategies that apply for all areas such as signs, lighting, open space, parking design and landscaping. Implement these recommendations as part of the zoning code update. CPD, PB, CC Potential Partners RNOs, property owners, businesses
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
Strategy Description Responsibility
Station Development Monitoring There is baseline development data for the station area. Regular updates and analysis of this data will effectively measure the success of the transit station and implementation strategies. For example, it will be important to track changes in population, density, gross floor area of retail and office uses, parking, transit use, vehicles per household, etc. CPD Potential Partners RNOs, property owners, businesses
Parking Management Implementation and Monitoring Plan Recommendation: Parking Recommendation #1 Public Works enacted parking restrictions on most of the blocks within the quarter mile radius of the station. Public Works will monitor the parking restrictions in early 2007 when Southeast Light Rail traffic patterns begin to stabilize. Public Works will make any necessary changes to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the parking management plan. Maintain frequent and consistent contact with RNO's and businesses. Public Works (PW) Potential Partners RNOs, businesses
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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan
ADDITIONAL ACTION ITEMS (2-5 YEARS)
Task Description Responsibility
Zoning for Urban Neighborhood Station Transition Plan Recommendations: Land Use Recommendations #2, 4 & 5 Urban Design Recommendations #l&2(a- e) The Urban Neighborhood Station Transition supports a mixture of uses developed at a neighborhood and pedestrian scale and character. The current mix of zoning categories does not always create a consistent transition. Work with the Zoning Code update to improve the zoning. North of 1-25, the current location of B-2 and B-l districts is appropriate. Generally, streets separate these sites from residential zoning. As part of the code update, the intensities and uses of these districts should remain. Improve these districts to balance opportunities consistent with the plan while respecting the current character and lifestyle of the surrounding neighborhood. CPD, PB, CC Potential Partners Property owners, RNOs
Mobility Recommendations #3(a)& 7(b) Parking Recommendation #2 South of 1-25 there is a greater mixture of zoning categories. In addition, most of these sites directly abut residential districts. The lack of predictability and the zoning's inability to properly transition to abutting residential is an identified issue. Improve this zoning pattern with special emphasis on creating appropriate edges between reinvestment and committed areas, through techniques such as lower building heights.
Establish Appropriate Funding Mechanisms Plan Recommendations: Mobility Recommendations #5(b)& 7(c&e) Institute a finance mechanism to fund streetscape improvements including bike racks, benches, street trees, medians, wayfinding and other design recommendations. Possible mechanisms include maintenance and improvement districts formed by property owners. PW, CPD, Office of Economic Development (OED) Potential Partners Property owners, businesses
Parking Management District Plan Recommendations: Parking Recommendation #2 Explore formation of a parking district or other tool to implement and manage shared parking arrangements within the business districts as well as to provide a financing mechanism. This district could be in conjunction with improvement and maintenance districts. CPD, PW, CC, OED Potential Partners Property owners, businesses
Promoting use of alternative transportation Consider creative approaches to promote use of all travel modes. These can apply to residents, employees and visitors to neighborhoods and businesses. Programs could include incentives to offer the RTD Eco- Pass, informational flyers on the benefits of alternative transportation. RTD, PW, CPD, DRCOG Potential Partners Property owners, businesses, RNO's
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Full Text

PAGE 1

Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Prepared by the City and County of Denver Community Planning & Development Department

PAGE 3

Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page i Acknowledgements Mayor John Hickenlooper Denver City Council Michael B. Hancock, Council President, District 11 Rick Garcia, District 1 Jeanne Faatz, District 2 Paul Lopez, District 3 Peggy Lehmann, District 4 Marcia Johnson, District 5 Charlie Brown, District 6 Chris Nevitt, District 7 Carla Madison, District 8 Judy Montero, District 9 Jeanne Robb, District 10 Carol Boigon, At-Large Doug Linkhart, At-Large Denver Planning Board Laura Aldrete Brad Buchanan Fred Corn Richard Delanoy William Hornby Barbara Kelley, Chair Judith Martinez Bruce OÂ’Donnell Karen Perez Thomas Potter Jeffrey Walker Denver Community Planning and Development Peter J. Park, AICP, Manager Catherine Cox-Blair, AICP Principal City Planner, TOD Program Manager Caryn M. Wenzara, AICP Senior City Planner, Project Manager Chris Gleissner Eric McClelland

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page ii Denver Public Works Brian Mitchell, PE, Director of Traffic Engineering Amy Schiller, Senior City Planner Robert Kochevar, Denver FasTracks Liaison Office of Economic Development Jacky Morales-Ferrand Denver Parks and Recreation Devon Buckels Louisiana-Pearl Station Working Group Kathleen MacKenzie (Councilwoman District 7) Ashley E. Arroyo Nick Ault Jimmy Balafas Jim Carlson Julie Conner Michael Craig John Dee Roxanne Esquibel Mathew Evans Kathryn Fontaine David Foster Janis Frame Fred Hammer Joe Kanata Donna Krentz Lisa Lapp Jan Lapetino Erin Manning Edythe Mullins David P. Reusch Bill Ryan Jim Schneck Sherri Way Shelly Watters

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction................................................................................................................... ..1 Study Area..................................................................................................................... .1 Southeast Light Rail Corridor ......................................................................................2 FasTracks...................................................................................................................... ...2 Project Partners and Plan Process..............................................................................3 Purpose of the Plan.......................................................................................................4 Relationship to Other Plans and Studies....................................................................5 Existing Co nditions.......................................................................................................10 Station Area History.....................................................................................................10 Demographic Characteristics...................................................................................11 Existing Land Use..........................................................................................................12 Zoning......................................................................................................................... ...15 Mobility....................................................................................................................... ...18 Plan Vision.................................................................................................................... .25 Framework Plan............................................................................................................27 Introduction..................................................................................................................2 7 Land Use Concept......................................................................................................27 Urban Design................................................................................................................38 Mobility....................................................................................................................... ...44 Parking........................................................................................................................ ...50 Implementation Strategy.............................................................................................52 Top Priority Ac tion Items.............................................................................................52 Additional Action Items..............................................................................................55

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 1 INTRODUCTION STUDY AREA The planning area boundary is the 0.25 mile radius from the Louisiana-Pearl light rail station, located at the intersection of Loui siana Avenue and Buchtel Boulevard South. This radius is a five-minute walking distance from the station and represents the area of immediate influence. Th e northern boundary is Mississippi Avenue and t he southern boundary is Florida Avenue. The eastern boundary is South Logan Street and western boundary is South Corona Street. While typical planning for a transit station area is a 0.5 mile radius, the Louisiana-Pearl station is strictly a walkup station that does not offe r a park-n-ride. Therefore, ridership generated by the station will be riders from the neighborhood walking, biki ng, busing, or drop off. As such, the area of influ ence is smaller and aligned with the 0.25 mile (5-minute walk) radius. The planning area resi des in the charming neighborhoods of Platt Park and West Washington Park. Platt Park is south of I-25 and West Washington Park is north of I-25. These stable neighborhoods offer a variety of traditional ho using stock, neighborhood parks and schools. Rein vestment and changes in existing business types are likely in response to the success of the transit station and the desirability of the neighborhoods.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 2 SOUTHEAST LIGHT RAIL CORRIDOR The Louisiana-Pearl light rail station is on the Southeast Light Rail Corridor, which opened November 2006. The transit ext ension was part of the Transportation Expansion Project (T-REX). T-REX was a $1.67 billion venture that will transform circulation patterns of Denver Metro co mmuters along Interstates 25 and 225. TREX added nineteen miles of light rail an d improved seventeen miles of highway through southeast Denver, Aurora, Gr eenwood Village, Centennial and Lone Tree. The project is the result of a unique transit and highway collaboration between the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), the Regional Transportation District (RTD) and participating communities. FASTRACKS Also underway is FasTracks, RTD's comp rehensive plan to build-out and operate a regional rapid transit system by 2017. This system consists of commuter rail, light rail, bus rapid transit, circulator bus serv ice and park-n-ride facilities. FasTracks cost is projected at $4.7 billion to be constructed over twelve years. A combination of region-wide sales tax, fede ral funds, and local contributions will fund the expansion. Once complete, t he investment of Fa sTracks will augment RTDÂ’s ability to provide enhanced public transit access to majo r destinations in the region. FasTracks includes: o 119 miles of new light rail and commuter rail o 18 miles of bus rapid transit service o 21,000 new parking spaces at rail and bus stations o Expanded bus service Louisiana-Pearl is the northernmost station of the Southeast Light Rail Corridor. The transit corridors extend north and south beyond the boundary of this graphic.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 3 PROJECT PARTNERS AND PLAN PROCESS The planning, design, cons truction and opening of the Southeast Light Rail Corridor are a source of pride and exci tement for neighborhoods and businesses in Denver. Some elements are already in place, such as the station location and the new plaza. Opportunities for changes to land use, design and mobility exist at the Louisiana-Pearl light rail station. Over a course of approximately eighteen months, volunteers from the community wo rked together to articulate these opportunities, develop a vision and craf t strategies to achieve the vision. These volunteers formed a Working Group comprised of representatives from businesses, developers and residents in the area. The plan ning area (within Council District 7) included the Platt Pa rk, West Washington Park and University neighborhoods. In addition, the process involved collaboration between the City and County of DenverÂ’s Community Plan ning and Development Department and Public Works Department, with support from the Department of Parks and Recreation and Office of Economic Development. Regular Working Group meetings and public meetings shaped plan contents. Briefings and public hearings with City Council, Denver Planni ng Board and interagency city staff were also crucial to the process. The wo rking group engaged in this process: Task One: Identify and map existing co nditions, current and future market trends, key destinations and activity nodes Task Two: Determine str engths, weaknesses, opport unities and threats, and develop a vision statement Task Three: Conduct a parking study to evaluate parking for the station area Task Four: Develop circulation im provement and parking management strategies Task Five: Develop land use and design recommendations Task Six: Prepare implementation strategies for plan recommendations Task Seven: Finalize draft plan Task Eight: Adoption process Project Partners: Business Owners Property Owners Residents Platt Park People Association Platt Park Residents Coalition West University Community Association West Washington Park Neighborhood Association South Washington Park Neighborhood Association Regional Transportation District

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 4 PURPOSE OF THE PLAN Property owners, elected officials, neighborhood organizations and city departments will use the Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan for many purposes over its lifespan. The following is a descriptio n of the primary uses of the plan ranging from big picture expectations to implementation. Data Resource: The plan offers a collection of existing conditions data about the planning area in an ea sy-to-reference document. Reinvestment Guidance : Market conditions cannot be guaranteed and changes in demographics cannot be accu rately predicted. However, it is clear that the addition of the light rail station generates rein vestment interest. The plan established a vision that guid es public and priv ate decision-making and investment over the coming years. It covers only the topics of land use, urban design, parking and mobility. The plan offers guidance on reinvestment for the near-term but adapts to changing markets and demographics. Zoning Amendments: The plan does not convey or deny any zoning entitlement but is an essential evalua tion tool used in proposed zoning changes. Furthermore, the plan does not change zoning code language, but establishes goals and parameters for future zoning changes. Capital Improvements : A plan can provide the justif ication or the prioritization and allocation of funding from the ci tyÂ’s capital improv ement budget and other sources. Funding and Partnership Opportunities: Implementation of plans requires a collaborative effort between neighborhood s, businesses, elected officials and city departments. Plans typically requ ire funding beyond the cityÂ’s budget. This plan identifies and supports these partnerships and resource leveraging efforts.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 5 RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER PLANS AND STUDIES The Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan builds upon a solid foundation of existing documents and guiding principles. This section provides a review of the applicable content of adopte d citywide plans. The Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan provides specific recommendations for the planning area that, in case of conflict, supersede general recommend ations from existing plans. Comprehensive Plan, 2000 The City Council adopted Denver Comprehensive Plan in 2000. Plan 2000 provides the planning and policy framework for de velopment of Denver. The key subjects of Plan 2000 are land use, mobility, legacies and housing. Land Use: Land use recommendations promote new investment that accommodates new residents, improves economic vitality and enhances the city’s aesthetics and livability. In addition, Plan 2000 supports sustainable development patterns by promoting wa lking, biking and transit use. Mobility: Plan 2000 emphasizes planning for multip le modes of transportation – walking, biking, transit and cars. Key concepts include expanding mobility choices for commuters and regional cooperation in transit system planning. Plan 2000 also promotes compact, mixeduse development in transit rich places (like station areas). Legacies: Ensuring that new buildings, infrastructure and open spaces create attractive, beautiful places is the foundati on of the legacies chapter. Historic building preservation and respect for traditional patterns of development are also key tenets of Plan 2000 To this end, Plan 2000 places a high value on streets, trails, and parkways that link destinations with in the community. Housing: Plan 2000 recognizes that access to housing is a basic need for Denver citizens. Thus, Plan 2000 emphasizes preservation and maintenance of the existing housing stock and expanding housing options. Providing a variety of unit types and costs, in addition to housing development in transit rich places are fundamental tenets of Plan 2000. Plan 2000 guides and shapes future policies and planning efforts.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 6 Blueprint Denver: An Integrated Land Use and Transportation Plan, 2002 Plan 2000 recommended that the city create a plan to integrate land use and transportation planning. Blueprint Denver is an implementation plan that recognizes this relationship and describes the building blocks and tools necessary to achieve the vision outlined in Plan 2000 Areas of Change and Stability : Blueprint Denver divides the city into Areas of Change and Areas of Stability. Over ti me, all areas of the city will fluctuate somewhat between change and stability. The goal for Areas of Stability is to identify and maintain the character of an area while accommodating some new development and redevelopment. T he goal for Areas of Change is to channel growth where it will be beneficial and can best improve access to jobs, housing and services. Transportation: The transportation component of Blueprint Denver provides transportation building blocks and t ools that promote multimodal and intermodal connections. Elements of connect ion include the street system, bus transit system, bicycle system, and pe destrian system. These components must work together to realize the guiding principles of Blueprint Denver. Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan, 2006 The Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Strategic Plan prioritizes the cityÂ’s planning and implementation efforts related to the transit system and station area development. TOD Defined: The TOD Strategic Plan defines TOD as development near transit that creates beautiful, vital, walkab le neighborhoods; provides housing, shopping, and transportation choices; generates lasting value, and provides access to the region via transit. TOD Typologies : The TOD Strategic Plan establishes TOD typologies for every transit station in the city. Typologies establish a framework to distinguish the

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 7 types of places linked by the transit sy stem. The typologies frame expectations about the land use mix and intensity of development at each of the stations. The Louisiana-Pearl Station is an Urban Neighborhood Station. This implies a predominant neighborhood charac ter with supportive services. Station Area Planning: While providing an important planning framework, the TOD Strategic Plan calls for more detailed station area plans. Such plans offer specific direction for appropriate development, needed infrastructure investments and economic development strategies. Bicycle Master Plan, 2002 In 2002 in response to Plan 2000 the Bicycle Master Plan (2002) provides a framework for an interconnected bicycle system. The primary objective of the Bicycle Master Plan is develop new neighborhood ro utes that create connections between the existing bicycle route system and nearby facilities not currently on a bicycle route. The plan also recommends improving access and signage around light rail stations to make bicycling and transit work in a seamless manner. Finally, the plan promotes education, enforcement and policy for the bicycle system. Pedestrian Master Plan, 2004 The Pedestrian Master Plan serves as a framework for implementation of new city policies that place an emphasis on pedestrian mobility in planning. Specifically, the plan considers safety, accessibility, education, connectivity streetscape, land use, and public health as it relates to the creation of a citywide pedestrian circulation system. Plan 2000 and Blueprint Denver recommended preparation of this plan. The plan establishes street cl assifications for the pedestrian network in order to highlight routes that require greater emphasis on the pedestrian. Parks and Recreation Game Plan, 2002 The Game Plan is a master plan for the cityÂ’s park, open space and recreation system. A primary principle is to cr eate greener neighborhoods. Game Plan establishes a tree canopy goal of 15-18% for the entire city. The plan also establishes a parkland acreage target of 8-10 acres per 1,000 residents. Tools to The Bicycle Master Plan provides a framework for an interconnected bicycle system.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 8 accomplish these goals include promot ing green streets and parkways, which indicate routes that require greater em phasis and additions to the landscape. Strategic Transportation Plan, 2006 Denver Public Works drafted the Strategic Tr ansportation Plan (STP). The STP is an important implementation tool for Blueprint Denver and Plan 2000 The objective of the STP is to determine transportation investments. The STP accomplishes: (1) education concerning options for transpor tation alternatives; (2) consensus on transportation strategies along transportation corridors through a collaborative process; and (3) stakeholder support. The STP represents a new approach to transportation planning in Denver. It forecasts person-trips to evaluate the magnitude of transportation impacts caused by all travel type s. This person-trip data provides the ability to plan improvements for bikes, pedestrians, transit and streets. Storm Drainage Plan 2005 and Sanitary Sewer Plan 2006 The Storm Drainage Master Plan and the Sanitary Sewer Master Plan evaluates adequacy of the existing systems assuming the future land us es identified in Blueprint Denver The Storm Drainage Master Pl an determines the amount of imperviousness resulting from future land development and the subsequent runoff. The Sanitary Sewer Master Plan identifies needed sanitary sewer improvements to respond to forecasted development. Greenprint Denver Greenprint Denver is the ci ties environmental action plan to ensure a positive legacy for sustainability. The plan co vers action items such as reducing greenhouse emissions, increase city fore st coverage, reduce waste, utilize renewable energies, increase green buil t affordable housing, promote and leverage mass transit, improve, protec t and conserve water and promote green industry economic development.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 9 Zoning Code Update Denver citizens called for reform of the CityÂ’s Zoning Code in the 1989 Comprehensive Plan and again in the Denver Comprehensive Plan 2000 Blueprint Denver provided the vision and initial st rategy to begin this effort. The Zoning Code Update process is making steady progress in the effort to bring DenverÂ’s current regulations into clos er alignment with desired development patterns. Key issues identified include re cognition that in some instances current regulations do not advance the proactiv e implementation of Blueprint Denver and other adopted plans; current procedures are numerous, complicated and often inconsistent; and the size and comp lexity of the current regulations make them difficult to use, comply with, unde rstand, and enforce. The results of this effort will include better tools than currently available for implementation. Platt Park Neighborhood Assessment 2003 The Platt Park Assessment documents co nditions as of 2003 of the Platt Park statistical neighborhood. Demographic findings indicate the neighborhood continues to stabilize and improve in desirability and quality. The assessment supports a focus on reinvestment areas su ch as the station area, Antique Row, South Broadway and Old South Pearl Street. The assessment supports preserving existing residential structur es in stable areas and improving access to the transit station, parks, business districts and other destinations. Economic analysis shows strong economics health for the neighborhood. West Washington Park Neighborhood Plan 1991 In collaboration with the city, the West Washington Park neighborhood prepared a neighborhood plan. The plan promotes patterns of land use, urban design, circulation and services that contribute to the economic, social, and physical health, safety and welfare of the people living and working in the neighborhood. The vision is to preserve and enhance the positive qualities of the neighborhood. This includes a diversity of people, hist oric buildings, mature landscape, humanscale land use, urban character, conveni ent transportation access and the high level of energy and interaction among residents and business people.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 10 EXISTING CONDITIONS STATION AREA HISTORY Settlement of the Platt Park and West Wa shington Park neighborhoods in the late 1800s has an interesting history. This hi story plays a strong role in its current characteristics. This area incorporated in 1886 as the Town of South Denver. The City of Denver annexed the area in 1894. In 1893, Denver Tramway Company insta lled the first cable car service along Broadway. The company later extended its service to Alameda Avenue and South Pearl Street. During the 1950s, ru bber wheeled trolley coaches replaced electric trolley cars. The transit an d pedestrian linkages created by these streetcar systems shaped land use patterns still evident today. One of the greatest influences in the area was the Gates Rubber Company located at South Broadway and Mississi ppi Avenue. In 1911, Charles Gates, Sr. purchased the Colorado Tire and Leather Company. Over time, the Gates Rubber Company became a successful regional and international company. Many employees lived in the nearby Pl att Park and West Washington Park neighborhoods. After almost a century of operation, Gates ceased activity and sold the site. One final influencing factor in the transp ortation history of the Louisiana-Pearl Station area was the construction and completion of the Valley Highway, now known as Interstate 25. Construction of the Valley Highway started in 1948 and completed in 1958. The Valley Highway became a physical barrier between the Platt Park and Washington Park neighborhoods. The original street car and cable car lines play a role in the development pattern of the Platt Park and West Washington Park neighborhood.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 11 DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS The table below provides a summary of the demographics of the Louisiana-Pearl Station planning area in comparison to the demographics of the ci ty. This data is derived from the 2000 U.S. Census counts and includes the census block groups mostly contained within a 0.25 mile radius of the station. The employment data is from the Denver Regional Council of Go vernmentÂ’s 2000 traffic analysis zone (TAZ) data. 2000 Demographic Data Category Planning Area City of Denver Population 4,477 people 554,636 people Housing 2,423 units 251,435 units Persons per Household 1.95 people 2.3 people % of Housing Ownership 59.2% 49.9% Median Income $70,158 $39,500 Average Age 36.2 years 33.1 years Employment 2,592 workers 301,434 workers Sources: 2000 U.S. Census Tract 002902 Block Groups 2 and 3 and Census Tract 003001 Block Groups 1 and 2; employment data provided by DRCOG The high median income and housing owner ship in comparison to the city as a whole reflect the planning areaÂ’s stable neighborhood character. They also are indicators that residents in the planning area have less diverse characteristics than the city as a whole. The slightly higher median age and smaller household size reveal a variety of household types in th e planning area, including small families, singles, couples without children, empty neste rs and retired residents. Like many Denver neighborhoods, the areasÂ’ househo ld composition may evolve over time. 15% 45% 32% 8% Planning Area Age Distribution % Less than Age 18 % between Age 18-39 % between Age 40-64 % Age 65 and greater

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 12 EXISTING LAND USE In the Fall of 2006, the city conducted an inventory of existing land uses for the planning area. The Existing Land Use Map is on page 15. There are six land use categories, described below. The pred ominant land use for the entire planning area is single family residential. Generally, West Wa shington Park has more singlefamily residential dwellings and less commerc ial and office uses in comparison to Platt Park. Platt Park co ntains greater diversity of housing types and nonresidential uses. Since the initiation of the planning process, the neighborhoods (Platt Park in particular) have seen re investment activity for businesses and housing. There is a new mixed use pr oject across from the station with 29 condominium units and ground floor retail. Single Family : Single family residential area s contain neighborhood design qualities typical of Denver neighborhoods such as detached sidewalks, street trees, uniform setbacks, front porches/e ntries, and detached garages accessed by an alley. Single fami ly residential is the predominant land use in both Platt Park and West Washington Park. In recent years, many homeowners have reinvested in their homes through renova tions, additions, or tearing down the existing structure and building a new home (e.g. “scrape-offs”). This reinvestment is an indicator that both neighborhood s are becoming increasingly desirable. Two Family: The Existing Land Use Map identifies the location of all two family, or attached duplex structures. Two family structures exist in scattered locations throughout the planning area and the two neighborhoods. As indicated on the map, the majority of the tw o-family units are in Platt Park. Areas zoned R-2 have seen an increase in new construction of du plexes, again due to the desirability of the neighborhoods. Multiple Family: This category includes residential structures with three or more units in a building. These uses are very limited and only found in Platt Park within the planning area. Most are locate d near commercial areas and on major This commercial building is a good local example of a mixed-use building right near the station. It has ground floor commercial and upper level residential. Single family homes are the predominant land use in West Washington Park and Platt Park.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 13 streets. Due to minimum lot area re quirements and limited land assembly opportunities, multiple family use is not co mmon. A new multiple family project is located at the corner of Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel Boulevard South. While it is primarily multiple family, there is small scale ground floor retail. Institutional: Institutional uses include a church and school that are located on the edge of the planning area. Office: Office uses are along Buchtel Boulevard North and South. While minimal, office uses in these neighborhoods provid e opportunities for residents to live near work and to enjoy nearby professional services. Commercial: Commercial uses include busines ses such as retail, services, restaurants and repair. Some buildings containing commercial uses have residential units on upper floors. Most commercial uses are concentrated in Platt Park along Buchtel Boulevard South, South Pearl Street and Louisiana Avenue. The eclectic mix of restaurants and retail sh ops in Platt Park is an important part of the neighborhood character and attracts cu stomers from all over the metro area. In West Washington Park, commercial uses in the planning area are south of East Mississippi Avenue, west of South Washington Street. Vacant: There is only one site labeled as va cant because it has no existing use or structure. There is one vacant site in the station area with in-fill development potential. It is on South Pearl Street, north of Louisiana and is approximately 10,000 square feet in area. There are numerous businesses serving the station area located along South Pearl Street and Louisiana Avenue. This new multiple family project at Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel Boulevard South has ground floor retail.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 14

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 15 ZONING The following is a summary of the existing zoning district s represented in the station area. The Zoning Map, found on page 18, shows the zoning within the study area. R-1 Single Unit Detached Dwellings. This residential zone district is a low density residential district that accommodates si ngle family homes and certain limited ancillary uses. While many lots do no t meet the minimum lot size, the current required minimum lot size is 6,000 square feet, which translates to a gross density of 7.3 dwelling units per acre. As shown on the Zoning Map, the majority of the R1 zoning is in West Washington Park with a few blocks zoned R-1 within Platt Park. R-2 Duplex/Multi-Unit Dwellings. This district typically includes a mix of single family, duplexes and multiple family structures. The size of the parcel, parking and other development regulations dictate t he number of allowable units. The minimum lot size is 6,000 square feet for ea ch duplex structure with an additional 3,000 square feet required for each addition al unit. This yields a maximum density of approximately 14.5 units per acre. The majority of the R2 zoning is in Platt Park with a few blocks within West Washingt on Park. Both neighborhoods have R-2 zoning where duplexes and multiple unit dwellings are currently allowable. However, the current land use pattern in R-2 areas is predominantly single family. B-1 Limited Office. This district allows of fice uses such as dental clinics, medical care and professional services. There is a low volume of direct daily customer contact with these permitted office uses. Th is district is characteristically small in area and ideally situated between more intense business areas and residential areas. The district regulations establish standards comparable to those of the low density residential districts. Bulk stan dards and open space requirements control building height. Building floor area canno t exceed the site area. B-1 zoning is on both sides of I-25 within the planning area. B-2 Neighborhood Business. This district provides for the retailing of commodities classed as “convenience goods” and the furn ishing of certain personal services. In R-2 zoned areas, most homes are single family (above) but there are some duplex units (below). These photographs are of Platt Park.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 16 The district intends to satisfy the daily and weekly household or personal needs of the residents of surrounding residentia l neighborhoods. This district is characteristically small in size and locate d on collector streets. Residential uses typically surround these areas, offering a co nvenient walking distance. The district regulations establish standards comparable to those of low density residential districts, resulting in similar as-built buil ding heights. Building floor area cannot exceed the site area. B-2 zoning is on both sides of I-25 in the planning area. B-4 General Business. This district provides fo r appropriate commercial uses adjacent to arterial streets. Allowed us es include a wide variety of consumer and business services and retail establishmen ts. The regulations generally allow a moderate intensity of use and concentration The maximum floor area ratio of 2 to 1 controls the size of buildings. Buildi ng height limitations apply only when there is an abutment to a protected residential zone district or view plane restrictions exist. B-4 zoning is only in Platt Park. P-1 Off-Street Parking. The P-1 district allows only parking lots and structures with bulk and setback regulations applying to structures. This zone allows business parking without the expansion of the bu siness zone. There are requirements for visual screening when adjacent to residentia l uses. P-1 zoning is only in Platt Park. R-MU-30 Residential Mixed-Use. There is one site within the planning area zoned R-MU-30. It is at the inte rsection of South Emerson and South Buchtel Blvd, in Platt Park. This is a primarily re sidential district that allo ws supportive commercial uses such as consumer retail, service uses an d small scale office. Maximum heights, setbacks, parking and open space requirem ents determine building size. This zoning change occurred during the planning process. It is one example of how the transit investment resulted in immedi ate reinvestment inte rest in the station area.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 18 MOBILITY Within the station area, there are many ci rculation choices. The following is an overview of these opportunities. Refer to the Existing Mobility Map and Street Classification Map on pages 23 and 24. Light Rail Transit The Louisiana-Pearl Station is a neighbor hood serving station on the Southeast Light Rail line. The 2006 Southeast Co rridor Service Plan, prepared by RTD, projects that by 2010 weekday activity on the Southeast Light Rail Corridor will reach 43,300 riders. Of that total, 1,500 riders (3.4%) are projected to use the Louisiana-Pearl Station. The station includes a below grade platfo rm that is 370 feet long and 30 feet wide. Elevators and stairs access the pl atform at the intersection of Buchtel Boulevard South and Louisiana Avenue. The northbound and southbound light rail tracks run between the station platform s. There is a plaza area for public gathering and is an amenity for the neighborhood. To support the walk-up nature of the st ation, the Louisiana Avenue/I-25 overpass includes pullouts for bus and passenger use, new pedestrian lighting, sidewalks, bike lockers and bike racks. The street s at the station have new pedestrian crossing striping and intersection signal ization. These impr ovements enhance the stationÂ’s pedestrian and bike access. Bus Routes Three bus routes serve the station area. Bus Route #12 runs along South Downing Street, Louisiana Avenue, and South Pearl Street. Route #12 is a heavily used route for Platt Park and West Washington Park residents because of its direct connection to downtown. Bus Route #11 ru ns along Louisiana Avenue. Bus Route #79 runs along Buchtel Boulevard North and South Logan Street with a loop by Three bus routes serve the LouisianaPearl light rail station. Improvements and new facilities at the bridge over I-25 were part of T-REX. The station platform is below grade and offers a cano py and seatin g for transit

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 19 the station. These route changes provide better service to the transit station for the neighborhood. Pedestrian Access There are sidewalks along every street within the planning area. Bridge improvements, made as part of T-REX, include wide sidewalks and pedestrian lighting on all the bridges over I-25 al ong South Logan Street, South Washington Street, Louisiana Avenue, and South Emerso n Street. The Louisiana-Pearl Station plaza creates a wonderful place for neighb orhood gathering near the station. In addition, there are striped and signalized crosswalks with acce ssible ramps. The grid street pattern coupled with the complete sidewalk system provides pedestrian access throughout the planning area. Bike Routes There are three bike routes within or near the planning area. Bike route D-9 runs along South Logan Street, D-18 runs along Iowa Avenue then links up to Buchtel Boulevard South at South Franklin Street, and D-11 runs along Franklin and feeds into Washington Park. The primary street s in the planning area are wide enough to accommodate on-street bicycles. Howe ver, there is no designated on-street bike route running by the transit station. Street Classification and Typologies Street classifications and typo logies identify the function and character of streets. First, the conventional street function al classification encompasses a streetÂ’s design and travel characteristics. This classification forms a hierarchy of streets ranging from those for travel mobility (arterials) to those for access to property (local streets). Second, Blueprint Denver defines streets by relating them to the adjacent land use and their function for pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit. Beyond these main methods, the Pedestrian Master Plan and the Parks and Recreation Game Plan also assign typologies to streets. The following is a list of the key streets in the plan ning area and their over lapping classifications: The new plaza at the station creates a welcoming pedestrian environment.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 20 Interstate-25. I-25 is a federal highway that runs north/south through the state. Blueprint Denver designates I-25 as an Arterial. The highway carries local, statewide and regional traffic at high volumes. T-REX included a number of highway improvements between Broadway and south of the city boundary. Improvements assist in lessoning co ngestion on the highway and at interchanges. Convenient access to I25 is an asset to the neighborhoods, providing a direct link to the region. Within the planning area, access ramps to I-25 are at South Washington Street along Buchtel Boulevard North and South. South Logan Street. This street classification is Arterial and provides access to destinations outside of the neighborhood. Blueprint Denver identifies this street as a Residential Arterial and em phasizes neighborhood character. The Pedestrian Master Plan and Parks and Recreation Game Plan designate South Logan Street as a Green Street, reinforcin g its role in neighborhood character and identifying a need for landsc ape and pedestrian enhancements. Louisiana Avenue. Its street classification is Co llector and links local traffic to arterials. Blueprint Denver identifies this street as a Residential Collector, which indicates it will handle more traffic than a local street, but there is an important emphasis on neighborh ood character. The Pedestrian Master Plan and Parks and Recreation Game Plan designate Louisiana Av enue as a Green Street further reinforcing the streetÂ’s role in establishing the neighborhood character and its need for landscape and pedestrian enhancements. Buchtel Boulevard South Buchtel Boulevard South is a Collector and designated in Blueprint Denver as a Mixed-Use Collector, in terms of land use. The Mixed-Use typology emphasizes a vari ety of travel choices supported by a healthy mix of land uses. Buchtel Bo ulevard South is a Green Street and is a designated Parkway between South Clarkson Street and South Colorado Boulevard. These designations entail special attention to landscaping, green space and land uses that will activate t he street in Platt Pa rk. Additionally, Buchtel Boulevard South connects t he Louisiana-Pearl Station area Louisiana Avenue is a Residential Collector and a Green Street and plays an important role in defining the neighborhood character.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 21 neighborhoods, University Station and Colorado Statio n. Unfortunately, the addition of travel lanes and limited right-of-way diminished much of the established greenspace along the corridor wi thin the planning area. It is not until east of the planning area that Buchtel Boulevard South evolves into a dynamic arrangement of mu lti-modal circulation and parkway design. This plan explores opportunities for reversing this condition. Buchtel Boulevard North. Buchtel Boulevard North is a Collector and has no other designation in the Pedestrian Master Plan or Parks and Recreation Game Plan. The street extends from Sout h Logan to South Downing, thereby collecting traffic only from the We st Washington Park neighborhood. While the street is a Mixed-Use Collector in Blueprint Denver the true characteristics of this street are more co nsistent with a “Residential Collector.” Buchtel Boulevard North is characterized by primarily single family residential uses with only a few incidences of neighborhood scale retail and office. These land uses generate low volumes of tr affic and minimal on-site activity compatible with the neighborhood. On e cannot travel the roadway and gain access further east or west of the neighborhood. South Washington Street and South Emerson Street Presently, both streets are Collectors and assigned the Resi dential Collector typology in Blueprint Denver north of I-25 West Washington Park is pursuing the feasibility of converting of these streets from one-way to two-way. South of I-25 they are local streets. The streets do not have a designation from the Pedestrian Master Plan or Parks and Recreation Game Plan South Pearl Street and all others All other streets function as local streets providing immediate access to private property. They support the street hierarchy by evenly dispersing loca l traffic within the neighborhood.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 24 Parking Access to the Louisiana-Pearl station is by walking, biking, passenger drop-off or bus. As su ch, there are no, and should be no, dedicated parking facilities for transit users. Some of the businesses in the area provide thei r own on-site parking. On-street parking accommodates the remainder of the parking demand in the planning area. A capacity assessment of on-street parking supply within a quarter-mile walking distance of the station was completed. The study was on a typical day for a few hours in the morning and a few hours in the evening. The study suggests that in the morning hours, there was a relatively stable supply of available on-street parking spaces. In the ev ening, there is more competition for parking spaces between residents and businesses. While this “snap shot” data was in formative, there was substantially more interest and discussion ab out future parking supply impacts upon station opening. In response the City and County of Denver Public Works Department impl emented a Parking Management Plan. The plan addresses potent ial neighborhood impacts from transit-related parking demand. The full impact of the new restrictions will require evaluation over time. The accompanying image illustrates existing parking restrictions.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 25 PLAN VISION The Louisiana-Pearl Station is a ‘walk-up’ light rail transit station with easy pedestrian access and designated passeng er drop-off and pick-up areas. It is embedded in a stable neighborhood that offers primarily single family housing. Consistent with the principles of the Urban Neighborhood TOD Typology, near the platform there is a vibrant mix of additi onal housing options, shopping, dining, employment and public gathering areas. Station Platform Area: The immediate station platfo rm area is inviting and comfortable. The transit plaza draws ri ders to the station while providing a neighborhood gathering sp ace made attractive with landscaping, art and appropriate lighting. Access: Multiple transportation choices will continue, providing access and opportunities for travel by foot, bicycle, li ght rail, bus or car. There is special emphasis and enhancement to pedestrian -friendly and convenient access to the light rail station. Parking supplie s balance business and resident needs. Mobility: Sidewalks provide easy access to an d from the station by foot. Bike routes offer safe routes to the station and bicycle facilities provide convenient storage. Streetscape improvement s create a pleasant environment. Reinvestment: Mixed uses and buildings respect the scale and character of the neighborhood with the greatest concen tration of reinvestment occurring at Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel Boulevar d South. Development provides pedestrian friendly, ground-floor uses of fering goods and services to residents, workers, transit riders and visitors There are new and diverse housing opportunities and employment for resident s to live close to work, services and transit. The vision for the station area includes an active business district that serves the neighborhood.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 26 Design: Building design is contextual and respects the character of the surrounding older, established neighborh oods in building orientation, massing, scale and quality of materials. Dominant front entries promote pedestrian access and connections at the street. T here is an increase in sustainable design practices in accordan ce with Greenprint Denver. Housing: The stable, neighborhoods of Platt Park and West Washington Park will maintain their predominantly single family housing, tree-lined streets, sidewalks, and front yards and engaged entries. Ho using reinvestment will maintain the unique neighborhood character, the long-standing tradition of high quality construction and materials and support goals of environmentally responsible design.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 27 FRAMEWORK PLAN INTRODUCTION The Framework Plan seeks to carry forwar d the vision for the station area. It accomplishes this by articulating deta iled goals and recommendations. There are four main subject areas for these idea s. The Land Use Concept guides land use and development intensity. Urban Design directs the main elements of building form, orientation, and character. Mobility addresses further improvements to multi-modal access within the station area. Finally, Parking provides techniques for handling pa rking demands in the neighborhoods. LAND USE CONCEPT The land use concept articulates the geog raphic land use pattern envisioned for the planning area. Different land use categories distinguish land within the planning area that requires different recommendations and strategies. Also included is a discussion of the primary issues and opportunities for the land use concept. Finally, there are goals and recommendations that guide decisionmaking as it relates to la nd use in the station area. Committed and Reinvestment Areas of Stability The entire planning area is an Area of Stability, per Blueprint Denver The goal for Areas of Stability is to identify and maintain character of an area while accommodating some change. Blueprint Denver further explains that Areas of Stability belong predominantly to one of the following two categories: “Committed Areas” and “Rei nvestment Areas.” This station area plan delineates committed areas and reinvestment area s (see accompanying graphic). While both areas have specific entitlements based on zoning, the plan establishes these Continued reinvestment in the existing housing stock is necessary to maintain the neighborhood character illustrated in this picture of West Washington Park..

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 28 two different areas in order to direct the most significant change, if it occurs, to the established development pattern to reinvestment areas. Committed Areas. Committed areas are stable and benefit from reinvestment in the housing stock and some new hous ing development. Committed areas coincide with residential zone districts (R-1 and R-2). The established land use and building pattern of this area is important to maintain. As indicated on the existing land use map, homes are predominantly si ngle family in Platt Park and West Washington Park. Homes have prominent front porches, entrie s and high quality construction. The public realm is comfortable and walkable with narrow streets, on-street parking, alleys, rear access detached garages, side walks, tree lawns and street trees. The neighborhoods also include wonderful amenities including parks, churches, schools, bus routes and now light rail acce ss. Collectively, these details create two desirable neighborhoods and an import ant component in DenverÂ’s success. Like many Denver neighborhoods, curre nt regulations for these areas need improved alignment with t he existing and desired development pattern. The R1areas found in Platt Park and West Wash ington Park are compatible and protect single family use. However, bulk and massing requirements for R-1 and R-2 do not foster predictable development with simple easy-to-understand regulations. In addition, the development capacity of the R-2 (two-family versus multiple family) may be too intense in some areas of th e planning area in comparison to the existing and desired development pattern. For example, West Washington Park seeks to preserve the predominant single family housing stock in R-1 areas and continue the pattern of predominantly sing le family homes with some duplexes in R-2 areas of their neighborhood. Better tools that speak to these elements will maintain this character and improvements to the existing housing stock can continue in a manner that protects the investment of homeowners and the neighborhood character.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 29 Reinvestment Areas Reinvestment areas have a character that is desirable to maintain but may benefit from a greater level of reinvestment than committed areas. Reinvestment areas were determined based on the existing business zoning and the additional capacity for deve lopment in those areas. In addition, these sites have good access to collector an d arterial routes and the station area. In the coming years, these areas should support limited and ta rgeted investment. The new mixed-use building at the corner of Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel Boulevard South is an example of ho w reinvestment areas have begun to experience redevelopment. Challenges to reinvestment include the transition between committed areas, adequate neighborhood services and redevelopment of underutilized sites. The successful Old South Pearl Business Di strict along S. Pearl Street (in the southwest edge of the planning area) is a reinvestment area because it will continue to evolve and improve. Since t he majority of this business district is located outside of the statio n area, this plan does not address specific strategies for this area. This business associatio n should continue to work with the neighborhood to balance op portunities for reinvestments and compatibility with adjoining residential uses. The Reinvestment Areas Land Use Conc ept creates two sub-areas for business properties closest to the station. These sub-areas provide specific direction on the land use and character for the reinvestment areas. Urban Neighborhood Station. The Urban Neighborhood Station area includes the business district immediatel y adjacent to the station. The main frontage streets include South Pear l Street, Louisiana Avenue, South Washington Street, and Buchtel Boulev ard South. The Urban Neighborhood Station is currently zoned B-4 and offe rs a mix of commercial businesses. A new mixed-use development has ground floor retail and upper story residential units. Over the long term, redevelopment can occur that will add housing and businesses in close proximity to the station. This is where a greater level of intensity should occu r compared to the Transition area. New housing such as these townhouses found in Stapleton is an ideal transition between the Urban Neighborhood Station area and the nei g hborhoods.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 30 Development must promote active ground floor uses and a pedestrianfriendly environment. It must also respect the scale, context and unique character of the area through techniqu es such as lower building heights adjoining residential districts. Urban Neighborhood Station Transition The Urban Neighborhood Station Transition area, the majority of whic h is in Platt Park, is along Buchtel Boulevard North and South. These boundaries generally coincide with existing business zoning. Th is area is within a few blocks of the station and includes established businesses. The street grid and residential parcels separate most sites from each other. There is a more consistent business corridor along Buchtel Boulevard South compared to along Buchtel Boulevard North. Over the long term, reinvestment may occur adding additional housing and neighborhood serving retail, service and office uses. Nevertheless, it must be at a scale th at is compatible with the adjoining committed areas. Develo pment must respect the boundaries of this area. Treatment of the edges must be sensit ive to adjoining residential areas, particularly when adjoining properties are single family homes. The Urban Neighborhood Station area has the greatest potential for redevelopment. This is a photograph of an example of the type of building appropriate in this area.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 31

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 32 Land Use Primary Issues and Opportunities This plan addresses goals, recommendations and implementation strategies for the reinvestment areas. In order to deve lop these, it is important to understand the primary issues and opportunities of this area. A summary is below: Established Businesses. The reinvestment area offers a number of extremely successful businesses that include a mix of office, art/design studios, charming shops, popular restaurants and a grocer y store. Most are owned/operated by local merchants. These established businesses and their local roots are paramount to the continued success and quality of the neighborhood. Many of the merchants belong to the Old South Pearl Street Association (OSPSA). OSPSA is a merchantsÂ’ association that is involved in busines s revitalization and marketing efforts such as special event s, lighting and landscaping. The organization is an excellent model and resource. Value-Added Development and Reinvestment Potential. Opportunities to increase the activity and add value to the transit system investment are important. Reinvestment can provide ad ditional services conveniently located for the neighborhood. Reinvestment can al so provide an opportunity for residents to live near the station and reduce hous ehold transportation expenditures. In addition, increased convenience allows mo re time devoted to family and friends rather than commuting. For example, ri ders can stop for coffee, pick up drycleaning or meet for dinner near the statio n. Finally, employers and retail benefit from enhanced foot traffic, exposure and access. Louisiana-Pearl Station Typology. In accordance with the Transit Oriented Development Strategic Plan the Louisiana-Pearl Station typology is Urban Neighborhood. As an Urban Neighborh ood station, access is primarily by pedestrians living and working in the ad joining neighborhoods, or by passenger Sites closest to the station, like these on S. Pearl Street, present the greatest opportunities for value-added reinvestment.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 33 drop-off from the bus or autos. A mix of housing and neighborhood serving retail and offices characterize development in Urban Neighborhood station area. Market Trends. As part of the citywide transit pl anning efforts, there exists a Transit Oriented Development Economic Analysis an d Market Study. Th is analysis covers national, regional and transit station ma rket trends. While the study did not specifically analyze the Louisiana-Pearl Stat ion, many of the national and regional trends are helpful indicators that reinforce assumptions about reinvestment potential in the Urban Neighborhood Statio n area. These are relevant findings: There is particular interest in office along the Southeast light rail corridor as indicated by positive absorption trends, declining vacancy rates, increasing rental rates and employer intere st in locating near transit. Demographic and economic forces in the Denver region are fueling interest in living near transit as evid enced by growth of households more likely to live near transit (e.g. empty-nesters, young pr ofessionals and working families) and rising energy costs. Household growth subsequently fuels retail growth as demonstrated by positive absorption rates and increased rents. There is an increased market interest in sites with smaller markets, access and visibility, connectivity to residential areas, access to regional attractions and existing retail clusters. Housing supply at station. The reinvestment area cu rrently provides a limited supply of residential units. Housing is an inte gral part of the mix of uses in a station area and more residences are important in strategic locations that respect the neighborhood character and quality of life. Residents and the activity that results from healthy neighborhoods provide “eyes on the street” that increase natural surveillance and the sense of safety. Th erefore, additional opportunities for housing in the reinvestment area (the Urban Neighborhood Station area in particular) are important.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 34 Station Area Zoning and Development Predictability. As depicted on the zoning map on page 20, most Urban Neighborhood Station properties are zoned B-4. The B-4 zoning possesses many well-documented shortcomings. These problems do not support the vision of Blueprint Denver (and this Plan) to create pedestrianfriendly uses and site design that is comp atible with transit-oriented development. Some of the shortcomings of B-4 zoning include: Many non-residential land uses (co mmercial and industrial) are allowable without prevention or minimization of ex ternal effects to adjoining residential properties. B-4 does not allow residential uses appr opriate near a transit station such as live/work units and artist studios. There is no incentive to mix land uses. Development standards in the B-4 zone fall short of furthering pedestrianfriendly uses and site design. Specific ally, there is no “build-to” line, which means that buildings may be set back from the street and not oriented to pedestrians. Parking is permitted between st ructures and the sidewalk. B-4 permits private parking lots, contrary to the goals of the walk-up station. There are no open space requirements for residential land uses. There is no maximum height for the dist rict. However, in this location the Washington Park view plane and the bu lk plane along R-1 and R-2 zoned sites create height limitations. All of these factors vary based on size, location and proposed land use, thereby creating a very unpredictable situation and in many cases underutilized sites. This lack of predictability increases ri sk for developers and uncertainty for nearby residents. Zoning Mixture of Urban Neighborhood Station Transition. The Urban Neighborhood Station Transition area includ es a zoning mix of B-1, B-2, B-4, P-1 and R-MU-30 (with waivers). The B-1 an d B-2 districts are valuable to the neighborhoods and the B-4 zoning district is far more problematic. However, The current urban form with many open spaces along the street front is a result of the inconsistency of B-4 zoning.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 35 collectively this mixture does not suppo rt a land use and development pattern that coincides with the vision of the Urba n Neighborhood Station Transition area. Examples of impacts from the current zoning mixture include: Varying or lacking building height requirements. Inconsistent setbacks resulting in inco nsistent building and parking placement. Varying floor-area-ratio requirements. Some allowable uses are not appr opriate adjoining residential. With the exception of B-1, it lacks pred ictability and creates uncertainty for the neighborhoods and diminishes its role as a transition area. With the exception of B-1, a lack of appropriate tools to transition between these districts and adjoining residential districts. Gates Redevelopment. Redevelopment of the Gates factory is a significant opportunity for the Broadway Station ar ea. This development can serve as a receiving area for more intense develo pment and will assist in alleviating development pressure at the Louisiana-Pe arl Station. This will help ensure that reinvestment at Louisiana-Pearl will cont inue to respect the committed areas of Platt Park and West Washington Park. Land Use Goals Goal 1: Focus Reinvestment at the Transit Station Encourage pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use development closest to the station area to create a defined neighborhood center and opportunities to live, work, and play near the station. Goal 2: Station Area Transition Maintain a buffer of smaller scale, nei ghborhood serving land uses between the station and stable neighborhoods. Land use goals promote neighborhood scale, pedestrian-oriented uses near the station such as this neighborhood business district in Uptown Denver

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 36 Goal 3: Neighborhood Character Stability Respect the stable single family ne ighborhood fabric and pattern of development in terms of density, qual ity, scale, landsc ape, open space and safety for residents. Land Use Recommendations Recommendation 1: Urban Neighborhood Station. Provide active, pedestrianoriented uses on the ground floor of buildings in the Urban Neighborhood Station area that compliment existing neighborhood businesses. These uses could include small grocers, pharmacies, dry cleaners, florists, bookstores, gift shops, professional studios, service and repair, restaurants, banks, and childcare facilities. Vertical mixed use is encouraged that includes office and residential uses. Private surface parkin g is not a land use that supports the vision for the Urban Neig hborhood Station area. Recommendation 2: Urban Neighborhood Station Transition. Improve the predictably of the land use mixture and scale in the Urban Neighborhood Station Transition area. Appropriate ve rtical and horizontal land use mixtures include residential, office, medical uses, and neighborhood serving retail and services. Desired intensitie s, but not necessarily land uses, are most compatible with the existing B-1 and B-2 zoning cate gories to create a necessary land use transition to single family and other residential uses in Platt Park and West Washington Park. Private surface parkin g is not a land use that supports the vision for the Urban Neighbor hood Station Transition area. Special consideration should be given to si tes that abut single family residential uses in terms of appropriate use, intens ity and design. For example, this is particularly important along Buchtel Boulevard North where Transition sites adjoin residential zoning on multiple sides. Another ex ample is in Platt Park at Arizona Avenue and S. Clarkson Street. It is ideal to create one zoning district Land Use Recommendations: Active, pedestrian uses near the station Transition area between the station and residential areas Neighborhood serving employment and services Diverse housing options near the station

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 37 for the Urban Neighborhood Statio n Transition. However, special circumstances (such as variations between areas north and south of I-25) will likely warrant multiple techniques. Recommendation 3: Committed Areas. Create predictable, easy-tounderstand regulations aligned with the current neighborhood development pattern. Areas zoned R-1 offer a solid fo undation to protect the single family housing pattern and needs to remain. Ho wever, both residential districts need improvement to align with the desired density, building types, proportion, coverage, form and size of the neighborhoods. Recommendation 4: Employment and Services. Provide employment and service opportunities within the Ur ban Neighborhood Station and Urban Neighborhood Station Transition areas with convenient access for residents and transit riders. Recommendation 5: Compact, Diverse Housing Opportunities. Provide some new housing opportunities (e.g. townho uses, lofts live/work units) at an appropriate intensity. Locate in suit able areas of the Urban Neighborhood Station and Urban Neighbor hood Station Transition. Committed areas require better tools to protect the predominant single family housing stock in Platt Park and West Washington Park

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 38 URBAN DESIGN Urban Design Primary Issues and Opportunities Placemaking. While land use mixture is an important foundation to any neighborhood and station area, the expe rience is what truly defines its success and quality. Placemaking is what compel s people to drive less often, walk more, and interact with their neighborhood. In order to succeed, a neighborhood and station area needs to be safe, stimulating and attractive. Additionally, it must offer opportunities for gathering and be easily accessible. Currently, some sites in the station area have varying locations of buildings, landscaping and parking. This condition creates an inconsistent street presence and dominance of off-street parking. The eclectic mix of design styles and heights contributes to the areaÂ’s charm. In some instances, it does not support the placemaking of t he station area. Design & Development Standards Existing zoning for reinvestment areas do not provide sufficient design and development standards. Additionally, it does not encourage mixed-use development or enhancements to the pedestrian experience. Parking is often between buil dings and streets, and excessive curb cuts interrupt the pedestrian realm. Streetscape Streets provide the best opportunity for the neighborhood to create significant places for people to move and interact. It is even more important in this small neighborhood station setting. T-REX included excellent improvements immediately near the station with a new plaza area, pedestrian crossings, wider sidewalks and decorative street lighting Unfortunately, the adjacent business areas lack streetscape improvements to carry this new aesthetic into the neighborhood. Placemaking is important at the station to create an experience such as this plaza in Portland, Oregon The current streetscape along S. Pearl Street lacks character and appeal.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 39 A complete streetscape environment consisti ng of curb lawns, street trees, wide sidewalks, pedestrian lighting, and other am enities have a number of benefits. Creates a desirable experience that entices pedestrians to stroll along the street, walk further distances withou t driving and interact with their neighborhood Increases business revenue thro ugh longer customer visits Promotes a feeling of safety and comfort for residents and visitors. Reduces traffic speeds because it alerts the driver of an active pedestrian area and triggers the need to drive cautiously. Building Mass and Scale. As change occurs to the physical environment of the station area, it will take adjustment because it will look and feel different from the current mass and scale. In addition, ma ny developers will want to maximize density and mass at the station area. Ma ny techniques break-u p or minimize the mass and scale of larger structures so they blend into the neighborhood and add value to the neighborhood and station area These techniques not only benefit the neighborhood but also provide long -term benefits to the developer because these details become key selling points for a project. Urban Design Goals Goal 1: Pedestrian Scale Establish distinct design areas that crea te timeless and beautiful places for the neighborhood at a human scale that encourages comfort, pedestrian activity and a sense of place. Goal 2: Design Quality Ensure that building and si te design reflect the scale, active environment and construction quality of t he established neighborhood.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 40 Urban Design Recommendations Recommendation 1: Specific Design Recommendations for Urban Neighborhood Station and Urban Neighborhood Station Transition Areas Support different urban design characte ristics for the two reinvestment subareas of Urban Neighborhood Statio n and Urban Neighborhood Station Transition as it relates to development pattern, building height, building scale, street character and off-street parking. Urban Neighborhood Station Urban Neighborhood Station Transition Development Pattern Variable, compact, dense – highest intensity focused around the station platform Variable, less compact than the Urban Neighborhood Station Building Height Buildings 1-5 stories; use stepbacks to properly transition building heights adjoining residential districts. Bulk plane and Washington Park Viewplane requirements apply. Buildings 1-3 stories; compatible with B1/B-2 zoning, respectively. Bulk plane and Washington Park Viewplane requirements apply. Building Scale 70-100% lot coverage 30-80% lot coverage, compatible with B-1/B-2 zoning, respectively Features Functional courtyards, porches, stoops, balconies, sidewalk cafes Functional front yards, courtyards, porches, stoops, balconies Street Character Wide (16 feet) attached sidewalks with street trees in grates and pedestrian amenities such as lighting, benches, outdoor eating places and seating, trash cans, and bike racks. Existing constraints, such as existing buildings or lack of ROW, may warrant a narrower 13 ft width. Street trees, curb lawns (8 feet), detached sidewalks (5 feet) In cases where businesses face the neighborhood, some building setback from the sidewalk is appropriate to create greater separation. Off-Street Parking In garages, below grade, or parking spaces accessed from alleys In garages, below grade or parking spaces accessed from alleys. Above ground parking for the buildings north of I-25 should be sited along Buchtel Boulevard North. This view exemplifies many of the Urban Design Goals by creating a vibrant and appropriately-scaled environment for the station area.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 41 Recommendation 2: General Design Recommendations for Urban Neighborhood Station and Urban Neighborhood Station Transition Areas. Create a built environment that offers a consistent design theme relating to massing and form, pedestrian scale, landscape and open space, parking, signs, lighting and sustainability. a. Massing and Form: (1) Arrange residential, employment, reta il, service and open space uses to be convenient to and compatible wi th each other and to minimize impact on surrounding residential areas. (2) Provide architecturally finished and detailed elevations to create interesting traditionally-informed buildings, visually minimize the mass of a building and avoid monolithic lines. (3) Provide a primary building entrance facing or clearly visible from the public sidewalk. Secondary entrances are possible from parking areas or side streets. The main focal street s in the Urban Neighborhood Station areas are Louisiana Avenue and South Pearl Street with Buchtel Boulevard South and South Washington Street as secondary streets. (4) Relate the perceived form, quantity or aggregate volumes of new construction to the form of traditional development patterns. b. Pedestrian Scale: Promote pedestrian activity an d a neighborhood of inviting experiences that is respectful of the surrounding residential areas: (1) Orient buildings to form a consistent st reet wall; orient structures on corner lots to “hold the corner.” (2) Establish appropriate standards for the street edge created by residential structures. (3) Relate the intervals, rhythm and orde r of new construction to traditional development patterns. (4) Step-back upper stories of taller buildings to preserve pedestrian scale. The step-back will also create a tr ansition into the neighborhood. Create human-scale buildings and avoid monolithic lines through: Massing Scale Spacing Variation in materials and details Upper story step backs Active ground floor uses Prominent front entries

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 42 (5) Provide pedestrian active uses on the first floor, directly accessible from public space. (6) Use higher proportions of first floor fenestration (transparency) permit views of interior activities. (7) Promote use of design features such as functional stoops, patios, porches and balconies on the street facing facades of residential buildings to promote informal opportunitie s for community interaction. c. Landscape and Open Space: Incorporate landscaping and small open spaces to add depth and soften the hard edges of a building. Shared outdoor spaces may include active sidewalk cafes or passive seating areas. Link these spaces directly to the streets and the streetscape. These improvements will contribute to increasing tree canopy and open space goals of the Game Plan and Greenprint Denver. d. Parking: (1) Provide screening when abutting the street or residential zone district through landscaping and/or a decorative wall or fence. (2) Provide parking that is designed to mi nimize the impact on the pedestrian realm and residential areas. (3) Locate parking at the rear of the site, or below grade, away from the street and residential areas, and utilizing the alley for access and circulation. (4) Promote opportunities to increase on -street parking supply to alleviate impacts on the neighborhood. Techni ques to consider include driveway closures and angled parking. e. Signs: Ensure that signs enhance the character of the neighborhood through: (1) Appropriate scale, color, material and lighting levels. (2) Creativity such as two and three dimension forms and iconographic representation. Orient entrances at the street, use durable materials and incorporate landscaping to soften hard edges. This is an example of great neighborhood streetscape in Platt Park.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 43 (3) Use of high quality, durable materials. (4) Limiting off-premise, outdoor advert ising to the below-grade platform area. (5) Kiosks and other signage (other than wayfinding) should be limited to the Urban Neighborhood Station area an d should not be near residentially zoned properties. f. Lighting: Use lighting that is compatible with adjoining residential and fully shielded. Limit building ligh ting to only decorative styles and strictly limit sign illumination when facing residential districts. g. Sustainability: In accordance with Greenprint Denver, encourage use of green building practices and LEED certification. The leaves and pedestrian plaza at the station are an excellent foundation for open space at the Louisiana-Pearl station

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 44 MOBILITY Mobility Primary Issues and Opportunities Complete Streets. T-REX improvements within the station area included installation of the Southeast Light Rail Corridor and improvements to I-25 and the overpasses. Station specific improvement s included construction of vehicle and bus pullouts, bike racks and lockers, wi der sidewalks on the bridges and new crosswalk striping. These projects contri bute to a multi-modal, or “complete” street network for the neighb orhood in accordance with Plan 2000, Blueprint Denver and Greenprint Denver The Mobility section of the plan seeks to address challenges, opportunities and improvements to mobility choice. Pedestrian Environment. Existing conditions listed below do not create a desirable pedestrian experience. As a result, people might be more inclined to drive to destinations within the station area instead of walking. Underutilized properties crea te gaps and inconsistencies along the street front. Limited pedestrian amenities de grade the feeling of comfort. Limited active businesses inhibit opportunities for outdoor gathering, seating, window shopping, etc. Multiple curb cuts and lack of access control increase points of contact between vehicles and pedestrians and increase potential for conflicts. Some intersection corners do not acco mmodate ADA accessibility or strollers. Bike Facilities. The streets within the station area provide adequate width for mixed vehicle and bike traffic. The Bicycle Master Plan s pecifically calls for direct bike route connections to all transit stations However, there is currently no route planned along Louisiana Avenue to co nnect bicyclists between the existing system and the station. Complete streets allow bikes, people and cars to co-exist, like this example in Washington Park

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 45 There is bike storage immediately near the station platform to serve transit riders. However, there is a future demand for ad ditional bicycle facilities within the Urban Neighborhood Station to serve empl oyees and visitors. Without these bike facilities bicyclists will be less inclined to choose this mode of transportation. Buchtel Boulevard North As noted in the Existing Cond itions section of this report, the residential character of Buchtel Boul evard North is not consistent with the Blueprint Denver designation of Mixed-Use Collect or. This designation implies greater development potential than is poss ible or consistent with the land use recommendations of this plan. Louisiana Avenue Intersection at South Pearl Street: The Reinvestment Area Land Use Concept contemplates the four cor ners of Louisiana Avenue and South Pearl Street to become a pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use area for the neighborhood. To accomplish this, pedestrians must be able to access buildings and uses on either side of the str eet easily and safely. The intersection is stop sign controlled for South Pearl Street so traffic does not st op on Louisiana Ave at this intersection. Louisiana Avenue is a busy street, which often results in long waits before traffic clears for pedestrian crossing. Since ther e is no stop sign or traffic signal for Louisiana Avenue, there is no painted crosswalk for pedestrians. If a marked crosswalk were in place, it could enhanc e awareness of pedestrians crossing in this area. In addition, the curb-to-curb crossi ng distance on Louisiana Avenue is wider than desirable and does not contri bute to slower traffic speeds. These existing conditions combine to create a non-friendly pedestrian environment for the Urban Neighborhood Station area. Louisiana Avenue Intersection at Buchtel Boulevard South. This is a signalized intersection re-aligned as part of T-RE X. The angle of Buchtel Boulevard South creates a non-typical intersection alignment and merging of multiple lanes including a highway exit ramp. Drivers an d pedestrians have to be very alert in order to avoid conflicts. Public Works recently completed additional corrective action to provide a painted crosswalk and curb ramp for pedestrian crossing on the west leg of the intersection. This pr ovides an additional pedestrian crossing The current Louisiana Avenue and South Pearl Street intersection is not pedestrianfriendly.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 46 opportunity. Because of the angle, vehicles turning left onto Louisiana Avenue from Buchtel Boulevard South do not have ideal site distance for pedestrians and it is difficult for pedestrians to recognize if vehicles are turnin g left (onto Louisiana Avenue) or continuing stra ight (on Buchtel Boulevard South). This condition increases potential for pedestrian/vehicle conflicts and impedes the pedestrian friendliness of this crucial in tersection at the station. Buchtel Boulevard South. Within the planning area, the current character of Buchtel Boulevard South is not compatib le with its Parkway and Green Street designations. It lacks cons istent landscaping and green sp ace. In addition, a few of the blocks have attached five-foot wide sidewalks. Its location along a busy three-lane road, which induces higher traffi c speeds, is not a pleasant experience for pedestrians. Mobility Goals Goal 1 : Transportation Choice Expand transportation choices an d routes in the planning area. Goal 2 : Bike and Pedestrian Friendly Station Area Create a bike and pedestrian friendly station area that supports the walk-up typology and provides a focal point for the neighborhood. Goal 3: Safety and Convenience Improve the safety and convenience of facilities for non-motorized travel and wayfinding throughout the station area Mobility Recommendations The following recommendations are importan t in realizing the Mobility Goals. Recommendations can be more specific than the land use and urban design because market and demographics conditio ns do not influence the details. In Key Mobility Recommendations: Make Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel Boulevard South complete streets Improve vehicle operations and pedestrian-friendliness at Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel Boulevard Provide enhanced pedestrian crossings at Louisiana Avenue and South Pearl Street Install wide sidewalks in the Urban Neighborhood Station area to support the higher volumes of pedestrian traffic Install pedestrian amenities along the streetscape such as benches and wayfinding signs Incorporate additional bike storage facilities

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 47 addition, as City and County of Denver right-of-way, the land is publicly controlled and there is little reliance on private entities. Recommendation 1: Louisiana Avenue Pedestrian Improvements. Consistent with the “Green Street” designation, explore opportunities and resources to provide enhanced pedestrian crossings on Louisiana Avenue. Public Works recently added a striped crosswalk for pedestrians on the west leg of the intersection with Buchtel Boulevard Sout h. This increases opportunities for pedestrians to cross Louisiana Avenue safely. As a focal point for the Urban Neighborh ood Station area, the intersection of Louisiana Avenue and South Pearl St reet needs additional attention to improve pedestrian comfort, slow traffic speeds and contribute to placemaking. Public Works has agr eed to evaluate whether volumes and operations warrant a traffic signal at this intersection. Suggested crosswalk improvements include colored concrete or striping and bump-outs at the curb ramps to decrease crossing distance Other “Green Street” enhancements for Louisiana Avenue include street trees and a modest landscape median. Recommendation 2: Louisiana Avenue and Buchtel Boulevard South. As described in Issues and Opportunities, Buchtel Boulevard South intersects with Louisiana Avenue at an unusual angl e and there are converging lanes and exit ramps. Vehicles on Buchtel Boul evard South turning east onto Louisiana Avenue travel at higher speeds and have limited visibility for pedestrians. Public Works has agreed to conduct further analysis of signal operations and other elements at this intersection in an attempt to improve pedestrian safety on this east leg of the intersection. Recommendation 3: The Greening of Buchtel Boulevard South. As noted in Issues and Opportunities, T-REX de graded the greenspace along Buchtel Boulevard South in Platt Park. As a “Gre en Street,” we must seek opportunities to replace that character and replicate, to the extent possible, the beauty found east of South Downing Street. This will take collaborati on from different Within the planning area, replicate the beauty and greenspace of Buchtel Boulevard South east of South Downing Street.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 48 entities. In the end, we can create a tr uly picturesque boulevard that links the Louisiana –Pearl, University and Colorado stations and offers an invaluable amenity for the adjoining neighborhoods. a. As new development occurs on the south side of the street, replace existing attached sidewalks with a curb lawn street trees and five-foot wide sidewalk. Planned and almost complete projects will create this condition on the blocks between Louisiana Aven ue and South Clarkson Street and between South Emerson Street and So uth Ogden Street. The remaining gaps are between South Clarkson Street and South Emerson Street and between South Ogden Street an d South Downing Street. b. Evaluate the need for three travel lanes on Buchtel Boulevard South between Louisiana Avenue and South Emer son Street. Reducing the travel lanes could result in lower travel speeds on Buchtel Boulevard South, south of Louisiana. In addition, the shorte r crossing distance and slower traffic speeds could enhance pedestrian comfort crossing the street or walking along the street. It may also be possib le to use this excess right-of-way for additional greenspace. Recommendation 4: Buchtel Boulevard North Street Typology. As part of the update to Blueprint Denver, pursue changing the street typology from MixedUse Collector to Residential Collector. Recommendation 5: Bike Improvement. Providing options for travel is important especially for a neighborhood walk-up transit station. People are more inclined to use other modes, such as bikes, if it is convenient. The following recommendations improve t he environment for bicycles and can increase use in the neighborhood and for access to the station. a. Explore the potential to designate a bi ke route along Louisiana Avenue to create an east-west link to the existi ng north/south bikes routes D-11(runs

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 49 through Washington Park to Frankl in) and D-9 (runs along Logan). A neighborhood connector route improves east/west bike route connectivity in the area and offers a direct bike ro ute to the station. Route designation options include a sign, or if there is adequate street width, a striped bike lane on both sides of the street. b. Explore opportunities and resources to install additional city standard inverted “U” type bike racks within the Urban Neighborhood Station area. Recommendation 6: Bus Improvements. Monitor bus route changes to ensure they continue to service the neighborhoods and their regular travel patterns. Recommendation 7: Pedestrian Improvements. As part of site redevelopment or other capital investment projects, implement simple improvements that will improve the pedestrian experience: a. Install wider, attached sidewalks (16 feet wide) with street trees in grates in the Urban Neighborhood Station area and other areas of high pedestrian traffic. This may require dedication of additional right-of-way. If there are constraints such as existing buildings, a minimum width of 13 feet may be acceptable. b. Maintain detached 5-foot sidewalks wi th an 8-foot tree lawn in the Urban Neighborhood Station Transit ion area. This cross sect ion is also appropriate in other areas with lower levels of pedestrian activity. c. Seek opportunities and resources to in stall benches, trash receptacles and other pedestrian amenities along sidewalks near the station, bus stops and other public gathering areas. Barrie r free improvements (e.g. curb ramps) are also essential. d. Reduce and/or seek to eliminate dr iveways accessing the street through mandated access from the alleys as redevelopment occurs.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 50 e. Seek opportunities and resources to install and maintain tasteful, lowimpact wayfinding signage that will direct people exiting the station to key destinations. These dest inations could include Washington Park, businesses north of the station at South Pearl St reet and Mississipp i Avenue, businesses immediately west of the station at So uth Pearl Street and Louisiana Avenue and businesses south of the station at South Pearl Street and Iowa Avenue. PARKING Primary Issues and Opportunities Parking Supply. While the current on-street parking supply and demand is balanced, new development and reinvestment could create spillover into the neighborhoods. While this cannot be completely avoided, opportunities to increase parking supply particularly on-street are important to reduce this impact. However, it is crucial to ensure that new parking supply does not impede the pedestrian-friendly environment. Parking Demand. The light rail station is conveniently located close to Downtown and the Denver Tech Center (DTC). This creates opportunities for residents in the neighborhood to use vehicles less. This shift in driving behavior reduces parking demand. The close proximity of the ligh t rail station to ne ighborhood business districts creates opportunities for visitors and employers to travel by light rail as opposed to driving their cars, also reducing parking demand. Shared Parking. The businesses in the station area are primarily part of the Old South Pearl Merchants Association. This is a great resource to address parking issues collectively and capitalize on the am azing resource of the light rail station. On-street parking is a valuable resource in the neighborhood but demand should decrease as transportation choices increase.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 51 Parking Goals Goal 1 : Support Short Term Parking Demand Ensure that parking demand in the short term does not affect the quality and character of the neighborhoods and business districts. Goal 2: Reduce Long Term Parking Demand Strive to change long term parking beha viors and reduce parking demand within the station area and Old South Pearl comme rcial district through capitalizing on the transit system and other transportation choices such as bike and pedestrian. Goal 3: Parking Design Allow strategic additions to the parking supply in a manner that does not disrupt or diminish the placemaking and pedestrian character and respect the walk-up nature of the station. Parking Recommendations Recommendation 1: Monitor Parking Restrictions Monitor parking restrictions and patterns within the station area for an acceptable period. Consider the relationship between existing restri cted areas, businesses, transit and neighborhood. This will assist in un derstanding ridership counts and assess whether additional or less parking rest rictions are necessary to implement. Maintain consistent and frequent cont act with the business association and registered neighborhood associations on findings and recommendations. Recommendation 2: Parking Supply and Design. Explore creative ways to offer an appropriate level of parking su pply. Examples include shared parking opportunities for businesses and expanding the on-street parking supply through techniques such as elimination of curb cuts. Design new off-street parking in a manner that does not dominate the streetscape. Shared parking can accommodate parking demand and blend in with the street environment.

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 52 IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY As described in the beginning of this docu ment, the purpose of the plan is to set forth a vision for the planning area. Furt her, it sets the foundation and support for implementation strategies such as changes to zoning, investment in infrastructure and seeking funding sources. Like any plan, additional work needs to occur in order to realize goals and recommendatio ns. This implementation section outlines the proceeding st eps to achieve the recommendations of this plan. Many of the implementation strate gies implement more than one recommendation of the plan, so the de scription lists all the applicable recommendations. The list of strategies provides the top pr iority action items first, followed by the remain ing strategies. TOP PRIORITY ACTON ITEMS (YEAR 1) Strategy Description Responsibility Implementation Focus Groups Convene focus groups of residents, property owners, business owners and other partners to pursue top priority action items. PW, CPD Potential Partners RNOs, property owners, businesses Zoning for Urban Neighborhood Station Plan Recommendations: Land Use Recommendations #1, #4 & #5 Urban Design Recommendations #1 & #2 (a-e) Mobility Recommendation #7(a) Parking Recommendation #2 Urban Neighborhood Station needs an active mixture of business and residential uses that creates a pedest rian oriented, vibrant station area. Building heights should range from 1 to 5 stories with a height transition from residential districts to respect ne ighborhood character. The current B-4 zoning does not guarantee this de sired vision. Form-based zoning will support this vision because it will require design elements such as buildings and entrances at the street, minimum transparency and building heights. Explore application of Main Street Zoning or a new form-based district to existing B-4 properties. Pursue this zoning map update in a comprehensive manner that considers potential for property owners, impacts to adjoining pr operties and plan goals and recommendations. Community Planning and Development (CPD), Planning Board (PB),City Council (CC) Potential Partners Property owners, registered neighborhood organizations (RNOs)

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 53 Strategy Description Responsibility Zoning for Committed Areas Plan Recommendations: Land Use Recommendations #3 Areas already zoned R-1have a strong foundation to protect the single family character of the neighborhoods. The district needs improvement in terms of its bulk and building type requirements to ensure reinvestment in the housing stock respect the curre nt character. Both R-1 and R-2 areas have less predictability in terms of use, density and building type. Establish improved zoning tools as part of the Zoning Code update to support the existing character. CPD, PB, CC Potential Partners Property owners, RNOs Public Works Plan Recommendations: Mobility Recommendations #1, #2, #3(b) As a walk-up light rail station, this planning process revealed the need for improvements to station accessibilit y and the pedestrian environment. Public Works has agreed to pursue a number of implementation tasks and seek funding sources in order to crea te a safer more pedestrian friendly station area. Evaluate whether volumes and operations warrant a traffic signal at the Louisiana Avenue an d South Pearl Street this intersection and consider other techniques to improve pedestrian friendliness such as bulb-outs. Conduct further analysis of signal operations and other components at the Louisiana Avenue and Buchte l Boulevard South intersection in an attempt to improve pedestrian safety at the intersection. As new development occurs on the south side of the street, require replacement of existing attached sidewalks with a detached 5-foot sidewalk and tree lawn along Buchtel Boulevard South. Evaluate the need for three travel lanes on Buchtel Boulevard South between Louisiana Avenue and South Emerson Street. This could create additional land area for the green street environment. PW, CPD Potential Partners RNOs, property owners, business owners Bike Route on Louisiana Avenue Plan Recommendations: Mobility Recommendation #5 (a-b) Update the Bicycle Master Plan to include a bike route (or neighborhood connector) along Louisiana Avenue. Once the plan is updated, allocate funding for necessary signag e, bike racks and possible route striping PW,CPD Urban Design Plan Recommendations : Urban Design Recommendation #2(f-j) Many of the Urban Design recommendations may translate to the new zoning districts for the Urban Neighborhood Station and perhaps portions of the Urban Neighborhood Station Transition areas. There are general strategies that apply for all areas such as signs, lighting, open space, parking design and landscaping. Implement these recommendations as part of the zoning code update. CPD, PB, CC Potential Partners RNOs property owners, businesses

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 54 Strategy Description Responsibility Station Development Monitoring There is baseline development data for the station area. Regular updates and analysis of this data w ill effectively measure the success of the transit station and implementation st rategies. For example, it will be important to track changes in population, density, gross floor area of retail and office uses, parking, transit use, vehicles per household, etc. CPD Potential Partners RNOs property owners, businesses Parking Management Implementation and Monitoring Plan Recommendation: Parking Recommendation #1 Public Works enacted parkin g restrictions on most of the blocks within the quarter mile radius of the station. Public Works will monitor the parking restrictions in early 2007 when Southeast Light Rail traffic patterns begin to stabilize. Public Works will make any necessary changes to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the parking management plan. Maintain frequent and consistent contact with RNOÂ’s and businesses. Public Works (PW) Potential Partners RNOs, businesses

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Louisiana-Pearl Station Area Plan Page 55 ADDITIONAL ACTION ITEMS (2-5 YEARS) Task Description Responsibility Zoning for Urban Neighborhood Station Transition Plan Recommendations: Land Use Recommendations #2, 4 & 5 Urban Design Recommendations #1& 2(ae) Mobility Recommendations #3(a)& 7(b) Parking Recommendation #2 The Urban Neighborhood Station Transition supports a mixture of uses developed at a neighborhood and pe destrian scale and character. The current mix of zoning categories does not always create a consistent transition. Work with the Zoning Code update to improve the zoning. North of I-25, the current location of B-2 and B-1 districts is appropriate. Generally, streets separate these sites from residential zoning. As part of the code update, the intensities and uses of these districts should remain. Improve these districts to balance opportunities consistent with the plan while respecting the current characte r and lifestyle of the surrounding neighborhood. South of I-25 there is a greater mixture of zoning categories. In addition, most of these sites directly abut re sidential districts. The lack of predictability and the zoningÂ’s inability to properly transition to abutting residential is an identified issue. Im prove this zoning pa ttern with special emphasis on creating appropriate edges between reinvestment and committed areas, through techniques such as lower building heights. CPD, PB, CC Potential Partners Property owners, RNOs Establish Appropriate Funding Mechanisms Plan Recommendations: Mobility Recommendations #5(b)& 7(c&e) Institute a finance mechanism to fund streetscape improvements including bike racks, benches, stre et trees, medians, wayfinding and other design recommendations. Possible mechanisms include maintenance and improvement districts formed by property owners. PW, CPD, Office of Economic Development (OED) Potential Partners Property owners, businesses Parking Management District Plan Recommendations: Parking Recommendation #2 Explore formation of a parking distri ct or other tool to implement and manage shared parking arra ngements within the business districts as well as to provide a financing mechanis m. This district could be in conjunction with improvement and maintenance districts. CPD, PW, CC, OED Potential Partners Property owners, businesses Promoting use of alternative transportation Consider creative approaches to promote use of all travel modes. These can apply to residents, employees and visitors to neighborhoods and businesses. Programs could include incentives to offer the RTD EcoPass, informational flyers on the bene fits of alternative transportation. RTD, PW, CPD, DRCOG Potential Partners Property owners, businesses, RNOÂ’s